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Sample records for actinobacteria

  1. Emerging biopharmaceuticals from marine actinobacteria.

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    Hassan, Syed Shams Ul; Anjum, Komal; Abbas, Syed Qamar; Akhter, Najeeb; Shagufta, Bibi Ibtesam; Shah, Sayed Asmat Ali; Tasneem, Umber

    2017-01-01

    Actinobacteria are quotidian microorganisms in the marine world, playing a crucial ecological role in the recycling of refractory biomaterials and producing novel secondary metabolites with pharmaceutical applications. Actinobacteria have been isolated from the huge area of marine organisms including sponges, tunicates, corals, mollusks, crabs, mangroves and seaweeds. Natural products investigation of the marine actinobacteria revealed that they can synthesize numerous natural products including alkaloids, polyketides, peptides, isoprenoids, phenazines, sterols, and others. These natural products have a potential to provide future drugs against crucial diseases like cancer, HIV, microbial and protozoal infections and severe inflammations. Therefore, marine actinobacteria portray as a pivotal resource for marine drugs. It is an upcoming field of research to probe a novel and pharmaceutically important secondary metabolites from marine actinobacteria. In this review, we attempt to summarize the present knowledge on the diversity, chemistry and mechanism of action of marine actinobacteria-derived secondary metabolites from 2007 to 2016. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel actinobacteria from marine sponges.

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    Montalvo, Naomi F; Mohamed, Naglaa M; Enticknap, Julie J; Hill, Russell T

    2005-01-01

    Actinobacteria exclusively within the sub-class Acidimicrobidae were shown by 16S rDNA community analysis to be major components of the bacterial community associated with two sponge species in the genus Xestospongia. Four groups of Actinobacteria were identified in Xestospongia spp., with three of these four groups being found in both Xestospongia muta from Key Largo, Florida and Xestospongia testudinaria from Manado, Indonesia. This suggests that these groups are true symbionts in these sponges and may play a common role in both the Pacific and Atlantic sponge species. The fourth group was found only in X. testudinaria and was a novel assemblage distantly related to any previously sequenced actinobacterial clones. The only actinobacteria that were obtained in initial culturing attempts were Gordonia, Micrococcus and Brachybacterium spp., none of which were represented in the clone libraries. The closest cultured actinobacteria to all the Acidimicrobidae clones from Xestospongia spp. are 'Microthrix parvicella' and Acidimicrobium spp. Xestospongia spp. can now be targeted as source material from which to culture novel Acidimicrobidae to investigate their potential as producers of bioactive compounds. Isolation of sponge-associated Acidimicrobidae will also make it possible to elucidate their role as sponge symbionts.

  3. Brazilian Cerrado Soil Actinobacteria Ecology

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    Monique Suela Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 2152 Actinobacteria strains were isolated from native Cerrado (Brazilian Savannah soils located in Passos, Luminárias, and Arcos municipalities (Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The soils were characterised for chemical and microbiological analysis. The microbial analysis led to the identification of nine genera (Streptomyces, Arthrobacter, Rhodococcus, Amycolatopsis, Microbacterium, Frankia, Leifsonia, Nakamurella, and Kitasatospora and 92 distinct species in both seasons studied (rainy and dry. The rainy season produced a high microbial population of all the aforementioned genera. The pH values of the soil samples from the Passos, Luminárias, and Arcos regions varied from 4.1 to 5.5. There were no significant differences in the concentrations of phosphorus, magnesium, and organic matter in the soils among the studied areas. Samples from the Arcos area contained large amounts of aluminium in the rainy season and both hydrogen and aluminium in the rainy and dry seasons. The Actinobacteria population seemed to be unaffected by the high levels of aluminium in the soil. Studies are being conducted to produce bioactive compounds from Actinobacteria fermentations on different substrates. The present data suggest that the number and diversity of Actinobacteria spp. in tropical soils represent a vast unexplored resource for the biotechnology of bioactives production.

  4. [Biologically active metabolites of the marine actinobacteria].

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    Sobolevskaia, M P; Kuznetsova, T A

    2010-01-01

    This review systematically data on the chemical structure and biological activity of metabolites of obligate and facultative marine actinobacteria, published from 2000 to 2007. We discuss some structural features of the five groups of metabolites related to macrolides and compounds containing lactone, quinone and diketopiperazine residues, cyclic peptides, alkaloids, and compounds of mixed biosynthesis. Survey shows a large chemical diversity of metabolites actinobacteria isolated from marine environment. It is shown that, along with metabolites, identical to previously isolated from terrestrial actinobacteria, marine actinobacteria synthesize unknown compounds not found in other natural sources, including micro organisms. Perhaps the biosynthesis of new chemotypes bioactive compounds in marine actinobacteria is one manifestation of chemical adaptation of microorganisms to environmental conditions at sea. Review stresses the importance of the chemical study of metabolites of marine actinobacteria. These studies are aimed at obtaining new data on marine microorganisms producers of biologically active compounds and chemical structure and biological activity of new low-molecular bioregulators of natural origin.

  5. Marine actinobacteria: perspectives, challenges, future directions.

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    Bull, Alan T; Stach, James E M; Ward, Alan C; Goodfellow, Michael

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the current state of research on the biology and biotechnology of marine actinobacteria. The topics covered include the abundance, diversity, novelty and biogeographic distribution of marine actinobacteria, ecosystem function, bioprospecting, and a new approach to the exploration of actinobacterial taxonomic space. An agenda for future marine actinobacterial research is suggested based upon consideration of the above issues.

  6. Pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites of marine actinobacteria.

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    Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Sivakumar, Kannan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-04-01

    Marine actinobacteria are one of the most efficient groups of secondary metabolite producers and are very important from an industrial point of view. Many representatives of the order Actinomycetales are prolific producers of thousands of biologically active secondary metabolites. Actinobacteria from terrestrial sources have been studied and screened since the 1950s, for many important antibiotics, anticancer, antitumor and immunosuppressive agents. However, frequent rediscovery of the same compounds from the terrestrial actinobacteria has made them less attractive for screening programs in the recent years. At the same time, actinobacteria isolated from the marine environment have currently received considerable attention due to the structural diversity and unique biological activities of their secondary metabolites. They are efficient producers of new secondary metabolites that show a range of biological activities including antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer, antitumor, cytotoxic, cytostatic, anti-inflammatory, anti-parasitic, anti-malaria, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-angiogenesis, etc. In this review, an evaluation is made on the current status of research on marine actinobacteria yielding pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites. Bioactive compounds from marine actinobacteria possess distinct chemical structures that may form the basis for synthesis of new drugs that could be used to combat resistant pathogens. With the increasing advancement in science and technology, there would be a greater demand for new bioactive compounds synthesized by actinobacteria from various marine sources in future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Production of Enzymes from Marine Actinobacteria.

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    Zhao, X Q; Xu, X N; Chen, L Y

    Marine actinobacteria are well recognized for their capabilities to produce valuable natural products, which have great potential for applications in medical, agricultural, and fine chemical industries. In addition to producing unique enzymes responsible for biosynthesis of natural products, many marine actinobacteria also produce hydrolytic enzymes which are able to degrade various biopolymers, such as cellulose, xylan, and chitin. These enzymes are important to produce biofuels and biochemicals of interest from renewable biomass. In this chapter, the recent reports of novel enzymes produced by marine actinobacteria are reviewed, and advanced technologies that can be applied to search for novel marine enzymes as well as for improved enzyme production by marine actinobacteria are summarized, which include ribosome engineering, genome mining, as well as synthetic biology studies. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Biomedical Applications of Enzymes From Marine Actinobacteria.

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    Kamala, K; Sivaperumal, P

    Marine microbial enzyme technologies have progressed significantly in the last few decades for different applications. Among the various microorganisms, marine actinobacterial enzymes have significant active properties, which could allow them to be biocatalysts with tremendous bioactive metabolites. Moreover, marine actinobacteria have been considered as biofactories, since their enzymes fulfill biomedical and industrial needs. In this chapter, the marine actinobacteria and their enzymes' uses in biological activities and biomedical applications are described. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Marine actinobacteria as a drug treasure house.

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    Hassan, Syed Shams Ul; Shaikh, Abdul Lateef

    2017-03-01

    Marine actinobacteria have been considered as a gold mine with respect to great potential regarding their secondary metabolites. Most of the researches have been conducted on actinobacteria's derived secondary metabolites to examine its pharmacological properties. Actinobacteria have a potential to provide future drugs against crucial diseases, such as drug-resistance bacteria, cancer, a range of viral illnesses, malaria, several infections and inflammations. Although, the mode of action of many bio molecules are still untapped, for a tangible number of compounds by which they interfere with human pathogenesis are reported here with detailed diagrammed illustrations. This knowledge is one of the basic vehicles to be known especially for transforming bio medicinal molecules to medicines. Actinobacteria produce a different kind of biochemical substances with numerous carbon skeletons, which have been found to be the main component interfering with human pathogenesis at different sites. Different diseases have the capability to fight at different sites inside the body can lead to a new wave of increasing the chances to produce targeted medicines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Diversity and biogeography of marine actinobacteria.

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    Ward, Alan C; Bora, Nagamani

    2006-06-01

    The actinomycetes, although not all the Actinobacteria, are easy to isolate from the marine environment. However, their ecological role in the marine ecosystem is largely neglected and various assumptions meant there was little incentive to isolate strains for search and discovery of new drugs. However, the marine environment has become a prime resource in search and discovery for novel natural products and biological diversity, and marine actinomycetes turn out to be important contributors. Similarly, striking advances have been made in marine microbial ecology using molecular techniques and metagenomics, and actinobacteria emerge as an often significant, sometimes even dominant, environmental clade. Both approaches - cultivation methods and molecular techniques - are leading to new insights into marine actinobacterial biodiversity and biogeography. Very different views of actinobacterial diversity emerge from these, however, and the true extent and biogeography of this are still not clear. These are important for developing natural product search and discovery strategies, and biogeography is a hot topic for microbial ecologists.

  11. Research on marine actinobacteria in India.

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    Sivakumar, K; Sahu, Maloy Kumar; Thangaradjou, T; Kannan, L

    2007-09-01

    Marine actinobacteriology is one of the major emerging areas of research in tropics. Marine actinobacteria occur on the sediments and in water and also other biomass (mangrove) and substrates (animal). These organisms are gaining importance not only for their taxonomic and ecological perspectives, but also for their unique metabolites and enzymes. Many earlier studies on these organisms were confined only to the temperate regions. In tropical environment, investigations on them have gained importance only in the last two decades. So far, from the Indian peninsula, 41 species of actinobacteria belonging to 8 genera have been recorded. The genus, Streptomyces of marine origin has been more frequently recorded. Of 9 maritime states of India, only 4 have been extensively covered for the study of marine actinobacteria. Most of the studies conducted pertain to isolation, identification and maintenance of these organisms in different culture media. Further, attention has been focused on studying their antagonistic properties against different pathogens. Their biotechnological potentials are yet to be fully explored.

  12. Thermophilic and alkaliphilic Actinobacteria: biology and potential applications.

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    Shivlata, L; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2015-01-01

    Microbes belonging to the phylum Actinobacteria are prolific sources of antibiotics, clinically useful bioactive compounds and industrially important enzymes. The focus of the current review is on the diversity and potential applications of thermophilic and alkaliphilic actinobacteria, which are highly diverse in their taxonomy and morphology with a variety of adaptations for surviving and thriving in hostile environments. The specific metabolic pathways in these actinobacteria are activated for elaborating pharmaceutically, agriculturally, and biotechnologically relevant biomolecules/bioactive compounds, which find multifarious applications.

  13. Genome Sequences of 11 Human Vaginal Actinobacteria Strains

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    Deitzler, Grace E.; Ruiz, Maria J.; Weimer, Cory; Park, SoEun; Robinson, Lloyd S.; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Wollam, Aye; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the vaginal microbiota is an important health determinant. Several members of the phylum Actinobacteria have been implicated in bacterial vaginosis, a condition associated with many negative health outcomes. Here, we present 11 strains of vaginal Actinobacteria (now available through BEI Resources) along with draft genome sequences. PMID:27688328

  14. Polyhydroxyalkanoates production by actinobacteria isolated from soil.

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    Matias, Fernanda; Bonatto, Diego; Padilla, Gabriel; Rodrigues, Maria Filomena de Andrade; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas

    2009-07-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biodegradable and renewable polymers produced by a wide range of bacterial groups. New microbial bioprospection approaches have become an important way to find new PHA producers and new synthesized polymers. Over the past years, bacteria belonging to actinomycetes group have become known as PHA producers, such as Nocardia and Rhodococcus species, Kineosphaera limosa Liu et al. 2002, and, more recently, Streptomyces species. In this paper, we disclose that there are more actinobacteria PHA producers in addition to the genera cited. Some unusual genera, such as Streptoalloteichus, and some genera frequently present in soil, such as Streptacidiphilus, have been found. Thirty-four isolates were able to accumulate poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and a number of these have traces of poly(3-hydroxyvalerate) when cultivated on glucose or glucose and casein as carbon source. Furthermore, some strains showed traces of medium chain length PHA. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the PHA accumulation occurs in hyphae and spores.

  15. Thermophilic and alkaliphilic Actinobacteria: Biology and potential applications

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    L eShivlata

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbes belonging to the phylum Actinobacteria are prolific sources of antibiotics, clinically useful bioactive compounds and industrially important enzymes. The focus of the current review is on the diversity and potential applications of thermophilic and alkaliphilic actinobacteria, which are highly diverse in their taxonomy and morphology with a variety of adaptations for surviving and thriving in hostile environments. The specific metabolic pathways in these actinobacteria are activated for elaborating pharmaceutically, agriculturally and biotechnologically relevant biomolecules/bioactive compounds, which find multifarious applications.

  16. Surfactants tailored by the class Actinobacteria

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    Johannes H Kügler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gloablly, the drive towards the establishment of a bio-based economy has resulted in an increased need for bio-based applications. This, in turn, has served as a driving force for the discovery and application of novel biosurfactants. The class Actinobacteria represents a vast group of microorganisms with the ability to produce a diverse range of secondary metabolites, including surfactants. Understanding the extensive nature of the biosurfactants produced by actinobacterial strains can assist in finding novel biosurfactants with new potential applications. This review therefore presents a comprehensive overview of the knowledge available on actinobacterial surfactants, the chemical structures that have been completely or partly elucidated, as well as the identity of the biosurfactant-producing strains. Producer strains of not yet elucidated compounds are discussed, as well as the original habitats of all the producer strains, which seems to indicate that biosurfactant production is environmentally driven. Methodology applied in the isolation, purification and structural elucidation of the different types of surface active compounds, as well as surfactant activity tests, are also discussed. Overall, actinobacterial surfactants can be summarized to include the dominantly occurring trehalose-comprising surfactants, other non-trehalose containing glycolipids, lipopeptides and the more rare actinobacterial surfactants. The lack of structural information on a large proportion of actinobacterial surfactants should be considered as a driving force to further explore the abundance and diversity of these compounds. This would allow for a better understanding of actinobacterial surface active compounds and their potential for biotechnological application.

  17. [Identification of environmental Actinobacteria representing an occupational health risk].

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    Skóra, Justyna; Szponar, Bogumiła; Paściak, Mariola; Gutarowska, Beata

    2013-12-06

    Actinobacteria, the etiologic agents of tuberculosis, actinomycosis, respiratory infections and pathological skin lesions, are also classified as hazardous biological agents at the workplace. An increased number of Actinobacteria primarily occurs at the workplaces in composting plants, agriculture, waste management facilities, libraries and museums. Robust identification of Actinobacteria requires a polyphasic diagnostic strategy including an assessment of morphological, physiological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic features as well as genotyping. Commercially available diagnostic kits often do not include bacteria isolated from the environment and therefore analyses of chemotaxonomic markers--components of peptidoglycan, fatty acids, polar lipids (phospho- and glycolipids) and isoprenoid quinones are recommended. The paper discusses a comprehensive approach to the isolation and identification of Actinobacteria, with emphasis on chemotaxonomic methods. A diagnostic procedure is exemplified by environmental strains obtained from composting plants and libraries.

  18. Changes of cellular fatty acids of soil Actinobacteria producing antibiotics

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    LIPENSKÁ, Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Changes of cellular fatty acids in membrane of Actinobacteria. Changes of fatty acids are significant biomarkers of changing conditions of surroundings. This can also indicate production of antibiotics along with production of atypical fatty acids.

  19. Actinobacteria from arid and desert habitats: diversity and biological activity

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    Joachim eWink

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The lack of new antibiotics in the pharmaceutical pipeline guides more and more researchers to leave the classical isolation procedures and to look in special niches and ecosystems. Bioprospecting of extremophilic Actinobacteria through mining untapped strains and avoiding resiolation of known biomolecules is among the most promising strategies for this purpose. With this approach, members of acidtolerant, alkalitolerant, psychrotolerant, thermotolerant, halotolerant and xerotolerant Actinobacteria have been obtained from respective habitats. Among these, little survey exists on the diversity of Actinobacteria in arid areas, which are often adapted to relatively high temperatures, salt concentrations, and radiation. Therefore, arid and desert habitats are special ecosystems which can be recruited for the isolation of uncommon Actinobacteria with new metabolic capability.At the time of this writing, members of Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Saccharothrix, Streptosporangium, Cellulomonas, Amycolatopsis, Geodermatophilus, Lechevalieria, Nocardia and Actinomadura are reported from arid habitats. However, metagenomic data present dominant members of the communities in desiccating condition of areas with limited water availability that are not yet isolated. Furthermore, significant diverse types of polyketide synthase (PKS and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS genes are detected in xerophilic and xerotolerant Actinobacteria and some bioactive compounds are reported from them. Rather than pharmaceutically active metabolites, molecules with protection activity against drying such as Ectoin and Hydroxyectoin with potential application in industry and agriculture have also been identified from xerophilic Actinobacteria. In addition, numerous biologically active small molecules are expected to be discovered from arid adapted Actinobacteria in the future. In the current survey, the diversity and biotechnological potential of Actinobacteria

  20. Coral-Associated Actinobacteria: Diversity, Abundance, and Biotechnological Potentials.

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    Mahmoud, Huda M; Kalendar, Aisha A

    2016-01-01

    Marine Actinobacteria, particularly coral-associated Actinobacteria, have attracted attention recently. In this study, the abundance and diversity of Actinobacteria associated with three types of coral thriving in a thermally stressed coral reef system north of the Arabian Gulf were investigated. Coscinaraea columna, Platygyra daedalea and Porites harrisoni have been found to harbor equivalent numbers of culturable Actinobacteria in their tissues but not in their mucus. However, different culturable actinobacterial communities have been found to be associated with different coral hosts. Differences in the abundance and diversity of Actinobacteria were detected between the mucus and tissue of the same coral host. In addition, temporal and spatial variations in the abundance and diversity of the cultivable actinobacterial communities were detected. In total, 19 different actinobacterial genera, namely Micrococcus, Brachybacterium, Brevibacterium, Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Renibacterium, Nocardia, Microbacterium, Dietzia, Cellulomonas, Ornithinimicrobium, Rhodococcus, Agrococcus, Kineococcus, Dermacoccus, Devriesea, Kocuria, Marmoricola, and Arthrobacter, were isolated from the coral tissue and mucus samples. Furthermore, 82 isolates related to Micromonospora, Brachybacterium, Nocardia, Micrococcus, Arthrobacter, Rhodococcus, and Streptomyces showed antimicrobial activities against representative Gram-positive and/or Gram-negative bacteria. Even though Brevibacterium and Kocuria were the most dominant actinobacterial isolates, they failed to show any antimicrobial activity, whereas less dominant genera, such as Streptomyces, did show antimicrobial activity. Focusing on the diversity of coral-associated Actinobacteria may help to understand how corals thrive under harsh environmental conditions and may lead to the discovery of novel antimicrobial metabolites with potential biotechnological applications.

  1. Antagonistic activity of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria

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    Selvakumar Dharmaraj; Dhevendaran Kandasamy

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To focus on the isolation and preliminary characterization of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria particularly Streptomyces species and also their antagonistic activities against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Methods: The sponges were collected from Kovalam and Vizhinjam port of south-west coast of Kerala, India. Isolation of strains was carried out from sponge extracts using international Streptomyces project media. For preliminary identification of the strains, morphological (mycelial colouration, soluble pigments, melanoid pigmentation, spore morphology), nutritional uptake (carbon utilisation, amonoacids influence, sodium chloride tolerance), physiological (pH, temperature) and chemotaxonomical characterization were done. Antimicrobial studies were also carried out for the selected strains. Results: With the help of the spicule structures, the collected marine sponges were identified as Callyspongia diffusa, Mycale mytilorum, Tedania anhelans and Dysidea fragilis. Nearly 94 strains were primarily isolated from these sponges and further they were sub-cultured using international Streptomyces project media. The strains exhibited different mycelial colouration (aerial and substrate), soluble and melanoid pigmentations. The strains possessed three types of sporophore morphology namely rectus flexibilis, spiral and retinaculiaperti. Among the 94 isolates, seven exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities with maximal zone of inhibition of 30 mm. The nutritional, physiological and chemotaxonomical characteristic study helped in the conventional identification of the seven strains and they all suggest that the strains to be grouped under the genus Streptomyces. Conclusions: The present study clearly helps in the preliminary identification of the isolates associated with marine sponges. Antagonistic activities prove the production of antimicrobial metabolites against the pathogens. Marine sponges associated Streptomyces are universally well

  2. Antagonistic activity of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria

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    Selvakumar Dharmaraj

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To focus on the isolation and preliminary characterization of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria particularly Streptomyces species and also their antagonistic activities against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Methods: The sponges were collected from Kovalam and Vizhinjam port of south-west coast of Kerala, India. Isolation of strains was carried out from sponge extracts using international Streptomyces project media. For preliminary identification of the strains, morphological (mycelial colouration, soluble pigments, melanoid pigmentation, spore morphology, nutritional uptake (carbon utilisation, amonoacids influence, sodium chloride tolerance, physiological (pH, temperature and chemotaxonomical characterization were done. Antimicrobial studies were also carried out for the selected strains. Results: With the help of the spicule structures, the collected marine sponges were identified as Callyspongia diffusa, Mycale mytilorum, Tedania anhelans and Dysidea fragilis. Nearly 94 strains were primarily isolated from these sponges and further they were sub-cultured using international Streptomyces project media. The strains exhibited different mycelial colouration (aerial and substrate, soluble and melanoid pigmentations. The strains possessed three types of sporophore morphology namely rectus flexibilis, spiral and retinaculiaperti. Among the 94 isolates, seven exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities with maximal zone of inhibition of 30 mm. The nutritional, physiological and chemotaxonomical characteristic study helped in the conventional identification of the seven strains and they all suggest that the strains to be grouped under the genus Streptomyces. Conclusions: The present study clearly helps in the preliminary identification of the isolates associated with marine sponges. Antagonistic activities prove the production of antimicrobial metabolites against the pathogens. Marine sponges associated Streptomyces are

  3. Evolution and Ecology of Actinobacteria and Their Bioenergy Applications.

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    Lewin, Gina R; Carlos, Camila; Chevrette, Marc G; Horn, Heidi A; McDonald, Bradon R; Stankey, Robert J; Fox, Brian G; Currie, Cameron R

    2016-09-08

    The ancient phylum Actinobacteria is composed of phylogenetically and physiologically diverse bacteria that help Earth's ecosystems function. As free-living organisms and symbionts of herbivorous animals, Actinobacteria contribute to the global carbon cycle through the breakdown of plant biomass. In addition, they mediate community dynamics as producers of small molecules with diverse biological activities. Together, the evolution of high cellulolytic ability and diverse chemistry, shaped by their ecological roles in nature, make Actinobacteria a promising group for the bioenergy industry. Specifically, their enzymes can contribute to industrial-scale breakdown of cellulosic plant biomass into simple sugars that can then be converted into biofuels. Furthermore, harnessing their ability to biosynthesize a range of small molecules has potential for the production of specialty biofuels.

  4. Effects of actinobacteria on plant disease suppression and growth promotion.

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    Palaniyandi, Sasikumar Arunachalam; Yang, Seung Hwan; Zhang, Lixin; Suh, Joo-Won

    2013-11-01

    Biological control and plant growth promotion by plant beneficial microbes has been viewed as an alternative to the use of chemical pesticides and fertilizers. Bacteria and fungi that are naturally associated with plants and have a beneficial effect on plant growth by the alleviation of biotic and abiotic stresses were isolated and developed into biocontrol (BCA) and plant growth-promoting agents (PGPA). Actinobacteria are a group of important plant-associated spore-forming bacteria, which have been studied for their biocontrol, plant growth promotion, and interaction with plants. This review summarizes the effects of actinobacteria as BCA, PGPA, and its beneficial associations with plants.

  5. Trehalolipid biosurfactants from nonpathogenic Rhodococcus actinobacteria with diverse immunomodulatory activities.

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    Kuyukina, Maria S; Ivshina, Irena B; Baeva, Tatiana A; Kochina, Olesia A; Gein, Sergey V; Chereshnev, Valery A

    2015-12-25

    Actinobacteria of the genus Rhodococcus produce trehalolipid biosurfactants with versatile biochemical properties and low toxicity. In recent years, these biosurfactants are increasingly studied as possible biomedical agents with expressed immunological activities. Applications of trehalolipids from Rhodococcus, predominantly cell-bound, in biomedicine are also attractive because their cost drawback could be less significant for high-value products. The review summarizes recent findings in immunomodulatory activities of trehalolipid biosurfactants from nonpathogenic Rhodococcus and related actinobacteria and compares their biomedical potential with well-known immunomodifying properties of trehalose dimycolates from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Molecular mechanisms of trehalolipid interactions with immunocompetent cells are also discussed.

  6. Littoral lichens as a novel source of potentially bioactive Actinobacteria.

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    Parrot, Delphine; Antony-Babu, Sanjay; Intertaglia, Laurent; Grube, Martin; Tomasi, Sophie; Suzuki, Marcelino T

    2015-10-30

    Cultivable Actinobacteria are the largest source of microbially derived bioactive molecules. The high demand for novel antibiotics highlights the need for exploring novel sources of these bacteria. Microbial symbioses with sessile macro-organisms, known to contain bioactive compounds likely of bacterial origin, represent an interesting and underexplored source of Actinobacteria. We studied the diversity and potential for bioactive-metabolite production of Actinobacteria associated with two marine lichens (Lichina confinis and L. pygmaea; from intertidal and subtidal zones) and one littoral lichen (Roccella fuciformis; from supratidal zone) from the Brittany coast (France), as well as the terrestrial lichen Collema auriforme (from a riparian zone, Austria). A total of 247 bacterial strains were isolated using two selective media. Isolates were identified and clustered into 101 OTUs (98% identity) including 51 actinobacterial OTUs. The actinobacterial families observed were: Brevibacteriaceae, Cellulomonadaceae, Gordoniaceae, Micrococcaceae, Mycobacteriaceae, Nocardioidaceae, Promicromonosporaceae, Pseudonocardiaceae, Sanguibacteraceae and Streptomycetaceae. Interestingly, the diversity was most influenced by the selective media rather than lichen species or the level of lichen thallus association. The potential for bioactive-metabolite biosynthesis of the isolates was confirmed by screening genes coding for polyketide synthases types I and II. These results show that littoral lichens are a source of diverse potentially bioactive Actinobacteria.

  7. Marine actinobacteria: an important source of bioactive natural products.

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    Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Kang, Kyong-Hwa; Sivakumar, Kannan; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y; Oh, Hyun-Myung; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-07-01

    Marine environment is largely an untapped source for deriving actinobacteria, having potential to produce novel, bioactive natural products. Actinobacteria are the prolific producers of pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites, accounting for about 70% of the naturally derived compounds that are currently in clinical use. Among the various actinobacterial genera, Actinomadura, Actinoplanes, Amycolatopsis, Marinispora, Micromonospora, Nocardiopsis, Saccharopolyspora, Salinispora, Streptomyces and Verrucosispora are the major potential producers of commercially important bioactive natural products. In this respect, Streptomyces ranks first with a large number of bioactive natural products. Marine actinobacteria are unique enhancing quite different biological properties including antimicrobial, anticancer, antiviral, insecticidal and enzyme inhibitory activities. They have attracted global in the last ten years for their ability to produce pharmaceutically active compounds. In this review, we have focused attention on the bioactive natural products isolated from marine actinobacteria, possessing unique chemical structures that may form the basis for synthesis of novel drugs that could be used to combat resistant pathogenic microorganisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Screening of marine actinobacteria for amylase enzymes inhibitors.

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    Raja, S; Ganesan, S; Sivakumar, K; Thangaradjou, T

    2010-06-01

    Amylase inhibitor producing actinobacteria were isolated and characterized from terrestrial environment and there is no much report found from marine environment, hence in the present study, 17 strains isolated from the rhizosphere sediments of mangroves were tested for their amylase inhibition ability. Seawater requirement test for the growth of actinobacteria found that the strains SSR-3, SSR-12 and SSR-16 requires at least 50% and SSR-6 requires at least 25% seawater for their growth. The inhibition activity of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic amylase was tested by using Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus niger. The maximum amylase activity (40mm) produced by the A. niger was taken as positive control, when the test actinobacteria strains grown in the medium they inhibited amylase activity and was evidenced by the reduction in inhibition zone (14-37 mm) similarly the amylase produced by the Bacillus subtilis was also recorded maximum (35 mm) amylase activity and was taken as positive control, and the test atinobacterial strains reduced enzyme action(12-33 mm) it varied levals. This indicates that the actinobacteria strains were controlled amylase enzyme activity in both the cases. The strain SSR-10 was highly effective and SSR-8 was less effective in inhibiting eukaryotic amylase produced by A. niger. The strain SSR-2 was effective and SSR-6 showed very less effect in inhibiting the prokaryotic amylase produced by the B subtilis.

  9. Estimating and comparing the diversity of marine actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stach, James E M; Bull, Alan T

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of species richness estimators to microbial diversity data and describes phylogenetic approaches to comparing microbial communities. The techniques are demonstrated using a community of marine actinobacteria. Results demonstrate that marine environments harbour massive actinobacterial diversity. Furthermore, these predictions are likely to be severe underestimates due to the use of arbitrary OTU definitions.

  10. Anti-Candida Properties of Urauchimycins from Actinobacteria Associated with Trachymyrmex Ants

    OpenAIRE

    Mendes, Thais D.; Borges, Warley S.; Andre Rodrigues; Solomon, Scott E.; Paulo C. Vieira; Duarte, Marta C. T.; Pagnocca, Fernando C.

    2013-01-01

    After decades of intensive searching for antimicrobial compounds derived from actinobacteria, the frequency of isolation of new molecules has decreased. To cope with this concern, studies have focused on the exploitation of actinobacteria from unexplored environments and actinobacteria symbionts of plants and animals. In this study, twenty-four actinobacteria strains isolated from workers of Trachymyrmex ants were evaluated for antifungal activity towards a variety of Candida species. Results...

  11. Marine Rare Actinobacteria: Isolation, Characterization, and Strategies for Harnessing Bioactive Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Dhakal, Dipesh; Pokhrel, Anaya Raj; Shrestha, Biplav; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2017-01-01

    Actinobacteria are prolific producers of thousands of biologically active natural compounds with diverse activities. More than half of these bioactive compounds have been isolated from members belonging to actinobacteria. Recently, rare actinobacteria existing at different environmental settings such as high altitudes, volcanic areas, and marine environment have attracted attention. It has been speculated that physiological or biochemical pressures under such harsh environmental conditions ca...

  12. Effect of actinobacteria agent inoculation methods on cellulose degradation during composting based on redundancy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Lu, Qian; Wei, Yuquan; Cui, Hongyang; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Xueqin; Shan, Si; Wei, Zimin

    2016-11-01

    In this study, actinobacteria agent including Streptomyces sp. and Micromonospora sp. were inoculated during chicken manure composting by different inoculation methods. The effect of different treatments on cellulose degradation and the relationship between inoculants and indigenous actinobacteria were investigated during composting. The results showed that inoculation in different stages of composting all improved the actinobacteria community diversity particularly in the cooling stage of composting (M3). Moreover, inoculation could distinctly accelerate the degradation of organic matters (OM) especially celluloses. Redundancy analysis indicated that the correlation between indigenous actinobacteria and degradation of OM and cellulose were regulated by inoculants and there were significant differences between different inoculation methods. Furthermore, synergy between indigenous actinobacteria and inoculants for degradation of OM and cellulose in M3 was better than other treatments. Conclusively, we suggested an inoculation method to regulate the indigenous actinobacteria based on the relationship between inoculants and indigenous actinobacteria and degradation content.

  13. Diversity of culturable actinobacteria isolated from marine sponge Haliclona sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shumei; Sun, Wei; Chen, Minjie; Dai, Shikun; Zhang, Long; Liu, Yonghong; Lee, Kyung Jin; Li, Xiang

    2007-11-01

    This study describes actinobacteria isolated from the marine sponge Haliclona sp. collected in shallow water of the South China Sea. A total of 54 actinobacteria were isolated using media selective for actinobacteria. Species diversity and natural product diversity of isolates from marine sponge Haliclona sp. were analysed. Twenty-four isolates were selected on the basis of their morphology on different media and assigned to the phylum Actinobacteria by a combination of 16S rRNA gene based restriction enzymes digestion and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The 16S rRNA genes of 24 isolates were digested by restriction enzymes TaqI and MspI and assigned to different groups according to their restriction enzyme pattern. The phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that the isolates belonged to the genera Streptomyces, Nocardiopsis, Micromonospora and Verrucosispora; one other isolate was recovered that does not belong to known genera based on its unique 16S rRNA gene sequence. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a bacterium classified as Verrucosispora sp. that has been isolated from a marine sponge. The majority of the strains tested belong to the genus Streptomyces and three isolates may be new species. All of the 24 isolates were screened for genes encoding polyketide synthases (PKS) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS). PKS and NRPS sequences were detected in more than half of the isolates and the different "PKS-I-PKS-II-NRPS" combinations in different isolates belonging to the same species are indicators of their potential natural product diversity and divergent genetic evolution.

  14. Antioxidant activity of newly discovered lineage of marine actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, Loganathan; Kumar, Gaurav; Bhaskara Rao, Kokati Venkata

    2013-04-13

    To investigate the antioxidant activity of marine actinobacteria. The content of total phenolics, the level of antioxidant potential by DPPH radical scavenging activity, metal chelating activity, FRAP method, β carotene assay and NO scavenging activity in extract were determined. In all the methods the extract exhibited good scavenging activity except NO scavenging activity. The IC(50) values of marine actinobacteria extract on DPPH radical were found to be 41.09 μg/mL. The zone of color retention was 12 mm in β-carotene bleaching assay. DNA protective efficiency of the extracts was also studied using UV-photolysed H(2)O(2)-driven oxidative damage to pBR322. HPLC analysis identified some of the major phenolic compounds in extracts, which might be responsible for the antioxidant potential and cyto-protection. It showed a 100% cytotoxic effect in brine shrimp lethality assay within 10 mins. The novel actinobacteria was identified as Streptomyces LK-3 (JF710608) through 16S rDNA Sequencing. The results obtained suggest that the extracts bear anti-cancer metabolites and could be considered as a potential source for anti-cancer drug development. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Genomics of aerobic cellulose utilization systems in actinobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain Anderson

    Full Text Available Cellulose degrading enzymes have important functions in the biotechnology industry, including the production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. Anaerobes including Clostridium species organize cellulases and other glycosyl hydrolases into large complexes known as cellulosomes. In contrast, aerobic actinobacteria utilize systems comprised of independently acting enzymes, often with carbohydrate binding domains. Numerous actinobacterial genomes have become available through the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA project. We identified putative cellulose-degrading enzymes belonging to families GH5, GH6, GH8, GH9, GH12, GH48, and GH51 in the genomes of eleven members of the actinobacteria. The eleven organisms were tested in several assays for cellulose degradation, and eight of the organisms showed evidence of cellulase activity. The three with the highest cellulase activity were Actinosynnema mirum, Cellulomonas flavigena, and Xylanimonas cellulosilytica. Cellobiose is known to induce cellulolytic enzymes in the model organism Thermobifida fusca, but only Nocardiopsis dassonvillei showed higher cellulolytic activity in the presence of cellobiose. In T. fusca, cellulases and a putative cellobiose ABC transporter are regulated by the transcriptional regulator CelR. Nine organisms appear to use the CelR site or a closely related binding site to regulate an ABC transporter. In some, CelR also regulates cellulases, while cellulases are controlled by different regulatory sites in three organisms. Mining of genome data for cellulose degradative enzymes followed by experimental verification successfully identified several actinobacteria species which were not previously known to degrade cellulose as cellulolytic organisms.

  16. Diversity and distribution of Actinobacteria associated with reef coral Porites lutea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weiqi; Li, Jie; Zhang, Si; Long, Lijuan

    2015-01-01

    Actinobacteria is a ubiquitous major group in coral holobiont. The diversity and spatial and temporal distribution of actinobacteria have been rarely documented. In this study, diversity of actinobacteria associated with mucus, tissue and skeleton of Porites lutea and in the surrounding seawater were examined every 3 months for 1 year on Luhuitou fringing reef. The population structures of the P. lutea-associated actinobacteria were analyzed using phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, which demonstrated highly diverse actinobacteria profiles in P. lutea. A total of 25 described families and 10 unnamed families were determined in the populations, and 12 genera were firstly detected in corals. The Actinobacteria diversity was significantly different between the P. lutea and the surrounding seawater. Only 10 OTUs were shared by the seawater and coral samples. Redundancy and hierarchical cluster analyses were performed to analyze the correlation between the variations of actinobacteria population within the divergent compartments of P. lutea, seasonal changes, and environmental factors. The actinobacteria communities in the same coral compartment tended to cluster together. Even so, an extremely small fraction of OTUs was common in all three P. lutea compartments. Analysis of the relationship between actinobacteria assemblages and the environmental parameters showed that several genera were closely related to specific environmental factors. This study highlights that coral-associated actinobacteria populations are highly diverse, and spatially structured within P. lutea, and they are distinct from which in the ambient seawater. PMID:26539166

  17. No ancient DNA damage in Actinobacteria from the Neanderthal bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Zaremba-Niedźwiedzka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Neanderthal genome was recently sequenced using DNA extracted from a 38,000-year-old fossil. At the start of the project, the fraction of mammalian and bacterial DNA in the sample was estimated to be <6% and 9%, respectively. Treatment with restriction enzymes prior to sequencing increased the relative proportion of mammalian DNA to 15%, but the large majority of sequences remain uncharacterized. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our taxonomic profiling of 3.95 Gb of Neanderthal DNA isolated from the Vindija Neanderthal Vi33.16 fossil showed that 90% of about 50,000 rRNA gene sequence reads were of bacterial origin, of which Actinobacteria accounted for more than 75%. Actinobacteria also represented more than 80% of the PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences from a cave sediment sample taken from the same G layer as the Neanderthal bone. However, phylogenetic analyses did not identify any sediment clones that were closely related to the bone-derived sequences. We analysed the patterns of nucleotide differences in the individual sequence reads compared to the assembled consensus sequences of the rRNA gene sequences. The typical ancient nucleotide substitution pattern with a majority of C to T changes indicative of DNA damage was observed for the Neanderthal rRNA gene sequences, but not for the Streptomyces-like rRNA gene sequences. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analyses suggest that the Actinobacteria, and especially members of the Streptomycetales, contribute the majority of sequences in the DNA extracted from the Neanderthal fossil Vi33.16. The bacterial DNA showed no signs of damage, and we hypothesize that it was derived from bacteria that have been enriched inside the bone. The bioinformatic approach used here paves the way for future studies of microbial compositions and patterns of DNA damage in bacteria from archaeological bones. Such studies can help identify targeted measures to increase the relative amount of endogenous DNA in the

  18. [Halogenated natural products from the marine-derived actinobacteria and their halogenation mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yi; Zhou, Hong-xia; Wang, Yi-guang; Gan, Mao-luo; Yang, Zhao-yong

    2013-09-01

    In the last decade, along with the development of taxonomy research in marine-derived actinobacteria, more and more halogenated natural products were discovered from marine actinobacteria. Most of them showed good biological activity and unique structure compared to those from land. The special halogenation mechanism in some compounds' biosynthesis has drawn great attention. So in this review, we focus on the halogenated natural products from marine actinobacteria and their halogenation mechanisms.

  19. Marine actinobacteria: new opportunities for natural product search and discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Alan T; Stach, James E M

    2007-11-01

    It is widely accepted that new drugs, especially antibiotics, are urgently required, and that the most propitious source remains natural products. We argue that in exploring new sources of bioactive natural products the marine environment warrants particular attention, in view of the remarkable diversity of microorganisms and metabolic products. Recent reports of new chemical entities and first-in-class drug candidates, and confirmation of indigenous marine actinobacteria, make exciting discoveries even more likely given the unrivalled capacity of this class of bacteria to produce exploitable natural products.

  20. Marine actinobacteria associated with marine organisms and their potentials in producing pharmaceutical natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valliappan, Karuppiah; Sun, Wei; Li, Zhiyong

    2014-09-01

    Actinobacteria are ubiquitous in the marine environment, playing an important ecological role in the recycling of refractory biomaterials and producing novel natural products with pharmic applications. Actinobacteria have been detected or isolated from the marine creatures such as sponges, corals, mollusks, ascidians, seaweeds, and seagrass. Marine organism-associated actinobacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences, i.e., 3,003 sequences, deposited in the NCBI database clearly revealed enormous numbers of actinobacteria associated with marine organisms. For example, RDP classification of these sequences showed that 112 and 62 actinobacterial genera were associated with the sponges and corals, respectively. In most cases, it is expected that these actinobacteria protect the host against pathogens by producing bioactive compounds. Natural products investigation and functional gene screening of the actinobacteria associated with the marine organisms revealed that they can synthesize numerous natural products including polyketides, isoprenoids, phenazines, peptides, indolocarbazoles, sterols, and others. These compounds showed anticancer, antimicrobial, antiparasitic, neurological, antioxidant, and anti-HIV activities. Therefore, marine organism-associated actinobacteria represent an important resource for marine drugs. It is an upcoming field of research to search for novel actinobacteria and pharmaceutical natural products from actinobacteria associated with the marine organisms. In this review, we attempt to summarize the present knowledge on the diversity and natural products production of actinobacteria associated with the marine organisms, based on the publications from 1991 to 2013.

  1. Prospects of using marine actinobacteria as probiotics in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Surajit; Ward, Louise R; Burke, Chris

    2008-12-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents have been banned for disease management in aquaculture systems due to the emergence of antibiotic resistance gene and enduring residual effects in the environments. Instead, microbial interventions in sustainable aquaculture have been proposed, and among them, the most popular and practical approach is the use of probiotics. A range of microorganisms have been used so far as probiotics, which include Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, yeast, bacteriophages, and unicellular algae. The results are satisfactory and promising; however, to combat the latest infectious diseases, the search for a new strain for probiotics is essential. Marine actinobacteria were designated as the chemical factory a long time ago, and quite a large number of chemical substances have been isolated to date. The potent actinobacterial genera are Streptomyces; Micromonospora; and a novel, recently described genus, Salinispora. Despite the existence of all the significant features of a good probiont, actinobacteria have been hardly used as probiotics in aquaculture. However, this group of bacteria promises to supply the most potential probiotic strains in the future.

  2. Diversity and novelty of actinobacteria in Arctic marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gaiyun; Cao, Tingfeng; Ying, Jianxi; Yang, Yanliu; Ma, Lingqi

    2014-04-01

    The actinobacterial diversity of Arctic marine sediments was investigated using culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches. A total of 152 strains were isolated from seven different media; 18 isolates were selected for phylogenetic analysis on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences. Results showed that the 18 isolates belonged to a potential novel genus and 10 known genera including Actinotalea, Arthrobacter, Brachybacterium, Brevibacterium, Kocuria, Kytococcus, Microbacterium, Micrococcus, Mycobacterium, and Pseudonocardia. Subsequently, 172 rDNA clones were selected by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis from 692 positive clones within four actinobacteria-specific 16S rDNA libraries of Arctic marine sediments, and then these 172 clones were sequenced. In total, 67 phylotypes were clustered in 11 known genera of actinobacteria including Agrococcus, Cellulomonas, Demequina, Iamia, Ilumatobacter, Janibacter, Kocuria, Microbacterium, Phycicoccus, Propionibacterium, and Pseudonocardia, along with other, unidentified actinobacterial clones. Based on the detection of a substantial number of uncultured phylotypes showing low BLAST identities (marine environments harbour highly diverse actinobacterial communities, many of which appear to be novel, uncultured species.

  3. Diversity of cultivable actinobacteria in geographically widespread marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Luis A; Stach, James E M; Pathom-aree, Wasu; Ward, Alan C; Bull, Alan T; Goodfellow, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Reports describing actinobacteria isolated from marine environments have been dominated by Micromonospora, Rhodococcus and Streptomyces species. Recent culture-independent studies have shown that marine environments contain a high diversity of actinobacterial species that are rarely, if at all, recovered by cultivation-based methods. In this study, it is shown that cultivation-independent methods can be used to guide the application of selective isolation methods. The detection of marine-derived actinobacterial species that have previously only been reported from terrestrial habitats is highlighted. This study provides good evidence that the previously described low diversity of actinobacterial species isolated from marine environments does not reflect an actual low species diversity, and that the use of informed selective isolation procedures can aid in the isolation of members of novel taxa.

  4. Actinobacteria: Current research and perspectives for bioremediation of pesticides and heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Analia; Saez, Juliana Maria; Davila Costa, José Sebastian; Colin, Veronica Leticia; Fuentes, María Soledad; Cuozzo, Sergio Antonio; Benimeli, Claudia Susana; Polti, Marta Alejandra; Amoroso, María Julia

    2017-01-01

    Actinobacteria exhibit cosmopolitan distribution since their members are widely distributed in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. In the environment they play relevant ecological roles including recycling of substances, degradation of complex polymers, and production of bioactive molecules. Biotechnological potential of actinobacteria in the environment was demonstrated by their ability to remove organic and inorganic pollutants. This ability is the reason why actinobacteria have received special attention as candidates for bioremediation, which has gained importance because of the widespread release of contaminants into the environment. Among organic contaminants, pesticides are widely used for pest control, although the negative impact of these chemicals in the environmental balance is increasingly becoming apparent. Similarly, the extensive application of heavy metals in industrial processes lead to highly contaminated areas worldwide. Several studies focused in the use of actinobacteria for cleaning up the environment were performed in the last 15 years. Strategies such as bioaugmentation, biostimulation, cell immobilization, production of biosurfactants, design of defined mixed cultures and the use of plant-microbe systems were developed to enhance the capabilities of actinobacteria in bioremediation. In this review, we compiled and discussed works focused in the study of different bioremediation strategies using actinobacteria and how they contributed to the improvement of the already existing strategies. In addition, we discuss the importance of omic studies to elucidate mechanisms and regulations that bacteria use to cope with pollutant toxicity, since they are still little known in actinobacteria. A brief account of sources and harmful effects of pesticides and heavy metals is also given.

  5. Isolation and Characterisation of Antagonistic Actinobacteria from Mangrove Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Raghava Rao

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 1024x768 The aim of the present study was to isolate and screen actinobacteria having antagonistic activities against pathogenic microorganisms. A total of twenty actinobacteria strains were isolated from the mangrove sediment. Of these four active isolates were identified as Streptomyces species by means of morphological, physiological, biochemical and cultural characteristics. These isolates were subjected to shake flask fermentation and the secondary metabolites were extracted with ethyl acetate and screened for their antimicrobial activities against selected bacterial and fungal pathogens. The results showed that among the active isolates, four isolates (BC 01, BC 02, BC 03 and BC 04 showed promising activities against the selected test pathogens. These four extracted isolates were analyzed for UV Spectrophotometric and HPLC. Spectral data of the extracted compound revealed its antimicrobial nature. The UV spectrum of the methanol extracts for the active isolates showed absorbance peaks ranging between 207-223 nm. Two to three bioactive regions were detected on the HPLC. The results indicate that Streptomyces strains isolated from mangrove sediment produce potential antibacterial, antifungal and broad spectrum antibiotic compounds. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  6. A trap for in situ cultivation of filamentous actinobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrish, Ekaterina; Bollmann, Annette; Epstein, Slava; Lewis, Kim

    2008-01-01

    The approach of growing microorganisms in situ, or in a simulated natural environment is appealing, and different versions of it have been described by several groups. The major difficulties with these approaches are that they are not selective for actinomycetes – a group of gram-positive bacteria well known as a rich source of antibiotics. In order to efficiently access actinomycetes, a trap for specifically capturing and cultivating these microorganisms in situ has been developed, based on the ability of these bacteria to form hyphae and penetrate solid environments. The trap is formed by two semi-permeable membranes (0.2 – 0.6 μm pore-size bottom membrane and 0.03 μm pore-size top membrane) glued to a plastic washer with sterile agar or gellan gum inside. The trap is placed on top of soil, and filamentous microorganisms selectively penetrate into the device and form colonies. Decreasing the size of the pores of the lower membrane to 0.2 μm restricted penetration of fungi. The trap produced more filamentous actinobacteria, and a higher variety of them, as compared to a conventional Petri dish cultivation from the same soil sample. Importantly, the trap cultivation resulted in the isolation of unusual and rare actinomycetes. PMID:18255181

  7. Exploring the Potential for Actinobacteria as Defensive Symbionts in Fungus-Growing Termites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.A.; Mesquita Nobre, T.; Currie, C.R.; Aanen, D.K.; Poulsen, M.

    2012-01-01

    In fungus-growing termites, fungi of the subgenus Pseudoxylaria threaten colony health through substrate competition with the termite fungus (Termitomyces). The potential mechanisms with which termites suppress Pseudoxylaria have remained unknown. Here we explore if Actinobacteria potentially play a

  8. Exploring the potential for actinobacteria as defensive symbionts in fungus-growing termites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Anna A.; Nobre, Tânia; Currie, Cameron R.

    2012-01-01

    In fungus-growing termites, fungi of the subgenus Pseudoxylaria threaten colony health through substrate competition with the termite fungus (Termitomyces). The potential mechanisms with which termites suppress Pseudoxylaria have remained unknown. Here we explore if Actinobacteria potentially play...... a role as defensive symbionts against Pseudoxylaria in fungus-growing termites. We sampled for Actinobacteria from 30 fungus-growing termite colonies, spanning the three main termite genera and two geographically distant sites. Our isolations yielded 360 Actinobacteria, from which we selected subsets......-growing termites, indicating lack of specificity. Antibiotic-activity screening of 288 isolates against the fungal cultivar and competitor revealed that most of the Actinobacteria-produced molecules with antifungal activity. A more detailed bioassay on 53 isolates, to test the specificity of antibiotics, showed...

  9. Exploring the Potential for Actinobacteria as Defensive Symbionts in Fungus-Growing Termites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.A.; Mesquita Nobre, T.; Currie, C.R.; Aanen, D.K.; Poulsen, M.

    2012-01-01

    In fungus-growing termites, fungi of the subgenus Pseudoxylaria threaten colony health through substrate competition with the termite fungus (Termitomyces). The potential mechanisms with which termites suppress Pseudoxylaria have remained unknown. Here we explore if Actinobacteria potentially play a

  10. Marine actinobacteria showing phosphate-solubilizing efficiency in Chorao Island, Goa, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dastager, S.G.; Damare, S.R.

    The occurrence and distribution of an actinobacteria group of bacteria capable of dissolving insoluble phosphates were investigated in this study in marine environments, especially in sediments of Chorao Island, Goa, India. A total of 200 bacterial...

  11. Isolation and screening for plant growth-promoting (PGP) actinobacteria from Araucaria angustifolia rhizosphere soil

    OpenAIRE

    Vasconcellos,Rafael Leandro de Figueiredo; Silva,Mylenne Calciolari Pinheiro da; RIBEIRO, Carlos Marcelo; Cardoso,Elke Jurandy Bran Nogueira

    2010-01-01

    Actinobacteria are capable of playing several different roles in soil ecosystems. These microorganisms affect other organisms by producing secondary metabolites and are responsible for the degradation of different complex and relatively recalcitrant organic compounds. In our survey of actinobacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of Araucaria angustifolia, five culture media (AI, WYE, YCED, MSSC and LNMS) were compared for their effectiveness in isolating these microorganisms. When summing up ...

  12. In-vitro antimicrobial activity of marine actinobacteria against multidrug resistance Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Sathish Kumar SR; Kokati Venkata Bhaskara Rao

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the antibacterial activity of marine actinobacteria against multidrug resistance Staphylococcus aureus (MDRSA). Methods: Fifty one actinobacterial strains were isolated from salt pans soil, costal area in Kothapattanam, Ongole, Andhra Pradesh. Primary screening was done using cross-streak method against MDRSA. The bioactive compounds are extracted from efficient actinobacteria using solvent extraction. The antimicrobial activity of crude and solvent extracts was p...

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Anti-Adenoviral Secondary Metabolites from Marine Actinobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Mårten Strand; Marcus Carlsson; Hanna Uvell; Koushikul Islam; Karin Edlund; Inger Cullman; Björn Altermark; Ya-Fang Mei; Mikael Elofsson; Nils-Peder Willassen; Göran Wadell; Fredrik Almqvist

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus infections in immunocompromised patients are associated with high mortality rates. Currently, there are no effective anti-adenoviral therapies available. It is well known that actinobacteria can produce secondary metabolites that are attractive in drug discovery due to their structural diversity and their evolved interaction with biomolecules. Here, we have established an extract library derived from actinobacteria isolated from Vestfjorden, Norway, and performed a screening campa...

  14. Actinobacteria associated with the marine sponges Cinachyra sp., Petrosia sp., and Ulosa sp. and their culturability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shams Tabrez; Takagi, Motoki; Shin-ya, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Actinobacteria associated with 3 marine sponges, Cinachyra sp., Petrosia sp., and Ulosa sp., were investigated. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that actinobacterial diversity varied greatly and that Ulosa sp. was most diverse, while Cinachyra sp. was least diverse. Culture-based approaches failed to isolate actinobacteria from Petrosia sp. or Ulosa sp., but strains belonging to 10 different genera and 3 novel species were isolated from Cinachyra sp.

  15. Exploring the potential for actinobacteria as defensive symbionts in fungus-growing termites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Anna A; Nobre, Tânia; Currie, Cameron R; Aanen, Duur K; Poulsen, Michael

    2012-05-01

    In fungus-growing termites, fungi of the subgenus Pseudoxylaria threaten colony health through substrate competition with the termite fungus (Termitomyces). The potential mechanisms with which termites suppress Pseudoxylaria have remained unknown. Here we explore if Actinobacteria potentially play a role as defensive symbionts against Pseudoxylaria in fungus-growing termites. We sampled for Actinobacteria from 30 fungus-growing termite colonies, spanning the three main termite genera and two geographically distant sites. Our isolations yielded 360 Actinobacteria, from which we selected subsets for morphological (288 isolates, grouped in 44 morphotypes) and for 16S rRNA (35 isolates, spanning the majority of morphotypes) characterisation. Actinobacteria were found throughout all sampled nests and colony parts and, phylogenetically, they are interspersed with Actinobacteria from origins other than fungus-growing termites, indicating lack of specificity. Antibiotic-activity screening of 288 isolates against the fungal cultivar and competitor revealed that most of the Actinobacteria-produced molecules with antifungal activity. A more detailed bioassay on 53 isolates, to test the specificity of antibiotics, showed that many Actinobacteria inhibit both Pseudoxylaria and Termitomyces, and that the cultivar fungus generally is more susceptible to inhibition than the competitor. This suggests that either defensive symbionts are not present in the system or that they, if present, represent a subset of the community isolated. If so, the antibiotics must be used in a targeted fashion, being applied to specific areas by the termites. We describe the first discovery of an assembly of antibiotic-producing Actinobacteria occurring in fungus-growing termite nests. However, due to the diversity found, and the lack of both phylogenetic and bioactivity specificity, further work is necessary for a better understanding of the putative role of antibiotic-producing bacteria in the fungus

  16. [Isolation of actinobacteria with antibiotic associated with soft coral Nephthea sp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liang; Zhang, Wenjun; Zhu, Yiguang; Wu, Zhengchao; Saurav, Kumar; Hang, Hui; Zhang, Changsheng

    2013-10-04

    The present study aims to isolate and identify actinobacteria associated with the soft coral Nephthea sp., and to isolate natural products from these actinobacteria under the guidance of PCR screening for polyketides synthase (PKS) genes. Eleven selective media were used to isolate actinobacteria associated with the soft coral Nephthea sp. collected from Yongxin Island. The isolated actinobacteria were classified on the basis of phylogenetic tree analysis of their 16S rRNA genes. Degenerated primers targeted on conserved KS (ketoacyl-synthase) domain of type I PKS genes were used to screen for potential isolates. The positive isolates were cultured in three different media to check their producing profiles. One bioactive strain that is rich in metabolites was subjected to larger scale fermentation for isolating bioactive natural products. A total of 20 strains were isolated from Nephthea sp., and were categorized into 3 genera including Streptomyces, Dietzia and Salinospora, among which 18 strains were positive in screening with type I PKS genes. Two bioactive compounds rifamycin S and rifamycin W were isolated and identified from Salinospora arenicola SH04. This is the first report of isolating indigenous marine actinobacteria Salinospora from the soft coral Nephthea sp. It provides an example of isolating bioactive secondary metabolites from cultivable actinobacteria associated with Nephthea sp. by PCR screening.

  17. Intertidal marine sediment harbours Actinobacteria with promising bioactive and biosynthetic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Polpass Arul; Jha, Bhavanath

    2017-08-30

    Actinobacteria are the major source of bioactive natural products that find their value in research and drug discovery programmes. Antimicrobial resistance and the resulting high demand for novel antibiotics underscore the need for exploring novel sources of these bacteria endowed with biosynthetic potential. Intertidal ecosystems endure regular periods of immersion and emersion, and represent an untapped source of Actinobacteria. In this study, we studied the diversity and biosynthetic potential of cultivable Actinobacteria from intertidal sediments of Diu Island in the Arabian Sea. A total of 148 Actinobacteria were selectively isolated using a stamping method with eight isolation media. Isolates were grouped into OTUs based on their 16S rRNA gene sequence, and categorized within actinobacterial families such as Glycomycetaceae, Micromonosporaceae, Nocardiaceae, Nocardiopsaceae, Pseudonocardiaceae, Streptomycetaceae, and Thermomonosporaceae. The biosynthetic potential of the Actinobacteria, necessary for secondary metabolite biosynthesis, was screened and confirmed by extensive fingerprinting approaches based on genes coding for polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases. The observed biosynthetic potential was correlated with the antibacterial activity exhibited by these isolates in laboratory conditions. Ultimately, the results demonstrate that intertidal sediment is a rich source of diverse cultivable Actinobacteria with high potential to synthesize novel bioactive compounds in their genomes.

  18. New primers for the class Actinobacteria: application to marine and terrestrial environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stach, James E M; Maldonado, Luis A; Ward, Alan C; Goodfellow, Michael; Bull, Alan T

    2003-10-01

    In this study, we redesigned and evaluated primers for the class Actinobacteria. In silico testing showed that the primers had a perfect match with 82% of genera in the class Actinobacteria, representing a 26-213% improvement over previously reported primers. Only 4% of genera that displayed mismatches did so in the terminal three bases of the 3' end, which is most critical for polymerase chain reaction success. The primers, designated S-C-Act-0235-a-S-20 and S-C-Act-0878-a-A-19, amplified an approximately 640 bp stretch of the 16S rRNA gene from all actinobacteria tested (except Rubrobacter radiotolerans) up to an annealing temperature of 72 degrees C. An Actinobacteria Amplification Resource (http://microbe2.ncl.ac.uk/MMB/AAR.htm) was generated to provide a visual guide to aid the amplification of actinobacterial 16S rDNA. Application of the primers to DNA extracted from marine and terrestrial samples revealed the presence of actinobacteria that have not been described previously. The use of 16S rDNA similarity and DNA-DNA pairing correlations showed that almost every actinomycete clone represented either a new species or a novel genus. The results of this study reinforce the proposition that current culture-based techniques drastically underestimate the diversity of Actinobacteria in the environment and highlight the need to evaluate taxon-specific primers regularly in line with improvements in databases holding 16S rDNA sequences.

  19. Genomic islands predict functional adaptation in marine actinobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penn, Kevin; Jenkins, Caroline; Nett, Markus; Udwary, Daniel; Gontang, Erin; McGlinchey, Ryan; Foster, Brian; Lapidus, Alla; Podell, Sheila; Allen, Eric; Moore, Bradley; Jensen, Paul

    2009-04-01

    Linking functional traits to bacterial phylogeny remains a fundamental but elusive goal of microbial ecology 1. Without this information, it becomes impossible to resolve meaningful units of diversity and the mechanisms by which bacteria interact with each other and adapt to environmental change. Ecological adaptations among bacterial populations have been linked to genomic islands, strain-specific regions of DNA that house functionally adaptive traits 2. In the case of environmental bacteria, these traits are largely inferred from bioinformatic or gene expression analyses 2, thus leaving few examples in which the functions of island genes have been experimentally characterized. Here we report the complete genome sequences of Salinispora tropica and S. arenicola, the first cultured, obligate marine Actinobacteria 3. These two species inhabit benthic marine environments and dedicate 8-10percent of their genomes to the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Despite a close phylogenetic relationship, 25 of 37 secondary metabolic pathways are species-specific and located within 21 genomic islands, thus providing new evidence linking secondary metabolism to ecological adaptation. Species-specific differences are also observed in CRISPR sequences, suggesting that variations in phage immunity provide fitness advantages that contribute to the cosmopolitan distribution of S. arenicola 4. The two Salinispora genomes have evolved by complex processes that include the duplication and acquisition of secondary metabolite genes, the products of which provide immediate opportunities for molecular diversification and ecological adaptation. Evidence that secondary metabolic pathways are exchanged by Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) yet are fixed among globally distributed populations 5 supports a functional role for their products and suggests that pathway acquisition represents a previously unrecognized force driving bacterial diversification

  20. Exploring Actinobacteria assemblages in coastal marine sediments under contrasted Human influences in the West Istria Sea, Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Robert; Bielen, Ana; Paradžik, Tina; Gassie, Claire; Pustijanac, Emina; Cagnon, Christine; Hamer, Bojan; Vujaklija, Dušica

    2015-10-01

    The exploration of marine Actinobacteria has as major challenge to answer basic questions of microbial ecology that, in turn, will provide useful information to exploit Actinobacteria metabolisms in biotechnological processes. The ecological functions performed by Actinobacteria in marine sediments are still unclear and belongs to the most burning basic questions. The comparison of Actinobacteria communities inhabiting marine sediments that are under the influence of different contamination types will provide valuable information in the adaptation capacities of Actinobacteria to colonize specific ecological niche. In the present study, the characterization of different Actinobacteria assemblages according to contamination type revealed the ecological importance of Actinobacteria for maintaining both general biogeochemical functions through a "core" Actinobacteria community and specific roles associated with the presence of contaminants. Indeed, the results allowed to distinguish Actinobacteria genera and species operational taxonomic units (OTUs) able to cope with the presence of either (i) As, (ii) metals Ni, Fe, V, Cr, and Mn, or (iii) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and toxic metals (Hg, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn). Such observations highlighted the metabolic capacities of Actinobacteria and their potential that should be taken into consideration and advantage during the implementation of bioremediation processes in marine ecosystems.

  1. Coral-associated Actinobacteria from the Arabian Gulf: diversity, abundance and biotechnological potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Mahmoud Mahmoud

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Actinobacteria are widely distributed in terrestrial environments, where they are considered a significant source of bioactive compounds, mainly antibiotics. Marine Actinobacteria, particularly coral-associated Actinobacteria, have attracted attention recently. In this study, the abundance and diversity of Actinobacteria associated with Coscinaraea columna, Platygyra daedalea and Porites harrisoni, north of the Arabian Gulf were investigated. The corals of the Arabian Gulf, one of the world’s hottest seas, are thriving under extreme water temperatures that exceed 39°C during the summer. Similar water temperatures cause coral bleaching and death in other water bodies. For this reason, the corals of the Gulf are living models for investigating how corals in other settings may survive at the end of the current century.Different coral hosts have been found to harbor equivalent numbers of culturable Actinobacteria in their tissues but not in their mucus. However, different culturable actinobacterial communities have been found to be associated with different coral hosts. Differences in the abundance and diversity of Actinobacteria were detected between the mucus and tissue of the same coral host. In addition, temporal and spatial variations in the abundance and diversity of the cultivable actinobacterial communities were detected. In total, 19 different actinobacterial genera, namely Micrococcus, Brachybacterium, Brevibacterium, Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Renibacterium, Nocardia, Microbacterium, Dietzia, Cellulomonas, Ornithinimicrobium, Rhodococcus, Agrococcus, Kineococcus, Dermacoccus, Devriesea, Kocuria, Marmoricola and Arthrobacter, were isolated from the coral tissue and mucus samples. Furthermore, 82 isolates related to Micromonospora, Brachybacterium, Nocardia, Micrococcus, Arthrobacter, Rhodococcus and Streptomyces showed antimicrobial activities against representative Gram-positive and/or Gram-negative bacteria. Even though

  2. Culturable diversity and antimicrobial activity of Actinobacteria from marine sediments in Valparaíso bay, Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Claverías, Fernanda P.; Undabarrena, Agustina; González, Myriam; Seeger, Michael; Cámara, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Marine-derived Actinobacteria are a source of a broad variety of secondary metabolites with diverse biological activities, such as antibiotics and antitumorals; many of which have been developed for clinical use. Rare Actinobacteria represent an untapped source of new bioactive compounds that have been scarcely recognized. In this study, rare Actinobacteria from marine sediments were isolated from the Valparaíso bay, Chile, and their potential to produce antibacterial compounds was evaluated....

  3. High diversity and suggested endemicity of culturable Actinobacteria in an extremely oligotrophic desert oasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Fernando Arocha-Garza

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The phylum Actinobacteria constitutes one of the largest and anciently divergent phyla within the Bacteria domain. Actinobacterial diversity has been thoroughly researched in various environments due to its unique biotechnological potential. Such studies have focused mostly on soil communities, but more recently marine and extreme environments have also been explored, finding rare taxa and demonstrating dispersal limitation and biogeographic patterns for Streptomyces. To test the distribution of Actinobacteria populations on a small scale, we chose the extremely oligotrophic and biodiverse Cuatro Cienegas Basin (CCB, an endangered oasis in the Chihuahuan desert to assess the diversity and uniqueness of Actinobacteria in the Churince System with a culture-dependent approach over a period of three years, using nine selective media. The 16S rDNA of putative Actinobacteria were sequenced using both bacteria universal and phylum-specific primer pairs. Phylogenetic reconstructions were performed to analyze OTUs clustering and taxonomic identification of the isolates in an evolutionary context, using validated type species of Streptomyces from previously phylogenies as a reference. Rarefaction analysis for total Actinobacteria and for Streptomyces isolates were performed to estimate species’ richness in the intermediate lagoon (IL in the oligotrophic Churince system. A total of 350 morphologically and nutritionally diverse isolates were successfully cultured and characterized as members of the Phylum Actinobacteria. A total of 105 from the total isolates were successfully subcultured, processed for DNA extraction and 16S-rDNA sequenced. All strains belong to the order Actinomycetales, encompassing 11 genera of Actinobacteria; the genus Streptomyces was found to be the most abundant taxa in all the media tested throughout the 3-year sampling period. Phylogenetic analysis of our isolates and another 667 reference strains of the family Streptomycetaceae

  4. High diversity and suggested endemicity of culturable Actinobacteria in an extremely oligotrophic desert oasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arocha-Garza, Hector Fernando; Canales-Del Castillo, Ricardo; Eguiarte, Luis E; Souza, Valeria; De la Torre-Zavala, Susana

    2017-01-01

    The phylum Actinobacteria constitutes one of the largest and anciently divergent phyla within the Bacteria domain. Actinobacterial diversity has been thoroughly researched in various environments due to its unique biotechnological potential. Such studies have focused mostly on soil communities, but more recently marine and extreme environments have also been explored, finding rare taxa and demonstrating dispersal limitation and biogeographic patterns for Streptomyces. To test the distribution of Actinobacteria populations on a small scale, we chose the extremely oligotrophic and biodiverse Cuatro Cienegas Basin (CCB), an endangered oasis in the Chihuahuan desert to assess the diversity and uniqueness of Actinobacteria in the Churince System with a culture-dependent approach over a period of three years, using nine selective media. The 16S rDNA of putative Actinobacteria were sequenced using both bacteria universal and phylum-specific primer pairs. Phylogenetic reconstructions were performed to analyze OTUs clustering and taxonomic identification of the isolates in an evolutionary context, using validated type species of Streptomyces from previously phylogenies as a reference. Rarefaction analysis for total Actinobacteria and for Streptomyces isolates were performed to estimate species' richness in the intermediate lagoon (IL) in the oligotrophic Churince system. A total of 350 morphologically and nutritionally diverse isolates were successfully cultured and characterized as members of the Phylum Actinobacteria. A total of 105 from the total isolates were successfully subcultured, processed for DNA extraction and 16S-rDNA sequenced. All strains belong to the order Actinomycetales, encompassing 11 genera of Actinobacteria; the genus Streptomyces was found to be the most abundant taxa in all the media tested throughout the 3-year sampling period. Phylogenetic analysis of our isolates and another 667 reference strains of the family Streptomycetaceae shows that our

  5. Quorum Sensing: An Under-Explored Phenomenon in the Phylum Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polkade, Ashish V; Mantri, Shailesh S; Patwekar, Umera J; Jangid, Kamlesh

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is known to play a major role in the regulation of secondary metabolite production, especially, antibiotics, and morphogenesis in the phylum Actinobacteria. Although it is one of the largest bacterial phylum, only 25 of the 342 genera have been reported to use quorum sensing. Of these, only nine have accompanying experimental evidence; the rest are only known through bioinformatic analysis of gene/genome sequences. It is evident that this important communication mechanism is not extensively explored in Actinobacteria. In this review, we summarize the different quorum sensing systems while identifying the limitations of the existing screening strategies and addressing the improvements that have taken place in this field in recent years. The γ-butyrolactone system turned out to be almost exclusively limited to this phylum. In addition, methylenomycin furans, AI-2 and other putative AHL-like signaling molecules are also reported in Actinobacteria. The lack of existing screening systems in detecting minute quantities and of a wider range of signaling molecules was a major reason behind the limited information available on quorum sensing in this phylum. However, recent improvements in screening strategies hold a promising future and are likely to increase the discovery of new signaling molecules. Further, the quorum quenching ability in many Actinobacteria has a great potential in controlling the spread of plant and animal pathogens. A systematic and coordinated effort is required to screen and exploit the enormous potential that quorum sensing in the phylum Actinobacteria has to offer for human benefit.

  6. In-vitro antimicrobial activity of marine actinobacteria against multidrug resistance Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathish, Kumar S R; Kokati, Venkata Bhaskara Rao

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the antibacterial activity of marine actinobacteria against multidrug resistance Staphylococcus aureus (MDRSA). Fifty one actinobacterial strains were isolated from salt pans soil, costal area in Kothapattanam, Ongole, Andhra Pradesh. Primary screening was done using cross-streak method against MDRSA. The bioactive compounds are extracted from efficient actinobacteria using solvent extraction. The antimicrobial activity of crude and solvent extracts was performed using Kirby-Bauer method. MIC for ethyl acetate extract was determined by modified agar well diffusion method. The potent actinobacteria are identified using Nonomura key, Shirling and Gottlieb 1966 with Bergey's manual of determinative bacteriology. Among the fifty one isolates screened for antibacterial activity, SRB25 were found efficient against MDRSA. The ethyl acetate extracts showed high inhibition against test organism. MIC test was performed with the ethyl acetate extract against MDRSA and found to be 1 000 µg/mL. The isolated actinobacteria are identified as Streptomyces sp with the help of Nonomura key. The current investigation reveals that the marine actinobacteria from salt pan environment can be able to produce new drug molecules against drug resistant microorganisms.

  7. In-vitro antimicrobial activity of marine actinobacteria against multidrug resistance Staphylococcus aureus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sathish Kumar S.R; Kokati Venkata Bhaskara Rao

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the antibacterial activity of marine actinobacteria against Multidrug resistance Staphylococcus aureus (MDRSA). Methods: Fifty one actinobacterial strains were isolated from salt pans soil, costal area in Kothapattanam, Ongole, Andhra Pradesh. Primary screening was done using cross-streak method against MDRSA. The bioactive compounds are extracted from efficient actinobacteria using solvent extraction. The antimicrobial activity of crude and solvent extracts was performed using Kirby-Bauer method. MIC for ethyl acetate extract was determined by modified agar well diffusion method. The potent actinobacteria are identified using Nonomura key, Shirling and Gottlieb 1966 with Bergey’s manual of Determinative Bacteriology. Results: Among the fifty one isolates screened for antibacterial activity, SRB25 were found efficient against MDRSA. The ethyl acetate extracts showed high inhibition against test organism. MIC test was performed with the ethyl acetate extract against MDRSA and found to be 1000μg/ml. The isolated actinobacteria are identified as Streptomyces sp with the help of Nonomura key. Conclusion: The current investigation reveals that the marine actinobacteria from salt pan environment can be able to produce new drug molecules against drug resistant microorganisms.

  8. In-vitro antimicrobial activity of marine actinobacteria against multidrug resistance Staphylococcus aureus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sathish Kumar SR; Kokati Venkata Bhaskara Rao

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the antibacterial activity of marine actinobacteria against multidrug resistance Staphylococcus aureus (MDRSA). Methods: Fifty one actinobacterial strains were isolated from salt pans soil, costal area in Kothapattanam, Ongole, Andhra Pradesh. Primary screening was done using cross-streak method against MDRSA. The bioactive compounds are extracted from efficient actinobacteria using solvent extraction. The antimicrobial activity of crude and solvent extracts was performed using Kirby-Bauer method. MIC for ethyl acetate extract was determined by modified agar well diffusion method. The potent actinobacteria are identified using Nonomura key, Shirling and Gottlieb 1966 with Bergey's manual of determinative bacteriology. Results: Among the fifty one isolates screened for antibacterial activity, SRB25 were found efficient against MDRSA. The ethyl acetate extracts showed high inhibition against test organism. MIC test was performed with the ethyl acetate extract against MDRSA and found to be 1 000 μg/mL. The isolated actinobacteria are identified as Streptomyces sp with the help of Nonomura key. Conclusions: The current investigation reveals that the marine actinobacteria from salt pan environment can be able to produce new drug molecules against drug resistant microorganisms.

  9. Distribution of PASTA domains in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases of Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawara, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    PASTA domains (penicillin-binding protein and serine/threonine kinase-associated domains) have been identified in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases of Gram-positive Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. They are believed to bind β-lactam antibiotics, and be involved in peptidoglycan metabolism, although their biological function is not definitively clarified. Actinobacteria, especially Streptomyces species, are distinct in that they undergo complex cellular differentiation and produce various antibiotics including β-lactams. This review focuses on the distribution of PASTA domains in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases in Actinobacteria. In Actinobacteria, PASTA domains are detectable exclusively in class A but not in class B penicillin-binding proteins, in sharp contrast to the cases in other bacteria. In penicillin-binding proteins, PASTA domains distribute independently from taxonomy with some distribution bias. Particularly interesting thing is that no Streptomyces species have penicillin-binding protein with PASTA domains. Protein kinases in Actinobacteria possess 0 to 5 PASTA domains in their molecules. Protein kinases in Streptomyces can be classified into three groups: no PASTA domain, 1 PASTA domain and 4 PASTA domain-containing groups. The 4 PASTA domain-containing groups can be further divided into two subgroups. The serine/threonine kinases in different groups may perform different functions. The pocket region in one of these subgroup is more dense and extended, thus it may be involved in binding of ligands like β-lactams more efficiently.

  10. In-vitro antimicrobial activity of marine actinobacteria against multidrug resistance Staphylococcus aureus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sathish; Kumar; SR; Kokati; Venkata; Bhaskara; Rao

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the antibacterial aclivily of marine actinobacteria against multidrug resistance Staphylococcus aureus(MDRSA).Methods:Fifty one actinobacterial strains were isolated from salt pans soil,costal area in Kothapattanam,Ongole,Andhra Pradesh.Primary screening was done using cross-streak method against MDRSA.The bioaclive compounds are extracted from efficient actinobacteria using solvent extraction.The antimicrobial activity of crude and solvent extracts was perfomied using Kirby-Bauer method.MIC for ethyl acetate extract was determined by modified agar well diffusion method.The potent actinobacteria are identified using Nonomura key,Shirling and Gottlieb 1966 with Bergey’s manual of determinative bacteriology.Results:Among the fifty one isolates screened for antibacterial activity,SRB25were found efficient against MDRSA.The ethyl acetate extracts showed high inhibition against test organism.MIC test was performed with the ethyl acetate extract against MDRSA and found to be 1 000μg/mL.The isolaled actinobacteria are identified as Streptomyces sp with the help of Nonomura key.Conclusions:The current investigation reveals that the marine actinobacteria from salt pan environment can be able to produce new drug molecules against drug resistant microorganisms.

  11. Endophytic Actinobacteria Associated with Dracaena cochinchinensis Lour.: Isolation, Diversity, and Their Cytotoxic Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Nimaichand; Khieu, Thi-Nhan; Liu, Min-Jiao; Vu, Thu-Trang; Chu-Ky, Son; Quach, Ngoc-Tung; Phi, Quyet-Tien; Narsing Rao, Manik Prabhu; Fontana, Angélique; Sarter, Samira; Li, Wen-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Dracaena cochinchinensis Lour. is an ethnomedicinally important plant used in traditional Chinese medicine known as dragon's blood. Excessive utilization of the plant for extraction of dragon's blood had resulted in the destruction of the important niche. During a study to provide a sustainable way of utilizing the resources, the endophytic Actinobacteria associated with the plant were explored for potential utilization of their medicinal properties. Three hundred and four endophytic Actinobacteria belonging to the genera Streptomyces, Nocardiopsis, Brevibacterium, Microbacterium, Tsukamurella, Arthrobacter, Brachybacterium, Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Kocuria, Nocardioides, and Pseudonocardia were isolated from different tissues of D. cochinchinensis Lour. Of these, 17 strains having antimicrobial and anthracyclines-producing activities were further selected for screening of antifungal and cytotoxic activities against two human cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and Hep G2. Ten of these selected endophytic Actinobacteria showed antifungal activities against at least one of the fungal pathogens, of which three strains exhibited cytotoxic activities with IC50-values ranging between 3 and 33 μg·mL(-1). Frequencies for the presence of biosynthetic genes, polyketide synthase- (PKS-) I, PKS-II, and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) among these 17 selected bioactive Actinobacteria were 29.4%, 70.6%, and 23.5%, respectively. The results indicated that the medicinal plant D. cochinchinensis Lour. is a good niche of biologically important metabolites-producing Actinobacteria.

  12. Endophytic Actinobacteria Associated with Dracaena cochinchinensis Lour.: Isolation, Diversity, and Their Cytotoxic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimaichand Salam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dracaena cochinchinensis Lour. is an ethnomedicinally important plant used in traditional Chinese medicine known as dragon’s blood. Excessive utilization of the plant for extraction of dragon’s blood had resulted in the destruction of the important niche. During a study to provide a sustainable way of utilizing the resources, the endophytic Actinobacteria associated with the plant were explored for potential utilization of their medicinal properties. Three hundred and four endophytic Actinobacteria belonging to the genera Streptomyces, Nocardiopsis, Brevibacterium, Microbacterium, Tsukamurella, Arthrobacter, Brachybacterium, Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Kocuria, Nocardioides, and Pseudonocardia were isolated from different tissues of D. cochinchinensis Lour. Of these, 17 strains having antimicrobial and anthracyclines-producing activities were further selected for screening of antifungal and cytotoxic activities against two human cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and Hep G2. Ten of these selected endophytic Actinobacteria showed antifungal activities against at least one of the fungal pathogens, of which three strains exhibited cytotoxic activities with IC50-values ranging between 3 and 33 μg·mL−1. Frequencies for the presence of biosynthetic genes, polyketide synthase- (PKS- I, PKS-II, and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS among these 17 selected bioactive Actinobacteria were 29.4%, 70.6%, and 23.5%, respectively. The results indicated that the medicinal plant D. cochinchinensis Lour. is a good niche of biologically important metabolites-producing Actinobacteria.

  13. [Physiological and biochemical properties of actinobacteria as the basis of their high biodegradative activity (review)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solvanikova, I P; Golovleva, L A

    2015-01-01

    The review summarizes the authors' own data and reports by other researchers concerning the degradation of stable organic compounds by actinobacteria. Properties of these microorganisms are characterized. They include the ability to survive and to maintain metabolic activity during prolonged exposure to adverse environmental conditions, as well as the presence of enzymes with a broad substrate specificity, which enables these bacteria to decompose natural and synthetic substances. The transformation pathways of key intermediates and the ability of actinobacteria to develop novel pathways are discussed. Approaches to increasing the destructive activity of bacterial cultures are presented.

  14. Exploring the Diversity and Antimicrobial Potential of Marine Actinobacteria from the Comau Fjord in Northern Patagonia, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undabarrena, Agustina; Beltrametti, Fabrizio; Claverías, Fernanda P; González, Myriam; Moore, Edward R B; Seeger, Michael; Cámara, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Bioprospecting natural products in marine bacteria from fjord environments are attractive due to their unique geographical features. Although, Actinobacteria are well known for producing a myriad of bioactive compounds, investigations regarding fjord-derived marine Actinobacteria are scarce. In this study, the diversity and biotechnological potential of Actinobacteria isolated from marine sediments within the Comau fjord, in Northern Chilean Patagonia, were assessed by culture-based approaches. The 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that members phylogenetically related to the Micrococcaceae, Dermabacteraceae, Brevibacteriaceae, Corynebacteriaceae, Microbacteriaceae, Dietziaceae, Nocardiaceae, and Streptomycetaceae families were present at the Comau fjord. A high diversity of cultivable Actinobacteria (10 genera) was retrieved by using only five different isolation media. Four isolates belonging to Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Corynebacterium and Kocuria genera showed 16S rRNA gene identity Actinobacteria with biotechnological potential for producing biologically active compounds.

  15. Marine Rare Actinobacteria: Isolation, Characterization, and Strategies for Harnessing Bioactive Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Dipesh; Pokhrel, Anaya Raj; Shrestha, Biplav; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2017-01-01

    Actinobacteria are prolific producers of thousands of biologically active natural compounds with diverse activities. More than half of these bioactive compounds have been isolated from members belonging to actinobacteria. Recently, rare actinobacteria existing at different environmental settings such as high altitudes, volcanic areas, and marine environment have attracted attention. It has been speculated that physiological or biochemical pressures under such harsh environmental conditions can lead to the production of diversified natural compounds. Hence, marine environment has been focused for the discovery of novel natural products with biological potency. Many novel and promising bioactive compounds with versatile medicinal, industrial, or agricultural uses have been isolated and characterized. The natural compounds cannot be directly used as drug or other purposes, so they are structurally modified and diversified to ameliorate their biological or chemical properties. Versatile synthetic biological tools, metabolic engineering techniques, and chemical synthesis platform can be used to assist such structural modification. This review summarizes the latest studies on marine rare actinobacteria and their natural products with focus on recent approaches for structural and functional diversification of such microbial chemicals for attaining better applications.

  16. Marine Rare Actinobacteria: Isolation, Characterization, and Strategies for Harnessing Bioactive Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipesh Dhakal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Actinobacteria are prolific producers of thousands of biologically active natural compounds with diverse activities. More than half of these bioactive compounds have been isolated from members belonging to actinobacteria. Recently, rare actinobacteria existing at different environmental settings such as high altitudes, volcanic areas, and marine environment have attracted attention. It has been speculated that physiological or biochemical pressures under such harsh environmental conditions can lead to the production of diversified natural compounds. Hence, marine environment has been focused for the discovery of novel natural products with biological potency. Many novel and promising bioactive compounds with versatile medicinal, industrial, or agricultural uses have been isolated and characterized. The natural compounds cannot be directly used as drug or other purposes, so they are structurally modified and diversified to ameliorate their biological or chemical properties. Versatile synthetic biological tools, metabolic engineering techniques, and chemical synthesis platform can be used to assist such structural modification. This review summarizes the latest studies on marine rare actinobacteria and their natural products with focus on recent approaches for structural and functional diversification of such microbial chemicals for attaining better applications.

  17. Actinobacteria and Myxobacteria-Two of the Most Important Bacterial Resources for Novel Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landwehr, Wiebke; Wolf, Corinna; Wink, Joachim

    Bacteria have been by far the most promising resource for antibiotics in the past decades and will in all undoubtedly remain an important resource of innovative bioactive natural products in the future. Actinobacteria have been screened for many years, whereas the Myxobacteria have been underestimated in the past. Even though Actinobacteria belong to the Gram-positive and Myxobacteria to the Gram-negative bacteria both groups have a number of similar characters, as they both have huge genomes with in some cases more than 10kB and a high GC content and they both can differentiate and have often cell cycles including the formation of spores. Actinobacteria have been used for the antibiotic research for many years, hence it is often discussed whether this resource has now been exhaustively exploited but most of the screening programs from pharmaceutical companies were basing on the cultivation mainly of members of the genus Streptomyces or Streptomyces like strains (e.g., some Saccharopolyspora, Amycolatopsis or Actinomadura species) by use of standard methods so that many of the so called "neglected" Actinobacteria were overlooked the whole time. The present review gives an overview on the state of the art regarding new bioactive compounds with a focus on the marine habitats. Furthermore, the evaluation of Myxobacteria in our ongoing search for novel anti-infectives is highlighted.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of actinobacteria isolated from the guts of subterranean termites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel Arango; C. M. Carlson; C. R. Currie; B. R. McDonald; A. J. Book; Frederick Green; K. F. Raffa; N.K. Lebow

    2016-01-01

    Subterranean termites need to minimize potentially pathogenic and competitive fungi in their environment in order to maintain colony health. We examined the ability of Actinobacteria isolated from termite guts in suppressing microorganisms commonly encountered in a subterranean environment. Guts from two subterranean termite species, Reticulitermes flavipes...

  19. Anti-Candida properties of urauchimycins from actinobacteria associated with trachymyrmex ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Thais D; Borges, Warley S; Rodrigues, Andre; Solomon, Scott E; Vieira, Paulo C; Duarte, Marta C T; Pagnocca, Fernando C

    2013-01-01

    After decades of intensive searching for antimicrobial compounds derived from actinobacteria, the frequency of isolation of new molecules has decreased. To cope with this concern, studies have focused on the exploitation of actinobacteria from unexplored environments and actinobacteria symbionts of plants and animals. In this study, twenty-four actinobacteria strains isolated from workers of Trachymyrmex ants were evaluated for antifungal activity towards a variety of Candida species. Results revealed that seven strains inhibited the tested Candida species. Streptomyces sp. TD025 presented potent and broad spectrum of inhibition of Candida and was selected for the isolation of bioactive molecules. From liquid shake culture of this bacterium, we isolated the rare antimycin urauchimycins A and B. For the first time, these molecules were evaluated for antifungal activity against medically important Candida species. Both antimycins showed antifungal activity, especially urauchimycin B. This compound inhibited the growth of all Candida species tested, with minimum inhibitory concentration values equivalent to the antifungal nystatin. Our results concur with the predictions that the attine ant-microbe symbiosis may be a source of bioactive metabolites for biotechnology and medical applications.

  20. Isolation and characterization of actinobacteria ectosymbionts from Acromyrmex subterraneus brunneus (Hymenoptera, Formicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchi, Tiago D; Guidolin, Aline S; Cônsoli, Fernando L

    2011-01-20

    The ectosymbiont actinobacterium Pseudonocardia was isolated from the integument of Acromyrmex leaf-cutter ants and seems to play a crucial role in maintaining asepsis of the nest. Currently, there has been an intensive search for Pseudonocardia associated with several attine species, but few studies have indicated that other actinobacteria may be associated with these ants as well. We therefore characterized the culturable actinobacteria community associated with the integument of the fungus-growing ant Acromyrmex subterraneus brunneus Forel, 1893 (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Ectosymbionts were isolated using four different media and characterized by morphological and molecular (16S rDNA) methods. A total of 20 strains were isolated, of which 17 were characterized as Streptomyces spp., and one isolate each as Pseudonocardia, Kitassatospora and Propionicimonas. Unlike other Acromyrmex species, A. subterraneus brunneus is associated with a diversity of actinobacteria. Even though Pseudonocardia is present on this leaf-cutting ant's integument, the number and diversity of Streptomyces spp. found differs from those of previous studies with other attine ants and suggest that different culturing approaches are needed to characterize the true diversity of microbes colonizing the integument of attine ants. Moreover, understanding the diversity of the culturable actinobacteria associated with A. subterraneus brunneus should increase our knowledge of the evolutionary relationship of this intricate symbiotic association.

  1. Anti-Candida Properties of Urauchimycins from Actinobacteria Associated with Trachymyrmex Ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais D. Mendes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available After decades of intensive searching for antimicrobial compounds derived from actinobacteria, the frequency of isolation of new molecules has decreased. To cope with this concern, studies have focused on the exploitation of actinobacteria from unexplored environments and actinobacteria symbionts of plants and animals. In this study, twenty-four actinobacteria strains isolated from workers of Trachymyrmex ants were evaluated for antifungal activity towards a variety of Candida species. Results revealed that seven strains inhibited the tested Candida species. Streptomyces sp. TD025 presented potent and broad spectrum of inhibition of Candida and was selected for the isolation of bioactive molecules. From liquid shake culture of this bacterium, we isolated the rare antimycin urauchimycins A and B. For the first time, these molecules were evaluated for antifungal activity against medically important Candida species. Both antimycins showed antifungal activity, especially urauchimycin B. This compound inhibited the growth of all Candida species tested, with minimum inhibitory concentration values equivalent to the antifungal nystatin. Our results concur with the predictions that the attine ant-microbe symbiosis may be a source of bioactive metabolites for biotechnology and medical applications.

  2. Antimicrobial potential of actinobacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of the Caatinga biome plant Caesalpinia pyramidalis Tul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Lacerda, G R; Santana, R C F; Vicalvi-Costa, M C V; Solidônio, E G; Sena, K X F R; Lima, G M S; Araújo, J M

    2016-03-04

    Actinobacteria are known to produce various secondary metabolites having antibiotic effects. This study assessed the antimicrobial potential of actinobacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of Caesalpinia pyramidalis Tul. from the Caatinga biome. Sixty-eight actinobacteria isolates were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against different microorganisms by disk diffusion and submerged fermentation, using different culture media, followed by determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and chemical prospecting of the crude extract. Of the isolates studied, 52.9% of those isolated at 37°C and 47.05% of those isolated at 45°C had activity against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Fusarium moniliforme, and Candida albicans. When compared with others actinobacteria, the isolate C1.129 stood out with better activity and was identified by 16S rDNA gene analysis as Streptomyces parvulus. The crude ethanol extract showed an MIC of 0.97 μg/mL for MRSA and B. subtilis, while the ethyl acetate extract showed MIC of 3.9 μg/mL for S. aureus and MRSA, showing the greatest potential among the metabolites produced. Chemical prospecting revealed the presence of mono/sesquiterpenes, proanthocyanidin, triterpenes, and steroids in both crude extracts. This study evaluates S. parvulus activity against multi-resistant microorganisms such as MRSA. Thus, it proves that low-fertility soil, as is found in the Caatinga, may contain important microorganisms for the development of new antimicrobial drugs.

  3. Potential biocontrol actinobacteria: Rhizospheric isolates from the Argentine Pampas lowlands legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solans, Mariana; Scervino, Jose Martin; Messuti, María Inés; Vobis, Gernot; Wall, Luis Gabriel

    2016-11-01

    Control of fungal plant diseases by using naturally occurring non-pathogenic microorganisms represents a promising approach to biocontrol agents. This study reports the isolation, characterization, and fungal antagonistic activity of actinobacteria from forage soils in the Flooding Pampa, Argentina. A total of 32 saprophytic strains of actinobacteria were obtained by different isolation methods from rhizospheric soil of Lotus tenuis growing in the Salado River Basin. Based on physiological traits, eight isolates were selected for their biocontrol-related activities such as production of lytic extracellular enzymes, siderophores, hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and antagonistic activity against Cercospora sojina, Macrophomia phaseolina, Phomopsis sp., Fusarium oxysporum, and Fusarium verticilloides. These actinobacteria strains were characterized morphologically, physiologically, and identified by using molecular techniques. The characterization of biocontrol-related activities in vitro showed positive results for exoprotease, phospholipase, fungal growth inhibition, and siderophore production. However, none of the strains was positive for the production of hydrogen cyanide (HCN). Streptomyces sp. MM140 presented the highest index for biocontrol, and appear to be promising pathogenic fungi biocontrol agents. These results show the potential capacity of actinobacteria isolated from forage soils in the Argentine Pampas lowlands as promising biocontrol agents, and their future agronomic applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Paratrechina longicornis ants in a tropical dry forest harbor specific Actinobacteria diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Ruth D Hernández; Cafaro, Matías J

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of Actinobacteria associated with Paratrechina longicornis, an ant species that prefers a high protein diet, in a subtropical dry forest (Guánica, Puerto Rico) was determined by culture methods and by 16S rDNA clone libraries. The results of both methodologies were integrated to obtain a broader view of the diversity. Streptomyces, Actinomadura, Nocardia, Ornithinimicrobium, Tsukamurella, Brevibacterium, Saccharopolyspora, Nocardioides, Microbacterium, Leifsonia, Pseudonocardia, Corynebacterium, Geodermatophilus, Amycolatopsis, and Nonomuraea were found associated with the ants. The genera Streptomyces and Actinomadura were the most abundant. Also, the diversity of Actinobacteria associated with the soil surrounding the nest was determined using 16S rDNA clone libraries. In total, 27 genera of Actinobacteria were associated with the nest soils. A dominant genus was not observed in any of the soil samples. We compared statistically the Actinobacteria communities among P. longicornis nests and each nest with its surrounding soil using the clone libraries data. We established that the communities associated with the ants were consistent and significantly different from those found in the soil in which the ants live.

  5. Metagenomic Classification and Characterization Marine Actinobacteria from the Gulf of Maine without Representative Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, R.; Heidelberg, J.

    2012-12-01

    Actinobacteria represent one of the largest and most diverse bacterial phyla and unlike most marine prokaryotes are gram-positive. This phylum encompasses a broad range of physiologies, morphologies, and metabolic properties with a broad array of lifestyles. The marine actinobacterial assemblage is dominated by the orders Actinomycetales and Acidimicrobiales (also known as the marine Actinobacteria clade). The Acidimicrobiales bacteria typically outnumber the Actinomycetales bacteria and are mostly represented by the OCS155 group. Although bacteria of the order Acidimicrobiales make up ~7.6% of the 16S matches from the Global Ocean Survey shotgun metagenomic libraries; very little is known about their potential function and role in biogeochemical cycling. Samples were collected from surface seawater samples in the Gulf of Maine (GOM) from the summer and winter of 2006. Sanger sequences were generated from the 0.1-0.8 μm fractions using paired-end medium insert shotgun libraries. The resulting 2.2 Gb were assembled using the Celera Assembler package into 280 Mb of non-redundant scaffolds. Putative actinobacterial assemblies were identified using (1) ribosomal RNA genes (16S and 23S), (2) phylogenetically informative non-ribosomal core genes thought to be resistant to horizontal gene transfer (e.g. RecA and RpoB) and (3) compositional binning using oligonucleotide frequency pattern based hierarchical clustering. Binning resulted in 3.6 Mb (4.2X coverage) of actinobacterial scaffolds that were comprised of 15.1 Mb of unassembled reads. Putative actinobacterial assemblies included both summer and winter reads demonstrating that the Actinobacteria are abundant year round. Classification reveals that all of the sampled Actinobacteria are from the orders Acidimicrobiales and Actinomycetales and are similar to those found in the global ocean. The GOM Actinobacteria show a broad range of G+C % content (32-66%) indicating a high level of genomic diversity. Those assemblies

  6. Abundance of actinobacteria and production of geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol in Danish streams and fish ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausen, Cecilie; Nicolaisen, Mette H; Strobel, Bjarne W; Warnecke, Falk; Nielsen, Jeppe L; Jørgensen, Niels O G

    2005-04-01

    Occurrence of the odours geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) in freshwater environments indicates that odour-producing organisms are commonly occurring. In the present study, we assumed actinomycetes to be a major source of the odours. Seasonal concentrations of odours and abundance of Actinobacteria, which includes actinomycetes and other G+ and high GC bacteria, were determined in one oligotrophic and two eutrophic freshwater streams, as well as in aquacultures connected to these streams, in Denmark. Concentrations of geosmin and MIB ranged from 2 to 9 ng l(-1) and were lowest in the winter. Passage of stream water in the aquacultures increased the amount of geosmin and MIB by up to 55% and 110%, respectively. Densities of actinobacteria were determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization with catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD-FISH) technique and were found to make up from 4 to 38 x 10(7) cells l(-1), corresponding to 3-9% of the total bacterial populations. The lowest densities of actinobacteria occurred in the winter. Filamentous bacteria targeted by the FISH probe made up about 2.7-38% (average was 22%) of the actinobacteria and were expected to be actinomycetes. Combined microautoradiography and CARD-FISH demonstrated that 10-38% (incorporation of 3H-thymidine) and 41-65% (incorporation of 3H-leucine) of the actinobacteria were metabolically active. The proportion of active actinobacteria increased up to 2-fold during passage of stream water in the aquacultures, and up to 98% of the cells became active. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes in 8 bacterial isolates with typical actinomycete morphology from the streams and ponds demonstrated that most of them belonged to the genus Streptomyces. The isolated actinomycetes produced geosmin at rates from 0.1 to 35 aggeosmin bacterium(-1)h(-1). MIB was produced at similar rates in 5 isolates, whereas no MIB was produced by three of the isolates. Addition of the odours to stream water demonstrated that indigenous stream

  7. Uncovering the prevalence and diversity of integrating conjugative elements in actinobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Gabriela Ghinet

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer greatly facilitates rapid genetic adaptation of bacteria to shifts in environmental conditions and colonization of new niches by allowing one-step acquisition of novel functions. Conjugation is a major mechanism of horizontal gene transfer mediated by conjugative plasmids and integrating conjugative elements (ICEs. While in most bacterial conjugative systems DNA translocation requires the assembly of a complex type IV secretion system (T4SS, in Actinobacteria a single DNA FtsK/SpoIIIE-like translocation protein is required. To date, the role and diversity of ICEs in Actinobacteria have received little attention. Putative ICEs were searched for in 275 genomes of Actinobacteria using HMM-profiles of proteins involved in ICE maintenance and transfer. These exhaustive analyses revealed 144 putative FtsK/SpoIIIE-type ICEs and 17 putative T4SS-type ICEs. Grouping of the ICEs based on the phylogenetic analyses of maintenance and transfer proteins revealed extensive exchanges between different sub-families of ICEs. 17 ICEs were found in Actinobacteria from the genus Frankia, globally important nitrogen-fixing microorganisms that establish root nodule symbioses with actinorhizal plants. Structural analysis of ICEs from Frankia revealed their unexpected diversity and a vast array of predicted adaptive functions. Frankia ICEs were found to excise by site-specific recombination from their host's chromosome in vitro and in planta suggesting that they are functional mobile elements whether Frankiae live as soil saprophytes or plant endosymbionts. Phylogenetic analyses of proteins involved in ICEs maintenance and transfer suggests that active exchange between ICEs cargo-borne and chromosomal genes took place within the Actinomycetales order. Functionality of Frankia ICEs in vitro as well as in planta lets us anticipate that conjugation and ICEs could allow the development of genetic manipulation tools for this challenging microorganism

  8. Culturable diversity and antimicrobial activity of Actinobacteria from marine sediments in Valparaíso bay, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claverías, Fernanda P; Undabarrena, Agustina; González, Myriam; Seeger, Michael; Cámara, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Marine-derived Actinobacteria are a source of a broad variety of secondary metabolites with diverse biological activities, such as antibiotics and antitumorals; many of which have been developed for clinical use. Rare Actinobacteria represent an untapped source of new bioactive compounds that have been scarcely recognized. In this study, rare Actinobacteria from marine sediments were isolated from the Valparaíso bay, Chile, and their potential to produce antibacterial compounds was evaluated. Different culture conditions and selective media that select the growth of Actinobacteria were used leading to the isolation of 68 bacterial strains. Comparative analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences led to identifying isolates that belong to the phylum Actinobacteria with genetic affiliations to 17 genera: Aeromicrobium, Agrococcus, Arthrobacter, Brachybacterium, Corynebacterium, Dietzia, Flaviflexus, Gordonia, Isoptericola, Janibacter, Microbacterium, Mycobacterium, Ornithinimicrobium, Pseudonocardia, Rhodococcus, Streptomyces, and Tessaracoccus. Also, one isolate could not be consistently classified and formed a novel phylogenetic branch related to the Nocardiopsaceae family. The antimicrobial activity of these isolates was evaluated, demonstrating the capability of specific novel isolates to inhibit the growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In conclusion, this study shows a rich biodiversity of culturable Actinobacteria, associated to marine sediments from Valparaíso bay, highlighting novel rare Actinobacteria, and their potential for the production of biologically active compounds.

  9. Culturable diversity and antimicrobial activity of Actinobacteria from marine sediments in Valparaíso bay, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Paz Claverías

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Marine-derived Actinobacteria are a source of a broad variety of secondary metabolites with diverse biological activities, such as antibiotics and antitumorals; many of which have been developed for clinical use. Rare Actinobacteria represent an untapped source of new bioactive compounds that have been scarcely recognized. In this study, rare Actinobacteria from marine sediments were isolated from the Valparaíso bay, Chile, and their potential to produce antibacterial compounds was evaluated. Different culture conditions and selective media that select the growth of Actinobacteria were used leading to the isolation of 68 bacterial strains. Comparative analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences led to identifying isolates that belong to the phylum Actinobacteria with genetic affiliations to 17 genera: Aeromicrobium, Agrococcus, Arthrobacter, Brachybacterium, Corynebacterium, Dietzia, Flaviflexus, Gordonia, Isoptericola, Janibacter, Microbacterium, Mycobacterium, Ornithinimicrobium, Pseudonocardia, Rhodococcus, Streptomyces and Tessaracoccus. Also, one isolate could not be consistently classified and formed a novel phylogenetic branch related to the Nocardiopsaceae family. The antimicrobial activity of these isolates was evaluated, demonstrating the capability of specific novel isolates to inhibit the growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In conclusion, this study shows a rich biodiversity of culturable Actinobacteria, associated to marine sediments from Valparaíso bay, highlighting novel rare Actinobacteria, and their potential for the production of biologically active compounds.

  10. A comparative study on the phylogenetic diversity of culturable actinobacteria isolated from five marine sponge species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Wei; Jin, Yan; Jin, Meifang; Yu, Xingju

    2008-03-01

    A cultivation-based approach was employed to compare the culturable actinobacterial diversity associated with five marine sponge species (Craniella australiensis, Halichondria rugosa, Reniochalina sp., Sponge sp., and Stelletta tenuis). The phylogenetic affiliation of the actinobacterial isolates was assessed by 16S rDNA-RFLP analysis. A total of 181 actinobacterial strains were isolated using five different culture media (denoted as M1-M5). The type of medium exhibited significant effects on the number of actinobacteria recovered, with the highest number of isolates on M3 (63 isolates) and the lowest on M1 (12 isolates). The genera isolated were also different, with the recovery of three genera on M2 and M3, and only a single genus on M1. The number of actinobacteria isolated from the five sponge species was significantly different, with a count of 83, 36, 30, 17, and 15 isolates from S. tenuis, H. rugosa, Sponge sp., Reniochalina sp., and C. australiensis, respectively. M3 was the best isolation medium for recovery of actinobacteria from S. tenuis, H. rugosa, and Sponge sp., while no specific medium preference was observed for the recovery of actinobacteria from Reniochalina sp., and C. australiensis. The RFLP fingerprinting of 16S rDNA genes digested with HhaI revealed six different patterns, in which 16 representative 16S rDNAs were fully sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that 12 strains belong to the group Streptomyces, three strains belong to Pseudonocardia, and one strain belongs to Nocardia. Two strains C14 (from C. australiensis) and N13 (from Sponge sp.) have only 96.26% and 96.27% similarity to earlier published sequences, and are therefore potential candidates for new species. The highest diversity of three actinobacteria genera was obtained from Sponge sp., though the number of isolates was low. Two genera of actinobacteria, Streptomyces, and Pseudonocardia, were isolated from both S. tenuis and C. australiensis. Only the genus of Streptomyces

  11. Co-evolution of RNA polymerase with RbpA in the phylum Actinobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Dey

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of RbpA in the backdrop of M. smegmatis showed that it rescues mycobacterial RNA polymerase from rifampicin-mediated inhibition (Dey et al., 2010; Dey et al., 2011. Paget and co-workers (Paget et al., 2001; Newell et al., 2006 have revealed that RbpA homologs occur exclusively in actinobacteria. Newell et al. (2006 showed that MtbRbpA, when complemented in a ∆rbpA mutant of S. coelicolor, showed a low recovery of MIC (from 0.75 to 2 μg/ml as compared to complementation by native RbpA of S. coelicolor (MIC increases from 0.75 to 11 μg/ml. Our studies on MsRbpA show that it is a differential marker for M. smegmatis RNA polymerase as compared to E. coli RNA polymerase at IC50 levels of rifampicin. A recent sequence-based analysis by Lane and Darst (2010 has shown that RNA polymerases from Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria have had a divergent evolution. E. coli is a representative of Proteobacteria and M. smegmatis is an Actinobacterium. RbpA has an exclusive occurrence in Actinobacteria. Since protein–protein interactions might not be conserved across different species, therefore, the probable reason for the indifference of MsRbpA toward E. coli RNA polymerase could be the lineage-specific differences between actinobacterial and proteobacterial RNA polymerases. These observations led us to ask the question as to whether the evolution of RbpA in Actinobacteria followed the same route as that of RNA polymerase subunits from actinobacterial species. We show that the exclusivity of RbpA in Actinobacteria and the unique evolution of RNA polymerase in this phylum share a co-evolutionary link. We have addressed this issue by a blending of experimental and bioinformatics based approaches. They comprise of induction of bacterial cultures coupled to rifampicin-tolerance, transcription assays and statistical comparison of phylogenetic trees for different pairs of proteins in actinobacteria.

  12. Date palm and the activated sludge co-composting actinobacteria sanitization potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Fels, Loubna; Hafidi, Mohamed; Ouhdouch, Yedir

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to find a connection between the development of the compost actinobacteria and the potential involvement of antagonistic thermophilic actinomycetes in compost sanitization as high temperature additional role. An abundance of actinobacteria and coliforms during the activated sludge and date palm co-composting is determined. Hundred actinomycete isolates were isolated from the sample collected at different composting times. To evaluate the antagonistic effects of the different recovered actinomycete isolates, several wastewater-linked microorganisms known as human and plant potential pathogens were used. The results showed that 12 isolates have an in vitro inhibitory effect on at least 9 of the indicator microorganisms while only 4 active strains inhibit all these pathogens. The antimicrobial activities of sterilized composting time extracts are also investigated.

  13. A Proteomic Survey of Nonribosomal Peptide and Polyketide Biosynthesis in Actinobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yunqiu; Ntai, Ioanna; Ju, Kou-San; Unger, Michelle; Zamdborg, Leonid; Robinson, Sarah J.; Doroghazi, James R.; Labeda, David P.; Metcalf, William W.; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2011-01-01

    Actinobacteria such as streptomycetes are renowned for their ability to produce bioactive natural products including nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides (PKs). The advent of genome sequencing has revealed an even larger genetic repertoire for secondary metabolism with most of the small molecule products of these gene clusters still unknown. Here, we employed a “protein-first” method called PrISM (Proteomic Investigation of Secondary Metabolism) to screen 26 unsequenced actinomycetes ...

  14. Genomes of planktonic Acidimicrobiales: widening horizons for marine Actinobacteria by metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Carolina Megumi; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Ghai, Rohit

    2015-02-10

    The genomes of four novel marine Actinobacteria have been assembled from large metagenomic data sets derived from the Mediterranean deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM). These are the first marine representatives belonging to the order Acidimicrobiales and only the second group of planktonic marine Actinobacteria to be described. Their streamlined genomes and photoheterotrophic lifestyle suggest that they are planktonic, free-living microbes. A novel rhodopsin clade, acidirhodopsins, related to freshwater actinorhodopsins, was found in these organisms. Their genomes suggest a capacity to assimilate C2 compounds, some using the glyoxylate bypass and others with the ethylmalonyl-coenzyme A (CoA) pathway. They are also able to derive energy from dimethylsulfopropionate (DMSP), sulfonate, and carbon monoxide oxidation, all commonly available in the marine habitat. These organisms appear to be prevalent in the deep photic zone at or around the DCM. The presence of sister clades to the marine Acidimicrobiales in freshwater aquatic habitats provides a new example of marine-freshwater transitions with potential evolutionary insights. Despite several studies showing the importance and abundance of planktonic Actinobacteria in the marine habitat, a representative genome was only recently described. In order to expand the genomic repertoire of marine Actinobacteria, we describe here the first Acidimicrobidae genomes of marine origin and provide insights about their ecology. They display metabolic versatility in the acquisition of carbon and appear capable of utilizing diverse sources of energy. One of the genomes harbors a new kind of rhodopsin related to the actinorhodopsin clade of freshwater origin that is widespread in the oceans. Our data also support their preference to inhabit the deep chlorophyll maximum and the deep photic zone. This work contributes to the perception of marine actinobacterial groups as important players in the marine environment with distinct and

  15. Codon usage bias in phylum Actinobacteria: relevance to environmental adaptation and host pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Devi; Verma, Mansi; Behura, Susanta K; Lal, Rup

    2016-10-01

    Actinobacteria are Gram-positive bacteria commonly found in soil, freshwater and marine ecosystems. In this investigation, bias in codon usages of ninety actinobacterial genomes was analyzed by estimating different indices of codon bias such as Nc (effective number of codons), SCUO (synonymous codon usage order), RSCU (relative synonymous codon usage), as well as sequence patterns of codon contexts. The results revealed several characteristic features of codon usage in Actinobacteria, as follows: 1) C- or G-ending codons are used frequently in comparison with A- and U ending codons; 2) there is a direct relationship of GC content with use of specific amino acids such as alanine, proline and glycine; 3) there is an inverse relationship between GC content and Nc estimates, 4) there is low SCUO value (Actinobacteria, extreme GC content and codon bias are driven by mutation rather than natural selection; (2) traits like aerobicity are associated with effective natural selection and therefore low GC content and low codon bias, demonstrating the role of both mutational bias and translational selection in shaping the habitat and phenotype of actinobacterial species. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. [Diversity and bioactivities of culturable marine actinobacteria isolated from mangrove sediment in Indian Ocean].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Zhang, Daofeng; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Xiaomei; Tang, Shukun; Xu, Lihua; Li, Wenjun

    2012-10-04

    In order to explore the diversity, antimicrobial activity and enzyme-producing activity of marine actinobacteria isolated from mangrove sediments in Indian Ocean. Eight sediments collected from mangrove sediments in Indian Ocean were treated by the plate dilution method and spread on 24 isolation media only containing sole carbon source for energy. Marine actinobacteria were isolated and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The antimicrobial activity and enzyme-producing activity of isolated strains were further detected by spot planting method. In total 139 representative strains were selected from 521 isolates, and they were further sequenced and performed phylogenetic analysis based on their 16S rRNA gene sequences. There were 35 strains identified as potential novel species. Antimicrobial activity was detected in Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus niger. Enzyme-producing activity for protease cellulase, amylase and esterase were 36.5%, 26.5%, 22.4% and 15.9%, respectively. Diverse marine actinobacteria were discovered in mangrove sediment in Indian Ocean, which have antimicrobial and enzyme activity.

  17. Biogeography of bacterial communities in hot springs: a focus on the actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Angel; Tuffin, Marla; Cowan, Don A

    2012-07-01

    Actinobacteria are ubiquitous in soil, freshwater and marine ecosystems. Although various studies have focused on the microbial ecology of this phylum, data are scant on the ecology of actinobacteria endemic to hot springs. Here, we have investigated the molecular diversity of eubacteria, with specific focus on the actinobacteria in hot springs in Zambia, China, New Zealand and Kenya. Temperature and pH values at sampling sites ranged between 44.5 and 86.5 °C and 5-10, respectively. Non-metric multidimensional scaling analysis of 16S rRNA gene T-RFLP patterns showed that samples could be separated by geographical location. Multivariate analysis showed that actinobacterial community composition was best predicted by changes in pH and temperature, whereas temperature alone was the most important variable explaining differences in bacterial community structure. Using 16S rRNA gene libraries, 28 major actinobacterial OTUs were found. Both molecular techniques indicated that many of the actinobacterial phylotypes were unique and exclusive to the respective sample. Collectively, these results support the view that both actinobacterial diversity and endemism are high in hot spring ecosystems.

  18. [New isolation methods and phylogenetic diversity of actinobacteria from hypersaline beach in Aksu].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao; Xia, Zhanfeng; Cao, Xinbo; Li, Jun; Zhang, Lili

    2013-08-04

    We explored 4 new methods to improve the isolation of actinobacterial resources from high salt areas. Optimized media based on 4 new strategies were used for isolating actinobacteria from hypersaline beaches. Glycerin-arginine, trehalose-creatine, glycerol-asparticacid, mannitol-casein, casein-mannitol, mannitol-alanine, chitosan-asparagineand GAUZE' No. 1 were used as basic media. New isolation strategy includes 4 methods: ten-fold dilution culture, simulation of the original environment, actinobacterial culture guided by uncultured molecular technology detected, and reference of actinobacterial media for brackish marine environment. The 16S rRNA genes of the isolates were amplified with bacterial universal primers. The results of 16S rRNA gene sequences were compared with sequences obtained from GenBank databases. We constructed phylogenetic tree with the neighbor-joining method. No actinobacterial strains were isolated by 8 media of control group, while 403 strains were isolated by new strategies. The isolates by new methods were members of 14 genera (Streptomyces, Streptomonospora, Saccharomonospora, Plantactinospora, Nocardia, Amycolatopsis, Glycomyces, Micromonospora, Nocardiopsis, Isoptericola, Nonomuraea, Thermobifida, Actinopolyspora, Actinomadura) of 10 families in 8 suborders. The most abundant and diverse isolates were the two suborders of Streptomycineae (69.96%) and Streptosporangineaesuborder (9.68%) within the phylum Actinobacteria, including 9 potential novel species. New isolation methods significantly improved the actinobacterial culturability of hypersaline areas, and obtained many potential novel species, which provided a new and more effective way to isolate actinobacteria resources in hypersaline environments.

  19. Isolation, Phylogenetic Analysis and Antibiotic Activity Screening of Red Sea Sponge-Associated Actinobacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Chen

    2013-06-01

    Infectious disease has always been and will continue to be a heavy burden on human society worldwide. Terrestrial actinobacteria, notable as a source of antibiotics, have been well investigated in the past. In constrast, marine actinobacteria, especially sponge-associated species, have received much less attention and isolates are sparse. With the aim of studying and discovering novel marine actinobacteria, 11 different species of sponges were collected from the Central Red Sea in Saudi Arabia and cultured with three different types of media. 16S rRNA gene-sequencing revealed that among all 75 isolated bacterial strains 13 belonged to the order actinomycetales. These 13 actinomycetes fall into four different families and can be assigned to six different genera. Antibiotic activity tests using disc diffusion assay were performed against Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus sp.), Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli), fungi (Fusarium sp.) and West Nile virus NS3 protease. Nine strains presented different level of bioactivity against these pathogens. These findings provide evidence that actinomycetes are presented in marine sponges and that they have the potential to be good candidates in the search for new effective antibiotic, antifungal, and antiviral compounds.

  20. Diversity and antimicrobial activities of actinobacteria isolated from tropical mangrove sediments in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Learn-Han; Zainal, Nurullhudda; Azman, Adzzie-Shazleen; Eng, Shu-Kee; Goh, Bey-Hing; Yin, Wai-Fong; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate and identify Actinobacteria from Malaysia mangrove forest and screen them for production of antimicrobial secondary metabolites. Eighty-seven isolates were isolated from soil samples collected at 4 different sites. This is the first report to describe the isolation of Streptomyces, Mycobacterium, Leifsonia, Microbacterium, Sinomonas, Nocardia, Terrabacter, Streptacidiphilus, Micromonospora, Gordonia, and Nocardioides from mangrove in east coast of Malaysia. Of 87 isolates, at least 5 isolates are considered as putative novel taxa. Nine Streptomyces sp. isolates were producing potent antimicrobial secondary metabolites, indicating that Streptomyces isolates are providing high quality metabolites for drug discovery purposes. The discovery of a novel species, Streptomyces pluripotens sp. nov. MUSC 135(T) that produced potent secondary metabolites inhibiting the growth of MRSA, had provided promising metabolites for drug discovery research. The biosynthetic potential of 87 isolates was investigated by the detection of polyketide synthetase (PKS) and nonribosomal polyketide synthetase (NRPS) genes, the hallmarks of secondary metabolites production. Results showed that many isolates were positive for PKS-I (19.5%), PKS-II (42.5%), and NRPS (5.7%) genes, indicating that mangrove Actinobacteria have significant biosynthetic potential. Our results highlighted that mangrove environment represented a rich reservoir for isolation of Actinobacteria, which are potential sources for discovery of antimicrobial secondary metabolites.

  1. Diversity and Antimicrobial Activities of Actinobacteria Isolated from Tropical Mangrove Sediments in Malaysia

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    Learn-Han Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to isolate and identify Actinobacteria from Malaysia mangrove forest and screen them for production of antimicrobial secondary metabolites. Eighty-seven isolates were isolated from soil samples collected at 4 different sites. This is the first report to describe the isolation of Streptomyces, Mycobacterium, Leifsonia, Microbacterium, Sinomonas, Nocardia, Terrabacter, Streptacidiphilus, Micromonospora, Gordonia, and Nocardioides from mangrove in east coast of Malaysia. Of 87 isolates, at least 5 isolates are considered as putative novel taxa. Nine Streptomyces sp. isolates were producing potent antimicrobial secondary metabolites, indicating that Streptomyces isolates are providing high quality metabolites for drug discovery purposes. The discovery of a novel species, Streptomyces pluripotens sp. nov. MUSC 135T that produced potent secondary metabolites inhibiting the growth of MRSA, had provided promising metabolites for drug discovery research. The biosynthetic potential of 87 isolates was investigated by the detection of polyketide synthetase (PKS and nonribosomal polyketide synthetase (NRPS genes, the hallmarks of secondary metabolites production. Results showed that many isolates were positive for PKS-I (19.5%, PKS-II (42.5%, and NRPS (5.7% genes, indicating that mangrove Actinobacteria have significant biosynthetic potential. Our results highlighted that mangrove environment represented a rich reservoir for isolation of Actinobacteria, which are potential sources for discovery of antimicrobial secondary metabolites.

  2. Glutamine synthetase sequence evolution in the mycobacteria and their use as molecular markers for Actinobacteria speciation

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    Wiid Ian JF

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the gene encoding for glutamine synthetase (glnA is essential in several organisms, multiple glnA copies have been identified in bacterial genomes such as those of the phylum Actinobacteria, notably the mycobacterial species. Intriguingly, previous reports have shown that only one copy (glnA1 is essential for growth in M. tuberculosis, while the other copies (glnA2, glnA3 and glnA4 are not. Results In this report it is shown that the glnA1 and glnA2 encoded glutamine synthetase sequences were inherited from an Actinobacteria ancestor, while the glnA4 and glnA3 encoded GS sequences were sequentially acquired during Actinobacteria speciation. The glutamine synthetase sequences encoded by glnA4 and glnA3 are undergoing reductive evolution in the mycobacteria, whilst those encoded by glnA1 and glnA2 are more conserved. Conclusion Different selective pressures by the ecological niche that the organisms occupy may influence the sequence evolution of glnA1 and glnA2 and thereby affecting phylogenies based on the protein sequences they encode. The findings in this report may impact the use of similar sequences as molecular markers, as well as shed some light on the evolution of glutamine synthetase in the mycobacteria.

  3. Use of Metagenomics and Isolation of Actinobacteria in Brazil's Atlantic Rainforest Soil for Antimicrobial Prospecting

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    Assis, Danyelle Alves Martins; Rezende, Rachel Passos; Dias, João Carlos Teixeira

    2014-01-01

    Modern techniques involving molecular biology, such as metagenomics, have the advantage of exploiting a higher number of microorganisms; however, classic isolation and culture methods used to obtain antimicrobials continue to be promising, especially in the isolation of Actinobacteria, which are responsible for the production of many of these compounds. In this work, two methodologies were used to search for antimicrobial substances—isolation of Actinobacteria and metagenomics of the Atlantic Rainforest soil and of the cultivation of cocoa intercropped with acai berry in the Atlantic Rainforest. The metagenomic libraries were constructed with the CopyControl Fosmid Library kit EPICENTRE, resulting in a total of 2688 clones, 1344 of each soil sample. None of the clones presented antimicrobial activity against the microorganisms tested: S. aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Salmonella choleraesuis. A total of 46 isolates were obtained from the isolation of soil Actinobacteria: 24 isolates from Atlantic Rainforest soil and 22 isolates from the intercrop cultivation soil. Of these, two Atlantic Rainforest soil isolates inhibited the growth of S. aureus including a clinical isolate of S. aureus MRSA—a promising result, since it is an important multidrug-resistant human pathogen. PMID:25937991

  4. Use of Metagenomics and Isolation of Actinobacteria in Brazil’s Atlantic Rainforest Soil for Antimicrobial Prospecting

    OpenAIRE

    Danyelle Alves Martins Assis; Rachel Passos Rezende; João Carlos Teixeira Dias

    2014-01-01

    Modern techniques involving molecular biology, such as metagenomics, have the advantage of exploiting a higher number of microorganisms; however, classic isolation and culture methods used to obtain antimicrobials continue to be promising, especially in the isolation of Actinobacteria, which are responsible for the production of many of these compounds. In this work, two methodologies were used to search for antimicrobial substances—isolation of Actinobacteria and metagenomics of the Atlantic...

  5. Structural and Phylogenetic Analysis of a Conserved Actinobacteria-Specific Protein (ASP1; SCO1997) from Streptomyces Coelicolor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, B.; Sugiman-Marangos, S; Junop, M; Gupta, R

    2009-01-01

    The Actinobacteria phylum represents one of the largest and most diverse groups of bacteria, encompassing many important and well-characterized organisms including Streptomyces, Bifidobacterium, Corynebacterium and Mycobacterium. Members of this phylum are remarkably diverse in terms of life cycle, morphology, physiology and ecology. Recent comparative genomic analysis of 19 actinobacterial species determined that only 5 genes of unknown function uniquely define this large phylum [1]. The cellular functions of these actinobacteria-specific proteins (ASP) are not known.

  6. Phylogenetic diversity of actinobacteria associated with soft coral Alcyonium gracllimum and stony coral Tubastraea coccinea in the East China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shan; Sun, Wei; Tang, Cen; Jin, Liling; Zhang, Fengli; Li, Zhiyong

    2013-07-01

    Actinobacteria are widely distributed in the marine environment. To date, few studies have been performed to explore the coral-associated Actinobacteria, and little is known about the diversity of coral-associated Actinobacteria. In this study, the actinobacterial diversity associated with one soft coral Alcyonium gracllimum and one stony coral Tubastraea coccinea collected from the East China Sea was investigated using both culture-independent and culture-dependent approaches. A total of 19 actinobacterial genera were detected in these two corals, among which nine genera (Corynebacterium, Dietzia, Gordonia, Kocuria, Microbacterium, Micrococcus, Mycobacterium, Streptomyces, and Candidatus Microthrix) were common, three genera (Cellulomonas, Dermatophilus, and Janibacter) were unique to the soft coral, and seven genera (Brevibacterium, Dermacoccus, Leucobacter, Micromonospora, Nocardioides, Rhodococcus, and Serinicoccus) were unique to the stony coral. This finding suggested that highly diverse Actinobacteria were associated with different types of corals. In particular, five actinobacterial genera (Cellulomonas, Dermacoccus, Gordonia, Serinicoccus, and Candidatus Microthrix) were recovered from corals for the first time, extending the known diversity of coral-associated Actinobacteria. This study shows that soft and stony corals host diverse Actinobacteria and can serve as a new source of marine actinomycetes.

  7. A walk into the LuxR regulators of Actinobacteria: phylogenomic distribution and functional diversity.

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    Catarina Lopes Santos

    Full Text Available LuxR regulators are a widely studied group of bacterial helix-turn-helix (HTH transcription factors involved in the regulation of many genes coding for important traits at an ecological and medical level. This regulatory family is particularly known by their involvement in quorum-sensing (QS mechanisms, i.e., in the bacterial ability to communicate through the synthesis and binding of molecular signals. However, these studies have been mainly focused on gram-negative organisms, and the presence of LuxR regulators in the gram-positive Actinobacteria phylum is still poorly explored. In this manuscript, the presence of LuxR regulators among Actinobacteria was assayed using a domain-based strategy. A total of 991 proteins having one LuxR domain were identified in 53 genome-sequenced actinobacterial species, of which 59% had an additional domain. In most cases (53% this domain was REC (receiver domain, suggesting that LuxR regulators in Actinobacteria may either function as single transcription factors or as part of two-component systems. The frequency, distribution and evolutionary stability of each of these sub-families of regulators was analyzed and contextualized regarding the ecological niche occupied by each organism. The results show that the presence of extra-domains in the LuxR-regulators was likely driven by a general need to physically uncouple the signal sensing from the signal transduction. Moreover, the total frequency of LuxR regulators was shown to be dependent on genetic, metabolic and ecological variables. Finally, the functional annotation of the LuxR regulators revealed that the bacterial ecological niche has biased the specialization of these proteins. In the case of pathogens, our results suggest that LuxR regulators can be involved in virulence and are therefore promising targets for future studies in the health-related biotechnology field.

  8. Integral use of sugarcane vinasse for biomass production of actinobacteria: Potential application in soil remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Juan D; Benimeli, Claudia S; Almeida, César A; Polti, Marta A; Colin, Verónica L

    2017-08-01

    The use of living actinobacteria biomass to clean up contaminated soils is an attractive biotechnology approach. However, biomass generation from cheap feedstock is the first step to ensure process sustainability. The present work reports the ability of four actinobacteria, Streptomyces sp. M7, MC1, A5, and Amycolatopsis tucumanensis, to generate biomass from sugarcane vinasse. Optimal vinasse concentration to obtain the required biomass (more than 0.4 g L(-1)) was 20% for all strains, either grown individually or as mixed cultures. However, the biomass fraction recovered from first vinasse was discarded as it retained trace metals present in the effluent. Fractions recovered from three consecutive cycles of vinasse re-use obtained by mixing equal amounts of biomass from single cultures or produced as a mixed culture were evaluated to clean up contaminated soil with lindane and chromium. In all cases, the decrease in pesticide was about 50% after 14 d of incubation. However, chromium removal was statistically different depending on the preparation methodology of the inoculum. While the combined actinobacteria biomass recovered from their respective single cultures removed about 85% of the chromium, the mixed culture biomass removed more than 95%. At the end of the reused vinasse cycle, the mixed culture removed more than 70% of the biological oxygen demand suggesting a proportional reduction in the effluent toxicity. These results represent the first integral approach to address a problematic of multiple contaminations, concerning pesticides, heavy metals and a regionally important effluent like vinasse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative analysis of RNA regulatory elements of amino acid metabolism genes in Actinobacteria

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    Gelfand Mikhail S

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Formation of alternative structures in mRNA in response to external stimuli, either direct or mediated by proteins or other RNAs, is a major mechanism of regulation of gene expression in bacteria. This mechanism has been studied in detail using experimental and computational approaches in proteobacteria and Firmicutes, but not in other groups of bacteria. Results Comparative analysis of amino acid biosynthesis operons in Actinobacteria resulted in identification of conserved regions upstream of several operons. Classical attenuators were predicted upstream of trp operons in Corynebacterium spp. and Streptomyces spp., and trpS and leuS genes in some Streptomyces spp. Candidate leader peptides with terminators were observed upstream of ilvB genes in Corynebacterium spp., Mycobacterium spp. and Streptomyces spp. Candidate leader peptides without obvious terminators were found upstream of cys operons in Mycobacterium spp. and several other species. A conserved pseudoknot (named LEU element was identified upstream of leuA operons in most Actinobacteria. Finally, T-boxes likely involved in the regulation of translation initiation were observed upstream of ileS genes from several Actinobacteria. Conclusion The metabolism of tryptophan, cysteine and leucine in Actinobacteria seems to be regulated on the RNA level. In some cases the mechanism is classical attenuation, but in many cases some components of attenuators are missing. The most interesting case seems to be the leuA operon preceded by the LEU element that may fold into a conserved pseudoknot or an alternative structure. A LEU element has been observed in a transposase gene from Bifidobacterium longum, but it is not conserved in genes encoding closely related transposases despite a very high level of protein similarity. One possibility is that the regulatory region of the leuA has been co-opted from some element involved in transposition. Analysis of phylogenetic patterns

  10. On the nature of fur evolution: A phylogenetic approach in Actinobacteria

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    Benson David R

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An understanding of the evolution of global transcription regulators is essential for comprehending the complex networks of cellular metabolism that have developed among related organisms. The fur gene encodes one of those regulators – the ferric uptake regulator Fur – widely distributed among bacteria and known to regulate different genes committed to varied metabolic pathways. On the other hand, members of the Actinobacteria comprise an ecologically diverse group of bacteria able to inhabit various natural environments, and for which relatively little is currently understood concerning transcriptional regulation. Results BLAST analyses revealed the presence of more than one fur homologue in most members of the Actinobacteria whose genomes have been fully sequenced. We propose a model to explain the evolutionary history of fur within this well-known bacterial phylum: the postulated scenario includes one duplication event from a primitive regulator, which probably had a broad range of co-factors and DNA-binding sites. This duplication predated the appearance of the last common ancestor of the Actinobacteria, while six other duplications occurred later within specific groups of organisms, particularly in two genera: Frankia and Streptomyces. The resulting paralogues maintained main biochemical properties, but became specialised for regulating specific functions, coordinating different metal ions and binding to unique DNA sequences. The presence of syntenic regions surrounding the different fur orthologues supports the proposed model, as do the evolutionary distances and topology of phylogenetic trees built using both Neighbor-Joining and Maximum-Likelihood methods. Conclusion The proposed fur evolutionary model, which includes one general duplication and two in-genus duplications followed by divergence and specialization, explains the presence and diversity of fur genes within the Actinobacteria. Although a few rare

  11. Novel marine actinobacteria from emerald Andaman & Nicobar Islands: a prospective source for industrial and pharmaceutical byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Balakrishnan; Rajan, Lawrance Anbu; Vinithkumar, Nambali Valsalan; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam

    2013-06-22

    Andaman and Nicobar Islands situated in the eastern part of Bay of Bengal are one of the distinguished biodiversity hotspot. Even though number of studies carried out on the marine flora and fauna, the studies on actinobacteria from Andaman and Nicobar Islands are meager. The aim of the present study was to screen the actinobacteria for their characterization and identify the potential sources for industrial and pharmaceutical byproducts. A total of 26 actinobacterial strains were isolated from the marine sediments collected from various sites of Port Blair Bay where no collection has been characterized previously. Isolates were categorized under the genera: Saccharopolyspora, Streptomyces, Nocardiopsis, Streptoverticillium, Microtetraspora, Actinopolyspora, Actinokineospora and Dactylosporangium. Majority of the isolates were found to produce industrially important enzymes such as amylase, protease, gelatinase, lipase, DNase, cellulase, urease and phosphatase, and also exhibited substantial antibacterial activity against human pathogens. 77% of isolates exhibited significant hemolytic activity. Among 26 isolates, three strains (NIOT-VKKMA02, NIOT-VKKMA22 and NIOT-VKKMA26) were found to generate appreciable extent of surfactant, amylase, cellulase and protease enzyme. NIOT-VKKMA02 produced surfactant using kerosene as carbon source and emulsified upto E(24)-63.6%. Moreover, NIOT-VKKMA02, NIOT-VKKMA22 and NIOT-VKKMA26 synthesized 13.27 U/ml, 9.85 U/ml and 8.03 U/ml amylase; 7.75 U/ml, 5.01 U/ml and 2.08 U/ml of cellulase and 11.34 U/ml, 6.89 U/ml and 3.51 U/ml of protease enzyme, respectively. High diversity of marine actinobacteria was isolated and characterized in this work including undescribed species and species not previously reported from emerald Andaman and Nicobar Islands, including Streptomyces griseus, Streptomyces venezuelae and Saccharopolyspora salina. The enhanced salt, pH and temperature tolerance of the actinobacterial isolates along with their

  12. Carbonate Mineral Formation under the Influence of Limestone-Colonizing Actinobacteria: Morphology and Polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chengliang; Jiang, Jihong; Sun, Henry; Huang, Ying; Tao, Faxiang; Lian, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms and their biomineralization processes are widespread in almost every environment on earth. In this work, Streptomyces luteogriseus DHS C014, a dominant lithophilous actinobacteria isolated from microbial mats on limestone rocks, was used to investigate its potential biomineralization to allow a better understanding of bacterial contributions to carbonate mineralization in nature. The ammonium carbonate free-drift method was used with mycelium pellets, culture supernatant, and spent culture of the strain. Mineralogical analyses showed that hexagonal prism calcite was only observed in the sub-surfaces of the mycelium pellets, which is a novel morphology mediated by microbes. Hemispheroidal vaterite appeared in the presence of spent culture, mainly because of the effects of soluble microbial products (SMP) during mineralization. When using the culture supernatant, doughnut-like vaterite was favored by actinobacterial mycelia, which has not yet been captured in previous studies. Our analyses suggested that the effects of mycelium pellets as a molecular template almost gained an advantage over SMP both in crystal nucleation and growth, having nothing to do with biological activity. It is thereby convinced that lithophilous actinobacteria, S. luteogriseus DHS C014, owing to its advantageous genetic metabolism and filamentous structure, showed good biomineralization abilities, maybe it would have geoactive potential for biogenic carbonate in local microenvironments.

  13. Carbonate mineral formation under the influence of limestone-colonising actinobacteria: morphology and polymorphism

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    Chengliang eCao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms and their biomineralisation processes are widespread in almost every environment on earth. In this work, Streptomyces luteogriseus DHS C014, a dominant lithophilous actinobacteria isolated from microbial mats on limestone rocks, was used to investigate its potential biomineralisation to allow a better understanding of bacterial contributions to carbonate mineralisation in nature. The ammonium carbonate free-drift method was used with mycelium pellets, culture supernatant, and spent culture of the strain. Mineralogical analyses showed that hexagonal prism calcite was only observed in the sub-surfaces of the mycelium pellets, which is a novel morphology mediated by microbes. Hemispheroidal vaterite appeared in the presence of spent culture, mainly because of the effects of soluble microbial products (SMP during mineralisation. When using the liquid culture, doughnut-like vaterite was favoured by actinobacterial mycelia, which has not yet been captured in previous studies. Our analyses suggested that the effects of mycelium pellets as a molecular template almost gained an advantage over SMP both in crystal nucleation and growth, having nothing to do with biological activity. It is thereby convinced that lithophilous actinobacteria, S. luteogriseus DHS C014, owing to its advantageous genetic metabolism and filamentous structure, showed good biomineralisation abilities, maybe it would have geoactive potential for biogenic carbonate in local microenvironments.

  14. Consumption of atmospheric hydrogen during the life cycle of soil-dwelling actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Laura K; Rao, Deepa; Bosak, Tanja; Klepac-Ceraj, Vanja; Tada, Kendall R; Hansel, Colleen M; Ono, Shuhei; Prinn, Ronald G

    2014-06-01

    Microbe-mediated soil uptake is the largest and most uncertain variable in the budget of atmospheric hydrogen (H2 ). The diversity and ecophysiological role of soil microorganisms that can consume low atmospheric abundances of H2 with high-affinity [NiFe]-hydrogenases is unknown. We expanded the library of atmospheric H2 -consuming strains to include four soil Harvard Forest Isolate (HFI) Streptomyces spp., Streptomyces cattleya and Rhodococcus equi by assaying for high-affinity hydrogenase (hhyL) genes and quantifying H2 uptake rates. We find that aerial structures (hyphae and spores) are important for Streptomyces H2 consumption; uptake was not observed in S. griseoflavus Tu4000 (deficient in aerial structures) and was reduced by physical disruption of Streptomyces sp. HFI8 aerial structures. H2 consumption depended on the life cycle stage in developmentally distinct actinobacteria: Streptomyces sp. HFI8 (sporulating) and R. equi (non-sporulating, non-filamentous). Strain HFI8 took up H2 only after forming aerial hyphae and sporulating, while R. equi only consumed H2 in the late exponential and stationary phase. These observations suggest that conditions favouring H2 uptake by actinobacteria are associated with energy and nutrient limitation. Thus, H2 may be an important energy source for soil microorganisms inhabiting systems in which nutrients are frequently limited.

  15. Next Generation Sequencing of Actinobacteria for the Discovery of Novel Natural Products

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    Juan Pablo Gomez-Escribano

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Like many fields of the biosciences, actinomycete natural products research has been revolutionised by next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS. Hundreds of new genome sequences from actinobacteria are made public every year, many of them as a result of projects aimed at identifying new natural products and their biosynthetic pathways through genome mining. Advances in these technologies in the last five years have meant not only a reduction in the cost of whole genome sequencing, but also a substantial increase in the quality of the data, having moved from obtaining a draft genome sequence comprised of several hundred short contigs, sometimes of doubtful reliability, to the possibility of obtaining an almost complete and accurate chromosome sequence in a single contig, allowing a detailed study of gene clusters and the design of strategies for refactoring and full gene cluster synthesis. The impact that these technologies are having in the discovery and study of natural products from actinobacteria, including those from the marine environment, is only starting to be realised. In this review we provide a historical perspective of the field, analyse the strengths and limitations of the most relevant technologies, and share the insights acquired during our genome mining projects.

  16. Next Generation Sequencing of Actinobacteria for the Discovery of Novel Natural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Escribano, Juan Pablo; Alt, Silke; Bibb, Mervyn J

    2016-04-13

    Like many fields of the biosciences, actinomycete natural products research has been revolutionised by next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS). Hundreds of new genome sequences from actinobacteria are made public every year, many of them as a result of projects aimed at identifying new natural products and their biosynthetic pathways through genome mining. Advances in these technologies in the last five years have meant not only a reduction in the cost of whole genome sequencing, but also a substantial increase in the quality of the data, having moved from obtaining a draft genome sequence comprised of several hundred short contigs, sometimes of doubtful reliability, to the possibility of obtaining an almost complete and accurate chromosome sequence in a single contig, allowing a detailed study of gene clusters and the design of strategies for refactoring and full gene cluster synthesis. The impact that these technologies are having in the discovery and study of natural products from actinobacteria, including those from the marine environment, is only starting to be realised. In this review we provide a historical perspective of the field, analyse the strengths and limitations of the most relevant technologies, and share the insights acquired during our genome mining projects.

  17. Effect of Actinobacteria as a single cell protein on growth performance of Xiphophorus helleri

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    Selvakumar Dharmaraj

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The potential of Marine Actinobacteria particularly Streptomyces as a single cell protein (SCP feed for the growth of ornamental fish, Xiphophorus helleri has been investigated. The Streptomyces strains used as SCP were isolated from the marine sponges, namely Callyspongia diffusa, Mycale mytilorum, Tedania anhelans and Dysidea fragilis. Six SCP feeds were prepared and their effects were compared with those of control diet. After 30 days of feeding trials, the growth parameters including absolute growth rate, specific growth rate and feed conversion efficiency were found to be significantly (P<0.001 higher in groups that received SCP feed than those of control one, whereas feed conversion ratio was lower. Thus it was found that in addition to being effective antibiotic agents against harmful pathogens, Streptomyces could also promote the growth of fish effectively. Marine Actinobacteria, particularly Streptomyces, could play an important role as a single cell protein (SCP in aquaculture nutrition and is a promising microbe for the development of marine biotechnology.

  18. An Improved Protocol for Quantification of Freshwater Actinobacteria by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Raju; Pernthaler, Annelie; Pernthaler, Jakob; Warnecke, Falk; Posch, Thomas; Amann, Rudolf

    2003-01-01

    We tested a previously described protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridization of marine bacterioplankton with horseradish peroxidase-labeled rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes and catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD-FISH) in plankton samples from different lakes. The fraction of Bacteria detected by CARD-FISH was significantly lower than after FISH with fluorescently monolabeled probes. In particular, the abundances of aquatic Actinobacteria were significantly underestimated. We thus developed a combined fixation and permeabilization protocol for CARD-FISH of freshwater samples. Enzymatic pretreatment of fixed cells was optimized for the controlled digestion of gram-positive cell walls without causing overall cell loss. Incubations with high concentrations of lysozyme (10 mg ml−1) followed by achromopeptidase (60 U ml−1) successfully permeabilized cell walls of Actinobacteria for subsequent CARD-FISH both in enrichment cultures and environmental samples. Between 72 and >99% (mean, 86%) of all Bacteria could be visualized with the improved assay in surface waters of four lakes. For freshwater samples, our method is thus superior to the CARD-FISH protocol for marine Bacteria (mean, 55%) and to FISH with directly fluorochrome labeled probes (mean, 67%). Actinobacterial abundances in the studied systems, as detected by the optimized protocol, ranged from 32 to >55% (mean, 45%). Our findings confirm that members of this lineage are among the numerically most important Bacteria of freshwater picoplankton. PMID:12732568

  19. Larvicidal potency of marine actinobacteria isolated from mangrove environment against Aedes aegypti and Anopheles stephensi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, S; Santhanam, P; Srinivasan, M

    2017-06-01

    The marine soil samples were collected from different locations of Parangipettai mangrove ecosystem, Vellar estuary, southeast coast of India. Totally 30 different marine actinobacteria were isolated by serial dilution plate technique on starch casein agar medium. The isolated actinobacteria were investigated for their larvicidal activity against Aedes aegypti and Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. Streptomyces fungicidicus, S. griseus, S. albus, S. alboflavus and S. rochei were identified as potential biocide producers. Based on the antimicrobial activity, five strains were chosen for larvicidal and pupicidal activity. Among the crude extracts tested, the S. alboflavus extract showed significant activity against Ae. aegypti (LC50 1.48 ± 0.09 and LC90 3.33 ± 0.22) and An. stephensi (LC50 1.30 ± 0.09 and LC90 3.13 ± 0.21). Five isolates have shown a most significant mortality rate of the Ae. aegypti and An. stephensi mosquito larvae. This is an ideal eco-friendly approach for the control of Japanese encephalitis vectors, Ae. aegypti and malarial vector An. stephensi.

  20. Isolation and characterization of anti-adenoviral secondary metabolites from marine actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Mårten; Carlsson, Marcus; Uvell, Hanna; Islam, Koushikul; Edlund, Karin; Cullman, Inger; Altermark, Björn; Mei, Ya-Fang; Elofsson, Mikael; Willassen, Nils-Peder; Wadell, Göran; Almqvist, Fredrik

    2014-01-28

    Adenovirus infections in immunocompromised patients are associated with high mortality rates. Currently, there are no effective anti-adenoviral therapies available. It is well known that actinobacteria can produce secondary metabolites that are attractive in drug discovery due to their structural diversity and their evolved interaction with biomolecules. Here, we have established an extract library derived from actinobacteria isolated from Vestfjorden, Norway, and performed a screening campaign to discover anti-adenoviral compounds. One extract with anti-adenoviral activity was found to contain a diastereomeric 1:1 mixture of the butenolide secondary alcohols 1a and 1b. By further cultivation and analysis, we could isolate 1a and 1b in different diastereomeric ratio. In addition, three more anti-adenoviral butenolides 2, 3 and 4 with differences in their side-chains were isolated. In this study, the anti-adenoviral activity of these compounds was characterized and substantial differences in the cytotoxic potential between the butenolide analogs were observed. The most potent butenolide analog 3 displayed an EC50 value of 91 μM and no prominent cytotoxicity at 2 mM. Furthermore, we propose a biosynthetic pathway for these compounds based on their relative time of appearance and structure.

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Anti-Adenoviral Secondary Metabolites from Marine Actinobacteria

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    Mårten Strand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus infections in immunocompromised patients are associated with high mortality rates. Currently, there are no effective anti-adenoviral therapies available. It is well known that actinobacteria can produce secondary metabolites that are attractive in drug discovery due to their structural diversity and their evolved interaction with biomolecules. Here, we have established an extract library derived from actinobacteria isolated from Vestfjorden, Norway, and performed a screening campaign to discover anti-adenoviral compounds. One extract with anti-adenoviral activity was found to contain a diastereomeric 1:1 mixture of the butenolide secondary alcohols 1a and 1b. By further cultivation and analysis, we could isolate 1a and 1b in different diastereomeric ratio. In addition, three more anti-adenoviral butenolides 2, 3 and 4 with differences in their side-chains were isolated. In this study, the anti-adenoviral activity of these compounds was characterized and substantial differences in the cytotoxic potential between the butenolide analogs were observed. The most potent butenolide analog 3 displayed an EC50 value of 91 μM and no prominent cytotoxicity at 2 mM. Furthermore, we propose a biosynthetic pathway for these compounds based on their relative time of appearance and structure.

  2. Genetic and functional characterization of culturable plant-beneficial actinobacteria associated with yam rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam Palaniyandi, Sasikumar; Yang, Seung Hwan; Damodharan, Karthiyaini; Suh, Joo-Won

    2013-12-01

    Actinobacteria were isolated from the rhizosphere of yam plants from agricultural fields from Yeoju, South Korea and analyzed for their genetic and plant-beneficial functional diversity. A total of 29 highly occurring actinobacterial isolates from the yam rhizosphere were screened for various plant-beneficial traits such as antimicrobial activity on fungi and bacteria; biocontrol traits such as production of siderophore, protease, chitinase, endo-cellulase, and β-glucanase. The isolates were also screened for plant growth-promoting (PGP) traits such as auxin production, phosphate solubilization, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase activity, and in vitro Arabidopsis growth promotion. 16S rDNA sequence-based phylogenetic analysis was carried out on the actinobacterial isolates to determine their genetic relatedness to known actinobacteria. BOX-PCR analysis revealed high genetic diversity among the isolates. Several isolates were identified to belong to the genus Streptomyces and a few to Kitasatospora. The actinobacterial strains exhibited high diversity in their functionality and were identified as novel and promising candidates for future development into biocontrol and PGP agents. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Resistance to and Accumulation of Heavy Metals by Actinobacteria Isolated from Abandoned Mining Areas

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    Soraia El Baz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of high concentrations of heavy metals in environments can cause many human health risks and serious ecological problems. Nowadays, bioremediation using microorganisms is receiving much attention due to their good performance. The aim of this work is to investigate heavy metals resistance and bioaccumulation potential of actinobacteria strains isolated from some abandoned mining areas. Analysis of mining residues revealed that high concentration of zinc “Zn” was recorded in Sidi Bouatman, Arbar, and Bir Nhass mining residues. The highest concentration of lead “Pb” was found in Sidi Bouatman. Copper “Cu,” cadmium “Cd,” and chromium “Cr” were found with moderate and low concentrations. The resistance of 59 isolated actinobacteria to the five heavy metals was also determined. Using molecular identification 16S rRNA, these 27 isolates were found to belong to Streptomyces and Amycolatopsis genera. The results showed different levels of heavy metal resistance; the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC recorded was 0.55 for Pb, 0.15 for Cr, and 0.10 mg·mL−1 for both Zn and Cu. Chemical precipitation assay of heavy metals using hydrogen sulfide technic (H2S revealed that only 27 isolates have a strong ability to accumulate Pb (up to 600 mg of Pb per g of biomass for Streptomyces sp. BN3.

  4. Actinobacteria isolated from termite guts as a source of novel oxidative enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roes-Hill, Marilize; Rohland, Jeffrey; Burton, Stephanie

    2011-11-01

    A multi-faceted screening programme was designed to search for the oxidases, laccase, peroxidase and tyrosinase. Actinobacteria were selectively isolated from the paunch and colon region of the hindguts of the higher termite, Amitermes hastatus. The isolates were subjected to solid media assays (dye decolourization, melanin production and the utilization of indulin AT as sole carbon source) and liquid media assays. Eleven of the 39 strains had the ability to decolourize the dye RBBR, an indicator for the production of peroxidases in actinobacteria. Melanin production on ISP6 and ISP7 agar plates served as a good indicator for laccase and/or tyrosinase production and the ability of the strains to grow in the presence of indulin AT as a sole carbon source served as a good indicator of lignin peroxidase and/or general peroxidase production. Enzyme-producing strains were cultivated in liquid media and extracellular enzyme activities measured. Strains with the ability to produce oxidative enzymes under the conditions tested were identified to genus level by 16S rRNA gene analysis and compared to known oxidase producers. A strong relationship was observed between the environment sampled (termite guts where lignocellulose degradation occurs) and the dominant type of oxidative enzyme activity detected (laccases and peroxidases), which suggests the possibility of future targeted screening protocols linking the physical properties of the target enzymes with specific operational conditions required, such as lignocellulosic degradation in the preparation of biofuel feedstocks.

  5. Control of potato soft rot caused by Pectobacterium carotovorum and Pectobacterium atrosepticum by Moroccan actinobacteria isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baz, M; Lahbabi, D; Samri, S; Val, F; Hamelin, G; Madore, I; Bouarab, K; Beaulieu, C; Ennaji, M M; Barakate, Mustapha

    2012-01-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum and Pectobacterium atrosepticum are dreadful causal agents of potato soft rot. Actually, there are no efficient bactericides used to protect potato against Pectobacterium spp. Biological control using actinobacteria could be an interesting approach to manage this disease. Thus, two hundred actinobacteria isolated from Moroccan habitats were tested for their ability to inhibit in vitro 4 environmental Pectobacterium strains and the two reference strains (P. carotovorum CFBP 5890 and P. atrosepticum CFBP 5889). Eight percent of these isolates were active against at least one of the tested pathogens and only 2% exhibited an antimicrobial activity against all tested Pectobacterium strains. Four bioactive isolates having the greatest pathogen inhibitory capabilities and classified as belonging to the genus Streptomyces species through 16S rDNA analysis were subsequently tested for their ability to reduce in vivo soft rot symptoms on potato slices of Bintje, Yukon Gold, Russet and Norland cultivars caused by the two pathogens P. carotovorum and P. atrosepticum. This test was carried out by using biomass inoculums and culture filtrate of the isolates as treatment. Among these, strain Streptomyces sp. OE7, reduced by 65-94% symptom severity caused by the two pathogens on potato slices. Streptomyces OE7 showed a potential for controlling soft rot on potato slices and could be useful in an integrated control program against potato soft rot pathogens in the objective to reduce treatments with chemical compounds.

  6. Insights on the Effects of Heat Pretreatment, pH, and Calcium Salts on Isolation of Rare Actinobacteria from Karstic Caves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Bao-Zhu; Salam, Nimaichand; Han, Ming-Xian; Jiao, Jian-Yu; Cheng, Juan; Wei, Da-Qiao; Xiao, Min; Li, Wen-Jun

    2017-01-01

    The phylum Actinobacteria is one of the most ubiquitously present bacterial lineages on Earth. In the present study, we try to explore the diversity of cultivable rare Actinobacteria in Sigangli Cave, Yunnan, China by utilizing a combination of different sample pretreatments and under different culture conditions. Pretreating the samples under different conditions of heat, setting the isolation condition at different pHs, and supplementation of media with different calcium salts were found to be effective for isolation of diverse rare Actinobacteria. During our study, a total of 204 isolates affiliated to 30 genera of phylum Actinobacteria were cultured. Besides the dominant Streptomyces, rare Actinobacteria of the genera Actinocorallia, Actinomadura, Agromyces, Alloactinosynnema, Amycolatopsis, Beutenbergia, Cellulosimicrobium, Gordonia, Isoptericola, Jiangella, Knoellia, Kocuria, Krasilnikoviella, Kribbella, Microbacterium, Micromonospora, Mumia, Mycobacterium, Nocardia, Nocardioides, Nocardiopsis, Nonomuraea, Oerskovia, Pseudokineococcus, Pseudonocardia, Rhodococcus, Saccharothrix, Streptosporangium, and Tsukamurella were isolated from these cave samples.

  7. Insights on the Effects of Heat Pretreatment, pH, and Calcium Salts on Isolation of Rare Actinobacteria from Karstic Caves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Zhu Fang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The phylum Actinobacteria is one of the most ubiquitously present bacterial lineages on Earth. In the present study, we try to explore the diversity of cultivable rare Actinobacteria in Sigangli Cave, Yunnan, China by utilizing a combination of different sample pretreatments and under different culture conditions. Pretreating the samples under different conditions of heat, setting the isolation condition at different pHs, and supplementation of media with different calcium salts were found to be effective for isolation of diverse rare Actinobacteria. During our study, a total of 204 isolates affiliated to 30 genera of phylum Actinobacteria were cultured. Besides the dominant Streptomyces, rare Actinobacteria of the genera Actinocorallia, Actinomadura, Agromyces, Alloactinosynnema, Amycolatopsis, Beutenbergia, Cellulosimicrobium, Gordonia, Isoptericola, Jiangella, Knoellia, Kocuria, Krasilnikoviella, Kribbella, Microbacterium, Micromonospora, Mumia, Mycobacterium, Nocardia, Nocardioides, Nocardiopsis, Nonomuraea, Oerskovia, Pseudokineococcus, Pseudonocardia, Rhodococcus, Saccharothrix, Streptosporangium, and Tsukamurella were isolated from these cave samples.

  8. Metagenomics uncovers a new group of low GC and ultra-small marine Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghai, Rohit; Mizuno, Carolina Megumi; Picazo, Antonio; Camacho, Antonio; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    We describe a deep-branching lineage of marine Actinobacteria with very low GC content (33%) and the smallest free living cells described yet (cell volume ca. 0.013 μm(3)), even smaller than the cosmopolitan marine photoheterotroph, 'Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique'. These microbes are highly related to 16S rRNA sequences retrieved by PCR from the Pacific and Atlantic oceans 20 years ago. Metagenomic fosmids allowed a virtual genome reconstruction that also indicated very small genomes below 1 Mb. A new kind of rhodopsin was detected indicating a photoheterotrophic lifestyle. They are estimated to be ~4% of the total numbers of cells found at the site studied (the Mediterranean deep chlorophyll maximum) and similar numbers were estimated in all tropical and temperate photic zone metagenomes available. Their geographic distribution mirrors that of picocyanobacteria and there appears to be an association between these microbial groups. A new sub-class, 'Candidatus Actinomarinidae' is proposed to designate these microbes.

  9. Larvicidal, repellent, and ovicidal activity of marine actinobacteria extracts against Culex tritaeniorhynchus and Culex gelidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, L; Gaurav, K; Rao, K V Bhaskara; Rajakumar, G; Rahuman, A Abdul

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of crude extracts of marine actinobacteria on larvicidal, repellent, and ovicidal activities against Culex tritaeniorhynchus and Culex gelidus (Diptera: Culicidae). The early fourth instar larvae of C. tritaeniorhynchus and C. gelidus, reared in the laboratory, were used for larvicidal, ovicidal, and repellent assay with crude extracts of actinobacteria. Saccharomonospora spp. (LK-1), Streptomyces roseiscleroticus (LK-2), and Streptomyces gedanensis (LK-3) were identified as potential biocide producers. Based on the antimicrobial activity, three strains were chosen for larvicidal activity. The marine actinobacterial extracts showed moderate to high larvicidal effects after 24 h of exposure at 1,000 ppm and the highest larval mortality was found in extract of LK-3 (LC(50) = 108.08 ppm and LC(90) = 609.15 ppm) against the larvae of C. gelidus and (LC(50) = 146.24 ppm and LC(90) = 762.69 ppm) against the larvae of C. tritaeniorhynchus. Complete protections for 240 min were found in crude extract of LK-2 and LK-3 at 1,000 ppm, against mosquito bites of C. tritaeniorhynchus and C. gelidus, respectively. After 24-h treatment, mean percent hatchability of the ovicidal activity was observed. The percent hatchability was inversely proportional to the concentration of extract and directly proportional to the eggs. Crude extracts of LK-1 and LK-3 showed no hatchability at 1,000 ppm against C. tritaeniorhynchus and C. gelidus, respectively. This is an ideal ecofriendly approach for the control of Japanese encephalitis vectors, C. tritaeniorhynchus and C. gelidus.

  10. Marine actinobacteria showing phosphate-solubilizing efficiency in Chorao Island, Goa, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastager, Syed G; Damare, Samir

    2013-05-01

    The occurrence and distribution of an actinobacteria group of bacteria capable of dissolving insoluble phosphates were investigated in this study in marine environments, especially in sediments of Chorao Island, Goa Province, India. A total of 200 bacterial isolates of actinobacteria was isolated. All isolates were screened for phosphate-solubilizing activity on Pikovskaya's agar. Thirteen different isolates exhibiting maximum formation of halos (zone of solubilization) around the bacterial colonies were selected for quantitative estimations of P-solubilization. Quantitative estimations for P-solubilization were analyzed for up to 10 days at intervals of 24 h. Maximum solubilization from 89.3 ± 3.1 to 164.1 ± 4.1 μg ml(-1) was observed after 6 days of incubation in six of all isolates, while the isolate NII-1020 showed maximum P-solubilization. The increase in solubilization coincided with the drop in pH. Many of these species showed wide range of tolerance to temperature, pH, and salt concentrations. Further, 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses were carried to identify the bacterial groups which are actively solubilized phosphate in vitro. Gene sequencing results reveal that all isolates were clustered into six different actinobacterial genera: Streptomyces, Microbacterium, Angustibacter, Kocuria, Isoptericola, and Agromyces. The presence of phosphate-solubilizing microorganisms and their ability to solubilize phosphate were indicative of the important role played by bacteria in the biogeochemical cycle of phosphorus and the plant growth in coastal ecosystems.

  11. Korean indigenous bacterial species with valid names belonging to the phylum Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kyung Sook; Kim, Mi Sun; Lee, Ji Hee; Kang, Joo Won; Kim, Dae In; Lee, Ji Hee; Seong, Chi Nam

    2016-12-01

    To understand the isolation and classification state of actinobacterial species with valid names for Korean indigenous isolates, isolation source, regional origin, and taxonomic affiliation of the isolates were studied. At the time of this writing, the phylum Actinobacteria consisted of only one class, Actinobacteria, including five subclasses, 10 orders, 56 families, and 330 genera. Moreover, new taxa of this phylum continue to be discovered. Korean actinobacterial species with a valid name has been reported from 1995 as Tsukamurella inchonensis isolated from a clinical specimen. In 1997, Streptomyces seoulensis was validated with the isolate from the natural Korean environment. Until Feb. 2016, 256 actinobacterial species with valid names originated from Korean territory were listed on LPSN. The species were affiliated with three subclasses (Acidimicrobidae, Actinobacteridae, and Rubrobacteridae), four orders (Acidimicrobiales, Actinomycetales, Bifidobacteriales, and Solirubrobacterales), 12 suborders, 36 families, and 93 genera. Most of the species belonged to the subclass Actinobacteridae, and almost of the members of this subclass were affiliated with the order Actinomycetales. A number of novel isolates belonged to the families Nocardioidaceae, Microbacteriaceae, Intrasporangiaceae, and Streptomycetaceae as well as the genera Nocardioides, Streptomyces, and Microbacterium. Twenty-six novel genera and one novel family, Motilibacteraceae, were created first with Korean indigenous isolates. Most of the Korean indigenous actionobacterial species were isolated from natural environments such as soil, seawater, tidal flat sediment, and fresh-water. A considerable number of species were isolated from artificial resources such as fermented foods, wastewater, compost, biofilm, and water-cooling systems or clinical specimens. Korean indigenous actinobacterial species were isolated from whole territory of Korea, and especially a large number of species were from Jeju

  12. Genome sequence of "Candidatus Aquiluna" sp. strain IMCC13023, a marine member of the Actinobacteria isolated from an arctic fjord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ilnam; Lee, Kiyoung; Yang, Seung-Jo; Choi, Ahyoung; Kang, Dongmin; Lee, Yoo Kyoung; Cho, Jang-Cheon

    2012-07-01

    We report the genome sequence of actinobacterial strain IMCC13023, isolated from arctic fjord seawater. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene showed that the strain is related to "Candidatus Aquiluna rubra." The genome information suggests that strain IMCC13023 is a photoheterotroph carrying actinorhodopsin, with the smallest genome ever reported for a free-living member of the Actinobacteria.

  13. Potential for biocontrol of melanized fungi by actinobacteria isolated from intertidal region of Ilha Do Mel, Paraná, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalitz, Camila de Araújo; Porsani, Mariana Vieira; Figel, Izabel Cristina; Pimentel, Ida C; Dalzoto, Patrícia R

    Actinobacteria occur in many environments and have the capacity to produce secondary metabolites with antibiotic potential. Identification and taxonomy of actinobacteria that produce antimicrobial substances is essential for the screening of new compounds, and sequencing of the 16S region of ribosomal DNA (rDNA), which is conserved and present in all bacteria, is an important method of identification. Melanized fungi are free-living organisms, which can also be pathogens of clinical importance. This work aimed to evaluate growth inhibition of melanized fungi by actinobacteria and to identify the latter to the species level. In this study, antimicrobial activity of 13 actinobacterial isolates from the genus Streptomyces was evaluated against seven melanized fungi of the genera Exophiala, Cladosporium, and Rhinocladiella. In all tests, all actinobacterial isolates showed inhibitory activity against all isolates of melanized fungi, and only one actinobacterial isolate had less efficient inhibitory activity. The 16S rDNA region of five previously unidentified actinobacterial isolates from Ilha do Mel, Paraná, Brazil, was sequenced; four of the isolates were identified as Streptomyces globisporus subsp. globisporus, and one isolate was identified as Streptomyces aureus. This work highlights the potential of actinobacteria with antifungal activity and their role in the pursuit of novel antimicrobial substances. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Exploring the Diversity and Antimicrobial Potential of Marine Actinobacteria from the Comau Fjord in Northern Patagonia, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undabarrena, Agustina; Beltrametti, Fabrizio; Claverías, Fernanda P.; González, Myriam; Moore, Edward R. B.; Seeger, Michael; Cámara, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Bioprospecting natural products in marine bacteria from fjord environments are attractive due to their unique geographical features. Although, Actinobacteria are well known for producing a myriad of bioactive compounds, investigations regarding fjord-derived marine Actinobacteria are scarce. In this study, the diversity and biotechnological potential of Actinobacteria isolated from marine sediments within the Comau fjord, in Northern Chilean Patagonia, were assessed by culture-based approaches. The 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that members phylogenetically related to the Micrococcaceae, Dermabacteraceae, Brevibacteriaceae, Corynebacteriaceae, Microbacteriaceae, Dietziaceae, Nocardiaceae, and Streptomycetaceae families were present at the Comau fjord. A high diversity of cultivable Actinobacteria (10 genera) was retrieved by using only five different isolation media. Four isolates belonging to Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Corynebacterium and Kocuria genera showed 16S rRNA gene identity <98.7% suggesting that they are novel species. Physiological features such as salt tolerance, artificial sea water requirement, growth temperature, pigmentation and antimicrobial activity were evaluated. Arthrobacter, Brachybacterium, Curtobacterium, Rhodococcus, and Streptomyces isolates showed strong inhibition against both Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes. Antimicrobial activities in Brachybacterium, Curtobacterium, and Rhodococcus have been scarcely reported, suggesting that non-mycelial strains are a suitable source of bioactive compounds. In addition, all strains bear at least one of the biosynthetic genes coding for NRPS (91%), PKS I (18%), and PKS II (73%). Our results indicate that the Comau fjord is a promising source of novel Actinobacteria with biotechnological potential for producing biologically active compounds. PMID:27486455

  15. Diversity, biogeography and biodegradation potential of actinobacteria in the deep-sea sediments along the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The phylum Actinobacteria has been reported to be common or even abundant in deep marine sediments, however, knowledge about the diversity, distribution, and function of actinobacteria is limited. In this study, actinobacterial diversity in the deep sea along the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR was investigated using both 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and culture-based methods. The samples were collected at depths of 1662–4000 m below water surface. Actinobacterial sequences represented 1.2–9.1% of all microbial 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequences in each sample. A total of 5 actinobacterial classes, 17 orders, 28 families and 52 genera were detected by pyrosequencing, dominated by the classes Acidimicrobiia and Actinobacteria. Differences in actinobacterial community compositions were found among the samples. The community structure showed significant correlations to geochemical factors, notably pH, calcium, total organic carbon, total phosphorus, and total nitrogen, rather than to spatial distance at the scale of the investigation. In addition, 176 strains of the Actinobacteria class, belonging to 9 known orders, 18 families, and 29 genera, were isolated. Among these cultivated taxa, 8 orders, 13 families, and 15 genera were also recovered by pyrosequencing. At a 97% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, the pyrosequencing data encompassed 77.3% of the isolates but the isolates represented only 10.3% of the actinobacterial reads. Phylogenetic analysis of all the representative actinobacterial sequences and isolates indicated that at least four new orders within the phylum Actinobacteria were detected by pyrosequencing. More than half of the isolates spanning 23 genera and all samples demonstrated activity in the degradation of refractory organics, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polysaccharides, suggesting their potential ecological functions and biotechnological applications for carbon recycling.

  16. Exploring the diversity and antimicrobial potential of marine Actinobacteria from the Comau Fjord in Northern Patagonia, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustina Undabarrena

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bioprospecting natural products in marine bacteria from fjord environments are attractive due to their unique geographical features. Although Actinobacteria are well known for producing a myriad of bioactive compounds, investigations regarding fjord-derived marine Actinobacteria are scarce. In this study, the diversity and biotechnological potential of Actinobacteria isolated from marine sediments within the Comau fjord, in Northern Chilean Patagonia, were assessed by culture-based approaches. The 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that members phylogenetically related to the Micrococcaceae, Dermabacteraceae, Brevibacteriaceae, Corynebacteriaceae, Microbacteriaceae, Dietziaceae, Nocardiaceae and Streptomycetaceae families were present at the Comau fjord. A high diversity of cultivable Actinobacteria (10 genera was retrieved by using only five different isolation media. Four isolates belonging to Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Corynebacterium and Kocuria genera showed 16S rRNA gene identity <98.7% suggesting that they are novel species. Physiological features such as salt tolerance, artificial sea water requirement, growth temperature, pigmentation and antimicrobial activity were evaluated. Arthrobacter, Brachybacterium, Curtobacterium, Rhodococcus and Streptomyces isolates showed strong inhibition against both Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes. Antimicrobial activities in Brachybacterium, Curtobacterium and Rhodococcus have been scarcely reported, suggesting that non-mycelial strains are a suitable source of bioactive compounds. In addition, all strains bear at least one of the biosynthetic genes coding for NRPS (91%, PKS I (18% and PKS II (73%.Our results indicate that the Comau fjord is a promising source of novel Actinobacteria with biotechnological potential for producing biologically active compounds.

  17. Diversity, Biogeography, and Biodegradation Potential of Actinobacteria in the Deep-Sea Sediments along the Southwest Indian Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping; Zhang, Limin; Guo, Xiaoxuan; Dai, Xin; Liu, Li; Xi, Lijun; Wang, Jian; Song, Lei; Wang, Yuezhu; Zhu, Yaxin; Huang, Li; Huang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The phylum Actinobacteria has been reported to be common or even abundant in deep marine sediments, however, knowledge about the diversity, distribution, and function of actinobacteria is limited. In this study, actinobacterial diversity in the deep sea along the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) was investigated using both 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and culture-based methods. The samples were collected at depths of 1662-4000 m below water surface. Actinobacterial sequences represented 1.2-9.1% of all microbial 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequences in each sample. A total of 5 actinobacterial classes, 17 orders, 28 families, and 52 genera were detected by pyrosequencing, dominated by the classes Acidimicrobiia and Actinobacteria. Differences in actinobacterial community compositions were found among the samples. The community structure showed significant correlations to geochemical factors, notably pH, calcium, total organic carbon, total phosphorus, and total nitrogen, rather than to spatial distance at the scale of the investigation. In addition, 176 strains of the Actinobacteria class, belonging to 9 known orders, 18 families, and 29 genera, were isolated. Among these cultivated taxa, 8 orders, 13 families, and 15 genera were also recovered by pyrosequencing. At a 97% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, the pyrosequencing data encompassed 77.3% of the isolates but the isolates represented only 10.3% of the actinobacterial reads. Phylogenetic analysis of all the representative actinobacterial sequences and isolates indicated that at least four new orders within the phylum Actinobacteria were detected by pyrosequencing. More than half of the isolates spanning 23 genera and all samples demonstrated activity in the degradation of refractory organics, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polysaccharides, suggesting their potential ecological functions and biotechnological applications for carbon recycling.

  18. Understanding alternative fluxes/effluxes through comparative metabolic pathway analysis of phylum actinobacteria using a simplified approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mansi; Lal, Devi; Saxena, Anjali; Anand, Shailly; Kaur, Jasvinder; Kaur, Jaspreet; Lal, Rup

    2013-12-01

    Actinobacteria are known for their diverse metabolism and physiology. Some are dreadful human pathogens whereas some constitute the natural flora for human gut. Therefore, the understanding of metabolic pathways is a key feature for targeting the pathogenic bacteria without disturbing the symbiotic ones. A big challenge faced today is multiple drug resistance by Mycobacterium and other pathogens that utilize alternative fluxes/effluxes. With the availability of genome sequence, it is now feasible to conduct the comparative in silico analysis. Here we present a simplified approach to compare metabolic pathways so that the species specific enzyme may be traced and engineered for future therapeutics. The analyses of four key carbohydrate metabolic pathways, i.e., glycolysis, pyruvate metabolism, tri carboxylic acid cycle and pentose phosphate pathway suggest the presence of alternative fluxes. It was found that the upper pathway of glycolysis was highly variable in the actinobacterial genomes whereas lower glycolytic pathway was highly conserved. Likewise, pentose phosphate pathway was well conserved in contradiction to TCA cycle, which was found to be incomplete in majority of actinobacteria. The clustering based on presence and absence of genes of these metabolic pathways clearly revealed that members of different genera shared identical pathways and, therefore, provided an easy method to identify the metabolic similarities/differences between pathogenic and symbiotic organisms. The analyses could identify isoenzymes and some key enzymes that were found to be missing in some pathogenic actinobacteria. The present work defines a simple approach to explore the effluxes in four metabolic pathways within the phylum actinobacteria. The analysis clearly reflects that actinobacteria exhibit diverse routes for metabolizing substrates. The pathway comparison can help in finding the enzymes that can be used as drug targets for pathogens without effecting symbiotic organisms

  19. The diversity and biogeography of the communities of Actinobacteria in the forelands of glaciers at a continental scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Binglin; Wu, Xiukun; Zhang, Gaosen; Li, Shuyan; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Ximing; Sun, Likun; Zhang, Baogui; Liu, Guangxiu; Chen, Tuo

    2016-05-01

    Glacier forelands, where the initially exposed area is unvegetated with minimal human influence, are an ideal place for research on the distributions and biogeography of microbial communities. Actinobacteria produce many bioactive substances and have important roles in soil development and biogeochemical cycling. However, little is known about the distribution and biogeography of Actinobacteria in glacier forelands. Therefore, we investigated the patterns of diversity and the biogeography of actinobacterial communities of the inhabited forefields of 5 glaciers in China. Of the bacteria, the mean relative abundance of Actinobacteria was 13.1%, and 6 classes were identified in the phylum Actinobacteria. The dominant class was Actinobacteria (57%), which was followed in abundance by Acidimicrobiia (19%) and Thermoleophilia (19%). When combined, the relative abundance of the other three classes, the MB-A2-108, Nitriliruptoria and Rubrobacteria, was only 2.4%. A biogeographic pattern in the forelands of the 5 glaciers in China was not detected for actinobacterial communities. Compared with 7 other actinobacterial communities found in the forelands of glaciers globally, those in the Southern Hemisphere were significantly different from those in the Northern Hemisphere. Moreover, the communities were significantly different on the separate continents of the Northern Hemisphere. The dissimilarity of the actinobacterial communities increased with geographic distance (r = 0.428, p = 0.0003). Because of environmental factors, the effect of geography was clear when the distance exceeded a certain continent-level threshold. With the analysis of indicator species, we found that each genus had a geographic characteristic, which could explain why the communities with greater diversity were more strongly affected by biogeography.

  20. A proteomic survey of nonribosomal peptide and polyketide biosynthesis in actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunqiu; Ntai, Ioanna; Ju, Kou-San; Unger, Michelle; Zamdborg, Leonid; Robinson, Sarah J; Doroghazi, James R; Labeda, David P; Metcalf, William W; Kelleher, Neil L

    2012-01-01

    Actinobacteria such as streptomycetes are renowned for their ability to produce bioactive natural products including nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides (PKs). The advent of genome sequencing has revealed an even larger genetic repertoire for secondary metabolism with most of the small molecule products of these gene clusters still unknown. Here, we employed a "protein-first" method called PrISM (Proteomic Investigation of Secondary Metabolism) to screen 26 unsequenced actinomycetes using mass spectrometry-based proteomics for the targeted detection of expressed nonribosomal peptide synthetases or polyketide synthases. Improvements to the original PrISM screening approach (Nat. Biotechnol. 2009, 27, 951-956), for example, improved de novo peptide sequencing, have enabled the discovery of 10 NRPS/PKS gene clusters from 6 strains. Taking advantage of the concurrence of biosynthetic enzymes and the secondary metabolites they generate, two natural products were associated with their previously "orphan" gene clusters. This work has demonstrated the feasibility of a proteomics-based strategy for use in screening for NRP/PK production in actinomycetes (often >8 Mbp, high GC genomes) versus the bacilli (2-4 Mbp genomes) used previously.

  1. Comprehensive investigation of marine Actinobacteria associated with the sponge Halichondria panicea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneemann, Imke; Nagel, Kerstin; Kajahn, Inga; Labes, Antje; Wiese, Jutta; Imhoff, Johannes F

    2010-06-01

    Representatives of Actinobacteria were isolated from the marine sponge Halichondria panicea collected from the Baltic Sea (Germany). For the first time, a comprehensive investigation was performed with regard to phylogenetic strain identification, secondary metabolite profiling, bioactivity determination, and genetic exploration of biosynthetic genes, especially concerning the relationships of the abundance of biosynthesis gene fragments to the number and diversity of produced secondary metabolites. All strains were phylogenetically identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses and were found to belong to the genera Actinoalloteichus, Micrococcus, Micromonospora, Nocardiopsis, and Streptomyces. Secondary metabolite profiles of 46 actinobacterial strains were evaluated, 122 different substances were identified, and 88 so far unidentified compounds were detected. The extracts from most of the cultures showed biological activities. In addition, the presence of biosynthesis genes encoding polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) in 30 strains was established. It was shown that strains in which either PKS or NRPS genes were identified produced a significantly higher number of metabolites and exhibited a larger number of unidentified, possibly new metabolites than other strains. Therefore, the presence of PKS and NRPS genes is a good indicator for the selection of strains to isolate new natural products.

  2. Marine Actinobacteria from the Gulf of California: diversity, abundance and secondary metabolite biosynthetic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril-Espinosa, Amayaly; Freel, Kelle C; Jensen, Paul R; Soria-Mercado, Irma E

    2013-04-01

    The Gulf of California is a coastal marine ecosystem characterized as having abundant biological resources and a high level of endemism. In this work we report the isolation and characterization of Actinobacteria from different sites in the western Gulf of California. We collected 126 sediment samples and isolated on average 3.1-38.3 Actinobacterial strains from each sample. Phylogenetic analysis of 136 strains identified them as members of the genera Actinomadura, Micromonospora, Nocardiopsis, Nonomuraea, Saccharomonospora, Salinispora, Streptomyces and Verrucosispora. These strains were grouped into 26-56 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on 16S rRNA gene sequence identities of 98-100 %. At 98 % sequence identity, three OTUs appear to represent new taxa while nine (35 %) have only been reported from marine environments. Sixty-three strains required seawater for growth. These fell into two OTUs at the 98 % identity level and include one that failed to produce aerial hyphae and was only distantly related (≤95.5 % 16S identity) to any previously cultured Streptomyces sp. Phylogenetic analyses of ketosynthase domains associated with polyketide synthase genes revealed sequences that ranged from 55 to 99 % nucleotide identity to experimentally characterized biosynthetic pathways suggesting that some may be associated with the production of new secondary metabolites. These results indicate that marine sediments from the Gulf of California harbor diverse Actinobacterial taxa with the potential to produce new secondary metabolites.

  3. Genomic islands link secondary metabolism to functional adaptation in marine Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Kevin; Jenkins, Caroline; Nett, Markus; Udwary, Daniel W; Gontang, Erin A; McGlinchey, Ryan P; Foster, Brian; Lapidus, Alla; Podell, Sheila; Allen, Eric E; Moore, Bradley S; Jensen, Paul R

    2009-10-01

    Genomic islands have been shown to harbor functional traits that differentiate ecologically distinct populations of environmental bacteria. A comparative analysis of the complete genome sequences of the marine Actinobacteria Salinispora tropica and Salinispora arenicola reveals that 75% of the species-specific genes are located in 21 genomic islands. These islands are enriched in genes associated with secondary metabolite biosynthesis providing evidence that secondary metabolism is linked to functional adaptation. Secondary metabolism accounts for 8.8% and 10.9% of the genes in the S. tropica and S. arenicola genomes, respectively, and represents the major functional category of annotated genes that differentiates the two species. Genomic islands harbor all 25 of the species-specific biosynthetic pathways, the majority of which occur in S. arenicola and may contribute to the cosmopolitan distribution of this species. Genome evolution is dominated by gene duplication and acquisition, which in the case of secondary metabolism provide immediate opportunities for the production of new bioactive products. Evidence that secondary metabolic pathways are exchanged horizontally, coupled with earlier evidence for fixation among globally distributed populations, supports a functional role and suggests that the acquisition of natural product biosynthetic gene clusters represents a previously unrecognized force driving bacterial diversification. Species-specific differences observed in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat sequences suggest that S. arenicola may possess a higher level of phage immunity, whereas a highly duplicated family of polymorphic membrane proteins provides evidence for a new mechanism of marine adaptation in Gram-positive bacteria.

  4. Systematic characterization of potential cellulolytic marine actinobacteria Actinoalloteichus sp. MHA15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Gobalakrishnan; Kannan, Sivakumar

    2017-03-01

    Cellulose is the most abounding biopolymer in the world and there is a great interest in using this material as a substrate for various applications and it is the most important renewable resource for bioconversion. Therefore, it is necessary to screen the cellulolytic bioorganisms. In this context, actinobacteria are one of the most efficient prokaryotes, economically and biotechnologically, for their production of about half of the discovered bioactive secondary metabolites and they can metabolize many different compounds. Therefore, the present study was carried out to isolate and screen cellulase enzyme producing marine actinobacterial strains from the sediments of the Havelock island, the Andamans. Totally, 19 morphologically distinct actinobacterial strains were isolated and subjected to cellulose degradation assay. Out of the 19, four strains were found to possess good cellulose degradation activity and the strain MHA15 alone produced higher amount of cellulase enzyme (14.379 1U/ml) than the others. Taxonomical study of the strain MHA15 revealed that it belongs to the genus Actinoalloteichus and the molecular characters showed distinct difference in its phylogenetic relationship (8.4%) with A. cyanogriseus.

  5. Systematic characterization of potential cellulolytic marine actinobacteria Actinoalloteichus sp. MHA15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobalakrishnan Rajagopal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose is the most abounding biopolymer in the world and there is a great interest in using this material as a substrate for various applications and it is the most important renewable resource for bioconversion. Therefore, it is necessary to screen the cellulolytic bioorganisms. In this context, actinobacteria are one of the most efficient prokaryotes, economically and biotechnologically, for their production of about half of the discovered bioactive secondary metabolites and they can metabolize many different compounds. Therefore, the present study was carried out to isolate and screen cellulase enzyme producing marine actinobacterial strains from the sediments of the Havelock island, the Andamans. Totally, 19 morphologically distinct actinobacterial strains were isolated and subjected to cellulose degradation assay. Out of the 19, four strains were found to possess good cellulose degradation activity and the strain MHA15 alone produced higher amount of cellulase enzyme (14.379 1U/ml than the others. Taxonomical study of the strain MHA15 revealed that it belongs to the genus Actinoalloteichus and the molecular characters showed distinct difference in its phylogenetic relationship (8.4% with A. cyanogriseus.

  6. Comprehensive Investigation of Marine Actinobacteria Associated with the Sponge Halichondria panicea▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneemann, Imke; Nagel, Kerstin; Kajahn, Inga; Labes, Antje; Wiese, Jutta; Imhoff, Johannes F.

    2010-01-01

    Representatives of Actinobacteria were isolated from the marine sponge Halichondria panicea collected from the Baltic Sea (Germany). For the first time, a comprehensive investigation was performed with regard to phylogenetic strain identification, secondary metabolite profiling, bioactivity determination, and genetic exploration of biosynthetic genes, especially concerning the relationships of the abundance of biosynthesis gene fragments to the number and diversity of produced secondary metabolites. All strains were phylogenetically identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses and were found to belong to the genera Actinoalloteichus, Micrococcus, Micromonospora, Nocardiopsis, and Streptomyces. Secondary metabolite profiles of 46 actinobacterial strains were evaluated, 122 different substances were identified, and 88 so far unidentified compounds were detected. The extracts from most of the cultures showed biological activities. In addition, the presence of biosynthesis genes encoding polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) in 30 strains was established. It was shown that strains in which either PKS or NRPS genes were identified produced a significantly higher number of metabolites and exhibited a larger number of unidentified, possibly new metabolites than other strains. Therefore, the presence of PKS and NRPS genes is a good indicator for the selection of strains to isolate new natural products. PMID:20382810

  7. Culturable heterotrophic bacteria from the marine sponge Dendrilla nigra: isolation and phylogenetic diversity of actinobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvin, Joseph; Gandhimathi, R.; Kiran, G. Seghal; Priya, S. Shanmugha; Ravji, T. Rajeetha; Hema, T. A.

    2009-09-01

    Culturable heterotrophic bacterial composition of marine sponge Dendrilla nigra was analysed using different enrichments. Five media compositions including without enrichment (control), enriched with sponge extract, with growth regulator (antibiotics), with autoinducers, and complete enrichment containing sponge extract, antibiotics, and autoinducers were developed. DNA hybridization assay was performed to explore host specific bacteria and ecotypes of culturable sponge-associated bacteria. Enrichment with selective inducers (AHLs and sponge extract) and regulators (antibiotics) considerably enhanced the cultivation potential of sponge-associated bacteria. It was found that Marinobacter (MSI032), Micromonospora (MSI033), Streptomyces (MSI051), and Pseudomonas (MSI057) were sponge-associated obligate symbionts. The present findings envisaged that “ Micromonospora-Saccharomonospora-Streptomyces” group was the major culturable actinobacteria in the marine sponge D. nigra. The DNA hybridization assay was a reliable method for the analysis of culturable bacterial community in marine sponges. Based on the culturable community structure, the sponge-associated bacteria can be grouped (ecotypes) as general symbionts, specific symbionts, habitat flora, and antagonists.

  8. An airborne actinobacteria Nocardiopsis alba isolated from bioaerosol of a mushroom compost facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paściak, Mariola; Pawlik, Krzysztof; Gamian, Andrzej; Szponar, Bogumiła; Skóra, Justyna; Gutarowska, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Actinobacteria are widely distributed in many environments and represent the most important trigger to the occupant respiratory health. Health complaints, including hypersensitivity pneumonitis of the workers, were recorded in a mushroom compost facility (MCF). The studies on the airborne bacteria were carried out to find a possible microbiological source of these symptoms. Culture analysis of compost bioaerosols collected in different location of the MCF was performed. An assessment of the indoor microbial exposure revealed bacterial flora of bioaerosol in the mushroom compost facility represented by Bacillus, Geobacillus, Micrococcus, Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus spp., and actinobacterial strain with white aerial mycelium. The thermotolerant actinobacterial strain of the same morphology was repeatedly isolated from many locations in MCF: air, compost sample, and solid surface in production hall. On the base of complex morphological, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic characteristics, the isolate has been classified as Nocardiopsis alba. Dominant position of N. alba in microbial environment of the mushroom compost facility may represent an indicator microorganism in compost bioaerosol. The bioavailability of N. alba in mushroom compost facility creates potential risk for the health of workers, and the protection of respiratory tract and/or skin is strongly recommended.

  9. SANDPUMA: Ensemble Predictions of Nonribosomal Peptide Chemistry Reveals Biosynthetic Diversity across Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrette, Marc G; Aicheler, Fabian; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Currie, Cameron R; Medema, Marnix H

    2017-06-19

    Nonribosomally synthesized peptides (NRPs) are natural products with widespread applications in medicine and biotechnology. Many algorithms have been developed to predict the substrate specificities of nonribosomal peptide synthetase adenylation (A) domains from DNA sequences, which enables prioritization and dereplication, and integration with other data types in discovery efforts. However, insufficient training data and a lack of clarity regarding prediction quality have impeded optimal use. Here, we introduce prediCAT, a new phylogenetics-inspired algorithm, which quantitatively estimates the degree of predictability of each A-domain. We then systematically benchmarked all algorithms on a newly-gathered, independent test set of 434 A-domain sequences, showing that active-site-motif-based algorithms outperform whole-domain-based methods. Subsequently, we developed SANDPUMA, a powerful ensemble algorithm, based on newly-trained versions of all high-performing algorithms, which significantly outperforms individual methods. Finally, we deployed SANDPUMA in a systematic investigation of 7,635 Actinobacteria genomes, suggesting that NRP chemical diversity is much higher than previously estimated. SANDPUMA has been integrated into the widely-used antiSMASH biosynthetic gene cluster analysis pipeline and is also available as an open-source, standalone tool. SANDPUMA is freely available at https://bitbucket.org/chevrm/sandpuma and as a docker image at https://hub.docker.com/r/chevrm/sandpuma / under the GNU Public License 3 (GPL3). chevrette@wisc.edu , marnix.medema@wur.nl. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  10. Marine Actinobacteria from the Gulf of California: diversity, abundance and secondary metabolite biosynthetic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril-Espinosa, Amayaly; Freel, Kelle C.; Jensen, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    The Gulf of California is a coastal marine ecosystem characterized as having abundant biological resources and a high level of endemism. In this work we report the isolation and characterization of Actinobacteria from different sites in the western Gulf of California. We collected 126 sediment samples and isolated on average 3.1–38.3 Actinobacterial strains from each sample. Phylogenetic analysis of 136 strains identified them as members of the genera Actinomadura, Micromonospora, Nocardiopsis, Nonomuraea, Saccharomonospora, Salinispora, Streptomyces and Verrucosispora. These strains were grouped into 26–56 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on 16S rRNA gene sequence identities of 98–100 %. At 98 % sequence identity, three OTUs appear to represent new taxa while nine (35 %) have only been reported from marine environments. Sixty-three strains required seawater for growth. These fell into two OTUs at the 98 % identity level and include one that failed to produce aerial hyphae and was only distantly related (≤95.5 % 16S identity) to any previously cultured Streptomyces sp. Phylogenetic analyses of ketosynthase domains associated with polyketide synthase genes revealed sequences that ranged from 55 to 99 % nucleotide identity to experimentally characterized biosynthetic pathways suggesting that some may be associated with the production of new secondary metabolites. These results indicate that marine sediments from the Gulf of California harbor diverse Actinobacterial taxa with the potential to produce new secondary metabolites. PMID:23229438

  11. Isolation and characterization of actinobacteria from Yalujiang coastal wetland, North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jicheng Yu; Liu Zhang; Qiu Liu; Xiaohui Qi; Ying Ji; Beom Seok Kim

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate various types of samples from the different marine environments as sources of actinomycetes from the Yalujiang coastal wetland, North China, and to screen their antimicrobial properties. Further, the identified actinomycetes were characterized based on morphological, biochemical, and physiological characteristics. Methods:Eight different production media were used to isolate actinomycets from different stations of marine soil sediments in Yalujiang coastal wetland and the genotypic positions were established by 16S rDNA. Results:A total of 172 actinomycetal isolates were obtained from 13 samples using five media. The most effective culture media in the isolation of actinobacteria were Gause’s Synthetic agar and Starch-casein agar. Among 172 isolates, 46 isolates (26.74%) showed antibacterial activity, 70.93%belonged to the genus Streptomyces, others were Micromonospora spp. and Rhodococcus spp. Out of the 46 isolates, two cultures were further supported by morphological characterization analysis. Conclusions: This is the first report about actinomycetes isolated from Yalujiang coastal wetland and it seems that the promising isolates from the unusual/unexplored wetland may prove to be an important step in the development of microbial natural product research.

  12. Isolation and characterization of actinobacteria from Yalujiang coastal wetland, North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jicheng; Yu; Liu; Zhang; Qiu; Liu; Xiaohui; Qi; Ying; Ji; Beom; Seok; Kim

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate various types of samples from the different marine environments as sources of actinomycetes from the Yalujiang coastal wetland, North China, and to screen their antimicrobial properties. Further, the identified actinomycetes were characterized based on morphological, biochemical, and physiological characteristics.Methods: Eight different production media were used to isolate actinomycets from different stations of marine soil sediments in Yalujiang coastal wetland and the genotypic positions were established by 16 S r DNA.Results: A total of 172 actinomycetal isolates were obtained from 13 samples using five media. The most effective culture media in the isolation of actinobacteria were Gause’s Synthetic agar and Starch-casein agar. Among 172 isolates, 46 isolates(26.74%) showed antibacterial activity, 70.93% belonged to the genus Streptomyces, others were Micromonospora spp. and Rhodococcus spp. Out of the 46 isolates, two cultures were further supported by morphological characterization analysis.Conclusions: This is the first report about actinomycetes isolated from Yalujiang coastal wetland and it seems that the promising isolates from the unusual/unexplored wetland may prove to be an important step in the development of microbial natural product research.

  13. In vivo antimalarial activity of the endophytic actinobacteria, Streptomyces SUK 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Mohd Shukri; Zin, Noraziah Mohamad; Hassan, Zainal Abidin Abu; Latip, Jalifah; Pethick, Florence; Hunter, Iain S; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie; Herron, Paul R

    2015-12-01

    Endophytic bacteria, such as Streptomyces, have the potential to act as a source for novel bioactive molecules with medicinal properties. The present study was aimed at assessing the antimalarial activity of crude extract isolated from various strains of actinobacteria living endophytically in some Malaysian medicinal plants. Using the four day suppression test method on male ICR strain mice, compounds produced from three strains of Streptomyces (SUK8, SUK10, and SUK27) were tested in vivo against Plasmodium berghei PZZ1/100 in an antimalarial screen using crude extracts at four different concentrations. One of these extracts, isolated from Streptomyces SUK10 obtained from the bark of Shorea ovalis tree, showed inhibition of the test organism and was further tested against P. berghei-infected mice for antimalarial activity at different concentrations. There was a positive relationship between the survival of the infected mouse group treated with 50 µg/kg body weight (bw) of ethyl acetate-SUK10 crude extract and the ability to inhibit the parasites growth. The parasite inhibition percentage for this group showed that 50% of the mice survived for more than 90 days after infection with the parasite. The nucleotide sequence and phylogenetic tree suggested that Streptomyces SUK10 may constitute a new species within the Streptomyces genus. As part of the drug discovery process, these promising finding may contribute to the medicinal and pharmaceutical field for malarial treatment.

  14. Biodiversity of Actinobacteria from the South Pacific and the Assessment of Streptomyces Chemical Diversity with Metabolic Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumsille, Andrés; Undabarrena, Agustina; González, Valentina; Claverías, Fernanda; Rojas, Claudia; Cámara, Beatriz

    2017-09-11

    Recently, bioprospecting in underexplored habitats has gained enhanced focus, since new taxa of marine actinobacteria can be found, and thus possible new metabolites. Actinobacteria are in the foreground due to their versatile production of secondary metabolites that present various biological activities, such as antibacterials, antitumorals and antifungals. Chilean marine ecosystems remain largely unexplored and may represent an important source for the discovery of bioactive compounds. Various culture conditions to enrich the growth of this phylum were used and 232 bacterial strains were isolated. Comparative analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences led to identifying genetic affiliations of 32 genera, belonging to 20 families. This study shows a remarkable culturable diversity of actinobacteria, associated to marine environments along Chile. Furthermore, 30 streptomycete strains were studied to establish their antibacterial activities against five model strains, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, demonstrating abilities to inhibit bacterial growth of Gram-positive bacteria. To gain insight into their metabolic profiles, crude extracts were submitted to liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) analysis to assess the selection of streptomycete strains with potentials of producing novel bioactive metabolites. The combined approach allowed for the identification of three streptomycete strains to pursue further investigations. Our Chilean marine actinobacterial culture collection represents an important resource for the bioprospection of novel marine actinomycetes and its metabolites, evidencing their potential as producers of natural bioproducts.

  15. Phylogenetic diversity and biological activity of actinobacteria isolated from the Chukchi Shelf marine sediments in the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Meng; Yu, Yong; Li, Hui-Rong; Dong, Ning; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2014-03-06

    Marine environments are a rich source of Actinobacteria and have the potential to produce a wide variety of biologically active secondary metabolites. In this study, we used four selective isolation media to culture Actinobacteria from the sediments collected from the Chukchi Shelf in the Arctic Ocean. A total of 73 actinobacterial strains were isolated. Based on repetitive DNA fingerprinting analysis, we selected 30 representatives for partial characterization according to their phylogenetic diversity, antimicrobial activities and secondary-metabolite biosynthesis genes. Results from the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the 30 strains could be sorted into 18 phylotypes belonging to 14 different genera: Agrococcus, Arsenicicoccus, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Citricoccus, Janibacter, Kocuria, Microbacterium, Microlunatus, Nocardioides, Nocardiopsis, Saccharopolyspora, Salinibacterium and Streptomyces. To our knowledge, this paper is the first report on the isolation of Microlunatus genus members from marine habitats. Of the 30 isolates, 11 strains exhibited antibacterial and/or antifungal activity, seven of which have activities against Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans. All 30 strains have at least two biosynthetic genes, one-third of which possess more than four biosynthetic genes. This study demonstrates the significant diversity of Actinobacteria in the Chukchi Shelf sediment and their potential for producing biologically active compounds and novel material for genetic manipulation or combinatorial biosynthesis.

  16. Phylogenetic Diversity and Biological Activity of Actinobacteria Isolated from the Chukchi Shelf Marine Sediments in the Arctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Yuan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine environments are a rich source of Actinobacteria and have the potential to produce a wide variety of biologically active secondary metabolites. In this study, we used four selective isolation media to culture Actinobacteria from the sediments collected from the Chukchi Shelf in the Arctic Ocean. A total of 73 actinobacterial strains were isolated. Based on repetitive DNA fingerprinting analysis, we selected 30 representatives for partial characterization according to their phylogenetic diversity, antimicrobial activities and secondary-metabolite biosynthesis genes. Results from the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the 30 strains could be sorted into 18 phylotypes belonging to 14 different genera: Agrococcus, Arsenicicoccus, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Citricoccus, Janibacter, Kocuria, Microbacterium, Microlunatus, Nocardioides, Nocardiopsis, Saccharopolyspora, Salinibacterium and Streptomyces. To our knowledge, this paper is the first report on the isolation of Microlunatus genus members from marine habitats. Of the 30 isolates, 11 strains exhibited antibacterial and/or antifungal activity, seven of which have activities against Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans. All 30 strains have at least two biosynthetic genes, one-third of which possess more than four biosynthetic genes. This study demonstrates the significant diversity of Actinobacteria in the Chukchi Shelf sediment and their potential for producing biologically active compounds and novel material for genetic manipulation or combinatorial biosynthesis.

  17. Sequence-based analysis of secondary-metabolite biosynthesis in marine actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontang, Erin A; Gaudêncio, Susana P; Fenical, William; Jensen, Paul R

    2010-04-01

    A diverse collection of 60 marine-sediment-derived Actinobacteria representing 52 operational taxonomic units was screened by PCR for genes associated with secondary-metabolite biosynthesis. Three primer sets were employed to specifically target adenylation domains associated with nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and ketosynthase (KS) domains associated with type I modular, iterative, hybrid, and enediyne polyketide synthases (PKSs). In total, two-thirds of the strains yielded a sequence-verified PCR product for at least one of these biosynthetic types. Genes associated with enediyne biosynthesis were detected in only two genera, while 88% of the ketosynthase sequences shared greatest homology with modular PKSs. Positive strains included representatives of families not traditionally associated with secondary-metabolite production, including the Corynebacteriaceae, Gordoniaceae, Intrasporangiaceae, and Micrococcaceae. In four of five cases where phylogenetic analyses of KS sequences revealed close evolutionary relationships to genes associated with experimentally characterized biosynthetic pathways, secondary-metabolite production was accurately predicted. Sequence clustering patterns were used to provide an estimate of PKS pathway diversity and to assess the biosynthetic richness of individual strains. The detection of highly similar KS sequences in distantly related strains provided evidence of horizontal gene transfer, while control experiments designed to amplify KS sequences from Salinispora arenicola strain CNS-205, for which a genome sequence is available, led to the detection of 70% of the targeted PKS pathways. The results provide a bioinformatic assessment of secondary-metabolite biosynthetic potential that can be applied in the absence of fully assembled pathways or genome sequences. The rapid identification of strains that possess the greatest potential to produce new secondary metabolites along with those that produce known compounds can be used

  18. Sequence-Based Analysis of Secondary-Metabolite Biosynthesis in Marine Actinobacteria ▿ ‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontang, Erin A.; Gaudêncio, Susana P.; Fenical, William; Jensen, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    A diverse collection of 60 marine-sediment-derived Actinobacteria representing 52 operational taxonomic units was screened by PCR for genes associated with secondary-metabolite biosynthesis. Three primer sets were employed to specifically target adenylation domains associated with nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and ketosynthase (KS) domains associated with type I modular, iterative, hybrid, and enediyne polyketide synthases (PKSs). In total, two-thirds of the strains yielded a sequence-verified PCR product for at least one of these biosynthetic types. Genes associated with enediyne biosynthesis were detected in only two genera, while 88% of the ketosynthase sequences shared greatest homology with modular PKSs. Positive strains included representatives of families not traditionally associated with secondary-metabolite production, including the Corynebacteriaceae, Gordoniaceae, Intrasporangiaceae, and Micrococcaceae. In four of five cases where phylogenetic analyses of KS sequences revealed close evolutionary relationships to genes associated with experimentally characterized biosynthetic pathways, secondary-metabolite production was accurately predicted. Sequence clustering patterns were used to provide an estimate of PKS pathway diversity and to assess the biosynthetic richness of individual strains. The detection of highly similar KS sequences in distantly related strains provided evidence of horizontal gene transfer, while control experiments designed to amplify KS sequences from Salinispora arenicola strain CNS-205, for which a genome sequence is available, led to the detection of 70% of the targeted PKS pathways. The results provide a bioinformatic assessment of secondary-metabolite biosynthetic potential that can be applied in the absence of fully assembled pathways or genome sequences. The rapid identification of strains that possess the greatest potential to produce new secondary metabolites along with those that produce known compounds can be used

  19. Rape phosphatide concentrate in the technologies of surfactants production by the Actinobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Koretska

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Due to the fact that the production of microbial surfactants is limited by the low yield of end products and high cost of processes, the actual task is to optimize and reduce the cost of the technology of biosurfactants synthesis. One of the solutions of this problem is to use the industrial wastes, including rape phosphatide concentrate (PC. Materials and methods. Hexadecane and rape phosphatide concentrate (2% were used as a carbon source in a nutrient medium for the cultivation of bacteria. Lipids were extracted from a cell mass and supernatant by the mixture of chloroform-methanol 2:1. The qualitative analysis of metabolites was performed by a thin layer chromatography. Results and discussion. The peculiarities of synthesis of biosurfactants by strains G. rubripertincta UCM Aс-122 and R. erythropolis Au-1 during the growth on the nutrient media with rape phosphatide concentrate as a carbon source was studied. Quantity of biomass was 9.4 – 10.1 g/l, exopoly mers –8.9-9.5 g/l and the content of cellbound trehalose lipids was 1.37 – 2.26 g/l; whereas the content of exogenous trehalose lipids –metabolites of R. erythropolis Au-1 was 2.95 g/l. It was found that the addition of trehalose lipids (0.01 g/l to the nutrient medium caused the increase of biomass on 14.6 –17.0 % and cell-bound lipids on 13.9 –15.5 %. Conclusions. Rape phosphatide concentrate is economically viable carbon source in the technologies of surfactant production by Actinobacteria. Its use promotes an increasing of exogenous surfactants strain R. erythropolisAu-1 in 3-fold compared with cultivation on nutrient medium with hexadecane. Trehalose lipids show a stimulating effect on growth and synthesis of biosurfactants by strains of G. rubripertincta UCM Ac-122 and R. erythropolisAu-1.

  20. Environmental monitoring and assessment of antibacterial metabolite producing actinobacteria screened from marine sediments in south coastal regions of Karnataka, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skariyachan, Sinosh; Garka, Shruthi; Puttaswamy, Sushmitha; Shanbhogue, Shobitha; Devaraju, Raksha; Narayanappa, Rajeswari

    2017-06-01

    Assessment of the therapeutic potential of secondary metabolite producing microorganisms from the marine coastal areas imparts scope and application in the field of environmental monitoring. The present study aims to screen metabolites with antibacterial potential from actionbacteria associated with marine sediments collected from south coastal regions of Karnataka, India. The actinobacteria were isolated and characterized from marine sediments by standard protocol. The metabolites were extracted, and antibacterial potential was analyzed against eight hospital associated bacteria. The selected metabolites were partially characterized by proximate analysis, SDS-PAGE, and FTIR-spectroscopy. The antibiogram of the test clinical isolates revealed that they were emerged as multidrug-resistant strains (P ≤ 0.05). Among six actinobacteria (IS1-1S6) screened, 100 μl(-1) metabolite from IS1 showed significant antibacterial activities against all the clinical isolates except Pseudomonas aeruginosa. IS2 demonstrated antimicrobial potential towards Proteus mirabilis, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Escherichia coli. The metabolite from IS3 showed activity against Strep. pyogenes and E. coli. The metabolites from IS4, IS5, and IS6 exhibited antimicrobial activities against Ps. aeruginosa (P ≤ 0.05). The two metabolites that depicted highest antibacterial activities against the test strains were suggested to be antimicrobial peptides with low molecular weight. These isolates were characterized and designated as Streptomyces sp. strain mangaluru01 and Streptomyces sp. mangaloreK01 by 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing. This study suggests that south coastal regions of Karnataka, India, are one of the richest sources of antibacterial metabolites producing actinobacteria and monitoring of these regions for therapeutic intervention plays profound role in healthcare management.

  1. Endophytic Actinobacteria and The Interaction of Micromonospora and Nitrogen Fixing Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha E Trujillo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available For a long time, it was believed that a healthy plant did not harbor any microorganisms within its tissues, as these were often considered detrimental for the plant. In the last three decades, the numbers of studies on plant microbe-interactions has led to a change in our view and we now know that many of these invisible partners are essential for the overall welfare of the plant. The application of Next Generation Sequencing techniques is a powerful tool that has permitted the detection and identification of microbial communities in healthy plants. Among the new plant microbe interactions recently reported several actinobacteria such as Micromonospora are included.Micromonospora is a Gram-positive bacterium with a wide geographical distribution; it can be found in the soil, mangrove sediments, and freshwater and marine ecosistems. In the last years our group has focused on the isolation of Micromonospora strains from nitrogen fixing nodules of both leguminous and actinorhizal plants and reported for the first time its wide distribution in nitrogen fixing nodules of both types of plants. These studies have shown how this microoganism had been largely overlooked in this niche due to its slow growth. Surprisingly, the genetic diversity of Micromonospora strains isolated from nodules is very high and several new species have been described. The current data indicate that Micromonospora saelicesensis is the most frequently isolated species from the nodular tissues of both leguminous and actinorhizal plants. Further studies have also been carried out to confirm the presence of Micromonospora inside the nodule tissues, mainly by specific in-situ hybridization.The information derived from the genome of the model strain, Micromonospora lupini, Lupac 08, has provided useful information as to how this bacterium may relate with its host plant. Several strategies potentially necessary for Micromonospora to thrive in the soil, a highly competitive and rough

  2. Eco-friendly approach using marine actinobacteria and its compounds to control ticks and mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thenmozhi, Mohankumar; Gopal, Jannu Vinay; Kannabiran, Krishnan; Rajakumar, Govindasamy; Velayutham, Kanayairam; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul

    2013-02-01

    Ticks and mosquitoes are ectoparasitic arthropods that can transmit a variety of diseases to humans and animals during blood feeding and causing serious infectious disorders. The purpose of the present study was to assess the acaricidal and insecticidal property of ethyl acetate extract and its compounds isolated from marine actinobacteria, Streptomyces VITSTK7 sp. against the larvae of cattle ticks, Haemaphysalis bispinosa and Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae); fourth-instar larvae of malaria vector, Anopheles subpictus; and filarial vector, Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae). The ethyl acetate extract was loaded on silica gel column and separated with chloroform, methanol, and acetone as the solvents system. The separation of fractions was visualized by the thin layer chromatography (TLC) plate, further confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography, and followed by gas liquid chromatography. Three major fractions were analyzed in mass spectroscopy (MS) and matched with existing compounds in the data base. Based on the fragment pattern, it led to the major compounds which were predicted as cyclopentanepropanoic acid, 3,5-bis(acetyloxy)-2-[3-(methoxyimino)octyl], methyl ester (13.3 %) 1; 5-azidomethyl-3-(2-ethoxy carbonyl-ethyl)-4-ethoxycarbonylmethyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, ethyl ester (18.2 %) 2; and akuammilan-16-carboxylic acid, 17-(acetyloxy)-10-methoxy, methyl ester (16R) (53.3 %) 3. The maximum efficacy was observed in compounds 1, 2, and 3, and the ethyl acetate extract of Streptomyces VITSTK7 sp. against the larvae of H. bispinosa (LC(50) = 1,573.36, 1,333.09, 1,073.29, and 409.71 ppm; r(2) = 0.0.990, 0.934, 0.935, and 0.908), R. microplus (LC(50) = 1,877.86, 815.83, 1,631.14, and 441.54 ppm; r(2) = 0.981, 0.926, 0.0970, and 0.915), A. subpictus (LC(50) = 273.89, 687.69, 464.75, and 223.83 ppm; r(2) = 0.758, 0.924, 0.841, and 0.902), and C. quinquefasciatus (LC(50) = 430.06, 881.59, 777.0, and 195.70 ppm; r(2) = 0

  3. Diversity of Culturable Thermophilic Actinobacteria in Hot Springs in Tengchong, China and Studies of their Biosynthetic Gene Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lan; Salam, Nimaichand; Jiao, Jian-Yu; Jiang, Hong-Chen; Zhou, En-Min; Yin, Yi-Rui; Ming, Hong; Li, Wen-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The class Actinobacteria has been a goldmine for the discovery of antibiotics and has attracted interest from both academics and industries. However, an absence of novel approaches during the last few decades has limited the discovery of new microbial natural products useful for industries. Scientists are now focusing on the ecological aspects of diverse environments including unexplored or underexplored habitats and extreme environments in the search for new metabolites. This paper reports on the diversity of culturable actinobacteria associated with hot springs located in Tengchong County, Yunnan Province, southwestern China. A total of 58 thermophilic actinobacterial strains were isolated from the samples collected from ten hot springs distributed over three geothermal fields (e.g., Hehua, Rehai, and Ruidian). Phylogenetic positions and their biosynthetic profiles were analyzed by sequencing 16S rRNA gene and three biosynthetic gene clusters (KS domain of PKS-I, KSα domain of PKS-II and A domain of NRPS). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis, the 58 strains were affiliated with 12 actinobacterial genera: Actinomadura Micromonospora, Microbispora, Micrococcus, Nocardiopsis, Nonomuraea, Promicromonospora, Pseudonocardia, Streptomyces, Thermoactinospora, Thermocatellispora, and Verrucosispora, of which the two novel genera Thermoactinospora and Thermocatellisopora were recently described from among these strains. Considering the biosynthetic potential of these actinobacterial strains, 22 were positive for PCR amplification of at least one of the three biosynthetic gene clusters (PKS-I, PKS-II, and NRPS). These actinobacteria were further subjected to antimicrobial assay against five opportunistic human pathogens (Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus faecalis). All of the 22 strains that were positive for PCR amplification of at least one of the biosynthetic gene domains exhibited

  4. Pharmacological Potential of Phylogenetically Diverse Actinobacteria Isolated from Deep-Sea Coral Ecosystems of the Submarine Avilés Canyon in the Cantabrian Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento-Vizcaíno, Aida; González, Verónica; Braña, Alfredo F; Palacios, Juan J; Otero, Luis; Fernández, Jonathan; Molina, Axayacatl; Kulik, Andreas; Vázquez, Fernando; Acuña, José L; García, Luis A; Blanco, Gloria

    2017-02-01

    Marine Actinobacteria are emerging as an unexplored source for natural product discovery. Eighty-seven deep-sea coral reef invertebrates were collected during an oceanographic expedition at the submarine Avilés Canyon (Asturias, Spain) in a range of 1500 to 4700 m depth. From these, 18 cultivable bioactive Actinobacteria were isolated, mainly from corals, phylum Cnidaria, and some specimens of phyla Echinodermata, Porifera, Annelida, Arthropoda, Mollusca and Sipuncula. As determined by 16S rRNA sequencing and phylogenetic analyses, all isolates belong to the phylum Actinobacteria, mainly to the Streptomyces genus and also to Micromonospora, Pseudonocardia and Myceligenerans. Production of bioactive compounds of pharmacological interest was investigated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques and subsequent database comparison. Results reveal that deep-sea isolated Actinobacteria display a wide repertoire of secondary metabolite production with a high chemical diversity. Most identified products (both diffusible and volatiles) are known by their contrasted antibiotic or antitumor activities. Bioassays with ethyl acetate extracts from isolates displayed strong antibiotic activities against a panel of important resistant clinical pathogens, including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as fungi, all of them isolated at two main hospitals (HUCA and Cabueñes) from the same geographical region. The identity of the active extracts components of these producing Actinobacteria is currently being investigated, given its potential for the discovery of pharmaceuticals and other products of biotechnological interest.

  5. Culturable actinobacteria from the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve: isolation and phylogenetic diversity by 16S rRNA gene-RFLP analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haitao; Lee, Yoo Kyung; Zhang, Wei; Lee, Hong Kum

    2006-08-01

    A total of 106 actinobacteria associated with the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve collected from the Yellow Sea, China were isolated using eight different media. The number of species and genera of actinobacteria recovered from the different media varied significantly, underlining the importance of optimizing the isolation conditions. The phylogenetic diversity of the actinobacteria isolates was assessed using 16S rRNA gene amplification-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the 106 strains with different morphologies. The RFLP fingerprinting of selected strains by HhaI-digestion of the 16S rRNA genes resulted in 11 different patterns. The HhaI-RFLP analysis gave good resolution for the identification of the actinobacteria isolates at the genus level. A phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the isolates belonged to seven genera of culturable actinobacteria including Actinoalloteichus, Micromonospora, Nocardia, Nocardiopsis, Pseudonocardia, Rhodococcus, and Streptomyces. The dominant genus was Streptomyces, which represented 74% of the isolates. Three of the strains identified are candidates for new species.

  6. Haloalkalitolerant Actinobacteria with capacity for anthracene degradation isolated from soils close to areas with oil activity in the State of Veracruz, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Severino, Reyna Del C; Camacho-López, Miguel A; Casanova-González, Edgar; Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo M; Sandoval-Trujillo, Ángel H; Isaac-Olivé, Keila; Ramírez-Durán, Ninfa

    2016-03-01

    The use of native strains of microorganisms from soils is an excellent option for bioremediation. To our knowledge, until now there has been no other group working on the isolation of Actinobacteria from contaminated soils in Mexico. In this study, samples of soils close to areas with oil activity in the State of Veracruz, Mexico, were inoculated for the isolation of Actinobacteria. The strains isolated were characterized morphologically, and the concentrations of NaCl and pH were determined for optimal growth. Strain selection was performed by the detection of a phylogenetic marker for Actinobacteria located at the 23S rRNA gene, followed by species identification by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene. Several haloalkalitolerant Actinobacteria were isolated and identified as: Kocuria rosea, K. palustris, Microbacterium testaceum, Nocardia farcinica and Cellulomonas denverensis. Except for C. denverensis, the biomass of all strains increased in the presence of anthracene. The strains capacity to metabolize anthracene (at 48 h), determined by fluorescence emission, was in the range of 46-54%. During this time, dihydroxy aromatic compounds formed, characterized by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy bands of 1205 cm-1 and 1217 cm-1. Those Actinobacteria are potentially useful for the bioremediation of saline and alkaline environments contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds. [Int Microbiol 2016; 19(1):15-26].

  7. Distribution of the 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase gene and isoprenoid production in marine-derived Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shams Tabrez; Izumikawa, Miho; Motohashi, Keiichiro; Mukai, Akira; Takagi, Motoki; Shin-Ya, Kazuo

    2010-03-01

    During the course of our screening program to isolate isoprenoids from marine Actinobacteria, 523 actinobacterial strains were isolated from 18 marine sponges, a tunicate, and two marine sediments. These strains belonged to 21 different genera, but most were members of Streptomyces, Nocardia, Rhodococcus, and Micromonospora. Some Actinobacteria have been reported to use the mevalonate pathway for the production of isoprenoids as secondary metabolites. Therefore, we investigated whether these strains possessed the 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (hmgr) gene, which indicates the presence of the mevalonate pathway. As a result, six strains belonging to the genera Streptomyces (SpC080624SC-11, SpA080624GE-02, and Sp080513GE-23), Nocardia (Sp080513SC-18), and Micromonospora (Se080624GE-07 and SpC080624GE-05) were found to possess the hmgr gene, and these genes were highly similar to hmgr genes in isoprenoid biosynthetic gene clusters. Among the six strains, the two strains SpC080624SC-11 and SpA080624GE-02 produced the novel isoprenoids, JBIR-46, -47, and -48, which consisted of phenazine chromophores, and Sp080513GE-23 produced a known isoprenoid, fumaquinone. Furthermore, these compounds showed cytotoxic activity against human acute myelogenous leukemia HL-60 cells.

  8. Production of an antibiotic enterocin from a marine actinobacteria strain H1003 by metal-stress technique with enhanced enrichment using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Syed Shamsul; Shah, Sayed Asmat Ali; Pan, Chengqian; Fu, Leilei; Cao, Xun; Shi, Yutong; Wu, Xiaodan; Wang, Kuiwu; Wu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Elicitation by chemical means including heavy metals is one of a new technique for drug discoveries. In this research, the effect of heavy metals on marine actinobacteria Streptomyces sp. H-1003 for the production of enterocin, with a strong broad spectrum activity, along optimized fermented medium was firstly investigated. The optimum metal stress conditions consisted of culturing marine actinobacteria strain H-1003 with addition of cobalt ions at 2mM in optimized Gause's medium having starch at 20mg/L for 10 days at 180 revolution/min. Under these conditions, enterocin production was enhanced with a value of 5.33mg/L, which was totally absent at the normal culture of strain H-1003 and much higher than other tested metal-stress conditions. This work triumphantly announced a prodigious effect of heavy metals on marine actinobacteria with fringe benefits as a key tool of enterocin production.

  9. Studies on a Novel Actinobacteria Species Capable of Oxidizing Ammonium under Iron Reduction Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanh, Shan; Ruiz-Urigüen, Melany; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2014-05-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) oxidation coupled to iron reduction in the absence of oxygen and nitrate/nitrite (NO3-/NO2-) was noted in a forested riparian wetland in New Jersey (1,2), and in tropical rainforest soils (3), and was coined Feammox (4). Through a 180-days anaerobic incubation of soil samples collected at the New Jersey site, and using 16S rDNA PCR-DGGE, 454-pyosequecing, and qPCR analysis, we have shown that an Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6, belonging to the phylum Actinobacteria, is responsible for this Feammox process, described previously (1,2). We have enriched these Feammox bacteria in a high efficiency Feammox membrane reactor (with 85% NH4+removal per 48h), and isolated the pure Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 strain 5, in an autotrophic medium. To determine if the Feammox bacteria found in this study are common, at least at the regional scale, we analyzed a series of local wetland-, upland-, as well as storm-water detention pond-sediments. Through anaerobic incubations and molecular biology analysis, the Feammox reaction and Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 were found in three of twenty soil samples collected, indicating that the Feammox pathway might be widespread in selected soil environments. Results show that soil pH and Fe(III) content are key environmental factors controlling the distributions of Feammox bacteria, which require acidic conditions and the presence of iron oxides. Results from incubation experiments conducted at different temperatures have shown that, in contrast to another anaerobic ammonium oxidation pathways (e.g., anammox), the optimal temperature of the Feammox process is ~ 20° and that the organisms are still active when the temperature is around 10°. An incubation experiment amended with acetylene gas (C2H2) as a selected inhibitor showed that in the Feammox reaction, Fe(III) is the electron acceptor, which is reduced to Fe(II), and NH4+is the electron donor, which is oxidized to NO2-. After this process, NO2- is converted to

  10. Endophytic Actinobacteria and the Interaction of Micromonospora and Nitrogen Fixing Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Martha E; Riesco, Raúl; Benito, Patricia; Carro, Lorena

    2015-01-01

    For a long time, it was believed that a healthy plant did not harbor any microorganisms within its tissues, as these were often considered detrimental for the plant. In the last three decades, the numbers of studies on plant microbe-interactions has led to a change in our view and we now know that many of these invisible partners are essential for the overall welfare of the plant. The application of Next Generation Sequencing techniques is a powerful tool that has permitted the detection and identification of microbial communities in healthy plants. Among the new plant microbe interactions recently reported several actinobacteria such as Micromonospora are included. Micromonospora is a Gram-positive bacterium with a wide geographical distribution; it can be found in the soil, mangrove sediments, and freshwater and marine ecosistems. In the last years our group has focused on the isolation of Micromonospora strains from nitrogen fixing nodules of both leguminous and actinorhizal plants and reported for the first time its wide distribution in nitrogen fixing nodules of both types of plants. These studies have shown how this microoganism had been largely overlooked in this niche due to its slow growth. Surprisingly, the genetic diversity of Micromonospora strains isolated from nodules is very high and several new species have been described. The current data indicate that Micromonospora saelicesensis is the most frequently isolated species from the nodular tissues of both leguminous and actinorhizal plants. Further studies have also been carried out to confirm the presence of Micromonospora inside the nodule tissues, mainly by specific in situ hybridization. The information derived from the genome of the model strain, Micromonospora lupini, Lupac 08, has provided useful information as to how this bacterium may relate with its host plant. Several strategies potentially necessary for Micromonospora to thrive in the soil, a highly competitive, and rough environment, and

  11. Functional gene-based discovery of phenazines from the actinobacteria associated with marine sponges in the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppiah, Valliappan; Li, Yingxin; Sun, Wei; Feng, Guofang; Li, Zhiyong

    2015-07-01

    Phenazines represent a large group of nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds produced by the diverse group of bacteria including actinobacteria. In this study, a total of 197 actinobacterial strains were isolated from seven different marine sponge species in the South China Sea using five different culture media. Eighty-seven morphologically different actinobacterial strains were selected and grouped into 13 genera, including Actinoalloteichus, Kocuria, Micrococcus, Micromonospora, Mycobacterium, Nocardiopsis, Prauserella, Rhodococcus, Saccharopolyspora, Salinispora, Serinicoccus, and Streptomyces by the phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene. Based on the screening of phzE genes, ten strains, including five Streptomyces, two Nocardiopsis, one Salinispora, one Micrococcus, and one Serinicoccus were found to be potential for phenazine production. The level of phzE gene expression was highly expressed in Nocardiopsis sp. 13-33-15, 13-12-13, and Serinicoccus sp. 13-12-4 on the fifth day of fermentation. Finally, 1,6-dihydroxy phenazine (1) from Nocardiopsis sp. 13-33-15 and 13-12-13, and 1,6-dimethoxy phenazine (2) from Nocardiopsis sp. 13-33-15 were isolated and identified successfully based on ESI-MS and NMR analysis. The compounds 1 and 2 showed antibacterial activity against Bacillus mycoides SJ14, Staphylococcus aureus SJ51, Escherichia coli SJ42, and Micrococcus luteus SJ47. This study suggests that the integrated approach of gene screening and chemical analysis is an effective strategy to find the target compounds and lays the basis for the production of phenazine from the sponge-associated actinobacteria.

  12. Degradation of various alkyl ethers by alkyl ether-degrading Actinobacteria isolated from activated sludge of a mixed wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Hak; Cha, Chang-Jun; Engesser, Karl-Heinrich; Kim, Sang-Jong

    2008-11-01

    Various substrate specificity groups of alkyl ether (AE)-degrading Actinobacteria coexisted in activated sewage sludge of a mixed wastewater treatment. There were substrate niche overlaps including diethyl ether between linear AE- and cyclic AE-degrading strains and phenetole between monoalkoxybenzene- and linear AE-degrading strains. Representatives of each group showed different substrate specificities and degradation pathways for the preferred substrates. Determining the rates of initial reactions and the initial metabolite(s) from whole cell biotransformation helped us to get information about the degradation pathways. Rhodococcus sp. strain DEE5311 and Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain 117 both were able to degrade anisole and phenetole through aromatic 2-monooxygenation to form 2-alkoxyphenols. In contrast, diethyl ether-oxidizing strain DEE5311 capable of degrading a broad range of linear AE, dibenzyl ether and monoalkoxybenzenes initially transformed anisole and phenetole to phenol via direct O-dealkylation. Compared to this, cyclic AE-degrading Rhodococcus sp. strain THF100 preferred tetrahydrofuran (265 ± 35 nmol min(-1)mg(-1) protein) to diethyl ether (diethoxybenzene-degrading Rhodococcus sp. strain DEOB100 and Gordonia sp. strain DEOB200 transformed 1,3-/1,4-dialkoxybenzenes to 3-/4-alkoxyphenols by similar manners in the order of rates (nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein): 1,4-diethoxybenzene (11.1 vs. 3.9)>1,4-dimethoxybenzene (1.6 vs. 2.6)>1,3-dimethoxybenzene (0.6 vs. 0.6). This study suggests that the AE-degrading Actinobacteria can orchestrate various substrate specificity responses to the degradation of various categories of AE pollutants in activated sludge communities.

  13. Basin-scale patterns in the abundance of SAR11 subclades, marine Actinobacteria (OM1), members of the Roseobacter clade and OCS116 in the South Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Robert M; Frazar, Christian D; Carlson, Craig A

    2012-05-01

    Bacterioplankton are major biogeochemical agents responsible for mediating the flux of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and subsequent cycling of nutrients in the oceans. Most information about the composition of bacterioplankton communities has come from studies along well-defined biogeochemical gradients in the northern hemisphere. This study extends observations of spatial and temporal dynamics for SAR11, Actinobacteria and OCS116 in the North Atlantic by demonstrating distinct spatial variability in the abundance and distribution of these and other lineages across the South Atlantic gyre and in the Benguela upwelling system. We identified shifts in SAR11, Actinobacteria, OCS116, SAR86, SAR116 and members of the Roseobacter clade along basin-scale gradients in nutrients, chlorophyll and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Distinct SAR11 subclades dominated the western and eastern regions of the gyre, and Actinobacteria, OCS116 and members of the Roseobacter lineages were most abundant at the deep chlorophyll maxima. SAR86 and SAR116 accounted for a significant fraction of coastal and open ocean communities, respectively, and members of the gamma sulfur oxidizer (GSO) clade persisted in the Benguela upwelling system. These data suggest that distinct communities are partitioned along basin-scale biogeochemical gradients, that SAR11 community structure varies across the gyre and that Actinobacteria, OCS116, and members of the Roseobacter clade are closely associated with phytoplankton in the gyre. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Influence of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) on the structure of Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Acidobacteria communities in a soil microcosm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Peinado, M del Mar; González-López, Jesús; Martínez-Toledo, M Victoria; Pozo, Clementina; Rodelas, Belén

    2010-03-01

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) is the most used anionic surfactant in a worldwide scale and is considered a high-priority pollutant. LAS is regarded as a readily biodegradable product under aerobic conditions in aqueous media and is mostly removed in wastewater treatment plants, but an important fraction (20-25%) is immobilized in sewage sludge and persists under anoxic conditions. Due to the application of the sludge as a fertilizer, LAS reaches agricultural soil, and therefore, microbial toxicity tests have been widely used to evaluate the influence of LAS on soil microbial ecology. However, molecular-based community-level analyses have been seldom applied in studies regarding the effects of LAS on natural or engineered systems, and, to our knowledge, there are no reports of their use for such appraisals in agricultural soil. In this study, a microcosm system is used to evaluate the effects of a commercial mixture of LAS on the community structure of Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Acidobacteria in an agricultural soil. The microcosms consisted of agricultural soil columns (800 g) fed with sterile water (8 ml h(-1)) added of different concentration of LAS (10 or 50 mg l(-1)) for periods of time up to 21 days. Sterile water was added to control columns for comparison. The structures of Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Acidobacteria communities were analyzed by a cultivation independent method (temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) separation of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified partial 16S rRNA genes). Relevant populations were identified by subsequent reamplification, DNA sequencing, and database comparisons. Cluster analysis of the TGGE fingerprints taking into consideration both the number of bands and their relative intensities revealed that the structure of the Alphaproteobacteria community was significantly changed in the presence of LAS, at both concentrations tested. The average number of bands was significantly

  15. Plant growth-promoting actinobacteria: a new strategy for enhancing sustainable production and protection of grain legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathya, Arumugam; Vijayabharathi, Rajendran; Gopalakrishnan, Subramaniam

    2017-06-01

    Grain legumes are a cost-effective alternative for the animal protein in improving the diets of the poor in South-East Asia and Africa. Legumes, through symbiotic nitrogen fixation, meet a major part of their own N demand and partially benefit the following crops of the system by enriching soil. In realization of this sustainability advantage and to promote pulse production, United Nations had declared 2016 as the "International Year of pulses". Grain legumes are frequently subjected to both abiotic and biotic stresses resulting in severe yield losses. Global yields of legumes have been stagnant for the past five decades in spite of adopting various conventional and molecular breeding approaches. Furthermore, the increasing costs and negative effects of pesticides and fertilizers for crop production necessitate the use of biological options of crop production and protection. The use of plant growth-promoting (PGP) bacteria for improving soil and plant health has become one of the attractive strategies for developing sustainable agricultural systems due to their eco-friendliness, low production cost and minimizing consumption of non-renewable resources. This review emphasizes on how the PGP actinobacteria and their metabolites can be used effectively in enhancing the yield and controlling the pests and pathogens of grain legumes.

  16. Diversity, ecological distribution and biotechnological potential of Actinobacteria inhabiting seamounts and non-seamounts in the Tyrrhenian Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettoumi, Besma; Chouchane, Habib; Guesmi, Amel; Mahjoubi, Mouna; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Neifar, Mohamed; Borin, Sara; Daffonchio, Daniele; Cherif, Ameur

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the ecological distribution of marine Actinobacteria isolated from seamount and non-seamount stations in the Tyrrhenian Sea was investigated. A collection of 110 isolates was analyzed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of representatives for each ARISA haplotype (n=49). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences showed a wide diversity of marine isolates and clustered the strains into 11 different genera, Janibacter, Rhodococcus, Arthrobacter, Kocuria, Dietzia, Curtobacterium, Micrococcus, Citricoccus, Brevibacterium, Brachybacterium and Nocardioides. Interestingly, Janibacter limosus was the most encountered species particularly in seamounts stations, suggesting that it represents an endemic species of this particular ecosystem. The application of BOX-PCR fingerprinting on J. limosus sub-collection (n=22), allowed their separation into seven distinct BOX-genotypes suggesting a high intraspecific microdiversity among the collection. Furthermore, by screening the biotechnological potential of selected actinobacterial strains, J. limosus was shown to exhibit the most important biosurfactant activity. Our overall data indicates that Janibacter is a major and active component of seamounts in the Tyrrhenian Sea adapted to low nutrient ecological niche. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Marine Actinobacteria as a source of compounds for phytopathogen control: An integrative metabolic-profiling / bioactivity and taxonomical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancur, Luz A; Naranjo-Gaybor, Sandra J; Vinchira-Villarraga, Diana M; Moreno-Sarmiento, Nubia C; Maldonado, Luis A; Suarez-Moreno, Zulma R; Acosta-González, Alejandro; Padilla-Gonzalez, Gillermo F; Puyana, Mónica; Castellanos, Leonardo; Ramos, Freddy A

    2017-01-01

    Marine bacteria are considered as promising sources for the discovery of novel biologically active compounds. In this study, samples of sediment, invertebrate and algae were collected from the Providencia and Santa Catalina coral reef (Colombian Caribbean Sea) with the aim of isolating Actinobateria-like strain able to produce antimicrobial and quorum quenching compounds against pathogens. Several approaches were used to select actinobacterial isolates, obtaining 203 strains from all samples. According to their 16S rRNA gene sequencing, a total of 24 strains was classified within Actinobacteria represented by three genera: Streptomyces, Micromonospora, and Gordonia. In order to assess their metabolic profiles, the actinobacterial strains were grown in liquid cultures, and LC-MS-based analyses from ethyl acetate fractions were performed. Based on taxonomical classification, screening information of activity against phytopathogenic strains and quorum quenching activity, as well as metabolic profiling, six out of the 24 isolates were selected for follow-up with chemical isolation and structure identification analyses of putative metabolites involved in antimicrobial activities.

  18. Diversity, ecological distribution and biotechnological potential of Actinobacteria inhabiting seamounts and non-seamounts in the Tyrrhenian Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Ettoumi, Besma

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the ecological distribution of marine Actinobacteria isolated from seamount and non-seamount stations in the Tyrrhenian Sea was investigated. A collection of 110 isolates was analyzed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of representatives for each ARISA haplotype (n = 49). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences showed a wide diversity of marine isolates and clustered the strains into 11 different genera, Janibacter, Rhodococcus, Arthrobacter, Kocuria, Dietzia, Curtobacterium, Micrococcus, Citricoccus, Brevibacterium, Brachybacterium and Nocardioides. Interestingly, Janibacter limosus was the most encountered species particularly in seamounts stations, suggesting that it represents an endemic species of this particular ecosystem. The application of BOX-PCR fingerprinting on J. limosus sub-collection (n = 22), allowed their separation into seven distinct BOX-genotypes suggesting a high intraspecific microdiversity among the collection. Furthermore, by screening the biotechnological potential of selected actinobacterial strains, J. limosus was shown to exhibit the most important biosurfactant activity. Our overall data indicates that Janibacter is a major and active component of seamounts in the Tyrrhenian Sea adapted to low nutrient ecological niche.

  19. Marine Actinobacteria as a source of compounds for phytopathogen control: An integrative metabolic-profiling / bioactivity and taxonomical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancur, Luz A.; Naranjo-Gaybor, Sandra J.; Vinchira-Villarraga, Diana M.; Moreno-Sarmiento, Nubia C.; Maldonado, Luis A.; Suarez-Moreno, Zulma R.; Acosta-González, Alejandro; Padilla-Gonzalez, Gillermo F.; Puyana, Mónica; Castellanos, Leonardo; Ramos, Freddy A.

    2017-01-01

    Marine bacteria are considered as promising sources for the discovery of novel biologically active compounds. In this study, samples of sediment, invertebrate and algae were collected from the Providencia and Santa Catalina coral reef (Colombian Caribbean Sea) with the aim of isolating Actinobateria-like strain able to produce antimicrobial and quorum quenching compounds against pathogens. Several approaches were used to select actinobacterial isolates, obtaining 203 strains from all samples. According to their 16S rRNA gene sequencing, a total of 24 strains was classified within Actinobacteria represented by three genera: Streptomyces, Micromonospora, and Gordonia. In order to assess their metabolic profiles, the actinobacterial strains were grown in liquid cultures, and LC-MS-based analyses from ethyl acetate fractions were performed. Based on taxonomical classification, screening information of activity against phytopathogenic strains and quorum quenching activity, as well as metabolic profiling, six out of the 24 isolates were selected for follow-up with chemical isolation and structure identification analyses of putative metabolites involved in antimicrobial activities. PMID:28225766

  20. Actinobacteria phylogenomics, selective isolation from an iron oligotrophic environment and siderophore functional characterization, unveil new desferrioxamine traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Morales, Pablo; Ramos-Aboites, Hilda E; Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtémoc; Selem-Mójica, Nelly; Mejía-Ponce, Paulina M; Souza-Saldívar, Valeria; Barona-Gómez, Francisco

    2017-09-01

    Desferrioxamines are hydroxamate siderophores widely conserved in both aquatic and soil-dwelling Actinobacteria. While the genetic and enzymatic bases of siderophore biosynthesis and their transport in model families of this phylum are well understood, evolutionary studies are lacking. Here, we perform a comprehensive desferrioxamine-centric (des genes) phylogenomic analysis, which includes the genomes of six novel strains isolated from an iron and phosphorous depleted oasis in the Chihuahuan desert of Mexico. Our analyses reveal previously unnoticed desferrioxamine evolutionary patterns, involving both biosynthetic and transport genes, likely to be related to desferrioxamines chemical diversity. The identified patterns were used to postulate experimentally testable hypotheses after phenotypic characterization, including profiling of siderophores production and growth stimulation of co-cultures under iron deficiency. Based in our results, we propose a novel des gene, which we term desG, as responsible for incorporation of phenylacetyl moieties during biosynthesis of previously reported arylated desferrioxamines. Moreover, a genomic-based classification of the siderophore-binding proteins responsible for specific and generalist siderophore assimilation is postulated. This report provides a much-needed evolutionary framework, with specific insights supported by experimental data, to direct the future ecological and functional analysis of desferrioxamines in the environment. © FEMS 2017.

  1. MULTIDRUG RESISTANT GRAM NEGATIVE PATHOGENS ANTIBIOTIC PROFILE AND ITS EFFECTIVE CONTROL US ING SECONDARY METABOLITES FROM MARINE ACTINOBACTERIA

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    Shanthi J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim:To screen the spread ofresistance in ESBLs producer’s particularly non lactose fermenting gram negative Acinetobacter spp. andPseudomonas spp.and study antimicrobial activity with crude extract from novel marine actinomycetes in India. Methods:Fifty clinical isolates in a period of one year were processed and the antibiotic susceptibility was determined by double disk approximation test, the ESBLs production was screened with phenotypic confirmatory methodsusing disks of amikacin, meropenem, netilimicin, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, tigecycline and piperacillinalong with cephalosporin disks. Antimicrobial activity of the crude extract was determined by agar plug method. Results:The isolates collected from different samples were found resistant to third and fourth generation cephalosporins. ESBL production was detected in 56 % to 66 % of the isolates, amikacin and netilmicin showed 50% to 60% resistance they were also found resistant to carbapenems,86% resistance wasobserved in Acinetobacter spp. Two strains PM21 and PM27selected from 24 actinobacterial isolates had zone of inhibition >21mm. Conclusion:A high level of antibiotic resistance was found in Acinetobacter spp.in our study and may reflect the scenario in India. Earlier detection and reporting of ESBL producers will help in treating individual cases and also in controlling the spread of these resistant genes to othersensitive nosocomial isolates. The medical need for new agents is most acute and the future of this work aims to identify one such novel compound from marine actinobacteria.

  2. Culture-independent nested PCR method reveals high diversity of actinobacteria associated with the marine sponges Hymeniacidon perleve and Sponge sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yanjuan; Huang, Jianyu; Deng, Maicun; Zhang, Wei

    2008-11-01

    A culture-independent nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to investigate the diversity of actinobacteria communities associated with the sponges Hymeniacidon perleve and Sponge sp. The phylogenetic affiliation of sponge-derived actinobacteria was then assessed by 16S rRNA sequencing of cloned DNA fragments. A total of 196 positive clones were screened by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis; 48 unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were selected for sequencing. Rarefaction analysis indicated that the clone libraries represented 93% and 94% of the total estimated diversity for the two species, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of sequence data revealed representatives of various phylogenetic divisions, which were related to the following ten actinobacterial genera: Acidimicrobium, Corynebacterium, Propionibacterium, Actinomyces, Micrococcus, Microbacterium, Streptomyces, Mycobacterium, Cellulosimicrobium, Sporichthya, and unidentified actinobacterial clones. A sponge-specific, previously uncultured actinobacteria community grouped within the subclass Acidimicrobidae was discovered from both H. perleve and Sponge sp. Sequences belonging to Acidimicrobium in the H. perleve and the Sponge sp. clone libraries represented 33% and 24% of the clones, respectively. In the Sponge sp. clone library Mycobacterium dominated, accounting for 70% of all clones. The presence of Acidimicrobium and mycobacteria within two sponges can lay the groundwork for attempts to culture these interesting bacteria for industrial applications.

  3. Culture-dependent and culture-independent diversity of Actinobacteria associated with the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve from the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Dai, Shikun; Jiang, Shumei; Wang, Guanghua; Liu, Guohui; Wu, Houbo; Li, Xiang

    2010-06-01

    In this report, the diversity of Actinobacteria associated with the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve collected from a remote island of the South China Sea was investigated employing classical cultivation and characterization, 16S rDNA library construction, 16S rDNA-restriction fragment length polymorphism (rDNA-RFLP) and phylogenetic analysis. A total of 184 strains were isolated using seven different media and 24 isolates were selected according to their morphological characteristics for phylogenetic analysis on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences. Results showed that the 24 isolates were assigned to six genera including Salinispora, Gordonia, Mycobacterium, Nocardia, Rhodococcus and Streptomyces. This is the first report that Salinispora is present in a marine sponge from the South China Sea. Subsequently, 26 rDNA clones were selected from 191 clones in an Actinobacteria-specific 16S rDNA library of the H. perleve sample, using the RFLP technique for sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. In total, 26 phylotypes were clustered in eight known genera of Actinobacteria including Mycobacterium, Amycolatopsis, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Microlunatus, Nocardioides, Pseudonocardia and Streptomyces. This study contributes to our understanding of actinobacterial diversity in the marine sponge H. perleve from the South China Sea.

  4. 4-alkyl-L-(Dehydro)proline biosynthesis in actinobacteria involves N-terminal nucleophile-hydrolase activity of γ-glutamyltranspeptidase homolog for C-C bond cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Guannan; Zhao, Qunfei; Zhang, Qinglin; Liu, Wen

    2017-07-01

    γ-Glutamyltranspeptidases (γ-GTs), ubiquitous in glutathione metabolism for γ-glutamyl transfer/hydrolysis, are N-terminal nucleophile (Ntn)-hydrolase fold proteins that share an autoproteolytic process for self-activation. γ-GT homologues are widely present in Gram-positive actinobacteria where their Ntn-hydrolase activities, however, are not involved in glutathione metabolism. Herein, we demonstrate that the formation of 4-Alkyl-L-(dehydro)proline (ALDP) residues, the non-proteinogenic α-amino acids that serve as vital components of many bioactive metabolites found in actinobacteria, involves unprecedented Ntn-hydrolase activity of γ-GT homologue for C-C bond cleavage. The related enzymes share a key Thr residue, which acts as an internal nucleophile for protein hydrolysis and then as a newly released N-terminal nucleophile for carboxylate side-chain processing likely through the generation of an oxalyl-Thr enzyme intermediate. These findings provide mechanistic insights into the biosynthesis of various ALDP residues/associated natural products, highlight the versatile functions of Ntn-hydrolase fold proteins, and particularly generate interest in thus far less-appreciated γ-GT homologues in actinobacteria.

  5. Extremozymes from Marine Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriya, J; Bharathiraja, S; Krishnan, M; Manivasagan, P; Kim, S-K

    Marine microorganisms that have the possibility to survive in diverse conditions such as extreme temperature, pH, pressure, and salinity are known as extremophiles. They produce biocatalysts so named as extremozymes that are active and stable at extreme conditions. These enzymes have numerous industrial applications due to its distinct properties. Till now, only a fraction of microorganisms on Earth have been exploited for screening of extremozymes. Novel techniques used for the cultivation and production of extremophiles, as well as cloning and overexpression of their genes in various expression systems, will pave the way to use these enzymes for chemical, food, pharmaceutical, and other industrial applications. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative 16S rRNA Analysis of Lake Bacterioplankton Reveals Globally Distributed Phylogenetic Clusters Including an Abundant Group of Actinobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Zaichikov, Evgeny; Belkova, Natalia; Denissova, Ludmilla; Pernthaler, Jakob; Pernthaler, Annelie; Amann, Rudolf

    2000-01-01

    In a search for cosmopolitan phylogenetic clusters of freshwater bacteria, we recovered a total of 190 full and partial 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences from three different lakes (Lake Gossenköllesee, Austria; Lake Fuchskuhle, Germany; and Lake Baikal, Russia). The phylogenetic comparison with the currently available rDNA data set showed that our sequences fall into 16 clusters, which otherwise include bacterial rDNA sequences of primarily freshwater and soil, but not marine, origin. Six of the clusters were affiliated with the α, four were affiliated with the β, and one was affiliated with the γ subclass of the Proteobacteria; four were affiliated with the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group; and one was affiliated with the class Actinobacteria (formerly known as the high-G+C gram-positive bacteria). The latter cluster (hgcI) is monophyletic and so far includes only sequences directly retrieved from aquatic environments. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with probes specific for the hgcI cluster showed abundances of up to 1.7 × 105 cells ml−1 in Lake Gossenköllesee, with strong seasonal fluctuations, and high abundances in the two other lakes investigated. Cell size measurements revealed that Actinobacteria in Lake Gossenköllesee can account for up to 63% of the bacterioplankton biomass. A combination of phylogenetic analysis and FISH was used to reveal 16 globally distributed sequence clusters and to confirm the broad distribution, abundance, and high biomass of members of the class Actinobacteria in freshwater ecosystems. PMID:11055963

  7. Isolation and antimicrobial activities of actinobacteria closely associated with liquorice plants Glycyrrhiza glabra L. and Glycyrrhiza inflate BAT. in Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ke; Zhao, Chong; Liao, Ping; Zhang, Qin; Li, Yanbing; Liu, Maoke; Ao, Xiaoling; Gu, Yunfu; Liao, Decong; Xu, Kaiwei; Yu, Xiumei; Xiang, Quanju; Huang, Chengyi; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Xiaoping; Penttinen, Petri

    2016-07-01

    A total of 218 actinobacteria strains were isolated from wild perennial liquorice plants Glycyrrhiza glabra L. and Glycyrrhiza. inflate BAT. Based on morphological characteristics, 45 and 32 strains from G. inflate and G. glabra, respectively, were selected for further analyses. According to 16S rRNA sequence analysis, most of the strains belonged to genus Streptomyces and a few strains represented the rare actinobacteria Micromonospora, Rhodococcus and Tsukamurella. A total of 39 strains from G. inflate and 27 strains from G. glabra showed antimicrobial activity against at least one indicator organism. The range of the antimicrobial activity of the strains isolated from G. glabra and G. inflate was similar. A total of 34 strains from G. inflate and 29 strains from G. glabra carried at least one of the genes encoding polyketide synthases, non-ribosomal peptide synthetase and FADH2-dependent halogenase. In the type II polyketide synthase KSα gene phylogenetic analysis, the strains were divided into two major clades: one included known spore pigment production-linked KSα sequences and other sequences were linked to the production of different types of aromatic polyketide antibiotics. Based on the antimicrobial range, the isolates that carried different KSα types were not separated from each other or from the isolates that did not carry KSα. The incongruent phylogenies of 16S rRNA and KSα genes indicated that the KSα genes were possibly horizontally transferred. In all, the liquorice plants were a rich source of biocontrol agents that may produce novel bioactive compounds.

  8. Ketide Synthase (KS) Domain Prediction and Analysis of Iterative Type II PKS Gene in Marine Sponge-Associated Actinobacteria Producing Biosurfactants and Antimicrobial Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvin, Joseph; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Lipton, Anuj N; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Kiran, George S

    2016-01-01

    The important biological macromolecules, such as lipopeptide and glycolipid biosurfactant producing marine actinobacteria were analyzed and their potential linkage between type II polyketide synthase (PKS) genes was explored. A unique feature of type II PKS genes is their high amino acid (AA) sequence homology and conserved gene organization. These enzymes mediate the biosynthesis of polyketide natural products with enormous structural complexity and chemical nature by combinatorial use of various domains. Therefore, deciphering the order of AA sequence encoded by PKS domains tailored the chemical structure of polyketide analogs still remains a great challenge. The present work deals with an in vitro and in silico analysis of PKS type II genes from five actinobacterial species to correlate KS domain architecture and structural features. Our present analysis reveals the unique protein domain organization of iterative type II PKS and KS domain of marine actinobacteria. The findings of this study would have implications in metabolic pathway reconstruction and design of semi-synthetic genomes to achieve rational design of novel natural products.

  9. Ketide Synthase (KS domain prediction and analysis of iterative type II PKS gene in marine sponge-associated actinobacteria producing biosurfactants and antimicrobial agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Seghal Kiran

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The important biological macromolecules such as lipopeptide and glycolipid biosurfactant producing marine actinobacteria were analyzed and their potential linkage between type II polyketide synthase (PKS genes was also explored. A unique feature of type II PKS genes is their high amino acid sequence homology and conserved gene organization. These enzymes mediate the biosynthesis of polyketide natural products with enormous structural complexity and chemical nature by combinatorial use of various domains. Therefore, deciphering the order of amino acid sequence encoded by PKS domains tailored the chemical structure of polyketide analogues still remains a great challenge. The present work deals with an in vitro and in silico analysis of PKS type II genes from five actinobacterial species with known PKS and metabolic products to correlate the domain architecture and structural features shared with known PKS proteins. Our present analysis reveals the unique protein domain organization of iterative type II PKS and KS domain of marine actinobacteria. The findings of this study would have implications in metabolic pathway reconstruction and design of semi-synthetic genomes to achieve rational design of novel natural products.

  10. 孟加拉虎粪便放线菌的分离及其多样性%Isolation methods and diversity of culturable fecal actinobacteria associated with Panthera tigris tigris in Yunnan Safari Park

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹艳茹; 姜怡; 李有龙; 陈秀; 靳荣线; 和文祥

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] We studied the isolation methods and diversity of culturable fecal actinobacteria associated with Panthera tigris tigris by using culture-dependent approaches. [Methods] Fresh fecal samples of healthy Panthera tigris tigris were collected from Yunnan Safari Park. Pretreatment of the samples, isolation media and inhibitors were tested for actinobacteria isolation.16S rRNA genes of actinobacteria were sequenced and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. [ Results] The abundance of culturable actinobacteria was 1.10×10 cfu/g colony forming units (CFU) per gram of feces (wet weight). We obtained 110 purified cultural actinobacterium strains. The analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that these strains were distributed in 10 different families and 12 genera of actinobacteria at least, and most of them were non-filamentous, such as Arthrobacter, Dietzia, Kocuria, Corynebacterium and Microbacterium. Streptomyces was the mainly classical filamentous actinobacteria, and up to 64% of total. [Conclusion] Drying and heating up the fecal samples can greatly increase the rate of the actinobacteria. Many kinds of inhibitors and chemical defined media are suitable for isolation of fecal actinobacteria. The culturable actinobacteria are abundant in Panthera tigris tigris feces. Our study found an effective method to isolate animals' fecal actinobacteria and it's useful for studying and exploiting animals' fecal actinobacteria.%[目的]建立有效分离动物粪便放线菌的方法,认识孟加拉虎粪便放线菌的多样性.[方法]从预处理、抑制剂、培养基三个方面考虑,采用平板稀释的分离方法.用细菌通用引物扩增获得放线菌菌株的16S rRNA基因,根据系统发育分析进行鉴定.[结果]孟加拉虎粪便样品中,可培养放线菌的菌落平均数量为1.10×108 cfu/g(粪便湿重);对分离到的110株纯培养放线菌的16S rRNA基因部分序列分析表明:它们分布于10个科、12个属,主要是一

  11. Caracterización de actinobacterias raras, degradadoras de lignocelulosa: demostración de actividad lacasa en dos aislados de Tsukamurella sp y Cellulosimicrobium sp

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    Enrique Luis Revollo Escudero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Título en ingles: Characterization of lignocelluloses-degrading rare actinobacteria: Demostration of laccase activity in two isolates of Tsukamurella sp and Cellulosimicrobium sp Resumen: Las características fisicoquímicas de la lignina y su compactación con la celulosa han dificultado la explotación biotecnológica de enormes cantidades de biomasa vegetal. Las lacasas constituyen una subfamilia de oxidasas multicobre que intervienen en la despolimerización de la lignina. Si bien han sido ampliamente caracterizadas en los hongos, los estudios de la diversidad y las funcionalidades de las lacasas en los procariotas se han centrado especialmente en isoformas enzimáticas de Streptomyces sp. En este trabajo se aislaron 20 cepas de actinobacterias del suelo. La actividad lacasa de 17 de ellas fue evidenciada en ensayos cualitativos con guayacol y dos cepas seleccionadas fueron caracterizadas en detalle. Las pruebas morfológicas y el análisis de las secuencias del gen 16S rRNA apuntan a que estos dos aislados pertenecen a los géneros Tsukamurella y Cellulosimicrobium. En cultivo sumergido con agitación, AC01 (Tsukamurella sp. expresó una máxima actividad de oxidación de ABTS (2,2’-azino-bis-(3-etilbenzotiazolin-6-sulfonato de 108 U/L. Por otra parte, AC18 (Cellulosimicrobium sp. que había exhibido una actividad oxidativa de guayacol superior a las 16 cepas restantes y demostró ser resistente a niveles tóxicos de cobre, logró un valor máximo de oxidación del ABTS de 0,56 U/L. Estos resultados sugieren que en el aislado AC18 operaría un fenómeno de especificidad de sustrato o de inductor, regulador de la expresión y de la actividad lacasa cuantificable. La caracterización genómica y funcional de las lacasas de nuevas actinobacterias lignocelulósicas ampliará la gama de centros redox con aplicaciones biotecnológicas específicas, además de facilitar el establecimiento de sus relaciones evolutivas con las eucariotas

  12. Evidence for the presence of key chlorophyll-biosynthesis-related proteins in the genus Rubrobacter (Phylum Actinobacteria) and its implications for the evolution and origin of photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Radhey S; Khadka, Bijendra

    2016-02-01

    Homologs showing high degree of sequence similarity to the three subunits of the protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase enzyme complex (viz. BchL, BchN, and BchB), which carries out a central role in chlorophyll-bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) biosynthesis, are uniquely found in photosynthetic organisms. The results of BLAST searches and homology modeling presented here show that proteins exhibiting a high degree of sequence and structural similarity to the BchB and BchN proteins are also present in organisms from the high G+C Gram-positive phylum of Actinobacteria, specifically in members of the genus Rubrobacter (R. x ylanophilus and R. r adiotolerans). The results presented exclude the possibility that the observed BLAST hits are for subunits of the nitrogenase complex or the chlorin reductase complex. The branching in phylogenetic trees and the sequence characteristics of the Rubrobacter BchB/BchN homologs indicate that these homologs are distinct from those found in other photosynthetic bacteria and that they may represent ancestral forms of the BchB/BchN proteins. Although a homolog showing high degree of sequence similarity to the BchL protein was not detected in Rubrobacter, another protein, belonging to the ParA/Soj/MinD family, present in these bacteria, exhibits high degree of structural similarity to the BchL. In addition to the BchB/BchN homologs, Rubrobacter species also contain homologs showing high degree of sequence similarity to different subunits of magnesium chelatase (BchD, BchH, and BchI) as well as proteins showing significant similarity to the BchP and BchG proteins. Interestingly, no homologs corresponding to the BchX, BchY, and BchZ proteins were detected in the Rubrobacter species. These results provide the first suggestive evidence that some form of photosynthesis either exists or was anciently present within the phylum Actinobacteria (high G+C Gram-positive) in members of the genus Rubrobacter. The significance of these results concerning the

  13. The first complete genome sequences of the acI lineage, the most abundant freshwater Actinobacteria, obtained by whole-genome-amplification of dilution-to-extinction cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ilnam; Kim, Suhyun; Islam, Md. Rashedul; Cho, Jang-Cheon

    2017-01-01

    The acI lineage of the phylum Actinobacteria is the most abundant bacterial group in most freshwater lakes. However, due to difficulties in laboratory cultivation, only two mixed cultures and some incomplete single-amplified or metagenome-derived genomes have been reported for the lineage. Here, we report the initial cultivation and complete genome sequences of four novel strains of the acI lineage from the tribes acI-A1, -A4, -A7, and -C1. The acI strains, initially isolated by dilution-to-extinction culturing, eventually failed to be maintained as axenic cultures. However, the first complete genomes of the acI lineage were successfully obtained from these initial cultures through whole genome amplification applied to more than hundreds of cultured acI cells. The genome sequences exhibited features of genome streamlining and showed that the strains are aerobic chemoheterotrophs sharing central metabolic pathways, with some differences among tribes that may underlie niche diversification within the acI lineage. Actinorhodopsin was found in all strains, but retinal biosynthesis was complete in only A1 and A4 tribes. PMID:28186143

  14. Detection of biosynthetic gene and phytohormone production by endophytic actinobacteria associated with Solanum lycopersicum and their plant-growth-promoting effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passari, Ajit Kumar; Chandra, Preeti; Zothanpuia; Mishra, Vineet Kumar; Leo, Vincent Vineeth; Gupta, Vijai Kumar; Kumar, Brijesh; Singh, Bhim Pratap

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, fifteen endophytic actinobacterial isolates recovered from Solanum lycopersicum were studied for their antagonistic potential and plant-growth-promoting (PGP) traits. Among them, eight isolates showed significant antagonistic and PGP traits, identified by amplification of the 16S rRNA gene. Isolate number DBT204, identified as Streptomyces sp., showed multiple PGP traits tested in planta and improved a range of growth parameters in seedlings of chili (Capsicum annuum L.) and tomato (S. lycopersicum L.). Further, genes of indole acetic acid (iaaM) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase (acdS) were successively amplified from five strains. Six antibiotics (trimethoprim, fluconazole, chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, rifampicin and streptomycin) and two phytohormones [indole acetic acid (IAA) and kinetin (KI)] were detected and quantified in Streptomyces sp. strain DBT204 using UPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The study indicates the potential of these PGP strains for production of phytohormones and shows the presence of biosynthetic genes responsible for production of secondary metabolites. It is the first report showing production of phytohormones (IAA and KI) by endophytic actinobacteria having PGP and biosynthetic potential. We propose Streptomyces sp. strain DBT204 for inoculums production and development of biofertilizers for enhancing growth of chili and tomato seedlings. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Anti-phytopathogen potential of endophytic actinobacteria isolated from tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum) in southern Brazil, and characterization of Streptomyces sp. R18(6), a potential biocontrol agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Margaroni Fialho; da Silva, Mariana Germano; Van Der Sand, Sueli T

    2010-09-01

    Tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum) are highly susceptible to phytopathogen attack. The resulting intensive application of pesticides on tomato crops can affect the environment and health of humans and animals. The objective of this study was to select potential biocontrol agents among actinobacteria from tomato plants, in a search for alternative phytopathogen control. We evaluated 70 endophytic actinobacteria isolated from tomato plants in southern Brazil, testing their antimicrobial activity, siderophore production, indoleacetic acid production, and phosphate solubility. The actinomycete isolate with the highest antimicrobial potential was selected using the agar-well diffusion method, in order to optimize conditions for the production of compounds with antimicrobial activity. For this study, six growth media (starch casein-SC, ISP2, Bennett's, Sahin, Czapek-Dox, and TSB), three temperatures (25 degrees C, 30 degrees C, and 35 degrees C) and different pH were tested. Of the actinobacteria tested, 88.6% showed antimicrobial activity against at least one phytopathogen, 72.1% showed a positive reaction for indoleacetic acid production, 86.8% produced siderophores and 16.2% showed a positive reaction for phosphate solubility. Isolate R18(6) was selected due to its antagonistic activity against all phytopathogenic microorganisms tested in this study. The best conditions for production were observed in the SC medium, at 30 degrees C and pH 7.0. The isolate R18(6) showed close biochemical and genetic similarity to Streptomyces pluricolorescens.

  16. Characterization and engineering of the biosynthesis gene cluster for antitumor macrolides PM100117 and PM100118 from a marine actinobacteria: generation of a novel improved derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcedo, Raúl García; Olano, Carlos; Gómez, Cristina; Fernández, Rogelio; Braña, Alfredo F; Méndez, Carmen; de la Calle, Fernando; Salas, José A

    2016-02-22

    PM100117 and PM100118 are glycosylated polyketides with remarkable antitumor activity, which derive from the marine symbiotic actinobacteria Streptomyces caniferus GUA-06-05-006A. Structurally, PM100117 and PM100118 are composed of a macrocyclic lactone, three deoxysugar units and a naphthoquinone (NQ) chromophore that shows a clear structural similarity to menaquinone. Whole-genome sequencing of S. caniferus GUA-06-05-006A has enabled the identification of PM100117 and PM100118 biosynthesis gene cluster, which has been characterized on the basis of bioinformatics and genetic engineering data. The product of four genes shows high identity to proteins involved in the biosynthesis of menaquinone via futalosine. Deletion of one of these genes led to a decay in PM100117 and PM100118 production, and to the accumulation of several derivatives lacking NQ. Likewise, five additional genes have been genetically characterized to be involved in the biosynthesis of this moiety. Moreover, the generation of a mutant in a gene coding for a putative cytochrome P450 has led to the production of PM100117 and PM100118 structural analogues showing an enhanced in vitro cytotoxic activity relative to the parental products. Although a number of compounds structurally related to PM100117 and PM100118 has been discovered, this is, to our knowledge, the first insight reported into their biosynthesis. The structural resemblance of the NQ moiety to menaquinone, and the presence in the cluster of four putative menaquinone biosynthetic genes, suggests a connection between the biosynthesis pathways of both compounds. The availability of the PM100117 and PM100118 biosynthetic gene cluster will surely pave a way to the combinatorial engineering of more derivatives.

  17. Streptosporangium sonchi sp. nov. and Streptosporangium kronopolitis sp. nov., two novel actinobacteria isolated from a root of common sowthistle (Sonchus oleraceus L.) and a millipede (Kronopolites svenhedind Verhoeff).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhaoxu; Liu, Hui; Liu, Chongxi; He, Hairong; Zhao, Junwei; Wang, Xin; Li, Jiansong; Wang, Xiangjing; Xiang, Wensheng

    2015-06-01

    Two novel actinobacteria, designated strains NEAU-QS7(T) and NEAU-ML10(T), were isolated from a root of Sonchus oleraceus L. and a Kronopolites svenhedind Verhoeff specimen, respectively, collected from Wuchang, Heilongjiang Province, China. A polyphasic study was carried out to establish the taxonomic positions of these strains. The two strains were observed to form abundant aerial hyphae that differentiated into spherical spore vesicles. The phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains NEAU-QS7(T) and NEAU-ML10(T) showed that the two novel isolates exhibited 99.7 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with each other and that they are most closely related to Streptosporangium shengliense NEAU-GH7(T) (99.1, 99.0 %) and Streptosporangium longisporum DSM 43180(T) (99.1, 99.0 %). However, the DNA-DNA hybridization value between strains NEAU-QS7(T) and NEAU-ML10(T) was 46.5 %, and the values between the two strains and their closest phylogenetic relatives were also below 70 %. With reference to phenotypic characteristics, phylogenetic data and DNA-DNA hybridization results, the two strains can be distinguished from each other and their closest phylogenetic relatives. Thus, strains NEAU-QS7(T) and NEAU-ML10(T) represent two novel species of the genus Streptosporangium, for which the names Streptosporangium sonchi sp. nov. and Streptosporangium kronopolitis sp. nov. are proposed. The type strains are NEAU-QS7(T) (=CGMCC 4.7142(T) =DSM 46717(T)) and NEAU-ML10(T) (=CGMCC 4.7153(T) =DSM 46720(T)), respectively.

  18. Streptosporangium jiaoheense sp. nov. and Streptosporangium taraxaci sp. nov., actinobacteria isolated from soil and dandelion root (Taraxacum mongolicum Hand.-Mazz.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junwei; Guo, Lifeng; Li, Zhilei; Piao, Chenyu; Li, Yao; Li, Jiansong; Liu, Chongxi; Wang, Xiangjing; Xiang, Wensheng

    2016-06-01

    Two novel actinobacteria, designated strains NEAU-Jh1-4T and NEAU-Wp2-0T, were isolated from muddy soil collected from a riverbank in Jiaohe and a dandelion root collected from Harbin, respectively. A polyphasic study was carried out to establish the taxonomic positions of these two strains. The phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains NEAU-Jh1-4T and NEAU-Wp2-0T indicated that strain NEAU-Jh1-4T clustered with Streptosporangium nanhuense NEAU-NH11T (99.32 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Streptosporangium purpuratum CY-15110T (98.30 %) and Streptosporangium yunnanense CY-11007T (97.95 %) and strain NEAU-Wp2-0T clustered with 'Streptosporangium sonchi  ' NEAU-QS7 (99.39 %), 'Streptosporangium kronopolitis' NEAU-ML10 (99.26 %), 'Streptosporangium shengliense' NEAU-GH7 (98.85 %) and Streptosporangium longisporum DSM 43180T (98.69 %). Moreover, morphological and chemotaxonomic properties of the two isolates also confirmed their affiliation to the genus Streptosporangium. However, the low level of DNA-DNA hybridization and some phenotypic characteristics allowed the isolates to be differentiated from the most closely related species. Therefore, it is proposed that strains NEAU-Jh1-4T and NEAU-Wp2-0T represent two novel species of the genus Streptosporangium, for which the name Streptosporangium jiaoheense sp. nov. and Streptosporangium taraxaci sp. nov. are proposed. The type strains are NEAU-Jh1-4T (=CGMCC 4.7213T=JCM 30348T) and NEAU-Wp2-0T (=CGMCC 4.7217T=JCM 30349T), respectively.

  19. Diversity and bioactivity of culturable actinobacteria from animal feces%五种动物粪便纯培养放线菌的多样性及生物活性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜怡; 曹艳茹; 韩力; 靳荣线; 郑丹; 和文祥; 李有龙; 黄学石

    2012-01-01

    [Objectives] In order to provide new source for discovering new lead compounds of drugs and other products, the diversity and some bioactivities of culturable actinobacteria in animal feces were studied. [ Methods ] Five animals' fecal samples were collected from Yunnan Wild Animal Park. The pure cultures of actinobacteria were isolated from these samples by using 5 different media. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of 119 selected strains were determined; the phylogenetic analysis was carried out; and antimicrobial and anti-tumor activities were determined by using agar diffusion method, tumor cell lines k562and HL60 respectively. [Results] In total 20 genera of actinobacteria from the 5 animals' feces were identified. Many strains inhibited Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus lentus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger. Some strains presented antitumor activities. Some known secondary metabolites and Sannastatin, a novel macrolactam polyketide glycoside with bioactivities, were isolated and identified. [Conclusion] Fecal actinobacteria are a new potential source for discovering drug lead and other industry products.%[目的]以资源利用为出发点,研究了五种动物粪便放线菌的多样性及生物活性.[方法]从云南野生动物园采集5种半野生动物的新鲜粪便样品,用5种培养基分离其中的放线菌,将放线菌鉴定到属,测定纯培养放线菌的抗菌活性,抗肿瘤活性等.[结果]结果表明,所试5种动物粪便放线菌的种类非常丰富,组成各不相同,以链霉菌和微球菌占优势,可能存在大量未知放线菌;粪便放线菌的抗菌活性,抗肿瘤活性,酶活性,分解纤维素、角蛋白的活性非常普遍,尤其是具有抗肿瘤活性的菌株比例较大;产生的具有生物活性的次生代谢产物也是多种多样的.[结论]因此,粪便放线菌与土壤,海洋及植物的放线菌一样,是开发药物、农药和其他产品的重要来源之一,应当

  20. Isolation and screening for plant growth-promoting (PGP actinobacteria from Araucaria angustifolia rhizosphere soil Isolamento e seleção de actinobactérias promotoras do crescimento de plantas de solo rizosférico de Araucaria angustifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Leandro Figueiredo de Vasconcellos

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Actinobacteria are capable of playing several different roles in soil ecosystems. These microorganisms affect other organisms by producing secondary metabolites and are responsible for the degradation of different complex and relatively recalcitrant organic compounds. In our survey of actinobacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of Araucaria angustifolia, five culture media (AI, WYE, YCED, MSSC and LNMS were compared for their effectiveness in isolating these microorganisms. When summing up all the isolates randomly obtained, we got 103 isolates. After isolation, the phosphate-solubilizing ability and the "in vitro" production of indole-acetic acid and chitinases were evaluated. The AI medium was ineffective for actinobacteria isolation, when it was compared with the other four culture media. Indole-acetic acid and chitinase were produced by respectively 36% and 24% of the strains tested. However, only 2% of the 103 strains presented some phosphate-solubilizing ability. These results demonstrate the biotechnological potential of these microorganisms.Actinobactérias são capazes de desenvolver diferentes funções no ecossistema edáfico. Esses microrganismos, além de interagir com outros grupos de microrganismos e plantas, ao produzir metabólitos secundários, são responsáveis pela degradação de diferentes compostos orgânicos. Com intuito de facilitar os estudos envolvendo actinobactérias encontradas em sistemas florestais, cinco meios de cultura (AI, WYE, YCED, MSSC e LNMS foram avaliados quanto à eficiência em isolar estes microrganismos. Além disso, foi analisada a capacidade dos diferentes isolados em solubilizar fosfato de cálcio, produzir ácido indol-acético e quitinases. Dos cinco meios de cultura testados, somente o AI foi ineficiente em isolar actinobactérias. A produção de ácido indol-acético e quitinases foi observada em 36% e 24% dos isolados analisados, respectivamente. Contudo, apenas 2% dos 103 isolados foram

  1. Discovery of potent broad spectrum antivirals derived from marine actinobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avi Raveh

    Full Text Available Natural products provide a vast array of chemical structures to explore in the discovery of new medicines. Although secondary metabolites produced by microbes have been developed to treat a variety of diseases, including bacterial and fungal infections, to date there has been limited investigation of natural products with antiviral activity. In this report, we used a phenotypic cell-based replicon assay coupled with an iterative biochemical fractionation process to identify, purify, and characterize antiviral compounds produced by marine microbes. We isolated a compound from Streptomyces kaviengensis, a novel actinomycetes isolated from marine sediments obtained off the coast of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea, which we identified as antimycin A1a. This compound displays potent activity against western equine encephalitis virus in cultured cells with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of less than 4 nM and a selectivity index of greater than 550. Our efforts also revealed that several antimycin A analogues display antiviral activity, and mechanism of action studies confirmed that these Streptomyces-derived secondary metabolites function by inhibiting the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain, thereby suppressing de novo pyrimidine synthesis. Furthermore, we found that antimycin A functions as a broad spectrum agent with activity against a wide range of RNA viruses in cultured cells, including members of the Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae, Picornaviridae, and Paramyxoviridae families. Finally, we demonstrate that antimycin A reduces central nervous system viral titers, improves clinical disease severity, and enhances survival in mice given a lethal challenge with western equine encephalitis virus. Our results provide conclusive validation for using natural product resources derived from marine microbes as source material for antiviral drug discovery, and they indicate that host mitochondrial electron transport is a viable target for the continued development of broadly active antiviral compounds.

  2. Discovery of potent broad spectrum antivirals derived from marine actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveh, Avi; Delekta, Phillip C; Dobry, Craig J; Peng, Weiping; Schultz, Pamela J; Blakely, Pennelope K; Tai, Andrew W; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Irani, David N; Sherman, David H; Miller, David J

    2013-01-01

    Natural products provide a vast array of chemical structures to explore in the discovery of new medicines. Although secondary metabolites produced by microbes have been developed to treat a variety of diseases, including bacterial and fungal infections, to date there has been limited investigation of natural products with antiviral activity. In this report, we used a phenotypic cell-based replicon assay coupled with an iterative biochemical fractionation process to identify, purify, and characterize antiviral compounds produced by marine microbes. We isolated a compound from Streptomyces kaviengensis, a novel actinomycetes isolated from marine sediments obtained off the coast of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea, which we identified as antimycin A1a. This compound displays potent activity against western equine encephalitis virus in cultured cells with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of less than 4 nM and a selectivity index of greater than 550. Our efforts also revealed that several antimycin A analogues display antiviral activity, and mechanism of action studies confirmed that these Streptomyces-derived secondary metabolites function by inhibiting the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain, thereby suppressing de novo pyrimidine synthesis. Furthermore, we found that antimycin A functions as a broad spectrum agent with activity against a wide range of RNA viruses in cultured cells, including members of the Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae, Picornaviridae, and Paramyxoviridae families. Finally, we demonstrate that antimycin A reduces central nervous system viral titers, improves clinical disease severity, and enhances survival in mice given a lethal challenge with western equine encephalitis virus. Our results provide conclusive validation for using natural product resources derived from marine microbes as source material for antiviral drug discovery, and they indicate that host mitochondrial electron transport is a viable target for the continued development of broadly active antiviral compounds.

  3. Competitive strategies differentiate closely related species of marine actinobacteria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patin, Nastassia V; Duncan, Katherine R; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Jensen, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    ... to the functional traits and evolutionary processes that led to their divergence. Here we show that two closely related marine actinomycete species can be differentiated based on competitive strategies...

  4. Diversity of Actinobacteria Associated with the Marine Ascidian Eudistoma toealensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Georg; Taylor, Michael W; Schupp, Peter J

    2015-08-01

    Ascidians have yielded a wide variety of bioactive natural products. The colonial ascidian Eudistoma toealensis from Micronesia has been identified as the source of a series of staurosporine derivatives, though the exact origin of these derivatives is still unknown. To identify known staurosporine-producing microbes associated with E. toealensis, we analyzed with 16S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing the overall bacterial community and focused on potential symbiotic bacteria already known from other ascidians or other marine hosts, such as sponges. The described microbiota was one of very high diversity, comprising 43 phyla: two from archaea, 34 described bacterial phyla, and seven candidate bacterial phyla. Many bacteria, which are renowned community members of other ascidians and marine holobionts, such as sponges and corals, were also part of the E. toealensis microbial community. Furthermore, two known producers of indolocarbazoles, Salinispora and Verrucosispora, were found with high abundance exclusively in the ascidian tissue, suggesting that microbial symbionts and not the organism itself may be the true producers of the staurosporines in E. toealensis.

  5. Competitive strategies differentiate closely related species of marine actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patin, Nastassia V; Duncan, Katherine R; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Jensen, Paul R

    2016-02-01

    Although competition, niche partitioning, and spatial isolation have been used to describe the ecology and evolution of macro-organisms, it is less clear to what extent these principles account for the extraordinary levels of bacterial diversity observed in nature. Ecological interactions among bacteria are particularly challenging to address due to methodological limitations and uncertainties over how to recognize fundamental units of diversity and link them to the functional traits and evolutionary processes that led to their divergence. Here we show that two closely related marine actinomycete species can be differentiated based on competitive strategies. Using a direct challenge assay to investigate inhibitory interactions with members of the bacterial community, we observed a temporal difference in the onset of inhibition. The majority of inhibitory activity exhibited by Salinispora arenicola occurred early in its growth cycle and was linked to antibiotic production. In contrast, most inhibition by Salinispora tropica occurred later in the growth cycle and was more commonly linked to nutrient depletion or other sources. Comparative genomics support these differences, with S. arenicola containing nearly twice the number of secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters as S. tropica, indicating a greater potential for secondary metabolite production. In contrast, S. tropica is enriched in gene clusters associated with the acquisition of growth-limiting nutrients such as iron. Coupled with differences in growth rates, the results reveal that S. arenicola uses interference competition at the expense of growth, whereas S. tropica preferentially employs a strategy of exploitation competition. The results support the ecological divergence of two co-occurring and closely related species of marine bacteria by providing evidence they have evolved fundamentally different strategies to compete in marine sediments.

  6. Antagonistic potential of marine Actinobacteria against fish and shellfish pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    DHARMARAJ, Selvakumar

    2011-01-01

    A total of 94 marine actinobacterial isolates were found to be associated with 4 sponges: Callyspongia diffusa, Mycale mytilorum, Tedania anhelans, and Dysidea fragilis. Among the cultures 7 strains showed antagonism against fish and shellfish pathogens. Analysis of morphological, physiological, biochemical, and protein profile characteristics suggested that the actinobacterial strains belonged to the genus Streptomyces. The initial screening of the isolates by the spot inoculation method exh...

  7. The isolation and characterization of actinobacteria from dominant benthic macroinvertebrates endemic to Lake Baikal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Axenov-Gribanov, Denis; Rebets, Yuriy; Tokovenko, Bogdan; Voytsekhovskaya, Irina; Timofeyev, Maxim; Luzhetskyy, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    ...’ communities of Lake Baikal. Twenty-five distinct strains were obtained from 5 species of Baikal endemic macroinvertebrates of amphipods, freshwater sponges, turbellaria worms, and insects (caddisfly larvae...

  8. Stone-dwelling actinobacteria Blastococcus saxobsidens, Modestobacter marinus and Geodermatophilus obscurus proteogenomes

    KAUST Repository

    Sghaier, Haïtham

    2015-06-30

    The Geodermatophilaceae are unique model systems to study the ability to thrive on or within stones and their proteogenomes (referring to the whole protein arsenal encoded by the genome) could provide important insight into their adaptation mechanisms. Here we report the detailed comparative genome analysis of Blastococcus saxobsidens (Bs), Modestobacter marinus (Mm) and Geodermatophilus obscurus (Go) isolated respectively from the interior and the surface of calcarenite stones and from desert sandy soils. The genome-scale analysis of Bs, Mm and Go illustrates how adaptation to these niches can be achieved through various strategies including ‘molecular tinkering/opportunism’ as shown by the high proportion of lost, duplicated or horizontally transferred genes and ORFans. Using high-throughput discovery proteomics, the three proteomes under unstressed conditions were analyzed, highlighting the most abundant biomarkers and the main protein factors. Proteomic data corroborated previously demonstrated stone-related ecological distribution. For instance, these data showed starvation-inducible, biofilm-related and DNA-protection proteins as signatures of the microbes associated with the interior, surface and outside of stones, respectively.

  9. Isolation and characterization of actinobacteria from Yalujiang coastal wetland, North China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicheng Yu

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: This is the first report about actinomycetes isolated from Yalujiang coastal wetland and it seems that the promising isolates from the unusual/unexplored wetland may prove to be an important step in the development of microbial natural product research.

  10. Draft genome sequence of a marine actinobacteria Sciscionella strain SE31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Wee Fei Aaron; Wee, Wei Yee; Choo, Siew Woh; Tan, Geok Yuan Annie

    2015-04-01

    The bacterium strain SE31, a member of the genus Sciscionella, was isolated from intertidal sediments collected from Cape Rachado, Malaysia. The high quality draft genome sequence of Sciscionella strain SE31 with a genome size of approximately 7.4 Mbp is reported. Preliminary analysis revealed 46 putative gene clusters involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and 113 putative genes that are associated with bacterial virulence, disease and defense. Availability of the genome sequence of Sciscionella SE31 will contribute to a better understanding of the genus Sciscionella. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Developmental cycle and pharmaceutically relevant compounds of Salinispora actinobacteria isolated from Great Barrier Reef marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Yi Kai; Hewavitharana, Amitha K; Webb, Richard; Shaw, P Nicholas; Fuerst, John A

    2013-04-01

    The developmental cycle of the obligate marine antibiotic producer actinobacterium Salinispora arenicola isolated from a Great Barrier Reef marine sponge was investigated in relation to mycelium and spore ultrastructure, synthesis of rifamycin antibiotic compounds, and expression of genes correlated with spore formation and with rifamycin precursor synthesis. The developmental cycle of S. arenicola M413 on solid agar medium was characterized by substrate mycelium growth, change of colony color, and spore formation; spore formation occurred quite early in colony growth but development of black colonies occurred only at late stages, correlated with a change in spore maturity in relation to cell wall layers. Rifamycins were detected throughout the growth cycle, but changed in relative quantity at particular phases in the cycle, with a marked increase after 32 days. Expression of the spore division gene ssgA and the rifK gene for 3-amino-5-hydroxybenzoate synthase responsible for rifamycin precursor synthesis was seen even at early stages of the growth cycle. ssgA expression significantly increased between days 26 and 31, but rifK expression effectively remained constant throughout the growth cycle, consistent with the early synthesis of rifamycin. Factors other than precursor synthesis may be responsible for an observed late increase in rifamycin production. A useful approach for measuring and exploring the regulation of antibiotic synthesis and gene expression in the marine natural product producer S. arenicola has been established.

  12. Protease inhibitors from marine actinobacteria as a potential source for antimalarial compound.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Karthik

    Full Text Available The study was planned to screen the marine actinobacterial extract for the protease inhibitor activity and its anti- Pf activity under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Out of 100 isolates, only 3 isolates exhibited moderate to high protease inhibitor activities on trypsin, chymotrypsin and proteinase K. Based on protease inhibitor activity 3 isolates were chosen for further studies. The potential isolate was characterized by polyphasic approach and identified as Streptomyces sp LK3 (JF710608. The lead compound was identified as peptide from Streptomyces sp LK3. The double-reciprocal plot displayed inhibition mode is non-competitive and it confirms the irreversible nature of protease inhibitor. The peptide from Streptomyces sp LK3 extract showed significant anti plasmodial activity (IC50: 25.78 µg/ml. In in vivo model, the highest level of parasitemia suppression (≈ 45% was observed in 600 mg/kg of the peptide. These analyses revealed no significant changes were observed in the spleen and liver tissue during 8 dpi. The results confirmed up-regulation of TGF-β and down regulation of TNF-α in tissue and serum level in PbA infected peptide treated mice compared to PbA infection. The results obtained infer that the peptide possesses anti- Pf activity activity. It suggests that the extracts have novel metabolites and could be considered as a potential source for drug development.

  13. Biological Significance of Marine Actinobacteria of East Coast of Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, Alapati; Savithri, Handanahal S

    2017-01-01

    An attempt was made to identify actinobacterial strains present in the marine soil of East Coast regions viz., Chirala, Bapatla, and Peddaganjam, Andhra Pradesh; Kanyakumari, Tamil Nadu and Goa, Goa along with the study of their antimicrobial potential. Eight out of 73 actinobacterial strains isolated from these regions showed strong antimicrobial activity against Gram positive bacteria, Gram negative bacteria, and Candida albicans. Molecular identification (16S rRNA analysis) of the eight strains revealed that they belong to Dietzia sp., Kocuria sp., Nocardiopsis sp., and Streptomyces spp. ISP (International Streptomyces project) -1, ISP-2 and starch casein media supported high antimicrobial potential after 5-6 days of growth. Production of antimicrobials by the strains varied significantly with different carbon and nitrogen sources. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) analysis of volatile compounds produced by the strains illustrated an array of antimicrobial compounds such as 1, 2-benzene dicarboxylic acid, 2-piperidinone, pyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrazine-1,4-dion, phenyl ethyl alcohol, 3-phenyl propionic acid etc. Ours is the first report on the study and detection of above mentioned antimicrobial metabolites from Dietzia sp. (A3), Kocuria sp. (A5), and Nocardiopsis sp. (A7). By sequence based analysis for secondary metabolites, non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster was noticed in six strains (A2, A3, A4, A6, A7, and A8) and none of them had polyketide synthase (PKS) system. The present study intimates the biological potentiality of the actinobacterial strains isolated from East Coast of Andhra Pradesh, India which reveals further scope to investigate new bioactive compounds from them by employing both natural product chemistry and modern biotechnological aspects.

  14. Biological Significance of Marine Actinobacteria of East Coast of Andhra Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alapati Kavitha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available An attempt was made to identify actinobacterial strains present in the marine soil of East Coast regions viz., Chirala, Bapatla, and Peddaganjam, Andhra Pradesh; Kanyakumari, Tamil Nadu and Goa, Goa along with the study of their antimicrobial potential. Eight out of 73 actinobacterial strains isolated from these regions showed strong antimicrobial activity against Gram positive bacteria, Gram negative bacteria, and Candida albicans. Molecular identification (16S rRNA analysis of the eight strains revealed that they belong to Dietzia sp., Kocuria sp., Nocardiopsis sp., and Streptomyces spp. ISP (International Streptomyces project -1, ISP-2 and starch casein media supported high antimicrobial potential after 5–6 days of growth. Production of antimicrobials by the strains varied significantly with different carbon and nitrogen sources. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS analysis of volatile compounds produced by the strains illustrated an array of antimicrobial compounds such as 1, 2-benzene dicarboxylic acid, 2-piperidinone, pyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrazine-1,4-dion, phenyl ethyl alcohol, 3-phenyl propionic acid etc. Ours is the first report on the study and detection of above mentioned antimicrobial metabolites from Dietzia sp. (A3, Kocuria sp. (A5, and Nocardiopsis sp. (A7. By sequence based analysis for secondary metabolites, non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS gene cluster was noticed in six strains (A2, A3, A4, A6, A7, and A8 and none of them had polyketide synthase (PKS system. The present study intimates the biological potentiality of the actinobacterial strains isolated from East Coast of Andhra Pradesh, India which reveals further scope to investigate new bioactive compounds from them by employing both natural product chemistry and modern biotechnological aspects.

  15. Protease inhibitors from marine actinobacteria as a potential source for antimalarial compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, L; Kumar, Gaurav; Keswani, Tarun; Bhattacharyya, Arindam; Chandar, S Sarath; Bhaskara Rao, K V

    2014-01-01

    The study was planned to screen the marine actinobacterial extract for the protease inhibitor activity and its anti- Pf activity under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Out of 100 isolates, only 3 isolates exhibited moderate to high protease inhibitor activities on trypsin, chymotrypsin and proteinase K. Based on protease inhibitor activity 3 isolates were chosen for further studies. The potential isolate was characterized by polyphasic approach and identified as Streptomyces sp LK3 (JF710608). The lead compound was identified as peptide from Streptomyces sp LK3. The double-reciprocal plot displayed inhibition mode is non-competitive and it confirms the irreversible nature of protease inhibitor. The peptide from Streptomyces sp LK3 extract showed significant anti plasmodial activity (IC50: 25.78 µg/ml). In in vivo model, the highest level of parasitemia suppression (≈ 45%) was observed in 600 mg/kg of the peptide. These analyses revealed no significant changes were observed in the spleen and liver tissue during 8 dpi. The results confirmed up-regulation of TGF-β and down regulation of TNF-α in tissue and serum level in PbA infected peptide treated mice compared to PbA infection. The results obtained infer that the peptide possesses anti- Pf activity activity. It suggests that the extracts have novel metabolites and could be considered as a potential source for drug development.

  16. Bacterial natural products : Prediction, regulation and characterization of biosynthetic gene clusters in Actinobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceniceros, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Secondary metabolites are produced by many microbes. They are not essential for life, but may provide a competitive advantage in the natural environment. Antibiotics are an important example, crucial agents in the human health system, widely used to combat infectious diseases. In view of the emergen

  17. Evaluating the role of Actinobacteria in the gut of wood-feeding termites (Reticulitermes spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel A. Arango; Frederick Green III; Vina W. Yang; Joliene R. Lindholm; Nathaniel P. Chotlos; Kenneth F. Raffa

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen has been shown to be a limiting nutrient across a range of xylophagous insects. These insects often rely on symbiotic microorganisms in the gut for nitrogen acquisition, via fixation of atmospheric nitrogen or break down of other available nitrogenous substances. In phylogenetically lower, wood-feeding termites, the role of nitrogen fixing bacteria has been...

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Gordonia sp. Strain UCD-TK1 (Phylum Actinobacteria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenigsaecker, Tynisha M.; Coil, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of Gordonia sp. strain UCD-TK1. The assembly contains 5,470,576 bp in 98 contigs. This strain was isolated from a disinfected ambulatory surgery center. PMID:27738036

  19. Mycelial actinobacteria in salt-affected soils of arid territories of Ukraine and Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishko, V. N.; Syshchikova, O. V.; Zenova, G. M.; Kozhevin, P. A.; Dubrova, M. S.; Lubsanova, D. A.; Chernov, I. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    A high population density (up to hundreds of thousands or millions CFU/g soil) of mycelial bacteria (actinomycetes) is determined in salt-affected soils of arid territories of Ukraine, Russia, and Turkmenistan. Of all the studied soils, the lowest amounts of actinomycetes (thousands and tens of thousands CFU/g soil) are isolated from sor (playa) and soda solonchaks developed on the bottoms of drying salt lakes in Buryatia and in the Amu Darya Delta. Actinomycetes of the Streptomyces, Micromonospora, and Nocardiopsis genera were recorded in the studied soils. It is found that conditions of preincubation greatly affect the activity of substrate consumption by the cultures of actinomycetes. This could be attributed to changes in the metabolism of actinomycetes as a mechanism of their adaptation to the increased osmotic pressure of the medium. The alkali tolerance of halotolerant actinomycetes isolated from the salt-affected soils is experimentally proved.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Curtobacterium sp. Strain UCD-KPL2560 (Phylum Actinobacteria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Brian A.; Faller, Lina L.; Jospin, Guillaume; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Coil, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the actinobacterium Curtobacterium sp. strain UCD-KPL2560, which was isolated from the running surface of an indoor track field house in Medford, MA, USA (42.409716°N, -71.115169°W). The genome assembly contains 3,480,487 bp in 156 contigs.

  1. Bacterial natural products : Prediction, regulation and characterization of biosynthetic gene clusters in Actinobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceniceros, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Secondary metabolites are produced by many microbes. They are not essential for life, but may provide a competitive advantage in the natural environment. Antibiotics are an important example, crucial agents in the human health system, widely used to combat infectious diseases. In view of the

  2. Bioprospecting from Marine Sediments of New Brunswick, Canada: Exploring the Relationship between Total Bacterial Diversity and Actinobacteria Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Duncan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Actinomycetes are an important resource for the discovery of natural products with therapeutic properties. Bioprospecting for actinomycetes typically proceeds without a priori knowledge of the bacterial diversity present in sampled habitats. In this study, we endeavored to determine if overall bacterial diversity in marine sediments, as determined by 16S rDNA amplicon pyrosequencing, could be correlated with culturable actinomycete diversity, and thus serve as a powerful tool in guiding future bioprospecting efforts. Overall bacterial diversity was investigated in eight marine sediments from four sites in New Brunswick, Canada, resulting in over 44,000 high quality sequences (x̄ = 5610 per sample. Analysis revealed all sites exhibited significant diversity (H’ = 5.4 to 6.7. Furthermore, statistical analysis of species level bacterial communities (D = 0.03 indicated community composition varied according to site and was strongly influenced by sediment physiochemical composition. In contrast, cultured actinomycetes (n = 466, 98.3% Streptomyces were ubiquitously distributed among all sites and distribution was not influenced by sediment composition, suggesting that the biogeography of culturable actinomycetes does not correlate with overall bacterial diversity in the samples examined. These actinomycetes provide a resource for future secondary metabolite discovery, as exemplified by the antimicrobial activity observed from preliminary investigation.

  3. Bioprospecting from marine sediments of New Brunswick, Canada: exploring the relationship between total bacterial diversity and actinobacteria diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Katherine; Haltli, Bradley; Gill, Krista A; Kerr, Russell G

    2014-02-13

    Actinomycetes are an important resource for the discovery of natural products with therapeutic properties. Bioprospecting for actinomycetes typically proceeds without a priori knowledge of the bacterial diversity present in sampled habitats. In this study, we endeavored to determine if overall bacterial diversity in marine sediments, as determined by 16S rDNA amplicon pyrosequencing, could be correlated with culturable actinomycete diversity, and thus serve as a powerful tool in guiding future bioprospecting efforts. Overall bacterial diversity was investigated in eight marine sediments from four sites in New Brunswick, Canada, resulting in over 44,000 high quality sequences (x = 5610 per sample). Analysis revealed all sites exhibited significant diversity (H' = 5.4 to 6.7). Furthermore, statistical analysis of species level bacterial communities (D = 0.03) indicated community composition varied according to site and was strongly influenced by sediment physiochemical composition. In contrast, cultured actinomycetes (n = 466, 98.3% Streptomyces) were ubiquitously distributed among all sites and distribution was not influenced by sediment composition, suggesting that the biogeography of culturable actinomycetes does not correlate with overall bacterial diversity in the samples examined. These actinomycetes provide a resource for future secondary metabolite discovery, as exemplified by the antimicrobial activity observed from preliminary investigation.

  4. Production of N-acyl homoserine lactones by the sponge-associated marine actinobacteria Salinispora arenicola and Salinispora pacifica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Utpal; Ortori, Catharine A; Sarmad, Sarir; Barrett, David A; Hewavitharana, Amitha K; Hodson, Mark P; Fuerst, John A; Shaw, P Nicholas; Boden, Rich

    2017-01-01

    The structures of acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) compounds and their quantification were accomplished using an integrated liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry approach. The precursor and product ions, along with retention times of peaks, were searched against an in-house database of AHLs and structures confirmed by accurate mass and by comparison with authentic AHL standards. The two compounds, N-(3-oxodecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone and N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone, were characterised and quantified in Salinispora sp. cultures. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. USE OF AGRICULTURAL WASTES FOR BIOMASS PRODUCTION OF THE PLANT GROWTH PROMOTER ACTINOBACTERIA, Streptomyces sp. MCR26

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Ávila-Cortes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of agricultural wastes for plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR biomass production has not been widely explored. This study focuses on the development a culture medium for PGPR Streptomyces sp. MCR26, evaluating the influence of carnation harvest waste, yeast extract and ammonium sulfate on biomass production, as well as, the effect of biomass produced in the designed culture medium on the maintenance of PGPR MCR26 traits. The experiments were conducted by a full factorial design, varying nutritional sources concentrations, with duplicate experiments at the central point. Yeast extract and carnation harvest waste were the most influential factors, showing a positive effect on biomass production. The statistical model predicted optimal conditions for maximal biomass production at 20.0 g/L carnation harvest waste and 4.0 g/L yeast extract. Shake flask validation experiments resulted in 8.087 g/L of MCR26 biomass, 80.6% higher compared to carboxymetil cellulose (CMC broth. MCR26 biomass produced on designed culture medium enhanced hydroxamate production, and maintained phosphatases and indole-3-acetic acid synthesis. In addition, white clover inoculated plants presented higher shoot biomass accumulation compared to control treatment; nevertheless, there were no effects on seed germination. These results demonstrated that the designed culture medium effectively induced Streptomyces sp. MCR26 biomass production and maintained its plant growth promotion traits.

  6. The soil and plant determinants of community structures of the dominant actinobacteria in Marion Island terrestrial habitats, Sub-Antarctica

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sanyika, TW

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available and to identify their determinant soil and plant characteristics. Using the 16S rRNA gene, the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis patterns and clone library diversity were correlated with the soil and plant characteristics. Multivariate statistical methods...

  7. Actinobacteria from Termite Mounds Show Antiviral Activity against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus, a Surrogate Model for Hepatitis C Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Aiello Padilla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracts from termite-associated bacteria were evaluated for in vitro antiviral activity against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV. Two bacterial strains were identified as active, with percentages of inhibition (IP equal to 98%. Both strains were subjected to functional analysis via the addition of virus and extract at different time points in cell culture; the results showed that they were effective as posttreatments. Moreover, we performed MTT colorimetric assays to identify the CC50, IC50, and SI values of these strains, and strain CDPA27 was considered the most promising. In parallel, the isolates were identified as Streptomyces through 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Specifically, CDPA27 was identified as S. chartreusis. The CDPA27 extract was fractionated on a C18-E SPE cartridge, and the fractions were reevaluated. A 100% methanol fraction was identified to contain the compound(s responsible for antiviral activity, which had an SI of 262.41. GC-MS analysis showed that this activity was likely associated with the compound(s that had a peak retention time of 5 min. Taken together, the results of the present study provide new information for antiviral research using natural sources, demonstrate the antiviral potential of Streptomyces chartreusis compounds isolated from termite mounds against BVDV, and lay the foundation for further studies on the treatment of HCV infection.

  8. Evidence of α-, β- and γ-HCH mixture aerobic degradation by the native actinobacteria Streptomyces sp. M7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sineli, P E; Tortella, G; Dávila Costa, J S; Benimeli, C S; Cuozzo, S A

    2016-05-01

    The organochlorine insecticide γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH, lindane) and its non-insecticidal α- and β-isomers continue to pose serious environmental and health concerns, although their use has been restricted or completely banned for decades. In this study we report the first evidence of the growth ability of a Streptomyces strain in a mineral salt medium containing high doses of α- and β-HCH (16.6 mg l(-1)) as a carbon source. Degradation of HCH isomers by Streptomyces sp. M7 was investigated after 1, 4, and 7 days of incubation, determining chloride ion release, and residues in the supernatants by GC with µECD detection. The results show that both the α- and β-HCH isomers were effectively metabolized by Streptomyces sp. M7, with 80 and 78 % degradation respectively, after 7 days of incubation. Moreover, pentachlorocyclohexenes and tetrachlorocyclohexenes were detected as metabolites. In addition, the formation of possible persistent compounds such as chlorobenzenes and chlorophenols were studied by GC-MS, while no phenolic compounds were detected. In conclusion, we have demonstrated for the first time that Streptomyces sp. M7 can degrade α- and β-isomers individually or combined with γ-HCH and could be considered as a potential agent for bioremediation of environments contaminated by organochlorine isomers.

  9. Partial Purification and Characterization of a Heat Stable α-Amylase from a Thermophilic Actinobacteria, Streptomyces sp. MSC702

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A partial purification and biochemical characterization of the α-amylase from Streptomyces sp. MSC702 were carried out in this study. The optimum operational conditions for enzyme substrate reaction for amylolytic enzyme activity from the strain were evaluated. The optimum pH, temperature, and incubation period for assaying the enzyme were observed to be 5.0, 55°C, and 30 min, respectively. The extracellular extract was concentrated using ammonium sulfate precipitation. It was stable in the presence of metal ions (5 mM such as K+, Co2+, and Mo2+, whereas Pb2+, Mn2+, Mg2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Ba2+, Ca2+, Hg2+, Sn2+, Cr3+, Al3+, Ag+, and Fe2+ were found to have inhibitory effects. The enzyme activity was also unstable in the presence of 1% Triton X-100, 1% Tween 80, 5 mM sodium lauryl sulphate, 1% glycerol, 5 mM EDTA, and 5 mM denaturant urea. At temperature 60°C and pH 5.0, the enzyme stability was maximum. α-amylase retained 100% and 34.18% stability for 1 h and 4 h, respectively, at 60°C (pH 7.0. The enzyme exhibited a half-life of 195 min at 60°C temperature. The analysis of kinetic showed that the enzyme has Km of 2.4 mg/mL and Vmax of 21853.0 μmol/min/mg for soluble potato starch. The results indicate that the enzyme reflects their potentiality towards industrial utilization.

  10. -Genomic data mining of the marine actinobacteria Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 unveils insights into multi-stress related genes and metabolic pathways involved in antimicrobial synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undabarrena, Agustina; Ugalde, Juan A; Seeger, Michael; Cámara, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 is an actinobacterial strain isolated from marine sediments of a Chilean Patagonian fjord. Morphological characterization together with antibacterial activity was assessed in various culture media, revealing a carbon-source dependent activity mainly against Gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus and L. monocytogenes). Genome mining of this antibacterial-producing bacterium revealed the presence of 26 biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) for secondary metabolites, where among them, 81% have low similarities with known BGCs. In addition, a genomic search in Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 unveiled the presence of a wide variety of genetic determinants related to heavy metal resistance (49 genes), oxidative stress (69 genes) and antibiotic resistance (97 genes). This study revealed that the marine-derived Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 bacterium has the capability to tolerate a diverse set of heavy metals such as copper, cobalt, mercury, chromate and nickel; as well as the highly toxic tellurite, a feature first time described for Streptomyces. In addition, Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 possesses a major resistance towards oxidative stress, in comparison to the soil reference strain Streptomyces violaceoruber A3(2). Moreover, Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 showed resistance to 88% of the antibiotics tested, indicating overall, a strong response to several abiotic stressors. The combination of these biological traits confirms the metabolic versatility of Streptomyces sp. H-KF8, a genetically well-prepared microorganism with the ability to confront the dynamics of the fjord-unique marine environment.

  11. Estudio de comunidades bacterianas naturales: diferenciación de las actinobacterias mediante electroforesis en doble gel en gradiente de desnaturalización (DDGGE)

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz Martínez, Alberto

    2005-01-01

    El primer objetivo, en esta Tesis, es la optimización de las condiciones a emplear para el estudio de comunidades bacterianas naturales. Esto se conseguirá mejorando los gradientes empleados en los geles en condiciones desnaturalizantes. En lo referente a la optimización de los gradientes, hay que tener en cuenta que en las muestras naturales las comunidades presentes son heterogéneas, lo que hace necesaria una optimización de los gradientes de desnaturalización, con el fin de mejorar la sepa...

  12. ­Genomic data mining of the marine actinobacteria Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 unveils insights into multi-stress related genes and metabolic pathways involved in antimicrobial synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustina Undabarrena

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 is an actinobacterial strain isolated from marine sediments of a Chilean Patagonian fjord. Morphological characterization together with antibacterial activity was assessed in various culture media, revealing a carbon-source dependent activity mainly against Gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus and L. monocytogenes. Genome mining of this antibacterial-producing bacterium revealed the presence of 26 biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs for secondary metabolites, where among them, 81% have low similarities with known BGCs. In addition, a genomic search in Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 unveiled the presence of a wide variety of genetic determinants related to heavy metal resistance (49 genes, oxidative stress (69 genes and antibiotic resistance (97 genes. This study revealed that the marine-derived Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 bacterium has the capability to tolerate a diverse set of heavy metals such as copper, cobalt, mercury, chromate and nickel; as well as the highly toxic tellurite, a feature first time described for Streptomyces. In addition, Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 possesses a major resistance towards oxidative stress, in comparison to the soil reference strain Streptomyces violaceoruber A3(2. Moreover, Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 showed resistance to 88% of the antibiotics tested, indicating overall, a strong response to several abiotic stressors. The combination of these biological traits confirms the metabolic versatility of Streptomyces sp. H-KF8, a genetically well-prepared microorganism with the ability to confront the dynamics of the fjord-unique marine environment.

  13. ­Genomic data mining of the marine actinobacteria Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 unveils insights into multi-stress related genes and metabolic pathways involved in antimicrobial synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undabarrena, Agustina; Ugalde, Juan A.; Seeger, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 is an actinobacterial strain isolated from marine sediments of a Chilean Patagonian fjord. Morphological characterization together with antibacterial activity was assessed in various culture media, revealing a carbon-source dependent activity mainly against Gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus and L. monocytogenes). Genome mining of this antibacterial-producing bacterium revealed the presence of 26 biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) for secondary metabolites, where among them, 81% have low similarities with known BGCs. In addition, a genomic search in Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 unveiled the presence of a wide variety of genetic determinants related to heavy metal resistance (49 genes), oxidative stress (69 genes) and antibiotic resistance (97 genes). This study revealed that the marine-derived Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 bacterium has the capability to tolerate a diverse set of heavy metals such as copper, cobalt, mercury, chromate and nickel; as well as the highly toxic tellurite, a feature first time described for Streptomyces. In addition, Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 possesses a major resistance towards oxidative stress, in comparison to the soil reference strain Streptomyces violaceoruber A3(2). Moreover, Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 showed resistance to 88% of the antibiotics tested, indicating overall, a strong response to several abiotic stressors. The combination of these biological traits confirms the metabolic versatility of Streptomyces sp. H-KF8, a genetically well-prepared microorganism with the ability to confront the dynamics of the fjord-unique marine environment. PMID:28229018

  14. [Advance in marine actinobacterial research--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xinpeng; Zhang, Si; Li, Wenjun

    2011-02-01

    The research on marine actinobacteria has worldwide interest because of their potential to produce special and new metabolites. Based on the research history of marine actinobacteria, we reviewed the research progress, conception, bio-resources and diversity,secondary metabolites, ecological function, genomics of marine actinobacteria and finally introduced the status of marine actinobacterial research in China.

  15. Genetic diversity of siderophore-producing bacteria of tobacco rhizosphere

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fang Tian; Yanqin Ding; Hui Zhu; Liangtong Yao; Binghai Du

    2009-01-01

    ... ?-, ?-, ?-Proteobacteria, Sphingobacteria, Bacilli,and Actinobacteria. Especially, ?-Proteobacteria consisting of Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Serratia, Pantoea, Erwinia and Stenotrophomonasgenus encountered 18 different ARDRA groups...

  16. Structure, Function and Diversity of the Healthy Human Microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    universal on the skin and present in 93% of nares samples, and at the opposite extreme Pseudomonas aeruginosa (a representative Gram - negative skin pathogen...ra y– C ur tis ) Actinobacteria|Actinobacteria Bacteroidetes|Bacteroidia Firmicutes| Bacilli Firmicutes|Negativicutes Proteobacteria|Gammaproteobacteria

  17. Toxicity of Bioactive and Probiotic Marine Bacteria and Their Secondary Metabolites in Artemia sp. and Caenorhabditis elegans as Eukaryotic Model Organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neu, Anna; Månsson, Maria; Gram, Lone

    2014-01-01

    We have previously reported that some strains belonging to the marine Actinobacteria class, the Pseudoalteromonas genus, the Roseobacter clade, and the Photobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae families produce both antibacterial and antivirulence compounds, and these organisms are interesting from......-producing Roseobacter bacteria as a promising group to be used as probiotics in aquaculture, whereas Actinobacteria, Pseudoalteromonas, Photobacteriaceae, and Vibrionaceae should be used with caution....

  18. Speleothem and biofilm formation in a granite/dolerite cave, Northern Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sallstedt, T.; Ivarsson, M.; Lundberg, J.

    2014-01-01

    incorporated remains of microorganisms. Two types of microbial communities can be distinguished associated with the speleothems: an Actinobacteria-like biofilm and a fungal community. Actinobacteria seem to play an important role in the formation of speleothem while the fungal community acts as both...... a constructive and a destructive agent. A modern biofilm dominated by Actinobacteria is present in the speleothem-free parts of the dolerite and located in cave ceiling cracks. These biofilms may represent sites of early speleothem formation. Because of its unusual position in between two types of host rock...

  19. Production and purification of a bioactive substance against multi-drug resistant human pathogens from the marine-sponge-derived Salinispora sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyendra Singh

    2014-10-01

    Conclusions: The present study reported the rifamycin W from sponge-associated Salinispora sp. and it exhibited appreciable antibacterial activity against multi-drug resistant human pathogens which indicated that sponge-associated Actinobacteria are significant sources of bioactive metabolites.

  20. Preliminary assessment of insecticidal activity of Moroccan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    2015-03-11

    Mar 11, 2015 ... capitata, and the most important pupation reduction was obtained for isolates 37 ... Key words: Moroccan actinobacteria, insecticidal activity, biological screening, ..... extracts against culex tritaeniorhynchus and culex gelidus.

  1. The Steroid Catabolic Pathway of the Intracellular Pathogen Rhodococcus equi Is Important for Pathogenesis and a Target for Vaccine Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geize, R.; Grommen, A. W. F.; Hessels, G. I.; Jacobs, A. A. C.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    Rhodococcus equi causes fatal pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals and immunocompromised animals and humans. Despite its importance, there is currently no effective vaccine against the disease. The actinobacteria R. equi and the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis are related, and both cause

  2. Cloning, overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of 3-ketosteroid Delta(4)-(5 alpha)-dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosterwijk, Niels; Knol, Jan; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; van der Geize, Robert; Dijkstra, Bauke

    2011-01-01

    3-Ketosteroid dehydrogenases are flavoproteins which play key roles in steroid ring degradation. The enzymes are abundantly present in actinobacteria, including the catabolic powerhouse Rhodococcus jostii and the pathogenic species R. equi and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The gene for 3-ketosteroid

  3. The vaginal microbiome is stable in prepubertal and sexually mature Ellegaard Göttingen Minipigs throughout an estrous cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Emma; Kudirkiene, Egle; Gutman, Nicole;

    2015-01-01

    in prepubertal and sexually mature Göttingen Minipigs during an estrous cycle. The dominating phyla in the vaginal microbiota consisted of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteriodetes and Tenericutes. The most abundant bacterial families were Enterobacteriaceae, unclassified families from...

  4. New Abundant Microbial Groups in Aquatic Hypersaline Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Ghai, Rohit; Pašić, Lejla; Fernández González, Ana Beatriz; Martín Cuadrado, Ana Belén; Megumi Mizuno, Carolina; McMahon, Katherine D.; Papke, R Thane; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Rodríguez Brito, Beltrán; Rohwer, Forest; Sánchez-Porro Álvarez, Cristina; Ventosa Ucero, Antonio; Rodríguez Valera, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    We describe the microbiota of two hypersaline saltern ponds, one of intermediate salinity (19%) and a NaCl saturated crystallizer pond (37%) using pyrosequencing. The analyses of these metagenomes (nearly 784 Mb) reaffirmed the vast dominance of Haloquadratum walsbyi but also revealed novel, abundant and previously unsuspected microbial groups. We describe for the first time, a group of low GC Actinobacteria, related to freshwater Actinobacteria, abundant in low and intermediate salinities. M...

  5. The Role of Symbiont Genetic Distance and Potential Adaptability in Host Preference Towards Pseudonocardia Symbionts in Acromyrmex Leaf-Cutting Ants

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas-Poulsen, Michael; Maynard, Janielle; Roland, Damien L; Currie, Cameron R

    2011-01-01

    Fungus-growing ants display symbiont preference in behavioral assays, both towards the fungus they cultivate for food and Actinobacteria they maintain on their cuticle for antibiotic production against parasites. These Actinobacteria, genus Pseudonocardia Henssen (Pseudonocardiacea: Actinomycetales), help defend the ants’ fungal mutualist from specialized parasites. In Acromyrmex Mayr (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) leaf-cutting ants, individual colonies maintain either a single or a few strains of...

  6. Association between Pseudonocardia symbionts and Atta leaf-cutting ants suggested by improved isolation methods

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, Sarah E.; Poulsen, Michael; Gorosito, Norma B.; Pinto-Tomás, Adrián; Masiulionis, Virginia E. [UNESP; Currie, Cameron R

    2013-01-01

    Fungus-growing ants associate with multiple symbiotic microbes, including Actinobacteria for production of antibiotics. The best studied of these bacteria are within the genus Pseudonocardia, which in most fungus-growing ants are conspicuously visible on the external cuticle of workers. However, given that fungus-growing ants in the genus Atta do not carry visible Actinobacteria on their cuticle, it is unclear if this genus engages in the symbiosis with Pseudonocardia. Here we explore whether...

  7. Actinobacterial Diversity in Volcanic Caves and Associated Geomicrobiological Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, Cristina; Marshall Hathaway, Jennifer J; Enes Dapkevicius, Maria de L N; Miller, Ana Z; Kooser, Ara; Northup, Diana E; Jurado, Valme; Fernandez, Octavio; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Cheeptham, Naowarat

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic caves are filled with colorful microbial mats on the walls and ceilings. These volcanic caves are found worldwide, and studies are finding vast bacteria diversity within these caves. One group of bacteria that can be abundant in volcanic caves, as well as other caves, is Actinobacteria. As Actinobacteria are valued for their ability to produce a variety of secondary metabolites, rare and novel Actinobacteria are being sought in underexplored environments. The abundance of novel Actinobacteria in volcanic caves makes this environment an excellent location to study these bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) from several volcanic caves worldwide revealed diversity in the morphologies present. Spores, coccoid, and filamentous cells, many with hair-like or knobby extensions, were some of the microbial structures observed within the microbial mat samples. In addition, the SEM study pointed out that these features figure prominently in both constructive and destructive mineral processes. To further investigate this diversity, we conducted both Sanger sequencing and 454 pyrosequencing of the Actinobacteria in volcanic caves from four locations, two islands in the Azores, Portugal, and Hawai'i and New Mexico, USA. This comparison represents one of the largest sequencing efforts of Actinobacteria in volcanic caves to date. The diversity was shown to be dominated by Actinomycetales, but also included several newly described orders, such as Euzebyales, and Gaiellales. Sixty-two percent of the clones from the four locations shared less than 97% similarity to known sequences, and nearly 71% of the clones were singletons, supporting the commonly held belief that volcanic caves are an untapped resource for novel and rare Actinobacteria. The amplicon libraries depicted a wider view of the microbial diversity in Azorean volcanic caves revealing three additional orders, Rubrobacterales, Solirubrobacterales, and Coriobacteriales. Studies of microbial ecology in

  8. Western bats as a reservoir of novel Streptomyces species with antifungal activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Paris S.; Caimi, Nicole A.; Northup, Diana E.; Valdez, Ernest W.; Buecher, Debbie C.; Dunlap, Christopher A.; Labeda, David P.; Lueschow, Shiloh; Porras-Alfaro, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    At least two-thirds of commercial antibiotics today are derived from Actinobacteria, more specifically from the genus Streptomyces. Antibiotic resistance and new emerging diseases pose great challenges in the field of microbiology. Cave systems, in which actinobacteria are ubiquitous and abundant, represent new opportunities for the discovery of novel bacterial species and the study of their interactions with emergent pathogens. White-nose syndrome is an invasive bat disease caused by the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans, which has killed more than six million bats in the last 7 years. In this study, we isolated naturally occurring actinobacteria from white-nose syndrome (WNS)-free bats from five cave systems and surface locations in the vicinity in New Mexico and Arizona, USA. We sequenced the 16S rRNA region and tested 632 isolates from 12 different bat species using a bilayer plate method to evaluate antifungal activity. Thirty-six actinobacteria inhibited or stopped the growth of P. destructans, with 32 (88.9%) actinobacteria belonging to the genus Streptomyces. Isolates in the genera Rhodococcus, Streptosporangium, Luteipulveratus, and Nocardiopsis also showed inhibition. Twenty-five of the isolates with antifungal activity against P. destructans represent 15 novel Streptomyces spp. based on multilocus sequence analysis. Our results suggest that bats in western North America caves possess novel bacterial microbiota with the potential to inhibit P. destructans.

  9. Bacterial community composition and chitinase gene diversity of vermicompost with antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasir, Muhammad; Aslam, Zubair; Kim, Seon Won; Lee, Seon-Woo; Jeon, Che Ok; Chung, Young Ryun

    2009-10-01

    Bacterial communities and chitinase gene diversity of vermicompost (VC) were investigated to clarify the influence of earthworms on the inhibition of plant pathogenic fungi in VC. The spore germination of Fusarium moniliforme was reduced in VC aqueous extracts prepared from paper sludge and dairy sludge (fresh sludge, FS). The bacterial communities were examined by culture-dependent and -independent analyses. Unique clones selected from 16S rRNA libraries of FS and VC on the basis of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) fell into the major lineages of the domain bacteria Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. Among culture isolates, Actinobacteria dominated in VC, while almost equal numbers of Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria were present in FS. Analysis of chitinolytic isolates and chitinase gene diversity revealed that chitinolytic bacterial communities were enriched in VC. Populations of bacteria that inhibited plant fungal pathogens were higher in VC than in FS and particularly chitinolytic isolates were most active against the target fungi.

  10. Phylogenetic diversity of culturable bacteria in surface seawater from the Drake Passage, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhao; Xing, Mengxin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Dan; Zhu, Jiancheng; Sun, Mi

    2016-09-01

    The Drake Passage is located between the Antarctic Peninsula and Tierra del Fuego in the south of South America. Surface seawater samples were collected at seven sites in the Drake Passage during the austral summer of 2012. The 16S rRNA sequences were analyzed from 187 isolated bacterial strains. Three phyla, 29 genera and 56 species were identified. The three phyla were Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria; the Proteobacteria included α-Proteobacteria, β-Proteobacteria and γ-Proteobacteria. γ-Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes were the dominant class or phyla in terms of quantity and species. Gram-positive bacteria (Actinobacteria and Firmicutes) accounted for 57.8% of all types identified. There were nine dominant genera, including Curtobacterium, Staphylococcus, and Halomonas, and 14 dominant species including Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens, Curtobacterium pusillum, and Staphylococcus sciuri. Of the strains identified, 87.2% were catalase positive or weakly positive.

  11. The gastric caeca of pentatomids as a house for actinomycetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zucchi Tiago D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbes are extensively associated with insects, playing key roles in insect defense, nutrition and reproduction. Most of the associations reported involve Proteobacteria. Despite the fact that Actinobacteria associated with insects were shown to produce antibiotic barriers against pathogens to the hosts or to their food and nutrients, there are few studies focusing on their association with insects. Thus, we surveyed the Actinobacteria diversity on a specific region of the midgut of seven species of stinkbugs (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae known to carry a diversity of symbiotically-associated Proteobacteria. Results A total of 34 phylotypes were placed in 11 different Actinobacteria families. Dichelops melacanthus held the highest diversity with six actinobacteria families represented by nine phylotypes. Thyanta perditor (n = 7, Edessa meditabunda (n = 5, Loxa deducta (n = 4 and Pellaea stictica (n = 3 were all associated with three families. Piezodorus guildini (n = 3 and Nezara viridula (n = 3 had the lowest diversity, being associated with two (Propionibacteriaceae and Mycobacteriaceae and one (Streptomyceataceae families, respectively. Corynebacteriaceae and Mycobacteriaceae were the most common families with phylotypes from three different insect species each one. Conclusions Many phylotypes shared a low 16S rRNA gene similarity with their closest type strains and formed new phyletic lines on the periphery of several genera. This is a strong indicative that stinkbug caeca can harbor new species of actinobacteria, which might be derived from specific associations with the species of stinkbugs studied. Although the well-known role of actinobacteria as a source of biomolecules, the ecological features of these symbionts on the stinkbugs biology remain unknown.

  12. Diversity of microorganisms in decaying maize stalks revealed by a molecular method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Xia; Zhang, Han-Bo

    2007-08-01

    Microbial diversity in decaying maize stalk was characterized by constructing and analyzing rRNA gene clone library. Total 47 OTUs were obtained from 82 bacterial clones, including Proteobacteria (64.6%), Actinobacteria (30.5%), Bacteroidetes (2.4%) and Firmicutes (2.4%). Most proteobacterial clones were members of Rhizobium, Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas. Eighty-four percent of Actinobacteria was related to Microbacterium. Only 14 OTUs were identified from 124 fungal clones, including Ascomycota (88%) and Basidiomycota (12%). Sixty percent of Ascomycota were members of Eupenicillium and Paecilomyces but all Basidiomycota were close to Kurtzmanomyces nectairei.

  13. Dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes from antibiotic producers to pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Xinglin; Ellabaan, Mostafa M Hashim; Charusanti, Pep

    2017-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that some antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) found in pathogenic bacteria derive from antibiotic-producing actinobacteria. Here we provide bioinformatic and experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis. We identify genes in proteobacteria, including some pathogens......, that appear to be closely related to actinobacterial ARGs known to confer resistance against clinically important antibiotics. Furthermore, we identify two potential examples of recent horizontal transfer of actinobacterial ARGs to proteobacterial pathogens. Based on this bioinformatic evidence, we propose...... results support the existence of ancient and, possibly, recent transfers of ARGs from antibiotic-producing actinobacteria to proteobacteria, and provide evidence for a defined mechanism....

  14. Land use intensity controls actinobacterial community structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hill, Patrick; Krištůfek, Václav; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Boddy, Christopher; Kroetsch, David; Elsas, Jan Dirk van

    2011-01-01

    Actinobacteria are major producers of secondary metabolites; however, it is unclear how they are distributed in the environment. DNA was extracted from forest, pasture and cultivated soils, street sediments (dust and material in place), and sediments affected by animal activity (e.g. guano, vermicom

  15. [MICROBIAL DESTRUCTION MINERAL (OIL) MOTOR OIL].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homenko, L A; Nogina, T M

    2015-01-01

    In a review information is presented about composition of mineral motor oils and their negative impact on the environment and the ability of microorganisms, in particular actinobacteria, to assimilate hydrocarbon oil components. The role of bacteria is described in the process of cleaning up polluted environments motor oils and the prospect of their use in biotechnology, environmental clean-up of these pollutants.

  16. Investigation of Microbial Diversity in Geothermal Hot Springs in Unkeshwar, India, Based on 16S rRNA Amplicon Metagenome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehetre, Gajanan T; Paranjpe, Aditi; Dastager, Syed G; Dharne, Mahesh S

    2016-02-25

    Microbial diversity in geothermal waters of the Unkeshwar hot springs in Maharashtra, India, was studied using 16S rRNA amplicon metagenomic sequencing. Taxonomic analysis revealed the presence of Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, Archeae, and OD1 phyla. Metabolic function prediction analysis indicated a battery of biological information systems indicating rich and novel microbial diversity, with potential biotechnological applications in this niche.

  17. A common soil flagellate (Cercomonas sp.) grows slowly when feeding on the bacterium Rhodococcus fascians in isolation, but does not discriminate against it in a mixed culture with Sphingopyxis witflariensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lekfeldt, Jonas D S; Rønn, Regin

    2008-01-01

    Flagellates are very important predators on bacteria in soil. Because of their high growth rates, flagellate populations respond rapidly to changes in bacterial numbers. Previous results indicate that actinobacteria are generally less suitable than proteobacteria as food for flagellates. In this ...

  18. Characterization of Thermostable Cellulases Produced by Bacillus and Geobacillus Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial community composition of thermophilic (60 deg C) mixed cellulose-enrichment cultures was examined by constructing a 16S rDNA clone library which demonstrated major lineages affiliated to Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Deinococcus-Thermus, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria. A tot...

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Propane- and Butane-Oxidizing Actinobacterium Rhodococcus ruber IEGM 231

    OpenAIRE

    Ivshina, Irena B.; Kuyukina, Maria S.; Krivoruchko, Anastasiya V.; Barbe, Valérie; Fischer, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    We report a draft genome sequence of Rhodococcus ruber IEGM 231, isolated from a water spring near an oil-extracting enterprise (Perm region, Russian Federation). This sequence provides important insights into the genetic mechanisms of propane and n-butane metabolism, organic sulfide and beta-sitosterol biotransformation, glycolipid biosurfactant production, and heavy metal resistance in actinobacteria.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Propane- and Butane-Oxidizing Actinobacterium Rhodococcus ruber IEGM 231.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivshina, Irena B; Kuyukina, Maria S; Krivoruchko, Anastasiya V; Barbe, Valérie; Fischer, Cécile

    2014-12-11

    We report a draft genome sequence of Rhodococcus ruber IEGM 231, isolated from a water spring near an oil-extracting enterprise (Perm region, Russian Federation). This sequence provides important insights into the genetic mechanisms of propane and n-butane metabolism, organic sulfide and beta-sitosterol biotransformation, glycolipid biosurfactant production, and heavy metal resistance in actinobacteria.

  1. Association between Pseudonocardia symbionts and Atta leaf-cutting ants suggested by improved isolation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Sarah E.; Poulsen, Michael; Gorosito, Norma B.;

    2013-01-01

    Fungus-growing ants associate with multiple symbiotic microbes, including Actinobacteria for production of antibiotics. The best studied of these bacteria are within the genus Pseudonocardia, which in most fungus-growing ants are conspicuously visible on the external cuticle of workers. However, ...

  2. Association between Pseudonocardia symbionts and Atta leaf-cutting ants suggested by improved isolation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Sarah E.; Poulsen, Michael; Gorosito, Norma B.

    2013-01-01

    Fungus-growing ants associate with multiple symbiotic microbes, including Actinobacteria for production of antibiotics. The best studied of these bacteria are within the genus Pseudonocardia, which in most fungus-growing ants are conspicuously visible on the external cuticle of workers. However...

  3. Crystallization and preliminary characterization of a novel haem-binding protein of Streptomyces reticuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zou, Peijian; Groves, Matthew R; Viale-Bouroncle, Sandra D; Ortiz de Orué Lucana, Darío

    2008-01-01

    Streptomyces reticuli is a soil-growing Gram-positive bacteria that has been shown to secrete a novel haem-binding protein known as HbpS. Sequence analysis reveals that homologues of HbpS are found in a wide variety of bacteria, including different Actinobacteria and the Gram-negative Vibrio cholera

  4. QuartetS-DB: A Large-Scale Orthology Database for Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes Inferred by Evolutionary Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    669 Firmicutes (B) 303 Actinobacteria (B) 137 Euryarchaeota (A) 60 Bacteroidetes (B) 57 Ascomycota (E) 51 Cyanobacteria (B) 44 Crenarchaeota (A) 28...manuscript to BioMed Central and take full advantage of: • Convenient online submission • Thorough peer review • No space constraints or color figure

  5. Safety assessment of dairy microorganisms: aerobic coryneform bacteria isolated from the surface of smear-ripened cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Catherine; Irlinger, Françoise

    2008-09-01

    The group of "coryneform bacteria" belongs to the class of Actinobacteria including a diverse and heterogeneous collection of bacteria of various genera. Most of them are known as environmental residents and/or commensal flora of humans and they are isolated frequently in clinical studies. Actinobacteria include also several aerobic species, present at the surface of smear-ripened cheeses for decades and used as ripening culture in the dairy industry. Their clinical significance is controversial because an easy combination of phenotypic and molecular methods to characterize Actinobacteria at the species level is still lacking. A bibliographical survey was conducted to assess the safety status of Actinobacteria species used as starter culture in fermented dairy foods, according to their technological interest. Aerobic coryneform bacteria isolated from smear-ripened cheeses are most commonly recovered from soil, the environment or food. To date, no clinical infection or food toxi-infection related to smear cheese coryneform bacteria ingestion has been reported. From a taxonomic viewpoint, dairy species are distant from the reference species associated with known pathologies. From a physiological viewpoint, cheese smear coryneform bacteria appear to be related to particular ecological niches: they are all oxidative species, and most are psychrotrophic and unable to grow at 37 degrees C whereas medically relevant coryneform bacteria are facultative anaerobes and grow at 35-37 degrees C. Consequently, technological strains must be selected according to taxonomic criteria (nonpathogenic species) and ecological criteria.

  6. Oral supplementation of healthy adults with 2'-O-fucosyllactose and lacto-N-neotetraose is well tolerated and shifts the intestinal microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elison, Emma; Vigsnæs, Louise K.; Rindom Krogsgaard, Laura

    2016-01-01

    in relative abundance of Actinobacteria and Bifidobacterium in particular and a reduction in relative abundance of Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. This study provides the first set of data on safety, tolerance and impact of HMO on the adult gut microbiota. Collectively, the results from this study show...

  7. Improvement of the representation of bifidobacteria in fecal microbiota metagenomic libraries by application of the cpn60 universal primer cocktail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Janet E; Fernando, W M Ursla; Zello, Gordon A; Tyler, Robert T; Dahl, Wendy J; Van Kessel, Andrew G

    2010-07-01

    Actinobacteria, particularly bifidobacteria, are widely observed to be underrepresented in metagenomic studies of microbial communities. We have compared human fecal microbiota clone libraries based on 16S rRNA and cpn60 PCR products. Taxonomic profiles were similar except that the cpn60 libraries contained large numbers of bifidobacterial sequences.

  8. Improvement of the Representation of Bifidobacteria in Fecal Microbiota Metagenomic Libraries by Application of the cpn60 Universal Primer Cocktail ▿

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Actinobacteria, particularly bifidobacteria, are widely observed to be underrepresented in metagenomic studies of microbial communities. We have compared human fecal microbiota clone libraries based on 16S rRNA and cpn60 PCR products. Taxonomic profiles were similar except that the cpn60 libraries contained large numbers of bifidobacterial sequences.

  9. The Steroid Catabolic Pathway of the Intracellular Pathogen Rhodococcus equi Is Important for Pathogenesis and a Target for Vaccine Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geize, R.; Grommen, A. W. F.; Hessels, G. I.; Jacobs, A. A. C.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    2011-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi causes fatal pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals and immunocompromised animals and humans. Despite its importance, there is currently no effective vaccine against the disease. The actinobacteria R. equi and the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis are related, and both cause pu

  10. Chemical analyses of wasp-associated streptomyces bacteria reveal a prolific potential for natural products discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Poulsen

    Full Text Available Identifying new sources for small molecule discovery is necessary to help mitigate the continuous emergence of antibiotic-resistance in pathogenic microbes. Recent studies indicate that one potentially rich source of novel natural products is Actinobacterial symbionts associated with social and solitary Hymenoptera. Here we test this possibility by examining two species of solitary mud dauber wasps, Sceliphron caementarium and Chalybion californicum. We performed enrichment isolations from 33 wasps and obtained more than 200 isolates of Streptomyces Actinobacteria. Chemical analyses of 15 of these isolates identified 11 distinct and structurally diverse secondary metabolites, including a novel polyunsaturated and polyoxygenated macrocyclic lactam, which we name sceliphrolactam. By pairing the 15 Streptomyces strains against a collection of fungi and bacteria, we document their antifungal and antibacterial activity. The prevalence and anti-microbial properties of Actinobacteria associated with these two solitary wasp species suggest the potential role of these Streptomyces as antibiotic-producing symbionts, potentially helping defend their wasp hosts from pathogenic microbes. Finding phylogenetically diverse and chemically prolific Actinobacteria from solitary wasps suggests that insect-associated Actinobacteria can provide a valuable source of novel natural products of pharmaceutical interest.

  11. Cell division in Corynebacterineae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catriona eDonovan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cells must coordinate a number of events during the cell cycle. Spatio-temporal regulation of bacterial cytokinesis is indispensable for the production of viable, genetically identical offspring. In many rod-shaped bacteria, precise midcell assembly of the division machinery relies on inhibitory systems such as Min and Noc. In rod-shaped Actinobacteria, for example Corynebacterium glutamicum and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the divisome assembles in the proximity of the midcell region, however more spatial flexibility is observed compared to Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Actinobacteria represent a group of bacteria that spatially regulate cytokinesis in the absence of recognizable Min and Noc homologs. The key cell division steps in E. coli and B. subtilis have been subject to intensive study and are well understood. In comparison, only a minimal set of positive and negative regulators of cytokinesis are known in Actinobacteria. Nonetheless, the timing of cytokinesis and the placement of the division septum is coordinated with growth as well as initiation of chromosome replication and segregation. We summarize here the current knowledge on cytokinesis and division site selection in the Actinobacteria suborder Corynebacterineae.

  12. A potent fish pathogenic bacterial killer Streptomyces sp. isolated from the soils of east coast region, South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durairaj Thirumurugan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the potentiality of the marine actinobacteria isolated from marine soil against fish pathogenic bacteria. Methods: In the present study, a total of 33 soil samples were collected from the Bay of Bengal, east coast region (ECR of Tamilnadu, South India. Then they were used for the isolation of actinobacteria by using conventional serial dilution technique on starch casein agar medium. The antibacterial activities of the actinobacteria were screened primarily by using cross streak plate method against fish pathogenic bacteria namely Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio cholera, Aeromonas sp. and Pseudomonas sp. The antimicrobial efficacy of the selected isolates was carried out with various organic solvents, and finally the active compound was subjected to chromatographic techniques including TLC and GC-MS. Results: Of the 82 actinobacteria isolated, 21 (26% isolates were possessed antibacterial activity against fish pathogenic bacteria. Out of 21 antibacterial isolates, the isolate ECR77 was selected for further study based on its potential activity against fish pathogenic bacteria. Of the various solvents tested, the ethyl acetate extract had good antibacterial activity against the tested bacterial pathogens. The isolate ECR77 grew well on oat meal agar medium with 2% salt level at 35 °C. GC-MS study found that the presence of bioactive compounds namely tetradecanoic acid, n-hexadecanoic acid and octadecanoic acid. The morphological, physiological, biochemical and cultural characteristics of the potential isolate were supported the identity up to generic level as Streptomyces sp. ECR77. Conclusions: The results obtained from this study concludes that the ECR soils of South India is a hot spot of novel bioactive compound producing marine actinobacteria with great pharmaceutical values.

  13. A potent fish pathogenic bacterial killer Streptomyces sp. isolated from the soils of east coast region, South India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Durairaj Thirumurugan; Ramasamy Vijayakumar

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the potentiality of the marine actinobacteria isolated from marine soil against fish pathogenic bacteria.Methods:east coast region (ECR) of Tamilnadu, South India. Then they were used for the isolation of actinobacteria by using conventional serial dilution technique on starch casein agar medium. The antibacterial activities of the actinobacteria were screened primarily by using cross streak plate method against fish pathogenic bacteria namely Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus,Vibrio cholera, Aeromonas sp. and Pseudomonas sp. The antimicrobial efficacy of the selected isolates was carried out with various organic solvents, and finally the active compound was subjected to chromatographic techniques including TLC and GC-MS.Results:In the present study, a total of 33 soil samples were collected from the Bay of Bengal, against fish pathogenic bacteria. Out of 21 antibacterial isolates, the isolate ECR77 was selected for further study based on its potential activity against fish pathogenic bacteria. Of the various solvents tested, the ethyl acetate extract had good antibacterial activity against the tested bacterial pathogens. The isolate ECR77 grew well on oat meal agar medium with 2% salt level at 35 °C. GC-MS study found that the presence of bioactive compounds namely tetradecanoic acid,n-hexadecanoic acid and octadecanoic acid. The morphological, physiological, biochemical and cultural characteristics of the potential isolate were supported the identity up to generic level asStreptomyces sp. ECR77. Conclusions: The results obtained from this study concludes that the ECR soils of South India is a hot spot of novel bioactive compound producing marine actinobacteria with great pharmaceutical values. Of the 82 actinobacteria isolated, 21 (26%) isolates were possessed antibacterial activity.

  14. Isolation and diversity of natural product biosynthetic genes of cultivable bacteria associated with marine sponge Mycale sp. from the coast of Fujian, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Pei; Wang, De-Xiang; Ding, Shao-Xiong; Zhao, Jing

    2014-04-01

    The marine sponge Mycale sp., a potential source of natural bioactive products, is widely distributed along the coast of Fujian, China. The cultivable bacterial community associated with Mycale sp., the antibacterial activities, and the PKS (polyketide synthase) and NRPS (nonribosomal peptide synthetase) gene diversity of these bacteria were investigated. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene showed that the 51 isolates from Mycale sp. belonged to Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes. Among them, some bacteria were first isolated from marine sponge. The 20 isolates with antimicrobial activities were primarily clustered within the groups Actinobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacillus. Strain HNS054, which showed 99% similarity to Streptomyces labedae, exhibited the strongest antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 1430, Bacillus subtilis MTCC 441) and Vibrio species. The screening of natural product biosynthetic genes revealed that 8 Actinobacteria species with antimicrobial activities possessed PKS-KS (ketosynthase) or NRPS-A domains, and the Nocardiopsis species contained a hybrid or mixed PKS-NRPS system. The phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequences indicated that the identified KS domains clustered with those from diverse bacterial groups, including Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, and Firmicutes. Most KS domain sequences had high homology (>80%) to type I KSs, but the KS domain of Nocardiopsis sp. strain HNS048 had 77% similarity to the type II KS domain of Burkholderia gladioli. The NRPS-A domains of the 8 isolates were grouped into the Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes groups. The NRPS-A gene of strain HNS052, identified as Nocardiopsis cyriacigeorgica, showed only 54% similarity to Rhodococcus opacus. All results suggested that Mycale sp. harboured diverse bacteria that could contribute to the production of novel

  15. EFFECTS OF CARBON SOURCE TO RESISTANCE OF HEAVY METALS OF OIL-DESTUCTIVE STRAINS ACTINOBACTERIA USED FOR BIOREMEDIATION Влияние источника углерода на устойчивость к тяжёлым металлам штаммов нефтеокисляющих актинобактерий, используемых в процессах биоремедиации

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khudokormov A. A.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We studied the resistance of the eight strains of oil-destructive actinomycetes, isolated from the oil-contaminated ecosystems to heavy metal salts when cultivatiwng with different carbon sources. Furthermore we researched feasibility to use those microorganisms for bioremediation of oil- contaminated sites with high level of heavy metals

  16. [Main bacterial groups in banana soil under rotated and continuous cropping].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Xian; Ruan, Xiao-Lei; Wu, Chao; Bai, Ting-Ting; Li, Hua-Ping

    2011-06-01

    Banana wilt is the main disease in banana production, while banana-leek rotation can effectively control the occurrence of the disease. In order to understand the variations of soil bacterial groups under banana-leek rotation and banana continuous cropping, soil samples under these two cropping systems were collected to extract crude DNA, and the bacterial 16S rDNA in V3 region was amplified by PCR. The PCR products were then separated by DGGE, and the main different bands were sequenced and compared with the records of NCBI to identify the germs. Under banana-leek rotation, soil bacterial diversity was richer, and the main bacterial groups were Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Acidobacteria; while under banana continuous cropping, the soil bacterial diversity was somewhat decreased, and the main bacterial groups were Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Chloroflexi.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Coriobacterium glomerans type strain (PW2T) from the midgut of Pyrrhocoris apterus L. (red soldier bug)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stackebrandt, Erko [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Zeytun, Ahmet [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Pukall, Rudiger [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2013-01-01

    Coriobacterium glomerans Haas and Ko nig 1988, is the only species of the genus Coriobacterium, family Coriobacteriaceae, order Coriobacteriales, phylum Actinobacteria. The bacterium thrives as an endosymbiont of pyrrhocorid bugs, i.e. the red fire bug Pyrrhocoris apterus L. The rationale for sequencing the genome of strain PW2T is its endosymbiotic life style which is rare among members of Actinobacteria. Here we describe the features of this symbiont, together with the complete genome sequence and its annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Coriobacterium and the sixth member of the order Coriobacteriales for which complete genome sequences are now available. The 2,115,681 bp long single replicon genome with its 1,804 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  18. Actinobacterial melanins: current status and perspective for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Sivakumar, Kannan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-10-01

    Melanins are enigmatic pigments that are produced by a wide variety of microorganisms including several species of bacteria and fungi. Melanins are biological macromolecules with multiple important functions, yet their structures are not well understood. Melanins are frequently used in medicine, pharmacology, and cosmetics preparations. Melanins also have great application potential in agriculture industry. They have several biological functions including photoprotection, thermoregulation, action as free radical sinks, cation chelators, and antibiotics. Plants and insects incorporate melanins as cell wall and cuticle strengtheners, respectively. Actinobacteria are the most economically as well as biotechnologically valuable prokaryotes. However, the melanin properties are, in general, poorly understood. In this review an evaluation is made on the present state of research on actinobacterial melanins and its perspectives. The highlights include the production and biotechnological applications of melanins in agriculture, food, cosmetic and medicinal fields. With increasing advancement in science and technology, there would be greater demands in the future for melanins produced by actinobacteria from various sources.

  19. 信息动态

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Actinobacteria is one of the best studied taxa of prokaryotes due to its great importance in biotechnology, medical science, ecology and etc.. Modern actinobacterial taxonomy is polyphasic taxonomy, which is based on the phylogenetic analysis of sequences of 16S rRNA genes and other conservative molecular sequences, and employs a variety of microbial information for polyphasic systematic study. Currently, with the development of large-scale sequencing, over 100 actinobacterial genomes have been finished. A comprehensive, detailed and robust phylogeny of actinobacteria is thus needed for understanding how this group emerged and maintained such a vast diversity throughout evolution and how every subgroup related to each other from various habitats. “Phylogenomics” and “Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea, GEBA project” indicated that actinobacterial taxonomy stepped into the era of genomics. This review summarizes the actinobacterial taxonomic methodology of the genomic era, and results from recent studies.

  20. Unravelling the microbiome of eggs of the endangered sea turtle Eretmochelys imbricata identifies bacteria with activity against the emerging pathogen Fusarium falciforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jullie M Sarmiento-Ramírez

    Full Text Available Habitat bioaugmentation and introduction of protective microbiota have been proposed as potential conservation strategies to rescue endangered mammals and amphibians from emerging diseases. For both strategies, insight into the microbiomes of the endangered species and their habitats is essential. Here, we sampled nests of the endangered sea turtle species Eretmochelys imbricata that were infected with the fungal pathogen Fusarium falciforme. Metagenomic analysis of the bacterial communities associated with the shells of the sea turtle eggs revealed approximately 16,664 operational taxonomic units, with Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes as the most dominant phyla. Subsequent isolation of Actinobacteria from the eggshells led to the identification of several genera (Streptomyces, Amycolaptosis, Micromomospora Plantactinospora and Solwaraspora that inhibit hyphal growth of the pathogen F. falciforme. These bacterial genera constitute a first set of microbial indicators to evaluate the potential role of microbiota in conservation of endangered sea turtle species.

  1. Copper Tube Pitting in Santa Fe Municipal Water Caused by Microbial Induced Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas D. Burleigh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many copper water lines for municipal drinking water in Santa Fe, New Mexico USA, have developed pinhole leaks. The pitting matches the description of Type I pitting of copper, which has historically been attributed to water chemistry and to contaminants on the copper tubing surface. However, more recent studies attribute copper pitting to microbial induced corrosion (MIC. In order to test for microbes, the copper tubing was fixed in hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS, then the tops of the corrosion mounds were broken open, and the interior of the corrosion pits were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The analysis found that microbes resembling actinobacteria were deep inside the pits and wedged between the crystallographic planes of the corroded copper grains. The presence of actinobacteria confirms the possibility that the cause of this pitting corrosion was MIC. This observation provides better understanding and new methods for preventing the pitting of copper tubing in municipal water.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of the Marine Streptomyces sp. Strain PP-C42, Isolated from the Baltic Sea▿

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Longjiang; Liu, Yun; Li, Zefeng; Baumann, Heike I.; Kleinschmidt, Katrin; Ye, Wanzhi; Imhoff, Johannes F.; Kleine, Michael; Cai, Daguang

    2011-01-01

    Streptomyces, a branch of aerobic Gram-positive bacteria, represents the largest genus of actinobacteria. The streptomycetes are characterized by a complex secondary metabolism and produce over two-thirds of the clinically used natural antibiotics today. Here we report the draft genome sequence of a Streptomyces strain, PP-C42, isolated from the marine environment. A subset of unique genes and gene clusters for diverse secondary metabolites as well as antimicrobial peptides could be identifie...

  3. Genome sequence of the Fleming strain of Micrococcus luteus, a simple free- living actinobacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Michael; Artsatbanov, Vladislav; Beller, Harry R.; Chandra, Govind; Chater, Keith F.; Dover, Lynn G.; Goh, Ee-Been; Kahan, Tamar; Kaprelyants, Arseny S.; Kyrpides, Nikos; Lapidus, Alla; Lowry, Stephen R.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Mahillon, Jacques; Markowitz, Viktor; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Mukamolova, Galina V.; Oren, Aharon; Rokem, J. Stefan; Smith, Margaret C. M.; Young, Danielle I.; Greenblatt, Charles L.

    2009-11-01

    Micrococcus luteus (NCTC2665, Fleming strain) has one of the smallest genomes of free living actinobacteria sequenced to date, comprising a single circular chromosome of 2,501,097 bp (G+C content 73%) predicted to encode 2403 proteins. The genome shows extensive synteny with that of the closely related organism, Kocuria rhizophila, from which it was taxonomically separated relatively recently. Despite its small size, the genome harbors 73 IS elements, almost all of which are closely related to elements found in other actinobacteria. An IS element is inserted into the rrs gene of one of only two rrn operons found in M. luteus. The genome encodes only four sigma factors and fourteen response regulators, indicative of adaptation to a rather strict ecological niche (mammalian skin). The high sensitivity of M. luteus to {Beta}-lactam antibiotics may result from the presence of a reduced set of penicillin binding proteins and the absence of a wblC gene, which plays an important role in antibiotic resistance in other actinobacteria. Consistent with the restricted range of compounds it can use as a sole source of carbon for energy and growth, M. luteus has a minimal complement of genes concerned with carbohydrate transport and metabolism and its inability to utilize glucose as a sole carbon source may be due to the apparent absence of a gene encoding glucokinase. Uniquely among characterized bacteria, M. luteus appears to be able to metabolize glycogen only via trehalose, and to make trehalose only via glycogen. It has very few genes associated with secondary metabolism. In contrast to other actinobacteria, M. luteus encodes only one resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) required for emergence from dormancy and its complement of other dormancy-related proteins is also much reduced. M. luteus is capable of long-chain alkene biosynthesis, which is of interest for advanced biofuel production; a three gene cluster essential for this metabolism has been identified in the genome.

  4. In-situ Substrate Addition to Create Reactive Zones for Treatment of Chlorinated Aliphatic Hydrocarbons: Vandenberg Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-17

    north-northwest and dip to the southwest, approximately parallel to the topographic slope. A series of marine transgression and regression episodes...traditional forms. Current Names Traditional Names Phylogenic Groups Actinobacteria High G+C Gram positive bacteria such as Actinomycetes , Mycobacterium...Date pmol/mL cells/mL Firmicutes (TerBrSats) Proteobacteria (Monos) Anaerobic metal reducers (BrMonos) Actinomycetes / SRB (MidBrSats

  5. Comparative genomics reveals evidence of marine adaptation in Salinispora species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Actinobacteria represent a consistent component of most marine bacterial communities yet little is known about the mechanisms by which these Gram-positive bacteria adapt to life in the marine environment. Here we employed a phylogenomic approach to identify marine adaptation genes in marine Actinobacteria. The focus was on the obligate marine actinomycete genus Salinispora and the identification of marine adaptation genes that have been acquired from other marine bacteria. Results Functional annotation, comparative genomics, and evidence of a shared evolutionary history with bacteria from hyperosmotic environments were used to identify a pool of more than 50 marine adaptation genes. An Actinobacterial species tree was used to infer the likelihood of gene gain or loss in accounting for the distribution of each gene. Acquired marine adaptation genes were associated with electron transport, sodium and ABC transporters, and channels and pores. In addition, the loss of a mechanosensitive channel gene appears to have played a major role in the inability of Salinispora strains to grow following transfer to low osmotic strength media. Conclusions The marine Actinobacteria for which genome sequences are available are broadly distributed throughout the Actinobacterial phylogenetic tree and closely related to non-marine forms suggesting they have been independently introduced relatively recently into the marine environment. It appears that the acquisition of transporters in Salinispora spp. represents a major marine adaptation while gene loss is proposed to play a role in the inability of this genus to survive outside of the marine environment. This study reveals fundamental differences between marine adaptations in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and no common genetic basis for marine adaptation among the Actinobacteria analyzed. PMID:22401625

  6. Comparative genomics reveals evidence of marine adaptation in Salinispora species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Kevin; Jensen, Paul R

    2012-03-08

    Actinobacteria represent a consistent component of most marine bacterial communities yet little is known about the mechanisms by which these Gram-positive bacteria adapt to life in the marine environment. Here we employed a phylogenomic approach to identify marine adaptation genes in marine Actinobacteria. The focus was on the obligate marine actinomycete genus Salinispora and the identification of marine adaptation genes that have been acquired from other marine bacteria. Functional annotation, comparative genomics, and evidence of a shared evolutionary history with bacteria from hyperosmotic environments were used to identify a pool of more than 50 marine adaptation genes. An Actinobacterial species tree was used to infer the likelihood of gene gain or loss in accounting for the distribution of each gene. Acquired marine adaptation genes were associated with electron transport, sodium and ABC transporters, and channels and pores. In addition, the loss of a mechanosensitive channel gene appears to have played a major role in the inability of Salinispora strains to grow following transfer to low osmotic strength media. The marine Actinobacteria for which genome sequences are available are broadly distributed throughout the Actinobacterial phylogenetic tree and closely related to non-marine forms suggesting they have been independently introduced relatively recently into the marine environment. It appears that the acquisition of transporters in Salinispora spp. represents a major marine adaptation while gene loss is proposed to play a role in the inability of this genus to survive outside of the marine environment. This study reveals fundamental differences between marine adaptations in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and no common genetic basis for marine adaptation among the Actinobacteria analyzed.

  7. Comparative genomics reveals evidence of marine adaptation in Salinispora species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penn Kevin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actinobacteria represent a consistent component of most marine bacterial communities yet little is known about the mechanisms by which these Gram-positive bacteria adapt to life in the marine environment. Here we employed a phylogenomic approach to identify marine adaptation genes in marine Actinobacteria. The focus was on the obligate marine actinomycete genus Salinispora and the identification of marine adaptation genes that have been acquired from other marine bacteria. Results Functional annotation, comparative genomics, and evidence of a shared evolutionary history with bacteria from hyperosmotic environments were used to identify a pool of more than 50 marine adaptation genes. An Actinobacterial species tree was used to infer the likelihood of gene gain or loss in accounting for the distribution of each gene. Acquired marine adaptation genes were associated with electron transport, sodium and ABC transporters, and channels and pores. In addition, the loss of a mechanosensitive channel gene appears to have played a major role in the inability of Salinispora strains to grow following transfer to low osmotic strength media. Conclusions The marine Actinobacteria for which genome sequences are available are broadly distributed throughout the Actinobacterial phylogenetic tree and closely related to non-marine forms suggesting they have been independently introduced relatively recently into the marine environment. It appears that the acquisition of transporters in Salinispora spp. represents a major marine adaptation while gene loss is proposed to play a role in the inability of this genus to survive outside of the marine environment. This study reveals fundamental differences between marine adaptations in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and no common genetic basis for marine adaptation among the Actinobacteria analyzed.

  8. Draft genome sequence of Kocuria sp. SM24M-10 isolated from coral mucus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Rafaella Z. Palermo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Here, we describe the genomic features of the Actinobacteria Kocuria sp. SM24M-10 isolated from mucus of the Brazilian endemic coral Mussismilia hispida. The sequences are available under accession number LDNX01000000 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/LDNX00000000. The genomic analysis revealed interesting information about the adaptation of bacteria to the marine environment (such as genes involved in osmotic and oxidative stress and to the nutrient-rich environment provided by the coral mucus.

  9. Reclassification of Brevibacterium incertum (Breed 1953) as Desemzia incerta gen. nov., comb. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackebrandt, E; Schumann, P; Swiderski, J; Weiss, N

    1999-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA indicates that Brevibacterium incertum is not a member of the genus Brevibacterium but related to species of the genus Carnobacterium. Hence, Brevibacterium incertum is not a member of the class Actinobacteria but belongs to the phylogenetically defined broad Bacillus-Lactobacillus cluster. Based upon properties that taxonomically clearly distinguishes Brevibacterium incertum from species of the phylogenetic sister genus Carnobacterium, Brevibacterium incertum is reclassified as Desemzia incerta gen. nov., comb. nov.

  10. Characterisation of the bacteria associated with barnacle, Balanus amphitrite, shell and their role in gregarious settlement of cypris larvae

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    BacchettiDeGregoris, T.; Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.; Mesbahi, E.; Burgess, J.G.; Clare, A.S.

    with barnacles and to test their effect on larval behaviour (Avelin Mary et al., 1993; Khandeparker et al., 2002; 2006) but a systematic survey of bacterial communities associated with B. amphitrite has yet to be undertaken. Our aim was to investigate... by determining the abundance and diversity of 16S rRNA genes belonging to the broad taxonomic units Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and α-Proteobacteria. Subsequently, a microbiological medium composed of barnacle extract as the only source...

  11. Spider, bacterial and fungal phospholipase D toxins make cyclic phosphate products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajoie, Daniel M; Cordes, Matthew H J

    2015-12-15

    Phospholipase D (PLD) toxins from sicariid spiders, which cause disease in mammals, were recently found to convert their primary substrates, sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine, to cyclic phospholipids. Here we show that two PLD toxins from pathogenic actinobacteria and ascomycete fungi, which share distant homology with the spider toxins, also generate cyclic phospholipids. This shared function supports divergent evolution of the PLD toxins from a common ancestor and suggests the importance of cyclic phospholipids in pathogenicity.

  12. Increase in Bacterial Colony Formation from a Permafrost Ice Wedge Dosed with a Tomitella biformata Recombinant Resuscitation-Promoting Factor Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspita, Indun Dewi; Kitagawa, Wataru; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H

    2015-01-01

    Resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) is a protein that has been found in a number of different Actinobacteria species and has been shown to promote the growth of active cells and resuscitate dormant (non-dividing) cells. We previously reported the biological activity of an Rpf protein in Tomitella biformata AHU 1821(T), an Actinobacteria isolated from a permafrost ice wedge. This protein is excreted outside the cell; however, few studies have investigated its contribution in environmental samples to the growth or resuscitation of bacteria other than the original host. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether Rpf from T. biformata impacted the cultivation of other bacteria from the permafrost ice wedge from which it was originally isolated. All experiments used recombinant Rpf proteins produced using a Rhodococcus erythropolis expression system. Dilutions of melted surface sterilized ice wedge samples mixed with different doses of the purified recombinant Rpf (rRpf) protein indicated that the highest concentration tested, 1250 pM, had a significantly (p <0.05) higher number of CFUs on agar plates after 8 d, approximately 14-fold higher than that on control plates without rRpf. 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that all the colonies on plates were mainly related to Brevibacterium antiquum strain VKM Ac-2118 (AY243344), with 98-99% sequence identity. This species is also a member of the phylum Actinobacteria and was originally isolated from Siberian permafrost sediments. The results of the present study demonstrated that rRpf not only promoted the growth of T. biformata from which it was isolated, but also enhanced colony formation by another Actinobacteria in an environmental sample.

  13. Genomics of Probiotic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    Probiotic bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species belong to the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria phylum, respectively. Lactobacilli are members of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group, a broadly defined family of microorganisms that ferment various hexoses into primarily lactic acid. Lactobacilli are typically low G + C gram-positive species which are phylogenetically diverse, with over 100 species documented to date. Bifidobacteria are heterofermentative, high G + C content bacteria with about 30 species of bifidobacteria described to date.

  14. Genome-wide bioinformatics analysis of steroid metabolism-associated genes in Nocardioides simplex VKM Ac-2033D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtratnikova, Victoria Y; Schelkunov, Mikhail I; Fokina, Victoria V; Pekov, Yury A; Ivashina, Tanya; Donova, Marina V

    2016-08-01

    Actinobacteria comprise diverse groups of bacteria capable of full degradation, or modification of different steroid compounds. Steroid catabolism has been characterized best for the representatives of suborder Corynebacterineae, such as Mycobacteria, Rhodococcus and Gordonia, with high content of mycolic acids in the cell envelope, while it is poorly understood for other steroid-transforming actinobacteria, such as representatives of Nocardioides genus belonging to suborder Propionibacterineae. Nocardioides simplex VKM Ac-2033D is an important biotechnological strain which is known for its ability to introduce ∆(1)-double bond in various 1(2)-saturated 3-ketosteroids, and perform convertion of 3β-hydroxy-5-ene steroids to 3-oxo-4-ene steroids, hydrolysis of acetylated steroids, reduction of carbonyl groups at C-17 and C-20 of androstanes and pregnanes, respectively. The strain is also capable of utilizing cholesterol and phytosterol as carbon and energy sources. In this study, a comprehensive bioinformatics genome-wide screening was carried out to predict genes related to steroid metabolism in this organism, their clustering and possible regulation. The predicted operon structure and number of candidate gene copies paralogs have been estimated. Binding sites of steroid catabolism regulators KstR and KstR2 specified for N. simplex VKM Ac-2033D have been calculated de novo. Most of the candidate genes grouped within three main clusters, one of the predicted clusters having no analogs in other actinobacteria studied so far. The results offer a base for further functional studies, expand the understanding of steroid catabolism by actinobacteria, and will contribute to modifying of metabolic pathways in order to generate effective biocatalysts capable of producing valuable bioactive steroids.

  15. Concluding remarks

    OpenAIRE

    Lerayer, Alda

    2005-01-01

    International audience; The focus of this Symposium was on bifidobacteria and propionibacteria for dairy and probiotic applications.Both genera have many similarities: being phylogenetically closely grouped within the Actinobacteria, they are high G+C branch Gram-positive bacteria, and share several physiological properties, despite having different industrial applications. It was highlighted in this Symposium that, from the point of view of consumers, consumer organizations, and government a...

  16. Butyric Acid- and Dimethyl Disulfide-Assimilating Microorganisms in a Biofilter Treating Air Emissions from a Livestock Facility▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, Anja; Lindholst, Sabine; Feilberg, Anders; Nielsen, Per H.; Neufeld, Josh D.; Nielsen, Jeppe L.

    2011-01-01

    Biofiltration has proven an efficient tool for the elimination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and ammonia from livestock facilities, thereby reducing nuisance odors and ammonia emissions to the local environment. The active microbial communities comprising these filter biofilms have not been well characterized. In this study, a trickle biofilter treating air from a pig facility was investigated and proved efficient in removing carboxylic acids (>70% reduction), mainly attributed to the primary filter section within which reduced organic sulfur compounds were also depleted (up to 50%). The secondary filter eliminated several aromatic compounds: phenol (81%), p-cresol (89%), 4-ethylphenol (68%), indole (48%), and skatole (69%). The active butyric acid degrading bacterial community of an air filter sample was identified by DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) and microautoradiography, combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (MAR-FISH). The predominant 16S rRNA gene sequences from a clone library derived from “heavy” DNA from [13C4]butyric acid incubations were Microbacterium, Gordonia, Dietzia, Rhodococcus, Propionibacterium, and Janibacter, all from the Actinobacteria. Actinobacteria were confirmed and quantified by MAR-FISH as being the major bacterial phylum assimilating butyric acid along with several Burkholderiales-related Betaproteobacteria. The active bacterial community assimilating dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) was characterized by DNA-SIP and MAR-FISH and found to be associated with the Actinobacteria, along with a few representatives of Flavobacteria and Sphingobacteria. Interestingly, ammonia-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria were also implicated in DMDS degradation, as were fungi. Thus, multiple isotope-based methods provided complementary data, enabling high-resolution identification and quantitative assessments of odor-eliminating Actinobacteria-dominated populations of these biofilter environments. PMID:22003018

  17. Variation in Pseudonocardia antibiotic defence helps govern parasite-induced morbidity in Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants

    OpenAIRE

    Poulsen, Michael; Cafaro, Matías J.; Erhardt, Daniel P.; Little, Ainslie E. F.; Gerardo, Nicole M.; Tebbets, Brad; Klein, Bruce S.; Currie, Cameron R

    2009-01-01

    Host–parasite associations are potentially shaped by evolutionary reciprocal selection dynamics, in which parasites evolve to overcome host defences and hosts are selected to counteract these through the evolution of new defences. This is expected to result in variation in parasite-defence interactions, and the evolution of resistant parasites causing increased virulence. Fungus-growing ants maintain antibiotic-producing Pseudonocardia (Actinobacteria) that aid in protection against specializ...

  18. Atmospheric Hydrogen Scavenging: from Enzymes to Ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We have known for 40 years that soils can consume the trace amounts of molecular hydrogen (H2) found in the Earth's atmosphere. This process is predicted to be the most significant term in the global hydrogen cycle. However, the organisms and enzymes responsible for this process were only recently identified. Pure culture experiments demonstrated that several species of Actinobacteria, including streptomycetes and mycobacteria, can couple the oxidation of atmospheric H2 to the reduction of am...

  19. Elicitation of secondary metabolism in actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadan; Grkovic, Tanja; Balasubramanian, Srikkanth; Kamel, Mohamed Salah; Quinn, Ronald J; Hentschel, Ute

    2015-11-01

    Genomic sequence data have revealed the presence of a large fraction of putatively silent biosynthetic gene clusters in the genomes of actinomycetes that encode for secondary metabolites, which are not detected under standard fermentation conditions. This review focuses on the effects of biological (co-cultivation), chemical, as well as molecular elicitation on secondary metabolism in actinomycetes. Our review covers the literature until June 2014 and exemplifies the diversity of natural products that have been recovered by such approaches from the phylum Actinobacteria.

  20. Benzoyl Peroxide Formulated Polycarbophil/Carbopol 934P Hydrogel with Selective Antimicrobial Activity, Potentially Beneficial for Treatment and Prevention of Bacterial Vaginosis

    OpenAIRE

    Shiqi Xu; Cavera, Veronica L.; Rogers, Michael A.; Qingrong Huang; Konstantin Zubovskiy; Chikindas, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The human vagina is colonized by a variety of indigenous microflora; in healthy individuals the predominant bacterial genus is Lactobacillus while those with bacterial vaginosis (BV) carry a variety of anaerobic representatives of the phylum Actinobacteria. In this study, we evaluated the antimicrobial activity of benzoyl peroxide (BPO) encapsulated in a hydrogel against Gardnerella vaginalis, one of the causative agents of BV, as well as indicating its safety for healthy human lactobacilli. ...

  1. Bacterial succession within an ephemeral hypereutrophic mojave desert playa lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, J.B.; Moser, D.P.; Flores, A.; Ross, C.; Rosen, Michael R.; Dong, H.; Zhang, G.; Hedlund, B.P.

    2009-01-01

    Ephemerally wet playas are conspicuous features of arid landscapes worldwide; however, they have not been well studied as habitats for microorganisms. We tracked the geochemistry and microbial community in Silver Lake playa, California, over one flooding/desiccation cycle following the unusually wet winter of 2004-2005. Over the course of the study, total dissolved solids increased by 10-fold and pH increased by nearly one unit. As the lake contracted and temperatures increased over the summer, a moderately dense planktonic population of 1 ?????106 cells ml-1 of culturable heterotrophs was replaced by a dense population of more than 1????????109 cells ml-1, which appears to be the highest concentration of culturable planktonic heterotrophs reported in any natural aquatic ecosystem. This correlated with a dramatic depletion of nitrate as well as changes in the microbial community, as assessed by small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequencing of bacterial isolates and uncultivated clones. Isolates from the early-phase flooded playa were primarily Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes, yet clone libraries were dominated by Betaproteobacteria and yet uncultivated Actinobacteria. Isolates from the late-flooded phase ecosystem were predominantly Proteobacteria, particularly alkalitolerant isolates of Rhodobaca, Porphyrobacter, Hydrogenophaga, Alishwenella, and relatives of Thauera; however, clone libraries were composed almost entirely of Synechococcus (Cyanobacteria). A sample taken after the playa surface was completely desiccated contained diverse culturable Actinobacteria typically isolated from soils. In total, 205 isolates and 166 clones represented 82 and 44 species-level groups, respectively, including a wide diversity of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Acidobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  2. On the limits of computational functional genomics for bacterial lifestyle prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbosa, Eudes; Röttger, Richard; Hauschild, Anne-Christin

    2014-01-01

    We review the level of genomic specificity regarding actinobacterial pathogenicity. As they occupy various niches in diverse habitats, one may assume the existence of lifestyle-specific genomic features. We include 240 actinobacteria classified into four pathogenicity classes: human pathogens (HP...... in the post-genome era and despite next-generation sequencing technology, our ability to efficiently deduce real-world conclusions, such as pathogenicity classification, remains quite limited....

  3. Actinobacterial diversity in limestone deposit sites in Hundung, Manipur (India and their antimicrobial activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salam eNimaichand

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies on actinobacterial diversity in limestone habitats are scarce. This paper reports profiling of actinobacteria isolated from Hundung limestone samples in Manipur, India using ARDRA as the molecular tool for preliminary classification. A total of 137 actinobacteria were clustered into 31 phylotypic groups based on the ARDRA pattern generated and representative of each group was subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Generic diversity of the limestone isolates consisted of Streptomyces (15 phylotypic groups, Micromonospora (4, Amycolatopsis (3, Arthrobacter (3, Kitasatospora (2, Janibacter (1, Nocardia (1, Pseudonocardia (1 and Rhodococcus (1. Considering the antimicrobial potential of these actinobacteria, 19 showed antimicrobial activities against at least one of the bacterial and candidal test pathogens, while 45 exhibit biocontrol activities against at least one of the rice fungal pathogens. Out of the 137 actinobacterial isolates, 118 were found to have at least one of the three biosynthetic gene clusters (PKS-I, PKS-II, NRPS. The results indicate that 86% of the strains isolated from Hundung limestone deposit sites possessed biosynthetic gene clusters of which 40% exhibited antimicrobial activities. It can, therefore, be concluded that limestone habitat is a promising source for search of novel secondary metabolites.

  4. Actinobacterial diversity in limestone deposit sites in Hundung, Manipur (India) and their antimicrobial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimaichand, Salam; Devi, Asem Mipeshwaree; Tamreihao, K; Ningthoujam, Debananda S; Li, Wen-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Studies on actinobacterial diversity in limestone habitats are scarce. This paper reports profiling of actinobacteria isolated from Hundung limestone samples in Manipur, India using ARDRA as the molecular tool for preliminary classification. A total of 137 actinobacteria were clustered into 31 phylotypic groups based on the ARDRA pattern generated and representative of each group was subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Generic diversity of the limestone isolates consisted of Streptomyces (15 phylotypic groups), Micromonospora (4), Amycolatopsis (3), Arthrobacter (3), Kitasatospora (2), Janibacter (1), Nocardia (1), Pseudonocardia (1) and Rhodococcus (1). Considering the antimicrobial potential of these actinobacteria, 19 showed antimicrobial activities against at least one of the bacterial and candidal test pathogens, while 45 exhibit biocontrol activities against at least one of the rice fungal pathogens. Out of the 137 actinobacterial isolates, 118 were found to have at least one of the three biosynthetic gene clusters (PKS-I, PKS-II, NRPS). The results indicate that 86% of the strains isolated from Hundung limestone deposit sites possessed biosynthetic gene clusters of which 40% exhibited antimicrobial activities. It can, therefore, be concluded that limestone habitat is a promising source for search of novel secondary metabolites.

  5. Bacterial communities predominant in the degradation of 13C(4)-4,5,9,10-pyrene during composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jingjing; Zhang, Yuan; Su, Jianqiang; Qiu, Qiongfen; Jia, Zhongjun; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2013-09-01

    An in-vessel composting bioremediation of (13)C4-4,5,9,10-pyrene and unlabeled pyrene spiked soil amended with fresh wastes was investigated by DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP) of active bacteria involved. Highest dissipation of (13)C4-pyrene was detected at 55 °C after 42 days composting. The active bacterial communities in the composting changed over time, showing a distinct difference among different stages. α-, β-, γ-Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria were detected mainly involving in pyrene degradation at 38 °C over 14 days composting. Streptomyces appeared to dominate the pyrene degradation at 55 °C. β- and γ-Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were the dominant pyrene degraders at 70 °C after 42 days composting and at 38 °C after 60 days composting. The results of this study suggest the pyrene degradation was performed by phylogenetically distinct bacterial guilds from the phyla Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria during in-vessel composition processes.

  6. Generic and functional diversity in endophytic actinomycetes from wild Compositae plant species at South Sinai - Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shatoury, Sahar A; El-Kraly, Omnia A; Trujillo, Martha E; El-Kazzaz, Waleed M; El-Din, El-Sayeda Gamal; Dewedar, Ahmed

    2013-09-01

    The diversity of culturable endophytic actinomycetes associated with wild Compositae plants is scantily explored. In this study, one hundred and thirty one endophytic actinobacteria were isolated from ten Compositae plant species collected from South Sinai in Egypt. Microscopic and chemotaxonomic investigation of the isolates indicated fourteen genera. Rare genera, such as Microtetraspora, and Intrasporangium, which have never been previously reported to be endophytic, were identified. Each plant species accommodated between three to eight genera of actinobacteria and unidentified strains were recovered from seven plant species. The generic diversity analysis of endophytic assemblages grouped the plant species into three main clusters, representing high, moderate and low endophytic diversity. The endophytes showed high functional diversity, based on forty four catabolic and plant growth promotion traits; providing some evidence that such traits could represent key criteria for successful residence of endophytes in the endosphere. Stress-tolerance traits were more predictive measure of functional diversity differences between the endophyte assemblages (Shannon's index, p = 0.01). The results indicate a potential prominent role of endophytes for their hosts and emphasize the potency of plant endosphere as a habitat for actinobacteria with promising future applications.

  7. Clone-based comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes retrieved from biodeteriorating brick buildings of the former Auschwitz II-Birkenau concentration and extermination camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otlewska, Anna; Adamiak, Justyna; Gutarowska, Beata

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the bacterial communities in four samples of historical materials (plaster, brick, and wood) derived from buildings located in the former Auschwitz II-Birkenau concentration and extermination camp in Brzezinka, Poland. For this purpose a molecular strategy based on the construction of 16S rRNA clone libraries was used. In total, 138 partial 16S rRNA gene sequences (∼600bp) were obtained and compared. The clones belonged to phyla Proteobacteria (classes: Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria), Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. The plaster samples predominantly contained clones closely related to Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria, brick samples contained Gammaproteobacteria, while wood samples had Actinobacteria clones. Interestingly, the historic plaster and brick samples contained the following bacteria with known and described biodeterioration potential: chemoorganotrophic Streptomyces sp. and Pseudonocardia sp., halotolerant or halophilic Rubrobacter sp., Salinisphaera sp. and Halomonas sp. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that amongst the bacterial species detected and identified none occurred on all the tested historical materials. The 16S rRNA clone library construction method was successfully used for the detection and diversity determination of bacterial communities inhabiting brick barracks located in the former Auschwitz II-Birkenau concentration and extermination camp in Brzezinka.

  8. Morphological, Physiological, and Taxonomic Characterization of Actinobacterial Isolates Living as Endophytes of Cacao Pods and Cacao Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchinda, Romaric Armel Mouafo; Boudjeko, Thaddée; Simao-Beaunoir, Anne-Marie; Lerat, Sylvain; Tsala, Éric; Monga, Ernest; Beaulieu, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Vascular plants are commonly colonized by endophytic actinobacteria. However, very little is known about the relationship between these microorganisms and cacao fruits. In order to determine the physiological and taxonomic relationships between the members of this community, actinobacteria were isolated from cacao fruits and seeds. Among the 49 isolates recovered, 11 morphologically distinct isolates were selected for further characterization. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene allowed the partition of the selected isolates into three phylogenetic clades. Most of the selected endophytic isolates belonged to the Streptomyces violaceusniger clade. Physiological characterization was carried out and a similarity index was used to cluster the isolates. However, clustering based on physiological properties did not match phylogenetic lineages. Isolates were also characterized for traits commonly associated with plant growth-promoting bacteria, including antibiosis and auxin biosynthesis. All isolates exhibited resistance to geldanamycin, whereas only two isolates were shown to produce this antibiotic. Endophytes were inoculated on radish seedlings and most isolates were found to possess plant growth-promoting abilities. These endophytic actinobacteria inhibited the growth of various plant pathogenic fungi and/or bacteria. The present study showed that S. violaceusniger clade members represent a significant part of the actinobacterial community living as endophytes in cacao fruits and seeds. While several members of this clade are known to be geldanamycin producers and efficient biocontrol agents of plant diseases, we herein established the endophytic lifestyle of some of these microorganisms, demonstrating their potential as plant health agents.

  9. Actinobacterial peroxidases: an unexplored resource for biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roes-Hill, Marilize; Khan, Nuraan; Burton, Stephanie Gail

    2011-07-01

    Peroxidases are redox enzymes that can be found in all forms of life where they play diverse roles. It is therefore not surprising that they can also be applied in a wide range of industrial applications. Peroxidases have been extensively studied with particular emphasis on those isolated from fungi and plants. In general, peroxidases can be grouped into haem-containing and non-haem-containing peroxidases, each containing protein families that share sequence similarity. The order Actinomycetales comprises a large group of bacteria that are often exploited for their diverse metabolic capabilities, and with recent increases in the number of sequenced genomes, it has become clear that this metabolically diverse group of organisms also represents a large resource for redox enzymes. It is therefore surprising that, to date, no review article has been written on the wide range of peroxidases found within the actinobacteria. In this review article, we focus on the different types of peroxidases found in actinobacteria, their natural role in these organisms and how they compare with the more well-described peroxidases. Finally, we also focus on work remaining to be done in this research field in order for peroxidases from actinobacteria to be applied in industrial processes.

  10. Biodegradation of high concentrations of mixed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by indigenous bacteria from a river sediment: a microcosm study and bacterial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muangchinda, Chanokporn; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Polrit, Duangporn; Thoetkiattikul, Honglada; Mhuantong, Wuttichai; Champreda, Verawat; Pinyakong, Onruthai

    2017-02-01

    This study assessed the biodegradation of mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by indigenous bacteria in river sediment. Microcosms were constructed from sediment from the Chao Phraya River (the main river in Thailand) by supplementation with high concentrations of fluorene, phenanthrene, pyrene (300 mg kg(-1) of each PAH), and acenaphthene (600 mg kg(-1)). Fluorene and phenanthrene were completely degraded, whereas 50% of the pyrene and acenaphthene were removed at the end of the incubation period (70 days). Community analyses revealed the dynamics of the bacterial profiles in the PAH-degrading microcosms after PAH exposure. Actinobacteria predominated and became significantly more abundant in the microcosms after 14 days of incubation at room temperature under aerobic conditions. Furthermore, the remaining PAHs and alpha diversity were positively correlated. The sequencing of clone libraries of the PAH-RHDα genes also revealed that the dioxygenase genes of Mycobacterium sp. comprised 100% of the PAH-RHDα library at the end of the microcosm setup. Moreover, two PAH-degrading Actinobacteria (Arthrobacter sp. and Rhodococcus ruber) were isolated from the original sediment sample and showed high activity in the degradation of phenanthrene and fluorene in liquid cultivation. This study reveals that indigenous bacteria had the ability to degrade high concentrations of mixed PAHs and provide clear evidence that Actinobacteria may be potential candidates to play a major role in PAH degradation in the river sediment.

  11. Diversity and function of the Antarctic krill microorganisms from Euphausia superba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoqiu; Zhu, Guoliang; Liu, Haishan; Jiang, Guoliang; Wang, Yi; Zhu, Weiming

    2016-11-01

    The diversity and ecological function of microorganisms associated with Euphausia superba, still remain unknown. This study identified 75 microbial isolates from E. superba, that is 42 fungi and 33 bacteria including eight actinobacteria. And all the isolates showed NaF tolerance in conformity with the nature of the fluoride krill. The maximum concentration was 10%, 3% and 0.5% NaF for actinobacteria, bacteria and fungi, respectively. The results demonstrated that 82.4% bacteria, 81.3% actinobacteria and 12.3% fungi produced antibacterial metabolites against pathogenic bacteria without NaF; the MIC value reached to 3.9 μg/mL. In addition, more than 60% fungi produced cytotoxic metabolites against A549, MCF-7 or K562 cell lines. The presence of NaF led to a reduction in the producing antimicrobial compounds, but stimulated the production of cytotoxic compounds. Furthermore, seven cytotoxic compounds were identified from the metabolites of Penicillium citrinum OUCMDZ4136 under 0.5% NaF, with the IC50 values of 3.6-13.1 μM for MCF-7, 2.2-19.8 μM for A549 and 5.4-15.4 μM for K562, respectively. These results indicated that the krill microbes exert their chemical defense by producing cytotoxic compounds to the mammalians and antibacterial compounds to inhibiting the pathogenic bacteria.

  12. Isolation, identification, and characterization of gut microflora of Perionyx excavatus collected from Midnapore, West Bengal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Tanushree Tulsian; Das, Ankita

    2016-03-01

    Agriculture is an important part of the economy of the undivided Midnapore district. Agricultural land is its asset and most importantly its means of sustenance as well as survival. Earthworms are invertebrates that play a key role in recycling organic matters in soils. Since the intestines of earthworms harbor wide ranges of microorganisms, enzymes, hormones etc., these half digested materials decompose rapidly and are transformed into a stabilized material called vermicompost which is very useful for increasing the soil fertility. One has to look for these characters before recommending any species for vermiculture. In the present study, Perionyx excavatus specimens were collected from the undivided Midnapore district and from the Earthworms gut, bacteria, fungus, actinobacteria, and yeast were isolated and identified using various morphological and biochemical tests. All the bacterial isolates were identified using morphological study, staining techniques, and different biochemical tests such as catalase test, KOH test, H2 SO4 test, Starch hydrolysis test, oxidase test, and sucrose hydrolysis test. All the fungal, actinobacteria, and yeast isolates were subjected to staining and morphological characterization (color and texture of fungal colony). Bacterial isolates of genus Bacillus sp., Staphylococcus sp., Enterococci, Micrococcus sp., Enterobacter sp., and Citrobacter sp. were identified. Among the fungal isolates Aspergilus sp., and P. boydii were identified. Streptomyces sp., Nocardia sp. among the actinobacteria and Candida sp. among yeast were also found to be present in earthworm gut and these might play an important role along with the earthworm to increase the quality and fertility of soil.

  13. Community of environmental streptomyces related to geosmin development in Chinese liquors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hai; Lu, Hu; Xu, Yan; Du, Xiaowei

    2013-02-13

    Diverse Streptomyces species act as geosmin producers in the Chinese liquor-making process. In this paper, the ecology of these Streptomyces species was analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of amplified Actinobacteria -specified rDNA. The result showed that Streptomyces were widely distributed during Daqu incubation, and multiple processing, geographic, and climate factors can affect their distribution and diversity. The genes associated with geosmin production were characterized in four geosmin-producing Streptomyces strains, all of which were isolated from geosmin-contaminated Daqu. On the basis of this information, a real-time PCR method was developed, enabling the detection of traces of Streptomyces in complex solid-state matrices. The primer was targeted at the gene coding for geosmin synthase (geoA). The real-time PCR method was found to be specific for geosmin-producing Streptomyces and did not show any cross-reactivity with geosmin-negative isolates, which are frequently present in the Chinese liquor-brewing process. Quantification of geoA in the Chinese liquor-making process could permit the monitoring of the level of geosmin producers prior to the occurrence of geosmin production. Comparison of the qPCR results based on the gene encoding geosmin synthase and Actinobacteria-specified rDNA showed that about 1-10% of the Actinobacteria carry the geosmin synthesis gene.

  14. Delineation of Steroid-Degrading Microorganisms through Comparative Genomic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee H. Bergstrand

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Steroids are ubiquitous in natural environments and are a significant growth substrate for microorganisms. Microbial steroid metabolism is also important for some pathogens and for biotechnical applications. This study delineated the distribution of aerobic steroid catabolism pathways among over 8,000 microorganisms whose genomes are available in the NCBI RefSeq database. Combined analysis of bacterial, archaeal, and fungal genomes with both hidden Markov models and reciprocal BLAST identified 265 putative steroid degraders within only Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, which mainly originated from soil, eukaryotic host, and aquatic environments. These bacteria include members of 17 genera not previously known to contain steroid degraders. A pathway for cholesterol degradation was conserved in many actinobacterial genera, particularly in members of the Corynebacterineae, and a pathway for cholate degradation was conserved in members of the genus Rhodococcus. A pathway for testosterone and, sometimes, cholate degradation had a patchy distribution among Proteobacteria. The steroid degradation genes tended to occur within large gene clusters. Growth experiments confirmed bioinformatic predictions of steroid metabolism capacity in nine bacterial strains. The results indicate there was a single ancestral 9,10-seco-steroid degradation pathway. Gene duplication, likely in a progenitor of Rhodococcus, later gave rise to a cholate degradation pathway. Proteobacteria and additional Actinobacteria subsequently obtained a cholate degradation pathway via horizontal gene transfer, in some cases facilitated by plasmids. Catabolism of steroids appears to be an important component of the ecological niches of broad groups of Actinobacteria and individual species of Proteobacteria.

  15. Removal of the insecticide diazinon from liquid media by free and immobilized Streptomyces sp. isolated from agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño, Gabriela; Fuentes, María S; Rubilar, Olga; Jorquera, Milko; Tortella, Gonzalo; Palma, Graciela; Amoroso, María J; Diez, Maria Cristina

    2015-03-01

    From an agricultural soil that had received continuous applications of organophosphorus pesticides, 30 actinobacteria strains were isolated. Two strains, identified as Streptomyces sp. AC1-6 and Streptomyces sp. ISP4, were selected because of their tolerance to diazinon and based on the relationship between diazinon removal and microbial growth. In liquid medium with diazinon at concentrations of 25 and 50 mg L(-1), both strains were able to remove approximately 40-50% and 70-90% of the initial diazinon after 24 and 96 h of incubation, respectively. This diazinon removal was accompanied by microbial growth of the strains, an initial pH decrease, and glucose consumption in the liquid medium. Evaluation of the diazinon removal achieved by the free actinobacteria and Streptomyces sp. AC1-6 immobilized on alginate beads revealed that the immobilized cells exhibited a 60% higher diazinon removal compared with the free cells. The reusability of the encapsulated biomass was confirmed, and a diazinon removal rate of more than 50% was obtained after the second batch. This work constitutes one of the few reports that describe Streptomyces strains as diazinon degraders. Given the high diazinon removal found, the streptomycetes exhibit suitable potential as diazinon-degrading actinobacteria for elimination of diazinon from liquid residues.

  16. Interaction between workers during a short time window is required for bacterial symbiont transmission in Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Sarah E; Poulsen, Michael; Pinto-Tomás, Adrián; Currie, Cameron R

    2014-01-01

    Stable associations between partners over time are critical for the evolution of mutualism. Hosts employ a variety of mechanisms to maintain specificity with bacterial associates. Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants farm a fungal cultivar as their primary nutrient source. These ants also carry a Pseudonocardia Actinobacteria exosymbiont on their bodies that produces antifungal compounds that help inhibit specialized parasites of the ants' fungal garden. Major workers emerge from their pupal cases (eclose) symbiont-free, but exhibit visible Actinobacterial coverage within 14 days post-eclosion. Using subcolony experiments, we investigate exosymbiont transmission within Acromyrmex colonies. We found successful transmission to newly eclosed major workers fostered by major workers with visible Actinobacteria in all cases (100% acquiring, n = 19). In contrast, newly eclosed major workers reared without exosymbiont-carrying major workers did not acquire visible Actinobacteria (0% acquiring, n = 73). We further show that the majority of ants exposed to major workers with exosymbionts within 2 hours of eclosion acquired bacteria (60.7% acquiring, n = 28), while normal acquisition did not occur when exposure occurred later than 2 hours post-eclosion (0% acquiring, n = 18). Our findings show that transmission of exosymbionts to newly eclosed major workers occurs through interactions with exosymbiont-covered workers within a narrow time window after eclosion. This mode of transmission likely helps ensure the defensive function within colonies, as well as specificity and partner fidelity in the ant-bacterium association.

  17. Microbial community changes during the start-up of an anaerobic/aerobic/anoxic-type sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; He, Jiajie; Wang, Hongyu; Ma, Fang; Yang, Kai; Wang, Jingbo

    2013-01-01

    An anaerobic/aerobic/anoxic-type sequencing batch reactor was started up during a summer rainy season to obtain enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR), and its sludge microbial community was also monitored in the hope of observing the microbial community evolution of polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs). During the start-up process, a total of 17 bands of highest species richness were detected in the sludge microbial community, including Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma- Proteobacteria, as well as Actinobacteria and Planctomycetes. Major microbial community structural change was observed in Rhodocyclus-related and Acinetobacter-related PAOs, glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs), and Actinobacteria. In contrast to the current belief that enrichment of PAOs is essential for the establishment of EBPR, PAOs were not favourably enriched in this study. Instead, Actinobacteria and GAOs overwhelmingly flourished. The overall conclusion of this study challenges the conventional view that EBPR cannot live without traditional PAOs. However, it suggests an non-negligible role of denitrifying phosphorus-accumulating bacteria in EBPR systems, as well as other uncultured bacteria.

  18. Insecticidal activity of a Moroccan strain of Streptomyces phaeochromogenes LD-37 on larvae, pupae and adults of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samri, S E; Baz, M; Ghalbane, I; El Messoussi, S; Zitouni, A; El Meziane, A; Barakate, M

    2017-04-01

    The Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), Ceratitis capitata, is considered the most important fruit pest worldwide. Its management is mainly based on the use of chemical insecticides. Although these conventional pesticides are effective at high doses, they cause considerable human health and environment problems. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess insecticidal activity of Moroccan actinobacteria against C. capitata. A total of 12 preselected actinobacteria isolated from various Moroccan habitats were screened for their insecticidal activity against larvae, pupae and adults of C. capitata. Four actinobacteria isolates were significantly active against the first-instar larvae, and nine were active against the medfly adult, while no significant mortality was obtained against the third-instar larval and pupal stages. Among the selected isolates, the biological screening revealed that strain Streptomyces LD-37, which showed 99.4% similarity with Streptomyces phaeochromogenes, exhibited the maximal corrected larval mortality of 98%. Moreover, the isolates AS1 and LD-37 showed the maximum significant corrected mortality against adults of 32.5 and 28.2%, respectively. The crude extract obtained from a fermented culture of strain S. phaeochromogenes LD-37 was separated into six fractions by thin layer chromatography. Fractions F3 and F4 caused a significant corrected larval mortality of 66.7 and 53.3%, respectively; whereas the maximum reduction in adult emergence was obtained with fraction F4. This finding could be useful for utilizing S. phaeochromogenes LD-37 as an alternative to chemical insecticides in pest management of C. capitata.

  19. Ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE)-degrading microbial communities in enrichments from polluted environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Digabel, Yoann; Demanèche, Sandrine; Benoit, Yves; Fayolle-Guichard, Françoise; Vogel, Timothy M

    2014-08-30

    The ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) degradation capacity and phylogenetic composition of five aerobic enrichment cultures with ETBE as the sole carbon and energy source were studied. In all cases, ETBE was entirely degraded to biomass and CO2. Clone libraries of the 16S rRNA gene were prepared from each enrichment. The analyses of the DNA sequences obtained showed different taxonomic compositions with a majority of Proteobacteria in three cases. The two other enrichments have different microbiota with an abundance of Acidobacteria in one case, whereas the microbiota in the second was more diverse (majority of Actinobacteria, Chlorobi and Gemmatimonadetes). Actinobacteria were detected in all five enrichments. Several bacterial strains were isolated from the enrichments and five were capable of degrading ETBE and/or tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), a degradation intermediate. The five included three Rhodococcus sp. (IFP 2040, IFP 2041, IFP 2043), one Betaproteobacteria (IFP 2047) belonging to the Rubrivivax/Leptothrix/Ideonella branch, and one Pseudonocardia sp. (IFP 2050). Quantification of these five strains and two other strains, Rhodococcus sp. IFP 2042 and Bradyrhizobium sp. IFP2049, which had been previously isolated from one of the enrichments was carried out on the different enrichments based on quantitative PCR with specific 16S rRNA gene primers and the results were consistent with the hypothesized role of Actinobacteria and Betaproteobacteria in the degradation of ETBE and the possible role of Bradyrhizobium strains in the degradation of TBA.

  20. Functional divergence of HBHA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its evolutionary relationship with TadA from Rhodococcus opacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranconi, Mariana P; Alvarez, Héctor M

    2016-08-01

    Rhodococcus opacus PD630 and Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 are oleaginous bacteria able to synthesize and accumulate triacylglycerols (TAG) in lipid bodies (LB). Highly relevant to the structure of LB is a protein homologous to heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA) (called TadA in rhodococci), which is a virulence factor found in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. HBHA is an adhesin involved in binding to non-phagocytic cells and extrapulmonary dissemination. We observed a conserved synteny of three genes encoding a transcriptional regulator (TR), the HBHA protein and a membrane protein (MP) between TAG-accumulating actinobacteria belonging to Rhodococcus, Mycobacterium, Nocardia and Dietzia genera, among others. A 354 bp-intergenic spacing containing a SigF-binding site was found between hbha and the TR genes in M. tuberculosis, which was absent in genomes of other investigated actinobacteria. Analyses of available "omic" information revealed that TadA and TR were co-induced in rhodococci under TAG-accumulating conditions; whereas in M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis, HBHA and TR were regulated independently under stress conditions occurring during infection. We also found differences in protein lengths, domain content and distribution between HBHA and TadA proteins from mycobacteria and rhodococci, which may explain their different roles in cells. Based on the combination of results obtained in model actinobacteria, we hypothesize that HBHA and TadA proteins originated from a common ancestor, but later suffered a process of functional divergence during evolution. Thus, rhodococcal TadA probably has maintained its original role; whereas HBHA may have evolved as a virulence factor in pathogenic mycobacteria.

  1. Comparison of bacterial culture and 16S rRNA community profiling by clonal analysis and and pyrosequencing for the characterisation of the caries-associated microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin eSchulze-Schweifing

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Culture-independent analyses have greatly expanded knowledge regarding the composition of complex bacterial communities including those associated with oral diseases. A consistent finding from such studies, however, has been the under-reporting of members of the phylum Actinobacteria. In this study, five pairs of broad range primers targeting 16S rRNA genes were used in clonal analysis of 6 samples collected from tooth lesions involving dentine in subjects with active caries. Samples were also subjected to cultural analysis and pyrosequencing by means of the 454 platform. A diverse bacterial community of 229 species-level taxa was revealed by culture and clonal analysis, dominated by representatives of the genera Prevotella, Lactobacillus, Selenomonas and Streptococcus. The five most abundant species were: Lactobacillus gasseri, Prevotella denticola, Alloprevotella tannerae, S. mutans and Streptococcus sp. HOT 070, which together made up 31.6 % of the sequences. Two samples were dominated by lactobacilli, while the remaining samples had low numbers of lactobacilli but significantly higher numbers of Prevotella species. The different primer pairs produced broadly similar data but proportions of the phylum Bacteroidetes were significantly higher when primer 1387R was used. All of the primer sets underestimated the proportion of Actinobacteria compared to culture. Pyrosequencing analysis of the samples was performed to a depth of sequencing of 4293 sequences per sample which were identified to 264 species-level taxa, and resulted in significantly higher coverage estimates than the clonal analysis. Pyrosequencing, however, also underestimated the relative abundance of Actinobacteria compared to culture.

  2. Diversity and biological activities of the bacterial community associated with the marine sponge Phorbas tenacior (Porifera, Demospongiae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, S; Carré-Mlouka, A; Descarrega, F; Ereskovsky, A; Longeon, A; Mouray, E; Florent, I; Bourguet-Kondracki, M L

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of the cultivable microbiota of the marine sponge Phorbas tenacior frequently found in the Mediterranean Sea was investigated, and its potential as a source of antimicrobial, antioxidant and antiplasmodial compounds was evaluated. The cultivable bacterial community was studied by isolation, cultivation and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Twenty-three bacterial strains were isolated and identified in the Proteobacteria (α or γ classes) and Actinobacteria phyla. Furthermore, three different bacterial morphotypes localized extracellularly within the sponge tissues were revealed by microscopic observations. Bacterial strains were assigned to seven different genera, namely Vibrio, Photobacterium, Shewanella, Pseudomonas, Ruegeria, Pseudovibrio and Citricoccus. The strains affiliated to the same genus were differentiated according to their genetic dissimilarities using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses. Eleven bacterial strains were selected for evaluation of their bioactivities. Three isolates Pseudovibrio P1Ma4, Vibrio P1MaNal1 and Citricoccus P1S7 revealed antimicrobial activity; Citricoccus P1S7 and Vibrio P1MaNal1 isolates also exhibited antiplasmodial activity, while two Vibrio isolates P1Ma8 and P1Ma5 displayed antioxidant activity. These data confirmed the importance of Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria associated with marine sponges as a reservoir of bioactive compounds. This study presents the first report on the diversity of the cultivable bacteria associated with the marine sponge Phorbas tenacior, frequently found in the Mediterranean Sea. Evaluation of the antiplasmodial, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of the isolates has been investigated and allowed to select bacterial strains, confirming the importance of Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria as sources of bioactive compounds. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Regulation of the Alkane Hydroxylase CYP153 Gene in a Gram-Positive Alkane-Degrading Bacterium, Dietzia sp. Strain DQ12-45-1b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jie-Liang; JiangYang, Jing-Hong; Nie, Yong; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2015-11-13

    CYP153, one of the most common medium-chain n-alkane hydroxylases belonging to the cytochrome P450 superfamily, is widely expressed in n-alkane-degrading bacteria. CYP153 is also thought to cooperate with AlkB in degrading various n-alkanes. However, the mechanisms regulating the expression of the protein remain largely unknown. In this paper, we studied CYP153 gene transcription regulation by the potential AraC family regulator (CypR) located upstream of the CYP153 gene cluster in a broad-spectrum n-alkane-degrading Gram-positive bacterium, Dietzia sp. strain DQ12-45-1b. We first identified the transcriptional start site and the promoter of the CYP153 gene cluster. Sequence alignment of upstream regions of CYP153 gene clusters revealed high conservation in the -10 and -35 regions in Actinobacteria. Further analysis of the β-galactosidase activity in the CYP153 gene promoter-lacZ fusion cell indicated that the CYP153 gene promoter was induced by n-alkanes comprised of 8 to 14 carbon atoms, but not by derived decanol and decanic acid. Moreover, we constructed a cypR mutant strain and found that the CYP153 gene promoter activities and CYP153 gene transcriptional levels in the mutant strain were depressed compared with those in the wild-type strain in the presence of n-alkanes, suggesting that CypR served as an activator for the CYP153 gene promoter. By comparing CYP153 gene arrangements in Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, we found that the AraC family regulator is ubiquitously located upstream of the CYP153 gene, suggesting its universal regulatory role in CYP153 gene transcription. We further hypothesize that the observed mode of CYP153 gene regulation is shared by many Actinobacteria.

  4. Diversity and abundance of Gram positive bacteria in a tidal flat ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Heike; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Rink, Beate; Vollmers, John; Simon, Meinhard

    2007-07-01

    Gram positive bacteria recently have been identified as important components of freshwater ecosystems and are also present in marine environments. However, their quantitative significance and possible role in the latter systems is still little studied, in particular in coastal regions. Therefore, we investigated the abundance and composition of Gram positive bacteria in the Wadden Sea, a tidal flat ecosystem in the German Bight of the North Sea. Applying fluorescence in situ hybridization we found that Actinobacteria constitute 4-7% of total bacteria in the Wadden Sea and slightly higher proportions in a freshwater drainage channel connected to the sea by a sluice. The application of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rRNA gene fragments after amplification by an Actinobacteria-specific primer set and subsequent sequencing showed that the composition of the actinobacterial community in the Wadden Sea was distinctly different from that in the freshwater system. A bacterial clone library of 111 clones yielded eight Gram positive phylotypes which are related closely to other marine phylotypes including the Marine Actinobacteria Clade but also to freshwater phylotypes. We applied dilution cultures, enriched with various biopolymers, Marine Broth and Fucus vesiculosus extracts, for isolating bacteria from the bulk water, suspended aggregates, the oxic surface and oxic/anoxic transition zone of the sediment. Fifty-three isolates affiliated to seven families of the order Actinomycetales and nine isolates to the family Bacillaceae. The salinity range (1-45 per thousand NaCl) and growth optimum of 14 strains from various families showed that all except one strain exhibited a rather broad range of sustained growth from 1 per thousand to >or= 20 per thousand NaCl and several strains exhibited an optimum of > 10 per thousand NaCl. The results indicate that the Gram positive bacterial community in the Wadden Sea is surprisingly diverse and consists mainly of

  5. Comparative analysis of the gastrointestinal microbial communities of bar-headed goose (Anser indicus) in different breeding patterns by high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Cao, Jian; Li, Ji-Rong; Yang, Fang; Li, Zhuo; Li, Lai-Xing

    2016-01-01

    The bar-headed goose is currently one of the most popular species for rare birds breeding in China. However, bar-headed geese in captivity display a reduced reproductive rate. The gut microbiome has been shown to influence host factors such as nutrient and energy metabolism, immune homeostasis and reproduction. It is therefore of great scientific and agriculture value to analyze the microbial communities associated with bar-headed geese in order to improve their reproductive rate. Here we describe the first comparative study of the gut microbial communities of bar-headed geese in three different breeding pattern groups by 16SrRNA sequences using the Illumina MiSeq platform. The results showed that Firmicutes predominated (58.33%) among wild bar-headed geese followed by Proteobacteria (30.67%), Actinobacteria (7.33%) and Bacteroidetes (3.33%). In semi-artificial breeding group, Firmicutes was also the most abundant bacteria (62.00%), followed by Bacteroidetes (28.67%), Proteobacteria (4.20%), Actinobacteria (3.27%) and Fusobacteria (1.51%). The microbial communities of artificial breeding group were dominated by Firmicutes (60.67%), Fusobacteria (29.67%) and Proteobacteria (9.33%). Wild bar-headed geese had a significant higher relative abundance of Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, while semi-artificial breeding bar-headed geese had significantly more Bacteroidetes. The semi-artificial breeding group had the highest microbial community diversity and richness, followed by wild group, and then the artificial breeding group. The marked differences of genus level group-specific microbes create a baseline for future bar-headed goose microbiology research.

  6. Selective progressive response of soil microbial community to wild oat roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAngelis, K.M.; Brodie, E.L.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Andersen, G.L.; Lindow, S.E.; Firestone, M.K.

    2008-10-01

    Roots moving through soil enact physical and chemical changes that differentiate rhizosphere from bulk soil, and the effects of these changes on soil microorganisms have long been a topic of interest. Use of a high-density 16S rRNA microarray (PhyloChip) for bacterial and archaeal community analysis has allowed definition of the populations that respond to the root within the complex grassland soil community; this research accompanies previously reported compositional changes, including increases in chitinase and protease specific activity, cell numbers and quorum sensing signal. PhyloChip results showed a significant change in 7% of the total rhizosphere microbial community (147 of 1917 taxa); the 7% response value was confirmed by16S rRNA T-RFLP analysis. This PhyloChip-defined dynamic subset was comprised of taxa in 17 of the 44 phyla detected in all soil samples. Expected rhizosphere-competent phyla, such as Proteobacteria and Firmicutes, were well represented, as were less-well-documented rhizosphere colonizers including Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Nitrospira. Richness of Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria decreased in soil near the root tip compared to bulk soil, but then increased in older root zones. Quantitative PCR revealed {beta}-Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria present at about 10{sup 8} copies of 16S rRNA genes g{sup -1} soil, with Nitrospira having about 10{sup 5} copies g{sup -1} soil. This report demonstrates that changes in a relatively small subset of the soil microbial community are sufficient to produce substantial changes in function in progressively more mature rhizosphere zones.

  7. Effects of nutritional input and diesel contamination on soil enzyme activities and microbial communities in Antarctic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiwon; Jung, Jaejoon; Hyun, Seunghun; Park, Hyun; Park, Woojun

    2012-12-01

    Pollution of Antarctic soils may be attributable to increased nutritional input and diesel contamination via anthropogenic activities. To investigate the effect of these environmental changes on the Antarctic terrestrial ecosystem, soil enzyme activities and microbial communities in 3 types of Antarctic soils were evaluated. The activities of alkaline phosphomonoesterase and dehydrogenase were dramatically increased, whereas the activities of β-glucosidase, urease, arylsulfatase, and fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis were negligible. Alkaline phosphomonoesterase and dehydrogenase activities in the 3 types of soils increased 3- to 10-fold in response to nutritional input, but did not increase in the presence of diesel contamination. Consistent with the enzymatic activity data, increased copy numbers of the phoA gene, encoding an alkaline phosphomonoesterase, and the 16S rRNA gene were verified using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, dehydrogenase activity and 16S rRNA gene copy number increased slightly after 30 days, even under diesel contamination, probably because of adaptation of the bacterial population. Intact Antarctic soils showed a predominance of Actinobacteria phylum (mostly Pseudonorcarida species) and other phyla such as Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes, Firmicutes, and Verrucomicrobia were present in successively lower proportions. Nutrient addition might act as a selective pressure on the bacterial community, resulting in the prevalence of Actinobacteria phylum (mostly Arthrobacter species). Soils contaminated by diesel showed a predominance of Proteobacteria phylum (mostly Phyllobacterium species), and other phyla such as Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, and Gemmatimonadetes were present in successively lower proportions. Our data reveal that nutritional input has a dramatic impact on bacterial communities in Antarctic soils and that diesel contamination is likely toxic to enzymes in this

  8. Determination of physiological, taxonomic, and molecular characteristics of a cultivable arsenic-resistant bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordi, A; Pagnout, C; Devin, S; Poirel, J; Billard, P; Dollard, M A; Bauda, P

    2015-09-01

    A collection of 219 bacterial arsenic-resistant isolates was constituted from neutral arsenic mine drainage sediments. Isolates were grown aerobically or anaerobically during 21 days on solid DR2A medium using agar or gelan gum as gelling agent, with 7 mM As(III) or 20 mM As(V) as selective pressure. Interestingly, the sum of the different incubation conditions used (arsenic form, gelling agent, oxygen pressure) results in an overall increase of the isolate diversity. Isolated strains mainly belonged to Proteobacteria (63%), Actinobacteria (25%), and Bacteroidetes (10%). The most representative genera were Pseudomonas (20%), Acinetobacter (8%), and Serratia (15%) among the Proteobacteria; Rhodococcus (13%) and Microbacterium (5%) among Actinobacteria; and Flavobacterium (13%) among the Bacteroidetes. Isolates were screened for the presence of arsenic-related genes (arsB, ACR3(1), ACR3(2), aioA, arsM, and arrA). In this way, 106 ACR3(1)-, 74 arsB-, 22 aioA-, 14 ACR3(2)-, and one arsM-positive PCR products were obtained and sequenced. Analysis of isolate sensitivity toward metalloids (arsenite, arsenate, and antimonite) revealed correlations between taxonomy, sensitivity, and genotype. Antimonite sensitivity correlated with the presence of ACR3(1) mainly present in Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria, and arsenite or antimonite resistance correlated with arsB gene presence. The presence of either aioA gene or several different arsenite carrier genes did not ensure a high level of arsenic resistance in the tested conditions.

  9. Selective progressive response of soil microbial community to wild oat roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, Kristen M; Brodie, Eoin L; DeSantis, Todd Z; Andersen, Gary L; Lindow, Steven E; Firestone, Mary K

    2009-02-01

    Roots moving through soil induce physical and chemical changes that differentiate rhizosphere from bulk soil, and the effects of these changes on soil microorganisms have long been a topic of interest. The use of a high-density 16S rRNA microarray (PhyloChip) for bacterial and archaeal community analysis has allowed definition of the populations that respond to the root within the complex grassland soil community; this research accompanies compositional changes reported earlier, including increases in chitinase- and protease-specific activity, cell numbers and quorum sensing signal. PhyloChip results showed a significant change compared with bulk soil in relative abundance for 7% of the total rhizosphere microbial community (147 of 1917 taxa); the 7% response value was confirmed by16S rRNA terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. This PhyloChip-defined dynamic subset was comprised of taxa in 17 of the 44 phyla detected in all soil samples. Expected rhizosphere-competent phyla, such as Proteobacteria and Firmicutes, were well represented, as were less-well-documented rhizosphere colonizers including Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Nitrospira. Richness of Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria decreased in soil near the root tip compared with bulk soil, but then increased in older root zones. Quantitative PCR revealed rhizosphere abundance of beta-Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria at about 10(8) copies of 16S rRNA genes per g soil, with Nitrospira having about 10(5) copies per g soil. This report demonstrates that changes in a relatively small subset of the soil microbial community are sufficient to produce substantial changes in functions observed earlier in progressively more mature rhizosphere zones.

  10. Metagenomic analysis of bacterial and archaeal assemblages in the soil-mousse surrounding a geothermal spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sonu; Batra, Navneet; Pathak, Ashish; Joshi, Amit; Souza, Leila; Almeida, Paulo; Chauhan, Ashvini

    2015-09-01

    The soil-mousse surrounding a geothermal spring was analyzed for bacterial and archaeal diversity using 16S rRNA gene amplicon metagenomic sequencing which revealed the presence of 18 bacterial phyla distributed across 109 families and 219 genera. Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and the Deinococcus-Thermus group were the predominant bacterial assemblages with Crenarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota as the main archaeal assemblages in this largely understudied geothermal habitat. Several metagenome sequences remained taxonomically unassigned suggesting the presence of a repertoire of hitherto undescribed microbes in this geothermal soil-mousse econiche.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of bacteria in sea ice brine sampled from the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial diversity in sea ice brine samples which collected from four stations located at the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean was analyzed by PCR-DGGE. Twenty-three 16S rDNA sequences of bacteria obtained from DGGE bands were cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis clustered these sequences within γ-proteobacteria, Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides (CFB) group, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. The phylotype of Pseudoalteromonas in the γ-proteobacteria was predominant and members of the CFB group and γ-proteobacteria were highly abundant in studied sea ice brine samples.

  12. Host-specific microbial communities in three sympatric North Sea sponges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naim, Mohd Azrul; Morillo, Jose A.; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of next generation technology sequencing has deepened our knowledge of marine sponge-associated microbiota with the identification of at least 32 phyla of bacteria and archaea from a large number of sponge species. In this study we assessed the diversity of the microbial...... phylotypes belonging to Chlamydiae, TM6, Actinobacteria and Betaproteobacteria were detected in all sponge samples. A number of phylotypes of the phylum Chlamydiae were present at an unprecedentedly high relative abundance of up to 14.4% ± 1.4% of the total reads, which suggests an important ecological role...

  13. Epiphytic bacterial communities of the alga Fucus vesiculosus in oil-contaminated water areas of the Barents Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugovkin, D V; Liaimer, A; Jensen, J B

    2016-11-01

    Taxonomic compositions of epiphytic bacterial communities in water areas differing in levels of oil pollution were revealed. In total, 82 bacterial genera belonging to 16 classes and 11 phyla were detected. All detected representatives of epiphytic bacterial communities belonged to the phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Acidobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, and Fusobacteria and candidate division TM7. The ratio of the phyla in the communities varied depending on the levels of oil pollution. New data on taxonomic composition of uncultivated epiphytic bacterial communities of Fucus vesiculosus were obtained.

  14. Comparison of bacterial succession in green waste composts amended with inorganic fertiliser and wastewater treatment plant sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Sean; Chualain, Dearbháil Ní; Doyle, Owen; Clipson, Nicholas; Doyle, Evelyn

    2015-03-01

    Replacing CAN with DWS resulted in a stable product capable of supporting similar levels of plant growth to conventional compost. Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum detected in both CAN- and DWS-amended composts with Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Chloroflexi present also. Proteobacteria in both composts negatively correlated with pH, NO3 concentration and temperature, but were positively influenced by NH4 levels. Sphaerobacter was the most abundant genus in the mature phase of both CAN- and DWS-amended composts but bacterial community structure in mature DWS-amended compost appeared more diverse than that present in mature compost made using CAN.

  15. 四川冬菜中细菌群落组成及多样性%Bacterial biodiversity in Dongcai, a traditional pickled mustard product in Sichuan Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董玲; 蒲彪; 敖晓琳; 张小平; 郑有坤; 李小林

    2012-01-01

    [ Objective] To investigate the bacteria community and biodiversity of four-years pickled Yanshan Dongcai. [Methods] We studied the bacterial communities of Dongcai by 16S rDNA diversity analysis and the cultured species isolated from Dongcai sample by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism ( RFLP) and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. [ Results] The 16S rDNA diversity showed that the bacteria belonged to the phyla Proteobacteria (87. 9% ) and Firmicutes (7. 1% ) , including many moderately halophilic bacteria such as Virgibacillus kekensis, Marinococcus albus, Salinicoccus sp. , Lactobacillus halophilus and Halomonas. Only 5% of clone sequences belonged to the phylum Actinobacteria. Thirty-five strains were isolated from Dongcai sample, and 16S rDNA-RFLP analysis indicated that 34 isolates affiliated with the phylum Firmicutes, including Virgibacillus, Bacillus megaterium and Gracilibacillus saliphilus which were moderately halophilic bacteria, but only one isolate belonged to the phylum Actinobacteria. [ Conclusion ] The bacterial diversity is low in Dongcai, dominated by moderately halophilic bacteria.%[目的]了解腌制4年的四川南充冬菜中细菌群落组成及多样性.[方法]通过16S rDNA多样性分析样品细菌落组成;采用16S rDNA-RFLP方法分析从样品中分离出的纯培养细菌.[结果]16S rDNA多样性分析结果表明,样品中细菌主要属于变形杆菌门( Proteobacteria)和厚壁菌门(Firmicutes),分别占克隆文库的87.9%、7.1%,其中包括Virgibacillus kekensis,Marinococcus albus,Salinicoccus sp.,Lactobacillus halophilus和Halomonas等中度嗜盐菌,仅有5%属于放线菌门(Actinobacteria).通过纯培养方法从冬菜中分离到35株菌,16S rDNA-RFLP分析结果表明,34株属于厚壁菌门(Firmicutes),包括Virgibacillus,Bacillus megaterium和Gracilibacillus saliphilus等中度嗜盐菌,1株属于放线菌门(Actinobacteria).[结论]冬菜中细菌群落多样性较低,以中度嗜盐菌为主.

  16. Site- and horizon-specific patterns of microbial community structure and enzyme activities in permafrost-affected soils of Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gittel, Antje; Barta, Jiri; Kohoutova, Iva;

    2014-01-01

    that the distribution pattern of Actinobacteria and a variety of other bacterial classes was related to the activity of phenol oxidases and peroxidases supporting the hypothesis that bacteria might resume the role of fungi in oxidative enzyme production and degradation of phenolic and other complex substrates...... on its impact on the carbon budget are thus still highly uncertain. However, the fate of OC is not only determined by abiotic factors, but closely tied to microbial activity. We investigated eight soil profiles in northeast Greenland comprising two sites with typical tundra vegetation and one wet fen...

  17. Metagenomic analysis of bacterial and archaeal assemblages in the soil-mousse surrounding a geothermal spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonu Bhatia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The soil-mousse surrounding a geothermal spring was analyzed for bacterial and archaeal diversity using 16S rRNA gene amplicon metagenomic sequencing which revealed the presence of 18 bacterial phyla distributed across 109 families and 219 genera. Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and the Deinococcus-Thermus group were the predominant bacterial assemblages with Crenarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota as the main archaeal assemblages in this largely understudied geothermal habitat. Several metagenome sequences remained taxonomically unassigned suggesting the presence of a repertoire of hitherto undescribed microbes in this geothermal soil-mousse econiche.

  18. [Number, viability, and diversity of the filterable forms of prokaryotes in sphagnous high-moor peat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysak, L V; Lapygina, E V; Kadulin, M S; Konova, I A

    2014-01-01

    The number, potential viability, and taxonomic diversity (at the level of phylum) of the filterable forms of prokaryotes (FFP) are estimated in the main genetic horizons of high-moor peat. It was shown that the number of FFP reached 500 million cells in 1 g, i.e., up to 5% of the general size bacteria. The portion of viable cells among FFP (93-98%) was higher than that for the general size bacteria (60-68%). FISH-analysis (fluorescence in situ hybridization) showed that FFP contained the same phylogenetic groups as the population of general size bacteria (domain Archea and phylum Actinobacteria, Cytophaga, and Proteobacteria of the domain Bacteria).

  19. Microbial diversity associated with tetrodotoxin production in marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratheepa, V; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2013-11-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX), is a potent neurotoxin found in genetically diversed organisms. Many TTX producing microorganism have also been isolated from TTX bearing animals. The TTX producing microbes found in four different phylum (Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes), the Proteobacteria are the dominating one. In most of the cases, TTX producing microbes are found in the intestine of the TTX producing vector indicating the origin of TTX through food chain. This paper reviews the TTX and its analogs and the geographic distribution of TTX in symbiotic microorganism and its production.

  20. Human microbiome: From the bathroom to the bedside

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen; Malnick; Ehud; Melzer

    2015-01-01

    The human gut contains trillions of bacteria, the major phylae of which include Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. Fecal microbial transplantation(FMT) has been known of for manyyears but only recently has been subjected to rigorous examination. We review the evidence regarding FMT for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection which has resulted in it being an approved treatment. In addition there is some evidence for its use in both irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. Further research is needed in order to define the indications for FMT and the most appropriate method of administration.

  1. Culture-independent characterization of the bacterioplankton community composition of a mesotrophic reservoir (Embalse Río III, Argentina Caracterización independiente de la composición de la comunidad del bacterioplancton en un embalse mesotrófico (embalse Río III, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Polverino

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study represents the first analysis of the bacterioplankton community structure from a freshwater reservoir of Argentina using amplification of the entire 16S rDNA gene. It includes the description and the phylogenetic relationships of the bacterioplankton community from the photic and aphotic layers of the Río III Reservoir in Córdoba, Argentina. The classical ecological approach indicated that the photic layer had greater diversity whereas the aphotic layer had a better distribution of species and higher abundance. Nevertheless, when the microbial communities in both layers were compared using phylogenetic information, this analysis indicated that both environments were similar and that neither was enriched for any particular lineage. The phyla present in the Río III reservoir were Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria and the 2 dominant species in both layers were "Candidatus Planktophila sp." (class Actinobacteria and Polynucleobacter sp. (class Betaproteobacteria.Este estudio constituye el primer análisis de la estructura de la comunidad del bacterioplancton en un reservorio de agua dulce de Argentina utilizando amplificación completa del gen ADNr 16S. Incluye las relaciones filogenéticas y una descripción del bacterioplacton de las zonas fótica y afótica del Embalse Río III, Córdoba, Argentina. El análisis ecológico clásico indicó que la zona fótica tenía mayor diversidad, mientras que la afótica tenía mayor abundancia y una distribución más uniforme de especies. Sin embargo, cuando se utilizó la información filogenética para comparar las comunidades microbianas de ambas zonas, este análisis indicó que ambos ambientes eran similares y que en ninguno predominaba algún linaje en particular. Los phyla identificados en el Embalse del Río III fueron Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria y Proteobacteria. Las especies dominantes en ambas zonas fueron "Candidatus Planktophila sp." (clase Actinobacteria y

  2. Human microbiome: From the bathroom to the bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malnick, Stephen; Melzer, Ehud

    2015-08-15

    The human gut contains trillions of bacteria, the major phylae of which include Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. Fecal microbial transplantation (FMT) has been known of for many years but only recently has been subjected to rigorous examination. We review the evidence regarding FMT for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection which has resulted in it being an approved treatment. In addition there is some evidence for its use in both irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. Further research is needed in order to define the indications for FMT and the most appropriate method of administration.

  3. Multi-Analytical Approach Reveals Potential Microbial Indicators in Soil for Sugarcane Model Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acacio Aparecido Navarrete

    Full Text Available This study focused on the effects of organic and inorganic amendments and straw retention on the microbial biomass (MB and taxonomic groups of bacteria in sugarcane-cultivated soils in a greenhouse mesocosm experiment monitored for gas emissions and chemical factors. The experiment consisted of combinations of synthetic nitrogen (N, vinasse (V; a liquid waste from ethanol production, and sugarcane-straw blankets. Increases in CO2-C and N2O-N emissions were identified shortly after the addition of both N and V to the soils, thus increasing MB nitrogen (MB-N and decreasing MB carbon (MB-C in the N+V-amended soils and altering soil chemical factors that were correlated with the MB. Across 57 soil metagenomic datasets, Actinobacteria (31.5%, Planctomycetes (12.3%, Deltaproteobacteria (12.3%, Alphaproteobacteria (12.0% and Betaproteobacteria (11.1% were the most dominant bacterial groups during the experiment. Differences in relative abundance of metagenomic sequences were mainly revealed for Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia with regard to N+V fertilization and straw retention. Differential abundances in bacterial groups were confirmed using 16S rRNA gene-targeted phylum-specific primers for real-time PCR analysis in all soil samples, whose results were in accordance with sequence data, except for Gammaproteobacteria. Actinobacteria were more responsive to straw retention with Rubrobacterales, Bifidobacteriales and Actinomycetales related to the chemical factors of N+V-amended soils. Acidobacteria subgroup 7 and Opitutae, a verrucomicrobial class, were related to the chemical factors of soils without straw retention as a surface blanket. Taken together, the results showed that MB-C and MB-N responded to changes in soil chemical factors and CO2-C and N2O-N emissions, especially for N+V-amended soils. The results also indicated that several taxonomic groups of bacteria, such as Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and

  4. A snapshot on spatial and vertical distribution of bacterial communities in the eastern Indian Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing; KAN Jinjun; BORECKI Laura; ZHANG Xiaodong; WANG Dongxiao; SUN Jun

    2016-01-01

    Besides being critical components of marine food web, microorganisms play vital roles in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and elements in the ocean. Currently little is known about microbial population structure and their distributions in the eastern Indian Ocean. In this study, we applied molecular approaches including polymerase chain reaction-denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and High-Throughput next generation sequencing to investigate bacterial 16S rRNA genes from the equatorial regions and the adjacent Bay of Bengal in the eastern Indian Ocean. In general,Bacteroidetes,Proteobacteria (mainlyAlpha, andGamma),Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria andPlanctomycetes dominated the microbial communities. Horizontally distinct spatial distribution of major microbial groups was observed from PCR-DGGE gel image analyses. However, further detailed characterization of community structures by pyrosequencing suggested a more pronounced stratified distribution pattern:Cyanobacteria andActinobacteria were more predominant at surface water (25 m);Bacteroidetes dominated at 25 m and 150 m whileProteobacteria (mainlyAlphaproteobacteria) occurred more frequently at 75 m water depth. With increasing water depth, the bacterial communities from different locations tended to share high similarity, indicating a niche partitioning for minor groups of bacteria recovered with high throughput sequencing approaches. This study provided the first “snapshot” on biodiversity and spatial distribution ofBacteria in water columns in the eastern Indian Ocean, and the findings further emphasized the potential functional roles of these microbes in energy and resource cycling in the eastern Indian Ocean.

  5. Biodiversity and physiological characteristics of Antarctic and Arctic lichens-associated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yung Mi; Kim, Eun Hye; Lee, Hong Kum; Hong, Soon Gyu

    2014-10-01

    The diversity and physiological characteristics of culturable bacteria associated with lichens from different habitats of the Arctic and Antarctica were investigated. The 68 retrieved isolates could be grouped on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences into 26 phylotypes affiliated with the phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Deinococcus-Thermus, and Firmicutes and with the classes Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria. Isolates belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria were the most abundant, followed by those belonging to Actinobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Deinococcus-Thermus. Phylogenetic analysis showed that approximately 21 % of the total isolates represented a potentially novel species or genus (≤97 % sequence similarity). Strains belonging to the genera Sphingomonas, Frondihabitans, Hymenobacter, and Burkholderia were recovered from lichen samples from both geographic locations, implying common and important bacterial functions within lichens. Extracellular protease activities were detected in six isolates, affiliated with Burkholderia, Frondihabitans, Hymenobacter, Pseudomonas, and Rhodanobacter. Extracellular lipase activities were detected in 37 isolates of the genera Burkholderia, Deinococcus, Frondihabitans, Pseudomonas, Rhodanobacter, Sphingomonas, and Subtercola. This is the first report on the culturable bacterial diversity present within lichens from Arctic and Antarctica and the isolates described herein are valuable resources to decode the functional and ecological roles of bacteria within lichens. In addition, the low similarity (≤97 %) of the recovered isolates to known species and their production of cold-active enzymes together suggest that lichens are noteworthy sources of novel bacterial strains for use in biotechnological applications.

  6. Microbial Community Responses to Increased Water and Organic Matter in the Arid Soils of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather N Buelow

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The soils of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica are an extreme polar desert, inhabited exclusively by microscopic taxa. This region is on the threshold of anticipated climate change, with glacial melt, permafrost thaw, and the melting of massive buried ice increasing liquid water availability and mobilizing soil nutrients. Experimental water and organic matter (OM amendments were applied to investigate how these climate change effects may impact the soil communities. To identify active taxa and their functions, total community RNA transcripts were sequenced and annotated, and amended soils were compared with unamended control soils using differential abundance and expression analyses. Overall, taxonomic diversity declined with amendments of water and organic matter. The domain Bacteria increased with both amendments while Eukaryota declined from 38% of all taxa in control soils to 8% and 11% in water and OM amended soils, respectively. Among bacterial phyla, Actinobacteria (59% dominated water-amended soils and Firmicutes (45% dominated OM amended soils. Three bacterial phyla (Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Firmicutes were primarily responsible for the observed positive functional responses, while eukaryotic taxa experienced the majority (27 of 34 of significant transcript losses. These results indicated that as climate changes in this region, a replacement of endemic taxa adapted to dry, oligotrophic conditions by generalist, copiotrophic taxa is likely.

  7. [Intestinal bacterial community is indicative for the healthy status of Litopenaeus vannamei].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-feng; Xiong, Jin-bo; Wang, Xin; Qiu, Qian-ling-ling; Zheng, Jia-lai; Zhang, De-min

    2016-02-01

    High density and intensive Litopenaeus vannamei aquaculture has increased the frequency of shrimp disease, however, it remains uncertain whether change in intestinal bacteria could be indicative of shrimp health state (healthy or diseased). Therefore, we collected water and shrimp intestine samples from ponds with or without diseased shrimps. Using bacterial 16S rRNA gene as a biomarker, the bacterial community structure and diversity were evaluated with the Illumina MiSeq sequencing technique. The results showed that the variations of bacterioplankton community were primarily shaped by the levels of NO2(-)-N, chlorophyll a and PO4(3-)-P. Bacterial diversity was signif-7 icantly lower in diseased shrimps than in healthy ones. Using a response ratio analysis, we screened 28 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), and their abundances significantly changed in the intestines between healthy and diseased shrimps. In general, the abundances of OTUs belonged to Actinobacteria, Flavobacteria and Bacilli significantly decreased in diseased shrimps compared with those in healthy shrimps., while the OTUs affiliated to Clostridia showed an opposite pattern. In addition, we obtained 61 indicator species that primarily affiliated to Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes and Actinobacteria. Notably, the identified indicator taxa exhibited clearly discriminative patterns among habitats (water or intestine) and health status. Collectively, this study provided scientific information for development of new probiotics and disease prevention.

  8. Seasonal variation of bacterial endophytes in urban trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Yi eShen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial endophytes, non-pathogenic bacteria residing within plants, contribute to the growth and development of plants and their ability to adapt to adverse conditions. In order to fully exploit the capabilities of these bacteria, it is necessary to understand the extent to which endophytic communities vary between species and over time. The endophytes of Acer negundo, Ulmus pumila and Ulmus parvifolia were sampled over three seasons and analyzed using culture dependent and independent methods (culture on two media, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, and tagged pyrosequencing of 16S ribosomal amplicons. The majority of culturable endophytes isolated were Actinobacteria, and all the samples harbored Bacillus, Curtobacterium, Frigoribacterium, Methylobacterium, Paenibacilllus and Sphingomonas species. Regardless of culture medium used, only the culturable communities obtained in the winter for A. negundo could be distinguished from those of Ulmus spp.. In contrast, the nonculturable communities were dominated by Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, particularly Erwinia, Ralstonia and Sanguibacter spp.. The presence and abundance of various bacterial classes and phyla changed with the changing seasons. Multivariate analysis on the culture independent data revealed significant community differences between the endophytic communities of A. negundo and Ulmus spp., but overall season was the main determinant of endophytic community structure. This study suggests investigations of the studies ofendophytic populations of urban trees should expect to find significant seasonal and species-specific community differences and sampling should proceed accordingly.

  9. The actinobacterial transcription factor RbpA binds to the principal sigma subunit of RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabib-Salazar, Aline; Liu, Bing; Doughty, Philip; Lewis, Richard A; Ghosh, Somadri; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Simpson, Peter J; O'Dwyer, Kathleen; Matthews, Steve J; Paget, Mark S

    2013-06-01

    RbpA is a small non-DNA-binding transcription factor that associates with RNA polymerase holoenzyme and stimulates transcription in actinobacteria, including Streptomyces coelicolor and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. RbpA seems to show specificity for the vegetative form of RNA polymerase as opposed to alternative forms of the enzyme. Here, we explain the basis of this specificity by showing that RbpA binds directly to the principal σ subunit in these organisms, but not to more diverged alternative σ factors. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that, although differing in their requirement for structural zinc, the RbpA orthologues from S. coelicolor and M. tuberculosis share a common structural core domain, with extensive, apparently disordered, N- and C-terminal regions. The RbpA-σ interaction is mediated by the C-terminal region of RbpA and σ domain 2, and S. coelicolor RbpA mutants that are defective in binding σ are unable to stimulate transcription in vitro and are inactive in vivo. Given that RbpA is essential in M. tuberculosis and critical for growth in S. coelicolor, these data support a model in which RbpA plays a key role in the σ cycle in actinobacteria.

  10. Antimicrobial Activity of Marine Bacterial Symbionts Retrieved from Shallow Water Hydrothermal Vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eythorsdottir, Arnheidur; Omarsdottir, Sesselja; Einarsson, Hjorleifur

    2016-06-01

    Marine sponges and other sessile macro-organisms were collected at a shallow water hydrothermal site in Eyjafjörður, Iceland. Bacteria were isolated from the organisms using selective media for actinomycetes, and the isolates were screened for antimicrobial activity. A total of 111 isolates revealed antimicrobial activity displaying different antimicrobial patterns which indicates production of various compounds. Known test strains were grown in the presence of ethyl acetate extracts from one selected isolate, and a clear growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus was observed down to 0.1 % extract concentration in the medium. Identification of isolates shows different species of Actinobacteria with Streptomyces sp. playing the largest role, but also members of Bacilli, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. Sponges have an excellent record regarding production of bioactive compounds, often involving microbial symbionts. At the hydrothermal vents, however, the majority of active isolates originated from other invertebrates such as sea anemones or algae. The results indicate that antimicrobial assays involving isolates in full growth can detect activity not visible by other methods. The macro-organisms inhabiting the Eyjafjörður hydrothermal vent area host diverse microbial species in the phylum Actinobacteria with antimicrobial activity, and the compounds responsible for the activity will be subject to further research.

  11. Genetic Approach for the Fast Discovery of Phenazine Producing Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes F. Imhoff

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A fast and efficient approach was established to identify bacteria possessing the potential to biosynthesize phenazines, which are of special interest regarding their antimicrobial activities. Sequences of phzE genes, which are part of the phenazine biosynthetic pathway, were used to design one universal primer system and to analyze the ability of bacteria to produce phenazine. Diverse bacteria from different marine habitats and belonging to six major phylogenetic lines were investigated. Bacteria exhibiting phzE gene fragments affiliated to Firmicutes, Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, and Actinobacteria. Thus, these are the first primers for amplifying gene fragments from Firmicutes and Alphaproteobacteria. The genetic potential for phenazine production was shown for four type strains belonging to the genera Streptomyces and Pseudomonas as well as for 13 environmental isolates from marine habitats. For the first time, the genetic ability of phenazine biosynthesis was verified by analyzing the metabolite pattern of all PCR-positive strains via HPLC-UV/MS. Phenazine production was demonstrated for the type strains known to produce endophenazines, 2-hydroxy-phenazine, phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylic acid, and chlororaphin as well as for members of marine Actinobacteria. Interestingly, a number of unidentified phenazines possibly represent new phenazine structures.

  12. Culturable heterotrophic bacteria from Potter Cove, Antarctica, and their hydrolytic enzymes production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Tropeano

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Affiliations of the dominant culturable bacteria isolated from Potter Cove, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica, were investigated together with their production of cold-active hydrolytic enzymes. A total of 189 aerobic heterotrophic bacterial isolates were obtained at 4°C and sorted into 63 phylotypes based on their amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis profiles. The sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of representatives from each phylotype showed that the isolates belong to the phyla Proteobacteria (classes Alpha- and Gamma-proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes (class Flavobacteria, Actinobacteria (class Actinobacteria and Firmicutes (class Bacilli. The predominant culturable group in the site studied belongs to the class Gammaproteobacteria, with 65 isolates affiliated to the genus Pseudoalteromonas and 58 to Psychrobacter. Among the 189 isolates screened, producers of amylases (9.5%, pectinases (22.8%, cellulases (14.8%, CM-cellulases (25.4%, xylanases (20.1% and proteases (44.4% were detected. More than 25% of the isolates produced at least one extracellular enzyme, with some of them producing up to six of the tested extracellular enzymatic activities. These results suggest that a high culturable bacterial diversity is present in Potter Cove and that this place represents a promising source of biomolecules.

  13. Integration of acoustic and light sensors for marine bio-mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    Maximum diversity of life exists within the estuaries and coral reefs of the Globe. The absence of vertebrate and other land dwelling adaptations has resulted in an enormous range of complexity among invertebrates and their symbiotic biome resulting in the generation of compounds finding uses in anti-tumor and antibiotic applications. It has been widely reported that the greatest factor limiting progress in characterizing and processing new therapeutics derived from invertebrates is the lack of adequate original material. Symbiotic bacteria within specific tunicates often synthesize antitumor compounds as secondary metabolites. We describe a 3-stage protocol that utilizes acoustic and photonic analysis of large areas of marine ecosystem and life forms. We refer to this as Estuary Assessment System (EAS), which includes a multi-frequency acoustic transducer/sensing instrument mounted on our research vessel. This generates a topological map of surveyed tracks of marine locations known to be habitats of useful actinobacteria laden invertebrates. Photonic devices are used to generate image and pulse data leading to location, identification and isolation of tunicates and actinobacteria.

  14. Dynamics of communities of bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in response to simazine attenuation in agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Rui; Wang, Zhao; Xie, Shuguang

    2014-02-15

    Autochthonous microbiota plays a crucial role in natural attenuation of s-triazine herbicides in agricultural soil. Soil microcosm study was carried out to investigate the shift in the structures of soil autochthonous microbial communities and the potential degraders associated with natural simazine attenuation. The relative abundance of soil autochthonous degraders and the structures of microbial communities were assessed using quantitative PCR (q-PCR) and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP), respectively. Phylogenetic composition of bacterial community was also characterized using clone library analysis. Soil autochthonous microbiota could almost completely clean up simazine (100 mg kg(-1)) in 10 days after herbicide application, indicating a strong self-remediation potential of agricultural soil. A significant increase in the proportion of s-triazine-degrading atzC gene was found in 6 days after simazine amendment. Simazine application could alter the community structures of total bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB). AOA were more responsive to simazine application compared to AOB and bacteria. Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were the dominant bacterial groups either at the initial stage after simazine amendment or at the end stage of herbicide biodegradation, but Actinobacteria predominated at the middle stage of biodegradation. Microorganisms from several bacterial genera might be involved in simazine biodegradation. This work could add some new insights on the bioremediation of herbicides contaminated agricultural soils. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Immune status, antibiotic medication and pH are associated with changes in the stomach fluid microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rosenvinge, Erik C; Song, Yang; White, James R; Maddox, Cynthia; Blanchard, Thomas; Fricke, W Florian

    2013-07-01

    The stomach acts as a barrier to ingested microbes, thereby influencing the microbial ecology of the entire gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The stomach microbiota and the role of human host and environmental factors, such as health status or medications, in shaping its composition remain largely unknown. We sought to characterize the bacterial and fungal microbiota in the stomach fluid in order to gain insights into the role of the stomach in GI homeostasis. Gastric fluid was collected from 25 patients undergoing clinically indicated upper endoscopy. DNA isolates were used for PCR amplification of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and fungal internal transcribed spacers (ITS). RNA isolates were used for 16S rRNA cDNA generation and subsequent PCR amplification. While all stomach fluid samples are dominated by the phyla Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Fusobacteria (>99% of sequence reads), the transcriptionally active microbiota shows significant reduction in Actinobacteria (34%) and increase in Campylobacter (444%) (PBacterial but not fungal diversity is reduced by antibiotic treatment (28%; P4 (70%; Pmicrobiota, using bacterial 16S rRNA gene and transcript, and fungal ITS amplicon sequencing and provide evidence for a significant impact of the host immune status on its composition with likely consequences for human health.

  16. Discordant temporal development of bacterial phyla and the emergence of core in the fecal microbiota of young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jing; Ringel-Kulka, Tamar; Heikamp-de Jong, Ineke; Ringel, Yehuda; Carroll, Ian; de Vos, Willem M; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Satokari, Reetta

    2016-04-01

    The colonization pattern of intestinal microbiota during childhood may impact health later in life, but children older than 1 year are poorly studied. We followed healthy children aged 1-4 years (n=28) for up to 12 months, during which a synbiotic intervention and occasional antibiotics intake occurred, and compared them with adults from the same region. Microbiota was quantified with the HITChip phylogenetic microarray and analyzed with linear mixed effects model and other statistical approaches. Synbiotic administration increased the stability of Actinobacteria and antibiotics decreased Clostridium cluster XIVa abundance. Bacterial diversity did not increase in 1- to 5-year-old children and remained significantly lower than in adults. Actinobacteria, Bacilli and Clostridium cluster IV retained child-like abundances, whereas some other groups were converting to adult-like profiles. Microbiota stability increased, with Bacteroidetes being the main contributor. The common core of microbiota in children increased with age from 18 to 25 highly abundant genus-level taxa, including several butyrate-producing organisms, and developed toward an adult-like composition. In conclusion, intestinal microbiota is not established before 5 years of age and diversity, core microbiota and different taxa are still developing toward adult-type configuration. Discordant development patterns of bacterial phyla may reflect physiological development steps in children.

  17. Microbial and viral-like rhodopsins present in coastal marine sediments from four polar and subpolar regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, José L.; Golemba, Marcelo; Hernández, Edgardo; Lozada, Mariana; Dionisi, Hebe; Jansson, Janet K.; Carroll, Jolynn; Lundgren, Leif; Sjöling, Sara; Mac Cormack, Walter P.; Sobecky, Patricia

    2016-11-03

    Rhodopsins are broadly distributed. In this work, we analyzed 23 metagenomes corresponding to marine sediment samples from four regions that share cold climate conditions (Norway; Sweden; Argentina and Antarctica). In order to investigate the genes evolution of viral rhodopsins, an initial set of 6224 bacterial rhodopsin sequences according to COG5524 were retrieved from the 23 metagenomes. After selection by the presence of transmembrane domains and alignment, 123 viral (51) and non-viral (72) sequences (>50 amino acids) were finally included in further analysis. Viral rhodopsin genes were homologs of Phaeocystis globosa virus and Organic lake Phycodnavirus. Non-viral microbial rhodopsin genes were ascribed to Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus and Cryptophyta and Fungi. A rescreening using Blastp, using as queries the viral sequences previously described, retrieved 30 sequences (>100 amino acids). Phylogeographic analysis revealed a geographical clustering of the sequences affiliated to the viral group. This clustering was not observed for the microbial non-viral sequences. The phylogenetic reconstruction allowed us to propose the existence of a putative ancestor of viral rhodopsin genes related to Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi. This is the first report about the existence of a phylogeographic association of the viral rhodopsin sequences from marine sediments.

  18. Metagenomic analyses reveal no differences in genes involved in cellulose degradation under different tillage treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Maria; Schöler, Anne; Ertl, Julia; Xu, Zhuofei; Schloter, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Incorporation of plant litter is a frequent agricultural practice to increase nutrient availability in soil, and relies heavily on the activity of cellulose-degrading microorganisms. Here we address the question of how different tillage treatments affect soil microbial communities and their cellulose-degrading potential in a long-term agricultural experiment. To identify potential differences in microbial taxonomy and functionality, we generated six soil metagenomes of conventional (CT) and reduced (RT) tillage-treated topsoil samples, which differed in their potential extracellular cellulolytic activity as well as their microbial biomass. Taxonomic analysis of metagenomic data revealed few differences between RT and CT, and a dominance of Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, whereas eukaryotic phyla were not prevalent. Prediction of cellulolytic enzymes revealed glycoside hydrolase families 1, 3 and 94, auxiliary activity family 8 and carbohydrate-binding module 2 as the most abundant in soil. These were annotated mainly to the phyla of Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. These results suggest that the observed higher cellulolytic activity in RT soils can be explained by a higher microbial biomass or changed expression levels but not by shifts in the soil microbiome. Overall, this study reveals the stability of soil microbial communities and cellulolytic gene composition under the investigated tillage treatments.

  19. Remarkable impact of PAHs and TPHs on the richness and diversity of bacterial species in surface soils exposed to long-term hydrocarbon pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Tibor; Vajna, Balázs; Táncsics, András; Márialigeti, Károly; Lányi, Szabolcs; Máthé, István

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays, because of substantial use of petroleum-derived fuels the number and extension of hydrocarbon polluted terrestrial ecosystems is in growth worldwide. In remediation of aforementioned sites bioremediation still tends to be an innovative, environmentally attractive technology. Although huge amount of information is available concerning the hydrocarbon degradation potential of cultivable hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria little is known about the in situ long-term effects of petroleum derived compounds on the structure of soil microbiota. Therefore, in this study our aim was to determine the long-term impact of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs), volatile petroleum hydrocarbons (VPHs), total alkyl benzenes (TABs) as well as of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on the structure of bacterial communities of four different contaminated soil samples. Our results indicated that a very high amount of TPH affected positively the diversity of hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria. This finding was supported by the occurrence of representatives of the α-, β-, γ-Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Flavobacteriia and Bacilli classes. High concentration of VPHs and TABs contributed to the predominance of actinobacterial isolates. In PAH impacted samples the concentration of PAHs negatively correlated with the diversity of bacterial species. Heavily PAH polluted soil samples were mainly inhabited by the representatives of the β-, γ-Proteobacteria (overwhelming dominance of Pseudomonas sp.) and Actinobacteria.

  20. Bacterial communities associated with the rhizosphere of pioneer plants (Bahia xylopoda and Viguiera linearis) growing on heavy metals-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi E; Jan-Roblero, Janet; González-Chávez, Maria del Carmen; Hernández-Gama, Regina; Hernández-Rodríguez, César

    2010-05-01

    In this study, the bacterial communities associated with the rhizospheres of pioneer plants Bahia xylopoda and Viguiera linearis were explored. These plants grow on silver mine tailings with high concentration of heavy metals in Zacatecas, Mexico. Metagenomic DNAs from rhizosphere and bulk soil were extracted to perform a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis (DGGE) and to construct 16S rRNA gene libraries. A moderate bacterial diversity and twelve major phylogenetic groups including Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Gemmatimonadetes, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, Nitrospirae and Actinobacteria phyla, and divisions TM7, OP10 and OD1 were recognized in the rhizospheres. Only 25.5% from the phylotypes were common in the rhizosphere libraries and the most abundant groups were members of the phyla Acidobacteria and Betaproteobacteria (Thiobacillus spp., Nitrosomonadaceae). The most abundant groups in bulk soil library were Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria, and no common phylotypes were shared with the rhizosphere libraries. Many of the clones detected were related with chemolithotrophic and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, characteristic of an environment with a high concentration of heavy metal-sulfur complexes, and lacking carbon and organic energy sources.

  1. Characterization of an Exopolymeric Flocculant Produced by a Brachybacterium sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony I. Okoh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the bioflocculant production potential of an Actinobacteria, which was isolated from a freshwater environment in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa. 16S rDNA nucleotide sequencing analyses revealed that the actinobacteria belongs to the Brachybacterium genus, and the sequences were deposited in the GenBank as Brachybacterium sp. UFH, with accession number HQ537131. Optimum fermentation conditions for bioflocculant production by the bacteria include an initial medium pH of 7.2, incubation temperature of 30 °C, agitation speed of 160 rpm and an inoculum size of 2% (vol/vol of cell density 3.0 × 108 CFU/mL. The carbon, nitrogen and cation sources for optimum bioflocculant production were maltose (83% flocculating activity, urea (91.17% flocculating activity and MgCl2 (91.16% flocculating activity. Optimum bioflocculant production coincided with the logarithmic growth phase of the bacteria, and chemical analyses of the bioflocculant showed 39.4% carbohydrate and 43.7% protein (wt/wt. The mass ratio of neutral sugar, amino sugar and uronic acids was 1.3:0.7:2.2. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR indicated the presence of carboxyl, hydroxyl and amino groups, amongst others, typical for heteropolysaccharide and glycosaminoglycan polysaccharides. Bioflocculant pyrolysis showed thermal stability at over 600 °C, while scanning electron microscope (SEM imaging revealed a maze-like structure of interlaced flakes. Its high flocculation activity suggests its suitability for industrial applicability.

  2. VARIABILITY OF MICROBIAL AIR POLLUTION AND DUST CONCENTRATION INSIDE AND OUTSIDE A SELECTED SCHOOL IN POZNAŃ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Basińska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an analysis of the variability of air parameters quality realized in the two cycles measured (03.2013 and 11.2014. The measurements were made during 1.5 years in selected educa-tional building from the 70s. Measurements in each cycle research were carried out in two classrooms, before lessons and directly after they are finished and outside the building. The research included an assessment of the physical air quality (the air temperature, relative humidity, CO2 concentration and microbiological contamination (the general count of mesophilic bacteria, the general count of psychrophilic bacteria, the count of staphylococcus (Staphylococcus mannitol positive (type α and mannitol negative (type β, the count of Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria, actinobacteria (Actinobacteria, as well as the general count of microscopic fungi. Additionally, air samples were taken to determine the concentration of dust in the classroom before lessons and immediately after their end. The quality of the physical air correlated with the abundance and activity of students in classrooms. The measurement results of microbiological contaminations were compared with the Polish requirements (PN, in order to classify the degree of air pollution as a function of microorganisms in 1 m3 of air. On the basis of the measurements it was found that the analysed school physical air quality is unsatisfactory. Periodically, the acceptable levels of selected groups of microorganisms were exceeded. The measurement of dust concentrations showed that pupils’ activity inside the classrooms leads to secondary dust particles entrain.

  3. Characterization of Endolithic Culturable Microbial Communities in Carbonate Rocks from a Typical Karst Canyon in Guizhou (China).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuan; Cheng, Jian-Zhong; Lian, Bin

    2017-01-02

    The endolithic environment is a ubiquitous habitat for microorganisms and a critical interface between biology and geology. In this study, a culture-based method and the phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences were used to investigate the diversity of endolithic bacteria and fungi in two main types of carbonate rocks (namely dolomite and limestone) from Nanjiang Canyon in Guizhou karst area, China. The results of bacterial diversity indicated that all bacteria isolated from dolomite and limestone rocks were divided into 4 bacterial groups, including Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. For these two kinds of rocks, Proteobacteria was the first dominant group, and Gammaproteobacteria occupied the greatest proportion which might be closely related to Pseudomonas in phylogeny to be the most dominant genera after isolation. Actinobacteria and Bacillus bacteria were also widespread in these two kinds of rock environments. There were only 9 and 8 strains of fungi isolated from dolomite and limestone respectively, which all belonged to Ascomycota. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on diversity of endolithic culturable bacteria and fungi in carbonate rocks in Guizhou karst region. These microorganisms may play an important and unprecedented role in the carbonate rock weathering during the long history of geological evolution.

  4. Unraveling the biochemistry and provenance of pupylation: a prokaryotic analog of ubiquitination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind L

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recently Mycobacterium tuberculosis was shown to possess a novel protein modification, in which a small protein Pup is conjugated to the epsilon-amino groups of lysines in target proteins. Analogous to ubiquitin modification in eukaryotes, this remarkable modification recruits proteins for degradation via archaeal-type proteasomes found in mycobacteria and allied actinobacteria. While a mycobacterial protein named PafA was found to be required for this conjugation reaction, its biochemical mechanism has not been elucidated. Using sensitive sequence profile comparison methods we establish that the PafA family proteins are related to the γ-glutamyl-cysteine synthetase and glutamine synthetase. Hence, we predict that PafA is the Pup ligase, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent ligation of the terminal γ-carboxylate of glutamate to lysines, similar to the above enzymes. We further discovered that an ortholog of the eukaryotic PAC2 (e.g. cg2106 is often present in the vicinity of the actinobacterial Pup-proteasome gene neighborhoods and is likely to represent the ancestral proteasomal chaperone. Pup-conjugation is sporadically present outside the actinobacteria in certain lineages, such as verrucomicrobia, nitrospirae, deltaproteobacteria and planctomycetes, and in the latter two lineages it might modify membrane proteins. Reviewers This article was reviewed by M. Madan Babu and Andrei Osterman

  5. Nitrogen deposition and management practices increase soil microbial biomass carbon but decrease diversity in Moso bamboo plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quan; Song, Xinzhang; Gu, Honghao; Gao, Fei

    2016-06-15

    Because microbial communities play a key role in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, changes in the soil microbial community may directly affect ecosystem functioning. However, the effects of N deposition and management practices on soil microbes are still poorly understood. We studied the effects of these two factors on soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and community composition in Moso bamboo plantations using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Plantations under conventional (CM) or intensive management (IM) were subjected to one of four N treatments for 30 months. IM and N addition, both separately and in combination, significantly increased soil MBC while decreasing bacterial diversity. However, increases in soil MBC were inhibited when N addition exceeded 60 kg N∙ha(-1)∙yr(-1). IM increased the relative abundances of Actinobacteria and Crenarchaeota but decreased that of Acidobacteria. N addition increased the relative abundances of Acidobacteria, Crenarchaeota, and Actinobacteria but decreased that of Proteobacteria. Soil bacterial diversity was significantly related to soil pH, C/N ratio, and nitrogen and available phosphorus content. Management practices exerted a greater influence over regulation of the soil MBC and microbial diversity compared to that of N deposition in Moso bamboo plantations.

  6. Gut bacterial community structure of two Australian tropical fruit fly species (Diptera: Tephritidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narit Thaochan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The community structure of the alimentary tract bacteria of two Australian fruit fly species, Bactrocera cacuminata (Hering and Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt, was studied using a molecular cloning method based on the 16S rRNA gene. Differences in the bacterial community structure were shown between the crops and midguts of the two species and sexes of each species. Proteobacteria was the dominant bacterial phylum in the flies, especially bacteria in the order Gammaproteobacteria which was prominent in all clones. The total bacterial community consisted of Proteobacteria (more than 75% of clones, except in the crop of B. cacuminata where more than 50% of clones belonged to Firmicutes. Firmicutes gave the number of the secondary community structure in the fly’s gut. Four orders, Alpha-, Beta-, Delta- and Gammaproteobacteria and the phyla Firmicutes and Actinobacteria were found in both fruit fly species, while the order Epsilonproteobacteria and the phylum Bacteroidetes were found only in B. tryoni. Two phyla, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes, were rare and less frequent in the flies. There was a greater diversity of bacteria in the crop of the two fruit fly species than in the midgut. The midgut of B. tryoni females and the midgut of B. cacuminata males had the lowest bacterial diversity.

  7. Comparative genomic analysis of the genus Nocardiopsis provides new insights into its genetic mechanisms of environmental adaptability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Wei Li

    Full Text Available The genus Nocardiopsis, a widespread group in phylum Actinobacteria, has received much attention owing to its ecological versatility, pathogenicity, and ability to produce a rich array of bioactive metabolites. Its high environmental adaptability might be attributable to its genome dynamics, which can be estimated through comparative genomic analysis targeting microorganisms with close phylogenetic relationships but different phenotypes. To shed light on speciation, gene content evolution, and environmental adaptation in these unique actinobacteria, we sequenced draft genomes for 16 representative species of the genus and compared them with that of the type species N. dassonvillei subsp. dassonvillei DSM 43111(T. The core genome of 1,993 orthologous and paralogous gene clusters was identified, and the pan-genomic reservoir was found not only to accommodate more than 22,000 genes, but also to be open. The top ten paralogous genes in terms of copy number could be referred to three functional categories: transcription regulators, transporters, and synthases related to bioactive metabolites. Based on phylogenomic reconstruction, we inferred past evolutionary events, such as gene gains and losses, and identified a list of clade-specific genes implicated in environmental adaptation. These results provided insights into the genetic causes of environmental adaptability in this cosmopolitan actinobacterial group and the contributions made by its inherent features, including genome dynamics and the constituents of core and accessory proteins.

  8. Streptomyces sp. LK3 mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles and its biomedical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, L; Kumar, Gaurav; Kirthi, A Vishnu; Rahuman, A A; Bhaskara Rao, K V

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, the marine actinobacteria mediated biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNps) was achieved using Streptomyces sp LK3. The synthesized AgNps showed the characteristic absorption spectra in UV-vis at 420 nm, which confirmed the presence of nanoparticles. XRD analysis showed intense peaks at 2θ values of 27.51°, 31.87°, 45.57°, 56.56°, 66.26°, and 75.25° corresponding to (210), (113), (124), (240), (226), and (300) Bragg's reflection based on the fcc structure of AgNps. The FTIR spectra exhibited prominent peaks at 3,417 cm(-1) (OH stretching due to alcoholic group) and 1,578 cm(-1) (C=C ring stretching). TEM micrograph showed that the synthesized AgNps were spherical in shape with an average size of 5 nm. Surface morphology and topographical structure of the synthesized AgNps were dignified by AFM. The synthesized AgNps showed significant acaricidal activity against Rhipicephalus microplus and Haemaphysalis bispinosa with LC50 values of 16.10 and 16.45 mg/L, respectively. Our results clearly indicate that AgNps could provide a safer alternative to conventional acaricidal agents in the form of a topical antiparasitic formulation. The present study aimed to develop a novel, cost-effective, eco-friendly actinobacteria mediated synthesis of AgNps and its antiparasitic activity.

  9. Microbial communities adhering to the obverse and reverse sides of an oil painting on canvas: identification and evaluation of their biodegradative potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Miras, M; Piñar, G; Romero-Noguera, J; Bolívar-Galiano, F C; Ettenauer, J; Sterflinger, K; Martín-Sánchez, I

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we investigated and compared the microbial communities adhering to the obverse and the reverse sides of an oil painting on canvas exhibiting signs of biodeterioration. Samples showing no visible damage were investigated as controls. Air samples were also analysed, in order to investigate the presence of airborne microorganisms suspended in the indoor atmosphere. The diversity of the cultivable microorganisms adhering to the surface was analysed by molecular techniques, such as RAPD analysis and gene sequencing. DGGE fingerprints derived from DNA directly extracted from canvas material in combination with clone libraries and sequencing were used to evaluate the non-cultivable fraction of the microbial communities associated with the material. By using culture-dependent methods, most of the bacterial strains were found to be common airborne, spore-forming microorganisms and belonged to the phyla Actinobacteria and Firmicutes, whereas culture-independent techniques identified sequenced clones affiliated with members of the phyla Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. The diversity of fungi was shown to be much lower than that observed for bacteria, and only species of Penicillium spp. could be detected by cultivation techniques. The selected strategy revealed a higher microbial diversity on the obverse than on the reverse side of the painting and the near absence of actively growing microorganisms on areas showing no visible damage. Furthermore, enzymatic activity tests revealed that the most widespread activities involved in biodeterioration were esterase and esterase lipase among the isolated bacterial strains, and esterase and N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase among fungi strains.

  10. Feasibility of Metatranscriptome Analysis from Infant Gut Microbiota: Adaptation to Solid Foods Results in Increased Activity of Firmicutes at Six Months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floor Hugenholtz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Newborns are rapidly colonized by microbes and their intestinal tracts contain highly dynamic and rapidly developing microbial communities in the first months of life. In this study, we describe the feasibility of isolating mRNA from rapidly processed faecal samples and applying deep RNA-Seq analysis to provide insight into the active contributors of the microbial community in early life. Specific attention is given to the impact of removing rRNA from the mRNA on the phylogenetic and transcriptional profiling and its analysis depth. A breastfed baby was followed in the first six months of life during adaptation to solid food, dairy products, and formula. It was found that, in the weaning period, the total transcriptional activity of Actinobacteria, mainly represented by Bifidobacterium, decreased while that of Firmicutes increased over time. Moreover, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, including the canonical Bifidobacteria as well as Collinsella, were found to be important contributors to carbohydrate fermentation and vitamin biosynthesis in the infant intestine. Finally, the expression of Lactobacillus rhamnosus-like genes was detected, likely following transfer from the mother who consumed L. rhamnosus GG. The study indicates that metatranscriptome analysis of the infant gut microbiota is feasible on infant stool samples and can be used to provide insight into the core activities of the developing community.

  11. Intestinal microbiota as a tetrahydrobiopterin exogenous source in hph-1 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belik, Jaques; Shifrin, Yulia; Arning, Erland; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Pan, Jingyi; Daigneault, Michelle C.; Allen-Vercoe, Emma

    2017-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a cofactor of a number of regulatory enzymes. Although there are no known BH4 exogenous sources, the tissue content of this biopterin increases with age in GTP cyclohydrolase 1-deficient hyperphenylalaninemia-1 (hph-1) mice. Since certain bacteria are known to generate BH4, we hypothesize that generation of this biopterin by the intestinal microbiota contributes to its tissue increase in hph-1 adult mice. The goal of this study was to comparatively evaluate hph-1 mice and wild-type C57Bl/6 controls for the presence of intestinal BH4-producing bacteria. Newborn and adult mice fecal material was screened for 6-pyruvoyltetrahydropterin synthase (PTPS-2) an enzyme only present in BH4-generating bacteria. Adult, but not newborn, wild-type control and hph-1 mouse fecal material contained PTPS-2 mRNA indicative of the presence of BH4-generating bacteria. Utilizing chemostat-cultured human fecal bacteria, we identified the PTPS-2-producing bacteria as belonging to the Actinobacteria phylum. We further confirmed that at least two PTPS-2-producing species, Aldercreutzia equolifaciens and Microbacterium schleiferi, generate BH4 and are present in hph-1 fecal material. In conclusion, intestinal Actinobacteria generate BH4. This finding has important translational significance, since manipulation of the intestinal flora in individuals with congenital biopterin deficiency may allow for an increase in total body BH4 content. PMID:28079055

  12. Diversity of culturable thermo-resistant aquatic bacteria along an environmental gradient in Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerritos, René; Eguiarte, Luis E; Avitia, Morena; Siefert, Janet; Travisano, Michael; Rodríguez-Verdugo, Alejandra; Souza, Valeria

    2011-02-01

    At the desert oasis of Cuatro Ciénegas in Coahuila, México, more than 300 oligotrophic pools can be found and a large number of endemic species of plants and animals. The most divergent taxa of diatoms, snail and fishes are located in the Churince hydrological system, where we analyzed the local diversification of cultivable Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. The Churince hydrological system is surrounded by gypsum dunes and has a strong gradient for salinity, temperature, pH and dissolved oxygen. In August 2003, surface water samples were taken in 10 sites along the Churince system together with the respective environmental measurements. 417 thermo-resistant bacteria were isolated and DNA was extracted to obtain their BOX-PCR fingerprints, revealing 55 different patterns. In order to identify similarities and differences in the diversity of the various sampling sites, an Ordination Analysis was applied using Principal Component Analysis. This analysis showed that conductivity is the environmental factor that explains the distribution of most of the microbial diversity. Phylogenetic reconstruction from their 16S rRNA sequences was performed for a sample of 150 isolates. Only 17 sequences had a 100% match in the Gene Bank (NCBI), representing 10 well known cosmopolitan taxa. The rest of the sequences cluster in 22 clades for Firmicutes and another 22 clades for Actinobacteria, supporting the idea of high diversity and differentiation for this site.

  13. Distribution, diversity and abundance of bacterial laccase-like genes in different particle size fractions of sediments in a subtropical mangrove ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ling; Zhou, Zhi-Chao; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the diversity and abundance of bacterial lacasse-like genes in different particle size fractions, namely sand, silt, and clay of sediments in a subtropical mangrove ecosystem. Moreover, the effects of nutrient conditions on bacterial laccase-like communities as well as the correlation between nutrients and, both the abundance and diversity indices of laccase-like bacteria in particle size fractions were also studied. Compared to bulk sediments, Bacteroidetes, Caldithrix, Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi were dominated in all 3 particle-size fractions of intertidal sediment (IZ), but Actinobacteria and Firmicutes were lost after the fractionation procedures used. The diversity index of IZ fractions decreased in the order of bulk > clay > silt > sand. In fractions of mangrove forest sediment (MG), Verrucomicrobia was found in silt, and both Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes appeared in clay, but no new species were found in sand. The declining order of diversity index in MG fractions was clay > silt > sand > bulk. Furthermore, the abundance of lacasse-like bacteria varied with different particle-size fractions significantly (p clay > silt in both IZ and MG fractions. Additionally, nutrient availability was found to significantly affect the diversity and community structure of laccase-like bacteria (p < 0.05), while the total organic carbon contents were positively related to the abundance of bacterial laccase-like genes in particle size fractions (p < 0.05). Therefore, this study further provides evidence that bacterial laccase plays a vital role in turnover of sediment organic matter and cycling of nutrients.

  14. Biofilm bacterial communities in urban drinking water distribution systems transporting waters with different purification strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huiting; Zhang, Jingxu; Mi, Zilong; Xie, Shuguang; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xiaojian

    2015-02-01

    Biofilm formation in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) has many adverse consequences. Knowledge of microbial community structure of DWDS biofilm can aid in the design of an effective control strategy. However, biofilm bacterial community in real DWDS and the impact of drinking water purification strategy remain unclear. The present study investigated the composition and diversity of biofilm bacterial community in real DWDSs transporting waters with different purification strategies (conventional treatment and integrated treatment). High-throughput Illumina MiSeq sequencing analysis illustrated a large shift in the diversity and structure of biofilm bacterial community in real DWDS. Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Nitrospirae, and Cyanobacteria were the major components of biofilm bacterial community. Proteobacteria (mainly Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria) predominated in each DWDS biofilm, but the compositions of the dominant proteobacterial classes and genera and their proportions varied among biofilm samples. Drinking water purification strategy could shape DWDS biofilm bacterial community. Moreover, Pearson's correlation analysis indicated that Actinobacteria was positively correlated with the levels of total alkalinity and dissolved organic carbon in tap water, while Firmicutes had a significant positive correlation with nitrite nitrogen.

  15. Zinc treatment increases the titre of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' in huanglongbing-affected citrus plants while affecting the bacterial microbiomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M Q; Guo, Y; Powell, C A; Doud, M S; Yang, C Y; Zhou, H; Duan, Y P

    2016-06-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB)-affected citrus often display zinc deficiency symptoms. In this study, supplemental zinc was applied to citrus to determine its effect on Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) titre, HLB symptoms, and leaf microbiome. HLB-affected citrus were treated with various amounts of zinc. The treatments promoted Las growth and affected microbiomes in citrus leaves. Phylochip(™) -based results indicated that 5475 of over 50 000 known Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) in 52 phyla were detected in the midribs of HLB-affected citrus, of which Proteobacteria was the most abundant, followed by Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. In comparison, the microbiomes of zinc-treated diseased plants had overall more OTUs with higher amounts of Proteobacteria, but decreased percentages of Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. In addition, more OTUs of siderophore-producing bacteria were present. Only zinc-sensitive Staphylococcaceae had higher OTU's in the diseased plants without zinc treatments. Although HLB-affected citrus appear zinc deficient, zinc amendments increased the pathogen levels and shifted the microbiome. HLB is currently the most devastating disease of citrus worldwide. Zinc is often applied to HLB-affected citrus due to zinc deficiency symptoms. This study provided new insights into the potential effects of zinc on HLB and the microbial ecology of citrus. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Bacterial Bio-Resources for Remediation of Hexachlorocyclohexane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María J. Amoroso

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades, highly toxic organic compounds like the organochlorine pesticide (OP hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH have been released into the environment. All HCH isomers are acutely toxic to mammals. Although nowadays its use is restricted or completely banned in most countries, it continues posing serious environmental and health concerns. Since HCH toxicity is well known, it is imperative to develop methods to remove it from the environment. Bioremediation technologies, which use microorganisms and/or plants to degrade toxic contaminants, have become the focus of interest. Microorganisms play a significant role in the transformation and degradation of xenobiotic compounds. Many Gram-negative bacteria have been reported to have metabolic abilities to attack HCH. For instance, several Sphingomonas strains have been reported to degrade the pesticide. On the other hand, among Gram-positive microorganisms, actinobacteria have a great potential for biodegradation of organic and inorganic toxic compounds. This review compiles and updates the information available on bacterial removal of HCH, particularly by Streptomyces strains, a prolific genus of actinobacteria. A brief account on the persistence and deleterious effects of these pollutant chemical is also given.

  17. Effect of different levels of nitrogen on rhizosphere bacterial community structure in intensive monoculture of greenhouse lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Gang; Shen, Min-Chong; Hou, Jin-Feng; Li, Ling; Wu, Jun-Xia; Dong, Yuan-Hua

    2016-04-28

    Pyrosequencing-based analyses revealed significant effects among low (N50), medium (N80), and high (N100) fertilization on community composition involving a long-term monoculture of lettuce in a greenhouse in both summer and winter. The non-fertilized control (CK) treatment was characterized by a higher relative abundance of Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Chloroflexi; however, the average abundance of Firmicutes typically increased in summer, and the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes increased in winter in the N-fertilized treatments. Principle component analysis showed that the distribution of the microbial community was separated by a N gradient with N80 and N100 in the same group in the summer samples, while CK and N50 were in the same group in the winter samples, with the other N-level treatments existing independently. Redundancy analysis revealed that available N, NO3(-)-N, and NH4(+)-N, were the main environmental factors affecting the distribution of the bacterial community. Correlation analysis showed that nitrogen affected the shifts of microbial communities by strongly driving the shifts of Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria in summer samples, and Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Acidobacteria in winter samples. The study demonstrates a novel example of rhizosphere bacterial diversity and the main factors influencing rizosphere microbial community in continuous vegetable cropping within an intensive greenhouse ecosystem.

  18. Molecular Biological Analysis of Microorganisms in Petroleum Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, J.; Son, H. A.; Im, K. C.; Back, K. H.; Kim, H. T.

    2014-12-01

    Microorganisms in petroleum reservoirs were analyzed to examine the potential to apply for microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). Genomic DNA (16S rDNA) were extracted from two heavy oil samples from Canadian oil sand and six light oil samples from the Salin fore-arc basin in Myanmar, and amplified using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. The microbes were identified by cloning the PCR products and pyrosequencing. Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria were common in both Canadian and Myanmar samples. Staphylococcus and Streptococcus belonging to the Firmicutes phylum are abundant in oil sands, while Propionibacteria belonging to the Actinobacteria phylum and Coprothermobacter, Streptococcus, and Clostridia belonging to the Frimicutes phylum are contained in Myanmar samples. Streptococcus is known to use crude oil as nutrient, and produce organic acid, bio-gas and polysaccharide that could reduce oil viscosity, improve permeability by dissolving carbonate cement from pores throat, and reduce interfacial tension between oil and rock/water surface. Clostridia produce acids and gases by methanogenesis that could improve oil recovery.

  19. Comparison of bacterial community structures of terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc flagelliforme in three different regions of China using PCR-DGGE analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pei-pei; Shen, Shi-gang; Jia, Shi-ru; Wang, Hui-yan; Zhong, Cheng; Tan, Zhi-lei; Lv, He-xin

    2015-07-01

    Filamentous Nostoc flagelliforme form colloidal complex, with beaded cells interacting with other bacteria embedded in the complex multilayer sheath. However, the species of bacteria in the sheath and the interaction between N. flagelliforme and associated bacteria remain unclear. In this study, PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to investigate the bacterial communities of N. flagelliforme from three regions of China. DGGE patterns showed variations in all samples, exhibiting 25 discrete bands with various intensities. The diversity index analysis of bands profiles suggested the high similarity of bacterial communities to each other but also the dependence of microbial composition on each location. Phylogenetic affiliation indicated that the majority of the sequences obtained were affiliated with Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, of which Cyanobacteria was dominant, followed the Proteobacteria. Members of the genus Nostoc were the most abundant in all samples. Rhizobiales and Actinobacteria were identified, whereas, Craurococcus, Caulobacter, Pseudomonas, Terriglobus and Mucilaginibacter were also identified at low levels. Through comparing the bacterial composition of N. flagelliforme from different regions, it was revealed that N. flagelliforme could facilitate the growth of other microorganisms including both autotrophic bacteria and heterotrophic ones and positively contributed to their harsh ecosystems. The results indicated N. flagelliforme played an important role in diversifying the microbial community composition and had potential application in soil desertification.

  20. Nitrogen deposition and management practices increase soil microbial biomass carbon but decrease diversity in Moso bamboo plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quan; Song, Xinzhang; Gu, Honghao; Gao, Fei

    2016-06-01

    Because microbial communities play a key role in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, changes in the soil microbial community may directly affect ecosystem functioning. However, the effects of N deposition and management practices on soil microbes are still poorly understood. We studied the effects of these two factors on soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and community composition in Moso bamboo plantations using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Plantations under conventional (CM) or intensive management (IM) were subjected to one of four N treatments for 30 months. IM and N addition, both separately and in combination, significantly increased soil MBC while decreasing bacterial diversity. However, increases in soil MBC were inhibited when N addition exceeded 60 kg N•ha‑1•yr‑1. IM increased the relative abundances of Actinobacteria and Crenarchaeota but decreased that of Acidobacteria. N addition increased the relative abundances of Acidobacteria, Crenarchaeota, and Actinobacteria but decreased that of Proteobacteria. Soil bacterial diversity was significantly related to soil pH, C/N ratio, and nitrogen and available phosphorus content. Management practices exerted a greater influence over regulation of the soil MBC and microbial diversity compared to that of N deposition in Moso bamboo plantations.

  1. Pyrosequencing reveals the influence of organic and conventional farming systems on bacterial communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ru Li

    Full Text Available It has been debated how different farming systems influence the composition of soil bacterial communities, which are crucial for maintaining soil health. In this research, we applied high-throughput pyrosequencing of V1 to V3 regions of bacterial 16S rRNA genes to gain further insight into how organic and conventional farming systems and crop rotation influence bulk soil bacterial communities. A 2×2 factorial experiment consisted of two agriculture management systems (organic versus conventional and two crop rotations (flax-oat-fababean-wheat versus flax-alfalfa-alfalfa-wheat was conducted at the Glenlea Long-Term Crop Rotation and Management Station, which is Canada's oldest organic-conventional management study field. Results revealed that there is a significant difference in the composition of bacterial genera between organic and conventional management systems but crop rotation was not a discriminator factor. Organic farming was associated with higher relative abundance of Proteobacteria, while Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi were more abundant in conventional farming. The dominant genera including Blastococcus, Microlunatus, Pseudonocardia, Solirubrobacter, Brevundimonas, Pseudomonas, and Stenotrophomonas exhibited significant variation between the organic and conventional farming systems. The relative abundance of bacterial communities at the phylum and class level was correlated to soil pH rather than other edaphic properties. In addition, it was found that Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were more sensitive to pH variation.

  2. Impact of plant development on the rhizobacterial population of Arachis hypogaea: a multifactorial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Shyamalina; Sengupta, Sanghamitra

    2015-07-01

    Present study investigates the impact of plant development on the structure and composition of root-associated bacterial community of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) plant, an economically important oilseed legume. Relative abundance of total and active bacteria were studied in bulk soil and rhizosphere samples collected from different growth stages of groundnut plant by sequencing PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments from soil genomic DNA and reverse-transcribed soil community RNA. Plant growth promoting potential of cultivable rhizobacteria was evaluated using assays for inorganic phosphate solubilization and production of indole acetic acid, siderophores, biofilm, 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase, laccase, and anti-fungal chemicals. Our study demonstrates that groundnut plant rhizosphere harbors a core microbiome populated by Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Acidobacteria. A distinct bacterial assemblage at nodulation stage due to predominance of Flavobacteria and Actinobacteria in DNA and RNA derived libraries respectively was also observed. Majority of cultivable isolates exhibiting plant growth promoting activities belonged to Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Of them, Pseudomonas indica and Bacillus megaterium were detected in the rhizosphere samples from all the developmental stages of groundnut plant. This polyphasic study establishes the impact of plant development on rhizobacterial population of groundnut and underscores the applicability of soil isolates as a reliable component in sustainable agriculture.

  3. Effect of different levels of nitrogen on rhizosphere bacterial community structure in intensive monoculture of greenhouse lettuce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Gang; Shen, Min-Chong; Hou, Jin-Feng; Li, Ling; Wu, Jun-Xia; Dong, Yuan-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Pyrosequencing-based analyses revealed significant effects among low (N50), medium (N80), and high (N100) fertilization on community composition involving a long-term monoculture of lettuce in a greenhouse in both summer and winter. The non-fertilized control (CK) treatment was characterized by a higher relative abundance of Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Chloroflexi; however, the average abundance of Firmicutes typically increased in summer, and the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes increased in winter in the N-fertilized treatments. Principle component analysis showed that the distribution of the microbial community was separated by a N gradient with N80 and N100 in the same group in the summer samples, while CK and N50 were in the same group in the winter samples, with the other N-level treatments existing independently. Redundancy analysis revealed that available N, NO3−-N, and NH4+-N, were the main environmental factors affecting the distribution of the bacterial community. Correlation analysis showed that nitrogen affected the shifts of microbial communities by strongly driving the shifts of Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria in summer samples, and Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Acidobacteria in winter samples. The study demonstrates a novel example of rhizosphere bacterial diversity and the main factors influencing rizosphere microbial community in continuous vegetable cropping within an intensive greenhouse ecosystem. PMID:27121918

  4. Pyrosequencing reveals the influence of organic and conventional farming systems on bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ru; Khafipour, Ehsan; Krause, Denis O; Entz, Martin H; de Kievit, Teresa R; Fernando, W G Dilantha

    2012-01-01

    It has been debated how different farming systems influence the composition of soil bacterial communities, which are crucial for maintaining soil health. In this research, we applied high-throughput pyrosequencing of V1 to V3 regions of bacterial 16S rRNA genes to gain further insight into how organic and conventional farming systems and crop rotation influence bulk soil bacterial communities. A 2×2 factorial experiment consisted of two agriculture management systems (organic versus conventional) and two crop rotations (flax-oat-fababean-wheat versus flax-alfalfa-alfalfa-wheat) was conducted at the Glenlea Long-Term Crop Rotation and Management Station, which is Canada's oldest organic-conventional management study field. Results revealed that there is a significant difference in the composition of bacterial genera between organic and conventional management systems but crop rotation was not a discriminator factor. Organic farming was associated with higher relative abundance of Proteobacteria, while Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi were more abundant in conventional farming. The dominant genera including Blastococcus, Microlunatus, Pseudonocardia, Solirubrobacter, Brevundimonas, Pseudomonas, and Stenotrophomonas exhibited significant variation between the organic and conventional farming systems. The relative abundance of bacterial communities at the phylum and class level was correlated to soil pH rather than other edaphic properties. In addition, it was found that Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were more sensitive to pH variation.

  5. Bacterial endophytes mediate positive feedback effects of early legume termination times on the yield of subsequent durum wheat crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Hamel, Chantal; Gan, Yantai; Vujanovic, Vladimir

    2012-12-01

    Field crops influence the biotic properties of the soil, impacting the health and productivity of subsequent crops. Polymerase chain reaction and 454 GS FLX pyrosequencing of amplicons were used to clarify the legacy of chickpea and pea crops on the quality of the bacterial community colonizing the root endosphere of subsequent crops of wheat, in a replicated field study. Similar communities of root endosphere bacteria were formed in durum wheat grown after pea and chickpea crops when chickpea crops were terminated as early as pea (July). Termination of the chickpea crops in September led to the domination of Firmicutes in wheat root endosphere; Actinobacteria dominated the wheat root endosphere following early pulse crop termination. The architecture of wheat plants was correlated with the composition of its root endosphere community. High grain yield was associated with the production of fewer but larger wheat heads, the abundance of endospheric Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria, and the scarcity of endospheric Firmicutes. Pulse termination time affected wheat root endosphere colonization strongly in 2009 but weakly in 2010, an abnormally wet year. This study improved our understanding of the so-called "crop rotation effect" in pulse-wheat systems and showed how this system can be manipulated through agronomic decisions.

  6. Changes of soil bacterial diversity as a consequence of agricultural land use in a semi-arid ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Chun Ding

    Full Text Available Natural scrublands in semi-arid deserts are increasingly being converted into fields. This results in losses of characteristic flora and fauna, and may also affect microbial diversity. In the present study, the long-term effect (50 years of such a transition on soil bacterial communities was explored at two sites typical of semi-arid deserts. Comparisons were made between soil samples from alfalfa fields and the adjacent scrublands by two complementary methods based on 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from total community DNA. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analyses revealed significant effects of the transition on community composition of Bacteria, Actinobacteria, Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria at both sites. PhyloChip hybridization analysis uncovered that the transition negatively affected taxa such as Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Acidimicrobiales, Rubrobacterales, Deltaproteobacteria and Clostridia, while Alpha-, Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria increased in abundance. Redundancy analysis suggested that the community composition of phyla responding to agricultural use (except for Spirochaetes correlated with soil parameters that were significantly different between the agricultural and scrubland soil. The arable soils were lower in organic matter and phosphate concentration, and higher in salinity. The variation in the bacterial community composition was higher in soils from scrubland than from agriculture, as revealed by DGGE and PhyloChip analyses, suggesting reduced beta diversity due to agricultural practices. The long-term use for agriculture resulted in profound changes in the bacterial community and physicochemical characteristics of former scrublands, which may irreversibly affect the natural soil ecosystem.

  7. Effect of Bifidobacterium breve on the Intestinal Microbiota of Coeliac Children on a Gluten Free Diet: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Quagliariello

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Coeliac disease (CD is associated with alterations of the intestinal microbiota. Although several Bifidobacterium strains showed anti-inflammatory activity and prevention of toxic gliadin peptides generation in vitro, few data are available on their efficacy when administered to CD subjects. This study evaluated the effect of administration for three months of a food supplement based on two Bifidobacterium breve strains (B632 and BR03 to restore the gut microbial balance in coeliac children on a gluten free diet (GFD. Microbial DNA was extracted from faeces of 40 coeliac children before and after probiotic or placebo administration and 16 healthy children (Control group. Sequencing of the amplified V3-V4 hypervariable region of 16S rRNA gene as well as qPCR of Bidobacterium spp., Lactobacillus spp., Bacteroides fragilis group Clostridium sensu stricto and enterobacteria were performed. The comparison between CD subjects and Control group revealed an alteration in the intestinal microbial composition of coeliacs mainly characterized by a reduction of the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio, of Actinobacteria and Euryarchaeota. Regarding the effects of the probiotic, an increase of Actinobacteria was found as well as a re-establishment of the physiological Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio. Therefore, a three-month administration of B. breve strains helps in restoring the healthy percentage of main microbial components.

  8. Bacterial degradation of Aroclor 1242 in the mycorrhizosphere soils of zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hua; Brookes, Philip C; Xu, Jianming; Feng, Youzhi

    2014-11-01

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.), inoculated with the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) species Acaulospora laevis, Glomus caledonium, and Glomus mosseae, on the soil bacterial community responsible for Aroclor 1242 dissipation. The dissipation rates of Aroclor 1242 and soil bacteria abundance were much higher with the A. laevis and G. mosseae treatments compared to the non-mycorrhizal control. The biphenyl dioxygenase (bphA) and Rhodococcus-like 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl dioxygenase (bphC) genes were more abundant in AM inoculated soils, suggesting that the bphA and Rhodococcus-like bphC pathways play an important role in Aroclor 1242 dissipation in the mycorrhizosphere. The soil bacterial communities were dominated by classes Betaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria, while the relative proportion of Actinobacteria was significantly (F=2.288, P<0.05) correlated with the PCB congener profile in bulk soil. Our results showed that AM fungi could enhance PCB dissipation by stimulating bph gene abundance and the growth of specific bacterial groups.

  9. Polyphasic analysis of a middle ages coprolite microbiota, Belgium.

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    Sandra Appelt

    Full Text Available Paleomicrobiological investigations of a 14(th-century coprolite found inside a barrel in Namur, Belgium were done using microscopy, a culture-dependent approach and metagenomics. Results were confirmed by ad hoc PCR--sequencing. Investigations yielded evidence for flora from ancient environment preserved inside the coprolite, indicated by microscopic observation of amoebal cysts, plant fibers, seeds, pollens and mold remains. Seventeen different bacterial species were cultured from the coprolite, mixing organisms known to originate from the environment and organisms known to be gut inhabitants. Metagenomic analyses yielded 107,470 reads, of which known sequences (31.9% comprised 98.98% bacterial, 0.52% eukaryotic, 0.44% archaeal and 0.06% viral assigned reads. Most abundant bacterial phyla were Proteobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The 16 S rRNA gene dataset yielded 132,000 trimmed reads and 673 Operational Taxonomic Units. Most abundant bacterial phyla observed in the 16 S rRNA gene dataset belonged to Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Chlamydia. The Namur coprolite yielded typical gut microbiota inhabitants, intestinal parasites Trichuris and Ascaris and systemic pathogens Bartonella and Bordetella. This study adds knowledge to gut microbiota in medieval times.

  10. Diversity of endophytic bacteria of Dendrobium officinale based on culture-dependent and culture-independent methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Pei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Culture-dependent and culture-independent methods were compared and evaluated in the study of the endophytic diversity of Dendrobium officinale. Culture-independent methods consisted of polymerase chain reaction–denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE and metagenome methods. According to the results, differences were found between the three methods. Three phyla, namely Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria, were detected using the culture-dependent method, and two phyla, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, were detected by the DGGE method. Using the metagenome method, four major phyla were determined, including Proteobacteria (76.54%, Actinobacteria (18.56%, Firmicutes (2.27%, and Bacteroidetes (1.56%. A distinct trend was obtained at the genus level in terms of the method and the corresponding number of genera determined. There were 449 genera and 16 genera obtained from the metagenome and DGGE methods, respectively, and only 7 genera were obtained through the culture-dependent method. By comparison, all the genera from the culture-dependent and DGGE methods were contained in the members determined using the metagenome method. Overall, culture-dependent methods are limited to ‘finding’ endophytic bacteria in plants. DGGE is an alternative to investigating primary diversity patterns; however, the metagenome method is still the best choice for determining the endophytic profile in plants. It is essential to use multiphasic approaches to study cultured and uncultured microbes.

  11. Responsiveness of soil nitrogen fractions and bacterial communities to afforestation in the Loess Hilly Region (LHR) of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chengjie; Sun, Pingsheng; Kang, Di; Zhao, Fazhu; Feng, Yongzhong; Ren, Guangxin; Han, Xinhui; Yang, Gaihe

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper, we investigated the effects of afforestation on nitrogen fractions and microbial communities. A total of 24 soil samples were collected from farmland (FL) and three afforested lands, namely Robinia pseudoacacia L (RP), Caragana korshinskii Kom (CK), and abandoned land (AL), which have been arable for the past 40 years. Quantitative PCR and Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes were used to analyze soil bacterial abundance, diversity, and composition. Additionally, soil nitrogen (N) stocks and fractions were estimated. The results showed that soil N stock, N fractions, and bacterial abundance and diversity increased following afforestation. Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria were the dominant phyla of soil bacterial compositions. Overall, soil bacterial compositions generally changed from Actinobacteria (Acidobacteria)-dominant to Proteobacteria-dominant following afforestation. Soil N fractions, especially for dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), were significantly correlated with most bacterial groups and bacterial diversity, while potential competitive interactions between Proteobacteria (order Rhizobiales) and Cyanobacteria were suggested. In contrast, nitrate nitrogen (NO3‑-N) influenced soil bacterial compositions less than other N fractions. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that bacterial diversity and specific species respond to farmland-to-forest conversion and hence have the potential to affect N dynamic processes in the Loess Plateau.

  12. Effects of changes in straw chemical properties and alkaline soils on bacterial communities engaged in straw decomposition at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guixiang; Zhang, Jiabao; Zhang, Congzhi; Feng, Youzhi; Chen, Lin; Yu, Zhenghong; Xin, Xiuli; Zhao, Bingzi

    2016-02-26

    Differences in the composition of a bacterial community engaged in decomposing wheat straw in a fluvo-aquic soil at 15 °C, 25 °C, and 35 °C were identified using barcode pyrosequencing. Functional carbon groups in the decomposing wheat straw were evaluated by (13)C-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance). Actinobacteria and Firmicutes were more abundant, whereas Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were less abundant, at higher temperatures during the later stages of decomposition. Differences in the chemical properties of straw accounted for 19.3% of the variation in the community composition, whereas soil properties accounted for more (24.0%) and temperature, for less (7.4%). Carbon content of the soil microbial biomass and nitrogen content of straw were significantly correlated with the abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. The chemical properties of straw, especially the NCH/OCH3, alkyl O-C-O, and O-alkyl functional groups, exercised a significant effect on the composition of the bacterial community at different temperatures during decomposition-results that extend our understanding of bacterial communities associated with the decomposition of straw in agro-ecosystems and of the effects of temperature and chemical properties of the decomposing straw and soil on such communities.

  13. The Arctic soil bacterial communities in the vicinity of a little auk colony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Zielinska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to deposition of birds’ guano, eggshells or feathers, the vicinity of a large seabirds’ breeding colony is expected to have a substantial impact on the soil’s physicochemical features as well as on diversity of vegetation and the soil invertebrates. Consequently, due to changing physicochemical features the structure of bacterial communities might fluctuate in different soil environments. The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial assemblages in the Arctic soil within the area of a birds’ colony and in a control sample from a topographically similar location but situated away from the colony’s impact area. A high number of OTUs found in both areas indicates a highly complex microbial populations structure. The most abundant phyla in both of the tested samples were: Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi, with different proportions in the total share. Despite differences in the physicochemical soil characteristics, the soil microbial community structures at the phylum level were similar to some extent in the two samples. The only share that was significantly higher in the control area when compared to the sample obtained within the birds’ colony, belonged to the Actinobacteria phylum. Moreover, when analyzing the class level for each phylum, several differences between the samples were observed. Furthermore, lower proportions of Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria were observed in the soil sample under the influence of the bird’s colony, which most probably could be linked to higher nitrogen concentrations in that sample.

  14. Ubiquity, diversity and physiological characteristics of Geodermatophilaceae in Shapotou National Desert Ecological Reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong-Min; Zhang, Tao; Yu, Li-Yan; Sen, Keya; Zhang, Yu-Qin

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to gain insight into the diversity of culturable actinobacteria in desert soil crusts and to determine the physiological characteristics of the predominant actinobacterial group in these crusts. Culture-dependent method was employed to obtain actinobacterial strains from desert soil samples collected from Shapotou National Desert Ecological Reserve (NDER) located in Tengger Desert, China. A total of 376 actinobacterial strains were isolated and 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis indicated that these isolates belonged to 29 genera within 18 families, among which the members of the family Geodermatophilaceae were predominant. The combination of 16S rRNA gene information and the phenotypic data allowed these newly-isolated Geodermatophilaceae members to be classified into 33 "species clusters," 11 of which represented hitherto unrecognized species. Fermentation broths from 19.7% of the isolated strains showed activity in at least one of the six screens for antibiotic activity. These isolates exhibited bio-diversity in enzymatic characteristics and carbon utilization profiles. The physiological characteristics of the isolates from different types of crusts or bare sand samples were specific to their respective micro-ecological environments. Our study revealed that members of the family Geodermatophilaceae were ubiquitous, abundant, and diverse in Shapotou NDER, and these strains may represent a new major group of potential functional actinobacteria in desert soil.

  15. Seasonal changes in microbial community composition in river water studied using 454-pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaevska, Marija; Videnska, Petra; Sedlar, Karel; Slana, Iva

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the microbial community in five rivers in the proximity of a city in the Czech Republic using 454-pyrosequencing, as well as to assess seasonal variability over the course of 1 year and to identify the factors influencing the structure of bacterial communities. Samples from five rivers around the city of Brno were obtained during four seasons and analysed using 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The core composition of bacterial communities consisted of Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria, TM7 and others. Our approach enabled us to more closely study the correlation between the abundance of different families and environmental factors. Overall, Actinobacteria negatively correlated with phosphorus, sulphate, dissolved particle and chloride levels. In contrast, Proteobacteria positively correlated with sulphate, dissolved particle, chloride, dissolved oxygen and nitrite levels. Future work should focus on the dynamics of bacterial communities present in river water and their relation to the overall stability of the water ecosystem.

  16. Effect of different levels of nitrogen on rhizosphere bacterial community structure in intensive monoculture of greenhouse lettuce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Gang; Shen, Min-Chong; Hou, Jin-Feng; Li, Ling; Wu, Jun-Xia; Dong, Yuan-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Pyrosequencing-based analyses revealed significant effects among low (N50), medium (N80), and high (N100) fertilization on community composition involving a long-term monoculture of lettuce in a greenhouse in both summer and winter. The non-fertilized control (CK) treatment was characterized by a higher relative abundance of Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Chloroflexi; however, the average abundance of Firmicutes typically increased in summer, and the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes increased in winter in the N-fertilized treatments. Principle component analysis showed that the distribution of the microbial community was separated by a N gradient with N80 and N100 in the same group in the summer samples, while CK and N50 were in the same group in the winter samples, with the other N-level treatments existing independently. Redundancy analysis revealed that available N, NO3--N, and NH4+-N, were the main environmental factors affecting the distribution of the bacterial community. Correlation analysis showed that nitrogen affected the shifts of microbial communities by strongly driving the shifts of Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria in summer samples, and Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Acidobacteria in winter samples. The study demonstrates a novel example of rhizosphere bacterial diversity and the main factors influencing rizosphere microbial community in continuous vegetable cropping within an intensive greenhouse ecosystem.

  17. Potential of semiarid soil from Caatinga biome as a novel source for mining lignocellulose-degrading enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerda Júnior, Gileno V; Noronha, Melline F; de Sousa, Sanderson Tarciso P; Cabral, Lucélia; Domingos, Daniela F; Sáber, Mírian L; de Melo, Itamar S; Oliveira, Valéria M

    2017-02-01

    The litterfall is the major organic material deposited in soil of Brazilian Caatinga biome, thus providing the ideal conditions for plant biomass-degrading microorganisms to thrive. Herein, the phylogenetic composition and lignocellulose-degrading capacity have been explored for the first time from a fosmid library dataset of Caatinga soil by sequence-based screening. A complex bacterial community dominated by Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria was unraveled. SEED subsystems-based annotations revealed a broad range of genes assigned to carbohydrate and aromatic compounds metabolism, indicating microbial ability to utilize plant-derived material. CAZy-based annotation identified 7275 genes encoding 37 glycoside hydrolases (GHs) families related to hydrolysis of cellulose, hemicellulose, oligosaccharides and other lignin-modifying enzymes. Taxonomic affiliation of genes showed high genetic potential of the phylum Acidobacteria for hemicellulose degradation, whereas Actinobacteria members appear to play an important role in celullose hydrolysis. Additionally, comparative analyses revealed greater GHs profile similarity among soils as compared to the digestive tract of animals capable of digesting plant biomass, particularly in the hemicellulases content. Combined results suggest a complex synergistic interaction of community members required for biomass degradation into fermentable sugars. This large repertoire of lignocellulolytic enzymes opens perspectives for mining potential candidates of biochemical catalysts for biofuels production from renewable resources and other environmental applications. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Water regime influences bulk soil and Rhizosphere of Cereus jamacaru bacterial communities in the Brazilian Caatinga biome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessner Kavamura, Vanessa; Taketani, Rodrigo Gouvêa; Lançoni, Milena Duarte; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Mendes, Rodrigo; Soares de Melo, Itamar

    2013-01-01

    We used the T-RFLP technique combined with Ion Torrent (PGM) sequencing of 16S rRNA and multivariate analysis to study the structure of bulk soil and rhizosphere bacterial communities of a cactus, Cereus jamacaru, from the Brazilian Caatinga biome, which is unique to Brazil. The availability of water shapes the rhizosphere communities, resulting in different patterns during the rainy and dry seasons. Taxonomic approaches and statistical analysis revealed that the phylum Actinobacteria strongly correlated with the dry season, while samples from the rainy season exhibited a strong correlation with the phylum Proteobacteria for rhizosphere samples and with the phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Lentisphaerae, and Tenericutes for bulk soil samples. The STAMP software also indicated that the phylum Bacteroidetes, as well as two classes in the Proteobacteria phylum (γ and δ), were the most significant ones during the rainy season. The average abundance of the phylum Actinobacteria and the genus Bacillus was significantly greater during the dry season. Some significant genera found during the dry season might reflect their tolerance to the extreme conditions found in the Caatinga biome. They may also indicate the ecological function that microorganisms play in providing plants with some degree of tolerance to water stress or in assisting in their development through mechanisms of growth promotion. Alterations in microbial communities can be due to the different abilities of native microorganisms to resist and adapt to environmental changes.

  19. Microbiote shift in the Medicago sativa rhizosphere in response to cyanotoxins extract exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khalloufi, Fatima; Oufdou, Khalid; Bertrand, Marie; Lahrouni, Majida; Oudra, Brahim; Ortet, Philippe; Barakat, Mohamed; Heulin, Thierry; Achouak, Wafa

    2016-01-01

    The bloom-containing water bodies may have an impact due to cyanotoxins production on other microorganisms and aquatic plants. Where such water is being used for crops irrigation, the presence of cyanotoxins may also have a toxic impact on terrestrial plants and their rhizosphere microbiota. For that purpose, PCR-based 454 pyrosequencing was applied to phylogenetically characterize the bacterial community of Medicago sativa rhizosphere in response to cyanotoxins extract. This analysis revealed a wide diversity at species level, which decreased from unplanted soil to root tissues indicating that only some populations were able to compete for nutrients and niches in this selective habitat. Gemmatimonas, Actinobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Opitutae mainly inhabited the bulk soil, whereas, the root-adhering soil and the root tissues were inhabited by Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria. The proportion of these populations fluctuated in response to cyanotoxins extract exposure. Betaproteobacteria proportion increased in the three studied compartments, whereas Gammaproteobacteria proportion decreased except in the bulk soil. This study revealed the potential toxicity of cyanotoxins extract towards Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonas, Deltaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria, however Clostridia, Opitutae and bacteria related with Betaproteobacteria, were stimulated denoting their tolerance. Altogether, these data indicate that crop irrigation using cyanotoxins containing water might alter the rhizosphere functioning.

  20. Characterization of Bacterial Communities in Selected Smokeless Tobacco Products Using 16S rDNA Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E Tyx

    Full Text Available The bacterial communities present in smokeless tobacco (ST products have not previously reported. In this study, we used Next Generation Sequencing to study the bacteria present in U.S.-made dry snuff, moist snuff and Sudanese toombak. Sample diversity and taxonomic abundances were investigated in these products. A total of 33 bacterial families from four phyla, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, were identified. U.S.-produced dry snuff products contained a diverse distribution of all four phyla. Moist snuff products were dominated by Firmicutes. Toombak samples contained mainly Actinobacteria and Firmicutes (Aerococcaceae, Enterococcaceae, and Staphylococcaceae. The program PICRUSt (Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States was used to impute the prevalence of genes encoding selected bacterial toxins, antibiotic resistance genes and other pro-inflammatory molecules. PICRUSt also predicted the presence of specific nitrate reductase genes, whose products can contribute to the formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines. Characterization of microbial community abundances and their associated genomes gives us an indication of the presence or absence of pathways of interest and can be used as a foundation for further investigation into the unique microbiological and chemical environments of smokeless tobacco products.

  1. Characterization of Bacterial Communities in Selected Smokeless Tobacco Products Using 16S rDNA Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyx, Robert E; Stanfill, Stephen B; Keong, Lisa M; Rivera, Angel J; Satten, Glen A; Watson, Clifford H

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial communities present in smokeless tobacco (ST) products have not previously reported. In this study, we used Next Generation Sequencing to study the bacteria present in U.S.-made dry snuff, moist snuff and Sudanese toombak. Sample diversity and taxonomic abundances were investigated in these products. A total of 33 bacterial families from four phyla, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, were identified. U.S.-produced dry snuff products contained a diverse distribution of all four phyla. Moist snuff products were dominated by Firmicutes. Toombak samples contained mainly Actinobacteria and Firmicutes (Aerococcaceae, Enterococcaceae, and Staphylococcaceae). The program PICRUSt (Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States) was used to impute the prevalence of genes encoding selected bacterial toxins, antibiotic resistance genes and other pro-inflammatory molecules. PICRUSt also predicted the presence of specific nitrate reductase genes, whose products can contribute to the formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines. Characterization of microbial community abundances and their associated genomes gives us an indication of the presence or absence of pathways of interest and can be used as a foundation for further investigation into the unique microbiological and chemical environments of smokeless tobacco products.

  2. Presence and diversity of Streptomyces in Dendroctonus and sympatric bark beetle galleries across North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulcr, Jiri; Adams, Aaron S; Raffa, Kenneth; Hofstetter, Richard W; Klepzig, Kier D; Currie, Cameron R

    2011-05-01

    Recent studies have revealed several examples of intimate associations between insects and Actinobacteria, including the Southern Pine Beetle Dendroctonus frontalis and the Spruce Beetle Dendroctonus rufipennis. Here, we surveyed Streptomyces Actinobacteria co-occurring with 10 species of Dendroctonus bark beetles across the United States, using both phylogenetic and community ecology approaches. From these 10 species, and 19 other scolytine beetles that occur in the same trees, we obtained 154 Streptomyces-like isolates and generated 16S sequences from 134 of those. Confirmed 16S sequences of Streptomyces were binned into 36 distinct strains using a threshold of 0.2% sequence divergence. The 16S rDNA phylogeny of all isolates does not correlate with the distribution of strains among beetle species, localities, or parts of the beetles or their galleries. However, we identified three Streptomyces strains occurring repeatedly on Dendroctonus beetles and in their galleries. Identity of these isolates was corroborated using a house-keeping gene sequence (efTu). These strains are not confined to a certain species of beetle, locality, or part of the beetle or their galleries. However, their role as residents in the woodboring insect niche is supported by the repeated association of their 16S and efTu from across the continent, and also having been reported in studies of other subcortical insects.

  3. Microbial community structure and functional diversity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria associated with Colophospermum mopane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbano, Claudia Sofía; Grönemeyer, Jann Lasse; Hurek, Thomas; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    Colophospermum mopane is an indigenous legume tree that grows in Southern Africa and is one of the predominant trees of the woodland vegetation. In order to increase knowledge about its ecology, especially how C. mopane thrives in the nitrogen-poor soils of the region, we analyzed the root-associated bacteria to assess the active diazotrophic diversity and total microbial diversity by culture-dependent and independent techniques. Root nodules were not detected but in some samples the lateral roots showed an outgrowth-like protuberance, that were not likely to have functions related to legume root nodules. The bacterial isolates recovered were related to Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. The total microbial diversity was dominated by Actinobacteria-related phylotypes, while the active diazotrophic diversity showed that the majority of the sequences were related to the order Rhizobiales but also to Spirochaetes, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Deltaproteobacteria. Several isolates showed characteristics of plant growth-promoting bacteria. These findings increase the spectrum of possible phylotypes that can be found in legume trees that are typically nodulated by Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria, and reveal for the first time a surprising diversity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria active in legume tree roots. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Cultivation Versus Molecular Analysis of Banana (Musa sp.) Shoot-Tip Tissue Reveals Enormous Diversity of Normally Uncultivable Endophytic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Pious; Sekhar, Aparna Chandra

    2017-05-01

    The interior of plants constitutes a unique environment for microorganisms with various organisms inhabiting as endophytes. Unlike subterranean plant parts, aboveground parts are relatively less explored for endophytic microbial diversity. We employed a combination of cultivation and molecular approaches to study the endophytic bacterial diversity in banana shoot-tips. Cultivable bacteria from 20 sucker shoot-tips of cv. Grand Naine included 37 strains under 16 genera and three phyla (Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes). 16S rRNA gene-ribotyping approach on 799f and 1492r PCR-amplicons to avoid plant organelle sequences was ineffective showing limited bacterial diversity. 16S rRNA metagene profiling targeting the V3-V4 hypervariable region after filtering out the chloroplast (74.2 %), mitochondrial (22.9 %), and unknown sequences (1.1 %) revealed enormous bacterial diversity. Proteobacteria formed the predominant phylum (64 %) succeeded by Firmicutes (12.1 %), Actinobacteria (9.5 %), Bacteroidetes (6.4 %), Planctomycetes, Cyanobacteria, and minor shares (bacteria prevailing in banana shoot-tips (20 phyla, 46 classes) with about 2.6 % of the deciphered 269 genera and 1.5 % of the 656 observed species from the same source of shoot-tips attained through cultivation. The predominant genera included several agriculturally important bacteria. The study reveals an immense ecosystem of endophytic bacteria in banana shoot tissues endorsing the earlier documentation of intracellular "Cytobacts" and "Peribacts" with possible roles in plant holobiome and hologenome.

  5. Microbial Character Related Sulfur Cycle under Dynamic Environmental Factors Based on the Microbial Population Analysis in Sewerage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qian; Shi, Hanchang; Liu, Yanchen

    2017-01-01

    The undesired sulfur cycle derived by microbial population can ultimately causes the serious problems of sewerage systems. However, the microbial community characters under dynamic environment factors in actual sewerage system is still not enough. This current study aimed to character the distributions and compositions of microbial communities that participate in the sulfur cycle under the dynamic environmental conditions in a local sewerage system. To accomplish this, microbial community compositions were assessed using 454 high-throughput sequencing (16S rDNA) combined with dsrB gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The results indicated that a higher diversity of microbial species was present at locations in sewers with high concentrations of H2S. Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria were dominant in the sewerage system, while Actinobacteria alone were dominant in regions with high concentrations of H2S. Specifically, the unique operational taxonomic units could aid to characterize the distinct microbial communities within a sewerage manhole. The proportion of sulfate-reducing bacteria, each sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) were strongly correlated with the liquid parameters (DO, ORP, COD, Sulfide, NH3-N), while the Mycobacterium and Acidophilic SOB (M&A) was strongly correlated with gaseous factors within the sewer, such as H2S, CH4, and CO. Identifying the distributions and proportions of critical microbial communities within sewerage systems could provide insights into how the microbial sulfur cycle is affected by the dynamic environmental conditions that exist in sewers and might be useful for explaining the potential sewerage problems. PMID:28261160

  6. Microbial Character Related Sulfur Cycle under Dynamic Environmental Factors Based on the Microbial Population Analysis in Sewerage System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qian; Shi, Hanchang; Liu, Yanchen

    2017-01-01

    The undesired sulfur cycle derived by microbial population can ultimately causes the serious problems of sewerage systems. However, the microbial community characters under dynamic environment factors in actual sewerage system is still not enough. This current study aimed to character the distributions and compositions of microbial communities that participate in the sulfur cycle under the dynamic environmental conditions in a local sewerage system. To accomplish this, microbial community compositions were assessed using 454 high-throughput sequencing (16S rDNA) combined with dsrB gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The results indicated that a higher diversity of microbial species was present at locations in sewers with high concentrations of H2S. Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria were dominant in the sewerage system, while Actinobacteria alone were dominant in regions with high concentrations of H2S. Specifically, the unique operational taxonomic units could aid to characterize the distinct microbial communities within a sewerage manhole. The proportion of sulfate-reducing bacteria, each sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) were strongly correlated with the liquid parameters (DO, ORP, COD, Sulfide, NH3-N), while the Mycobacterium and Acidophilic SOB (M&A) was strongly correlated with gaseous factors within the sewer, such as H2S, CH4, and CO. Identifying the distributions and proportions of critical microbial communities within sewerage systems could provide insights into how the microbial sulfur cycle is affected by the dynamic environmental conditions that exist in sewers and might be useful for explaining the potential sewerage problems.

  7. The desert of Tataouine: an extreme environment that hosts a wide diversity of microorganisms and radiotolerant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanal, Angélique; Chapon, Virginie; Benzerara, Karim; Barakat, Mohamed; Christen, Richard; Achouak, Wafa; Barras, Frédéric; Heulin, Thierry

    2006-03-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of prokaryotic communities exposed to arid conditions in the hot desert of Tataouine (south Tunisia) was estimated with a combination of a culture and - molecular-based analysis. Thirty-one isolates, representative of each dominant morphotypes, were affiliated to Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and the CFB group while none related to Archaea. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed the presence of species related to Bacteria and Archaea. Sequences related to Archaea were all affiliated to the non-thermophilic Crenarchaeota subgroup. Bacterial sequences were dominated by Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria; a few sequences were distributed among eight others phyla, including Thermus/Deinococcus relatives. A correlation between tolerance to desiccation and to radiation has been demonstrated for the radiotolerant bacteria Deinococcus radiodurans. Because bacteria living in the hot desert of Tataouine are one way or another tolerant to desiccation, we investigate whether they could also be tolerant to radiation. Exposition of soil samples to intense gamma radiation yields Bacillus, Thermus/Deinococcus and alpha-Proteobacteria relatives. Four of these strains correspond to radiotolerant species as revealed by evaluation of the resistance levels of the individual cultures. A detailed analysis of the resistance levels for two Thermus/Deinococcus and two alpha-Proteobacteria relatives revealed that they correspond to new radiotolerant species.

  8. Survival of introduced phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) and their impact on microbial community structure during the phytoextraction of Cd-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seulki; Moon, Hee Sun; Shin, Doyun; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2013-12-15

    This study was conducted to investigate whether or not phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) as a kind of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria enhance the uptake of Cd by plants. In addition, the effect of PSB augmentation during phytoextraction on the microbial community of indigenous soil bacteria was also studied. In the initial Cd-contaminated soil, the major phyla were Proteobacteria (35%), Actinobacteria (38%) and Firmicutes (8%). While Proteobacteria were dominant at the second and sixth week (41 and 54%, respectively) in inoculated soil, Firmicutes (mainly belonging to the Bacilli class-61%), dramatically increased in the eight-week soil. For the uninoculated soil, the proportion of α-Proteobacteria increased after eight weeks (32%). Interestingly, Actinobacteria class, which was originally present in the soil (37%), seemed to disappear during phytoremediation, irrespective of whether PSB was inoculated or not. Cluster analysis and Principal Component Analysis revealed that the microbial community of eight-week inoculated soil was completely separated from the other soil samples, due to the dramatic increase of Bacillus aryabhattai. These findings revealed that it took at least eight weeks for the inoculated Bacillus sp. to functionally adapt to the introduced soil, against competition with indigenous microorganisms in soil. An ecological understanding of interaction among augmented bacteria, plant and indigenous soil bacteria is needed, for proper management of phytoextraction.

  9. Role of primary substrate composition on microbial community structure and function and trace organic chemical attenuation in managed aquifer recharge systems

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Dong

    2014-03-26

    This study was performed to reveal the microbial community characteristics in simulated managed aquifer recharge (MAR), a natural water treatment system, under different concentrations and compositions of biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and further link these to the biotransformation of emerging trace organic chemicals (TOrCs). Two pairs of soil-column setups were established in the laboratory receiving synthetic feed solutions composed of different peptone/humic acid ratios and concentrations. Higher BDOC concentration resulted in lower microbial community diversity and higher relative abundance of Betaproteobacteria. Decreasing the peptone/humic acid ratio resulted in higher diversity of the community and higher relative abundances of Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, and Actinobacteria. The metabolic capabilities of microbiome involved in xenobiotics biodegradation were significantly promoted under lower BDOC concentration and higher humic acid content. Cytochrome P450 genes were also more abundant under these primary substrate conditions. Lower peptone/humic acid ratios also promoted the attenuation of most TOrCs. These results suggest that the primary substrate characterized by a more refractory character could increase the relative abundances of Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, and Actinobacteria, as well as associated cytochrome P450 genes, all of which should play important roles in the biotransformation of TOrCs in this natural treatment system. © 2014 Springer-Verlag.

  10. Association between Pseudonocardia symbionts and Atta leaf-cutting ants suggested by improved isolation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Sarah E; Poulsen, Michael; Gorosito, Norma B; Pinto-Tomás, Adrián; Masiulionis, Virginia E; Currie, Cameron R

    2013-03-01

    Fungus-growing ants associate with multiple symbiotic microbes, including Actinobacteria for production of antibiotics. The best studied of these bacteria are within the genus Pseudonocardia, which in most fungus-growing ants are conspicuously visible on the external cuticle of workers. However, given that fungus-growing ants in the genus Atta do not carry visible Actinobacteria on their cuticle, it is unclear if this genus engages in the symbiosis with Pseudonocardia. Here we explore whether improving culturing techniques can allow for successful isolation of Pseudonocardia from Atta cephalotes leaf-cutting ants. We obtained Pseudonocardia from 9 of 11 isolation method/colony component combinations from all 5 colonies intensively sampled. The most efficient technique was bead-beating workers in phosphate buffer solution, then plating the suspension on carboxymethylcellulose medium. Placing these strains in a fungus-growing ant-associated Pseudonocardia phylogeny revealed that while some strains grouped with clades of Pseudonocardia associated with other genera of fungus-growing ants, a large portion of the isolates fell into two novel phylogenetic clades previously not identified from this ant-microbe symbiosis. Our findings suggest that Pseudonocardia may be associated with Atta fungus-growing ants, potentially internalized, and that localizing the symbiont and exploring its role is necessary to shed further light on the association.

  11. Bacterial community structure in the rhizosphere of three cactus species from semi-arid highlands in central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Garrido, J Félix; Montiel-Lugo, Daniel; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Torres-Cortes, Gloria; Millán, Vicenta; Toro, Nicolás; Martínez-Abarca, Francisco; Ramírez-Saad, Hugo C

    2012-05-01

    The nature reserve of Tehuacan-Cuicatlan in central Mexico is known for its diversity and endemism mainly in cactus plants. Although the xerophytic flora is reasonably documented, the bacterial communities associated with these species have been largely neglected. We assessed the diversity and composition of bacterial communities in bulk (non-rhizospheric) soil and the rhizosphere of three cactus plant species: Mammillaria carnea, Opuntia pilifera and Stenocereus stellatus, approached using cultivation and molecular techniques, considering the possible effect of dry and rainy seasons. Cultivation-dependent methods were focused on putative N(2)-fixers and heterotrophic aerobic bacteria, in the two media tested the values obtained for dry season samples grouped together regardless of the sample type (rhizospheric or non-rhizospheric), these groups also included the non-rhizospheric sample for rainy season, on each medium. These CFU values were smaller and significantly different from those obtained on rhizospheric samples from rainy season. Genera composition among isolates of the rhizospheric samples was very similar for each season, the most abundant taxa being α-Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. Interestingly, the genus Ochrobactrum was highly represented among rhizospheric samples, when cultured in N-free medium. The structure of the bacterial communities was approached with molecular techniques targeting partial 16S rRNA sequences such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and serial analysis of ribosomal sequence tags. Under these approaches, the most represented bacterial phyla were Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria. The first two were also highly represented when using isolation techniques.

  12. Comparison of airborne bacterial communities from a hog farm and spray field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfken, Ann M; Song, Bongkeun; Sung, Jung-Suk

    2015-05-01

    Airborne bacteria from hog farms may have detrimental impacts on human health, particularly in terms of antibiotic resistance and pathogen zoonosis. Despite human health risks, very little is known about the composition and diversity of airborne bacteria from hog farms and hog-related spray fields. We used pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA genes to compare airborne bacterial communities in a North Carolina hog farm and lagoon spray field. In addition, we isolated and identified antibiotic-resistant bacteria from both air samples. Based on 16S rRNA gene pyrosequence analysis, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria were the dominant phyla in airborne bacterial communities from both hog farm and spray field sites. Within the Firmicutes genera, Clostridium spp. were more abundant in the hog farm, whereas Staphylococcus spp. were higher in the spray field. The presence of opportunitic pathogens, including several Staphylococcus species and Propionibacterium acnes, was detected in both bioaerosol communities based on phylogenetic analysis. The isolation and identification of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from air samples also showed similar results with dominance of Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria in both hog farm and spray field air. Thus, the existence of opportunistic pathogens and antibiotic resistant bacteria in airborne communities evidences potential health risks to farmers and other residents from swine bioaerosol exposure.

  13. Influence of 20-year organic and inorganic fertilization on organic carbon accumulation and microbial community structure of aggregates in an intensively cultivated sandy loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huanjun; Ding, Weixin; He, Xinhua; Yu, Hongyan; Fan, Jianling; Liu, Deyan

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term effect of compost (CM) and inorganic fertilizer (NPK) application on microbial community structure and organic carbon (OC) accumulation at aggregate scale, soils from plots amended with CM, NPK and no fertilizer (control) for 20 years (1989-2009) were collected. Soil was separated into large macroaggregate (>2,000 μm), small macroaggregate (250-2,000 μm), microaggregate (53-250 μm), silt (2-53 μm) and clay fraction (soil oxygen diffusion coefficient. NPK mainly increased OC in macroaggregates and displayed weaker influence on aggregation. Bacteria distributed in all aggregates, while fungi and actinobacteria were mainly in macroaggregates and microaggregates. The ratio of monounsaturated to branched (M/B) PLFAs, as an indicator for the ratio of aerobic to anaerobic microorganisms, increased inversely with aggregate size. Both NPK and especially CM significantly (Psoil was not only due to a more effective decrease of actinobacteria, but also a decrease of monounsaturated PLFAs and an increase of branched PLFAs. Aggregations under CM appear to alter micro-habitats to those more suitable for anaerobes, which in turn boosts OC accumulation.

  14. Different continuous cropping spans significantly affect microbial community membership and structure in a vanilla-grown soil as revealed by deep pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wu; Zhao, Qingyun; Zhao, Jun; Xun, Weibing; Li, Rong; Zhang, Ruifu; Wu, Huasong; Shen, Qirong

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, soil bacterial and fungal communities across vanilla continuous cropping time-series fields were assessed through deep pyrosequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. The results demonstrated that the long-term monoculture of vanilla significantly altered soil microbial communities. Soil fungal diversity index increased with consecutive cropping years, whereas soil bacterial diversity was relatively stable. Bray-Curtis dissimilarity cluster and UniFrac-weighted principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) revealed that monoculture time was the major determinant for fungal community structure, but not for bacterial community structure. The relative abundances (RAs) of the Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Basidiomycota phyla were depleted along the years of vanilla monoculture. Pearson correlations at the phyla level demonstrated that Actinobacteria, Armatimonadetes, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Firmicutes had significant negative correlations with vanilla disease index (DI), while no significant correlation for fungal phyla was observed. In addition, the amount of the pathogen Fusarium oxysporum accumulated with increasing years and was significantly positively correlated with vanilla DI. By contrast, the abundance of beneficial bacteria, including Bradyrhizobium and Bacillus, significantly decreased over time. In sum, soil weakness and vanilla stem wilt disease after long-term continuous cropping can be attributed to the alteration of the soil microbial community membership and structure, i.e., the reduction of the beneficial microbes and the accumulation of the fungal pathogen.

  15. Microbial quality and phylogenetic diversity of fresh rainwater and tropical freshwater reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Rajni; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar; Dunstan, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    The impact of rainwater on the microbial quality of a tropical freshwater reservoir through atmospheric wet deposition of microorganisms was studied for the first time. Reservoir water samples were collected at four different sampling points and rainwater samples were collected in the immediate vicinity of the reservoir sites for a period of four months (January to April, 2012) during the Northeast monsoon period. Microbial quality of all fresh rainwater and reservoir water samples was assessed based on the counts for the microbial indicators: Escherichia coli (E. coli), total coliforms, and Enterococci along with total heterotrophic plate counts (HPC). The taxonomic richness and phylogenetic relationship of the freshwater reservoir with those of the fresh rainwater were also assessed using 16 S rRNA gene clone library construction. The levels of E. coli were found to be in the range of 0 CFU/100 mL-75 CFU/100 mL for the rainwater, and were 10-94 CFU/100 mL for the reservoir water. The sampling sites that were influenced by highway traffic emissions showed the maximum counts for all the bacterial indicators assessed. There was no significant increase in the bacterial abundances observed in the reservoir water immediately following rainfall. However, the composite fresh rainwater and reservoir water samples exhibited broad phylogenetic diversity, including sequences representing Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Lentisphaerae and Bacteriodetes. Members of the Betaproteobacteria group were the most dominant in both fresh rainwater and reservoir water, followed by Alphaproteobacteria, Sphingobacteria, Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria.

  16. Diversity of culturable bacteria recovered from Pico Bolívar's glacial and subglacial environments, at 4950 m, in Venezuelan tropical Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondón, Johnma; Gómez, Wileidy; Ball, María M; Melfo, Alejandra; Rengifo, Marcos; Balcázar, Wilvis; Dávila-Vera, Delsy; Balza-Quintero, Alirio; Mendoza-Briceño, Rosa Virginia; Yarzábal, Luis Andrés

    2016-11-01

    Even though tropical glaciers are retreating rapidly and many will disappear in the next few years, their microbial diversity remains to be studied in depth. In this paper we report on the biodiversity of the culturable fraction of bacteria colonizing Pico Bolívar's glacier ice and subglacial meltwaters, at ∼4950 m in the Venezuelan Andean Mountains. Microbial cells of diverse morphologies and exhibiting uncompromised membranes were present at densities ranging from 1.5 × 10(4) to 4.7 × 10(4) cells/mL in glacier ice and from 4.1 × 10(5) to 9.6 × 10(5) cells/mL in subglacial meltwater. Of 89 pure isolates recovered from the samples, the majority were eurypsychrophilic or stenopsychrophilic, according to their temperature range of growth. Following analysis of their 16S rDNA nucleotidic sequence, 54 pure isolates were assigned to 23 phylotypes distributed within 4 different phyla or classes: Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Actinobacteria dominated the culturable fraction of glacier ice samples, whereas Proteobacteria were dominant in subglacial meltwater samples. Chloramphenicol and ampicillin resistance was exhibited by 73.07% and 65.38%, respectively, of the subglacial isolates, and nearly 35% of them were multiresistant. Considering the fast rate at which tropical glaciers are melting, this study confirms the urgent need to study the microbial communities immured in such environments.

  17. Evaluación de la producción de ácidos orgánicos por Streptomyces spp. y solubilización de tres fuentes de fósforo por la cepa T3A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Carolina Prieto Correal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available  Título en ingles: Evaluation of organic acid production by Streptomyces spp. and solubilization of three phosphorus sources by strain T3A Título corto: Producción de ácidos orgánicos por Streptomyces spp.  y solubilización de fosfatos por la cepa T3A. Título corto en ingles: Organic acid production by Streptomyces spp. and solubilization by strain T3AResumen: Quince aislamientos de actinobacterias solubilizadoras de fósforo obtenidas a partir de suelos de los andes orientales colombianos fueron identificadas por sus características morfológicas y por la secuenciación del gen 16S ADNr. El análisis BLASTN de las 15 secuencias obtenidas mostró que los aislamientos pertenecían al género Streptomyces. Paralelamente, los aislamientos fueron sometidos a la detección de ácidos orgánicos, durante el proceso de solubilización de fósforo con la presencia mayoritaria de los ácidos oxálico, cítrico y glucónico. Dentro de las cepas evaluadas Streptomyces sp. T3A fue seleccionada para ser evaluada bajo diferentes fuentes de fósforo inorgánico debido a los resultados de evaluaciones cualitativas y cuantitativas realizadas previamente, en las cuales mostró una actividad solubilizadora de fósforo significativamente alta. Los resultados evidenciaron la capacidad de ésta actinobacteria para solubilizar diferentes fuentes de fosfatos insolubles con valores de 122 mgP·L-1 paraCa3(PO42, 14 mgP·L-1 para AlPO4 y 19,6 mgP·L-1 para roca fosfórica. También los ensayos revelaron que la actividad se mantiene en un rango de pH de 5 a 8 con las mismas fuentes de fosfatos evaluadas. Los resultados presentados contribuyen al avance en la caracterización de estas bacterias como promotoras de crecimiento vegetal con el fin de presentarlos como un recurso clave a nivel de biotecnología agrícola. Palabras clave: Streptomyces, Solubilización de fósforo, ácidos orgánicos, actinobacteria, HPLC. Abstrac: Fifteen isolates of Eastern

  18. The taxophysiological paradox: changes in the intestinal microbiota of the xylophagous cockroach Cryptocercus punctulatus depending on the physiological state of the host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlanga, Mercedes; Paster, Bruce J; Guerrero, Ricardo

    2009-12-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of symbiotic bacteria from the xylophagous cockroach Cryptocercus (Cryptocercidae, Blattaria) were compared to those described in previous reports in lower termites. The 16S rDNA bacterial genes were PCR-amplified from DNA isolated from the entire hindgut using Bacteria-selective primers, and the 16S rDNA amplicons were cloned into Escherichia coli. The changes in the gut microbiota of Cryptocercus under three physiological conditions, "active," "fasting," and "dead," were studied. Analysis of the active-clone library revealed 45 new phylotypes (clones sharing >97% sequence identity were grouped into the same phylotype) from 54 analyzed clones. The clones were affiliated with the phyla Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Spirochaetes, Synergistetes, Verrucomicrobia, and candidate phylum Termite Group 1 (TG1). Clones belonging to Spirochaetes, Bacteroidetes, and TG1 phyla clustered with previously reported sequences obtained from the guts of several termites, suggesting that these clones are common constituents of the intestinal microbiota of lower termites and Cryptocercus. In the fasting-clone library, 19 new phylotypes, from 49 clones studied, were distinguished. The new phylotypes were affiliated with the phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Spirochaetes, Synergistetes, and the candidate phylum TM7. Finally, in the dead-clone library, 24 new phylotypes from 50 studied clones were found. The new phylotypes were affiliated with the phyla Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria. Thus, from active, to fasting, to dead physiological states, a decrease in the number of phyla present in the whole microbial gut was evident. However, in the dead physiological state, each phylum conserved contained more new phylotypes. This poses a taxophysiological paradox, because a stable, active physiological state of Cryptocercus-due to a continuous input of wood-supports a higher diversity of

  19. Characterization of Growing Soil Bacterial Communities across a pH gradient Using H218O DNA-Stable Isotope Probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty-Bernard, A. T.; Schwartz, E.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have established consistent relationships between pH and bacterial diversity and community structure in soils from site-specific to landscape scales. However, these studies rely on DNA or PLFA extraction techniques from bulk soils that encompass metabolically active and inactive, or dormant, communities, and loose DNA. Dormant cells may comprise up to 80% of total live cells. If dormant cells dominate a particular environment, it is possible that previous interpretations of the soil variables assumed to drive communities could be profoundly affected. We used H218O stable isotope probing and bar-coded illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes to monitor the response of actively growing communities to changes in soil pH in a soil microcosm over 14 days. This substrate-independent approach has several advantages over 13C or 15N-labelled molecules in that all growing bacteria should be able to make use of water, allowing characterization of whole communities. We hypothesized that Acidobacteria would increasingly dominate the growing community and that Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes would decline, given previously established responses by these taxa to soil pH. Instead, we observed the reverse. Actinobacteria abundance increased three-fold from 26 to 76% of the overall community as soil pH fell from pH 5.6 to pH 4.6. Shifts in community structure and decreases in diversity with declining soil pH were essentially driven by two families, Streptomyceaca and Microbacteracea, which collectively increased from 2 to 40% of the entire community. In contrast, Acidobacteria as a whole declined although numbers of subdivision 1 remained stable across all soil pH levels. We suggest that the brief incubation period in this SIP study selected for growth of acid-tolerant Actinobacteria over Acidobacteria. Taxa within Actinomycetales have been readily cultured over short time frames, suggesting rapid growth patterns. Conversely, taxa within Acidobacteria have been

  20. Microbial monitoring in treated stone at the Royal Chapel of Granada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jroundi, Fadwa; Pinar, Guadalupe; González-Muñoz, Maria Theresa; Sterflinger, Katja

    2014-05-01

    Biomineralization processes have been applied in situ to protect and consolidate decayed ornamental stone of the Royal Chapel in Granada (Spain). In few years, this conservation treatment has gained worth attention as environmentally friendly methodology for protection and consolidation of limestone because of the compatibilities shown between the new calcium carbonate cement and the original stone substrate. Moreover, the success of this approach may be related to the diversity of the microbiota inhabiting the stone and activated upon the biotreatment application and throughout the time. González-Muñoz et al. (2008) proposed a nutritional solution that activate among the bacteria inhabiting the stone those with carbonatogenic activity. In this study, a long-term (one, two and three years) monitoring of the microbiota present on the treated and untreated stones was done using a molecular strategy, including total DNA extraction, PCR amplification of 16S rRNA sequences, construction of clone libraries and fingerprinting by DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis) analysis. Sequencing of the 16S rDNA revealed the dominant occurrence of members of Actinobacteria (44.20%), Gamma-proteobacteria (30.24%) and Chloroflexi (25.56%) after one year of the biotreatment. Whereas after two years, members of Cyanobacteria (22.10%) appeared and three years after, the microbiota consisted of only Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria with approximately the same percentage in comparison with the untreated stones, dominated exclusively by Actinobacteria (100%). Fungal diversity followed the same dynamic as bacterial diversity being Ascomicota the predominant order before treatment. After one year, members of Basidiomycota and Viridiplantae appeared on the stone while two years after, the Viridiplantae dominated with a percentage of 84.77%. Finally, three years after the treatment, fungi population started to stabilize again and Ascomicota predominated next to 16.67% of

  1. Bacteria as growth-promoting agents for citrus rootstocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giassi, Valdionei; Kiritani, Camila; Kupper, Katia Cristina

    2016-09-01

    The microbial community plays an essential role in maintaining the ecological balance of soils. Interactions between microorganisms and plants have a major influence on the nutrition and health of the latter, and growth-promoting rhizobacteria can be used to improve plant development through a wide range of mechanisms. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to evaluate bacteria as growth-promoting agents for citrus rootstocks. A total of 30 bacterial isolates (11 of Bacillus spp., 11 actinobacteria, and 8 lactic acid bacteria) were evaluated in vitro for indoleacetic acid production, phosphate solubilization, and nitrogen (N) fixation. In vivo testing consisted of growth promotion trials of the bacterial isolates that yielded the best results on in vitro tests with three rootstocks: Swingle citrumelo [Citrus×paradisi Macfad cv. Duncan×Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.], Sunki mandarin (Citrus sunki Hort. ex Tan), and rangpur (Citrus×limonia Osbeck). The parameters of interest were height, number of leaves, stem diameter, shoot and root dry mass, and total dry mass at 150days after germination. The results showed that most bacterial isolates were capable of IAA production. Only one lactic acid bacterium isolate (BL06) solubilized phosphate, with a high solubilization index (PSI>3). In the actinobacteria group, isolates ACT01 (PSI=2.09) and ACT07 (PSI=2.01) exhibited moderate phosphate-solubilizing properties. Of the Bacillus spp. isolates, only CPMO6 and BM17 solubilized phosphate. The bacterial isolates that most fixated nitrogen were BM17, ACT11, and BL24. In the present study, some bacteria were able to promote growth of citrus rootstocks; however, this response was dependent on plant genotype and isolate. Bacillus spp. BM16 and CPMO4 were able to promote growth of Swingle citrumelo. In Sunki mandarin plants, the best treatment results were obtained with BM17 (Bacillus sp.) and ACT11 (actinobacteria). For Rangpur lime rootstock, only BM05 (Bacillus sp

  2. Lichens as natural sources of biotechnologically relevant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Marcelino T; Parrot, Delphine; Berg, Gabriele; Grube, Martin; Tomasi, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    The search for microorganisms from novel sources and in particular microbial symbioses represents a promising approach in biotechnology. In this context, lichens have increasingly become a subject of research in microbial biotechnology, particularly after the recognition that a diverse community of bacteria other than cyanobacteria is an additional partner to the traditionally recognized algae-fungus mutualism. Here, we review recent studies using culture-dependent as well as culture-independent approaches showing that lichens can harbor diverse bacterial families known for the production of compounds of biotechnological interest and that several microorganisms isolated from lichens, in particular Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria, can produce a number of bioactive compounds, many of them with biotechnological potential.

  3. Isolation of putative probionts from cod rearing environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauzon, H.L.; Gudmundsdottir, S.; Pedersen, M.H.;

    2008-01-01

    , metabolite production and adhesion to fish cell lines. Our study demonstrated that 14% of screened bacteria (n = 188) had antagonistic properties towards fish pathogens. The majority of these isolates were Gram-positive (81%), belonging to Firmicutes (69.2%) and Actinobacteria (11.5%) phyla based on 16S r...... was designed to search for new probiotics to target this critical period in cod rearing. Potential probionts were selected from the naturalmicrobiota of cod aquacultural environment. The selection was based on several criteria: pathogen inhibition potential, growth characteristics, strain identification......RNA gene sequencing. Only 6 (3.2%) of 188 isolates could inhibit all three pathogens tested: Vibrio anguillarum, Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. achromogenes and Vibrio salmonicida. Differences observed in activity intensity and spectrum among inhibitory isolates emphasise the need to develop probiotic...

  4. A novel acidophile community populating waste ore deposits at an acid mine drainage site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Chun-bo; ZHANG Hong-xun; BAI Zhi-hui; HU Qing; ZHANG Bao-guo

    2007-01-01

    Waste ore samples (pH 3.0) were collected at an acid mine drainage site in Anhui, China. The present acidophilic microbial community in the waste ore was studied with 16S rRNA gene clone library and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Eighteen different clones were identified and affiliated with Actinobacteria, low G + C Gram-positives, Thermomicrobia, Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, Candidate division TM7, and Planctomycetes. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed a diversity of acidophiles in the samples that were mostly novel. It is unexpected that the moderately thermophilic acidophiles were abundant in the acidic ecosystem and may play a great role in the generation of AMD. The result of DGGE was consistent with that of clone library analysis. These findings help in the better understanding of the generation mechanism of AMD and in developing a more efficient method to control AMD.

  5. Chemical analyses of wasp-associated streptomyces bacteria reveal a prolific potential for natural products discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Michael; Oh, Dong-Chan; Clardy, Jon;

    2011-01-01

    Identifying new sources for small molecule discovery is necessary to help mitigate the continuous emergence of antibiotic-resistance in pathogenic microbes. Recent studies indicate that one potentially rich source of novel natural products is Actinobacterial symbionts associated with social...... of these isolates identified 11 distinct and structurally diverse secondary metabolites, including a novel polyunsaturated and polyoxygenated macrocyclic lactam, which we name sceliphrolactam. By pairing the 15 Streptomyces strains against a collection of fungi and bacteria, we document their antifungal...... and antibacterial activity. The prevalence and anti-microbial properties of Actinobacteria associated with these two solitary wasp species suggest the potential role of these Streptomyces as antibiotic-producing symbionts, potentially helping defend their wasp hosts from pathogenic microbes. Finding...

  6. Diversity of Nitrate-Reducing and Denitrifying Bacteria in a Marine Aquaculture Biofilter and their Response to Sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krieger, Bärbel; Schwermer, Carsten U.; Rezakhani, Nastaran

    2006-01-01

    their response to sulfide concentrations relevant for the system. Almost 500 nitrate-consuming isolates were screened by 16S rRNA gene-RFLP; for each RFLP pattern representatives were sequenced. In total, 40 different strains were identified, some of them novel species, mostly affiliating...... with Alphaproteobacteria but also including Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria. The diversity of the isolates was compared to the cultivation-independent diversity of nitrate-reducing and denitrifying bacteria based on narG and nosZ as functional marker genes. Growth experiments...... revealed great differences in sulfide-tolerance among isolates, ranging from generally resulted in increased nitrous oxide production. Batch incubations of anaerobic sludge with 15N-nitrate confirmed...

  7. Molecular characterization of an endolithic microbial community in dolomite rock in the central Alps (Switzerland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horath, Thomas; Bachofen, Reinhard

    2009-08-01

    Endolithic microorganisms colonize the pores in exposed dolomite rocks in the Piora Valley in the Swiss Alps. They appear as distinct grayish-green bands about 1-8 mm below the rock surface. Based on environmental small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences, a diverse community driven by photosynthesis has been found. Cyanobacteria (57 clones), especially the genus Leptolyngbya, form the functional basis for an endolithic community which contains a wide spectrum of so far not characterized species of chemotrophic Bacteria (64 clones) with mainly Actinobacteria, Alpha-Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Acidobacteria, as well as a cluster within the Chloroflexaceae. Furthermore, a cluster within the Crenarchaeotes (40 clones) has been detected. Although the eukaryotic diversity was outside the scope of the study, an amoeba (39 clones), and several green algae (51 clones) have been observed. We conclude that the bacterial diversity in this endolithic habitat, especially of chemotrophic, nonpigmented organisms, is considerable and that Archaea are present as well.

  8. Microbial community structures and dynamics in the O3/BAC drinking water treatment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jian; Lu, Jun; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jian-Cheng; Sun, Li-Chen; Hu, Zhang-Li

    2014-06-16

    Effectiveness of drinking water treatment, in particular pathogen control during the water treatment process, is always a major public health concern. In this investigation, the application of PCR-DGGE technology to the analysis of microbial community structures and dynamics in the drinking water treatment process revealed several dominant microbial populations including: α-Proteobacteria, β-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria Firmicutes and Cyanobacteria. α-Proteobacteria and β-Proteobacteria were the dominant bacteria during the whole process. Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were the dominant bacteria before and after treatment, respectively. Firmicutes showed season-dependent changes in population dynamics. Importantly, γ-Proteobacteria, which is a class of medically important bacteria, was well controlled by the O3/biological activated carbon (BAC) treatment, resulting in improved effluent water bio-safety.

  9. Metagenomic exploration of microbial community in mine tailings of Malanjkhand copper project, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Abhishek; Dutta, Avishek; Sarkar, Jayeeta; Paul, Dhiraj; Panigrahi, Mruganka Kumar; Sar, Pinaki

    2017-06-01

    Mine tailings from copper mines are considered as one of the sources of highly hazardous acid mine drainage (AMD) due to bio-oxidation of its sulfidic constituents. This study was designed to understand microbial community composition and potential for acid generation using samples from mine tailings of Malanjkhand copper project (MCP), India through 16S rRNA gene based amplicon sequencing approach (targeting V4 region). Three tailings samples (T1, T2 and T3) with varied physiochemical properties selected for the study revealed distinct microbial assemblages. Sample (T3) with most extreme nature (pH  3.0) exhibited abundance of Proteobacteria, Fimicutes, Actinobacteria and/or Nitrospirae. Metagenomic sequences are available under the BioProject ID PRJNA361456.

  10. Microbial diversity at the moderate acidic stage in three different sulfidic mine tailings dumps generating acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korehi, Hananeh; Blöthe, Marco; Schippers, Axel

    2014-11-01

    In freshly deposited sulfidic mine tailings the pH is alkaline or circumneutral. Due to pyrite or pyrrhotite oxidation the pH is dropping over time to pH values tailings are only scarcely studied. Here we investigated the microbial diversity via 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis in eight samples (pH range 3.2-6.5) from three different sulfidic mine tailings dumps in Botswana, Germany and Sweden. In total 701 partial 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed a divergent microbial community between the three sites and at different tailings depths. Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were overall the most abundant phyla in the clone libraries. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Nitrospira occurred less frequently. The found microbial communities were completely different to microbial communities in tailings at

  11. Metagenomic exploration of microbial community in mine tailings of Malanjkhand copper project, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Gupta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mine tailings from copper mines are considered as one of the sources of highly hazardous acid mine drainage (AMD due to bio-oxidation of its sulfidic constituents. This study was designed to understand microbial community composition and potential for acid generation using samples from mine tailings of Malanjkhand copper project (MCP, India through 16S rRNA gene based amplicon sequencing approach (targeting V4 region. Three tailings samples (T1, T2 and T3 with varied physiochemical properties selected for the study revealed distinct microbial assemblages. Sample (T3 with most extreme nature (pH 3.0 exhibited abundance of Proteobacteria, Fimicutes, Actinobacteria and/or Nitrospirae. Metagenomic sequences are available under the BioProject ID PRJNA361456.

  12. Pyrosequencing based profiling of the bacterial community in the Chilika Lake, the largest lagoon of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab Pramanik

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Brackish water lake is the most extraordinary reservoir for bacterial community with an adaptability of tolerance to saline stress. In the present study, metagenomic approach was implemented utilising 454-pyrosequencing platform to gain deeper insights into the bacterial diversity profile of the soil sediment of Chilika Lake, Odisha, India. Metagenome contained 68,150 sequences with 31,896,430 bp and 56.79% G+C content. Metagenome sequences data are now available at NCBI under the Sequence Read Archive (SRA database with accession no. SRX753382. Bacterial community metagenome sequences were analysed by MG-RAST server representing the presence of 16,212 species belonging to 45 different phyla. The dominating phyla were Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Planctomycetes. The analysis of bacterial community datasets obtained from two different saline soil sediments revealed significant differences in bacterial community composition and diversity value providing better understanding of the ecosystem dynamics of Chilika Lake.

  13. What stories can the Frankia genomes start to tell us?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Louis Tisa; Nicholas Beauchemin; Maher Gtari; Arnab Sen; Luis G Wall

    2013-11-01

    Among the Actinobacteria, the genus Frankia is well known for its facultative lifestyle as a plant symbiont of dicotyledonous plants and as a free-living soil dweller. Frankia sp. strains are generally classified into one of four major phylogenetic groups that have distinctive plant host ranges. Our understanding of these bacteria has been greatly facilitated by the availability of the first three complete genome sequences, which suggested a correlation between genome size and plant host range. Since that first report, eight more Frankia genomes have been sequenced. Representatives from all four lineages have been sequenced to provide vital baseline information for genomic approaches toward understanding these novel bacteria. An overview of the Frankia genomes will be presented to stimulate discussion on the potential of these organisms and a greater understanding of their physiology and evolution.

  14. Microbial Community Structures and Dynamics in the O3/BAC Drinking Water Treatment Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Tian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Effectiveness of drinking water treatment, in particular pathogen control during the water treatment process, is always a major public health concern. In this investigation, the application of PCR-DGGE technology to the analysis of microbial community structures and dynamics in the drinking water treatment process revealed several dominant microbial populations including: α-Proteobacteria, β-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria Firmicutes and Cyanobacteria. α-Proteobacteria and β-Proteobacteria were the dominant bacteria during the whole process. Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were the dominant bacteria before and after treatment, respectively. Firmicutes showed season-dependent changes in population dynamics. Importantly, γ-Proteobacteria, which is a class of medically important bacteria, was well controlled by the O3/biological activated carbon (BAC treatment, resulting in improved effluent water bio-safety.

  15. Assessment of the bacterial community of soils contaminated with used lubricating oil by PCR-DGGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naruemon Meeboon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of indigenous bacteria in three soils contaminated with used lubricating oil (ULO was determined and compared using molecular analysis of bacteria cultured during the enrichment process. Sequencing analyses demonstrated that the majority of the DGGE bands in enrichment cultures were affiliated with four phyla of the domain, Bacteria: α, β, γ- Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. Soil C had a higher ULO contamination level than soil A and B, which may explain why enrichment culture C had the greatest diversity of bacteria, but further studies would be needed to determine whether ULO concentration results in higher diversity of ULO-degraders in soils. The diversity of ULO-degraders detected in these three different soils suggests that biostimulation methods for increasing the activity of indigenous microorganisms may be a viable approach to bioremediation, and that future studies to determine how to increase their activity in situ are warranted.

  16. Temporal Patterns in Bacterioplankton Community Composition in Three Reservoirs of Similar Trophic Status in Shenzhen, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiancheng Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The bacterioplankton community composition’s (BCC spatial and temporal variation patterns in three reservoirs (Shiyan, Xikeng, and LuoTian Reservoir of similar trophic status in Bao’an District, Shenzhen (China, were investigated using PCR amplification of the 16S rDNA gene and the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE techniques. Water samples were collected monthly in each reservoir during 12 consecutive months. Distinct differences were detected in band number, pattern, and density of DGGE at different sampling sites and time points. Analysis of the DGGE fingerprints showed that changes in the bacterial community structure mainly varied with seasons, and the patterns of change indicated that seasonal forces might have a more significant impact on the BCC than eutrophic status in the reservoirs, despite the similar Shannon-Weiner index among the three reservoirs. The sequences obtained from excised bands were affiliated with Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteriodetes, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Proteobacteria.

  17. Diet type dictates the gut microbiota and the immune response against Yersinia ruckeri in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Hans-Christian; Strube, Mikael Lenz; Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff

    2014-01-01

    of rainbow trout. The plant-based diet gave rise to an intestinal microbiota dominated by the genera Streptococcus, Leuconostoc and Weissella from phylum Firmicutes whereas phylum Proteobacteria/Bacteroidetes/Actinobacteria dominated the community in the marine fed fish. In connection to the Y. ruckeri bath......This study investigated the influence of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) commensal intestinal microbiota in connection to an experimental Yersina ruckeri infection, the causative agent of enteric redmouth disease. One marine and one plant diet was administered to two different groups...... challenge there was no effect of the diet type on the cumulative survival, but the number of Y. ruckeri positive fish as measured by plate count and the number of fish with a 'high' number of reads belonging to genus Yersinia as measured by 16S rRNA next-generation sequencing was higher for marine diet fed...

  18. Latitudinal patterns in the abundance of major marine bacterioplankton groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wietz, Matthias; Gram, Lone; Jørgensen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the abundance of major marine bacterioplankton taxa and two bacterial genera (Pseudoalteromonas and Vibrio) in surface seawater at 24 stations around the world. Catalyzed Reporter Deposition-Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (CARD-FISH) showed that Alphaproteobacteria (average...... relative abundance 37%, average absolute abundance 3.7×105 cells mL-1) including SAR11 (30%/3×105), Gammaproteobacteria (14%/1.2×105), and Bacteroidetes (12%/1.3×105) globally dominated the bacterioplankton. The SAR86 clade (4.6%/4.1×104) and Actinobacteria (4.5%/4×104) were detected ubiquitously, whereas...... oceans underlined the presence of biogeographical patterns among marine bacteria and the influence of environmental parameters on bacterial distribution....

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of the gut bacterial microflora of the fungus-growing termite Odontotermes formosanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzato, Naoya; Muramatsu, Mizuho; Matsui, Toru; Watanabe, Yoshio

    2007-04-01

    We constructed a bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone library from the gut microbial community of O. formosanus and phylogenetically analyzed it in order to contribute to the evolutional study of digestive symbiosis and method development for termite control. After screening by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, 56 out of 280 clones with unique RFLP patterns were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. The representative phylotypes were affiliated to four phylogenetic groups, Firmicutes, the Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi group, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria of the domain Bacteira. No one clone affiliated with the phylum Spirochaetes was identified, in contrast to the case of wood-feeding termites. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that nearly half of the representative clones (25 phylotypes) formed monophyletic clusters with clones obtained from other termite species, especially with the sequences retrieved from fungus-growing termites. These results indicate that the presence of termite-specific bacterial lineages implies a coevolutional relationship of gut microbes and host termites.

  20. Metaproteomics reveals major microbial players and their biodegradation functions in a large-scale aerobic composting plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongming; Li, Mingxiao; Xi, Beidou; Zhao, Yue; Wei, Zimin; Song, Caihong; Zhu, Chaowei

    2015-11-01

    Composting is an appropriate management alternative for municipal solid waste; however, our knowledge about the microbial regulation of this process is still scare. We employed metaproteomics to elucidate the main biodegradation pathways in municipal solid waste composting system across the main phases in a large-scale composting plant. The investigation of microbial succession revealed that Bacillales, Actinobacteria and Saccharomyces increased significantly with respect to abundance in composting process. The key microbiologic population for cellulose degradation in different composting stages was different. Fungi were found to be the main producers of cellulase in earlier phase. However, the cellulolytic fungal communities were gradually replaced by a purely bacterial one in active phase, which did not support the concept that the thermophilic fungi are active through the thermophilic phase. The effective decomposition of cellulose required the synergy between bacteria and fungi in the curing phase.

  1. Evolution of bacterial diversity during two-phase olive mill waste ("alperujo") composting by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortosa, Germán; Castellano-Hinojosa, Antonio; Correa-Galeote, David; Bedmar, Eulogio J

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms are the main contributing factor responsible for organic matter degradation during composting. In this research, the 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was used to elucidate evolution of bacterial diversity during mesophilic, thermophilic and maturation composting stages of the two-phase olive mill waste ("alperujo"), the main by-product of the Spanish olive oil industry. Two similar piles were performance composting AL with sheep manure as bulking agent. Actinobacteria, Bacteriodetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were the main phyla found in genomic libraries from each composting phase. Shannon and Chao1 biodiversity indices showed a clear difference between the mesophilic/thermophilic and maturation phases, which was mainly due to detection of new genera. PCA analysis of the relative number of sequences confirmed maturation affected bacterial population structure, and Pearson correlation coefficients between physicochemical composting parameters and relative number of genera sequences suggest that Planomicrobium and Ohtaekwangia could be considered as biomarkers for AL composting maturation.

  2. Effects of the feeding ratio of food waste on fed-batch aerobic composting and its microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojun; Pan, Songqing; Zhang, Zhaoji; Lin, Xiangyu; Zhang, Yuzhen; Chen, Shaohua

    2017-01-01

    To determine the suitable feeding ratio for fed-batch aerobic composting, four fermenters were operated by adding 0%, 5%, 10% or 15% of food waste every day. The results showed that the 5% and 10% treatments were able to maintain continuous thermophilic conditions, while the 15% treatment performed badly in regard to composting temperature, which was probably due to the negative effects of excessive moisture on microbial activity. As composting proceeded, both the 5% and the 10% treatments reached maturity and achieved weight losses of approximately 65%. High-throughput sequencing results indicated that Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria were the dominant phyla of the community structure. The communities sampled at the thermophilic phases had high similarity and relatively low diversity, while species diversity increased in the maturity phase. This study was devoted to optimizing the fed-batch composting process and assessing bacterial communities, both of which were supplied as a reference for practical application.

  3. Cheese rind microbial communities: diversity, composition and origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irlinger, Françoise; Layec, Séverine; Hélinck, Sandra; Dugat-Bony, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Cheese rinds host a specific microbiota composed of both prokaryotes (such as Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria) and eukaryotes (primarily yeasts and moulds). By combining modern molecular biology tools with conventional, culture-based techniques, it has now become possible to create a catalogue of the biodiversity that inhabits this special environment. Here, we review the microbial genera detected on the cheese surface and highlight the previously unsuspected importance of non-inoculated microflora--raising the question of the latter's environmental sources and their role in shaping microbial communities. There is now a clear need to revise the current view of the cheese rind ecosystem (i.e. that of a well-defined, perfectly controlled ecosystem). Inclusion of these new findings should enable us to better understand the cheese-making process.

  4. Capacity of Aromatic Compound Degradation by Bacteria from Amazon Dark Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Mancini Nakamura

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Amazon dark earth (ADE is known for its high organic matter content, biochar concentration and microbial diversity. The biochar amount suggests the existence of microorganisms capable of degrading aromatic hydrocarbons (AHs. In an effort to investigate the influence of bacteria on the resilience and fertility of these soils, we enriched five ADE soils with naphthalene and phenanthrene, and biodegradation assays with phenanthrene and diesel oil were carried out, as well. After DNA extraction, amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA bacterial gene, we identified 148 isolates as the Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria phyla comprising genera closely related to AHs biodegradation. We obtained 128 isolates that degrade diesel oil and 115 isolates that degrade phenanthrene. Some isolates were successful in degrading both substrates within 2 h. In conclusion, the obtained isolates from ADE have degrading aromatic compound activity, and perhaps, the biochar content has a high influence on this.

  5. Selective isolation of potentially phosphate-mobilizing, biosurfactant-producing and biodegradative bacteria associated with a sub-Arctic, terricolous lichen, Peltigera membranacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurbjörnsdóttir, Margrét Auður; Vilhelmsson, Oddur

    2016-06-01

    Lichens are the symbiotic association of fungi and a photosynthetic partner. However, non-phototrophic bacteria are also present and thought to comprise an essential part of the lichen symbiosis, although their roles in the symbiosis are still poorly understood. In this study, we isolated and characterized 110 non-phototrophic bacterial lichen associates from thalli of the terricolous lichen Peltigera membranacea The biodegradative and other nutrient-scavenging properties studied among selected isolates were phosphate mobilization, biosurfactant production and degradation of napthalene and several biopolymers, suggesting organic and inorganic nutrient scavenging as roles for bacteria in the lichen symbiotic association. Identification by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that the isolates comprised 18 genera within the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, many with high similarities with bacteria typically associated with the plant and rhizosphere environments, could suggest that plants may be important sources of terricolous lichen-associated bacteria, or vice versa.

  6. Bioprospecting Sediments from Red Sea Coastal Lagoons for Microorganisms and Their Antimicrobial Potential

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Amoudi, Soha

    2016-12-08

    showed a higher percentage of enzymes associated with antibiotic synthesis, PKS and NRPS. When considering sediment type, mangrove mud samples showed a higher percentage of enzymes associated with antibiotic synthesis than microbial mat samples. Taken together, RHL was shown to be the better location with an increased probability of successful antibiotic bioprospecting, while the best sediment type in RHL for this purpose is microbial mat. Moreover, the phylum Actinobacteria tends to be the common target for research when it comes to antibiotic bioprospecting. However this culture-independent metagenomic study suggests the tremendous potential of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria and Firmicutes for this purpose. Taking into account that the metagenomic screen suggests other phyla beyond Actinobacteria for antibiotic bioprospecting, the culture-dependent experiments were not designed to target actinobacteria alone. A total of 251 bacterial strains were isolated from the three collected sediments. Phylogenetic characterization of 251 bacterial isolates, based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, supported their assignment to five different phyla: Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Planctomycetes. Fifteen putative novel species were identified based on a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of ≤ 98 % to other strain sequences in the NCBI database. We demonstrate that 52 of the 251 isolates exhibit the potential to produce an antimicrobial effect. Additionally, at least one type of biosynthetic gene sequence, responsible for the synthesis of secondary metabolites, was recovered from 25 of the 52 isolates. Moreover, 10 of the isolates had a growth inhibition effect towards all target strains. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the significant microbial diversity associated with Red Sea harbor/lagoon systems and their potential to produce antimicrobial compounds and novel secondary metabolites. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first

  7. Use of Limited Proteolysis and Mutagenesis To Identify Folding Domains and Sequence Motifs Critical for Wax Ester Synthase/Acyl Coenzyme A:Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Juan A.; Cabezas, Matilde; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Triacylglycerols and wax esters are synthesized as energy storage molecules by some proteobacteria and actinobacteria under stress. The enzyme responsible for neutral lipid accumulation is the bifunctional wax ester synthase/acyl-coenzyme A (CoA):diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT). Structural modeling of WS/DGAT suggests that it can adopt an acyl-CoA-dependent acyltransferase fold with the N-terminal and C-terminal domains connected by a helical linker, an architecture demonstrated experimentally by limited proteolysis. Moreover, we found that both domains form an active complex when coexpressed as independent polypeptides. The structural prediction and sequence alignment of different WS/DGAT proteins indicated catalytically important motifs in the enzyme. Their role was probed by measuring the activities of a series of alanine scanning mutants. Our study underscores the structural understanding of this protein family and paves the way for their modification to improve the production of neutral lipids. PMID:24296496

  8. Crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis) allelochemicals that interfere with crop growth and the soil microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Kong, Chui-Hua; Li, Yong-Hua; Wang, Peng; Xu, Xiao-Hua

    2013-06-05

    Three chemicals, veratric acid, maltol, and (−)-loliolide, were isolated from crabgrass and their structures were identified by spectroscopic analysis. The chemicals were detected in crabgrass root exudates and rhizosphere soils, and their concentrations ranged from 0.16 to 8.10 μg/g. At an approximate concentration determined in crabgrass root exudates, all chemicals significantly inhibited the growth of wheat, maize, and soybean and reduced soil microbial biomass carbon. Phospholipid fatty acid profiling showed that veratric acid, maltol, and (−)-loliolide affected the signature lipid biomarkers of soil bacteria, actinobacteria, and fungi, resulting in changes in soil microbial community structures. There were significant relationships between crop growth and soil microbes under the chemicals' application. Chemical-specific changes in the soil microbial community generated negative feedback on crop growth. The results suggest that veratric acid, maltol, and (−)-loliolide released from crabgrass may act as allelochemicals interfering with crop growth and the soil microbial community.

  9. Symbiotic bacteria on the cuticle of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex subterraneus subterraneus protect workers from attack by entomopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoso, Thalles C; Moreira, Denise D O; Samuels, Richard I

    2012-06-23

    Although only discovered in 1999, the symbiotic filamentous actinobacteria present on the integument of certain species of leaf-cutting ants have been the subject of intense research. These bacteria have been shown to specifically suppress fungal garden parasites by secretion of antibiotics. However, more recently, a wider role for these bacteria has been suggested from research revealing their generalist anti-fungal activity. Here we show, for the first time, evidence for a role of these bacteria in the defence of young worker ants against a fungal entomopathogen. Experimental removal of the bacterial bio-film using an antibiotic resulted in a significant increase in susceptibility of worker ants to infection by the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae. This is the first direct evidence for the advantage of maintaining a bacterial bio-film on the cuticle as a defensive strategy of the ants themselves and not exclusively for protection of the fungus garden.

  10. The cell aggregating propensity of probiotic actinobacterial isolates: isolation and characterization of the aggregation inducing peptide pheromone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu Selvam, Ramu; Vinothini, Gopal; Palliyarai Thaiyammal, Sethuramalingam; Latha, Selvanathan; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Dhanasekaran, Dharumadurai; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Ali Alharbi, Sulaiman; Archunan, Govindaraju

    2016-01-01

    The auto-aggregating ability of a probiotic is a prerequisite for colonization and protection of the gastrointestinal tract, whereas co-aggregation provides a close interaction with pathogenic bacteria. Peptide pheromone mediated signaling has been studied in several systems. However, it has not yet been explored in prokaryotes, especially actinobacteria. Hence, in the present study, the diffusible aggregation promoting factor was purified from the culture supernatant of a potent actinobacterial probiont and characterized using 20 different actinobacterial cultures isolated from the gut region of chicken and goat. The results showed that the pheromone-like compound induces the aggregation propensity of treated isolates. The factor was found to be a heat stable, acidic pH resistant, low molecular weight peptide which enhances the biofilm forming ability of other actinobacterial isolates. The aggregation promoting factor represents a bacterial sex factor (pheromone) and its characterization confirms its usage in the probiotic formulation.

  11. The Actinobacterial Colonization of Etruscan Paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Herraiz, Marta; Jurado, Valme; Cuezva, Soledad; Laiz, Leonila; Pallecchi, Pasquino; Tiano, Piero; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2013-01-01

    The paintings from Tomba della Scimmia, in Tuscany, are representative of the heavy bacterial colonization experienced in most Etruscan necropolises. The tomb remained open until the late 70′s when it was closed because of severe deterioration of the walls, ceiling and paintings after decades of visits. The deterioration is the result of environmental changes and impacts suffered since its discovery in 1846. We show scanning electron microscopy and molecular studies that reveal the extent and nature of the biodeterioration. Actinobacteria, mainly Nocardia and Pseudonocardia colonize and grow on the tomb walls and this process is linked to the availability of organic matter, phyllosilicates (e.g. clay minerals) and iron oxides. Nocardia is found metabolically active in the paintings. The data confirm the specialization of the genera Nocardia and Pseudonocardia in the colonization of subterranean niches. PMID:23486535

  12. Application of a new purification method of West-Kazakhstan chestnut soil microbiota DNA for metagenomic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergaliev, N. Kh.; Kakishev, M. G.; Zhiengaliev, A. T.; Volodin, M. A.; Andronov, E. E.; Pinaev, A. G.

    2015-04-01

    A method for the extraction of soil microbial DNA has been tested on chestnut soils (Kastanozems) of the West Kazakhstan region. The taxonomic analysis of soil microbiome libraries has shown that the phyla Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria constitute the largest part of microbial communities in the analyzed soils. The Archaea form an appreciable part of the microbiome in the studied samples. In the underdeveloped dark chestnut soil, their portion is higher than 11%. This is of interest, as the proportion of Archaea in the soil communities of virgin lands usually does not exceed 5%. In addition to the phyla mentioned above, there are representatives of the phyla Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadales, Planctomycetes, and Verrucomicrobia, which are all fairly common in soil communities.

  13. Bacterial reduction of mercury in the high arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Annette Klæstrup

    from three snow depths and freshwater only showed a scattered representation of the phyla and genera in comparison to strains identified by culture independent methods. The microbial composition of all arctic sample sites was significantly different, with the two uppermost snow layers being most......, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Planctomycetes in freshwater. The bacteria identified in this study both included phylotypes commonly found in cold environments as well as rare phylotypes. During the time of sampling atmospheric ozone measurements and total Hg measurements in the snow indicated...... suggested that this may be important in the deeper snow layers. This highlights the importance of microbial mercury transformation in the biogeochemical mercury cycling in the High Arctic. While bacterial Hg reduction by the mercuric reductase, MerA, is widespread in temperate environments, its distribution...

  14. Molecular phylogenetic diversity of bacteria associated with soil of the savanna-like Cerrado vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirino, Betania F; Pappas, Georgios J; Tagliaferro, Andrea C; Collevatti, Rosane G; Neto, Eduardo Leonardecz; da Silva, Maria Regina S S; Bustamante, Mercedes M C; Krüger, Ricardo H

    2009-01-01

    The Brazilian savanna-like vegetation of Cerrado is rapidly being converted to pasture and agricultural fields. A 16S rDNA-based approach was taken to study the bacterial community associated with the soil of a native cerrado area (sensu stricto) and an area that has been converted to pasture. The bacterial group most abundantly identified in cerrado sensu stricto soil was the alpha-Proteobacteria while in cerrado converted to pasture the Actinobacteria were the most abundant. Rarefaction curves indicate that the species richness of cerrado sensu stricto is greater than that of cerrado converted to pasture. Furthermore, lineage-through-time plots show that the expected richness of species present in cerrado sensu stricto soil is approximately 10 times greater than that of cerrado converted to pasture.

  15. Bacteria and archaea paleomicrobiology of the dental calculus: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, H T T; Verneau, J; Levasseur, A; Drancourt, M; Aboudharam, G

    2016-06-01

    Dental calculus, a material observed in the majority of adults worldwide, emerged as a source for correlating paleomicrobiology with human health and diet. This mini review of 48 articles on the paleomicrobiology of dental calculus over 7550 years discloses a secular core microbiota comprising nine bacterial phyla - Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, TM7, Synergistetes, Chloroflexi, Fusobacteria, Spirochetes - and one archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota; and some accessory microbiota that appear and disappear according to time frame. The diet residues and oral microbes, including bacteria, archaea, viruses and fungi, consisting of harmless organisms and pathogens associated with local and systemic infections have been found trapped in ancient dental calculus by morphological approaches, immunolabeling techniques, isotope analyses, fluorescent in situ hybridization, DNA-based approaches, and protein-based approaches. These observations led to correlation of paleomicrobiology, particularly Streptococcus mutans and archaea, with past human health and diet. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Effect of different salinity adaptation on the performance and microbial community in a sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Park, Hee-Deung; Park, Jeong-Hoon; Zhang, Fushuang; Chen, Chen; Li, Xiangkun; Zhao, Dan; Zhao, Fangbo

    2016-09-01

    The performance and microbial community profiles in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treating saline wastewater were studied over 300days from 0wt% to 3.0wt% salinity. The experimental results indicated that the activated sludge had high sensitivity to salinity variations in terms of pollutants removal and sedimentation. At 2.0wt% salinity, the system retained a good performance, and 95% removal rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), NH4(+)-N and total phosphorus (TP) could be achieved. Operation before addition salinity revealed the optimal performance and the most microbial diversity indicated by 16S rRNA gene clone library. Sequence analyses illustrated that Candidate_division_TM7 (TM7) was predominant at 2.0 wt% salinity; however, Actinobacteria was more abundant at 3.0wt% salinity.

  17. A Comparative Study of Temperature Optimal Control in a Solid State Fermentation Process for Edible Mushroom Growing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Gurubel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, optimal control strategies for temperature trajectory determination in order to maximize thermophilic bacteria in a fed-batch solid-state fermentation reactor are proposed. This process is modeled by nonlinear differential equations, which has been previously validated experimentally with scale reactor temperature profiles. The dynamic input aeration rate of the reactor is determined to increase microorganisms growth of a selective substrate for edible mushroom cultivation. In industrial practice, the process is comprised of three thermal stages with constant input air flow and three types of microorganisms in a 150-hour lapse. Scytalidium thermophilum and actinobacteria are desired in order to obtain a final biomass composition with acceptable microorganisms concentration. The Steepest Descent gradient algorithm in continuous time and the Gradient Projection algorithm in discrete-time are used for the process optimal control. A comparison of simulation results in the presence of disturbances is presented, where the resulting temperature trajectories exhibit similar tendencies as industrial data.

  18. Analysis of bacterial and fungal communities in Marcha and Thiat, traditionally prepared amylolytic starters of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Shankar Prasad; Jani, Kunal; Sharma, Avinash; Anupma, Anu; Pradhan, Pooja; Shouche, Yogesh; Tamang, Jyoti Prakash

    2017-09-08

    Marcha and thiat are traditionally prepared amylolytic starters use for production of various ethnic alcoholic beverages in Sikkim and Meghalaya states in India. In the present study we have tried to investigate the bacterial and fungal community composition of marcha and thiat by using high throughput sequencing. Characterization of bacterial community depicts phylum Proteobacteria is the most dominant in both marcha (91.4%) and thiat (53.8%), followed by Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria. Estimates of fungal community composition showed Ascomycota as the dominant phylum. Presence of Zygomycota in marcha distinguishes it from the thiat. The results of NGS analysis revealed dominance of yeasts in marcha whereas molds out numbers in case of thiat. This is the first report on microbial communities of traditionally prepared amylolytic starters of India using high throughput sequencing.

  19. A review of applied aspects of dealing with gut microbiota impact on rodent models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Krych, Lukasz; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota (GM) affects numerous human diseases, as well as rodent models for these. We will review this impact and summarize ways to handle this challenge in animal research. The GM is complex, with the largest fractions being the gram-positive phylum Firmicutes and the gram......-negative phylum Bacteroidetes. Other important phyla are the gram-negative phyla Proteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia, and the gram-positive phylum Actinobacteria. GM members influence models for diseases, such as inflammatory bowel diseases, allergies, autoimmunity, cancer, and neuropsychiatric diseases. GM...... characterization of all individual animals and incorporation of their GM composition in data evaluation may therefore be considered in future protocols. Germfree isolator-housed rodents or rodents made virtually germ free by antibiotic cocktails can be used to study diverse microbial influences on disease...

  20. Microbial diversity and community structure in an antimony-rich tailings dump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Enzong; Krumins, Valdis; Dong, Yiran; Xiao, Tangfu; Ning, Zengping; Xiao, Qingxiang; Sun, Weimin

    2016-09-01

    To assess the impact of antimony (Sb) on microbial community structure, 12 samples were taken from an Sb tailings pile in Guizhou Province, Southwest China. All 12 samples exhibited elevated Sb concentrations, but the mobile and bioaccessible fractions were small in comparison to total Sb concentrations. Besides the geochemical analyses, microbial communities inhabiting the tailing samples were characterized to investigate the interplay between the microorganisms and environmental factors in mine tailings. In all samples, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were the most dominant phyla. At the genus level, Thiobacillus, Limnobacter, Nocardioides, Lysobacter, Phormidium, and Kaistobacter demonstrated relatively high abundances. The two most abundant genera, Thiobacillus and Limnobacter, are characterized as sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and thiosulfate-oxidizing bacteria, respectively, while the genus Lysobacter contains arsenic (As)-resistant bacteria. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicates that TOC and the sulfate to sulfide ratio strongly shaped the microbial communities, suggesting the influence of the environmental factors in the indigenous microbial communities.

  1. Exploitation of the Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) genome sequence for discovery of new natural products and biosynthetic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challis, Gregory L

    2014-02-01

    Streptomyces, and related genera of Actinobacteria, are renowned for their ability to produce antibiotics and other bioactive natural products with a wide range of applications in medicine and agriculture. Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) is a model organism that has been used for more than five decades to study the genetic and biochemical basis for the production of bioactive metabolites. In 2002, the complete genome sequence of S. coelicolor was published. This greatly accelerated progress in understanding the biosynthesis of metabolites known or suspected to be produced by S. coelicolor and revealed that streptomycetes have far greater potential to produce bioactive natural products than suggested by classical bioassay-guided isolation studies. In this article, efforts to exploit the S. coelicolor genome sequence for the discovery of novel natural products and biosynthetic pathways are summarized.

  2. Microbiota of Demodex mites from rosacea patients and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Nathalia; Aubert, Jérome; Raoult, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Proliferation of Demodex mites is associated with rosacea. Furthermore, Demodex-associated bacteria were suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of rosacea. We decided to analyze Demodex microbiota. Mites were collected by standardized skin surface biopsies from patients with erythematotelangiectatic, papulopustular rosacea or from control subjects. The microbiota from each mite was characterized by 16S rRNA clone library approach. The 16S rRNA clone library consisted of 367 clones obtained from 73 extracts originating from 5 samples per study group (ETR, PPR or healthy subjects). A total of 86 species were identified with 36 as Demodex-specific microbiota. In the papulopustular group, proportions of Proteobacteria and Firmicutes increased whereas proportion of Actinobacteria decreased. Here, we report preliminary results on the microbiota of Demodex mites based on a molecular approach showing an unexpected diversity. Differences according to the host status need to be confirmed but open new perspectives for diagnostic of rosacea.

  3. Sequential sludge digestion after diverse pre-treatment conditions: sludge removal, methane production and microbial community changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Kyu; Jang, Hyun Min; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Park, Jong Moon

    2014-06-01

    A lab-scale sequential sludge digestion process which consists of a mesophilic anaerobic digester (MAD) and a thermophilic aerobic digester (TAD) was developed. Thermal, thermal-alkaline and long-term alkaline pre-treatments were applied to the feed sludge to examine their effects on sludge removal and methane production. Especially after thermal-alkaline pre-treatment, high COD removal was maintained; methane production rate was also drastically increased by improving the hydrolysis step of sludge degradation. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis indicated that bacterial communities were represented by three phyla (Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria) and that Clostridium straminisolvens was the major bacterial species in MAD. Quantitative real-time PCR results indicated that Methanosaeta concilli was the major archaeal species in MAD, and that Ureibacillus sp. was the most abundant bacterial species in TAD.

  4. Effects of Temperature, Acetate and Nitrate on Methane Generation from Petroleum Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chunshuang; Zhao Dongfeng; Zhang Yunbo

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effects of temperature, acetate and nitrate on methane gas production from biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons were investigated. The results indicated that methane gas production at 35℃was higher than that obtained at 55℃. The acetate addition signiifcant enhanced the methane production at 35℃, however, at 55℃the nitrate addition could largely promote the methane production. The microbial community structures were revealed by PCR-DGGE. The Actinobacteria, Clostridia, Clostridiales, Syntrophus, Pseudomonas, and Proteobacteria-like bacteria and Methano-cellales, Methanosaeta, Methanomicrobiales, Methanolinea, Thermoprotei-like archaea had been enriched at 35 ℃in the acetate addition test. The Thermoprotei, Proteobacterium, Thermodesulfovibrio-like bacteria and Methanocellales-like ar-chaea had been enriched at 55℃in the nitrate addition test. The results may shed light on the bio-utilization of marginal oil reservoirs for enhancing energy recovery.

  5. Coevolution of aah: A dps-Like Gene with the Host Bacterium Revealed by Comparative Genomic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyan Ping

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A protein named AAH was isolated from the bacterium Microbacterium arborescens SE14, a gut commensal of the lepidopteran larvae. It showed not only a high sequence similarity to Dps-like proteins (DNA-binding proteins from starved cell but also reversible hydrolase activity. A comparative genomic analysis was performed to gain more insights into its evolution. The GC profile of the aah gene indicated that it was evolved from a low GC ancestor. Its stop codon usage was also different from the general pattern of Actinobacterial genomes. The phylogeny of dps-like proteins showed strong correlation with the phylogeny of host bacteria. A conserved genomic synteny was identified in some taxonomically related Actinobacteria, suggesting that the ancestor genes had incorporated into the genome before the divergence of Micrococcineae from other families. The aah gene had evolved new function but still retained the typical dodecameric structure.

  6. Molecular characterization of the Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis hsp60-hsp10 operon, and evaluation of the immune response and protective efficacy induced by hsp60 DNA vaccination in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Sérgio C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heat shock proteins (HSPs are important candidates for the development of vaccines because they are usually able to promote both humoral and cellular immune responses in mammals. We identified and characterized the hsp60-hsp10 bicistronic operon of the animal pathogen Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, a Gram-positive bacterium of the class Actinobacteria, which causes caseous lymphadenitis (CLA in small ruminants. Findings To construct the DNA vaccine, the hsp60 gene of C. pseudotuberculosis was cloned in a mammalian expression vector. BALB/c mice were immunized by intramuscular injection with the recombinant plasmid (pVAX1/hsp60. Conclusion This vaccination induced significant anti-hsp60 IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a isotype production. However, immunization with this DNA vaccine did not confer protective immunity.

  7. Endophytic and rhizospheric bacterial communities isolated from the medicinal plants Echinacea purpurea and Echinacea angustifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiellini, Carolina; Maida, Isabel; Emiliani, Giovanni; Mengoni, Alessio; Mocali, Stefano; Fabiani, Arturo; Biffi, Sauro; Maggini, Valentina; Gori, Luigi; Vannacci, Alfredo; Gallo, Eugenia; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Fani, Renato

    2014-09-01

    In this work we analyzed the composition and structure of cultivable bacterial communities isolated from the stem/leaf and root compartments of two medicinal plants, Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench and Echinacea angustifolia (DC.) Hell, grown in the same soil, as well as the bacterial community from their rhizospheric soils. Molecular PCR-based techniques were applied to cultivable bacteria isolated from the three compartments of the two plants. The results showed that the two plants and their respective compartments were characterized by different communities, indicating a low degree of strain sharing and a strong selective pressure within plant tissues. Pseudomonas was the most highly represented genus, together with Actinobacteria and Bacillus spp. The presence of distinct bacterial communities in different plant species and among compartments of the same plant species could account for the differences in the medicinal properties of the two plants. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  8. Diversity of Culturable Rhizosphere Bacteria from Reed in Hetao Irrigation Area,Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region%内蒙古河套灌区湿地芦苇根际可培养细菌多样性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙磊; 刘莹; 姚娜; 邵红; 李潞滨

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of culturable bacteria of reed (Phmgmites australis) rhizosphere from natural and degraded wetlands in Hetao irrigation region of Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region was investigated in this study. A total of 99 bacterial strains with different colony characteristics were isolated on R2A medium: 45 isolates from natural wetlands. 44 isolates from degraded wetlands. Population densities of rhizosphere bacteria were (1.7?.14)x 10" cfu/gfw (colony-forming units per gram fresh weight) for natural wetlands, and (1.3?.38)x 108 cfu/gfw for degraded wetlands. Bases on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, 45 rhizosphere isolated from natural wetlands were grouped into 3 groups, Gammaproteobacteria (44.44%), Firmicutes (42.22%), and Actinobacteria (13.33%). The dominant group was Gammaproteobacteria. All bacterial isolated from natural wetlands were assigned to 9 genera. The dominant genus was Bacillus (42.22%) and Pseudomonas (22.2%); 44 rhizosphere isolates from degraded wetlands were belonged to 4 groups, Gammaproteobacteria (13.64% ), Betaproteobacteria (6.82%), Firmicutes (47.73%), and Actinobacteria (31.82%). The dominant group was Firmicutes. All bacterial isolates from degraded wetlands were assigned to 13 genera, and the genus Bacillus (40.91%) was the predominant genus, which included 18 bacterial isolates. The results indicated that the diversity of rhizosphere bacteria from the wetlands in study area was abundant and the rhizosphere bacterial communities between natural and the degraded wetlands had differences.%以内蒙古河套灌区湿地植物芦苇(Phragmites australis)根际土壤为材料,采用分离培养法对天然湿地和退化湿地的芦苇根际细菌多样性进行了研究.16S rRNA基因系统发育分析的结果显示,分离自天然湿地芦苇根际的45株细菌分属于γ-变形菌纲(44.44%)、厚壁菌门(Firmicutes) (42.22%)和放线菌门(Actinobacteria)(13.33%)3大类群,其中,γ-变形菌纲为最

  9. The actinobacterial signature protein ParJ (SCO1662) regulates ParA polymerization and affects chromosome segregation and cell division during Streptomyces sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditkowski, Bartosz; Troć, Paulina; Ginda, Katarzyna; Donczew, Magdalena; Chater, Keith F; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta; Jakimowicz, Dagmara

    2010-12-01

    Bacterial chromosome segregation usually involves cytoskeletal ParA proteins, ATPases which can form dynamic filaments. In aerial hyphae of the mycelial bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor, ParA filaments extend over tens of microns and are responsible for segregation of dozens of chromosomes. We have identified a novel interaction partner of S. coelicolor ParA, ParJ. ParJ negatively regulates ParA polymerization in vitro and is important for efficient chromosome segregation in sporulating aerial hyphae. ParJ-EGFP formed foci along aerial hyphae even in the absence of ParA. ParJ, which is encoded by sco1662, turned out to be one of the five actinobacterial signature proteins, and another of the five is a ParJ paralogue. We hypothesize that polar growth, which is characteristic not only of streptomycetes, but even of simple Actinobacteria, may be interlinked with ParA polymer assembly and its specific regulation by ParJ.

  10. Periodical episodes of foaming involving Gram-negative filaments. Morpho type 0581: an unknown; Episodios periodicos de espumacion con impliaciond e filamentos Gram negativos. El morfotipo 0581: un desconido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarnoza, A.; Rodriguez, E.; Isac, L.; Alonso, J. L.; Fernandez, N.; Zorrila, F.; Fajardo, V.

    2006-07-01

    The bacteria GALO and Microthrix parvicella are responsible for foaming in active sludge in WWTP. According to Eikelboom (2000) and Jenkins, et al. (2003), these micro-organisms are classified by morpho types, which sometimes show a diversity of species when specific probes are used. A study of the periodical foaming process in the WWTP in the municipally of Torres-Torres (Valencia, Spain), with a predominance of morpho type 0581, has made it possible to ascertain both the optical and phylogenetic identity of this morpho type. Contrary to what might have been expected in view of its morphological similarity to Microthrix parvicella, morpho type 0581 is photogenically related to the phylum Chloroflexi and not to the phylum Actinobacteria, to which Microthrix parvicella belong. (Author)

  11. Discovery of Rickettsia species in Dermacentor niveus Neumann ticks by investigating the diversity of bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Lu; Wang, Cheng-Yan; Tong, Yi-Gang; Tang, Fang; Yang, Hong; Liu, Wei; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2014-09-01

    Ticks (Dermacentor niveus Neumann) were collected from Tacheng, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, and their bacterial diversity was investigated using the 16S RNA gene library method from one pooled sample. A total of 452 clones was successfully sequenced and assigned to 4 phyla. The dominant phylum was the Proteobacteria, accounting for 62.8% of all the clones of the 16S rRNA gene at the confidence level 80%. The other sequences were assigned to the phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and accounted for 13.5%, 12.4%, and 11.3%, respectively. These results provide an insight into the bacterial diversity associated with D. niveus ticks in the natural environment of Tacheng. They indicate the occurrence of Rickettsia raoultii and Rickettsia slovaca in D. niveus ticks in this area, and as a consequence, cases of TIBOLA/DEBONEL may occur (tick-borne lymphadenopathy/Dermacentor-borne necrosis erythema and lymphadenopathy).

  12. Participation of microbiota in the development of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Li; Yu, Xin-Juan; Zhan, Shu-Hui; Jia, Sheng-Jiao; Tian, Zi-Bin; Dong, Quan-Jiang

    2014-05-07

    There are a large number of bacteria inhabiting the human body, which provide benefits for the health. Alterations of microbiota participate in the pathogenesis of diseases. The gastric microbiota consists of bacteria from seven to eleven phyla, predominantly Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria. Intrusion by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) does not remarkably interrupt the composition and structure of the gastric microbiota. Absence of bacterial commensal from the stomach delays the onset of H. pylori-induced gastric cancer, while presence of artificial microbiota accelerates the carcinogenesis. Altered gastric microbiota may increase the production of N-nitroso compounds, promoting the development of gastric cancer. Further investigation of the carcinogenic mechanisms of microbiota would benefit for the prevention and management of gastric cancer.

  13. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic microbial communities during microalgal biomass production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Hulatt, Chris J; Wakeman, Kathryn D; Thomas, David N; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2012-11-01

    Eukaryotic and bacterial communities were characterized and quantified in microalgal photobioreactor cultures of freshwater Chlorella vulgaris and marine Dunaliella tertiolecta. The microalgae exhibited good growth, whilst both cultures contained diverse bacterial communities. Both cultures included Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, while C. vulgaris cultures also contained Actinobacteria. The bacterial genera present in the cultures were different due to different growth medium salinities and possibly different extracellular products. Bacterial community profiles were relatively stable in D. tertiolecta cultures but not in C. vulgaris cultures likely due to presence of ciliates (Colpoda sp.) in the latter. The presence of ciliates did not, however, cause decrease in total number of C. vulgaris or bacteria during 14 days of cultivation. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) reliably showed relative microalgal and bacterial cell numbers in the batch cultures with stable microbial communities, but was not effective when bacterial communities varied. Raw culture samples were successfully used as qPCR templates.

  14. [Diversity and viability of prokaryotes in primitive soils of the larsemann oasis (East Antarctica)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudinova, A G; Lysak, L V; Lapygina, E V; Soina, V S; Mergelov, N S

    2015-01-01

    The diversity and viability of prokaryotic communities in the primitive organomineral soils of East Antarctica have been studied; it has been shown that the total number of bacteria is smaller than and the viability of bacteria is similar to that in soils of the temperate zone. The prokaryotic communities are characterized by the occurrence of a major part of cells in filterable forms, which is higher than the analogous parameter for the temperate soils. The method of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed that the distribution of the main taxons is similar to that in the temperate soils: the portion of the domain Archaea is smaller than that of the domain Bacteria; the total content of Gram-negative bacteria (the phyla Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Planctomycetes) is higher than that of Gram-positive bacteria (Actinobacteria). Within the phylum Proteobacteria, a significant variation of three proteobacterial classes has been noted along the profiles of the soils studied.

  15. Microbial Community in a Biofilter for Removal of Low Load Nitrobenzene Waste Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Jian; Wang, Zhu; Shi, Peng; Long, Chao

    2017-01-01

    To improve biofilter performance, the microbial community of a biofilter must be clearly defined. In this study, the performance of a lab-scale polyurethane biofilter for treating waste gas with low loads of nitrobenzene (NB) (biofilters were analysed by using Illumina MiSeq high-throughput sequencing. The results showed that NB waste gas was successfully degraded in the biofilter. High-throughput sequencing data suggested that the phylum Actinobacteria and genus Rhodococcus played important roles in the degradation of NB. The variations of the microbial community were attributed to the different intermediate degradation products of NB in each layer. The strains identified in this study were potential candidates for purifying waste gas effluents containing NB.

  16. The Human Vaginal Bacterial Biota and Bacterial Vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha Srinivasan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial biota of the human vagina can have a profound impact on the health of women and their neonates. Changes in the vaginal microbiota have been associated with several adverse health outcomes including premature birth, pelvic inflammatory disease, and acquisition of HIV infection. Cultivation-independent molecular methods have provided new insights regarding bacterial diversity in this important niche, particularly in women with the common condition bacterial vaginosis (BV. PCR methods have shown that women with BV have complex communities of vaginal bacteria that include many fastidious species, particularly from the phyla Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria. Healthy women are mostly colonized with lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii, and Lactobacillus iners, though a variety of other bacteria may be present. The microbiology of BV is heterogeneous. The presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae coating the vaginal epithelium in some subjects with BV suggests that biofilms may contribute to this condition.

  17. Spontaneous arsenic (III) oxidation with bioelectricity generation in single-chamber microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunlong; Zhang, Baogang; Cheng, Ming; Li, Yalong; Hao, Liting; Guo, Huaming

    2016-04-05

    Arsenic is one of the most toxic elements commonly found in groundwater. With initial concentration of 200μgL(-1), spontaneous As(III) oxidation is realized completely during 7 days operation in single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) in the present study, with the maximum power density of 752.6±17mWm(-2). The product is less toxic and mobile As(V), which can be removed from aqueous solution more easily. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis indicates the existence of arsenic-resistant bacteria as Actinobacteria, Comamonas, Pseudomonas and arsenic-oxidizing bacteria as Enterobacter, with electrochemically active bacteria as Lactococcus, Enterobacter. They interact together and are responsible for As(III) oxidation and bioelectricity generation in MFCs. This study offers a potential attractive method for remediation of arsenic-polluted groundwater.

  18. The Gut Microbiota and Atherosclerosis: The State of the Art and Novel Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio La Rosa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The human gut microbiota is composed of more than 100 trillion microbes. Most communities are dominated by species belonging to the phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia. Microflora-derived short-chain fatty acids play a pivotal role in the framework of insulin resistance, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. They are an important energy source and are involved in several pathways, with proatherogenic and antiatherogenic effects. The increased gut microbiota lipopolysaccharide levels (defined as “metabolic endotoxemia” induce a state of low-grade inflammation and are involved in atherosclerotic disease through Toll-like receptor 4. Another important inflammatory trigger in gut microbiota–mediated atherosclerotic promotion is trimethylamine N-oxide. On the other hand, protocatechuic acid was found to promote cholesterol efflux from macrophages, showing an antiatherogenic effect. Further studies to clarify specific gut composition involved in cardiometabolic syndrome and atherogenesis are needed for greater use of targeted approaches.

  19. Community analysis of bacteria colonizing intestinal tissue of neonates with necrotizing enterocolitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Birgitte; Bodé, Susan; Petersen, Bodil L.

    2011-01-01

    (30.4%), Actinobacteria (17.1%) and Bacteroidetes (3.6%). A major detected class of the phylum Proteobacteria belonged to δ-proteobacteria. Surprisingly, Clostridium species were only detected in 4 of the specimens by FISH, but two of these specimens exhibited histological pneumatosis intestinalis...... combined with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), using bacterial rRNA-targeting oligonucleotide probes. RESULTS: Bacteria were detected in 22 of the 24 specimens, 71% had moderate to high densities of bacteria. The phyla detected by 16S rRNA gene sequencing were: Proteobacteria (49.0%), Firmicutes...... and both specimens had a moderate to a high density of C. butyricum and C. parputrificum detected by using species specific FISH probes. A 16S rRNA gene sequence tag similar to Ralstonia species was detected in most of the neonatal tissues and members of this genus have been reported to be opportunistic...

  20. The bacterial aetiology of rosy discoloration of ancient wall paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperi, Francesco; Caneva, Giulia; Cancellieri, Laura; Ricci, Maria A; Sodo, Armida; Visca, Paolo

    2007-11-01

    The inventory of microorganisms responsible for biological deterioration of ancient paintings has become an integral part of restoration activities. Here, the microbial agent of rosy discoloration on medieval frescoes in the Crypt of the Original Sin (Matera, Italy) was investigated by a combination of microscopic, molecular and spectroscopic approaches. The bacterial community from three rosy-discoloured painting sites was characterized by 16S rRNA gene-based techniques. The eubacterial population was prevalently composed of Actinobacteria, among which Rubrobacter radiotolerans-related bacteria accounted for 63-87% of the 16S rRNA gene pool per sampled site. Archaea, with prevalence of Haloarchaea-related species, were detected in one of the three sites where they accounted for paintings.

  1. High-efficiency multiplex genome editing of Streptomyces species using an engineered CRISPR/Cas system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Ryan E; Wang, Yajie; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-06-19

    Actinobacteria, particularly those of genus Streptomyces, remain invaluable hosts for the discovery and engineering of natural products and their cognate biosynthetic pathways. However, genetic manipulation of these bacteria is often labor and time intensive. Here, we present an engineered CRISPR/Cas system for rapid multiplex genome editing of Streptomyces strains, demonstrating targeted chromosomal deletions in three different Streptomyces species and of various sizes (ranging from 20 bp to 30 kb) with efficiency ranging from 70 to 100%. The designed pCRISPomyces plasmids are amenable to assembly of spacers and editing templates via Golden Gate assembly and isothermal assembly (or traditional digestion/ligation), respectively, allowing rapid plasmid construction to target any genomic locus of interest. As such, the pCRISPomyces system represents a powerful new tool for genome editing in Streptomyces.

  2. Diversity of bacterial endophytes in roots of Mexican husk tomato plants (Physalis ixocarpa) and their detection in the rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez-Santacruz, H A; Hernandez-Leon, R; Orozco-Mosqueda, M C; Velazquez-Sepulveda, I; Santoyo, G

    2010-12-07

    Endophytic bacterial diversity was estimated in Mexican husk tomato plant roots by amplified rDNA restriction analysis and sequence homology comparison of the 16S rDNA genes. Sixteen operational taxonomic units from the 16S rDNA root library were identified based on sequence analysis, including the classes Gammaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacilli. The predominant genera were Stenotrophomonas (21.9%), Microbacterium (17.1%), Burkholderia (14.3%), Bacillus (14.3%), and Pseudomonas (10.5%). In a 16S rDNA gene library of the same plant species' rhizosphere, only common soil bacteria, including Stenotrophomonas, Burkholderia, Bacillus, and Pseudomonas, were detected. We suggest that the endophytic bacterial diversity within the roots of Mexican husk tomato plants is a subset of the rhizosphere bacterial population, dominated by a few genera.

  3. Changes in abundance of oral microbiota associated with oral cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian L Schmidt

    Full Text Available Individual bacteria and shifts in the composition of the microbiome have been associated with human diseases including cancer. To investigate changes in the microbiome associated with oral cancers, we profiled cancers and anatomically matched contralateral normal tissue from the same patient by sequencing 16S rDNA hypervariable region amplicons. In cancer samples from both a discovery and a subsequent confirmation cohort, abundance of Firmicutes (especially Streptococcus and Actinobacteria (especially Rothia was significantly decreased relative to contralateral normal samples from the same patient. Significant decreases in abundance of these phyla were observed for pre-cancers, but not when comparing samples from contralateral sites (tongue and floor of mouth from healthy individuals. Weighted UniFrac principal coordinates analysis based on 12 taxa separated most cancers from other samples with greatest separation of node positive cases. These studies begin to develop a framework for exploiting the oral microbiome for monitoring oral cancer development, progression and recurrence.

  4. Lobophorin K, a New Natural Product with Cytotoxic Activity Produced by Streptomyces sp. M-207 Associated with the Deep-Sea Coral Lophelia pertusa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braña, Alfredo F; Sarmiento-Vizcaíno, Aida; Osset, Miguel; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Martín, Jesús; de Pedro, Nuria; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Díaz, Caridad; Vicente, Francisca; Reyes, Fernando; García, Luis A; Blanco, Gloria

    2017-05-19

    The present article describes the isolation of a new natural product of the lobophorin family, designated as lobophorin K (1), from cultures of the marine actinobacteria Streptomyces sp. M-207, previously isolated from the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa collected at 1800 m depth during an expedition to the submarine Avilés Canyon. Its structure was determined using a combination of spectroscopic techniques, mainly ESI-TOF MS and 1D and 2D NMR. This new natural product displayed cytotoxic activity against two human tumor cell lines, such as pancreatic carcinoma (MiaPaca-2) and breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7). Lobophorin K also displayed moderate and selective antibiotic activity against pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus.

  5. Physicochemical characteristics and microbial community evolution of biofilms during the start-up period in a moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Yan; Ren, Hong-Qiang; Geng, Jin-Ju; Xu, Ke; Huang, Hui; Ding, Li-Li

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate biofilm properties evolution coupled with different ages during the start-up period in a moving bed biofilm reactor system. Physicochemical characteristics including adhesion force, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), morphology as well as volatile solid and microbial community were studied. Results showed that the formation and development of biofilms exhibited four stages, including (I) initial attachment and young biofilm formation, (II) biofilms accumulation, (III) biofilm sloughing and updating, and (IV) biofilm maturation. During the whole start-up period, adhesion force was positively and significantly correlated with the contents of EPS, especially the content of polysaccharide. In addition, increased adhesion force and EPS were beneficial for biofilm retention. Gram-negative bacteria mainly including Sphaerotilus, Zoogloea and Haliscomenobacter were predominant in the initial stage. Actinobacteria was beneficial to resist sloughing. Furthermore, filamentous bacteria were dominant in maturation biofilm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Gut Microbiota Modulates Energy Metabolism in the Hibernating Brown Bear Ursus arctos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Felix; Ståhlman, Marcus; Ilkayeva, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Hibernation is an adaptation that helps many animals to conserve energy during food shortage in winter. Brown bears double their fat depots during summer and use these stored lipids during hibernation. Although bears seasonally become obese, they remain metabolically healthy. We analyzed...... the microbiota of free-ranging brown bears during their active phase and hibernation. Compared to the active phase, hibernation microbiota had reduced diversity, reduced levels of Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, and increased levels of Bacteroidetes. Several metabolites involved in lipid metabolism, including...... triglycerides, cholesterol, and bile acids, were also affected by hibernation. Transplantation of the bear microbiota from summer and winter to germ-free mice transferred some of the seasonal metabolic features and demonstrated that the summer microbiota promoted adiposity without impairing glucose tolerance...

  7. Multiple antibiotic resistance genes distribution in ten large-scale membrane bioreactors for municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanmei; Shen, Yue-Xiao; Liang, Peng; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng; Huang, Xia

    2016-12-01

    Wastewater treatment plants are thought to be potential reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes. In this study, GeoChip was used for analyzing multiple antibiotic resistance genes, including four multidrug efflux system gene groups and three β-lactamase genes in ten large-scale membrane bioreactors (MBRs) for municipal wastewater treatment. Results revealed that the diversity of antibiotic genes varied a lot among MBRs, but about 40% common antibiotic resistance genes were existent. The average signal intensity of each antibiotic resistance group was similar among MBRs, nevertheless the total abundance of each group varied remarkably and the dominant resistance gene groups were different in individual MBR. The antibiotic resistance genes majorly derived from Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. Further study indicated that TN, TP and COD of influent, temperature and conductivity of mixed liquor were significant (Pantibiotic resistance genes distribution in MBRs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The human salivary microbiome exhibits temporal stability in bacterial diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Simon J S; Huws, Sharon A; Hegarty, Matthew J; Smith, Daniel P M; Mur, Luis A J

    2015-09-01

    The temporal variability of the human microbiome may be an important factor in determining its relationship with health and disease. In this study, the saliva of 40 participants was collected every 2 months over a one-year period to determine the temporal variability of the human salivary microbiome. Salivary pH and 16S rRNA gene copy number were measured for all participants, with the microbiome of 10 participants assessed through 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. In February 2013, 16S rRNA gene copy number was significantly (P Salivary pH levels were significantly (P salivary pH (R(2) = 7.8%; P = 0.019). At the phylum level, significant differences were evident between participants in the Actinobacteria (P salivary microbiome, suggesting that bacterial diversity is stable, but that 16S rRNA gene copy number may be subject to seasonal flux.

  9. Lobophorin K, a New Natural Product with Cytotoxic Activity Produced by Streptomyces sp. M-207 Associated with the Deep-Sea Coral Lophelia pertusa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braña, Alfredo F.; Sarmiento-Vizcaíno, Aida; Osset, Miguel; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Martín, Jesús; de Pedro, Nuria; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Díaz, Caridad; Vicente, Francisca; Reyes, Fernando; García, Luis A.; Blanco, Gloria

    2017-01-01

    The present article describes the isolation of a new natural product of the lobophorin family, designated as lobophorin K (1), from cultures of the marine actinobacteria Streptomyces sp. M-207, previously isolated from the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa collected at 1800 m depth during an expedition to the submarine Avilés Canyon. Its structure was determined using a combination of spectroscopic techniques, mainly ESI-TOF MS and 1D and 2D NMR. This new natural product displayed cytotoxic activity against two human tumor cell lines, such as pancreatic carcinoma (MiaPaca-2) and breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7). Lobophorin K also displayed moderate and selective antibiotic activity against pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:28534807

  10. A Novel Insecticidal Peptide SLP1 Produced by Streptomyces laindensis H008 against Lipaphis erysimi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lijian; Liang, Kangkang; Duan, Bensha; Yu, Mengdi; Meng, Wei; Wang, Qinggui; Yu, Qiong

    2016-08-22

    Aphids are major insect pests for crops, causing damage by direct feeding and transmission of plant diseases. This paper was completed to discover and characterize a novel insecticidal metabolite against aphids from soil actinobacteria. An insecticidal activity assay was used to screen 180 bacterial strains from soil samples against mustard aphid, Lipaphis erysimi. The bacterial strain H008 showed the strongest activity, and it was identified by the phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and physiological traits as a novel species of genus Streptomyces (named S. laindensis H008). With the bioassay-guided method, the insecticidal extract from S. laindensis H008 was subjected to chromatographic separations. Finally, a novel insecticidal peptide was purified from Streptomyces laindensis H008 against L. erysimi, and it was determined to be S-E-P-A-Q-I-V-I-V-D-G-V-D-Y-W by TOF-MS and amino acid analysis.

  11. A Novel Insecticidal Peptide SLP1 Produced by Streptomyces laindensis H008 against Lipaphis erysimi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijian Xu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aphids are major insect pests for crops, causing damage by direct feeding and transmission of plant diseases. This paper was completed to discover and characterize a novel insecticidal metabolite against aphids from soil actinobacteria. An insecticidal activity assay was used to screen 180 bacterial strains from soil samples against mustard aphid, Lipaphis erysimi. The bacterial strain H008 showed the strongest activity, and it was identified by the phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and physiological traits as a novel species of genus Streptomyces (named S. laindensis H008. With the bioassay-guided method, the insecticidal extract from S. laindensis H008 was subjected to chromatographic separations. Finally, a novel insecticidal peptide was purified from Streptomyces laindensis H008 against L. erysimi, and it was determined to be S-E-P-A-Q-I-V-I-V-D-G-V-D-Y-W by TOF-MS and amino acid analysis.

  12. Comparative analysis of bacterial communities in a potato field as determined by pyrosequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inceoglu, Özgül; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Salles, Joana Falcão

    2011-01-01

    Background: Plants selectively attract particular soil microorganisms, in particular consumers of root-excreted compounds. It is unclear to what extent cultivar type and/or growth stage affect this process. Methodology/Principal Findings: DNA-based pyrosequencing was used to characterize the stru......Background: Plants selectively attract particular soil microorganisms, in particular consumers of root-excreted compounds. It is unclear to what extent cultivar type and/or growth stage affect this process. Methodology/Principal Findings: DNA-based pyrosequencing was used to characterize...... obtained (5,700 to 38,000 per sample). Across all samples, rank abundance distributions best fitted the power law model, which indicates a community composed of a few highly dominant species next to numerous rare species. Grouping of the sequences showed that members of the Actinobacteria...

  13. In situ analysis of the bacterial community associated with the reindeer lichen Cladonia arbuscula reveals predominance of Alphaproteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, Massimiliano; Vieira de Castro, João; Müller, Henry; Berg, Gabriele; Grube, Martin

    2008-10-01

    The diversity and spatial pattern of the bacterial community hosted by the shrub-like reindeer lichen Cladonia arbuscula were investigated by general DNA staining and FISH, coupled with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Using an optimized protocol for FISH using cryosections of small lichen fragments, we found about 6 x 10(7) bacteria g(-1) of C. arbuscula. Approximately 86% of acridine orange-stained cells were also stained by the universal FISH probe EUB338. Using group-specific FISH probes, we detected a dominance of Alphaproteobacteria (more than 60% of all bacteria), while the abundance of Actinobacteria and Betaproteobacteria was much lower (lichen showed a lower bacterial colonization. alpha-proteobacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified using total DNA extracts from C. arbuscula and separated by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). Sequencing of excised bands revealed the dominance of Acetobacteraceae.

  14. Exploration of Microbial Diversity and Community Structure of Lonar Lake: The Only Hypersaline Meteorite Crater Lake within Basalt Rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Dhiraj; Kumbhare, Shreyas V; Mhatre, Snehit S; Chowdhury, Somak P; Shetty, Sudarshan A; Marathe, Nachiket P; Bhute, Shrikant; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2015-01-01

    Lonar Lake is a hypersaline and hyperalkaline soda lake and the only meteorite impact crater in the world situated in basalt rocks. Although culture-dependent studies have been reported, a comprehensive understanding of microbial community composition and structure in Lonar Lake remains elusive. In the present study, microbial community structure associated with Lonar Lake sediment and water samples was investigated using high-throughput sequencing. Microbial diversity analysis revealed the existence of diverse, yet largely consistent communities. Proteobacteria (30%), Actinobacteria (24%), Firmicutes (11%), and Cyanobacteria (5%) predominated in the sequencing survey, whereas Bacteroidetes (1.12%), BD1-5 (0.5%), Nitrospirae (0.41%), and Verrucomicrobia (0.28%) were detected in relatively minor abundances in the Lonar Lake ecosystem. Within the Proteobacteria phylum, the Gammaproteobacteria represented the most abundantly detected class (21-47%) within sediment samples, but only a minor population in the water samples. Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were found at significantly higher abundance (p ≥ 0.05) in sediment samples, whereas members of Actinobacteria, Candidate division TM7 and Cyanobacteria (p ≥ 0.05) were significantly abundant in water samples. Compared to the microbial communities of other hypersaline soda lakes, those of Lonar Lake formed a distinct cluster, suggesting a different microbial community composition and structure. Here we report for the first time, the difference in composition of indigenous microbial communities between the sediment and water samples of Lonar Lake. An improved census of microbial community structure in this Lake ecosystem provides a foundation for exploring microbial biogeochemical cycling and microbial function in hypersaline lake environments.

  15. Influence of 20-year organic and inorganic fertilization on organic carbon accumulation and microbial community structure of aggregates in an intensively cultivated sandy loam soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanjun Zhang

    Full Text Available To evaluate the long-term effect of compost (CM and inorganic fertilizer (NPK application on microbial community structure and organic carbon (OC accumulation at aggregate scale, soils from plots amended with CM, NPK and no fertilizer (control for 20 years (1989-2009 were collected. Soil was separated into large macroaggregate (>2,000 μm, small macroaggregate (250-2,000 μm, microaggregate (53-250 μm, silt (2-53 μm and clay fraction (<2 μm by wet-sieving, and their OC concentration and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA were measured. The 20-year application of compost significantly (P<0.05 increased OC by 123-134% and accelerated the formation of macroaggregates, but decreased soil oxygen diffusion coefficient. NPK mainly increased OC in macroaggregates and displayed weaker influence on aggregation. Bacteria distributed in all aggregates, while fungi and actinobacteria were mainly in macroaggregates and microaggregates. The ratio of monounsaturated to branched (M/B PLFAs, as an indicator for the ratio of aerobic to anaerobic microorganisms, increased inversely with aggregate size. Both NPK and especially CM significantly (P<0.05 decreased M/B ratios in all aggregates except the silt fraction compared with the control. The increased organic C in aggregates significantly (P<0.05 negatively correlated with M/B ratios under CM and NPK. Our study suggested that more efficient OC accumulations in aggregates under CM-treated than under NPK-treated soil was not only due to a more effective decrease of actinobacteria, but also a decrease of monounsaturated PLFAs and an increase of branched PLFAs. Aggregations under CM appear to alter micro-habitats to those more suitable for anaerobes, which in turn boosts OC accumulation.

  16. Intestinal Microbiota of White Shrimp Penaeus vannamei Under Intensive Cultivation Conditions in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainza, Oreste; Ramírez, Carolina; Ramos, Alfredo Salinas; Romero, Jaime

    2017-09-20

    The goal of the study was to characterize the intestinal tract bacterial microbiota composition of Penaeus vannamei in intensive commercial ponds in Ecuador, comparing two shrimp-farming phases: nursery and harvest. Bacterial microbiota was examined by sequencing amplicons V2-V3 of the 16S rRNA using Ion Torrent technology. Archaea sequences were detected in both phases. Sequence analyses revealed quantitative and qualitative differences between the nursery phase and the harvest phase in shrimp intestinal microbiota composition. The main differences were observed at the phylum level during the nursery phase, and the prevailing phyla were CKC4 (37.3%), Proteobacteria (29.8%), Actinobacteria (11.6%), and Firmicutes (10.1%). In the harvest phase, the prevailing phyla were Proteobacteria (28.4%), Chloroflexi (19.9%), and Actinobacteria (15.1%). At the genus level, microbiota from the nursery phase showed greater relative abundances of CKC4 uncultured bacterium (37%) and Escherichia-Shigella (18%). On the contrary, in the microbiota of harvested shrimp, the prevailing genera were uncultured Caldilinea (19%) and Alphaproteobacteria with no other assigned rate (10%). The analysis of similarity ANOSIM test (beta diversity) indicated significant differences between the shrimp microbiota for these two farming phases. Similarly, alfa-diversity analysis (Chao1) indicated that the microbiota at harvest was far more diverse than the microbiota during the nursery phase, which showed a homogeneous composition. These results suggest that shrimp microbiota diversify their composition during intensive farming. The present work offers the most detailed description of the microbiota of P. vannamei under commercial production conditions to date.