WorldWideScience

Sample records for action plans workshop

  1. Workshop on the preparation of climate change action plans. Workshop summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-24

    Over 130 participants from more than 27 countries shared experiences of developing and transition countries in preparation and development of their climate change national action plans. International experts guided countries in preparation of their climate change national action plans.

  2. Abbreviated Report of the WHO Western Pacific Region Workshop on National Plans of Action for Nutrition: Key Elements for Success, Constraints and Future Plans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A workshop on National Plans of Action for Nutrition:Constraints, Key Elements for Success, and Future Plans was convened and organized by the WHO Regional Office for the Western Pacific in collaboration with the Institute for Medical Research Malaysia and co-sponsored with FAO and UNICEF from 25—29 October 1999. It was attended by representatives of 25 countries in the region and resource persons, representatives from WHO and other international agencies. The objectives of the workshop were to review the progress of countries in developing, implementing and monitoring national plans of action for nutrition (NPANs) in the Western Pacific Region and to identify constraints and key elements of success in these efforts. Most of the countries have NPANs, either approved and implemented or awaiting official endorsement. The Plan formulation is usually multisectoral, involving several government ministries, non-governmental organizations, and international agencies. Often official adoption or endorsement of the Plan comes from the head of state and cabinet or the minister of health, one to six years from the start of its formulation. The NPAN has stimulated support for the development and implementation of nutrition projects and activities, with comparatively greater involvement of and more support from government ministries, UN agencies and non-governmental agencies compared to local communities, bilateral and private sectors and research and academic institutions. Monitoring and evaluation are important components of NPANs. They are, however, not given high priority and often not built into the plan. The role of an intersectoral coordinating body is considered crucial to a country's nutrition program. Most countries have an intersectoral structure or coordinating body to ensure the proper implementation, monitoring and evaluation of their NPANs.

  3. Abbreviated Report of the WHO Western Pacific Region Workshop on National Plans of Action for Nutrition:Key Elements for Success ,Constraints and Future plans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E-SIONGTEE

    2001-01-01

    A workshop on National Plans of Action for Nutrition:Constraints,Key Elements for Sucess,and Futrue Plans was convened and organized by the WHO Regional Office for the Western Pacific in collaboration with the Institute for Medical Research Malasysia and Co-Sponsored with FAO and UNICEF from 25-29 October 1999,It was attended by representatives of 25 coutries in the region and resource persons,representatives form WHO and other international agencies,The objectives of the workshop were to review the progress of countries in developing,implementing and monitoring national plans of action for nutrition(NPANs) in the Western Pacific Region and to identify constraints and key elements of success in these efforts.Most of the countries have NPANs,either approved and implemented or awaiting official endorsement.The Plan formulation is usually multisectoral,involving several government ministries.non-governmental organizations,and international agencies,Ofter official adoption or endorsement of the Plan comes from the head of state and cabinet or the minister of health,one to six years from the stat of its formulation,The NPAn has stiumlated support for the development and implementation of nutrition projects and activities,with comparatively greater involvement of and more support from government ministries,NU agencies and non-governmental a gencies compared to local communities,bilateral and private sectors and research and academic institutions.Monitoring and evaluation are importand components of NPANs.They are,however,not given high priority and often not bulit into the plan.The role of an intersectoral coordinating body is considered crucial to a coutry's nutrition program.Most countries have an intersectoral structure or coordinating body to ensure the proper impleentation,monitoring and evaluation of their NPANs.The workshop identified the constraints and key elements of success in each of the four stages of the NPAN process

  4. American Samoa: Energy Action Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ness, J. Erik [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Haase, Scott [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Conrad, Misty [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This document outlines actions being taken to reduce American Samoa's petroleum consumption. It describes the four near-term strategies selected by the American Samoa Renewable Energy Committee during action-planning workshops conducted in May 2016, and describes the steps that will need to be taken to implement those strategies.

  5. Guam Energy Action Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad, M. D.; Ness, J. E.

    2013-07-01

    Describes the four near-term strategies selected by the Guam Energy Task Force during action planning workshops conducted in March 2013, and outlines the steps being taken to implement those strategies. Each strategy addresses one of the energy sectors identified in the earlier Guam strategic energy plan as being an essential component of diversifying Guam's fuel sources and reducing fossil energy consumption 20% by 2020. The four energy strategies selected are: (1) expanding public outreach on energy efficiency and conservation, (2) establishing a demand-side management revolving loan program, (3) exploring waste-to-energy options, and (4) influencing the transportation sector via anti-idling legislation, vehicle registration fees, and electric vehicles.

  6. American Samoa Energy Action Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, Scott [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Esterly, Sean [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Herdrich, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bodell, Tim [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Visser, Charles [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Describes the five near-term strategies selected by the American Samoa Renewable Energy Committee (ASREC) during action planning workshops conducted in May 2013, and outlines the actions being taken to implement those strategies. Each option is tied to a priority identified in the earlier draft American Samoa Strategic Energy Plan as being an essential component of reducing American Samoa'spetroleum energy consumption. The actions described for each strategy provide a roadmap to facilitate the implementation of each strategy. This document is intended to evolve along with the advancement of the projects, and will be updated to reflect progress.

  7. Action research Toolkit II: The Scenario Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2003-01-01

    The article describes the scenario workshop within the action research paradigm. In addtion, the maina phases and the functions of the facilitator and the participants are outlined. Finally,it describes and analyses the experiences of using the scenario workshop in practice.......The article describes the scenario workshop within the action research paradigm. In addtion, the maina phases and the functions of the facilitator and the participants are outlined. Finally,it describes and analyses the experiences of using the scenario workshop in practice....

  8. Plans for Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Ballmann, Josef; Bhatia, Kumar; Blades, Eric; Boucke, Alexander; Chwalowski, Pawel; Dietz, Guido; Dowell, Earl; Florance, Jennifer P.; Hansen, Thorsten; Mani, Mori; Marvriplis, Dimitri; Perry, Boyd, III; Ritter, Markus; Schuster, David M.; Smith, Marilyn; Taylor, Paul; Whiting, Brent; Wieseman, Carol C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the plans for the first Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop. The workshop is designed to assess the state of the art of computational methods for predicting unsteady flow fields and aeroelastic response. The goals are to provide an impartial forum to evaluate the effectiveness of existing computer codes and modeling techniques, and to identify computational and experimental areas needing additional research and development. Three subject configurations have been chosen from existing wind tunnel data sets where there is pertinent experimental data available for comparison. For each case chosen, the wind tunnel testing was conducted using forced oscillation of the model at specified frequencies

  9. NSP Action Plans

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — NSP Action Plans, also known as Substantial Amendments, contain a description of a grantee’s intended use for NSP funds. The plans contain information on the...

  10. Workshop on FLood Management in Local PLanning - Workshop Report

    OpenAIRE

    HORNICH Rudolf; METELKO-SKUTNIK Vesna; HALLVARD Berg; MYHRE Marianne; WALLIS Brian; DONAGHY Mike; BARREDO CANO Jose'

    2008-01-01

    At the Working-Group F meeting on October 19th 2007, theme 2 from the Oslo Workshop ¿ ¿Flood Management in Local Planning¿ ¿ was proposed as the topic for the 2008 Workshop, which was held from April 8th to 10th, 2008 in Bad Radkersburg / Gornja Radgona (Austria/Slovenia). During the first two days of the Workshop, regional planning and water management experts presented current projects and examples in flood control and regional planning. Moreover, four Group Sessions were held, followed by ...

  11. Global action plan for childhood diarrhoea: Developing research priorities Report from a Workshop of the Programme for Global Paediatric Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvin Zipursky

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Childhood diarrhoea remains a major public health problem responsible for the deaths of approximately 800 000 children annually, worldwide. The present study was undertaken to further define research priorities for the prevention and treatment of diarrhoea in low and middle income countries. We used the Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative (CHNRI process for defining research priorities. This provided a transparent, systematic method of obtaining the opinions of experts regarding research priorities in childhood diarrhoea. The present report describes the deliberations of a workshop that reviewed these research priorities by stakeholders including colleagues from: government agencies, academic institutions, major funding agencies and non–governmental organizations.

  12. DARPA Santa Cruz Workshop on Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Swartout, William R.

    1988-01-01

    This is a summary of the Workshop on Planning that was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency and held in Santa Cruz, California, on October 21-23, 1987. The purpose of this workshop was to identify and explore new directions for research in planning.

  13. Diversity in Action: Interactive Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Diversity Office

    2012-01-01

    Come and take part in an interactive workshop organised by the CERN Diversity Office to allow you to discuss and share your experience of diversity at CERN. What does diversity mean to you? How important is it for you at work? David Weaver, an experienced external specialist on diversity issues, will facilitate a lively exchange of views on the benefits and challenges of working with colleagues of different nationalities, genders, ages and professions This session will be run in English; small group discussions may be held in both official languages. Everyone working on the CERN site is welcome! There are a limited number of places available so please sign up here  as soon as possible. The event will take place on Thursday 8 March from 2.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m. in the Pump Room, Building 216-R-401.

  14. Asthma action plan

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2014-01-01

    This action plans allow each child (or parent/carer) to record his or her asthma treatment to help manage their asthma when they are well, when their symptoms get worse and when they are suffering an asthma attack.

  15. Postpartum Depression Action Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    MENU Return to Web version Postpartum Depression | Postpartum Depression Action Plan Patient __________________________ Physician/NP/PA __________________ Clinic ____________________________ Phone Number ____________________ Choose one area and add other areas as you begin to feel ...

  16. Diversity in Action | Interactive Workshop | 4 July

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Come and take part in an interactive workshop organised by the CERN Diversity Programme designed to creatively explore the meaning of diversity and share your experience of working with differences at CERN.   Thursday 4 July 2013 – 1.30 p.m. - 5.30 p.m. Pump Hall - Building 216-R-401 "Diversity in Action" is an interactive half-day workshop designed to creatively explore the meaning and importance of diversity at CERN, in support of the Organization’s value of “appreciating differences, fostering equality and promoting collaboration”. Using participative multi-media methods, this innovative workshop will provide participants with insights into diversity, help them to develop greater sensitivity to differences, explore ways to recognise and overcome biases and thereby strengthen our tradition of inclusiveness at CERN. Alan Richter, Ph. D., is the president of QED Consulting, a 25-year-old company based in New York. He has consulted to org...

  17. New technology integration planning workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Purpose of the Workshop was to provide guidance, reflecting electric utility industry viewpoints, for developing and directing its research and development program structures to facilitate the integration of new energy technologies into electric utility systems. The Workshop was structured to directly elicit the positions and viewpoints representative of electric utility companies.

  18. RPII Action Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document outlines RPII's committments under the Public Service Action Plan 2010 to 2014, otherwise known as the Croke Park Agreement. The document describes the proposed changes to the workplan, the benefits arising from the changes and the timeframe for implementing the committments

  19. Ontario's energy action plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the fall of 2002, the government of Ontario announced an action plan designed to ensure stable electricity prices while additional electricity generating capacity is built. The action plan included a strategy for encouraging major private sector investments in wind, solar and other renewable energy sources. The strategies for new renewable energy projects include: property tax incentives, business income tax incentives, and sales tax rebates. Initiatives to increase supply include: Toronto's Portland 550 megawatt, natural gas-fired generating station, Niagara Falls' Beck Tunnel Project, and Windsor's 580 megawatt natural gas-fired generating station. The government is promoting energy conservation by reducing its electricity consumption by 10 per cent, and setting a target where 20 per cent of electricity consumed in the province must be from renewable energy sources. The use of interval meters by Ontario residents is being encouraged. A provincial sales tax rebate is being offered to customers buying select energy efficient appliances. In its commitment to environmental protection, the Ontario government is phasing out coal, offering rebates for solar energy systems, implementing measures to reduce acid rain, and investing $3.25 billion over ten years to renew and expand public transit. In Chatham, Ontario, a plant producing ethanol from corn was built, and others are planned for other parts of the province. Tax incentives are also offered for alternative fuel users. 1 ref., 1 tab

  20. Customer Service Action Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health (Ireland)

    2003-01-01

    Customer Service Action Plan One of the fundamental themes of Delivering Better Government (1996) is the â?oachievement of an excellent service for the Government and for the public as customers and clients at all levelsâ?Âù. In 2000, the Quality Customer Service (QCS) Working Group reviewed and revised the 1997 Principles of Quality Customer Service to take account of changes in the environment since 1997, such as the equality agenda. In July 2000, the Government decided that: Click ...

  1. Action Plan for Jobs 2012

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The Action Plan for jobs provides the blueprint for action which aligns all Government departments and agencies around an enterprise growth and jobs objective. The plan contains over 270 actions to be implemented in 2012 by all 15 Government Departments as well as 36 State agencies. The publication of the Action Plan for Jobs marks the commencement of an annual process to produce an Action Plan focused on jobs and the enterprise economy. Forfás worked closely with the Minister for Jobs, Enter...

  2. Diversity in Action workshop | 18 September | Business Centre Technoparc

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    After two years, five successful editions and plenty of positive feedback, we are happy to announce the sixth edition of our Diversity in Action workshop.   Seize the opportunity and participate in this half-day interactive workshop designed to explore the meaning and importance of diversity at CERN. Using participative multimedia methods, this workshop will provide participants with insights into the different dimensions of diversity, help to develop greater sensitivity to differences, and explore ways to recognise and overcome biases and thereby strengthen our tradition of inclusiveness at CERN. “For me it was a great opportunity to talk about diversity issues with other people at CERN who I would never have met otherwise,” says Alex Brown, who participated in the third edition of the workshop. “The discussions I was involved in inspired connections that are still active.” Diversity in Action workshop – sixth...

  3. 'Action 2016': AREVA's strategic action plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On December 13, 2011, Luc Oursel, CEO, and Pierre Aubouin, Chief Financial Officer presented the group's strategic plan for the period 2012-2016. The plan has been drawn up collectively and is based on a thorough-going analysis and a realistic assessment of perspectives for all group activities and associated resources. Development of nuclear and renewable energies: the fundamentals are unchanged. In this context, the German decision remains an isolated case and the great majority of nuclear programs around the world have been confirmed. More conservative in its projections than the International Energy Agency, the group expects growth of 2.2% annually, reaching 583 GW of installed nuclear capacity by 2030, against 378 GW today. However, the Fukushima accident will lead to delays in launching new programs. 'Action 2016' plan aims to consolidate AREVA's leadership in nuclear energy and become a leading player in renewable energy. The group's strategic action plan 'Action 2016' is based on the following strategic choices: - commercial priority given to value creation, - selectivity in investments, - strengthening of the financial structure. These demand an improvement in the group's performance by 2015. This plan makes nuclear safety a strategic priority for the industrial and commercial performance of the group. This ambitious performance plan for the period 2012-2016 will give the group the wherewithal to withstand a temporary slowdown in the market resulting from the Fukushima accident and to deliver safe and sustainable growth of the business. The plan sets out the strategic direction for the group's employees for the years ahead: taking advantage of the expected growth in nuclear and renewable energies, targeted investment programs, and return to self-financing as of 2014

  4. What's an Asthma Action Plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... asthma action plan is to reduce or prevent flare-ups and emergency department visits through day-to-day ... can: avoid triggers identify early symptoms of a flare-up and treat them to prevent the flare-up ...

  5. Proceedings of the CEATI 2010 distribution planning workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This workshop provided a forum for electrical industry distribution experts to discuss methods of distribution planning that will ensure the provision of low-cost and reliable electrical service to present and future customers. Participants in the workshop discussed methods of integrating renewable energy resources, maximizing the use of existing assets, and reducing the carbon footprint of electric utilities. The effects of new loads on reliability, power quality, and voltage stability were considered. Planning distribution system modifications for the future were reviewed. The workshop provided an overview of distribution planning in relation to smart grids. The workshop included sessions on distribution planning for the 21. century; planning for a smarter grid; integrating renewable energy into the distribution system; and planning to manage reliability. The workshop featured 22 presentations, of which 16 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs.

  6. Diversity in Action workshop | 5 May | Technoparc Business Centre

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Diversity Office

    2015-01-01

    Get an insight into diversity, develop greater sensitivity to differences, acquire new tools to recognise and overcome unconscious biases.   Diversity in Action workshop 5th edition in English Tuesday, 5 May 2015 8:30 a.m. - 12 p.m. Technoparc Business Centre – Saint-Genis-Pouilly Registration and more information on the workshop: http://cern.ch/diversity/in-action On 5 May at 2 p.m., Alan Richter will also lead a forum for discussion  on the topic of “Respect in the workplace”. More information here.  

  7. Supplemental action learning workshops: Understanding the effects of independent and cooperative workshops on students' knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Kathryn Michelle

    Community colleges enroll more than half of the undergraduate population in the United States, thereby retaining students of varying demographics with extracurricular demands differing from traditional four-year university students. Often in a collegiate lecture course, students are limited in their abilities to absorb and process information presented by their instructors due to content-specific cognitive gaps between the instructor and the student (Preszler, 2009). Research has shown that implementation of instructor-facilitated action learning workshops as supplemental instruction may help bridge these cognitive gaps allowing better student conceptualization and dissemination of knowledge (Drake, 2011; Fullilove & Treisman, 1990; Preszler, 2009; Udovic, Morris, Dickman, Postlethwait, & Wetherwax, 2002). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of cooperative action learning workshops and independent action learning workshops on students' knowledge of specified topics within a General Biology I with lab course. The results of this investigation indicate that implementation of an instructor-facilitated action learning workshop did not affect students' knowledge gain; furthermore, attendance of a particular workshop style (independent or cooperative) did not affect students' knowledge gain.

  8. Chemical sensors technology development planning workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastiaans, G.J.; Haas, W.J. Jr.; Junk, G.A. [eds.

    1993-03-01

    The workshop participants were asked to: (1) Assess the current capabilities of chemical sensor technologies for addressing US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) needs; (2) Estimate potential near term (one to two years) and intermediate term (three to five years) capabilities for addressing those needs; and (3) Generate a ranked list of specific recommendations on what research and development (R&D) should be funded to provide the necessary capabilities. The needs were described in terms of two pervasive EM problems, the in situ determination of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and selected metals in various matrices at DOE sites. The R&D recommendations were to be ranked according to the estimated likelihood that the product technology will be ready for application within the time frame it is needed and the estimated return on investment. The principal conclusions and recommendations of the workshop are as follows: Chemical sensors capable of in situ determinations can significantly reduce analytical costs; Chemical sensors have been developed for certain VOCs in gases and water but none are currently capable of in situ determination of VOCs in soils; The DOE need for in situ determination of metals in soils cannot be addressed with existing chemical sensors and the prospects for their availability in three to five years are uncertain; Adaptation, if necessary, and field application of laboratory analytical instruments and those few chemical sensors that are already in field testing is the best approach for the near term; The chemical sensor technology development plan should include balanced support for near- and intermediate-term efforts.

  9. Chemical sensors technology development planning workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop participants were asked to: (1) Assess the current capabilities of chemical sensor technologies for addressing US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) needs; (2) Estimate potential near term (one to two years) and intermediate term (three to five years) capabilities for addressing those needs; and (3) Generate a ranked list of specific recommendations on what research and development (R ampersand D) should be funded to provide the necessary capabilities. The needs were described in terms of two pervasive EM problems, the in situ determination of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and selected metals in various matrices at DOE sites. The R ampersand D recommendations were to be ranked according to the estimated likelihood that the product technology will be ready for application within the time frame it is needed and the estimated return on investment. The principal conclusions and recommendations of the workshop are as follows: Chemical sensors capable of in situ determinations can significantly reduce analytical costs; Chemical sensors have been developed for certain VOCs in gases and water but none are currently capable of in situ determination of VOCs in soils; The DOE need for in situ determination of metals in soils cannot be addressed with existing chemical sensors and the prospects for their availability in three to five years are uncertain; Adaptation, if necessary, and field application of laboratory analytical instruments and those few chemical sensors that are already in field testing is the best approach for the near term; The chemical sensor technology development plan should include balanced support for near- and intermediate-term efforts

  10. Diversity in Action | Interactive Workshop | 2nd edition | 22 October

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Diversity Programme has designed an interactive workshop to creatively explore the meaning of diversity. Come, take part, and share your experience of working with differences at CERN.   Tuesday 22 October 2013 – 1.30 p.m. - 5.30 p.m. Pump Hall - Building 216-R-401 "Diversity in Action" is an interactive half-day workshop designed to creatively explore the meaning and importance of diversity at CERN, in support of the Organization’s value of “appreciating differences, fostering equality and promoting collaboration”. Using participative multi-media methods, this innovative workshop will provide participants with insights into diversity, help them to develop greater sensitivity to differences, explore ways to recognise and overcome biases and thereby strengthen our tradition of inclusiveness at CERN. Virginia Humud Guerrero is a seasoned professional and HR expert who has spent a considerable part of her career in UN agencies worl...

  11. Protective action guides for accidentally contaminated water and food. Proceedings of a workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Workshop on Protective Action Guides for Accidentally Contaminated Water and Food was designed for those who have experience in planning for and responding to ingestion exposure scenarios. The objective was to identify and discuss all of the issues, problems, relevant experiences, and research that should be considered in the development of Protective Action Guides (PAGs) for water and food. The workshop proved to be very helpful for those responsible for developing PAGs for the ingestion exposure pathways. This workshop addressed the roles and responsibilities for the development of PAGs. EPA has the responsibility for development of PAGs, except in the case of PAGs for food for which the responsibility is shared with FDA. EPA participated in the development of the recommendations on PAGs for food and animal feed that FDA published in 1982, which are under revision. In the absence of PAGs specifically for water, past practice has been for EPA to provide ad hoc guidance when needed. EPA will be developing guidance for drinking water during the next fiscal year and, therefore, one of the working groups at the workshop was devoted to considering issues related to PAGs for water. It has not yet been determined whether PAGs for drinking water should be separate or included with those for food. These issues were discussed at the workshop and the recommendations included in this proceedings document will be used as resource in the development of PAGs for the ingestion pathway

  12. Hungarian climate change action plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molnar, S.; Takacs, T. [Systemexpert Consulting Ltd., Budapest (Hungary); Arpasi, M. [MOL, Budapest (Hungary); Farago, T.; Palvoelgyi, T. [Ministry for Environment and Regional Policy, Budapest (Hungary); Harnos, Z. [Univ. of Horticulture, Budapest (Hungary); Lontay, Z. [EGI-Contracting Engineering Co. Ltd., Budapest (Hungary); Somogyi, Z. [Forest Research Inst., Budapest (Hungary); Tajthy, T. [Univ. of Technology, Budapest (Hungary)

    1998-12-31

    In 1994--1996, within the framework of the US Country Studies Program, the Hungarian Country Study Team developed the national greenhouse gas emission inventory, and elaborated the mitigation options for the different sectors of the economy. In 1997, the development of a National Action Plan was begun as the continuation of this work. Results of the inventory study showed that greenhouse gas emissions decreased from the selected base level (i.e., from the yearly average emissions of 1985--1987) until 1994 by cca. 25%. However, this decrease was primarily caused by the deep economic recession. Therefore the policy makers have to face the problem of economic recovery without a relevant increase of greenhouse gas emissions in the near future. This is the main focus of the mitigation analysis and the National Action Plan.

  13. Westcoast Energy Inc. VCR action plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westcoast Energy Inc. comprises a group of 14 major natural gas and petroleum companies from Canada and the United States. Climate change is a key strategic issue for the group. This paper represents their first consolidated Voluntary Challenge and Registry (VCR) action plan and includes updated information for the seven Westcoast companies which have previously filed individual action plans with the VCR office. Westcoast is involved in gathering and distribution of natural gas to more than one million consumers in Canada, and strongly supports a voluntary approach to meet Canada's commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Westcoast believes that market-based measures are the most effective and least-expensive way of addressing climate change issues. Key actions undertaken by Westcoast in 1996 were: (1) the creation of a climate change employee awareness program, (2) the development of greenhouse gas emissions inventories, (3) the use of new technologies and methods to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, (4) the development and use of end-user energy efficiency programs, and (5) support for research and pilot scale projects aimed at market-based approaches. In 1996, Westcoast emission from operational sources were 8,201 kt CO2 equivalent. Emissions from operational sources represent an increase of 42 per cent over 1990 emissions. The main reason for these higher emissions is the increased market demand for natural gas which has resulted in the expansion of Westcoast operations. The demand for natural gas is expected to remain high because natural gas offers low carbon intensity compared to other fossil fuels. Future actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions include gas storage in abandoned pipelines, a corporation-wide greenhouse gas emission reduction workshop, use of dry low NOx turbine combustion technology, advanced pipeline technology, acid gas reinjection, improvements in data tracking and capture, co-generation, recovery of landfill methane, and support

  14. Diversity in Action workshop | 14 June | Business Center Technoparc

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    After two years, five successful editions and plenty of positive feedback, we are happy to announce the 7th edition of our Diversity in Action workshop.   Tuesday 14 June 2016 – 8.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Crêt Neige (Business Center Technoparc) Seize the opportunity and participate in this half-day interactive workshop designed to explore the meaning and importance of diversity at CERN. Using participative multi-media methods and study cases from the CERN work environment, this workshop will provide participants with insights into the different dimensions of diversity, help to develop greater sensitivity to differences, explore ways to recognise and overcome biases and thereby strengthen our tradition of inclusiveness at CERN. “For me it was a great opportunity to talk about diversity issues with other people at CERN who I would have never met otherwise," says Alex Brown, who participated in the 3rd edition of the workshop. "The ...

  15. New Approaches to Planning Diabetic Diets Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Georgia

    Instructional materials are provided for a workshop to enable participants to educate patients and food service staff regarding diabetic diets, incorporating current therapeutic recommendations and allowing variation and flexibility. Representative topics are facts about diabetes mellitus, high risk groups, symptoms, treatment and goals of diet…

  16. ECOWindS Joint Action Plan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The Joint Action Plan (JAP) is a deliverable of the ECOWindS project Work Package 4 (WP4) “Joint Action Plan”. It presents a plan of action or a roadmap for research, development, and innovation (RDI) for the Offshore Wind Service (OWS) industry. The objective of the JAP is to be an international...

  17. Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands Energy Action Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad, M. D.; Ness, J. E.

    2013-07-01

    This document describes the three near-term energy strategies selected by the CNMI Energy Task Force during action planning workshops conducted in March 2013, and outlines the steps being taken to implement those strategies. The three energy strategies selected by the task force are (1) designing a demand-side management program focusing on utility, residential and commercial sectors, (2) developing an outreach and education plan focused on energy conservation in government agencies and businesses, including workplace rules, and (3) exploring waste-to-energy options. The task force also discussed several other medium- and long-term energy strategies that could be explored at a future date.

  18. Acadia National Park Climate Change Scenario Planning Workshop summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Star, Jonathan; Fisichelli, Nicholas; Bryan, Alexander; Babson, Amanda; Cole-Will, Rebecca; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J.

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes outcomes from a two-day scenario planning workshop for Acadia National Park, Maine (ACAD). The primary objective of the workshop was to help ACAD senior leadership make management and planning decisions based on up-to-date climate science and assessments of future uncertainty. The workshop was also designed as a training program, helping build participants' capabilities to develop and use scenarios. The details of the workshop are given in later sections. The climate scenarios presented here are based on published global climate model output. The scenario implications for resources and management decisions are based on expert knowledge distilled through scientist-manager interaction during workgroup break-out sessions at the workshop. Thus, the descriptions below are from these small-group discussions in a workshop setting and should not be taken as vetted research statements of responses to the climate scenarios, but rather as insights and examinations of possible futures (Martin et al. 2011, McBride et al. 2012).

  19. Solar heating action plan; Solvarme handlingsplan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Jan Erik

    2011-10-15

    This solar action plan should be seen as a follow-up to the Danish Energy Agency's solar heating strategy from 2007, which showed great potential and opportunities for exploitation and use of solar heat in Denmark. In relation to the strategy from 2007, this action plan adjusted the distribution of solar heat from district heating plants and individual plants, but it is still the objective of this action plan to achieve the strategy's overall goal for 2030. With the implementation of the Action Plan in early 2012, it is estimated that in 2030 there will be about. 10 million m2 of solar collectors in operation, 8 million m2 for district heating and 2 million m2 for individual heating, equivalent to an installed capacity totaling 7 GW. The budget for actions in the Action Plan is about 80 million DKK annually over the next 5 years to initiate and ensure this development. (LN)

  20. IT Strategic Planning Workshops Develop Long-Term Goals | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of NCI’s Research IT Strategic Planning efforts, a workshop was held on the NIH main campus in June. The main purpose of the workshop was to discuss ways to better integrate IT and informatics throughout NCI, and develop specific, high-level goals and related objectives that will drive the direction of IT and informatics support over the next five years. The initiative to integrate NCI’s IT and informatics is a collaboration between the Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (CBIIT), Office of Scientific Operations, Data Management Services, and the IT Operations Group.

  1. The Development of Action Planning in a Joint Action Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The ability to act jointly with another person is a fundamental requirement for participation in social life. The current study examines the development of action planning in a joint action context. In 4 experiments, 3-, 5-, and 7-year-old children as well as a group of adults (n = 196) interacted with another person to operate a novel apparatus.…

  2. Semantic Activation in Action Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Oliver; Stenneken, Prisca; van Schie, Hein T.; Bekkering, Harold

    2006-01-01

    Four experiments investigated activation of semantic information in action preparation. Participants either prepared to grasp and use an object (e.g., to drink from a cup) or to lift a finger in association with the object's position following a go/no-go lexical-decision task. Word stimuli were consistent to the action goals of the object use…

  3. 'Action 2016': AREVA's strategic action plan to improve performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On December 12, 2011, Luc Oursel, Executive Officer of AREVA, and Pierre Aubouin, Chief Financial Executive Officer, presented the group's 'Action 2016' strategic action plan based on an in-depth analysis of the market's outlook. This document makes, first, a Detailed presentation of the 'Action 2016' plan and then presents the group's financial outlook: - Full-year 2011 immediate accounting consequences of the new market environment: operating losses expected in 2011; - 2012-2013 transition period Objective: self-finance capex in cumulative terms; - 2014-2016: safe growth and cash generation, free operating cash flow at break-even beginning in 2013, above euro 1 bn per year beginning in 2015

  4. The development of action planning in a joint action context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Markus

    2016-07-01

    The ability to act jointly with another person is a fundamental requirement for participation in social life. The current study examines the development of action planning in a joint action context. In 4 experiments, 3-, 5-, and 7-year-old children as well as a group of adults (n = 196) interacted with another person to operate a novel apparatus. Their task was to hand the experimenter a tool with which she could activate 1 of 2 different effects on the apparatus. The elicitation of each effect required participants to grasp and insert the tool in a particular orientation. We assessed whether participants planned their grasping and reaching action in such a way that it enabled the partner to efficiently handle the tool, that is, anticipating the final end state of the joint activity. We found that 3-year-old children did not adjust their behavior to accommodate the other's action and that they did not increase their performance over multiple trials. Five- and 7-year-old children initially showed a tendency to plan their action in an egocentric manner (i.e., showed a form of egocentrism), but improved their joint action performance over time. Adult participants demonstrated joint action planning from the beginning. Interestingly, 3- and 5-year-old children were able to plan their grasp efficiently when acting alone on the apparatus. Yet, having first-hand experience with the task before acting with a partner did not facilitate performance in the joint action task for younger children. Overall, the study informs current approaches on the psychological basis and ontogenetic origins of joint action in childhood. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27337512

  5. The Climate Change Action Plan: Technical supplement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This Technical Annex documents the assumptions and parameters used in developing the supporting analysis for the Climate Change Action Plan (the Plan) issued by President Clinton on October 19, 1993. The Annex is intended to meet the needs of independent energy and environmental analysts who wish to better understand the Plan, its analytical underpinnings, and the events that need to transpire for the emissions reductions called for in the Plan to be realized. The Plan documented in this Annex reflects the outcome of a wide-ranging effort by Government agencies and interested members of the public to develop and implement actions that can reduce net greenhouse gas emissions in the year 2000 to their aggregate 1990 level. Based on agency and public input, the Climate Change Mitigation Group, chaired by the White House Office on Environmental Policy, developed the Plan`s content. Many of the actions called for in the Plan are now underway, while others are in advanced planning pending congressional action on the fiscal year 1995 budget. The analysis supporting the Plan represents the results of an interagency effort. The US Department of Energy (DOE) was responsible for the integrated analysis of energy-related options, based on the analysis of individual energy-related options by DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Transportation (DOT). EPA led in providing analysis for actions related to methane, hydrofluorocarbons, and perfluorocarbons. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) led the analysis of carbon sequestration actions and cooperated with EPA in the analysis of actions to reduce nitrous oxide emissions.

  6. Russian River Interim Action Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An interim action plan is presented to guide the 1979 management of the Kenai National Moose Range's portion of the lower Russian River and its confluence with the...

  7. Regional Synthesis for State Wildlife Action Plans

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The North Atlantic LCC and Northeast states are developing a synthesis of regional conservation information for State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) revisions....

  8. Conservation Action Planning: Lessons learned from the St. Marys River watershed biodiversity conservation planning process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Tamatha A.; Grundel, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Conservation Action Planning (CAP) is an adaptive management planning process refined by The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and embraced worldwide as the Open Standards for the Practice of Conservation. The CAP process facilitates open, multi-institutional collaboration on a common conservation agenda through organized actions and quantified results. While specifically designed for conservation efforts, the framework is adaptable and flexible to multiple scales and can be used for any collaborative planning effort. The CAP framework addresses inception; design and development of goals, measures, and strategies; and plan implementation and evaluation. The specific components of the CAP include defining the project scope and conservation targets; assessing the ecological viability; ascertaining threats and surrounding situation; identifying opportunities and designing strategies for action; and implementing actions and monitoring results. In 2007, TNC and a multidisciplinary graduate student team from the University of Michigan's School of Natural Resources and Environment initiated a CAP for the St. Marys River, the connecting channel between Lake Superior and Lake Huron, and its local watershed. The students not only gained experience in conservation planning, but also learned lessons that notably benefited the CAP process and were valuable for any successful collaborative effort—a dedicated core team improved product quality, accelerated the timeline, and provided necessary support for ongoing efforts; an academic approach in preparation for engagement in the planning process brought applicable scientific research to the forefront, enhanced workshop facilitation, and improved stakeholder participation; and early and continuous interactions with regional stakeholders improved cooperation and built a supportive network for collaboration.

  9. Environmental health action plan for Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Environmental Health Action Plan for Europe was endorsed by the second European Conference on Environment and Health, held in Helsinki, 20 to 22 June 1994. It sets out directions for the attainment of long term environment and health policy objectives define in the European Charter on Environment and Health. The Action Plan is primarily addressed at the public health and environmental protection sectors. 10 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Proceedings of the flexible, midsize gas turbine program planning workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the California Energy Commission (CEC) held a program planning workshop on March 4--5, 1997 in Sacramento, California on the subject of a flexible, midsize gas turbine (FMGT). The workshop was also co-sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the Gas Research Institute (GRI), the Gas Turbine Association (GTA), and the Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine Program (CAGT). The purpose of the workshop was to bring together a broad cross section of knowledgeable people to discuss the potential benefits, markets, technical attributes, development costs, and development funding approaches associated with making this new technology available in the commercial marketplace. The participants in the workshop included representatives from the sponsoring organizations, electric utilities, gas utilities, independent power producers, gas turbine manufacturers, gas turbine packagers, and consultants knowledgeable in the power generation field. Thirteen presentations were given on the technical and commercial aspects of the subject, followed by informal breakout sessions that dealt with sets of questions on markets, technology requirements, funding sources and cost sharing, and links to other programs.

  11. Semantic activation in action planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindemann, Oliver; Stenneken, Prisca; van Schie, Hein T.; Bekkering, Harold

    2006-01-01

    Four experiments investigated activation of semantic information in action preparation. Participants either prepared to grasp and use an object (e.g., to drink from a cup) or to lift a finger in association with the object's position following a go/no-go lexical-decision task. Word stimuli were cons

  12. Friends Partnership Mentoring Program Action Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Action Plan has been prepared to support Recommendation 11 of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Refuge System’s “Conserving the Future”. The plan outlines a...

  13. Operating and Maintaining Energy Smart Schools Action Plan Template - All Action Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-07-01

    EnergySmart Schools action plan templates for benchmarking, lighting, HVAC, water heating, building envelope, transformer, plug loads, kitchen equipment, swimming pool, building automation system, other.

  14. Planning for Sustainability through Action Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egmose, Jonas; Andersen, John

    This paper elaborates how action research can make methodological contributions to sustainability planning by strengthening civic orientations across citizens’ everyday life and institutionalised contexts. Taking into account an emerging number of civic sustainability initiatives, the paper...... addresses how sustainability planning can more actively integrate civic aspirations as part of broader societal transformations towards sustainability. Conceptualised by the notion of sustaining sustain-abilities the role of planning implies strengthening possibilities for ecological and social life...... to renew itself without eroding its own foundation of existence. Analysing learning experiences from a three year action research project taking place in Northern London 2007-9 the paper exemplifies how synergies between action research methodologies and sustainability planning can help strengthening...

  15. PREFACE: First European Workshop on Monte Carlo Treatment Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaert, Nick

    2007-07-01

    The "First European Workshop on Monte Carlo treatment planning", was an initiative of the European working group on Monte Carlo treatment planning (EWG-MCTP). It was organised at Ghent University (Belgium) on 22-25October 2006. The meeting was very successful and was attended by 150 participants. The impressive list of invited speakers and the scientific contributions (posters and oral presentations) have led to a very interesting program, that was well appreciated by all attendants. In addition, the presence of seven vendors of commercial MCTP software systems provided serious added value to the workshop. For each vendor, a representative has given a presentation in a dedicated session, explaining the current status of their system. It is clear that, for "traditional" radiotherapy applications (using photon or electron beams), Monte Carlo dose calculations have become the state of the art, and are being introduced into almost all commercial treatment planning systems. Invited lectures illustrated that scientific challenges are currently associated with 4D applications (e.g. respiratory motion) and the introduction of MC dose calculations in inverse planning. But it was striking that the Monte Carlo technique is also becoming very important in more novel treatment modalities such as BNCT, hadron therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, Tomotherapy, etc. This emphasizes the continuous growing interest in MCTP. The people who attended the dosimetry session will certainly remember the high level discussion on the determination of correction factors for different ion chambers, used in small fields. The following proceedings will certainly confirm the high scientific level of the meeting. I would like to thank the members of the local organizing committee for all the hard work done before, during and after this meeting. The organisation of such an event is not a trivial task and it would not have been possible without the help of all my colleagues. I would also like to thank

  16. The Danish Organic Action Plan 2020

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Nina Nørgaard; Lassen, Anne Dahl; Løje, Hanne;

    2015-01-01

    Objective With political support from the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020, organic public procurement in Denmark is expected to increase. In order to evaluate changes in organic food procurement in Danish public kitchens, reliable methods are needed. The present study aimed to compare organic food...... procurement measurements by two methods and to collect and discuss baseline organic food procurement measurements from public kitchens participating in the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020. Design Comparison study measuring organic food procurement by applying two different methods, one based on the use...... organic food conversion projects funded by the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020 during 2012 and 2013. Subjects Twenty-six public kitchens (comparison study) and 345 public kitchens (baseline organic food procurement status). Results A high significant correlation coefficient was found between the two...

  17. URBAN ATMOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY (UAO) FIRST PLANNING WORKSHOP, JANUARY 27-28-2003. WORKSHOP SUMMARY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REYNOLDS,R.M.; LEE,H.N.

    2003-03-27

    The Urban Atmospheric Observatory (UAO) First Planning Workshop was held on 27-28 January 2003 at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) in downtown Manhattan, New York City. The meeting was well attended by local, state, and national administrators, as well as scientists and engineers from the national laboratories and academia. The real-time intensive UAO is a necessary step toward the development and validation of new technologies in support of the New York City emergency management and anti-terrorism effort. The real-time intensive UAO will be a dense array of meteorological instrumentation, remote sensing and satellite products and model output, as well as radiation detection, gamma spectrometer and aerosol measurements focused onto a small area in the heart of Manhattan. Such a test-bed, developed in a somewhat homogeneous urban area, and with a well-developed communication and data collection backbone, will be of immense utility for understanding how models of all scales can be improved and how they can best be integrated into the city's emergency program. The goal of the First Planning Workshop was to bring together a small group of experts in the fields of urban meteorology, modeling from mesoscale to fine-mesh computational fluid dynamics, instrumentation, communications and visualization, in order to (1) establish the importance of the observational program, (2) define the most efficient and cost-effective design for the program, (3) define needed intensive observational efforts and establish a schedule, and (4) define the importance of the UAO in emergency operations. The workshop achieved its goals with the enthusiastic participation of over forty persons. There was a synthesis of ideas towards a world-class facility that would benefit both immediate emergency management activities and, over an extended time, the entire field of urban meteorology and contaminant dispersion modeling.

  18. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Work Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. M. Heileson

    2006-12-01

    This Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for operation of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility Complex (ICDF). This facility includes (a) an engineered landfill that meets the substantial requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl landfill requirements; (b) centralized receiving, inspections, administration, storage/staging, and treatment facilities necessary for CERCLA investigation-derived, remedial, and removal waste at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prior to final disposition in the disposal facility or shipment off-Site; and (c) an evaporation pond that has been designated as a corrective action management unit. The ICDF Complex, including a buffer zone, will cover approximately 40 acres, with a landfill disposal capacity of approximately 510,000 yd3. The ICDF Complex is designed and authorized to accept INL CERCLA-generated wastes, and includes the necessary subsystems and support facilities to provide a complete waste management system. This Remedial Action Work Plan presents the operational approach and requirements for the various components that are part of the ICDF Complex. Summaries of the remedial action work elements are presented herein, with supporting information and documents provided as appendixes to this work plan that contain specific detail about the operation of the ICDF Complex. This document presents the planned operational process based upon an evaluation of the remedial action requirements set forth in the Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision.

  19. Pakistan's nuclear security action plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: The Government of Pakistan approved a five year plan to strengthen the nuclear security regime in the country which is being implemented since July 2006 . The objective of this Project is to strengthen and enhance the existing regulatory capabilities of PNRA to discharge its responsibilities towards safety and security of nuclear/radioactive materials and facilities. Areas of Focus: The project covers following five areas: Area-1: Management of Radioactive Sources in Category 1-3. evaluation of vulnerable facilities and supporting their efforts: The outcome of the area would be Assessment of security levels at the licensed facilities, identification of weaknesses, propagation of the security culture, up-gradation of the security effort and strengthening of PNRA effectiveness and vigilance . Area-2: Establishment of PNRA Nuclear Safety/Security Training Center: The outcome of this area would be a permanent training facility for sustainable system at national level for providing training in nuclear safety and security to manpower in PNRA and other national organizations. Area-3: National Nuclear Security Emergency Co-ordination Center (NuSECC): The outcome of this area would be the capability to assess, control, and respond and co-ordinate in case of an emergency pertaining to nuclear security. Area-4: Locating and Securing Orphan Radioactive Sources: The outcome of this area would be the establishment or restoration of regulatory control over orphan sources, disposing and putting these sources out of reach of perpetrators and saboteurs. Provision of clean metal and environment to the public. Area-5: Provision of Detection Equipment at Strategic Points: The outcome of this area would be better control of illicit trafficking of nuclear/radioactive material and prompt response to radiological emergency. (author)

  20. 7 CFR 275.16 - Corrective action planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corrective action planning. 275.16 Section 275.16... Corrective action planning. (a) Corrective action planning is the process by which State agencies shall...)/management unit(s) in the planning, development, and implementation of corrective action are those which:...

  1. Action plan for the Tiger Team assessment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-08-30

    This document contains responses and planned actions that address the findings of the Tiger Team Assessment of Brookhaven National Laboratory, June 1990. In addition, the document contains descriptions of the management and organizational structure to be used in conducting planned actions, root causes for the problems identified in the findings, responses, planned actions, schedules and milestones for completing planned actions, and, where known, costs associated with planned actions.

  2. Driving change : sustainable development action plans Guidance

    OpenAIRE

    Sustainable Development Commission

    2008-01-01

    This guidance builds upon the Sustainable Development Commission’s previous guidance, Getting Started (August 2005), which set out the basic elements that the Sustainable Development Commission would expect to see in a good Sustainable Development Action Plan. Publisher PDF Original published August 2005.

  3. The ANSTO waste management action plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levins, D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    ANSTO`s Waste Management Action Plan is a five-year program which addresses legacy issues that have arisen from the accumulation of radioactive wastes at Lucas Heights over the last forty years. Following an extensive review of waste management practices, a detailed Action Plan was prepared involving seventeen projects in the areas of solid wastes, liquid wastes, control of effluents and emissions, spent reactor fuel and organisational issues. The first year of the Waste Management Action Plan has resulted in significant achievements, especially in the areas of improved storage of solid wastes, stabilisation of uranium scrap, commissioning and operation of a scanning system for low-level waste drums, treatment of intermediate-level liquid wastes and improvements in the methods for monitoring of spent fuel storage facilities. The main goal of the Waste Management Action Plan is to achieve consistency, by the year 2000, with best practice as identified in the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards and Guidelines currently under development by the IAEA. 3 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  4. Do Written Asthma Action Plans Improve Outcomes?

    OpenAIRE

    Kelso, John M.

    2016-01-01

    With appropriate management, children with asthma should expect few symptoms, no limits on activity, rare exacerbations, and normal lung function. Appropriate education of parents and other caregivers of children with asthma has clearly been shown to help achieve these goals. Although recommended in asthma guidelines, providing written asthma action plans does not improve outcomes beyond asthma education alone.

  5. Emergency Action Plans in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanis, Cindy J.; Hebel, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Emergency Action Plans (EAP) are essential to properly manage injuries and illnesses in physical education and sport. However, most literature discusses EAP's in the athletic arena instead of physical education. The purpose of this study was to examine physical education instructors' experiences of student illness and injury, discuss the steps of…

  6. Housekeeping category corrective action unit work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Work Plan is to provide a strategy to be used by the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), the US Department of Defense (DoD) Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA) (formerly the Defense Nuclear Agency), and contractor personnel for conducting corrective actions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and Nevada off-site locations including the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), the Project Shoal Area, and the Central Nevada Test Area. This Work Plan applies to housekeeping category CAUs already listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Appendices (FFACO, 1996) as well as newly identified Corrective Action Sites (CASs) that will follow the housekeeping process

  7. Critical utopian action research and the power of future creating workshops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Mia; Tofteng, Ditte Maria Børglum

    2015-01-01

    This paper will discuss some of our and our colleagues experiences doing critical utopian action research inspired by the future creating workshop (Tofteng and Husted 2011, Critical utopian action research is a rather new tradition within the action research family that has grown to be strong...... in existing society. Critical utopian action researchers are influenced by the methodological steps in the future creating workshop as the method holds a strong potential to provide a free space (Bladt and Nielsen 2013) for the participants to create action, experiments or social activism through.......). Action Research and Interactive Research: Beyond Practice and Theory. London: Shaker Publishing: 63 - 89 Nielsen, Birger Steen, Kurt Aagaard Nielsen and Peter Olsén(1996): From silent to talkative participants. A discussion og technique as social construction. In Economic and Industrial Democracy. Vol...

  8. Wetland Resources Action Planning (WRAP) toolkit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunting, Stuart W.; Smith, Kevin G.; Lund, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    The Wetland Resources Action Planning (WRAP) toolkit is a toolkit of research methods and better management practices used in HighARCS (Highland Aquatic Resources Conservation and Sustainable Development), an EU-funded project with field experiences in China, Vietnam and India. It aims...... to communicate best practices in conserving biodiversity and sustaining ecosystem services to potential users and to promote the wise-use of aquatic resources, improve livelihoods and enhance policy information....

  9. [Souris River Loop Refuges : CCP planning workshops meeting

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary on an initial meeting to discuss 1 how the biological workshops will be conducted , 2 tentatively agree on the expected outcome of the workshops,...

  10. State planning for winter energy emergencies: workshop materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    Workshops were conducted in 5 cities to improve communications between the states and the Federal government so that both might be better prepared to avoid or mitigate the impacts of energy emergencies during the winter; to provide a forum for the exchange of technical information regarding selected energy demand restraint measures which could be implemented by individual states or regions in an energy emergency; and to promote the concept of pre-crisis contingency planning and strategy development, with particuliar emphasis on the need for interstate coordination of emergency plans. The major topics addressed by the discussion guide involved net energy use impact, implementation procedures and problems, and social and economic effects. The Task Force performed extensive research into the technical considerations and prior experience in implementing each of the demand restraint measures selected for discussion. Results and conclusions are summarized for reduction of thermostat setting for space conditioning and water heating; reduction in hours of operation and lighting in commercial establishments; reduction in hours of operation in school, and industrial fuel substitution. (MCW)

  11. Action plan for renewable energy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    In the Finnish Energy Strategy, approved by the Finnish Government in 1997, the emphasis is laid on the importance of bioenergy and other renewable energy sources for the creation of such prerequisites for the Finnish energy economy that the supply of energy can be secured, the price on energy is competitive and the emissions from energy generation are within the limits set by the international commitments made by Finland. In 1998, the European Union Meeting of the Ministers of Energy adopted a resolution taking a positive attitude to the Communication from the Commission 'Energy for the future: Renewable sources of energy' - White Paper for a Community Strategy and Action Plan. National measures play a key role in the achievement of the objectives set in the White Paper. This Action Plan for Renewable Energy Sources is a national programme in line with the EU's White Paper. It comprises all renewable sources of energy available in Finland. It encompasses even peat, which in Finland has traditionally been considered to be a solid biofuel but is internationally classified as one of the non-renewable sources of energy. In the Action Plan, objectives are set for the volume of renewable energy sources used in the year 2010 including a prognosis on the development by the year 2025. The goal is that by the year 2010 the volume of energy generated using renewable energy sources has increased by 50% compared with the year 1995. This would mean an increase by 3 Mtoe, which is about 1 Mtoe more than anticipated in the outlook based on the Finnish Energy Strategy. A further goal is to double the use of renewable energy sources by the year 2025. The aggregate use of renewable energy sources depends to a large extent both on the development of the price on energy produced using other energy sources and on possible changes in the production volume of the Finnish forest industry. The most important objective stated in the Action Plan is to improve the

  12. Action plan for renewable energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Finnish Energy Strategy, approved by the Finnish Government in 1997, the emphasis is laid on the importance of bioenergy and other renewable energy sources for the creation of such prerequisites for the Finnish energy economy that the supply of energy can be secured, the price on energy is competitive and the emissions from energy generation are within the limits set by the international commitments made by Finland. In 1998, the European Union Meeting of the Ministers of Energy adopted a resolution taking a positive attitude to the Communication from the Commission 'Energy for the future: Renewable sources of energy' - White Paper for a Community Strategy and Action Plan. National measures play a key role in the achievement of the objectives set in the White Paper. This Action Plan for Renewable Energy Sources is a national programme in line with the EU's White Paper. It comprises all renewable sources of energy available in Finland. It encompasses even peat, which in Finland has traditionally been considered to be a solid biofuel but is internationally classified as one of the non-renewable sources of energy. In the Action Plan, objectives are set for the volume of renewable energy sources used in the year 2010 including a prognosis on the development by the year 2025. The goal is that by the year 2010 the volume of energy generated using renewable energy sources has increased by 50% compared with the year 1995. This would mean an increase by 3 Mtoe, which is about 1 Mtoe more than anticipated in the outlook based on the Finnish Energy Strategy. A further goal is to double the use of renewable energy sources by the year 2025. The aggregate use of renewable energy sources depends to a large extent both on the development of the price on energy produced using other energy sources and on possible changes in the production volume of the Finnish forest industry. The most important objective stated in the Action Plan is to improve the competitiveness of renewable

  13. Effects of action planning and coping planning within the theory of planned behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakpour, Amir H.; Zedi, Isa mohammadi; Chatzisarantis, Nikos;

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Patients on dialysis have low physical activity levels. The aim of the study was to examine the validity of action planning and coping planning within the theory of planned behaviour framework, for predicting physical activity behaviour of patients on hemodialysis. Methods: One hundred...... and forty four patients who were undergoing emodialysis were selected from dialysis centers. The mean age of the patients was 56.61 (SD= 11.38) years. The patients completed a questionnaire including variables from the theory of planned behaviour, action planning and coping planning. Physical activity...... was prospectively assessed at 4-weeks with the validated International Physical Activity Questionnaire self-report measure. A hierarchical regression analysis was performed to examine the effects of action planning and coping planning on physical activity behaviour. Results: There was a main effect for coping...

  14. Challenges of radiotherapy: Report on the 4D treatment planning workshop 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knopf, Antje; Nill, Simeon; Yohannes, Indra; Graeff, Christian; Dowdell, Stephen; Kurz, Christopher; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Biegun, Aleksandra K.; Lang, Stephanie; McCelland, Jamie; Champion, Benjamin; Fast, Martin; Wölfelschneider, Jens; Gianoli, Chiara; Rucinscki, Antoni; Baroni, Guido; Richter, Christian; van de Water, Steven; Grassberger, Clemens; Weber, Damien; Poulsen, Per; Shimizu, Shinichi; Bert, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    This report, compiled by experts on the treatment of mobile targets with advanced radiotherapy, summarizes the main conclusions and innovations achieved during the 4D treatment planning workshop 2013. This annual workshop focuses on research aiming to advance 4D radiotherapy treatments, including al

  15. 77 FR 38296 - Draft Public Health Action Plan-A National Public Health Action Plan for the Detection...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Draft Public Health Action Plan--A National Public Health Action Plan for the Detection, Prevention, and Management of Infertility AGENCY: Centers... Federal Register requesting public comment on the draft National Public Health Action Plan for...

  16. Air quality management and planning system for Guangzhou. Report from workshop 1, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is proceedings from Workshop no. 1, 1998 of the Sino-Norwegian co-operation project ''Guangzhou Air Quality Management and Planning System''. The project studies pollution emissions generally and from coal, vehicle and energy activities, dispersion modelling, monitoring, exposure, health damage assessment, material damage assessment, vegetation, control options, baseline scenario development, cost benefit analysis, pollution control management and policy instruments and air pollution forecasting. A forth workshop is planned. There are several reports from the various project activities

  17. Clean slate corrective action investigation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Clean Slate sites discussed in this report are situated in the central portion of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), north of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) on the northwest portion of the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR) which is approximately 390 kilometers (km) (240 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. These sites were the locations for three of the four Operation Roller Coaster experiments. These experiments evaluated the dispersal of plutonium in the environment from the chemical explosion of a plutonium-bearing device. Although it was not a nuclear explosion, Operation Roller Coaster created some surface contamination which is now the subject of a corrective action strategy being implemented by the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project (NV ERP) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) activities will be conducted at three of the Operation Roller Coaster sites. These are Clean Slate 1 (CS-1), Clean Slate 2 (CS-2), and Clean Slate 3 (CS-3) sites, which are located on the TTR. The document that provides or references all of the specific information relative to the various investigative processes is called the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP). This CAIP has been prepared for the DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) by IT Corporation (IT)

  18. Clean slate corrective action investigation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The Clean Slate sites discussed in this report are situated in the central portion of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), north of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) on the northwest portion of the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR) which is approximately 390 kilometers (km) (240 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. These sites were the locations for three of the four Operation Roller Coaster experiments. These experiments evaluated the dispersal of plutonium in the environment from the chemical explosion of a plutonium-bearing device. Although it was not a nuclear explosion, Operation Roller Coaster created some surface contamination which is now the subject of a corrective action strategy being implemented by the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project (NV ERP) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) activities will be conducted at three of the Operation Roller Coaster sites. These are Clean Slate 1 (CS-1), Clean Slate 2 (CS-2), and Clean Slate 3 (CS-3) sites, which are located on the TTR. The document that provides or references all of the specific information relative to the various investigative processes is called the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP). This CAIP has been prepared for the DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) by IT Corporation (IT).

  19. 76 FR 21907 - Draft Action Plan-A Public Health Action Plan To Combat Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    ... the draft, A Public Health Action Plan to Combat Antimicrobial Resistance (76 FR 14402). Written and... electronically to: http://www.regulations.gov . All comments received will be posted publicly without change..., reflected a broad-based consensus of participating Federal agencies, which was reached with individual...

  20. Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Regitze; Lotz, Katrine

    2003-01-01

    Program for en arkitektur-workshop med focus på de danske havne. Præsentation af 57 yngre danske og internationale deltagende arkitekter.......Program for en arkitektur-workshop med focus på de danske havne. Præsentation af 57 yngre danske og internationale deltagende arkitekter....

  1. ECOWindS Joint Action Plan - Guidelines for Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The Joint Action Plan (JAP) is a deliverable of the European Clusters for Offshore Wind Servicing (ECOWindS) project Work Package 4 (WP4) “Joint Action Plan”. It presents a plan of action or a roadmap for research, development, and innovation (RDI) for the Offshore Wind Service (OWS) industry...

  2. The Olympia Proceedings. Section VI: Analysis of the Action Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Joel; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Within legislative, practice, and professional issues in school psychology, examples of action plans for hypothetical events are presented. These were produced by groups of conference participants to stimulate development of detailed plans for local, state and national use by school psychologists. Action plan resources and implementation and…

  3. The lessons learned workshop : comprehensive conservation planning pilot projects

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary of the Lessons Learned Workshop, held i on January 22, 2003 in Lakewood, Colorado. Participants included U.S. Fish and Wildlife and U.S. Geological Survey....

  4. Determining Redundant Actions in Sequential Plans

    OpenAIRE

    Chrpa, Lukáš; McCluskey, T.L.; Osborne, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    Automated planning even in its simplest form, classical planning, is a computationally hard problem. With the increasing involvement of intelligent systems in everyday life there is a need for more and more advanced planning techniques able to solve planning problems in little (or real) time. However, planners designed to solve planning problems as fast as possible often provide solution plans of low quality. The quality of solution plans can be improved by their post-planning analysis by whi...

  5. Involving stakeholders in transport decision making using planning workshops and MCDA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Michael Bruhn; Pryn, Marie Ridley

    Developments regarding decision making in the transport sector has revealed an increasing need for involving stakeholders in the decision support process in order to capture all aspects of the often complex decision problems. This paper proposes the use of planning workshops and multi-criteria...... decision analysis to gather stakeholders and decision makers with the purpose of improving the final decision making by including a collaborative planning approach. An outline is made for how the planning workshop can be used for real decision support at different organizational levels in the process....

  6. 77 FR 43237 - Genome in a Bottle Consortium-Work Plan Review Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Genome in a Bottle Consortium--Work Plan Review Workshop.... SUMMARY: NIST announces the Genome in a Bottle Consortium meeting to be held on Thursday and Friday, August 16 and 17, 2012. The Genome in a Bottle Consortium is planning to develop the reference...

  7. Joint action without and beyond planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Olle

    2013-01-01

    toward a common goal. With Bratman’s account as a foil, I address two lacunas that are relatively unexplored in the philosophical literature. The first lacuna concerns how to make sense of the apparently joint cooperative activities of agents that lack the capacities for planning and “mindreading...... on the second. In chapter 2, I focus on why participants must have mutual or common knowledge of each other’s intentions and beliefs in order to have a shared intention: Why must these attitudes be “out in the open”? I argue that, if participants lack the concept of belief, then one of the two main motivations...... argue that ‘shared intention’-accounts are unable to say much about spontaneous or skilful joint action because of the following widely accepted constraint on what one can intend: while an agent might intend—in the sense of commit to a plan—that “we” do something together, an agent cannot intend...

  8. DOE Advanced Controls R&D Planning Workshop, June 11, 2003, Washington DC: Workshop Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambley, Michael R.; Haves, Philip; McDonald, Sean C.; Torcellini, Paul; Hansen, David G.; Holmberg, David; Roth, Kurt

    2005-04-13

    On June 11, 2003, representatives from universities, federal and state government agencies, Department of Energy national laboratories, and the private sector attended a one-day workshop in Washington, DC. The objective of the workshop was to review and provide input into DOE's assessment of the market for advanced sensors and controls technology and potential R&D pathways to enhance their success in the buildings market place. The workshop consisted of two sessions. During the morning session, participants were given an overview on the following topics: market assessment, current applications and strategies for new applications, sensors and controls, networking, security, and protocols and standards, and automated diagnostics, performance measurement, commissioning and optimal control and tools. In the sessions, workshop participants were asked to review the potential R&D pathways, identify high priority activities, and outline a five year path for each of these activities. Priorities were as follows: largest and quickest impact; best use of finite resources; greatest likelihood for market penetration; and ability to replicate results. The participants identified several promising R&D opportunities.

  9. 12 CFR 704.10 - Investment action plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Investment action plan. 704.10 Section 704.10... CREDIT UNIONS § 704.10 Investment action plan. (a) Any corporate credit union in possession of an investment, including a derivative, that fails to meet a requirement of this part must, within 30...

  10. The role of action control and action planning on fruit and vegetable consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangyu; Gan, Yiqun; Miao, Miao; Hamilton, Kyra; Knoll, Nina; Schwarzer, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Globally, fruit and vegetable intake is lower than recommended despite being an important component to a healthy diet. Adopting or maintaining a sufficient amount of fruit and vegetables in one's diet may require not only motivation but also self-regulatory processes. Action control and action planning are two key volitional determinants that have been identified in the literature; however, it is not fully understood how these two factors operate between intention and behavior. Thus, the aim of the current study was to explore the roles of action control and action planning as mediators between intentions and dietary behavior. A longitudinal study with three points in time was conducted. Participants (N = 286) were undergraduate students and invited to participate in a health behavior survey. At baseline (Time 1), measures of intention and fruit and vegetable intake were assessed. Two weeks later (Time 2), action control and action planning were assessed as putative sequential mediators. At Time 3 (two weeks after Time 2), fruit and vegetable consumption was measured as the outcome. The results revealed action control and action planning to sequentially mediate between intention and subsequent fruit and vegetable intake, controlling for baseline behavior. Both self-regulatory constructs, action control and action planning, make a difference when moving from motivation to action. Our preliminary evidence, therefore, suggests that planning may be more proximal to fruit and vegetable intake than action control. Further research, however, needs to be undertaken to substantiate this conclusion.

  11. Smart Buildings: Business Case and Action Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrlich, Paul; Diamond, Rick

    2009-04-01

    General Services Administration (GSA) has been a pioneer in using Smart Building technologies but it has yet to achieve the full benefits of an integrated, enterprise-wide Smart Building strategy. In July 2008, GSA developed an initial briefing memorandum that identified five actions for a Smart Buildings feasibility study: (1) Identify and cluster the major building systems under consideration for a Smart Buildings initiative; (2) Identify GSA priorities for these clusters; (3) Plan for future adoption of Smart Building strategies by identifying compatible hardware; (4) Develop a framework for implementing and testing Smart Building strategies and converged networks; and (5) Document relevant GSA and industry initiatives in this arena. Based on this briefing memorandum, PBS and FAS retained consultants from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Noblis, and the Building Intelligence Group to evaluate the potential for Smart Buildings within GSA, and to develop this report. The project has included extensive interviews with GSA staff (See Appendix A), a review of existing GSA standards and documents, and an examination of relevant GSA and industry initiatives. Based on interviews with GSA staff and a review of GSA standards and documents, the project team focused on four goals for evaluating how Smart Building technology can benefit GSA: (1) Achieve Energy Efficiency Mandates--Use Smart Building technology as a tool to meet EISA 2007 and EO 13423 goals for energy efficiency. (2) Enhance Property Management--Deploy enterprise tools for improved Operations and Maintenance (O&M) performance and verification. (3) Implement Network as the Fourth Utility--Utilize a converged broadband network to support Smart Building systems and provide GSA clients with connectivity for voice, data and video. (4) Enhance Safety and Security--Harmonize Physical Access Control Systems (PACS) with Smart Building Systems.

  12. Improving Contract Performance by Corrective Actions Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrective Action Plans (CAPs) are required to be developed, submitted, and reported upon by the prime contractors for the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Management and Operations (M and O) contracts. The best known CAP ''type,'' and there are many, is for Price-Anderson Amendments Act (PAAA) ''potential noncompliances.'' The M and O contractor fines for PAAA problems have increased from approximately $100,000 in 1996 to almost $2,000,000 in 2000. In order to improve CAP performance at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) site at Y-12 in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the contractor chose to centralize the company-wide processes of problem identification and reporting with the PAAA (and other) CAP processes. This directly integrates these functional reports to the contractor General Manager. The functions contained in the M and O contractor central organization, called ''Performance Assurance,'' are: PAAA; Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Liaison; Contract Requirements Management; Issues Management (including the CAP processes); Lessons Learned; Independent and Management Assessments; Internal Audits; and Ethics. By centrally locating and managing these problem identification and problem correction functions, the contractor, BWXT Y-12, L.L.C., has improved PAAA (and other) CAP performance more than 200 percent in the first year of the contract. Much of this improvement (see Table 1 for examples) has been achieved by increasing the knowledge and experience of management and workers in the specific contract and company requirements for CAPs. The remainder of this paper will describe some of the many CAP processes at Y-12 to show the reader the non-trivial scope of the CAP process. Improvements in CAP management will be discussed. In addition, a specific recommendation for CAP management, in a major capital construction project, will be presented

  13. Air quality management and planning system for Guangzhou. Report from workshop 1, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larssen, Steinar

    1999-02-01

    The report is proceedings from Workshop no. 1, 1998 of the Sino-Norwegian co-operation project ''Guangzhou Air Quality Management and Planning System''. The project studies pollution emissions generally and from coal, vehicle and energy activities, dispersion modelling, monitoring, exposure, health damage assessment, material damage assessment, vegetation, control options, baseline scenario development, cost benefit analysis, pollution control management and policy instruments and air pollution forecasting. A forth workshop is planned. There are several reports from the various project activities.

  14. Workshop on IAEA Tools for Nuclear Energy System Assessment for Long-Term Planning and Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the workshop is to present to Member States tools and methods that are available from the IAEA in support of long-term energy planning and nuclear energy system assessments, both focusing on the sustainable development of nuclear energy. This includes tools devoted to energy system planning, indicators for sustainable energy development, the INPRO methodology for Nuclear Energy System Assessment (NESA) and tools for analysing nuclear fuel cycle material balance. The workshop also intends to obtain feedback from Member States on applying the tools, share experiences and lessons learned, and identify needs for IAEA support

  15. K basins interim remedial action health and safety plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAY, P.T.

    1999-09-14

    The K Basins Interim Remedial Action Health and Safety Plan addresses the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as they apply to the CERCLA work that will take place at the K East and K West Basins. The provisions of this plan become effective on the date the US Environmental Protection Agency issues the Record of Decision for the K Basins Interim Remedial Action, currently planned in late August 1999.

  16. Planning my actions to accommodate yours: joint action development during early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Marlene; van der Wel, Robrecht P R D; Hunnius, Sabine

    2016-05-01

    The planning and adjusting of one's actions in relation to an action partner is fundamental to smooth joint action. During their first years of life, children gradually become more engaged in joint actions. Here, we investigated whether and at what age children take their partner into account in their action plans to accommodate the other's actions. We focused on children's proactive planning (without prior experience) and flexible adjustment of action plans over time. In a behavioural study, we tested 96 children from four age groups (2½, 3, 3½ and 5 years) in a joint cup-stacking task. Children passed cups to their partner who had only one hand available (alternating over time) to build a tower. Children's response choices were assessed (i.e. passing the cup on the free or occupied side to their partner). The study yielded two major findings. At all ages, children proactively planned their actions in a way that accommodated their partner's actions. However, only by 3½ years did children start to flexibly integrate their partner into their action plans. Even at age 5, children only showed minimal adjustments to their action partner. Candidate processes underlying these developmental changes (e.g. inhibitory control, cognitive flexibility, perspective taking) are discussed. PMID:27069048

  17. Towards a Joint Action Plan for Research and Development in the Offshore Wind Service Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Dannemand; Piirainen, Kalle A.; Clausen, Niels-Erik;

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a joint action plan (JAP) for research and development and innovation (RDI) in the offshore wind service industry in Denmark, Germany, Norway and the UK. Offshore wind servicing (OWS) is in this context defined as both assembly and installation of offshore wind farms as well...... for offshore wind installations, and industry clusters based on OWS are emerging in regions around the North Sea. The JAP builds on a mapping (based on desk studies, patent analyses, and bibliometrics) of each of participating region’s existing capabilities, and on an overall strategic orientation and options...... for a innovation. The JAP is built on this foundation together with stakeholders from the four regions, comprising representatives from R&D and education, policy makers and offshore wind industry. Following the workshop, the ECOWindS consortium has been developing the proposed action plan further based...

  18. Delivery 7 Report on the impact of conflicts/synergies and policy proposals for implementing the EU Action Plan in member states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne-Marie Tyroll; Michelsen, Johannes

    This report on “Implementing the European Organic Action Plan in EU member states - stakeholders’ perceptions of implementation problems and coping strategies” recapitulates the results of a series of national workshops undertaken in winter/spring 2007. It brings together very different views and...... and perceptions on organic action plans and possible evaluation methodologies and can be seen as ORGAP’s stakeholder oriented or public oriented step....

  19. National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency

    2006-07-01

    Summarizes recommendations, key barriers, and methods for energy efficiency in utility ratemaking as well as revenue requirements, resource planning processes, rate design, and program best practices.

  20. Incorporating gender, equity, and human rights into the action planning process: moving from rhetoric to action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Sanjeev; Maplazi, Joanna; Shirodkar, Apurva; Richardson, Emma; Nakaima, April

    2016-01-01

    Background Mainstreaming of gender, equity, and human rights (GER) is an important focus of the World Health Organization (WHO) and other UN organizations. This paper explores the role of action plans in mainstreaming GER. This paper is informed by a theory-driven evaluation lens. Design A theory of change framework explored the following seven dimensions of how action plans can implement mainstreaming of GER: awareness of the foundations of GER; understanding of context; planning to impact GER; implementation for GER; monitoring, evaluation, and learning; planning for sustainability; agenda setting and buy-in. The seven dimensions were used to analyze the action plans. Reviewers also explored innovations within each of the action plans for the seven dimensions. Results GER mainstreaming is more prominent in the foundation, background, and planning components of the plan but becomes less so along the theory of change including implementation; monitoring and evaluation; sustainability; and agenda setting and buy-in. Conclusions Our analysis demonstrates that much more can be done to incorporate GER considerations into the action planning process. Nine specific recommendations are identified for WHO and other organizations. A theory-driven approach as described in the paper is potentially helpful for developing clarity by which action plans can help with mainstreaming GER considerations. PMID:27606968

  1. Equivalence considerations for orally inhaled products for local action-ISAM/IPAC-RS European Workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Carole; Cipolla, David; Chesworth, Tim; Agurell, Eva; Ahrens, Richard; Conner, Dale; Dissanayake, Sanjeeva; Dolovich, Myrna; Doub, William; Fuglsang, Anders; García Arieta, Afredo; Golden, Michael; Hermann, Robert; Hochhaus, Günther; Holmes, Susan; Lafferty, Paul; Lyapustina, Svetlana; Nair, Parameswaran; O'Connor, Dennis; Parkins, David; Peterson, Ilse; Reisner, Colin; Sandell, Dennis; Singh, Gur Jai Pal; Weda, Marjolein; Watson, Patricia

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to document the discussions at the 2010 European Workshop on Equivalence Determinations for Orally Inhaled Drugs for Local Action, cohosted by the International Society for Aerosols in Medicine (ISAM) and the International Pharmaceutical Consortium on Regulation and Science (IPAC-RS). The article summarizes current regulatory approaches in Europe, the United States, and Canada, and presents points of consensus as well as ongoing debate in the four major areas: in vitro testing, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies, and device similarity. Specific issues in need of further research and discussion are also identified.

  2. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-08-31

    This corrective action plan provides the closure implementation methods for the Area 3 Landfill Complex, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 424, located at the Tonopah Test Range. The Area 3 Landfill Complex consists of 8 landfill sites, each designated as a separate corrective action site.

  3. Farm succession planning workshops scheduled for Virginia and North Carolina farmers

    OpenAIRE

    Stott, Charlie

    2005-01-01

    The average age of a Virginia farmer is now 56 years old, and a large transfer of farm assets could occur over the next two decades. To address this important issue, the Virginia Cooperative Extension has scheduled two workshops on farm business succession planning during May in eastern Virginia.

  4. 78 FR 47674 - Genome in a Bottle Consortium-Progress and Planning Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Genome in a Bottle Consortium--Progress and Planning... workshop. SUMMARY: NIST announces the Genome in a Bottle Consortium meeting to be held on Thursday and Friday, August 15 and 16, 2013. The Genome in a Bottle Consortium is developing the reference...

  5. Differentiation between deviant trajectory planning, action planning, and reduced psychomotor speed in schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houthoofd, S.; Morrens, M.; Hulstijn, W.; Sabbe, B.G.C.C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Abnormal psychomotor behaviour in schizophrenia might be based on separate deficits. Here we studied the relationship between trajectory planning, action planning, psychomotor speed, and indices of cognitive functioning in a large group of stabilised patients with schizophrenia. Method

  6. Heart Truth for Women: An Action Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care provider, a registered dietitian, or a qualified nutritionist to help you develop a sensible plan for ... exercise specialists, physical and occupational therapists, dietitians or nutritionists, and psychologists or other mental health specialists. Rehab ...

  7. Yunnan Launches Four Year Mine Searching Action Plan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>The Yunnan Provincial State Land Resource Bureau has organized the provincial Geological Investigation Bureau and relevant institutions to kick off the "Yunnan Province 2009-2010 Mine Search Action Plan"

  8. Adverse Drug Event Prevention: 2014 Action Plan Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducoffe, Aaron R; Baehr, Avi; Peña, Juliet C; Rider, Briana B; Yang, Sandra; Hu, Dale J

    2016-09-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) have been highlighted as a national patient safety and public health challenge by the National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention (ADE Action Plan), which was released by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in August 2014. The following October, the ADE Prevention: 2014 Action Plan Conference provided an opportunity for federal agencies, national experts, and stakeholders to coordinate and collaborate in the initiative to reduce preventable ADEs. The single-day conference included morning plenary sessions focused on the surveillance, evidence-based prevention, incentives and oversights, and additional research needs of the drug classes highlighted in the ADE Action Plan: anticoagulants, diabetes agents, and opioids. Afternoon breakout sessions allowed for facilitated discussions on measures for tracking national progress in ADE prevention and the identification of opportunities to ensure safe and high-quality health care and medication use.

  9. Learning through Participatory Action Research for Community Ecotourism Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, Jose Roberto Q.

    1996-01-01

    Ecologically sound tourism planning and policy require an empowering community participation. The participatory action research model helps a community gain understanding of its social reality, learn how to learn, initiate dialog, and discover new possibilities for addressing its situation. (SK)

  10. Sport Fishing Plan : Meredosia National Wildlife Refuge : Environmental Action Memorandum

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Environmental Action Memorandum states that the Meredosia NWR Sport Fishing Plan is found not to have significant environmental effects.

  11. The Norwegian Plan of Action for nuclear safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Plan of Action underlies Norwegian activities in the field of international co-operation to enhance nuclear safety and prevent radioactive contamination from activities in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Geographically the highest priority has been given to support for safety measures in north-west Russia. This information brochure outlines the main content of the Plan of Action for nuclear safety issues and lists a number of associated measures and projects

  12. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project surface project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Project Management Plan describes the planning, systems, and organization that shall be used to manage the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). US DOE is authorized to stabilize and control surface tailings and ground water contamination at 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials

  13. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior as a Framework for the Evaluation of a Professional Development Workshop

    OpenAIRE

    PATTERSON, ROBIN R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a theoretical framework based on several decades of attitudinal research to assess the intentions of Microbial Discovery Workshop participants to incorporate the inquiry activities presented at the workshop into their curricula, to evaluate the participants actual use of these activities after the workshop, and to uncover the barriers and enablers the participants faced in doing so. As a framework, the theory of planned behavior was ascertained to be an ap...

  14. Action Planning: Rowing in the Same Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Kurtis; Adrian, Lorna

    2008-01-01

    Two years ago, as Claresholm Elementary School prepared for a new year with a new principal, it had the usual shopping list of ambitions--focus on student learning, support the staff, empower parents, and more. However, in examining the school's improvement plan it became apparent that the school staff had a unique opportunity to develop solid…

  15. Action planning in young children's tool use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, R.F.A.; Smitsman, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    Tool use consists of at least two coupled phases of activities, involving multi-step problem solving. It therefore provides an interesting window on the development of planning in goal-directed behavior. This study investigated 2-year-olds’ and 3-year-olds’ hand use in picking up and subsequently us

  16. Scenario planning during rapid ecological change: lessons and perspectives from workshops with southwest Yukon wildlife managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan M. Beach

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Scenario planning has been increasingly advocated as a strategic planning tool for enabling natural resource managers to make decisions in the face of uncertainty and rapid change. However, few examples exist that discuss the technique's application in that field. We used a scenario planning approach to develop wildlife management goals and evaluated participants' perceptions of scenario planning as a goal development tool. Study participants emphasized the context-specificity of management goals, and that "no-regrets" management strategies might not be constructive. We found that scenario planning can help resource managers identify needs that have been overlooked but may become important in the future. Scenarios can likely be used to develop management goals for other resources within the same system. Scenario planning provides a way to apply traditional ecological knowledge and local knowledge in a planning process in a respectful manner. Further process-oriented findings may be helpful to practitioners or researchers considering this approach: workshops should to be temporally close together for participants to retain context during the process, and ensuring continuity of workshop participants is important. Study participants judged scenario planning to be an effective tool to stimulate group-thought on longer time scales, facilitate adaptive learning, and enhance institutional linkages. Ultimately such outcomes can help groups comprising diverse participants to develop shared mental models of the future and identify pathways to achieve them.

  17. Strategic planning and action on climate change: A guide for Canadian mining companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Guide has been developed by the Pembina Institute for Appropriate Development of Drayton Valley, Alberta and Stratos Inc., of Ottawa, as a project for the Mining Association of Canada, in an effort to assist senior executives in the Canadian mining industry in developing corporate strategic responses to the risks and opportunities associated with climate change and sustainable development. Section One of the Guide provides an introduction to the scientific, political and legal issues involved in climate change. Section Two outlines the implications of this issue for Canadian mining companies. Section Three and Four provide senior managers with a strategic framework to help understand the scope of a comprehensive response and assist them in developing and integrating climate change policies into their overall corporate strategy and business plan. Section Five outlines the major components of a generic climate change strategy and action plan, while Section Six looks at specific technical opportunity areas where mining companies can reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Section Seven focuses on business opportunities related to greenhouse gas emission reductions that can be implemented domestically or internationally outside of Canadian mining operations. Section Eight concludes the Guide with a comprehensive list of references and additional sources of information to assist users in follow-up and implementation. The accompanying companion handbook, entitled 'Guide to inventorying, measuring and reporting on climate change actions for MAC member companies' is designed to be used by energy managers and technical support staff who are responsible for implementing greenhouse gas measurement reporting systems. In addition to the Guide, the Mining Association and the Pembina Institute also developed three versions of a climate change strategy workshop designed for mining company personnel at different levels and different responsibilities. These workshops can also be

  18. Report on the planning workshop on cost-effective ceramic machining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, P.J.

    1991-11-01

    A workshop on Cost Effective Ceramic Machining'' (CECM) was held at Oak Ridge Associated Universities Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, May 1991. The purpose of this workshop was to present a preliminary project plan for industry critique and to identify specific components and cost-reduction targets for a new project on Cost Effective Ceramic Machining. The CECM project is an extension of the work on the Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines (CTAHE) Program sponsored by the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Materials. The workshop consisted of fifteen invited papers, discussions, a survey of the attendee's opinions, and a tour of the High Temperature Materials Laboratory at ORNL. The total number of registrants was sixty-seven, including thirty-three from industry or private sector organizations, seven from universities, three from industry groups, fourteen from DOE laboratories (including ORNL, Y-12, and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory), three from trade associations, and three from other government organizations. Forty- one survey forms, which critiqued the proposed project plan, were completed by attendees, and the results are presented in this report. Valves, cam roller followers, water pump seals, and diesel engine head plates were rated highest fro application of ceramic machining concepts to reduce cost. Coarse grinding, abrasives and wheel technology, and fine grinding were most highly rated as regards their impact on cost reduction. Specific cost-reduction targets for given parts varied greatly in the survey results and were not felt to be useful for the purposes for the CECM plan development. A range of individual comments were obtained and are listed in an appendix. As a result of the workshop and subsequent discussions, a modified project plan, different in certain aspects from the original CECM plan, has been developed.

  19. Report on the planning workshop on cost-effective ceramic machining. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, P.J.

    1991-11-01

    A workshop on ``Cost Effective Ceramic Machining`` (CECM) was held at Oak Ridge Associated Universities Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, May 1991. The purpose of this workshop was to present a preliminary project plan for industry critique and to identify specific components and cost-reduction targets for a new project on Cost Effective Ceramic Machining. The CECM project is an extension of the work on the Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines (CTAHE) Program sponsored by the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Materials. The workshop consisted of fifteen invited papers, discussions, a survey of the attendee`s opinions, and a tour of the High Temperature Materials Laboratory at ORNL. The total number of registrants was sixty-seven, including thirty-three from industry or private sector organizations, seven from universities, three from industry groups, fourteen from DOE laboratories (including ORNL, Y-12, and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory), three from trade associations, and three from other government organizations. Forty- one survey forms, which critiqued the proposed project plan, were completed by attendees, and the results are presented in this report. Valves, cam roller followers, water pump seals, and diesel engine head plates were rated highest fro application of ceramic machining concepts to reduce cost. Coarse grinding, abrasives and wheel technology, and fine grinding were most highly rated as regards their impact on cost reduction. Specific cost-reduction targets for given parts varied greatly in the survey results and were not felt to be useful for the purposes for the CECM plan development. A range of individual comments were obtained and are listed in an appendix. As a result of the workshop and subsequent discussions, a modified project plan, different in certain aspects from the original CECM plan, has been developed.

  20. Energy and nuclear power planning using the IAEA's ENPEP computer package. Proceedings of a workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Regional (Europe) Technical Co-operation Project on the Study of Energy Options Using the IAEA Planning Methodologies was first implemented by the IAEA in 1995. The project aims at improving national capabilities for energy, electricity and nuclear power planning and promoting regional co-operation among participating countries in the European region. The project includes the organization of workshops, training activities at the regional and national levels, scientific visits, etc. The proceedings of a workshop held in Warsaw, Poland, from 4 to 8 September 1995 are contained herein. The workshop had as a basic objective the analysis of the specific problems encountered by the represented countries during application of the IAEA's ENPEP package in the conduct of national studies and to provide a forum for further co-operation among participating countries. A second objective of the workshop was to make proposals for future activities to be organized within the project. This publication is intended to serve as reference for the users of the IAEA's ENPEP package, as well as for energy and electricity planners in general. Refs, figs, tabs

  1. 'Action 2016': AREVA's strategic action plan; AREVA presente son Plan d'Actions Strategique 'Action 2016'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, Patricia; Briand, Pauline; Floquet-Daubigeon, Fleur; Michaut, Maxime; De Scorbiac, Marie; Du Repaire, Philippine

    2011-12-13

    On December 13, 2011, Luc Oursel, CEO, and Pierre Aubouin, Chief Financial Officer presented the group's strategic plan for the period 2012-2016. The plan has been drawn up collectively and is based on a thorough-going analysis and a realistic assessment of perspectives for all group activities and associated resources. Development of nuclear and renewable energies: the fundamentals are unchanged. In this context, the German decision remains an isolated case and the great majority of nuclear programs around the world have been confirmed. More conservative in its projections than the International Energy Agency, the group expects growth of 2.2% annually, reaching 583 GW of installed nuclear capacity by 2030, against 378 GW today. However, the Fukushima accident will lead to delays in launching new programs. 'Action 2016' plan aims to consolidate AREVA's leadership in nuclear energy and become a leading player in renewable energy. The group's strategic action plan 'Action 2016' is based on the following strategic choices: - commercial priority given to value creation, - selectivity in investments, - strengthening of the financial structure. These demand an improvement in the group's performance by 2015. This plan makes nuclear safety a strategic priority for the industrial and commercial performance of the group. This ambitious performance plan for the period 2012-2016 will give the group the wherewithal to withstand a temporary slowdown in the market resulting from the Fukushima accident and to deliver safe and sustainable growth of the business. The plan sets out the strategic direction for the group's employees for the years ahead: taking advantage of the expected growth in nuclear and renewable energies, targeted investment programs, and return to self-financing as of 2014

  2. Teaching Scenario-Based Planning for Sustainable Landscape Development: An Evaluation of Learning Effects in the Cagliari Studio Workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Albert

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the contributions of an intensive educational workshop to advance students’ understanding and skills for collaborative, scenario-based landscape planning. The research design involves a case study workshop with thirty international students and several regional experts as well as a multi-stage, in-process evaluation. The workshop resulted in six different alternative futures for the region of Cagliari, Italy, and a seventh combined version that was considered best by regional reviewers. The students’ learning evaluation showed substantial advances in their relevant understanding and skills. Key aspects of the workshop pedagogy and the evaluation are discussed, and recommendations for future applications presented.

  3. FACILITIES PLANNING WORKSHOP FOR BLASTING SUPPORT THE ACTIVITY OF DEVELOPMENT AND REPAIR SHIP IN PT. JASA MARINA INDAH UNIT II

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Samuel; Ari Wibawa Budi Santosa

    2012-01-01

    Blasting in the process of planning the workshop production of new building and ship repair to play a role in providing blasting and paint on the block that will be of erection. As a result of blasting workshop facilities that do not have resulted in low production capacity that can be achieved by this workshop, namely three block ships per month. Capacity blasting and paint shop in this low resulted in low productivity process stage (stage) the previous workshops which of course result in a ...

  4. The neural basis of predicting the outcomes of planned actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eJahn

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A key feature of human intelligence is the ability to predict the outcomes of one’s own actions prior to executing them. Action values are thought to be represented in part in the dorsal and ventral medial prefrontal cortex, yet current studies have focused on the value of executed actions rather than the anticipated value of a planned action. Thus, little is known about the neural basis of how individuals think (or fail to think about their actions and the potential consequences before they act. We scanned individuals with fMRI while they thought about performing actions that they knew would likely be correct or incorrect. Here we show that merely imagining an error, as opposed to imagining a correct outcome, increases activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, independently of subsequent actions. This activity overlaps with regions that respond to actual error commission. The findings show a distinct network that signals the prospective outcomes of one’s planned actions. A number of clinical disorders such as schizophrenia and drug abuse involve a failure to take the potential consequences of an action into account prior to acting. Our results thus suggest how dysfunctions of the medial prefrontal cortex may contribute to such failures.

  5. Assessment of Evacuation Protective Action Strategies For Emergency Preparedness Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report which studies about evacuation formation suggests some considerable factors to reduce damage of radiological accidents. Additional details would be required to study in depth and more elements should be considered for updating emergency preparedness. However, this methodology with sensitivity analysis could adapt to specific plant which has total information such as geological data, weather data and population data. In this point of view the evacuation study could be contribute to set up emergency preparedness plan and propose the direction to enhance protective action strategies. In radiological emergency, residents nearby nuclear power plant should perform protective action that is suggested by emergency preparedness plan. The objective of emergency preparedness plan is that damages, such as casualties and environmental damages, due to radioactive accident should be minimized. The recent PAR study includes a number of subjects to improve the quality of protective action strategies. For enhancing protective action strategies, researches that evaluate many factors related with emergency response scenario are essential parts to update emergency preparedness plan. Evacuation is very important response action as protective action strategy

  6. Transformation of a virtual action plan into a motor plan in the premotor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yoshihisa; Yamagata, Tomoko; Tanji, Jun; Hoshi, Eiji

    2008-10-01

    Before preparing to initiate a forthcoming motion, we often acquire information about the future action without specifying actual motor parameters. The information for planning an action at this conceptual level can be provided with verbal commands or nonverbal signals even before the associated motor targets are visible. Under these conditions, the information signifying a virtual action plan must be transformed to information that can be used for constructing a motor plan to initiate specific movements. To determine whether the premotor cortex is involved in this process, we examined neuronal activity in the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) of monkeys performing a behavioral task designed to isolate the behavioral stages of the acquisition of information for a future action and the construction of a motor plan. We trained the animals to receive a symbolic instruction (color and shape of an instruction cue) to determine whether to select the right or left of targets to reach, despite the physical absence of targets. Subsequently, two targets appeared on a screen at different locations. The animals then determined the correct target (left or right) based on the previous instruction and prepared to initiate a reaching movement to an actual target. The experimental design dissociated the selection of the right/left at an abstract level (action plan) from the physical motor plan. Here, we show that activity of individual PMd neurons initially reflects a virtual action plan transcending motor specifics, before these neurons contribute to a transformation process that leads to activity encoding a motor plan. PMID:18842888

  7. Action plan for electric mobility in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electric mobility is an important emerging industry in Canada, where there is significant expertise in electric and hybrid vehicles, batteries, hybrid technologies, grid-connected technologies and fuel cell vehicles. This paper presented a case for the formation of Electric Mobility Canada, a proposed network of private companies and public sector agencies that aims to stimulate industry and provide support to government agencies involved with meeting Canada's obligations under the Kyoto Protocol, as well as in new industry sectors. The environmental, health, economic and industrial benefits of electric mobility were outlined. Current programs for electric mobility were reviewed, and details of financial incentives and initiatives were presented. An overview of electric mobility programs in the United States and Europe was provided. Research and development needs were evaluated. The former Electric Vehicle Association of Canada was discussed. An organizational structure for the proposed network was presented, along with a mission statement and outline of future goals. Recommendations for the future of the network included identifying short and long-term market opportunities for electric mobility technologies for all surface transport modes in Canada; determining research and development needs and appropriate funding and investment opportunities; determining other actions necessary to allow the electric mobility industry to play a growing role in meeting Canada's transport needs; and raising public awareness of the importance of electric mobility trends. It was concluded that the federal government should be approached for start-up funds for the network, which will be followed by further investment from provincial and business interests once the network is in place and functioning. 84 refs

  8. 77 FR 71399 - Notice of Public Workshop: Blueprint for Action: Workshop on the Design of the National Network...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ... the Design of the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI) AGENCY: National Institute of... on the Design of the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI).'' This workshop series provides a forum for the AMNPO to present the proposed design of the National Network for...

  9. Preparing US community greenhouse gas inventories for climate action plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackhurst, Michael [Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1752, Austin, TX 78712-0276 (United States); Scott Matthews, H; Hendrickson, Chris T [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 119 Porter Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Sharrard, Aurora L [Green Building Alliance, 333 East Carson Street, Suite 331, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (United States); Azevedo, Ines Lima, E-mail: mblackhurst@gmail.com, E-mail: hsm@cmu.edu, E-mail: auroras@gbapgh.org, E-mail: cth@andrew.cmu.edu, E-mail: iazevedo@cmu.edu [Department of Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University, 119 Porter Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    This study illustrates how alternative and supplemental community-level greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory techniques could improve climate action planning. Eighteen US community GHG inventories are reviewed for current practice. Inventory techniques could be improved by disaggregating the sectors reported, reporting inventory uncertainty and variability, and aligning inventories with local organizations that could facilitate emissions reductions. The potential advantages and challenges of supplementing inventories with comparative benchmarks are also discussed. While GHG inventorying and climate action planning are nascent fields, these techniques can improve CAP design, help communities set more meaningful emission reduction targets, and facilitate CAP implementation and progress monitoring.

  10. Preparing US community greenhouse gas inventories for climate action plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study illustrates how alternative and supplemental community-level greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory techniques could improve climate action planning. Eighteen US community GHG inventories are reviewed for current practice. Inventory techniques could be improved by disaggregating the sectors reported, reporting inventory uncertainty and variability, and aligning inventories with local organizations that could facilitate emissions reductions. The potential advantages and challenges of supplementing inventories with comparative benchmarks are also discussed. While GHG inventorying and climate action planning are nascent fields, these techniques can improve CAP design, help communities set more meaningful emission reduction targets, and facilitate CAP implementation and progress monitoring.

  11. Predicting Changes in Physical Activity among Adolescents: The Role of Self-Efficacy, Intention, Action Planning and Coping Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo-Soares, Vera; McIntyre, Teresa; Sniehotta, Falko F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to test the direct predictors of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), action planning and coping planning as predictors of changes in physical activity (PA) in 157 adolescents (mean age: 12). TPB measures, the Action Planning and Coping Planning Scales (APCPS) and the International Physical Activity Questionnaires were measured…

  12. Action plans for motor-operated valves and check valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proper performance of motor-operated valves (MOVs) and check valves is necessary for the safety operation of a nuclear power plant. Problems have been experienced, however, with these valves for many years. Currently, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the nuclear industry have a number of activities under way to provide assurance that MOVs and check valves will successfully perform their safety functions when needed. The Mechanical Engineering Branch (EMEB) of the NRC Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation has been assigned the responsibility of coordinating NRC activities and monitoring industry activities regarding MOVs and check valves. To meet this responsibility, EMEB has prepared action plans to provide assurance of the proper performance of these valves. Among the staff activities described in the action plans is the consideration of the need to revise the regulations to clarify the inservice testing (IST) requirements for these valves. The need for regulatory guidance for the development of acceptable IST programs, as well as for other licensee activities relating to the performance of MOVs and check valves, will also be evaluated. In addition, NRC personnel will have to verify, in a consistent manner, implementation of licensee commitments in response to NRC generic letters and bulletins. Another important aspect of the action plans is the provision for the NRC staff to provide assistance, where appropriate, to the industry in its efforts to address MOV and check valve issues. Finally, the action plans include a tentative schedule for accomplishing the described staff activities

  13. Awarding Educational Credit for CETA Training: A Plan of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullins, W. Robert; And Others

    A project was conducted to determine problems or barriers prohibiting awarding credit for Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) training in Virginia. Potential solutions and strategies for their implementation were to be identified. A variety of methods were used to obtain information required to produce a Plan of Action that presents…

  14. Algeria : National Environmental Action Plan for Sustainable Development

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2002-01-01

    This staff sector assessment note accompanies the recently completed national environmental action plan for sustainable development (NEAP-SD), which, as an output of the Industrial Pollution Control Project in Algeria, focused on charting a new course for environmental management in the country, based on an objective assessment of past policy, and institutional failures, on a new consensus...

  15. Projects of Strategic Action Plan of S&T Innovation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ In July 2001, CAS decided to shift the focus of the current Knowledge Innovation Program (KIP) onto research projects designed to meet the country's strategic needs, and Iaunched the strategic action plan of innovation (SAPI). Under the SAPI, CAS organized the implementation of seven major projects in 2001.The followings are their profiles.

  16. A national action plan for workforce development in behavioral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, Michael A; Morris, John A; Stuart, Gail W; Huey, Leighton Y; Bergeson, Sue; Flaherty, Michael T; Morgan, Oscar; Peterson, Janice; Daniels, Allen S; Paris, Manuel; Madenwald, Kappy

    2009-07-01

    Across all sectors of the behavioral health field there has been growing concern about a workforce crisis. Difficulties encompass the recruitment and retention of staff and the delivery of accessible and effective training in both initial, preservice training and continuing education settings. Concern about the crisis led to a multiphased, cross-sector collaboration known as the Annapolis Coalition on the Behavioral Health Workforce. With support from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, this public-private partnership crafted An Action Plan for Behavioral Health Workforce Development. Created with input from a dozen expert panels, the action plan outlines seven core strategic goals that are relevant to all sectors of the behavioral health field: expand the role of consumers and their families in the workforce, expand the role of communities in promoting behavioral health and wellness, use systematic recruitment and retention strategies, improve training and education, foster leadership development, enhance infrastructure to support workforce development, and implement a national research and evaluation agenda. Detailed implementation tables identify the action steps for diverse groups and organizations to take in order to achieve these goals. The action plan serves as a call to action and is being used to guide workforce initiatives across the nation.

  17. Evaluation criteria for communications-related corrective action plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    This document provides guidance and criteria for US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel to use in evaluating corrective action plans for nuclear power plant communications. The document begins by describing the purpose, scope, and applicability of the evaluation criteria. Next, it presents background information concerning the communication process, root causes of communication errors, and development and implementation of corrective actions. The document then defines specific criteria for evaluating the effectiveness of the corrective action plan, interview protocols, and an observation protocol related to communication processes. This document is intended only as guidance. It is not intended to have the effect of a regulation, and it does not establish any binding requirements or interpretations of NRC regulations.

  18. Evaluation criteria for communications-related corrective action plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides guidance and criteria for US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel to use in evaluating corrective action plans for nuclear power plant communications. The document begins by describing the purpose, scope, and applicability of the evaluation criteria. Next, it presents background information concerning the communication process, root causes of communication errors, and development and implementation of corrective actions. The document then defines specific criteria for evaluating the effectiveness of the corrective action plan, interview protocols, and an observation protocol related to communication processes. This document is intended only as guidance. It is not intended to have the effect of a regulation, and it does not establish any binding requirements or interpretations of NRC regulations

  19. Renewable energy action plan. Policy action plan for promotion of renewable energy in the Czech Republic to 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy efficiency and renewable energy production contribute to the three major goals of the national energy policy of the Czech Republic: overall competitiveness, security of supply; and environmental protection. Therefore, the Czech government promotes these two sustainable options. The Energy Policy White Paper, which is being developed at the time of writing (June 1999), will provide the general framework for the future role of energy efficiency and renewable energy in the Czech Republic. However, in addition, it is necessary to develop specific policies. The National Energy Efficiency Study aimed to support the Czech government in the formula tion of energy efficiency and renewable energy policy. The National Energy Efficiency Study has resulted in the following documents: (1) The Renewable Energy Action Plan (this report) addresses renewable energy production. The Energy Efficiency Action Plan focuses on the promotion of energy efficiency in end use (separate report; ECN-C--99-065). These two Action Plans provide policy makers in the Czech government with information on potentials, targets, budgets and recommended policy instruments. The core of the Action Plans is the list of concrete policy actions, ready for implementation; (2) The National Energy Efficiency Study NEES (separate report; ECN-C--99-063). This report is the background document to the two Action Plans. It contains detailed information on options and measures, potentials, barriers and policy instruments for energy efficiency and renewables. The main part is a detailed outline for a new energy efficiency and renewable policy. Also, it includes recommendations for financing schemes to overcome the invest ment constraints in the Czech Republic. Finally, a list of concrete projects is included to support project identification

  20. Energy efficiency action plan. Policy action plan for promotion of energy efficiency in the Czech Republic to 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy efficiency and renewable energy production contribute to the three major goals of the national energy policy of the Czech Republic: overall competitiveness, security of supply and environmental protection. Therefore, the Czech government aims to promote these two sustainable options. The Energy Policy White Paper, which is being developed at the time of writing (June 1999), will provide the general framework for the future role of energy efficiency and renewable energy in the Czech Republic. In addition, it is necessary to develop specific policies. The National Energy Efficiency Study aimed to support the Czech government in the formulation of energy efficiency and renewable energy policy. The National Energy Efficiency Study has resulted in the following documents: (1) The Energy Efficiency Action Plan focuses on promotion of energy efficiency in end-use (this report); The Renewable Energy Action Plan (separate report; ECN-C--99-064) deals with policy on promotion of renewable energy production. These two Action Plans provide policy makers in the Czech government with essential information on potentials, targets, budgets and recommended policy instruments. The core of the Action Plans is the list of concrete policy actions, ready for implementation; and (2) The National Energy Efficiency Study NEES (separate report; ECN-C--99-063). This report is the background document to the two Action Plans. It contains detailed information on options and measures, potentials, barriers and policy instruments for energy efficiency and renewables. The main part is a detailed outline for a new energy efficiency and renewable policy. Also, it includes recommendations for financing schemes to overcome the investment constraints in the Czech Republic. Finally, a list of concrete projects is included to support project identification

  1. Corrective action investigation plan: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Correction Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains environmental sample collection objectives and logic for the CAU No. 426, which includes the Cactus Spring Waste Trenches, CAS No. RG-08-001-RG-CS. The Cactus Spring Waste Trenches are located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) which is part of the Nellis Air Force Range, approximately 255 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air. The purpose of this investigation is to generate sufficient data to establish the types of waste buried in the trenches, identify the presence and nature of contamination, determine the vertical extent of contaminant migration below the Cactus Spring Waste Trenches, and determine the appropriate course of action for the site. The potential courses of action for the site are clean closure, closure in place (with or without remediation), or no further action

  2. Experiences in methods to involve key players in planning protective actions in a case of nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Openness, transparency and key players participation are all important for balanced decision making in public issues. The emergency exercises involve commonly representatives from various sectors of the society to increase competence and build links for communication and coordination. A different approach has been a set of meetings where the key players aimed to plan comprehensive set of generic protective actions. The approach of this work was to develop methods and techniques to evaluate systematically and comprehensively protective action strategies. This was done in a way that all key players' concerns and issues related to decisions on protective actions could be aggregated openly and equally. We have developed and tested an approach called facilitated workshop based an theory of decision analysis. The work builds on case studies in which it was assumed that a hypothetical accident at a nuclear power plant had led to a release of considerable amounts of radionuclides and therefore various types of protective actions should be considered. Altogether six workshops were organized where all key players were represented, i.e., authorities, expert organizations, industry and producers. The participants were those who are responsible for preparing advice or making presentations of matters to those responsible for formal decision-making. Many preparatory meetings were held with various experts. It was seen essential that the setup followed strictly the decision-making process the participants are accustomed with. The realistic nature and the disciplined process of a facilitated workshop, and committed to decision-making yielded insight on what information should be collected or studied. Information should be in the proper form needed in decision-making. For example, the study revealed the need to further develop methods to assess the radiological and cost implications of different countermeasures realistically. In order to provide consequence assessments

  3. Action Planning Mediates Guidance of Visual Attention from Working Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Feldmann-Wüstefeld

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Visual search is impaired when a salient task-irrelevant stimulus is presented together with the target. Recent research has shown that this attentional capture effect is enhanced when the salient stimulus matches working memory (WM content, arguing in favor of attention guidance from WM. Visual attention was also shown to be closely coupled with action planning. Preparing a movement renders action-relevant perceptual dimensions more salient and thus increases search efficiency for stimuli sharing that dimension. The present study aimed at revealing common underlying mechanisms for selective attention, WM, and action planning. Participants both prepared a specific movement (grasping or pointing and memorized a color hue. Before the movement was executed towards an object of the memorized color, a visual search task (additional singleton was performed. Results showed that distraction from target was more pronounced when the additional singleton had a memorized color. This WM-guided attention deployment was more pronounced when participants prepared a grasping movement. We argue that preparing a grasping movement mediates attention guidance from WM content by enhancing representations of memory content that matches the distractor shape (i.e., circles, thus encouraging attentional capture by circle distractors of the memorized color. We conclude that templates for visual search, action planning, and WM compete for resources and thus cause interferences.

  4. Action Planning Mediates Guidance of Visual Attention from Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann-Wüstefeld, Tobias; Schubö, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Visual search is impaired when a salient task-irrelevant stimulus is presented together with the target. Recent research has shown that this attentional capture effect is enhanced when the salient stimulus matches working memory (WM) content, arguing in favor of attention guidance from WM. Visual attention was also shown to be closely coupled with action planning. Preparing a movement renders action-relevant perceptual dimensions more salient and thus increases search efficiency for stimuli sharing that dimension. The present study aimed at revealing common underlying mechanisms for selective attention, WM, and action planning. Participants both prepared a specific movement (grasping or pointing) and memorized a color hue. Before the movement was executed towards an object of the memorized color, a visual search task (additional singleton) was performed. Results showed that distraction from target was more pronounced when the additional singleton had a memorized color. This WM-guided attention deployment was more pronounced when participants prepared a grasping movement. We argue that preparing a grasping movement mediates attention guidance from WM content by enhancing representations of memory content that matches the distractor shape (i.e., circles), thus encouraging attentional capture by circle distractors of the memorized color. We conclude that templates for visual search, action planning, and WM compete for resources and thus cause interferences. PMID:26171241

  5. Affirmative Action Plans, January 1, 1994--December 31, 1994. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-16

    This document is the Affirmative Action Plan for January 1, 1994 through December 31, 1994 for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California (``LBL`` or ``the Laboratory.``) This is an official document that will be presented upon request to the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, US Department of Labor. The plan is prepared in accordance with the Executive Order 11246 and 41 CFR Section 60-1 et seq. covering equal employment opportunity and will be updated during the year, if appropriate. Analyses included in this volume as required by government regulations are based on statistical comparisons. All statistical comparisons involve the use of geographic areas and various sources of statistics. The geographic areas and sources of statistics used here are in compliance with the government regulations, as interpreted. The use of any geographic area or statistic does not indicate agreement that the geographic area is the most appropriate or that the statistic is the most relevant. The use of such geographic areas and statistics is intended to have no significance outside the context of this Affirmative Action Plan, although, of course, such statistics and geographic areas will be used in good faith with respect to this Affirmative Action Plan.

  6. Integrated mined area reclamation and land use planning: the Fulton County case: a workshop synopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, J.; Guernsey, L.; Toner, W.; Imhoff, E.; LaFevers, J.

    1978-02-01

    The RALI/DOE workshop on the subject of Integrated Mined-Area Reclamation and Land-Use Planning demonstrated benefits derived from a close working arrangement between the planning community of the coal mining industry. Both of these parties, along with environmental groups, state and federal agencies, and other special interest groups, were exposed to the types of information available to each other, to some of the problems involved in the solution of mutual difficulties, and to some of the inherent limitations of their individual fields. The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA) was introduced to the working sessions, and some of its provisions were tested in an exercise designed to represent a real-life situation. The most representative comment made about the new statute was in regard to the vast quantity of data that must be collected and analyzed in order to cope with the decision making mandated by the new Act. While SMRCA was generally held to increase the power of local decision makers in evaluating some mining and reclamation elements, and in determining standards in some areas would compromise the planners' ability to develop the best mixture of activities for their jurisdictions. The workshop used a modeling approach which simulated a real situation in land-use planning and mined-area reclamation. The participants were asked to make land-use plans while constantly faced, as had been the case in the real-life planning situation in this area, with changes in statutes, interests, and mining plans.

  7. 7 CFR 275.18 - Project area/management unit corrective action plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Project area/management unit corrective action plan... SYSTEM Corrective Action § 275.18 Project area/management unit corrective action plan. (a) The State agency shall ensure that corrective action plans are prepared at the project area/management unit...

  8. Implementing Environmental Policies in EU – Action Plans and Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Patricia ARDELEANU

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of the EU environmental policy are environmental and public health protection, prudent and rational use of natural resources, and promoting international actions to solve the regional and global environmental problems. The EU policies implementation is performed by using specific tools as legislation, - notably Directives setting environmental quality standards (levels of pollution, rules for industrial procedures (emission standards, design and operational standards, products standards (concentration or emission limits for a product - environmental protectionaction plans, and financial aid programs. This paper reviews some of the most important policies and actions promoted at European level in order to protect the environment and ensuring sustainable development.

  9. Transcript of the workshop to discuss plans for a National High Intensity Radioactive Nuclear Beam Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the ''First International Conference on Radioactive Nuclear Beams'' in Berkeley, a workshop was held on October 19, 1989 at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to discuss plans for a National High Intensity Radioactive Nuclear Beam (RNB) Facility. The purpose of the workshop was -- after having discussed during the conference the physics question that can be addressed with RNBs -- to evaluate more concretely the possibilities for actually constructing such a facility in this country. It is becoming increasingly apparent that facility producing beams of radioactive nuclei with extreme neutron-to-proton ratios is of high scientific interest and technically feasible. It would allow the study of nuclear structure and astrophysical reactions very far from the line of stable nuclei, and could provide new possibilities of reaching the long-sought island of stability of superheavy nuclei. Such facilities are under advanced consideration in Japan and at CERN in Europe. This paper contains a slightly edited transcript of the tape recording that was made of the workshop

  10. Transcript of the workshop to discuss plans for a National High Intensity Radioactive Nuclear Beam Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitschke, J.M. (ed.)

    1989-10-19

    Following the First International Conference on Radioactive Nuclear Beams'' in Berkeley, a workshop was held on October 19, 1989 at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to discuss plans for a National High Intensity Radioactive Nuclear Beam (RNB) Facility. The purpose of the workshop was -- after having discussed during the conference the physics question that can be addressed with RNBs -- to evaluate more concretely the possibilities for actually constructing such a facility in this country. It is becoming increasingly apparent that facility producing beams of radioactive nuclei with extreme neutron-to-proton ratios is of high scientific interest and technically feasible. It would allow the study of nuclear structure and astrophysical reactions very far from the line of stable nuclei, and could provide new possibilities of reaching the long-sought island of stability of superheavy nuclei. Such facilities are under advanced consideration in Japan and at CERN in Europe. This paper contains a slightly edited transcript of the tape recording that was made of the workshop.

  11. Belfast Active Travel Action Plan 2014-2020

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2014-01-01

    The Belfast Strategic Partnership, which is led by the Public Health Agency, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust and Belfast City Council, is launching the�Belfast Active Travel Action Plan 2014-2020 which aims to build a healthier city by encouraging people to incorporate walking and/or cycling into their daily travel.The travel plan aims to try to make Belfast a more vibrant city where people are healthy, fit, well-connected with one another, and use physical activity as part of their ever...

  12. China Attains Targets in National Human Rights Action Plan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Chen

    2011-01-01

    In April 2009,after receiving approval from the State Council,the Information Office of the State Counc pub shed the National Human Rights Action Plan of China (2009-2010).It is China's first national plan on the theme of human rights,and serves as a policy document of the current stage for advancing China's human fights in a comprehensive way.It is an important move to implement the constitutional principle of respecting and safeguarding human rights,and to promote sustainable development and social harmony.It is also a solemn commitment to the world made by the Chinese government on human rights.

  13. Clarification of TMI action plan requirements. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document, NUREG-0737, is a letter from D.G. Eisenhut, Director of the Division of Licensing, NRR, to licensees of operating power reactors and applicants for operating licenses forwarding post-TMI requirements which have been approved for implementation. Following the accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2, the NRC staff developed the Action Plan, NUREG-0660, to provide a comprehensive and integrated plan to improve safety at power reactors. Specific items from NUREG-0660 have been approved by the Commission for implementation at reactors. In this NRC report, these specific items comprise a single document which includes additional information about schedules, applicability, method of implementation review, submittal dates, and clarification of technical positions. It should be noted that the total set of TMI-related actions have been collected in NUREG-0660, but only those items that the Commission has approved for implementation to date are included in this document, NUREG-0737

  14. Sustainable ICT: Action Planning for the New Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Upton, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    The global economy is showing promising signs of recovery, and the 16th Conference of the Parties (COP 16) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, in Cancun, Mexico at the end of 2010, concluded with an approach to addressing climate change that is based on national action plans and reporting of progress against national targets. In the current economic environment, both sustainability and IT will play pivotal roles in any recovery. When these two powerful components come togethe...

  15. Uranium mill tailings remedial action project real estate management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This plan summarizes the real estate requirements of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Action (UMTRA) Project, identifies the roles and responsibilities of project participants involved in real estate activities, and describes the approaches used for completing these requirements. This document is intended to serve as a practical guide for all project participants. It is intended to be consistent with all formal agreements, but if a conflict is identified, the formal agreements will take precedence

  16. Creating community action plans for obesity prevention using the ANGELO (Analysis Grid for Elements Linked to Obesity) Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmons, A; Mavoa, H M; Bell, A C;

    2009-01-01

    Community-based interventions are an important component of obesity prevention efforts. The literature provides little guidance on priority-setting for obesity prevention in communities, especially for socially and culturally diverse populations. This paper reports on the process of developing...... prioritized, community-participatory action plans for obesity prevention projects in children and adolescents using the ANGELO (Analysis Grid for Elements Linked to Obesity) Framework. We combined stakeholder engagement processes, the ANGELO Framework (scans for environmental barriers, targeted behaviours......, gaps in skills and knowledge) and workshops with key stakeholders to create action plans for six diverse obesity prevention projects in Australia (n = 3), New Zealand, Fiji and Tonga from 2002 to 2005. Some sites included sociocultural contextual analyses in the environmental scans. Target groups were...

  17. Motivations for self-regulation: The clean air action plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the fall of 2006 the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles announced the Clean Air Action Plan (CAAP). Its intent was to greatly accelerate emissions reductions from port activities. The CAAP was unprecedented in several ways: it was a voluntary agreement between two competing ports; it was achieved with the cooperation of local, state and federal agencies; it promised large particulate emissions reductions along with continued port growth, and it had a price tag of $2.1 billion. What explains the Ports’ decision to implement the CAAP? We conduct a case study to explore alternative explanations for the CAAP. Using data from interviews, media, and the history of events leading up to the CAAP, we find that the CAAP was a strategic response to social and political pressures that had built up over the previous decade. Its intent was to respond to local concerns and reduce opposition to port growth. The CAAP represents an example of the potential of voluntary efforts to solve environmental problems. - Highlights: • We conduct a case study of self-regulation for emissions reduction at seaports in Southern California. • We examine motivations for implementing the Clean Air Action Plan. • We find that social and political pressures were the main motivators, with regulatory threats a contributing factor. • The Clean Air Action Plan is a powerful example of the potential of voluntary strategies

  18. Information architecture: Standards adoption and retirement process service action plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this Service Action Plan is to announce, as well as provide, a high-level outline of a new Departmental process for the adoption and retirement of information technology standards. This process supports the implementation of a Department of Energy (DOE) Information Architecture. This plan was prepared with the Department of Energy information technology standards customers and stakeholders in mind. The process described in this plan will be serviced primarily by staff from the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Information Management with assistance from designated program and site Information Technology Standards Points of Contact. We welcome any comments regarding this new Departmental process and encourage the proposal of information technology standards for adoption or retirement.

  19. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 551: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 551, Area 12 muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the 'Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 551 is located in Area 12 of the NTS, which is approximately 110 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Area 12 is approximately 40 miles beyond the main gate to the NTS. Corrective Action Unit 551 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) 12-01-09, Aboveground Storage Tank and Stain; (2) 12-06-05, Muckpile; (3) 12-06-07, Muckpile; and (4) 12-06-08, Muckpile. Corrective Action Site 12-01-09 is located in Area 12 and consists of an above ground storage tank (AST) and associated stain. Corrective Action Site 12-06-05 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. Corrective Action Site 12-06-07 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. Corrective Action Site 12-06-08 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. In keeping with common convention, the U12B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels will be referred to as the B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and sampling of media, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions

  20. Nordic workshop on action related to short-lived climate forcers. Organised by the Nordic Council of Ministers Climate and Air Quality Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skotte Moeller, H. (ed.)

    2013-02-15

    Nordic Ministers of Environment adopted in March 2012 the ''Svalbard Declaration'' with decisions to reduce the negative impacts of the climate changes and air pollution caused by the emission of the so-called Short-lived Climate Forcers (SLCFs) such as black carbon (soot) and methane. Along with CO{sub 2}, they are the main reasons why the ice in the Arctic now is melting rapidly. At a workshop organised by the Nordic Group on Climate and Air Quality in June 2012 researchers and policy-makers discussed the recent scientific findings, the national experiences with emission inventories, identification of cost-effective measures to cut emissions and the drawing up of national action plans as well as the development in the field of international co-operation on SLCFs. The report presents policy recommendations, conclusions and recommendations on scientific research and monitoring. (Author)

  1. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Campbell

    2000-04-01

    This Corrective Action Plan provides methods for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as provided in the Corrective Action Decision Document for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 (DOE/NV, 1999). The CNTA is located in the Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, approximately 137 kilometers (85 miles) northeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CNTA consists of three separate land withdrawal areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4, all of which are accessible to the public. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs). Results of the investigation activities completed in 1998 are presented in Appendix D of the Corrective Action Decision Document (DOE/NV, 1999). According to the results, the only Constituent of Concern at the CNTA is total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Of the 34 CASs, corrective action was proposed for 16 sites in 13 CASs. In fiscal year 1999, a Phase I Work Plan was prepared for the construction of a cover on the UC-4 Mud Pit C to gather information on cover constructibility and to perform site management activities. With Nevada Division of Environmental Protection concurrence, the Phase I field activities began in August 1999. A multi-layered cover using a Geosynthetic Clay Liner as an infiltration barrier was constructed over the UC-4 Mud Pit. Some TPH impacted material was relocated, concrete monuments were installed at nine sites, signs warning of site conditions were posted at seven sites, and subsidence markers were installed on the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover. Results from the field activities indicated that the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover design was constructable and could be used at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP). However, because of the size of the UC-1 CMP this design would be extremely costly. An alternative cover design, a vegetated cover, is proposed for the UC-1 CMP.

  2. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-07-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139, Waste Disposal Sites, is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). CAU 139 consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 139 consists of the following CASs: CAS 03-35-01, Burn Pit; CAS 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; CAS 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; CAS 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; CAS 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; CAS 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and CAS 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. Details of the site history and site characterization results for CAU 139 are provided in the approved Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2006) and in the approved Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to present the detailed scope of work required to implement the recommended corrective actions as specified in Section 4.0 of the approved CADD (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The approved closure activities for CAU 139 include removal of soil and debris contaminated with plutonium (Pu)-239, excavation of geophysical anomalies, removal of surface debris, construction of an engineered soil cover, and implementation of use restrictions (URs). Table 1 presents a summary of CAS-specific closure activities and contaminants of concern (COCs). Specific details of the corrective actions to be performed at each CAS are presented in Section 2.0 of this report.

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 137: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 137: Waste Disposal Sites. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 137 contains sites that are located in Areas 1, 3, 7, 9, and 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 137 is comprised of the eight corrective action sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) CAS 01-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; (2) CAS 03-23-01, Waste Disposal Site; (3) CAS 03-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (4) CAS 03-99-15, Waste Disposal Site; (5) CAS 07-23-02, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (6) CAS 09-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (7) CAS 12-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; and (8) CAS 12-23-07, Waste Disposal Site. The Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, geophysical surveys, sampling of environmental media, analysis of samples, and assessment of investigation results, where appropriate. Data will be obtained to support corrective action alternative evaluations and waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 137 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before evaluating and selecting corrective action

  4. Planning perception and action for cognitive mobile manipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaschler, Andre; Nogina, Svetlana; Petrick, Ronald P. A.; Knoll, Alois

    2013-12-01

    We present a general approach to perception and manipulation planning for cognitive mobile manipulators. Rather than hard-coding single purpose robot applications, a robot should be able to reason about its basic skills in order to solve complex problems autonomously. Humans intuitively solve tasks in real-world scenarios by breaking down abstract problems into smaller sub-tasks and use heuristics based on their previous experience. We apply a similar idea for planning perception and manipulation to cognitive mobile robots. Our approach is based on contingent planning and run-time sensing, integrated in our knowledge of volumes" planning framework, called KVP. Using the general-purpose PKS planner, we model information-gathering actions at plan time that have multiple possible outcomes at run time. As a result, perception and sensing arise as necessary preconditions for manipulation, rather than being hard-coded as tasks themselves. We demonstrate the e ectiveness of our approach on two scenarios covering visual and force sensing on a real mobile manipulator.

  5. Proceedings of a Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Workshop for the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinson, Lyman; Hirsch, Derrick; Helweg, David; Dhanju, Amardeep; Barmenski, Joan; Ferrero, Richard

    2011-01-01

    and Enforcement (BOEMRE) uses spatial planning exercises in State Renewable Energy Task Force meetings to identify competing and conflicting ocean uses, and to delineate areas suitable for renewable energy development. Similarly terrestrial areas such as in national parks and national wildlife refuges managed by the Department of the Interior (DOI) prepare management plans for preservation and restoration of species and habitats of concern, some of which are protected by law. The analogy to CMSP is clear - multiple users and multiple expectations, resulting in the requirement to establish spatial plans for management of different resources and different ecosystem services. A two-day workshop on December 1-2, 2010, was convened for DOI representatives and several key non-DOI participants with roles in CMSP as a step toward clarifying national perspectives and consequences of the National Ocean Policy for the West (appendix 1). Discussions helped to develop an understanding of CMSP from the federal perspective and to identify regional priorities. An overarching theme was to promote a better understanding of current and future science needs. The workshop format included briefings by key Federal agencies on their understanding of the national focus followed by discussion of regional issues, including the needs for scientific information and coordination. The workshop also explored potential science contributions by Federal agencies and others; utilizing current capabilities, data, and information systems; and provided a foundation for possible future regional workshops focusing in turn on the West Coast Region (California, Oregon, and Washington), Pacific Islands (sometimes referred to as Oceania) and Alaska. Participants were asked to share information in the following areas, recognizing that the purpose would be to learn more about the national perspective (see appendixes 2-4): Explore how the Western U.S. (Alaska, Pacific Islands, and West Coast Region) migh

  6. Clean Energy for Development Investment Framework : Progress Report on the World Bank Group Action Plan

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2007-01-01

    During the 2007 spring meetings, the development committee endorsed the World Bank Group's action plan on the Clean Energy Investment Framework (CEIF). This progress report is a response to the committee's request for an update on the implementation of the action plan for the annual meetings in October 2007. It summarizes accomplishments in the three areas of the action plan: 1) energy for...

  7. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-09-30

    This corrective action plan proposes the closure method for the area 9 unexploded Ordnance landfill, corrective action unit 453 located at the Tonopah Test Range. The area 9 UXO landfill consists of corrective action site no. 09-55-001-0952 and is comprised of three individual landfill cells designated as A9-1, A9-2, and A9-3. The three landfill cells received wastes from daily operations at area 9 and from range cleanups which were performed after weapons testing. Cell locations and contents were not well documented due to the unregulated disposal practices commonly associated with early landfill operations. However, site process knowledge indicates that the landfill cells were used for solid waste disposal, including disposal of UXO.

  8. Emergency team and action plan; Brigada de emergencia y plan de accion de emergencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez Gorgerino, Ruben Dario [Central Hidroelectrica Itaipu, Hernandarias (Paraguay)]. E-mail: jimenez@itaipu.gov.br

    1998-07-01

    This work reports the various activities developed by a commission designated for the investigation of the fire occurred in the excitation panel of the generator unit 16, for the execution of two tasks: short term creation of plant emergency team, and a long term implementation of emergency action plan.

  9. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project environmental protection implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP is updated annually. This version covers the time period of 9 November 1994, through 8 November 1995. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies

  10. [Strategic planning: an important economic action for German hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Christoph H R; Zink, Wolfgang; Russo, Sebastian G

    2011-11-01

    In medical systems, economic issues and means of action are in the course of dwindling human (physicians and nurses) and financial resources are more important. For this reason, physicians must understand basic economic principles. Only in this way, there may be medical autonomy from social systems and hospital administrators. The current work is an approach to present a model for strategic planning of an anesthesia department. For this, a "strengths", "weaknesses", "opportunities", and "threats" (SWOT) analysis is used. This display is an example of an exemplary anaesthetic department.

  11. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP covers the time period of November 9, 1993, through November 8, 1994. It will be updated annually. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies. Contents of this report are: (1) general description of the UMTRA project environmental protection program; (2) notifications; (3) planning and reporting; (4) special programs; (5) environmental monitoring programs; (6) quality assurance and data verification; and (7) references

  12. Asthma Education, Action Plans, Psychosocial Issues and Adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kolbe

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with four separate but not disparate topics. The first section discusses asthma education, reviews the current literature and attempts to challenge some of the dogma that is associated with this area. Knowledge alone does not guarantee appropriate behaviour, due to a variety of adverse socioeconomic and psychological factors that need to be considered for each patient. Action plans and peak flow monitoring have both been disappointing in terms of reducing asthma morbidity; the former needs to be individualized, and the latter may be useful in specific situations. Space precludes an in-depth discussion of psychological issues and adherence, but an attempt has been made to address salient issues, particularly related to the first two topics. Psychological factors, especially anxiety, play an important role in asthma outcome. Adherence to medication prescriptions and other management strategies need to be taken into account when an individual’s treatment program is planned.

  13. Biodiversity in School Grounds: Auditing, Monitoring and Managing an Action Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansell, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    The idea of using site biodiversity action plans to introduce biodiversity management initiatives into school grounds is outlined. Selected parts of a case study, involving the use of such an action plan to record, monitor and plan for biodiversity on a university campus, are described and ideas for applying a similar plan to a school setting are…

  14. Human Genome Diversity Project. Summary of planning workshop 3(B): Ethical and human-rights implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    The third planning workshop of the Human Genome Diversity Project was held on the campus of the US National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, from February 16 through February 18, 1993. The second day of the workshop was devoted to an exploration of the ethical and human-rights implications of the Project. This open meeting centered on three roundtables, involving 12 invited participants, and the resulting discussions among all those present. Attendees and their affiliations are listed in the attached Appendix A. The discussion was guided by a schedule and list of possible issues, distributed to all present and attached as Appendix B. This is a relatively complete, and thus lengthy, summary of the comments at the meeting. The beginning of the summary sets out as conclusions some issues on which there appeared to be widespread agreement, but those conclusions are not intended to serve as a set of detailed recommendations. The meeting organizer is distributing his recommendations in a separate memorandum; recommendations from others who attended the meeting are welcome and will be distributed by the meeting organizer to the participants and to the Project committee.

  15. Hanford Action Tracking System release planning support documents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keasling, R.

    1995-05-05

    This document contains impacts, plans, resource requirements, schedules, and documents to ensure the conduct of activities for the operation of the Hanford Action Tracking System (HATS). Each discrete topic in this document applies to a specific area of management and team interaction. These formally establish the planning, resources, documentation, and training responsibilities for the system management team. This document is composed of four appendices. These include the following: (1) organization impacts and implementation plan--expected organizational impacts resulting from setting up the new support system for the HATS, the plan to address each of these impacts and other system implementation requirements; (2) training and information requirements--training and information needed to use and operate the HATS; (3) operation/maintenance resources--resources required to maintain and operate the HATS once the system becomes operations; (4) training package--HATS implementation training needs, includes a training procedure, the environment for training users (tools and materials required for the facility, trainer, and trainee); schedule, and handout materials and forms to be completed at the time of training.

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 542: Disposal Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    locate previously unidentified features at CASs 03-20-07, 03-20-09, 03-20-10, 03-20-11, and 06-20-03. (4) Perform field screening. (5) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (6) Collect quality control samples for laboratory analyses to evaluate the performance of measurement systems and controls based on the requirements of the data quality indicators. (7) If COCs are present at the surface/near surface (< 15 feet below ground surface), collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. (8) If COCs are present in the subsurface (i.e., base of disposal hole), collect additional samples to define the vertical extent of contamination. A conservative use restriction will be used to encompass the lateral extent of subsurface contamination. (9) Stake or flag sample locations in the field, and record coordinates through global positioning systems surveying. (10) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan

  17. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 407: Roller Coaster RADSAFE Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. M. Fitzmaurice

    2000-05-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for the Roller Coaster RADSAFE Area Corrective Action Unit 407 in accordance with the Federal Facility and Consent Order (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP] et al., 1996). This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved Corrective Action Alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999). The RCRSA was used during May and June of 1963 to decontaminate vehicles, equipment, and personnel from the Clean Slate tests. The Constituents of Concern (COCs) identified during the site characterization include plutonium, uranium, and americium. No other COCS were identified. The following closure actions will be implemented under this plan: (1) Remove and dispose of surface soils which are over three times background for the area. Soils identified for removal will be disposed of at an approved disposal facility. Excavated areas will be backfilled with clean borrow soil fi-om a nearby location. (2) An engineered cover will be constructed over the waste disposal pit area where subsurface COCS will remain. (3) Upon completion of the closure and approval of the Closure Report by NDEP, administrative controls, use restrictions, and site postings will be used to prevent intrusive activities at the site. Barbed wire fencing will be installed along the perimeter of this unit. Post closure monitoring will consist of site inspections to determine the condition of the engineered cover. Any identified maintenance and repair requirements will be remedied within 90 working days of discovery and documented in writing at the time of repair. Results of all inspections/repairs for a given year will be addressed in a single report submitted annually to the NDEP.

  18. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior as a Framework for the Evaluation of a Professional Development Workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin R. Patterson

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to use a theoretical framework based on several decades of attitudinal research to assess the intentions of Microbial Discovery Workshop participants to incorporate the inquiry activities presented at the workshop into their curricula, to evaluate the participants actual use of these activities after the workshop, and to uncover the barriers and enablers the participants faced in doing so. As a framework, the theory of planned behavior was ascertained to be an appropriate means of assessment and it was revealed that participants’ intention to use the workshop activities significantly correlated with their actual use. The participants’ attitudes toward using the activities influenced their use more than the participants’ perceptions of the social pressures that would influence their decision to use the activities or their belief as to how easy or difficult it would be to incorporate a given activity. The participants were found to be highly self-efficacious pertaining to their ability to implement the activities, but perceived self-efficacy was not a significant predictor of the participants’ intentions to incorporate the activities into their teaching-learning repertoire. The study also uncovered other behaviors the participants displayed as a result of attending the workshop consistent with the goals and objectives of the workshop organizers.

  19. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 563: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-03-31

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 563, Septic Systems, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 563 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 3 and 12 of the Nevada Test Site. CAU 563 consists of the following CASs: CAS 03-04-02, Area 3 Subdock Septic Tank CAS 03-59-05, Area 3 Subdock Cesspool CAS 12-59-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Septic Tanks CAS 12-60-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Outfalls Site characterization activities were performed in 2007, and the results are presented in Appendix A of the CAU 563 Corrective Action Decision Document. The scope of work required to implement the recommended closure alternatives is summarized below. CAS 03-04-02, Area 3 Subdock Septic Tank, contains no contaminants of concern (COCs) above action levels. No further action is required for this site; however, as a best management practice (BMP), all aboveground features (e.g., riser pipes and bumper posts) will be removed, the septic tank will be removed, and all open pipe ends will be sealed with grout. CAS 03-59-05, Area 3 Subdock Cesspool, contains no COCs above action levels. No further action is required for this site; however, as a BMP, all aboveground features (e.g., riser pipes and bumper posts) will be removed, the cesspool will be abandoned by filling it with sand or native soil, and all open pipe ends will be sealed with grout. CAS 12-59-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Septic Tanks, will be clean closed by excavating approximately 4 cubic yards (yd3) of arsenic- and chromium-impacted soil. In addition, as a BMP, the liquid in the South Tank will be removed, the North Tank will be removed or filled with grout and left in place, the South Tank will be filled with grout and left in place, all open pipe ends will be sealed with grout or similar material, approximately 10 yd3 of chlordane-impacted soil will be excavated, and debris within the CAS boundary will be removed. CAS 12

  20. Compact Toroid Theory Planning Workshop. A panel report to the Director, Division of Applied Plasma Physics, Office of Fusion Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Workshop was to identify the most important physics issues that need to be addressed in the near term in order to assure the optimal design and timely interpretation of Compact Toroid (CT) experiments. The Panel was also asked to assess the levels of effort required to obtain priority information on appropriate time scales compatible with DOE plans to design a CT proof-of-principle experiment. The fiscal year cost anticipated for the effort recommended by the Workshop Panel (excluding costs for computing) is estimated to be approximately $5.7M. CT theory is currently funded at a level of approximately $2.0M per year

  1. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi2 (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives

  2. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

  3. Remedial Action Work Plan Amchitka Island Mud Pit Closures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE/NV

    2001-04-05

    This remedial action work plan presents the project organization and construction procedures developed for the performance of the remedial actions at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE's) sites on Amchitka Island, Alaska. During the late1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (the predecessor agency to DOE) used Amchitka Island as a site for underground nuclear tests. A total of nine sites on the Island were considered for nuclear testing; however, tests were only conducted at three sites (i.e., Long Shot in 1965, Milrow in 1969, and Cannikin in 1971). In addition to these three sites, large diameter emplacement holes were drilled in two other locations (Sites D and F) and an exploratory hole was in a third location (Site E). It was estimated that approximately 195 acres were disturbed by drilling or preparation for drilling in conjunction with these activities. The disturbed areas include access roads, spoil-disposal areas, mud pits which have impacted the environment, and an underground storage tank at the hot mix plant which was used to support asphalt-paving operations on the island. The remedial action objective for Amchitka Island is to eliminate human and ecological exposure to contaminants by capping drilling mud pits, removing the tank contents, and closing the tank in place. The remedial actions will meet State of Alaska regulations, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge management goals, address stakeholder concerns, and address the cultural beliefs and practices of the native people. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office will conduct work on Amchitka Island under the authority of the Comprehensive Emergency Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Field activities are scheduled to take place May through September 2001. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent Closure Report.

  4. Inter-active and dynamic approaches on forest and land-use planning - proceedings from a training workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandewall, Mats [ed.

    1999-07-01

    This document summarises the outcome of a training workshop, 'Inter-active and dynamic approaches on forest and land-use planning', that was organised in Vietnam and Lao PDR during April 1999. The workshop was arranged by researchers from SLU, Umeaa in cooperation with SIDA and it's CCB programme, The National Board of Forestry and concerned government institutions in Lao PDR - The national Programme for Shifting Cultivation Stabilisation, Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry , and in Vietnam - the Forest Inventory and Planning Institute, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development. The main purpose of this paper are: (1) to review and conclude the outcome of the workshop to all those who have participated or been concerned with it; (2) to summarise an evaluation of the somewhat unique arrangement, with participants from different sectors, administrative levels, gender and countries; and (3) to present 'the APM approach' on land use planning, which was put forward, tested and discussed during the workshop.

  5. FACILITIES PLANNING WORKSHOP FOR BLASTING SUPPORT THE ACTIVITY OF DEVELOPMENT AND REPAIR SHIP IN PT. JASA MARINA INDAH UNIT II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Samuel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Blasting in the process of planning the workshop production of new building and ship repair to play a role in providing blasting and paint on the block that will be of erection. As a result of blasting workshop facilities that do not have resulted in low production capacity that can be achieved by this workshop, namely three block ships per month. Capacity blasting and paint shop in this low resulted in low productivity process stage (stage the previous workshops which of course result in a decrease in vessel productivity in general.                 In penelitiaan aims to plan for blasting and paint shop facility which has been adjusted to the planned production capacity of PT. JASA MARINA INDAH II units.                 In this study it - thing to note is to understand the data - the data field for research conducted in terms of both technical and economic terms, with the blasting and paint shop facilities on the construction or repair of ships that have been planned, then the effectiveness of the work and production flow at. Jasa Marina Indah II units can be known.                 Based on the analysis and calculation of both technical and economical it can be identified by the workshop on the process of blasting Blasting efficiency is obtained for 2.55 hours, at 10.16 hours during the painting process, while economical in terms of labor costs can be reduced blasting cost is Rp.930000    for          paint       and         Rp.1.23million

  6. What Works Scotland & West Dunbartonshire Community Planning Partnership – Community-Led Action Planning Report

    OpenAIRE

    Bynner, Claire

    2015-01-01

    At the heart of the What Works Scotland initiative is a programme of Collaborative Action Research (CAR) that is being taken forward with representatives from four case study Community Planning Partnerships (CPPs). The aim of this work is to build capacity and capability in the use of evidence to support local improvement projects and to capture evidence from practice as to what works in achieving public service reform. West Dunbartonshire is one of four WWS national case study...

  7. Planning and management support for NPP personnel SAT-based training programmes. IAEA regional workshop. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the European regional TC Project a workshop on Planning and Management Support for NPP Personnel SAT Based Training programmes was held at the Paks NPP Maintenance Training Centre in June 1998. It was organized jointly by IAEA and the Paks NPP. The objective of the workshop was to present the important experience gained by successful implementation of the IAEA Model Project on Strengthening Training for Safe Operation at Paks NPP as well as international experience in developing and carrying out the projects to upgrade NPP personnel training in particular maintenance training, and competence based Systematic Approach to Training (SAT). Twenty five participants from Armenia, Bulgaria, China, Czech republic, Hungary, Romania, Russia, Slovak Republic and Ukraine attended the workshop presenting and exchanging experiences in implementing NPP SAT-based training programmes

  8. PROSPECTIVE ACTION PLAN FOR DEVELOPING PRODUCT CONTAINING MICROENCAPSULATED PROBIOTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikh Mahammed Athar Alli

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Probiotic micro-organisms explored for delivering associated proclaimed valuable benefits and its market is expanding in diverse sphere. Probiotics (PRs are presented as pharmaceutical, dairy, non-dairy, and personal care products. To improve performances and marketplace survival of these products, diverse methods and technology devised. Amongst them microencapsulation (MEC is widely explored to get product with wished and improved performances. Interest evoke for marketing of product containing microencapsulated probiotics (PCEP to upkeep performance, reproducible, throughout its life cycle. The review features on prospective action plan for evolution of PCEP including method for combating issues. Presented information will be a helping hand for developers to get PCEP, with excellent feature and performance, and improved marketability.

  9. Implementation plan: Quality assurance requirements: Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document establishes the Quality Assurance (QA) Program requirements for the Hazards Waste remedial Actions Program (HASWRAP) for ensuring, with a high degree of confidence, that program objectives will be achieved as planned. The QA Program is introduced in Sect. 1. The HAZWRAP Support Contractor Office (SCO) functional organization and QA responsibilities are shown in Sect. 2. QA program requirements are contained in Sect. 3. These requiremens are pased on the American national Standard, American National Standards Institute/American Society of Mechanical Engineers NQA-1 Quality Assurance Program Requirements for Nuclear Facilities. The 18 elements defined in the standard are tailored to HAZWRAP's needs. The QA program requirements are delineated under the major headings: Quality Assurance Program, Organization, and Control of Quality;two additional program requirements, Software Quality Assurance and Problem Prevention, are included. Definitions of QA terms and the list of formal reports published by the HAZWRAP SCO are included as appendixes. 8 refs., 1 fig

  10. Scales, strategies and actions for effective energy planning: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is a review of the most recent literature on the interaction between climate change, land-use and energy, based on the analysis of papers collected through the most relevant scientific literature databases. A total of 114 papers published between 2000 and 2011 were reviewed. The aims of this review are: in general (1) to identify the different research topics that have been developed related to the interaction between climate change, land-use and energy; more specifically, (2) to analyze what are the most suitable spatial and temporal scales of investigation to focus on for actions and strategies to reduce critical issues in the field of energy and environment; (3) to identify which actions and strategies are deemed as the most appropriate to mitigate critical issues in energy and environment; and given the research gaps found in the review, (4) to propose research recommendations in the context of effective climate-energy planning. We argue that there are certain gaps and needs for a “nested” environmental governance. It is necessary to understand how different environmental policies overlap and how they can be integrated in order to verify whether there are conflicting targets that may negate each other in the long term. - Highlights: • Energy production and consumption can directly or indirectly affect climate change. • Energy sector is influenced directly and indirectly by changes in climate conditions. • Energy sector and climate change affect and limit alternative uses of land, causing land-use changes. • The most suitable spatial scale for energy planning is the municipal level requiring short-term perspectives. • Several research recommendations to deal with the complexity of energy-land-use-climate change issue are proposed

  11. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions: Lessons from state climate action plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollak, Melisa, E-mail: mpollak@umn.edu [Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota, 301 19th Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Meyer, Bryn, E-mail: meye1058@umn.edu [Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota, 301 19th Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Wilson, Elizabeth, E-mail: ewilson@umn.edu [Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota, 301 19th Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    We examine how state-level factors affect greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction policy preference across the United States by analyzing climate action plans (CAPs) developed in 11 states and surveying the CAP advisory group members. This research offers insights into how states approach the problem of choosing emissions-abatement options that maximize benefits and minimize costs, given their unique circumstances and the constellation of interest groups with power to influence state policy. The state CAPs recommended ten popular GHG reduction strategies to accomplish approximately 90% of emissions reductions, but they recommended these popular strategies in different proportions: a strategy that is heavily relied on in one state's overall portfolio may play a negligible role in another state. This suggests that any national policy to limit GHG emissions should encompass these key strategies, but with flexibility to allow states to balance their implementation for the state's unique geographic, economic, and political circumstances. Survey results strongly support the conclusion that decisions regarding GHG reductions are influenced by the mix of actors at the table. Risk perception is associated with job type for all strategies, and physical and/or geographic factors may underlie the varying reliance on certain GHG reduction strategies across states. - Highlights: > This study analyzed climate action plans from 12 states and surveyed the advisory group members. > Ten strategies supply 90% of recommended emission reductions, but states weigh them differently. > Advisory group members perceived different opportunities and risks in the top-ten strategies. > Both geographic and socio-political factors may underlie the varying reliance on certain strategies. > Cost, business practices and consumer behavior were ranked as the top barriers to reducing emissions.

  12. Planning for environmental restoration of uranium mining and milling sites in Central and Eastern Europe. Proceedings of a workshop held under the technical co-operation project RER/9/022 on environmental restoration in Central and Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An IAEA Regional Technical Co-operation (TC) project RER/9/022 on ''Environmental Restoration'' for central and eastern Europe and the former USSR was launched in 1992 and concluded at the end of 1996. The first phase of this project had the primary purpose of identifying and characterizing radioactively contaminated sites in the region, including evaluation of doses to the general public and other environmental impacts. The main result of this phase of the project were published in IAEA-TECDOC-865. A new 1995-1996 phase of the project focused on the radioactive contamination of uranium mining and milling sites and the development of plans for environmental restoration of these sites. While the 1993-1994 phase aimed at attracting the attention of Member States in the region to a long neglected problem, the second phase served as a stimulus to initiate concrete planning activities that would lead to corrective actions in highly contaminated areas in those countries. As a consequence, the project emphasis shifted from scientific discussions to the identification of responsibilities, planning activities, and the assessment of existing and required resources for the eventual implementation of restoration plans. The 1995-1996 phase of the project consisted of a planning meeting and three workshops that addressed different topical themes. The papers compiled in this publication were presented at the last workshop, held in Felix, Romania, 4-8 November 1996. They summarize national situations in environmental contamination as of the end of 1996 and ongoing or planned actions for remediation

  13. Regulatory inspection activities related to inspection planning, plant maintenance and assessment of safety. Proceedings of an international workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) believes that an essential factor in ensuring the safety of nuclear installations is the continuing exchange and analysis of technical information and data. To facilitate this exchange the Committee has established Working Groups and Groups of Experts in specialised topics. CNRA believes that safety inspections are a major element in the regulatory authority's efforts to ensure the safe operation of nuclear facilities. Considering the importance of these issues, the Committee has established a special Working Group on Inspection Practices (WGIP). The purpose of WGIP, is to facilitate the exchange of information and experience related to regulatory safety inspections between CNRA Member countries. This was the 3. international workshop held by the WGIP on regulatory inspection activities. The focus of this workshop was on 3 main topics; Inspection Planning, Plant Maintenance and Assessment of Safety. This document presents the proceedings from the workshop, including: workshop programme, results and conclusions, papers and presentations and the list of participants. The main purpose of the Workshop is to provide a forum of exchange of information on the regulatory inspection activities

  14. Smoking cessation in cardiac patients: the influence of action plans, coping plans and self-efficacy on quitting smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Hoog, Natascha; Bolman, Catherine; Berndt, Nadine; Kers, Esther; Mudde, Aart; de Vries, Hein; Lechner, Lilian

    2016-06-01

    Smoking cessation is the most effective action for cardiac patients who smoke to improve their prognosis, yet more than one-half of cardiac patients continue to smoke after hospital admission. This study examined the influence of action plans, coping plans and self-efficacy on intention to quit and smoking cessation in cardiac patients. Cardiac patients completed a baseline questionnaire (N = 245) assessing demographic characteristics, smoking behavior, intention, self-efficacy, relapse self-efficacy and action and coping plans. Six months later (N = 184) continued abstinence from smoking was assessed. Self-efficacy predicted intention to quit smoking and was an indirect predictor of continued abstinence, through intention. Intention to quit smoking and making action plans both directly influenced continued abstinence. Future interventions to facilitate smoking cessation in cardiac patients should put strong emphasis on enhancing self-efficacy and on making specific action plans to increase the likelihood of smoking cessation.

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office; the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; and the U. S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 232 consists of Corrective Action Site 25-03-01, Sewage Lagoon. Corrective Action Unit 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, received sanitary effluent from four buildings within the Test Cell ''C'' Facility from the mid-1960s through approximately 1996. The Test Cell ''C'' Facility was used to develop nuclear propulsion technology by conducting nuclear test reactor studies. Based on the site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, herbicides, gamma emitting radionuclides, isotopic plutonium, isotopic uranium, and strontium-90. A detailed conceptual site model is presented in Section 3.0 and Appendix A of this Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The conceptual model serves as the basis for the sampling strategy. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, the Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the Corrective Action Decision Document

  16. Land-use planning for phosphate mining and resource areas: the central Florida case. A workshop synopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFevers, J. R.; Toner, W. J.; Guernsey, J. L.; Rifkin, E.

    1980-05-01

    On July 19-20, 1978, a workshop was conducted in Bartow, Florida, on the topic of land-use and reclamation planning in the local phosphate mining region. More than 100 participants attended the workshop representing the phosphate mining industry, environmental groups, research organizations, planning agencies, news media, and governmental regulatory agencies. Various aspects of the environmental and land-use impacts of phosphate mining, together with the state-of-the-art of mitigating adverse impacts, were discussed. The participants were required to work cooperatively to develop a series of alternative land-use plans for a selected mining site that was the focus of a half-day field trip. Overall, the participants developed a number of rational land-use and reclamation plans for the site that were considered acceptable by the majority of the group. There was general agreement that the most valuable aspect of the workshop was the opportunity for individuals with such diverse interests to work cooperatively on a common problem and develop acceptable solutions.

  17. The sequential encoding of competing action goals involves dynamic restructuring of motor plans in working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallivan, Jason P; Bowman, Natasha A R; Chapman, Craig S; Wolpert, Daniel M; Flanagan, J Randall

    2016-06-01

    Recent neural and behavioral findings provide support for the influential idea that in situations in which multiple action options are presented simultaneously, we prepare action plans for each competing option before deciding between and executing one of those plans. However, in natural, everyday environments, our available action options frequently change from one moment to the next, and there is often uncertainty as to whether additional options will become available before having to select a particular course of action. Here, with the use of a target-directed reaching task, we show that in this situation, the brain specifies a competing action for each new, sequentially presented potential target and that recently formed action plans can be revisited and updated so as to conform with separate, more newly developed, plans. These findings indicate that the brain forms labile motor plans for sequentially arising target options that can be flexibly restructured to accommodate new motor plans. PMID:27030738

  18. Environmental Action Statement : [Whittlesey Creek National Wildlife Refuge Habitat Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Environmental Action Statement for the Whittlesey Creek NWR Habitat Management Plan states that the plan is found not to have significant environmental effects.

  19. Environmental Action Memorandum : [Ottawa and Cedar Point National Wildlife Refuges Fishery Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Environmental Action memorandum for the Ottawa and Cedar Point NWRs Fishery Management Plan states that the Plan is found not to have significant environmental...

  20. Environmental Action Memorandum : [Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge White-tailed Deer Hunting Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Environmental Action Memorandum for the proposed Ottawa NWR White-tailed Deer Hunting Plan states that the plan is found not to have significant environmental...

  1. How One Middle School Began to Plan for Instruction - an Action Research Journey

    OpenAIRE

    Bengier, Andrea L.

    2000-01-01

    This study documented the initial planning process of a group of sixth grade teachers on a collaborative team over a six-month period. Using action research, this team of teachers examined their own practices of planning and implementing instruction. The teachers identified a focus area, planned for instruction, implemented the plan, observed the results of their plan, reflected upon the results and revised the plan (Kemmis and Wilkinson, 1998) to map their instruction. The teachers used arc...

  2. Nantucket, Ma. Climate Protection Action Plan: A Public Outreach Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrik, C.; Stephenson, A.; Petsch, S.

    2009-12-01

    As communities and municipalities gain a better understanding of climate change, they are exploring the ways in which to work towards adaptation and mitigation. One strategy that the Island of Nantucket, Massachusetts turned toward is the drafting of a Climate Protection Action Plan (CPAP). The CPAP was developed during the summer of 2009 to meet three goals: (1) assist the Town of Nantucket in creating a framework to help them reduce CO2 emissions; (2) educate the municipality and community in techniques that promote energy efficiency and sustainability on the island; and (3) document past, present and future approaches adopted by the Town towards emissions reduction and energy sustainability. In particular, this project focused on using local strengths and natural resources identified by island stakeholders that may help the island to mitigate carbon emissions and adapt to climate change.. Drafting the CPAP provided community members and politicians with an opportunity to become better educated in the science of climate change and to learn how climate change will affect their community. On the island of Nantucket, leaders in the religious, civic, and political communities were brought into a conversation about how each group could contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. A geosciences graduate student was brought into the CPAP team as a climate fellow to facilitate this conversation. This provided the foundation for stakeholder recommendations incorporated into the CPAP. This capacity-building model served as an effective way to create an informal learning environment about climate change that allowed members of the island community to directly participate in developing their locally appropriate climate protection strategy. The draft CPAP developed through this study and presented to the Town of Nantucket comprises assessments and recommendations in public research and education; building and energy efficiency; transportation; renewable energy; and carbon

  3. Site Maintenance Plan: Part 2, Site Maintenance Action Plan for FY 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Fiscal Year (FY) 1994 Site Maintenance Action Plan (SMAP) is Part II of the Site Maintenance Plan, and has been written by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to outline the requirements stated in DOE Order 4330.4B, Maintenance Management Program, Chapter 1, Paragraph 3.3.1. The SMAP provides an annual status of maintenance initiatives completed and planned, a summary of performance indicators, a summary of maintenance backlog, a listing of real property and capital equipment maintenance cost estimates that were used to create the FY 1996 infrastructure and maintenance budget input, and a listing of proposed line item and general plant projects. Additionally, assumptions for various Site programs are listed to bring the Site Maintenance Plan into focus with overall Site activities. The primary mission at Hanford is to clean up the Site. In this cleanup process WHC will provide scientific and technological expertise to meet global needs, and partnership with stakeholders in the region to develop regional economic diversification. Other missions at the Hanford Site include energy research and development, and waste management and disposal activities. Their primary mission has a 30-year projected life span and will direct the shutting down and cleanup of defense production facilities and the Fast Flux Test Facility. This long-term mission requires continuous maintenance and in many instances, replacement of existing basic infrastructure, support facilities, and utilities. Without adequate maintenance and capital funding these infrastructure, support facilities, and utilities will continue to deteriorate causing an increase in backlogged work

  4. Workshop discusses priorities in veterinary helminthology for South Africa : information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Krecek

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available A workshop was held at Onderstepoort to set priorities in veterinary helminthology for South Africa. Representatives from 19 organisations attended. The workshop achieved 2 of the 3 aims set, namely to identify the problems within the field and to develop strategies to address these challenges. The 7 strategies proposed are: motivation, education, therapeutic, worm resistance, animal tolerance, biological control and diagnostic strategies. A follow-up session is being planned to formulate action plans for each sphere.

  5. Social Marketing Workshop Evaluation Report

    OpenAIRE

    Billings, Jenny R.; Hashem, Ferhana; Hellyer, N.; D. Kocman

    2009-01-01

    This document reports upon two afternoon workshops on ‘Evaluating Social Marketing’, which were conducted on the 9th and 10th September 2009 for Eastern and Coastal Kent (ECK) PCT. The workshops were held at the Centre for Health Services Studies, University of Kent. The aims were to increase participants’ understanding of social marketing and evaluation, and to develop an action plan that will meet any training needs and identify how research support can be provided until the end of the proj...

  6. Measurement of action planning in children, adolescents, and adults: A comparison between 3 tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongbloed-Pereboom, M.; Spruijt, S.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.; Steenbergen, B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare age-related action planning performance on 3 different tasks, focusing on differences in task complexity. Methods: A total of 119 participants were divided across 6 age groups (4-5, 6-7, 8-9, 10-12,14-16, and 20-22 years). Participants performed 3 action planning tasks: the overt

  7. A Strategic Action Plan for Advancing Math and Science Education in New Mexico 2007-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Mexico Public Education Department, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This Strategic Action Plan for Advancing Math and Science Education is an initial outline of strategies, actions, measures of progress, resources needed, timelines, and responsible parties. The Plan focuses on these three main goals: (1) increasing student interest, participation, and achievement in math and science; (2) raising public support and…

  8. Using Action Plans to Support Communication Programming for Children Who Are Deafblind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    The author describes the use of action plans to support 2 teachers' post-in-service implementation of communication strategies with 3 children who are deafblind. In the action plans, the teachers recorded changes in thinking and instructional practices under the 4 aspects of communication: form, function, content, and context. They also recorded…

  9. Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility mitigation action plan. Annual report for 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haagenstad, T.

    1999-01-15

    This Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report (MAPAR) has been prepared as part of implementing the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) to protect workers, soils, water, and biotic and cultural resources in and around the facility.

  10. Manipulation of patient-provider interaction: discussing illness representations or action plans concerning adherence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theunissen, N.C.M.; Ridder, D.T.D. de; Bensing, J.M.; Rutten, G.E.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    According to Leventhal's Self-Regulatory Model of Illness, patients have ideas and action plans related to the management of their disease. The aim of this study is to examine whether ideas and action plans relating to hypertension change as a result of general practitioner's (GP's) discussing them

  11. Manipulation of patient–provider interaction: discussing illness representations or action plans concerning adherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theunissen, N.C.M.; Ridder, D.T.D. de; Bensing, J.; Rutten, G.E.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    According to Leventhal’s Self-Regulatory Model of Illness, patients have ideas and action plans related to the management of their disease. The aim of this study is to examine whether ideas and action plans relating to hypertension change as a result of general practitioner’s (GP’s) discussing them

  12. Action Mapping: A Planning Tool for Change. HSLA Monograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Bruce

    Future leaders will have to rely upon skills that are far different from those used in the past. Action mapping serves as a meta-process for moving schools toward desired ends; it calls upon school leaders to move into action, to reflect upon such actions, and to collect stories for future reflections. This process could be helpful to a school…

  13. Interim Action Proposed Plan for the Chemicals, Metals, and Pesticides (CMP) Pits Operable Unit; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Interim Action Proposed Plan (IAPP) is to describe the preferred interim remedial action for addressing the Chemicals, Metals, and Pesticides (CMP) Pits Operable Unit and to provide an opportunity for public input into the remedial action selection process

  14. Making the 2007-2010 Action Plan work for women in family medicine in the Asia Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coles Jan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Wonca Working Party for Women and Family Medicine (WWPWFM was organized in 2001 with the following objectives: to identify the key issues for women doctors; to review Wonca policies and procedures for equity and transparency; to provide opportunities to network at meetings and through the group's listserve and website; and to promote women doctors' participation in Wonca initiatives. In October 2008, at the Asia Pacific Regional conference, the Wonca Working Party on Women in Family Medicine (WWPWFM held a preconference day and conference workshops, building on the success and commitment to initiatives which enhance women's participation in Wonca developed in Ontario, Canada (2006 and at the Singapore World Congress (2007. At this meeting fifty women workshopped issues for women in Family Medicine in the Asia Pacific. Using the Action Plan formulated in Singapore (2007 the participants identified key regional issues and worked towards a solution. Key issues identified were professional issues, training in family medicine and women's health. Solutions were to extend the understanding of women's contributions to family medicine, improved career pathways for women in family medicine and improving women's participation in practices, family medicine organizations and academic meetings.

  15. From Collaboration to Knowledge: Planning for Remedial Action in the Great LAkes

    OpenAIRE

    Keuhl, David

    1998-01-01

    The goal of planning is to use knowledge to determine action. Planning theory has focused specifically on how the process of achieving this occurs. Two dominant theories prevail: rational comprehensive and communicative planning theory. The former relies heavily on the scientific method as a model for acquiring knowledge from which the correct action can be determined. The latter suggests that collaborative processes that engage stakeholders in decision-making offer distinct advantages to ach...

  16. SOCAP: Lessons learned in applying SIPE-2 to the military operations crisis action planning domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desimone, Roberto

    1992-01-01

    This report describes work funded under the DARPA Planning and Scheduling Initiative that led to the development of SOCAP (System for Operations Crisis Action Planning). In particular, it describes lessons learned in applying SIPE-2, the underlying AI planning technology within SOCAP, to the domain of military operations deliberate and crisis action planning. SOCAP was demonstrated at the U.S. Central Command and at the Pentagon in early 1992. A more detailed report about the lessons learned is currently being prepared. This report was presented during one of the panel discussions on 'The Relevance of Scheduling to AI Planning Systems.'

  17. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Environmental Line Management Audit Action Plan. Final report. Audit, October 26, 1992--November 6, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Action Plan contains responses, planned actions, and estimated costs for addressing the findings discovered in the Environmental Management Audit conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA), October 26 through November 6, 1992. This document should be read in conjunction with the Audit Report to ensure the findings addressed in this document are fully understood. The scope of the UMTRA Environmental Management Audit was comprehensive and encompassed all areas of environmental management except environmental programs pertaining to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance. The Audit Report listed 18 findings: 11 were identified as compliance findings, and the remaining 7 were best management practice findings. Root cause analysis was performed on all the findings. The results of the analysis as well as planned corrective actions are summarized in Section 5.0. All planned actions were prioritized using the Tiger Team Assessment Corrective Action Plan system. Based on assigned priorities, all planned actions were costed by fiscal year. This Action Plan contains a description of the organizational and management structures to be used to implement the Action Plan, a brief discussion of root cause analysis and funding, followed by the responses and planned actions for each finding. A member of the UMTRA Project Office (PO) has been assigned responsibility for tracking the progress on each of the findings. The UMTRA PO staff wrote and/or approved all of the corrective actions recorded in this Action Plan

  18. Key outcomes from stakeholder workshops at a symposium to inform the development of an Australian national plan for rare diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molster Caron

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calls have been made for governments to adopt a cohesive approach to rare diseases through the development of national plans. At present, Australia does not have a national plan for rare diseases. To progress such a plan an inaugural Australian Rare Diseases Symposium was held in Western Australia in April 2011. This paper describes the key issues identified by symposium attendees for the development of a national plan, compares these to the content of EUROPLAN and national plans elsewhere and discusses how the outcomes might be integrated for national planning. Methods The symposium was comprised of a series of plenary sessions followed by workshops. The topics covered were; 1 Development of national plans for rare diseases; 2 Patient empowerment; 3 Patient care, support and management; 4 Research and translation; 5 Networks, partnerships and collaboration. All stakeholders within the rare diseases community were invited to participate, including: people affected by rare diseases such as patients, carers, and families; clinicians and allied health practitioners; social and disability services; researchers; patient support groups; industry (e.g. pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies; regulators and policy-makers. Results All of these stakeholder groups were represented at the symposium. Workshop participants indicated the need for a national plan, a national peak body, a standard definition of ‘rare diseases’, education campaigns, lobbying of government, research infrastructure, streamlined whole-of-lifetime service provision, case co-ordination, early diagnosis, support for health professionals and dedicated funding. Conclusions These findings are consistent with frameworks and initiatives being undertaken internationally (such as EUROPLAN, and with national plans in other countries. This implies that the development of an Australian national plan could plausibly draw on frameworks for plan

  19. PLANNING PROCESS, BETWEEN EXPERT PROJECT AND COLLECTIVE ACTION

    OpenAIRE

    Thibault, Serge; Verdelli, Laura

    2009-01-01

    texte présenté au colloque annuel de l'AESOP Foundations, planning theory and method, planning and complexity - 24th AESOP Annual Conference, Finland The content of this paper concerns some recent evolutions of the planning process in France. Analyzing two study cases, we'll show that today, two types of process are coexisting and, in a way, confronting. The first one corresponds to the "classic" plan for which the project is the principal stage of a linear process. This linear plan is org...

  20. Corrective action investigation plan: Area 2 Photo Skid 16 Wastewater Pit, Corrective Action Unit 332. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains a detailed description and plan for an environmental investigation of the Area 2 Photo Skid 16 Wastewater Pit. The site is located in Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site. The Photo Skid Wastewater Pit was used for disposal of photochemical process waste, and there is a concern that such disposal may have released photochemicals and metals to the soil beneath the pit and adjacent to it. The purpose of this investigation is to identify the presence and nature of contamination present in and adjacent to the wastewater pit and to determine the appropriate course of environmental response action for the site. The potential courses of action for the site are clean closure through remediation, closure in place (with or without remediation), or no further action.

  1. Proceedings: 1985 EPRI [Electric Power Research Institute] workshop on remedial actions for secondary-side intergranular corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A meeting on ''Remedial Actions for Secondary Side Intergranular Corrosion'' was organized in an effort to give those working in this area an opportunity to share their results, ideas and plans. Topics discussed included: (1) results from steam generator tube and tube sheet examinations; (2) plant water chemistry studies associated with causes and prevention of IGA; and (3) retarding IGA and IGSCC rates by control of environments, temperatures, crevice flushing, buffering, etc

  2. Connecting the Dots--From Planning to Implementation: Translating Commitments into Action in a Strategic Planning Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieso, Rob Roba

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the implementation of the Commitments to Action (CTAs) that were developed for the Outreach Institutional Initiative (OII) as part of the 2006 strategic planning process at De Anza College. Although the strategic planning process identified four Institutional Initiatives (IIs) [Outreach, Individualized Attention to Student…

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Strand

    2004-10-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 554 is located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 554 is comprised of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), which is: 23-02-08, USTs 23-115-1, 2, 3/Spill 530-90-002. This site consists of soil contamination resulting from a fuel release from underground storage tanks (USTs). Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 554. Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 15, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; and contractor personnel. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 554.

  4. A soil plan of action to awaken society beyond 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Arwyn; Bampa, Francesca; Towers, Willie; Broll, Gabrielle; Vargas, Ronald

    2014-05-01

    suite of positive examples offered by soil enthusiasts is to provide a common platform appropriate to all parts of the world, with a common consensus on soil issues to be covered and be brought to the table of consumers. The Global Soil Partnership (GSP) is an interactive, responsive and voluntary partnership, open to governments, regional organizations, institutions and other stakeholders. One of the pillars of action aims to "Encourage investment, technical cooperation, policy, education awareness and extension in soil". In order to achieve this goal, a small regionally balanced committee was formed following the 3rd European Network on Soil Awareness conference in Aberdeen and the 2nd Global Soil Week in Berlin. This group produced a draft plan of action that will be submitted to the Intergovernmental technical Panel on Soils (ITPS) of the GSP. Some key points that we need to address are: finding new soil communicators to awake and engage the society and the political arena (e.g. actors, poets, artists, etc.); focusing on a harmonised public perception of soil and their importance for environment and society; re-introducing soil science into the school curricula as a cross-cutting discipline designing a coherent but flexible structure and ensuring a proper and logical constructive transition between each learning stage (e.g. training teachers, web-based courses/ web-based platform, etc.). REFERENCES Bouma J, Broll G, Crane TA, Dewitte O, Gardi C, Schulte RPO, Towers W (2012) Soil information in support of policy making and awareness raising. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, 4, 552-558. EC (2006) (COM(2006)231 final) Communication from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee of the Regions, Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection. (ed Commission E), Brussels, Belgium.

  5. Climatic Action Plan Project for the state of Veracruz (Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejeda, A.; Ochoa, C.

    2007-05-01

    With financing of the British Government and support of the National Institute of Ecology, from April of 2006 to March of 2008 an action plan which intends variability effects and climatic change for the state of Veracruz will be made. This plan will be taken to the state government and will be spread out to manufacturers, industrialists and population. Throughout the Gulf of Mexico, the state of Veracruz is a 745 km coast in length with a width that goes from 156 km in the center to 47 km in the north. The state has large mountains, forests, plains, rivers, cascades, lagoons and coasts. Veracruz is the 10th largest state in Mexico with a 72,420 km2 surface, it is located between 17°00' and 22°28' north latitude and between 93°95' and 98°38' west longitude. Because of the orographic effect, the Sierra Madre Oriental causes the existence of many types of climate, from dry to tropical forest, going through snow on the top of the Pico de Orizaba (5747m of altitude). The wind affects the coasts by not allowing to fish during a hundred days a year (particularly in winter), and on summer tropical waves and occasionally hurricanes affect rivers causing overflow and urban floods in fields. These phenomena do not have a regular affectation; they are subject to climate variability effects. Veracruz is the third state with most population in the country (7.1 million people in 2005), only surpassed by the state of Mexico and Mexico City. Although it occupies 3.7% of the national territory, Veracruz has 6.9% of human population in the country, and is the 6th state of PIB national contribution (240 thousands of millions pesos approximately). Of the possible effects of the climatic change the following can be expected: , , : Most of the coasts of the Gulf of Mexico, low and sandy, less of a meter on the sea level, represent the most vulnerable territory of Veracruz. Towns will be affected, the saline water will infiltrate until the phreatic mantles and the coast electrical

  6. Alternatives/action plan report for outfall 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    This Document contains information pertaining to alternatives/action associated with controlling ammonia entering through outfall 17. This document identifies the location of contaminate source, the ammonia concentration levels entering East Fork Poplar Creek, and the action taken to reduce/eliminate the toxicity problem.

  7. Alternatives/action plan report for outfall 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Document contains information pertaining to alternatives/action associated with controlling ammonia entering through outfall 17. This document identifies the location of contaminate source, the ammonia concentration levels entering East Fork Poplar Creek, and the action taken to reduce/eliminate the toxicity problem

  8. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 573: Alpha Contaminated Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 573 is located in Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 573 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with non-nuclear experiments and nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 573, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 05-23-02, GMX Alpha Contaminated Area • 05-45-01, Atmospheric Test Site - Hamilton These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives.

  9. 'Action 2016': AREVA's strategic action plan to improve performance; 'Action 2016': le plan d'actions strategique d'AREVA pour ameliorer sa performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, Patricia; Floquet-Daubigeon, Fleur; Michaut, Maxime; De Scorbiac, Marie; Du Repaire, Philippine

    2011-12-12

    On December 12, 2011, Luc Oursel, Executive Officer of AREVA, and Pierre Aubouin, Chief Financial Executive Officer, presented the group's 'Action 2016' strategic action plan based on an in-depth analysis of the market's outlook. This document makes, first, a Detailed presentation of the 'Action 2016' plan and then presents the group's financial outlook: - Full-year 2011 immediate accounting consequences of the new market environment: operating losses expected in 2011; - 2012-2013 transition period Objective: self-finance capex in cumulative terms; - 2014-2016: safe growth and cash generation, free operating cash flow at break-even beginning in 2013, above euro 1 bn per year beginning in 2015

  10. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2004-04-06

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach for collecting the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 12 on the NTS, CAU 552 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 12-06-04, Muckpile; 12-23-05, Ponds. Corrective Action Site 12-06-04 in Area 12 consists of the G-Tunnel muckpile, which is the result of tunneling activities. Corrective Action Site 12-23-05 consists of three dry ponds adjacent to the muckpile. The toe of the muckpile extends into one of the ponds creating an overlap of two CASs. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technic ally viable corrective actions. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  11. The Action Plan Against Repetitive Work - An Industrial Relation Strategy for Improving the Working Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Peter; Møller, Niels

    2001-01-01

    The Danish Action Plan against Repetitive Work is presented and discussed as a possible new strategy for regulating repetitive work as well as other complicated working environment problems. The article is based on an empirical evaluation ot the Action Plan. The asseessment of the Action Plan...... indicates that a measurable reduction of repetitive work has been achieved, while recognizing the the new management strategies focusing on human resources development have also played an important role. These results are used to suggest that - under certain conditions - a combination of state regulation...... and industrial relation agreements can be used to regulate other working environment problems....

  12. Development of criteria and procedures for the evaluation of the European Action Plan for Organic Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, Otto; Lampkin, Nicolas; Dabbert, Stephan; Zanoli, Raffaele; Michelsen, Johannes; Gonzalvez, Victor

    2008-01-01

    This final report provides a synthesis of the results of the EU-funded ORGAP project, with the title “European Action Plan of Organic Food and Farming - Development of criteria and procedures for the evaluation of the EU Action Plan for Organic Agriculture”. This project started in May 2005 and was completed in April 2008. The overall objective of this project was to give scientific support to the implementation of the EU Organic Action Plan (EUOAP) by the development of an evaluation toolbox...

  13. A Social-Action Approach for Planning Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolan, Richard S.; And Others

    The growing complexity of urban industrial society necessitates adequate planning techniques to insure future livability, but traditional methods of training planners have emphasized technology and ignored the human element. To remedy this deficiency, training programs should be expanded to include the social and political aspects of planning.…

  14. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 554 is located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 554 is comprised of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), which is: 23-02-08, USTs 23-115-1, 2, 3/Spill 530-90-002. This site consists of soil contamination resulting from a fuel release from underground storage tanks (USTs). Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 554. Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 15, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; and contractor personnel. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 554. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to CAS 23-02-08. The scope of the corrective action investigation

  15. EDITORIAL: Special section: Selected papers from the Second European Workshop on Monte Carlo Treatment Planning (MCTP2009) Special section: Selected papers from the Second European Workshop on Monte Carlo Treatment Planning (MCTP2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spezi, Emiliano

    2010-08-01

    Sixty years after the paper 'The Monte Carlo method' by N Metropolis and S Ulam in The Journal of the American Statistical Association (Metropolis and Ulam 1949), use of the most accurate algorithm for computer modelling of radiotherapy linear accelerators, radiation detectors and three dimensional patient dose was discussed in Wales (UK). The Second European Workshop on Monte Carlo Treatment Planning (MCTP2009) was held at the National Museum of Wales in Cardiff. The event, organized by Velindre NHS Trust, Cardiff University and Cancer Research Wales, lasted two and a half days, during which leading experts and contributing authors presented and discussed the latest advances in the field of Monte Carlo treatment planning (MCTP). MCTP2009 was highly successful, judging from the number of participants which was in excess of 140. Of the attendees, 24% came from the UK, 46% from the rest of Europe, 12% from North America and 18% from the rest of the World. Fifty-three oral presentations and 24 posters were delivered in a total of 12 scientific sessions. MCTP2009 follows the success of previous similar initiatives (Verhaegen and Seuntjens 2005, Reynaert 2007, Verhaegen and Seuntjens 2008), and confirms the high level of interest in Monte Carlo technology for radiotherapy treatment planning. The 13 articles selected for this special section (following Physics in Medicine and Biology's usual rigorous peer-review procedure) give a good picture of the high quality of the work presented at MCTP2009. The book of abstracts can be downloaded from http://www.mctp2009.org. I wish to thank the IOP Medical Physics and Computational Physics Groups for their financial support, Elekta Ltd and Dosisoft for sponsoring MCTP2009, and leading manufacturers such as BrainLab, Nucletron and Varian for showcasing their latest MC-based radiotherapy solutions during a dedicated technical session. I am also very grateful to the eight invited speakers who kindly accepted to give keynote

  16. Corrective Action Decision Document/ Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 443: Central Nevada Test Area-Subsurface Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan Evans

    2004-11-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the subsurface at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443, CNTA - Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). CAU 443 is located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, north of U.S. Highway 6, about 48 kilometers north of Warm Springs, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the corrective action plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for the UC-1 Cavity (Corrective Action Site 58-57-001) at CAU 443, as provided in the FFACO. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. A Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) was performed in several stages from 1999 to 2003, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Sites (Corrective Action Unit No. 443)'' (DOE/NV, 1999). Groundwater modeling was the primary activity of the CAI. Three phases of modeling were conducted for the Faultless underground nuclear test. The first involved the gathering and interpretation of geologic and hydrogeologic data into a three-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow, and use of the output of the flow model for a

  17. ICP-MS Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carman, April J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Eiden, Gregory C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-11-01

    This is a short document that explains the materials that will be transmitted to LLNL and DNN HQ regarding the ICP-MS Workshop held at PNNL June 17-19th. The goal of the information is to pass on to LLNL information regarding the planning and preparations for the Workshop at PNNL in preparation of the SIMS workshop at LLNL.

  18. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 145: Wells and Storage Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Strand

    2004-09-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 145: Wells and Storage Holes. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 145 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 145 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-20-01, Core Storage Holes; (2) 03-20-02, Decon Pad and Sump; (3) 03-20-04, Injection Wells; (4) 03-20-08, Injection Well; (5) 03-25-01, Oil Spills; and (6) 03-99-13, Drain and Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. One conceptual site model with three release scenario components was developed for the six CASs to address all releases associated with the site. The sites will be investigated based on data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 24, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQOs process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 145.

  19. Planning, preparation, execution, and imagery of volitional action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deecke, L

    1996-03-01

    There are different motor sets, which a human subject can be in or act from: he or she can be in a self-initiated voluntary movement set (action) or in a response set (re-action). Also, imagery sets are available that are necessary for the acquisition and practice of skill. Most important are such imagery sets for rehearsal in theatre, dance, music, sports, combat, etc. PMID:8713545

  20. Planning, preparation, execution, and imagery of volitional action

    OpenAIRE

    Deecke, Lüder

    1996-01-01

    There are different motor sets, which a human subject can be in or act from: He or she can be in a self-initiated voluntary movement set (action) or in a response set (re-action). Also, imagery sets are available that are necessary for the acquisition and practice of skill. Most important are such imagery sets for rehearsal in theatre, dance, music, sports, combat, etc.

  1. 76 FR 60505 - Food Defense Workshop; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food Defense Workshop; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Office of... M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center (FAPC), is announcing a public workshop entitled...

  2. Who formulates self-regulatory action plans regarding fruit consumption? An application of the big five personality theory.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.-J. de Bruijn

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Action planning is regarded as an important correlate and predictor of health behaviour, but little is known about antecedents of action planning. Because personality constructs have been shown to moderate the effect of action planning interventions, the present study tested associations

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 528: Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-05-08

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 528, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination (PCBs), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in the southwestern portion of Area 25 on the NTS in Jackass Flats (adjacent to Test Cell C [TCC]), CAU 528 consists of Corrective Action Site 25-27-03, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Surface Contamination. Test Cell C was built to support the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (operational between 1959 and 1973) activities including conducting ground tests and static firings of nuclear engine reactors. Although CAU 528 was not considered as a direct potential source of PCBs and petroleum contamination, two potential sources of contamination have nevertheless been identified from an unknown source in concentrations that could potentially pose an unacceptable risk to human health and/or the environment. This CAU's close proximity to TCC prompted Shaw to collect surface soil samples, which have indicated the presence of PCBs extending throughout the area to the north, east, south, and even to the edge of the western boundary. Based on this information, more extensive field investigation activities are being planned, the results of which are to be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  4. Five-Year Action Plan to Improve NWRS Geospatial Capabilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS) geospatial plan and the associated memo (Date: 20160304; FWS/ANRS/ITM/062385) from Cynthia Martinez (Chief, NWRS) to the NWRS...

  5. Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge : Environmental Action Statement, Environmental Assessment, Interim Hunting and Fishing Plan : 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains the Environmental Action Statement, Environmental Assessment, and Interim Hunting and Fishing Plan for Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge from...

  6. Environmental Action Memorandum : [Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge Hunting and Fishing Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Environmental Action Memorandum states that the Patoka River NWR Hunting and Fishing Plan is found not to have significant environmental effects.

  7. On the way to an Austrian radon action plan; Auf dem Weg zum oesterreichischen Radonaktionsplan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, V.; Ringer, W.; Wurm, G. [Oesterreichische Agentur fuer Gesundheit und Ernaehrungssicherheit (AGES), Linz (Austria). Oesterreichische Fachstelle fuer Radon; Haider, W. [Bundesministerium fuer Land- und Forstwirtschaft, Umwelt und Wasserwirtschaft (BMLFUW), Wien (Austria). Abt. Strahlenschutz

    2013-07-01

    According to the draft of the new European Basic Safety Standards (EU-BSS) all member states are obliged to develop a national radon action plan, to control the long term risks from radon exposure in dwellings, public buildings and workplaces. The National Radon Centre, embedded in the Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES), was assigned by the Ministry for Environment (BMLFUW) to develop this Austrian action plan and the strategy behind. This conference contribution discusses where we still have a need for actions and how the new BSS will influence the Austrian radon legislation (reference levels, responsibilities, standards, building law). Currently running and planned projects regarding the radon action plan like developing a national radon data base, definition of radon prone areas by improving the radon map and strategies to increase public radon awareness and involve the building sector are presented. (orig.)

  8. Sustainable Development Action Plans (SDAPs) : support and scrutiny from the Sustainable Development Commission

    OpenAIRE

    Sustainable Development Commission

    2008-01-01

    This paper details the guidance, support and scrutiny that the SDC will provide on Sustainable Development Action Plans (SDAPs), to government departments, executive agencies, and other government bodies. Publisher PDF

  9. The Austrian radon activities on the way to the national radon action plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, V; Ringer, W; Wurm, G; Haider, W

    2014-07-01

    Based on the new Euratom Basic Safety Standards (BSS), all EU member states will be obliged to design a strategy to address long-term risks from radon exposure, which is laid down in the 'national radon action plan'. In Austria, the National Radon Centre is responsible for the development of the action plan. This paper presents the current and planned radon protection activities on the way to establish the radon action plan--like the national radon database, the definition of radon risk areas by improving the existing radon map, as well as strategies and activities to increase the radon awareness of the public and decision-makers and to involve the building sector. The impact of and the need for actions caused by the BSS requirements on the Austrian radon legislation, strategy and programme are discussed.

  10. NRC action plan developed as a result of the TMI-2 accident. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Action Plan provides a comprehensive and integrated plan for all actions judged necessary by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to correct or improve the regulation and operation of nuclear facilities based on the experience from the accident at the Three Mile Island, Unit 2, nuclear facility and the official studies and investigations of the accident. The tables included in this volume list the recommendations from the various organizations and task forces investigating the accident at Three Mile Island. The tables are annotated to provide easy references to the associated parts of the Action Plan in Volume 1. The tables are also annotated to provide a shorthand indication of how the various recommendations are treated in the Action Plan

  11. Fiscal Year 2013 Trails Management Program Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report, October 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pava, Daniel S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-25

    This Trails Management Program Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report (Trails MAPAR) has been prepared for the Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) as part of implementing the 2003 Final Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Los Alamos National Laboratory Trails Management Program (DOE 2003). The Trails Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is now a part of the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (DOE/EIS 0380) Mitigation Action Plan (2008 SWEIS MAP) (DOE 2008). The MAP provides guidance for the continued implementation of the Trails Management Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and integration of future mitigation actions into the 2008 SWEIS MAP to decrease impacts associated with recreational trails use at LANL. This eighth MAPAR includes a summary of Trails Management Program activities and actions during Fiscal Year (FY) 2013, from October 2012 through September 2013.

  12. Workshop on ENU Mutagenesis: Planning for Saturation, July 25-28, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadeau, Joseph H

    2002-07-25

    The goal of the conference is to enhance the development of improved technologies and new approaches to the identification of genes underlying chemically-induced mutant phenotypes. The conference brings together ENU mutagenesis experts from the United States and aborad for a small, intensive workshop to consider these issues.

  13. Representation and Integration: Combining Robot Control, High-Level Planning, and Action Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrick, Ronald; Kraft, Dirk; Mourao, Kira;

    We describe an approach to integrated robot control, high-level planning, and action effect learning that attempts to overcome the representational difficulties that exist between these diverse areas. Our approach combines ideas from robot vision, knowledgelevel planning, and connectionist machin......-level action specifications, suitable for planning, from a robot’s interactions with the world. We present a detailed overview of our approach and show how it supports the learning of certain aspects of a high-level lepresentation from low-level world state information.......We describe an approach to integrated robot control, high-level planning, and action effect learning that attempts to overcome the representational difficulties that exist between these diverse areas. Our approach combines ideas from robot vision, knowledgelevel planning, and connectionist machine...

  14. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 2, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root cause of the findings identified during the assessment. This report is concerned with reactors safety and health findings, responses, and planned actions. Specific areas include: organization and administration; quality verification; operations; maintenance; training and certification; auxiliary systems; emergency preparedness; technical support; nuclear criticality safety; security/safety interface; experimental activities; site/facility safety review; radiological protection; personnel protection; fire protection; management findings, responses, and planned actions; self-assessment findings, responses, and planned actions; and summary of planned actions, schedules, and costs.

  15. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 2, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root cause of the findings identified during the assessment. This report is concerned with reactors safety and health findings, responses, and planned actions. Specific areas include: organization and administration; quality verification; operations; maintenance; training and certification; auxiliary systems; emergency preparedness; technical support; nuclear criticality safety; security/safety interface; experimental activities; site/facility safety review; radiological protection; personnel protection; fire protection; management findings, responses, and planned actions; self-assessment findings, responses, and planned actions; and summary of planned actions, schedules, and costs

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139 is located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 139 is comprised of the seven corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-35-01, Burn Pit; (2) 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; (3) 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; (4) 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; (5) 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; (6) 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and (7) 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives with the exception of CASs 09-23-01 and 09-34-01. Regarding these two CASs, CAS 09-23-01 is a gravel gertie where a zero-yield test was conducted with all contamination confined to below ground within the area of the structure, and CAS 09-34-01 is an underground detection station where no contaminants are present. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for the other five CASs where information is insufficient. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 4, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 139

  17. Education in Environmental Chemistry: Setting the Agenda and Recommending Action. A Workshop Report Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoller, Uri

    2005-08-01

    Worldwide, the essence of the current reform in science education is a paradigm shift from algorithmic, lower-order cognitive skills (LOCS) teaching to higher-order cognitive skills (HOCS) learning. In the context of education in environmental chemistry (EEC), the ultimate goal is to educate students to be science technology environment society (STES)-literate, capable of evaluative thinking, decision making, problem solving and taking responsible action accordingly. Educators need to translate this goal into effective courses that can be implemented: this includes developing teaching strategies and assessment methodologies that are consonant with the goal of HOCS learning. An international workshop—"Environmental Chemistry Education in Europe: Setting the Agenda"—yielded two main recommendations for those undertaking educational reform in science education, particularly to promote meaningful EEC. The first recommendation concerns integration of environmental sciences into core chemistry courses as well as the development and implementation of HOCS-promoting teaching strategies and assessment methodologies in chemical education. The second emphasizes the development of students' HOCS for transfer, followed by performance assessment of HOCS. This requires changing the way environmental chemistry is typically taught, moving from a narrowly focused approach (applied analytical, ecotoxicological, or environmental engineering chemistry) to an interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approach.

  18. National climate change action plans: Interim report for developing and transition countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benioff, R.; Ness, E.; Hirst, J. [eds.

    1997-10-01

    Under its Support for National Action Plans (SNAP) initiative, the U.S. Country Studies Program is providing financial and technical assistance to 18 countries for the development of climate change action plans. Although most of the countries have not yet completed their plans, the important lessons learned thus far are valuable and should be shared with other countries and international institutions that have an interest in the process of action plan development. This interim report describes the experience of 11 countries that are the furthest along in their planning activity and who have offered to share their results to date with the larger community of interested nations. These action plans delineate specific mitigation and adaptation measures that the countries will implement and integrate into their ongoing development programs. This report focuses on the measures the countries have selected and the methods they used to prepare their action plans. This executive summary presents key lessons and common themes using a structure similar to that used in the individual country chapters.

  19. National Wildlife Refuge System Action Plan : Response to Independent Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Refuge System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This action plan is the first in what the Leadership Team intends to be a recurring annual plan to monitor and address overall Refuge System effectiveness. The plan...

  20. 78 FR 23740 - Notice of Availability of a Swine Brucellosis and Pseudorabies Proposed Action Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ... Register (78 FR 9028-9029, Docket No. APHIS-2010-0086) a notice that made a proposed action plan describing... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Notice of Availability of a Swine Brucellosis and Pseudorabies... swine brucellosis and pseudorabies available for public review and comment. This action will...

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 240: Area 25 Vehicle Washdown Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE/NV

    1999-01-25

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 240, Area 25 Vehicle Washdown, which is located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS).

  2. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. L. Gustafason

    2001-02-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 2000). The CAU includes two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 25-23-09, Contaminated Waste Dump Number 1; and 25-23-03, Contaminated Waste Dump Number 2. Investigation of CAU 143 was conducted in 1999. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against preliminary action levels to determine constituents of concern for CAU 143. Radionuclide concentrations in disposal pit soil samples associated with the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility West Trenches, the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility East Trestle Pit, and the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility Trench are greater than normal background concentrations. These constituents are identified as constituents of concern for their respective CASs. Closure-in-place with administrative controls involves use restrictions to minimize access and prevent unauthorized intrusive activities, earthwork to fill depressions to original grade, placing additional clean cover material over the previously filled portion of some of the trenches, and placing secondary or diversion berm around pertinent areas to divert storm water run-on potential.

  3. Too much talk and not enough action over obesity plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-12

    After all the build-up and delays, it was probably no surprise that the government's eagerly-awaited childhood obesity plan has been derided for being too timid. The 13-page document - relatively light considering the severity of the posed threat - fails to mention tighter controls on advertising unhealthy food and drinks to children and families. Without these controls it is hard to see how the plan's stated aim of reducing childhood obesity in England over the next ten years can be met. PMID:27615563

  4. Corrective action investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 340, Pesticide Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This Correction Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense. As required by the FFACO (1996), this document provides or references all of the specific information for planning investigation activities associated with three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These CASs are collectively known as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 340, Pesticide Release Sites. According to the FFACO, CASs are sites that may require corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. These sites are CAS 23-21-01, Area 23 Quonset Hut 800 (Q800) Pesticide Release Ditch; CAS 23-18-03, Area 23 Skid Huts Pesticide Storage; and CAS 15-18-02, Area 15 Quonset Hut 15-11 Pesticide Storage (Q15-11). The purpose of this CAIP for CAU 340 is to direct and guide the investigation for the evaluation of the nature and extent of pesticides, herbicides, and other contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) that were stored, mixed, and/or disposed of at each of the CASs.

  5. Empowering Parents in the College-Planning Process: An Action-Inquiry Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Ronald E.; Griffen, Jacalyn

    2015-01-01

    Involving parents in the college-planning process is essential to increasing access for students from low-income communities of color. Using the action inquiry model, we explore how collaboration between a school district and a university can empower parents to engage in meaningful conversations and planning related to college access. This…

  6. An Action Research Plan for Developing and Implementing the Students' Listening Comprehension Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chunpin

    2008-01-01

    This is a proposal for an action research plan designed to find out how to improve students' listening comprehension skills, enhance their performance and help to promote better learning. This plan is focused on the minority students who major in English in our University. Listening comprehension is one of the most difficult courses for them. As…

  7. Group Action Planning: An Innovative Manual for Building a Self-Determined Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Emma Longan; And Others

    This manual is designed to provide adolescents and young adults who have disabilities with a blueprint for setting and achieving goals, making decisions, acquiring needed supports, and achieving a self-determined and sustainable lifestyle. A planning process called Group Action Planning is used as a foundation for self-determination, with…

  8. Proposals for the National Environmental Health Action Plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José María Ordóñez Iriarte

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available According to international strategies for environment and health, the spanish administration of Health and Environment launched in 2007 the necessary mechanisms for developing the National Plan for Health and Environment. The first step was an agreement with the Carlos III Health Institute for designing the basis on which to sus- tain the plan. The scientific committee established for that purpose has drafted a basis-report with the participation of a large group of experts. This work is an abstract of the proposals contained in that report. The proposals refer to the items considered as a priority in the European environment and health strategy, ie, cancer, endocrine disruption, neuro-developmental disorders and respiratory diseases and are organized around the major environmental risk factors for health: water, persistent toxic chemicals, electromagnetic fields, ionizing radiation, noise and climate change and extreme temperatures. To give consistency to the plan, the report identifies some essential measures to ensure its administrative, political, technical and financial feasibility. To give it coherence, the report point to some common priorities and methodological strategies. To give a shape to the plan, the report finally identifies programs to be implemented.

  9. EDITORIAL: Special section: Selected papers from the Third European Workshop on Monte Carlo Treatment Planning (MCTP2012) Special section: Selected papers from the Third European Workshop on Monte Carlo Treatment Planning (MCTP2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spezi, Emiliano; Leal, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    The Third European Workshop on Monte Carlo Treatment Planning (MCTP2012) was held from 15-18 May, 2012 in Seville, Spain. The event was organized by the Universidad de Sevilla with the support of the European Workgroup on Monte Carlo Treatment Planning (EWG-MCTP). MCTP2012 followed two successful meetings, one held in Ghent (Belgium) in 2006 (Reynaert 2007) and one in Cardiff (UK) in 2009 (Spezi 2010). The recurrence of these workshops together with successful events held in parallel by McGill University in Montreal (Seuntjens et al 2012), show consolidated interest from the scientific community in Monte Carlo (MC) treatment planning. The workshop was attended by a total of 90 participants, mainly coming from a medical physics background. A total of 48 oral presentations and 15 posters were delivered in specific scientific sessions including dosimetry, code development, imaging, modelling of photon and electron radiation transport, external beam radiation therapy, nuclear medicine, brachitherapy and hadrontherapy. A copy of the programme is available on the workshop's website (www.mctp2012.com). In this special section of Physics in Medicine and Biology we report six papers that were selected following the journal's rigorous peer review procedure. These papers actually provide a good cross section of the areas of application of MC in treatment planning that were discussed at MCTP2012. Czarnecki and Zink (2013) and Wagner et al (2013) present the results of their work in small field dosimetry. Czarnecki and Zink (2013) studied field size and detector dependent correction factors for diodes and ion chambers within a clinical 6MV photon beam generated by a Siemens linear accelerator. Their modelling work based on the BEAMnrc/EGSnrc codes and experimental measurements revealed that unshielded diodes were the best choice for small field dosimetry because of their independence from the electron beam spot size and correction factor close to unity. Wagner et al (2013

  10. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2004-05-03

    The general purpose of this Corrective Action Investigation Plan is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective action alternatives (CAAs) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. Located in Areas 6 and 15 on the NTS, CAU 543 is comprised of a total of seven corrective action sites (CASs), one in Area 6 and six in Area 15. The CAS in Area 6 consists of a Decontamination Facility and its components which are associated with decontamination of equipment, vehicles, and materials related to nuclear testing. The six CASs in Area 15 are located at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Farm and are related to waste disposal activities at the farm. Sources of possible contamination at Area 6 include potentially contaminated process waste effluent discharged through a process waste system, a sanitary waste stream generated within buildings of the Decon Facility, and radiologically contaminated materials stored within a portion of the facility yard. At Area 15, sources of potential contamination are associated with the dairy operations and the animal tests and experiments involving radionuclide uptake. Identified contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides, herbicides, polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and radionuclides. Three corrective action closure alternatives - No Further Action, Close in Place, or Clean Closure - will be recommended for CAU 543 based on an evaluation of all the data quality objective-related data. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

  11. 300-FF-1 remedial design report/remedial action work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 300 Area has been divided into three operable units 300-FF-1, 300-FF-2, and 300-FF-5 all of which are in various stages of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) process. The 300-FF-1 Operable Unit, the subject of this report, includes liquid waste disposal sites, landfills, and a burial ground. This Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan (RDR/RAWP) provides a summary description of each waste site included in the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit, the basis for remedial actions to be taken, and the remedial action approach and management process for implementing these actions. The remedial action approach and management sections provide a description of the remedial action process description, the project schedule, the project team, required planning documentation, the remedial action change process, the process for verifying attainment of the remedial action goals, and the required CERCLA and RCRA closeout documentation. Appendix A provides additional details on each waste site. In addition to remediation of the waste sites, waste generated during the remedial investigation/feasibility study portions of the project will also be disposed at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). Appendix B provides a summary of the modeling performed in the 300-FF-1 Phase 3 FS and a description of the modeling effort to be used to show attainment of the remedial action goals. Appendix C provides the sampling and analysis plan (SAP) for all sampling and field-screening activities performed during remediation and for verification of attainment with the remedial action goals. Appendix D provides the public involvement plan, prepared to ensure information is provided to the public during remedial design and remedial action processes

  12. The role of immediate and final goals in action planning: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdandzić, Jasminka; Grol, Meike J; van Schie, Hein T; Verhagen, Lennart; Toni, Ivan; Bekkering, Harold

    2007-08-15

    To interact effectively with our environment, we need to specify the intended outcomes (goals) of our actions. In this process, immediate goals and final goals can be regarded as different levels within a hierarchically organized system for action planning: immediate goals and movement details are selected to accomplish more remote goals. Behavioral studies support this notion of different levels of action planning, but the neurophysiological basis remains unclear. Using fMRI, we examined the neural correlates of preparing object manipulations based on either the desired end-state (the final goal) or the initial movement towards a target (the immediate goal). Subjects had to insert an object (consisting of a large and a small cube) into one of two corresponding large and small slots. The subjects were cued on either which slot to fill (Final Goal trials) or which object part to grasp (Immediate Goal trials). These actions required similar movements, but different planning. During Final Goal trials, there was differential preparatory activity along the superior frontal gyrus (bilaterally) and in left inferior parietal cortex. Immediate Goal trials evoked differential activity in occipito-parietal and occipito-temporal cortex. These findings support the notion that actions can be planned at different levels. We show that different fronto-parietal circuits plan the same action, by a relative emphasis on either selecting a sequence of movements to achieve a desired end-state, or selecting movements spatially compatible with given object properties.

  13. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 137: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.:0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2005-12-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 137: Waste Disposal Sites. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 137 contains sites that are located in Areas 1, 3, 7, 9, and 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 137 is comprised of the eight corrective action sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) CAS 01-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; (2) CAS 03-23-01, Waste Disposal Site; (3) CAS 03-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (4) CAS 03-99-15, Waste Disposal Site; (5) CAS 07-23-02, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (6) CAS 09-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (7) CAS 12-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; and (8) CAS 12-23-07, Waste Disposal Site. The Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, geophysical surveys, sampling of environmental media, analysis of samples, and assessment of investigation results, where appropriate. Data will be obtained to support corrective action alternative evaluations and waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 137 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before evaluating and selecting

  14. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 22, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root causes of the findings identified during the assessment. The action plan has benefited from a complete review by various offices at DOE Headquarters as well as review by the Tiger Team that conducted the assessment to ensure that the described actions are responsive to the observed problems

  15. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 22, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root causes of the findings identified during the assessment. The action plan has benefited from a complete review by various offices at DOE Headquarters as well as review by the Tiger Team that conducted the assessment to ensure that the described actions are responsive to the observed problems.

  16. Removal Action Plan for the Accelerated Retrieval Project for a Described Area within Pit 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. M. Tyson

    2006-08-01

    This Removal Action Plan documents the plan for implementation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compenstion, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action to be performed by the Accelerated Retrieval Project. The focus of the action is the limited excavation and retrieval of selected waste streams from a designated portion of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Subsurface Disposal Area that are contaminated with volatile organic compounds, isotopes of uranium, or transuranic radionuclides. The selected retrieval area is approximately 0.2 ha (1/2 acre) and is located in the eastern portion of Pit 4. The proposed project is referred to as the Accelerated Retrieval Project. This Removal Action Plan details the major work elements, operations approach, and schedule, and summarizes the environmental, safety and health, and waste management considerations associated with the project.

  17. Interaction in planning movement direction for articulatory gestures and manual actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainio, Lari; Tiainen, Mikko; Tiippana, Kaisa; Komeilipoor, Naeem; Vainio, Martti

    2015-10-01

    Some theories concerning speech mechanisms assume that overlapping representations are involved in programming certain articulatory gestures and hand actions. The present study investigated whether planning of movement direction for articulatory gestures and manual actions could interact. The participants were presented with written vowels (Experiment 1) or syllables (Experiment 2) that were associated with forward or backward movement of tongue (e.g., [i] vs. [ɑ] or [te] vs. [ke], respectively). They were required to pronounce the speech unit and simultaneously move the joystick forward or backward according to the color of the stimulus. Manual and vocal responses were performed relatively rapidly when the articulation and the hand action required movement into the same direction. The study suggests that planning horizontal tongue movements for articulation shares overlapping neural mechanisms with planning horizontal movement direction of hand actions. PMID:26126804

  18. Removal Action Plan for the Accelerated Retrieval Project for a Described Area within Pit 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Removal Action Plan documents the plan for implementation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action to be performed by the Accelerated Retrieval Project. The focus of the action is the limited excavation and retrieval of selected waste streams from a designated portion of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Subsurface Disposal Area that are contaminated with volatile organic compounds, isotopes of uranium, or transuranic radionuclides. The selected retrieval area is approximately 0.2 ha (1/2 acre) and is located in the eastern portion of Pit 4. The proposed project is referred to as the Accelerated Retrieval Project. This Removal Action Plan details the major work elements, operations approach, and schedule, and summarizes the environmental, safety and health, and waste management considerations associated with the project

  19. Office of River Protection Integrated Safety Management System Phase 1 Verification Corrective Action Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan is to demonstrate the OW planned and/or completed actions to implement ISMS as well as prepare for the RPP ISMS Phase II Verification scheduled for August, 1999. This Plan collates implied or explicit ORP actions identified in several key ISMS documents and aligns those actions and responsibilities perceived necessary to appropriately disposition all ISM Phase II preparation activities specific to the ORP. The objective will be to complete or disposition the corrective actions prior to the commencement of the ISMS Phase II Verification. Improvement products/tasks not slated for completion prior to the RPP Phase II verification will be incorporated as corrective actions into the Strategic System Execution Plan (SSEP) Gap Analysis. Many of the business and management systems that were reviewed in the ISMS Phase I verification are being modified to support the ORP transition and are being assessed through the SSEP. The actions and processes identified in the SSEP will support the development of the ORP and continued ISMS implementation as committed to be complete by end of FY-2000

  20. National stakeholder workshop summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This is a summary of the plenary sessions and small group discussion sessions from the fourth National Stakeholder Workshop sponsored by the DOE Office of Worker and Community Transition held in Atlanta, Georgia on March 13--15, 1996. Topics of the sessions included work force planning and restructuring, worker participation in health and safety, review of actions and commitments, lessons learned in collective bargaining agreements, work force restructuring guidance, work force planning, update on community transition activities. Also included are appendices listing the participants and DOE contacts.

  1. Patient-centered cancer treatment planning: improving the quality of oncology care. Summary of an Institute of Medicine workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Erin P; Ganz, Patricia A; Murphy, Sharon B; Nass, Sharyl J; Ferrell, Betty R; Stovall, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's National Cancer Policy Forum recently convened a workshop on patient-centered cancer treatment planning, with the aim of raising awareness about this important but often overlooked aspect of cancer treatment. A primary goal of patient-centered treatment planning is to engage patients and their families in meaningful, thorough interactions with their health care providers to develop an accurate, well-conceived treatment plan, using all available medical information appropriately while also considering the medical, social, and cultural needs and desires of the patient and family. A cancer treatment plan can be shared among the patient, family, and care team in order to facilitate care coordination and provide a roadmap to help patients navigate the path of cancer treatment. There are numerous obstacles to achieving patient-centered cancer treatment planning in practice. Some of these challenges stem from the patient and include patients' lack of assertiveness, health literacy, and numeracy, and their emotional state and concurrent illnesses. Others are a result of physician limitations, such as a lack of time to explain complex information and a lack of tools to facilitate treatment planning, as well as insensitivity to patients' informational, cultural, and emotional needs. Potential solutions to address these obstacles include better training of health care providers and patients in optimal communication and shared decision making, and greater use of support services and tools such as patient navigation and electronic health records. Other options include greater use of quality metrics and reimbursement for the time it takes to develop, discuss, and document a treatment plan. PMID:22128118

  2. An investigation into the relevance of action planning, theory of planned behaviour concepts, and automaticity for fruit intake action control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J. de Bruijn; A. Wiedemann; R.E. Rhodes

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In the action control framework, intention-behaviour discordance is studied around public health guidelines. Although this framework has been applied to physical activity behaviours, it has only seen very limited attention regarding fruit intake. The purpose of this study was therefore to

  3. Remedial action and waste disposal project - ERDF readiness evaluation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Readiness Evaluation Report presents the results of the project readiness evaluation to assess the readiness of the Environmental Restoration and Disposal Facility. The evaluation was conducted at the conclusion of a series of readiness activities that began in January 1996. These activities included completion of the physical plant; preparation, review, and approval of operating procedures; definition and assembly of the necessary project and operational organizations; and activities leading to regulatory approval of the plant and operating plans

  4. Network workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Evans, Robert Harry

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the background for, realisation of and author reflections on a network workshop held at ESERA2013. As a new research area in science education, networks offer a unique opportunity to visualise and find patterns and relationships in complicated social or academic network data....... These include student relations and interactions and epistemic and linguistic networks of words, concepts and actions. Network methodology has already found use in science education research. However, while networks hold the potential for new insights, they have not yet found wide use in the science education...... research community. With this workshop, participants were offered a way into network science based on authentic educational research data. The workshop was constructed as an inquiry lesson with emphasis on user autonomy. Learning activities had participants choose to work with one of two cases of networks...

  5. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-04-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490, Station 44 Burn Area is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). CAU 490 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) and includes for Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (1) Fire Training Area (CAS 03-56-001-03BA); (2) Station 44 Burn Area (CAS RG-56-001-RGBA); (3) Sandia Service Yard (CAS 03-58-001-03FN); and (4) Gun Propellant Burn Area (CAS 09-54-001-09L2).

  6. DOUBLE TRACKS Test Site interim corrective action plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The DOUBLE TRACKS site is located on Range 71 north of the Nellis Air Force Range, northwest of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). DOUBLE TRACKS was the first of four experiments that constituted Operation ROLLER COASTER. On May 15, 1963, weapons-grade plutonium and depleted uranium were dispersed using 54 kilograms of trinitrotoluene (TNT) explosive. The explosion occurred in the open, 0.3 m above the steel plate. No fission yield was detected from the test, and the total amount of plutonium deposited on the ground surface was estimated to be between 980 and 1,600 grams. The test device was composed primarily of uranium-238 and plutonium-239. The mass ratio of uranium to plutonium was 4.35. The objective of the corrective action is to reduce the potential risk to human health and the environment and to demonstrate technically viable and cost-effective excavation, transportation, and disposal. To achieve these objectives, Bechtel Nevada (BN) will remove soil with a total transuranic activity greater then 200 pCI/g, containerize the soil in ``supersacks,`` transport the filled ``supersacks`` to the NTS, and dispose of them in the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site. During this interim corrective action, BN will also conduct a limited demonstration of an alternative method for excavation of radioactive near-surface soil contamination.

  7. Corrective action investigation plan for the Roller Coaster RADSAFE Area, Corrective Action Unit 407, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. CAUs consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU No. 407, the Roller Coaster RADSAFE Area (RCRSA) which is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range Complex, is approximately 255 km (140 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU No. 407 is comprised of only one CAS (TA-23-001-TARC). The RCRSA was used during May and June 1963 to decontaminate vehicles, equipment, and personnel from the Clean Slate tests. The surface and subsurface soils are likely to have been impacted by plutonium and other contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) associated with decontamination activities at this site. The purpose of the corrective action investigation described in this CAIP is to: identify the presence and nature of COPCs; determine the vertical and lateral extent of COPCs; and provide sufficient information and data to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for the CAS.

  8. Corrective action investigation plan for the Roller Coaster RADSAFE Area, Corrective Action Unit 407, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. CAUs consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU No. 407, the Roller Coaster RADSAFE Area (RCRSA) which is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range Complex, is approximately 255 km (140 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU No. 407 is comprised of only one CAS (TA-23-001-TARC). The RCRSA was used during May and June 1963 to decontaminate vehicles, equipment, and personnel from the Clean Slate tests. The surface and subsurface soils are likely to have been impacted by plutonium and other contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) associated with decontamination activities at this site. The purpose of the corrective action investigation described in this CAIP is to: identify the presence and nature of COPCs; determine the vertical and lateral extent of COPCs; and provide sufficient information and data to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for the CAS

  9. Population attributable fraction: planning of diseases prevention actions in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rezende, Leandro Fórnias Machado; Eluf, José

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epidemiology is the study of occurrence, distribution and determinants of health-related events, including the application of that knowledge to the prevention and control of health problems. However, epidemiological studies, in most cases, have limited their research questions to determinants of health outcomes. Research related to the application of knowledge for prevention and control of diseases have been neglected. In this comment, we present a description of how population attributable fraction estimates can provide important elements for planning of prevention and control of diseases in Brazil. PMID:27305404

  10. Probabilistic Planning with Imperfect Sensing Actions Using Hybrid Probabilistic Logic Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Emad

    Effective planning in uncertain environment is important to agents and multi-agents systems. In this paper, we introduce a new logic based approach to probabilistic contingent planning (probabilistic planning with imperfect sensing actions), by relating probabilistic contingent planning to normal hybrid probabilistic logic programs with probabilistic answer set semantics [24]. We show that any probabilistic contingent planning problem can be encoded as a normal hybrid probabilistic logic program. We formally prove the correctness of our approach. Moreover, we show that the complexity of finding a probabilistic contingent plan in our approach is NP-complete. In addition, we show that any probabilistic contingent planning problem, \\cal PP, can be encoded as a classical normal logic program with answer set semantics, whose answer sets corresponds to valid trajectories in \\cal PP. We show that probabilistic contingent planning problems can be encoded as SAT problems. We present a new high level probabilistic action description language that allows the representation of sensing actions with probabilistic outcomes.

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfred Wickline

    2009-04-01

    Conduct radiological surveys. • Perform field screening. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine the nature and extent of any contamination released by each CAS. • Collect samples of source material to determine the potential for a release. • Collect samples of potential remediation wastes. • Collect quality control samples. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; DOE, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted following approval of the plan.

  12. Plan of action for solar energy 1995-97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of Denmark's energy policy of utilizing renewable energy sources this plan of management covering 3 years (1995-97) has been produced by the Committee for Solar Energy (Solenergiudvalget) at the request of the Danish Energy Agency. It is stated that during 1992-94 the use of solar energy has developed satisfactorily. Supported by state subsidies, local and national information dissemination campaigns have stimulated sales which have increased from 200 to ca. 2500 solar heating systems annually during the past 7 years. The total number of these systems established in Denmark is 16.000. Resulting energy savings are 0.25% of total energy consumption for space and water heating. Yet some goals have been not yet been reached, the development of passive solar heating integrated in buildings and photovoltaic conversion has not been satisfactory. Attention should now be concentrated on these latter aspects but priority should still be given to active solar heating systems. Traditional suppliers should now be included in information dissemination activities. It is reckoned that state subsidies should no longer be necessary for solar energy promotion shortly after 1997, but this form of economical aid should be withdrawn gradually as development within this field continues. Standard subsidies should not be donated regionally. More details are given of plans for each of the 3 years, and of the the status, potentials and barriers for usage of solar energy in Denmark. Detailed lists are offered of available authorized Danish solar heating systems in relation to manufacturers. (AB)

  13. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 565: Stored Samples, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickline, Alfred; McCall, Robert

    2006-08-01

    unrestricted use. This Corrective Action Investigation has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan.

  14. An Ontological Model of Behaviour Theory to Generate Personalized Action Plans to Modify Behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Wasif; Abidi, Samina; Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    2016-01-01

    Behavior change approaches aim to assist patients in achieving self-efficacy in managing their condition. Social cognitive theory (SCT) stipulates self-efficacy as a central element to behavior change and provides constructs to achieve self-efficacy guided by person-specific action plans. In our work, to administer behaviour change in patient with chronic conditions, our approach entails the computerization of SCT-based self-efficacy constructs in order to generate personalized action plans that are suitable to an individual's current care scenario. We have taken a knowledge management approach, whereby we have computerized the SCT-based self-efficacy constructs in terms of a high-level SCT knowledge model that can be operationalized to generate personalized behaviour change action plans. We have collected and computerized behavior change content targeting healthy living and physical activity. Semantic web technologies have been used to develop the SCT knowledge model, represented in terms of an ontology and SWRL rules. The ontological SCT model can inferred to generate personalized self-management action plans for a given patient profile. We present formative evaluation of the clinical correctness and relevance of the generated personalized action plans for a range of test patient profiles. PMID:27577412

  15. An Ontological Model of Behaviour Theory to Generate Personalized Action Plans to Modify Behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Wasif; Abidi, Samina; Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    2016-01-01

    Behavior change approaches aim to assist patients in achieving self-efficacy in managing their condition. Social cognitive theory (SCT) stipulates self-efficacy as a central element to behavior change and provides constructs to achieve self-efficacy guided by person-specific action plans. In our work, to administer behaviour change in patient with chronic conditions, our approach entails the computerization of SCT-based self-efficacy constructs in order to generate personalized action plans that are suitable to an individual's current care scenario. We have taken a knowledge management approach, whereby we have computerized the SCT-based self-efficacy constructs in terms of a high-level SCT knowledge model that can be operationalized to generate personalized behaviour change action plans. We have collected and computerized behavior change content targeting healthy living and physical activity. Semantic web technologies have been used to develop the SCT knowledge model, represented in terms of an ontology and SWRL rules. The ontological SCT model can inferred to generate personalized self-management action plans for a given patient profile. We present formative evaluation of the clinical correctness and relevance of the generated personalized action plans for a range of test patient profiles.

  16. N Springs expedited response action performance monitoring plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater contained in the 100-NR-2 Operable Unit is contaminated with various radionuclides derived from waste water disposal practices and spills associated with 100-N Reactor operations. Of primary concern is the presence of high levels of 90Sr in the groundwater and the discharge of 90Sr-contaminated groundwater to the nearby Columbia River through historic river bank seeps known as ''N Springs.'' A pump-and-treat system is being installed to remove 90Sr contamination from the groundwater as part of the N Springs expedited response action (ERA). The groundwater extraction system will consist of four extraction and two injection wells with a proposed initial treatment capacity of 50 gal/min. The proposed location of the groundwater extraction system relative to the 90Sr groundwater plume is presented

  17. Workshop on Key Issues in Major Research Plan "Study on the Signal Conduction Process Based on Chemical Small Molecular Probe" Held

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The workshop on key analysis method and largescale facilities application in the project of Major Research Plan "Study on the Signal Conduction Process Based on Chemical Small Molecular Probe" was held in the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Anhui on January 5th, 2008.

  18. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 309: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Strand

    2004-12-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 309, Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Corrective Action Unit 309 is located in Area 12 of the NTS, which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Area 12 is approximately 40 mi beyond the main gate to the NTS. Corrective Action Unit 309 is comprised of the three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: CAS 12-06-09, Muckpile; CAS 12-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump (CWD); and CAS 12-28-01, I, J, and K-Tunnel Debris. Corrective Action Sites 12-06-09 and 12-08-02 will be collectively referred to as muckpiles in this document. Corrective Action Site 12-28-01 will be referred to as the fallout plume because of the extensive lateral area of debris and fallout contamination resulting from the containment failures of the J-and K-Tunnels. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and media sampling, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 309 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination at these sites are insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a CAI prior to evaluating corrective action

  19. Canceling planned action: an FMRI study of countermanding saccades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Clayton E; Cole, Michael W; Rao, Vikas Y; D'Esposito, Mark

    2005-09-01

    We investigated the voluntary control of motor behavior by studying the process of deciding whether or not to execute a movement. We imaged the human dorsal cortex while subjects performed a countermanding task that allowed us to manipulate the probability that subjects would be able to cancel a planned saccade in response to an imperative stop signal. We modeled the behavioral data as a race between gaze-shifting mechanisms and gaze-holding mechanisms towards a finish line where a saccade is generated or canceled, and estimated that saccade cancelation took approximately 160 ms. The frontal eye fields showed greater activation on stop signal trials regardless of successful cancelation, suggesting coactivation of saccade and fixation mechanisms. The supplementary eye fields, however, distinguished between successful and unsuccessful cancelation, suggesting a role in monitoring performance. These oculomotor regions play distinct roles in the decision processes mediating saccadic choice. PMID:15616130

  20. Renewable energy plan of action for American Samoa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shupe, J.W. (USDOE San Francisco Operations Office, Honolulu, HI (USA). Pacific Site Office); Stevens, J.W. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-11-01

    American Samoa has no indigenous fossil fuels and is almost totally dependent for energy on seaborne petroleum. However, the seven Pacific Islands located at 14 degrees south latitude that constitute American Samoa have a wide variety of renewable resources with the potential for substituting for imported oil. Included as possible renewable energy conversion technologies are solar thermal, photovoltaics, wind, geothermal, ocean thermal, and waste-to-energy recovery. This report evaluates the potential of each of these renewable energy alternatives and establishes recommended priorities for their development in American Samoa. Rough cost estimates are also included. Although renewable energy planning is highly site specific, information in this report should find some general application to other tropical insular areas.

  1. EDITORIAL: Special section: Selected papers from the Third European Workshop on Monte Carlo Treatment Planning (MCTP2012) Special section: Selected papers from the Third European Workshop on Monte Carlo Treatment Planning (MCTP2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spezi, Emiliano; Leal, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    The Third European Workshop on Monte Carlo Treatment Planning (MCTP2012) was held from 15-18 May, 2012 in Seville, Spain. The event was organized by the Universidad de Sevilla with the support of the European Workgroup on Monte Carlo Treatment Planning (EWG-MCTP). MCTP2012 followed two successful meetings, one held in Ghent (Belgium) in 2006 (Reynaert 2007) and one in Cardiff (UK) in 2009 (Spezi 2010). The recurrence of these workshops together with successful events held in parallel by McGill University in Montreal (Seuntjens et al 2012), show consolidated interest from the scientific community in Monte Carlo (MC) treatment planning. The workshop was attended by a total of 90 participants, mainly coming from a medical physics background. A total of 48 oral presentations and 15 posters were delivered in specific scientific sessions including dosimetry, code development, imaging, modelling of photon and electron radiation transport, external beam radiation therapy, nuclear medicine, brachitherapy and hadrontherapy. A copy of the programme is available on the workshop's website (www.mctp2012.com). In this special section of Physics in Medicine and Biology we report six papers that were selected following the journal's rigorous peer review procedure. These papers actually provide a good cross section of the areas of application of MC in treatment planning that were discussed at MCTP2012. Czarnecki and Zink (2013) and Wagner et al (2013) present the results of their work in small field dosimetry. Czarnecki and Zink (2013) studied field size and detector dependent correction factors for diodes and ion chambers within a clinical 6MV photon beam generated by a Siemens linear accelerator. Their modelling work based on the BEAMnrc/EGSnrc codes and experimental measurements revealed that unshielded diodes were the best choice for small field dosimetry because of their independence from the electron beam spot size and correction factor close to unity. Wagner et al (2013

  2. Local Climate Action Plans in climate change mitigation - examining the case of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsø, Tue Noa Jacques; Kjær, Tyge; Christensen, Thomas Budde

    2016-01-01

    The article examines the climate action plans (CAPs) of local governments (LGs) in Denmark. Applying a quantitative content analysis approach, all available Danish LG action plans within the climate and energy field has been collected and coded, giving insight into the extent of LG CAPs. We assess...... the extent, targets and scope of LG CAPs and find that Danish LGs are highly involved in mitigation activities with a widespread CAP adoption and an overall high degree of sectoral coverage on base year accounts and action plans, albeit with some significant shortcomings. Different approaches for target...... and scope definition are identified and assessed, and the overall contribution of LGs to the Danish energy transition is discussed....

  3. Recent experience in the use of IAEA planning methodologies for energy, electricity and nuclear power planning among Member States of Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. Proceedings of a workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the proceedings of a workshop held in Budapest, Hungary, from 18 to 22 July 1994. The workshop had, as a basic objective, the promotion of the regional exchange of experience in the use of the IAEA's planning tools and of providing a forum for further co-operation among participating countries. This report is intended to serve as a useful guide for the users of the IAEA planning models, as well as energy and electricity planners in general. Refs, figs, tabs

  4. Resource management and operations in central North Dakota: Climate change scenario planning workshop summary November 12-13, 2015, Bismarck, ND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisichelli, Nicholas A.; Shuurman, Gregor; Symstad, Amy; Ray, Andrea; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Miller, Brian; Rowland, Erika

    2016-01-01

    The Scaling Climate Change Adaptation in the Northern Great Plains through Regional Climate Summaries and Local Qualitative-Quantitative Scenario Planning Workshops project synthesizes climate data into 3-5 distinct but plausible climate summaries for the northern Great Plains region; crafts quantitative summaries of these climate futures for two focal areas; and applies these local summaries by developing climate-resource-management scenarios through participatory workshops and, where possible, simulation models. The two focal areas are central North Dakota and southwest South Dakota (Figure 1). The primary objective of this project is to help resource managers and scientists in a focal area use scenario planning to make management and planning decisions based on assessments of critical future uncertainties.This report summarizes project work for public and tribal lands in the central North Dakota focal area, with an emphasis on Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site. The report explainsscenario planning as an adaptation tool in general, then describes how it was applied to the central North Dakota focal area in three phases. Priority resource management and climate uncertainties were identified in the orientation phase. Local climate summaries for relevant, divergent, and challenging climate scenarios were developed in the second phase. In the final phase, a two-day scenario planning workshop held November 12-13, 2015 in Bismarck, ND, featured scenario development and implications, testing management decisions, and methods for operationalizing scenario planning outcomes.

  5. Resource management and operations in southwest South Dakota: Climate change scenario planning workshop summary January 20-21, 2016, Rapid City, SD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisichelli, Nicholas A.; Schuurman, Gregor W; Symstad, Amy; Ray, Andrea; Miller, Brian; Cross, Molly; Rowland, Erika

    2016-01-01

    The Scaling Climate Change Adaptation in the Northern Great Plains through Regional Climate Summaries and Local Qualitative-Quantitative Scenario Planning Workshops project synthesizes climate data into 3-5 distinct but plausible climate summaries for the northern Great Plains region; crafts quantitative summaries of these climate futures for two focal areas; and applies these local summaries by developing climate-resource-management scenarios through participatory workshops and, where possible, simulation models. The two focal areas are central North Dakota and southwest South Dakota (Figure 1). The primary objective of this project is to help resource managers and scientists in a focal area use scenario planning to make management and planning decisions based on assessments of critical future uncertainties.This report summarizes project work for public and tribal lands in the southwest South Dakota grasslands focal area, with an emphasis on Badlands National Park and Buffalo Gap National Grassland. The report explains scenario planning as an adaptation tool in general, then describes how it was applied to the focal area in three phases. Priority resource management and climate uncertainties were identified in the orientation phase. Local climate summaries for relevant, divergent, and challenging climate scenarios were developed in the second phase. In the final phase, a two-day scenario planning workshop held January 20-21, 2016 in Rapid City, South Dakota, featured scenario development and implications, testing management decisions, and methods for operationalizing scenario planning outcomes.

  6. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 551: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert F. Boehlecke

    2004-06-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 551, Area 12 muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 551 is located in Area 12 of the NTS, which is approximately 110 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Area 12 is approximately 40 miles beyond the main gate to the NTS. Corrective Action Unit 551 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) 12-01-09, Aboveground Storage Tank and Stain; (2) 12-06-05, Muckpile; (3) 12-06-07, Muckpile; and (4) 12-06-08, Muckpile. Corrective Action Site 12-01-09 is located in Area 12 and consists of an above ground storage tank (AST) and associated stain. Corrective Action Site 12-06-05 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. Corrective Action Site 12-06-07 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. Corrective Action Site 12-06-08 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. In keeping with common convention, the U12B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels will be referred to as the B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and sampling of media, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions.

  7. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 551: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Strand

    2004-06-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 551, Area 12 muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 551 is located in Area 12 of the NTS, which is approximately 110 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Area 12 is approximately 40 miles beyond the main gate to the NTS. Corrective Action Unit 551 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) 12-01-09, Aboveground Storage Tank and Stain; (2) 12-06-05, Muckpile; (3) 12-06-07, Muckpile; and (4) 12-06-08, Muckpile. Corrective Action Site 12-01-09 is located in Area 12 and consists of an above ground storage tank (AST) and associated stain. Corrective Action Site 12-06-05 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. Corrective Action Site 12-06-07 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. Corrective Action Site 12-06-08 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. In keeping with common convention, the U12B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels will be referred to as the B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and sampling of media, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions.

  8. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 428: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 1 and 5 Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. S. Tobiason

    2000-08-01

    Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 1 and 5 are located in Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) (Figure 1). The site is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 428 and includes Corrective Action Sites 03-05-002-SW01 (Septic Waste System 1 [SWS 1]), and 03-05-002-SW05 (Septic Waste System 5 [SWS 5]). The site history for the CAU is provided in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1999). SWS 1 consists of two leachfields and associated septic tanks. SWS 1 received effluent from both sanitary and industrial sources from various buildings in Area 3 of the TTR (Figure 2). SWS 5 is comprised of one leachfield and outfall with an associated septic tank. SWS 5 received effluent from sources in Building 03-50 in Area 3 of the TTR (Figure 2). Both systems were active until 1990 when a consolidated sewer system was installed. The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to provide the strategy and methodology to close the Area 3 SWS 1 and 5. The CAU will be closed following state and federal regulations and the FFACO (1996). Site characterization was done during May and June 1999. Samples of the tank contents, leachfield soil, and soil under the tanks and pipes were collected. The results of the characterization were reported in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (DOE/NV, 2000). Additional sampling was done in May 2000, the results of which are presented in this plan. Soil sample results indicated that two constituents of concern were detected above Preliminary Action Levels (PALs). Total arsenic was detected at a concentration of 68.7 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg). The arsenic was found under the center distribution line at the proximal end of the SWS 5 Leachfield (Figure 3). Total benzo(a)pyrene was detected at a concentration of 480 micrograms per kilogram ({micro}g/kg). The benzo(a)pyrene was found in the soil under the

  9. Do Bans on Affirmative Action Hurt Minority Students? Evidence from the Texas Top 10% Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Kalena E. Cortes

    2010-01-01

    In light of the recent bans on affirmative action in higher education, this paper provides new evidence on the effects of alternative admissions policies on the persistence and college completion of minority students. I find that the change from affirmative action to the Top 10% Plan in Texas decreased both retention and graduation rates of lower-ranked minority students. Results show that both fall-to-fall freshmen retention and six-year college graduation of seconddecile minority students d...

  10. Documentation of a Model Action Plan to Deter Illicit Nuclear Trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D; Kristo, M; Niemeyer, S; Dudder, G

    2006-07-28

    Theft, illegal possession, smuggling, or attempted unauthorized sale of nuclear and radiological materials remains a worldwide problem. The Nuclear Smuggling International Technical Working Group (ITWG) has adopted a model action plan to guide investigation of these cases through a systematic approach to nuclear forensics. The model action plan was recently documented and provides recommendations concerning incident response, collection of evidence in conformance with required legal standards, laboratory sampling and distribution of samples, radioactive materials analysis, including categorization and characterization of samples, forensics analysis of conventional evidence, and case development including interpretation of forensic signatures.

  11. 2011-2015 National action plan for the management of radon-related risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an assessment of the 2005-2008 action plan, this report presents the 2011-2015 plan. It comprises five main axis: the implementation of a policy regarding the management of the radon-related risk in existing dwellings, the implementation of a regulation for new dwellings, the follow-up of the regulation regarding public places and that applicable to workers, the development and the implementation of new management tools for the diagnosis of buildings and works performed by professionals, and the coordination of policy regarding investigation and research. Each axis comprises several actions which are defined and presented. Eight key measures are also defined

  12. A Resiliency Action Plan for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: May 23, 2014 -- June 5, 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, J [Abt Environmental Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Wagner, C. [Abt Environmental Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Renfrow, S. [Abt Environmental Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-09-03

    The second stage in a two-stage project called the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Climate Change Resiliency and Preparedness (CCRP) project is summarized in this resiliency action plan. This CCRP pilot project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Sustainability Performance Office and launched in winter 2014. The resiliency action plan begins where the previous stage of the project -- the vulnerability assessment -- ended. This report discusses resiliency options to reduce the risk of the highest risk vulnerabilities that were identified in the NREL vulnerability assessment.

  13. Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility mitigation action plan. Annual report for 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haagenstad, H.T.

    1998-01-15

    This Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report (MAPAR) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of implementing the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) Mitigation Action Plan (MAP). This MAPAR provides a status on specific DARHT facility design- and construction-related mitigation actions that have been initiated in order to fulfill DOE`s commitments under the DARHT MAP. The functions of the DARHT MAP are to (1) document potentially adverse environmental impacts of the Phased Containment Option delineated in the Final EIS, (2) identify commitments made in the Final EIS and ROD to mitigate those potential impacts, and (3) establish Action Plans to carry out each commitment (DOE 1996). The DARHT MAP is divided into eight sections. Sections 1--5 provide background information regarding the NEPA review of the DARHT project and an introduction to the associated MAP. Section 6 references the Mitigation Action Summary Table which summaries the potential impacts and mitigation measures; indicates whether the mitigation is design-, construction-, or operational-related; the organization responsible for the mitigation measure; and the projected or actual completion data for each mitigation measure. Sections 7 and 8 discuss the Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report and Tracking System commitment and the Potential Impacts, Commitments, and Action Plans respectively. Under Section 8, potential impacts are categorized into five areas of concern: General Environment, including impacts to air and water; Soils, especially impacts affecting soil loss and contamination; Biotic Resources, especially impacts affecting threatened and endangered species; Cultural/Paleontological Resources, especially impacts affecting the archeological site known as Nake`muu; and Human Health and Safety, especially impacts pertaining to noise and radiation. Each potential impact includes a brief statement of the nature of the impact and its cause(s). The commitment

  14. Analysis of the CNSC Staffs Action Plan to Reflect Lessons Learned from Fukushima Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On September 30, 2011, the Task Force completed its review and presented the public with the findings and recommendations in the CNSC Fukushima Task Force Report. The Task Force made 13 recommendations to further enhance the safety of nuclear power plants in Canada. After that, the CNSC established the CNSC Staffs Action Plan based on the Fukushima Task Force's recommendations. In Canada, 19 nuclear power reactor units are currently producing electric power, and all of them are pressurized heavy water-reactor (PHWR) types. Also, considering 2 power reactor units in Korea, Wolsung unit 1 and 2, are the same reactor type, the analysis of the CNSC Staffs Action Plan will be of benefit to determining recommendations of Korea to address lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Therefore, the CNSC Staffs Action Plan was introduced and analyzed in this study. From the results of the above analysis, it is recognized that the strengthening of defense in depth, emergency preparedness and the regulatory oversight of nuclear power plants in Canada were emphasized and much similar to practices of other countries. Public consultation process establishing the CNSC Staffs action plan has been carried out several times, in order to ensure regulatory transparency, by the CNSC staffs, and this is comparable with other countries. It is expected that the detail analysis results of the above plan will be helpful to enhance the safety of domestic operating nuclear power plants

  15. LEAP: local environmental action plan. Municipality of Dolneni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Municipality of Dolneni is situated in the northern part of the Pelagonia Valley, at about 600 meters above the sea level. It is surrounded on three sides (north, northeast, east and northwest) by the mountain massifs of Dautica, Babuna and Busova Planina. The assesment of the state of the environment in the Municipality of Dolneni presented in this document is based on several principles, including, before all, human health, as well as impacts from human activities on urban and natural environment, social and economic development, etc. The impacts from environmental pollution on human health in the Municipality of Dolneni are evident. Major problem is the lack of sewerage system to collect wastewater and absence of organized landfill(s) for solid waste disposal. In addition, the improper drinking water supply in most of the settlements contributes to the increased human health risk in the Municipality. The absence of urban planning has lead to developments and uncontrolled use of natural resources that cause degradation of the environment and consequently decrease in quality of living for the population. The above problems affect the quality of living conditions and human health both directly and indirectly. In recent years, incidence of epidemics of communicable hepatitis was recovered (Debreste, Desovo), and there is a concern for a high risk of appearance of intestinal and other infectious diseases. There are no indicators of the soil quality of surface running water resources with regard to pollution. In any case, on the basis of the manner of land use and specific human activities on the territory of the Municipality, as well as on the basis of the above mentioned solid waste and waste water related problems, it may be concluded that these resources are in a rather poor condition. Other aspects of determining the quality of the environment (atmosphere, noise, natural ecosystems and biodiversity in general) are not under serious human pressure at present

  16. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-10-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 335, Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996). This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD). However, there is one modification to the selected alternative. Due to the large area that would require fencing, it is proposed that instead of fencing, an appropriate number of warning signs attached to tee posts be used to delineate the use restriction area. CAU 335 is located in Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 335 is located in the Area 6 Well 3 Yard approximately 39 km (24 mi) north of Mercury, on the Mercury Highway and several hundred feet (ft) west along Road 6-06. CAU 335 consists of the following three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-20-01, Drums, Oil Waste, Spill; CAS 06-20-02, 20-inch Cased Hole; CAS 06-23-03, Drain Pit. The site history for CAU 335 is provided in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (DOE/NV, 2000). Briefly, CAS 06-20-01, was used for storing material that was pumped out of CAS 06-20-02 and placed into four 208-liter (L) (55-gall [gal]) drums. The drums were taken to the NTS Area 5 Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site in 1991. CAS 06-20-01 will be closed with no further action required. Any spills associated with CAS 06-20-01 are addressed and considered part of CAS 06-20-02. CAS 06-20-02 was used for disposal of used motor oil, wastewater, and debris for an undetermined amount of time. In 1991, the casing was emptied of its contents, excavated, and backfilled. CAS 06-23-03 was used as a depository for effluent waste from truck-washing activities from 1960-1991.

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 487: Thunderwell Site, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0, January 2001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE/NV

    2001-01-02

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's (DOE/NV's) approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 487, Thunderwell Site, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 487 consists of a single Corrective Action Site (CAS), RG 26-001-RGRV, Thunderwell Site. The site is located in the northwest portion of the TTR, Nevada, approximately five miles northwest of the Area 3 Control Point and closest to the Cactus Flats broad basin. Historically, Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico used CAU 487 in the early to mid-1960s for a series of high explosive tests detonated at the bottom of large cylindrical steel tubes. Historical photographs indicate that debris from these tests and subsequent operations may have been scattered and buried throughout the site. A March 2000 walk-over survey and a July 2000 geophysical survey indicated evidence of buried and surface debris in dirt mounds and areas throughout the site; however, a radiological drive-over survey also performed in July 2000 indicated that no radiological hazards were identified at this site. Based on site history, the scope of this plan is to resolve the problem statement identified during the Data Quality Objectives process that detonation activities at this CAU site may have resulted in the release of contaminants of concern into the surface/subsurface soil including total volatile and total semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, radionuclides, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and high explosives. Therefore, the scope of corrective action field investigation will involve excavation, drilling, and extensive soil sampling and analysis activities to determine the extent (if any) of both the lateral and vertical contamination

  18. Phase II -- Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA): Safety and health action plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, K.

    1994-09-01

    To establish guidelines for the implementation and administration of an injury and illness prevention program for PVUSA and to assign specific responsibilities for the execution of the program. To provide a basic Safety and Health Action Plan (hereinafter referred to as Plan) that assists management, supervision, and project personnel in the recognition, evaluation, and control of hazardous activities and/or conditions within their respective areas of responsibility.

  19. Plan of Action: JASPER Management Prestart Review (Surrogate Material Experiments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    undergone appropriate formal engineering design reviews. This MPR will affirm the quality of those reviews, their findings/resolutions, and will look most closely at systems integration requirements and demonstrations that will have undergone technical acceptance reviews before the formal MPR action. Closure of MPR findings will finalize requirements for a DOE/NV Real Estate/Operations Permit (REOP) for surrogate-material experiments. Upon completion of that experiment series and the establishment of capabilities for incorporating SNM into future experiments, the team will convene again as part of the process of authorizing those activities

  20. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 573: Alpha Contaminated Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick [Nevada Site Office, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-02-01

    CAU 573 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 05-23-02, GMX Alpha Contaminated Area • 05-45-01, Atmospheric Test Site - Hamilton These two CASs include the release at the Hamilton weapons-related tower test and a series of 29 atmospheric experiments conducted at GMX. The two CASs are located in two distinctly separate areas within Area 5. To facilitate site investigation and data quality objective (DQO) decisions, all identified releases (i.e., CAS components) were organized into study groups. The reporting of investigation results and the evaluation of DQO decisions are at the release level. The corrective action alternatives (CAAs) were evaluated at the FFACO CAS level. The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to evaluate potential CAAs, provide the rationale for the selection of recommended CAAs, and provide the plan for implementation of the recommended CAA for CAU 573. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from January 2015 through November 2015, as set forth in the CAU 573 Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP). Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against appropriate final action levels (FALs) to identify the contaminants of concern. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 573 revealed the following: • Radiological contamination within CAU 573 does not exceed the FALs (based on the Occasional Use Area exposure scenario). • Chemical contamination within CAU 573 does not exceed the FALs. • Potential source material—including lead plates, lead bricks, and lead-shielded cables—was removed during the investigation and requires no additional corrective action.

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE/NV

    1999-01-28

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. A CAU consists of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the CAU 321 Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, CAS 22-99-05 Fuel Storage Area. For purposes of this discussion, this site will be referred to as either CAU 321 or the Fuel Storage Area. The Fuel Storage Area is located in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The Fuel Storage Area (Figure 1-2) was used to store fuel and other petroleum products necessary for motorized operations at the historic Camp Desert Rock facility which was operational from 1951 to 1958 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The site was dismantled after 1958 (DOE/NV, 1996a).

  2. Thermal Properties Capability Development Workshop Summary to Support the Implementation Plan for PIE Thermal Conductivity Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braase, Lori [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Papesch, Cynthia [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hurley, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE)-Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and associated nuclear fuels programs have invested heavily over the years in infrastructure and capability development. With the current domestic and international need to develop Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF), increasing importance is being placed on understanding fuel performance in irradiated conditions and on the need to model and validate that performance to reduce uncertainty and licensing timeframes. INL’s Thermal Properties Capability Development Workshop was organized to identify the capability needed by the various nuclear programs and list the opportunities to meet those needs. In addition, by the end of fiscal year 2015, the decision will be made on the initial thermal properties instruments to populate the shielded cell in the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL).

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 409: Other Waste Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. 0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE/NV

    2000-10-05

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 409 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 409 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-53-001-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.1; TA-53-002-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.2; and RG-24-001-RGCR, Battery Dump Site. The Septic Sludge Disposal Pits are located near Bunker Two, close to Area 3, on the Tonopah Test Range. The Battery Dump Site is located at the abandoned Cactus Repeater Station on Cactus Peak. The Cactus Repeater Station was a remote, battery-powered, signal repeater station. The two Septic Sludge Disposal Pits were suspected to be used through the late 1980s as disposal sites for sludge from septic tanks located in Area 3. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern are the same for the disposal pits and include: volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) as gasoline- and diesel-range organics, polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and radionuclides (including plutonium and depleted uranium). The Battery Dump Site consists of discarded lead-acid batteries and associated construction debris, placing the site in a Housekeeping Category and, consequently, no contaminants are expected to be encountered during the cleanup process. The corrective action the at this CAU will include collection of discarded batteries and construction debris at the Battery Dump Site for proper disposal and recycling, along with photographic documentation as the process progresses. The corrective action for the remaining CASs involves the collection of background radiological data through borings drilled

  4. Science for Managing Riverine Ecosystems: Actions for the USGS Identified in the Workshop "Analysis of Flow and Habitat for Instream Aquatic Communities"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencala, Kenneth E.; Hamilton, David B.; Petersen, James H.

    2006-01-01

    Federal and state agencies need improved scientific analysis to support riverine ecosystem management. The ability of the USGS to integrate geologic, hydrologic, chemical, geographic, and biological data into new tools and models provides unparalleled opportunities to translate the best riverine science into useful approaches and usable information to address issues faced by river managers. In addition to this capability to provide integrated science, the USGS has a long history of providing long-term and nationwide information about natural resources. The USGS is now in a position to advance its ability to provide the scientific support for the management of riverine ecosystems. To address this need, the USGS held a listening session in Fort Collins, Colorado in April 2006. Goals of the workshop were to: 1) learn about the key resource issues facing DOI, other Federal, and state resource management agencies; 2) discuss new approaches and information needs for addressing these issues; and 3) outline a strategy for the USGS role in supporting riverine ecosystem management. Workshop discussions focused on key components of a USGS strategy: Communications, Synthesis, and Research. The workshop identified 3 priority actions the USGS can initiate now to advance its capabilities to support integrated science for resource managers in partner government agencies and non-governmental organizations: 1) Synthesize the existing science of riverine ecosystem processes to produce broadly applicable conceptual models, 2) Enhance selected ongoing instream flow projects with complementary interdisciplinary studies, and 3) Design a long-term, watershed-scale research program that will substantively reinvent riverine ecosystem science. In addition, topical discussion groups on hydrology, geomorphology, aquatic habitat and populations, and socio-economic analysis and negotiation identified eleven important complementary actions required to advance the state of the science and to

  5. HighARCS Integrated Action Planning for the Phu Yen District study site, Son La Province, Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Thi Dieu Phuong; Lund, Søren

    The report presents action plans elaborated to preserve aquatic resources and local livelihoods in the Phu Yen District, including methodologies and procedures applied for the selection and assessment of the actions....

  6. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada, Rev. No.: 3 with Errata Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tim Echelard

    2006-03-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447, Project Shoal Area (PSA)-Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Corrective Action Unit 447 is located in the Sand Springs Mountains in Churchill County, Nevada, approximately 48 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for CAU 447, as provided in the FFACO. Corrective Action Unit 447 consists of two corrective action sites (CASs): CAS 57-49-01, Emplacement Shaft, and CAS 57-57-001, Cavity. The emplacement shaft (CAS-57-49-01) was backfilled and plugged in 1996 and will not be evaluated further. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. The original Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for the PSA was approved in September 1996 and described a plan to drill and test four characterization wells, followed by flow and transport modeling (DOE/NV, 1996). The resultant drilling is described in a data report (DOE/NV, 1998e) and the data analysis and modeling in an interim modeling report (Pohll et al., 1998). After considering the results of the modeling effort

  7. Corrective action investigation plan for CAU Number 453: Area 9 Landfill, Tonopah Test Range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the environmental sample collection objectives and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the Area 9 Landfill, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 453/Corrective Action (CAS) 09-55-001-0952, which is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 255 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The Area 9 Landfill is located northwest of Area 9 on the TTR. The landfill cells associated with CAU 453 were excavated to receive waste generated from the daily operations conducted at Area 9 and from range cleanup which occurred after test activities

  8. ASCAD: Approved standard corrective action design-an innovative one-step remedial action plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will describe an innovative environmental restoration approach being developed at the Savannah River Site to group sites, define characterization parameters, and match those conditions with standard environmental restoration designs. The package is called the Approved Standardized Corrective Action Design (ASCAD). The purpose of developing this package is to obtain regulator approval of standard technologies and designs for any waste site documented as meeting bounded characterization conditions. For instance, the grouping might be labeled open-quotes radioactive basinsclose quotes. The ASCAD package would contain one design for expected (ABC) conditions defined by characterization. A second design also would be included for DEF conditions should they be encountered. The concept is a next generation of the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration, SAFER where limited characterization and technology selections are conducted in parallel with the processes supporting each other. The impact of ASCAD is to reach remediation faster and lower costs on remedial investigation and design

  9. Integrated action planning for biodiversity conservation and sustainable use of highland aquatic resources: evaluating outcomes for the Beijiang River, China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunting, Stuart W.; Cai, K.; Luo, S.;

    2016-01-01

    The need for enhanced environmental planning and management for highland aquatic resources is described and rationale for integrated action planning presented. Past action planning initiatives for biodiversity conservation and wetland management are reviewed. A reflective account is given...... of integrated action planning from five sites in China, India and Vietnam. Eight planning phases are described encompassing: stakeholder assessment and partner selection; rapport building and agreement on collaboration; integrated biodiversity, ecosystem services, livelihoods and policy assessment; problem......-economic development objectives assessed. Criteria to evaluate the quality of planning processes are proposed. Principles for integrated action planning elaborated here should enable stakeholders to formulate plans to reconcile biodiversity conservation with the wise-use of wetlands....

  10. Kenya's Climate Change Action Plan. Low Carbon Climate Resilient Development Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, D.; Sawyer, D.; Stiebert, S.; McFatridge, S. [International Institute for Sustainable Development IISD, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Wuertenberger, L.; Van Tilburg, X.; Hekkenberg, M. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Policy Studies, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Owino, T.; Battye, W. [ClimateCare, Nairobi (Kenya); Mutia, T. [Regional Institute for Social Enterprise Kenya RISE, Nairobi (Kenya); Olum, P. [Climate Change Consultant (Kenya)

    2012-12-15

    Kenya Vision 2030 - the long-term development blueprint for the country - aims to transform Kenya into 'a newly industrialising, middle-income country providing a high quality of life to all its citizens in a clean and secure environment'. A low carbon climate resilient development pathway, as set out in this Climate Change Action Plan, can help meet Vision 2030 goals through actions that address both sustainable development and climate change. This pathway can also help the Government achieve the Millennium Development Goals and other internationally agreed development goals without compromising the environment and its natural resources. As Kenya realizes its development aspirations, there will be gains and risks. A growing population and economy with migration to cities will mean increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Resulting environmental and social conditions, including increased competition over resources, could intensify vulnerability to climate risks. Transitioning to a low carbon climate resilient development pathway can address future risks thereby improving Kenya's ability to prosper under a changing climate while reducing the emissions intensity of a growing economy. Moving forward on the 2010 National Climate Change Response Strategy will help Kenya transition to a low carbon climate resilient development pathway that puts people and livelihoods at the forefront. The strategy recognized the importance of climate change and development, and this Climate Change Action Plan is the logical next step. A yearlong multistakeholder participatory process involving the public sector, private sector and civil society resulted in this Action Plan that identifies priority climate change actions for Kenya for the short, medium and long term. The Government of Kenya takes climate change and its impact on development seriously. Climate change is considered a crosscutting issue that will be mainstreamed in the planning process both at the national

  11. Public Service Agreement 2010-2014 - Health Sector Action Plan 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health

    2012-01-01

    This revised Action Plan is designed to support the delivery of the HSEâ?Ts 2012 National Service Plan by facilitating the fast-tracking of measures required to deliver essential health and personal social services across the country within the context of further reductions in funding and staff numbers. The implementation of the National Service Plan, approved by the Minister for Health on 13 January 2012, represents a major challenge to the health services and comes at a time of major refor...

  12. Updated action plan for the implementation of measures as a consequence of the Fukushima reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action plan of the German government concerning the measures following the Fukushima reactor accident include the decision on the future of nuclear power in Germany, safety analyses, investigations and measures for nuclear power plants in a national frame, investigations in an international frame, planning for the implementation of CNS (Convention on nuclear safety) topics 1-3, i.e. measures to increase the robustness in German nuclear power plants, and the planning of implementation of further measures (CNS topics 4-6).

  13. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 555: Septic Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0 with Errata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastor, Laura

    2005-12-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 555: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 555 is located in Areas 1, 3 and 6 of the NTS, which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and is comprised of the five corrective action sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) CAS 01-59-01, Area 1 Camp Septic System; (2) CAS 03-59-03, Core Handling Building Septic System; (3) CAS 06-20-05, Birdwell Dry Well; (4) CAS 06-59-01, Birdwell Septic System; and (5) CAS 06-59-02, National Cementers Septic System. An FFACO modification was approved on December 14, 2005, to include CAS 06-20-05, Birdwell Dry Well, as part of the scope of CAU 555. The work scope was expanded in this document to include the investigation of CAS 06-20-05. The Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, geophysical surveys, sampling of environmental media, analysis of samples, and assessment of investigation results, where appropriate. Data will be obtained to support corrective action alternative evaluations and waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 555 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by

  14. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 410: Waste Disposal Trenches, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision No.:0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 410 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 410 is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), which is included in the Nevada Test and Training Range (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range) approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of five Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-19-002-TAB2, Debris Mound; TA-21-003-TANL, Disposal Trench; TA-21-002-TAAL, Disposal Trench; 09-21-001-TA09, Disposal Trenches; 03-19-001, Waste Disposal Site. This CAU is being investigated because contaminants may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment, and waste may have been disposed of with out appropriate controls. Four out of five of these CASs are the result of weapons testing and disposal activities at the TTR, and they are grouped together for site closure based on the similarity of the sites (waste disposal sites and trenches). The fifth CAS, CAS 03-19-001, is a hydrocarbon spill related to activities in the area. This site is grouped with this CAU because of the location (TTR). Based on historical documentation and process know-ledge, vertical and lateral migration routes are possible for all CASs. Migration of contaminants may have occurred through transport by infiltration of precipitation through surface soil which serves as a driving force for downward migration of contaminants. Land-use scenarios limit future use of these CASs to industrial activities. The suspected contaminants of potential concern which have been identified are volatile organic compounds; semivolatile organic compounds; high explosives; radiological constituents including depleted uranium

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE/NV

    2000-12-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 335, Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 335 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs). The CAU is located in the Well 3 Yard in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. Historical records indicate that the Drain Pit (CAS 06-23-03) received effluent from truck-washing; the Drums/Oil Waste/Spill (CAS 06-20-01) consisted of four 55-gallon drums containing material removed from the Cased Hole; and the Cased Hole (CAS 06-20-02) was used for disposal of used motor oil, wastewater, and debris. These drums were transported to the Area 5 Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site in July 1991; therefore, they are no longer on site and further investigation or remediation efforts are not required. Consequently, CAS 06-20-01 will be closed with no further action and details of this decision will be described in the Closure Report for this CAU. Any spills that may have been associated with this CAS will be investigated and addressed under CAS 06-20-02. Field investigation efforts will be focused on the two remaining CASs. The scope of the investigation will center around identifying any contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) and, if present, determining the vertical and lateral extent of contamination. The COPCs for the Drain Pit include: total volatile/ semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (gasoline-and diesel-range organics), ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, polychlorinated biphenyls, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and radionuclides. The COPCs for the Cased Hole include: total volatile/ semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel-range organics only), and total Resource Conservation

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 375: Area 30 Buggy Unit Craters, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-03-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 375 is located in Areas 25 and 30 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 375 comprises the two corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 25-23-22, Contaminated Soils Site • 30-45-01, U-30a, b, c, d, e Craters Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination present at the CAU 375 CASs is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). This document details an investigation plan that will provide for the gathering of sufficient information to evaluate and recommend CAAs. Corrective Action Site 25-23-22 is composed of the releases associated with nuclear rocket testing at Test Cell A (TCA). Test Cell A was used to test and develop nuclear rocket motors as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station from its construction in 1958 until 1966, when rocket testing began being conducted at Test Cell C. The rocket motors were built with an unshielded nuclear reactor that produced as much as 1,100 kilowatts (at full power) to heat liquid hydrogen to 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit, at which time the expanded gases were focused out a nozzle to produce thrust. The fuel rods in the reactor were not clad and were designed to release fission fragments to the atmosphere, but due to vibrations and loss of cooling during some operational tests, fuel fragments in excess of planned releases became entrained in the exhaust and spread in the immediate surrounding area. Cleanup efforts have been undertaken at times to collect the fuel rod fragments and other contamination. Previous environmental investigations in the TCA area have resulted in the creation of a number of use restrictions. The industrial area of TCA is encompassed by a fence and is currently posted as a radioactive material area. Corrective Action Site 30-45-01 (releases associated with the Buggy Plowshare test) is located in Area 30 on Chukar Mesa. It was a

  17. Academic Misconduct: A Goals-Plans-Action Approach to Peer Confrontation and Whistle-Blowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsen, Mary Lynn Miller; Valde, Kathleen S.; Denbow, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Academic misconduct is a serious, pervasive, communication phenomenon on college campuses. In this study, the goals-plans-action model (Dillard, 1990) was used as a theoretical framework to investigate peer confrontation of cheating and whistle-blowing to a course instructor. In an experiment, participants were asked to respond to measures of…

  18. 44 CFR 350.8 - Initial FEMA action on State plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Initial FEMA action on State plan. 350.8 Section 350.8 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY... acknowledge in writing within ten days the receipt of the State application. (b) FEMA shall publish a...

  19. 77 FR 38199 - Determining Conformity of Federal Actions to State or Federal Implementation Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 93 Determining Conformity of Federal Actions to State or Federal Implementation Plans... conformity purposes, the budget(s) shall not be used to satisfy the requirements of this section....

  20. Guam Public School System District Action Plan: Goals and Objectives, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guam Public School System, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Guam Education Policy Board initially adopted the Guam Public School System District Action Plan in May 2003. The DAP established the direction and details for improving academic performance in reading, math, and language arts by using the provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act as a framework. The adopted DAP was also used as a basis for…

  1. Enhancing School Asthma Action Plans: Qualitative Results from Southeast Minnesota Beacon Stakeholder Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egginton, Jason S.; Textor, Lauren; Knoebel, Erin; McWilliams, Deborah; Aleman, Marty; Yawn, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study explores ways southeast Minnesota schools currently address asthma problems, identifies areas for improvement, and assesses the potential value of asthma action plans (AAPs) in schools. Methods: Focus groups were used to query stakeholder groups on asthma care in schools. Groups were held separately for elementary school…

  2. The policy-practice gap: supporting national VISION 2020 action plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An interview with Daniel Etya’ale

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Dr Etya'ale, can you tell us what your work involves? My job is to help countries in Africa develop and implement their national VISION 2020 action plans. This involves visiting countries and speaking with government and non-government agencies so that a well co-ordinated set of activities can be agreed.

  3. Local actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the context of national action plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Municipalities can play a number of important roles to complement national actions to limit greenhouse gas emissions: (i) by facilitating comprehensive, city-wide building retrofit activities; (ii) by facilitating the development and/or expansion of community integrated energy systems involving district heating, district cooling, and cogeneration of electricity; and (iii) by promoting urban intensification to reduce the need to use the private automobile. Innovative institutional and financial mechanism are needed to overcome some of the persistent barriers to more efficient energy use in buildings and a number of concepts, which are currently being considered by the City of Toronto as part of its programme to reduce CO2 emissions by 20% from the 1988 level by 2005, are discussed here. These concepts involve using public securitization funds to leverage private sector funds for energy efficiency retrofits and a number of measures to reduce financing and retrofit transaction costs. Even where surplus electricity generating capacity exists at the regional scale, reduced electricity demand can still result in avoided utility system costs if transmission bottlenecks and future transmission and transformer upgrade costs are reduced. Finally, given the need to replace or modify many of the existing commercial chillers due to the phase out of CFC's, a window of opportunity exists during the next few years to provide alternative, chlorocarbon-free district cooling systems based on absorption chillers using waste heat from electricity generation, with significant (30-65%) CO2 emission savings. (au)

  4. Remedial action plan for the inactive Uranium Processing Site at Naturita, Colorado. Remedial action plan: Attachment 2, Geology report, Attachment 3, Ground water hydrology report: Working draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado, is one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be cleaned up by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), 42 USC {section}7901 et seq. Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This RAP serves two purposes. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Second, this RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the state of Colorado, and the NRC, become Appendix B of the cooperative agreement between the DOE and the state of Colorado.

  5. Remedial action plan for the inactive Uranium Processing Site at Naturita, Colorado. Remedial action plan: Attachment 2, Geology report, Attachment 3, Ground water hydrology report: Working draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado, is one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be cleaned up by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), 42 USC section 7901 et seq. Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE's remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This RAP serves two purposes. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Second, this RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the state of Colorado, and the NRC, become Appendix B of the cooperative agreement between the DOE and the state of Colorado

  6. Mid/Long-Term Action Plan to Mitigate SEE related Risks at the LHC (and required actions)

    CERN Document Server

    Brugger, M; Kramer, Daniel; Losito, R; Myers, S; Perrot, A L; Pojer, M; Røed, K; Roesler, S; Solfaroli, M; Vergara, A; Weisz, S; Wijnands, T; Zanetti, M

    2009-01-01

    Modifications of the LHC schedule and the needed planning for future shutdowns requires an approach compatible with all operational scenarios in order to reduce the failures due to SEE around the machine. The R2E study group recommends a list of short-term actions, to plan, analyse and prepare mid/long-term activities and to assign additional resources. The aim is to maximize the use of available time slots and to allow for a coherent decision on mid/long-term actions to be taken in 2009/10. This decision might be required before measurements during early operation and ongoing radiation tests can allow for a complete analysis of the situation. It is important to note, that the detailed review and analysis of equipments and areas, as well as early measurements and continued radiation tests remain important requirements to be able to make the appropriate future decisions in the coming year(s). The aim of the following approach is to keep during the coming months as many options open as possible and have as many...

  7. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides selected corrective action alternatives and proposes the closure methodology for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 262, Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point. CAU 262 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. Remediation of CAU 262 is required under the FFACO. CAU 262 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs) within CAU 262 are located in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station complex. Individual CASs are located in the vicinity of the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD); Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD); and Test Cell C compounds. CAU 262 includes the following CASs as provided in the FFACO (1996); CAS 25-02-06, Underground Storage Tank; CAS 25-04-06, Septic Systems A and B; CAS 25-04-07, Septic System; CAS 25-05-03, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-05, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-06, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-08, Radioactive Leachfield; CAS 25-05-12, Leachfield; and CAS 25-51-01, Dry Well. Figures 2, 3, and 4 show the locations of the R-MAD, the E-MAD, and the Test Cell C CASs, respectively. The facilities within CAU 262 supported nuclear rocket reactor engine testing. Activities associated with the program were performed between 1958 and 1973. However, several other projects used the facilities after 1973. A significant quantity of radioactive and sanitary waste was produced during routine operations. Most of the radioactive waste was managed by disposal in the posted leachfields. Sanitary wastes were disposed in sanitary leachfields. Septic tanks, present at sanitary leachfields (i.e., CAS 25-02-06,2504-06 [Septic Systems A and B], 25-04-07, 25-05-05,25-05-12) allowed solids to settle out of suspension prior to entering the leachfield. Posted leachfields do not contain septic tanks. All CASs located in CAU 262 are

  8. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-06-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides selected corrective action alternatives and proposes the closure methodology for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 262, Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point. CAU 262 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. Remediation of CAU 262 is required under the FFACO. CAU 262 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs) within CAU 262 are located in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station complex. Individual CASs are located in the vicinity of the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD); Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD); and Test Cell C compounds. CAU 262 includes the following CASs as provided in the FFACO (1996); CAS 25-02-06, Underground Storage Tank; CAS 25-04-06, Septic Systems A and B; CAS 25-04-07, Septic System; CAS 25-05-03, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-05, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-06, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-08, Radioactive Leachfield; CAS 25-05-12, Leachfield; and CAS 25-51-01, Dry Well. Figures 2, 3, and 4 show the locations of the R-MAD, the E-MAD, and the Test Cell C CASs, respectively. The facilities within CAU 262 supported nuclear rocket reactor engine testing. Activities associated with the program were performed between 1958 and 1973. However, several other projects used the facilities after 1973. A significant quantity of radioactive and sanitary waste was produced during routine operations. Most of the radioactive waste was managed by disposal in the posted leachfields. Sanitary wastes were disposed in sanitary leachfields. Septic tanks, present at sanitary leachfields (i.e., CAS 25-02-06,2504-06 [Septic Systems A and B], 25-04-07, 25-05-05,25-05-12) allowed solids to settle out of suspension prior to entering the leachfield. Posted leachfields do not contain septic tanks. All CASs located in CAU 262 are

  9. Exercise habit strength, planning and the theory of planned behaviour: an action control approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.-J. de Bruijn

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Action control refers to the successful translation of intention into behaviour. The purpose of this study was to explore the potential usefulness of extending intention-exercise profiles with past exercise behaviour and exercise habit strength and the potential discriminative effect of a

  10. Challenges and Approaches in River Delta Planning - report on training workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wosten, J.H.M.; Douven, W.; Long Phi, H.; Fida Abdullah Khan, M.

    2012-01-01

    River delta’s, like the Mekong Delta (Vietnam), Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (Bangladesh), Irrawady (Myanmar) and Ciliwung Delta (Indonesia) are developing rapidly and characterized by large-scale urbanization and industrialization processes. They are facing serious planning challenges related to issues

  11. 29 CFR Appendix to Subpart E of... - Exit Routes, Emergency Action Plans, and Fire Prevention Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... adequate number of employees are available at all times during working hours to act as evacuation wardens... with the other employers within the building to assure that conflicts and confusion are avoided during... essential that these employers coordinate their plans with each other to avoid conflicts and confusion....

  12. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-10-01

    CAU 104 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C • 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 • 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site • 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a • 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) • 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) • 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) • 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) • 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) • 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth • 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 • 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b • 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These 15 CASs include releases from 30 atmospheric tests conducted in the approximately 1 square mile of CAU 104. Because releases associated with the CASs included in this CAU overlap and are not separate and distinguishable, these CASs are addressed jointly at the CAU level. The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to evaluate potential corrective action alternatives (CAAs), provide the rationale for the selection of recommended CAAs, and provide the plan for implementation of the recommended CAA for CAU 104. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 4, 2011, through May 3, 2012, as set forth in the CAU 104 Corrective Action Investigation Plan.

  13. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 550: Smoky Contamination Area Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant Evenson

    2012-05-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550 is located in Areas 7, 8, and 10 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 550, Smoky Contamination Area, comprises 19 corrective action sites (CASs). Based on process knowledge of the releases associated with the nuclear tests and radiological survey information about the location and shape of the resulting contamination plumes, it was determined that some of the CAS releases are co-located and will be investigated as study groups. This document describes the planned investigation of the following CASs (by study group): (1) Study Group 1, Atmospheric Test - CAS 08-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T-2C; (2) Study Group 2, Safety Experiments - CAS 08-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-8B - CAS 08-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T-8A - CAS 08-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site T-8C; (3) Study Group 3, Washes - Potential stormwater migration of contaminants from CASs; (4) Study Group 4, Debris - CAS 08-01-01, Storage Tank - CAS 08-22-05, Drum - CAS 08-22-07, Drum - CAS 08-22-08, Drums (3) - CAS 08-22-09, Drum - CAS 08-24-03, Battery - CAS 08-24-04, Battery - CAS 08-24-07, Batteries (3) - CAS 08-24-08, Batteries (3) - CAS 08-26-01, Lead Bricks (200) - CAS 10-22-17, Buckets (3) - CAS 10-22-18, Gas Block/Drum - CAS 10-22-19, Drum; Stains - CAS 10-22-20, Drum - CAS 10-24-10, Battery. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each study group. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed

  14. Is science the driving force in the operation of environmental regimes? : a case study of the Mediterranean Action Plan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frantzi, Sofia; Lovett, Jon C.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the role of science in the operation of environmental regimes using the Barcelona Convention/Mediterranean Action Plan (MAP) as a case study. The ‘epistemic communities’ theory suggests that emergence of the Mediterranean Action Plan was largely driven by scientific experts. In o

  15. Does action planning moderate the intention-habit interaction in the exercise domain? A three-way interaction analysis investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.-J. de Bruijn; R.E. Rhodes; L. van Osch

    2012-01-01

    Both habit strength and action planning have been found to moderate the intention-exercise behaviour relationship, but no research exists that has investigated how habit strength and action planning simultaneously influence this relationship. The present study was designed to explore this issue in a

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 542: Disposal Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laura Pastor

    2006-05-01

    activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. (2) Conduct radiological surveys. (3) Conduct geophysical surveys to locate previously unidentified features at CASs 03-20-07, 03-20-09, 03-20-10, 03-20-11, and 06-20-03. (4) Perform field screening. (5) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (6) Collect quality control samples for laboratory analyses to evaluate the performance of measurement systems and controls based on the requirements of the data quality indicators. (7) If COCs are present at the surface/near surface (< 15 feet below ground surface), collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. (8) If COCs are present in the subsurface (i.e., base of disposal hole), collect additional samples to define the vertical extent of contamination. A conservative use restriction will be used to encompass the lateral extent of subsurface contamination. (9) Stake or flag sample locations in the field, and record coordinates through global positioning systems surveying. (10) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan.

  17. A novel test of planning ability: great apes can plan step-by-step but not in advance of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecwyn, Emma C; Thorpe, Susannah K S; Chappell, Jackie

    2013-11-01

    The ability to identify an appropriate sequence of actions or to consider alternative possible action sequences might be particularly useful during problem solving in the physical domain. We developed a new 'paddle-box' task to test the ability of different ape species to plan an appropriate sequence of physical actions (rotating paddles) to retrieve a reward from a goal location. The task had an adjustable difficulty level and was not dependent on species-specific behaviours (e.g. complex tool use). We investigated the planning abilities of captive orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) and bonobos (Pan paniscus) using the paddle-box. In experiment 1, subjects had to rotate one or two paddles before rotating the paddle with the reward on. Subjects of both species performed poorly, though orangutans rotated more non-food paddles, which may be related to their greater exploratory tendencies and bolder temperament compared with bonobos. In experiment 2 subjects could always rotate the paddle with the reward on first and still succeed, and most subjects of both species performed appropriate sequences of up to three paddle rotations to retrieve the reward. Poor performance in experiment 1 may have been related to subjects' difficulty in inhibiting the prepotent response to act on the reward immediately. PMID:24153327

  18. The Extrastriate Body Area Computes Desired Goal States during Action Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Marius; Verhagen, Lennart; de Lange, Floris P; Toni, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    How do object perception and action interact at a neural level? Here we test the hypothesis that perceptual features, processed by the ventral visuoperceptual stream, are used as priors by the dorsal visuomotor stream to specify goal-directed grasping actions. We present three main findings, which were obtained by combining time-resolved transcranial magnetic stimulation and kinematic tracking of grasp-and-rotate object manipulations, in a group of healthy human participants (N = 22). First, the extrastriate body area (EBA), in the ventral stream, provides an initial structure to motor plans, based on current and desired states of a grasped object and of the grasping hand. Second, the contributions of EBA are earlier in time than those of a caudal intraparietal region known to specify the action plan. Third, the contributions of EBA are particularly important when desired and current object configurations differ, and multiple courses of actions are possible. These findings specify the temporal and functional characteristics for a mechanism that integrates perceptual processing with motor planning. PMID:27066535

  19. The Extrastriate Body Area Computes Desired Goal States during Action Planning123

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract How do object perception and action interact at a neural level? Here we test the hypothesis that perceptual features, processed by the ventral visuoperceptual stream, are used as priors by the dorsal visuomotor stream to specify goal-directed grasping actions. We present three main findings, which were obtained by combining time-resolved transcranial magnetic stimulation and kinematic tracking of grasp-and-rotate object manipulations, in a group of healthy human participants (N = 22). First, the extrastriate body area (EBA), in the ventral stream, provides an initial structure to motor plans, based on current and desired states of a grasped object and of the grasping hand. Second, the contributions of EBA are earlier in time than those of a caudal intraparietal region known to specify the action plan. Third, the contributions of EBA are particularly important when desired and current object configurations differ, and multiple courses of actions are possible. These findings specify the temporal and functional characteristics for a mechanism that integrates perceptual processing with motor planning. PMID:27066535

  20. Student-Faculty Interactions about Disappointing Grades: Application of the Goals-Plans-Actions Model and the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsen, Mary Lynn Miller; Valde, Kathleen S.; Russell, Gregory A.; Russell, Gregory R.

    2011-01-01

    The goals-plans-actions model and the theory of planned behavior were used to predict what lead to students having a conversation about a disappointing grade with a faculty member. Participants (N = 130) completed two surveys. In the first survey, participants completed measures of primary and secondary goals, planning, decision to engage,…

  1. A Low Carbon City Action Plan for one of China’s Low Carbon Pilot Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakutyte-Walangitang D.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In Chinese cities urbanization, industrialization and a changing life style of the population are driving growing energy consumption in buildings, industries and transportation and an increase in CO2 emissions. Facing these challenges, the National Development and Reform Commission has recognised an urgent need for transformation and designated 8 Cities and 5 Provinces in China to pioneer the planning and implementation of concrete low carbon measures, aiming to decrease the CO2 intensity of the economic development, to increase the energy efficiency of urban systems and to improve the quality of life in growing urban regions. In this context, a Sino-Austrian cooperation has been initiated between the Development and Reform Commission of Nanchang, one of the 8 selected Low Carbon Pilot Cities, and the Austrian Institute of Technology to develop a comprehensive set of Low Carbon City Measures and a Low Carbon City Action Plan, proposing specific technological and non-technological measures and concrete actions, capable of introducing important impulses targeting the increase of energy efficiency and the reduction of CO2 emissions in Nanchang. A team of experts has developed an integrated Low Carbon City Action Plan, including sectors such as buildings, energy supply and consumption, industries, transportation, agriculture and urban planning.

  2. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 547: Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Krauss

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to present the corrective action alternatives (CAAs) evaluated for CAU 547, provide justification for selection of the recommended alternative, and describe the plan for implementing the selected alternative. Corrective Action Unit 547 consists of the following three corrective action sites (CASs): (1) CAS 02-37-02, Gas Sampling Assembly; (2) CAS 03-99-19, Gas Sampling Assembly; and(3) CAS 09-99-06, Gas Sampling Assembly. The gas sampling assemblies consist of inactive process piping, equipment, and instrumentation that were left in place after completion of underground safety experiments. The purpose of these safety experiments was to confirm that a nuclear explosion would not occur in the case of an accidental detonation of the high-explosive component of the device. The gas sampling assemblies allowed for the direct sampling of the gases and particulates produced by the safety experiments. Corrective Action Site 02-37-02 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and is associated with the Mullet safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U2ag on October 17, 1963. Corrective Action Site 03-99-19 is located in Area 3 of the NNSS and is associated with the Tejon safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U3cg on May 17, 1963. Corrective Action Site 09-99-06 is located in Area 9 of the NNSS and is associated with the Player safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U9cc on August 27, 1964. The CAU 547 CASs were investigated in accordance with the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAU 547. Existing radiological survey data and historical knowledge of

  3. Remedial design report and remedial action work plan for the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 groundwater operable units' interim action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a combination remedial design report and remedial action work plan for the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 Operable Units (located on the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington) interim action. The interim actions described in this document represent the first of an ongoing program to address groundwater contamination in each operable unit. This document describes the design basis, provides a description of the interim action, and identifies how they will meet the requirements set forth in the interim action Record of Decision

  4. Model-based action planning involves cortico-cerebellar and basal ganglia networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermin, Alan S. R.; Yoshida, Takehiko; Yoshimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Makoto; Tanaka, Saori C.; Doya, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Humans can select actions by learning, planning, or retrieving motor memories. Reinforcement Learning (RL) associates these processes with three major classes of strategies for action selection: exploratory RL learns state-action values by exploration, model-based RL uses internal models to simulate future states reached by hypothetical actions, and motor-memory RL selects past successful state-action mapping. In order to investigate the neural substrates that implement these strategies, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment while humans performed a sequential action selection task under conditions that promoted the use of a specific RL strategy. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum increased activity in the exploratory condition; the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsomedial striatum, and lateral cerebellum in the model-based condition; and the supplementary motor area, putamen, and anterior cerebellum in the motor-memory condition. These findings suggest that a distinct prefrontal-basal ganglia and cerebellar network implements the model-based RL action selection strategy. PMID:27539554

  5. Model-based action planning involves cortico-cerebellar and basal ganglia networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermin, Alan S R; Yoshida, Takehiko; Yoshimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Makoto; Tanaka, Saori C; Doya, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Humans can select actions by learning, planning, or retrieving motor memories. Reinforcement Learning (RL) associates these processes with three major classes of strategies for action selection: exploratory RL learns state-action values by exploration, model-based RL uses internal models to simulate future states reached by hypothetical actions, and motor-memory RL selects past successful state-action mapping. In order to investigate the neural substrates that implement these strategies, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment while humans performed a sequential action selection task under conditions that promoted the use of a specific RL strategy. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum increased activity in the exploratory condition; the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsomedial striatum, and lateral cerebellum in the model-based condition; and the supplementary motor area, putamen, and anterior cerebellum in the motor-memory condition. These findings suggest that a distinct prefrontal-basal ganglia and cerebellar network implements the model-based RL action selection strategy. PMID:27539554

  6. Proceedings of the Department of Energy Defense Programs hazardous and mixed waste minimization workshop: Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first workshop on hazardous and mixed waste minimization was held in Las Vegas, Nevada, on July 26--28, 1988. The objective of this workshop was to establish an interchange between DOE headquarters (DOE-HQ) DP, Operations Offices, and contractors of waste minimization strategies and successes. The first day of the workshop began with presentations stressing the importance of establishing a waste minimization program at each site as required by RCRA, the land ban restrictions, and the decrease in potential liabilities associated with waste disposal. Discussions were also centered on pending legislation which would create an Office of Waste Reduction in the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The Waste Minimization and Avoidance Study was initiated by DOE as an addition to the long-term productivity study to address the issues of evolving requirements facing RCRA waste management activities at the DP sites, to determine how major operations will be affected by these requirements, and to determine the available strategies and options for waste minimization and avoidance. Waste minimization was defined in this study as source reduction and recycling

  7. Resolution No. 44/172. Plan of Action to Combat Desertification, 19 December 1989.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Resolution No. 44172, December 19, 1989, from the United Nations-General Assembly reviews the plan of action to combat desertification. Step A, implementation of the plan of action to combat desertification begins with recalling of previous resolutions concerning desertification, acknowledges with deep concern the problem of desertification, which has a global impact but is still on the fringe of growing awareness on the part of the international community, and how imperative it is to combat environment deterioration effectively within the framework of the interdependence of nations. It expresses grave concern at the continuing spread and intensification of decertification in developing countries, particularly in Africa, the indescribable human suffering, economic and financial losses, and social disruption caused by that scourge; it acknowledges that drought and desertification place a considerable burden on the economic and financial capacities of the developing countries affected and that the negative effects of the international economic environment impede their efforts to undertake effective and sustained programs to combat desertification, for which they bear primary responsibility. The resolution notes the inadequacy of financial resources for the implementation of the plan of action to combat desertification, urges governments to increase and intensify their efforts and to prioritize decertification control, and requests a report containing expert studies in the specified areas. Step B, implementation in the Sudan-Sahelian region of the plan of action to combat decertification, begins with the recall of previous resolutions, reviews important facts and concerns, urges affected countries to include projects to combat desertification and drought in their national development plans and to accord high priority to them. It invites the United Nations Sudano-Sahelian office to intensify its efforts to mobilize additional resources to support the efforts of the

  8. From Plan to Action: Successful Data Management Plan Implementation in a Multidisciplinary Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret H. Burnette

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective and Setting: While data management planning becomes more commonplace, moving from planning into implementation remains a hurdle for many researchers. With little specific guidance from funding agencies and libraries in the early stages of developing services to assist researchers, insights into what contributes to successful data management are sorely needed. The objective of this study was to document how a multidisciplinary research team, after consultation with the University of Illinois Library, took steps to implement a data management plan. Design and Methods: A case study was designed to gather insights from the research group through semi-structured interviews. Questions focused on which of the recommended data management strategies were adopted and how those strategies affected the project in terms of cost, time, effectiveness, and long-term data use. Results: From these interviews five major themes emerged as important: intentional staffing, addressing essential data management elements, iterative improvement, training and mentorship, and increased efficiency and peace of mind. Conclusions: Despite the initial investment that data management requires, researchers report significant benefits.

  9. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 309: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert F. Boehlecke

    2004-12-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 309, Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The general purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective actions. Corrective Action Unit 309 is comprised of the following three corrective action sites (CASs) in Area 12 of the NTS: (1) CAS 12-06-09, Muckpile; (2) CAS 12-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump (CWD); and (3) CAS 12-28-01, I-, J-, and K-Tunnel Debris. Corrective Action Site 12-06-09 consists of a muckpile and debris located on the hillside in front of the I-, J-, and K-Tunnels on the eastern slopes of Rainier Mesa in Area 12. The muckpile includes mining debris (muck) and debris generated during the excavation and construction of the I-, J-, and K-Tunnels. Corrective Action Site 12-08-02, CWD, consists of a muckpile and debris and is located on the hillside in front of the re-entry tunnel for K-Tunnel. For the purpose of this investigation CAS 12-28-01 is defined as debris ejected by containment failures during the Des Moines and Platte Tests and the associated contamination that is not covered in the two muckpile CASs. This site consists of debris scattered south of the I-, J-, and K-Tunnel muckpiles and extends down the hillside, across the valley, and onto the adjacent hillside to the south. In addition, the site will cover the potential contamination associated with ''ventings'' along the fault, fractures, and various boreholes on the mesa top and face. One conceptual site model was developed for all three CASs to address possible contamination migration pathways associated with CAU

  10. Method for Measuring the Alignment Between Information Technology Strategic Planning and Actions of Information Technology Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcio Melre da Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to present a method for measuring the degree of alignment between Strategic Planning and Information Technology Management practices and Information Technology Governance. A survey of IT governance maturity at the High Courts and the Supreme Court was carried out in order to reach this aim. The Attribute Table of the COBIT 4.1 was used both as a model for maturity analysis as for the degree of alignment of IT strategic plans of these bodies with the IT Strategic Planning established by the National Judiciary Council (CNJ. It was assessed the maturity of thirty four processes, according to six attributes, in the four COBIT domains. The proposed method, named COMPLAN-GTI, allows the linking of the guidelines of the strategic planning to the COBIT processes. The field research above mentioned shows that the alignment between the planning established by the CNJ and those established by the High Courts and Supreme Court is around 68%, leading to the conclusion that the policies and actions established by the National Council of Justice for the Judiciary are being followed. The application of the method is also used to confirm whether the management practices and the IT Governance are consistent with the strategic plan established by the organization. It was observed in the research carried out in the Courts that the average convergence between PETIs and management practices and Governance lies around 70%, leading to the conclusion that the strategic plans exerted influence on the action planning of these organizations.

  11. Corrective action investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit Number 427: Area 3 septic waste system numbers 2 and 6, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the Area 3 Compound, specifically Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Number 427, which is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 255 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The Corrective Action Unit Work Plan, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada divides investigative activities at TTR into Source Groups. The Septic Tanks and Lagoons Group consists of seven CAUs. Corrective Action Unit Number 427 is one of three septic waste system CAUs in TTR Area 3. Corrective Action Unit Numbers 405 and 428 will be investigated at a future data. Corrective Action Unit Number 427 is comprised of Septic Waste Systems Number 2 and 6 with respective CAS Numbers 03-05-002-SW02 and 03-05-002-SW06

  12. Remedial action plan for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Monument Valley, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-02-01

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. It presents the series of activities which are proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site located near Monument Valley, Arizona It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement.

  13. Operable Unit 3: Proposed Plan/Environmental Assessment for interim remedial action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents a Proposed Plan and an Environmental Assessment for an interim remedial action to be undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) within Operable Unit 3 (OU3) at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). This proposed plan provides site background information, describes the remedial alternatives being considered, presents a comparative evaluation of the alternatives and a rationnale for the identification of DOE's preferred alternative, evaluates the potential environmental and public health effects associated with the alternatives, and outlines the public's role in helping DOE and the EPA to make the final decision on a remedy

  14. IAEA Board of Governors approves IAEA action plan to combat nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA Board of Governors today approved in principal an action plan designed to upgrade worldwide protection against acts of terrorism involving nuclear and other radioactive materials. In approving the plan, the Board has recognized that the first line of defense against nuclear terrorism is the strong physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials. 'National measures for protecting nuclear material and facilities are uneven in their substance and application,' the IAEA says. 'There is wide recognition that the international physical protection regime needs to be strengthened.'

  15. Predicting Physical Activity Outcomes During Episodes of Academic Goal Conflict: The Differential Role of Action Planning and Coping Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Natasha; Gaudreau, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    The moderating role of academic goal conflict in the relations between action planning (AP) and coping planning (CP) with physical activity was tested using samples of university students concurrently pursuing an academic and a physical activity goal. In Study 1 (N = 317), AP was found to positively relate to physical activity goal progress at low, but not at high, levels of goal conflict. CP trended toward being positively related to goal progress at high, but not at low levels of goal conflict. Study 2 (N = 97), using a 1-week daily diary design and measures of self-reported physical activity behavior and goal progress, showed that daily AP positively related to daily physical activity outcomes on days when students experienced lower, but not higher, levels of goal conflict relative to their average. Conversely, CP positively related to daily physical activity outcomes on days when students experienced higher, but not lower, levels of goal conflict.

  16. Action planning as predictor of health protective and health risk behavior: an investigation of fruit and snack consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candel Math

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large discrepancies between people's intention to eat a healthy diet and actual dietary behavior indicate that motivation is not a sufficient instigator for healthy behavior. Research efforts to decrease this 'intention - behavior gap' have centered on aspects of self-regulation, most importantly self-regulatory planning. Most studies on the impact of self-regulatory planning in health and dietary behavior focus on the promotion of health protective behaviors. This study investigates and compares the predictive value of action planning in health protective behavior and the restriction of health risk behavior. Methods Two longitudinal observational studies were performed simultaneously, one focusing on fruit consumption (N = 572 and one on high-caloric snack consumption (N = 585 in Dutch adults. Structural equation modeling was used to investigate and compare the predictive value of action planning in both behaviors, correcting for demographics and the influence of motivational factors and past behavior. The nature of the influence of action planning was investigated by testing mediating and moderating effects. Results Action planning was a significant predictor of fruit consumption and restricted snack consumption beyond the influence of motivational factors and past behavior. The strength of the predictive value of action planning did not differ between the two behaviors. Evidence for mediation of the intention - behavior relationship was found for both behaviors. Positive moderating effects of action planning were demonstrated for fruit consumption, indicating that individuals who report high levels of action planning are significantly more likely to translate their intentions into actual behavior. Conclusion The results indicate that the planning of specific preparatory actions predicts the performance of healthy dietary behavior and support the application of self-regulatory planning in both health protective and health

  17. Visions, Scenarios and Action Plans Towards Next Generation Tanzania Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Kyaruzi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents strategic visions, scenarios and action plans for enhancing Tanzania Power Systems towards next generation Smart Power Grid. It first introduces the present Tanzanian power grid and the challenges ahead in terms of generation capacity, financial aspect, technical and non-technical losses, revenue loss, high tariff, aging infrastructure, environmental impact and the interconnection with the neighboring countries. Then, the current initiatives undertaken by the Tanzania government in response to the present challenges and the expected roles of smart grid in overcoming these challenges in the future with respect to the scenarios presented are discussed. The developed scenarios along with visions and recommended action plans towards the future Tanzanian power system can be exploited at all governmental levels to achieve public policy goals and help develop business opportunities by motivating domestic and international investments in modernizing the nation’s electric power infrastructure. In return, it should help build the green energy economy.

  18. Theories of reasoned action and planned behavior as models of condom use: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarracín, D; Johnson, B T; Fishbein, M; Muellerleile, P A

    2001-01-01

    To examine how well the theories of reasoned action and planned behavior predict condom use, the authors synthesized 96 data sets (N = 22,594) containing associations between the models' key variables. Consistent with the theory of reasoned action's predictions, (a) condom use was related to intentions (weighted mean r. = .45), (b) intentions were based on attitudes (r. = .58) and subjective norms (r. = .39), and (c) attitudes were associated with behavioral beliefs (r. = .56) and norms were associated with normative beliefs (r. = .46). Consistent with the theory of planned behavior's predictions, perceived behavioral control was related to condom use intentions (r. = .45) and condom use (r. = .25), but in contrast to the theory, it did not contribute significantly to condom use. The strength of these associations, however, was influenced by the consideration of past behavior. Implications of these results for HIV prevention efforts are discussed.

  19. Theories of reasoned action and planned behavior as models of condom use: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarracín, D; Johnson, B T; Fishbein, M; Muellerleile, P A

    2001-01-01

    To examine how well the theories of reasoned action and planned behavior predict condom use, the authors synthesized 96 data sets (N = 22,594) containing associations between the models' key variables. Consistent with the theory of reasoned action's predictions, (a) condom use was related to intentions (weighted mean r. = .45), (b) intentions were based on attitudes (r. = .58) and subjective norms (r. = .39), and (c) attitudes were associated with behavioral beliefs (r. = .56) and norms were associated with normative beliefs (r. = .46). Consistent with the theory of planned behavior's predictions, perceived behavioral control was related to condom use intentions (r. = .45) and condom use (r. = .25), but in contrast to the theory, it did not contribute significantly to condom use. The strength of these associations, however, was influenced by the consideration of past behavior. Implications of these results for HIV prevention efforts are discussed. PMID:11271752

  20. Democracy and changes. The energy action plan 96; Demokrati og forandring. Energihandlingsplan 96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hvelplund, F.; Lund, H.; Serup, K.E.; Maeng, H.

    1995-12-01

    Denmark has problems with implementation of the official energy policy. This book deals with the background of these problems and the ways for remedial action. Realization of the energy-political aims requires a new organization, where single large supply systems are replaced by many smaller energy-saving ones. However, at present all the changes are attempted by the old organizations in closed formal bodies, without control by the general public. The planned changes cannot be effectively implemented without a wide democratic participation. Consumers, organizations and businesses should be given the necessary knowledge and action chances, so that they can develop various fuel-saving measures. This book indicates, how such democratization of the energy planning might become like, and how it might be implemented. The phase is reached, where further technological energy effectivization can be achieved solely by means of democratization of the energy system control. (EG) 154 refs.

  1. Facing the Challenge of Natural Disasters in Latin America and the Caribbean: An IDB Action Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Caroline Clarke; Céline Charvériat; Sergio Mora-Castro; Michael Collins; Kari Keipi

    2000-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the current state of affairs regarding capacity to cope with natural disasters in the region, an analysis of what needs to be done, and a plan of action with specific measures that the Bank will put into practice in its operation. The Bank's comprehensive approach to disaster risk management will place top priority on preventing and mitigating natural disasters, while standing ready to assist countries in their reconstruction and rehabilitation efforts when...

  2. Enhancing local action planning through quantitative flood risk analysis: a case study in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Castillo-Rodríguez, Jesica T.; Escuder-Bueno, Ignacio; Perales-Momparler, Sara; Porta-Sancho, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a method to incorporate and promote quantitative flood risk analysis to support local action planning against flooding. The proposed approach aims to provide a standardized framework for local flood risk analysis, combining hazard mapping with vulnerability data to quantify risk in terms of expected annual affected population, potential injuries, number of fatalities, and economic damages. Flood risk is estimated combining GIS data of loads, system response and consequen...

  3. Theories of Reasoned Action and Planned Behavior as Models of Condom Use: A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Albarracín, Dolores; Johnson, Blair T.; Fishbein, Martin; Muellerleile, Paige A.

    2001-01-01

    To examine how well the theories of reasoned action and planned behavior predict condom use, the authors synthesized 96 data sets (N = 22,594) containing associations between the models’ key variables. Consistent with the theory of reasoned action’s predictions, (a) condom use was related to intentions (weighted mean r. = .45), (b) intentions were based on attitudes (r. = .58) and subjective norms (r. = .39), and (c) attitudes were associated with behavioral beliefs (r. = .56) and norms were ...

  4. Participatory evaluation methodology for community plans and action. Three experiences of participatory evaluation in Catalunya

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Planas Lladó; Pilar Pineda-Herrero; Esther Gil Pasamontes; Laia Sánchez Casals

    2014-01-01

    Participatory evaluation (PE) is frequently used to assess community plans and actions. But how is a PE process designed and carried out? Which methodological elements differentiate PE from other assessment practices? And what kind of tools and instruments are used? This article attempts to answer these questions, though a review of the most recent literature and guidebooks on the EP methodology. Some methodological reflections on th...

  5. Plan of action for quality improvement of ventilation systems; Actieplan Kwaliteitsverbetering Ventilatievoorzieningen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atsma, J. [Ministerie van Infrastructuur en Milieu IenM, Den Haag (Netherlands); Calon, M. [Aedes vereniging van woningcorporaties, Den Haag (Netherlands); Schoorl, F.J. [Bond Nederlandse Architecten BNA, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Van Tuinen, J.L. [Bouwend Nederland, Zoetermeer (Netherlands); Bodewes, W.J. [Vereniging van Nederlandse projectontwikkeling Maatschappijen Neprom, Voorburg (Netherlands); Goossens, J.H. [Vereniging voor ontwikkelaars en bouwondernemers NVB, Voorburg (Netherlands); Polman, E.J.M. [Stichting Waarborgfonds Koopwoningen SWK, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Engels, M. [Uneto-VNI, Zoetermeer (Netherlands); Werner-van Beek, H. J. [VACpunt Wonen, Utrecht (Netherlands); Mulder, R.J. [Vereniging Eigen Huis VEH, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Rook, G. [Vereniging Leveranciers van Luchttechnische Apparaten VLA, Zoetermeer (Netherlands); Van Noord, P. [Woningborg, Gouda (Netherlands); Paping, R.H.M. [De Nederlandse Woonbond, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-06-15

    The action plan comprises the agreements made by the Ministry of Infrastructure and Environment and the Ministry of Internal Affairs in the Netherlands with representatives of building organizations to improve the quality of ventilation systems in newly built houses [Dutch] Het actieplan bevat de afspraken die het ministerie van Infrastructuur en Milieu en het ministerie van Binnenlandse Zaken met de bouwpartijen hebben gemaakt om de kwaliteit van de ventilatievoorzieningen van nieuwbouwwoningen te verbeteren.

  6. Enhancing local action planning through quantitative flood risk analysis: a case study in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Rodríguez, Jesica Tamara; Escuder-Bueno, Ignacio; Perales-Momparler, Sara; Ramón Porta-Sancho, Juan

    2016-07-01

    This article presents a method to incorporate and promote quantitative risk analysis to support local action planning against flooding. The proposed approach aims to provide a framework for local flood risk analysis, combining hazard mapping with vulnerability data to quantify risk in terms of expected annual affected population, potential injuries, number of fatalities, and economic damages. Flood risk is estimated combining GIS data of loads, system response, and consequences and using event tree modelling for risk calculation. The study area is the city of Oliva, located on the eastern coast of Spain. Results from risk modelling have been used to inform local action planning and to assess the benefits of structural and non-structural risk reduction measures. Results show the potential impact on risk reduction of flood defences and improved warning communication schemes through local action planning: societal flood risk (in terms of annual expected affected population) would be reduced up to 51 % by combining both structural and non-structural measures. In addition, the effect of seasonal population variability is analysed (annual expected affected population ranges from 82 to 107 %, compared with the current situation, depending on occupancy rates in hotels and campsites). Results highlight the need for robust and standardized methods for urban flood risk analysis replicability at regional and national scale.

  7. Task action plans for unresolved safety issues related to nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains Task Action Plans for generic tasks addressing Unresolved Safety Issues (USIs) related to nuclear power plants. Progress on USIs is reported to Congress each year in the NRC Annual Report pursuant to the requirements of Section 210 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended. In addition, the NRR issues NUREG-0606, Unresolved Safety Issues Summary, Aqua Book on a quarterly basis; this report provides current schedule information for each USI. The Task Action Plans in this document include a description of the issue, a description of the NRC staff's approach to resolving the issue, a general discussion of the basis for continued operation and licensing pending resolution of the issue, a discussion of the technical organizations involved in the task, the requirements of manpower and program support funding, interactions with outside organizations and potential problems. This document does not include Task Action Plans for generic tasks addressing USIs for which reports providing the NRC staff resolution of the issue have been published. Those tasks for which reports have been published are identified and the reports are referenced

  8. Maintaining professional confidence--monitoring work with obese schoolchildren with support of an action plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllersdorf, Maria; Zuccato, Linda Martinson; Nimborg, Jennie; Eriksson, Henrik

    2010-03-01

    School nurses meet obese children in their everyday work. Although school nurses acknowledge the importance of getting hold of school children's obesity, they seem to lack strategies enabling them to handle the delicacy of the problem. The aim of this study was to describe how school nurses perceive their work with obese children with support of an action plan. Qualitative in-depth interviews were performed with six school nurses working in a municipality, where an action plan for the work with obese school-age children had been implemented. The transcribed data was analysed by a manifest content analysis. The results showed that the informants perceived having a key role in the obesity work, which they experienced as meaningful, but full of pitfalls. They found themselves suitable for the task, but perceived lacking deeper knowledge about specific modes of work such as motivational conversation. As the task was considered delicate, there were great demands for guidelines, education and cooperation. The action plan served as support for maintaining professional confidence throughout the process, but there was room for improvements.

  9. Collective action control by goals and plans: applying a self-regulation perspective to group performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieber, Frank; Thürmer, J Lukas; Gollwitzer, Peter M

    2012-01-01

    In celebration of the 125th anniversary of The American Journal of Psychology, this article discusses a seminal publication by Marjorie Shaw (1932) on small group performance in the rational solution of complex problems. We then propose an approach for the effective regulation of group goal striving based on the collective action control perspective. From this perspective, group performance might be hindered by a collective intention-behavior gap: Groups fail to act on their intentions despite being strongly committed to the collective goal, knowing what the necessary actions are, and being capable of performing them. To reduce this gap, we suggest specific if-then plans (implementation intentions) in which groups specify when, where, and how to act toward their collective goal as an easily applicable self-regulation strategy to automate collective action control. Studies in which implementation intentions improved group performance in hidden profile, escalation of commitment, and cooperation task paradigms are reported and discussed.

  10. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 529: Area 25 Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-02-26

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 529, Area 25 Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 529 consists of one Corrective Action Site (25-23-17). For the purpose of this investigation, the Corrective Action Site has been divided into nine parcels based on the separate and distinct releases. A conceptual site model was developed for each parcel to address the translocation of contaminants from each release. The results of this investigation will be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  11. Corrective Action Plan in response to the March 1992 Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On March 5, 1992, a Department of Energy (DOE) Tiger Team completed an assessment of the Ames Laboratory, located in Ames, Iowa. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with a report on the status and performance of Environment, Safety and Health (ES ampersand H) programs at Ames Laboratory. Detailed findings of the assessment are presented in the report, DOE/EH-0237, Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory. This document, the Ames Laboratory Corrective Action Plan (ALCAP), presents corrective actions to overcome deficiencies cited in the Tiger Team Assessment. The Tiger Team identified 53 Environmental findings, from which the Team derived four key findings. In the Safety and Health (S ampersand H) area, 126 concerns were identified, eight of which were designated Category 11 (there were no Category I concerns). Seven key concerns were derived from the 126 concerns. The Management Subteam developed 19 findings which have been summarized in four key findings. The eight S ampersand H Category 11 concerns identified in the Tiger Team Assessment were given prompt management attention. Actions to address these deficiencies have been described in individual corrective action plans, which were submitted to DOE Headquarters on March 20, 1992. The ALCAP includes actions described in this early response, as well as a long term strategy and framework for correcting all remaining deficiencies. Accordingly, the ALCAP presents the organizational structure, management systems, and specific responses that are being developed to implement corrective actions and to resolve root causes identified in the Tiger Team Assessment. The Chicago Field Office (CH), IowaState University (ISU), the Institute for Physical Research and Technology (IPRT), and Ames Laboratory prepared the ALCAP with input from the DOE Headquarters, Office of Energy Research (ER)

  12. Project licensing plan for UMTRA [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action] sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Licensing Plan is to establish how a disposal site will be licensed, and to provide responsibilities of participatory agencies as legislated by the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 (Public Law 95-604). This Plan has been developed to ensure that the objectives of licensing are met by identifying the necessary institutional controls, participatory agency responsibilities, and key milestones in the licensing process. The Plan contains the legislative basis for and a description of the licensing process (''Process'') for UMTRA sites. This is followed by a discussion of agency responsibilities, and milestones in the Process. The Plan concludes with a generic timeline of this Process. As discussed in Section 2.1, a custodial maintenance and surveillance plan will constitute the basis for a site license. The details of maintenance and surveillance are discussed in the Project Maintenance and Surveillance Plan (AL-350124.0000). 5 refs., 4 figs

  13. A Critical Review on the National Energy Efficiency Action Plan of Egypt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem Elrefaei

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Egypt, as with other developing countries, faces a major energy security problem, which strongly impacts all national plans for economic development. A sound energy strategy is crucially needed, and should be based on two pillars: first, boosting the production of clean energy from various renewable and non-renewable sources, and second, managing and rationalizing energy demand, with related reforms. Some steps were taken by previous Egyptian governments regarding these two pillars. In February 2008, the Ministry of Electricity and Energy of Egypt put a target of 20% of electricity to come from renewable energy resources by 2020. In July 2012, the Ministerial Cabinet approved both the Egyptian Solar Plan targeting 3500 MW of solar energy by 2027, and the National Energy Efficiency Action Plan (NEEAP to reduce energy consumption 5% during the period from 2012-2015 compared to the average consumption of the previous 5 years. We believe that these plans will not bring their expected fruits unless they are well orchestrated with other sectoral development plans in areas such as agriculture, transport, housing and services, amongst others. This paper aims to investigate the Egyptian NEEAP and assess whether the adopted national energy efficiency plan and the associated policies on all other development sectors adopted by the government have sound implications. We aim to find out whether the development policies with a focus on energy policy are set in an integrated or fragmented way.

  14. Attitudes and exercise adherence: test of the Theories of Reasoned Action and Planned Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R A; Biddle, S J

    1999-04-01

    Three studies of exercise adherence and attitudes are reported that tested the Theory of Reasoned Action and the Theory of Planned Behaviour. In a prospective study of adherence to a private fitness club, structural equation modelling path analysis showed that attitudinal and social normative components of the Theory of Reasoned Action accounted for 13.1% of the variance in adherence 4 months later, although only social norm significantly predicted intention. In a second study, the Theory of Planned Behaviour was used to predict both physical activity and sedentary behaviour. Path analyses showed that attitude and perceived control, but not social norm, predicted total physical activity. Physical activity was predicted from intentions and control over sedentary behaviour. Finally, an intervention study with previously sedentary adults showed that intentions to be active measured at the start and end of a 10-week intervention were associated with the planned behaviour variables. A multivariate analysis of variance revealed no significant multivariate effects for time on the planned behaviour variables measured before and after intervention. Qualitative data provided evidence that participants had a positive experience on the intervention programme and supported the role of social normative factors in the adherence process.

  15. Fourth annual Windsor-Essex County air quality action plan report card

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-12-01

    An anti-smog action plan has been in effect in Windsor-Essex County, Ontario since May 2000. The plan was initiated by the Citizens Environment Alliance (CEA) in an effort to mitigate the poor air quality in the region. This fourth annual report card summarizes the commitments made by the city Council and evaluates its progress. Efforts in implementing the Air Quality Action Plan were graded. The report outlines emergency measures and long term air quality strategies. This report card focuses on the City of Windsor, evaluating the County when it is relevant. The report states that in the past 12 months, neither the City nor the County have made significant progress in implementing the air quality plan. In 30 categories, they received 18 grade F, 9 grade D, 1 grade C, and 2 grade C plus. The CEA indicated that the problem is getting worse, noting that Windsor averages more than 30 smog advisory days per year. This report card also includes an appendix citing the human health and economic impacts of air pollution in Essex County. Eleven recommendations were proposed, including the establishment of an Environment Canada office in Windsor or Essex County to address transboundary air quality issues. 2 tabs., 1 appendix.

  16. Third annual Windsor-Essex County air quality action plan report card

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-10-01

    In July 1998, the Citizens Environment Alliance (CEA) proposed an anti-smog action plan to the City of Windsor, Ontario. The city council referred the proposed plan to the City Administration for review and comment. A similar plan was adopted in 2000 by the City of Windsor in an effort to mitigate the poor air quality in the region. The present report focusses on the City of Windsor, and discusses Essex County when appropriate. According to the assessment provided by the CEA, it awarded 23 grade F, 5 grade D and 2 grade C in thirty categories. The CEA concluded that the municipalities had made no significant efforts to address air quality issues. The CEA indicated that the problem is getting worse, noting that Windsor averages in excess of 30 smog advisory days per year. All levels of government are responsible for the deteriorating situation. A series of eleven recommendations were made, from the need to create an implementation strategy from the Air Quality Action Plan adopted in 2000, to the establishment of an Environment Canada office in Windsor or Essex County. It was suggested that all levels of government should invest additional funds to public transit. 2 tabs.

  17. National technology needs assessment for the preparation and implementation of climate change action plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkel, C.W.M. van; Blonk, T.J.; Westra, C.A.

    1996-12-31

    In the United National Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) it is recognised that developed countries have a responsibility in assisting developing countries and countries in economic transition in building a national capacity for the development, acquisition and transfer of Climate-related Technologies (CTs). Such assistance is most likely to be successful once it is tailored to the results of a sound assessment of the country`s development needs and once the results of this assessment have been endorsed by the most important stakeholders in the country. Recent insight in the opportunities and constraints for National (technology) Needs Assessments (NNAs) as planning tool for both capacity building and technology transfer regarding Environmentally Sound Technologies (ESTs) is applied here to propose a participatory Climate Change Action Planning (CCAP) process. This participatory planning process is thought to serve the dual objective of defining a national Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP) while at the same time contributing to the creation of a broad supportive basis for its acceptance and implementation among stakeholders in the developing country.

  18. TPC Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first workshop to focus on time projection chambers was held at TRIUMF (Canada) this summer. Some 75 participants came from groups in Europe and North America using TPCs in a variety of applications in experimental physics. Reports included several general descriptions of existing detectors as well as some proposals for new instruments. A time projection chamber (TPC) is the name given to a class of large volume drift chambers which operate generally with parallel electric and magnetic fields. Applications span energies from a few MeV in double beta decay searches, through intermediate energies in muon decay studies to large high energy arrays planned for LEP at CERN

  19. Health sector planning led by management of recurrent expenditure: an agenda for action-research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, M

    1991-01-01

    Health services in developing countries face a crisis of recurrent costs. Far from being able to fund primary health care (PHC) developments, governments now have difficulty in keeping existing health services in operation. This article proposes an approach to the problem based on the proactive planning and management of recurrent health expenditure. The system addresses existing services as well as future plans and allows explicit trade-offs to be made in resource allocation. This may be termed 'recurrent-expenditureled planning'. The article describes a diagnostic health sector review, which incorporates a recurrent expenditure profile in four planes: by type of provider, source of finance, level of care and recipient population group. A fifth dimension of time trends for certain expenditure categories can be added. The steps of a strategic planning cycle for health services resources are then described, which allows health service strategies to be tested for broad economic feasibility. It also results in the establishment of resource targets that can act as benchmarks against which actual levels of funding can be compared. The targets help to maintain sectoral priorities in resource allocation even in times of economic constraint and to channel funds preferentially to localities and facilities in greatest need. The system calls for innovations in the methods of health planning and financial management in the health sector. Implementation will require health systems action-research at the country level. The essential purpose is to promote PHC policy-led resource allocation and use. No amount of planning can substitute for political action to realize 'health for all', but this system provides technical support to the political forces in favour of distributive PHC policies.

  20. 汽车冲压车间的工艺规划设计%Process planning design of automotive stamping workshop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王平; 崔礼春; 熊飞

    2012-01-01

    详细论述了汽车冲压车间工艺规划的主要设计内容,包括:设计任务,输入条件,设计原则等;介绍了现代化冲压车间的主要设备组成及各自的功用,以及冲压车间各功能区的布局规划和车间各工段人员配置清单.先进合理的冲压车间工艺规划设计,应该充分体现出自动化水平的提高、生产节拍的提升、冲压件成本的降低以及冲压件品质的提高等.%The main design content of the automobile stamping process planning was discussed in detail, including design task, input conditions, design principle, etc. The main components and their functions of modern stamping workshop, each function area layout planning and personnel allocation list of stamping workshop were introduced. In advanced stamping workshop, it reflects not only the improvement of automation level, the promotion of production rhythm, but also the lower cost of stamping parts, the improved quality and so on.

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) was developed for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain. The CAIP is a requirement of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) (FFACO, 1996). The FFACO addresses environmental restoration activities at U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) facilities and sites including the underground testing area(s) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This CAIP describes the investigation activities currently planned for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU. These activities are consistent with the current Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project strategy described in Section 3.0 of Appendix VI, Revision No. 1 (December 7, 2000) of the FFACO (1996) and summarized in Section 2.1.2 of this plan. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU extends over several areas of the NTS (Figure 1-1) and includes former underground nuclear testing locations in Areas 12 and 16. The area referred to as ''Rainier Mesa'' includes the geographical area of Rainier Mesa proper and the contiguous Aqueduct Mesa. Figure 1-2 shows the locations of the tests (within tunnel complexes) conducted at Rainier Mesa. Shoshone Mountain is located approximately 20 kilometers (km) south of Rainier Mesa, but is included within the same CAU due to similarities in their geologic setting and in the nature and types of nuclear tests conducted. Figure 1-3 shows the locations of the tests conducted at Shoshone Mountain. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU falls within the larger-scale Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain Investigation Area, which also includes the northwest section of the Yucca Flat CAU as shown in Figure 1-1. Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain lie adjacent to the Timber Mountain Caldera Complex and are composed of volcanic rocks that erupted from the

  2. We can do better : achieving a made in Canada climate change action plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A made in Canada approach to climate change is supported by the Canadian Coalition for Responsible Environmental Solutions, which is comprised of several business organizations, industry associations, and consumer advocacy groups. The issue of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, thereby contributing to a cleaner environment and a stronger economy, can be better achieved through the development of a climate change action plan that takes into account the specific circumstances of Canada through innovative solutions and the development of new technology. This document supports building a stronger national consensus on climate change to involve all Canadians. A brief overview of the challenge of the Kyoto Protocol for Canada is provided, followed by a statement of principles for a solution made in Canada. The components of such a plan are examined through the Canadian context, sectoral emission performance agreements, public involvement and education, and international Canadian leadership. A section is devoted to the right measurement for industrial emissions. It is proposed that the time frame be based on a combination of the most effective short-term and medium-term actions with a long-term framework to stimulate the development and deployment of viable technologies that can be commercialized. A coordinated air quality agenda, a national research and innovation strategy, a comprehensive review and streamlining of regulation, sinks and offsets all need to be included. Initiatives concerning the green advantage of Canada, transportation, buildings, community action and science and adaptation are required. 1 fig

  3. Steps in preparing and biodiversity section of climate change action plan. Development and evolution of forestry and biodiversity mitigation measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methodic for drawing up of national action plans on prevention of unfavorable consequences of climate change in forestry is described. Approaches to development and measures evolution in these fields on greenhouse effect reduce are considered. (author)

  4. Territories climate plans: territories in action 21 collectivities involved in the climatic change challenge. 1. experiences collection 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The climate plan invites the collectivities to implement actions of greenhouse reduction. This collection presents the first collectivities involved in a climate approach: towns, natural parks, syndicates, general and regional council. (A.L.B.)

  5. 77 FR 43846 - Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Medical Devices Workshop; Notice of Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... Workshop; Notice of Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Office of Orphan Products Development is announcing the following workshop: FDA Pediatric Medical Devices Workshop. This meeting is intended to focus on challenges in pediatric device...

  6. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irene Farnham and Sam Marutzky

    2011-07-01

    This CADD/CAP follows the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) stage, which results in development of a set of contaminant boundary forecasts produced from groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling of the Frenchman Flat CAU. The Frenchman Flat CAU is located in the southeastern portion of the NNSS and comprises 10 underground nuclear tests. The tests were conducted between 1965 and 1971 and resulted in the release of radionuclides in the subsurface in the vicinity of the test cavities. Two important aspects of the corrective action process are presented within this CADD/CAP. The CADD portion describes the results of the Frenchman Flat CAU data-collection and modeling activities completed during the CAI stage. The corrective action objectives and the actions recommended to meet the objectives are also described. The CAP portion describes the corrective action implementation plan. The CAP begins with the presentation of CAU regulatory boundary objectives and initial use restriction boundaries that are identified and negotiated by NNSA/NSO and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). The CAP also presents the model evaluation process designed to build confidence that the flow and contaminant transport modeling results can be used for the regulatory decisions required for CAU closure. The first two stages of the strategy have been completed for the Frenchman Flat CAU. A value of information analysis and a CAIP were developed during the CAIP stage. During the CAI stage, a CAIP addendum was developed, and the activities proposed in the CAIP and addendum were completed. These activities included hydrogeologic investigation of the underground testing areas, aquifer testing, isotopic and geochemistry-based investigations, and integrated geophysical investigations. After these investigations, a groundwater flow and contaminant transport model was developed to forecast contaminant boundaries that enclose areas potentially exceeding the Safe Drinking

  7. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 563: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, with Errata Sheet, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfred Wickline

    2007-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit 563, Septic Systems, is located in Areas 3 and 12 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 563 is comprised of the four corrective action sites (CASs) below: • 03-04-02, Area 3 Subdock Septic Tank • 03-59-05, Area 3 Subdock Cesspool • 12-59-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Septic Tanks • 12-60-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Outfalls These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

  8. An introduction to the HighARCS Integrated Action Plans, with an institutions, policies and conflicts perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Søren

    This report is an introduction focused on institutions, policies and conflicts aspects, for the Integrated Action Plans (IAPs) produced by the HighARCS project for the 5 sites in China, India and Vietnam......This report is an introduction focused on institutions, policies and conflicts aspects, for the Integrated Action Plans (IAPs) produced by the HighARCS project for the 5 sites in China, India and Vietnam...

  9. The Danish Organic Action Plan 2020:assessment method and baseline status of organic procurement in public kitchens

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, Nina Nørgaard; Lassen, Anne Dahl; Løje, Hanne; Tetens, Inge

    2015-01-01

    Objective With political support from the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020, organic public procurement in Denmark is expected to increase. In order to evaluate changes in organic food procurement in Danish public kitchens, reliable methods are needed. The present study aimed to compare organic food procurement measurements by two methods and to collect and discuss baseline organic food procurement measurements from public kitchens participating in the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020. Design Co...

  10. A Local Action Plan (PAL) to Combat Desertification in Apulia Region: Functional Integration of Existing Territorial Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Trotta; Massimo Iannetta

    2010-01-01

    In 2006-2007, the Italian National Committee to Combat Drought and Desertification promoted the execution of local action plans in some of the Italian regions. The aims of these plans were: to carry out specific actions at a local scale; to promote the integration of local policies; to involve the local communities in proposing strategies to be adopted; to harmonize the procedures among institutions in charge of adopting the policies. In this framework, ENEA carried out an evaluation of exist...

  11. Corrective action investigation plan for CAU No. 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This Correction Action Investigation Plan contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the Area 3 Landfill Complex, CAU No. 424, which is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 255 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, nevada. The CAU 424 is comprised of eight individual landfill sites that are located around and within the perimeter of the Area 3 Compound. Due to the unregulated disposal activities commonly associated with early landfill operations, an investigation will be conducted at each CAS to complete the following tasks: identify the presence and nature of possible contaminant migration from the landfills; determine the vertical and lateral extent of possible contaminant migration; ascertain the potential impact to human health and the environment; and provide sufficient information and data to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective action strategies for each CAS.

  12. Corrective action investigation plan for CAU No. 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Correction Action Investigation Plan contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the Area 3 Landfill Complex, CAU No. 424, which is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 255 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, nevada. The CAU 424 is comprised of eight individual landfill sites that are located around and within the perimeter of the Area 3 Compound. Due to the unregulated disposal activities commonly associated with early landfill operations, an investigation will be conducted at each CAS to complete the following tasks: identify the presence and nature of possible contaminant migration from the landfills; determine the vertical and lateral extent of possible contaminant migration; ascertain the potential impact to human health and the environment; and provide sufficient information and data to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective action strategies for each CAS

  13. Tactical Action Plan: Powering the Energy Frontier (An Appendix to the Strategic Roadmap 2024)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-01-01

    The Tactical Action Plan identifies and describes the Western-wide tasks and activities, existing and new, needed to fully achieve the goals in Strategic Roadmap 2024. Each activity in the TAP chart is briefly described in this document and also linked to the Critical Pathway it supports. As the TAP is a list of specific strategies and actions susceptible to changing environments and needs, the TAP will be updated more frequently as Western progresses towards its goals. The TAP is organized into seven Strategic Target Areas that serve as Western’s priorities and areas of focus for the next two to three years. These Target Areas are: Power and Transmission Related Services; Energy Infrastructure; Partnership and Innovation; Asset Management; Safety and Security; Communication; and Human Capital Management and Organization Structure. Target Areas are also used to create the agency’s annual performance targets, which measure progress and implementation of the TAP, and the status of which will be reported regularly.

  14. Feasibility of a smartphone application based action plan and monitoring in asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Yeong; Lee, Suh-Young; Jo, Eun-Jung; Lee, Seung-Eun; Kang, Min-Gyu; Song, Woo-Jung; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Sang-Heon; Min, Kyung-Up; Ahn, Ki-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Background Asthma patients may experience acute episodic exacerbation. The guidelines recommend that written action plan should be given to asthma patients. However, no one can predict when and where acute exacerbation will happen. As people carry smart phone almost anytime and anywhere, smartphone application could be a useful tool in asthma care. We evaluated the feasibility of the ubiquitous healthcare system of asthma care using a smartphone application (snuCare) based on the self-management guideline or action plan. Methods Forty-four patients including fragile asthmatics were enrolled from Seoul National University Bundang Hospital between December 2011 and February 2012. They were randomly assigned into application user (n = 22) or application nonuser group (n = 22). We evaluated user-satisfaction, and clinical parameters such as asthma control, Quality of Life Questionnaire for Adult Korean Asthmatics, and the adherence of patients. Results The characteristics were similar at baseline between the 2 groups except those who treated with short-term systemic steroid or increased dose of systemic steroid during previous 8 weeks (user vs. nonuser: 31.8% vs. 4.5%, p = 0.020). Total of 2,226 signals was generated during 8 weeks including 5 risky states. After eight weeks, the users answered that it was very easy to use the application, which was shown in highest scores in terms of satisfaction (mean ± standard deviation, 4.3 ± 0.56). Seventy-three percent of patients answered that the application was very useful for asthma care. User group showed improved the adherence scores (p = 0.017). One patient in application user group could avoid Emergency Department visit owing to the application while a patient in nonuser group visited Emergency Department. Conclusion The ubiquitous healthcare system using a smartphone application (snuCare) based on the self-management guideline or action plan could be helpful in the monitoring and the management of asthma. PMID

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0 / June 2003), Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-06-27

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 536 consists of a single Corrective Action Site (CAS): 03-44-02, Steam Jenny Discharge. The CAU 536 site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of possible contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for CAS 03-44-02. The additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of this field investigation are to be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3-2004.

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Revision 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    USDOE/NV

    1999-07-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed for Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The Frenchman Flat CAU is located along the eastern border of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and includes portions of Areas 5 and 11. The Frenchman Flat CAU constitutes one of several areas of the Nevada Test Site used for underground nuclear testing in the past. The nuclear tests resulted in groundwater contamination in the vicinity as well as downgradient of the underground test areas. The CAIP describes the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) to be conducted at the Frenchman Flat CAU to evaluate the extent of contamination in groundwater due to the underground nuclear testing. The Frenchman Flat CAI will be conducted by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project which is a part of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Environmental Restoration Project. The CAIP is a requirement of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996 ) agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Based on the general definition of a CAI from Section IV.14 of the FFACO, the purpose of the CAI is ''...to gather data sufficient to characterize the nature, extent, and rate of migration or potential rate of migration from releases or discharges of pollutants or contaminants and/or potential releases or discharges from corrective action units identified at the facilities...'' (FFACO, 1996). However, for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) CAUs, ''...the objective of the CAI process is to define boundaries around each UGTA CAU that establish areas that contain water that may be unsafe for domestic and municipal use.'', as stated in Appendix VI of the FFACO (1996). According to the UGTA strategy (Appendix VI of the FFACO), the CAI of a given CAU starts with the evaluation of the existing data. New

  17. Towards a Joint Action Plan for Research and Development in the Offshore Wind Service Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Dannemand; Piirainen, Kalle A.; Clausen, Niels-Erik;

    The poster presents a joint action plan (JAP) for research and development and innovation (RDI) in the offshore wind service industry in Denmark, Germany,Norway and the UK. Offshore wind servicing (OWS) is in this context defined as both assembly and installation of offshore wind farms as well...... levelized cost of energy. Hence, reducing the cost of OWS is a major challenge for the wind industry. Furthermore, the North Sea is currently the most important site for offshore wind installations, and industry clusters based on OWSare emerging in regions around the North Sea.The JAP is a result...

  18. Clean Water Action Plan: Restoring and protecting America`s waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    On October 18, 1997, the 25th anniversary of the enactment of the Clean Water Act, the Vice President called for a renewed effort to restore and protect water quality. The Vice President asked that the Secretary of Agriculture and the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), working with other affected agencies, develop a Clean Water Action Plan that builds on clean water successes and addresses three major goals: (1) enhanced protection from public health threats posed by water pollution; (2) more effective control of polluted runoff; and (3) promotion of water quality protection on a watershed basis.

  19. Research Progress in the CAS Action Plan for the Development of Western China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Renguo

    2005-01-01

    @@ To speed up the regional development in central and western China is a strategic decision made by the Chinese government at the turn of the century. For CAS research professionals, active participation into the campaign is a solemn historic commitment and a major task of the CAS-piloted national Knowledge Innovation Program. In early 2000, the CAS leadership formulated an Action Plan for Western China Development and initiated a research program aiming at the environmental evolution,ecological restoration and the sustainable exploitation of the local resources in the region.

  20. Tackling non-point source water pollution in British Columbia: An action plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1998-01-01

    Efforts to protect British Columbia water quality by regulating point discharges from municipal and industrial sources have generally been successful, and it is recognized that the major remaining cause of water pollution in the province is from non-point sources. These sources are largely unregulated and associated with urbanization, agriculture, and other forms of land development. The first part of this report reviews the provincial commitment to clean water, the effects of non-point-source (NPS) pollution, and the management of NPS in the province. Part 2 describes the main causes of NPS in British Columbia: Land development, agriculture, stormwater runoff, on-site sewage systems, forestry and range activities, atmospheric deposition, and boating/marine activities. Finally, it presents key components of the province's NPS action plan: Education and training, prevention at site, land use planning and co-ordination, assessment and reporting, economic incentives, legislation and regulation, and implementation.

  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment. Volume 2, Revision 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 2, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root cause of the findings identified during the assessment. This report is concerned with reactors safety and health findings, responses, and planned actions. Specific areas include: organization and administration; quality verification; operations; maintenance; training and certification; auxiliary systems; emergency preparedness; technical support; nuclear criticality safety; security/safety interface; experimental activities; site/facility safety review; radiological protection; personnel protection; fire protection; management findings, responses, and planned actions; self-assessment findings, responses, and planned actions; and summary of planned actions, schedules, and costs.

  2. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-04-30

    This Corrective Action Plan has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996 as amended). CAU 366 consists of the following six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 11 of the Nevada National Security Site: · CAS 11-08-01, Contaminated Waste Dump #1 · CAS 11-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump #2 · CAS 11-23-01, Radioactively Contaminated Area A · CAS 11-23-02, Radioactively Contaminated Area B · CAS 11-23-03, Radioactively Contaminated Area C · CAS 11-23-04, Radioactively Contaminated Area D Site characterization activities were performed in 2011 and 2012, and the results are presented in Appendix A of the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for CAU 366 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2012a). The following closure alternatives were recommended in the CADD: · No further action for CAS 11-23-01 · Closure in place for CASs 11-08-01, 11-08-02, 11-23-02, 11-23-03, and 11-23-04 The scope of work required to implement the recommended closure alternatives includes the following: · Non-engineered soil covers approximately 3 feet thick will be constructed at CAS 11-08-01 over contaminated waste dump (CWD) #1 and at CAS 11-08-02 over CWD #2. · FFACO use restrictions (URs) will be implemented for the areas where the total effective dose (TED) exceeds the final action level (FAL) of 25 millirems per Occasional Use Area year (mrem/OU-yr). The FAL is based on an assumption that the future use of the site includes occasional work activities and that workers will not be assigned to the area on a regular basis. A site worker under this scenario is assumed to be on site for a maximum of 80 hours per year for 5 years. The FFACO UR boundaries will encompass the areas where a worker would be exposed to 25 millirems of radioactivity per year if they are present for 80

  3. Wildlife connectivity approaches and best practices in U.S. state wildlife action plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacher, Iara; Wilkerson, Marit L.

    2014-01-01

    As habitat loss and fragmentation threaten biodiversity on large geographic scales, creating and maintaining connectivity of wildlife populations is an increasingly common conservation objective. To assess the progress and success of large-scale connectivity planning, conservation researchers need a set of plans that cover large geographic areas and can be analyzed as a single data set. The state wildlife action plans (SWAPs) fulfill these requirements. We examined 50 SWAPs to determine the extent to which wildlife connectivity planning, via linkages, is emphasized nationally. We defined linkage as connective land that enables wildlife movement. For our content analysis, we identified and quantified 6 keywords and 7 content criteria that ranged in specificity and were related to linkages for wide-ranging terrestrial vertebrates and examined relations between content criteria and statewide data on focal wide-ranging species, spending, revenue, and conserved land. Our results reflect nationwide disparities in linkage conservation priorities and highlight the continued need for wildlife linkage planning. Only 30% or less of the 50 SWAPs fulfilled highly specific content criteria (e.g., identifying geographic areas for linkage placement or management). We found positive correlations between our content criteria and statewide data on percent conserved land, total focal species, and spending on parks and recreation. We supplemented our content analysis with interviews with 17 conservation professionals to gain specific information about state-specific context and future directions of linkage conservation. Based on our results, relevant literature, and interview responses, we suggest the following best practices for wildlife linkage conservation plans: collect ecologically meaningful background data; be specific; establish community-wide partnerships; and incorporate sociopolitical and socioeconomic information.

  4. 77 FR 74183 - Farm Credit Administration Board Action To Approve a Plan of Voluntary Liquidation for, and To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... Farm Credit Administration Board Action To Approve a Plan of Voluntary Liquidation for, and To Cancel the Charter of, the Farm Credit Finance Corporation of Puerto Rico AGENCY: Farm Credit Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: On August 22, 2012, the Farm Credit Administration (FCA) Board authorized...

  5. Introduction of Action Plan of Forestry Sustainable Development of Qinzhou-Fangchenggang area, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Guanngxi Autonomous Region is an important tropical forestry region in south of China. The main purpose of this research supported by FAO is to generate action plan for sustainable forestry development of this region. Through two-year broad and deep investigation, the programme of the action plant has been made, which includes 12 fields, 38 projects, with duration of 5 years.

  6. Nuclear Innovation Workshops Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, John Howard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Allen, Todd Randall [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hildebrandt, Philip Clay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Baker, Suzanne Hobbs [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Innovation Workshops were held at six locations across the United States on March 3-5, 2015. The data collected during these workshops has been analyzed and sorted to bring out consistent themes toward enhancing innovation in nuclear energy. These themes include development of a test bed and demonstration platform, improved regulatory processes, improved communications, and increased public-private partnerships. This report contains a discussion of the workshops and resulting themes. Actionable steps are suggested at the end of the report. This revision has a small amount of the data in Appendix C removed in order to avoid potential confusion.

  7. Nuclear Innovation Workshops Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Innovation Workshops were held at six locations across the United States on March 3-5, 2015. The data collected during these workshops has been analyzed and sorted to bring out consistent themes toward enhancing innovation in nuclear energy. These themes include development of a test bed and demonstration platform, improved regulatory processes, improved communications, and increased public-private partnerships. This report contains a discussion of the workshops and resulting themes. Actionable steps are suggested at the end of the report. This revision has a small amount of the data in Appendix C removed in order to avoid potential confusion.

  8. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 371: Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Matthews

    2009-02-01

    dose rates exceed final action levels (FALs). • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether chemical contaminants are present at concentrations exceeding FALs. • If contamination exceeds FALs, define the extent of the contamination exceeding FALs. • Investigate waste to determine whether potential source material is present. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy; and U.S. Department of Defense. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted following approval of the plan.

  9. IFPA Meeting 2013 Workshop Report II: use of 'omics' in understanding placental development, bioinformatics tools for gene expression analysis, planning and coordination of a placenta research network, placental imaging, evolutionary approaches to understanding pre-eclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, W E; Adamson, L; Carter, A M; Collins, S; Cox, B; Elliot, M G; Ermini, L; Gruslin, A; Hoodless, P A; Huang, J; Kniss, D A; McGowen, M R; Post, M; Rice, G; Robinson, W; Sadovsky, Y; Salafia, C; Salomon, C; Sled, J G; Todros, T; Wildman, D E; Zamudio, S; Lash, G E

    2014-02-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At the IFPA meeting 2013 twelve themed workshops were presented, five of which are summarized in this report. These workshops related to various aspects of placental biology but collectively covered areas of new technologies for placenta research: 1) use of 'omics' in understanding placental development and pathologies; 2) bioinformatics and use of omics technologies; 3) planning and coordination of a placenta research network; 4) clinical imaging and pathological outcomes; 5) placental evolution.

  10. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the designated disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

  11. Workshop on the Thermophysical Properties of Molten Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The role of accurate thermophysical property data in the process design and modeling of solidification processes was the subject of a workshop held on 22-23 Oct. 1992 in Cleveland, Ohio. The workshop was divided into three sequential sessions dealing with (1) industrial needs and priorities for thermophysical data, (2) experimental capabilities for measuring the necessary data, and (3) theoretical capabilities for predicting the necessary data. In addition, a 2-hour panel discussion of the salient issues was featured as well as a 2-hour caucus that assessed priorities and identified action plans.

  12. Status of safety issues at licensed power plants: TMI Action Plan requirements, unresolved safety issues, generic safety issues, other multiplant action issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is to provide a comprehensive description of the implementation and verification status of Three Mile Island (TMI) Action Plan requirements, safety issues designated as Unresolved Safety Issues (USIs), Generic Safety Issues(GSIs), and other Multiplant Actions (MPAs) that have been resolved and involve implementation of an action or actions by licensees. This report makes the information available to other interested parties, including the public. An additional purpose of this NUREG report is to serve as a follow-on to NUREG-0933, ''A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues,'' which tracks safety issues up until requirements are approved for imposition at licensed plants or until the NRC issues a request for action by licensees

  13. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 214: Bunkers and Storage Areas, Nevada Test Site, Nevada - Revision 0 - March 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2005-03-01

    Corrective Action Unit 214, Bunkers and Storage Areas, is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. Corrective Action Unit 214 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites located in Areas 5, 11, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site. The Nevada Test Site is located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, in Nye County. Corrective Action Unit 214 was previously characterized in 2004, and results were presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document for 214. Site characterization indicated that soil and/or debris exceeded clean-up criteria for Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons, pesticides, metals, and radiological contamination.

  14. Removal action work plan for the YS-860 Firing Ranges, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy is conducting environmental restoration activities at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. As part of these efforts, a removal action is planned for the former YS-860 Firing Ranges as described in the Action Memorandum for the project. This removal action work plan (RmAWP) is focused on the former YS-860 Firing Ranges, located outside the primary fenceline at the eastern end of the plant. This RmAWP defines the technical approach, procedures, and requirements for the removal of lead-contaminated soil and site restoration of the former YS-860 Firing Ranges at the Y-12 Plant. This RmAWP describes excavation, verification/confirmatory sampling, and reporting requirements for the project. Lower tier plans associated with the RmAWP, which are submitted as separate stand-alone documents, include a field sampling and analysis plan, a health and safety plan, a quality assurance project plan, a waste management plan, a data management implementation plan, and a best management practices plan. A site evaluation of the YS-86O Firing Ranges conducted in 1996 by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., determined that elevated lead levels were present in the Firing Ranges target berm soils. The results of this sampling event form the basis for the removal action recommendation as described in the Action Memorandum for this project. This RmAWP contains a brief history and description of the Former YS-860 Firing Ranges Project, along with the current project schedule and milestones. This RmAWP also provides an overview of the technical requirements of the project, including a summary of the approach for the removal activities. Finally, the RmAWP identifies the regulatory requirements and the appropriate removal action responses to address applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements to achieve the project goals of substantially reducing the risk to human health and the environment

  15. Removal action work plan for the YS-860 Firing Ranges, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The US Department of Energy is conducting environmental restoration activities at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. As part of these efforts, a removal action is planned for the former YS-860 Firing Ranges as described in the Action Memorandum for the project. This removal action work plan (RmAWP) is focused on the former YS-860 Firing Ranges, located outside the primary fenceline at the eastern end of the plant. This RmAWP defines the technical approach, procedures, and requirements for the removal of lead-contaminated soil and site restoration of the former YS-860 Firing Ranges at the Y-12 Plant. This RmAWP describes excavation, verification/confirmatory sampling, and reporting requirements for the project. Lower tier plans associated with the RmAWP, which are submitted as separate stand-alone documents, include a field sampling and analysis plan, a health and safety plan, a quality assurance project plan, a waste management plan, a data management implementation plan, and a best management practices plan. A site evaluation of the YS-86O Firing Ranges conducted in 1996 by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., determined that elevated lead levels were present in the Firing Ranges target berm soils. The results of this sampling event form the basis for the removal action recommendation as described in the Action Memorandum for this project. This RmAWP contains a brief history and description of the Former YS-860 Firing Ranges Project, along with the current project schedule and milestones. This RmAWP also provides an overview of the technical requirements of the project, including a summary of the approach for the removal activities. Finally, the RmAWP identifies the regulatory requirements and the appropriate removal action responses to address applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements to achieve the project goals of substantially reducing the risk to human health and the environment.

  16. Ocean margins workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the refocusing of its marine research program to emphasize the study of ocean margins and their role in modulating, controlling, and driving Global Change phenomena. This is a proposal to conduct a workshop that will establish priorities and an implementation plan for a new research initiative by the Department of Energy on the ocean margins. The workshop will be attended by about 70 scientists who specialize in ocean margin research. The workshop will be held in the Norfolk, Virginia area in late June 1990.

  17. Strategic Decision-making,Action Planning,Flexible Creation:A Philosophic Thinking on Chinese City Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Based on the rich experience in urban construction in China for decades,the author argues that urban planning is a process of flexible creation under the guidance of strategic decision-making and action planning and in accordance with local conditions in hope of creating better human settlements and a harmonious society at the same time.Efforts should be made to strengthen the general knowledge and universal truth on urban planning and transform them into public consensus.

  18. National action plan for renewable energy in Denmark; National handlingsplan for vedvarende energi i Danmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-06-15

    Renewable energy sources shall lead to a reduced emission of greenhouse gases in the European Union (EU) and to an improved security of energy supply. Therefore, the EU has defined a general target of at least 20% of renewable energy in 2020 of the final energy consumption. The target is divided between the 27 member countries in the EU Directive on Renewable Energy. With a target of 30%, Denmark is among those countries which have committed itself to the largest use of renewable energy. Also transport shall increasingly be based on renewable energy. The EU directive on renewable energy therefore contains a special target for the share of renewable energy for transportation of at least 10% in each member country by 2020. On 23 June 2010, Denmark sent its national action plan for renewable energy to the EU Commission. The action plan follows the outline required by the EU and describes the Danish energy policy for the renewable energy field and how Denmark will meet the demands in the EU directive. (ln)

  19. Participatory evaluation methodology for community plans and action. Three experiences of participatory evaluation in Catalunya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Planas Lladó

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Participatory evaluation (PE is frequently used to assess community plans and actions. But how is a PE process designed and carried out? Which methodological elements differentiate PE from other assessment practices? And what kind of tools and instruments are used? This article attempts to answer these questions, though a review of the most recent literature and guidebooks on the EP methodology. Some methodological reflections on the EP process conducted in three community plans are given and described. In this paper we analyze the most relevant methodological aspects observed during entry into the community (1, context analysis (2, the formation of the steering group (3, the application of participatory techniques and dynamics to evaluate community actions, their multiplication (4, and the evaluation and closure of the three processes of EP (5. Results allow identifying relevant methodological contributions to theimplementation of future processes of Participatory Evaluation in community settings, as the key stakeholders to the process of entry into the community, some elements to consider in order to encourage participation, and the role of the professional evaluators team.

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 511: Waste Dumps (Piles & Debris), Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0 with ROTC 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Strand

    2004-08-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 511: Waste Dumps (Piles & Debris), Nevada Test Site, Nevada, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The general purpose of the investigation is to ensure adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select viable corrective actions. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan provides investigative details for CAU 511, whereas programmatic aspects of this project are discussed in the ''Project Management Plan'' (DOE/NV, 1994). General field and laboratory quality assurance and quality control issues are presented in the ''Industrial Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan'' (NNSA/NV, 2002). Health and safety aspects of the project are documented in the current version of the Environmental Engineering Services Contractor's Health and Safety Plan and will be supplemented with a site-specific safety basis document. Corrective Action Unit 511 is comprised of the following nine corrective action sites in Nevada Test Site Areas 3, 4, 6, 7, 18, and 19: (1) 03-08-02, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (2) 03-99-11, Waste Dump (Piles); (3) 03-99-12, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (4) 04-99-04, Contaminated Trench/Berm; (5) 06-16-01, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (6) 06-17-02, Scattered Ordnance/Automatic Weapons Range; (7) 07-08-01, Contaminated Mound; (8) 18-99-10, Ammunition Dump; and (9) 19-19-03, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris). Corrective Action Sites 18-99-10 and 19-19-03 were identified after a review of the ''1992 RCRA Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site, Volume IV, Section L Potential Solid Waste Management Unit'' (DOE/NV, 1992). The remaining seven sites were first identified in the 1991 Reynolds

  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment. Volume 1, Revision 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 22, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root causes of the findings identified during the assessment. The action plan has benefited from a complete review by various offices at DOE Headquarters as well as review by the Tiger Team that conducted the assessment to ensure that the described actions are responsive to the observed problems.

  2. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219: Septic Systems and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Strand

    2005-01-01

    The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219, Septic Systems and Injection Wells, has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective actions. Corrective Action Unit 219 is located in Areas 3, 16, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 219 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-11-01, Steam Pipes and Asbestos Tiles; (2) 16-04-01, Septic Tanks (3); (3) 16-04-02, Distribution Box; (4) 16-04-03, Sewer Pipes; (5) 23-20-01, DNA Motor Pool Sewage and Waste System; and (6) 23-20-02, Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

  3. Corrective Action Investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 546: Injection Well and Surface Releases, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 546 is located in Areas 6 and 9 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 546 is comprised of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: 06-23-02, U-6a/Russet Testing Area 09-20-01, Injection Well These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on November 8, 2007, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process has been used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 546

  4. Corrective Action Investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 546: Injection Well and Surface Releases, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfred Wickline

    2008-03-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 546 is located in Areas 6 and 9 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 546 is comprised of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: •06-23-02, U-6a/Russet Testing Area •09-20-01, Injection Well These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on November 8, 2007, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process has been used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 546.

  5. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 560: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC1, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant Evenson

    2008-05-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 560 is located in Areas 3 and 6 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 560 is comprised of the seven corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 03-51-01, Leach Pit • 06-04-02, Septic Tank • 06-05-03, Leach Pit • 06-05-04, Leach Bed • 06-59-03, Building CP-400 Septic System • 06-59-04, Office Trailer Complex Sewage Pond • 06-59-05, Control Point Septic System These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 22, 2008, by representatives from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 560.

  6. Corrective action investigation plan for Central Nevada Test Area, CAU No. 417

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) is part of a US Department of Energy (DOE)-funded environmental investigation of the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA). This CAIP addresses the surface investigation and characterization of 15 identified Corrective Action Sites (CASs). In addition, several other areas of the CNTA project area have surface expressions that may warrant investigation. These suspect areas will be characterized, if necessary, in subsequent CAIPs or addendums to this CAIP prepared to address these sites. This CAIP addresses only the 15 identified CASs as shown in Table 2-1 that are associated with the drilling and construction of a number of testing wells designed as part of an underground nuclear testing program. The purpose of the wells at the time of construction was to provide subsurface access for the emplacement, testing, and post detonation evaluations of underground nuclear devices. If contamination is found at any of the 15-surface CASs, the extent of contamination will be determined in order to develop an appropriate corrective action.

  7. Measures for the Diffusion of Solar PV are Aligned in Technology Action Plans for Six Countries in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Ivan; Hansen, Ulrich Elmer; Pedersen, Mathilde Brix;

    2014-01-01

    African countries from 2010 to 2013, dedicated government committees have prioritized climate change mitigation technologies and developed action plans for the diffusion of the selected technologies. The project results show that solar PV is high on the agenda in Africa. Six out of ten countries...... in the region prioritized solar PV, and action plans for the diffusion of solar home systems were put forward in Cote d’Ivoire, Kenya, Mali and Senegal, while the implementation of grid-connected systems was proposed in Rwanda, Mali and Senegal. The project reports and technology action plans prepared...... in these six countries are used as the basis for comparing how solar PV is perceived in these countries and how policy measures enabling environmental adjustments and investment programmes are being planned to promote diffusion of the technology in these different contexts....

  8. Recent Workshops

    CERN Multimedia

    Wickens, F. J.

    Since the previous edition of ATLAS e-news, the NIKHEF Institute in Amsterdam has hosted not just one but two workshops related to ATLAS TDAQ activities. The first in October was dedicated to the Detector Control System (DCS). Just three institutes, CERN, NIKHEF and St Petersburg, provide the effort for the central DCS services, but each ATLAS sub-detector provides effort for their own controls. Some 30 people attended, including representatives for all of the ATLAS sub-detectors, representatives of the institutes working on the central services and the project leader of JCOP, which brings together common aspects of detector controls across the LHC experiments. During the three-day workshop the common components were discussed, and each sub-detector described their experiences and plans for their future systems. Whilst many of the components to be used are standard commercial components, a key custom item for ATLAS is the ELMB (Embedded Local Monitor Board). Prototypes for this have now been extensively test...

  9. Institutional frameworks to direct development and implementation of great lakes remedial action plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartig, John H.; Law, Neely

    1994-11-01

    Locally designed, institutional frameworks are being used to develop and implement remedial action plans (RAPs) to restore beneficial uses in 43 Great Lakes areas of concern. A 1993 Canada-United States roundtable was convened to learn from case studies and to develop recommendations regarding essential characteristics of RAP institutional frameworks, guidance to ensure linkages to other related plans, and ways of embracing new institutional frameworks from RAP development to implementation. Major roundtable recommendations are: (1) RAP institutional frameworks should be empowered to pursue their mission of restoring uses. Empowerment would be demonstrated by: a watershed focus, inclusive and shared decision-making, clear responsibilities and sufficient authority, creative funding capability, flexibility and continuity in the process, an iterative process of continuous improvement, and commitment to education and outreach. (2) RAP institutional frameworks should be used as mechanisms to coordinate programs at the local level. Such local coordination should be complemented with governmental commitments to intra- and interagency coordination in work plans. (3) RAP institutional frameworks can help build the capacity of governments to achieve their goals. Therefore, governments must adopt long-term, visionary goals and commit to a customer-driven RAP process of continuous improvement.

  10. Spatial learning and action planning in a prefrontal cortical network model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Emmanuel Martinet

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The interplay between hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC is fundamental to spatial cognition. Complementing hippocampal place coding, prefrontal representations provide more abstract and hierarchically organized memories suitable for decision making. We model a prefrontal network mediating distributed information processing for spatial learning and action planning. Specific connectivity and synaptic adaptation principles shape the recurrent dynamics of the network arranged in cortical minicolumns. We show how the PFC columnar organization is suitable for learning sparse topological-metrical representations from redundant hippocampal inputs. The recurrent nature of the network supports multilevel spatial processing, allowing structural features of the environment to be encoded. An activation diffusion mechanism spreads the neural activity through the column population leading to trajectory planning. The model provides a functional framework for interpreting the activity of PFC neurons recorded during navigation tasks. We illustrate the link from single unit activity to behavioral responses. The results suggest plausible neural mechanisms subserving the cognitive "insight" capability originally attributed to rodents by Tolman & Honzik. Our time course analysis of neural responses shows how the interaction between hippocampus and PFC can yield the encoding of manifold information pertinent to spatial planning, including prospective coding and distance-to-goal correlates.

  11. Action plan to counteract soil acidification and to promote sustainable use of forest land

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report consists of the National Board of Forestry's proposals on a plan to counteract soil acidification and to promote sustainable use of forest land. In 1989 the government requested the National Board of Forestry to start experimental activities to find measures to counteract soil acidification. In 1997 the Board presented a proposal for liming and vitalisation of forest land. An Environmental Impact Assessment of the proposal was submitted in 1999, after which a revision of the plan was started. In order to obtain better basic knowledge of the situation, the Board of Forestry commissioned nine reports that dealt with different aspects of soil acidification and corrective measures. Major emphasis has also been placed on the national environmental quality goals and the national plan for liming of lakes and waterways. The report is divided into three parts. The first part explains the Board of Forestry's proposals on measures to counteract soil acidification, and the second part, the description of the situation today, presents the conditions for the design of the plan such as political goals and guidelines that affect the plan and its design, the knowledge available today on soil acidification, its effects, possibilities for recovery, and possible measures that can be used. The third and final part contains brief summaries of the responses to the plan when circulated for comments. The action plan allows a return of the buffering capacity of the most acidified forest land, mainly in southern and southwestern Sweden. The Board of Forestry proposes that the spreading of ashes and lime is done within drainage areas where the natural recovery is assessed to be slow and insufficient, and where the leaching of toxic aluminium from forest land is hazardous to the aquatic ecosystem. In the assessments made by the Board, between 200,000 and 350,000 hectares of forest land may require measures of this kind. The Board of Forestry is of the opinion that a three

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-04-28

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Sites Office's (NNSA/NSO's) approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 516, Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 516 consists of six Corrective Action Sites: 03-59-01, Building 3C-36 Septic System; 03-59-02, Building 3C-45 Septic System; 06-51-01, Sump Piping, 06-51-02, Clay Pipe and Debris; 06-51-03, Clean Out Box and Piping; and 22-19-04, Vehicle Decontamination Area. Located in Areas 3, 6, and 22 of the NTS, CAU 516 is being investigated because disposed waste may be present without appropriate controls, and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present or migrating at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information and process knowledge on the expected nature and extent of contamination of CAU 516 are insufficient to select preferred corrective action alternatives; therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3/2004.

  13. Status of safety issues at licensed power plants: TMI Action Plan requirements, unresolved safety issues, generic safety issues, other multiplant action issues. Supplement 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of ongoing US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) efforts to ensure the quality and accountability of safety issue information, the NRC established a program for publishing an annual report on the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of safety issues in major NRC requirements areas. This information was initially compiled and reported in three NUREG-series volumes. Volume 1, published in March 1991, addressed the status of Three Mile Island (TMI) Action Plan Requirements. Volume 2, published in May 1991, addressed the status of unresolved safety issues (USIs). Volume 3, published in June 1991, addressed the implementation and verification status of generic safety issues (GSIs). The first annual supplement, which combined these volumes into a single report and presented updated information as of September 30, 1991, was published in December 1991. The second annual supplement, which provided updated information as of September 30, 1992, was published in December 1992. Supplement 2 also provided the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of other multiplant action (MPA) issues not related to TMI Action Plan requirements, USIs, or GSIs. Supplement 3 gives status as of September 30, 1993. This annual report, Supplement 4, presents updated information as of September 30, 1994. This report gives a comprehensive description of the implementation and verification status of TMI Action Plan requirements, safety issues designated as USIs, GSIs, and other MPAs that have been resolved and involve implementation of an action or actions by licensees. This report makes the information available to other interested parties, including the public. Additionally, this report serves as a follow-on to NUREG-0933, ''A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues,'' which tracks safety issues until requirements are approved for imposition at licensed plants or until the NRC issues a request for action by licensees

  14. Status of safety issues at licensed power plants: TMI Action Plan requirements; unresolved safety issues; generic safety issues; other multiplant action issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of ongoing US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) efforts to ensure the quality and accountability of safety issue information, the NRC established a program for publishing an annual report on the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of safety issues in major NRC requirements areas. This information was initially compiled and reported in three NUREG-series volumes. Volume 1, published in March 1991, addressed the status of Three Mile Island (TMI) Action Plan Requirements. Volume 2, published in May 1991, addressed the status of unresolved safety issues (USIs). Volume 3, published in June 1991, addressed the implementation and verification status of generic safety issues (GSIs). The first annual supplement, which combined these volumes into a single report and presented updated information as of September 30, 1991, was published in December 1991. The second annual supplement, which provided updated information as of September 30, 1992, was published in December 1992. Supplement 2 also provided the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of other multiplant action (MPA) issues not related to TMI Action Plan requirements, USIs, or GSIs. This third annual NUREG report, Supplement 3, presents updated information as of September 30, 1993. This report gives a comprehensive description of the implementation and verification status of TMI Action Plan requirements, safety issues designated as USIs, GSIs, and other MPAs that have been resolved and involve implementation of an action or actions by licensees. This report makes the information available to other interested parties, including the public. Additionally, this report serves as a follow-on to NUREG-0933, ''A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues,'' which tracks safety issues until requirements are approved for imposition at licensed plants or until the NRC issues a request for action by licensees

  15. The South African fruit fly action plan: area-wide suppression and exotic species surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Brian N., E-mail: barnesb@arc.agric.z [ARC Infruitec-Nietvoorbij Institute for Fruit, Vine and Wine, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Venter, Jan-Hendrik, E-mail: janhendrikv@nda.agric.z [Directorate Plant Health, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2006-07-01

    Two species of tephritid fruit flies of economic importance, Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly, Ceratitis capitata [Wiedemann]) and Natal fruit fly (C. rosa Karsch) cause economic losses in the South African deciduous fruit industry of approximately US$3 million per annum. A third species, marula fruit fly, C. cosyra (Walker), causes damage to citrus and sub-tropical fruits in the north-eastern part of the country. In 1999 a sterile insect technique (SIT) programme against Medfly was initiated over 10,000 ha of table grapes with a goal of cost-effective, ecologically compatible suppression of Medfly. The SIT programme was extended to two other fruit production areas in 2004. Although results in all three SIT areas have been mixed, populations of wild Medflies, as well as associated pesticide usage and control costs, have been reduced since the start of sterile fly releases. Reasons for the partial degree of success and the relatively slow expansion of Medfly SIT to other areas include economic, operational and cultural factors, as well as certain fruit production practices. Before fruit fly-free areas can be created, deficiencies in the ability to mass-rear Natal fruit fly need to be overcome so that an SIT programme against this species can be initiated. Any fruit fly suppression or eradication campaign will be severely compromised by any introductions into South Africa of exotic fruit fly species. The risk of such introductions is increasing as trade with and travel to the country increases. A Plant Health Early Warning Systems Division has been initiated to formulate fruit fly detection and action plans. Melon fly (Bactrocera cucurbitae [Coquillett]), Asian fruit fly (B. invadens Drew, Tsurutu and White) and peach fruit fly (B. zonata [Saunders]), which are all well established in parts of Africa and/or Indian Ocean islands, have been identified as presenting the highest risk for entering and becoming established in South Africa. An exotic fruit fly surveillance

  16. Implementation of an action plan in radiological protection of the patient in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The medical irradiations constitute the main contribution to the human exposure to ionizing radiations of artificial character. The growing quantity of practices, facilities and human resources dedicated to such ends, it has increased the concern of regulator organisms and scientific societies by the radiological protection of the patient (PRP). Besides completing it regulatory function in the domains of the medical practices that its concern it, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) of Argentina, decided to install an active discussion in order to promoting an action plan in PRP in the national environment. To such end, the ARN organized the First National Day on PRP in December, 2004, with the attendance of professionals of the fields of the Radiodiagnostic, the Nuclear Medicine and the Radiotherapy as well as of representatives of professional associations and authorities of health. In this day the conclusions of the International Conference on PRP (Malaga, 2001) and the approaches of the Directive 97/43/EURATOM adopted in European countries were presented. It was discussed about: practices justification, responsibility of the prescriber doctor, quality systems, dose optimization, reference levels, dosimetry, training of human resources, especially for certain practices (pregnant woman, pediatric radiology and interventionist, PR/118 tomography for the correct application of diagnostic practices and an expert presented in teleconference form the experience of France for the adoption of these guides. During the Second National Day on PRP organized by the ARN (June 2005), received opinions were debated in the different environments in relation to the PR/118 guide and it potential adaptation to the national conditions. Also it was presented the state of advance of the activities developed in relation to the proposed tasks. As a result of this meeting, it was conformed a national net of PRP to which intended to incorporate academic institutions, in order to

  17. The South African fruit fly action plan: area-wide suppression and exotic species surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two species of tephritid fruit flies of economic importance, Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly, Ceratitis capitata [Wiedemann]) and Natal fruit fly (C. rosa Karsch) cause economic losses in the South African deciduous fruit industry of approximately US$3 million per annum. A third species, marula fruit fly, C. cosyra (Walker), causes damage to citrus and sub-tropical fruits in the north-eastern part of the country. In 1999 a sterile insect technique (SIT) programme against Medfly was initiated over 10,000 ha of table grapes with a goal of cost-effective, ecologically compatible suppression of Medfly. The SIT programme was extended to two other fruit production areas in 2004. Although results in all three SIT areas have been mixed, populations of wild Medflies, as well as associated pesticide usage and control costs, have been reduced since the start of sterile fly releases. Reasons for the partial degree of success and the relatively slow expansion of Medfly SIT to other areas include economic, operational and cultural factors, as well as certain fruit production practices. Before fruit fly-free areas can be created, deficiencies in the ability to mass-rear Natal fruit fly need to be overcome so that an SIT programme against this species can be initiated. Any fruit fly suppression or eradication campaign will be severely compromised by any introductions into South Africa of exotic fruit fly species. The risk of such introductions is increasing as trade with and travel to the country increases. A Plant Health Early Warning Systems Division has been initiated to formulate fruit fly detection and action plans. Melon fly (Bactrocera cucurbitae [Coquillett]), Asian fruit fly (B. invadens Drew, Tsurutu and White) and peach fruit fly (B. zonata [Saunders]), which are all well established in parts of Africa and/or Indian Ocean islands, have been identified as presenting the highest risk for entering and becoming established in South Africa. An exotic fruit fly surveillance

  18. State Wildlife Action Plans as Tools for Adapting to a Continuously Changing Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metivier, D. W.; Yocum, H.; Ray, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Public land management plans are potentially powerful policies for building sustainability and adaptive capacity. Land managers are recognizing the need to respond to numerous climate change impacts on natural and human systems. For the first time, in 2015, the federal government required each state to incorporate climate change into their State Wildlife Action Plans (SWAP) as a condition for funding. As important land management tools, SWAPs have the potential to guide state agencies in shaping and implementing practices for climate change adaptation. Intended to be revised every ten years, SWAPs can change as conditions and understanding of climate change evolves. This study asks what practices are states using to integrate climate change, and how does this vary between states? To answer this question, we conducted a broad analysis among seven states (CO, MT, NE, ND, SD, UT, WY) and a more in-depth analysis of four states (CO, ND, SD, WY). We use seven key factors that represent best practices for incorporating climate change identified in the literature. These best practices are species prioritization, key habitats, threats, monitoring, partnerships and participation, identification of management options, and implementation of management options. The in-depth analysis focuses on how states are using climate change information for specific habitats addressed in the plans. We find that states are integrating climate change in many different ways, showing varying degrees of sophistication and preparedness. We summarize different practices and highlight opportunities to improve the effectiveness of plans through: communication tools across state lines and stakeholders, explicit targeting of key habitats, enforcement and monitoring progress and success, and conducting vulnerability analyses that incorporate topics beyond climate and include other drivers, trajectories, and implications of historic and future land-use change.

  19. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 374: Area 20 Schooner Unit Crater Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-02-01

    Corrective Action Unit 374 is located in Areas 18 and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 374 comprises the five corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 18-22-05, Drum • 18-22-06, Drums (20) • 18-22-08, Drum • 18-23-01, Danny Boy Contamination Area • 20-45-03, U-20u Crater (Schooner) These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on October 20, 2009, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 374.

  20. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-03-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 151, Septic Systems and Discharge Area, is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). CAU 151 consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 2, 12, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada.

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 568: Area 3 Plutonium Dispersion Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    CAU 568 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 568, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 03-23-17, S-3I Contamination Area • 03-23-19, T-3U Contamination Area • 03-23-20, Otero Contamination Area • 03-23-22, Platypus Contamination Area • 03-23-23, San Juan Contamination Area • 03-23-26, Shrew/Wolverine Contamination Area These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report.

  2. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant Evenson

    2006-04-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139 is located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 139 is comprised of the seven corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-35-01, Burn Pit; (2) 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; (3) 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; (4) 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; (5) 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; (6) 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and (7) 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives with the exception of CASs 09-23-01 and 09-34-01. Regarding these two CASs, CAS 09-23-01 is a gravel gertie where a zero-yield test was conducted with all contamination confined to below ground within the area of the structure, and CAS 09-34-01 is an underground detection station where no contaminants are present. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for the other five CASs where information is insufficient. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 4, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 139.

  3. AREVA - 2012 annual results: significant turnaround in performance one year after launching the Action 2016 plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One year after launching Areva's Action 2016 strategic plan, the first results are in. AREVA is ahead of schedule in executing its recovery plan. While pursuing its efforts in the management of a few difficult projects (such as OL3), Areva group was able to return to a virtuous performance cycle rooted in strong growth in nuclear order intake and good progress on its cost reduction program. Commercially, despite the difficult economic environment, AREVA was able to capitalize on its leadership in the installed base and on its long-term partnerships with strategic customers, beginning with EDF, with which AREVA renewed a confident and constructive working relationship. Areva has secured 80% of its objective of one billion euros of savings by the end of 2015 to improve its competitiveness. The group also continued efforts to optimize working capital requirement and control the capital expenditure trajectory. Together, these results enabled AREVA to exceed the objectives set for 2012 for two key indicators of its strategic plan: EBITDA and free operating cash flow. Nearly 60% of the 2.1 billion euros devoted to capital expenditures for future growth in 2012 were funded by operations, a quasi-doubled share compared to 2011. Areva's floor target for asset disposals was achieved one year ahead of schedule, also helping the Group to control its net debt, which remained below 4 billion euros. In 2013, Areva is continuing to implement the Action 2016 plan to keep its turnaround on track. In summary: - Backlog renewed over the year 2012 to euro 45.4 bn thanks to the increase in nuclear order intake; - Sales revenue growth: euro 9.342 bn (+5.3% vs. 2011), led by nuclear and renewables operations; - Very sharp upturn in EBITDA: euro 1.007 bn (+euro 586 m vs. 2011) - Very net improvement in free operating cash flow: -euro 854 m (+euro 512 m vs. 2011); - Back to positive reported operating income: euro 118 m (+euro 1.984 bn vs. 2011); - 2012-2013 floor target for asset disposals

  4. The 13 february action plan and the prospects for the North Korean nuclear issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 13 February, the Third Session of the Fifth Round of the Six-Party Talks ended with the adoption of the 'Action Plan' for the implementation of the September 2005 Joint Statement.2 The Action Plan has two phases - the initial phase and the 'next' phase - but the core of the deal lies in the initial stage in which the parties agreed to exchange the nuclear freeze and the provision of energy. In the initial phase, North Korea will 'shut down and seal' the Yongbyon nuclear facility, including the reprocessing facility, and invite back International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) personnel to conduct monitoring and verifications within 60 days. In return, the other parties of the talks will provide emergency energy assistance equivalent to 50,000 tons of heavy fuel oil (HFO) to North Korea. There are other items in the initial stage such as North Korea discussing a list of all its nuclear programs with other parties, and the United States and North Korea starting bilateral talks toward full diplomatic relations. However, these items are rather nominal and symbolic in nature and will not likely produce meaningful results in a short period of time. The second phase is even more open-ended. In the second phase, North Korea will provide a complete declaration of all nuclear programs and disable all existing nuclear facilities. In return, the other parties will provide economic, energy and humanitarian assistance up to the equivalent of 950,000 tons of HFO. However, the timing and the details of the nuclear 'disablement' and the provision of assistance are not specified, making it likely that the parties will disagree over how to interpret the words in the Action Plan. The Action Plan provides that five Working Groups (WG) on different topics will be established in order to discuss the details, but the effectiveness of the WG remains to be seen. The Action Plan, therefore, represents the lowest common denominator for the parties involved. In agreeing to the plan, all

  5. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 166: Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Strand

    2006-06-01

    contaminants of concern are present. (5) If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. (6) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, and field work will commence following approval.

  6. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (December 2002, Revision No.: 0), Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NNSA/NSO

    2002-12-12

    The Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 204 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 204 is located on the Nevada Test Site approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which include: 01-34-01, Underground Instrument House Bunker; 02-34-01, Instrument Bunker; 03-34-01, Underground Bunker; 05-18-02, Chemical Explosives Storage; 05-33-01, Kay Blockhouse; 05-99-02, Explosive Storage Bunker. Based on site history, process knowledge, and previous field efforts, contaminants of potential concern for Corrective Action Unit 204 collectively include radionuclides, beryllium, high explosives, lead, polychlorinated biphenyls, total petroleum hydrocarbons, silver, warfarin, and zinc phosphide. The primary question for the investigation is: ''Are existing data sufficient to evaluate appropriate corrective actions?'' To address this question, resolution of two decision statements is required. Decision I is to ''Define the nature of contamination'' by identifying any contamination above preliminary action levels (PALs); Decision II is to ''Determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs. If PALs are not exceeded, the investigation is completed. If PALs are exceeded, then Decision II must be resolved. In addition, data will be obtained to support waste management decisions. Field activities will include radiological land area surveys, geophysical surveys to identify any subsurface metallic and nonmetallic debris, field screening for applicable contaminants of potential concern, collection and analysis of surface and subsurface soil samples from biased locations

  7. Choosing goals, not rules: deciding among rule-based action plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaes, Christian; Westendorff, Stephanie; Chakrabarti, Shubhodeep; Gail, Alexander

    2011-05-12

    In natural situations, movements are often directed toward locations different from that of the evoking sensory stimulus. Movement goals must then be inferred from the sensory cue based on rules. When there is uncertainty about the rule that applies for a given cue, planning a movement involves both choosing the relevant rule and computing the movement goal based on that rule. Under these conditions, it is not clear whether primates compute multiple movement goals based on all possible rules before choosing an action, or whether they first choose a rule and then only represent the movement goal associated with that rule. Supporting the former hypothesis, we show that neurons in the frontoparietal reach areas of monkeys simultaneously represent two different rule-based movement goals, which are biased by the monkeys' choice preferences. Apparently, primates choose between multiple behavioral options by weighing against each other the movement goals associated with each option.

  8. Corrective action investigation plan for Central Nevada Test Area CAU No. 417

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) is part of a US Department of Energy (DOE)-funded environmental investigation of the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA). The CNTA is located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, adjacent to US Highway 6, about 15 kilometers (10 miles) northeast of Warm Springs. The CNTA was the site of Project Faultless, a nuclear device detonated in the subsurface by the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in January 1968. The purpose of this test was to gauge the seismic effects of relatively large, high-yield detonations completed outside of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The test was also used to determine the suitability of the site for future large detonations. The yield of the Faultless test was between 200 kilotons and 1 megaton (DOE, 1994c).

  9. Addendum to the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0, November 2000)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE/NV

    2000-11-03

    This addendum to the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to determine the extent of contamination existing at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 321. This addendum was required when the extent of contamination exceeded the estimate in the original Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD). Located in Area 22 on the Nevada Test Site, Corrective Action Unit 321, Weather Station Fuel Storage, consists of Corrective Action Site 22-99-05, Fuel Storage Area, was used to store fuel and other petroleum products necessary for motorized operations at the historic Camp Desert Rock facility. This facility was operational from 1951 to 1958 and dismantled after 1958. Based on site history and earlier investigation activities at CAU 321, the contaminant of potential concern (COPC) was previously identified as total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel-range organics). The scope of this corrective action investigation for the Fuel Storage Area will include the selection of biased sample locations to determine the vertical and lateral extent of contamination, collection of soil samples using rotary sonic drilling techniques, and the utilization of field-screening methods to accurately determine the extent of COPC contamination. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives and be included in the revised CADD.

  10. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 365: Baneberry Contamination Area, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-12-01

    Corrective Action Unit 365 comprises one corrective action site (CAS), CAS 08-23-02, U-8d Contamination Area. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for the CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 6, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for the Baneberry site. The primary release associated with Corrective Action Unit 365 was radiological contamination from the Baneberry nuclear test. Baneberry was an underground weapons-related test that vented significant quantities of radioactive gases from a fissure located in close proximity to ground zero. A crater formed shortly after detonation, which stemmed part of the flow from the fissure. The scope of this investigation includes surface and shallow subsurface (less than 15 feet below ground surface) soils. Radionuclides from the Baneberry test with the potential to impact groundwater are included within the Underground Test Area Subproject. Investigations and corrective actions associated with the Underground Test Area Subproject include the radiological inventory resulting from the Baneberry test.

  11. 2011-2015 National action plan for the management of radon-related risk; Plan national d'actions 2011-2015 pour la gestion du risque lie au radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    After an assessment of the 2005-2008 action plan, this report presents the 2011-2015 plan. It comprises five main axis: the implementation of a policy regarding the management of the radon-related risk in existing dwellings, the implementation of a regulation for new dwellings, the follow-up of the regulation regarding public places and that applicable to workers, the development and the implementation of new management tools for the diagnosis of buildings and works performed by professionals, and the coordination of policy regarding investigation and research. Each axis comprises several actions which are defined and presented. Eight key measures are also defined

  12. Remedial Action Plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendices C--E. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-02-01

    This document provides appendices C, D, and E this Remedial Action Plan (RAP) which is a revision of the original Mexican Hat Remedial Action Plan and RAP Modification submitted in July 1988 and January 1989, respectively, along with updated design documents. Appendix C provide the Radiological Support Plan, Appendix D provides the Site Characterization, and Appendix E provides the Water Resources Protection Strategy.

  13. Highlights of NASA's Special ETO Program Planning Workshop on rocket-based combined-cycle propulsion system technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, W. J. D.

    1992-01-01

    A NASA workshop on rocket-based combined-cycle propulsion technologies is described emphasizing the development of a starting point for earth-to-orbit (ETO) rocket technologies. The tutorial is designed with attention given to the combined development of aeronautical airbreathing propulsion and space rocket propulsion. The format, agenda, and group deliberations for the tutorial are described, and group deliberations include: (1) mission and space transportation infrastructure; (2) vehicle-integrated propulsion systems; (3) development operations, facilities, and human resource needs; and (4) spaceflight fleet applications and operations. Although incomplete the workshop elevates the subject of combined-cycle hypersonic propulsion and develops a common set of priniciples regarding the development of these technologies.

  14. Closure plan for Corrective Action Unit 109: U-2bu subsidence crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U-2bu subsidence crater, Corrective Action Unit 109, will be closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection operational permit, and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The U-2bu subsidence crater is located in Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site. It was created in 1971 by an underground nuclear test with the name Miniata. The crater has a diameter of 288 meters (944 feet) and an approximate depth of 35 meters (115 feet). Based on the results of the analyses reported in the site characterization report, the only constituents of concern in the U-2bu subsidence crater include leachable lead and total petroleum hydrocarbons. Closure activities will include the excavation and disposal of impacted soil from the top of the crater. Upon completion of excavation, verification samples will be collected to show that the leachable lead has been removed to concentrations below the regulatory action level. After sample results show that the lead has been removed, the excavated area will be backfilled and a soil flood diversion berm will be constructed as a best management practice. An independent registered professional engineer will certify the site was closed following the approved Closure Plan. Post-closure care is not warranted for this site because closure activities will involve removal of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act constituents of concern

  15. Closure plan for Corrective Action Unit 109: U-2bu subsidence crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The U-2bu subsidence crater, Corrective Action Unit 109, will be closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection operational permit, and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The U-2bu subsidence crater is located in Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site. It was created in 1971 by an underground nuclear test with the name Miniata. The crater has a diameter of 288 meters (944 feet) and an approximate depth of 35 meters (115 feet). Based on the results of the analyses reported in the site characterization report, the only constituents of concern in the U-2bu subsidence crater include leachable lead and total petroleum hydrocarbons. Closure activities will include the excavation and disposal of impacted soil from the top of the crater. Upon completion of excavation, verification samples will be collected to show that the leachable lead has been removed to concentrations below the regulatory action level. After sample results show that the lead has been removed, the excavated area will be backfilled and a soil flood diversion berm will be constructed as a best management practice. An independent registered professional engineer will certify the site was closed following the approved Closure Plan. Post-closure care is not warranted for this site because closure activities will involve removal of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act constituents of concern.

  16. Closure Plan for Corrective Action Unit 109: U-2bu Subsidence Crater Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon Parsons

    1999-03-01

    The U-2bu subsidence crater, Corrective Action Unit 109, will be closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection operational permit, and the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order. The U-2bu subsidence crater is located in Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site. It was created in 1971 by an underground nuclear test with the name Miniata. The crater has a diameter of 288 meters (944 feet) and an approximate depth of 35 meters (115 feet). The subsidence crater was used as a land disposal unit for radioactive and hazardous waste from 1973 to 1988. Site disposal history is supported by memorandums, letters, and personnel who worked at the Nevada Test Site at the time of active disposal. Closure activities will include the excavation and disposal of impacted soil form the tip of the crater. Upon completion of excavation, verification samples will be collected to show that lead has been removed to concentrations be low regulatory action level. The area will then be backfilled and a soil flood diversion berm will be constructed, and certified by an independent professional engineer as to having followed the approved Closure Plan.

  17. The 25 IEA energy efficiency policy recommendations to the G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jollands, Nigel; Laustsen, Jens; Tanaka, Kanako; De T' Serclaes, Philippine; Barnsley, Ingrid; Bradley, Rick [International Energy Agency (France); Waide, Paul [Navigant (United States); Ellis, Mark [Mark Ellis and Associates (Australia); Onoda, Takao [Japan' s Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport (Japan); Meier, Alan [The Lawrence Berkley Laboratory (United States)

    2010-11-15

    The imperative to pursue energy efficiency improvements is clearly on the political agenda at all levels of governments. This paper explores the lessons from past attempts at galvanising international efforts to expand energy efficiency activities through the use of international-level recommendations. Drawing on these lessons, the paper outlines the IEA response to the call for policy advice on energy efficiency through the G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action. Specifically, the paper outlines a 'necessary conditions' framework that was used to develop a set of energy efficiency policy priorities and describes the subsequent recommendations presented to the G8 in Hokkaido-Toyako Summit in 2008. The recommendations cover 25 fields of action in seven priority areas: buildings, appliances, lighting, transport, industry, energy utilities and cross-sectoral issues. Together, the suite of recommendations sets out an ambitious road map for global energy efficiency improvement. If implemented globally without delay, they could save around 8.2 GtCO{sub 2}/yr or 96 EJ/yr by 2030. This is equivalent to roughly twice the current total EU energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions. (author)

  18. The Italian Action Plan for the endangered Eurasian otter Lutra lutra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Loy

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract
    Although recent evidence of the species recovery has been reported for many European countries, in Italy the Eurasian otter Lutra lutra is still considered endangered. Otter populations are confined to few river basins in the southern part of the peninsula and these are both geographically and genetically isolated from other European populations. This critical situation led the Italian Ministry of Environment to promote the production of an Action Plan for the otter in Italy, whose methods, aims and actions are briefly summarized.

    Riassunto
    Il Piano d'Azione Nazionale per la Lontra Lutra lutra
    Nonostante i segnali di recupero segnalati in molti paesi europei, la lontra Lutra lutra è ancora una delle specie più minacciate della fauna italiana, in virtù delle piccole dimensioni della popolazione e del suo isolamento , sia geografico, sia genetico, dal resto delle popolazioni europee. Sulla base di queste considerazioni il Ministero dell’Ambiente e della Tutela del territorio e del Mare ha recentemente promosso la realizzazione di un Piano d’Azione Nazionale per la Conservazione della Lontra, i cui contenuti, obiettivi, e azioni sono riassunti in questo lavoro.

    doi:10.4404/hystrix-21.1-4483

  19. Geodiversity action plans for the enhancement of geoheritage in the Piemonte region (north-western Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ferrero

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A geoethical approach to geodiversity allows better understanding of the value of abiotic nature and enhances its conservation and development. Our basic assumption is that even during an economical crisis, geoheritage sites can serve both public and private interests. A set of nine strategic geothematic areas were chosen to represent the geodiversity of the Piemonte region, north-western Italy, each of which is characterized by great potential for scientific studies, enhancement of public understanding of science, recreational activities, and economic support to the local communities. Specialized research teams individuated critical aspects to advance our knowledge of the geological history of the Piemonte region, through climate and environmental changes, natural hazards, soil processes, and georesources. The scientific concepts and techniques were coupled with geodiffusion actions and products: not only geosites, but also museum collections, evidence of mining and quarrying activities, science exhibitions, and nature trails. The preliminary results have allowed action plans to be developed with local partners, to assess the geoheritage management requirements. A series of investigations were carried out to improve the visual representation of the geological processes and the evolutionary scenarios. Further outcomes of the project will include didactic tools for educators, schools, and the public in general.

  20. Comparative assessment of national bioenergy strategies and biomass action plans in 12 EU countries. European Best Practice Report. Extended version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a key output of the EU project 'BAP Driver', an initiative of energy agencies from 8 European key bioenergy nations and the European Biomass Association (AEBIOM). The BAP Driver project aims at identifying ways for improvement of current national policy frameworks for bioenergy in Europe, and at leveraging the process of developing country-specific Biomass Action Plans (BAP). From a strategic perspective, the general approach of this report focuses on four stages, required for setting up national biomass strategies and action plans: Assessment of national biomass resources; Formulation of national bioenergy strategies and biomass action plans; Implementation of national bioenergy policies; Monitoring of national bioenergy markets and policies. Overall the analysis is split into three chapters corresponding to the following logical steps: Chapter B: Country analysis (12 individual country profiles); Chapter C: Benchmark analysis (comparative assessment of 12 countries); Chapter D: Best practice analysis (transnational conclusions across national boundaries)

  1. Comparative assessment of national bioenergy strategies and biomass action plans in 12 EU countries. European Best Practice Report. Executive Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a key output of the EU project 'BAP Driver', an initiative of energy agencies from 8 European key bioenergy nations and the European Biomass Association (AEBIOM). The BAP Driver project aims at identifying ways for improvement of current national policy frameworks for bioenergy in Europe, and at leveraging the process of developing country-specific Biomass Action Plans (BAP). From a strategic perspective, the general approach of this report focuses on four stages, required for setting up national biomass strategies and action plans: Assessment of national biomass resources; Formulation of national bioenergy strategies and biomass action plans; Implementation of national bioenergy policies; Monitoring of national bioenergy markets and policies. Overall the analysis is split into three chapters corresponding to the following logical steps: Chapter B: Country analysis (12 individual country profiles); Chapter C: Benchmark analysis (comparative assessment of 12 countries); Chapter D: Best practice analysis (transnational conclusions across national boundaries)

  2. The Third Pacific Basin Biofuels Workshop: Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Among the many compelling reasons for the development of biofuels on remote Pacific islands, several of the most important include: (1) a lack of indigenous fossil fuels necessitates their import at great economic loss to local island economics, (2) ideal conditions for plant growth exist on many Pacific islands to produce yields of biomass feedstocks, (3) gaseous and liquid fuels such as methane, methanol and ethanol manufactured locally from biomass feedstocks are the most viable alternatives to gasoline and diesel fuels for transportation, and (4) the combustion of biofuels is cleaner than burning petroleum products and contributes no net atmospheric CO2 to aggravate the greenhouse effect and the subsequent threat of sea level rise to low islands. Dr. Vic Phillips, HNEI Program Manager of the Hawaii Integrated Biofuels Research Program welcomed 60 participants to the Third Pacific Basin Biofuels Workshop at the Sheraton Makaha Hotel, Waianae, Oahu, on March 27 and 28, 1989. The objectives of the workshop were to update progress since the Second Pacific Basin Biofuels Workshop in April 1987 and to develop a plan for action for biofuels R and D, technology transfer, and commercialization now (immediate attention), in the near-term (less than two years), in the mid-term (three to five years), and in the long-term (more than six years). An emerging theme of the workshop was how the production, conversion, and utilization of biofuels can help increase environmental and economic security locally and globally. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base.

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2006-12-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 190 is located in Areas 11 and 14 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 190 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 11-02-01, Underground Centrifuge; (2) 11-02-02, Drain Lines and Outfall; (3) 11-59-01, Tweezer Facility Septic System; and (4) 14-23-01, LTU-6 Test Area. These sites are being investigated because existing information is insufficient on the nature and extent of potential contamination to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI). The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on August 24, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture, and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 190. The scope of the CAU 190 CAI includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling; (2) Conduct radiological and geophysical surveys; (3) Perform field screening; (4) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (5) If COCs are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the lateral and vertical extent of the contamination; (6) Collect samples of source material, if present

  4. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 190 is located in Areas 11 and 14 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 190 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 11-02-01, Underground Centrifuge; (2) 11-02-02, Drain Lines and Outfall; (3) 11-59-01, Tweezer Facility Septic System; and (4) 14-23-01, LTU-6 Test Area. These sites are being investigated because existing information is insufficient on the nature and extent of potential contamination to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI). The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on August 24, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture, and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 190. The scope of the CAU 190 CAI includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling; (2) Conduct radiological and geophysical surveys; (3) Perform field screening; (4) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (5) If COCs are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the lateral and vertical extent of the contamination; (6) Collect samples of source material, if present

  5. Quality assurance program plan for the Radiological Survey Activities Program - Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for surveying designated sites in the vicinity of 24 inactive mill sites involved in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP). The purpose of these surveys is to provide a recommendation to DOE whether to include or exclude the site from UMTRAP based on whether the onsite residual radioactive material (if any) originated from the former mill sites, and radiation levels onsite are in excess of appropriate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria. This report describes the quality assurance program plan for the RASA program in conducting all activities related to the UMTRA project. All quality assurance provisions given by the DOE, DOE/UMTRA, and ORNL organizations are integrated into this plan. Specifically, this report identifies the policies and procedures followed in accomplishing the RASA/UMTRAP QA program, identifies those organizational units involved in the implementation of these procedures, and outlines the respective responsibilities of those groups

  6. Bioeconomy and Green Economy: European Strategies, Action Plans and Impact on Life Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Socaciu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The review presents the definitions, the main concepts and vision for Bioeconomy versus Green economy. The key aspects which are discussed refers to European strategy and action plans (1, Bioeconomy and agriculture orientation (2, Biorefinery for a better life quality (3 and involvement of education, research and innovation for the progress of Bioeconomy (4. There are described the main challenges, requirements, aims related to the integration of bioeconomy in different economic sectors, the strategic plans and activities at global level  with specific consideration for European member states. Innovation and the need of an integrative knowledge, creating translational bridges and covering gaps by sustainable interdisciplinary research and technology development are  also discussed. Considering the vital links betweeen research - innovation and technlogy transfer, for the bioeconomy progress, relevant examples will be presented, related to  European programs (2014-2020, e.g. Horizon 2020,  European Innovation partnership (EIP and Partnerships Public-Private (PPP. The role of universities, as best providers of education and research will be underlined with a strong focus on the need to develop the entrepreunership culture and their role as knowledge and innovation disseminator, filling the gap research­-invention­­-innovation.

  7. Revised draft Hanford remedial action environmental impact statement and comprehensive land-use plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report evaluates the potential environmental impacts associated with implementing a comprehensive land-use plan for the Hanford Site for at least the next 50 years. With the exception of the required No-Action Alternative, each of the six alternatives presented represents a Tribal, Federal, state, or local agency's Preferred Alternative. Each alternative is presented separately. The DOE's Preferred Alternative anticipates multiple uses of the Hanford Site, including: consolidating waste management operations in the Central Plateau, allowing industrial development in the eastern and southern portions of the site, increasing recreational access to the Columbia River, and expanding the Saddle Mountain National Wildlife Refuge to include all of the Wahluke Slope (managed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service). The Hanford Site occupies 1,517 square kilometers (km2) (586 square miles [mi2]) in southeastern Washington. Today, the Hanford Site has diverse missions associated with environmental restoration, waste management, and science and technology. These missions have resulted in the growing need for a comprehensive, long-term approach to planning and development for the Site

  8. Revised draft Hanford remedial action environmental impact statement and comprehensive land-use plan: Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report evaluates the potential environmental impacts associated with implementing a comprehensive land-use plan for the Hanford Site for at least the next 50 years. With the exception of the required No-Action Alternative, each of the six alternatives presented represents a Tribal, Federal, state, or local agency's Preferred Alternative. Each alternative is presented separately. The DOE's Preferred Alternative anticipates multiple uses of the Hanford Site, including: consolidating waste management operations in the Central Plateau, allowing industrial development in the eastern and southern portions of the site, increasing recreational access to the Columbia River, and expanding the Saddle Mountain National Wildlife Refuge to include all of the Wahluke Slope (managed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service). The Hanford Site occupies 1,517 square kilometers (km2) (586 square miles [mi2]) in southeastern Washington. Today, the Hanford Site has diverse missions associated with environmental restoration, waste management, and science and technology. These missions have resulted in the growing need for a comprehensive, long-term approach to planning and development for the Site

  9. Transierra social action plan; Plano de acao social de Transierra: responsabilidade social e satisfacao comunitaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez Alba, Rafael [TRANSIERRA S.A., Santa Cruz (Bolivia)

    2005-07-01

    The design and the execution of the social - environmental compensation's plan of Transierra, or Plan of Social Action (PAS), are based on the implementation of programs and projects with 8 organizations belonging to 2 Indigenous Villages and with 6 Municipal Governments, for which jurisdictions crosses the Gas pipeline Yacuiba Rio Grande (GASYRG). The PAS is allowing the company to support tight links of good vicinity, and at the same time that is generating local employment and public and private concurrent investments, contributing this way to the sustainable development and to the improvement of the quality of life of the region and the country. Transierra's PAS is implemented by the principal social actors of the influence area who have institutional, legal and social - politics responsibilities with the development of more than 30.000 families, the same ones that have expressed a high degree of satisfaction for being beneficiaries of more than 600 projects of health, education, culture, basic sanitation, infrastructure and productive development. The present work tries to summarize the current advances and the results of the implementation of the PAS, as well as to demonstrate that the levels of satisfaction of the beneficiaries are happily coincidental with the institutional intentions of Social Corporate Responsibility. (author)

  10. Workshop on the Development of the UNESCO Co-Action Learning Centre Programme (1st, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, November 12-18, 1992). Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Federation of UNESCO Associations in Japan, Tokyo.

    This publication summarizes reports from a workshop to share the experience of UNESCO's literacy program and to learn about other effective experiences in literacy available in the region. The opening of the workshop and election of officers is reported. Summaries of the following reports are given: (1) the role of learning centers to achieve…

  11. Microbial Corrosion: 1988 Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1989-04-01

    Microbial action can greatly increase corrosion damage in power plant water systems. This workshop pulled together practical experience and theoretical knowledge on microbially induced corrosion, documented diagnostic and treatment methods, and identified areas for future research.

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 557: Spills and Tank Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfred Wickline

    2008-07-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 557 is located in Areas 1, 3, 6, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and is comprised of the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 01-25-02, Fuel Spill • 03-02-02, Area 3 Subdock UST • 06-99-10, Tar Spills • 25-25-18, Train Maintenance Bldg 3901 Spill Site These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 3, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 557. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 557 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological survey at CAS 25-25-18. • Perform field screening. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern are present. • If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional step

  13. A Local Action Plan (PAL to Combat Desertification in Apulia Region: Functional Integration of Existing Territorial Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Trotta

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In 2006-2007, the Italian National Committee to Combat Drought and Desertification promoted the execution of local action plans in some of the Italian regions. The aims of these plans were: to carry out specific actions at a local scale; to promote the integration of local policies; to involve the local communities in proposing strategies to be adopted; to harmonize the procedures among institutions in charge of adopting the policies. In this framework, ENEA carried out an evaluation of existing policies and programs to be considered in implementing a local action plan to combat desertification in the Apulia region. The application of the environmental and socio-economic measures of the regional Rural Development Plan 2007-2013 (PSR seemed to be an effective tool to positively influence human activities such as agriculture, breeding, and forestry, with the purpose of preserving or improving soil characteristics and overall environmental conditions, and eventually resulting in a reduction of desertification processes. Therefore, we proposed that these measures should be taken into account and effectively integrated into the Local Action Plan of the Apulia region. Additionally, we considered the four priority sectors identified by the National Action Plan (PAN to combat drought and desertification as the guiding principles to carry out our analysis. These sectors were: Soil Protection, Sustainable Water Management, Reduction of the Impact of Productive Activities, and Territorial Equilibrium. We also included Climate Change, in consideration of the alarming and urgent role it has assumed. The desertification-prone province of Foggia was selected as a pilot area in where to evaluate the influences that PSR measures can directly or indirectly have on desertification-related factors, and identify and implement specific actions. The Provincial Coordination Territorial Plan (PTCP of Foggia provided the basic land units for this analysis, the

  14. Development and Implementation of South Asia’s First Heat-Health Action Plan in Ahmedabad (Gujarat, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Knowlton

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent heat waves, already a concern in rapidly growing and urbanizing South Asia, will very likely worsen in a warming world. Coordinated adaptation efforts can reduce heat’s adverse health impacts, however. To address this concern in Ahmedabad (Gujarat, India, a coalition has been formed to develop an evidence-based heat preparedness plan and early warning system. This paper describes the group and initial steps in the plan’s development and implementation. Evidence accumulation included extensive literature review, analysis of local temperature and mortality data, surveys with heat-vulnerable populations, focus groups with health care professionals, and expert consultation. The findings and recommendations were encapsulated in policy briefs for key government agencies, health care professionals, outdoor workers, and slum communities, and synthesized in the heat preparedness plan. A 7-day probabilistic weather forecast was also developed and is used to trigger the plan in advance of dangerous heat waves. The pilot plan was implemented in 2013, and public outreach was done through training workshops, hoardings/billboards, pamphlets, and print advertisements. Evaluation activities and continuous improvement efforts are ongoing, along with plans to explore the program’s scalability to other Indian cities, as Ahmedabad is the first South Asian city to address heat-health threats comprehensively.

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 105 is a geographical grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with atmospheric nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 105, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney • 02-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site T-2A • 02-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T-2B • 02-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site T-2 • 02-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Turk These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 105. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with all CAU 105 CASs are from atmospheric nuclear testing activities. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU

  16. Proceedings of the twentieth annual aquatic toxicity workshop. Comptes rendus du vingtieme colloque annuel de toxicologie aquatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coillie, R. van; Roy, Y.; Bois, Y.; Campbell, P.G.C.; Lundahl, P.; Martel, L.; Michaud, M.; Riebel, P.; Thellen, C. (eds.)

    1994-01-01

    A workshop was held as part of a continuing series of meetings on toxicity testing methods and pathways of contaminants in the aquatic environment. Papers were presented at the workshop on topics including biodegradation of contaminants, ecological assessments of priority substances, micro-scale bioassays, mercury in the northern aquatic environment, ecotoxicological risk assessment, bioaccumulation of contaminants, effects assessment, the St. Lawrence River Action Plan, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, industrial effluents and environment management, microcosms and mesocosms, and biomarkers. Separate abstracts have been prepared for five papers from this workshop.

  17. Corrective action investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit Number 423: Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Number 423, the Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point (UDP), which is located in Area 3 at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, part of the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 225 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU Number 423 is comprised of only one Corrective Action Site (CAS) which includes the Building 03-60 UDP and an associated discharge line extending from Building 03-60 to a point approximately 73 meters (240 feet) northwest. The UDP was used between approximately 1965 and 1990 to dispose of waste fluids from the Building 03-60 automotive maintenance shop. It is likely that soils surrounding the UDP have been impacted by oil, grease, cleaning supplies and solvents as well as waste motor oil and other automotive fluids released from the UDP

  18. Workshop on DNA repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Lehmann (Alan); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); A.A. van Zeeland (Albert); C.M.P. Backendorf (Claude); B.A. Bridges; A. Collins; R.P.D. Fuchs; G.P. Margison; R. Montesano; E. Moustacchi; A.T. Natarajan; M. Radman; A. Sarasin; E. Seeberg; C.A. Smith; M. Stefanini (Miria); L.H. Thompson; G.P. van der Schans; C.A. Weber (Christine); M.Z. Zdzienika

    1992-01-01

    textabstractA workshop on DNA repair with emphasis on eukaryotic systems was held, under the auspices of the EC Concerted Action on DNA Repair and Cancer, at Noordwijkerhout (The Netherlands) 14-19 April 1991. The local organization of the meeting was done under the auspices of the Medical Genetic C

  19. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit No. 423: Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE/NV

    1997-10-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), and the US Department of Defense. The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUS) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs) (FFACO, 1996). As per the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU No. 423, the Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point (UDP), which is located in Area 3 at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, part of the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 225 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figures 1-1 and 1-2). Corrective Action Unit No. 423 is comprised of only one CAS (No. 03-02-002-0308), which includes the Building 03-60 UDP and an associated discharge line extending from Building 03-60 to a point approximately 73 meters (m) (240 feet [ft]) northwest as shown on Figure 1-3.

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1 with ROTC 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Strand

    2005-01-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 552 is comprised of the one Corrective Action Site which is 12-23-05, Ponds. One additional CAS, 12-06-04, Muckpile (G-Tunnel Muckpile), was removed from this CAU when it was determined that the muckpile is an active site. A modification to the FFACO to remove CAS 12-06-04 was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on December 16, 2004. The G-Tunnel ponds were first identified in the 1991 Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. document entitled, ''Nevada Test Site Inventory of Inactive and Abandoned Facilities and Waste Sites'' (REECo, 1991). Corrective Action Unit 552 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating and selecting the corrective action alternatives for the site. The CAI will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and sampling of appropriate media. Data will also be obtained to support investigation-derived waste (IDW) disposal and potential future waste management decisions.