WorldWideScience

Sample records for action levels pals

  1. META-ANALYSIS OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVEL ( PAL ) DATA FOR U.S. YOUTH

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper describes analytical research undertaken by EMRB staff to obtain age- and gender-specific distributions of Physical Activity Level (PAL) values for children measured in studies published between 1990-2004 in the clinical nutrition and exercise physiology literatures. ...

  2. Soumen Pal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Soumen Pal. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 32 Issue 2 April 2009 pp 169-176 Composites. Sintering behaviour of spinel–alumina composites · Soumen Pal A K Bandyopadhyay P G Pal S Mukherjee B N Samaddar · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  3. Sitaram Pal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics. Sitaram Pal. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 68 Issue 5 May 2007 pp 789-801 Research Articles. Evidence of self-affne multiplicity scaling of charged-particle multiplicity distribution in hadron–nucleus interaction · Dipak Ghosh Argha Deb Sitaram Pal ...

  4. A Local Action Plan (PAL to Combat Desertification in Apulia Region: Functional Integration of Existing Territorial Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Trotta

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In 2006-2007, the Italian National Committee to Combat Drought and Desertification promoted the execution of local action plans in some of the Italian regions. The aims of these plans were: to carry out specific actions at a local scale; to promote the integration of local policies; to involve the local communities in proposing strategies to be adopted; to harmonize the procedures among institutions in charge of adopting the policies. In this framework, ENEA carried out an evaluation of existing policies and programs to be considered in implementing a local action plan to combat desertification in the Apulia region. The application of the environmental and socio-economic measures of the regional Rural Development Plan 2007-2013 (PSR seemed to be an effective tool to positively influence human activities such as agriculture, breeding, and forestry, with the purpose of preserving or improving soil characteristics and overall environmental conditions, and eventually resulting in a reduction of desertification processes. Therefore, we proposed that these measures should be taken into account and effectively integrated into the Local Action Plan of the Apulia region. Additionally, we considered the four priority sectors identified by the National Action Plan (PAN to combat drought and desertification as the guiding principles to carry out our analysis. These sectors were: Soil Protection, Sustainable Water Management, Reduction of the Impact of Productive Activities, and Territorial Equilibrium. We also included Climate Change, in consideration of the alarming and urgent role it has assumed. The desertification-prone province of Foggia was selected as a pilot area in where to evaluate the influences that PSR measures can directly or indirectly have on desertification-related factors, and identify and implement specific actions. The Provincial Coordination Territorial Plan (PTCP of Foggia provided the basic land units for this analysis, the

  5. The use of Sphagnum recurvum Pal. Beauv. as biological tests for determination of the level of pollution with fluorine compounds and sulphur dioxide in the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Świeboda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The green parts of the peat moss Sphagnum recurvum Pal. Beauv. were used as a biological test to evaluate the pollution level of the natural environment in the region of the aluminium works "Skawina" (Southern Poland with fluorine compounds and sulphur dioxide. The moss samples were placed in nylon nets and exposed to the polluted air for 6 weeks, then the fluorine and sulphur content in them was determined. The results demonstrated the usefulness of this method for the purpose of establishing the range of influence of the emitted industrial pollution.

  6. Reactor Emergency Action Level Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touchton, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Reactor Emergency Action Level Monitor (REALM) Expert System is designed to provide assistance in the identification of a nuclear power plant emergency situation and the determination of its severity. REALM has been developed to operate in a real-time processing environment. REALM embodies a hybrid architecture utilizing both rule-based reasoning and object-oriented programming techniques borrowed from the Artificial Intelligence discipline of Computer Sciences. The rulebase consists of event-based rules and symptom-based rules. The symptom-based rules go beyond the current EAL structure to address the more problematic scenarios and entail a more symbolic representation of the plant information. The results to date have been encouraging that expert system technology can provide improved emergency decision-making capability in nuclear power plants

  7. Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehlecke, Robert F.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) oversees numerous sites on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other locations in the State of Nevada that have been impacted by activities related to the development and testing of nuclear devices and by other activities. NNSA/NSO is responsible for protecting members of the public, including site workers, from harmful exposure to both chemical and radiological contaminants at these sites as they remediate these sites. The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) is the primary state agency responsible for protection of human health and the environment with respect to chemical and radiological wastes. In 1996 the DOE, U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada entered into an agreement known as the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Appendix VI to the FFACO describes the strategy employed to plan, implement, and complete environmental corrective action activities at NTS and other locations in the state of Nevada. One of the categories of corrective action units (CAUs) is Industrial Sites, which consists of approximately 1,150 locations that may require some level of investigation and corrective action. To evaluate the need for the extent of corrective action at a particular site, NNSA/NSO assesses the potential impacts to receptors by comparing measurements of contaminant concentrations to risk-based (chemical) and dose-based (radionuclide) standards (action levels). Preliminary action levels (PALs) are established as part of the data quality objective (DQO) process, and are presented in one or more FFACO documents generated as part of the corrective action process. This document formally defines and clarifies the NDEP-approved process NNSA/NSO Industrial Sites Project uses to fulfill the requirements of the FFACO and state regulations. This process establishes final action levels (FALs) based on the risk

  8. 30 CFR 62.120 - Action level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Action level. 62.120 Section 62.120 Mineral... OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE § 62.120 Action level. If during any work shift a miner's noise exposure equals or exceeds the action level the mine operator must enroll the miner in a hearing conservation program that...

  9. 10 CFR 850.23 - Action level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Action level. 850.23 Section 850.23 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.23 Action level. (a) The responsible employer must include in its CBDPP an action level that is no greater than 0.2 µg...

  10. Recommended action levels for radon in dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The recommendation made by a group appointed by the Directorate of Public Health, arrives at the conclusion that radon in Norwegian dwellings implies a substantial health problem for the country. For this reason it is recommended that actions should be taken to reduce the radiation exposure from radon in Norway. Upper levels for such actions are set to 200 Bq/m 3 (radon in air of dwellings) for new contructions. For existing dwellings having concentrations of 200 - 800 Bq/m 3 , simple and unexpensive remedial actions to reduce levels are sufficient. When levels exceed 800 Bq/m 3 , more elaborate and costly actions are necessary. An evaluation of the extent of the radon problem in Norway is included, together with a survey of the cost and benefit involved in choosing various levels for remedial actions

  11. Proliferation related acidic leucine-rich protein PAL31 functions as a caspase-3 inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Weiyong; Kimura, Hiromichi; Hattori, Naka; Tanaka, Satoshi; Matsuyama, Shigemi; Shiota, Kunio

    2006-01-01

    Proliferation related acidic leucine-rich protein PAL31 (PAL31) is expressed in proliferating cells and consists of 272 amino acids with a tandem structure of leucine-rich repeats in the N-terminus and a highly acidic region with a putative nuclear localization signal in the C-terminus. We previously reported that PAL31 is required for cell cycle progression. In the present study, we found that the antisense oligonucleotide of PAL31 induced apoptosis to the transfected Nb2 cells. Stable transfectants, in which PAL31 was regulated by an inducible promoter, were generated to gain further insight into the signaling role of PAL31 in the regulation of apoptosis. Expression of PAL31 resulted in the marked rescue of Rat1 cells from etoposide and UV radiation-induced apoptosis and the cytoprotection was correlated with the levels of PAL31 protein. Thus, cytoprotection from apoptosis is a physiological function of PAL31. PAL31 can suppress caspase-3 activity but not cytochrome c release in vitro, indicating that PAL31 is a direct caspase-3 inhibitor. In conclusion, PAL31 is a multifunctional protein working as a cell cycle progression factor as well as a cell survival factor

  12. Analysis of Sea Level Rise in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, K. M.; Huang, T.; Quach, N. T.; Boening, C.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Sea Level Change Portal provides scientists and the general public with "one-stop" source for current sea level change information and data. Sea Level Rise research is a multidisciplinary research and in order to understand its causes, scientists must be able to access different measurements and to be able to compare them. The portal includes an interactive tool, called the Data Analysis Tool (DAT), for accessing, visualizing, and analyzing observations and models relevant to the study of Sea Level Rise. Using NEXUS, an open source, big data analytic technology developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the DAT is able provide user on-the-fly data analysis on all relevant parameters. DAT is composed of three major components: A dedicated instance of OnEarth (a WMTS service), NEXUS deep data analytic platform, and the JPL Common Mapping Client (CMC) for web browser based user interface (UI). Utilizing the global imagery, a user is capable of browsing the data in a visual manner and isolate areas of interest for further study. The interfaces "Analysis" tool provides tools for area or point selection, single and/or comparative dataset selection, and a range of options, algorithms, and plotting. This analysis component utilizes the Nexus cloud computing platform to provide on-demand processing of the data within the user-selected parameters and immediate display of the results. A RESTful web API is exposed for users comfortable with other interfaces and who may want to take advantage of the cloud computing capabilities. This talk discuss how DAT enables on-the-fly sea level research. The talk will introduce the DAT with an end-to-end tour of the tool with exploration and animating of available imagery, a demonstration of comparative analysis and plotting, and how to share and export data along with images for use in publications/presentations. The session will cover what kind of data is available, what kind of analysis is possible, and what are the outputs.

  13. Preparation of 1D Hierarchical Material Mesosilica/Pal Composite and Its Performance in the Adsorption of Methyl Orange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Wu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights the synthesis of a one-dimensional (1D hierarchical material mesosilica/palygorskite (Pal composite and evaluates its adsorption performance for anionic dye methyl orange (MO in comparison with Pal and Mobile crystalline material-41 (MCM-41. The Mesosilica/Pal composite is consisted of mesosilica coated Pal nanorods and prepared through a dual template approach using cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB and Pal as soft and hard templates, respectively. The composition and structure of the resultant material was characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmissionelectron microscopy (TEM, N2 adsorption-desorption analysis, small-angle X-Ray powder diffraction (XRD, and zeta potential measurement. Adsorption experiments were carried out with different absorbents at different contact times and pH levels. Compared with Pal and MCM-41, the mesosilica/Pal composite exhibited the best efficiency for MO adsorption. Its adsorption ratio is as high as 70.4%. Its adsorption equilibrium time is as short as 30 min. Results testify that the MO retention is promoted for the micro-mesoporous hierarchical structure and positive surface charge electrostatic interactions of the mesosilica/Pal composite. The regenerability of the mesosilica/Pal composite absorbent was also assessed. 1D morphology makes it facile to separate from aqueous solutions. It can be effortlessly recovered and reused for up to nine cycles.

  14. Preparation of 1D Hierarchical Material Mesosilica/Pal Composite and Its Performance in the Adsorption of Methyl Orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mei; Han, Haifeng; Ni, Lingli; Song, Daiyun; Li, Shuang; Hu, Tao; Jiang, Jinlong; Chen, Jing

    2018-01-20

    This paper highlights the synthesis of a one-dimensional (1D) hierarchical material mesosilica/palygorskite (Pal) composite and evaluates its adsorption performance for anionic dye methyl orange (MO) in comparison with Pal and Mobile crystalline material-41 (MCM-41). The Mesosilica/Pal composite is consisted of mesosilica coated Pal nanorods and prepared through a dual template approach using cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and Pal as soft and hard templates, respectively. The composition and structure of the resultant material was characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmissionelectron microscopy (TEM), N₂ adsorption-desorption analysis, small-angle X-Ray powder diffraction (XRD), and zeta potential measurement. Adsorption experiments were carried out with different absorbents at different contact times and pH levels. Compared with Pal and MCM-41, the mesosilica/Pal composite exhibited the best efficiency for MO adsorption. Its adsorption ratio is as high as 70.4%. Its adsorption equilibrium time is as short as 30 min. Results testify that the MO retention is promoted for the micro-mesoporous hierarchical structure and positive surface charge electrostatic interactions of the mesosilica/Pal composite. The regenerability of the mesosilica/Pal composite absorbent was also assessed. 1D morphology makes it facile to separate from aqueous solutions. It can be effortlessly recovered and reused for up to nine cycles.

  15. Becoming an Effective Peer Assisted Learning (PAL) Leader

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Harry; Jenkins, Rhiannon; Hill, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    This Directions paper, written by two former Peer Assisted Learning (PAL) Leaders, (West and Jenkins) and a PAL Tutor (Hill), will support any geographer considering a PAL role. It reflects their experiences of participating in a PAL scheme at the University of the West of England (UWE), Bristol, United Kingdom, and research conducted with…

  16. Isolation and Functional Characterization of a Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyase Gene (SsPAL1 from Coleus (Solenostemon scutellarioides (L. Codd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinlong Zhu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL is the first enzyme involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway and plays important roles in the secondary metabolisms, development and defense of plants. To study the molecular function of PAL in anthocyanin synthesis of Coleus (Solenostemon scutellarioides (L. Codd, a Coleus PAL gene designated as SsPAL1 was cloned and characterized using a degenerate oligonucleotide primer PCR and RACE method. The full-length SsPAL1 was 2450 bp in size and consisted of one intron and two exons encoding a polypeptide of 711 amino acids. The deduced SsPAL1 protein showed high identities and structural similarities with other functional plant PAL proteins. A series of putative cis-acting elements involved in transcriptional regulation, light and stress responsiveness were found in the upstream regulatory sequence of SsPAL1. Transcription pattern analysis indicated that SsPAL1 was constitutively expressed in all tissues examined and was enhanced by light and different abiotic factors. The recombinant SsPAL1 protein exhibited high PAL activity, at optimal conditions of 60 °C and pH 8.2. Although the levels of total PAL activity and total anthocyanin concentration have a similar variation trend in different Coleus cultivars, there was no significant correlation between them (r = 0.7529, p > 0.1, suggesting that PAL was not the rate-limiting enzyme for the downstream anthocyanin biosynthetic branch in Coleus. This study enables us to further understand the role of SsPAL1 in the phenylpropanoid (flavonoids, anthocyanins biosynthesis in Coleus at the molecular level.

  17. Regulation of a phenylalanine ammonia lyase (BbPAL) by calmodulin in response to environmental changes in the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Park, Hyesung; Han, Jae-Gu; Oh, Junsang; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Kim, Seong Hwan; Sung, Gi-Ho

    2015-11-01

    Phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL, E.C. 4.3.1.5) catalyses the deamination of L -phenylalanine to trans-cinnamic acid and ammonia, facilitating a critical step in the phenylpropanoid pathway that produces a variety of secondary metabolites. In this study, we isolated BbPAL gene in the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana. According to multiple sequence alignment, homology modelling and in vitro PAL activity, we demonstrated that BbPAL acts as a typical PAL enzyme in B. bassiana. BbPAL interacted with calmodulin (CaM) in vitro and in vivo, indicating that BbPAL is a novel CaM-binding protein. The functional role of CaM in BbPAL action was to negatively regulate the BbPAL activity in B. bassiana. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that L -phenylalanine was reduced and trans-cinnamic acid was increased in response to the CaM inhibitor W-7. Dark conditions suppressed BbPAL activity in B. bassiana, compared with light. In addition, heat and cold stresses inhibited BbPAL activity in B. bassiana. Interestingly, these negative effects of BbPAL activity by dark, heat and cold conditions were recovered by W-7 treatment, suggesting that the inhibitory mechanism is mediated through stimulation of CaM activity. Therefore, this work suggests that BbPAL plays a role in the phenylpropanoid pathway mediated by environmental stimuli via the CaM signalling pathway. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Intervention levels for protective action in the radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, G.Y.; Khang, B.O.; Lee, M.; Lee, J.T.

    1998-09-01

    In the event of nuclear accident or radiological emergency, the protective action based on intervention levels prepared in advance should be implemented in order to minimize the public hazard. There are several protective measures such as sheltering, evacuation, iodine prophylaxis, foodstuff restrictions, temporary relocation, permanent resettlement, etc. for protecting the public. The protective measures should be implemented on the basis of operational intervention level of action level. This report describes the basic principles of intervention and the methodology for deriving intervention levels, and also recommendations for the intervention levels suggested from IAEA, ICRP, WHO and EU are summarized to apply to the domestic radiological emergency. This report also contains a revision procedure of operational intervention levels to meet a difference accident condition. Therefore, it can be usefully applied to establish revised operational intervention levels considering or the regional characteristics of our country. (author). 20 refs

  19. Learning a Mid-Level Representation for Multiview Action Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuiwei Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recognizing human actions in videos is an active topic with broad commercial potentials. Most of the existing action recognition methods are supposed to have the same camera view during both training and testing. And thus performances of these single-view approaches may be severely influenced by the camera movement and variation of viewpoints. In this paper, we address the above problem by utilizing videos simultaneously recorded from multiple views. To this end, we propose a learning framework based on multitask random forest to exploit a discriminative mid-level representation for videos from multiple cameras. In the first step, subvolumes of continuous human-centered figures are extracted from original videos. In the next step, spatiotemporal cuboids sampled from these subvolumes are characterized by multiple low-level descriptors. Then a set of multitask random forests are built upon multiview cuboids sampled at adjacent positions and construct an integrated mid-level representation for multiview subvolumes of one action. Finally, a random forest classifier is employed to predict the action category in terms of the learned representation. Experiments conducted on the multiview IXMAS action dataset illustrate that the proposed method can effectively recognize human actions depicted in multiview videos.

  20. Rule-based emergency action level monitor prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touchton, R.A.; Gunter, A.D.; Cain, D.

    1985-01-01

    In late 1983, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) began a program to encourage and stimulate the development of artificial intelligence (AI) applications for the nuclear industry. Development of a rule-based emergency action level classification system prototype is discussed. The paper describes both the full prototype currently under development and the completed, simplified prototype

  1. PAL driven organizational learning theory and practices a light on learning journey of organizations

    CERN Document Server

    Chuah, Kong

    2015-01-01

    Presenting an innovative concept and approach for organization management, this book serves to document an organization’s journey towards the ultimate goal of learning organization. This book also shares the experience on how a OL framework built on established learning theories, could be used effectively, overcoming many of the barriers in a real industrial setting. Utilizing a ready-to-use tool called Project Action Learning (PAL) to analyze real life case studies, the authors introduce a framework that allows teams of people to work and learn over the course of business projects. Equal emphasis is placed on the achievement of pre-set project outcomes and the learning objectives of the participants. In addition, a long term organizational learning strategy is put forward and the necessary supporting infrastructure, in the form of four ‘PAL Pillars’, is described. The concepts and development of the PAL driven Organizational Learning model are inspired by, and grounded in, Western and Eastern business ...

  2. quantification of emergency action levels for research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhongwang; Qu Jingyuan; Liu Yuanzhong; Xi Shuren

    2000-01-01

    Emergency action level (EAL) technical criteria or parameters for emergency conditions classes. Reference methodology for development of EAL in foreign countries, in process of developed and reviewed emergency plan of home several research reactors, the author thought that should be taken initiating conditions which result in emergency conditions quantified some instrumental readings or alarm thresholds, in order to distinguish and confirm emergency conditions and provide technical bases for emergency response actions. Then based on this principle, revised or developed emergency plans of INET Tsinghua University, promote development of work for emergency plan of research reactors

  3. The rocky flats controversy on radionuclide soil action levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, T.C.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the Rocky Flats radionuclide soil action level controversy as a case study for the purpose of understanding the nature and value of stakeholder involvement in the management of radiological hazards. The report consists of three main sections. The first section outlines the Rocky Flats story, including the Cold War era, the post-Cold War era, and the transition between the two. This provides the context necessary to understand the radionuclide soil action level controversy, the main events of which are described in the second section. In the final section, the Rocky Flats case is briefly discussed within the framework of a general model of stakeholder involvement and the lessons learned from the case are identified. (author)

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehlecke, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The six bunkers included in CAU 204 were primarily used to monitor atmospheric testing or store munitions. The 'Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada' (NNSA/NV, 2002a) provides information relating to the history, planning, and scope of the investigation; therefore, it will not be repeated in this CADD. This CADD identifies potential corrective action alternatives and provides a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 204. The evaluation of corrective action alternatives is based on process knowledge and the results of investigative activities conducted in accordance with the CAIP (NNSA/NV, 2002a) that was approved prior to the start of the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI). Record of Technical Change (ROTC) No. 1 to the CAIP (approval pending) documents changes to the preliminary action levels (PALs) agreed to by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This ROTC specifically discusses the radiological PALs and their application to the findings of the CAU 204 corrective action investigation. The scope of this CADD consists of the following: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of corrective action alternatives in relation to corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 204

  5. The rocky flats controversy on radionuclide soil action levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, T.C.

    2004-01-01

    An account of the Rocky Flats radionuclide soil action level controversy is presented as: a case study for the purpose of understanding the nature and value of stakeholder involvement in the management of radiological hazards. The report consists of three main sections. The first section outlines the Rocky Flats story, including the Cold War era, which was characterised by secrecy and distrust, the post-Cold War era, in which trust and co-operation between risk managers and the public began to develop. This contrast between these two historical periods provides the context necessary to understand the radionuclide soil action level controversy, the main events of which are described in the second section. In the final section, the Rocky Flats case is briefly discussed within the framework of a general model of stakeholder involvement and the lessons learned from the case are identified: (1) without a basis in shared values, collaborative public involvement in the management of radiological hazards is not possible; (2) given a basis in shared values, collaborative public involvement can lead to improved solutions to the management of radiological hazards; and (3) risk managers should therefore seek to understand the values of public stakeholders and to identify ways, through stakeholder involvement, that those values can be incorporated in management practice. (author)

  6. The rocky flats controversy on radionuclide soil action levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, T.C.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes how stakeholder involvement processes led to the successful resolution of a dispute over radionuclide soil action levels at the Rocky Flats Site near Denver, Colorado. During the Cold War Era, Rocky Flats, a plutonium fabrication plant, was part of the American government's multi-site nuclear weapons production facilities. Although the Rocky Flats plant had significant positive effects on the local economy, it became a target of public protest due to concerns over both public safety in the area surrounding the site and global nuclear proliferation. In the late 1980's, local safety concerns led to investigations by state and federal agencies. In 1992, with the Cold War ended, the Department of Energy decided to decommission the Rocky Flats site and to begin the long process of decontamination. (author)

  7. Reactor Emergency Action Level Monitor: Knowledge acquisition experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touchton, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the Knowledge Acquisition experiences in developing the Reactor Emergency Action Level Monitor (REALM) Expert System Prototype. REALM is an expert system which interprets plant sensor data and provides advice on the proper emergency classification. The REALM project is being funded by the Electric Power Research Institute, Consolidated Edison is serving as the host utility, and the effort is being conducted by Technology Applications, Inc. REALM is being designed to provide expert assistance in the identification of a nuclear power plant emergency situation and the determination of its severity, ultimately operating in a real-time, on-line processing environment. The paper discusses briefly the direct knowledge acquisition techniques used by the project team (who are themselves power industry engineers), to extract relevant knowledge from plant specifications and procedures

  8. Recent highlights of the PALS research program

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jungwirth, Karel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 23, - (2005), s. 177-182 ISSN 0263-0346. [ECLIM 2004: European Conference on Laser Interaction with Matter /28./. Roma, 06.09.2004-10.09.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK2043105; GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A100 Grant - others:European Commission(XE) HPRI-CT-1999-00053 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : ablation * Iodine lasers * laser ion sources * laser-produced plasma * laser-target interaction * PALS * shock waves * XUV lasers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.590, year: 2005

  9. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Boehlecke

    2004-04-01

    The six bunkers included in CAU 204 were primarily used to monitor atmospheric testing or store munitions. The ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada'' (NNSA/NV, 2002a) provides information relating to the history, planning, and scope of the investigation; therefore, it will not be repeated in this CADD. This CADD identifies potential corrective action alternatives and provides a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 204. The evaluation of corrective action alternatives is based on process knowledge and the results of investigative activities conducted in accordance with the CAIP (NNSA/NV, 2002a) that was approved prior to the start of the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI). Record of Technical Change (ROTC) No. 1 to the CAIP (approval pending) documents changes to the preliminary action levels (PALs) agreed to by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This ROTC specifically discusses the radiological PALs and their application to the findings of the CAU 204 corrective action investigation. The scope of this CADD consists of the following: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of corrective action alternatives in relation to corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 204.

  10. Draft emergency action level guidelines for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1979-09-15

    This document is provided for interim use during the initial phases of the NRC effort to promptly improve emergency preparedness at operating nuclear power plants. Changes to the document can be expected as experience is gained in its use and public comments are received. Further, the Commission has initiated a rulemaking procedure, now scheduled for completion in January 1930 in the area of Emergency Planning and Preparedness. Additional requirements are to be expected when rulemaking is completed and some modifications to this document may be necessary. Four classes of Emergency Action Levels are established which replace the classes in Regulatory Guide 1.101, each with associated examples of initiating conditions. The classes are: - Notification of Unusual Event; - Alert; - Site Emergency; - General Emergency. The rationale for the notification and alert classes is to provide early and prompt notification of minor events which could lead to more serious consequences given operator error or equipment failure or which might be indicative of more serious conditions which are not yet fully realized. A gradation is provided to assure fuller response preparations for more serious indicators. The site emergency class reflects conditions where some significant releases are likely or are occurring but where a core melt situation is not indicated based on current information. In this situation full mobilization of emergency personnel in tie :near site environs is indicated as well as dispatch of monitoring teams and associated communications. The general emergency class involves actual or imminent substantial core degradation or malting with the potential for loss of containment. The immediate action for this class is sheltering (staying inside) rather thai evacuation until an assessment can be made that (1) an evacuation is indicated and (2) an evacuation, if indicated, can be completed prior to significant release and transport of radioactive material to the affected

  11. Draft emergency action level guidelines for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    This document is provided for interim use during the initial phases of the NRC effort to promptly improve emergency preparedness at operating nuclear power plants. Changes to the document can be expected as experience is gained in its use and public comments are received. Further, the Commission has initiated a rulemaking procedure, now scheduled for completion in January 1930 in the area of Emergency Planning and Preparedness. Additional requirements are to be expected when rulemaking is completed and some modifications to this document may be necessary. Four classes of Emergency Action Levels are established which replace the classes in Regulatory Guide 1.101, each with associated examples of initiating conditions. The classes are: - Notification of Unusual Event; - Alert; - Site Emergency; - General Emergency. The rationale for the notification and alert classes is to provide early and prompt notification of minor events which could lead to more serious consequences given operator error or equipment failure or which might be indicative of more serious conditions which are not yet fully realized. A gradation is provided to assure fuller response preparations for more serious indicators. The site emergency class reflects conditions where some significant releases are likely or are occurring but where a core melt situation is not indicated based on current information. In this situation full mobilization of emergency personnel in tie :near site environs is indicated as well as dispatch of monitoring teams and associated communications. The general emergency class involves actual or imminent substantial core degradation or malting with the potential for loss of containment. The immediate action for this class is sheltering (staying inside) rather thai evacuation until an assessment can be made that (1) an evacuation is indicated and (2) an evacuation, if indicated, can be completed prior to significant release and transport of radioactive material to the affected

  12. PowerPal: power up your creek

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    PowerPal micro-hydro equipment was developed in Vietnam by Asian Phoenix Resources Ltd. of Victoria, BC; a company who aims to help disadvantaged people in less developed countries by making renewable energy devices available to them. The idea for the micro-hydro system was conceived after mineral exploration parties in Vietnam noted that large numbers of poor quality propeller turbines were being used to supply AC power to individual homes. A plan was developed to improve the quality and reliability of low head turbines with better castings, magnets, superior bearings and electronic load controllers. Funding for the program was initially difficult to obtain. However, PowerPal micro-hydro equipment eventually came to the attention of the World Bank as well as other government and non-governmental organizations. Financing for the purchase and installation of larger numbers of units has now been achieved, and missionary groups in various parts of the world have ordered units. European markets have also opened up, and distributors of the micro-hydro equipment have been appointed in various countries. Sales are now strong in Central America, South America, the Caribbean, Australasia, Oceania, Africa and Europe. It was concluded that the surge of interest has coincided with a steep upturn in oil prices. 8 figs

  13. Leader Self Disclosure within PAL: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Adelaide; Court, Sue

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the value of self disclosure within Peer Assisted Learning (PAL) sessions at Bournemouth University. We consider the role of self disclosure in education contexts in order to inform our understanding of this skill in PAL. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were employed in this research to investigate…

  14. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) gene activity in response to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) catalyzes the biosynthesis of rosmarinic acid (RA), tyrosine and phenylalanine are the precursors of RA, while proline drives metabolite precursors toward Shikimate and phenylpropanoid pathway ending with the production of RA. The aim of this study was to investigate the PAL gene ...

  15. Designing technology for emergent literacy: the PictoPal initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2009-01-01

    PictoPal is the name of a technology-supported intervention designed to foster the development of emergent reading and writing skills in four and five year old children. Following the theoretical underpinnings and a brief description of PictoPal, this article describes how children worked with the

  16. Phase 1 Trial of Subcutaneous rAvPAL-PEG in Subjects with Phenylketonuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Nicola; Harding, Cary O.; Burton, Barbara K.; Grange, Dorothy K.; Vockley, Jerry; Wasserstein, Melissa; Rice, Gregory M.; Musson, Donald G.; Gu, Zhonghua; Sile, Saba

    2014-01-01

    Objective Phenylketonuria is an inherited disease caused by impaired activity of phenylalanine hydroxylase, the enzyme that converts phenylalanine to tyrosine, leading to accumulation of phenylalanine and subsequent neurocognitive dysfunction. A phenylalanine-restricted diet initiated early in life can ameliorate the toxic effects of phenylalanine. However, the diet is onerous and compliance is extremely difficult. Phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) is a prokaryotic enzyme that converts phenylalanine to ammonia and trans-cinnamic acid. This Phase 1, multicenter clinical trial evaluated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and efficacy of rAvPAL-PEG (recombinant Anabaena variabilis PAL produced in E. coli conjugated with polyethylene glycol [PEG] to reduce immunogenicity) in reducing phenylalanine levels in subjects with phenylketonuria. Methods Single subcutaneous injections of rAvPAL-PEG in escalating doses (0·001, 0·003, 0·01, 0·03, and 0·1 mg/kg) were administered to 25 adults with phenylketonuria recruited from those attending metabolic clinics in North America whose blood phenylalanine concentrations were ≥600 μmol/L. Results The most frequently reported adverse events were injection-site reactions and dizziness. Reactions were self-limited without sequelae. During the trial, two subjects had adverse reactions to intramuscular (IM) medroxyprogesterone acetate, a drug containing polyethylene glycol as an excipient. Three subjects developed a generalized skin rash at the highest rAvPAL-PEG dose (0·1 mg/kg). Drug levels peaked ∼5 days after the injection. Treatment was effective in reducing blood phenylalanine in all five subjects receiving the highest dose (0·1 mg/kg, mean percent change of -58 from baseline), with a nadir ∼6 days after injection and inverse correlation between drug and phenylalanine concentrations in plasma. Phenylalanine concentrations returned to near-baseline levels ∼20 days after the single injection. Conclusions

  17. Conservation, Divergence, and Genome-Wide Distribution of PAL and POX A Gene Families in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawal, H C; Singh, N K; Sharma, T R

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide identification and phylogenetic and syntenic comparison were performed for the genes responsible for phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and peroxidase A (POX A) enzymes in nine plant species representing very diverse groups like legumes (Glycine max and Medicago truncatula), fruits (Vitis vinifera), cereals (Sorghum bicolor, Zea mays, and Oryza sativa), trees (Populus trichocarpa), and model dicot (Arabidopsis thaliana) and monocot (Brachypodium distachyon) species. A total of 87 and 1045 genes in PAL and POX A gene families, respectively, have been identified in these species. The phylogenetic and syntenic comparison along with motif distributions shows a high degree of conservation of PAL genes, suggesting that these genes may predate monocot/eudicot divergence. The POX A family genes, present in clusters at the subtelomeric regions of chromosomes, might be evolving and expanding with higher rate than the PAL gene family. Our analysis showed that during the expansion of POX A gene family, many groups and subgroups have evolved, resulting in a high level of functional divergence among monocots and dicots. These results will act as a first step toward the understanding of monocot/eudicot evolution and functional characterization of these gene families in the future.

  18. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS): a probe for molecular organisation in self-assembled biomimetic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Celesta; Dong, Aurelia W; Hill, Anita J; Boyd, Ben J; Drummond, Calum J

    2015-07-21

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) has been shown to be highly sensitive to conformational, structural and microenvironmental transformations arising from subtle geometric changes in molecular geometry in self-assembling biomimetic systems. The ortho-positronium (oPs) may be considered an active probe that can provide information on intrinsic packing and mobility within low molecular weight solids, viscous liquids, and soft matter systems. In this perspective we provide a critical overview of the literature in this field, including the evolution of analysis software and experimental protocols with commentary upon the practical utility of PALS. In particular, we discuss how PALS can provide unique insight into the macroscopic transport properties of several porous biomembrane-like nanostructures and suggest how this insight may provide information on the release of drugs from these matrices to aid in developing therapeutic interventions. We discuss the potentially exciting and fruitful application of this technique to membrane dynamics, diffusion and permeability. We propose that PALS can provide novel molecular level information that is complementary to conventional characterisation techniques.

  19. Internet Safety and Malaysian Students: A Study of Female Undergraduates and Their Net Pals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheong Lee Mei, Dianne

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Malaysian female undergraduates are perceived as able to rationally evaluate and estimate risks towards Net pals. Friendship is secured online while deception and fraud are revealed offline. Based on what they have been informed, the female undergraduates may know their Net pals’ likes and dislikes but the invisible cyber veil does not allow them to penetrate the illusion and accurately evaluate a person’s character and personality. This study examined how Malaysian female undergraduates use the Internet, perceive risks in meeting Net pals and the safety awareness surrounding cyber friendship. Responses of 118 female undergraduates (43% from UiTM, 30% from UM, 27% from MMU to a survey indicated that Net pals were befriended through chat rooms and websites. More than half of the female undergraduates would have a face-to-face meeting with their Net pals without the knowledge of relevant parties and have done at least one potentially unsafe behaviour. If the extent and level of Internet safety awareness is known, the problem of Internet deception that might lead to potential social problems such as rape and sexual abuse can be effectively addressed.

  20. Conservation, Divergence, and Genome-Wide Distribution of PAL and POX A Gene Families in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Rawal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide identification and phylogenetic and syntenic comparison were performed for the genes responsible for phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL and peroxidase A (POX A enzymes in nine plant species representing very diverse groups like legumes (Glycine max and Medicago truncatula, fruits (Vitis vinifera, cereals (Sorghum bicolor, Zea mays, and Oryza sativa, trees (Populus trichocarpa, and model dicot (Arabidopsis thaliana and monocot (Brachypodium distachyon species. A total of 87 and 1045 genes in PAL and POX A gene families, respectively, have been identified in these species. The phylogenetic and syntenic comparison along with motif distributions shows a high degree of conservation of PAL genes, suggesting that these genes may predate monocot/eudicot divergence. The POX A family genes, present in clusters at the subtelomeric regions of chromosomes, might be evolving and expanding with higher rate than the PAL gene family. Our analysis showed that during the expansion of POX A gene family, many groups and subgroups have evolved, resulting in a high level of functional divergence among monocots and dicots. These results will act as a first step toward the understanding of monocot/eudicot evolution and functional characterization of these gene families in the future.

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (December 2002, Revision No.: 0), Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NNSA/NSO

    2002-12-12

    The Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 204 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 204 is located on the Nevada Test Site approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which include: 01-34-01, Underground Instrument House Bunker; 02-34-01, Instrument Bunker; 03-34-01, Underground Bunker; 05-18-02, Chemical Explosives Storage; 05-33-01, Kay Blockhouse; 05-99-02, Explosive Storage Bunker. Based on site history, process knowledge, and previous field efforts, contaminants of potential concern for Corrective Action Unit 204 collectively include radionuclides, beryllium, high explosives, lead, polychlorinated biphenyls, total petroleum hydrocarbons, silver, warfarin, and zinc phosphide. The primary question for the investigation is: ''Are existing data sufficient to evaluate appropriate corrective actions?'' To address this question, resolution of two decision statements is required. Decision I is to ''Define the nature of contamination'' by identifying any contamination above preliminary action levels (PALs); Decision II is to ''Determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs. If PALs are not exceeded, the investigation is completed. If PALs are exceeded, then Decision II must be resolved. In addition, data will be obtained to support waste management decisions. Field activities will include radiological land area surveys, geophysical surveys to identify any subsurface metallic and nonmetallic debris, field screening for applicable contaminants of potential concern, collection and analysis of surface and subsurface soil samples from biased locations

  2. Anatomy of a decision III: Evaluation of national disposal at sea program action level efficacy considering 2 chemical action levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apitz, Sabine E; Vivian, Chris; Agius, Suzanne

    2017-11-01

    The potential performance (i.e., ability to separate nontoxic from toxic sediments) of a range of international Disposal at Sea (DaS) chemical Action Levels (ALs) was compared using a sediment chemical and toxicological database. The use of chemistry alone (without the use of further lines of evidence) did not perform well at reducing costs and protecting the environment. Although some approaches for interpreting AL1 results are very effective at filtering out the majority of acutely toxic sediments, without subsequent toxicological assessment, a large proportion of nontoxic sediments would be unnecessarily subjected to treatment and containment, and a number of sublethally toxic sediments would be missed. Even the best tiered systems that collect and evaluate information sequentially resulted in the failure to catch at least some sublethally or acutely toxic sediments. None of the AL2s examined were particularly effective in distinguishing between non-, sublethally, or acutely toxic sediments. Thus, this review did not support the use of chemical AL2s to predict the degree to which sediments will be toxic. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:1086-1099.© 2017 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC). © 2017 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC).

  3. Neuroprotective effects of (Val8)GLP-1-Glu-PAL in the MPTP Parkinson's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, YanFang; Chen, YiMei; Li, Lin; Hölscher, Christian

    2015-10-15

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a hormone and a growth factor. GLP-1 mimetics are currently on the market as treatments for type 2 diabetes. They also have shown neuroprotective properties in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, the GLP-1 mimetic exendin-4 has shown protective effects in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD), and a first clinical trial in PD patients showed promising results. (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL is a new GLP-1 analogue which has a longer biological half-life than exendin-4. We previously showed that (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL has neuroprotective properties. Here we tested the drug in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. MPTP was injected (30mg/kg i.p.) along with (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL (25nmol/kg i.p.) once-daily for 8 days. (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL showed good effects in preventing the MPTP-induced motor impairment (Rotarod, open field locomotion, swim test), reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase levels (dopamine synthesis) in the substantia nigra, a reduction of activated caspase 3 levels, of TUNEL positive cell numbers, of the pro-apoptotic signaling molecule BAX and an increase in the growth signaling molecule Bcl-2. The results demonstrate that (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL shows promise as a novel treatment of PD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of PAL activity, Phenolic and Flavonoid Contents in Three Pistachio (Pistacia vera L. Cultivars Grafted onto Three Different Rootstocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Nadernejad

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL is a biochemical marker of the environmental stress and plays a pivotal role in phenolic synthesis. The lower ROS level and oxidative damage was observed in grafted plants and the rootstocks have a profound influence on the biochemical composition, especially phenolic compounds. Regarding the importance of the effect rootstocks have on scion in pistachio trees, this study was carried out to assess and compare three pistachio cultivars ("Ahmadaghaii", "Ohadi" and "Kallehghuchi" on three rootstocks (Mutica, Ahli, Sarakhs. PAL activity, phenolic compounds, flavonoid and anthocyanin contents in leaves, flowers and fruits were measured toward the selection of the most suitable and compatible rootstock/scion resistant to environmental stresses. The results showed that PAL activity was different among the cultivars and organs. A positive correlation was observed between PAL activity and phenolic compounds in the leaves and flowers of Mutica- Ahmadaghaii, suggesting that it is more resistant than the others to environmental stresses. PAL activity and total phenolics in fruits of pistachio suffered a decrease when the maturation processes began. The hulls of the pistachio fruits contained high levels of phenolic compounds especially in Mutica-Ahmadaghaii suggesting its function as a protective layer and a defense chemical against ultraviolet radiation and pathogen. Our results indicated the presence of a number of bioactive compounds in kernels with the highest amount belonging to Mutica- Ahmadaghaii, and therefore it is concluded that pistachio rootstocks may affect the antioxidant compounds in kernels.

  5. Dysregulation in level of goal and action identification across psychological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Goals, events, and actions can be mentally represented within a hierarchical framework that ranges from more abstract to more concrete levels of identification. A more abstract level of identification involves general, superordinate, and decontextualized mental representations that convey the meaning of goals, events, and actions, “why” an action is performed, and its purpose, ends, and consequences. A more concrete level of identification involves specific and subordinate mental representations that include contextual details of goals, events, and actions, and the specific “how” details of an action. This review considers three lines of evidence for considering that dysregulation of level of goal/action identification may be a transdiagnostic process. First, there is evidence that different levels of identification have distinct functional consequences and that in non-clinical samples level of goal/action identification appears to be regulated in a flexible and adaptive way to match the level of goal/action identification to circumstances. Second, there is evidence that level of goal/action identification causally influences symptoms and processes involved in psychological disorders, including emotional response, repetitive thought, impulsivity, problem solving and procrastination. Third, there is evidence that the level of goal/action identification is biased and/or dysregulated in certain psychological disorders, with a bias towards more abstract identification for negative events in depression, GAD, PTSD, and social anxiety. PMID:20579789

  6. THE PAL 5 STAR STREAM GAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlberg, R. G.; Hetherington, Nathan; Grillmair, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    Pal 5 is a low-mass, low-velocity-dispersion, globular cluster with spectacular tidal tails. We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 data to extend the density measurements of the trailing star stream to 23 deg distance from the cluster, at which point the stream runs off the edge of the available sky coverage. The size and the number of gaps in the stream are measured using a filter which approximates the structure of the gaps found in stream simulations. We find 5 gaps that are at least 99% confidence detections with about a dozen gaps at 90% confidence. The statistical significance of a gap is estimated using bootstrap resampling of the control regions on either side of the stream. The density minimum closest to the cluster is likely the result of the epicyclic orbits of the tidal outflow and has been discounted. To create the number of 99% confidence gaps per unit length at the mean age of the stream requires a halo population of nearly a thousand dark matter sub-halos with peak circular velocities above 1 km s –1 within 30 kpc of the galactic center. These numbers are a factor of about three below cold stream simulation at this sub-halo mass or velocity but, given the uncertainties in both measurement and more realistic warm stream modeling, are in substantial agreement with the LCDM prediction.

  7. A study of porosity of synthetic polymer nanoparticles using PALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, B; Smith, S V [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) NSW 2232 (Australia); Guagliardo, P; Williams, J; Samarin, S, E-mail: binh.pham@ansto.gov.au, E-mail: svs@ansto.gov.au [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Physics, University of Western Australia, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2011-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) has been used to study the free volume in dry synthetic polymer nanoparticles of various sizes. A series of poly(styrene/divinyl benzene) particles with diameters in the range of 100 to 500 nm were synthesized and then carefully chemically treated using the sulfonation process, to increase their porosity. The particles were characterised by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), light scattering and PALS. Light scattering gave larger size for the treated particles, reflecting the hydration effect and therefore the increase in porosity. PALS spectra of untreated and treated particles gave four and three life-time components, respectively. Analysis by PAScual version 1.3.0 program indicated there was a reduction in the intensity and the type of the micropores in the treated particles. The data suggest PALS is a sensitive tool for detecting changes in microporosity in particles. The conflicting results obtained for light scattering compared to PALS for chemically treated particles is difficult to resolve and suggests sample preparation of polymeric materials for PALS is the critical factor.

  8. The Ve-mediated resistance response of the tomato to Verticillium dahliae involves H2O2, peroxidase and lignins and drives PAL gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merino Fuencisla

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Verticillium dahliae is a fungal pathogen that infects a wide range of hosts. The only known genes for resistance to Verticillium in the Solanaceae are found in the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Ve locus, formed by two linked genes, Ve1 and Ve2. To characterize the resistance response mediated by the tomato Ve gene, we inoculated two nearly isogenic tomato lines, LA3030 (ve/ve and LA3038 (Ve/Ve, with V. dahliae. Results We found induction of H2O2 production in roots of inoculated plants, followed by an increase in peroxidase activity only in roots of inoculated resistant plants. Phenylalanine-ammonia lyase (PAL activity was also increased in resistant roots 2 hours after inoculation, while induction of PAL activity in susceptible roots was not seen until 48 hours after inoculation. Phenylpropanoid metabolism was also affected, with increases in ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, vanillin and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde contents in resistant roots after inoculation. Six tomato PAL cDNA sequences (PAL1 - PAL6 were found in the SolGenes tomato EST database. RT-PCR analysis showed that these genes were expressed in all organs of the plant, albeit at different levels. Real-time RT-PCR indicated distinct patterns of expression of the different PAL genes in V. dahliae-inoculated roots. Phylogenetic analysis of 48 partial PAL cDNAs corresponding to 19 plant species grouped angiosperm PAL sequences into four clusters, suggesting functional differences among the six tomato genes, with PAL2 and PAL6 presumably involved in lignification, and the remaining PAL genes implicated in other biological processes. An increase in the synthesis of lignins was found 16 and 28 days after inoculation in both lines; this increase was greater and faster to develop in the resistant line. In both resistant and susceptible inoculated plants, an increase in the ratio of guaiacyl/syringyl units was detected 16 days after inoculation, resulting from the lowered amount

  9. Mixed-methods development of a new patient-reported outcome instrument for chronic low back pain: part 1-the Patient Assessment for Low Back Pain - Symptoms (PAL-S).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mona L; Blum, Steven I; Liedgens, Hiltrud; Bushnell, Donald M; McCarrier, Kelly P; Hatley, Noël V; Ramasamy, Abhilasha; Freynhagen, Rainer; Wallace, Mark; Argoff, Charles; Eerdekens, Mariёlle; Kok, Maurits; Patrick, Donald L

    2018-06-01

    We describe the mixed-methods (qualitative and quantitative) development and preliminary validation of the Patient Assessment for Low Back Pain-Symptoms (PAL-S), a patient-reported outcome measure for use in chronic low back pain (cLBP) clinical trials. Qualitative methods (concept elicitation and cognitive interviews) were used to identify and refine symptom concepts and quantitative methods (classical test theory and Rasch measurement theory) were used to evaluate item- and scale-level performance of the measure using an iterative approach. Patients with cLBP participated in concept elicitation interviews (N = 43), cognitive interviews (N = 38), and interview-based assessment of paper-to-electronic mode equivalence (N = 8). A web-based sample of patients with self-reported cLBP participated in quantitative studies to evaluate preliminary (N = 598) and revised (n = 401) drafts and a physician-diagnosed cohort of patients with cLBP (N = 45) participated in preliminary validation of the measure. The PAL-S contained 14 items describing symptoms (overall pain, sharp, prickling, sensitive, tender, radiating, shocking, shooting, burning, squeezing, muscle spasms, throbbing, aching, and stiffness). Item-level performance, scale structure, and scoring seemed to be appropriate. One-week test-retest reproducibility was acceptable (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.81 [95% confidence interval, 0.61-0.91]). Convergent validity was demonstrated with total score and MOS-36 Bodily Pain (Pearson correlation -0.79), Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (0.73), Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (0.67), and MOS-36 Physical Functioning (-0.65). Individual item scores and total score discriminated between numeric rating scale tertile groups and painDETECT categories. Respondent interpretation of paper and electronic administration modes was equivalent. The PAL-S has demonstrated content validity and is potentially useful to assess treatment benefit in cLBP clinical trials.

  10. Characterization of promoter of EgPAL1, a novel PAL gene from the oil palm Elaeis guineensis Jacq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Chong Yu Lok; Abdullah, Janna Ong; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Abu Seman, Idris; Abdullah, Mohd Puad

    2018-02-01

    The oil palm EgPAL1 gene promoter and its regulatory region were functional as a promoter in the heterologous system of Arabidopsis according to the cis-acting elements present in that region. The promoter was developmentally regulated, vascular tissue specific and responsive to water stress agents. Phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.24) is the key enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway which plays important roles in plant development and adaptation. To date, there is no report on the study of PAL from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis), an economically important oil crop. In this study, the 5' regulatory sequence of a highly divergent oil palm PAL gene (EgPAL1) was isolated and fused with GUS in Arabidopsis to create two transgenic plants carrying the minimal promoter with (2302 bp) and without its regulatory elements (139 bp). The regulatory sequence contained cis-acting elements known to be important for plant development and stress response including the AC-II element for lignin biosynthesis and several stress responsive elements. The promoter and its regulatory region were fully functional in Arabidopsis. Its activities were characterised by two common fundamental features of PAL which are responsive to plant internal developmental programme and external factors. The promoter was developmentally regulated in certain organs; highly active in young organs but less active or inactive in mature organs. The presence of the AC elements and global activity of the EgPAL1 promoter in all organs resembled the property of lignin-related genes. The existence of the MBS element and enhancement of the promoter activity by PEG reflected the behaviour of drought-responsive genes. Our findings provide a platform for evaluating oil palm gene promoters in the heterologous system of Arabidopsis and give insights into the activities of EgPAL1 promoter in oil palm.

  11. Changing household car ownership level and life cycle events : An action in anticipation or an action on occurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oakil, Abu Toasin Md; Ettema, Dick; Arentze, Theo; Timmermans, Harry

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes households' decision to change their car ownership level in response to actions/decisions regarding mobility issues and other household events. Following recent literature on the importance of critical events for mobility decisions, it focuses on the relationship between specific

  12. Development of new S-band SLED for PAL-XFEL Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Youngdo; Park, Yongjung; Heo, Hoon; Heo, Jinyul; Park, Sung-Soo; Kim, Sang-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Hoon; Kang, Heung-Sik [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Heung-Soo, E-mail: lhs@postech.ac.kr [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Sungju; Oh, Kyoungmin [VitzroTech, Ansan, Gyeonggi 15603 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-21

    In order to achieve beam acceleration to the beam energy of 10 GeV at the end of its 716 m-long linear accelerator (Linac), the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray Free Electron Laser (PAL-XFEL) is going to operate the Stanford Linear Accelerator Energy Doubler (SLED) at the maximum klystron output peak power of 80 MW, with a pulse length of 4 μs, and at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. The original SLED that had been used in Pohang Light Source-II (PLS-II) can no longer sustain such a high-power operation because excessive radiation caused by RF breakdown has been frequently detected even at the lower klystron peak power during the PLS-II operation. Therefore, a new SLED is designed by modifying both the 3-dB power hybrid and the waveguide-cavity coupling structure of the original SLED where the excessive radiation has been mainly detected. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation in the CST Microwave Studio shows that the new SLED has a peak electric field and a surface current lower than those of the original SLED at the same level of the RF input peak power, which would secure stable high-power operation. All of the 42 SLEDs in the PAL-XFEL Linac are newly fabricated and installed. During the RF conditioning of the PAL-XFEL Linac, no significant vacuum and radiation issue was found in the new SLEDs. Finally, the accelerated electron beam energy of 10 GeV obtained at the end of the PAL-XFEL Linac verified that the RF performance of the new SLED is stable.

  13. Development of new S-band SLED for PAL-XFEL Linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Youngdo; Park, Yongjung; Heo, Hoon; Heo, Jinyul; Park, Sung-Soo; Kim, Sang-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Hoon; Kang, Heung-Sik; Lee, Heung-Soo; Noh, Sungju; Oh, Kyoungmin

    2017-01-01

    In order to achieve beam acceleration to the beam energy of 10 GeV at the end of its 716 m-long linear accelerator (Linac), the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray Free Electron Laser (PAL-XFEL) is going to operate the Stanford Linear Accelerator Energy Doubler (SLED) at the maximum klystron output peak power of 80 MW, with a pulse length of 4 μs, and at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. The original SLED that had been used in Pohang Light Source-II (PLS-II) can no longer sustain such a high-power operation because excessive radiation caused by RF breakdown has been frequently detected even at the lower klystron peak power during the PLS-II operation. Therefore, a new SLED is designed by modifying both the 3-dB power hybrid and the waveguide-cavity coupling structure of the original SLED where the excessive radiation has been mainly detected. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation in the CST Microwave Studio shows that the new SLED has a peak electric field and a surface current lower than those of the original SLED at the same level of the RF input peak power, which would secure stable high-power operation. All of the 42 SLEDs in the PAL-XFEL Linac are newly fabricated and installed. During the RF conditioning of the PAL-XFEL Linac, no significant vacuum and radiation issue was found in the new SLEDs. Finally, the accelerated electron beam energy of 10 GeV obtained at the end of the PAL-XFEL Linac verified that the RF performance of the new SLED is stable.

  14. Some perspectives on action levels in areas contaminated with radioactive fallout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walinder, Gunnar

    1986-07-01

    Maximum permissible radiation levels for planned activities must be distinguished from action levels as applied to protect people and animals after nuclear accidents. The essential thing with action levels is the optimal balance between the danger of the radiation and the harm involved in the counter measures themselves. Among other things these counter measures are dependent on the magnitude of the fallout, i.e. on the apprehended doses to man and animals.

  15. Some perspectives on action levels in areas contaminated with radioactive fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walinder, Gunnar

    1986-01-01

    Maximum permissible radiation levels for planned activities must be distinguished from action levels as applied to protect people and animals after nuclear accidents. The essential thing with action levels is the optimal balance between the danger of the radiation and the harm involved in the counter measures themselves. Among other things these counter measures are dependent on the magnitude of the fallout, i.e. on the apprehended doses to man and animals

  16. Proposed actions are no actions: re-modeling an ontology design pattern with a realist top-level ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddig-Raufie, Djamila; Jansen, Ludger; Schober, Daniel; Boeker, Martin; Grewe, Niels; Schulz, Stefan

    2012-09-21

    Ontology Design Patterns (ODPs) are representational artifacts devised to offer solutions for recurring ontology design problems. They promise to enhance the ontology building process in terms of flexibility, re-usability and expansion, and to make the result of ontology engineering more predictable. In this paper, we analyze ODP repositories and investigate their relation with upper-level ontologies. In particular, we compare the BioTop upper ontology to the Action ODP from the NeOn an ODP repository. In view of the differences in the respective approaches, we investigate whether the Action ODP can be embedded into BioTop. We demonstrate that this requires re-interpreting the meaning of classes of the NeOn Action ODP in the light of the precepts of realist ontologies. As a result, the re-design required clarifying the ontological commitment of the ODP classes by assigning them to top-level categories. Thus, ambiguous definitions are avoided. Classes of real entities are clearly distinguished from classes of information artifacts. The proposed approach avoids the commitment to the existence of unclear future entities which underlies the NeOn Action ODP. Our re-design is parsimonious in the sense that existing BioTop content proved to be largely sufficient to define the different types of actions and plans. The proposed model demonstrates that an expressive upper-level ontology provides enough resources and expressivity to represent even complex ODPs, here shown with the different flavors of Action as proposed in the NeOn ODP. The advantage of ODP inclusion into a top-level ontology is the given predetermined dependency of each class, an existing backbone structure and well-defined relations. Our comparison shows that the use of some ODPs is more likely to cause problems for ontology developers, rather than to guide them. Besides the structural properties, the explanation of classification results were particularly hard to grasp for 'self-sufficient' ODPs as

  17. Do the UK workplace Radon Action Levels reflect the radiation dose received by the occupants?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, A.R.; Parkinson, S.; Barker, S.P.; Marley, F.; Phillips, P.S.

    1999-01-01

    In the UK, Action Levels for radon have been established at 400 Bq m -3 for the workplace and 200 Bq m -3 for the home. We have estimated the dose received by occupants of rooms with radon levels near or above the Action Level, using hourly radon readings, and a questionnaire to record occupancy. In the workplace, results for 73 staff suggest that doses are lower than expected, partly due to part-time working and partly due to the mobility of staff. The 75% quantile for the series, corrected to a 37 hour week, is 5.2 mSv at 400 Bq m -3 . Compared to the current annual limit for radiation workers, the Action Level could be increased, but the current Action Level is compatible with the recent EEC Directive requiring a lower dose limit. However, when raised radon levels in the workplace were reduced by remediation in the series we studied, the dose reduction to staff was consistently around half of the radon level reduction. Although it would be appropriate to study more locations, this suggests an Action Level for remediated workplaces of 200 Bq m -3 . Finally, in a limited series of dose assessments in domestic properties, we found that doses could considerably exceed 5 mSv at the 200 Bq m -3 Action Level, primarily because the sample included an example of high occupancy, in our case several Asian wives in purdah, whose occupancy was almost total. (author)

  18. From the Last Interglacial to the Anthropocene: Modelling a Complete Glacial Cycle (PalMod)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brücher, Tim; Latif, Mojib

    2017-04-01

    internal to the Earth system to climate variability at different time scales. Third, in order to achieve a higher level of understanding of natural climate variability at time scales of millennia, its governing processes and implications for the future climate, we bring together three different research communities: the Earth system modeling community, the proxy data community and the computational science community. The consortium consists of 18 partners including all major modelling centers within Germany. The funding comprises approximately 65 PostDoc positions and more than 120 scientists are involved. PalMod is coordinated at the Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR).

  19. Action level for imported food in Japan after the reactor accident at Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Takashi

    1988-01-01

    The nuclear accident at Chernobyl in Apr. 1986 caused a widespread release of radionuclides to environment. As a result of food movement in international trade, it was necessary to decide action level of radionuclides for food imported in Japan. The action level was derived from the following basic principle: Dose equivalent should be less than one third of 0.5 rem/year for whole body exposure. Assuming that the composition of representative radionuclides ( 90 Sr, 134 Cs and 137 Cs) in imported food are equal to those of fallout in Japan and consumption of internal food products reduces total intake of radionuclides to 35 %, action level indicated by sum of 134 Cs and 137 Cs concentrations was estimated to be 370 Bq/kg. From Nov. 1986 to Sep. 1987, it was observed that twenty samples in imported food contained radioactivity exceeding the action level. (author)

  20. Monoclonal antibody PAL-E specific for endothelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlingemann, R. O.; Dingjan, G. M.; Emeis, J. J.; Blok, J.; Warnaar, S. O.; Ruiter, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, PAL-E, is described that is specific for endothelial cells. The monoclonal antibody, an IgG2a, markedly stains endothelium of capillaries, medium-sized and small veins, and venules in frozen sections of human and some animal tissues tested. It reacts not at all or only weakly

  1. Content Analysis Schedule for Bilingual Education Programs: Proyecto PAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Castor

    This content analysis schedule for "Proyecto PAL" in San Jose, California, presents information on the history, funding, and scope of the project. Included are sociolinguistic process variables such as the native and dominant languages of students and their interaction. Information is provided on staff selection and the linguistic…

  2. A phenylalanine ammonia-lyase ortholog (PkPAL1) from Picrorhiza kurrooa Royle ex. Benth: molecular cloning, promoter analysis and response to biotic and abiotic elicitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Wajid Waheed; Razdan, Sumeer; Rana, Satiander; Dhar, Niha; Wani, Tariq Ahmad; Qazi, Parvaiz; Vishwakarma, Ram; Lattoo, Surrinder K

    2014-09-01

    Picrorhiza kurrooa Royle ex Benth. is a highly reputed medicinal herb utilised in the preparation of a number of herbal drug formulations, principally due to the presence of novel monoterpene iridoid glycosides kenned as picrosides. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase catalyses an important rate-limiting step in phenylpropanoid pathway and supplies precursors like cinnamic acid, vanillic acid, ferulic acid, etc., to a variety of secondary metabolites including picrosides. The imperilled status of P. kurrooa coupled with lack of information regarding biogenesis of picrosides necessitates deciphering the biosynthetic pathway for picrosides. In the present study, a PAL gene, designated PkPAL1 was isolated from P. kurrooa. The cDNA is 2312 bp in length, consisting of an ORF of 2142 bp encoding for a 713 amino acid protein having a predicted molecular weight of 77.66 kDa and an isoelectric point of pH 6.82. qRT-PCR analysis of various tissues of P. kurrooa showed that PkPAL1 transcript levels were highest in the leaves, consistent with picroside accumulation pattern. Using Genome walking, a 718 bp promoter region was also isolated resulting in identification of distinct cis-regulatory elements including TGA-element, TGACG-motif, CGTCA-motif, etc. qRT-PCR indicated up-regulation of PkPAL1 by methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid, 2,4-dicholorophenoxy acetic acid and UV-B elicitations that corroborated positively with the identified cis-elements within the promoter region. Moreover, altitude was found to have a positive effect on the PkPAL1 transcript levels, driving the expression of PkPAL1 abundantly. Based on docking analysis, we identified eight residues as potentially essential for substrate binding in PkPAL1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 266: Area 25 Building 3124 Leachfield, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NNSA/NV

    2000-02-17

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) was prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 266, Area 25 Building 3124 Leachfield, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, CAU 266 includes Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-05-09. The Corrective Action Decision Document and Closure Report were combined into one report because sample data collected during the corrective action investigation (CAI) indicated that contaminants of concern (COCs) were either not present in the soil, or present at concentrations not requiring corrective action. This CADD/CR identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's recommendation that no corrective action was necessary for CAU 266. From February through May 1999, CAI activities were performed as set forth in the related Corrective Action Investigation Plan. Analytes detected during the three-stage CAI of CAU 266 were evaluated against preliminary action levels (PALs) to determine COCs, and the analysis of the data generated from soil collection activities indicated the PALs were not exceeded for total volatile/semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, gamma-emitting radionuclides, isotopic uranium/plutonium, and strontium-90 for any of the samples. However, COCs were identified in samples from within the septic tank and distribution box; and the isotopic americium concentrations in the two soil samples did exceed PALs. Closure activities were performed at the site to address the COCs identified in the septic tank and distribution box. Further, no use restrictions were required to be placed on CAU 266 because the CAI revealed soil contamination to be less than the 100 millirems per year limit established by DOE Order 5400.5.

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 266: Area 25 Building 3124 Leachfield, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) was prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 266, Area 25 Building 3124 Leachfield, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, CAU 266 includes Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-05-09. The Corrective Action Decision Document and Closure Report were combined into one report because sample data collected during the corrective action investigation (CAI) indicated that contaminants of concern (COCs) were either not present in the soil, or present at concentrations not requiring corrective action. This CADD/CR identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's recommendation that no corrective action was necessary for CAU 266. From February through May 1999, CAI activities were performed as set forth in the related Corrective Action Investigation Plan. Analytes detected during the three-stage CAI of CAU 266 were evaluated against preliminary action levels (PALs) to determine COCs, and the analysis of the data generated from soil collection activities indicated the PALs were not exceeded for total volatile/semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, gamma-emitting radionuclides, isotopic uranium/plutonium, and strontium-90 for any of the samples. However, COCs were identified in samples from within the septic tank and distribution box; and the isotopic americium concentrations in the two soil samples did exceed PALs. Closure activities were performed at the site to address the COCs identified in the septic tank and distribution box. Further, no use restrictions were required to be placed on CAU 266 because the CAI revealed soil contamination to be less than the 100 millirems per year limit established by DOE Order 5400.5

  5. Representation and Integration: Combining Robot Control, High-Level Planning, and Action Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrick, Ronald; Kraft, Dirk; Mourao, Kira

    We describe an approach to integrated robot control, high-level planning, and action effect learning that attempts to overcome the representational difficulties that exist between these diverse areas. Our approach combines ideas from robot vision, knowledgelevel planning, and connectionist machine......-level action specifications, suitable for planning, from a robot’s interactions with the world. We present a detailed overview of our approach and show how it supports the learning of certain aspects of a high-level lepresentation from low-level world state information....... learning, and focuses on the representational needs of these components.We also make use of a simple representational unit called an instantiated state transition fragment (ISTF) and a related structure called an object-action complex (OAC). The goal of this work is a general approach for inducing high...

  6. 21 CFR 109.4 - Establishment of tolerances, regulatory limits, and action levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... a food additive, may be established to define a level of contamination at which a food may be... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Establishment of tolerances, regulatory limits, and action levels. 109.4 Section 109.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  7. 21 CFR 509.4 - Establishment of tolerances, regulatory limits, and action levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... a food additive, may be established to define a level of contamination at which a food may be... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Establishment of tolerances, regulatory limits, and action levels. 509.4 Section 509.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  8. Study of micro-phase separation of two polystyrene-based copolymer mixture using the combination of PALS and FT-IR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Z.Y.; Jiang, X.Q.; Yang, Y.X.; Huang, Y.J.; Huang, H.B.; Hsia, Y.F.

    2005-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) have been applied to study the micro-phase separation in the blends of poly(styrene-co-methylmethacrylate) (SMMA) copolymer and poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) (SMA) copolymer. The DSC results indicate that the SMA/SMMA blends are miscible and weak intermolecular interactions exist between SMA and SMMA. The strength of intermolecular interactions to some degree exhibits somewhat non-monotonic variation with increasing of SMA component in the blends. The results of PAL measurement present the blend containing 20 wt% SMA is phase-separated in molecular level, which is interpreted by the results of FT-IR analysis. It was concluded that it is helpful to study the miscibility of polymer blends in molecular level by means of PAL method, accompanied with the requisite measurement of DSC and FT-IR

  9. Construction and Commissioning of PAL-XFEL Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Soo Ko

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The construction of Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray Free-Electron Laser (PAL-XFEL, a 0.1-nm hard X-ray free-electron laser (FEL facility based on a 10-GeV S-band linear accelerator (LINAC, is achieved in Pohang, Korea by the end of 2016. The construction of the 1.11 km-long building was completed by the end of 2014, and the installation of the 10-GeV LINAC and undulators started in January 2015. The installation of the 10-GeV LINAC, together with the undulators and beamlines, was completed by the end of 2015. The commissioning began in April 2016, and the first lasing of the hard X-ray FEL line was achieved on 14 June 2016. The progress of the PAL-XFEL construction and its commission are reported here.

  10. Steps for arm and trunk actions of overhead forehand stroke used in badminton games across skill levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianyu; Liu, Wenhao; Moffit, Jeffrey

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine arm and trunk actions in overhead forehand strokes used in badminton games across skill levels. The participants were 80 students (40 boys, 40 girls) who were randomly selected from video recordings of 300 students ages 16 to 19 years. The videotaped performances of overhead forehand strokes were coded based on three steps of arm action (elbow flexion, elbow and humeral flexion, and upward backswing) and three steps of trunk action (no trunk action, forward-backward movement, and trunk rotation). Students across the four skill levels exhibited different patterns of arm and trunk actions. Students at advanced levels used more mature arm and trunk actions.

  11. The dependence level analysis between the human actions in NPP Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farcasiu, M.; Nitoi, M.; Apostol, M.; Florescu, G.; Prisecaru, Ilie

    2009-01-01

    The Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) is an important method in Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) studies and offers desirability for concrete improvement of the man - machine - organization interfaces, reliability and safety. An important step in HRA is the dependence level analysis between the human actions performed by the same person or between the actions performed by different persons, step in quantitative analysis of the human errors probabilities. The purpose of this paper is to develop a model to analyze the dependence level between human actions for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) operation. The model estimates the conditional human error probabilities (CHEP) and joint human error probabilities (JHEP). The achieved sensitivity analyses determine human performance sensibility to systematic variations for dependence level between human actions. The human error probabilities estimated in this paper are adequate values for integration both in HRA and in PSA realized for NPP. This type of analysis helps in finding and analyzing the ways of reducing the likelihood of human errors, so that the impact of human factor to systems availability, reliability and safety can be realistically estimated. In order to demonstrate the usability of this model an analysis is performed upon the dependences between the necessary human actions in mitigating the consequences of LOCA events, particularly for the case of Cernavoda NPP. (authors)

  12. For your eyes only: Effect of confederate's eye level on reach-to-grasp action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois eQuesque

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the spatio-temporal parameters of reach-to-grasp movement are influenced by the social context in which the motor action is performed. In particular, when interacting with a confederate, movements are slower, with longer initiation times and more ample trajectories, which has been interpreted as implicit communicative information emerging through voluntary movement to catch the partner’s attention and optimize cooperation (Quesque et al., 2013. Because gaze is a crucial component of social interactions, the present study evaluated the role of a confederate's eye level on the social modulation of trajectory curvature. An actor and a partner facing each other took part in a cooperative task consisting, for one of them, of grasping and moving a wooden dowel under time constraints. Before this Main action, the actor performed a Preparatory action, which consisted of placing the wooden dowel on a central marking. The partner's eye level was unnoticeably varied using an adjustable seat that matched or was higher than the actor’s seat. Our data confirmed the previous effects of social intention on motor responses. Furthermore, we observed an effect of the partner's eye level on the Preparatory action, leading the actors to exaggerate unconsciously the trajectory curvature in relation to their partner's eye level. No interaction was found between the actor's social intention and their partner's eye level. These results suggest that other bodies are implicitly taken into account when a reach-to-grasp movement is produced in a social context.

  13. Evaluation of pal activity, phenolic and flavonoid contents in three pistachio ( Pistacia vera L. ) cultivars grafted onto three different rootstocks

    OpenAIRE

    Nadernejad, N.; Ahmadimoghadam, A.; Hossyinifard, J.; Poorseyedi, S.

    2013-01-01

    Phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) is a biochemical marker of the environmental stress and plays a pivotal role in phenolic synthesis. The lower ROS level and oxidative damage was observed in grafted plants and the rootstocks have a profound influence on the biochemical composition, especially phenolic compounds. Regarding the importance of the effect rootstocks have on scion in pistachio trees, this study was carried out to assess and compare three pistachio cultivars ("Ahmadaghaii", "Ohadi" ...

  14. Use of screening action levels in risk management at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, J.R.; Hueske, K.L.; Dorries, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The screening assessment approach used at Los Alamos National Laboratory has proved to be a valuable risk management tool in making decisions that are cost-effective, efficient, and defensible. Los Alamos has successfully used screening action levels to prioritize RFI activities, streamline data evaluation, and insure analytical methods are adequately sensitive to be protective of human health

  15. An action research proposal to enhance the ideation practices among shopfloor level employees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paalanen, Anne; Bergenholtz, Carsten

    proposes an inter-unit solution to activate the shopfloor level employees to give innovation ideas and to share the ideas between different units. The methodology used in this paper is action research. The results suggest that the bottom-up approach to create new active roles to harvest innovation ideas...

  16. Higher-level processes in the formation and application of associations during action understanding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heil, L.; Pelt, S. van; Kwisthout, J.H.P.; Rooij, I.J.E.I. van; Bekkering, H.

    2014-01-01

    The associative account described in the target article provides a viable explanation for the origin of mirror neurons. We argue here that if mirror neurons develop purely by associative learning, then they cannot by themselves explain intentional action understanding. Higher-level processes seem to

  17. Development and verification for review plan of emergency action level (EAL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    Emergency action levels (EALs) are used as the trigger in order to implement the precautionary protective actions at the nuclear emergency. In this study the framework for applying the EAL in Japan and the process for developing the review plan, such as procedures to review the basis of EAL submitted by the licensee, have been investigated based on the survey for EAL review executed in the United States. In addition, issues to reflect the EAL framework in enhancement of the local government emergency planning and emergency response support system have been investigated. (author)

  18. Some problems in the action level and dose assesment of radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Ziqiang

    2007-01-01

    In the recent past, remarkable progresses has been made in radon epidemiological investigation for human populations, with the radon-induced excess relative risk being 0.16%/100 Bq m -3 . It should be noted, for implementing radon action standards, that the action levels are differently implicated for population dwellings and workplaces. The dose limits and the derived air concentration are provided for the individuals, both of which can not be used as the main basis for con- trolling workplaces (sources). The controlling of radon concentrations should be based primarily on radiation protection optimization and constraints. (authors)

  19. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) application in metal barrier layer integrity for porous low- k materials

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Lin; Gidley, D W; Wetzel, J T; Monnig, K A; Ryan, E T; Simon, Jang; Douglas, Yu; Liang, M S; En, W G; Jones, E C; Sturm, J C; Chan, M J; Tiwari, S C; Hirose, M

    2002-01-01

    Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) is a useful tool to pre-screen metal barrier integrity for Si-based porous low-k dielectrics. Pore size of low-k, thickness of metal barrier Ta, positronium (Ps) leakage from PALS, trench sidewall morphology, electrical test from one level metal (1LM) pattern wafer and Cu diffusion analysis were all correlated. Macro-porous low-k (pore size >=200 AA) and large scale meso-porous low-k (>50~200 AA) encounter both Ps leakage and Cu diffusion into low-k dielectric in the 0.25 mu mL/0.3 mu mS structures when using SEMATECH in-house PVD Ta 250 AA as barrier layer. For small scale meso-porous (>20~50 AA) and micro- porous (<=20 AA) low-k, no Ps leakage and no Cu diffusion into low-k were observed even with PVD Ta 50 AA, which is proved also owing to sidewall densification to seal all sidewall pores due to plasma etch and ash. For future technology, smaller pore size of porous Si-based low-k (=<50 AA) will be preferential for dense low-k like trench sidewall to...

  20. PENGARUH PENERAPAN STRATEGI PEER ASSISTED LEARNING (PAL TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN LITERASI SAINS MAHASISWA DALAM PERKULIAHAN MORFOLOGI TUMBUHAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sariwulan Diana

    2016-11-01

    Telah dilakukan penelitian tentang pengaruh penerapan strategi Peer Assisted Learning (PAL dalam perkuliahan Morfologi Tumbuhan, yang bertujuan untuk meningkatkan kemampuan literasi sains mahasiswa. Penelitian ini menggunakan metode eksperimen, dengan rancangan quasi eksperimental jenis pretest postest control group design. Rancangan tersebut mencakup satu kelompok mahasiswa yang diberi pretes (tes yang dilakukan sebelum perlakuan PAL yang kemudian dilanjutkan dengan mengobservasi proses perlakuan PAL dan diakhiri postes. Satu kelompok mahasiswa lainnya (kontrol hanya diberi pretes dan diakhiri postes. Instrumen penelitian meliputi angket untuk menjaring tutor, seperangkat soal pretes, soal responsi, soal postes dan angket tentang respon mahasiswa terhadap program PAL yang dilakukan. Penerapan strategi PAL berpengaruh signifikan terhadap peningkatan kemampuan literasi sains mahasiswa dalam  perkuliahan Morfologi Tumbuhan (thitung > ttabel. Peningkatan literasi sains mahasiswa pada kelas eksperimen termasuk kategori sedang (N-gain 0,4 dan rendah (N-gain 0,1 pada kelas kontrol. Semua mahasiswa merespon positif terhadap startegi PAL yang dilakukan.

  1. PAL: an object-oriented programming library for molecular evolution and phylogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, A; Strimmer, K

    2001-07-01

    Phylogenetic Analysis Library (PAL) is a collection of Java classes for use in molecular evolution and phylogenetics. PAL provides a modular environment for the rapid construction of both special-purpose and general analysis programs. PAL version 1.1 consists of 145 public classes or interfaces in 13 packages, including classes for models of character evolution, maximum-likelihood estimation, and the coalescent, with a total of more than 27000 lines of code. The PAL project is set up as a collaborative project to facilitate contributions from other researchers. AVAILIABILTY: The program is free and is available at http://www.pal-project.org. It requires Java 1.1 or later. PAL is licensed under the GNU General Public License.

  2. Weighted score-level feature fusion based on Dempster-Shafer evidence theory for action recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoliang; Jia, Songmin; Li, Xiuzhi; Zhang, Xiangyin

    2018-01-01

    The majority of human action recognition methods use multifeature fusion strategy to improve the classification performance, where the contribution of different features for specific action has not been paid enough attention. We present an extendible and universal weighted score-level feature fusion method using the Dempster-Shafer (DS) evidence theory based on the pipeline of bag-of-visual-words. First, the partially distinctive samples in the training set are selected to construct the validation set. Then, local spatiotemporal features and pose features are extracted from these samples to obtain evidence information. The DS evidence theory and the proposed rule of survival of the fittest are employed to achieve evidence combination and calculate optimal weight vectors of every feature type belonging to each action class. Finally, the recognition results are deduced via the weighted summation strategy. The performance of the established recognition framework is evaluated on Penn Action dataset and a subset of the joint-annotated human metabolome database (sub-JHMDB). The experiment results demonstrate that the proposed feature fusion method can adequately exploit the complementarity among multiple features and improve upon most of the state-of-the-art algorithms on Penn Action and sub-JHMDB datasets.

  3. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 240: Area 25 Vehicle Washdown, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office

    1999-01-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Offices's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 240: Area 25 Vehicle Washdown, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This corrective action investigation was conducted in accordance with the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for CAU 240 as developed under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, CAU 240 is comprised of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 25-07-01, Vehicle Washdown Area (Propellant Pad); 25-07-02, Vehicle Washdown Area (F and J Roads Pad); and 25-07-03, Vehicle Washdown Station (RADSAFE Pad). In March 1999, the corrective action investigation was performed to detect and evaluate analyte concentrations against preliminary action levels (PALs) to determine contaminants of concern (COCs). There were no COCs identified at CAS 25-07-01 or CAS 25-07-03; therefore, there was no need for corrective action at these two CASs. At CAS 25-07-02, diesel-range organics and radionuclide concentrations in soil samples from F and J Roads Pad exceeded PALs. Based on this result, potential CAAs were identified and evaluated to ensure worker, public, and environmental protection against potential exposure to COCs in accordance with Nevada Administrative Code 445A. Following a review of potential exposure pathways, existing data, and future and current operations in Area 25, two CAAs were identified for CAU 240 (CAS 25-07-02): Alternative 1 - No Further Action and Alternative 2 - Clean Closure by Excavation and Disposal. Alternative 2 was identified as the preferred alternative. This alternative was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated, compliance with all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site, as well as minimizing potential future exposure

  4. Team Action Imagery and Team Cognition: Imagery of Game Situations and Required Team Actions Promotes a Functional Structure in Players' Representations of Team-Level Tactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Cornelia; Linstromberg, Gian-Luca; Hennig, Linda; Heinen, Thomas; Schack, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    A team's cognitions of interpersonally coordinated actions are a crucial component for successful team performance. Here, we present an approach to practice team action by way of imagery and examine its impact on team cognitions in long-term memory. We investigated the impact of a 4-week team action imagery intervention on futsal players' mental representations of team-level tactics. Skilled futsal players were assigned to either an imagery training group or a no imagery training control group. Participants in the imagery training group practiced four team-level tactics by imagining team actions in specific game situations for three times a week. Results revealed that the imagery training group's representations were more similar to that of an expert representation after the intervention compared with the control group. This study indicates that team action imagery training can have a significant impact on players' tactical skill representations and thus order formation in long-term memory.

  5. Investigations of mechanism of laser radiation absorption at PALS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalinowska, Z.; Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Gus’kov, S.Yu.; Demchenko, N. N.; Ullschmied, Jiří; Krouský, Eduard; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skála, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 2 (2012), s. 227-230 ISSN 0029-5922. [International Conference on Research and Applications of Plasmas (PLASMA)2011. Warsaw, 12.09.2011-16.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : collisional absorption * crater volume * electron density distribution * interferometry * iodine laser * resonance absorption * Laser radiation * inverse bremsstrahlung * laser interferometry * PALS laser Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.507, year: 2012 http://www.nukleonika.pl/www/back/full/vol57_2012/v57n2p227f.pdf

  6. 'Greening' Gweru urban tourist lodges: low levels of ecoliteracy, green awareness and actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DK Nyahunzvi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the findings of an exploratory study on the level of environmental awareness and engagement among Gweru urban lodges. The study's data collection instruments were a survey questionnaire, personal observations, follow-up interviews and document analysis. The key finding of the study was that there were low levels of ecoliteracy and environmental awareness and consequently, limited 'green actions' undertaken by lodge managers. It was also found that not a single tourist lodge had a formal written environmental policy whilst the lodge managers expressed a need for the provision of information and education around green tourism. A conclusion is reached that this study's findings are consistent with studies elsewhere that bemoan the limited nature of green actions undertaken by tourism Small, Medium and Micro Enterprises (SMMEs. The study ends with recommendations and an indication of future research priorities.

  7. Proton therapy for prostate cancer treatment employing online image guidance and an action level threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Carlos; Falchook, Aaron; Indelicato, Daniel; Yeung, Anamaria; Henderson, Randall; Olivier, Kenneth; Keole, Sameer; Williams, Christopher; Li, Zuofeng; Palta, Jatinder

    2009-04-01

    The ability to determine the accuracy of the final prostate position within a determined action level threshold for image-guided proton therapy is unclear. Three thousand one hundred ten images for 20 consecutive patients treated in 1 of our 3 proton prostate protocols from February to May of 2007 were analyzed. Daily kV images and patient repositioning were performed employing an action-level threshold (ALT) of > or = 2.5 mm for each beam. Isocentric orthogonal x-rays were obtained, and prostate position was defined via 3 gold markers for each patient in the 3 axes. To achieve and confirm our action level threshold, an average of 2 x-rays sets (median 2; range, 0-4) was taken daily for each patient. Based on our ALT, we made no corrections in 8.7% (range, 0%-54%), 1 correction in 82% (41%-98%), and 2 to 3 corrections in 9% (0-27%). No patient needed 4 or more corrections. All patients were treated with a confirmed error of < 2.5 mm for every beam delivered. After all corrections, the mean and standard deviations were: anterior-posterior (z): 0.003 +/- 0.094 cm; superior-inferior (y): 0.028 +/- 0.073 cm; and right-left (x) -0.013 +/- 0.08 cm. It is feasible to limit all final prostate positions to less than 2.5 mm employing an action level image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) process. The residual errors after corrections were very small.

  8. Use of ecotoxicological screening action levels in ecological risk assessment at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferenbauah, R.; Ebinger, M.; Gallegos, A.; Hansen, W.; Myers, O.; Wenzel, W.

    1995-01-01

    Regulatory drivers found in several environmental statutes require that ecological risk assessment and Natural Resource Damage Assessment be performed to assess potential environmental impact from contaminated sites and from proposed remedial alternatives. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, the initial phase of the ecological risk assessment process required preliminary evaluation of contaminated sites to determine whether potential for ecological impact exists. The preliminary evaluations were made using Ecotoxicological Screening Action Levels (ESALS) calculated as a function of reference toxicity dose, body weight, food/water/air intake, and fraction of soil intake with food. Reference toxicity doses were derived from the Environmental Protection Agency Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) and Health Effects Assessment Summary Tables (HEAST) toxicology databases. Other parameters required for ESAL calculations were derived from physiological, metabolic, and behavioral data available in the literature. The Los Alamos ESALs were derived for guilds of animals with similar behavioral patterns, which were identified from natural resource survey data collected at Los Alamos. Subsequent to development of Ecotoxicological Screening Action Levels, Hazard Quotients, which are ratios of soil concentrations to Ecotoxicological Screening Action Levels, were calculated for potential contaminants of concern. The Hazard Quotients were used to identify which potential contaminants of concern should be evaluated further for ecological impact. There is potential for ecological impact when the Hazard Quotient is equal to or greater than one

  9. Essential levels of health information in Europe: an action plan for a coherent and sustainable infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carinci, Fabrizio

    2015-04-01

    The European Union needs a common health information infrastructure to support policy and governance on a routine basis. A stream of initiatives conducted in Europe during the last decade resulted into several success stories, but did not specify a unified framework that could be broadly implemented on a continental level. The recent debate raised a potential controversy on the different roles and responsibilities of policy makers vs the public health community in the construction of such a pan-European health information system. While institutional bodies shall clarify the statutory conditions under which such an endeavour is to be carried out, researchers should define a common framework for optimal cross-border information exchange. This paper conceptualizes a general solution emerging from past experiences, introducing a governance structure and overarching framework that can be realized through four main action lines, underpinned by the key principle of "Essential Levels of Health Information" for Europe. The proposed information model is amenable to be applied in a consistent manner at both national and EU level. If realized, the four action lines outlined here will allow developing a EU health information infrastructure that would effectively integrate best practices emerging from EU public health initiatives, including projects and joint actions carried out during the last ten years. The proposed approach adds new content to the ongoing debate on the future activity of the European Commission in the area of health information. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Risk newsboy: approach for addressing uncertainty in developing action levels and cleanup limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, Roger; MacDonell, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Site cleanup decisions involve developing action levels and residual limits for key contaminants, to assure health protection during the cleanup period and into the long term. Uncertainty is inherent in the toxicity information used to define these levels, based on incomplete scientific knowledge regarding dose-response relationships across various hazards and exposures at environmentally relevant levels. This problem can be addressed by applying principles used to manage uncertainty in operations research, as illustrated by the newsboy dilemma. Each day a newsboy must balance the risk of buying more papers than he can sell against the risk of not buying enough. Setting action levels and cleanup limits involves a similar concept of balancing and distributing risks and benefits in the face of uncertainty. The newsboy approach can be applied to develop health-based target concentrations for both radiological and chemical contaminants, with stakeholder input being crucial to assessing 'regret' levels. Associated tools include structured expert judgment elicitation to quantify uncertainty in the dose-response relationship, and mathematical techniques such as probabilistic inversion and iterative proportional fitting. (authors)

  11. Status of PPI (Pohang Photo-Injector) for PAL XFEL

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Sung-Ju; Oh, Jong-Seok; Park, Chong-Do; Park Jang Ho; Soo Ko In; Wang, Xijie; Woon Parc, Yong

    2005-01-01

    A X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) project based on the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) is under progress at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL). One of the critical R&D for the PAL XFEL* is to develop the Pohang Photo-Injector (PPI) which is required to deliver electron beams with normalized emittance < 1.5 mm-mrad. In order to achieve the required beam quality with high stability and reliability, we will use photocathode with quantum efficiency > 0.1 % and long lifetime. This will greatly lessen the laser energy requirement for producing flat-top UV pulses, and open the possibility of using only regenerative amplifiers (RGAs) to drive the photocathode RF gun. The RGAs can produce mJs output with much better stability than multi-pass amplifiers. Both the Cs2Te and Mg are under consideration for the possible photo-cathode. To demonstrate the suitability of the Mg and Cs2Te for the future 4th generation light source application, an improved BNL-type S-band RF gun with a high-pe...

  12. Developmental role of phenylalanine-ammonia-lyase (PAL) and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) genes during adventitious rooting of Juglans regia L. microshoots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheniany, Monireh; Ganjeali, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Phenylalanine-ammonia-lyase and cinnamate-4-hydroxylase play important role in the phenylpropanoid pathway, which produces many biologically important secondary metabolites participating in normal plant development. Flavonol quercetin is the main representant of these compounds that has been identified in numerous Juglans spp. In this survey, the developmental expression patterns of PAL and C4H genes during in vitro rooting of two walnut cultivars 'Sunland' and 'Howard' was examined by RT-PCR. To understand the potential role in rooting, the changing pattern of endogenous content of quercetin was also analyzed by HPLC. The 'Sunland' with better capacity to root had more quercetin content during the "inductive phase" of rooting than 'Howard'. In each cultivar, the level of PAL transcripts showed the same behavior with the changing patterns of quercetin during root formation of microshoots. The positive correlation between the changes of quercetin and PAL-mRNA indicated that PAL gene may have an immediate effect on flavonoid pathway metabolites including quercetin. Although the behavioral change of C4H expression was similar in both cultivars during root formation (with significantly more level for 'Howard'), it was not coincide with the changes of quercerin concentrations. Our results showed that C4H function is important for the normal development, but its transcriptional regulation does not correlate with quercetin as an efficient phenolic compound for walnut rhizogenesis.

  13. Application of Emergency Action Levels from Potential Release at Research Reactor HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jongsoo; Lee, Goan Yub; Lee, Hae Choi; Kim, Bong Suk

    2014-01-01

    Execution of the protective action promptly is possible that Emergency Action Levels (EALs) must be established for a radiological release from nuclear facility. The EALs for electric power reactor are already developed and applied to recognize an emergency situation rapidly. Recently the IAEA published the safety report including the EALs for research reactor. This paper describes the EALs to apply for a potential release pathway at the research reactor HANARO. The results of table 1 and 2 will be higher than actual because the weather condition in real situation is difference. However, the EALs applying the potential stack release, ground release and site can be useful for research reactor HANARO making the emergency declaration. The EALs at the site boundary of the table 3 can be applied to protect the off-site public

  14. Ecosystem Pen Pals: Using Place-Based Marine Science and Culture to Connect Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Carlie S.; Matsumoto, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The marine environment provides a unique context for students to explore both natural and cultural connections. This paper reports preliminary findings on Ecosystem Pen Pals, an ocean literacy program for 4th and 5th graders focused on using a pen pal model for integrating traditional ecological knowledge into marine science. Surveys with…

  15. Endothelial cell marker PAL-E reactivity in brain tumor, developing brain, and brain disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenstra, S.; Troost, D.; Das, P. K.; Claessen, N.; Becker, A. E.; Bosch, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The endothelial cell marker PAL-E is not reactive to vessels in the normal brain. The present study concerns the PAL-E reactivity in brain tumors in contrast to normal brain and nonneoplastic brain disease. A total of 122 specimens were examined: brain tumors (n = 94), nonneoplastic brain disease (n

  16. The federated ontology of the pal project interfacing ontologies and integrating time-dependent data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krieger, H.U.; Peters, R.; Kiefer, B.; Van Bekkum, M.A.; Kaptein, F.; Neerincx, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes ongoing work carried out in the European project PAL which will support childre in their diabetes self-management as well as assist health professionals and parents involved in the diabete regimen of the child. Here, we will focus on the construction of the PAL ontology which

  17. Considering Actionability at the Participant's Research Setting Level for Anticipatable Incidental Findings from Clinical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Osorno, Alberto Betto; Ehler, Linda A; Brooks, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Determining what constitutes an anticipatable incidental finding (IF) from clinical research and defining whether, and when, this IF should be returned to the participant have been topics of discussion in the field of human subject protections for the last 10 years. It has been debated that implementing a comprehensive IF-approach that addresses both the responsibility of researchers to return IFs and the expectation of participants to receive them can be logistically challenging. IFs have been debated at different levels, such as the ethical reasoning for considering their disclosure or the need for planning for them during the development of the research study. Some authors have discussed the methods for re-contacting participants for disclosing IFs, as well as the relevance of considering the clinical importance of the IFs. Similarly, other authors have debated about when IFs should be disclosed to participants. However, no author has addressed how the "actionability" of the IFs should be considered, evaluated, or characterized at the participant's research setting level. This paper defines the concept of "Actionability at the Participant's Research Setting Level" (APRSL) for anticipatable IFs from clinical research, discusses some related ethical concepts to justify the APRSL concept, proposes a strategy to incorporate APRSL into the planning and management of IFs, and suggests a strategy for integrating APRSL at each local research setting. © 2015 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  18. Committed sea-level rise under the Paris Agreement and the legacy of delayed mitigation action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengel, Matthias; Nauels, Alexander; Rogelj, Joeri; Schleussner, Carl-Friedrich

    2018-02-20

    Sea-level rise is a major consequence of climate change that will continue long after emissions of greenhouse gases have stopped. The 2015 Paris Agreement aims at reducing climate-related risks by reducing greenhouse gas emissions to net zero and limiting global-mean temperature increase. Here we quantify the effect of these constraints on global sea-level rise until 2300, including Antarctic ice-sheet instabilities. We estimate median sea-level rise between 0.7 and 1.2 m, if net-zero greenhouse gas emissions are sustained until 2300, varying with the pathway of emissions during this century. Temperature stabilization below 2 °C is insufficient to hold median sea-level rise until 2300 below 1.5 m. We find that each 5-year delay in near-term peaking of CO 2 emissions increases median year 2300 sea-level rise estimates by ca. 0.2 m, and extreme sea-level rise estimates at the 95th percentile by up to 1 m. Our results underline the importance of near-term mitigation action for limiting long-term sea-level rise risks.

  19. Vital analysis: annotating sensed physiological signals with the stress levels of first responders in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, P; Kaiseler, M; Queirós, C; Oliveira, M; Lopes, B; Coimbra, M

    2012-01-01

    First responders such as firefighters are exposed to extreme stress and fatigue situations during their work routines. It is thus desirable to monitor their health using wearable sensing but this is a complex and still unsolved research challenge that requires large amounts of properly annotated physiological signals data. In this paper we show that the information gathered by our Vital Analysis Framework can support the annotation of these vital signals with the stress levels perceived by the target user, confirmed by the analysis of more than 4600 hours of data collected from real firefighters in action, including 717 answers to event questionnaires from a total of 454 different events.

  20. Increasing advance personal planning: the need for action at the community level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Amy; Sanson-Fisher, Rob; Ries, Nola; Bryant, Jamie

    2018-05-09

    Advance personal planning is the process by which people consider, document and communicate their preferences for personal, financial and health matters in case they lose the ability to make decisions or express their wishes in the future. Advance personal planning is most often undertaken by individuals who are seriously ill, often in the context of a medical crisis and/or at the time of admission to hospital. However, the clinical utility and legal validity of the planning process may be compromised in these circumstances. Patients may lack sufficient capacity to meaningfully engage in advance personal planning; there may be insufficient time to adequately reflect on and discuss wishes with key others; and there may also be limited opportunity for inter-professional input and collaboration in the process. Here, we propose an agenda for research to advance the science of advance personal planning by promoting a 'whole community' approach. Adoption of advance personal planning at a community level may be achieved using a variety of strategies including public media campaigns, intervening with professionals across a range of health care and legal settings, and mobilising support from influential groups and local government. One potentially promising method for encouraging earlier adoption of advance personal planning among a broader population involves a community action approach, whereby multiple evidence-based strategies are integrated across multiple access points. Community action involves calling on community members, professionals, community and/or government organisations to work collaboratively to design and systematically implement intervention strategies with the aim of bringing about desired behaviour change. An example of a community action trial to improving uptake and quality of advance personal planning is described. While promising, there is a need for rigorous evidence to demonstrate whether a community action approach is effective in

  1. Actionable Science for Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding to Help Avoid Maladaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, M. K.

    2017-12-01

    Rising sea levels increase the frequency of flooding at all levels, from nuisance to extreme, along coastlines across the world. Although recent flooding has increased the saliency of sea level rise (SLR) and the risks it presents to governments and communities, the effect of SLR on coastal hazards is complex and filled with uncertainty that is often uncomfortable for decision-makers. Although it is certain that SLR is occurring and will continue, its rate remains ambiguous. Because extreme flooding is by definition rare, there is also uncertainty in the effect of natural variability on flood frequency. These uncertainties pose methodological obstacles for integrating SLR into flood hazard projections and risk management. A major challenge is how to distill this complexity into information geared towards public sectors to help inform adaptation decision-making. Because policy windows are limited, budgets are tight, and decisions may have long-term consequences, it is especially important that this information accounts for uncertainty to help avoid damage and maladaptation. The U.S. Global Research Program, and others, describe this type of science—data and tools that help decision-makers plan for climate change impacts—as actionable [1]. We produce actionable science to support decision-making for adaptation to coastal impacts, despite uncertainty in projections of SLR and flood frequency. We found that SLR will boost the occurrence of minor rather than severe flooding in some regions of the U.S., while in other regions the reverse is true. For many cities, the current ten-year flood level will become a regular occurrence as the century progresses and by 2100 will occur every few days for some cities. This creates a mismatch with current planning in some cases. For example, a costly storm surge barrier may be built to protect parts of New York City from extreme flood levels but these are not often used because they are expensive to operate and obstructive to

  2. Purposeful collective action in ambiguous and contested situations: exploring ‘enabling capacities’ and cross-level interplay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Patterson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purposeful collective action is important for sustainably managing many kinds of natural resource issues in social-ecological systems. However, cultivating purposeful collective action is challenging in ambiguous and contested situations involving multiple issues, actors, levels, and drivers, and weak or missing feedback. A particular example is the problem of managing waterway health in large and diverse landscapes. This paper analyses the emergence of purposeful collective action for managing waterway health, focusing on a case study of a large and diverse region in Australia. It applies a heuristic developed to guide inquiry into 'enabling capacities' underpinning purposeful collective action, to analyse three local cases embedded within a broader regional landscape. A diverse range of enabling capacities at both local and regional levels, and cross-level interplay between these levels, are shown to be important. Findings imply that efforts to generate purposeful collective action require building enabling capacities across multiple levels of organisation, from which contextually-appropriate and adaptive action can emerge. Moreover, findings indicate the need for a practice-focused ‘knowledge-action perspective’ that recognises the importance of intersubjectivity and agency. The paper demonstrates a promising approach for investigating purposeful collective action in ambiguous and contested water and environmental governance situations.

  3. Ethical Issues in Using Children's Blood Lead Levels as a Remedial Action Objective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Emily Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency measures the success or failure of Superfund site remediation efforts against remedial action objectives (RAOs). RAOs are frequently based on environmental contaminant concentrations, but with lead exposure, blood lead levels from the population at risk are often used. Although childhood lead screening is an important public health tool, an RAO based on child blood lead levels raises ethical concerns: public health efforts that are more reactive than preventive, a blood lead standard (10 μg/dL) that may not be fully protective, the use of a measure whose validity and reliability may be easily compromised, and exacerbation of environmental injustice and systematic disadvantages. The example of Bunker Hill mine, Kellogg, Idaho, allowed an examination of these ethical concerns. PMID:21836120

  4. The study of hydrogen peroxide level under cisplatin action using genetically encoded sensor hyper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belova, A. S.; Orlova, A. G.; Maslennikova, A. V.; Brilkina, A. A.; Balalaeva, I. V.; Antonova, N. O.; Mishina, N. M.; Shakhova, N. M.; Belousov, V. V.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the work was to study the participation of hydrogen peroxide in reaction of cervical cancer cell line HeLa Kyoto on cisplatin action. Determination of hydrogen peroxide level was performed using genetically encoded fluorescent sensor HyPer2. The dependence of cell viability on cisplatin concentration was determined using MTT assay. Mechanisms of cell death as well as HyPer2 reaction was revealed by flow cytometry after 6-hours of incubation with cisplatin in different concentrations. Cisplatin used in low concentrations had no effect on hydrogen peroxide level in HeLa Kyoto cells. Increase of HyPer2 fluorescence was detected only after exposure with cisplatin in high concentration. The reaction was not the consequence of cell death.

  5. Molecular and analysis of a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase gene (LrPAL2) from Lycoris radiata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yumei; Xia, Bing; Liang, Lijian; Li, Xiaodan; Xu, Sheng; Peng, Feng; Wang, Ren

    2013-03-01

    Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), the first enzyme of phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, participates in the biosynthesis of flavonoids, lignins, stilbenes and many other compounds. In this study, we cloned a 2,326 bp full-length PAL2 gene from Lycoris radiata by using degenerate oligonucleotide primer PCR (DOP-PCR) and the rapid amplification of cDNA ends method. The cDNA contains a 2,124 bp coding region encoding 707 amino acids. The LrPAL2 shares about 77.0 % nucleic acid identity and 83 % amino acid identity with LrPAL1. Furthermore, genome sequence analysis demonstrated that LrPAL2 gene contains one intron and two exons. The 5' flanking sequence of LrPAL2 was also cloned by self-formed adaptor PCR (SEFA-PCR), and a group of putative cis-acting elements such as TATA box, CAAT box, G box, TC-rich repeats, CGTCA motif and TCA-element were identified. The LrPAL2 was detected in all tissues examined, with high abundance in bulbs at leaf sprouting stage and in petals at blooming stage. Besides, LrPAL2 drastically responded to MJ, SNP and UV, moderately responded to GA and SA, and a little increased under wounding. Comparison of LrPAL2 expression and LrPAL1 expression demonstrated that LrPAL2 can be more significantly induced than LrPAL1 under the above treatments, and LrPAL2 transcripts accumulated prominently at blooming stage, especially in petals, while LrPAL1 transcripts did not accumulated significantly at blooming stage. All these results suggested that LrPAL2 might play distinct roles in different branches of the phenylpropanoid pathway.

  6. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 500: Test Cell A Septic System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 500: Test Cell A Septic System, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, CAU 500 is comprised of one Corrective Action Site, CAS 25-04-05. This CADD/CR identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's (DOE/NV's) recommendation that no corrective action is deemed necessary for CAU 500. The Corrective Action Decision Document and Closure Report have been combined into one report based on sample data collected during the field investigation performed between February and May 1999, which showed no evidence of soil contamination at this site. The clean closure justification for CAU 500 is based on these results. Analytes detected were evaluated against preliminary action levels (PALs) to determine contaminants of concern (COCs) for CAU 500, and it was determined that the PALs were not exceeded for total volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, gamma-emitting radionuclides, isotopic uranium, and strontium-90 for any of the soil samples collected. COCs were identified only within the septic tank and distribution box at the CAU. No COCs were identified outside these two areas; therefore, no corrective action was necessary for the soil. Closure activities were performed to address the COCs identified within the septic tank and distribution box. The DOE/NV recommended that neither corrective action nor a corrective action plan was required at CAU 500. Further, no use restrictions were required to be placed on CAU 500, and the septic tank and distribution box have been closed in accordance with all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site

  7. Lowering the UK domestic radon Action Level to prevent more lung cancers-is it cost-effective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, A R; Groves-Kirkby, C J; Coskeran, T; Phillips, P S; Crockett, R G M; Tornberg, R

    2008-01-01

    Case studies have shown that radon gas can accumulate within domestic properties at sufficiently high levels that it can cause lung cancer, and recent studies have suggested that this risk remains significant below the UK domestic Action Level of 200 Bq m -3 . Raised radon levels can be reduced by engineering measures, and it has been shown that domestic radon remediation programmes in UK Affected Areas can result in reduced risks to the population and can be cost-effective. We consider here the benefits and costs of the domestic radon remediation programme in Northamptonshire, UK, and consider the implications for that programme of reducing the UK Action Level below its present value. A radon remediation programme based on an Action Level above 200 Bq m -3 will cost less and will target those most at risk, but will be less cost-effective and will lead to higher residual dose and greater risk of cancer in the remaining population. Reducing the Action Level below 200 Bq m -3 will prevent more cancers, but at significantly higher cost. It will also be less cost-effective, because remediation of a significant number of houses with moderate radon levels will provide only a modest health benefit to occupants. Overall, a completed radon remediation programme of the type implemented in Northamptonshire is most cost-effective for an Action Level between 200 and 300 Bq m -3 . The implications for future health policy are discussed

  8. Integration of emergency action levels with Combustion Engineering Emergency Operating Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faletti, D.W.; Jamison, J.D.

    1985-09-01

    This report documents the development of a method for integrating Emergency Action Levels (EALs) with plant-specific Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) using the Combustion Engineering Owners' Group Emergency Operating Procedure Technical Guidelines (CEOG EOPTFs). EALs are discrete conditions or values of plant operating parameters which, if exceeded, require declaration of an appropriate level of emergency. At most operating plants, the EALs and event classification procedures are totally separate from the Emergency Operating Procedures used by the plant staff to control the plant during abnormal conditions. Control room personnel using the EOPs to deal with abnormal plant conditions must recognize when plant safety is sufficiently degraded that an emergency declaration may be warranted, and then enter a separate classification procedure containing EALs for a number of plant conditions and parameters. The operator then compares the existing plant conditions to the EALs and makes an emergency declaration accordingly. Using the Combustion Engineering Owners' Group Technical Guidelines document, a set of emergency class definitions and criteria were developed based on the status of the three main fission product barriers (fuel cladding, primary coolant system and containment). The EOPTGs were then annotated with suggested guidance to a procedure writer. The proposed method was tested by applying it to the reactor accident sequences that were shown in the reactor safety study to dominate accident risk. The object of the test was to determine if an EAL set linked to the EOP annotations would produce timely and accurate classification of the risk-dominant sequences. 6 refs., 13 figs., 31 tabs

  9. Review: Biflavonoid compounds of Selaginella Pal. Beauv. and its benefit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AHMAD DWI SETYAWAN

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present day, medicinal plants increasingly play important role in human health, while about 60-75% of world population depending on plants and their extracts for medication. Selaginella Pal. Beauv. (Selaginellaceae Reichb. is a potent medicinal plant source. This plant contains biflavonoid compounds, a dimeric form of flavonoids. Flavonoids are secondary metabolite that is most used in medical purposes. They are often occurred in daily consumed vegetables and fruits. Chemical constituents of flavonoids are very diverse, because they are generated in many biosynthetic methods. There are many biflavonoid compounds of Selaginella, i.e. amentoflavone, 2',8''-biapigenin, ginkgetin, heveaflavone, hinokiflavone, isocryptomerine, kayaflavone, podocarpusflavone A, robustaflavone, sumaflavone, and taiwaniaflavone. For the plants, these biflavonoid are used to response environmental condition such as defense against pests, diseases, herbivory, and competitions; while for the people, these compounds are used as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti cancer, antimicrobial (antivirus, antibacterial, anti fungal, antiprotozoan, neuroprotective, vasorelaxant, anti UV-irradiation, antispasmodic, anti allergic, antihaemorrhagic, antinociceptive, etc. The antioxidant purpose of biflavonoid is the most important activities of this secondary metabolite. It is related to the anti cancer and anti-inflammatory functions. The antioxidant of biflavonoid is more powerful than β-carotene, vitamin C and E. In the future, Selaginella research exhaustively needs to be conducted on morphological and molecular characteristics. It deeply needs to explore on biflavonoid and other natural products constituents, and it also needs to search on their bioactivities.

  10. BitPAl: a bit-parallel, general integer-scoring sequence alignment algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loving, Joshua; Hernandez, Yozen; Benson, Gary

    2014-11-15

    Mapping of high-throughput sequencing data and other bulk sequence comparison applications have motivated a search for high-efficiency sequence alignment algorithms. The bit-parallel approach represents individual cells in an alignment scoring matrix as bits in computer words and emulates the calculation of scores by a series of logic operations composed of AND, OR, XOR, complement, shift and addition. Bit-parallelism has been successfully applied to the longest common subsequence (LCS) and edit-distance problems, producing fast algorithms in practice. We have developed BitPAl, a bit-parallel algorithm for general, integer-scoring global alignment. Integer-scoring schemes assign integer weights for match, mismatch and insertion/deletion. The BitPAl method uses structural properties in the relationship between adjacent scores in the scoring matrix to construct classes of efficient algorithms, each designed for a particular set of weights. In timed tests, we show that BitPAl runs 7-25 times faster than a standard iterative algorithm. Source code is freely available for download at http://lobstah.bu.edu/BitPAl/BitPAl.html. BitPAl is implemented in C and runs on all major operating systems. jloving@bu.edu or yhernand@bu.edu or gbenson@bu.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  11. The Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale modified for palliative care inpatients (RASS-PAL): a pilot study exploring validity and feasibility in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Bush, Shirley H; Grassau, Pamela A; Yarmo, Michelle N; Zhang, Tinghua; Zinkie, Samantha J; Pereira, José L

    2014-01-01

    Background The Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS), which assesses level of sedation and agitation, is a simple observational instrument which was developed and validated for the intensive care setting. Although used and recommended in palliative care settings, further validation is required in this patient population. The aim of this study was to explore the validity and feasibility of a version of the RASS modified for palliative care populations (RASS-PAL). Methods A prospective study...

  12. Clinical evaluation of monitor unit software and the application of action levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georg, Dietmar; Nyholm, Tufve; Olofsson, Joergen; Kjaer-Kristoffersen, Flemming; Schnekenburger, Bruno; Winkler, Peter; Nystroem, Hakan; Ahnesjoe, Anders; Karlsson, Mikael

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was the clinical evaluation of an independent dose and monitor unit verification (MUV) software which is based on sophisticated semi-analytical modelling. The software was developed within the framework of an ESTRO project. Finally, consistent handling of dose calculation deviations applying individual action levels is discussed. Materials and methods: A Matlab-based software ('MUV') was distributed to five well-established treatment centres in Europe (Vienna, Graz, Basel, Copenhagen, and Umea) and evaluated as a quality assurance (QA) tool in clinical routine. Results were acquired for 226 individual treatment plans including a total of 815 radiation fields. About 150 beam verification measurements were performed for a portion of the individual treatment plans, mainly with time variable fluence patterns. The deviations between dose calculations performed with a treatment planning system (TPS) and the MUV software were scored with respect to treatment area, treatment technique, geometrical depth, radiological depth, etc. Results: In general good agreement was found between calculations performed with the different TPSs and MUV, with a mean deviation per field of 0.2 ± 3.5% (1 SD) and mean deviations of 0.2 ± 2.2% for composite treatment plans. For pelvic treatments less than 10% of all fields showed deviations larger than 3%. In general, when using the radiological depth for verification calculations the results and the spread in the results improved significantly, especially for head-and-neck and for thorax treatments. For IMRT head-and-neck beams, mean deviations between MUV and the local TPS were -1.0 ± 7.3% for dynamic, and -1.3 ± 3.2% for step-and-shoot IMRT delivery. For dynamic IMRT beams in the pelvis good agreement was obtained between MUV and the local TPS (mean: -1.6 ± 1.5%). Treatment site and treatment technique dependent action levels between ±3% and ±5% seem to be clinically realistic if a radiological depth

  13. Institutional Diversity in Collective Action: Investigating Successful Village Level Maintenance of Hand Pumps in Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Brian Anthony

    Providing clean water to rural communities in sub-Saharan Africa remains a challenge. Unsanitary and distant water sources cause a host of health and humanitarian problems. A common means of remedying this situation has been the donation of improved water sources, fitted with low-cost hand pumps. Due donor capacity and/ or policy most hand pumps are donated under the guise of Village Level Operation and Maintenance (VLOM). This premises the notion that recipient communities will take ownership of the new pump and as such will ensure its maintenance. To assist with this many donors carry out programs of technical repair training and the structuring of in-village leadership and management groups. The reality is that a high proportion of these pumps break down after donation and cease to work thereafter. Measures to redress technical elements of these failures through increased training or adequate distribution of spares has seen some success but failure rates remains high. This has led to a call for more attention to demand side issues, focusing on the communal aspects that may influence a village to act collectively in the maintenance of its hand pump. This thesis researched five Malawian villages where the community had maintained their hand pumps for a period of 10 or more years. These hand pumps were treated as shared resources and the literature on common-pool resources and social institutions was used as a theoretical framework. Applying these theories proved to be appropriate for analyzing the norms, conventions and forms of cooperative conduct. This allowed the research to gain insights into institutional diversity and the relationship between 'formal institutions', most often exogenous in nature, and informal' or customary collective action institutions embedded within the communities. Findings showed the emergence of three predominant themes within these successful case studies: 1) the role of leadership at varying levels and how it is embodied

  14. The Feeling of Agency: Empirical Indicators for a Pre-Reflective Level of Action Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Nicole; Stenzel, Anna; Schneider, Till R.; Engel, Andreas K.

    2011-01-01

    The sense of agency has been defined as the sense that I am the author of my own actions. This sense, however, is usually not reflected upon but instead pre-reflectively experienced. Experimental approaches usually measure the sense of agency by judgments or verbal reports, despite evidence that the sense of agency is not sufficiently assessed on such a reflective level. Here we sought to identify non-verbal measures of the sense of agency, particularly testing the relevance of physiological activity such as skin conductance and heart rate. Manipulating the visual feedback to an executed movement, we investigated how well physiological activity and other movement parameters differed between real and false feedback (i.e., between actual agency and non-agency), and how they related to accuracy of agency judgments. Skin conductance and heart rate did not differ between agency and non-agency situations; neither did they inform agency judgments. In contrast, movement onsets – particularly, discrepancies between feedback and movement onsets – were related to agency judgments. Overall, our results indicate weak visceral–somatic associations with the sense of agency. Thus, physiological activity did not prove to be an empirical indicator for the feeling of agency. PMID:21779268

  15. Reactor Emergency Action Level Monitor: Volume 2, REALM user's reference guide: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touchton, R.A.

    1988-09-01

    A User Manual for the Reactor Emergency Action Level Monitor (REALM) expert system prototype is provided in this volume. REALM has been designed to provide expert assistance in the identification of a nuclear power plant emergency situation and the determination of its severity. REALM has been developed as an expert system which can provide sensor interpretation and situation assessment in a real-time processing environment. In its state of development at project completion, these capabilities are used in an off-line (i.e., stand-alone, desktop) fashion to provide emergency preparedness assistance in the areas of emergency classification training and emergency exercise scenario generation. REALM also serves a prototype and stepping-stone for the possible connection to the plant for on-line use. In order to distinguish the off-line system (now complete) from the on-line system (now moving from a research prototype to an installed system), the term ''REALM'' is used to indicate the on-line version, with users in the control room, technical support center, and the emergency operations facility, The off-line version is referred to as ''uREALM.''

  16. Systems-level mechanisms of action of Panax ginseng: a network pharmacological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sa-Yoon; Park, Ji-Hun; Kim, Hyo-Su; Lee, Choong-Yeol; Lee, Hae-Jeung; Kang, Ki Sung; Kim, Chang-Eop

    2018-01-01

    Panax ginseng has been used since ancient times based on the traditional Asian medicine theory and clinical experiences, and currently, is one of the most popular herbs in the world. To date, most of the studies concerning P. ginseng have focused on specific mechanisms of action of individual constituents. However, in spite of many studies on the molecular mechanisms of P. ginseng , it still remains unclear how multiple active ingredients of P. ginseng interact with multiple targets simultaneously, giving the multidimensional effects on various conditions and diseases. In order to decipher the systems-level mechanism of multiple ingredients of P. ginseng , a novel approach is needed beyond conventional reductive analysis. We aim to review the systems-level mechanism of P. ginseng by adopting novel analytical framework-network pharmacology. Here, we constructed a compound-target network of P. ginseng using experimentally validated and machine learning-based prediction results. The targets of the network were analyzed in terms of related biological process, pathways, and diseases. The majority of targets were found to be related with primary metabolic process, signal transduction, nitrogen compound metabolic process, blood circulation, immune system process, cell-cell signaling, biosynthetic process, and neurological system process. In pathway enrichment analysis of targets, mainly the terms related with neural activity showed significant enrichment and formed a cluster. Finally, relative degrees analysis for the target-disease association of P. ginseng revealed several categories of related diseases, including respiratory, psychiatric, and cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Paving the Way for Change: Visionary Leadership in Action at the Middle Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathleen M.; Anfara, Vincent A., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Case study explores visionary leadership in action by focusing on the strategies that some middle-school principals use before implementing schoolwide reforms. Finds that visionary leadership in action involves an initial exploration of possible change areas; discussions and education regarding the issues involved; and support, commitment, and…

  18. The Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale modified for palliative care inpatients (RASS-PAL): a pilot study exploring validity and feasibility in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Shirley H; Grassau, Pamela A; Yarmo, Michelle N; Zhang, Tinghua; Zinkie, Samantha J; Pereira, José L

    2014-03-31

    The Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS), which assesses level of sedation and agitation, is a simple observational instrument which was developed and validated for the intensive care setting. Although used and recommended in palliative care settings, further validation is required in this patient population. The aim of this study was to explore the validity and feasibility of a version of the RASS modified for palliative care populations (RASS-PAL). A prospective study, using a mixed methods approach, was conducted. Thirteen health care professionals (physicians and nurses) working in an acute palliative care unit assessed ten consecutive patients with an agitated delirium or receiving palliative sedation. Patients were assessed at five designated time points using the RASS-PAL. Health care professionals completed a short survey and data from semi-structured interviews was analyzed using thematic analysis. The inter-rater intraclass correlation coefficient range of the RASS-PAL was 0.84 to 0.98 for the five time points. Professionals agreed that the tool was useful for assessing sedation and was easy to use. Its role in monitoring delirium however was deemed problematic. Professionals felt that it may assist interprofessional communication. The need for formal education on why and how to use the instrument was highlighted. This study provides preliminary validity evidence for the use of the RASS-PAL by physicians and nurses working in a palliative care unit, specifically for assessing sedation and agitation levels in the management of palliative sedation. Further validity evidence should be sought, particularly in the context of assessing delirium.

  19. The Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale modified for palliative care inpatients (RASS-PAL): a pilot study exploring validity and feasibility in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS), which assesses level of sedation and agitation, is a simple observational instrument which was developed and validated for the intensive care setting. Although used and recommended in palliative care settings, further validation is required in this patient population. The aim of this study was to explore the validity and feasibility of a version of the RASS modified for palliative care populations (RASS-PAL). Methods A prospective study, using a mixed methods approach, was conducted. Thirteen health care professionals (physicians and nurses) working in an acute palliative care unit assessed ten consecutive patients with an agitated delirium or receiving palliative sedation. Patients were assessed at five designated time points using the RASS-PAL. Health care professionals completed a short survey and data from semi-structured interviews was analyzed using thematic analysis. Results The inter-rater intraclass correlation coefficient range of the RASS-PAL was 0.84 to 0.98 for the five time points. Professionals agreed that the tool was useful for assessing sedation and was easy to use. Its role in monitoring delirium however was deemed problematic. Professionals felt that it may assist interprofessional communication. The need for formal education on why and how to use the instrument was highlighted. Conclusion This study provides preliminary validity evidence for the use of the RASS-PAL by physicians and nurses working in a palliative care unit, specifically for assessing sedation and agitation levels in the management of palliative sedation. Further validity evidence should be sought, particularly in the context of assessing delirium. PMID:24684942

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehlecke, Robert F.

    2005-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit 552 is being investigated because man-made radionuclides and chemical contaminants may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose an unacceptable risk to human health and/or the environment. The CAI will be conducted following the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). The DQOs are used to identify the type, amount, and quality of data needed to define the nature and extent of contamination and identify and evaluate the most appropriate corrective action alternatives for CAU 552. The primary problem statement for the investigation is: 'Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for CAS 12-23-05.' To address this problem statement, the resolution of the following two decision statements is required: (1) The Decision I statement is: 'Is a contaminant present within the CAU at a concentration that could pose an unacceptable risk to human health and the environment?' Any site-related contaminant detected at a concentration exceeding the corresponding preliminary action level (PAL), as defined in Section A.1.4.2, will be considered a contaminant of concern (COC). A COC is defined as a site-related constituent that exceeds the screening criteria (PAL). The presence of a contaminant within each CAS is defined as the analytical detection of a COC. (2) The Decision II statement is: 'Determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs.' This decision will be achieved by the collection of data that are adequate to define the extent of COCs. Decision II samples are used to determine the lateral and vertical extent of the contamination as well as the likelihood of COCs to migrate outside of the site boundaries. The migration pattern can be derived from the Decision II

  1. A two-shift optimisation of the 'no action level' setup correction protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, C.; Fisher, R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: As electronic portal imaging equipment becomes more common, many radiotherapy centres now have the ability to collect patient treatment position deviation values. One commonly used off-line set-up correction protocol for calculating patient setup corrections is the 'no action level' (NAL) protocol. This paper proposes a two-shift approach and calculates the number of images required for minimum systematic error. Patient data is used in a simulation to confirm this approach. Patient treatment position deviations were available for all treatment sessions for a large group of patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate. Thirty of these patients were selected. The patient position at treatment and all isocentre shifts made were recorded in the treatment notes. These were used to simulate the effect of the NAL protocol using a range of image numbers as the basis of the set-up correction. As Bortfeld et al noted, there is an error minimum that can be observed beyond which the mean radial systematic set-up error increases slowly with an increase in the number of images used. An enhancement to the NAL was proposed in which the patient's position is corrected on two occasions; once early in the treatment schedule, and again after more images have been collected. The expectation value of the set-up error for this two-shift NAL was found and minimised. The optimum staging for the two-shift NAL for the prostate patients was to image for a total of 9 sessions and to shift the patient after 3 sessions and 9 sessions. The thirty patients showed an uncorrected mean radial setup error of 0.65cm. In this simulation this was corrected to 0.26cm by application of the NAL using 5 images and to 0.17 cm using the two shift NAL with shifts after three and nine images. In situations where staff can manage the workload of collecting and analysing portal images for nine sessions for each patient, the two-shift NAL will result in a high level of set-up accuracy. Copyright

  2. Intrinsically motivated action-outcome learning and goal-based action recall: a system-level bio-constrained computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassarre, Gianluca; Mannella, Francesco; Fiore, Vincenzo G; Redgrave, Peter; Gurney, Kevin; Mirolli, Marco

    2013-05-01

    Reinforcement (trial-and-error) learning in animals is driven by a multitude of processes. Most animals have evolved several sophisticated systems of 'extrinsic motivations' (EMs) that guide them to acquire behaviours allowing them to maintain their bodies, defend against threat, and reproduce. Animals have also evolved various systems of 'intrinsic motivations' (IMs) that allow them to acquire actions in the absence of extrinsic rewards. These actions are used later to pursue such rewards when they become available. Intrinsic motivations have been studied in Psychology for many decades and their biological substrates are now being elucidated by neuroscientists. In the last two decades, investigators in computational modelling, robotics and machine learning have proposed various mechanisms that capture certain aspects of IMs. However, we still lack models of IMs that attempt to integrate all key aspects of intrinsically motivated learning and behaviour while taking into account the relevant neurobiological constraints. This paper proposes a bio-constrained system-level model that contributes a major step towards this integration. The model focusses on three processes related to IMs and on the neural mechanisms underlying them: (a) the acquisition of action-outcome associations (internal models of the agent-environment interaction) driven by phasic dopamine signals caused by sudden, unexpected changes in the environment; (b) the transient focussing of visual gaze and actions on salient portions of the environment; (c) the subsequent recall of actions to pursue extrinsic rewards based on goal-directed reactivation of the representations of their outcomes. The tests of the model, including a series of selective lesions, show how the focussing processes lead to a faster learning of action-outcome associations, and how these associations can be recruited for accomplishing goal-directed behaviours. The model, together with the background knowledge reviewed in the paper

  3. Dynamics study of free volume properties of SMA/SMMA blends by PAL method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Z.Y.; Jiang, X.Q.; Huang, Y.J.; Lin, J.; Li, S.M.; Li, S.Z.; Hsia, Y.F.

    2006-01-01

    Miscibility of poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) (containing 7 wt% maleic anhydride)/poly(styrene-co-methyl methacrylate) (containing 40 wt% styrene) blends were previously studied. It was obtained that SMA70 (containing 70 wt% of SMA in SMA/SMMA blends) is miscible in molecular level but SMA20 is not. In this paper, the two blends selected were used to investigate the temperature dependence of free volume parameters. It showed there are different deviations of free volume parameters in SMA20 and SMA70, and it was interesting that temperature dependence of ortho-positronium lifetime τ 3 of the SMA20 mixture exhibits two breaks in the range temperature from 90 deg. C to 120 deg. C, which revealed that the mixture has two glass transition ranges. Also, ortho-positronium lifetime τ 3 of the SMA20 mixture is nearly constant in the temperature range from 130 deg. C to 160 deg. C. These indicated that SMA20 blend is phase-separated in room temperature and become miscible above 130 deg. C, which may be due to steric hindrance effect of phenyl rings of SMMA and SMA. From the deviation of o-Ps lifetimes of SMA70, the single glass transition temperature of SMA70 blend was shown. Combining the previous study, it was further concluded that PAL method seems to be a powerful method to detect in situ phase behavior of immiscible polymer blends and glass transition of miscible polymer blends

  4. PAL-XFEL cavity beam position monitor pick-up design and beam test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sojeong, E-mail: sojung8681@postech.ac.kr; Park, Young Jung; Kim, Changbum; Kim, Seung Hwan; Shin, Dong Cheol; Han, Jang-Hui; Ko, In Soo

    2016-08-11

    As an X-ray Free Electron Laser, PAL-XFEL is about to start beam commissioning. X-band cavity beam position monitor (BPM) is used in the PAL-XFEL undulator beam line. Prototypes of cavity BPM pick-up were designed and fabricated to test the RF characteristics. Also, the beam test of a cavity BPM pick-up was done in the Injector Test Facility (ITF). In the beam test, the raw signal properties of the cavity BPM pick-up were measured at a 200 pC bunch charge. According to the RF test and beam test results, the prototype cavity BPM pick-up design was confirmed to meet the requirements of the PAL-XFEL cavity BPM system.

  5. Charged defects in chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors studied with combined Raman scattering and PALS methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavetskyy, T.; Vakiv, M.; Shpotyuk, O.

    2007-01-01

    A combination of Raman scattering and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) techniques to study charged defects in chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors (ChVSs) was applied for the first time in this study. In the case of Ge 15.8 As 21 S 63.2 glass, it is found that the main radiation-induced switching of heteropolar Ge-S bonds into heteropolar As-S ones, previously detected by IR fast Fourier transform spectroscopy, can also be identified by Raman spectroscopy in the depolarized configuration. Results obtained by Raman scattering are in good agreement with PALS data for the investigated glass composition

  6. Charged defects in chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors studied with combined Raman scattering and PALS methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavetskyy, T.; Vakiv, M. [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); Shpotyuk, O. [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine)], E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua

    2007-04-15

    A combination of Raman scattering and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) techniques to study charged defects in chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors (ChVSs) was applied for the first time in this study. In the case of Ge{sub 15.8}As{sub 21}S{sub 63.2} glass, it is found that the main radiation-induced switching of heteropolar Ge-S bonds into heteropolar As-S ones, previously detected by IR fast Fourier transform spectroscopy, can also be identified by Raman spectroscopy in the depolarized configuration. Results obtained by Raman scattering are in good agreement with PALS data for the investigated glass composition.

  7. [Farmacological effect of retabolil on aldosterone level and arterial pressure in rats under the action of vibrations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obut, T A; Ovsiukova, M V; Egorova, S A; Érdynieva, T A; Dement'eva, T Iu; Obut, E T

    2014-01-01

    The experiments were performed on male rats, which were subjected to single and multiply repeated vibrations (low-frequency, horizontal, high-amplitude) analogous to the action of motor transport vibrations. It is established that the administration of retabolil produces a hypotensive effect and blocks the vibration-induced increase in the level of hypertensive hormone aldosterone. Under conditions of the multiply repeated action of vibrations, both effects were realized via micro-opioid receptors. In the case of a single action, these receptors were only involved in a hypotensive effect but not mediated in aldosterone suppression. Both these effects were absent in the control group of animals (not subjected to vibrations). Therefore, retabolil can be used as a hypotensive and aldosterone-blocking drug for vibration-induced hypertension in animals and, probably, in humans.

  8. Multidisciplinary and multisectoral coalitions as catalysts for action against antimicrobial resistance: Implementation experiences at national and regional levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Mohan P; Chintu, Chifumbe; Mpundu, Mirfin; Kibuule, Dan; Hazemba, Oliver; Andualem, Tenaw; Embrey, Martha; Phulu, Bayobuya; Gerba, Heran

    2018-03-20

    The multi-faceted complexities of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) require consistent action, a multidisciplinary approach, and long-term political commitment. Building coalitions can amplify stakeholder efforts to carry out effective AMR prevention and control strategies. We have developed and implemented an approach to help local stakeholders kick-start the coalition-building process. The five-step process is to (1) mobilise support, (2) understand the local situation, (3) develop an action plan, (4) implement the plan, and (5) monitor and evaluate. We first piloted the approach in Zambia in 2004, then used the lessons learned to expand it for use in Ethiopia and Namibia and to the regional level through the Ecumenical Pharmaceutical Network [EPN]. Call-to-action declarations and workshops helped promote a shared vision, resulting in the development of national AMR action plans, revision of university curricula to incorporate relevant topics, infection control activities, engagement with journalists from various mass media outlets, and strengthening of drug quality assurance systems. Our experience with the coalition-building approach in Ethiopia, Namibia, Zambia, and with the EPN shows that coalitions can form in a variety of ways with many different stakeholders, including government, academia, and faith-based organisations, to organise actions to preserve the effectiveness of existing antimicrobials and contain AMR.

  9. Vascular expression of endothelial antigen PAL-E indicates absence of blood-ocular barriers in the normal eye

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlingemann, R. O.; Hofman, P.; Anderson, L.; Troost, D.; van der Gaag, R.

    1997-01-01

    The endothelium-specific antigen PAL-E is expressed in capillaries and veins throughout the body with the exception of the brain, where the antigen is absent from anatomical sites with a patent blood-brain barrier. In this study we determined vascular endothelial staining for PAL-E in the normal eye

  10. Validation of the Actigraph GT3X and ActivPAL Accelerometers for the Assessment of Sedentary Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngdeok; Barry, Vaughn W.; Kang, Minsoo

    2015-01-01

    This study examined (a) the validity of two accelerometers (ActiGraph GT3X [ActiGraph LLC, Pensacola, FL, USA] and activPAL [PAL Technologies Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland]) for the assessment of sedentary behavior; and (b) the variations in assessment accuracy by setting minimum sedentary bout durations against a proxy for direct observation using an…

  11. Underlying data for derived emergency reference levels. Post-Chernobyl action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinnaeve, J.; Gerber, G.

    1991-01-01

    After an accidental release of radioactive material to the atmosphere leading to significant off-site contamination, various countermeasures are needed to reduce the radiation exposure of the population. These may include measures to reduce the consumption of contaminated foodstuffs. This report is concerned with the underlying information required for calculating when and if such countermeasures as regards foodstuffs should be introduced. The work in this report was sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities as one of a series of post-Chernobyl actions under its radiation protection programme

  12. Analysis and prediction of daily physical activity level data using autoregressive integrated moving average models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, Xi; Pauws, S.C.; Pijl, M.; Lacroix, J.; Goris, A.H.C.; Aarts, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    Results are provided on predicting daily physical activity level (PAL) data from past data of participants of a physical activity lifestyle program aimed at promoting a healthier lifestyle consisting of more physical exercise. The PAL data quantifies the level of a person’s daily physical activity

  13. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) as a characterization technique for nanostructured self-assembled amphiphile systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Aurelia W; Pascual-Izarra, Carlos; Pas, Steven J; Hill, Anita J; Boyd, Ben J; Drummond, Calum J

    2009-01-08

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) has potential as a novel rapid characterization method for self-assembly amphiphile systems; however, a lack of systematic correlation of PALS parameters with structural attributes has limited its more widespread application. In this study, using the well-characterized phytantriol/water and the phytantriol/vitamin E acetate/water self-assembly amphiphile systems, the impact of systematic structural changes controlled by changes in composition and temperature on PALS parameters has been studied. The PALS parameters (orthopositronium (oPs) lifetime and intensity signatures) were shown to be sensitive to the molecular packing and mobility of the self-assembled lipid molecules in various lyotropic liquid crystalline phases, enabling differentiation between liquid crystalline structures. The oPs lifetime, related to the molecular packing and mobility, is correlated with rheological properties of the individual mesophases. The oPs lifetime links the lipid chain packing and mobility in the various mesophases to resultant macroscopic properties, such as permeability, which is critical for the use of these mesophase structures as diffusion-controlled release matrices for active liposoluble compounds.

  14. Increased expression of endothelial antigen PAL-E in human diabetic retinopathy correlates with microvascular leakage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlingemann, R. O.; Hofman, P.; Vrensen, G. F.; Blaauwgeers, H. G.

    1999-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The Pathologische Anatomie Leiden-Endothelium (PAL-E) antigen is a marker for loss of the blood-brain barrier function in brain tumours. It is endothelium specific and is associated with the endothelial plasmalemmal vesicles (caveolae) involved in transcellular transport. To test

  15. Free volume changes in mechanically milled PS and PC studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Günther-Schade, K.; Castricum, H.L.; Ziegler, H.J.; Bakker, H.; Faupel, F.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of mechanical milling on free volume was studied by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) in polystyrene (PS) as a typical brittle polymer and in polycarbonate (PC) as a tough representative. Long-time milling increases the free volume, while a decrease is observed

  16. Polar localization of Escherichia coli chemoreceptors requires an intact Tol–Pal complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Thiago M. A.; Lin, Ti-Yu; Rajendran, Madhusudan; Anderson, Samantha M.; Weibel, Douglas B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Subcellular biomolecular localization is critical for the metabolic and structural properties of the cell. The functional implications of the spatiotemporal distribution of protein complexes during the bacterial cell cycle have long been acknowledged; however, the molecular mechanisms for generating and maintaining their dynamic localization in bacteria are not completely understood. Here we demonstrate that the trans-envelope Tol–Pal complex, a widely conserved component of the cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria, is required to maintain the polar positioning of chemoreceptor clusters in Escherichia coli. Localization of the chemoreceptors was independent of phospholipid composition of the membrane and the curvature of the cell wall. Instead, our data indicate that chemoreceptors interact with components of the Tol–Pal complex and that this interaction is required to polarly localize chemoreceptor clusters. We found that disruption of the Tol–Pal complex perturbs the polar localization of chemoreceptors, alters cell motility, and affects chemotaxis. We propose that the E. coli Tol–Pal complex restricts mobility of the chemoreceptor clusters at the cell poles and may be involved in regulatory mechanisms that co-ordinate cell division and segregation of the chemosensory machinery. PMID:24720726

  17. Des villages au Népal se préparent à des conditions climatiques ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    4 avr. 2012 ... La grande diversité ethnique, culturelle et linguistique, ainsi que l'inaccessibilité de nombreuses communautés rurales, particulièrement dans les régions montagneuses, font partie des facteurs venant compliquer les choses. La recherche. En 2010, l'Institute for Social and Environmental Transition – Népal ...

  18. Fast ion emission from the plasma produced by the PALS laser system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wolowski, J.; Badziak, J.; Boody, F. P.; Hora, H.; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Jungwirth, Karel; Krása, Josef; Láska, Leoš; Parys, P.; Peřina, Vratislav; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Rohlena, Karel; Ryc, L.; Ullschmied, Jiří; Woryna, E.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 44, - (2002), s. 1277-1283 ISSN 0741-3335 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : emission * plasma produced * PALS laser system ? Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 2.121, year: 2002

  19. Mechanisms and manifestations of toxic actions at the bone tissue level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The principal abnormalities determined by toxic at the bone level are: osteoporosis, osteomalacia, osteosclerosis or osteopetrosis. The principal toxics having a noxiousness at the bone level are: the fluorine, the phosphorus, the lead, the bismuth, the cadmium and the strontium. The strontium 90 has an important radioactivity that gives at the bone level osteosarcomas or at low doses, leukemoid reactions and marrow angiosarcoma. (N.C.)

  20. A participatory action research approach to strengthening health managers' capacity at district level in Eastern Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetui, Moses; Coe, Anna-Britt; Hurtig, Anna-Karin; Bennett, Sara; Kiwanuka, Suzanne N; George, Asha; Kiracho, Elizabeth Ekirapa

    2017-12-28

    Many approaches to improving health managers' capacity in poor countries, particularly those pursued by external agencies, employ non-participatory approaches and often seek to circumvent (rather than strengthen) weak public management structures. This limits opportunities for strengthening local health managers' capacity, improving resource utilisation and enhancing service delivery. This study explored the contribution of a participatory action research approach to strengthening health managers' capacity in Eastern Uganda. This was a qualitative study that used open-ended key informant interviews, combined with review of meeting minutes and observations to collect data. Both inductive and deductive thematic analysis was undertaken. The Competing Values Framework of organisational management functions guided the deductive process of analysis and the interpretation of the findings. The framework builds on four earlier models of management and regards them as complementary rather than conflicting, and identifies four managers' capacities (collaborate, create, compete and control) by categorising them along two axes, one contrasting flexibility versus control and the other internal versus external organisational focus. The findings indicate that the participatory action research approach enhanced health managers' capacity to collaborate with others, be creative, attain goals and review progress. The enablers included expanded interaction spaces, encouragement of flexibility, empowerment of local managers, and the promotion of reflection and accountability. Tension and conflict across different management functions was apparent; for example, while there was a need to collaborate, maintaining control over processes was also needed. These tensions meant that managers needed to learn to simultaneously draw upon and use different capacities as reflected by the Competing Values Framework in order to maximise their effectiveness. Improved health manager capacity is

  1. StarPals International Young Astronomers' Network Collaborative Projects for IYA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingan, Jessi

    2008-09-01

    StarPals is a nascent non-profit organization with the goal of providing opportunities for international collaboration between students of all ages within space science research. We believe that by encouraging an interest in the cosmos, the one thing that is truly Universal, from a young age, students will not only further their knowledge of and interest in science but will learn valuable teamwork and life skills. The goal is to foster respect, understanding and appreciation of cultural diversity among all StarPals participants, whether students, teachers, or mentors. StarPals aims to inspire students by providing opportunities in which, more than simply visualizing themselves as research scientists, they can actually become one. The technologies of robotic telescopes, videoconferencing, and online classrooms are expanding the possibilities like never before. In honor of IYA2009, StarPals would like to encourage 400 schools to participate on a global scale in astronomy/cosmology research on various concurrent projects. We will offer in-person or online workshops and training sessions to teach the teachers. We will be seeking publication in scientific journals for some student research. For our current project, the Double Stars Challenge, students use the robotic telescopes to take a series of four images of one of 30 double stars from a list furnished by the US Naval Observatory and then use MPO Canopus software to take distance and position angle measurements. StarPals provides students with hands-on training, telescope time, and software to complete the imaging and measuring. A paper will be drafted from our research data and submitted to the Journal of Double Star Observations. The kids who participate in this project may potentially be the youngest contributors to an article in a vetted scientific journal. Kids rapidly adapt and improve their computer skills operating these telescopes and discover for themselves that science is COOL!

  2. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 410: Waste Disposal Trenches, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision No.:0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    , beryllium, total petroleum hydrocarbons; and total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals. Field activities will consist of geophysical and radiological surveys, and collecting soil samples at biased locations by appropriate methods. A two-step data quality objective strategy will be followed: (1) define the nature of contamination at each CAS location by identifying any contamination above preliminary action levels (PALs); and, (2) determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document

  3. State-Level Farmers Market Activities: A Review of CDC-Funded State Public Health Actions That Support Farmers Markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahin, Sahra A; Wright, Demia S; Pejavara, Anu; Kim, Sonia A

    Introducing farmers markets to underserved areas, or supporting existing farmers markets, can increase access and availability of fruits and vegetables and encourage healthy eating. Since 2003, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity (DNPAO) has provided guidance and funding to state health departments (SHDs) to support the implementation of interventions, including activities around farmers markets, to address healthy eating, and improve the access to and availability of fruits and vegetables at state and community levels. For this project, we identified state-level farmers market activities completed with CDC's DNPAO funding from 2003 to 2013. State-level was defined as actions taken by the state health department that influence or support farmers market work across the state. We completed an analysis of SHD farmers market activities of 3 DNPAO cooperative agreements from 2003 to 2013: State Nutrition and Physical Activity Programs to Prevent Obesity and Other Chronic Diseases; Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity Program; and Communities Putting Prevention to Work. To identify state farmers market activities, data sources for each cooperative agreement were searched using the key words "farm," "market," "produce market," and "produce stand." State data with at least one state-level farmers market action present were then coded for the presence of itemized activities. Across all cooperative agreements, the most common activities identified through analysis included the following: working on existing markets and nutrition assistance benefit programs, supporting community action, and providing training and technical assistance. Common partners were nutrition assistance benefit program offices and state or regional Department of Agriculture or agricultural extension offices. Common farmers market practices and evidence-based activities, such as nutrition assistance benefits programs and land

  4. Lowering the UK domestic radon action level to reduce radiation-induced lung cancer in general population: when and where is it cost effective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, A.R.; Phillips, P.S.

    2008-01-01

    Case studies have shown that radon gas can be present within domestic properties at sufficiently high levels that it can significantly increase the risk of lung cancer in occupants. Recently, Darby et al. (2006) have shown that this risk exists at radon concentrations as low as 100 Bq·m -3 , which is below the UK domestic Action Level of 200 Bq·m -3 . As a result, there have been suggestions that national domestic Action Levels should be reduced. This paper considers the benefits and costs of the domestic radon remediation programmes in the UK, when a range of Action Levels from 125 Bq·m -3 to 600 Bq·m -3 are applied. The variations of total cost, cost-effectiveness, dose reduction and lung cancers saved for each proposed action level, and the proportion of houses over the proposed action level, were estimated. The study shows that, for an Action Level above 200 Bq·m -3 , a completed domestic radon remediation programme in Northamptonshire, where 6.3% of existing houses have initial radon levels over 200 Bq·m -3 , will cost less and will target those most at risk, but will be less cost effective. In addition, a higher Action Level leaves a higher residual dose and greater risk of cancer in the population living in unremediated homes. Reducing the Action Level below 200 Bq·m -3 will prevent more cancers, but at significantly higher cost. It will be less cost-effective, because a significant number of houses with moderate radon levels will be remediated with modest health benefit to occupants. The study suggests that a completed radon remediation programme is most cost-effective with an action level of around 250 to 300 Bq·m -3 . The finding appears to be independent of the percentage of houses over the Action Level. This has clear implications for future health policy. (author)

  5. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0 with ROTC 1, 2, and Errata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2004-04-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 204 Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) north of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). The Corrective Action Sites (CASs) within CAU 204 are located in Areas 1, 2, 3, and 5 of the NTS, in Nye County, Nevada (Figure 1-2). Corrective Action Unit 204 is comprised of the six CASs identified in Table 1-1. As shown in Table 1-1, the FFACO describes four of these CASs as bunkers one as chemical exchange storage and one as a blockhouse. Subsequent investigations have identified four of these structures as instrumentation bunkers (CASs 01-34-01, 02-34-01, 03-34-01, 05-33-01), one as an explosives storage bunker (CAS 05-99-02), and one as both (CAS 05-18-02). The six bunkers included in CAU 204 were primarily used to monitor atmospheric testing or store munitions. The ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada'' (NNSA/NV, 2002a) provides information relating to the history, planning, and scope of the investigation; therefore, it will not be repeated in this CADD. This CADD identifies potential corrective action alternatives and provides a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 204. The evaluation of corrective action alternatives is based on process knowledge and the results of investigative activities conducted in accordance with the CAIP (NNSA/NV, 2002a) that was approved prior to the start of the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI). Record of Technical Change (ROTC) No. 1 to the CAIP (approval pending) documents changes to the preliminary action levels

  6. Cellular adverse actions of dibromoacetonitrile, a by-product in water bacterial control, at sublethal levels in rat thymocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, Takumi; Akiyoshi, Kenji; Erdenedalai, Erdenebat; Enhetomuru, Anu; Imai, Shoji; Oyama, Yasuo

    2018-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dibromoacetonitrile (DBAN), a by-product in water bacterial control, at sublethal concentrations on rat thymocytes, by using a cytometric technique with appropriate fluorescent dyes. By using this method, the possibility that DBAN induces cellular actions related to oxidative stress was assessed. DBAN reduced the content of cellular nonprotein thiols under Zn 2+ -free conditions. It elevated the intracellular level of Zn 2+ , being independent from external Zn 2+ . DBAN increased cell vulnerability to the cytotoxic action of hydrogen peroxide. These actions of DBAN were likely related to oxidative stress. DBAN is formed by the reaction of bromides and chlorinated oxidants during water disinfection. Hydrolysis of 2,2-dibromo-3-nitrilopropionamide, an antimicrobial used in hydraulic fracturing fluids for production of shale gas and oil, produces DBAN. Therefore, the concern regarding the levels of DBAN in industrial water systems is necessary to avoid the environmental risk to humans and wild mammals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. DiPALS: Diaphragm Pacing in patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Christopher J; Bradburn, Mike J; Maguire, Chin; Cooper, Cindy L; Baird, Wendy O; Baxter, Susan K; Cohen, Judith; Cantrill, Hannah; Dixon, Simon; Ackroyd, Roger; Baudouin, Simon; Bentley, Andrew; Berrisford, Richard; Bianchi, Stephen; Bourke, Stephen C; Darlison, Roy; Ealing, John; Elliott, Mark; Fitzgerald, Patrick; Galloway, Simon; Hamdalla, Hisham; Hanemann, C Oliver; Hughes, Philip; Imam, Ibrahim; Karat, Dayalan; Leek, Roger; Maynard, Nick; Orrell, Richard W; Sarela, Abeezar; Stradling, John; Talbot, Kevin; Taylor, Lyn; Turner, Martin; Simonds, Anita K; Williams, Tim; Wedzicha, Wisia; Young, Carolyn; Shaw, Pamela J

    2016-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease resulting in death, usually from respiratory failure, within 2-3 years of symptom onset. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is a treatment that when given to patients in respiratory failure leads to improved survival and quality of life. Diaphragm pacing (DP), using the NeuRx/4(®) diaphragm pacing system (DPS)™ (Synapse Biomedical, Oberlin, OH, USA), is a new technique that may offer additional or alternative benefits to patients with ALS who are in respiratory failure. The Diaphragm Pacing in patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (DiPALS) trial evaluated the effect of DP on survival over the study duration in patients with ALS with respiratory failure. The DiPALS trial was a multicentre, parallel-group, open-label, randomised controlled trial incorporating health economic analyses and a qualitative longitudinal substudy. Eligible participants had a diagnosis of ALS (ALS laboratory-supported probable, clinically probable or clinically definite according to the World Federation of Neurology revised El Escorial criteria), had been stabilised on riluzole for 30 days, were aged ≥ 18 years and were in respiratory failure. We planned to recruit 108 patients from seven UK-based specialist ALS or respiratory centres. Allocation was performed using 1 : 1 non-deterministic minimisation. Participants were randomised to either standard care (NIV alone) or standard care (NIV) plus DP using the NeuRX/4 DPS. The primary outcome was overall survival, defined as the time from randomisation to death from any cause. Secondary outcomes were patient quality of life [assessed by European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions, three levels (EQ-5D-3L), Short Form questionnaire-36 items and Sleep Apnoea Quality of Life Index questionnaire]; carer quality of life (EQ-5D-3L and Caregiver Burden Inventory); cost-utility analysis and health-care resource use; tolerability and adverse events. Acceptability and attitudes to

  8. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 168: Area 25 and 26 Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 2 with Errata Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2006-12-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 168: Area 25 and 26, Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each corrective action site (CAS) within CAU 168. The corrective action investigation (CAI) was conducted in accordance with the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 168: Area 25 and 26, Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada'', as developed under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 168 is located in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada and is comprised of the following 12 CASs: CAS 25-16-01, Construction Waste Pile; CAS 25-16-03, MX Construction Landfill; CAS 25-19-02, Waste Disposal Site; CAS 25-23-02, Radioactive Storage RR Cars; CAS 25-23-13, ETL - Lab Radioactive Contamination; CAS 25-23-18, Radioactive Material Storage; CAS 25-34-01, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; CAS 25-34-02, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; CAS 25-99-16, USW G3; CAS 26-08-01, Waste Dump/Burn Pit; CAS 26-17-01, Pluto Waste Holding Area; and CAS 26-19-02, Contaminated Waste Dump No.2. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against preliminary action levels (PALs) to determine contaminants of concern (COCs) for CASs within CAU 168. Radiological measurements of railroad cars and test equipment were compared to unrestricted (free) release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from the CAI activities revealed the following: (1) Corrective Action Site 25-16-01 contains hydrocarbon-contaminated soil at concentrations exceeding the PAL. The contamination is at discrete locations associated with asphalt debris. (2) No COCs were identified at CAS 25-16-03. Buried construction waste is present in at least two

  9. Experimental study of radiative shocks at PALS facility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stehlé, C.; Gonzalez, M.; Kozlová, Michaela; Rus, Bedřich; Mocek, Tomáš; Acef, O.; Colombier, J.P.; Lanz, T.; Champion, N.; Jakubczak, Krzysztof; Polan, Jiří; Barroso, P.; Baudin, D.; Audit, E.; Dostál, Jan; Stupka, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 2 (2010), s. 253-261 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laboratory astrophysics * hydrodynamics * laser plasmas * shocks * stellar formation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.656, year: 2010 http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayFulltext?type=6&fid=7807203&jid=LPB&volumeId=28&issueId=02&aid=7807202&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S02630346100

  10. Eco-efficiency guiding micro-level actions towards sustainability. Ten basic steps for analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huppes, Gjalt; Ishikawa, Masanobu

    2009-01-01

    This paper looks at the compatibility between technological improvements at the micro-level and sustainability at the macro-level. The two main approaches to prevent environmental degradation are technological improvement and economic degrowth. How do we establish the sustainability of technological options? LCA-type analysis of the technology system, combined with economic cost analysis, offers a first integrated eco-efficiency score. However, such a technology analysis focuses on micro-level technology relations only, is usually too optimistic and ignores other constraints implied in a choice. Fitting more comprehensive knowledge into the sustainability evaluation of options requires a unifying systematic framework, which is worked out in the present paper as a ten-step procedure. The integrative framework for empirical analysis is ultimately a comparative-static systems analysis at macro-level, not in a deterministic dynamic mode, which is impossible, but as a knowledge-fed scenario analysis. The analysis shows the change in society's overall eco-efficiency, combining total value creation with total environmental impacts. Possible domains of application include not only technology choices like those in eco-innovation, including changed consumption styles and volumes, but also changes in policies regarding technologies and markets, whether direct policy shifts or indirect changes through institutional adaptations. Ultimately, such a framework also allows culturally framed questions about the type of society we would like to live in, to be analysed in terms of their economic and environmental consequences. (author)

  11. Following Alice: Theories of Critical Thinking and Reflective Practice in Action at Postgraduate Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanwick, Ruth; Kitchen, Ruth; Jarvis, Joy; McCracken, Wendy; O'Neil, Rachel; Powers, Steve

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a flexible framework of principles for teaching critical thinking and reflective practice skills at the postgraduate level. It reports on a collaborative project between four UK institutions providing postgraduate programmes in deaf education. Through a critical review of current theories of critical thinking and reflective…

  12. [Level of knowledge and action on lipaemia among Spanish primary and specialist care doctors. Press cholesterol study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellán Alemán, José; Leal Hernández, Mariano; Martínez Pastor, Antonio; Hernández Menárguez, Fernando; García-Galbis Marín, José Antonio; Jara Gómez, Purificación

    2006-09-01

    To find the level of knowledge, the guidelines for action and the monitoring of lipaemia by Spanish primary care and specialist doctors. A self-defined questionnaire of 12 items was designed. Data on the population treated and the subjective evaluation of objectives, and on the management and monitoring of lipid parameters were filled in. A total of 1998 doctors from the whole of Spain took part; 68.8% of the doctors interviewed worked in primary health care and 30.2% in specialist centres or hospitals. A 91% of the doctors said they followed international consensus on monitoring lipaemia. The most commonly used objective therapeutic parameter for treating lipaemia was LDL-cholesterol (83%), followed by total cholesterol (62%), HDL-cholesterol (56%) and triglycerides (51%). If the patient's lipaemia was well controlled, then 21.8% of doctors reduced the doses of lipid-lowerers. In general terms, no great differences were appreciated between the criteria followed by PC and by specialist doctors. The criteria for action on lipaemia could be improved. There are no important differences of view or action in clinical and therapeutic criteria for Lipaemia cases between PC and specialist doctors.

  13. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 428: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 1 and 5 Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. S. Tobiason

    2000-08-01

    Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 1 and 5 are located in Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) (Figure 1). The site is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 428 and includes Corrective Action Sites 03-05-002-SW01 (Septic Waste System 1 [SWS 1]), and 03-05-002-SW05 (Septic Waste System 5 [SWS 5]). The site history for the CAU is provided in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1999). SWS 1 consists of two leachfields and associated septic tanks. SWS 1 received effluent from both sanitary and industrial sources from various buildings in Area 3 of the TTR (Figure 2). SWS 5 is comprised of one leachfield and outfall with an associated septic tank. SWS 5 received effluent from sources in Building 03-50 in Area 3 of the TTR (Figure 2). Both systems were active until 1990 when a consolidated sewer system was installed. The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to provide the strategy and methodology to close the Area 3 SWS 1 and 5. The CAU will be closed following state and federal regulations and the FFACO (1996). Site characterization was done during May and June 1999. Samples of the tank contents, leachfield soil, and soil under the tanks and pipes were collected. The results of the characterization were reported in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (DOE/NV, 2000). Additional sampling was done in May 2000, the results of which are presented in this plan. Soil sample results indicated that two constituents of concern were detected above Preliminary Action Levels (PALs). Total arsenic was detected at a concentration of 68.7 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg). The arsenic was found under the center distribution line at the proximal end of the SWS 5 Leachfield (Figure 3). Total benzo(a)pyrene was detected at a concentration of 480 micrograms per kilogram ({micro}g/kg). The benzo(a)pyrene was found in the soil under the

  14. Coastal Hazards Maps: Actionable Information for Communities Facing Sea-Level Rise (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibeaut, J. C.; Barraza, E.

    2010-12-01

    Barrier islands along the U.S. Gulf coast remain under increasing pressure from development. This development and redevelopment is occurring despite recent hurricanes, ongoing erosion, and sea-level rise. To lessen the impacts of these hazards, local governments need information in a form that is useful for informing the public, making policy, and enforcing development rules. We recently completed the Galveston Island Geohazards Map for the city of Galveston, Texas and are currently developing maps for the Mustang and South Padre Island communities. The maps show areas that vary in their susceptibility to, and function for, mitigating the effects of geological processes, including sea-level rise, land subsidence, erosion and storm-surge flooding and washover. The current wetlands, beaches and dunes are mapped as having the highest geohazard potential both in terms of their exposure to hazardous conditions and their mitigating effects of those hazards for the rest of the island. These existing “critical environments” are generally protected under existing regulations. Importantly, however, the mapping recognizes that sea-level rise and shoreline retreat are changing the island; therefore, 60-year model projections of the effects of these changes are incorporated into the map. The areas that we project will become wetlands, beaches and dunes in the next 60 years are not protected. These areas are the most difficult to deal with from a policy point of view, yet we must address what happens there if real progress is to be made in how we live with sea-level rise. The geohazards maps draw on decades of geological knowledge of how barrier islands behave and put it in a form that is intuitive to the public and directly useful to planners. Some of the “messages” in the map include: leave salt marshes alone and give them room to migrate inland as sea level rises; set back and move development away from the shoreline to provide space for beaches and protective dunes

  15. Same-level peer-assisted learning in medical clinical placements: a narrative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Joanna; Molloy, Elizabeth; Haines, Terry; Canny, Benedict

    2016-04-01

    Peer-assisted learning (PAL) is increasingly used in medical education, and the benefits of this approach have been reported. Previous reviews have focused on the benefits of peer tutoring of junior students by senior students. Forms of PAL such as discussion groups and role-playing have been neglected, as have alternative teacher-learner configurations (e.g. same-level PAL) and the effects on other stakeholders, including clinician educators and patients. This review examines the benefits of same-level PAL for students, clinician educators and patients in pre-registration clinical medical education. Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL and ERIC were searched in March 2014. A total of 1228 abstracts were retrieved for review; 64 full-text papers were assessed. Data were extracted from empirical studies describing a same-level PAL initiative in a clinical setting, focusing on effects beyond academic performance and student satisfaction. Qualitative thematic analysis was employed to identify types of PAL and to cluster the reported PAL effects. Forty-three studies were included in the review. PAL activities were categorised into role-play, discussion, teaching and assessment. Only 50% of studies reported information beyond self-report and satisfaction with the PAL intervention. Benefits for students (including development of communication and professional skills) and clinician educators (developing less-used facilitation skills) were reported. Direct patient outcomes were not identified. Caveats to the use of PAL emerged, and guidelines for the use of PAL were perceived as useful. Many student-related benefits of PAL were identified. PAL contributes to the development of crucial skills required for a doctor in the workplace. Vertical integration of learning and teaching skills across the curriculum and tools such as feedback checklists may be required for successful PAL in the clinical environment. Benefits for patients and educators were poorly characterised within the

  16. Defining the action spectrum of potential PGC-1α activators on a mitochondrial and cellular level in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Annette; Noe, Natalie; Tischner, Christin; Kladt, Nikolay; Lellek, Veronika; Schauß, Astrid; Wenz, Tina

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a therapeutic benefit of pharmaceutical PGC-1α activation in cellular and murine model of disorders linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. While in some cases, this effect seems to be clearly associated with boosting of mitochondrial function, additional alterations as well as tissue- and cell-type-specific effects might play an important role. We initiated a comprehensive analysis of the effects of potential PGC-1α-activating drugs and pharmaceutically targeted the PPAR (bezafibrate, rosiglitazone), AMPK (AICAR, metformin) and Sirt1 (resveratrol) pathways in HeLa cells, neuronal cells and PGC-1α-deficient MEFs to get insight into cell type specificity and PGC-1α dependence of their working action. We used bezafibrate as a model drug to assess the effect on a tissue-specific level in a murine model. Not all analyzed drugs activate the PGC pathway or alter mitochondrial protein levels. However, they all affect supramolecular assembly of OXPHOS complexes and OXPHOS protein stability. In addition, a clear drug- and cell-type-specific influence on several cellular stress pathways as well as on post-translational modifications could be demonstrated, which might be relevant to fully understand the action of the analyzed drugs in the disease state. Importantly, the effect on the activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and stress response program upon drug treatment is PGC-1α dependent in MEFs demonstrating not only the pleiotropic effects of this molecule but points also to the working mechanism of the analyzed drugs. The definition of the action spectrum of the different drugs forms the basis for a defect-specific compensation strategy and a future personalized therapeutic approach.

  17. Facilitating learning and action for food sovereignty on family and community levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaarst, Mette

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on strengthening local communities in West Uganda, where an approach focusing on building up social capital and sharing responsibilities for own development within and between families. We see it as an approach to reach food sovereignty because it takes its roots within...... in reaching food sovereignty, - Building social capital in local communities is a key to control over food, - Context-specific learning and knowledge in combination with an organizational and institutional capacity in local CBOs or NGOs all are paramount for strengthening food sovereignty on a local level...... the family itself, where the responsibility for both family food and cash crops exists and is not always shared equally. When families start working together and use the resources in a group of both men and women, elders and youth, a local community becomes stronger and can match the capacities within...

  18. Potential Causes of Significant Inventory Differences at Bulk Handling Facilities and the Importance of Inventory Difference Action Levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homer, Alan; O’Hagan, Brendan

    2015-01-01

    Accountancy for nuclear material can be split into two categories. Firstly, where possible, accountancy should be in terms of items that can be transferred as discrete packages and their contents fixed at the time of their creation. All items must remain accounted for at all times, and a single missing item is considered significant. Secondly, where nuclear material is unconstrained, for example in a reprocessing plant where it can change form, there is an uncertainty that relates to the amount of material present in any location. Cumulatively, these uncertainties can be summed and provide a context for any estimate of material in a process. Any apparent loss or gain between what has been physically measured within a facility during its physical inventory take and what is reported within its nuclear material accounts is known as an inventory difference. The cumulative measurement uncertainties can be used to set an action level for the inventory difference so that if an inventory difference is observed outside of such action levels, the difference is classified as significant and an investigation to find the root cause(s) is required. The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential causes of significant inventory differences and to provide a framework within which an inventory difference investigation can be carried out.

  19. Experimental and theoretical investigations of mechanisms responsible for plasma jets formation at PALS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Demchenko, N. N.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Kálal, M.; Ullschmied, Jiří; Krouský, Eduard; Mašek, Karel; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Rohlena, Karel; Skála, Jiří; Pisarczyk, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 3 (2009), s. 415-427 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508; CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : Laser-plasma interaction * laser produced-plasma jet * radiative cooling * target irradiation geometry * PALS laser * laser interferometry Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.420, year: 2008

  20. Clam-Gallasův palác - emblematická architektura?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konečný, Lubomír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 28, - (2009), s. 91-98 ISSN 0231-7443. [Život pražských paláců. Praha, 09.10.2007-11.10.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80330511 Keywords : Clam-Gallas Palace * Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach * architecture * emblem s * imprints Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage

  1. Dynamics of a quantum two-level system under the action of phase-diffusion field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobakinskaya, E.A. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures of RAS, Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Pankratov, A.L., E-mail: alp@ipm.sci-nnov.ru [Institute for Physics of Microstructures of RAS, Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Vaks, V.L. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures of RAS, Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-09

    We study a behavior of quantum two-level system, interacting with noisy phase-diffusion field. The dynamics is shown to split into two regimes, determined by the coherence time of the phase-diffusion field. For both regimes we present a model of quantum system behavior and discuss possible applications of the obtained effect for spectroscopy. In particular, the obtained analytical formula for the macroscopic polarization demonstrates that the phase-diffusion field does not affect the absorption line shape, which opens up an intriguing possibility of noisy spectroscopy, based on broadband sources with Lorentzian line shape. -- Highlights: ► We study dynamics of quantum system interacting with noisy phase-diffusion field. ► At short times the phase-diffusion field induces polarization in the quantum system. ► At long times the noise leads to polarization decay and heating of a quantum system. ► Simple model of interaction is derived. ► Application of the described effects for spectroscopy is discussed.

  2. An application of programmatic assessment for learning (PAL) system for general practice training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuwirth, Lambert; Valentine, Nyoli; Dilena, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Programmatic assessment for learning (PAL) is becoming more and more popular as a concept but its implementation is not without problems. In this paper we describe the design principles behind a PAL program in a general practice training context. Design principles: The PAL program was designed to optimise the meaningfulness of assessment information for the registrar and to make him/her use that information to self regulate their learning. The main principles in the program were cognitivist and transformative. The main cognitive principles we used were fostering the understanding of deep structures and stimulating transfer by making registrars constantly connect practice experiences with background knowledge. Ericsson's deliberate practice approach was built in with regard to the provision of feedback combined with Pintrich's model of self regulation. Mezirow's transformative learning and insights from social network theory on collaborative learning were used to support the registrars in their development to become GP professionals. Finally the principal of test enhanced learning was optimised. Epilogue: We have provided this example explain the design decisions behind our program, but not want to present our program as the solution to any given situation.

  3. One NASA: Sharing Knowledge Through an Agency-wide Process Asset Library (PAL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truss, Baraka J.

    2006-01-01

    This poster session will cover the key purpose and components behind implementing the NASA PAL website. This session will present the current results, describing the process used to create the website, the current usage measure, and will demonstrate how NASA is truly becoming ONE. The target audience for the poster session includes those currently implementing the CMMI model and looking for PAL adoption techniques. To continue to be the leader in space, science and technology, NASA is using this agency-wide PAL to share knowledge, work products and lessons learned through this website. Many organizations have failed to recognize how the efforts of process improvement fit into overall organizational effort. However, NASA as an agency has adopted the benefits of process improvement by the creation of this website to foster communication between its ten centers. The poster session will cover the following, topics outlined below: 1) Website purpose; 2) Characteristics of the website; 3) User accounts status; 4) Website content size; and 5) Usage percentages.

  4. Development and Evaluation of vetPAL, a Student-Led, Peer-Assisted Learning Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Lucy S W; Warman, Sheena; Pither, Zoe; Baillie, Sarah

    Based on an idea from a final-year student, Bristol Veterinary School introduced vetPAL, a student-led, peer-assisted learning program. The program involved fifth-year (final-year) students acting as tutors and leading sessions for fourth-year students (tutees) in clinical skills and revision (review) topics. The initiative aimed to supplement student learning while also providing tutors with opportunities to further develop a range of skills. All tutors received training and the program was evaluated using questionnaires collected from tutees and tutors after each session. Tutees' self-rated confidence increased significantly in clinical skills and for revision topics. Advantages of being taught by students rather than staff included the informal atmosphere, the tutees' willingness to ask questions, and the relatability of the tutors. The small group size and the style of learning in the revision sessions (i.e., group work, discussions, and interactivity) were additional positive aspects identified by both tutees and tutors. Benefits for tutors included developing their communication and teaching skills. The training sessions were considered key in helping tutors feel prepared to lead sessions, although the most difficult aspects were the lack of teaching experience and time management. Following the successful pilot of vetPAL, plans are in place to make the program permanent and sustainable, while incorporating necessary changes based on the evaluation and the student leader's experiences running the program. A vetPAL handbook has been created to facilitate organization of the program for future years.

  5. Feasibility and reliability of remote assessment of PALS psychomotor skills via interactive videoconferencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Douglas L; Molsberry, Dianne M

    2009-03-01

    This study determined inter-rater agreement between skill assessments provided by on-site PALS evaluators with ratings from evaluators at a remote site viewing the same skill performance over a videoconferencing network. Judgments about feasibility of remote evaluation were also obtained from the evaluators and PALS course participants. Two remote and two on-site instructors independently rated performance of 27 course participants who performed cardiac and shock/respiratory emergency core cases. Inter-rater reliability was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Feasibility was assessed with surveys of evaluators and course participants. Core cases were under the direction of the remote evaluators. The ICC for overall agreement on pass/fail decisions was 0.997 for the cardiac cases and 0.998 for the shock/respiratory cases. Perfect agreement was reached on 52 of 54 pass/fail decisions. Across all evaluators, all core cases, and all participants, 2584 ratings of individual skill criteria were provided, of which 21 (0.8%) were ratings in which a single evaluator disagreed with the other three evaluators. No trends emerged for location of the disagreeing evaluator. Survey responses indicated that remote evaluation was acceptable and feasible to course participants and to the evaluators. Videoconferencing technology was shown to provide adequate spatial and temporal resolution for PALS evaluators at-a-distance from course participants to agree with ratings of on-site evaluators.

  6. The effect of peer assisted learning (PAL) on anatomic competencies of prospective student’s biology teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, S.

    2018-05-01

    Research about the effect of Peer Assisted Learning (PAL) strategy on Plant Anatomy Course, which aims to improve anatomic competencies of prospective student’s biology teacher, has been done. This study used a quasi-experimental pre-test post-test control group design. The draft includes a group of students who were given a pre-test which is then followed by observing the PAL treatment process and post-test. The other students group (control) was given the pre-test and post-test only. The PAL program began with a discussion between the lecturer and the tutor about the pretest results and then discussion between the tutors and their tutees in the class about the responses items. After that, all students were assigned to answer a set of response items, and then did the posttest. The results showed that the PAL strategy can increase student’s anatomic literacy significantly and can increase student’s anatomic lab skills no significantly. Thus the PAL strategy implementation has a potential to improve student’s anatomic competencies. The generally students weaknesses were they lack practice in interpreting of research results in the graphs form and rarely shared about anatomic lab skills. All students respond positively to the PAL strategy.

  7. Phenylalanine ammonia lyase from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPAL2): A potent MIO-enzyme for the synthesis of non-canonical aromatic alpha-amino acids: Part I: Comparative characterization to the enzymes from Petroselinum crispum (PcPAL1) and Rhodosporidium toruloides (RtPAL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreßen, Alana; Hilberath, Thomas; Mackfeld, Ursula; Billmeier, Arne; Rudat, Jens; Pohl, Martina

    2017-09-20

    Phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPAL2) was comparatively characterized to the well-studied enzyme from parsley (PcPAL1) and Rhodosporidium toruloides (RtPAL) with respect to kinetic parameters for the deamination and the amination reaction, pH- and temperature optima and the substrate range of the amination reaction. Whereas both plant enzymes are specific for phenylalanine, the bifunctional enzyme from Rhodosporidium toruloides shows K M -values for L-Phe and L-Tyr in the same order of magnitude and, compared to both plant enzymes, a 10-15-fold higher activity. At 30°C all enzymes were sufficiently stable with half-lives of 3.4days (PcPAL1), 4.6days (AtPAL2) and 9.7days (RtPAL/TAL). Very good results for the amination of various trans-cinnamic acid derivatives were obtained using E. coli cells as whole cell biocatalysts in ammonium carbonate buffer. Investigation of the substrate ranges gave interesting results for the newly tested enzymes from A. thaliana and R. toruloides. Only the latter accepts besides 4-hydroxy-CA also 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-CA as a substrate, which is an interesting intermediate for the formation of pharmaceutically relevant L-Dopa. AtPAL2 is a very good catalyst for the formation of (S)-3-F-Phe, (S)-4-F-Phe and (S)-2-Cl-Phe. Such non-canonical amino acids are valuable building blocks for the formation of various drug molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Adolescent Personality in Social Contexts: Pals, Partners, and Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, R.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current dissertation was to show how adolescent personality was linked to youths’ developmental outcomes. Our findings suggest that adolescent personality has concurrent and predictive relations to a variety of important developmental outcomes. Specifically, adolescent personality was associated with internalizing and externalizing problem behaviors at an individual level. Also, adolescent personality was related to conflict frequency and conflict resolution strategies as well ...

  9. Simulation de la sédimentation dans un bassin évaporitique à niveau d'eau sous influence eustatique. Application au bassin paléogène de Mulhouse (Alsace, France Simulation of Sedimentation in an Evaporitic Basin At Water Level under Eustatic Influence. Application to the Paleogene Mulhouse Basin (Alsace, France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carpentier B.

    2006-11-01

    lower body of salt water (salt saturated, an upper body of salt water (with varying salinity and sometimes at the surface a body of low-salt water linked to the supply of continental water. The lower body of salt water, called captive brine , is defined as the water layer underneath the threshold. Its height during time depends on the difference between the depth of the sediments deposited and the subsidence. We will assume that the depth of the basin (and hence the subsidence is always sufficient for the captive brineto be able to exist. The upper body of salt water, called active body of water , is defined as the salt water layer located topographically above the threshold. It is in communication with the transfer zone or the open marine domain/basin . Its height during time thus depends on eustatic variations. The body of low-salt water corresponds to a body of pellicular water whose existence is defined by the presence or absence of influxes of fresh continental water in the mesh. On the scale of the basin, this body of low-salt water has a geographic extension that is governed by the regional hydrologic balance (influxes of continental water and evaporation. It may not exist at the level of the mesh considered, and its presence at the top is linked to the very strong contrast of density between the low-salt water and the underlying brines. In the model, sedimentation as a function of time is governed by the alternating passage of the regional hydrologic balance between the two states:(a State 1 ( dryperiod in which the volume of continental water supplied to the top of the mesh is lower than the volume of water evaporated. There is no body of low-salt water, and sedimentation is evaporitic. (b State 2 ( wetperiod in which the volume of continental water supplied to the top of the mesh is greater than the volume of water evaporated. A body of low-salt water exists at the top of the mesh, and sedimentation is shaly. The duration of each stateand the regional

  10. Zur Palökologie der Euproopiden im Nordwestdeutschen Oberkarbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Schultka

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Tierische Fossilien aus dem Westfal D des Piesbergs bei Osnabrück sind seit 1860 vereinzelt immer wieder beschrieben worden. Doch erst durch die Funde der letzten 30 Jahre zählt der Piesberg zu den bedeutendsten Fundorten terrestrischer Fauna im Karbon. Erstmals werden 45 stratifiziert aufgesammelte Individuen von Euproops untersucht. Einige Details der Morphologie sowie eine dichte Behaarung werden beschrieben. Auf der Basis dieser Merkmale sowie der Verteilung juveniler und adulter Individuen im geologischen Profil wird eine Deutung des Lebensraumes der Euproopiden versucht. Danach hielten sich die juvenilen Individuen dieser Tiergruppe als Laubstreubewohner in feuchten Spülsäumen flacher ruhiger Gewässer und Laubstreuhorizonten auf. Die adulten Formen lebten vornehmlich benthisch in ufernahen Gewässern und verließen wohl nur noch gelegentlich das Wasser. Since 1860 articulated fossils of terrestrial taxa have been described from lower Westfalian D sediments of the Piesberg section near Osnabrück (northwestern Germany. In this paper 45 individuals of the genus Euproops, sampled from particular levels in the profile, are reported on for the first time. Analysis of the fossil material reveals new morphological details – especially setae densely covering the ventral side – that, combined with the geological setting of the profile, gives novel insights into the palaeoenvironment and to the hypothesis of subaerial activity. Young individuals of Euproops may have been "litter dwellers" inhabiting forest-litter and partly decayed plant material that had washed ashore. By contrast, adults formed a principal component of the nearshore benthic fauna. They were able to leave the water, but only for short periods. This is proved by the occurence of adults and juveniles in different lithologies. doi:10.1002/mmng.20000030105

  11. Maximal sustained levels of energy expenditure in humans during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jamie A; Nguyen, David D; Ruby, Brent C; Schoeller, Dale A

    2011-12-01

    Migrating birds have been able to sustain an energy expenditure (EE) that is five times their basal metabolic rate. Although humans can readily reach these levels, it is not yet clear what levels can be sustained for several days. The study's purposes were 1) to determine the upper limits of human EE and whether or not those levels can be sustained without inducing catabolism of body tissues and 2) to determine whether initial body weight is related to the levels that can be sustained. We compiled data on documented EE as measured by doubly labeled water during high levels of physical activity (minimum of five consecutive days). We calculated the physical activity level (PAL) of each individual studied (PAL = total EE / basal metabolic rate) from the published data. Correlations were run to examine the relationship between initial body weight and body weight lost with both total EE and PAL. The uppermost limit of EE was a peak PAL of 6.94 that was sustained for 10 consecutive days of a 95-d race. Only two studies reported PALs above 5.0; however, significant decreases in body mass were found in each study (0.45-1.39 kg·wk(-1) of weight loss). To test whether initial weight affects the ability to sustain high PALs, we found a significant positive correlation between TEE and initial body weight (r = 0.46, P body weight (r = 0.27, not statistically significant). Some elite humans are able to sustain PALs above 5.0 for a minimum of 10 d. Although significant decreases in body weight occur at this level, catabolism of body tissue may be preventable in situations with proper energy intake. Further, initial body weight does not seem to affect the sustainability of PALs.

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 410: Waste Disposal Trenches, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0 (includes ROTCs 1, 2, and 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NNSA/NV

    2002-07-16

    uranium, beryllium, total petroleum hydrocarbons; and total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals. Field activities will consist of geophysical and radiological surveys, and collecting soil samples at biased locations by appropriate methods. A two-step data quality objective strategy will be followed: (1) define the nature of contamination at each CAS location by identifying any contamination above preliminary action levels (PALs); and, (2) determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  13. Suppressed phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity after heat shock in transgenic Nicotiana plumbaginifolia containing an Arabidopsis HSP18.2-parsley PAL2 chimera gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriwaki, M; Yamakawa, T; Washino, T; Kodama, T; Igarashi, Y

    1999-01-01

    The activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL; EC 4.3.1.5) after heat shock (HS) in leaves and buds of transgenic Nicotiana plumbaginifolia containing an Arabidopsis HSP18.2 promoter-parsley phenylalanine ammonia-lyase 2 (HSP18.2-PAL2) chimera gene was examined. Immediately after HS treatment at 44 degrees C for 5 h, the PAL activity in both transgenic and normal (untransformed) plants was 35-38% lower than that before HS. At normal temperature (25-26 degrees C), the PAL activity recovered within 5 h of ending the HS treatment in normal plants, but not until 12-24 h in transgenic plants containing the HSP18.2-PAL2 gene. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed the presence of parsley PAL2 mRNA in transgenic plants, which remained for 8-12 h following 5-h HS at 44 degrees C; the mRNA was not observed before HS. The content of chlorogenic acid (CGA; 3-caffeoylquinic acid) decreased drastically 8-12 h after HS in transgenic plants, but only slightly in normal plants. Thus, the decrease in PAL activity accompanied by expression of the parsley PAL2 gene after HS treatment corresponded to the decrease in CGA synthesis. These results might be attributed to post-transcriptional degradation of endogenous PAL mRNA triggered by transcription of the transgene.

  14. Examining the validity of the ActivPAL monitor in measuring posture and ambulatory movement in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminian Saeideh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decreasing sedentary activities that involve prolonged sitting may be an important strategy to reduce obesity and other physical and psychosocial health problems in children. The first step to understanding the effect of sedentary activities on children’s health is to objectively assess these activities with a valid measurement tool. Purpose To examine the validity of the ActivPAL monitor in measuring sitting/lying, standing, and walking time, transition counts and step counts in children in a laboratory setting. Methods Twenty five healthy elementary school children (age 9.9 ± 0.3 years; BMI 18.2 ± 1.9; mean ± SD were randomly recruited across the Auckland region, New Zealand. Children were fitted with ActivPAL monitors and observed during simulated free-living activities involving sitting/lying, standing and walking, followed by treadmill and over-ground activities at various speeds (slow, normal, fast against video observation (criterion measure. The ActivPAL sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transition counts and steps were also compared with video data. The accuracy of step counts measured by the ActivPAL was also compared against the New Lifestyles NL-2000 and the Yamax Digi-Walker SW-200 pedometers. Results We observed a perfect correlation between the ActivPAL monitor in time spent sitting/lying, standing, and walking in simulated free-living activities with direct observation. Correlations between the ActivPAL and video observation in total numbers of sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions were high (r = 0.99 ± 0.01. Unlike pedometers, the ActivPAL did not misclassify fidgeting as steps taken. Strong correlations (r = 0.88-1.00 between ActivPAL step counts and video observation in both treadmill and over-ground slow and normal walking were also observed. During treadmill and over-ground fast walking and running, the correlations were low (r = 0.21-0.46. Conclusion The ActivPAL monitor is

  15. Mechanisms and manifestations of toxic actions at the bone tissue level; Mecanismes et manifestations de l'action des toxiques au niveau du tissu osseux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The principal abnormalities determined by toxic at the bone level are: osteoporosis, osteomalacia, osteosclerosis or osteopetrosis. The principal toxics having a noxiousness at the bone level are: the fluorine, the phosphorus, the lead, the bismuth, the cadmium and the strontium. The strontium 90 has an important radioactivity that gives at the bone level osteosarcomas or at low doses, leukemoid reactions and marrow angiosarcoma. (N.C.)

  16. Effect of microbial action on the corrosion potential of austenitic alloy containers for high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angell, P.; Dunn, D.S.; Cragnolino, G.A.

    1996-01-01

    The safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) entails the ability to ensure the integrity of waste containers for prolonged time periods. It is generally accepted that under certain conditions, microbial action may change local benign environments to those in which localized corrosion can be actively promoted. The use of repassivation potential (E rp ) in relation to the value of the corrosion potential (E corr ) has been proposed as a means of assessing the propensity of a metallic material to localized corrosion. Microbial activity is known to influence E corr however, the precise mechanism is unresolved. Shewanella putrefaciens, a bacteria with many of the characteristics of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), are being grown under controlled conditions on 316L stainless steel (SS) surfaces to understand the relationship between E corr and metabolic activity. It has been observed that the growth of the bacteria under aerobic conditions, without the production of metabolic sulfide, leads to only minor variation in E corr . These changes possibly correlate to the periods of active bacterial growth

  17. Multi-Level Policy Dialogues, Processes, and Actions: Challenges and Opportunities for National REDD+ Safeguards Measurement, Reporting, and Verification (MRV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Jagger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available REDD+ social safeguards have gained increasing attention in numerous forums. This paper reviews the evolution of multi-level policy dialogues, processes, and actions related to REDD+ social safeguards (e.g., Cancun Safeguards 1–5 among policy makers, civil society organizations, and within the media in Brazil, Indonesia and Tanzania, three countries with well advanced REDD+ programs. We find that progress on core aspects of social safeguards is uneven across the three countries. Brazil is by far the most advanced having drafted a REDD+ social safeguards policy. Both Brazil and Indonesia have benefited from progress made by strong sub-national entities in the operationalization of REDD+ safeguards including free prior and informed consent (FPIC, participation, and benefit sharing. Tanzania has weakly articulated how social safeguards will be operationalized and has a more top-down approach. We conclude that in all three countries, measuring, reporting and verifying progress on social safeguards is likely to be a complex issue. Stakeholders with vested interests in REDD+ social safeguards operate in polycentric rather than nested systems, suggesting that aggregation of information from local to national-scale will be a challenge. However, polycentric systems are also likely to support more transparent and comprehensive safeguards systems. Clear direction from the international community and financing for REDD+ safeguard MRV is essential if REDD+ social safeguards are to be meaningfully integrated into forest-based climate mitigation strategies.

  18. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 428: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 1 and 5 Tonopah Test Range, Nevada; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. S. Tobiason

    2000-01-01

    Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 1 and 5 are located in Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) (Figure 1). The site is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 428 and includes Corrective Action Sites 03-05-002-SW01 (Septic Waste System 1[SWS 1]), and 03-05-002-SW05 (Septic Waste System 5[SWS 5]). The site history for the CAU is provided in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office[DOE/NV], 1999). SWS 1 consists of two leachfields and associated septic tanks. SWS 1 received effluent from both sanitary and industrial sources from various buildings in Area 3 of the TTR (Figure 2). SWS 5 is comprised of one leachfield and outfall with an associated septic tank. SWS 5 received effluent from sources in Building 03-50 in Area 3 of the TTR (Figure 2). Both systems were active until 1990 when a consolidated sewer system was installed. The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to provide the strategy and methodology to close the Area 3 SWS 1 and 5. The CAU will be closed following state and federal regulations and the FFACO (1996). Site characterization was done during May and June 1999. Samples of the tank contents, leachfield soil, and soil under the tanks and pipes were collected. The results of the characterization were reported in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (DOE/NV, 2000). Additional sampling was done in May 2000, the results of which are presented in this plan. Soil sample results indicated that two constituents of concern were detected above Preliminary Action Levels (PALs). Total arsenic was detected at a concentration of 68.7 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg). The arsenic was found under the center distribution line at the proximal end of the SWS 5 Leachfield (Figure 3). Total benzo(a)pyrene was detected at a concentration of 480 micrograms per kilogram ((micro)g/kg). The benzo(a)pyrene was found in the soil under the discharge

  19. Optimisation of transgene action at the post-transcriptional level: high quality parthenocarpic fruits in industrial tomatoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Defez Roberto

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic engineering of parthenocarpy confers to horticultural plants the ability to produce fruits under environmental conditions that curtail fruit productivity and quality. The DefH9-iaaM transgene, whose predicted action is to confer auxin synthesis specifically in the placenta, ovules and derived tissues, has been shown to confer parthenocarpy to several plant species (tobacco, eggplant, tomato and varieties. Results UC82 tomato plants, a typical cultivar used by the processing industry, transgenic for the DefH9-iaaM gene produce parthenocarpic fruits that are malformed. UC82 plants transgenic for the DefH9-RI-iaaM, a DefH9-iaaM derivative gene modified in its 5'ULR by replacing 53 nucleotides immediately upstream of the AUG initiation codon with an 87 nucleotides-long sequence derived from the rolA intron sequence, produce parthenocarpic fruits of high quality. In an in vitro translation system, the iaaM mRNA, modified in its 5'ULR is translated 3–4 times less efficiently than the original transcript. An optimal expressivity of parthenocarpy correlates with a reduced transgene mRNA steady state level in DefH9-RI-iaaM flower buds in comparison to DefH9-iaaM flower buds. Consistent with the known function of the iaaM gene, flower buds transgenic for the DefH9-RI-iaaM gene contain ten times more IAA than control untransformed flower buds, but five times less than DefH9-iaaM flower buds. Conclusions By using an auxin biosynthesis transgene downregulated at the post-transcriptional level, an optimal expressivity of parthenocarpy has been achieved in a genetic background not suitable for the original transgene. Thus, the method allows the generation of a wider range of expressivity of the desired trait in transgenic plants.

  20. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 356: Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 356, Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. This CAU is located in Areas 3 and 20 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 356 consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-04-01, Area 3 Change House Septic System; 03-09-01, Mud Pit Spill Over; 03-09-03, Mud Pit; 03-09-04, Mud Pit; 03-09-05, Mud Pit; 20-16-01, Landfill; and 20-22-21, Drums. This CR identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's (NNSA/NV's) recommendation that no further corrective action and closure in place is deemed necessary for CAU 356. This recommendation is based on the results of field investigation/closure activities conducted November 20, 2001, through January 3, 2002, and March 11 to 14, 2002. These activities were conducted in accordance with the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan (SAFER) for CAU 356. For CASs 03-09-01, 03-09-03, 20-16-01, and 22-20-21, analytes detected in soil during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against Preliminary Action Levels (PALs) and it was determined that no Contaminants of Concern (COCs) were present. Therefore, no further action is necessary for the soil at these CASs. For CASs 03-04-01, 03-09-04, and 03-09-05, analytes detected in soil during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against PALs and identifies total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) and radionuclides (i.e., americium-241 and/or plutonium 239/240) as COCs. The nature, extent, and concentration of the TPH and radionuclide COCs were bounded by sampling and shown to be relatively immobile. Therefore, closure in place is recommended for these CASs in CAU 356. Further, use restrictions are not required at this CAU beyond the NTS use restrictions identified in

  1. Activity-Oriented Design of Health Pal: A Smart Phone for Elders' Healthcare Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Shih-Chen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless telephones and personal digital assistants are emerging, as the information hubs connect their human users with assorted electronic devices and the World Wide Web. As such, they quickly become the de facto basis for personalized information services. The Kannon project team at the National Chiao Tung University (NCTU in Taiwan is developing a ubiquitous service infrastructure for elders' healthcare support. Among their deliverables, there is a PDA Phone, christened Health Pal, which can communicate with Bluetooth/ZigBee devices, uni¬ver¬sal plug-and-play (UPnP e-home service platforms, and online healthcare providers to offer 24/7 healthcare services to elderly people. This paper presents the early results of this effort including the functional and operational concepts of Health Pal as well as the activity-oriented approach of its design. Preliminary results of its usefulness and usability evaluations are reported. A comparison of this platform against several similar prototypes was also included to illustrate the advantage of applying activity-oriented design approach to human-computer interactions.

  2. Activity-Oriented Design of Health Pal: A Smart Phone for Elders' Healthcare Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chen Fan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Wireless telephones and personal digital assistants are emerging, as the information hubs connect their human users with assorted electronic devices and the World Wide Web. As such, they quickly become the de facto basis for personalized information services. The Kannon project team at the National Chiao Tung University (NCTU in Taiwan is developing a ubiquitous service infrastructure for elders' healthcare support. Among their deliverables, there is a PDA Phone, christened Health Pal, which can communicate with Bluetooth/ZigBee devices, uni¬ver¬sal plug-and-play (UPnP e-home service platforms, and online healthcare providers to offer 24/7 healthcare services to elderly people. This paper presents the early results of this effort including the functional and operational concepts of Health Pal as well as the activity-oriented approach of its design. Preliminary results of its usefulness and usability evaluations are reported. A comparison of this platform against several similar prototypes was also included to illustrate the advantage of applying activity-oriented design approach to human-computer interactions.

  3. Phosphate enhances levan production in the endophytic bacterium Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Pal5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idogawa, Nao; Amamoto, Ryuta; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a gram-negative and endophytic nitrogen-fixing bacterium that has several beneficial effects in host plants; thus, utilization of this bacterium as a biofertilizer in agriculture may be possible. G. diazotrophicus synthesizes levan, a D-fructofuranosyl polymer with β-(2→6) linkages, as an exopolysaccharide and the synthesized levan improves the stress tolerance of the bacterium. In this study, we found that phosphate enhances levan production by G. diazotrophicus Pal5, a wild type strain that showed a stronger mucous phenotype on solid medium containing 28 mM phosphate than on solid medium containing 7 mM phosphate. A G. diazotrophicus Pal5 levansucrase disruptant showed only a weak mucous phenotype regardless of the phosphate concentration, indicating that the mucous phenotype observed on 28 mM phosphate medium was caused by levan. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the effect of a high concentration of phosphate on exopolysaccharide production. PMID:24717418

  4. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert F. Boehlecke

    2005-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit 552 is being investigated because man-made radionuclides and chemical contaminants may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose an unacceptable risk to human health and/or the environment. The CAI will be conducted following the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). The DQOs are used to identify the type, amount, and quality of data needed to define the nature and extent of contamination and identify and evaluate the most appropriate corrective action alternatives for CAU 552. The primary problem statement for the investigation is: ''Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for CAS 12-23-05.'' To address this problem statement, the resolution of the following two decision statements is required: (1) The Decision I statement is: ''Is a contaminant present within the CAU at a concentration that could pose an unacceptable risk to human health and the environment?'' Any site-related contaminant detected at a concentration exceeding the corresponding preliminary action level (PAL), as defined in Section A.1.4.2, will be considered a contaminant of concern (COC). A COC is defined as a site-related constituent that exceeds the screening criteria (PAL). The presence of a contaminant within each CAS is defined as the analytical detection of a COC. (2) The Decision II statement is: ''Determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs.'' This decision will be achieved by the collection of data that are adequate to define the extent of COCs. Decision II samples are used to determine the lateral and vertical extent of the contamination as well as the likelihood of COCs to migrate outside of the site

  5. Water-Vapor Sorption Processes in Nanoporous MgO-Al2O3 Ceramics: the PAL Spectroscopy Study

    OpenAIRE

    Klym, Halyna; Ingram, Adam; Shpotyuk, Oleh; Hadzaman, Ivan; Solntsev, Viacheslav

    2016-01-01

    The water-vapor sorption processes in nanoporous MgO-Al2O3 ceramics are studied with positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) spectroscopy employing positron trapping and positronium (Ps)-decaying modes. It is demonstrated that the longest-lived components in the four-term reconstructed PAL spectra with characteristic lifetimes near 2 and 60?70?ns can be, respectively, attributed to ortho-positronium (o-Ps) traps in nanopores with 0.3- and 1.5?1.8-nm radii. The first o-Ps decaying process include...

  6. Structures of the human Pals1 PDZ domain with and without ligand suggest gated access of Crb to the PDZ peptide-binding groove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, Marina E.; Fletcher, Georgina C.; O’Reilly, Nicola; Purkiss, Andrew G.; Thompson, Barry J. [Cancer Research UK, 44 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); McDonald, Neil Q., E-mail: neil.mcdonald@cancer.org.uk [Cancer Research UK, 44 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Birkbeck College, University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    This study characterizes the interaction between the carboxy-terminal (ERLI) motif of the essential polarity protein Crb and the Pals1/Stardust PDZ-domain protein. Structures of human Pals1 PDZ with and without a Crb peptide are described, explaining the highly conserved nature of the ERLI motif and revealing a sterically blocked peptide-binding groove in the absence of ligand. Many components of epithelial polarity protein complexes possess PDZ domains that are required for protein interaction and recruitment to the apical plasma membrane. Apical localization of the Crumbs (Crb) transmembrane protein requires a PDZ-mediated interaction with Pals1 (protein-associated with Lin7, Stardust, MPP5), a member of the p55 family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs). This study describes the molecular interaction between the Crb carboxy-terminal motif (ERLI), which is required for Drosophila cell polarity, and the Pals1 PDZ domain using crystallography and fluorescence polarization. Only the last four Crb residues contribute to Pals1 PDZ-domain binding affinity, with specificity contributed by conserved charged interactions. Comparison of the Crb-bound Pals1 PDZ structure with an apo Pals1 structure reveals a key Phe side chain that gates access to the PDZ peptide-binding groove. Removal of this side chain enhances the binding affinity by more than fivefold, suggesting that access of Crb to Pals1 may be regulated by intradomain contacts or by protein–protein interaction.

  7. EFFECTS OF CONCENTRIC AND ECCENTRIC MUSCLE ACTIONS ON SERUM MYOSTATIN AND FOLLISTATIN-LIKE RELATED GENE LEVELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemuel Taylor

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study determined the effects of concentric and eccentric muscle actions on the contents of serum myostatin and follistatin-like related gene (FLRG. Eight untrained males performed one exercise bout with each leg, separated by three weeks. One bout consisted of 7 sets of 10 repetitions of eccentric muscle actions of the knee extensors at 150% of the concentric 1-RM while the other bout consisted of 7 sets of 10 repetitions of concentric muscle actions at 75% 1-RM. The legs used and the bouts performed were randomized. Five days prior to each exercise bout, baseline measurements were taken for muscle strength. For both bouts, a venous blood sample was obtained immediately prior to exercise and again at 6, 24, and 48 hr post-exercise. Data were analyzed with 2 X 4 (bout x test ANOVA (p < 0.05. Increases in serum myostatin and FLRG occurred with each exercise bout and, excluding 48 hr post-exercise, were significantly correlated to one another (p < 0.05. After eccentric exercise, peak increases of 68% and 50% (p < 0.05 were observed for myostatin and FLRG, respectively. Similar increases of 54% and 44% (p < 0.05 were observed after concentric muscle actions. There was no significant difference in expression of myostatin or FLRG as a function of muscle action type. Our results suggest that a single bout of exercise with either eccentric or concentric muscle actions appear to elicit a similar increase in serum myostatin and FLRG. Therefore, the type of muscle action may not be as much a mitigating factor for increasing serum myostatin and FLRG rather than the muscle action per se.

  8. Using the PALS Architecture to Verify a Distributed Topology Control Protocol for Wireless Multi-Hop Networks in the Presence of Node Failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Meseguer

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The PALS architecture reduces distributed, real-time asynchronous system design to the design of a synchronous system under reasonable requirements. Assuming logical synchrony leads to fewer system behaviors and provides a conceptually simpler paradigm for engineering purposes. One of the current limitations of the framework is that from a set of independent "synchronous machines", one must compose the entire synchronous system by hand, which is tedious and error-prone. We use Maude's meta-level to automatically generate a synchronous composition from user-provided component machines and a description of how the machines communicate with each other. We then use the new capabilities to verify the correctness of a distributed topology control protocol for wireless networks in the presence of nodes that may fail.

  9. Characterization of control mesoporous glasses (CPGs) using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayed Ahmed, Essmat Mahmoud Hassan

    2008-01-30

    This thesis has two main goals. Firstly and for the first time, the positron annihilation lifetime technique (PALS) is used to characterize the control porous glasses (CPGs) media. All the positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) investigations have been interested in the commercial Vycor glass media of pores size {<=} 4 nm. Therefore, the PALS is used to establish basic correlations between the important physical properties of the CPG (pore size, surface area, and porosity) and the orthopositronium (o-Ps) lifetime. The second goal is to use these correlations to verify the validity of some suggested models and theories to discover possible deviations from the expected behaviour and to discuss the physical point of view for these deviations. Chapter 1 presents an overview of positron, positronium and their interaction with solid materials. Chapter 2 of this thesis is concerned with characterization of porous glass materials. This chapter discusses in detail the preparation methods of porous glasses specially control porous glass and Vycor glass. The gas adsorption phenomenon in porous glass and the related definitions are discussed. The most important terms of the porous glass such as pore size, shape, volume, pore size distribution, surface area, and porosity are discussed. Chapter 3 presents in detail the well known models and the derived equations which correlate between the lifetime of the o-Ps long-lived component and the pore size, pore shape and the temperature dependence of the porous media. Chapter 4 presents an overview of the main experimental techniques used in this thesis, namely positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Chapter 5 explains the sample preparation for the measurements. The chapter represents also the experimental data for the correlation between the o-Ps lifetime and pore sizes for a system of CPG media (from 1 nm to 64 nm). I also studied the temperature dependence of the o-Ps long-lived component in different pore sizes. In this

  10. Characterization of control mesoporous glasses (CPGs) using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayed Ahmed, Essmat Mahmoud Hassan

    2008-01-01

    This thesis has two main goals. Firstly and for the first time, the positron annihilation lifetime technique (PALS) is used to characterize the control porous glasses (CPGs) media. All the positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) investigations have been interested in the commercial Vycor glass media of pores size ≤ 4 nm. Therefore, the PALS is used to establish basic correlations between the important physical properties of the CPG (pore size, surface area, and porosity) and the orthopositronium (o-Ps) lifetime. The second goal is to use these correlations to verify the validity of some suggested models and theories to discover possible deviations from the expected behaviour and to discuss the physical point of view for these deviations. Chapter 1 presents an overview of positron, positronium and their interaction with solid materials. Chapter 2 of this thesis is concerned with characterization of porous glass materials. This chapter discusses in detail the preparation methods of porous glasses specially control porous glass and Vycor glass. The gas adsorption phenomenon in porous glass and the related definitions are discussed. The most important terms of the porous glass such as pore size, shape, volume, pore size distribution, surface area, and porosity are discussed. Chapter 3 presents in detail the well known models and the derived equations which correlate between the lifetime of the o-Ps long-lived component and the pore size, pore shape and the temperature dependence of the porous media. Chapter 4 presents an overview of the main experimental techniques used in this thesis, namely positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Chapter 5 explains the sample preparation for the measurements. The chapter represents also the experimental data for the correlation between the o-Ps lifetime and pore sizes for a system of CPG media (from 1 nm to 64 nm). I also studied the temperature dependence of the o-Ps long-lived component in different pore sizes. In this

  11. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (pal) and peroxidase activity in brown rust infected tissues of pakistani wheat cultivars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riaz, A.; Tahir, M.I.

    2014-01-01

    Besides other factors resistance and susceptibility is the outcome of biochemical processes such as activities of defense-related enzymes. So in this study, Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and Peroxidase activity of resistant (Inqilab-91) and susceptible (Kirin-95) wheat cultivars were determined through spectrophotometer to address the biochemical aspect related to the disease after 8 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours and 72 hours of leaf rust inoculation. The results have shown that these enzymes were present in both the resistant and susceptible cultivars but the activity was more pronounced in the resistant one. The effect of PAL and peroxidase activity was also investigated among inoculated and uninoculated plants within the same cultivar. The activity of both PAL and peroxidase were more significant in inoculated ones. The results have shown that the after 72 hours of inoculation Inqilab-91 had more PAL activity i.e., 5.47 IU/ml/min than in Kirin-95 i.e., 2.08 IU/ml/min at 270 nm. While peroxidase activity in Inqilab-91 was 6.41 IU/ml/min and in Kirin-95, 3.66 IU/ml/min after 72 hours of inoculation, observed under 470 nm wavelength. Increase in one's activity increases the other enzyme's activity. The activity was more prominent after 72 hours of infection as pathogen had successfully established itself in the host plant tissue. The activities of these enzymes act as plants active defense mechanism against the attack of pathogen. (author)

  12. Retrieving soil moisture for non-forested areas using PALS radiometer measurements in SMAPVEX12 field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper we investigate retrieval of soil moisture based on L-band brightness temperature under diverse conditions and land cover types. We apply the PALS (Passive Active L-band System) radiometer data collected in the SMAPVEX12 (Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012) field ex...

  13. Mitochondrial pAL2-1 plasmid homologs are senescence factors in Podospora anserina independent of intrinsic senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeningen, van A.D.; Debets, A.J.M.; Slakhorst-Wandel, S.M.; Hoekstra, R.F.

    2008-01-01

    Since the first description of a linear mitochondrial plasmid in Podospora anserina, pAL2-1, and homologous plasmids have gone from being considered beneficial longevity plasmids, via neutral genetic elements, toward mutator plasmids causing senescence. The plasmid has an invertron structure, with

  14. Mitochondrial pAL2-1 plasmid homologs are senescence factors in Podospora anserina independent of intrinsic senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diepeningen, Anne D; Debets, Alfons J M; Slakhorst, S Marijke; Hoekstra, Rolf F

    Since the first description of a linear mitochondrial plasmid in Podospora anserina, pAL2-1, and homologous plasmids have gone from being considered beneficial longevity plasmids, via neutral genetic elements, toward mutator plasmids causing senescence. The plasmid has an invertron structure, with

  15. Interferometric investigation of an early stage of plasma expansion with the high-power laser system PALS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, P.; Pisarczyk, T.; Králiková, Božena; Mašek, Karel; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Rohlena, Karel; Skála, Jiří; Ullschmied, Jiří; Kálal, M.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2002), s. 395-404 ISSN 0011-4626 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A100 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : laser plasma, PALS laser system, laser interferometry Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.311, year: 2002

  16. PALS investigations of matrix Vycor glass doped with molecules of luminescent dye and silver nanoparticles. Discrepancies from the ETE model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorgol Marek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A thermal stability of three materials: undoped reference Vycor glass, glass filled with ROT-305 red dye, and silver nanoparticles was investigated by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS in a broad temperature range (from 93 to 473 K. The attempt of pore size calculations from the ortho-positronium lifetime data was performed using the extended Tao-Eldrup (ETE model. Below room temperature, a significant decrease in lifetime values of the longest-lived component was found for all the samples. This effect could not be explained by thermal shrinkage of the material and is probably caused by interaction of o-Ps with a Vycor glass matrix. The greatest discrepancy from the ETE model predictions was observed for the reference glass. Doping the base material with dye molecules and silver nanoparticles resulted in similar small decrease in this discrepancy. After reheating the samples to the room temperature, the PALS components returned to the initial values. In the temperature range of 293–473 K, quite good agreement between PALS results and the ETE model predictions was observed for the reference glass and the glass incorporated with dye molecules. The observed small discrepancy in this range could possibly be partly explained by thermal expansion of the material. For the glass doped with silver nanoparticles, a significant change in PALS parameters was observed in the temperature range from 403 to 473 K.

  17. Active Detectors for Plasma Soft X-Ray Detection at PALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Granja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the work carried out for an experimental study of low-energy nuclear excitation by laser-produced plasma at the PALS Prague laser facility. We describe the adaptation and shielding of single-quantum active radiation detectors developed at IEAP CTU Prague to facilitate their operation inside the laser interaction chamber in the vicinity of the plasma target. The goal of this effort is direct real-time single-quantum detection of plasma soft X-ray radiation with energy above a few keV and subsequent identification of the decay of the excited nuclear states via low-energy gamma rays in a highly radiative environment with strong electromagnetic interference.

  18. High Current, High Density Arc Plasma as a New Source for WiPAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waleffe, Roger; Endrizzi, Doug; Myers, Rachel; Wallace, John; Clark, Mike; Forest, Cary; WiPAL Team

    2016-10-01

    The Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Lab (WiPAL) has installed a new array of nineteen plasma sources (plasma guns) on its 3 m diameter, spherical vacuum vessel. Each gun is a cylindrical, molybdenum, washer-stabilized, arc plasma source. During discharge, the guns are maintained at 1.2 kA across 100 V for 10 ms by the gun power supply establishing a high density plasma. Each plasma source is fired independently allowing for adjustable plasma parameters, with densities varying between 1018 -1019 m-3 and electron temperatures of 5-15 eV. Measurements were characterized using a 16 tip Langmuir probe. The plasma source will be used as a background plasma for the magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), the Terrestrial Reconnection Experiment (TREX), and as the plasma source for a magnetic mirror experiment. Temperature, density, and confinement results will be presented. This work is supported by the DoE and the NSF.

  19. Measurements of Transverse Emittance for RF Photocathode Gun at the PAL

    CERN Document Server

    Park Jang Ho; Park, Sung-Ju; Soo Ko In; Wang, Xijie; Woon Parc, Yong; Xiang, Dao

    2005-01-01

    A BNL GUN-IV type RF photo-cathode gun is under fabrication for use in the FIR (Far Infra-Red) facility being built at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL). Performance test of the gun will include the measurement of transverse emittance profile along the longitudinal direction. Successful measurement of the emittance profile will provide powerful tool for the commissioning of the 4GLS (4th generation light source) injectors based on the emittance compensation principle. We are going to achieve this withthe use of pepper-pot based emittance meters that can be moved along the longitudinal direction. In this article, we present design considerations on the emittance meter with the resolution of 1 mm mrad.

  20. Comparison of the free volume sizes and shapes determined from crystallographic and PALS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tydda Maciej

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Two different classes of molecular crystals were investigated. The first group was benzenediols, which are characterized by the same chemical composition but a different organization of their crystallographic structures; all of the compounds from this group have only one kind of free volumes. The second class was represented by olanzapine, which has more complex chemical composition and two kinds of free volumes in the structure. The o-Ps lifetime values determined from positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS measurements agree quite well with those calculated for sizes found from crystallographic data for benzenediols (agreement within 10% of the lifetime values. For olanzapine, a good agreement is observed in the case of cuboidal free volumes, while for the other kind of void, the agreement is less satisfactory. Positronium diffusion coefficient determined from o-Ps redistribution in olanzapine agrees with these found for polymers.

  1. Measurement of the target current by inductive probe during laser interaction on terawatt laser system PALS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cikhardt, Jakub; Krása, Josef; De Marco, Massimo; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Velyhan, Andriy; Krouský, Eduard; Cikhardtová, B.; Klír, Daniel; Řezáč, Karel; Ullschmied, Jiří; Skála, Jiří; Kubeš, P.; Kravárik, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 10 (2014), s. 103507-103507 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010014; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13029; GA ČR GAP205/12/0454; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279 Grant - others:LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser PALS * laser-target interaction * target current * inductive probe Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.614, year: 2014 http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4898016

  2. Remedial action in areas of enhanced natural background radiation levels (with particular emphasis in areas with mineral sand mining residues)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindon, T.N.

    1985-01-01

    In areas where individuals may receive doses from natural background sources which are higher than those received in areas of normal background radiation, it may be considered desirable that some remedial action be taken to reduce those doses. Contributions to these higher doses may be through high gamma ray fields from the ground or from the use of local building materials, the intake of food or water derived from the areas or of food covered with dust from the areas, the ingestion of dirt and the inhalation of dust, and radon or thoron. Guidelines for remedial action in areas where residues from mineral sand mining and processing have been deposited are given

  3. Point defects in gallium arsenide characterized by positron annihilation spectroscopy and deep level transient spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mih, R.; Gronsky, R.; Sterne, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is a unique technique for detection of vacancy related defects in both as-grown and irradiated materials. The authors present a systematic study of vacancy defects in stoichiometrically controlled p-type Gallium Arsenide grown by the Hot-Wall Czochralski method. Microstructural information based on PALS, was correlated to crystallographic data and electrical measurements. Vacancies were detected and compared to electrical levels detected by deep level transient spectroscopy and stoichiometry based on crystallographic data

  4. Genetic and nongenetic determinants of skeletal muscle glucose transporter 4 messenger ribonucleic acid levels and insulin action in twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Heidi; Poulsen, Pernille; Ling, Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    -stimulated expressions of GLUT4 were independently and significantly related to whole-body in vivo insulin action, nonoxidative glucose metabolism, and glucose oxidation. CONCLUSION: We show that skeletal muscle GLUT4 gene expression in twins is significantly and independently related to glucose metabolism...

  5. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, CAU 254 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. A corrective action investigation for this CAS as conducted in January 2000 as set forth in the related Corrective Action Investigation Plan. Samples were collected from various media throughout the CAS and sent to an off-site laboratory for analysis. The laboratory results indicated the following: radiation dose rates inside the Decontamination Facility, Building 3126, and in the storage yard exceeded the average general dose rate; scanning and static total surface contamination surveys indicated that portions of the locker and shower room floor, decontamination bay floor, loft floor, east and west decon pads, north and south decontamination bay interior walls, exterior west and south walls, and loft walls were above preliminary action levels (PALs). The investigation-derived contaminants of concern (COCs) included: polychlorinated biphenyls, radionuclides (strontium-90, niobium-94, cesium-137, uranium-234 and -235), total volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Metals). During the investigation, two corrective action objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate human exposure to COCs. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations at the Nevada Test Site, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey; and Alternative 3 - Unrestricted

  6. Issues regarding the U.S. F.D.A. Protective Action Guidelines and derived response levels for human food and animal feed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denney, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    Full text: A review of the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) rationale and methods for determining protective action guidelines (PAGs) and derived response levels (DRLs) (FDAa82, FDAb82) for human food and animal feed reveals the presence of ambiguous and contradictory information that should be clarified in order to improve the usefulness of the guidance. The differences in the criteria used to determine the Preventative and Emergency PAGs and DRLs, for example, are striking. The Preventative PAGs (and DRLs) are based on accepted health physics principles, e.g. risk factors, avoidance of fetal health effects, agricultural models, etc. The Emergency PAGs (and DRLs), however, are based solely on a traditional safety factor of ten. This difference in rationale becomes more conspicuous when the protective actions for these PAGs are compared: preventative protective actions involve low impact actions, e.g. removal of cattle from pasture, storage to allow for radioactive decay, etc., while emergency protective actions involve high impact actions e.g. isolating and condemning food products. These differences result in a contradiction: high impact actions, which may cause considerable problems and loss of income for farmers and food processors, are based on non-technical premises ('tradition'), while the low impact actions, which may only result in minor inconveniences to farmers and food processors, are based on solid scientific principles. Justifying or explaining these differences to farmers or to the media may be very difficult. Clearly there exists a need to review the basis and rationale upon which the Emergency PAGs and DRLs were derived in order to provide a more scientific explanation for their choice and use. In the FDA guidance (FDAa82), references are also made to ALARA and to the use of low-impact actions at doses lower than the PAGs. Although the FDA accepts and endorses the concept of keeping doses as low as reasonably achievable, the FDA does not

  7. Characterization of the TolB-Pal trans-envelope complex from Xylella fastidiosa reveals a dynamic and coordinated protein expression profile during the biofilm development process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Clelton A; Janissen, Richard; Toledo, Marcelo A S; Beloti, Lilian L; Azzoni, Adriano R; Cotta, Monica A; Souza, Anete P

    2015-10-01

    The intriguing roles of the bacterial Tol-Pal trans-envelope protein complex range from maintenance of cell envelope integrity to potential participation in the process of cell division. In this study, we report the characterization of the XfTolB and XfPal proteins of the Tol-Pal complex of Xylella fastidiosa. X. fastidiosa is a major plant pathogen that forms biofilms inside xylem vessels, triggering the development of diseases in important cultivable plants around the word. Based on functional complementation experiments in Escherichia coli tolB and pal mutant strains, we confirmed the role of xftolB and xfpal in outer membrane integrity. In addition, we observed a dynamic and coordinated protein expression profile during the X. fastidiosa biofilm development process. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), the low-resolution structure of the isolated XfTolB-XfPal complex in solution was solved for the first time. Finally, the localization of the XfTolB and XfPal polar ends was visualized via immunofluorescence labeling in vivo during bacterial cell growth. Our results highlight the major role of the components of the cell envelope, particularly the TolB-Pal complex, during the different phases of bacterial biofilm development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Two-Level Theory of verb meaning: An approach to integrating the semantics of action with the mirror neuron system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmerer, David; Gonzalez-Castillo, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Verbs have two separate levels of meaning. One level reflects the uniqueness of every verb and is called the "root". The other level consists of a more austere representation that is shared by all the verbs in a given class and is called the "event structure template". We explore the following hypotheses about how, with specific reference to the motor features of action verbs, these two distinct levels of semantic representation might correspond to two distinct levels of the mirror neuron system. Hypothesis 1: Root-level motor features of verb meaning are partially subserved by somatotopically mapped mirror neurons in the left primary motor and/or premotor cortices. Hypothesis 2: Template-level motor features of verb meaning are partially subserved by representationally more schematic mirror neurons in Brodmann area 44 of the left inferior frontal gyrus. Evidence has been accumulating in support of the general neuroanatomical claims made by these two hypotheses-namely, that each level of verb meaning is associated with the designated cortical areas. However, as yet no studies have satisfied all the criteria necessary to support the more specific neurobiological claims made by the two hypotheses-namely, that each level of verb meaning is associated with mirror neurons in the pertinent brain regions. This would require demonstrating that within those regions the same neuronal populations are engaged during (a) the linguistic processing of particular motor features of verb meaning, (b) the execution of actions with the corresponding motor features, and (c) the observation of actions with the corresponding motor features. 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 356: Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with Errata Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NNSA/NV

    2002-11-12

    This Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 356, Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. This CAU is located in Areas 3 and 20 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 356 consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-04-01, Area 3 Change House Septic System; 03-09-01, Mud Pit Spill Over; 03-09-03, Mud Pit; 03-09-04, Mud Pit; 03-09-05, Mud Pit; 20-16-01, Landfill; and 20-22-21, Drums. This CR identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's (NNSA/NV's) recommendation that no further corrective action and closure in place is deemed necessary for CAU 356. This recommendation is based on the results of field investigation/closure activities conducted November 20, 2001, through January 3, 2002, and March 11 to 14, 2002. These activities were conducted in accordance with the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan (SAFER) for CAU 356. For CASs 03-09-01, 03-09-03, 20-16-01, and 22-20-21, analytes detected in soil during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against Preliminary Action Levels (PALs) and it was determined that no Contaminants of Concern (COCs) were present. Therefore, no further action is necessary for the soil at these CASs. For CASs 03-04-01, 03-09-04, and 03-09-05, analytes detected in soil during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against PALs and identifies total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) and radionuclides (i.e., americium-241 and/or plutonium 239/240) as COCs. The nature, extent, and concentration of the TPH and radionuclide COCs were bounded by sampling and shown to be relatively immobile. Therefore, closure in place is recommended for these CASs in CAU 356. Further, use restrictions are not required at this CAU beyond the NTS use restrictions

  10. Perceived need to increase physical activity levels among adults at high risk of type 2 diabetes. A cross-sectional analysis within a community-based diabetes prevention project FIN-D2D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vähäsarja Kati

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased physical activity is a cornerstone of type 2 diabetes prevention. The perception of a need to change is considered essential in behaviour change processes. However, the existing literature on individuals’ perceived need to change health behaviour is limited. In order to improve understanding of diabetes prevention through increased physical activity levels (PAL, we assessed factors associated with perceiving a need to increase PAL among adults at high risk of diabetes. Methods Opportunistic screening was used within a primary-care based lifestyle intervention covering 10 149 men and women at high risk of type 2 diabetes. Data were obtained at baseline visits. The explored determinants were demographic, anthropometric/clinical, behavioural and psychosocial characteristics, along with four categories of PAL awareness. Logistic regression was used in the analysis. Results 74% of men (n = 2 577 and 76% of women (n = 4 551 perceived a need to increase their PAL. The participants most likely to perceive this need were inactive, had a larger waist circumference, rated their PAL as insufficient, and were at the contemplation stage of change. Smoking, elevated blood pressure, dyslipidaemia, and a family history of diabetes were not associated with this perception. The likelihood was also greater among women with less perceived fitness and less education. Demographic factors other than education did not determine participants’ perceived need to increase PAL. PAL overestimators were less likely to perceive the need to increase their PAL than realistic inactive participants. Conclusions Subjective rather than objective health factors appear to determine the perception of a need to increase PAL among adults at high risk of diabetes. Client perceptions need to be evaluated in health counselling in order to facilitate a change in PAL. Practical descriptions of the associations between metabolic risk factors, PAL, and

  11. DietPal: a Web-based dietary menu-generating and management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noah, Shahrul A; Abdullah, Siti Norulhuda; Shahar, Suzana; Abdul-Hamid, Helmi; Khairudin, Nurkahirizan; Yusoff, Mohamed; Ghazali, Rafidah; Mohd-Yusoff, Nooraini; Shafii, Nik Shanita; Abdul-Manaf, Zaharah

    2004-01-30

    Attempts in current health care practice to make health care more accessible, effective, and efficient through the use of information technology could include implementation of computer-based dietary menu generation. While several of such systems already exist, their focus is mainly to assist healthy individuals calculate their calorie intake and to help monitor the selection of menus based upon a prespecified calorie value. Although these prove to be helpful in some ways, they are not suitable for monitoring, planning, and managing patients' dietary needs and requirements. This paper presents a Web-based application that simulates the process of menu suggestions according to a standard practice employed by dietitians. To model the workflow of dietitians and to develop, based on this workflow, a Web-based system for dietary menu generation and management. The system is aimed to be used by dietitians or by medical professionals of health centers in rural areas where there are no designated qualified dietitians. First, a user-needs study was conducted among dietitians in Malaysia. The first survey of 93 dietitians (with 52 responding) was an assessment of information needed for dietary management and evaluation of compliance towards a dietary regime. The second study consisted of ethnographic observation and semi-structured interviews with 14 dietitians in order to identify the workflow of a menu-suggestion process. We subsequently designed and developed a Web-based dietary menu generation and management system called DietPal. DietPal has the capability of automatically calculating the nutrient and calorie intake of each patient based on the dietary recall as well as generating suitable diet and menu plans according to the calorie and nutrient requirement of the patient, calculated from anthropometric measurements. The system also allows reusing stored or predefined menus for other patients with similar health and nutrient requirements. We modeled the workflow of

  12. Study design and protocol for a mixed methods evaluation of an intervention to reduce and break up sitting time in primary school classrooms in the UK: The CLASS PAL (Physically Active Learning) Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routen, Ash C; Biddle, Stuart J H; Bodicoat, Danielle H; Cale, Lorraine; Clemes, Stacy; Edwardson, Charlotte L; Glazebrook, Cris; Harrington, Deirdre M; Khunti, Kamlesh; Pearson, Natalie; Salmon, Jo; Sherar, Lauren B

    2017-11-08

    Children engage in a high volume of sitting in school, particularly in the classroom. A number of strategies, such as physically active lessons (termed movement integration (MI)), have been developed to integrate physical activity into this learning environment; however, no single approach is likely to meet the needs of all pupils and teachers. This protocol outlines an implementation study of a primary school-based MI intervention: CLASS PAL (Physically Active Learning) programme. This study aims to (A) determine the degree of implementation of CLASS PAL, (B) identify processes by which teachers and schools implement CLASS PAL and (C) investigate individual (pupil and teacher) level and school-level characteristics associated with implementation of CLASS PAL. The intervention will provide teachers with a professional development workshop and a bespoke teaching resources website. The study will use a single group before-and-after design, strengthened by multiple interim measurements. Six state-funded primary schools will be recruited within Leicestershire, UK.Evaluation data will be collected prior to implementation and at four discrete time points during implementation: At measurement 0 (October 2016), school, teacher and pupil characteristics will be collected. At measurements 0 and 3 (June-July 2017), accelerometry, cognitive functioning, self-reported sitting and classroom engagement data will be collected. At measurements 1(December 2016-March 2017) and 3 , teacher interviews (also at measurement 4; September-October 2017) and pupil focus groups will be conducted, and at measurements 1 and 2 (April-May 2017), classroom observations. Implementation will be captured through website analytics and ongoing teacher completed logs. Ethical approval was obtained through the Loughborough University Human Participants Ethics Sub-Committee (Reference number: R16-P115). Findings will be disseminated via practitioner and/or research journals and to relevant regional and

  13. Non-perturbative renormalization of quark bilinear operators with N{sub f}=2 (tmQCD) Wilson fermions and the tree-level improved gauge action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantinou, M. [Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; Dimopoulos, P. [Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; INFN, Rome (Italy); Frezzotti, R. [Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; INFN, Roma (IT)] (and others)

    2010-06-15

    We present results for the renormalization constants of bilinear quark operators obtained b4>UNL<426>UNL using the tree-level Symanzik improved gauge action and the N{sub f}=2 twisted mass fermion action at maximal twist, which guarantees automatic O(a)- improvement. Our results are also relevant for the corresponding standard (untwisted) Wilson fermionic action since the two actions only differ, in the massless limit, by a chiral rotation of the quark fields. The scale-independent renormalization constants Z{sub V}, Z{sub A} and the ratio Z{sub P}/Z{sub S} have been computed using the RI-MOM approach, as well as other alternative methods. For Z{sub A} and Z{sub P}/Z{sub S}, the latter are based on both standard twisted mass and Osterwalder-Seiler fermions, while for Z{sub V} a Ward Identity has been used. The quark field renormalization constant Z{sub q} and the scale dependent renormalization constants Z{sub S}, Z{sub P} and Z{sub T} are determined in the RI-MOM scheme. Leading discretization effects of O(g{sup 2}a{sup 2}), evaluated in one-loop perturbation theory, are explicitly subtracted from the RI-MOM estimates. (orig.)

  14. Water-Vapor Sorption Processes in Nanoporous MgO-Al2O3 Ceramics: the PAL Spectroscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klym, Halyna; Ingram, Adam; Shpotyuk, Oleh; Hadzaman, Ivan; Solntsev, Viacheslav

    2016-12-01

    The water-vapor sorption processes in nanoporous MgO-Al2O3 ceramics are studied with positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) spectroscopy employing positron trapping and positronium (Ps)-decaying modes. It is demonstrated that the longest-lived components in the four-term reconstructed PAL spectra with characteristic lifetimes near 2 and 60-70 ns can be, respectively, attributed to ortho-positronium (o-Ps) traps in nanopores with 0.3- and 1.5-1.8-nm radii. The first o-Ps decaying process includes "pick-off" annihilation in the "bubbles" of liquid water, while the second is based on o-Ps interaction with physisorbed water molecules at the walls of the pores. In addition, the water vapor modifies structural defects located at the grain boundaries in a vicinity of pores, this process being accompanied by void fragmentation during water adsorption and agglomeration during water desorption after drying.

  15. Water-Vapor Sorption Processes in Nanoporous MgO-Al2O3 Ceramics: the PAL Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klym, Halyna; Ingram, Adam; Shpotyuk, Oleh; Hadzaman, Ivan; Solntsev, Viacheslav

    2016-03-01

    The water-vapor sorption processes in nanoporous MgO-Al2O3 ceramics are studied with positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) spectroscopy employing positron trapping and positronium (Ps)-decaying modes. It is demonstrated that the longest-lived components in the four-term reconstructed PAL spectra with characteristic lifetimes near 2 and 60-70 ns can be, respectively, attributed to ortho-positronium (o-Ps) traps in nanopores with 0.3- and 1.5-1.8-nm radii. The first o-Ps decaying process includes "pick-off" annihilation in the "bubbles" of liquid water, while the second is based on o-Ps interaction with physisorbed water molecules at the walls of the pores. In addition, the water vapor modifies structural defects located at the grain boundaries in a vicinity of pores, this process being accompanied by void fragmentation during water adsorption and agglomeration during water desorption after drying.

  16. Structural analysis of poly(vinyl alcohol hydrogels) produced by freezing and thawing process Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paranhos, Caio M.; Oliveira, Renata N.; Soares, Bluma G.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels with a entrapped polyelectrolyte were characterized through Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS). PALS was used to determine the average pore radii (R), average free volume (V f ) and the intensity of ortho-positronium (I 3 ). The free volume estimated for the hydrogels increases with increasing polyelectrolyte content, while the intensity of o-Ps decreases with the increasing polyelectrolyte content. Degree of crystallinity of the samples decreases with the presence of polyelectrolyte. The structural changes observed can be discussed in terms of the changes in hydrogels structure due to a hindrance capacity of the polyelectrolyte on the crystalline behavior and the different polymer-polymer interactions. (author)

  17. Fast and slow plasma components produced by the PALS facility - comparsion of interferometric and ion diagnostic measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pisarcyk, T.; Badziak, J.; Kasperczuk, A.; Parys, P.; Wolowski, J.; Woryna, E.; Jungwirth, Karel; Králiková, Božena; Krása, Josef; Láska, Leoš; Mašek, Karel; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Rohlena, Karel; Skála, Jiří; Ullschmied, Jiří

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 52, Suppl. D (2002), D310-D316 ISSN 0011-4626. [Plasma Physics and Technology. Prague, 10.06.2002-13.06.2002] Grant - others:PALS/005(6)(XE) HPRI-CT-1999-00053 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : laser plasma Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.311, year: 2002

  18. [An operational remote sensing algorithm of land surface evapotranspiration based on NOAA PAL dataset].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ying-Yu; He, Yan-Bo; Wang, Jian-Lin; Tian, Guo-Liang

    2009-10-01

    Based on the time series 10-day composite NOAA Pathfinder AVHRR Land (PAL) dataset (8 km x 8 km), and by using land surface energy balance equation and "VI-Ts" (vegetation index-land surface temperature) method, a new algorithm of land surface evapotranspiration (ET) was constructed. This new algorithm did not need the support from meteorological observation data, and all of its parameters and variables were directly inversed or derived from remote sensing data. A widely accepted ET model of remote sensing, i. e., SEBS model, was chosen to validate the new algorithm. The validation test showed that both the ET and its seasonal variation trend estimated by SEBS model and our new algorithm accorded well, suggesting that the ET estimated from the new algorithm was reliable, being able to reflect the actual land surface ET. The new ET algorithm of remote sensing was practical and operational, which offered a new approach to study the spatiotemporal variation of ET in continental scale and global scale based on the long-term time series satellite remote sensing images.

  19. Passive aquatic listener (PAL): An adoptive underwater acoustic recording system for the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anagnostou, Marios N.; Nystuen, Jeffrey A.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Papadopoulos, Anastasios; Lykousis, Vassilios

    2011-01-01

    The ambient sound field in the ocean is a combination of natural and manmade sounds. Consequently, the interpretation of the ambient sound field can be used to quantify these processes. In the frequency range from 1 to 50 kHz, the general character of ocean ambient sound is a slowly changing background that is closely associated with local wind speed, interspersed with shorter time scale events such as rain storms, ships and animal calls. At lower frequencies the underwater ambient sound budget includes geologically generated sound activities including underwater volcanic eruptions, seismic and seepage faults that generate bubbles, etc. that can also potentially be classified and quantified. Acoustic data are collected on hydrophones. Hydrophones are simple, robust sensors that can be deployed on most ocean instrumentation systems including surface or sub-surface moorings, bottom mounted systems, drifters, ARGO floats or autonomous underwater platforms. A dedicated oceanic underwater recorder called a passive acoustic listener (PAL) has been developed. A principal issue is to accurately distinguish different sound sources so that they can be quantified as part of a sound budget, and then quantified if appropriate. Based on ongoing data collected from the Poseidon II network the retrieval potential of multi-parameters from underwater sound, including meteorological (i.e., precipitation and winds) and in general geophysical, anthropogenetic (i.e., ships, submarines, etc.) and biological (whales, etc.) sources is presented.

  20. Passive aquatic listener (PAL): An adoptive underwater acoustic recording system for the marine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anagnostou, Marios N., E-mail: managnostou@ath.hcmr.g [Hellenic Center for Marine Research, Department of Inland Waters, Anavissos (Greece); Nystuen, Jeffrey A. [Hellenic Center for Marine Research, Department of Inland Waters, Anavissos (Greece); Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Anagnostou, Emmanouil N. [Hellenic Center for Marine Research, Department of Inland Waters, Anavissos (Greece); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Connecticut, CT (United States); Papadopoulos, Anastasios [Hellenic Center for Marine Research, Department of Inland Waters, Anavissos (Greece); Lykousis, Vassilios [Hellenic Center for Marine Research, Department of Oceanography, Anavissos (Greece)

    2011-01-21

    The ambient sound field in the ocean is a combination of natural and manmade sounds. Consequently, the interpretation of the ambient sound field can be used to quantify these processes. In the frequency range from 1 to 50 kHz, the general character of ocean ambient sound is a slowly changing background that is closely associated with local wind speed, interspersed with shorter time scale events such as rain storms, ships and animal calls. At lower frequencies the underwater ambient sound budget includes geologically generated sound activities including underwater volcanic eruptions, seismic and seepage faults that generate bubbles, etc. that can also potentially be classified and quantified. Acoustic data are collected on hydrophones. Hydrophones are simple, robust sensors that can be deployed on most ocean instrumentation systems including surface or sub-surface moorings, bottom mounted systems, drifters, ARGO floats or autonomous underwater platforms. A dedicated oceanic underwater recorder called a passive acoustic listener (PAL) has been developed. A principal issue is to accurately distinguish different sound sources so that they can be quantified as part of a sound budget, and then quantified if appropriate. Based on ongoing data collected from the Poseidon II network the retrieval potential of multi-parameters from underwater sound, including meteorological (i.e., precipitation and winds) and in general geophysical, anthropogenetic (i.e., ships, submarines, etc.) and biological (whales, etc.) sources is presented.

  1. Simple low cost differentiation of Candida auris from Candida haemulonii complex using CHROMagar Candida medium supplemented with Pal's medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Sachu, Arun; Mohan, Karthika; Vinod, Vivek; Dinesh, Kavitha; Karim, Shamsul

    Candida auris is unique due to its multidrug resistance and misidentification as Candida haemulonii by commercial systems. Its correct identification is important to avoid inappropriate treatments. To develop a cheap method for differentiating C. auris from isolates identified as C. haemulonii by VITEK2. Fifteen C. auris isolates, six isolates each of C. haemulonii and Candida duobushaemulonii, and one isolate of Candida haemulonii var. vulnera were tested using CHROMagar Candida medium supplemented with Pal's agar for better differentiation. On CHROMagar Candida medium supplemented with Pal's agar all C. auris strains showed confluent growth of white to cream colored smooth colonies at 37°C and 42°C after 24 and 48h incubation and did not produce pseudohyphae. The isolates of the C. haemulonii complex, on the contrary, showed poor growth of smooth, light-pink colonies at 24h while at 48h the growth was semiconfluent with the production of pseudohyphae. C. haemulonii complex failed to grow at 42°C. We report a rapid and cheap method using CHROMagar Candida medium supplemented with Pal's agar for differentiating C. auris from isolates identified as C. haemulonii by VITEK2. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. The effectiveness of the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020 to increase the level of organic public procurement in Danish public kitchens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Nina Nørgaard; Tetens, Inge; Løje, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    and after kitchen employees participated in conversion projects. Public kitchens participating in the nine organic food conversion projects under the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020, initiated during autumn 2012 and spring 2013 and completed in summer 2015. A total of 622 public kitchens. The average...... (median) increase in organic food percentage from baseline to follow-up was 24 percentage points (Pincrease remained significant for seven out of eight kitchens. Furthermore......’, ‘menu planning’, ‘network’ and ‘Organic Cuisine Label method’ to ensure successful implementation. The study reports significant increases in the level of organic food procurement among public kitchens participating in the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020. Recommendations for future organic conversion...

  3. One safety critical indicators model for regulatory actions on nuclear power plants based on a level 1 PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Jefferson Borges

    2006-03-01

    This study presents a general methodology to the establishment, selection and use of safety indicators for a two loop PWR plant, as Angra 1. The study performed identifies areas considered critical for the plant operational safety. For each of these areas, strategic sub-areas are defined. For each strategic sub-area, specific safety indicators are defined. These proposed Safety Indicators are based on the contribution to risk considering a quantitative risk analysis. For each safety indicator, a goal, a bounded interval and proper bases are developed, to allow for a clear and comprehensive individual behavior evaluation. Additionally, an integrated evaluation of the indicators, using expert systems, was done to obtain an overview of the plant general safety. This methodology can be used for identifying situations where the plant safety is challenged, by giving a general overview of the plant operational condition. Additionally, this study can also identify eventual room for improvements by generating suggestions and recommendations, as a complement for regulatory actions and inspections, focusing resources on eventual existing weaknesses, in order to increase or maintain a high pattern of operational safety. (author)

  4. Modelling in Action. Scaffolding High School Students to Higher Levels of Autonomy: The School's Elevator and the Inverse Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmolejo Rivas, Eugenia

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we focus our discussion on the strategy we follow to scaffold high school students to successfully build models of a real-life system. Our aim is for students to gradually achieve a higher level of autonomy and to use and further develop their mathematical knowledge. We present work students did when we asked them to build a model…

  5. Action taken by ENRESA and the NPPs with a view to reducing the production of low and intermediate level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, A.; Rojo, F.

    1996-01-01

    In those countries in which the responsibilities of the different organizations involved in the management of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes (Regulatory Body, Agency, Facility Operators and Producers) are perfectly defined and a definitive Waste Disposal Facility is in operation, the next phase in order of importance consists of addressing a waste volume reduction policy aimed at optimizing storage capacity

  6. Building connected data standards to promote interdisciplinary research in the paleogeosciences- PalEON, Neotoma, THROUGHPUT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goring, S. J.; Richard, S. M.; Williams, J. W.; Dawson, A.

    2017-12-01

    A broad array of data resources, across disciplines, are needed to study Earth system processes operating at multiple spatial or temporal scales. Data friction frequently delays this integrative and interdisciplinary research, while sustainable solutions may be hampered as a result of academic incentives that penalize technical "tool building" at the expense of research publication. The paleogeosciences, in particular, often integrate data drawn from multiple sub-disciplines and from a range of long-tail and big data sources. Data friction can be lowered and the pace of scientific discovery accelerated through the development and adoption of data standards, both within the paleogeosciences and with allied disciplines. Using the PalEON Project (https://sites.nd.edu/paleonproject/) and the Neotoma Paleoecological Database (https://neotomadb.org) as focal case studies, we first illustrate the advances possible through data standardization. We then focus on new efforts in data standardization and building linkages among paleodata resources underway through the EarthCube-funded Throughput project. A first step underway is to analyze existing standards across paleo-data repositories and identify ways in which the adoption of common standards can promote connectivity, reducing barriers to interdisciplinary research, especially for early career researchers. Experience indicates that standards tend to emerge by necessity and from a mixture of bottom-up and top-down processes. A common pathway is when conventions developed to solve specific problems within a community are extended to address challenges that are more general. The Throughput project will identify, document, and promote such solutions to foster wider adoption of standards for data interchange and reduce data friction in the paleogeosciences.

  7. Galactic Pal-eontology: abundance analysis of the disrupting globular cluster Palomar 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Andreas; Côté, Patrick

    2017-05-01

    We present a chemical abundance analysis of the tidally disrupted globular cluster (GC) Palomar 5. By co-adding high-resolution spectra of 15 member stars from the cluster's main body, taken at low signal-to-noise with the Keck/HIRES spectrograph, we were able to measure integrated abundance ratios of 24 species of 20 elements including all major nucleosynthetic channels (namely the light element Na; α-elements Mg, Si, Ca, Ti; Fe-peak and heavy elements Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn; and the neutron-capture elements Y, Zr, Ba, La, Nd, Sm, Eu). The mean metallicity of -1.56 ± 0.02 ± 0.06 dex (statistical and systematic errors) agrees well with the values from individual, low-resolution measurements of individual stars, but it is lower than previous high-resolution results of a small number of stars in the literature. Comparison with Galactic halo stars and other disrupted and unperturbed GCs renders Pal 5 a typical representative of the Milky Way halo population, as has been noted before, emphasizing that the early chemical evolution of such clusters is decoupled from their later dynamical history. We also performed a test as to the detectability of light element variations in this co-added abundance analysis technique and found that this approach is not sensitive even in the presence of a broad range in sodium of 0.6 dex, a value typically found in the old halo GCs. Thus, while methods of determining the global abundance patterns of such objects are well suited to study their overall enrichment histories, chemical distinctions of their multiple stellar populations is still best obtained from measurements of individual stars. Full Table 3 is is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/601/A41

  8. Phytochemical study of phenolic compounds of labrador tea (Lédum palústre L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Валентина Петровна Гапоненко

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This work is devoted a phytochemical study of biologically active substances in herb of Labrador Tea (Lédum palústre L., as well as investigation of the possibility of complex use of raw materials in order to create on its basis new herbal medicines.Methods. The object of the study served as the herb Labrador Tea. Separation of isolated substances was performed by adsorption and partition chromatography on various adsorbents. The structure of the isolated compounds was determined based on physicochemical methods: paper (PC and the thin layer (TLC chromatography, UV, IR and NMR spectroscopy in comparison with the original valid standards of flavonoids. Acid hydrolys was used for the determination of the flavonoid aglycone composition. The content of total flavonoids was determined by differential spectrophotometry at a wavelength of 412 nm from the reaction with aluminum chloride based on the hyperoside-standard (Ukrainian scientific Pharmacopoeial center for quality of medicines (Pharmacopoeial center, Kharkоv.Results. During this study we found more than 40 of phenolic compounds and identified 31compounds. The phytochemical analysis showed the presence of flavonols (11 compounds, catechins (5. Hydroxycinnamic acids represented by caffeic, ferulic, chlorogenic acids. Besides that, it were found phenolic glycoside arbutin, coumarins - coumarin, umbelliferon, scopoletin, esculetin and esculin, tannins – metyl gallate, pyrogallol.Conclusions. The following biologically active substances were defined for the first time: flavonoids – 5-methyl-kaempferol, avicularin, polistahozid, quercitrin; coumarins – esculetin, esculin; as well as hydroxycinnamic acids – ferulic, chlorogenic, neochlorogenic of Labrador Tea. The obtained data justify the prospectivefor creation of new and effective herbal medicines from Labrador Tea

  9. [Estimation of action of lactoovovegetarian and vegan diets on blood level of atherogenic lipoproteins in healthy people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medkova, I L; Mosiakina, L I; Biriukova, L S

    2002-01-01

    The biochemical status of 72 vegetarians (aged 40-60) was studied; 35 persons kept to a lactoovovegetarian diet and 37 persons followed a vegan diet (vegetable food only). As the results of the investigation showed, almost all of the biochemical parameters of blood tests in the both groups were kept to the physiological norm. A pronounced hypolipidemic effect of both the diets was observed (the total cholesterol level was 5.24 +/- 0.28 mmol/l in the vegetarian group and 3.26 +/- 0.17 mmol/l in the vegan group), some parameters of lipid metabolism in the group of vegan being lower then in the vegetarian group. Thus, the total cholesterol level in the vegan group was lower by 38.7%, the atherogenic coefficient--by 13.8%, the low density cholesterol--by 34.3%, triglicerides--by 28.3%. Although the above mentioned parameters of the vegan group seem to be more satisfactory than those of the vegetarian group, we could not recommend the vegan diet for long periods of time because of deficiency of some nutrients in it.

  10. Genetic variations altering FSH action affect circulating hormone levels as well as follicle growth in healthy peripubertal girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Alexander S; Hagen, Casper P; Almstrup, Kristian; Main, Katharina M; Juul, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Do variants of the genes encoding follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) beta subunit (B) and FSH receptor (R) impact circulating reproductive hormone levels and ovarian follicle maturation in healthy peripubertal girls? FSHB and FSHR genetic variants exert, alone or their combination, distinct effects on reproductive hormone levels as well as ovarian follicle maturation in healthy peripubertal girls. FSHB and FSHR genetic variants impact reproductive hormone levels as well as associated pathologies in women. While FSHR c. 2039A>G is known to alter gonadotrophin levels in women, FSHR c.-29G>A has not yet been shown to exert effect and there are conflicting results concerning FSHB c.-211G>T. This population-based study included 633 girls recruited as part of two cohorts, the COPENHAGEN Puberty Study (2006-2014, a cross-sectional and ongoing longitudinal study) and the Copenhagen Mother-Child Cohort (1997-2002, including transabdominal ultrasound (TAUS) of the ovaries in a subset of 91 peripubertal girls). Clinical examinations, including pubertal breast stage (Tanner's classification B1-B5) were performed. Circulating levels of FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol, anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) and inhibin-B were assessed by immunoassays. In a subset of the girls (n = 91), ovarian volume and the number/size of antral follicles were assessed by TAUS. Genotypes were determined by competitive PCR. FSHR c.2039A>G minor alleles were positively associated with serum FSH (β = 0.08, P = 0.004), LH (β = 0.06, P = 0.012) and estradiol (β = 0.06, P = 0.017) (adjusted for Tanner stages). In a combined model, FSHR c.-29G>A and FSHR c.2039A>G alleles were positively associated with FSH levels in early-pubertal girls (B2 + B3, n = 327, r = 0.1, P = 0.02) and in young adolescents (B4 + B5, n = 149, r = 0.2, P = 0.01). Serum AMH and inhibin B levels were not significantly influenced by the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Single SNPs were not associated with follicles

  11. A framework to promote collective action within the One Health community of practice: Using participatory modelling to enable interdisciplinary, cross-sectoral and multi-level integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelie Binot

    2015-12-01

    The implementation of a One Health (OH approach in this context calls for improved integration among disciplines and improved cross-sectoral collaboration, involving stakeholders at different levels. For sure, such integration is not achieved spontaneously, implies methodological guidelines and has transaction costs. We explore pathways for implementing such collaboration in SEA context, highlighting the main challenges to be faced by researchers and other target groups involved in OH actions. On this basis, we propose a conceptual framework of OH integration. Throughout 3 components (field-based data management, professional training workshops and higher education, we suggest to develop a new culture of networking involving actors from various disciplines, sectors and levels (from the municipality to the Ministries through a participatory modelling process, fostering synergies and cooperation. This framework could stimulate long-term dialogue process, based on the combination of case studies implementation and capacity building. It aims for implementing both institutional OH dynamics (multi-stakeholders and cross-sectoral and research approaches promoting systems thinking and involving social sciences to follow-up and strengthen collective action.

  12. A study of the mechanism of action of pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone at the cellular level using reticulocytes loaded with non-heme 59Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, A.R.; Ponka, P.; McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec; Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec

    1983-01-01

    Pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone (PIH) has recently been identified as a new iron chelating agent with a high degree of iron mobilizing activity in vitro and in vivo which makes this compound a candidate drug in the treatment of iron overload. This study was undertaken to elucidate the mechanism of action of the iron mobilizing activity of PIH at the cellular level. An in vitro system of rabbit reticulocytes with a high level of non-heme 59 Fe was used as a model of iron overload. The effects of various biochemical and physiological manoeuvers on the mobilization of 59 Fe by PIH from the cells were studied. The fate of [ 14 C]-PIH in the in vitro system was also studied. Studies were also carried out using a crude mitochondrial fraction. (orig./AJ)

  13. Implementing Local Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Actions: The Role of Various Policy Instruments in a Multi-Level Governance Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Carina H. Keskitalo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, considerable focus, e.g., in the fifth IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Assessment Report (2014 has been trained on why adaptation and mitigation have not been developed more than at present, with relatively few local government actions taken compared with, for example, more discursive policy agreement on the importance of the issue of climate change. Going beyond a focus on general limits and barriers, this comment suggests that one important issue is that climate change has not yet been sufficiently integrated into the state regulative structure of legislation and policy-making. A comparison between three cases suggests that local developments that are not supported in particular by binding regulation are unlikely to achieve the same general level of implementation as issues for which such regulative demands (and thereby also requirements for prioritization exist. This constitutes an important consideration for the development of adaptation and mitigation as policy areas, including on the local level.

  14. How much locomotive activity is needed for an active physical activity level: analysis of total step counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohkawara Kazunori

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although physical activity recommendations for public health have focused on locomotive activity such as walking and running, it is uncertain how much these activities contribute to overall physical activity level (PAL. The purpose of the present study was to determine the contribution of locomotive activity to PAL using total step counts measured in a calorimeter study. Methods PAL, calculated as total energy expenditure divided by basal metabolic rate, was evaluated in 11 adult men using three different conditions for 24-hour human calorimeter measurements: a low-activity day (L-day targeted at a low active level of PAL (1.45, and a high-frequency moderate activity day (M-day or a high-frequency vigorous activity day (V-day targeted at an active level of PAL (1.75. These subjects were permitted only light activities except prescribed activities. In a separate group of 41 adults, free-living PAL was evaluated using doubly-labeled water (DLW. In both experiments, step counts per day were also measured using an accelerometer. Results In the human calorimeter study, PAL and step counts were 1.42 ± 0.10 and 8,973 ± 543 steps/d (L-day, 1.82 ± 0.14 and 29,588 ± 1,126 steps/d (M-day, and 1.74 ± 0.15 and 23,755 ± 1,038 steps/d (V-day, respectively. In the DLW study, PAL and step counts were 1.73 ± 0.15 and 10,022 ± 2,605 steps/d, and there was no significant relationship between PAL and daily step counts. Conclusions These results indicate that an enormous number of steps are needed for an active level of PAL if individuals extend physical activity-induced energy expenditure by only locomotive activity. Therefore, non-locomotive activity such as household activity should also play a significant role in increasing PAL under free-living conditions.

  15. L’opinion dissidente de Pal et le révisionnisme historique dans le Japon d’après-guerre The dissentient judgment of Pal and historical revisionism in Postwar Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Nakajima

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dans son opinion dissidente au procès de Tôkyô (le Tribunal militaire international pour l’Extrême-Orient, le juge indien Radhabinhod Pal avait contesté le bien-fondé des notions de « crime contre la paix » et de « crimes contre l’humanité » élaborées par la Charte du tribunal qui furent utilisées pour condamner les hauts responsables japonais comme « criminels de guerre de classe A ». Considérant que ces notions relèvent d’une législation ex post facto, il estima qu’il eût été préférable de s’en tenir à la notion existante de « crimes de guerre ». Faute de quoi, au lieu de servir la justice, le procès de Tokyo cautionna selon lui l’idée qu’il suffirait de sortir vainqueur d’un conflit armé pour pouvoir imposer la loi de manière arbitraire. Au Japon, cette opinion se vit peu à peu durcie, puis détournée de sa visée initiale, par un courant de plus en plus outrageusement révisionniste. Cet article réexamine les points essentiels de l’argumentation de Pal avant d’analyser la façon dont les révisionnistes japonais s’en sont emparée.In his dissenting judgment in the Tokyo trial (the International Military Tribunal for the Far East, the Indian judge Radhabinhod Pal had challenged the validity of the concepts of "crime against peace" and "crime against humanity" developed by the Charter of the court and which were used to condemn the Japanese officials as "war criminals category A". Whereas these concepts are subject to ex post facto legislation, he felt it was better to stick to the existing concept of "war crimes". Failing that, instead of justice, the trial of Tokyo according to endorse the idea that it was enough to win an armed conflict to impose the law in an arbitrary manner. In Japan, this opinion is gradually tightened, then diverted from its original purpose, by a stream of more and more outrageously revisionist. This article reviews the essential points of the argument of

  16. Improving Diversity and Educational Outreach at the K-14 level: A Call to Action for the AGU Membership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, F. R.; Johnson, R.

    2002-12-01

    In 2002, the Subcommittee on Diversity (SD) of the Committee on Education and Human Resources (CEHR) submitted a Diversity Plan to the leadership of AGU. This plan outlines specific programs and goals that AGU can follow to help improve diversity in the Earth and space sciences. Diversity issues are key components to improve the human resource potential in the geosciences. As women are the majority population, and racial and ethnic minorities are experiencing the largest growing segment of the United States population, it is within our best interest to actively recruit and retain these populations into our dynamic fields of study. The SD recognizes that the strength of the AGU lies within its membership. Composed of some of the brightest and talented scientists in the world, the AGU members are leaders and pioneers in our understanding of the Earth System. Yet, many, if not most, people within underrepresented communities are not aware of the relevance that the Earth and space sciences play in their lives. In this discussion, we will discuss the importance of the AGU membership in the Diversity Plan. In addition, we will outline specific things that AGU members can do to improve access of US students and citizenry to Earth and space science education. These steps require that AGU members become active advocates in the public, especially at the K-14 level.

  17. Action plan for response to abnormal conditions in Hanford high level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks containing flammable gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.J.

    1994-03-01

    Radioactive liquid waste tends to produce hydrogen as a result of the interaction of gamma radiation and water. In tanks containing organic chelating agents, additional hydrogen gas as well as nitrous oxide and ammonia can be produced by thermal and radiolytic decomposition of these organics. Several high-level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks, located underground at the Hanford Site, contain waste that retains the gases produced in them until large quantities are released rapidly to the tank vapor space. Tanks filled to near capacity have relatively little vapor space; therefore, if the waste suddenly releases a large amount of hydrogen and nitrous oxide, a flammable gas mixture may result. The most notable waste tank with a flammable gas problem is tank 241-SY-101. Waste in this tank has occasionally released enough flammable gas to burn if an ignition source had been present inside of the tank. Several other waste tanks exhibit similar behavior to a lesser magnitude. Administrative controls have been developed to assure that these Flammable Gas Watch List tanks are safely maintained. Responses have also been developed for off-normal conditions which might develop in these tanks. In addition, scientific and engineering studies are underway to further understand and mitigate the behavior of the Flammable Gas Watch List tanks

  18. Neuroprotective effects of (Val8)GLP-1-Glu-PAL in the MPTP Parkinson's disease mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, YanFang; Chen, YiMei; Li, Lin; Holscher, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a hormone and a growth factor. GLP-1 mimetics are currently on the market as treatments for type 2 diabetes. They also have shown neuroprotective properties in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, the GLP-1 mimetic exendin-4 has shown protective effects in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD), and a first clinical trial in PD patients showed promising results. (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL is a new GLP-1 analogue which has a longer biologica...

  19. Volume changes at macro- and nano-scale in epoxy resins studied by PALS and PVT experimental techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somoza, A. [IFIMAT-UNCentro, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina) and CICPBA, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina)]. E-mail: asomoza@exa.unicen.edu.ar; Salgueiro, W. [IFIMAT-UNCentro, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Goyanes, S. [LPMPyMC, Depto. de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ramos, J. [Materials and Technology Group, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y M. Ambiente, Escuela University Politecnica, Universidad Pais Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Pz. Europa 1, 20018 Donostia/San Sebastian (Spain); Mondragon, I. [Materials and Technology Group, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y M. Ambiente, Escuela University Politecnica, Universidad Pais Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Pz. Europa 1, 20018 Donostia/San Sebastian (Spain)

    2007-02-15

    A systematic study on changes in the volumes at macro- and nano-scale in epoxy systems cured with selected aminic hardeners at different pre-cure temperatures is presented. Free- and macroscopic specific-volumes were measured by PALS and pressure-volume-temperature techniques, respectively. An analysis of the relation existing between macro- and nano-scales of the thermosetting networks developed by the different chemical structures is shown. The result obtained indicates that the structure of the hardeners governs the packing of the molecular chains of the epoxy network.

  20. ÉTUDE DE CAS — Népal : La découverte de la diversité | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    5 janv. 2011 ... Agriculteurs et chercheurs travaillent à l'amélioration du riz et du maïs Les variétés locales de céréales cultivées dans les hautes terres du Népal pourraient faire beaucoup pour accroître les disponibilités alimentaires, mais elles ont été longtemps ignorées par le système officiel de la recherche.

  1. Évolution des politiques environnementales et tourisme de montagne au Népal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Sacareau

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Le développement du trekking au Népal a suscité des inquiétudes qui ont abouti à la création d’aires protégées sur la foi d’un scénario de crise environnementale dont les touristes et les paysans étaient jugés responsables. Devant les conflits entre la conservation et les nécessités de développement des régions concernées, la gouvernance des aires protégées a évolué dans le sens d’une meilleure prise en compte des sociétés locales. Pour autant les mesures prises ne font qu’accompagner et diriger des dynamiques touristiques plus anciennes qui s’exercent à des échelles plus vastes. Le trekking constitue ainsi un système touristique très largement aux mains des sociétés montagnardes du pays qui a permis l’amélioration de leurs conditions de vie tout en limitant ses impacts environnementaux. En ce sens le trekking répond assez largement aux principes du développement durable.Against a backdrop of environmental crisis, attributed to the impact of tourism and the practices of rural populations, Nepal has created protected areas with a view to preserving the Himalayan environment and promoting sustainable tourism in the regions concerned. Given the conflicts between conservation needs and development needs, local communities are now being given a bigger role in the governance of these protected areas. Yet the measures being taken simply accompany and guide well-established tourism dynamics that operate on a much greater scale. Trekking is thus a tourism system largely in the hands of the country’s mountain communities and is an activity that has enabled these communities to improve their living conditions while at the same time limiting environmental impacts. In this sense it is very much in line with the principles of sustainable development.

  2. Agreement between activPAL and ActiGraph for assessing children's sedentary time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridgers Nicola D

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accelerometers have been used to determine the amount of time that children spend sedentary. However, as time spent sitting may be detrimental to health, research is needed to examine whether accelerometer sedentary cut-points reflect the amount of time children spend sitting. The aim of this study was to: a examine agreement between ActiGraph (AG cut-points for sedentary time and objectively-assessed periods of free-living sitting and sitting plus standing time using the activPAL (aP; and b identify cut-points to determine time spent sitting and sitting plus standing. Methods Forty-eight children (54% boys aged 8-12 years wore a waist-mounted AG and thigh-mounted aP for two consecutive school days (9-3:30 pm. AG data were analyzed using 17 cut-points between 50-850 counts·min-1 in 50 counts·min-1 increments to determine sedentary time during class-time, break time and school hours. Sitting and sitting plus standing time were obtained from the aP for these periods. Limits of agreement were computed to evaluate bias between AG50 to AG850 sedentary time and sitting and sitting plus standing time. Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC analyses identified AG cut-points that maximized sensitivity and specificity for sitting and sitting plus standing time. Results The smallest mean bias between aP sitting time and AG sedentary time was AG150 for class time (3.8 minutes, AG50 for break time (-0.8 minutes, and AG100 for school hours (-5.2 minutes. For sitting plus standing time, the smallest bias was observed for AG850. ROC analyses revealed an optimal cut-point of 96 counts·min-1 (AUC = 0.75 for sitting time, which had acceptable sensitivity (71.7% and specificity (67.8%. No optimal cut-point was obtained for sitting plus standing (AUC = 0.51. Conclusions Estimates of free-living sitting time in children during school hours can be obtained using an AG cut-point of 100 counts·min-1. Higher sedentary cut-points may capture both

  3. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 482: Area 15 U15a/e Muckpiles and Ponds Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-09-30

    This Corrective Action Decision Document /Closure Report (CADD/CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 482 U15a/e Muckpiles and Ponds. This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 482 is comprised of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and one adjacent area: CAS 15-06-01, U15e Muckpile; CAS 15-06-02, U15a Muckpile; CAS 15-38-01, Area 15 U15a/e Ponds; and Drainage below the U15a Muckpile. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure with no further corrective action, by placing use restrictions on the three CASs and the adjacent area of CAU 482. To support this recommendation, a corrective action investigation (CAI) was performed in September 2002. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process: (1) Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. (3) Provide sufficient information and data to determine appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 482 dataset from the CAI was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. Tier 2 FALS were determined for the hazardous constituents of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH)-diesel-range organics (DRO) and the radionuclides americium (Am)-241, cesium (Cs)-137, plutonium (Pu)-238, and Pu-239. The Tier 2 FALs were calculated for the radionuclides using site-specific information. The hazardous constituents of TPH-DRO were compared to the PALs

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 482: Area 15 U15a/e Muckpiles and Ponds Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document /Closure Report (CADD/CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 482 U15a/e Muckpiles and Ponds. This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 482 is comprised of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and one adjacent area: CAS 15-06-01, U15e Muckpile; CAS 15-06-02, U15a Muckpile; CAS 15-38-01, Area 15 U15a/e Ponds; and Drainage below the U15a Muckpile. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure with no further corrective action, by placing use restrictions on the three CASs and the adjacent area of CAU 482. To support this recommendation, a corrective action investigation (CAI) was performed in September 2002. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process: (1) Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. (3) Provide sufficient information and data to determine appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 482 dataset from the CAI was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. Tier 2 FALS were determined for the hazardous constituents of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH)-diesel-range organics (DRO) and the radionuclides americium (Am)-241, cesium (Cs)-137, plutonium (Pu)-238, and Pu-239. The Tier 2 FALs were calculated for the radionuclides using site-specific information. The hazardous constituents of TPH-DRO were compared to the PALs

  5. Non-perturbative renormalization in coordinate space for N{sub f}=2 maximally twisted mass fermions with tree-level Symanzik improved gauge action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichy, Krzysztof [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany). NIC; Adam Mickiewicz Univ., Poznan (Poland). Faculty of Physics; Jansen, Karl [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany). NIC; Korcyl, Piotr [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany). NIC; Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland). M. Smoluchowski Inst. of Physics

    2012-07-15

    We present results of a lattice QCD application of a coordinate space renormalization scheme for the extraction of renormalization constants for flavour non-singlet bilinear quark operators. The method consists in the analysis of the small-distance behaviour of correlation functions in Euclidean space and has several theoretical and practical advantages, in particular: it is gauge invariant, easy to implement and has relatively low computational cost. The values of renormalization constants in the X-space scheme can be converted to the MS scheme via 4-loop continuum perturbative formulae. Our results for N{sub f}=2 maximally twisted mass fermions with tree-level Symanzik improved gauge action are compared to the ones from the RI-MOM scheme and show full agreement with this method. (orig.)

  6. Non-perturbative renormalization in coordinate space for Nf=2 maximally twisted mass fermions with tree-level Symanzik improved gauge action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cichy, Krzysztof; Adam Mickiewicz Univ., Poznan; Jansen, Karl; Korcyl, Piotr; Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow

    2012-07-01

    We present results of a lattice QCD application of a coordinate space renormalization scheme for the extraction of renormalization constants for flavour non-singlet bilinear quark operators. The method consists in the analysis of the small-distance behaviour of correlation functions in Euclidean space and has several theoretical and practical advantages, in particular: it is gauge invariant, easy to implement and has relatively low computational cost. The values of renormalization constants in the X-space scheme can be converted to the MS scheme via 4-loop continuum perturbative formulae. Our results for N f =2 maximally twisted mass fermions with tree-level Symanzik improved gauge action are compared to the ones from the RI-MOM scheme and show full agreement with this method. (orig.)

  7. Practical Use of the Extended No Action Level (eNAL) Correction Protocol for Breast Cancer Patients With Implanted Surgical Clips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penninkhof, Joan; Quint, Sandra; Baaijens, Margreet; Heijmen, Ben; Dirkx, Maarten

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the practical use of the extended No Action Level (eNAL) setup correction protocol for breast cancer patients with surgical clips and evaluate its impact on the setup accuracy of both tumor bed and whole breast during simultaneously integrated boost treatments. Methods and Materials: For 80 patients, two orthogonal planar kilovoltage images and one megavoltage image (for the mediolateral beam) were acquired per fraction throughout the radiotherapy course. For setup correction, the eNAL protocol was applied, based on registration of surgical clips in the lumpectomy cavity. Differences with respect to application of a No Action Level (NAL) protocol or no protocol were quantified for tumor bed and whole breast. The correlation between clip migration during the fractionated treatment and either the method of surgery or the time elapsed from last surgery was investigated. Results: The distance of the clips to their center of mass (COM), averaged over all clips and patients, was reduced by 0.9 ± 1.2 mm (mean ± 1 SD). Clip migration was similar between the group of patients starting treatment within 100 days after surgery (median, 53 days) and the group starting afterward (median, 163 days) (p = 0.20). Clip migration after conventional breast surgery (closing the breast superficially) or after lumpectomy with partial breast reconstructive techniques (sutured cavity). was not significantly different either (p = 0.22). Application of eNAL on clips resulted in residual systematic errors for the clips’ COM of less than 1 mm in each direction, whereas the setup of the breast was within about 2 mm of accuracy. Conclusions: Surgical clips can be safely used for high-accuracy position verification and correction. Given compensation for time trends in the clips’ COM throughout the treatment course, eNAL resulted in better setup accuracies for both tumor bed and whole breast than NAL.

  8. A framework to promote collective action within the One Health community of practice: Using participatory modelling to enable interdisciplinary, cross-sectoral and multi-level integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binot, Aurelie; Duboz, Raphaël; Promburom, Panomsak; Phimpraphai, Waraphon; Cappelle, Julien; Lajaunie, Claire; Goutard, Flavie Luce; Pinyopummintr, Tanu; Figuié, Muriel; Roger, François Louis

    2015-12-01

    As Southeast Asia (SEA) is characterized by high human and domestic animal densities, growing intensification of trade, drastic land use changes and biodiversity erosion, this region appears to be a hotspot to study complex dynamics of zoonoses emergence and health issues at the Animal-Human-Environment interface. Zoonotic diseases and environmental health issues can have devastating socioeconomic and wellbeing impacts. Assessing and managing the related risks implies to take into account ecological and social dynamics at play, in link with epidemiological patterns. The implementation of a One Health ( OH ) approach in this context calls for improved integration among disciplines and improved cross-sectoral collaboration, involving stakeholders at different levels. For sure, such integration is not achieved spontaneously, implies methodological guidelines and has transaction costs. We explore pathways for implementing such collaboration in SEA context, highlighting the main challenges to be faced by researchers and other target groups involved in OH actions. On this basis, we propose a conceptual framework of OH integration. Throughout 3 components (field-based data management, professional training workshops and higher education), we suggest to develop a new culture of networking involving actors from various disciplines, sectors and levels (from the municipality to the Ministries) through a participatory modelling process, fostering synergies and cooperation. This framework could stimulate long-term dialogue process, based on the combination of case studies implementation and capacity building. It aims for implementing both institutional OH dynamics (multi-stakeholders and cross-sectoral) and research approaches promoting systems thinking and involving social sciences to follow-up and strengthen collective action.

  9. Correlates of physical activity level among hemodialysis patients in Selangor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S W; Chan, Y M; Lim, T S

    2011-12-01

    There is mounting evidence demonstrating the importance of adequate physical activity to promote better well-being among hemodialysis patients. Available data pertaining to the levels of physical activity and its determinants among hemodialysis patients is, however, scarce in Malaysia. The objectives of this study are hence to determine the levels of physical activity and it associated factors among hemodialysis patients. A total of 70 subjects were recruited from three dialysis centres in Selangor. A face-to-face interview was conducted to obtain socio-demographic data and subjects' knowledge on dietary sources. Medical history, biochemical parameters and weight status were obtained from medical records. Physical activity level (PAL) was assessed using the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ). A total of 81.4% and 18.6% of the respondents had low and moderate PALs, respectively. Thus, none of the respondents had high PAL. Serum creatinine, education level, personal income and knowledge score on potassium-related medical complications were factors found to correlate significantly with PAL. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that higher PAL was predicted by a lower knowledge score on dietary sodium source, higher education and higher serum creatinine. Despite consistent documentation of the potential positive impact of physical exercise on hemodialysis outcomes, the level of physical activity remains low among these patients. It is hoped that these findings can add to the existing body of knowledge and serve as a supporting document for the formulation of appropriate interventions to improve the status of physical activity among hemodialysis patients in Malaysia.

  10. Léonard Ginsburg et la Paléontologie Portugaise. Hommage amical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telles Antunes, M.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Léonard Ginsburg has been a distinguished palaeontologist. He was a gifted one: intelligence, high working capacity, experience, knowledge and critical sense. As critical sense is not always the best for some people, adversaries were not rare. He was both an accomplished researcher and a deep connoisseur of the collections under his responsibility, as well as someone with a broad knowledge of the science world. By the high number and value of his contributions, an homage that he deserved so much is but an act of justice. As far as I am concerned, Ginsburg was a Colleague and Friend since 1961 until the end, even after his research activities ceased. Of course, his contributions cannot be valued just from a personal viewpoint. We can recognize their value for, among many others, a Country as Portugal. After obtaining a scholarship to prepare my Ph.D., I drove to Paris loaded with vertebrate fossils from Angola and Portugal, not without a few incidents because, by sheer chance, I arrived just the day of the Algerian “putsch”. Here they are my beginnings in Paris that developed into an institutional and personal collaboration and friendship for half a century. I have been very well received by the Director of the Muséum’s Institut de Paléontologie, Professor Jean-Pierre Lehman. I was lodged at the building’s basement. Soon afterwards, an unknown man approached asking me if I was a young « Spaniard » that came in to study fossil vertebrates, as Mr. Lehman had told him. He was Léonard Ginsburg. Our collaboration begun. We dealt mainly with the Miocene mammalian faunas from Portugal, and especially from Lisbon, as well as some Eocene ones. Nevertheless we also studied some other groups as crocodilians and areas, mostly in France. Research was carried on at the Paris Museum, the concerned Portuguese institutions and on the field. Under a palaeontological viewpoint, a most important place concerns Carnivora and Rhinocerotidae, as well as

  11. An fMRI study of joint action – varying levels of cooperation correlates with activity in sensorimotor control, but not mentalization, networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry eChaminade

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available As social agents, humans continuously interact with with the people around them. Here, motor cooperation was investigated by designing a situation in which pairs of participants, one being scanned with fMRI, controlled jointly a visually presented object with joystick movements. The object oscillated dynamically along two dimensions, shades of pink and width of gratings, corresponding to the two cardinal directions of joystick movements. While the overall control of each participant on the object was kept constant, the amount of cooperation along the two dimensions varied along four levels, from no (each participant controlled exclusively one dimension to full (each participant controlled half of each dimension cooperation. Increasing cooperation correlated with BOLD signal in the left parietal operculum and anterior cingulate cortex, while decreasing cooperation correlated with activity in the right inferior frontal and superior temporal gyri, in the intraparietal sulci and inferior temporal gyrii bilaterally, and in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. As joint control improved with the level of cooperation, we assessed the brain responses correlating with joint performance, and found that activity in most of the areas associated with levels of cooperation also correlated with the joint performance. The only brain area found exclusively in the negative correlation with cooperation was within the posterior region of the rostral medial frontal cortex, involved in the monitoring of action outcome. We therefore propose that this region responds to the predictability of visual feedback given the motor commands, which is maximal when participants do not cooperate as they fully control one dimension. Our results therefore indicate that, in the current experimental paradigm, the level of cooperation affects sensorimotor processing, but not mentalizing. Altogether, humans do not need to have access to others’ intentional states to cooperate on a joint

  12. Item-level psychometrics and predictors of performance for Spanish/English bilingual speakers on an object and action naming battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Lisa A; Donovan, Neila J

    2012-04-01

    There is a pressing need for psychometrically sound naming materials for Spanish/English bilingual adults. To address this need, in this study the authors examined the psychometric properties of An Object and Action Naming Battery (An O&A Battery; Druks & Masterson, 2000) in bilingual speakers. Ninety-one Spanish/English bilinguals named O&A Battery items in English and Spanish. Responses underwent a Rasch analysis. Using correlation and regression analyses, the authors evaluated the effect of psycholinguistic (e.g., imageability) and participant (e.g., proficiency ratings) variables on accuracy. Rasch analysis determined unidimensionality across English and Spanish nouns and verbs and robust item-level psychometric properties, evidence for content validity. Few items did not fit the model, there were no ceiling or floor effects after uninformative and misfit items were removed, and items reflected a range of difficulty. Reliability coefficients were high, and the number of statistically different ability levels provided indices of sensitivity. Regression analyses revealed significant correlations between psycholinguistic variables and accuracy, providing preliminary construct validity. The participant variables that contributed most to accuracy were proficiency ratings and time of language use. Results suggest adequate content and construct validity of O&A items retained in the analysis for Spanish/English bilingual adults and support future efforts to evaluate naming in older bilinguals and persons with bilingual aphasia.

  13. CIGB-552: A new penetrating peptide with antitumor action mediated by the increased levels of the COMMD1 protein in cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra-Vallespi, M; Fernández-Massó, JR; Oliva-Argüelles, B.; Reyes-Acosta, O.; Garay-Pérez, H.E.; Cabrales-Rico, A.; Tejeda-Gómez, Y.; Mendoza-Fuentes, O.; Soria, Y.; Guillen-Pérez, I.; Palenzuela-Gardon, D.; Vázquez-Blomquist, D.; Musacchio-Lasa, A.; Novoa-Perez, L.I.; Gómez-Rodríguez, Y.; Delgado-Roche, L.; Pimentel, G.; Garza, J.; Basaco, T.; Sánchez, I.; Calderón, C.; Rodríguez, J.C.; Astrada, S.; Bollati-Fogolín, M.; Rivera-Markelova, M.; Fichtner, I.

    2015-01-01

    A second-generation peptide CIGB-552, with cell-penetrating capacity, was developed by the modification of the primary structure of the L-2 peptide. The molecular mechanism underlying its cytotoxic activity remains partially unknown. In this study, it was shown that CIGB-552 binds and increases the levels of COMMD1, a protein involved in copper homeostasis, sodium transport, and the NF-kB signaling pathway. We found that CIGB-552 induces ubiquitination of RelA and inhibits the antiapoptotic activity regulated by NF-κβ, whereas the knockdown of COMMD1 blocks this effect. We also found that CIGB-552 increases the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), decreases the cellular antioxidant capacity and induces the peroxidation of proteins and lipids in tumor cells. Altogether, our results bring new insights into the mechanism of action of CIGB-552. Moreover, its anti-tumoral effect was explored by subcutaneous administration in a therapeutic schedule in syngeneic murine tumors and patient-derived xenograft models. Outstandingly, a significant delay of tumor growth was observed after the administration of CIGB-552 in these experimental settings. Our data reinforce the perspectives of CIGB-552 for targeted therapy against cancer. This research granted the 2014 Award of the Cuban National Academy of Sciences. (author)

  14. Quality of Life in Patients With Brain Metastases Using the EORTC QLQ-BN20+2 and QLQ-C15-PAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caissie, Amanda; Nguyen, Janet; Chen, Emily; Zhang Liying; Sahgal, Arjun; Clemons, Mark; Kerba, Marc; Arnalot, Palmira Foro; Danjoux, Cyril; Tsao, May; Barnes, Elizabeth; Holden, Lori; Danielson, Brita; Chow, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The 20-item European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire–Brain Neoplasm (QLQ-BN20) is a validated quality-of-life (QOL) questionnaire for patients with primary brain tumors. The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire–Core 15 Palliative (QLQ-C15-PAL) core palliative questionnaire is a 15-item version of the core 30-item QLQ-C30 and was developed to decrease the burden on patients with advanced cancer. The combination of the QLQ-BN20 and QLQ-C30 to assess QOL may be too burdensome for patients. The primary aim of this study was to assess QOL in patients before and after treatment for brain metastases using the QLQ-BN20+2 and QLQ-C15-PAL, a version of the QLQ-BN20 questionnaire with 2 additional questions assessing cognitive functioning that were not addressed in the QLQ-C15-PAL. Methods and Materials: Patients with brain metastases completed the QLQ-C15-PAL and QLQ-BN20+2 questionnaires to assess QOL before and 1 month after radiation. Linear regression analysis was used to assess changes in QOL scores over time, as well as to explore associations between the QLQ-BN20+2 and QLQ-C15-PAL scales, patient demographics, and clinical variables. Spearman correlation assessed associations between the QLQ-BN20+2 and QLQ-C15-PAL scales. Results: Among 108 patients, the majority (55%) received whole-brain radiotherapy only, with 65% of patients completing follow-up at 1 month after treatment. The most prominent symptoms at baseline were future uncertainty (QLQ-BN20+2) and fatigue (QLQ-C15-PAL). After treatment, significant improvement was seen for the QLQ-C15-PAL insomnia scale, as well as the QLQ-BN20+2 scales of future uncertainty, visual disorder, and concentration difficulty. Baseline Karnofsky Performance Status was negatively correlated to QLQ-BN20+2 motor dysfunction but positively related to QLQ-C15-PAL physical functioning and QLQ-BN20+2 cognitive functioning at

  15. Quality of Life in Patients With Brain Metastases Using the EORTC QLQ-BN20+2 and QLQ-C15-PAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caissie, Amanda; Nguyen, Janet; Chen, Emily; Zhang Liying [Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun [Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Clemons, Mark [Department of Medical Oncology, Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Kerba, Marc [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Arnalot, Palmira Foro [Parc de Salut Mar Hospital de l' Esperanca, Barcelona (Spain); Danjoux, Cyril; Tsao, May; Barnes, Elizabeth; Holden, Lori [Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Danielson, Brita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Chow, Edward, E-mail: edward.chow@sunnybrook.ca [Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The 20-item European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Brain Neoplasm (QLQ-BN20) is a validated quality-of-life (QOL) questionnaire for patients with primary brain tumors. The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15 Palliative (QLQ-C15-PAL) core palliative questionnaire is a 15-item version of the core 30-item QLQ-C30 and was developed to decrease the burden on patients with advanced cancer. The combination of the QLQ-BN20 and QLQ-C30 to assess QOL may be too burdensome for patients. The primary aim of this study was to assess QOL in patients before and after treatment for brain metastases using the QLQ-BN20+2 and QLQ-C15-PAL, a version of the QLQ-BN20 questionnaire with 2 additional questions assessing cognitive functioning that were not addressed in the QLQ-C15-PAL. Methods and Materials: Patients with brain metastases completed the QLQ-C15-PAL and QLQ-BN20+2 questionnaires to assess QOL before and 1 month after radiation. Linear regression analysis was used to assess changes in QOL scores over time, as well as to explore associations between the QLQ-BN20+2 and QLQ-C15-PAL scales, patient demographics, and clinical variables. Spearman correlation assessed associations between the QLQ-BN20+2 and QLQ-C15-PAL scales. Results: Among 108 patients, the majority (55%) received whole-brain radiotherapy only, with 65% of patients completing follow-up at 1 month after treatment. The most prominent symptoms at baseline were future uncertainty (QLQ-BN20+2) and fatigue (QLQ-C15-PAL). After treatment, significant improvement was seen for the QLQ-C15-PAL insomnia scale, as well as the QLQ-BN20+2 scales of future uncertainty, visual disorder, and concentration difficulty. Baseline Karnofsky Performance Status was negatively correlated to QLQ-BN20+2 motor dysfunction but positively related to QLQ-C15-PAL physical functioning and QLQ-BN20+2 cognitive functioning at

  16. Development and feasibility testing of an intervention to support active lifestyles in youths with type 1 diabetes-the ActivPals programme: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Fiona; Kirk, Alison; Robertson, Kenneth; Reilly, John J

    2016-01-01

    The global incidence of type 1 diabetes is rising, and youths with type 1 diabetes continue to suffer poorer health than peers without diabetes. Evidence suggests youths with type 1 diabetes have physical activity (PA) levels well below the recommendations for health and have high levels of sedentary behaviour. An active lifestyle is therefore recommended to improve health. There is limited research showing effective lifestyle behaviour change in this population; therefore, an evidence gap exists between the need to promote physical activity in type 1 diabetes care and lack of understanding on how to do this. This protocol paper describes a feasibility and pilot study of the ActivPals programme-an intervention to support active lifestyles in youths with type 1 diabetes. Key intervention components have been identified from preliminary work (individual and family focus, peer mentoring, technology integration and improved communication and understanding) and are being developed into a pragmatic randomised controlled trial (RCT) supported by recruitment pathways. A steering group of health care professionals and managers will refine the intervention to patient needs. A pilot trial is providing data on intervention implementation, acceptability and feasibility. Twenty youths with type 1 diabetes are being recruited and randomised into an intervention or control group. Physical activity is being measured objectively using the Actigraph GT3X+ monitor at baseline and 1-month follow-up. Contextual factors associated with intervention delivery are being explored. This study will contribute to the development of evidence-based, user-informed and pragmatic interventions leading to healthier lifestyles in youths with type 1 diabetes.

  17. Finding the Subcellular Location of Barley, Wheat, Rice and Maize Proteins: The Compendium of Crop Proteins with Annotated Locations (cropPAL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Cornelia M; Castleden, Ian R; Aryamanesh, Nader; Jacoby, Richard P; Millar, A Harvey

    2016-01-01

    Barley, wheat, rice and maize provide the bulk of human nutrition and have extensive industrial use as agricultural products. The genomes of these crops each contains >40,000 genes encoding proteins; however, the major genome databases for these species lack annotation information of protein subcellular location for >80% of these gene products. We address this gap, by constructing the compendium of crop protein subcellular locations called crop Proteins with Annotated Locations (cropPAL). Subcellular location is most commonly determined by fluorescent protein tagging of live cells or mass spectrometry detection in subcellular purifications, but can also be predicted from amino acid sequence or protein expression patterns. The cropPAL database collates 556 published studies, from >300 research institutes in >30 countries that have been previously published, as well as compiling eight pre-computed subcellular predictions for all Hordeum vulgare, Triticum aestivum, Oryza sativa and Zea mays protein sequences. The data collection including metadata for proteins and published studies can be accessed through a search portal http://crop-PAL.org. The subcellular localization information housed in cropPAL helps to depict plant cells as compartmentalized protein networks that can be investigated for improving crop yield and quality, and developing new biotechnological solutions to agricultural challenges. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Pengaruh Karakteristik Budaya Organisasi, Locus of Control dan Disiplin Kerja Terhadap Kinerja Karyawan Studi Pada Perusahaan Daerah Pengelola Air Limbah (PD PAL Kota Banjarmasin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dessy Rosiana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed to simultaneously analyze the significantly positive effect of organizational culture characteristics, locus of control and work discipline towards employee performance at PD PAL Banjarmasin; also to partially analyze the significantly positive effect of organizational culture characteristics, locus of control, and work discipline towards employee performance at PD PAL Banjarmasin. The type of this research was explanatory research. All population became the samples in this research. The information collection of 53 employees who acted as the respondents in this research was done by using questionnaire arranged in 5 Likert Scale. The data analysis used multiple linear regression analysis, multiple determination coefficient, as well as F test and t test. The result of this research showed that the variable of organizational culture characteristics, locus of control and work discipline simultaneously has a significantly positive effect towards employee performance at PD PAL Banjarmasin. The organizational culture characteristics partially does not  have a positive and significant effect towards employee performance. Partially   the locus control has a significantly positive effect towards employee performance. Work discipline partially has a significantly positive effect towards employee performance. The implication to the management, based on the result of this research, is (1 the implementation of the organizational culture characteristics needs to be socialized among employee of PD PAL, and (2 a strong control on the locus control and discipline is needed to improve the employee performance. Keywords: Organizational Culture Characteristics, Locus of Control, Work Discipline, Employee Performance

  19. Azimuthal Signature of Coincidental Brightness Temperature and Normalized Radar Cross-Section Obtained Using Airborne PALS Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliander, Andreas; Kim, Seungbum; Yueh, Simon; Cosh, Mike; Jackson, Tom; Njoku, Eni

    2010-01-01

    Coincidental airborne brightness temperature (TB) and normalized radar-cross section (NRCS) measurements were carried out with the PALS (Passive and Active L- and S-band) instrument in the SMAPVEX08 (SMAP Validation Experiment 2008) field campaign. This paper describes results obtained from a set of flights which measured a field in 45(sup o) steps over the azimuth angle. The field contained mature soy beans with distinct row structure. The measurement shows that both TB and NRCS experience modulation effects over the azimuth as expected based on the theory. The result is useful in development and validation of land surface parameter forward models and retrieval algorithms, such as the soil moisture algorithm for NASA's SMAP (Soil Moisture Active and Passive) mission. Although the footprint of the SMAP will not be sensitive to the small resolution scale effects as the one presented in this paper, it is nevertheless important to understand the effects at smaller scale.

  20. Basic features of electromagnetic pulse generated in a laser-target chamber at 3-TW laser facility PALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Marco, M; Pfeifer, M; Krousky, E; Krasa, J; Cikhardt, J; Klir, D; Nassisi, V

    2014-01-01

    We describe the radiofrequency emission taking place when 300 ps laser pulses irradiate various solid targets with an intensity of 10 16 W/cm 2 . The emission of intense electromagnetic pulses was observed outside the laser target chamber by two loop antennas up to 1 GHz. Electromagnetic pulses can be 800 MHz transients, which decay from a peak electromagnetic field of E 0 ≊ 7 kV/m and H 0 ≊ 15 A/m. The occurrence of these electromagnetic pulses is associated with generation of hard x-rays with photon energies extending beyond 1 MeV. This contribution reports the first observation of this effect at the PALS facility.

  1. A Look at the Researches of the Syro-Italian Archaeological Mission in Palmyra (PAL.M.A.I.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gioia Zenoni

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dal 2007 la Missione Archeologica Italo-Siriana a Palmira (PAL.M.A.I.S., nata da un accordo fra l’Università degli Studi di Milano e la Direzione Generale delle Antichità e dei Musei di Damasco, opera nel sito di Tadmor-Palmira (Siria sotto la direzione della prof. Maria Teresa Grassi. Le ricerche, finalizzate allo studio dell’edilizia residenziale privata della città romana attraverso l’indagine di un settore cruciale, il Quartiere Sud-Ovest, sono state supportate da attività sul campo - fra cui lo scavo stratigrafico dell’Edificio con Peristilio, ora interrotto - e dal 2011 si sono concentrate sullo studio dell’architettura e della cultura materiale in vista della pubblicazione finale.

  2. [Assessment of IDC-Pal as a Diagnostic Tool for Family Physicians to Identify Patients with Complex Palliative Care Needs in Germany: a Pilot Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comino, María Rosa Salvador; Garcia, Victor Regife; López, Maria Auxiliadora Fernández; Feddersen, Berend; Roselló, María Luisa Martin; Sanftenberg, Linda; Schelling, Jörg

    2017-07-11

    Background Palliative medicine is an essential component of the health care system. Basic palliative care should be provided by primary care services (family physician and home nursing) with palliative-medical basic qualification. Often it is very difficult to identify patients that would profit from a specialized palliative care team. For the evaluation of the case complexity of a palliative patient, we present a Spanish diagnostic tool IDC-Pal, which tries to specify when, why and where a palliative patient should be referred. The aims of this study were the translation and cultural adaptation of the diagnostic tool for complexity in palliative care IDC-Pal to the German language, and the measurement of its feasibility and face validity. Methods During the first phase, a forward-backward translation with linguistic and cultural adaptation of the tool IDC-Pal as well as the validation of its content by a review committee was performed. During the second phase, the preliminary version of the tool was tested by 38 family physicians that were asked for a qualitative assessment using a 10-points Likert scale (1 = "strongly disagree" and 10 = "totally agree"). Finally, a definitive version was developed. Results The translation and adaptation were achieved without major problems. Both feasibility and apparent validity of the tool IDC-Pal were rated as high. The mean response in the Likert scale was 7.79, with a SD of 0.36. Participants strongly agreed on the apparent validity of the tool with a mean of 7.82 and a SD of 0.26 and on its feasibility with a mean of 7.79, and a SD of 0.39. Conclusions A conceptually, culturally and linguistically equivalent version of the original instrument IDC-Pal was obtained. German family physicians agreed on the usability of IDC-Pal as a tool for rating the case complexity of palliative patients. These results indicate that physicians in Bavaria and eventually in Germany could benefit of the full validation of IDC-Pal. © Georg Thieme

  3. Actions of p-synephrine on hepatic enzyme activities linked to carbohydrate metabolism and ATP levels in vivo and in the perfused rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Marcos Rodrigues; Bracht, Lívia; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; Corrêa, Rúbia Carvalho Gomes; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar

    2018-01-01

    p-Synephrine is one of the main active components of the fruit of Citrus aurantium (bitter orange). Extracts of the bitter orange and other preparations containing p-synephrine have been used worldwide to promote weight loss and for sports performance. The purpose of the study was to measure the action of p-synephrine on hepatic enzyme activities linked to carbohydrate and energy metabolism and the levels of adenine mononucleotides. Enzymes and adenine mononucleotides were measured in the isolated perfused rat liver and in vivo after oral administration of the drug (50 and 300 mg/kg) by using standard techniques. p-Synephrine increased the activity of glycogen phosphorylase in vivo and in the perfused liver. It decreased, however, the activities of pyruvate kinase and pyruvate dehydrogenase also in vivo and in the perfused liver. p-Synephrine increased the hepatic pools of adenosine diphosphate and adenosine triphosphate. Stimulation of glycogen phosphorylase is consistent with the reported increased glycogenolysis in the perfused liver and increased glycemia in rats. The decrease in the pyruvate dehydrogenase activity indicates that p-synephrine is potentially capable of inhibiting the transformation of carbohydrates into lipids. The capability of increasing the adenosine triphosphate-adenosine diphosphate pool indicates a beneficial effect of p-synephrine on the cellular energetics. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Test Area for Remedial Actions (TARA) site characterization and dynamic compaction of low-level radioactive waste trenches. FY 1988 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, E. C.; Spalding, B. P.; Lee, S. Y.; Hyder, L. K.

    1989-01-01

    As part of a low-level radioactive waste burial ground stabilization and closure technology demonstration project, a group of five burial trenches in Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 was selected as a demonstration site for testing trench compaction, trench grouting, and trench cap installation and performance. This report focuses on site characterization, trench compaction, and grout-trench leachate compatibility. Trench grouting and cap design and construction will be the subject of future reports. The five trenches, known as the Test Area for Remedial Actions (TARA) site, are contained within a hydrologically isolated area of SWSA 6; for that reason, any effects of stabilization activities on site performance and groundwater quality will be separable from the influence of other waste disposal units in SWSA 6. To obviate the chronic problem of burial trench subsidence and to provide support for an infiltration barrier cap, these five trenches were dynamically compacted by repeated dropping of a 4-ton weight onto each trench from heights of approximately 7 m.

  5. Control of Human Error and comparison Level risk after correction action With the SHERPA Method in a control Room of petrochemical industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zakerian

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims Today in many jobs like nuclear, military and chemical industries, human errors may result in a disaster. Accident in different places of the world emphasizes this subject and we indicate for example, Chernobyl disaster in (1986, tree Mile accident in (1974 and Flixborough explosion in (1974.So human errors identification especially in important and intricate systems is necessary and unavoidable for predicting control methods.   Methods Recent research is a case study and performed in Zagross Methanol Company in Asalouye (South pars.   Walking –Talking through method with process expert and control room operators, inspecting technical documents are used for collecting required information and completing Systematic Human Error Reductive and Predictive Approach (SHERPA worksheets.   Results analyzing SHERPA worksheet indicated that, were accepting capable invertebrate errors % 71.25, % 26.75 undesirable errors, % 2 accepting capable(with change errors, % 0 accepting capable errors, and after correction action forecast Level risk to this arrangement, accepting capable invertebrate errors % 0, % 4.35 undesirable errors , % 58.55 accepting capable(with change errors, % 37.1 accepting capable errors .   ConclusionFinally this result is comprehension that this method in different industries especially in chemical industries is enforceable and useful for human errors identification that may lead to accident and adventures.

  6. Late Neolithic vegetation history at the pile-dwelling site of Palù di Livenza (northeastern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Roberta

    2004-12-01

    The Late Neolithic pile-dwelling of Palù di Livenza yielded archaeological remains typical of the Square Mouth Pottery and Lagozza Cultures. A palynological investigation reveals important changes in the vegetation due to anthropogenic pressure. Between ca. 6590 and 5960 cal. yr BP, dense oak wood forests with deciduous Quercus, Fagus and Corylus extended around the mire, with no signs of human impact. The establishment of the pile-dwelling, dated to ca. 5960 cal. yr BP, led to a strong reduction of forests, reclamation of wetlands, and expansion of herbaceous communities, with cultivated species, infestant weeds, nitrophilous and ruderal herbs, pastures and meadows. According to AMS dates and previous archaeological chronologies, the pile-dwelling persisted for about 700 years (from ca. 5960 to 5260 cal. yr BP). The history of the pile-dwelling after ca. 5260 cal. yr BP cannot be reconstructed because of recent contamination of the top part of the section. Rarefaction analysis was applied to estimate changes of palynological richness through time: the highest E(Tn) (between 56 and 69 taxa) are contemporaneous with the local development of the pile-dwelling. The comparison of pollen data with archaeobotanical evidence indicates that Fragaria vesca, Malus sylvestris, Papaver somniferum and Physalis alkekengi were gathered at some distance from the site and that Linum usitatissimum is strongly under-represented in pollen samples. Crop cultivation can be estimated for a radius of several hundred metres around the mire. Palù di Livenza is significant in the context of Neolithic archaeobotany of northern Italy and neighbouring countries. Copyright

  7. Managing air and water quality in the face of uncertain futures: perspectives, perceptions, reported action, and needs for climate adaptation at the local level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedsworth, L. W.; Ekstrom, J.

    2017-12-01

    As the climate continues to shift, projections show amplified and more frequent extreme events, including coastal and inland flooding, wildfires, prolonged droughts, and heatwaves. Vital public goods, both air quality and water quality, can be critically affected by such extreme events. Climate change will make it increasingly difficult for managers to achieve public health targets for air and water quality. Successfully preparing governance structures developed to maintain and improve air and water quality may benefit from preventative strategies to avoid public health impacts and costs of climate change locally. Perceptions of climate change and its risks, actions taken so far, and perceived barriers to adaptation give insight into the needs of managers for preparing for climate change impacts. This paper compares results of two surveys that looked at local level management of air quality and water quality in California. Air quality managers consistently reported to recognize the risks of climate change on their sector, where water quality managers' perceptions varied between no concern to high concern. We explore the differences in governance, capacity influence the ill-defined responsibility and assumed roles of water and air districts in adaptation to extreme events increasing with climate change. The chain and network of managing air quality is compared with that of water quality - laying out similarities and differences. Then we compare how the survey respondents differed in terms of extreme weather-influenced threats to environmental quality. We end with a discussion of responsibility - where in the chain of managing these life-critical ecosystem services, is the need greatest for adapting to climate change and what does this mean for the other levels in the chain beyond the local management.

  8. Social-ecological factors and preventive actions decrease the risk of dengue infection at the household-level: Results from a prospective dengue surveillance study in Machala, Ecuador.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aileen Kenneson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In Ecuador, dengue virus (DENV infections transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito are among the greatest public health concerns in urban coastal communities. Community- and household-level vector control is the principal means of controlling disease outbreaks. This study aimed to assess the impact of knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAPs and social-ecological factors on the presence or absence of DENV infections in the household.In 2014 and 2015, individuals with DENV infections from sentinel clinics in Machala, Ecuador, were invited to participate in the study, as well as members of their household and members of four neighboring households located within 200 meters. We conducted diagnostic testing for DENV on all study participants; we surveyed heads of households (HOHs regarding demographics, housing conditions and KAPs. We compared KAPs and social-ecological factors between households with (n = 139 versus without (n = 80 DENV infections, using bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression models with and without interactions.Significant risk factors in multivariate models included proximity to abandoned properties, interruptions in piped water, and shaded patios (p<0.05. Significant protective factors included the use of mosquito bed nets, fumigation inside the home, and piped water inside the home (p<0.05. In bivariate analyses (but not multivariate modeling, DENV infections were positively associated with HOHs who were male, employed, and of younger age than households without infections (p<0.05. DENV infections were not associated with knowledge, attitude, or reported barriers to prevention activities.Specific actions that can be considered to decrease the risk of DENV infections in the household include targeting vector control in highly shaded properties, fumigating inside the home, and use of mosquito bed nets. Community-level interventions include cleanup of abandoned properties, daily garbage collection, and reliable

  9. An extended model of reasoned action to understand the influence of individual- and network-level factors on African Americans' participation in HIV vaccine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, Paula M; Archibald, Matthew; Diallo, Dazon Dixon; Hou, Su-I; Horton, Takeia; Chan, Kayshin; Mulligan, Mark J; del Rio, Carlos

    2010-06-01

    In the United States, the number and proportion of HIV/AIDS cases among black/African Americans continue to highlight the need for new biomedical prevention interventions, including an HIV vaccine, microbicide, or new antiretroviral (ARV) prevention strategies such as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to complement existing condom usage, harm reduction methods, and behavioral change strategies to stem the HIV epidemic. Although black/African Americans are disproportionately impacted by HIV/AIDS, their participation in HIV clinical research continues to have unique challenges. We theorize that interaction among multilevel factors creates ideal alignment for minority participation in HIV clinical studies. Thus, we initially set out to test an extended model of reasoned action with 362 participants to understand the interplay of sociopsychological and network-level considerations influencing minority participation in HIV prevention research efforts. In this study, we linked the intrapersonal dimensions of attitudes, beliefs, and normative concerns to community-level components, appraisal of involvement with the clinical research organization, an entity which operates within a networked structure of community partner agencies, and identification with coalition advocacy aims. Various participatory outcomes were explored including involvement in future HIV vaccine community functions, participation in community promotion of HIV vaccine research, and community mobilization. Three-stage least squares estimates indicated similar findings across three models. Significant effects demonstrate the importance of positive attitudes toward HIV vaccine research, favorable health research beliefs, perceived social support for participation, HIV/AIDS issue engagement, and perceived relevance of the clinical research site's mission and values. Identification of these nuanced pathway effects provides implications for tailored community program development.

  10. An Extended Model of Reasoned Action to Understand the Influence of Individual- and Network-Level Factors on African Americans’ Participation in HIV Vaccine Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, Paula M.; Archibald, Matthew; Diallo, Dazon Dixon; Hou, Su-I; Horton, Takeia; Chan, Kayshin; Mulligan, Mark J.; del Rio, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    In the United States, the number and proportion of HIV/AIDS cases among black/African Americans continue to highlight the need for new biomedical prevention interventions, including an HIV vaccine, microbicide, or new antiretroviral (ARV) prevention strategies such as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to complement existing condom usage, harm reduction methods, and behavioral change strategies to stem the HIV epidemic. Although black/African Americans are disproportionately impacted by HIV/AIDS, their participation in HIV clinical research continues to have unique challenges. We theorize that interaction among multilevel factors creates ideal alignment for minority participation in HIV clinical studies. Thus, we initially set out to test an extended model of reasoned action with 362 participants to understand the interplay of sociopsychological and network-level considerations influencing minority participation in HIV prevention research efforts. In this study, we linked the intrapersonal dimensions of attitudes, beliefs, and normative concerns to community-level components, appraisal of involvement with the clinical research organization, an entity which operates within a networked structure of community partner agencies, and identification with coalition advocacy aims. Various participatory outcomes were explored including involvement in future HIV vaccine community functions, participation in community promotion of HIV vaccine research, and community mobilization. Three-stage least squares estimates indicated similar findings across three models. Significant effects demonstrate the importance of positive attitudes toward HIV vaccine research, favorable health research beliefs, perceived social support for participation, HIV/AIDS issue engagement, and perceived relevance of the clinical research site’s mission and values. Identification of these nuanced pathway effects provides implications for tailored community program development. PMID:20012200

  11. Evaluation of auxin and thiamine interaction effect on PAL activity and phenolic compounds content in vegetative growth stage of soybean plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    nazi nadernejad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Soybean (Glycin max L. is one of the most important oily seeds in the world. This plant is rich in protein and unsaturated fats, and plays a significant role in human health with phenolic compounds and flavonoids. Indole Butyric Acid (IBA is a plant growth regulator that plays a key role in producing phenolic compounds and increasing the antioxidant capacity of the plant. Thiamine is one of the important vitamins in strengthening the immune system and increasing the resistance to environmental stresses in the plant's growth stages. Regarding the effect of hormone auxin and thiamine on the production of phenolic compounds as one of the antioxidant compounds in growth stages, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the two compounds in two stages of soybean growth and compare their effect on phenolic compounds changes in order to Detecting higher antioxidant capacity in environmental stress tolerance. For this purpose, the DPX cultivar of soybean seeds were prepared from Dezful Agriculture Research Center and planted in perlite containing flowers. The plants were planted under factorial design under IBA treatments with three concentrations of 0, 10 and 50 and thiamine with three concentrations of 0, 50 and 200. Extraction and evaluation of phenolic compounds, anthocyanins and pigments in leaves were performed. Data were analyzed using Duncan's test at a significant level of 5%. The results showed that the combined use of auxin and thiamine increased the carotenoid content in both phases and caused a significant increase in phenolic content. Application of auxin alone reduced auxin and thiamine the anthocyanin content significantly in both phases, but did not have a significant effect on phenolic content. The results showed that the PAL activity of the phenolic and anthocyanin content increased significantly in the 9-leaf stage compared to 3-leaf. Generally, the results showed that interaction effect between auxin and thiamine on

  12. Evaluating IMRT and VMAT dose accuracy: Practical examples of failure to detect systematic errors when applying a commonly used metric and action levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelms, Benjamin E. [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Chan, Maria F. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Basking Ridge, New Jersey 07920 (United States); Jarry, Geneviève; Lemire, Matthieu [Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montréal, QC H1T 2M4 (Canada); Lowden, John [Indiana University Health - Goshen Hospital, Goshen, Indiana 46526 (United States); Hampton, Carnell [Levine Cancer Institute/Carolinas Medical Center, Concord, North Carolina 28025 (United States); Feygelman, Vladimir [Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: This study (1) examines a variety of real-world cases where systematic errors were not detected by widely accepted methods for IMRT/VMAT dosimetric accuracy evaluation, and (2) drills-down to identify failure modes and their corresponding means for detection, diagnosis, and mitigation. The primary goal of detailing these case studies is to explore different, more sensitive methods and metrics that could be used more effectively for evaluating accuracy of dose algorithms, delivery systems, and QA devices.Methods: The authors present seven real-world case studies representing a variety of combinations of the treatment planning system (TPS), linac, delivery modality, and systematic error type. These case studies are typical to what might be used as part of an IMRT or VMAT commissioning test suite, varying in complexity. Each case study is analyzed according to TG-119 instructions for gamma passing rates and action levels for per-beam and/or composite plan dosimetric QA. Then, each case study is analyzed in-depth with advanced diagnostic methods (dose profile examination, EPID-based measurements, dose difference pattern analysis, 3D measurement-guided dose reconstruction, and dose grid inspection) and more sensitive metrics (2% local normalization/2 mm DTA and estimated DVH comparisons).Results: For these case studies, the conventional 3%/3 mm gamma passing rates exceeded 99% for IMRT per-beam analyses and ranged from 93.9% to 100% for composite plan dose analysis, well above the TG-119 action levels of 90% and 88%, respectively. However, all cases had systematic errors that were detected only by using advanced diagnostic techniques and more sensitive metrics. The systematic errors caused variable but noteworthy impact, including estimated target dose coverage loss of up to 5.5% and local dose deviations up to 31.5%. Types of errors included TPS model settings, algorithm limitations, and modeling and alignment of QA phantoms in the TPS. Most of the errors were

  13. Physical activity level and exercise in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Camila Kümmel; Almeida, Jussara Carnevale de; Merker, Aline Juliana Schneider; Brauer, Fabiane de Oliveira; Rodrigues, Ticiana da Costa

    2012-01-01

    To compare physical activity level (PAL) and care related to exercise in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). DM outpatients (adult, insulin-user patients) were assessed for PAL (international questionnaire; moderate- and high-level activities, as well as walking, over a typical week) and questioned about formal exercise practice, self-care, and hypoglycemic episodes related to exercise or reasons for not exercising. Two hundred twenty five patients were assessed: 107 (47.6%) had type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) and 118 (52.4%) had type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1), with a larger percentage of patients with DM2 being classified as poorly active [33 (30.7%) versus 12 (10.3%)] and a lower percentage being classified as highly active [9 (8.7%) versus 29 (25%)], compared with patients having DM1. Patients who do not exercise (n = 140) gave different reasons for not doing so: patients with DM2 claimed that they "felt uncomfortable", "presented medical restrictions", and "did not like it"; DM1 patients claimed that they "had no time to exercise", "were lazy", and "had hypoglycemic episodes". Only 85 patients exercised regularly, regardless of the PAL, and 38.8% performed self-care, such as eating, stretching, and capillary glucose monitoring. Patients with DM2 [5 (14.3%)] reported a lower number of hypoglycemic episodes related to exercise than those with DM1 [17 (34%)]. Patients with DM2 have different PAL and behavior related to exercise than those seen in DM1 patients.

  14. Collective Training and Fielding Opportunities for the Objective Force Maneuver Systems at the Unit of Action Level in a Unit Manning/Unit Replacement Personnel System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Courts, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of Objective Force formations, beginning with the first Unit of Action, will fundamentally change existing organizational structures, training requirements and operational constructs for the U.S. Army...

  15. Design of a petawatt optical parametric chirped pulse amplification upgrade of the kilojoule iodine laser PALS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Ondřej; Divoký, Martin; Turčičová, Hana; Straka, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 2 (2013), s. 211-218 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/06/0814; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LN00A100 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 506350 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : VULCAN petawatt * system * prospects * facility * program Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.701, year: 2013 http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online& aid =8950936

  16. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0 with Errata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehlecke, Robert

    2004-11-01

    corrective action investigation (CAI). Record of Technical Change No. 1 to the CAIP documents changes to the PALs agreed to by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This ROTC provides the justification for changing from background-based to dose-based radiological PALs. This ROTC was approved and the dose-based PAL comparison implemented on March 9, 2004.

  17. Negotiating action

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    After years of working towards a climate accord, the Paris Agreement of 2015 marked the shift from negotiating to reach consensus on climate action to implementation of such action. The challenge now is to ensure transparency in the processes and identify the details of what is required.

  18. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October - December 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  19. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July - September 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  20. Development of the ProPal-COPD tool to identify patients with COPD for proactive palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duenk RG

    2017-07-01

    of proactive palliative care, we proposed a cutoff in the model that prioritized sensitivity over specificity (0.90 over 0.73, respectively. Our model (ProPal-COPD tool was a stronger predictor of mortality within 1 year than the CODEX (comorbidity, age, obstruction, dyspnea, and previous severe exacerbations index.Conclusion: The ProPal-COPD tool is a promising multivariable prediction tool to identify patients with COPD for proactive palliative care. Keywords: COPD, exacerbation, proactive palliative care, prognosis, mortality

  1. Application of the No Action Level (NAL) protocol to correct for prostate motion based on electronic portal imaging of implanted markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, Hans C.J. de; Os, Marjolein J.H. van; Jansen, Peter P.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of the No Action Level (NAL) off-line correction protocol in the reduction of systematic prostate displacements as determined from electronic portal images (EPI) using implanted markers. Methods and materials: Four platinum markers, two near the apex and two near the base of the prostate, were implanted for localization purposes in patients who received fractionated high dose rate brachytherapy. During the following course of 25 fractions of external beam radiotherapy, the position of each marker relative to the corresponding position in digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) was measured in EPI in 15 patients for on average 17 fractions per patient. These marker positions yield the composite displacements due to both setup error and internal prostate motion, relative to the planning computed tomography scan. As the NAL protocol is highly effective in reducing systematic errors (recurring each fraction) due to setup inaccuracy alone, we investigated its efficacy in reducing systematic composite displacements. The analysis was performed for the center of mass (COM) of the four markers, as well as for the cranial and caudal markers separately. Furthermore, the impact of prostate rotation on the achieved positioning accuracy was determined. Results: In case of no setup corrections, the standard deviations of the systematic composite displacements of the COM were 3-4 mm in the craniocaudal and anterior-posterior directions, and 2 mm in the left-right direction. The corresponding SDs of the random displacements (interfraction fluctuations) were 2-3 mm in each direction. When applying a NAL protocol based on three initial treatment fractions, the SDs of the systematic COM displacements were reduced to 1-2 mm. Displacements at the cranial end of the prostate were slightly larger than at the caudal end, and quantitative analysis showed this originates from left-right axis rotations about the prostate apex. Further analysis revealed

  2. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1990) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. Also included are a number of enforcement actions that had been previously resolved but not published in this NUREG. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  3. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. Also included are a number of enforcement actions that had been previously resolved but not published in this NUREG. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  4. Are physical activity levels linked to nutrient adequacy? Implications for cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csizmadi, Ilona; Kelemen, Linda E; Speidel, Thomas; Yuan, Yan; Dale, Laura C; Friedenreich, Christine M; Robson, Paula J

    2014-01-01

    Cancer prevention guidelines recommend a healthy body mass index, physical activity, and nutrient intake from food rather than supplements. Sedentary individuals may restrict energy intake to prevent weight gain and in so doing may compromise nutritional intake. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis to determine if adequacy of micronutrients is linked to physical activity levels (PALs) in healthy-weight adults. Tomorrow Project participants in Alberta, Canada (n = 5333), completed past-year diet and physical activity questionnaires. The percent meeting Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) was reported across low and high PAL groups, and the relation between PAL and percent achieved DRI was determined using multiple linear regression analyses. Overall, genders (P physical activity to include having a more favorable impact on nutrient adequacy.

  5. Visit of H.E. Mr. Attila Chikan, Minister of Economic Affairs, Prof. Adam Török, President, National Committee for Technological Development, Mr. Pal Koncz, Deputy Director General, National Committee for Technological Development, Hungary

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    Visit of H.E. Mr. Attila Chikan, Minister of Economic Affairs, Prof. Adam Török, President, National Committee for Technological Development, Mr. Pal Koncz, Deputy Director General, National Committee for Technological Development, Hungary

  6. Effects of Biota on Backscatter: Experiments with the Portable Acoustic Laboratory (PAL)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    .... Monitoring showed a sudden drop in backscatter, but this was short lived. Abundant mysid shrimp appeared to have caused microtopographic changes that quickly raised backscatter intensity to near-background levels...

  7. Item-Level Psychometrics and Predictors of Performance for Spanish/English Bilingual Speakers on "An Object and Action Naming Battery"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Lisa A.; Donovan, Neila J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: There is a pressing need for psychometrically sound naming materials for Spanish/English bilingual adults. To address this need, in this study the authors examined the psychometric properties of An Object and Action Naming Battery (An O&A Battery; Druks & Masterson, 2000) in bilingual speakers. Method: Ninety-one Spanish/English…

  8. An Action Research Study into the Role of Student Negotiation in Enhancing Perceived Student Engagement during English Speaking Classes at University Level in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uztosun, Mehmet Sercan; Skinner, Nigel; Cadorath, Jill

    2018-01-01

    A major issue in English language teaching in Turkey and other monolingual countries is the teaching of spoken English. This article reports the initial and final stages of an action research study which used student negotiation to enhance student engagement in speaking classes. The research was conducted in the English Language Teaching…

  9. Implementing Local Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Actions: The Role of Various Policy Instruments in a Multi-Level Governance Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.; Juhola, Sirkku; Baron, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Recently, considerable focus, e.g., in the fifth IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) Assessment Report (2014) has been trained on why adaptation and mitigation have not been developed more than at present, with relatively few local government actions taken compared with, for example,...

  10. Data from the PALS (Pregnancy and Lifestyle Study, a Community-Based Study of Lifestyle on Fertility and Reproductive Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Helen Ford

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the possible effects of lifestyle on fertility and pregnancy outcome, the PALS (Pregnancy and Lifestyle study collected extensive data on a broad range of parameters termed ‘lifestyle’ from couples who were planning a natural (non-assisted pregnancy in the coming months. There was no intervention. Participants were recruited over a six year period from 1988 to 1993 in response to extensive promotion in the local media. Male and female partners were interviewed independently and all interviews were conducted prospectively before the couple attempted to conceive. The result of each month of ‘trying’ was recorded and pregnancies were confirmed by urine tests and by ultrasound. The length of gestation of each pregnancy was recorded and pregnancies at term were classified with respect to weight. Multiple pregnancies and/or babies with congenital abnormalities have been excluded from the dataset. The data is stored as an xls file and each variable has a codename. For each of 582 couples there are 355 variables, the codes for which are described in a separate metadata file. The questionnaire based data includes information about households, occupation, chemical exposures at work and home, diet, smoking, alcohol use, hobbies, exercise and health. Recorded observations include monthly pregnancy tests and pregnancy outcomes.

  11. Structural-relaxation phenomena in As–S glasses as probed by combined PAL/DBAR technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O., E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua [Institute of Materials of Scientific Research Company “Carat”, 202 Stryjska Str., Lviv, 79031 (Ukraine); Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15 al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa, 42200 (Poland); Ingram, A. [Faculty of Physics of Opole Technical University, 75 Ozimska Str., Opole, 45370 (Poland); Szatanik, R. [Institute of Physics of Opole University, 48 Oleska Str., Opole, 45052 (Poland); Shpotyuk, M. [Institute of Materials of Scientific Research Company “Carat”, 202 Stryjska Str., Lviv, 79031 (Ukraine); Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12 Bandery Str., Lviv, 79013 (Ukraine); Golovchak, R. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Austin Peay State University, 601 College Str., Clarksville, TN, 37044 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Experimental techniques exploring phenomena of positron–electron interaction, namely the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation, are shown to be very informative tools to study radiation- and thermally-induced phenomena in chalcogenide glasses of binary As–S system. Time-dependent processes of free-volume voids agglomeration (expansion), fragmentation (refining) and disappearing (contraction) are identified as main stages of physical aging in S-rich glasses, while a competitive channel of coordination topological defects formation associated with void charging becomes significant in a vicinity of near-stoichiometric glass compositions under γ-irradiation. The data of combined positron lifetime and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation measurements are correlated with radiation-induced shift of fundamental optical absorption edge of the studied glasses. The meaningful model for γ-induced and relaxation-driven evolution in free-volume void structure of As–S glasses giving a unified insight on their structural-chemical nature is proposed. - Highlights: • Combined optical, PAL and DBAR probes to study structural relaxation in As–S glasses. • Void agglomeration, fragmentation and disappearing are main stages of physical aging. • Radiation-induced coordination defects are important in near-stoichiometric As–S. • Proposed model describes free-volume evolution in the void structure of As–S glasses.

  12. Structural-relaxation phenomena in As–S glasses as probed by combined PAL/DBAR technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Ingram, A.; Szatanik, R.; Shpotyuk, M.; Golovchak, R.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental techniques exploring phenomena of positron–electron interaction, namely the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation, are shown to be very informative tools to study radiation- and thermally-induced phenomena in chalcogenide glasses of binary As–S system. Time-dependent processes of free-volume voids agglomeration (expansion), fragmentation (refining) and disappearing (contraction) are identified as main stages of physical aging in S-rich glasses, while a competitive channel of coordination topological defects formation associated with void charging becomes significant in a vicinity of near-stoichiometric glass compositions under γ-irradiation. The data of combined positron lifetime and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation measurements are correlated with radiation-induced shift of fundamental optical absorption edge of the studied glasses. The meaningful model for γ-induced and relaxation-driven evolution in free-volume void structure of As–S glasses giving a unified insight on their structural-chemical nature is proposed. - Highlights: • Combined optical, PAL and DBAR probes to study structural relaxation in As–S glasses. • Void agglomeration, fragmentation and disappearing are main stages of physical aging. • Radiation-induced coordination defects are important in near-stoichiometric As–S. • Proposed model describes free-volume evolution in the void structure of As–S glasses

  13. Derivation of Pal-Bell equations for two-point reactors, and its application to correlation measurements at KUCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Naoyuki; Yamane, Yoshihiro; Nishina, Kojiro; Shiroya, Seiji; Kanda, Keiji.

    1980-01-01

    A probability is defined for an event in which m neutrons exist at time t sub(f) in core I of a coupled-core system, originating from a neutron injected into the core I at an earlier time t; we call it P sub(I,I,m)(t sub(f)/t). Similarly, P sub(I,II,m)(t sub(f)/t) is defined as the probability for m neutrons to exist in core II of the system at time t sub(f), originating from a neutron injected into the core I at time t. Then a system of coupled equations are derived for the generating functions G sub(Ij)(z, t sub(f)/t) = μP sub(Ijm)(t sub(f)/t).z sup(m), where j = I, II. By similar procedures equations are derived for the generating functions associated with joint probability of the following events: a given combination of numbers of neutrons are detected during given series of detection time intervals by a detector inserted in one of the cores. The above two kinds of systems of equations can be regarded as a two-point version of Pal-Bell's equations. As the application of these formulations, analyzing formula for correlation measurements, namely (1) Feynman-alpha experiment and (2) Rossi-alpha experiment of Orndoff-type, are derived, and their feasibility is verified by experiments carried out at KUCA. (author)

  14. Microstructures induced by excimer laser surface melting of the SiC{sub p}/Al metal matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, D.S., E-mail: Daishu.qian@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Zhong, X.L.; Yan, Y.Z.; Hashimoto, T.; Liu, Z.

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Microstructural analysis of the excimer laser-melted SiC{sub p}/AA2124;. • Analytical, FEM, and SPH simulation of the laser-material interaction;. • Mechanism of the formation of the laser-induced microstructure. - Abstract: Laser surface melting (LSM) was carried out on the SiC{sub p}/Al metal matrix composite (MMC) using a KrF excimer laser with a fluence of 7 J/cm{sup 2}. The re-solidification microstructure was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray detector, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. It was found that a 2.5 μm thick melted layer was formed in the near-surface region, in which dissolution of the intermetallics and removal of the SiC particles occurred. The thermal and material response upon laser irradiation was simulated using three models, i.e. analytical model, finite element model (FEM) and smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model. The effect of SiC particles on the LSM process, the mechanism of the SiC removal and the re-solidification microstructures in the melted layer were discussed. The simulation results were in good agreement with the experimental results and contributed to the generic understanding of the re-solidification microstructures induced by ns-pulsed lasers.

  15. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  16. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  17. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1990) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  18. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  19. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1990) and includes copies of letters, notices, and orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  20. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  1. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1990) and includes copies of letters, notices, and orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  2. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  3. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  4. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  5. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  6. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April-June 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  7. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  8. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  9. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  10. Physical activity levels and motor skills of 5 th to 7 th grade students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The physical activity (PA) and motor skill levels (MS) (flexibility, balance, speed, sit-up, hand grip strength, standing long jump) were determined for 5th to 7th grade students from central schools in Nigde Province, Turkey according to age and gender and to investigate the relationships. PAL was determined by means of ...

  11. The Two-Level Theory of Verb Meaning: An Approach to Integrating the Semantics of Action with the Mirror Neuron System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmerer, David; Gonzalez-Castillo, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Verbs have two separate levels of meaning. One level reflects the uniqueness of every verb and is called the "root". The other level consists of a more austere representation that is shared by all the verbs in a given class and is called the "event structure template". We explore the following hypotheses about how, with specific reference to the…

  12. Action Refinement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorrieri, R.; Rensink, Arend; Bergstra, J.A.; Ponse, A.; Smolka, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    In this chapter, we give a comprehensive overview of the research results in the field of action refinement during the past 12 years. The different approaches that have been followed are outlined in detail and contrasted to each other in a uniform framework. We use two running examples to discuss

  13. Application of ultraperformance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabonomic techniques to analyze the joint toxic action of long-term low-level exposure to a mixture of organophosphate pesticides on rat urine profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Longfei; Wang, Hong; Xu, Wei; Zeng, Yan; Hou, Yurong; Zhang, Yuqiu; Zhao, Xiujuan; Sun, Changhao

    2013-07-01

    In previously published articles, we evaluated the toxicity of four organophosphate (OP) pesticides (dichlorvos, dimethoate, acephate, and phorate) to rats using metabonomic technology at their corresponding no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL). Results show that a single pesticide elicits no toxic response. This study aimed to determine whether chronic exposure to a mixture of the above four pesticides (at their corresponding NOAEL) can lead to joint toxic action in rats using the same technology. Pesticides were administered daily to rats through drinking water for 24 weeks. The above mixture of the four pesticides showed joint toxic action at the NOAEL of each pesticide. The metabonomic profiles of rats urine were analyzed by ultraperformance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The 16 metabolites statistically significantly changed in all treated groups compared with the control group. Dimethylphosphate and dimethyldithiophosphate exclusively detected in all treated groups can be used as early, sensitive biomarkers for exposure to a mixture of the OP pesticides. Moreover, exposure to the OP pesticides resulted in increased 7-methylguanine, ribothymidine, cholic acid, 4-pyridoxic acid, kynurenine, and indoxyl sulfate levels, as well as decreased hippuric acid, creatinine, uric acid, gentisic acid, C18-dihydrosphingosine, phytosphingosine, suberic acid, and citric acid. The results indicated that a mixture of OP pesticides induced DNA damage and oxidative stress, disturbed the metabolism of lipids, and interfered with the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Ensuring food safety requires not only the toxicology test data of each pesticide for the calculation of the acceptable daily intake but also the joint toxic action.

  14. Zur Geschichte der Geowissenschaften im Museum für Naturkunde zu Berlin. Teil 6: Geschichte des Geologisch-Paläontologischen Instituts und Museums der Universität Berlin 1910–2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Gross

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Die Entwicklung des Geologisch-Paläontologischen Instituts und Museums der Universität Berlin von einer Institution, die Geologie zusammen mit Paläontologie als eine Einheit vertrat, über eine Institution, die eine geotektonische Ausrichtung hatte, zu einer auf Paläontologie konzentrierten Institution wird nachvollzogen. Die beiden Institutsdirektoren am Anfang des 20sten Jahrhunderts waren Vertreter der allumfassenden Geologie des 19ten Jahrhunderts, während die beiden folgenden Direktoren eine Geologie ohne Paläontologie vertraten. Das führte zu einer Trennung der beiden Richtungen, und nach der III. Hochschulreform der DDR 1968 verblieb allein die sammlungsbezogene Paläontologie am Museum. Nach der Wiedervereinigung wurde ein Institut für Paläontologie mit biologischer Ausrichtung mit zwei Professuren, einer für Paläozoologie und einer für Paläobotanik, eingerichtet. The development of the Geologisch-Paläontologisches Institut und Museum of the Museum für Naturkunde at the Humboldt University (formerly Friedrich-Wilhelm-Universität in Berlin from a geology-paleontology institution to a pure paleontology institution is described. The first two directors of the department in the beginning of the 20th century, Prof, von Branca and Prof. Pompeckj, represented a 19th century concept of a geology, which included paleontology, even vertebrate paleontology as the crown jewel of geology. They fought sometimes vigorously against a separation of paleontology from geology. The next two directors. Prof. Stille and Prof, von Bubnoff, were the leading geologists in Germany; to be a student of Stille was a special trade mark in geology of Germany. They represented a geology centered on tectonics. The separation of paleontology as separate section was prepared. The destructions of the Second World War, the following restaurations and the division of Germany into two States influenced strongly their directorships. The education of geologists

  15. Evaluation of Esophageal Anastomotic Integrity With Serial Pleural Amylase Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel L; Helms, Gerald A; Mayfield, William R

    2018-01-01

    An anastomotic leak is the most devastating and potentially fatal complication after esophagectomy. Current detection methods can be inaccurate and place patients at risk of other complications. Analysis of pleural fluid for amylase may be more accurate and place patients at less of a risk for evaluating the integrity of an esophageal anastomosis. We retrospectively reviewed prospective data of 45 consecutive patients who underwent an Ivor Lewis esophagectomy over an 18-month period and evaluated their anastomotic integrity with serial pleural amylase levels (PAL). There were 40 men (89%), and median age was 63 years (range, 35 to 79). Indication for esophagectomy was cancer in 38 patients (84%); 27 (71%) underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation. A barium swallow was performed in the first 25 patients at median postoperative day (POD) 5 (range, 5 to 10); the swallow was negative in 23 patients (93%). Serial PALs were obtained starting on POD 3 and stopped 1 day after toleration of clear liquids. The PALs in the no-leak patients were highest on POD 3 (median 42 IU/L; range, 20 to 102 IU/L) and decreased (median 15 IU/L; range, 8 to 34 IU/L) to the lowest levels 1 day after clear liquid toleration (p = 0.04). Two patients had a leak and had peak PALs of 227 IU/L and 630 IU/L, respectively; both leaks occurred on POD 4, 1 day before their scheduled swallow test. The last 20 patients underwent serial PALs only, without a planned swallow test or computed tomography scan for anastomotic integrity evaluation. One of these patients had a leak on POD 5 with a low PAL of 55 IU/L the day before the spike of more than 4,000 IU/L. Two of the leaks were treated with esophageal stent placement and intravenous antibiotics, and the remaining patient's leak resolved with intravenous antibiotics, no oral intake, and observation only. None of the leak patients required transthoracic esophageal repair or drainage of an empyema. There was 1 postoperative death (2%) secondary to aspiration

  16. Cloning and construction of recombinant palI gene from Klebsiella oxytoca on pET-32b into E. coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS for production of isomaltulose, a new generation of sugar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeis, Maelita R., E-mail: sony@sith.itb.ac.id; Berlian, Liska, E-mail: sony@sith.itb.ac.id; Suhandono, Sony, E-mail: sony@sith.itb.ac.id; Prima, Alex, E-mail: sony@sith.itb.ac.id; Komalawati, Eli, E-mail: sony@sith.itb.ac.id; Kristianti, Tati, E-mail: sony@sith.itb.ac.id

    2014-03-24

    Klebsiella oxytoca produces sucrose isomerase which catalyses the conversion of sucrose to isomaltulose, a new generation of sugar. From the previous study, palI gene from Klebsiella oxytoca was succesfully isolated from sapodilla fruit (Manilkara zapota). The full-length palI gene sequence of Klebsiella oxytoca was cloned in E. coli DH5α. The deduced amino acid sequence shows 498 residues which includes conserved motif for sucrose isomerisation {sup 325}RLDRD{sup 329} and 97% identical to palI gene from Klebsiella sp. LX3 (GenBank:AAK82938.1). This fragment was succesfullly ligated into the expression vector pET-32b using overlap-extension PCR and cloned in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS. DNA sequencing result shows that palI gene of Klebsiella oxytoca was inserted in-frame in pET-32b. This is the first report on cloning of palI gene from Klebsiella oxytoca.

  17. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2004-04-28

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Areas 3, 6, and 22 on the NTS, CAU 516 includes six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) consisting of two septic systems, a sump and piping, a clean-out box and piping, dry wells, and a vehicle decontamination area. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from July 22 through August 14, 2003, with supplemental sampling conducted in late 2003 and early 2004. The potential exposure pathways for any contaminants of concern (COCs) identified during the development of the DQOs at CAU 516 gave rise to the following objectives: (1) prevent or mitigate exposure to media containing COCs at concentrations exceeding PALs as defined in the corrective action investigation plan; and (2) prevent the spread of COCs beyond each CAS. The following alternatives have been developed for consideration at CAU 516: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Clean Closure; and Alternative 3 - Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. Alternative 1, No Further Action, is the preferred corrective action for two CASs (06-51-02 and 22-19-04). Alternative 2, Clean Closure, is the preferred corrective action for four CASs (03-59-01, 03-59-02, 06-51-01, and 06-51-03). The selected alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated, as well as meeting all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will further eliminate the contaminated media at CAU 516.

  18. Cognitive framing in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, John M; Potts, Cory Adam; Rosenbaum, David A

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive framing effects have been widely reported in higher-level decision-making and have been ascribed to rules of thumb for quick thinking. No such demonstrations have been reported for physical action, as far as we know, but they would be expected if cognition for physical action is fundamentally similar to cognition for higher-level decision-making. To test for such effects, we asked participants to reach for a horizontally-oriented pipe to move it from one height to another while turning the pipe 180° to bring one end (the "business end") to a target on the left or right. From a physical perspective, participants could have always rotated the pipe in the same angular direction no matter which end was the business end; a given participant could have always turned the pipe clockwise or counter-clockwise. Instead, our participants turned the business end counter-clockwise for left targets and clockwise for right targets. Thus, the way the identical physical task was framed altered the way it was performed. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that cognition for physical action is fundamentally similar to cognition for higher-level decision-making. A tantalizing possibility is that higher-level decision heuristics have roots in the control of physical action, a hypothesis that accords with embodied views of cognition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Juego, Cultura y Desarrollo en la Infancia: El caso del Palín Mapuche y el Hockey. Play, Culture and Development in Childhood: Analysis of Mapuche’s Palin and Hockey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garoz , Ignacio

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEl propósito del presente trabajo consiste en analizar los juegos de reglas, partiendo de su papel como transmisores de conocimiento sobre el mundo social (valores, creencias, normas, roles, etc., a partir del planteamiento piagetiano de la comprensión de las reglas de los juegos por los niños. Se aborda cómo se produce la evolución del conocimiento práctico y teórico de las reglas y se incorpora el estudio sobre el desarrollo del conocimiento del significado de los juegos, de sus reglas y acciones. Se utiliza un enfoque transcultural que nos permita comprender las diferencias entre el desarrollo de la regla a través de un juego deportivo como el hockey hierba en España y un juego tradicional del pueblo indígena mapuche de Chile, el palín o chueca.AbstractThe aim of this work is to analyse rule games and their importance in conveying understanding of the social world (values, beliefs, norms, roles, etc., following the Piagetian explanation of how children understand the rules of the games. Starting with the development of practical and theoretical grasp of rules the study includes children's understanding of meaning of games, their rules and play actions. A crosscultural comparison is used to explore the differences between how an understanding of rule is developed in a sporting game such as grass hockey in Spain and in a traditional game of the Mapuche indigenous tribe of Chile, such as palin (or chueca.

  20. Prof. Yash Pal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 26 November 1926. Date of death: 24 July 2017. Specialization: Physics, Astrophysics, Space Technology and Communications Last known address: 11B, Super Delux Flats, Sector 15A, Noida 201 301, U.P.. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  1. Anticoincidence logic using PALs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolanos, L.; Arista Romeu, E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the functioning principle of an anticoincidence logic and a design of this based on programing logic. The circuit was included in a discriminator of an equipment for single-photon absorptiometry

  2. Mittal, Dr Jai Pal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1986 Section: Chemistry ... Specialization: Radiation Chemistry & Radiation Biology, Photochemistry ... Address: 11-B, Rohini Co-op. ... The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be held from 29–30 June 2018 in Infosys, Mysuru ...

  3. Retinol-binding protein 4 in twins: regulatory mechanisms and impact of circulating and tissue expression levels on insulin secretion and action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Friedrichsen, Martin; Vaag, Allan

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Retinol-binding protein (RBP) 4 is an adipokine of which plasma levels are elevated in obesity and type 2 diabetes. The aims of the study were to identify determinants of plasma RBP4 and RBP4 mRNA expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and skeletal muscle and to investigate...... expression was not associated with circulatory RBP4. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, our data indicate that RBP4 levels in plasma, skeletal muscle, and fat may be linked to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in a secondary and noncausal manner....

  4. The global dimension of water governance: why the river basin approach is no longer sufficient and why cooperative action at global level is needed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert

    2011-01-01

    When water problems extend beyond the borders of local communities, the river basin is generally seen as the most appropriate unit for analysis, planning, and institutional arrangements. In this paper it is argued that addressing water problems at the river basin level is not always sufficient. Many

  5. The costs, effects and cost-effectiveness of counteracting overweight on a population level. A scientific base for policy targets for the Dutch national plan for action.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemelmans, W.; Baal, van P.; Wendel-Vos, G.C.W.; Schuit, J.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Ament, A.; Hoogenveen, R.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. To gain insight in realistic policy targets for overweight at a population level and the accompanying costs. Therefore, the effect on overweight prevalence was estimated of large scale implementation of a community intervention (applied to 90% of general population) and an intensive

  6. Energy requirements and physical activity level of active elderly people in rural areas of Cuba. Highlights and achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Trianna, M.

    2002-01-01

    Physical activity levels (PALs) values of urban elderly of developed countries obtained by the DLW-method are usually higher than the recommendations of the Expert Committee on Energy and Protein. This underestimation should be more evident for the rural elderly

  7. Long-term stability of the near-field about high-level radioactive waste repository in thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling action condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yuemiao; Wang Ju; Ke Dan; Cai Meifeng

    2008-01-01

    It is a long-term process for the high-level radioactive waste repository, from opening, construction to end of its service. The long-term stability of the near-field is the key issue for the design of HLW repository because the opening and heat generated from the HLW. Through a nationwide investigation, Beishan area, a Gobi desert in Gansu province, is considered as a suitable candidate and GMZ bentonite deposit which located in Xinghe County, Inner Mongolia has been proposed for the supplier of buffer/backfill material for HLW geological repository in China. According to the R and D guide of high-level radioactive waste disposal in China, the 3D model of HLW repository with high-level radioactive waste, canister and buffer/backfill material is established using FLAC3D. To take into account in situ stress, geothermal gradient, groundwater, thermal relief of HLW and swelling pressure of buffer/backfill material, the evolution of temperature, stress and displacement of HLW repository under thermo-mechanical coupling, hydro-mechanical coupling and thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling conditions was analyzed respectively. The long-term stability of HLW repository in Beishan area was studied. (authors)

  8. Cinatii, Rambois e Pereira Câo e a pintura-decorativa do Palácio Angeje-Palmela no Paço do Lumiar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Leal

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Na zona do Paço do Lumiar, outrora fora de Lisboa, encontra-se o Palácio Angeja- Palmela, edifício palaciano do século XVIII, construído no post terramoto de 1755. Nos seus interiores encontramos uma decoração realizada em pintura a fresco e que podemos atribuir à tríade Cinatti, Rambois e Pereira Cão, cenógrafos e pintores-decoradores da Lisboa de Oitocentos. O palácio, os seus jardins e a sua decoração interior respiram uma atmosfera romântica que é visível na pintura decorativa dos seus interiores, encomenda do seu antigo proprietário D. Domingos de Sousa Holstein, segundo duque de Palmela.In the site of Paço do Lumiar, we find the Angeja-Palmela palace, a building of the XVIII century, built after the Lisbon earthquake of 1755. Inside the palace we find a fresh paintings decoration made by Cinatti, Rambois and Pereira Cão, Lisbon´s set designers and decorative painters of the XIX century. The palace, the gardens and it’s interior decoration breath a romantic atmosphere that we perceive in the respective mural paintings, a commission of it’s former owner, D. Domigos de Sousa Holstein, second duke of Palmela.

  9. Condiciones de vida en zonas palúdicas de Antioquia (Colombia, 2005 Condições de vida em zonas palúdicas de Antioquia (Colômbia, 2005 Living conditions in Antioquia's (Colombia paludic areas, 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Carmona Fonseca

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Explorar las condiciones de vida de las familias de niños palúdicos en dos zonas de Antioquia. Metodología. Diseño descriptivo de corte transversal. Se describe y analiza un conjunto de variables socioeconómicas que expresan las condiciones de vida de esas familias, en 2004-2005. Resultados. 88 familias de los municipios de Turbo y El Bagre, el 58% vivían en zona. En general, las variables analizadas presentan diferencia estadísticamente significativa por municipio y zona (peores condiciones: Turbo-rural; menos malas: El Bagre-urbano. Los rasgos familiares más frecuentes fueron: familias nucleares típicas (66%, con un promedio de 7,1 miembros. Habitan rancho/tugurio el 29%, cuentan con servicio sanitario intradomicilio el 42%, tiraban las basuras a campo abierto el 31%. El 69% de las viviendas tienen peridomicilio con vegetación y otro 66% tiene agua estancada/ corriente. El padre trabajaba en 64%, el trabajo era inestable en el 59% de los casos; las ocupaciones más comunes fueron de agricultor (53%, minero (13% y jornalero (12%. El ingreso monetario mensual promedio era de solo $244 000. Hubo 58% de las familias con fuentes estables de alimentos. El consumo de carnes/vísceras animales fue menor de una 1 vez/semana, leche y huevos de 2-3 veces/semana, frutas ricas en carotenos provitamina A no se consumían. Los alimentos consumidos tenían alta probabilidad de satisfacer los requerimientos familiares de vitamina A en grado alto (45%. Conclusión. Las condiciones de vida de las familias que residen en Turbo y El Bagre son muy deficientes y es elevada la cantidad de familias con necesidades básicas no satisfechas. Hay importantes diferencias entre los municipios de estudio y entre la zona urbana y rural. La situación de mala calidad de vida en estas regiones maláricas supera ampliamente lo referido por los promedios para el departamento de Antioquia y para Colombia.Objetivo. Explorar as condições de vida das fam

  10. Action Learning: Avoiding Conflict or Enabling Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corley, Aileen; Thorne, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Action learning is based on the premise that action and learning are inextricably entwined and it is this potential, to enable action, which has contributed to the growth of action learning within education and management development programmes. However has this growth in action learning lead to an evolution or a dilution of Revan's classical…

  11. D-sorbose inhibits disaccharidase activity and demonstrates suppressive action on postprandial blood levels of glucose and insulin in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, Tsuneyuki; Murata-Takenoshita, Yoko; Yamazaki, Yuko; Shimura, Fumio; Nakamura, Sadako

    2014-11-01

    In an attempt to develop D-sorbose as a new sweetener that could help in preventing lifestyle-related diseases, we investigated the inhibitory effect of D-sorbose on disaccharidase activity, using the brush border membrane vesicles of rat small intestines. The inhibitory effect was compared with that of L-sorbose and other rare sugars, and the small intestinal disaccharidases in rats was compared with that of humans as well. In humans and the small intestines of rats, d-sorbose strongly inhibited sucrase activity and weakly inhibited maltase activity. Inhibition by D-sorbose of sucrase activity was similar to that of L-arabinose, and the K(i) of D-sorbose was 7.5 mM. Inhibition by D-sorbose was very strong in comparison with that of L-sorbose (K(i), 60.8 mM), whereas inhibition of d-tagatose was between that of D-sorbose and L-sorbose. The inhibitory mode of D-sorbose for sucrose and maltase was uncompetitive, and that of L-sorbose was competitive. To determine a suppressive effect on postprandial blood levels of glucose and insulin via inhibition of sucrase activity, sucrose solution with or without D-sorbose was administered to rats. Increments in the blood levels of glucose and insulin were suppressed significantly after administration of sucrose solution with D-sorbose to rats, in comparison to administration of sucrose solution without D-sorbose. In contrast, the suppressive effect of L-sorbose on postprandial blood levels of glucose and insulin was very weak. These results suggest that D-sorbose may have an inhibitory effect on disaccharidase activity and could be used as a sweetener to suppress the postprandial elevation of blood levels of glucose and insulin. The use of D-sorbose as a sweetener may contribute to the prevention of lifestyle-related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Aerobic exercise did not have compensatory effects on physical activity levels in type 2 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moura, Bruno Pereira; Marins, João Carlos Bouzas; Franceschini, Sylvia Do Carmo Castro; Reis, Janice Sepúlveda; Amorim, Paulo Roberto Dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Although exercise promotes beneficial effects in diabetic patients, some studies have questioned the degree of their importance in terms of the increase in total energy expenditure. In these studies, the decrease of physical activity levels (PAL) was referred as "compensatory effect of exercise". However, our aim was to investigate whether aerobic exercise has compensatory effects on PAL in type 2 diabetes patients. Eight volunteers (51.1 ± 8.2 years) were enrolled in a supervised exercise programme for 8 weeks (3 d · wk(-1), 50-60% of VO2 peak for 30-60 min). PAL was measured using tri-axial accelerometers in the 1st, 8th and 12th weeks. Biochemical tests, cardiorespiratory fitness, anthropometric assessment and body composition were measured in the 2nd and 11th weeks. Statistical analysis was performed using non-parametric tests (Friedman and Wilcoxon, P exercise programme generated a significant 14.8% increase in VO2 peak and a 15% reduction in fructosamine. The exercise programme had no compensatory effects on PAL in type 2 diabetes patients, but improved their cardiorespiratory fitness and glycaemic control.

  13. Dielectrophoretic analysis of changes in cytoplasmic ion levels due to ion channel blocker action reveals underlying differences between drug-sensitive and multidrug-resistant leukaemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, L; Shelmerdine, H; Hughes, M P; Coley, H M; Huebner, Y; Labeed, F H

    2008-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP)-the motion of particles in non-uniform AC fields-has been used in the investigation of cell electrophysiology. The technique offers the advantages of rapid determination of the conductance and capacitance of membrane and cytoplasm. However, it is unable to directly determine the ionic strengths of individual cytoplasmic ions, which has potentially limited its application in assessing cell composition. In this paper, we demonstrate how dielectrophoresis can be used to investigate the cytoplasmic ion composition by using ion channel blocking agents. By blocking key ion transporters individually, it is possible to determine their overall contribution to the free ions in the cytoplasm. We use this technique to evaluate the relative contributions of chloride, potassium and calcium ions to the cytoplasmic conductivities of drug sensitive and resistant myelogenous leukaemic (K562) cells in order to determine the contributions of individual ion channel activity in mediating multi-drug resistance in cancer. Results indicate that whilst K + and Ca 2+ levels were extremely similar between sensitive and resistant lines, levels of Cl - were elevated by three times to that in the resistant line, implying increased chloride channel activity. This result is in line with current theories of MDR, and validates the use of ion channel blockers with DEP to investigate ion channel function. (note)

  14. The Global Dimension of Water Governance: Why the River Basin Approach Is No Longer Sufficient and Why Cooperative Action at Global Level Is Needed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen Y. Hoekstra

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available When water problems extend beyond the borders of local communities, the river basin is generally seen as the most appropriate unit for analysis, planning, and institutional arrangements. In this paper it is argued that addressing water problems at the river basin level is not always sufficient. Many of today’s seemingly local water issues carry a (subcontinental or even global dimension, which urges for a governance approach that comprises institutional arrangements at a level beyond that of the river basin. This paper examines a number of arguments for the thesis that good water governance requires a global approach complementary to the river basin approach. Subsequently, it identifies four major issues to be addressed at global scale: Efficiency, equity, sustainability and security of water supply in a globalised world. Finally, the paper raises the question of what kind of institutional arrangements could be developed to cope with the global dimension of water issues. A few possible directions are explored, ranging from an international protocol on full-cost water pricing and a water label for water-intensive products to the implementation of water footprint quotas and the water-neutral concept.

  15. [The effect of prolonged treatment of hypertensive rats with antihypertensive drugs of various actions on the arterial tension and noradrenaline level in the myocardium, brain and aortal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriakov, A; Khlebarova, M; Staneva-stoicheva, D; Panova, I

    1975-01-01

    The authors examined the changes in arterial blood pressure and the content of Noradrenaline in the myocardium, brain and aorta of rats with hypertension due to nephrectomy and treatment with desoxycorticosterone and NaCl, and after a chronic 6-month treatment of hypertension with various antihypertensive means. The most significant reduction of noradrenaline in the three of the examined tissues was found in rats, which received dic. sulfyram (100 mg/kg per os). Clondine (10 mkg/kg, per os) manifested the strongest hypotensive effect and lowered the level of noradrenaline in the myocardium, while it was raised in the aorta. Reserpine (10 mkg/kg, s. c) induced a clear reduction of Noradrenaline content in the brain, but an increase in the other two tissues. Insignificant hypotensive effect was observed in animals, treated with guanetidine (0.5 mg/kg, per os), which did not affect substantially noradrenaline in the examined organs. The increase of noradrenaline level was established in the three of the organs of animals, treated with alpha-methyl-DOFA (25 mg/kg, per os). Furosemide (1 mg/kg, s.c.) induced a statistically significant elevation of noradrenaline in the aorta, but was noneffective to noradrenaline in the myocardium and brain.

  16. International experts' conference 'Promotion of environmental protection at municipal level - strategies and approaches for action' in preparation of the UN conference on environment and development (UNCED)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapelfeldt, U.; Klassen, I.

    1992-02-01

    This meeting took place in Berlin in February 1992 in the run-up to the Rio UNCED conference. The proceedings compile the schedule, the opening speeches and the papers contributed on different subjects by the working groups. A declaration ('Berlin Declaration') was passed to summarize some important statements and central targets: An environmentally compatible market economy is an essential prerequisite for a lasting ecologically acceptable development of the urban areas; the towns and cities are the natural allies of the corresponding environmental policies; urban development strategies must comprise all fields which are of environmental relevance; urban development and municipal pollution abatement are interdependent; there must be enough room for sufficiently autonomous decision-making and development at the local level to ensure, last but not least, an efficient municipal environmental management (orig./HP) [de

  17. Music Therapy’s Effects on Mexican Migrant Farmworkers’ Levels of Depression, Anxiety and Social Isolation: A Mixed Methods Randomized Control Trial Utilizing Participatory Action Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swantes, Melody

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, the agricultural industry is dependent on men and women from Mexico who migrate throughout the country to participate in the care and harvest of crops. They often migrate independently of their families and leave loved ones behind. Separation from families and difficult...... are not able to meet the needs in culturally sensitive ways presented by this population. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of music therapy on Mexican farmworkers’ levels of depression, anxiety, and social isolation. In addition, this study sought to examine how the migrant farmworkers used...... music-making sessions between music therapy sessions as a coping skill to further improve their overall mental health. Finally, this study sought to examine how migrant farmworkers engaged in the research process and how they valued their relationship with the researcher. This study utilized a mixed...

  18. Group A Streptococcus M1T1 Intracellular Infection of Primary Tonsil Epithelial Cells Dampens Levels of Secreted IL-8 Through the Action of SpyCEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia T. Soderholm

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus; GAS commonly causes pharyngitis in children and adults, with severe invasive disease and immune sequelae being an infrequent consequence. The ability of GAS to invade the host and establish infection likely involves subversion of host immune defenses. However, the signaling pathways and innate immune responses of epithelial cells to GAS are not well-understood. In this study, we utilized RNAseq to characterize the inflammatory responses of primary human tonsil epithelial (TEpi cells to infection with the laboratory-adapted M6 strain JRS4 and the M1T1 clinical isolate 5448. Both strains induced the expression of genes encoding a wide range of inflammatory mediators, including IL-8. Pathway analysis revealed differentially expressed genes between mock and JRS4- or 5448-infected TEpi cells were enriched in transcription factor networks that regulate IL-8 expression, such as AP-1, ATF-2, and NFAT. While JRS4 infection resulted in high levels of secreted IL-8, 5448 infection did not, suggesting that 5448 may post-transcriptionally dampen IL-8 production. Infection with 5448ΔcepA, an isogenic mutant lacking the IL-8 protease SpyCEP, resulted in IL-8 secretion levels comparable to JRS4 infection. Complementation of 5448ΔcepA and JRS4 with a plasmid encoding 5448-derived SpyCEP significantly reduced IL-8 secretion by TEpi cells. Our results suggest that intracellular infection with the pathogenic GAS M1T1 clone induces a strong pro-inflammatory response in primary tonsil epithelial cells, but modulates this host response by selectively degrading the neutrophil-recruiting chemokine IL-8 to benefit infection.

  19. Multidimensional Recurrence Quantification Analysis (MdRQA) for the Analysis of Multidimensional Time-Series: A Software Implementation in MATLAB and Its Application to Group-Level Data in Joint Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallot, Sebastian; Roepstorff, Andreas; Mønster, Dan

    2016-01-01

    We introduce Multidimensional Recurrence Quantification Analysis (MdRQA) as a tool to analyze multidimensional time-series data. We show how MdRQA can be used to capture the dynamics of high-dimensional signals, and how MdRQA can be used to assess coupling between two or more variables. In particular, we describe applications of the method in research on joint and collective action, as it provides a coherent analysis framework to systematically investigate dynamics at different group levels-from individual dynamics, to dyadic dynamics, up to global group-level of arbitrary size. The Appendix in Supplementary Material contains a software implementation in MATLAB to calculate MdRQA measures.

  20. Anticlockwise or Clockwise? A Dynamic Perception-Action-Laterality Model for Directionality Bias in Visuospatial Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, A.K.M. Rezaul; Proulx, Michael J.; Likova, Lora T.

    2016-01-01

    Reviewing the relevant literature in visual psychophysics and visual neuroscience we propose a three-stage model of directionality bias in visuospatial functioning. We call this model the ‘Perception-Action-Laterality’ (PAL) hypothesis. We analyzed the research findings for a wide range of visuospatial tasks, showing that there are two major directionality trends: clockwise versus anticlockwise. It appears these preferences are combinatorial, such that a majority of people fall in the first category demonstrating a preference for stimuli/objects arranged from left-to-right rather than from right-to-left, while people in the second category show an opposite trend. These perceptual biases can guide sensorimotor integration and action, creating two corresponding turner groups in the population. In support of PAL, we propose another model explaining the origins of the biases– how the neurogenetic factors and the cultural factors interact in a biased competition framework to determine the direction and extent of biases. This dynamic model can explain not only the two major categories of biases, but also the unbiased, unreliably biased or mildly biased cases in visuosptial functioning. PMID:27350096

  1. TINGKAT KERUSAKAN LINGKUNGAN DI DATARAN TINGGI DIENG SEBAGAI DATABASE GUNA UPAYA KONSERVASI (The Level of Environmental Damage in Dieng Plateau for Database to Conservation Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Ngabekti

    2007-07-01

    area in Dieng Plateau has been reducing biodiversity. An assessment by Balai Konservasi Sumber Daya Alam Jawa Tengah in 2001 found less than fifty species vegetation per hectare in the area, which means poor diversity. This research aims to know the level of environmental damage in Dieng Plateau as a database for conservation attempts. The variables to assess will be the level of environmental damages, both physically and biologically, in connection with demographic, economic, societal, and cultural aspects. Physical observation showed that plantation area was seriously damaged, which reduced the potato crops. Whereas from biological observation, it was found that the vegetational diversity index was relatively low (0.81-0.98. From behavioral view, it seemed that the inhabitants have not fully supported the conservation attempts; it can be seen that the potato cultivation area has expanded as deforestation has also spread out. As a result, waters resources have depleted significantly. From the current research, it was concluded that the level of environmental damage in Dieng Plateau was seriously damaged. It was suggested to manage the Dieng Plateau area. Due to unique geographical conditions, plantation design implemented in the area should be followed by conservation review. To prevent erosion, it is important to find substitutes to potatoes

  2. Low-Level Corruption Tolerance: An “Action-Based” Approach for Peru and Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Pozsgai Alvarez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the past decade, the tolerance of corruption by citizens of most Latin American countries has become a concept in its own right within the broader study of corruption. This construct, however, lacks a systematic approach and is yet to account for specific types of corruption tolerance or identify appropriate indicators to measure them. The present study addresses these voids by analyzing data provided by LAPOP’s AmericasBarometer 2006 for Peru (a typical case for the incidence of bribery in Latin America and the Global Corruption Barometer against a carefully constructed framework for the understanding of the phenomenon of corruption tolerance. The results indicate that attitudes toward specific types of low-level corruption should not be equated to citizens’ decisions to engage in such behavior. They further suggest that the study of corruption tolerance has the potential to greatly improve our understanding of the determinants of corruption in developing countries.

  3. Influence of age and splanchnic nerve on the action of melatonin in the adrenomedullary catecholamine content and blood glucose level in the avian group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahata, S K; Mandal, A; Ghosh, A

    1988-01-01

    A single intraperitoneal (IP) melatonin injection (0.5 mg/100 g body wt.) caused an increase in norepinephrine (NE) fluorescence and elevation of NE content in newly-hatched pigeons (Columba livia), but a reduction of NE fluorescence and depletion of NE content in the adrenal medulla of newly-hatched crows (Corvus splendens) after 0.5 h of treatment. In contrast, in adults melatonin caused increase in NE fluorescence and elevation of NE content only in the parakeet (Psittacula krameri). Half an hour of IP melatonin treatment (0.5 mg/100 g body wt.) induced release of epinephrine (E) from the adrenal medulla of newly-hatched pigeon and parakeet. In contrast, in the adults melatonin caused more than a two-fold increase in E in the pigeon, and a significant increase in the crow. Single IP melatonin injection (0.5 mg/100 g body wt.) caused hypoglycemia in the newly-hatched parakeet and adult pigeon, and hyperglycemia in newly-hatched pigeon after 0.5 h of treatment. Melatonin failed to regulate glucose homoeostasis in newly-hatched and adult crow. Splanchnic denervation of the left adrenal gland was performed in the adult pigeon. The right adrenal served as the innervated gland. Melatonin-induced modulation of catecholamines following a single IP injection (0.5 mg/100 g body wt.) revealed significant increases in NE fluorescence and NE content at 4 and 12 h after treatment in the denervated gland only, which gradually approached normal levels 9 days after treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Distracted shareholders and corporate actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempf, Elisabeth; Manconi, Alberto; Spalt, Oliver

    Investor attention matters for corporate actions. Our new identification approach constructs firm-level shareholder "distraction" measures, by exploiting exogenous shocks to unrelated parts of institutional shareholders' portfolios. Firms with "distracted" shareholders are more likely to announce

  5. Health-related factors correlate with behavior trends in physical activity level in old age: longitudinal results from a population in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Manoel CSA

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical inactivity in leisure time is common among elderly in Brazil and this finding is particularly alarming considering that this population is greatly affected by chronic diseases. The identification of health factors that influence physical activity level (PAL will help in the development of strategies for increasing PAL older adults. The current research aimed to identify variables that independently affect behavior trends in PAL over the course of two years among elderly. Methods A survey entitled the Epidoso Project ("Epidemiology of aging" studied 1,667 community-based older individuals in São Paulo city, Brazil over the course of two years. Physical activity level was determined through questions about frequency and duration of physical activities. Body Mass Index was calculated; functional capacity was assessed through the ADL (activities of daily living scale; cognition was assessed by Mini-Mental State Examination; and mental health was assessed through the Dysthymia Screening. Experiences of falls and fractures were also assessed. Subjects were divided into three groups according to their self-report of Physical Activity Level: a - Regularly Active; b - Insufficiently Active and c - Physically Inactive. Behavior trends in PAL were also measured after two years. Multivariate regression model methodology was used to test associations longitudinally. Results Results from the final model demonstrated that the risk of a not favorable behavior trend in PAL, which included the group who remained physically inactive and the group that displayed decreased PAL, in this cohort of older adults was significantly increased if the individual was female (OR = 2.50; 95% CI = 1.60-3.89; P , older (80 y vs. 65 y, OR = 6.29, 95% CI = 2.69-14.67; P , dependent on help from others for activities in the ADL scale (moderate-severe = 4-7+ vs. 0 ADLs (OR = 2.25, 95% CI = 1.20-4.21; P or had experienced a history of falls with

  6. Effect of a supportive-educative program in the math class for stress, anxiety, and depression in female students in the third level of junior high school: An action research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamjomeh, Seyedeh Mahtab; Bahrami, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Students in junior high school, particularly in the third level, are prone to a variety of stressors. This in turn might lead to stress, anxiety, depression, and other health-related problems. There are a very limited number of action research studies to identify the effect of stress management techniques among students. Therefore, a study was conducted to assess the effect of a program used in the math class to decrease the student's level of stress, anxiety, and depression. This was an action research study, which was conducted in region three of the Education and Training Office of Isfahan, in the year 2012. Fifty-one students in a junior high school were selected and underwent a comprehensive stress management program. This program was prepared in collaboration with the students, their parents, teachers, and managers of the school, and was implemented approximately during a four-month period. The student's stress, anxiety, and depression were measured before and after the program using the DASS-21 questionnaire. The t-test identified that the mean scores of stress, anxiety, and depression after the intervention were significantly lower than the corresponding scores before the program. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) also showed that the students from the veterans (Janbaz) families had higher levels of stress compared to their classmates, who belonged to the non-veteran families (PEducation and implementation of stress management techniques including cognitive and behavioral interventions along with active and collaborative methods of learning in the math class might be useful both inside and outside the class, for better management of stress and other health-related problems of students.

  7. Action-based flood forecasting for triggering humanitarian action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan de Perez, Erin; van den Hurk, Bart; van Aalst, Maarten K.; Amuron, Irene; Bamanya, Deus; Hauser, Tristan; Jongma, Brenden; Lopez, Ana; Mason, Simon; Mendler de Suarez, Janot; Pappenberger, Florian; Rueth, Alexandra; Stephens, Elisabeth; Suarez, Pablo; Wagemaker, Jurjen; Zsoter, Ervin

    2016-09-01

    Too often, credible scientific early warning information of increased disaster risk does not result in humanitarian action. With financial resources tilted heavily towards response after a disaster, disaster managers have limited incentive and ability to process complex scientific data, including uncertainties. These incentives are beginning to change, with the advent of several new forecast-based financing systems that provide funding based on a forecast of an extreme event. Given the changing landscape, here we demonstrate a method to select and use appropriate forecasts for specific humanitarian disaster prevention actions, even in a data-scarce location. This action-based forecasting methodology takes into account the parameters of each action, such as action lifetime, when verifying a forecast. Forecasts are linked with action based on an understanding of (1) the magnitude of previous flooding events and (2) the willingness to act "in vain" for specific actions. This is applied in the context of the Uganda Red Cross Society forecast-based financing pilot project, with forecasts from the Global Flood Awareness System (GloFAS). Using this method, we define the "danger level" of flooding, and we select the probabilistic forecast triggers that are appropriate for specific actions. Results from this methodology can be applied globally across hazards and fed into a financing system that ensures that automatic, pre-funded early action will be triggered by forecasts.

  8. Joint Association of Dietary Pattern and Physical Activity Level with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Chinese Men: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    Full Text Available The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the joint associations of physical activity level (PAL and dietary patterns in relation to cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors among Chinese men. The study population consisted of 13 511 Chinese males aged 18-59 years from the 2002 China National Nutrition and Health Survey. Based on dietary data collected by a food frequency questionnaire, four dietary patterns were identified and labeled as "Green Water" (high consumption of rice, vegetables, seafood, pork, and poultry, "Yellow Earth" (high consumption of wheat flour products and starchy tubers, "New Affluent" (high consumption of animal sourced foods and soybean products, and "Western Adopter" (high consumption of animal sourced foods, cakes, and soft drinks. From the information collected by a 1-year physical activity questionnaire, PAL was calculated and classified into 4 categories: sedentary, low active, active, and very active. As compared with their counterparts from the New Affluent pattern, participants who followed the Green Water pattern had a lower likelihood of abdominal obesity (AO; 50.2%, hypertension (HT; 37.9%, hyperglycemia (HG; 41.5%, elevated triglyceride (ETG; 14.5%, low HDL (LHDL; 39.8%, and metabolic syndrome (MS; 51.9%. When compared to sedentary participants, the odds ratio of participants with very active PAL was 0.62 for AO, 0.85 for HT, 0.71 for HG, 0.76 for ETG, 0.74 for LHDL, and 0.58 for MS. Individuals who followed both very active PAL and the Green Water pattern had a lower likelihood of CVD risk factors (AO: 65.8%, HT: 39.1%, HG: 57.4%, ETG: 35.4%, LHDL: 56.1%, and MS: 75.0%, compared to their counterparts who followed both sedentary PAL and the New Affluent pattern. In addition, adherence to both healthy dietary pattern and very active PAL presented a remarkable potential for CVD risk factor prevention.

  9. Estimation of physical activity levels using cell phone questionnaires: a comparison with accelerometry for evaluation of between-subject and within-subject variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bexelius, Christin; Sandin, Sven; Trolle Lagerros, Ylva; Litton, Jan-Eric; Löf, Marie

    2011-09-25

    Physical activity promotes health and longevity. Further elaboration of the role of physical activity for human health in epidemiological studies on large samples requires accurate methods that are easy to use, cheap, and possible to repeat. The use of telecommunication technologies such as cell phones is highly interesting in this respect. In an earlier report, we showed that physical activity level (PAL) assessed using a cell phone procedure agreed well with corresponding estimates obtained using the doubly labeled water method. However, our earlier study indicated high within-subject variation in relation to between-subject variations in PAL using cell phones, but we could not assess if this was a true variation of PAL or an artifact of the cell phone technique. Our objective was to compare within- and between-subject variations in PAL by means of cell phones with corresponding estimates using an accelerometer. In addition, we compared the agreement of daily PAL values obtained using the cell phone questionnaire with corresponding data obtained using an accelerometer. PAL was measured both with the cell phone questionnaire and with a triaxial accelerometer daily during a 2-week study period in 21 healthy Swedish women (20 to 45 years of age and BMI from 17.7 kg/m² to 33.6 kg/m²). The results were evaluated by fitting linear mixed effect models and descriptive statistics and graphs. With the accelerometer, 57% (95% confidence interval [CI] 40%-66%) of the variation was within subjects, while with the cell phone, within-subject variation was 76% (95% CI 59%-83%). The day-to-day variations in PAL observed using the cell phone questions agreed well with the corresponding accelerometer results. Both the cell phone questionnaire and the accelerometer showed high within-subject variations. Furthermore, day-to-day variations in PAL within subjects assessed using the cell phone agreed well with corresponding accelerometer values. Consequently, our cell phone

  10. Anemia esplénica hemolítica de origen palúdico: Consideraciones sobre esplenomegalia e indicaciones de la esplenectomía

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Jose Sarmiento

    1942-02-01

    Full Text Available Falta demostrar de una manera científica cuales son las causas que han producido las alteraciones de la función normal hemolítica del bazo. Hay algunos factores que permiten pensar en la hipótesis que tiene bastantes probabilidades en su favor de que sean las toxinas de los hematozoarios de Laveran las responsables. Así, se encuentra en todos estos enfermos las reinfecciones palúdicas, en su pasado patológico; se sabe que el órgano más afectado en esta enfermedad es el bazo, se sabe que existe cierta inmunidad para el paludismo en los nativos de las regiones en donde el paludismo es endémico.

  11. Izlases dizainu salīdzināšana ar simulācijas eksperimentu palīdzību

    OpenAIRE

    Rikačova, Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    Darbā tika aplūkoti trīs veidu izlases dizaini: vienkāršā gadījuma izlase, sistemātiskā gadījuma izlase un stratificētā gadījuma izlase, kā arī tika apskatīta GREG novērtējumu teorija. Pētījuma mērķis bija ar simulācijas eksperimentu palīdzību salīdzināt iepriekš minētos izlases dizainus, lai noteiktu izlases dizainu, kas dod precīzākus konkrētās populācijas parametru novērtējumus. Lai veiktu simulācijas eksperimentus tika ģenerēti dati un uzrakstītas programmas, kas tika palaistas va...

  12. L'Anti-Atlas occidental du Maroc: étude sédimentologique et reconstitutions paléogéographiques au Cambrien inférieur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benssaou, M.; Hamoumi, N.

    2001-04-01

    L'étude lithostratigraphique en sédimentologique des formations du Cambrien inférieur de l'Anti-Atlas occidental (Maroc) a permis de mettre en évidence la diversité extrême des faciès allant des faciès continentaux jusqu'au faciès franchement marins. La répartition verticale de ces faciès ainsi que leurs associations ont permis de (i) proposer un nouveau découpage de la succession en formations lithostratigraphiques, (ii) reconstituer les milieux de dépôt (système fluviatile, lacs, fan-deltas, milieu littoral, plate-forme dominée par des constructions stromatolitiques et récifales et plate-forme dominée par les tempêtes) et (iii) établir des modèles paléogéographiques retraçant les différentes étapes d'évolution de ce bassin qui fait partie de la plate-forme nord-gondwanienne au Cambrien inférieur. Lithostratigraphical and sedimentological studies of the Early Cambrian formations in the western Anti-Atlas (Morocco) evidence their large diversity of facies ranging from continental to clearly marine. Vertical distribution and associations of facies afford opportunities to (i) suggest a new classification of the sedimentary sequence in terms of lithostratigraphic formations, (ii) restore the depositional environments (fluvial system, lake, delta fan, coast, stromatolite and reef-dominated platform, tempest-dominated platform), and (iii) establish palæogeographic models displaying the different evolutionary stages of this basin that constituted a part of the Lower Cambrian north-Gondwanian platform.

  13. Prevalence of potentially serious drug-drug interactions among South African elderly private health sector patients using the Mimica Matanović/Vlahović-Palčevski protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerden, Julandi A; Burger, Johanita R; Gerber, Jan J; Vlahović-Palčevski, Vera

    2018-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of potentially serious drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and their relationship with gender and age, among elderly in South Africa. A cross-sectional study was conducted using pharmaceutical claims data for 2013, for a total of 103 420 medical scheme beneficiaries' ≥65 years. All medications dispensed within one calendar month where the days' supply of medication dispensed overlapped, were grouped as one prescription. DDIs per prescription were then identified using the Mimica Matanović/Vlahović-Palčevski DDI protocol. Results were interpreted using effect sizes, that is Cramér's V, Cohen's d and Cohen's ƒ 2 . A total of 331 659 DDIs were identified on 235 870 (25.8%, N = 912 713) prescriptions (mean 0.36 (SD 0.7) (95% CI, 0.36 to 0.37)). Women encountered 63.5% of all DDIs. Effect sizes for the association between DDIs and age group (Cramér's V = 0.06), and gender (Cramér's V = 0.05) was negligible. There was no difference between men and women regarding the mean number of DDIs identified per prescription (Cohen's d = 0.10). The number of medicine per prescription (ƒ 2 = 0.51) was the biggest predictor of the DDIs. The most frequent interacting drug combinations were between central nervous system medicines (30.6%). Our study is the first to report the prevalence of potentially serious DDIs among an elderly population in the South African private health sector utilising the Mimica Matanović/Vlahović-Palčevski DDI protocol. Overall, we identified DDIs in approximately 26% of the prescriptions in our study. Age and gender were not found to be predictors of potentially serious DDIs. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  14. Joint Association of Dietary Pattern and Physical Activity Level with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Chinese Men: A Cross-Sectional Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, D.; He, Y.; Li, Y.P.; Luan, D.C.; Zhai, F.Y.; Yang, X.G.; Ma, G.S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the joint associations of physical activity level (PAL) and dietary patterns in relation to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors among Chinese men. The study population consisted of 13 511 Chinese males aged 18-59 years from the 2002

  15. Internal consistency, concurrent validity, and discriminant validity of a measure of public support for policies for active living in transportation (PAL-T) in a population-based sample of adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Daniel; Gauvin, Lise; Fournier, Michel; Kestens, Yan; Daniel, Mark; Morency, Patrick; Drouin, Louis

    2012-04-01

    Active living is a broad conceptualization of physical activity that incorporates domains of exercise; recreational, household, and occupational activities; and active transportation. Policy makers develop and implement a variety of transportation policies that can influence choices about how to travel from one location to another. In making such decisions, policy makers act in part in response to public opinion or support for proposed policies. Measures of the public's support for policies aimed at promoting active transportation can inform researchers and policy makers. This study examined the internal consistency, and concurrent and discriminant validity of a newly developed measure of the public's support for policies for active living in transportation (PAL-T). A series of 17 items representing potential policies for promoting active transportation was generated. Two samples of participants (n = 2,001 and n = 2,502) from Montreal, Canada, were recruited via random digit dialling. Analyses were conducted on the combined data set (n = 4,503). Participants were aged 18 through 94 years (58% female). The concurrent and discriminant validity of the PAL-T was assessed by examining relationships with physical activity and smoking. To explore the usability of the PAL-T, predicted scale scores were compared to the summed values of responses. Results showed that the internal consistency of the PAL-T was 0.70. Multilevel regression demonstrated no relationship between the PAL-T and smoking status (p > 0.05) but significant relationships with utilitarian walking (p public opinion can inform policy makers and support advocacy efforts aimed at making built environments more suitable for active transportation while allowing researchers to examine the antecedents and consequences of public support for policies.

  16. An assessment of the magnitude of intra-fraction movement of head-and-neck IMRT cases and its implication on the action-level of the imaging protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, Pei Ping Eric; Hendry, Julie; Cheah, Shie Lee; Soong, Yoke Lim; Fong, Kam Weng; Wee, Tien Seng Joseph; Tan, Wee Kiat Terence; Nei, Wen Long; Wang, Fuqiang; Wong, Ru Xin; Ng, Wee Loon; Chen, John

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: A planning margin ⩽3 mm is employed in some head-and-neck IMRT cases due to the proximity of critical structures. This study aims to explore the need to redefine the action-level in the head-and-neck imaging protocol in consideration of the intra-fraction movement. Material and methods: This is a local study of 18 patients treated using the same immobilisation system and setup protocol. Post-treatment orthogonal pair of kilovoltage X-ray images was acquired on the first three days of treatment. 106 sets of pre- and post-treatment kV X-ray images acquired over 53 fractions were analysed against the treatment planning DRR for calculation of intra-fraction movement. Results: Individual mean intra-fraction movement in all directions ranged from −1.8 to 1.1 mm. Population mean (median) intra-fraction movement in the x-, y-, and z-planes were −0.1 mm (0 mm), −0.3 mm (−0.3 mm) and −0.2 mm (−0.2 mm) respectively. Intra-fraction movement in all three dimensions, x-, y- and z-planes were considered statistically significant (p < 0.05). 7 out of 53 fractions (13.2%) were highlighted as the combined magnitude of the intra-fraction motion with the uncorrected pre-treatment setup errors had exceeded the boundaries of given margins. Conclusions: 3 mm-AL was not adequate to account for intra-fraction movement when the CTV–PTV margin was ⩽3 mm and should be excluded from the routine imaging protocol and daily image-guided radiotherapy should be employed. Adjusting the action-level to 2 mm would allow a more confident approach in delivery of the prescribed dose in head-and-neck IMRT cases

  17. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 356: Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Revision No. 0, August 2001); FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions necessary for the characterization and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 356, Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, as identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The CAU, located on the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 03-04-01, Area 3 Change House Septic System; CAS 03-09-01, Mud Pit Spill Over; CAS 03-09-03, Mud Pit; CAS 03-09-04, Mud Pit; CAS 03-09-05, Mud Pit; CAS 20-16-01, Landfill; CAS 20-22-21, Drums. Sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations are the basis for the development of the phased approach chosen to address the data collection activities prior to implementing the preferred closure alternative for each CAS. The Phase I investigation will determine through collection of environmental samples from targeted populations (i.e., mud/soil cuttings above textural discontinuity) if contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are present in concentrations exceeding preliminary action levels (PALs) at each of the CASs. If COPCs are present above PALs, a Phase II investigation will be implemented to determine the extent of contamination to support the appropriate corrective action alternative to complete closure of the site. Groundwater impacts from potentially migrating contaminants are not expected due to the depths to groundwater and limiting hydrologic drivers of low precipitation and high evaporation rates. Future land-use scenarios limit future uses to industrial activities; therefore, future residential uses are not considered. Potential exposure routes to site workers from contaminants of concern in septage and soils include oral ingestion, inhalation, or dermal contact (absorption) through in-advertent disturbance of contaminated structures and/or soils. Diesel within drilling muds is expected to be the primary COPC based on process

  18. Palácio Itamaraty em Brasília: Análise de Adequação às Normas Brasileiras sobre Acessibilidade e Propostas de Melhoria, Respeitando a Autenticidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio da Silva Máximo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Brasília é a única cidade construída no século XX considerada pela UNESCO como Patrimônio Cultural da Humanidade, pelo reconhecimento mundial do seu Plano Urbanístico como um exemplar ímpar do urbanismo modernista caracterizado pelo racionalismo e funcionalismo. O Decreto Federal nº 5.296, de 02 de dezembro de 2004, consolidou a legislação brasileira de acessibilidade e tornou obrigatória a norma brasileira NBR 9050:2004. O país está em processo de adaptação e o respeito à legislação envolve adaptações do patrimônio arquitetônico, tanto “histórico” como contemporâneo. O processo de adaptação deve garantir a acessibilidade e a preservação do bem. Este artigo apresenta uma análise, com uso da ferramenta “Matriz de Autenticidade e Acessibilidade”, do Palácio Itamaraty – referência integrada da arquitetura moderna, inserido no conjunto urbanístico tombado - onde foi possível obter informações para melhoria das condições de acessibilidade, respeitando sua autenticidade. Brasilia, the only twentieth century city recognized by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site, is characterized by its rationalism, functionalism and as a unique specimen of the modern urbanism. In 2004, a Federal Decree # 5.296/2004 consolidated the Brazilian legislation on accessibility and so the Brazilian standard NBR-9050:2004 became mandatory. Since then, the country has been adapting its architectural heritage to fit its requirements. During the process changes to the site and to the building itself must be made to ensure accessibility, but how it can be done in order to prevent damages to the integrity and authenticity of the good and to the city. This paper presents an analysis on The Itamaraty Palace using a tool “Matrix of Authenticity and Accessibility” in order to identify characteristics and needs to accessibility. The palace is a reference of the modern architecture and is located inside the urban preservation perimeter

  19. DAPs: Deep Action Proposals for Action Understanding

    KAUST Repository

    Escorcia, Victor; Caba Heilbron, Fabian; Niebles, Juan Carlos; Ghanem, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    action proposals from long videos. We show how to take advantage of the vast capacity of deep learning models and memory cells to retrieve from untrimmed videos temporal segments, which are likely to contain actions. A comprehensive evaluation indicates

  20. Givental action and trivialisation of circle action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dotsenko, V.; Shadrin, S.; Vallette, B.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we show that the Givental group action on genus zero cohomological field theories, also known as formal Frobenius manifolds or hypercommutative algebras, naturally arises in the deformation theory of Batalin-Vilkovisky algebras. We prove that the Givental action is equal to an action

  1. Remedial action technology - arid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakonson, T.E.; DePoorter, G.L.; Nyhan, J.W.; Perkins, B.A.; Lane, L.J.

    1982-01-01

    A summary is presented of the low-level waste remedial action program at Los Alamos. The experimental design and progress is described for the experiments on second generation intrusion barriers, subsidence effects on SLB components, moisture cycling effects on chemical transport, and erosion control methodologies. The soil moisture data from the bio-intrusion and moisture cycling experiments both demonstrate the overwhelming importance of vegetation in minimizing infiltration of water through trench covers and backfill. Evaporation, as a water loss component in trench covers, is only effective in reducing soil moisture within 40 cm of the trench cover surface. Moisture infiltrating past the zone of evaporation in unvegetated or poorly vegetated trench covers is in storage and accumulates until drainage out of the soil profile occurs. Judicious selection of vegetation species for revegetating a low-level waste site may prevent infiltration of moisture into the trench and, when coupled with other design features (i.e. trench cover slope, tilling and seeding practice), may greatly reduce problems with erosion. Standard US Department of Agriculture erosion plots, when coupled with a state-of-the-art water balance and erosion model (CREAMS) promises to be highly useful in screening proposed remedial action cover designs for low-level waste sites. The erosion plot configuration allows for complete accounting of the water balance in a soil profile. This feature enables the user to optimize cover designs to minimize erosion and infiltration of water into the trench

  2. Action Research for Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egmose, Jonas

    on urban sustainability the need to move towards sustainability at societal level is conceptualised as a democratic challenge questioning the way we live on planet earth. By understanding sustainability as an immanent and emergent ability of ecological and social life, continuously to renew itself without...... with a greater say in the future of urban sustainability research, the work shows how action research can make important methodological contributions to processes of social learning between citizens and scientists by enabling free spaces in peoples everyday life and within academia, where aspects...

  3. Action Research for Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egmose, Jonas

    by analysing processes of social learning. The book addresses the need to move towards sustainability at societal level as a democratic challenge questioning the way we live on planet earth. By conceptualising sustain-ability as an immanent and emergent ability of ecological and social life, continuously...... to provide local citizens with a greater say in the future of urban sustainability research, this book shows how action research can make important methodological contributions to processes of social learning between citizens and scientists by enabling free spaces in peoples everyday life and within academia...

  4. Impulsive action and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frijda, Nico H

    2010-07-01

    This paper explores the way in which emotions are causal determinants of action. It argues that emotional events, as appraised by the individual, elicit changes in motive states (called states of action readiness), which in turn may (or may not) cause action. Actions can be elicited automatically, without prior intention (called impulsive actions), or intentionally. Impulsive actions reflect the simplest and biologically most general form in which emotions can cause action, since they require no reflection, no foresight, and no planning. Impulsive actions are determined conjointly by the nature of action readiness, the affordances perceived in the eliciting event as appraised, and the individual's action repertoire. Those actions from one's repertoire are performed that both match the perceived affordances and the aim of the state of action readiness. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Significant NRC Enforcement Actions

    Data.gov (United States)

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission — This dataset provides a list of Nuclear Regulartory Commission (NRC) issued significant enforcement actions. These actions, referred to as "escalated", are issued by...

  6. Increased toll-like receptors and p53 levels regulate apoptosis and angiogenesis in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: mechanism of action of P-MAPA biological response modifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Patrick Vianna; Seiva, Fábio Rodrigues Ferreira; Carniato, Amanda Pocol; Mello Júnior, Wilson de; Duran, Nelson; Macedo, Alda Maria; Oliveira, Alexandre Gabarra de; Romih, Rok; Nunes, Iseu da Silva; Nunes, Odilon da Silva; Fávaro, Wagner José

    2016-01-01

    The new modalities for treating patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) for whom BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guerin) has failed or is contraindicated are recently increasing due to the development of new drugs. Although agents like mitomycin C and BCG are routinely used, there is a need for more potent and/or less-toxic agents. In this scenario, a new perspective is represented by P-MAPA (Protein Aggregate Magnesium-Ammonium Phospholinoleate-Palmitoleate Anhydride), developed by Farmabrasilis (non-profit research network). This study detailed and characterized the mechanisms of action of P-MAPA based on activation of mediators of Toll-like Receptors (TLRs) 2 and 4 signaling pathways and p53 in regulating angiogenesis and apoptosis in an animal model of NMIBC, as well as, compared these mechanisms with BCG treatment. Our results demonstrated the activation of the immune system by BCG (MyD88-dependent pathway) resulted in increased inflammatory cytokines. However, P-MAPA intravesical immunotherapy led to distinct activation of TLRs 2 and 4-mediated innate immune system, resulting in increased interferons signaling pathway (TRIF-dependent pathway), which was more effective in the NMIBC treatment. Interferon signaling pathway activation induced by P-MAPA led to increase of iNOS protein levels, resulting in apoptosis and histopathological recovery. Additionally, P-MAPA immunotherapy increased wild-type p53 protein levels. The increased wild-type p53 protein levels were fundamental to NO-induced apoptosis and the up-regulation of BAX. Furthermore, interferon signaling pathway induction and increased p53 protein levels by P-MAPA led to important antitumor effects, not only suppressing abnormal cell proliferation, but also by preventing continuous expansion of tumor mass through suppression of angiogenesis, which was characterized by decreased VEGF and increased endostatin protein levels. Thus, P-MAPA immunotherapy could be considered an important therapeutic

  7. Increased toll-like receptors and p53 levels regulate apoptosis and angiogenesis in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: mechanism of action of P-MAPA biological response modifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Patrick Vianna; Seiva, Fábio Rodrigues Ferreira; Carniato, Amanda Pocol; de Mello Júnior, Wilson; Duran, Nelson; Macedo, Alda Maria; de Oliveira, Alexandre Gabarra; Romih, Rok; Nunes, Iseu da Silva; Nunes, Odilon da Silva; Fávaro, Wagner José

    2016-07-07

    The new modalities for treating patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) for whom BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guerin) has failed or is contraindicated are recently increasing due to the development of new drugs. Although agents like mitomycin C and BCG are routinely used, there is a need for more potent and/or less-toxic agents. In this scenario, a new perspective is represented by P-MAPA (Protein Aggregate Magnesium-Ammonium Phospholinoleate-Palmitoleate Anhydride), developed by Farmabrasilis (non-profit research network). This study detailed and characterized the mechanisms of action of P-MAPA based on activation of mediators of Toll-like Receptors (TLRs) 2 and 4 signaling pathways and p53 in regulating angiogenesis and apoptosis in an animal model of NMIBC, as well as, compared these mechanisms with BCG treatment. Our results demonstrated the activation of the immune system by BCG (MyD88-dependent pathway) resulted in increased inflammatory cytokines. However, P-MAPA intravesical immunotherapy led to distinct activation of TLRs 2 and 4-mediated innate immune system, resulting in increased interferons signaling pathway (TRIF-dependent pathway), which was more effective in the NMIBC treatment. Interferon signaling pathway activation induced by P-MAPA led to increase of iNOS protein levels, resulting in apoptosis and histopathological recovery. Additionally, P-MAPA immunotherapy increased wild-type p53 protein levels. The increased wild-type p53 protein levels were fundamental to NO-induced apoptosis and the up-regulation of BAX. Furthermore, interferon signaling pathway induction and increased p53 protein levels by P-MAPA led to important antitumor effects, not only suppressing abnormal cell proliferation, but also by preventing continuous expansion of tumor mass through suppression of angiogenesis, which was characterized by decreased VEGF and increased endostatin protein levels. Thus, P-MAPA immunotherapy could be considered an important therapeutic

  8. Mitos e Lendas como contributo para a diferenciação da Experiência Turística – o caso dos Túneis do Palácio Nacional de Mafra, Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Sofia Costa Morgado

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Desmitificar os Túneis do Palácio Nacional de Mafra, Portugal, perspetivando novas formas de diferenciação de uma oferta turística associada a um imaginário de exotismo e mistério, foi o principal propósito do presente trabalho. Os mitos relativos ao Palácio Nacional de Mafra integram a cultura popular mafrense, pelo que se coloca a possibilidade de envolver a comunidade local com base na apropriação simbólica da sua realidade. O pressuposto do envolvimento comunitário local foi equacionado nos inquéritos realizados junto da comunidade local e, assim, as ofertas turísticas alternativas assumem-se como uma oportunidade de diferenciação da Experiência Turística em Mafra.

  9. Large-scale integration of small molecule-induced genome-wide transcriptional responses, Kinome-wide binding affinities and cell-growth inhibition profiles reveal global trends characterizing systems-level drug action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusica eVidovic

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS project is a large-scale coordinated effort to build a comprehensive systems biology reference resource. The goals of the program include the generation of a very large multidimensional data matrix and informatics and computational tools to integrate, analyze, and make the data readily accessible. LINCS data include genome-wide transcriptional signatures, biochemical protein binding profiles, cellular phenotypic response profiles and various other datasets for a wide range of cell model systems and molecular and genetic perturbations. Here we present a partial survey of this data facilitated by data standards and in particular a robust compound standardization workflow; we integrated several types of LINCS signatures and analyzed the results with a focus on mechanism of action and chemical compounds. We illustrate how kinase targets can be related to disease models and relevant drugs. We identified some fundamental trends that appear to link Kinome binding profiles and transcriptional signatures to chemical information and biochemical binding profiles to transcriptional responses independent of chemical similarity. To fill gaps in the datasets we developed and applied predictive models. The results can be interpreted at the systems level as demonstrated based on a large number of signaling pathways. We can identify clear global relationships, suggesting robustness of cellular responses to chemical perturbation. Overall, the results suggest that chemical similarity is a useful measure at the systems level, which would support phenotypic drug optimization efforts. With this study we demonstrate the potential of such integrated analysis approaches and suggest prioritizing further experiments to fill the gaps in the current data.

  10. impact des variations paléoclimatiques sur la sédimentation carbonatée au Valanginien

    OpenAIRE

    Gréselle , Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    The detailed study of depositional geometries and facies of sedimentary successions from the Jura platform to the Vocontian trough (SE France) shows that the Valanginian (Cretaceous) global carbonate crisis is recorded as a multistep process. The development of ice caps at high latitudes led to sea-level fluctuations of several tens of meters. Global cooling associated with an increase of nutrient input linked to moister climate as well as decreasing sea-level then led to diminishing carbonat...

  11. Biological Action Spectra (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruijl, F.R. de

    2000-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation induces a wide variety of biological responses: ranging in humans from well-known short-term effects like sunburn to long-term effects like skin cancer. The wavelength dependencies ('action spectra') of the responses can differ significantly, depending on the UV-targeted molecules (their absorption spectra), their localisation (transmission to the target depth) and the photochemical reactions involved (e.g. quantum yields, competing reaction). An action spectrum (e.g. of sunburn) is usually determined in a wavelength by wavelength analysis of the response. This is not always possible (e.g. in case of skin cancer), and an action spectrum may then be extracted mathematically from differences in responses to broadband UV sources of various spectral compositions (yielding 'biological spectral weights'). However, relative spectral weights may shift with exposure levels and contributions from different wavelengths may not always add up. Under these circumstances conventional analyses will yield different action spectra for different experimental conditions. (author)

  12. Study design and protocol for a mixed methods evaluation of an intervention to reduce and break up sitting time in primary school classrooms in the UK: The CLASS PAL (Physically Active Learning) Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Routen, Ash C; Biddle, Stuart J H; Bodicoat, Danielle H; Cale, Lorraine; Clemes, Stacy; Edwardson, Charlotte L; Glazebrook, Cris; Harrington, Deirdre M; Khunti, Kamlesh; Pearson, Natalie; Salmon, Jo; Sherar, Lauren B

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Children engage in a high volume of sitting in school, particularly in the classroom. A number of strategies, such as physically active lessons (termed movement integration (MI)), have been developed to integrate physical activity into this learning environment; however, no single approach is likely to meet the needs of all pupils and teachers. This protocol outlines an implementation study of a primary school-based MI intervention: CLASS PAL (Physically Active Learning) programm...

  13. Low level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 1: mechanisms of action, dosimetric, and safety considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecha, Judith A. E. M.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Nair, Raj G.; Epstein, Joel B.; Sonis, Stephen T.; Elad, Sharon; Hamblin, Michael R.; Barasch, Andrei; Migliorati, Cesar A.; Milstein, Dan M. J.; Genot, Marie-Thérèse; Lansaat, Liset; van der Brink, Ron; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; van Diessen, Judi; de Lange, Jan; Smeele, Ludi E.; Schubert, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM), for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together with a better understanding of mechanisms involved, may expand the applications for PBM in the management of other complications associated with HNC treatment. This article (part 1) describes PBM mechanisms of action, dosimetry, and safety aspects and, in doing so, provides a basis for a companion paper (part 2) which describes the potential breadth of potential applications of PBM in the management of side-effects of (chemo)radiation therapy in patients being treated for HNC and proposes PBM parameters. Methods This study is a narrative non-systematic review. Results We review PBM mechanisms of action and dosimetric considerations. Virtually, all conditions modulated by PBM (e.g., ulceration, inflammation, lymphedema, pain, fibrosis, neurological and muscular injury) are thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of (chemo)radiation therapy-induced complications in patients treated for HNC. The impact of PBM on tumor behavior and tumor response to treatment has been insufficiently studied. In vitro studies assessing the effect of PBM on tumor cells report conflicting results, perhaps attributable to inconsistencies of PBM power and dose. Nonetheless, the biological bases for the broad clinical activities ascribed to PBM have also been noted to be similar to those activities and pathways associated with negative tumor behaviors and impeded response to treatment. While there are no anecdotal descriptions of poor tumor outcomes in patients treated with PBM, confirming its neutrality with respect to cancer responsiveness is a critical priority. Conclusion Based on its therapeutic effects, PBM may have utility in a broad range of oral, oropharyngeal, facial, and neck

  14. Impulsive action and motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijda, N.H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the way in which emotions are causal determinants of action. It argues that emotional events, as appraised by the individual, elicit changes in motive states (called states of action readiness), which in turn may (or may not) cause action. Actions can be elicited automatically,

  15. Climate Action Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Partnerships Contact Us Climate Action Team & Climate Action Initiative The Climate Action programs and the state's Climate Adaptation Strategy. The CAT members are state agency secretaries and the . See CAT reports Climate Action Team Pages CAT Home Members Working Groups Reports Back to Top

  16. Hybrid Action Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönnkö, M.; Ravn, Anders Peter; Sere, K.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the use of action systems with differential actions in the specifcation of hybrid systems. As the main contribution we generalize the definition of a differential action, allowing the use of arbitrary relations over model variables and their time......-derivatives in modelling continuous-time dynamics. The generalized differential action has an intuitively appealing predicate transformer semantics, which we show to be both conjunctive and monotonic. In addition, we show that differential actions blend smoothly with conventional actions in action systems, even under...... parallel composition. Moreover, as the strength of the action system formalism is the support for stepwise development by refinement, we investigate refinement involving a differential action. We show that, due to the predicate transformer semantics, standard action refinement techniques apply also...

  17. Saskarsmes prasmju veicināšana ar mūzikas palīdzību pirmsskolā

    OpenAIRE

    Gūtšmite, Sana

    2017-01-01

    Bakalaura darba autore ir Sana Gūtšmite. Bakalaura darba nosaukums: „Saskarsmes prasmju veicināšana ar mūzikas palīdzību pirmsskolā”. Darba mērķis: – teorētiski un empīriski pētīt bērnu saskarsmes prasmju veicināšanas iespējas muzikālās rotaļās un muzikāli ritmiskās kustībās. Darbā izvirzīta sekojoša hipotēze: – pirmsskolas vecuma bērnu saskarsmes prasmes veicināšana būs sekmīgāka, ja pedagoģiskajā procesā skolotājs •izmantos muzikālas rotaļas un muzikāli ritmiskās kustības; •veidos labvēlīg...

  18. Apgrozījuma prognozēšana ar mākslīgo neironu tīklu palīdzību

    OpenAIRE

    Puškina, Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    Bakalaura darba pētījumu ietvaros tika analizēta mākslīgo neironu tīklu programmas izvēle Latvijas uzņēmuma „Pasaules Optika” apgrozījuma prognozēšanai, kā arī veikta tā praktiskā pielietošana. Darbs sastāv no trim nodaļām, kurās tiek izskatītas problēmas, kas ir iespējams risināt ar mākslīgo neironu tiklu palīdzību, izmantojot Neuro XL programmu. Salīdzinājumā ar citām mākslīgā intelekta risinošam datu apstrādes programmām tiek novērtēts Neuro XL programmas priekšrocības, tiek imitēti ikgadē...

  19. Hybrid Action Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronkko, Mauno; Ravn, Anders P.

    1997-01-01

    a differential action, which allows differential equations as primitive actions. The extension allows us to model hybrid systems with both continuous and discrete behaviour. The main result of this paper is an extension of such a hybrid action system with parallel composition. The extension does not change...... the original meaning of the parallel composition, and therefore also the ordinary action systems can be composed in parallel with the hybrid action systems....

  20. Le comportement symbolique dans la Préhistoire de la Roumanie: art mobilier au Paléolithique supérieur en Moldavie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneliu BELDIMAN

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available RÉSUMÉ: Les approches récentes des collections anciennes aussi bien que les découvertes des derniers décennies ont permis des discussions détaillés (concernant le répertoire, la typologie, la technologie, les dates radiométriques, etc. sur les rares documents d’art mobilier (parure, objets décorés et dites “non utilitaires” appartenant au Paléolithique supérieur (Gravettien oriental, autour 23-13 kya BP et provenant de la Moldavie roumaine –région Est du pays, comprise entre les Carpates et la rivière Prut–. Les 29 artefacts signalés ont été découvertes en 6 sites de plein aire et dans un site en grotte. Les types identifiés sont: bâtons percés sur métatarse de cheval et sur bois de renne; pendeloques lithiques et en os; rondelle en bois de renne; dents percées; objets lithiques en quartzite et graphite; objets gravés et encochés lithiques et en os; harpon décoré; fragment de défense de mammouth ayant des traces de débitage et façonnage; coquilles fossiles appartenant à l’espèce Congeria?; coquilles percées appartenant à l’espèce Succinea oblonga? ou Lithoglyphus naticoides? La plupart des artéfacts ont une signification spéciale pour le phénomène de l’art et de la technologie préhistorique de la région envisagée: il s’agit des pendeloques de Mitoc, dép. de Botosani et de fragment d’os gravé d’une représentation de patte d’animal? de Piatra Neamt, dép. de Neamt. Une autre pièce exceptionnelle c’est le fragment de défense de mammouth de Lespezi, dép. de Bacau portant sur l’extrémité proximale des traces de débitage par entaillage et probablement par sciage à la ficelle; cela peut être le plus ancienne situation de cette sorte signalée dans cette partie de l’Europe. Tenant compte du fait que les objets en ivoire de mammouth sont apparitions extrêmement rares dans le Paléolithique supérieur de la Roumanie et les analogies on peut envisager la provenance de cet

  1. DAPs: Deep Action Proposals for Action Understanding

    KAUST Repository

    Escorcia, Victor

    2016-09-17

    Object proposals have contributed significantly to recent advances in object understanding in images. Inspired by the success of this approach, we introduce Deep Action Proposals (DAPs), an effective and efficient algorithm for generating temporal action proposals from long videos. We show how to take advantage of the vast capacity of deep learning models and memory cells to retrieve from untrimmed videos temporal segments, which are likely to contain actions. A comprehensive evaluation indicates that our approach outperforms previous work on a large scale action benchmark, runs at 134 FPS making it practical for large-scale scenarios, and exhibits an appealing ability to generalize, i.e. to retrieve good quality temporal proposals of actions unseen in training.

  2. Six policy actions for accelerated deployment of renewable energy. READy Renewable Energy Action on Deployment. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-03-15

    The READy book presents a kaleidoscope of policy options that have proven to accelerate the deployment of renewable energy technologies, based on experiences around the world at the local and national levels. Lessons learned from successful cases are distilled into six essential action points. Together these categories of policy actions compose the ACTION Star, a guide for taking action now while preparing for growth over the long term.

  3. The Prose of Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ulrik; Thrane, Sof

    2014-01-01

    risks changes over time in response to a lack of action on reported risks. In these processes Frontline Managers take on new responsibilities to make General Managers take action on reported risk. The reporting practice changes from the mere identification of risk to risk assessment and, finally......, to incorporating the possible response into the risk report. These findings add to extant literature by illustrating that actions do not automatically flow from the identification of risk. Rather, risk and action are dynamically interrelated in the sense that the prose in the risk report is a variable input...... to generate action and that a lack of action encourages managers to change their approach to reporting....

  4. Precautionary allergen labelling: perspectives from key stakeholder groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DunnGalvin, A.; Chan, C. -H.; Crevel, R.

    2015-01-01

    to summarize the perspectives of all the key stakeholders (including clinicians, patients, food industry and regulators), with the aim of defining common health protection and risk minimization goals. The lack of agreed reference doses has resulted in inconsistent application of PAL by the food industry...... and in levels of contamination that prompt withdrawal action by enforcement officers. So there is a poor relationship between the presence or absence of PAL and actual reaction risk. This has led to a loss of trust in PAL, reducing the ability of consumers with food allergies to make informed choices....... The result has been reduced avoidance, reduced quality of life and increased risk-taking by consumers who often ignore PAL. All contributing stakeholders agree that PAL must reflect actual risk. PAL should be transparent and consistent with rules underpinning decision-making process being communicated...

  5. Action Rules Mining

    CERN Document Server

    Dardzinska, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    We are surrounded by data, numerical, categorical and otherwise, which must to be analyzed and processed to convert it into information that instructs, answers or aids understanding and decision making. Data analysts in many disciplines such as business, education or medicine, are frequently asked to analyze new data sets which are often composed of numerous tables possessing different properties. They try to find completely new correlations between attributes and show new possibilities for users.   Action rules mining discusses some of data mining and knowledge discovery principles and then describe representative concepts, methods and algorithms connected with action. The author introduces the formal definition of action rule, notion of a simple association action rule and a representative action rule, the cost of association action rule, and gives a strategy how to construct simple association action rules of a lowest cost. A new approach for generating action rules from datasets with numerical attributes...

  6. Recovery Action Mapping Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Recovery Action Mapping Tool is a web map that allows users to visually interact with and query actions that were developed to recover species listed under the...

  7. Normative Action Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baboroglu, Oguz; Ravn, Ib

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an argument for an enrichment of action research methodology. To the current state of action research, we add a constructivist epistemological argument, as well as a crucial inspiration from some futures-oriented planning approaches. Within the domain of social....... They are generated jointly by the stakeholders of a system and the involved action researchers and are tested every time that the prescriptions for action contained in them are followed by a system's stakeholders....

  8. Pals in power armor: attribution of human-like emotions to video game characters in an ingroup/outgroup situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besmann, Anna; Rios, Kimberly

    2012-08-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the tendency for humans to anthropomorphize computers-that is, to react to computers as social actors, despite knowing that the computers are mere machines. In the present research, we examined the attribution of both primary (non-uniquely human) and secondary (human-like) emotions to ingroup (teammate) and outgroup (opponent) computer-controlled characters in a video game. We found that participants perceived the teammate character as experiencing more secondary emotions than the opponent character, but that they perceived the teammate and opponent character as experiencing equal levels of primary emotions. Thus, participants anthropomorphized the ingroup character to a greater extent than the outgroup character. These results imply that computers' "emotions" are treated with a similar ingroup/outgroup social regard as the emotions of actual humans.

  9. NeoPalAna: Neoadjuvant palbociclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor, and anastrozole for clinical stage 2 or 3 estrogen receptor positive breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cynthia X.; Gao, Feng; Luo, Jingqin; Northfelt, Donald W.; Goetz, Matthew; Forero, Andres; Hoog, Jeremy; Naughton, Michael; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Suresh, Rama; Anderson, Karen S.; Margenthaler, Julie; Aft, Rebecca; Hobday, Timothy; Moynihan, Timothy; Gillanders, William; Cyr, Amy; Eberlein, Timothy J.; Hieken, Tina; Krontiras, Helen; Guo, Zhanfang; Lee, Michelle V.; Spies, Nicholas C.; Skidmore, Zachary L.; Griffith, Obi L.; Griffith, Malachi; Thomas, Shana; Bumb, Caroline; Vij, Kiran; Bartlett, Cynthia Huang; Koehler, Maria; Al-Kateb, Hussam; Sanati, Souzan; Ellis, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 drives cell proliferation in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer. This single-arm phase II neoadjuvant trial (NeoPalAna) assessed the anti-proliferative activity of the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib in primary breast cancer as a prelude to adjuvant studies. Experimental Design Eligible patients with clinical stage II/III ER+/HER2- breast cancer received anastrozole 1mg daily for 4 weeks (cycle 0) (with goserelin if premenopausal), followed by adding palbociclib (125mg daily on days 1-21) on cycle 1 day 1 (C1D1) for four 28-day cycles unless C1D15 Ki67>10%, in which case patients went off study due to inadequately response. Anastrozole was continued until surgery, which occurred 3-5 weeks post palbociclib exposure. Later patients received additional 10-12 days of palbociclib (Cycle 5) immediately before surgery. Serial biopsies at baseline, C1D1, C1D15, and surgery were analyzed for Ki67, gene expression and mutation profiles. The primary endpoint was Complete Cell Cycle Arrest (CCCA: central Ki67<2.7%). Results Fifty patients enrolled. The CCCA rate was significantly higher after adding palbociclib to anastrozole (C1D15 87% vs C1D1 26%, p<0.001). Palbociclib enhanced cell cycle control over anastrozole monotherapy regardless of luminal subtype (A vs B) and PIK3CA status with activity observed across a broad range of clinicopathological and mutation profiles. Ki67 recovery at surgery following palbociclib washout was suppressed by cycle 5 palbociclib. Resistance was associated with non-luminal subtypes and persistent E2F-target gene expression. Conclusions Palbociclib is an active anti-proliferative agent for early-stage breast cancer resistant to anastrozole, however, prolonged administration may be necessary to maintain its effect. PMID:28270497

  10. Emotions and action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijda, N.H.; Manstead, A.S.R.; Frijda, N.H.; Fischer, A.H.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter discusses the relationships between emotion and action. Emotion, by its very nature, is change in action readiness to maintain or change one's relationship to an object or event. Motivation, or motivational change, is one of the key aspects of emotions. Even so, action follows only

  11. Action and Interactiv research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kurt Aagaard; Svensson, Lennart

    The text is written as a first version of editors introduction to a book about action research/interactive research in Nordic countries. You can read abouttrends and contradictions in the history of action research.The authors question the trends and demands a more explicit critical approach...... to actual action research/interactive research....

  12. Action-based mechanisms of attention.

    OpenAIRE

    Tipper, S P; Howard, L A; Houghton, G

    1998-01-01

    Actions, which have effects in the external world, must be spatiotopically represented in the brain. The brain is capable of representing space in many different forms (e.g. retinotopic-, environment-, head- or shoulder-centred), but we maintain that actions are represented in action-centred space, meaning that, at the cellular level, the direction of movement is defined by the activity of cells. In reaching, for example, object location is defined as the direction and distance between the or...

  13. Physical activity level and sedentary behavior among students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Augusto Santos Silva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2009v11n3p299   The objective of this study was to determine the physical activity level (PAL and sedentary behavior of students from the city of Aracaju (SE. A total of 1028 students of both genders participated in the study, with a mean age of 15.38 (2.44 years for girls and 15.24 (2.40 years for boys. Among the sample, 24.7% were children and 75.3% were adolescents, with a mean age of 12.07 (0.88 and 16.39 (1.72 years, respectively. An instrument already used in Brazilian studies was applied to identify the average time (hours watching TV per day (hTV and PAL – PAQ-C. Descriptive statistics, t-test for independent samples, Fisher’s exact test and comparison test between two proportions were used for data analysis, with the level of significance set at 5% (p≤0.05. Boys presented a significantly higher physical activity score 2.25 (0.60 than girls. The prevalence of sedentarism was 72.5, 89.3 and 85.2% in the groups of children and adolescents and in the group as a whole, respectively, for girls, and 55.4, 74.8 and 69.8% for boys. No differences in hTV were observed between genders or between sedentary and physically active students (p > 0.05. We conclude that a there is a high prevalence of “sedentary” and “very sedentary” children and adolescents; b boys present a higher PAL than girls; c adolescents are less active than children, and d the number of hTV is high in the group studied.

  14. Physical activity level and sedentary behavior among students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Jerônimo dos Santos Silva

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the physical activity level (PAL and sedentary behavior of students from the city of Aracaju (SE. A total of 1028 students of both genders participated in the study, with a mean age of 15.38 (2.44 years for girls and 15.24 (2.40 years for boys. Among the sample, 24.7% were children and 75.3% were adolescents, with a mean age of 12.07 (0.88 and 16.39 (1.72 years, respectively. An instrument already used in Brazilian studies was applied to identify the average time (hours watching TV per day (hTV and PAL – PAQ-C. Descriptive statistics, t-test for independent samples, Fisher’s exact test and comparison test between two proportions were used for data analysis, with the level of significance set at 5% (p≤0.05. Boys presented a significantly higher physical activity score 2.25 (0.60 than girls. The prevalence of sedentarism was 72.5, 89.3 and 85.2% in the groups of children and adolescents and in the group as a whole, respectively, for girls, and 55.4, 74.8 and 69.8% for boys. No differences in hTV were observed between genders or between sedentary and physically active students (p > 0.05. We conclude that a there is a high prevalence of “sedentary” and “very sedentary” children and adolescents; b boys present a higher PAL than girls; c adolescents are less active than children, and d the number of hTV is high in the group studied.

  15. La grotte Mandrin et les premières occupations du Paléolithique supérieur en Occitanie orientale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Slimak

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Le niveau supérieur de la grotte Mandrin présente une courte occupation attribuable au passage d'un groupe hiumain postérieurement à 35 000 BP (Giraud et al. à paraître. Ces éléments présentent de nettes affinités avec les séries attribuées régionalement à un Aurignacien initial méditerranéen (Bazile 1974, 1999, actuellement reconnu comme la première expression du Paléolithique supérieur dans le sud-est de la France, région où le Castelperronien n'est pas représenté (Combler 1960, 1967, 1990. La reconnaissance et la caractérisation d'un faciès de transition non reconnu jusqu'alors est en cours d'élaboration (Slimak 2004. Située sous un promontoire rocheux dominant la vallée du Rhône au sud de Montélimar (France, Fig. 1, la grotte Mandrin se présente comme un petit abri peu profond ouvert au nord. Sondée dès 1990, elle livre depuis une importante stratigraphie comprenant huit niveaux attribuables à un Paléolithique moyen récent. Au sein du niveau Protoaurignacien, les lamelles Dufour rectilignes et de grand module occupent une place prépondérante du système technique. Cette étude permet d'apporter un nouveau regard sur les systèmes techniques protoaurignaciens et élabore une synthèse régionale portant sur les premières occupations du Paléolithique supérieur reconnues dans cette région. L'aire géographique concernée par cette synthèse couvre la Provence, le Languedoc oriental, l'Ardèche et la Drôme, qui appartiennent à la frange orientale de l'Occitanie.El nivel superior de la Cueva Mandrin indica que fue ocupada por grupos humanos durante un brève période después de 35 000 BP (Giraud et al., en prensa. La industrfa leptolitica contenida en este nivel muestra claras afinidades con otras séries de la région, atribuidas a un Aurihaciense inicial (Bazile 1974, 1999, actualmente reconocido como la primera expresiôn del Paleolitico Superior en el sudeste de Francia donde no hay ocupaciones

  16. System-Level Action Required for Wide-Scale Improvement in Quality of Primary Health Care: Synthesis of Feedback from an Interactive Process to Promote Dissemination and Use of Aggregated Quality of Care Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailie, Jodie; Laycock, Alison; Matthews, Veronica; Bailie, Ross

    2016-01-01

    literacy. The findings identify areas of focus for development of barrier-driven, tailored interventions to improve health outcomes. They reinforce the importance of system-level action to improve health center performance and health outcomes, and of developing strategies to address system-wide challenges that can be adapted to local contexts.

  17. System level action required for wide-scale improvement in quality of primary healthcare: synthesis of feedback from an interactive process to promote dissemination and use of aggregated quality of care data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodie eBailie

    2016-05-01

    delivery, use of information systems and community health literacy.ConclusionsThe findings identify areas of focus for development of barrier driven, tailored interventions to improve health outcomes. They reinforce the importance of system-level action to improve health centre performance and health outcomes, and of developing strategies to address system-wide challenges that can be adapted to local contexts.

  18. Binding Action and Emotion in Social Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Francesca; Ebisch, Sjoerd J. H.; Costantini, Marcello; Salone, Anatolia; Arciero, Giampiero; Mazzola, Viridiana; Ferro, Filippo Maria; Romani, Gian Luca; Gallese, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    In social life actions are tightly linked with emotions. The integration of affective- and action-related information has to be considered as a fundamental component of appropriate social understanding. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging study aimed at investigating whether an emotion (Happiness, Anger or Neutral) dynamically expressed by an observed agent modulates brain activity underlying the perception of his grasping action. As control stimuli, participants observed the same agent either only expressing an emotion or only performing a grasping action. Our results showed that the observation of an action embedded in an emotional context (agent’s facial expression), compared with the observation of the same action embedded in a neutral context, elicits higher neural response at the level of motor frontal cortices, temporal and occipital cortices, bilaterally. Particularly, the dynamic facial expression of anger modulates the re-enactment of a motor representation of the observed action. This is supported by the evidence that observing actions embedded in the context of anger, but not happiness, compared with a neutral context, elicits stronger activity in the bilateral pre-central gyrus and inferior frontal gyrus, besides the pre-supplementary motor area, a region playing a central role in motor control. Angry faces not only seem to modulate the simulation of actions, but may also trigger motor reaction. These findings suggest that emotions exert a modulatory role on action observation in different cortical areas involved in action processing. PMID:23349792

  19. Differential Equations as Actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronkko, Mauno; Ravn, Anders P.

    1997-01-01

    We extend a conventional action system with a primitive action consisting of a differential equation and an evolution invariant. The semantics is given by a predicate transformer. The weakest liberal precondition is chosen, because it is not always desirable that steps corresponding to differential...... actions shall terminate. It is shown that the proposed differential action has a semantics which corresponds to a discrete approximation when the discrete step size goes to zero. The extension gives action systems the power to model real-time clocks and continuous evolutions within hybrid systems....

  20. Creativity as action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre; Lubart, Todd; Bonnardel, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    The present paper outlines an action theory of creativity and substantiates this approach by investigating creative expression in five different domains. We propose an action framework for the analysis of creative acts built on the assumption that creativity is a relational, inter......, science, scriptwriting, and music. Results point to complex models of action and inter-action specific for each domain and also to interesting patterns of similarity and differences between domains. These findings highlight the fact that creative action takes place not “inside” individual creators but “in...

  1. Action research: Scandinavian Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2004-01-01

    The article focus on paradigms, methods and ethics of action research in the Scandinavian countries. The special features of the action research paradigm is identified. A historical overview follows of some main action research projects in Norway, Sweden and Denmark. The tendency towards upsclae...... action research projects from organisational or small community projects yo large-scale, regional based network apporaches are also outlined and discussed. Finally, a synthesised approach of the classical, socio-technical action research approach and the large-scale network and holistic approaches...

  2. HEALTH SECTOR ACTIONS TO IMPROVE NUTRITION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reducing malnutrition-related maternal and childhood morbidity and mortality in Africa requires a systematic and coordinated strategy. This paper discusses a health sector strategy which includes: i) advocating for action in nutrition at all levels; ii) integration of the essential nutrition actions into six key contact points ...

  3. Failed fuel action plan guidelines: Special report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    The objective of this document is to provide a generic guideline that can be used to formulate a failed fuel action plan (FFAP) for specific application by a utility. This document is intended to be part of a comprehensive fuel reliability monitoring, management, and improvement program. The utilities may utilize this document as one resource in developing a failed fuel action plan. This document is not intended to be used as a failed fuel action plan standard. This document is intended to provide guidance on: management responsibilities; fuel performance parameters; cost/benefit analysis; action levels; long-term improvement methods; and data collection, analysis, and trending. 3 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  4. Alimentación y estado nutricional de los niños en zonas palúdicas de Antioquia (Colombia.Food and nutritional status among children of endemic malaria zones of Antioquia (Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Carmona-Fonseca, MD MSc*

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Malaria, parasitosis intestinales y desnutrición interactúan en los habitantes de zonas palúdicas, en particular en niños. Objetivo: Medir el estado nutricional de niños (4-10 años con malaria y algunos aspectos del consumo alimentario familiar en dos zonas maláricas del departamento de Antioquia. Metodología: Estudio transversal en niños que consultaron por paludismo. Diseño muestral aleatorio. Resultados: A Consumo alimentario familiar: 74% obtenían regularmente alimentos de criar animales menores, huerta casera o ambos; 17% recibían regularmente alimentos, dinero o ambos; consumo de alimentos fuentes de vitamina A (veces/semana: carnes-vísceras animales 1, leche y huevos 2-3 cada uno, frutas con provitamina A. Satisfacción alimentaria de requerimientos nutricionales familiares de fuentes de vitamina A: 55% (grado bajo-medio. B Estado nutricional infantil: Riesgo de desnutrición: 52% crónica, 15% aguda; parásitos intestinales patógenos 80%; promedio de hemoglobina pretratamiento 10.3 gr/dL (6.39 mmol/L y al día 30 en 11.8 gr/dL (7.32 mmol/L; promedio de retinol pretratamiento de 19.1 µg/dL (0.67 µmol/L y al día 30 31.2 µg/dL (1.09 µmol/L. Conclusiones: La desnutrición crónica amenaza a ≥50% de los niños; esa frecuencia es 3-4 veces la encontrada en Colombia. No hubo asociación estadísticamente significativa entre estado nutricional y las variables asociadas a obtención-consumo alimentario. Quizás esta ausencia de relación se deba a que las variables usadas para medir estas condiciones no sean adecuadas o se hayan medido de manera inapropiada. [Carmona-Fonseca J. Alimen-tación y estado nutricional de los niños en zonas palúdicas de Antioquia (Colombia. MedUNAB 2011; 14:94-102]._______________________Introduction: Malaria, intestinal parasites and malnutritioninteract in people of malaria areas, particularly in childrenObjective: To measure the nutritional status of children (4-10years and

  5. Egocentric Temporal Action Proposals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao Huang; Weiqiang Wang; Shengfeng He; Lau, Rynson W H

    2018-02-01

    We present an approach to localize generic actions in egocentric videos, called temporal action proposals (TAPs), for accelerating the action recognition step. An egocentric TAP refers to a sequence of frames that may contain a generic action performed by the wearer of a head-mounted camera, e.g., taking a knife, spreading jam, pouring milk, or cutting carrots. Inspired by object proposals, this paper aims at generating a small number of TAPs, thereby replacing the popular sliding window strategy, for localizing all action events in the input video. To this end, we first propose to temporally segment the input video into action atoms, which are the smallest units that may contain an action. We then apply a hierarchical clustering algorithm with several egocentric cues to generate TAPs. Finally, we propose two actionness networks to score the likelihood of each TAP containing an action. The top ranked candidates are returned as output TAPs. Experimental results show that the proposed TAP detection framework performs significantly better than relevant approaches for egocentric action detection.

  6. PTTSA Action Plan Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    The Pre-Tiger Team Self-Assessment (PTTSA) Report identified findings with respect to the way Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque, (including Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and Kauai Test Facility (KTF)) conducts its environment, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) activities. It presented Action Plan Requirements (APR) addressing these findings. The purpose of this PTTSA Action Plan Report is to assist in managing these action plan requirements by collecting, prioritizing, and estimating required resources. The specific objectives addressed by this report include: collection of requirements for the resolution of the findings presented in the PTTSA Report; consolidation of proposed Action Plan Requirements into logical Action Plan groupings for efficiency of resolution; categorization of Action Plans according to severity of the hazards represented by the findings; provision of a basis for long-range planning and issues management; documentation of the status of the proposed corrective actions; establishment of traceability of the corrective action to the original problem or issue; and integration of these plans into the existing ES ampersand H structure. The Action Plans in this report are an intermediate step between the identification of a problem or a finding in the PTTSA Report and the execution of the solution. They consist of requirements for solution, proposed actions, and an estimate of the time and (where applicable) resources required to develop the solution. This report is an input to the process of planning, resource commitment, development, testing, implementation, and maintenance of problem resolution. 2 figs

  7. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Affirmative Action Program. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Affirmative Action Program (AAP) serves as a working document that describes current policies, practices, and results in the area of affirmative action. It represents the Laboratory`s framework for an affirmative approach to increasing the representation of people of color and women in segments of our work force where they have been underrepresented and taking action to increase the employment of persons with disabilities and special disabled and Vietnam era veterans. The AAP describes the hierarchy of responsibility for Laboratory affirmative action, the mechanisms that exist for full Laboratory participation in the AAP, the policies and procedures governing recruitment at all levels, the Laboratory`s plan for monitoring, reporting, and evaluating affirmative action progress, and a description of special affirmative action programs and plans the Laboratory has used and will use in its efforts to increase the representation and retention of groups historically underrepresented in our work force.

  8. Action Research for Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    , to innovation policies combining Action Research with gender science. In the second part of the book epistemological and ontological dimensions of Action Research are discussed addressing questions of validity criteria related to Action Research, the transformation of knowledge institutions and the specific......Contemporary society encounters profound economical, socio-ecological and political crises challenging the democratic foundation of our societies. This book addresses the potentials and challenges for Action Research supporting democratic alternatives. It offers a broad spectrum of examples from...... Scandinavian Action Research showing different openings towards democratic development. The book’s first part contributes with a wide range of examples such as Action Research in relation to the Triple Helix/Mode II contexts, to design as a democratic process, to renewal of welfare work and public institutions...

  9. Staying mindful in action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    Action Learning is a well-proven method to integrate ‘task’ and ‘process’, as learning about team and self (process) takes place while delivering on a task or business challenge of real importance (task). An Action Lab® is an intensive Action Learning programme lasting for 5 days, which aims...... at balancing and integrating individual challenges and business challenges, as well as the ‘Action’ and the ‘Learning’ of Action Learning. However, in spite of the aspiration to balance and integrate ‘task’ and ‘process’, a tendency and a challenge is experienced: When deeply involved in delivering...... this tendency by sharing a study looking into what hinders and promotes mindful awareness on the process, while dealing with a business challenge in an Action Lab®. Drawing on the findings, the account of practice will share some recommendations for the Action Learning facilitator to take up the challenge...

  10. Multimodal responsive action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oshima, Sae

    ; Raymond 2003; Schegloff and Lerner 2009), including those with multimodal actions (e.g. Olsher 2004; Fasulo & Monzoni 2009). Some responsive actions can also be completed with bodily behavior alone, such as: when an agreement display is achieved by using only nonvocal actions (Jarmon 1996), when...... the recipient’s gaze shift becomes a significant part of the speaker’s turn construction (Goodwin 1980), and when head nods show the recipient’s affiliation with the speaker’s stance (Stivers 2008). Still, much room remains for extending our current understanding of responding actions that necessarily involve...... a hairstylist and a client negotiate the quality of the service that has been provided. Here, the first action is usually the stylist’s question and/or explanation of the new cut that invites the client’s assessment/(dis)agreement, accompanied with embodied actions that project an imminent self...

  11. 低速風洞試験によるMuPAL(多目的実証実験機)のDLCフラップ基本空力特性確認

    OpenAIRE

    Hozumi, Koki; Shirai, Masataka; 穂積 弘毅; 白井 正孝

    2001-01-01

    Flap-in-flap type DLC (Direct Lift Control) flaps were installed on the MuPAL (Multi-Purpose Aviation Laboratory), an in-flight simulator now being developed by the NAL and based on a Dornier Do228-200. In order to evaluate the aerodynamic performance of DLC-flaps (symmetrical deflection) and flight safety in the event of malfunction (asymmetrical deflection), the static aerodynamic characteristics were investigated using the NAL low-speed wind tunnel and a 1/6-scale model with motor-driven p...

  12. Historiografia wobec Action Francaise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Kornat

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Action Franęaise in HistoriographyFrench radical right movement, Action Franęaise belongs to those political phe- nomenon in history which are differently interpreted by historiography. Principally we have eight interpretations. First ofthem is Action Franęaise own image and identity as royalist and anti-liberal "party of order”. One of the most important historical interpretation of this movement is French historian Rene Remond’s one. In his Les Droites aujourdhui Remond argued that Action Franęaise was model example of anti-liberal Right in France and in Europe of the first half of the XX century. The most popular interpretation of Action Franęaise are two: (1 Action Franęaise as an incarnation of conservative revolution (Carl Schmitt and (2 as the ideology of "integral nationalism” (Hans Konh, Carlton Hayes. Very original concept was developed by well known German historian Ernst Nolte, who considered Action Franęaise as pro- to-fascistmovement. British thinker Isaiah Berlin and Israeli historian Zeev Sternhell interpreted Action Franęaise as revolution of "anti-Enlightment” (les anti-Lumieres. Polish philosopher Stanisław Brzozowski argued that Action Franęaise was a con- seąuence of conflict between romanticism and positivism and was sure that Action Franęaise inherited much from positivistphilosophy. Non less controversial problem is forthehistorians the excommunication of Action Franęaise by Pope Pius XI in 1926. To our days there are many opposite attempts to reconstruct of this event and its origins. For many historians Pius XI tried to defend the doctrine of the Church which seemed to him intoxicated by the "nationalist and racialist heresy”. For some other writers the Vatican policy was under German influence and this caused papai action. In 1939 another Pope Pius XII decided to abolish the condemnation from 1926.

  13. Habits as action sequences: hierarchical action control and changes in outcome value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfouli, Amir; Lingawi, Nura W; Balleine, Bernard W

    2014-11-05

    Goal-directed action involves making high-level choices that are implemented using previously acquired action sequences to attain desired goals. Such a hierarchical schema is necessary for goal-directed actions to be scalable to real-life situations, but results in decision-making that is less flexible than when action sequences are unfolded and the decision-maker deliberates step-by-step over the outcome of each individual action. In particular, from this perspective, the offline revaluation of any outcomes that fall within action sequence boundaries will be invisible to the high-level planner resulting in decisions that are insensitive to such changes. Here, within the context of a two-stage decision-making task, we demonstrate that this property can explain the emergence of habits. Next, we show how this hierarchical account explains the insensitivity of over-trained actions to changes in outcome value. Finally, we provide new data that show that, under extended extinction conditions, habitual behaviour can revert to goal-directed control, presumably as a consequence of decomposing action sequences into single actions. This hierarchical view suggests that the development of action sequences and the insensitivity of actions to changes in outcome value are essentially two sides of the same coin, explaining why these two aspects of automatic behaviour involve a shared neural structure. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Global action networks: agents for collective action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glasbergen, P.

    2010-01-01

    Global action networks (GANs) are civil society initiated multi-stakeholder arrangements that aim to fulfill a leadership role for systemic change in global governance for sustainable development. The paper develops a network approach to study some of these GANs as motivators of global collective

  15. The effective action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWitt, B.

    1987-01-01

    The concept of the effective action in quantum field theory was introduced into physics by Julian Schwinger in 1954. The effective action summarizes, in a single functional, all the quantum properties of the fields under consideration. The functional derivative of the effective action yields the effective field equations, which replace the classical field equations as descriptors of the dynamical behavior of quantized fields. Solutions of these equations are 'in-out' matrix elements of the field operators and, when substituted back into the effective action itself, yield logarithms of the corresponding 'in-out' amplitudes. The classical field equations are gauge covariant, a fact that derives from the gauge invariance of the classical action. One has learned how to construct effective actions that are similarly gauge invariant (in each order of perturbation theory) and that yield effective field equations having the covariance properties of their classical analogs. Despite this advance, problems remain, stemming from the fact that there is not one but an infinite number of gauge invariant effective actions, one for every background-covariant choice of supplementary conditions and ghost fields. Vilkovisky (1984) has argued persuasively that by requiring additionally that the effective action be invariant under local invertible changes in the choice of basic field variables, one can construct a natural unique gauge invariant effective action. This lecture will examine Vilkovisky's ideas. 3 refs

  16. Stereoscopically Observing Manipulative Actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, S; Pauwels, K; Rizzolatti, G; Orban, G A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of stereopsis to the processing of observed manipulative actions. To this end, we first combined the factors "stimulus type" (action, static control, and dynamic control), "stereopsis" (present, absent) and "viewpoint" (frontal, lateral) into a single design. Four sites in premotor, retro-insular (2) and parietal cortex operated specifically when actions were viewed stereoscopically and frontally. A second experiment clarified that the stereo-action-specific regions were driven by actions moving out of the frontoparallel plane, an effect amplified by frontal viewing in premotor cortex. Analysis of single voxels and their discriminatory power showed that the representation of action in the stereo-action-specific areas was more accurate when stereopsis was active. Further analyses showed that the 4 stereo-action-specific sites form a closed network converging onto the premotor node, which connects to parietal and occipitotemporal regions outside the network. Several of the specific sites are known to process vestibular signals, suggesting that the network combines observed actions in peripersonal space with gravitational signals. These findings have wider implications for the function of premotor cortex and the role of stereopsis in human behavior. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  17. Action Type Deontic Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Martin Mose

    2014-01-01

    A new deontic logic, Action Type Deontic Logic, is presented. To motivate this logic, a number of benchmark cases are shown, representing inferences a deontic logic should validate. Some of the benchmark cases are singled out for further comments and some formal approaches to deontic reasoning...... are evaluated with respect to the benchmark cases. After that follows an informal introduction to the ideas behind the formal semantics, focussing on the distinction between action types and action tokens. Then the syntax and semantics of Action Type Deontic Logic is presented and it is shown to meet...

  18. Immunization Action Coalition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IAC | Contact | A-Z Index | Donate | Shop | SUBSCRIBE Immunization Action Coalition Favorites ACIP Recommendations Package Inserts Additional Immunization Resources Photos Adult Vaccination Screening Checklists Ask the ...

  19. Ascetismo, gênero e poder no Baixo Império Romano: Paládio de Helenópolis e o status das devotas cristãs Asceticism, gender and power in the Late Roman Empire: Palladius and the status of the holy women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilvan Ventura da Silva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available As diversas modalidades de ascetismo feminino que vigoraram nas comunidades cristãs ao longo dos três primeiros séculos do Império tenderão a se integrar numa nova experiência religiosa que começa a se esboçar por volta de 270 para alcançar uma expansão considerável no final do Mundo Antigo: o monacato. Mediante a análise da História Lausíaca, de Paládio de Helenópolis, obra escrita por volta de 420, investigamos a posição social das ascetas e o tipo de atuação que desempenharam no interior de um movimento dominado pelos homens, como foi o movimento monástico. Além disso, analisamos a capacidade das mulheres de exercer alguma modalidade de poder no âmbito das suas comunidades locais em comparação aos homens divinos cristãos do Baixo Império.The several kinds of female asceticism observed in the Roman Empire during the first three centuries A.D. will be gathered in a new religious experience that begins around 270 A.D.: the monasticism. Throughout the analysis of the Lausiac History, written by Palladius, bishop of Hellenopolis, in Bitinia, we aim at researching about the female ascetics social position and their actions as monastic movement members. Besides, we reflect over the kind of power women could exercise in their local communities compared with the holy men.

  20. Action adaptation during natural unfolding social scenes influences action recognition and inferences made about actor beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Bruce D; Wincenciak, Joanna; Jellema, Tjeerd; Ward, James W; Barraclough, Nick E

    2016-07-01

    When observing another individual's actions, we can both recognize their actions and infer their beliefs concerning the physical and social environment. The extent to which visual adaptation influences action recognition and conceptually later stages of processing involved in deriving the belief state of the actor remains unknown. To explore this we used virtual reality (life-size photorealistic actors presented in stereoscopic three dimensions) to see how visual adaptation influences the perception of individuals in naturally unfolding social scenes at increasingly higher levels of action understanding. We presented scenes in which one actor picked up boxes (of varying number and weight), after which a second actor picked up a single box. Adaptation to the first actor's behavior systematically changed perception of the second actor. Aftereffects increased with the duration of the first actor's behavior, declined exponentially over time, and were independent of view direction. Inferences about the second actor's expectation of box weight were also distorted by adaptation to the first actor. Distortions in action recognition and actor expectations did not, however, extend across different actions, indicating that adaptation is not acting at an action-independent abstract level but rather at an action-dependent level. We conclude that although adaptation influences more complex inferences about belief states of individuals, this is likely to be a result of adaptation at an earlier action recognition stage rather than adaptation operating at a higher, more abstract level in mentalizing or simulation systems.

  1. Effect of the rally length on performance according to the final action and the playing level in high-level men’s volleyball. [Efecto de la duración de la jugada sobre el rendimiento en función de la acción final y del nivel de juego en voleibol masculino de alto nivel].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Sánchez-Moreno

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to analyze how rally length affected performance according to the final action of the rally and the playing level, as well as to identify potential critical rallies associated with rally length in high-level men’s volleyball. Thirty-one matches (5,438 rallies of the top ranking national teams were sampled from two of the premier worldwide competitions: Men’s World Championship and Men’s World League. Rallies between eight and ten seconds emerged as critical incidents of the game, changing the general trend in performance according to the final action of the rally (attack point or attack error with or without opposite team’s contact. Rallies longer than ten seconds seemed to balance the chances of success between both teams, with the team in the side-out phase losing the initial advantage of being the first team to attack. Differences were found among teams of similar level, suggesting that the ability to efficiently manage some game situations might be attributed to team’s features. Coaches may deliver drills with varying playing styles and strategies depending on the length of the really, determining the degree of risk according to the length. Resumen El objetivo de este estudio fue analizar cómo la duración de la jugada afecta al rendimiento de los equipos en función de la acción final y del nivel de juego, así como identificar las jugadas potencialmente críticas asociadas a su duración en voleibol masculino de alto nivel. Se analizaron treinta y un partidos (5438 jugadas, donde se enfrentaban las mejores selecciones nacionales clasificadas en dos de las mejores competiciones mundiales: el Campeonato del Mundo Masculino y la Liga Mundial Masculina. Las jugadas de entre ocho y diez segundos surgieron como incidentes críticos del juego alterando la tendencia general esperada respecto al rendimiento de los equipos en función de la acción final ocurrida (puntos o errores de ataque, directos o

  2. Freedom in Action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miltenburg, N. van

    2015-01-01

    Free will is the capacity to select and execute one really possible action alternative. In recent years this simple libertarian picture of our capacity to freely act has drawn much criticism. Many neuroscientists claim that we do not have a capacity to select alternative courses of action since our

  3. Talk and Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Thøger; Morsing, Mette; Thyssen, Ole

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the relationship between organizational talk and action. Focusing in particular on the temporal dimension of this relationship, that is, the potential for talk to become action over time, we put forward ideal types of organizational strategies for possible talk...

  4. Talk and Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Thøger; Morsing, Mette; Thyssen, Ole

    of organizational talk and their associated activities, the paper discusses the different ways time shape the relationship between talk and action. Acknowledging that talk gives rise to different expectations over time, we put forward ideal types of organizational strategies for possible talk-action relationships...

  5. Human Actions Made Tangible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buur, Jacob; Caglio, Agnese; Jensen, Lars Christian

    2014-01-01

    , a method developed to engage people from different backgrounds in collaboratively analysing videos with the help of physical objects. We will present one of these tools, Action Scrabble, for analysing temporal organisation of human actions. We work with a case of skilled forklift truck driving...

  6. Action Learning in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Action learning was introduced into China less than 20 years ago, but has rapidly become a valuable tool for organizations seeking to solve problems, develop their leaders, and become learning organizations. This article provides an historical overview of action learning in China, its cultural underpinnings, and five case studies. It concludes…

  7. Renormalized action improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachos, C.

    1984-01-01

    Finite lattice spacing artifacts are suppressed on the renormalized actions. The renormalized action trajectories of SU(N) lattice gauge theories are considered from the standpoint of the Migdal-Kadanoff approximation. The minor renormalized trajectories which involve representations invariant under the center are discussed and quantified. 17 references

  8. Bridging Strategies and Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Sanne

    2017-01-01

    concentrate on the way employees perceive changes. Another invention of Lewin proved to be relevant in this regard, notably action research. The application of a dialogical action research method resulted in rich empirical data, which proved the relevance of Lewin’s theoretical constructs and fed forward...

  9. Critical Utopian Action Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birger Steen; Nielsen, Kurt Aagaard

    2016-01-01

    The specific concept of critical utopian action research is presented and discussed, as to its origin, use and potentials. The inspiration from Robert Jungk and his future creating workshops is elaborated.......The specific concept of critical utopian action research is presented and discussed, as to its origin, use and potentials. The inspiration from Robert Jungk and his future creating workshops is elaborated....

  10. Mathematics in Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    December 2004-November 2007 Denmark, Hungary, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway, Slovenia and Spain have cooperated in the project Mathematics in Action (MiA). The MiA project is supported by the Grundtvig action in the Socrates program of the European Commission. The aim of the project...

  11. Introducere in Action Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Søren Witzel

    In these years action learning has become an increasing aspect of qualifying in service training of teachers in Western European countries. In this article the model of action learning which has been developed by teachers at VIA University College and introduced to the teachers at the SCAN...

  12. An Action Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Brand, Mark; Iversen, Jørgen; Mosses, Peter David

    2004-01-01

    constructs underlying Core ML. The paper also describes the Action Environment, a new environment supporting use and validation of ASDF descriptions. The Action Environment has been implemented on top of the ASF+SDF Meta-Environment, exploiting recent advances in techniques for integration of different...... formalisms, and inheriting all the main features of the Meta-Environment....

  13. Photosensitized herbicidal action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zweig, A; Nachtigall, G W [American Cyanamid Co., Stamford, Conn.

    1975-12-01

    The herbicidal action produced by the colorless hydrocarbon fluoranthene sprayed on the leaves of growing plants did not occur when uv radiation was removed from the light to which the plants are exposed. If the uv component of the light under which the plants were grown was augmented, the herbicidal effect of fluoranthene was increased. The mechanism of this photodynamic action is discussed.

  14. Preferential Affirmative Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Derrick A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the philosophical rationale for preferential affirmative action presented by Daniel C. Maguire in "A New American Justice." Maintains that self-interest bars present society's acceptance of Maguire's theories of justice, as demonstrated in negative reactions to the Harvard Law Review's affirmative action plan. (MJL)

  15. Biological Action Spectra (invited paper)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruijl, F.R. de

    2000-07-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation induces a wide variety of biological responses: ranging in humans from well-known short-term effects like sunburn to long-term effects like skin cancer. The wavelength dependencies ('action spectra') of the responses can differ significantly, depending on the UV-targeted molecules (their absorption spectra), their localisation (transmission to the target depth) and the photochemical reactions involved (e.g. quantum yields, competing reaction). An action spectrum (e.g. of sunburn) is usually determined in a wavelength by wavelength analysis of the response. This is not always possible (e.g. in case of skin cancer), and an action spectrum may then be extracted mathematically from differences in responses to broadband UV sources of various spectral compositions (yielding 'biological spectral weights'). However, relative spectral weights may shift with exposure levels and contributions from different wavelengths may not always add up. Under these circumstances conventional analyses will yield different action spectra for different experimental conditions. (author)

  16. Actions and Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monthoux, Pierre Guillet de

    2017-01-01

    as Aristotelian syllogistic reasoning. Her constant analytical care to defend a philosophy of action against metaphysical assumptions and taken-for-granted “psychologisms” shows that an action-perspective is as analytic as ever one of decision-making. What differs is that the latter seems constantly attracted......How management philosophy is conceived depends on if pragmatism is acknowledged or not! After having been under the main domination of management science both research and education has until recently widened its scope from a decision-making to an action-perspective. It seems to be a recent...... reconnection to pragmatism that makes the 2011 Carnegie report propose to rethink management in liberal arts terms, whilst the vastly influential 1959 Carnegie Pierson report distanced itself from American pragmatism thus focusing on decisions and forgetting actions. Actions may contain decisions and choices...

  17. A estrutura do palácio do Itamaraty em Brasília: Aspectos históricos e tecnológicos de projeto, execução, intervenções e manutenção

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Evaristo; Clímaco, João; Nepomuceno, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    O Palácio do Itamaraty em Brasília é uma obra prima na Esplanada dos Ministérios da capital do Brasil, a única cidade construída no século XX laureada pela Unesco como Patrimônio Cultural da Humanidade, em 1989. O Palácio denota o gênio de seus criadores - o arquiteto Oscar Niemeyer e engenheiro estrutural Joaquim Cardozo, e a ousadia e qualidade dos profissionais de projeto e construção do Brasil. Baseado em documentos originais e depoimentos do pessoal envolvido na construção, entre 1963 e ...

  18. Theater and action research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tofteng, Ditte Maria Børglum; Husted, Mia

    2011-01-01

    Action research on marginalization and exclusion often seeks to examine relations between recognition, respect, and inclusion, but addressing these topics is difficult. Theatre-based action research opens up a new way to communicate and make visible knowledge and experiences from below that have...... difficulties reaching the public agenda or influencing structures of power. In this article we follow the creation of a play and of scenes that address the life, sufferings, and wishes of unemployed people. The skills of actors, writers, and producers are worked into a critical utopian action research project...

  19. Action Investment Energy Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Laursen, Simon; Srba, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the formalism of action investment energy games where we study the trade-off between investments limited by given budgets and resource constrained (energy) behavior of the underlying system. More specifically, we consider energy games extended with costs of enabling actions and fixed...... budgets for each player. We ask the question whether for any Player 2 investment there exists a Player 1 investment such that Player 1 wins the resulting energy game. We study the action investment energy game for energy intervals with both upper and lower bounds, and with a lower bound only, and give...

  20. Hungarian climate change action plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molnar, S.; Takacs, T. [Systemexpert Consulting Ltd., Budapest (Hungary); Arpasi, M. [MOL, Budapest (Hungary); Farago, T.; Palvoelgyi, T. [Ministry for Environment and Regional Policy, Budapest (Hungary); Harnos, Z. [Univ. of Horticulture, Budapest (Hungary); Lontay, Z. [EGI-Contracting Engineering Co. Ltd., Budapest (Hungary); Somogyi, Z. [Forest Research Inst., Budapest (Hungary); Tajthy, T. [Univ. of Technology, Budapest (Hungary)

    1998-12-31

    In 1994--1996, within the framework of the US Country Studies Program, the Hungarian Country Study Team developed the national greenhouse gas emission inventory, and elaborated the mitigation options for the different sectors of the economy. In 1997, the development of a National Action Plan was begun as the continuation of this work. Results of the inventory study showed that greenhouse gas emissions decreased from the selected base level (i.e., from the yearly average emissions of 1985--1987) until 1994 by cca. 25%. However, this decrease was primarily caused by the deep economic recession. Therefore the policy makers have to face the problem of economic recovery without a relevant increase of greenhouse gas emissions in the near future. This is the main focus of the mitigation analysis and the National Action Plan.

  1. Brain-to-brain hyperclassification reveals action-specific motor mapping of observed actions in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Dmitry; Lachat, Fanny; Peltola, Tomi; Lahnakoski, Juha M; Koistinen, Olli-Pekka; Glerean, Enrico; Vehtari, Aki; Hari, Riitta; Sams, Mikko; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2017-01-01

    Seeing an action may activate the corresponding action motor code in the observer. It remains unresolved whether seeing and performing an action activates similar action-specific motor codes in the observer and the actor. We used novel hyperclassification approach to reveal shared brain activation signatures of action execution and observation in interacting human subjects. In the first experiment, two "actors" performed four types of hand actions while their haemodynamic brain activations were measured with 3-T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The actions were videotaped and shown to 15 "observers" during a second fMRI experiment. Eleven observers saw the videos of one actor, and the remaining four observers saw the videos of the other actor. In a control fMRI experiment, one of the actors performed actions with closed eyes, and five new observers viewed these actions. Bayesian canonical correlation analysis was applied to functionally realign observers' and actors' fMRI data. Hyperclassification of the seen actions was performed with Bayesian logistic regression trained on actors' data and tested with observers' data. Without the functional realignment, between-subjects accuracy was at chance level. With the realignment, the accuracy increased on average by 15 percentage points, exceeding both the chance level and the accuracy without functional realignment. The highest accuracies were observed in occipital, parietal and premotor cortices. Hyperclassification exceeded chance level also when the actor did not see her own actions. We conclude that the functional brain activation signatures underlying action execution and observation are partly shared, yet these activation signatures may be anatomically misaligned across individuals.

  2. Safety and efficacy of diaphragm pacing in patients with respiratory insufficiency due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (DiPALS): a multicentre, open-label, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    was shorter in the non-invasive ventilation plus pacing group than in the non-invasive ventilation alone group (median 11·0 months [95% CI 8·3-13·6] vs 22·5 months [13·6-not reached]; adjusted hazard ratio 2·27, 95% CI 1·22-4·25; p=0·009). 28 (76%) patients died in the pacing group and 19 (51%) patients died in the non-invasive ventilation alone group. We recorded 162 adverse events (5·9 events per person-year) in the pacing group, of which 46 events were serious, compared with 81 events (2·5 events per person-year) in the non-invasive ventilation alone group, of which 31 events were serious. Addition of diaphragm pacing to standard care with non-invasive ventilation was associated with decreased survival in patients with ALS. Our results suggest that diaphragmatic pacing should not be used as a routine treatment for patients with ALS in respiratory failure. The National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment Programme; the Motor Neurone Disease Association of England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Copyright © 2015 DiPALS Study Group Collaborators. Open Access article distributed under the terms of CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Commitment to action. Population Action International.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, S

    1994-01-01

    The national chair of Population Action International (formerly the Population Crisis Committee), Robin Chandler Duke, is a crusader for women's reproductive rights. She was in Bangladesh in 1971 during its civil war. Soldiers would rape young Muslim women, and their families would reject them when they became pregnant. The head of the exiled government agreed to let physicians from IPPF perform abortions on these women, which allowed families to take them back. Opposition to the abortions arose, however. This experience in Bangladesh sparked Ms. Duke's interest in population control. Her years as the wife of a US diplomat granted her access to powerful people worldwide. Her predecessor, retired US Army General Bill Draper, called Ms. Duke from his death bed in 1974 to ask her to be national chair of PAI. She served as a delegate in various international meetings, e.g., the 1980 UNESCO meetings in Belgrade. Spain and Luxembourg honored her for her work of campaigning for women's reproductive rights. She believes that rapid population growth is the most significant problem in the world today. It exacerbates poverty, environmental destruction, and political instability. She believes that universal availability of high quality, voluntary family planning services, including safe abortion, is needed to save humanity from the vicious cycle. Since family planning, sex education, and abortion are the most personal and sensitive parts of people's lives, Population Action frames family planning in the context of basic health care. AIDS complicates the issue, because contraception is no longer limited to birth control. Even though the organization realizes that sexual abstinence is the best way to avoid AIDS, it tries to educate female teenagers not to let boys coerce them to have sex. If they do, have sex Population Action advocates condom use. Ms. Duke cites the family planning successes of Indonesia, Zimbabwe, and Thailand.

  4. 'Action 2016': AREVA's strategic action plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, Patricia; Briand, Pauline; Floquet-Daubigeon, Fleur; Michaut, Maxime; De Scorbiac, Marie; Du Repaire, Philippine

    2011-01-01

    On December 13, 2011, Luc Oursel, CEO, and Pierre Aubouin, Chief Financial Officer presented the group's strategic plan for the period 2012-2016. The plan has been drawn up collectively and is based on a thorough-going analysis and a realistic assessment of perspectives for all group activities and associated resources. Development of nuclear and renewable energies: the fundamentals are unchanged. In this context, the German decision remains an isolated case and the great majority of nuclear programs around the world have been confirmed. More conservative in its projections than the International Energy Agency, the group expects growth of 2.2% annually, reaching 583 GW of installed nuclear capacity by 2030, against 378 GW today. However, the Fukushima accident will lead to delays in launching new programs. 'Action 2016' plan aims to consolidate AREVA's leadership in nuclear energy and become a leading player in renewable energy. The group's strategic action plan 'Action 2016' is based on the following strategic choices: - commercial priority given to value creation, - selectivity in investments, - strengthening of the financial structure. These demand an improvement in the group's performance by 2015. This plan makes nuclear safety a strategic priority for the industrial and commercial performance of the group. This ambitious performance plan for the period 2012-2016 will give the group the wherewithal to withstand a temporary slowdown in the market resulting from the Fukushima accident and to deliver safe and sustainable growth of the business. The plan sets out the strategic direction for the group's employees for the years ahead: taking advantage of the expected growth in nuclear and renewable energies, targeted investment programs, and return to self-financing as of 2014

  5. Stabilizing bottomless action theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greensite, J.; Halpern, M.B.

    1983-12-01

    The authors show how to construct the Euclidean quantum theory corresponding to classical actions which are unbounded from below. The method preserves the classical limit, the large-N limit, and the perturbative expansion of the unstabilized theories. (Auth.)

  6. The Body in Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Thor

    2008-01-01

    This article is about how to describe an agent's awareness of her bodily movements when she is aware of executing an action for a reason. Against current orthodoxy, I want to defend the claim that the agent's experience of moving has an epistemic place in the agent's awareness of her own intentio......This article is about how to describe an agent's awareness of her bodily movements when she is aware of executing an action for a reason. Against current orthodoxy, I want to defend the claim that the agent's experience of moving has an epistemic place in the agent's awareness of her own...... intentional action. In "The problem," I describe why this should be thought to be problematic. In "Motives for denying epistemic role," I state some of the main motives for denying that bodily awareness has any epistemic role to play in the content of the agent's awareness of her own action. In "Kinaesthetic...

  7. Sustainability and Entrepreneurial Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Steffen T.; Anderson, Alistair

    Abstract Objectives - This paper explores how entrepreneurial action can lead to environmental sustainability. It builds on the assumption that the creation of sustainble practices is one of the most important challenges facing the global society, and that entrepreneurial action is a vital......: resource oriented sustainable entrepreneurial action.  Approach - The paper uses a case study approach to build deeper theoretical knowledge of environmentally sustainable entrepreneurship.  Results - The paper identifies and analyses a distinct form of sustainable entrepreneurship -  resource oriented...... entrepreneurship - which uses bricolage in various ways to create sustainable solutions. Implications and value - The concept of resource oriented sustainable entrepreneurship contributes to the theoretical understanding of how entrepreneurial action can support sustainability, Furthermore the case study has...

  8. Asthma action plan

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2014-01-01

    This action plans allow each child (or parent/carer) to record his or her asthma treatment to help manage their asthma when they are well, when their symptoms get worse and when they are suffering an asthma attack.

  9. Perception, Action, and Consciousness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    What is the relationship between perception and action, between an organism and its environment, in explaining consciousness? These are issues at the heart of philosophy of mind and the cognitive sciences. This book explores the relationship between perception and action from a variety of interdi......What is the relationship between perception and action, between an organism and its environment, in explaining consciousness? These are issues at the heart of philosophy of mind and the cognitive sciences. This book explores the relationship between perception and action from a variety...... of interdisciplinary perspectives, ranging from theoretical discussion of concepts to findings from recent scientific studies. It incorporates contributions from leading philosophers, psychologists, neuroscientists, and an artificial intelligence theorist. The contributions take a range of positions with respect...

  10. Groupoid Actions on Fractafolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Marius; Kumjian, Alex

    2014-06-01

    We define a bundle over a totally disconnected set such that each fiber is homeomorphic to a fractal blowup. We prove that there is a natural action of a Renault-Deaconu groupoid on our fractafold bundle and that the resulting action groupoid is a Renault-Deaconu groupoid itself. We also show that when the bundle is locally compact the associated C^*-algebra is primitive and has a densely defined lower-semicontinuous trace.

  11. Action, Passion, Crises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Goldberg

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The title of this speech is taken from a remark of the renowned Judge Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr: “When we were young our hearts were touched with fire...[and as]...life is action and passion, it is required of [one] that [one] should share the passion and action of [one’s] time, at the peril of being judged not to have lived [...

  12. Tonopah Test Range Environmental Restoration Corrective Action Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the status (closed, closed in place, or closure in progress) of the Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and Corrective Action Units (CAUs) at the Tonopah Test Range. CASs and CAUs where contaminants were either not detected or were cleaned up to within regulatory action levels are summarized

  13. Motor Intentions and Non-Observational Knowledge of Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Olle; Brozzo, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    the action only down to the level of the agent’s habits and skills. Markos Valaris (2015) argues that, because of this, the standard story cannot make sense of the deep reach of our non-observational knowledge of action. He concludes that we therefore have to jettison its conception of actions as mindless...... bodily movements animated from the outside by intentions. Here we defend the standard story. We can make sense of the reach of non-observational knowledge of action once we reject the following two assumptions: (i) that an intended habitual or skilled action is a so-called basic action—that is, an action...

  14. Improved lattice fermion action for heavy quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong-Gwi; Hashimoto, Shoji; Jüttner, Andreas; Kaneko, Takashi; Marinkovic, Marina; Noaki, Jun-Ichi; Tsang, Justus Tobias

    2015-01-01

    We develop an improved lattice action for heavy quarks based on Brillouin-type fermions, that have excellent energy-momentum dispersion relation. The leading discretization errors of O(a) and O(a"2) are eliminated at tree-level. We carry out a scaling study of this improved Brillouin fermion action on quenched lattices by calculating the charmonium energy-momentum dispersion relation and hyperfine splitting. We present a comparison to standard Wilson fermions and domain-wall fermions.

  15. Levels of potential bioactive compounds including carotenoids, vitamin C and phenolic compounds, and expression of their cognate biosynthetic genes vary significantly in different varieties of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) grown under uniform cultural conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcarcel, Jesus; Reilly, Kim; Gaffney, Michael; O'Brien, Nora M

    2016-02-01

    In addition to their high carbohydrate content, potatoes are also an important dietary source of vitamin C and bioactive secondary metabolites, including phenolic compounds and carotenoids, which have been suggested to play a role in human health. The expression of genes encoding key enzymes involved in the synthesis of these compounds was assessed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and compared to the accumulation of the corresponding product in seven potato varieties showing contrasting levels of metabolite accumulation. Strong positive correlations were found between phenolic content in the flesh of tubers and transcript levels of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and chalcone synthase (CHS) genes. The expression of PAL and CHS was also related to that of AN1, a transcription factor involved in the synthesis of anthocyanins, suggesting that these genes are regulated in a coordinated manner. No clear relationship was found between transcript levels of phytoene synthase (PSY) or L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH) genes and total carotenoid or vitamin C accumulation, respectively. Data indicate that levels of total phenolic and flavonoid compounds in potato are controlled primarily by PAL and CHS gene expression. Transcript levels of PSY and GLDH did not control accumulation of carotenoids or vitamin C. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. One safety critical indicators model for regulatory actions on nuclear power plants based on a level 1 PSA; Um modelo de indicadores criticos de seguranca para acoes regulatorias em usinas nucleares baseado em uma APS nivel 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Jefferson Borges

    2006-03-15

    This study presents a general methodology to the establishment, selection and use of safety indicators for a two loop PWR plant, as Angra 1. The study performed identifies areas considered critical for the plant operational safety. For each of these areas, strategic sub-areas are defined. For each strategic sub-area, specific safety indicators are defined. These proposed Safety Indicators are based on the contribution to risk considering a quantitative risk analysis. For each safety indicator, a goal, a bounded interval and proper bases are developed, to allow for a clear and comprehensive individual behavior evaluation. Additionally, an integrated evaluation of the indicators, using expert systems, was done to obtain an overview of the plant general safety. This methodology can be used for identifying situations where the plant safety is challenged, by giving a general overview of the plant operational condition. Additionally, this study can also identify eventual room for improvements by generating suggestions and recommendations, as a complement for regulatory actions and inspections, focusing resources on eventual existing weaknesses, in order to increase or maintain a high pattern of operational safety. (author)

  17. Climate Action: Now or Never

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auverlot, Dominique; Beeker, Etienne; Venturi, Richard

    2016-04-01

    The success of the Paris Agreement in rallying the world to take collective action against climate change and global warming has highlighted the stark challenge that lays ahead: Humankind must achieve a net zero carbon emissions target by the second half of this century. If the goal of keeping warming within 2 deg. C is to be met, all countries will have to reduce their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by about 30% more than the amount that was pledged in the run-up to the Paris conference in December 2015. This makes the action taken over the next decade absolutely critical in reaching this goal. The fact that affordable fossil fuels are likely to remain readily available is certain to complicate this collective effort even further. Together with the US and China, the European Union will have to go beyond its goal of reducing its emissions by 40% of its 1990 levels by 2030. This means it will have to both lower its consumption of fossil fuels - coal in particular - and create a credible carbon price signal for its economy by establishing a floor price in its Emissions Trading System (ETS) and possibly a European carbon tax. France, for its part, must concentrate on reducing emissions from transport, residential and commercial housing and agriculture as its emissions from electricity generation are already very low. Having brought down its emissions by close to 19% since 1990, France is clearly committed to taking climate action. The economic crisis notwithstanding, this reduction comes mostly from the manufacturing sector and energy production itself. However, if the country is to reach carbon neutrality by the second half of the 21. century without hampering its competitiveness, it will have to rethink the scope and rate of action to be taken. (authors)

  18. Effects of Security actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Ramona; Andersson-Sköld, Yvonne; Nyberg, Lars; Johansson, Magnus

    2010-05-01

    In a project funded by the Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency, the effort and work to reduce different kinds of accidents are being evaluated. The project wants to illuminate the links between actions and outcome, so we can learn from today's performance and in the future select more effective measures and overall deal with accidents more efficiently. The project ESS covers the field of frequent accidents such as sliding accidents at home, in house fires and less common accidents such as chemical and land fill accidents up to even more rare accidents such as natural accidents and hazards. In the ESS project SGI (Swedish geotechnical institute) will evaluate the work and effort concerning various natural hazards limited to landslides, erosion and flooding. The aim is to investigate how municipalities handle, especially prevention, of such natural disasters today. The project includes several aspects such as: • which are the driving forces for risk analysis in a municipality • do one use risk mapping (and what type) in municipal risk analysis • which aspects are most important when selecting preventive measures • in which way do one learn from past accidents • and from previous accidents elsewhere, by for example use existing databases • etc There are many aspects that play a role in a well-functioning safety promotion work. The overall goal is to examine present work and activities, highlight what is well functioning and identify weak points. The aim is to find out where more resources are needed and give suggestions for a more efficient security work. This includes identification of the most efficient "tools" in use or needed. Such tools can be education, directives, funding, more easily available maps and information regarding previous accidents and preventive measures etc. The project will result in recommendations for more effective ways to deal with landslides, erosion and flooding. Since different kinds of problems can occur depending on level of

  19. Flood action plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slopek, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    Safe operating procedures developed by TransAlta Utilities for dealing with flooding, resulting from upstream dam failures or extreme rainfalls, were presented. Several operating curves developed by Monenco AGRA were described, among them the No Overtopping Curve (NOC), the Safe Filling Curve (SFC), the No Spill Curve (NSC) and the Guaranteed Fill Curve (GFC). The concept of an operational comfort zone was developed and defined. A flood action plan for all operating staff was created as a guide in case of a flooding incident. Staging of a flood action plan workshop was described. Dam break scenarios pertinent to the Bow River were developed for subsequent incorporation into a Flood Action Plan Manual. Evaluation of the technical presentations made during workshops were found them to have been effective in providing operating staff with a better understanding of the procedures that they would perform in an emergency. 8 figs

  20. Facilitating Dissident Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thydal, Signe; Svensson, Christian Franklin

    2018-01-01

    Firefund.net. crowdfunds and provides resources for direct action movements. The organisation positions itself within a political struggle to create a global solidarity network. Firefund.net’s challenges and possibilities are analysed in relation to juridical issues and issues of control and shar......Firefund.net. crowdfunds and provides resources for direct action movements. The organisation positions itself within a political struggle to create a global solidarity network. Firefund.net’s challenges and possibilities are analysed in relation to juridical issues and issues of control...... to support radical initiatives without breaking the law: some activists sympathise with movements in a juridical grey zone. Both issues are relevant to social movements and current direct action....

  1. Mitigation Action Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) focuses on mitigation commitments stated in the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Specific commitments and mitigation implementation actions are listed in Appendix A-Mitigation Actions, and form the central focus of this MAP. They will be updated as needed to allow for organizational, regulatory, or policy changes. It is the intent of DOE to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental, safety, and health laws and regulations. Eighty-six specific commitments were identified in the SEIS and associated ROD which pertain to continued operation of NPR-1 with petroleum production at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER). The mitigation measures proposed are expected to reduce impacts as much as feasible, however, as experience is gained in actual implementation of these measures, some changes may be warranted.

  2. Immigration Enforcement Actions - Annual Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Each year, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) undertakes immigration enforcement actions involving hundreds of thousands of foreign nationals. These actions...

  3. Controversies on affirmative action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Mesić

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Affirmative action was launched by American presidents J.F. Kennedy and L.B. Johnson, yet by ironic historical accident it attained its greatest expansion and most radical form during R. Nixon’s conservative administration. Affirmative action was originally a government programme aimed at improving the social position of Afro-Americans, mostly in the sphere of employment and education, as a kind of compensation for racial discrimination, and also other forms of social injustice suffered by minority and underprivileged groups. Its goal was to increase the proportion of Afro-Americans, and later members of other minorities, as well as women, in higher education institutions and in various types of employment. It was supported by many social researchers and activists. Law courts, namely their verdicts and explanations in the case of precedents, had an especially important role in the debate on affirmative action. Political conservatives attacked various affirmative action programmes (especially preferential enrolment quotas for minority students, basing their criticism on the American constitutional principles on equal rights for every citizen. Market conservatives, furthermore, claimed that the government’s policy of racial preference brought into question the very basis of the capital system (competition and at the same time was not in the interest of the Afro-American working class. Namely, the social strata that profited most was the relatively affluent segment of the Afro-American community, which only increased economic and social differences within the latter. Recently the debate on affirmative action in the US has not been limited only to two opposing sides (liberals and conservatives. More and more scientists and other participants have recognised the negative aspects and also the failures of affirmative action, while at the same time refuting conservative opinions and goals.

  4. Characterizations of proper actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biller, Harald

    2004-03-01

    Three kinds of proper actions of increasing strength are defined. We prove that the three definitions specialize to the definitions by Bourbaki, by Palais and by Baum, Connes and Higson in their respective settings. The third of these, which thus turns out to be the strongest, originally only concerns actions of second countable locally compact groups on metrizable spaces. In this situation, it is shown to coincide with the other two definitions if the total space locally has the Lindelöf property and the orbit space is regular.

  5. Genre as Fictional Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auken, Sune

    2014-01-01

    The arcticle is an interdisciplinary study between literary and rhetorical genre research. Its starting point is the well-deserved leading position held by Rhetorical Genre Studies (RGS). The article proposes a scholarly collaboration between Literary Studies and RGS and posits one possible start...... starting point for this collaboration by utilizing Carolyn Miller´s central concept of "Genre as Social Action" as a way to analyze literary characters´ social actions within narratives through an interpretation of their uses of genre....

  6. Improvisation in Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2003-01-01

    The paper discusses the role of extemporaneous action and bricolage in designing and implementing information systems in organizations. We report a longitudinal field study of design and implementation of a Web-based groupware application in a multinational corporation. We adopt a sensemaking...... perspective to analyze the dynamics of this process and show that improvisational action and bricolage (making do with the materials at hand) played a vital role in the development of the application. Finally, we suggest that this case study provides an occasion to reconsider how we conceptualize information...

  7. Technologies as incarnated action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schraube, Ernst

    Contemporary conceptualizations of technology go beyond the traditional interpretation of created things as simply neutral means to an end. They theorize technologies as objects, which embody regimes of power (the theory of technological politics), or scripts (actor-network theory), or values (cr...... represent incarnated or reified actions. I will conclude that an understanding of human activity today has to embrace an imagination of how the inherent action principles of the objects situate the activities and relationships of the subjects to themselves and to others....

  8. Low level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 1: mechanisms of action, dosimetric, and safety considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecha, Judith A. E. M.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Nair, Raj G.; Epstein, Joel B.; Sonis, Stephen T.; Elad, Sharon; Hamblin, Michael R.; Barasch, Andrei; Migliorati, Cesar A.; Milstein, Dan M. J.; Genot, Marie-Thérèse; Lansaat, Liset; van der Brink, Ron; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; van Diessen, Judi; de Lange, Jan; Smeele, Ludi E.; Schubert, Mark M.; Bensadoun, René-Jean

    2016-01-01

    There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM), for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together with a

  9. Correlation of Gas Permeability in a Metal-Organic Framework MIL-101(Cr)-Polysulfone Mixed-Matrix Membrane with Free Volume Measurements by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeazet, Harold B Tanh; Koschine, Tönjes; Staudt, Claudia; Raetzke, Klaus; Janiak, Christoph

    2013-10-25

    Hydrothermally stable particles of the metal-organic framework MIL-101(Cr) were incorporated into a polysulfone (PSF) matrix to produce mixed-matrix or composite membranes with excellent dispersion of MIL-101 particles and good adhesion within the polymer matrix. Pure gas (O2, N2, CO2 and CH4) permeation tests showed a significant increase of gas permeabilities of the mixed-matrix membranes without any loss in selectivity. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) indicated that the increased gas permeability is due to the free volume in the PSF polymer and the added large free volume inside the MIL-101 particles. The trend of the gas transport properties of the composite membranes could be reproduced by a Maxwell model.

  10. Correlation of Gas Permeability in a Metal-Organic Framework MIL-101(Cr)–Polysulfone Mixed-Matrix Membrane with Free Volume Measurements by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeazet, Harold B. Tanh; Koschine, Tönjes; Staudt, Claudia; Raetzke, Klaus; Janiak, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Hydrothermally stable particles of the metal-organic framework MIL-101(Cr) were incorporated into a polysulfone (PSF) matrix to produce mixed-matrix or composite membranes with excellent dispersion of MIL-101 particles and good adhesion within the polymer matrix. Pure gas (O2, N2, CO2 and CH4) permeation tests showed a significant increase of gas permeabilities of the mixed-matrix membranes without any loss in selectivity. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) indicated that the increased gas permeability is due to the free volume in the PSF polymer and the added large free volume inside the MIL-101 particles. The trend of the gas transport properties of the composite membranes could be reproduced by a Maxwell model. PMID:24957061

  11. Action preferences and the anticipation of action outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mann, D.L.; Schaefers, T.; Canal Bruland, R.

    2014-01-01

    Skilled performers of time-constrained motor actions acquire information about the action preferences of their opponents in an effort to better anticipate the outcome of that opponent's actions. However, there is reason to doubt that knowledge of an opponent's action preferences would unequivocally

  12. Evaluating the Consistency of the 1982–1999 NDVI Trends in the Iberian Peninsula across Four Time-series Derived from the AVHRR Sensor: LTDR, GIMMS, FASIR, and PAL-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Segura, Domingo; Liras, Elisa; Tabik, Siham; Paruelo, José; Cabello, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Successive efforts have processed the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensor archive to produce Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) datasets (i.e., PAL, FASIR, GIMMS, and LTDR) under different corrections and processing schemes. Since NDVI datasets are used to evaluate carbon gains, differences among them may affect nations’ carbon budgets in meeting international targets (such as the Kyoto Protocol). This study addresses the consistency across AVHRR NDVI datasets in the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal) by evaluating whether their 1982–1999 NDVI trends show similar spatial patterns. Significant trends were calculated with the seasonal Mann-Kendall trend test and their spatial consistency with partial Mantel tests. Over 23% of the Peninsula (N, E, and central mountain ranges) showed positive and significant NDVI trends across the four datasets and an additional 18% across three datasets. In 20% of Iberia (SW quadrant), the four datasets exhibited an absence of significant trends and an additional 22% across three datasets. Significant NDVI decreases were scarce (croplands in the Guadalquivir and Segura basins, La Mancha plains, and Valencia). Spatial consistency of significant trends across at least three datasets was observed in 83% of the Peninsula, but it decreased to 47% when comparing across the four datasets. FASIR, PAL, and LTDR were the most spatially similar datasets, while GIMMS was the most different. The different performance of each AVHRR dataset to detect significant NDVI trends (e.g., LTDR detected greater significant trends (both positive and negative) and in 32% more pixels than GIMMS) has great implications to evaluate carbon budgets. The lack of spatial consistency across NDVI datasets derived from the same AVHRR sensor archive, makes it advisable to evaluate carbon gains trends using several satellite datasets and, whether possible, independent/additional data sources to contrast. PMID:22205868

  13. Evaluating the consistency of the 1982-1999 NDVI trends in the Iberian Peninsula across four time-series derived from the AVHRR sensor: LTDR, GIMMS, FASIR, and PAL-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Segura, Domingo; Liras, Elisa; Tabik, Siham; Paruelo, José; Cabello, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Successive efforts have processed the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensor archive to produce Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) datasets (i.e., PAL, FASIR, GIMMS, and LTDR) under different corrections and processing schemes. Since NDVI datasets are used to evaluate carbon gains, differences among them may affect nations' carbon budgets in meeting international targets (such as the Kyoto Protocol). This study addresses the consistency across AVHRR NDVI datasets in the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal) by evaluating whether their 1982-1999 NDVI trends show similar spatial patterns. Significant trends were calculated with the seasonal Mann-Kendall trend test and their spatial consistency with partial Mantel tests. Over 23% of the Peninsula (N, E, and central mountain ranges) showed positive and significant NDVI trends across the four datasets and an additional 18% across three datasets. In 20% of Iberia (SW quadrant), the four datasets exhibited an absence of significant trends and an additional 22% across three datasets. Significant NDVI decreases were scarce (croplands in the Guadalquivir and Segura basins, La Mancha plains, and Valencia). Spatial consistency of significant trends across at least three datasets was observed in 83% of the Peninsula, but it decreased to 47% when comparing across the four datasets. FASIR, PAL, and LTDR were the most spatially similar datasets, while GIMMS was the most different. The different performance of each AVHRR dataset to detect significant NDVI trends (e.g., LTDR detected greater significant trends (both positive and negative) and in 32% more pixels than GIMMS) has great implications to evaluate carbon budgets. The lack of spatial consistency across NDVI datasets derived from the same AVHRR sensor archive, makes it advisable to evaluate carbon gains trends using several satellite datasets and, whether possible, independent/additional data sources to contrast.

  14. Unconventional Gas Resources in the Paleozoic of Central Europe Ressources de gaz non conventionnels dans le Paléozoïque de l’Europe Centrale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Littke R.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Whereas gas production from unconventional reserves has greatly increased over the past decades, there is still a largely unexplored potential in the Paleozoic of Central Europe. For this area, the paper summarizes some important aspects of the geology of tight sandstone gas reservoirs, gas shales and coalbed methane. Tight sandstones with low permeabilities are especially present in the Permian (Rotliegend Formation of The Netherlands and northern Germany, but also in the underlying Carboniferous. There is already active production from some of these reservoirs. Further development greatly depends on understanding of gas charge as well as the regional distribution of porosity and permeability which in turn depend on facies and diagenesis. In contrast exploration for gas shales is just at the very beginning. Whereas Mesozoic shales in the southern Lower Saxony Basin have to be regarded as prime targets due to thickness, maturity and organic matter content, there are additional targets in the Mississippian, but also in older rocks. Currently an international gas shale research programme (Gas shales in Europe, GASH gathers relevant data for these units. Coalbed methane exploration started already about 20 years ago in the Ruhr Basin, but was not successful at that time due to small flow rates. On the other hand, production from abandoned coal mines provided substantial amounts of gas. Due to the abundance of coal seams and the suitable maturity conditions and gas contents, there is a high potential for future substantial coalbed methane in the area. Alors que l’extraction du gaz naturel des gisements non conventionnels a fortement augmenté ces dernières dizaines d’années, un large potentiel de ressources reste inexploré dans les couches paléozoïques de l’Europe Centrale. Cet article présente, pour cette région, quelques aspects importants de la géologie des grès de faible perméabilité (tight gas sands, des gaz de schiste (gas

  15. Our actions in my mind: Motor imagery of joint action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesper, Cordula; Knoblich, Günther; Sebanz, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    How do people imagine performing actions together? The present study investigated motor imagery of joint actions that requires integrating one's own and another's part of an action. In two experiments, individual participants imagined jumping alone or jointly next to an imagined partner. The joint...... condition required coordinating one's own imagined actions with an imagined partner's actions to synchronize landing times. We investigated whether the timing of participants' own imagined jumps would reflect the difference in jump distance to their imagined partner's jumps. The results showed...... of joint jumping. These findings link research on motor imagery and joint action, demonstrating that individuals are able to integrate simulations of different parts of a joint action....

  16. Jump into Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Stephen; Cohen, Ann; Meyer, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Jump Into Action (JIA) is a school-based team-taught program to help fifth-grade students make healthy food choices and be more active. The JIA team (physical education teacher, classroom teacher, school nurse, and parent) work together to provide a supportive environment as students set goals to improve food choices and increase activity.…

  17. Economics Action Pack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald's Corp., Oak Brook, IL.

    One of five McDonald's Action Packs, this learning package introduces intermediate grade students to basic economic concepts. The fourteen activities include the topics of consumption (4 activities), production (5), the market system (3), a pretest, and a posttest. Specific titles under consumption include The Wonderful Treasure Tree (introduction…

  18. RPII Action Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    This document outlines RPII's committments under the Public Service Action Plan 2010 to 2014, otherwise known as the Croke Park Agreement. The document describes the proposed changes to the workplan, the benefits arising from the changes and the timeframe for implementing the committments

  19. Class Actions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2009-01-01

    The article deals with the relatively new Danish Act on Class Action (Danish: gruppesøgsmål) which was suggested by The Permanent Council on Civil procedure (Retsplejerådet) of which the article's author is a member. The operability of the new provisions is illustrated through some wellknown Danish...

  20. Hope for Environmental Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Barbara J.; DeMoor, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Environmental consciousness-raising programs tend to emphasize the magnitude of imminent ecological disasters, if humans continue on their current trajectory. While these environmental literacy programs also call for action to avoid cataclysmic ecological changes, psychological research on "learned helplessness" suggests that information…

  1. The action of France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    After a favorable period for the weapons mastership, the disarmament and the non-proliferation, the conditions of international safety and the strategical context revealed recently worrying developments. The France is decided to continue its action in favor of the disarmament and the non-proliferation in the continuity of its political engagements. (A.L.B.)

  2. Collective Action under Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Steen

    Collective action in the form of industrial conflict has declined dramatically since the high tide in the 1970s in Europe. This article argues that this decline is the result of significant changes in both economic and institutional factors, influencing the calculations of employees and of their ...

  3. Citizens' action group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andritzky, W.

    1978-01-01

    For the first empirical study of citizens' action groups 331 such groups were consulted. Important information was collected on the following aspects of these groups: their self-image, areas and forms of activities, objectives and their extent, how long the group has existed, successes and failures and their forms of organisation. (orig.) [de

  4. Staying Mindful in Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    participants in business driven action learning programmes, mutual exploration of conscious and unconscious drivers of group and individual behaviour during the programme (via working notes), and diary studies and exploratory sessions (including drawing as a method) after the programme. Socioanalytic method...

  5. Entrepreneurial learning requires action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Tove; Madsen, Svend Ole

    2014-01-01

    that is enhanced by essential large-scale industry players and other SME managers are required to create action and value in learning. An open-mindedness to new learning approaches by SME managers and an open-mindedness to multi- and cross-disciplinary collaboration with SME managers by facilitators is required....

  6. Users in Persistant Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, John K.; Gasparin, Marta; Varnes, Claus J.

    2012-01-01

    of the hybrid collective to include the press and distribution channels to want it back. All actors in collective actions can become lead users when supported by establishing alliances. This perspective is different from Von Hippel (1986) who is claiming that the trend needs to be defined before the lead users...

  7. Action and agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galle, Per

    2000-01-01

    Following the Conceptual Engineering approach suggested in OAR 'The notion of product modelling', I develop a 'sufficient but minimal' philosophical understanding (in the Platonist tratidion) of agents and their actions. The motivation for this is the role of product modelling in mediating...

  8. Isotopes in action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    For most people the obvious application of nuclear technology is in power generation. But there are many other uses for radioactive materials or for products made with their help. They are found in our factories, hospitals, offices and homes. ''Isotopes in Action'' looks at the many applications of radioisotopes in our society. (author)

  9. mechanism of action

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    known as azidothymidine) in 1987. Fourteen agents are available for general use in South Africa. Several newer compounds are in preclinical development or have ... Site of action penetration. AlJ. Thymidine. Zidovudine. Retrovir. Intracellularly;. Good activated Tcells. d4T. Thymidine. Stavudine. Zerit. Intracellularly;. Good.

  10. Intelligent robot action planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vamos, T; Siegler, A

    1982-01-01

    Action planning methods used in intelligent robot control are discussed. Planning is accomplished through environment understanding, environment representation, task understanding and planning, motion analysis and man-machine communication. These fields are analysed in detail. The frames of an intelligent motion planning system are presented. Graphic simulation of the robot's environment and motion is used to support the planning. 14 references.

  11. Being observed magnifies action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinmetz, J.; Xu, Q.; Fishbach, A.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that people, when observed, perceive their actions as more substantial because they add the audience’s perspective to their own perspective. We find that participants who were observed while eating (Study 1) or learned they were observed after eating (Study 2) recalled eating

  12. Elements of social action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Miloš

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the significant analytical advantages, the author prefers social action as initial sociological concept in the relation to social phenomenon. Its basic elements are: actors, subjects and tools, needs and interests, values and norms, positions and roles. Actors set in motion and unify the rest of elements, guide to the magic triangle of sociology (movement, change, order, reaffirm actor paradigm to systemic paradigm. Subjects and tools materialize an action and its overestimate results in technological determinism or (by means of property as institutional appropriation of nature in the (unclassed historical type of society. Needs and interests are the basis of person's motivation and starting point for depth analysis of sociability. The expansion of legitimate interests circle develops techniques of normative regulation. Values and norms guide to institutional-organizational, positions to vertical and roles to horizontal structure. Values give the meaning to the action as well as to human existence, they are orientations of motivate system of personality but also basic aspect of society. As abstractions, values are latent background of norms and they tell to us what to do, and norms how to do something. Norms are specified instructions for suitable behavior Without normative order, not to be possible the satisfying of needs and the conciliation of interests. Riches, power and prestige are components of social position, and legal status is the determination of rights and obligations of the position. Roles are normative expectation of behavior. Toward kinds of sanctions roles are classified. Roles but also other elements of social action are starting point for sociological analysis of legal norms and institutes. On the other side, the observation of legal component of social actions enriches, strengths and precises sociological analysis of them.

  13. What's an Asthma Action Plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Search English Español What's an Asthma Action Plan? KidsHealth / For Parents / What's an Asthma Action Plan? ... acción contra el asma? What's an Asthma Action Plan? An asthma action plan (or management plan) is ...

  14. How artefacts influence our actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pols, A.J.K.

    2013-01-01

    Artefacts can influence our actions in several ways. They can be instruments, enabling and facilitating actions, where their presence affects the number and quality of the options for action available to us. They can also influence our actions in a morally more salient way, where their presence

  15. Learning Actions Models: Qualitative Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolander, Thomas; Gierasimczuk, Nina

    2015-01-01

    In dynamic epistemic logic, actions are described using action models. In this paper we introduce a framework for studying learnability of action models from observations. We present first results concerning propositional action models. First we check two basic learnability criteria: finite ident...

  16. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for Fentanyl in support of the development of Provisional Advisory Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankaran, Harish, E-mail: harish.shankaran@pnnl.gov [Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Adeshina, Femi [National Homeland Security Research Center, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Teeguarden, Justin G. [Systems Toxicology Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Provisional Advisory Levels (PALs) are tiered exposure limits for toxic chemicals in air and drinking water that are developed to assist in emergency responses. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling can support this process by enabling extrapolations across doses, and exposure routes, thereby addressing gaps in the available toxicity data. Here, we describe the development of a PBPK model for Fentanyl – a synthetic opioid used clinically for pain management – to support the establishment of PALs. Starting from an existing model for intravenous Fentanyl, we first optimized distribution and clearance parameters using several additional IV datasets. We then calibrated the model using pharmacokinetic data for various formulations, and determined the absorbed fraction, F, and time taken for the absorbed amount to reach 90% of its final value, t90. For aerosolized pulmonary Fentanyl, F = 1 and t90 < 1 min indicating complete and rapid absorption. The F value ranged from 0.35 to 0.74 for oral and various transmucosal routes. Oral Fentanyl was absorbed the slowest (t90 ∼ 300 min); the absorption of intranasal Fentanyl was relatively rapid (t90 ∼ 20–40 min); and the various oral transmucosal routes had intermediate absorption rates (t90 ∼ 160–300 min). Based on these results, for inhalation exposures, we assumed that all of the Fentanyl inhaled from the air during each breath directly, and instantaneously enters the arterial circulation. We present model predictions of Fentanyl blood concentrations in oral and inhalation scenarios relevant for PAL development, and provide an analytical expression that can be used to extrapolate between oral and inhalation routes for the derivation of PALs. - Highlights: • We develop a Fentanyl PBPK model for relating external dose to internal levels. • We calibrate the model to oral and inhalation exposures using > 50 human datasets. • Model predictions are in good agreement with the available

  17. Partial Actions and Power Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Ávila

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a partial action (X,α with enveloping action (T,β. In this work we extend α to a partial action on the ring (P(X,Δ,∩ and find its enveloping action (E,β. Finally, we introduce the concept of partial action of finite type to investigate the relationship between (E,β and (P(T,β.

  18. Body posture modulates action perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Marius; Toni, Ivan; de Lange, Floris P

    2013-04-03

    Recent studies have highlighted cognitive and neural similarities between planning and perceiving actions. Given that action planning involves a simulation of potential action plans that depends on the actor's body posture, we reasoned that perceiving actions may also be influenced by one's body posture. Here, we test whether and how this influence occurs by measuring behavioral and cerebral (fMRI) responses in human participants predicting goals of observed actions, while manipulating postural congruency between their own body posture and postures of the observed agents. Behaviorally, predicting action goals is facilitated when the body posture of the observer matches the posture achieved by the observed agent at the end of his action (action's goal posture). Cerebrally, this perceptual postural congruency effect modulates activity in a portion of the left intraparietal sulcus that has previously been shown to be involved in updating neural representations of one's own limb posture during action planning. This intraparietal area showed stronger responses when the goal posture of the observed action did not match the current body posture of the observer. These results add two novel elements to the notion that perceiving actions relies on the same predictive mechanism as planning actions. First, the predictions implemented by this mechanism are based on the current physical configuration of the body. Second, during both action planning and action observation, these predictions pertain to the goal state of the action.

  19. Regulatory actions post - Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciurea Ercau, C.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the safety reviews performed in Romania after the Fukushima accident and the resulting actions for improving the safety. The actions taken by the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN) to improve the regulatory framework include the development of new regulations and the enhancement of inspection practices, taking account of the lessons learned from the Fukushima accident. A regulation on the response to transients, accidents and emergency situations at nuclear power plants has been developed, which includes requirements on transient and accident scenarios that have to be covered by the Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs), accident scenarios to be covered by the Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGs), emergency situations to be covered by the on-site emergency response plan and emergency response procedures. (authors)

  20. INFORM'ACTION

    CERN Multimedia

    STAFF ASSOCIATION

    2010-01-01

    INFORM’ACTION Commission ! It’s all in the title ! At a time when one of the keywords is COMMUNICATE, the Staff Association has a duty to take it seriously. This is why, among other reasons, the youngest of the Staff Association internal commissions was created in 20005. As its name indicates, this commission is responsible for INFORMING, TRAINING (FORMER) and organizing ACTIONs. INFORMING : The members of this commission endeavour to work using all imaginable and known channels of information: articles, emails, alerts, posters, web site, organizing meetings, distributing flyers, banners, videos, etc. In 2009 a new web site (http://cern.ch/association) was put on line.   Since then this site has been continually updated to provide information regarding the latest news in the social domain (Pension Fund, CHIS, 5YR), and also special offers for our members, club news, and social and cultural activities. In 2009 and 2010, the Staff Association notice boards were ...