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Sample records for actinomyces

  1. Actinomyces Species Isolated from Breast Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, S. F.; Morris, T.; Hughes, H.; Dixon, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic infection caused by Actinomyces species characterized by abscess formation, tissue fibrosis, and draining sinuses. The spectrum of infections caused by Actinomyces species ranges from classical invasive actinomycosis to a less invasive form of superficial skin and soft tissue infection. We present a review detailing all Actinomyces species isolated from breast infections in NHS Lothian between 2005 and 2013, Actinomyces species isolated from breast infections referred to the United Kingdom Anaerobe Reference Unit between 1988 and 2014, and cases describing Actinomyces breast infections published in the medical literature since 1994. Actinomyces species are fastidious organisms which can be difficult to identify and are likely to be underascertained as a cause of breast infections. Due to improved diagnostic methods, they are increasingly associated with chronic, recurrent breast infections and may play a more significant role in these infections than has previously been appreciated. PMID:26224846

  2. Breast abscess due to Actinomyces europaeus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, W A; Pinheiro, A M; Jahns, B; Bögli-Stuber, K; Droz, S; Zimmerli, S

    2011-06-01

    Actinomyces europaeus was first described in 1997 as a new species causing predominantly skin and soft-tissue infections. Mastitis due to A. europaeus is an unusual condition. This article reports a case of primary breast abscess caused by A. europaeus in a postmenopausal woman.

  3. A breast abscess caused by Actinomyces radingae

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    Martine Hoogewerf, Gwen M.P. Diepenhorst, Hannah Visser, Edgar J. Peters, Karin van Dijk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Actinomyces radingae is a rare isolate in clinical specimens. We describe a case of a postmenopausal woman presenting with a breast abscess caused by A. radingae. To our knowledge, this is the second description of a case of a breast infection due to this pathogen. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2016;6(2: 84-86

  4. Actinomyces meyeri brain abscess following dental extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Clancy, U; Ronayne, A; Prentice, M B; Jackson, A

    2015-01-01

    We describe the rare occurrence of an Actinomyces meyeri cerebral abscess in a 55-year-old woman following a dental extraction. This patient presented with a 2-day history of hemisensory loss, hyper-reflexia and retro-orbital headache, 7?days following a dental extraction for apical peridonitis. Neuroimaging showed a large left parietal abscess with surrounding empyema. The patient underwent craniotomy and drainage of the abscess. A. meyeri was cultured. Actinomycosis is a rare cause of cereb...

  5. Actinomyces meyeri brain abscess following dental extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, U; Ronayne, A; Prentice, M B; Jackson, A

    2015-04-13

    We describe the rare occurrence of an Actinomyces meyeri cerebral abscess in a 55-year-old woman following a dental extraction. This patient presented with a 2-day history of hemisensory loss, hyper-reflexia and retro-orbital headache, 7 days following a dental extraction for apical peridonitis. Neuroimaging showed a large left parietal abscess with surrounding empyema. The patient underwent craniotomy and drainage of the abscess. A. meyeri was cultured. Actinomycosis is a rare cause of cerebral abscess. The A. meyeri subtype is particularly rare, accounting for less than 1% of specimens. This case describes an unusually brief course of the disease, which is usually insidious. Parietal lobe involvement is unusual as cerebral abscesses usually have a predilection for the frontal and temporal regions of the brain. Although there are no randomised trials to guide therapy, current consensus is to use a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics, followed by 6-12 months of oral therapy. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  6. Actinomyces pyogenes septic arthritis in a diabetic farmer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, M

    2012-02-03

    We report a case of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis of the left ankle due to Actinomyces pyogenes in a diabetic farmer. Few confirmed human cases of A. pyogenes infection have been reported, partly because of inadequate identification of this bacterium. Bacteriological characteristics of the organism, which resembles Arcanobacterium haemolyticum, are described with a review of previous case reports.

  7. Actinomyces spp. gene expression in root caries lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naile Dame-Teixeira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The studies of the distribution of Actinomyces spp. on carious and non-carious root surfaces have not been able to confirm the association of these bacteria with root caries, although they were extensively implicated as a prime suspect in root caries. Objective: The aim of this study was to observe the gene expression of Actinomyces spp. in the microbiota of root surfaces with and without caries. Design: The oral biofilms from exposed sound root surface (SRS; n=10 and active root caries (RC; n=30 samples were collected. The total bacterial RNA was extracted, and the mRNA was isolated. Samples with low RNA concentration were pooled, yielding a final sample size of SRS=10 and RC=9. Complementary DNA (cDNA libraries were prepared and sequenced on an Illumina® HiSeq 2500 system. Sequence reads were mapped to eight Actinomyces genomes. Count data were normalized using DESeq2 to analyse differential gene expression applying the Benjamini-Hochberg correction (false discovery rate [FDR]0.05, except for Actinomyces OT178 (p=0.001 and Actinomyces gerencseriae (p=0.004, which had higher read counts in the SRS. Genes that code for stress proteins (clp, dnaK, and groEL, enzymes of glycolysis pathways (including enolase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, adhesion (Type-2 fimbrial and collagen-binding protein, and cell growth (EF-Tu were highly – but not differentially (p>0.001 – expressed in both groups. Genes with the most significant upregulation in RC were those coding for hypothetical proteins and uracil DNA glycosylase (p=2.61E-17. The gene with the most significant upregulation in SRS was a peptide ABC transporter substrate-binding protein (log2FC=−6.00, FDR=2.37E-05. Conclusion: There were similar levels of Actinomyces gene expression in both sound and carious root biofilms. These bacteria can be commensal in root surface sites but may be cariogenic due to survival mechanisms that allow them to exist in acid environments and

  8. Chronic Actinomyces Infection Caused by Retained Cervical Cerclage: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyttle, Brianna; Johnson, Julia V

    2016-01-01

    Historically, Actinomyces infection has been associated primarily with the intrauterine device. Recently, case reports associating Actinomyces with other implants have been described, including nonwoven polypropylene mesh used for urethral slings and Mersilene cerclage placements. However, there are no reported cases of chronic Actinomyces infections associated with retained Mersilene cerclage. A 51-year-old woman, gravida 3, para 3, presented with a 10-year history of vaginal discharge and Actinomyces identified on endometrial biopsy. After failing medical treatment and undergoing a hysterectomy, the patient was found to have a retained Mersilene cerclage. This is the first case to report persistent Actinomyces infection with a retained Mersilene cerclage. No current recommendations exist for assessing full removal of cerclage. Clinicians should have a high suspicion of Actinomyces infection in a patient who presents with persistent vaginal discharge and history of cerclage placement.

  9. Brain abscess with an unexpected finding: Actinomyces meyeri CNS infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiset, Andreas Halgreen; Thomsen, Marianne Kragh; Wejse, Christian

    -up. The source of infection was most likely periodontitis with spread to the lungs from aspiration or oropharyngeal secretion into the respiratory tract, alternatively from haematogenous spread. Conclusions: We report of the successful treatment of a cerebral abscess caused by A. meyeri with narrow spectrum......Background: CNS infection caused by Actinomyces spp. is rare and the subtype Actinomyces meyeri even rarer. Risk factors include periodontal disease and alcohol overuse. We present a case report of a 54-year-old female with dental and lung foci. Case history: A female was hospitalised with tonic...... oedema. By MRI an abscess was suspected and the patient was transferred to the department of neurosurgery, where drainage was performed. Microscopy revealed gram-positive cocci and gram-negative rods and iv. treatment with ceftriaxone 4g x 1 and metronidazole 1g x 1 was commenced. Pus cultures showed...

  10. The cytopathology of Actinomyces, Nocardia, and their mimickers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Kelsey E; Sturgis, Charles D; Procop, Gary W; Rhoads, Daniel D

    2017-12-01

    Nocardia species and Actinomyces species are 2 of the most commonly diagnosed filamentous bacteria in routine cytopathology practice. These genera share many overlapping cytomorphologic features, including their thin, beaded, branching, Gram-positive, GMS-positive filamentous structures that fragment at their peripheries into bacillary- and coccoid-appearing forms. Features that help distinguish between these 2 microorganisms include the width of their filamentous structures, the angles at which they branch, and their ability or lack thereof to retain a modified acid-fast stain. In addition to cytomorphologic overlap, overlap in clinical presentation is frequent with pulmonary and mucocutaneous presentations seen in both. Differentiating between Nocardia and Actinomyces is essential because patients with these infections require different approaches to medical management. Both antibiotic susceptibilities and the need for early surgical intervention as part of the treatment plan vary greatly among these 2 groups. This review focuses on the clinical presentation, cytomorphology and staining characteristics that can be useful in identifying and distinguishing between Nocardia and Actinomyces infections, as well as their mimickers. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. First Reported Case of Bacterial Endocarditis Attributable to Actinomyces meyeri

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    Susan Moffatt

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A 48-year-old man presented to the Victoria General Hospital, Halifax, Nova Scotia in severe congestive heart failure. Echocardiographic studies revealed significant aortic valve insufficiency. Two anaerobic blood cultures performed two weeks apart were both positive for Actinomyces meyeri. The patient was treated with high dose intravenous penicillin. Three weeks after antibiotics were begun, he underwent aortic valve replacement. Intraoperative cultures were negative. Histopathological examination revealed findings in keeping with subacute bacterial endocarditis. The patient completed a six-week course of penicillin and was doing well three months after surgery. This is the first case of endocarditis attributable to A meyeri reported in the literature.

  12. Actinomyces meyeri Popliteal Cyst Infection and Review of the Literature

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    Bharath Raj Palraj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 66-year-old, Caucasian male presented with pain and swelling involving the left knee of one-week duration. Arthrocentesis was negative for evidence of septic arthritis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI study of the left knee showed degenerative arthritis, partial tear of medial meniscus, and a complex fluid collection along the posteromedial aspect of the left knee suggestive of popliteal cyst. He underwent arthroscopy with partial medial meniscectomy. Intraoperative joint fluid was noted to be cloudy but cultures were negative. Arthroscopic procedure provided him with temporary relief but the pain and swelling in the posterior aspect of the left knee recurred in 6 weeks. Repeat MRI showed complex fluid collection in the posterolateral aspect of left knee. Ultrasound guided aspiration of the fluid collection revealed purulent material and cultures grew Actinomyces meyeri. He was treated with 6 weeks of intravenous penicillin regimen followed by 18 months of oral penicillin.

  13. Iron-dependent gene expression in Actinomyces oris

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    Matthew P. Mulé

    2015-12-01

    Results: When A. oris was grown under iron-limiting conditions, the genes encoding iron/siderophore transporters fetA and sidD showed increased expression. One of these genes (sidD was mutated, and the sidD::Km strain exhibited a 50% reduction in growth in late log and stationary phase cells in media that contained iron. This growth defect was restored when the sidD gene was provided in a complemented strain. We were able to isolate the AmdR-encoding gene in seven clinical isolates of Actinomyces. When these protein sequences were aligned to the laboratory strain, there was a high degree of sequence similarity. Conclusions: The growth of the sidD::Km mutant in iron-replete medium mirrored the growth of the wild-type strain grown in iron-limiting medium, suggesting that the sidD::Km mutant was compromised in iron uptake. The known iron regulator AmdR is well conserved in clinical isolates of A. oris. This work provides additional insight into iron metabolism in this important oral microbe.

  14. Isolation and characterization of oral Actinomyces strain from patients with periodontal disease

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    Eshraghi S.

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available "nAbstract: Actinomyces species are normal residents of the mouth cavity, gastrointestinal tract and female genital tract. The genus consists of gram-positive bacteria, strictly anaerobic or microaerophilic. The bacteria are opportunists with a low virulence potential that cause actinomycosis only when the normal mucosal barriers are disrupted. The main purpose of this study was the isolation of Actinomyces strains and determining of their role in periodontal diseases. The present study was carried out on 100 patients with periodontal diseases referred to the Periodontic Department of Faculty of Dentistry. The sampling was done in 6 months with isolation of oral Actinomyces from microbial plaque and periodontal pocket. The samples were selected based on the following criteria: periodontal plaque with deep pocket (>3 mm, no antibiotic therapy for a period of at least two weeks, and lack of systemic diseases. One strain of Actinomyces viscosus and two strains of Actinomyces naeslundii were isolated from the patients with gingivitis and periodontitis. Of the 100 patients with gingivitis and periodontitis, aged between 18-57 years old, 46% were males and 54% were females. The peak incidence of the diseases (35% was in the third age group (31-40 and the lowest incidence (10% was in the first age group (<20. Forty patients (40% complained of gingival disease and its bleeding with lower incidence of (42.5% in female.

  15. Fluoride-sensitivity of growth and acid production of oral Actinomyces: comparison with oral Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Junko; Nakajo, Kazuko; Washio, Jumpei; Mayanagi, Gen; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2013-12-01

    Actinomyces are predominant oral bacteria; however, their cariogenic potential in terms of acid production and fluoride sensitivity has not been elucidated in detail and compared with that of other caries-associated oral bacteria, such as Streptococcus. Therefore, this study aimed to elucidate and compare the acid production and growth of Actinomyces and Streptococcus in the presence of bicarbonate and fluoride to mimic conditions in the oral cavity. Acid production from glucose was measured by pH-stat at pH 5.5 and 7.0 under anaerobic conditions. Growth rate was assessed by optical density in anaerobic culture. Although Actinomyces produced acid at a lower rate than did Streptococcus, their acid production was more tolerant of fluoride (IDacid production 50 = 110-170 ppm at pH 7.0 and 10-13 ppm at pH 5.5) than that of Streptococcus (IDacid production 50 = 36-53 ppm at pH 7.0 and 6.3-6.5 ppm at pH 5.5). Bicarbonate increased acid production by Actinomyces with prominent succinate production and enhanced their fluoride tolerance (IDacid production 50 = 220-320 ppm at pH 7.0 and 33-52 ppm at pH 5.5). Bicarbonate had no effect on these variables in Streptococcus. In addition, although the growth rate of Actinomyces was lower than that of Streptococcus, Actinomyces growth was more tolerant of fluoride (IDgrowth 50 = 130-160 ppm) than was that of Streptococcus (IDgrowth 50 = 27-36 ppm). These results indicate that oral Actinomyces are more tolerant of fluoride than oral Streptococcus, and bicarbonate enhances the fluoride tolerance of oral Actinomyces. Because of the limited number of species tested here, further study is needed to generalize these findings to the genus level. © 2013 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Actinomyces graevenitzii Pulmonary Abscess Mimicking Tuberculosis in a Healthy Young Man

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    Smaranda Gliga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary actinomycosis is a rare disease that is often misdiag-nosed as tuberculosis or lung cancer. Actinomyces graevenitzii is a relatively new recognized Actinomyces species isolated from various clinical samples. The authors report a case of pulmonary actinomycosis caused by A graevenitzii. A computed tomography examination revealed an excavated consolidation in the middle right lobe of a previously healthy young man who presented with a long history of moderate cough. Cultures of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid confirmed the diagnosis of pulmonary abscess caused by A gravenitzii. At the three-month follow-up consultation and, after six weeks of high-dose amoxicillin, the pulmonary lesion had completely disappeared.

  17. Identification of the Genes Involved in the Biofilm-like Structures on Actinomyces oris K20, a Clinical Isolate from an Apical Lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    bacteria in clinically asymptomatic periapical pathosis. J Endod 1990;16:534–8. 5. Nair PNR. On the causes of persistent apical periodontitis : a review...Identification of the Genes Involved in the Biofilm-like Structures on Actinomyces oris K20, a Clinical Isolate from an Apical Lesion Chiho Mashimo...Actinomyces oris K20. (J Endod 2013;39:44–48) Key Words Actinomyces oris, apical abscess, biofilm, polysac- charide deacetylase, transposon mutagenesis

  18. Characterization of Actinomyces with genomic DNA fingerprints and rRNA gene probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, G; Johnson, J; Schachtele, C

    1993-08-01

    Cellular DNA from 25 Actinomyces naeslundii and Actinomyces viscosus strains belonging to the 7 taxonomic clusters of Fillery et al. (1978) and several unclustered strains was obtained by enzymatic and N-lauroylsarcosine/guanidine isothiocyanate treatment of whole cells, followed by extraction of the nucleic acid. The DNA samples were digested with restriction endonucleases BamHI or PvuII, and agarose gel electrophoresis was used to obtain DNA fingerprints. The DNA fragments were subjected to Southern blot hybridization with a digoxigenin-labeled cDNA probe transcribed from Escherichia coli 16S and 23S rRNA. The patterns of bands from genomic (DNA fingerprints) and rDNA fingerprints (ribotypes) were used for comparison between the taxonomic cluster strains and strains within clusters. Representative strains from each taxonomic cluster provided different BamHI DNA fingerprints and ribotype patterns with 3 to 9 distinct bands. Some strains within a cluster showed identical ribotype patterns with both endonucleases (A. naeslundii B120 and A. naeslundii B102 from cluster 3), while others showed the same pattern with BamHI but a different pattern with PvuII (A. naeslundii ATCC 12104 and 398A from cluster 5). A viscosus ATCC 15987 (cluster 7) and its parent strain T6 yielded identical fingerprint and ribotype patterns. The genomic diversity revealed by DNA fingerprinting and ribotyping demonstrates that these techniques, which do not require phenotypic expression, are suited for study of the oral ecology of the Actinomyces, and for epidemiological tracking of specific Actinomyces strains associated with caries lesions and sites of periodontal destruction.

  19. Super Infection of An Ovarian Dermoid Cyst with Actinomyces in An Infertile Woman

    OpenAIRE

    Salehpour, Saghar; Akbari Sene, Azadeh

    2013-01-01

    We present super infection of an ovarian dermoid cyst with actinomyces in an infertile patient. This is a case-report study for evaluation a couple with male factor infertility, who was a good candidate for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), while a 10 cm dermoid cyst was found in the woman’s right ovary. Patient complained of pelvic pain, intermittent fever, dysmenorrhea, and dyspareunia. The cyst was extracted using laparoscopy, whilst in histopathological examination, an actinomycosi...

  20. Nitrogenous compounds stimulate glucose-derived acid production by oral Streptococcus and Actinomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norimatsu, Yuka; Kawashima, Junko; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2015-09-01

    Both Streptococcus and Actinomyces can produce acids from dietary sugars and are frequently found in caries lesions. In the oral cavity, nitrogenous compounds, such as peptides and amino acids, are provided continuously by saliva and crevicular gingival fluid. Given that these bacteria can also utilize nitrogen compounds for their growth, it was hypothesized that nitrogenous compounds may influence their acid production; however, no previous studies have examined this topic. Therefore, the present study aimed to assess the effects of nitrogenous compounds (tryptone and glutamate) on glucose-derived acid production by Streptococcus and Actinomyces. Acid production was evaluated using a pH-stat method under anaerobic conditions, whereas the amounts of metabolic end-products were quantified using high performance liquid chromatography. Tryptone enhanced glucose-derived acid production by up to 2.68-fold, whereas glutamate enhanced Streptococcus species only. However, neither tryptone nor glutamate altered the end-product profiles, indicating that the nitrogenous compounds stimulate the whole metabolic pathways involving in acid production from glucose, but are not actively metabolized, nor do they alter metabolic pathways. These results suggest that nitrogenous compounds in the oral cavity promote acid production by Streptococcus and Actinomyces in vivo. © 2015 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Actinomyces-like organisms in the cervical smears of IUCD users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farida Jamal; Mohd Salleh Mohd Yasin; Zooraidah Zainal; Hamid Arshat

    1983-01-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a well-documented complication of IUD use. The presence of tails on the IUDs appears to facilitate ascent of bacteria from the vagina into the uterus. In this study, cervical smears of 128 IUD users were stained by Gram's stain and screened for the presence of Actinomyces-like organisms. 5.5% of the smears were positive for these organisms. Pus was seen in 20.1% of the smears, and yeast cells were seen in 10.2%. The average duration of IUD insertion was 8 months. Smears of 103 controls were negative for Actinomyces-like organisms, pus cells were present in 8.7%, and yeast cells in 4.8%. Of the 7 smears positive for the organisms, only 1 was from the user of a plastic device. All cases included were asymptomatic and were visiting the clinic for routine follow-up. These data suggest that colonization by Actinomyces-like organisms does not appear to be a significant problem in IUD users in Malaysia.

  2. Characterization of the binding of Actinomyces naeslundii (ATCC 12104) and Actinomyces viscosus (ATCC 19246) to glycosphingolipids, using a solid-phase overlay approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroemberg, N.K.; Karlsson, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    Actinomyces naeslundii (ATCC 12104) and Actinomyces viscosus (ATCC 19246) were radiolabeled externally (125I) or metabolically (35S) and analyzed for their ability to bind glycosphingolipids separated on thin layer chromatograms or coated in microtiter wells. Two binding properties were found and characterized in detail. (i) Both bacteria showed binding to lactosylceramide (LacCer) in a fashion similar to bacteria characterized earlier. The activity of free LacCer was dependent on the ceramide structure; species with 2-hydroxy fatty acid and/or a trihydroxy base were positive, while species with nonhydroxy fatty acid and a dihydroxy base were negative binders. Several glycolipids with internal lactose were active but only gangliotriaosylceramide and gangliotetraosylceramide were as active as free LacCer. The binding to these three species was half-maximal at about 200 ng of glycolipid and was not blocked by preincubation of bacteria with free lactose or lactose-bovine serum albumin. (ii) A. naeslundii, unlike A. viscosus, showed a superimposed binding concluded to be to terminal or internal GalNAc beta and equivalent to a lactose-inhibitable specificity previously analyzed by other workers. Terminal Gal beta was not recognized in several glycolipids, although free Gal and lactose were active as soluble inhibitors. The binding was half-maximal at about 10 ng of glycolipid. A glycolipid mixture prepared from a scraping of human buccal epithelium contained an active glycolipid with sites for both binding specificities

  3. Genome sequence and description of Actinomyces polynesiensis str. MS2 sp. nov. isolated from the human gut

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    T. Cimmino

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Actinomyces polynesiensis strain MS2 gen. nov., sp. nov. is a newly proposed genus within the family Actinomycetaceae, isolated from the stools of a healthy individual in Raiatea Island (French Polynesia, South Pacific. Actinomyces massiliensis is an anaerobic, Gram-positive organism. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation—2 943 271 bp with a 70.80% G+C content, assembled into 15 scaffolds and containing 2080 genes.

  4. Mandibular Actinomyces osteomyelitis complicating florid cemento-osseous dysplasia: case report

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    Edwards Sean P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apart from neoplastic processes, chronic disfiguring and destructive diseases of the mandible are uncommon. Case Presentation We report, perhaps for the first time, the simultaneous occurrence of two such conditions in one patient, in a case that emphasizes the importance of bone biopsy in establishing the correct diagnosis. Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia (FCOD is a chronic, disfiguring condition of the maxillofacial region. This relatively benign disease is primarily observed in middle-aged women of African ancestry. Cervicofacial actinomycosis is an uncommon and progressive infection caused by bacilli of the Actinomyces genus that typically involves intraoral soft tissues but may also involve bone. The accurate diagnosis of actinomycosis is critical for successful treatment. A diagnosis of osteomyelitis caused by Actinomyces bacteria was diagnosed by bone biopsy in a 53 year-old African-American woman with a longstanding history of FCOD after she presented with a new draining ulcer overlying the mandible. Conclusions Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of actinomycosis arising in the setting of FCOD, and the importance of bone biopsy and cultures in arriving at a definitive and timely diagnosis.

  5. Mandibular Actinomyces osteomyelitis complicating florid cemento-osseous dysplasia: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Miller H; Harms, Paul W; Newton, Duane W; Lebar, Bill; Edwards, Sean P; Aronoff, David M

    2011-07-21

    Apart from neoplastic processes, chronic disfiguring and destructive diseases of the mandible are uncommon. We report, perhaps for the first time, the simultaneous occurrence of two such conditions in one patient, in a case that emphasizes the importance of bone biopsy in establishing the correct diagnosis. Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia (FCOD) is a chronic, disfiguring condition of the maxillofacial region. This relatively benign disease is primarily observed in middle-aged women of African ancestry. Cervicofacial actinomycosis is an uncommon and progressive infection caused by bacilli of the Actinomyces genus that typically involves intraoral soft tissues but may also involve bone. The accurate diagnosis of actinomycosis is critical for successful treatment. A diagnosis of osteomyelitis caused by Actinomyces bacteria was diagnosed by bone biopsy in a 53 year-old African-American woman with a longstanding history of FCOD after she presented with a new draining ulcer overlying the mandible. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of actinomycosis arising in the setting of FCOD, and the importance of bone biopsy and cultures in arriving at a definitive and timely diagnosis.

  6. Isolation and Expression of the Lysis Genes of Actinomyces naeslundii Phage Av-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delisle, Allan L.; Barcak, Gerard J.; Guo, Ming

    2006-01-01

    Like most gram-positive oral bacteria, Actinomyces naeslundii is resistant to salivary lysozyme and to most other lytic enzymes. We are interested in studying the lysins of phages of this important oral bacterium as potential diagnostic and therapeutic agents. To identify the Actinomyces phage genes encoding these species-specific enzymes in Escherichia coli, we constructed a new cloning vector, pAD330, that can be used to enrich for and isolate phage holin genes, which are located adjacent to the lysin genes in most phage genomes. Cloned holin insert sequences were used to design sequencing primers to identify nearby lysin genes by using whole phage DNA as the template. From partial digestions of A. naeslundii phage Av-1 genomic DNA we were able to clone, in independent experiments, inserts that complemented the defective λ holin in pAD330, as evidenced by extensive lysis after thermal induction. The DNA sequence of the inserts in these plasmids revealed that both contained the complete lysis region of Av-1, which is comprised of two holin-like genes, designated holA and holB, and an endolysin gene, designated lysA. We were able to subclone and express these genes and determine some of the functional properties of their gene products. PMID:16461656

  7. Pulmonary intravascular macrophages in the pathogenesis of bovine pulmonary lesions caused by Actinomyces pyogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leifsson, Páll Skúli; Basse, A.; Jensen, Henrik Michael Elvang

    1995-01-01

    Rabbit antisera raised against somatic antigens from two strains of Actinomyces pyogenes reacted specifically in a peroxidase anti-peroxidase technique which was developed for the location of the bacteria in formalin-fixed tissues. The technique was applied on experimental murine and spontaneous...

  8. Description of osteomyelitis lesions associated with Actinomyces pyogenes infection in the proximal tibia of adult male turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, M K; Schellberg, L C; Johnson, J B; Frank, R K; Halvorson, D A; Newman, J A

    1993-01-01

    Actinomyces pyogenes was isolated from osteomyelitis lesions from the proximal tibia of mature tom turkeys. Gram-stained impression smears of the lesions resulted in bacteria that appeared as club-shaped, gram-positive pleomorphic rods. The bacteria grew better in a reduced-oxygen environment. The lesions were well demarcated and cavernous, ranging from purulent to caseous in consistency.

  9. Actinomyces pyogenes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-04

    Dec 4, 2011 ... strains was further confirmed by molecular method using analysis of 16S rDNA. Key words: .... nitrate B, Zym A, Zym B, PYZ, H2O2, mineral oil and sterile saline 3 ml. ...... amyloidosis and fibrino-hemorrhagic pancreatitis in a Gazelle ... Evolutionary Genetics Analysis (MEGA) software version 4.0. Mol.

  10. Actinomyces pyogenes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-04

    Dec 4, 2011 ... important livestock such as dairy, beef cattle and gazelles. It is also a common inhabitant of the ..... reaction was performed in a Peltier thermal cycler (BioRad, USA) using the following conditions: Initial .... Esculin hydrolysis.

  11. Pilonidal Sinus of the Glans Penis Associated with Actinomyces Case Reports and Review of Literature

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    Shylashree Chikkamuniyappa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilonidal sinus is a well-recognized condition that occurs most commonly in the sacrococcygeal area of younger men. It is hypothesized to be an acquired chronic inflammation condition due mainly to hair trapped beneath the surface. A pilonidal sinus in the sacrococcygeal region is associated with recurrent infection, abscess formation, cellulitis, fistulae, and rarely, squamous cell carcinoma. A pilonidal sinus of the penis is a rare entity. The association of a penile pilonidal cyst and Actinomyces is even more uncommon with only three cases reported previously. Two cases of pilonidal sinus are reported in this paper. One of the cases was associated with actinomycosis. Pilonidal sinus of the penis should be considered in the clinical and pathological differential diagnosis and has to be distinguished from balanoposthitis, epidermal cyst, and carcinoma. The knowledge about possible association with actinomycosis is important to ensure early treatment.

  12. Fournier's gangrene caused by Actinomyces funkei, Fusobacterium gonidiaformans and Clostridium hathewayi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tena, Daniel; Losa, Cristina; Medina-Pascual, María José; Sáez-Nieto, Juan Antonio

    2014-06-01

    We report the first case of Fournier's gangrene caused by three unusual anaerobic organisms: Actinomyces funkei, Fusobacterium gonidiaformans and Clostridium hathewayi. The infection occurred in a 73-year-old man without typical risk factors for the development of Fournier's gangrene. Clinical outcome was good after prolonged antibiotic treatment and extensive debridement of the perineum. The case suggests that A. funkei, F. gonidiaformans and C. hathewayi should be considered as potential pathogens of Fournier's gangrene. Human infections caused by these organisms are very rare but can be underestimated because correct identification is very difficult, especially in polymicrobial infections such as Fournier's gangrene. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Actinomyces israelii in osteoradionecrosis of the jaws. Histopathologic and immunocytochemical study of five cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Happonen, R.P.; Viander, M.; Pelliniemi, L.; Aitasalo, K.

    1983-01-01

    Five surgically treated patients with osteoradionecrosis of the jaws are presented. The clinical history of the disease varied from 3 to 17 years. In three cases the progression of the disease was enhanced by surgical procedures performed in the irradiated area causing exfoliation of the premaxillary area in one case and spontaneous mandibular fracture in two cases. Actinomyces israelii was demonstrated in tissue sections of all five cases by using FITC-labeled specific antiserum and additionally with peroxidase-antiperoxidase method in one case. Candida was found in histologic sections of three cases. Radiation damage in the oral soft tissues and jawbones makes the atmosphere favorable for anaerobic microorganisms. The present results indicate that the role of A. israelii in the pathogenesis of osteoradionecrosis of the jaws has not been fully appreciated

  14. Bacteroides gingivalis-Actinomyces viscosus cohesive interactions as measured by a quantitative binding assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, S.; Ellen, R.P.; Grove, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    There is limited evidence, mostly indirect, to suggest that the adherence of Bacteroides gingivalis to teeth may be enhanced by the presence of gram-positive dental plaque bacteria like Actinomyces viscosus. The purpose of this study was to carry out direct quantitative assessments of the cohesion of B gingivalis and A. viscosus by using an in vitro assay modeled on the natural sequence in which these two species colonize the teeth. The assay allowed comparisons to be made of the adherence of 3 H-labeled B. gingivalis 2561 and 381 to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads (S-HA) and A. viscosus WVU627- or T14V-coated S-HA (actinobeads) in equilibrium and kinetics binding studies. A series of preliminary binding studies with 3H-labeled A. viscosus and parallel studies by scanning electron microscopy with unlabeled A. viscosus were conducted to establish a protocol by which actinobeads suitable for subsequent Bacteroides adherence experiments could be prepared. By scanning electron microscopy, the actinobeads had only small gaps of exposed S-HA between essentially irreversibly bound A. viscosus cells. Furthermore, B. gingivalis cells appeared to bind preferentially to the Actinomyces cells instead of the exposed S-HA. B. gingivalis binding to both S-HA and actinobeads was saturable with at least 2 X 10(9) to 3 X 10(9) cells per ml, and equilibrium with saturating concentrations was reached within 10 to 20 min. B. gingivalis always bound in greater numbers to the actinobeads than to S-HA. These findings provide direct measurements supporting the concept that cohesion with dental plaque bacteria like A. viscosus may foster the establishment of B. gingivalis on teeth by enhancing its adherence

  15. First report of Actinomyces europaeus bacteraemia result from a breast abscess in a 53-year-old man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.L. Nielsen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This is the first report of Actinomyces europaeus bacteraemia in a 53-year-old man. The bacteraemia was the result of a breast abscess. Identification was established by matrix-assisted desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry and confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The patient was treated with surgical drainage and penicillin for 4 weeks; the patient did not experience any relapse during 6 months of follow-up.

  16. Antiaggregation potential of berry fractions against pairs of Streptococcus mutans with Fusobacterium nucleatum or Actinomyces naeslundii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihinen, Kaisu; Ryynänen, Anu; Toivanen, Marko; Könönen, Eija; Törrönen, Riitta; Tikkanen-Kaukanen, Carina

    2011-01-01

    Coaggregation is an interspecies adhesion process, which is essential to the development of dental plaque. This is an in vitro study of the composition of the soluble solids in the berry juice molecular size fractions (100 kDa, FIII) derived from apple, bilberry, blackcurrant, cloudberry, crowberry and lingonberry and their ability to inhibit and reverse coaggregation of the pairs of common species in dental plaque: Streptococcus mutans with Fusobacterium nucleatum or Actinomyces naeslundii. Inhibitory and reversal activity was found in the molecular size fractions FII and FIII of bilberry, blackcurrant, crowberry and lingonberry. The active fractions contained higher amounts of polyphenols (5-12% of soluble solids) than those without activity (juice fractions FII and FIII and also small amounts of anthocyanins were detected. Anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins and flavonol glycosides were prevalent in FII and FIII fractions of bilberry, blackcurrant and crowberry juices. Comparable amounts of sugars and titratable acids were present in the latter three berry juice fractions of different size. The results indicate that the high molecular size fractions of lingonberry, bilberry, blackcurrant and crowberry juices have antiaggregation potential on common oral bacteria, the potential being associated with their polyphenolic content. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Salivary Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies 2 and Lactobacillus casei levels predict pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasanayake, Ananda P; Li, Yihong; Wiener, Howard; Ruby, John D; Lee, Men-Jean

    2005-02-01

    Gravida's poor periodontal health is emerging as a modifiable independent risk factor for preterm delivery and low birth weight. To test the hypothesis that oral bacteria other than periodontal pathogens are also associated with pregnancy outcomes, specific oral bacterial levels measured during pregnancy were evaluated in relation to gestational age and birth weight while controlling for demographic, medical, and dental variables. The study population consisted of 297 predominantly African- American women who were pregnant for the first time. The salivary bacterial levels evaluated were Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus sanguinus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies (gsp) 1 and 2, total streptococci, and total cultivable organisms. For 1 unit increase in log(10) A. naeslundii gsp 2 levels, there was a 60 gm decrease in birth weight (beta = -59.7 g; SE = 29.1; P = 0.04), and a 0.17 week decrease in gestational age (beta = -0.17 wk; SE = 0.09; P = 0.05). In contrast, per 1 unit increase in log(10) L. casei levels, there was a 42 gm increase in birth weight (beta = 42.2 g; SE = 19.3; P = 0.03), and a 0.13 week increase in gestational age (beta = 0.13 week; SE = 0.06; P = 0.04). We conclude that other oral bacterial species can also be related to pregnancy outcomes in addition to previously reported periodontal pathogens. These organism levels may not only predict poor pregnancy outcomes, but also be used as modifiable risk factors in reducing prematurity and low birth weight.

  18. Antimicrobial Effects of Novel Triple Antibiotic Paste-Mimic Scaffolds on Actinomyces naeslundii Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Maria T P; Ryan, Stuart J; Münchow, Eliseu A; Kamocka, Maria M; Gregory, Richard L; Valera, Marcia C; Bottino, Marco C

    2015-08-01

    Actinomyces naeslundii has been recovered from traumatized permanent teeth diagnosed with necrotic pulps. In this work, a triple antibiotic paste (TAP)-mimic scaffold is proposed as a drug-delivery strategy to eliminate A. naeslundii dentin biofilm. Metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, and minocycline were added to a polydioxanone (PDS) polymer solution and spun into fibrous scaffolds. Fiber morphology, mechanical properties, and drug release were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy, microtensile testing, and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Human dentin specimens (4 × 4 × 1 mm(3), n = 4/group) were inoculated with A. naeslundii (ATCC 43146) for 7 days for biofilm formation. The infected dentin specimens were exposed to TAP-mimic scaffolds, TAP solution (positive control), and pure PDS (drug-free scaffold). Dentin infected (7-day biofilm) specimens were used for comparison (negative control). Confocal laser scanning microscopy was done to determine bacterial viability. Scaffolds displayed a submicron mean fiber diameter (PDS = 689 ± 312 nm and TAP-mimic = 718 ± 125 nm). Overall, TAP-mimic scaffolds showed significantly (P ≤ .040) lower mechanical properties than PDS. Within the first 24 hours, a burst release for all drugs was seen. A sustained maintenance of metronidazole and ciprofloxacin was observed over 4 weeks, but not for minocycline. Confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated complete elimination of all viable bacteria exposed to the TAP solution. Meanwhile, TAP-mimic scaffolds led to a significant (P mimic scaffolds hold significant potential in the eradication/elimination of bacterial biofilm, a critical step in regenerative endodontics. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Polymerase chain reaction detection of Propionibacterium propionicus and Actinomyces radicidentis in primary and persistent endodontic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N

    2003-08-01

    Propionibacterium propionicus and the recently described species Actinomyces radicidentis have been isolated from infections of endodontic origin; nevertheless, the possibility exists that their actual prevalence may have been underestimated by culture. The purpose of our study was to assess the occurrence of these 2 species in different types of endodontic infections by using the sensitive 16S rDNA-based nested polymerase chain reaction approach. To detect these 2 species, nested polymerase chain reaction was performed directly in samples taken from primary endodontic infections associated with asymptomatic periradicular lesions, acute apical periodontitis, or acute periradicular abscesses and in samples from patients in whom endodontic therapy had failed. DNA was extracted from the samples and initially amplified by using universal 16S rDNA primers. In the second round of amplification, the first polymerase chain reaction products were used to detect a specific 16S rDNA fragment of either P propionicus or A radicidentis. P propionicus was detected in 6/21 (29%) root canal samples from teeth with chronic periradicular lesions, in 5/10 (50%) cases diagnosed as acute apical periodontitis, and in 7/19 (37%) pus samples aspirated from acute periradicular abscesses. Overall, this species was found in 18/50 (36%) samples taken from primary endodontic infections. Of the root canal samples obtained from root-filled teeth with chronic periradicular lesions, P propionicus was detected in 7/12 (58%) cases. A radicidentis was detected in 1/21 (5%) root canal samples from teeth with chronic periradicular lesions and in 1/10 (10%) cases of acute apical periodontitis. No pus sample yielded this species. In general, A radicidentis was detected in 2/50 (4%) samples taken from primary endodontic infections and in 1/12 (8%) root canal samples taken from patients in whom endodontic treatment had failed. P propionicus was found in a relatively large number of patients with primary and

  20. Stannous Fluoride Effects on Gene Expression of Streptococcus mutans and Actinomyces viscosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y; Li, R; White, D J; Biesbrock, A R

    2018-02-01

    A genome-wide transcriptional analysis was performed to elucidate the bacterial cellular response of Streptococcus mutans and Actinomyces viscosus to NaF and SnF 2 . The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) of SnF 2 were predetermined before microarray study. Gene expression profiling microarray experiments were carried out in the absence (control) and presence (experimental) of 10 ppm and 100 ppm Sn 2+ (in the form of SnF 2 ) and fluoride controls for 10-min exposures (4 biological replicates/treatment). These Sn 2+ levels and treatment time were chosen because they have been shown to slow bacterial growth of S. mutans (10 ppm) and A. viscosus (100 ppm) without affecting cell viability. All data generated by microarray experiments were analyzed with bioinformatics tools by applying the following criteria: 1) a q value should be ≤0.05, and 2) an absolute fold change in transcript level should be ≥1.5. Microarray results showed SnF 2 significantly inhibited several genes encoding enzymes of the galactose pathway upon a 10-min exposure versus a negative control: lacA and lacB (A and B subunits of the galactose-6-P isomerase), lacC (tagatose-6-P kinase), lacD (tagatose-1,6-bP adolase), galK (galactokinase), galT (galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase), and galE (UDP-glucose 4-epimerase). A gene fruK encoding fructose-1-phosphate kinase in the fructose pathway was also significantly inhibited. Several genes encoding fructose/mannose-specific enzyme IIABC components in the phosphotransferase system (PTS) were also downregulated, as was ldh encoding lactate dehydrogenase, a key enzyme involved in lactic acid synthesis. SnF 2 downregulated the transcription of most key enzyme genes involved in the galactose pathway and also suppressed several key genes involved in the PTS, which transports sugars into the cell in the first step of glycolysis.

  1. Periodontitis-associated septic pulmonary embolism caused by Actinomyces species identified by anaerobic culture of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Shun; Mishima, Eikan; Takeuchi, Yoichi; Ohi, Takashi; Ishida, Masatsugu; Yanai, Masaru; Kiyomoto, Hideyasu; Nagasawa, Tasuku; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2015-12-01

    Periodontal disease is a less common but important cause of septic pulmonary embolism (SPE). However, the pathogens causing periodontal disease-associated SPE (PD-SPE) have been poorly understood. Actinomyces species are resident microbiota in the oral cavity. Here we report a case of PD-SPE caused by Actinomyces species, which was identified by anaerobic culture of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL). A 64-year-old Asian man, complicated with severe chronic periodontitis, was admitted with chest pain and fever. Chest CT revealed multiple bilateral pulmonary nodules located subpleurally. We diagnosed the case as SPE associated with periodontitis. Although blood cultures were negative for the usual 5-day incubation, anaerobic culture of the BAL fluid sample yielded Actinomyces species. Antibacterial therapy alone did not ameliorate the symptoms; however, additional dental treatment, including tooth extraction, promptly did. The patient was discharged 23 days after admission. The 3-month follow-up revealed no recurrence of the symptoms and complete resolution of the lung lesions. This case demonstrated that Actinomyces species can cause PD-SPE. Additionally, clinicians should consider performing appropriate anaerobic culture of BAL fluid to identify the pathogen of SPE, and to ordering dental treatment, if necessary, in addition to antibiotics for the initial management of PD-SPE.

  2. Identification of an antifungal metabolite produced by a potential biocontrol Actinomyces strain A01 Identificação de um metabólito antifúngico produzido pela cepa Actinomyces A01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Ge Lu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Actinomyces strain A01 was isolated from soil of a vegetable field in the suburb of Beijing, China. According to the morphological, cultural, physiological and biochemical characteristics, and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, strain A01 was identified as Streptomyces lydicus. In the antimicrobial spectrum test strain A01 presented a stable and strong inhibitory activity against several plant pathogenic fungi such as Fusarium oxysporum, Botrytis cinerea, Monilinia laxa, etc. However, no antibacterial activity was found. In pot experiments in greenhouse, the development of tomato gray mold was markedly suppressed by treatment with the fermentation broth of the strain A01, and the control efficacy was higher than those of Pyrimethanil and Polyoxin. A main antifungal compound (purity 99.503% was obtained from the fermentation broth of strain A01 using column chromatography and HPLC. The chemical structural analysis with UV, IR, MS, and NMR confirmed that the compound produced by the strain A01 is natamycin, a polyene antibiotic produced by S. chattanovgensis, S. natalensis, and S. gilvosporeus, widely used as a natural biological preservative for food according to previous reports. The present study revealed a new producing strain of natamycin and its potential application as a biological control agent for fungal plant diseases.A cepa Actinomyces A01 foi isolada do solo de um campo agrícola no subúrbio de Beijing, China. De acordo com as características morfológicas, culturais, fisiológicas e bioquímicas, e análise da sequência 16S rDNA , a cepa A01 foi identificada como Streptomyces lydicus. Nos testes de espectro antimicrobiano, a cepa A01 apresentou atividade inibitória intensa e estável contra vários fungos patogênicos para plantas, como Fusarium oxysporum, Botrytis cinerea, Monilia laxa, etc. Entretanto, não foi encontrada atividade antibacteriana. Em experimentos em estufas, o desenvolvimento do fungo cinza do tomate foi fortemente

  3. Electron Transport Chain Is Biochemically Linked to Pilus Assembly Required for Polymicrobial Interactions and Biofilm Formation in the Gram-Positive Actinobacterium Actinomyces oris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkys C. Sanchez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-positive actinobacteria Actinomyces spp. are key colonizers in the development of oral biofilms due to the inherent ability of Actinomyces to adhere to receptor polysaccharides on the surface of oral streptococci and host cells. This receptor-dependent bacterial interaction, or coaggregation, requires a unique sortase-catalyzed pilus consisting of the pilus shaft FimA and the coaggregation factor CafA forming the pilus tip. While the essential role of the sortase machine SrtC2 in pilus assembly, biofilm formation, and coaggregation has been established, little is known about trans-acting factors contributing to these processes. We report here a large-scale Tn5 transposon screen for mutants defective in Actinomyces oris coaggregation with Streptococcus oralis. We obtained 33 independent clones, 13 of which completely failed to aggregate with S. oralis, and the remainder of which exhibited a range of phenotypes from severely to weakly defective coaggregation. The former had Tn5 insertions in fimA, cafA, or srtC2, as expected; the latter were mapped to genes coding for uncharacterized proteins and various nuo genes encoding the NADH dehydrogenase subunits. Electron microscopy and biochemical analyses of mutants with nonpolar deletions of nuo genes and ubiE, a menaquinone C-methyltransferase-encoding gene downstream of the nuo locus, confirmed the pilus and coaggregation defects. Both nuoA and ubiE mutants were defective in oxidation of MdbA, the major oxidoreductase required for oxidative folding of pilus proteins. Furthermore, supplementation of the ubiE mutant with exogenous menaquinone-4 rescued the cell growth and pilus defects. Altogether, we propose that the A. oris electron transport chain is biochemically linked to pilus assembly via oxidative protein folding.

  4. Coinfection by Ureaplasma spp., Photobacterium damselae and an Actinomyces-like microorganism in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) with pleuropneumonia stranded along the Adriatic coast of Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francesco, Gabriella; Cammà, Cesare; Curini, Valentina; Mazzariol, Sandro; Proietto, Umberto; Di Francesco, Cristina Esmeralda; Ferri, Nicola; Di Provvido, Andrea; Di Guardo, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    A case of pleuropneumonia is reported in an adult male bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) found stranded in 2014 along the Central Adriatic coast of Italy. A severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia and thoracic lymphadenopathy were present at necropsy. Numerous Splendore-Hoeppli bodies were found microscopically scattered throughout the lung. Histochemical evidence of Actinomyces-like organisms was obtained from the pulmonary parenchyma, with a strain of Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida and Ureaplasma spp. being also isolated from the same tissue. For the latter, a genome fragment of approximately 1400 bp from the 16s rDNA was amplified and sequenced. BLAST analysis revealed 100% identity with an uncultured Ureaplasma spp. (JQ193826.1). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Significant increase in cultivation of Gardnerella vaginalis, Alloscardovia omnicolens, Actinotignum schaalii, and Actinomyces spp. in urine samples with total laboratory automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Sabrina; Nurjadi, Dennis; Horner, Susanne; Heeg, Klaus; Zimmermann, Stefan; Burckhardt, Irene

    2018-04-13

    While total laboratory automation (TLA) is well established in laboratory medicine, only a few microbiological laboratories are using TLA systems. Especially in terms of speed and accuracy, working with TLA is expected to be superior to conventional microbiology. We compared in total 35,564 microbiological urine cultures with and without incubation and processing with BD Kiestra TLA for a 6-month period each retrospectively. Sixteen thousand three hundred thirty-eight urine samples were analyzed in the pre-TLA period and 19,226 with TLA. Sixty-two percent (n = 10,101/16338) of the cultures processed without TLA and 68% (n = 13,102/19226) of the cultures processed with TLA showed growth. There were significantly more samples with two or more species per sample and with low numbers of colony forming units (CFU) after incubation with TLA. Regarding the type of bacteria, there were comparable amounts of Enterobacteriaceae in the samples, slightly less non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria, but significantly more Gram-positive cocci, and Gram-positive rods. Especially Alloscardivia omnicolens, Gardnerella vaginalis, Actinomyces spp., and Actinotignum schaalii were significantly more abundant in the samples incubated and processed with TLA. The time to report was significantly lower in the TLA processed samples by 1.5 h. We provide the first report in Europe of a large number of urine samples processed with TLA. TLA showed enhanced growth of non-classical and rarely cultured bacteria from urine samples. Our findings suggest that previously underestimated bacteria may be relevant pathogens for urinary tract infections. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  6. A Disulfide Bond-forming Machine Is Linked to the Sortase-mediated Pilus Assembly Pathway in the Gram-positive Bacterium Actinomyces oris*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon-Robinson, Melissa E.; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Chang, Chungyu; Wu, Chenggang; Jooya, Neda; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2015-01-01

    Export of cell surface pilins in Gram-positive bacteria likely occurs by the translocation of unfolded precursor polypeptides; however, how the unfolded pilins gain their native conformation is presently unknown. Here, we present physiological studies to demonstrate that the FimA pilin of Actinomyces oris contains two disulfide bonds. Alanine substitution of cysteine residues forming the C-terminal disulfide bridge abrogates pilus assembly, in turn eliminating biofilm formation and polymicrobial interaction. Transposon mutagenesis of A. oris yielded a mutant defective in adherence to Streptococcus oralis, and revealed the essential role of a vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) gene in pilus assembly. Targeted deletion of vkor results in the same defects, which are rescued by ectopic expression of VKOR, but not a mutant containing an alanine substitution in its conserved CXXC motif. Depletion of mdbA, which encodes a membrane-bound thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase, abrogates pilus assembly and alters cell morphology. Remarkably, overexpression of MdbA or a counterpart from Corynebacterium diphtheriae, rescues the Δvkor mutant. By alkylation assays, we demonstrate that VKOR is required for MdbA reoxidation. Furthermore, crystallographic studies reveal that A. oris MdbA harbors a thioredoxin-like fold with the conserved CXXC active site. Consistently, each MdbA enzyme catalyzes proper disulfide bond formation within FimA in vitro that requires the catalytic CXXC motif. Because the majority of signal peptide-containing proteins encoded by A. oris possess multiple Cys residues, we propose that MdbA and VKOR constitute a major folding machine for the secretome of this organism. This oxidative protein folding pathway may be a common feature in Actinobacteria. PMID:26170452

  7. A Disulfide Bond-forming Machine Is Linked to the Sortase-mediated Pilus Assembly Pathway in the Gram-positive Bacterium Actinomyces oris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon-Robinson, Melissa E; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Chang, Chungyu; Wu, Chenggang; Jooya, Neda; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2015-08-28

    Export of cell surface pilins in Gram-positive bacteria likely occurs by the translocation of unfolded precursor polypeptides; however, how the unfolded pilins gain their native conformation is presently unknown. Here, we present physiological studies to demonstrate that the FimA pilin of Actinomyces oris contains two disulfide bonds. Alanine substitution of cysteine residues forming the C-terminal disulfide bridge abrogates pilus assembly, in turn eliminating biofilm formation and polymicrobial interaction. Transposon mutagenesis of A. oris yielded a mutant defective in adherence to Streptococcus oralis, and revealed the essential role of a vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) gene in pilus assembly. Targeted deletion of vkor results in the same defects, which are rescued by ectopic expression of VKOR, but not a mutant containing an alanine substitution in its conserved CXXC motif. Depletion of mdbA, which encodes a membrane-bound thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase, abrogates pilus assembly and alters cell morphology. Remarkably, overexpression of MdbA or a counterpart from Corynebacterium diphtheriae, rescues the Δvkor mutant. By alkylation assays, we demonstrate that VKOR is required for MdbA reoxidation. Furthermore, crystallographic studies reveal that A. oris MdbA harbors a thioredoxin-like fold with the conserved CXXC active site. Consistently, each MdbA enzyme catalyzes proper disulfide bond formation within FimA in vitro that requires the catalytic CXXC motif. Because the majority of signal peptide-containing proteins encoded by A. oris possess multiple Cys residues, we propose that MdbA and VKOR constitute a major folding machine for the secretome of this organism. This oxidative protein folding pathway may be a common feature in Actinobacteria. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Mechanisms of inhibition by fluoride of urease activities of cell suspensions and biofilms of Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus salivarius, Actinomyces naeslundii and of dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza-Silva, E; Castro, A C D; Marquis, R E

    2005-12-01

    Fluoride is known to be a potent inhibitor of bacterial ureases and can also act in the form of hydrofluoric acid as a transmembrane proton conductor to acidify the cytoplasm of intact cells with possible indirect, acid inhibition of urease. Our research objectives were to assess the inhibitory potencies of fluoride for three urease-positive bacteria commonly found in the mouth and to determine the relative importance of direct and indirect inhibition of ureases for overall inhibition of intact cells or biofilms. The experimental design involved intact bacteria in suspensions, mono-organism biofilms, cell extracts, and dental plaque. Standard enzymatic assays for ammonia production from urea were used. We found that ureolysis by cells in suspensions or mono-organism biofilms of Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus salivarius or Actinomyces naeslundii was inhibited by fluoride at plaque levels of 0.1-0.5 mm in a pH-dependent manner. The results of experiments with the organic weak acids indomethacin and capric acid, which do not directly inhibit urease enzyme, indicated that weak-acid effects leading to cytoplasmic acidification are also involved in fluoride inhibition. However, direct fluoride inhibition of urease appeared to be the major mechanism for reduction in ureolytic activity in acid environments. Results of experiments with freshly harvested supragingival dental plaque indicated responses to fluoride similar to those of S. salivarius with pH-dependent fluoride inhibition and both direct and indirect inhibition of urease. Fluoride can act to diminish alkali production from urea by oral bacteria through direct and indirect mechanisms.

  9. Photodynamic Inactivation of Actinomyces naeslundii in Comparison With Chlorhexidine and Polyhexanide--A New Approach for Antiseptic Treatment of Medication-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Sigurd; Ehrenfeld, Michael; Storz, Enno; Wieser, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Local antimicrobial therapy is a fundamental principle in the treatment of lesions of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) as a local application for the treatment of microbial infections has become more widely used in recent years. In the mouth, the bone surface is in constant contact with saliva and thus cannot be kept sterile, making the development of strategies for disinfection even more important. Different methods currently in use include local rinses with chlorhexidine (CHX), polyhexanide (PHX), or aPDT. This study compared the efficiency of these 3 methods. The in vitro activity of 3 different agents against slowly growing Actinomyces naeslundii isolated from a patient with osteonecrosis was evaluated. PHX 0.04% solution, CHX 0.12% solution, and methylene blue (MB) based dye with a laser light of 660-nm wavelength (aPDT) were compared. The decrease in colony-forming units by each method was measured using an in vitro killing assay based on a water-exposed surface in a well plate. MB dye with laser (10 seconds) decreased the bacterial load by more than 4 orders of magnitude and was superior to PHX and CHX exposure for 60 seconds. Laser exposure alone and MB dye exposure alone decreased bacterial loads slightly, but less efficiently than 60-second exposure to PHX or CHX. The most effective means of decreasing colony-forming units was achieved by a combination of laser light and dye, which also can be used clinically. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Actinomyces naeslundii in intial dental biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Raarup, Merete Krog; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2009-01-01

    Combined use of Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) and Fluorescent in situ Hybridization (FISH) offers new opportunities for analysing the spatial relationships and temporal changes of specific members of microbial populations in intact dental biofilms. AIMS: The purpose of this study....... RESULTS: This study confirmed previous work that streptococci are the predominant colonizers of early dental biofilm along with A. naeslundii. There was a notable increase in the total number of bacteria, Streptococcus spp., and A. naeslundii over time with a tendency towards a slower growth rate for A......-layer dental biofilms up to 48 h definitively demonstrated that A. naeslundii preferentially occupied the inner layers. Some A. naeslundii microcolonies extended perpendicularly from the supporting surface surrounded by other bacteria forming chimneys of complex multilayered micro-colonies. CONCLUSIONS...

  11. Actinomyces associated with persistent vaginal granulation tissue.

    OpenAIRE

    Wai, Clifford Y; Nihira, Mikio A; Drewes, Peter G; Chang, Joe S; Siddiqui, Momin T; Hemsell, David L

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We report a case of symptomatic actinomycosis associated with vaginal suture erosion and granulation tissue refractory to conservative management, in an outpatient setting. CASE: Three months after total vaginal hysterectomy and uterosacral ligament vaginal vault suspension, a woman complained of painless, intermittent vaginal discharge and spotting. Despite cauterization of granulation tissue, vaginal spotting persisted for another month. On re-examination, braided polyester sutu...

  12. Metabolites from Actinomyces Strain H6552 Extract Inhibit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bag 2073, 88999 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia, 4Department of Physiology and Biomedical Sciences, Michigan State. University, 2201 .... incubation with the primary antibody and washing ... pathogen-free conditions in a satellite facility of.

  13. Disease: H01325 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available es that are established but less common causes of actinomycosis include A. naeslundii/viscosus complex, A. odonto...raelii Actinomyces naeslundii Actinomyces viscosus Actinomyces odontolyticus Actinomyces meyeri Actinomyces

  14. Actinomyces-induced inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the colon: A rare cause of an abdominal mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Akbulut

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: This case demonstrates that the development of IMFT secondary to actinomycosis is difficult to predict in the preoperative period. Once an exact diagnosis is confirmed by histopathologic examination, affected patients should receive prolonged antibiotherapy.

  15. Pathogenicity of Exopolysaccharide-Producing Actinomyces oris Isolated from an Apical Abscess Lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    sugars with man- nose constituting 77.5% of the polysaccharides . Strain K20 induced persistent abscesses in mice lasting at least 5 days at a... polysaccharides (EPSs) could contribute to their survival and the development of persistent infections in the human body (Costerton et al. 1999). For example...High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of EPSs Neutral monosaccharides were released from purified EPS (5 mg) by hydrolysis in a

  16. [Respiratory infections caused by slow-growing bacteria: Nocardia, Actinomyces, Rhodococcus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschapasse, E; Hussenet, C; Bergeron, A; Lebeaux, D

    2017-06-01

    Pneumonia caused by slow-growing bacteria is rare but sometimes severe. These infections share many similarities such as several differential diagnoses, difficulties to identify the pathogen, the importance of involving the microbiologist in the diagnostic investigation and the need for prolonged antibiotic treatment. However, major differences distinguish them: Nocardia and Rhodococcus infect mainly immunocompromised patients while actinomycosis also concerns immunocompetent patients; the severity of nocardioses is related to their hematogenous spread while locoregional extension by contiguity makes the gravity of actinomycosis. For these diseases, molecular diagnostic tools are essential, either to obtain a species identification and guide treatment in the case of nocardiosis or to confirm the diagnosis from a biological sample. Treatment of these infections is complex due to: (1) the limited data in the literature; (2) the need for prolonged treatment of several months; (3) the management of toxicities and drug interactions for the treatment of Nocardia and Rhodococcus. Close cooperation between pneumonologists, infectious disease specialists and microbiologists is essential for the management of these patients. Copyright © 2017 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Ecological approach of macrolide-lincosamides-streptogramin producing actinomyces from Cuban soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, I; Niebla, A; Lemus, M; González, L; Iznaga, I O; Pérez, M E; Vallin, C

    1999-09-01

    We report in this study the frequency of Streptomyces strains to produce macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) antibiotics isolated from Cuban soils. The screening assay is based on the induction of MLS-resistance phenotype in a clinical isolated strain of Staphylococcus aureus S-18. Our results suggest that of 800 Streptomyces strains isolated from different soil samples, 6% were positives in the screening test used. The ferralitic red soil from Pinar del Río (north) provided the major percentage (3.6%) of MLS producing strains. The other soil samples tested belonging to Guira de Melena and Bauta in Havana, Matanzas City, Topes De Collantes (Villa Clara), and Soroa Mountains (Pinar del Rio) hill reached very low percentages.

  18. Antimicrobial Effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on Cariogenic Bacteria Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus mutans, and Periodontal Diseases Actinomyces naeslundii and Tannerella forsythia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baca-Castañón, Magda Lorena; De la Garza-Ramos, Myriam Angélica; Alcázar-Pizaña, Andrea Guadalupe; Grondin, Yohann; Coronado-Mendoza, Anahí; Sánchez-Najera, Rosa Isela; Cárdenas-Estrada, Eloy; Medina-De la Garza, Carlos Eduardo; Escamilla-García, Erandi

    2015-03-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are well known for their beneficial effects on human health in the intestine and immune system; however, there are few studies on the impact they can generate in oral health. The aim of this study was to test and compare in vitro antimicrobial activity of L. reuteri on pathogenic bacteria involved in the formation of dental caries: S. mutans, S. gordonii, and periodontal disease: A. naeslundii and T. forsythia. Also, we determined the growth kinetics of each bacterium involved in this study. Before determining the antimicrobial action of L. reuteri on cariogenic bacteria and periodontal disease, the behavior and cell development time of each pathogenic bacterium were studied. Once the conditions for good cell growth of each of selected pathogens were established according to their metabolic requirements, maximum exponential growth was determined, this being the reference point for analyzing the development or inhibition by LAB using the Kirby Bauer method. Chlorhexidine 0.12% was positive control. L. reuteri was shown to have an inhibitory effect against S. mutans, followed by T. forsythia and S. gordonii, and a less significant effect against A. naeslundii. Regarding the effect shown by L. reuteri on the two major pathogens, we consider its potential use as a possible functional food in the prevention or treatment of oral diseases.

  19. Host-derived pentapeptide affecting adhesion, proliferation, and local pH in biofilm communities composed of Streptococcus and Actinomyces species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drobni, M.; Li, T.; Krüger, C.

    2006-01-01

    RGRPQ and derivatives were used to investigate associated innate properties and responsible motifs. The RGRPQ peptide increased 2.5-fold the growth rate of S. gordonii via a Q-dependent sequence motif and selectively stimulated oral colonization of this organism in a rat model in vivo. In contrast......, the growth of Streptococcus mutans, implicated in caries, was not affected. While the entire RGRPQ sequence was required to block sucrose-induced pH-decrease by S. gordonii and S. mutans, the N-terminal Arg residue mediated the pH increase (i.e., ammonia production) by S. gordonii alone (which exhibits Arg...

  20. Identification of the srtC1 Transcription Start Site and Catalytically Essential Residues Required for Actinomyces oris T14V SrtC1 Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    report the identification of the tran scription starting site of the srtC1 determined by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method and several...When needed, kanamycin and trimethoprim were included in growth media at concentra tions of 50 and 100mg mL1, respectively. RNA isolation and...tation, resuspended in a small volume of RNase free water and stored at 80 1C. To determine the transcription start site(s) of A. oris srtC1, 50RACE PCR

  1. Effects of fruit and vegetable low molecular mass fractions on gene expression in gingival cells challenged with Prevotella intermedia and Actinomyces naeslundii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canesi, L.; Borghi, C.; Stauder, M.; Lingström, P.; Papetti, A.; Pratten, J.; Signoretto, C.; Spratt, D.A.; Wilson, M.; Zaura, E.; Pruzzo, C.

    2011-01-01

    Low molecular mass (LMM) fractions obtained from extracts of raspberry, red chicory, and Shiitake mushrooms have been shown to be an useful source of specific antibacterial, antiadhesion/coaggregation, and antibiofilm agent(s) that might be used for protection towards caries and gingivitis. In this

  2. Evaluation of Ellagic acid on the activities of oral bacteria with the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175, Streptococcus sanguis ATCC 10556, Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975, Actinomyces naeslundii ATCC 12104, Actinomyces viscosus ATCC 15987, Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103, Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 and Bacteroides forsythus ATCC 43037 were the ...

  3. Characterization of a xylanolytic bacterial strain C10 isolated from the rumen of a red deer (Cervus elaphus) closely related of the recently described species Actinomyces succiniciruminis, A-glycerinitolerans, and A-ruminicola

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimůnek, Jiří Jr.; Killer, Jiří; Sechovcová, Hana; Šimůnek, Jiří; Pechar, R.; Rada, V.; Švec, P.; Sedláček, I.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 3 (2018), s. 391-399 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-12431S Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : bacterium C10 * red deer Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 1.521, year: 2016

  4. [Possibility of the spectral analysis of heterogeneous biological systems. The determination of the mycelium concentration of Actinomyces aureofaciens, a producer of tetracycline, cultured on a medium with corn meal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Iu N; Slugina, M D; Makarevich, V G; Telegin, N L

    1979-03-01

    A possibility of using spectroscopy of attenuated total reflection in the IR region for analysis of the heterogenic system consisting of the microorganisms and plant cells is discussed. The method of spectroscopy is proposed for estimating the mycelium concentration of Act. aureofaciens producing tetracycline in the presence of corn meal in the medium. The experimental data confirming this possibility are presented. The peculiar properties of the spectral analysis under these particular conditions are discussed. It is supposed that the method may be used for analysis of heterogenous systems including other microorganisms.

  5. Antibacterial activity of garlic and lime on isolates of extracted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) on seven bacterial species (Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Norcadia asteroides, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Actinomyces viscosus, Staphylococcus aureus and Veillonella alcaligens) isolated from 240 extracted, carious ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CREM-01-1346 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CREM-01-1346 ref|ZP_02044868.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_01748 [Actinomyces odonto...lyticus ATCC 17982] gb|EDN81280.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_01748 [Actinomyces odontolyticus ATCC 17982] ZP_02044868.1 8e-35 31% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-1899 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-1899 ref|ZP_02044205.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_01064 [Actinomyces odonto...lyticus ATCC 17982] gb|EDN80617.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_01064 [Actinomyces odontolyticus ATCC 17982] ZP_02044205.1 0.93 30% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CREM-01-1353 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CREM-01-1353 ref|ZP_02044500.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_01369 [Actinomyces odonto...lyticus ATCC 17982] gb|EDN80912.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_01369 [Actinomyces odontolyticus ATCC 17982] ZP_02044500.1 1e-61 44% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CREM-01-1291 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CREM-01-1291 ref|ZP_02045249.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_02140 [Actinomyces odonto...lyticus ATCC 17982] gb|EDN81661.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_02140 [Actinomyces odontolyticus ATCC 17982] ZP_02045249.1 2e-55 43% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CREM-01-1189 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CREM-01-1189 ref|ZP_02043993.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_00848 [Actinomyces odonto...lyticus ATCC 17982] gb|EDN80405.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_00848 [Actinomyces odontolyticus ATCC 17982] ZP_02043993.1 1e-89 55% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CREM-01-1317 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CREM-01-1317 ref|ZP_02044162.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_01021 [Actinomyces odonto...lyticus ATCC 17982] gb|EDN80574.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_01021 [Actinomyces odontolyticus ATCC 17982] ZP_02044162.1 1e-18 29% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0138 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0138 ref|ZP_02044351.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_01217 [Actinomyces odonto...lyticus ATCC 17982] gb|EDN80763.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_01217 [Actinomyces odontolyticus ATCC 17982] ZP_02044351.1 8e-09 27% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OLAT-13-0071 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OLAT-13-0071 ref|ZP_02044094.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_00951 [Actinomyces odonto...lyticus ATCC 17982] gb|EDN80506.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_00951 [Actinomyces odontolyticus ATCC 17982] ZP_02044094.1 0.24 24% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CREM-01-1317 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CREM-01-1317 ref|ZP_02044205.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_01064 [Actinomyces odonto...lyticus ATCC 17982] gb|EDN80617.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_01064 [Actinomyces odontolyticus ATCC 17982] ZP_02044205.1 3e-18 30% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CREM-01-1364 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CREM-01-1364 ref|ZP_02043317.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_00156 [Actinomyces odonto...lyticus ATCC 17982] gb|EDN79729.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_00156 [Actinomyces odontolyticus ATCC 17982] ZP_02043317.1 2e-77 62% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CREM-01-1349 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CREM-01-1349 ref|ZP_02043850.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_00702 [Actinomyces odonto...lyticus ATCC 17982] gb|EDN80262.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_00702 [Actinomyces odontolyticus ATCC 17982] ZP_02043850.1 3e-64 64% ...

  17. Gene : CBRC-AGAM-02-0138 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available etical protein ACTODO_01217 [Actinomyces odontolyticus ATCC 17982] gb|EDN80763.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_01217 [Actinomyces odon...tolyticus ATCC 17982] 8e-09 27% gnl|UG|Aga#S10993527 Single read from an extremity

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-1899 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-1899 ref|ZP_02044162.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_01021 [Actinomyces odonto...lyticus ATCC 17982] gb|EDN80574.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_01021 [Actinomyces odontolyticus ATCC 17982] ZP_02044162.1 3.5 31% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-0675 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-0675 ref|ZP_02043714.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_00563 [Actinomyces odonto...lyticus ATCC 17982] gb|EDN80126.1| hypothetical protein ACTODO_00563 [Actinomyces odontolyticus ATCC 17982] ZP_02043714.1 0.37 24% ...

  20. In vivo studies on the prebiotic effects of Vernonia amygdalina and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ifeoma Ezeonu

    2011-11-21

    Nov 21, 2011 ... Actinomyces were identified as resident bacteria in the rabbit gastrointestinal tract (GIT). ... host, by selectively stimulating the favourable growth or activity of a limited ..... particular population should change significantly while.

  1. Palatal Actinomycosis and Kaposi Sarcoma in an HIV-Infected Subject with Disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuria Ablanedo-Terrazas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Actinomyces and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare are facultative intracellular organisms, members of the bacterial order actinomycetales. Although Actinomyces can behave as copathogen when anatomic barriers are compromised, its coinfection with Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare has not previously been reported. We present the first reported case of palatal actinomycosis co-infection with disseminated MAC, in an HIV-infected subject with Kaposi sarcoma and diabetes. We discuss the pathogenesis of the complex condition of this subject.

  2. Actinomycosis pleura-pulmonary. Report of case and literature revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varon Cotes, Juan Carlos; Pardo, Diego H; Rodriguez, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Actinomyces are gram-positive aerobic-growing bacteria that are part of human bacterial flora. Actinomyces infections, which are more prevalent among men than among women (3:1), usually affect patients in their fourth decade and most often involve A. israelli (85%). thoracic, abdominal or pelvic actinomycosis is uncommon. Pulmonary infections result more from aspiration of oral secretions than from direct extension. We report one case of necrotizing pneumonia of a patient with previous stab wound injury in the affected hemi thorax and an unusual aggressive behavior

  3. Cutaneous fistula due to pulmonary actinomycosis in a Mapuche girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño, Gaston; Guzman, Pablo; Schafer, Fabiola

    2013-01-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic granulomatous disease caused by Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria of the genus Actinomyces. Pulmonary actinomycosis is a rare infection in children, and its extension into the chest wall is infrequently reported. We report a case of pulmonary actinomycosis in a 14-year-old girl of Mapuche descent who presented with chronic respiratory symptoms and multiple discharging skin sinuses on her right lower chest wall. The diagnosis was made by skin biopsy, which showed sulfur granules with actinomyces colonies. She was successfully treated with intravenous ceftriaxone and penicillin G for 6 weeks, followed by oral amoxicillin for 6 months. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Actinomycetes canaliculitis complicating congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Gopinathan Nair

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Actinomyces israelii is a Gram-positive anaerobic organism commonly associated with canaliculitis in adults. Pediatric canaliculitis is relatively rare, especially in infancy. We report the case of an 11-month-old boy who presented with co-existing canaliculitis and congenital nasolacrimal obstruction. The presenting signs included epiphora, discharge, conjunctival congestion, and matting of lashes. On examination, punctual pouting, regurgitation, and yellow canaliculiths were noted. A punctoplasty and canalicular curettage were performed along with nasolacrimal probing. Microbiological tests confirmed the organisms to be A. israelii. We discuss the clinical features and management of Actinomyces-associated canaliculitis and review the available literature on pediatric canaliculitis.

  5. Potential cariogenicity of Lycasin® 80/55 before and after repeated transmissions of the dental plaque flora in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoppelaar, J.D. de; Havenaar, R.; Drost, J.S.; Huis In t Veld, J.H.J.; Dirks, O.B.

    1984-01-01

    Five successive experiments, with rats fed ad libitum on diets containing sucrose or Lycasin® 80/55, were carried out. In experiment I, the rats were inoculated with Streptococcus mutans alone or with Strep, mutans in combination with Actinomyces viscosus. In three successive transmission

  6. Sequence of oral bacterial co-adhesion and non-contact brushing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mei, H. C.; Rustema-Abbing, M.; Bruinsma, G. M.; Gottenbos, B.; Busscher, H. J.

    Non-contact plaque removal offers advantages in interproximal spaces, fissures, and pockets. It requires the generation of strong fluid flows and the inclusion of air bubbles to become effective. A pair of co-adhering streptococci and actinomyces has been used previously to demonstrate non-contact

  7. Identification of non-streptococcal organisms from human dental plaque grown on the Streptococcus-selective medium mitis-salivarius agar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Si Young

    2015-02-01

    Mitis-salivarius (MS) agar has been used widely in microbial epidemiological studies because oral viridans streptococci can be selectively grown on this medium. Even though the previous findings reported the limited selecting power of MS agar for streptococcus strains, the identities of non-streptococcal strains from human oral samples which can grow on this medium are not clear yet. In this study, we identified non-streptococcal organisms grown on MS agar plates by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. Eighty bacterial colonies on MS plates were isolated from plaque samples, and bacterial identification was achieved with the rapid ID 32 Strep system and mini API reader. The bacterial colonies identified as non-streptococci by the API system were selected for further identification. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR and verified using DNA sequencing analysis for identification. Sequences were compared with those of reference organisms in the genome database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST). Among the 11 isolated non-streptococcal strains on MS plates, 3 strains were identified as Actinomyces naeslundii, 7 strains were identified as Actinomyces oris and 1 strain were identified as Actinomyces sp. using Blastn. In this study, we showed that some oral Actinomyces species can grow on Streptococcus-selective MS agar plates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of organic acids in Cichorium intybus inhibiting virulence-related properties of oral pathogenic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papetti, A.; Mascherpa, D.; Carazzone, C.; Stauder, M.; Spratt, D.A.; Wilson, M.; Pratten, J.; Ciric, L.; Lingström, P.; Zaura, E.; Weiss, E.; Ofek, I.; Signoretto, C.; Pruzzo, C.; Gazzani, G.

    2013-01-01

    The low molecular mass (LMM) extract of Cichorium intybus var. silvestre (red chicory) has been shown to inhibit virulence-linked properties of oral pathogens including Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces naeslundii and Prevotella intermedia. In the present study HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS2 was used to

  9. Actinomycosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the condition's common name, "lumpy jaw." Eventually, the abscess breaks through the skin surface to produce a draining sinus tract. Symptoms Symptoms may include any of the following: Draining sores in the skin, especially on the chest wall from lung infection with actinomyces Fever Mild or no pain ...

  10. Influence of age and immunization on development of gingivitis in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lekic, P; Klausen, B; Friis-Hasché, E

    1989-01-01

    To study the effect of age and antigenic priming on the development of gingivitis, 33 healthy rats were placed in contact with Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces viscosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Bacteroides gingivalis. On days 0, 3, 7, and 14 after inoculation, the gingival condition...

  11. Effects of amine fluoride on biofilm growth and salivary pellicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Mei, HC; Engels, E; de Vries, Jacob; Busscher, HJ

    2008-01-01

    The amine fluoride (AmF) N'-octadecyltrimethylendiamine-N, N,N'-tris(2-ethanol)-dihydrofluoride is a cationic antimicrobial which can have beneficial effects on plaque formation. Here, we determine changes in pellicle and bacterial cell surface properties of the strains Actinomyces naeslundii HM1,

  12. Co-adhesion and removal of adhering bacteria from salivary pellicles by three different modes of brushing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, J; Belder, GF; Busscher, HJ; Bos, R.R.M.

    2001-01-01

    This study compares removal of pairs of co-adhering and non-co-adhering oral actinomyces and streptococci by hand, electric and sonic brushing from salivary pellicles. In addition, re-deposition of a co-adhering and non-co-adhering streptococcal strain to brushed pellicles was studied. First,

  13. Isolation and Identification of Spoilage Fungi Associated With Rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The spoilage fungi isolated were Aspergillus species, Rhizopus, Penicilluim, Fusarium, Eurotium, Mucor, Geotrichum, Alternaria, Cladosporium and Actinomyces species. The predominant spoilage fungi in the grains were Aspergillus species. The populations of some spoilage fungi isolated from the grains were not high ...

  14. Molecular and biochemical characteristics of the inulosucrase HugO from Streptomyces viridochromogenes DSM40736 (Tü494)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frasch, Hans-Jörg; Leeuwen, Sander S van; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2017-01-01

    Polyfructans are synthesized from sucrose by plants (mostly inulin) and by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria (mostly levan). In the phylum Actinobacteria only levan synthesis by Actinomyces species has been reported. We have identified a putative fructansucrase gene (hugO) in

  15. Antimicrobial Activity of Diterpenes from Viguiera arenaria against Endodontic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos H. G. Martins

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Six pimarane-type diterpenes isolated from Viguiera arenaria Baker and two semi-synthetic derivatives were evaluated in vitro against a panel of representative microorganisms responsible for dental root canal infections. The microdilution method was used for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC against Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella nigrescens, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella buccae, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Bacteroides fragilis, Actinomyces naeslundii, Actinomyces viscosus, Peptostreptococcus micros, Enterococcus faecalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The compounds ent-pimara-8(14,15-dien-19-oic acid, its sodium salt and ent-8(14,15-pimaradien-3β-ol were the most active, displaying MIC values ranging from 1 to 10 μg mL-1. The results also allow us to conclude that minor structural differences among these diterpenes significantly influence their antimicrobial activity, bringing new perspectives to the discovery of new chemicals for use as a complement to instrumental endodontic procedures.

  16. Intracranial actinomycosis: case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco-Hernandez Alfonso

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Actinomycosis infection is a slow progressing disease, in which involvment of the central nervous system by Actinomyces israelii is uncommon (less than 5%. Clinical picture is non-specific and is often misdiagnosed with neoplasia; some clinical clues my arise suspicion. The case of a 59 year-old female is reported who presented headache and focal neurologic signs and in whom a out-of the hospital diagnosis of a neuroepitelial dysembryoplastic tumor was made; nonetheless after careful interview and physical exploration, a spectroscopy magnetic resonance of the brain and hystopathological description of the lesion was made and yielded the definitive diagnosis of intracranial actinomyces infection. Treatment and progression were uneventful.

  17. Fine needle aspiration cytology of vulvar actinomycosis masquerading clinically as malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Parasram Wanjari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Actinomycosis is a chronic infection caused by Actinomyces israelii, usually seen in immunocompromised patients or in the background of tissue injury. Vulvar actinomycosis presenting as a fixed swelling in an elderly individual can mimic malignancy and pose a diagnostic dilemma. We report here a case of vulvar actinomycosis diagnosed by fine needle aspiration (FNA. A 60-year-old postmenopausal female presented with a gradually increasing 15 cm × 10 cm vulvar swelling involving the right mons and right labia majora. The swelling was nodular, fixed, and nonulcerated, with multiple healed and few active discharging sinus tracts draining serosanguineous fluid and yellowish sulfur granules. FNA was diagnostic, as it revealed colonies of Actinomyces surrounded by polymorphs. Histopathology of excised specimen confirmed the cytological findings. FNA is an effective tool in the diagnosis of actinomycosis, although, its documentation is rare. Difficulties in the management can be avoided by early diagnosis using the FNA technique.

  18. Fine needle aspiration cytology of cervicofacial actinomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh Kusuma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Actinomycosis is a chronic infection caused by Actinomyces israelii, usually seen in immunocompromised patients or in the background of tissue injury. Cervicofacial actinomycosis presenting as a fixed jaw swelling in an elderly individual can mimic malignancy and pose a diagnostic dilemma. We report here a case of cervicofacial actinomycosis diagnosed by fine needle aspiration, along with a review of the relevant literature. A 60 year-old man presented with a gradually increasing 6 x 5 cm swelling in the left side of his jaw. The swelling was fixed, without any apparent sinus or abscess. Fine needle aspiration was diagnostic as it revealed colonies of actinomyces surrounded by polymorphs and chronic inflammatory cells. The histopathological study of the excised specimen confirmed the cytological findings. Fine needle aspiration is an effective tool in the diagnosis of actinomycosis although its documentation is rare. Difficulties in the management can be avoided by early diagnosis using the fine needle aspiration technique.

  19. Isolated hepatic actinomycosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehab Thomas M

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Actinomyces are slow growing, non-spore forming, gram-positive, branching bacilli that thrive in anaerobic and microareophilic conditions. Actinomyces are more commonly associated with oral and cervicofacial infections. Hepatic involvement in infections of the abdomen (known as isolated hepatic actinomycosis is rare, accounting for only 5% of all cases of actinomycosis. Case presentation We present the case of a 75-year-old Caucasian woman with a 3-month history of night sweats, fever, chills, abdominal bloating, anorexia, weight-loss, and early satiety. The patient was found to have isolated hepatic actinomycosis infection after undergoing a laparotomy with a biopsy of the liver. The patient has now recovered. Conclusion Isolated hepatic actinomycosis is a rare and often overlooked etiology for a liver mass. Given its subacute presentation and nondescript symptomatology, physicians should be aware of this differential and the potential pitfalls in diagnosis and management.

  20. [Protease activity of microflora in the oral cavity of patients with periodontitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voropaeva, E A; Baĭrakova, A L; Bichucher, A M; D'iakov, V L; Kozlov, L V

    2008-01-01

    Microbial spectrum and non-specific as well as specific IgA1 protease activity of isolated microorganisms were investigated in gingival liquid of patients with periodontitis. Microorganisms from the gingival liqud of these patients belonged to conditional-pathogenic obligate and facultatively anaerobic bacteria. 24 strains of microorganisms have been identified. Nonspecific proteolytic activity was found in the following microorganisms: Actinomyces israelii, Actinomyces naeslundii, Aerococcus viridans, Bifidobacterium longum, Neisseria subflave, Streptococcus parvulus, Eubacterium alactolyticum, Lactobaccilus catenoforme, Bacillus spp. Specific IgA1-protease activity and lack of proteolytic activity towards IgG was found in Streptococcus acidominimus, Streptococcus hansenii, Streptococcus salivarius, Leptotrychia buccalis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Neisseria sicca. No proteolytic activity was found in cultivation medium of Eubacterium alactolyticum (1 strain), Prevotella buccalis, Aerococcus viridans and Streptococcus sanguis.

  1. Use of computed tomography in the diagnosis of a cerebral abscess in a goat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerros, T.C.; Mattoon, J.S.; Snyder, S.P.

    1998-01-01

    A 7-month-old La Mancha doe was presented with a right head tilt and ventral strabismus while circling to the left, History and physical examination led to a tentative diagnosis of a cerebral abscess. Computed tomography revealed a large, complex mass with ring enhancement in the left cerebral hemisphere, supporting the diagnosis. Postmortem examination confirmed the cerebral abscess. Bacterial cultures yielded heavy growth of Actinomyces pyogenes

  2. Role of microbial biofilms in the maintenance of oral health and in the development of dental caries and periodontal diseases. Consensus report of group 1 of the Joint EFP/ORCA workshop on the boundaries between caries and periodontal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanz, Mariano; Beighton, David; Curtis, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: The scope of this working group was to review (1) ecologica linteractions at the dental biofilm in health and disease, (2) the role of microbial communities in the pathogenesis of periodontitis and caries, and (3) the innate host response in caries and periodontal diseases....... Results and Conclusions: A health-associated biofilm includes genera such as Neisseria, Streptococcus, Actinomyces, Veillonella and Granulicatella. Microorganisms associated with both caries and periodontal diseases are metabolically highly specialized and organized as multispecies microbial biofilms...

  3. Actinomicose pulmonar: A propósito de um caso clínico Pulmonary actinomycosis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabela Salgueiro Marques

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A actinomicose pulmonar é uma situação clínica rara mas de diagnóstico importante e nem sempre fácil. Trata-se de uma infecção crónica supurativa causada por uma bactéria anaeróbia gram-positiva microfilamentosa designada por Actinomyces. Apresenta-se o caso clínico de um homem de 32 anos, previamente saudável, sem co-morbilidades, que desenvolve um quadro de febre, associada a tosse produtiva e toracalgia direita. Verificou-se a existência de alterações radiológicas sugestivas de pneumonia lobar superior direita. Iniciou terapêutica antibiótica com amoxicilina/clavulanato, com melhoria clínica e analítica, contudo com persistência do achado radiológico, acabando por realizar tomografia computorizada que revelou tratar-se de condensação lobar superior direita com características discretamente expansivas. A investigação etiológica permitiu identificar o agente responsável, o Actinomyces. Os autores fazem uma breve revisão desta patologia.Pulmonary Actinomycosis is a rare clinical situation whose diagnosis is important but not always easy to make. It is a chronic infection caused by the anaerobic grampositive filamentous bacterium Actinomyces. We present a case report of a 32 year-old man previously healthy with no co-morbidities, with fever, productive cough and chest pain, with radiological evidence of right superior lobar pneumonia. He began antibiotic therapy with amoxicillin/clavulanate, with good clinical and analytic response, but the radiological finding persisted. Thoracic computerized tomography revealed discretely expansive right lobar condensation. The epidemiological investigation identified actinomyces. The authors present this case and a brief review of this disease.

  4. Unusual multifocal granulomatous disease caused by actinomycetous bacteria in a nestling Derbyan parrot (Psittacula derbiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, F J; Jaensch, S

    2009-01-01

    A nestling Derbyan parrot (Psittacula derbiana) was presented with unusual subcutaneous swellings of the thigh regions, and poor growth. Histological examination revealed actinomycetous bacteria associated with multifocal systemic granulomas. The clinical and pathological findings of the case are presented, and some relevant aspects of actinomycetous bacterial infections in mammals and birds are discussed. Although granulomatous disease is encountered at times in avian species, the actinomycetous bacteria (Nocardia and Actinomyces spp.) have rarely been reported in association with multifocal granulomatous disease in birds.

  5. Chameleon of head and neck diseases: Intraoral actinomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srisha Basappa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Actinomycosis is a chronic infectious granulomatous disease caused by saprophytic Actinomyces species. The case discussed in this report is of an adult female patient with a large actinomycotic lesion in the region of the mandibular left second premolar, first and second molars. Provisional diagnosis was made as extragingival pyogenic granuloma. Definitive diagnosis was based on histopathological examination. Since actinomycotic infection has opportunistic characteristics, early diagnosis and proper management of the disease is mandatory to prevent further complications.

  6. Pediatric cervicofacial actinomycosis disclosing an underlying congenital dermoid cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santwana Verma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric cervicofacial actinomycosis is a rare occurrence consequent to dental infections and manipulations or maxillofacial trauma. The clinical presentation ranges from multiple draining sinuses to swellings resembling tumors and cysts. The present unusual case had congenital dermoid cyst of mid upper lip with Actinomyces israelii infection identified on microscopy, culture, and histopathology. A successful outcome in the present case was obtained using combination of medical and surgical treatment.

  7. Actinomycotic brain infection: registered diffusion, perfusion MR imaging and MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Sumei; Wolf, Ronald L.; Woo, John H.; Melhem, Elias R.; Poptani, Harish; Wang, Jiongjiong; O'Rourke, Donald M.; Roy, Subhojit

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Actinomycotic brain infection is caused by an organism of the Actinomyces genus. We report here one such case. Methods: The methods used included coregistered diffusion, perfusion and spectroscopic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Decreased apparent diffusion coefficient, markedly elevated fractional anisotropy (FA) and reduced cerebral blood flow were observed. MR spectroscopy demonstrated elevated amino acids, acetate and succinate. Elevated FA values may be due to the microstructure of this special brain infection. (orig.)

  8. In vitro activity of cefbuperazone, a new cephamycin, against anaerobic bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhala, R H; Thadepalli, H; Rao, B; Bansal, M B; Marshall, R

    1985-01-01

    The 90% MIC of cefbuperazone (BMY 25182) was 32 micrograms/ml for Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides spp., 128 micrograms/ml for Fusobacterium and Clostridium spp., 64 micrograms/ml for Eubacterium and Peptococcus spp., 8 micrograms/ml for Actinomyces spp., and 32 micrograms/ml for Peptostreptococcus spp. The level of activity of cefbuperazone was higher against B. fragilis and lower against anaerobic cocci than those of related cephalosporins, i.e., cefoxitin, cefoperazone, cefotaxime, cef...

  9. Microbial characteristics of purple paddy soil in response to Pb pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiu-Ju; Zhang, Yue-Qiang; Zhang, La-Mei; Zhou, Xin-Bin; Shi, Xiao-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The study focused on the change of microbial characteristics affected by Plumbum pollution with purple paddy soil in an incubation experiment. The results showed that low concentration of Plumbum had little effect on most of microbial amounts, biological activity and enzymatic activity. However, denitrifying activity was inhibited severely, and inhibition rate was up to 98%. Medium and high concentration of Plumbum significantly reduced the amounts and activity of all microorganisms and enzymatic activity, which increased with incubation time. Negative correlations were found between Plumbum concentrations and microbial amounts, biological activity and enzymatic activities except fungi and actinomyces. Thus they can be used to indicate the Plumbum pollution levels to some extent. LD(50) of denitrifying bacteria (DB) and ED50 of denitrifying activity were 852mg/kg and 33.5mg/kg. Across all test soil microbes, denitrifying bacteria was most sensitive to Plumbum pollution in purple paddy soil. Value of early warning showed that anaerobic cellulose-decomposing bacteria (ACDB) and actinomyces were also sensitive to Plumbum pollution. We concluded that denitrifying activity, actinomyces, ACDB or DB can be chosen as predictor of Plumbum contamination in purple paddy soil.

  10. Complete structure of the cell surface polysaccharide of Streptococcus oralis ATCC 10557: A receptor for lectin-mediated interbacterial adherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abeygunawardana, C.; Bush, C.A.; Cisar, J.O.

    1991-01-01

    Lectin-carbohydrate binding is known to play an important role in a number of different cell-cell interactions including those between certain species of oral streptococci and actinomyces that colonize teeth. The cell wall polysaccharides of Streptococcus oralis ATCC 10557, S. oralis 34, and Streptococcus mitis J22, although not identical antigenically, each function as a receptor molecule for the galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine reactive fimbrial lectins of Actinomyces viscosus and Actinomyces naeslundii. Carbohydrate analysis of the receptor polysaccharide isolated from S. oralis ATCC 10557 shows galactose (3 mol), glucose (1 mol), GalNAc (1 mol), and rhamnose (1 mol). 1 H NMR spectra of the polysaccharide show that is partially O-acetylated. Analysis of the 1 H NMR spectrum of the de-O-acetylated polysaccharide shows that it is composed of repeating subunits containing six monosaccharides and that the subunits are joined by a phosphodiester linkage. The 1 H and 13 C NMR spectra were completely assigned by two-dimensional homonuclear correlation methods and by 1 H-detected heteronuclear multiple-quantum correlation ( 1 H[ 13 C]HMQC). The complete 1 H and 13 C assignment of the native polysaccharide was carried out by the same techniques augmented by a 13 C-coupled hybrid HMQC-COSY method, which is shown to be especially useful for carbohydrates in which strong coupling and overlapping peaks in the 1 H spectrum pose difficulties

  11. Preoperative diagnosis of pelvic actinomycosis by clinical cytology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuda K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Katsuya Matsuda,1 Hisayoshi Nakajima,2 Khaleque N Khan,1 Terumi Tanigawa,1 Daisuke Hamaguchi,1 Michio Kitajima,1 Koichi Hiraki,1 Shingo Moriyama,3 Hideaki Masuzaki11Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 2Department of Health Sciences, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 3Shimabara Maternity Clinic, Nagasaki, JapanBackground: The purpose of this work was to investigate whether clinical cytology could be useful in the preoperative diagnosis of pelvic actinomycosis.Methods: This study involved the prospective collection of samples derived from the endometrium and the uterine cervix, and retrospective data analysis. Nine patients with clinically diagnosed pelvic actinomycosis were enrolled. The clinical and hematological characteristics of patients were recorded, and detection of actinomyces was performed by cytology, pathology, and bacteriological culture of samples and by imprint intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD cytology.Results: The detection rate of actinomyces was 77.7% by combined cervical and endometrial cytology, 50.0% by pathology, and 11.1% by bacterial culture.Conclusion: The higher detection rate of actinomyces by cytology than by pathology or bacteriology suggests that careful cytological examination may be clinically useful in the preoperative diagnosis of pelvic actinomycosis.Keywords: actinomycosis, cytology, pathology, intrauterine contraceptive device, pelvic inflammatory disease

  12. Microflora of root filled teeth with apical periodontitis in Latvian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindere, Anda; Kundzina, Rita; Nikolajeva, Vizma; Eze, Daina; Petrina, Zaiga

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the microbial flora of root filled teeth with apical periodontitis and to determine the prevalence of β-lactamase producing strains in isolated bacteria in Latvian patients. 33 root filled teeth with asymptomatic persisting periapical lesions were selected for the present study. During nonsurgical endodontic retreatment, the root filling material was removed and canals were sampled. Determination of microbial species was based on series of biochemical tests using identification kits. All strains of bacteria were tested for β-lactamase production by using chromogenic nitrocefin-impregnated slides. Bacteria were found in 32 (97%) of initial specimens from the teeth. The number of isolated microbial strains in the specimens ranged from one to six (mean 2.7). 79% of the isolated microbial species were Gram-positive bacteria. The most common isolates were Streptococcus (27%), Actinomyces (27%), Staphylococcus (18%), Enterococcus (18%) and Lactobacillus (18%) spp. Yeasts were found as four isolates in 3 cases (9%). β-lactamase-producing bacterial strains were detected in 12 specimens, 36% of the patients. The most common enzyme-producing bacteria belonged to Actinomyces and Staphylococcus spp. The microbial flora in previously treated root canals with apical periodontitis is limited to a small number of predominantly Gram-positive microbial species. The most common isolates are Streptococcus, Actinomyces, Staphylococcus, Enterococcus and Lactobacillus spp. A moderately high prevalence of β-lactamase producing bacterial strains was detected in patients with root filled teeth with apical periodontitis.

  13. Role of Papanicolaou Smear in the Diagnosis of Pathologic Flora in Asymptomatic Patients in Rural Health Care Set-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siona Sabu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The infections of female genital tract, especially the cervix are asymptomatic in presentation and pose a diagnostic challenge. Vaginal infections can lead to cytoplasmic and nuclear abnormalities in the epithelial cells. Additionally, these infections could augur an inflammatory response of varying nature. The most common flora include Candida albicans, Gardnerella vaginalis, Trichomonas vaginalis, Human Papilloma Virus (HPV, Human Herpes Virus (HHV and Actinomyces sp. Aim: This study seeks to measure the role of Papanicolaou smear in detection of pathologic flora: Candida albicans, Gardnerella vaginalis, Trichomonas vaginalis, HPV, HHV and Actinomyces; in a rural health care set up amongst women in the reproductive and menopausal age group. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of cervical smears by Papanicolaou method, over a 14 month period was carried out in a tertiary care centre including a total number of 150 patients. Results: Of the total of 150 samples examined, Candida species was the most frequently detected (8.7% followed by Trichomonas vaginalis (5.3% and Gardnerella vaginalis species (4.7%. HPV-induced changes were noted in a mere 2% of cases. Actinomyces species was noted in less than 1% of cases. Conclusion: The Papanicolaou test for examining cervical smear has definite uses in detecting vaginal microorganisms. Apart from detection of the usual pathogenic flora, the test has utility in defining the degree of inflammation and additional reparative changes.

  14. [Effects of nitrogen application rate on faba bean fusarium wilt and rhizospheric microbial metabolic functional diversity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yan; Yang, Zhi-xian; Dong, Kun; Tang, Li; Zheng, Yi; Hu, Guo-bin

    2013-04-01

    A field plot experiment was conducted to study the effects of different nitrogen (N) application rates on the microbial functional diversity in faba bean rhizosphere and the relationships between the microbial functional diversity and the occurrence of faba bean fusarium wilt. Four nitrogen application rates were installed, i. e. , N0(0 kg hm-2 , N1 (56. 25 kg hm-2) , N2(112. 5 kg hm-2), and N3 (168.75 kg hm-2), and Biolog microbial analysis system was applied to study the damage of faba bean fusarium wilt and the rhizospheric microbial metabolic functional diversity. Applying N (N1 N2, and N3) decreased the disease index of faba bean fusarium wilt and the quantity of Fusarium oxysporum significantly, and increased the quantities of bacteria and actinomyces and the ratios of bacteria/fungi and actinomyces/fungi significantly, with the peak values of bacteria and actinomyces, bacteria/fungi, and actinomyces/fungi, and the lowest disease index and F. oxysporum density in N2. As compared with N0, applying N increased the AWCD value significantly, but the effects of different N application rates on the ability of rhizospheric microbes in utilizing six types of carbon sources had definite differences. Under the application of N, the utilization rates of carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and amino acids by the rhizospheric microbes were higher. Principal component analysis demonstrated that applying N changed the rhizospheric microbial community composition obviously, and the carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and amino acids were the sensitive carbon sources differentiating the changes of the microbial community induced by N application. Applying N inhibited the utilization of carbohydrates and carboxylic acids but improved the utilization of amino acids and phenolic acids by the rhizospheric microbes, which could be one of the main reasons of applying N being able to reduce the harm of faba bean fusarium wilt. It was suggested that rationally applying N could increase the

  15. Actinomicosis: presentación de un caso y revisión del tema con énfasis en los aspectos orales Actinomycosis in children with emphasis on oral aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Gómez Jiménez

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available En el presente artículo se actualizan los conocimientos sobre actinomicosis y se presenta el caso de un niño con la forma torácica de dicha entidad. La actinomicosis es una infección infrecuente que puede afectar cualquier parte del cuerpo; los Actinomyces son bacilos o filamentos gram positivos que forman parte de la flora endógena de las mucosas en especial las de las cavidades oral e intestinal. Su comportamiento es insidioso pero en oportunidades tiene expresión aguda, fistulización a piel y cicatrización con fibrosis. Los llamados gránulos de azufre son una característica macroscópica del exudado que contribuye al diagnóstico de laboratorio. La infección inicial para la forma cervicofacial suele provenir de la cavidad oral y extenderse a la vecindad o ser aspirada a los pulmones. El tratamiento de elección es la penicilina, inicialmente endovenosa y seguidamente oral por un lapso no menor de 6 meses. Algunas formas requieren manejo quirúrgico. We report the case of a child with thoracic actinomycosis and review this disease. Actinomycosis is a rare infection that can affect any part of the body; Actinomyces are gram positive bacilli or filaments belonging to the endogenous flora of the mUCOUS membranes, specially that of the oral cavity and the intestinal tract. Actinomycosis usually behaves as an insidioUS disease but may ocassionally have acute expressions with fistulization to the skin and fibroUS healing during resolution. The So called sulfur granules are an important macroscopic detail that helps establish the diagnosis. Actinomyces infections usually start in the oral cavity for the cervicofacial form and then spread to contiguous tissues or to the lungs via aspiration. Penicillin is the drug of choice and surgical drainage may become necessary.

  16. Implication of zinc excess on soil health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyszkowska, Jadwiga; Boros-Lajszner, Edyta; Borowik, Agata; Baćmaga, Małgorzata; Kucharski, Jan; Tomkiel, Monika

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate zinc's influence on the resistance of organotrophic bacteria, actinomyces, fungi, dehydrogenases, catalase and urease. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse of the University of Warmia and Mazury (UWM) in Olsztyn, Poland. Plastic pots were filled with 3 kg of sandy loam with pHKCl - 7.0 each. The experimental variables were: zinc applied to soil at six doses: 100, 300, 600, 1,200, 2,400 and 4,800 mg of Zn(2+) kg(-1) in the form of ZnCl2 (zinc chloride), and species of plant: oat (Avena sativa L.) cv. Chwat and white mustard (Sinapis alba) cv. Rota. Soil without the addition of zinc served as the control. During the growing season, soil samples were subjected to microbiological analyses on experimental days 25 and 50 to determine the abundance of organotrophic bacteria, actinomyces and fungi, and the activity of dehydrogenases, catalase and urease, which provided a basis for determining the soil resistance index (RS). The physicochemical properties of soil were determined after harvest. The results of this study indicate that excessive concentrations of zinc have an adverse impact on microbial growth and the activity of soil enzymes. The resistance of organotrophic bacteria, actinomyces, fungi, dehydrogenases, catalase and urease decreased with an increase in the degree of soil contamination with zinc. Dehydrogenases were most sensitive and urease was least sensitive to soil contamination with zinc. Zinc also exerted an adverse influence on the physicochemical properties of soil and plant development. The growth of oat and white mustard plants was almost completely inhibited in response to the highest zinc doses of 2,400 and 4,800 mg Zn(2+) kg(-1).

  17. Reproducción in vitro de la biopelícula de mucositis sobre implantes de zirconio

    OpenAIRE

    Spina, Marianela; Butler, Teresa Adela; Lazo, Sergio Daniel; Escudero Giachella, Ezequiel; Friso, Nélida Ester; Basal, Roxana Lía; Bentivegna, Nicolás; Amaro, Emilio Gustavo; Pazos, Fernando Ezequiel; Alfaro, Gabriel Enrique; Ivanov, Marcela; Cuchetti, Diana; Merlo, Diego; Viscovick, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    La mucositis, causada por formas cocoides y Actinomyces, es una patología que se observa con frecuencia en los implantes de titanio. Sin embargo, aún no se ha reportado la presencia de estos microorganismos sobre los implantes de zirconio. El objetivo de este trabajo es examinar la presencia de la biopelícula de mucositis adherida a los implantes Zirconio, a través de la observación por Microscopía Electrónica de Barrido (MEB). Para este trabajo se utilizaron 10 cápsulas de Petri con Agar Mit...

  18. Investigação das propriedades anticariogênicas de óleos essenciais: atividade antimicrobiana e caracterização química

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Maria Alcionéia Carvalho de [UNESP

    2012-01-01

    O objetivo desse trabalho foi avaliar os óleos essenciais de Thymus vulgaris, Hyptis spicigera, Cymbopogon citratrus, Cymbopogon martinii, Cymbopogon flexuosus bem como os terpenos (citral e cineoli), com relação ao seu potencial para aplicação em terapia anticariogênica. Inicialmente, e a seguir foram realizados testes microbiológicos para a determinação da concentração inibitória mínima (CIM), concentração bactericida mínima (CBM), utilizando os micro-organismos Actinomyces naeslundii ATCC ...

  19. Abdominal actinomycosis: a report of three cases of this uncommon infection; Actinomicos abdominal: una infeccion poco frecuente. A proposito de tres casos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostiz, S.; Sanchez, C.; Jimenez, G.; Caballero, P.; Cordero, J. L.; Montes, M. [Hospital Virgen del Camino. Pamplona (Spain)

    1999-07-01

    Abdominal actinomycosis is a rare infection caused by Actinomyces, a grampositive bacterium that generally exists as a saprophyte in the oral cavity and colon. The diagnosis is usually difficult due to its low incidence and nonspecific clinical and radiological findings. We present three new cases of abdominal actinomycosis. The first involved several pelvic structures and abdominal wall. The second was detected in left hepatic lobe. In the third case, the infection was located in descending colon. We stress the wide range of presenting signs, describing the findings that, when taken together, suggest the correct diagnosis. (Author) 13 refs.

  20. GenBank blastx search result: AK104368 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104368 001-035-E04 AF056321.1 Actinomyces naeslundii urease gamma subunit UreA (ureA), urease... beta subunit UreB (ureB), urease alpha subunit UreC (ureC), urease accessory protein UreE (ureE), urease... accessory protein UreF (ureF), urease accessory protein UreG (ureG), and urease accessory protein UreD (ureD) genes, complete cds.|BCT BCT 3e-48 +1 ...

  1. Influence of complement on neutrophil extracellular trap release induced by bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Lisa Joanne; Damgaard, Christian; Holmstrup, Palle

    2016-01-01

    by Staphylococcus aureus and three oral bacteria: Actinomyces viscosus, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. vincettii. Material and Methods Bacteria-stimulated NET release from the neutrophils of healthy donors was measured fluorometrically. Various complement containing...... In conclusion, complement opsonization promotes NET release induced by a variety of bacteria, including A. actinomycetemcomitans, and CR1 plays a dominant role in the process. Complement consumption or deficiency may compromise NETosis induced by some bacterial species, including A. actinomycetemcomitans....... Within biofilms, the complement-inactivating abilities of some bacteria may protect other species against NETosis, while these are more vulnerable when adopting a planktonic lifestyle....

  2. Binding Properties of Streptococcus gordonii SspA and SspB (Antigen I/II Family) Polypeptides Expressed on the Cell Surface of Lactococcus lactis MG1363

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Ann R.; Gilbert, Christophe; Wells, Jeremy M.; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    1998-01-01

    The oral bacterium Streptococcus gordonii expresses two cell wall-associated polypeptides, designated SspA (1,542 amino acid residues) and SspB (1,462 amino acid residues), that have 70% sequence identity. These polypeptides are members of the antigen I/II family of oral streptococcal adhesins and mediate the binding of streptococci to salivary glycoproteins, collagen, and other oral microorganisms such as Actinomyces naeslundii. To determine if SspA and SspB have differential binding propert...

  3. In vitro activities of ramoplanin, teicoplanin, vancomycin, linezolid, bacitracin, and four other antimicrobials against intestinal anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citron, D M; Merriam, C V; Tyrrell, K L; Warren, Y A; Fernandez, H; Goldstein, E J C

    2003-07-01

    By using an agar dilution method, the in vitro activities of ramoplanin, teicoplanin, vancomycin, linezolid, and five other agents were determined against 300 gram-positive and 54 gram-negative strains of intestinal anaerobes. Ramoplanin was active at Eubacterium, Actinomyces, Propionibacterium, and Peptostreptococcus spp. were inhibited by spp. were >or=256 microg/ml. Ramoplanin displays excellent activity against C. difficile and other gram-positive enteric anaerobes, including vancomycin-resistant strains; however, it has poor activity against most gram-negative anaerobes and thus potentially has a lesser effect on the ecological balance of normal fecal flora.

  4. Primary omental actinomycosis as a differential diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Castañeda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Actinomycosis is a chronic suppurative granulomatous inflammation caused by Actinomyces species. Abdominal actinomycosis is a rare condition, with very low incidence in childhood, and usually associated to trauma or perforation of hollow viscera. We are presenting a case of a ten-year-old boy with omental actinomycosis mimic and appendiceal infection, without a history of trauma or perforation, suggesting a hemmatogen spread. The complete resection of the affected tissue may warrant a cure in spite of a short antibiotic curse.

  5. Unusual Presentations of Actinomycosis; Anterior Abdominal Wall and Appendix: Report of Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Karateke

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary actinomycosis of the anterior abdominal wall and appendix are very rare clinical entities. An accurate diagnosis is generally obtained by histological examination, and treatment often requires surgical resection. Case Report: In this study we presented two cases of primary actinomycosis involving the anterior abdominal wall and a third one located in the appendix. Conclusion: Actinomyces Israelii can involve all anatomic structures of the abdomen. Although preoperative diagnosis is difficult, the combination of surgery and antibiotic treatment results in complete treatment in the majority of cases.

  6. Identification by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing of Lactobacillus salivarius Bacteremic Cholecystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Fung, Ami M. Y.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2002-01-01

    An anaerobic, nonsporulating, gram-positive bacterium was isolated from blood and bile pus cultures of a 70-year-old man with bacteremic acute cholecystitis. The API 20A system showed that it was 70% Actinomyces naeslundii and 30% Bifidobacterium species, whereas the Vitek ANI system and the ATB ID32A Expression system showed that it was “unidentified.” The 16S rRNA gene of the strain was amplified and sequenced. There were 3 base differences between the nucleotide sequence of the isolate and that of Lactobacillus salivarius subsp. salivarius or L. salivarius subsp. salicinius, indicating that the isolate was a strain of L. salivarius. The patient responded to cholecystectomy and a 2-week course of antibiotic treatment. Identification of the organism in the present study was important because the duration of antibiotic therapy would have been entirely different depending on the organism. If the bacterium had been identified as Actinomyces, penicillin for 6 months would have been the regimen of choice. However, it was Lactobacillus, and a 2-week course of antibiotic was sufficient. PMID:11773128

  7. [Correlation analysis of nutrients and microorganisms in soils with polyphenols and total flavonoids of Houttuynia cordata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Luo, Shi-qiong; Yang, Zhan-nan; Ma, Jing; Hong, Liang

    2015-04-01

    The relationship of nutrients and microorganisms in soils with polyphenols and total flavonoids of Houttuynia cordata were investigated by measuring nutrients, enzyme activity, pH, concentrations of microbe phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils, and determining concentrations of polyphenols and total flavonoids of H. cordata. The research is aimed to understand characteristics of the planting soils and improve the quality of cultivated H. cordata. The soils at different sample sites varied greatly in nutrients, enzyme activity, pH, microbic PLFAs and polyphenols and all flavonoids. The content of total PLFAs in sample sites was following: bacteria > fungi > actinomyces > nematode. The content of bacteria PLFAs was 37.5%-65.0% at different sample sites. Activities of polyphenol oxidease, concentrations of available P and content of PLFAs of bacteria, actinomyces and total microorganisms in soils were significantly and positively related to the concentrations of polyphenols and total flavonoids of H. cordata, respectively (P soils was significantly and negatively related to concentrations of polyphenols and total flavonoids of H. cordata, respectively (P soil nutrient, which may be improved due to transformation of soil microorganisms and enzymes to N and P in the soils, was beneficial to adaptation of H. cordata adapted to different soil conditions, and significantly affects metabolic accumulation of polyphenols and flavonoids of H. cordata.

  8. Divergent pro-inflammatory profile of human dendritic cells in response to commensal and pathogenic bacteria associated with the airway microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Steen-Jensen, Daniel Bisgaard; Laursen, Janne Marie; Søndergaard, Jonas Nørskov; Musavian, Hanieh Sadat; Butt, Tariq Mahmood; Brix, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies using culture-independent methods have characterized the human airway microbiota and report microbial communities distinct from other body sites. Changes in these airway bacterial communities appear to be associated with inflammatory lung disease, yet the pro-inflammatory properties of individual bacterial species are unknown. In this study, we compared the immune stimulatory capacity on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) of selected airway commensal and pathogenic bacteria predominantly associated with lungs of asthma or COPD patients (pathogenic Haemophillus spp. and Moraxella spp.), healthy lungs (commensal Prevotella spp.) or both (commensal Veillonella spp. and Actinomyces spp.). All bacteria were found to induce activation of DCs as demonstrated by similar induction of CD83, CD40 and CD86 surface expression. However, asthma and COPD-associated pathogenic bacteria provoked a 3-5 fold higher production of IL-23, IL-12p70 and IL-10 cytokines compared to the commensal bacteria. Based on the differential cytokine production profiles, the studied airway bacteria could be segregated into three groups (Haemophilus spp. and Moraxella spp. vs. Prevotella spp. and Veillonella spp. vs. Actinomyces spp.) reflecting their pro-inflammatory effects on DCs. Co-culture experiments found that Prevotella spp. were able to reduce Haemophillus influenzae-induced IL-12p70 in DCs, whereas no effect was observed on IL-23 and IL-10 production. This study demonstrates intrinsic differences in DC stimulating properties of bacteria associated with the airway microbiota.

  9. The anti-adherence effect of Piper betle and Psidium guajava extracts on the adhesion of early settlers in dental plaque to saliva-coated glass surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Fathilah Abdul; Rahim, Zubaidah Haji Abd

    2003-12-01

    The aqueous extracts of Piper betle and Psidium guajava were prepared and tested for their anti-adherence effect on the adhesion of early plaque settlers (Strep. mitis, Strep. sanguinis and Actinomyces sp.). The saliva-coated glass surfaces were used to simulate the pellicle-coated enamel surface in the oral cavity. Our results showed that the anti-adherence activities of Piper betle and Psidium guajava extracts towards the bacteria were different between the bacterial species. Psidium guajava was shown to have a slightly greater anti-adherence effect on Strep. sanguinis by 5.5% and Actinomyces sp. by 10% and a significantly higher effect on Strep. mitis (70%) compared to Piper betle. The three bacterial species are known to be highly hydrophobic, and that hydrophobic bonding seemed to be an important factor in their adherence activities. It is therefore suggested that the plant extracts, in expressing their anti-adherence activities, could have altered the hydrophobic nature of the bonding between the bacteria and the saliva-coated glass surfaces.

  10. A Suspicious Pancreatic Mass in Chronic Pancreatitis: Pancreatic Actinomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. de Clerck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a chronic infection of the pancreas caused by the suppurative Gram-positive bacterium Actinomyces. It has mostly been described in patients following repeated main pancreatic duct stenting in the context of chronic pancreatitis or following pancreatic surgery. This type of pancreatitis is often erroneously interpreted as pancreatic malignancy due to the specific invasive characteristics of Actinomyces. Case. A 64-year-old male with a history of chronic pancreatitis and repeated main pancreatic duct stenting presented with weight loss, fever, night sweats, and abdominal pain. CT imaging revealed a mass in the pancreatic tail, invading the surrounding tissue and resulting in splenic vein thrombosis. Resectable pancreatic cancer was suspected, and pancreatic tail resection was performed. Postoperative findings revealed pancreatic actinomycosis instead of neoplasia. Conclusion. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a rare type of infectious pancreatitis that should be included in the differential diagnosis when a pancreatic mass is discovered in a patient with chronic pancreatitis and prior main pancreatic duct stenting. Our case emphasizes the importance of pursuing a histomorphological confirmation.

  11. Microbiota saprófita associada à doença periodontal em cães Oral flora associated with periodontal disease in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. Domingues

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se um estudo sobre a microbiota saprófita associada à doença periodontal espontânea em cães com o objetivo de identificar as bactérias anaeróbias predominantes nas lesões. Com auxílio de cureta odontológica, amostras colhidas diretamente do espaço subgengival foram semeadas em meio CDC (Central for Disease Control para anaeróbios e incubadas, em anaerobiose, a 37°C, por sete dias. A caracterização das colônias foi realizada por meio da morfologia e do teste bioquímico (Sistema API 20AÒ. Identificaram-se os seguintes gêneros: Prevotella spp., Bacteroides spp., Propionibacterium spp., Gemella spp., Actinomyces spp., Eubacterium spp. e Porphyromonas spp.Anaerobic bacteria associated with spontaneous periodontal disorders were studied. The samples were directly colected from the subgingival space with a odontologic curet, and they were plated in Central for Disease Control culture medium for anaerobic bacteria and incubated in anaerobic conditions at 37°C for seven days. The characterization of the colonies were done by the morphologic study and biochemical tests (API 20A. Prevotella spp., Bacteroides spp., Propionibacterium spp., Actinomyces spp., Eubacterium spp., Porphyromonas spp. and Gemella spp. were identified in the samples.

  12. Decomposition of cholesterol by some organisms isolated from certain Egyptian soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.S.

    1994-01-01

    Some soil microorganisms exhibit a good growth on cholesterol mineral salts agar medium with a uniform distribution of cholesterol as a sole carbon study, 74 strains succeeded to grow on mineral salts agar medium supplied with 0.1% (w/v) cholesterol as the sole source of carbon. Out of these microorganisms, only 43 strains of actinomyces formed zones of translucency on the cholesterol agar medium. Colorimetric determination showed that the total cholesterol decomposition ranges between (74.0-99.0%) for the different actinomyces. One strain was considered a new variety and proved to be the most potent cholesterol decomposer according to its ability to decompose the highest amount of cholesterol as the sole source of carbon, and hence was chosen for further study. It was identified to the species level as pseudo nocardia compact var. nov, chole-rugosa, S-39 B B II. The influence of temperature, incubation period, shaking and buffers on cholesterol decomposition were also investigated. Optimum temperature and buffer were 30 degree C(at ph 7.0-7.2) after 8 days at 120 r.p.m. in a medium containing 0.01 M phosphate buffer and 0.1 m (w/v) cholesterol. The maximum cholesterol decomposition at an incubation temperature of 30 degree C was detected in the presence of L-glutamine

  13. The Quality of Liquid Fermented Products for Alternative Use of Antibiotics for Animal Raising

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piadang, Nattaya

    2006-09-01

    The chemical properties of liquid fermented products (LFP) as probiotics substance for alternative uses of antibiotic were studied. The LFP of 235 were sampling from markets and farmers during 2005-2006. The total count of bacteria, fungi, lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Actinomyces and coliform bacteria were conducted. Chemical analysis of LFP showed medium nitrogen (0.01- 0.55%), maximum sugar contents (0.02 - 19.40%), high lactic acid contents (0.34 - 13.01%) and low pH (2.9-5.0). LFPs were free from fecal coliform and Escherichia coil (Ec); but in LAB (1.0 - 1.25x10 7 cfu/ml) and high Actinomyces (1.0 - 7.5 x 10 6 cfu/ml). LFPs inhibited Staphylococcus aureus (Sa), Samonella typhimurium (STM), Escherichia coil (Ec) and Ec 0157 at maximum yield by using Minimal Inhibition Concentration (MIC). But Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) could medium inhibited. Therefore LFP samples are suitable as probiotics for alternative use of antibiotic for animal raising.

  14. The Quality of Liquid Fermented Products for Alternative Use of Antibiotics for Animal Raising

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piadang, Nattaya [Office of Atoms for Peace, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2006-09-15

    The chemical properties of liquid fermented products (LFP) as probiotics substance for alternative uses of antibiotic were studied. The LFP of 235 were sampling from markets and farmers during 2005-2006. The total count of bacteria, fungi, lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Actinomyces and coliform bacteria were conducted. Chemical analysis of LFP showed medium nitrogen (0.01- 0.55%), maximum sugar contents (0.02 - 19.40%), high lactic acid contents (0.34 - 13.01%) and low pH (2.9-5.0). LFPs were free from fecal coliform and Escherichia coil (Ec); but in LAB (1.0 - 1.25x10{sup 7} cfu/ml) and high Actinomyces (1.0 - 7.5 x 10{sup 6} cfu/ml). LFPs inhibited Staphylococcus aureus (Sa), Samonella typhimurium (STM), Escherichia coil (Ec) and Ec 0157 at maximum yield by using Minimal Inhibition Concentration (MIC). But Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) could medium inhibited. Therefore LFP samples are suitable as probiotics for alternative use of antibiotic for animal raising.

  15. Intraabdominal actinomycosis resulting in a difficult to diagnose intraperitoneal mass: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Naoto; Takemoto, Hiroyoshi; Nakahara, Yujiro; Wakasugi, Masaki; Matsumoto, Takashi; Nishioka, Kiyonori; Takachi, Kou; Oshima, Satoshi; Yoshida, Kyotaro

    2018-01-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic suppurative granulomatous disease caused by Actinomyces israelii. Preoperative confirmed diagnosis is very difficult, so most cases are diagnosed preoperatively as malignant tumors. We report a case of intraabdominal actinomycosis which was difficult to diagnose preoperatively. A woman, 60 years old, experienced discomfort in her lower right abdomen. She complained of nausea and anorexia and visited our hospital. Laboratory blood tests, abdominal CT, and abdominal MRI led to a diagnosis of a uterine sarcoma or primary intestinal mass, and she underwent surgery. Her histopathological diagnosis was intraabdominal actinomycosis. Actinomycosis is a chronic purulent granulomatous inflammation caused by Actinomyces israelii. No clinical symptoms or laboratory findings are characteristic of abdominal actinomycosis, so this disorder is very difficult to diagnose preoperatively. Therefore, many cases are diagnosed as malignant tumors and undergo surgery. After surgery, long-term antibiotic treatment (penicillin) is usually administered. We reported a case of intraabdominal actinomycosis that resulted in a difficult to diagnose intraperitoneal mass. When a large intraperitoneal mass is found, actinomycosis needs to be included as one of differential diagnoses. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative evaluation of antimicrobial activity of three cements: new endodontic cement (NEC), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Portland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan Zarrabi, Mohammad; Javidi, Maryam; Naderinasab, Mahboube; Gharechahi, Maryam

    2009-09-01

    Using the agar diffusion method, we conducted an in vitro study to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), new endodontic cement (NEC) and Portland cement at different concentrations against five different microorganisms. A base layer was made using Muller-Hinton agar for Escherichia coli (ATCC 10538) and Candida (ATCC 10231). For Actinomyces viscosus (ATCC 15987), Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 10541) and Streptococcus mutans (ATCC 25175) blood agar medium was used. Wells were formed by removing the agar, and the materials were placed in the well immediately after manipulation. The plates were kept at room temperature for 2 h for prediffusion, and then incubated at 37 degrees C for 72 h. The inhibition zones were then measured. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and the Tukey test to compare the differences among the three cements at different concentrations. The positive controls showed bacterial growth, while the negative controls showed no bacterial growth. All materials showed antimicrobial activity against the tested strains except for Enterococcus faecalis. NEC created larger inhibition zones than MTA and Portland cement. This difference was significant for Portland cement (P 0.05). Among the examined microorganisms, the largest inhibition zone was observed for Actinomyces group (P < 0.05). The antimicrobial activity of the materials increased with time and concentration (P < 0.05). It was concluded that NEC is a potent inhibitor of microorganism growth.

  17. A Para-Canalicular Abscess Resembling an Inflamed Chalazion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diamantis Almaliotis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lacrimal infections by Actinomyces are rare and commonly misdiagnosed for long periods of time. They account for 2% of all lacrimal diseases. Case Report. We report a case of a 70-year-old female patient suffering from a para-canalicular abscess in the medial canthus of the left eye, beside the lower punctum lacrimale, resembling a chalazion. Purulence exited from the punctum lacrimale due to inflammation of the inferior canaliculus (canaliculitis. When pressure was applied to the mass, a second exit of purulence was also observed under the palpebral conjunctiva below the lacrimal caruncle. A surgical excision was performed followed by administration of local antibiotic therapy. The histopathological examination of the extracted mass revealed the existence of actinomycosis. Conclusion. Persistent or recurrent infections and lumps of the eyelids should be thoroughly investigated. Actinomyces as a causative agent should be considered. Differential diagnosis is broad and should include canaliculitis, chalazion, and multiple types of neoplasias. For this reason, in nonconclusive cases, a histopathological examination should be performed.

  18. [Isolation and identification of aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria in the oral cavity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenxin; Wu, Fanzi; Zhou, Xinxuan; Wu, Lan; Li, Mingyun; Ren, Biao; Guo, Qiang; Huang, Ruijie; Li, Jiyao; Xiao, Liying; Li, Yan

    2015-12-01

    To establish a systematic method for isolation and identification of aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria in the oral cavity. Samples of the saliva, dental plaque and periapical granulation tissue were collected from 20 subjects with healthy oral condition and from 8 patients with different oral diseases. The bacteria in the samples were identified by morphological identification, VITEK automatic microorganism identification and 16s rRNA gene sequencing. VITEK automatic microorganism identification and 16s rRNA gene sequencing showed an agreement rate of 22.39% in identifying the bacteria in the samples. We identified altogether 63 bacterial genus (175 species), among which Streptococcus, Actinomyces and Staphylococcus were the most common bacterial genus, and Streptococcus anginosus, Actinomyces oris, Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus mitis were the most common species. Streptococcus anginosus was commonly found in patients with chronic periapical periodontitis. Streptococcus intermedius and Staphylococcus aureus were common in patients with radiation caries, and in patients with rampant caries, Streptococcus mutans was found at considerably higher rate than other species. Aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria are commonly found in the oral cavity, and most of them are gram-positive. 16s rRNA gene sequencing is more accurate than VITEK automatic microorganism identification in identifying the bacteria.

  19. Susceptibility of anaerobic bacteria in Auckland: 1991-1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, K P; Pottumarthy, S; Morris, A J

    1999-11-12

    To determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of local anaerobic bacteria. The antimicrobial susceptibility of 357 obligate anaerobes collected between 1991 and 1997 was determined by a standard agar dilution method. Isolates tested included Bacteroides spp. 131, Fusobacterium spp. 12, Prevotella spp. 13, Veillonella spp. 5, Clostridium perfringens 27, other Clostridium spp. 29, Propionibacterium spp. 57, Actinomyces spp. 7, other non-sporing gram-positive bacilli 28 and Peptostreptococcus spp. 48. Ten antimicrobials were tested: penicillin, amoxycillin/ clavulanic acid, pipercillin/tazobactam, ceftriaxone, cefoxitin, cefotetan, imipenem, meropenem, clindamycin and metronidazole. Imipenem, pipercillin/tazobactam, meropenem and amoxycillin/clavulanic acid were active against virtually all anaerobes tested. Metronidazole was active against all anaerobic gram-negative bacteria and Clostridium spp., but had variable activity against other anaerobes. Cefoxitin was the most active cephalosporin against Bacteroides spp., with 76%, 64% and 15% of Bacteroides spp. being susceptible to cefoxitin, cefotetan and ceftriaxone, respectively. Penicillin had poor activity against anaerobic gram negative bacilli. Actinomyces and Propionibacterium spp. were susceptible to all antimicrobials tested except metronidazole. Variable results were obtained with other antimicrobial-organism combinations. Comparison of results with data from a previously published survey showed little change in susceptibility except for increased resistance of Bacteroides fragilis to ceftriaxone and Clostridium species (not C perfringens) to clindamycin. Our results update the local susceptibility profile of anaerobic bacteria and may be considered when choosing an antimicrobial agent for prophylaxis or treatment of anaerobic infections.

  20. The human oral metaproteome reveals potential biomarkers for caries disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belda-Ferre, Pedro; Williamson, James; Simón-Soro, Áurea

    2015-01-01

    metabolism and immune response. We applied multivariate analysis in order to find the minimum set of proteins that better allows discrimination of healthy and caries-affected dental plaque samples, detecting seven bacterial and five human protein functions that allow determining the health status......Tooth decay is considered the most prevalent human disease worldwide. We present the first metaproteomic study of the oral biofilm, using different mass spectrometry approaches that have allowed us to quantify individual peptides in healthy and caries-bearing individuals. A total of 7771 bacterial...... and 853 human proteins were identified in 17 individuals, which provide the first available protein repertoire of human dental plaque. Actinomyces and Coryneybacterium represent a large proportion of the protein activity followed by Rothia and Streptococcus. Those four genera account for 60-90% of total...

  1. [Effect of compound Chinese traditional medicine on infected root canal bacteria biofilm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rui; Huang, Li-li; Xia, Wen-wei; Zhu, Cai-lian; Ye, Dong-xia

    2010-08-01

    To assess the efficacy of compound Chinese traditional medicine(CTM), which composed of gallic acid, magnolol and polysaccharide of Blettila striata, against the infected root canal bacterial biofilm. Actinomyces viscosus (Av), Enterococcus faecalis (Ef), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) were composed to form biofilm, then confocal laser scan microscope (CLSM) was used to observe and study the bacterial activity. SAS6.12 software package was used for statistical analysis. The biofilm thickness reduced after treatment by both CTM and ZnO (P>0.05),while there was a significant decrease of the percentage of vital bacterias after treatment by CTM (Pcompound Chinese traditional medicine is effective on biofilm control, so that it would be an effective disinfecting drug for root canal sealers. Supported by Research Fund of Bureau of Traditional Chinese Medicine of Shanghai Municipality (Grant No.2008L008A).

  2. Molecular detection of bacteria associated to caries activity in dentinal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Beatriz Gonçalves; Stipp, Rafael Nóbrega; da Silva Bezerra, Daniela; de Figueiredo Guedes, Sarah Florindo; Rodrigues, Lidiany Karla Azevedo

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed at identifying and quantifying Actinomyces naeslundii, Bifidobacterium spp., Streptococcus mitis group, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei group, Streptococcus gordonii, and Streptococcus mutans in active and inactive carious dentine lesions of children with early childhood caries by using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Fifty-six dentin lesion samples, classified as active (n = 39) or inactive (n = 17), were collected from children aged from 2 to 5 years old. Dentinal-cavitated lesions were evaluated by Nyvad criteria for the assessment of caries lesion activity. Relative quantification revealed that Bifidobacterium spp. and the L. casei group were significantly more abundant in active dentin lesions (p oral microbiota related to dentin caries activity status is relevant, this study provides insights to better understand the differences in the microbiotas between active and arrested dentin cavities.

  3. A rare and an unusually delayed presentation of orbital actinomycosis following avulsion injury of the scalp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hegde Vidya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of orbital swelling presenting one year after head trauma. An initial fine needle aspiration cytology revealed it to be an infected organizing hematoma. However, broad-spectrum antibiotics did not resolve the infection and the orbital lesion continued to grow in size, as evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging. Incisional biopsies were done, which were reported as orbital actinomycosis. Patient has responded well to treatment with penicillin. This case is of interest due to the delayed presentation of an orbital complication of head trauma and the rare infection with actinomyces. It also highlights the importance of using appropriate antibiotics, as well as the need for long-term treatment.

  4. A case of relapsed lung abscess caused by Eubacterium brachy infection following an initial diagnosis of pulmonary actinomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Yamakawa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of lung abscess due to Eubacterium brachy. In this case, an analysis of the aspirate from frank pus revealed Gram-positive coccobacilli. We initially strongly suspected lung abscess associated with actinomycosis because of the chronic/recurrent clinical course and radio-pathological findings such as a granuloma lesion. Although a biochemical analysis revealed Actinomyces sp., 16S rRNA gene sequencing and a phylogenetic tree analysis of the isolated strain confirmed the presence of E. brachy. Some cases previously diagnosed as actinomycosis might be correctly diagnosed as E. brachy infection. Clinicians should be aware that additional studies using 16S rRNA gene sequencing are needed to clarify whether pulmonary infection associated with E. brachy is a similar entity to that of chronic granulomatous infection disease in pulmonary actinomycosis.

  5. Bilateral pulmonary infiltrates in association with disseminated actinomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dontfraid, F; Ramphal, R

    1994-07-01

    The most common infectious cause of bilateral upper-lobe pulmonary disease is tuberculosis. However, we recently encountered a patient with bilateral apical infiltrates and multiple soft-tissue abscesses caused by Actinomyces odontolyticus. Other findings included fever, weight loss, and leukocytosis, and the patient's only known source of immunosuppression was a long history of alcoholism. There was no history of diabetes, steroid use, or other chronic underlying disease. The diagnosis was made by culture of drainage fluid from one abscess. Therapy with intravenous penicillin G led to rapid clinical improvement and reduction in the infiltrates. To our knowledge, the presentation of pulmonary infection, with bilateral apical infiltrates due to A. odontolyticus has not been previously reported in the medical literature.

  6. [Significance of the bacterial flora in the etiology of apical periodontitis. Qualitative, quantitative and topographical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accorsi, S; Lavagnoli, G; Frigeri, S; Fiamminghi, L

    1990-01-01

    In the international literature it is shown the central role of root canal infection in the etiology of periapical lesions. As a matter of fact it has been proved (13) that sterile necrotic pulp tissue is completely unable to cause inflammatory reactions at the periapex. Infection of endodontic origin extends to the supporting tissues of the tooth only in the case of their acute inflammation (e.g. acute apical periodontitis, acute alveolar abscess, phoenix abscess). On the other hand in chronic inflammation bacteria remain confined in the endodontic space. Only few exceptions to this general rule have been experimentally proved. In endodontics we deal with a mixed infection which is composed by obligate anaerobes and by facultative anaerobes. The most frequently found obligate anaerobes are Bacteroides sp. and Fusobacterium sp. (Gram- rods) Anaerobic Diphtheroides (Gram+ rods) Peptostreptococcus sp. (Gram+ cocci) and Veilonella sp. (Gram- cocci). Actinomyces sp., Lactobacillus sp., Streptococcus sp., and Staphilococcus sp. are the facultative anaerobes most frequently found.

  7. Influence of Vladivostok coastal waters pollution on a microflora of mussel Crenomytilus grayanus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatyrenko, E. A.; Dunkai, T. I.; Buzoleva, L. S.; Kim, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    Taxonomic structure of bacterial community for mussel Crenomytilus grayanus digestive system from coastal waters of Vladivostok city, which is characterized by considerable anthropogenic impact was studied. Specimens of Micrococcaceae family predominated in the mollusc microscopic flora by the quantity of selected strains (62%). The order of Actinomycetales (namely genera of Actinomyces and Pimelobacter) were large (11%). In addition, there were numerous representatives of Enterobacteriaceae family (9%), Vibrio genus (9%), and Paracoccus genus (9%) selected. There were found such pathogenic and opportunistic microorganisms, as Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Klebsiella spp in microbial communities of mussels. Even though pathogenic microflora does not predominate in the biotic community, it nevertheless shifts the balance to increase extrinsic microflora within the hydrobiont. Detection of such potentially harmful bacteria indicates the insufficient sanitary and epidemiological state of the water area researched, the bay persistently polluted with municipal domestic drain waters.

  8. Bacterial action of carbon dioxide laser radiation in experimental dental root canals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakariasen, K.L.; Dederich, D.N.; Tulip, John; DeCoste, Sandra; Jensen, S.E.; Pickard, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of a carbon dioxide laser to sterilize the root canal of human teeth has been investigated. Three oral bacteria, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mutans, and Actinomyces viscosus, and three other bacteria, Bacillus cereus, Staphyloccus aureus, and Pseudomonoas aeruginosa were used as experimental organisms. Exposure of cells on glass slides to laser radiation showed there was little difference in the exposure required to kill these six organisms. Complete recovery of bacteria from the root canal was initially a problem and was only achieved when bacterial manipulations and removal were carried out in rapid succession, within 5 min of inoculation. However, the geometry of the instrumented canal and the laser alignment were major factors in achieving consistent cell death of oral bacteria in the root canals. Using sets of 10 teeth, four repeated exposures of 10 W for 1 s was found to sterilize 4 or more of the teeth

  9. BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF AZITROMICYN ON CONNECTIVE TISSUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafira Kurnia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: periodontal disease is commonly caused by bacteria, especially actinomyces actinomycetemcomitans and porphyromonas gingivalis have an abilty enter epithelial cells objectives: to investigate systemic azithromycin as the antibiotic of choice for periodontal disease based on biocomptability test in connective tissue. Material and Methods: BHK 21 cell lines were exposed to 0.025%, 0.050%, 0.075%, and 0.1% azithromycin solution for seven times. Samples were put in incubator for 24 hours. Result: Azitrromycin 0.050%-0.1% showed significant difference between life cells percentage and control, however, azithromycin 0.025% revealed insignificant difference with control. Conclusion: 0.025% azithromycin was considered biocompatible with connective tissue and 0.050% was not.

  10. Microbial flora in orodental infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to compare the normal aerobic and anaerobic bacterial oral flora with flora from deep seated dental caries, gingivitis and adult periodontitis. All the samples belonging to both the control and study groups yielded microbes. Aerobe / Anaerobe ratio was high in normal flora (1.48 as compared to dental caries (0.9, gingivitis (0.72 and periodontitis (0.56. Ninety seven percent of orodental infections were polymicrobial and three or more microbes were found in 84% cases of study group as compared to 28% in controls. Streptococcus mutans and anaerobic lactobacilli were common in dental caries, Actinomyces and Peptostreptococcus spp. in gingivitis, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis in periodontitis.

  11. CRISPR-Cas9 Toolkit for Actinomycete Genome Editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, Yaojun; Robertsen, Helene Lunde; Blin, Kai

    2018-01-01

    engineering approaches for boosting known and discovering novel natural products. In order to facilitate the genome editing for actinomycetes, we developed a CRISPR-Cas9 toolkit with high efficiency for actinomyces genome editing. This basic toolkit includes a software for spacer (sgRNA) identification......, a system for in-frame gene/gene cluster knockout, a system for gene loss-of-function study, a system for generating a random size deletion library, and a system for gene knockdown. For the latter, a uracil-specific excision reagent (USER) cloning technology was adapted to simplify the CRISPR vector...... construction process. The application of this toolkit was successfully demonstrated by perturbation of genomes of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) and Streptomyces collinus Tü 365. The CRISPR-Cas9 toolkit and related protocol described here can be widely used for metabolic engineering of actinomycetes....

  12. Divergent pro-inflammatory profile of human dendritic cells in response to commensal and pathogenic bacteria associated with the airway microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Steen-Jensen, Daniel Bisgaard; Laursen, Janne Marie

    2012-01-01

    of individual bacterial species are unknown. In this study, we compared the immune stimulatory capacity on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) of selected airway commensal and pathogenic bacteria predominantly associated with lungs of asthma or COPD patients (pathogenic Haemophillus spp. and Moraxella...... spp.), healthy lungs (commensal Prevotella spp.) or both (commensal Veillonella spp. and Actinomyces spp.). All bacteria were found to induce activation of DCs as demonstrated by similar induction of CD83, CD40 and CD86 surface expression. However, asthma and COPD-associated pathogenic bacteria...... provoked a 3-5 fold higher production of IL-23, IL-12p70 and IL-10 cytokines compared to the commensal bacteria. Based on the differential cytokine production profiles, the studied airway bacteria could be segregated into three groups (Haemophilus spp. and Moraxella spp. vs. Prevotella spp. and Veillonella...

  13. [Experimental evaluation of the spraying disinfection efficiency on dental models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Fu, Yuan-fei; Xu, Kan

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the disinfect effect after spraying a new kind of disinfectant on the dental plaster models. The germ-free plaster samples, which were smeared with bacteria compound including Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces albicans, Streptococcus mutans and Actinomyces viscosus were sprayed with disinfectants (CaviCide) and glutaraldehyde individually. In one group(5 minutes later) and another group(15 minutes later), the colonies were counted for statistical analysis after sampling, inoculating, and culturing which were used for evaluation of disinfecting efficiency. ANOVA was performed using SPSS12.0 software package. All sample bacteria were eradicated after spraying disinfectants(CaviCide) within 5 minutes and effective bacteria control was retained after 15 minutes. There was significant difference between the disinfecting efficiency of CaviCide and glutaraldehyde. The effect of disinfection with spraying disinfectants (CaviCide) on dental models is quick and effective.

  14. Empyema Necessitans Complicating Pleural Effusion Associated with Proteus Species Infection: A Diagnostic Dilemma

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    M. S. Yauba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Empyema necessitans, a rare complication of pleural effusion, could result in significant morbidity and mortality in children. It is characterized by the dissection of pus through the soft tissues and the skin of the chest wall. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Actinomyces israelii are common causes but Gram negative bacilli could be a rare cause. However, there were challenges in differentiating between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous empyema in a resource poor setting like ours. We report a child with pleural effusion and empyema necessitans secondary to Proteus spp. infection. Methods. We describe a 12-year-old child with empyema necessitans complicating pleural effusion and highlight management challenges. Results. This case was treated with quinolones, antituberculous drugs, chest tube drainage, and nutritional rehabilitation. Conclusion. Empyema necessitatis is a rare condition that can be caused by Gram negative bacterial pathogens like Proteus species.

  15. PCR-based identification of selected pathogens associated with endodontic infections in deciduous and permanent teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogulu, Dilsah; Uzel, Atac; Oncag, Ozant; Eronat, Cemal

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of the selected pathogens in samples from deciduous and permanent tooth root canals by using PCR method and to determine the association of these organisms with clinical symptoms. A total of 145 children, 5 to 13 years old, were involved in this study. The presence of selected pathogens (Actinomyces israelii, Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Streptococcus intermedius, Treponema denticola, Parvimonas micra, Tannerella forsythensis, Enterococcus faecium, Prevotella melaninogenica) in infected root canals was studied using PCR. T. denticola (P = .012, .02) and E. faecalis (P = .012, .04) were highly associated with periapical radiolucency and previous pain, while P. gingivalis was associated with tenderness to percussion in both deciduous and permanent teeth (P = .01, .015). The results of the present study confirm that certain species of microorganisms are associated with clinical signs and symptoms of endodontic disease in both deciduous and permanent teeth.

  16. La microflore des sols du vignoble de Touraine

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    Claude Cuinier

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available L'étude microbiologique des sols du vignoble porte sur trois années. Les déterminations quantitatives des bactéries, champignons, actinomycètes et des groupes fonctionnels des cycles de l'azote, du carbone et du soufre sont effectuées au cours de trois périodes du cycle végétatif de la vigne. Des variations saisonnières et annuelles sont observées. La microflore des sols viticoles est comparée à celle d'autres sols. Elle est au moins aussi riche et se distingue par son caractère plus aérobie. De grands écarts dans la composition microbiologique sont apparus entre des sols viticoles différant par leurs caractéristiques physiques et chimiques.

  17. Dysbiosis of oral buccal mucosa microbiota in patients with oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Y; Gong, D; Shi, C; Shao, F; Shi, J; Fei, J

    2017-07-01

    The bacterial community structure of buccal mucosa in patients with oral lichen planus was evaluated and compared with healthy control. Buccal scraping samples have been taken on 43 oral lichen planus patients (21 erosive and 22 non-erosive) and 21 mucosal healthy volunteers. The V3 hypervariable 16S rDNA region was amplified and sequenced by high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing. 94.26% of the total buccal bacteria were classified into 15 abundant genera. Eight of these abundant genera could be detected in all cases, namely Streptococcus, Prevotella, Haemophilu, Neisseria, Fusobacterium, Leptotrichia, Veillonella and Actinomyces. Four abundant bacteria showed significantly different prevalence at the genus level: Streptococcus was more abundant (P oral microbiome. Further studies should be taken to elucidate the inner relationship between these observed changes and OLP development. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Misleading diagnosis of retroperitoneal actinomycosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berchtenbreiter, C.; Bruening, R.; Reiser, M. [Inst. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Grosshadern, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Auernhammer, A. [Medical Clinic II, Univ. Hospital Grosshadern, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    A 34-year-old woman presented with a left-sided suprarenal space-occupying lesion on sonography. Culture of material obtained during sonographic-guided puncture of the retroperitoneal lesion yielded a mixed flora of Actinomyces and Peptostreptococcus. Initially, a misleading diagnosis of an adrenal pheochromocytoma was initiated by highly positive metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy after chemical chemistry vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) test showed elevated values for adrenaline and its derivatives. Retroperitoneal actinomycosis with yet unproven spread into thoracic and cervical compartments is a particular unusual presentation of an infection with these organisms. Because it may mimic subacute infections or malignant masses in terms of clinical and laboratory findings, radiological diagnosis of this entity may be difficult. The diagnosis was based on results of culture and the response of the patient to long-term penicillin-derivate therapy after surgical drainage of the suprarenal abscess formation. (orig.)

  19. The use of instrumental neutron activation analysis method in bio-sorption determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamidova, Kh.M.; Mutavalieva, Z.S.; Muchamedshina, N.M.; Mirzagatova, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Recently, much attention is paid to the research and development of effective metal remediation methods. In industry, for the removal of metals from the industrial solutions and wastes, the expensive ion-exchange resin method of metal sorption is used today. The microbiological methods are much less expensive, are available and provide its application in natural conditions. The search for molybdenum bio sorbent was performed amongst Actinomyces strains. The 18 of Streptomyces strains were used. The data showed that all investigated strains uptake the molybdenum from the solution in various degrees. The molybdenum determination was performed using neutron activation analysis technique. In a nuclear reactor, the samples were treated with a steady flow of neutrons (5.1·10 13 ) n·cm -2 sec -1 in 20 hours. The samples were stored for 6-7 days before analysis. The Actinomyces biomass uptake capacity was up to 94.5 %. The 8 cultures have the most high uptake capacity that varied from 87.4 to 94.5 %. Streptomyces sp. 39 and Streptomyces sp.32 have the lowest bio-sorption capacity amongst studied strains, which was 46.6% and 40 % respectively, whereas the bio sorption capacity of other cultures varied from 55.8 to 64.1%. The influence of some physical and chemical parameters (culture age, pH, temperature) on molybdenum bio-sorption was studied. Data showed that the change in pH, temperature and cultivation period lead to the increase of bio-sorption capacity

  20. Etiologia das infecções intramamárias em vacas primíparas no período pós-parto Etiology of intramammary infections in primiparous cows at postparturition

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    Paulo Eduardo Pardo

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Foram analisadas 664 amostras de leite de 83 vacas primíparas da raça Holandesa. As amostras foram colhidas no primeiro e no sétimo dia após o parto. Das 664 amostras analisadas, 488 (73,50% foram bacteriologicamente negativas e 176 (26,50%, positivas para microrganismos aeróbios. Foi observado um alto índice de mastite clínica (20,48%. Os agentes isolados com maior freqüência foram os Staphylococcus spp coagulase negativo (64,20%, Staphylococcus spp coagulase positivo (8,52%, Streptococcus spp (7,96%, Actinomyces pyogenes (4,55%, Mycoplasma bovigenitalium (3,40% e Escherichia coli (2,84%. Foi observado um maior índice de isolamento de patógenos no primeiro dia (17,62% em relação ao sétimo (8,88%.A total of 664 foremilk samples from 83 Holstein cows were cultured. Quarter samples were collected at parturition and 7 days post the first parturition. From 664 milk samples examined, 488 (73.50% were bacteriologically negative and 176 (26.50% were positive. A high incidence (20.48% of clinical mastitis was observed. The most frequently encountered isolates were coagulase negative staphylococci (64.20%, coagulase positive staphylococci (8.52%, streptococci (7.96%, Actinomyces pyogenes (4.55%, Mycoplasma bovigenitalium (3.40% and Escherichia coli (2.84%. The frequency of mastitis pathogen isolation was highest at parturition (17.62% and decreased markedly during the first week (8.88%.

  1. Multilevel analysis of bacterial counts from chronic periodontitis after root planing/scaling, surgery, and systemic and local antibiotics: 2-year results

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    Ibrahimu Mdala

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To follow changes (over 2 years in subgingival bacterial counts of five microbial complexes including health-related Actinomyces spp. in deeper pockets (≥5 mm after periodontal treatments. Methods: Eight different treatments were studied: (1 scaling+root planing (SRP; (2 periodontal surgery (SURG+systemic amoxicillin (AMOX+systemic metronidazole (MET; (3 SURG+locally delivered tetracycline (TET; (4 SURG; (5 AMOX+MET+TET; (6 AMOX+MET; (7 TET; and (8 SURG+AMOX+MET+TET. Antibiotics were given immediately following SRP. Subgingival plaque was collected mesiobuccally from each tooth, except third molars, from 176 subjects, completing the study, at baseline, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months post-treatment and analysed for 40 different bacteria using checkerboard hybridization. A negative binomial (NB generalized estimating equation (NB GEE model was used to analyze count data and a logistic GEE was used for proportions. Results: We observed short-term beneficial changes in the composition of the red complex of up to 3 months by treating subjects with AMOX+MET+TET. Similar short-term improvements with the same treatment were observed for Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola of the red complex. SURG had also short-term beneficial effect on Porphyromonas gingivalis. No periodontal treatments applied to severely affected sites promoted the growth of Actinomyces. Smoking elevated counts of both the red and orange complex while bleeding on probing (BOP and gingival redness were also predictors of more red complex counts. Comparatively similar findings were obtained by analyzing counts and by analyzing proportions. Conclusions: Although short-term reductions in the counts of the red complex were observed in sites that were treated with AMOX+MET+TET, long-term significant effects were not observed with any of the eight treatments. Poor oral hygiene in patients with severe chronic periodontitis diminished the beneficial effects of treatment.

  2. Efficacy and mechanisms of non-antibacterial, chemical plaque control by dentifrices--an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busscher, Henk J; White, Don J; Atema-Smit, Jelly; van der Mei, Henny C

    2007-04-01

    The provision of antiplaque benefits to dentifrices assists patients in improving hygiene and reducing susceptibility to gingivitis and caries. Chemical plaque control involves different mechanisms and is mostly associated with antibacterial effects, but also includes effects on pellicle surface chemistry to improve cleansing or discourage renewed plaque formation. It is the aim of this paper to analyze in vitro detachment of co-aggregating oral actinomyces and streptococci from pellicle surfaces by dentifrice supernates and to study subsequent de novo streptococcal deposition. Detachment by dentifrices of a co-adhering bacterial pair was studied in the parallel plate flow chamber on a 16 h pellicle coated surface. After detachment by perfusing the chamber with a dentifrice, re-deposition was initiated by flowing with a fresh streptococcal suspension. The dentifrices included both a regular, SLS-fluoride based formulation as well a pyrophosphate, anticalculus and antimicrobial formulations. All dentifrice supernates containing SLS were effective in detaching co-adhering bacteria from pellicles surfaces, except in combination with SnF(2). When hexametaphosphate was added immediate detachment was relatively low, but continued even during re-deposition. The re-deposition of streptococci after detachment by other, NaF containing dentifrices involved relatively few large aggregates, presumably because fluoride was able to block bi-dentate calcium binding sites on the bacterial cell surfaces, mediating co-adhesion. When pyrophosphate was present in addition to NaF, re-deposition involved significantly more large aggregates, likely because pyrophosphate served as a bi-dentate bridge between calcium bound on the bacterial cell surfaces. Commercially available dentifrice formulations differ in their ability to stimulate bacterial detachment from pellicles and dependent on their composition yield the formation of large co-adhering aggregates of actinomyces and streptococci

  3. Buried straw layer and plastic mulching increase microlfora diversity in salinized soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu-yi; PANG Huan-cheng; HAN Xiu-fang; YAN Shou-wei; ZHAO Yong-gan; WANG Jing; ZHAI Zhen; ZHANG Jian-li

    2016-01-01

    Salt stress has been increasingly constraining crop productivity in arid lands of the world. In our recent study, salt stress was aleviated and crop productivity was improved remarkably by straw layer burial plus plastic iflm mulching in a saline soil. However, its impact on the microlfora diversity is not wel documented. Field micro-plot experiments were conducted from 2010 to 2011 using four tilage methods: (i) deep tilage with plastic iflm mulching (CK), (i) straw layer burial at 40 cm (S), (ii) straw layer burial plus surface soil mulching with straw material (S+S), and (iv) plastic iflm mulching plus buried straw layer (P+S). Culturable microbes and predominant bacterial communities were studied; based on 16S rDNA, bacterial com-munity structure and abundance were characterized using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results showed that P+S was the most favorable for culturable bacteria, actinomyces and fungi and induced the most diverse genera of bacteria compared to other tilage methods. Soil temperature had signiifcant positive correlations with the number of bacteria, actinomyces and fungi (P<0.01). However, soil water was poorly correlated with any of the microbes. Salt content had a signiifcant negative correlation with the number of microbers, especialy for bacteria and fungi (P<0.01). DGGE analysis showed that the P+S exhibited the highest diversity of bacteria with 20 visible bands folowed by S+S, S and CK. Moreover, P+S had the highest similarity (68%) of bacterial communities with CK. The major bacterial genera in al soil samples wereFirmicutes,Proteobacteria andActinobacteria. Given the considerable increase in microbial growth, the combined use of straw layer burial and plastic iflm mulching could be a practical option for aleviating salt stress effects on soil microbial community and thereby improving crop production in arid saline soils.

  4. Persistent extraradicular infection in root-filled asymptomatic human tooth: scanning electron microscopic analysis and microbial investigation after apical microsurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signoretti, Fernanda G C; Endo, Marcos S; Gomes, Brenda P F A; Montagner, Francisco; Tosello, Fernanda B; Jacinto, Rogério C

    2011-12-01

    Procedural accidents have a negative effect on healing and might contribute to the persistence of infections in inaccessible apical areas, requiring surgical intervention. This report describes a case of persistent apical periodontitis of a lower left first molar associated with the sinus tract and a periapical lesion that required nonsurgical endodontic retreatment and apical surgery for resolution. The tooth had received endodontic treatment 3 years ago and had to be retreated using the crown-down technique with chemical auxiliary substance (2% chlorhexidine gel), foramen patency, and enlargement and was filled in a single appointment. The occlusal access cavity was immediately restored with composite resin. After 1 month, it could be observed that the sinus tract persisted and, radiographically, the lesion remained unaltered. Therefore, endodontic microsurgery was indicated. Apical microsurgery was performed under magnification with the use of a dental operating microscope including apicectomy, root end with ultrasound, and sealing with mineral trioxide aggregate. A microbiological sample was collected from the apical lesion. The resected distal root apex was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The following species were detected: Actinomyces naeslundii and Actinomyces meyeri, Propionibacterium propionicum, Clostridium botullinum, Parvimonas micra, and Bacteroides ureolyticus; scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed bacterial biofilm surrounding the apical foramen and external radicular surface. Gutta-percha overfilling at the apex because of a zip caused during initial endodontic treatment could be observed. A 6-month follow-up showed apparent radiographic periapical healing, which progressed after 24 months. Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria and extraradicular biofilm seem to participate in the maintenance of persistent periapical pathology, and endodontic retreatment followed by periapical microsurgery proved to be a successful alternative in the

  5. Analysis of bacterial flora associated with peri-implantitis using obligate anaerobic culture technique and 16S rDNA gene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Naoki; Ochi, Morio; Miyakawa, Hiroshi; Nakazawa, Futoshi

    2013-01-01

    To analyze and characterize the predominant bacterial flora associated with peri-implantitis by using culture techniques under obligate anaerobic conditions and 16S rDNA gene sequences. Subgingival bacterial specimens were taken from 30 patients: control (n = 15), consisting of patients with only healthy implants; and test (n = 15), consisting of patients with peri-implantitis. In both groups, subgingival bacterial specimens were taken from the deepest sites. An anaerobic glove box system was used to cultivate bacterial strains. The bacterial strains were identified by 16S rDNA genebased polymerase chain reaction and comparison of the gene sequences. Peri-implantitis sites had approximately 10-fold higher mean colony forming units (per milliliter) than healthy implant sites. A total of 69 different bacterial species were identified in the peri-implantitis sites and 53 in the healthy implant sites. The predominant bacterial species in the peri-implantitis sites were Eubacterium nodatum, E. brachy, E. saphenum, Filifactor alocis, Slackia exigua, Parascardovia denticolens, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Centipeda periodontii, and Parvimonas micra. The predominant bacteria in healthy implant sites apart from Streptococcus were Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus, Veillonella species, Actinomyces israelii, Actinomyces species, Propionibacterium acnes, and Parvimonas micra. These results suggest that the environment in the depths of the sulcus showing peri-implantitis is well suited for growth of obligate anaerobic bacteria. The present study demonstrated that the sulcus around oral implants with peri-implantitis harbors high levels of asaccharolytic anaerobic gram-positive rods (AAGPRs) such as E. nodatum, E. brachy, E. saphenum, Filifactor alocis, Slackia exigua, and gram-negative anaerobic rods, suggesting that conventional periodontopathic bacteria are not the only periodontal pathogens active in peri-implantitis, and that AAGPRs

  6. Multi-centre evaluation of mass spectrometric identification of anaerobic bacteria using the VITEK® MS system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, O; Mochon, A; Branda, J; Burnham, C-A; Bythrow, M; Ferraro, M; Ginocchio, C; Jennemann, R; Manji, R; Procop, G W; Richter, S; Rychert, J; Sercia, L; Westblade, L; Lewinski, M

    2014-04-01

    Accurate and timely identification of anaerobic bacteria is critical to successful treatment. Classic phenotypic methods for identification require long turnaround times and can exhibit poor species level identification. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is an identification method that can provide rapid identification of anaerobes. We present a multi-centre study assessing the clinical performance of the VITEK(®) MS in the identification of anaerobic bacteria. Five different test sites analysed a collection of 651 unique anaerobic isolates comprising 11 different genera. Multiple species were included for several of the genera. Briefly, anaerobic isolates were applied directly to a well of a target plate. Matrix solution (α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) was added and allowed to dry. Mass spectra results were generated with the VITEK(®) MS, and the comparative spectral analysis and organism identification were determined using the VITEK(®) MS database 2.0. Results were confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Of the 651 isolates analysed, 91.2% (594/651) exhibited the correct species identification. An additional eight isolates were correctly identified to genus level, raising the rate of identification to 92.5%. Genus-level identification consisted of Actinomyces, Bacteroides and Prevotella species. Fusobacterium nucleatum, Actinomyces neuii and Bacteroides uniformis were notable for an increased percentage of no-identification results compared with the other anaerobes tested. VITEK(®) MS identification of clinically relevant anaerobes is highly accurate and represents a dramatic improvement over other phenotypic methods in accuracy and turnaround time. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  7. Cervical precancerous changes and selected cervical microbial infections, Kiambu County, Kenya, 2014: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyina, Evalyne Wambui; Kamau, Lucy; Muturi, Margaret

    2017-09-25

    Cervical cancer is the predominant cancer among women in Kenya and second most common in women in developing regions. Population-based cytological screening and early treatment reduces morbidity and mortality associated with the cancer. We determined the occurrence of cervical precancerous changes and cervical microbial infections (Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida albicans, Neisseria gonorrhea and Actinomyces) among women attending Family Health Option Kenya (FHOK) clinic in Thika. This was a hospital based cross sectional study among women attending reproductive health screening clinic from November 2013 to January 2014. Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) I, II, III, cervical cancer and microbial infection (Actinomyces, Trichomonas vaginalis and Yeast cells) diagnosis was based on Pap smear screening test and High Vaginal Swab wet preparation microscopy. Neisseria gonorrhea was diagnosed through Gram staining. Socio-demographic and reproductive health data was collected using a structured questionnaire administered to the study participants and analyzed using Epi Info version 3.5.1. Of the 244 women screened, 238 (97.5%) presented with cervical inflammation, 80 (32.8%) cervical microbial infections and 12 (4.9%) cervical precancerous changes; 10 (83.3%) with CIN I and 2 (16.7%) CIN II. Of the 80 cervical microbial infections, 62 (77.5%) were yeast cell and 18 (22.5%) T. vaginalis. One thirty four (55%) participants had no history of Pap smear screening of which 84 (62.7%) were 20-40 years. Use of IUCDs (OR: 2.47, 95% CI 1.3-4.6) was associated with cervical inflammation. CIN I was the predominant cervical precancerous change. There is need to scale up cervical screening test to capture all categories of women.

  8. Genetic basis of coaggregation receptor polysaccharide biosynthesis in Streptococcus sanguinis and related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Yoshida, Y; Cisar, J O

    2014-02-01

    Interbacterial adhesion between streptococci and actinomyces promotes early dental plaque biofilm development. Recognition of coaggregation receptor polysaccharides (RPS) on strains of Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus oralis by Actinomyces spp. type 2 fimbriae is the principal mechanism of these interactions. Previous studies of genetic loci for synthesis of RPS (rps) and RPS precursors (rml, galE1 and galE2) in S. gordonii 38 and S. oralis 34 revealed differences between these strains. To determine whether these differences are strain-specific or species-specific, we identified and compared loci for polysaccharide biosynthesis in additional strains of these species and in several strains of the previously unstudied species, S. sanguinis. Genes for synthesis of RPS precursors distinguished the rps loci of different streptococci. Hence, rml genes for synthesis of TDP-L-Rha were in rps loci of S. oralis strains but at other loci in S. gordonii and S. sanguinis. Genes for two distinct galactose epimerases were also distributed differently. Hence, galE1 for epimerization of UDP-Glc and UDP-Gal was in galactose operons of S. gordonii and S. sanguinis strains but surprisingly, this gene was not present in S. oralis. Moreover, galE2 for epimerization of both UDP-Glc and UDP-Gal and UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-GalNAc was at a different locus in each species, including rps operons of S. sanguinis. The findings provide insight into cell surface properties that distinguish different RPS-producing streptococci and open an approach for identifying these bacteria based on the arrangement of genes for synthesis of polysaccharide precursors. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of four different dental gel formulas on cariogenic bacteria evaluated using the linear regression method Atividade antimicrobiana de quatro formulações diferentes de géis dentais em bactérias cariogênicas avaliada pelo método de regressão linear

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    Nádia Araci Bou-Chacra

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of four different dental gel formulas was evaluated on three microorganisms associated with cariogenesis: Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei and Actinomyces viscosus. The preliminary antimicrobial activity evaluation was performed using an agar diffusion method. In addition, the formulas were challenged using each microorganism with subsequent determinations of survivors at time intervals of 1, 5, 10, 20 and 30 minutes. The decimal reduction time (D-value calculated from the obtained curves (logCFU/mL vs. time was employed for the antimicrobial activity comparison of the formulas. The selected method for survivor enumeration was validated according to official compendia. Results revealed intense bactericidal activity, even at 1:2 dilution, on S. mutans and L. casei. The data concerning A. viscosus showed the absence of microbial reduction in the challenge employing diluted formulas at the selected time interval. The obtained D-values were 0.21, 2.08, 1.93 and 5.79 minutes for formulas 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. After comparing the obtained results, formula 1 can be considered to have the highest bactericidal activity.A atividade antimicrobiana de quatro diferentes fórmulas de gel dental foi avaliada empregando três microrganismos associados à cariogênese: Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei e Actinomyces viscosus. A avaliação preliminar foi efetuada utilizando método por difusão em ágar. Além disso, as fórmulas foram desafiadas empregando cada microrganismo e as determinações relativas aos sobreviventes foram efetuadas após 1, 5, 10, 20 e 30 minutos do desafio. O tempo de redução decimal (valor-D foi calculado por meio das curvas obtidas (UFC/mL x tempo, objetivando a comparação da atividade antimicrobiana entre as fórmulas. O método selecionado para a enumeração dos sobreviventes foi validado de acordo com compêndio oficial. Os resultados revelaram intensa atividade antimicrobiana

  10. Avaliação da suscetibilidade antimicrobiana de bactérias anaeróbias facultativas isoladas de canais radiculares de dentes com insucesso endodôntico frente aos antibióticos de uso sistêmico

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    Bárbara Trindade Di Santi

    Full Text Available ResumoIntroduçãoBactérias associadas ao insucesso do tratamento endodôntico são capazes de adquirir e expressar resistência aos agentes antimicrobianos comumente empregados para tratar infecções, o que torna necessário, em determinadas situações, a realização de testes laboratoriais para detectar a resistência ou a suscetibilidade antimicrobiana desses micro-organismos.Objetivoavaliar a suscetibilidade antimicrobiana das cepas de Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Actinomyces viscosus e Staphylococcus aureus isoladas de canais radiculares de dentes com insucesso endodôntico.Material e métodoCepas clínicas de Enterococcus faecalis (n=3, Enterococcus faecium (n=3, Actinomyces viscosus (n=3 e Staphylococcus aureus (n=3, coletadas in vivo de canais radiculares com insucesso endodôntico, foram testadas quanto à suscetibilidade antimicrobiana por meio do método E-test em duplicata, utilizando os antibióticos: Amoxicilina (AC, Rifampicina (RI, Moxifloxacina (MX, Vancomicina (VA, Tetraciclina (TC, Ciprofloxacina (CI, Cloranfenicol (CL, Benzilpenicilina (PG, Amoxicilina + ácido clavulânico (XL, Doxiciclina (DC, Eritromicina (EM e Azitromicina (AZ.ResultadoTodas as cepas clínicas testadas foram suscetíveis aos antibióticos AC, XL, PG, DC, MX, TC e VA. Todos os isolados das espécies de S. aureus foram suscetíveis aos 12 antibióticos testados. As cepas de E. faecalis, E. faecium e A. viscosus mostraram padrão de suscetibilidade intermediário contra EM. Algumas cepas de E. faecalis e E. faecium foram resistentes a AZ e RI.ConclusãoAs cepas clínicas isoladas dos canais radiculares de dentes com insucesso endodôntico mostraram perfis diferentes de suscetibilidade antimicrobiana e nenhum isolado de E. faecalis e E. faeciumapresentou-se suscetível a AZ e EM.

  11. Antimicrobial Constituents of Artemisia afra Jacq. ex Willd. against Periodontal Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garland More

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The phytochemical investigation of an ethanol extract of Artemisia afra led to the isolation of six known compounds, acacetin (1, 12α,4α-dihydroxybishopsolicepolide (2, scopoletin (3, α-amyrin (4, phytol (5, and a pentacyclic triterpenoid betulinic acid (6. The compounds were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against Gram positive (Actinomyces naeslundii, Actinomyces israelii, and Streptococcus mutans, Gram negative bacteria (Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans previously known as Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, and Candida albicans. The crude extract of A. afra inhibited the growth of all tested microbial species at concentration range of 1.6 mg/mL to 25 mg/mL. The compounds 1–6 also showed activity range at 1.0 mg/mL to 0.25 mg/mL. Three best compounds (scopoletin, betulinic acid, and acacetin which showed good antimicrobial activity were selected for further studies. Cytotoxicity of extract and compounds was determined using the XTT cell proliferation kit. The antioxidant activity of the extract and compounds was done using the DPPH scavenging method. The extract showed good antioxidant activity with an IC50 value of 22.2 μg/mL. Scopoletin had a strong transformation of the DPPH radical into its reduced form, with an IC50 value of 1.24 μg/mL which was significant to that of vitamin C (1.22 μg/mL. Acacetin and betulinic acid exhibited a decreased scavenging activity with the IC50 of 2.39 and 2.42 μg/mL, respectively. The extract and compounds showed moderate toxicity on McCoy fibroblast cell line and scopoletin was relatively nontoxic with an IC50 value of 132.5 μg/mL. Acacetin and betulinic acid also showed a smooth trend of non-toxic effects with IC50 values of 35.44 and 30.96 μg/mL. The obtained results in this study confirm the use of A. afra in the treatment of microbial infections.

  12. Avaliação da influência do uso de métodos contraceptivos sobre os resultados dos esfregaços de Papanicolaou - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v28i1.1091 Evaluation of the influence of contraceptive methods on the results of Papanicolaou smears - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v28i1.1091

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terezinha Inez Estivalet Svidzinski

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Foi avaliada a influência do uso de métodos contraceptivos como dispositivo intrauterino (DIU, contraceptivos hormonais (CPH e preservativo (PRESER, nos resultados dos esfregaços de Papanicolaou (Pap, por meio de análise retrospectiva de seus laudos e das informações sobre métodos contraceptivos de 2251 mulheres, distribuídas em: DIU (n=80, CPH (n=172, PRESER (n=40 e não usuárias (n=1959. As não usuárias apresentaram mais resultados normais e as com DIU mais alterações benignas. Os três grupos de usuárias, principalmente DIU, manifestaram mais metaplasia escamosa do que as não usuárias. Não houve aumento de ASCUS/LIS ou câncer nas usuárias de métodos contraceptivos. Predominaram as infecções candidíase e vaginose bacteriana e em DIU houve mais vaginose. Actinomyces sp. ocorreu apenas em DIU e Trichomonas vaginalis apenas em não usuárias. Assim, é importante a realização de Pap nas usuárias de DIU e CPH para acompanhar as alterações benignas, pois as mesmas podem predispor e/ou facilitar infecções, incluindo por HPVThis study aimed to evaluate the influence of the use of contraceptive methods, such as the intrauterine device (IDU, the hormonal contraceptive (HCP and the preservative (PRESER, on the results of Papanicolaou smears (Pap. A retrospective analysis was conducted based on Papanicolau results and on information from 2251 women's contraceptive methods, distributed in: IDU (n=80, HCP (n=172, PRESER (n=40 and non-users (n=1959. Non-users presented more normal results; and IDU users presented benign alterations. Among the three groups, the IDU users manifested more squaly squamous metaplasia than the non-users. There was no notice of ASCUS/SIL or cancer in the users of contraceptive methods. The infections with candidiasis and bacterial vaginosis prevailed. Particularly in IDU users, there was more vaginosis. Actinomyces sp. was only noticed in IDU users, and Trichomonas vaginalis in non-users. Thus

  13. Betel nut chewing, oral premalignant lesions, and the oral microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Brenda Y; Zhu, Xuemei; Goodman, Marc T; Gatewood, Robert; Mendiola, Paul; Quinata, Katrina; Paulino, Yvette C

    2017-01-01

    Oral cancers are attributed to a number of causal agents including tobacco, alcohol, human papillomavirus (HPV), and areca (betel) nut. Although betel nut chewing has been established as an independent cause of oral cancer, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are poorly understood. An investigation was undertaken to evaluate the influence of betel nut chewing on the oral microbiome and oral premalignant lesions. Study participants were recruited from a dental clinic in Guam. Structured interviews and oral examinations were performed. Oral swabbing and saliva samples were evaluated by 454 pyrosequencing of the V3- V5 region of the 16S rRNA bacterial gene and genotyped for HPV. One hundred twenty-two adults were enrolled including 64 current betel nut chewers, 37 former chewers, and 21 with no history of betel nut use. Oral premalignant lesions, including leukoplakia and submucous fibrosis, were observed in 10 chewers. Within-sample bacterial diversity was significantly lower in long-term (≥10 years) chewers vs. never chewers and in current chewers with oral lesions vs. individuals without lesions. Between-sample bacterial diversity based on Unifrac distances significantly differed by chewing status and oral lesion status. Current chewers had significantly elevated levels of Streptococcus infantis and higher and lower levels of distinct taxa of the Actinomyces and Streptococcus genera. Long-term chewers had reduced levels of Parascardovia and Streptococcus. Chewers with oral lesions had significantly elevated levels of Oribacterium, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus, including Streptococcus anginosus. In multivariate analyses, controlling for smoking, oral HPV, S.anginosus, and S. infantis levels, current betel nut chewing remained the only predictor of oral premalignant lesions. Our study provides evidence that betel nut chewing alters the oral bacterial microbiome including that of chewers who develop oral premalignant lesions. Nonetheless, whether microbial changes

  14. Avaliação da influência do uso de métodos contraceptivos sobre os resultados dos esfregaços de Papanicolaou = Evaluation of the influence of contraceptive methods on the results of Papanicolaou smears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Cristina da Silva

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Foi avaliada a influência do uso de métodos contraceptivos como dispositivo intrauterino (DIU, contraceptivos hormonais (CPH e preservativo (PRESER, nos resultados dos esfregaços de Papanicolaou (Pap, por meio de análise retrospectiva de seus laudos e das informações sobre métodos contraceptivos de 2251 mulheres, distribuídas em: DIU (n=80, CPH (n=172, PRESER (n=40 e não usuárias (n=1959. As não usuárias apresentaram mais resultados normais e as com DIU mais alterações benignas. Os três grupos de usuárias, principalmente DIU, manifestaram mais metaplasia escamosa do que as não usuárias. Não houve aumento de ASCUS/LIS ou câncer nas usuárias de métodos contraceptivos. Predominaram as infecções candidíase e vaginose bacteriana e em DIU houve mais vaginose. Actinomyces sp. ocorreu apenas em DIU e Trichomonas vaginalis apenasem não usuárias. Assim, é importante a realização de Pap nas usuárias de DIU e CPH para acompanhar as alterações benignas, pois as mesmas podem predispor e/ou facilitar infecções, incluindo por HPV.This study aimed to evaluate the influence of the use of contraceptive methods, such as the intrauterine device (IDU, the hormonal contraceptive (HCP and the preservative (PRESER, on the results of Papanicolaou smears (Pap. A retrospective analysis was conducted based on Papanicolau results and on information from2251 women's contraceptive methods, distributed in: IDU (n=80, HCP (n=172, PRESER (n=40 and non-users (n=1959. Non-users presented more normal results; and IDU users presented benign alterations. Among the three groups, the IDU users manifested more squaly squamous metaplasia than the non-users. There was no notice of ASCUS/SIL or cancer in the users of contraceptive methods. The infections withcandidiasis and bacterial vaginosis prevailed. Particularly in IDU users, there was more vaginosis. Actinomyces sp. was only noticed in IDU users, and Trichomonas vaginalis in nonusers. Thus

  15. In vitro activities of the new semisynthetic glycopeptide telavancin (TD-6424), vancomycin, daptomycin, linezolid, and four comparator agents against anaerobic gram-positive species and Corynebacterium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Merriam, C Vreni; Warren, Yumi A; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Fernandez, Helen T

    2004-06-01

    Telavancin is a new semisynthetic glycopeptide anti-infective with multiple mechanisms of action, including inhibition of bacterial membrane phospholipid synthesis and inhibition of bacterial cell wall synthesis. We determined the in vitro activities of telavancin, vancomycin, daptomycin, linezolid, quinupristin-dalfopristin, imipenem, piperacillin-tazobactam, and ampicillin against 268 clinical isolates of anaerobic gram-positive organisms and 31 Corynebacterium strains using agar dilution methods according to National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards procedures. Plates with daptomycin were supplemented with Ca(2+) to 50 mg/liter. The MICs at which 90% of isolates tested were inhibited (MIC(90)s) for telavancin and vancomycin were as follows: Actinomyces spp. (n = 45), 0.25 and 1 microg/ml, respectively; Clostridium difficile (n = 14), 0.25 and 1 microg/ml, respectively; Clostridium ramosum (n = 16), 1 and 4 microg/ml, respectively; Clostridium innocuum (n = 15), 4 and 16 microg/ml, respectively; Clostridium clostridioforme (n = 15), 8 and 1 microg/ml, respectively; Eubacterium group (n = 33), 0.25 and 2 microg/ml, respectively; Lactobacillus spp. (n = 26), 0.5 and 4 microg/ml, respectively; Propionibacterium spp. (n = 34), 0.125 and 0.5 microg/ml, respectively; Peptostreptococcus spp. (n = 52), 0.125 and 0.5 microg/ml, respectively; and Corynebacterium spp. (n = 31), 0.03 and 0.5 microg/ml, respectively. The activity of TD-6424 was similar to that of quinupristin-dalfopristin for most strains except C. clostridioforme and Lactobacillus casei, where quinupristin-dalfopristin was three- to fivefold more active. Daptomycin had decreased activity (MIC > 4 microg/ml) against 14 strains of Actinomyces spp. and all C. ramosum, Eubacterium lentum, and Lactobacillus plantarum strains. Linezolid showed decreased activity (MIC > 4 microg/ml) against C. ramosum, two strains of C. difficile, and 15 strains of Lactobacillus spp. Imipenem and piperacillin

  16. In vitro antimicrobial efficiency of a mouthwash containing triclosan/gantrez and sodium bicarbonate Eficiência antimicrobiana in vitro de um enxaguatório bucal contendo triclosan/gantrez e bicarbonato de sódio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Rico Pires

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Several antiseptic substances have been used as adjuncts to routine mechanical procedures of oral hygiene, based on their antimicrobial effects. The objective of this study was to assess in vitro the antimicrobial efficiency of a mouthwash containing Triclosan/Gantrez and sodium bicarbonate in comparison to both positive and negative controls. Standard strain samples of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Actinomyces viscosus and Bacillus subtilis were used. Samples of Streptococcus mutans and Gram-negative bacilli were collected from 20 volunteers (10 with a clinically healthy periodontium and 10 presenting biofilm-associated gingivitis. Evaluation of the antimicrobial activity was performed by determining the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC. The results indicated that the test solution inhibited the growth of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive microorganisms from the volunteers’ saliva as well as that of the standard strains at the MIC dilution of 1:20, whereas the MIC dilution of 0.12% chlorhexidine against the same bacteria was 1:80. Thus, even though the tested mouthrinse solution presented an in-vitro antimicrobial activity superior to that of a placebo, it was inferior to that of chlorhexidine.Diversas substâncias antisépticas têm sido utilizadas como adjuntos aos procedimentos mecânicos rotineiros de higiene oral, com base em seus efeitos antimicrobianos. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar, in vitro, a eficiência antimicrobiana de um enxaguatório bucal contendo Triclosan/Gantrez e bicarbonato de sódio, em comparação a controles positivos e negativos. Linhagens padrão de Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Actinomyces viscosus e Bacillus subtilis foram utilizadas. Amostras de Streptococcus mutans e Bacilos Gram-negativos foram coletadas de 20 voluntários (10 com um periodonto clinicamente saudável e 10 com gengivite associada à presença de biofilme. A avaliação da atividade antimicrobiana foi

  17. A Little Vacation on Mars: Mars Simulation Microbial Challenge Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boston, P.; Todd, P.; Van De Camp, J.; Northup, D.; Spilde, M.

    2008-06-01

    Communities of microbial organisms isolated from a variety of extreme environments were subjected to 1 to 5 weeks of simulated Martian environmental conditions using the Mars Environment Simulation Chamber at the Techshot, Inc. facility in Greenville, Indiana. The goal of the overall experiment program was to assess survival of test Earth organisms under Mars full spectrum sunlight, low-latitude daily temperature profile and various Mars-atmosphere pressures (~50 mbar to 500 mbar, 100% CO2) and low moisture content. Organisms surviving after 5 weeks at 100 mbar included those from gypsum surface fracture communities in a Permian aged evaporite basin, desert varnish on andesite lavas around a manganese mine, and iron and manganese oxidizing organisms isolated from two caves in Mew Mexico. Phylogenetic DNA analysis revealed strains of cyanobacteria, bacterial genera (present in all surviving communities) Asticacaulis, Achromobacter, Comamonas, Pantoea, Verrucomicrobium, Bacillus, Gemmatimonas, Actinomyces, and others. At least one microcolonial fungal strain from a desert varnish community and at least one strain from Utah survived simulations. Strains related to the unusual cave bacterial group Bacteroidetes are present in survivor communities that resist isolation into pure culture implying that their consortial relationships may be critical to their survival.

  18. [Solitary actinomycotic brain abscess: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Hasegawa, Yoshihito; Nishimoto, Yo; Hayashi, Satoru; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Kuzume, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Keiko; Enzan, Hideaki

    2012-06-01

    Actinomycotic brain abscess is a rare condition with uncertain clinical features. Here we report the case of a 66-year-old immune-competent woman with an actinomycotic brain abscess who presented with sensory aphasia and mild right hemiparesis. She had no febrile episode or headache. Moreover, she did not have any periodontal or oto-rhino-laryngological disease, and the results of laboratory tests were normal. A computed tomography scan showed an irregular, low-density area in the left parietal lobe. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging showed low-signal intensity in a T1 weighted image, high-signal intensity in a T2 weighted image, and mixed intensity on a diffusion weighted image. Thallium-201 chloride scintigraphy showed definite accumulation of thallium in the lesion and the patient's condition gradually deteriorated. Ten days after gadolinium administration, a T1 weighted image showed a multi- lobulated irregular mass in the left parietal lobe. The patient subsequently underwent craniotomy and evacuation of the yellowish abscess. Gram staining of the tissue showed the presence of gram-positive filamentous rods, and abscess cultures were positive for Actinomyces and Prevotella disiens. The abscess resolved after treatment with a high dose of intravenous penicillin G (24 million units/day) for 8 weeks, followed by an oral dose of amoxicillin for 4 months. The patient was discharged with a rudimentary limitation of the visual field.

  19. Benzene biodegradation using an anaerobic column coupled to Mn(IV) reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villatoro-Monzon, W.R.; Velasquez-Mejia, E.K.; Morales-Ibarria, M.G.; Razo-Flores, E. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexico). Programo de Biotenologia del Petroleo

    2004-07-01

    Benzene, toluene, and o, m, p-xylene compounds make up a large proportion of gasoline. Due to spills and leaks from underground tanks, these compounds frequently contaminate groundwater and sediment. In particular the high solubility of benzene makes it very mobile and an extra danger to groundwater. Moreover, there are strong links between benzene and cancer and thus benzene is considered a serious pollutant. Contaminated sites usually become anaerobic due to microbe action. In this study, benzene biodegradation was done in a glass column inoculated with anaerobic Rhine River sediment and using Mn(IV) as the final electron acceptor. Under steady state operation, benzene biodegradation efficiency was as high as 95 per cent. Carbon dioxide and Mn(II) recovery rates were 81 and 77 per cent respectively. Reactor sediment was withdrawn on day 104 and subject to DGGE profiling. This sediment showed different band patterns than the original sediment that was not exposed to benzene. The authors conclude that the species associated with the degradation of benzene are of the genus Propionibacterium and Actinomyces. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Waste drilling-fluid-utilising microorganisms in a tropical mangrove swamp oilfield location

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benka-Coker, M.O.; Olumagin, A.

    1995-01-01

    Waste drilling-fluid-utilising microorganisms were isolated from drilling-mud cuttings, soil and creek water from a mangrove swamp oilfield location in the Delta area of Nigeria using waste drilling-fluid as the substrate. Eighteen bacterial isolates obtained were identified as species of Staphylococcus, Acinetobacter, Alcaligenes, Serratia, Clostridium, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Nocardia, Bacillus, Actinomyces, Micrococcus and Pseudomonas, while the genera of fungi isolated were Penicillium, Cladosporium and Fusarium. Even though drilling-fluid-utilising genera were in higher numbers in the soil than in the two other sources examined, the percentages of the total heterotrophic bacteria that utilised waste drilling-fluid were 6.02 in the drilling-mud cuttings, 0.83 in creek water and 0.42 in soil. The screen tests for biodegradation potential of the bacterial isolates showed that, even though all the isolates were able to degrade and utilise the waste fluid for growth, species of Alcaligenes and Micrococcus were more active degraders of the waste. The significance of the results in environmental management in oil-producing areas of Nigeria is discussed. (Author)

  1. Biofilm forming ability of bacteria isolated from necrotic roots canals of teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwan, Merriam Ghadhanfar; Usup, Gires; Heng, Lee Yook; Ahmad, Asmat

    2018-04-01

    The growth of microbes in biofilms are associated with repeated and chronic human infections and are extremely resistant to antimicrobial agents. The purpose of this study was to determine the diversity of bacteria from necrotic roots canals of teeth and to detect their biofilm formation ability. A total of 42 bacterial isolates were isolated and identified as belonging to 11 genera. These are Enterococcus sp. (21.4%) followed by Streptococcus sp. (16.8%), Bacillus sp. (11.9%), Peptostreptococcus sp. (9.5%), Staphylococcus sp. (9.5%), Bacteroides sp. (7.1%), Clostridium sp. (7.1%), Actinomyces sp. (7.1%), Fusobacterium sp. (4.76%), Provotella sp. (2.4%) and Chromobacterium sp. (2.4%). Three screening methods for biofilm forming ability were used. Congo Red Agar method (CRA), Tube method (TM) and Microtitre Plate (MTP). From the results, MTP method is a more reliable and quantitative method for the screening and detection of microorganism's ability to form biofilm. This method can be recommended and suggested as a general screening method for the detection of biofilm forming bacteria isolated from roots canals of teeth.

  2. Hepatosplenic actinomycosis in an immunocompetent patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Kung Wang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatosplenic abscess caused by Actinomyces is rare and often misdiagnosed as malignancy. Herein, we report a case of hepatosplenic actinomycosis in a 37-year-old immunocompetent man with a 2-month clinical history of intermittent fever and upper left abdominal pain. Physical examination revealed a mildly ill-appearing man with a low-grade fever (38°C and upper left quadrant abdominal tenderness. Abdominal sonographic examination showed the presence of a 6.3 cm × 6.5 cm heterogeneous abscess with a hypoechoic center and honeycomb appearance in an enlarged spleen (8 cm × 5 cm. Computerized tomography of the abdomen revealed a multiloculated splenic lesion, and laparotomy showed multiple hepatic nodules and a splenic abscess. Histopathological examination of the biopsy revealed filamentous branching bacilli and sulfur granules in the hepatosplenic abscess. The patient successfully underwent splenectomy accompanied by intravenous and oral penicillin treatment. Proper and prompt diagnosis of hepatosplenic actinomycosis is important because the therapeutic plan and prognosis of this pathogen are quite different from other microorganisms and malignancies.

  3. Effects of probiotics on the growth performance and intestinal micro flora of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yin-bo; Xu, Qian-qian; Yang, Cun-jin; Yang, Xin; Lv, Le; Yin, Chun-hua; Liu, Xiao-lu; Yan, Hai

    2014-05-01

    Antibiotics have been used in poultry industry for decades to promote growth and protect animals from diseases, followed by various side effects. In efforts of searching for a better alternative, probiotic is of extensive attention. We investigated the effects of Bacillus subtitles, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Candida utilis and Lactobacillus acidophilus as 0.1% (W/W) feed additives on broiler growth performance and intestinal microflora. The results showed the probiotics treatments significantly improved growth of broilers. Broilers supplemented with B. subtilis and L. acidophilus weighed 18.4% and 10.1% more than birds in control group at 42 days of age. Furthermore the feed conversion ratios of the birds in the two groups were also improved, decreasing 9.1% and 12.9%, respectively. Further study indicated a significant increase of cecal Lactobacilli concentration in briolers supplemented with probiotics, expecially in L. acidophilus treatment group. Meanwhile, the count of cecal Actinomyces in birds treated with probiotics was significantly lower compared with the control group. In conclusion, probiotics such as B. subtitles and L. acidophilus are good alternatives to antibiotics in promoting growth resulting from a beneficial modulation of the intestinal micro flora, which leads to increased efficiency of intestinal digestion in the host animal.

  4. Effects of xylitol on xylitol-sensitive versus xylitol-resistant Streptococcus mutans strains in a three-species in vitro biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marttinen, Aino M; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Hidalgo-Cantabrana, Claudio; Saari, Markku A; Ihalin, Riikka A; Söderling, Eva M

    2012-09-01

    We studied the effects of xylitol on biofilms containing xylitol-resistant (Xr) and xylitol-sensitive (Xs) Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces naeslundii and S. sanguinis. The biofilms were grown for 8 and 24 h on hydroxyapatite discs. The viable microorganisms were determined by plate culturing techniques and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed using a S. mutans-specific probe. Extracellular cell-bound polysaccharides (EPS) were determined by spectrofluorometry from single-species S. mutans biofilms. In the presence of 5 % xylitol, the counts of the Xs S. mutans decreased tenfold in the young (8 h) biofilm (p Xr strains, and FISH confirmed these results. No differences were detected in the EPS production of the Xs S. mutans grown with or without xylitol, nor between Xr and Xs S. mutans strains. Thus, it seems that xylitol did not affect the EPS synthesis of the S. mutans strains. Since the Xr S. mutans strains, not inhibited by xylitol, showed no xylitol-induced decrease in the biofilms, we conclude that growth inhibition could be responsible for the decrease of the counts of the Xs S. mutans strains in the clinically relevant young biofilms.

  5. Polymicrobial Pituitary Abscess Predominately Involving Escherichia coli in the Setting of an Apoplectic Pituitary Prolactinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Beatty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary abscess is a rare intracranial infection that can be life-threatening if not appropriately diagnosed and treated upon presentation. The most common presenting symptoms include headache, anterior pituitary hypofunction, and visual field disturbances. Brain imaging with either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging usually reveals intra- or suprasellar lesion(s. Diagnosis is typically confirmed intra- or postoperatively when pathological analysis is done. Clinicians should immediately start empiric antibiotics and request a neurosurgical consult when pituitary abscess is suspected. Escherichia coli (E. coli causing intracranial infections are not well understood and are uncommon in adults. We present an interesting case of an immunocompetent male with a history of hypogonadism presenting with worsening headache and acute right eye vision loss. He was found to have a polymicrobial pituitary abscess predominantly involving E.   coli in addition to Actinomyces odontolyticus and Prevotella melaninogenica in the setting of an apoplectic pituitary prolactinoma. The definitive etiology of this infection was not determined but an odontogenic process was suspected. A chronic third molar eruption and impaction in close proximity to the pituitary gland likely led to contiguous spread of opportunistic oral microorganisms allowing for a polymicrobial pituitary abscess formation.

  6. Removal and prevention of dental plaque with d-tagatose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y; Levin, G V

    2002-08-01

    Dental plaque develops when early bacterial colonizers adhere to the acquired pellicle (saliva-derived proteinous coating on the tooth surface) followed by adhesion of late interspecies colonizers to form this type of biofilm (coaggregation). In developing a d-tagatose-based toothpaste, we examined 15 oral isolates, including both early colonizers (Streptococcus and Actinomyces) and late colonizers (Fusobacterium, Porphyromonas, Prevotella, Veillonella, Capnocytophaga, and Actinobacillus), and tested them for their ability to coaggregate with each other. We then tested the ability of d-tagatose to reverse any such coaggregations. Coaggregation was examined visually and scored by using a system ranging from 0, for no visible coaggregation to 4, for maximum coaggregation. d-Tagatose, at a concentration of less than 750 mm, completely reversed the coaggregation of 17 (60%) of 28 strongly coaggregating pairs (coaggregation score = 2 or higher) tested. In contrast, d-sorbitol had little reversal effect. d-Tagatose-sensitive coaggregations were d-galactose-reversible as well. d-Tagatose acted on both early and late colonizers; both groups, especially the late colonizers, were frequently involved in periodontal diseases. Thus, d-tagatose has the potential for preventing and removing plaque development and for altering the subgingival microbiota. These effective qualities offer conservative control of gingival and periodontal disease.

  7. Exploring the salivary microbiome of children stratified by the oral hygiene index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashima, Izumi; Theodorea, Citra F.; Thaweboon, Boonyanit; Thaweboon, Sroisiri; Scannapieco, Frank A.

    2017-01-01

    Poor oral hygiene often leads to chronic diseases such as periodontitis and dental caries resulting in substantial economic costs and diminished quality of life in not only adults but also in children. In this study, the salivary microbiome was characterized in a group of children stratified by the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S). Illumina MiSeq high-throughput sequencing based on the 16S rRNA was utilized to analyze 90 salivary samples (24 Good, 31 Moderate and 35 Poor oral hygiene) from a cohort of Thai children. A total of 38,521 OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units) with a 97% similarity were characterized in all of the salivary samples. Twenty taxonomic groups (Seventeen genera, two families and one class; Streptococcus, Veillonella, Gemellaceae, Prevotella, Rothia, Porphyromonas, Granulicatella, Actinomyces, TM-7-3, Leptotrichia, Haemophilus, Selenomonas, Neisseria, Megasphaera, Capnocytophaga, Oribacterium, Abiotrophia, Lachnospiraceae, Peptostreptococcus, and Atopobium) were found in all subjects and constituted 94.5–96.5% of the microbiome. Of these twenty genera, the proportion of Streptococcus decreased while Veillonella increased with poor oral hygiene status (P oral hygiene group. This is the first study demonstrating an important association between increase of Veillonella and poor oral hygiene status in children. However, further studies are required to identify the majority of Veillonella at species level in salivary microbiome of the Poor oral hygiene group. PMID:28934367

  8. Rhamnolipids and lactonic sophorolipids: natural antimicrobial surfactants for oral hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshikh, M; Moya-Ramírez, I; Moens, H; Roelants, S; Soetaert, W; Marchant, R; Banat, I M

    2017-11-01

    To assess the efficacy of rhamnolipid (mixture of monorhamnolipid and dirhamnolipid congeners), purified monorhamnolipid, dirhamnolipid and lactonic sophorolipid biosurfactants against pathogens important for oral hygiene. Acquired and produced biosurfactants were fully characterized to allow the antimicrobial activity to be assigned to the biosurfactant congeners. Antimicrobial activity was assessed using the resazurin-aided microdilution method. Mixed rhamnolipid JBR425 (MR) and lactonic sophorolipids (LSLs) demonstrated the lowest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) which ranged between 100 and 400 μg ml -1 against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus oralis, Actinomyces naeslundii, Neisseria mucosa and Streptococcus sanguinis. Combining these biosurfactants with standard antimicrobial agents namely chlorhexidine, sodium lauryl sulphate, tetracycline HCl and ciprofloxacin showed a dramatic drop in the MIC values. In addition, in vitro studies demonstrated the biosurfactants' ability to prevent and disrupt oral pathogens biofilms. The increased permeability of microorganisms treated with biosurfactant, as shown using bisbenzimide dye, in part explains the inhibition effect. The results demonstrate that rhamnolipids and LSLs have the ability to inhibit oral pathogens both in planktonic and oral biofilm states. The findings indicate the potential value of biosurfactants for both oral hygiene and the pharmaceutical industries since there is a serious need to reduce the reliance on synthetic antimicrobials and antibiotics. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms associated with peri-implantitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Kadkhoda

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed to assessthe antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine (CHX on Aggregatibacter actinomyce-temcomitans biofilms isolated from subgingival plaque of peri-implantitis lesions. Methods. Thirteen patients requiring peri-implantitis treatment were consecutively selected and their subgingival biofilm was collected by inserting fine sterile paper points into peri-implant pockets for 15 seconds. A. actinomycetemcomitans was isolated from the subgingival biofilm and cultured. In this study, the standard strain of A. actinomycetemcomitans served as the positive control group and a blank disc impregnated with water served as the negative control; 0.1 mL of the bacterial suspension was cultured on specific culture medium and blank discs (6 mm in diameter impregnated with 0.2%CHX mouthrinse (Behsa Pharmaceutical Co. and negative control discs were placed on two sides of the bacterial culture plate. The size of growth inhibition zone was measured by a blinded independent observer in millimetres. Results. According to the results of disc diffusion test, the mean diameter of growth inhibition zone of A. actinomycetem-comitans around discs impregnated with CHX was larger in both standard (positive control and biofilm samples of A. acti-nomycetemcomitans compared to the negative control group (blank disc (P<0.001. Conclusion. Use of0.2% CHX mouthwash had antibacterial effects on A. actinomycetemcomitans species isolated from peri-implantitis sites.

  10. The effect of Piper betle and Psidium guajava extracts on the cell-surface hydrophobicity of selected early settlers of dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Fathilah Abdul; Othman, Rofina Yasmin; Rahim, Zubaidah Haji Abd

    2006-06-01

    The adhesion of early settlers of dental plaque to the tooth surface has a role in the initiation of the development of dental plaque. The hydrophobic surface properties of the bacteria cell wall are indirectly responsible for the adhesion of the bacteria cell to the acquired pellicle on the tooth surfaces. In this study, the effect of aqueous extract of two plants (Psidium guajava and Piper betle) on the cell-surface hydro-phobicity of early settlers of dental plaque was determined in vitro. Hexadecane, a hydrocarbon was used to represent the hydrophobic surface of the teeth in the oral cavity. It was found that treatment of the early plaque settlers with 1 mg/ml extract of Psidium guajava reduced the cell-surface hydrophobicity of Strep. sanguinis, Strep. mitis and Actinomyces sp. by 54.1%, 49.9% and 40.6%, respectively. Treatment of these bacteria with the same concentration of Piper betle however, showed a comparatively lesser effect (< 10%). It was also observed that the anti-adhesive effect of the two extracts on the binding of the early plaque settlers to hexadecane is concentration dependent.

  11. Bacteriostatic effect of Piper betle and Psidium guajava extracts on dental plaque bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathilah, A R; Rahim, Z H A; Othman, Y; Yusoff, M

    2009-03-15

    In this study, the bacteriostatic effect of Piper betle and Psidium guajava extracts on selected early dental plaque bacteria was investigated based on changes in the doubling time (g) and specific growth rates (micro). Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mitis and Actinomyces sp. were cultured in Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) in the presence and absence of the extracts. The growth of bacteria was monitored periodically every 15 min over a period of 9 h to allow for a complete growth cycle. Growth profiles of the bacteria in the presence of the extracts were compared to those in the absence and deviation in the g and micro were determined and analyzed. It was found that the g and mu were affected by both extracts. At 4 mg mL(-1) of P. betle the g-values for S. sanguinis and S. mitis were increased by 12.0- and 10.4-fold, respectively (p betle and P. guajava extracts have bacteriostatic effect on the plaque bacteria by creating a stressed environment that had suppressed the growth and propagation of the cells. Within the context of the dental plaque, this would ensure the attainment of thin and healthy plaque. Thus, decoctions of these plants would be suitable if used in the control of dental plaque.

  12. Difference in initial dental biofilm accumulation between night and day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dige, Irene; Schlafer, Sebastian; Nyvad, Bente

    2012-12-01

    The study of initial microbial colonization on dental surfaces is a field of intensive research because of the aetiological role of biofilms in oral diseases. Most previous studies of de novo accumulation and composition of dental biofilms in vivo do not differentiate between biofilms formed during day and night. This study hypothesized that there is a diurnal variation in the rate of accumulation of bacteria on solid surfaces in the oral cavity. In situ biofilm from healthy individuals was collected for 12 h during day and night, respectively, subjected to fluorescent in situ hybridization and visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Analysis of the biofilms using stereological methods and digital image analysis revealed a consistent statistically significant difference between both the total number of bacteria and the biovolume in the two 12-h groups (p = 0.012), with the highest accumulation of bacteria during daytime (a factor of 8.8 and 6.1 higher, respectively). Hybridization with probes specific for streptococci and Actinomyces naeslundii indicated a higher proportion of streptococci in biofilms grown during daytime as compared to night-time. No differences could be observed for A. naeslundii. The degree of microbial coverage and the bacterial composition varied considerably between different individuals. The data provide firm evidence that initial biofilm formation decreases during the night, which may reflect differences in the availability of salivary nutrients. This finding is of significant importance when studying population dynamics during experimental dental biofilm formation.

  13. Actinomycotic Osteomyelitis of Maxilla Presenting as Oroantral Fistula: A Rare Case Report

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    Ashalata Gannepalli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Actinomycosis is a chronic granulomatous infection caused by Actinomyces species which may involve only soft tissue or bone or the two together. Actinomycotic osteomyelitis of maxilla is relatively rare when compared to mandible. These are normal commensals and become pathogens when they gain entry into tissue layers and bone where they establish and maintain an anaerobic environment with extensive sclerosis and fibrosis. This infection spreads contiguously, frequently ignoring tissue planes and surrounding tissues or organ. The portal of entry may be pulpal, periodontal infection, and so forth which may lead to involvement of adjacent structures as pharynx, larynx, tonsils, and paranasal sinuses and has the propensity to damage extensively. Diagnosis is often delayed and is usually based on histopathology as they are cultured in fewer cases. The chronic clinical course without regional lymphadenopathy may be essential in diagnosis. The management of actinomycotic osteomyelitis is surgical debridement of necrotic tissue combined with antibiotics for 3–6 months. The primary actinomycosis arising within the maxilla with contiguous involvement of paranasal sinus with formation of oroantral fistula is rare. Hence, we present a 50-year-old female patient with chronic sclerosing osteomyelitis of maxilla which presented as oroantral fistula with suppurative and sclerotic features.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of some Pacific Northwest woods against anaerobic bacteria and yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, W H; Karchesy, J J; Constantine, G H; Craig, A M

    2001-11-01

    Extracts of woods commonly used for animal bedding were tested for antimicrobial activity. Essential oils from Alaska cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis), western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis) and old growth Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) as well as methanol extracts of wood from these trees plus western red cedar (Thuja plicata) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) were tested for antimicrobial activity against anaerobic bacteria and yeast. The test microbes included Fusobacterium necrophorum, Clostridium perfringens, Actinomyces bovis and Candida albicans which are common to foot diseases and other infections in animals. The essential oils and methanol extracts were tested using a standardized broth assay. Only extracts of Alaska cedar and western juniper showed significant antimicrobial activity against each of the microbes tested. The essential oil of Douglas fir did show antimicrobial activity against A. bovis at the concentrations tested. The methanol extracts of the heartwood of Douglas fir and the sapwood of ponderosa pine showed no antimicrobial activity. The major chemical components of western juniper (cedrol and alpha- and beta-cedrene) and Alaska cedar (nootkatin) were also tested. In western juniper, alpha- and beta-cedrene were found to be active components. Nootkatin showed activity only against C. albicans. The inhibitory activity in Alaska cedar oil was high enough to justify further efforts to define the other chemical components responsible for the antimicrobial activity. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Periodontopathic microorganisms in peripheric blood after scaling and root planing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafaurie, Gloria Inés; Mayorga-Fayad, Isabel; Torres, María Fernanda; Castillo, Diana Marcela; Aya, Maria Rosario; Barón, Alexandra; Hurtado, Paola Andrea

    2007-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of periodontopathic and other subgingival anaerobic and facultative bacteria in the bloodstream following scaling and root planing (SRP). Forty-two patients with severe generalized chronic periodontitis (GChP) and generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) were included in the study. Four samples of peripheric blood were drawn from the cubital vein at different times: Pre-treatment: immediately before the SRP procedure (T1), immediately after treatment (T2), 15 min. post-treatment (T3) and 30 min. post-treatment (T4). In order to identify the presence of microorganisms in blood, subcultures were conducted under anaerobic conditions. 80.9% of the patients presented positive cultures after SRP and it occurred more frequently immediately after treatment; however, 19% of the patients still had microorganisms in the bloodstream 30 min. after the procedure. The periodontopathic microorganisms more frequently identified were Porphyromonas gingivalis and Micromonas micros. Campylobacter spp., Eikenella corrodens, Tannerella forsythensis, Fusobacterium spp. and Prevotella intermedia were isolated less often. Actinomyces spp. were also found frequently during bacteraemia after SRP. SRP induced bacteraemia associated with anaerobic bacteria, especially in patients with periodontal disease.

  16. An ORMOSIL-Containing Orthodontic Acrylic Resin with Concomitant Improvements in Antimicrobial and Fracture Toughness Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueggeberg, Frederick A.; Niu, Li-na; Mettenberg, Donald; Yiu, Cynthia K. Y.; Blizzard, John D.; Wu, Christine D.; Mao, Jing; Drisko, Connie L.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2012-01-01

    Global increase in patients seeking orthodontic treatment creates a demand for the use of acrylic resins in removable appliances and retainers. Orthodontic removable appliance wearers have a higher risk of oral infections that are caused by the formation of bacterial and fungal biofilms on the appliance surface. Here, we present the synthetic route for an antibacterial and antifungal organically-modified silicate (ORMOSIL) that has multiple methacryloloxy functionalities attached to a siloxane backbone (quaternary ammonium methacryloxy silicate, or QAMS). By dissolving the water-insoluble, rubbery ORMOSIL in methyl methacrylate, QAMS may be copolymerized with polymethyl methacrylate, and covalently incorporated in the pressure-processed acrylic resin. The latter demonstrated a predominantly contact-killing effect on Streptococcus mutans ATCC 36558 and Actinomyces naselundii ATCC 12104 biofilms, while inhibiting adhesion of Candida albicans ATCC 90028 on the acrylic surface. Apart from its favorable antimicrobial activities, QAMS-containing acrylic resins exhibited decreased water wettability and improved toughness, without adversely affecting the flexural strength and modulus, water sorption and solubility, when compared with QAMS-free acrylic resin. The covalently bound, antimicrobial orthodontic acrylic resin with improved toughness represents advancement over other experimental antimicrobial acrylic resin formulations, in its potential to simultaneously prevent oral infections during appliance wear, and improve the fracture resistance of those appliances. PMID:22870322

  17. Pneumonia in slaughtered sheep in south-western Iran: pathological characteristics and aerobic bacterial aetiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Shahrzad; Korani, Farzad Shahrani; Oryan, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the lungs of 1,000 sheep carcasses were subjected to gross examination and those suspected to be infected with pneumonia were studied at histopathological level as well as examined for presence of bacteria. Pneumonia was detected in 42 (4.2%) carcasses. Based on histopathological lesions, 45.24% were affected with suppurative bronchopneumonia, 20.93% with interstitial pneumonia, 11.9% bronchointerstitial pneumonia, 7.14% with fibrinous bronchopneumonia and 2.38% with embolic pneumonia. In addition, 11.9% of the lungs showed lung abscesses and 2.33% were affected with pleuritis without involving pulmonary parenchyma. Bacteriological examination revealed presence of ovine pathogens, such as Pasteurella multocida (24.53%), Staphylococcus aureus (20.75%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (15.09%), Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (7.55%) and Actinomyces pyogenes (1.89%). The most common form of pneumonia was suppurative bronchopneumonia with moderate amounts of fibrin deposits on the pleural surface and inside the bronchioles and alveoli.

  18. Pneumonia in slaughtered sheep in south-western Iran: pathological characteristics and aerobic bacterial aetiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Azizi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the lungs of 1,000 sheep carcasses were subjected to gross examination and those suspected to be infected with pneumonia were studied at histopathological level as well as examined for presence of bacteria. Pneumonia was detected in 42 (4.2% carcasses. Based on histopathological lesions, 45.24% were affected with suppurative bronchopneumonia, 20.93% with interstitial pneumonia, 11.9% bronchointerstitial pneumonia, 7.14% with fibrinous bronchopneumonia and 2.38% with embolic pneumonia. In addition, 11.9% of the lungs showed lung abscesses and 2.33% were affected with pleuritis without involving pulmonary parenchyma. Bacteriological examination revealed presence of ovine pathogens, such as Pasteurella multocida (24.53%, Staphylococcus aureus (20.75%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (15.09%, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (7.55% and Actinomyces pyogenes (1.89%. The most common form of pneumonia was suppurative bronchopneumonia with moderate amounts of fibrin deposits on the pleural surface and inside the bronchioles and alveoli.

  19. Pyrosequencing analysis of oral microbiota in children with severe early childhood dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Hui

    2013-11-01

    Severe early childhood caries are a prevalent public health problem among preschool children throughout the world. However, little is known about the microbiota found in association with severe early childhood caries. Our study aimed to explore the bacterial microbiota of dental plaques to study the etiology of severe early childhood caries through pyrosequencing analysis based on 16S rRNA gene V1-V3 hypervariable regions. Forty participants were enrolled in the study, and we obtained twenty samples of supragingival plaque from caries-free subjects and twenty samples from subjects with severe early childhood caries. A total of 175,918 reads met the quality control standards, and the bacteria found belonged to fourteen phyla and sixty-three genera. Our results show the overall structure and microbial composition of oral bacterial communities, and they suggest that these bacteria may present a core microbiome in the dental plaque microbiota. Three genera, Streptococcus, Granulicatella, and Actinomyces, were increased significantly in children with severe dental cavities. These data may facilitate improvements in the prevention and treatment of severe early childhood caries.

  20. Abdominal-Pelvic Actinomycosis Mimicking Malignant Neoplasm

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    Teresa Pusiol

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal-pelvic actinomycosis is often mistaken for other conditions, presenting a preoperative diagnostic challenge. In a 46-year-old female, computed tomography showed an abdominal-pelvic retroperitoneal mass extending from the lower pole of the right kidney to the lower pelvis. The patient had a 3-year history of intrauterine device. The mass appeared to involve the ascending colon, cecum, distal ileum, right Fallopian tube and ovary, and ureter anteriorly and the psoas muscle posteriorly. The resection of retroperitoneal mass, distal ileum appendicectomy, right hemicolectomy, and right salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. The postoperative period was uneventful. Penicillin therapy was given for six months without any complication. The retroperitoneal mass measured 4.5 × 3.5 × 3 cm, surrounded adjacent organs and histologically showed inflammatory granulomatous tissue, agglomeration of filaments, and sulfur granules of Actinomyces, with positive reaction with periodic acid Schiff. Right tubo-ovarian abscess was present. Abdominalpelvic actinomycosis should always be considered in patients with a pelvic mass especially in ones using intrauterine device.

  1. Cutaneous Nocardiosis Simulating Cutaneous Lymphatic Sporotrichosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secchin, Pedro; Trope, Beatriz Moritz; Fernandes, Larissa Araujo; Barreiros, Glória; Ramos-E-Silva, Marcia

    2017-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is the subcutaneous mycosis caused by several species of the Sporothrix genus. With worldwide occurrence, the State of Rio de Janeiro is presently undergoing a zoonotic sporotrichosis epidemic. The form of lymphocutaneous nocardiosis is rare, being caused especially by Nocardia brasiliensis. It appears as a nodular or ulcerated lesion, with multiple painful erythematous nodules or satellite pustules distributed along the lymphatic tract, similar to the lymphocutaneous variant of sporotrichosis. We present a 61-year-old man who, after an insect bite in the left leg, developed an ulcerated lesion associated with ascending lymphangitis, nonresponsive to previous antibiotic therapies. The patient was admitted for investigation, based on the main diagnostic hypothesis of lymphatic cutaneous sporotrichosis entailed by the highly suggestive morphology, associated with the epidemiologic information that he is a resident of the city of Rio de Janeiro. While culture results were being awaited, the patient was medicated with sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim to cover CA-MRSA and evolved with total healing of the lesions. After hospital discharge, using an ulcer fragment, an Actinomyces sp. was cultivated and N. brasiliensis was identified by molecular biology. The objective of this report is to demonstrate a case of lymphocutaneous nocardiosis caused by N. brasiliensis after a probable insect bite. Despite the patient being a resident of the State of Rio de Janeiro (endemic region for sporotrichosis), it is highlighted that it is necessary to be aware of the differential diagnoses of an ulcerated lesion with lymphangitis, favoring an early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of the illness.

  2. Microbiota associated with chronic osteomyelitis of the jaws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elerson Gaetti-Jardim Júnior

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic osteomyelitis of maxilla and mandible is rare in industrialized countries and its occurrence in developing countries is associated with trauma and surgery, and its microbial etiology has not been studied thoroughly. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the microbiota associated with osteomyelitis of mandible or maxilla from some Brazilian patients. After clinical and radiographic evaluation, samples of bone sequestra, purulent secretion, and biopsies of granulomatous tissues from twenty-two patients with chronic osteomyelitis of mandible and maxilla were cultivated and submitted for pathogen detection by using a PCR method. Each patient harbored a single lesion. Bacterial isolation was performed on fastidious anaerobe agar supplemented with hemin, menadione and horse blood for anaerobes; and on tryptic soy agar supplemented with yeast extract and horse blood for facultative bacteria and aerobes. Plates were incubated in anaerobiosis and aerobiosis, at 37ºC for 14 and 3 days, respectively. Bacteria were cultivated from twelve patient samples; and genera Actinomyces, Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, and Staphylococcus were the most frequent. By PCR, bacterial DNA was detected from sixteen patient samples. The results suggest that cases of chronic osteomyelitis of the jaws are usually mixed anaerobic infections, reinforcing the concept that osteomyelitis of the jaws are mainly related to microorganisms from the oral environment, and periapical and periodontal infections may act as predisposing factors.

  3. Disinfectant Efficacy of 0.525% Sodium Hypochlorite and Epimax on Alginate Impression Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Gopal Krishna; Chitumalla, Rajkiran; Manual, Litto; Rajalbandi, Santosh Kumar; Chauhan, Mahinder Singh; Talukdar, Pratim

    2018-01-01

    Species of Streptococcus, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus, Actinomyces, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, and Candida are commonly seen in the oral cavity. Impression materials are commonly contaminated with microorganisms. The present study was conducted to assess the disinfection efficacy of Epimax and 0.525% sodium hypochlorite on alginate impression over a period of 10 minutes. This study was conducted in the Department of Prosthodontics in the year 2015. An alginate impression material was prepared. For each bacteria species, 15 samples were used. Out of 15 samples, 3 were used by 0.525% sodium hypochlorite for disinfection for 5 minutes and 3 others for 10 minutes. Similarly, 3 samples were used by Epimax for 5 minutes and other 3 for 10 minutes. Three samples were used as controls. Each sample was polluted with Candida albicans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus strains. There was no statistical difference in P. aeruginosa and C. albicans after 5 minutes, whereas S. aureus showed significant difference (p alginate impression material against C. albicans, P. aeruginosa, and S. aureus strains. However, Epimax was found to be more effective against S. aureus as compared with 0.525% sodium hypochlorite. Efficacy of disinfection of sodium hypo-chlorite and Epimax on alginate impression.

  4. Evaluation of the Vitek 2 ANC card for identification of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E H L; Degener, J E; Welling, G W; Veloo, A C M

    2011-05-01

    An evaluation of the Vitek 2 ANC card (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France) was performed with 301 anaerobic isolates. Each strain was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, which is considered to be the reference method. The Vitek 2 ANC card correctly identified 239 (79.4%) of the 301 clinical isolates to the genus level, including 100 species that were not represented in the database. Correct species identification was obtained for 60.1% (181/301) of the clinical isolates. For the isolates not identified to the species level, a correct genus identification was obtained for 47.0% of them (47/100), and 16 were accurately designated not identified. Although the Vitek 2 ANC card allows the rapid and acceptable identification of the most common clinically important anaerobic bacteria within 6 h, improvement is required for the identification of members of the genera Fusobacterium, Prevotella, and Actinomyces and certain Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC).

  5. Effect of maltitol-containing chewing gum use on the composition of dental plaque microbiota in subjects with active dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosdocimi, Erica M; Kistler, James O; Moazzez, Rebecca; Thabuis, Clementine; Perreau, Caroline; Wade, William G

    2017-01-01

    Background : Sugar alcohols such as xylitol are incorporated in a number of oral hygiene products for their anti-cariogenic properties while chewing gum is known to be beneficial to oral hygiene. Objective : The aim of this study was to determine the composition of the dental plaque microbiota in patients with active caries before and after using a chewing gum supplemented with maltitol. Design : Forty subjects with active caries were randomly allocated to chew maltitol gum or gum base for two weeks. A healthy control group used gum base for two weeks. Plaque samples were collected before and after treatment and the microbiota analysed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Results : A total of 773,547 sequences were obtained from 117 samples. There was no difference in structure of the bacterial communities between groups (AMOVA). There was a significant difference in community membership between groups, (AMOVA, p=0.009). There was a significant difference between the control group after treatment and the maltitol patient group after treatment (p<0.001). A. naeslundii HOT-176 and Actinomyces HOT-169 were significantly reduced following use of maltitol chewing gum in patients. Conclusions : This study has shown that chewing gum containing maltitol had minor effects on the composition of the plaque microbiome.

  6. Comparative cytotoxicity of periodontal bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, R.H.; Hammond, B.F.

    1988-01-01

    The direct cytotoxicity of sonic extracts (SE) from nine periodontal bacteria for human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) was compared. Equivalent dosages (in terms of protein concentration) of SE were used to challenge HGF cultures. The cytotoxic potential of each SE was assessed by its ability to (1) inhibit HGF proliferation, as measured by direct cell counts; (2) inhibit 3H-thymidine incorporation in HGF cultures; or (3) cause morphological alterations of the cells in challenged cultures. The highest concentration (500 micrograms SE protein/ml) of any of the SEs used to challenge the cells was found to be markedly inhibitory to the HGFs by all three of the criteria of cytotoxicity. At the lowest dosage tested (50 micrograms SE protein/ml); only SE from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides gingivalis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum caused a significant effect (greater than 90% inhibition or overt morphological abnormalities) in the HGFs as determined by any of the criteria employed. SE from Capnocytophaga sputigena, Eikenella corrodens, or Wolinella recta also inhibited cell proliferation and thymidine incorporation at this dosage; however, the degree of inhibition (5-50%) was consistently, clearly less than that of the first group of three organisms named above. The SE of the three other organisms tested (Actinomyces odontolyticus, Bacteroides intermedius, and Streptococcus sanguis) had little or no effect (0-10% inhibition) at this concentration. The data suggest that the outcome of the interaction between bacterial components and normal resident cells of the periodontium is, at least in part, a function of the bacterial species

  7. Periodontal Therapy Effects on Nitrite Related to Oral Bacteria: A 6-Month Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortelli, Sheila C; Costa, Fernando O; Rodrigues, Edson; Cota, Luis O M; Cortelli, Jose R

    2015-08-01

    Nitrite is a biologic factor relevant to oral and systemic homeostasis. Through an oral bacteria reduction process, it was suggested that periodontal therapy and chlorhexidine (CHX) rinse could affect nitrite levels, leading to negative effects, such as an increase in blood pressure. This 6-month randomized clinical trial evaluated the effects of periodontal therapeutic protocols on salivary nitrite and its relation to subgingival bacteria. One hundred patients with periodontitis were allocated randomly to debridement procedures in four weekly sections (quadrant scaling [QS]) or within 24 hours (full-mouth scaling [FMS]) in conjunction with a 60-day CHX (QS + CHX and FMS + CHX), placebo (QS + placebo and FMS + placebo), or no mouthrinse (QS + none and FMS + none) use. Real-time polymerase chain reaction determined total bacterial, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, Streptococcus oralis, and Actinomyces naeslundii levels. Salivary nitrite concentration was determined with Griess reagent. Data were analyzed statistically at baseline and 3 and 6 months by analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, and Spearman correlation tests (P periodontal pockets. The relationship between nitrite and bacterial levels appears weak. Short-term scaling exhibited a greater influence on nitrite concentrations then long-term CHX use.

  8. Dissemination of Periodontal Pathogens in the Bloodstream after Periodontal Procedures: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horliana, Anna Carolina Ratto Tempestini; Chambrone, Leandro; Foz, Adriana Moura; Artese, Hilana Paula Carillo; Rabelo, Mariana de Sousa; Pannuti, Cláudio Mendes; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Background To date, there is no compilation of evidence-based information associating bacteremia and periodontal procedures. This systematic review aims to assess magnitude, duration, prevalence and nature of bacteremia caused by periodontal procedures. Study Design Systematic Review Types of Studies Reviewed MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACS databases were searched in duplicate through August, 2013 without language restriction. Observational studies were included if blood samples were collected before, during or after periodontal procedures of patients with periodontitis. The methodological quality was assessed in duplicate using the modified Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS). Results Search strategy identified 509 potentially eligible articles and nine were included. Only four studies demonstrated high methodological quality, whereas five were of medium or low methodological quality. The study characteristics were considered too heterogeneous to conduct a meta-analysis. Among 219 analyzed patients, 106 (49.4%) had positive bacteremia. More frequent bacteria were S. viridans, A. actinomycetemcomitans P. gingivalis, M. micros and species Streptococcus and Actinomyces, although identification methods of microbiologic assays were different among studies. Clinical Implications Although half of the patients presented positive bacteremia after periodontal procedures, accurate results regarding the magnitude, duration and nature of bacteremia could not be confidentially assessed. PMID:24870125

  9. CLINICAL USE OF MODERN FLUOROQUINOLONES IN DENTAL IMPLANTATION AND MAXILLARY SINUS LIFTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Novikov

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available New fluoroquinolones like levofloxacine, with broad-spectrum of effect which is also active against anaerobic bacteria, is a prospective drug for the prevention of the inflammatory complications in implant dentistry and maxillary sinus augmentation. 34 patients have been selected for this study, including 16 women and 18 men aged 18-65. All the patients have been classified into the main and control groups. Patiens of the first group have been prescribed 500 mg of levofloxacine before and after the operation two times a day for 10 days. Patients of the control group have been treated with amocxicilline. In the control group, which has used amoxicilline, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus salivarius and anaerobic bacteria have been identified. The amount of Prevotella intermedia is insignificant. The same picture has been found with Fusobacterium spp. The rate of Actinomyces spp. was insignificant over the whole period of study. Patients of the experimental group had a slightly different distribution of bacteria. On the 10th day after the operation in the main patient group no periodontal pathogenesis, which may cause inflammatory complications have been identified. During the early post-operative period no significant differences have been observed among the patients of both groups.

  10. The Biofilm Community-Rebels with a Cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruni, A Wilson; Dou, Yuetan; Mishra, Arunima; Fletcher, Hansel M

    2015-03-01

    Oral Biofilms are one of the most complex and diverse ecosystem developed by successive colonization of more than 600 bacterial taxa. Development starts with the attachment of early colonizers such as Actinomyces species and oral streptococci on the acquired pellicle and tooth enamel. These bacteria not only adhere to tooth surface but also interact with each other and lay foundation for attachment of bridging colonizer such as Fusobacterium nucleatum followed by late colonizers including the red complex species: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola -the founders of periodontal disease. As the biofilm progresses from supragingival sites to subgingival sites, the environment changes from aerobic to anaerobic thus favoring the growth of mainly Gram-negative obligate anaerobes while restricting the growth of the early Gram-positive facultative aerobes. Microbes present at supragingival level are mainly related to gingivitis and root-caries whereas subgingival species advance the destruction of teeth supporting tissues and thus causing periodontitis. This review summarizes our present understanding and recent developments on the characteristic features of supra- and subgingival biofilms, interaction between different genera and species of bacteria constituting these biofilms and draws our attention to the role of some of the recently discovered members of the oral community.

  11. Effects of poly-γ-glutamic acid biopreparation (PGAB) on nitrogen conservation in the coastal saline soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihua; Xu, Xianghong; Zhang, Huan; Han, Rui; Cheng, Yao; Tan, Xueyi; Chen, Xuanyu

    2017-04-01

    Water leaching is the major method to decrease soil salinity of the coastal saline soil. Conservation of soil nutrition in the soil ameliorating process is helpful to maintain soil fertility and prevent environment pollution. In the experiment, glutamic acid and poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA) producing bacteria were isolated for manufacturing the PGA biopreparation (PGAB), and the effect of PGAB on the soil nitrogen (N) conservation was assayed. The glutamic acid and PGA producing bacteria were identified as Brevibacterium flavum and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. After soil leached with water for 90 days, compared to control treatment, salt concentration of 0-30cm soil with PGAB treatment was lowered by 39.93%, however the total N loss was decreased by 65.37%. Compared to control, the microbial biomass N increased by 1.19 times at 0-30 cm soil with PGAB treatment. The populations of soil total bacteria, fungi, actinomyces, nitrogen fixing bacteria, ammonifying bacteria, nitrifying bacteria and denitrifying bacteria and biomass of soil algae were significantly increased in PGAB treatment, while anaerobic bacteria decreased (P 0.25 mm and 0.02 mm < diameter <0.25 mm were increased by 2.93 times and 26.79% respectively in PGAB treatment. The soil erosion-resistance coefficient of PGAB treatment increased by 50%. All these suggested that the PGAB conserved the soil nitrogen effectively in the process of soil water leaching and improved the coastal saline soil quality.

  12. Characterization of salivary alpha-amylase binding to Streptococcus sanguis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scannapieco, F.A.; Bergey, E.J.; Reddy, M.S.; Levine, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the major salivary components which interact with oral bacteria and to determine the mechanism(s) responsible for their binding to the bacterial surface. Strains of Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus mutans, and Actinomyces viscosus were incubated for 2 h in freshly collected human submandibular-sublingual saliva (HSMSL) or parotid saliva (HPS), and bound salivary components were eluted with 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western transfer, alpha-amylase was the prominent salivary component eluted from S. sanguis. Studies with 125 I-labeled HSMSL or 125 I-labeled HPS also demonstrated a component with an electrophoretic mobility identical to that of alpha-amylase which bound to S. sanguis. Purified alpha-amylase from human parotid saliva was radiolabeled and found to bind to strains of S. sanguis genotypes 1 and 3 and S. mitis genotype 2, but not to strains of other species of oral bacteria. Binding of [ 125 I]alpha-amylase to streptococci was saturable, calcium independent, and inhibitable by excess unlabeled alpha-amylases from a variety of sources, but not by secretory immunoglobulin A and the proline-rich glycoprotein from HPS. Reduced and alkylated alpha-amylase lost enzymatic and bacterial binding activities. Binding was inhibited by incubation with maltotriose, maltooligosaccharides, limit dextrins, and starch

  13. Novel model for multispecies biofilms that uses rigid gas-permeable lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyyala, Rebecca; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S; Ebersole, Jeffrey L; Novak, Karen F

    2011-05-01

    Oral biofilms comprise complex multispecies consortia aided by specific inter- and intraspecies interactions occurring among commensals and pathogenic bacterial species. Oral biofilms are primary initiating factors of periodontal disease, although complex multifactorial biological influences, including host cell responses, contribute to the individual outcome of the disease. To provide a system to study initial stages of interaction between oral biofilms and the host cells that contribute to the disease process, we developed a novel in vitro model system to grow biofilms on rigid gas-permeable contact lenses (RGPLs), which enable oxygen to permeate through the lens material. Bacterial species belonging to early- and late-colonizing groups were successfully established as single- or three-species biofilms, with each group comprising Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus sanguinis; S. gordonii, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Fusobacterium nucleatum; or S. gordonii, F. nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Quantification of biofilm numbers by quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed substantial differences in the magnitude of bacterial numbers in single-species and multispecies biofilms. We evaluated cell-permeable conventional nucleic acid stains acridine orange, hexidium iodide, and Hoechst 33258 and novel SYTO red, blue, and green fluorochromes for their effect on bacterial viability and fluorescence yield to allow visualization of the aggregates of individual bacterial species by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Substantial differences in the quantity and distribution of the species in the multispecies biofilms were identified. The specific features of these biofilms may help us better understand the role of various bacteria in local challenge of oral tissues.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of different disinfectants against cariogenic microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra UZER CELIK

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro antimicrobial effects of chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX, polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHBM, and octenidine dihydrochloride (OCT on cariogenic microorganisms by using their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC. CHX, PHBM, and OCT were diluted in distilled water to the final test concentrations. Using the in-tube dilution method, Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and Actinomyces viscosus were cultivated on blood agar and Mueller–Hinton broth (MHB at 37°C for 48 h. They were read using a spectrophotometer to detect MIC. To determine MBC, samples in the range of the turbidity threshold after 24 h were transferred onto blood agar and evaluated for growth after 24 h. Different MICs and MBCs were observed in all disinfectants against each microorganism. The lowest MIC and MBC against S. mutans (60 mg/L were obtained from PHBM. The lowest values against L. rhamnosus (15 mg/L, 30 mg/L, A. viscosus (30 mg/L, and L. acidophilus (15 mg/L, 30 mg/L were determined by OCT. PHBM and OCT have the potential to be replaced with CHX because they were effective against cariogenic microorganisms.

  15. Waste drilling-fluid-utilising microorganisms in a tropical mangrove swamp oilfield location

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benka-Coker, M.O.; Olumagin, A. [Benin Univ. (Nigeria). Dept. of Microbiology

    1995-12-31

    Waste drilling-fluid-utilising microorganisms were isolated from drilling-mud cuttings, soil and creek water from a mangrove swamp oilfield location in the Delta area of Nigeria using waste drilling-fluid as the substrate. Eighteen bacterial isolates obtained were identified as species of Staphylococcus, Acinetobacter, Alcaligenes, Serratia, Clostridium, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Nocardia, Bacillus, Actinomyces, Micrococcus and Pseudomonas, while the genera of fungi isolated were Penicillium, Cladosporium and Fusarium. Even though drilling-fluid-utilising genera were in higher numbers in the soil than in the two other sources examined, the percentages of the total heterotrophic bacteria that utilised waste drilling-fluid were 6.02 in the drilling-mud cuttings, 0.83 in creek water and 0.42 in soil. The screen tests for biodegradation potential of the bacterial isolates showed that, even though all the isolates were able to degrade and utilise the waste fluid for growth, species of Alcaligenes and Micrococcus were more active degraders of the waste. The significance of the results in environmental management in oil-producing areas of Nigeria is discussed. (Author)

  16. Functionalization of titanium with chitosan via silanation: evaluation of biological and mechanical performances.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Renoud

    Full Text Available Complications in dentistry and orthopaedic surgery are mainly induced by peri-implant bacterial infections and current implant devices do not prevent such infections. The coating of antibacterial molecules such as chitosan on its surface would give the implant bioactive properties. The major challenge of this type of coating is the attachment of chitosan to a metal substrate. In this study, we propose to investigate the functionalization of titanium with chitosan via a silanation. Firstly, the surface chemistry and mechanical properties of such coating were evaluated. We also verified if the coated chitosan retained its biocompatibility with the peri-implant cells, as well as its antibacterial properties. FTIR and Tof-SIMS analyses confirmed the presence of chitosan on the titanium surface. This coating showed great scratch resistance and was strongly adhesive to the substrate. These mechanical properties were consistent with an implantology application. The Chitosan-coated surfaces showed strong inhibition of Actinomyces naeslundii growth; they nonetheless showed a non significant inhibition against Porphyromonas gingivalis after 32 hours in liquid media. The chitosan-coating also demonstrated good biocompatibility to NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Thus this method of covalent coating provides a biocompatible material with improved bioactive properties. These results proved that covalent coating of chitosan has significant potential in biomedical device implantation.

  17. Prevalence of microorganisms associated with udder infections in dairy goats on small-scale farms in Kenya : short communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.N. Ndegwa

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Six hundred and thirty clinically-normal milk samples from dairy goat flocks comprising a mixed population of German Alpine, Toggenburg, Saanen and Galla crosses were exam-ined over a 3-month period to determine the prevalence of bacterial organisms. Bacteria were isolated in 28.7 % of the milk samples (181/630 either singly (92.8 % or in combination (7.2 %. The most prevalent bacterial organisms were Staphylococcus spp. (60.3 %, followed by Micrococcus spp. (17.7 %, Acinetobacter spp. (5 %, Actinomyces spp. (5% and Streptococcus spp. (1.1 %. The Staphylococcus spp. were mainly coagulase negative (64.3 %. Coagulase-- negative staphylococci and coagulase-positive staphylococci accounted for 37.5 % and 22.7 % respectively of the total bacteria isolated. The isolation of bacteria, some of which are important in clinical and subclinical mastitis, in apparently normal caprine milk, indicates that particular attention should be given to the management of these dairy goat flocks in order to avoid the development of cases of clinical mastitis.

  18. Pyrosequencing of Plaque Microflora In Twin Children with Discordant Caries Phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Zhang

    Full Text Available Despite recent successes in the control of dental caries, the mechanism of caries development remains unclear. To investigate the causes of dental decay, especially in early childhood caries, the supragingival microflora composition of 20 twins with discordant caries phenotypes were analyzed using high-throughput pyrosequencing. In addition, the parents completed a lifestyle questionnaire. A total of 228,789 sequencing reads revealed 10 phyla, 84 genera, and 155 species of microflora, the relative abundances of these strains varied dramatically among the children, Comparative analysis between groups revealed that Veillonella, Corynebacterium and Actinomyces were presumed to be caries-related genera, Fusobacterium, Kingella and Leptotrichia were presumed to be healthy-related genus, yet this six genera were not statistically significant (P>0.05. Moreover, a cluster analysis revealed that the microbial composition of samples in the same group was often dissimilar but that the microbial composition observed in twins was usually similar. Although the genetic and environmental factors that strongly influence the microbial composition of dental caries remains unknown, we speculate that genetic factors primarily influence the individual's susceptibility to dental caries and that environmental factors primarily regulate the microbial composition of the dental plaque and the progression to caries. By using improved twins models and increased sample sizes, our study can be extended to analyze the specific genetic and environmental factors that affect the development of caries.

  19. Lipoquinones of some spore-forming rods, lactic-acid bacteria and actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, A; Holländer, R; Mannheim, W

    1979-11-01

    The respiratory quinones of 73 strains of Gram-positive bacteria including spore-forming rods, lactic-acid bacteria and actinomyctes were examined. Menaquinones with seven isoprenoid units (MK-7) were the main quinone type found in representatives of the genus Bacillus and in Sporolactobacillus inulinus. However, a strain of B. thuringiensis produced MK-8 in addition to MK-7, and strains of B. lentus and B. pantothenticus appeared to produce MK-9 and MK-8, respectively, with no MK-7. In the clostridia and lactic-acid bacteria, no quinones were found, except in Pediococcus cerevisiae NCTC 8066 and Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus ATCC 7469, which contained menaquinones, and Streptococcus faecalis NCTC 775 and HIM 478-1, which contained demethylmenaquinones, in relatively low concentrations. Menaquinones were also found in the actinomycetes (except Actinomyces odontolyticus and Bifidobacterium bifidum which did not produce any quinones) and in Protaminobacter alboflavus ATCC 8458, the so-called Actinobacillus actinoides ATCC 15900 and Noguchia granulosis NCTC 10559.

  20. [Abdominal wall actinomycosis. A report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Pérez-Ezquerra, Beatriz; Guardia-Dodorico, Lorena; Arribas-Marco, Teresa; Ania-Lahuerta, Aldonza; González Ballano, Isabel; Chipana-Salinas, Margot; Carazo-Hernández, Belén

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal wall Actinomycosis is a rare disease associated with the use of intrauterine device and as a complication of abdominal surgery. Diagnosis is difficult because it is unusual and behaves like a malignant neoplasm. A case report is presented of a patient who had used an intrauterine device for four years and developed a stony tumour in the abdominal wall associated with a set of symptoms that, clinically and radiologically, was simulating a peritoneal carcinomatosis associated with paraneoplastic syndrome, even in the course of an exploratory laparotomy. The patient attended our hospital with a two-month history of abdominal pain and symptoms that mimic a paraneoplastic syndrome. The diagnosis of abdominal actinomycosis was suspected by the finding of the microorganism in cervical cytology together with other cultures and Actinomyces negative in pathological studies, confirming the suspicion of a complete cure with empirical treatment with penicillin. Actinomycosis should be considered in patients with pelvic mass or abdominal wall mass that mimics a malignancy. Antibiotic therapy is the first treatment choice and makes a more invasive surgical management unnecessary. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  1. Exploring the variation of oral microbiota in supragingival plaque during and after head-and-neck radiotherapy using pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Hu, Yuejian; Wang, Yuxia; Jiang, Wenxin; He, Zhiyan; Zhu, Cailian; Ma, Rui; Huang, Zhengwei

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this article was to study the variation in oral microflora of the subgingival plaque during and after radiotherapy. During and after radiotherapy, microbial samples were collected at seven time points (early stage, medium stage, and later stage of radiotherapy, and 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after radiotherapy) in three subjects for a total of 21 samples. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification was carried out on the 16S rDNA hypervariable V1-V3 region, and then the PCR products were determined by high-throughput pyrosequencing. The rarefaction curve indicating the richness of the microflora demonstrated that the number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) was in decline from the early stage of radiotherapy to the time point 1 month after radiotherapy and then trended upward. The Shannon diversity index declined during radiotherapy (ranging from 4.59 to 3.73), and generally rose after radiotherapy, with the lowest value of 3.5 (1 month after radiotherapy) and highest value of 4.75 (6 months after radiotherapy). A total of 120 genera were found; five genera (Actinomyces, Veillonella, Prevotella, Streptococcus, Campylobacter) were found in all subjects across all time points. The richness and diversity of oral ecology decreased with increased radiation dose, and it was gradually restored with time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Preparation of an orthodontic bracket coated with an nitrogen-doped TiO(2-x)N(y) thin film and examination of its antimicrobial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Baocheng; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Na; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yingjie

    2013-01-01

    A bracket coated with a nitrogen-doped (N-doped) TiO(2-x)N(y) thin film was prepared using the RF magnetron sputtering method. The physicochemical properties of the thin film were measured using X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, while the antimicrobial activity of the bracket against common oral pathogenic microbes was assessed on the basis of colony counts. The rate of antimicrobial activity of the bracket coated with nano-TiO(2-x)N(y) thin film against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Actinomyces viscous, and Candida albicans was 95.19%, 91.00%, 69.44%, and 98.86%, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy showed that fewer microbes adhered to the surface of this newly designed bracket than to the surface of the normal edgewise bracket. The brackets coated with the N-doped TiO(2-x)N(y) thin film showed high antimicrobial and bacterial adhesive properties against normal oral pathogenic bacterial through visible light, which is effective in prevention of enamel demineralization and gingivitis in orthodontic patients.

  3. Cymbopogon citratus essential oil: effect on polymicrobial caries-related biofilm with low cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maria Alcionéia Carvalho de; Borges, Aline Chiodi; Brighenti, Fernanda Lourenção; Salvador, Marcos José; Gontijo, Aline Vidal Lacerda; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi

    2017-11-06

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of Cymbopogon citratus essential oil and its main compound (citral) against primary dental colonizers and caries-related species. Chemical characterization of the essential oil was performed by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS), and the main compound was determined. Antimicrobial activity was tested against Actinomyces naeslundii, Lactobacillus acidophilus, S. gordonii, S. mitis, S. mutans, S. sanguinis and S. sobrinus. Minimum inhibitory and bactericide concentrations were determined by broth microdilution assay for streptococci and lactobacilli reference, and for clinical strains. The effect of the essential oil on bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation/disruption was investigated. Negative (without treatment) and positive controls (chlorhexidine) were used. The effect of citral on preformed biofilm was also tested using the same methodology. Monospecies and microcosm biofilms were tested. ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used (α=0.05). Cytotoxicity of the essential oil to human keratinocytes was performed by MTT assay. GC/MS demonstrated one major component (citral). The essential oil showed an inhibitory effect on all tested bacterial species, including S. mutans and L. acidophilus. Essential oil of C. citratus (10X MIC) reduced the number of viable cells of lactobacilli and streptococci biofilms (p essential oil inhibited adhesion of caries-related polymicrobial biofilm to dental enamel (p essential oil showed low cytotoxicity to human keratinocytes. Based on these findings, this study can contribute to the development of new formulations for products like mouthwash, against dental biofilms.

  4. Lemongrass essential oil gel as a local drug delivery agent for the treatment of periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivaraj B Warad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been long recognized that periodontal diseases are infections of the periodontium, comprising the bacterial etiology, an immune response, and tissue destruction. Treatment strategies aiming primarily at suppressing or eliminating specific periodontal pathogens include adjunct use of local and systemic antibiotics as part of nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Unwanted side effects and resistance of microorganisms toward antibiotics due to their widespread use have modified the general perception about their efficacy. Research in phytosciences has revealed various medicinal plants offering a new choice of optional antimicrobial therapy. Cymbopogon citratus, Stapf. (lemongrass is a popular medicinal plant. At a concentration ≤2%, lemongrass essential oil inhibits the growth of several kinds of microorganisms including periodontal pathogens, especially the reference strains Actinomyces naeslundii and Porphyromonas gingivalis, which were resistant to tetracycline hydrochloride. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of locally delivered 2% lemongrass essential oil in gel form as an adjunct to scaling and root planing, as compared to scaling and root planing alone for the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: 2% Lemongrass essential oil gel was prepared and placed in moderate to deep periodontal pockets after scaling and root planing. Results: Statistically significant reduction in probing depth and gingival index and gain in relative attachment level were noted in the experimental group as compared to the control group at 1 and 3 months. Conclusion: Locally delivered 2% lemongrass essential oil gel offers a new choice of safe and effective adjunct to scaling and root planing in periodontal therapy.

  5. Extracellular DNA and lipoteichoic acids interact with exopolysaccharides in the extracellular matrix of Streptococcus mutans biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo Pedraza, Midian C.; Novais, Tatiana F.; Faustoferri, Roberta C.; Quivey, Robert G.; Terekhov, Anton; Hamaker, Bruce R.; Klein, Marlise I.

    2018-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans -derived exopolysaccharides are virulence determinants in the matrix of biofilms that cause caries. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) are found in cariogenic biofilms, but their functions are unclear. Therefore, strains of S. mutans carrying single deletions that would modulate matrix components were used: eDNA – ΔlytS and ΔlytT; LTA – ΔdltA and ΔdltD; and insoluble exopolysaccharide – ΔgtfB. Single-species (parental strain S. mutans UA159 or individual mutant strains) and mixed-species (UA159 or mutant strain, Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus gordonii) biofilms were evaluated. Distinct amounts of matrix components were detected, depending on the inactivated gene. eDNA was found to be cooperative with exopolysaccharide in early phases, while LTA played a larger role in the later phases of biofilm development. The architecture of mutant strains biofilms was distinct (vs UA159), demonstrating that eDNA and LTA influence exopolysaccharide distribution and microcolony organization. Thus, eDNA and LTA may shape exopolysaccharide structure, affecting strategies for controlling pathogenic biofilms. PMID:28946780

  6. Role of microbial biofilms in the maintenance of oral health and in the development of dental caries and periodontal diseases. Consensus report of group 1 of the Joint EFP/ORCA workshop on the boundaries between caries and periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Mariano; Beighton, David; Curtis, Michael A; Cury, Jaime A; Dige, Irene; Dommisch, Henrik; Ellwood, Roger; Giacaman, Rodrigo A; Herrera, David; Herzberg, Mark C; Könönen, Eija; Marsh, Philip D; Meyle, Joerg; Mira, Alex; Molina, Ana; Mombelli, Andrea; Quirynen, Marc; Reynolds, Eric C; Shapira, Lior; Zaura, Egija

    2017-03-01

    The scope of this working group was to review (1) ecological interactions at the dental biofilm in health and disease, (2) the role of microbial communities in the pathogenesis of periodontitis and caries, and (3) the innate host response in caries and periodontal diseases. A health-associated biofilm includes genera such as Neisseria, Streptococcus, Actinomyces, Veillonella and Granulicatella. Microorganisms associated with both caries and periodontal diseases are metabolically highly specialized and organized as multispecies microbial biofilms. Progression of these diseases involves multiple microbial interactions driven by different stressors. In caries, the exposure of dental biofilms to dietary sugars and their fermentation to organic acids results in increasing proportions of acidogenic and aciduric species. In gingivitis, plaque accumulation at the gingival margin leads to inflammation and increasing proportions of proteolytic and often obligately anaerobic species. The natural mucosal barriers and saliva are the main innate defence mechanisms against soft tissue bacterial invasion. Similarly, enamel and dentin are important hard tissue barriers to the caries process. Given that the present state of knowledge suggests that the aetiologies of caries and periodontal diseases are mutually independent, the elements of innate immunity that appear to contribute to resistance to both are somewhat coincidental. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Lemongrass essential oil gel as a local drug delivery agent for the treatment of periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warad, Shivaraj B.; Kolar, Sahana S.; Kalburgi, Veena; Kalburgi, Nagaraj B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: It has been long recognized that periodontal diseases are infections of the periodontium, comprising the bacterial etiology, an immune response, and tissue destruction. Treatment strategies aiming primarily at suppressing or eliminating specific periodontal pathogens include adjunct use of local and systemic antibiotics as part of nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Unwanted side effects and resistance of microorganisms toward antibiotics due to their widespread use have modified the general perception about their efficacy. Research in phytosciences has revealed various medicinal plants offering a new choice of optional antimicrobial therapy. Cymbopogon citratus, Stapf. (lemongrass) is a popular medicinal plant. At a concentration ≤2%, lemongrass essential oil inhibits the growth of several kinds of microorganisms including periodontal pathogens, especially the reference strains Actinomyces naeslundii and Porphyromonas gingivalis, which were resistant to tetracycline hydrochloride. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of locally delivered 2% lemongrass essential oil in gel form as an adjunct to scaling and root planing, as compared to scaling and root planing alone for the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: 2% Lemongrass essential oil gel was prepared and placed in moderate to deep periodontal pockets after scaling and root planing. Results: Statistically significant reduction in probing depth and gingival index and gain in relative attachment level were noted in the experimental group as compared to the control group at 1 and 3 months. Conclusion: Locally delivered 2% lemongrass essential oil gel offers a new choice of safe and effective adjunct to scaling and root planing in periodontal therapy. PMID:24991068

  8. [A case of mediastinum actinomycosis by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razafimanjato, N N M; Portela, A M; Radu, D M; Guiraudet, P; Destable, M D; Seguin, A; Martinod, E

    2016-12-01

    The actinomycosis is a suppurative infection due to an anaerobic and microaerophillic bacteria called actinomyces. Only few case reports are described for the mediastinal locations of this rare entity. We report a new case of inflammatory pseudotumor in the mediastinum due to Aggregatibacte actinomycetemcomitans revealed by hemoptysis. The mediastinoscopy procedure with biopsy was needed to confirm the definitive bacteriological diagnosis by a positive culture. During the postoperative course, a cutaneous fistula was found which had a favourable evolution after appropriate antibiotherapy. Through this case report, the authors insist upon the importance of considering the diagnosis of mediastinal actinomycosis when facing non-specfic mediastinal mass symptoms and also about the interest of systematic bacterioscopic examination and histopathologic examination on nodes' biopsies to avoid to be lost on pathology of mediastinal tumor or tuberculosis. In practise, we caution the non-expert during biopsies because of this lesion's invasive characteristic especially in the confined space of the mediastinum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Culturable microbial groups and thallium-tolerant fungi in soils with high thallium contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jialong; Zou, Xiao; Ning, Zengping; Sun, Min; Peng, Jingquan; Xiao, Tangfu

    2012-12-15

    Thallium (Tl) contamination in soil exerts a significant threat to the ecosystem health due to its high toxicity. However, little is known about the effect of Tl on the microbial community in soil. The present study aimed at characterizing the culturable microbial groups in soils which experience for a long time high Tl contamination and elevated Hg and As. The contamination originates from As, Hg and Tl sulfide mineralization and the associated mining activities in the Guizhou Province, Southwest China. Our investigation showed the existence of culturable bacteria, filamentous fungi and actinomyces in long-term Tl-contaminated soils. Some fungal groups grow in the presence of high Tl level up to 1000 mg kg⁻¹. We have isolated and identified nine Tl-tolerant fungal strains based on the morphological traits and ITS analysis. The dominant genera identified were Trichoderma, Penicillium and Paecilomyces. Preliminary data obtained in this study suggested that certain microbes were able to face high Tl pollution in soil and maintain their metabolic activities and resistances. The highly Tl-tolerant fungi that we have isolated are potentially useful in the remediation of Tl-contaminated sites. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. DIAGNÓSTICO ETIOLÓGICO DE CATARROS GENITAIS EM VACAS LEITERAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Lari Félix Cordeiro

    1992-08-01

    Full Text Available Cem vacas leiteras da região do Vale do Itajaí, de Santa Catarina, foram agrupadas, através do exame ginecológico, em quatro categorias, para um estudo bacteriológico dos catarros genitais inespecíficos. Os grupos compostos de 25 vacas, em fase pós-puerperal, foram assim caracterizados: A - sem alteração; B - catarro genital do primeiro grau; C - catarro genital de segundo grau; D - catarro genital de terceiro grau. O exame bacteriológico das secreções cérvico-uterinas demonstrou que ocorreu crescimento bacteriano em 57 vacas, das quais 46 com manifestação clínica de catarro genital. Os microrganismos mais freqüentemente isolados foram Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus beta - hemolítico, Bacillus sp., Escherichia coli, Actinomyces pyogenes, Serratia odorífera, Proteus mirabilis e Candida sp. Considerando que foi detectado crescimento bacteriano nos quatro grupos de vacas, conclui-se que não existe relação entre este crescimento e a existência de catarros genitais.

  11. White-spot Lesions and Gingivitis Microbiotas in Orthodontic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, A.C.R.; Sonis, A.L.; Lif Holgerson, P.; Starr, J.R.; Nunez, Y.; Kressirer, C.A.; Paster, B.J.; Johansson, I.

    2012-01-01

    White-spot lesions (WSL) associated with orthodontic appliances are a cosmetic problem and increase risk for cavities. We characterized the microbiota of WSL, accounting for confounding due to gingivitis. Participants were 60 children with fixed appliances, aged between 10 and 19 yrs, half with WSL. Plaque samples were assayed by a 16S rRNA-based microarray (HOMIM) and by PCR. Mean gingival index was positively associated with WSL (p = 0.018). Taxa associated with WSL by microarray included Granulicatella elegans (p = 0.01), Veillonellaceae sp. HOT 155 (p gingivitis by microarray included: Gemella sanguinis (p = 0.002), Actinomyces sp. HOT 448 (p = 0.003), Prevotella cluster IV (p = 0.021), and Streptococcus sp. HOT 071/070 (p = 0.023); and levels of S. mutans (p = 0.02) and Bifidobacteriaceae (p = 0.012) by qPCR. Species’ associations with WSL were minimally changed with adjustment for gingivitis level. Partial least-squares discriminant analysis yielded good discrimination between children with and those without WSL. Granulicatella, Veillonellaceae and Bifidobacteriaceae, in addition to S. mutans and S. wiggsiae, were associated with the presence of WSL in adolescents undergoing orthodontic treatment. Many taxa showed a stronger association with gingivitis than with WSL. PMID:22837552

  12. In-vivo fluorescence detection and imaging of porphyrin-producing bacteria in the human skin and in the oral cavity for diagnosis of acne vulgaris, caries, and squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Karsten; Schneckenburger, Herbert; Hemmer, Joerg; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1994-05-01

    Certain bacteria are able to synthesize metal-free fluorescent porphyrins and can therefore be detected by sensitive autofluorescence measurements in the red spectral region. The porphyrin-producing bacterium Propionibacterium acnes, which is involved in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris, was localized in human skin. Spectrally resolved fluorescence images of bacteria distribution in the face were obtained by a slow-scan CCD camera combined with a tunable liquid crystal filter. The structured autofluorescence of dental caries and dental plaque in the red is caused by oral bacteria, like Bacteroides or Actinomyces odontolyticus. `Caries images' were created by time-gated imaging in the ns-region after ultrashort laser excitation. Time-gated measurements allow the suppression of backscattered light and non-porphyrin autofluorescence. Biopsies of oral squamous cell carcinoma exhibited red autofluorescence in necrotic regions and high concentrations of the porphyrin-producing bacterium Pseudomonas aerigunosa. These studies suggest that the temporal and spectral characteristics of bacterial autofluorescence can be used in the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of diseases.

  13. The impact on the soil microbial community and enzyme activity of two earthworm species during the bioremediation of pentachlorophenol-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhong; Zhen, Zhen; Wu, Zhihao; Yang, Jiewen; Zhong, Laiyuan; Hu, Hanqiao; Luo, Chunling; Bai, Jing; Li, Yongtao; Zhang, Dayi

    2016-01-15

    The ecological effect of earthworms on the fate of soil pentachlorophenol (PCP) differs with species. This study addressed the roles and mechanisms by which two earthworm species (epigeic Eisenia fetida and endogeic Amynthas robustus E. Perrier) affect the soil microbial community and enzyme activity during the bioremediation of PCP-contaminated soils. A. robustus removed more soil PCP than did E. foetida. A. robustus improved nitrogen utilisation efficiency and soil oxidation more than did E. foetida, whereas the latter promoted the organic matter cycle in the soil. Both earthworm species significantly increased the amount of cultivable bacteria and actinomyces in soils, enhancing the utilisation rate of the carbon source (i.e. carbohydrates, carboxyl acids, and amino acids) and improving the richness and evenness of the soil microbial community. Additionally, earthworm treatment optimized the soil microbial community and increased the amount of the PCP-4-monooxygenase gene. Phylogenic classification revealed stimulation of indigenous PCP bacterial degraders, as assigned to the families Flavobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae and Sphingobacteriacea, by both earthworms. A. robustus and E. foetida specifically promoted Comamonadaceae and Moraxellaceae PCP degraders, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Actinomycosis of the Gallbladder Mimicking Carcinoma: a Case Report with US and CT Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Han; Kim, Seong Hyun; Cho, Mee Yon; Rhoe, Byoung Seon; Kim, Myung Soon [Wonju Christian Hospital, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Actinomycosis should be included in the differential diagnosis when sonography and computed tomography findings show a mass engulfing the stone in the gallbladder and extensive pericholecystic infiltration with extension to neighboring abdominal wall muscle. A ctinomycosis is a chronic suppurative and granulomatous disease that is characterized by the formation of multiple abscesses, draining sinuses, abundant granulation and dense fibrous tissue. The disease is most frequently caused by Actinomyces israelii. These organisms are gram-positive anaerobic bacteria, and are considered opportunistic pathogens associated with infection, trauma or surgery. These events allow them to cross mucosal barriers as these organisms are normally present in healthy individuals, especially in the oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, and female genital tract. In abdominopelvic actinomycosis, aggressive perilesional infiltration with a tendency to cross fascial planes or boundaries and extend to the abdominal wall has been well described as an important radiologic finding. Actinomycosis of the gallbladder is an extremely rare disease; only 21 cases have been reported in the English literature. Moreover, a diagnosis of actinomycosis of the gallbladder is difficult because this condition can be confused with carcinoma. We report here on a rare case of actinomycosis of the gallbladder that presented as a mass by sonography and computed tomography (CT)

  15. Pelvic actinomycosis presenting with a large abscess and bowel stenosis with marked response to conservative treatment: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nozawa Hiroaki

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pelvic actinomycosis is a rare disease that can result in abscess formation, bowel obstruction, and other serious complications. Moreover, the correct diagnosis can seldom be established before radical surgery because the disease often mimics pelvic neoplasms. It has been recently recognized that pelvic actinomycosis is associated with long-term use of an intrauterine contraceptive device. We report a woman with a long-standing intrauterine contraceptive device who visited our hospital complaining of symptoms mimicking large bowel ileus with a subacute course. X-ray fluorography and sigmoidoscopy showed marked stenosis in the sigmoid colon but rejected the possibility of colon cancers. Abdomino-pelvic CT and MRI revealed a huge abscess lying over the urinary bladder and anterior to the uterus. Furthermore, a cervical Papanicolaou smear disclosed Actinomyces species. We removed the intrauterine device from the patient. Subsequent high-dose ampicillin administration led to dramatic shrinkage of the abscess and improved the management of the bowel movement quickly. This is a successful case of symptomatic pelvic actinomycosis that was correctly diagnosed and treated without unnecessary surgical intervention.

  16. Microbial population dynamics during startup of a full-scale anaerobic digester treating industrial food waste in Kyoto eco-energy project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ike, Michihiko; Inoue, Daisuke; Miyano, Tomoki; Liu, Tong Tong; Sei, Kazunari; Soda, Satoshi; Kadoshin, Shiro

    2010-06-01

    The microbial community in a full-scale anaerobic digester (2300m3) treating industrial food waste in the Kyoto Eco-Energy Project was analyzed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism for eubacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes. Both thermophilic and mesophilic sludge of treated swine waste were seeded to the digestion tank. During the 150-day startup period, coffee grounds as a main food waste, along with potato, kelp and boiled beans, tofu, bean curd lees, and deep-fried bean curd were fed to the digestion process step-by-step (max. 40t/d). Finally, the methane yield reached 360m3/t-feed with 40days' retention time, although temporary accumulation of propionate was observed. Eubacterial communities that formed in the thermophilic digestion tank differed greatly from both thermophilic and mesophilic types of seed sludge. Results suggest that the Actinomyces/Thermomonospora and Ralstonia/Shewanella were contributors for hydrolyzation and degradation of food waste into volatile fatty acids. Acetate-utilizing methanogens, Methanosaeta, were dominant in seed sludges of both types, but they decreased drastically during processing in the digestion tank. Methanosarcina and Methanobrevibacter/Methanobacterium were, respectively, possible main contributors for methane production from acetate and H2 plus CO2. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Effects of different organic fertilizers on the microbes in rhizospheric soil of flue-cured tobacco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun-Wei; Xu, Zhi; Tang, Li; Li, Yan-Hong; Song, Jian-Qun; Xu, Jian-Qin

    2013-09-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of applying different organic fertilizers (refined organic fertilizer and bio-organic fertilizer) and their combination with 20% reduced chemical fertilizers on the microbes in rhizospheric soil of flue-cured tobacco, the resistance of the tobacco against bacterial wilt, and the tobacco yield and quality. As compared with conventional chemical fertilization (CK), applying refined organic fertilizer (ROF) or bio-organic fertilizer (BIO) in combining with 20% reduced chemical fertilization increased the bacterial number and the total microbial number in the rhizospheric soil significantly. Applying BIO in combining with 20% reduced chemical fertilization also increased the actinomyces number in the rhizospheric soil significantly, with an increment of 44.3% as compared with that under the application of ROF in combining with 20% reduced chemical fertilization, but decreased the fungal number. As compared with CK, the ROF and BIO increased the carbon use capacity of rhizospheric microbes significantly, and the BIO also increased the capacity of rhizospheric microbes in using phenols significantly. Under the application of ROF and BIO, the disease incidence and the disease index of bacterial wilt were decreased by 4% and 8%, and 23% and 15.9%, and the proportions of high grade tobacco leaves increased significantly by 10.5% and 9.7%, respectively, as compared with those in CK. BIO increased the tobacco yield and its output value by 17.1% and 18.9% , respectively, as compared with ROF.

  18. Identification of organic acids in Cichorium intybus inhibiting virulence-related properties of oral pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papetti, Adele; Mascherpa, Dora; Carazzone, Chiara; Stauder, Monica; Spratt, David A; Wilson, Michael; Pratten, Jonathan; Ciric, Lena; Lingström, Peter; Zaura, Egija; Weiss, Ervin; Ofek, Itzak; Signoretto, Caterina; Pruzzo, Carla; Gazzani, Gabriella

    2013-06-01

    The low molecular mass (LMM) extract of Cichorium intybus var. silvestre (red chicory) has been shown to inhibit virulence-linked properties of oral pathogens including Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces naeslundii and Prevotella intermedia. In the present study HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS(2) was used to investigate the compounds contained in this extract for their anti-virulence activity. The extract contained a number of components, including oxalic, succinic, shikimic and quinic acids, which interfere with the growth and virulence traits (i.e., biofilm formation, adherence to epithelial cells and hydroxyapatite) of oral pathogens involved in gingivitis and tooth decay. Succinic and quinic acid seem to be the most potent, mainly by interfering with the ability of oral pathogens to form biofilms (either through inhibition of their development or promotion of their disruption). Our findings suggest that one or more of these compounds may modulate plaque formation in vivo, which is a prerequisite for the development of both caries and gingivitis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Composition and abundance of microbiota in the pharynx in patients with laryngeal carcinoma and vocal cord polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Hongli; Wang, Boyan; Shi, Yi; Shi, Yong; Xiao, Xiyan; Cao, Pengyu; Tao, Lei; Wang, Yuezhu; Zhou, Liang

    2017-08-01

    The pharynx is an important site of microbiota colonization, but the bacterial populations at this site have been relatively unexplored by culture-independent approaches. The aim of this study was to characterize the microbiota structure of the pharynx. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene libraries was used to characterize the pharyngeal microbiota using swab samples from 68 subjects with laryngeal cancer and 28 subjects with vocal cord polyps. Overall, the major phylum was Firmicutes, with Streptococcus as the predominant genus in the pharyngeal communities. Nine core operational taxonomic units detected from Streptococcus, Fusobacterium, Prevotella, Granulicatella, and Veillonella accounted for 21.3% of the total sequences detected. However, there was no difference in bacterial communities in the pharynx from patients with laryngeal cancer and vocal cord polyps. The relative abundance of Firmicutes was inversely correlated with Fusobacteria, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. The correlation was evident at the genus level, and the relative abundance of Streptococcus was inversely associated with Fusobacterium, Leptotrichia, Neisseria, Actinomyces, and Prevotella. This study presented a profile for the overall structure of the microbiota in pharyngeal swab samples. Inverse correlations were found between Streptococcus and other bacterial communities, suggesting that potential antagonism may exist among pharyngeal microbiota.

  20. Extracellular DNA and lipoteichoic acids interact with exopolysaccharides in the extracellular matrix of Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo Pedraza, Midian C; Novais, Tatiana F; Faustoferri, Roberta C; Quivey, Robert G; Terekhov, Anton; Hamaker, Bruce R; Klein, Marlise I

    2017-10-01

    Streptococcus mutans-derived exopolysaccharides are virulence determinants in the matrix of biofilms that cause caries. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) are found in cariogenic biofilms, but their functions are unclear. Therefore, strains of S. mutans carrying single deletions that would modulate matrix components were used: eDNA - ∆lytS and ∆lytT; LTA - ∆dltA and ∆dltD; and insoluble exopolysaccharide - ΔgtfB. Single-species (parental strain S. mutans UA159 or individual mutant strains) and mixed-species (UA159 or mutant strain, Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus gordonii) biofilms were evaluated. Distinct amounts of matrix components were detected, depending on the inactivated gene. eDNA was found to be cooperative with exopolysaccharide in early phases, while LTA played a larger role in the later phases of biofilm development. The architecture of mutant strains biofilms was distinct (vs UA159), demonstrating that eDNA and LTA influence exopolysaccharide distribution and microcolony organization. Thus, eDNA and LTA may shape exopolysaccharide structure, affecting strategies for controlling pathogenic biofilms.

  1. Screening and Scoring of Antimicrobial and Biological Activities of Italian Vulnerary Plants against Major Oral Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianmaria F. Ferrazzano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the activity of Italian vulnerary plants against the most important oral pathogenic bacteria. This estimate was accomplished through a fivefold process: (a a review of ethnobotanical and microbiological data concerning the Italian vulnerary plants; (b the development of a scoring system to rank the plants; (c the comparative assessment of microbiological properties; (d the assessment of potential cytotoxic effects on keratinocyte-like cells and gingival fibroblasts in culture by XTT cell viability assay; (e clinical evaluation of the most suitable plant extract as antibacterial agent in a home-made mouthwash. The study assays hexane (H, ethanol (E, and water (W extracts from 72 plants. The agar diffusion method was used to evaluate the activity against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus casei, and Actinomyces viscosus. Twenty-two plants showed appreciable activity. The extracts showing the strongest antibacterial power were those from Cotinus coggygria Scop., Equisetum hyemale L., Helichrysum litoreum Guss, Juniperus communis L., and Phyllitis scolopendrium (L. Newman subsp. scolopendrium. The potential cytotoxic effect of these extracts was assessed. On the basis of these observations, a mouth-rinse containing the ethanolic extract of H. litoreum has been tested in vivo, resulting in reduction of the salivary concentration of S. mutans.

  2. Screening and Scoring of Antimicrobial and Biological Activities of Italian Vulnerary Plants against Major Oral Pathogenic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrazzano, Gianmaria F.; Roberto, Lia; Catania, Maria Rosaria; Chiaviello, Angela; De Natale, Antonino; Roscetto, Emanuela; Pinto, Gabriele; Pollio, Antonino; Ingenito, Aniello; Palumbo, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the activity of Italian vulnerary plants against the most important oral pathogenic bacteria. This estimate was accomplished through a fivefold process: (a) a review of ethnobotanical and microbiological data concerning the Italian vulnerary plants; (b) the development of a scoring system to rank the plants; (c) the comparative assessment of microbiological properties; (d) the assessment of potential cytotoxic effects on keratinocyte-like cells and gingival fibroblasts in culture by XTT cell viability assay; (e) clinical evaluation of the most suitable plant extract as antibacterial agent in a home-made mouthwash. The study assays hexane (H), ethanol (E), and water (W) extracts from 72 plants. The agar diffusion method was used to evaluate the activity against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus casei, and Actinomyces viscosus. Twenty-two plants showed appreciable activity. The extracts showing the strongest antibacterial power were those from Cotinus coggygria Scop., Equisetum hyemale L., Helichrysum litoreum Guss, Juniperus communis L., and Phyllitis scolopendrium (L.) Newman subsp. scolopendrium. The potential cytotoxic effect of these extracts was assessed. On the basis of these observations, a mouth-rinse containing the ethanolic extract of H. litoreum has been tested in vivo, resulting in reduction of the salivary concentration of S. mutans. PMID:24302963

  3. Molecular detection of bacteria associated to dental caries in 4-12-year-old Tunisian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouidhi, Bochra; Fdhila, Kais; Ben Slama, Rihab; Mahdouani, Kacem; Hentati, Hajer; Najjari, Fayrouz; Bakhrouf, Amina; Chaieb, Kamel

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of several microbial species in the oral cavity of 4-12-year-old Tunisian children was investigated. Samples were taken from 158 children (81 caries actives and 77 caries free). Genomic DNA was extracted and analyzed for the presence of 17 microbial species using a polymerase chain reaction assay. All samples were positive for at least one of the target microbial strains. Streptococcus mutans was the most prevalent species (76.5%) detected in genomic DNA collected from carious lesions. Other prevalent species were Candida spp (63%), Streptococcus salivarius (59%) and Streptococcus oralis (42%). The frequency of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Lactobacillus casei-group in caries lesions was 29.5%, 34.5% and 22% respectively. Pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus was found in 28.5% of carious lesion samples compared to 15.5% in the control. Frequency of Porphyromonas endodontali, Actinomyces radicidentis and Treponema denticola recovery did not differ significantly between origins of samples. PCR analysis of genomic DNA detect various oral bacteria that differ between caries actives and caries-free children. In addition, the association of same aciduric bacteria (S. mutans, S. salivarius, L. acidophilus) and caries formation was noticed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Actinomycosis of the Gallbladder Mimicking Carcinoma: a Case Report with US and CT Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Han; Kim, Seong Hyun; Cho, Mee Yon; Rhoe, Byoung Seon; Kim, Myung Soon

    2007-01-01

    Actinomycosis should be included in the differential diagnosis when sonography and computed tomography findings show a mass engulfing the stone in the gallbladder and extensive pericholecystic infiltration with extension to neighboring abdominal wall muscle. A ctinomycosis is a chronic suppurative and granulomatous disease that is characterized by the formation of multiple abscesses, draining sinuses, abundant granulation and dense fibrous tissue. The disease is most frequently caused by Actinomyces israelii. These organisms are gram-positive anaerobic bacteria, and are considered opportunistic pathogens associated with infection, trauma or surgery. These events allow them to cross mucosal barriers as these organisms are normally present in healthy individuals, especially in the oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, and female genital tract. In abdominopelvic actinomycosis, aggressive perilesional infiltration with a tendency to cross fascial planes or boundaries and extend to the abdominal wall has been well described as an important radiologic finding. Actinomycosis of the gallbladder is an extremely rare disease; only 21 cases have been reported in the English literature. Moreover, a diagnosis of actinomycosis of the gallbladder is difficult because this condition can be confused with carcinoma. We report here on a rare case of actinomycosis of the gallbladder that presented as a mass by sonography and computed tomography (CT)

  5. Shifts in microbial community structure and diversity in a MBR combined with worm reactors treating synthetic wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Zuo, Wei; Zhang, Jun; Li, Hui; Li, Lipin; Tian, Yu

    2017-04-01

    The chemical oxygen demand (COD) and NH 3 -N removal, membrane fouling, sludge characteristics and microbial community structure in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) coupled with worm reactors (SSBWR) were evaluated for 210days. The obtained results were compared to those from a conventional MBR (C-MBR) operated in parallel. The results indicated that the combined MBR (S-MBR) achieved higher COD and NH 3 -N removal efficiency, slower increase in membrane fouling, better sludge settleability and higher activities of the related enzymes in the activated sludge. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the microbial community structures in the C-MBR and the S-MBR. The microbial community structure in the S-MBR was more diverse than that in the C-MBR. Additionally, the slow-growing microbes such as Saprospiraceae, Actinomyces, Frankia, Clostridium, Comamonas, Pseudomonas, Dechloromonas and Flavobacterium were enriched in the S-MBR, further accounting for the sludge reduction, membrane fouling alleviation and wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. A cross-sectional survey of bacterial species in plaque from client owned dogs with healthy gingiva, gingivitis or mild periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ian J; Wallis, Corrin; Deusch, Oliver; Colyer, Alison; Milella, Lisa; Loman, Nick; Harris, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease is the most widespread oral disease in dogs which if left untreated results in significant pain to the pet and loss of dentition. The objective of this study was to identify bacterial species in canine plaque that are significantly associated with health, gingivitis and mild periodontitis (dogs with healthy gingiva, gingivitis and mild periodontitis with 72 to 77 samples per health status. DNA was extracted from the plaque samples and subjected to PCR amplification of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rDNA. Pyrosequencing of the PCR amplicons identified a total of 274 operational taxonomic units after bioinformatic and statistical analysis. Porphyromonas was the most abundant genus in all disease stages, particularly in health along with Moraxella and Bergeyella. Peptostreptococcus, Actinomyces, and Peptostreptococcaceae were the most abundant genera in mild periodontitis. Logistic regression analysis identified species from each of these genera that were significantly associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis. Principal component analysis showed distinct community profiles in health and disease. The species identified show some similarities with health and periodontal disease in humans but also major differences. In contrast to human, healthy canine plaque was found to be dominated by Gram negative bacterial species whereas Gram positive anaerobic species predominate in disease. The scale of this study surpasses previously published research and enhances our understanding of the bacterial species present in canine subgingival plaque and their associations with health and early periodontal disease.

  7. Antimicrobial properties of Cocos nucifera (coconut) husk: An extrapolation to oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Maji; Cyriac, Maria B; Pai, Vidya; Varghese, Ipe; Shantaram, Manjula

    2014-07-01

    Brushing the teeth with fibrous husk of Cocos nucifera (coconut) is a common oral hygiene practice among people of rural areas of South India. However, the probable antimicrobial properties of this plant material against common oral pathogens have not been proved scientifically. Therefore, the present study was designed. Alcoholic extract of the husk of Cocos nucifera was prepared and the antimicrobial properties against common oral pathogens like cariogenic bacteria, periodontal pathogens, and candidal organisms were performed by the Agar Well Diffusion Method. The results obtained were then subjected to statistical analysis using One-Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD). The alcoholic extract of Cocos nucifera showed a significant concentration-dependent antimicrobial activity, expressed as a zone of inhibition with respect to all tested organisms except Actinomyces species. The inhibitory effect was more significant, with a majority of cariogenic organisms and Candida, with a zone of inhibition ranging from 4.6 mm to 16.3 mm. However, the effect was lesser with Cocos nucifera compared to chlorhexidine. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranged from 50 mg/ml to 75 mg/ml. Cocos nucifera has a significant inhibitory action against common oral pathogens, indicating the presence of highly effective antimicrobial compounds. Therefore, it is proved that its use can contribute to oral health to a great extent. Identification of these active compounds provides the scope for incorporating it into a modern oral care system, so as to control oral diseases.

  8. Antibacterial activity of Tribulus terrestris and its synergistic effect with Capsella bursa-pastoris and Glycyrrhiza glabra against oral pathogens: an in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimanpour, Saman; Sedighinia, Fereshteh Sadat; Safipour Afshar, Akbar; Zarif, Reza; Ghazvini, Kiarash

    2015-01-01

    In this study, antimicrobial activities of an ethanol extract of Tribulus terrestris aloneand in combination with Capsella bursa-pastoris and Glycyrrhiza glabra were examined in vitro against six pathogens namely Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, Actinomyces viscosus, Enterococcus faecalis Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli. Antibacterial activities of the extracts were examined using disc and well diffusion methods and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of ethanol extracts were determined against these microorganisms using agar and broth dilution methods. Chlorhexidine was used as positive control. Tribulus terrestris extract exhibited good antibacterial activity against all bacteria. Antibacterial activity of mixed extract was evaluated and exhibited that mixed extract was more effective against all bacteria than any of the cases alone which indicates the synergistic effect between these three extracts (p˂0.05). No strain showed resistance against these extracts. In agar dilution, Tribulus terrestris exhibited MIC values ranging from 35.0 to 20.0 mg/ml and mixed extract showed MIC values ranging from 12.5 to 5.0 mg/ml. The results of broth dilution method were consistent with the findings of the agar dilution method. This in-vitro study was a preliminary evaluation of antibacterial activity of the plants. It provided scientific evidence to support uses of T. terrestris and its mixture with C. bursa-pastoris and G. glabra for the treatment of oral infections. In-vivo studies are also required to better evaluate the effect of these extracts.

  9. Exploring the possible applications of catechin (gel for oral care of the elderly and disabled individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneaki Tamura

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The oral cavity contains more than hundreds of microbial species. An increase in the number of these microorganisms like high pathogenic potential species, such as cariogenic and periodontopathic bacteria, and the change of microbial biota may result in, not only oral infection, but also systemic diseases, such as infective endocarditis and aspiration pneumonia. It is very important to control the growth of these microorganisms and its biota just after oral cleaning in order to suppress disease onset. In this regard, it is useful to use the anti-microbial component which acts against pathogenic microorganisms. Here, we highlight the importance of catechin, and feature its possible oral, especially periodontal applications. By combining catechin with gel (catechin gel, antimicrobial activity of catechin was prolonged in gel and catechin anti-oxidization property was observed. Catechin gel inhibited the growth of the Actinomyces, periodontopathic bacteria and Candida strains tested, but did not inhibit that of the oral streptococci that are important in the normal oral flora. In contrast, commercially available moisture gels containing antimicrobial components showed antimicrobial activity against all of the tested strains including the oral streptococci. This show that catechin has selective antimicrobial activity, attributable to hydrogen peroxide production. This paper reviews previous works using catechin and, likewise, catechin gel may be show its possible oral application for prevent dental caries and periodontal disease.

  10. Isolation of obligate anaerobic bacteria from ulcerative keratitis in domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, Eric C; Scarlett, Janet M

    2008-01-01

    To determine the frequency of obligate anaerobic bacterial isolation from corneal samples of domestic animals with ulcerative keratitis and to characterize the historical, clinical, cytological, and microbiological features of culture-positive cases. Three hundred and thirty domestic animals with ulcerative keratitis. Anaerobic bacteriologic culture and Gram stain were performed on corneal samples from consecutive animals examined with suspect septic ulcerative keratitis. Additional corneal diagnostics included: aerobic bacteriologic culture for all species; fungal culture for ungulates; Mycoplasma culture and virus isolation or feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for cats. Historical, clinical, and cytological findings were correlated with microbiologic data. Anaerobic bacteria were isolated from 13.0% of corneal samples (dogs: 14.0%; horses: 12.9%; cats: 7.9%; alpacas: 18.8%). The most frequent isolates were Clostridium, Peptostreptococcus, Actinomyces, Fusobacterium, and Bacteroides species. The majority of these infections were mixed anaerobic and aerobic bacteria, unless antimicrobial therapy had been administered prior to presentation. The clinical appearance of anaerobic bacterial culture-positive cases was highly variable. Ocular trauma, pre-existing corneal disease, previous corneal surgery, and chronic dermatological disease were significantly (P anaerobic cultures in one or more species. The results of the present study demonstrate that obligate anaerobic bacteria are present within the intralesional flora of ulcerative keratitis in domestic animals. In most species evaluated, these bacteria were identified infrequently. Anaerobic bacterial infection of the cornea most frequently occurs in association with other ocular pathogens and previous corneal abnormalities.

  11. [Role of obligate anaerobes in infections in hospitalized patients and therapeutic options].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróblewska, Marta; Rokosz, Alicja; Sawicka-Grzelak, Anna; Kot, Katarzyna; Luczak, Mirosław

    2005-01-01

    Monitoring of prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of strictly anaerobic bacteria, causing infections in hospitalized patients, constitutes a part of a program for prudent use of antibiotics. The aim of the study was to assess prevalence of strictly anaerobic bacteria in patients hospitalized in a tertiary care hospital in 2001-2002 with reference to empiric antibiotic therapy. The most common gram-positive bacteria were Clostridium difficile--27.7%, Peptostreptococcus spp. and Peptoniphilus asaccharolyticus--21.9% and Actinomyces spp.--11.1%. There was an increase in the number of stool samples positive for C. difficile toxins A and B from 39.4% in 2001 to 59.0% in 2002. The results of susceptibility testing of gram-positive isolates showed the highest percentages of strains susceptible to piperacilin/tazobactam--99.6%, ticarcillin/clavulanate--98.5%, imipenem--98.5%, amoxicillin/clavulanate--97.4% and piperacillin--97.4%. The most prevalent gram-negative anaerobes were strains of Bacteroides spp.--43.1%, Prevotella spp.--35.8% and Fusobacterium spp.--11.0%. All tested strains of gram-negative bacteria were susceptible to metronidazole, piperacilin/tazobactam, ticarcillin/clavulanate and imipenem. In the analyzed population beta-lactam antibiotics with beta-lactamase inhibitors, carbapenems and metronidazole may be used in empiric therapy of infections caused by strictly anaerobic bacteria.

  12. Granulomatous Thyroiditis: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Darshan P; Bhagat, Ramesh; Nakanishi, Yukihiro; Wang, Alun; Moroz, Krzysztof; Falk, Nadja K

    2017-09-01

    Granulomatous disease in the thyroid gland has been linked to viral, bacterial and autoimmune etiologies. The most common granulomatous disease of the thyroid is subacute granulomatous thyroiditis, which is presumed to have a viral or post-viral inflammatory cause. Bacterial etiologies include tuberculosis, actinomycosis, and nocardiosis, but are extremely rare. Disseminated actinomycosis and nocardiosis more commonly affect organ-transplant patients with the highest susceptibility within the first year after transplant surgery. A 45-year-old African American male, who received his third kidney transplant for renal failure secondary to Alport Syndrome, presented with numerous subcutaneous nodules and diffuse muscle pain in the neck. Further workup revealed bilateral nodularity of the thyroid. Fine needle aspiration of these nodules demonstrated suppurative granulomatous thyroiditis. Subsequent right thyroid lobectomy showed granulomatous thyroiditis with filamentous micro-organisms, morphologically resembling Nocardia or Actinomyces. Disseminated granulomatous disease presenting in the thyroid is very rare, and typically afflicts immune-compromised patients. The overall clinical, cytologic and histologic picture of this patient strongly points to an infectious etiology, likely Nocardia, in the setting of recent organ transplantation within the last year. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  13. Salivary microbiota and metabolome associated with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francavilla, Ruggiero; Ercolini, Danilo; Piccolo, Maria; Vannini, Lucia; Siragusa, Sonya; De Filippis, Francesca; De Pasquale, Ilaria; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Di Toma, Michele; Gozzi, Giorgia; Serrazanetti, Diana I; De Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the salivary microbiota and metabolome of 13 children with celiac disease (CD) under a gluten-free diet (treated celiac disease [T-CD]). The same number of healthy children (HC) was used as controls. The salivary microbiota was analyzed by an integrated approach using culture-dependent and -independent methods. Metabolome analysis was carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-solid-phase microextraction. Compared to HC, the number of some cultivable bacterial groups (e.g., total anaerobes) significantly (P endodontalis, and Prevotella nanceiensis), together with the smallest amount of Actinobacteria. T-CD children were also characterized by decreased levels of some Actinomyces species, Atopobium species, and Corynebacterium durum. Rothia mucilaginosa was the only Actinobacteria species found at the highest level in T-CD children. As shown by multivariate statistical analyses, the levels of organic volatile compounds markedly differentiated T-CD children. Some compounds (e.g., ethyl-acetate, nonanal, and 2-hexanone) were found to be associated with T-CD children. Correlations (false discovery rate [FDR], oral dysbiosis that could affect the oral metabolome.

  14. EOR by stimulated microflora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svarovskaya, L.I.; Altunina, L.K.; Rozhenkova, Z.A.; Bulavin, V.D. [Institute of Petroleum Chemistry, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    A combined microbiological and physico-chemical method for EOR has been developed for flooded West Siberia oil fields with formation temperature of 45{degrees}-95{degrees}C (318-365K). Formation water includes rich and various biocenoses numbering up to 2 x 10{sup 7} cells per ml. Representatives of genera, i.e, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Actinomyces, Micrococcus, Mycobacterium, Sarcina, etc. were found to be the most widely distributed microorganisms. The method is based on injection of systems exhibiting high oil displacing capacity and at the same time being an additional nitrous nutrient for endemic populations of microorganisms. Their injection into formation water favors biomass growth by 4-6 orders and promotes syntheses of biosurfactants, biopolymers, acids, etc., and gaseous products. The features of residual oil displacement have been studied on laboratory models using a combined microbiological and physico-chemical method. A curve for the yield of residual oil is presented by two peaks. The first peak is stipulated by the washing action of oil displacement system, and the second one by the effect of metabolites produced at stimulation of biogenic processes. Oil displacement index increases by 15%-30%.

  15. Gram-positive rods prevailing in teeth with apical periodontitis undergoing root canal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez de Paz, L E; Molander, A; Dahlén, G

    2004-09-01

    To identify Gram-positive rods from root canals of teeth with apical periodontitis and to examine their associations with other species. Consecutive root canal samples (RCSs) from 139 teeth undergoing root canal treatment were analyzed prospectively for cultivable microbes. Gram-positive rods in the first RCS submitted after chemo-mechanical preparation were categorised to genus level by selective media and gas-liquid chromatography (GLC), and identified to species level by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Associations between organisms were measured by odds ratios (OR). In the first samples submitted a total of 158 Gram-positive rods, 115 Gram-positive cocci, 26 Gram-negative rods and 9 Gram-negative cocci, were identified. At genus levels Gram-positive rods were classified into: Lactobacillus spp. (38%), Olsenella spp. (18%), Propionibacterium spp. (13%), Actinomyces spp. (12%), Bifidobacterium spp. (13%) and Eubacterium spp. (6%). The most frequent species were Olsenella uli, Lactobacillus paracasei and Propionibacterium propionicum. In subsequent samples taken during treatment, Gram-positive rods were also identified, although the number of strains was considerably reduced. Positive associations were observed between members of the genus lactobacilli and Gram-positive cocci (OR>2). Olsenella uli and Lactobacillus spp. predominated over other Gram-positive rods. A possible association exists between Lactobacillus spp. and Gram-positive cocci in root canals of teeth with apical periodontitis receiving treatment.

  16. Evaluation of the RapID-ANA system for identification of anaerobic bacteria of veterinary origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adney, W S; Jones, R L

    1985-12-01

    This study evaluated the ability of the RapID-ANA system (Innovative Diagnostic Systems, Inc., Atlanta, Ga.) to accurately identify a spectrum of freshly isolated veterinary anaerobes. A total of 183 isolates were tested and included 7 Actinomyces spp., 53 Bacteroides spp., 32 Clostridium spp., 2 Eubacterium spp., 65 Fusobacterium spp., 1 Peptococcus spp., 22 Peptostreptococcus spp., and 1 Propionibacterium spp. All isolates were initially identified by conventional biochemical testing and gas-liquid chromatography of short-chain fatty acid metabolites. Additional tests were performed as required by the RapID-ANA system. Of these isolates, 81.4% were correctly identified to the genus level, including 59.6% to the species level, 14.2% were incorrectly identified at the genus level, and 4.4% were not identified. Initially, 20.2% of the strains were not identified because the microcodes were not in the code book. The majority of the incorrect identifications were caused by the misidentification of Fusobacterium spp. as Bacteroides spp. Errors also occurred when veterinary anaerobes not included in the data base were assigned an identification from the existing data base. The RapID-ANA system appears to be a promising new method for rapid identification of veterinary anaerobes; however, further evaluation with an extended data base is needed before the system can accurately identify all clinically significant anaerobes.

  17. Anaerobic bacteria in 118 patients with deep-space head and neck infections from the University Hospital of Maxillofacial Surgery, Sofia, Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyanova, Lyudmila; Kolarov, Rossen; Gergova, Galina; Deliverska, Elitsa; Madjarov, Jivko; Marinov, Milen; Mitov, Ivan

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and susceptibility to antibacterial agents of anaerobic strains in 118 patients with head and neck abscesses (31) and cellulitis (87). Odontogenic infection was the most common identified source, occurring in 73 (77.7%) of 94 patients. The incidence of anaerobes in abscesses and cellulitis was 71 and 75.9%, respectively, and that in patients before (31 patients) and after (87) the start of empirical treatment was 80.6 and 72.4%, respectively. The detection rates of anaerobes in patients with odontogenic and other sources of infection were 82.2 and 71.4%, respectively. In total, 174 anaerobic strains were found. The predominant bacteria were Prevotella (49 strains), Fusobacterium species (22), Actinomyces spp. (21), anaerobic cocci (20) and Eubacterium spp. (18). Bacteroides fragilis strains were isolated from 7 (5.9%) specimens. The detection rate of Fusobacterium strains from non-treated patients (32.2%) was higher than that from treated patients (13.8%). Resistance rates to clindamycin and metronidazole of Gram-negative anaerobes were 5.4 and 2.5%, respectively, and those of Gram-positive species were 4.5 and 58.3%, respectively. One Prevotella strain was intermediately susceptible to ampicillin/sulbactam. In conclusion, the start of empirical treatment could influence the frequency or rate of isolation of Fusobacterium species. The involvement of the Bacteroides fragilis group in some head and neck infections should be considered.

  18. [Bacteriological study on juvenile periodontitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, N

    1991-02-01

    The predominant cultivable microflora of 23 pockets in 15 juvenile periodontitis (JP) patients was studied for the first time in China using the current anaerobic methodology. Samples were taken with sterile paper points and dispersed on a vortex mixer. Then the diluted samples were plated on the non-selective blood agar plates and selective MGB medium which favors the growth of Actinobacillus actimycetemcomitans (Aa) and incubated in anaerobic chamber for 5 days. From each sample 15 or more isolated colonies were picked in sequence without selection and subcultured. The isolates were identified mainly by Schrechenberger's 4 hour rapid methods for biochemical and fermentative tests and the chromatographic analysis of acid end products using ion-chromatography. The results were as follows: 1. The microflora of healthy sulci of 7 healthy young subjects was significantly different from that in the pocket of JP patients. The predominant species in healthy sulci were Streptococcus spp and Capnocytophaga gingivalis. 2. The species increased significantly in JP patients in prevalence and proportions was Eubacterium. Other species in high proportions were Bacteroides oris, B. melaninogenicus, B. gingivalis, Capnocytophaga sputigena, and Actinomyces meyeri, etc. 3. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was not detected in any of the samples.

  19. In vitro activities of dalbavancin and nine comparator agents against anaerobic gram-positive species and corynebacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Merriam, C Vreni; Warren, Yumi; Tyrrell, Kerin; Fernandez, Helen T

    2003-06-01

    Dalbavancin is a novel semisynthetic glycopeptide with enhanced activity against gram-positive species. Its comparative in vitro activities and those of nine comparator agents, including daptomycin, vancomycin, linezolid, and quinupristin-dalfopristin, against 290 recent gram-positive clinical isolates strains, as determined by the NCCLS agar dilution method, were studied. The MICs of dalbavancin at which 90% of various isolates tested were inhibited were as follows: Actinomyces spp., 0.5 microg/ml; Clostridium clostridioforme, 8 microg/ml; C. difficile, 0.25 microg/ml; C. innocuum, 0.25 microg/ml; C. perfringens, 0.125 microg/ml; C. ramosum, 1 microg/ml; Eubacterium spp., 1 microg/ml; Lactobacillus spp., >32 microg/ml, Propionibacterium spp., 0.5 microg/ml; and Peptostreptococcus spp., 0.25 microg/ml. Dalbavancin was 1 to 3 dilutions more active than vancomycin against most strains. Dalbavancin exhibited excellent activity against gram-positive strains tested and warrants clinical evaluation.

  20. Microbiological characteristics of subgingival microbiota in adult periodontitis, localized juvenile periodontitis and rapidly progressive periodontitis subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonnenmacher, C; Mutters, R; de Jacoby, L F

    2001-04-01

    To describe the prevalence of the cultivable subgingival microbiota in periodontal diseases and to draw attention to the polymicrobial nature of periodontic infections. The study population consisted of 95 patients, 51 females and 44 males, aged 14-62 years. Twenty-nine patients exhibited adult periodontitis (AP), six localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP), and 60 rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP). Two to four pooled bacterial samples were obtained from each patient. Samples were collected with sterile paper points from the deepest periodontal pockets. The samples were cultured under anaerobic and microaerophilic conditions using selective and non-selective media. Isolates were characterized to species level by conventional biochemical tests and by a commercial rapid test system. Prevotella intermedia and Capnocytophaga spp. were the most frequently detected microorganisms in all diagnostic groups. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Peptostreptococcus micros were found more frequently in AP and RPP patients, while Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Eikenella corrodens were associated with AP, LJP and RPP patients. The other bacterial species, including Actinomyces spp., Streptococcus spp. and Eubacterium spp., were detected at different levels in the three disease groups. The data show the complexity of the subgingival microbiota associated with different periodontal disease groups, indicating that the detection frequency and levels of recovery of some periodontal pathogens are different in teeth affected by different forms of periodontal disease.

  1. Bacterial meningoencephalomyelitis in dogs: a retrospective study of 23 cases (1990-1999).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaelli, Simona T; Platt, Simon R

    2002-01-01

    The clinical records of 23 dogs (1990-1999) with histopathologically confirmed bacterial meningoencephalomyelitis were evaluated retrospectively. No breed, age, sex, or weight predisposition was found. All the dogs presented with clinical signs of a brain lesion, whereas 5 of 23 had neck pain. Pyrexia was detected in 11 of 23 dogs on admission. CBCs revealed neutrophilic leucocytosis in 7 of 21 dogs and thrombocytopenia in 3 of 21 dogs. The serum chemistry profiles were abnormal in 15 of 21 dogs. The results of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis were abnormal in 13 of 14 dogs and aerobic CSF culture was positive for bacteria in 1of 8 samples. At postmortem examination, the lesions were localized to the central nervous system. Escherichia coli, Streptococcus, and Klebsiella spp were the most frequently isolated bacteria from cultures collected at postmortem examination. Twelve papers reporting 51 total clinical cases of canine bacterial meningoencephalomyelitis were reviewed. The clinical signs and results of the CBC, serum chemistry, blood culture, and CSF analysis were collated and compared with those of this study. The results of the CSF analysis in this study were similar to those in the literature. CSF cultures documented in the literature were positive for Staphylococcus, Pasteurella. Actinomyces, Nocardia spp, and various anaerobic species including Peptostreptococcus, Eubacterium, and Bacteroides spp.

  2. Pelvic Actinomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra García-García

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Actinomycosis is a chronic bacterial infection caused by Actinomyces, Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria. Its symptomatology imitates some malignant pelvic tumours, tuberculosis, or nocardiosis, causing abscesses and fistulas. Actinomycoses are opportunistic infections and require normal mucous barriers to be altered. No epidemiological studies have been conducted to determine prevalence or incidence of such infections. Objective. To analyse the clinical cases of pelvic actinomycosis reported worldwide, to update the information about the disease. Methods. A systematic review of worldwide pelvic actinomycosis cases between 1980 and 2014 was performed, utilising the PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases. The following information was analysed: year, country, type of study, number of cases, use of intrauterine device (IUD, final and initial diagnosis, and method of diagnosis. Results. 63 articles met the search criteria, of which 55 reported clinical cases and 8 reported cross-sectional studies. Conclusions. Pelvic actinomycosis is confusing to diagnose and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pelvic chronic inflammatory lesions. It is commonly diagnosed through a histological report, obtained after a surgery subsequent to an erroneous initial diagnosis. A bacterial culture in anaerobic medium could be useful for the diagnosis but requires a controlled technique and should be performed using specialised equipment.

  3. The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer defines a novel superfamily of prokaryotic small-molecule binding domains

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    De Souza Robson F

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer (ASRT is a small protein that has been claimed to function as a signaling molecule downstream of the cyanobacterial sensory rhodopsin. However, orthologs of ASRT have been detected in several bacteria that lack rhodopsin, raising questions about the generality of this function. Using sequence profile searches we show that ASRT defines a novel superfamily of β-sandwich fold domains. Through contextual inference based on domain architectures and predicted operons and structural analysis we present strong evidence that these domains bind small molecules, most probably sugars. We propose that the intracellular versions like ASRT probably participate as sensors that regulate a diverse range of sugar metabolism operons or even the light sensory behavior in Anabaena by binding sugars or related metabolites. We also show that one of the extracellular versions define a predicted sugar-binding structure in a novel cell-surface lipoprotein found across actinobacteria, including several pathogens such as Tropheryma, Actinomyces and Thermobifida. The analysis of this superfamily also provides new data to investigate the evolution of carbohydrate binding modes in β-sandwich domains with very different topologies. Reviewers: This article was reviewed by M. Madan Babu and Mark A. Ragan.

  4. Use of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to detect Actinobacteria associated with the human faecal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyles, Lesley; Clear, Jessica A; McCartney, Anne L

    2013-08-01

    With the exceptions of the bifidobacteria, propionibacteria and coriobacteria, the Actinobacteria associated with the human gastrointestinal tract have received little attention. This has been due to the seeming absence of these bacteria from most clone libraries. In addition, many of these bacteria have fastidious growth and atmospheric requirements. A recent cultivation-based study has shown that the Actinobacteria of the human gut may be more diverse than previously thought. The aim of this study was to develop a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) approach for characterizing Actinobacteria present in faecal samples. Amount of DNA added to the Actinobacteria-specific PCR used to generate strong PCR products of equal intensity from faecal samples of five infants, nine adults and eight elderly adults was anti-correlated with counts of bacteria obtained using fluorescence in situ hybridization probe HGC69A. A nested PCR using Actinobacteria-specific and universal PCR-DGGE primers was used to generate profiles for the Actinobacteria. Cloning of sequences from the DGGE bands confirmed the specificity of the Actinobacteria-specific primers. In addition to members of the genus Bifidobacterium, species belonging to the genera Propionibacterium, Microbacterium, Brevibacterium, Actinomyces and Corynebacterium were found to be part of the faecal microbiota of healthy humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Detecção de subfertilidade em vacas leiteiras por meio de medidas anatômicas da região pélvica e do aparelho genital Evaluation of subfertility in dairy cows by measuring the pelvis and the genital tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L.M. Vasconcelos

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi mensurar as regiões que compõem a garupa da vaca leiteira, com aparelho desenvolvido para esse fim, e avaliar o efeito dessas variáveis na contaminação intra-uterina e na eficiência reprodutiva (intervalos parto-primeiro cio e parto-primeira inseminação, número de serviços por concepção e período de serviço. Foram usadas 252 vacas Holandesas, paridas há mais de 30 dias e não inseminadas. Realizaram-se medidas anatômicas da região pélvica e do aparelho genital e cultivo bacteriológico de material uterino. A influência das variáveis independentes (mensurações sobre a presença de contaminantes intra-uterinos foi analisada por meio de regressão logística, a da presença de contaminantes intra-uterinos sobre a eficiência reprodutiva, por análise de variância, e a das variáveis independentes (mensurações sobre a eficiência reprodutiva por meio de regressão linear múltipla. A presença de contaminantes intra-uterinos não foi influenciada por nenhuma das variáveis. Staphylococcus sp. (29,6% foi o microrganismo mais encontrado no material uterino, seguido por Actinomyces pyogenes (26,0%, Streptococcus sp. (22,2% e coliformes (22,2%, porém essa contaminação não teve efeito negativo nos índices reprodutivos. Das medidas anatômicas avaliadas, as que influenciaram as características reprodutivas foram: abertura do ílio (maior abertura menor eficiência reprodutiva, localização do óstio cranial da cérvice (quanto mais abdominal, piores os índices reprodutivos e presença de urovagina (influência negativa na taxa de concepção.The objective of this study was to measure the dairy cow rump with an equipment especially developed for this purpose, and to evaluate the effect of these variables on intrauterine contamination and reproductive efficiency (intervals parturition-first estrus and parturition-first AI, services per conception and days open. Lactating Holstein cows (n=252 with

  6. Dominant culturable bacterial microbiota in the digestive tract of the American black vulture (Coragyps atratus Bechstein 1793 and search for antagonistic substances Microbiota bacteriana dominante cultivável no trato digestivo do urubu (Coragyps atratus Bechstein 1793

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydston Rodrigues de Carvalho

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Strict and facultative culturable anaerobic bacteria from the digestive tract of six American black vultures (Coragyps atratus Bechstein 1793 were isolated and identified. After capture, the birds received a non-contaminated diet for one week to eliminate possible allochthonous microorganisms. Then, specimens collected from tongue, stomach and intestines were weighed, submitted to decimal dilution in an anaerobic chamber, inoculated into culture media and incubated aerobically and anaerobically at 37ºC for enumeration, isolation and identification. Isolated bacteria were submitted to tests to detect possible antagonisms between them. The total bacterial population along the digestive tract ranged from 3.46 ± 0.39 log CFU/g in the stomach to 10.75 ± 0.37 log CFU/g in the distal intestine. Some bacteria were isolated for the first time from the digestive tract of C. atratus: Actinomyces bovis, Lactobacillus cellobiosus, Micrococcus luteus, Neisseria sicca, Clostridium bifermentans, Enterobacter agglomerans, Peptostreptococcus sp., Sarcina sp., Serratia odorifera, and Shigella flexneri. Associations between microorganisms were observed during isolation on two occasions, one involving A. bovis and N. sicca, and the other involving A. bovis and a Gram-negative rod. Hetero-, iso- and autoantagonisms were observed, suggesting the ecological role of these indigenous microorganisms in terms of population auto-control and environmental barrier in the digestive tract of carrion-feeding birds.As bactérias anaeróbias estritas e facultativas cultiváveis do trato digestivo de seis urubus (Coragyps atratus Bechstein 1793 foram isoladas e identificadas. Após a captura, as aves receberam uma alimentação de baixa contaminação durante uma semana para eliminar possíveis microorganismos alóctonos. A seguir, amostras colhidas na língua, estomago e intestinos foram pesadas, submetidas a diluições decimais numa câmara anaeróbia, inoculadas em meios de

  7. "Cara inchada" of cattle, an infectious, apparently soil antibiotics-dependant periodontitis in Brazil

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    Döbereiner Jürgen

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this review on the investigation of "cara inchada" in cattle (CI, pursued over the last 30 years, was to elucidate the pathogenicity of the disease and come to proper conclusions on its etiology. CI has been widely considered to be of nutritional origin, caused primarily by mineral deficiency or imbalance. However, the disease consists of a rapidly progressive periodontitis, affecting the periodontal tissues at the level of the premolars and molars during the period of tooth eruption generally starting in young calves. The disease led to great economic losses for farmers in central-western Brazil, after the occupation of new land for cattle raising in the 1960s and 1970s. The lateral enlargement of the maxillary bones of affected calves gave the disease the popular name of "cara inchada", i.e., swollen or enlarged face. The enlargement was found to be due to a chronic ossifying periostitis resulting from the purulent alveolitis of CI. Black-pigmented non-saccharolytic Bacteroides melaninogenicus, always together with Actinomyces (Corynebacterium pyogenes, were isolated in large numbers from the periodontal lesions. B. melaninogenicus could be isolated in small numbers also from the marginal gingiva of a few healthy calves maintained on CI-free farms. "In vitro"-assays showed that streptomycin and actinomycin, as well as the supernatants of cultivates of actinomycetes from soils of CI-prone farms, applied in subinhibitory concentrations to the bacteria tested, enhanced significantly (up to 10 times the adherence of the black-pigmented B.melaninogenicus to epithelial cells of the bovine gingiva. The antibiotics are apparently produced in large quantities by the increased number of soil actinomycetes, including the genus Streptomyces, that develop when soil microflora are modified by cultivating virgin forest or "Cerrado" (tree-savanna for the first time for cattle grazing. The epidemiology of CI now provides strong evidence that

  8. Biofilm formation on titanium alloy and anatase-Bactercline® coated titanium healing screws: an in vivo human study

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    Antonio Scarano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim Bacterial adherence to implants is considered to be an important event in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections. In fact, this infection process is a first stage of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, and a positive correlation has been found between oral hygiene and marginal bone loss around implants in the edentulous mandible. Surface properties of transgingival implant components are important determinants in bacterial adhesion. The purpose of this study was to characterize the biofilm formation, in vivo, on healing screws made of titanium alloy or coated with a combination of anatase and Bactercline® product. Materials and methods Twenty-five patients, between 21- 37 years, in excellent systemic health, participated in this study. In each of the 25 participants, one anatase-Bactercline® coated healing screw (Test and one titanium alloy (TI6Al4V healing screw (Control were adapted to two different implants. Quantitative and qualitative biofilm formation on healing abutments was analyzed by culture method.Results Bacterial adherence to the two different healing screws used in this study were compared. Statistically significant differences were found between the Control and the Test group for both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial counts (p<0,05. The microflora consisted both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and displayed a high variability. The anaerobic S. intermedius, potentially “pathogenic”, was isolated only from the Control group. Both healing screws harbored primarily Gram-positive rods as Actinomyces spp, A. naeslundii, A. viscosus and the Gram-negative rods (Fusobacterium spp, Prevotella spp, Capnocythophaga spp were mostly found on the Control healing screws.Conclusion Anatase-Bactercline® coated healing screws reduce the number of initially adhering bacteria, formed mainly of Gram-positive microorgnisms, while, on the contrary, the microflora covering the titanium alloy healing screws was, for the

  9. Occurrence of hydrocarbon degrading bacteria in soil in Kukawa, Borno State

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    IA Allamin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil samples were collected from five sites covering petroleum exploration station in Kukawa, Kukawa Local Government Area of Borno State, Nigeria between October, 2012 and February, 2013 at two different depths (0-10cm and 10-20cm to enumerate and identify hydrocarbon degrading bacteria in the soil. Total aerobic heterotrophic bacteria (TAHB were enumerated on Nutrient agar (NA, and Hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria (HUB enumerated on Oil agar (OA. The bacterial isolates were identified using morphological and biochemical tests. It was observed that the microorganisms (TAHB, and HUB were more densely populated at 10cm depth. (TAHB: 5.3×108 - 11.4×108cfu/g, and HUB: 2.4×105 - 5.3×105 cfu/g, than at 20 cm depth (TAHB: 3.0×108 - 5.7×108 cfu/g, and HUB: 2.1×105 - 4.8×105 cfu/g. The HUB was identified as species of Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Lactobacillus, Micrococcus, Corynebacterium, and Actinomyces. Bacillus, and Pseudomonas species were more constantly isolated than other isolates and they constitute 100% of total bacterial isolates. The potential of hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria isolated to degrade hydrocarbon was studied. Nineteen (19 bacterial species was screened, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus cereus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Micrococcus leteus,and Lactobacillus casei, utilized and degrade crude oil at considerably high rates after 21 days of incubation. The degradation efficiency was confirmed by GC-MS analysis, which indicated that the bacterial isolates utilized most of the crude oil components particularly straight chain alkanes and cycloalkanes DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v3i2.10503 International Journal of the Environment Vol.3(2 2014: 36-47

  10. Sputum microbiota in tuberculosis as revealed by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing.

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    Man Kit Cheung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB remains a global threat in the 21st century. Traditional studies of the disease are focused on the single pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Recent studies have revealed associations of some diseases with an imbalance in the microbial community. Characterization of the TB microbiota could allow a better understanding of the disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, the sputum microbiota in TB infection was examined by using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. A total of 829,873 high-quality sequencing reads were generated from 22 TB and 14 control sputum samples. Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Fusobacteria were the five major bacterial phyla recovered, which together composed over 98% of the microbial community. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were more represented in the TB samples and Firmicutes was more predominant in the controls. Sixteen major bacterial genera were recovered. Streptococcus, Neisseria and Prevotella were the most predominant genera, which were dominated by several operational taxonomic units grouped at a 97% similarity level. Actinomyces, Fusobacterium, Leptotrichia, Prevotella, Streptococcus, and Veillonella were found in all TB samples, possibly representing the core genera in TB sputum microbiota. The less represented genera Mogibacterium, Moryella and Oribacterium were enriched statistically in the TB samples, while a genus belonging to the unclassified Lactobacillales was enriched in the controls. The diversity of microbiota was similar in the TB and control samples. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The composition and diversity of sputum microbiota in TB infection was characterized for the first time by using high-throughput pyrosequencing. It lays the framework for examination of potential roles played by the diverse microbiota in TB pathogenesis and progression, and could ultimately facilitate advances in TB treatment.

  11. Red fluorescence of dental plaque in children -A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgenant, Catherine M C; Zaura, Egija; Brandt, Bernd W; Buijs, Mark J; Tellez, Marisol; Malik, Gayatri; Ismail, Amid I; Ten Cate, Jacob M; van der Veen, Monique H

    2017-03-01

    The relation between the presence of red fluorescent plaque and the caries status in children was studied. In addition, the microbial composition of dental plaque from sites with red fluorescent plaque (RFP) and from sites with no red fluorescent plaque (NFP) was assessed. Fluorescence photographs were taken from fifty children (6-14 years old) with overnight plaque. Full-mouth caries scores (ICDAS II) were obtained. The composition of a saliva sample and two plaque samples (RFP and NFP) was assessed using 16S rDNA sequencing. At the site level, no clinically relevant correlations were found between the presence of RFP and the caries status. At the subject level, a weak correlation was found between RFP and the caries status when non-cavitated lesions were included (r s =0.37, p=0.007). The microbial composition of RFP differed significantly from NFP. RFP had more anaerobes and more Gram-negative bacterial taxa. The most discriminative operational taxonomic units (OTUs) for RFP were Corynebacterium, Leptotrichia, Porphyromonas and Selenomonas, while the most discriminative OTUs for NFP were Neisseria, Actinomyces, Streptococcus and Rothia. There were no clinical relevant correlations in this cross-sectional study between the presence of RFP and (early) caries lesions. There were differences in the composition of these phenotypically different plaque samples: RFP contained more Gram-negative, anaerobic taxa and was more diverse than NFP. The study outcomes provide more insight in the possibilities to use plaque fluorescence in oral health risk assessments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bacterial diversity and community structure of supragingival plaques in adults with dental health or caries revealed by 16S pyrosequencing

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    Cuicui Xiao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries has a polymicrobial etiology within the complex oral microbial ecosystem. However, the overall diversity and structure of supragingival plaque microbiota in adult dental health and caries are not well understood. Here, 160 supragingival plaque samples from patients with dental health and different severities of dental caries were collected for bacterial genomic DNA extraction, pyrosequencing by amplification of the 16S rDNA V1–V3 hypervariable regions, and bioinformatic analysis. High-quality sequences (2,261,700 clustered into 10,365 operational taxonomic units (OTUs; 97% identity, representing 453 independent species belonging to 122 genera, 66 families, 34 orders, 21 classes, and 12 phyla. All groups shared 7522 OTUs, indicating the presence of a core plaque microbiome. Smooth rarefaction curves were suggestive of plaque microbial diversity. α diversity analysis showed that healthy plaque microbial diversity exceeded that of dental caries, with the diversity decreasing gradually with the severity of caries. The dominant phyla of plaque microbiota included Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria, and TM7. The dominant genera included Capnocytophaga, Prevotella, Actinomyces, Corynebacterium, Neisseria, Streptococcus, Rothia, and Leptotrichia. β diversity analysis showed that the plaque microbial community structure was similar in all groups and that group members were relatively constant, only showing differences in abundance. Analysis of composition differences identified 10 health-related and 21 caries-related genera. Key genera (27 that potentially contributed to plaque microbiota distributions between groups were identified. Finally, co-occurrence network analysis and function prediction were performed. Treatment strategies directed toward modulating microbial interactions and their functional output should be further developed.

  13. Plaque bacterial microbiome diversity in children younger than 30 months with or without caries prior to eruption of second primary molars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Xu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Our primary objective is to phylogenetically characterize the supragingival plaque bacterial microbiome of children prior to eruption of second primary molars by pyrosequencing method for studying etiology of early childhood caries. METHODS: Supragingival plaque samples were collected from 10 caries children and 9 caries-free children. Plaque DNA was extracted, used to generate DNA amplicons of the V1-V3 hypervariable region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, and subjected to 454-pyrosequencing. RESULTS: On average, over 22,000 sequences per sample were generated. High bacterial diversity was noted in the plaque of children with caries [170 operational taxonomical units (OTU at 3% divergence] and caries-free children (201 OTU at 3% divergence with no significant difference. A total of 8 phyla, 15 classes, 21 orders, 30 families, 41 genera and 99 species were represented. In addition, five predominant phyla (Firmicute, Fusobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria and seven genera (Leptotrichia, Streptococcus, Actinomyces, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Neisseria, and Veillonella constituted a majority of contents of the total microbiota, independent of the presence or absence of caries. Principal Component Analysis (PCA presented that caries-related genera included Streptococcus and Veillonella; while Leptotrichia, Selenomonas, Fusobacterium, Capnocytophaga and Porphyromonas were more related to the caries-free samples. Neisseria and Prevotella presented approximately in between. In both groups, the degree of shared organism lineages (as defined by species-level OTUs among individual supragingival plaque microbiomes was minimal. CONCLUSION: Our study represented for the first time using pyrosequencing to elucidate and monitor supragingival plaque bacterial diversity at such young age with second primary molar unerrupted. Distinctions were revealed between caries and caries-free microbiomes in terms of microbial community

  14. Necrotizing pneumonia: CT findings and its clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hong Suk; Im, Jung Gi; Ryoo, Jae Wook; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Han, Man Chung

    1995-01-01

    To analyze CT and follow-up chest radiographic findings in patients with necrotizing pneumonia and to evaluate clinical significance of the extent of necrosis. We reviewed medical records and retrospectively analysed CT scans and follow-up chest radiographs of 22 patients with necrotizing pneumonia, confirmed by biopsy (n = 7) and culture (n = 15). Inclusion criteria for necrotizing pneumonia was necrotic low attenuation, with or without cavitation on postcontrast enhanced CT scan. The study group included 15 men and seven women, aged 11-66 years (average: 47 years). The pathogens of necrotizing pneumonia were Klebsiella spp (n = 7), Enterobacter spp (n = 5), Actinomyces spp (n = 4), Pseudomonas spp (n = 4), Nocardia spp (n = 4), and others (n = 5). Average duration of pneumonia was 4.1 months. On CT scan, pneumonic consolidations were well-marginated in 14 patients and there were cavities on initial CT scan in 16 cases. Margins of the necrotic portion on CT scan were well-demarcated in majority of the patients (16/22). Low attenuation areas on initial CT scan resulted in cavitation, fibrosis and volume loss as shown on follow-up chest radiographs. The larger the necrotic areas on CT, the more the volume loss was. CT findings of necrotizing pneumonia were well-marginated air-space consolidation with low attenuation area, with or without cavity. The extent of necrotic area was closely related with the degree of fibrotic change later on. CT is important tool for diagnosis and prediction of parenchymal damage in necrotizing pneumonia

  15. L’actinomycose thoracique multiple chez l’immunocompétent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msougar, Yassine; Fenane, Hicham; Maidi, Mehdi; Benosman, Abdellatif

    2013-01-01

    L′actinomycose est une affection bactérienne granulomateuse, suppurative, étendue et chronique provoquée par la bactérie anaérobique gram positif Actinomyces israelii. La localisation thoracique est rare, elle peut simuler une pathologie néoplasique ou une tuberculose. Il s’agit d’un patient de 54ans sans antécédents pathologiques, qui s’est présenté avec deux tuméfactions pariétales basithoarciques droites, l’une antérieure et l’autre postérieure s’accompagnant d’une altération de l’état général. L’examen clinique ainsi que le bilan radiologique ont montré deux masses de la paroi thoracique et une atteinte parenchymateuse basale droite. L’examen anatomopathologique de la biopsie de la masse antérieure a montré des foyers d’actinomycose permettant d’établir le diagnostic d’actinomycose thoraco-pulmonaire. Un bilan immunologique s’est révélé normal. Le patient est alors mis sous traitement antibiotique à base d’amoxicilline protégée avec bonne évolution clinique et radiologique. Le but de cette observation est de rappeler les aspects radio-clinique, histologiques, thérapeutiques et évolutifs ainsi que les difficultés diagnostiques de cette affection. PMID:24672630

  16. The evaluation of cultivable microbiota profile in patients with secondary endodontic infection before and after photo-activated disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhajibagher, Maryam; Ghorbanzadeh, Roghayeh; Parker, Steven; Chiniforush, Nasim; Bahador, Abbas

    2017-06-01

    Secondary/persistent endodontic infection can be the outcome of failure of endodontic treatment. Photo-activated disinfection (PAD) can be a useful adjunct to mechanical and antimicrobial agents in eliminating endopathogenic microorganisms. In this study, we evaluated the effect of PAD on diversity and count of microbiota related to secondary/persistent endodontic infections. Root canal samples were taken using sterile paper points from the root canals of 14 patients with secondary/persistent endodontic infections after removing the root-canal filling materials. PAD was performed on teeth with toluidine blue O (TBO) in combination with diode laser. Then re-sampling was conducted from the canal root using sterile paper points and transferred to transport medium. The samples were plated and pure cultures of the target microorganisms were then isolated and identified by analytical profile index (API ® 20A) assays and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Before TBO-PAD, a total of 31 cultivable isolates could be retrieved; 25.8% of the isolated species were obligate anaerobic or microphilics including Veillonella parvula, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Propionibacterium acnes, and Lactobacillus acidophilus, and 74.2% of the isolated species were facultative anaerobic such as Enterococcus faecalis, Actinomyces naeslundii, L. rhamnosus, L. casei, Streptococcus sanguinis, S. mitis, and Candida albicans. According to this in vivo study, the diversity and count of microbiota in root canal-treated teeth were decreased after TBO-PAD, so that E. faecalis, V. parvula, and C. albicans were the microorganisms that recovered after PAD. TBO-PAD is an effective approach that exhibited anti-microbial potential activity against microbiota involved in secondary/persistent endodontic infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Rhamnolipids from non-pathogenic Burkholderia thailandensis E264: Physicochemical characterization, antimicrobial and antibiofilm efficacy against oral hygiene related pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshikh, Mohamed; Funston, Scott; Chebbi, Alif; Ahmed, Syed; Marchant, Roger; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2017-05-25

    Biosurfactants are naturally occurring surface active compounds that have mainly been exploited for environmental applications and consumer products, with their biomedical efficacy an emerging area of research. Rhamnolipids area major group of biosurfactants that have been reported for their antimicrobial and antibiofilm efficacy. One of the main limiting factors for scaled up production and downstream applications of rhamnolipids is the fact that they are predominantly produced from the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this article, we have reported the production and characterisation of long chain rhamnolipids from non-pathogenic Burkholderia thailandensis E264 (ATCC 700388). We have also investigated the antibacterial and antibiofilm properties of these rhamnolipids against some oral pathogens (Streptococcus oralis, Actinomyces naeslundii, Neisseria mucosa and Streptococcus sanguinis), important for oral health and hygiene. Treating these bacteria with different concentrations of long chain rhamnolipids resulted in a reduction of 3-4 log of bacterial viability, placing these rhamnolipids close to being classified as biocidal. Investigating long chain rhamnolipid efficacy as antibiofilm agents for prospective oral-related applications revealed good potency against oral-bacteria biofilms in a co-incubation experiments, in a pre-coated surface format, in disrupting immature biofilms and has shown excellent combination effect with Lauryl Sodium Sulphate which resulted in a drastic decrease in its minimal inhibitory concentration against different bacteria. Investigating the rhamnolipid permeabilization effect along with their ability to induce the formation of reactive oxygen species has shed light on the mechanism through which inhibition/killing of bacteria may occur. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Antibacterial photocatalytic activity of different crystalline TiO2 phases in oral multispecies biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaroto, Heloisa N; Ricomini-Filho, Antonio P; Bertolini, Martinna M; Dias da Silva, José Humberto; Azevedo Neto, Nilton F; Sukotjo, Cortino; Rangel, Elidiane C; Barão, Valentim A R

    2018-07-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) incorporation in biomaterials is a promising technology due to its photocatalytic and antibacterial activities. However, the antibacterial potential of different TiO 2 crystalline structures on a multispecies oral biofilm remains unknown. We hypothesized that the different crystalline TiO 2 phases present different photocatalytic and antibacterial activities. Three crystalline TiO 2 films were deposited by magnetron sputtering on commercially pure titanium (cpTi), in order to obtain four groups: (1) machined cpTi (control); (2) A-TiO 2 (anatase); (3) M-TiO 2 (mixture of anatase and rutile); (4) R-TiO 2 (rutile). The morphology, crystalline phase, chemical composition, hardness, elastic modulus and surface free energy of the surfaces were evaluated. The photocatalytic potential was assessed by methylene blue degradation assay. The antibacterial activity was evaluated on relevant oral bacteria, by using a multispecies biofilm (Streptococcus sanguinis, Actinomyces naeslundii and Fusobacterium nucleatum) formed on the treated titanium surfaces (16.5h) followed by UV-A light exposure (1h) to generate reactive oxygen species production. All TiO 2 films presented around 300nm thickness and improved the hardness and elastic modulus of cpTi surfaces (p0.05 vs. control). This study brings new insights on the development of extra oral protocols for the photocatalytic activity of TiO 2 in oral biofilm-associated disease. Anatase and mixture-TiO 2 showed antibacterial activity on this oral bacterial biofilm, being promising surface coatings for dental implant components. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  19. Chestnut green waste composting for sustainable forest management: Microbiota dynamics and impact on plant disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventorino, Valeria; Parillo, Rita; Testa, Antonino; Viscardi, Sharon; Espresso, Francesco; Pepe, Olimpia

    2016-01-15

    Making compost from chestnut lignocellulosic waste is a possible sustainable management strategy for forests that employs a high-quality renewable organic resource. Characterization of the microbiota involved in composting is essential to better understand the entire process as well as the properties of the final product. Therefore, this study investigated the microbial communities involved in the composting of chestnut residues obtained from tree cleaning and pruning. The culture-independent approach taken highlighted the fact that the microbiota varied only slightly during the process, with the exception of those of the starting substrate and mature compost. The statistical analysis indicated that most of the bacterial and fungal species in the chestnut compost persisted during composting. The dominant microbial population detected during the process belonged to genera known to degrade recalcitrant lignocellulosic materials. Specifically, we identified fungal genera, such as Penicillium, Fusarium, Cladosporium, Aspergillus and Mucor, and prokaryotic species affiliated with Bacilli, Actinobacteria, Flavobacteria and γ-Proteobacteria. The suppressive properties of compost supplements for the biocontrol of Sclerotinia minor and Rhizoctonia solani were also investigated. Compared to pure substrate, the addition of compost to the peat-based growth substrates resulted in a significant reduction of disease in tomato plants of up to 70 % or 51 % in the presence of Sclerotinia minor or Rhizoctonia solani, respectively. The obtained results were related to the presence of putative bio-control agents and plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria belonging to the genera Azotobacter, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Bacillus, Flavobacterium, Streptomyces and Actinomyces in the chestnut compost. The composting of chestnut waste may represent a sustainable agricultural practice for disposing of lignocellulosic waste by transforming it into green waste compost that can be used to

  20. Actinobaculum shaalii: a new uropathogen?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Felice

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. Actinobaculum schaalii is a facultative anaerobic, Gram-positive rod-shaped species phylogenetically related to Actinomyces. A. schaalii is an emerging pathogen causing urinary tract infections (UTI in both children and adults; although, as part of the human genitourinary tract flora, it is frequently overlooked or considered as a contaminant. While the phenotypic identification of A. schaalii is difficult, the recent Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation Time-Of-Flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF technology could represent a promising tool for its identification. Materials and Methods. This is a retrospective study including all known cases (n=7 of A. schaalii infections occurred (between July 2013 and November 2013 at the Microbiology Laboratory of the A. Cardarelli Hospital, in Campobasso (Italy. Results. All the 7 A. schaalii collected strains, resulted in vitro susceptible to most of the drugs commonly used for urinary tract infections, but resistant to ciprofloxacin, a first-line antibiotic in the treatment of prostatitis. All isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic, ampicillin-sulbactam, cefuroxime, gentamicin, piperacillin-tazobactam, vancomicin, tetracycline (no EUCAST breakpoints. All except two isolates were susceptible to cefotaxime; 3/7 and 5/7 strains were clindamicin and levofloxacin resistant, respectively. Conclusions. As most antibiotics empirically prescribed for UTI (mainly fluoroquinolones or trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole are not effective against A. schaalii, the appropriate onset of treatment was delayed by an average of 2.8 days. The implementation of the newer MALDI TOF technology in routine diagnostic procedures may allow a more reliable and rapid identification of A. schaalii in future.

  1. Antibacterial Effect of Silver Diamine Fluoride on Cariogenic Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yali; Darvell, Brain W; Botelho, Michael G

    2018-05-01

    To screen the possible antimicrobial activity of a range of clinically used, silver-based compounds on cariogenic organisms: silver diamine fluoride (SDF), silver fluoride, and silver nitrate. Preliminary screening disk-diffusion susceptibility tests were conducted on Mueller-Hinton agar plates inoculated with Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Actinomyces naeslundii, organisms known to be cariogenic. In order to identify which component of the silver compounds was responsible for any antibacterial (AB) effect, and to provide controls, the following were also investigated at high and low concentrations: sodium fluoride, ammonium fluoride, ammonium chloride, sodium fluoride, sodium chloride, and sodium nitrate, as well as deionized water as control. A volume of 10 pL of a test solution was dispensed onto a paper disk resting on the inoculated agar surface, and the plate incubated anaerobically at 37°C for 48 hours. The zones of inhibition were then measured. Silver diamine fluoride, silver fluoride, silver nitrate, and ammonium fluoride had significant AB effect (p effect at low concentration; the remaining other compounds had no effect. Silver ions appear to be the principal AB agent at both high and low concentration; fluoride ions only have an AB effect at high concentration, while ammonium, nitrate, chloride and sodium ions have none. The anticaries effect of topical silver solutions appears restricted to that of the silver ions. Silver compounds, such as SDF, silver fluoride, and silver nitrate have AB effect against cariogenic organisms and these may have clinical impact in arresting or preventing dental decay. Sodium fluoride did not have AB effect under the conditions tested.

  2. Comparative analysis of salivary bacterial microbiome diversity in edentulous infants and their mothers or primary care givers using pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly D Cephas

    Full Text Available Bacterial contribution to oral disease has been studied in young children, but there is a lack of data addressing the developmental perspective in edentulous infants. Our primary objectives were to use pyrosequencing to phylogenetically characterize the salivary bacterial microbiome of edentulous infants and to make comparisons against their mothers. Saliva samples were collected from 5 edentulous infants (mean age = 4.6±1.2 mo old and their mothers or primary care givers (mean age = 30.8±9.5 y old. Salivary DNA was extracted, used to generate DNA amplicons of the V4-V6 hypervariable region of the bacterial 16S rDNA gene, and subjected to 454-pyrosequencing. On average, over 80,000 sequences per sample were generated. High bacterial diversity was noted in the saliva of adults [1012 operational taxonomical units (OTU at 3% divergence] and infants (578 OTU at 3% divergence. Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Fusobacteria were predominant bacterial phyla present in all samples. A total of 397 bacterial genera were present in our dataset. Of the 28 genera different (P<0.05 between infants and adults, 27 had a greater prevalence in adults. The exception was Streptococcus, which was the predominant genera in infant saliva (62.2% in infants vs. 20.4% in adults; P<0.05. Veillonella, Neisseria, Rothia, Haemophilus, Gemella, Granulicatella, Leptotrichia, and Fusobacterium were also predominant genera in infant samples, while Haemophilus, Neisseria, Veillonella, Fusobacterium, Oribacterium, Rothia, Treponema, and Actinomyces were predominant in adults. Our data demonstrate that although the adult saliva bacterial microbiome had a greater OTU count than infants, a rich bacterial community exists in the infant oral cavity prior to tooth eruption. Streptococcus, Veillonella, and Neisseria are the predominant bacterial genera present in infants. Further research is required to characterize the development of oral microbiota early in life

  3. Analysis of oral microbiota in children with dental caries by PCR-DGGE and barcoded pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Zongxin; Kong, Jianming; Jia, Peng; Wei, Chaochun; Wang, Yuezhu; Pan, Zhiwen; Huang, Wujing; Li, Lanjuan; Chen, Hui; Xiang, Charlie

    2010-10-01

    Oral microbiota plays a vital role in maintaining the homeostasis of oral cavity. Dental caries are among the most common oral diseases in children and pathogenic bacteria contribute to the development of the disease. However, the overall structure of bacterial communities in the oral cavity from children with dental caries has not been explored deeply heretofore. We used high-throughput barcoded pyrosequencing and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to examine bacterial diversity of oral microbiota in saliva and supragingival plaques from 60 children aged 3 to 6 years old with and without dental caries from China. The multiplex barcoded pyrosequencing was performed in a single run, with multiple samples tagged uniquely by multiplex identifiers. As PCR-DGGE analysis is a conventional molecular ecological approach, this analysis was also performed on the same samples and the results of both approaches were compared. A total of 186,787 high-quality sequences were obtained for evaluating bacterial diversity and 41,905 unique sequences represented all phylotypes. We found that the oral microbiota in children was far more diverse than previous studies reported, and more than 200 genera belonging to ten phyla were found in the oral cavity. The phylotypes in saliva and supragingival plaques were significantly different and could be divided into two distinct clusters (p oral microbiome analyzed by PCR-DGGE and barcoded pyrosequencing was employed to cross validate the data sets. The genera of Streptococcus, Veillonella, Actinomyces, Granulicatella, Leptotrichia, and Thiomonas in plaques were significantly associated with dental caries (p oral microbiota allowed for a better understanding of oral microecosystem, and these pathogenic populations in plaque provide new insights into the etiology of dental caries and suggest new targets for interventions of the disease.

  4. Rapid and sensitive PCR-dipstick DNA chromatography for multiplex analysis of the oral microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lingyang; Sato, Takuichi; Niwa, Kousuke; Kawase, Mitsuo; Tanner, Anne C R; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    A complex of species has been associated with dental caries under the ecological hypothesis. This study aimed to develop a rapid, sensitive PCR-dipstick DNA chromatography assay that could be read by eye for multiplex and semiquantitative analysis of plaque bacteria. Parallel oligonucleotides were immobilized on a dipstick strip for multiplex analysis of target DNA sequences of the caries-associated bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Scardovia wiggsiae, Actinomyces species, and Veillonella parvula. Streptavidin-coated blue-colored latex microspheres were to generate signal. Target DNA amplicons with an oligonucleotide-tagged terminus and a biotinylated terminus were coupled with latex beads through a streptavidin-biotin interaction and then hybridized with complementary oligonucleotides on the strip. The accumulation of captured latex beads on the test and control lines produced blue bands, enabling visual detection with the naked eye. The PCR-dipstick DNA chromatography detected quantities as low as 100 pg of DNA amplicons and demonstrated 10- to 1000-fold higher sensitivity than PCR-agarose gel electrophoresis, depending on the target bacterial species. Semiquantification of bacteria was performed by obtaining a series of chromatograms using serial 10-fold dilution of PCR-amplified DNA extracted from dental plaque samples. The assay time was less than 3 h. The semiquantification procedure revealed the relative amounts of each test species in dental plaque samples, indicating that this disposable device has great potential in analysis of microbial composition in the oral cavity and intestinal tract, as well as in point-of-care diagnosis of microbiota-associated diseases.

  5. Rapid and Sensitive PCR-Dipstick DNA Chromatography for Multiplex Analysis of the Oral Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyang Tian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A complex of species has been associated with dental caries under the ecological hypothesis. This study aimed to develop a rapid, sensitive PCR-dipstick DNA chromatography assay that could be read by eye for multiplex and semiquantitative analysis of plaque bacteria. Parallel oligonucleotides were immobilized on a dipstick strip for multiplex analysis of target DNA sequences of the caries-associated bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Scardovia wiggsiae, Actinomyces species, and Veillonella parvula. Streptavidin-coated blue-colored latex microspheres were to generate signal. Target DNA amplicons with an oligonucleotide-tagged terminus and a biotinylated terminus were coupled with latex beads through a streptavidin-biotin interaction and then hybridized with complementary oligonucleotides on the strip. The accumulation of captured latex beads on the test and control lines produced blue bands, enabling visual detection with the naked eye. The PCR-dipstick DNA chromatography detected quantities as low as 100 pg of DNA amplicons and demonstrated 10- to 1000-fold higher sensitivity than PCR-agarose gel electrophoresis, depending on the target bacterial species. Semiquantification of bacteria was performed by obtaining a series of chromatograms using serial 10-fold dilution of PCR-amplified DNA extracted from dental plaque samples. The assay time was less than 3 h. The semiquantification procedure revealed the relative amounts of each test species in dental plaque samples, indicating that this disposable device has great potential in analysis of microbial composition in the oral cavity and intestinal tract, as well as in point-of-care diagnosis of microbiota-associated diseases.

  6. [Management of Lung Abscess].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, A; Hillejan, L; Ukena, D

    2015-10-01

    A lung abscess is an infectious pulmonary disease characterised by the presence of a pus-filled cavity within the lung parenchyma. The content of an abscess often drains into the airways spontaneously, leading to an air-fluid level visible on chest X-rays and CT scans. Primary lung abscesses occur in patients who are prone to aspiration or in otherwise healthy individuals; secondary lung abscesses typically develop in association with a stenosing lung neoplasm or a systemic disease that compromises immune defences, such as AIDS, or after organ transplantation. The organisms found in abscesses caused by aspiration pneumonia reflect the resident flora of the oropharynx. The most commonly isolated organisms are anaerobic bacteria (Prevotella, Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Peptostreptococcus) or streptococci; in alcoholics with poor oral hygiene, the spectrum of pathogens includes Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Actinomyces. Chest radiography and computed tomography (CT) are mandatory procedures in the diagnostic algorithm. Standard treatment for a lung abscess consists of systemic antibiotic therapy, which is based on the anticipated or proven bacterial spectrum of the abscess. In most cases, primary abscesses are successfully treated by calculated empiric antibiotic therapy, with an estimated lethality rate of less than 10 %. Secondary abscesses, despite targeted antimicrobial therapy, are associated with a poor prognosis, which depends on the patient's general condition and underlying disease; lethality is as high as 75 %. Negative prognostic factors are old age, severe comorbidities, immunosuppression, bronchial obstruction, and neoplasms. Surgical intervention due to failure of conservative treatment is required in only 10 % of patients, with a success rate of up to 90 % and postoperative mortality rates ranging between 0 and 33 %. Treatment success after endoscopic or percutaneous drainage is achieved in 73 to 100 % of cases, with an

  7. Etiology and outcome of community-acquired lung abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Noboru; Kagiyama, Naho; Ishiguro, Takashi; Tokunaga, Daidou; Sugita, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobes are the first and Streptococcus species the second most common cause of community-acquired lung abscess (CALA) in the West. The etiologic pathogens of this disease have changed in Taiwan, with Klebsiella pneumoniae being reported as the most common cause of CALA. To determine the etiologies of community-acquired lung abscess. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 205 Japanese adult patients with CALA to evaluate etiologies and outcomes. We used not only traditional microbiological investigations but also percutaneous ultrasonography-guided transthoracic needle aspiration and protected specimen brushes. Of these 205 patients, 122 had documented bacteriological results, with 189 bacterial species isolated. Pure aerobic, mixed aerobic and anaerobic, and pure anaerobic bacteria were isolated in 90 (73.8%), 17 (13.9%), and 15 (12.3%) patients, respectively. The four most common etiologic pathogens were Streptococcus species (59.8%), anaerobes (26.2%), Gemella species (9.8%), and K. pneumoniae (8.2%). Streptococcus mitis was the most common among the Streptococcus species. Mean duration of antibiotic administration was 26 days. Six patients (2.9%, 3 with actinomycosis and 3 with nocardiosis) were treated with antibiotics for 76-189 days. Two patients with anaerobic lung abscess died. The first and second most common etiologic pathogens of CALA in our hospital were Streptococcus species and anaerobes, respectively. The etiologies in our study differ from those in Taiwan and are similar to those in the West with the exception that Streptococcus species were the most common etiologic pathogens in our study whereas anaerobes are the most frequent etiologic pathogens in Western countries. S. mitis and Gemella species are important etiologic pathogens as well. The identification of Actinomyces and Nocardia is important in order to define the adequate duration of antibiotic administration. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Effect of compliance during periodontal maintenance therapy on levels of bacteria associated with periodontitis: A 6-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Fernando Oliveira; Vieira, Thaís Riberal; Cortelli, Sheila Cavalca; Cota, Luís Otávio Miranda; Costa, José Eustáquio; Aguiar, Maria Cássia Ferreira; Cortelli, José Roberto

    2018-05-01

    It is well established that regular compliance during periodontal maintenance therapy (PMT) maintains the stability of periodontal clinical parameters obtained after active periodontal therapy (APT). However, compliance during PMT has not yet been related to subgingival bacterial levels. Thus, this study followed individuals in PMT over 6 years and longitudinally evaluated the effects of compliance on periodontitis-associated bacterial levels and its relation to periodontal status. From a 6-year prospective cohort study with 212 individuals in PMT, 91 were determined to be eligible. From this total, 28 regular compliers (RC) were randomly selected and matched for age and sex with 28 irregular compliers (IC). Complete periodontal examination and microbiological samples were obtained 5 times: T1 (prior to APT), T2 (after APT), T3 (2 years), T4 (4 years), and T5 (6 years). Total bacteria counts and levels of Actinomyces naeslundii, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola were evaluated through quantitative polymerase chain reaction. RC had less tooth loss and better clinical and microbiological conditions over time when compared with IC. IC had higher total bacterial counts and higher levels of T. denticola. Moreover, among IC, total bacterial counts were positively associated with plaque index and bleeding on probing, while levels of A. naeslundii, T. forsythia, and T. denticola were negatively associated with clinical attachment loss (4 to 5 mm) among RC. Compliance positively influenced subgingival microbiota and contributed to stability of periodontal clinical status. Regular visits during PMT sustained microbiological benefits provided by APT over a 6-year period. © 2018 American Academy of Periodontology.

  9. Molecular identification of bacteria associated with canine periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggio, Marcello P; Lennon, Alan; Taylor, David J; Bennett, David

    2011-06-02

    Periodontal disease is one of the most common diseases of adult dogs, with up to 80% of animals affected. The aetiology of the disease is poorly studied, although bacteria are known to play a major role. The purpose of this study was to identify the bacteria associated with canine gingivitis and periodontitis and to compare this with the normal oral flora. Swabs were obtained from the gingival margin of three dogs with gingivitis and three orally healthy controls, and subgingival plaque was collected from three dogs with periodontitis. Samples were subjected to routine bacterial culture. The prevalent species identified in the normal, gingivitis and periodontitis groups were uncultured bacterium (12.5% of isolates), Bacteroides heparinolyticus/Pasteurella dagmatis (10.0%) and Actinomyces canis (19.4%), respectively. Bacteria were also identified using culture-independent methods (16S rRNA gene sequencing) and the predominant species identified were Pseudomonas sp. (30.9% of clones analysed), Porphyromonas cangingivalis (16.1%) and Desulfomicrobium orale (12.0%) in the normal, gingivitis and periodontitis groups, respectively. Uncultured species accounted for 13.2%, 2.0% and 10.5%, and potentially novel species for 38.2%, 38.3% and 35.3%, of clones in the normal, gingivitis and periodontitis groups, respectively. This is the first study to use utilise culture-independent methods for the identification of bacteria associated with this disease. It is concluded that the canine oral flora in health and disease is highly diverse and also contains a high proportion of uncultured and, in particular, potentially novel species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Relationship between serologic markers of periodontal bacteria and metabolic syndrome and its components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Deepika; Choi, Youn-Hee; Zhang, Jiajia; Hazlett, Linda J; Merchant, Anwar T

    2015-03-01

    Periodontitis is a result of a complex biologic alteration of the periodontal microenvironment and a distributional shift of key periodontal pathogens. Metabolic syndrome (MetS), a complex cluster of cardiovascular risk factors, has been linked to periodontal diseases; however, the contribution of periodontal bacteria to systemic conditions remains unclear. The study population comprised 7,848 United States adults who participated in an interview, underwent a clinical oral-health examination, and had serum immunoglobulin G titers measured against 19 periodontal bacteria as part of the third National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey. The z-score antibody titers were clustered into four mutually exclusive groups and named after Socransky's classification of periodontal bacteria (Orange-Red, Red-Green, Yellow-Orange, and Orange-Blue). Survey logistic regression was used to investigate the independent associations between the cluster scores, and MetS and each component, including hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, central obesity, and elevated fasting glucose. The Orange-Red cluster score (that included Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella spp.) was positively associated (odds ratio [OR] = 1.067, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02 to 1.12) and the Orange-Blue cluster score (which included Actinomyces naeslundii and Eubacterium nodatum) was inversely associated (OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.88 to 0.97) with elevated fasting glucose (≥ 110 mg/dL) after adjustment for clusters and potential confounders. Neither MetS nor its other remaining MetS components were associated with a particular cluster score. The associations between specific antibody clusters (Orange-Red and Orange-Blue) against periodontal bacteria and elevated plasma glucose were in qualitatively opposite directions after multivariable adjustment in a large, adult population. The periodontal bacterial profile was not found to be associated with metabolic

  11. In vitro evaluation of a multispecies oral biofilm on different implant surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Violant, Deborah; Galofré, Marta; Nart, José; Teles, Ricardo Patricio

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm accumulation on implant surfaces is one of the most important factors for early and late implant failure. Because of the related clinical implications, the aim of this in vitro study was to compare the bacterial cell attachment of a four-species oral biofilm on titanium discs of purity grade 2 and 4, with machined surfaces and etched-thermochemically modified with Avantblast®. The in vitro biofilm model was composed of early (Actinomyces naeslundii, Streptococcus gordonii), secondary (Veillonella parvula), and intermediate (Fusobacterium nucleatum ssp. polymorphum) colonizers of tooth surfaces. A total of 36 discs were divided into four groups: Tigr2-c (titanium grade 2, machined surface), Tigr2-t (titanium grade 2, modified surface with Avantblast®), Tigr4-c (titanium grade 4, machined surface), Tigr4-t (titanium grade 4, modified surface with Avantblast®). The experiment was repeated three times. Biofilm viability was tested with 1% 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride solution and bacterial cell quantification by checkerboard DNA–DNA hybridization. Descriptive analysis was performed to evaluate biofilm composition and differences between groups were checked with the Mann–Whitney test (p < 0.05). After one week, multispecies biofilms showed a similar pattern of bacterial composition on all analyzed implant surfaces. The most prevalent bacterium was V. parvula (∼50% of the total biomass), followed by S. gordonii (∼30%), F. nucleatum ssp. polymorphum (∼10%) and A. naeslundii (<5%). Total bacterial biomass was significantly higher in both grade-4-titanium surfaces (p < 0.05). The results demonstrated that not only implant surface treatment, but also titanium purity, influence early bacterial colonization. (paper)

  12. New bacterial composition in primary and persistent/secondary endodontic infections with respect to clinical and radiographic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennert, Christian; Fuhrmann, Maximilian; Wittmer, Annette; Karygianni, Lamprini; Altenburger, Markus J; Pelz, Klaus; Hellwig, Elmar; Al-Ahmad, Ali

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the microbiota of primary and secondary/persistent endodontic infections of patients undergoing endodontic treatment with respect to clinical and radiographic findings. Samples from the root canals of 21 German patients were taken using 3 sequential sterile paper points. In the case of a root canal filling, gutta-percha was removed with sterile files, and samples were taken using sterile paper points. The samples were plated, and microorganisms were then isolated and identified morphologically by biochemical analysis and sequencing the 16S rRNA genes of isolated microorganisms. In 12 of 21 root canals, 33 different species could be isolated. Six (50%) of the cases with isolated microorganisms were primary, and 6 (50%) cases were endodontic infections associated with root-filled teeth. Twelve of the isolated species were facultative anaerobic and 21 obligate anaerobic. Monomicrobial infections were found for Enterococcus faecalis and Actinomyces viscosus. E. faecalis was most frequently isolated in secondary endodontic infections (33%). Moraxella osloensis was isolated from a secondary endodontic infection that had an insufficient root canal filling accompanied by a mild sensation of pain. A new bacterial composition compromising Atopobium rimae, Anaerococcus prevotii, Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus, Dialister invisus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum was recovered from teeth with chronic apical abscesses. New bacterial combinations were found and correlated to clinical and radiographic findings, particularly to chronic apical abscesses. M. osloensis was detected in root canals for the second time and only in German patients. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bacterial profile of dentine caries and the impact of pH on bacterial population diversity.

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    Nima Kianoush

    Full Text Available Dental caries is caused by the release of organic acids from fermentative bacteria, which results in the dissolution of hydroxyapatite matrices of enamel and dentine. While low environmental pH is proposed to cause a shift in the consortium of oral bacteria, favouring the development of caries, the impact of this variable has been overlooked in microbial population studies. This study aimed to detail the zonal composition of the microbiota associated with carious dentine lesions with reference to pH. We used 454 sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (V3-V4 region to compare microbial communities in layers ranging in pH from 4.5-7.8 from 25 teeth with advanced dentine caries. Pyrosequencing of the amplicons yielded 449,762 sequences. Nine phyla, 97 genera and 409 species were identified from the quality-filtered, de-noised and chimera-free sequences. Among the microbiota associated with dentinal caries, the most abundant taxa included Lactobacillus sp., Prevotella sp., Atopobium sp., Olsenella sp. and Actinomyces sp. We found a disparity between microbial communities localised at acidic versus neutral pH strata. Acidic conditions were associated with low diversity microbial populations, with Lactobacillus species including L. fermentum, L. rhamnosus and L. crispatus, being prominent. In comparison, the distinctive species of a more diverse flora associated with neutral pH regions of carious lesions included Alloprevotella tanerrae, Leptothrix sp., Sphingomonas sp. and Streptococcus anginosus. While certain bacteria were affected by the pH gradient, we also found that ∼ 60% of the taxa associated with caries were present across the investigated pH range, representing a substantial core. We demonstrated that some bacterial species implicated in caries progression show selective clustering with respect to pH gradient, providing a basis for specific therapeutic strategies.

  14. Morphologic characterization of Mycobacterium marinum by neutron radiographic technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jaqueline Michele da; Crispim, Verginia Reis, E-mail: vrcrispim@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (CT/UFRJ) Centro Tecnologico, Engenharia Nuclear, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Marlei Gomes da [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (CCS/UFRJ), Centro de Ciencias da Saude. Instituto de Microbiologia Professor Paulo de Goes (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The genus Mycobacterium shares many characteristics with the genera Corynebacterium and Actinomyces, among which, similar genome content of bases Guanine-Cytosine and the production of branched long-chain fatty acids called mycolic acids should be enhanced. Mycobacteria are strict aerobic, considered weakly Gram-positive, rod-shaped microorganisms, not possessing flagella. They are intracellular infecting and proliferating in the interior of macrophages, they do not form spores, produce toxins or have capsule. Optimal growth temperature and rate are variable. The genus encompasses approximately 120 known species; however, the present study focuses the characterization of Mycobacterium marinum. This species is generally pathogenic causing deep skin infections. Colonies grow slowly at temperatures around 37 degree C. The aim of this study is to speed the process of M. Marinum morphologic characterization and, in the future, apply it to other species of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM. In relation to conventional microbiologic essays that usually demand 28 days for colony growth, nuclear testing, using the neutron radiography technique, prove to be much faster. The samples were initially sterilized at the Mycobacteria Laboratory/IMPPG/UFRJ using hypochlorite solution, gluta + formaldehyde and warmed distilled water, according conventional protocols. Then, they were incubated with sodium borate, deposited over CR-39 sheets, fixed with casein (only the first and third sample) and irradiated with a thermal neutron beam generated at the J-9 channel of the Argonauta reactor from the IEN/CNEN. To this end, the following parameters were optimized: incubation time, irradiation time and CR-39 developing time. The images registered in CR-39 were visualized with the help of a Nikon E-400 optical microscope and captured with a Cool pix 995 digital camera. The results showed that the technique produces enlarged images, making it easier the morphologic characterization of

  15. Antibacterial activity of Tribulus terrestris and its synergistic effect with Capsella bursa-pastoris and Glycyrrhiza glabra against oral pathogens: an in-vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimanpour, Saman; Sedighinia, Fereshteh Sadat; Safipour Afshar, Akbar; Zarif, Reza; Ghazvini, Kiarash

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this study, antimicrobial activities of an ethanol extract of Tribulus terrestris aloneand in combination with Capsella bursa-pastoris and Glycyrrhiza glabra were examined in vitro against six pathogens namely Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, Actinomyces viscosus, Enterococcus faecalis Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli. Materials and methods: Antibacterial activities of the extracts were examined using disc and well diffusion methods and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of ethanol extracts were determined against these microorganisms using agar and broth dilution methods. Chlorhexidine was used as positive control. Results: Tribulus terrestris extract exhibited good antibacterial activity against all bacteria. Antibacterial activity of mixed extract was evaluated and exhibited that mixed extract was more effective against all bacteria than any of the cases alone which indicates the synergistic effect between these three extracts (p˂0.05). No strain showed resistance against these extracts. In agar dilution, Tribulus terrestris exhibited MIC values ranging from 35.0 to 20.0 mg/ml and mixed extract showed MIC values ranging from 12.5 to 5.0 mg/ml. The results of broth dilution method were consistent with the findings of the agar dilution method. Conclusion: This in-vitro study was a preliminary evaluation of antibacterial activity of the plants. It provided scientific evidence to support uses of T. terrestris and its mixture with C. bursa-pastoris and G. glabra for the treatment of oral infections. In-vivo studies are also required to better evaluate the effect of these extracts. PMID:26101754

  16. Novel Model for Multispecies Biofilms That Uses Rigid Gas-Permeable Lenses ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyyala, Rebecca; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Novak, Karen F.

    2011-01-01

    Oral biofilms comprise complex multispecies consortia aided by specific inter- and intraspecies interactions occurring among commensals and pathogenic bacterial species. Oral biofilms are primary initiating factors of periodontal disease, although complex multifactorial biological influences, including host cell responses, contribute to the individual outcome of the disease. To provide a system to study initial stages of interaction between oral biofilms and the host cells that contribute to the disease process, we developed a novel in vitro model system to grow biofilms on rigid gas-permeable contact lenses (RGPLs), which enable oxygen to permeate through the lens material. Bacterial species belonging to early- and late-colonizing groups were successfully established as single- or three-species biofilms, with each group comprising Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus sanguinis; S. gordonii, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Fusobacterium nucleatum; or S. gordonii, F. nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Quantification of biofilm numbers by quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed substantial differences in the magnitude of bacterial numbers in single-species and multispecies biofilms. We evaluated cell-permeable conventional nucleic acid stains acridine orange, hexidium iodide, and Hoechst 33258 and novel SYTO red, blue, and green fluorochromes for their effect on bacterial viability and fluorescence yield to allow visualization of the aggregates of individual bacterial species by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Substantial differences in the quantity and distribution of the species in the multispecies biofilms were identified. The specific features of these biofilms may help us better understand the role of various bacteria in local challenge of oral tissues. PMID:21421785

  17. Impact of early colonizers on in vitro subgingival biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Ammann

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of early colonizing species on the structure and the composition of the bacterial community developing in a subgingival 10-species biofilm model system. The model included Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus anginosus, Actinomycesoris, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum, Veillonella dispar, Campylobacter rectus, Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola. Based on literature, we considered Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus anginosus, and Actinomyces oris as early colonizers and examined their role in the biofilms by either a delayed addition to the consortium, or by not inoculating at all the biofilms with these species. We quantitatively evaluated the resulting biofilms by real-time quantitative PCR and further compared the structures using confocal laser scanning microscopy following fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The absence of the early colonizers did not hinder biofilm formation. The biofilms reached the same total counts and developed to normal thickness. However, quantitative shifts in the abundances of individual species were observed. In the absence of streptococci, the overall biofilm structure appeared looser and more dispersed. Moreover, besides a significant increase of P. intermedia and a decrease of P. gingivalis , P. intermedia appeared to form filamented long chains that resembled streptococci. A. oris, although growing to significantly higher abundance in absence of streptococci, did not have a visible impact on the biofilms. Hence, in the absence of the early colonizers, there is a pronounced effect on P. intermedia and P. gingivalis that may cause distinct shifts in the structure of the biofilm. Streptococci possibly facilitate the establishment of P. gingivalis into subgingival biofilms, while in their absence P. intermedia became more dominant and forms elongated chains.

  18. Serum IgG antibody levels to periodontal microbiota are associated with incident Alzheimer disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Noble

    Full Text Available Periodontitis and Alzheimer disease (AD are associated with systemic inflammation. This research studied serum IgG to periodontal microbiota as possible predictors of incident AD.Using a case-cohort study design, 219 subjects (110 incident AD cases and 109 controls without incident cognitive impairment at last follow-up, matched on race-ethnicity, were drawn from the Washington Heights-Inwood Columbia Aging Project (WHICAP, a cohort of longitudinally followed northern Manhattan residents aged >65 years. Mean follow-up was five years (SD 2.6. In baseline sera, serum IgG levels were determined for bacteria known to be positively or negatively associated with periodontitis (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4, Treponema denticola, Campylobacter rectus, Eubacterium nodatum, and Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies-2. In all analyses, we used antibody threshold levels shown to correlate with presence of moderate-severe periodontitis.Mean age was 72 years (SD 6.9 for controls, and 79 years (SD 4.6 for cases (p640 ng/ml, present in 10% of subjects was associated with increased risk of AD (HR = 2.0, 95%CI: 1.1-3.8. This association was stronger after adjusting for other significant titers (HR = 3.1, 95%CI: 1.5-6.4. In this model, high anti-E. nodatum IgG (>1755 ng/ml; 19% of subjects was associated with lower risk of AD (HR = 0.5, 95%CI: 0.2-0.9.Serum IgG levels to common periodontal microbiota are associated with risk for developing incident AD.

  19. Actinomycosis of Distal Phalanx Twenty Years after Flap Reconstruction of Index Finger: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant N

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Actinomycosis is a chronic granulomatous suppurative infection caused by anaerobic bacteria from genus Actinomyces which are normal flora of mouth, colon and vagina. Actinomycosis of upper extremity is rare. We report a case of actinomycosis of the distal phalanx of finger many years after flap reconstruction. The patient presented with two months’ history of chronic discharging sinus from the tip of his right index finger, which had sustained a degloving injury 20 years previously. It had been treated with an anterior chest wall flap which had healed uneventfully but was bulky due to excess tissue from the donor site. Radiograph revealed osetomyelitis changes of distal phalanx. Debulking surgery with curettage of the distal phalanx was done. Wound healing was uneventful. He was treated with six weeks of metronidazole and ciprofloxacin. The discharge from the distal phalanx cultured actinomycosis odontolyticus. Histopathology of the debrided tissue showed chronic inflammation. As far as we are aware, there are no reports of actinomycosis in a flap involving the finger treated previously with a chest wall skin flap. The infection was probably dormant for many years before manifesting as a discharging sinus. Although the finger flap was bulky, it was not problematic until it started to have serous discharge. With a thorough debridement of all infected tissue, six weeks of antibiotic was adequate. Ciprofloxacin was prescribed based on discharge culture sensitivity. Metronidazole was added as actinomycosis is anaerobic. Response was prompt as patient was not immunocompromised. At follow-up six months post-surgery the finger had recovered with good function. If not for the discharging sinus, patient would probably have tolerated his bulky finger for the rest of his life.

  20. Inhibition of purified enolases from oral bacteria by fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha-Chowdhury, N; Clark, A G; Sissons, C H

    1997-04-01

    Enolase activity in strains of oral streptococci previously has been found to be inhibited by 50% (Ki) by fluoride concentrations ranging from 50 to 300 microM or more in the presence of 0.5 to 1.0 mM inorganic phosphate ions. In this study, enolase was extracted and partly purified by a two-step process from five oral bacterial species and the effect of fluoride on the kinetics of enolase examined. The molecular weight of the putative enolase proteins was 46-48 kDa. The Vmax values ranged from 20 to 323 IU/mg and K(m) for glycerate-2-phosphate from 0.22 to 0.74 mM. Enolase activity was inhibited competitively by fluoride, with Ki values ranging from 16 to 54 microM in the presence of 5 mM inorganic phosphate ions. Ki values for phosphate ranged from 2 to 8 mM. The enolase from Streptococcus sanguis ATCC 10556 was more sensitive to fluoride (Ki = 16 +/- 2) than was enolase from Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 10575 (Ki = 19 +/- 2) or Streptococcus mutans NCTC 10449 (Ki = 40 +/- 4) and all three streptococcal strains were more sensitive to fluoride than either Actinomyces naeslundii WVU 627 (Ki = 46 +/- 6) or Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 (Ki = 54 +/- 6) enolases. The levels of fluoride found to inhibit the streptococcal enolases in this study are much lower than previously reported and are likely to be present in plaque, especially during acidogenesis, and could exert an anti-glycolytic effect.

  1. Insertional inactivation of genes responsible for the D-alanylation of lipoteichoic acid in Streptococcus gordonii DL1 (Challis) affects intrageneric coaggregations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemans, D L; Kolenbrander, P E; Debabov, D V; Zhang, Q; Lunsford, R D; Sakone, H; Whittaker, C J; Heaton, M P; Neuhaus, F C

    1999-05-01

    Most human oral viridans streptococci participate in intrageneric coaggregations, the cell-to-cell adherence among genetically distinct streptococci. Two genes relevant to these intrageneric coaggregations were identified by transposon Tn916 mutagenesis of Streptococcus gordonii DL1 (Challis). A 626-bp sequence flanking the left end of the transposon was homologous to dltA and dltB of Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 (formerly called Lactobacillus casei). A 60-kb probe based on this flanking sequence was used to identify the homologous DNA in a fosmid library of S. gordonii DL1. This DNA encoded D-alanine-D-alanyl carrier protein ligase that was expressed in Escherichia coli from the fosmid clone. The cloned streptococcal dltA was disrupted by inserting an ermAM cassette, and then it was linearized and transformed into S. gordonii DL1 for allelic replacement. Erythromycin-resistant transformants containing a single insertion in dltA exhibited a loss of D-alanyl esters in lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and a loss of intrageneric coaggregation. This phenotype was correlated with the loss of a 100-kDa surface protein reported previously to be involved in mediating intrageneric coaggregation (C. J. Whittaker, D. L. Clemans, and P. E. Kolenbrander, Infect. Immun. 64:4137-4142, 1996). The mutants retained the parental ability to participate in intergeneric coaggregation with human oral actinomyces, indicating the specificity of the mutation in altering intrageneric coaggregations. The mutants were altered morphologically and exhibited aberrant cell septa in a variety of pleomorphs. The natural DNA transformation frequency was reduced 10-fold in these mutants. Southern analysis of chromosomal DNAs from various streptococcal species with the dltA probe revealed the presence of this gene in most viridans streptococci. Thus, it is hypothesized that D-alanyl LTA may provide binding sites for the putative 100-kDa adhesin and scaffolding for the proper presentation of this adhesin to

  2. S-aryl-L-cysteine sulphoxides and related organosulphur compounds alter oral biofilm development and AI-2-based cell-cell communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, S H; Samarian, D; Jadhav, A P; Rickard, A H; Musah, R A; Cady, N C

    2014-11-01

    To design and synthesize a library of structurally related, small molecules related to homologues of compounds produced by the plant Petiveria alliacea and determine their ability to interfere with AI-2 cell-cell communication and biofilm formation by oral bacteria. Many human diseases are associated with persistent bacterial biofilms. Oral biofilms (dental plaque) are problematic as they are often associated with tooth decay, periodontal disease and systemic disorders such as heart disease and diabetes. Using a microplate-based approach, a bio-inspired small molecule library was screened for anti-biofilm activity against the oral species Streptococcus mutans UA159, Streptococcus sanguis 10556 and Actinomyces oris MG1. To complement the static screen, a flow-based BioFlux microfluidic system screen was also performed under conditions representative of the human oral cavity. Several compounds were found to display biofilm inhibitory activity in all three of the oral bacteria tested. These compounds were also shown to inhibit bioluminescence by Vibrio harveyi and were thus inferred to be quorum sensing (QS) inhibitors. Due to the structural similarity of these compounds to each other, and to key molecules in AI-2 biosynthetic pathways, we propose that these molecules potentially reduce biofilm formation via antagonism of QS or QS-related pathways. This study highlights the potential for a non-antimicrobial-based strategy, focused on AI-2 cell-cell signalling, to control the development of dental plaque. Considering that many bacterial species use AI-2 cell-cell signalling, as well as the increased concern of the use of antimicrobials in healthcare products, such an anti-biofilm approach could also be used to control biofilms in environments beyond the human oral cavity. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Effects of amine fluoride on biofilm growth and salivary pellicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Mei, H C; Engels, E; de Vries, J; Busscher, H J

    2008-01-01

    The amine fluoride (AmF) N'-octadecyl-trimethylene-diamine-N,N,N'-tris(2-ethanol)-dihydro-fluoride is a cationic antimicrobial which can have beneficial effects on plaque formation. Here, we determine changes in pellicle and bacterial cell surface properties of the strains Actinomyces naeslundii HM1, Streptococcus mutans NS, S.mutans ATCC 700610, S. sobrinus HG1025 and S. oralis HM1 upon adsorption of this AmF and accompanying effects on bacterial adhesion and biofilm growth. In vitro pellicles had a zeta potential of -12 mV that became less negative upon adsorption of AmF. The chemical functionalities in which carbon and oxygen were involved changed after AmF adsorption and AmF-treated pellicles had a greater surface roughness than untreated pellicles. Water contact angles in vitro decreased from 56 to 45 degrees upon AmF treatment, which corresponded with water contact angles (44 degrees ) measured intraorally on the front incisors of volunteers immediately after using an AmF-containing toothpaste. All bacterial strains were negatively charged and their isoelectric points (IEP) increased upon AmF adsorption. Minimal inhibitory concentrations were smallest for strains exhibiting the largest increase in IEP. Adhesion to salivary pellicles and biofilm growth of the mutans streptococcal strains were significantly reduced after AmF treatment, but not of A. naeslundii or S. oralis. However, regardless of the strain involved, biofilm viability decreased significantly after AmF treatment. The electrostatic interaction between cationic AmF and negatively charged bacterial cell surfaces is pivotal in establishing reduced biofilm formation by AmF through a combination of effects on initial adhesion and killing. The major effect of AmF treatment, however, was a reduction brought about in biofilm viability.

  4. Effect of an essential oil-containing dentifrice on dental plaque microbial composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, C H; Vincent, J W; Borycheski, L; Amatnieks, Y; Sarina, M; Qaqish, J; Proskin, H M

    2000-09-01

    To determine the effect of 6 months use of an essential oil-containing (EO) antiplaque/antigingivitis fluoride dentifrice on the balance of the oral microbial flora and on the emergence of resistant microbial forms by analysis of dental plaque and saliva. The dentifrice essential oils consisted of a fixed combination of thymol, menthol, methyl salicylate, and eucalyptol. An identical fluoride-containing dentifrice without the essential oils served as the control. A subgroup of 66 subjects from a clinical trial population of 321 was randomly selected for characterization of their dental plaque microflora. Saliva was also cultured to monitor for the emergence of opportunistic pathogens. Supragingival plaque and saliva were harvested at baseline, after which subjects received a dental prophylaxis. Subjects were sampled again after 3 and 6 months of product use prior to clinical examination. Plaque was characterized for microbial content by phase contrast microscopy for recognizable cellular morphotypes and by cultivation on nonselective and selective culture media. Determination of the minimum inhibitory concentrations of the test agent against selected Actinomyces and Veillonella isolated bacterial species was conducted at all time points to monitor for the potential development of bacterial resistance. There were no statistically significant differences between the microbial flora obtained from subjects using the essential oil-containing dentifrice and the vehicle control for all parameters and time periods except for the percentage of spirochetes at 6 months and for percentage of "other" microorganisms at 3 months. The EO group exhibited a lower adjusted mean for both parameters. Additionally, there was no evidence of the development of bacterial resistance to the antimicrobial activity of the essential oils or the emergence of opportunistic pathogens.

  5. Cymbopogon citratus essential oil: effect on polymicrobial caries-related biofilm with low cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alcionéia Carvalho de OLIVEIRA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of Cymbopogon citratus essential oil and its main compound (citral against primary dental colonizers and caries-related species. Chemical characterization of the essential oil was performed by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS, and the main compound was determined. Antimicrobial activity was tested against Actinomyces naeslundii, Lactobacillus acidophilus, S. gordonii, S. mitis, S. mutans, S. sanguinis and S. sobrinus. Minimum inhibitory and bactericide concentrations were determined by broth microdilution assay for streptococci and lactobacilli reference, and for clinical strains. The effect of the essential oil on bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation/disruption was investigated. Negative (without treatment and positive controls (chlorhexidine were used. The effect of citral on preformed biofilm was also tested using the same methodology. Monospecies and microcosm biofilms were tested. ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used (α=0.05. Cytotoxicity of the essential oil to human keratinocytes was performed by MTT assay. GC/MS demonstrated one major component (citral. The essential oil showed an inhibitory effect on all tested bacterial species, including S. mutans and L. acidophilus. Essential oil of C. citratus (10X MIC reduced the number of viable cells of lactobacilli and streptococci biofilms (p < 0.05. The essential oil inhibited adhesion of caries-related polymicrobial biofilm to dental enamel (p < 0.01. Citral significantly reduced the number of viable cells of streptococci biofilm (p < 0.001. The essential oil showed low cytotoxicity to human keratinocytes. Based on these findings, this study can contribute to the development of new formulations for products like mouthwash, against dental biofilms.

  6. Salivary biomarkers for dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoli; Jiang, Shan; Koh, David; Hsu, Chin-Ying Stephen

    2016-02-01

    As a highly prevalent multifactorial disease, dental caries afflicts a large proportion of the world's population. As teeth are constantly bathed in saliva, the constituents and properties of this oral fluid play an essential role in the occurrence and progression of dental caries. Various inorganic (water and electrolytes) and organic (proteins and peptides) components may protect teeth from dental caries. This occurs via several functions, such as clearance of food debris and sugar, aggregation and elimination of microorganisms, buffering actions to neutralize acid, maintaining supersaturation with respect to tooth mineral, participation in formation of the acquired pellicle and antimicrobial defense. Modest evidence is available on the associations between dental caries and several salivary parameters, including flow rate, buffering capacity and abundance of mutans streptococci. Despite some controversial findings, the main body of the literature supports an elevated caries prevalence and/or incidence among people with a pathologically low saliva flow rate, compromised buffering capacity and early colonization or high titer of mutans streptococci in saliva. The evidence remains weak and/or inconsistent on the association between dental caries and other saliva parameters, such as other possible cariogenic species (Lactobacillus spp., Streptococcus sanguis group, Streptococcus salivarius, Actinomyces spp. and Candida albicans), diversity of saliva microbiomes, inorganic and organic constituents (electrolytes, immunoglobulins, other proteins and peptides) and some functional properties (sugar clearance rate, etc.). The complex interactions between salivary components and functions suggest that saliva has to be considered in its entirety to account for its total effects on teeth. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Binding of 18F by cell membranes and cell walls of Streptococcus mutans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yotis, W.W.; Zeb, M.; McNulty, J.; Kirchner, F.; Reilly, C.; Glendenin, L.

    1983-01-01

    The binding of 18 F to isolated cell membranes and cell walls of Streptococcus mutans GS-5 or other bacteria was assayed. The attachment of 18 F to these cell envelopes proceeded slowly and reached equilibrium within 60 min. 18 F binding was stimulated by Ca 2+ (1 mM). The binding of 18 F to cellular components was dependent upon the pH, as well as the amount of 18 F and dose of the binder employed. The binding of 18 F by cell walls prepared from fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-resistant cells of S. salivarius and S. mutans did not differ significantly. The pretreatment of cell walls or cell membranes for 60 min at 30 degrees C with 1 mg of RNase, DNase, or trypsin per ml did not influence the binding of 18 F by the walls and membranes of S. mutans GS-5. However, prior exposure of cell membranes to sodium dodecyl sulfate caused a significant reduction in the number of 18 F atoms bound by the membranes. In saturated assay systems, cell membranes of S. mutans GS-5 bound 10(15) to 10(16) atoms of 18 F per mg (dry weight), whereas cell walls from S. mutans GS-5, FA-1, and HS-6 or Actinomyces viscosus T14V and T14AV bound 10(12) to 10(13) atoms of 18 F per mg (dry weight). 18 F in this quantity (10(12) to 10(13) atoms) cannot be detected with the fluoride electrode. The data provide, for the first time, a demonstration of 18 F binding by cell membranes and walls of oral flora

  8. Serum IgG antibody levels to periodontal microbiota are associated with incident Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, James M; Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Celenti, Romanita S; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Wright, Clinton B; Schupf, Nicole; Papapanou, Panos N

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis and Alzheimer disease (AD) are associated with systemic inflammation. This research studied serum IgG to periodontal microbiota as possible predictors of incident AD. Using a case-cohort study design, 219 subjects (110 incident AD cases and 109 controls without incident cognitive impairment at last follow-up), matched on race-ethnicity, were drawn from the Washington Heights-Inwood Columbia Aging Project (WHICAP), a cohort of longitudinally followed northern Manhattan residents aged >65 years. Mean follow-up was five years (SD 2.6). In baseline sera, serum IgG levels were determined for bacteria known to be positively or negatively associated with periodontitis (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4, Treponema denticola, Campylobacter rectus, Eubacterium nodatum, and Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies-2). In all analyses, we used antibody threshold levels shown to correlate with presence of moderate-severe periodontitis. Mean age was 72 years (SD 6.9) for controls, and 79 years (SD 4.6) for cases (pthe sample. In a model adjusting for baseline age, sex, education, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, smoking, prior history of stroke, and apolipoprotein E genotype, high anti-A. naeslundii titer (>640 ng/ml, present in 10% of subjects) was associated with increased risk of AD (HR = 2.0, 95%CI: 1.1-3.8). This association was stronger after adjusting for other significant titers (HR = 3.1, 95%CI: 1.5-6.4). In this model, high anti-E. nodatum IgG (>1755 ng/ml; 19% of subjects) was associated with lower risk of AD (HR = 0.5, 95%CI: 0.2-0.9). Serum IgG levels to common periodontal microbiota are associated with risk for developing incident AD.

  9. Antibacterial activity of Tribulus terrestris and its synergistic effect with Capsella bursa-pastoris and Glycyrrhiza glabra against oral pathogens: an in-vitro study

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    Saman Soleimanpour

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, antimicrobial activities of an ethanol extract of Tribulus terrestris aloneand in combination with Capsella bursa-pastoris and Glycyrrhiza glabra were examined in vitro against six pathogens namely Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, Actinomyces viscosus, Enterococcus faecalis Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli. Materials and methods: Antibacterial activities of the extracts were examined using disc and well diffusion methods and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC of ethanol extracts were determined against these microorganisms using agar and broth dilution methods. Chlorhexidine was used as positive control. Results: Tribulus terrestris extract exhibited good antibacterial activity against all bacteria. Antibacterial activity of mixed extract was evaluated and exhibited that mixed extract was more effective against all bacteria than any of the cases alone which indicates the synergistic effect between these three extracts (p˂0.05. No strain showed resistance against these extracts. In agar dilution, Tribulus terrestris exhibited MIC values ranging from 35.0 to 20.0 mg/ml and mixed extract showed MIC values ranging from 12.5 to 5.0 mg/ml. The results of broth dilution method were consistent with the findings of the agar dilution method. Conclusion: This in-vitro study was a preliminary evaluation of antibacterial activity of the plants. It provided scientific evidence to support uses of T. terrestris and its mixture with C. bursa-pastoris and G. glabra for the treatment of oral infections. In-vivo studies are also required to better evaluate the effect of these extracts.

  10. Morphologic characterization of Mycobacterium marinum by neutron radiographic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Jaqueline Michele da; Crispim, Verginia Reis; Silva, Marlei Gomes da

    2011-01-01

    The genus Mycobacterium shares many characteristics with the genera Corynebacterium and Actinomyces, among which, similar genome content of bases Guanine-Cytosine and the production of branched long-chain fatty acids called mycolic acids should be enhanced. Mycobacteria are strict aerobic, considered weakly Gram-positive, rod-shaped microorganisms, not possessing flagella. They are intracellular infecting and proliferating in the interior of macrophages, they do not form spores, produce toxins or have capsule. Optimal growth temperature and rate are variable. The genus encompasses approximately 120 known species; however, the present study focuses the characterization of Mycobacterium marinum. This species is generally pathogenic causing deep skin infections. Colonies grow slowly at temperatures around 37 degree C. The aim of this study is to speed the process of M. Marinum morphologic characterization and, in the future, apply it to other species of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM. In relation to conventional microbiologic essays that usually demand 28 days for colony growth, nuclear testing, using the neutron radiography technique, prove to be much faster. The samples were initially sterilized at the Mycobacteria Laboratory/IMPPG/UFRJ using hypochlorite solution, gluta + formaldehyde and warmed distilled water, according conventional protocols. Then, they were incubated with sodium borate, deposited over CR-39 sheets, fixed with casein (only the first and third sample) and irradiated with a thermal neutron beam generated at the J-9 channel of the Argonauta reactor from the IEN/CNEN. To this end, the following parameters were optimized: incubation time, irradiation time and CR-39 developing time. The images registered in CR-39 were visualized with the help of a Nikon E-400 optical microscope and captured with a Cool pix 995 digital camera. The results showed that the technique produces enlarged images, making it easier the morphologic characterization of

  11. Cutaneous Nocardiosis Simulating Cutaneous Lymphatic Sporotrichosis

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    Pedro Secchin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is the subcutaneous mycosis caused by several species of the Sporothrix genus. With worldwide occurrence, the State of Rio de Janeiro is presently undergoing a zoonotic sporotrichosis epidemic. The form of lymphocutaneous nocardiosis is rare, being caused especially by Nocardia brasiliensis. It appears as a nodular or ulcerated lesion, with multiple painful erythematous nodules or satellite pustules distributed along the lymphatic tract, similar to the lymphocutaneous variant of sporotrichosis. We present a 61-year-old man who, after an insect bite in the left leg, developed an ulcerated lesion associated with ascending lymphangitis, nonresponsive to previous antibiotic therapies. The patient was admitted for investigation, based on the main diagnostic hypothesis of lymphatic cutaneous sporotrichosis entailed by the highly suggestive morphology, associated with the epidemiologic information that he is a resident of the city of Rio de Janeiro. While culture results were being awaited, the patient was medicated with sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim to cover CA-MRSA and evolved with total healing of the lesions. After hospital discharge, using an ulcer fragment, an Actinomyces sp. was cultivated and N. brasiliensis was identified by molecular biology. The objective of this report is to demonstrate a case of lymphocutaneous nocardiosis caused by N. brasiliensis after a probable insect bite. Despite the patient being a resident of the State of Rio de Janeiro (endemic region for sporotrichosis, it is highlighted that it is necessary to be aware of the differential diagnoses of an ulcerated lesion with lymphangitis, favoring an early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of the illness.

  12. Comparison of the in vivo antimicrobial effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine used as root canal irrigants: a molecular microbiology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rôças, Isabela N; Siqueira, José F

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this clinical study was to compare the antimicrobial effects of 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and 0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) when used as irrigants during treatment of teeth with apical periodontitis. Forty-seven single-rooted single-canal teeth with necrotic pulps and asymptomatic apical periodontitis were selected for this study according to stringent inclusion/exclusion criteria. Bacterial samples were taken at the baseline (S1) and after (S2) chemomechanical preparation using 2.5% NaOCl (n = 30) or 0.12% CHX (n = 17) as the irrigant. Bacterial, archaeal, and fungal presence was evaluated by broad-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR), whereas bacterial identifications were performed by a closed-ended reverse-capture checkerboard approach targeting 28 candidate endodontic pathogens. All S1 samples were PCR positive for bacterial presence but negative for both archaea and fungi. Both NaOCl- and CHX-based protocols were significantly effective in reducing the bacterial levels and number of taxa. No significant differences were observed between them in all tested parameters including the incidence of negative PCR results in S2 (40% for NaOCl vs 47% for CHX, p = 0.8), reduction in the number of taxa per canal (p = 0.3), and reduction in the bacterial levels (p = 0.07). The most prevalent taxa in S2 samples from the NaOCl group were Propionibacterium acnes, Streptococcus species, Porphyromonas endodontalis, and Selenomonas sputigena. In the CHX group, the most prevalent taxa in S2 were Dialister invisus, Actinomyces israelii, Prevotella baroniae, Propionibacterium acidifaciens, and Streptococcus species. Treatment protocols using irrigation with either NaOCl or CHX succeeded in significantly reducing the the number of bacterial taxa and their levels in infected root canals, with no significant difference between these substances. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A cross-sectional survey of bacterial species in plaque from client owned dogs with healthy gingiva, gingivitis or mild periodontitis.

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    Ian J Davis

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is the most widespread oral disease in dogs which if left untreated results in significant pain to the pet and loss of dentition. The objective of this study was to identify bacterial species in canine plaque that are significantly associated with health, gingivitis and mild periodontitis (<25% attachment loss. In this survey subgingival plaque samples were collected from 223 dogs with healthy gingiva, gingivitis and mild periodontitis with 72 to 77 samples per health status. DNA was extracted from the plaque samples and subjected to PCR amplification of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rDNA. Pyrosequencing of the PCR amplicons identified a total of 274 operational taxonomic units after bioinformatic and statistical analysis. Porphyromonas was the most abundant genus in all disease stages, particularly in health along with Moraxella and Bergeyella. Peptostreptococcus, Actinomyces, and Peptostreptococcaceae were the most abundant genera in mild periodontitis. Logistic regression analysis identified species from each of these genera that were significantly associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis. Principal component analysis showed distinct community profiles in health and disease. The species identified show some similarities with health and periodontal disease in humans but also major differences. In contrast to human, healthy canine plaque was found to be dominated by Gram negative bacterial species whereas Gram positive anaerobic species predominate in disease. The scale of this study surpasses previously published research and enhances our understanding of the bacterial species present in canine subgingival plaque and their associations with health and early periodontal disease.

  14. An In Vitro Assessment of Antimicrobial and Cytotoxic Effects of Nanosilver

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    Rokhsareh Sadeghi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles has been investigated in medical fields in recent years, but there are few studies regarding its effect on oral microorganisms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial and toxicity properties of nanosilver against two dental plaque microorganisms  and Human Gin- gival Fibroblast (HGF cell line.Methods: Antibacterial effects of nanosilver colloidal solution were de-termined by minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimal bacte- ricidal   concentration   (MBC   using  microdilution   method.   Standard strains of Streptococcus sanguis and Actinomyces viscosus were used. For toxicity assessment,  MTT  and LDH  tests were performed  under  con- trolled conditions. Different concentrations of nanosilver were prepared and their toxic effects  on HGF were determined  after 24, 48 and 72 hours.Results: The MIC of nanosilver solution for S. sanguis and A. viscosuswere 16 and 4 µ g/ml, respectively. The MBC of nanosilver was 64 µ g/ml for S. sanguis and 16 µ g/ml for A. viscosus. MTT results showed that after 24 hours the concentrations of ≥ 0.5 µ g/ml of nanosilver solution affected cell viability when compared with control group. After 48 and 72 hours only the concentration of  ≥ 5 µ g/ml showed significant effect on cultured cell viability. LDH release test demonstrated toxic effect only after 48, 72 hours by 20 and 50 µ g/ml of nanosilver.Conclusion: The results demonstrated that beside its antibacterial activityagainst S. sanguis and A. viscosus, nanosilver mediated a concentration and time dependent cytotoxicity on HGF.

  15. Fournier’s Gangrene: Clinical Presentation of 13 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzaka, Bolesław; Borkowski, Tomasz; Kawecki, Dariusz; Kuzaka, Piotr; Młynarczyk, Grażyna; Radziszewski, Piotr

    2018-01-01

    Background Fournier’s gangrene (FG) is a fulminant form of infective, polymicrobial, necrotizing fasciitis of the perineal, genital, and perianal regions. It commonly affects men, but women and children may also develop this type of tissue necrosis. Material/Methods This study is a retrospective analysis of the management of 13 cases of Fournier’s gangrene, diagnosed from among about 45 000 patients (men, women, and children) treated in the Department of General, Oncological, and Functional Urology (Medical University of Warsaw) from 1995 to 2013. All patients with Fournier’s gangrene underwent adequate surgical debridement of the necrotic tissues. Additional procedures (suprapubic cystostomy and orchiectomy) were necessary in 10 out of 13 (77.0%) patients. Seven out of 13 (53.8%) patients required subsequent reconstructive surgery of the scrotum. Results All 13 patients were males, with a median age of 59.6 years (range: 42–68 years). The average hospital stay was 31.9 days (range: 16–46 days). None of our patients died due to Fournier’s gangrene. Bacteriological cultures of samples from the wounds showed polymicrobial flora, including the following genera of aerobes and anaerobes: Escherichia, Proteus, Klebsiella, Moraxella, Gemella, Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Bacteroides, Pseudoflavonifractor, Parabacteroides, Porphyromonas, Prevotella, Peptoniphilus, Peptostreptococcus, Actinomyces, Collinsella, and Lactobacillus. Conclusions Favorable outcome of FG treatment with low morbidity and no mortality can be achieved with rapid diagnosis, urgent surgical debridement of all necrotic tissues, and broad-spectrum empirical antimicrobial therapy, usually with combined antibiotics, against aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Prevention of uroseptic shock by treating localized infection is compulsory. PMID:29374769

  16. Bacteriome and mycobiome associations in oral tongue cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Pranab K; Wang, Hannah; Retuerto, Mauricio; Zhang, Huan; Burkey, Brian; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A; Eng, Charis

    2017-11-14

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral (mobile) tongue (OMTC), a non-human papilloma virus-associated oral cancer, is rapidly increasing without clear etiology. Poor oral hygiene has been associated with oral cancers, suggesting that oral bacteriome (bacterial community) and mycobiome (fungal community) could play a role. While the bacteriome is increasingly recognized as an active participant in health, the role of the mycobiome has not been studied in OMTC. Tissue DNA was extracted from 39 paired tumor and adjacent normal tissues from patients with OMTC. Microbiome profiling, principal coordinate, and dissimilarity index analyses showed bacterial diversity and richness, and fungal richness, were significantly reduced in tumor tissue (TT) compared to their matched non-tumor tissues (NTT, P <0.006). Firmicutes was the most abundant bacterial phylum, which was significantly increased in TT compared to NTT (48% vs. 40%, respectively; P =0.004). Abundance of Bacteroidetes and Fusobacteria were significantly decreased in TT compared to matched NTT ( P ≤0.003 for both). Abundance of 22 bacterial and 7 fungal genera was significantly different between the TT and NTT, including Streptococcus , which was the most abundant and significantly increased in the tumor group (34% vs. 22%, P <0.001). Abundance of fungal genus Aspergillus in TT correlated negatively with bacteria ( Actinomyces, Prevotella , Streptococcus) , but positively with Aggregatibacter . Patients with high T-stage disease had lower mean differences between TT and NTT compared with patients with low T-stage disease (0.07 vs. 0.21, P =0.04). Our results demonstrate differences in bacteriome and mycobiome between OMTC and their matched normal oral epithelium, and their association with T-stage.

  17. Cloning and Characterization of an Endoglucanase Gene from sp. Korean Native Goat 40

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    Sung Chan Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A gene from Actinomyces sp. Korean native goat (KNG 40 that encodes an endo-β-1,4-glucanase, EG1, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli DH5α. Recombinant plasmid DNA from a positive clone with a 3.2 kb insert hydrolyzing carboxyl methyl-cellulose (CMC was designated as pDS3. The entire nucleotide sequence was determined, and an open-reading frame (ORF was deduced. The ORF encodes a polypeptide of 684 amino acids. The recombinant EG1 produced in E. coli DH5α harboring pDS3 was purified in one step using affinity chromatography on crystalline cellulose and characterized. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/zymogram analysis of the purified enzyme revealed two protein bands of 57.1 and 54.1 kDa. The amino terminal sequences of these two bands matched those of the deduced ones, starting from residue 166 and 208, respectively. Putative signal sequences, a Shine–Dalgarno-type ribosomal binding site, and promoter sequences related to the consensus sequences were deduced. EG1 has a typical tripartite structure of cellulase, a catalytic domain, a serine-rich linker region, and a cellulose-binding domain. The optimal temperature for the activity of the purified enzyme was 55°C, but it retained over 90% of maximum activity in a broad temperature range (40°C to 60°C. The optimal pH for the enzyme activity was 6.0. Kinetic parameters, Km and Vmax of rEG1 were 0.39% CMC and 143 U/mg, respectively.

  18. Anaerobic bacteria in wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyprowski, Marcin; Stobnicka-Kupiec, Agata; Ławniczek-Wałczyk, Anna; Bakal-Kijek, Aleksandra; Gołofit-Szymczak, Małgorzata; Górny, Rafał L

    2018-03-28

    The objective of this study was to assess exposure to anaerobic bacteria released into air from sewage and sludge at workplaces from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Samples of both sewage and sludge were collected at six sampling points and bioaerosol samples were additionally collected (with the use of a 6-stage Andersen impactor) at ten workplaces covering different stages of the technological process. Qualitative identification of all isolated strains was performed using the biochemical API 20A test. Additionally, the determination of Clostridium pathogens was carried out using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The average concentration of anaerobic bacteria in the sewage samples was 5.49 × 10 4 CFU/mL (GSD = 85.4) and in sludge-1.42 × 10 6 CFU/g (GSD = 5.1). In turn, the average airborne bacterial concentration was at the level of 50 CFU/m 3 (GSD = 5.83) and the highest bacterial contamination (4.06 × 10 3  CFU/m 3 ) was found in winter at the bar screens. In total, 16 bacterial species were determined, from which the predominant strains belonged to Actinomyces, Bifidobacterium, Clostridium, Propionibacterium and Peptostreptococcus genera. The analysis revealed that mechanical treatment processes were responsible for a substantial emission of anaerobic bacteria into the air. In both the sewage and air samples, Clostridium perfringens pathogen was identified. Anaerobic bacteria were widely present both in the sewage and in the air at workplaces from the WWTP, especially when the technological process was performed in closed spaces. Anaerobic bacteria formed small aggregates with both wastewater droplets and dust particles of sewage sludge origin and as such may be responsible for adverse health outcomes in exposed workers.

  19. Oral microbiota species in acute apical endodontic abscesses

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    Noelle George

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Acute apical abscesses are serious endodontic diseases resulting from pulpal infection with opportunistic oral microorganisms. The objective of this study was to identify and compare the oral microbiota in patients (N=18 exhibiting acute apical abscesses, originating from the demographic region in Portland, Oregon. The study hypothesis is that abscesses obtained from this demographic region may contain unique microorganisms not identified in specimens from other regions. Design: Endodontic abscesses were sampled from patients at the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU School of Dentistry. DNA from abscess specimens was subjected to polymerase chain reaction amplification using 16S rRNA gene-specific primers and Cy3-dCTP labeling. Labeled DNA was then applied to microbial microarrays (280 species generated by the Human Oral Microbial Identification Microarray Laboratory (Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA. Results: The most prevalent microorganisms, found across multiple abscess specimens, include Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, Megasphaera species clone CS025, Prevotella multisaccharivorax, Atopobium rimae, and Porphyromonas endodontalis. The most abundant microorganisms, found in highest numbers within individual abscesses, include F. nucleatum, P. micra, Streptococcus Cluster III, Solobacterium moorei, Streptococcus constellatus, and Porphyromonas endodontalis. Strong bacterial associations were identified between Prevotella multisaccharivorax, Acidaminococcaceae species clone DM071, Megasphaera species clone CS025, Actinomyces species clone EP053, and Streptococcus cristatus (all with Spearman coefficients >0.9. Conclusions: Cultivable and uncultivable bacterial species have been identified in endodontic abscesses obtained from the Portland, Oregon demographic region, and taxa identifications correlated well with other published studies, with the exception of Treponema and Streptococcus cristae, which

  20. Oral microbiota species in acute apical endodontic abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Noelle; Flamiatos, Erin; Kawasaki, Kellie; Kim, Namgu; Carriere, Charles; Phan, Brian; Joseph, Raphael; Strauss, Shay; Kohli, Richie; Choi, Dongseok; Baumgartner, J Craig; Sedgley, Christine; Maier, Tom; Machida, Curtis A

    2016-01-01

    Acute apical abscesses are serious endodontic diseases resulting from pulpal infection with opportunistic oral microorganisms. The objective of this study was to identify and compare the oral microbiota in patients (N=18) exhibiting acute apical abscesses, originating from the demographic region in Portland, Oregon. The study hypothesis is that abscesses obtained from this demographic region may contain unique microorganisms not identified in specimens from other regions. Endodontic abscesses were sampled from patients at the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) School of Dentistry. DNA from abscess specimens was subjected to polymerase chain reaction amplification using 16S rRNA gene-specific primers and Cy3-dCTP labeling. Labeled DNA was then applied to microbial microarrays (280 species) generated by the Human Oral Microbial Identification Microarray Laboratory (Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA). The most prevalent microorganisms, found across multiple abscess specimens, include Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, Megasphaera species clone CS025, Prevotella multisaccharivorax, Atopobium rimae, and Porphyromonas endodontalis. The most abundant microorganisms, found in highest numbers within individual abscesses, include F. nucleatum, P. micra, Streptococcus Cluster III, Solobacterium moorei, Streptococcus constellatus, and Porphyromonas endodontalis. Strong bacterial associations were identified between Prevotella multisaccharivorax, Acidaminococcaceae species clone DM071, Megasphaera species clone CS025, Actinomyces species clone EP053, and Streptococcus cristatus (all with Spearman coefficients >0.9). Cultivable and uncultivable bacterial species have been identified in endodontic abscesses obtained from the Portland, Oregon demographic region, and taxa identifications correlated well with other published studies, with the exception of Treponema and Streptococcus cristae, which were not commonly identified in endodontic abscesses between the

  1. [Microbiological analysis of terrestrial biotopes of the Antarctic region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashirev, A B; Romanovskaia, V A; Rokitko, P V; Shilin, S O; Chernaia, N A; Tashireva, A A

    2010-01-01

    Microbiological analysis has been made of 120 samples from biotopes of the western coast of the Antarctic peninsula (Rasmussen cope, Tuxen cope, Waugh mountain), Argentine archipelago islands (Galindez, Skua, Corner, Barchans, Irizar, Uruguay, Cluls, Three Little Pigs, King-George), as well as neighbouring islands (Petermann--on the north, a group of Jalour islands--on the east, Berthelot--on the south-east); and more remote islands (Darboux, Lippmann, Booth). It was found out that the total number of chemoorganotrophic aerobic microorganisms was 10(6) - 10(8) cells/g of soil, that was by 2-3 orders lower than in the regions with temperate climate. One can observe a tendency of decreasing the quantity of chemoorganotrophic microorganisms in the Antartic biotopes (cells/g of a sample) in the following order: soil (1 x 10(7) - 8 x 10(8)), underground part of moss (1 x 10(6) - 5 x 10(7)), grass Deschampsia antarctica (10(6) - 10(8), slit of fresh-water reservoir (10(5) - 10(7)), ground part of moss (10(3) - 10(6)), lichens (10(3) - 10(6)). Representatives of several phylogenetic lines: Proteobacteria (genera Pseudomonas, Methylobacterium, Enterobacter), Firmicutes (genera Bacillus, Staphylococcus), Actinobacteria (genera Brevibacterium, Actinomyces, Streptomyces) have been found in the Antarctic samples. As a rule, genera of bacteria found in the Antarctic Region are widely distributed in different regions of the Earth with temperate climate. Microorganisms similar to the species Exophiala nigra (Issatsch.) Haats et de Hoog 1999, which was first detected 100 years ago by Academician B.L. Isachenko in the Arctic region water, were also isolated from biofilms on vertical rocks of the Galindez Island as well as from the soil of the Irizar Island.

  2. [Anaerobic bacteria isolated from patients with suspected anaerobic infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercis, Serpil; Tunçkanat, Ferda; Hasçelik, Gülşen

    2005-10-01

    The study involved 394 clinical samples sent to the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory of Hacettepe University Adult Hospital between January 1997 and May 2004 for anaerobic cultivation. Since multiple cultures from the same clinical samples of the same patient were excluded, the study was carried on 367 samples. The anaerobic cultures were performed in anaerobic jar using AnaeroGen kits (Oxoid, Basingstoke, U.K.) or GENbox (bioMérieux, Lyon, France). The isolates were identified by both classical methods and "BBL Crystal System" (Becton Dickinson, U.S.A.). While no growth was detected in 120 (32.7%) of the clinical samples studied, in 144 samples (39.2%) only aerobes, in 28 (7.6%) only anaerobes and in 75 (20.5%) of the samples both aerobes and anaerobes were isolated. The number of the anaerobic isolates was 217 from 103 samples with anaerobic growth. Of these 103 samples 15 showed single bacterial growth whereas in 88 samples multiple bacterial isolates were detected. Anaerobic isolates consisted of 92 Gram negative bacilli (Bacteroides spp. 50, Prevotella spp. 14, Porphyromonas spp. 10, Fusobacterium spp. 7, Tisierella spp. 2, unidentified 9), 57 Gram positive bacilli (Clostridium spp.17, Propionibacterium spp. 16, Lactobacillus spp. 8, Actinomyces spp. 5, Eubacterium spp. 2, Bifidobacterium adolescentis 1, Mobiluncus mulieris 1, unidentified nonspore forming rods 7), 61 Gram positive cocci (anaerobic cocci 44, microaerophilic cocci 17), and 7 Gram negative cocci (Veillonella spp.). In conclusion, in the samples studied with prediagnosis of anaerobic infection, Bacteroides spp. (23%) were the most common bacteria followed by anaerobic Gram positive cocci (20.3%) and Clostridium spp (7.8%).

  3. Anaerobic bacteria colonizing the lower airways in lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybojad, Pawel; Los, Renata; Sawicki, Marek; Tabarkiewicz, Jacek; Malm, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Anaerobes comprise most of the endogenous oropharyngeal microflora, and can cause infections of airways in lung cancer patients who are at high risk for respiratory tract infections. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and species diversity of anaerobes in specimens from the lower airways of lung cancer patients. Sensitivity of the isolates to conventional antimicrobial agents used in anaerobe therapy was assessed. Respiratory secretions obtained by bronchoscopy from 30 lung cancer patients were cultured onto Wilkins-Chalgren agar in anaerobic conditions at 37°C for 72-96 hours. The isolates were identified using microtest Api 20A. The minimal inhibitory concentrations for penicillin G, amoxicillin/clavulanate, piperacillin/tazobactam, cefoxitin, imipenem, clindamycin, and metronidazole were determined by E-test. A total of 47 isolates of anaerobic bacteria were detected in 22 (73.3%) specimens. More than one species of anaerobe was found in 16 (53.3%) samples. The most frequently isolated were Actinomyces spp. and Peptostreptococcus spp., followed by Eubacterium lentum, Veillonella parvula, Prevotella spp., Bacteroides spp., Lactobacillus jensenii. Among antibiotics used in the study amoxicillin/clavulanate and imipenem were the most active in vitro (0% and 2% resistant strains, respectively). The highest resistance rate was found for penicillin G and metronidazole (36% and 38% resistant strains, respectively). The results obtained confirm the need to conduct analyses of anaerobic microflora colonizing the lower respiratory tract in patients with lung cancer to monitor potential etiologic factors of airways infections, as well as to propose efficient, empirical therapy.

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria in Ontario, 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand-Austin, Alex; Rawte, Prasad; Toye, Baldwin; Jamieson, Frances B; Farrell, David J; Patel, Samir N

    2014-08-01

    The local epidemiology of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in anaerobic bacteria is important in guiding the empiric treatment of infections. However, susceptibility data are very limited on anaerobic organisms, particularly among non-Bacteroides organisms. To determine susceptibility profiles of clinically-significant anaerobic bacteria in Ontario Canada, anaerobic isolates from sterile sites submitted to Public Health Ontario Laboratory (PHOL) for identification and susceptibility testing were included in this study. Using the E-test method, isolates were tested for various antimicrobials including, penicillin, cefoxitin, clindamycin, meropenem, piperacillin-tazobactam and metronidazole. The MIC results were interpreted based on guidelines published by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Of 2527 anaerobic isolates submitted to PHOL, 1412 were either from sterile sites or bronchial lavage, and underwent susceptibility testing. Among Bacteroides fragilis, 98.2%, 24.7%, 1.6%, and 1.2% were resistant to penicillin, clindamycin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and metronidazole, respectively. Clostridium perfringens was universally susceptible to penicillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and meropenem, whereas 14.2% of other Clostridium spp. were resistant to penicillin. Among Gram-positive anaerobes, Actinomyces spp., Parvimonas micra and Propionibacterium spp. were universally susceptible to β-lactams. Eggerthella spp., Collinsella spp., and Eubacterium spp. showed variable resistance to penicillin. Among Gram-negative anaerobes, Fusobacterium spp., Prevotella spp., and Veillonella spp. showed high resistance to penicillin but were universally susceptible to meropenem and piperacillin-tazobactam. The detection of metronidazole resistant B. fragilis is concerning as occurrence of these isolates is extremely rare. These data highlight the importance of ongoing surveillance to provide clinically relevant information to clinicians for empiric management of

  5. Anaerobic bacteria colonizing the lower airways in lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Malm

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobes comprise most of the endogenous oropharyngeal microflora, and can cause infections of airways in lung cancer patients who are at high risk for respiratory tract infections. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and species diversity of anaerobes in specimens from the lower airways of lung cancer patients. Sensitivity of the isolates to conventional antimicrobial agents used in anaerobe therapy was assessed. Respiratory secretions obtained by bronchoscopy from 30 lung cancer patients were cultured onto Wilkins- -Chalgren agar in anaerobic conditions at 37°C for 72–96 hours. The isolates were identified using microtest Api 20A. The minimal inhibitory concentrations for penicillin G, amoxicillin/clavulanate, piperacillin/tazobactam, cefoxitin, imipenem, clindamycin, and metronidazole were determined by E-test. A total of 47 isolates of anaerobic bacteria were detected in 22 (73.3% specimens. More than one species of anaerobe was found in 16 (53.3% samples. The most frequently isolated were Actinomyces spp. and Peptostreptococcus spp., followed by Eubacterium lentum, Veillonella parvula, Prevotella spp., Bacteroides spp., Lactobacillus jensenii. Among antibiotics used in the study amoxicillin/clavulanate and imipenem were the most active in vitro (0% and 2% resistant strains, respectively. The highest resistance rate was found for penicillin G and metronidazole (36% and 38% resistant strains, respectively. The results obtained confirm the need to conduct analyses of anaerobic microflora colonizing the lower respiratory tract in patients with lung cancer to monitor potential etiologic factors of airways infections, as well as to propose efficient, empirical therapy. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 2, pp. 263–266

  6. Oral associated bacterial infection in horses: studies on the normal anaerobic flora from the pharyngeal tonsillar surface and its association with lower respiratory tract and paraoral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, G D; Love, D N

    1991-02-15

    Two hundred and seventy bacterial isolates were obtained from the pharyngeal tonsillar surface of 12 normal horses and 98 obligatory anaerobic bacteria were characterised. Of these, 57 isolates belonging to 7 genera (Peptostreptococcus (1); Eubacterium (9); Clostridium (6); Veillonella (6); Megasphera (1); Bacteroides (28); Fusobacterium (6)) were identified, and 16 of these were identified to species level (P. anaerobius (1); E. fossor (9); C. villosum (1); B. fragilis (1); B. tectum (2); B. heparinolyticus (2)). Three hundred and twenty isolates were obtained from 23 samples from horses with lower respiratory tract (LRT) or paraoral (PO) bacterial infections. Of the 143 bacteria selected for detailed characterisation, obligate anaerobes accounted for 100 isolates, facultative anaerobes for 42 isolates and obligate aerobes for one isolate. Phenotypic characterisation separated 99 of the isolates into 14 genera. Among the obligately anaerobic species, Gram-positive cocci including P. anaerobius comprised 25% of isolates, E. fossor 11% and other Gram-positive rods (excluding Clostridium sp.) 18% of isolates. The Gram-negative rods comprised B. fragilis 5%, B. heparinolyticus 5%, asaccharolytic pigmented Bacteroides 3% and other Bacteroides 13%, while a so-far unnamed species of Fusobacterium (7%), and Gram-negative corroding rods (3%) were isolated. Among the facultatively anaerobic isolates, S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus accounted for 31% of isolates, followed by Pasteurella spp. 19%, Escherichia coli 17%, Actinomyces spp. 9%, Streptococcus spp. 9%. Incidental facultative isolates were Enterococcus spp. 2%, Enterobacter cloaceae 2%, Actinobacillus spp. 2% and Gram-negative corroding rods 5%. On the basis of the similarities (as determined by DNA hybridization data and/or phenotypic characteristics) of some of the bacterial species (e.g. E. fossor and B. heparinolyticus) isolated from both the normal pharyngeal tonsillar surfaces and LRT and PO diseases of horses, it

  7. Supragingival Microbial Profiles of Permanent and Deciduous Teeth in Children with Mixed Dentition.

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    Weihua Shi

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate the microbial profiles of teeth in different locations in mixed-dentition-stage children, and to compare the microbiomes of permanent and deciduous teeth in the same healthy oral cavity.Supragingival plaque samples of teeth in various locations-the first permanent molars, deciduous molars, deciduous canines and incisors and permanent incisors-were collected from 20 healthy mixed-dentition-stage children with 10-12 permanent teeth erupted. Plaque DNA was extracted, and the V3-V4 hypervariable region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene was amplified and subjected to sequencing.On average, 18,051 high-quality sequences per sample were generated. Permanent tooth sites tended to host more diverse bacterial communities than those of deciduous tooth sites. A total of 12 phyla, 21 classes, 38 orders, 66 families, 74 genera were detected ultimately. Five predominant phyla (Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria and Actinobacteria were highly variable among sites. Of 26 genera with a mean relative abundance of >0.1%, 16 showed significant differences in relative abundance among the groups. More than 20% of the total operational taxonomical units were detected only in permanent or deciduous teeth. The variation in the microbial community composition was due mainly to permanent teeth being enriched in Actinomyces and deciduous teeth in Treponema. The core microbiome of supragingival plaque in mixed dentition comprised 19 genera with complex correlationships.Our results suggest differences in microbial diversity and composition between permanent and deciduous teeth sites in mixed dentition. Moreover, the core microbiome of these sites was determined. These findings enhance our understanding of the development of the native oral microbiota with age.

  8. Effects of Wheat and Faba Bean Intercropping on Microorganism Involved in Nitrogen Transformation in the Rhizosphere Soils

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    TANG Yan-fen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil microorganism is one of the key factors that affects soil ecological activity. It is an important symbol of soil health, and the soil nitrogen cycle is closely related to the microorganisms. The relationship between nitrogen and microorganisms under the intercropping is im-portant for the farmland ecosystem. In this paper, phospholipid fatty acids(PLFA analysis was used to determine soil microbial communi-ties, e.g., biomasses of anaerobic bacteria, aerobic bacteria, bacteria, fungi and actinobacteria. The abundance of nitrifying genes(AOB, AOA and three denitrifying genes (nirK, norB, nosZ were measured using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The enzymes, nitrate and ammonium concentrations were measured using conventional methods. The results showed that along with the growth period, the TPLFAs(total phospholipid fatty acids increased and the bacterias, fungus, actinomyces and aerobic bacterias significantly(P<0.05 dif-fered between intercropping and monoculture. The greater abundance of AOB than AOA and the variation range of 105~106 were observed in all samples. The gene copies of norB and nosZ were pronounced by intercropping in the rhizosphere of faba bean at elongation and heading stages, respectively. The abundance of nirK remarkably(P<0.05differed between intercropping and monoculture. In intercropping rhizo-sphere, the contents of NO3--N were lower than monoculture, while the NH4+-N contents were converse (P<0.05. Conclusively, wheat and fa-ba bean intercropping system could change rhizosphere microenvironment, and then the microbial community structure in the soils, which would facilitate the conservation and supplying of soil nitrogen and reduce the nitrogen loss and pollution under the intercropping conditions to some extent. This might be the nitrogen nutrition mechanism for the overyielding of wheat and faba bean intercropping system.

  9. Complete structure of the polysaccharide from Streptococcus sanguis J22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abeygunawardana, C.; Bush, C.A.; Cisar, J.O.

    1990-01-01

    The cell wall polysaccharides of certain oral streptococci such as Streptococcus sanguis strains 34 and J22, although immunologically distinct, act as receptors for the fimbrial lectins of Actinomyces viscosus T14V. The authors report the complete covalent structure of the polysaccharide from S. sanguis J22 which is composed of a heptasaccharide subunit linked by phosphodiester bonds. The repeating subunit, which contains α-GalNAc, α-rhamnose, β-rhamnose, β-glucose, and β-galactose all in the pyranoside form and β-galactofuranose, is compared with the previously published structure of the polysaccharide from strain 34. The structure has been determined almost exclusively by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance methods. The 1 H and 13 C NMR spectra of the polysaccharides from both strains 34 and J22 have been completely assigned. The stereochemistry of pyranosides was assigned from J H-H values determined from phase-sensitive COSY spectra, and acetamido sugars were assigned by correlation of the resonances of the amide 1 H with the sugar ring protons. The 13 C spectra were assigned by 1 H-detected multiple-quantum correlation (HMQC) spectra, and the assignments were confirmed by 1 H-detected multiple-bond correlation (HMBC) spectra. The positions of the glycosidic linkages were assigned by detection of three-bond 1 H- 13 C correlation across the glycosidic linkage in the HMBC spectra. The positions of the phosphodiester linkages were determined by splittings observed in the 13 C resonances due to 31 P coupling and also by 1 H-detected 31 P correlation spectroscopy

  10. Quantitative assessment of salivary oral bacteria according to the severity of dental caries in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Natália H; Kreling, Paula F; Ribas, Laís F F; Pereira, Jesse A; Kressirer, Christine A; Klein, Marlise I; Tanner, Anne C R; Duque, Cristiane

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to assess differences in selected oral bacteria in children according to the severity of dental caries. One hundred and thirty-six children, 36-60 months old were divided into three groups according to caries status: caries-free (CF) (n=47), early childhood caries (ECC) (n=40) and severe-early childhood caries (S-ECC) (n=49). Saliva was collected for detection and quantification of selected oral streptococci, Actinomyces naeslundii, Lactobacillus spp., Bifidobacterium spp., and Scardovia wiggsiae by quantitative-polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that the detection and quantitative levels of S. mutans, S. sobrinus, Bifidobacterium spp. and S. wiggsiae were significantly higher in S-ECC children compared to CF and ECC children, while for S. salivarius were significantly higher in CF compared to ECC and S-ECC children. There was no statistical difference among the clinical groups for S. mitis, S. oralis, A. naeslundii and Lactobacillus spp. levels and detection. S-ECC children had a lower monthly family income, started tooth brushing later and were breastfeed for a longer duration compared to CF children. S. mutans levels were positively correlated with S. wiggsiae and Bifidobacterium spp. levels, lower mother's education and child bottle-feeding before sleeping and negatively correlated with S. salivarius. It was concluded that in addition to S. mutans, other bacterial species, including bifidobacteria, Scardovia wiggsiae and S. sobrinus, are associated with severity of early childhood caries, although their role in the progress of dental caries remains unclear. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Populações microbianas em solo agrícola sob aplicação de lodos de curtume Microbial populations affected by the soil disposal of tannery sludge

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    Luiz Ermindo Cavallet

    2008-12-01

    estado natural.Tannery residues are potential pollution sources in several regions of Brazil, mainly in the State of Rio Grande do Sul. One of the alternatives for the final destination of the sludge resulting from the waste water treatment of tanning industries is the disposal and recycling in the soil. To evaluate the effects of two waste types originated from primary treatment of tannery residual water on soil microbial populations, an open air pot experiment was carried out in a Paleudult soil with ten percent clay from Estância Velha, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, where several tannery industries are located. Mineral fertilization was compared to sludge application of 15, 30 and 60 t ha-1 of sludge originated either from tannin or Cr tanning agents. One treatment with cattle manure and a control were also included. Chromium soil, organic C concentrations, pH and bacteria, fungi and actinomyces populations were determined. Biological degradation was efficient for sludge with Cr up to 60 t ha-1 level and for tannin sludge up to 30 t ha-1 dose. Except for the sludge with Cr on the fungus population, the bacteria, fungi and actinomyces populations were stimulated by tannery sludge application. Due to the organic matter concentration in the soil, bacteria microbial populations were stimulated more than fungi and actinomyces. Chromium, pH and organic C increased as a result of the soil disposal of tannery sludges. The application of both tannery residues did not decrease the biological degradation process when compared to normal soil levels.

  12. UNILATERAL ACTINOMYCOTIC TUBO-OVARIAN ABSCESS COMPLICATED WITH CEREBRITIS – A CASE REPORT

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    Marina Jakimovska

    2018-02-01

    , Bacteroides capillosus and Anaerobic gram negative bacilli were isolated, sensitive to Metronidazol, Clindamycin, Imipenem and Amoksicilin with Clavulonic Acid. The definite diagnosis was tuboovarian abscess caused by actinomyces complicated with etiologically undeterminated cerebritis. Conclusions: Tuboovarian abscess in a postmenopausal woman as a cause for brain inflammation or abscess is an absolute rarity. Actinomyces species are not generally considered as a part of the normal vaginal flora but rather are associated with the presence of a foreign body, most often an IUD. It is a chronic supurative infection, with a tendency to form abscess. Pelvic actinomycosis is a rare bacterial disease in women (3. It is difficult to diagnose because of the non specific clinical symptoms and imaging findings. Treatment is not standardized and depends on the clinical form. Medical therapy is based on long-term Penicillin G (4. The prognosis of correctly treated pelvic actinomycosis is generally good (3, 4. Experiences with the infection of the CNS by Actinomyces showed that it is potentially fatal (5 and should be considered in those patients with cerebral abscesses or cerebral infection as evident from our case.

  13. Extracellular matrix influence in Streptococcus mutans gene expression in a cariogenic biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez Salamanca, E J; Klein, M I

    2018-04-01

    Caries etiology is biofilm-diet-dependent. Biofilms are highly dynamic and structured microbial communities enmeshed in a three-dimensional extracellular matrix. The study evaluated the expression dynamics of Streptococcus mutans genes associated with exopolysaccharides (EPS) (gtfBCD, gbpB, dexA), lipoteichoic acids (LTA) (dltABCD, SMU_775c) and extracellular DNA (eDNA) (lytST, lrgAB, ccpA) during matrix development within a mixed-species biofilm of S. mutans, Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus gordonii. Mixed-species biofilms using S. mutans strains UA159 or ΔgtfB formed on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite discs were submitted to a nutritional challenge (providing an abundance of sucrose and starch). Biofilms were removed at eight developmental stages for gene expression analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The pH of spent culture media remained acidic throughout the experimental periods, being lower after sucrose and starch exposure. All genes were expressed at all biofilm developmental phases. EPS- and LTA-associated genes had a similar expression profile for both biofilms, presenting lower levels of expression at 67, 91 and 115 hours and a peak of expression at 55 hours, but having distinct expression magnitudes, with lower values for ΔgtfB (eg, fold-difference of ~382 for gtfC and ~16 for dltB at 43 hours). The eDNA-associated genes presented different dynamics of expression between both strains. In UA159 biofilms lrgA and lrgB genes were highly expressed at 29 hours (which were ~13 and ~5.4 times vs ΔgtfB, respectively), whereas in ΔgtfB biofilms an inverse relationship between lytS and lrgA and lrgB expression was detected. Therefore, the deletion of gtfB influences dynamics and magnitude of expression of genes associated with matrix main components. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Protein synthesis in vitro by Micrococcus luteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farwell, M A; Rabinowitz, J C

    1991-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis and related gram-positive bacteria which have low to moderate genomic G + C contents are unable to efficiently translate mRNA derived from gram-negative bacteria, whereas Escherichia coli and other gram-negative bacteria are able to translate mRNA from both types of organisms. This phenomenon has been termed translational species specificity. Ribosomes from the low-G + C-content group (low-G + C group) of gram-positive organisms (B. subtilis and relatives) lack an equivalent to Escherichia ribosomal protein S1. The requirement for S1 for translation in E. coli (G. van Dieijen, P. H. van Knippenberg, J. van Duin, B. Koekman, and P. H. Pouwels, Mol. Gen. Genet. 153:75-80, 1977) and its specific role (A.R. Subramanian, Trends Biochem. Sci. 9:491-494, 1984) have been proposed. The group of gram-positive bacteria characterized by high genomic G + C content (formerly Actinomyces species and relatives) contain S1, in contrast to the low-G + C group (K. Mikulik, J. Smardova, A. Jiranova, and P. Branny, Eur. J. Biochem. 155:557-563, 1986). It is not known whether members of the high-G + C group are translationally specific, although there is evidence that one genus, Streptomyces, can express Escherichia genes in vivo (M. J. Bibb and S. N. Cohen, Mol. Gen. Genet. 187:265-277, 1985; J. L. Schottel, M. J. Bibb, and S. N. Cohen, J. Bacteriol. 146:360-368, 1981). In order to determine whether the organisms of this group are translationally specific, we examined the in vitro translational characteristics of a member of the high-G + C group, Micrococcus luteus, whose genomic G + C content is 73%. A semipurified coupled transcription-translation system of M. luteus translates Escherichia mRNA as well as Bacillus and Micrococcus mRNA. Therefore, M. luteus is translationally nonspecific and resembles E. coli rather than B. subtilis in its translational characteristics. Images PMID:2045372

  15. The Impact of Maltitol-Sweetened Chewing Gum on the Dental Plaque Biofilm Microbiota Composition

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    Bart J. F. Keijser

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The oral cavity harbors a complex microbial ecosystem, intimately related to oral health and disease. The use of polyol-sweetened gum is believed to benefit oral health through stimulation of salivary flow and impacting oral pathogenic bacteria. Maltitol is often used as sweetener in food products. This study aimed to establish the in vivo effects of frequent consumption of maltitol-sweetened chewing gum on the dental plaque microbiota in healthy volunteers and to establish the cellular and molecular effects by in vitro cultivation and transcriptional analysis.Results: An intervention study was performed in 153 volunteers, randomly assigned to three groups (www.trialregister.nl; NTR4165. One group was requested to use maltitol gum five times daily, one group used gum-base, and the third group did not use chewing gum. At day 0 and day 28, 24 h-accumulated supragingival plaque was collected at the lingual sites of the lower jaw and the buccal sites of the upper jaw and analyzed by 16S ribosomal rRNA gene sequencing. At day 42, 2 weeks after completion of the study, lower-jaw samples were collected and analyzed. The upper buccal plaque microbiota composition had lower bacterial levels and higher relative abundances of (facultative aerobic species compared to the lower lingual sites. There was no difference in bacterial community structure between any of the three study groups (PERMANOVA. Significant lower abundance of several bacterial phylotypes was found in maltitol gum group compared to the gum-base group, including Actinomyces massiliensis HOT 852 and Lautropia mirabilis HOT 022. Cultivation studies confirmed growth inhibition of A. massiliensis and A. johnsonii by maltitol at levels of 1% and higher. Transcriptome analysis of A. massiliensis revealed that exposure to maltitol resulted in changes in the expression of genes linked to osmoregulation, biofilm formation, and central carbon metabolism.Conclusion: The results showed that

  16. The Impact of Maltitol-Sweetened Chewing Gum on the Dental Plaque Biofilm Microbiota Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijser, Bart J F; van den Broek, Tim J; Slot, Dagmar E; van Twillert, Lodewic; Kool, Jolanda; Thabuis, Clémentine; Ossendrijver, Michel; van der Weijden, Fridus A; Montijn, Roy C

    2018-01-01

    Background: The oral cavity harbors a complex microbial ecosystem, intimately related to oral health and disease. The use of polyol-sweetened gum is believed to benefit oral health through stimulation of salivary flow and impacting oral pathogenic bacteria. Maltitol is often used as sweetener in food products. This study aimed to establish the in vivo effects of frequent consumption of maltitol-sweetened chewing gum on the dental plaque microbiota in healthy volunteers and to establish the cellular and molecular effects by in vitro cultivation and transcriptional analysis. Results: An intervention study was performed in 153 volunteers, randomly assigned to three groups (www.trialregister.nl; NTR4165). One group was requested to use maltitol gum five times daily, one group used gum-base, and the third group did not use chewing gum. At day 0 and day 28, 24 h-accumulated supragingival plaque was collected at the lingual sites of the lower jaw and the buccal sites of the upper jaw and analyzed by 16S ribosomal rRNA gene sequencing. At day 42, 2 weeks after completion of the study, lower-jaw samples were collected and analyzed. The upper buccal plaque microbiota composition had lower bacterial levels and higher relative abundances of (facultative) aerobic species compared to the lower lingual sites. There was no difference in bacterial community structure between any of the three study groups (PERMANOVA). Significant lower abundance of several bacterial phylotypes was found in maltitol gum group compared to the gum-base group, including Actinomyces massiliensis HOT 852 and Lautropia mirabilis HOT 022. Cultivation studies confirmed growth inhibition of A. massiliensis and A. johnsonii by maltitol at levels of 1% and higher. Transcriptome analysis of A. massiliensis revealed that exposure to maltitol resulted in changes in the expression of genes linked to osmoregulation, biofilm formation, and central carbon metabolism. Conclusion: The results showed that chewing itself

  17. Evaluación citológica y microbiológica de lavados uterinos en bovinos con problemas reproductivos (estudio preliminar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Sánchez L.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Determinar las características citológicas y microbiológicas de lavados uterinos de bajo volúmen en hembras con problemas reproductivos en dos hatos del Altiplano Cundiboyacense. Materiales y métodos. Se evaluaron 21 muestras de lavados uterinosde vacas con historia de problemas reproductivos procedentes de dos hatos lecheros, en el primer hato ubicado en Sibaté (Cundinamarca se muestrearon 10 animales y en el segundo ubicado en Ventaquemada (Boyacá se obtuvieron las 11 muestras restantes. Se realizó evaluación macroscópica y microscópica de cada uno de los lavados uterinos; para la evaluación citológica se utilizaron las tinciones de Gram y Wright. La determinación de la flora bacteriana se realizó mediante técnicas estándar en microbiología para la identificaciónde bacterias no exigentes, adicionalmente se realizaron pruebas de sensibilidad por la técnica de difusión de Kirby-bauer. Resultados. En la citología se observaron bacilos y cocos gram positivos, células epiteliales de descamación uterina (CEDU y respuesta inflamatoria (RI mediada por polimorfonucleares (PMN. Los aislamientos bacterianos correspondieron a Lactobacillus sp como flora bacteriana normal del tracto genital (16.66% y Klebsiella sp como flora acompañante (16.66%; adicionalmente se aislaron bacterias patógenas causantes de problemas reproductivos como Streptococcus sp. β hemolítico (33.33%, Streptococcus sp α hemolítico (50% y Streptococcus sp. γ hemolítico (50% y Arcanobacterium pyogenes (Corynebacterium-Actinomyces pyogenes (16.66%; en un 9.52% de las muestras se observaron espiroquetas. Conclusiones. Se observó una relación directa entre el aspecto macroscópico de los lavados uterinos, la respuesta citológica y el aislamiento de bacterias.

  18. Diversity of biosurfactant producing microorganisms isolated from soils contaminated with diesel oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes Bento, Fátima; de Oliveira Camargo, Flavio A; Okeke, Benedict C; Frankenberger, William T

    2005-01-01

    Biosurfactant production is a desirable property of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms (HDM). We characterized biosurfactant producing microbial populations from a Long Beach soil, California (USA) and a Hong Kong soil (China), contaminated with diesel oil. A total of 33 hydrocarbon-utilizing microorganisms were isolated from the soils. Twelve isolates and three defined consortia were tested for biosurfactant production and emulsification activity. The highest reduction of surface tension was achieved with a consortium of L1, L2 and L3 isolates from a Long Beach soil (41.4mN m(-1)). Isolate L1 (Acinetobacter junii) displayed the highest reduction of surface tension (46.5 mN m(-1)). The emulsifying capacity evaluated by the E24 emulsification index was highest in the culture of isolate L5 (74%). No substantial emulsification was achieved with the cell-free extracts, indicating that the emulsifying activity was not extracellular. Based on surface tension and the E24 index results, isolates F1, F2, F3, F4, L1, L2, L3 and L4 were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Bacillus cereus, Bacillus sphaericus, B. fusiformis, Acinetobacter junii, a non-cultured bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. and B. pumilus, respectively. Cluster analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences of the bacterial isolates revealed 70% similarity amongst hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial community present in both soils. Five isolates (isolates F1, F2, F3, F4 and L4) belong to the Firmicutes order, two isolates (L1 and L3) belong to the Proteobacteria order and one isolate (L2) is an Actinomyces sp. Simpson's index (1 - D) and the Shannon-Weaver index (H) revealed more diversity of HDM in the Hong Kong soil, while evenness (E) and the equitability (J) data indicated that there was not a dominant population. Bacterial isolates displaying substantial potential for production of biosurfactants can be applied in the bioremediation of soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons.

  19. Corn cob biochar increases soil culturable bacterial abundance without enhancing their capacities in utilizing carbon sources in Biolog Eco-plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Lin-lin; HAN Guang-ming; LAN Yu; LIU Sai-nan; GAO Ji-ping; YANG Xu; MENG Jun; CHEN Wen-fu

    2017-01-01

    Biochar has been shown to influence soil microbial communities in terms of their abundance and diversity.However,the relationship among microbial abundance,structure and C metabolic traits is not well studied under biochar application.Here it was hypothesized that the addition of biochar with intrinsic properties (i.e.,porous structure) could affect the proliferation of culturable microbes and the genetic structure of soil bacterial communities.In the meantime,the presence of available organic carbon in biochar may influence the C utilization capacities of microbial community in Biolog Eco-plates.A pot experiment was conducted with differenct biochar application (BC) rates:control (0 t ha-1),BC1 (20 t ha-1) and BC2 (40 t ha-1).Culturable microorganisms were enumerated via the plate counting method.Bacterial diversity was examined using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE).Microbial capacity in using C sources was assessed using Biolog Eco-plates.The addition of biochar stimulated the growth of actinomyces and bacteria,especially the ammonifying bacteria and azotobacteria,but had no significant effect on fungi proliferation.The phylogenetic distribution of the operational taxonomic units could be divided into the following groups with the biochar addition:Firmicutes,Acidobacteria,Gemmatimonadetes,Actinobacteria,Cyanobacteria and α-,β-,γ-and δ-Proteobacteria (average similarity >95%).Biochar application had a higher capacity utilization for L-asparagine,Tween 80,D-mannitol,L-serine,γ-hydroxybutyric acid,N-acetyI-D-glucosamine,glycogen,itaconic acid,glycyl-L-glutamic acid,α-ketobutyricacid and putrescine,whereas it had received decreased capacities in using the other 20 carbon sources in Biolog Eco-plates.Redundancy analysis (RDA) revealed that the physico-chemical properties,indices of bacterial diversity,and C metabolic traits were positively correlated with the appearance of novel sequences under BC2 treatment.Our study indicates that the

  20. Periodontal Bacteria and Prediabetes Prevalence in ORIGINS: The Oral Infections, Glucose Intolerance, and Insulin Resistance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmer, R T; Jacobs, D R; Singh, R; Zuk, A; Rosenbaum, M; Papapanou, P N; Desvarieux, M

    2015-09-01

    Periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus are known to be associated. The relationship between periodontal microbiota and early diabetes risk has not been studied. We investigated the association between periodontal bacteria and prediabetes prevalence among diabetes-free adults. ORIGINS (the Oral Infections, Glucose Intolerance and Insulin Resistance Study) cross sectionally enrolled 300 diabetes-free adults aged 20 to 55 y (mean ± SD, 34 ± 10 y; 77% female). Prediabetes was defined as follows: 1) hemoglobin A1c values ranging from 5.7% to 6.4% or 2) fasting plasma glucose ranging from 100 to 125 mg/dL. In 1,188 subgingival plaque samples, 11 bacterial species were assessed at baseline, including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Actinomyces naeslundii. Full-mouth clinical periodontal examinations were performed, and participants were defined as having no/mild periodontitis vs. moderate/severe periodontitis per the definition of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / American Academy of Periodontology. Modified Poisson regression evaluated prediabetes prevalence across bacterial tertiles. Prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals for third vs. first tertiles are presented. All analyses were adjusted for cardiometabolic risk factors. All results presented currently arise from the baseline cross section. Prediabetes prevalence was 18%, and 58% of participants had moderate/severe periodontitis. Prevalence ratios (95% confidence intervals) summarizing associations between bacterial levels and prediabetes were as follows: A. actinomycetemcomitans, 2.48 (1.34, 4.58), P = 0.004; P. gingivalis, 3.41 (1.78, 6.58), P = 0.0003; T. denticola, 1.99 (0.992, 4.00), P = 0.052; T. forsythia, 1.95 (1.0, 3.84), P = 0.05; A. naeslundii, 0.46 (0.25, 0.85), P = 0.01. The prevalence ratio for prediabetes among participants with moderate/severe vs. no/mild periodontitis was 1.47 (0.78, 2.74), P

  1. Subgingival Microbiome Colonization and Cytokine Production during Early Dental Implant Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Jeffrey B; Johnson, Paul G; Kok, Car Reen; Gomes-Neto, João C; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E; Schmid, Marian J; Hutkins, Robert W

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about longitudinal development of the peri-implant subgingival microbiome and cytokine production as a new sulcus forms after dental implant placement. Therefore, the purpose of this observational study was to evaluate simultaneous longitudinal changes in the oral microbiome and cytokine production in the developing peri-implant sulcus compared to control natural teeth. Four and 12 weeks after implant placement and abutment connection, a dental implant and a natural tooth were sampled in 25 patients for subgingival plaque and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF [around teeth] and peri-implant crevicular fluid [PICF] around implants). DNA from plaque samples was extracted and sequenced using Illumina-based 16S rRNA sequencing. GCF and PICF samples were analyzed using a customized Milliplex human cytokine and chemokine magnetic bead panel. Beta diversity analysis revealed that natural teeth and implants had similar subgingival microbiomes, while teeth had greater alpha diversity than implants. At the genus level, however, few differences were noted between teeth and dental implants over 12 weeks. Specifically, Actinomyces and Selenomonas were significantly elevated around teeth versus dental implants at both 4 weeks and 12 weeks, while Corynebacterium and Campylobacter were significantly elevated only at 4 weeks around teeth. The only difference between PICF and GCF biomarkers was significantly elevated granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels around teeth versus dental implants at the 4-week visit. The subgingival microbiome and cytokine production were similar between teeth and implants during early healing, suggesting that these profiles are driven by the patient following dental implant placement and are not determined by anatomical niche. IMPORTANCE Dental implants are a common treatment option offered to patients for tooth replacement. However, little is known regarding initial colonization of the subgingival microbiome and

  2. 慢性根尖性歯周炎における肉芽腫形成機転

    OpenAIRE

    渡邉, 隆史; 伊藤, 範明; 永山, 元彦; 竹内, 宏

    2009-01-01

    慢性根尖性歯周炎の主病巣は線維芽細胞と血管芽細胞の過剰増殖より成る肉芽組織で、感染根管からの感染による慢性増殖性炎を原病巣としている。今回、b-FGF、IL-1α、TGF-α、TGF-β1、HGF、TNF-α、EGF、PDGFとこれらのレセプターのFGFR(Bek)、IL-1R、TGFβRI、TGFβR II、HGFR、TNFR、EGFR、PDGFRαについて、60例の慢性根尖性歯周炎を病理組織学的にI型からVI型に分け、各病型における各増殖因子とレセプターの発現の特徴を免疫組織化学的に検索した。続いて、感染根管から採取した細菌の培養菌(Wb)と純培養したActinomyces naeslunndii ATCC12104(An)をラットの頬粘膜に接種し、50日間にわたる実験的感染病巣における経時的動態を検索した。各種病型は、I型(膿瘍の形成を伴う病型、15例)、II型(病巣のほとんどが肉芽腫より成り多数の好中球の浸潤を伴う病型、10例)、III型(II型と同様の肉芽腫性病変で好中球の浸潤のない病型、10例)、IV型(歯根肉芽腫の一型で線維成分が多く肉芽組織の少ない病型、15例)、...

  3. Streptococcus mutans Protein Synthesis during Mixed-Species Biofilm Development by High-Throughput Quantitative Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Marlise I.; Xiao, Jin; Lu, Bingwen; Delahunty, Claire M.; Yates, John R.; Koo, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms formed on tooth surfaces are comprised of mixed microbiota enmeshed in an extracellular matrix. Oral biofilms are constantly exposed to environmental changes, which influence the microbial composition, matrix formation and expression of virulence. Streptococcus mutans and sucrose are key modulators associated with the evolution of virulent-cariogenic biofilms. In this study, we used a high-throughput quantitative proteomics approach to examine how S. mutans produces relevant proteins that facilitate its establishment and optimal survival during mixed-species biofilms development induced by sucrose. Biofilms of S. mutans, alone or mixed with Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus oralis, were initially formed onto saliva-coated hydroxyapatite surface under carbohydrate-limiting condition. Sucrose (1%, w/v) was then introduced to cause environmental changes, and to induce biofilm accumulation. Multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) approach detected up to 60% of proteins encoded by S. mutans within biofilms. Specific proteins associated with exopolysaccharide matrix assembly, metabolic and stress adaptation processes were highly abundant as the biofilm transit from earlier to later developmental stages following sucrose introduction. Our results indicate that S. mutans within a mixed-species biofilm community increases the expression of specific genes associated with glucan synthesis and remodeling (gtfBC, dexA) and glucan-binding (gbpB) during this transition (Pmutans up-regulates specific adaptation mechanisms to cope with acidic environments (F1F0-ATPase system, fatty acid biosynthesis, branched chain amino acids metabolism), and molecular chaperones (GroEL). Interestingly, the protein levels and gene expression are in general augmented when S. mutans form mixed-species biofilms (vs. single-species biofilms) demonstrating fundamental differences in the matrix assembly, survival and biofilm maintenance in the presence of other

  4. [Immunologic response to microorganisms from a polluted ventilation system in a working environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernelc, S; Vozelj, M

    1991-01-01

    between ELISA and prick test results with antigen MMM. Wilcoxon test showed a statistically significant difference between the two groups (0.01). The median or central value of PEFR reduction in Group A is 10.23 per cent, and in Group B 1.49 per cent. A 30 per cent reduction of PEFR was observed in 5.21 per cent of subjects in Group A. Exposure to ventilation systems contaminated with Thermophilic actinomyces may be responsible for increased morbidity and reduced performance of employees working in air conditioning systems. Particularly the main filter should be checked regularly. Moreover, regular microbiologic examinations of dust and water from air preventing chronic obstructive lung diseases in employees working in areas served by contaminated air conditioning systems.

  5. The Impact of Maltitol-Sweetened Chewing Gum on the Dental Plaque Biofilm Microbiota Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijser, Bart J. F.; van den Broek, Tim J.; Slot, Dagmar E.; van Twillert, Lodewic; Kool, Jolanda; Thabuis, Clémentine; Ossendrijver, Michel; van der Weijden, Fridus A.; Montijn, Roy C.

    2018-01-01

    Background: The oral cavity harbors a complex microbial ecosystem, intimately related to oral health and disease. The use of polyol-sweetened gum is believed to benefit oral health through stimulation of salivary flow and impacting oral pathogenic bacteria. Maltitol is often used as sweetener in food products. This study aimed to establish the in vivo effects of frequent consumption of maltitol-sweetened chewing gum on the dental plaque microbiota in healthy volunteers and to establish the cellular and molecular effects by in vitro cultivation and transcriptional analysis. Results: An intervention study was performed in 153 volunteers, randomly assigned to three groups (www.trialregister.nl; NTR4165). One group was requested to use maltitol gum five times daily, one group used gum-base, and the third group did not use chewing gum. At day 0 and day 28, 24 h-accumulated supragingival plaque was collected at the lingual sites of the lower jaw and the buccal sites of the upper jaw and analyzed by 16S ribosomal rRNA gene sequencing. At day 42, 2 weeks after completion of the study, lower-jaw samples were collected and analyzed. The upper buccal plaque microbiota composition had lower bacterial levels and higher relative abundances of (facultative) aerobic species compared to the lower lingual sites. There was no difference in bacterial community structure between any of the three study groups (PERMANOVA). Significant lower abundance of several bacterial phylotypes was found in maltitol gum group compared to the gum-base group, including Actinomyces massiliensis HOT 852 and Lautropia mirabilis HOT 022. Cultivation studies confirmed growth inhibition of A. massiliensis and A. johnsonii by maltitol at levels of 1% and higher. Transcriptome analysis of A. massiliensis revealed that exposure to maltitol resulted in changes in the expression of genes linked to osmoregulation, biofilm formation, and central carbon metabolism. Conclusion: The results showed that chewing itself

  6. Management of ASCUS findings in Papanicolaou smears. A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavazzo, C; Boutas, I; Grigoriadis, C; Vrachnis, N; Salakos, N

    2012-01-01

    inconclusive in 4/34 patients, while 8/34 cases were negative for Schiller and acetic acid tests and also had normal colposcopy. Infectious organisms were found in 8/34 patients with ASCUS, including actinomyces (1/8), trichomonas (5/8), and candida albicans (2/8). Histologic tests revealed 16/34 koilocytosis cases, 5/34 LGSIL, 1/34 HGSIL, and 0/34 SCC. The dilemma in the management of patients with an ASCUS diagnosis still exists as a significant problem for clinicians.

  7. Effect of nanoporous TiO2 coating and anodized Ca2+ modification of titanium surfaces on early microbial biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wennerberg Ann

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The soft tissue around dental implants forms a barrier between the oral environment and the peri-implant bone and a crucial factor for long-term success of therapy is development of a good abutment/soft-tissue seal. Sol-gel derived nanoporous TiO2 coatings have been shown to enhance soft-tissue attachment but their effect on adhesion and biofilm formation by oral bacteria is unknown. Methods We have investigated how the properties of surfaces that may be used on abutments: turned titanium, sol-gel nanoporous TiO2 coated surfaces and anodized Ca2+ modified surfaces, affect biofilm formation by two early colonizers of the oral cavity: Streptococcus sanguinis and Actinomyces naeslundii. The bacteria were detected using 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization together with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results Interferometry and atomic force microscopy revealed all the surfaces to be smooth (Sa ≤ 0.22 μm. Incubation with a consortium of S. sanguinis and A. naeslundii showed no differences in adhesion between the surfaces over 2 hours. After 14 hours, the level of biofilm growth was low and again, no differences between the surfaces were seen. The presence of saliva increased the biofilm biovolume of S. sanguinis and A. naeslundii ten-fold compared to when saliva was absent and this was due to increased adhesion rather than biofilm growth. Conclusions Nano-topographical modification of smooth titanium surfaces had no effect on adhesion or early biofilm formation by S. sanguinis and A. naeslundii as compared to turned surfaces or those treated with anodic oxidation in the presence of Ca2+. The presence of saliva led to a significantly greater biofilm biovolume but no significant differences were seen between the test surfaces. These data thus suggest that modification with sol-gel derived nanoporous TiO2, which has been shown to improve osseointegration and soft-tissue healing in vivo, does not cause greater biofilm

  8. Effect of a Novel Quaternary Ammonium Methacrylate Polymer (QAMP on Adhesion and Antibacterial Properties of Dental Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmine M. Pupo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the resin–dentin bond strength (μTBS, degree of conversion (DC, and antibacterial potential of an innovative adhesive system containing a quaternary ammonium methacrylate polymer (QAMP using in situ and in vitro assays. Forty-two human third molars were flattened until the dentin was exposed and were randomly distributed into three groups of self-etching adhesive systems: Clearfil™ SE Bond containing 5% QAMP (experimental group, Clearfil™ Protect Bond (positive control and Clearfil™ SE Bond (negative control. After light curing, three 1 mm-increments of composite resin were bonded to each dentin surface. A total of thirty of these bonded teeth (10 teeth per group was sectioned to obtain stick-shaped specimens and tested under tensile stress immediately, and after 6 and 12 months of storage in distilled water. Twelve bonded teeth (4 teeth per group were longitudinally sectioned in a mesio-to-distal direction to obtain resin-bonded dentin slabs. In situ DC was evaluated by micro-Raman spectroscopy. In vitro DC of thin films of each adhesive system was measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro susceptibility tests of these three adhesive systems were performed by the minimum inhibitory/minimum bactericidal concentration (MIC/MBC assays against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, and Actinomyces naeslundii. No statistically significant difference in μTBS was observed between Clearfil™ SE Bond containing 5% QAMP and Clearfil™ SE Bond (p > 0.05 immediately, and after 6 and 12 months of water storage. However Clearfil™ Protect Bond showed a significant reduction of μTBS after 12 months of storage (p = 0.039. In addition, QAMP provided no significant change in DC after incorporating into Clearfil™ SE Bond (p > 0.05. Clearfil™ SE Bond containing 5% QAMP demonstrated MIC/MBC values similar to the positive control against L. casei and A. naeslundii and higher than the negative

  9. Acid tolerance response and survival by oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensäter, G; Larsson, U B; Greif, E C; Cvitkovitch, D G; Hamilton, I R

    1997-10-01

    Using 21 species of oral bacteria, representing six acidogenic genera, we undertook to determine whether the pH-limiting exponential growth is related to the ability of the organisms to generate an acid-tolerance response that results in enhanced survival at low pH. The lower pH limit of exponential growth varied by more than two units with that of Neisseria A182 at pH 6.34; growth of Lactobacillus casei RB1014 stopped at pH 3.81, with species of Actinomyces, Enterococcus, Prevotella and Streptococcus falling between these limits. The working hypothesis was that the organisms with the higher pH limits for growth are unable to respond to acidic environments in order to survive, whereas the more aciduric organisms would possess or acquire acid tolerance. Adaptation to acid tolerance was tested by determining whether the prior exposure of exponential-phase cells to a low, sub-lethal pH would trigger the induction of a mechanism that would enhance survival at a pH killing pH 7.5 control cells. The killing pH varied from pH 4.5 for Prevotella intermedia ATCC 25611 to pH 2.3 for the three Lactobacillus casei strains in the study, with the three Streptococcus mutans strains killed at pH 3.0 for 3 h. The adaptation experiments revealed three groups of organisms: non-acid-responders, generally representing strains with the highest terminal pH values; weak acid-responders in the middle of the pH list, generating low numbers of survivors at one or two pH values, and the aciduric, strong responders generating a high number of survivors at pH values in the range 6.0 to 3.5, but not at pH 7.5. Predominant among the latter group were the S. mutans and Lactobacilli casei strains, with the most significant adaptive response exhibited by S. mutans LT11 and S. mutans Ingbritt, involving a process that required protein synthesis. Time course experiments with the latter organisms indicated that 90-120 min was required after exposure to the triggering pH before the acid response was

  10. Microbiota of radish plants, cultivated in closed and open ecological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirranen, L. S.

    It is common knowledge that microorganisms respond to environmental changes faster than other representatives of the living world. The major aim of this work was to examine and analyze the characteristics of the microbiota of radish culture, cultivated in the closed ecological system of human life-support Bios-3 and in an open system in different experiments. Microbial community of near-root, root zone and phyllosphere of radish were studied at the phases of seedlings, root formation, technical ripeness—by washing-off method—like microbiota of the substrate (expanded clay aggregate) and of the seeds of radish culture. Inoculation on appropriate media was made to count total quantity of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria, bacteria of coliform group, spore-forming, Proteus group, fluorescent, phytopathogenic bacteria, growing on Fermi medium, yeasts, microscopic fungi, Actinomyces. It was revealed that formation of the microbiota of radish plants depends on the age, plant cultivation technology and the specific conditions of the closed system. Composition of microbial conveyor-cultivated in phytotrons varied in quality and in quantity with plant growth phases—in the same manner as cultivation of even-aged soil and hydroponics monocultures which was determined by different qualitative and quantitative composition of root emissions in the course of plant vegetation. The higher plant component formed its own microbial complex different from that formed prior to closure. The microbial complex of vegetable polyculture is more diverse and stable than the monoculture of radish. We registered the changes in the species composition and microorganism quantity during plant cultivation in the closed system on a long-used solution. It was demonstrated that during the short-term (7 days) use of the nutrient solution in the experiments without system closing, the species composition of the microbiota of radish plants was more diverse in a multiple-aged vegetable polyculture (61

  11. Results of microbiological Investigations of Orbital Station MIR Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, N.

    15-year experience of orbital station MIR service demonstrated that specifically modified space vehicle environment allows to consider spaceship habitats as a certain ecological niche of microbial community development and functioning, which was formed from the organisms of different physiological and taxonomical groups. As a result of on-board experiments and revision of interior and equipment more than 234 microorganisms were identified. They were represented by technophylic specia, which cause material damage, as well as potential pathogens (bacteria, actinomyces spp, fungi), which capable to grow on artificial substrates. Resident colonization of interior and equipment of space habitat by bacterial and fungal associations, taking place during long-term microbiota exposure on cosmophysic, physic-chemical and biological factors, which is accompanied by appearance of technological and medical risks, capable to provide significant influence on safety of humans and reliability of space equipment. These risks are due to such processes: biodestruction of synthetic and organic polymeres, biocorrosion of metals, biofoulding of surfaces (biofilms), formation of obturation in vital activity support system, occurrence of biodisturbances resulting in devise and equipment failure, occurrence and development of supertolerants and other variants with unpredictable attributes, which are expressed as a result of phenotypical and genotypical modifications. Based on the information from results of in-flight and laboratory microbiological investigations, the following suppositions can be made to characterize evolution of the microbial community aboard long-operating space vehicle: - environment of a long-operating piloted space vehicle may be a peculiar kind of ecological niche for development and reproduction of bacilli and fungi belonging to particular species, - bacteriofungal associations primarily reside on decorative-finish and structural materials of space interior and

  12. Photoinactivation Using Visible Light Plus Water-Filtered Infrared-A (vis+wIRA and Chlorine e6 (Ce6 eradicates Planktonic Periodontal Pathogens and Subgingival Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Al-Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Alternative treatment methods for pathogens and microbial biofilms are required due to the widespread rise in antibiotic resistance. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT has recently gained attention as a novel method to eradicate pathogens. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of a novel aPDT method using visible light (vis and water infiltrated infrared A (wIRA in combination with chlorine e6 (Ce6 against different periodontal pathogens in planktonic form and within in situ subgingival oral biofilms. Eight different periodontal pathogens were exposed to aPDT using vis+wIRA and 100 µg/ml Ce6 in planktonic culture. Additionally, pooled subgingival dental biofilm was also treated by aPDT and the number of viable cells determined as colony forming units (CFU. Live/dead staining was used in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM to visualize and quantify antimicrobial effects within the biofilm samples. Untreated negative controls as well as 0.2 % chlorhexidine (CHX-treated positive controls were used. All eight tested periodontal pathogens including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Eikenella corrodens, Actinomyces odontolyticus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, Slackia exigua and Atopopium rimae and the aPDT-treated subgingival biofilm were eliminated over the ranges of 3.43 - 8.34 and 3.91 - 4.28 log10 CFU in the log10 scale, respectively. Thus, aPDT showed bactericidal effects on the representative pathogens as well as on the in situ subgingival biofilm. The live/dead staining also revealed a significant reduction (33.45 % of active cells within the aPDT-treated subgingival biofilm. Taking the favorable tissue healing effects of vis+wIRA into consideration, the significant antimicrobial effects revealed in this study highlight the potential of aPDT using this light source in combination with Ce6 as an adjunctive method to treat periodontitis as well as

  13. Periodontal Bacteria and Prediabetes Prevalence in ORIGINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmer, R.T.; Jacobs, D.R.; Singh, R.; Zuk, A.; Rosenbaum, M.; Papapanou, P.N.; Desvarieux, M.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus are known to be associated. The relationship between periodontal microbiota and early diabetes risk has not been studied. We investigated the association between periodontal bacteria and prediabetes prevalence among diabetes-free adults. ORIGINS (the Oral Infections, Glucose Intolerance and Insulin Resistance Study) cross sectionally enrolled 300 diabetes-free adults aged 20 to 55 y (mean ± SD, 34 ± 10 y; 77% female). Prediabetes was defined as follows: 1) hemoglobin A1c values ranging from 5.7% to 6.4% or 2) fasting plasma glucose ranging from 100 to 125 mg/dL. In 1,188 subgingival plaque samples, 11 bacterial species were assessed at baseline, including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Actinomyces naeslundii. Full-mouth clinical periodontal examinations were performed, and participants were defined as having no/mild periodontitis vs. moderate/severe periodontitis per the definition of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / American Academy of Periodontology. Modified Poisson regression evaluated prediabetes prevalence across bacterial tertiles. Prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals for third vs. first tertiles are presented. All analyses were adjusted for cardiometabolic risk factors. All results presented currently arise from the baseline cross section. Prediabetes prevalence was 18%, and 58% of participants had moderate/severe periodontitis. Prevalence ratios (95% confidence intervals) summarizing associations between bacterial levels and prediabetes were as follows: A. actinomycetemcomitans, 2.48 (1.34, 4.58), P = 0.004; P. gingivalis, 3.41 (1.78, 6.58), P = 0.0003; T. denticola, 1.99 (0.992, 4.00), P = 0.052; T. forsythia, 1.95 (1.0, 3.84), P = 0.05; A. naeslundii, 0.46 (0.25, 0.85), P = 0.01. The prevalence ratio for prediabetes among participants with moderate/severe vs. no/mild periodontitis was 1.47 (0.78, 2.74), P

  14. The lower genital tract microbiota in relation to cytokine-, SLPI- and endotoxin levels: application of checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization (CDH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaitchouk, Natalia; Andersch, Björn; Falsen, Enevold; Strömbeck, Louise; Mattsby-Baltzer, Inger

    2008-04-01

    In the present study the lower genital tract microbiota in asymptomatic fertile women (n=34) was identified and quantified by culturing vaginal secretions. Also, vaginal and cervical samples were analyzed by a semiquantitative checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique (CDH) based on genomic probes prepared from 13 bacterial species (Bacteroides ureolyticus, Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Gardnerella vaginalis, Mobiluncus curtisii ss curtisii, Prevotella bivia, Prevotella disiens, Prevotella melaninogenica, Atopobium vaginae, Lactobacillus iners, Staphylococcus aureus ss aureus, Streptococcus anginosus, and Streptococcus agalactiae). The bacterial species found by either culture or CDH were correlated with proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-8), secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), and endotoxin in the cervicovaginal samples. Grading the women into healthy, intermediate, or bacterial vaginosis (BV) as based on Gram staining of vaginal smears, the viable counts of lactobacilli (L. gasseri) and of streptococci-staphylococci combined were highest in the intermediate group. In BV, particularly the high concentrations of Actinomyces urogenitalis, Atopobium vaginae, and Peptoniphilus harei were noted (>or=10(11) per ml). The total viable counts correlated with both cervical IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta. A strong negative correlation was observed between L. iners and total viable counts, G. vaginalis, or cervical IL-1 alpha, while it correlated positively with SLPI. Analysis of vaginal and cervical samples from 26 out of the 34 women by CDH showed that anaerobic bacteria were more frequently detected by CDH compared to culture. By this method, A. vaginae correlated with G. vaginalis, and L. iners with S. aureus. With regard to cytokines, B. ureolyticus correlated with both cervical and vaginal IL-1 alpha as well as with cervical IL-8, while F. nucleatum, S. agalactiae, S. anginosus, or S. aureus correlated with vaginal IL-1 alpha

  15. Clinical and microbiological features of refractory periodontitis subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, A P; Haffajee, A D; Dewhirst, F E; Paster, B J; Smith, C M; Cugini, M A; Socransky, S S

    1998-02-01

    , Gemella haemolysans, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus warneri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and novel species in the genera Bartonella, Ralstonia, Neisseria, Eubacterium, Rothia, Gordona, Gemella, Corynebacterium, Leptotrichia, and Actinomyces. Refractory subjects constituted a heterogeneous group based on their subgingival microbiota. As a group, they did not harbor more of the "classic" periodontopathogens, although elevated proportions of S. constellatus were found.

  16. Rapid urease test (RUT) for evaluation of urease activity in oral bacteria in vitro and in supragingival dental plaque ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlén, Gunnar; Hassan, Haidar; Blomqvist, Susanne; Carlén, Anette

    2018-05-18

    Urease is an enzyme produced by plaque bacteria hydrolysing urea from saliva and gingival exudate into ammonia in order to regulate the pH in the dental biofilm. The aim of this study was to assess the urease activity among oral bacterial species by using the rapid urease test (RUT) in a micro-plate format and to examine whether this test could be used for measuring the urease activity in site-specific supragingival dental plaque samples ex vivo. The RUT test is based on 2% urea in peptone broth solution and with phenol red at pH 6.0. Oral bacterial species were tested for their urease activity using 100 μl of RUT test solution in the well of a micro-plate to which a 1 μl amount of cells collected after growth on blood agar plates or in broth, were added. The color change was determined after 15, 30 min, and 1 and 2 h. The reaction was graded in a 4-graded scale (none, weak, medium, strong). Ex vivo evaluation of dental plaque urease activity was tested in supragingival 1 μl plaque samples collected from 4 interproximal sites of front teeth and molars in 18 adult volunteers. The color reaction was read after 1 h in room temperature and scored as in the in vitro test. The strongest activity was registered for Staphylococcus epidermidis, Helicobacter pylori, Campylobacter ureolyticus and some strains of Haemophilus parainfluenzae, while known ureolytic species such as Streptococcus salivarius and Actinomyces naeslundii showed a weaker, variable and strain-dependent activity. Temperature had minor influence on the RUT reaction. The interproximal supragingival dental plaque between the lower central incisors (site 31/41) showed significantly higher scores compared to between the upper central incisors (site 11/21), between the upper left first molar and second premolar (site 26/25) and between the lower right second premolar and molar (site 45/46). The rapid urease test (RUT) in a micro-plate format can be used as a simple and rapid method to test urease

  17. Characterization of non-tuberculosis mycobacteria by neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Jaqueline M. da; Crispim, Verginia Reis; Gomes da Silva, Marlei; Furtado, Vanessa Rodrigues; Duarte, Rafael Da Silva

    2013-01-01

    The genus Mycobacterium shares many characteristics with Corynebacterium and Actinomyces genera, among which the genomic guanine plus cytosine content and the production of long branched-chain fatty acids, known as mycolic acids are enhanced. Growth rate and optimal temperature of mycobacteria are variable. The genus comprises more than 140 known species; however Mycobacterium fortuitum, a fast growing nontuberculous mycobacterium, is clinically significant, because it has been associated to several lesions following surgery procedures such as liposuction, silicone breast and pacemaker implants, exposure to prosthetic materials besides sporadic lesions in the skin, soft tissues and rarely lungs. The objective of the present study is to reduce the time necessary for M. fortuitum characterization based on its morphology and the use of the neutron radiography technique substituting the classical biochemical assays. We also aim to confirm the utility of dendrimers as boron carriers. The samples were sterilized through conventional protocols using 10% formaldehyde. In the incubation process, two solutions with different molar ratios (10:1 and 20:1) of sodium borate and PAMAM G4 dendrimer and also pure sodium borate were used. After doping and sterilization procedures, the samples were deposited on CR-39 sheets, irradiated with a 4.6×10 5 n/cm 2 s thermal neutron flux for 30 min, from the J-9 irradiation channel of the Argonauta IEN/CNEN reactor. The images registered in the CR-39 were visualized in a Nikon E400 optical transmission microscope and captured by a Nikon Coolpix 995 digital camera. Developing the nuclear tracks registered in the CR-39 allowed a 1000× enlargement of mycobacterium images, facilitating their characterization, the use of more sophisticated equipment not being necessary. The use of neutron radiography technique reduced the time necessary for characterization. Doping with PAMAM dendrimer improved the visualization of NTM in neutron radiography

  18. Engineered biosynthesis of regioselectively modified aromatic polyketides using bimodular polyketide synthases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Tang

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial aromatic polyketides such as tetracycline and doxorubicin are a medicinally important class of natural products produced as secondary metabolites by actinomyces bacteria. Their backbones are derived from malonyl-CoA units by polyketide synthases (PKSs. The nascent polyketide chain is synthesized by the minimal PKS, a module consisting of four dissociated enzymes. Although the biosynthesis of most aromatic polyketide backbones is initiated through decarboxylation of a malonyl building block (which results in an acetate group, some polyketides, such as the estrogen receptor antagonist R1128, are derived from nonacetate primers. Understanding the mechanism of nonacetate priming can lead to biosynthesis of novel polyketides that have improved pharmacological properties. Recent biochemical analysis has shown that nonacetate priming is the result of stepwise activity of two dissociated PKS modules with orthogonal molecular recognition features. In these PKSs, an initiation module that synthesizes a starter unit is present in addition to the minimal PKS module. Here we describe a general method for the engineered biosynthesis of regioselectively modified aromatic polyketides. When coexpressed with the R1128 initiation module, the actinorhodin minimal PKS produced novel hexaketides with propionyl and isobutyryl primer units. Analogous octaketides could be synthesized by combining the tetracenomycin minimal PKS with the R1128 initiation module. Tailoring enzymes such as ketoreductases and cyclases were able to process the unnatural polyketides efficiently. Based upon these findings, hybrid PKSs were engineered to synthesize new anthraquinone antibiotics with predictable functional group modifications. Our results demonstrate that (i bimodular aromatic PKSs present a general mechanism for priming aromatic polyketide backbones with nonacetate precursors; (ii the minimal PKS controls polyketide chain length by counting the number of atoms

  19. Lactic Acid and Probiotic Bacteria from Fermented and Probiotic Dairy Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.K.L. Karna

    2007-12-01

    Actinomyces israelii(1 species

  20. Propiedades microbiológicas en un suelo de la patagonia argentina bajo la influencia de diferentes especies forestales Microbiological properties of a soil of the argentine patagonia under the influence of different tree species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Noemí Effron

    2011-12-01

    bacterias totales y amilolíticas, podría favorecer una mayor descomposición del residuo vegetal aportado al suelo y explicar los mayores valores de carbono orgánico y respiración microbiana obtenidos.In forest systems, leaf litter is usually the main source of nutrients for the vegetation and microorganisms. Leaf litter composition may vary according to the biomass and quality of the materials produced by different species. Tree roots affect the development and activity of microflora. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of two implanted tree species, with different composition of plant residues, on the soil characteristics. The soil is classified as an Andisol and is located in the Trevelín Forest Station, Chubut, Argentina, Lat. 43° S, Long 71º31' West. The samples were extracted from the surface soil of two forest plots with a dominant species each: Radiata Pine (Pinus radiata D. Don. and European Oak (Quercus robur. The following analytical determinations were carried out on soil samples: organic carbon, microbial respiration, deshydrogenase activity, microbial count (bacterial communities, amilolytic, actinomyces and fungi as well as the functional diversity of associated microbial communities. The Shannon-Weaver index (H was calculated. The soil under Oak trees showed the highest values of microbial respiration, organic carbon and amilolytic and bacterial community counts. No significant differences were found in deshydrogenase activity, actinomyces and fungi counts between species. The principal component analysis showed significant variations in the physiology of microbial communities associated with these two tree species. The microorganism H diversity index was significantly greater for Pine. Plants residues of broadleaf species such as Oak have lower contents of recalcitrant substances than conifer species, and this fact, associated with the higher development of total and amylolytic bacteria, could result in an increase in the

  1. Signature of Microbial Dysbiosis in Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuric, Vincent; Le Gall-David, Sandrine; Boyer, Emile; Acuña-Amador, Luis; Martin, Bénédicte; Fong, Shao Bing; Barloy-Hubler, Frederique; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine

    2017-07-15

    Periodontitis is driven by disproportionate host inflammatory immune responses induced by an imbalance in the composition of oral bacteria; this instigates microbial dysbiosis, along with failed resolution of the chronic destructive inflammation. The objectives of this study were to identify microbial signatures for health and chronic periodontitis at the genus level and to propose a model of dysbiosis, including the calculation of bacterial ratios. Published sequencing data obtained from several different studies (196 subgingival samples from patients with chronic periodontitis and 422 subgingival samples from healthy subjects) were pooled and subjected to a new microbiota analysis using the same Visualization and Analysis of Microbial Population Structures (VAMPS) pipeline, to identify microbiota specific to health and disease. Microbiota were visualized using CoNet and Cytoscape. Dysbiosis ratios, defined as the percentage of genera associated with disease relative to the percentage of genera associated with health, were calculated to distinguish disease from health. Correlations between the proposed dysbiosis ratio and the periodontal pocket depth were tested with a different set of data obtained from a recent study, to confirm the relevance of the ratio as a potential indicator of dysbiosis. Beta diversity showed significant clustering of periodontitis-associated microbiota, at the genus level, according to the clinical status and independent of the methods used. Specific genera ( Veillonella , Neisseria , Rothia , Corynebacterium , and Actinomyces ) were highly prevalent (>95%) in health, while other genera ( Eubacterium , Campylobacter , Treponema , and Tannerella ) were associated with chronic periodontitis. The calculation of dysbiosis ratios based on the relative abundance of the genera found in health versus periodontitis was tested. Nonperiodontitis samples were significantly identifiable by low ratios, compared to chronic periodontitis samples. When

  2. Acid-regulated proteins induced by Streptococcus mutans and other oral bacteria during acid shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, I R; Svensäter, G

    1998-10-01

    first 30 min of the acid shock, with a total of 11 acid-regulated proteins formed during the 2-h adaptation period with enhanced synthesis transient for seven of these proteins. Streptococcus salivarius AT2 and Streptococcus gordonii TH12 had the formation of 6 and 8 proteins enhanced, while the weakly responding organisms, Streptococcus sanguis ATCC 10,556 and Streptococcus oralis ATCC 10,557, exhibited 8 and 6 such proteins, respectively. Even non-responding strains unable to survive at very low pH, such as Streptococcus sobrinus CH125/43, Streptococcus mitis ATCC 12,261 and Actinomyces naeslundii 301-13 showed the initial formation of 3-9 acid-regulated proteins, but protein synthesis was not sustained over the entire adaptation period. Clearly, the survival of oral bacteria at very low pH is related, not to the total number of the acid-regulated proteins induced per se but to the formation of key proteins that function to augment normal pH homeostasis.

  3. Rice to vegetables: short- versus long-term impact of land-use change on the indigenous soil microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Dong, Zhi-Xing; Zhang, Xue-Xian; Li, Yun; Cao, Hui; Cui, Zong-Li

    2011-08-01

    Land-use change is known to have a significant effect on the indigenous soil microbial community, but it is unknown if there are any general trends regarding how this effect varies over time. Here, we describe a comparative analysis of microbial communities from three adjacent agricultural fields: one-century-old paddy field (OP) and two vegetable fields (new vegetable field (NV) and old vegetable field (OV)) that were established on traditional paddy fields 10 and 100 years ago, respectively. Soil chemical and physical analysis showed that both vegetable fields were more nutrient rich than the paddy field in terms of organic C, total N, total P, and available K. The vegetable fields possessed relatively higher abundance of culturable bacteria, fungi, and specific groups of bacteria (Actinomyces, nitrifying bacteria, and cellulose-decomposing bacteria) but lower levels of microbial biomass C and N. Notably, the decrease of biomass was further confirmed by analysis of seven additional soils in chronosequence sampled from the same area. Next we examined the metabolic diversity of the microbial community using the EcoPlate(TM) system from Biolog Inc. (Hayward, CA, USA). The utilization patterns of 31 unique C substrates (i.e., community-level physiological profile) showed that microorganisms in vegetable soil and paddy soil prefer to use different C substrates (polymeric compounds for NV and OV soils, phenolic acids for OP soil). Principal component analysis and the average well color development data showed that the NV is metabolically more distinct from the OV and OP. The effect was likely attributable to the elevated soil pH in NV soil. Furthermore, we assessed the diversity of soil bacterial populations using the cultivation-independent technology of amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). Results showed that levels of bacterial diversity in OP and NV soils were similar (Shannon's diversity index H = 4.83 and 4.79, respectively), whereas bacteria in

  4. Effects of Continuous Cropping on Soil Microbial Biomas s of Tobacco Field and Quality of Flue-cured Tobacco%烤烟连作土壤微生物数量及烤烟品质变化的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王蒙蒙; 朱金峰; 许自成; 贾健; 王林

    2015-01-01

    The soil microbial quantity and quality of flue-cured tobacco were studied in tobacco field , in which crop rotation , 3-year continuous cropping , and 6-year continuous cropping had been carried out .The results showed that:from resettling stage to vigorous growth stage , further to mature period , the bacterial population in the soil reduced gradually , and it was the highest in the soil of crop rotation .The fungal number in the soil of crop rotation was less than that in the soil of continuous cropping , it reached the maximum at resettling stage in the soil of 6-year continuous cropping , and was significantly higher than that in the soil of crop rotation and 3-year continuous cropping .As for the number of actinomyces in the soil , the following order was found:crop rotation>continuous cropping for 3 years>continuous cropping for 6 years; at resettling stage>at vigorous growth stage>in mature period . There were significant differences in some physical characteristics of flue-cured tobacco ( such as filling value , leaf thickness , ten-sion stress, specific weight of leaf and stem ratio ) between crop rotation and 3-year continuous cropping , but the other indexes had no significant difference .As for the chemical properties of flue-cured tobacco , sugar-nicotine ratio , nitrogen-nicotine ratio , ratio of potassium to chlorine , and Schmuck value showed the sequence of crop rotation >continuous cropping for 6 years>continuous crop-ping for 3 years, they were all in the appropriate range , and their coordination in crop rotation treatment was better than that in con-tinuous cropping treatment .The total amount of neutral aroma components ( excluding neophytadiene ) showed crop rotation >contin-uous cropping for 6 years >continuous cropping for 3 years.%研究了轮作、连作3年、连作6年的植烟土壤微生物数量以及烤烟质量的变化,结果表明:细菌数量从团棵期、旺长期到成熟期,呈现出逐步减少的趋势,且轮作

  5. Malassezia pachydermatis e outros agentes infecciosos nas otites externas e dermatites em cães Malassezia pachydermatis and other infectious agents in external otitis and dermatitis in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Nobre

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Malassezia pachydermatis (Pityrosporum canis faz parte da microbiota da pele e quando ocorrem alterações no microambiente local como aumento da umidade, da temperatura e do substrato, determinando uma elevação do número de células, ocorre a transição da forma comensal para o parasitismo. O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar a prevalência da infeçâo por M. pachydermatis e outros agentes infecciosos nas otites externas e dermatites de cães. Foram analisadas 78 amostras de cães com otite, 36 amostras de cães com o conduto auditivo normal e 24 com dermatite. Todas as amostras foram submetidas ao exame direto. cultivo em ágar sangue e em ágar Sabouraud dextrose, acrescido de cloranfenicol e cicloheximida. Ao exame direto, 50% das amostras de otite e 16,6% das amostras de dermatite apresentaram numerosas células semelhante a M. pachydermatis, enquanto 83,3% das amostras de ouvidos saudáveis apresentaram ausência de células com esta morfologia. M. pachydermatis foi isolada em 25% das amostras do conduto auditivo normal, em 80,7% das amostras de otite e em 37,5% das amostras de dermatite. Foram também isolados das amostras de otite Staphylococcus intermédias, S. aureus, S. epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus sp, Actinomyces sp, Streptococcus sp e Otodectes cynotis e das de dermatite Staphylococcus intermédias, S. áureas, S. epidermidis Microsporum canis, M. gypseum,. Trychophyton sp e Demodex canis. M. pachydermatis foi o agente com maior prevalência nas otites externas e dermatites, sendo um agente oportunista que causa otite e dermatite quando há uma alteração do microambiente.The Malassezia pachydermatis ( Pityrosporum canis is found in the whole skin microflora. It seems to occur as a consequence of changes in the local microenvironment, such as moist increase, temperature or substrate enhancement, generating a raising on cell quantity, which brings the transition from commensal form to parasitism. The

  6. Application of radiochemical methods for development of new biological preparation designed for soil bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, A.A.; Djuraeva, G.T.; Djumaniyazova, G.I.; Yadgarov, Kh.T.

    2006-01-01

    developed complex of radiochemical methods allowed to determine the PCB-destructive activity of bacteria at initial screening, selection and investigation of strains of soil bacteria. Stability of the positive influence of biological preparations is defined by behaviour of introduced population in soil and by status of soil microbial community. We found the good survival rate of bacteria of genus Bacillus (up to 10 8 -10 9 cells / g of soil) from biological preparation which has been introduced in contaminated by HCCH and PCBs soil in dynamics during one year. Besides the introduction of association of active bacteria strains-destructors of organochlorine compounds in contaminated soil makes the positive effect on development of soil microflora - stimulates the development of the useful (ammonifiers, oligonutophiles, nitrogen fixers and actinomyces) and suppresses development of a harmful microflora (micromycetes). We found that microbial processes in the soil contaminated by organochlorine compounds proceeded more intensively at addition of biofertilizer. Hence, biofertilizer appeared suitable organic substrate for stimulation of introduced and natural microflora of contaminated soil. Thus artificial enrichment (introduction) of contaminated soils by the microbial preparation designed on the basis of associations of bacteria - destructors of pesticides can be perspective and economic way of elimination of residual amounts of organochlorine pesticides in soil. Biofertilizer can be recommended as additional organic substrate for stimulation of introduced and natural microflora of contaminated soils. The combined application of bacterial preparation and biofertilizer can be recommended as most efficient way for biodegradation of organochlorine compounds. (author)

  7. Characterisation of prototype Nurmi cultures using culture-based microbiological techniques and PCR-DGGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Sinéad M; Murphy, Richard A; Power, Ronan F G

    2006-08-01

    Undefined Nurmi-type cultures (NTCs) have been used successfully to prevent salmonella colonisation in poultry for decades. Such cultures are derived from the caecal contents of specific-pathogen-free birds and are administered via drinking water or spray application onto eggs in the hatchery. These cultures consist of many non-culturable and obligately anaerobic bacteria. Due to their undefined nature it is difficult to obtain approval from regulatory agencies to use these preparations as direct fed microbials for poultry. In this study, 10 batches of prototype NTCs were produced using an identical protocol over a period of 2 years. Traditional microbiological techniques and a molecular culture-independent methodology, polymerase chain reaction combined with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), were applied to characterise these cultures and also to examine if the constituents of the NTCs were identical. Culture-dependent analysis of these cultures included plating on a variety of selective and semi-selective agars, examination of colony morphology, Gram-staining and a series of biochemical tests (API, BioMerieux, France). Two sets of PCR-DGGE studies were performed. These involved the amplification of universal and subsequently lactic acid bacteria (LAB)-specific hypervariable regions of a 16S rRNA gene by PCR. Resultant amplicons were subjected to DGGE. Sequence analysis was performed on subsequent bands present in resultant DGGE profiles using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST). Microbiological culturing techniques tended to isolate common probiotic bacterial species from the genera Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Bifidobacterium, Enterococcus, Clostridium, Escherichia, Pediococcus and Enterobacterium as well as members of the genera, Actinomyces, Bacteroides, Propionibacterium, Capnocytophaga, Proteus, and Klebsiella. Bacteroides, Enterococcus, Escherichia, Brevibacterium, Klebsiella, Lactobacillus, Clostridium, Bacillus, Eubacterium