WorldWideScience

Sample records for activate mouse dorsal

  1. High concentrations of morphine sensitize and activate mouse dorsal root ganglia via TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messlinger Karl

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Morphine and its derivatives are key drugs in pain control. Despite its well-known analgesic properties morphine at high concentrations may be proalgesic. Particularly, short-lasting painful sensations have been reported upon dermal application of morphine. To study a possible involvement of TRP receptors in the pro-nociceptive effects of morphine (0.3 – 10 mM, two models of nociception were employed using C57BL/6 mice and genetically related TRPV1 and TRPA1 knockout animals, which were crossed and generated double knockouts. Hindpaw skin flaps were used to investigate the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide indicative of nociceptive activation. Results Morphine induced release of calcitonin gene-related peptide and sensitized the release evoked by heat or the TRPA1 agonist acrolein. Morphine activated HEK293t cells transfected with TRPV1 or TRPA1. Activation of C57BL/6 mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons in culture was investigated with calcium imaging. Morphine induced a dose-dependent rise in intracellular calcium in neurons from wild-type animals. In neurons from TRPV1 and TRPA1 knockout animals activation by morphine was markedly reduced, in the TRPV1/A1 double knockout animals this morphine effect was abrogated. Naloxone induced an increase in calcium levels similar to morphine. The responses to both morphine and naloxone were sensitized by bradykinin. Conclusion Nociceptor activation and sensitization by morphine is conveyed by TRPV1 and TRPA1.

  2. Persistent at-level thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia accompany chronic neuronal and astrocyte activation in superficial dorsal horn following mouse cervical contusion spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jaime L; Hala, Tamara J; Putatunda, Rajarshi; Sannie, Daniel; Lepore, Angelo C

    2014-01-01

    In humans, sensory abnormalities, including neuropathic pain, often result from traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). SCI can induce cellular changes in the CNS, termed central sensitization, that alter excitability of spinal cord neurons, including those in the dorsal horn involved in pain transmission. Persistently elevated levels of neuronal activity, glial activation, and glutamatergic transmission are thought to contribute to the hyperexcitability of these dorsal horn neurons, which can lead to maladaptive circuitry, aberrant pain processing and, ultimately, chronic neuropathic pain. Here we present a mouse model of SCI-induced neuropathic pain that exhibits a persistent pain phenotype accompanied by chronic neuronal hyperexcitability and glial activation in the spinal cord dorsal horn. We generated a unilateral cervical contusion injury at the C5 or C6 level of the adult mouse spinal cord. Following injury, an increase in the number of neurons expressing ΔFosB (a marker of chronic neuronal activation), persistent astrocyte activation and proliferation (as measured by GFAP and Ki67 expression), and a decrease in the expression of the astrocyte glutamate transporter GLT1 are observed in the ipsilateral superficial dorsal horn of cervical spinal cord. These changes have previously been associated with neuronal hyperexcitability and may contribute to altered pain transmission and chronic neuropathic pain. In our model, they are accompanied by robust at-level hyperaglesia in the ipsilateral forepaw and allodynia in both forepaws that are evident within two weeks following injury and persist for at least six weeks. Furthermore, the pain phenotype occurs in the absence of alterations in forelimb grip strength, suggesting that it represents sensory and not motor abnormalities. Given the importance of transgenic mouse technology, this clinically-relevant model provides a resource that can be used to study the molecular mechanisms contributing to neuropathic pain

  3. On Parallel Streams through the Mouse Dorsal Lateral Geniculate Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eDenman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The mouse visual system is an emerging model for the study of cortical and thalamic circuit function. To maximize the usefulness of this model system, it is important to analyze the similarities and differences between the organization of all levels of the murid visual system with other, better studied systems (e.g., non-human primates and the domestic cat. While the understanding of mouse retina and cortex has expanded rapidly, less is known about mouse dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN. Here, we study whether parallel processing streams exist in mouse dLGN. We use a battery of stimuli that have been previously shown to successfully distinguish parallel streams in other species: electrical stimulation of the optic chiasm, contrast-reversing stationary gratings at varying spatial phase, drifting sinusoidal gratings, dense noise for receptive field reconstruction, and frozen contrast-modulating noise. As in the optic nerves of domestic cats and non-human primates, we find evidence for multiple conduction velocity groups after optic chiasm stimulation. As in so-called ‘visual mammals’, we find a subpopulation of mouse dLGN cells showing non-linear spatial summation. However, differences in stimulus selectivity and sensitivity do not provide sufficient basis for identification of clearly distinct classes of relay cells. Nevertheless, consistent with presumptively homologous status of dLGNs of all mammals, there are substantial similarities between response properties of mouse dLGN neurons and those of cats and primates.

  4. Long-term activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors increases functional TRPV1-expressing neurons in mouse dorsal root ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayoshi eMasuoka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Damaged tissues release glutamate and other chemical mediators for several hours. These chemical mediators contribute to modulation of pruritus and pain. Herein, we investigated the effects of long-term activation of excitatory glutamate receptors on functional expression of transient receptor potential vaniloid type 1 (TRPV1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons and then on thermal pain behavior. In order to detect the TRPV1-mediated responses in cultured DRG neurons, we monitored intracellular calcium responses to capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, with Fura-2. Long-term (4 h treatment with glutamate receptor agonists (glutamate, quisqualate or DHPG increased the proportion of neurons responding to capsaicin through activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1, and only partially through the activation of mGluR5; engagement of these receptors was evident in neurons responding to allylisothiocyanate (AITC, a transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1 agonist. Increase in the proportion was suppressed by phospholipase C, protein kinase C, mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or transcription inhibitors. Whole-cell recording was performed to record TRPV1-mediated membrane current; TRPV1 current density significantly increased in the AITC-sensitive neurons after the quisqualate treatment. To elucidate the physiological significance of this phenomenon, a hot plate test was performed. Intraplantar injection of quisqualate or DHPG induced heat hyperalgesia that lasted for 4 h post injection. This chronic hyperalgesia was attenuated by treatment with either mGluR1 or mGluR5 antagonists. These results suggest that long-term activation of mGluR1/5 by peripherally released glutamate may increase the number of neurons expressing functional TRPV1 in DRG, which may be strongly associated with chronic hyperalgesia.

  5. Loss of inhibitory tone on spinal cord dorsal horn spontaneously and nonspontaneously active neurons in a mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Maria Carmen; Dhanasobhon, Dhanasak; Yalcin, Ipek; Schlichter, Rémy; Cordero-Erausquin, Matilde

    2016-07-01

    Plasticity of inhibitory transmission in the spinal dorsal horn (SDH) is believed to be a key mechanism responsible for pain hypersensitivity in neuropathic pain syndromes. We evaluated this plasticity by recording responses to mechanical stimuli in silent neurons (nonspontaneously active [NSA]) and neurons showing ongoing activity (spontaneously active [SA]) in the SDH of control and nerve-injured mice (cuff model). The SA and NSA neurons represented 59% and 41% of recorded neurons, respectively, and were predominantly wide dynamic range (WDR) in naive mice. Nerve-injured mice displayed a marked decrease in the mechanical threshold of the injured paw. After nerve injury, the proportion of SA neurons was increased to 78%, which suggests that some NSA neurons became SA. In addition, the response to touch (but not pinch) was dramatically increased in SA neurons, and high-threshold (nociceptive specific) neurons were no longer observed. Pharmacological blockade of spinal inhibition with a mixture of GABAA and glycine receptor antagonists significantly increased responses to innocuous mechanical stimuli in SA and NSA neurons from sham animals, but had no effect in sciatic nerve-injured animals, revealing a dramatic loss of spinal inhibitory tone in this situation. Moreover, in nerve-injured mice, local spinal administration of acetazolamide, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, restored responses to touch similar to those observed in naive or sham mice. These results suggest that a shift in the reversal potential for anions is an important component of the abnormal mechanical responses and of the loss of inhibitory tone recorded in a model of nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain.

  6. Intradermal endothelin-1 excites bombesin-responsive superficial dorsal horn neurons in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, T; Nagamine, M; Davoodi, A; Iodi Carstens, M; Cevikbas, F; Steinhoff, M; Carstens, E

    2015-10-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) has been implicated in nonhistaminergic itch. Here we used electrophysiological methods to investigate whether mouse superficial dorsal horn neurons respond to intradermal (id) injection of ET-1 and whether ET-1-sensitive neurons additionally respond to other pruritic and algesic stimuli or spinal superfusion of bombesin, a homolog of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) that excites spinal itch-signaling neurons. Single-unit recordings were made from lumbar dorsal horn neurons in pentobarbital-anesthetized C57BL/6 mice. We searched for units that exhibited elevated firing after id injection of ET-1 (1 μg/μl). Responsive units were further tested with mechanical stimuli, bombesin (spinal superfusion, 200 μg·ml(-1)·min(-1)), heating, cooling, and additional chemicals [histamine, chloroquine, allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), capsaicin]. Of 40 ET-1-responsive units, 48% responded to brush and pinch [wide dynamic range (WDR)] and 52% to pinch only [high threshold (HT)]. Ninety-three percent responded to noxious heat, 50% to cooling, and >70% to histamine, chloroquine, AITC, and capsaicin. Fifty-seven percent responded to bombesin, suggesting that they participate in spinal itch transmission. That most ET-1-sensitive spinal neurons also responded to pruritic and algesic stimuli is consistent with previous studies of pruritogen-responsive dorsal horn neurons. We previously hypothesized that pruritogen-sensitive neurons signal itch. The observation that ET-1 activates nociceptive neurons suggests that both itch and pain signals may be generated by ET-1 to result in simultaneous sensations of itch and pain, consistent with observations that ET-1 elicits both itch- and pain-related behaviors in animals and burning itch sensations in humans.

  7. Caspase-Mediated Apoptosis in Sensory Neurons of Cultured Dorsal Root Ganglia in Adult Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Momeni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG undergo apoptosis after peripheral nerve injury. The aim of this study was to investigate sensory neuron death and the mechanism involved in the death of these neurons in cultured DRG.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, L5 DRG from adult mouse were dissected and incubated in culture medium for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. Freshly dissected and cultured DRG were then fixed and sectioned using a cryostat. Morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis were investigated using fluorescent staining (Propidium iodide and Hoechst 33342 and the terminal Deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL method respectively. To study the role of caspases, general caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD.fmk, 100 μM and immunohistochemistry for activated caspase-3 were used.Results: After 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours in culture, sensory neurons not only displayed morphological features of apoptosis but also they appeared TUNEL positive. The application of Z-VAD.fmk inhibited apoptosis in these neurons over the same time period. In addition, intense activated caspase-3 immunoreactivity was found both in the cytoplasm and the nuclei of these neurons after 24 and 48 hours.Conclusion: Results of the present study show caspase-dependent apoptosis in the sensory neurons of cultured DRG from adult mouse.

  8. Properties of sodium currents in neonatal and young adult mouse superficial dorsal horn neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Melissa A; Farrell, Kristen E; Graham, Brett A; Brichta, Alan M; Callister, Robert J

    2015-03-28

    Superficial dorsal horn (SDH) neurons process nociceptive information and their excitability is partly determined by the properties of voltage-gated sodium channels. Recently, we showed the excitability and action potential properties of mouse SDH neurons change markedly during early postnatal development. Here we compare sodium currents generated in neonate (P0-5) and young adult (≥P21) SDH neurons. Whole cell recordings were obtained from lumbar SDH neurons in transverse spinal cord slices (CsF internal, 32°C). Fast activating and inactivating TTX-sensitive inward currents were evoked by depolarization from a holding potential of -100 mV. Poorly clamped currents, based on a deflection in the IV relationship at potentials between -60 and -50 mV, were not accepted for analysis. Current density and decay time increased significantly between the first and third weeks of postnatal development, whereas time to peak was similar at both ages. This was accompanied by more subtle changes in activation range and steady state inactivation. Recovery from inactivation was slower and TTX-sensitivity was reduced in young adult neurons. Our study suggests sodium channel expression changes markedly during early postnatal development in mouse SDH neurons. The methods employed in this study can now be applied to future investigations of spinal cord sodium channel plasticity in murine pain models.

  9. Selective depression of nociceptive responses of dorsal horn neurones by SNC 80 in a perfused hindquarter preparation of adult mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, C Q; Hong, Y G; Dray, A; Perkins, M N

    2001-01-01

    Detailed electrophysiological characterisation of spinal opioid receptors in the mouse has been limited due to various technical difficulties. In this study, extracellular single unit recordings were made from dorsal horn neurones in a perfused spinal cord with attached trunk-hindquarter to investigate the role of delta-opioid receptor in mediating nociceptive and non-nociceptive transmission in mouse. Noxious electrical shock, pinch and heat stimuli evoked a mean response of 20.8+/-2.5 (n=10, PSNC 80) was perfused for 8-10 min, these evoked nociceptive responses were reversibly depressed. SNC 80 (2 microM) depressed the nociceptive responses evoked by electrical shock, pinch and heat by 74.0+/-13.7% (n=8, PSNC 80 was 92.6+/-6.8% (n=3). SNC 80 at 5 microM also completely abolished the wind-up and/or hypersensitivity (n=5). The depressant effects of SNC 80 on the nociceptive responses were completely blocked by 10 microM naloxone (n=5) and 3 microM 17-(cyclopropylmethyl)-6,7-dehydro-4,5 alpha-epoxy-14 beta-ethoxy-5 beta-methylindolo [2',3':6',7'] morphinan-3-ol hydrochloride (HS 378, n=8), a novel highly selective delta-opioid receptor antagonist. Interestingly, HS 378 (3 microM) itself potentiated the background activity and evoked responses to pinch and heat by 151.8+/-38.4% (PSNC 80 at a dose of up to 10 microM (n=5). These data demonstrate that delta-opioid receptor modulate nociceptive, but not non-nociceptive, transmission in spinal dorsal horn neurones of the adult mouse. The potentiation of neuronal activity by HS 378 may reflect an autoregulatory role of the endogenous delta-opioid in nociceptive transmission in mouse.

  10. Oxaliplatin targeting to angiogenic vessels by PEGylated cationic liposomes suppresses the angiogenesis in a dorsal air sac mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Lila, Amr; Suzuki, Takuya; Doi, Yusuke; Ishida, Tatsuhiro; Kiwada, Hiroshi

    2009-02-20

    Oxaliplatin (trans-l-diaminocyclohexane oxalatoplatinum, l-OHP) is a third-generation platinum analogue with proven anti-tumor activity against many tumor cell lines, however it does not show sufficient anti-tumor activity in vivo when used alone. In order to overcome this problem and to achieve an anti-angiogenic therapy with l-OHP, the drug was encapsulated into PEG-coated cationic liposomes, which were designed to target the newly formed vessels, and its anti-angiogenic activity was evaluated in an in vivo mouse dorsal air sac (DAS) assay. For the DAS assay, chambers filled with tumor cells were implanted underneath the dorsal skin. l-OHP encapsulated in PEG-coated cationic liposomes (5 mg/kg mice) was intravenously injected once on day 1, 2, 3 or 4 after chamber implantation. On the fifth day after chamber implantation, animals were sacrificed and tumor-angiogenesis was evaluated. Liposome-encapsulated l-OHP completely suppressed angiogenesis in the skin when it was administered day 3 after chamber implantation. Under similar experimental conditions, neither l-OHP encapsulated in PEG-coated neutral liposomes, nor free l-OHP, nor "empty" (no drug containing) PEG-coated cationic liposomes showed such strong suppressive effect. The present study suggests that the liposomal formulation of l-OHP, which targeted to angiogenic vessels, has a remarkable in vivo anti-angiogenic activity and the formulation may become a promising novel approach to achieve anti-angiogenic therapy.

  11. Intracellular responses to frequency modulated tones in the dorsal cortex of the mouse inferior colliculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruediger eGeis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequency modulations occur in many natural sounds, including vocalizations. The neuronal response to frequency modulated (FM stimuli has been studied extensively in different brain areas, with an emphasis on the auditory cortex and the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. Here, we measured the responses to FM sweeps in whole-cell recordings from neurons in the dorsal cortex of the mouse inferior colliculus. Both up- and downward logarithmic FM sweeps were presented at two different speeds to both the ipsi- and the contralateral ear. Based on the number of action potentials that were fired, between 10-24% of cells were selective for rate or direction of the FM sweeps. A somewhat lower percentage of cells, 6-21%, showed selectivity based on EPSP size. To study the mechanisms underlying the generation of FM selectivity, we compared FM responses with responses to simple tones in the same cells. We found that if pairs of neurons responded in a similar way to simple tones, they generally also responded in a similar way to FM sweeps. Further evidence that FM selectivity can be generated within the dorsal cortex was obtained by reconstructing FM sweeps from the response to simple tones using three different models. In about half of the direction selective neurons the selectivity was generated by spectrally asymmetric synaptic inhibition. In addition, evidence for direction selectivity based on the timing of excitatory responses was also obtained in some cells. No clear evidence for the local generation of rate selectivity was obtained. We conclude that FM direction selectivity can be generated within the dorsal cortex of the mouse inferior colliculus by multiple mechanisms.

  12. [Response characteristics of neurons to tone in dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus of the mouse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Wen-Juan; Cheng, Yan-Ling; Yang, Dan-Dan; Wang, Xin

    2016-02-25

    The dorsal nucleus of lateral lemniscus (DNLL) is a nucleus in the auditory ascending pathway, and casts inhibitory efferent projections to the inferior colliculus. Studies on the DNLL are less than studies on the auditory brain stem and inferior colliculus. To date, there is no information about response characteristics of neurons in DNLL of albino mouse. Under free field conditions, we used extracellular single unit recording to study the acoustic signal characteristics of DNLL neurons in Kunming mice (Mus musculus). Transient (36%) and ongoing (64%) firing patterns were found in 96 DNLL neurons. Neurons with different firing patterns have significant differences in characteristic frequency and minimal threshold. We recorded frequency tuning curves (FTCs) of 87 DNLL neurons. All of the FTCs exhibit an open "V" shape. There is no significant difference in FTCs between transient and ongoing neurons, but among the ongoing neurons, the FTCs of sustained neurons are sharper than those of onset plus sustained neurons and pauser neurons. Our results showed that the characteristic frequency of DNLL neurons of mice was not correlated with depth, supporting the view that the DNLL of mouse has no frequency topological organization through dorsal-ventral plane, which is different from cats and some other animals. Furthermore, by using rate-intensity function (RIF) analysis the mouse DNLL neurons can be classified as monotonic (60%), saturated (31%) and non-monotonic (8%) types. Each RIF type includes transient and ongoing firing patterns. Dynamic range of the transient firing pattern is smaller than that of ongoing firing ones (P transient firing pattern. Multiple firing patterns and intensity coding of DNLL neurons may derive from the projections from multiple auditory nuclei, and play different roles in auditory information processing.

  13. Parcellation of cerebellins 1, 2, and 4 among different subpopulations of dorsal horn neurons in mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagle, Michael C; Honig, Marcia G

    2014-02-01

    The cerebellins (Cblns) are a family of secreted proteins that are widely expressed throughout the nervous system, but whose functions have been studied only in the cerebellum and striatum. Two members of the family, Cbln1 and Cbln2, bind to neurexins on presynaptic terminals and to GluRδs postsynaptically, forming trans-synaptic triads that promote synapse formation. Cbln1 has a higher binding affinity for GluRδs and exhibits greater synaptogenic activity than Cbln2. In contrast, Cbln4 does not form such triads and its function is unknown. The different properties of the three Cblns suggest that each plays a distinct role in synapse formation. To begin to elucidate Cbln function in other neuronal systems, we used in situ hybridization to examine Cbln expression in the mouse spinal cord. We find that neurons expressing Cblns 1, 2, and 4 tend to occupy different laminar positions within the dorsal spinal cord, and that Cbln expression is limited almost exclusively to excitatory neurons. Combined in situ hybridization and immunofluorescent staining shows that Cblns 1, 2, and 4 are expressed by largely distinct neuronal subpopulations, defined in part by sensory input, although there is some overlap and some individual neurons coexpress two Cblns. Our results suggest that differences in connectivity between subpopulations of dorsal spinal cord neurons may be influenced by which Cbln each subpopulation contains. Competitive interactions between axon terminals may determine the number of synapses each forms in any given region, and thereby contribute to the development of precise patterns of connectivity in the dorsal gray matter.

  14. Highly efficient method for gene delivery in mouse dorsal root ganglia neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingli eYu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of gene transfection technologies has greatly advanced our understanding of life sciences. While use of viral vectors has clear efficacy, it requires specific expertise and biological containment conditions. Electroporation has become an effective and commonly used method for introducing DNA into neurons and in intact brain tissue. The present study describes the use of the Neon® electroporation system to transfect genes into dorsal root ganglia neurons isolated from embryonic mouse Day 13.5 to 16. This cell type has been particularly recalcitrant and refractory to physical or chemical methods for introduction of DNA. By optimizing the culture condition and parameters including voltage and duration for this specific electroporation system, high efficiency (60 – 80% and low toxicity (> 60% survival were achieved with robust differentiation in response to Nerve growth factor (NGF. Moreover, 3-50 times fewer cells are needed (6x104 compared with other traditional electroporation methods. This approach underlines the efficacy of this type of electroporation, particularly when only limited amount of cells can be obtained, and is expected to greatly facilitate the study of gene function in dorsal root ganglia neuron cultures.

  15. Inputs to the dorsal striatum of the mouse reflect the parallel circuit architecture of the forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weixing X; Mao, Tianyi; Dudman, Joshua T

    2010-01-01

    The basal ganglia play a critical role in the regulation of voluntary action in vertebrates. Our understanding of the function of the basal ganglia relies heavily upon anatomical information, but continued progress will require an understanding of the specific functional roles played by diverse cell types and their connectivity. An increasing number of mouse lines allow extensive identification, characterization, and manipulation of specified cell types in the basal ganglia. Despite the promise of genetically modified mice for elucidating the functional roles of diverse cell types, there is relatively little anatomical data obtained directly in the mouse. Here we have characterized the retrograde labeling obtained from a series of tracer injections throughout the dorsal striatum of adult mice. We found systematic variations in input along both the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior neuraxes in close agreement with canonical features of basal ganglia anatomy in the rat. In addition to the canonical features we have provided experimental support for the importance of non-canonical inputs to the striatum from the raphe nuclei and the amygdala. To look for organization at a finer scale we have analyzed the correlation structure of labeling intensity across our entire dataset. Using this analysis we found substantial local heterogeneity within the large-scale order. From this analysis we conclude that individual striatal sites receive varied combinations of cortical and thalamic input from multiple functional areas, consistent with some earlier studies in the rat that have suggested the presence of a combinatorial map.

  16. Inputs to the dorsal striatum of the mouse conserve the parallel circuit architecture of the forebrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixing X Pan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The basal ganglia play a critical role in the regulation of voluntary action in vertebrates. Our understanding of the function of the basal ganglia relies heavily upon anatomical information, but continued progress will require an understanding of the specific functional roles played by diverse cell types and their connectivity. An increasing number of mouse lines allow extensive identification, characterization, and, manipulation of specified cell types in the basal ganglia. Despite the promise of genetically modified mice for elucidating the functional roles of diverse cell types, there is relatively little anatomical data obtained directly in the mouse. Here we have characterized the retrograde labeling obtained from a series of tracer injections throughout the dorsal striatum of adult mice. We found systematic variations in input along both the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior neuraxes in close agreement with canonical features of basal ganglia anatomy in the rat. In addition to the canonical features we have provided experimental support for the importance of non-canonical inputs to the striatum from the raphe nuclei and the amygdala. To look for organization at a finer scale we have analyzed the correlation structure of labeling intensity across our entire dataset. Using this analysis we found substantial local heterogeneity within the large-scale order. From this analysis we conclude that individual striatal sites receive varied combinations of cortical and thalamic input from multiple functional areas, consistent with some earlier studies in the rat that have suggested the presence of a combinatorial map.

  17. Parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons are increased in the dorsal hippocampus of the dystrophic mdx mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Tongo, Claudia; Carretta, Donatella; Fulgenzi, Gianluca; Catini, Claudio; Minciacchi, Diego

    2009-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by variable alterations of the dystrophin gene and by muscle weakness and cognitive impairment. We postulated an association between cognitive impairment and architectural changes of the hippocampal GABAergic system. We investigated a major subpopulation of GABAergic neurons, the parvalbumin-immunopositive (PV-I) cells, in the dorsal hippocampus of the mdx mouse, an acknowledged model of DMD. PV-I neurons were quantified and their distribution was compared in CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus in wild-type and mdx mice. The cell morphology and topography of PV-I neurons were maintained. Conversely, the number of PV-I neurons was significantly increased in the mdx mouse. The percent increase of PV-I neurons was from 45% for CA2, up to 125% for the dentate gyrus. In addition, the increased parvalbumin content in the mdx hippocampus was confirmed by Western blot. A change in the hippocampus processing abilities is the expected functional counterpart of the modification displayed by PV-I GABAergic neurons. Altered hippocampal functionality can be responsible for part of the cognitive impairment in DMD.

  18. Altered intrinsic and synaptic properties of lumbosacral dorsal horn neurons in a mouse model of colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Kristen E; Keely, Simon; Walker, Marjorie M; Brichta, Alan M; Graham, Brett A; Callister, Robert J

    2017-08-23

    Visceral pain in inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal conditions is a major clinical problem. The exact mechanisms underlying the development of pain, during and after visceral inflammation, are unknown clinical and pre-clinical evidence that suggests plasticity within the spinal cord dorsal horn is a contributing factor. Here we use an in vivo preparation and patch-clamp electrophysiology to test whether the synaptic and intrinsic properties of superficial dorsal horn (SDH) neurons are altered 5days after the induction of mild colitis in adult male mice (i.e. during acute inflammation of the colon). Whole-cell recordings were made from lumbosacral (L6-S1) superficial dorsal horn neurons (SDH), in animals under isoflurane anesthesia. Noxious colorectal distension (CRD) was used to identify SDH neurons with colonic inputs, while stimulation of the hind paw and tail was employed to assess convergent cutaneous input. Following inflammation, a significantly increased proportion of SDH neurons received both colonic and cutaneous inputs, compared to neurons in naïve animals. In addition, the nature and magnitude of responses to CRD and cutaneous stimulation differed in inflamed animals, as was spontaneous excitatory synaptic drive. Conversely, several measures of intrinsic excitability were altered in a manner that would decrease SDH network excitability following colitis. We propose that during inflammation, sensitization of colonic afferents results in increased signaling to the SDH. This is accompanied by plasticity in SDH neurons whereby their intrinsic properties are changed to compensate for altered afferent activity. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Spatial Organization of Chromatic Pathways in the Mouse Dorsal Lateral Geniculate Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denman, Daniel J; Siegle, Joshua H; Koch, Christof; Reid, R Clay; Blanche, Timothy J

    2017-02-01

    In both dichromats and trichromats, cone opsin signals are maintained independently in cones and combined at the bipolar and retinal ganglion cell level, creating parallel color opponent pathways to the central visual system. Like other dichromats, the mouse retina expresses a short-wavelength (S) and a medium-wavelength (M) opsin, with the S-opsin shifted to peak sensitivity in the ultraviolet (UV) range. Unlike in primates, nonuniform opsin expression across the retina and coexpression in single cones creates a mostly mixed chromatic signal. Here, we describe the visuotopic and chromatic organization of spiking responses in the dorsal lateral geniculate and of the local field potentials in their recipient zone in primary visual cortex (V1). We used an immersive visual stimulus dome that allowed us to present spatiotemporally modulated UV and green luminance in any region of the visual field of an awake, head-fixed mouse. Consistent with retinal expression of opsins, we observed graded UV-to-green dominated responses from the upper to lower visual fields, with a smaller difference across azimuth. In addition, we identified a subpopulation of cells (environments, color information is useful for guiding behavior. How small terrestrial mammals such as mice use graded expression of cone opsins to extract visual information from their environments is not clear, even as the use of mice for studying visually guided behavior grows. In this study, we examined the color signals that the retina sends to the visual cortex via the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus. We found that green dominated responses in the lower and nasal visual field and ultraviolet dominated responses in the upper visual field. We describe a subset of cells that exhibit color opponent responses. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/371102-15$15.00/0.

  20. Bone marrow-derived progenitor cells augment venous remodeling in a mouse dorsal skinfold chamber model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan E Doyle

    Full Text Available The delivery of bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs has been widely used to stimulate angiogenesis and arteriogenesis. We identified a progenitor-enriched subpopulation of BMDCs that is able to augment venular remodeling, a generally unexplored area in microvascular research. Two populations of BMDCs, whole bone marrow (WBM and Lin(-/Sca-1(+ progenitor cells, were encapsulated in sodium alginate and delivered to a mouse dorsal skinfold chamber model. Upon observation that encapsulated Sca-1(+ progenitor cells enhance venular remodeling, the cells and tissue were analyzed on structural and molecular levels. Venule walls were thickened and contained more nuclei after Sca-1(+ progenitor cell delivery. In addition, progenitors expressed mRNA transcript levels of chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 2 (CXCL2 and interferon gamma (IFNγ that are over 5-fold higher compared to WBM. Tissues that received progenitors expressed significantly higher protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, and platelet derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB compared to tissues that received an alginate control construct. Nine days following cell delivery, tissue from progenitor recipients contained 39% more CD45(+ leukocytes, suggesting that these cells may enhance venular remodeling through the modulation of the local immune environment. Results show that different BMDC populations elicit different microvascular responses. In this model, Sca-1(+ progenitor cell-derived CXCL2 and IFNγ may mediate venule enlargement via modulation of the local inflammatory environment.

  1. Modafinil Activates Phasic Dopamine Signaling in Dorsal and Ventral Striata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobak, Martin J; Weber, Matthew W; Doellman, Melissa A; Schuweiler, Douglas R; Athens, Jeana M; Juliano, Steven A; Garris, Paul A

    2016-12-01

    Modafinil (MOD) exhibits therapeutic efficacy for treating sleep and psychiatric disorders; however, its mechanism is not completely understood. Compared with other psychostimulants inhibiting dopamine (DA) uptake, MOD weakly interacts with the dopamine transporter (DAT) and modestly elevates striatal dialysate DA, suggesting additional targets besides DAT. However, the ability of MOD to induce wakefulness is abolished with DAT knockout, conversely suggesting that DAT is necessary for MOD action. Another psychostimulant target, but one not established for MOD, is activation of phasic DA signaling. This communication mode during which burst firing of DA neurons generates rapid changes in extracellular DA, the so-called DA transients, is critically implicated in reward learning. Here, we investigate MOD effects on phasic DA signaling in the striatum of urethane-anesthetized rats with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. We found that MOD (30-300 mg/kg i.p.) robustly increases the amplitude of electrically evoked phasic-like DA signals in a time- and dose-dependent fashion, with greater effects in dorsal versus ventral striata. MOD-induced enhancement of these electrically evoked amplitudes was mediated preferentially by increased DA release compared with decreased DA uptake. Principal component regression of nonelectrically evoked recordings revealed negligible changes in basal DA with high-dose MOD (300 mg/kg i.p.). Finally, in the presence of the D2 DA antagonist, raclopride, low-dose MOD (30 mg/kg i.p.) robustly elicited DA transients in dorsal and ventral striata. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of phasic DA signaling is an important mechanism underlying the clinical efficacy of MOD. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  2. Writer's cramp: increased dorsal premotor activity during intended writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnooz, Cathérine C S; Helmich, Rick C; Medendorp, W P; Van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Toni, Ivan

    2013-03-01

    Simple writer's cramp (WC) is a task-specific form of dystonia, characterized by abnormal movements and postures of the hand during writing. It is extremely task-specific, since dystonic symptoms can occur when a patient uses a pencil for writing, but not when it is used for sharpening. Maladaptive plasticity, loss of inhibition, and abnormal sensory processing are important pathophysiological elements of WC. However, it remains unclear how those elements can account for its task-specificity. We used fMRI to isolate cerebral alterations associated with the task-specificity of simple WC. Subjects (13 simple WC patients, 20 matched controls) imagined grasping a pencil to either write with it or sharpen it. On each trial, we manipulated the pencil's position and the number of imagined movements, while monitoring variations in motor output with electromyography. We show that simple WC is characterized by abnormally increased activity in the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) when imagined actions are specifically related to writing. This cerebral effect was independent from the known deficits in dystonia in generating focal motor output and in processing somatosensory feedback. This abnormal activity of the PMd suggests that the task-specific element of simple WC is primarily due to alterations at the planning level, in the computations that transform a desired action outcome into the motor commands leading to that action. These findings open the way for testing the therapeutic value of interventions that take into account the computational substrate of task-specificity in simple WC, e.g. modulations of PMd activity during the planning phase of writing.

  3. Probing glycine receptor stoichiometry in superficial dorsal horn neurones using the spasmodic mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, B A; Tadros, M A; Schofield, P R; Callister, R J

    2011-05-15

    Inhibitory glycine receptors (GlyRs) are pentameric ligand gated ion channels composed of α and β subunits assembled in a 2:3 stoichiometry. The α1/βheteromer is considered the dominant GlyR isoform at 'native' adult synapses in the spinal cord and brainstem. However, the α3 GlyR subunit is concentrated in the superficial dorsal horn (SDH: laminae I-II), a spinal cord region important for processing nociceptive signals from skin, muscle and viscera. Here we use the spasmodic mouse, which has a naturally occurring mutation (A52S) in the α1 subunit of the GlyR, to examine the effect of the mutation on inhibitory synaptic transmission and homeostatic plasticity, and to probe for the presence of various GlyR subunits in the SDH.We usedwhole cell recording (at 22-24◦C) in lumbar spinal cord slices obtained from ketamine-anaesthetized (100 mg kg⁻¹, I.P.) spasmodic and wild-type mice (mean age P27 and P29, respectively, both sexes). The amplitude and decay time constants of GlyR mediated mIPSCs in spasmodic micewere reduced by 25% and 50%, respectively (42.0 ± 3.6 pA vs. 31.0 ± 1.8 pA, P spasmodic GlyRs (EC50 =130 ± 20 μM vs. 64 ± 11 μM, respectively; n =8 and 15, respectively). Differential agonist sensitivity and mIPSC decay times were subsequently used to probe for the presence of α1-containing GlyRs in SDHneurones.Glycine sensitivity, based on the response to 1-3 μM glycine, was reduced in>75% of neurones tested and decay times were faster in the spasmodic sample. Together, our data suggest most GlyRs and glycinergic synapses in the SDH contain α1 subunits and few are composed exclusively of α3 subunits. Therefore, future efforts to design therapies that target the α3 subunit must consider the potential interaction between α1 and α3 subunits in the GlyR.

  4. Canonical BMP7 activity is required for the generation of discrete neuronal populations in the dorsal spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Dréau, Gwenvael; Garcia-Campmany, Lidia; Rabadán, M. Angeles; Ferronha, Tiago; Tozer, Samuel; Briscoe, James; Martí, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    BMP activity is essential for many steps of neural development, including the initial role in neural induction and the control of progenitor identities along the dorsal-ventral axis of the neural tube. Taking advantage of chick in ovo electroporation, we show a novel role for BMP7 at the time of neurogenesis initiation in the spinal cord. Using in vivo loss-of-function experiments, we show that BMP7 activity is required for the generation of three discrete subpopulations of dorsal interneurons: dI1-dI3-dI5. Analysis of the BMP7 mouse mutant shows the conservation of this activity in mammals. Furthermore, this BMP7 activity appears to be mediated by the canonical Smad pathway, as we demonstrate that Smad1 and Smad5 activities are similarly required for the generation of dI1-dI3-dI5. Moreover, we show that this role is independent of the patterned expression of progenitor proteins in the dorsal spinal cord, but depends on the BMP/Smad regulation of specific proneural proteins, thus narrowing this BMP7 activity to the time of neurogenesis. Together, these data establish a novel role for BMP7 in primary neurogenesis, the process by which a neural progenitor exits the cell cycle and enters the terminal differentiation pathway. PMID:22159578

  5. Combined activities of Gurken and decapentaplegic specify dorsal chorion structures of the Drosophila egg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, F; Roth, S

    2000-02-01

    During Drosophila oogenesis Gurken, associated with the oocyte nucleus, activates the Drosophila EGF receptor in the follicular epithelium. Gurken first specifies posterior follicle cells, which in turn signal back to the oocyte to induce the migration of the oocyte nucleus from a posterior to an anterior-dorsal position. Here, Gurken signals again to specify dorsal follicle cells, which give rise to dorsal chorion structures including the dorsal appendages. If Gurken signaling is delayed and starts after stage 6 of oogenesis the nucleus remains at the posterior pole of the oocyte. Eggs develop with a posterior ring of dorsal appendage material that is produced by main-body follicle cells expressing the gene Broad-Complex. They encircle terminal follicle cells expressing variable amounts of the TGFbeta homologue, decapentaplegic. By ectopically expressing decapentaplegic and clonal analysis with Mothers against dpp we show that Decapentaplegic signaling is required for Broad-Complex expression. Thus, the specification and positioning of dorsal appendages along the anterior-posterior axis depends on the intersection of both Gurken and Decapentaplegic signaling. This intersection also induces rhomboid expression and thereby initiates the positive feedback loop of EGF receptor activation, which positions the dorsal appendages along the dorsal-ventral egg axis.

  6. Mitotic activity in dorsal epidermis of Rana pipiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Arce, H.; Mizell, S.

    1972-01-01

    Study of statistically significant rhythms of mitotic division in dorsal epidermis of frogs, Rana pipiens, exposed to a 12:12 light:dark environment for 14 days. The results include the findings that (1) male animals have a primary period of 22 hr in summer and 18 hr in winter, (2) female animals have an 18 hr period, and (3) parapinealectomy and blinding abolish the rhythm.

  7. Sodium salicylate suppresses GABAergic inhibitory activity in neurons of rodent dorsal raphe nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jin

    Full Text Available Sodium salicylate (NaSal, a tinnitus inducing agent, can activate serotonergic (5-HTergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN and can increase serotonin (5-HT level in the inferior colliculus and the auditory cortex in rodents. To explore the underlying neural mechanisms, we first examined effects of NaSal on neuronal intrinsic properties and the inhibitory synaptic transmissions in DRN slices of rats by using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. We found that NaSal hyperpolarized the resting membrane potential, decreased the input resistance, and suppressed spontaneous and current-evoked firing in GABAergic neurons, but not in 5-HTergic neurons. In addition, NaSal reduced GABAergic spontaneous and miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in 5-HTergic neurons. We next examined whether the observed depression of GABAergic activity would cause an increase in the excitability of 5-HTergic neurons using optogenetic technique in DRN slices of the transgenic mouse with channelrhodopsin-2 expressed in GABAergic neurons. When the GABAergic inhibition was enhanced by optical stimulation to GABAergic neurons in mouse DRN, NaSal significantly depolarized the resting membrane potential, increased the input resistance and increased current-evoked firing of 5-HTergic neurons. However, NaSal would fail to increase the excitability of 5-HTergic neurons when the GABAergic synaptic transmission was blocked by picrotoxin, a GABA receptor antagonist. Our results indicate that NaSal suppresses the GABAergic activities to raise the excitability of local 5-HTergic neural circuits in the DRN, which may contribute to the elevated 5-HT level by NaSal in the brain.

  8. Microcirculatory parameters measured in subcutaneous tissue of the mouse using a novel dorsal skinfold chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushiyama, Akira; Yamada, Shigeyuki; Ohkubo, Chiyoji

    2004-09-01

    The dorsal skinfold chamber (DSC) is a transparent devise useful for the long-term study of subcutaneous microcirculation. Commonly used chambers are made of metal, thus heavy and potentially stress including. Therefore, we developed a nonmetallic dorsal skinfold chamber and demonstrated that it performs as well as metal chambers. The essential structural parts of the nonmetallic chamber are made of polyacetal resin (Duracon), and its design was based on an existing titanium chamber. Both Duracon and titanium chambers were implanted onto an 8-week-old male BALB/c mice and microcirculatory parameters were compared. In subcutaneous venules, there were no significant differences between the chambers in terms of maximum blood velocity, blood flow rate, or the number of rolling or adhering leukocytes in vessels. In arterioles, main frequency of vasomotion showed no significant difference between the two types of chambers. This novel nonmetallic chamber frame was determined to be as practical as the metal frame. The nonmetallic chamber is about 40% lighter in weight than the metallic one, subjecting mice to less stress. Additionally, the chamber has greater applications in experimental use where metallic frames are unsuitable, such as those employing nonionizing radiation.

  9. Neurotoxicity of isoniazid and its metabolites in cultures of mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons and hybrid neuronal cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfeliu, C; Wright, J M; Kim, S U

    1999-12-01

    Isoniazid (INH) is one of the anti-tuberculosis drugs widely prescribed for patients since the early 1950s. It is relatively nontoxic but some patients develop peripheral neuropathy attributed to a disturbance of vitamin B6 metabolism. Some isoniazid metabolites are hepatotoxic but little is known about their neurotoxic property. Isoniazid and its metabolites including acetylisoniazid, acetylhydrazine, diacetylhydrazine, isonicotinic acid and hydrazine were examined for their potential neurotoxic effects in cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and mouse neuroblastoma x DRG neuron hybrid cell line N18D3. Isoniazid did not cause neurotoxicity at exposures up to 7 days. Hydrazine was found to be the most toxic metabolite with LC50 values of 2.7 mM and 0.3 mM after 7 days of exposure in DRG neurons and N18D3 hybrid neurons, respectively. Other metabolites including acetylisoniazid, acetylhydrazine, diacetylhydrazine and isonicotinic acid had moderate to minor neurotoxic effects on N18D3 hybrid neurons. Pyridoxine, which is used in clinical practice to prevent or ameliorate the isoniazid-induced neuropathy, did not consistently reverse the neurotoxicity of any of the metabolites in the cell cultures, but some interaction with hydrazine cannot be ruled out. Pyridoxine itself was found to be neurotoxic both in DRG neurons and N18D3 hybrid neurons, in agreement with human peripheral sensory neuropathy caused by prolonged overdosage. The enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase and the antioxidant agent selenium showed some protection against hydrazine neurotoxicity, suggesting an involvement of the generation of reactive oxygen species in the pathogenesis of isoniazid neuropathy. Both mouse DRG neurons and N18D3 mouse hybrid neurons were shown to be useful culture systems for elucidating the neurotoxicity mechanisms of agents causing sensory neuropathies and general neurotoxic effects in the nervous system.

  10. Does posture of the cervical spine influence dorsal neck muscle activity when lifting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peolsson, Anneli; Marstein, Eivind; McNamara, Timothy; Nolan, Damien; Sjaaberg, Espen; Peolsson, Michael; Jull, Gwendolen; O'Leary, Shaun

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that postural orientations of the neck, such as flexed or forward head postures, are associated with heightened activity of the dorsal neck muscles. While these studies describe the impact of variations in neck posture alone, there is scant literature regarding the effect of neck posture on muscle activity when combined with upper limb activities such as lifting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of three different neck postures on the activity of the different layers of the dorsal neck muscles during a lifting task. Ultrasound measurements of dorsal neck muscle deformation were compared over two time points (rest, during lift) during a lifting task performed in three different neck postural conditions (neutral, flexed and forward head posture) in 21 healthy subjects. Data were analysed by post-process speckle tracking analysis. Results demonstrated significantly greater muscle deformation induced by flexed and forward head postures, compared to the neutral posture, for all dorsal neck muscles at rest (pposture of the cervical spine influenced the level of muscle deformation not only at rest, but also when lifting. The findings of the study suggest that neck posture should be considered during the evaluation or design of lifting activities as it may contribute to excessive demands on dorsal neck muscles with potential detrimental consequences. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Human dorsal striatal activity during choice discriminates reinforcement learning behavior from the gambler's fallacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessup, Ryan K; O'Doherty, John P

    2011-04-27

    Reinforcement learning theory has generated substantial interest in neurobiology, particularly because of the resemblance between phasic dopamine and reward prediction errors. Actor-critic theories have been adapted to account for the functions of the striatum, with parts of the dorsal striatum equated to the actor. Here, we specifically test whether the human dorsal striatum--as predicted by an actor-critic instantiation--is used on a trial-to-trial basis at the time of choice to choose in accordance with reinforcement learning theory, as opposed to a competing strategy: the gambler's fallacy. Using a partial-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning protocol focused on the striatum and other ventral brain areas, we found that the dorsal striatum is more active when choosing consistent with reinforcement learning compared with the competing strategy. Moreover, an overlapping area of dorsal striatum along with the ventral striatum was found to be correlated with reward prediction errors at the time of outcome, as predicted by the actor-critic framework. These findings suggest that the same region of dorsal striatum involved in learning stimulus-response associations may contribute to the control of behavior during choice, thereby using those learned associations. Intriguingly, neither reinforcement learning nor the gambler's fallacy conformed to the optimal choice strategy on the specific decision-making task we used. Thus, the dorsal striatum may contribute to the control of behavior according to reinforcement learning even when the prescriptions of such an algorithm are suboptimal in terms of maximizing future rewards.

  12. Gene Expression Architecture of Mouse Dorsal and Tail Skin Reveals Functional Differences in Inflammation and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Quigley

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Inherited germline polymorphisms can cause gene expression levels in normal tissues to differ substantially between individuals. We present an analysis of the genetic architecture of normal adult skin from 470 genetically unique mice, demonstrating the effect of germline variants, skin tissue location, and perturbation by exogenous inflammation or tumorigenesis on gene signaling pathways. Gene networks related to specific cell types and signaling pathways, including sonic hedgehog (Shh, Wnt, Lgr family stem cell markers, and keratins, differed at these tissue sites, suggesting mechanisms for the differential susceptibility of dorsal and tail skin to development of skin diseases and tumorigenesis. The Pten tumor suppressor gene network is rewired in premalignant tumors compared to normal tissue, but this response to perturbation is lost during malignant progression. We present a software package for expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL network analysis and demonstrate how network analysis of whole tissues provides insights into interactions between cell compartments and signaling molecules.

  13. Inhibition of spinal cord dorsal horn neuronal activity by electrical stimulation of the cerebellar cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagains, Christopher E; Senapati, Arun K; Huntington, Paula J; He, Ji-Wei; Peng, Yuan B

    2011-11-01

    The cerebellum plays a major role in not only modulating motor activity, but also contributing to other functions, including nociception. The intermediate hemisphere of the cerebellum receives sensory input from the limbs. With the extensive connection between the cerebellum to brain-stem structures and cerebral cortex, it is possible that the cerebellum may facilitate the descending system to modulate spinal dorsal horn activity. This study provided the first evidence to support this hypothesis. Thirty-one wide-dynamic-range neurons from the left lumbar and 27 from the right lumbar spinal dorsal horn were recorded in response to graded mechanical stimulation (brush, pressure, and pinch) at the hind paws. Electrical stimulation of the cerebellar cortex of the left intermediate hemisphere significantly reduced spinal cord dorsal horn neuron-evoked responses bilaterally in response to peripheral high-intensity mechanical stimuli. It is concluded that the cerebellum may play a potential antinociceptive role, probably through activating descending inhibitory pathways indirectly.

  14. Rhythmic activity of feline dorsal and ventral spinocerebellar tract neurons during fictive motor actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedirchuk, Brent; Stecina, Katinka; Kristensen, Kasper Kyhl

    2013-01-01

    Neurons of the dorsal spinocerebellar tracts (DSCT) have been described to be rhythmically active during walking on a treadmill in decerebrate cats, but this activity ceased following deafferentation of the hindlimb. This observation supported the hypothesis that DSCT neurons primarily relay the ...

  15. Differential activation of the dorsal striatum by high-calorie visual food stimuli in obese individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothemund, Yvonne; Preuschhof, Claudia; Bohner, Georg; Bauknecht, Hans-Christian; Klingebiel, Randolf; Flor, Herta; Klapp, Burghard F

    2007-08-15

    The neural systems regulating food intake in obese individuals remain poorly understood. Previous studies applied positron emission tomography and manipulated hunger and satiety to investigate differences in appetitive processing between obese and normal-weight individuals. However, it is not known whether manipulation of stimulus value may yield different neural activity in obese as compared to control subjects when intrinsic physiological states are kept constant. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate 13 obese and 13 normal-weight subjects and manipulated food motivation by presenting visual food stimuli differing in their caloric content and energy density. In contrast to controls, obese women selectively activated the dorsal striatum while viewing high-caloric foods. Moreover, in the high-calorie condition body mass index (BMI) predicted activation in the dorsal striatum, anterior insula, claustrum, posterior cingulate, postcentral and lateral orbitofrontal cortex. The results indicate that in obese individuals simple visual stimulation with food stimuli activates regions related to reward anticipation and habit learning (dorsal striatum). Additionally, high-calorie food images yielded BMI-dependent activations in regions associated with taste information processing (anterior insula and lateral orbitofrontal cortex), motivation (orbitofrontal cortex), emotion as well as memory functions (posterior cingulate). Collectively, the results suggest that the observed activation is independent of the physiological states of hunger and satiation, and thus may contribute to pathological overeating and obesity. Some of the observed activations (dorsal striatum, orbitofrontal cortex) are likely to be dopamine-mediated.

  16. Vascularization of the dorsal root ganglia and peripheral nerve of the mouse: Implications for chemical-induced peripheral sensory neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melemedjian Ohannes K

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although a variety of industrial chemicals, as well as several chemotherapeutic agents used to treat cancer or HIV, preferentially induce a peripheral sensory neuropathy what remains unclear is why these agents induce a sensory vs. a motor or mixed neuropathy. Previous studies have shown that the endothelial cells that vascularize the dorsal root ganglion (DRG, which houses the primary afferent sensory neurons, are unique in that they have large fenestrations and are permeable to a variety of low and high molecular weight agents. In the present report we used whole-mount preparations, immunohistochemistry, and confocal laser scanning microscopy to show that the cell body-rich area of the L4 mouse DRG has a 7 fold higher density of CD31+ capillaries than cell fiber rich area of the DRG or the distal or proximal aspect of the sciatic nerve. This dense vascularization, coupled with the high permeability of these capillaries, may synergistically contribute, and in part explain, why many potentially neurotoxic agents preferentially accumulate and injure cells within the DRG. Currently, cancer survivors and HIV patients constitute the largest and most rapidly expanding groups that have chemically induced peripheral sensory neuropathy. Understanding the unique aspects of the vascularization of the DRG and closing the endothelial fenestrations of the rich vascular bed of capillaries that vascularize the DRG before intravenous administration of anti-neoplastic or anti-HIV therapies, may offer a mechanism based approach to attenuate these chemically induced peripheral neuropathies in these patients.

  17. Cadherin-13 Deficiency Increases Dorsal Raphe 5-HT Neuron Density and Prefrontal Cortex Innervation in the Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Forero

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: During early prenatal stages of brain development, serotonin (5-HT-specific neurons migrate through somal translocation to form the raphe nuclei and subsequently begin to project to their target regions. The rostral cluster of cells, comprising the median and dorsal raphe (DR, innervates anterior regions of the brain, including the prefrontal cortex. Differential analysis of the mouse 5-HT system transcriptome identified enrichment of cell adhesion molecules in 5-HT neurons of the DR. One of these molecules, cadherin-13 (Cdh13 has been shown to play a role in cell migration, axon pathfinding, and synaptogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the contribution of Cdh13 to the development of the murine brain 5-HT system.Methods: For detection of Cdh13 and components of the 5-HT system at different embryonic developmental stages of the mouse brain, we employed immunofluorescence protocols and imaging techniques, including epifluorescence, confocal and structured illumination microscopy. The consequence of CDH13 loss-of-function mutations on brain 5-HT system development was explored in a mouse model of Cdh13 deficiency.Results: Our data show that in murine embryonic brain Cdh13 is strongly expressed on 5-HT specific neurons of the DR and in radial glial cells (RGCs, which are critically involved in regulation of neuronal migration. We observed that 5-HT neurons are intertwined with these RGCs, suggesting that these neurons undergo RGC-guided migration. Cdh13 is present at points of intersection between these two cell types. Compared to wildtype controls, Cdh13-deficient mice display increased cell densities in the DR at embryonic stages E13.5, E17.5, and adulthood, and higher serotonergic innervation of the prefrontal cortex at E17.5.Conclusion: Our findings provide evidence for a role of CDH13 in the development of the serotonergic system in early embryonic stages. Specifically, we indicate that Cdh13 deficiency affects the cell

  18. Activation of the ventral and dorsal striatum during cue reactivity in Internet gaming disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; Yip, Sarah W; Zhang, Jin-Tao; Wang, Ling-Jiao; Shen, Zi-Jiao; Liu, Ben; Ma, Shan-Shan; Yao, Yuan-Wei; Fang, Xiao-Yi

    2017-05-01

    Studies conducted in drug addiction suggest a transition in processing of drug-related cues from the ventral to the dorsal component of the striatum. However, this process has not been studied in a behavioral addiction. Assessment of this process in a non-drug addiction can provide insight into the pathophysiology of both substance and behavioral addictions. Thirty-nine male Internet gaming disorder (IGD) subjects and 23 male matched healthy controls (HCs) participated in functional magnetic resonance imaging during performance of a cue-reactivity task involving alternating presentation of Internet gaming-related stimuli (game cues) and general Internet surfing-related stimuli (control cues). Cue-induced neural activations in the ventral and dorsal striatum (DS) were compared between IGD and HC participants. Associations between cue-reactivity within these regions and cue-induced craving and severity and duration of IGD were also explored. IGD participants exhibited higher cue-induced activations within both the ventral and DS when compared with HCs. Within the IGD group, activity within the left ventral striatum (VS) was correlated negatively with cue-induced craving; positive associations were found between activations within the DS (right putamen, pallidum and left caudate) and duration of IGD. Cue-induced activity within the left putamen was negatively associated with right VS volumes among IGD participants. Consistent with studies in substance addictions, our results suggest that a transition from ventral to dorsal striatal processing may occur among individuals with IGD, a condition without the impact of substance intake.

  19. Expressing Constitutively Active Rheb in Adult Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Enhances the Integration of Sensory Axons that Regenerate Across a Chondroitinase-Treated Dorsal Root Entry Zone Following Dorsal Root Crush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C; Kholodilov, Nikolai; Burke, Robert E; Detloff, Megan R; Côté, Marie-Pascale; Tom, Veronica J

    2016-01-01

    While the peripheral branch of dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG) can successfully regenerate after injury, lesioned central branch axons fail to regrow across the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ), the interface between the dorsal root and the spinal cord. This lack of regeneration is due to the limited regenerative capacity of adult sensory axons and the growth-inhibitory environment at the DREZ, which is similar to that found in the glial scar after a central nervous system (CNS) injury. We hypothesized that transduction of adult DRG neurons using adeno-associated virus (AAV) to express a constitutively-active form of the GTPase Rheb (caRheb) will increase their intrinsic growth potential after a dorsal root crush. Additionally, we posited that if we combined that approach with digestion of upregulated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) at the DREZ with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), we would promote regeneration of sensory axons across the DREZ into the spinal cord. We first assessed if this strategy promotes neuritic growth in an in vitro model of the glial scar containing CSPG. ChABC allowed for some regeneration across the once potently inhibitory substrate. Combining ChABC treatment with expression of caRheb in DRG significantly improved this growth. We then determined if this combination strategy also enhanced regeneration through the DREZ after dorsal root crush in adult rats in vivo. After unilaterally crushing C4-T1 dorsal roots, we injected AAV5-caRheb or AAV5-GFP into the ipsilateral C5-C8 DRGs. ChABC or PBS was injected into the ipsilateral dorsal horn at C5-C8 to digest CSPG, for a total of four animal groups (caRheb + ChABC, caRheb + PBS, GFP + ChABC, GFP + PBS). Regeneration was rarely observed in PBS-treated animals, whereas short-distance regrowth across the DREZ was observed in ChABC-treated animals. No difference in axon number or length between the ChABC groups was observed, which may be related to intraganglionic inflammation induced by the

  20. NR2 subunits and NMDA receptors on lamina II inhibitory and excitatory interneurons of the mouse dorsal horn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacDermott Amy B

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NMDA receptors expressed by spinal cord neurons in the superficial dorsal horn are involved in the development of chronic pain associated with inflammation and nerve injury. The superficial dorsal horn has a complex and still poorly understood circuitry that is mainly populated by inhibitory and excitatory interneurons. Little is known about how NMDA receptor subunit composition, and therefore pharmacology and voltage dependence, varies with neuronal cell type. NMDA receptors are typically composed of two NR1 subunits and two of four NR2 subunits, NR2A-2D. We took advantage of the differences in Mg2+ sensitivity of the NMDA receptor subtypes together with subtype preferring antagonists to identify the NR2 subunit composition of NMDA receptors expressed on lamina II inhibitory and excitatory interneurons. To distinguish between excitatory and inhibitory interneurons, we used transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein driven by the GAD67 promoter. Results Analysis of conductance ratio and selective antagonists showed that lamina II GABAergic interneurons express both the NR2A/B containing Mg2+ sensitive receptors and the NR2C/D containing NMDA receptors with less Mg2+ sensitivity. In contrast, excitatory lamina II interneurons express primarily NR2A/B containing receptors. Despite this clear difference in NMDA receptor subunit expression in the two neuronal populations, focally stimulated synaptic input is mediated exclusively by NR2A and 2B containing receptors in both neuronal populations. Conclusions Stronger expression of NMDA receptors with NR2C/D subunits by inhibitory interneurons compared to excitatory interneurons may provide a mechanism to selectively increase activity of inhibitory neurons during intense excitatory drive that can provide inhibitory feedback.

  1. Calcium imaging of sleep-wake related neuronal activity in the dorsal pons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Julia; Pinto, Lucas; Dan, Yang

    2016-02-25

    The dorsal pons has long been implicated in the generation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, but the underlying circuit mechanisms remain poorly understood. Using cell-type-specific microendoscopic Ca(2+) imaging in and near the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, we found that many glutamatergic neurons are maximally active during REM sleep (REM-max), while the majority of GABAergic neurons are maximally active during wakefulness (wake-max). Furthermore, the activity of glutamatergic neurons exhibits a medio-lateral spatial gradient, with medially located neurons more selectively active during REM sleep.

  2. The cholinergic agonist carbachol increases the frequency of spontaneous GABAergic synaptic currents in dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C; Brown, R E

    2014-01-31

    Dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) serotonin (5-HT) neurons play an important role in feeding, mood control and stress responses. One important feature of their activity across the sleep-wake cycle is their reduced firing during rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep which stands in stark contrast to the wake/REM-on discharge pattern of brainstem cholinergic neurons. A prominent model of REM sleep control posits a reciprocal interaction between these cell groups. 5-HT inhibits cholinergic neurons, and activation of nicotinic receptors can excite DRN 5-HT neurons but the cholinergic effect on inhibitory inputs is incompletely understood. Here, in vitro, in DRN brain slices prepared from GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, a brief (3 min) bath application of carbachol (50 μM) increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in GFP-negative, putative 5-HT neurons but did not affect miniature (tetrodotoxin-insensitive) IPSCs. Carbachol had no direct postsynaptic effect. Thus, carbachol likely increases the activity of local GABAergic neurons which synapse on 5-HT neurons. Removal of dorsal regions of the slice including the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) region where GABAergic neurons projecting to the DRN have been identified, abolished the effect of carbachol on sIPSCs whereas the removal of ventral regions containing the oral region of the pontine reticular nucleus (PnO) did not. In addition, carbachol directly excited GFP-positive, GABAergic vlPAG neurons. Antagonism of both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors completely abolished the effects of carbachol. We suggest cholinergic neurons inhibit DRN 5-HT neurons when acetylcholine levels are lower i.e. during quiet wakefulness and the beginning of REM sleep periods, in part via excitation of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors located on local vlPAG and DRN GABAergic neurons. Higher firing rates or burst firing of cholinergic neurons associated with attentive wakefulness or phasic REM sleep periods

  3. Lack of liver X receptors leads to cell proliferation in a model of mouse dorsal prostate epithelial cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Dufour

    Full Text Available Recent studies underline the implication of Liver X Receptors (LXRs in several prostate diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate cancer. In order to understand the molecular mechanisms involved, we derived epithelial cells from dorsal prostate (MPECs of wild type (WT or Lxrαβ-/- mice. In the WT MPECs, our results show that LXR activation reduces proliferation and correlates with the modification of the AKT-survival pathway. Moreover, LXRs regulate lipid homeostasis with the regulation of Abca1, Abcg1 and Idol, and, in a lesser extent, Srebp1, Fas and Acc. Conversely cells derived from Lxrαβ-/- mice show a higher basal phosphorylation and consequently activation of the survival/proliferation transduction pathways AKT and MAPK. Altogether, our data point out that the cell model we developed allows deciphering the molecular mechanisms inducing the cell cycle arrest. Besides, we show that activated LXRs regulate AKT and MAPK transduction pathways and demonstrate that LXRs could be good pharmacological targets in prostate disease such as cancer.

  4. Different forms of glycine- and GABAA-receptor mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission in mouse superficial and deep dorsal horn neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brichta Alan M

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurons in superficial (SDH and deep (DDH laminae of the spinal cord dorsal horn receive sensory information from skin, muscle, joints and viscera. In both regions, glycine- (GlyR and GABAA-receptors (GABAARs contribute to fast synaptic inhibition. For rat, several types of GABAAR coexist in the two regions and each receptor type provides different contributions to inhibitory tone. Recent work in mouse has discovered an additional type of GlyR, (containing alpha 3 subunits in the SDH. The contribution of differing forms of the GlyR to sensory processing in SDH and DDH is not understood. Methods and Results Here we compare fast inhibitory synaptic transmission in mouse (P17-37 SDH and DDH using patch-clamp electrophysiology in transverse spinal cord slices (L3-L5 segments, 23°C. GlyR-mediated mIPSCs were detected in 74% (25/34 and 94% (25/27 of SDH and DDH neurons, respectively. In contrast, GABAAR-mediated mIPSCs were detected in virtually all neurons in both regions (93%, 14/15 and 100%, 18/18. Several Gly- and GABAAR properties also differed in SDH vs. DDH. GlyR-mediated mIPSC amplitude was smaller (37.1 ± 3.9 vs. 64.7 ± 5.0 pA; n = 25 each, decay time was slower (8.5 ± 0.8 vs. 5.5 ± 0.3 ms, and frequency was lower (0.15 ± 0.03 vs. 0.72 ± 0.13 Hz in SDH vs. DDH neurons. In contrast, GABAAR-mediated mIPSCs had similar amplitudes (25.6 ± 2.4, n = 14 vs. 25. ± 2.0 pA, n = 18 and frequencies (0.21 ± 0.08 vs. 0.18 ± 0.04 Hz in both regions; however, decay times were slower (23.0 ± 3.2 vs. 18.9 ± 1.8 ms in SDH neurons. Mean single channel conductance underlying mIPSCs was identical for GlyRs (54.3 ± 1.6 pS, n = 11 vs. 55.7 ± 1.8, n = 8 and GABAARs (22.7 ± 1.7 pS, n = 10 vs. 22.4 ± 2.0 pS, n = 11 in both regions. We also tested whether the synthetic endocanabinoid, methandamide (methAEA, had direct effects on Gly- and GABAARs in each spinal cord region. MethAEA (5 μM reduced GlyR-mediated mIPSC frequency in SDH

  5. Acupuncture inhibition on neuronal activity of spinal dorsal horn induced by noxious colorectal distention in rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-Jing Rong; Bing Zhu; Qi-Fu Huang; Xin-Yan Gao; Hui Ben; Yan-Hua Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To observe how acupuncture stimulation influences the visceral nociception in rat and to clarify the interactions between acupuncture or somatic input and visceral nociceptive inputs in the spinal dorsal horn. These will provide scientific base for illustrating the mechanism of acupuncture on visceral pain.METHODS: Experiments were performed on SpragueDawley rats and the visceral nociceptive stimulus was generated by colorectal distention (CRD). Unit discharges from individual single neuron were recorded extracellularly with glass-microelectrode in L1-3 spinal dorsal horn.Acupuncture stimulation was applied at contralateral heterotopic acupoint and ipsilateral homotopic acupoint,both of which were innervated by the same segments that innervate also the colorectal-gut.RESULTS: The visceral nociception could be inhibited at the spinal level by the heterotopic somatic mechanical stimulation and acupuncture. The maximal inhibition was induced by acupuncture or the somatic noxious stimulation at spinal dorsal horn level with inhibiting rate of 68.61%and 60.79%, respectively (P<0.01 and <0.001). In reversible spinalized rats (cervical-thoracic cold block)both spontaneous activity and responses to CRD increased significantly in 16/20 units examined, indicating the existence of tonic descending inhibition. The inhibition of acupuncture on the noxious CRD disappeared totally in the reversible spinalized rats (P<0.001).CONCLUSION: The inputs of noxious CRD and acupuncture may interact at the spinal level. The nociceptive visceral inputs could be inhibited by acupuncture applied to hetero-topic acupoint. The effect indicates that the spinal dorsal horn plays a significant role in mediating the inhibition of acupuncture and somatic stimulation on the neuronal response to the noxious visceral stimulation and the inhibition is modulated by upper cervical cord and/or supra-spinal center.

  6. Activation of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons is necessary for waiting for delayed rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Kayoko W; Miyazaki, Katsuhiko; Doya, Kenji

    2012-08-01

    The forebrain serotonergic system is a crucial component in the control of impulsive behaviors. We previously reported that the activity of serotonin neurons in the midbrain dorsal raphe nucleus increased when rats performed a task that required them to wait for delayed rewards. However, the causal relationship between serotonin neural activity and the tolerance for the delayed reward remained unclear. Here, we test whether the inhibition of serotonin neural activity by the local application of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin in the dorsal raphe nucleus impairs rats' tolerance for delayed rewards. Rats performed a sequential food-water navigation task that required them to visit food and water sites alternately via a tone site to get rewards at both sites after delays. During the short (2 s) delayed reward condition, the inhibition of serotonin neural activity did not significantly influence the numbers of reward choice errors (nosepoke at an incorrect reward site following a conditioned reinforcer tone), reward wait errors (failure to wait for the delayed rewards), or total trials (sum of reward choice errors, reward wait errors, and acquired rewards). By contrast, during the long (7-11 s) delayed reward condition, the number of wait errors significantly increased while the numbers of total trials and choice errors did not significantly change. These results indicate that the activation of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons is necessary for waiting for long delayed rewards and suggest that elevated serotonin activity facilitates waiting behavior when there is the prospect of forthcoming rewards.

  7. Physical Activity After Stroke Is Associated With Increased Interhemispheric Connectivity of the Dorsal Attention Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldsman, Michele; Churilov, Leonid; Werden, Emilio; Li, Qi; Cumming, Toby; Brodtmann, Amy

    2017-02-01

    Attention is frequently impaired after stroke, and its impairment is associated with poor quality of life. Physical activity benefits attention in healthy populations and has also been associated with recovery after brain injury. We investigated the relationship between objectively measured daily physical activity, attention network connectivity, and attention task performance after stroke. We hypothesized that increased daily physical activity would be associated with improved attention network function. Stroke patients (n = 62; mean age = 67 years, SD = 12.6 years) and healthy controls (n = 27; mean age = 68 years, SD = 6 years) underwent cognitive testing and 7 minutes of functional magnetic resonance imaging in the resting-state. Patients were tested 3 months after ischemic stroke. Physical activity was monitored with an electronic armband worn for 7 days. Dorsal and ventral attention network function was examined using seed-based connectivity analyses. Greater daily physical activity was associated with increased interhemispheric connectivity of the superior parietal lobule in the dorsal attention network (DAN; P attention tasks, as revealed by robust linear regression. The relationship remained after adjusting for age, gray matter volume, and white matter hyperintensity load. Daily physical activity was associated with increased resting interhemispheric connectivity of the DAN. Increased connectivity was associated with faster attention performance, suggesting a cognitive correlate to increased network connectivity. Attentional modulation by physical activity represents a key focus for intervention studies.

  8. Anatomy and muscle activity of the dorsal fins in bamboo sharks and spiny dogfish during turning maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Anabela; Wilga, Cheryl D

    2013-11-01

    Stability and procured instability characterize two opposing types of swimming, steady and maneuvering, respectively. Fins can be used to manipulate flow to adjust stability during swimming maneuvers either actively using muscle control or passively by structural control. The function of the dorsal fins during turning maneuvering in two shark species with different swimming modes is investigated here using musculoskeletal anatomy and muscle function. White-spotted bamboo sharks are a benthic species that inhabits complex reef habitats and thus have high requirements for maneuverability. Spiny dogfish occupy a variety of coastal and continental shelf habitats and spend relatively more time cruising in open water. These species differ in dorsal fin morphology and fin position along the body. Bamboo sharks have a larger second dorsal fin area and proportionally more muscle insertion into both dorsal fins. The basal and radial pterygiophores are plate-like structures in spiny dogfish and are nearly indistinguishable from one another. In contrast, bamboo sharks lack basal pterygiophores, while the radial pterygiophores form two rows of elongated rectangular elements that articulate with one another. The dorsal fin muscles are composed of a large muscle mass that extends over the ceratotrichia overlying the radials in spiny dogfish. However, in bamboo sharks, the muscle mass is divided into multiple distinct muscles that insert onto the ceratotrichia. During turning maneuvers, the dorsal fin muscles are active in both species with no differences in onset between fin sides. Spiny dogfish have longer burst durations on the outer fin side, which is consistent with opposing resistance to the medium. In bamboo sharks, bilateral activation of the dorsal in muscles could also be stiffening the fin throughout the turn. Thus, dogfish sharks passively stiffen the dorsal fin structurally and functionally, while bamboo sharks have more flexible dorsal fins, which result from a

  9. Effect of propofol on glutamate-induced activation and elated inflammatory cytokines of astrocytes from spinal cord dorsal horn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengming Qin; Qing Li; Juying Liu; Tao Zhu; Yong Xiang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Astrocytes participate in central nervous system-mediated physiological or pathological processes, such as pain. Activated dorsal horn astrocytes from the spinal cord produce nerve active substances and proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-I beta (IL-1 β ), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a ), which play important roles in pain transduction and regulation. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of different doses of propofol on activation of cultured spinal cord dorsal horn astrocytes induced by glutamate, as well as changes in IL-1 β, IL-6, and TNF-a, and IL-10 (anti-inflammatory cytokine) expression in rats, and to explore the dose relationship of propofnl. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The cellular and molecular biology experiment was performed at the Central Laboratory of Yunyang Medical College between March 2006 and December 2007. MATERIALS: Forty healthy, Wistar rats, aged 2-3 days, were selected. Propofol was provided by Zeneca, UK; glutamate by Sigma, USA; EPICS XL flow cytometry by Beckman culture, USA; rabbit-anti-mouse glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) antibody kit and inflammatory cytokine detection kit were provided by Zhongshan Biotechnology Company Ltd., Beijing; multimedia color pathologic image analysis system was a product of Nikon, Japan. METHODS: Astrocytes were harvested from T11-L6spinal cord dorsal horn of Wistar rats and incubated for 3 weeks. The cells were divided into seven groups, according to various treatment conditions: control group was cells cultured in Hank's buffered saline solution; intralipid group was cells cultured in intralipid (0.2 mL/L); glutamate group was cells cultured with 100 μ mol/L glutamate; propofol group was cells cultured with 250 μ mol/L propofol; three glutamate plus propofol groups were cultured in 100 μ mol/L of glutamate, followed by 5, 25, and 250 μ mol/L of prnpofol 10 minutes later. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: GFAP-labeled astrocytes were analyzed using a multimedia

  10. Slit-Robo GTPase-activating proteins are differentially expressed in murine dorsal root ganglia: modulation by peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Bing; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Zhao, Jiu-Hong; Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Dan; Zheng, Lin-Feng; Zhang, Xian-Fang; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Yi, Xi-Nan

    2012-04-01

    The Slit-Robo GTPase-activating proteins (srGAPs) play an important role in neurite outgrowth and axon guidance; however, little is known about its role in nerve regeneration after injury. Here, we studied the expression of srGAPs in mouse dorsal root ganglia (DRG) following sciatic nerve transection (SNT) using morphometric and immunohistochemical techniques. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis indicated that srGAP1 and srGAP3, but not srGAP2, were expressed in normal adult DRG. Following unilateral SNT, elevated mRNA and protein levels of srGAP1 and srGAP3 were detected in the ipsilateral relative to contralateral L(3-4) DRGs from day 3 to day 14. Immunohistochemical results showed that srGAP1 and srGAP3 were largely expressed in subpopulations of DRG neurons in naïve DRGs. However, after SNT, srGAP3 in neurons was significantly increased in the ipsilateral relative to contralateral DRGs, which peaked at day 7 to day 14. Interestingly, DRG neurons with strong srGAP3 labeling also coexpressed Robo2 after peripheral nerve injury. These results suggest that srGAPs are differentially expressed in murine DRG and srGAP3 are the predominant form. Moreover, srGAP3 may participate in Slit-Robo signaling in response to peripheral nerve injury or the course of nerve regeneration.

  11. GABA(A) receptor activation in the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus impairs consolidation of conditioned contextual fear in C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misane, Ilga; Kruis, Ayla; Pieneman, Anton W; Ögren, Sven Ove; Stiedl, Oliver

    2013-02-01

    Local infusion of the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol is used for reversible inactivation of septohippocampal brain structures associated with cognitive functions. However, information on the effective duration, affected processes and site(s) of action of muscimol in the hippocampus is lacking. Therefore, the dose- and time-dependent effects of bilateral dorsohippocampal infusion of muscimol (0.01-2.0 μg/mouse) below the CA1 area were examined on processing of fear memory in male C57BL/6J mice. Infusion of muscimol 15 min-6 h but not 9 h or 24 h before training impaired conditioned context-dependent fear tested 24 h or 48 h after training. Post-training infusion of muscimol also impaired context-dependent fear when applied either 4 h or 6 h after training, although with lower efficacy. Muscimol was ineffective when administered immediately, 1 h or 24 h after training. Infusion of muscimol 15 min before training impaired context-dependent fear 4-6 h after training indicating preserved short-term but impaired long-term memory. Regardless of infusion time and dose, muscimol had no effect on tone-dependent (cued) fear memory. The impairment by the fluorescently-labeled muscimol-bodipy (5.3 μg/mouse) were similar to those of an equimolar dose of muscimol (1 μg/mouse). The distribution profile after local infusion indicated that muscimol-bodipy (5.3 μg/mouse) was confined to the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus. These results demonstrated that GABA(A) receptor activation in the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus causes a long-term memory impairment of conditioned context-dependent fear mediated by a long-lasting (≥6 h) muscimol action most likely affecting consolidation processes.

  12. Difference in cortical activation during use of volar and dorsal hand splints:a functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung Ho Jang; Woo Hyuk Jang

    2016-01-01

    There have been no studies reported on the difference in cortical activation during use of volar and dorsal hand splints. We attempted to investigate the difference in cortical activation in the somatosensory cortical area during use of volar and dorsal hand splints by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We recruited eight healthy volunteers. fMRI was performed while subjects who were iftted with volar or dorsal hand splints performed grasp-release movements. Regions of interest were placed on the primary motor cortex (M1), primary somatosensory cortex (S1), posterior parietal cortex (PPC), and secondary somato-sensory cortex (S2). Results of group analysis of fMRI data showed that the total numbers of activated voxels in all ROIs were significantly higher during use of volar hand splint (3,376) compared with that (1,416) during use of dorsal hand splint. In each ROI, use of volar hand splint induced greater activation in all ROIs (M1:1,748, S1:1,455, PPC:23, and S2:150) compared with use of dorsal hand splint (M1:783, S1:625, PPC:0, and S2:8). The peak activated value was also higher during use of volar hand splint (t-value:17.29) compared with that during use of dorsal hand splint (t-value:13.11). Taken together, use of volar hand splint induced greater cortical activation relevant to somatosensory function than use of dorsal hand splint. This result would be important for the physiatrist and therapist to apply appropriate somatosensory input in patients with brain injury.

  13. Adeno-associated virus and lentivirus vectors mediate efficient and sustained transduction of cultured mouse and human dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, J; Ginn, S L; Weinberger, R P; Trahair, T N; Smythe, J A; Alexander, I E

    2001-01-01

    Peripheral nervous system (PNS) sensory neurons are directly involved in the pathophysiology of numerous inherited and acquired neurological conditions. Therefore, efficient and stable gene delivery to these postmitotic cells has significant therapeutic potential. Among contemporary vector systems capable of neuronal transduction, only those based on herpes simplex virus have been extensively evaluated in PNS neurons. We therefore investigated the transduction performance of recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) and VSV-G-pseudotyped lentivirus vectors derived from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) in newborn mouse and fetal human dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons. In dissociated mouse DRG cultures both vectors achieved efficient transduction of sensory neurons at low multiplicities of infection (MOIs) and sustained transgene expression within a 28-day culture period. Interestingly, the lentivirus vector selectively transduced neurons in murine cultures, in contrast to human cultures, in which Schwann and fibroblast-like cells were also transduced. Recombinant AAV transduced all three cell types in both mouse and human cultures. After direct microinjection of murine DRG explants, maximal transduction efficiencies of 20 and 200 transducing units per neuronal transductant were achieved with AAV and lentivirus vectors, respectively. Most importantly, both vectors achieved efficient and sustained transduction of human sensory neurons in dissociated cultures, thereby directly demonstrating the exciting potential of these vectors for gene therapy applications in the PNS.

  14. Maximal intermittent contractions of the first dorsal interosseous inhibits voluntary activation of the contralateral homologous muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Justin J; Feldman, Matthew R; Simmonds, Michael J

    2016-09-07

    The aim of this study was to investigate how maximal intermittent contractions for a hand muscle influence cortical and reflex activity, as well as the ability to voluntarily activate, the homologous muscle in the opposite limb. Twelve healthy subjects (age: 24 ± 3 years, all right hand dominant) performed maximal contractions of the dominant limb first dorsal interosseous (FDI), and activity of the contralateral FDI was examined in a series of experiments. Index finger abduction force, FDI EMG, motor evoked potentials and heteronomous reflexes were obtained from the contralateral limb during brief non-fatiguing contractions. The same measures, as well as the ability to voluntarily activate the contralateral FDI, were then assessed in an extended intermittent contraction protocol that elicited fatigue. Brief contractions under non-fatigued conditions increased index finger abduction force, FDI EMG, and motor evoked potential amplitude of the contralateral limb. However, when intermittent maximal contractions were continued until fatigue, there was an inability to produce maximal force with the contralateral limb (~30%) which was coupled to a decrease in the level of voluntary activation (~20%). These declines were present without changes in reflex activity, and regardless of whether cortical or motor point stimulation was used to assess voluntary activation. It is concluded that performing maximal intermittent contractions with a single limb causes an inability of the CNS to maximally drive the homologous muscle of the contralateral limb. This was, in part, mediated by mechanisms that involve the motor cortex ipsilateral to the contracting limb.

  15. Temperature dependence of rapidly adapting mechanically activated currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhanfeng; Ling, Jennifer; Gu, Jianguo G

    2012-08-01

    Rapidly adapting mechanically activated channels (RA) are expressed on somatosensory neurons and thought to play a role in mechanical transduction. Because mechanical sensations can be significantly affected by temperatures, we examined thermal sensitivity of RA currents in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons to see if RA channel activity is highly temperature-dependent. RA currents were evoked from DRG neurons by membrane displacements and recorded by the whole-cell patch-clamp recording technique. We found that RA currents were significantly enhanced by warming temperatures from 22 to 32 °C and reduced by cooling temperatures from 24 to 14 °C. RA channel activation exhibited steep temperature-dependence with a large temperature coefficient (Q10>5) and a high activation energy (Ea>30 kcal/mol). We further showed that RA channel activation by mechanical stimulation led to membrane depolarization, which could result in action potential firing at 22 °C or 32 °C but not at 14 °C. Taken together, our results provide the measurements of thermal dynamics and activation energy of RA channels, and suggest that a high energy barrier is present for RA channels to open. These findings are in agreement with temperature sensitivity of mechanical sensations in mammals.

  16. Developmental localization of calcitonin gene-related peptide in dorsal sensory axons and ventral motor neurons of mouse cervical spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongtae; Sunagawa, Masanobu; Kobayashi, Shiori; Shin, Taekyun; Takayama, Chitoshi

    2016-04-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-amino-acid neuropeptide, synthesized by alternative splicing of calcitonin gene mRNA. CGRP is characteristically distributed in the nervous system, and its function varies depending on where it is expressed. To reveal developmental formation of the CGRP network and its function in neuronal maturation, we examined the immunohistochemical localization of CGRP in the developing mouse cervical spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion. CGRP immunolabeling (IL) was first detected in motor neurons on E13, and in ascending axons of the posterior funiculus and DRG neurons on E14. CGRP-positive sensory axon fibers entered Laminae I and II on E16, and Laminae I through IV on E18. The intensity of the CGRP-IL gradually increased in both ventral and dorsal horns during embryonic development, but markedly decreased in the ventral horn after birth. These results suggest that CGRP is expressed several days after neuronal settling and entry of sensory fibers, and that the CGRP network is formed in chronological and sequential order. Furthermore, because CGRP is markedly expressed in motor neurons when axons are vastly extending and innervating targets, CGRP may also be involved in axonal elongation and synapse formation during normal development.

  17. Effects of Combined Electrical Stimulation of the Dorsal Column and Dorsal Roots on Wide-Dynamic-Range Neuronal Activity in Nerve-Injured Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Zhang, Tong; Tiwari, Vinod; Shu, Bin; Zhang, Chen; Wang, Yun; Vera-Portocarrero, Louis P; Raja, Srinivasa N; Guan, Yun

    2015-10-01

    Electrical stimulation at the dorsal column (DC) and dorsal root (DR) may inhibit spinal wide-dynamic-range (WDR) neuronal activity in nerve-injured rats. The objective of this study was to determine if applying electrical conditioning stimulation (CS) at both sites provides additive or synergistic benefits. By conducting in vivo extracellular recordings of WDR neurons in rats that had undergone L5 spinal nerve ligation, we tested whether combining 50 Hz CS at the two sites in either a concurrent (2.5 min) or alternate (5 min) pattern inhibits WDR neuronal activity better than CS at DC alone (5 min). The intensities of CS were determined by recording antidromic compound action potentials to graded stimulation at the DC and DR. We measured the current thresholds that resulted in the first detectable Aα/β waveform (Ab0) and the peak Aα/β waveform (Ab1) to select CS intensity at each site. The same number of electrical pulses and amount of current were delivered in different patterns to allow comparison. At a moderate intensity of 50% (Ab0 + Ab1), different patterns of CS all attenuated the C-component of WDR neurons in response to graded intracutaneous electrical stimuli (0.1-10 mA, 2 msec) and inhibited windup in response to repetitive noxious stimuli (0.5 Hz). However, the inhibitory effects did not differ significantly between different patterns. At the lower intensity (Ab0), no CS inhibited WDR neurons. These findings suggest that combined stimulation of DC and DR may not be superior to DC stimulation alone for inhibition of WDR neurons. © 2015 International Neuromodulation Society.

  18. Chronic monitoring of lower urinary tract activity via a sacral dorsal root ganglia interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurram, Abeer; Ross, Shani E.; Sperry, Zachariah J.; Ouyang, Aileen; Stephan, Christopher; Jiman, Ahmad A.; Bruns, Tim M.

    2017-06-01

    Objective. Our goal is to develop an interface that integrates chronic monitoring of lower urinary tract (LUT) activity with stimulation of peripheral pathways. Approach. Penetrating microelectrodes were implanted in sacral dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of adult male felines. Peripheral electrodes were placed on or in the pudendal nerve, bladder neck and near the external urethral sphincter. Supra-pubic bladder catheters were implanted for saline infusion and pressure monitoring. Electrode and catheter leads were enclosed in an external housing on the back. Neural signals from microelectrodes and bladder pressure of sedated or awake-behaving felines were recorded under various test conditions in weekly sessions. Electrodes were also stimulated to drive activity. Main results. LUT single- and multi-unit activity was recorded for 4-11 weeks in four felines. As many as 18 unique bladder pressure single-units were identified in each experiment. Some channels consistently recorded bladder afferent activity for up to 41 d, and we tracked individual single-units for up to 23 d continuously. Distension-evoked and stimulation-driven (DRG and pudendal) bladder emptying was observed, during which LUT sensory activity was recorded. Significance. This chronic implant animal model allows for behavioral studies of LUT neurophysiology and will allow for continued development of a closed-loop neuroprosthesis for bladder control.

  19. Abnormal Ventral and Dorsal Attention Network Activity During Single and Dual Target Detection in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M. Jimenez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Early visual perception and attention are impaired in schizophrenia, and these deficits can be observed on target detection tasks. These tasks activate distinct ventral and dorsal brain networks which support stimulus-driven and goal-directed attention, respectively. We used single and dual target rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP tasks during fMRI with an ROI approach to examine regions within these networks associated with target detection and the attentional blink (AB in 21 schizophrenia outpatients and 25 healthy controls. In both tasks, letters were targets and numbers were distractors. For the dual target task, the second target (T2 was presented at 3 different lags after the first target (T1 (lag1=100ms, lag3=300ms, lag7=700ms. For both single and dual target tasks, patients identified fewer targets than controls. For the dual target task, both groups showed the expected AB effect with poorer performance at lag 3 than at lags 1 or 7, and there was no group by lag interaction. During the single target task, patients showed abnormally increased deactivation of the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ, a key region of the ventral network. When attention demands were increased during the dual target task, patients showed overactivation of the posterior intraparietal cortex, a key dorsal network region, along with failure to deactivate TPJ. Results suggest inefficient and faulty suppression of salience-oriented processing regions, resulting in increased sensitivity to stimuli in general, and difficulty distinguishing targets from non-targets.

  20. A SAGE-based screen for genes expressed in sub-populations of neurons in the mouse dorsal root ganglion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garces Alain

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The different sensory modalities temperature, pain, touch and muscle proprioception are carried by somatosensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia. Study of this system is hampered by the lack of molecular markers for many of these neuronal sub-types. In order to detect genes expressed in sub-populations of somatosensory neurons, gene profiling was carried out on wild-type and TrkA mutant neonatal dorsal root ganglia (DRG using SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression methodology. Thermo-nociceptors constitute up to 80 % of the neurons in the DRG. In TrkA mutant DRGs, the nociceptor sub-class of sensory neurons is lost due to absence of nerve growth factor survival signaling through its receptor TrkA. Thus, comparison of wild-type and TrkA mutants allows the identification of transcripts preferentially expressed in the nociceptor or mechano-proprioceptor subclasses, respectively. Results Our comparison revealed 240 genes differentially expressed between the two tissues (P Conclusion We have identified and characterized the detailed expression patterns of three genes in the developing DRG, placing them in the context of the known major neuronal sub-types defined by molecular markers. Further analysis of differentially expressed genes in this tissue promises to extend our knowledge of the molecular diversity of different cell types and forms the basis for understanding their particular functional specificities.

  1. Differential activation of amygdala, dorsal and ventral hippocampus following an exposure to a reminder ofunderwater trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilad eRitov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recollection of emotional memories is attributed in part to the activation of the amygdala and the hippocampus. Recent hypothesis suggest a pivotal role for the ventral hippocampus in traumatic stress processing and emotional memory retrieval. Persistent re-experiencing and intrusive recollections are core symptoms in acute and posttraumatic stress disorders (ASD; PTSD. Such intrusive recollections are often triggered by reminders associated with the trauma.We examined the impact of exposure to a trauma reminder (under water trauma on the activation of the basolateral amygdala (BLA, dorsal and ventral hippocampus. Rats were exposed to underwater trauma and 24 hours later were re-exposed to the context of the trauma. Phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK was used as a marker for level of activation of these regions. Significant increase in ERK activation was found in the ventral hippocampus and BLA. Such pattern of activation was not found in animals exposed only to the trauma or in animals exposed only to the trauma reminder. Additionally, the dissociative pattern of activation of the ventral hippocampus sub-regions positively correlated with the activation of the BLA.Our findings suggest a specific pattern of neural activation during recollection of a trauma reminder, with a unique contribution of the ventral hippocampus. Measured 24 hrs after the exposure to the traumatic experience, the current findings relate to relatively early stages of traumatic memory consolidation. Understanding the neural mechanisms underlying these initial stages may contribute to developing intervention strategies that could reduce the risk of eventually developing PTSD.

  2. Repetitive and retinotopically restricted activation of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus with optogenetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Castonguay

    Full Text Available Optogenetics allows the control of cellular activity using focused delivery of light pulses. In neuroscience, optogenetic protocols have been shown to efficiently inhibit or stimulate neuronal activity with a high temporal resolution. Among the technical challenges associated with the use of optogenetics, one is the ability to target a spatially specific population of neurons in a given brain structure. To address this issue, we developed a side-illuminating optical fiber capable of delivering light to specific sites in a target nucleus with added flexibility through rotation and translation of the fiber and by varying the output light power. The designed optical fiber was tested in vivo in visual structures of ChR2-expressing transgenic mice. To assess the spatial extent of neuronal activity modulation, we took advantage of the hallmark of the visual system: its retinotopic organization. Indeed, the relative position of ganglion cells in the retina is transposed in the cellular topography of both the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN in the thalamus and the primary visual cortex (V1. The optical fiber was inserted in the LGN and by rotating it with a motor, it was possible to sequentially activate different neuronal populations within this structure. The activation of V1 neurons by LGN projections was recorded using intrinsic optical imaging. Increasing light intensity (from 1.4 to 8.9 mW/mm² led to increasing activation surfaces in V1. Optogenetic stimulation of the LGN at different translational and rotational positions was associated with different activation maps in V1. The position and/or orientation of the fiber inevitably varied across experiments, thus limiting the capacity to pool data. With the optogenetic design presented here, we demonstrate for the first time a transitory and spatially-concise activation of a deep neuronal structure. The optogenetic design presented here thus opens a promising avenue for studying the function

  3. Repetitive and retinotopically restricted activation of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus with optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castonguay, Alexandre; Thomas, Sébastien; Lesage, Frédéric; Casanova, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetics allows the control of cellular activity using focused delivery of light pulses. In neuroscience, optogenetic protocols have been shown to efficiently inhibit or stimulate neuronal activity with a high temporal resolution. Among the technical challenges associated with the use of optogenetics, one is the ability to target a spatially specific population of neurons in a given brain structure. To address this issue, we developed a side-illuminating optical fiber capable of delivering light to specific sites in a target nucleus with added flexibility through rotation and translation of the fiber and by varying the output light power. The designed optical fiber was tested in vivo in visual structures of ChR2-expressing transgenic mice. To assess the spatial extent of neuronal activity modulation, we took advantage of the hallmark of the visual system: its retinotopic organization. Indeed, the relative position of ganglion cells in the retina is transposed in the cellular topography of both the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) in the thalamus and the primary visual cortex (V1). The optical fiber was inserted in the LGN and by rotating it with a motor, it was possible to sequentially activate different neuronal populations within this structure. The activation of V1 neurons by LGN projections was recorded using intrinsic optical imaging. Increasing light intensity (from 1.4 to 8.9 mW/mm²) led to increasing activation surfaces in V1. Optogenetic stimulation of the LGN at different translational and rotational positions was associated with different activation maps in V1. The position and/or orientation of the fiber inevitably varied across experiments, thus limiting the capacity to pool data. With the optogenetic design presented here, we demonstrate for the first time a transitory and spatially-concise activation of a deep neuronal structure. The optogenetic design presented here thus opens a promising avenue for studying the function of deep brain

  4. Response to the Dorsal Anterior Gradient of EGFR Signaling in Drosophila Oogenesis Is Prepatterned by Earlier Posterior EGFR Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Fregoso Lomas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Spatially restricted epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR activity plays a central role in patterning the follicular epithelium of the Drosophila ovary. In midoogenesis, localized EGFR activation is achieved by the graded dorsal anterior localization of its ligand, Gurken. Graded EGFR activity determines multiple dorsal anterior fates along the dorsal-ventral axis but cannot explain the sharp posterior limit of this domain. Here, we show that posterior follicle cells express the T-box transcription factors Midline and H15, which render cells unable to adopt a dorsal anterior fate in response to EGFR activation. The posterior expression of Midline and H15 is itself induced in early oogenesis by posteriorly localized EGFR signaling, defining a feedback loop in which early induction of Mid and H15 confers a molecular memory that fundamentally alters the outcome of later EGFR signaling. Spatial regulation of the EGFR pathway thus occurs both through localization of the ligand and through localized regulation of the cellular response.

  5. Subpopulations of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons express active vesicular acetylcholine transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tata, Ada Maria; De Stefano, M Egle; Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; Vilaró, M Teresa; Levey, Allan I; Biagioni, Stefano

    2004-01-15

    The vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) is a transmembrane protein required, in cholinergic neurons, for selective storage of acetylcholine into synaptic vesicles. Although dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons utilize neuropeptides and amino acids for neurotransmission, we have previously demonstrated the presence of a cholinergic system. To investigate whether, in sensory neurons, the vesicular accumulation of acetylcholine relies on the same mechanisms active in classical cholinergic neurons, we investigated VAChT presence, subcellular distribution, and activity. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated the presence of VAChT mRNA and protein product in DRG neurons and in the striatum and cortex, used as positive controls. Moreover, in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry showed VAChT staining located mainly in the medium/large-sized subpopulation of the sensory neurons. A few small neurons were also faintly labeled by immunocytochemistry. In the electron microscope, immunolabeling was associated with vesicle-like elements distributed in the neuronal cytoplasm and in both myelinated and unmyelinated intraganglionic nerve fibers. Finally, [(3)H]acetylcholine active transport, evaluated either in the presence or in the absence of ATP, also demonstrated that, as previously reported, the uptake of acetylcholine by VAChT is ATP dependent. This study suggests that DRG neurons not only are able to synthesize and degrade ACh and to convey cholinergic stimuli but also are capable of accumulating and, possibly, releasing acetylcholine by the same mechanism used by the better known cholinergic neurons.

  6. In vivo characterization of colorectal and cutaneous inputs to lumbosacral dorsal horn neurons in the mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, K E; Rank, M M; Keely, S; Brichta, A M; Graham, B A; Callister, R J

    2016-03-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common symptom of inflammatory bowel disease and often persists in the absence of gut inflammation. Although the mechanisms responsible for ongoing pain are unknown, clinical and preclinical evidence suggests lumbosacral spinal cord dorsal horn neurons contribute to these symptoms. At present, we know little about the intrinsic and synaptic properties of this population of neurons in either normal or inflammed conditions. Therefore, we developed an in vivo preparation to make patch-clamp recordings from superficial dorsal horn (SDH) neurons receiving colonic inputs in naïve male mice. Recordings were made in the lumbosacral spinal cord (L6-S1) under isoflurane anesthesia. Noxious colorectal distension (CRD) was used to determine whether SDH neurons received inputs from mechanical stimulation/distension of the colon. Responses to hind paw/tail cutaneous stimulation and intrinsic and synaptic properties were also assessed, as well as action potential discharge properties. Approximately 11% of lumbosacral SDH neurons in the cohort of neurons sampled responded to CRD and a majority of these responses were subthreshold. Most CRD-responsive neurons (80%) also responded to cutaneous stimuli, compared with <50% of CRD-non-responsive neurons. Furthermore, CRD-responsive neurons had more hyperpolarized resting membrane potentials, larger rheobase currents, and reduced levels of excitatory drive, compared to CRD-non-responsive neurons. Our results demonstrate that CRD-responsive neurons can be distinguished from CRD-non-responsive neurons by several differences in their membrane properties and excitatory synaptic inputs. We also demonstrate that SDH neurons with colonic inputs show predominately subthreshold responses to CRD and exhibit a high degree of viscerosomatic convergence.

  7. Intersegmental synchronization of spontaneous activity of dorsal horn neurons in the cat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjarrez, E; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    2003-02-01

    Extracellular recordings of neuronal activity made in the lumbosacral spinal segments of the anesthetized cat have disclosed the existence of a set of neurons in Rexed's laminae III-VI that discharged in a highly synchronized manner during the occurrence of spontaneous negative cord dorsum potentials (nCDPs) and responded to stimulation of low-threshold cutaneous fibers (<1.5x T) with mono- and polysynaptic latencies. The cross-correlation between the spontaneous discharges of pairs of synchronic neurons was highest when they were close to each other, and decreased with increasing longitudinal separation. Simultaneous recordings of nCDPs from several segments in preparations with the peripheral nerves intact have disclosed the existence of synchronized spontaneous nCDPs in segments S1-L4. These potentials lasted between 25 and 70 ms and were usually larger in segments L7-L5, where they attained amplitudes between 50 and 150 micro V. The transection of the intact ipsilateral hindlimb cutaneous and muscle nerves, or the section of the dorsal columns between the L5 and L6, or between the L6 and L7 segments in preparations with already transected nerves, had very small effects on the intersegmental synchronization of the spontaneous nCDPs and on the power spectra of the cord dorsum potentials recorded in the lumbosacral enlargement. In contrast, sectioning the ipsilateral dorsal horn and the dorsolateral funiculus at these segmental levels strongly decoupled the spontaneous nCDPs generated rostrally from those generated caudally to the lesion and reduced the magnitude of the power spectra throughout the whole frequency range. These results indicate that the lumbosacral intersegmental synchronization between the spontaneous nCDPs does not require sensory inputs and is most likely mediated by intra- and intersegmental connections. It is suggested that the occurrence of spontaneous synchronized nCDPs is due to the activation of tightly coupled arrays of neurons, each

  8. Lower dorsal striatum activation in association with neuroticism during the acceptance of unfair offers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servaas, Michelle Nadine; Aleman, André; Marsman, Jan-Bernard Cornelis; Renken, Remco Jan; Riese, Harriëtte; Ormel, Johan

    2015-09-01

    Unfair treatment may evoke more negative emotions in individuals scoring higher on neuroticism, thereby possibly impacting their decision-making in these situations. To investigate the neural basis of social decision-making in these individuals, we examined interpersonal reactions to unfairness in the Ultimatum Game (UG). We measured brain activation with fMRI in 120 participants selected based on their neuroticism score, while they made decisions to accept or reject proposals that were either fair or unfair. The anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortex were more activated during the processing of unfair offers, consistent with prior UG studies. Furthermore, we found more activation in parietal and temporal regions for the two most common decisions (fair accept and unfair reject), involving areas related to perceptual decision-making. Conversely, during the decision to accept unfair offers, individuals recruited more frontal regions previously associated with decision-making and the implementation of reappraisal in the UG. High compared to low neurotic individuals did not show differential activation patterns during the proposal of unfair offers; however, they did show lower activation in the right dorsal striatum (putamen) during the acceptance of unfair offers. This brain region has been involved in the formation of stimulus-action-reward associations and motivation/arousal. In conclusion, the findings suggest that both high and low neurotic individuals recruit brain regions signaling social norm violations in response to unfair offers. However, when it comes to decision-making, it seems that neural circuitry related to reward and motivation is altered in individuals scoring higher on neuroticism, when accepting an unfair offer.

  9. Optogenetic activation of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons enhances patience for future rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Kayoko W; Miyazaki, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Kenji F; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Takahashi, Aki; Tabuchi, Sawako; Doya, Kenji

    2014-09-08

    Serotonin is a neuromodulator that is involved extensively in behavioral, affective, and cognitive functions in the brain. Previous recording studies of the midbrain dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) revealed that the activation of putative serotonin neurons correlates with the levels of behavioral arousal [1], rhythmic motor outputs [2], salient sensory stimuli [3-6], reward, and conditioned cues [5-8]. The classic theory on serotonin states that it opposes dopamine and inhibits behaviors when aversive events are predicted [9-14]. However, the therapeutic effects of serotonin signal-enhancing medications have been difficult to reconcile with this theory [15, 16]. In contrast, a more recent theory states that serotonin facilitates long-term optimal behaviors and suppresses impulsive behaviors [17-21]. To test these theories, we developed optogenetic mice that selectively express channelrhodopsin in serotonin neurons and tested how the activation of serotonergic neurons in the DRN affects animal behavior during a delayed reward task. The activation of serotonin neurons reduced the premature cessation of waiting for conditioned cues and food rewards. In reward omission trials, serotonin neuron stimulation prolonged the time animals spent waiting. This effect was observed specifically when the animal was engaged in deciding whether to keep waiting and was not due to motor inhibition. Control experiments showed that the prolonged waiting times observed with optogenetic stimulation were not due to behavioral inhibition or the reinforcing effects of serotonergic activation. These results show, for the first time, that the timed activation of serotonin neurons during waiting promotes animals' patience to wait for a delayed reward.

  10. Propofol Modulates Agonist-induced Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Subtype-1 Receptor Desensitization via a Protein Kinase Cε-dependent Pathway in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Sensory Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickley, Peter J.; Yuge, Ryo; Russell, Mary S.; Zhang, Hongyu; Sulak, Michael A.; Damron, Derek S.

    2011-01-01

    Background The activity of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype-1 (TRPV1) receptors, key nociceptive transducers in dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons, is enhanced by protein kinase C ε (PKCε) activation. The intravenous anesthetic propofol has been shown to activate PKCε. Our objectives were to examine whether propofol modulates TRPV1 function in dorsal root ganglion neurons via activation of PKCε. Methods Lumbar dorsal root ganglion neurons from wild-type and PKCε-null mice were isolated and cultured for 24 h. Intracellular free Ca2+ concentration was measured in neurons by using fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester. The duration of pain-associated behaviors was also assessed. Phosphorylation of PKCε and TRPV1 and the cellular translocation of PKCε from cytosol to membrane compartments were assessed by immunoblot analysis. Results In wild-type neurons, repeated stimulation with capsaicin (100 nM) progressively decreased the transient rise in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration. After desensitization, exposure to propofol rescued the Ca2+ response. The resensitizing effect of propofol was absent in neurons obtained from PKCε-null mice. Moreover, the capsaicin-induced desensitization of TRPV1 was markedly attenuated in the presence of propofol in neurons from wild-type mice but not in neurons from PKCε-null mice. Propofol also prolonged the duration of agonist-induced pain associated behaviors in wild-type mice. In addition, propofol increased phosphorylation of PKCε as well as TRPV1 and stimulated translocation of PKCε from cytosolic to membrane fraction. Discussion Our results indicate that propofol modulates TRPV1 sensitivity to capsaicin and that this most likely occurs through a PKCε-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1. PMID:20808213

  11. Use of fluorescently labelled calmodulins as tools to measure subcellular calmodulin activation in living dorsal root ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milikan, J M; Bolsover, S R

    2000-01-01

    We have used fluorescently labelled calmodulins to probe the activity of calmodulin in living dorsal root ganglion cells. Calmodulin labelled with the fluorophore 5-([4,6 dichlorotriazin-2yl]amino)-fluorescein (FL-CaM) does not change its fluorescence when it binds calcium, while calmodulin labelled at lysine 75 with 2-chloro-(6-(4-N,N-diethylamino-phenyl)-1,4,5-triazin-4-yl (TA-CaM), an environment-sensitive probe, increases its fluorescence when it binds calcium. We micro-injected FL-CaM or TA-CaM into rat dorsal root ganglion cells and found that both probes localise to the cell nucleus. In contrast, endogenous cellular calmodulin, in dorsal root ganglion cells as in hippocampal neurones, is predominantly cytosolic unless the neurones are depolarised, then it moves to the nucleus. FL-CaM and TA-CaM, introduced into dorsal root ganglion cells via a patch pipette, also immediately move to the nucleus, indicating that the nuclear localisation is a property of the labelled calmodulins. Although the subcellular distribution of FL-CaM and TA-CaM does not necessarily match that of endogenous calmodulin, we show that FL-CaM can be used as a control for TA-CaM when studying calmodulin activation in different cellular compartments.

  12. Modulatory effect of substance P on GABA-activated currents from rat dorsal root ganglion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-qiang SI; Zhi-qin ZHANG; Chun-xia LI; Li-feng WANG; Yun-lei YANG; Zhi-wang LI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the modulatory effect of substance P (SP) on GABA-activated current of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in rat. METHODS: The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record SP- and GABAactivated currents in neurons freshly dissociated from rat DRG neurons. Drugs were applied by rapid solution exchange. RESULTS: Application of SP (28/41, 68.5 %) and GABA (36/41, 88.2 %) could induce concentrationdependent inward current in some cells. SP-(10 μmol/L) and GABA (100 μmol/L)-activated inward currents were (244±83) pA (n=9) and (1.8±0.5) nA (n=13), respectively. The majority of GABA-activated current had obvious three processes, the peak value (Ip), the steady state (Iss) and the desensitization (Ia). The desensitization of GABAactivated current was a biphasic process, including fast and slow desensitization. However, pre-application of SP (0.001-1 μmol/L) could inhibit the GABA-activated inward current which was identified to be GABAA receptormediated current. The inhibitory effects were concentration-dependent. The inhibitory effect of SP on the peak value of GABA-activated current was more than the steady state of GABA-activated current. The inhibition of GABA-activated current by SP (0.1 μmol/L) was related to the time after application of SP, the inhibition of GABAactivated currents by SP reached the peak at about 4 min (49.8 %±7.2 %, n=7, P<0.01) and took about 12 min to get a full recovery. The inhibition of GABA-activated currents by SP was almost completely removed after blockade of PKC by H-7 with the re-patch clamp. CONCLUSION: Pre-application of SP exerts a more strong inhibitory effect on the peak value of GABA-activated current than the steady state of GABA-activated current.

  13. Modulation of physiological mirror activity with transcranial direct current stimulation over dorsal premotor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulé, Vincent; Tremblay, Sara; Lafleur, Louis-Philippe; Ferland, Marie C; Lepage, Jean-François; Théoret, Hugo

    2016-11-01

    Humans have a natural tendency towards symmetrical movements, which rely on a distributed cortical network that allows for complex unimanual movements. Studies on healthy humans using rTMS have shown that disruption of this network, and particularly the dorsal premotor cortex (dPMC), can result in increased physiological mirror movements. The aim of the present set of experiments was to further investigate the role of dPMC in restricting motor output to the contralateral hand and determine whether physiological mirror movements could be decreased in healthy individuals. Physiological mirror movements were assessed before and after transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over right and left dPMC in three conditions: bilateral, unilateral left and unilateral right stimulation. Mirror EMG activity was assessed immediately before, 0, 10 and 20 min after tDCS. Results show that physiological mirroring increased significantly in the hand ipsilateral to cathodal stimulation during bilateral stimulation of the dPMC, 10 and 20 min after stimulation compared to baseline. There was no significant modulation of physiological mirroring in the hand ipsilateral to anodal stimulation in the bilateral condition or following unilateral anodal or unilateral cathodal stimulation. The present data further implicate the dPMC in the control of unimanual hand movements and show that physiological mirroring can be increased but not decreased with dPMC tDCS.

  14. Age-related differences in twitch properties and muscle activation of the first dorsal interosseous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonathan D; Herda, Trent J; Trevino, Michael A; Sterczala, Adam J; Ciccone, Anthony B; Nicoll, Justin X

    2017-06-01

    To examine twitch force potentiation and twitch contraction duration, as well as electromyographic amplitude (EMGRMS) and motor unit mean firing rates (MFR) at targeted forces between young and old individuals in the first dorsal interosseous (FDI). Ultrasonography was used to assess muscle quality. Twenty-two young (YG) (age=22.6±2.7years) and 14 older (OD) (age=62.1±4.7years) individuals completed conditioning contractions at 10% and 50% maximal voluntary contraction, (MVC) during which EMGRMS and MFRs were assessed. Evoked twitches preceded and followed the conditioning contractions. Ultrasound images were taken to quantify muscle quality (cross-sectional area [CSA] and echo intensity [EI]). No differences were found between young and old for CSA, pre-conditioning contraction twitch force, or MFRs (P>0.05). However, OD individuals exhibited greater EI and contraction duration (PMFRs. Ultrasonography suggested age-related changes in muscle structure contributed to altered contractile properties in the OD. Greater muscle activation requirements can have negative implications on fatigue resistance at low to moderate intensities in older individuals. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Activation of neurotrophins in lumbar dorsal root probably contributes to neuropathic pain after spinal nerve ligation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Abdolreza; Rahmati, Masoud; Eslami, Rasoul; Sheibani, Vahid

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Neurotrophins (NTs) exert various effects on neuronal system. Growing evidence indicates that NTs are involved in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain. However, the exact role of these proteins in modulating nociceptive signaling requires being defined. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of spinal nerve ligation (SNL) on NTs activation in the lumbar dorsal root. Materials and Methods: Ten male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to two groups: tight ligation of the L5 spinal nerve (SNL: n=5) and Sham (n=5). In order to produce neuropathic pain, the L5 spinal nerve was tightly ligated (SNL). Then, allodynia and hyperalgesia tests were conducted weekly. After 4 weeks, tissue samples were taken from the two groups for laboratory evaluations. Here, Real-Time PCR quantity method was used for measuring NTs gene expression levels. Results: SNL resulted in a significant weight loss in the soleus muscle (Pthermal hyperalgesia thresholds (respectively, P<0.05; P<0.05). Also, NGF, NT-4, NT-3, TrkA, TrkB and TrkC expression were up-regulated following spinal nerve ligation group (respectively, P=0.025, P=0.013, P=0.001, P=0.002, P<0.001, P=001) (respectively, 4.7, 5.2, 7.5, 5.1, 7.2, 6.2 folds). Conclusion: The present study provides new evidence that neuropathic pain induced by spinal nerve ligation probably activates NTs and Trk receptors expression in DRG. However, further studies are needed to better elucidate the role of NTs in a neuropathic pain. PMID:28133521

  16. Morphine Reward Promotes Cue-Sensitive Learning: Implication of Dorsal Striatal CREB Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Baudonnat

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Different parallel neural circuits interact and may even compete to process and store information: whereas stimulus–response (S–R learning critically depends on the dorsal striatum (DS, spatial memory relies on the hippocampus (HPC. Strikingly, despite its potential importance for our understanding of addictive behaviors, the impact of drug rewards on memory systems dynamics has not been extensively studied. Here, we assessed long-term effects of drug- vs food reinforcement on the subsequent use of S–R vs spatial learning strategies and their neural substrates. Mice were trained in a Y-maze cue-guided task, during which either food or morphine injections into the ventral tegmental area (VTA were used as rewards. Although drug- and food-reinforced mice learned the Y-maze task equally well, drug-reinforced mice exhibited a preferential use of an S–R learning strategy when tested in a water-maze competition task designed to dissociate cue-based and spatial learning. This cognitive bias was associated with a persistent increase in the phosphorylated form of cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation (pCREB within the DS, and a decrease of pCREB expression in the HPC. Pharmacological inhibition of striatal PKA pathway in drug-rewarded mice limited the morphine-induced increase in levels of pCREB in DS and restored a balanced use of spatial vs cue-based learning. Our findings suggest that drug (opiate reward biases the engagement of separate memory systems toward a predominant use of the cue-dependent system via an increase in learning-related striatal pCREB activity. Persistent functional imbalance between striatal and hippocampal activity could contribute to the persistence of addictive behaviors, or counteract the efficiency of pharmacological or psychotherapeutic treatments.

  17. Active axial stress in mouse aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agianniotis, A; Rachev, A; Stergiopulos, N

    2012-07-26

    The study verifies the development of active axial stress in the wall of mouse aorta over a range of physiological loads when the smooth muscle cells are stimulated to contract. The results obtained show that the active axial stress is virtually independent of the magnitude of pressure, but depends predominately on the longitudinal stretch ratio. The dependence is non-monotonic and is similar to the active stress-stretch dependence in the circumferential direction reported in the literature. The expression for the active axial stress fitted to the experimental data shows that the maximum active stress is developed at longitudinal stretch ratio 1.81, and 1.56 is the longitudinal stretch ratio below which the stimulation does not generate active stress. The study shows that the magnitude of active axial stress is smaller than the active circumferential stress. There is need for more experimental investigations on the active response of different types of arteries from different species and pathological conditions. The results of these studies can promote building of refined constrictive models in vascular rheology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Up-regulation of miR-26a promotes neurite outgrowth and ameliorates apoptosis by inhibiting PTEN in bupivacaine injured mouse dorsal root ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Changlei; Xu, Gong; Qiu, Jinpeng; Fan, Xiushuang

    2015-08-01

    Local anesthetic of bupivacaine may inhibit neurite outgrowth and induce apoptosis in mouse dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. In this work, we intended to investigate the functional role of microRNA 26a (miR-26a) in regulating bupivacaine-induced nerve injury in DRG neurons. DRG neurons were extracted from C57BL/6 mice and cultured in vitro. Bupivacaine was applied in vitro and it induced apoptosis, inhibited neurite growth, and significantly down-regulated miR-26a gene in DRG neurons. MiR-26a mimic was then used to up-regulate miR-26a expression in DRG neurons. We found that miR-26a up-regulation promoted neurite outgrowth and reduced apoptosis in bupivacaine-injured DRG neurons. Luciferase assay and Western blot confirmed that Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) was down-stream target of miR-26a in DRG neurons. Ectopic PTEN up-regulation was then able to reverse the protective effect of miR-26a overexpression on bupivacaine-induced nerve injury in DRG neurons. Overall, this work demonstrated that miR-26a had a functional role in regulating bupivacaine-induced nerve injury in DRG neurons. Up-regulating miR-26a to suppress PTEN signaling pathway may be an effective method to protect local anesthetic-induced nerve injury in spinal cord.

  19. Three-dimensional distribution of sensory stimulation-evoked neuronal activity of spinal dorsal horn neurons analyzed by in vivo calcium imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Kazuhiko; Matsumura, Shinji; Taniguchi, Wataru; Uta, Daisuke; Furue, Hidemasa; Ito, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    The spinal dorsal horn comprises heterogeneous populations of interneurons and projection neurons, which form neuronal circuits crucial for processing of primary sensory information. Although electrophysiological analyses have uncovered sensory stimulation-evoked neuronal activity of various spinal dorsal horn neurons, monitoring these activities from large ensembles of neurons is needed to obtain a comprehensive view of the spinal dorsal horn circuitry. In the present study, we established in vivo calcium imaging of multiple spinal dorsal horn neurons by using a two-photon microscope and extracted three-dimensional neuronal activity maps of these neurons in response to cutaneous sensory stimulation. For calcium imaging, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based calcium indicator protein, Yellow Cameleon, which is insensitive to motion artifacts of living animals was introduced into spinal dorsal horn neurons by in utero electroporation. In vivo calcium imaging following pinch, brush, and heat stimulation suggests that laminar distribution of sensory stimulation-evoked neuronal activity in the spinal dorsal horn largely corresponds to that of primary afferent inputs. In addition, cutaneous pinch stimulation elicited activities of neurons in the spinal cord at least until 2 spinal segments away from the central projection field of primary sensory neurons responsible for the stimulated skin point. These results provide a clue to understand neuronal processing of sensory information in the spinal dorsal horn.

  20. Three-dimensional distribution of sensory stimulation-evoked neuronal activity of spinal dorsal horn neurons analyzed by in vivo calcium imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Nishida

    Full Text Available The spinal dorsal horn comprises heterogeneous populations of interneurons and projection neurons, which form neuronal circuits crucial for processing of primary sensory information. Although electrophysiological analyses have uncovered sensory stimulation-evoked neuronal activity of various spinal dorsal horn neurons, monitoring these activities from large ensembles of neurons is needed to obtain a comprehensive view of the spinal dorsal horn circuitry. In the present study, we established in vivo calcium imaging of multiple spinal dorsal horn neurons by using a two-photon microscope and extracted three-dimensional neuronal activity maps of these neurons in response to cutaneous sensory stimulation. For calcium imaging, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET-based calcium indicator protein, Yellow Cameleon, which is insensitive to motion artifacts of living animals was introduced into spinal dorsal horn neurons by in utero electroporation. In vivo calcium imaging following pinch, brush, and heat stimulation suggests that laminar distribution of sensory stimulation-evoked neuronal activity in the spinal dorsal horn largely corresponds to that of primary afferent inputs. In addition, cutaneous pinch stimulation elicited activities of neurons in the spinal cord at least until 2 spinal segments away from the central projection field of primary sensory neurons responsible for the stimulated skin point. These results provide a clue to understand neuronal processing of sensory information in the spinal dorsal horn.

  1. Lateral gene expression in Drosophila early embryos is supported by Grainyhead-mediated activation and tiers of dorsally-localized repression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Garcia

    Full Text Available The general consensus in the field is that limiting amounts of the transcription factor Dorsal establish dorsal boundaries of genes expressed along the dorsal-ventral (DV axis of early Drosophila embryos, while repressors establish ventral boundaries. Yet recent studies have provided evidence that repressors act to specify the dorsal boundary of intermediate neuroblasts defective (ind, a gene expressed in a stripe along the DV axis in lateral regions of the embryo. Here we show that a short 12 base pair sequence ("the A-box" present twice within the ind CRM is both necessary and sufficient to support transcriptional repression in dorsal regions of embryos. To identify binding factors, we conducted affinity chromatography using the A-box element and found a number of DNA-binding proteins and chromatin-associated factors using mass spectroscopy. Only Grainyhead (Grh, a CP2 transcription factor with a unique DNA-binding domain, was found to bind the A-box sequence. Our results suggest that Grh acts as an activator to support expression of ind, which was surprising as we identified this factor using an element that mediates dorsally-localized repression. Grh and Dorsal both contribute to ind transcriptional activation. However, another recent study found that the repressor Capicua (Cic also binds to the A-box sequence. While Cic was not identified through our A-box affinity chromatography, utilization of the same site, the A-box, by both factors Grh (activator and Cic (repressor may also support a "switch-like" response that helps to sharpen the ind dorsal boundary. Furthermore, our results also demonstrate that TGF-β signaling acts to refine ind CRM expression in an A-box independent manner in dorsal-most regions, suggesting that tiers of repression act in dorsal regions of the embryo.

  2. Lateral gene expression in Drosophila early embryos is supported by Grainyhead-mediated activation and tiers of dorsally-localized repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Mayra; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2011-01-01

    The general consensus in the field is that limiting amounts of the transcription factor Dorsal establish dorsal boundaries of genes expressed along the dorsal-ventral (DV) axis of early Drosophila embryos, while repressors establish ventral boundaries. Yet recent studies have provided evidence that repressors act to specify the dorsal boundary of intermediate neuroblasts defective (ind), a gene expressed in a stripe along the DV axis in lateral regions of the embryo. Here we show that a short 12 base pair sequence ("the A-box") present twice within the ind CRM is both necessary and sufficient to support transcriptional repression in dorsal regions of embryos. To identify binding factors, we conducted affinity chromatography using the A-box element and found a number of DNA-binding proteins and chromatin-associated factors using mass spectroscopy. Only Grainyhead (Grh), a CP2 transcription factor with a unique DNA-binding domain, was found to bind the A-box sequence. Our results suggest that Grh acts as an activator to support expression of ind, which was surprising as we identified this factor using an element that mediates dorsally-localized repression. Grh and Dorsal both contribute to ind transcriptional activation. However, another recent study found that the repressor Capicua (Cic) also binds to the A-box sequence. While Cic was not identified through our A-box affinity chromatography, utilization of the same site, the A-box, by both factors Grh (activator) and Cic (repressor) may also support a "switch-like" response that helps to sharpen the ind dorsal boundary. Furthermore, our results also demonstrate that TGF-β signaling acts to refine ind CRM expression in an A-box independent manner in dorsal-most regions, suggesting that tiers of repression act in dorsal regions of the embryo.

  3. The role of dorsal root ganglia activation and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenjun; Frost, Emma E; Begum, Farhana; Vora, Parvez; Au, Kelvin; Gong, Yuewen; MacNeil, Brian; Pillai, Prakash; Namaka, Mike

    2012-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by focal destruction of the white matter of the brain and spinal cord. The exact mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of the disease are unknown. Many studies have shown that MS is predominantly an autoimmune disease with an inflammatory phase followed by a demyelinating phase. Recent studies alongside current treatment strategies, including glatiramer acetate, have revealed a potential role for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in MS. However, the exact role of BDNF is not fully understood. We used the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of MS in adolescent female Lewis rats to identify the role of BDNF in disease progression. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cords were harvested for protein and gene expression analysis every 3 days post-disease induction (pdi) up to 15 days. We show significant increases in BDNF protein and gene expression in the DRG of EAE animals at 12 dpi, which correlates with peak neurological disability. BDNF protein expression in the spinal cord was significantly increased at 12 dpi, and maintained at 15 dpi. However, there was no significant change in mRNA levels. We show evidence for the anterograde transport of BDNF protein from the DRG to the dorsal horn of the spinal cord via the dorsal roots. Increased levels of BDNF within the DRG and spinal cord in EAE may facilitate myelin repair and neuroprotection in the CNS. The anterograde transport of DRG-derived BDNF to the spinal cord may have potential implications in facilitating central myelin repair and neuroprotection.

  4. Development of hematopoietic stem cell activity in the mouse embryo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Müller (Albrecht); A. Medvinsky; J. Strouboulis (John); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe precise time of appearance of the first hematopoietic stem cell activity in the developing mouse embryo is unknown. Recently the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region of the developing mouse embryo has been shown to possess hematopoietic colony-forming activity (CFU-S) in irradiated recipie

  5. Systematic and quantitative mRNA expression analysis of TRP channel genes at the single trigeminal and dorsal root ganglion level in mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandewauw Ine

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatosensory nerve fibres arising from cell bodies within the trigeminal ganglia (TG in the head and from a string of dorsal root ganglia (DRG located lateral to the spinal cord convey endogenous and environmental stimuli to the central nervous system. Although several members of the transient receptor potential (TRP superfamily of cation channels have been implicated in somatosensation, the expression levels of TRP channel genes in the individual sensory ganglia have never been systematically studied. Results Here, we used quantitative real-time PCR to analyse and compare mRNA expression of all TRP channels in TG and individual DRGs from 27 anatomically defined segments of the spinal cord of the mouse. At the mRNA level, 17 of the 28 TRP channel genes, TRPA1, TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPM2, TRPM3, TRPM4, TRPM5, TRPM6, TRPM7, TRPM8, TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV4, TRPML1 and TRPP2, were detectable in every tested ganglion. Notably, four TRP channels, TRPC4, TRPM4, TRPM8 and TRPV1, showed statistically significant variation in mRNA levels between DRGs from different segments, suggesting ganglion-specific regulation of TRP channel gene expression. These ganglion-to-ganglion differences in TRP channel transcript levels may contribute to the variability in sensory responses in functional studies. Conclusions We developed, compared and refined techniques to quantitatively analyse the relative mRNA expression of all TRP channel genes at the single ganglion level. This study also provides for the first time a comparative mRNA distribution profile in TG and DRG along the entire vertebral column for the mammalian TRP channel family.

  6. A combined electrophysiological and morphological study of neuropeptide Y-expressing inhibitory interneurons in the spinal dorsal horn of the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwagaki, Noboru; Ganley, Robert P; Dickie, Allen C; Polgár, Erika; Hughes, David I; Del Rio, Patricia; Revina, Yulia; Watanabe, Masahiko; Todd, Andrew J; Riddell, John S

    2016-03-01

    The spinal dorsal horn contains numerous inhibitory interneurons that control transmission of somatosensory information. Although these cells have important roles in modulating pain, we still have limited information about how they are incorporated into neuronal circuits, and this is partly due to difficulty in assigning them to functional populations. Around 15% of inhibitory interneurons in laminae I-III express neuropeptide Y (NPY), but little is known about this population. We therefore used a combined electrophysiological/morphological approach to investigate these cells in mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under control of the NPY promoter. We show that GFP is largely restricted to NPY-immunoreactive cells, although it is only expressed by a third of those in lamina I-II. Reconstructions of recorded neurons revealed that they were morphologically heterogeneous, but never islet cells. Many NPY-GFP cells (including cells in lamina III) appeared to be innervated by C fibres that lack transient receptor potential vanilloid-1, and consistent with this, we found that some lamina III NPY-immunoreactive cells were activated by mechanical noxious stimuli. Projection neurons in lamina III are densely innervated by NPY-containing axons. Our results suggest that this input originates from a small subset of NPY-expressing interneurons, with the projection cells representing only a minority of their output. Taken together with results of previous studies, our findings indicate that somatodendritic morphology is of limited value in classifying functional populations among inhibitory interneurons in the dorsal horn. Because many NPY-expressing cells respond to noxious stimuli, these are likely to have a role in attenuating pain and limiting its spread.

  7. The dorsal-related immunity factor, Dif, is a sequence-specific trans-activator of Drosophila Cecropin gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, U M; Björklund, G; Ip, Y T; Engström, Y

    1995-01-01

    A new member of the Rel family of transcription factors, the dorsal-related immunity factor, Dif, was recently cloned and suggested to be involved in regulating the immune response in Drosophila. Despite its classification as a Rel family member, the Dif cDNA-encoded product has not been proven previously to be a transcription factor. We now present evidence that the Dif gene product trans-activates the Drosophila Cecropin A1 gene in co-transfection assays. The transactivation requires a 40 b...

  8. Is avolition in schizophrenia associated with a deficit of dorsal caudate activity? A functional magnetic resonance imaging study during reward anticipation and feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Mucci, A.; D. Dima; Soricelli, A; Volpe, U.; Bucci, P.; Frangou, S.; Prinster, A.; Salvatore, M; Galderisi, S.; Maj, M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The neurobiological underpinnings of avolition in schizophrenia remain unclear. Most brain imaging research has focused on reward prediction deficit and on ventral striatum dysfunction, but findings are not consistent. In the light of accumulating evidence that both ventral striatum and dorsal caudate play a key role in motivation, we investigated ventral striatum and dorsal caudate activation during processing of reward or loss in patients with schizophrenia. METHOD: We used ...

  9. Improvement of Two-Way Active Avoidance Memory Requires Protein Kinase A Activation and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression in the Dorsal Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Datta, Subimal; Siwek, Donald F.; Huang, Max P.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that two-way active avoidance (TWAA) memory processing involves a functional interaction between the pontine wave (P wave) generator and the CA3 region of the dorsal hippocampus (DH-CA3). The present experiments examined whether the interaction between P wave generator activity and the DH-CA3 involves the intracellular protein kinase A (PKA) signaling system. In the first series of experiments, rats were subjected to a session of TWAA training followed immediately ...

  10. Activity-based anorexia has differential effects on apical dendritic branching in dorsal and ventral hippocampal CA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Tara G; Barbarich-Marsteller, Nicole C; Chan, Thomas E; Aoki, Chiye

    2014-11-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is an eating disorder to which adolescent females are particularly vulnerable. Like AN, activity-based anorexia (ABA), a rodent model of AN, results in elevation of stress hormones and has genetic links to anxiety disorders. The hippocampus plays a key role in the regulation of anxiety and responds with structural changes to hormones and stress, suggesting that it may play a role in AN. The hippocampus of ABA animals exhibits increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor and increased GABA receptor expression, but the structural effects of ABA have not been studied. We used Golgi staining of neurons to determine whether ABA in female rats during adolescence results in structural changes to the apical dendrites in hippocampal CA1 and contrasted to the effects of food restriction (FR) and exercise (EX), the environmental factors used to induce ABA. In the dorsal hippocampus, which preferentially mediates spatial learning and cognition, cells of ABA animals had less total dendritic length and fewer dendritic branches in stratum radiatum (SR) than in control (CON). In the ventral hippocampus, which preferentially mediates anxiety, ABA evoked more branching in SR than CON. In both dorsal and ventral regions, the main effect of exercise was localized to the SR while the main effect of food restriction occurred in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare. Taken together with data on spine density, these results indicate that ABA elicits pathway-specific changes in the hippocampus that may underlie the increased anxiety and reduced behavioral flexibility observed in ABA.

  11. Dissociation of dorsal hippocampal regional activation under the influence of stress in freely behaving rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes ePassecker

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Stress has deleterious effects on brain, body and behaviour in humans and animals alike. The present work investigated how 30-minute acute photic stress exposure impacts on spatial information processing in the main subregions of the dorsal hippocampal formation (CA1, CA3 and Dentate Gyrus, a brain structure prominently implicated in memory and spatial representation. Recordings were performed from spatially tuned hippocampal and dentate gyrus cells in rats while animals foraged in a square arena for food. The stress procedure induced a decrease in firing frequencies in CA1 and CA3 place cells while sparing locational characteristics. In contrast to the CA1-CA3 network, acute stress failed to induce major changes in the DG neuronal population. These data demonstrate a clear dissociation of the effects of stress on the main hippocampal sub-regions. Our findings further support the notion of decreased hippocampal excitability arising from stress in areas CA1 and CA3, but not in dentate gyrus.

  12. Reactive oxygen species mediate TNFR1 increase after TRPV1 activation in mouse DRG neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westlund Karin N

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1 is activated by low pH/protons and is well known to be involved in hyperalgesia during inflammation. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, is involved in nociceptive responses causing hyperalgesia through TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1 activation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS production is also prominently increased in inflamed tissue. The present study investigated TNFR1 receptors in primary cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons after TRPV1 activation and the involvement of ROS. C57BL/6 mice, both TRPV1 knockout and wild type, were used for immunofluorescent and live cell imaging. The L4 and L5 DRGs were dissected bilaterally and cultured overnight. TRPV1 was stimulated with capsaicin or its potent analog, resiniferatoxin. ROS production was measured with live cell imaging and TNFR1 was detected with immunofluorescence in DRG primary cultures. The TRPV1 knockout mice, TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, and ROS scavenger, N-tert-Butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN, were employed to explore the functional relationship among TRPV1, ROS and TNFR1 in these studies. Results The results demonstrate that TRPV1 activation increases TNFR1 receptors and ROS generation in primary cultures of mouse DRG neurons. Activated increases in TNFR1 receptors and ROS production are absent in TRPV1 deficient mice. The PBN blocks increases in TNFR1 and ROS production induced by capsaicin/resiniferatoxin. Conclusion TRPV1 activation increases TNFR1 in cultured mouse DRG neurons through a ROS signaling pathway, a novel sensitization mechanism in DRG neurons.

  13. Modulation of synaptic transmission from segmental afferents by spontaneous activity of dorsal horn spinal neurones in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjarrez, E; Rojas-Piloni, J G; Jimenez, I; Rudomin, P

    2000-12-01

    We examined, in the anaesthetised cat, the influence of the neuronal ensembles producing spontaneous negative cord dorsum potentials (nCDPs) on segmental pathways mediating primary afferent depolarisation (PAD) of cutaneous and group I muscle afferents and on Ia monosynaptic activation of spinal motoneurones. The intraspinal distribution of the field potentials associated with the spontaneous nCDPs indicated that the neuronal ensembles involved in the generation of these potentials were located in the dorsal horn of lumbar segments, in the same region of termination of low-threshold cutaneous afferents. During the occurrence of spontaneous nCDPs, transmission from low-threshold cutaneous afferents to second order neurones in laminae III-VI, as well as transmission along pathways mediating PAD of cutaneous and Ib afferents, was facilitated. PAD of Ia afferents was instead inhibited. Monosynaptic reflexes of flexors and extensors were facilitated during the spontaneous nCDPs. The magnitude of the facilitation was proportional to the amplitude of the 'conditioning' spontaneous nCDPs. This led to a high positive correlation between amplitude fluctuations of spontaneous nCDPs and fluctuations of monosynaptic reflexes. Stimulation of low-threshold cutaneous afferents transiently reduced the probability of occurrence of spontaneous nCDPs as well as the fluctuations of monosynaptic reflexes. It is concluded that the spontaneous nCDPs were produced by the activation of a population of dorsal horn neurones that shared the same functional pathways and involved the same set of neurones as those responding monosynaptically to stimulation of large cutaneous afferents. The spontaneous activity of these neurones was probably the main cause of the fluctuations of the monosynaptic reflexes observed under anaesthesia and could provide a dynamic linkage between segmental sensory and motor pathways.

  14. Morphological, neurochemical and electrophysiological features of parvalbumin-expressing cells: a likely source of axo-axonic inputs in the mouse spinal dorsal horn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, D I; Sikander, S; Kinnon, C M; Boyle, K A; Watanabe, M; Callister, R J; Graham, B A

    2012-01-01

    Axo-axonic synapses on the central terminals of primary afferent fibres modulate sensory input and are the anatomical correlate of presynaptic inhibition. Although several classes of primary afferents are under such inhibitory control, the origin of these presynaptic inputs in the dorsal horn is unknown. Here, we characterize the neurochemical, anatomical and electrophysiological properties of parvalbumin (PV)-expressing cells in wild-type and transgenic mice where enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) is expressed under the PV promoter. We show that most PV cells have either islet or central cell-like morphology, receive inputs from myelinated primary afferent fibres and are concentrated in laminae II inner and III. We also show that inhibitory PV terminals in lamina II inner selectively target the central terminals of myelinated afferents (∼80% of 935 PVeGFP boutons) and form axo-axonic synapses (∼75% of 71 synapses from PV boutons). Targeted whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from PVeGFP positive cells in laminae II and III showed action potential discharge was restricted to the tonic firing and initial bursting patterns (67% and 33% respectively; n = 18), and virtually all express Ih subthreshold voltage-gated currents (94%; n = 18). These neurons show higher rheobase current than non-eGFP cells but respond with high frequency action potential discharge upon activation. Together, our findings show that PV neurons in laminae II and III are a likely source of inhibitory presynaptic input on to myelinated primary afferents. Consequently PV cells are ideally placed to play an important role in the development of central sensitization and tactile allodynia. PMID:22674718

  15. Disrupted MEK/ERK signaling in the medial orbital cortex and dorsal endopiriform nuclei of the prefrontal cortex in a chronic restraint stress mouse model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Yea-Hyun; Yoon, Sang-Sun; Kim, Yu-Han; Jo, Sangmee Ahn

    2014-09-19

    Depression is one of the most prevalent mental illnesses, and causes a constant feeling of sadness and lose of interest, which often leads to suicide. Evidence suggests that depression is associated with aberrant MEK/ERK signaling. However, studies on MEK/ERK signaling in depression have only been done in a few brain regions, such as the hippocampus and mesolimbic reward pathways. Recent studies also implicate the involvement of the prefrontal cortex in depression. Thus, we examined the changes in MEK/ERK signaling in subregions of the prefrontal cortex of C57BL/6 mice by immunohistochemistry using phospho-MEK1/2 (Ser 217/221) and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) antibodies. Mice were subjected to 21 consecutive days of restraint stress (for 2h daily), and depression-like behavior was evaluated using a sociability test and tail suspension test. The antidepressant, imipramine (20mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 30min before restraint stress exposure. Chronic/repeated restraint stress produced depressive-like behavior, such as increased social avoidance in the social interaction test, and enhanced immobility time in the tail suspension test. This depressive behavior was ameliorated by imipramine. The behavioral changes well corresponded to a decrease in MEK/ERK immunoreactivity in the medial orbital (MO) cortex and dorsal endopiriform nuclei (DEn), which was averted by imipramine, but not in cingulate, prelimbic, infralimbic, and motor cortex. These results suggest that MEK/ERK signaling is disrupted in the DEn and MO subregions of the prefrontal cortex in the depressive phenotype, and that blocking a decrease in activated MEK/ERK is inherent to the antidepressant imipramine response.

  16. Sensory and spinal inhibitory dorsal midline crossing is independent of Robo3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Daniel Comer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Commissural neurons project across the midline at all levels of the central nervous system, providing bilateral communication critical for the coordination of motor activity and sensory perception. Midline crossing at the spinal ventral midline has been extensively studied and has revealed that multiple developmental lineages contribute to this commissural neuron population. Ventral midline crossing occurs in a manner dependent on Robo3 regulation of Robo/Slit signaling and the ventral commissure is absent in the spinal cord and hindbrain of Robo3 mutants. Midline crossing in the spinal cord is not limited to the ventral midline, however. While prior anatomical studies provide evidence that commissural axons also cross the midline dorsally, little is known of the genetic and molecular properties of dorsally-crossing neurons or of the mechanisms that regulate dorsal midline crossing. In this study, we describe a commissural neuron population that crosses the spinal dorsal midline during the last quarter of embryogenesis in discrete fiber bundles present throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the spinal cord. Using immunohistochemistry, neurotracing, and mouse genetics, we show that this commissural neuron population includes spinal inhibitory neurons and sensory nociceptors. While the floor plate and roof plate are dispensable for dorsal midline crossing, we show that this population depends on Robo/Slit signaling yet crosses the dorsal midline in a Robo3-independent manner. The dorsally-crossing commissural neuron population we describe suggests a substrate circuitry for pain processing in the dorsal spinal cord.

  17. Inhibitory Activity of Yokukansankachimpihange against Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Neurite Growth in Cultured Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiaki Murayama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pruritus is a major and distressing symptom of many cutaneous diseases, however, the treatment remains a challenge in the clinic. The traditional Chinese-Japanese medicine (Kampo medicine is a conservative and increasingly popular approach to treat chronic pruritus for both patients and medical providers. Yokukansankachimpihange (YKH, a Kampo formula has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of itching of atopic dermatitis in Japan although its pharmacological mechanism is unknown clearly. In an attempt to clarify its pharmacological actions, in this study, we focused on the inhibitory activity of YKH against neurite growth induced with nerve growth factor (NGF in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons because epidermal hyperinnervation is deeply related to itch sensitization. YKH showed approximately 200-fold inhibitory activity against NGF-induced neurite growth than that of neurotropin (positive control, a drug used clinically for treatment of chronic pruritus. Moreover, it also found that Uncaria hook, Bupleurum root and their chemical constituents rhynchophylline, hirsutine, and saikosaponin a, d showed inhibitory activities against NGF-induced neurite growth, suggesting they should mainly contribute to the inhibitory activity of YKH. Further study on the effects of YKH against epidermal nerve density in “itch-scratch” animal models is under investigation.

  18. Role of the Dorsal Medial Habenula in the Regulation of Voluntary Activity, Motor Function, Hedonic State, and Primary Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yun-Wei A.; Wang, Si D.; Wang, Shirong; Morton, Glenn; Zariwala, Hatim A.; de la Iglesia, Horacio O.

    2014-01-01

    The habenular complex in the epithalamus consists of distinct regions with diverse neuronal populations. Past studies have suggested a role for the habenula in voluntary exercise motivation and reinforcement of intracranial self-stimulation but have not assigned these effects to specific habenula subnuclei. Here, we have developed a genetic model in which neurons of the dorsal medial habenula (dMHb) are developmentally eliminated, via tissue-specific deletion of the transcription factor Pou4f1 (Brn3a). Mice with dMHb lesions perform poorly in motivation-based locomotor behaviors, such as voluntary wheel running and the accelerating rotarod, but show only minor abnormalities in gait and balance and exhibit normal levels of basal locomotion. These mice also show deficits in sucrose preference, but not in the forced swim test, two measures of depression-related phenotypes in rodents. We have also used Cre recombinase-mediated expression of channelrhodopsin-2 and halorhodopsin to activate dMHb neurons or silence their output in freely moving mice, respectively. Optical activation of the dMHb in vivo supports intracranial self-stimulation, showing that dMHb activity is intrinsically reinforcing, whereas optical silencing of dMHb outputs is aversive. Together, our findings demonstrate that the dMHb is involved in exercise motivation and the regulation of hedonic state, and is part of an intrinsic reinforcement circuit. PMID:25143617

  19. Role of the dorsal medial habenula in the regulation of voluntary activity, motor function, hedonic state, and primary reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yun-Wei A; Wang, Si D; Wang, Shirong; Morton, Glenn; Zariwala, Hatim A; de la Iglesia, Horacio O; Turner, Eric E

    2014-08-20

    The habenular complex in the epithalamus consists of distinct regions with diverse neuronal populations. Past studies have suggested a role for the habenula in voluntary exercise motivation and reinforcement of intracranial self-stimulation but have not assigned these effects to specific habenula subnuclei. Here, we have developed a genetic model in which neurons of the dorsal medial habenula (dMHb) are developmentally eliminated, via tissue-specific deletion of the transcription factor Pou4f1 (Brn3a). Mice with dMHb lesions perform poorly in motivation-based locomotor behaviors, such as voluntary wheel running and the accelerating rotarod, but show only minor abnormalities in gait and balance and exhibit normal levels of basal locomotion. These mice also show deficits in sucrose preference, but not in the forced swim test, two measures of depression-related phenotypes in rodents. We have also used Cre recombinase-mediated expression of channelrhodopsin-2 and halorhodopsin to activate dMHb neurons or silence their output in freely moving mice, respectively. Optical activation of the dMHb in vivo supports intracranial self-stimulation, showing that dMHb activity is intrinsically reinforcing, whereas optical silencing of dMHb outputs is aversive. Together, our findings demonstrate that the dMHb is involved in exercise motivation and the regulation of hedonic state, and is part of an intrinsic reinforcement circuit.

  20. Activation and connectivity patterns of the presupplementary and dorsal premotor areas during free improvisation of melodies and rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Manzano, Örjan; Ullén, Fredrik

    2012-10-15

    Free, i.e. non-externally cued generation of movement sequences is fundamental to human behavior. We have earlier hypothesized that the dorsal premotor cortex (PMD), which has been consistently implicated in cognitive aspects of planning and selection of spatial motor sequences may be particularly important for the free generation of spatial movement sequences, whereas the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), which shows increased activation during perception, learning and reproduction of temporal sequences, may contribute more to the generation of temporal structures. Here we test this hypothesis using fMRI and musical improvisation in professional pianists as a model behavior. We employed a 2 × 2 factorial design with the factors Melody (Specified/Improvised) and Rhythm (Specified/Improvised). The main effect analyses partly confirmed our hypothesis: there was a main effect of Melody in the PMD; the pre-SMA was present in the main effect of Rhythm, as predicted, as well as in the main effect of Melody. A psychophysiological interaction analysis of functional connectivity demonstrated that the correlation in activity between the pre-SMA and cerebellum was higher during rhythmic improvisation than during the other conditions. In summary, there were only subtle differences in activity level between the pre-SMA and PMD during improvisation, regardless of condition. Consequently, the free generation of rhythmic and melodic structures, appears to be largely integrated processes but the functional connectivity between premotor areas and other regions may change during free generation in response to sequence-specific spatiotemporal demands.

  1. Piezo Is Essential for Amiloride-Sensitive Stretch-Activated Mechanotransduction in Larval Drosophila Dorsal Bipolar Dendritic Sensory Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslak, Thomas J; Watson, Sonia; Thompson, Karen J; Shenton, Fiona C; Bewick, Guy S; Armstrong, J Douglas; Jarman, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Stretch-activated afferent neurons, such as those of mammalian muscle spindles, are essential for proprioception and motor co-ordination, but the underlying mechanisms of mechanotransduction are poorly understood. The dorsal bipolar dendritic (dbd) sensory neurons are putative stretch receptors in the Drosophila larval body wall. We have developed an in vivo protocol to obtain receptor potential recordings from intact dbd neurons in response to stretch. Receptor potential changes in dbd neurons in response to stretch showed a complex, dynamic profile with similar characteristics to those previously observed for mammalian muscle spindles. These profiles were reproduced by a general in silico model of stretch-activated neurons. This in silico model predicts an essential role for a mechanosensory cation channel (MSC) in all aspects of receptor potential generation. Using pharmacological and genetic techniques, we identified the mechanosensory channel, DmPiezo, in this functional role in dbd neurons, with TRPA1 playing a subsidiary role. We also show that rat muscle spindles exhibit a ruthenium red-sensitive current, but found no expression evidence to suggest that this corresponds to Piezo activity. In summary, we show that the dbd neuron is a stretch receptor and demonstrate that this neuron is a tractable model for investigating mechanisms of mechanotransduction.

  2. Relation between muscle and brain activity during isometric contractions of the first dorsal interosseus muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duinen, Hiske; Renken, Remco; Maurits, Natasha M.; Zijdewind, Inge

    2008-01-01

    We studied the relationship between muscle activity (electromyography, EMG), force, and brain activity during isometric contractions of the index finger, on a group and individual level. Ten subjects contracted their right or left index finger at 5, 15, 30, 50, and 70% of their maximal force. Subjec

  3. Interactions between procedural learning and cocaine exposure alter spontaneous and cortically-evoked spike activity in the dorsal striatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janie eOndracek

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that cocaine enhances gene regulation in the sensorimotor striatum associated with procedural learning in a running-wheel paradigm. Here we assessed whether cocaine produces enduring modifications of learning-related changes in striatal neuron activity, using single-unit recordings in anesthetized rats 1 day after the wheel training. Spontaneous and cortically-evoked spike activity was compared between groups treated with cocaine or vehicle immediately prior to the running-wheel training or placement in a locked wheel (control conditions. We found that wheel training in vehicle-treated rats increased the average firing rate of spontaneously active neurons without changing the relative proportion of active to quiescent cells. In contrast, in rats trained under the influence of cocaine, the proportion of spontaneously firing to quiescent cells was significantly greater than in vehicle-treated, trained rats. However, this effect was associated with a lower average firing rate in these spontaneously active cells, suggesting that training under the influence of cocaine recruited additional low-firing cells. Measures of cortically-evoked activity revealed a second interaction between cocaine treatment and wheel training, namely, a cocaine-induced decrease in spike onset latency in control rats (locked wheel. This facilitatory effect of cocaine was abolished when rats trained in the running wheel during cocaine action. These findings highlight important interactions between cocaine and procedural learning, which act to modify population firing activity and the responsiveness of striatal neurons to excitatory inputs. Moreover, these effects were found 24 hours after the training and last drug exposure indicating that cocaine exposure during the learning phase triggers long-lasting changes in synaptic plasticity in the dorsal striatum. Such changes may contribute to the transition from recreational to habitual or compulsive drug

  4. The activity in the contralateral primary motor cortex, dorsal premotor and supplementary motor area is modulated by performance gains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronen eSosnik

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There is growing experimental evidence that the engagement of different brain areas in a given motor task may change with practice, although the specific brain activity patterns underlying different stages of learning, as defined by kinematic or dynamic performance indices, are not well understood. Here we studied the change in activation in motor areas during practice on sequences of handwriting-like trajectories, connecting four target points on a digitizing table 'as rapidly and as accurately as possible' while lying inside an fMRI scanner. Analysis of the subjects' pooled kinematic and imaging data, acquired at the beginning, middle and end of the training period, revealed no correlation between the amount of activation in the contralateral M1, PM (dorsal and ventral, SMA, preSMA and PPC and the amount of practice per-se. Single trial analysis has revealed that the correlation between the amount of activation in the contralateral M1 and trial mean velocity was partially modulated by performance gains related effects, such as increased hand motion smoothness. Furthermore, it was found that the amount of activation in the contralateral preSMA increased when subjects shifted from generating straight point-to-point trajectories to their spatiotemporal concatenation into a smooth, curved trajectory. Altogether, our results indicate that the amount of activation in the contralateral M1, PMd and preSMA during the learning of movement sequences is correlated with performance gains and that high level motion features (e.g., motion smoothness may modulate, or even mask correlations between activity changes and low-level motion attributes (e.g., trial mean velocity.

  5. CULTIVOS DE CÉLULAS DE NERVIO CIÁTICO Y DE GANGLIO DE LA RAÍZ DORSAL DE RATÓN ADULTO Cell Cultures of the Sciatic Nerve and Dorsal Root Ganglia from Adult Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C OCHOA

    Full Text Available Las células de Schwann (CS son la glía de sistema nervio periférico. El diseño de prótesis nerviosas se ha centrado en la producción de CS autólogas cultivadas a partir de nervios ciáticos (NC y de ganglios de la raíz dorsal (GRD. Muy poca literatura reporta cultivo de células perineurales (CP y fibroblastos endoneurales (FE, y no son consideradas como elementos a incluir en una prótesis. En este trabajo, se describe la importancia de la microdisección del nervio ciático y de los GRD para obtener cultivos de CS, FE y CP con 98%±2 de purificación. Las CS crecen sobre diferentes soportes, con y sin mitógenos. Se obtuvo un porcentaje de CS elevado cuando se elimina el epineuro y perineuro de los NC 90%±3 y la cápsula de los GRD 94%±3 antes de la disociación enzimática, comparado a 70%±4,2 sin microdisección u 80%±3,5 sin epineuro. Los FE se adhieren preferencialmente en las primeras 24 h y 20% de suero favorece su crecimiento. En el primer sub-cultivo, son 99% CS o FE, siendo confluentes a los 6 y 8 días respectivamente. Las CP o de la cápsula de GRD no se disocian y no crecen en sub-cultivos, únicamente crecen a partir de explantes de perineuro; no forman monocapa sino una "lámina" de múltiples capas celulares. En conclusión, la microdisección del GRD y del NC y su disociación son indispensables para obtener en pocos días CS, FE y CP de animales adultos en cultivos altamente purificados.The Schwann cells (SC are glial of system peripheral nerve. The nervous prostheses are related to the production of autologous SC obtained from the peripheral nervous and from the dorsal root ganglia (DRG. There is a small amount of literature that reports perineural cells (PC and endoneural fibroblast (EF cultures as elements to take account of prostheses. In this work, the micro dissection importance is described in the sciatic nerve (SN and in the DRG to achieve SC, EF and PC culture with a purity of 98%. The SC grows up on

  6. Biological activity of the bryostatin analog Merle 23 on mouse epidermal cells and mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Jessica S; Cataisson, Christophe; Chen, Jinqiu; Herrmann, Michelle A; Petersen, Mark E; Baumann, David O; McGowan, Kevin M; Yuspa, Stuart H; Keck, Gary E; Blumberg, Peter M

    2016-12-01

    Bryostatin 1, a complex macrocyclic lactone, is the subject of multiple clinical trials for cancer chemotherapy. Although bryostatin 1 biochemically functions like the classic mouse skin tumor promoter phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to bind to and activate protein kinase C, paradoxically, it fails to induce many of the typical phorbol ester responses, including tumor promotion. Intense synthetic efforts are currently underway to develop simplified bryostatin analogs that preserve the critical functional features of bryostatin 1, including its lack of tumor promoting activity. The degree to which bryostatin analogs maintain the unique pattern of biological behavior of bryostatin 1 depends on the specific cellular system and the specific response. Merle 23 is a significantly simplified bryostatin analog that retains bryostatin like activity only to a limited extent. Here, we show that in mouse epidermal cells the activity of Merle 23 was either similar to bryostatin 1 or intermediate between bryostatin 1 and PMA, depending on the specific parameter examined. We then examined the hyperplastic and tumor promoting activity of Merle 23 on mouse skin. Merle 23 showed substantially reduced hyperplasia and was not tumor promoting at a dose comparable to that for PMA. These results suggest that there may be substantial flexibility in the design of bryostatin analogs that retain its lack of tumor promoting activity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Temporary inactivation reveals that the CA1 region of the mouse dorsal hippocampus plays an equivalent role in the retrieval of long-term object memory and spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackman, Robert W; Cohen, Sarah J; Lora, Joan C; Rios, Lisa M

    2016-09-01

    Recognition of a previously experienced item or object depends upon the successful retrieval of memory for the object. The neural mechanisms that support object recognition memory in the mammalian brain are not well understood. The rodent hippocampus plays a well-established role in spatial memory, and we previously demonstrated that temporary inactivation of the mouse hippocampus impairs object memory, as assessed with a novel object preference (NOP) test. The present studies were designed to test some remaining issues regarding the contribution of the CA1 sub-region of the mouse dorsal hippocampus to long-term object memory. Specifically, we examined whether the retrieval of spatial memory (as assessed by the Morris water maze; MWM) and object recognition memory are differentially sensitive to inactivation of the CA1 region. The current study used pre-test local microinfusion of muscimol directly into the CA1 region of dorsal hippocampus to temporarily interrupt its function during the respective retrieval phases of both behavioral tasks, in order to compare the contribution of the CA1 to object memory and spatial memory. Histological analyses revealed that local intra-CA1 injection of muscimol diffused within, and not beyond, the CA1 region of dorsal hippocampus. The degree of memory retrieval impairment induced by muscimol was comparable in the two tasks, supporting the view that object memory and spatial memory depend similarly on the CA1 region of rodent hippocampus. Further, we confirmed that the muscimol-induced impairment of CA1 function is temporary. First, mice that exhibited impaired object memory retrieval immediately after intra-CA1 muscimol, subsequently exhibited unimpaired retrieval of object memory when tested 24h later. Secondly, a cohort of mice that exhibited impaired object memory retrieval after intra-CA1 muscimol later acquired spatial memory in the MWM comparable to that of control mice. Together, these results offer further support for the

  8. Is dorsal anterior cingulate cortex activation in response to social exclusion due to expectancy violation?: An fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taishi eKawamoto

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available People are typically quite sensitive about being accepted or excluded by others. Previous studies have suggested that the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC is a key brain region involved in the detection of social exclusion. However, this region has also been shown to be sensitive to non-social expectancy violations. We often expect other people to follow an unwritten rule in which they include us as they would expect to be included, such that social exclusion likely involves some degree of expectancy violation. The present event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study sought to separate the effects of expectancy violation from those of social exclusion, such that we employed an overinclusion condition in which a player was unexpectedly overincluded in the game by the other players. With this modification, we found that the dACC and right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (rVLPFC were activated by exclusion, relative to overinclusion. In addition, we identified a negative correlation between exclusion-evoked brain activity and self-rated social pain in the rVLPFC, but not in the dACC. These findings suggest that the rVLPFC is critical for regulating social pain, whereas the dACC plays an important role in the detection of exclusion. The neurobiological basis of social exclusion is different from that of mere expectancy violation.

  9. Motor unit activity during isometric and concentric-eccentric contractions of the human first dorsal interosseus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J N; Fuglevand, A J; Walsh, M L; Bigland-Ritchie, B

    1995-08-01

    1. Motor unit activity was recorded with intramuscular fine wire electrodes during isometric, concentric, and eccentric activity in the human first dorsal interosseus muscle. Twenty-one units from 11 subjects were sampled. 2. During isotonic cycles of shortening and lengthening, 18 of 21 units were recruited during the concentric phase, increased their discharge rates as the concentric movement progressed, then decreased their discharge rate during the eccentric phase, and were derecruited. 3. A different pattern of recruitment was observed in recordings from three units. These units were recruited during the eccentric phase, at a time when other units were decreasing their discharge rate or being derecruited. In two of the units selectively recruited during the eccentric phase, it was possible to determine their isometric thresholds, which were higher than those of units exhibiting the more common pattern of recruitment. 4. For two of the three units exhibiting selective recruitment during eccentric contraction, the unit was recorded simultaneously with different pairs of recording wires separated by 5-10 mm. Each discharge of these units was detected by both electrodes, making it unlikely that movement artifact was responsible for the initiation or cessation of discharge. 5. The recruitment patterns observed suggest that changes in the type or distribution of synaptic inputs to motoneurons during movement can, in some instances, override pre- and postsynaptic factors that shape recruitment order in isometric conditions.

  10. Is dorsal anterior cingulate cortex activation in response to social exclusion due to expectancy violation? An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Taishi; Onoda, Keiichi; Nakashima, Ken'ichiro; Nittono, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Ura, Mitsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    People are typically quite sensitive about being accepted or excluded by others. Previous studies have suggested that the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) is a key brain region involved in the detection of social exclusion. However, this region has also been shown to be sensitive to non-social expectancy violations. We often expect other people to follow an unwritten rule in which they include us as they would expect to be included, such that social exclusion likely involves some degree of expectancy violation. The present event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study sought to separate the effects of expectancy violation from those of social exclusion, such that we employed an "overinclusion" condition in which a player was unexpectedly overincluded in the game by the other players. With this modification, we found that the dACC and right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (rVLPFC) were activated by exclusion, relative to overinclusion. In addition, we identified a negative correlation between exclusion-evoked brain activity and self-rated social pain in the rVLPFC, but not in the dACC. These findings suggest that the rVLPFC is critical for regulating social pain, whereas the dACC plays an important role in the detection of exclusion. The neurobiological basis of social exclusion is different from that of mere expectancy violation.

  11. Measurements of radon activity concentration in mouse tissues and organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimori, Yuu; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Akihiro; Kataoka, Takahiro; Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Mitsunobu, Fumihiro

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the biokinetics of inhaled radon, radon activity concentrations in mouse tissues and organs were determined after mice had been exposed to about 1 MBq/m(3) of radon in air. Radon activity concentrations in mouse blood and in other tissues and organs were measured with a liquid scintillation counter and with a well-type HP Ge detector, respectively. Radon activity concentration in mouse blood was 0.410 ± 0.016 Bq/g when saturated with 1 MBq/m(3) of radon activity concentration in air. In addition, average partition coefficients obtained were 0.74 ± 0.19 for liver, 0.46 ± 0.13 for muscle, 9.09 ± 0.49 for adipose tissue, and 0.22 ± 0.04 for other organs. With these results, a value of 0.414 for the blood-to-air partition coefficient was calculated by means of our physiologically based pharmacokinetic model. The time variation of radon activity concentration in mouse blood during exposure to radon was also calculated. All results are compared in detail with those found in the literature.

  12. Population activity in the human dorsal pathway predicts the accuracy of visual motion detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donner, T.H.; Siegel, M.; Oostenveld, R.; Fries, P.; Bauer, M.; Engel, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    A person's ability to detect a weak visual target stimulus varies from one viewing to the next. We tested whether the trial-to-trial fluctuations of neural population activity in the human brain are related to the fluctuations of behavioral performance in a "yes-no" visual motion-detection task. We

  13. The sensitivity of neurons with non-periodic activity to sympathetic stimulation in rat injured dorsal root ganglion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Jun YANG; San-Jue HU; Pu-Lin GONG; Jian-Hong DUAN

    2006-01-01

    Objective The relationship between firing pattern and sensitivity of neurons was studied in chronically compressed dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and the Hindmarsh-Rose (HR) neuronal model. Methods Spontaneous activities from single fibers of chronically compressed DRG neurons in rats were recorded, and divided into periodic and non-periodic firing patterns. The sensitivity of the two kinds of firing pattern neuron to sympathetic stimulation (SS)was compared. Result It was found that 27.3% of periodic firing neurons and 93.2% of non-periodic firing neurons responded to SS respectively ( periodic vs non-periodic, P < 0.01 ). The responses to SS with different stimulation time were greater non-periodic firing neurons than periodic firing neurons (P < 0.01 ). The non-periodic firing neurons obviously responded to SS. After the firing pattern of these neurons transformed to periodic firing pattern, their responses to SS disappeared or decreased obviously. The HR neuronal model exhibited a significantly greater response to perturbation in non-periodic (chaotic) firing pattern than in periodic firing pattern. Conclusion The non-periodic firing neurons with deterministic chaos are more sensitive to external stimuli than the periodic firing neurons.

  14. Tang-Luo-Ning Improves Mitochondrial Antioxidase Activity in Dorsal Root Ganglia of Diabetic Rats: A Proteomics Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanbin; Gong, Yanbin; Zhou, Hui; Xie, Peifeng; Guan, Song; Yi, Wenming

    2017-01-01

    Tang-luo-ning (TLN) is a traditional Chinese herbal recipe for treating diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). In this study, we investigated mitochondrial protein profiles in a diabetic rat model and explored the potential protective effect of TLN. Diabetic rats were established by injection of streptozocin (STZ) and divided into model, alpha lipoic acid (ALA), and TLN groups. Mitochondrial proteins were isolated from dorsal root ganglia and proteomic analysis was used to quantify the differentially expressed proteins. Tang-luo-ning mitigated STZ-induced diabetic symptoms and blood glucose level, including response time to cold or hot stimulation and nerve conductive velocity. As compared to the normal, there were 388 differentially expressed proteins in the TLN group, 445 in ALA group, and 451 in model group. As compared to the model group, there were 275 differential proteins in TLN group and 251 in ALA group. As compared to model group, mitochondrial complex III was significantly decreased, while glutathione peroxidase and peroxidase were increased in TLN group. When compared with ALA group, the mitochondrial complex III was increased, and mitochondrial complex IV was decreased in TLN group. Together, TLN should have a strong antioxidative activity, which appears to be modulated through regulation of respiratory complexes and antioxidases. PMID:28133612

  15. Separation of an anterior inducing activity from development of dorsal axial mesoderm in large-headed frog embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elinson, R P

    1991-05-01

    The body of a vertebrate arises through a series of inductive interactions in the embryo. Macrocephaly is a distortion of the body in which a disproportionate amount of tissue is devoted to the head. This syndrome occurs in certain hybrids between frog species and appears to be due to an alteration of inductive relationships. Chimeric blastulae between normal and hybrid embryos developed macrocephaly when the marginal zone was derived from the hybrid. In these cases, a large cement gland, characteristic of the hybrid head, was induced to form from normal ectoderm. When hybrid zygotes were irradiated with ultraviolet (uv) light, all dorsoanterior structures, including notochord, somites, and central nervous system, were eliminated, but the most anterior-induced structure, the cement gland, remained. Embryos without dorsoanterior structures but with cement glands were also produced by injecting germinal vesicle extracts into the blastocoel of uv-irradiated nonhybrid embryos. These results demonstrate that an anterior inducing activity can be uncoupled from development of the neural tube and dorsal axial mesoderm.

  16. [Posttrial injections of corticosterone in dorsal hippocampus of the BALB/c mouse facilitate extinction of appetitive operant conditioning in the Skinner box].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheau, J; Destrade, C; Soumireu-Mourat, B

    1982-06-28

    Corticosterone was injected bilaterally into the dorsal hippocampus of BALB/c Mice immediately after the first extinction session of an operant conditioning in a Skinner box. Compared with the control animals the Mice that received 1 or 0.1 microgram corticosterone exhibited 24 hrs. later, faster extinction of this conditioning. With a 0.01 microgram dose of corticosterone in each hippocampus we obtained an accelerated extinction during the session. These data suggest that corticosterone modulates hippocampal mechanisms involved in memory processes.

  17. Gene networks activated by specific patterns of action potentials in dorsal root ganglia neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Philip R.; Cohen, Jonathan E.; Iacobas, Dumitru A.; Iacobas, Sanda; Fields, R. Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks underlie the long-term changes in cell specification, growth of synaptic connections, and adaptation that occur throughout neonatal and postnatal life. Here we show that the transcriptional response in neurons is exquisitely sensitive to the temporal nature of action potential firing patterns. Neurons were electrically stimulated with the same number of action potentials, but with different inter-burst intervals. We found that these subtle alterations in the timing of action potential firing differentially regulates hundreds of genes, across many functional categories, through the activation or repression of distinct transcriptional networks. Our results demonstrate that the transcriptional response in neurons to environmental stimuli, coded in the pattern of action potential firing, can be very sensitive to the temporal nature of action potential delivery rather than the intensity of stimulation or the total number of action potentials delivered. These data identify temporal kinetics of action potential firing as critical components regulating intracellular signalling pathways and gene expression in neurons to extracellular cues during early development and throughout life. PMID:28256583

  18. Changes in correlation between spontaneous activity of dorsal horn neurones lead to differential recruitment of inhibitory pathways in the cat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, D; Rodríguez, E; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    2012-04-01

    Simultaneous recordings of cord dorsum potentials along the lumbo-sacral spinal cord of the anaesthetized cat revealed the occurrence of spontaneous synchronous negative (n) and negative-positive (np) cord dorsum potentials (CDPs). The npCDPs, unlike the nCDPs, appeared preferentially associated with spontaneous negative dorsal root potentials (DRPs) resulting from primary afferent depolarization. Spontaneous npCDPs recorded in preparations with intact neuroaxis or after spinalization often showed a higher correlation than the nCDPs recorded from the same pair of segments. The acute section of the sural and superficial peroneal nerves further increased the correlation between paired sets of npCDPs and reduced the correlation between the nCDPs recorded from the same pair of segments. It is concluded that the spontaneous nCDPs and npCDPs are produced by the activation of interconnected sets of dorsal horn neurones located in Rexed's laminae III–IV and bilaterally distributed along the lumbo-sacral spinal cord. Under conditions of low synchronization in the activity of this network of neurones there would be a preferential activation of the intermediate nucleus interneurones mediating Ib non-reciprocal postsynaptic inhibition. Increased synchronization in the spontaneous activity of this ensemble of dorsal horn neurones would recruit the interneurones mediating primary afferent depolarization and presynaptic inhibition and, at the same time, reduce the activation of pathways mediating Ib postsynaptic inhibition. Central control of the synchronization in the spontaneous activity of dorsal horn neurones and its modulation by cutaneous inputs is envisaged as an effective mechanism for the selection of alternative inhibitory pathways during the execution of specific motor or sensory tasks.

  19. Corticotropin-releasing factor increases GABA synaptic activity and induces inward current in 5-hydroxytryptamine dorsal raphe neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Lynn G; Freeman-Daniels, Emily; Lemos, Julia C; Nunan, John D; Lamy, Christophe; Akanwa, Adaure; Beck, Sheryl G

    2008-11-26

    Stress-related psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression involve dysfunction of the serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] system. Previous studies have found that the stress neurohormone corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) inhibits 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in vivo. The goals of the present study were to characterize the CRF receptor subtypes (CRF-R1 and -R2) and cellular mechanisms underlying CRF-5-HT interactions. Visualized whole-cell patch-clamp recording techniques in brain slices were used to measure spontaneous or evoked GABA synaptic activity in DRN neurons of rats and CRF effects on these measures. CRF-R1 and -R2-selective agonists were bath applied alone or in combination with receptor-selective antagonists. CRF increased presynaptic GABA release selectively onto 5-HT neurons, an effect mediated by the CRF-R1 receptor. CRF increased postsynaptic GABA receptor sensitivity selectively in 5-HT neurons, an effect to which both receptor subtypes contributed. CRF also had direct effects on DRN neurons, eliciting an inward current in 5-HT neurons mediated by the CRF-R2 receptor and in non-5-HT neurons mediated by the CRF-R1 receptor. These results indicate that CRF has direct membrane effects on 5-HT DRN neurons as well as indirect effects on GABAergic synaptic transmission that are mediated by distinct receptor subtypes. The inhibition of 5-HT DRN neurons by CRF in vivo may therefore be primarily an indirect effect via stimulation of inhibitory GABA synaptic transmission. These results regarding the cellular mechanisms underlying the complex interaction between CRF, 5-HT, and GABA systems could contribute to the development of novel treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders.

  20. Mirror System Activity for Action and Language Is Embedded in the Integration of Dorsal and Ventral Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbib, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    We develop the view that the involvement of mirror neurons in embodied experience grounds brain structures that underlie language, but that many other brain regions are involved. We stress the cooperation between the dorsal and ventral streams in praxis and language. Both have perceptual and motor schemas but the perceptual schemas in the dorsal…

  1. Estradiol-Induced Object Recognition Memory Consolidation Is Dependent on Activation of mTOR Signaling in the Dorsal Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortress, Ashley M.; Fan, Lu; Orr, Patrick T.; Zhao, Zaorui; Frick, Karyn M.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is an important regulator of protein synthesis and is essential for various forms of hippocampal memory. Here, we asked whether the enhancement of object recognition memory consolidation produced by dorsal hippocampal infusion of 17[Beta]-estradiol (E[subscript 2]) is dependent on mTOR…

  2. Mirror System Activity for Action and Language Is Embedded in the Integration of Dorsal and Ventral Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbib, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    We develop the view that the involvement of mirror neurons in embodied experience grounds brain structures that underlie language, but that many other brain regions are involved. We stress the cooperation between the dorsal and ventral streams in praxis and language. Both have perceptual and motor schemas but the perceptual schemas in the dorsal…

  3. 5-HT1A autoreceptor modulation of locomotor activity induced by nitric oxide in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.B. Gualda

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN is the origin of ascending serotonergic projections and is considered to be an important component of the brain circuit that mediates anxiety- and depression-related behaviors. A large fraction of DRN serotonin-positive neurons contain nitric oxide (NO. Disruption of NO-mediated neurotransmission in the DRN by NO synthase inhibitors produces anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects in rats and also induces nonspecific interference with locomotor activity. We investigated the involvement of the 5-HT1A autoreceptor in the locomotor effects induced by NO in the DRN of male Wistar rats (280-310 g, N = 9-10 per group. The NO donor 3-morpholinosylnomine hydrochloride (SIN-1, 150, and 300 nmol and the NO scavenger S-3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycine (carboxy-PTIO, 0.1-3.0 nmol were injected into the DRN of rats immediately before they were exposed to the open field for 10 min. To evaluate the involvement of the 5-HT1A receptor and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA glutamate receptor in the locomotor effects of NO, animals were pretreated with the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylaminotetralin (8-OH-DPAT, 8 nmol, the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist N-(2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl-1-piperazinyl]ethyl-N-2-pyridinyl-cyclohexanecarboxamide maleate (WAY-100635, 0.37 nmol, and the NMDA receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid (AP7, 1 nmol, followed by microinjection of SIN-1 into the DRN. SIN-1 increased the distance traveled (mean ± SEM in the open-field test (4431 ± 306.1 cm; F7,63 = 2.44, P = 0.028 and this effect was blocked by previous 8-OH-DPAT (2885 ± 490.4 cm or AP7 (3335 ± 283.5 cm administration (P < 0.05, Duncan test. These results indicate that 5-HT1A receptor activation and/or facilitation of glutamate neurotransmission can modulate the locomotor effects induced by NO in the DRN.

  4. Determination of alternative pathway of complement activity in mouse serum using rabbit erythrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, H. van; Rademaker, P.M.; Willers, J.M.N

    1980-01-01

    Rabbit, mouse and sheep erythrocytes expressing different concentrations of membrane sialic acid were used to study possible modes of activation of the alternative complement (C) pathway in mouse, human and guinea pig serum. Mouse erythrocytes activated only human serum, whereas rabbit erythrocytes

  5. Gene expression analysis of the emergence of epileptiform activity after focal injection of kainic acid into mouse hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Motti, Dario; Le Duigou, Caroline; Eugène, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    We report gene profiling data on genomic processes underlying the progression towards recurrent seizures after injection of kainic acid (KA) into the mouse hippocampus. Focal injection enabled us to separate the effects of proepileptic stimuli initiated by KA injection. Both the injected...... and contralateral hippocampus participated in the status epilepticus. However, neuronal death induced by KA treatment was restricted to the injected hippocampus, although there was some contralateral axonal degeneration. We profiled gene expression changes in dorsal and ventral regions of both the injected......-temporal changes revealed an early transcriptional response, strong immune, cell death and growth responses at 2 weeks and an activation of immune and extracellular matrix genes persisting at 6 months. Immunostaining for proteins coded by genes identified from array studies provided evidence for gliogenesis...

  6. Activation of CB1 inhibits NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 in adult mouse afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z-Y; McDowell, T; Wang, P; Alvarez, R; Gomez, T; Bjorling, D E

    2014-09-26

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-containing afferent neurons convey nociceptive signals and play an essential role in pain sensation. Exposure to nerve growth factor (NGF) rapidly increases TRPV1 activity (sensitization). In the present study, we investigated whether treatment with the selective cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) agonist arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) affects NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 in adult mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) afferent neurons. We found that CB1, NGF receptor tyrosine kinase A (trkA), and TRPV1 are present in cultured adult mouse small- to medium-sized afferent neurons and treatment with NGF (100ng/ml) for 30 min significantly increased the number of neurons that responded to capsaicin (as indicated by increased intracellular Ca(2 +) concentration). Pretreatment with the CB1 agonist ACEA (10nM) inhibited the NGF-induced response, and this effect of ACEA was reversed by a selective CB1 antagonist. Further, pretreatment with ACEA inhibited NGF-induced phosphorylation of AKT. Blocking PI3 kinase activity also attenuated the NGF-induced increase in the number of neurons that responded to capsaicin. Our results indicate that the analgesic effect of CB1 activation may in part be due to inhibition of NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 and also that the effect of CB1 activation is at least partly mediated by attenuation of NGF-induced increased PI3 signaling.

  7. Effect of Mimosa pudica (Linn.) extract on anxiety behaviour and GABAergic regulation of 5-HT neuronal activity in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayissi Mbomo, Rigobert; Gartside, Sasha; Ngo Bum, Elizabeth; Njikam, Njifutie; Okello, Ed; McQuade, Richard

    2012-04-01

    Mimosa pudica (Linn.) (M. pudica L.) is a plant used in some countries to treat anxiety and depression. In the present study we investigated the effects of an aqueous extract of M. pudica L. on mouse anxiety-like behaviour using the elevated T maze, and on regulation of dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) neuronal activity using an in-vitro mouse brain slice preparation. Acute treatment with M. pudica L. extract had an anxiolytic effect on behaviour in the elevated T maze, specifically on inhibitory avoidance behaviour. Acute application of the extract alone had no effect on the activity of DRN 5-HT neurones. However, when co-applied with the GABA(A) receptor agonist THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol), the extract enhanced the inhibitory effect of the THIP on DRN 5-HT neurones. These observed effects of M. pudica L. on both behaviour and GABA modulation of 5-HT neuronal activity are similar to the effects of diazepam, the established anxiolytic and positive modulator of the GABA(A) receptor. This study suggests that the aqueous extract of M. pudica L. contains a positive modulator of GABA(A) receptor function and provides impetus for further investigation of the neuropharmacologically active constituents of the extract.

  8. The effects of X-rays on the mitotic activity of mouse epidermis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowlton, N.P. Jr.; Hempelmann, L.H.; Hoffman, J.G.

    1949-04-19

    This report describes a simplified technique of obtaining the mitotic index of mouse skin and indicates the surprising sensitivity of the mitotic activity of mouse epithelium to the effects of x-rays.

  9. Improvement of two-way active avoidance memory requires protein kinase a activation and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the dorsal hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Subimal; Siwek, Donald F; Huang, Max P

    2009-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that two-way active avoidance (TWAA) memory processing involves a functional interaction between the pontine wave (P wave) generator and the CA3 region of the dorsal hippocampus (DH-CA3). The present experiments examined whether the interaction between P wave generator activity and the DH-CA3 involves the intracellular protein kinase A (PKA) signaling system. In the first series of experiments, rats were subjected to a session of TWAA training followed immediately by bilateral microinjection of either the PKA activation inhibitor (KT-5720) or vehicle control into the DH-CA3 and tested for TWAA memory 24 h later. The results indicated that immediate KT-5720 infusion impaired improvement of TWAA performance. Additional experiments showed that KT-5720 infusion also blocked TWAA training-induced BDNF expression in the DH-CA3. Together, these findings suggest that the PKA activation and BDNF expression in the DH-CA3 is essential for the improvement of TWAA memory.

  10. Calciumreleasing activity induced by nuclei of mouse fertilized early embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    At fertilization, repetitive transient rises of intracellular calcium concentration occur in all mammals studied so far. It has been shown that calcium rises could be induced when mouse fertilized 1-, 2-cell nuclei were transplanted into unfertilized eggs and that the reconstituted embryo could be activated. However, whether the capability of inducing calcium rises occurs in all stages of mammalian embryos remains unknown. In this study, by using the nuclear transplantation technique and measurement of intracellular calcium rises in living cells, we showed that only the nuclei from mouse fertilized 1-cell and 2-cell embryos, neither the nuclei from 4-, 8-cell and ethanol activated parthenogenetic embryos nor 2 or 3 nuclei of electrofused 4-cell stage syncytium, have calcium-releasing activity when they were transferred into unfertilized mature oocytes. Our results indicate that the calcium-releasing activity in nuclei of 1-, 2-cell embryos is produced during fertilization and exists at the special stage of fertilized early embryos. These suggested that the capacity of inducing calcium release activity in fertilized early embryos is important for normal embryonic development.

  11. Reversible modulation of SIRT1 activity in a mouse strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark-Knowles, Katherine V.; He, Xiaohong; Jardine, Karen; Coulombe, Josée; Dewar-Darch, Danielle; Caron, Annabelle Z.

    2017-01-01

    The SIRT1 protein deacetylase is reported to have a remarkably wide spectrum of biological functions affecting such varied processes as aging, cancer, metabolism, neurodegeneration and immunity. However, the SIRT1 literature is also full of contradictions. To help establish the role(s) of SIRT1 in these and other biological processes, we set out to create a mouse in which the SIRT1 activity could be toggled between on and off states by fusing the estrogen receptor ligand-binding domain (ER) to the C terminus of the SIRT1 protein. We found that the catalytic activity of the SIRT1-ER fusion protein increased 4–5 fold in cells treated with its ligand, 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen (4OHT). The 4OHT-induced activation of SIRT1-ER was due in large part to a 2 to 4-fold increase in abundance of the SIRT1-ER protein in cells in culture and in tissues in vivo. This increase is reversible and is a consequence of 4OHT-induced stabilization of the SIRT1-ER protein. Since changes in SIRT1 level or activity of 2–4 fold are frequently reported to be sufficient to affect its biological functions, this mouse should be helpful in establishing the causal relationships between SIRT1 and the diseases and processes it affects. PMID:28273169

  12. Effect of Ultrasound on Parthenogenic Activation of Mouse Oocyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Gurabi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Artificial stimulation of mouse oocyte, in the absence of sperm contribution,can induce its parthenogenic activation of oocyte. Ultrasound is one of the newest methodsfor artificial activation of mammal oocytes, and its successful utilization in pig oocyteactivation has been recently reported. Our objective was to assess the effect of ultrasoundon mouse oocyte activation.Materials and Methods: Our groups included1 control group, 3 experimental groups consistingof 1, 2 and 3 repetitions of ultrasound exposure, and 3 sham groups handled similarto experimental groups but ultrasound system was off during treatments.In experimental groups, adult female NMRI mice at the interval between pregnant mareserum gonadotropin (PMSG and human corionic gonadotropin (hCG injections, wereexposed to continuous ultrasound with 3.28 MHz frequency and peak intensity (Ipk = 355mW/cm2.Sixteen hours after injection of hCG, the mice were euthanized and their oocytes werecollected; thereafter, parthenogenic oocytes were counted.Results: Data analysis using the ANOVA test shows a significant increase in the number ofparthenogenic oocytes in mice with 3 overall exposures to ovarian ultrasound (p<0.05.A significant decrease in the number of metaphase II (MII oocytes numbers was alsoseen in mice treated with ultrasound (p<0.05.Conclusion: Ultrasound is thought to induce pores generation in oocyte membranes andprovides an easier inward transport of Ca++ into oocytes. This phenomenon can inducemeiosis resumption in immature oocytes. With increased exposure repetitions from 1 to 3times and greater Ca++ arrival, oocytes can be parthenogenetically activated.

  13. Activation of muscarinic receptors increases the activity of the granule neurones of the rat dorsal cochlear nucleus--a calcium imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kőszeghy, Áron; Vincze, János; Rusznák, Zoltán; Fu, Yuhong; Paxinos, George; Csernoch, László; Szücs, Géza

    2012-06-01

    Acetylcholine modulates the function of the cochlear nucleus via several pathways. In this study, the effects of cholinergic stimulation were studied on the cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration of granule neurones of the rat dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN). Ca(2+) transients were recorded in Oregon-Green-BAPTA 1-loaded brain slices using a calcium imaging technique. For the detection, identification and characterisation of the Ca(2+) transients, a wavelet analysis-based method was developed. Granule cells were identified on the basis of their size and localisation. The action potential-coupled character of the Ca(2+) transients of the granule cells was established by recording fluorescence changes and electrical activity simultaneously. Application of the cholinergic agonist carbamyl-choline (CCh) significantly increased the frequency of the Ca(2+) transients (from 0.37 to 6.31 min(-1), corresponding to a 17.1-fold increase; n = 89). This effect was antagonised by atropine, whereas CCh could still evoke an 8.3-fold increase of the frequency of the Ca(2+) transients when hexamethonium was present. Using immunolabelling, the expression of both type 1 and type 3 muscarinic receptors (M1 and M3 receptors, respectively) was demonstrated in the granule cells. Application of 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (an M3-specific antagonist) prevented the onset of the CCh effect, whereas an M1-specific antagonist (pirenzepine) was less effective. We conclude that cholinergic stimulation increases the activity of granule cells, mainly by acting on their M3 receptors. The modulation of the firing activity of the granule cells, in turn, may modify the firing of projection neurones and may adjust signal processing in the entire DCN.

  14. Activation of medullary dorsal horn γ isoform of protein kinase C interneurons is essential to the development of both static and dynamic facial mechanical allodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham-Dang, Nathalie; Descheemaeker, Amélie; Dallel, Radhouane; Artola, Alain

    2016-03-01

    The γ isoform of protein kinase C (PKCγ), which is concentrated in a specific class of interneurons within inner lamina II (IIi ) of the spinal dorsal horn and medullary dorsal horn (MDH), is known to be involved in the development of mechanical allodynia, a widespread and intractable symptom of inflammatory or neuropathic pain. However, although genetic and pharmacological impairment of PKCγ were shown to prevent mechanical allodynia in animal models of pain, after nerve injury or reduced inhibition, the functional consequences of PKCγ activation alone on mechanical sensitivity are still unknown. Using behavioural and anatomical approaches in the rat MDH, we tested whether PKCγ activation in naive animals is sufficient for the establishment of mechanical allodynia. Intracisternal injection of the phorbol ester, 12,13-dibutyrate concomitantly induced static as well as dynamic facial mechanical allodynia. Monitoring neuronal activity within the MDH with phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 immunoreactivity revealed that activation of both lamina I-outer lamina II and IIi -outer lamina III neurons, including lamina IIi PKCγ-expressing interneurons, was associated with the manifestation of mechanical allodynia. Phorbol ester, 12,13-dibutyrate-induced mechanical allodynia and associated neuronal activations were all prevented by inhibiting selectively segmental PKCγ with KIG31-1. Our findings suggest that PKCγ activation, without any other experimental manipulation, is sufficient for the development of static and dynamic mechanical allodynia. Lamina IIi PKCγ interneurons have been shown to be directly activated by low-threshold mechanical inputs carried by myelinated afferents. Thus, the level of PKCγ activation within PKCγ interneurons might gate the transmission of innocuous mechanical inputs to lamina I, nociceptive output neurons, thus turning touch into pain.

  15. Activity-dependent plasticity of mouse hippocampal assemblies in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eKeller

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Memory formation is associated with the generation of transiently stable neuronal assemblies. In hippocampal networks, such groups of functionally coupled neurons express highly ordered spatiotemporal activity patterns which are coordinated by local network oscillations. One of these patterns, sharp wave-ripple complexes (SPW-R, repetitively activates previously established groups of memory-encoding neurons, thereby supporting memory consolidation. This function implies that repetition of specific SPW-R induces plastic changes which render the underlying neuronal assemblies more stable. We modeled this repetitive activation in an in vitro model of SPW-R in mouse hippocampal slices. Weak electrical stimulation upstream of the CA3-CA1 networks reliably induced SPW-R of stereotypic waveform, thus representing re-activation of similar neuronal activity patterns. Frequent repetition of these patterns (100 times reduced the variance of both, evoked and spontaneous SPW-R waveforms, indicating stabilization of pre-existing assemblies. These effects were most pronounced in the CA1 subfield and depended on the timing of stimulation relative to spontaneous SPW-R. Additionally, plasticity of SPW-R was blocked by application of a NMDA receptor antagonist, suggesting a role for associative synaptic plasticity in this process. Thus, repetitive activation of specific patterns of SPW-R causes stabilization of memory-related networks.

  16. Neuronal activity in primate dorsal anterior cingulate cortex signals task conflict and predicts adjustments in pupil-linked arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebitz, R Becket; Platt, Michael L

    2015-02-04

    Whether driving a car, shopping for food, or paying attention in a classroom of boisterous teenagers, it's often hard to maintain focus on goals in the face of distraction. Brain imaging studies in humans implicate the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) in regulating the conflict between goals and distractors. Here we show that single dACC neurons signal conflict between task goals and distractors in the rhesus macaque, particularly for biologically relevant social stimuli. For some neurons, task conflict signals predicted subsequent changes in pupil size-a peripheral index of arousal linked to noradrenergic tone-associated with reduced distractor interference. dACC neurons also responded to errors, and these signals predicted adjustments in pupil size. These findings provide the first neurophysiological endorsement of the hypothesis that dACC regulates conflict, in part, via modulation of pupil-linked processes such as arousal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Preictal activity of subicular, CA1, and dentate gyrus principal neurons in the dorsal hippocampus before spontaneous seizures in a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Satoshi; Toyoda, Izumi; Thamattoor, Ajoy K; Buckmaster, Paul S

    2014-12-10

    Previous studies suggest that spontaneous seizures in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy might be preceded by increased action potential firing of hippocampal neurons. Preictal activity is potentially important because it might provide new opportunities for predicting when a seizure is about to occur and insight into how spontaneous seizures are generated. We evaluated local field potentials and unit activity of single, putative excitatory neurons in the subiculum, CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus in epileptic pilocarpine-treated rats as they experienced spontaneous seizures. Average action potential firing rates of neurons in the subiculum, CA1, and dentate gyrus, but not CA3, increased significantly and progressively beginning 2-4 min before locally recorded spontaneous seizures. In the subiculum, CA1, and dentate gyrus, but not CA3, 41-57% of neurons displayed increased preictal activity with significant consistency across multiple seizures. Much of the increased preictal firing of neurons in the subiculum and CA1 correlated with preictal theta activity, whereas preictal firing of neurons in the dentate gyrus was independent of theta. In addition, some CA1 and dentate gyrus neurons displayed reduced firing rates preictally. These results reveal that different hippocampal subregions exhibit differences in the extent and potential underlying mechanisms of preictal activity. The finding of robust and significantly consistent preictal activity of subicular, CA1, and dentate neurons in the dorsal hippocampus, despite the likelihood that many seizures initiated in other brain regions, suggests the existence of a broader neuronal network whose activity changes minutes before spontaneous seizures initiate. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3416671-17$15.00/0.

  18. Fibroblast growth factor 9 activates akt and MAPK pathways to stimulate steroidogenesis in mouse leydig cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Meng-Shao; Cheng, Yu-Sheng; Chen, Pei-Rong; Tsai, Shaw-Jenq; Huang, Bu-Miin

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) is a multifunctional polypeptide belonging to the FGF family and has functions related to bone formation, lens-fiber differentiation, nerve development, gap-junction formation and sex determination. In a previous study, we demonstrated that FGF9 stimulates the production of testosterone in mouse Leydig cells. In the present study, we used both primary mouse Leydig cells and MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells to further investigate the molecular mechanism of FGF9-stimulated steroidogenesis. Results showed that FGF9 significantly activated steroidogenesis in both mouse primary and tumor Leydig cells (psteroidogenesis in mouse Leydig cells. In conclusion, FGF9 specifically activated the Akt and ERK1/2 in normal mouse Leydig cells and the Akt, JNK and ERK1/2 in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells to stimulate steroidogenesis.

  19. Mutagenic activation reduces carcinogenic activity of ortho-aminoazotoluene for mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikova, L P; Bogdanova, L A; Kaledin, V I

    2013-03-01

    Pentachlorophenol (aromatic amine and azo stain metabolic stimulation inhibitor) reduced the hepatocarcinogenic activity of 4-aminoazobenzene and reduced that of ortho-aminoazotoluene in suckling mice. Both 4-aminoazobenzene and ortho-aminoazotoluene exhibited mutagenic activity in Ames' test in vitro on S. typhimurium TA 98 strain with activation with liver enzymes; this mutagenic activity was similarly suppressed by adding pentachlorophenol into activation medium. Induction of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes, stimulating the mutagenic activity of ortho-aminoazotoluene, suppressed its carcinogenic effect on mouse liver. Hence, ortho-aminotoluene (the initial compound), but not its mutagenic metabolites, was the direct active hepatocarcinogen for mice.

  20. Genetic expression of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebert, D W; Robinson, J R; Niwa, A; Kumaki, K; Poland, A P

    1975-04-01

    Monooxygenases require NADPH and molecular oxygen during the metabolism of numerous endogenous hydrophobic substrates and carcinogenic and toxic exogenous chemicals. The complexity of these membrane-bound multicomponent drug-metabolizing enzyme systems is reviewed. What "aryl hydrocarbon (benzo[a]pyrene) hydroxylase activity" actually represents is reviewed and discussed. At least two forms of the hydroxylase activity exist and we suggest that they are associated with different molecular species of membrane-bound CO-binding hemoprotein (i.e., they are associated with different enzyme active-sties). At least two, and probably more than two, nonlinked loci are responsible for the genetic expression of new cytochrome P1450 formation and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase induction--and the stimulation of 10 other monooxygenase "activities"--in the mouse treated with certain aromatic hydrocarbons. The individual variability of hydroxylase activity in an inbred and in a random-bred strain of micr is illustrated. The basal hydroxylase activity appears to be inherited differently from the aromatic hydrocarbon-inducible hydroxylase activity. The potent inducer 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin can stimulate increases in these hepatic monooxygenase activities and p1450 formation in so-called "nonresponsive" mice, whereas inducers such as beta-naphthoflavone and 3-methylcholanthrene cannot. Thus, the genetically "nonresponsive" micr apparently possess the structural and regulatory genes necessary for expression of these inducible monooxygenase activities and associated new formation of cytochrome P1450. We suggest that a mutation has occurred in the "nonresponsive" inbred strains that results in production of an inducer-binding receptor having a diminished affinity for aromatic hydrocarbons.

  1. 体外原代培养小鼠胚胎背根神经节细胞的神经化学特征%Neurochemical characteristics of cultured primary neurons from embryonic mouse dorsal root ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李夏青; Julie A Coffield; 王志如; 张宏

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨胚胎背根神经节(DRG)感觉神经元作为体外研究神经多肽的细胞模型之有效性.方法 采用免疫荧光及相差显微技术对30只胚胎小鼠背跟神经节细胞选择性神经多肽的分布、细胞大小及其多肽表达与细胞大小之间的关系进行观察比较.结果 培养时间达3周龄的DRG细胞主要以中小直径(30~ 20μm)的细胞为主,与成年在体脊髓DRG细胞的形态多形性特征类似;选择性神经多肽(钙调素基因相关多肽、P物质、甘丙肽和nociceptin)的表达也随着体外培养时间的延长明显增强,且从早期仅在胞体部位表达到3周时细胞周围神经突起也出现显著免疫荧光阳性.此外,体外培养达到3周时,降钙素基因相关多肽和P物质主要在体积较小的神经细胞表达,与成年鼠DRG的分布特征一致.而甘丙肽与nociceptin在不同大小DRG神经元的表达没有像降钙素基因相关多肽和P物质一样随着培养时间的延长而出现明显改变.结论 胚胎小鼠DRG神经细胞培养可以作为研究感觉神经细胞某些重要的神经多肽(降钙素基因相关多肽,P物质)在调节感觉神经细胞内相关信号转导通路中作用的体外模型.%Objective Morphological heterogeneity and the expression of neuropeptides in the cultured primary neurons of the dorsal root ganglia from the embryonic mouse were investigated. Methods Morphology and neurochemistry of cultured dorsal root ganglia ( DRG) neurons were analyzed by phase-contrast microscopy and immnuofluorensence. Results Morphological characteristics of DRG neurons with a 3-week culture period appeared similar to those observed in adult DRG neurons. The ratio of median to small sized neurons (20 - 30μm) was increased from (8. 9 ± 0. 61) % after 1 -week culture to (29.58 ±1.23)% after 3-weeks culture. The selective neuropeptides, CGRP, substance-P, galanin and nociceptin, were expressed in neuron soma from the first week of the

  2. Different impressions of other agents obtained through social interaction uniquely modulate dorsal and ventral pathway activities in the social human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Terada, Kazunori; Morita, Tomoyo; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Haji, Tomoki; Kozima, Hideki; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Yoshio; Omori, Takashi; Asada, Minoru; Naito, Eiichi

    2014-09-01

    Internal (neuronal) representations in the brain are modified by our experiences, and this phenomenon is not unique to sensory and motor systems. Here, we show that different impressions obtained through social interaction with a variety of agents uniquely modulate activity of dorsal and ventral pathways of the brain network that mediates human social behavior. We scanned brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 16 healthy volunteers when they performed a simple matching-pennies game with a human, human-like android, mechanical robot, interactive robot, and a computer. Before playing this game in the scanner, participants experienced social interactions with each opponent separately and scored their initial impressions using two questionnaires. We found that the participants perceived opponents in two mental dimensions: one represented "mind-holderness" in which participants attributed anthropomorphic impressions to some of the opponents that had mental functions, while the other dimension represented "mind-readerness" in which participants characterized opponents as intelligent. Interestingly, this "mind-readerness" dimension correlated to participants frequently changing their game tactic to prevent opponents from envisioning their strategy, and this was corroborated by increased entropy during the game. We also found that the two factors separately modulated activity in distinct social brain regions. Specifically, mind-holderness modulated activity in the dorsal aspect of the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and medial prefrontal and posterior paracingulate cortices, while mind-readerness modulated activity in the ventral aspect of TPJ and the temporal pole. These results clearly demonstrate that activity in social brain networks is modulated through pre-scanning experiences of social interaction with a variety of agents. Furthermore, our findings elucidated the existence of two distinct functional networks in the social human brain

  3. Tgfbi/Bigh3 silencing activates ERK in mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaman-Pillet, Nathalie; Oberson, Anne; Bustamante, Mauro; Tasinato, Andrea; Hummler, Edith; Schorderet, Daniel F

    2015-11-01

    BIGH3 is a secreted protein, part of the extracellular matrix where it interacts with collagen and integrins on the cell surface. BIGH3 can play opposing roles in cancer, acting as either tumor suppressor or promoter, and its mutations lead to different forms of corneal dystrophy. Although many studies have been carried out, little is known about the physiological role of BIGH3. Using the cre-loxP system, we generated a mouse model with disruption of the Bigh3 genomic locus. Bigh3 silencing did not result in any apparent phenotype modifications, the mice remained viable and fertile. We were able to determine the presence of BIGH3 in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). In the absence of BIGH3, a transient decrease in the apoptotic process involved in retina maturation was observed, leading to a transient increase in the INL thickness at P15. This phenomenon was accompanied by an increased activity of the pro-survival ERK pathway.

  4. I. Embryonal vasculature formation recapitulated in transgenic mammary tumor spheroids implanted pseudo-orthotopicly into mouse dorsal skin fold: the organoblasts concept [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1fa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Witkiewicz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Inadequate understanding of cancer biology is a problem. This work focused on cellular mechanisms of tumor vascularization. According to earlier studies, the tumor vasculature derives from host endothelial cells (angiogenesis or their precursors of bone marrow origin circulating in the blood (neo-vasculogenesis unlike in embryos. In this study, we observed the neo-vasculature form in multiple ways from local precursor cells. Recapitulation of primitive as well as advanced embryonal stages of vasculature formation followed co-implantation of avascular (in vitro cultured N202 breast tumor spheroids and homologous tissue grafts into mouse dorsal skin chambers. Ultrastructural and immunocytochemical analysis of tissue sections exposed the interactions between the tumor and the graft tissue stem cells. It revealed details of vasculature morphogenesis not seen before in either tumors or embryos. A gradual increase in complexity of the vascular morphogenesis at the tumor site reflected a range of steps in ontogenic evolution of the differentiating cells. Malignant- and surgical injury repair-related tissue growth prompted local cells to initiate extramedullar erythropoiesis and vascular patterning. The new findings included: interdependence between the extramedullar hematopoiesis and assembly of new vessels (both from the locally differentiating precursors; nucleo-cytoplasmic conversion (karyolysis as the mechanism of erythroblast enucleation; the role of megakaryocytes and platelets in vascular pattern formation before emergence of endothelial cells; lineage relationships between hematopoietic and endothelial cells; the role of extracellular calmyrin in tissue morphogenesis; and calmyrite, a new ultrastructural entity associated with anaerobic energy metabolism. The central role of the extramedullar erythropoiesis in the formation of new vasculature (blood and vessels emerged here as part of the tissue building process including the lymphatic system

  5. Differential oligonucleotide activity in cell culture versus mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickstrom, E; Tyson, F L

    1997-01-01

    The usual course of drug discovery begins with the demonstration of compound activity in cells and, usually, a lower level of activity in animals. Successive rounds of drug design may result in a compound with sufficient activity in animals to justify clinical trials. The basic endpoints of therapeutic oligonucleotide experiments include target antigen reduction, target messenger reduction and inhibition of transformed cell proliferation or viral replication. However, one should expect oligonucleotides to exhibit pleiotropic behaviour, as do all other drugs. In an animal oligonucleotides will necessarily bind to and dissociate from all macromolecules encountered in the blood, in tissues, on cell surfaces and within cellular compartments. Contrary to expectations, oligonucleotides designed to be complementary to certain transcripts have sometimes been found moderately effective in cell-free extracts, more effective in cell culture and most effective in animal models. If greater potency against standard endpoints is reported in mouse models than was observed in cell culture, critical examination must consider alternate modes of action in animals that may not apply in cell culture. This counterintuitive paradox will be examined, based on studies of Ha-ras expression in bladder cancer, Ki-ras expression in pancreatic cancer, erbB2 expression in ovarian cancer and c-myc expression in B cell lymphoma.

  6. Genetic Elimination of GABAergic Neurotransmission Reveals Two Distinct Pacemakers for Spontaneous Waves of Activity in the Developing Mouse Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Curtis R.; Weir, Keiko; Scott, Adina; Moen, Samantha P.; Barger, Zeke; Folch, Albert; Hevner, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Many structures of the mammalian CNS generate propagating waves of electrical activity early in development. These waves are essential to CNS development, mediating a variety of developmental processes, such as axonal outgrowth and pathfinding, synaptogenesis, and the maturation of ion channel and receptor properties. In the mouse cerebral cortex, waves of activity occur between embryonic day 18 and postnatal day 8 and originate in pacemaker circuits in the septal nucleus and the piriform cortex. Here we show that genetic knock-out of the major synthetic enzyme for GABA, GAD67, selectively eliminates the picrotoxin-sensitive fraction of these waves. The waves that remain in the GAD67 knock-out have a much higher probability of propagating into the dorsal neocortex, as do the picrotoxin-resistant fraction of waves in controls. Field potential recordings at the point of wave initiation reveal different electrical signatures for GABAergic and glutamatergic waves. These data indicate that: (1) there are separate GABAergic and glutamatergic pacemaker circuits within the piriform cortex, each of which can initiate waves of activity; (2) the glutamatergic pacemaker initiates waves that preferentially propagate into the neocortex; and (3) the initial appearance of the glutamatergic pacemaker does not require preceding GABAergic waves. In the absence of GAD67, the electrical activity underlying glutamatergic waves shows greatly increased tendency to burst, indicating that GABAergic inputs inhibit the glutamatergic pacemaker, even at stages when GABAergic pacemaker circuitry can itself initiate waves. PMID:24623764

  7. Indirubin Treatment of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Mastitis in a Mouse Model and Activity in Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jin-Lun; Liu, Yu-Hui; Peng, Yong-Chong; Ge, Pan; He, Chen-Fei; Liu, Chang; Chen, Ying-Yu; Guo, Ai-Zhen; Hu, Chang-Min

    2017-01-01

    Indirubin is a Chinese medicine extracted from indigo and known to be effective for treating chronic myelogenous leukemia, neoplasia, and inflammatory disease. This study evaluated the in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of indirubin in a lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced mouse mastitis model. The indirubin mechanism and targets were evaluated in vitro in mouse mammary epithelial cells. In the mouse model, indirubin significantly attenuated the severity of inflammatory lesions, edema, inflammatory hyperemia, milk stasis and local tissue necrosis, and neutrophil infiltration. Indirubin significantly decreased myeloperoxidase activity and downregulated the production of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-6 caused by LPS. In vitro, indirubin inhibited LPS-stimulated expression of proinflammatory cytokines in a dose-dependent manner. It also downregulated LPS-induced toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression and inhibited phosphorylation of LPS-induced nuclear transcription factor-kappa B (NF-κB) P65 protein and inhibitor of kappa B. In addition to its effect on the NF-κB signaling pathway, indirubin suppressed the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling by inhibiting phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), P38, and c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). Indirubin improved LPS-induced mouse mastitis by suppressing TLR4 and downstream NF-κB and MAPK pathway inflammatory signals and might be a potential treatment of mastitis and other inflammatory diseases.

  8. Effects of spinal and peripheral nerve lesions on the intersegmental synchronization of the spontaneous activity of dorsal horn neurons in the cat lumbosacral spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, C A; Chávez, D; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    2004-05-06

    In the anesthetized and paralyzed cat, spontaneous negative cord dorsum potentials (nCDPs) appeared synchronously in the L3 to S1 segments, both ipsi- and contralaterally. The acute section of both the intact sural and the superficial peroneal nerve increased the variability of the spontaneous nCDPs without affecting their intersegmental coupling. On the other hand, the synchronization between the spontaneous nCDPs recorded in segments L5-L6 was strongly reduced following an interposed lesion of the left (ipsilateral) dorsolateral spinal quadrant and it was almost completely abolished by an additional lesion of the contralateral dorsolateral quadrant at the same level. Our observations support the existence of a system of spontaneously active dorsal horn neurons that is bilaterally distributed along the lumbosacral segments and affects, in a synchronized and organized manner, impulse transmission along many reflex pathways, including those mediating presynaptic inhibition.

  9. Dietary omega-3 deficiency reduces BDNF content and activation NMDA receptor and Fyn in dorsal hippocampus: implications on persistence of long-term memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Simone Azevedo; de Siqueira, Letícia V; Müller, Alexandre P; Oses, Jean P; Quatrim, Andreia; Emanuelli, Tatiana; Vinadé, Lúcia; Souza, Diogo O; Moreira, Júlia D

    2014-07-01

    Omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids are important for adequate brain function and cognition. The aim of the present study was to evaluate how n-3 fatty acids influence the persistence of long-term memory (LTM) in an aversive memory task and to explore the putative mechanism involved. Female rats received isocaloric diets that included n-3 (n-3 group) or not (D group). The adult litters were subjected to an inhibitory avoidance task (0.7 mA, 1.0 seconds foot shock) to elicit persistent LTM. Twelve hours after the training session, the fatty acid profile and the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) content of the dorsal hippocampus were assessed. In addition, we measured the activation of the NR2B subunit of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and the SRC family protein Fyn. Despite pronounced learning in both groups, the persistence of LTM was abolished in the D group 7 days after the training session. We also observed that the D group presented reductions in hippocampal DHA (22:6 n-3) and BDNF content. Twelve hours after the training session, the D group showed decreased NR2B and Fyn phosphorylation in the dorsal hippocampus, with no change in the total content of these proteins. Further, there was a decrease in the interaction of Fyn with NR2B in the D group, as observed by co-immunoprecipitation. Taken together, these data suggest that n-3 fatty acids influence the persistence of LTM by maintaining adequate levels of DHA and BDNF as well as by influencing the activation of NR2B and Fyn during the period of memory formation.

  10. Dexamethasone rapidly increases GABA release in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus via retrograde messenger-mediated enhancement of TRPV1 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei V Derbenev

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids influence vagal parasympathetic output to the viscera via mechanisms that include modulation of neural circuitry in the dorsal vagal complex, a principal autonomic regulatory center. Glucocorticoids can modulate synaptic neurotransmitter release elsewhere in the brain by inducing release of retrograde signalling molecules. We tested the hypothesis that the glucocorticoid agonist dexamethasone (DEX modulates GABA release in the rat dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings revealed that DEX (1-10 µM rapidly (i.e. within three minutes increased the frequency of tetrodotoxin-resistant, miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs in 67% of DMV neurons recorded in acutely prepared slices. Glutamate-mediated mEPSCs were also enhanced by DEX (10 µM, and blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors reduced the DEX effect on mIPSC frequency. Antagonists of type I or II corticosteroid receptors blocked the effect of DEX on mIPSCs. The effect was mimicked by application of the membrane-impermeant BSA-conjugated DEX, and intracellular blockade of G protein function with GDP βS in the recorded cell prevented the effect of DEX. The enhancement of GABA release was blocked by the TRPV1 antagonists, 5'-iodoresiniferatoxin or capsazepine, but was not altered by the cannabinoid type 1 receptor antagonist AM251. The DEX effect was prevented by blocking fatty acid amide hydrolysis or by inhibiting anandamide transport, implicating involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the response. These findings indicate that DEX induces an enhancement of GABA release in the DMV, which is mediated by activation of TRPV1 receptors on afferent terminals. The effect is likely induced by anandamide or other 'endovanilloid', suggesting activation of a local retrograde signal originating from DMV neurons to enhance synaptic inhibition locally in response to glucocorticoids.

  11. The effects of rises in external K+ on the hyperpolarization-activated cation current Ih in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU ZhengQing; WU WenJie; ZHOU YuFen

    2009-01-01

    The effects of rises in external K+ (Kent) were examined on the hyperpolarization-activated cation current (4,) in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons using the whole-cell patch clamp technique.The results showed that Kext,increased Ih in a certain concentration and voltage-dependent manner.At the basal Kext level (4 mmol/L),4,had a maximal amplitude of 1085 ±340 pA which was enhanced by~45% and~92% at 8 and 16 mmol/L Kext,respectively.The midpoint activation voltage was significantly shifted from-98 mV in the hyperpolarizing direction by 8 and 12 mV at 8 and 16 mmol/L Kext,respectively with alteration of the activation course of Ih.The short time constants of activation became longer with the increasing amplitude of the command potential upon rises in Kext.The long time constants became shorter.The reversal potentials were shifted in the positive direction without significant alterations upon rises in Kext.According to the functional role of 4,,Kext increased Ih resulting in an enhanced neuronal excitability,which might produce activation potential abnormality and perhaps neuropathic pain involved.

  12. The effects of rises in external K~+ on the hyperpolarization-activated cation current I_h in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The effects of rises in external K+(Kext) were examined on the hyperpolarization-activated cation current(Ih) in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons using the whole-cell patch clamp technique.The results showed that Kext increased Ih in a certain concentration and voltage-dependent manner.At the basal Kext level(4 mmol/L),Ih had a maximal amplitude of 1085 ± 340 pA which was enhanced by ~45% and ~92% at 8 and 16 mmol/L Kext,respectively.The midpoint activation voltage was significantly shifted from -98 mV in the hyperpolarizing direction by 8 and 12 mV at 8 and 16 mmol/L Kext,respectively with alteration of the activation course of Ih.The short time constants of activation became longer with the increasing amplitude of the command potential upon rises in Kext.The long time constants became shorter.The reversal potentials were shifted in the positive direction without significant alterations upon rises in Kext.According to the functional role of Ih,Kext increased Ih,resulting in an enhanced neuronal excitability,which might produce activation potential abnormality and perhaps neuropathic pain involved.

  13. Depression of presynaptic excitation by the activation of vanilloid receptor 1 in the rat spinal dorsal horn revealed by optical imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikeda Hiroshi

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, we show that capsaicin (CAP depresses primary afferent fiber terminal excitability by acting on vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1 channels of primary afferent fibers in adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP- and temperature-dependent manner using two optical imaging methods. First, transverse slices of spinal cord were stained with a voltage-sensitive dye and the net excitation in the spinal dorsal horn was recorded. Prolonged treatment (>20 min with the TRPV1 channel agonist, CAP, resulted in a long-lasting inhibition of the net excitation evoked by single-pulse stimulation of C fiber-activating strength. A shorter application of CAP inhibited the excitation in a concentration-dependent manner and the inhibition was reversed within several minutes. This inhibition was Ca++-dependent, was antagonized by the TRPV1 channel antagonist, capsazepine (CPZ, and the P2X and P2Y antagonist, suramin, and was facilitated by the P2Y agonist, uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP. The inhibition of excitation was unaffected by bicuculline and strychnine, antagonists of GABAA and glycine receptors, respectively. Raising the perfusate temperature to 39°C from 27°C inhibited the excitation (-3%/°C. This depressant effect was antagonized by CPZ and suramin, but not by the P2X antagonist, 2', 3'-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate (TNP-ATP. Second, in order to record the presynaptic excitation exclusively, we stained the primary afferent fibers anterogradely from the dorsal root. CAP application and a temperature increase from 27°C to 33°C depressed the presynaptic excitation, and CPZ antagonized these effects. Thus, this study showed that presynaptic excitability is modulated by CAP, temperature, and ATP under physiological conditions, and explains the reported central actions of CAP. These results may have clinical importance, especially for the control of pain.

  14. Acquisition of Pavlovian fear conditioning using β-adrenoceptor activation of the dorsal premammillary nucleus as an unconditioned stimulus to mimic live predator-threat exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavesi, Eloisa; Canteras, Newton S; Carobrez, Antônio P

    2011-04-01

    In the present work, we sought to mimic the internal state changes in response to a predator threat by pharmacologically stimulating the brain circuit involved in mediating predator fear responses, and explored whether this stimulation would be a valuable unconditioned stimulus (US) in an olfactory fear conditioning paradigm (OFC). The dorsal premammillary nucleus (PMd) is a key brain structure in the neural processing of anti-predatory defensive behavior and has also been shown to mediate the acquisition and expression of anti-predatory contextual conditioning fear responses. Rats were conditioned by pairing the US, which was an intra-PMd microinjection of isoproterenol (ISO; β-adrenoceptor agonist), with amyl acetate odor-the conditioned stimulus (CS). ISO (10 and 40 nmol) induced the acquisition of the OFC and the second-order association by activation of β-1 receptors in the PMd. Furthermore, similar to what had been found for contextual conditioning to a predator threat, atenolol (β-1 receptor antagonist) in the PMd also impaired the acquisition and expression of OFC promoted by ISO. Considering the strong glutamatergic projections from the PMd to the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG), we tested how the glutamatergic blockade of the dPAG would interfere with the OFC induced by ISO. Accordingly, microinjections of NMDA receptor antagonist (AP5, 6 nmol) into the dPAG were able to block both the acquisition, and partially, the expression of the OFC. In conclusion, we have found that PMd β-1 adrenergic stimulation is a good model to mimic predatory threat-induced internal state changes, and works as a US able to mobilize the same systems involved in the acquisition and expression of predator-related contextual conditioning.

  15. Transcriptional activation of the mouse obese (ob) gene by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, C S; Mandrup, S; MacDougald, O A

    1996-01-01

    Like other adipocyte genes that are transcriptionally activated by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha) during preadipocyte differentiation, expression of the mouse obese (ob) gene is immediately preceded by the expression of C/EBP alpha. While the 5' flanking region of the mouse ob...

  16. Acute morphine activates satellite glial cells and up-regulates IL-1β in dorsal root ganglia in mice via matrix metalloprotease-9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Temugin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of spinal cord glial cells such as microglia and astrocytes has been shown to regulate chronic opioid-induced antinociceptive tolerance and hyperalgesia, due to spinal up-regulation of the proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β. Matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9 has been implicated in IL-1β activation in neuropathic pain. However, it is unclear whether acute opioid treatment can activate glial cells in the peripheral nervous system. We examined acute morphine-induced activation of satellite glial cells (SGCs and up-regulation of IL-1β in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs, and further investigated the involvement of MMP-9 in these opioid-induced peripheral changes. Results Subcutaneous morphine injection (10 mg/kg induced robust peripheral glial responses, as evidenced by increased GFAP expression in DRGs but not in spinal cords. The acute morphine-induced GFAP expression is transient, peaking at 2 h and declining after 3 h. Acute morphine treatment also increased IL-1β immunoreactivity in SGCs and IL-1β activation in DRGs. MMP-9 and GFAP are expressed in DRG neurons and SGCs, respectively. Confocal analysis revealed a close proximity of MMP-9 and GFAP immunostaining. Importantly, morphine-induced DRG up-regulation of GFAP expression and IL-1β activation was abolished after Mmp9 deletion or naloxone pre-treatment. Finally, intrathecal injections of IL-1β-selective siRNA not only reduced DRG IL-1β expression but also prolonged acute morphine-induced analgesia. Conclusions Acute morphine induces opioid receptors- and MMP-9-dependent up-regulation of GFAP expression and IL-1β activation in SGCs of DRGs. MMP-9 could mask and shorten morphine analgesia via peripheral neuron-glial interactions. Targeting peripheral glial activation might prolong acute opioid analgesia.

  17. Pupil size signals mental effort deployed during multiple object tracking and predicts brain activity in the dorsal attention network and the locus coeruleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnæs, Dag; Sneve, Markus Handal; Espeseth, Thomas; Endestad, Tor; van de Pavert, Steven Harry Pieter; Laeng, Bruno

    2014-04-01

    Attentional effort relates to the allocation of limited-capacity attentional resources to meet current task demands and involves the activation of top-down attentional systems in the brain. Pupillometry is a sensitive measure of this intensity aspect of top-down attentional control. Studies relate pupillary changes in response to cognitive processing to activity in the locus coeruleus (LC), which is the main hub of the brain's noradrenergic system and it is thought to modulate the operations of the brain's attentional systems. In the present study, participants performed a visual divided attention task known as multiple object tracking (MOT) while their pupil sizes were recorded by use of an infrared eye tracker and then were tested again with the same paradigm while brain activity was recorded using fMRI. We hypothesized that the individual pupil dilations, as an index of individual differences in mental effort, as originally proposed by Kahneman (1973), would be a better predictor of LC activity than the number of tracked objects during MOT. The current results support our hypothesis, since we observed pupil-related activity in the LC. Moreover, the changes in the pupil correlated with activity in the superior colliculus and the right thalamus, as well as cortical activity in the dorsal attention network, which previous studies have shown to be strongly activated during visual tracking of multiple targets. Follow-up pupillometric analyses of the MOT task in the same individuals also revealed that individual differences to cognitive load can be remarkably stable over a lag of several years. To our knowledge this is the first study using pupil dilations as an index of attentional effort in the MOT task and also relating these to functional changes in the brain that directly implicate the LC-NE system in the allocation of processing resources.

  18. Dysfunctional activation and brain network profiles in youth with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A focus on the dorsal anterior cingulate during working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav A. Diwadkar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain network dysfunction is emerging as a central biomarker of interest in psychiatry, in large part because psychiatric conditions are increasingly seen as disconnection syndromes. Understanding dysfunctional brain network profiles in task-active states provides important information on network engagement in an experimental context. This in turn may be predictive of many of the cognitive and behavioral deficits associated with complex behavioral phenotypes. Here we investigated brain network profiles in youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, contrasting them with a group of age-comparable controls. Network interactions were assessed during simple working memory: in particular, we focused on the modulation by the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC of cortical, striatal and thalamic regions. The focus on the dACC was motivated by its hypothesized role in the pathophysiology of OCD. However, its task-active network signatures have not been investigated before. Network interactions were modeled using psychophysiological interaction, a simple directional model of seed to target brain interactions. Our results indicate that OCD is characterized by significantly increased dACC modulation of cortical, striatal and thalamic targets during working memory, and that this aberrant increase in OCD patients is maintained regardless of working memory demand. The results constitute compelling evidence of dysfunctional brain network interactions in OCD and suggest that these interactions may be related to a combination of network inefficiencies and dACC hyper-activity that has been associated with the phenotype.

  19. Determining auditory-evoked activities from multiple cells in layer 1 of the dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus of mice by in vivo calcium imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tetsufumi; Hirose, Junichi; Murase, Kazuyuki; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    2014-11-24

    Layer 1 of the dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus (DCIC) is distinguished from other layers by its cytoarchitecture and fiber connections. However, the information of the sound types represented in layer 1 of the DCIC remains unclear because placing electrodes on such thin structures is challenging. In this study, we utilized in vivo calcium imaging to assess auditory-evoked activities in multiple cells in layer 1 of DCIC and to characterize sound stimuli producing strong activity. Most cells examined showed strong responses to broad-band noise and low-frequency tone bursts of high sound intensity. In some cases, we successfully obtained frequency response areas, which are receptive fields to tone frequencies and intensities, and ~30% of these showed V-shape tunings. This is the first systematic study to record auditory responses of cells in layer 1 of DCIC. These results indicate that cells in this area are selective to tones with low frequency, implying the importance of such auditory information in the neural circuitry of layer 1 of DCIC.

  20. Activation of matrix metalloproteinase in dorsal hippocampus drives improvement in spatial working memory after intra-VTA nicotine infusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Hui; Zheng, Guo-qing; Wang, Xiaona; Sun, Yanyun; Liu, Yushan; Weaver, John Michael; Shen, Xianzhi; Liu, Wenlan; Jin, Xinchun

    2015-10-01

    The hippocampus receives dopaminergic projections from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra. These inputs appear to provide a modulatory signal that influences hippocampus-dependent behaviors. Enhancements in working memory performance have been previously reported following acute smoking/nicotine exposure. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated the effects of nicotine on spatial working memory (SWM) and the mechanisms involved. Delayed alternation T-maze task was used to assess SWM. In situ and gel gelatin zymography were used to detect matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in SWM. Systemic or local (intra-VTA) administration of nicotine significantly improves SWM, which was accompanied by increased MMP-9 activity in dorsal hippocampus (dHPC). Intra-dHPC administration of MMP inhibitor FN-439 abolished the memory enhancement induced by intra-VTA nicotine infusion. FN-439 had no effect on locomotor behavior. Our data suggest that intra-VTA nicotine infusion activates MMP-9 in dHPC to improve SWM in rats.

  1. [Anti-angiogenic activities of UFT and its metabolites, GHB and GBL, in the dorsal air sac (DAS) model in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaki, Y; Yonekura, K; Chikahisa, L; Okabe, S; Hashimoto, A; Miyadera, K; Aoyagi, K; Yamada, Y

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the effects of UFT and its metabolites, GHB and GBL, on angiogenesis induced by tumor cells in a dorsal air sac (DAS) assay in mice. Five tumor cell lines (murine renal carcinoma; RENCA, human gastric cancer; 4-1ST, human small-cell lung carcinoma; LX-1, and human colon carcinoma; DLD-1, KM-20C) were used in the DAS assay. In this model, UFT demonstrated a significant anti-angiogenic activity in a dose-dependent manner while 5-FU (19 mg/kg/day) and 5'-DFUR (200 mg/kg/day) were less effective. Moreover, tegafur (FT), a component of UFT, and gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL), in vivo metabolites of UFT, inhibited angiogenesis induced by RENCA cells. The inhibitory effects of 5-FU, GHB, and GBL on angiogenesis were increased with administration by continuous infusion, providing a suitable pharmacokinetic profile. These results suggest that GHB and GBL are involved in the expression of anti-angiogenic activity of UFT.

  2. Interferon regulatory factor 1 is required for mouse Gbp gene activation by gamma interferon.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Full-scale transcriptional activation of the mouse Gbp genes by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) requires protein synthesis in embryonic fibroblasts. Although the Gbp-1 and Gbp-2 promoters contain binding sites for transcription factors Stat1 and IFN regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1), deletion analysis revealed that the Stat1 binding site is dispensable for IFN-gamma inducibility of Gbp promoter constructs in transfected fibroblasts. However, activation of the mouse Gbp promoter by IFN-gamma requires t...

  3. Activation of 5-HT(2C) receptors in the dorsal periaqueductal gray increases antinociception in mice exposed to the elevated plus-maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Daniela; Nunes-de-Souza, Ricardo Luiz; Canto-de-Souza, Azair

    2012-11-01

    Several findings have pointed to the role of the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) serotonin 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A-C) receptor subtypes in the modulation of defensive behavior in animals exposed to the elevated plus-maze (EPM). Besides displaying anxiety-like behavior, rodents also exhibit antinociception in the EPM. This study investigated the effects of intra-dPAG injections of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2B/2C) receptor ligands on EPM-induced antinociception in mice. Male Swiss mice received 0.1 μl intra-dPAG injections of vehicle, 5.6 and 10 nmol of 8-OHDPAT, a 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist (Experiment 1), or 0.01, 0.03 and 0.1 nmol of mCPP, a 5-HT(2B/2C) receptor agonist (Experiment 2). Five minutes later, each mouse received an intraperitoneal injection of 0.6% acetic acid (0.1 ml/10 g body weight; nociceptive stimulus) and was individually confined in the open (OA) or enclosed (EA) arms of the EPM for 5 min, during which the number of abdominal writhes induced by the acetic acid was recorded. While intra-dPAG injection of 8-OHDPAT did not change open-arm antinociception (OAA), mCPP (0.01 nmol) enhanced it. Combined injections of ketanserin (10 nmol/0.1 μl), a 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor antagonist, and 0.01 nmol of mCPP (Experiment 3), selectively and completely blocked the OAA enhancement induced by mCPP. Although intra-dPAG injection of mCPP (0.01 nmol) also produced antinociception in EA-confined mice (Experiment 2), this effect was not confirmed in Experiment 3. Moreover, no other compound changed the nociceptive response in EA-confined animals. These results suggest that the 5-HT(2C) receptors located within the PAG play a role in this type of environmentally induced pain inhibition in mice.

  4. Effect of computer mouse gain and visual demand on mouse clicking performance and muscle activation in a young and elderly group of experienced computer users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandfeld, Jesper; Jensen, Bente R.

    2005-01-01

    The present study evaluated the specific effects of motor demand and visual demands on the ability to control motor output in terms of performance and muscle activation. Young and elderly subjects performed multidirectional pointing tasks with the computer mouse. Three levels of mouse gain...... was only to a minor degree influenced by mouse gain (and target sizes) indicating that stability of the forearm/hand is of significance during computer mouse control. The study has implications for ergonomists, pointing device manufacturers and software developers....

  5. Curcumin exerts antinociceptive effects by inhibiting the activation of astrocytes in spinal dorsal horn and the intracellular extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway in rat model of chronic constriction injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Feng-tao; LIANG Jiang-jun; LIU Ling; CAO Ming-hui; LI Feng

    2013-01-01

    Background Activation of glial cells and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway play an important role in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain.Curcumin can alleviate the symptom of inflammatory pain by inhibiting the production and release of interleukin and tumor necrosis factor.However,whether curcumin affects neuropathic pain induced by nerve injury and the possible mechanism involved are still unknown.This study investigated the effects of tolerable doses of curcumin on the activation of astrocytes and ERK signaling in the spinal dorsal horn in rat model of neuropathic pain.Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups:a control (sham operated) group,and chronic constriction injury groups (to induce neuropathic pain) that were either untreated or treated with curcumin.Thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia thresholds were measured.The distribution and morphological changes of astrocytes were observed by immunofluorescence.Western blotting was used to detect changes in the expression of glial flbrillary acid protein (GFAP) and phosphorylated ERK.Results Injured rats showed obvious mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia.The number of GFAP-positive astrocytes,and the fluorescence intensity of GFAP were significantly increased in the spinal dorsal horn of injured compared with control rats.The soma of astrocytes also appeared hypertrophied in injured animals.Expression of GFAP and phosphorylated ERK was also significantly increased in the spinal dorsal hom of injured compared with control rats.Curcumin reduced the injury-induced thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia,the increase in the fluorescence intensity of GFAP and the hypertrophy of astrocytic soma,activation of GFAP and phosphorylation of ERK in the spinal dorsal horn.Conclusions Curcumin can markedly alleviate nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats.The analgesic effect of curcumin may be attributed to its inhibition of

  6. PKCε-dependent potentiation of TTX-resistant Nav1.8 current by neurokinin-1 receptor activation in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Zhi-Qi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substance P (SP, which mainly exists in a subtype of small-diameter dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons, is an important signal molecule in pain processing in the spinal cord. Our previous results have proved the expression of SP receptor neurokinin-1 (NK-1 on DRG neurons and its interaction with transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 receptor. Results In this study we investigated the effect of NK-1 receptor agonist on Nav1.8, a tetrodotoxin (TTX-resistant sodium channel, in rat small-diameter DRG neurons employing whole-cell patch clamp recordings. NK-1 agonist [Sar9, Met(O211]-substance P (Sar-SP significantly enhanced the Nav1.8 currents in a subgroup of small-diameter DRG neurons under both the normal and inflammatory situation, and the enhancement was blocked by NK-1 antagonist Win51708 and protein kinase C (PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide (BIM, but not the protein kinase A (PKA inhibitor H89. In particular, the inhibitor of PKCε, a PKC isoform, completely blocked this effect. Under current clamp model, Sar-SP reduced the amount of current required to evoke action potentials and increased the firing rate in a subgroup of DRG neurons. Conclusion These data suggest that activation of NK-1 receptor potentiates Nav1.8 sodium current via PKCε-dependent signaling pathway, probably participating in the generation of inflammatory hyperalgesia.

  7. Inhibition of cystathionine β-synthetase suppresses sodium channel activities of dorsal root ganglion neurons of rats with lumbar disc herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jun; Hu, Shufen; Zou, Kang; Xu, Min; Wang, Qianliang; Miao, Xiuhua; Yu, Shan Ping; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pain in lumbar disc herniation (LDH) remains poorly understood. We have recently demonstrated that voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were sensitized in a rat model of LDH. However, the detailed molecular mechanism for sensitization of VGSCs remains largely unknown. This study was designed to examine roles of the endogenous hydrogen sulfide synthesizing enzyme cystathionine β-synthetase (CBS) in sensitization of VGSCs in a previously validated rat model of LDH. Here we showed that inhibition of CBS activity by O-(Carboxymethyl) hydroxylamine hemihydrochloride (AOAA) significantly attenuated pain hypersensitivity in LDH rats. Administration of AOAA also reduced neuronal hyperexcitability, suppressed the sodium current density, and right-shifted the V1/2 of the inactivation curve, of hindpaw innervating DRG neurons, which is retrogradely labeled by DiI. In vitro incubation of AOAA did not alter the excitability of acutely isolated DRG neurons. Furthermore, CBS was colocalized with NaV1.7 and NaV1.8 in hindpaw-innervating DRG neurons. Treatment of AOAA markedly suppressed expression of NaV1.7 and NaV1.8 in DRGs of LDH rats. These data suggest that targeting the CBS-H2S signaling at the DRG level might represent a novel therapeutic strategy for chronic pain relief in patients with LDH. PMID:27905525

  8. The panicolytic-like effect of fluoxetine in the elevated T-maze is mediated by serotonin-induced activation of endogenous opioids in the dorsal periaqueductal grey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncon, Camila M; Biesdorf, Carla; Santana, Rosangela G; Zangrossi, Hélio; Graeff, Frederico G; Audi, Elisabeth A

    2012-04-01

    Serotonin (5-HT), opioids and the dorsal periaqueductal grey (DPAG) have been implicated in the pathophysiology of panic disorder. In order to study 5-HT-opioid interaction, the opioid antagonist naloxone was injected either systemically (1 mg/kg, i.p.) or intra-DPAG (0.2 μg/0.5 μL) to assess its interference with the effect of chronic fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, i.p., daily for 21 days) or of intra-DPAG 5-HT (8 μg/0.5 μL). Drug effects were measured in the one-escape task of the rat elevated T-maze, an animal model of panic. Pretreatment with systemic naloxone antagonized the lengthening of escape latency caused by chronic fluoxetine, considered a panicolytic-like effect that parallels the drug's therapeutic response in the clinics. Pretreatment with naloxone injected intra-DPAG antagonized both the panicolytic effect of chronic fluoxetine as well as that of 5-HT injected intra-DPAG. Neither the performance of the inhibitory avoidance task in the elevated T-maze, a model of generalized anxiety nor locomotion measured in a circular arena was affected by the above drug treatments. These results indicate that the panicolytic effect of fluoxetine is mediated by endogenous opioids that are activated by 5-HT in the DPAG. They also allow reconciliation between the serotonergic and opioidergic hypotheses of panic disorder pathophysiology.

  9. Function of dorsal fins in bamboo shark during steady swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Anabela; Wilga, Cheryl A

    2013-08-01

    To gain insight into the function of the dorsal fins in white-spotted bamboo sharks (Orectolobiformes: Hemiscyillidae) during steady swimming, data on three-dimensional kinematics and electromyographic recordings were collected. Bamboo sharks were induced to swim at 0.5 and 0.75 body lengths per second in a laminar flow tank. Displacement, lag and angles were analyzed from high-speed video images. Onset, offset, duration, duty cycle and asynchrony index were calculated from three muscle implants on each side of each dorsal fin. The dorsal fins were displaced more laterally than the undulating body. In addition, the dorsal tips had larger lateral displacement than the trailing edges. Increased speed was accompanied by an increase in tail beat frequency with constant tail beat amplitude. However, lateral displacement of the fins and duration of muscle bursts remained relatively constant with increased speed. The range of lateral motion was greater for the second dorsal fin (mean 33.3°) than for the first dorsal fin (mean 28.4°). Bending within the fin was greater for the second dorsal fin (mean 43.8°) than for the first dorsal fin (mean 30.8°). Muscle onset and offset among implants on the same side of each dorsal fin was similar. Three-dimensional conformation of the dorsal fins was caused by interactions between muscle activity, material properties, and incident flow. Alternating bilateral activity occurred in both dorsal fins, further supporting the active role of these hydrofoils in thrust production during steady swimming. The dorsal fins in bamboo sharks are capable of thrust production during steady swimming and do not appear to function as stabilizing structures.

  10. Small-fiber neuropathy Nav1.8 mutation shifts activation to hyperpolarized potentials and increases excitability of dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianying; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Peng; Gerrits, Monique M; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Bekelaar, Kim; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Faber, Catharina G; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2013-08-28

    Idiopathic small-fiber neuropathy (I-SFN), clinically characterized by burning pain in distal extremities and autonomic dysfunction, is a disorder of small-caliber nerve fibers of unknown etiology with limited treatment options. Functional variants of voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7, encoded by SCN9A, have been identified in approximately one-third of I-SFN patients. These variants render dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons hyperexcitable. Sodium channel Nav1.8, encoded by SCN10A, is preferentially expressed in small-diameter DRG neurons, and produces most of the current underlying the upstroke of action potentials in these neurons. We previously demonstrated two functional variants of Nav1.8 that either enhance ramp current or shift activation in a hyperpolarizing direction, and render DRG neurons hyperexcitable, in I-SFN patients with no mutations of SCN9A. We have now evaluated additional I-SFN patients with no mutations in SCN9A, and report a novel I-SFN-related Nav1.8 mutation I1706V in a patient with painful I-SFN. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings in small DRG neurons demonstrate that the mutation hyperpolarizes activation and the response to slow ramp depolarizations. However, it decreases fractional channels resistant to fast inactivation and reduces persistent currents. Current-clamp studies reveal that mutant channels decrease current threshold and increase the firing frequency of evoked action potentials within small DRG neurons. These observations suggest that the effects of this mutation on activation and ramp current are dominant over the reduced persistent current, and show that these pro-excitatory gating changes confer hyperexcitability on peripheral sensory neurons, which may contribute to pain in this individual with I-SFN.

  11. Microinfusion of the non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine) into the dorsal hippocampus of wistar rats does not affect latent inhibition and prepulse inhibition, but increases startle reaction and locomotor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W N; Bast, T; Feldon, J

    2000-01-01

    Latent inhibition (the retarded conditioning to a stimulus following its repeated non-reinforced pre-exposure) and prepulse inhibition (the reduction in the startle response to an intense acoustic stimulus when this stimulus is immediately preceded by a prepulse) reflect cognitive and sensorimotor gating processes, respectively, and are deficient in schizophrenic patients. The disruption of latent inhibition and prepulse inhibition in the rat is used as an animal model for the attentional deficits associated with schizophrenia. The present study tested the extent to which latent inhibition and prepulse inhibition, startle reaction and locomotor activity in the open field were affected by infusing the non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine) into the dorsal hippocampus of Wistar rats. We used the same dose of MK-801 (6.25microg/0.5microl per side) previously found to be effective in the disruption of prepulse inhibition when infused into the dorsal hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats [Bakshi V. P. and Geyer M. A. (1998) J. Neurosci. 18, 8394-8401; Bakshi V. P. and Geyer M. A. (1999) Neuroscience 92, 113-121]. Bilateral infusion of MK-801 into the dorsal hippocampus did not disrupt latent inhibition. Furthermore, in contrast to previous studies, we failed to find a significant disruption of prepulse inhibition after MK-801 infusion into the dorsal hippocampus, although MK-801 infusion was effective in increasing the startle amplitude as well as locomotor activity in an open field. From our results, we suggest that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated processes within the dorsal hippocampus are not necessary for the normal maintenance of the attentional processes reflected by latent inhibition and prepulse inhibition.

  12. Suppression of activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated gene expression in the dorsal striatum attenuates extinction of cocaine-seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearing, Matthew C; Schwendt, Marek; McGinty, Jacqueline F

    2011-07-01

    The caudate putamen (CPu) has been implicated in habit learning and neuroadaptive changes that mediate the compulsive nature of drug-seeking following chronic cocaine self-administration. Re-exposure to an operant chamber previously associated with cocaine, but not yoked-saline, increases activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated (Arc) gene mRNA expression within the dorsolateral (dl) CPu following prolonged abstinence. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that antisense gene knockdown of Arc within the dlCPu would alter cocaine-seeking. Initial studies showed that a single infusion of Arc antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) into the dlCPu significantly attenuated the induction of Arc mRNA and Arc protein by a single cocaine exposure (20 mg/kg i.p.) compared to scrambled-ODN-infused controls. In cocaine self-administering rats, infusion of Arc antisense ODN into the dlCPu 3 h prior to a test of context-driven drug-seeking significantly attenuated Arc protein induction, but failed to alter responding during testing, suggesting striatal Arc does not facilitate context-induced drug-seeking following prolonged abstinence. However, Arc antisense ODN infusion blunted the decrease in responding during subsequent 1-h extinction tests 24 and 48 h later. Following re-exposure to a cocaine-paired context, surface expression of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor GluR1 was significantly reduced whereas GluR2 was significantly increased in the dlCPu, independent of Arc antisense ODN infusion. Together, these findings indicate an important role for Arc in neuroadaptations within brain regions responsible for drug-seeking after abstinence and direct attention to changes occurring within striatal circuitry that are necessary to break down the habitual behaviour that leads to relapse.

  13. Apposition to endometrial epithelial cells activates mouse blastocysts for implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruane, Peter T; Berneau, Stéphane C; Koeck, Rebekka; Watts, Jessica; Kimber, Susan J; Brison, Daniel R; Westwood, Melissa; Aplin, John D

    2017-09-01

    How do interactions between blastocyst-stage embryos and endometrial epithelial cells regulate the early stages of implantation in an in vitro model? Mouse blastocyst apposition with human endometrial epithelial cells initiates trophectoderm differentiation to trophoblast, which goes on to breach the endometrial epithelium. In vitro models using mouse blastocysts and human endometrial cell lines have proven invaluable in the molecular characterisation of embryo attachment to endometrial epithelium at the onset of implantation. Genes involved in embryonic breaching of the endometrial epithelium have not been investigated in such in vitro models. This study used an established in vitro model of implantation to examine cellular and molecular interactions during blastocyst attachment to endometrial epithelial cells. Mouse blastocysts developed from embryonic day (E) 1.5 in vitro were hatched and co-cultured with confluent human endometrial adenocarcinoma-derived Ishikawa cells in serum-free medium. A scale of attachment stability based on blastocyst oscillation upon agitation was devised. Blastocysts were monitored for 48 h to establish the kinetics of implantation, and optical sectioning using fluorescence microscopy revealed attachment and invasion interfaces. Quantitative PCR was used to determine blastocyst gene expression. Data from a total of 680 mouse blastocysts are reported, with 3-6 experimental replicates. T-test and ANOVA analyses established statistical significance at P cells over the first 24 h of co-culture, with intermediate and stable attachment occurring from 28 h (E5.5 + 4 h) in a hormone-independent manner. Attached embryos fixed after 48 h (E6.5) frequently exhibited outgrowths, characterised morphologically and with antibody markers as trophoblast giant cells (TGCs), which had breached the Ishikawa cell layer. Beginning co-culture at E5.5 also resulted in intermediate and stable attachment from E5.5 + 4 h; however, these embryos did not go on to

  14. Dissociation of the dorsal-cactus complex and phosphorylation of the dorsal protein correlate with the nuclear localization of dorsal

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    The formation of dorsal-ventral polarity in Drosophila requires the asymmetric nuclear localization of the dorsal protein along the D/V axis. This process is regulated by the action of the dorsal group genes and cactus. We show that dorsal and cactus are both phosphoproteins that form a stable cytoplasmic complex, and that the cactus protein is stabilized by its interaction with dorsal. The dorsal-cactus complex dissociates when dorsal is targeted to the nucleus. While the phosphorylation of ...

  15. Beta-arrestin2 and c-Src regulate the constitutive activity and recycling of mu opioid receptors in dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walwyn, Wendy; Evans, Christopher J; Hales, Tim G

    2007-05-09

    Beta-arrestins bind to agonist-activated G-protein-coupled receptors regulating signaling events and initiating endocytosis. In beta-arrestin2-/- (beta arr2-/-) mice, a complex phenotype is observed that includes altered sensitivity to morphine. However, little is known of how beta-arrestin2 affects mu receptor signaling. We investigated the coupling of mu receptors to voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) in beta arr2+/+ and beta arr2-/- dorsal root ganglion neurons. A lack of beta-arrestin2 reduced the maximum inhibition of VGCCs by morphine and DAMGO (D-Ala2-N-Me-Phe4-glycol5-enkephalin) without affecting agonist potency, the onset of receptor desensitization, or the functional contribution of N-type VGCCs. The reduction in inhibition was accompanied by increased naltrexone-sensitive constitutive inhibitory coupling of mu receptors to VGCCs. Agonist-independent mu receptor inhibitory coupling was insensitive to CTAP (Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2), a neutral antagonist that inhibited the inverse agonist action of naltrexone. These functional changes were accompanied by diminished constitutive recycling and increased cell-surface mu receptor expression in beta arr2-/- compared with beta arr2+/+ neurons. Such changes could not be explained by the classical role of beta-arrestins in agonist-induced endocytosis. The localization of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Src appeared disrupted in beta arr2-/- neurons, and there was reduced activation of c-Src by DAMGO. Using the Src inhibitor PP2 [4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine], we demonstrated that defective Src signaling mimics the beta arr2-/- cellular phenotype of reduced mu agonist efficacy, increased constitutive mu receptor activity, and reduced constitutive recycling. We propose that beta-arrestin2 is required to target c-Src to constitutively active mu receptors, resulting in their internalization, providing another dimension to the complex role of beta-arrestin2 and c-Src in G

  16. Electromagnetic radiation (Wi-Fi) and epilepsy induce calcium entry and apoptosis through activation of TRPV1 channel in hippocampus and dorsal root ganglion of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazizadeh, Vahid; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2014-09-01

    Incidence rates of epilepsy and use of Wi-Fi worldwide have been increasing. TRPV1 is a Ca(2+) permeable and non-selective channel, gated by noxious heat, oxidative stress and capsaicin (CAP). The hyperthermia and oxidant effects of Wi-Fi may induce apoptosis and Ca(2+) entry through activation of TRPV1 channel in epilepsy. Therefore, we tested the effects of Wi-Fi (2.45 GHz) exposure on Ca(2+) influx, oxidative stress and apoptosis through TRPV1 channel in the murine dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and hippocampus of pentylentetrazol (PTZ)-induced epileptic rats. Rats in the present study were divided into two groups as controls and PTZ. The PTZ groups were divided into two subgroups namely PTZ + Wi-Fi and PTZ + Wi-Fi + capsazepine (CPZ). The hippocampal and DRG neurons were freshly isolated from the rats. The DRG and hippocampus in PTZ + Wi-Fi and PTZ + Wi-Fi + CPZ groups were exposed to Wi-Fi for 1 hour before CAP stimulation. The cytosolic free Ca(2+), reactive oxygen species production, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, caspase-3 and -9 values in hippocampus were higher in the PTZ group than in the control although cell viability values decreased. The Wi-Fi exposure induced additional effects on the cytosolic Ca(2+) increase. However, pretreatment of the neurons with CPZ, results in a protection against epilepsy-induced Ca(2+) influx, apoptosis and oxidative damages. In results of whole cell patch-clamp experiments, treatment of DRG with Ca(2+) channel antagonists [thapsigargin, verapamil + diltiazem, 2-APB, MK-801] indicated that Wi-Fi exposure induced Ca(2+) influx via the TRPV1 channels. In conclusion, epilepsy and Wi-Fi in our experimental model is involved in Ca(2+) influx and oxidative stress-induced hippocampal and DRG death through activation of TRPV1 channels, and negative modulation of this channel activity by CPZ pretreatment may account for the neuroprotective activity against oxidative stress.

  17. Encouraging overweight students with intellectual disability to actively perform walking activity using an air mouse combined with preferred stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Jui; Chang, Man-Ling; Shih, Ching-Hsiang

    2016-08-01

    This study continues the research on using an air mouse as a physical activity detector. An air mouse is embedded with a MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) gyro sensor, which can measure even the slightest movement in the air. The air mouse was strapped to one of each participant's calves to detect walking activity. This study was conducted to evaluate whether four students with intellectual disability who were overweight and disliked exercising could be motivated to engage in walking actively by linking the target response with preferred stimulation. Single-subject research with ABAB design was adopted in this study. The experimental data showed substantial increases in the participants' target responses (i.e. the performance of the activity of walking) during the intervention phases compared to the baseline phases. The practical and developmental implications of the findings are discussed.

  18. Differential effects of triclosan on the activation of mouse and human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuanfeng; Wu, Qiangen; Beland, Frederick A; Ge, Peter; Manjanatha, Mugimane G; Fang, Jia-Long

    2014-11-18

    Triclosan is an anti-bacterial agent used in many personal care products, household items, medical devices, and clinical settings. Liver tumors occur in mice exposed to triclosan, a response attributed to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) activation; however, the effects of triclosan on mouse and human PPARα have not been fully evaluated. We compared the effects of triclosan on mouse and human PPARα using PPARα reporter assays and on downstream events of PPARα activation using mouse hepatoma Hepa1c1c7 cells and human hepatoma HepG2 cells. PPARα transcriptional activity was increased by triclosan in a mouse PPARα reporter assay and decreased in a human PPARα reporter assay. Concentrations of triclosan inhibiting 50% cell growth were similar in both human and mouse hepatoma cells. Western blotting analysis showed that triclosan increased acyl-coenzyme A oxidase (ACOX1), a PPARα target, in Hepa1c1c7 cells but decreased the level in HepG2 cells. Treatment of Hepa1c1c7 cells with triclosan enhanced DNA synthesis and suppressed transforming growth factor beta-mediated apoptosis. This did not occur in HepG2 cells. These data demonstrate that triclosan had similar cytotoxicity in Hepa1c1c7 and HepG2 cells, but differential effects on the activation of PPARα, the expression of ACOX1, and downstream events including DNA synthesis and apoptosis.

  19. Agenesis of the dorsal pancreas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lale Pasaoglu; Murat Vural; Hatice Gul Hatipoglu; Gokce Tereklioglu; Suha Koparal

    2008-01-01

    Developmental anomalies of the pancreas have been reported but dorsal pancreatic agenesis is an extremely rare entity. We report an asymptomatic 62-year-old woman with complete agenesis of the dorsal pancreas.Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a normal pancreatic head, but pancreatic body and tail were not visualized. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)findings were similar to CT. At magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), the major pancreatic duct was short and the dorsal pancreatic duct was not visualized. The final diagnosis was dorsal pancreatic agenesis.

  20. Direct excitation of deep dorsal horn neurones in the rat spinal cord by the activation of postsynaptic P2X receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiokawa, Hiroaki; Nakatsuka, Terumasa; Furue, Hidemasa; Tsuda, Makoto; Katafuchi, Toshihiko; Inoue, Kazuhide; Yoshimura, Megumu

    2006-06-15

    ATP mediates somatosensory transmission in the spinal cord through the activation of P2X receptors. Nonetheless, the functional significance of postsynaptic P2X receptors in spinal deep dorsal horn neurones is still not yet well understood. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we investigated whether the activation of postsynaptic P2X receptors can modulate the synaptic transmission in lamina V neurones of postnatal day (P) 9-12 spinal cord slices. At a holding potential of -70 mV, ATPgammaS (100 microm), a nonhydrolysable ATP analogue, generated an inward current, which was resistant to tetrodotoxin (1 microm) in 61% of the lamina V neurones. The ATPgammaS-induced inward current was accompanied by a significant increase in the frequency of glutamatergic miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) in the majority of lamina V neurones. The ATPgammaS-induced inward current was not reproduced by P2Y receptor agonists, UTP (100 microm), UDP (100 microm), and 2-methylthio ADP (100 microm), and it was also not affected by the addition of guanosine-5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDPbetaS) into the pipette solution, thus suggesting that ionotropic P2X receptors were activated by ATPgammaS instead of metabotropic P2Y receptors. On the other hand, alpha,beta-methylene ATP (100 microm) did not change any membrane current, but instead increased the mEPSC frequency in the majority of lamina V neurones. The ATPgammaS-induced inward current was suppressed by pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS) (10 microm), but not by trinitrophenyl-ATP (TNP-ATP) (1 microm). Furthermore, we found that ATPgammaS (100 microm) produced a clear inward current which was observed in all lamina V neurones over P16 spinal cord slices, in contrast to P9-12. These results indicate that distinct subtypes of P2X receptors were functionally expressed at the post- and presynaptic sites in lamina V neurones, both of which may contribute to the hyperexcitability of lamina V in

  1. Activation of the RAGE/STAT3 Pathway in the Dorsal Root Ganglion Contributes to the Persistent Pain Hypersensitivity Induced by Lumbar Disc Herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-Sheng; Li, Xiao; Luo, Hai-Jie; Huang, Zhu-Xi; Liu, Cui-Cui; Wan, Qing; Xu, Shu-Wei; Wu, Shao-Ling; Ke, Song-Jian; Ma, Chao

    2017-07-01

    Clinically, chronic low back pain and sciatica associated with lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a common musculoskeletal disorder. Due to the unawareness of detailed mechanisms, it is difficult to get an effective therapy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of the RAGE/STAT3 pathway in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) on the formation and development of persistent pain hypersensitivity induced by LDH. Controlled animal study. University laboratory. After LDH induced by implantation of autologous nucleus pulposus (NP, harvested from animal tail) on the left L5 nerve root was established, mechanical thresholds and electrophysiological tests were conducted at relevant time points during an observation period of 28 days. Protein levels and localization of RAGE and p-STAT3 were performed by using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively. LDH induced persistent pain hypersensitivity, increased excitability of DRG neurons, and upregulated the expression of RAGE and p-STAT3 in the DRG. Consecutive injection of both RAGE antagonist FPS-ZM1 (i.t.) and STAT3 activity inhibitor S3I-201 (i.t.) inhibited the enhanced excitability of DRG neurons and mechanical allodynia induced by NP implantation. Furthermore, local knockdown of STAT3 by intrathecal injection of AAV-Cre-GFP into STAT3flox/flox mice markedly alleviated NP implantation-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. Importantly, the expression of p-STAT3 was colocalized with that of RAGE in the DRG and inhibition of RAGE with FPS-ZM1 prevented NP implantation-induced STAT3 activation. More underlying mechanism(s) of the role of the RAGE/STAT3 pathway on the formation and development of persistent pain hypersensitivity induced by LDH will be needed to be explored in future research. These findings suggest activation of the RAGE/STAT3 pathway plays a critical role in persistent pain induced by LDH, and this pathway may represent novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of LDH

  2. A bioluminescence reporter mouse that monitors expression of constitutively active β-catenin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Peavey, Mary C.; Hai, Lan; Lonard, David M.; Lydon, John P.

    2017-01-01

    This short technical report describes the generation and characterization of a bioluminescence reporter mouse that is engineered to detect and longitudinally monitor the expression of doxycycline-induced constitutively active β-catenin. The new responder transgenic mouse contains the TetO-ΔN89β-CatTMILA transgene, which consists of the tet-operator followed by a bicistronic sequence encoding a stabilized form of active β-catenin (ΔN89β-catenin), an internal ribosome entry site, and the firefly luciferase gene. To confirm that the transgene operates as designed, TetO-ΔN89β-CatTMILA transgenic mouse lines were crossed with an effector mouse that harbors the mouse mammary tumor virus-reverse tetracycline transactivator (MMTV-rtTA) transgene (termed MTB hereon), which primarily targets rtTA expression to the mammary epithelium. Following doxycycline administration, the resultant MTB/CatTMILA bigenic reporter exhibited precocious lobuloalveologenesis, ductal hyperplasia, and mammary adenocarcinomas, which were visualized and monitored by in vivo bioluminescence detection. Therefore, we predict that the TetO-ΔN89β-CatTMILA transgenic responder mouse—when crossed with the appropriate effector transgenic—will have wide-applicability to non-invasively monitor the influence of constitutively active β-catenin expression on cell-fate specification, proliferation, differentiation, and neoplastic transformation in a broad spectrum of target tissues. PMID:28253313

  3. Myoelectrical activity and transport of unfertilized ova in the oviduct of the mouse in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talo, A

    1980-09-01

    The relationship of myoelectrical activity to locations and movements of eggs was analysed in 12 mouse oviducts in vitro. When the eggs were in the ampulla the ampullary activity did not spread through the ampullary-isthmic junction (AIJ), and a narrow region of activity of lower frequency separated the ampullary and isthmic activities. When the eggs were in the isthmus the activity beginning on the isthmic side of the AIJ spread towards the uterus for progressively longer distances. Eggs were near or at the front of the plateau formed by this activity. A separate activity arising in one or more areas of the uterine side of the plateau often spread in the ovarian direction, thus opposing movements of eggs and fluid in the uterine direction. Transport of unfertilized eggs appears to be regulated by a small number of relatively stable pacemakers in the mouse oviduct.

  4. Effects of estrogens and bladder inflammation on mitogen-activated protein kinases in lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia from adult female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keast Janet R

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstitial cystitis is a chronic condition associated with bladder inflammation and, like a number of other chronic pain states, symptoms associated with interstitial cystitis are more common in females and fluctuate during the menstrual cycle. The aim of this study was to determine if estrogens could directly modulate signalling pathways within bladder sensory neurons, such as extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases. These signalling pathways have been implicated in neuronal plasticity underlying development of inflammatory somatic pain but have not been as extensively investigated in visceral nociceptors. We have focused on lumbosacral dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons projecting to pelvic viscera (L1, L2, L6, S1 of adult female Sprague-Dawley rats and performed both in vitro and in vivo manipulations to compare the effects of short- and long-term changes in estrogen levels on MAPK expression and activation. We have also investigated if prolonged estrogen deprivation influences the effects of lower urinary tract inflammation on MAPK signalling. Results In studies of isolated DRG neurons in short-term (overnight culture, we found that estradiol and estrogen receptor (ER agonists rapidly stimulated ER-dependent p38 phosphorylation relative to total p38. Examination of DRGs following chronic estrogen deprivation in vivo (ovariectomy showed a parallel increase in total and phosphorylated p38 (relative to β-tubulin. We also observed an increase in ERK1 phosphorylation (relative to total ERK1, but no change in ERK1 expression (relative to β-tubulin. We observed no change in ERK2 expression or phosphorylation. Although ovariectomy increased the level of phosphorylated ERK1 (vs. total ERK1, cyclophosphamide-induced lower urinary tract inflammation did not cause a net increase of either ERK1 or ERK2, or their phosphorylation. Inflammation did, however, cause an increase in p38

  5. Activation of Mas oncogene-related gene (Mrg) C receptors enhances morphine-induced analgesia through modulation of coupling of μ-opioid receptor to Gi-protein in rat spinal dorsal horn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Chen, T; Zhou, X; Couture, R; Hong, Y

    2013-12-03

    Mas oncogene-related gene (Mrg) G protein-coupled receptors are exclusively expressed in small-sized neurons in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in mammals. The present study investigated the effect of MrgC receptor activation on morphine analgesic potency and addressed its possible mechanisms. Intrathecal (i.t.) administration of the specific MrgC receptor agonist bovine adrenal medulla 8-22 (BAM8-22, 3 nmol) increased morphine-induced analgesia and shifted the morphine dose-response curve to the left in rats. Acute morphine (5 μg) reduced the coupling of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) to Gi-, but not Gs-, protein in the spinal dorsal horn. The i.t. BAM8-22 (3 nmol) prevented this change of G-protein repertoire while the inactive MrgC receptor agonist BAM8-18 (3 nmol, i.t.) failed to do so. A double labeling study showed the co-localization of MrgC and MORs in DRG neurons. The i.t. BAM8-22 also increased the coupling of MORs to Gi-protein and recruited Gi-protein from cytoplasm to the cell membrane in the spinal dorsal horn. Application of BAM8-22 (10nM) in the cultured ganglion explants for 30 min increased Gi-protein mRNA, but not Gs-protein mRNA. The present study demonstrated that acute administration of morphine inhibited the repertoire of MOR/Gi-protein coupling in the spinal dorsal horn in vivo. The findings highlight a novel mechanism by which the activation of MrgC receptors can modulate the coupling of MORs with Gi-protein to enhance morphine-induced analgesia. Hence, adjunct treatment of MrgC agonist BAM8-22 may be of therapeutic value to relieve pain.

  6. Neurotoxic activity of venom from the Australian eastern mouse spider (Missulena bradleyi) involves modulation of sodium channel gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rash, L D; Birinyi-Strachan, L C; Nicholson, G M; Hodgson, W C

    2000-08-01

    Mouse spiders represent a potential cause of serious envenomation in humans. This study examined the activity of Missulena bradleyi venom in several in vitro preparations. Whilst female M. bradleyi venom at doses up to 0.05 microl ml(-1) failed to alter twitch or resting tension in all preparations used, male venom (0.02 and 0.05 microl ml(-1)) produced potent effects on transmitter release in both smooth and skeletal neuromuscular preparations. In the mouse phrenic nerve diaphragm preparation, male M. bradleyi venom (0.02 microl ml(-1)) caused rapid fasciculations and an increase in indirectly evoked twitches. Male venom (0.02 and 0.05 microl ml(-1)) also caused a large contracture and rapid decrease in indirectly evoked twitches in the chick biventer cervicis muscle, however had no effect on responses to exogenous ACh (1 mM) or potassium chloride (40 mM). In the chick preparation, contractile responses to male M. bradleyi venom (0.05 microl ml(-1)) were attenuated by (+)-tubocurarine (100 microM) and by tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 microM). Both actions of male M. bradleyi venom were blocked by Atrax robustus antivenom (2 units ml(-1)). In the unstimulated rat vas deferens, male venom (0.05 microl ml(-1)) caused contractions which were inhibited by a combination of prazosin (0.3 microM) and P(2X)-receptor desensitization (with alpha,beta-methylene ATP 10 microM). In the rat stimulated vas deferens, male venom (0.05 microl ml(-1)) augmented indirectly evoked twitches. Male venom (0.1 microl ml(-1)) causes a slowing of inactivation of TTX-sensitive sodium currents in acutely dissociated rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. These results suggest that venom from male M. bradleyi contains a potent neurotoxin which facilitates neurotransmitter release by modifying TTX-sensitive sodium channel gating. This action is similar to that of the delta-atracotoxins from Australian funnel-web spiders.

  7. Circadian activity rhythms in the spiny mouse, Acomys cahirinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, E T; Hohn, V M

    2005-11-15

    Circadian locomotor rhythms were examined in adult common spiny mice, Acomys cahirinus. Spiny mice demonstrated nocturnal activity, with onset of activity coinciding promptly with onset of darkness. Re-entrainment to 6-h delays of the light-dark cycle was accomplished faster than to 6-h advances. Access to running wheels yielded significant changes in period and duration of daily activity. Novelty-induced wheel running had no effect on phase of activity rhythms. Circadian responses to light at various times of the circadian cycle were temporally similar to those observed in other nocturnal rodent species. No gender differences were observed in any of the parameters measured.

  8. Reduced activity-dependent protein levels in a mouse model of the fragile X premutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.E. von Leden (Ramona); L.C. Curley (Lindsey); G.D. Greenberg (Gian); M.R. Hunsaker (Michael); R. Willemsen (Rob); R.F. Berman (Robert)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractEnvironmental enrichment results in increased levels of Fmrp in brain and increased dendritic complexity. The present experiment evaluated activity-dependent increases in Fmrp levels in the motor cortex in response to training on a skilled forelimb reaching task in the CGG KI mouse model

  9. Functionally Charged Polystyrene Particles Activate Immortalized Mouse Microglia (BV2): Cellular and Genomic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of particle surface charge on the biological activation of immortalized mouse microglia (BV2) was examined. Same size (~850-950 nm) spherical polystyrene microparticles (SPM) with net negative (carboxyl, COOH-) or positive (dimethyl amino, CH3)2

  10. Nucleolar re-activation is delayed in mouse embryos cloned from two different cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svarcova, Olga; Dinnyes, A.; Polgar, Z.

    2009-01-01

    displayed early NPBs transformation. In conclusion, despite normal onset of EGA in cloned embryos, activation of functional nucleoli was one cell cycle delayed in NT embryos. NT-MEF embryos displayed normal targeting but delayed activation of nucleolar proteins. Contrary, in NT-HM1 embryos, both......Aim of this study was to evaluate and compare embryonic genome activation (EGA) in mouse embryos of different origin using nucleolus as a marker. Early and late 2-cell and late 4-cell stage embryos, prepared by in vitro fertilization (IVF), parthenogenetic activation (PG), and nuclear transfer...... ofmouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) and mouse HM1 emryonic stem cells (HM1), were processed for autoradiography following 3H-uridine incubation (transcriptional activity), transmission electron microscopy (ultrastructure) and immunofluorescence (nucleolar proteins; upstream binding factor, UBF...

  11. A tiger mouse and relatives. Variants caused by an activated transposable element?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, M E; Nash, H R

    1984-01-01

    In a laboratory-bred population of wild Peruvian house mice, one male had an excessive rate of non-pairing of the X and Y chromosomes. After crossing him with laboratory stock mice, a mouse of very unusual phenotype appeared from a yellow (AyA) mother. He was yellow with black dorsal stripes; hence Tiger. He was mated to many females, and inbred F2 and F3 generations were raised. There were no more tiger phenotypes, but his F1 contained an excess of black-and-tans over yellows, showing him to be a gonosomic mosaic Ayat/atat; the homozygous cell line probably arose from the heterozygous one. The mitotic karyotype was normal. Some of Tiger's mates were of known allozyme types and their progeny were scored. The allozyme segregations were normal, except at the Es-3 locus (esterase-3), for which Tiger was typed as homozygous. Several unusual events among Tiger's close relatives included a mutation to an unstable pattern mutant, three probable translocations, and several cases of somatic defect. All unusual mice derived from Tiger's yellow mother, whose genome was one-quarter Peruvian. Yellow is associated with an ecotropic murine leukemia virus. The Peru genome is characterized by a high occurrence of mutation and aberrant karyotypes. It is suggested that something from the Peru genome in Tiger's mother caused instability of the DNA sequence associated with yellow, with related disturbance at different locations thereafter. The nature of this instability, and of the Peru genome, is discussed.

  12. CB1 Cannabinoid Receptor-Dependent Activation of mTORC1/Pax6 Signaling Drives Tbr2 Expression and Basal Progenitor Expansion in the Developing Mouse Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Alonso, Javier; Aguado, Tania; de Salas-Quiroga, Adán; Ortega, Zaira; Guzmán, Manuel; Galve-Roperh, Ismael

    2015-09-01

    The CB1 cannabinoid receptor regulates cortical progenitor proliferation during embryonic development, but the molecular mechanism of this action remains unknown. Here, we report that CB1-deficient mouse embryos show premature cell cycle exit, decreased Pax6- and Tbr2-positive cell number, and reduced mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation in the ventricular and subventricular cortical zones. Pharmacological stimulation of the CB1 receptor in cortical slices and progenitor cell cultures activated the mTORC1 pathway and increased the number of Pax6- and Tbr2-expressing cells. Likewise, acute CB1 knockdown in utero reduced mTORC1 activation and cannabinoid-induced Tbr2-positive cell generation. Luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the CB1 receptor drives Tbr2 expression downstream of Pax6 induction in an mTORC1-dependent manner. Altogether, our results demonstrate that the CB1 receptor tunes dorsal telencephalic progenitor proliferation by sustaining the transcriptional activity of the Pax6-Tbr2 axis via the mTORC1 pathway, and suggest that alterations of CB1 receptor signaling, by producing the missexpression of progenitor identity determinants may contribute to neurodevelopmental alterations.

  13. Excitation of dorsal root fibers in spinal cord stimulation: a theoretical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijk, Johannes J.; Holsheimer, Jan; Boom, Herman B.K.

    1993-01-01

    In epidural spinal cord stimulation it is likely not only that dorsal column fibers are activated, but also that dorsal root fibers will be involved as well. In this investigation a volume conductor model of the spinal cord was used and dorsal root fibers were modeled by an electrical network includ

  14. DREADDs suppress seizure-like activity in a mouse model of pharmacoresistant epileptic brain tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avaliani, N.; Andersson, M.; Thomsen, Annika Højrup Runegaard

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder with a prevalence of ≈1% of general population. Available antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have multiple side effects and are ineffective in 30% of patients. Therefore, development of effective treatment strategies is highly needed, requiring drug-screening models...... in mouse OHSCs. As we also found that STIB in mouse OHSCs is resistant to common AED, valproic acid, collectively our findings suggest that DREADD-based strategy may be effective in suppressing epileptiform activity in a pharamcoresitant epileptic brain tissue....

  15. Role of NK1 and NK2 receptors in mouse gastric mechanical activity

    OpenAIRE

    Mulè, Flavia; Amato, Antonella; Vannucchi, Maria Giuliana; Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria Simonetta; Serio, Rosa

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the role of NK1 and NK2 receptors in the control of mechanical activity of mouse stomach. In this view, the motor effects induced by NK1 and NK2 receptor agonists and antagonists were analyzed, measuring motility as intraluminal pressure changes in mouse-isolated stomach preparations. In parallel, immunohistochemical studies were performed to identify the location of NK1 and NK2 receptors on myenteric neurons and smooth muscle cells.Substance P (SP)...

  16. Role of NK1 and NK2 receptors in mouse gastric mechanical activity

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the role of NK1 and NK2 receptors in the control of mechanical activity of mouse stomach. In this view, the motor effects induced by NK1 and NK2 receptor agonists and antagonists were analyzed, measuring motility as intraluminal pressure changes in mouse-isolated stomach preparations. In parallel, immunohistochemical studies were performed to identify the location of NK1 and NK2 receptors on myenteric neurons and smooth muscle cells.Substance P (SP)...

  17. Collection of superovulated mouse oocytes continuously by surgery and their development after activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Min-kang; Zhang Tian

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To establish a new way to collect superovulated oocytes or zygotes repeatedly from an individual mouse. Methods: Superovulations were induced by injection PMSG and hCG in Kunming strain mice. The ampullaes of oviduct of all anaesthetised mouse were put in a specially designed "U" sink and released. The second and third times of PMSG injection were made on the sixth day and eleventh day after the first superovulation injection. The capacity of development was examined by in vitro culture of parthenogenesis activation oocytes. Results: Development to blastocyst stage was not significantly different between the first and second time collection. The percentage of blastocyst stage in CD and Sr++ treatment was significantly higher (P<0.05) than the oocytes treated in CB and Sr++. Conclusion: This method enables us to collect oocytes or zygotes repeatedly from one individual mouse in an interval as short as 5 days and without influence on the quality of oocytes.

  18. Activation of farnesoid X receptor induces RECK expression in mouse liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Xiaomin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Wu, Weibin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhu, Bo; Sun, Zhichao; Ji, Lingling; Ruan, Yuanyuan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhou, Meiling, E-mail: meilingzhou2012@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhou, Lei, E-mail: yhchloech@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •RECK is a novel transcriptional target gene of FXR in mouse liver. •The FXR response element is located within the intron 1 of RECK gene. •FXR agonist reverses the down-regulation of RECK in the liver in mouse NASH model. -- Abstract: Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) belongs to the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily, and functions as a transcription factor regulating the transcription of numerous genes involved in bile acid homeostasis, lipoprotein and glucose metabolism. In the present study, we identified RECK, a membrane-anchored inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases, as a novel target gene of FXR in mouse liver. We found that FXR agonist substantially augmented hepatic RECK mRNA and protein expression in vivo and in vitro. FXR regulated the transcription of RECK through directly binding to FXR response element located within intron 1 of the mouse RECK gene. Moreover, FXR agonist reversed the down-regulation of RECK in the livers from mice fed a methionine and choline deficient diet. In summary, our data suggest that RECK is a novel transcriptional target of FXR in mouse liver, and provide clues to better understanding the function of FXR in liver.

  19. Detecting cardiac contractile activity in the early mouse embryo using multiple modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiann-mun eChen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The heart is one of the first organs to develop during mammalian embryogenesis. In the mouse, it starts to form shortly after gastrulation, and is derived primarily from embryonic mesoderm. The embryonic heart is unique in having to perform a mechanical contractile function while undergoing complex morphogenetic remodelling. Approaches to imaging the morphogenesis and contractile activity of the developing heart are important in understanding not only how this remodelling is controlled but also the origin of congenital heart defects. Here, we describe approaches for visualising contractile activity in the developing mouse embryo, using brightfield time lapse microscopy and confocal microscopy of calcium transients. We describe an algorithm for enhancing this image data and quantifying contractile activity from it. Finally we describe how atomic force microscopy can be used to record contractile activity prior to it being microscopically visible.

  20. Neutrophilic dermatosis of dorsal hands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet′s syndrome is characterized by erythematous tender nodules and plaques over face and extremities. Fever, leukocytosis with neutrophilia, and a neutrophilic infiltrate in the dermis are characteristic features. Neutrophilic dermatosis of dorsal hands is a rare localized variant of Sweet′s syndrome occurring predominantly over dorsa of hands. Various degrees of vascular damage may be observed on histopathology of these lesions. Both Sweet′s syndrome and its dorsal hand variant have been reported in association with malignancies, inflammatory bowel diseases, and drugs. We report a patient with neutrophilic dermatoses of dorsal hands associated with erythema nodosum. He showed an excellent response to corticosteroids and dapsone.

  1. Chronic at-level thermal hyperalgesia following rat cervical contusion spinal cord injury is accompanied by neuronal and astrocyte activation and loss of the astrocyte glutamate transporter, GLT1, in superficial dorsal horn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putatunda, Rajarshi; Hala, Tamara J; Chin, Jeannie; Lepore, Angelo C

    2014-09-18

    Neuropathic pain is a form of pathological nociception that occurs in a significant portion of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) patients, resulting in debilitating and often long-term physical and psychological burdens. While many peripheral and central mechanisms have been implicated in neuropathic pain, central sensitization of dorsal horn spinothalamic tract (STT) neurons is a major underlying substrate. Furthermore, dysregulation of extracellular glutamate homeostasis and chronic astrocyte activation play important underlying roles in persistent hyperexcitability of these superficial dorsal horn neurons. To date, central sensitization and astrocyte changes have not been characterized in cervical SCI-induced neuropathic pain models, despite the fact that a major portion of SCI patients suffer contusion trauma to cervical spinal cord. In this study, we have characterized 2 rat models of unilateral cervical contusion SCI that behaviorally result in chronic persistence of thermal hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral forepaw. In addition, we find that STT neurons are chronically activated in both models when compared to laminectomy-only uninjured rats. Finally, persistent astrocyte activation and significantly reduced expression of the major CNS glutamate transporter, GLT1, in superficial dorsal horn astrocytes are associated with both excitability changes in STT neurons and the neuropathic pain behavioral phenotype. In conclusion, we have characterized clinically-relevant rodent models of cervical contusion-induced neuropathic pain that result in chronic activation of both STT neurons and astrocytes, as well as compromise in astrocyte glutamate transporter expression. These models can be used as important tools to further study mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain post-SCI and to test potential therapeutic interventions.

  2. Working for Food Shifts Nocturnal Mouse Activity into the Day

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hut, Roelof A.; Pilorz, Violetta; Boerema, Ate S.; Strijkstra, Arjen M.; Daan, Serge; Yamazaki, Shin

    2011-01-01

    Nocturnal rodents show diurnal food anticipatory activity when food access is restricted to a few hours in daytime. Timed food access also results in reduced food intake, but the role of food intake in circadian organization per se has not been described. By simulating natural food shortage in mice

  3. Histone deacetylase inhibitors suppress immune activation in primary mouse microglia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kannan, Vishnu; Brouwer, Nieske; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Regen, Tommy; Eggen, Bart J. L.; Boddeke, Hendrikus W. G. M.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is required for tissue clearance and repair after infections or insults. To prevent excessive damage, it is crucial to limit the extent of neuroinflammation and thereby the activation of its principal effector cell, microglia. The two main major innate immune cell types in the CNS

  4. Tissue-specific metabolic activation and mutagenicity of 3-nitrobenzanthrone in MutaMouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guosheng; Gingerich, John; Soper, Lynda; Douglas, George R; White, Paul A

    2008-10-01

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a mutagen and suspected human carcinogen detected in diesel exhaust, airborne particulate matter, and urban soil. We investigated the tissue specific mutagenicity of 3-NBA at the lacZ locus of transgenic MutaMouse following acute single dose or 28-day repeated-dose oral administration. In the acute high dose (50 mg/kg) exposure, increased lacZ mutant frequency was observed in bone marrow and colonic epithelium, but not in liver and bladder. In the repeated-dose study, a dose-dependent increase in lacZ mutant frequency was observed in bone marrow and liver (2- and 4-fold increase above control), but not in lung or intestinal epithelium. In addition, a concentration-dependent increase in mutant frequency (8.5-fold above control) was observed for MutaMouse FE1 lung epithelial cells exposed in vitro. 1-Nitropyrene reductase, 3-NBA reductase, and acetyltransferase activities were measured in a variety of MutaMouse specimens in an effort to link metabolic activation and mutagenicity. High 3-NBA nitroreductase activities were observed in lung, liver, colon and bladder, and detectable N-acetyltransferase activities were found in all tissues except bone marrow. The relatively high 3-NBA nitroreductase activity in MutaMouse tissues, as compared with those in Salmonella TA98 and TA100, suggests that 3-NBA is readily reduced and activated in vivo. High 3-NBA nitroreductase levels in liver and colon are consistent with the elevated lacZ mutant frequency values, and previously noted inductions of hepatic DNA adducts. Despite an absence of induced lacZ mutations, the highest 3-NBA reductase activity was detected in lung. Further studies are warranted, especially following inhalation or intratracheal exposures. Published 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Ketogenic diet alters dopaminergic activity in the mouse cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, William H; Adams, Ryan E; Wyss, Livia S

    2014-06-13

    The present study was conducted to determine if the ketogenic diet altered basal levels of monoamine neurotransmitters in mice. The catecholamines dopamine (DA) and norephinephrine (NE) and the indolamine serotonin (5HT) were quantified postmortem in six different brain regions of adult mice fed a ketogenic diet for 3 weeks. The dopamine metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) and the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5HIAA) were also measured. Tissue punches were collected bilaterally from the motor cortex, somatosensory cortex, nucleus accumbens, anterior caudate-putamen, posterior caudate-putamen and the midbrain. Dopaminergic activity, as measured by the dopamine metabolites to dopamine content ratio - ([DOPAC]+[HVA])/[DA] - was significantly increased in the motor and somatosensory cortex regions of mice fed the ketogenic diet when compared to those same areas in brains of mice fed a normal diet. These results indicate that the ketogenic diet alters the activity of the meso-cortical dopaminergic system, which may contribute to the diet's therapeutic effect in reducing epileptic seizure activity.

  6. Dorsal Augmentation with Septal Cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Murrell, George L.

    2008-01-01

    Deficiency of nasal dorsal projection may be inherent or acquired. Repair is most commonly performed with an onlay graft. When nasal septal cartilage is available, it is the author's preferred source for graft material. It is important to realize that dorsal augmentation is an operation performed for aesthetic not functional reasons. As such, patients understandably scrutinize their postoperative result, and attention to detail in all aspects of the surgery is critical in achieving a favorabl...

  7. Antioxidant activity of Citrus limon essential oil in mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campêlo, Lidianne Mayra Lopes; Gonçalves, Fabrício Custódio Moura; Feitosa, Chistiane Mendes; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes

    2011-07-01

    Citrus limon (L.) Burms (Rutaceae) has been shown in previous studies to have various biological functions (anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, antiviral, antimutagenic, and anticarcinogenic). However, traditional uses in folk medicine suggest that C. limon may have an effect on the central nervous system (CNS). This study investigated the effects of C. limon essential oil (EO) on lipid peroxidation level, nitrite content, glutathione reduced (GSH) concentration, and antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx)] activities in mice hippocampus. Swiss mice were treated with the suspension of 0.5% Tween 80, in distilled water used as vehicle (i.p., control group) and with EO in three different doses (0.05, 0.1, or 0.15 g/kg, i.p., EO 50, EO 100, and EO 150 groups, respectively). After the treatments, all groups were observed for 24 h. The enzyme activities as well as the lipid peroxidation, nitrite, and GSH concentrations in mice hippocampus were measured using spectrophotometric methods and the results were compared with values obtained from control group. EO of C. limon treatment significantly reduced the lipid peroxidation level and nitrite content but increased the GSH levels and the SOD, catalase, and GPx activities in mice hippocampus. Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that oxidative stress in hippocampus can occur during neurodegenerative diseases, proving that hippocampal damage induced by the oxidative process plays a crucial role in brain disorders, and also imply that a strong protective effect could be achieved using EO of C. limon as an antioxidant.

  8. The hyperpolarization-activated non-specific cation current (In ) adjusts the membrane properties, excitability, and activity pattern of the giant cells in the rat dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusznák, Zoltán; Pál, Balázs; Kőszeghy, Aron; Fu, Yuhong; Szücs, Géza; Paxinos, George

    2013-03-01

    Giant cells of the cochlear nucleus are thought to integrate multimodal sensory inputs and participate in monaural sound source localization. Our aim was to explore the significance of a hyperpolarization-activated current in determining the activity of giant neurones in slices prepared from 10 to 14-day-old rats. When subjected to hyperpolarizing stimuli, giant cells produced a 4-(N-ethyl-N-phenylamino)-1,2-dimethyl-6-(methylamino) pyridinium chloride (ZD7288)-sensitive inward current with a reversal potential and half-activation voltage of -36 and -88 mV, respectively. Consequently, the current was identified as the hyperpolarization-activated non-specific cationic current (Ih ). At the resting membrane potential, 3.5% of the maximum Ih conductance was available. Immunohistochemistry experiments suggested that hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated, cation non-selective (HCN)1, HCN2, and HCN4 subunits contribute to the assembly of the functional channels. Inhibition of Ih hyperpolarized the membrane by 6 mV and impeded spontaneous firing. The frequencies of spontaneous inhibitory and excitatory postsynaptic currents reaching the giant cell bodies were reduced but no significant change was observed when evoked postsynaptic currents were recorded. Giant cells are affected by biphasic postsynaptic currents consisting of an excitatory and a subsequent inhibitory component. Inhibition of Ih reduced the frequency of these biphasic events by 65% and increased the decay time constants of the inhibitory component. We conclude that Ih adjusts the resting membrane potential, contributes to spontaneous action potential firing, and may participate in the dendritic integration of the synaptic inputs of the giant neurones. Because its amplitude was higher in young than in adult rats, Ih of the giant cells may be especially important during the postnatal maturation of the auditory system.

  9. Visualizing sensory transmission between dorsal root ganglion and dorsal horn neurons in co-culture with calcium imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshiro, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Shinji; Shinjo, Katsuhiro

    2007-09-15

    Sensory information is conveyed to the central nervous system by primary afferent neurons within dorsal root ganglia (DRG), which synapse onto neurons of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. This synaptic connection is central to the processing of both sensory and pain stimuli. Here, we describe a model system to monitor synaptic transmission between DRG neurons and dorsal horn neurons that is compatible with high-throughput screening. This co-culture preparation comprises DRG and dorsal horn neurons and utilizes Ca(2+) imaging with the indicator dye Fura-2 to visualize synaptic transmission. Addition of capsaicin to co-cultures stimulated DRG neurons and led to activation of dorsal horn neurons as well as increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. This effect was dose-dependent and absent when DRG neurons were omitted from the culture. NMDA receptors are a critical component of synapses between DRG and dorsal horn neurons as MK-801, a use-dependent non-competitive antagonist, prevented activation of dorsal horn neurons following capsaicin treatment. This model system allows for rapid and efficient analysis of noxious stimulus-evoked Ca(2+) signal transmission and provides a new approach both for investigating synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and for screening potential analgesic compounds.

  10. Resveratrol lacks protective activity against acute seizures in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaciello, Francesca; Leclercq, Karine; Kaminski, Rafal M

    2016-10-06

    Resveratrol (3,4',5-stilbenetriol) is a natural product having diverse anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. The compound has a wide spectrum of pharmacological and metabolic activity, including cardioprotective, neuroprotective, anticarcinogenic and anti-aging effects reported in numerous studies. Some reports also suggest potential anticonvulsant properties of resveratrol. In the present study, we used in mice three different seizure models which are routinely applied in preclinical drug discovery. The protective effects of resveratrol were evaluated in the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ), maximal electroshock (MES) and 6-Hz electrical seizure models. Resveratrol (up to 300mg/kg) administered ip (5-60min pre-treatment time) remained without any protective activity against seizures induced in these models. There was only a trend towards a delay in seizure latency, which reached statistical significance after treatment with resveratrol (100mg/kg; 15min) in case of tonic convulsions induced by PTZ. Phenobarbital (PHB, ip, 45min), used as a reference compound, displayed a clear-cut and dose-dependent protection against seizures in all the models. The ED50 values obtained with PHB were as follows: 7.3mg/kg (PTZ model), 13.3mg/kg (MES model) and 29.7mg/kg (6-Hz model). The present data demonstrate that an acute treatment with resveratrol does not provide any significant protection in three seizure models which collectively are able to detect anticonvulsants with diverse mechanisms of action. However, it cannot be excluded that chronic treatment with resveratrol may offer some protection in these or other seizure models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. RyR2 modulates a Ca2+-activated K+ current in mouse cardiac myocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Hui Mu

    Full Text Available In cardiomyocytes, Ca2+ entry through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs binds to and activates RyR2 channels, resulting in subsequent Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR and cardiac contraction. Previous research has documented the molecular coupling of small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (SK channels to VDCCs in mouse cardiac muscle. Little is known regarding the role of RyRs-sensitive Ca2+ release in the SK channels in cardiac muscle. In this study, using whole-cell patch clamp techniques, we observed that a Ca2+-activated K+ current (IK,Ca recorded from isolated adult C57B/L mouse atrial myocytes was significantly decreased by ryanodine, an inhibitor of ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2, or by the co-application of ryanodine and thapsigargin, an inhibitor of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA (p<0.05, p<0.01, respectively. The activation of RyR2 by caffeine increased the IK,Ca in the cardiac cells (p<0.05, p<0.01, respectively. We further analyzed the effect of RyR2 knockdown on IK,Ca and Ca2+ in isolated adult mouse cardiomyocytes using a whole-cell patch clamp technique and confocal imaging. RyR2 knockdown in mouse atrial cells transduced with lentivirus-mediated small hairpin interference RNA (shRNA exhibited a significant decrease in IK,Ca (p<0.05 and [Ca2+]i fluorescence intensity (p<0.01. An immunoprecipitated complex of SK2 and RyR2 was identified in native cardiac tissue by co-immunoprecipitation assays. Our findings indicate that RyR2-mediated Ca2+ release is responsible for the activation and modulation of SK channels in cardiac myocytes.

  12. Immunohistochemical visualization of hippocampal neuron activity after spatial learning in a mouse model of neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, Giovanni; Pangrazzi, Luca; Poli, Andrea; Berardi, Nicoletta; Bozzi, Yuri

    2015-05-12

    Induction of phosphorylated extracellular-regulated kinase (pERK) is a reliable molecular readout of learning-dependent neuronal activation. Here, we describe a pERK immunohistochemistry protocol to study the profile of hippocampal neuron activation following exposure to a spatial learning task in a mouse model characterized by cognitive deficits of neurodevelopmental origin. Specifically, we used pERK immunostaining to study neuronal activation following Morris water maze (MWM, a classical hippocampal-dependent learning task) in Engrailed-2 knockout (En2(-/-)) mice, a model of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). As compared to wild-type (WT) controls, En2(-/-) mice showed significant spatial learning deficits in the MWM. After MWM, significant differences in the number of pERK-positive neurons were detected in specific hippocampal subfields of En2(-/-) mice, as compared to WT animals. Thus, our protocol can robustly detect differences in pERK-positive neurons associated to hippocampal-dependent learning impairment in a mouse model of ASD. More generally, our protocol can be applied to investigate the profile of hippocampal neuron activation in both genetic or pharmacological mouse models characterized by cognitive deficits.

  13. Spatiotemporal Analysis of a Glycolytic Activity Gradient Linked to Mouse Embryo Mesoderm Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, Vinay; Prior, Nicole; Snaebjornsson, Marteinn T; Kuehne, Andreas; Sonnen, Katharina F; Kress, Jana; Stein, Frank; Schultz, Carsten; Sauer, Uwe; Aulehla, Alexander

    2017-02-27

    How metabolism is rewired during embryonic development is still largely unknown, as it remains a major technical challenge to resolve metabolic activities or metabolite levels with spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we investigated metabolic changes during development of organogenesis-stage mouse embryos, focusing on the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). We measured glycolytic labeling kinetics from (13)C-glucose tracing experiments and detected elevated glycolysis in the posterior, more undifferentiated PSM. We found evidence that the spatial metabolic differences are functionally relevant during PSM development. To enable real-time quantification of a glycolytic metabolite with spatiotemporal resolution, we generated a pyruvate FRET-sensor reporter mouse line. We revealed dynamic changes in cytosolic pyruvate levels as cells transit toward a more anterior PSM state. Combined, our approach identifies a gradient of glycolytic activity across the PSM, and we provide evidence that these spatiotemporal metabolic changes are intrinsically linked to PSM development and differentiation.

  14. The integrator complex subunit 6 (Ints6 confines the dorsal organizer in vertebrate embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee D Kapp

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Dorsoventral patterning of the embryonic axis relies upon the mutual antagonism of competing signaling pathways to establish a balance between ventralizing BMP signaling and dorsal cell fate specification mediated by the organizer. In zebrafish, the initial embryo-wide domain of BMP signaling is refined into a morphogenetic gradient following activation dorsally of a maternal Wnt pathway. The accumulation of β-catenin in nuclei on the dorsal side of the embryo then leads to repression of BMP signaling dorsally and the induction of dorsal cell fates mediated by Nodal and FGF signaling. A separate Wnt pathway operates zygotically via Wnt8a to limit dorsal cell fate specification and maintain the expression of ventralizing genes in ventrolateral domains. We have isolated a recessive dorsalizing maternal-effect mutation disrupting the gene encoding Integrator Complex Subunit 6 (Ints6. Due to widespread de-repression of dorsal organizer genes, embryos from mutant mothers fail to maintain expression of BMP ligands, fail to fully express vox and ved, two mediators of Wnt8a, display delayed cell movements during gastrulation, and severe dorsalization. Consistent with radial dorsalization, affected embryos display multiple independent axial domains along with ectopic dorsal forerunner cells. Limiting Nodal signaling or restoring BMP signaling restores wild-type patterning to affected embryos. Our results are consistent with a novel role for Ints6 in restricting the vertebrate organizer to a dorsal domain in embryonic patterning.

  15. The Integrator Complex Subunit 6 (Ints6) Confines the Dorsal Organizer in Vertebrate Embryogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Lee D.; Abrams, Elliott W.; Marlow, Florence L.; Mullins, Mary C.

    2013-01-01

    Dorsoventral patterning of the embryonic axis relies upon the mutual antagonism of competing signaling pathways to establish a balance between ventralizing BMP signaling and dorsal cell fate specification mediated by the organizer. In zebrafish, the initial embryo-wide domain of BMP signaling is refined into a morphogenetic gradient following activation dorsally of a maternal Wnt pathway. The accumulation of β-catenin in nuclei on the dorsal side of the embryo then leads to repression of BMP signaling dorsally and the induction of dorsal cell fates mediated by Nodal and FGF signaling. A separate Wnt pathway operates zygotically via Wnt8a to limit dorsal cell fate specification and maintain the expression of ventralizing genes in ventrolateral domains. We have isolated a recessive dorsalizing maternal-effect mutation disrupting the gene encoding Integrator Complex Subunit 6 (Ints6). Due to widespread de-repression of dorsal organizer genes, embryos from mutant mothers fail to maintain expression of BMP ligands, fail to fully express vox and ved, two mediators of Wnt8a, display delayed cell movements during gastrulation, and severe dorsalization. Consistent with radial dorsalization, affected embryos display multiple independent axial domains along with ectopic dorsal forerunner cells. Limiting Nodal signaling or restoring BMP signaling restores wild-type patterning to affected embryos. Our results are consistent with a novel role for Ints6 in restricting the vertebrate organizer to a dorsal domain in embryonic patterning. PMID:24204286

  16. Fos, nociception and the dorsal horn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggeshall, Richard E

    2005-12-01

    The protooncogene c-fos is rapidly activated after noxious stimuli to express the protein Fos in spinal dorsal horn neurons that are in the 'correct' locations for nociceptive information transfer. As such, therefore, mapping Fos expression in these neurons is at present the best global marker for efficiently locating populations of neurons in the awake animal that respond to nociceptive input. This allows, among other things, precise behavioral measurements to be correlated with Fos expression. Two arenas where mapping dorsal horn Fos expression has made a major impact are in the anatomy of nociceptive systems and as a useful assay for the analgesic properties of various therapeutic regimens. Also Fos expression is the only way to map populations of neurons that are responding to non-localized input such as withdrawal after addiction and vascular occlusion. Another insight is that it shows a clear activation of neurons in superficial 'pain-processing' laminae by innocuous stimuli after nerve lesions, a finding that presumably bears on the allodynia that often accompanies these lesions. It is to be understood, however, that the Fos localizations are not sufficient unto themselves, but the major function of these studies is to efficiently locate populations of cells in nociceptive pathways so that powerful anatomic and physiologic techniques can be brought to bear efficiently. Thus, the purpose of this review is to summarize the studies whose numbers are geometrically expanding that deal with Fos in the dorsal horn and the conclusions therefrom.

  17. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling mediates the dynamic maintenance of nuclear Dorsal levels during Drosophila embryogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeLotto, Robert; DeLotto, Yvonne; Steward, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    of Dorsal. We also find that diffusion of Dorsal is partially constrained to cytoplasmic islands surrounding individual syncitial nuclei. A model is proposed in which the generation and maintenance of the Dorsal gradient is a consequence of an active process involving both restricted long-range diffusion......In Drosophila, the NF-kappaB/REL family transcription factor, Dorsal, redistributes from the cytoplasm to nuclei, forming a concentration gradient across the dorsoventral axis of the embryo. Using live imaging techniques in conjunction with embryos expressing a chimeric Dorsal-GFP, we demonstrate...

  18. Developmental activity variations of DNA polymerase α,δ,ε in mouse forebrains and spleens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨荣武; 陆长德

    1995-01-01

    The levels of DNA polymerase α,δ,ε were examined in the neonatal mouse forebrains andspleens.The levels of DNA polymerase α were determined by the difference of polymerase activity in theabsence and the presence of α specific inhibitor,BuPdGTP,or its monoclonal antibody.The levels of DNApolymerase δ were determined in H · A fractions after separating it from the other two enzymes.The levelsof DNA polymerase ε were identified in H · A fractions by the use of α-monoclonal antibody or BuPdGTP.Results showed that in the mouse forebrain DNA polymerase α,δ,ε activities are the highest before birth,decline sharply following birth and are very low on the 8th day and hardly detectable on the 17th day;as forthe mouse spleen,however,DNA polymerase α,δ,ε activities are the lowest at birth,increase rapidly afterbirth and reach their maxima on the 8th day and then decline gradually but remain in higher levels.Theseresults not only prove that DNA polymerase α and δ take part in cell DNA replication but also suggest thatDNA polymerase ε is involved in DNA replication.

  19. Novel DNA motif binding activity observed in vivo with an estrogen receptor α mutant mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Sylvia C; Li, Leping; Grimm, Sara A; Winuthayanon, Wipawee; Hamilton, Katherine J; Pockette, Brianna; Rubel, Cory A; Pedersen, Lars C; Fargo, David; Lanz, Rainer B; DeMayo, Francesco J; Schütz, Günther; Korach, Kenneth S

    2014-06-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) interacts with DNA directly or indirectly via other transcription factors, referred to as "tethering." Evidence for tethering is based on in vitro studies and a widely used "KIKO" mouse model containing mutations that prevent direct estrogen response element DNA- binding. KIKO mice are infertile, due in part to the inability of estradiol (E2) to induce uterine epithelial proliferation. To elucidate the molecular events that prevent KIKO uterine growth, regulation of the pro-proliferative E2 target gene Klf4 and of Klf15, a progesterone (P4) target gene that opposes the pro-proliferative activity of KLF4, was evaluated. Klf4 induction was impaired in KIKO uteri; however, Klf15 was induced by E2 rather than by P4. Whole uterine chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing revealed enrichment of KIKO ERα binding to hormone response elements (HREs) motifs. KIKO binding to HRE motifs was verified using reporter gene and DNA-binding assays. Because the KIKO ERα has HRE DNA-binding activity, we evaluated the "EAAE" ERα, which has more severe DNA-binding domain mutations, and demonstrated a lack of estrogen response element or HRE reporter gene induction or DNA-binding. The EAAE mouse has an ERα null-like phenotype, with impaired uterine growth and transcriptional activity. Our findings demonstrate that the KIKO mouse model, which has been used by numerous investigators, cannot be used to establish biological functions for ERα tethering, because KIKO ERα effectively stimulates transcription using HRE motifs. The EAAE-ERα DNA-binding domain mutant mouse demonstrates that ERα DNA-binding is crucial for biological and transcriptional processes in reproductive tissues and that ERα tethering may not contribute to estrogen responsiveness in vivo.

  20. Inflammasome activation in mouse inner ear in response to MCMV induced hearing loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Shi; Yanfen Dong; Ya Li; ZenLu Zhao; Huan Li; Shiwei Qiu; Yaohan Li; Weiwei Guo; Yuehua Qiao

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To identify presence of inflammasome activated in mouse cochlea with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Method:MCMV was injected into the right cerebral hemisphere in neonatal BALB/c mice at 2000 pfu virus titers. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were tested to evaluate hearing at 21 days. Histopathological studies were conducted to confirm localizations of MCMV infected cells in the inner ear. Expression of inflammasome related factors was assessed by immunofluorescence, Quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting. Results:In the mouse model of CMV induced SNHL, inflammasome related kinase Caspase-1 and downstream inflammatory factor IL-1b and IL-18 were found increased and activated after CMV infection in the cochlea. These factors could further up-regulate expression of IL-6 and TNF-a. These inflammatory factors are neurotoxicity and may contribute to hearing impairment. Furthermore, we also detected significantly increased AIM2 protein that accumulated in the SGN of cochleae with CMV infection. Significance:We have shown that inflammasome as a novel inherent immunity mechanism may contribute to hearing impairment. Conclusion:Our data indicate that imflammasome assemble in mouse inner ear in response to CMV infection. We have revealed a novel pa-thology event in CMV induced SNHL involving activation of inflammasome in mouse cochlea. Additionally, we have shown that inflammasome may be a novel target for prevention and treatment of CMV related SNHL. Copyright © 2016, The Authors. Production & hosting by Elsevier (Singapore) Pte Ltd On behalf of PLA General Hospital Department of OtolaryngologyHead and Neck Surgery. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  1. Mapping social behavior-induced brain activation at cellular resolution in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongsoo; Venkataraju, Kannan Umadevi; Pradhan, Kith; Mende, Carolin; Taranda, Julian; Turaga, Srinivas C; Arganda-Carreras, Ignacio; Ng, Lydia; Hawrylycz, Michael J; Rockland, Kathleen S; Seung, H Sebastian; Osten, Pavel

    2015-01-13

    Understanding how brain activation mediates behaviors is a central goal of systems neuroscience. Here, we apply an automated method for mapping brain activation in the mouse in order to probe how sex-specific social behaviors are represented in the male brain. Our method uses the immediate-early-gene c-fos, a marker of neuronal activation, visualized by serial two-photon tomography: the c-fos-GFP+ neurons are computationally detected, their distribution is registered to a reference brain and a brain atlas, and their numbers are analyzed by statistical tests. Our results reveal distinct and shared female and male interaction-evoked patterns of male brain activation representing sex discrimination and social recognition. We also identify brain regions whose degree of activity correlates to specific features of social behaviors and estimate the total numbers and the densities of activated neurons per brain areas. Our study opens the door to automated screening of behavior-evoked brain activation in the mouse.

  2. Mapping Social Behavior-Induced Brain Activation at Cellular Resolution in the Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsoo Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how brain activation mediates behaviors is a central goal of systems neuroscience. Here, we apply an automated method for mapping brain activation in the mouse in order to probe how sex-specific social behaviors are represented in the male brain. Our method uses the immediate-early-gene c-fos, a marker of neuronal activation, visualized by serial two-photon tomography: the c-fos-GFP+ neurons are computationally detected, their distribution is registered to a reference brain and a brain atlas, and their numbers are analyzed by statistical tests. Our results reveal distinct and shared female and male interaction-evoked patterns of male brain activation representing sex discrimination and social recognition. We also identify brain regions whose degree of activity correlates to specific features of social behaviors and estimate the total numbers and the densities of activated neurons per brain areas. Our study opens the door to automated screening of behavior-evoked brain activation in the mouse.

  3. Activity-Dependent Changes in MAPK Activation in the Angelman Syndrome Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filonova, Irina; Trotter, Justin H.; Banko, Jessica L.; Weeber, Edwin J.

    2014-01-01

    Angelman Syndrome (AS) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by disruption of the maternal "UBE3A" gene. Ube3a protein is identified as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that shows neuron-specific imprinting. Despite extensive research evaluating the localization and basal expression profiles of Ube3a in mouse models, the molecular…

  4. Characterization of excitatory and inhibitory neuron activation in the mouse medial prefrontal cortex following palatable food ingestion and food driven exploratory behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald P Gaykema

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC is implicated in aspects of executive function, that include the modulation of attentional and memory processes involved in goal selection. Food-seeking behavior has been shown to involve activation of the mPFC, both during the execution of strategies designed to obtain food and during the consumption of food itself. As these behaviors likely require differential engagement of the prefrontal cortex, we hypothesized that the pattern of neuronal activation would also be behavior dependent. In this study we describe, for the first time, the expression of Fos in different layers and cell types of the infralimbic/dorsal peduncular (IL/DP and prelimbic/anterior cingulate (PL/AC subdivisions of mouse mPFC following both the consumption of palatable food and following exploratory activity of the animal directed at obtaining food reward. While both manipulations led to increases of Fos expression in principal excitatory neurons relative to control, food-directed exploratory activity produced a significantly greater increase in Fos expression than observed in the food intake condition. Consequently, we hypothesized that mPFC interneuron activation would also be differentially engaged by these manipulations. Interestingly, Fos expression patterns differed substantially between treatments and interneuron subtype, illustrating how the differential engagement of subsets of mPFC interneurons depends on the behavioral state. In our experiments, both vasoactive intestinal peptide- and parvalbumin-expressing neurons showed enhanced Fos expression only during the food-dependent exploratory task and not during food intake. Conversely, elevations in arcuate and paraventricular hypothalamic fos expression were only observed following food intake and not following food driven exploration. Our data suggest that activation of select mPFC interneurons may be required to support high cognitive demand states while being dispensable during

  5. Smc1β is required for activation of SAC during mouse oocyte meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yilong; Zhou, Changyin; Cui, Zhaokang; Dai, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Mianqun; Lu, Yajuan; Xiong, Bo

    2017-03-19

    Smc1β is a meiosis-specific cohesin subunit that is essential for sister chromatid cohesion and DNA recombination. Previous studies have shown that Smc1β-deficient mice in both sexes are sterile. Ablation of Smc1β during male meiosis leads to the blockage of spermatogenesis in pachytene stage, and ablation of Smc1β during female meiosis generates a highly error-prone oocyte although it could develop to metaphase II stage. However, the underlying mechanisms regarding how Smc1β maintains the correct meiotic progression in mouse oocytes have not been clearly defined. Here, we find that GFP-fused Smc1β is expressed and localized to the chromosomes from GV to MII stages during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation. Knockdown of Smc1β by microinjection of gene-specific morpholino causes the impaired spindle apparatus and chromosome alignment which are highly correlated with the defective kinetochore-microtubule attachments, consequently resulting in a prominently higher incidence of aneuploid eggs. In addition, the premature extrusion of polar bodies and escape of metaphase I arrest induced by low dose of nocodazole treatment in Smc1β-depleted oocytes indicates that Smc1β is essential for activation of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) activity. Collectively, we identify a novel function of Smc1β as a SAC participant beyond its role in chromosome cohesion during mouse oocyte meiosis.

  6. High-efficiency and heritable gene targeting in mouse by transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhongwei; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Zhaohua; Shao, Yanjiao; Pan, Hongjie; Wei, Gaigai; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Long; Li, Xia; Wang, Ping; Fan, Heng-Yu; Du, Bing; Liu, Bin; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2013-06-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a powerful new approach for targeted gene disruption in various animal models, but little is known about their activities in Mus musculus, the widely used mammalian model organism. Here, we report that direct injection of in vitro transcribed messenger RNA of TALEN pairs into mouse zygotes induced somatic mutations, which were stably passed to the next generation through germ-line transmission. With one TALEN pair constructed for each of 10 target genes, mutant F0 mice for each gene were obtained with the mutation rate ranged from 13 to 67% and an average of ∼40% of total healthy newborns with no significant differences between C57BL/6 and FVB/N genetic background. One TALEN pair with single mismatch to their intended target sequence in each side failed to yield any mutation. Furthermore, highly efficient germ-line transmission was obtained, as all the F0 founders tested transmitted the mutations to F1 mice. In addition, we also observed that one bi-allele mutant founder of Lepr gene, encoding Leptin receptor, had similar diabetic phenotype as db/db mouse. Together, our results suggest that TALENs are an effective genetic tool for rapid gene disruption with high efficiency and heritability in mouse with distinct genetic background.

  7. R26R-GR: a Cre-activable dual fluorescent protein reporter mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Tzung Chen

    Full Text Available Green fluorescent protein (GFP and its derivatives are the most widely used molecular reporters for live cell imagining. The development of organelle-specific fusion fluorescent proteins improves the labeling resolution to a higher level. Here we generate a R26 dual fluorescent protein reporter mouse, activated by Cre-mediated DNA recombination, labeling target cells with a chromatin-specific enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP and a plasma membrane-anchored monomeric cherry fluorescent protein (mCherry. This dual labeling allows the visualization of mitotic events, cell shapes and intracellular vesicle behaviors. We expect this reporter mouse to have a wide application in developmental biology studies, transplantation experiments as well as cancer/stem cell lineage tracing.

  8. Mouse Spermatozoa Contain a Nuclease that Is Activated by Pretreatment with EGTA and Subsequent Calcium Incubation

    OpenAIRE

    Boaz, Segal M.; Dominguez, Kenneth; Shaman, Jeffrey A; Ward, W. Steven

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrated that mouse spermatozoa cleave their DNA into ~50 kb loop-sized fragments with topoisomerase IIB when treated with MnCl2 and CaCl2 in a process we term sperm chromatin fragmentation (SCF). SCF can be reversed by EDTA. A nuclease then further degrades the DNA in a process we term sperm DNA degradation (SDD). MnCl2 alone could elicit this activity, but CaCl2 had no effect. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a nuclease in the vas deferens that can be activated by EGTA to digest...

  9. Energy expenditure in relation to activity of lesser mouse deer (Tragulus javanicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlis; Abdullah, N; Liang, J B; Purwanto, B; Ho, Y W

    2001-11-01

    Heat production (HP) of male and female mouse deer during eating, standing and sitting was determined using the open circuit respiration chamber (RC). The time taken for similar activities was also determined in an outdoor enclosure (OD). The animals were fed kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and rabbit pellet ad libitum. Male mouse deer consumed more dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM) and gross energy (GE) than female. The time for each activity of male and female mouse deer kept in RC and OD was similar. The average time spent in RC and OD for both male and female, respectively, for sitting (956 and 896 min/day) was significantly (P<0.01) longer than standing (463 and 520 min/day) and eating (21 and 24 min/day). Heat production for male and female mouse deer, respectively, during eating was the highest (0.44 and 0.43 kJ/kg W(0.75)/min) followed by standing (0.37 and 0.33 kJ/kgW(0.75)/min) and sitting (0.26 and 0.26 kJ/kg W(0.75)/min). The difference in HP per min during standing between male and female was significant (P<0.05). The HP for 08.00-14.00 h and 14.00-20.00 h periods were higher than 20.00-02.00 h and 02.00-08.00 h periods. The overall HP for males during 08.00-14.00 h and 14.00-20.00 h periods were significantly (P<0.05) higher (114.8 and 119.2 kJ/kg W(0.75)) than female (107.5 and 110.4 kJ/kg W(0.75)), respectively.

  10. Adolescent Mouse Takes on An Active Transcriptomic Expression During Postnatal Cerebral Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Postnatal cerebral development is a complicated biological process precisely controlled by multiple genes. To understand the molecular mechanism of cerebral development, we compared dynamics of mouse cerebrum transcriptome through three developmental stages using high-throughput RNA-seq technique. Three libraries were generated from the mouse cerebrum at infancy, adolescence and adulthood, respectively. Consequently, 44,557,729 (infancy, 59,257,530 (adolescence and 72,729,636 (adulthood reads were produced, which were assembled into 15,344, 16,048 and 15,775 genes, respectively. We found that the overall gene expression level increased from infancy to adolescence and decreased later on upon reaching adulthood. The adolescence cerebrum has the most active gene expression, with expression of a large number of regulatory genes up-regulated and some crucial pathways activated. Transcription factor (TF analysis suggested the similar dynamics as expression profiling, especially those TFs functioning in neurogenesis differentiation, oligodendrocyte lineage determination and circadian rhythm regulation. Moreover, our data revealed a drastic increase in myelin basic protein (MBP-coding gene expression in adolescence and adulthood, suggesting that the brain myelin may be generated since mouse adolescence. In addition, differential gene expression analysis indicated the activation of rhythmic pathway, suggesting the function of rhythmic movement since adolescence; Furthermore, during infancy and adolescence periods, gene expression related to axon repulsion and attraction showed the opposite trends, indicating that axon repulsion was activated after birth, while axon attraction might be activated at the embryonic stage and declined during the postnatal development. Our results from the present study may shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying the postnatal development of the mammalian cerebrum.

  11. Adolescent mouse takes on an active transcriptomic expression during postnatal cerebral development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Xin, Chengqi; Lin, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Gong, Wei; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jun; Cui, Peng; Hu, Songnian

    2014-06-01

    Postnatal cerebral development is a complicated biological process precisely controlled by multiple genes. To understand the molecular mechanism of cerebral development, we compared dynamics of mouse cerebrum transcriptome through three developmental stages using high-throughput RNA-seq technique. Three libraries were generated from the mouse cerebrum at infancy, adolescence and adulthood, respectively. Consequently, 44,557,729 (infancy), 59,257,530 (adolescence) and 72,729,636 (adulthood) reads were produced, which were assembled into 15,344, 16,048 and 15,775 genes, respectively. We found that the overall gene expression level increased from infancy to adolescence and decreased later on upon reaching adulthood. The adolescence cerebrum has the most active gene expression, with expression of a large number of regulatory genes up-regulated and some crucial pathways activated. Transcription factor (TF) analysis suggested the similar dynamics as expression profiling, especially those TFs functioning in neurogenesis differentiation, oligodendrocyte lineage determination and circadian rhythm regulation. Moreover, our data revealed a drastic increase in myelin basic protein (MBP)-coding gene expression in adolescence and adulthood, suggesting that the brain myelin may be generated since mouse adolescence. In addition, differential gene expression analysis indicated the activation of rhythmic pathway, suggesting the function of rhythmic movement since adolescence; Furthermore, during infancy and adolescence periods, gene expression related to axonrepulsion and attraction showed the opposite trends, indicating that axon repulsion was activated after birth, while axon attraction might be activated at the embryonic stage and declined during the postnatal development. Our results from the present study may shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying the postnatal development of the mammalian cerebrum. Copyright © 2014. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Adolescent Mouse Takes on An Active Transcriptomic Expression During Postnatal Cerebral Development

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Wei

    2014-06-01

    Postnatal cerebral development is a complicated biological process precisely controlled by multiple genes. To understand the molecular mechanism of cerebral development, we compared dynamics of mouse cerebrum transcriptome through three developmental stages using high-throughput RNA-seq technique. Three libraries were generated from the mouse cerebrum at infancy, adolescence and adulthood, respectively. Consequently, 44,557,729 (infancy), 59,257,530 (adolescence) and 72,729,636 (adulthood) reads were produced, which were assembled into 15,344, 16,048 and 15,775 genes, respectively. We found that the overall gene expression level increased from infancy to adolescence and decreased later on upon reaching adulthood. The adolescence cerebrum has the most active gene expression, with expression of a large number of regulatory genes up-regulated and some crucial pathways activated. Transcription factor (TF) analysis suggested the similar dynamics as expression profiling, especially those TFs functioning in neurogenesis differentiation, oligodendrocyte lineage determination and circadian rhythm regulation. Moreover, our data revealed a drastic increase in myelin basic protein (MBP)-coding gene expression in adolescence and adulthood, suggesting that the brain myelin may be generated since mouse adolescence. In addition, differential gene expression analysis indicated the activation of rhythmic pathway, suggesting the function of rhythmic movement since adolescence; Furthermore, during infancy and adolescence periods, gene expression related to axon. repulsion and attraction showed the opposite trends, indicating that axon repulsion was activated after birth, while axon attraction might be activated at the embryonic stage and declined during the postnatal development. Our results from the present study may shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying the postnatal development of the mammalian cerebrum. © 2014 .

  13. Adolescent Mouse Takes on An Active Transcriptomic Expression During Postnatal Cerebral Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Xu; Chengqi Xin; Qiang Lin; Feng Ding; Wei Gong; Yuanyuan Zhou; Jun Yu; Peng Cui; Songnian Hu

    2014-01-01

    Postnatal cerebral development is a complicated biological process precisely controlled by multiple genes. To understand the molecular mechanism of cerebral development, we compared dynamics of mouse cerebrum transcriptome through three developmental stages using high-throughput RNA-seq technique. Three libraries were generated from the mouse cerebrum at infancy, adolescence and adulthood, respectively. Consequently, 44,557,729 (infancy), 59,257,530 (adolescence) and 72,729,636 (adulthood) reads were produced, which were assembled into 15,344, 16,048 and 15,775 genes, respectively. We found that the overall gene expression level increased from infancy to adolescence and decreased later on upon reaching adulthood. The adolescence cerebrum has the most active gene expression, with expression of a large number of reg-ulatory genes up-regulated and some crucial pathways activated. Transcription factor (TF) analysis suggested the similar dynamics as expression profiling, especially those TFs functioning in neurogenesis differentiation, oligodendrocyte lineage determination and circadian rhythm regula-tion. Moreover, our data revealed a drastic increase in myelin basic protein (MBP)-coding gene expression in adolescence and adulthood, suggesting that the brain myelin may be generated since mouse adolescence. In addition, differential gene expression analysis indicated the activation of rhythmic pathway, suggesting the function of rhythmic movement since adolescence;Furthermore, during infancy and adolescence periods, gene expression related to axon repulsion and attraction showed the opposite trends, indicating that axon repulsion was activated after birth, while axon attraction might be activated at the embryonic stage and declined during the postnatal develop-ment. Our results from the present study may shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying the postnatal development of the mammalian cerebrum.

  14. [6]-Shogaol inhibits melanogenesis in B16 mouse melanoma cells through activation of the ERK pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng YAO; Jang-hee OH; Inn Gyung OH; Chi-hyun PARK; Jin Ho CHUNG

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of [6]-shogaol,an active ingredient in ginger,on melanogenesis and the underlying mechanisms.Methods: B16F10 mouse melanoma cells were tested.Cell viability was determined with the MTT assay.Melanin content and tyrosinase activity were analyzed with a spectrophotometer.The protein expression of tyrosinase and microphthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF),as well as phosphorylated or total ERK1/2 and Akt were measured using Western blot.Results: Treatment of the cells with [6]-shogaol (1,5,10 μmol/L) reduced the melanin content in a concentration-dependent manner.[6]-Shogaol (5 and 10 μmol/L) significantly decreased the intracellular tyrosinase activity,and markedly suppressed the expression levels of tyrosinase and MITF proteins in the cells.Furthermore,[6]-shogaol (10 μmol/L) activated ERK,which was known to negatively regulate melanin synthesis in these cells.Pretreatment with the specific ERK pathway inhibitor PD98059 (20 μmol/L) greatly attenuated the inhibition of melanin synthesis by [6]-shogaol (10 μmol/L).Conclusion: The results demonstrate that [6]-shogaol inhibits melanogenesis in B16F10 mouse melanoma cells via activating the ERK pathway.

  15. Rapid Detection of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 Activity in Mouse Sperm Using Fluorescent Gel Shift Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoseok Choi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Assaying the glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3 activity in sperm is of great importance because it is closely implicated in sperm motility and male infertility. While a number of studies on GSK3 activity have relied on labor-intensive immunoblotting to identify phosphorylated GSK3, here we report the simple and rapid detection of GSK3 activity in mouse sperm using conventional agarose gel electrophoresis and a fluorescent peptide substrate. When a dye-tethered and prephosphorylated (primed peptide substrate for GSK3 was employed, a distinct mobility shift in the fluorescent bands on the agarose was observed by GSK3-induced phosphorylation of the primed peptides. The GSK3 activity in mouse testes and sperm were quantifiable by gel shift assay with low sample consumption and were significantly correlated with the expression levels of GSK3 and p-GSK3. We suggest that our assay can be used for reliable and rapid detection of GSK3 activity in cells and tissue extracts.

  16. Expression profiles for macrophage alternative activation genes in AD and in mouse models of AD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Nostrand William E

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microglia are associated with neuritic plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD and serve as a primary component of the innate immune response in the brain. Neuritic plaques are fibrous deposits composed of the amyloid beta-peptide fragments (Abeta of the amyloid precursor protein (APP. Numerous studies have shown that the immune cells in the vicinity of amyloid deposits in AD express mRNA and proteins for pro-inflammatory cytokines, leading to the hypothesis that microglia demonstrate classical (Th-1 immune activation in AD. Nonetheless, the complex role of microglial activation has yet to be fully explored since recent studies show that peripheral macrophages enter an "alternative" activation state. Methods To study alternative activation of microglia, we used quantitative RT-PCR to identify genes associated with alternative activation in microglia, including arginase I (AGI, mannose receptor (MRC1, found in inflammatory zone 1 (FIZZ1, and chitinase 3-like 3 (YM1. Results Our findings confirmed that treatment of microglia with anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13 induces a gene profile typical of alternative activation similar to that previously observed in peripheral macrophages. We then used this gene expression profile to examine two mouse models of AD, the APPsw (Tg-2576 and Tg-SwDI, models for amyloid deposition and for cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA respectively. AGI, MRC1 and YM1 mRNA levels were significantly increased in the Tg-2576 mouse brains compared to age-matched controls while TNFα and NOS2 mRNA levels, genes commonly associated with classical activation, increased or did not change, respectively. Only TNFα mRNA increased in the Tg-SwDI mouse brain. Alternative activation genes were also identified in brain samples from individuals with AD and were compared to age-matched control individuals. In AD brain, mRNAs for TNFα, AGI, MRC1 and the chitinase-3 like 1 and 2 genes (CHI3L1; CHI3L2 were

  17. Prior cold water swim stress alters immobility in the forced swim test and associated activation of serotonergic neurons in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drugan, R C; Hibl, P T; Kelly, K J; Dady, K F; Hale, M W; Lowry, C A

    2013-12-01

    Prior adverse experience alters behavioral responses to subsequent stressors. For example, exposure to a brief swim increases immobility in a subsequent swim test 24h later. In order to determine if qualitative differences (e.g. 19°C versus 25°C) in an initial stressor (15-min swim) impact behavioral, physiological, and associated neural responses in a 5-min, 25°C swim test 24h later, rats were surgically implanted with biotelemetry devices 1 week prior to experimentation then randomly assigned to one of six conditions (Day 1 (15 min)/Day 2 (5 min)): (1) home cage (HC)/HC, (2) HC/25°C swim, (3) 19°C swim/HC, (4) 19°C swim/25°C swim, (5) 25°C swim/HC, (6) 25°C swim/25°C swim. Core body temperature (Tb) was measured on Days 1 and 2 using biotelemetry; behavior was measured on Day 2. Rats were transcardially perfused with fixative 2h following the onset of the swim on Day 2 for analysis of c-Fos expression in midbrain serotonergic neurons. Cold water (19°C) swim on Day 1 reduced Tb, compared to both 25°C swim and HC groups on Day 1, and, relative to rats exposed to HC conditions on Day 1, reduced the hypothermic response to the 25°C swim on Day 2. The 19°C swim on Day 1, relative to HC exposure on Day 1, increased immobility during the 5-min swim on Day 2. Also, 19°C swim, relative to HC conditions, on Day 1 reduced swim (25°C)-induced increases in c-Fos expression in serotonergic neurons within the dorsal and interfascicular parts of the dorsal raphe nucleus. These results suggest that exposure to a 5-min 19°C cold water swim, but not exposure to a 5-min 25°C swim alters physiological, behavioral and serotonergic responses to a subsequent stressor.

  18. Trans-Resveratrol Enhances the Anticoagulant Activity of Warfarin in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuka; Suzuki, Sachina; Tatefuji, Tomoki; Umegaki, Keizo

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Resveratrol is a popular ingredient in dietary supplements. Some patients concomitantly use dietary supplements and medicines in Japan. In the present study, we determined whether trans-resveratrol and melinjo (Gnetum gnemon L.) seed extract (MSE), which contains resveratrol dimers, interacted with drugs using a mouse model. Methods: Male C57BL/6J mice were fed experimental diets containing 0.005%, 0.05%, or 0.5% (w/w) trans-resveratrol or MSE for 1 or 12 weeks. The expression of liver cytochrome P-450 (CYP) mRNA and activity of liver microsomal CYP were measured. To determine the influence of resveratrol or MSE on drug efficacy, the anticoagulant activity of warfarin was examined in mice that were fed diets containing trans-resveratrol or MSE for 12 weeks. Results: When the mice were fed experimental diets for 1 week, none of the doses of trans-resveratrol and MSE affected body weight, liver weight, or plasma AST and ALT levels. Trans-resveratrol also did not affect CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2C, or CYP3A activities. In contrast, 0.5% MSE slightly increased CYP1A1 activity. When the mice were fed experimental diets for 12 weeks, 0.05% trans-resveratrol increased CYP1A1, CYP2C, and CYP3A activities, whereas 0.5% MSE suppressed CYP3A activity. Under these conditions, 0.5% trans-resveratrol enhanced the anticoagulant activity of warfarin, although CYP2C activity increased. However, MSE did not affect the anticoagulant activity of warfarin. Conclusion: The 0.05% trans-resveratrol did not interact with warfarin in a mouse model, whereas 0.5% trans-resveratrol may have enhanced the anticoagulant activity of warfarin. PMID:26947597

  19. A Highly Active Isoform of Lentivirus Restriction Factor SAMHD1 in Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Nicolin; Gläsker, Sabine; Sitaram, Poojitha; Hofmann, Henning; Shepard, Caitlin N; Schultz, Megan L; Kim, Baek; Landau, Nathaniel R

    2017-01-20

    The triphosphohydrolase SAMHD1 (sterile α motif and histidine-aspartate domain-containing protein 1) restricts HIV-1 replication in nondividing myeloid cells by depleting the dNTP pool, preventing reverse transcription. SAMHD1 is also reported to have ribonuclease activity that degrades the virus genomic RNA. Human SAMHD1 is regulated by phosphorylation of its carboxyl terminus at Thr-592, which abrogates its antiviral function yet has only a small effect on its phosphohydrolase activity. In the mouse, SAMHD1 is expressed as two isoforms (ISF1 and ISF2) that differ at the carboxyl terminus due to alternative splicing of the last coding exon. In this study we characterized the biochemical and antiviral properties of the two mouse isoforms of SAMHD1. Both are antiviral in nondividing cells. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that SAMHD1 is phosphorylated at several amino acid residues, one of which (Thr-634) is homologous to Thr-592. Phosphomimetic mutation at Thr-634 of ISF1 ablates its antiviral activity yet has little effect on phosphohydrolase activity in vitro dGTP caused ISF1 to tetramerize, activating its catalytic activity. In contrast, ISF2, which lacks the phosphorylation site, was significantly more active, tetramerized, and was active without added dGTP. Neither isoform nor human SAMHD1 had detectable RNase activity in vitro or affected HIV-1 genomic RNA stability in newly infected cells. These data support a model in which SAMHD1 catalytic activity is regulated through tetramer stabilization by the carboxyl-terminal tail, phosphorylation destabilizing the complexes and inactivating the enzyme. ISF2 may serve to reduce the dNTP pool to very low levels as a means of restricting virus replication.

  20. Sertad1 encodes a novel transcriptional co-activator of SMAD1 in mouse embryonic hearts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Yin [Department of Genetics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Zhao, Shaomin [Department of Genetics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069 (China); Song, Langying [Department of Genetics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Wang, Manyuan [School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069 (China); Jiao, Kai, E-mail: kjiao@uab.edu [Department of Genetics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •SERTAD1 interacts with SMAD1. •Sertad1 is expressed in mouse embryonic hearts. •SERTAD1 is localized in both cytoplasm and nucleus of cardiomyocytes. •SERTAD1 enhances expression of BMP target cardiogenic genes as a SMAD1 co-activator. -- Abstract: Despite considerable advances in surgical repairing procedures, congenital heart diseases (CHDs) remain the leading noninfectious cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Understanding the molecular/genetic mechanisms underlying normal cardiogenesis will provide essential information for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies against CHDs. BMP signaling plays complex roles in multiple cardiogenic processes in mammals. SMAD1 is a canonical nuclear mediator of BMP signaling, the activity of which is critically regulated through its interaction partners. We screened a mouse embryonic heart yeast two-hybrid library using Smad1 as bait and identified SERTAD1 as a novel interaction partner of SMAD1. SERTAD1 contains multiple potential functional domains, including two partially overlapping transactivation domains at the C terminus. The SERTAD1-SMAD1 interaction in vitro and in mammalian cells was further confirmed through biochemical assays. The expression of Sertad1 in developing hearts was demonstrated using RT-PCR, western blotting and in situ hybridization analyses. We also showed that SERTAD1 was localized in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of immortalized cardiomyocytes and primary embryonic cardiomyocyte cultures. The overexpression of SERTAD1 in cardiomyocytes not only enhanced the activity of two BMP reporters in a dose-dependent manner but also increased the expression of several known BMP/SMAD regulatory targets. Therefore, these data suggest that SERTAD1 acts as a SMAD1 transcriptional co-activator to promote the expression of BMP target genes during mouse cardiogenesis.

  1. Upper trapezius muscle activity patterns during repetitive manual material handling and work with with a computer mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, C; Finsen, L; Hansen, K; Christensen, H

    1999-10-01

    Firstly, upper trapezius EMG activity patterns were recorded on the dominant side of 6 industrial production workers and on the side operating a computer mouse of 14 computer-aided design (CAD) operators to study differences in acute muscular response related to the repetitiveness of the exposure. The work tasks were performed with median arm movement frequencies ranging from 5 min(-1) to 13 min(-1) and were characterized by work cycle times ranging from less than 30 sec to several days. However, the static and median EMG levels and EMG gap frequencies were similar for all work tasks indicating that shoulder muscle loads may be unaffected by large variations in arm movement frequencies and work cycle times. An exposure variation analyses (EVA) showed that the EMG activity patterns recorded during production work were more repetitive than during CAD work, whereas CAD work was associated with more static muscle activity patterns, both may be associated with a risk of developing musculoskeletal symptoms. Secondly, upper trapezius EMG activity patterns recorded on the mouse side of the CAD operators were compared with those recorded on the non-mouse side to study differences in muscular responses potentially related to the risk of developing shoulder symptoms which were more prevalent on the mouse side. The number of EMG gaps on the mouse side were significantly lower than the values for the upper trapezius on the non-mouse side indicating that more continuous activity was present in the upper trapezius muscle on the mouse side and EVA analyses showed a more repetitive muscle activity pattern on the mouse side. These findings may be of importance to explain differences in the prevalence of shoulder symptoms.

  2. Activity-Dependent Callosal Axon Projections in Neonatal Mouse Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Tagawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Callosal axon projections are among the major long-range axonal projections in the mammalian brain. They are formed during the prenatal and early postnatal periods in the mouse, and their development relies on both activity-independent and -dependent mechanisms. In this paper, we review recent findings about the roles of neuronal activity in callosal axon projections. In addition to the well-documented role of sensory-driven neuronal activity, recent studies using in utero electroporation demonstrated an essential role of spontaneous neuronal activity generated in neonatal cortical circuits. Both presynaptic and postsynaptic neuronal activities are critically involved in the axon development. Studies have begun to reveal intracellular signaling pathway which works downstream of neuronal activity. We also review several distinct patterns of neuronal activity observed in the developing cerebral cortex, which might play roles in activity-dependent circuit construction. Such neuronal activity during the neonatal period can be disrupted by genetic factors, such as mutations in ion channels. It has been speculated that abnormal activity caused by such factors may affect activity-dependent circuit construction, leading to some developmental disorders. We discuss a possibility that genetic mutation in ion channels may impair callosal axon projections through an activity-dependent mechanism.

  3. Tumor initiating and promoting activities of various benzo(a)pyrene metabolites in mouse skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaga, T J; Bracken, W M; Viaje, A; Berry, D L; Fischer, S M; Miller, D R; Levin, W; Conney, A H; Yagi, H; Jerina, D M

    1977-01-01

    The skin tumor-initiating activities of the twelve isomeric phenols of BP revealed that 2-OHBP was as potent as BP while 11-OHBP was moderately active and the others were weak or inactive. However, 2-OHBP has not been shown to be formed from BP in the skin or any other tissue. The (-)-trans-7,8-diol of BP skin was found to be more active as a skin tumor initiator than BP suggesting that it is a proximal carcinogen. The data on carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and metabolism suggest that BP-7..beta.., 8..cap alpha..-diol-9..cap alpha.., 10..cap alpha..-epoxide is the ultimate carcinogenic form of BP. The skin tumor-initiating activities of the various BP metabolites correlate very well with their complete carcinogenic in mouse skin except for BP-7..beta.., 8..cap alpha..-diol-9..cap alpha.., 10..cap alpha..-epoxide. It was found to have skin tumor initiating activity but not complete carcinogenic activity. However, BP-7..beta.., 8..cap alpha..-diol-9..cap alpha.., 10..cap alpha..-epoxide was found to be a very potent complete carcinogen in newborn mice. It is possible that BP-7..beta.., 8..cap alpha..-diol-9..cap alpha.., 10..cap alpha..-epoxide is only a tumor initiator in which a promoting stimulus must be supplied for carcinogenic activity. A natural tumor promoting stimulus may be present in the newborn mouse. There is also a good correlation between the skin tumor initiating activities of the various BP metabolites and their mutagenic activity in the V79 mammalian cell mediated mutagenesis system.

  4. Studies on the Antifatigue Activities of Cordyceps militaris Fruit Body Extract in Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cordyceps militaris has been used extensively as a crude drug and a folk tonic food in East Asia due to its various pharmacological activities. Our study aims to investigate the effect of Cordyceps militaris fruit body extract (CM on antifatigue in mouse model. Two week CM administration significantly delayed fatigue phenomenon which is confirmed via rotating rod test, forced swimming test and forced running test. Compared to nontreated mouse, CM administration increased ATP levels and antioxidative enzymes activity and reduced the levels of lactic acid, lactic dehydrogenase, malondialdehyde, and reactive oxygen species. Further data suggests that CM-induced fatigue recovery is mainly through activating 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and protein kinase B (AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathways and regulating serum hormone level. Moreover, CM-enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPK contributes to its antioxidant effect. Our data provides experimental evidence in supporting clinical use of CM as an effective agent against fatigue.

  5. Studies on the Antifatigue Activities of Cordyceps militaris Fruit Body Extract in Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jingjing; Wang, Yingwu; Teng, Meiyu; Cai, Guangsheng; Xu, Hongkai; Guo, Hanxiao; Liu, Yang; Wang, Di; Teng, Lesheng

    2015-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris has been used extensively as a crude drug and a folk tonic food in East Asia due to its various pharmacological activities. Our study aims to investigate the effect of Cordyceps militaris fruit body extract (CM) on antifatigue in mouse model. Two week CM administration significantly delayed fatigue phenomenon which is confirmed via rotating rod test, forced swimming test and forced running test. Compared to nontreated mouse, CM administration increased ATP levels and antioxidative enzymes activity and reduced the levels of lactic acid, lactic dehydrogenase, malondialdehyde, and reactive oxygen species. Further data suggests that CM-induced fatigue recovery is mainly through activating 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways and regulating serum hormone level. Moreover, CM-enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPK contributes to its antioxidant effect. Our data provides experimental evidence in supporting clinical use of CM as an effective agent against fatigue. PMID:26351509

  6. Macroglia-Microglia Interactions via TSPO Signaling Regulates Microglial Activation in the Mouse Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minhua; Wang, Xu; Zhao, Lian; Ma, Wenxin; Rodriguez, Ignacio R.; Fariss, Robert N.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic retinal inflammation in the form of activated microglia and macrophages are implicated in the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases of the retina, including age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. However, molecular biomarkers and targeted therapies for immune cell activation in these disorders are currently lacking. To address this, we investigated the involvement and role of translocator protein (TSPO), a biomarker of microglial and astrocyte gliosis in brain degeneration, in the context of retinal inflammation. Here, we find that TSPO is acutely and specifically upregulated in retinal microglia in separate mouse models of retinal inflammation and injury. Concomitantly, its endogenous ligand, diazepam-binding inhibitor (DBI), is upregulated in the macroglia of the mouse retina such as astrocytes and Müller cells. In addition, we discover that TSPO-mediated signaling in microglia via DBI-derived ligands negatively regulates features of microglial activation, including reactive oxygen species production, TNF-α expression and secretion, and microglial proliferation. The inducibility and effects of DBI-TSPO signaling in the retina reveal a mechanism of coordinated macroglia-microglia interactions, the function of which is to limit the magnitude of inflammatory responses after their initiation, facilitating a return to baseline quiescence. Our results indicate that TSPO is a promising molecular marker for imaging inflammatory cell activation in the retina and highlight DBI-TSPO signaling as a potential target for immodulatory therapies. PMID:24599476

  7. Phentolamine inhibits the pacemaker activity of mouse interstitial cells of Cajal by activating ATP-sensitive K+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Seung Whan; Kim, Sang Hun; Kim, Jin Ho; Choi, Seok; Yeum, Cheol Ho; Wie, Hee Wook; Sun, Jae Myeong; So, Insuk; Jun, Jae Yeoul

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify if phentolamine has proven effects on the pacemaker activities of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) from the mouse small intestine involving the ATPsensitive K(+) channels and adrenergic receptor. The actions of phentolamine on pacemaker activities were investigated using whole-cell patch-clamp technique and intracellular Ca(2+) analysis at 30 degrees C in cultured mouse intestinal ICC. ICC generated spontaneous pacemaker currents at a holding potential of -70 mV. Treatment with phentolamine reduced the frequency and amplitude of the pacemaker currents and increased the resting outward currents. Moreover, under current clamping (I = 0), phentolamine hyperpolarized the ICC membrane and decreased the amplitude of the pacemaker potentials. We also observed that phentolamine inhibited spontaneous [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations in ICC. The alpha-adrenergic drugs prazosin, yohimbine, methoxamine, and clonidine had no effect on ICC intestinal pacemaker activity and did not block phentolamine-induced effects. Phentolamine-induced effects on the pacemaker currents and the pacemaker potentials were significantly inhibited by ATP sensitive K(+) channel blocker glibenclamide, but not by TEA, apamin, or 4-aminopyridine. In addition, the NO synthase inhibitor, L-NAME and the guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ were incapable of blocking the phentolamine-induced effects. These results demonstrate that phentolamine regulates the pacemaker activity of ICC via ATP-sensitive K(+) channel activation. Phentolamine could act through an adrenergic receptor- and also through NO-independent mechanism that involves intracellular Ca(2+) signaling.

  8. Simplified estimates of ion-activity products of calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate in mouse urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiselius, Hans-Göran; Ferraz, Renato Ribeiro Nogueira; Heilberg, Ita Pfeferman

    2012-08-01

    This study aimed at formulating simplified estimates of ion-activity products of calcium oxalate (AP(CaOx)) and calcium phosphate (AP(CaP)) in mouse urineto find the most important determinants in order to limit the analytical work-up. Literature data on mouse urine composition was used to determine the relative effect of each urine variable on the two ion-activity products. AP(CaOx) and AP(CaP) were calculated by iterative approximation with the EQUIL2 computerized program. The most important determinants for AP(CaOx) were calcium, oxalate and citrate and for AP(CaP) calcium, phosphate, citrate, magnesium and pH. Urine concentrations of the variables were used. A simplified estimate of AP(CaOx) (AP(CaOx)-index(MOUSE)) that numerically approximately corresponded to 10(8) × AP(CaOx) was given the following expression:[Formula: see text]For a series of urine samples with various composition the coefficient of correlation between AP(CaOx)-index(MOUSE) and 10(8) × AP(CaOx) was 0.99 (p = 0.00000). A similar estimate of AP(CaP) (AP(CaP)-index(MOUSE)) was formulated so that it approximately would correspond numerically to 10(14) × AP(CaP) taking the following form:[Formula: see text]For a series of variations in urine composition the coefficient of correlation was 0.95 (p = 0.00000). The two approximate estimates shown in this article are simplified expressions of AP(CaOx) and AP(CaP). The intention of these theoretical calculations was not to get methods for accurate information on the saturation levels in urine, but to have mathematical tools useful for rough conclusions on the outcome of different experimental situations in mice. It needs to be emphasized that the accuracy will be negatively influenced if urine variables not included in the formulas differ very much from basic concentrations.

  9. Role of NK1 and NK2 receptors in mouse gastric mechanical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulè, Flavia; Amato, Antonella; Vannucchi, Maria Giuliana; Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria Simonetta; Serio, Rosa

    2006-02-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of NK1 and NK2 receptors in the control of mechanical activity of mouse stomach. In this view, the motor effects induced by NK1 and NK2 receptor agonists and antagonists were analyzed, measuring motility as intraluminal pressure changes in mouse-isolated stomach preparations. In parallel, immunohistochemical studies were performed to identify the location of NK1 and NK2 receptors on myenteric neurons and smooth muscle cells. 2. Substance P (SP) induced biphasic effects: a contraction followed by relaxation; neurokinin A (NKA) and [beta-Ala8]-NKA(4-10), selective agonist of NK2 receptors, evoked concentration-dependent contractions, whereas [Sar9, Met(O2)11]-SP, selective agonist of NK1 receptors, induced concentration-dependent relaxation. 3. SR48968, NK2 receptor antagonist, did not modify the spontaneous activity and reduced the contractile effects induced by tachykinins without affecting the relaxation. SR140333, NK1 receptor antagonist, did not modify the spontaneous activity and antagonized the relaxant response to tachykinins, failing to affect the contractile effects. 4. The relaxation to SP or to [Sar9, Met(O2)11]-SP was abolished by tetrodotoxin (TTX) and significantly reduced by N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). 5. NK2-immunoreactivity (NK2-IR) was seen at the level of the smooth muscle cells of both circular and longitudinal muscle layers. NK1-immunoreactive (NK1-IR) neurons were seen in the myenteric ganglia and NK1/nNOS double labeling revealed that some neurons were both NK1-IR and nNOS-IR. 6. These results suggest that, in mouse stomach, NK1 receptors, causing relaxant responses, are present on nitrergic inhibitory myenteric neurons, whereas NK2 receptors, mediating contractile responses, are present at muscular level.

  10. CNTF inhibits high voltage activated Ca2+ currents in fetal mouse cortical neurones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Ninna R; Christophersen, Palle; Hounsgaard, Jørn;

    2002-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors yield neuroprotection by mechanisms that may be related to their effects as inhibitors of apoptosis as well as their effects on ion channels. The effect of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on high-threshold voltage-activated Ca channels in cultured fetal mouse brain cortical...... neurones was investigated. Addition of CNTF into serum-free growth medium resulted in delayed reduction of the Ca2+ currents. The currents decreased to 50% after 4 h and stabilized at this level during incubation with CNTF for 48 h. Following removal of CNTF the inhibition was completely reversed after 18...

  11. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Modulates Neurogenesis and Microglia Activation in the Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Pikhovych

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS has been suggested as an adjuvant tool to promote recovery of function after stroke, but the mechanisms of its action to date remain poorly understood. Moreover, studies aimed at unraveling those mechanisms have essentially been limited to the rat, where tDCS activates resident microglia as well as endogenous neural stem cells. Here we studied the effects of tDCS on microglia activation and neurogenesis in the mouse brain. Male wild-type mice were subjected to multisession tDCS of either anodal or cathodal polarity; sham-stimulated mice served as control. Activated microglia in the cerebral cortex and neuroblasts generated in the subventricular zone as the major neural stem cell niche were assessed immunohistochemically. Multisession tDCS at a sublesional charge density led to a polarity-dependent downregulation of the constitutive expression of Iba1 by microglia in the mouse cortex. In contrast, both anodal and, to an even greater extent, cathodal tDCS induced neurogenesis from the subventricular zone. Data suggest that tDCS elicits its action through multifacetted mechanisms, including immunomodulation and neurogenesis, and thus support the idea of using tDCS to induce regeneration and to promote recovery of function. Furthermore, data suggest that the effects of tDCS may be animal- and polarity-specific.

  12. Influence of Electroacupuncture on COX Activity of Hippocampal Mitochondria in Senescence- accelerated Mouse Prone 8 Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Jing; Zeng Fang; He Yu-heng; Tang Yong; Yin Hai-yan; Yu Shu-guang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on cytochrome c oxidase (COX)activity of hippocampal mitochondria in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice, and to explore the EA mechanism on Alzheimer disease (AD) in improving energy metabolic disorder. Methods: Twelve SAMP8 mice were randomly divided into a model group and an EA group, with six in each group. Six senescence-accelerated mouse resistance 1 (SAMR1) mice were prepared as blank group. Mice in the EA group received EA on Baihui (GV 20) and Yongquan (KI 1), once a day for 7 d as a course, altogether 3 courses with one day intervalbetween two courses. Mice in the model group and the blank group were manipulated and fixed as those in the EA group. After interventions, Morris water maze was employed to test spatial learning and memory ability to evaluate EA effect; spectrophotometry was used to detect the activity of hippocampal mitochondria COX. Results: Compared with the blank group, mean escape latenciesof the EA group and model group were prolonged significantly in Morris water maze tests (P Conclusion: It’s plausible that EA improves AD learning and memory ability by increasing mitochondria COX activity, protecting the structure and function, and improving energy metabolism.

  13. Comparison of toluene-induced locomotor activity in Four Mouse Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Scott E; Kimar, Sarah; Irtenkauf, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms by which abused inhalants exert their neurobehavioral effects are only partially understood. In research with other drugs of abuse, specific inbred mouse strains have been useful in exploring genetic loci important to variation in behavioral reactions to these drugs. In the present investigation, mice from three inbred strains (Balb/cByj, C57BL/6J and DBA/2J) and one outbred strain (Swiss Webster) were studied for their acute and chronic sensitivity to toluene-induced changes in locomotor activity. Mice were exposed to toluene (0, 100, 2000, 8000, 10000 ppm) for 30 min in static exposure chambers equipped with activity monitors. In the acute condition, concentrations of toluene toluene for 14 consecutive days. Re-determination of responses to 2000-ppm challenge exposures revealed that sensitization developed in locomotor activity and that the DBA/2J strain showed the greatest increase in sensitivity. These baseline differences in acute sensitivity and the differential shifts in sensitivity after repeated exposures among the inbred mouse strains suggest a genetic basis for the behavioral effects to toluene. The results support the notion that like for other drugs of abuse, using various strains of mice may be useful for investigating mechanisms that underlie risk for inhalant abuse. PMID:20138905

  14. Identification of multisegmental nociceptive afferents that modulate locomotor circuits in the neonatal mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandadi, Sravan; Hong, Peter; Tran, Michelle A; Bráz, Joao M; Colarusso, Pina; Basbaum, Allan I; Whelan, Patrick J

    2013-08-15

    Compared to proprioceptive afferent collateral projections, less is known about the anatomical, neurochemical, and functional basis of nociceptive collateral projections modulating lumbar central pattern generators (CPG). Quick response times are critical to ensure rapid escape from aversive stimuli. Furthermore, sensitization of nociceptive afferent pathways can contribute to a pathological activation of motor circuits. We investigated the extent and role of collaterals of capsaicin-sensitive nociceptive sacrocaudal afferent (nSCA) nerves that directly ascend several spinal segments in Lissauer's tract and the dorsal column and regulate motor activity. Anterograde tracing demonstrated direct multisegmental projections of the sacral dorsal root 4 (S4) afferent collaterals in Lissauer's tract and in the dorsal column. Subsets of the traced S4 afferent collaterals expressed transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), which transduces a nociceptive response to capsaicin. Electrophysiological data revealed that S4 dorsal root stimulation could evoke regular rhythmic bursting activity, and our data suggested that capsaicin-sensitive collaterals contribute to CPG activation across multiple segments. Capsaicin's effect on S4-evoked locomotor activity was potent until the lumbar 5 (L5) segments, and diminished in rostral segments. Using calcium imaging we found elevated calcium transients within Lissauer's tract and dorsal column at L5 segments when compared to the calcium transients only within the dorsal column at the lumbar 2 (L2) segments, which were desensitized by capsaicin. We conclude that lumbar locomotor networks in the neonatal mouse spinal cord are targets for modulation by direct multisegmental nSCA, subsets of which express TRPV1 in Lissauer's tract and the dorsal column. J. Comp. Neurol. 521:2870-2887, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Anxiogenic effects of activation of NK-1 receptors of the dorsal periaqueductal gray as assessed by the elevated plus-maze, ultrasound vocalizations and tail-flick tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Gabriel S; Nobre, Manoel J; de Araújo, João E; Brandão, Marcus L

    2007-12-01

    Ultrasound vocalizations (USVs) known as 22kHz are usual components of the defensive responses of rats exposed to threatening conditions. The amount of emission of 22kHz USVs depends on the intensity of the aversive stimuli. While moderate fear causes an anxiolytic-sensitive enhancement of the defensive responses, high fear tended to reduce the defensive performance of the animals to aversive stimuli. The dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) is an important vocal center and a crucial structure for the expression of defensive responses. Substance P (SP) is involved in the modulation of the defensive response at this midbrain level, but the type of neurokinin receptors involved in this action is not completely understood. In this study we examined whether local injections of the selective NK-1 agonist SAR-MET-SP (10-100 pmol/0.2microL) into the dPAG (i) cause anxiogenic effects in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) (Exp. I), (ii) influence the novelty-induced 22kHz USVs recorded within the frequency range of 20-26kHz (Exp. II) and (iii) change the nociceptive reactivity to heat applied to the rat's tail (Exp III). The data obtained showed that SAR-MET-SP elicited significant "anxiety-like" behaviors, as revealed by the decrease in the number of entries into and time spent onto the open arms of the EPM. These anxiogenic effects were accompanied with antinociception and disruption of the novelty-induced increase in the number and duration of 22kHz USVs. These findings are in agreement with the notion that NK-1 receptors of the dPAG may be an important neurochemical target for new selective drugs aimed at the control of pathological anxiety states.

  16. Chemotactic effect of urokinase-type plasminogen activator on mouse spermatozoa in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the chemotactic effect of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)on mouse spermatozoa.Capillary assays were applied to study the chemotactic activity of ascending and descending gradients of uPA.Firstly,the chemotactic effect of an ascending gradient of uPA on mouse spermatozoa was observed by counting the number of spermatozoa that migrated into the capillary after incubation with uPA for 5,10,20,and 30 min,respectively,compared with that after incubation with F10.Twenty minutes was a suitable incubation time to obtain a plateau of sperm accumulation.Meanwhile,to confirm the specific effect of uPA on mouse sperm chemotaxis,uPA inhibitor (PAI-1)and anti-uPAR rabbit IgG were added to the test solution containing 20 U/mL uPA,respectively.To exclude the possibility that PAI-1 and anti-uPAR rabbit IgG may affect sperm accumulation nonspecifically,PAIl and anti-uPAR rabbit IgG were added to F10,respectively.It was found that the chemotactic effect of uPA was neutralized completely by PAI-1 and anti-uPAR rabbit IgG.PAI-1 and anti-uPAR rabbit IgG had no neutralizing effect on the sperm chemotactic effect.Lastly,the sperm chemotaxis response to a descending gradient of uPA was also observed.Taken together,the results suggest that uPA can induce sperm chemotaxis in vitro by binding to its receptor on the sperm membrane and may act as a chemoattractant in precontacting sperm-egg communication thereby increasing the chance encounter of spermatozoa and eggs.

  17. Peripheral Neuropathy in the Twitcher Mouse Involves the Activation of Axonal Caspase 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Smith

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Infantile Krabbe disease results in the accumulation of lipid-raft-associated galactosylsphingosine (psychosine, demyelination, neurodegeneration and premature death. Recently, axonopathy has been depicted as a contributing factor in the progression of neurodegeneration in the Twitcher mouse, a bona fide mouse model of Krabbe disease. Analysis of the temporal-expression profile of MBP (myelin basic protein isoforms showed unexpected increases of the 14, 17 and 18.5 kDa isoforms in the sciatic nerve of 1-week-old Twitcher mice, suggesting an abnormal regulation of the myelination process during early postnatal life in this mutant. Our studies showed an elevated activation of the pro-apoptotic protease caspase 3 in sciatic nerves of 15- and 30-day-old Twitcher mice, in parallel with increasing demyelination. Interestingly, while active caspase 3 was clearly contained in peripheral axons at all ages, we found no evidence of caspase accumulation in the soma of corresponding mutant spinal cord motor neurons. Furthermore, active caspase 3 was found not only in unmyelinated axons, but also in myelinated axons of the mutant sciatic nerve. These results suggest that axonal caspase activation occurs before demyelination and following a dying-back pattern. Finally, we showed that psychosine was sufficient to activate caspase 3 in motor neuronal cells in vitro in the absence of myelinating glia. Taken together, these findings indicate that degenerating mechanisms actively and specifically mediate axonal dysfunction in Krabbe disease and support the idea that psychosine is a pathogenic sphingolipid sufficient to cause axonal defects independently of demyelination.

  18. Peripheral neuropathy in the Twitcher mouse involves the activation of axonal caspase 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto R Bongarzone

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Infantile Krabbe disease results in the accumulation of lipid-raft-associated galactosylsphingosine (psychosine, demyelination, neurodegeneration and premature death. Recently, axonopathy has been depicted as a contributing factor in the progression of neurodegeneration in the Twitcher mouse, a bona fide mouse model of Krabbe disease. Analysis of the temporal-expression profile of MBP (myelin basic protein isoforms showed unexpected increases of the 14, 17 and 18.5 kDa isoforms in the sciatic nerve of 1-week-old Twitcher mice, suggesting an abnormal regulation of the myelination process during early postnatal life in this mutant. Our studies showed an elevated activation of the pro-apoptotic protease caspase 3 in sciatic nerves of 15- and 30-day-old Twitcher mice, in parallel with increasing demyelination. Interestingly, while active caspase 3 was clearly contained in peripheral axons at all ages, we found no evidence of caspase accumulation in the soma of corresponding mutant spinal cord motor neurons. Furthermore, active caspase 3 was found not only in unmyelinated axons, but also in myelinated axons of the mutant sciatic nerve. These results suggest that axonal caspase activation occurs before demyelination and following a dying-back pattern. Finally, we showed that psychosine was sufficient to activate caspase 3 in motor neuronal cells in vitro in the absence of myelinating glia. Taken together, these findings indicate that degenerating mechanisms actively and specifically mediate axonal dysfunction in Krabbe disease and support the idea that psychosine is a pathogenic sphingolipid sufficient to cause axonal defects independently of demyelination.

  19. Characterization of renin mRNA expression and enzyme activity in rat and mouse mesangial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade A.Q.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Renin is an enzyme involved in the stepwise generation of angiotensin II. Juxtaglomerular cells are the main source of plasma renin, but renin activity has been detected in other cell types. In the present study we evaluated the presence of renin mRNA in adult male Wistar rat and mouse (C-57 Black/6 mesangial cells (MC and their ability to process, store and release both the active and inactive forms of the enzyme. Active renin and total renin content obtained after trypsin treatment were estimated by angiotensinogen consumption analyzed by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and quantified by angiotensin I generation by HPLC. Renin mRNA, detected by RT-PCR, was present in both rat and mouse MC under basal conditions. Active renin was significantly higher (P<0.05 in the cell lysate (43.5 ± 5.7 ng h-1 10(6 cells than in the culture medium (12.5 ± 2.5 ng h-1 10(6 cells. Inactive prorenin content was similar for the intra- and extracellular compartments (9.7 ± 3.1 and 3.9 ± 0.9 ng h-1 10(6 cells. Free active renin was the predominant form found in both cell compartments. These results indicate that MC in culture are able to synthesize and translate renin mRNA probably as inactive prorenin which is mostly processed to active renin inside the cell. MC secrete both forms of the enzyme but at a lower level compared with intracellular content, suggesting that the main role of renin synthesized by MC may be the intracellular generation of angiotensin II.

  20. Activation of transcriptional activity of HSE by a novel mouse zinc finger protein ZNFD specifically expressed in testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fengqin; Wang, Weiping; Lei, Chen; Liu, Qingmei; Qiu, Hao; Muraleedharan, Vinaydhar; Zhou, Bin; Cheng, Hongxia; Huang, Zhongkai; Xu, Weian; Li, Bichun; Wang, Minghua

    2012-04-01

    Zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) that contain multiple cysteine and/or histidine residues perform important roles in various cellular functions, including transcriptional regulation, cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The Cys-Cys-His-His (C(2)H(2)) type of ZFPs are the well-defined members of this super family and are the largest and most complex proteins in eukaryotic genomes. In this study, we identified a novel C(2)H(2) type of zinc finger gene ZNFD from mice which has a 1,002 bp open reading frame and encodes a protein with 333 amino acid residues. The predicted 37.4 kDa protein contains a C(2)H(2) zinc finger domain. ZNFD gene is located on chromosome 18qD1. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the ZNFD gene was specifically expressed in mouse testis but not in other tissues. Subcellular localization analysis demonstrated that ZNFD was localized in the nucleus. Reporter gene assays showed that overexpression of ZNFD in the COS7 cells activates the transcriptional activities of heat shock element (HSE). Overall, these results suggest that ZNFD is a member of the zinc finger transcription factor family and it participates in the transcriptional regulation of HSE. Many heat shock proteins regulated by HSE are involved in testicular development. Therefore, our results suggest that ZNFD may probably participate in the development of mouse testis and function as a transcription activator in HSE-mediated gene expression and signaling pathways.

  1. Schwann cell cultures from human fetal dorsal root ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaping Feng; Hui Zhu; Jiang Hao; Xinmin Wang; Shengping Wu; Li Bai; Xiangming Li; Yun Zha

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Previous studies have used many methods for in vitro Schwann cells (SCs) cul-tures and purification,such as single cell suspension and cytosine arabinoside.However,it has been difficult to obtain sufficient cellular density,and the procedures have been quite tedious.OBJECTIVE:To investigate the feasibility of culturing high-density SCs using fetal human dorsal root ganglion tissue explants.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:Cell culture and immunohistochemistry were performed at the Cen-tral Laboratory of Kunming General Hospital of Chinese PLA between March 2001 and October 2008.MATERIALS:Culture media containing 10% fetal bovine serum,as well as 0.2% collagenase and 0.25% trypsin were purchased from Gibco,USA;mouse anti-human S-100 monoclonal antibody and goat anti-mouse IgG labeled with horseradish peroxidase were provided by Beijing Institute of Bi-ological Products,China.METHODS:Primarily cultured SCs were dissociated from dorsal root ganglia of human aborted fe-tuses at 4-6 months pregnancy.Following removal of the dorsal root ganglion perineurium,the gan-glia were dissected into tiny pieces and digested with 0.2% collagenase and 0.25% trypsin (volume ratio 1:1),then explanted and cultured.SC purification was performed with 5 mL 10% fetal bovine serum added to the culture media,followed by differential adhesion.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:SCs morphology was observed under inverted phase contrast light microscopy.SC purity was evaluated according to percentage of S-100 immunostained cells.RESULTS:SCs were primarily cultured for 5-6 days and then subcultured for 4-5 passages.The highly enriched SC population reached > 95% purity and presented with normal morphology.CONCLUSION:A high purity of SCs was obtained with culture methods using human fetal dorsal root ganglion tissue explants.

  2. Canine parvovirus NS1 protein exhibits anti-tumor activity in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P; Harish, D R; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Tiwari, A K

    2016-02-02

    Many viral proteins have the ability to kill tumor cells specifically without harming the normal cells. These proteins, on ectopic expression, cause lysis or induction of apoptosis in the target tumor cells. Parvovirus NS1 is one of such proteins, which is known to kill high proliferating tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the apoptosis inducing ability of canine parvovirus type 2 NS1 protein (CPV2.NS1) in vitro in 4T1 cells, and found it to cause significant cell death due to induction of apoptosis through intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway. Further, we also evaluated the oncolytic activity of CPV2.NS1 protein in a mouse mammary tumor model. The results suggested that CPV2.NS1 was able to inhibit the growth of 4T1 induced mouse mammary tumor as indicated by significantly reduced tumor volume, mitotic, AgNOR and PCNA indices. Further, inhibition of tumor growth was found to be because of induction of apoptosis in the tumor cells, which was evident by a significant increase in the number of TUNEL positive cells. Further, CPV2.NS1 was also able to stimulate the immune cells against the tumor antigens as indicated by the increased CD4+ and CD8+ counts in the blood of CVP2.NS1 treated mice. Further optimization of the delivery of NS1 protein and use of an adjuvant may further enhance its anti-tumor activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of Trip12 is essential for mouse embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Kajiro

    Full Text Available Protein ubiquitination is a post-translational protein modification that regulates many biological conditions. Trip12 is a HECT-type E3 ubiquitin ligase that ubiquitinates ARF and APP-BP1. However, the significance of Trip12 in vivo is largely unknown. Here we show that the ubiquitin ligase activity of Trip12 is indispensable for mouse embryogenesis. A homozygous mutation in Trip12 (Trip12(mt/mt that disrupts the ubiquitin ligase activity resulted in embryonic lethality in the middle stage of development. Trip12(mt/mt embryos exhibited growth arrest and increased expression of the negative cell cycle regulator p16. In contrast, Trip12(mt/mt ES cells were viable. They had decreased proliferation, but maintained both the undifferentiated state and the ability to differentiate. Trip12(mt/mt ES cells had increased levels of the BAF57 protein (a component of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex and altered gene expression patterns. These data suggest that Trip12 is involved in global gene expression and plays an important role in mouse development.

  4. Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Inhibits Dendritic Cell Activation and Attenuates Nephritis in a Mouse Model of Lupus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed S Elshikha

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disorder with a worldwide distribution and considerable mortality and morbidity. Although the pathogenesis of this disease remains elusive, over-reactive dendritic cells (DCs play a critical role in the disease development. It has been shown that human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT has protective effects in type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis mouse models. In the present study, we tested the effect of AAT on DC differentiation and functions, as well as its protective effect in a lupus-prone mouse model. We showed that hAAT treatment significantly inhibited LPS (TLR4 agonist and CpG (TLR9 agonist -induced bone-marrow (BM-derived conventional and plasmacytoid DC (cDC and pDC activation and reduced the production of inflammatory cytokines including IFN-I, TNF-α and IL-1β. In MRL/lpr mice, hAAT treatment significantly reduced BM-derived DC differentiation, serum autoantibody levels, and importantly attenuated renal pathology. Our results for the first time demonstrate that hAAT inhibits DC activation and function, and it also attenuates autoimmunity and renal damage in the MRL/lpr lupus model. These results imply that hAAT has a therapeutic potential for the treatment of SLE in humans.

  5. Sperm postacrosomal WW domain-binding protein is not required for mouse egg activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satouh, Yuhkoh; Nozawa, Kaori; Ikawa, Masahito

    2015-10-01

    To begin embryonic development, the zygote must resume the cell cycle correctly after stimulation by sperm-borne oocyte-activating factors (SOAFs). The postacrosomal WW domain-binding protein (PAWP) is one of the strongest SOAF candidates and is widely conserved among eutherian mammals. It has been reported that the microinjection of recombinant PAWP protein can trigger not only Ca(2+) oscillations in mammalian eggs but also intracellular Ca(2+) release in amphibian eggs. It was also suggested that PAWP is involved in the formation of high-quality spermatozoa. On the other hand, negligible SOAF activity for PAWP cRNA has also been reported. In this study, we generated PAWP null mice and examined the fertilizing ability of male mice. Electron microscopy showed no aberrant morphology in spermatogenesis. Intracytoplasmic injection of a single spermatozoon from the null mouse line showed that depletion of PAWP elicited no quantitative differences in Ca(2+) oscillations or in subsequent development of the embryos. We conclude that PAWP does not play an essential role in mouse fertilization.

  6. Insulin resistance in Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse intestinal macrophages is mediated by activation of JNK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y-L; Du, Y-F; Du, H; Shao, P

    2017-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been considered as a metabolic disorder disease, which closely related to insulin signaling impairment. Therefore, identifying the potential mechanism of insulin resistance is important for AD treatment. An APP/PS1 double transgenic AD mouse model was introduced to study insulin resistance in gut. The expressions of AD markers and key elements of insulin signaling were detected in ileum and intestinal macrophages of AD mice by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, mouse intestinal macrophage cell line RAW264.7 was treated by Aβ25-35 or Aβ25-35 + insulin to explore the mechanism of insulin resistance in vitro. The expression of IR-β and the activation of cell signaling related proteins (Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), protein kinase B (AKT) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)) in Aβ25-35-stimulated macrophages were performed via Western blotting. The expressions of IRS1, Aβ and Tuj in AD mice ileum were significantly different from WT mice (pinsulin could reverse these changes (pinsulin addition. Activation of JNK pathway played an important role in insulin resistance of AD mice, suggesting that inhibition of JNK pathway might be a new strategy toward resolving insulin resistance related diseases, such as AD.

  7. Systematic identification of cis-regulatory sequences active in mouse and human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marica Grskovic

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the transcriptional regulation of pluripotent cells is of fundamental interest and will greatly inform efforts aimed at directing differentiation of embryonic stem (ES cells or reprogramming somatic cells. We first analyzed the transcriptional profiles of mouse ES cells and primordial germ cells and identified genes upregulated in pluripotent cells both in vitro and in vivo. These genes are enriched for roles in transcription, chromatin remodeling, cell cycle, and DNA repair. We developed a novel computational algorithm, CompMoby, which combines analyses of sequences both aligned and non-aligned between different genomes with a probabilistic segmentation model to systematically predict short DNA motifs that regulate gene expression. CompMoby was used to identify conserved overrepresented motifs in genes upregulated in pluripotent cells. We show that the motifs are preferentially active in undifferentiated mouse ES and embryonic germ cells in a sequence-specific manner, and that they can act as enhancers in the context of an endogenous promoter. Importantly, the activity of the motifs is conserved in human ES cells. We further show that the transcription factor NF-Y specifically binds to one of the motifs, is differentially expressed during ES cell differentiation, and is required for ES cell proliferation. This study provides novel insights into the transcriptional regulatory networks of pluripotent cells. Our results suggest that this systematic approach can be broadly applied to understanding transcriptional networks in mammalian species.

  8. Measurement of mouse liver glutathione S-transferase activity by the integrated method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖飞; 李甲初; 康格非; 曾昭淳; 左渝萍

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The integrated method was investigated to measure Vm/Km of mouse liver glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity on GSH and 7-Cl-4-nitrobenzofurazozan. Methods: Presetting concentration of one substrate twenty-fold above the others and taking maximum product absorbance Am as parameter while Km as constant, Vm/Km was obtained by nonlinear fitting of GST reaction curve to the integrated Michaelis-Menten equation ln [Am/(Am-Ai)]+Ai/(ε×Km)=(Vm/Km)×ti (1). Results: Vm/Km for GST showed slight dependence on initial substrate concentration and data range, but it was resistant to background absorbance, error in reaction origin and small deviation in presetting Km. Vm/Km was proportional to the amount of GST with upper limit higher than that by initial rate. There was close correlation between Vm/Km and initial rate of the same GST. Consistent results were obtained by this integrated method and classical initial rate method for the measurement of mouse liver GST. Conclusion: With the concentration of one substrate twenty-fold above the others, this integrated method was reliable to measure the activity of enzyme on two substrates, and substrate concentration of the lower one close to its apparent Km was able to be used.

  9. TRPV3 Channels Mediate Strontium-Induced Mouse-Egg Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Carvacho

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, calcium influx is required for oocyte maturation and egg activation. The molecular identities of the calcium-permeant channels that underlie the initiation of embryonic development are not established. Here, we describe a transient receptor potential (TRP ion channel current activated by TRP agonists that is absent in TrpV3−/− eggs. TRPV3 current is differentially expressed during oocyte maturation, reaching a peak of maximum density and activity at metaphase of meiosis II (MII, the stage of fertilization. Selective activation of TRPV3 channels provokes egg activation by mediating massive calcium entry. Widely used to activate eggs, strontium application is known to yield normal offspring in combination with somatic cell nuclear transfer. We show that TRPV3 is required for strontium influx, because TrpV3−/− eggs failed to conduct Sr2+ or undergo strontium-induced activation. We propose that TRPV3 is a major mediator of calcium influx in mouse eggs and is a putative target for artificial egg activation.

  10. Low expression of SEMA6C accelerates the primordial follicle activation in the neonatal mouse ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Su; Yan, Wei; Shen, Wei; Cheng, Jing; Xi, Yueyue; Yuan, Suzhen; Fu, Fangfang; Ding, Ting; Luo, Aiyue; Wang, Shixuan

    2017-09-07

    The primordial follicle assembly, activation and the subsequent development are critical processes for female reproduction. A limited number of primordial follicles are activated to enter the growing follicle pool each wave, and the primordial follicle pool progressively diminishes over a woman's life-time. The number of remaining primordial follicles represents the ovarian reserve. Identification and functional investigation of the factors involved in follicular initial recruitment will be of great significance to the understanding of the female reproduction process and ovarian ageing. In this study, we aimed to study whether and how semaphorin 6C (Sema6c) regulated the primordial follicle activation in the neonatal mouse ovary. The attenuation of SEMA6C expression by SiRNA accelerated the primordial follicle activation in the in vitro ovary culture system. PI3K-AKT-rpS6 pathway was activated when SEMA6C expression was down-regulated. And the LY294002 could reverse the effect of low SEMA6C expression on primordial follicle activation. Our findings revealed that Sema6c was involved in the activation of primordial follicles, and the down-regulation of SEMA6C led to massive primordial follicle activation by interacting with the PI3K-AKT-rpS6 pathway, which might also provide valuable information for understanding premature ovarian failure and ovarian ageing. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  11. Ion channels generating complex spikes in cartwheel cells of the dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yuil; Trussell, Laurence O

    2007-02-01

    Cartwheel cells are glycinergic interneurons that modify somatosensory input to the dorsal cochlear nucleus. They are characterized by firing of mixtures of both simple and complex action potentials. To understand what ion channels determine the generation of these two types of spike waveforms, we recorded from cartwheel cells using the gramicidin perforated-patch technique in brain slices of mouse dorsal cochlear nucleus and applied channel-selective blockers. Complex spikes were distinguished by whether they arose directly from a negative membrane potential or later during a long depolarization. Ca(2+) channels and Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels were major determinants of complex spikes. Onset complex spikes required T-type and possibly R-type Ca(2+) channels and were shaped by BK and SK K(+) channels. Complex spikes arising later in a depolarization were dependent on P/Q- and L-type Ca(2+) channels as well as BK and SK channels. BK channels also contributed to fast repolarization of simple spikes. Simple spikes featured an afterdepolarization that is probably the trigger for complex spiking and is shaped by T/R-type Ca(2+) and SK channels. Fast spikes were dependent on Na(+) channels; a large persistent Na(+) current may provide a depolarizing drive for spontaneous activity in cartwheel cells. Thus the diverse electrical behavior of cartwheel cells is determined by the interaction of a wide variety of ion channels with a prominent role played by Ca(2+).

  12. [Palmar and dorsal nail anlage of the small finger. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, P

    1998-07-01

    A congenital malformation of a 18-month-old boy is presented. Palmar and dorsal surface of the small finger presented a complete nail. Active flexion of the PIP and DIP joints was not possible. The small finger displayed typical dorsal skin both dorsally and palmarly. Flexion creases were absent. The palmar nail was removed, and the defect was covered by a cross-finger flap.

  13. Phorbol Ester Modulation of Ca2+ Channels Mediates Nociceptive Transmission in Dorsal Horn Neurones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary J. Stephens

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Phorbol esters are analogues of diacylglycerol which activate C1 domain proteins, such as protein kinase C (PKC. Phorbol ester/PKC pathways have been proposed as potential therapeutic targets for chronic pain states, potentially by phosphorylating proteins involved in nociception, such as voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs. In this brief report, we investigate the potential involvement of CaV2 VDCC subtypes in functional effects of the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA on nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord. Effects of PMA and of selective pharmacological blockers of CaV2 VDCC subtypes on nociceptive transmission at laminae II dorsal horn neurones were examined in mouse spinal cord slices. Experiments were extended to CaV2.3(−/− mice to complement pharmacological studies. PMA increased the mean frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic currents (sPSCs in dorsal horn neurones, without an effect on event amplitude or half-width. sPSC frequency was reduced by selective VDCC blockers, w-agatoxin-IVA (AgTX; CaV2.1, w-conotoxin-GVIA (CTX; CaV2.2 or SNX-482 (CaV2.3. PMA effects were attenuated in the presence of each VDCC blocker and, also, in CaV2.3(−/− mice. These initial data demonstrate that PMA increases nociceptive transmission at dorsal horn neurones via actions on different CaV2 subtypes suggesting potential anti-nociceptive targets in this system.

  14. Accumulation of Misfolded SOD1 in Dorsal Root Ganglion Degenerating Proprioceptive Sensory Neurons of Transgenic Mice with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Sábado

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is an adult-onset progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting upper and lower motoneurons (MNs. Although the motor phenotype is a hallmark for ALS, there is increasing evidence that systems other than the efferent MN system can be involved. Mutations of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 gene cause a proportion of familial forms of this disease. Misfolding and aggregation of mutant SOD1 exert neurotoxicity in a noncell autonomous manner, as evidenced in studies using transgenic mouse models. Here, we used the SOD1G93A mouse model for ALS to detect, by means of conformational-specific anti-SOD1 antibodies, whether misfolded SOD1-mediated neurotoxicity extended to neuronal types other than MNs. We report that large dorsal root ganglion (DRG proprioceptive neurons accumulate misfolded SOD1 and suffer a degenerative process involving the inflammatory recruitment of macrophagic cells. Degenerating sensory axons were also detected in association with activated microglial cells in the spinal cord dorsal horn of diseased animals. As large proprioceptive DRG neurons project monosynaptically to ventral horn MNs, we hypothesise that a prion-like mechanism may be responsible for the transsynaptic propagation of SOD1 misfolding from ventral horn MNs to DRG sensory neurons.

  15. Gene therapy with IL-12 induced enhanced anti-tumor activity in fibrosarcoma mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razi Soofiyani, Saiedeh; Kazemi, Tohid; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Mohammad Hosseini, Akbar; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Hallaj-Nezhadi, Somayeh; Baradaran, Behzad

    2016-12-01

    Context Immunotherapy is among the most promising modalities for treatment of cancer. Recently, interleukin 12 (IL-12) has been used as an immunotherapeutic agent in cancer gene therapy. IL-12 can activate dendritic cells (DCs) and boost anti-tumor immune responses. Objective In the current study, we have investigated if IL-12 gene therapy can lead to the regression of tumor mass in a mouse model of fibrosarcoma. Material and methods To investigate the therapeutic efficacy of IL-12, WEHI-164 tumor cells were transfected with murine-IL12 plasmids using Lipofectamine. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to confirm IL-12 expression in transfected cells. The fibrosarcoma mouse model was established by subcutaneous injection of transfected cells to Balb/C mice. Mice were sacrificed and the tumors were extracted. Tumor sizes were measured by caliper. The expression of IL-12 and IFN-γ was studied with real-time PCR and western blotting. The expression of Ki-67(a tumor proliferation marker) in tumor mass was studied by immunohistochemistry staining. Results and discussion The group treated with IL-12 showed a significant decrease in tumor mass volume (P: 0.000). The results of real-time PCR and western blotting showed that IL-12 and IFN-γ expression increased in the group treated with IL-12 (relative expression of IL-12: 1.9 and relative expression of IFN-γ: 1.766). Immunohistochemistry staining showed that Ki-67 expression was reduced in the group treated with IL-12. Conclusion IL-12 gene therapy successfully led to regress of tumor mass in the fibrosarcoma mouse model. This may serve as a candidate therapeutic approach for treatment of cancer.

  16. DMEM enhances tyrosinase activity in B16 mouse melanoma cells and human melanocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panpen Diawpanich

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Media components may affect the activities of cultured cells. In this study, tyrosinase activity was evaluated by using B16-F10 mouse melanoma cell lines (B16-F10 and primary human melanocytes cultured in different media. An optical density measurement and a L-dopa reaction assay were used as the determination of the tyrosinase activity. The study of B16-F10 found the optical density to be 2010, 2246 and 2961 in cells cultured in RPMI Medium 1640 (RPMI1640,Minimum Essential Medium (MEM and Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM, respectively. Moreover, compared to RPMI 1640 and MEM, DMEM showed the darkest color of melanin formation in culture media and in cells after the L-dopa reaction assay. Addition of kojic acid showed a significant inhibitory effect on tyrosinase activity in all media.Whereas MCDB153 showed no significant effect on human melanocytes, DMEM caused a dramatic increase in tyrosinase activity after 4 days of cultivation. Addition of kojic acid showed a significant tyrosinase inhibitory effect in DMEM only. Furthermore, an active ingredient in green tea, epigallocathechin gallate (EGCG could inhibit tyrosinase activity in both B16-F10 and human melanocytes cultured in DMEM. In summary, these results suggest that DMEM is a suitable medium that provides high detection sensitivity in a tyrosinase inhibition assay.

  17. Ginsenosides stimulated the proliferation of mouse spermatogonia involving activation of protein kinase C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-lei ZHANG; Kai-ming WANG; Cai-qiao ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    The effect of ginsenosides on proliferation of type A spermatogonia was investigated in 7-day-old mice.Spermatogonia were characterized by c-kit expression and cell proliferation was assessed by immunocytochemical demonstration of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA).After 72-h culture,Sertoli cells formed a confluent monolayer to which numerous spermatogonial colonies attached.Spermatogonia were positive for c-kit staining and showed high proliferating activity by PCNA expression.Ginsenosides (1.0~10 μg/ml) significantly stimulated proliferation of spermatogonia.Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) elicited proliferation of spermatogonia at 10-8 to 107 mol/L and the PKC inhibitor H7 inhibited this effect.Likewise,ginsenosides-stimulated spermatogonial proliferation was suppressed by combined treatment of H7.These results indicate that the proliferating effect ofginsenosides on mouse type A spermatogonia might be mediated by a mechanism involving the PKC signal transduction pathway.

  18. Cell interactions in concanavalin A activated cation flux and DNA synthesis of mouse lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Kaplan, J G

    1980-01-01

    Co-culture at constant cell density of nude mouse spleen cells (by themselves unresponsive to the T-cell mitogen concanavalin A (Con A)), with congenic T-enriched lymphocyte suspensions and Con A caused anomalously high activation of K+ transport (measured by 86Rb uptake) and of incorporation...... of thymidine into DNA; the expected dilution of these two responses by nude spleen cells did not occur. However, if the nude splenocytes were added immediately prior to assay to the enriched T cells that had been precultured in presence of Con A, the expected dilution of the activated T-cell responses occurred......; both 86Rb uptake and thymidine incorporation were reduced proportionally to the degree of dilution of the T cells by the nonresponding cells. These data indicate that during co-culture in presence of Con A there is interaction between the T cells, capable of responding to mitogens, and the nude spleen...

  19. Mammalian peptide isomerase: platypus-type activity is present in mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Jennifer M S; Chow, Stephanie J P; Crossett, Ben; Kuchel, Philip W

    2010-06-01

    Male platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) venom has a peptidyl aminoacyl L/D-isomerase (hereafter called peptide isomerase) that converts the second amino acid residue in from the N-terminus from the L- to the D-form, and vice versa. A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) assay has been developed to monitor the interconversion using synthetic hexapeptides derived from defensin-like peptide-2 (DLP-2) and DLP-4 as substrates. It was hypothesised that animals other than the platypus would have peptide isomerase with the same substrate specificity. Accordingly, eight mouse tissues were tested and heart was shown to have the activity. This is notable for being the first evidence of a peptide isomerase being present in a higher mammal and heralds finding the activity in man.

  20. Quantitation of fibroblast activation protein (FAP-specific protease activity in mouse, baboon and human fluids and organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona M. Keane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The protease fibroblast activation protein (FAP is a specific marker of activated mesenchymal cells in tumour stroma and fibrotic liver. A specific, reliable FAP enzyme assay has been lacking. FAP's unique and restricted cleavage of the post proline bond was exploited to generate a new specific substrate to quantify FAP enzyme activity. This sensitive assay detected no FAP activity in any tissue or fluid of FAP gene knockout mice, thus confirming assay specificity. Circulating FAP activity was ∼20- and 1.3-fold less in baboon than in mouse and human plasma, respectively. Serum and plasma contained comparable FAP activity. In mice, the highest levels of FAP activity were in uterus, pancreas, submaxillary gland and skin, whereas the lowest levels were in brain, prostate, leukocytes and testis. Baboon organs high in FAP activity included skin, epididymis, bladder, colon, adipose tissue, nerve and tongue. FAP activity was greatly elevated in tumours and associated lymph nodes and in fungal-infected skin of unhealthy baboons. FAP activity was 14- to 18-fold greater in cirrhotic than in non-diseased human liver, and circulating FAP activity was almost doubled in alcoholic cirrhosis. Parallel DPP4 measurements concorded with the literature, except for the novel finding of high DPP4 activity in bile. The new FAP enzyme assay is the first to be thoroughly characterised and shows that FAP activity is measurable in most organs and at high levels in some. This new assay is a robust tool for specific quantitation of FAP enzyme activity in both preclinical and clinical samples, particularly liver fibrosis.

  1. Inhibition of STAT3 activity delays obesity-induced thyroid carcinogenesis in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Won; Han, Cho Rong; Zhao, Li; Willingham, Mark C; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2016-01-01

    Compelling epidemiologic studies indicate that obesity is a risk factor for many human cancers, including thyroid cancer. In recent decades, the incidence of thyroid cancer has dramatically increased along with a marked rise in obesity prevalence. We previously demonstrated that a high fat diet (HFD) effectively induced the obese phenotype in a mouse model of thyroid cancer (Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice). Moreover, HFD activates the STAT3 signal pathway to promote more aggressive tumor phenotypes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of S3I-201, a specific inhibitor of STAT3 activity, on HFD-induced aggressive cancer progression in the mouse model of thyroid cancer. WT and Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice were treated with HFD together with S3I-201 or vehicle-only as controls. We assessed the effects of S3I-201 on HFD-induced thyroid cancer progression, the leptin-JAK2-STAT3 signaling pathway, and key regulators of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). S3I-201 effectively inhibited HFD-induced aberrant activation of STAT3 and its downstream targets to markedly inhibit thyroid tumor growth and to prolong survival. Decreased protein levels of cyclins D1 and B1, cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), CDK6, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein led to the inhibition of tumor cell proliferation in S3I-201-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice. Reduced occurrence of vascular invasion and blocking of anaplasia and lung metastasis in thyroid tumors of S3I-201-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice were mediated via decreased expression of vimentin and matrix metalloproteinases, two key effectors of EMT. The present findings suggest that inhibition of the STAT3 activity would be a novel treatment strategy for obesity-induced thyroid cancer. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  2. Endomorphins: localization, release and action on rat dorsal horn neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dun, N J; Dun, S L; Wu, S Y; Williams, C A; Kwok, E H

    2000-01-01

    Endomorphin (Endo) 1 and 2, two tetrapeptides isolated from the bovine and human brain, have been proposed to be the endogenous ligand for the mu-opiate receptor. A multi-disciplinary study was undertaken to address the issues of localization, release and biological action of Endo with respect to the rat dorsal horn. First, immunohistochemical studies showed that Endo-1- or Endo-2-like immunoreactivity (Endo-1- or Endo-2-LI) is selectively expressed in fiber-like elements occupying the superficial layers of the rat dorsal horn, which also exhibit a high level of mu-opiate receptor immunoreactivity. Second, release of immunoreactive Endo-2-like substances (irEndo) from the in vitro rat spinal cords upon electrical stimulation of dorsal root afferent fibers was detected by the immobilized antibody microprobe technique. The site of release corresponded to laminae I and II where the highest density of Endo-2-LI fibers was localized. Lastly, whole-cell patch clamp recordings from substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons of rat lumbar spinal cord slices revealed two distinct actions of exogenous Endo-1 and Endo-2: (1) depression of excitatory and/or inhibitory postsynaptic potentials evoked by stimulation of dorsal root entry zone, and (2) hyperpolarization of SG neurons. These two effects were prevented by the selective mu-opiate receptor antagonist beta-funaltrexamine. The localization of endomorphin-positive fibers in superficial layers of the dorsal horn and the release of irEndo upon stimulation of dorsal root afferents together with the observation that Endo inhibits the activity of SG neurons by interacting with mu-opiate receptors provide additional support of a role of Endo as the endogenous ligand for the mu-opiate receptor in the rat dorsal horn.

  3. Mechanisms of complement activation by dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoworms in mouse versus human serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banda, Nirmal K; Mehta, Gaurav; Chao, Ying

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The complement system is a key component of innate immunity implicated in the neutralization and clearance of invading pathogens. Dextran coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle is a promising magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. However, dextran SPIO has...... pathway (LP) or alternative pathway (AP) components were used to study mechanisms of mouse complement activation. In vitro measurements of fluid phase markers of complement activation C4d and Bb and the terminal pathway marker SC5b-C9 in normal and genetically deficient sera were used to study...... the CP, but that did not affect the total level of C3 deposition on the particles. CONCLUSIONS: There were important differences and similarities in the complement activation by SPIO NW in mouse versus human sera. Understanding the mechanisms of immune recognition of nanoparticles in mouse and human...

  4. Glucose decouples intracellular Ca2+ activity from glucagon secretion in mouse pancreatic islet alpha-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain J Le Marchand

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of glucagon secretion and its suppression by glucose are presently unknown. This study investigates the relationship between intracellular calcium levels ([Ca(2+](i and hormone secretion under low and high glucose conditions. We examined the effects of modulating ion channel activities on [Ca(2+](i and hormone secretion from ex vivo mouse pancreatic islets. Glucagon-secreting α-cells were unambiguously identified by cell specific expression of fluorescent proteins. We found that activation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels is critical for α-cell calcium oscillations and glucagon secretion at low glucose levels. Calcium channel activation depends on K(ATP channel activity but not on tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na(+ channels. The use of glucagon secretagogues reveals a positive correlation between α-cell [Ca(2+](i and secretion at low glucose levels. Glucose elevation suppresses glucagon secretion even after treatment with secretagogues. Importantly, this inhibition is not mediated by K(ATP channel activity or reduction in α-cell [Ca(2+](i. Our results demonstrate that glucose uncouples the positive relationship between [Ca(2+](i and secretory activity. We conclude that glucose suppression of glucagon secretion is not mediated by inactivation of calcium channels, but instead, it requires a calcium-independent inhibitory pathway.

  5. Immunization of stromal cell targeting fibroblast activation protein providing immunotherapy to breast cancer mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Mingyao; Wang, Wenju; Yan, Jun; Tan, Jing; Liao, Liwei; Shi, Jianlin; Wei, Chuanyu; Xie, Yanhua; Jin, Xingfang; Yang, Li; Jin, Qing; Zhu, Huirong; Tan, Weiwei; Yang, Fang; Hou, Zongliu

    2016-08-01

    Unlike heterogeneous tumor cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) are genetically more stable which serve as a reliable target for tumor immunotherapy. Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) which is restrictively expressed in tumor cells and CAF in vivo and plays a prominent role in tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis can function as a tumor rejection antigen. In the current study, we have constructed artificial FAP(+) stromal cells which mimicked the FAP(+) CAF in vivo. We immunized a breast cancer mouse model with FAP(+) stromal cells to perform immunotherapy against FAP(+) cells in the tumor microenvironment. By forced expression of FAP, we have obtained FAP(+) stromal cells whose phenotype was CD11b(+)/CD34(+)/Sca-1(+)/FSP-1(+)/MHC class I(+). Interestingly, proliferation capacity of the fibroblasts was significantly enhanced by FAP. In the breast cancer-bearing mouse model, vaccination with FAP(+) stromal cells has significantly inhibited the growth of allograft tumor and reduced lung metastasis indeed. Depletion of T cell assays has suggested that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were involved in the tumor cytotoxic immune response. Furthermore, tumor tissue from FAP-immunized mice revealed that targeting FAP(+) CAF has induced apoptosis and decreased collagen type I and CD31 expression in the tumor microenvironment. These results implicated that immunization with FAP(+) stromal cells led to the disruption of the tumor microenvironment. Our study may provide a novel strategy for immunotherapy of a broad range of cancer.

  6. NF-kB activation as a biomarker of light injury using a transgenic mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocock, Ginger M.; Boretsky, Adam; Wang, Heuy-Ching; Golden, Dallas; Gupta, Praveena; Vargas, Gracie; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Motamedi, Massoud

    2012-03-01

    The spatial and temporal activation of NF-kB (p65) was monitored in the retina of a transgenic mouse model (cis-NFkB-EGFP) in vivo after receiving varying grades of laser induced thermal injury in one eye. Baseline images of the retinas from 26 mice were collected prior to injury and up to five months post-exposure using a Heidelberg Spectralis HRA confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO) with a spectral domain optical coherence tomographer (SDOCT). Injured and control eyes were enucleated at discrete time points following laser exposure for cryosectioning to determine localization of NF-kB dependent enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene expression within the retina using fluorescence microscopy. In addition, EGFP basal expression in brain and retinal tissue from the cis-NFkB-EGFP was characterized using two-photon imaging. Regions of the retina exposed to threshold and supra-threshold laser damage evaluated using fluorescence cSLO showed increased EGFP fluorescence localized to the exposed region for a duration that was dependent upon the degree of injury. Fluorescence microscopy of threshold damage revealed EGFP localized to the outer nuclear region and retinal pigment epithelial layer. Basal expression of EGFP imaged using two-photon microscopy was heterogeneously distributed throughout brain tissue and confined to the inner retina. Results show cis-NF-kB-EGFP reporter mouse can be used for in vivo studies of light induced injury to the retina and possibly brain injury.

  7. Controlled Osteogenic Differentiation of Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Tetracycline-Controlled Transcriptional Activation of Amelogenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Okawa, Hiroko; Kamano, Yuya; Niibe, Kunimichi; Kayashima, Hiroki; Osathanon, Thanaphum; Pavasant, Prasit; Saeki, Makio; Yatani, Hirofumi; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative dental therapies for bone tissues rely on efficient targeting of endogenous and transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to guide bone formation. Amelogenin is the primary component of Emdogain, which is used to regenerate periodontal defects; however, the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects on alveolar bone remain unclear. The tetracycline (Tet)-dependent transcriptional regulatory system is a good candidate to investigate distinct roles of genes of interest during stem cell differentiation. Here, we investigated amelogenin-dependent regulation of osteogenesis in MSCs by establishing a Tet-controlled transcriptional activation system. Clonal mouse bone marrow-derived MSCs were lentivirally transduced with the Tet repressor (TetR) expression vector followed by drug selection to obtain MSCs constitutively expressing TetR (MSCs-TetR). Expression vectors that contained the Tet operator and amelogenin-coding (Amelx) cDNA fragments were constructed using the Gateway system and lentivirally introduced into MSCs-TetR to generate a Tet regulation system in MSCs (MSCs-TetR/Amelx). MSCs-TetR/Amelx significantly overexpressed the Amelx gene and protein in the presence of the tetracycline derivative doxycycline. Concomitant expression of osterix, bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteopontin, and osteocalcin was modulated by addition or removal of doxycycline under osteogenic guidance. During osteogenic induction, MSCs-TetR/Amelx treated with doxycycline showed significantly increased gene expression of osterix, type I collagen, BSP, and osteocalcin in addition to increased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation. Enhanced extracellular matrix calcification was observed when forced Amelx expression commenced at the early stage but not at the intermediate or late stages of osteogenesis. These results suggest that a Tet-controlled Amelx gene regulation system for mouse MSCs was successfully established, in which transcriptional activation

  8. Patterns of recombination activity on mouse chromosome 11 revealed by high resolution mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Billings

    Full Text Available The success of high resolution genetic mapping of disease predisposition and quantitative trait loci in humans and experimental animals depends on the positions of key crossover events around the gene of interest. In mammals, the majority of recombination occurs at highly delimited 1-2 kb long sites known as recombination hotspots, whose locations and activities are distributed unevenly along the chromosomes and are tightly regulated in a sex specific manner. The factors determining the location of hotspots started to emerge with the finding of PRDM9 as a major hotspot regulator in mammals, however, additional factors modulating hotspot activity and sex specificity are yet to be defined. To address this limitation, we have collected and mapped the locations of 4829 crossover events occurring on mouse chromosome 11 in 5858 meioses of male and female reciprocal F1 hybrids of C57BL/6J and CAST/EiJ mice. This chromosome was chosen for its medium size and high gene density and provided a comparison with our previous analysis of recombination on the longest mouse chromosome 1. Crossovers were mapped to an average resolution of 127 kb, and thirteen hotspots were mapped to <8 kb. Most crossovers occurred in a small number of the most active hotspots. Females had higher recombination rate than males as a consequence of differences in crossover interference and regional variation of sex specific rates along the chromosome. Comparison with chromosome 1 showed that recombination events tend to be positioned in similar fashion along the centromere-telomere axis but independently of the local gene density. It appears that mammalian recombination is regulated on at least three levels, chromosome-wide, regional, and at individual hotspots, and these regulation levels are influenced by sex and genetic background but not by gene content.

  9. Immunosuppression, peripheral inflammation and invasive infection from endogenous gut microbiota activate retinal microglia in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneu, Victoria; Noailles, Agustina; Gómez-Vicente, Violeta; Carpena, Nuria; Cuenca, Nicolás; Gil, M Luisa; Gozalbo, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Although its actual role in the progression of degenerative processes is not fully known, the persistent activated state of retinal microglia and the concurrent secretion of inflammatory mediators may contribute to neuronal death and permanent vision loss. Our objective was to determine whether non-ocular conditions (immunosuppression and peripheral inflammation) could lead to activation of retinal microglia. Mouse models of immunosuppression induced by cyclophosphamide and/or peripheral inflammation by chemically induced sublethal colitis in C57BL/6J mice were used. Retinal microglia morphology, spatial distribution and complexity, as well as MHCII and CD11b expression levels were determined by flow cytometry and confocal immunofluorescence analysis with anti-CD11b, anti-IBA1 and anti-MHCIIRT1B antibodies. Retinas of mice with double treatment showed changes in microglial morphology, spatial distribution and expression levels of CD11b and MHCII. These effects were higher than those observed with any treatment separately. In addition, we also observed in these mice: (i) translocation of endogenous bacteria from gut to liver, and (ii) upregulation of TLR2 expression in retinal microglia. Using a mouse model of immunosuppression and gut colonization by Candida albicans, translocation of fungal cells was confirmed to occur in wild type and, to a higher extent, in TLR2 KO mice, which are more susceptible to fungal invasion; interestingly microglial changes were also higher in TLR2 KO mice. Hence, non-ocular injuries (immunosuppression, peripheral inflammation and invasive infection from endogenous gut microbiota) can activate retinal microglia and therefore could affect the progression of neurodegenerative disorders and should be taken into account to improve therapeutic options. © 2016 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Controlled Osteogenic Differentiation of Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Tetracycline-Controlled Transcriptional Activation of Amelogenin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Wang

    Full Text Available Regenerative dental therapies for bone tissues rely on efficient targeting of endogenous and transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs to guide bone formation. Amelogenin is the primary component of Emdogain, which is used to regenerate periodontal defects; however, the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects on alveolar bone remain unclear. The tetracycline (Tet-dependent transcriptional regulatory system is a good candidate to investigate distinct roles of genes of interest during stem cell differentiation. Here, we investigated amelogenin-dependent regulation of osteogenesis in MSCs by establishing a Tet-controlled transcriptional activation system. Clonal mouse bone marrow-derived MSCs were lentivirally transduced with the Tet repressor (TetR expression vector followed by drug selection to obtain MSCs constitutively expressing TetR (MSCs-TetR. Expression vectors that contained the Tet operator and amelogenin-coding (Amelx cDNA fragments were constructed using the Gateway system and lentivirally introduced into MSCs-TetR to generate a Tet regulation system in MSCs (MSCs-TetR/Amelx. MSCs-TetR/Amelx significantly overexpressed the Amelx gene and protein in the presence of the tetracycline derivative doxycycline. Concomitant expression of osterix, bone sialoprotein (BSP, osteopontin, and osteocalcin was modulated by addition or removal of doxycycline under osteogenic guidance. During osteogenic induction, MSCs-TetR/Amelx treated with doxycycline showed significantly increased gene expression of osterix, type I collagen, BSP, and osteocalcin in addition to increased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation. Enhanced extracellular matrix calcification was observed when forced Amelx expression commenced at the early stage but not at the intermediate or late stages of osteogenesis. These results suggest that a Tet-controlled Amelx gene regulation system for mouse MSCs was successfully established, in which transcriptional

  11. Controlled Osteogenic Differentiation of Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Tetracycline-Controlled Transcriptional Activation of Amelogenin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Okawa, Hiroko; Kamano, Yuya; Niibe, Kunimichi; Kayashima, Hiroki; Osathanon, Thanaphum; Pavasant, Prasit; Saeki, Makio; Yatani, Hirofumi; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative dental therapies for bone tissues rely on efficient targeting of endogenous and transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to guide bone formation. Amelogenin is the primary component of Emdogain, which is used to regenerate periodontal defects; however, the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects on alveolar bone remain unclear. The tetracycline (Tet)-dependent transcriptional regulatory system is a good candidate to investigate distinct roles of genes of interest during stem cell differentiation. Here, we investigated amelogenin-dependent regulation of osteogenesis in MSCs by establishing a Tet-controlled transcriptional activation system. Clonal mouse bone marrow-derived MSCs were lentivirally transduced with the Tet repressor (TetR) expression vector followed by drug selection to obtain MSCs constitutively expressing TetR (MSCs-TetR). Expression vectors that contained the Tet operator and amelogenin-coding (Amelx) cDNA fragments were constructed using the Gateway system and lentivirally introduced into MSCs-TetR to generate a Tet regulation system in MSCs (MSCs-TetR/Amelx). MSCs-TetR/Amelx significantly overexpressed the Amelx gene and protein in the presence of the tetracycline derivative doxycycline. Concomitant expression of osterix, bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteopontin, and osteocalcin was modulated by addition or removal of doxycycline under osteogenic guidance. During osteogenic induction, MSCs-TetR/Amelx treated with doxycycline showed significantly increased gene expression of osterix, type I collagen, BSP, and osteocalcin in addition to increased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation. Enhanced extracellular matrix calcification was observed when forced Amelx expression commenced at the early stage but not at the intermediate or late stages of osteogenesis. These results suggest that a Tet-controlled Amelx gene regulation system for mouse MSCs was successfully established, in which transcriptional activation

  12. G protein activation by endomorphins in the mouse periaqueductal gray matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, M; Mizoguchi, H; Narita, M; Dun, N J; Hwang, B H; Endoh, T; Suzuki, T; Nagase, H; Suzuki, T; Tseng, L F

    2000-01-01

    The midbrain periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) is an important brain region for the coordination of mu-opioid-induced pharmacological actions. The present study was designed to determine whether newly isolated mu-opioid peptide endomorphins can activate G proteins through mu-opioid receptors in the PAG by monitoring the binding to membranes of the non-hydrolyzable analog of GTP, guanosine-5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPgammaS). An autoradiographic [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding study showed that both endomorphin-1 and -2 produced similar anatomical distributions of activated G proteins in the mouse midbrain region. In the mouse PAG, endomorphin-1 and -2 at concentrations from 0.001 to 10 microM increased [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding in a concentration-dependent manner and reached a maximal stimulation of 74.6+/-3.8 and 72.3+/-4.0%, respectively, at 10 microM. In contrast, the synthetic selective mu-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala(2),NHPhe(4), Gly-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO) had a much greater efficacy and produced a 112.6+/-5.1% increase of the maximal stimulation. The receptor specificity of endomorphin-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding was verified by coincubating membranes with endomorphins in the presence of specific mu-, delta- or kappa-opioid receptor antagonists. Coincubation with selective mu-opioid receptor antagonists beta-funaltrexamine or D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Phe-Thr-NH(2) (CTOP) blocked both endomorphin-1 and-2-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding. In contrast, neither delta- nor kappa-opioid receptor antagonist had any effect on the [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding stimulated by either endomorphin-1 or -2. These findings indicate that both endomorphin-1 and -2 increase [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding by selectively stimulating mu-opioid receptors with intrinsic activity less than that of DAMGO and suggest that these new endogenous ligands might be partial agonists for mu-opioid receptors in the mouse PAG.

  13. Interferon-gamma alters the phagocytic activity of the mouse trophoblast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrahamsohn Ises

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma mediates diverse functions in bone marrow-derived phagocytes, including phagocytosis and microbe destruction. This cytokine has also been detected at implantation sites under both physiological and pathological conditions in many different species. At these particular sites, the outermost embryonic cell layer in close contact with the maternal tissues, the trophoblast exhibits intense phagocytic activity. To determine whether IFN-gamma affects phagocytosis of mouse-trophoblast cells, ectoplacental cone-derived trophoblast was cultured and evaluated for erythrophagocytosis. Phagocytic activity was monitored ultrastructurally and expressed as percentage of phagocytic trophoblast in total trophoblast cells. Conditioned medium from concanavalin-A-stimulated spleen cells significantly enhanced trophoblast phagocytosis. This effect was blocked by pre-incubation with an anti-IFN-gamma neutralizing antibody. Introduction of mouse recombinant IFN-gamma (mrIFN-gamma to cultures did not increase cell death, but augmented the percentage of phagocytic cells in a dose-dependent manner. Ectoplacental cones from mice deficient for IFN-gamma receptor alpha-chain showed a significant decrease of the phagocytosis, even under mrIFN-gamma stimulation, suggesting that IFN-gamma-induced phagocytosis are receptor-mediated. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analyses confirmed the presence of mRNA for IFN-gamma receptor alpha and beta-chains in trophoblast cells and detected a significant increase in the mRNA levels of IFN-gamma receptor beta-chain, mainly, when cultured cells were exposed to IFN-gamma. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses also revealed protein expression of the IFN-gamma receptor alpha-chain. These results suggest that IFN-gamma may participate in the phagocytic activation of the mouse trophoblast, albeit the exact mechanism was not hereby elucidated. Protective and/or nutritional fetal benefit may result from this

  14. Bay11-7082 attenuates neuropathic pain via inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B and nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor protein 3 inflammasome activation in dorsal root ganglions in a rat model of lumbar disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang AL

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ailiang Zhang, Kun Wang, Lianghua Ding, Xinnan Bao, Xuan Wang, Xubin Qiu, Jinbo Liu Spine Surgery, Third Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Changzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Lumbar disc herniation (LDH is an important cause of radiculopathy, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Many studies suggested that local inflammation, rather than mechanical compression, results in radiculopathy induced by LDH. On the molecular and cellular level, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB and nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3 inflammasome have been implicated in the regulation of neuroinflammation formation and progression. In this study, the autologous nucleus pulposus (NP was implanted in the left L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG to mimic LDH in rats. We investigated the expression of NF-κB and the components of NLRP3 inflammasome in the DRG neurons in rats. Western blotting and immunofluorescence for the related molecules, including NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing caspase-1 activator domain (ASC, caspase-1, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-18, IκBα, p-IκBα, p65, p-p65, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP were examined. In the NP-treated group, the activations of NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1, IL-1β, IL-18, p-IκBα, and p-p65 in DRG neurons in rats were elevated at 1 day after surgery, and the peak occurred at 7 days. Treatment with Bay11-7082, an inhibitor of the actions of IKK-β, was able to inhibit expression and activation of the molecules (NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1, IL-1β, IL-18, p-IκBα, and p-p65 and relieve the pain in rats. Our study shows that NF-κB and NLRP3 inflammasome are involved in the maintenance of NP-induced pain, and that Bay11-7082 could alleviate mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia by inhibiting NF-κB and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Keywords: pain, NLRP3, NF-κB, dorsal root ganglion, nucleus pulposus

  15. Proteinase-Activated Receptor-1 and Immunomodulatory Effects of a PAR1-Activating Peptide in a Mouse Model of Prostatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mark Stanton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nonbacterial prostatitis has no established etiology. We hypothesized that proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR1 can play a role in prostatitis. We therefore investigated the effects of PAR1 stimulation in the context of a new model of murine nonbacterial prostatitis. Methods. Using a hapten (ethanol-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- (DNBS- induced prostatitis model with both wild-type and PAR1-null mice, we examined (1 the location of PAR1 in the mouse prostate and (2 the impact of a PAR1-activating peptide (TFLLR-NH2: PAR1-TF on ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation. Results. Ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation was maximal at 2 days. In the tissue, PAR1 was expressed predominantly along the apical acini of prostatic epithelium. Although PAR1-TF on its own did not cause inflammation, its coadministration with ethanol-DNBS reduced all indices of acute prostatitis. Further, PAR1-TF administration doubled the prostatic production of interleukin-10 (IL-10 compared with ethanol-DNBS treatment alone. This enhanced IL-10 was not observed in PAR1-null mice and was not caused by the reverse-sequence receptor-inactive peptide, RLLFT-NH2. Surprisingly, PAR1-TF, also diminished ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation in PAR1-null mice. Conclusions. PAR1 is expressed in the mouse prostate and its activation by PAR1-TF elicits immunomodulatory effects during ethanol-DNBS-induced prostatitis. However, PAR1-TF also diminishes ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation via a non-PAR1 mechanism by activating an as-yet unknown receptor.

  16. Proteinase-activated receptor-1 and immunomodulatory effects of a PAR1-activating peptide in a mouse model of prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, M Mark; Nelson, Lisa K; Benediktsson, Hallgrimur; Hollenberg, Morley D; Buret, Andre G; Ceri, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Nonbacterial prostatitis has no established etiology. We hypothesized that proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) can play a role in prostatitis. We therefore investigated the effects of PAR1 stimulation in the context of a new model of murine nonbacterial prostatitis. Using a hapten (ethanol-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- (DNBS-)) induced prostatitis model with both wild-type and PAR1-null mice, we examined (1) the location of PAR1 in the mouse prostate and (2) the impact of a PAR1-activating peptide (TFLLR-NH2: PAR1-TF) on ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation. Ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation was maximal at 2 days. In the tissue, PAR1 was expressed predominantly along the apical acini of prostatic epithelium. Although PAR1-TF on its own did not cause inflammation, its coadministration with ethanol-DNBS reduced all indices of acute prostatitis. Further, PAR1-TF administration doubled the prostatic production of interleukin-10 (IL-10) compared with ethanol-DNBS treatment alone. This enhanced IL-10 was not observed in PAR1-null mice and was not caused by the reverse-sequence receptor-inactive peptide, RLLFT-NH2. Surprisingly, PAR1-TF, also diminished ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation in PAR1-null mice. PAR1 is expressed in the mouse prostate and its activation by PAR1-TF elicits immunomodulatory effects during ethanol-DNBS-induced prostatitis. However, PAR1-TF also diminishes ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation via a non-PAR1 mechanism by activating an as-yet unknown receptor.

  17. A novel BK channel-targeted peptide suppresses sound evoked activity in the mouse inferior colliculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, L. L.; Brecht, E. J.; Philpo, A.; Iyer, S.; Wu, N. S.; Mihic, S. J.; Aldrich, R. W.; Pierce, J.; Walton, J. P.

    2017-01-01

    Large conductance calcium-activated (BK) channels are broadly expressed in neurons and muscle where they modulate cellular activity. Decades of research support an interest in pharmaceutical applications for modulating BK channel function. Here we report a novel BK channel-targeted peptide with functional activity in vitro and in vivo. This 9-amino acid peptide, LS3, has a unique action, suppressing channel gating rather than blocking the pore of heterologously expressed human BK channels. With an IC50 in the high picomolar range, the apparent affinity is higher than known high affinity BK channel toxins. LS3 suppresses locomotor activity via a BK channel-specific mechanism in wild-type or BK channel-humanized Caenorhabditis elegans. Topical application on the dural surface of the auditory midbrain in mouse suppresses sound evoked neural activity, similar to a well-characterized pore blocker of the BK channel. Moreover, this novel ion channel-targeted peptide rapidly crosses the BBB after systemic delivery to modulate auditory processing. Thus, a potent BK channel peptide modulator is open to neurological applications, such as preventing audiogenic seizures that originate in the auditory midbrain. PMID:28195225

  18. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is a neuroprotectant in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverry, Ramiro; Wu, Jialing; Haile, Woldeab B; Guzman, Johanna; Yepes, Manuel

    2010-06-01

    The best-known function of the serine protease tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is as a thrombolytic enzyme. However, it is also found in structures of the brain that are highly vulnerable to hypoxia-induced cell death, where its association with neuronal survival is poorly understood. Here, we have demonstrated that hippocampal areas of the mouse brain lacking tPA activity are more vulnerable to neuronal death following an ischemic insult. We found that sublethal hypoxia, which elicits tolerance to subsequent lethal hypoxic/ischemic injury in a natural process known as ischemic preconditioning (IPC), induced a rapid release of neuronal tPA. Treatment of hippocampal neurons with tPA induced tolerance against a lethal hypoxic insult applied either immediately following insult (early IPC) or 24 hours later (delayed IPC). tPA-induced early IPC was independent of the proteolytic activity of tPA and required the engagement of a member of the LDL receptor family. In contrast, tPA-induced delayed IPC required the proteolytic activity of tPA and was mediated by plasmin, the NMDA receptor, and PKB phosphorylation. We also found that IPC in vivo increased tPA activity in the cornu ammonis area 1 (CA1) layer and Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus, as well as ischemic tolerance in wild-type but not tPA- or plasminogen-deficient mice. These data show that tPA can act as an endogenous neuroprotectant in the murine hippocampus.

  19. Activity of potent and selective host defense peptide mimetics in mouse models of oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Lisa K; Freeman, Katie B; Masso-Silva, Jorge A; Falkovsky, Klaudia; Aloyouny, Ashwag; Markowitz, Kenneth; Hise, Amy G; Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz; Scott, Richard W; Diamond, Gill

    2014-07-01

    There is a strong need for new broadly active antifungal agents for the treatment of oral candidiasis that not only are active against many species of Candida, including drug-resistant strains, but also evade microbial countermeasures which may lead to resistance. Host defense peptides (HDPs) can provide a foundation for the development of such agents. Toward this end, we have developed fully synthetic, small-molecule, nonpeptide mimetics of the HDPs that improve safety and other pharmaceutical properties. Here we describe the identification of several HDP mimetics that are broadly active against C. albicans and other species of Candida, rapidly fungicidal, and active against yeast and hyphal cultures and that exhibit low cytotoxicity for mammalian cells. Importantly, specificity for Candida over commensal bacteria was also evident, thereby minimizing potential damage to the endogenous microbiome which otherwise could favor fungal overgrowth. Three compounds were tested as topical agents in two different mouse models of oral candidiasis and were found to be highly active. Following single-dose administrations, total Candida burdens in tongues of infected animals were reduced up to three logs. These studies highlight the potential of HDP mimetics as a new tool in the antifungal arsenal for the treatment of oral candidiasis.

  20. Molecular Imaging Provides Novel Insights on Estrogen Receptor Activity in Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Stell

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptors have long been known to be expressed in several brain areas in addition to those directly involved in the control of reproductive functions. Investigations in humans and in animal models suggest a strong influence of estrogens on limbic and motor functions, yet the complexity and heterogeneity of neural tissue have limited our approaches to the full understanding of estrogen activity in the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to examine the transcriptional activity of estrogen receptors in the brain of male and female mice. Exploiting the ERE-Luc reporter mouse, we set up a novel, bioluminescence-based technique to study brain estrogen receptor transcriptional activity. Here we show, for the first time, that estrogen receptors are similarly active in male and female brains and that the estrous cycle affects estrogen receptor activity in regions of the central nervous system not known to be associated with reproductive functions. Because of its reproducibility and sensitivity, this novel bioluminescence application stands as a candidate as an innovative methodology for the study and development of drugs targeting brain estrogen receptors.

  1. Isolated dorsal dislocation of the tarsal naviculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaziz Hamdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolated dislocation of the tarsal naviculum is an unusual injury, scarcely reported in the literature. The naviculum is surrounded by the rigid bony and ligamentous support hence fracture dislocation is more common than isolated dislocation. The mechanism and treatment options remain unclear. In this case report, we describe a 31 year old man who sustained an isolated dorsal dislocation of the left tarsal naviculum, without fracture, when he was involved in a motor vehicle collision. The reported mechanism of the dislocation is a hyper plantar flexion force applied to the midfoot, resulting in a transient disruption of the ligamentous support of the naviculum bone, with dorsal displacement of the bone. The patient was treated with open reduction and Krischner-wire fixation of the navicular after the failure of closed reduction. The wires were removed after 6 weeks postoperatively. Physiotherapy for stiffness and midfoot pain was recommended for 2 months. At 6 months postoperatively, limping, midfoot pain and weakness were reported, no X-ray abnormalities were found. The patient returned to his obvious activities with a normal range of motion.

  2. Cucurbitacin IIb exhibits anti-inflammatory activity through modulating multiple cellular behaviors of mouse lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Wang

    Full Text Available Cucurbitacin IIb (CuIIb is one of the major active compounds in Hemsleyadine tablets which have been used for clinical treatment of bacillary dysentery, enteritis and acute tonsilitis. However, its action mechanism has not been completely understood. This study aimed to explore the anti-inflammatory activity of CuIIb and its underlying mechanism in mitogen-activated lymphocytes isolated from mouse mesenteric lymph nodes. The results showed that CuIIb inhibited the proliferation of concanavalin A (Con A-activated lymphocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. CuIIb treatment arrested their cell cycle in S and G2/M phases probably due to the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and the modulation of p27(Kip1 and cyclin levels. Moreover, the surface expression of activation markers CD69 and CD25 on Con A-activated CD3(+ T lymphocytes was suppressed by CuIIb treatment. Both Con A- and phorbol ester plus ionomycin-induced expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-6 proteins was attenuated upon exposure to CuIIb. Mechanistically, CuIIb treatment suppressed the phosphorylation of JNK and Erk1/2 but not p38 in Con A-activated lymphocytes. Although CuIIb unexpectedly enhanced the phosphorylation of IκB and NF-κB (p65, it blocked the nuclear translocation of NF-κB (p65. In support of this, CuIIb significantly decreased the mRNA levels of IκBα and TNF-α, two target genes of NF-κB, in Con A-activated lymphocytes. In addition, CuIIb downregulated Con A-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and increased cell apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that CuIIb exhibits its anti-inflammatory activity through modulating multiple cellular behaviors and signaling pathways, leading to the suppression of the adaptive immune response.

  3. Contribution of mucosal maltase-glucoamylase activities to mouse small intestinal starch alpha-glucogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto; Robayo-Torres, Claudia C; Opekun, Antone R; Sen, Partha; Ao, Zihua; Hamaker, Bruce R; Quaroni, Andrea; Brayer, Gary D; Wattler, Sigrid; Nehls, Michael C; Sterchi, Erwin E; Nichols, Buford L

    2007-07-01

    Digestion of starch requires activities provided by 6 interactive small intestinal enzymes. Two of these are luminal endo-glucosidases named alpha-amylases. Four are exo-glucosidases bound to the luminal surface of enterocytes. These mucosal activities were identified as 4 different maltases. Two maltase activities were associated with sucrase-isomaltase. Two remaining maltases, lacking other identifying activities, were named maltase-glucoamylase. These 4 activities are better described as alpha-glucosidases because they digest all linear starch oligosaccharides to glucose. Because confusion persists about the relative roles of these 6 enzymes, we ablated maltase-glucoamylase gene expression by homologous recombination in Sv/129 mice. We assayed the alpha-glucogenic activities of the jejunal mucosa with and without added recombinant pancreatic alpha-amylase, using a range of food starch substrates. Compared with wild-type mucosa, null mucosa or alpha-amylase alone had little alpha-glucogenic activity. alpha-Amylase amplified wild-type and null mucosal alpha-glucogenesis. alpha-Amylase amplification was most potent against amylose and model resistant starches but was inactive against its final product limit-dextrin and its constituent glucosides. Both sucrase-isomaltase and maltase-glucoamylase were active with limit-dextrin substrate. These mucosal assays were corroborated by a 13C-limit-dextrin breath test. In conclusion, the global effect of maltase-glucoamylase ablation was a slowing of rates of mucosal alpha-glucogenesis. Maltase-glucoamylase determined rates of digestion of starch in normal mice and alpha-amylase served as an amplifier for mucosal starch digestion. Acarbose inhibition was most potent against maltase-glucoamylase activities of the wild-type mouse. The consortium of 6 interactive enzymes appears to be a mechanism for adaptation of alpha-glucogenesis to a wide range of food starches.

  4. Mouse cytotoxic T cell-derived granzyme B activates the mitochondrial cell death pathway in a Bim-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, Elena; Jaime-Sánchez, Paula; Aguiló, Nacho; Simon, Markus M; Froelich, Christopher J; Pardo, Julián

    2015-03-13

    Cytotoxic T cells (Tc) use perforin and granzyme B (gzmB) to kill virus-infected cells and cancer cells. Recent evidence suggests that human gzmB primarily induces apoptosis via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway by either cleaving Bid or activating Bim leading to the activation of Bak/Bax and subsequent generation of active caspase-3. In contrast, mouse gzmB is thought to predominantly induce apoptosis by directly processing pro-caspase-3. However, in certain mouse cell types gzmB-mediated apoptosis mainly occurs via the mitochondrial pathway. To investigate whether Bim is involved under the latter conditions, we have now employed ex vivo virus-immune mouse Tc that selectively kill by using perforin and gzmB (gzmB(+)Tc) as effector cells and wild type as well as Bim- or Bak/Bax-deficient spontaneously (3T9) or virus-(SV40) transformed mouse embryonic fibroblast cells as targets. We show that gzmB(+)Tc-mediated apoptosis (phosphatidylserine translocation, mitochondrial depolarization, cytochrome c release, and caspase-3 activation) was severely reduced in 3T9 cells lacking either Bim or both Bak and Bax. This outcome was related to the ability of Tc cells to induce the degradation of Mcl-1 and Bcl-XL, the anti-apoptotic counterparts of Bim. In contrast, gzmB(+)Tc-mediated apoptosis was not affected in SV40-transformed mouse embryonic fibroblast cells lacking Bak/Bax. The data provide evidence that Bim participates in mouse gzmB(+)Tc-mediated apoptosis of certain targets by activating the mitochondrial pathway and suggest that the mode of cell death depends on the target cell. Our results suggest that the various molecular events leading to transformation and/or immortalization of cells have an impact on their relative resistance to the multiple gzmB(+)Tc-induced death pathways.

  5. Metastable primordial germ cell-like state induced from mouse embryonic stem cells by Akt activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamano, Noriko [Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kimura, Tohru, E-mail: tkimura@patho.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Medical School, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Watanabe-Kushima, Shoko [Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Shinohara, Takashi [Department of Molecular Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Nakano, Toru, E-mail: tnakano@patho.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Pathology, Medical School, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-02-12

    Specification to primordial germ cells (PGCs) is mediated by mesoderm-induction signals during gastrulation. We found that Akt activation during in vitro mesodermal differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) generated self-renewing spheres with differentiation states between those of ESCs and PGCs. Essential regulators for PGC specification and their downstream germ cell-specific genes were expressed in the spheres, indicating that the sphere cells had commenced differentiation to the germ lineage. However, the spheres did not proceed to spermatogenesis after transplantation into testes. Sphere cell transfer to the original feeder-free ESC cultures resulted in chaotic differentiation. In contrast, when the spheres were cultured on mouse embryonic fibroblasts or in the presence of ERK-cascade and GSK3 inhibitors, reversion to the ESC-like state was observed. These results indicate that Akt signaling promotes a novel metastable and pluripotent state that is intermediate to those of ESCs and PGCs.

  6. Linker for activation of T cells contributes to airway inflammation in an asthmatic mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xue-jun; REN Lian-ping; SUN Yi-ping; ZHOU Min; XU Wei-guo

    2010-01-01

    Background Allergic asthma is associated with airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness caused by dysregulated production of cytokines secreted by allergen-specific helper T-type 2 (Th2) cells. The linker for activation of T cells (LAT)is a membrane-associated adaptor protein, which has been shown to take part in regulating T cell receptor (TCR)signaling and T cell homeostasis. In this study, we established an asthmatic mouse model to examine the changes in LAT levels during allergic airway disease and the effects of LAT transgenic expression on airway inflammation.Methods T ceils from mouse lung tissues were isolated from allergen challenged (ovalbumin (OVA)) and control mice,and the purity of these isolated T cells was examined by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). Semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the expression of the LAT gene and LAT protein, respectively. After an intranasally administered mixture of pCMV-HA-LAT plasmid and Lipofectamine 2000, 24 hours before and 72 hours after allergen challenge, the BALF cell count and the differential cytologies were studied. In addition, IL-4 and IFN-γ levels in the BALF were determined by ELISA, and pathological changes in lung tissues were observed.Results LAT protein and mRNA expression were decreased in lung T cells in a mouse model of allergen-induced airway disease. After intranasal administration of pCMV-HA-LAT, histopathological examination of the lungs showed that intervention with LAT overexpression prevented mice from developing airway inflammation, and the number of total cells,eosinophils, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in the BALF was reduced significantly compared with the OVA sensitized and challenged group. In addition, the Th2 cytokine IL-4 decreased, while the Th1 cytokine IFN-Y increased compared to the OVA sensitized and challenged group or the OVA sensitized group plus pCMV-HA treatment.Conclusion This study demonstrates that LAT might effectively diminish Th2

  7. The Impact of Myeloperoxidase and Activated Macrophages on Metaphase II Mouse Oocyte Quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faten Shaeib

    Full Text Available Myeloperoxidase (MPO, an abundant heme-containing enzyme present in neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages, is produced in high levels during inflammation, and associated with poor reproductive outcomes. MPO is known to generate hypochlorous acid (HOCl, a damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS utilizing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and chloride (Cl-. Here we investigate the effect of activated immune cells and MPO on oocyte quality. Mouse metaphase II oocytes were divided into the following groups: 1 Incubation with a catalytic amount of MPO (40 nM for different incubation periods in the presence of 100 mM Cl- with and without H2O2 and with and without melatonin (100 μM, at 37°C (n = 648/648 total number of oocytes in each group for oocytes with and without cumulus cells; 2 Co-cultured with activated mouse peritoneal macrophage and neutrophils cells (1.0 x 106 cells/ml in the absence and presence of melatonin (200 μM, an MPO inhibitor/ROS scavenger, for different incubation periods in HTF media, at 37°C (n = 200/200; 3 Untreated oocytes incubated for 4 hrs as controls (n = 73/64. Oocytes were then fixed, stained and scored based on the microtubule morphology and chromosomal alignment. All treatments were found to negatively affect oocyte quality in a time dependent fashion as compared to controls. In all cases the presence of cumulus cells offered no protection; however significant protection was offered by melatonin. Similar results were obtained with oocytes treated with neutrophils. This work provides a direct link between MPO and decreased oocyte quality. Therefore, strategies to decrease MPO mediated inflammation may influence reproductive outcomes.

  8. Restoration of glyoxalase enzyme activity precludes cognitive dysfunction in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Swati S; Vartak, Ashish P; Vince, Robert

    2013-02-20

    Pathologically high brain levels of reactive dicarbonyls such as methylglyoxal or glyoxal initiate processes that lead ultimately to neurodegeneration, presented clinically as Alzheimer's disease and other cognitive or motor impairment disorders. Methylglyoxal and glyoxal result from glycolysis and normal metabolic pathways. Their reaction products with proteins (advanced glycation end products), and their primary chemical toxicities are both linked unequivocally to the primary pathologies of Alzheimer's disease, namely, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Generation of dicarbonyls is countered through the reduction of dicarbonyls by the glutathione-dependent glyoxalase enzyme system. Although glyoxalase-I is overexpressed in early and middle stages of Alzheimer's disease, glutathione depletion in the Alzheimer's afflicted brain cripples its efficacy. Due to the lack of a suitable pharmacological tool, the restoration of glyoxalase enzyme activity in pre-Alzheimer's or manifest Alzheimer's remains yet unvalidated as a means for anti-Alzheimer's therapy development. Disclosed herein are the results of a preclinical study into the therapeutic efficacy of ψ-GSH, a synthetic cofactor of glyoxalase, in mitigating Alzheimer's indicators in a transgenic mouse model (APP/PS1) that is predisposed to Alzheimer's disease. ψ-GSH administration completely averts the development of spatial mnemonic and long-term cognitive/cued-recall impairment. Amyloid β deposition and oxidative stress indicators are drastically reduced in the ψ-GSH-treated APP/PS1 mouse. ψ-GSH lacks discernible toxicity at strikingly high doses of 2000 mg/kg. The hypothesis that restoring brain glyoxalase activity would ameliorate neurogeneration stands validated, thus presenting a much needed new target for design of anti-Alzheimer's therapeutics. Consequently, ψ-GSH is established as a candidate for drug-development.

  9. Contribution of complement activation pathways to neuropathology differs among mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura Yuko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complement proteins and activation products have been found associated with neuropathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Recently, a C5a receptor antagonist was shown to suppress neuropathology in two murine models of AD, Tg2576 and 3xTg. Previously, a genetic deficiency of C1q in the Tg2576 mouse model showed an accumulation of fibrillar plaques similar to the complement sufficient Tg2576, but reactive glia were significantly decreased and neuronal integrity was improved suggesting detrimental consequences for complement activation in AD. The goal of this study was to define the role of the classical complement activation pathway in the progression of pathology in the 3xTg mouse that develops tangles in addition to fibrillar plaques (more closely reflecting human AD pathology and to assess the influence of complement in a model of AD with a higher level of complement hemolytic activity. Methods 3xTg mice deficient in C1q (3xTgQ-/- were generated, and both 3xTg and 3xTgQ-/- were backcrossed to the BUB mouse strain which has higher in vitro hemolytic complement activity. Mice were aged and perfused, and brain sections stained for pathological markers or analyzed for proinflammatory marker expression. Results 3xTgQ-/- mice showed similar amounts of fibrillar amyloid, reactive glia and hyperphosphorylated tau as the C1q-sufficient 3xTg at the ages analyzed. However, 3xTg and 3xTgQ-/- on the BUB background developed pathology earlier than on the original 3xTg background, although the presence of C1q had no effect on neuropathological and pro-inflammatory markers. In contrast to that seen in other transgenic models of AD, C1q, C4 and C3 immunoreactivity was undetectable on the plaques of 3xTg in any background, although C3 was associated with reactive astrocytes surrounding the plaques. Importantly, properdin a component of the alternative complement pathway was associated with plaques in all models. Conclusions In contrast to

  10. MiR-16 regulates mouse peritoneal macrophage polarization and affects T-cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaoqin; Li, Xiaomin; Shen, Yating; Miao, Junjun; Liu, Hao; Li, Guoli; Wang, Zhengbing

    2016-10-01

    MiR-16 is a tumour suppressor that is down-regulated in certain human cancers. However, little is known on its activity in other cell types. In this study, we examined the biological significance and underlying mechanisms of miR-16 on macrophage polarization and subsequent T-cell activation. Mouse peritoneal macrophages were isolated and induced to undergo either M1 polarization with 100 ng/ml of interferon-γ and 20 ng/ml of lipopolysaccharide, or M2 polarization with 20 ng/ml of interleukin (IL)-4. The identity of polarized macrophages was determined by profiling cell-surface markers by flow cytometry and cytokine production by ELISA. Macrophages were infected with lentivirus-expressing miR-16 to assess the effects of miR-16. Effects on macrophage-T cell interactions were analysed by co-culturing purified CD4(+) T cells with miR-16-expressing peritoneal macrophages, and measuring activation marker CD69 by flow cytometry and cytokine secretion by ELISA. Bioinformatics analysis was applied to search for potential miR-16 targets and understand its underlying mechanisms. MiR-16-induced M1 differentiation of mouse peritoneal macrophages from either the basal M0- or M2-polarized state is indicated by the significant up-regulation of M1 marker CD16/32, repression of M2 marker CD206 and Dectin-1, and increased secretion of M1 cytokine IL-12 and nitric oxide. Consistently, miR-16-expressing macrophages stimulate the activation of purified CD4(+) T cells. Mechanistically, miR-16 significantly down-regulates the expression of PD-L1, a critical immune suppressor that controls macrophage-T cell interaction and T-cell activation. MiR-16 plays an important role in shifting macrophage polarization from M2 to M1 status, and functionally activating CD4(+) T cells. This effect is potentially mediated through the down-regulation of immune suppressor PD-L1.

  11. Influence of body temperature on the evoked activity in mouse visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bin; Kalatsky, Valery A

    2013-06-01

    Optical imaging of intrinsic signals and conventional electrophysiological methods were used to investigate the correlation between the evoked activity in mouse visual cortex and core body temperature. The results show that hypothermia (25-36 °C) decreases the intensity of optical imaging in the visual cortex and the imaging signal reversibly disappears at 25 °C. Hyperthermia (39-41 °C) increases the intensity but decreases the quality of cortical imaging when body temperature is above 40 °C. The change of optical imaging was in line with that of neuronal activities and local field potentials (LFPs) directly recorded from the visual cortex at 25-39 °C. Hypothermia decreases neuron firing rate and LFPs amplitude. Most of the recorded neurons ceased firing to visual stimulation at 25 °C. Hyperthermia increases neuronal firing rate and LFPs amplitude. Both are reduced when body temperature is above 40 °C, though neither change was statistically significant. These results suggest: (1) Body temperature has an important impact on the visual cortical evoked activities and optical imaging generally reflects these effects when body temperature is between 25 and 39 °C; (2) Optical imaging may not properly reflect the neuronal activity when body temperature is over 40 °C. It is important to maintain core body temperature within 3 °C of the normal body temperature to obtain verifiable results.

  12. 7-Ketocholesterol Induces Cell Apoptosis by Activation of Nuclear Factor kappa B in Mouse Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang,Zhenyu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms responsible for the induction of apoptosis in mouse monocytic macrophage cell line J774A.1 stimulated by 7-ketocholesterol (7-KC. Cell apoptosis was detected by Annexin V-propidium iodide (PI staining. The DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. Results showed that 7-KC-stimulation in J774A.1 cells activated NF-kappaB, which is involved in cell apoptosis, in a time- and dose-dependent manners. 7-KC was also found to increase the binding activity of NF-kappaB to specific DNA binding sites, a possible mechanism for the induction of the cell apoptosis. Moreover, these effects were partially inhibited by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, an NF-kappaB inhibitor. Taken together, 7-KC may be an important factor in atherosclerosis due to the ability of 7-KC to induce cell apoptosis, which is at least partially mediated through the activation of NF-kappaB.

  13. Staphylococcal lipoteichoic acid promotes osteogenic differentiation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells by increasing autophagic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Yuan; Cao, Zhen; Dou, Ce; Bai, Yun; Liu, Chuan; Dong, Shiwu; Fei, Jun

    2017-02-16

    This study sought to explore the effect of staphylococcal lipoteichoic acid (LTA) on autophagy in mouse mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and then influence osteogenesis through the change of autophagy. C3H10T1/2 cells were induced by osteogenic medium with the treatment of LTA at different concentrations (1, 5, 10 μg/mL); 3-methyladenine (3-MA) were used as the autophagy inhibitor, and rapamycin (rapamycin, Rap) were used to activate autophagy; the effects on osteogenesis were detected by alkaline phosphatase staining, alizarin red staining, real-time quantitative PCR, and western blotting; autophagic activity was investigated by the expression of LC3-Ⅱand p62 proteins. Compared with control group, the expression of osteogenesis markers was significantly up-regulated with the LTA treatment on the mRNA and protein level; the positive rate of alkaline phosphatase was enhanced in the LTA groups; and the formation of calcium nodules was increased simultaneously. The expression of LC3-Ⅱ protein was increased in LTA groups, while the expression of p62 protein was decreased. Inhibition of autophagy significantly reduced the effect of LTA on osteogenesis of MSCs; the promotion of LTA on osteogenic differentiation was further enhanced when adding rapamycin to activate autophagic activity. It provides new insight of prevention and treatment for bone infection.

  14. Antifatigue Activity of Liquid Cultured Tricholoma matsutake Mycelium Partially via Regulation of Antioxidant Pathway in Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tricholoma matsutake has been popular as food and biopharmaceutical materials in Asian countries for its various pharmacological activities. The present study aims to analyze the antifatigue effects on enhancing exercise performance of Tricholoma matsutake fruit body (ABM and liquid cultured mycelia (TM in mouse model. Two-week Tricholoma matsutake treatment significantly enhances the exercise performance in weight-loaded swimming, rotating rod, and forced running test. In TM- and ABM-treated mice, some factors were observed at 60 min after swimming compared with nontreated mice, such as the increased levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP, antioxidative enzymes, and glycogen and the reduced levels of malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species in muscle, liver, and/or serum. Further data obtained from western blot show that CM and ABM have strongly enhanced the activation of 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, and the expressions of peroxisome proliferator have activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α and phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK-1 in liver. Our data suggest that both Tricholoma matsutake fruit body and liquid cultured mycelia possess antifatigue effects related to AMPK-linked antioxidative pathway. The information uncovered in our study may serve as a valuable resource for further identification and provide experimental evidence for clinical trials of Tricholoma matsutake as an effective agent against fatigue related diseases.

  15. Behavioral characterization of a mutant mouse strain lacking D-amino acid oxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Ballard, Michael E; Basso, Ana M; Bratcher, Natalie; Browman, Kaitlin E; Curzon, Pete; Konno, Ryuichi; Meyer, Axel H; Rueter, Lynne E

    2011-02-02

    D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), an enzyme that degrades d-serine, has been suggested as a susceptibility factor for schizophrenia. Here we sought to understand more about the behavioral consequence of lacking DAO and the potential therapeutic implication of DAO inhibition by characterizing a mouse strain (ddY/DAO(-)) lacking DAO activity. We found that the mutant mice showed enhanced prepulse inhibition responses (PPI). Intriguingly, DAO-/- mice had increased sensitivity to the PPI-disruptive effect induced by the competitive NMDA antagonist, SDZ 220-581. In the 24-h inhibitory avoidance test, DAO-/- mice were not different from DAO+/+ mice during the recall. In Barnes Maze, we found that DAO-/- mice had a shortened latency to enter the escape tunnel. Interestingly, although these mice were hypoactive when tested in a protected open field, they showed a profound increase of activity on the edge of the unprotected open field of the Barnes Maze even with the escape tunnel removed. This increased edge activity does not appear to be related to a reduced level of anxiety given that there were no significant genotype effects on the measures of anxiety-like behaviors in two standard animal models of anxiety, elevated plus maze and novelty suppressed feeding. Our data suggest that DAO-/- mice might have altered functioning of NMDARs. However, these results provide only modest support for manipulations of DAO activity as a potential therapeutic approach to treat schizophrenia.

  16. Selective activation of parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons triggers epileptic seizurelike activity in mouse medial entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekhlef, Latefa; Breschi, Gian Luca; Lagostena, Laura; Russo, Giovanni; Taverna, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    GABAergic interneurons are thought to play a critical role in eliciting interictal spikes (IICs) and triggering ictal discharges in temporal lobe epilepsy, yet the contribution of different interneuronal subtypes to seizure initiation is still largely unknown. Here we took advantage of optogenetic techniques combined with patch-clamp and field recordings to selectively stimulate parvalbumin (PV)- or somatostatin (SOM)-positive interneurons expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (CHR-2) in layers II-III of adult mouse medial entorhinal cortical slices during extracellular perfusion with the proconvulsive compound 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 100-200 μM). In control conditions, blue laser photostimulation selectively activated action potential firing in either PV or SOM interneurons and, in both cases, caused a robust GABAA-receptor-mediated inhibition in pyramidal cells (PCs). During perfusion with 4-AP, brief photostimuli (300 ms) activating either PV or SOM interneurons induced patterns of epileptiform activity that closely replicated spontaneously occurring IICs and tonic-clonic ictal discharges. Laser-induced synchronous firing in both interneuronal types elicited large compound GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) correlating with IICs and preictal spikes. In addition, spontaneous and laser-induced epileptic events were similarly initiated in concurrence with a large increase in extracellular potassium concentration. Finally, interneuron activation was unable to stop or significantly shorten the progression of seizurelike episodes. These results suggest that entorhinal PV and SOM interneurons are nearly equally effective in triggering interictal and ictal discharges that closely resemble human temporal lobe epileptic activity.

  17. Optogenetic activation of VGLUT2-expressing excitatory neurons blocks epileptic seizure-like activity in the mouse entorhinal cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekhlef, Latefa; Breschi, Gian Luca; Taverna, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    We investigated whether an anti-epileptic effect is obtained by selectively activating excitatory neurons expressing ChR2 under the promoter for the synaptic vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2). VGLUT2-expressing cells were optically stimulated while local field potential and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in mouse entorhinal cortical slices perfused with the proconvulsive compound 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). In control conditions, blue light flashes directly depolarized the majority of putative glutamatergic cells, which in turn synaptically excited GABAergic interneurons. During bath perfusion with 4-AP, photostimuli triggered a fast EPSP-IPSP sequence which was often followed by tonic-clonic seizure-like activity closely resembling spontaneous ictal discharges. The GABAA-receptor antagonist gabazine blocked the progression of both light-induced and spontaneous seizures. Surprisingly, prolonged photostimuli delivered during ongoing seizures caused a robust interruption of synchronous discharges. Such break was correlated with a membrane potential depolarization block in principal cells, while putative GABAergic interneurons changed their firing activity from a burst-like to an irregular single-spike pattern. These data suggest that photostimulation of glutamatergic neurons triggers seizure-like activity only in the presence of an intact GABAergic transmission and that selectively activating the same glutamatergic cells robustly interrupts ongoing seizures by inducing a strong depolarization block, resulting in the disruption of paroxysmal burst-like firing. PMID:28230208

  18. The maternal JAK/STAT pathway of Drosophila regulates embryonic dorsal-ventral patterning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes E.S.S.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of NFkappaB plays a pivotal role in many cellular processes such as inflammation, proliferation and apoptosis. In Drosophila, nuclear translocation of the NFkappaB-related transcription factor Dorsal is spatially regulated in order to subdivide the embryo into three primary dorsal-ventral (DV domains: the ventral presumptive mesoderm, the lateral neuroectoderm and the dorsal ectoderm. Ventral activation of the Toll receptor induces degradation of the IkappaB-related inhibitor Cactus, liberating Dorsal for nuclear translocation. In addition, other pathways have been suggested to regulate Dorsal. Signaling through the maternal BMP member Decapentaplegic (Dpp inhibits Dorsal translocation along a pathway parallel to and independent of Toll. In the present study, we show for the first time that the maternal JAK/STAT pathway also regulates embryonic DV patterning. Null alleles of loci coding for elements of the JAK/STAT pathway, hopscotch (hop, marelle (mrl and zimp (zimp, modify zygotic expression along the DV axis. Genetic analysis suggests that the JAK kinase Hop, most similar to vertebrate JAK2, may modify signals downstream of Dpp. In addition, an activated form of Hop results in increased levels of Cactus and Dorsal proteins, modifying the Dorsal/Cactus ratio and consequently DV patterning. These results indicate that different maternal signals mediated by the Toll, BMP and JAK/STAT pathways may converge to regulate NFkappaB activity in Drosophila.

  19. Enhanced casein kinase II activity during mouse embryogenesis. Identification of a 110-kDa phosphoprotein as the major phosphorylation product in mouse embryos and Krebs II mouse ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, H R; Reichert, G H; Issinger, O G

    1986-01-01

    , increased phosphorylation of a 110-kDa protein is observed. Treatment of the embryo extracts with heparin, a highly specific inhibitor of CKII activity, results in a drastic reduction of the 110-kDa protein phosphorylation indicating that the protein might be a CKII-specific substrate. Rapidly proliferating...... mouse tumour cells also show an enhanced CKII activity. Here too, a 110-kDa phosphoprotein was the major phosphoryl acceptor. Partial proteolytic digestion shows that both proteins are identical. Other protein kinases tested (cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases) only show a basal level of enzyme...

  20. Dorsal variant blister aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couldwell, William T; Chamoun, Roukoz

    2012-01-01

    Dorsal variant proximal carotid blister aneurysms are treacherous lesions to manage. It is important to recognize this variant on preoperative angiographic imaging, in anticipation of surgical strategies for their treatment. Strategies include trapping the involved segment and revascularization if necessary. Other options include repair of the aneurysm rupture site directly. Given that these are not true berry aneurysms, repair of the rupture site involves wrapping or clip-grafting techniques. The case presented here was a young woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dorsal variant blister aneurysm. The technique used is demonstrated in the video and is a modified clip-wrap technique using woven polyester graft material. The patient was given aspirin preoperatively as preparation for the clip-wrap technique. It is the authors' current protocol to attempt a direct repair with clip-wrapping and leaving artery sacrifice with or without bypass as a salvage therapy if direct repair is not possible. Assessment of vessel patency after repair is performed by intraoperative Doppler and indocyanine green angiography. Intraoperative somatosensory and motor evoked potential monitoring is performed in all cases. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/crUreWGQdGo.

  1. Agenesis of the dorsal pancreas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wolfgang J Schnedl; Claudia Piswanger-Soelkner; Sandra J Wallner; Robert Krause; Rainer W Lipp

    2009-01-01

    During the last 100 years in medical literature, there are only 54 reports, including the report of Pasaoglu et al ( World J Gastroenterol 2008; 14: 2915-2916), with clinical descriptions of agenesis of the dorsal panc reas in humans . Agenes i s of the dor sal pancreas, a rare congenital pancreatic malformation,is associated with some other medical conditions such as hyperglycemia, abdominal pain, pancreatitis and a few other diseases. In approximately 50% of reported patients with this congenital malformation,hyperglycemia was demonstrated. Evaluation of hyperglycemia and diabetes mellitus in all patients with agenesis of the dorsal pancreas including description of fasting blood glucose, oral glucose tolerance test, glycated hemoglobin and medical treatment would be a future goal. Since autosomal dominant transmission has been suggested in single families,more family studies including imaging technologies with demonstration of the pancreatic duct system are needed for evaluation of this disease. With this letter to the editor, we aim to increase available information for the better understanding of this rare disease.

  2. A potential inhibitory function of draxin in regulating mouse trunk neural crest migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sanbing; Su, Yuhong; Gao, Jinbao; Zhang, Chenbing; Tanaka, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    Draxin is a repulsive axon guidance protein that plays important roles in the formation of three commissures in the central nervous system and dorsal interneuron 3 (dI3) in the chick spinal cord. In the present study, we report the expression pattern of mouse draxin in the embryonic mouse trunk spinal cord. In the presence of draxin, the longest net migration length of a migrating mouse trunk neural crest cell was significantly reduced. In addition, the relative number of apolar neural crest cells increased as the draxin treatment time increased. Draxin caused actin cytoskeleton rearrangement in the migrating trunk neural crest cells. Our data suggest that draxin may regulate mouse trunk neural crest cell migration by the rearrangement of cell actin cytoskeleton and by reducing the polarization activity of these cells subsequently.

  3. Spinal cord stimulation-induced analgesia: electrical stimulation of dorsal column and dorsal roots attenuates dorsal horn neuronal excitability in neuropathic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yun; Wacnik, Paul W; Yang, Fei; Carteret, Alene F; Chung, Chih-Yang; Meyer, Richard A; Raja, Srinivasa N

    2010-12-01

    The sites of action and cellular mechanisms by which spinal cord stimulation reduces neuropathic pain remain unclear. We examined the effect of bipolar electrical-conditioning stimulation (50 Hz, 0.2 ms, 5 min) of the dorsal column and lumbar dorsal roots on the response properties of spinal wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons in rats after L5 spinal nerve injury. The conditioning stimulation intensity was set at the lowest current that evoked a peak antidromic sciatic Aα/β-compound action potential without inducing an Aδ- or C-compound action potential. Within 15 min of the dorsal column or root conditioning stimulation, the spontaneous activity rate of WDR neurons was significantly reduced in nerve-injured rats. Conditioning stimulation also significantly attenuated WDR neuronal responses to mechanical stimuli in nerve-injured rats and inhibited the C-component of the neuronal response to graded intracutaneous electrical stimuli applied to the receptive field in nerve-injured and sham-operated rats. It is noteworthy that dorsal column stimulation blocked windup of WDR neuronal response to repetitive intracutaneous electrical stimulation (0.5 Hz) in nerve-injured and sham-operated rats, whereas dorsal root stimulation inhibited windup only in sham-operated rats. Therefore, stimulation of putative spinal substrates at A-fiber intensities with parameters similar to those used by patients with spinal cord stimulators attenuated established WDR neuronal hyperexcitability in the neuropathic condition and counteracted activity-dependent increase in neuronal excitability (i.e., windup). These results suggest a potential cellular mechanism underlying spinal cord stimulation-induced pain relief. This in vivo model allows the neurophysiologic basis for spinal cord stimulation-induced analgesia to be studied.

  4. Dorsal penile nerves and primary premature ejaculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hai-feng; ZHANG Chun-ying; LI Xing-hua; FU Zhong-ze; CHEN Zhao-yan

    2009-01-01

    Background Based on our clinical experience, the number of dorsal penile nerves in patients with primary premature ejaculation (PPE) is not consistent with the average number (2 branches). In this study, we evaluated the number and distribution of dorsal penile nerves among healthy Chinese adults and patients with PPE.Methods The dorsal nerve of the penis, the deep dorsal vein of the penis, and the dorsal artery of the penis between the deep fascia of the penis and the albuginea penis were carefully educed, observed, and counted in 38 adult autopsy specimens. The number and distribution of the dorsal penile nerve in 128 surgical patients with PPE were determined. Results The numbers of dorsal penile nerves of the 38 cases were as follows:7 branches in 1 case; 6 branches in 1 case; 5 branches in 6 cases; 4 branches in 9 cases; 3 branches in 14 cases; and 2 branches in 7 cases. Most of the dorsal nerves were parallel to each other and in the dorsum of the penis. In only 8 cases, the branches were connected by some communicating branches. In 4 cases, 1 or 2 thin dorsal nerves continued their pathway over the ventral aspect of the penis. The average number of branches of the dorsal penile nerve in patients with PPE was 7.16. Conclusions Based on the study of 38 cases, the average number of dorsal penile nerves was 3.55 branches and that of patients with PPE was greater. These preliminary results suggest that the excessive dorsal penile nerves may have an impact on PPE via increased sensitivity and provide topographic data for the possible treatment of PPE.

  5. Activation of tumor cell proliferation by thyroid hormone in a mouse model of follicular thyroid carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid cancers are the most common malignancy of the endocrine system in humans. To understand the molecular genetic events underlying thyroid carcinogenesis, we have generated a mouse model that spontaneously develops follicular thyroid carcinoma similar to human thyroid cancer (ThrbPV/PV mouse). This mutant mouse harbors a dominantnegative mutated thyroid hormone receptor β (denoted PV). The PV mutation was identified in a patient with resistance to thyroid hormone (TH). ThrbPV/PV mice exh...

  6. Low salt concentrations activate AMP-activated protein kinase in mouse macula densa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Natasha; Fraser, Scott A; Katerelos, Marina; Katsis, Frosa; Gleich, Kurt; Mount, Peter F; Steinberg, Gregory R; Levidiotis, Vicki; Kemp, Bruce E; Power, David A

    2009-04-01

    The energy-sensing kinase AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is associated with the sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter NKCC2 in the kidney and phosphorylates it on a regulatory site in vitro. To identify a potential role for AMPK in salt sensing at the macula densa, we have used the murine macula densa cell line MMDD1. In this cell line, AMPK was rapidly activated by isosmolar low-salt conditions. In contrast to the known salt-sensing pathway in the macula densa, AMPK activation occurred in the presence of either low sodium or low chloride and was unaffected by inhibition of NKCC2 with bumetanide. Assays using recombinant AMPK demonstrated activation of an upstream kinase by isosmolar low salt. The specific calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase inhibitor STO-609 failed to suppress AMPK activation, suggesting that it was not part of the signal pathway. AMPK activation was associated with increased phosphorylation of the specific substrate acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) at Ser(79), as well as increased NKCC2 phosphorylation at Ser(126). AMPK activation due to low salt concentrations was inhibited by an adenovirus construct encoding a kinase dead mutant of AMPK, leading to reduced ACC Ser(79) and NKCC2 Ser(126) phosphorylation. This work demonstrates that AMPK activation in macula densa-like cells occurs via isosmolar changes in sodium or chloride concentration, leading to phosphorylation of ACC and NKCC2. Phosphorylation of these substrates in vivo is predicted to increase intracellular chloride and so reduce the effect of salt restriction on tubuloglomerular feedback and renin secretion.

  7. Cyclooxygenase activity is important for efficient replication of mouse hepatitis virus at an early stage of infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaben, Matthijs; Einerhand, Alexandra W. C.; Taminiau, Lucas J. A.; van Houdt, Michel; Bouma, Janneke; Raatgeep, Rolien H.; Buller, Hans A.; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Rossen, John W. A.

    2007-01-01

    Cyclooxygenases (COXs) play a significant role in many different viral infections with respect to replication and pathogenesis. Here we investigated the role of COXs in the mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV) infection cycle. Blocking COX activity by different inhibitors or by RNA interference affecte

  8. Dopamine exerts activation-dependent modulation of spinal locomotor circuits in the neonatal mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Jennifer M; Whelan, Patrick J

    2012-12-01

    Monoamines can modulate the output of a variety of invertebrate and vertebrate networks, including the spinal cord networks that control walking. Here we examined the multiple changes in the output of locomotor networks induced by dopamine (DA). We found that DA can depress the activation of locomotor networks in the neonatal mouse spinal cord following ventral root stimulation. By examining disinhibited rhythms, where the Renshaw cell pathway was blocked, we found that DA depresses a putative recurrent excitatory pathway that projects onto rhythm-generating circuitry of the spinal cord. This depression was D(2) but not D(1) receptor dependent and was not due exclusively to depression of excitatory drive to motoneurons. Furthermore, the depression in excitation was not dependent on network activity. We next compared the modulatory effects of DA on network function by focusing on a serotonin and a N-methyl-dl-aspartate-evoked rhythm. In contrast to the depressive effects on a ventral root-evoked rhythm, we found that DA stabilized a drug-evoked rhythm, reduced the frequency of bursting, and increased amplitude. Overall, these data demonstrate that DA can potentiate network activity while at the same time reducing the gain of recurrent excitatory feedback loops from motoneurons onto the network.

  9. Acupuncture inhibits microglial activation and inflammatory events in the MPTP-induced mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jun Mo; Park, Hi Joon; Choi, Yeong Gon; Choe, Il Hwan; Park, Jae Hyun; Kim, Yong Sik; Lim, Sabina

    2007-02-02

    Using a mouse model of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced Parkinson's disease (PD), this study investigated on the neuroprotective effects of acupuncture by examining whether acupuncture contributed to inhibiting microglial activation and inflammatory events. C57BL/6 mice were treated with MPTP (30 mg/kg, i.p.) for 5 consecutive days. Acupuncture was then applied to acupoints Yanglingquan (GB34) and Taichong (LR3) starting 2 h after the first MPTP administration and then at 48 h intervals until the mice were sacrificed for analyses at 1, 3, and 7 days after the last MPTP injection. These experiments demonstrated that acupuncture inhibited the decreased of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity (IR) and generated a neuroprotective effects in the striatum (ST) and the substantia nigra (SN) on days 1, 3, and 7 post-MPTP injections. Acupuncture attenuated the increase of macrophage antigen complex-1 (MAC-1), a marker of microglial activation, at 1 and 3 days and reduced the increases in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression on days 1, 3, and 7. In MPTP group, striatal dopamine (DA) was measured by 46% at 7 days, whereas DA in the acupuncture group was 78%. On the basis of these results, we suggest that acupuncture could be used as a neuroprotective intervention for the purpose of inhibiting microglial activation and inflammatory events in PD.

  10. Recombinase-Dependent Mouse Lines for Chemogenetic Activation of Genetically Defined Cell Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natale R. Sciolino

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemogenetic technologies, including the mutated human Gq-coupled M3 muscarinic receptor (hM3Dq, have greatly facilitated our ability to directly link changes in cellular activity to altered physiology and behavior. Here, we extend the hM3Dq toolkit with recombinase-responsive mouse lines that permit hM3Dq expression in virtually any cell type. These alleles encode a fusion protein designed to increase effective expression levels by concentrating hM3Dq to the cell body and dendrites. To illustrate their broad utility, we targeted three different genetically defined cell populations: noradrenergic neurons of the compact, bilateral locus coeruleus and two dispersed populations, Camk2a+ neurons and GFAP+ glia. In all three populations, we observed reproducible expression and confirmed that activation of hM3Dq is sufficient to dose-dependently evoke phenotypic changes, without extreme phenotypes associated with hM3Dq overexpression. These alleles offer the ability to non-invasively control activity of diverse cell types to uncover their function and dysfunction at any developmental stage.

  11. Direct Effects of Activin A on the Activation of Mouse Macrophage RAW264.7 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingyan Ge; Yinan Wang; Ye Feng; Haiyan Liu; Xueling Cui; Fangfang Chen; Guixiang Tai; Zhonghui Liu

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages play critical roles in innate immune and acquired immune via secreting pro-inflammatory mediators, phagocytosing microorganisms and presenting antigens. Activin A, a member of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) superfamily, is produced by macrophages and microglia cells. In this study, we reported a direct effect of activin A as a pro-inflammatory factor on mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells. Our data revealed that activin A could not only increase IL-1v and IL-6 production from RAW264.7 cells, but also promote pinocytic and phagocytic activities of RAW264.7 cells. In addition, activin A obviously up-regulated MHC Ⅱ expression on the surface of RAW264.7 cells, whereas did not influence MHC I expression. Activin A also enhanced CD80 expression, which is a marker of activated macrophages, but did not influence RAW264.7 cell proliferation. These data suggest that activin A may regulate primary macrophage-mediated innate and acquired immune response via promoting the activation of rest macrophages. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  12. Salidroside stimulates DNA repair enzyme Parp-1 activity in mouse HSC maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Sipple, Jared; Pang, Qishen; Du, Wei

    2012-05-03

    Salidroside is a phenylpropanoid glycoside isolated from the medicinal plant Rhodiola rosea, which has potent antioxidant properties. Here we show that salidroside prevented the loss of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in mice under oxidative stress. Quiescent HSCs were recruited into cell cycling on in vivo challenge with oxidative stress, which was blocked by salidroside. Surprisingly, salidroside does not prevent the production of reactive oxygen species but reduces hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA-strand breaks in bone marrow cells enriched for HSCs. We tested whether salidroside enhances oxidative DNA damage repair in mice deficient for 5 DNA repair pathways known to be involved in oxidative DNA damage repair; we found that salidroside activated poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a component of the base excision repair pathway, in mouse bone marrow HSCs as well as primary fibroblasts and human lymphoblasts. PARP-1 activation by salidroside protects quiescent HSCs from oxidative stress-induced cycling in native animals and self-renewal defect in transplanted recipients, which was abrogated by genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibition of PARP-1. Together, these findings suggest that activation of PARP-1 by salidroside could affect the homeostasis and function of HSCs and contribute to the antioxidant effects of salidroside.

  13. Gender-dependent effects of maternal immune activation on the behavior of mouse offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid C Y Xuan

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders are neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by two core symptoms; impaired social interactions and communication, and ritualistic or repetitive behaviors. Both epidemiological and biochemical evidence suggests that a subpopulation of autistics may be linked to immune perturbations that occurred during fetal development. These findings have given rise to an animal model, called the "maternal immune activation" model, whereby the offspring from female rodents who were subjected to an immune stimulus during early or mid-pregnancy are studied. Here, C57BL/6 mouse dams were treated mid-gestation with saline, lipopolysaccharide (LPS to mimic a bacterial infection, or polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (Poly IC to mimic a viral infection. Autism-associated behaviors were examined in the adult offspring of the treated dams. Behavioral tests were conducted to assess motor activity, exploration in a novel environment, sociability, and repetitive behaviors, and data analyses were carried independently on male and female mice. We observed a main treatment effect whereby male offspring from Poly IC-treated dams showed reduced motor activity. In the marble burying test of repetitive behavior, male offspring but not female offspring from both LPS and Poly IC-treated mothers showed increased marble burying. Our findings indicate that offspring from mothers subjected to immune stimulation during gestation show a gender-specific increase in stereotyped repetitive behavior.

  14. Aberrant neuronal activity-induced signaling and gene expression in a mouse model of RASopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhaei-Rad, Saeideh; Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Pina-Fernández, Eneko; Marini, Claudia; Santos, Monica; Ahmadian, Mohammad R.; Stork, Oliver; Zenker, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by reduced growth, craniofacial abnormalities, congenital heart defects, and variable cognitive deficits. NS belongs to the RASopathies, genetic conditions linked to mutations in components and regulators of the Ras signaling pathway. Approximately 50% of NS cases are caused by mutations in PTPN11. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying cognitive impairments in NS patients are still poorly understood. Here, we report the generation and characterization of a new conditional mouse strain that expresses the overactive Ptpn11D61Y allele only in the forebrain. Unlike mice with a global expression of this mutation, this strain is viable and without severe systemic phenotype, but shows lower exploratory activity and reduced memory specificity, which is in line with a causal role of disturbed neuronal Ptpn11 signaling in the development of NS-linked cognitive deficits. To explore the underlying mechanisms we investigated the neuronal activity-regulated Ras signaling in brains and neuronal cultures derived from this model. We observed an altered surface expression and trafficking of synaptic glutamate receptors, which are crucial for hippocampal neuronal plasticity. Furthermore, we show that the neuronal activity-induced ERK signaling, as well as the consecutive regulation of gene expression are strongly perturbed. Microarray-based hippocampal gene expression profiling revealed profound differences in the basal state and upon stimulation of neuronal activity. The neuronal activity-dependent gene regulation was strongly attenuated in Ptpn11D61Y neurons. In silico analysis of functional networks revealed changes in the cellular signaling beyond the dysregulation of Ras/MAPK signaling that is nearly exclusively discussed in the context of NS at present. Importantly, changes in PI3K/AKT/mTOR and JAK/STAT signaling were experimentally confirmed. In summary, this study uncovers aberrant neuronal activity-induced signaling and regulation

  15. Dietary whey protein stimulates mitochondrial activity and decreases oxidative stress in mouse female brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shertzer, Howard G; Krishan, Mansi; Genter, Mary Beth

    2013-08-26

    In humans and experimental animals, protein-enriched diets are beneficial for weight management, muscle development, managing early stage insulin resistance and overall health. Previous studies have shown that in mice consuming a high fat diet, whey protein isolate (WPI) reduced hepatosteatosis and insulin resistance due in part to an increase in basal metabolic rate. In the current study, we examined the ability of WPI to increase energy metabolism in mouse brain. Female C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal AIN-93M diet for 12 weeks, with (WPI group) or without (Control group) 100g WPI/L drinking water. In WPI mice compared to controls, the oxidative stress biomarkers malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxyalkenals were 40% lower in brain homogenates, and the production of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide were 25-35% less in brain mitochondria. Brain mitochondria from WPI mice remained coupled, and exhibited higher rates of respiration with proportionately greater levels of cytochromes a+a3 and c+c1. These results suggested that WPI treatment increased the number or improved the function of brain mitochondria. qRT-PCR revealed that the gene encoding a master regulator of mitochondrial activity and biogenesis, Pgc-1alpha (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha) was elevated 2.2-fold, as were the PGC-1alpha downstream genes, Tfam (mitochondrial transcription factor A), Gabpa/Nrf-2a (GA-binding protein alpha/nuclear respiratory factor-2a), and Cox-6a1 (cytochrome oxidase-6a1). Each of these genes had twice the levels of transcript in brain tissue from WPI mice, relative to controls. There was no change in the expression of the housekeeping gene B2mg (beta-2 microglobulin). We conclude that dietary whey protein decreases oxidative stress and increases mitochondrial activity in mouse brain. Dietary supplementation with WPI may be a useful clinical intervention to treat conditions associated with oxidative stress or diminished mitochondrial activity in the

  16. Activation of cannabinoid CB2 receptors reduces hyperalgesia in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Weisi; Taylor, Bradley K

    2015-05-19

    Clinical trials investigating the analgesic efficacy of cannabinoids in multiple sclerosis have yielded mixed results, possibly due to psychotropic side effects mediated by cannabinoid CB1 receptors. We hypothesized that, a CB2-specific agonist (JWH-133) would decrease hyperalgesia in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model of multiple sclerosis. Four weeks after induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, we found that intrathecal administration of JWH-133 (10-100μg) dose-dependently reduced both mechanical and cold hypersensitivity without producing signs of sedation or ataxia. The anti-hyperalgesic effects of JWH-133 could be dose-dependently prevented by intrathecal co-administration of the CB2 antagonist, AM-630 (1-3μg). Our results suggest that JWH-133 acts at CB2 receptors, most likely within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, to suppress the hypersensitivity associated with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These are the first pre-clinical studies to directly promote CB2 as a promising target for the treatment of central pain in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

  17. Attention modulates the dorsal striatum response to love stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeslag, Sandra J E; van der Veen, Frederik M; Röder, Christian H

    2014-02-01

    In previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies concerning romantic love, several brain regions including the caudate and putamen have consistently been found to be more responsive to beloved-related than control stimuli. In those studies, infatuated individuals were typically instructed to passively view the stimuli or to think of the viewed person. In the current study, we examined how the instruction to attend to, or ignore the beloved modulates the response of these brain areas. Infatuated individuals performed an oddball task in which pictures of their beloved and friend served as targets and distractors. The dorsal striatum showed greater activation for the beloved than friend, but only when they were targets. The dorsal striatum actually tended to show less activation for the beloved than the friend when they were distractors. The longer the love and relationship duration, the smaller the response of the dorsal striatum to beloved-distractor stimuli was. We interpret our findings in terms of reinforcement learning. By virtue of using a cognitive task with a full factorial design, we show that the dorsal striatum is not activated by beloved-related information per se, but only by beloved-related information that is attended.

  18. Plectasin shows intracellular activity against Staphylococcus aureus in human THP-1 monocytes and in a mouse peritonitis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinch, Karoline Sidelmann; Sandberg, Anne; Baudoux, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    was maintained (maximal relative efficacy [E(max)], 1.0- to 1.3-log reduction in CFU) even though efficacy was inferior to that of extracellular killing (E(max), >4.5-log CFU reduction). Animal studies included a novel use of the mouse peritonitis model, exploiting extra- and intracellular differentiation assays...... concentration. These findings stress the importance of performing studies of extra- and intracellular activity since these features cannot be predicted from traditional MIC and killing kinetic studies. Application of both the THP-1 and the mouse peritonitis models showed that the in vitro results were similar...

  19. Neurotoxic activity of venom from the Australian Eastern mouse spider (Missulena bradleyi) involves modulation of sodium channel gating

    OpenAIRE

    Rash, Lachlan D; Birinyi-Strachan, Liesl C; Nicholson, Graham M.; Wayne C. Hodgson

    2000-01-01

    Mouse spiders represent a potential cause of serious envenomation in humans. This study examined the activity of Missulena bradleyi venom in several in vitro preparations. Whilst female M. bradleyi venom at doses up to 0.05 μl ml−1 failed to alter twitch or resting tension in all preparations used, male venom (0.02 and 0.05 μl ml−1) produced potent effects on transmitter release in both smooth and skeletal neuromuscular preparations.In the mouse phrenic nerve diaphragm preparation, male M. br...

  20. The role of BDNF/TrkB signaling in acute amphetamine-induced locomotor activity and opioid peptide gene expression in the rat dorsal striatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline F McGinty

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to psychostimulants increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF mRNA and protein levels in the cerebral cortex and subcortical structures. Because BDNF is co-localized with dopamine and glutamate in afferents to the striatum of rats, it may be co-released with those neurotransmitters upon stimulation. Further, there may be an interaction between the intracellular signaling cascades activated by dopamine, glutamate, and TrkB receptors in medium spiny striatal neurons. In the present study, the effect of acute amphetamine administration on TrkB phosphorylation (p-TrkB, as an indirect indicator of activation, and striatal gene expression, was evaluated. In Experiment 1, 15 minutes or 2 hours after a single saline or amphetamine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p. injection, the caudate-putamen (CPu, nucleus accumbens (NAc, and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC were extracted and processed for phospho (p-TrkB immunoreactivity. Immunoprecipitation analyses indicated that neither the tyrosine phosphorylation (p-Tyr or autophosphorylation sites of TrkB (706 were changed in NAc, CPu, or dmPFC 15 min after amphetamine administration. In contrast, p-Tyr and the PLCγ phosphorylation site of TrkB (816 were increased in the NAc and CPu 2 hrs after amphetamine. In Experiment 2, intra-striatal infusion of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, K252a, increased amphetamine-induced vertical activity but not total distance traveled. In addition, K252a inhibited amphetamine -induced preprodynorphin, but not preproenkephalin, mRNA expression in the striatum. These data indicate that acute amphetamine administration induces p-TrkB activation and signaling in a time- and brain region-dependent manner and that TrkB/BDNF signaling plays an important role in amphetamine-induced behavior and striatal gene expression.

  1. Biological characteristics of mouse skin melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhanquan; Ji, Kaiyuan; Yang, Shanshan; Zhang, Junzhen; Yao, Jianbo; Dong, Changsheng; Fan, Ruiwen

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the optimal passage number according to the biological characteristics of mouse skin melanocytes from different passages. Skin punch biopsies harvested from the dorsal region of 2-day old mice were used to establish melanocyte cultures. The cells from passage 4, 7, 10 and 13 were collected and evaluated for their melanogenic activity. Histochemical staining for tyrosinase (TYR) activity and immunostaining for the melanocyte specific markers including S-100 antigen, TYR, tyrosinase related protein 1 (TYRP1), tyrosinase related protein 2 (TYRP2) and micropthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF) confirmed purity and melanogenic capacity of melanocytes from different passages, with better melanogenic activity of passage 10 and 13 cells being observed. Treatment of passage 13 melanocytes with α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) showed increased expression of MITF, TYR and TYRP2 mRNA. However, considering the TYR mRNA dramatically high expression which is the characteristics of melanoma cells, melanocytes from passage 10 was the optimal passage number for the further research. Our results demonstrate culture of pure populations of mouse melanocytes to at least 10 passages and illustrate the potential utility of passage 10 cells for studies of intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of genes controlling pigmentation and coat color in mouse.

  2. Bay11-7082 attenuates neuropathic pain via inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B and nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor protein 3 inflammasome activation in dorsal root ganglions in a rat model of lumbar disc herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ailiang; Wang, Kun; Ding, Lianghua; Bao, Xinnan; Wang, Xuan; Qiu, Xubin; Liu, Jinbo

    2017-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is an important cause of radiculopathy, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Many studies suggested that local inflammation, rather than mechanical compression, results in radiculopathy induced by LDH. On the molecular and cellular level, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome have been implicated in the regulation of neuroinflammation formation and progression. In this study, the autologous nucleus pulposus (NP) was implanted in the left L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) to mimic LDH in rats. We investigated the expression of NF-κB and the components of NLRP3 inflammasome in the DRG neurons in rats. Western blotting and immunofluorescence for the related molecules, including NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing caspase-1 activator domain (ASC), caspase-1, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18, IκBα, p-IκBα, p65, p-p65, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) were examined. In the NP-treated group, the activations of NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1, IL-1β, IL-18, p-IκBα, and p-p65 in DRG neurons in rats were elevated at 1 day after surgery, and the peak occurred at 7 days. Treatment with Bay11-7082, an inhibitor of the actions of IKK-β, was able to inhibit expression and activation of the molecules (NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1, IL-1β, IL-18, p-IκBα, and p-p65) and relieve the pain in rats. Our study shows that NF-κB and NLRP3 inflammasome are involved in the maintenance of NP-induced pain, and that Bay11-7082 could alleviate mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia by inhibiting NF-κB and NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

  3. Clofazimine Contributes Sustained Antimicrobial Activity after Treatment Cessation in a Mouse Model of Tuberculosis Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Rosemary V; Ammerman, Nicole C; Ngcobo, Bongani; Adamson, John; Moodley, Chivonne; Dorasamy, Afton; Moodley, Sashen; Mgaga, Zinhle; Bester, Linda A; Singh, Sanil D; Almeida, Deepak V; Grosset, Jacques H

    2016-05-01

    Experimental and clinical studies have indicated that the antileprosy drug clofazimine may contribute treatment-shortening activity when included in tuberculosis treatment regimens. Clofazimine accumulates to high levels in tissues, has a long half-life, and remains in the body for months after administration is stopped. We hypothesized that in tuberculosis treatment, accumulated clofazimine may contribute sustained antimicrobial activity after treatment cessation, and we used the BALB/c mouse model of chronic tuberculosis chemotherapy to address this hypothesis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected mice were treated for 4 weeks or 8 weeks with either isoniazid alone, clofazimine alone, the first-line regimen rifampin-isoniazid-pyrazinamide-ethambutol, or a first-line regimen where clofazimine was administered in place of ethambutol. To evaluate posttreatment antimicrobial activity, bacterial regrowth in the lungs and spleens was assessed at the day of treatment cessation and 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after treatment was stopped. Bacterial regrowth was delayed in all mice receiving clofazimine, either alone or in combination, compared to the mice that did not receive clofazimine. This effect was especially evident in mice receiving multidrug therapy. In mice not receiving clofazimine, bacterial regrowth began almost immediately after treatment was stopped, while in mice receiving clofazimine, bacterial regrowth was delayed for up to 6 weeks, with the duration of sustained antimicrobial activity being positively associated with the time that serum clofazimine levels remained at or above the 0.25-μg/ml MIC for M. tuberculosis Thus, sustained activity of clofazimine may be important in the treatment-shortening effect associated with this drug. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Mouse spermatozoa contain a nuclease that is activated by pretreatment with EGTA and subsequent calcium incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaz, Segal M; Dominguez, Kenneth; Shaman, Jeffrey A; Ward, W Steven

    2008-04-01

    We demonstrated that mouse spermatozoa cleave their DNA into approximately 50 kb loop-sized fragments with topoisomerase IIB when treated with MnCl(2) and CaCl(2) in a process we term sperm chromatin fragmentation (SCF). SCF can be reversed by EDTA. A nuclease then further degrades the DNA in a process we term sperm DNA degradation (SDD). MnCl(2) alone could elicit this activity, but CaCl(2) had no effect. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a nuclease in the vas deferens that can be activated by ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) to digest the sperm DNA by SDD. Spermatozoa were extracted with salt and dithiothreitol to remove protamines and then incubated with EGTA. Next, the EGTA was removed and divalent cations were added. We found that Mn(2+), Ca(2+), or Zn(2+) could each activate SDD in spermatozoa but Mg(2+) could not. When the reaction was slowed by incubation on ice, EGTA pretreatment followed by incubation in Ca(2+) elicited the reversible fragmentation of sperm DNA evident in SCF. When the reactions were then incubated at 37 degrees C they progressed to the more complete degradation of DNA by SDD. EDTA could also be used to activate the nuclease, but required a higher concentration than EGTA. This EGTA-activatable nuclease activity was found in each fraction of the vas deferens plasma: in the spermatozoa, in the surrounding fluid, and in the insoluble components in the fluid. These results suggest that this sperm nuclease is regulated by a mechanism that is sensitive to EGTA, possibly by removing inhibition of a calcium binding protein.

  5. Expression of mouse beta defensin 2 in Escherichia coli and its broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianxiang Gong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mature mouse beta defensin 2 (mBD2 is a small cationic peptide with antimicrobial activity. Here we established a prokaryotic expression vector containing the cDNA of mature mBD2 fused with thioredoxin (TrxA, pET32a-mBD2. The vector was transformed into Escherichia Coli (E. coli Rosseta-gami (2 for expression fusion protein. Under the optimization of fermentation parameters: induce with 0.6 mM isopropylthiogalactoside (IPTG at 34ºC in 2×YT medium and harvest at 6 h postinduction, fusion protein TrxA-mBD2 was high expressed in the soluble fraction (>95%. After cleaved fusion protein by enterokinase, soluble mature mBD2 was achieved 6 mg/L with a volumetric productivity. Purified recombinant mBD2 demonstrated clear broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity for fungi, bacteria and virus. The MIC of antibacterial activity of against Staphylococcus aureus was 50 µg/ml. The MIC of against Candida albicans (C. albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans was 12.5µg/ml and 25µg/ml, respectively. Also, the antimicrobial activity of mBD2 was effected by NaCl concentration. Additionally, mBD2 showed antiviral activity against influenza A virus (IAV, the protective rate for Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK was 93.86% at the mBD2 concentration of 100 µg/ml. These works might provide a foundation for the following research on the mBD2 as therapeutic agent for medical microbes.

  6. Complete agenesis of dorsal pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malwinder Singh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Complete agenesis of body and tail of pancreas is a very rare type of developmental anomaly of pancreas. It is important regarding its presentations of diabetes mellitus, pancreatitis, and exocrine insufficiency. Case Report: An old man had presented with atypical symptoms of obstructive jaundice with exocrine insufficiency. CECT helped to reveal the complete absence of the body and tail of pancreas with radiologically normal head with no signs of pancreatitis or mass lesion. Conclusions: The cause of agenesis of the dorsal pancreas is currently not well understood. It can also present lately as the presenting case. The presentations are usually related to secretory malfunctions. CECT is an initial investigation for diagnosis

  7. Liposarcome dorsal: aspect clinique rare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbessi, Odry; Arrob, Adil; Fiqhi, Kamal; Khalfi, Lahcen; Nassih, Mohammed; El Khatib, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Décrit la première fois par Virchow en 1860, le liposarcome est une tumeur mésenchymateuse rare. Cette rareté est relative car les liposarcomes représentent quand même 14 à 18% de l'ensemble des tumeurs malignes des parties molles et ils constituent le plus fréquent des sarcomes des parties molles. Pour la majorité des auteurs, il ne se développerait jamais sur un lipome ou une lipomatose préexistant. Nous rapportons un cas de volumineux liposarcome de la face dorsale du tronc. L'histoire de la maladie, l'aspect clinique inhabituel « de tumeur dans tumeur », l'aspect de la pièce opératoire nous fait évoquer la possibilité de la transformation maligne d'un lipome bénin préexistant. PMID:26113914

  8. Cucurbitacins-type triterpene with potent activity on mouse embryonic fibroblast from Cucumis prophetarum, cucurbitaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seif-Eldin N Ayyad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Higher plants are considered as a well-known source of the potent anticancer metabolites with diversity of chemical structures. For instance, taxol is an amazing diterpene alkaloid had been lunched since 1990. Objective: To isolate the major compounds from the fruit extract of Cucumis prophetarum, Cucurbitaceae, which are mainly responsible for the bioactivities as anticancer. Materials and Methods: Plant material was shady air dried, extracted with equal volume of chloroform/methanol, and fractionated with different adsorbents. The structures of obtained pure compounds were elucidated with different spectroscopic techniques employing 1D ( 1 H and 13 C and 2D (COSY, HMQC and HMBC NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry and ESI-MS (Eelectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry spectroscopy. The pure isolates were tested towards human cancer cell lines, mouse embryonic fibroblast (NIH3T3 and virally transformed form (KA3IT. Results: Two cucurbitacins derivatives, dihydocucurbitacin B (1 and cucurbitacin B (2, had been obtained. Compounds 1 and 2 showed potent inhibitory activities toward NIH3T3 and KA31T with IC 50 0.2, 0.15, 2.5 and 2.0 μg/ml, respectively. Conclusion: The naturally cucurbitacin derivatives (dihydocucurbitacin B and cucurbitacin B showed potent activities towards NIH3T3 and KA31T, could be considered as a lead of discovering a new anticancer natural drug.

  9. Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucan is an activator of human and mouse dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Martirosyan

    Full Text Available Bacterial cyclic glucans are glucose polymers that concentrate within the periplasm of alpha-proteobacteria. These molecules are necessary to maintain the homeostasis of the cell envelope by contributing to the osmolarity of Gram negative bacteria. Here, we demonstrate that Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans are potent activators of human and mouse dendritic cells. Dendritic cells activation by Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans requires TLR4, MyD88 and TRIF, but not CD14. The Brucella cyclic glucans showed neither toxicity nor immunogenicity compared to LPS and triggered antigen-specific CD8(+ T cell responses in vivo. These cyclic glucans also enhanced antigen-specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell responses including cross-presentation by different human DC subsets. Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans increased the memory CD4(+ T cell responses of blood mononuclear cells exposed to recombinant fusion proteins composed of anti-CD40 antibody and antigens from both hepatitis C virus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Thus cyclic glucans represent a new class of adjuvants, which might contribute to the development of effective antimicrobial therapies.

  10. Restricted expression of recombination activating gene (RAG-1) in mouse lymphoid tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Akihito; Fujinaga, Hiroyuki; Hamatani, Kiyohiro [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan). Nagasaki Branch; Atsuta, Mitsuru

    1993-03-01

    In an attempt to determine the distribution of recombinase activity in the mouse thymus, spleen, and lymph nodes, we used the in situ hybridization method to examine the expression of the recombination activating genes RAG-1 and RAG-2. Expression of RAG-1 was found in most cortical thymocytes but not in the majority of medullary thymocytes. Although hybridization signals of RAG-2 were not as intense as those of RAG-1, the localization of RAG-2 transcripts was similar to that of RAG-1. In the spleen, expression of RAG-1 was found only in limited cells near the splenic sinus, and the majority of the cells within the follicle were negative for RAG-1 transcript. In nude mice, RAG-1-expressing cells were detected in the same regions, which suggests that in situ hybridization signals of RAG-1 in the spleen are due to the cells of B-cell origin. In the lymph nodes, expression of RAG-1 was found only in the medullary region. Expression of RAG-2 transcript in the spleen and the lymph nodes, if any, was too faint to allow determination of the specific localization. These results suggest that most of the cortical thymocytes and some cells in the spleen are capable of rearranging T-cell receptor genes and immunoglobulin genes, respectively, but the possible involvement of the RAG-1 transcript in RAG-1-positive cells of the spleen and the lymph nodes in functions other than the rearrangement of genes could not be ruled out. (author).

  11. Induction of megakaryocytic colony-stimulating activity in mouse skin by inflammatory agents and tumor promoters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D.A.; Dessypris, E.N.; Koury, M.J.

    1987-03-01

    The production of megakaryocytic colony-stimulating activity (MEG-CSA) was assayed in acetic acid extracts of skin from mice topically treated with inflammatory and tumor-promoting agents. A rapid induction of MEG-CSA was found in skin treated both with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a strong tumor promoter, and with mezerein, a weak tumor promoter, but no induction was found in untreated skin. The time course of induction of MEG-CSA following treatment of skin with PMA or mezerein was very similar to that previously demonstrated for the induction of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating activity in mouse skin by these agents. The induced MEG-CSA was found in both the epidermis and the dermis. Pretreatment of the skin with US -methasone abrogated the MEG-CSA induction. The cell number response curve suggests that the MEG-CSA acts directly on the progenitor cells of the megakaryocyte colonies. That topical administration of diterpene esters results in the rapid, local induction of MEG-CSA which can be blocked by US -methasone pretreatment suggests a mechanism for the thrombocytosis associated with some inflammatory states. The indirect action in which diterpene esters induce in certain cells the production or release of growth regulatory factors for other cell types may also aid in understanding their carcinogenic properties.

  12. RhoA/ROCK downregulates FPR2-mediated NADPH oxidase activation in mouse bone marrow granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filina, Julia V; Gabdoulkhakova, Aida G; Safronova, Valentina G

    2014-10-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) express the high and low affinity receptors to formylated peptides (mFPR1 and mFPR2 in mice, accordingly). RhoA/ROCK (Rho activated kinase) pathway is crucial for cell motility and oxidase activity regulated via FPRs. There are contradictory data on RhoA-mediated regulation of NADPH oxidase activity in phagocytes. We have shown divergent Rho GTPases signaling via mFPR1 and mFPR2 to NADPH oxidase in PMNs from inflammatory site. The present study was aimed to find out the role of RhoA/ROCK in the respiratory burst activated via mFPR1 and mFPR2 in the bone marrow PMNs. Different kinetics of RhoA activation were detected with 0.1μM fMLF and 1μM WKYMVM operating via mFPR1 and mFPR2, accordingly. RhoA was translocated in fMLF-activated cells towards the cell center and juxtamembrane space versus uniform allocation in the resting cells. Specific inhibition of RhoA by CT04, Rho inhibitor I, weakly depressed the respiratory burst induced via mFPR1, but significantly increased the one induced via mFPR2. Inhibition of ROCK, the main effector of RhoA, by Y27632 led to the same effect on the respiratory burst. Regulation of mFPR2-induced respiratory response by ROCK was impossible under the cytoskeleton disruption by cytochalasin D, whereas it persisted in the case of mFPR1 activation. Thus we suggest RhoA to be one of the regulatory and signal transduction components in the respiratory burst through FPRs in the mouse bone marrow PMNs. Both mFPR1 and mFPR2 binding with a ligand trigger the activation of RhoA. FPR1 signaling through RhoA/ROCK increases NADPH-oxidase activity. But in FPR2 action RhoA/ROCK together with cytoskeleton-linked systems down-regulates NADPH-oxidase. This mechanism could restrain the reactive oxygen species dependent damage of own tissues during the chemotaxis of PMNs and in the resting cells.

  13. Simultaneous Gene Editing by Injection of mRNAs Encoding Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases into Mouse Zygotes

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chunliang; Qi, Rong; Singleterry, Rebecca; Hyle, Judith; Balch, Amanda; Li, Xiuling; Sublett, Jack; Berns, Hartmut; Valentine, Marcus; Valentine, Virginia; Sherr, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    Injection of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) mRNAs into mouse zygotes transferred into foster mothers efficiently generated founder mice with heritable mutations in targeted genes. Immunofluorescence visualization of phosphorylated histone 2A (γH2AX) combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that TALEN pairs targeting the Agouti locus induced site-directed DNA breaks in zygotes within 6 h of injection, an activity that continued at reduced efficiency in...

  14. Diosgenin inhibits superoxide generation in FMLP-activated mouse neutrophils via multiple pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y; Jia, R; Liu, Y; Gao, Y; Zeng, X; Kou, J; Yu, B

    2014-12-01

    Diosgenin possesses anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. Activated neutrophils produce high concentrations of the superoxide anion which is involved in the pathophysiology of inflammation-related diseases and cancer. In the present study, the inhibitory effect and possible mechanisms of diosgenin on superoxide generation were investigated in mouse bone marrow neutrophils. Diosgenin potently and concentration-dependently inhibited the extracellular and intracellular superoxide anion generation in Formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP)- activated neutrophils, with IC50 values of 0.50 ± 0.08 μM and 0.66 ± 0.13 μM, respectively. Such inhibition was not mediated by scavenging the superoxide anion or by a cytotoxic effect. Diosgenin inhibited the phosphorylation of p47phox and membrane translocation of p47phox and p67phox, and thus blocking the assembly of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase. Moreover, cellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and protein kinase A (PKA) expression were also effectively increased by diosgenin. It attenuated FMLP-induced increase of phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A (cPLA2), p21-activated kinase (PAK), Akt, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Our data indicate that diosgenin exhibits inhibitory effects on superoxide anion production through the blockade of cAMP, PKA, cPLA2, PAK, Akt and MAPKs signaling pathways. The results may explain the clinical implications of diosgenin in the treatment of inflammation-related disorders.

  15. Activation of Mouse Tcrb: Uncoupling RUNX1 Function from Its Cooperative Binding with ETS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiang-Yang; Osipovich, Oleg; Koues, Olivia I; Majumder, Kinjal; Oltz, Eugene M

    2017-08-01

    T lineage commitment requires the coordination of key transcription factors (TFs) in multipotent progenitors that transition them away from other lineages and cement T cell identity. Two important TFs for the multipotent progenitors to T lineage transition are RUNX1 and ETS1, which bind cooperatively to composite sites throughout the genome, especially in regulatory elements for genes involved in T lymphopoiesis. Activation of the TCR β (Tcrb) locus in committed thymocytes is a critical process for continued development of these cells, and is mediated by an enhancer, Eβ, which harbors two RUNX-ETS composite sites. An outstanding issue in understanding T cell gene expression programs is whether RUNX1 and ETS1 have independent functions in enhancer activation that can be dissected from cooperative binding. We now show that RUNX1 is sufficient to activate the endogenous mouse Eβ element and its neighboring 25 kb region by independently tethering this TF without coincidental ETS1 binding. Moreover, RUNX1 is sufficient for long-range promoter-Eβ looping, nucleosome clearance, and robust transcription throughout the Tcrb recombination center, spanning both DβJβ clusters. We also find that a RUNX1 domain, termed the negative regulatory domain for DNA binding, can compensate for the loss of ETS1 binding at adjacent sites. Thus, we have defined independent roles for RUNX1 in the activation of a T cell developmental enhancer, as well as its ability to mediate specific changes in chromatin landscapes that accompany long-range induction of recombination center promoters. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. Isoniazid suppresses antioxidant response element activities and impairs adipogenesis in mouse and human preadipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yanyan [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Xue, Peng [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Key Laboratory of the Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Hou, Yongyong [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Zhang, Hao [Key Laboratory of the Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zheng, Hongzhi [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Zhou, Tong [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Qu, Weidong [Key Laboratory of the Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Teng, Weiping [The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E. [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Pi, Jingbo, E-mail: jingbopi@gmail.com [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China)

    2013-12-15

    Transcriptional signaling through the antioxidant response element (ARE), orchestrated by the Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a major cellular defense mechanism against oxidative or electrophilic stress. Here, we reported that isoniazid (INH), a widely used antitubercular drug, displays a substantial inhibitory property against ARE activities in diverse mouse and human cells. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, INH concentration-dependently suppressed the ARE-luciferase reporter activity and mRNA expression of various ARE-dependent antioxidant genes under basal and oxidative stressed conditions. In keeping with our previous findings that Nrf2-ARE plays a critical role in adipogenesis by regulating expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), suppression of ARE signaling by INH hampered adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells and human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Following adipogenesis induced by hormonal cocktails, INH-treated 3T3-L1 cells and ADSCs displayed significantly reduced levels of lipid accumulation and attenuated expression of C/EBPα and PPARγ. Time-course studies in 3T3-L1 cells revealed that inhibition of adipogenesis by INH occurred in the early stage of terminal adipogenic differentiation, where reduced expression of C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ was observed. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that INH suppresses ARE signaling and interrupts with the transcriptional network of adipogenesis, leading to impaired adipogenic differentiation. The inhibition of ARE signaling may be a potential underlying mechanism by which INH attenuates cellular antioxidant response contributing to various complications. - Highlights: • Isoniazid suppresses ARE-mediated transcriptional activity. • Isoniazid inhibits adipogenesis in preadipocytes. • Isoniazid suppresses adipogenic gene expression during adipogenesis.

  17. The venom of the fishing spider Dolomedes sulfurous contains various neurotoxins acting on voltage-activated ion channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hengyun; Zhang, Fan; Li, Dan; Xu, Shiyan; He, Juan; Yu, Hai; Li, Jiayan; Liu, Zhonghua; Liang, Songping

    2013-04-01

    Dolomedes sulfurous is a venomous spider distributed in the south of China and characterized with feeding on fish. The venom exhibits great diversity and contains hundreds of peptides as revealed by off-line RP-HPLC/MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. The venom peptides followed a triple-modal distribution, with 40.7% of peptides falling in the mass range of 1000-3000 Da, 25.6% peptides in the 7000-9000 Da range and 23.5% peptides in the 3000-5000 Da range. This distribution modal is rather different from these of peptides from other spider venoms analyzed. The venom could inhibit voltage-activated Na(+), K(+) and Ca(2+) channels in rat DRG neurons as revealed by voltage-clamp analysis. Significantly, the venom exhibited inhibitory effects on TTX-R Na(+) and T-type Ca(2+) currents, suggesting that there exist both channel antagonists which might be valuable tools for investigation of both channels and drug development. Additionally, intrathoracically injection of venom could cause serve neurotoxic effects on zebrafish and death at higher concentrations. The LD50 value was calculated to be 28.8 μg/g body weight. Our results indicated that the venom of D. sulfurous contain diverse neurotoxins which serve to capture prey. Intensive studies will be necessary to investigate the structures and functions of specific peptides of the venom in the future.

  18. Induction of dorsal mesoderm by soluble, mature Vg1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, D S; Melton, D A

    1995-07-01

    Mesoderm induction during Xenopus development has been extensively studied, and two members of the transforming growth factor-beta family, activin beta B and Vg1, have emerged as candidates for a natural inducer of dorsal mesoderm. Heretofore, analysis of Vg1 activity has relied on injection of hybrid Vg1 mRNAs, which have not been shown to direct efficient secretion of ligand and, therefore, the mechanism of mesoderm induction by processed Vg1 protein is unclear. This report describes injection of Xenopus oocytes with a chimeric activin-Vg1 mRNA, encoding the pro-region of activin beta B fused to the mature region of Vg1, resulting in the processing and secretion of mature Vg1. Treatment of animal pole explants with mature Vg1 protein resulted in differentiation of dorsal, but not ventral, mesodermal tissues and dose-dependent activation of both dorsal and ventrolateral mesodermal markers. At high doses, mature Vg1 induced formation of 'embryoids' with a rudimentary axial pattern, head structures including eyes and a functional neuromuscular system. Furthermore, truncated forms of the activin and FGF receptors, which block mesoderm induction in the intact embryo, fully inhibited mature Vg1 activity. To examine the mechanism of inhibition, we have performed receptor-binding assays with radiolabeled Vg1. Finally, follistatin, a specific inhibitor of activin beta B which is shown not to block endogenous dorsal mesoderm induction, failed to inhibit Vg1. The results support a role for endogenous Vg1 in dorsal mesoderm induction during Xenopus development.

  19. P2 purinergic receptor activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and guanylyl cyclase in the dorsal facial area of the medulla increases blood flow in the common carotid arteries of cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Y-W; Leung, Y-M; Lin, N-N; Lee, T J-F; Kuo, J-S; Tung, K-C; Gong, C-L

    2015-02-12

    In the dorsal facial area (DFA) of the medulla, an activation of either P2 purinergic receptor or nitric oxide synthase (NOS) results in the release of glutamate, leading to an increase in blood flow of the common carotid artery (CCA). It is not known whether activation of the P2 receptor by ATP may mediate activation of NOS/guanylyl cyclase to cause glutamate release and/or whether L-Arg (nitric oxide (NO) precursor) may also cause ATP release from any other neuron, to cause an increase in CCA flow. We demonstrated that microinjections of P2 receptor agonists (ATP, α,β-methylene ATP) or NO precursor (L-arginine) into the DFA increased CCA blood flow. The P2-induced CCA blood flow increase was dose-dependently reduced by pretreatment with NG-nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, a non-specific NOS inhibitor), 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, a relatively selective neuronal NOS inhibitor) or methylene blue (MB, a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor) but not by that with D-NAME (an isomer of L-NAME) or N5-(1-iminoethyl)-L-ornithine (L-NIO, a potent endothelial NOS inhibitor). Involvement of glutamate release in these responses were substantiated by microdialysis studies, in which perfusions of ATP into the DFA increased the glutamate concentration in dialysates, but co-perfusion of ATP with L-NAME or 7-NI did not. Nevertheless, the arginine-induced CCA blood flow increase was abolished by combined pretreatment of L-NAME and MB, but not affected by pretreatment with a selective P2 receptor antagonist, pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS). In conclusion, ATP activation of the P2 receptor in the DFA induced activation of neuronal NOS/guanylyl cyclase, which causes glutamate release leading to an increase in CCA blood flow. However, arginine activation of neuronal NOS/guanylyl cyclase, which also caused glutamate release and CCA blood flow increase, did not induce activation of P2 receptors. These findings provide important information for drug design and

  20. Modulatory activity of Lactobacillus rhamnosus OLL2838 in a mouse model of intestinal immunopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogita, Tasuku; Bergamo, Paolo; Maurano, Francesco; D'Arienzo, Rossana; Mazzarella, Giuseppe; Bozzella, Giuseppina; Luongo, Diomira; Sashihara, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Takuya; Tanabe, Soichi; Rossi, Mauro

    2015-06-01

    Gut microbiota and probiotic strains play an important role in oral tolerance by modulating regulatory and effector cell components of the immune system. We have previously described the ability of Lactobacilli to influence both the innate and adaptive immunity to wheat gluten, a food antigen, in mouse. In this study, we further explored the immunomodulatory mechanisms elicited in this model by testing three specific probiotic strains, namely L. rhamnosus OLL2838, B. infantis ATCC15697 and S. thermophilus Sfi39. In vitro analysis showed the all tested strains induced maturation of bone marrow derived dendritic cells (DCs). However, only L. rhamnosus induced appreciable levels of IL-10 and nitric oxide productions, whereas S. thermophilus essentially elicited IL-12 and TNF-α. The anti-inflammatory ability of OLL2838 was then tested in vivo by adopting mice that develop a gluten-specific enteropathy. This model is characterized by villus blunting, crypt hyperplasia, high levels of intestinal IFN-γ, increased cell apoptosis in lamina propria, and reduced intestinal total glutathione (GSHtot) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity. We found that, following administration of OLL2838, GSHtot and GST activity were enhanced, whereas caspase-3 activity was reduced. On the contrary, this probiotic strain failed in recovering the normal histology and further increased intestinal IFN-γ. Confocal microscopy revealed the inability of the probiotic strain to appropriately interact with enterocytes of the small intestine and with Peyer's patches in treated mice. In conclusion, these data highlighted the potential of L. rhamnosus OLL2838 to recover specific toxicity parameters induced by gluten in enteropathic mice through mechanisms that involve induction of low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Hair growth activity of Crataegus pinnatifida on C57BL/6 mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Heon-Sub; Lee, Jung-Min; Park, Sang-Yong; Yang, Jung-Eun; Kim, Ju-Han; Yi, Tae-Hoo

    2013-09-01

    Crataegus pinnatifida has a long history of use in traditional oriental herbal medicine to stimulating digestion and improving blood circulation. Based on nutrition of hair, the present study was conducted to assess the effect of C. pinnatifida extract on hair growth using mouse model and its mechanisms of action. The C. pinnatifida extract containing the contents of total polyphenol of 5.88□0.82 g gallic acid/100 g extract and proanthocyanidin of 9.15□1.58 mg cyaniding chloride/100 g extract was orally administered daily at a dosage of 50 mg/kg weight to the 7-week-old C57BL/6 mice in telogen. The C. pinnatifida extract promoted hair growth by inducing anagen phase in mice in telogen, reflected by color of skin, thickness of hair shaft, and density of hair. The ratio of anagento telogen was determined by shape of hair follicles in vertically sectioned slide and increased by oral administration of C. pinnatifida extract. The number and the size of hair follicles were also enlarged, indicating anagen phase induction. The proliferation of human dermal papilla cells (hDPC) was accelerated by addition of C. pinnatifida extract, which activated the signaling of mitogen-activated protein kinases (Erk, p-38, and JNK) and Akt. Moreover, the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax as the determinant of cell fate was also raised in skin. These results suggest that the C. pinnatifida extract promotes hair growth by inducing anagen phase, which might be mediated by the activation of cellular signalings that enhance the survival of cultured hDPC and the increase of the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax that protects cells against cell death. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Role of persistent sodium current in bursting activity of mouse neocortical networks in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Drongelen, Wim; Koch, Henner; Elsen, Frank P; Lee, Hyong C; Mrejeru, Ana; Doren, Erin; Marcuccilli, Charles J; Hereld, Mark; Stevens, Rick L; Ramirez, Jan-Marino

    2006-11-01

    Most types of electrographic epileptiform activity can be characterized by isolated or repetitive bursts in brain electrical activity. This observation is our motivation to determine mechanisms that underlie bursting behavior of neuronal networks. Here we show that the persistent sodium (Na(P)) current in mouse neocortical slices is associated with cellular bursting and our data suggest that these cells are capable of driving networks into a bursting state. This conclusion is supported by the following observations. 1) Both low concentrations of tetrodotoxin (TTX) and riluzole reduce and eventually stop network bursting while they simultaneously abolish intrinsic bursting properties and sensitivity levels to electrical stimulation in individual intrinsically bursting cells. 2) The sensitivity levels of regular spiking neurons are not significantly affected by riluzole or TTX at the termination of network bursting. 3) Propagation of cellular bursting in a neuronal network depended on excitatory connectivity and disappeared on bath application of CNQX (20 microM) + CPP (10 microM). 4) Voltage-clamp measurements show that riluzole (20 microM) and very low concentrations of TTX (50 nM) attenuate Na(P) currents in the neural membrane within a 1-min interval after bath application of the drug. 5) Recordings of synaptic activity demonstrate that riluzole at this concentration does not affect synaptic properties. 6) Simulations with a neocortical network model including different types of pyramidal cells, inhibitory interneurons, neurons with and without Na(P) currents, and recurrent excitation confirm the essence of our experimental observations that Na(P) conductance can be a critical factor sustaining slow population bursting.

  3. Cloning and Transcriptional Activity of the Mouse Omi/HtrA2 Gene Promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Liu, Xin; Wu, Ye; Wang, Wen; Ma, Xinliang; Liu, Huirong

    2016-01-16

    HtrA serine peptidase 2 (HtrA2), also named Omi, is a pro-apoptotic protein that exhibits dramatic changes in expression levels in a variety of disorders, including ischemia/reperfusion injury, cancer, and neurodegeneration. In our study, Omi/HtrA2 protein levels were high in the heart, brain, kidney and liver, with elevated heart/brain expression in aging mice. A similar expression pattern was observed at the mRNA level, which suggests that the regulation of Omi/HtrA2 is predominately transcriptional. Promoter binding by transcription factors is the main influencing factor of transcription, and to identify specific promoter elements that contribute to the differential expression of mouse Omi/HtrA2, we constructed truncated Omi/HtrA2 promoter/luciferase reporter vectors and analyzed their relative luciferase activity; it was greatest in the promoter regions at -1205~-838 bp and -146~+93 bp, with the -838~-649 bp region exhibiting negative regulatory activity. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that the Omi/HtrA2 gene promoter contains a CpG island at -709~+37 bp, and eight heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) sites, two Sp1 transcription factor (SP1)sites, one activator protein (AP) site, seven p53 sites, and four YY1 transcription factor(YY1) sites were predicted in the core areas. Furthermore, we found that p53 and HSF1 specifically binds to the Omi/HtrA2 promoter using chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. These results provide a foundation for understanding Omi/HtrA2 regulatory mechanisms, which could further understanding of HtrA-associated diseases.

  4. Inhibiting cholesterol degradation induces neuronal sclerosis and epileptic activity in mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chali, Farah; Djelti, Fathia; Eugene, Emmanuel; Valderrama, Mario; Marquer, Catherine; Aubourg, Patrick; Duykaerts, Charles; Miles, Richard; Cartier, Nathalie; Navarro, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    Elevations in neuronal cholesterol have been associated with several degenerative diseases. An enhanced excitability and synchronous firing in surviving neurons are among the sequels of neuronal death in these diseases and also in some epileptic syndromes. Here, we attempted to increase neuronal cholesterol levels, using a short hairpin RNA to suppress expression of the enzyme cytochrome P450 family 46, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 gene (CYP46A1). This protein hydroxylates cholesterol and so facilitates transmembrane extrusion. A short hairpin RNA CYP46A1construction coupled to the adeno-associated virus type 5 was injected focally and unilaterally into mouse hippocampus. It was selectively expressed first in neurons of the cornu ammonis (hippocampus) (CA)3a region. Cytoplasmic and membrane cholesterol increased, and the neuronal soma volume increased and then decreased before pyramidal cells died. As CA3a pyramidal cells died, interictal electroencephalographic (EEG) events occurred during exploration and non-rapid eye movement sleep. With time, neuronal death spread to involve pyramidal cells and interneurons of the CA1 region. CA1 neuronal death was correlated with a delayed local expression of phosphorylated tau. Astrocytes were activated throughout the hippocampus and microglial activation was specific to regions of neuronal death. CA1 neuronal death was correlated with distinct aberrant EEG activity. During exploratory behaviour and rapid eye movement sleep, EEG oscillations at 7-10 Hz (theta) could accelerate to 14-21 Hz (beta) waves. They were accompanied by low-amplitude, high-frequency oscillations of peak power at ~300 Hz and a range of 250-350 Hz. Although episodes of EEG acceleration were not correlated with changes in exploratory behaviour, they were followed in some animals by structured seizure-like discharges. These data strengthen links between increased cholesterol, neuronal sclerosis and epileptic behaviour.

  5. Morphometry and acetylcholinesterase activity of the myenteric plexus of the wild mouse Calomys callosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.B.M. Maifrino

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available The myenteric plexus of the digestive tract of the wild mouse Calomys callosus was examined using a histochemical method that selectively stains nerve cells, and the acetylcholinesterase (AChE histochemical technique in whole-mount preparations. Neuronal density was 1,500 ± 116 neurons/cm2 (mean ± SEM in the esophagus, 8,900 ± 1,518 in the stomach, 9,000 ± 711 in the jejunum and 13,100 ± 2,089 in the colon. The difference in neuronal density between the esophagus and other regions was statistically significant. The neuron profile area ranged from 45 to 1,100 µm2. The difference in nerve cell size between the jejunum and other regions was statistically significant. AChE-positive nerve fibers were distributed within the myenteric plexus which is formed by a primary meshwork of large nerve bundles and a secondary meshwork of finer nerve bundles. Most of the nerve cells displayed AChE activity in the cytoplasm of different reaction intensities. These results are important in order to understand the changes occurring in the myenteric plexus in experimental Chagas' disease

  6. Stem Cell Emergence and Hemopoietic Activity Are Incompatible in Mouse Intraembryonic Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Isabelle; Garcia-Porrero, Juan Antonio; Dieterlen-Lièvre, Françoise; Cumano, Ana

    1999-01-01

    In the mouse embryo, the generation of candidate progenitors for long-lasting hemopoiesis has been reported in the paraaortic splanchnopleura (P-Sp)/aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. Here, we address the following question: can the P-Sp/AGM environment support hemopoietic differentiation as well as generate stem cells, and, conversely, are other sites where hemopoietic differentiation occurs capable of generating stem cells? Although P-Sp/AGM generates de novo hemopoietic stem cells between 9.5 and 12.5 days post coitus (dpc), we show here that it does not support hemopoietic differentiation. Among mesoderm-derived sites, spleen and omentum were shown to be colonized by exogenous cells in the same fashion as the fetal liver. Cells colonizing the spleen were multipotent and pursued their evolution to committed progenitors in this organ. In contrast, the omentum, which was colonized by lymphoid-committed progenitors that did not expand, cannot be considered as a hemopoietic organ. From these data, stem cell generation appears incompatible with hemopoietic activity. At the peak of hemopoietic progenitor production in the P-Sp/AGM, between 10.5 and 11.5 dpc, multipotent cells were found at the exceptional frequency of 1 out of 12 total cells and 1 out of 4 AA4.1+ cells. Thus, progenitors within this region constitute a pool of undifferentiated hemopoietic cells readily accessible for characterization. PMID:10429669

  7. Identification of an active ID-like group of SINEs in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, David H; Jamison, Nicole

    2007-09-01

    The mouse genome consists of five known families of SINEs: B1, B2, B4/RSINE, ID, and MIR. Using RT-PCR we identified a germ-line transcript that demonstrates 92.7% sequence identity to ID (excluding primer sequence), yet a BLAST search identified numerous matches of 100% sequence identity. We analyzed four of these elements for their presence in orthologous genes in strains and subspecies of Mus musculus as well as other species of Mus using a PCR-based assay. All four analyzed elements were identified either only in M. musculus or exclusively in both M. musculus and M. domesticus, indicative of recent integrations. In conjunction with the identification of transcripts, we present an active ID-like group of elements that is not derived from the proposed BC1 master gene of ID elements. A BLAST of the rat genome indicated that these elements were not in the rat. Therefore, this family of SINEs has recently evolved, and since it has thus far been observed mainly in M. musculus, we refer to this family as MMIDL.

  8. Decline of cell viability and mitochondrial activity in mouse skeletal muscle cell in a hypomagnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jing-Peng; Mo, Wei-Chuan; Liu, Ying; He, Rong-Qiao

    2016-05-01

    Hypomagnetic field (HMF), one of the key environmental risk factors for astronauts traveling in outer space, has previously been shown to repress locomotion of mammalians. However, underlying mechanisms of how HMF affects the motor system remains poorly understood. In this study, we created an HMF (<3 μT) by eliminating geomagnetic field (GMF, ∼50 μT) and exposed primary mouse skeletal muscle cells to this low magnetic field condition for a period of three days. HMF-exposed cells showed a decline in cell viability relative to GMF control, even though cells appeared normal in terms of morphology and survival rate. After a 3-day HMF-exposure, glucose consumption of skeletal muscle cells was significantly lower than GMF control, accompanied by less adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) content and higher ADP/ATP ratio. In agreement with these findings, mitochondrial membrane potential of HMF-exposed cells was also lower, whereas levels of cellular Reactive Oxygen Species were higher. Moreover, viability and membrane potential of isolated mitochondria were reduced after 1 h HMF-exposure in vitro. Our results indicate that mitochondria can directly respond to HMF at functional level, and suggest that HMF-induced decline in cell functionality results from a reduction in energy production and mitochondrial activity.

  9. Cucumarioside A2-2 causes changes in the morphology and proliferative activity in mouse spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pislyagin, E A; Manzhulo, I V; Dmitrenok, P S; Aminin, D L

    2016-05-01

    The immunomodulatory effect of triterpene glycoside cucumarioside A2-2 (CA2-2), isolated from the Far Eastern sea cucumber Cucumaria japonica, on the mouse spleen was investigated in comparison with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It has been shown that the intraperitoneal (i.p.) glycoside administration did not influence on splenic weights, while the statistically significant increase in splenic weight was observed after LPS administration. Changes in the ratio of red to white pulp after CA2-2 or LPS administration were observed. The proportion of splenic white pulp after glycoside or LPS administration increased by up to 34% and 36%, respectively. A detailed study of the distribution of the РСNA (Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen) marker showed that the proliferative activity in the white pulp under CA2-2 and LPS influence increased 2.07 and 2.24 times, respectively. The localization of PCNA-positive nuclei in the white pulp region, as well as their dimensional characteristics, suggests that a large proportion of the proliferating cell population consisted of B cells. The mass spectrometry profiles of spleen peptide/protein homogenate were obtained using the MALDI-TOF-MS (Matrix -Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry) approach. It was found that i.p. stimulation of animals with CA2-2 or LPS leads to marked changes in the intensity of revealed characteristic peaks of peptides/proteins after exposure to immunostimulants.

  10. Antiinflammatory activity of glucomoringin isothiocyanate in a mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galuppo, Maria; Giacoppo, Sabrina; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Iori, Renato; Navarra, Michele; Lombardo, Giovanni Enrico; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2014-06-01

    Glucomoringin (4(α-L-rhamnosyloxy)-benzyl glucosinolate) (GMG) is an uncommon member of glucosinolate group belonging to the Moringaceae family, of which Moringa oleifera Lam. is the most widely distributed. Bioactivation of GMG with the enzyme myrosinase forms the corresponding isothiocyanate (4(α-L-rhamnosyloxy)-benzyl isothiocyanate) (GMG-ITC), which can play a key role in antitumoral activity and counteract the inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of GMG-ITC treatment in an experimental mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory demyelinating disease with neurodegeneration characterized by demyelinating plaques, neuronal, and axonal loss. For this reason, C57Bl/6 male mice were injected with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein35-55 which is able to evoke an autoimmune response against myelin fibers miming human multiple sclerosis physiopatogenesis. Results clearly showed that the treatment was able to counteract the inflammatory cascade that underlies the processes leading to severe MS. In particular, GMG-ITC was effective against proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α. Oxidative species generation including the influence of iNOS, nitrotyrosine tissue expression and cell apoptotic death pathway was also evaluated resulting in a lower Bax/Bcl-2 unbalance. Taken together, this work adds new interesting properties and applicability of GMG-ITC and this compound can be suggested as a useful drug for the treatment or prevention of MS, at least in association with current conventional therapy.

  11. Shortening amplitude affects the incomplete force recovery after active shortening in mouse soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Noten, Pieter; Van Leemputte, Marc

    2009-12-11

    Compared to isometric contraction, the force producing capacity of muscle is reduced (force depression, FD) after a work producing shortening phase. It has been suggested that FD results from an inhibition of cross-bridge binding. Because the rate constants of the exponential force (re)development are thought to be primarily determined by cross-bridge attachment/detachment rate, we aimed to investigate the components of force redevelopment (REDEV) after 0.6, 1.2 and 2.4mm shortening, resulting in varying amounts of FD (from about 5% to about 16%), in mouse soleus muscle (n=11). Compared to isometric force development (DEV), the time to reach steady-state during REDEV was about 3 times longer (370 versus 1261ms) increasing with increasing amplitude. Contrary to a single, a double exponential function with one component set equal to the rate constant of DEV (14.3s(-1)), accurately described REDEV (RMSshortening amplitude and was associated with work delivered during shortening (R(2)=0.75) and FD (R(2)=0.77). We concluded that a work related slow exponential component is induced to the trajectory of incomplete force recovery after shortening, causing FD. These results suggest that after shortening, aside from cross-bridges with normal attachment/detachment rate, cross-bridges with reduced cycling rate are active.

  12. Sertoli cells maintain Leydig cell number and peritubular myoid cell activity in the adult mouse testis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Rebourcet

    Full Text Available The Sertoli cells are critical regulators of testis differentiation and development. In the adult, however, their known function is restricted largely to maintenance of spermatogenesis. To determine whether the Sertoli cells regulate other aspects of adult testis biology we have used a novel transgenic mouse model in which Amh-Cre induces expression of the receptor for Diphtheria toxin (iDTR specifically within Sertoli cells. This causes controlled, cell-specific and acute ablation of the Sertoli cell population in the adult animal following Diphtheria toxin injection. Results show that Sertoli cell ablation leads to rapid loss of all germ cell populations. In addition, adult Leydig cell numbers decline by 75% with the remaining cells concentrated around the rete and in the sub-capsular region. In the absence of Sertoli cells, peritubular myoid cell activity is reduced but the cells retain an ability to exclude immune cells from the seminiferous tubules. These data demonstrate that, in addition to support of spermatogenesis, Sertoli cells are required in the adult testis both for retention of the normal adult Leydig cell population and for support of normal peritubular myoid cell function. This has implications for our understanding of male reproductive disorders and wider androgen-related conditions affecting male health.

  13. Of faeces and sweat. How much a mouse is willing to run: having a hard time measuring spontaneous physical activity in different mouse sub-strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Coletti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity has multiple beneficial effects in the physiology and pathology of the organism. In particular, we and other groups have shown that running counteracts cancer cachexia in both humans and rodents. The latter are prone to exercise in wheel-equipped cages even at advanced stages of cachexia. However, when we wanted to replicate the experimental model routinely used at the University of Rome in a different laboratory (i.e. at Paris 6 University, we had to struggle with puzzling results due to unpredicted mouse behavior. Here we report the experience and offer the explanation underlying these apparently irreproducible results. The original data are currently used for teaching purposes in undergraduate student classes of biological sciences.

  14. Maternal control of the Drosophila dorsal-ventral body axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, David S; Stevens, Leslie M

    2014-01-01

    The pathway that generates the dorsal-ventral (DV) axis of the Drosophila embryo has been the subject of intense investigation over the previous three decades. The initial asymmetric signal originates during oogenesis by the movement of the oocyte nucleus to an anterior corner of the oocyte, which establishes DV polarity within the follicle through signaling between Gurken, the Drosophila Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-α homologue secreted from the oocyte, and the Drosophila Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) that is expressed by the follicular epithelium cells that envelop the oocyte. Follicle cells that are not exposed to Gurken follow a ventral fate and express Pipe, a sulfotransferase that enzymatically modifies components of the inner vitelline membrane layer of the eggshell, thereby transferring DV spatial information from the follicle to the egg. These ventrally sulfated eggshell proteins comprise a localized cue that directs the ventrally restricted formation of the active Spätzle ligand within the perivitelline space between the eggshell and the embryonic membrane. Spätzle activates Toll, a transmembrane receptor in the embryonic membrane. Transmission of the Toll signal into the embryo leads to the formation of a ventral-to-dorsal gradient of the transcription factor Dorsal within the nuclei of the syncytial blastoderm stage embryo. Dorsal controls the spatially specific expression of a large constellation of zygotic target genes, the Dorsal gene regulatory network, along the embryonic DV circumference. This article reviews classic studies and integrates them with the details of more recent work that has advanced our understanding of the complex pathway that establishes Drosophila embryo DV polarity. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Alzheimer disease: functional abnormalities in the dorsal visual pathway.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bokde, Arun L W

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate whether patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) have altered activation compared with age-matched healthy control (HC) subjects during a task that typically recruits the dorsal visual pathway. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was performed in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki, with institutional ethics committee approval, and all subjects provided written informed consent. Two tasks were performed to investigate neural function: face matching and location matching. Twelve patients with mild AD and 14 age-matched HC subjects were included. Brain activation was measured by using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Group statistical analyses were based on a mixed-effects model corrected for multiple comparisons. RESULTS: Task performance was not statistically different between the two groups, and within groups there were no differences in task performance. In the HC group, the visual perception tasks selectively activated the visual pathways. Conversely in the AD group, there was no selective activation during performance of these same tasks. Along the dorsal visual pathway, the AD group recruited additional regions, primarily in the parietal and frontal lobes, for the location-matching task. There were no differences in activation between groups during the face-matching task. CONCLUSION: The increased activation in the AD group may represent a compensatory mechanism for decreased processing effectiveness in early visual areas of patients with AD. The findings support the idea that the dorsal visual pathway is more susceptible to putative AD-related neuropathologic changes than is the ventral visual pathway.

  16. Assisting People with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder by Actively Reducing Limb Hyperactive Behavior with a Gyration Air Mouse through a Controlled Environmental Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    The latest researches have adopted software technology turning the gyration air mouse into a high performance limb movement detector, and have assessed whether two persons with multiple disabilities would be able to control an environmental stimulation using limb movement. This study extends gyration air mouse functionality by actively reducing…

  17. Rapamycin-sensitive mTORC1 signaling is involved in physiological primordial follicle activation in mouse ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yuanyuan; Li, Fei; Lu, Yi; Cao, Yanlan; Gao, Jimin; Liu, Jianghuai

    2013-12-01

    In mammals, resting female oocytes reside in primordial ovarian follicles. An individual primordial follicle may stay quiescent for a protracted period of time before initiating follicular growth, which is also termed “activation.” Female reproductive capacity is sustained by the gradual, streamlined activation of the entire population of primordial follicles, but this process also results in reproductive senescence in older animals. Based on the recent findings that genetically triggered, excessive mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation in mouse oocytes leads to accelerated primordial follicle activation, we examined the necessity of mTORC1 signaling in physiological primordial follicle activation. We found that induction of oocyte mTORC1 activity is associated with early follicular growth in neonatal mouse ovaries. Pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 activity in vivo by rapamycin treatment leads to a marked, but partial, suppression of primordial follicle activation. The suppressive effect of rapamycin on primordial follicle activation was reproduced in cultured ovaries. While rapamycin did not apparently affect several plausible cellular targets in neonatal mouse ovaries, such as mTORC2, AKT, or cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p27-KIP1, its inhibitory effect on Cyclin A2 gene expression implies that mTORC1 signaling in oocytes may engage a Cyclin A/CDK regulatory network that promotes primordial follicle activation. The current work strengthens the concept that mTORC1-dependent events in the oocytes of primordial follicles may represent potential targets for intervention in humans to slow the depletion of the ovarian reserve. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Modulation of intracellular calcium waves and triggered activities by mitochondrial ca flux in mouse cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghang Zhao

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that mitochondria may play important roles in the Ca(2+ homeostasis of cardiac myocytes. However, it is still unclear if mitochondrial Ca(2+ flux can regulate the generation of Ca(2+ waves (CaWs and triggered activities in cardiac myocytes. In the present study, intracellular/cytosolic Ca(2+ (Cai (2+ was imaged in Fluo-4-AM loaded mouse ventricular myocytes. Spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR Ca(2+ release and CaWs were induced in the presence of high (4 mM external Ca(2+ (Cao (2+. The protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP reversibly raised basal Cai (2+ levels even after depletion of SR Ca(2+ in the absence of Cao (2+ , suggesting Ca(2+ release from mitochondria. FCCP at 0.01 - 0.1 µM partially depolarized the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ m and increased the frequency and amplitude of CaWs in a dose-dependent manner. Simultaneous recording of cell membrane potentials showed the augmentation of delayed afterdepolarization amplitudes and frequencies, and induction of triggered action potentials. The effect of FCCP on CaWs was mimicked by antimycin A (an electron transport chain inhibitor disrupting Δψ m or Ru360 (a mitochondrial Ca(2+ uniporter inhibitor, but not by oligomycin (an ATP synthase inhibitor or iodoacetic acid (a glycolytic inhibitor, excluding the contribution of intracellular ATP levels. The effects of FCCP on CaWs were counteracted by the mitochondrial permeability transition pore blocker cyclosporine A, or the mitochondrial Ca(2+ uniporter activator kaempferol. Our results suggest that mitochondrial Ca(2+ release and uptake exquisitely control the local Ca(2+ level in the micro-domain near SR ryanodine receptors and play an important role in regulation of intracellular CaWs and arrhythmogenesis.

  19. Expression of calcium-activated chloride channels Ano1 and Ano2 in mouse taste cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkashin, Alexander P; Kolesnikova, Alisa S; Tarasov, Michail V; Romanov, Roman A; Rogachevskaja, Olga A; Bystrova, Marina F; Kolesnikov, Stanislav S

    2016-02-01

    Specialized Ca(2+)-dependent ion channels ubiquitously couple intracellular Ca(2+) signals to a change in cell polarization. The existing physiological evidence suggests that Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels (CaCCs) are functional in taste cells. Because Ano1 and Ano2 encode channel proteins that form CaCCs in a variety of cells, we analyzed their expression in mouse taste cells. Transcripts for Ano1 and Ano2 were detected in circumvallate (CV) papillae, and their expression in taste cells was confirmed using immunohistochemistry. When dialyzed with CsCl, taste cells of the type III exhibited no ion currents dependent on cytosolic Ca(2+). Large Ca(2+)-gated currents mediated by TRPM5 were elicited in type II cells by Ca(2+) uncaging. When TRPM5 was inhibited by triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO), ionomycin stimulated a small but resolvable inward current that was eliminated by anion channel blockers, including T16Ainh-A01 (T16), a specific Ano1 antagonist. This suggests that CaCCs, including Ano1-like channels, are functional in type II cells. In type I cells, CaCCs were prominently active, blockable with the CaCC antagonist CaCCinh-A01 but insensitive to T16. By profiling Ano1 and Ano2 expressions in individual taste cells, we revealed Ano1 transcripts in type II cells only, while Ano2 transcripts were detected in both type I and type II cells. P2Y agonists stimulated Ca(2+)-gated Cl(-) currents in type I cells. Thus, CaCCs, possibly formed by Ano2, serve as effectors downstream of P2Y receptors in type I cells. While the role for TRPM5 in taste transduction is well established, the physiological significance of expression of CaCCs in type II cells remains to be elucidated.

  20. Ornithine Decarboxylase Activity Is Required for Prostatic Budding in the Developing Mouse Prostate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Gamat

    Full Text Available The prostate is a male accessory sex gland that produces secretions in seminal fluid to facilitate fertilization. Prostate secretory function is dependent on androgens, although the mechanism by which androgens exert their effects is still unclear. Polyamines are small cationic molecules that play pivotal roles in DNA transcription, translation and gene regulation. The rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis is ornithine decarboxylase, which is encoded by the gene Odc1. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA decreases in the prostate upon castration and increases upon administration of androgens. Furthermore, testosterone administered to castrated male mice restores prostate secretory activity, whereas administering testosterone and the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor D,L-α-difluromethylornithine (DFMO to castrated males does not restore prostate secretory activity, suggesting that polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effects. To date, no one has examined polyamines in prostate development, which is also androgen dependent. In this study, we showed that ornithine decarboxylase protein was expressed in the epithelium of the ventral, dorsolateral and anterior lobes of the adult mouse prostate. Ornithine decarboxylase protein was also expressed in the urogenital sinus (UGS epithelium of the male and female embryo prior to prostate development, and expression continued in prostatic epithelial buds as they emerged from the UGS. Inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase using DFMO in UGS organ culture blocked the induction of prostatic buds by androgens, and significantly decreased expression of key prostate transcription factor, Nkx3.1, by androgens. DFMO also significantly decreased the expression of developmental regulatory gene Notch1. Other genes implicated in prostatic development including Sox9, Wif1 and Srd5a2 were unaffected by DFMO. Together these results indicate that Odc1 and polyamines are required for androgens to exert their

  1. Mouse early extra-embryonic lineages activate compensatory endocytosis in response to poor maternal nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Congshan; Velazquez, Miguel A; Marfy-Smith, Stephanie; Sheth, Bhavwanti; Cox, Andy; Johnston, David A; Smyth, Neil; Fleming, Tom P

    2014-03-01

    Mammalian extra-embryonic lineages perform the crucial role of nutrient provision during gestation to support embryonic and fetal growth. These lineages derive from outer trophectoderm (TE) and internal primitive endoderm (PE) in the blastocyst and subsequently give rise to chorio-allantoic and visceral yolk sac placentae, respectively. We have shown maternal low protein diet exclusively during mouse preimplantation development (Emb-LPD) is sufficient to cause a compensatory increase in fetal and perinatal growth that correlates positively with increased adult-onset cardiovascular, metabolic and behavioural disease. Here, to investigate early mechanisms of compensatory nutrient provision, we assessed the influence of maternal Emb-LPD on endocytosis within extra-embryonic lineages using quantitative imaging and expression of markers and proteins involved. Blastocysts collected from Emb-LPD mothers within standard culture medium displayed enhanced TE endocytosis compared with embryos from control mothers with respect to the number and collective volume per cell of vesicles with endocytosed ligand and fluid and lysosomes, plus protein expression of megalin (Lrp2) LDL-family receptor. Endocytosis was also stimulated using similar criteria in the outer PE-like lineage of embryoid bodies formed from embryonic stem cell lines generated from Emb-LPD blastocysts. Using an in vitro model replicating the depleted amino acid (AA) composition found within the Emb-LPD uterine luminal fluid, we show TE endocytosis response is activated through reduced branched-chain AAs (leucine, isoleucine, valine). Moreover, activation appears mediated through RhoA GTPase signalling. Our data indicate early embryos regulate and stabilise endocytosis as a mechanism to compensate for poor maternal nutrient provision.

  2. Immature monocytes recruited to the ischemic mouse brain differentiate into macrophages with features of alternative activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró-Mur, Francesc; Pérez-de-Puig, Isabel; Ferrer-Ferrer, Maura; Urra, Xabier; Justicia, Carles; Chamorro, Angel; Planas, Anna M

    2016-03-01

    Acute stroke induces a local inflammatory reaction causing leukocyte infiltration. Circulating monocytes are recruited to the ischemic brain and become tissue macrophages morphologically indistinguishable from reactive microglia. However, monocytes are a heterogeneous population of cells with different functions. Herein, we investigated the infiltration and fate of the monocyte subsets in a mouse model of focal brain ischemia by permanent occlusion of the distal portion of the middle cerebral artery. We separated two main subtypes of CD11b(hi) monocytes according to their expression of the surface markers Ly6C and CD43. Using adoptive transfer of reporter monocytes and monocyte depletion, we identified the pro-inflammatory Ly6C(hi)CD43(lo)CCR2(+) subset as the predominant monocytes recruited to the ischemic tissue. Monocytes were seen in the leptomeninges from where they entered the cortex along the penetrating arterioles. Four days post-ischemia, they had invaded the infarcted core, where they were often located adjacent to blood vessels. At this time, Iba-1(-) and Iba-1(+) cells in the ischemic tissue incorporated BrdU, but BrdU incorporation was rare in the reporter monocytes. The monocyte phenotype progressively changed by down-regulating Ly6C, up-regulating F4/80, expressing low or intermediate levels of Iba-1, and developing macrophage morphology. Moreover, monocytes progressively acquired the expression of typical markers of alternatively activated macrophages, like arginase-1 and YM-1. Collectively, the results show that stroke mobilized immature pro-inflammatory Ly6C(hi)CD43(lo) monocytes that acutely infiltrated the ischemic tissue reaching the core of the lesion. Monocytes differentiated to macrophages with features of alternative activation suggesting possible roles in tissue repair during the sub-acute phase of stroke.

  3. Characterization of calcium responses and electrical activity in differentiating mouse neural progenitor cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Martje W G D M; Dingemans, Milou M L; Rus, Katinka H; de Groot, Aart; Westerink, Remco H S

    2014-02-01

    In vitro methods for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) testing have the potential to reduce animal use and increase insight into cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying chemical-induced alterations in the development of functional neuronal networks. Mouse neural progenitor cells (mNPCs) differentiate into nervous system-specific cell types and have proven valuable to detect DNT using biochemical and morphological techniques. We therefore investigated a number of functional neuronal parameters in primary mNPCs to explore their applicability for neurophysiological in vitro DNT testing. Immunocytochemistry confirmed that mNPCs express neuronal, glial, and progenitor markers at various differentiation durations (1, 7, 14, and 21 days). Because intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) plays an essential role in neuronal development and function, we measured stimulus-evoked changes in [Ca(2+)]i at these differentiation durations using the Ca(2+)-responsive dye Fura-2. Increases in [Ca(2+)]i (averages ranging from 65 to 226 nM) were evoked by depolarization, ATP, l-glutamic acid, acetylcholine, and dopamine (up to 87%, 57%, 93%, 28%, and 37% responding cells, respectively) and to a lesser extent by serotonin and gamma-aminobutyric acid (both up to 10% responding cells). Notably, the changes in percentage of responsive cells and their response amplitudes over time indicate changes in the expression and functionality of the respective neurotransmitter receptors and related calcium signaling pathways during in vitro differentiation. The development of functional intercellular signaling pathways was confirmed using multielectrode arrays, demonstrating that mNPCs develop electrical activity within 1-2 weeks of differentiation (55% active wells at 14 days of differentiation; mean spike rate of 1.16 spikes/s/electrode). The combined data demonstrate that mNPCs develop functional neuronal characteristics in vitro, making it a promising model to study chemical-induced effects on the

  4. Force depression and relaxation kinetics after active shortening and deactivation in mouse soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Noten, P; Van Leemputte, M

    2013-03-15

    After active shortening, isometric force production capacity of muscle is reduced (force depression, FD). The mechanism is incompletely understood but increasing cross-bridge detachment and/or decreasing attachment rate might be involved. Therefore we aimed to investigate the relation between work delivered during shortening (W), and change in half-relaxation time (Δ0.5RT) and change in the slow phase of muscle relaxation (Δkslow), considered as a marker for cross-bridge detachment rate, after shortening and after a short (0.7s) interruption of activation (deactivation). We hypothesized that shortening induces an accelerated relaxation related to W which is, similar to FD, largely abolished by a short deactivation. In 10 incubated supra-maximally stimulated mouse soleus muscles, we varied the amount of FD at L0 by varying shortening amplitude (0.6, 1.2 and 2.4mm). We found that W not only induces FD (R(2)=0.92) but also a dose dependent accelerated relaxation (R(2)=0.88 and R(2)=0.77 for respectively Δkslow and Δ0.5RT). In cyclic movements this is of functional significance, because the loss in force generating capacity might be (partially) compensated by faster relaxation. After a short deactivation, both FD and Δkslow were largely abolished but Δ0.5RT remained largely present. Under the assumption that Δkslow reflects a change in cross-bridge detachment rate, these results support the idea that FD is an intrinsic sarcomeric property originating from a work induced reduction of the number of force generating cross-bridges, however not via decreased attachment but via increased detachment rate. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Heterogeneity of Intrinsic and Synaptic Properties of Neurons in the Ventral and Dorsal Parts of the Ventral Nucleus of the Lateral Lemniscus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspari, Franziska; Baumann, Veronika J.; Garcia-Pino, Elisabet; Koch, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    The ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (VNLL) provides a major inhibitory projection to the inferior colliculus (IC). Neurons in the VNLL respond with various firing patterns and different temporal precision to acoustic stimulation. The present study investigates the underlying intrinsic and synaptic properties of various cell types in different regions of the VNLL, using in vitro electrophysiological recordings from acute brain slices of mice and immunohistochemistry. We show that the biophysical membrane properties and excitatory input characteristics differed between dorsal and ventral VNLL neurons. Neurons in the ventral VNLL displayed an onset-type firing pattern and little hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih). Stimulation of lemniscal inputs evoked a large all-or-none excitatory response similar to Calyx of Held synapses in neurons in the lateral part of the ventral VNLL. Neurons that were located within the fiber tract of the lateral lemniscus, received several and weak excitatory input fibers. In the dorsal VNLL onset-type and sustained firing neurons were intermingled. These neurons showed large Ih and were strongly immunopositive for the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 1 (HCN1) subunit. Both neuron types received several excitatory inputs that were weaker and slower compared to ventrolateral VNLL neurons. Using a mouse model that expresses channelrhodopsin under the promotor of the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) suggests that dorsal and ventral neurons were inhibitory since they were all depolarized by light stimulation. The diverse membrane and input properties in dorsal and ventral VNLL neurons suggest differential roles of these neurons for sound processing. PMID:26635535

  6. Dorsal spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshana Sanghvi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 61-year-old female patient presented with diffuse pain in the dorsal region of the back of 3 months duration. The magnetic resonance imaging showed an extramedullary, extradural space occupative lesion on the right side of the spinal canal from D5 to D7 vertebral levels. The mass was well marginated and there was no bone involvement. Compression of the adjacent thecal sac was observed, with displacement to the left side. Radiological differential diagnosis included nerve sheath tumor and meningioma. The patient underwent D6 hemilaminectomy under general anesthesia. Intraoperatively, the tumor was purely extradural in location with mild extension into the right foramina. No attachment to the nerves or dura was found. Total excision of the extradural compressing mass was possible as there were preserved planes all around. Histopathology revealed cavernous hemangioma. As illustrated in our case, purely epidural hemangiomas, although uncommon, ought to be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural soft tissue masses. Findings that may help to differentiate this lesion from the ubiquitous disk prolapse, more common meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors are its ovoid shape, uniform T2 hyperintense signal and lack of anatomic connection with the neighboring intervertebral disk or the exiting nerve root. Entirely extradural lesions with no bone involvement are rare and represent about 12% of all intraspinal hemangiomas.

  7. Dorsal spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghvi, Darshana; Munshi, Mihir; Kulkarni, Bijal; Kumar, Abhaya

    2010-07-01

    A 61-year-old female patient presented with diffuse pain in the dorsal region of the back of 3 months duration. The magnetic resonance imaging showed an extramedullary, extradural space occupative lesion on the right side of the spinal canal from D5 to D7 vertebral levels. The mass was well marginated and there was no bone involvement. Compression of the adjacent thecal sac was observed, with displacement to the left side. Radiological differential diagnosis included nerve sheath tumor and meningioma. The patient underwent D6 hemilaminectomy under general anesthesia. Intraoperatively, the tumor was purely extradural in location with mild extension into the right foramina. No attachment to the nerves or dura was found. Total excision of the extradural compressing mass was possible as there were preserved planes all around. Histopathology revealed cavernous hemangioma. As illustrated in our case, purely epidural hemangiomas, although uncommon, ought to be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural soft tissue masses. Findings that may help to differentiate this lesion from the ubiquitous disk prolapse, more common meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors are its ovoid shape, uniform T2 hyperintense signal and lack of anatomic connection with the neighboring intervertebral disk or the exiting nerve root. Entirely extradural lesions with no bone involvement are rare and represent about 12% of all intraspinal hemangiomas.

  8. Targeting Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling in Mouse Models of Cardiomyopathy Caused by Lamin A/C Gene Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muchir, Antoine; Worman, Howard J

    2016-01-01

    The most frequently occurring mutations in the gene encoding nuclear lamin A and nuclear lamin C cause striated muscle diseases virtually always involving the heart. In this review, we describe the approaches and methods used to discover that cardiomyopathy-causing lamin A/C gene mutations increase MAP kinase signaling in the heart and that this plays a role in disease pathogenesis. We review different mouse models of cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutations and how transcriptomic analysis of one model identified increased cardiac activity of the ERK1/2, JNK, and p38α MAP kinases. We describe methods used to measure the activity of these MAP kinases in mouse hearts and then discuss preclinical treatment protocols using pharmacological inhibitors to demonstrate their role in pathogenesis. Several of these kinase inhibitors are in clinical development and could potentially be used to treat human subjects with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutations.

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes vesicular glutamate transporter 3 expression and neurite outgrowth of dorsal root ganglion neurons through the activation of the transcription factors Etv4 and Etv5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Huaxiang; Li, Hao; Pan, Xinliang; Li, Zhenzhong

    2016-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is critical for sensory neuron survival and is necessary for vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGLUT3) expression. Whether the transcription factors Etv4 and Etv5 are involved in these BDNF-induced effects remains unclear. In the present study, primary cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were used to test the link between BDNF and transcription factors Etv4 and Etv5 on VGLUT3 expression and neurite outgrowth. BDNF promoted the mRNA and protein expression of Etv4 and Etv5 in DRG neurons. These effects were blocked by extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) inhibitor PD98059 but not phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 or phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) inhibitor U73122. Etv4 siRNA and Etv5 siRNA effectively blocked the VGLUT3 expression and neurite elongation induced by BNDF. The overexpression of Etv4 or Etv5 potentiated the effects of BNDF-induced neurite elongation and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43), medium neurofilament (NF-M), and light neurofilament (NF-L) expression while these effects could be inhibited by Etv4 and Etv5 siRNA. These data imply that Etv4 and Etv5 are essential transcription factors in modulating BDNF/TrkB signaling-mediated VGLUT3 expression and neurite outgrowth. BDNF, through the ERK1/2 signaling pathway, activates Etv4 and Etv5 to initiate GAP-43 expression, promote neurofilament (NF) protein expression, induce neurite outgrowth, and mediate VGLUT3 expression for neuronal function improvement. The biological effects initiated by BDNF/TrkB signaling linked to E26 transformation-specific (ETS) transcription factors are important to elucidate neuronal differentiation, axonal regeneration, and repair in various pathological states.

  10. Effects of alpha-AMPK knockout on exercise-induced gene activation in mouse skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Sebastian B; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P; Viollet, Benoit; Andreelli, Fabrizio; Birk, Jesper B; Hellsten, Ylva; Schjerling, Peter; Vaulont, Sophie; Neufer, P Darrell; Richter, Erik A; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2005-07-01

    conclusion, KO of the alpha2- but not the alpha1-AMPK isoform markedly diminished AMPK activation during running. Nevertheless, exercise-induced activation of the investigated genes in mouse skeletal muscle was not impaired in alpha1- or alpha2-AMPK KO muscles. Although it cannot be ruled out that activation of the remaining alpha-isoform is sufficient to increase gene activation during exercise, the present data do not support an essential role of AMPK in regulating exercise-induced gene activation in skeletal muscle.

  11. Effects of Resveratrol on Daily Rhythms of Locomotor Activity and Body Temperature in Young and Aged Grey Mouse Lemurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Pifferi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In several species, resveratrol, a polyphenolic compound, activates sirtuin proteins implicated in the regulation of energy balance and biological clock processes. To demonstrate the effect of resveratrol on clock function in an aged primate, young and aged mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus were studied over a 4-week dietary supplementation with resveratrol. Spontaneous locomotor activity and daily variations in body temperature were continuously recorded. Reduction in locomotor activity onset and changes in body temperature rhythm in resveratrol-supplemented aged animals suggest an improved synchronisation on the light-dark cycle. Resveratrol could be a good candidate to restore the circadian rhythms in the elderly.

  12. A novel sulindac derivative lacking cyclooxygenase-inhibitory activities suppresses carcinogenesis in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Jinhui; Wang, Lei; Quealy, Emily; Gary, Bernard D; Reynolds, Robert C; Piazza, Gary A; Lü, Junxuan

    2010-07-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including sulindac are well documented to be highly effective for cancer chemoprevention. However, their cyclooxygenase (COX)-inhibitory activities cause severe gastrointestinal, renal, and cardiovascular toxicities, limiting their chronic use. Recent studies suggest that COX-independent mechanisms may be responsible for the chemopreventive benefits of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and support the potential for the development of a novel generation of sulindac derivatives lacking COX inhibition for cancer chemoprevention. A prototypic sulindac derivative with a N,N-dimethylammonium substitution called sulindac sulfide amide (SSA) was recently identified to be devoid of COX-inhibitory activity yet displays much more potent tumor cell growth-inhibitory activity in vitro compared with sulindac sulfide. In this study, we investigated the androgen receptor (AR) signaling pathway as a potential target for its COX-independent antineoplastic mechanism and evaluated its chemopreventive efficacy against prostate carcinogenesis using the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate model. The results showed that SSA significantly suppressed the growth of human and mouse prostate cancer cells expressing AR in strong association with G(1) arrest, and decreased AR level and AR-dependent transactivation. Dietary SSA consumption dramatically attenuated prostatic growth and suppressed AR-dependent glandular epithelial lesion progression through repressing cell proliferation in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate mice, whereas it did not significantly affect neuroendocrine carcinoma growth. Overall, the results suggest that SSA may be a chemopreventive candidate against prostate glandular epithelial carcinogenesis.

  13. An interspecies conserved motif of the mouse immune system-released activating agent (ISRAA) induces proliferative effects on human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Safa; Fathallah, Mohamed Dahmani; Bakhiet, Moiz

    2014-07-01

    We have recently described an immune system-released activating agent (ISRAA) as a nervous system-induced factor that stimulates immune responses in the mouse spleen. However, the human ISRAA has not yet been identified. In this study, we examined the effects of the mouse ISRAA protein on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), to observe if the biological activity of this molecule is consistent between the two different species. Mouse ISRAA demonstrated dose-dependent dualistic effects on human cells, as 5 µg exhibited positive apoptosis and 50 pg exhibited significant proliferation (P<0.05). Furthermore, immunosuppressed cells from patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy demonstrated significant proliferation to 50 pg ISRAA (P<0.05). Studies to compare sequences in different species revealed a preserved motif, exhibiting 72% similarity with the interspecies conserved signal peptide motif of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1). A mutant ISRAA lacking this motif was produced and tested for its biological effects. The mutant ISRAA demonstrated neither apoptotic nor proliferative effects compared with wild type. Therefore, an interspecies conserved domain of ISRAA constitutes the active site of the molecule, and its effects on immunocompromised cells should be investigated for future therapies in the treatment of immunosuppressive disorders.

  14. Characterization of TREM-3, an activating receptor on mouse macrophages: definition of a family of single Ig domain receptors on mouse chromosome 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Dong-Hui; Seaman, William E; Daws, Michael R

    2002-01-01

    We recently reported the cloning of two triggering receptors expressed by myeloid cells (TREM), TREM-2a and TREM-2b, which are highly homologous to each other. These receptors associate with DAP12, and ligation of TREM-2 on the surface of macrophages leads to the release of nitric oxide. Using the immunoglobulin (Ig) domain of TREM-2 to screen a mouse EST database we have isolated a novel receptor, derived from a WEHI-3 macrophage library, which shows homology to TREM-2 (20%). The DNA sequence of this receptor has been submitted to Genbank with the name TREM-3. The predicted amino acid sequence contains a single Ig domain and a transmembrane lysine residue. We found transcripts for TREM-3 in two macrophage cell lines (RAW264.7 and MT2) but not in P388D1 macrophage cells. TREM-3 transcripts could also be detected at low levels in T cell lines, but were not detectable in NK, B cell, or mast cell lines. Furthermore, in macrophage cells, transcripts for TREM-3 were up-regulated by LPS, but were down-regulated by IFN-gamma. Like TREM-1 and TREM-2, TREM-3 signals through DAP12, and when TREM-3 is transfected into an NK cell line it mediates redirected lysis. Thus, TREM-3 functions as an activating receptor. Analysis of the mouse genome reveals that the gene for TREM-3 lies adjacent to the gene for TREM-1 and in close proximity to a number of other single Ig domain receptors, including TREM-2. Thus, TREM-3 is a novel member of a family of immunoglobulin receptors that form an innate immune gene complex on chromosome 17.

  15. Soyasaponins Protect Against Palmitic Acid-Induced Oxidative Stress in Primary Mouse Hepatocytes:Structure-Activity Relationship

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-zhi HE; Jia-ding CHEN; Yan-hong HU; Jin-bin CHEN; Jian-lin LV; Long-ying ZHA

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the structure and activity in protection of soyasaponins against palmitic acid (PA)-induced oxidative stress in primary mouse hepatocytes.Methods The primary mouse hepatocytes were treated with 0.05 mmol/L PA in the presence or absence of soyasaponins (10μg/ml) for 16h. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA), triglyceride (TG) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined.Results PA treatment significantly lowered cellular SOD and GSH-Px activities (P<0.05), increased the contents of MDA and TG (P<0.05) and the production of ROS in mitochondria was elevated (P<0.05). When compared to the treatment of PA alone, the combined treatment of soyasaponins and PA significantly increased the activities of SOD and GSH-Px (P<0.05) and decreased the contents of MDA, TG and ROS (P<0.05). It was found that soyasaponin-A1 or A2 significantly increased the cellular activities of SOD and GSH-Px (P<0.05) and decreased the contents of MDA and ROS as compared with soyasapogenol-A (P<0.05). Similarly, soyasaponin-I significantly increased activities of cellular SOD and GSH-Px (P<0.05) and decreased the content of ROS as compared with soyasapogenol-B (P<0.05).Conclusion Soyasaponins possess antioxidant activity against PA-induced oxidative stress in primary mouse hepatocytes. Soyasaponin-A1, A2 and I are stronger than their corresponding soyasapogenols (soyasapogenol-A and B) in antioxidant activity, probably due to the sugar moieties presented in their chemical structures.

  16. Comparison of the activities of wild type and mutant enhancing factor/mouse secretory phospholipase A2 proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhakti M Kirtane; Rita Mulherkar

    2002-09-01

    Enhancing factor (EF) protein, an isoform of secretory phospholipase A2 (PLA2), was purified as a modulator of epidermal growth factor from the small intestine of the Balb/c mouse. It was for the first time that a growth modulatory property of sPLA2 was demonstrated. Deletion mutation analysis of EF cDNA carried out in our laboratory showed that enhancing activity and phospholipase activity are two separate activities that reside in the same molecule. In order to study the specific amino acids involved in each of these activities, two site-directed mutants of EF were made and expressed in vitro. Comparison of enhancing activity as well as phospholipase A2 activity of these mutant proteins with that of wild type protein helped in identification of some of the residues important for both the activities.

  17. Dihydropyridine receptors actively control gating of ryanodine receptors in resting mouse skeletal muscle fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Gaëlle; Allard, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Contraction of skeletal muscle is triggered by the release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in response to depolarization of the muscle membrane. Depolarization is known to elicit a conformational change of the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) in the tubular membrane that controls in a time- and voltage-dependent manner the opening of the ryanodine receptor (RyR), the SR Ca2+ release channel. At rest, it is assumed that RyRs are kept in a closed state imposed by the repressive action of DHPRs; however, a direct control of the RyR gating by the DHPR has up to now never been demonstrated in resting adult muscle. In this study, we monitored slow changes in SR Ca2+ content using the Ca2+ indicator fluo-5N loaded in the SR of voltage-clamped mouse muscle fibres. We first show that external Ca2+ removal induced a reversible SR Ca2+ efflux at −80 mV and prevented SR Ca2+ refilling following depolarization-evoked SR Ca2+ depletion. The dihydropyridine compound nifedipine induced similar effects. The rate of SR Ca2+ efflux was also shown to be controlled in a time- and voltage-dependent manner within a membrane potential range more negative than −50 mV. Finally, intracellular addition of ryanodine produced an irreversible SR Ca2+ efflux and kept the SR in a highly depleted state following depolarization-evoked SR Ca2+ depletion. The fact that resting SR Ca2+ efflux is modulated by conformational changes of DHPRs induced by external Ca2+, nifedipine and voltage demonstrates that DHPRs exert an active control on gating of RyRs in resting skeletal muscle. PMID:23006480

  18. Prostaglandin E2 induces spontaneous rhythmic activity in mouse urinary bladder independently of efferent nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayter, S; Young, JS; Brain, KL

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The acute effects of PGE2 on bladder smooth muscle and nerves were examined to determine the origin of PGE2-induced spontaneous rhythmic contractions. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Contraction studies, confocal Ca2+ imaging and electrophysiological recordings in strips of mouse urinary bladder were used to differentiate the effects of PGE2 on bladder smooth muscle and efferent nerves. KEY RESULTS PGE2 (50 µM) increased the tone and caused phasic contractions of detrusor smooth muscle strips. Confocal Ca2+ imaging showed that PGE2 increased the frequency of whole-cell Ca2+ transients (WCTs) (72 ± 5%) and intracellular recordings showed it increased the frequency of spontaneous depolarizations, from 0.31·s−1 to 0.90·s−1. Non-selective inhibition of EP receptors using SC-51322 and AH-6809 (10 µM), or the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine (1 µM), prevented these phasic contractions and WCTs, and reduced the tone (by 45 ± 7% and 59 ± 6%, respectively). Blocking P2X1 receptors with NF449 (10 µM) caused a small but significant reduction in the frequency of PGE2-induced phasic contractions (24 ± 9%) and WCTs (28 ± 17%) but had no significant effect on spontaneous depolarizations or tone. Inhibiting muscarinic receptors with cyclopentolate (1 µM) had no significant effect on these measures. Spontaneous WCTs became synchronous in PGE2, implying enhanced functional coupling between neighbouring cells. However, the electrical input resistance was unchanged. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS It was concluded that depolarization alone is sufficient to explain a functional increase in intercellular coupling and the ability of PGE2 to increase detrusor spontaneous rhythmic activity does not require parasympathetic nerves. PMID:21671904

  19. Timing of mTOR activation affects tuberous sclerosis complex neuropathology in mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Magri

    2013-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is a dominantly inherited disease with high penetrance and morbidity, and is caused by mutations in either of two genes, TSC1 or TSC2. Most affected individuals display severe neurological manifestations – such as intractable epilepsy, mental retardation and autism – that are intimately associated with peculiar CNS lesions known as cortical tubers (CTs. The existence of a significant genotype-phenotype correlation in individuals bearing mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2 is highly controversial. Similar to observations in humans, mouse modeling has suggested that a more severe phenotype is associated with mutation in Tsc2 rather than in Tsc1. However, in these mutant mice, deletion of either gene was achieved in differentiated astrocytes. Here, we report that loss of Tsc1 expression in undifferentiated radial glia cells (RGCs early during development yields the same phenotype detected upon deletion of Tsc2 in the same cells. Indeed, the same aberrations in cortical cytoarchitecture, hippocampal disturbances and spontaneous epilepsy that have been detected in RGC-targeted Tsc2 mutants were observed in RGC-targeted Tsc1 mutant mice. Remarkably, thorough characterization of RGC-targeted Tsc1 mutants also highlighted subventricular zone (SVZ disturbances as well as STAT3-dependent and -independent developmental-stage-specific defects in the differentiation potential of ex-vivo-derived embryonic and postnatal neural stem cells (NSCs. As such, deletion of either Tsc1 or Tsc2 induces mostly overlapping phenotypic neuropathological features when performed early during neurogenesis, thus suggesting that the timing of mTOR activation is a key event in proper neural development.

  20. Curine inhibits eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime [Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Departamento de Fisiologia e Patologia, UFPB, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Calheiros, Andrea Surrage; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana [Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Moraes de Carvalho, Katharinne Ingrid [Laboratório de Inflamação, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Silva Mendes, Diego da [Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Melo, Christianne Bandeira [Laboratório de Inflamação, Instituto Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Martins, Marco Aurélio [Laboratório de Inflamação, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Silva Dias, Celidarque da [Laboratório de Fitoquímica, Departamento de Ciências Farmacêuticas, UFPB, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Piuvezam, Márcia Regina, E-mail: mrpiuvezam@ltf.ufpb.br [Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Departamento de Fisiologia e Patologia, UFPB, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); and others

    2013-11-15

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease with increasing prevalence around the world. Current asthma therapy includes drugs that usually cause significant side effects, justifying the search for new anti-asthmatic drugs. Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that modulates calcium influx in many cell types; however, its anti-allergic and putative toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to investigate the effects of curine on eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and to characterize its potential toxic effects. We used a mouse model of allergic asthma induced by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of oral treatment with curine. The oral administration of curine significantly inhibited eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophil lipid body formation and AHR in animals challenged with OVA compared with animals in the untreated group. The curine treatment also reduced eotaxin and IL-13 production triggered by OVA. Verapamil, a calcium channel antagonist, had similar anti-allergic properties, and curine pre-treatment inhibited the calcium-induced tracheal contractile response ex-vivo, suggesting that the mechanism by which curine exerts its effects is through the inhibition of a calcium-dependent response. A toxicological evaluation showed that orally administered curine did not significantly alter the biochemical, hematological, behavioral and physical parameters measured in the experimental animals compared with saline-treated animals. In conclusion, curine showed anti-allergic activity through mechanisms that involve inhibition of IL-13 and eotaxin and of Ca{sup ++} influx, without inducing evident toxicity and as such, has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs. - Highlights: • Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid from Chondrodendron platyphyllum. • Curine inhibits eosinophil influx and activation and airway hyper-responsiveness. • Curine

  1. LIMK1 activity is required for MTOC localization and spindle bipolarity establishment during meiosis in mouse oocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiaoyun; Li Xin; Ma Wei

    2015-01-01

    Aneuploid embryo generally leads to infertility, spontaneous abortion and birth defects, mainly resulting from abnormal chromosome segregation during maternal oocytes meiosis. Chromosome division is conducted by bipolar spindle which formed through an acentrosomal way, dependent on a unique microtubule organizing center ( MTOC) in mammalian oocytes, however, the molecular composition and functional regulation of MTOC is still not fully ex-plored. LIM kinases 1 (LIMK1) is a conserved serine/threonine kinase, a major regulator of actin and microtubule dynamics, involved in microtubule stability and spindle positioning during mitosis. So far little is known about LIMK1 protein expression and its roles in oocytes during meiosis. We reported here the protein expression and sub-cellular distribution of LIMK1 in mouse oocytes during meiosis. Western blot procedure detected high and stable expression of LIMK1 in mouse oocytes from germinal vesicle ( GV) stage to metaphase II ( MII) . In contrast, acti-vated LIMK1 ( phosphorylated at Thr508 , pLIMK1 Thr508 ) was only observed after germinal vesicle breakdown ( GVBD) , and gradually increased with peak levels at metaphase I ( MI) and MII. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that LIMK1 was co-localized with microtubules on the whole spindle structure, while pLIMK1Thr508 was con- centrated with key components of MTOC,pericentrin and -Tubulin, on spindle poles in mouse oocytes. Inhibition of LIMK1 activity by BMS3, a specific ATPase competitive inhibitor, distroyed the formation of bipolar spindle structure, disturbed MTOC integrity and MTOC proteins recruitment to spindle poles. Moreover, LIMK1 inhibition caused chromosome misalignment and meiotic progression arrest at MI stage. Therefore, LIMK1 activity is required for formation and maintenance of bipolar spindle in mouse oocytes,importantly, pLIMK1T508 is MTOC-associated protein,involved in establishment and positioning of MTOC.

  2. Mouse preimplantation embryo responses to culture medium osmolarity include increased expression of CCM2 and p38 MAPK activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Andrew J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanisms that confer an ability to respond positively to environmental osmolarity are fundamental to ensuring embryo survival during the preimplantation period. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK occurs following exposure to hyperosmotic treatment. Recently, a novel scaffolding protein called Osmosensing Scaffold for MEKK3 (OSM was linked to p38 MAPK activation in response to sorbitol-induced hypertonicity. The human ortholog of OSM is cerebral cavernous malformation 2 (CCM2. The present study was conducted to investigate whether CCM2 is expressed during mouse preimplantation development and to determine whether this scaffolding protein is associated with p38 MAPK activation following exposure of preimplantation embryos to hyperosmotic environments. Results Our results indicate that Ccm2 along with upstream p38 MAPK pathway constituents (Map3k3, Map2k3, Map2k6, and Map2k4 are expressed throughout mouse preimplantation development. CCM2, MAP3K3 and the phosphorylated forms of MAP2K3/MAP2K6 and MAP2K4 were also detected throughout preimplantation development. Embryo culture in hyperosmotic media increased p38 MAPK activity in conjunction with elevated CCM2 levels. Conclusion These results define the expression of upstream activators of p38 MAPK during preimplantation development and indicate that embryo responses to hyperosmotic environments include elevation of CCM2 and activation of p38 MAPK.

  3. Syntactic processing depends on dorsal language tracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen M; Galantucci, Sebastiano; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Rising, Kindle; Patterson, Dianne K; Henry, Maya L; Ogar, Jennifer M; DeLeon, Jessica; Miller, Bruce L; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa

    2011-10-20

    Frontal and temporal language areas involved in syntactic processing are connected by several dorsal and ventral tracts, but the functional roles of the different tracts are not well understood. To identify which white matter tract(s) are important for syntactic processing, we examined the relationship between white matter damage and syntactic deficits in patients with primary progressive aphasia, using multimodal neuroimaging and neurolinguistic assessment. Diffusion tensor imaging showed that microstructural damage to left hemisphere dorsal tracts--the superior longitudinal fasciculus including its arcuate component--was strongly associated with deficits in comprehension and production of syntax. Damage to these dorsal tracts predicted syntactic deficits after gray matter atrophy was taken into account, and fMRI confirmed that these tracts connect regions modulated by syntactic processing. In contrast, damage to ventral tracts--the extreme capsule fiber system or the uncinate fasciculus--was not associated with syntactic deficits. Our findings show that syntactic processing depends primarily on dorsal language tracts.

  4. Induction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and -2 activity in mouse blastocyst by fibronectin-integrin interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Fibronectin, a major extracellular matrix, plays an important role in embryo implantation by mediating embryo adhesion and outgrowth. In this work, mouse blastocysts produced pro-matrix metalloproteinase-9, pro-matrix metalloproteinase-2 and 64 ku matrix metalloproteinase-2 when they were co-cultured with fibronectin. In contrast, mouse blastocysts did not produce these proteinases without fibronectin. Focal adhesion kinase is a fundamental molecule of integrin signaling pathway and its antisense oligodeoxynucleiotide inhibited blastocyst matrix metalloproteinases expression induced by fibronectin. The results indicated that fibronectin triggered matrix metalloproteinase-9 and -2 expression in mouse blastocyst through its integrin receptors and subsequent signaling pathway, which enhanced the synchronization of blastocyst invasiveness and uterine receptivity and ensured the accuracy of events relative to implantation in timing and spatiality.

  5. TLR4 mutation reduces microglial activation, increases Aβ deposits and exacerbates cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Min

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid plaques, a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD, are accompanied by activated microglia. The role of activated microglia in the pathogenesis of AD remains controversial: either clearing Aβ deposits by phagocytosis or releasing proinflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic substances. Microglia can be activated via toll-like receptors (TLRs, a class of pattern-recognition receptors in the innate immune system. We previously demonstrated that an AD mouse model homozygous for a loss-of-function mutation of TLR4 had increases in Aβ deposits and buffer-soluble Aβ in the brain as compared with a TLR4 wild-type AD mouse model at 14-16 months of age. However, it is unknown if TLR4 signaling is involved in initiation of Aβ deposition as well as activation and recruitment of microglia at the early stage of AD. Here, we investigated the role of TLR4 signaling and microglial activation in early stages using 5-month-old AD mouse models when Aβ deposits start. Methods Microglial activation and amyloid deposition in the brain were determined by immunohistochemistry in the AD models. Levels of cerebral soluble Aβ were determined by ELISA. mRNA levels of cytokines and chemokines in the brain and Aβ-stimulated monocytes were quantified by real-time PCR. Cognitive functions were assessed by the Morris water maze. Results While no difference was found in cerebral Aβ load between AD mouse models at 5 months with and without TLR4 mutation, microglial activation in a TLR4 mutant AD model (TLR4M Tg was less than that in a TLR4 wild-type AD model (TLR4W Tg. At 9 months, TLR4M Tg mice had increased Aβ deposition and soluble Aβ42 in the brain, which were associated with decrements in cognitive functions and expression levels of IL-1β, CCL3, and CCL4 in the hippocampus compared to TLR4W Tg mice. TLR4 mutation diminished Aβ-induced IL-1β, CCL3, and CCL4 expression in monocytes. Conclusion This is the first demonstration of TLR4

  6. Superficial Dorsal Vein Injury/Thrombosis Presenting as False Penile Fracture Requiring Dorsal Venous Ligation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Rafiei, MD

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Early exploration of patients with suspected penile fracture provides excellent results with maintenance of erectile function. Also, in the setting of dorsal vein thrombosis, ligation preserves the integrity of the penile tissues and avoids unnecessary complications from conservative management. Rafiei A, Hakky TS, Martinez D, Parker J, and Carrion R. Superficial dorsal vein injury/thrombosis presenting as false penile fracture requiring dorsal venous ligation. Sex Med 2014;2:182–185.

  7. Dehydroepiandrosterone formation is independent of cytochrome P450 17alpha-hydroxylase/17, 20 lyase activity in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Pocivavsek, Ana; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2009-07-01

    Cytochrome P450 17alpha-hydroxylase/17, 20 lyase (CYP17) is a microsomal enzyme reported to have two distinct catalytic activities, 17alpha-hydroxylase and 17, 20 lyase, that are essential for the biosynthesis of peripheral androgens such as dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). Paradoxically, DHEA is present and plays a role in learning and memory in the adult rodent brain, while CYP17 activity and protein are undetectable. To determine if CYP17 is required for DHEA formation and function in the adult rodent brain, we generated CYP17 chimeric mice that had reduced circulating testosterone levels. There were no detectable differences in cognitive spatial learning between CYP17 chimeric and wild-type mice. In addition, while CYP17 mRNA levels were reduced in CYP17 chimeric compared to wild-type mouse brain, the levels of brain DHEA levels were comparable. To determine if adult brain DHEA is formed by an alternative Fe(2+)-dependent pathway, brain microsomes were isolated from wild-type and CYP17 chimeric mice and treated with FeSO(4). Fe(2+) caused comparable levels of DHEA production by both wild-type and CYP17 chimeric mouse brain microsomes; DHEA production was not reduced by a CYP17 inhibitor. Taken together these in vivo studies suggest that in the adult mouse brain DHEA is formed via a Fe(2+)-sensitive CYP17-independent pathway.

  8. Altered behavior and neural activity in conspecific cagemates co-housed with mouse models of brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyunwoo; Jung, Seungmoon; Seo, Jinsoo; Khalid, Arshi; Yoo, Jung-Seok; Park, Jihyun; Kim, Soyun; Moon, Jangsup; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun; Jeon, Daejong

    2016-09-01

    The psychosocial environment is one of the major contributors of social stress. Family members or caregivers who consistently communicate with individuals with brain disorders are considered at risk for physical and mental health deterioration, possibly leading to mental disorders. However, the underlying neural mechanisms of this phenomenon remain poorly understood. To address this, we developed a social stress paradigm in which a mouse model of epilepsy or depression was housed long-term (>4weeks) with normal conspecifics. We characterized the behavioral phenotypes and electrophysiologically investigated the neural activity of conspecific cagemate mice. The cagemates exhibited deficits in behavioral tasks assessing anxiety, locomotion, learning/memory, and depression-like behavior. Furthermore, they showed severe social impairment in social behavioral tasks involving social interaction or aggression. Strikingly, behavioral dysfunction remained in the cagemates 4weeks following co-housing cessation with the mouse models. In an electrophysiological study, the cagemates showed an increased number of spikes in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) neurons. Our results demonstrate that conspecifics co-housed with mouse models of brain disorders develop chronic behavioral dysfunctions, and suggest a possible association between abnormal mPFC neural activity and their behavioral pathogenesis. These findings contribute to the understanding of the psychosocial and psychiatric symptoms frequently present in families or caregivers of patients with brain disorders.

  9. Analysis of the chemotactic activities of mouse chemokine MIP-2 to thymocyte subgroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A mouse chemokine MIP-2 ( macrophage inflamatory protein 2) is constitutively expressed not only by peritoneal macrophages, but also by fresh thymic stromal cells, based on RT-PCR detection. Moreover, the specific receptor of MIP-2 is expressed at different levels among four main subgroups of murine thymocytes including DN, DP, CD4SP and CD8SP. By the chemotaxis assays with Boyden chamber, we proved that the recombinant mouse MIP-2 can chemoattract the four main subgroups of thymocytes in different degrees, it mainly chemoattract the DP and SP subgroups. We firstly reported that MIP-2 is involved in the regulation of the directional migration of developing thymocytes.

  10. Spinal dorsal horn astrocytes: New players in chronic itch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Tsuda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic itch is a debilitating symptom of inflammatory skin conditions, such as atopic dermatitis, and systemic diseases, for which existing treatment is largely ineffective. Recent studies have revealed the selective neuronal pathways that are involved in itch sensations; however, the mechanisms by which itch turns into a pathological chronic state are poorly understood. Recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms producing chronic itch have been made by defining causal roles for astrocytes in the spinal dorsal horn in mouse models of chronic itch including atopic dermatitis. Understanding the key roles of astrocytes may provide us with exciting insights into the mechanisms for itch chronicity and lead to a previously unrecognized target for treating chronic itch.

  11. Relocation of mitochondria to the prospective dorsal marginal zone during Xenopus embryogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, H. J.; Phillips, C. R.; Boore, J. L.; Bertman, J.; Whalon, B.; Danilchik, M. V.

    1995-01-01

    Dorsal-ventral axis formation in Xenopus laevis begins with a cytoplasmic rotation during the first cell cycle and culminates in a series of cell interactions and movements during gastrulation and neurulation that lead to the formation of dorsal-anterior structures. Evidence reported here indicates that mitochondria are differentially redistributed along the prospective dorsal-ventral axis as a consequence of the cortical-cytoplasmic rotation during the first cell cycle. This finding reinvigorates a possibility that has been considered for many years: asymmetries in cytoplasmic components and metabolic activities contribute to the development of morphological asymmetries.

  12. Uterine endoplasmic reticulum stress and its unfolded protein response may regulate caspase 3 activation in the pregnant mouse uterus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Suresh

    Full Text Available We have previously proposed that uterine caspase-3 may modulate uterine contractility in a gestationally regulated fashion. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanism by which uterine caspase-3 is activated and consequently controlled in the pregnant uterus across gestation. Utilizing the mouse uterus as our gestational model we examined the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signaling pathways and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response as potential activators of uterine caspase-3 at the transcriptional and translational level. Our study revealed robust activation of the uterine myocyte endoplasmic reticulum stress response and its adaptive unfolded protein response during pregnancy coinciding respectively with increased uterine caspase-3 activity and its withdrawal to term. In contrast the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signaling pathways remained inactive across gestation. We speculate that physiological stimuli experienced by the pregnant uterus likely potentiates the uterine myocyte endoplasmic reticulum stress response resulting in elevated caspase-3 activation, which is isolated to the pregnant mouse myometrium. However as term approaches, activation of an elevated adaptive unfolded protein response acts to limit the endoplasmic reticulum stress response inhibiting caspase-3 resulting in its decline towards term. We speculate that these events have the capacity to regulate gestational length in a caspase-3 dependent manner.

  13. Uterine endoplasmic reticulum stress and its unfolded protein response may regulate caspase 3 activation in the pregnant mouse uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Arvind; Subedi, Kalpana; Kyathanahalli, Chandrashekara; Jeyasuria, Pancharatnam; Condon, Jennifer C

    2013-01-01

    We have previously proposed that uterine caspase-3 may modulate uterine contractility in a gestationally regulated fashion. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanism by which uterine caspase-3 is activated and consequently controlled in the pregnant uterus across gestation. Utilizing the mouse uterus as our gestational model we examined the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signaling pathways and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response as potential activators of uterine caspase-3 at the transcriptional and translational level. Our study revealed robust activation of the uterine myocyte endoplasmic reticulum stress response and its adaptive unfolded protein response during pregnancy coinciding respectively with increased uterine caspase-3 activity and its withdrawal to term. In contrast the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signaling pathways remained inactive across gestation. We speculate that physiological stimuli experienced by the pregnant uterus likely potentiates the uterine myocyte endoplasmic reticulum stress response resulting in elevated caspase-3 activation, which is isolated to the pregnant mouse myometrium. However as term approaches, activation of an elevated adaptive unfolded protein response acts to limit the endoplasmic reticulum stress response inhibiting caspase-3 resulting in its decline towards term. We speculate that these events have the capacity to regulate gestational length in a caspase-3 dependent manner.

  14. Genetic Ablation of Type III Adenylyl Cyclase Exerts Region-Specific Effects on Cilia Architecture in the Mouse Nose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary C Challis

    Full Text Available We recently reported that olfactory sensory neurons in the dorsal zone of the mouse olfactory epithelium exhibit drastic location-dependent differences in cilia length. Furthermore, genetic ablation of type III adenylyl cyclase (ACIII, a key olfactory signaling protein and ubiquitous marker for primary cilia, disrupts the cilia length pattern and results in considerably shorter cilia, independent of odor-induced activity. Given the significant impact of ACIII on cilia length in the dorsal zone, we sought to further investigate the relationship between cilia length and ACIII level in various regions throughout the mouse olfactory epithelium. We employed whole-mount immunohistochemical staining to examine olfactory cilia morphology in phosphodiesterase (PDE 1C-/-;PDE4A-/- (simplified as PDEs-/- hereafter and ACIII-/- mice in which ACIII levels are reduced and ablated, respectively. As expected, PDEs-/- animals exhibit dramatically shorter cilia in the dorsal zone (i.e., where the cilia pattern is found, similar to our previous observation in ACIII-/- mice. Remarkably, in a region not included in our previous study, ACIII-/- animals (but not PDEs-/- mice have dramatically elongated, comet-shaped cilia, as opposed to characteristic star-shaped olfactory cilia. Here, we reveal that genetic ablation of ACIII has drastic, location-dependent effects on cilia architecture in the mouse nose. These results add a new dimension to our current understanding of olfactory cilia structure and regional organization of the olfactory epithelium. Together, these findings have significant implications for both cilia and sensory biology.

  15. Calcium-activated K+ Channels of Mouse β-cells are Controlled by Both Store and Cytoplasmic Ca2+

    OpenAIRE

    Goforth, P. B.; Bertram, R.; Khan, F. A.; Zhang, M.; Sherman, A.; Satin, L. S.

    2002-01-01

    A novel calcium-dependent potassium current (Kslow) that slowly activates in response to a simulated islet burst was identified recently in mouse pancreatic β-cells (Göpel, S.O., T. Kanno, S. Barg, L. Eliasson, J. Galvanovskis, E. Renström, and P. Rorsman. 1999. J. Gen. Physiol. 114:759–769). Kslow activation may help terminate the cyclic bursts of Ca2+-dependent action potentials that drive Ca2+ influx and insulin secretion in β-cells. Here, we report that when [Ca2+]i handling was disrupted...

  16. High-yield expression in Escherichia coli and purification of mouse ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Andreia F; Pinto, Manuel P; Grou, Cláudia P; Vitorino, Rui; Domingues, Pedro; Yamao, Fumiaki; Sá-Miranda, Clara; Azevedo, Jorge E

    2012-07-01

    Research in the ubiquitin field requires large amounts of ubiquitin-activating enzyme (E1) for in vitro ubiquitination assays. Typically, the mammalian enzyme is either isolated from natural sources or produced recombinantly using baculovirus/insect cell protein expression systems. Escherichia coli is seldom used to produce mammalian E1 probably due to the instability and insolubility of this high-molecular mass protein. In this report, we show that 5-10 mg of histidine-tagged mouse E1 can be easily obtained from a 1 l E. coli culture. A low temperature during the protein induction step was found to be critical to obtain an active enzyme.

  17. Distribution of cytoglobin in the mouse brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eReuss

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cytoglobin (Cygb is a vertebrate globin with so far poorly defined function. It is expressed in the fibroblast cell-lineage but has also been found in neurons. Here we provide, using immunohistochemistry, a detailed study on the distribution of Cygb in the mouse brain. While Cygb is a cytoplasmic protein in active cells of the supportive tissue, in neurons it is located in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. We found the expression of Cygb in all brain regions, although only a fraction of the neurons was Cygb-positive. Signals were of different intensity ranging from faint to very intense. Telencephalic neurons in all laminae of the cerebral cortex, in the olfactory bulb (in particular periglomerular cells, in the hippocampal formation (strongly stained pyramidal cells with long processes, basal ganglia (scattered multipolar neurons in the dorsal striatum, dorsal and ventral pallidum, and in the amygdala (neurons with unlabeled processes were labeled by the antibody. In the diencephalon, we observed Cygb-positive neurons of moderate intensity in various nuclei of the dorsal thalamus, in the hypothalamus, metathalamus (geniculate nuclei, epithalamus with strong labeling of habenular nucleus neurons and no labeling of pineal cells, and in the ventral thalamus. Tegmental neurons stood out by strongly stained somata with long processes in, e.g., the laterodorsal nucleus. In the tectum, faintly labeled neurons and fibers were detected in the superior colliculus. The cerebellum exhibited unlabeled Purkinje-neurons but signs of strong afferent cortical innervation. Neurons in the gray matter of the spinal cord showed moderate immunofluorescence. Peripheral ganglia were not labeled by the antibody. The Meynert-fascicle and the olfactory and optic nerves/tracts were the only Cygb-immunoreactive fiber systems. Notably, we found a remarkable level of colocalization of Cygb and neuronal nitric oxide-synthase in neurons, which supports a functional association.

  18. REDOX DISRUPTING POTENTIAL OF TOXCAST CHEMICALS RANKED BY ACTIVITY IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    To gain insight regarding the adverse outcome pathways leading to developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals, we evaluated ToxCast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay and identified a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with al...

  19. Redox Disrupting Potential of ToxCast™Chemicals Ranked by Activity in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known regarding the adverse outcome pathways responsible for developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals. An evaluation of Toxoast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay revealed a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with...

  20. Characterization of calcium responses and electrical activity in differentiating mouse neural progenitor cells in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Martje W G D M; Dingemans, Milou M L; Rus, Katinka H; de Groot, Aart; Westerink, Remco H S

    2014-01-01

    In vitro methods for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) testing have the potential to reduce animal use and increase insight into cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying chemical-induced alterations in the development of functional neuronal networks. Mouse neural progenitor cells (mNPCs) differe

  1. Redox Disrupting Potential of ToxCast™Chemicals Ranked by Activity in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known regarding the adverse outcome pathways responsible for developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals. An evaluation of Toxoast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay revealed a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with...

  2. Antitumor-promoting activity of oligomeric proanthocyanidins in mouse epidermis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei Xiao Gao; Elisabeth M. Perchellet; Hala U. Gali; Limarie Rodriguez; Richard W. Hemingway; Jean-Pierre Perchellet

    1994-01-01

    The flavanoid catechin and heterogenous samples of oligomeric proanthocyanidins extracted from various sources were compared for their ability to inhibit the biochemical and biological effects of 12-o-tertra-decanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in mouse epidermis in vivo. Topical applications of catechin fail to alter the hydroperoxide response to TPA but inhibit the...

  3. Effects of strictosamide on mouse brain and kidney Na+, K+-ATPase and Mg2+-ATPase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candeias, M F; Abreu, P; Pereira, A; Cruz-Morais, J

    2009-01-12

    Present study reports on the general bioactivity of strictosamide and on its effects on Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase activities of Charles River male mouse. Strictosamide is the main glycoalkaloid of Sarcocephalus latifolius (Rubiaceae) leaves and roots, used as medicinal plant in folk medicine. In this work, we studied the in vitro effects of various concentrations of strictosamide (0.25, 0.5, 1 or 2 mg/mL) and the in vivo effects of single doses (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg, i.p.) of this compound on kidney and brain Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase activities. Results of general study showed that strictosamide is slightly toxic to Charles River mouse (LD(50)=723.17 mg/kg), producing CNS depression and kidney toxicity, but the exact mechanism of these effects could not be defined. Strictosamide inhibited the in vitro and in vivo Mg(2+)-ATPase activity on kidney but had nonsignificant effect on brain. Furthermore, strictosamide had nonsignificant in vitro and in vivo effect on kidney Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity but produced an in vivo increase of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity of brain, these findings suggesting that strictosamine may be related to the induction of alpha(2) isoform of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and may account for the folk use of Sarcocephalus latifolius root infusion on hypertension.

  4. Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced activation of NF-κB and expression of COX-2, and induces expression of cytoprotective enzymes in mouse skin in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Joydeb Kumar [College of Pharmacy, Keimyung University, Daegu 704-701 (Korea, Republic of); Liu, Lijia; Shin, Jun-Wan [Tumor Microenvironment Global Core Research Center, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Surh, Young-Joon, E-mail: surh@plaza.snu.ac.kr [Tumor Microenvironment Global Core Research Center, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced COX-2 expression in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone attenuates phosphorylation of IκBα and DNA binding of NF-κB in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone inhibits phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, JNK and Akt in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone induces the expression of cytoprotective proteins in mouse skin. -- Abstract: Thymoquinone (TQ), the active ingredient of Nigella sativa, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive properties. The present study was aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities of thymoquinone in mouse skin. Pretreatment of female HR-1 hairless mouse skin with TQ attenuated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). TQ diminished nuclear translocation and the DNA binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) via the blockade of phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of IκBα in TPA-treated mouse skin. Pretreatment with TQ attenuated the phosphorylation of Akt, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but not that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2. Moreover, topical application of TQ induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H-quinoneoxidoreductase-1, glutathione-S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase in mouse skin. Taken together, the inhibitory effects of TQ on TPA-induced COX-2 expression and NF-κB activation, and its ability to induce the expression of cytoprotective proteins provide a mechanistic basis of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects of TQ in hairless mouse skin.

  5. GITR signaling potentiates airway hyperresponsiveness by enhancing Th2 cell activity in a mouse model of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Oosterhout Antoon JM

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergic asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR and allergic inflammation of the airways, driven by allergen-specific Th2 cells. The asthma phenotypes and especially AHR are sensitive to the presence and activity of regulatory T (Treg cells in the lung. Glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor (GITR is known to have a co-stimulatory function on effector CD4+ T cells, rendering these cells insensitive to Treg suppression. However, the effects of GITR signaling on polarized Th1 and Th2 cell effector functions are not well-established. We sought to evaluate the effect of GITR signaling on fully differentiated Th1 and Th2 cells and to determine the effects of GITR activation at the time of allergen provocation on AHR and airway inflammation in a Th2-driven mouse model of asthma. Methods CD4+CD25- cells were polarized in vitro into Th1 and Th2 effector cells, and re-stimulated in the presence of GITR agonistic antibodies to assess the effect on IFNγ and IL-4 production. To evaluate the effects of GITR stimulation on AHR and allergic inflammation in a mouse asthma model, BALB/c mice were sensitized to OVA followed by airway challenges in the presence or absence of GITR agonist antibodies. Results GITR engagement potentiated cytokine release from CD3/CD28-stimulated Th2 but not Th1 cells in vitro. In the mouse asthma model, GITR triggering at the time of challenge induced enhanced airway hyperresponsiveness, serum IgE and ex vivo Th2 cytokine release, but did not increase BAL eosinophilia. Conclusion GITR exerts a differential effect on cytokine release of fully differentiated Th1 and Th2 cells in vitro, potentiating Th2 but not Th1 cytokine production. This effect on Th2 effector functions was also observed in vivo in our mouse model of asthma, resulting in enhanced AHR, serum IgE responses and Th2 cytokine production. This is the first report showing the effects of GITR activation on cytokine

  6. Spontaneous oscillatory activity in rd1 mouse retina is transferred from ON pathway to OFF pathway via glycinergic synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poria, Deepak; Dhingra, Narender K

    2015-01-15

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) spike randomly in the dark and carry information about visual stimuli to the brain via specific spike patterns. However, following photoreceptor loss, both ON and OFF type of RGCs exhibit spontaneous oscillatory spike activity, which reduces the quality of information they can carry. Furthermore, it is not clear how the oscillatory activity would interact with the experimental treatment approaches designed to produce artificial vision. The oscillatory activity is considered to originate in ON-cone bipolar cells, AII amacrine cells, and/or their synaptic interactions. However, it is unknown how the oscillatory activity is generated in OFF RGCs. We tested the hypothesis that oscillatory activity is transferred from the ON pathway to the OFF pathway via the glycinergic AII amacrine cells. Using extracellular loose-patch and whole cell patch recordings, we recorded oscillatory activity in ON and OFF RGCs and studied their response to strychnine, a specific glycine receptor blocker. The cells were labeled with a fluorescent dye, and their dendritic stratification in inner plexiform layer was studied using confocal microscopy. Application of strychnine resulted in abolition of the oscillatory burst activity in OFF RGCs but not in ON RGCs, implying that oscillatory activity is generated in ON pathway and is transferred to OFF pathway, likely via the glycinergic AII amacrine cells. We found oscillatory activity in RGCs as early as postnatal day 12 in rd1 mouse, when rod degeneration has started but cones are still intact. This suggests that the oscillatory activity in rd1 mouse retina originates in rod pathway.

  7. Caspase-9/-3 activation and apoptosis are induced in mouse macrophages upon ingestion and digestion of Escherichia coli bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häcker, Hans; Fürmann, Christine; Wagner, Hermann; Häcker, Georg

    2002-09-15

    A number of highly virulent, intracellular bacteria are known to induce cell death by apoptosis in infected host cells. In this work we demonstrate that phagocytosis of bacteria from the Escherichia coli laboratory strain K12 DH5alpha is a potent cell death stimulus for mouse macrophages. RAW264.7 mouse macrophages took up bacteria and digested them within 2-4 h as investigated with green fluorescent protein-expressing bacteria. No evidence of apoptosis was seen at 8 h postexposure, but at 24 h approximately 70% of macrophages displayed an apoptotic phenotype by a series of parameters. Apoptosis was blocked by inhibition of caspases or by forced expression of the apoptosis-inhibiting protein Bcl-2. Processing of caspase-3 and caspase-9 but not caspase-8 was seen suggesting that the mitochondrial branch of the apoptotic pathway was activated. Active effector caspases could be detected in two different assays. Because the adapter molecule myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) has been implicated in apoptosis, involvement of the Toll-like receptor pathway was investigated. In RAW264.7 cells, heat-treated bacteria were taken up poorly and failed to induce significant apoptosis. However, cell activation was almost identical between live and heat-inactivated bacteria as measured by extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, generation of free radicals, and TNF secretion. Furthermore, primary bone marrow-derived macrophages from wild-type as well as from MyD88-deficient mice underwent apoptosis upon phagocytosis of bacteria. These results show that uptake and digestion of bacteria leads to MyD88-independent apoptosis in mouse macrophages. This form of cell death might have implications for the generation of the immune response.

  8. Arginine vasopressin, via activation of post-junctional V1 receptors, induces contractile effects in mouse distal colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropaolo, Mariangela; Zizzo, Maria Grazia; Auteri, Michelangelo; Mulè, Flavia; Serio, Rosa

    2013-11-10

    The aim of this study was to analyze whether arginine vasopressin (AVP) may be considered a modulator of intestinal motility. In this view, we evaluated, in vitro, the effects induced by exogenous administration of AVP on the contractility of mouse distal colon, the subtype(s) of receptor(s) activated and the action mechanism. Isometric recordings were performed on longitudinal and circular muscle strips of mouse distal colon. AVP (0.001 nM-100 nM) caused concentration-dependent contractile effects only on the longitudinal muscle, antagonized by the V1 receptor antagonist, V-1880. AVP-induced effect was not modified by tetrodotoxin, atropine and indomethacin. Contractile response to AVP was reduced in Ca(2+)-free solution or in the presence of nifedipine, and it was abolished by depletion of calcium intracellular stores after repetitive addition of carbachol in calcium-free medium with addition of cyclopiazonic acid. U-73122, an inhibitor of the phospholipase C, effectively antagonized AVP effects, whilst it was not affected by an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor. Oxytocin induced an excitatory effect in the longitudinal muscle of distal colon at very high concentrations, effect antagonized by V-1880. The results of this study shown that AVP, via activation of V1 receptors, is able to modulate positively contractile activity of longitudinal muscle of mouse distal colon, independently by enteric nerve activation and prostaglandin synthesis. Contractile response is achieved by increase in cytoplasmatic Ca(2+) concentration via extracellular Ca(2+) influx from L-type Ca(2+) channels and via Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores through phospholipase C pathway. No modulation has been observed on the contractility of the circular muscle.

  9. Induced Mitogenic Activity in AML-12 Mouse Hepatocytes Exposed to Low-dose Ultra-Wideband Electromagnetic Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Tchounwou

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultra–wideband (UWB technology has increased with the use of various civilian and military applications. In the present study, we hypothesized that low-dose UWB electromagnetic radiation (UWBR could elicit a mitogenic effect in AML-12 mouse hepatocytes, in vitro. To test this hypothesis, we exposed AML-12 mouse hepatocytes, to UWBR in a specially constructed gigahertz transverse electromagnetic mode (GTEM cell. Cells were exposed to UWBR for 2 h at a temperature of 23°C, a pulse width of 10 ns, a repetition rate of 1 kHz, and field strength of 5-20 kV/m. UWB pulses were triggered by an external pulse generator for UWBR exposure but were not triggered for the sham exposure. We performed an MTT Assay to assess cell viability for UWBR-treated and sham-exposed hepatocytes. Data from viability studies indicated a time-related increase in hepatocytes at time intervals from 8-24 h post exposure. UWBR exerted a statistically significant (p < 0.05 dose-dependent response in cell viability in both serum-treated and serum free medium (SFM -treated hepatocytes. Western blot analysis of hepatocyte lysates demonstrated that cyclin A protein was induced in hepatocytes, suggesting that increased MTT activity after UWBR exposure was due to cell proliferation. This study indicates that UWBR has a mitogenic effect on AML-12 mouse hepatocytes and implicates a possible role for UWBR in hepatocarcinoma.

  10. Naringin Enhances CaMKII Activity and Improves Long-Term Memory in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong-Mei; Yang, Ya-Jun; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Xu; Guan, Fei-Fei; Zhang, Lian-Feng

    2013-03-11

    The Amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced impairment of hippocampal synaptic plasticity is an underlying mechanism of memory loss in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in human and mouse models. The inhibition of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) autophosphorylation plays an important role in long-term memory. In this study, we isolated naringin from Pomelo peel (a Citrus species) and studied its effect on long-term memory in the APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mouse model of AD. Three-month-old APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice were randomly assigned to a vehicle group, two naringin (either 50 or 100 mg/kg body weight/day) groups, or an Aricept (2 mg/kg body weight/day) group. After 16 weeks of treatment, we observed that treatment with naringin (100 mg/kg body weight/day) enhanced the autophosphorylation of CaMKII, increased the phosphorylation of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic (AMPA) receptor at a CaMKII-dependent site and improved long-term learning and memory ability. These findings suggest that the increase in CaMKII activity may be one of the mechanisms by which naringin improves long-term cognitive function in the APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mouse model of AD.

  11. Differences in enhancer activity in mouse and zebrafish reporter assays are often associated with changes in gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariza-Cosano Ana

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phenotypic evolution in animals is thought to be driven in large part by differences in gene expression patterns, which can result from sequence changes in cis-regulatory elements (cis-changes or from changes in the expression pattern or function of transcription factors (trans-changes. While isolated examples of trans-changes have been identified, the scale of their overall contribution to regulatory and phenotypic evolution remains unclear. Results Here, we attempt to examine the prevalence of trans-effects and their potential impact on gene expression patterns in vertebrate evolution by comparing the function of identical human tissue-specific enhancer sequences in two highly divergent vertebrate model systems, mouse and zebrafish. Among 47 human conserved non-coding elements (CNEs tested in transgenic mouse embryos and in stable zebrafish lines, at least one species-specific expression domain was observed in the majority (83% of cases, and 36% presented dramatically different expression patterns between the two species. Although some of these discrepancies may be due to the use of different transgenesis systems in mouse and zebrafish, in some instances we found an association between differences in enhancer activity and changes in the endogenous gene expression patterns between mouse and zebrafish, suggesting a potential role for trans-changes in the evolution of gene expression. Conclusions In total, our results: (i serve as a cautionary tale for studies investigating the role of human enhancers in different model organisms, and (ii suggest that changes in the trans environment may play a significant role in the evolution of gene expression in vertebrates.

  12. Gender- and age-dependent gamma-secretase activity in mouse brain and its implication in sporadic Alzheimer disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Placanica

    Full Text Available Alzheimer disease (AD is an age-related disorder. Aging and female gender are two important risk factors associated with sporadic AD. However, the mechanism by which aging and gender contribute to the pathogenesis of sporadic AD is unclear. It is well known that genetic mutations in gamma-secretase result in rare forms of early onset AD due to the aberrant production of Abeta42 peptides, which are the major constituents of senile plaques. However, the effect of age and gender on gamma-secretase has not been fully investigated. Here, using normal wild-type mice, we show mouse brain gamma-secretase exhibits gender- and age-dependent activity. Both male and female mice exhibit increased Abeta42ratioAbeta40 ratios in aged brain, which mimics the effect of familial mutations of Presenilin-1, Presenlin-2, and the amyloid precursor protein on Abeta production. Additionally, female mice exhibit much higher gamma-secretase activity in aged brain compared to male mice. Furthermore, both male and female mice exhibit a steady decline in Notch1 gamma-secretase activity with aging. Using a small molecule affinity probe we demonstrate that male mice have less active gamma-secretase complexes than female mice, which may account for the gender-associated differences in activity in aged brain. These findings demonstrate that aging can affect gamma-secretase activity and specificity, suggesting a role for gamma-secretase in sporadic AD. Furthermore, the increased APP gamma-secretase activity seen in aged females may contribute to the increased incidence of sporadic AD in women and the aggressive Abeta plaque pathology seen in female mouse models of AD. In addition, deceased Notch gamma-secretase activity may also contribute to neurodegeneration. Therefore, this study implicates altered gamma-secretase activity and specificity as a possible mechanism of sporadic AD during aging.

  13. Dectin-1 agonist selectively induces IgG1 class switching by LPS-activated mouse B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Beom-Seok; Park, Ha-Yan; Yoon, Hee-Kyung; Yoo, Yung-Choon; Lee, Junglim; Park, Seok-Rae

    2016-10-01

    Heat-killed Saccharomyces cerevisiae (HKSC) is an agonist for Dectin-1, a major fungal cell wall β-glucan receptor. We previously reported that HKSC selectively enhances IgG1 production by LPS-activated mouse B cells. To determine if this IgG1 selectivity is caused by selective IgG1 class switching, we performed RT-PCRs for measuring germline transcripts (GLTs), flow cytometric analyses for detecting Ig-expressing cells, and ELISPOT assays for measuring the number of Ig-secreting cells in HKSC/LPS-stimulated mouse B cell cultures. HKSC selectively enhanced expression of GLTγ1, the number of IgG1-expressing cells, and the number of IgG1-secreting B cells in the presence of LPS stimulation. In addition, HKSC induced the expression of CD69, an activation marker for B lymphocytes, and the expression of surface Dectin-1. Two Dectin-1 antagonists, laminarin and a neutralizing Dectin-1 antibody, selectively diminished HKSC-reinforced IgG1 production by LPS-stimulated B cells. Furthermore, depleted zymosan (dzn), a Dectin-1 agonist with increased selectivity, also selectively enhanced GLTγ1 transcription. The Dectin-1 antagonists blocked dzn-induced IgG1 production by LPS-activated B cells. Collectively, these results suggest that Dectin-1 agonists selectively induce IgG1 class switching by direct stimulation of Dectin-1 on LPS-activated B cells resulting in selective production of IgG1.

  14. Chinese Herbal Preparation Xuebijing Potently Inhibits Inflammasome Activation in Hepatocytes and Ameliorates Mouse Liver Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiqiang Liu

    Full Text Available The Chinese herb preparation Xuebijing injection (XBJ has been widely used in the management of various septic disorders or inflammation-related conditions, however the molecular mechanism of its anti-inflammatory effect remains largely elusive. In the current study, we found that XBJ treatment potently ameliorated mouse hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury, manifested as decreased liver function tests (LDH, ALT, AST, improved inflammation and less hepatocyte apoptosis. Notably, XBJ markedly inhibited inflammasome activation and IL-1 production in mouse livers subjected to IRI, even in the absence of Kupffer cells, suggesting Kupffer cells are not necessary for hepatic inflammasome activation upon Redox-induced sterile inflammation. This finding led us to investigate the role of XBJ on hepatocyte apoptosis and inflammasome activation using an in vitro hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-triggered hepatocyte injury model. Our data clearly demonstrated that XBJ potently inhibited apoptosis, as well as caspase-1 cleavage and IL-1β production in a time- and dose-dependent manner in isolated hepatocytes, suggesting that in addition to its known modulatory effect on NF-κB-dependent inflammatory gene expression, it also has a direct impact on hepatocyte inflammasome activation. The current study not only deepens our understanding of how XBJ ameliorates inflammation and apoptosis, but also has immediate practical significance in many clinical situations such as partial hepatectomy, liver transplantation, etc.

  15. Lipopolysaccharides Derived from Pantoea agglomerans Can Promote the Phagocytic Activity of Amyloid β in Mouse Microglial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yutaro; Inagawa, Hiroyuki; Kohchi, Chie; Okazaki, Katsuichiro; Zhang, Ran; Kobara, Hideki; Masaki, Tsutomu; Soma, Gen-Ichiro

    2017-07-01

    Recent studies reported that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exhibits beneficial effects on prevention of immune-related diseases by activating macrophages. We previously demonstrated that pre-treatment with LPS derived from Pantoea agglomerans (LPSp) activated amyloid β (Aβ) phagocytosis in mouse primary microglia. In the present study, we further examined the promotory effect on phagocytosis of phagocytic particles in the C8-B4 microglia cell line. Phagocytic analysis of C8-B4 cells was evaluated using phagocytic particles (latex beads or HiLyte™ Fluor 488-conjugated Aβ1-42). The phagocytic activity of latex beads was dependent on the concentration of beads and incubation time. LPSp, at as low as 100 pg/ml, significantly increased phagocytosis against the beads. In the experiment of Aβ1-42 phagocytosis, LPSp significantly increased Aβ phagocytic activity. LPSp treatment was confirmed to enhance Aβ1-42 phagocytosis by mouse microglia. It is suggested that the use of LPSp may be a potential promising candidate for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  16. Malignant spinal meningioma in a CD-1 mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balme, Emmanuelle; Roth, Daniel Robert; Perentes, Elias

    2008-08-01

    Spontaneous meningiomas are extremely rare tumors in small laboratory animals, except in some strains of rats and in the B6C3F1 mouse. We report the case of a male CD-1 mouse in poor health condition, with severe apathy and partial paresis of hindlegs. No macroscopic lesion was noticed at necropsy. Microscopic examination revealed the presence of a malignant meningioma (approximately 3mm in diameter) at the distal lumbar level of the spinal cord, invading the vertebral canal, and bilaterally the ventral and dorsal nerve roots and the dorsal root ganglia. The tumor displayed highly cellular sheets of polygonal cells with a well-delineated, abundant, eosinophilic cytoplasm and scarce fibrovascular stroma; epithelioid and sarcomatous areas were also present. The mitotic activity was moderate. Tumor cells expressed vimentin immunoreactivity and were negative for periodic acid-Schiff (PAS), silver impregnation for reticulin, chromogranin A, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), cytokeratin (CK) and S-100 protein. The diagnosis of malignant spinal meningioma was based on the morphologic features of the neoplasm, the evidence of local invasion and the immunohistochemical results.

  17. Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane technical mixture regulates cell cycle and apoptosis genes through the activation of CAR and ERα in mouse livers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazantseva, Yuliya A.; Yarushkin, Andrei A. [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics SB RAMS, Novosibirsk, Timakova str., 2, 630117 (Russian Federation); Pustylnyak, Vladimir O., E-mail: pustylnyak@ngs.ru [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics SB RAMS, Novosibirsk, Timakova str., 2, 630117 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk, Pirogova str., 2, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-01

    Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) is a widely used organochlorine pesticide and a xenoestrogen that promotes rodent hepatomegaly and tumours. A recent study has shown significant correlation between DDT serum concentration and liver cancer incidence in humans, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We hypothesised that a mixture of DDT isomers could exert effects on the liver through pathways instead of classical ERs. The acute effects of a DDT mixture containing the two major isomers p,p′-DDT (85%) and o,p′-DDT (15%) on CAR and ERα receptors and their cell cycle and apoptosis target genes were studied in mouse livers. ChIP results demonstrated increased CAR and ERα recruitment to their specific target gene binding sites in response to the DDT mixture. The results of real-time RT-PCR were consistent with the ChIP data and demonstrated that the DDT was able to activate both CAR and ERα in mouse livers, leading to target gene transcriptional increases including Cyp2b10, Gadd45β, cMyc, Mdm2, Ccnd1, cFos and E2f1. Western blot analysis demonstrated increases in cell cycle progression proteins cMyc, Cyclin D1, CDK4 and E2f1 and anti-apoptosis proteins Mdm2 and Gadd45β. In addition, DDT exposure led to Rb phosphorylation. Increases in cell cycle progression and anti-apoptosis proteins were accompanied by a decrease in p53 content and its transcriptional activity. However, the DDT was unable to stimulate the β-catenin signalling pathway, which can play an important role in hepatocyte proliferation. Thus, our results indicate that DDT treatment may result in cell cycle progression and apoptosis inhibition through CAR- and ERα-mediated gene activation in mouse livers. These findings suggest that the proliferative and anti-apoptotic conditions induced by CAR and ERα activation may be important contributors to the early stages of hepatocarcinogenesis as