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Sample records for actinium-225 self-immolative tumor-targeted

  1. Actinium-225 and Bismuth-213 Alpha Particle Immunotherapy of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheinberg, D.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclides with appropriate half-lives and emission characteristics that would be potent enough to kill neoplastic cells in the small quantities that reach targets in vivo, include the high linear energy transfer (LET) alpha emitters such as Actinium-225 and Bi-213. We developed methods for the attachment of radiometals via bifunctional chelates to monoclonal antibodies (mAb) without loss of immunoreactivity. We developed alphaemitting Bi-213 lintuzumab constructs, characterized and qualified them in preclinical models, and took them into human clinical trials in patients with AML. Safety, anti-leukemic activity, and complete responses (CR’s) have been demonstrated through phase 2 trilas. Bi-213 is produced in a portable small generator device based on Ac- 225 in the hospital nuclear medicine lab. The isotope is then purified, attached to the antibody, and the product is qualified and processed. Despite this success, the major obstacle to the widespread use of these drugs remains the short 213 Bi half-life (46 minutes), which poses a large logistical hurdle before injection and limits its delivery to only the most accessible cancer cells after injection

  2. Production of Actinium-225 via High Energy Proton Induced Spallation of Thorium-232

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, James T.; Nolen, Jerry; Vandergrift, George; Gomes, Itacil; Kroc, Tom; Horwitz, Phil; McAlister, Dan; Bowers, Del; Sullivan, Vivian; Greene, John

    2011-12-30

    The science of cancer research is currently expanding its use of alpha particle emitting radioisotopes. Coupled with the discovery and proliferation of molecular species that seek out and attach to tumors, new therapy and diagnostics are being developed to enhance the treatment of cancer and other diseases. This latest technology is commonly referred to as Alpha Immunotherapy (AIT). Actinium-225/Bismuth-213 is a parent/daughter alpha-emitting radioisotope pair that is highly sought after because of the potential for treating numerous diseases and its ability to be chemically compatible with many known and widely used carrier molecules (such as monoclonal antibodies and proteins/peptides). Unfortunately, the worldwide supply of actinium-225 is limited to about 1,000mCi annually and most of that is currently spoken for, thus limiting the ability of this radioisotope pair to enter into research and subsequently clinical trials. The route proposed herein utilizes high energy protons to produce actinium-225 via spallation of a thorium-232 target. As part of previous R and D efforts carried out at Argonne National Laboratory recently in support of the proposed US FRIB facility, it was shown that a very effective production mechanism for actinium-225 is spallation of thorium-232 by high energy proton beams. The base-line simulation for the production rate of actinium-225 by this reaction mechanism is 8E12 atoms per second at 200 MeV proton beam energy with 50 g/cm2 thorium target and 100 kW beam power. An irradiation of one actinium-225 half-life (10 days) produces {approx}100 Ci of actinium-225. For a given beam current the reaction cross section increases slightly with energy to about 400 MeV and then decreases slightly for beam energies in the several GeV regime. The object of this effort is to refine the simulations at proton beam energies of 400 MeV and above up to about 8 GeV. Once completed, the simulations will be experimentally verified using 400 MeV and 8 Ge

  3. Programmable Microcapsules from Self-Immolative Polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P. [Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Sottos, Nancy R. [Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); White, Scott R. [Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Moore, Jeffrey S. [Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2010-01-01

    For the autonomous repair of damaged materials, microcapsules are needed that release their contents in response to a variety of physical and chemical phenomena, not just by direct mechanical rupture. Herein we report a general route to programmable microcapsules. This method creates core-shell microcapsules with polymeric shell walls composed of self-immolative polymer networks. The polymers in these networks undergo a head-to-tail depolymerization upon removal of the triggering end group, leading to breakdown of the shell wall and subsequent release of the capsule’s liquid interior. We report microcapsules with shell walls bearing both Boc and Fmoc triggering groups. The capsules release their contents only under conditions known to remove these triggering groups; otherwise, they retain their contents under a variety of conditions. In support of the proposed release mechanism, the capsule shell walls were observed to undergo physical cracking upon exposure to the triggering conditions.

  4. A model to explain suicide by self-immolation among Iranian women: A grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khankeh, Hamid Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Rezaie, Leeba; Shakeri, Jalal; Schwebel, David C

    2015-11-01

    Self-immolation is a common method of suicide among Iranian women. There are several contributing motives for attempting self-immolation, and exploration of the process of self-immolation incidents will help interventionists and clinicians develop prevention programs. A grounded theory study using face-to-face, recorded interviews was conducted with surviving self-immolated patients (n=14), their close relatives (n=5), and medical staff (n=8) in Kermanshah, Iran. Data were analyzed using constant comparison in open, axial, and selective coding stages. A conceptual model was developed to explain the relationships among the main categories extracted through the grounded theory study. Family conflicts emerged as the core category. Cultural context of self-immolated patients offered a contextual condition. Other important categories linked to the core category were mental health problems, distinct characteristics of the suicidal method, and self-immolation as a threat. The role of mental health problems as a causal condition was detected in different levels of the self-immolation process. Finally, adverse consequences of self-immolation emerged as having important impact. The conceptual model, derived through grounded theory study, can guide design of prevention programs. The pivotal role of family conflicts should be emphasized in mental health interventions. The impact of adverse consequences of self-immolation on further suicidal processes necessitates post-suicide prevention programs. Further research to design specific interventions is recommended. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  5. Self-immolation and its adverse life-events risk factors: results from an Iranian population

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadi, Alireza; Schwebel, David C.; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad; Taliee, Kobra; Karim, Hosein; Mohammadi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Despite considerable loss of life by deliberate self-burning in low and middle-income countries, few scholars have examined psychiatric factors such as adverse life events that may be related to self-immolation. Methods: This case-control study investigated adverse life-events as risk factors for self-immolation patients admitted to a burn center serving the western region of Iran. Variables inves-tigated included the following adverse life-events: unplanned pregna...

  6. Suicide by self-immolation in Tunisia: A 10 year study (2005-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khelil, Mehdi; Zgarni, Amine; Zaafrane, Malek; Chkribane, Youssef; Gharbaoui, Meriem; Harzallah, Hana; Banasr, Ahmed; Hamdoun, Moncef

    2016-11-01

    In Tunisia, few data are available about self-immolation epidemiology especially in the absence of official statistics on suicides. The aim of our study was to analyze the trends of suicide by self-immolation over a period of ten years (2005-2014). We conducted a descriptive, retrospective study including all the cases of self-immolation suicides that occurred over a period of 10 years (2005-2014) and autopsied in the Department of Legal Medicine of the Charles Nicolle Hospital of Tunis, including self-immolation occurring in Northern Tunisia as well as those committed in remaining governorates and transferred before death to the central intensive care unit of burnt in Tunis receiving patients from all over Tunisia (about 80% of cases occurring in Tunisia). 235 cases of self-immolation were collected. The average age at death was 34.1±12.43 years (range 14-83 years). Gender ratio was of 3.27. Psychiatric history was mentioned in 32.8% of cases, represented by schizophrenia in 17.9% and depression in 12.3% of cases. 12.3% had a history of suicide attempts, and 7.3% presented a history of suicidal threats. The number of casualties of suicide by self-immolation tripled after 2011 with a rising trend during the next three years and slight drop in 2014. The most reported reason in our study was decompensation of a psychiatric illness (24.7%). Self-immolation occurred most frequently in a private home (34.5%) or a public place (30.2). Our study showed that self-immolation affects essentially, young men, who are unemployed and mostly having mental diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  7. A Survey of Characteristics of Self-Immolation in the East of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Dastgiri

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was investigating the characteristic and outcome of self-immolation cases admitted to the Burn Centre of Birjand, Iran over an eight year period. This study is a retrospective review of case notes for patients with self-Immolation and admitted to our referral burn centre in the last 8 years (January 2003-January 2011. A performa was designed to collect the data such as: demographic information, length of hospital stay, extent of the burn injuries as %TBSA (Total Body Surface Area and final outcome. Data was analyzed by SPSS software. Between 2003 and 2011, 188 self-immolation cases admitted. The mean age was 26.97 ±12.6 years. Female to male ratio was 1.7:1. Housewives represented the largest group (43.1% and kerosene was the most frequent agent used (74.6%. There was significant different between mortality and TBSA and low educational level (P=0.0001. There was a significant fluctuation time trend in the incidence (per 100,000 population of self-immolation from 2003 (4.64, CI 95%: 4.62-4.65 to 2008 (5.2, CI 95%: 5.19-5.21. Mortality rate was 64%. The survival rates at three weeks survival for patients who self-immolated was 24 percent (CI 95%: 17-31. The mean and median survival times were 6 days (CI 95%: 4.8-7.2 and 17.5 days (CI 95%: 13.3-21.6, respectively. Our study has shown a lower incidence of self-immolation (5.3% in the South Khorasan region, when compared with other parts of Iran, as well as a relatively low mortality rate. We have also reported self-immolation in pregnant women which has rarely been reported in medical literature.

  8. What is missed in self-immolated patients' care? A grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, Kian; Taghinejad, Hamid; Mohammadi, Farahnaz; Mohammadi, Eesa; Suhrabi, Zainab

    2012-12-01

    To explore rehabilitation care process in patients who commit self-immolation. Self-immolation is not only a type of burn injury, but it is also a suicidal method. It is placed in burn injury category that requires long-term rehabilitation and treatment measures. As a suicidal method, among all forms of suicidal attempts, it is the most dramatic, violent and often difficult one to understand. Unfortunately, there are few reported studies investigating experiences and perceptions of nurses about burn care and with qualitative study about the patients' experiences and perceptions. On the basis of the research question, the grounded theory method was used. Considering ethical codes of Belmont and Helsinki statements, purposive sampling was used to select the participants. The patients were deliberately selected, based on the research needs. They were self-immolated patients being referred to Talaghani hospital of Ilam (western Iran) or discharged previously (time of interview and observation ranged from immediately later the burn till 5 years after), in Ilam, where self-immolation rate is very high. The main methods for data collection were deep, open ended, semi-structured interviews, dairies and observations. The interviews were audio taped in Persian, and verbatim transcriptions were made. By doing so, semantic meaning is preserved, and misinterpretation of data due to translation into English is minimised. Data analysis was conducted using the Strauss and Corbin method. Five main categories were emerged: situation of crisis unprofessional care, prolongation and formidability of the journey, self-immolation as paralyse, and attempt for self-management. Finally, by constant, comparison of collected data and emerged categories, central variable entitled unintegrated care emerged as the main problem of self-immolated patients' care. The study comes to the conclusion that we need to focus on specific considerations to provide integrated care for the burned patients as

  9. Cationic Poly(benzyl ether)s as Self-Immolative Antimicrobial Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergene, Cansu; Palermo, Edmund F

    2017-10-09

    Self-immolative polymers (SIMPs) are macromolecules that spontaneously undergo depolymerization into small molecules when triggered by specific external stimuli. We report here the first examples of antimicrobial SIMPs with potent, rapid, and broad-spectrum bactericidal activity. Their antibacterial and hemolytic activities were examined as a function of cationic functionality. Polymers bearing primary ammonium cationic groups showed more potent bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli, relative to tertiary and quaternary ammonium counterparts, whereas the quaternary ammonium polymers showed the lowest hemolytic toxicity. These antibacterial polycations undergo end-to-end depolymerization when triggered by an externally applied stimulus. Specifically, poly(benzyl ether)s end-capped with a silyl ether group and bearing pendant allyl side chains were converted to polycations by photoinitiated thiol-ene radical addition using cysteamine HCl. The intact polycations are stable in solution, but they spontaneously unzip into their component monomers upon exposure to fluoride ions, with excellent sensitivity and selectivity. Upon triggered depolymerization, the antibacterial potency was largely retained but the hemolytic toxicity was substantially reduced. Thus, we reveal the first example of a self-immolative antibacterial polymer platform that will enable antibacterial materials to spontaneously unzip into biologically active small molecules upon the introduction of a specifically designed stimulus.

  10. Living with burn scars caused by self-immolation among women in Iraqi Kurdistan: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirlashari, Jila; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Amin, Pakestan Mohammad

    2017-03-01

    Patients with burns have to live with a variety of long-term physical and psychosocial consequences. Burns lead to prolonged hospital stay, disfiguring scars, disability, and even death. Since self-immolation is common in women of Iraqi Kurdistan, the present study sought to explore the experiences of women living with scars caused by self-immolation. This paper was part of a qualitative research study. A purposive sample of 18 female self-immolation survivors from Iraqi Kurdistan was selected, and 21 individual interviews were conducted and analyzed using conventional content analysis. Four categories emerged during the data analysis: (1) feelings of disbelief, regret, and anger caused by post-burn scars; (2) desperately seeking solutions; (3) grief due to disappointment and surrender to despair; and (4) rejection and isolation. In conclusion, individuals with scars and disfigurements sometimes adopted inappropriate measures to deal with the psychological problems caused by others' behaviors and wrong perceptions. Educational and support programs are hence indicated to promote awareness levels of self-immolation survivors, their families, and the whole society. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  11. From Querulous to Suicidal: Self-immolation in Public Places as a Symbolic Response to the Feeling of Injustice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévy, Benjamin T; Prudent, Cécile; Liétard, Florian; Evrard, Renaud

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This paper sheds light on the context that leads some querulous patients to self-immolate in front of, or into, public buildings (e.g., tribunals, city halls, and employment agencies). Method: The author defines paranoid querulousness. A psychoanalytic perspective, but also a judicial and a psychiatric point of view, over querulous claimants is presented. The links between political or social claims and self-immolation are studied. The expression of suicidal thoughts voiced by four querulous subjects is analyzed. Eight examples of self-immolation are presented. Results: The querulous subjects' self-aggressive behaviors seem to be caused by a loss of hope to obtain compensation for a prejudice they allegedly suffered. Querulous individuals tend to self-immolate in front of, or into, public buildings when no answer is given to their claims. These gestures may be both a consequence of some personal distress and triggered by a difficult social or professional context. Discussion: Five sets of assumptions derived from Freudian and Lacanian psychoanalytic theories are advanced. The status of the object over which the querulous claimants wish to assert their rights is clarified. The meaning of self-aggressive gestures is outlined by making reference to the concepts of instinct for mastery, symbolic other, chain of signifiers, masochism, pleasure principle, and reality principle. Conclusion: Prevention of self-immolation could involve that members of the legal professions, social workers, civil servants, and mental health professionals in contact with querulous subjects openly show their will to listen to these claimants' voice: self-aggressive gestures might be avoided by supporting the querulous person's hope to obtain compensation for the prejudice allegedly suffered.

  12. From Querulous to Suicidal: Self-immolation in Public Places as a Symbolic Response to the Feeling of Injustice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin T. Lévy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This paper sheds light on the context that leads some querulous patients to self-immolate in front of, or into, public buildings (e.g., tribunals, city halls, and employment agencies.Method: The author defines paranoid querulousness. A psychoanalytic perspective, but also a judicial and a psychiatric point of view, over querulous claimants is presented. The links between political or social claims and self-immolation are studied. The expression of suicidal thoughts voiced by four querulous subjects is analyzed. Eight examples of self-immolation are presented.Results: The querulous subjects' self-aggressive behaviors seem to be caused by a loss of hope to obtain compensation for a prejudice they allegedly suffered. Querulous individuals tend to self-immolate in front of, or into, public buildings when no answer is given to their claims. These gestures may be both a consequence of some personal distress and triggered by a difficult social or professional context.Discussion: Five sets of assumptions derived from Freudian and Lacanian psychoanalytic theories are advanced. The status of the object over which the querulous claimants wish to assert their rights is clarified. The meaning of self-aggressive gestures is outlined by making reference to the concepts of instinct for mastery, symbolic other, chain of signifiers, masochism, pleasure principle, and reality principle.Conclusion: Prevention of self-immolation could involve that members of the legal professions, social workers, civil servants, and mental health professionals in contact with querulous subjects openly show their will to listen to these claimants' voice: self-aggressive gestures might be avoided by supporting the querulous person's hope to obtain compensation for the prejudice allegedly suffered.

  13. Oxidation Responsive Polymers with a Triggered Degradation via Arylboronate Self-Immolative Motifs on a Polyphosphazene Backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturmendi, Aitziber; Monkowius, Uwe; Teasdale, Ian

    2017-02-21

    Oxidation responsive polymers with triggered degradation pathways have been prepared via attachment of self-immolative moieties onto a hydrolytically unstable polyphosphazene backbone. After controlled main-chain growth, postpolymerization functionalization allows the preparation of hydrolytically stable poly(organo)phosphazenes decorated with a phenylboronic ester caging group. In oxidative environments, triggered cleavage of the caging group is followed by self-immolation, exposing the unstable glycine-substituted polyphosphazene which subsequently undergoes to backbone degradation to low-molecular weight molecules. As well as giving mechanistic insights, detailed GPC and 1 H and 31 P NMR analysis reveal the polymers to be stable in aqueous solutions, but show a selective, fast degradation upon exposure to hydrogen peroxide containing solutions. Since the post-polymerization functionalization route allows simple access to polymer backbones with a broad range of molecular weights, the approach of using the inorganic backbone as a platform significantly expands the toolbox of polymers capable of stimuli-responsive degradation.

  14. Amplified release through the stimulus triggered degradation of self-immolative oligomers, dendrimers, and linear polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Andrew D; DeWit, Matthew A; Gillies, Elizabeth R

    2012-08-01

    In recent years, numerous delivery systems based on polymers, dendrimers, and nano-scale assemblies have been developed to improve the properties of drug molecules. In general, for the drug molecules to be active, they must be released from these delivery systems, ideally in a selective manner at the therapeutic target. As the changes in physiological conditions are relatively subtle from one tissue to another and the concentrations of specific enzymes are often quite low, a release strategy involving the amplification of a biological signal is particularly attractive. This article describes the development of oligomers, dendrimers, and linear polymers based on self-immolative spacers. This new class of molecules is designed to undergo a cascade of intramolecular reactions in response to the cleavage of a trigger moiety, resulting in molecular fragmentation and the release of multiple reporter or drug molecules. Progress in the development of these materials as drug delivery vehicles and sensors will be highlighted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A study of suicide and attempted suicide by self-immolation in an Irish psychiatric population: an increasing problem.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donoghue, J M

    2012-02-03

    In the Western World self-immolation is an uncommon but dramatic method of attempting suicide. In-patients who attempt suicide by fire-setting tend to be female with severe psychopathology. In a previous study from the South of Ireland, seven cases from a psychiatric and prison population were identified in a five year period from 1984 to 1989. This would represent an annual rate of 1.07 per cent of burns treated in the burns unit at Cork University Hospital. In this study 12 cases were identified for the years 1994 and 1995. This represents an increase of 3.5 per cent from 1.07 to 4.6 per cent of all burns treated at the same institution. Ten of these patients had a previous psychiatric history and eight of them were resident on a psychiatric ward when they committed the act. Seven of the patients were found to have a high degree of suicide intent of whom four died of their injuries, which gives a mortality rate for this group of 33 per cent. Effective prevention policies are necessary if this increasing problem is to be curtailed.

  16. Design, Synthesis and Application of Fluorine-Labeled Taxoids as19F NMR Probes for the Metabolic Stability Assessment of Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Joshua D; Vineberg, Jacob G; Wei, Longfei; Khan, Jonathan F; Lichtenthal, Brendan; Lin, Chi-Feng; Ojima, Iwao

    2015-03-01

    Novel tumor-targeting drug conjugates, BLT-F 2 ( 1 ) and BLT-S-F 6 ( 2 ), bearing a fluorotaxoid as the warhead, a mechanism-based self-immolative disulfide linker, and biotin as the tumor-targeting module, were designed and synthesized as 19 F NMR probes. Fluorine atoms and CF 3 groups were strategically incorporated into the conjugates to investigate the mechanism of linker cleavage and factors that influence their plasma and metabolic stability by real-time monitoring with 19 F NMR. Time-resolved 19 F NMR study on probe 1 disclosed a stepwise mechanism for release of a fluorotaxoid, which might not have been detected by other analytical methods. Probe 2 was designed to bear two CF 3 groups in the taxoid moiety as "3-FAB" reporters for enhanced sensitivity and a polyethylene glycol oligomer insert to improve solubility. The clean analysis of the linker stability and reactivity of drug conjugates in blood plasma or cell culture media by HPLC and 1 H NMR is troublesome, due to the overlap of key signals/peaks with background arising from highly complex ingredients in biological systems. Accordingly, the use of 19 F NMR would provide a practical solution to this problem. In fact, our "3-FAB" probe 2 was proven to be highly useful to investigate the stability and reactivity of the self-immolative disulfide linker system in human blood plasma by 19 F NMR. It has also been revealed that the use of polysorbate 80 as excipient for the formulation of probe 2 dramatically increases the stability of the disulfide linker system. This finding further indicates that the tumor-targeting drug conjugates with polysorbate 80/EtOH/saline formulation for in vivo studies would have high stability in blood plasma, while the drug release in cancer cells proceeds smoothly.

  17. Guided molecular missiles for tumor-targeting chemotherapy--case studies using the second-generation taxoids as warheads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Iwao

    2008-01-01

    human tumor xenografts in animal models. We have developed self-immolative disulfide linkers wherein the glutathione-triggered cascade drug release takes place to generate the original anticancer agent. The use of disulfide linkers is attractive beacuse it takes into account the fact that the concentration of glutathione is much higher (>1000 times) in tumor cells than in blood plasma. In order to monitor and elucidate the mechanism of tumor-targeting, internalization, and drug release, several fluorescent and fluorogenic probes using biotin as the tumor-targeting module were developed and used. Then, the progressive occurrence of the designed receptor-mediated endocytosis, drug release, and drug binding to the target protein (microtubules) has been successfully observed and confirmed by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy. These "guided molecular missiles" provide bright prospects for the development of highly efficacious new generation drugs for cancer chemotherapy.

  18. Advances in Tumor Targeted Liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A; Jain, S K

    2018-04-15

    Cancer remains a deadly disease for effective treatment. Although anomalous tumor microenvironment is now widely exploited for targeted chemotherapy, safe and efficacious drug delivery to tumor cells is not still warranted. Liposomes are promising biodegradable and biocompatible nanocarriers having potential amenability for surface and internal modifications, and extraordinary capability to carry both hydrophilic as well as hydrophobhic drugs. Meticulous fabrication of liposomes with tumor selective ligand(s) and PEGylation reduces immunogenicity and increase target-specificity. This chapter focuses on critical developmental aspects of liposomes to target cancer cells exploiting Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) effect and tumor-selective ligands such as folate, transferrin, peptides etc. Moreover, stimuli-responsive smart liposomes (triggers: pH, temperature, enzymes, magnetic field, ultrasound, and redox potential etc.) are also investigated for enhancement of drug delivery to tumors. This review summarizes advances in tumor-targeted liposomes via various means of targeting. This knowledgeable assemblage of advances in liposomal approaches will render new insights to formulators and budding scientists to design cancer targeted liposomes. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Carbohydrate plasma expanders for passive tumor targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Stefan; Caysa, Henrike; Kuntsche, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Da and HES 450 kDa) and dextran (DEX 500 kDa). Particle size and molecular weight distribution were determined by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4). The biodistribution was investigated non-invasively in nude mice using multispectral optical imaging. The most promising polymer conjugate...... was characterized in human colon carcinoma xenograft bearing nude mice. A tumor specific accumulation of HES 450 was observed, which proves it’s potential as carrier for passive tumor targeting....

  20. High efficiency diffusion molecular retention tumor targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Guo

    Full Text Available Here we introduce diffusion molecular retention (DMR tumor targeting, a technique that employs PEG-fluorochrome shielded probes that, after a peritumoral (PT injection, undergo slow vascular uptake and extensive interstitial diffusion, with tumor retention only through integrin molecular recognition. To demonstrate DMR, RGD (integrin binding and RAD (control probes were synthesized bearing DOTA (for (111 In(3+, a NIR fluorochrome, and 5 kDa PEG that endows probes with a protein-like volume of 25 kDa and decreases non-specific interactions. With a GFP-BT-20 breast carcinoma model, tumor targeting by the DMR or i.v. methods was assessed by surface fluorescence, biodistribution of [(111In] RGD and [(111In] RAD probes, and whole animal SPECT. After a PT injection, both probes rapidly diffused through the normal and tumor interstitium, with retention of the RGD probe due to integrin interactions. With PT injection and the [(111In] RGD probe, SPECT indicated a highly tumor specific uptake at 24 h post injection, with 352%ID/g tumor obtained by DMR (vs 4.14%ID/g by i.v.. The high efficiency molecular targeting of DMR employed low probe doses (e.g. 25 ng as RGD peptide, which minimizes toxicity risks and facilitates clinical translation. DMR applications include the delivery of fluorochromes for intraoperative tumor margin delineation, the delivery of radioisotopes (e.g. toxic, short range alpha emitters for radiotherapy, or the delivery of photosensitizers to tumors accessible to light.

  1. Self-immolation after forehead flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melyssa Hancock

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: Despite the widespread use of petrolatum-based products and their role as potential fuel sources, the flammability potential of these products is poorly described in the literature. Nonetheless, petroleum-based products are associated with potential risks, especially for patients who smoke or for those who engage in activities or occupations that pose a greater risk for fire exposure. Surgeons must be explicit in communicating this risk to patients to prevent acutely devastating complications.

  2. An eighteen-membered macrocyclic ligand for actinium-225 targeted alpha therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiele, Nikki A.; MacMillan, Samantha N.; Wilson, Justin J. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Chemistry and Chemical Biology; Brown, Victoria; Jermilova, Una; Ramogida, Caterina F.; Robertson, Andrew K.H.; Schaffer, Paul; Radchenko, Valery [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Life Science Div.; Kelly, James M.; Amor-Coarasa, Alejandro; Nikolopoulou, Anastasia; Ponnala, Shashikanth; Williams, Clarence Jr.; Babich, John W. [Radiology, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Cristina [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy and Centre for Comparative Medicine

    2017-11-13

    The 18-membered macrocycle H{sub 2}macropa was investigated for {sup 225}Ac chelation in targeted alpha therapy (TAT). Radiolabeling studies showed that macropa, at submicromolar concentration, complexed all {sup 225}Ac (26 kBq) in 5 min at RT. [{sup 225}Ac(macropa)]{sup +} remained intact over 7 to 8 days when challenged with either excess La{sup 3+} ions or human serum, and did not accumulate in any organ after 5 h in healthy mice. A bifunctional analogue, macropa-NCS, was conjugated to trastuzumab as well as to the prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeting compound RPS-070. Both constructs rapidly radiolabeled {sup 225}Ac in just minutes at RT, and macropa-Tmab retained >99 % of its {sup 225}Ac in human serum after 7 days. In LNCaP xenograft mice, {sup 225}Ac-macropa-RPS-070 was selectively targeted to tumors and did not release free {sup 225}Ac over 96 h. These findings establish macropa to be a highly promising ligand for {sup 225}Ac chelation that will facilitate the clinical development of {sup 225}Ac TAT for the treatment of soft-tissue metastases. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Tumor-targeting delivery of herb-based drugs with cell-penetrating/tumor-targeting peptide-modified nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebebe, Dereje; Liu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Yumei; Vilakhamxay, Maikhone; Liu, Zhidong; Li, Jiawei

    2018-01-01

    Cancer has become one of the leading causes of mortality globally. The major challenges of conventional cancer therapy are the failure of most chemotherapeutic agents to accumulate selectively in tumor cells and their severe systemic side effects. In the past three decades, a number of drug delivery approaches have been discovered to overwhelm the obstacles. Among these, nanocarriers have gained much attention for their excellent and efficient drug delivery systems to improve specific tissue/organ/cell targeting. In order to enhance targeting efficiency further and reduce limitations of nanocarriers, nanoparticle surfaces are functionalized with different ligands. Several kinds of ligand-modified nanomedicines have been reported. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are promising ligands, attracting the attention of researchers due to their efficiency to transport bioactive molecules intracellularly. However, their lack of specificity and in vivo degradation led to the development of newer types of CPP. Currently, activable CPP and tumor-targeting peptide (TTP)-modified nanocarriers have shown dramatically superior cellular specific uptake, cytotoxicity, and tumor growth inhibition. In this review, we discuss recent advances in tumor-targeting strategies using CPPs and their limitations in tumor delivery systems. Special emphasis is given to activable CPPs and TTPs. Finally, we address the application of CPPs and/or TTPs in the delivery of plant-derived chemotherapeutic agents.

  4. Advancing theranostics with tumor-targeting peptides for precision otolaryngology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadwick L. Wright

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, about 600,000 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC are detected annually, many of which involve high risk human papilloma virus (HPV. Surgery is the primary and desired first treatment option. Following surgery, the existence of cancer cells at the surgical margin is strongly associated with eventual recurrence of cancer and a poor outcome. Despite improved surgical methods (robotics, microsurgery, endoscopic/laparoscopic, and external imaging, surgeons rely only on their vision and touch to locate tumors during surgery. Diagnostic imaging systems like computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and positron-emission tomography (PET are too large, slow and costly to use efficiently during most surgeries and, ultrasound imaging, while fast and portable, is not cancer specific. This purpose of this article is to review the fundamental technologies that will radically advance Precision Otolaryngology practices to the benefit of patients with HNSCC. In particular, this article will address the potential for tumor-targeting peptides to enable more precise diagnostic imaging while simultaneously advancing new therapeutic paradigms for next generation image-guided surgery, tumor-specific chemotherapeutic delivery and tumor-selective targeted radiotherapy (i.e., theranostic. Keywords: Squamous cell carcinoma, Peptide, Optical surgical navigation, Diagnostic imaging, Theranostic

  5. Purification of radium-226 for the manufacturing of actinium-225 in a cyclotron for alpha-immunotherapy; Radium-Aufreinigung zur Herstellung von Actinium-225 am Zyklotron fuer die Alpha-Immuntherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, Sebastian Markus

    2014-09-23

    The thesis describes the development of methods for the purification of Ra-226. The objective was to obtain the radionuclide in the quality that is needed to be used as starting material in the manufacturing process for Ac-225 via proton-irradiated Ra-226. The radionuclide has been gained efficiently out of huge excesses of impurities. The high purity of the obtained radium affords its use as staring material in a pharmaceutical manufacturing process.

  6. Bismuth-213 and actinium-225 -- generator performance and evolving therapeutic applications of two generator-derived alpha-emitting radioisotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Apostolidis, Christos

    2012-07-01

    The alpha emitters (225)Ac and (213)Bi are promising therapeutic radionuclides for application in targeted alpha therapy of cancer and infectious diseases. Both alpha emitters are available with high specific activity from established radionuclide generators. Their favourable chemical and physical properties have led to the conduction of a large number of preclinical studies and several clinical trials, demonstrating the feasibility, safety and therapeutic efficacy of targeted alpha therapy with (225)Ac and (213)Bi. This review describes methods for the production of (225)Ac and (213)Bi and gives an overview of (225)Ac/(213)Bi radionuclide generator systems. Selected preclinical studies are highlighted and the current clinical experience with (225)Ac and (213)Bi is summarized.

  7. Boronic acid-tethered amphiphilic hyaluronic acid derivative-based nanoassemblies for tumor targeting and penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jae Young; Hong, Eun-Hye; Lee, Song Yi; Lee, Jae-Young; Song, Jae-Hyoung; Ko, Seung-Hak; Shim, Jae-Seong; Choe, Sunghwa; Kim, Dae-Duk; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Cho, Hyun-Jong

    2017-04-15

    (3-Aminomethylphenyl)boronic acid (AMPB)-installed hyaluronic acid-ceramide (HACE)-based nanoparticles (NPs), including manassantin B (MB), were fabricated for tumor-targeted delivery. The amine group of AMPB was conjugated to the carboxylic acid group of hyaluronic acid (HA) via amide bond formation, and synthesis was confirmed by spectroscopic methods. HACE-AMPB/MB NPs with a 239-nm mean diameter, narrow size distribution, negative zeta potential, and >90% drug encapsulation efficiency were fabricated. Exposed AMPB in the outer surface of HACE-AMPB NPs (in the aqueous environment) may react with sialic acid of cancer cells. The improved cellular accumulation efficiency, in vitro antitumor efficacy, and tumor penetration efficiency of HACE-AMPB/MB NPs, compared with HACE/MB NPs, in MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44 receptor-positive human breast adenocarcinoma cells) may be based on the CD44 receptor-mediated endocytosis and phenylboronic acid-sialic acid interaction. Enhanced in vivo tumor targetability, infiltration efficiency, and antitumor efficacies of HACE-AMPB NPs, compared with HACE NPs, were observed in a MDA-MB-231 tumor-xenografted mouse model. In addition to passive tumor targeting (based on an enhanced permeability and retention effect) and active tumor targeting (interaction between HA and CD44 receptor), the phenylboronic acid-sialic acid interaction can play important roles in augmented tumor targeting and penetration of HACE-AMPB NPs. STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE: (3-Aminomethylphenyl)boronic acid (AMPB)-tethered hyaluronic acid-ceramide (HACE)-based nanoparticles (NPs), including manassantin B (MB), were fabricated and their tumor targeting and penetration efficiencies were assessed in MDA-MB-231 (CD44 receptor-positive human adenocarcinoma) tumor models. MB, which exhibited antitumor efficacies via the inhibition of angiogenesis and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1, was entrapped in HACE-AMPB NPs in this study. Phenylboronic acid located in the outer surface

  8. PRELIMINARY STRUCTURE–ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP STUDY OF HEPTAMETHINE INDOCYANINE DYES FOR TUMOR-TARGETED IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QINYUAN GUO

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our research has identified a couple of near-infrared (NIR heptamethine indocyanine dyes exhibiting preferential tumor accumulation property for in vivo imaging. On the basis of our foregoing work, we describe here a preliminary structure–activity relationship (SAR study of 11 related heptamethine indocyanine dyes and several essential requirements of these structures for in vivo tumor-targeted imaging.

  9. In vivo imaging of passively tumor targeted polymer carrier and the enzymatically cleavable drug model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pola, Robert; Heinrich, A. K.; Mueller, T.; Kostka, Libor; Mäder, K.; Pechar, Michal; Etrych, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 6, 4 (Suppl) (2017), s. 90 ISSN 2325-9604. [International Conference and Exhibition on Nanomedicine and Drug Delivery. 29.05.2017-31.05.2017, Osaka] R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV16-28594A Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polymer drug carrier * tumor targeting * enzymatic release Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology

  10. A hybrid actuated microrobot using an electromagnetic field and flagellated bacteria for tumor-targeting therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Donghai; Choi, Hyunchul; Cho, Sunghoon; Jeong, Semi; Jin, Zhen; Lee, Cheong; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new concept for a hybrid actuated microrobot for tumor-targeting therapy. For drug delivery in tumor therapy, various electromagnetic actuated microrobot systems have been studied. In addition, bacteria-based microrobot (so-called bacteriobot), which use tumor targeting and the therapeutic function of the bacteria, has also been proposed for solid tumor therapy. Compared with bacteriobot, electromagnetic actuated microrobot has larger driving force and locomotive controllability due to their position recognition and magnetic field control. However, because electromagnetic actuated microrobot does not have self-tumor targeting, they need to be controlled by an external magnetic field. In contrast, the bacteriobot uses tumor targeting and the bacteria's own motility, and can exhibit self-targeting performance at solid tumors. However, because the propulsion forces of the bacteria are too small, it is very difficult for bacteriobot to track a tumor in a vessel with a large bloodstream. Therefore, we propose a hybrid actuated microrobot combined with electromagnetic actuation in large blood vessels with a macro range and bacterial actuation in small vessels with a micro range. In addition, the proposed microrobot consists of biodegradable and biocompatible microbeads in which the drugs and magnetic particles can be encapsulated; the bacteria can be attached to the surface of the microbeads and propel the microrobot. We carried out macro-manipulation of the hybrid actuated microrobot along a desired path through electromagnetic field control and the micro-manipulation of the hybrid actuated microrobot toward a chemical attractant through the chemotaxis of the bacteria. For the validation of the hybrid actuation of the microrobot, we fabricated a hydrogel microfluidic channel that can generate a chemical gradient. Finally, we evaluated the motility performance of the hybrid actuated microrobot in the hydrogel microfluidic channel. We expect

  11. Chemosensitizing indomethacin-conjugated chitosan oligosaccharide nanoparticles for tumor-targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Young; Termsarasab, Ubonvan; Lee, Mee Yeon; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Lee, Song Yi; Kim, Jung Sun; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Dae-Duk

    2017-07-15

    A chitosan oligosaccharide (CSO)-indomethacin (IDM) conjugate (CI) was synthesized to fabricate chemosensitizing nanoparticles (NPs) for tumor-targeted drug delivery. IDM was conjugated to a CSO backbone via amide bond formation, of which successful synthesis was confirmed by proton-nuclear magnetic resonance analyses. Doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded CI (CI10/DOX; CI:DOX=10:1 [w/w]) NPs with IDM increased in the presence of A549 cell lysates. In A549 cells (human lung carcinoma cells), more efficient cellular uptake of CI10/DOX NPs than that of free DOX was observed by using confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry. The in vitro cytotoxicity of CI10/DOX NPs in A549 cells was higher than those of free DOX and CI NPs with free DOX groups. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies after intravenous administration in rats showed significantly lower clearance of DOX from NPs compared with the free DOX group. Tumor targetability of the developed CI NPs was also verified by a real-time optical imaging study. In summary, the chemosensitizing CI/DOX NP with enhanced anticancer activity, prolonged blood circulation, and passive tumor targeting can be a promising anticancer drug delivery system for tumor-targeted therapy. Chemosensitizing nanoparticles (NPs) based on amphiphilic chitosan oligosaccharide-indomethacin (CSO-IDM; CI) conjugate were developed for tumor-targeted delivery of doxorubicin (DOX). IDM was introduced to the CSO backbone as a hydrophobic residue to synthesize an amphiphilic conjugate and a chemosenstizer of DOX for improving antitumor efficacies. IDM, conjugated to CSO, may inhibit the efflux of cellular uptaken DOX via multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and subsequently augment the anti-proliferation potentials of DOX in A549 cells (MRP-expressed human lung cancer cells). Chemosensitizing properties of developed CI NPs were assessed in cell culture models and the tumor targetability of CI/DOX NPs was demonstrated in A549 tumor-xenografted mouse

  12. In vivo tumor targeting of gold nanoparticles: effect of particle type and dosing strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puvanakrishnan P

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Priyaveena Puvanakrishnan1, Jaesook Park1, Deyali Chatterjee2, Sunil Krishnan2, James W Tunnell11Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA; 2The UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs have gained significant interest as nanovectors for combined imaging and photothermal therapy of tumors. Delivered systemically, GNPs preferentially accumulate at the tumor site via the enhanced permeability and retention effect, and when irradiated with near infrared light, produce sufficient heat to treat tumor tissue. The efficacy of this process strongly depends on the targeting ability of the GNPs, which is a function of the particle’s geometric properties (eg, size and dosing strategy (eg, number and amount of injections. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of GNP type and dosing strategy on in vivo tumor targeting. Specifically, we investigated the in vivo tumor-targeting efficiency of pegylated gold nanoshells (GNSs and gold nanorods (GNRs for single and multiple dosing. We used Swiss nu/nu mice with a subcutaneous tumor xenograft model that received intravenous administration for a single and multiple doses of GNS and GNR. We performed neutron activation analysis to quantify the gold present in the tumor and liver. We performed histology to determine if there was acute toxicity as a result of multiple dosing. Neutron activation analysis results showed that the smaller GNRs accumulated in higher concentrations in the tumor compared to the larger GNSs. We observed a significant increase in GNS and GNR accumulation in the liver for higher doses. However, multiple doses increased targeting efficiency with minimal effect beyond three doses of GNPs. These results suggest a significant effect of particle type and multiple doses on increasing particle accumulation and on tumor targeting ability.Keywords: gold nanorods, gold nanoshells, tumor targeting

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Tumor-Targeted Gene Therapy in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Niess, Hanno; Conrad, Claudius; Schwarz, Bettina; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Huss, Ralf; Nelson, Peter J.; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem (or stromal) cells (MSCs) are nonhematopoietic progenitor cells that can be obtained from bone marrow aspirates or adipose tissue, expanded and genetically modified in vitro, and then used for cancer therapeutic strategies in vivo. Here, we review available data regarding the application of MSC-based tumor-targeted therapy in gastrointestinal cancer, provide an overview of the general history of MSC-based gene therapy in cancer research, and discuss potential problems associa...

  14. Novel tumor-targeting, self-assembling peptide nanofiber as a carrier for effective curcumin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianfeng; Liu, Jinjian; Xu, Hongyan; Zhang, Yumin; Chu, Liping; Liu, Qingfen; Song, Naling; Yang, Cuihong

    2014-01-01

    The poor aqueous solubility and low bioavailability of curcumin restrict its clinical application for cancer treatment. In this study, a novel tumor-targeting nanofiber carrier was developed to improve the solubility and tumor-targeting ability of curcumin using a self-assembled Nap-GFFYG-RGD peptide. The morphologies of the peptide nanofiber and the curcumin-encapsulated nanofiber were visualized by transmission electron microscopy. The tumor-targeting activity of the curcumin-encapsulated Nap-GFFYG-RGD peptide nanofiber (f-RGD-Cur) was studied in vitro and in vivo, using Nap-GFFYG-RGE peptide nanofiber (f-RGE-Cur) as the control. Curcumin was encapsulated into the peptide nanofiber, which had a diameter of approximately 10-20 nm. Curcumin showed sustained-release behavior from the nanofibers in vitro. f-RGD-Cur showed much higher cellular uptake in αvβ3 integrin-positive HepG2 liver carcinoma cells than did non-targeted f-RGE-Cur, thereby leading to significantly higher cytotoxicity. Ex vivo studies further demonstrated that curcumin could accumulate markedly in mouse tumors after administration of f-RGD-Cur via the tail vein. These results indicate that Nap-GFFYG-RGD peptide self-assembled nanofibers are a promising hydrophobic drug delivery system for targeted treatment of cancer.

  15. Identification of functional peptides from natural and synthetic products on their anticancer activities by tumor targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Joshua K; Auyeung, Kathy K

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells can express specific membrane proteins, which act as biomarkers for chemotherapeutic targeting. Functional peptides possess unique properties that will ensure efficacy, selectivity, specificity and low toxicity when used as therapeutic agents. Therapeutic peptides have been derived in treatment of cancers through improvement of cellular uptake, drug targeting and vaccine development. Peptides from natural source have been used for chemoprevention and therapy of various cancers. These include peptides derived from food, marine products, venom components and other animal constituents. Besides, chemically- and recombinantly-synthesized peptides have also been produced and extensively studied in contemporary applications. Improvement of tumor targeting is essential for chemotherapeutic development. This can be achieved through enhancement of intracellular delivery and/or increased specific binding affinity to cancer cells by pore-forming and cytotoxic peptides. Cytotoxic peptides such as the Bcl-2 family members can induce receptor-specific binding to tumor cells and promote apoptosis by targeting lipid membranes. This approach has some limitations in targeting, penetration and localization within tumors. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) belong to a new class of tumor-targeting peptides that can facilitate internalization of tumor markers and/or chemotherapeutic drugs. In order to overcome the problem of serum instability in classical CPPs (e.g. Tat), newer classes of CPPs has been recently introduced. Nevertheless, some cyclized CPPs can further enhance cellular uptake and binding selectivity when compared to activities of their linear counterpart, especially when treating chemoresistant tumors. This review compiles the use of effective tumor-targeting peptides including novel CPPs that represents new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancers.

  16. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Tumor-Targeted Gene Therapy in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Niess, Hanno; Conrad, Claudius; Schwarz, Bettina; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Huss, Ralf; Nelson, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem (or stromal) cells (MSCs) are nonhematopoietic progenitor cells that can be obtained from bone marrow aspirates or adipose tissue, expanded and genetically modified in vitro, and then used for cancer therapeutic strategies in vivo. Here, we review available data regarding the application of MSC-based tumor-targeted therapy in gastrointestinal cancer, provide an overview of the general history of MSC-based gene therapy in cancer research, and discuss potential problems associated with the utility of MSC-based therapy such as biosafety, immunoprivilege, transfection methods, and distribution in the host. PMID:22530882

  17. Liposomal Tumor Targeting in Drug Delivery Utilizing MMP-2- and MMP-9-Binding Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oula Penate Medina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology offers an alternative to conventional treatment options by enabling different drug delivery and controlled-release delivery strategies. Liposomes being especially biodegradable and in most cases essentially nontoxic offer a versatile platform for several different delivery approaches that can potentially enhance the delivery and targeting of therapies to tumors. Liposomes penetrate tumors spontaneously as a result of fenestrated blood vessels within tumors, leading to known enhanced permeability and subsequent drug retention effects. In addition, liposomes can be used to carry radioactive moieties, such as radiotracers, which can be bound at multiple locations within liposomes, making them attractive carriers for molecular imaging applications. Phage display is a technique that can deliver various high-affinity and selectivity peptides to different targets. In this study, gelatinase-binding peptides, found by phage display, were attached to liposomes by covalent peptide-PEG-PE anchor creating a targeted drug delivery vehicle. Gelatinases as extracellular targets for tumor targeting offer a viable alternative for tumor targeting. Our findings show that targeted drug delivery is more efficient than non-targeted drug delivery.

  18. In vivo tomographic imaging with fluorescence and MRI using tumor-targeted dual-labeled nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Yue Zhang,1 Bin Zhang,1 Fei Liu,1,2 Jianwen Luo,1,3 Jing Bai1 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, 2Tsinghua-Peking Center for Life Sciences, 3Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of China Abstract: Dual-modality imaging combines the complementary advantages of different modalities, and offers the prospect of improved preclinical research. The combination of fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides cross-validated information and direct comparison between these modalities. Here, we report on the application of a novel tumor-targeted, dual-labeled nanoparticle (NP, utilizing iron oxide as the MRI contrast agent and near infrared (NIR dye Cy5.5 as the fluorescent agent. Results of in vitro experiments verified the specificity of the NP to tumor cells. In vivo tumor targeting and uptake of the NPs in a mouse model were visualized by fluorescence and MR imaging collected at different time points. Quantitative analysis was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of MRI contrast enhancement. Furthermore, tomographic images were also acquired using both imaging modalities and cross-validated information of tumor location and size between these two modalities was revealed. The results demonstrate that the use of dual-labeled NPs can facilitate the dual-modal detection of tumors, information cross-validation, and direct comparison by combing fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT and MRI. Keywords: dual-modality, fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, nanoparticle

  19. A Functional Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Modified with PLA-PEG-DG as Tumor-Targeted MRI Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Fei; Hu, Ke; Yu, Haoli; Zhou, Lijun; Song, Lina; Zhang, Yu; Shan, Xiuhong; Liu, Jianping; Gu, Ning

    2017-08-01

    Tumor targeting could greatly promote the performance of magnetic nanomaterials as MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) agent for tumor diagnosis. Herein, we reported a novel magnetic nanoparticle modified with PLA (poly lactic acid)-PEG (polyethylene glycol)-DG (D-glucosamine) as Tumor-targeted MRI Contrast Agent. In this work, we took use of the D-glucose passive targeting on tumor cells, combining it on PLA-PEG through amide reaction, and then wrapped the PLA-PEG-DG up to the Fe 3 O 4 @OA NPs. The stability and anti phagocytosis of Fe 3 O 4 @OA@PLA-PEG-DG was tested in vitro; the MRI efficiency and toxicity was also detected in vivo. These functional magnetic nanoparticles demonstrated good biocompatibility and stability both in vitro and in vivo. Cell experiments showed that Fe 3 O 4 @OA@PLA-PEG-DG nanoparticles exist good anti phagocytosis and high targetability. In vivo MRI images showed that the contrast effect of Fe 3 O 4 @OA@PLA-PEG-DG nanoparticles prevailed over the commercial non tumor-targeting magnetic nanomaterials MRI agent at a relatively low dose. The DG can validly enhance the tumor-targetting effect of Fe 3 O 4 @OA@PLA-PEG nanoparticle. Maybe MRI agents with DG can hold promise as tumor-targetting development in the future.

  20. Solid Tumor-Targeting Theranostic Polymer Nanoparticle in Nuclear Medicinal Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Makino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer nanoparticles can be prepared by self-assembling of amphiphilic polymers, and various types of molecular assemblies have been reported. In particular, in medicinal fields, utilization of these polymer nanoparticles as carriers for drug delivery system (DDS has been actively tried, and some nanoparticulate drugs are currently under preclinical evaluations. A radionuclide is an unstable nucleus and decays with emission of radioactive rays, which can be utilized as a tracer in the diagnostic imaging systems of PET and SPECT and also in therapeutic purposes. Since polymer nanoparticles can encapsulate most of diagnostic and therapeutic agents with a proper design of amphiphilic polymers, they should be effective DDS carriers of radionuclides in the nuclear medicinal field. Indeed, nanoparticles have been recently attracting much attention as common platform carriers for diagnostic and therapeutic drugs and contribute to the development of nanotheranostics. In this paper, recent developments of solid tumor-targeting polymer nanoparticles in nuclear medicinal fields are reviewed.

  1. Photodynamic therapy and imaging based on tumor-targeted nanoprobe, polymer-conjugated zinc protoporphyrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jun; Liao, Long; Yin, Hongzhuan; Nakamura, Hideaki; Subr, Vladimir; Ulbrich, Karel; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the potential of tumor-targeted nanoprobe, N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer-conjugated zinc protoporphyrin (PZP) for photodynamic therapy (PDT) and tumor imaging. Materials & Methods: Different tumor models including carcinogen-induced cancer were used, PZP was intravenously injected followed by irradiation with xenon or blue fluorescent light on tumor. Results: One PZP 20 mg/kg (ZnPP equivalent) dose with two or three treatments of light at an intensity of ≥20 J/cm2 caused necrosis and disappearance of most tumors (>70%) in different tumor models. We also confirmed PZP-based tumor imaging in carcinogen-induced breast tumor and colon cancer models. Conclusion: These findings support the potential application of PZP as a tumor-selective nanoprobe for PDT as well as tumor imaging, by virtue of the enhanced permeability and retention effect. PMID:28031879

  2. Programmed activation of cancer cell apoptosis: A tumor-targeted phototherapeutic topoisomerase I inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Weon Sup; Han, Jiyou; Kumar, Rajesh; Lee, Gyung Gyu; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Jong Seung

    2016-07-01

    We report here a tumor-targeting masked phototherapeutic agent 1 (PT-1). This system contains SN-38—a prodrug of the topoisomerase I inhibitor irinotecan. Topoisomerase I is a vital enzyme that controls DNA topology during replication, transcription, and recombination. An elevated level of topoisomerase I is found in many carcinomas, making it an attractive target for the development of effective anticancer drugs. In addition, PT-1 contains both a photo-triggered moiety (nitrovanillin) and a cancer targeting unit (biotin). Upon light activation in cancer cells, PT-1 interferes with DNA re-ligation, diminishes the expression of topoisomerase I, and enhances the expression of inter alia mitochondrial apoptotic genes, death receptors, and caspase enzymes, inducing DNA damage and eventually leading to apoptosis. In vitro and in vivo studies showed significant inhibition of cancer growth and the hybrid system PT-1 thus shows promise as a programmed photo-therapeutic (“phototheranostic”).

  3. Pegylated zinc protoporphyrin: a water-soluble heme oxygenase inhibitor with tumor-targeting capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, S K; Sawa, T; Fang, J; Tanaka, S; Miyamoto, Y; Akaike, T; Maeda, H

    2002-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is a key enzyme in heme metabolism; it oxidatively degrades heme to biliverdin, accompanied by formation of free iron and carbon monoxide. Biliverdin is subsequently reduced by cytosolic biliverdin reductase to form bilirubin, a potent antioxidant. We recently found that tumor cells utilize HO to protect themselves from oxidative stress by producing the antioxidant bilirubin. This result suggested an important potential therapeutic strategy: suppression of bilirubin production with the use of HO inhibitors; hence, cancer cells become vulnerable to oxidative stress induced by anticancer drugs or leukocytes of the host. This concept was validated by using the intraarterial administration of an HO inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin, in nonphysiological solution. In the present study, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) was conjugated with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) with molecular weight of 5000, to make ZnPP, a water-soluble compound (PEG-ZnPP), and to improve its tumor-targeting efficiency. PEG was conjugated to ZnPP through newly introduced amino groups, where ethylenediamine residues were added at C6 and C7 of protoporphyrin. The divalent zinc cation was chelated into the protoporphyrin ring to obtain PEG-ZnPP. PEG-ZnPP did become highly water-soluble, and it formed multimolecular associations with molecules larger than 70 kDa in aqueous media. PEG-ZnPP inhibited splenic microsomal HO activity in vitro in a competitive manner in the presence of hemin, with an apparent inhibitory constant of 0.12 microM. Most important, PEG-ZnPP injected intravenously significantly suppressed intratumor HO activity in a murine solid tumor model, which suggests that tumor-targeted inhibition of HO is possible with the use of PEG-ZnPP.

  4. Conjugate of biotin with silicon(IV) phthalocyanine for tumor-targeting photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Qiu, Ling; Liu, Qingzhu; Lv, Gaochao; Zhao, Xueyu; Wang, Shanshan; Lin, Jianguo

    2017-09-01

    In order to improve the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT), biotin was axially conjugated with silicon(IV) phthalocyanine (SiPc) skeleton to develop a new tumor-targeting photosensitizer SiPc-biotin. The target compound SiPc-biotin showed much higher binding affinity toward BR-positive (biotin receptor overexpressed) HeLa human cervical carcinoma cells than its precursor SiPc-pip. However, when the biotin receptors of HeLa cells were blocked by free biotin, >50% uptake of SiPc-biotin was suppressed, demonstrating that SiPc-biotin could selectively accumulate in BR-positive cancer cells via the BR-mediated internalization. The confocal fluorescence images further confirmed the target binding ability of SiPc-biotin. As a consequence of specificity of SiPc-biotin toward BR-positive HeLa cells, the photodynamic effect was also largely dependent on the BR expression level of HeLa cells. The photodynamic activities of SiPc-biotin against HeLa cells were dramatically reduced when the biotin receptors were blocked by the free biotin (IC 50 : 0.18μM vs. 0.46μM). It is concluded that SiPc-biotin can selectively damage BR-positive cancer cells under irradiation. Furthermore, the dark toxicity of SiPc-biotin toward human normal liver cell lines LO2 was much lower than that of its precursor SiPc-pip. The targeting photodynamic activity and low dark toxicity suggest that SiPc-biotin is a promising photosensitizer for tumor-targeting photodynamic therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Tumor targeting efficiency of bare nanoparticles does not mean the efficacy of loaded anticancer drugs: importance of radionuclide imaging for optimization of highly selective tumor targeting polymeric nanoparticles with or without drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Beom Suk; Park, Kyeongsoon; Park, Sangjin; Kim, Gui Chul; Kim, Hyo Jung; Lee, Sangjoo; Kil, Heeseup; Oh, Seung Jun; Chi, Daeyoon; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Choi, Kuiwon; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Sang Yoon

    2010-10-15

    The better understanding of polymeric nanoparticles as a drug delivery carrier is a decisive factor to get more efficient therapeutic response in vivo. Here, we report the non-invasive imaging of bare polymeric nanoparticles and drug-loaded polymeric nanoparticles to evaluate biodistribution in tumor bearing mice. To make nano-sized drug delivery carrier, glycol chitosan was modified with different degrees of hydrophobic N-acetyl histidine (NAcHis-GC-1, -2, and -3). The biodistribution of polymeric nanoparticles and drug was confirmed by using gamma camera with (131)I-labeled NAcHis-GC and (131)I-labeled doxorubicin (DOX) and by using in vivo live animal imaging with near-infrared fluorescence Cy5.5-labeled NAcHis-GC. Among bare nanoparticles, NAcHis-GC3 (7.8% NAcHis content) showed much higher tumor targeting efficiency than NAcHis-GC1 (3.3% NAcHis content) and NAcHis-GC2 (6.8% NAcHis content). In contrast, for drug-loaded nanoparticles, DOX-NAcHis-GC1 displayed two-fold higher tumor targeting property than DOX-NAcHis-GC3. These data imply that the biodistribution and tumor targeting efficiency between bare and drug-loaded nanoparticles may be greatly different. Therapeutic responses for NAcHis-GC nanoparticles after drug loading were also evaluated. In xenograft animal model, we could find out that DOX-NAcHis-GC1 with higher tumor targeting of DOX has more excellent therapeutic effect than DOX-NAcHis-GC3 and free DOX. These results mean that the hydrophobic core stability might be a critical factor for tumor targeting efficiency of nanoparticles. The present study indicates that by using molecular imaging, we can select more appropriate nanoparticles with the highest tumor targeting properties, leading to exerting more excellent therapeutic results in cancer therapy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A Tumor-Targeted Nanodelivery System to Improve Early MRI Detection of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen F. Pirollo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of improvements in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI that would enhance sensitivity, leading to earlier detection of cancer and visualization of metastatic disease, is an area of intense exploration. We have devised a tumor-targeting, liposomal nanodelivery platform for use in gene medicine. This systemically administered nanocomplex has been shown to specifically and efficiently deliver both genes and oligonucleotides to primary and metastatic tumor cells, resulting in significant tumor growth inhibition and even tumor regression. Here we examine the effect on MRI of incorporating conventional MRI contrast agent Magnevist® into our anti-transferrin receptor single-chain antibody (TfRscFv liposomal complex. Both in vitro and in an in vivo orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer, we show increased resolution and image intensity with the complexed Magnevist®. Using advanced microscopy techniques (scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy, we also established that the Magnevist® is in fact encapsulated by the liposome in the complex and that the complex still retains its nanodimensional size. These results demonstrate that this TfRscFv-liposome-Magnevist® nanocomplex has the potential to become a useful tool in early cancer detection.

  7. A tumor-targeted activatable phthalocyanine-tetrapeptide-doxorubicin conjugate for synergistic chemo-photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Mei-Rong; Chen, Shao-Fang; Peng, Xiao-Hui; Zheng, Qiao-Feng; Zheng, Bi-Yuan; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Huang, Jian-Dong

    2017-02-15

    Chemo-photodynamic therapy is a promising strategy for cancer treatments. However, it remains a challenge to develop a chemo-photodynamic therapeutic agent with little side effect, high tumor-targeting, and efficient synergistic effect simultaneously. Herein, we report a zinc(II) phthalocyanine (ZnPc)-doxorubicin (DOX) prodrug linked with a fibroblast activation protein (FAP)-responsive short peptide with the sequence of Thr-Ser-Gly-Pro for chemo-photodynamic therapy. In the conjugate, both photosensitizing activity of ZnPc and cytotoxicity of DOX are inhibited obviously. However, FAP-triggered separation of the photosensitizer and DOX can enhance fluorescence emission, singlet oxygen generation, dark- and photo-cytotoxicity significantly, and lead to a synergistic anticancer efficacy against HepG2 cells. The prodrug can also be specifically and efficiently activated in tumor tissue of mice. Thus, this prodrug shows great potential for clinical application in chemo-photodynamic therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Aldoxorubicin: a tumor-targeted doxorubicin conjugate for relapsed or refractory soft tissue sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong J

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Jun Gong,1,* Jessica Yan,2,* Charles Forscher,3 Andrew Hendifar4 1Department of Medical Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA, USA; 2Department of Hematology and Oncology, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, USA; 3Sarcoma Program, Samuel Oschin Cancer Center, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 4Gastrointestinal and Neuroendocrine Malignancies, Samuel Oschin Cancer Center, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Despite available therapies after initial systemic therapy, prognosis remains poor in relapsed or refractory soft tissue sarcomas (STS. The rational and clinical development of novel agents to improve outcomes in this area of high unmet need is desperately warranted. Aldoxorubicin is a prodrug of doxorubicin that binds to serum albumin immediately after administration through an acid-sensitive hydrazone linker and is subsequently transported to tumor tissues where the acidic environment cleaves the linker and facilitates delivery of a tumor-targeted drug payload. In clinical studies to date, there has been evidence of efficacy and mitigated cardiac toxicity. In this review, we comprehensively detail the clinical development of aldoxorubicin in STS to date. Specifically, we highlight available data on the pharmacokinetics and efficacy from Phase I, Phase II, and Phase III trials in advanced or metastatic STS. We conclude with considerations for future directions of investigation for this promising antitumor agent.Keywords: aldoxorubicin, albumin conjugate, soft tissue sarcomas, clinical trials, pharmacokinetics, cardiotoxicity 

  9. Estimation of lung tissue incompressibility variation throughout respiration for tumor targeting in lung radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirzadi, Zahra; Samani, Abbas

    2013-03-01

    A novel technique is proposed to characterize lung tissue incompressibility variation during respiration. Lung tissue incompressibility variation stems from significant air content variation in the tissue throughout respiration. Estimating lung tissue incompressibility and its variation is critical for computer assisted tumor motion tracking. Continuous tumor motion during respiration is a major challenge in lung cancer treatment by external beam radiotherapy. If not accounted for, this motion leads to areas of radiation over dosage for the lung normal tissues. Since no effective imaging modality is available for real-time lung tumor tracking, computer based modeling which has the capability for accurate tissue deformation estimation can be a good alternative. Lung tissue deformation estimation can be made using the lung Finite Element (FE) model where its accuracy depends on input tissue biomechanical properties including incompressibility parameter. In this research, an optimization algorithm is proposed to estimate the incompressibility parameter function in terms of respiration cycle time. In this algorithm, the incompressibility parameter and lung pressure values are varied systematically until optimal values, which result in maximum similarity between acquired and simulated 4D CT images of the lung, are achieved for each respiration time point. The simulated images are constructed using a reference image in conjunction with the deformation field obtained from the lung's FE model in each respiration time increment. We demonstrated that utilizing the calculated function along with respiratory system FE modeling leads to accurate tumor targeting, hence potentially improving lung radiotherapy outcome.

  10. Identification of a New Peptide for Fibrosarcoma Tumor Targeting and Imaging In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Che Wu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 12-mer amino acid peptide SATTHYRLQAAN, denominated TK4, was isolated from a phage-display library with fibrosarcoma tumor-binding activity. In vivo biodistribution analysis of TK4-displaying phage showed a significant increased phage titer in implanted tumor up to 10-fold in comparison with normal tissues after systemic administration in mouse. Competition assay confirmed that the binding of TK4-phage to tumor cells depends on the TK4 peptide. Intravenous injection of 131I-labeled synthetic TK4 peptide in mice showed a tumor retention of 3.3% and 2.7% ID/g at 1- and 4-hour postinjection, respectively. Tumor-to-muscle ratio was 1.1, 5.7, and 3.2 at 1-, 4-, and 24-hour, respectively, and tumors were imaged on a digital γ-camera at 4-hour postinjection. The present data suggest that TK4 holds promise as a lead structure for tumor targeting, and it could be further applied in the development of diagnostic or therapeutic agent.

  11. RGD-modified lipid disks as drug carriers for tumor targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Xie, Cao; Zhang, Mingfei; Wei, Xiaoli; Yan, Zhiqiang; Ren, Yachao; Ying, Man; Lu, Weiyue

    2016-03-01

    Melittin, the major component of the European bee venom, is a potential anticancer candidate due to its lytic properties. However, in vivo applications of melittin are limited due to its main side effect, hemolysis, especially when applied through intravenous administration. The polyethylene glycol-stabilized lipid disk is a novel type of nanocarrier, and the rim of lipid disks has a high affinity to amphiphilic peptides. In our study, a c(RGDyK) modified lipid disk was developed as a tumor targeted drug delivery system for melittin. Cryo-TEM was used to confirm the shape and size of lipid disks with or without c(RGDyK) modification. In vitro and in vivo hemolysis analyses revealed that the hemolysis effect significantly decreased after melittin associated with lipid disks. Importantly, the results of our in vivo biodistribution and tumor growth inhibitory experiments showed that c(RGDyK) modification increased the distribution of lipid disks in the tumor and the anticancer efficacy of melittin loaded lipid disks. Thus, we successfully achieved a targeted drug delivery system for melittin and other amphiphilic peptides with a good therapeutic effect and low side effects.

  12. Matrix Metalloprotease 2-Responsive Multifunctional Liposomal Nanocarrier for Enhanced Tumor Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Kate, Pooja; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    A novel “smart” multifunctional drug delivery system was successfully developed to respond to the up-regulated matrix metalloprotease 2 (MMP2) in the tumor microenvironment and improve cancer cell-specific delivery of loaded drugs. The system represents a surface-functionalized liposomal nanocarrier, for which two functional polyethylene glycol (PEG)-lipid conjugates were synthesized and characterized. The functionalized liposome was further modified with the tumor cell-specific anti-nucleosome monoclonal antibody (mAb 2C5). In the resulting system, several drug delivery strategies were combined in the same nanocarrier in a simple way and coordinated in an optimal fashion. The functions of the nanocarrier include: i) the hydrophilic and flexible long PEG chains to prevent nanocarrier non-specific interactions and prolong its circulation time; ii) a nanoscale size of the system that allows for its passive tumor targeting via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect; iii) a mAb 2C5 to allow for the specific targeting of tumor cells; iv) a matrix metalloprotease 2-sensitive bond between PEG and lipid that undergoes cleavage in the tumor by the highly expressed extracellular MMP2 for the removal of PEG chains; v) The cell-penetrating peptide (TATp) triggering of the enhanced intracellular delivery of the system after long-chain PEG removal and exposure of the previously hidden surface-attached TATp. It is shown that such a design can enhance the targetability and internalization of nanocarriers in cancer cells. PMID:22409425

  13. GLUT1-mediated selective tumor targeting with fluorine containing platinum(II) glycoconjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ran; Fu, Zheng; Zhao, Meng; Gao, Xiangqian; Li, Hong; Mi, Qian; Liu, Pengxing; Yang, Jinna; Yao, Zhi; Gao, Qingzhi

    2017-06-13

    Increased glycolysis and overexpression of glucose transporters (GLUTs) are physiological characteristics of human malignancies. Based on the so-called Warburg effect, 18flurodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has successfully developed as clinical modality for the diagnosis and staging of many cancers. To leverage this glucose transporter mediated metabolic disparity between normal and malignant cells, in the current report, we focus on the fluorine substituted series of glucose, mannose and galactose-conjugated (trans-R,R-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine)-2-flouromalonato-platinum(II) complexes for a comprehensive evaluation on their selective tumor targeting. Besides highly improved water solubility, these sugar-conjugates presented improved cytotoxicity than oxaliplatin in glucose tranporters (GLUTs) overexpressing cancer cell lines and exhibited no cross-resistance to cisplatin. For the highly water soluble glucose-conjugated complex (5a), two novel in vivo assessments were conducted and the results revealed that 5a was more efficacious at a lower equitoxic dose (70% MTD) than oxaliplatin (100% MTD) in HT29 xenograft model, and it was significantly more potent than oxaliplatin in leukemia-bearing DBA/2 mice as well even at equimolar dose levels (18% vs 90% MTD). GLUT inhibitor mediated cell viability analysis, GLUT1 knockdown cell line-based cytotoxicity evaluation, and platinum accumulation study demonstrated that the cellular uptake of the sugar-conjugates was regulated by GLUT1. The higher intrinsic DNA reactivity of the sugar-conjugates was confirmed by kinetic study of platinum(II)-guanosine adduct formation. The mechanistic origin of the antitumor effect of the fluorine complexes was found to be forming the bifunctional Pt-guanine-guanine (Pt-GG) intrastrand cross-links with DNA. The results provide a rationale for Warburg effect targeted anticancer drug design.

  14. Overcoming photodynamic resistance and tumor targeting dual-therapy mediated by indocyanine green conjugated gold nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Guo, Xiaomeng; Kong, Fenfen; Zhang, Hanbo; Luo, Lihua; Li, Qingpo; Zhu, Chunqi; Yang, Jie; Du, Yongzhong; You, Jian

    2017-07-28

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) have captured much attention due to the great potential to cure malignant tumor. Nevertheless, photodynamic resistance of cancer cells has limited the further efficacy of PDT. Unfortunately, the resistance mechanism and efforts to overcome the resistance still have been rarely reported so far. Here, we report a nanosystem with specific tumor targeting for combined PDT and PTT mediated by near-infrared (NIR) light, which was established by covalently conjugating indocyanine green (ICG) and TNYL peptide onto the surface of hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNS). Our nanosystem (TNYL-ICG-HAuNS) was proved to possess significantly increased light stability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and photothermal effect under NIR light irradiation, thus presenting a remarkably enhanced antitumor efficacy. The up-regulation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NFE2L2, Nrf2) in cancer cells during PDT induced a significant increase of ABCG2, NQO-1 and HIF-1α expression, causing PDT resistance of the cells. Interestingly, ABCG2 expression could almost keep a normal level in the whole PDT process mediated by TNYL-ICG-HAuNS. After repeated irradiations, TNYL-ICG-HAuNS could still produce almost constant ROS in cells while the Nrf2 expression reduced significantly. Furthermore, PDT resistance induced an obvious decrease of the internalization of free ICG, but didn't influence the cell uptake of TNYL-ICG-HAuNS. Our data explained that TNYL-ICG-HAuNS could overcome the photodynamic resistance of cancer cells, acting as a promising modality for simultaneous photothermal and photodynamic cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Recombinant expression and purification of a tumor-targeted toxin in Bacillus anthracis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachran, Christopher; Abdelazim, Suzanne; Fattah, Rasem J.; Liu, Shihui [National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Leppla, Stephen H., E-mail: sleppla@niaid.nih.gov [National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-infectious and protease-deficient Bacillus anthracis protein expression system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Successful expression and purification of a tumor-targeted fusion protein drug. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Very low endotoxin contamination of purified protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Efficient protein secretion simplifies purification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Functional anti-tumor fusion protein purified. -- Abstract: Many recombinant therapeutic proteins are purified from Escherichia coli. While expression in E. coli is easily achieved, some disadvantages such as protein aggregation, formation of inclusion bodies, and contamination of purified proteins with the lipopolysaccharides arise. Lipopolysaccharides have to be removed to prevent inflammatory responses in patients. Use of the Gram-positive Bacillus anthracis as an expression host offers a solution to circumvent these problems. Using the multiple protease-deficient strain BH460, we expressed a fusion of the N-terminal 254 amino acids of anthrax lethal factor (LFn), the N-terminal 389 amino acids of diphtheria toxin (DT389) and human transforming growth factor alpha (TGF{alpha}). The resulting fusion protein was constitutively expressed and successfully secreted by B. anthracis into the culture supernatant. Purification was achieved by anion exchange chromatography and proteolytic cleavage removed LFn from the desired fusion protein (DT389 fused to TGF{alpha}). The fusion protein showed the intended specific cytotoxicity to epidermal growth factor receptor-expressing human head and neck cancer cells. Final analyses showed low levels of lipopolysaccharides, originating most likely from contamination during the purification process. Thus, the fusion to LFn for protein secretion and expression in B. anthracis BH460 provides an elegant tool to obtain high levels of lipopolysaccharide-free recombinant protein.

  16. Recombinant expression and purification of a tumor-targeted toxin in Bacillus anthracis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachran, Christopher; Abdelazim, Suzanne; Fattah, Rasem J.; Liu, Shihui; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Non-infectious and protease-deficient Bacillus anthracis protein expression system. ► Successful expression and purification of a tumor-targeted fusion protein drug. ► Very low endotoxin contamination of purified protein. ► Efficient protein secretion simplifies purification. ► Functional anti-tumor fusion protein purified. -- Abstract: Many recombinant therapeutic proteins are purified from Escherichia coli. While expression in E. coli is easily achieved, some disadvantages such as protein aggregation, formation of inclusion bodies, and contamination of purified proteins with the lipopolysaccharides arise. Lipopolysaccharides have to be removed to prevent inflammatory responses in patients. Use of the Gram-positive Bacillus anthracis as an expression host offers a solution to circumvent these problems. Using the multiple protease-deficient strain BH460, we expressed a fusion of the N-terminal 254 amino acids of anthrax lethal factor (LFn), the N-terminal 389 amino acids of diphtheria toxin (DT389) and human transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα). The resulting fusion protein was constitutively expressed and successfully secreted by B. anthracis into the culture supernatant. Purification was achieved by anion exchange chromatography and proteolytic cleavage removed LFn from the desired fusion protein (DT389 fused to TGFα). The fusion protein showed the intended specific cytotoxicity to epidermal growth factor receptor-expressing human head and neck cancer cells. Final analyses showed low levels of lipopolysaccharides, originating most likely from contamination during the purification process. Thus, the fusion to LFn for protein secretion and expression in B. anthracis BH460 provides an elegant tool to obtain high levels of lipopolysaccharide-free recombinant protein.

  17. Improved tumor-targeting MRI contrast agents: Gd(DOTA) conjugates of a cycloalkane-based RGD peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ji-Ae; Lee, Yong Jin; Ko, In Ok; Kim, Tae-Jeong; Chang, Yongmin; Lim, Sang Moo; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Jung Young

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Development of improved tumor-targeting MRI contrast agents. • To increase the targeting ability of RGD, we developed cycloalkane-based RGD peptides. • Gd(DOTA) conjugates of cycloalkane-based RGD peptide show improved tumor signal enhancement in vivo MR images. - Abstract: Two new MRI contrast agents, Gd-DOTA-c(RGD-ACP-K) (1) and Gd-DOTA-c(RGD-ACH-K) (2), which were designed by incorporating aminocyclopentane (ACP)- or aminocyclohexane (ACH)-carboxylic acid into Gd-DOTA (gadolinium-tetraazacyclo dodecanetetraacetic acid) and cyclic RGDK peptides, were synthesized and evaluated for tumor-targeting ability in vitro and in vivo. Binding affinity studies showed that both 1 and 2 exhibited higher affinity for integrin receptors than cyclic RGDyK peptides, which were used as a reference. These complexes showed high relaxivity and good stability in human serum and have the potential to improve target-specific signal enhancement in vivo MR images

  18. Improved tumor-targeting MRI contrast agents: Gd(DOTA) conjugates of a cycloalkane-based RGD peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji-Ae, E-mail: jpark@kirams.re.kr [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong Jin; Ko, In Ok [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae-Jeong; Chang, Yongmin [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sang Moo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyeong Min [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Young, E-mail: jykim@kirams.re.kr [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Development of improved tumor-targeting MRI contrast agents. • To increase the targeting ability of RGD, we developed cycloalkane-based RGD peptides. • Gd(DOTA) conjugates of cycloalkane-based RGD peptide show improved tumor signal enhancement in vivo MR images. - Abstract: Two new MRI contrast agents, Gd-DOTA-c(RGD-ACP-K) (1) and Gd-DOTA-c(RGD-ACH-K) (2), which were designed by incorporating aminocyclopentane (ACP)- or aminocyclohexane (ACH)-carboxylic acid into Gd-DOTA (gadolinium-tetraazacyclo dodecanetetraacetic acid) and cyclic RGDK peptides, were synthesized and evaluated for tumor-targeting ability in vitro and in vivo. Binding affinity studies showed that both 1 and 2 exhibited higher affinity for integrin receptors than cyclic RGDyK peptides, which were used as a reference. These complexes showed high relaxivity and good stability in human serum and have the potential to improve target-specific signal enhancement in vivo MR images.

  19. Macromolecular pHPMA-based nanoparticles with cholesterol for solid tumor targeting: behavior in HSA protein environment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhang, X.; Niebuur, B.-J.; Chytil, Petr; Etrych, Tomáš; Filippov, Sergey K.; Kikhney, A.; Wieland, D. C. F.; Svergun, D. I.; Papadakis, C. M.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 2 (2018), s. 470-480 ISSN 1525-7797 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC15-10527J; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-28594A; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polymer carriers * N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide * tumor targeting Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 5.246, year: 2016

  20. Passive tumor targeting of polymer therapeutics: in vivo imaging of both the polymer carrier and the enzymatically cleavable drug model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pola, Robert; Heinrich, A. K.; Mueller, T.; Kostka, Libor; Mäder, K.; Pechar, Michal; Etrych, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 11 (2016), s. 1577-1582 ISSN 1616-5187 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-02986S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-17207S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polymer drug carriers * tumor targeting * enzymatic release Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.238, year: 2016

  1. Chemical gas-generating nanoparticles for tumor-targeted ultrasound imaging and ultrasound-triggered drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Hyun Su; Son, Sejin; You, Dong Gil; Lee, Tae Woong; Lee, Jangwook; Lee, Sangmin; Yhee, Ji Young; Lee, Jaeyoung; Han, Moon Hee; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Sun Hwa; Choi, Kuiwon; Park, Kinam; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan

    2016-11-01

    Although there is great versatility of ultrasound (US) technologies in the real clinical field, one main technical challenge is the compromising of high quality of echo properties and size engineering of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs); a high echo property is offset by reducing particle size. Herein, a new strategy for overcoming the dilemma by devising chemical gas (CO2) generating carbonate copolymer nanoparticles (Gas-NPs), which are clearly distinguished from the conventional gas-encapsulated micro-sized UCAs. More importantly, Gas-NPs could be readily engineered to strengthen the desirable in vivo physicochemical properties for nano-sized drug carriers with higher tumor targeting ability, as well as the high quality of echo properties for tumor-targeted US imaging. In tumor-bearing mice, anticancer drug-loaded Gas-NPs showed the desirable theranostic functions for US-triggered drug delivery, even after i.v. injection. In this regard, and as demonstrated in the aforementioned study, our technology could serve a highly effective platform in building theranostic UCAs with great sophistication and therapeutic applicability in tumor-targeted US imaging and US-triggered drug delivery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Trope of Apotheosis and Intimations of Self-Immolation: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Contemporary Journal of African Studies. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 4, No 1 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  3. Preparation, characterization, in vivo pharmacokinetics, and biodistribution of polymeric micellar dimethoxycurcumin for tumor targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu H

    2015-10-01

    increased and prolonged by intravenously administering DMC-loaded micelles when compared with the same dose of free DMC dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide. Furthermore, in vivo distribution results from tumor-bearing nude mice demonstrated that this micellar formulation significantly changed the biodistribution profile of DMC and increased drug accumulation in tumors. Therefore, the polymeric micellar formulation of DMC, based on the amphiphilic block copolymer, mPEG-PCL-Phe(Boc, could provide a desirable method for delivering DMC, especially for applications in cancer therapy. Keywords: dimethoxycurcumin, polymeric micelles, characterization, pharmacokinetic profile, biodistribution, tumor targeting 

  4. RGD-modified poly(D,L-lactic acid nanoparticles enhance tumor targeting of oridonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu J

    2012-01-01

    -PLA-NPs or ORI solution. Consistent with these observations, ORI-PLA-RGD-NPs showed greater antitumor efficacy than ORI-PLA-RGD-NPs or ORI solution, as reflected by the decreased tumor growth and the prolonged survival time of mice bearing H22 tumors.Conclusion: The tumor-targeting efficiency and subsequent antitumor efficacy of ORI is increased by incorporation into ORI-PLA-RGD-NPs.Keywords: ORI, antitumor activity, RGD, poly(D,L-lactic acid, nanoparticles

  5. Bilayered near-infrared fluorescent nanoparticles based on low molecular weight PEI for tumor-targeted in vivo imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Li, Ke; Xu, Liang; Wu, Daocheng

    2014-12-01

    To improve the tumor fluorescent imaging results in vivo, bilayered nanoparticles encapsulating a lipophilic near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindotri-carbocyanine iodide (DiR) were prepared using low molecular weight stearic acid-grafted polyethyleneimine and hyaluronic acid (DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles), which were investigated as a novel NIR fluorescent nano-probe for in vivo tumor-targeted optical imaging. These nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), infrared (IR) spectra, UV-visual absorption, and fluorescent emission spectra. Their cytotoxicity in vitro and hepatotoxicity in vivo were tested by MTT assay and histological study, respectively. In vivo NIR fluorescence imaging of the DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles was performed using a Carestream imaging system. The DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles were sphere shaped with a diameter of approximately 50 nm according to the TEM images. The DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles had a low cytotoxicity in vitro according to the MTT assay and low hepatotoxicity in vivo as determined in histological studies. The fluorescent emission of DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles was stable in pH values of 5-9 in solution, with only slight blue-shifts of the emission maxima at the basic pH range. The DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles exhibited a substantial tumor-targeting ability in the optical imaging with the use of tumor-bearing mice. These results demonstrated that the DiR-PgSHA nanoparticle is an excellent biocompatible nano-probe for in vivo tumor-targeted NIR fluorescence imaging with a potential for clinical applications.

  6. Bilayered near-infrared fluorescent nanoparticles based on low molecular weight PEI for tumor-targeted in vivo imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hao; Li, Ke [Xi’an Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering of Education Ministry, School of Life Science and Technology (China); Xu, Liang [The University of Kansas, Department of Molecular Biosciences (United States); Wu, Daocheng, E-mail: wudaocheng@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Xi’an Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering of Education Ministry, School of Life Science and Technology (China)

    2014-12-15

    To improve the tumor fluorescent imaging results in vivo, bilayered nanoparticles encapsulating a lipophilic near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindotri-carbocyanine iodide (DiR) were prepared using low molecular weight stearic acid-grafted polyethyleneimine and hyaluronic acid (DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles), which were investigated as a novel NIR fluorescent nano-probe for in vivo tumor-targeted optical imaging. These nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), infrared (IR) spectra, UV-visual absorption, and fluorescent emission spectra. Their cytotoxicity in vitro and hepatotoxicity in vivo were tested by MTT assay and histological study, respectively. In vivo NIR fluorescence imaging of the DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles was performed using a Carestream imaging system. The DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles were sphere shaped with a diameter of approximately 50 nm according to the TEM images. The DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles had a low cytotoxicity in vitro according to the MTT assay and low hepatotoxicity in vivo as determined in histological studies. The fluorescent emission of DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles was stable in pH values of 5–9 in solution, with only slight blue-shifts of the emission maxima at the basic pH range. The DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles exhibited a substantial tumor-targeting ability in the optical imaging with the use of tumor-bearing mice. These results demonstrated that the DiR-PgSHA nanoparticle is an excellent biocompatible nano-probe for in vivo tumor-targeted NIR fluorescence imaging with a potential for clinical applications.

  7. Dual actions of albumin packaging and tumor targeting enhance the antitumor efficacy and reduce the cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng K

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ke Zheng,1 Rui Li,2 Xiaolei Zhou,2 Ping Hu,2 Yaxin Zhang,2 Yunmei Huang,3 Zhuo Chen,2 Mingdong Huang2 1College of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, People’s Republic of China; 3Fujian Academy of Integrative Medicine, Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Doxorubicin (DOX is an effective chemotherapy drug used to treat different types of cancers. However, DOX has severe side effects, especially life-threatening cardiotoxicity. We herein report a new approach to reduce the toxicity of DOX by embedding DOX inside human serum albumin (HSA. HSA is further fused by a molecular biology technique with a tumor-targeting agent, amino-terminal fragment of urokinase (ATF. ATF binds with a high affinity to urokinase receptor, which is a cell-surface receptor overexpressed in many types of tumors. The as-prepared macromolecule complex (ATF–HSA:DOX was not as cytotoxic as free DOX to cells in vitro, and was mainly localized in cell cytosol in contrast to DOX that was localized in cell nuclei. However, in tumor-bearing mice, ATF–HSA:DOX was demonstrated to have an enhanced tumor-targeting and antitumor efficacy compared with free DOX. More importantly, histopathological examinations of the hearts from the mice treated with ATF–HSA:DOX showed a significantly reduced cardiotoxicity compared with hearts from mice treated with free DOX. These results demonstrate the feasibility of this approach in reducing the cardiotoxicity of DOX while strengthening its antitumor efficacy. Such a tumor-targeted albumin packaging strategy can also be applied to other antitumor drugs. Keywords: amino-terminal fragment of urokinase, urokinase receptor, drug carrier, human serum albumin, doxorubicin, cytotoxicity

  8. Multiple cues on the physiochemical, mesenchymal, and intracellular trafficking interactions with nanocarriers to maximize tumor target efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Khang, Dongwoo

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, numerous medical strategies have been employed to overcome neoplasms. In fact, with the exception of lung, bronchial, and pancreatic cancers, the 5-year survival rate of most cancers currently exceeds 70%. However, the quality of life of patients during chemotherapy remains unsatisfactory despite the increase in survival rate. The side effects of current chemotherapies stem from poor target efficiency at tumor sites due to the uncontrolled biodistribution of anticancer agents (ie, conventional or current approved nanodrugs). This review discusses the effective physiochemical factors for determining biodistribution of nanocarriers and, ultimately, increasing tumor-targeting probability by avoiding the reticuloendothelial system. Second, stem cell-conjugated nanotherapeutics was addressed to maximize the tumor searching ability and to inhibit tumor growth. Lastly, physicochemical material properties of anticancer nanodrugs were discussed for targeting cellular organelles with modulation of drug-release time. A better understanding of suggested topics will increase the tumor-targeting ability of anticancer drugs and, ultimately, promote the quality of life of cancer patients during chemotherapy.

  9. Multiple cues on the physiochemical, mesenchymal, and intracellular trafficking interactions with nanocarriers to maximize tumor target efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim SW

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sang-Woo Kim, Dongwoo Khang Nanomedicine Laboratory, Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Gachon University, Incheon, South Korea Abstract: Over the past 60 years, numerous medical strategies have been employed to overcome neoplasms. In fact, with the exception of lung, bronchial, and pancreatic cancers, the 5-year survival rate of most cancers currently exceeds 70%. However, the quality of life of patients during chemotherapy remains unsatisfactory despite the increase in survival rate. The side effects of current chemotherapies stem from poor target efficiency at tumor sites due to the uncontrolled biodistribution of anticancer agents (ie, conventional or current approved nanodrugs. This review discusses the effective physiochemical factors for determining biodistribution of nanocarriers and, ultimately, increasing tumor-targeting probability by avoiding the reticuloendothelial system. Second, stem cell-conjugated nanotherapeutics was addressed to maximize the tumor searching ability and to inhibit tumor growth. Lastly, physicochemical material properties of anticancer nanodrugs were discussed for targeting cellular organelles with modulation of drug-release time. A better understanding of suggested topics will increase the tumor-targeting ability of anticancer drugs and, ultimately, promote the quality of life of cancer patients during chemotherapy. Keywords: cancer, anticancer nanodrugs, mesenchymal stem cell, intracellular trafficking

  10. Self-Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles Shows Microenvironment-Mediated Dynamic Switching and Enhanced Brain Tumor Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qishuai; Shen, Yajing; Fu, Yingjie; Muroski, Megan E; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Qiaoyue; Xu, Chang; Lesniak, Maciej S; Li, Gang; Cheng, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles with unique physical properties have been explored as nanomedicines for brain tumor treatment. However, the clinical applications of the inorganic formulations are often hindered by the biological barriers and failure to be bioeliminated. The size of the nanoparticle is an essential design parameter which plays a significant role to affect the tumor targeting and biodistribution. Here, we report a feasible approach for the assembly of gold nanoparticles into ~80 nm nanospheres as a drug delivery platform for enhanced retention in brain tumors with the ability to be dynamically switched into the single formulation for excretion. These nanoassemblies can target epidermal growth factor receptors on cancer cells and are responsive to tumor microenvironmental characteristics, including high vascular permeability and acidic and redox conditions. Anticancer drug release was controlled by a pH-responsive mechanism. Intracellular L-glutathione (GSH) triggered the complete breakdown of nanoassemblies to single gold nanoparticles. Furthermore, in vivo studies have shown that nanospheres display enhanced tumor-targeting efficiency and therapeutic effects relative to single-nanoparticle formulations. Hence, gold nanoassemblies present an effective targeting strategy for brain tumor treatment.

  11. Self-assembled micelles of amphiphilic poly(L-phenylalanine)-b-poly(L-serine) polypeptides for tumor-targeted delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ziming; Wang, Yu; Han, Jin; Wang, Keli; Yang, Dan; Yang, Yihua; Du, Qian; Song, Yuanjian; Yin, Xiaoxing

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to design, synthesize, and characterize self-assembled micelles based on polypeptides as a potential antitumor drug carrier. Amphiphilic poly(L-phenylalanine)-b-poly(L-serine) (PFS) polypeptides were obtained through the polymerization of N-carboxyanhydride. As a novel hydrophilic segment, poly(L-serine) was utilized to enhance tumor targeting due to a large demand of tumors for serine. PFS could self-assemble into micelles with an average diameter of 110-240 nm and a slightly negative charge. PFS polypeptides adopted random coil in pH 7.4 phosphate-buffered saline and could partly transform to α-helix induced by trifluoroethanol. PFS micelles with a low critical micelle concentration of 4.0 μg mL(-1) were stable in pH 5-9 buffers and serum albumin solution. PFS micelles had a loading capacity of 3.8% for coumarin-6 and exhibited a sustained drug release. Coumarin-6 loaded rhodamine B isothiocyanate-labeled PFS micelles were incubated with Huh-7 tumor cells to study the correlation between drugs and carriers during endocytosis. The uptake of drugs was consistent with the micelles, illustrating that the intracellular transport of drugs highly depended on the micelles. PFS micelles diffused in whole cytoplasm while coumarin-6 assumed localized distribution, suggesting that the micelles could release the loaded drugs in particular areas. The internalization mechanism of PFS micelles was involved with clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis. Excess serine inhibited the uptake of PFS micelles, which demonstrated that serine receptors played a positive role in the internalization of PFS. The more interesting thing was that the uptake inhibition impacted on normal cells but not on tumor cells at the physiological concentration of serine. The difference in the uptake of PFS micelles was fourfold as high between the tumor cells and the normal cells, which indicated that PFS micelles had good tumor targeting in vitro. In conclusion, PFS

  12. Nano-engineered mesenchymal stem cells increase therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drug through true active tumor targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layek, Buddhadev; Sadhukha, Tanmoy; Panyam, Jayanth; Prabha, Swayam

    2018-03-28

    Tumor-targeted drug delivery has the potential to improve therapeutic efficacy and mitigate non-specific toxicity of anticancer drugs. However, current drug delivery approaches rely on inefficient passive accumulation of the drug carrier in the tumor. We have developed a unique, truly active tumor targeting strategy that relies on engineering mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with drug-loaded nanoparticles. Our studies using the A549 orthotopic lung tumor model show that nano-engineered MSCs carrying the anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) home to tumors and create cellular drug depots that release the drug payload over several days. Despite significantly lower doses of PTX, nano-engineered MSCs resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth and superior survival. Anticancer efficacy of nano-engineered MSCs was confirmed in immunocompetent C57BL/6 albino female mice bearing orthotopic Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LL/2-luc) tumors. Further, at doses that resulted in equivalent therapeutic efficacy, nano-engineered MSCs had no effect on white blood cell count whereas PTX solution and PTX nanoparticle treatments caused leukopenia. Biodistribution studies showed that nano-engineered MSCs resulted in greater than 9-fold higher AUClung of PTX (1.5 µg.day/g) than PTX solution and nanoparticles (0.2 and 0.1 µg.day/g tissue, respectively) in the target lung tumors. Furthermore, the lung-to-liver and the lung-to-spleen ratios of PTX were several folds higher for nano-engineered MSCs relative to those for PTX solution and nanoparticle groups, suggesting that nano-engineered MSCs demonstrate significantly less off-target deposition. In summary, our results demonstrate that nano-engineered MSCs can serve as an efficient carrier for tumor specific drug delivery and significantly improved anti-cancer efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. In vivo tumor targeting and anti-tumor effects of 5-fluororacil loaded, folic acid targeted quantum dot system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bwatanglang, Ibrahim Birma; Mohammad, Faruq; Yusof, Nor Azah; Abdullah, Jaafar; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Hussein, Mohd Zubir; Abu, Nadiah; Mohammed, Nurul Elyani; Nordin, Noraini; Zamberi, Nur Rizi; Yeap, Swee Keong

    2016-10-15

    In this study, we modulated the anti-cancer efficacy of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) using a carrier system with enhanced targeting efficacy towards folate receptors (FRs) expressing malignant tissues. The 5-FU drug was loaded onto Mn-ZnS quantum dots (QDs) encapsulated with chitosan (CS) biopolymer and conjugated with folic acid (FA) based on a simple wet chemical method. The formation of 5-FU drug loaded composite was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Furthermore, the in vivo biodistribution and tumor targeting specificity of the 5-FU@FACS-Mn:ZnS in the tumor-bearing mice was conducted based on the Zn(2+) tissue bioaccumulation using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectroscopy. In addition to the characterization, the in vitro release profile of 5-FU from the conjugates investigated under diffusion controlled method demonstrated a controlled release behaviour as compared against the release behaviour of free 5-FU drug. The as-synthesized 5-FU@FACS-Mn:ZnS nanoparticle (NP) systemically induced higher level of apoptosis in breast cancer cells in vitro as compared to cells treated with free 5-FU drug following both cell cycle and annexin assays, respectively. Also, the in vivo toxicity assessment of the 5-FU@FACS-Mn:ZnS NPs as compared to the control did not cause any significant increase in the activities of the liver and kidney function biomarkers, malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) levels. However, based on the FA-FRs chemistry, the 5-FU@FACS-Mn:ZnS NPs specifically accumulated in the tumor of the tumor-bearing mice and thus contributed to the smaller tumor size and less event of metastasis was observed in the lungs when compared to the tumor-bearing mice groups treated with the free 5-FU drug. In summary, the results demonstrated that the 5-FU@FACS-Mn:ZnS QDs exhibits selective anti-tumor effect in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells in vitro and 4TI breast

  14. Dosimetric evaluation of a moving tumor target in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Kyu; Kang, Min Kyu; Yea, Ji Woon; Oh, Se An

    2013-07-01

    Immobilization plays an important role in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The application of IMRT in lung cancer patients is very difficult due to the movement of the tumor target. Patient setup in radiation treatment demands high accuracy because IMRT employs a treatment size of a 1mm pixel unit. Hence, quality assurance of the dose delivered to patients must be at its highest. The radiation dose was evaluated for breathing rates of 9, 14, and 18 breaths per minute (bpm) for tumor targets moving up and down by 1.0 cm and 1.5 cm. The dose of the moving planned target volume (PTV) was measured by using a thermo-luminescent dosimeter (TLD) and Gafchromic™ EBT film. The measurement points were 1.0 cm away from the top, the bottom and the left and the right sides of the PTV center. The evaluated dose differences ranged from 94.2 to 103.8%, from 94.4 to 105.4%, and from 90.7 to 108.5% for 9, 14 and 18 bpm, respectively, for a tumor movement of 1.0 cm. The mean values of the doses were 101.4, 99.9, and 99.5% for 9, 14 and 18 bpm, respectively, for a tumor movement of 1.0 cm. Meanwhile, the evaluated dose differences ranged from 93.6 to 105.8%, from 95.9 to 111.5%, and from 96.2 to 111.7% for 9, 14 and 18 bpm, respectively, for a tumor movement of 1.5 cm. The mean values of the doses were 102.3, 103.4, and 103.1% for 9, 14 and 18 bpm, respectively, for a tumor movement of 1.5 cm. Therefore, we suggest that IMRT can be used in the treatment of lung cancer patients with vertical target movements within the range of 1.0 to 1.5 cm.

  15. Computationally efficient particle release map determination for direct tumor-targeting in a representative hepatic artery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, E M; Kleinstreuer, C

    2014-01-01

    Implementation of a novel direct tumor-targeting technique requires a computer modeling stage to generate particle release maps (PRMs) which allow for optimal catheter positioning and selection of best injection intervals for drug-particles. This simulation task for a patient-specific PRM may require excessive computational resources and a relatively long turn-around time for a fully transient analysis. Hence, steady-state conditions were sought which generates PRMs equivalent to the pulsatile arterial flow environment. Fluid-particle transport in a representative hepatic artery system was simulated under fully transient and steady-state flow conditions and their corresponding PRMs were analyzed and compared. Comparisons of the transient PRMs from ten equal intervals of the cardiac pulse revealed that the diastolic phase produced relatively constant PRMs due to its semisteady flow conditions. Furthermore, steady-state PRMs, which best matched the transient particle release maps, were found for each interval and over the entire cardiac pulse. From these comparisons, the flow rate and outlet pressure differences proved to be important parameters for estimating the PRMs. The computational times of the fully transient and steady simulations differed greatly, i.e., about 10 days versus 0.5 to 1 h, respectively. The time-averaged scenario may provide the best steady conditions for estimating the transient particle release maps. However, given the considerable changes in the PRMs due to the accelerating and decelerating phases of the cardiac cycle, it may be better to model several steady scenarios, which encompass the wide range of flows and pressures experienced by the arterial system in order to observe how the PRMs may change throughout the pulse. While adding more computation time, this method is still significantly faster than running the full transient case. Finally, while the best steady PRMs provide a qualitative guide for best catheter placement, the final

  16. The tumor-targeting core-shell structured DTX-loaded PLGA@Au nanoparticles for chemo-photothermal therapy and X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yongwei; Zhang, Bingxiang; Zheng, Cuixia; Ji, Rui; Ren, Xiangyi; Guo, Fangfang; Sun, Shili; Shi, Jinjin; Zhang, Hongling; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yun

    2015-12-28

    In this study, an organic-inorganic hybrid nanocomposite was synthesized by deposition of Au onto the surface of docetaxel (DTX)-loaded poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticle cores to form the core-shell structured DTX-loaded PLGA@Au nanoparticles. The tumor targeting peptide, angiopep-2, was then introduced onto the gold nanoshell through Au-S bond, achieving drug delivery with active targeting capability. This novel system allowed combined chemotherapy and thermal therapy for cancer, resulting from DTX and gold nanoshell. The formation of tumor-targeting gold nanoshell surrounding PLGA nanocore, designated as ANG/GS/PLGA/DTX NPs, was confirmed by its surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band in the UV-Vis spectrum and by a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The release profiles of DTX from this system showed strong dependence on near-infrared (NIR) laser. Compared with DTX alone, the ANG/GS/PLGA/DTX NPs afforded much higher anti-tumor efficiency without obvious toxic effects. Besides, it also showed potential X-ray imaging ability. These results demonstrated that the tumor-targeting core-shell structured DTX-loaded PLGA@Au nanoparticles could be used as a multifunctional nanomaterial system with NIR-triggered drug-releasing properties for tumor-targeted chemo-photothermal therapy and theranostics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Long-circulating and passively tumor-targeted polymer-drug conjugates improve the efficacy and reduce the toxicity of radiochemotherapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lammers, T.; Šubr, Vladimír; Ulbrich, Karel; Peschke, P.; Huber, P. E.; Hennink, W. E.; Storm, G.; Kiessling, F.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 9 (2010), B413-B421 ISSN 1438-1656 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : HPMA copolymers * targeting * tumor targeting Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 1.746, year: 2010

  18. Brain Tumor Targeting of Magnetic Nanoparticles for Potential Drug Delivery: Effect of Administration Route and Magnetic Field Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E.; Yang, Victor C.

    2011-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated feasibility of magnetically-mediated retention of iron-oxide nanoparticles in brain tumors after intravascular administration. The purpose of this study was to elucidate strategies for further improvement of this promising approach. In particular, we explored administration of the nanoparticles via a non-occluded carotid artery as a way to increase the passive exposure of tumor vasculature to nanoparticles for subsequent magnetic entrapment. However, aggregation of nanoparticles in the afferent vasculature interfered with tumor targeting. The magnetic setup employed in our experiments was found to generate a relatively uniform magnetic flux density over a broad range, exposing the region of the afferent vasculature to high magnetic force. To overcome this problem, the magnetic setup was modified with a 9-mm diameter cylindrical NdFeB magnet to exhibit steeper magnetic field topography. Six-fold reduction of the magnetic force at the injection site, achieved with this modification, alleviated the aggregation problem under the conditions of intact carotid blood flow. Using this setup, carotid administration was found to present 1.8-fold increase in nanoparticle accumulation in glioma compared to the intravenous route at 350 mT. This increase was found to be in reasonable agreement with the theoretically estimated 1.9-fold advantage of carotid administration, Rd. The developed approach is expected to present an even greater advantage when applied to drug-loaded nanoparticles exhibiting higher values of Rd. PMID:21763736

  19. Styrene-maleic acid-copolymer conjugated zinc protoporphyrin as a candidate drug for tumor-targeted therapy and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jun; Tsukigawa, Kenji; Liao, Long; Yin, Hongzhuan; Eguchi, Kanami; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies indicated the potential of zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) as an antitumor agent targeting to the tumor survival factor heme oxygenase-1, and/or for photodynamic therapy (PDT). In this study, to achieve tumor-targeted delivery, styrene-maleic acid-copolymer conjugated ZnPP (SMA-ZnPP) was synthesized via amide bond, which showed good water solubility, having ZnPP loading of 15%. More importantly, it forms micelles in aqueous solution with a mean particle size of 111.6 nm, whereas it has an apparent Mw of 65 kDa. This micelle formation was not detracted by serum albumin, suggesting it is stable in circulation. Further SMA-ZnPP conjugate will behave as an albumin complex in blood with much larger size (235 kDa) by virtue of the albumin binding property of SMA. Consequently, SMA-ZnPP conjugate exhibited prolonged circulating retention and preferential tumor accumulation by taking advantage of enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Clear tumor imaging was thus achieved by detecting the fluorescence of ZnPP. In addition, the cytotoxicity and PDT effect of SMA-ZnPP conjugate was confirmed in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Light irradiation remarkably increased the cytotoxicity (IC50, from 33 to 5 μM). These findings may provide new options and knowledge for developing ZnPP based anticancer theranostic drugs.

  20. Polymeric micelles of zinc protoporphyrin for tumor targeted delivery based on EPR effect and singlet oxygen generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Arun K; Greish, Khaled; Seki, Takahiro; Okazaki, Shoko; Fang, Jun; Takeshita, Keizo; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Polymeric micelles of zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) with water soluble biocompatible and amphiphilic polymer, polyethylene glycol (PEG) demonstrated unique characteristics to target tumor tissues selectively based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. The micellar macromolecular drug of ZnPP (SMA-ZnPP and PEG-ZnPP) previously showed notable anticancer activity as a consequence of selective tumor targeting ability and its potent HO-1 inhibitory potential, resulting in suppressed biliverdin/bilirubin production in tumors thereby leading to oxystress induced tumor cell killing. Furthermore, recent findings also showed that ZnPP efficiently generated reactive singlet oxygen under illumination of visible light, laser, or xenon light source, which could augment its oxystress induced cell killing abilities. In the present paper, we report the synergistic effects of light induced photosensitizing capabilities and HO-1 inhibitory potentials of these unique micelles when tested in vitro and in vivo on tumor models under localized, mild illumination conditions using a tungsten-xenon light source. The results indicate that these water soluble polymeric micelles of ZnPP portend to be promising candidates for targeted chemotherapy as well as photodynamic therapy against superficial tumors as well as solid tumors located at light penetrable depths.

  1. Impact of fluid-structure interaction on direct tumor-targeting in a representative hepatic artery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Emily M; Kleinstreuer, Clement

    2014-03-01

    Direct targeting of solid tumors with chemotherapeutic drugs and/or radioactive microspheres can be a treatment option which minimizes side-effects and reduces cost. Briefly, computational analysis generates particle release maps (PRMs) which visually link upstream particle injection regions in the main artery with associated exit branches, some connected to tumors. The overall goal is to compute patient-specific PRMs realistically, accurately, and cost-effectively, which determines the suitable radial placement of a micro-catheter for optimal particle injection. Focusing in this paper on new steps towards realism and accuracy, the impact of fluid-structure interaction on direct drug-targeting is evaluated, using a representative hepatic artery system with liver tumor as a test bed. Specifically, the effect of arterial wall motion was demonstrated by modeling a two-way fluid-structure interaction analysis with Lagrangian particle tracking in the bifurcating arterial system. Clearly, rapid computational evaluation of optimal catheter location for tumor-targeting in a clinical application is very important. Hence, rigid-wall cases were also compared to the flexible scenario to establish whether PRMs generated when based on simplifying assumptions could provide adequate guidance towards ideal catheter placement. It was found that the best rigid (i.e., time-averaged) geometry is the physiological one that occurs during the diastolic targeting interval.

  2. Tumor targeted gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of molecular mechanisms governing malignant transformation brings new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against cancer using novel approaches. One of them is gene therapy based on the transfer of genetic material to an organism with the aim of correcting a disease. The application of gene therapy to the cancer treatment had led to the development of new experimental approaches such as suicidal gene therapy, inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a prodrug into a toxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and cytosine deaminase (CD). Especially, physicians and scientists of nuclear medicine field take an interest in suicidal gene therapy because they can monitor the location and magnitude, and duration of expression of HSV1-tk and CD by PET scanner

  3. A modular labeling strategy for in vivo PET and near-infrared fluorescence imaging of nanoparticle tumor targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Abdel-Atti, Dalya; Zhang, Yachao; Longo, Valerie A; Irwin, Chrisopher P; Binderup, Tina; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Fayad, Zahi A; Lewis, Jason S; Mulder, Willem J M; Reiner, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Advances in preclinical molecular imaging have generated new opportunities to noninvasively visualize the biodistribution and tumor targeting of nanoparticle therapeutics. Capitalizing on recent achievements in this area, we sought to develop an (89)Zr-based labeling strategy for liposomal nanoparticles that accumulate in tumors via passive targeting mechanisms. (89)Zr-labeled liposomes were prepared using 2 different approaches: click labeling and surface chelation. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies, as well as PET/CT imaging of the radiolabeled nanoparticles, were performed on a mouse model of breast cancer. In addition, a dual PET/optical probe was prepared by incorporation of a near-infrared fluorophore and tested in vivo by PET and near-infrared fluorescence imaging. The surface chelation approach proved to be superior in terms of radiochemical yield and stability, as well as in vivo performance. Accumulation of these liposomes in tumor peaked at 24 h after injection and was measured to be 13.7 ± 1.8 percentage injected dose per gram. The in vivo performance of this probe was not essentially perturbed by the incorporation of a near-infrared fluorophore. We have developed a highly modular and efficient strategy for the labeling of liposomal nanoparticles with (89)Zr. In xenograft and orthotopic mouse models of breast cancer, we demonstrated that the biodistribution of these nanoparticles can be visualized by PET imaging. In combination with a near-infrared dye, these liposomal nanoparticles can serve as bimodal PET/optical imaging agents. The liposomes target malignant growth, and their bimodal features may be useful for simultaneous PET and intraoperative imaging. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  4. Synthesis and Bioevaluation of Iodine-131 Directly Labeled Cyclic RGD-PEGylated Gold Nanorods for Tumor-Targeted Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Radiolabeled gold nanoparticles play an important role in biomedical application. The aim of this study was to prepare iodine-131 (131I-labeled gold nanorods (GNRs conjugated with cyclic RGD and evaluate its biological characteristics for targeted imaging of integrin αvβ3-expressing tumors. Methods. HS-PEG(5000-COOH molecules were applied to replace CTAB covering the surface of bare GNRs for better biocompatibility, and c(RGDfK peptides were conjugated onto the carboxyl terminal of GNR-PEG-COOH via EDC/NHS coupling reactions. The nanoconjugate was characterized, and 131I was directly tagged on the surface of GNRs via AuI bonds for SPECT/CT imaging. We preliminarily studied the characteristics of the probe and its feasibility for tumor-targeting SPECT/CT imaging. Results. The [131I]GNR-PEG-cRGD probe was prepared in a simple and rapid manner and was stable in both PBS and fetal bovine serum. It targeted selectively and could be taken up by tumor cells mainly via integrin αvβ3-receptor-mediated endocytosis. In vivo imaging, biodistribution, and autoradiography results showed evident tumor uptake in integrin αvβ3-expressing tumors. Conclusions. These promising results showed that this smart nanoprobe can be used for angiogenesis-targeted SPECT/CT imaging. Furthermore, the nanoprobe possesses a remarkable capacity for highly efficient photothermal conversion in the near-infrared region, suggesting its potential as a multifunctional theranostic agent.

  5. Tumor-targeted inhibition by a novel strategy - mimoretrovirus expressing siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huaizhi; Jia, Zhengcai; Shi, Jinglei; Tang, Jun; Mao, Liwei; Liu, Hongli; Deng, Yijing; He, Yangdong; Ruan, Zhihua; Li, Jintao; Wu, Yuzhang; Ni, Bing

    2010-12-01

    Pokemon gene has crucial but versatile functions in cell differentiation, proliferation and tumorigenesis. It is a master regulator of the ARF-HDM2-p53 and Rb-E2F pathways. The facts that the expression of Pokemon is essential for tumor formation and many kinds of tumors over-express the Pokemon gene make it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention for cancer treatment. In this study, we used an RNAi strategy to silence the Pokemon gene in a cervical cancer model. To address the issues involving tumor specific delivery and durable expression of siRNA, we applied the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide ligand and polylysine (K(18)) fusion peptide to encapsulate a recombinant retrovirus plasmid expressing a siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene and produced the 'mimoretrovirus'. At charge ratio 2.0 of fusion peptide/plasmid, the mimoretrovirus formed stable and homogenous nanoparticles, and provided complete DNase I protection and complete gel retardation. This nanoparticle inhibited SiHa cell proliferation and invasion, while it promoted SiHa cell apoptosis. The binding of the nanoparticle to SiHa cells was mediated via the RGD-integrin α(v)β(3) interaction, as evidenced by the finding that unconjugated RGD peptide inhibited this binding significantly. This tumor-targeting mimoretrovirus exhibited excellent anti-tumor capacity in vivo in a nude mouse model. Moreover, the mimoretrovirus inhibited tumor growth with a much higher efficiency than recombinant retrovirus expressing siRNA or the K(18)/P4 nanoparticle lacking the RGD peptide. Results suggest that the RNAi/RGD-based mimoretrovirus developed in this study represents a novel anti-tumor strategy that may be applicable to most research involving cancer therapy and, thus, has promising potential as a cervical cancer treatment.

  6. Anti-EGFR-iRGD recombinant protein conjugated silk fibroin nanoparticles for enhanced tumor targeting and antitumor efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bian X

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Xinyu Bian,* Puyuan Wu,* Huizi Sha, Hanqing Qian, Qing Wang, Lei Cheng, Yang Yang, Mi Yang, Baorui LiuComprehensive Cancer Center of Drum-Tower Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Clinical Cancer Institute of Nanjing University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: In this study, we report a novel kind of targeting with paclitaxel (PTX-loaded silk fibroin nanoparticles conjugated with iRGD–EGFR nanobody recombinant protein (anti-EGFR-iRGD. The new nanoparticles (called A-PTX-SF-NPs were prepared using the carbodiimide-mediated coupling procedure and their characteristics were evaluated. The cellular cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of A-PTX-SF-NPs were also investigated. The results in vivo suggested that NPs conjugated with the recombinant protein exhibited more targeting and anti-neoplastic property in cells with high EGFR expression. In the in vivo antitumor efficacy assay, the A-PTX-SF-NPs group showed slower tumor growth and smaller tumor volumes than PTX-SF-NPs in a HeLa xenograft mouse model. A real-time near-infrared fluorescence imaging study showed that A-PTX-SF-NPs could target the tumor more effectively. These results suggest that the anticancer activity and tumor targeting of A-PTX-SF-NPs were superior to those of PTX-SF-NPs and may have the potential to be used for targeted delivery for tumor therapies. Keywords: EGFR, nanobody, iRGD, recombinant protein, targeting drug carriers, antitumor efficiency

  7. Melanin-manganese nanoparticles with ultrahigh efficient clearance in vivo for tumor-targeting T1magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen; Sun, Jinghua; Li, Liping; Peng, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Ruiping; Wang, Binquan

    2017-12-19

    Endogenous biomaterials in organisms, with native biocompatibility and biodegradability, appear more advantageous in the development of nanoscale diagnostic and therapeutic systems for future clinical translation. Herein, a novel tumor-targeting Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agent was developed based on Mn 2+ -chelating ultrasmall water-soluble melanin nanoparticles (MNP-PEG-Mn). The nanoparticles, with a size of about 5.6 nm, presented high chelation stability and showed negligible cytotoxicity as estimated by MTT assay. Moreover, the r 1 longitudinal relaxivity (20.56 mM -1 s -1 ) of MNP-PEG-Mn was much higher than that of Gadodiamide (6.00 mM -1 s -1 ), which is a clinically approved MRI contrast agent. In vivo MRI experiments revealed excellent tumor-targeting specificity after tumor-bearing mice were intravenously injected with MNP-PEG-Mn. Additionally, MNP-PEG-Mn could be excreted via renal and hepatobiliary pathways with negligible toxicity to body tissues. These preliminary results indicated the clinically translatable potential of MNP-PEG-Mn as a T 1 MRI contrast agent for tumor-targeted imaging.

  8. A comparison of prostate tumor targeting strategies using magnetic resonance imaging-targeted, transrectal ultrasound-guided fusion biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Peter R; Cool, Derek W; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D

    2018-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy aims to reduce the 21-47% false-negative rate of clinical two-dimensional (2D) TRUS-guided systematic biopsy, but continues to yield false-negative results. This may be improved via needle target optimization, accounting for guidance system errors and image registration errors. As an initial step toward the goal of optimized prostate biopsy targeting, we investigated how needle delivery error impacts tumor sampling probability for two targeting strategies. We obtained MRI and 3D TRUS images from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident assessed these MR images and contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding tumor surfaces that were registered to 3D TRUS. The biopsy system's root-mean-squared needle delivery error (RMSE) and systematic error were modeled using an isotropic 3D Gaussian distribution. We investigated two different prostate tumor-targeting strategies using (a) the tumor's centroid and (b) a ring in the lateral-elevational plane. For each simulation, targets were spaced at equal arc lengths on a ring with radius equal to the systematic error magnitude. A total of 1000 biopsy simulations were conducted for each tumor, with RMSE and systematic error magnitudes ranging from 1 to 6 mm. The difference in median tumor sampling probability and probability of obtaining a 50% core involvement was determined for ring vs centroid targeting. Our simulation results indicate that ring targeting outperformed centroid targeting in situations where systematic error exceeds RMSE. In these instances, we observed statistically significant differences showing 1-32% improvement in sampling probability due to ring targeting. Likewise, we observed statistically significant differences showing 1-39% improvement in 50% core involvement probability due to ring targeting. Our results suggest that the optimal targeting scheme for prostate biopsy depends on

  9. Improved tumor targeting of anti-HER2 nanobody through N-succinimidyl 4-guanidinomethyl-3-iodobenzoate radiolabeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruszynski, Marek; Koumarianou, Eftychia; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Revets, Hilde; Devoogdt, Nick; Lahoutte, Tony; Lyerly, H Kim; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2014-04-01

    Nanobodies are approximately 15-kDa proteins based on the smallest functional fragments of naturally occurring heavy chain-only antibodies and represent an attractive platform for the development of molecularly targeted agents for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Because the human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) is overexpressed in breast and ovarian carcinoma, as well as in other malignancies, HER2-specific Nanobodies may be valuable radiodiagnostics and therapeutics for these diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the tumor-targeting potential of anti-HER2 5F7GGC Nanobody after radioiodination with the residualizing agent N-succinimidyl 4-guanidinomethyl 3-(125/131)I-iodobenzoate (*I-SGMIB). The 5F7GGC Nanobody was radiolabeled using *I-SGMIB and, for comparison, with N(ε)-(3-*I-iodobenzoyl)-Lys(5)-N(α)-maleimido-Gly(1)-GEEEK (*I-IB-Mal-d-GEEEK), another residualizing agent, and by direct radioiodination using IODO-GEN ((125)I-Nanobody). The 3 labeled Nanobodies were evaluated in affinity measurements, and paired-label internalization assays were performed on HER2-expressing BT474M1 breast carcinoma cells and in paired-label tissue distribution measurements in mice bearing subcutaneous BT474M1 xenografts. *I-SGMIB-Nanobody was produced in 50.4% ± 3.6% radiochemical yield and exhibited a dissociation constant of 1.5 ± 0.5 nM. Internalization assays demonstrated that intracellular retention of radioactivity was up to 1.5-fold higher for *I-SGMIB-Nanobody than for coincubated (125)I-Nanobody or *I-IB-Mal-d-GEEEK-Nanobody. Peak tumor uptake for *I-SGMIB-Nanobody was 24.50% ± 9.89% injected dose/g at 2 h, 2- to 4-fold higher than observed with other labeling methods, and was reduced by 90% with trastuzumab blocking, confirming the HER2 specificity of localization. Moreover, normal-organ clearance was fastest for *I-SGMIB-Nanobody, such that tumor-to-normal-organ ratios greater than 50:1 were reached by 24 h in all tissues except lungs

  10. Development and optimization of a tumor targeting system based on microbial synthesized PHA biopolymers and PhaP mediated functional modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fan; Wang, Leilei; Ouyang, Zhenlin; Wen, Yurong; Lu, Xiaoyun

    2018-04-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) is a class of microbial synthesized biodegradable and biocompatible aliphatic polymer which has been developed into nanoparticles (NPs) for sustained release of hydrophobic compounds. Taking advantage of the natural PHA binding protein PhaP which could be steadily adsorbed onto PHA NPs through hydrophobic interaction, a tumor targeting system was developed in this study by presenting an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeting peptide (ETP) on the surface of PHA NPs, via PhaP mediated adsorption. To reveal the effects of residual emulsifiers on PhaP mediated ETP modification and optimize the tumor targeting capacity of the system, a novel emulsifier-free PHA NPs (EF-NPs) was fabricated together with other two kinds of conventional emulsifier-required PHA NPs (PVA-NPs and P68-NPs, which were prepared with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and Pluronic F68 as emulsifiers, respectively). By analyzing the surface hydrophobicity, the amount of adsorbed fusion protein, and the cellular uptake of all kinds of PHA NPs, our results demonstrated that EF-NPs with stronger surface hydrophobicity were the most proper formulation for further PhaP mediated ETP functionalization. The residual PVA and Pluronic F68 affected the modification efficiency and secondary structure of ETP-PhaP fusion protein, and finally obstructed the targeting effect of ETP-PhaP modified PVA-NPs and P68-NPs to EGFR over-expressed tumor cells. The animal experiment further confirmed the effectiveness and feasibility of in vivo application of ETP-PhaP functionalized EF-NPs, indicating that it could be served as a promising tumor targeting system with satisfactory EGFR targeting ability. This PhaP mediated bio-modification process also opens a wide way for developing various PHA-based targeting systems by presenting different tumor or other tissue-specific targeting peptides.

  11. pH-Responsive Tumor-Targetable Theranostic Nanovectors Based on Core Crosslinked (CCL Micelles with Fluorescence and Magnetic Resonance (MR Dual Imaging Modalities and Drug Delivery Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidan Tian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of novel theranostic nanovectors is of particular interest in treating formidable diseases (e.g., cancers. Herein, we report a new tumor-targetable theranostic agent based on core crosslinked (CCL micelles, possessing tumor targetable moieties and fluorescence and magnetic resonance (MR dual imaging modalities. An azide-terminated diblock copolymer, N3-POEGMA-b-P(DPA-co-GMA, was synthesized via consecutive atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP, where OEGMA, DPA, and GMA are oligo(ethylene glycolmethyl ether methacrylate, 2-(diisopropylaminoethyl methacrylate, and glycidyl methacrylate, respectively. The resulting diblock copolymer was further functionalized with DOTA(Gd (DOTA is 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetrakisacetic acid or benzaldehyde moieties via copper(I-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC chemistry, resulting in the formation of DOTA(Gd-POEGMA-b-P(DPA-co-GMA and benzaldehyde-POEGMA-b-P(DPA-co-GMA copolymers. The resultant block copolymers co-assembled into mixed micelles at neutral pH in the presence of tetrakis[4-(2-mercaptoethoxyphenyl]ethylene (TPE-4SH, which underwent spontaneous crosslinking reactions with GMA residues embedded within the micellar cores, simultaneously switching on TPE fluorescence due to the restriction of intramolecular rotation. Moreover, camptothecin (CPT was encapsulated into the crosslinked cores at neutral pH, and tumor-targeting pH low insertion peptide (pHLIP, sequence: AEQNPIYWARYADWLFTTPLLLLDLALLVDADEGTCG moieties were attached to the coronas through the Schiff base chemistry, yielding a theranostic nanovector with fluorescence and MR dual imaging modalities and tumor-targeting capability. The nanovectors can be efficiently taken up by A549 cells, as monitored by TPE fluorescence. After internalization, intracellular acidic pH triggered the release of loaded CPT, killing cancer cells in a selective manner. On the other hand, the nanovectors labeled with DOTA

  12. PET imaging of 64Cu-DOTA-scFv-anti-PSMA lipid nanoparticles (LNPs): Enhanced tumor targeting over anti-PSMA scFv or untargeted LNPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Patty; Li, Lin; Chea, Junie; Delgado, Melissa K.; Crow, Desiree; Poku, Erasmus; Szpikowska, Barbara; Bowles, Nicole; Channappa, Divya; Colcher, David; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.; Shively, John E.; Yazaki, Paul J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Single chain (scFv) antibodies are ideal targeting ligands due to their modular structure, high antigen specificity and affinity. These monovalent ligands display rapid tumor targeting but have limitations due to their fast urinary clearance. Methods: An anti-prostate membrane antigen (PSMA) scFv with a site-specific cysteine was expressed and evaluated in a prostate cancer xenograft model by Cu-64 PET imaging. To enhance tumor accumulation, the scFv-cys was conjugated to the co-polymer DSPE-PEG-maleimide that spontaneously assembled into a homogeneous multivalent lipid nanoparticle (LNP). Results: The targeted LNP exhibited a 2-fold increase in tumor uptake compared to the scFv alone using two different thiol ester chemistries. The anti-PSMA scFv-LNP exhibited a 1.6 fold increase in tumor targeting over the untargeted LNP. Conclusions: The targeted anti-PSMA scFv-LNP showed enhanced tumor accumulation over the scFv alone or the untargeted DOTA-micelle providing evidence for the development of this system for drug delivery. Advances in knowledge and implications for patient care: Anti-tumor scFv antibody fragments have not achieved their therapeutic potential due to their fast blood clearance. Conjugation to an LNP enables multivalency to the tumor antigen as well as increased molecular size for chemotherapy drug delivery.

  13. Tumor-Shed Antigen Affects Antibody Tumor Targeting: Comparison of Two 89Zr-Labeled Antibodies Directed against Shed or Nonshed Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Ho Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of shed antigen mesothelin on the tumor uptake of amatuximab, a therapeutic anti-mesothelin mAb clinically tested in mesothelioma patients. The B3 mAb targeting a nonshed antigen was also analyzed for comparison. The mouse model implanted with A431/H9 tumor, which expresses both shed mesothelin and nonshed Lewis-Y antigen, provided an ideal system to compare the biodistribution and PET imaging profiles of the two mAbs. Our study demonstrated that the tumor and organ uptakes of 89Zr-B3 were dose-independent when 3 doses, 2, 15, and 60 μg B3, were compared at 24 h after injection. In contrast, tumor and organ uptakes of 89Zr-amatuximab were dose-dependent, whereby a high dose (60 μg was needed to achieve tumor targeting comparable to the low dose (2 μg of 89Zr-B3, suggesting that shed mesothelin may affect amatuximab tumor targeting as well as serum half-life. The autoradiography analysis showed that the distribution of 89Zr-B3 was nonuniform with the radioactivity primarily localized at the tumor periphery independent of the B3 dose. However, the autoradiography analysis for 89Zr-amatuximab showed dose-dependent distribution profiles of the radiolabel; at 10 μg dose, the radiolabel penetrated toward the tumor core with its activity comparable to that at the tumor periphery, whereas at 60 μg dose, the distribution profile became similar to those of 89Zr-B3. These results suggest that shed antigen in blood may act as a decoy requiring higher doses of mAb to improve serum half-life as well as tumor targeting. Systemic mAb concentration should be at a severalfold molar excess to the shed Ag in blood to overcome the hepatic processing of mAb-Ag complexes. On the other hand, mAb concentration should remain lower than the shed Ag concentration in the tumor ECS to maximize tumor penetration by passing binding site barriers.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of ZnS:Mn/ZnS core/shell nanoparticles for tumor targeting and imaging in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhangsen; Ma, Xiying; Yu, Bin; Pan, Yuefang; Liu, Zhaogang

    2013-08-01

    Fluorescence imaging technique has been used for imaging of biological cells and tissues in vivo. The Cd-free luminescent quantum dots conjugating with a cancer targeting ligand has been taken as a promising biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity system for targeted cancer imaging. This work reports the synthesis of fluorescent-doped core/shell quantum dots of water-soluble manganese-doped zinc sulfide. Quantum dots of manganese-doped zinc sulfide were prepared by nucleation doping strategy, with 3-mercaptopropionic acid as stabilizer at 90 in aqueous solution. The manganese-doped zinc sulfide nanoparticles exhibit strong orange fluorescence under UV irradiation, resistance to photo-bleaching, and low-cytotoxicity to HeLa cells. The structure and optical properties of nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering, and photoluminescence emission spectroscopy. Manganese-doped zinc sulfide nanoparticles conjugated with folic acid using 2,2'-(ethylenedioxy)-bis-(ethylamine) as the linker. The covalent binding of both 2,2'-(ethylenedioxy)-bis-(ethylamine) and folic acid on the surface of manganese-doped zinc sulfide nanoparticles probed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy detection. Furthermore, in vitro cytotoxicity assessment of manganese-doped zinc sulfide-folic acid probes use HeLa cells. The obtained fluorescent probes (manganese-doped zinc sulfide) were used for tumor targeting and imaging in vivo. The manganese-doped zinc sulfide-folic acid fluorescent probes which targeting the tumor cells in the body of nude mouse tumor model would emit orange fluorescence, when exposed to a 365 nm lamp. We investigate the biodistribution of the manganese-doped zinc sulfide-folic acid fluorescent probes in tumor mouse model by measuring zinc concentration in tissues. These studies demonstrate the practicality of manganese-doped zinc sulfide-folic acid fluorescent probes as promising platform for tumor

  15. Facile Synthesis of Gd-Cu-In-S/ZnS Bimodal Quantum Dots with Optimized Properties for Tumor Targeted Fluorescence/MR In Vivo Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weitao; Guo, Weisheng; Gong, Xiaoqun; Zhang, Bingbo; Wang, Sheng; Chen, Na; Yang, Wentao; Tu, Yu; Fang, Xiangming; Chang, Jin

    2015-08-26

    Dual-modal imaging techniques have gained intense attention for their potential role in the dawning era of tumor early accurate diagnosis. Chelate-free robust dual-modal imaging nanoprobes with high efficiency and low toxicity are of essential importance for tumor targeted dual-modal in vivo imaging. It is still a crucial issue to endow Cd-free dual-modal nanoprobes with bright fluorescence as well as high relaxivity. Herein, a facile synthetic strategy was developed to prepare Gd-doped CuInS/ZnS bimodal quantum dots (GCIS/ZnS, BQDs) with optimized properties. The fluorescent properties of the GCIS/ZnS BQDs can be thoroughly optimized by varying reaction temperature, aging time, and ZnS coating. The amount of Gd precursor can be well-controlled to realize the optimized balance between the MR relaxivity and optical properties. The obtained hydrophobic GCIS/ZnS BQDs were surface engineered into aqueous phase with PEGylated dextran-stearyl acid polymeric lipid vesicles (PEG-DS PLVs). Upon the phase transfer, the hydrophilic GCIS/ZnS@PLVs exhibited pronounced near-infrared fluorescence as well as high longitudinal relaxivity (r1 = 9.45 mM(-1) S(-1)) in water with good colloidal stability. In vivo tumor-bearing animal experiments further verified GCIS/ZnS@PLVs could achieve tumor-targeted MR/fluorescence dual-modal imaging. No toxicity was observed in the in vivo and ex vivo experiments. The GCIS/ZnS@PLVs present great potential as bimodal imaging contrast agents for tumor diagnosis.

  16. Tumor-targeting properties of {sup 90}Y- and {sup 177}Lu-labeled {alpha}-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analogues in a murine melanoma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao Yubin [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States) and Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Harry S. Truman Memorial Veteran Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States)]. E-mail: miaoy@missouri.edu; Hoffman, Timothy J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Harry S. Truman Memorial Veteran Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Quinn, Thomas P. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Harry S. Truman Memorial Veteran Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the tumor-targeting properties of {sup 90}Y-DOTA-Re(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH and {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH in a murine melanoma mouse model. Methods: The in vitro properties of cellular internalization and retention of {sup 90}Y-DOTA-Re(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH and {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH were studied in B16/F1 murine melanoma cells. The pharmacokinetics of {sup 90}Y-DOTA-Re(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH and {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. Results: {sup 90}Y-DOTA-Re(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH and {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH exhibited fast cellular internalization and extended cellular retention in B16/F1 cells. High receptor-mediated tumor uptake and retention coupled with fast whole-body clearance of {sup 90}Y-DOTA-Re(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH and {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH were demonstrated in B16/F1 tumor-bearing C57 mice. The tumor uptakes of {sup 90}Y-DOTA-Re(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH and {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH were 25.70{+-}4.64 and 14.48{+-}0.85 %ID/g at 2 h, and 14.09{+-}2.73 and 17.68{+-}3.32 %ID/g at 4 h postinjection. There was little activity accumulated in normal organs except for kidney. Conclusions: High tumor-targeting properties of {sup 90}Y-DOTA-Re(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH and {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH highlighted their potential as radiopharmaceuticals for targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma in further investigations.

  17. Tumor-targeting properties of 90Y- and 177Lu-labeled α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analogues in a murine melanoma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Yubin; Hoffman, Timothy J.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the tumor-targeting properties of 90 Y-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH and 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH in a murine melanoma mouse model. Methods: The in vitro properties of cellular internalization and retention of 90 Y-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH and 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH were studied in B16/F1 murine melanoma cells. The pharmacokinetics of 90 Y-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH and 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. Results: 90 Y-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH and 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH exhibited fast cellular internalization and extended cellular retention in B16/F1 cells. High receptor-mediated tumor uptake and retention coupled with fast whole-body clearance of 90 Y-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH and 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH were demonstrated in B16/F1 tumor-bearing C57 mice. The tumor uptakes of 90 Y-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH and 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH were 25.70±4.64 and 14.48±0.85 %ID/g at 2 h, and 14.09±2.73 and 17.68±3.32 %ID/g at 4 h postinjection. There was little activity accumulated in normal organs except for kidney. Conclusions: High tumor-targeting properties of 90 Y-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH and 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH highlighted their potential as radiopharmaceuticals for targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma in further investigations

  18. Development and evaluation of novel tumor-targeting paclitaxel-loaded nano-carriers for ovarian cancer treatment: in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shu; Li, Li; Su, Xuan-Tao; Wang, Kai; Lu, Zai-Jun; Yuan, Cun-Zhong; Feng, Jin-Bo; Yan, Shi; Kong, Bei-Hua; Song, Kun

    2018-02-26

    Ovarian cancer is the most leading cause of death and the third most common gynecologic malignancy in women. Traditional chemotherapy has inevitable drawbacks of nonspecific tumor targeting, high toxicity, and poor therapeutic efficiency. In order to overcome such shortcomings, we prepared a novel nano-carrier drug-delivery system to enhance the anti-tumor efficiency. In vitro characterizations of nano-carriers were determined by TEM, DLS. Cell viability was measured by MTT method. RT-PCR was performed to measure the expression of FARα in three ovarian cancer cell lines. The drug-release study and the uptaken study were measured in vitro. The pharmacokinetic and the drug distribution study were verified by HPLC methods in vivo. The enhanced anti-tumor efficiency of FA-NP was evaluated by the tumor inhibitory rate in vivo. Paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded nanoparticles (NPs) (PTX-PEG-PLA-NP and PTX-PEG-PLA-FA-NP) were prepared successfully, and the drug-release study showed that the cumulative release rates of NP groups were much less than free PTX group. The pharmacokinetic study showed that the elimination phase of two kinds of NP groups were much longer than that of PTX group. The drug distribution in different tissues showed that the peak-reach time was 2 h in the PTX group and 6 h in both NP groups. All of these results confirmed the excellent slow-release effects of both kinds of nano-carriers. More importantly, we confirmed that PTX-PEG-PLA-FA-NP had greater uptake by SK-OV-3 cells than PTX-PEG-PLA-NP and free PTX in vitro. A drug-distribution study of tumor-bearing mice demonstrated that the PTX concentration of tumor tissues in the PTX-PEG-PLA-FA-NP group was 3 times higher than the other two groups. PTX-PEG-PLA-FA-NP was uptaken much more by SK-OV-3 cells than PTX-PEG-PLA-NP and free PTX. Eventually, based on the slow-release effect and tumor-targeting characteristics of PTX-PEG-PLA-FA-NP, a cytotoxicity test indicated that PTX-PEG-PLA-FA-NP was much more toxic

  19. Development of PLGA-lipid nanoparticles with covalently conjugated indocyanine green as a versatile nanoplatform for tumor-targeted imaging and drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Y

    2016-11-01

    course of the treatment (1 month. The results obtained demonstrate the versatility of the NPs, featuring stable fluorescence and tumor-targeting characteristics, with promising future applications in cancer therapy. Keywords: indocyanine green, resveratrol, near-infrared nanoprobe, tumor targeting, fluorescence imaging, drug delivery 

  20. Tetrameric far-red fluorescent protein as a scaffold to assemble an octavalent peptide nanoprobe for enhanced tumor targeting and intracellular uptake in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haiming; Yang, Jie; Jin, Honglin; Huang, Chuan; Fu, Jianwei; Yang, Fei; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Zhihong

    2011-06-01

    Relatively weak tumor affinities and short retention time in vivo hinder the application of targeting peptides in tumor molecular imaging. Multivalent strategies based on various scaffolds have been utilized to improve the ability of peptide-receptor binding or extend the clearance time of peptide-based probes. Here, we use a tetrameric far-red fluorescent protein (tfRFP) as a scaffold to create a self-assembled octavalent peptide fluorescent nanoprobe (Octa-FNP) using a genetic engineering approach. The multiligand connecting, fluorophore labeling and nanostructure formation of Octa-FNP were performed in one step. In vitro studies showed Octa-FNP is a 10-nm fluorescent probe with excellent serum stability. Cellular uptake of Octa-FNP by human nasopharyngeal cancer 5-8F cells is 15-fold of tetravalent probe, ∼80-fold of monovalent probe and ∼600-fold of nulvalent tfRFP. In vivo enhanced tumor targeting and intracellular uptake of Octa-FNP were confirmed using optical imaging and Western blot analysis. It achieved extremely high contrast of Octa-FNP signal between tumor tissue and normal organs, especially seldom Octa-FNP detected in liver and spleen. Owing to easy preparation, precise structural and functional control, and multivalent effect, Octa-FNP provides a powerful tool for tumor optical molecular imaging and evaluating the targeting ability of numerous peptides in vivo.

  1. The serotonin transporter (SLC6A4) is present in B-cell clones of diverse malignant origin: probing a potential anti-tumor target for psychotropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Elizabeth J; Holder, Michelle J; Chamba, Anita; Challa, Anita; Drake-Lee, Adrian; Bunce, Christopher M; Drayson, Mark T; Pilkington, Geoffrey; Blakely, Randy D; Dyer, Martin J S; Barnes, Nicholas M; Gordon, John

    2005-07-01

    Following our previous description of the serotonin transporter (SERT) acting as a conduit to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-mediated apoptosis, specifically in Burkitt's lymphoma, we now detail its expression among a broad spectrum of B cell malignancy, while exploring additional SERT substrates for potential therapeutic activity. SERT was readily detected in derived B cell lines with origins as diverse as B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, mantle cell lymphoma, diffuse large B cell lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. Concentration and timecourse kinetics for the antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities of the amphetamine derivatives fenfluramine (an appetite suppressant) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; "Ecstasy") revealed them as being similar to the endogenous indoleamine. A tricyclic antidepressant, clomipramine, instead mirrored the behavior of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine, both being effective in the low micromolar range. A majority of neoplastic clones were sensitive to one or more of the serotonergic compounds. Dysregulated bcl-2 expression, either by t(14;18)(q32;q21) translocation or its introduction as a constitutively active transgene, provided protection from proapoptotic but not antiproliferative outcomes. These data indicate a potential for SERT as a novel anti-tumor target for amphetamine analogs, while evidence is presented that the seemingly more promising antidepressants are likely impacting malignant B cells independently of the transporter itself.

  2. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R is a highly effective general therapeutic for undifferentiated soft tissue sarcoma patient-derived orthotopic xenograft nude-mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Kei; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Miyake, Kentaro; Miyake, Masuyo; Singh, Arun S; Eckardt, Mark A; Nelson, Scott D; Russell, Tara A; Dry, Sarah M; Li, Yunfeng; Yamamoto, Norio; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Kimura, Hiroaki; Miwa, Shinji; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Singh, Shree Ram; Eilber, Fritz C; Hoffman, Robert M

    2018-03-18

    Undifferentiated soft tissue sarcoma (USTS) is a recalcitrant and heterogeneous subgroup of soft tissue sarcoma with high risk of metastasis and recurrence. Due to heterogeneity of USTS, there is no reliably effective first-line therapy. We have generated tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R), which previously showed strong efficacy on single patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) models of Ewing's sarcoma and follicular dendritic cell sarcoma. In the present study, tumor resected from 4 patients with a biopsy-proven USTS (2 undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma [UPS], 1 undifferentiated sarcoma not otherwise specified [NOS] and 1 undifferentiated spindle cell sarcoma [USS]) were grown orthotopically in the biceps femoris muscle of mice to establish PDOX models. One USS model and one UPS model were doxorubicin (DOX) resistant. One UPS and the NOS model were partially sensitive to DOX. DOX is first-line therapy for these diseases. S. typhimurium A1-R arrested tumor growth all 4 models. In addition to arresting tumor growth in each case, S. typhimurium A1-R was significantly more efficacious than DOX in each case, thereby surpassing first-line therapy. These results suggest that S. typhimurium A1-R can be a general therapeutic for USTS and possibly sarcoma in general. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Methyl 6-Amino-6-deoxy-d-pyranoside-Conjugated Platinum(II) Complexes for Glucose Transporter (GLUT)-Mediated Tumor Targeting: Synthesis, Cytotoxicity, and Cellular Uptake Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Taoli; Gao, Xiangqian; Yang, Liu; Shi, Yunli; Gao, Qingzhi

    2016-05-19

    Methyl 6-aminodeoxy-d-pyranoside-derived platinum(II) glycoconjugates were designed and synthesized based on the clinical drug oxaliplatin for glucose transporter (GLUT)-mediated tumor targeting. In addition to a substantial improvement in water solubility, the conjugates exhibited cytotoxicity similar to or higher than that of oxaliplatin in six different human cancer cell lines. GLUT-mediated transport of the complexes was investigated with a cell-based fluorescence competition assay and GLUT-inhibitor-mediated cytotoxicity analysis in a GLUT-overexpressing human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29) cell line. The antitumor effect of the aminodeoxypyranoside-conjugated platinum(II) complexes was found to depend significantly on the GLUT inhibitor, and the cellular uptake of the molecules was regulated by GLUT-mediated transport. The results from this study demonstrate the potential advantages of aminodeoxypyranosides as sugar motifs for glycoconjugation for Warburg-effect-targeted drug design. These fundamental results also support the potential of aminodeoxypyranoside-conjugated platinum(II) complexes as lead compounds for further preclinical evaluation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Tumor Targeting with Phage Library

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pai, Jih

    2000-01-01

    I have proposed to identify peptides that bind to the vasculature of prostate cancers by using a technique developed in our laboratory called "in vivo phage display", and then to use these peptides...

  5. Tumor targeting via integrin ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udaya Kiran eMarelli

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Selective and targeted delivery of drugs to tumors is a major challenge for an effective cancer therapy and also to overcome the side effects associated with current treatments. Overexpression of various receptors on tumor cells is a characteristic structural and biochemical aspect of tumors and distinguishes them from physiologically normal cells. This abnormal feature is therefore suitable for selectively directing anticancer molecules to tumors by using ligands that can preferentially recognize such receptors. Several subtypes of integrin receptors that are crucial for cell adhesion, cell signaling, cell viability and motility have been shown to have an upregulated expression on cancer cells. Thus, ligands that recognize specific integrin subtypes represent excellent candidates to be conjugated to drugs or drug carrier systems and be targeted to tumors. In this regard, integrins recognizing the RGD cell adhesive sequence have been extensively targeted for tumor specific drug delivery. Here we review key recent examples on the presentation of RGD-based integrin ligands by means of distinct drug delivery systems, and discuss the prospects of such therapies to specifically target tumor cells.

  6. Building Stable MMP2-Responsive Multifunctional Polymeric Micelles by an All-in-One Polymer-Lipid Conjugate for Tumor-Targeted Intracellular Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qing; Dai, Zhi; Hoon Choi, Jong; Kim, Dongin; Zhu, Lin

    2017-09-27

    In this study, we described an "all-in-one" polymer-lipid conjugate (PEG2k-ppTAT-PEG1k-PE) that could self-assemble to matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2)-sensitive multifunctional micelles. The assembled micelles had several key features, including a protective long chain poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG2k) (the outer shell), an MMP2-sensitive peptide linker (pp) (the tumor-targeting middle layer), a trans-activating transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide (the cell-penetrating middle layer), and a stable PEG1k-PE micelle for drug loading (the inner core). In the absence of MMP2, the PEG2k-ppTAT-PEG1k-PE micelles were intact and showed low bioactivity due to the surface-anchored PEG2k, whereas in the presence of MMP2, the pp was cleaved, resulting in the PEG2k deshielding and exposure of the previously hidden TAT for enhanced intracellular drug delivery. Even if completely cleaved by MMP2, the remaining PEG1k-PE micelles were stable and the micelles' particle size and drug release were not significantly influenced. The paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded PEG2k-ppTAT-PEG1k-PE micelles showed significant MMP2-dependent cellular uptake, tumor penetration, and anticancer activity in various cancer cells and three-dimensional multicellular spheroids. Because of the enhanced intracellular drug accumulation, these multifunctional micelles were able to sensitize the drug-resistant cancer cells and their spheroids to PTX treatments. Furthermore, in vivo tumor uptake and retention data indicated that the PEG2k-ppTAT-PEG1k-PE micelles could dramatically increase the residence time of their payloads in the tumor.

  7. Tumor-Targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R in Combination with Trastuzumab Eradicates HER-2-Positive Cervical Cancer Cells in Patient-Derived Mouse Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiko Hiroshima

    Full Text Available We have previously developed mouse models of HER-2-positive cervical cancer. Tumors in nude mice had histological structures similar to the original tumor and were stained by anti-HER-2 antibody in the same pattern as the patient's cancer. We have also previously developed tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R and have demonstrated its efficacy against patient-derived tumor mouse models, both alone and in combination. In the current study, we determined the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R in combination with trastuzumab on a patient-cancer nude-mouse model of HER-2 positive cervical cancer. Mice were randomized to 5 groups and treated as follows: (1 no treatment; (2 carboplatinum (30 mg/kg, ip, weekly, 5 weeks; (3 trastuzumab (20 mg/kg, ip, weekly, 5 weeks; (4 S. typhimurium A1-R (5 × 107 CFU/body, ip, weekly, 5 weeks; (5 S. typhimurium A1-R (5 × 107 CFU/body, ip, weekly, 5 weeks + trastuzumab (20 mg/kg, ip, weekly, 5 weeks. All regimens had significant efficacy compared to the untreated mice. The relative tumor volume of S. typhimurium A1-R + trastuzumab-treated mice was smaller compared to trastuzumab alone (p = 0.007 and S. typhimurium A1-R alone (p = 0.039. No significant body weight loss was found compared to the no treatment group except for carboplatinum-treated mice (p = 0.021. Upon histological examination, viable tumor cells were not detected, and replaced by stromal cells in the tumors treated with S. typhimurium A1-R + trastuzumab. The results of the present study suggest that S. typhimurium A1-R and trastuzumab in combination are highly effective against HER-2-expressing cervical cancer.

  8. Octanoyl galactose ester-modified microemulsion system self-assembled by coix seed components to enhance tumor targeting and hepatoma therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ding; Liu, Mingjian; Huang, Mengmeng; Wang, Lixiang; Chen, Yan; Liu, Congyan; Liu, Yuping

    2017-01-01

    A nanosized drug delivery platform with a combination of rational components and tumor targeting is significant for enhancement of anticancer therapy and reduction of side effects. In this study, we developed a octanoyl galactose ester-modified microemulsion system self-assembled by coix seed components (Gal(oct)-C-MEs), which improved the tumor accumulation through asialoglycoprotein receptor-mediated endocytosis and promoted the antitumor efficacy through multicomponent-mediated synergistic effect. Octanoyl galactose ester (Gal(oct)) with a yield of 82.3% was synthesized through a green enzymatic reaction and multidimensional characterization. Gal(oct)-C-MEs with a spherical shape had a small and uniform particle size (58.49±1.03 nm), narrow polydispersity index (0.09±0.01) and neutral surface charge (−5.82±0.57 mV). In the cellular uptake studies, the internalized Gal(oct)-C-ME was 2.28-fold higher relative to that of coix seed component-based microemulsions (C-MEs). The half-maximal inhibitory concentration of Gal(oct)-C-MEs against HepG2 cells was 46.5±2.4 μg/mL, which was notably higher than that of C-MEs. Importantly, the intratumor fluorescence of HepG2 xenograft-bearing nude mice treated with Cy5/Gal(oct)-C-MEs was 1.9-fold higher relative to treatment with Cy5/C-MEs. In the study of antitumor efficacy in vivo, HepG2 xenograft-bearing nude mice intragastrically administered Gal(oct)-C-MEs for 14 days exhibited the strongest inhibition of tumor growth and the lowest toxicity against liver and kidney among all the treatments. In summary, Gal(oct)-C-ME, as a highly effective and safe anticancer drug delivery system, showed promising potential for hepatoma therapy. PMID:28352174

  9. Toxicology and efficacy of tumor-targetingSalmonella typhimuriumA1-R compared to VNP 20009 in a syngeneic mouse tumor model in immunocompetent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Cao, Wenluo; Toneri, Makoto; Zhang, Nan; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Murakami, Takashi; Nelson, Scott D; Dry, Sarah M; Li, Yunfeng; Li, Shukuan; Wang, Xiaoen; Ma, Huaiyu; Singh, Arun S; Eilber, Fritz C; Hoffman, Robert M; Zhao, Ming

    2017-08-15

    Salmonella typhimurium A1-R ( S. typhimurium A1-R) attenuated by leu and arg auxotrophy has been shown to target multiple types of cancer in mouse models. In the present study, toxicologic and biodistribution studies of tumor-targeting S. typhimurium A1-R and S. typhimurium VNP20009 (VNP 20009) were performed in a syngeneic tumor model growing in immunocompetent BALB/c mice. Single or multiple doses of S. typhimurium A1-R of 2.5 × 10 5 and 5 × 10 5 were tolerated. A single dose of 1 × 10 6 resulted in mouse death. S. typhimurium A1-R (5 × 10 5 CFU) was eliminated from the circulation, liver and spleen approximately 3-5 days after bacterial administration via the tail vein, but remained in the tumor in high amounts. S. typhimurium A1-R was cleared from other organs much more rapidly. S. typhimurium A1-R and VNP 20009 toxicity to the spleen and liver was minimal. S. typhimurium A1-R showed higher selective targeting to the necrotic areas of the tumors than VNP20009. S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of CT26 colon carcinoma to a greater extent at the same dose of VNP20009. In conclusion, we have determined a safe dose and schedule of S. typhimurium A1-R administration in BALB/c mice, which is also efficacious against tumor growth. The results of the present report indicate similar toxicity of S. typhimurium A1-R and VNP20009, but greater antitumor efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R in an immunocompetent animal. Since VNP2009 has already proven safe in a Phase I clinical trial, the present results indicate the high clinical potential of S. typhimurium A1-R.

  10. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R Inhibits Osteosarcoma Angiogenesis in the In Vivo Gelfoam® Assay Visualized by Color-coded Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyuna, Tasuku; Tome, Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Murakami, Takashi; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Ming; Kanaya, Fuminori; Hoffman, Robert M

    2018-01-01

    We previously developed a color-coded imaging model that can quantify the length of nascent blood vessels using Gelfoam® implanted in nestin-driven green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP) nude mice. In this model, nascent blood vessels selectively express GFP. We also previously showed that osteosarcoma cells promote angiogenesis in this assay. We have also previously demonstrated the tumor-targeting bacteria Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R) can inhibit or regress all tested tumor types in mouse models. The aim of the present study was to determine if S. typhimurium A1-R could inhibit osteosarcoma angiogenesis in the in vivo Gelfoam® color-coded imaging assay. Gelfoam® was implanted subcutaneously in ND-GFP nude mice. Skin flaps were made 7 days after implantation and 143B-RFP human osteosarcoma cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were injected into the implanted Gelfoam. After establishment of tumors in the Gelfoam®, control-group mice were treated with phosphate buffered saline via tail-vein injection (iv) and the experimental group was treated with S. typhimurium A1-R iv Skin flaps were made at day 7, 14, 21, and 28 after implantation of the Gelfoam® to allow imaging of vascularization in the Gelfoam® using a variable-magnification small-animal imaging system and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Nascent blood vessels expressing ND-GFP extended into the Gelfoam® over time in both groups. However, the extent of nascent blood-vessel growth was significantly inhibited by S. typhimurium A1-R treatment by day 28. The present results indicate S. typhimurium A1-R has potential for anti-angiogenic targeted therapy of osteosarcoma. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  11. An efficient PEGylated liposomal nanocarrier containing cell-penetrating peptide and pH-sensitive hydrazone bond for enhancing tumor-targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Y

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yuan Ding,1,* Dan Sun,1,* Gui-Ling Wang,1 Hong-Ge Yang,1 Hai-Feng Xu,1 Jian-Hua Chen,2 Ying Xie,1,3 Zhi-Qiang Wang4 1Beijing Key Laboratory of Molecular Pharmaceutics and New Drug Delivery Systems, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 2School of Medicine, Jianghan University, Wuhan, 3State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, Peking University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kent State University Geauga, Burton, OH, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs as small molecular transporters with abilities of cell penetrating, internalization, and endosomal escape have potential prospect in drug delivery systems. However, a bottleneck hampering their application is the poor specificity for cells. By utilizing the function of hydration shell of polyethylene glycol (PEG and acid sensitivity of hydrazone bond, we constructed a kind of CPP-modified pH-sensitive PEGylated liposomes (CPPL to improve the selectivity of these peptides for tumor targeting. In CPPL, CPP was directly attached to liposome surfaces via coupling with stearate (STR to avoid the hindrance of PEG as a linker on the penetrating efficiency of CPP. A PEG derivative by conjugating PEG with STR via acid-degradable hydrazone bond (PEG2000-Hz-STR, PHS was synthesized. High-performance liquid chromatography and flow cytometry demonstrated that PHS was stable at normal neutral conditions and PEG could be completely cleaved from liposome surface to expose CPP under acidic environments in tumor. An optimal CPP density on liposomes was screened to guaranty a maximum targeting efficiency on tumor cells as well as not being captured by normal cells that consequently lead to a long circulation in blood. In vitro and in vivo studies indicated, in 4 mol% CPP of lipid modified system, that CPP exerted higher efficiency on internalizing the liposomes into

  12. In vivo tumor targeting and imaging with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody-conjugated dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh WJ

    2012-06-01

    sections of tumor tissues stained for the iron constituent of the NPs with Prussian blue revealed a strong blue reaction in the tumors of anti-VEGF-NP-treated mice, but only a weak reaction in mice injected with NPs. In both groups, at all time points, Prussian blue-stained liver and spleen sections showed only light staining, while stained cells were rarely detected in kidney and lung sections. Transmission electron microscopy showed that many more electron-dense particles were present in endothelial cells, tumor cells, and extracellular matrix in tumor tissues in mice injected with anti-VEGF-NPs than in NP-injected mice.Conclusion: These results demonstrated in vivo tumor targeting and efficient accumulation of anti-VEGF-NPs in tumor tissues after systemic delivery in a colon cancer model, showing that anti-VEGF-NPs have potential for use as a molecular-targeted tumor imaging agent in vivo.Keywords: nanoparticles, vascular endothelial growth factor, colon tumor, magnetic resonance imaging, transmission electron microscopy

  13. One-pot synthesis of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-self-immolative polyoxalate prodrug nanoparticles for hormone dependent cancer therapy with minimized side effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Höcherl, Anita; Jäger, Eliezer; Jäger, Alessandro; Hrubý, Martin; Konefal, Rafal; Janoušková, Olga; Spěváček, Jiří; Jiang, Y.; Schmidt, P. W.; Lodge, T. P.; Štěpánek, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 13 (2017), s. 1999-2004 ISSN 1759-9954 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH14079; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-02870S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-13853S; GA ČR(CZ) GA17-09998S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polyprodrug * diethylstilbestrol * cancer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 5.375, year: 2016

  14. Water-Solubilizing Hydrophobic ZnAgInSe/ZnS QDs with Tumor-Targeted cRGD-Sulfobetaine-PIMA-Histamine Ligands via a Self-Assembly Strategy for Bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tao; Peng, Yanan; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Jie; Gu, Yueqing; Huang, Dechun; Deng, Dawei

    2017-04-05

    Exploring the organic-to-aqueous phase transfer of quantum dots (QDs) is significant for achieving their versatile applications in biomedical fields. In this thematic issue, surface modification, size control, and biocompatibility of QDs and QDs-based nanocomposites are core problems. Herein, the new highly fluorescent tumor-targeted QDs-clusters consisting of ZnAgInSe/ZnS (ZAISe/ZnS) QDs and sulfobetaine-PIMA-histamine (SPH) polymer with the α ν β 3 integrin receptor cyclic RGD (c-RGD) were developed via ligand exchange and an accompanying self-assembly process. It was found that the structure of RGD-SPH QDs-clusters was propitious to reduce the capture of reticulo-endothelial system (RES) in virtue of external stealth ligands, and benefit to selectively accumulate at the tumor site after intravenous injection via active tumor targeting cooperated with the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. In the meantime, those clusters also recognized and enriched the cell surface when cocultured with the α ν β 3 integrin receptor overexpressed malignant cells (U87MG tumor). On the basis of the results, fabricating mutil-functional nanocomposites integrated with the long-term circulation and dual-targeting effects should be an interesting strategy for imaging cancer in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Actinium radioisotope products of enhanced purity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meikrantz, David Herbert; Todd, Terry Allen; Tranter, Troy Joseph; Horwitz, E. Philip

    2010-06-15

    A product includes actinium-225 (.sup.225Ac) and less than about 1 microgram (.mu.g) of iron (Fe) per millicurie (mCi) of actinium-225. The product may have a radioisotopic purity of greater than about 99.99 atomic percent (at %) actinium-225 and daughter isotopes of actinium-225, and may be formed by a method that includes providing a radioisotope mixture solution comprising at least one of uranium-233 (.sup.233U) and thorium-229 (.sup.229Th), extracting the at least one of uranium-233 and thorium-229 into an organic phase, substantially continuously contacting the organic phase with an aqueous phase, substantially continuously extracting actinium-225 into the aqueous phase, and purifying the actinium-225 from the aqueous phase. In some embodiments, the product may include less than about 1 nanogram (ng) of iron per millicurie (mCi) of actinium-225, and may include less than about 1 microgram (.mu.g) each of magnesium (Mg), Chromium (Cr), and manganese (Mn) per millicurie (mCi) of actinium-225.

  16. Tumor-Targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R Promotes Tumoricidal CD8+ T Cell Tumor Infiltration and Arrests Growth and Metastasis in a Syngeneic Pancreatic-Cancer Orthotopic Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takashi; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Ming; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Miyake, Kentaro; Homma, Yuki; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M

    2018-01-01

    The present study determined the effect of the tumor-targeting strain Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R) on CD8 + tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in a syngeneic pancreatic-cancer orthotopic mouse model. The effect of tumor-targeting S. typhimurium A1-R on CD8 + TILs was determined on the Pan02 murine pancreatic-adenocarcinoma implanted orthotopically in the pancreatic tail of C57BL/6 immunocompromised mice. Three weeks after orthotopic implantation, mice were randomized as follows G1: untreated control group (n = 8); and G2: S. typhimurium A1-R-treatment group (n = 8, 1 × 10 7 colony forming units [CFU]/body, iv, weekly, 3 weeks). On the 22nd day from initial treatment, all mice were sacrificed and tumors were harvested. The tumor-volume ratio was defined as ratio of tumor volume on the 22nd day relative to the 1st day. The tumor volume ratio was significantly lower in the S. typhimurium A1-R-treated group (G2) (3.0 ± 2.8) than the untreated control (G1) (39.9 ± 30.7, P R-treated mice (G2). Six mice in G1 had peritoneal dissemination, whereas no mice showed peritoneal dissemination in G2 (P R promotes CD8 + T cell infiltration and inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis. J. Cell. Biochem. 119: 634-639, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Uncertainces in tumor target definition using PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirov, A.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: PET entered into the clinics for radiation therapy as a means of displaying the metabolically active part of the tumor. However this advantage, PET has a number of shortcomings that prevent its use for precise determination of the tumor boundaries. What you will learn: The aim of the lecture is to present: the requirements for the accuracy of the determination of tumor boundaries in radiation therapy; the main phenomena which bring uncertainty using PET and a brief overview of methods for segmentation of tumors and their problems

  18. Tumor-targeted nanomedicines for cancer theranostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Twan; Shi, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic drugs have multiple drawbacks, including severe side effects and suboptimal therapeutic efficacy. Nanomedicines assist in improving the biodistribution and the target accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs, and are therefore able to enhance the balance between efficacy and toxicity. Multiple different types of nanomedicines have been evaluated over the years, including liposomes, polymer-drug conjugates and polymeric micelles, which rely on strategies such as passive targeting, active targeting and triggered release for improved tumor-directed drug delivery. Based on the notion that tumors and metastases are highly heterogeneous, it is important to integrate imaging properties in nanomedicine formulations in order to enable non-invasive and quantitative assessment of targeting efficiency. By allowing for patient pre-selection, such next generation nanotheranostics are useful for facilitating clinical translation and personalizing nanomedicine treatments. PMID:27865762

  19. Radioimmunotherapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with 90Y-DOTA humanized anti-CD22 IgG (90Y-Epratuzumab): do tumor targeting and dosimetry predict therapeutic response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Robert M; Brenner, Arnold; Burton, Jack; Hajjar, George; Toder, Stephen P; Alavi, Abass; Matthies, Alexander; Tsai, Donald E; Schuster, Stephen J; Stadtmauer, Edward A; Czuczman, Myron S; Lamonica, Dominick; Kraeber-Bodere, Françoise; Mahe, Beatrice; Chatal, Jean-François; Rogatko, André; Mardirrosian, George; Goldenberg, David M

    2003-12-01

    A DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N",N"'-tetraacetic acid)-conjugated, (111)In- and (90)Y-labeled humanized antibody to CD22, epratuzumab, was studied in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) to assess biodistribution and tumor targeting, pharmacokinetics, dosimetry, and anti-antibody response. Of particular interest was to evaluate whether pretherapy targeting and tumor dosimetry could predict therapeutic responses. Patients received a pretherapy imaging study with (111)In-DOTA-epratuzumab IgG (0.75 mg/kg), followed about 1 wk later with (90)Y-DOTA-epratuzumab starting at a dose level of 0.185 GBq/m(2) (5 mCi/m(2)) in patients who had prior high-dose chemotherapy (group 2), and at 0.370 GBq/m(2) in patients who did not have a prior transplant (group 1), with escalation in 0.185-GBq/m(2) increments. The effective blood half-life for (111)In-DOTA epratuzumab was 36.1 +/- 7.9 h (n = 25) compared with 35.2 +/- 7.0 h for (90)Y-DOTA-epratuzumab (n = 22). The whole-body half-life for (90)Y-DOTA-epratuzumab estimated from (111)In-DOTA-epratuzumab scintigraphy was 58.3 +/- 4.7 h (n = 20), with urine collection confirming the loss of between 2.2% and 15.9% of the injected activity over 3 d (n = 3). One-hundred sixteen of 165 CT-confirmed lesions were visualized with (111)In-DOTA-epratuzumab. Radiation-absorbed doses to liver, lungs, and kidneys averaged 0.55 +/- 0.13 (n = 17), 0.28 +/- 0.06 (n = 17), and 0.38 +/- 0.07 mGy/MBq (n = 10), respectively, with 0.14 +/- 0.02 and 0.23 +/- 0.04 mGy/MBq delivered to the whole-body and red marrow, respectively. Tumor doses (n = 14 lesions in 10 patients) ranged from 1.0 to as much as 83 mGy/MBq for a 0.5-g lesion (median, 7.15 mGy/MBq). Group 2 patients were more likely to experience significant hematologic toxicities, but doses of up to 0.370 GBq/m(2) of (90)Y-DOTA-epratuzumab were tolerated with standard support measures, whereas patients in group 1 tolerated doses of up to 0.740 GBq/m(2) with the potential for

  20. The availability of a functional tumor targeting T-cell repertoire determines the anti-tumor efficiency of combination therapy with anti-CTLA-4 and anti-4-1BB antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A H Jensen

    Full Text Available It has previously been found that combination therapy with anti-CTLA-4 and anti-4-1BB antibodies may enhance tumor immunity. However, this treatment is not efficient against all tumors, and it has been suggested that variations in tumor control may reflect differences in the immunogenicity of different tumors. In the present report, we have formally tested this hypothesis. Comparing the efficiency of combination antibody therapy against two antigenically distinct variants of the B16.F10 melanoma cell line, we observed that antibody therapy delayed the growth of a variant expressing an exogenous antigen (P<0.0001, while this treatment failed to protect against the non-transfected parental line (P = 0.1850 consistent with published observations. As both cell lines are poorly immunogenic in wild type mice, these observations suggested that the magnitude of the tumor targeting T-cell repertoire plays a major role in deciding the efficiency of this antibody treatment. To directly test this assumption, we made use of mice expressing the exogenous antigen as a self-antigen and therefore carrying a severely purged T-cell repertoire directed against the major tumor antigen. Notably, combination therapy completely failed to inhibit tumor growth in the latter mice (P = 0.8584. These results underscore the importance of a functionally intact T-cell population as a precondition for the efficiency of treatment with immunomodulatory antibodies. Clinically, the implication is that this type of antibody therapy should be attempted as an early form of tumor-specific immunotherapy before extensive exhaustion of the tumor-specific T-cell repertoire has occurred.

  1. WE-G-BRE-07: Proton Therapy Enhanced by Tumor-Targeting Gold Nanoparticles: A Pilot in Vivo Experiment at The Proton Therapy Center at MD Anderson Cancer Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, T; Grant, J; Wolfe, A; Gillin, M; Krishnan, S [MD Anderson Cancer Ctr., Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Assess tumor-growth delay and survival in a mouse model of prostate cancer treated with tumor-targeting gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and proton therapy. Methods: We first examined the accumulation of targeting nanoparticles within prostate tumors by imaging AuNPs with ultrasound-guided photoacoustics at 24h after the intravenous administration of goserelin-conjugated AuNPs (gAuNP) in three mice. Nanoparticles were also imaged at the cellular level with TEM in PC3 cells incubated with gAuNP for 24h. Pegylated AuNPs (pAuNP) were also imaged in vivo and in vitro for comparison. PC3 cells were then implanted subcutaneously in nude mice; 51mice with 8–10mm tumors were included. AuNPs were injected intravenously at 0.2%w/w final gold concentration 24h before irradiation. A special jig was designed to facilitate tumor irradiation perpendicular to the proton beam. Proton energy was set to 180MeV, the radiation field was 18×18cm{sup 2}, and 9cm or 13.5cm thick solid-water compensators were used to position the tumors at either the beam entrance (BE) or the SOBP. Physical doses of 5Gy were delivered to all tumors on a patient beam line at MD Anderson's Proton Therapy Center. Results: The photoacoustic experiment reveled that our nanoparticles leak from the tumor-feeding vasculature and accumulate within the tumor volume over time. Additionally, TEM images showed gAuNP are internalized in cancer cells, accumulating within the cytoplasm, whereas pAuNP are not. Tumor-growth was delayed by 11 or 32days in mice receiving gAuNP irradiated at the BE or the SOBP, relative to proton radiation alone. Survival curves (ongoing experiment) reveal that gAuNPs improved survival by 36% or 74% for tumors irradiated at the BE or SOBP. Conclusion: These important, albeit preliminary, in vivo findings reveal nanoparticles to be potent sensitizers to proton therapy. Further, conjugation of AuNPs to tumor-specific antigens that promote enhanced cellular internalization improved

  2. Synthesis of star-branched PLA-b-PMPC copolymer micelles as long blood circulation vectors to enhance tumor-targeted delivery of hydrophobic drugs in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Li-xia [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhao, Jin, E-mail: zhaojin@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Li, Ke; He, Li-gang; Qian, Xiao-ming; Liu, Chao-yong; Wang, Li-mei; Yang, Xin-qi [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Sun, Jinjin [Department of General Surgery, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300211 (China); Ren, Yu [Tianjin Research Center of Basic Medical Science, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Kang, Chun-sheng, E-mail: kang97061@yahoo.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China); Yuan, Xu-bo, E-mail: xbyuan@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2016-09-01

    Star-branched amphiphilic copolymer nanocarriers with high-density zwitterionic shell show great promise in drug delivery due to their controllable small size and excellent anti-biofouling properties. This gives the hydrophobic cargo with high stability and long blood circulation in vivo. In the present study, star-branched polylactic acid and poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) copolymers with (AB{sub 3}){sub 3}–type architecture (PLA-b-PMPC{sub 3}){sub 3} were conceived as drug vectors, and the copolymers were synthesized by an “arm-first” approach via the combination of ring opening polymerization (ROP), atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and the click reaction. The self-assembled star-branched copolymer micelles (sCPM) had an average diameter of about 64.5 nm and exhibited an ultra-hydrophilic surface with an ultralow water contact angle of about 12.7°, which efficiently suppressed the adhesion of serum proteins. In vivo experiments showed that the sCPM loading strongly enhanced the blood circulation time of DiI and the plasma half-life of DiI in sCPM was 19.3 h. The relative accumulation concentration in tumor of DiI delivered by sCPM was 2.37-fold higher than that of PLA-PEG, at 4 h after intravenous injection. These results demonstrated that the star-branched copolymer (PLA-b-PMPC{sub 3}){sub 3} is a promising alternative carrier material for intravenous delivery versus classic PEG-modified strategies. - Highlights: • Star-branched amphiphilic copolymer micelles (sCPM) with zwitterionic shells were prepared. • sCPM possess an ultra-hydrophilic surface and thus inhibited the protein absorption. • sCPM can effectively prolong the cargo’s plasma circulation time. • sCPM can enhance the cargo’s passive tumor-targeted delivery.

  3. 10 CFR 110.23 - General license for the export of byproduct material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) Actinium-225 and -227, americium-241 and -242m, californium-248, -249, -250, -251, -252, -253, and -254, curium-240, -241, -242, -243, -244, -245, -246 and -247, einsteinium-252, -253, -254 and -255, fermium...

  4. Review of Gallium-68 PSMA PET/CT Imaging in the Management of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzo, Nat P; Meyrick, Danielle; Turner, J Harvey

    2018-02-11

    Over 90% of prostate cancers over-express prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) and these tumor cells may be accurately targeted for diagnosis by 68 Ga-PSMA-positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 68 Ga-PSMA-PET/CT) imaging. This novel molecular imaging modality appears clinically to have superseded CT, and appears superior to MR imaging, for the detection of metastatic disease. 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT has the ability to reliably stage prostate cancer at presentation and can help inform an optimal treatment approach. Novel diagnostic applications of 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT include guiding biopsy to improve sampling accuracy, and guiding surgery and radiotherapy. In addition to facilitating the management of metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), 68 Ga-PSMA can select patients who may benefit from targeted systemic radionuclide therapy. 68 Ga-PSMA is the diagnostic positron-emitting theranostic pair with the beta emitter Lutetium-177 PSMA ( 177 Lu-PSMA) and alpha-emitter Actinium-225 PSMA ( 225 Ac-PSMA) which can both be used to treat PSMA-avid metastases of prostate cancer in the molecular tumor-targeted approach of theranostic nuclear oncology.

  5. Engineering of magnetic DNA nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Chen Yiru; He Wenjie; Hong Poda; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Domb, Abraham J.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to engineer novel targeted delivery system composed of magnetic DNA nanoparticles to be effective as an efficient targeted gene therapy vehicle for tumor therapy. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of plasmid DNA-encoded NK4 that acts as an HGF-antagonist and anti-angiogenic regulator for inhibitions of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Spermine (Sm) was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to obtain dextran-Sm. When Fe 2+ solution was added to the mixture of dextran-Sm and a plasmid DNA, homogenous DNA nanoparticles were formed via chemical metal coordination bonding with average size of 230 nm. Characterization of DNA nanoparticles was performed via dynamic light scattering measurement, electrophoretic light scattering measurement, as well as transmission electron microscope. DNA nanoparticles effectively condensed plasmid DNA into nanoparticles and enhanced the stability of DNA, while significantly improved transfection efficiency in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo. In addition, magnetic DNA nanoparticles exhibited high efficiency in antitumor therapy with regards to tumor growth as well as survival of animals evaluated in the presence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the magnetic properties of these DNA nanoparticles would enhance the tracking of non-viral gene delivery systems when administrated in vivo in a test model. These findings suggest that DNA nanoparticles effectively deliver DNA to tumor and thereby inhibiting tumor growth.

  6. Tumor-targeted induction of oxystress for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, J; Nakamura, H; Iyer, A K

    2007-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide anion radicals (O.-2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are potentially harmful by-products of normal cellular metabolism that directly affect cellular functions. ROS is generated by all aerobic organisms and it seems to be indispensable for signal transduction pathways that regulate cell growth and reduction-oxidation (redox) status. However, overproduction of these highly reactive oxygen metabolites can initiate lethal chain reactions, which involve oxidation and damage to structures that are crucial for cellular integrity and survival. In fact, many antitumor agents, such as vinblastine, cisplatin, mitomycin C, doxorubicin, camptothecin, inostamycin, neocarzinostatin and many others exhibit antitumor activity via ROS-dependent activation of apoptotic cell death, suggesting potential use of ROS as an antitumor principle. Thus, a unique anticancer strategy named "oxidation therapy" has been developed by inducing cytotoxic oxystress for cancer treatment. This goal could be achieved mainly by two methods, namely, (i) inducing the generation of ROS directly to solid tumors and (ii) inhibiting the antioxidative enzyme (defense) system of tumor cells. Since 1950s, many strategies have been employed based on the first method, namely, administration of ROS per se (e.g. H2O2) or ROS generating enzyme to tumor bearing animals. However no successful and practical results were obtained probably because of the lack of tumor selective ROS delivery and hence resulting in subsequent induction of severe side effects. To overcome these obstacles, we developed polyethylene glycol (PEG) conjugated O.-2 or H2O2-generating enzymes, xanthine oxidase (XO) and D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) (PEG-DAO) respectively. More recently, a pegylated (PEG) zinc protoporphyrin (PEG-ZnPP) and a highly water soluble micellar formulation of ZnPP based on amphiphilic styrene maleic acid (SMA) copolymer, SMA-ZnPP, are prepared, which are potent inhibitors of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). HO-1 is a major antioxidative enzyme of tumors, that is different in mechanism of catalase or superoxide dismutase (SOD). Consequently, both PEG-enzymes and PEG-ZnPP exhibited superior in vivo pharmacokinetics than their parental molecules, particularly in tumor delivery by taking advantage of the EPR effect of macromolecular nature, and thus showed remarkable antitumor effects suggesting the potentials of this anticancer therapeutic for clinical application. Furthermore, it has been well known that many antioxidative enzymes such as catalase, SOD are down-regulated in most solid tumors in vivo. On the contrary, HO-1 is highly upregulated and it plays a very important role of antioxidation, because HO-1 generates biliverdin, which being converted to bilirubin exhibits a very potent antioxidative effect, and hence antiapoptosis in tumors. Thus this oxidation therapy, by inhibiting this HO-1 dependent antioxidant (bilirubin) formation by ZnPP, and by enhancing ROS generation, is expected to offer a powerful therapeutic modality for future anticancer therapy.

  7. Engineering of magnetic DNA nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein, E-mail: hosseinkhani@yahoo.com [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Chen Yiru [National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (China); He Wenjie; Hong Poda [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Yu, Dah-Shyong [Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center (China); Domb, Abraham J. [Institute of Drug Research, The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2013-01-15

    This study aims to engineer novel targeted delivery system composed of magnetic DNA nanoparticles to be effective as an efficient targeted gene therapy vehicle for tumor therapy. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of plasmid DNA-encoded NK4 that acts as an HGF-antagonist and anti-angiogenic regulator for inhibitions of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Spermine (Sm) was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to obtain dextran-Sm. When Fe{sup 2+} solution was added to the mixture of dextran-Sm and a plasmid DNA, homogenous DNA nanoparticles were formed via chemical metal coordination bonding with average size of 230 nm. Characterization of DNA nanoparticles was performed via dynamic light scattering measurement, electrophoretic light scattering measurement, as well as transmission electron microscope. DNA nanoparticles effectively condensed plasmid DNA into nanoparticles and enhanced the stability of DNA, while significantly improved transfection efficiency in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo. In addition, magnetic DNA nanoparticles exhibited high efficiency in antitumor therapy with regards to tumor growth as well as survival of animals evaluated in the presence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the magnetic properties of these DNA nanoparticles would enhance the tracking of non-viral gene delivery systems when administrated in vivo in a test model. These findings suggest that DNA nanoparticles effectively deliver DNA to tumor and thereby inhibiting tumor growth.

  8. Reduction sensitive nanosystems for tumor targeted imaging and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Yaqin

    2017-01-01

    Nanomedicines based on biodegradable polymers for tumor imaging and therapy receive more and more attention due to their improved water solibility, bioavailability, and extended blood circulation times. Advanced polymer chemistry combined with a thorough understanding of the tumor microenvironment,

  9. Radiolabeling Strategies for Tumor-Targeting Proteinaceous Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Sugiura

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their large size proteinaceous drugs offer higher operative information content compared to the small molecules that correspond to the traditional understanding of druglikeness. As a consequence these drugs allow developing patient-specific therapies that provide the means to go beyond the possibilities of current drug therapy. However, the efficacy of these strategies, in particular “personalized medicine”, depends on precise information about individual target expression rates. Molecular imaging combines non-invasive imaging methods with tools of molecular and cellular biology and thus bridges current knowledge to the clinical use. Moreover, nuclear medicine techniques provide therapeutic applications with tracers that behave like the diagnostic tracer. The advantages of radioiodination, still the most versatile radiolabeling strategy, and other labeled compounds comprising covalently attached radioisotopes are compared to the use of chelator-protein conjugates that are complexed with metallic radioisotopes. With the techniques using radioactive isotopes as a reporting unit or even the therapeutic principle, care has to be taken to avoid cleavage of the radionuclide from the protein it is linked to. The tracers used in molecular imaging require labeling techniques that provide site specific conjugation and metabolic stability. Appropriate choice of the radionuclide allows tailoring the properties of the labeled protein to the application required. Until the event of positron emission tomography the spectrum of nuclides used to visualize cellular and biochemical processes was largely restricted to iodine isotopes and 99m-technetium. Today, several nuclides such as 18-fluorine, 68-gallium and 86-yttrium have fundamentally extended the possibilities of tracer design and in turn caused the need for the development of chemical methods for their conjugation.

  10. Recent Trends in Multifunctional Liposomal Nanocarriers for Enhanced Tumor Targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Perche

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Liposomes are delivery systems that have been used to formulate a vast variety of therapeutic and imaging agents for the past several decades. They have significant advantages over their free forms in terms of pharmacokinetics, sensitivity for cancer diagnosis and therapeutic efficacy. The multifactorial nature of cancer and the complex physiology of the tumor microenvironment require the development of multifunctional nanocarriers. Multifunctional liposomal nanocarriers should combine long blood circulation to improve pharmacokinetics of the loaded agent and selective distribution to the tumor lesion relative to healthy tissues, remote-controlled or tumor stimuli-sensitive extravasation from blood at the tumor’s vicinity, internalization motifs to move from tumor bounds and/or tumor intercellular space to the cytoplasm of cancer cells for effective tumor cell killing. This review will focus on current strategies used for cancer detection and therapy using liposomes with special attention to combination therapies.

  11. Amphiphilic Phospholipid-Based Riboflavin Derivatives for Tumor Targeting Nanomedicines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beztsinna, N.; Tsvetkova, Y.; Bartneck, M.; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria; Kiessling, F.; Bestel, I.

    2016-01-01

    Riboflavin (RF) is an essential vitamin for cellular metabolism. Recent studies have shown that RF is internalized through RF transporters, which are highly overexpressed by prostate and breast cancer cells, as well as by angiogenic endothelium. Here, we present an optimized synthesis protocol for

  12. Engineering of magnetic DNA nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Chen, Yi-Ru; He, Wenjie; Hong, Po-Da; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Domb, Abraham J.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to engineer novel targeted delivery system composed of magnetic DNA nanoparticles to be effective as an efficient targeted gene therapy vehicle for tumor therapy. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of plasmid DNA-encoded NK4 that acts as an HGF-antagonist and anti-angiogenic regulator for inhibitions of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Spermine (Sm) was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to obtain dextran-Sm. When Fe2+ solution was added to the mixture of dextran-Sm and a plasmid DNA, homogenous DNA nanoparticles were formed via chemical metal coordination bonding with average size of 230 nm. Characterization of DNA nanoparticles was performed via dynamic light scattering measurement, electrophoretic light scattering measurement, as well as transmission electron microscope. DNA nanoparticles effectively condensed plasmid DNA into nanoparticles and enhanced the stability of DNA, while significantly improved transfection efficiency in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo. In addition, magnetic DNA nanoparticles exhibited high efficiency in antitumor therapy with regards to tumor growth as well as survival of animals evaluated in the presence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the magnetic properties of these DNA nanoparticles would enhance the tracking of non-viral gene delivery systems when administrated in vivo in a test model. These findings suggest that DNA nanoparticles effectively deliver DNA to tumor and thereby inhibiting tumor growth.

  13. The Blazing Horror of Now

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warner, Cameron David

    2012-01-01

    On following posts on Tibetan self-immolation on Facebook and the sense that our normal academic tools of analysis fail to give us the sense that we can derive significant meaning.......On following posts on Tibetan self-immolation on Facebook and the sense that our normal academic tools of analysis fail to give us the sense that we can derive significant meaning....

  14. Biodegradable star HPMA polymer conjugates of doxorubicin for passive tumor targeting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Etrych, Tomáš; Strohalm, Jiří; Chytil, Petr; Černoch, Peter; Starovoytova, Larisa; Pechar, Michal; Ulbrich, Karel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 5 (2011), s. 527-539 ISSN 0928-0987 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400500806; GA AV ČR IAAX00500803; GA ČR GA203/08/0543 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : dendrimer * HPMA copolymers * doxorubicin Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.212, year: 2011

  15. Conjugates of doxorubicin with graft HPMA copolymers for passive tumor targeting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Etrych, Tomáš; Chytil, Petr; Mrkvan, Tomáš; Šírová, Milada; Říhová, Blanka; Ulbrich, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 3 (2008), s. 184-192 ISSN 0168-3659 R&D Projects: GA MPO FI-IM2/111; GA AV ČR KAN200200651; GA AV ČR IAA400500806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : HPMA copolymers * drug carriers * doxorubicin * graft polymers Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.690, year: 2008

  16. Improved tumor targeting of radiolabeled RGD peptides using rapid dose fractionation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.; Frielink, C.; Dijkgraaf, I.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Edwards, D.S.; Liu, S.; Rajopadhye, M.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Boerman, O.C.

    2004-01-01

    Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptides preferentially bind to alphavbeta3 integrin, an integrin expressed on newly formed endothelial cells and on various tumor cells. When labeled with beta-emitting radionuclides, these peptides can be used for peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy of

  17. Baicalin loaded in folate-PEG modified liposomes for enhanced stability and tumor targeting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chen, Y.; Minh, L. V.; Liu, J.; Angelov, Borislav; Drechsler, M.; Garamus, V. M.; Willumeit-Römer, R.; Zou, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 140, 1 April (2016), s. 74-82 ISSN 0927-7765 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC15-10527J Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : baicalin * liposomes * folate receptor Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.887, year: 2016

  18. Photodynamic therapy and imaging based on tumor-targeted nanoprobe, polymer-conjugated zinc protoporphyrin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fang, J.; Liao, L.; Yin, H.; Nakamura, H.; Šubr, Vladimír; Ulbrich, Karel; Maeda, H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 2015, č. 4 (2015), s. 1-13 ISSN 2056-5623 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/12/1254 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP0802 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : fluorescent nanoprobe * photodynamic therapy * theranostic nanomedicine Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  19. Molecular Basis of Natural Killer Cell Tumor Target Recognition: The NKr/MHC Class I Complex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hasemann, Charles

    1999-01-01

    .... We have pursued this via the heterologous expression of wild type and mutant NK receptors for the purpose of the determination of the atomic structure of an NK receptor/ class I MHC complex via X-ray crystallography...

  20. Multimodality imaging in vivo for preclinical assessment of tumor-targeted doxorubicin nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Youn Hwang

    Full Text Available This study presents a new multimodal imaging approach that includes high-frequency ultrasound, fluorescence intensity, confocal, and spectral imaging to improve the preclinical evaluation of new therapeutics in vivo. Here we use this approach to assess in vivo the therapeutic efficacy of the novel chemotherapy construct, HerDox during and after treatment. HerDox is comprised of doxorubicin non-covalently assembled in a viral-like particle targeted to HER2+ tumor cells, causing tumor cell death at over 10-fold lower dose compared to the untargeted drug, while sparing the heart. Whereas our initial proof-of-principle studies on HerDox used tumor growth/shrinkage rates as a measure of therapeutic efficacy, here we show that multimodal imaging deployed during and after treatment can supplement traditional modes of tumor monitoring to further characterize the particle in tissues of treated mice. Specifically, we show here that tumor cell apoptosis elicited by HerDox can be monitored in vivo during treatment using high frequency ultrasound imaging, while in situ confocal imaging of excised tumors shows that HerDox indeed penetrated tumor tissue and can be detected at the subcellular level, including in the nucleus, via Dox fluorescence. In addition, ratiometric spectral imaging of the same tumor tissue enables quantitative discrimination of HerDox fluorescence from autofluorescence in situ. In contrast to standard approaches of preclinical assessment, this new method provides multiple/complementary information that may shorten the time required for initial evaluation of in vivo efficacy, thus potentially reducing the time and cost for translating new drug molecules into the clinic.

  1. Tumor-targeted micelle-forming block copolymers for overcoming of multidrug resistance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Braunová, Alena; Kostka, Libor; Sivák, Ladislav; Cuchalová, Lucie; Hvězdová, Zuzana; Laga, Richard; Filippov, Sergey K.; Černoch, Peter; Pechar, Michal; Janoušková, Olga; Šírová, Milada; Etrych, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 245, 10 January (2017), s. 41-51 ISSN 0168-3659 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV16-28600A; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : multidrug resistance * P-glycoprotein inhibitor * EPR effect Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry; EE - Microbiology, Virology (MBU-M) OBOR OECD: Polymer science; Microbiology (MBU-M) Impact factor: 7.786, year: 2016

  2. Biodegradable micellar HPMA-based polymer-drug conjugates with betulinic acid for passive tumor targeting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lomkova, Ekaterina A.; Chytil, Petr; Janoušková, Olga; Mueller, T.; Lucas, H.; Filippov, Sergey K.; Trhlíková, Olga; Aleshunin, P. A.; Skorik, Y. A.; Ulbrich, Karel; Etrych, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 11 (2016), s. 3493-3507 ISSN 1525-7797 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-02986S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) * polymeric micelles * drug delivery Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 5.246, year: 2016

  3. Fluorescent and quantitative mitochondrial redox imaging of tumor targeted by Octa-RGD probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Sha

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Integrins, over-expressed in a broad range of cancer diseases, are widely utilized as a tumor biomarker. Metabolism investigation also plays important roles in tumor theranostics. Developing simple integrin-targetting probe and monitoring tumor metabolism will give opportunities to find ways for cancer treatment, however, the investigation of tumor metabolism with integrin receptor based probes has been rarely reported so far. Here, we developed an octavalent fluorescent probe Octa-RGD by convenient genetic method, based on one tetrameric far-red fluorescent protein (fRFP linked with RGD peptides. We validated its intergin targeting by confocal imaging in vitro. Then we screened a variety of tumor cells, and differentiated their binding affinity based on the fluorescence of the probe via flow cytometry. Among these cells, CNE-2 cells had the highest uptake of the probe, while B16 cells had the lowest, corresponding with their intergin expression levels. Next, the fluorescent and metabolic imaging was performed in HT1080 (intergin postive tumor, where nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogen (NADH, flavoprotein (Fp and fRFP fluorescent signals were collected. The tumor from mice intravenously injected with Octa-RGD probe displayed obviously higher NADH redox ratio NADH/(Fp+NADH and fRFP signal, than those with fRFP protein. It suggested that integrin targeting may have influence on the target cell metabolism, and further demonstrated Octa-RGD probe facilitated its uptake in the targeted tumor in vivo. This paper developed a useful probe, which can bind integrins specifically and efficiently in tumor cells, and together with tumor metabolic information, it may provide new insight for RGD targeting-based cancer therapeutics.

  4. A tumor-targeted polymer theranostics platform for positron emission tomography and fluorescence imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koziolová, Eva; Goel, S.; Chytil, Petr; Janoušková, Olga; Barnhart, T. E.; Cai, W.; Etrych, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 30 (2017), s. 10906-10918 ISSN 2040-3364 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-02986S; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-28594A; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers * positron emission tomography ( PET ) * fluorescence imaging Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 7.367, year: 2016

  5. Phosphatidylinositol turnover is associated with human natural killer cell activation by tumor target cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, T.A.; Brahmi, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cell activity has been shown to be a binding-dependent event leading to the destruction of various targets. This suggests a possible role for plasma membrane phospholipid turnover in coupling a receptor-mediated binding event with transduction of a intracellular signal to result in the activation of the effector cell. Currently, phosphatidylinositol (PI) turnover is implicated in several immune cell systems. Therefore, in this study, the authors examined phospholipid turnover in human NK cells upon exposure to a sensitive (K562) and a resistant (YAC-1) target cell (TC). NK cell membrane phospholipids were labelled with Phosphorus-32 ( 32 P) and, following stimulation, were extracted and run on silica gel thin-layer chromatography. Labelled phospholipids were visualized by autoradiography then scraped and counted in a liquid scintillation counter. A 2.5 fold increase in label incorporation into PI relative to controls was shown to occur when NK cells were stimulated by K562 for 2 hours. In contrast, no increased labelling of PI relative to controls was noted when NK cells were stimulated by YAC-1 for the same period of time. No change in incorporation of 32 P into phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine occurred in either set of conditions. These results suggest that PI turnover may be an early activation event in NK cells following binding of K562

  6. Radiopaque, Tumor-Targeted Nanoparticles for Improved Mammographic Detection of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, Gregory P

    2007-01-01

    ...% and a positive predictive value (PPV2) of only 25-40%. Accordingly a large number of patients either do not receive treatment when they should or are subjected to needless physical and emotional trauma...

  7. Nano-siRNA Particles and Combination Therapies for Ovarian Tumor Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    reaction parameters. Treating the multi-RNAi-MS particles with different polycations, such as poly-L- lysine (PLL) and polyethylene imine (PEI), yielded...perspective and guidance in pre-clinical studies of specific combination drug/siRNA sets for targeting OC, and in the use of appropriate animal models...an amino-acid linker spacer exhibit potent antagonism that suppress the ErbB3-NRG dimerization and reduce the downstream signaling pathways of ErbB3

  8. A RNA-DNA Hybrid Aptamer for Nanoparticle-Based Prostate Tumor Targeted Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Leach

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The side effects of radio- and chemo-therapy pose long-term challenges on a cancer patient’s health. It is, therefore, highly desirable to develop more effective therapies that can specifically target carcinoma cells without damaging normal and healthy cells. Tremendous efforts have been made in the past to develop targeted drug delivery systems for solid cancer treatment. In this study, a new aptamer, A10-3-J1, which recognizes the extracellular domain of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA, was designed. A super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-aptamer-doxorubicin (SPIO-Apt-Dox was fabricated and employed as a targeted drug delivery platform for cancer therapy. This DNA RNA hybridized aptamer antitumor agent was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of targeted cells while minimizing collateral damage to non-targeted cells. This SPIO-Apt-Dox nanoparticle has specificity to PSMA+ prostate cancer cells. Aptamer inhibited nonspecific uptake of membrane-permeable doxorubic to the non-target cells, leading to reduced untargeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake while enhancing targeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake. The experimental results indicate that the drug delivery platform can yield statistically significant effectiveness being more cytotoxic to the targeted cells as opposed to the non-targeted cells.

  9. Evaluation of tumor targeting with radiolabeled F(ab2 fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Babaei MH

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Humanized monoclonal antibody U36 and its F(ab'2 fragment, radio labeled with 125I, were tested for tumor localization in nude mice bearing a squamous cell carcinoma xenograft line derived from a head and neck carcinoma. Monoclonal antibody IgG or F(ab'2 fragment were injected in parallel and at days 1, 2 and 3, mice were dissected for determination of isotope biodistribution. IgG as well as F(ab'2 showed highly specific localization in tumor tissue. The mean tumor uptake (n=3 is expressed as the percentage of the injected dose per gram of tumor tissue (%ID/g. %ID/g of IgG was 11.7% at day 1 and decreased to 10.9% at day 3 whereas %ID/g of F(ab'2 was 2.9% at day 1 and decreased on following days. Tumor to blood ratios (T/B at day 1 were 0.86 for IgG and 1.32 for F(ab'2 and reached a maximum at day 3 with values of 4.41 and 1.84 respectively. These findings suggest that the superior tumor to non-tumor ratios in the day of 1 render the F(ab'2 fragment more qualified for specific targeting radioisotopes to tumor xenografts in this exprimental setting.

  10. Synergistic anti-tumor effects of bevacizumab and tumor targeted polymerized VEGF siRNA nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung Goo; Jo, Sung Duk; Yhee, Ji Young; Lee, Beom Suk; Lee, So Jin; Park, Sung Gurl; Kang, Sun-Woong; Kim, Sun Hwa; Jeong, Ji Hoon

    2017-07-15

    A variety of VEGF inhibitors have been reported to treat cancers by suppressing tumor angiogenesis. Bevacizumab, a monoclonal VEGF antibody, was the first FDA approved anti-angiogenic agent for cancer treatments. However, bevacizumab shows modest therapeutic efficiency and often cause resistant problem in significant populations of cancer patients. To solve these problem, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of siRNA drugs targeting VEGF and combination of the RNAi drug with bevacizumab for cancer treatments. For efficient VEGF siRNA delivery, chemically polymerized siRNAs were complexed with thiolated-glycol chitosan (psi(VEGF)/tGC). The poly-VEGF siRNA and thiolated-glycol chitosan formed stable nanoparticles via electrostatic interaction and chemical crosslinking, and showed high accumulation in tumor tissues resulting in efficient gene silencing. Both VEGF siRNA nanoparticles and bevacizumab had efficient therapeutic effects in tumor xenograft mouse models. Interestingly, most pronounced therapeutic efficacy was observed when the two distinct VEGF inhibitors were treated in combination revealing synergistic effects. The results showed that the psi(VEGF)/tGC nanoparticle mediated knockdown of VEGF exerts anti-tumor effects and the combination treatments with bevacizumab can extend the treatments options to conventional bevacizumab treatments for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Nano-siRNA Particles and Combination Therapies for Ovarian Tumor Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Taconic, Hudson, NY) were used for biodistribution experiments. Mice fed on the alfalfa -free special diet (AIN-93M Maintenance Purified Diet from...cancer stem cells unravels the mechanisms for repair and chemoresistance. Cell Cycle 2009, 8, 158-166. 40. Zhang, S.; Balch, C.; Chan, M. W.; Lai, H.-C

  12. Evaluation of radioiodinated curcumin for its potential as a tumor-targeting radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Chandan; Subramanian, Suresh; Samuel, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, a component of the spice turmeric has widely reported anticancer properties in several types of cancer. The differential accumulation and mechanism of its action in normal and cancer cells have proven its potential in targeting tumor. Therefore, it was of interest to label curcumin with a suitable radionuclide and explore its potential for use in nuclear medicine. Curcumin was labeled with 125 I by iodogen method. The radiochemical purity was analyzed by paper electrophoresis and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Cell binding was carried out in murine lymphoma and melanoma cell lines. Bioevaluation and pharmacokinetics of radioiodinated curcumin was carried out in lymphoma-bearing mice for various time points (1, 3, 24, and 48 h). The efficiency of labeling was >75% and the radiochemical purity postpurification was >95%. The maximum uptake (∼7% at 2 h, 37°C using 5 X 10 5 cells) was observed in EL4 cells. Significant tumor uptake in lymphoma-bearing mice was observed at 180 min (3.3 ± 0.76% ID/g). In addition, pharmacokinetics of radioiodinated curcumin is fast, with the majority of the preparation out of the bloodstream in 3 h. The results of these studies suggest that curcumin has the potential for targeting lymphomas, which may be used as diagnostic/therapeutic agent by labeling with other radionuclides. (author)

  13. A Glycyrrhetinic Acid-Modified Curcumin Supramolecular Hydrogel for liver tumor targeting therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoqin; Li, Jinliang; Cai, Yanbin; Zhan, Jie; Gao, Jie; Song, Mingcai; Shi, Yang; Yang, Zhimou

    2017-03-01

    Curcumin (Cur), a phenolic anti-oxidant compound obtained from Curcuma longa plant, possesses a variety of therapeutic properties. However, it is suffered from its low water solubility and low bioavailability property, which seriously restricts its clinical application. In this study, we developed a glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) modified curcumin supramolecular pro-gelator (GA-Cur) and a control compound Nap-Cur by replacing GA with the naphthylacetic acid (Nap). Both compounds showed good water solubility and could form supramolecular gels by disulfide bond reduction triggered by glutathione (GSH) in vitro. Both formed gels could sustainedly release Cur in buffer solutions. We also investigated the cytotoxicity of pro-gelators to HepG2 cells by a MTT assay and determined the cellular uptake behaviours of them by fluorescence microscopy and LC-MS. Due to the over expression of GA receptor in liver cancer cells, our pro-gelator of GA-Cur showed an enhanced cellular uptake and better inhibition capacity to liver tumor cells than Nap-Cur. Therefore, the GA-Cur could significantly inhibit HepG2 cell growth. Our study provides a novel nanomaterial for liver tumor chemotherapy.

  14. Liposomes containing alkylated methotrexate analogues for phospholipase A(2) mediated tumor targeted drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasgaard, Thomas; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Jensen, Simon Skøde

    2009-01-01

    Two lipophilic methotrexate analogues have been synthesized and evaluated for cytotoxicity against KATO III and HT-29 human colon cancer cells. Both analogues contained a C-16-alkyl chain attached to the gamma-carboxylic acid and one of the analogues had an additional benzyl group attached...... cytotoxicity was incorporated into liposomes that were designed to be particularly Susceptible to a liposome degrading enzyme, secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)), which is found in high concentrations in tumors of several different cancer types. Liposome incorporation was investigated by differential...... of the MTX-liposomes against KATO III and HT-29 cancer cells was found to be independent of sPLA(2) hydrolysis, indicating that the alkylated MTX-analogue was available for cancer cell uptake even in the absence of liposome hydrolysis. Using a DSC based method for assessing the anchoring stability...

  15. Dual-function synthetic peptide derived from BMP4 for highly efficient tumor targeting and antiangiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Suk Hyun; Lee, Jue Yeon; Suh, Jin Sook; Park, Yoon Shin; Chung, Chong Pyoung; Park, Yoon Jeong

    Angiogenesis plays a critical role in the growth and metastasis of cancer, and growth factors released from cancer promote blood-vessel formation in the tumor microenvironment. The angiogenesis is accelerated via interactions of growth factors with the high-affinity receptors on cancer cells. In particular, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) on the surface of cancer cells have been shown to be important in many aspects of determining a tumor's phenotype and development. Specifically, the regulation of the interactions between HSPGs and growth factors results in changes in tumor progression. A peptide with heparin-binding (HBP) activity has been developed and synthesized to inhibit tumor growth via the prevention of angiogenesis. We hypothesized that HBP could inhibit the interaction of growth factors and HSPGs on the surface of cancer cells, decrease paracrine signaling in endothelial cells (ECs), and finally decrease angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we found that HBP had antiangiogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. The conditioned media obtained from a breast cancer cell line treated with HBP were used to culture human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) to evaluate the antiangiogenic effect of HBP on ECs. HBP effectively inhibited the migration, invasion, and tube formation of HUVECs in vitro. In addition, the expressions of angiogenesis-mediating factors, including ERK, FAK, and Akt, were considerably decreased. HBP also decreased the levels of invasive factors, including MMP2 and MMP9, secreted by the HUVECs. We demonstrated significant suppression of tumor growth in a breast cancer xenograft model and enhanced distribution of HBP at the site of tumors. Taken together, our results show that HBP has antiangiogenic effects on ECs, and suggest that it may serve as a potential antitumor agent through control of the tumor microenvironment.

  16. Dual-function synthetic peptide derived from BMP4 for highly efficient tumor targeting and antiangiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi SH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Suk Hyun Choi,1,* Jue Yeon Lee,2,* Jin Sook Suh,1 Yoon Shin Park,3 Chong Pyoung Chung,2 Yoon Jeong Park1 1Department of Dental Regenerative Biotechnology, Dental Research Institute, 2Central Research Institute, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, 3Department in Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, South Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Angiogenesis plays a critical role in the growth and metastasis of cancer, and growth factors released from cancer promote blood-vessel formation in the tumor microenvironment. The angiogenesis is accelerated via interactions of growth factors with the high-affinity receptors on cancer cells. In particular, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs on the surface of cancer cells have been shown to be important in many aspects of determining a tumor’s phenotype and development. Specifically, the regulation of the interactions between HSPGs and growth factors results in changes in tumor progression. A peptide with heparin-binding (HBP activity has been developed and synthesized to inhibit tumor growth via the prevention of angiogenesis. We hypothesized that HBP could inhibit the interaction of growth factors and HSPGs on the surface of cancer cells, decrease paracrine signaling in endothelial cells (ECs, and finally decrease angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we found that HBP had antiangiogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. The conditioned media obtained from a breast cancer cell line treated with HBP were used to culture human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs to evaluate the antiangiogenic effect of HBP on ECs. HBP effectively inhibited the migration, invasion, and tube formation of HUVECs in vitro. In addition, the expressions of angiogenesis-mediating factors, including ERK, FAK, and Akt, were considerably decreased. HBP also decreased the levels of invasive factors, including MMP2 and MMP9, secreted by the HUVECs. We demonstrated significant suppression of tumor growth in a breast cancer xenograft model and enhanced distribution of HBP at the site of tumors. Taken together, our results show that HBP has antiangiogenic effects on ECs, and suggest that it may serve as a potential antitumor agent through control of the tumor microenvironment. Keywords: heparin-binding peptide, HBP, antiangiogenesis, heparan sulfate proteoglycans, HSPGs, endothelial cells, breast cancer xenograft, tumor microenvironment

  17. On-line cone beam CT image guidance for vocal cord tumor targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Sarah O.S.; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Astreinidou, Eleftheria; Gangsaas, Anne; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: We are developing a technique for highly focused vocal cord irradiation in early glottic carcinoma to optimally treat a target volume confined to a single cord. This technique, in contrast with the conventional methods, aims at sparing the healthy vocal cord. As such a technique requires sub-mm daily targeting accuracy to be effective, we investigate the accuracy achievable with on-line kV-cone beam CT (CBCT) corrections. Materials and methods: CBCT scans were obtained in 10 early glottic cancer patients in each treatment fraction. The grey value registration available in X-ray volume imaging (XVI) software (Elekta, Synergy) was applied to a volume of interest encompassing the thyroid cartilage. After application of the thus derived corrections, residue displacements with respect to the planning CT scan were measured at clearly identifiable relevant landmarks. The intra- and inter-observer variations were also measured. Results: While before correction the systematic displacements of the vocal cords were as large as 2.4 ± 3.3 mm (cranial-caudal population mean ± SD Σ), daily CBCT registration and correction reduced these values to less than 0.2 ± 0.5 mm in all directions. Random positioning errors (SD σ) were reduced to less than 1 mm. Correcting only for translations and not for rotations did not appreciably affect this accuracy. The residue random displacements partly stem from intra-observer variations (SD = 0.2-0.6 mm). Conclusion: The use of CBCT for daily image guidance in combination with standard mask fixation reduced systematic and random set-up errors of the vocal cords to <1 mm prior to the delivery of each fraction dose. Thus, this facilitates the high targeting precision required for a single vocal cord irradiation.

  18. Ovarian cancer treatment with a tumor-targeting and gene expression-controllable lipoplex

    OpenAIRE

    He, Zhi-Yao; Deng, Feng; Wei, Xia-Wei; Ma, Cui-Cui; Luo, Min; Zhang, Ping; Sang, Ya-Xiong; Liang, Xiao; Liu, Li; Qin, Han-Xiao; Shen, Ya-Li; Liu, Ting; Liu, Yan-Tong; Wang, Wei; Wen, Yan-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of folate receptor alpha (FR?) and high telomerase activity are considered to be the characteristics of ovarian cancers. In this study, we developed FR?-targeted lipoplexes loaded with an hTERT promoter-regulated plasmid that encodes a matrix protein (MP) of the vesicular stomatitis virus, F-LP/pMP(2.5), for application in ovarian cancer treatment. We first characterized the pharmaceutical properties of F-LP/pMP(2.5). The efficient expression of the MP-driven hTERT promoter in ...

  19. To serve and protect: Enzyme inhibitors as radiopeptide escorts promote tumor targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A. Nock (Berthold); T. Maina (Theodosia); E.P. Krenning (Eric); M. de Jong (Marcel)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractRadiolabeled octreotide analogs are most successfully being applied today in clinical cancer imaging and treatment. Propagation of this paradigm to other radiopeptide families has been greatly hampered by the inherent poor metabolic stability of systemically administered peptide analogs.

  20. Intrinsically active nanobody-modified polymeric micelles for tumor-targeted combination therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talelli, M.; Oliveira, S.; Rijcken, C.J.; Pieters, E.H.; Etrych, T.; Ulbrich, K.; van Nostrum, C.F.; Storm, Gerrit; Hennink, W.E.; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria

    2013-01-01

    Various different passively and actively targeted nanomedicines have been designed and evaluated over the years, in particular for the treatment of cancer. Reasoning that the potential of ligand-modified nanomedicines can be substantially improved if intrinsically active targeting moieties are used,

  1. Intrinsically active nanobody-modified polymeric micelles for tumor-targeted combination therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Talelli, M.; Oliveira, S.; Rijcken, C. J. F.; Pieters, E. H. E.; Etrych, Tomáš; Ulbrich, Karel; van Nostrum, R. C. F.; Storm, G.; Hennink, W. E.; Lammers, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 4 (2013), s. 1255-1260 ISSN 0142-9612 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400500806; GA ČR GAP301/11/0325 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polymeric micelle * doxorubicin * active targeting Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 8.312, year: 2013

  2. Tumor Targeting by Fusobacterium nucleatum: A Pilot Study and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawad Abed

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC is a common tumor with high mortality rates. Interestingly, CRC was found to be colonized by the oral anaerobic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, which accelerates tumor progression and enables immune evasion. The CRC-specific colonization by fusobacteria is mediated through the recognition of tumor displayed Gal-GalNAc moieties by the fusobacterial Fap2 Gal-GalNAc lectin. Here, we show high Gal-GalNAc levels in additional adenocarcinomas including those found in the stomach, prostate, ovary, colon, uterus, pancreas, breast, lung, and esophagus. This observation coincides with recent reports that found fusobacterial DNA in some of these tumors. Given the tumorigenic role of fusobacteria and its immune evasion properties, we suggest that fusobacterial elimination might improve treatment outcome of the above tumors. Furthermore, as fusobacteria appears to specifically home-in to Gal-GalNAc—displaying tumors, it might be engineered as a platform for treating CRC and the above common, lethal, adenocarcinomas.

  3. Tumor Targeting byFusobacterium nucleatum: A Pilot Study and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Jawad; Maalouf, Naseem; Parhi, Lishay; Chaushu, Stella; Mandelboim, Ofer; Bachrach, Gilad

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) is a common tumor with high mortality rates. Interestingly, CRC was found to be colonized by the oral anaerobic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum , which accelerates tumor progression and enables immune evasion. The CRC-specific colonization by fusobacteria is mediated through the recognition of tumor displayed Gal-GalNAc moieties by the fusobacterial Fap2 Gal-GalNAc lectin. Here, we show high Gal-GalNAc levels in additional adenocarcinomas including those found in the stomach, prostate, ovary, colon, uterus, pancreas, breast, lung, and esophagus. This observation coincides with recent reports that found fusobacterial DNA in some of these tumors. Given the tumorigenic role of fusobacteria and its immune evasion properties, we suggest that fusobacterial elimination might improve treatment outcome of the above tumors. Furthermore, as fusobacteria appears to specifically home-in to Gal-GalNAc-displaying tumors, it might be engineered as a platform for treating CRC and the above common, lethal, adenocarcinomas.

  4. Polymeric nanomedicines for image-guided drug delivery and tumor-targeted combination therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lammers, T.; Šubr, Vladimír; Ulbrich, Karel; Hennink, W. E.; Storm, G.; Kiessling, F.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 3 (2010), s. 197-212 ISSN 1748-0132 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : nanomedicine s * drug targeting * polymer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.750, year: 2010

  5. Passive versus active tumor targeting using RGD- and NGR-modified polymeric nanomedicines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kunjachan, S.; Pola, Robert; Gremse, F.; Theek, B.; Ehling, J.; Moeckel, D.; Hermanns-Sachweh, B.; Pechar, Michal; Ulbrich, Karel; Hennink, W. E.; Storm, G.; Lederle, W.; Kiessling, F.; Lammers, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 2 (2014), s. 972-981 ISSN 1530-6984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GCP207/12/J030 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : nanomedicine * drug targeting * EPR Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 13.592, year: 2014

  6. Tumor Immunotargeting Using Innovative Radionuclides

    OpenAIRE

    Françoise Kraeber-Bodéré; Caroline Rousseau; Caroline Bodet-Milin; Cédric Mathieu; François Guérard; Eric Frampas; Thomas Carlier; Nicolas Chouin; Ferid Haddad; Jean-François Chatal; Alain Faivre-Chauvet; Michel Chérel; Jacques Barbet

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews some aspects and recent developments in the use of antibodies to target radionuclides for tumor imaging and therapy. While radiolabeled antibodies have been considered for many years in this context, only a few have reached the level of routine clinical use. However, alternative radionuclides, with more appropriate physical properties, such as lutetium-177 or copper-67, as well as alpha-emitting radionuclides, including astatine-211, bismuth-213, actinium-225, and others a...

  7. Folate-decorated chitosan/doxorubicin poly(butyl)cyanoacrylate nanoparticles for tumor-targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan Jinghua [Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Hepatobiliary and Enteric Surgery Research Center (China); Liu Mujun [Central South University, School of Biological Science and Technology (China); Zhang Yangde; Zhao Jinfeng; Pan Yifeng [Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Hepatobiliary and Enteric Surgery Research Center (China); Yang Xiyun, E-mail: bax_2007@126.com [Central South University, School of Metallurgical Science and Engineering (China)

    2012-03-15

    A novel chitosan coated poly(butyl cyanoacrylate) (PBCA) nanoparticles loaded doxorubicin (DOX) were synthesized and then conjugated with folic acid to produce a folate-targeted drug carrier for tumor-specific drug delivery. Prepared nanoparticles were surface modified by folate for targeting cancer cells, which is confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy and characterized for shape, size, and zeta potential measurements. The size and zeta potential of prepared DOX-PBCA nanoparticles (DOX-PBCA NPs) were almost 174 {+-} 8.23 nm and +23.14 {+-} 4.25 mV, respectively with 46.8 {+-} 3.32% encapsulation capacity. The transmission electron microscopy study revealed that preparation allowed the formation of spherical nanometric and homogeneous. Fluorescent microscopy imaging and flow cytometry analysis revealed that DOX-PBCA NPs were endocytosed into MCF-7 cells through the interaction with overexpressed folate receptors on the surface of the cancer cells. The results demonstrate that folate-conjugated DOX-PBCA NPs drug delivery system could provide increased therapeutic benefit by delivering the encapsulated drug to the folate receptor positive cancer cells.

  8. Cytocompatible chitosan-graft-mPEG-based 5-fluorouracil-loaded polymeric nanoparticles for tumor-targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniraj, M Gover; Ayyavu, Mahesh; Henry, Linda Jeeva Kumari; Nageshwar Rao, Goutham; Natesan, Subramanian; Sundar, D Sathish; Kandasamy, Ruckmani

    2018-03-01

    Biodegradable materials like chitosan (CH) and methoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG) are widely being used as drug delivery carriers for various therapeutic applications. In this study, copolymer (CH-g-mPEG) of CH and carboxylic acid terminated mPEG was synthesized by carbodiimide-mediated acid amine reaction. The resultant hydrophilic copolymer was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and 1 H NMR studies, revealing its relevant functional bands and proton peaks, respectively. Blank polymeric nanoparticles (B-PNPs) and 5-fluorouracil loaded polymeric nanoparticles (5-FU-PNPs) were formulated by ionic gelation method. Furthermore, folic acid functionalized FA-PNPs and FA-5-FU-PNPs were prepared for folate receptor-targeted drug delivery. FA-5-FU-PNPs were characterized by particle size, zeta potential, and in vitro drug release studies, resulting in 197.7 nm, +29.9 mv, and sustained drug release of 88% in 24 h, respectively. Cytotoxicity studies were performed for FA-PNPs and FA-5-FU-PNPs in MCF-7 cell line, which exhibited a cell viability of 80 and 41%, respectively. In vitro internalization studies were carried out for 5-FU-PNPs and FA-5-FU-PNPs which demonstrated increased cellular uptake of FA-5-FU-PNPs by receptor-mediated transport. Significant (p drug delivery, thereby influencing better therapeutic effect.

  9. Tumor targeting using {sup 67}Ga-DOTA-Bz-folate - investigations of methods to improve the tissue distribution of radiofolates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Cristina, E-mail: cristina.mueller@psi.ch [Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Vlahov, Iontcho R.; Santhapuram, Hari Krishna R.; Leamon, Christopher P. [Endocyte Inc., West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States); Schibli, Roger [Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-07-15

    Introduction: Use of folic acid radioconjugates for folate receptor (FR) targeting is a promising strategy for imaging purposes as well as for potential therapy of cancer and inflammatory diseases due to the frequent FR overexpression found on cancer cells and activated macrophages. Herein, we report on preclinical results using a novel DOTA-Bz-EDA-folate conjugate radiolabeled with [{sup 67}Ga]-gallium. Methods: DOTA-Bz-EDA-folate was prepared by conjugation of ethylenediamine-({gamma})-folate with 2-(p-isothiocyanobenzyl)-DOTA. Radiolabeling was carried out with {sup 67}GaCl{sub 3} according to standard procedures. Biodistribution studies of the tracer were performed in mice bearing FR-positive KB tumor xenografts. The effects on radiofolate biodistribution with coadministered renal uptake-blocking amino acids, diuretic agents, antifolates as well as different routes of administration were likewise investigated. Supportive imaging studies were performed using a small-animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT scanner. Results: {sup 67}Ga-DOTA-Bz-EDA-folate showed a high and specific accumulation in tumors (6.30%{+-}0.75% ID/g, 1 h pi and 6.08%{+-}0.89% ID/g, 4 h pi). Nonspecific radioactivity uptake in nontargeted tissues was negligible, but significant accumulation was found in FR-positive kidneys, which resulted in unfavorably low tumor-to-kidney ratios (<0.1). Coadministered amino acids or diuretics did not effectively reduce renal accumulation; in contrast, predosed pemetrexed did significantly reduce kidney uptake (<29% of control values). The SPECT/CT studies confirmed the excellent tumor-to-background contrast of {sup 67}Ga-radiofolate and the favorable reduction in kidney uptake (with improved imaging quality) resulting from pemetrexed administration. Conclusion: Conventional methods to reduce kidney uptake of radiofolates fail. However, the novel {sup 67}Ga-radiolabeled DOTA-Bz-EDA-folate can effectively be used to image FR-positive cancer and potentially inflammatory diseases. Due to its rapid blood clearance properties, this tracer is also a promising candidate for positron emission tomography imaging if radiolabeled with the short-lived [{sup 68}Ga]-gallium radionuclide.

  10. Multifunctional nanosheets based on hyaluronic acid modified graphene oxide for tumor-targeting chemo-photothermal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Lin; Feng, Qianhua; Wang, Yating; Zhang, Huijuan; Jiang, Guixiang; Yang, Xiaomin; Ren, Junxiao; Zhu, Xiali; Shi, Yuyang; Zhang, Zhenzhong, E-mail: zhangzz-pharm@163.com [Zhengzhou University, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (China)

    2015-03-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) with strong optical absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) region has shown great potential both in photothermal therapy and drug delivery. In this work, hyaluronic acid (HA)-functionalized GO (HA-GO) was successfully synthesized and controlled loading of mitoxantrone (MIT) onto HA-GO via π–π stacking interaction was investigated. The results revealed that drug-loaded nanosheets with high loading efficiency of 45 wt% exhibited pH-sensitive responses to tumor environment. Owing to the receptor-mediated endocytosis, cellular uptake analysis of HA-GO showed enhanced internalization. In vivo optical imaging test demonstrated that HA-GO nanosheets could enhance the targeting ability and residence time in tumor site. Moreover, the anti-tumor activity of free MIT, MIT/GO, and MIT/HA-GO in combination with NIR laser was investigated using human MCF-7 cells. In vitro cytotoxicity study revealed that HA-GO could stand as a biocompatible nanocarrier and MIT/HA-GO demonstrated remarkably higher toxicity than free MIT and MIT/GO, with IC{sub 50} of 0.79 µg ml{sup −1}. Tumor cell-killing potency was enhanced when MIT/HA-GO were combined with NIR irradiation, and the IC{sub 50} of MIT/HA-GO plus laser irradiation was 0.38 µg ml{sup −1}. In vivo, MIT/HA-GO plus NIR laser irradiation with the tumor growth inhibition of 93.52 % displayed greater anti-tumor effect compared with free MIT and MIT/GO with or without laser irradiation. Therefore, the MIT/HA-GO nanosheets may potentially be useful for further development of synergistic cancer therapy.

  11. Long-circulating polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate nanoparticles for tumor targeted docetaxel delivery: Formulation, optimization and in vitro characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardhan, Harsh; Mittal, Pooja; Adena, Sandeep Kumar Reddy; Mishra, Brahmeshwar

    2017-03-01

    In the present research an attempt was made to develop and optimize docetaxel-loaded polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) nanoparticles, using modified emulsification solvent evaporation technique and design of experiment (DOE) methodology. Formulation of docetaxel-loaded PHBV nanoparticles was conducted by factor screening studies with Plackett-Burman design (PBD) followed by Box-Behnken experimental design (BBD) to evaluate the effect of independent variables on responses. Five most important independent variables were screened out, which were obtained from failure mode effect analysis (FMEA) and factor screening studies. The effect of formulation parameters on selected responses was depicted by 2-D and 3-D response surface methodology (RSM). The final optimized batch was evaluated by various in vitro characterizations. The observed particle size, zeta potential and entrapment efficiency of optimized formulation was found to be 283±2.79nm, -17±2.64mV and 44±0.59% respectively. Morphological studies demonstrated the smooth and spherical shape of nanoparticles. In vitro drug release follows the Peppas-Korsmeyer model of drug release kinetics. Cytotoxicity study was assessed using MCF-7 for percentage inhibition of human breast cancer cell line. These results indicate that the PHBV Nanoparticles could be a promising drug delivery system for efficient prolong drug release. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Bevacizumab reduces tumor targeting of antiepidermal growth factor and anti-insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heskamp, Sandra; Boerman, Otto C.; Molkenboer-Kuenen, Janneke D. M.; Oyen, Wim J. G.; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Bevacizumab (antivascular endothelial growth factor [anti-VEGF]) and cetuximab (antiepidermal growth factor receptor [anti-EGFR]) are approved antibodies for treatment of cancer. However, in advanced colorectal cancer, the combination fails to improve survival. As the reason for the lack of activity

  13. Biodegradable multiblock polymers based on N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide designed as drug carriers for tumor-targeted delivery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mužíková, Gabriela; Pola, Robert; Laga, Richard; Pechar, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 217, č. 15 (2016), s. 1690-1703 ISSN 1022-1352 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12742S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-17207S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : biodegradable polymers * click chemistry * drug delivery systems Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.500, year: 2016

  14. Multifunctional nanosheets based on hyaluronic acid modified graphene oxide for tumor-targeting chemo-photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lin; Feng, Qianhua; Wang, Yating; Zhang, Huijuan; Jiang, Guixiang; Yang, Xiaomin; Ren, Junxiao; Zhu, Xiali; Shi, Yuyang; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2015-03-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) with strong optical absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) region has shown great potential both in photothermal therapy and drug delivery. In this work, hyaluronic acid (HA)-functionalized GO (HA-GO) was successfully synthesized and controlled loading of mitoxantrone (MIT) onto HA-GO via π- π stacking interaction was investigated. The results revealed that drug-loaded nanosheets with high loading efficiency of 45 wt% exhibited pH-sensitive responses to tumor environment. Owing to the receptor-mediated endocytosis, cellular uptake analysis of HA-GO showed enhanced internalization. In vivo optical imaging test demonstrated that HA-GO nanosheets could enhance the targeting ability and residence time in tumor site. Moreover, the anti-tumor activity of free MIT, MIT/GO, and MIT/HA-GO in combination with NIR laser was investigated using human MCF-7 cells. In vitro cytotoxicity study revealed that HA-GO could stand as a biocompatible nanocarrier and MIT/HA-GO demonstrated remarkably higher toxicity than free MIT and MIT/GO, with IC50 of 0.79 µg ml-1. Tumor cell-killing potency was enhanced when MIT/HA-GO were combined with NIR irradiation, and the IC50 of MIT/HA-GO plus laser irradiation was 0.38 µg ml-1. In vivo, MIT/HA-GO plus NIR laser irradiation with the tumor growth inhibition of 93.52 % displayed greater anti-tumor effect compared with free MIT and MIT/GO with or without laser irradiation. Therefore, the MIT/HA-GO nanosheets may potentially be useful for further development of synergistic cancer therapy.

  15. Potential Development of Tumor-Targeted Oral Anti-Cancer Prodrugs: Amino Acid and Dipeptide Monoester Prodrugs of Gemcitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Drelich, Adam J; Smith, David E; Amidon, Gordon L

    2017-08-10

    One of the main obstacles for cancer therapies is to deliver medicines effectively to target sites. Since stroma cells are developed around tumors, chemotherapeutic agents have to go through stroma cells in order to reach tumors. As a method to improve drug delivery to the tumor site, a prodrug approach for gemcitabine was adopted. Amino acid and dipeptide monoester prodrugs of gemcitabine were synthesized and their chemical stability in buffers, resistance to thymidine phosphorylase and cytidine deaminase, antiproliferative activity, and uptake/permeability in HFF cells as a surrogate to stroma cells were determined and compared to their parent drug, gemcitabine. The activation of all gemcitabine prodrugs was faster in pancreatic cell homogenates than their hydrolysis in buffer, suggesting enzymatic action. All prodrugs exhibited great stability in HFF cell homogenate, enhanced resistance to glycosidic bond metabolism by thymidine phosphorylase, and deamination by cytidine deaminase compared to their parent drug. All gemcitabine prodrugs exhibited higher uptake in HFF cells and better permeability across HFF monolayers than gemcitabine, suggesting a better delivery to tumor sites. Cell antiproliferative assays in Panc-1 and Capan-2 pancreatic ductal cell lines indicated that the gemcitabine prodrugs were more potent than their parent drug gemcitabine. The transport and enzymatic profiles of gemcitabine prodrugs suggest their potential for delayed enzymatic bioconversion and enhanced resistance to metabolic enzymes, as well as for enhanced drug delivery to tumor sites, and cytotoxic activity in cancer cells. These attributes would facilitate the prolonged systemic circulation and improved therapeutic efficacy of gemcitabine prodrugs.

  16. Peptide Mediated In Vivo Tumor Targeting of Nanoparticles through Optimization in Single and Multilayer In Vitro Cell Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina Yang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Optimizing the interface between nanoparticles (NPs and the biological environment at various levels should be considered for improving delivery of NPs to the target tumor area. For NPs to be successfully delivered to cancer cells, NPs needs to be functionalized for circulation through the blood vessels. In this study, accumulation of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG functionalized gold nanoparticles (GNPs was first tested using in vitro monolayer cells and multilayer cell models prior to in vivo models. A diameter of 10 nm sized GNP was selected for this study for sufficient penetration through tumor tissue. The surfaces of the GNPs were modified with PEG molecules, to improve circulation time by reducing non-specific uptake by the reticuloendothelial system (RES in animal models, and with a peptide containing integrin binding domain, RGD (arginyl-glycyl-aspartic acid, to improve internalization at the cellular level. A 10–12% accumulation of the injected GNP dose within the tumor was observed in vivo and the GNPs remained within the tumor tissue up to 72 h. This study suggests an in vitro platform for optimizing the accumulation of NP complexes in cells and tissue structures before testing them in animal models. Higher accumulation within the tumor in vivo upon surface modification is a promising outcome for future applications where GNPs can be used for drug delivery and radiation therapy.

  17. Tumor-Targeted Human T Cells Expressing CD28-Based Chimeric Antigen Receptors Circumvent CTLA-4 Inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maud Condomines

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell therapy represents a promising treatment for cancer. Human T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR recognize and kill tumor cells in a MHC-unrestricted manner and persist in vivo when the CAR includes a CD28 costimulatory domain. However, the intensity of the CAR-mediated CD28 activation signal and its regulation by the CTLA-4 checkpoint are unknown. We investigated whether T cells expressing an anti-CD19, CD3 zeta and CD28-based CAR (19-28z displayed the same proliferation and anti-tumor abilities than T cells expressing a CD3 zeta-based CAR (19z1 costimulated through the CD80/CD28, ligand/receptor pathway. Repeated in vitro antigen-specific stimulations indicated that 19-28z+ T cells secreted higher levels of Th1 cytokines and showed enhanced proliferation compared to those of 19z1+ or 19z1-CD80+ T cells. In an aggressive pre-B cell leukemia model, mice treated with 19-28z+ T cells had 10-fold reduced tumor progression compared to those treated with 19z1+ or 19z1-CD80+ T cells. shRNA-mediated CTLA-4 down-regulation in 19z1-CD80+ T cells significantly increased their in vivo expansion and anti-tumor properties, but had no effect in 19-28z+ T cells. Our results establish that CTLA-4 down-regulation may benefit human adoptive T cell therapy and demonstrate that CAR design can elude negative checkpoints to better sustain T cell function.

  18. Tumor targeting with radiolabeled alpha(v)beta(3) integrin binding peptides in a nude mouse model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.L.H.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Dijkgraaf, I.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Frielink, C.; Edwards, D.S.; Rajopadhye, M.; Boonstra, H.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Boerman, O.C.

    2002-01-01

    The alpha(v)beta(3) integrin is expressed on proliferating endothelial cells such as those present in growing tumors, as well as on tumor cells of various origin. Tumor-induced angiogenesis can be blocked in vivo by antagonizing the alpha(v)beta(3) integrin with small peptides containing the

  19. An assessment tumor targeting ability of 177Lu labeled cyclic CCK analogue peptide by binding with cholecystokinin receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Ha Cho

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The cholecystokinin (CCK receptor is known as a receptor that is overexpressed in many human tumors. The present study was designed to investigate the targeting ability of cyclic CCK analogue in AR42J pancreatic cells. The CCK analogues, DOTA-K(glucose-Gly-Trp-Nle-Asp-Phe (DOTA-glucose-CCK and DOTA-Nle-cyclo(Glu-Trp-Nle-Asp-Phe-Lys-NH2 (DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK, were synthesized and radiolabeled with 177Lu, and competitive binding was evaluated. The binding appearance of synthesized peptide with AR42J cells was evaluated by confocal microscopy. And bio-distribution was performed in AR42J xenografted mice. Synthesized peptides were prepared by a solid phase synthesis method, and their purity was over 98%. DOTA is the chelating agent for 177Lu-labeling, in which the peptides were radiolabeled with 177Lu by a high radiolabeling yield. A competitive displacement of 125I-CCK8 on the AR42J cells revealed that the 50% inhibitory concentration value (IC50 was 12.3 nM of DOTA-glucose-CCK and 1.7 nM of DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK. Radio-labeled peptides were accumulated in AR42J tumor in vivo, and %ID/g of the tumor was 0.4 and 0.9 at 2 h p.i. It was concluded that 177Lu-DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK has higher binding affinity than 177Lu-DOTA-glucose-CCK and can be a potential candidate as a targeting modality for a CCK receptor over-expressing tumors.

  20. In Vitro Evaluation of Molecular Tumor Targets in Nuclear Medicine: Immunohistochemistry Is One Option, but Under Which Conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reubi, Jean Claude

    2017-12-01

    The identification of new molecular targets for diagnostic and therapeutic applications using in vitro methods is an important challenge in nuclear medicine. One such method is immunohistochemistry, increasingly popular because it is easy to perform. This review presents the case for conducting receptor immunohistochemistry to evaluate potential molecular targets in human tumor tissue sections. The focus is on the immunohistochemistry of G-protein-coupled receptors, one of the largest families of cell surface proteins, representing a major class of drug targets and thus playing an important role in nuclear medicine. This review identifies common pitfalls and challenges and provides guidelines on performing such immunohistochemical studies. An appropriate validation of the target is a prerequisite for developing robust and informative new molecular probes. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  1. CD34-based enrichment of genetically engineered human T cells for clinical use results in dramatically enhanced tumor targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norell, Håkan; Zhang, Yi; McCracken, James; Martins da Palma, Telma; Lesher, Aaron; Liu, Yueying; Roszkowski, Jeffrey J; Temple, Anquanette; Callender, Glenda G; Clay, Timothy; Orentas, Rimas; Guevara-Patiño, José; Nishimura, Michael I

    2010-06-01

    Objective clinical responses can be achieved in melanoma patients by infusion of T cell receptor (TCR) gene transduced T cells. Although promising, the therapy is still largely ineffective, as most patients did not benefit from treatment. That only a minority of the infused T cells were genetically modified and that these were extensively expanded ex vivo may have prevented their efficacy. We developed novel and generally applicable retroviral vectors that allow rapid and efficient selection of T cells transduced with human TCRs. These vectors encode two TCR chains and a truncated CD34 molecule (CD34t) in a single mRNA transcript. Transduced T cells were characterized and the effects of CD34-based enrichment of redirected T cells were evaluated. Both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells could be transduced and efficiently co-expressed all introduced transgenes on their surface. Importantly, more than fivefold enrichment of both the frequency of transduced cells and the specific anti-tumor reactivity of the effector population could be achieved by magnetic beads-based enrichment procedures readily available for clinical grade hematopoietic stem cell isolation. This CD34-based enrichment technology will improve the feasibility of adoptive transfer of clinically relevant effectors. In addition to their enhanced tumor recognition, the enriched redirected T cells may also show superior reactivity and persistence in vivo due to the high purity of transduced cells and the shortened ex vivo culture.

  2. CD34-Based Enrichment of Genetically-Engineered Human T Cells for Clinical Use Results in Dramatically Enhanced Tumor Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norell, Håkan; Zhang, Yi; McCracken, James; da Palma, Telma Martins; Lesher, Aaron; Liu, Yueying; Roszkowski, Jeffrey J.; Temple, Anquanette; Callender, Glenda G.; Clay, Timothy; Orentas, Rimas; Guevara-Patiño, José; Nishimura, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Objective clinical responses can be achieved in melanoma patients by infusion of T cell receptor (TCR) gene transduced T cells (1, 2). Although encouraging, the therapy is still largely ineffective as most patients were unable to benefit from treatment. That only a minority of the infused T cells were genetically modified and that these were extensively expanded ex vivo may have prevented their efficacy (3). Here, we developed a novel selection technology that allows rapid and efficient enrichment of genetically engineered cells for clinical use. Both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells transduced with retrovirus encoding two TCR chains and a truncated CD34 (CD34t) molecule efficiently co-expressed all the transgenes on the cell surface. Importantly, over 5-fold enrichment of both the frequency of transduced cells and the specific anti-tumor reactivity of the effector population could be achieved by the magnetic beads-based enrichment procedures readily available for hematopoietic stem cell isolation. This CD34t-based technology will improve the feasibility of adoptive transfer of clinically relevant effectors. The effectiveness of the enriched redirected T cells may further be superior due both to their higher reactivity and the reduced ex vivo culture period necessary, resulting in less exhausted cells better capable of persisting in vivo. PMID:20052466

  3. Application of ion exchange and extraction chromatography to the separation of actinium from proton-irradiated thorium metal for analytical purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchenko, V; Engle, J W; Wilson, J J; Maassen, J R; Nortier, F M; Taylor, W A; Birnbaum, E R; Hudston, L A; John, K D; Fassbender, M E

    2015-02-06

    Actinium-225 (t1/2=9.92d) is an α-emitting radionuclide with nuclear properties well-suited for use in targeted alpha therapy (TAT), a powerful treatment method for malignant tumors. Actinium-225 can also be utilized as a generator for (213)Bi (t1/2 45.6 min), which is another valuable candidate for TAT. Actinium-225 can be produced via proton irradiation of thorium metal; however, long-lived (227)Ac (t1/2=21.8a, 99% β(-), 1% α) is co-produced during this process and will impact the quality of the final product. Thus, accurate assays are needed to determine the (225)Ac/(227)Ac ratio, which is dependent on beam energy, irradiation time and target design. Accurate actinium assays, in turn, require efficient separation of actinium isotopes from both the Th matrix and highly radioactive activation by-products, especially radiolanthanides formed from proton-induced fission. In this study, we introduce a novel, selective chromatographic technique for the recovery and purification of actinium isotopes from irradiated Th matrices. A two-step sequence of cation exchange and extraction chromatography was implemented. Radiolanthanides were quantitatively removed from Ac, and no non-Ac radionuclidic impurities were detected in the final Ac fraction. An (225)Ac spike added prior to separation was recovered at ≥ 98%, and Ac decontamination from Th was found to be ≥ 10(6). The purified actinium fraction allowed for highly accurate (227)Ac determination at analytical scales, i.e., at (227)Ac activities of 1-100 kBq (27 nCi to 2.7 μCi). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Contemporary Journal of African Studies - Vol 4, No 1 (2016)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Trope of Apotheosis and Intimations of Self-Immolation: A Deconstructive Interpretation of Mother-Daughter Dynamics in Chika Unigwe's Night Dancer · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Sola Owonibi, Funmilayo Gaji, 129-153 ...

  5. Investigations into the carbonic anhydrase inhibition of COS-releasing donor core motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Andrea K; Zhao, Yu; Choi, Won Jin; Crammond, Alder; Tillotson, McKinna R; Pluth, Michael D

    2018-03-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) releasing scaffolds are gaining popularity as hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) donors through exploitation of the carbonic anhydrase (CA)-mediated hydrolysis of COS to H 2 S. The majority of compounds in this emerging class of donors undergo triggerable decomposition (often referred to as self-immolation) to release COS, and a handful of different COS-releasing structures have been reported. One benefit of this donation strategy is that numerous caged COS-containing core motifs are possible and are poised for development into self-immolative COS/H 2 S donors. Because the intermediate release of COS en route to H 2 S donation requires CA, it is important that the COS donor motifs do not inhibit CA directly. In this work, we investigate the cytotoxicity and CA inhibition properties of different caged COS donor cores, as well as caged CO 2 and CS 2 motifs and non-self-immolative control compounds. None of the compounds investigated exhibited significant cytotoxicity or enhanced cell proliferation at concentrations up to 100 μM in A549 cells, but we identified four core structures that function as CA inhibitors, thus providing a roadmap for the future development of self-immolative COS/H 2 S donor motifs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Socialization and Class in the Making of Gani Fawehinmi and Fela ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tracie1

    Protest and agitation keep increasing all over the world, and individuals, rather than groups are playing key roles in them. In 2010 Tunisia, the self immolation protest of Benzoazi sparked off a new ... agitations and protest attitudes are what this paper intends to explain through ..... known human rights attorney. He is also a ...

  7. A Struggle to Contextualize Photographic Images: American Print Media and the "Burning Monk."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skow, Lisa M.; Dionisopoulos, George N.

    1997-01-01

    Contributes to scholarship on the role of discursive rhetoric for providing a context for visual messages. Analyzes how the American print media, in the summer of 1963, contextualized M. Browne's photographs of a Vietnamese Buddhist monk's self-immolation in two competing frames of either religious oppression or a war for freedom against the…

  8. The geopolitics of politico-religious protest in Eastern Tibet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Fischer (Andrew Martín)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIt is clear that the recent wave of self-immolations and protests taking place in southern Amdo and northern Kham in eastern Tibet is a reflection of an extreme form of defiance in response to an increasingly repressive atmosphere. The atmosphere is epitomized by the intensification of

  9. Preparation, radioiodination and in vitro evaluation of a nido-carborane-dextran conjugate, a potential residualizing label for tumor targeting proteins and peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolmachev, V.; Bruskin, A.; Uppsala University; Sjoeberg, S.; Carlsson, J.; Lundqvist, H.

    2004-01-01

    Polysaccharides are not degradable by proteolytic enzymes in lysosomes and do not diffuse through cellular membranes. Thus, attached to an internalizing, targeting protein, such polysaccharide linkers, will remain intracellularly after protein degradation. They can be labeled with halogens and provide then a so called residualizing label. Such an approach improves tumor-to-non-tumor radioactivity ratio and, consequently, the results of radionuclide diagnostics and therapy. A new approach to obtain a stable halogenation of the polysaccharide dextran using 7-(3-amino-propyl)-7,8-dicarba-nido-undecaborate (-) (ANC) is presented. Dextran T10 was partially oxidized by metaperiodate, and ANC was coupled to dextran by reductive amination. The conjugate was then labeled with 125 I using either Chloramine-T or IodoGen as oxidants. Labeling efficiency was 69-85%. Stability of the label was evaluated in rat liver homogenates. Under these conditions, the ANC-dextran conjugate was found to be more stable than labeled albumin, which was used as a control protein. (author)

  10. Dual fluorescent HPMA copolymers for passive tumor targeting with pH-sensitive drug release II: impact of release rate on biodistribution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chytil, Petr; Hoffmann, S.; Schindler, Lucie; Kostka, Libor; Ulbrich, Karel; Caysa, H.; Mueller, T.; Mäder, K.; Etrych, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 172, č. 2 (2013), s. 504-512 ISSN 0168-3659. [International Symposium on Recent Advances in Drug Delivery Systems /16./. Salt Lake City, 03.02.2013-06.02.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GCP207/12/J030; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0029 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : HPMA copolymers * pH-responsive drug release * tumor accumulation Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 7.261, year: 2013

  11. Human Neutrophil Peptides 1–3 as Gastric Cancer Tissue Markers Measured by MALDI-Imaging Mass Spectrometry: Implications for Infiltrated Neutrophils as a Tumor Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chia Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Human neutrophil peptides (HNPs -1, -2 and -3 are significantly upregulated and were reported as biomarkers in gastric cancer (GC. However, the tissue location and function of HNPs 1-3 are still unclear in GC, and the spatial distribution of the triad needs to be disclosed. The aims of this study were to investigate the distribution and relationships among HNPs-1, -2 and -3, and assess whether infiltrated neutrophils accumulate in gastric tumor.

  12. PET-based compartmental modeling of {sup 124}I-A33 antibody: quantitative characterization of patient-specific tumor targeting in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanzonico, Pat; O' Donoghue, Joseph A.; Humm, John L. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Ruan, Shutian; Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Smith-Jones, Peter [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Stony Brook School of Medicine, Departments of Psychiatry and Radiology, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Divgi, Chaitanya [Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Scott, Andrew M. [La Trobe University, Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Kemeny, Nancy E.; Wong, Douglas; Scheinberg, David [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Fong, Yuman [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); City of Hope, Department of Surgery, Duarte, CA (United States); Ritter, Gerd; Jungbluth, Achem; Old, Lloyd J. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The molecular specificity of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against tumor antigens has proven effective for targeted therapy of human cancers, as shown by a growing list of successful antibody-based drug products. We describe a novel, nonlinear compartmental model using PET-derived data to determine the ''best-fit'' parameters and model-derived quantities for optimizing biodistribution of intravenously injected {sup 124}I-labeled antitumor antibodies. As an example of this paradigm, quantitative image and kinetic analyses of anti-A33 humanized mAb (also known as ''A33'') were performed in 11 colorectal cancer patients. Serial whole-body PET scans of {sup 124}I-labeled A33 and blood samples were acquired and the resulting tissue time-activity data for each patient were fit to a nonlinear compartmental model using the SAAM II computer code. Excellent agreement was observed between fitted and measured parameters of tumor uptake, ''off-target'' uptake in bowel mucosa, blood clearance, tumor antigen levels, and percent antigen occupancy. This approach should be generally applicable to antibody-antigen systems in human tumors for which the masses of antigen-expressing tumor and of normal tissues can be estimated and for which antibody kinetics can be measured with PET. Ultimately, based on each patient's resulting ''best-fit'' nonlinear model, a patient-specific optimum mAb dose (in micromoles, for example) may be derived. (orig.)

  13. Macromolecular HPMA-based nanoparticles with cholesterol for solid-tumor targeting: detailed study of the inner structure of a highly efficient drug delivery system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filippov, Sergey K.; Chytil, Petr; Konarev, P. V.; Dyakonova, M.; Papadakis, C. M.; Zhigunov, Alexander; Pleštil, Josef; Štěpánek, Petr; Etrych, Tomáš; Ulbrich, Karel; Svergun, D. I.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 8 (2012), s. 2594-2604 ISSN 1525-7797 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME09059; GA AV ČR IAAX00500803; GA ČR GAP108/12/0640 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : HPMA * cholesterol * SAXS Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 5.371, year: 2012

  14. Construction of expressing vectors including melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7 (mda-7 fused with the RGD sequences for better tumor targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboobeh Khodadad

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: Theoretically RGD tagged mda-7 would be able to induce apoptosis with more specificity and stronger than the standard one, therefore, these new constructs may have the potential for further researches.

  15. Dual fluorescent N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide-based conjugates for passive tumor targeting with reduction-sensitive drug release: proof of the concept, tumor accumulation, and biodistribution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Studenovský, Martin; Heinrich, A. K.; Lucas, H.; Mueller, T.; Mäder, K.; Etrych, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 4 (2016), s. 348-360 ISSN 0883-9115 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GCP207/12/J030; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12742S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : HPMA copolymers * reduction-responsive drug release * tumor accumulation Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.310, year: 2016

  16. Synthesis of Zn-Cu-In-S/ZnS core/shell quantum dots with inhibited blue-shift photoluminescence and applications for tumor targeted bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weisheng; Chen, Na; Tu, Yu; Dong, Chunhong; Zhang, Bingbo; Hu, Chunhong; Chang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    A facile strategy is reported here for synthesis of Zn-Cu-In-S/ZnS (ZCIS/ZnS) core/shell QDs to address the synthetic issues that the unexpected blue-shift of CuInS(2)-based nanocrystals. In this strategy, Zn(2+) ions are intentionally employed for the synthesis of alloyed ZCIS core QDs before ZnS shell coating, which contributes to the reduced blue-shift in photoluminescence (PL) emission. The experimental results demonstrate this elaborate facile strategy is effective for the reduction of blue-shift during shell growth. Particularly, a hypothesis is proposed and proved for explanation of this effective strategy. Namely, both cation exchange inhibition and ions accumulation are involved during the synthesis of ZCIS/ZnS QDs. Furthermore, the obtained near infrared (NIR) ZCIS/ZnS QDs are transferred into aqueous phase by a polymer coating technique and coupled with cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp peptide (cRGD) peptides. After confirmation of biocompability by cytotoxicity test on normal 3T3 cells, these QDs are injected via tail vein into nude mice bearing U87 MG tumor. The result indicates that the signals detected in the tumor region are much more distinguishing injected with ZCIS/ZnS-cRGD QDs than that injected with ZCIS/ZnS QDs.

  17. Tumor Targeting via Sialic Acid: [68Ga]DOTA-en-pba as a New Tool for Molecular Imaging of Cancer with PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoukalas, Charalambos; Geninatti-Crich, Simonetta; Gaitanis, Anastasios; Tsotakos, Theodoros; Paravatou-Petsotas, Maria; Aime, Silvio; Jiménez-Juárez, Rogelio; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos D; Djanashvili, Kristina; Bouziotis, Penelope

    2018-02-20

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the potential of Ga-68-labeled macrocycle (DOTA-en-pba) conjugated with phenylboronic vector for tumor recognition by positron emission tomography (PET), based on targeting of the overexpressed sialic acid (Sia). The imaging reporter DOTA-en-pba was synthesized and labeled with Ga-68 at high efficiency. Cell binding assay on Mel-C and B16-F10 melanoma cells was used to evaluate melanin production and Sia overexpression to determine the best model for demonstrating the capability of [ 68 Ga]DOTA-en-pba to recognize tumors. The in vivo PET imaging was done with B16-F10 tumor-bearing SCID mice injected with [ 68 Ga]DOTA-en-pba intravenously. Tumor, blood, and urine metabolites were assessed to evaluate the presence of a targeting agent. The affinity of [ 68 Ga]DOTA-en-pba to Sia was demonstrated on B16-F10 melanoma cells, after the production of melanin as well as Sia overexpression was proved to be up to four times higher in this cell line compared to that in Mel-C cells. Biodistribution studies in B16-F10 tumor-bearing SCID mice showed blood clearance at the time points studied, while uptake in the tumor peaked at 60 min post-injection (6.36 ± 2.41 % ID/g). The acquired PET images were in accordance with the ex vivo biodistribution results. Metabolite assessment on tumor, blood, and urine samples showed that [ 68 Ga]DOTA-en-pba remains unmetabolized up to at least 60 min post-injection. Our work is the first attempt for in vivo imaging of cancer by targeting overexpression of sialic acid on cancer cells with a radiotracer in PET.

  18. Anionic clay as the drug delivery vehicle: tumor targeting function of layered double hydroxide-methotrexate nanohybrid in C33A orthotopic cervical cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Goeun; Piao, Huiyan; Alothman, Zeid A; Vinu, Ajayan; Yun, Chae-Ok; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX), an anticancer agent, was successfully intercalated into the anionic clay, layered double hydroxides to form a new nanohybrid drug. The coprecipitation and subsequent hydrothermal method were used to prepare chemically, structurally, and morphologically well-defined two-dimensional drug-clay nanohybrid. The resulting two-dimensional drug-clay nanohybrid showed excellent colloidal stability not only in deionized water but also in an electrolyte solution of Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium with 10% fetal bovine serum, in which the average particle size in colloid and the polydispersity index were determined to be around 100 and 0.250 nm, respectively. The targeting property of the nanohybrid drug was confirmed by evaluating the tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-liver ratios of the MTX with anionic clay carrier, and these ratios were compared to those of free MTX in the C33A orthotopic cervical cancer model. The biodistribution studies indicated that the mice treated with the former showed 3.5-fold higher tumor-to-liver ratio and fivefold higher tumor-to-blood ratio of MTX than those treated with the latter at 30 minutes postinjection.

  19. Design and Fabrication of Multifunctional Sericin Nanoparticles for Tumor Targeting and pH-Responsive Subcellular Delivery of Cancer Chemotherapy Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Tao, Kaixiong; Liu, Jia; Qi, Chao; Xu, Luming; Chang, Panpan; Gao, Jinbo; Shuai, Xiaoming; Wang, Guobin; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Lin

    2016-03-01

    The severe cytotoxicity of cancer chemotherapy drugs limits their clinical applications. Various protein-based nanoparticles with good biocompatibility have been developed for chemotherapy drug delivery in hope of reducing drugs' side effects. Sericin, a natural protein from silk, has no immunogenicity and possesses diverse bioactivities that have prompted sericin's application studies. However, the potential of sericin as a multifunctional nanoscale vehicle for cancer therapy have not been fully explored. Here we report the successful fabrication and characterization of folate-conjugated sericin nanoparticles with cancer-targeting capability for pH-responsive release of doxorubicin (these nanoparticles are termed "FA-SND"). DOX is covalently linked to sericin through pH-sensitive hydrazone bonds that render a pH-triggered release property. The hydrophobicity of DOX and the hydrophilicity of sericin promote the self-assembly of sericin-DOX (SND) nanoconjugates. Folate (FA) is then covalently grafted to SND nanoconjugates as a binding unit for actively targeting cancer cells that overexpress folate receptors. Our characterization study shows that FA-SND nanoparticles exhibit negative surface charges that would reduce nonspecific clearance by circulation. These nanoparticles possess good cytotoxicity and hemocompatibiliy. Acidic environment (pH 5.0) triggers effective DOX release from FA-SND, 5-fold higher than does a neutral condition (pH 7.4). Further, FA-SND nanoparticles specifically target folate-receptor-rich KB cells, and endocytosed into lysosomes, an acidic organelle. The acidic microenvironment of lysosomes promotes a rapid release of DOX to nuclei, producing cancer specific chemo-cytotoxicity. Thus, FA-mediated cancer targeting and lysosomal-acidity promoting DOX release, two sequentially-occurring cellular events triggered by the designed components of FA-SND, form the basis for FA-SND to achieve its localized and intracellular chemo-cytotoxicity. Together, this study suggests that these FA-SND nanoparticles may be a potentially effective carrier particularly useful for delivering hydrophobic chemotherapeutic agents for treating cancers with high-level expression of folate receptors.

  20. Pharmacokinetics and tumor targeting of 131I-labeled F(ab')2 fragments of the chimeric monoclonal antibody G250: preclinical and clinical pilot studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, A.H.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Oosterwijk, E.; Buijs, W.C.A.M.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Boerman, O.C.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Clinical and animal studies of chimeric monoclonal antibody G250 (moAb cG250) for the targeting of clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC), to date, have been with the intact IgG form. To determine whether F(ab')2 fragments are more suited for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) than intact IgG,

  1. Preclinical pharmacokinetic, biodistribution, imaging and therapeutic efficacy of 177Lu-Labeled glycated bombesin analogue for gastrin-releasing peptide receptor-positive prostate tumor targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jae Cheong; Cho, Eun Ha; Kim, Jin Joo; Choi, Sang Mu; Lee, So Young; Nam, Sung Soo; Park, Ul Jae; Park, Soo Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) has been shown to be overexpressed in many human tumors, including prostate, colon, gastric, breast, pancreatic, and small cell lung cancers. Because bombesin (BBS) binds to GRPR with high affinity, BBS derivatives have been labeled with various radionuclides and have been demonstrated to be successful candidates for peptide receptor radiotherapy (PRRT). The present study describes the in vitro and in vivo preclinical characteristics of 177 Lu-DOTA-Lys(glucose)-4 aminobenzoic acid-BBS 7-14 ( 177 Lu-DOTA-gluBBN) to prepare radiolabeled candidates for the treatment of GRPR-expressing prostate tumors. Methods: 177 Lu-DOTA-gluBBN was prepared as previously published [1]. Human prostate PC-3 tumor cells were used to determine the binding (Kd) retention and efflux of 177 Lu-DOTA-gluBBN. Pharmacokinetic, imaging, and radiotherapy studies were performed in PC-3 xenografted mice. Results: The Kd value of 177 Lu-DOTA-gluBBN was 0.63 nM, with a maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of 669.7 fmol/10 6 cells (4.04 × 10 5 GRPR/cell). During a 2-hr incubation, 90.1 ± 0.4% of the cell-associated radio-peptide was internalized, and 56.3 ± 7.1% of the internalized radio-peptide was externalized in vitro. High amounts of the radio-peptide were rapidly accumulated in a PC-3 tumor in vivo, and the % ID/g of the tumor was 12.42 ± 2.15 1 hr p.i. The radio-peptide was quickly cleared from the blood, yielding tumor-to-blood ratios of 39.22 ± 17.36 at 1 hr p.i. and 330.67 ± 131.23 at 24 hr p.i. In addition, 177 Lu-DOTA-gluBBN was clearly visualized in PC-3 tumors 1 hr p.i. and significantly inhibited the tumor growth (P < 0.05). Treatment-related toxicity in the pancreas and kidneys was not observed, except for slight glomerulopathy. Conclusions: The pharmacokinetic, imaging, and therapy studies suggest that this 177 Lu-DOTA-gluBBN has promising characteristics for application in nuclear medicine, namely, for the diagnosis and treatment of GRPR-overexpressing prostate tumors

  2. Preparation and Characterization of a Tumor-Targeting Dual-Image System Based on Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Functionalized with Folic Acid and Rhodamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Ancira-Cortez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the diseases with most deaths worldwide, around 8.2 million annually. For this reason, several treatments and diagnostic tools have been investigated and developed over the past decades. Among them, a dual-image system has been developed to achieve and enhance the detection of cancer, which has not been done with systems currently available. The present study describes the preparation of a dual-image targeting system composed of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized with folic acid and rhodamine; nanoparticles synthesis was achieved by a coprecipitation method; the functionalization was carried out by a carbodiimide with folic acid and/or the rhodamine isothiocyanate; conjugates were characterized by spectrometric techniques; toxicity was measured by cell proliferation assay on HeLa cells using progressive concentrations of functionalized nanoparticles. Cellular uptake assay was carried out by competitive assay on HeLa cells. Iron oxide magnetite nanoparticles, modified with folic acid and rhodamine, were successfully synthetized with a particle size lower than 20 nm (TEM, EDS, HRTEM, and XDR showed highly crystalline Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Folic acid and rhodamine were conjugated with high efficiency. A significant selectivity and uptake, facilitated by surface modification of iron oxide nanoparticles with folic acid, were demonstrated. The multifunctional system showed suitable physicochemical and biological properties for cell targeting through folate receptors.

  3. Preparation, Characterization, and Optimization of Folic Acid-Chitosan-Methotrexate Core-Shell Nanoparticles by Box-Behnken Design for Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghibi Beidokhti, Hamid Reza; Ghaffarzadegan, Reza; Mirzakhanlouei, Sasan; Ghazizadeh, Leila; Dorkoosh, Farid Abedin

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the combined influence of independent variables in the preparation of folic acid-chitosan-methotrexate nanoparticles (FA-Chi-MTX NPs). These NPs were designed and prepared for targeted drug delivery in tumor. The NPs of each batch were prepared by coaxial electrospray atomization method and evaluated for particle size (PS) and particle size distribution (PSD). The independent variables were selected to be concentration of FA-chitosan, ratio of shell solution flow rate to core solution flow rate, and applied voltage. The process design of experiments (DOE) was obtained with three factors in three levels by Design expert software. Box-Behnken design was used to select 15 batches of experiments randomly. The chemical structure of FA-chitosan was examined by FTIR. The NPs of each batch were collected separately, and morphologies of NPs were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The captured pictures of all batches were analyzed by ImageJ software. Mean PS and PSD were calculated for each batch. Polynomial equation was produced for each response. The FE-SEM results showed the mean diameter of the core-shell NPs was around 304 nm, and nearly 30% of the produced NPs are in the desirable range. Optimum formulations were selected. The validation of DOE optimization results showed errors around 2.5 and 2.3% for PS and PSD, respectively. Moreover, the feasibility of using prepared NPs to target tumor extracellular pH was shown, as drug release was greater in the pH of endosome (acidic medium). Finally, our results proved that FA-Chi-MTX NPs were active against the human epithelial cervical cancer (HeLa) cells.

  4. Tumor-targeted Nanobullets: Anti-EGFR nanobody-liposomes loaded with anti-IGF-1R kinase inhibitor for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meel, Roy; Oliveira, Sabrina; Altintas, Isil; Haselberg, Rob; van der Veeken, Joris; Roovers, Rob C; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P; Storm, Gert; Hennink, Wim E; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Kok, Robbert J

    2012-04-30

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a validated target for anti-cancer therapy and several EGFR inhibitors are used in the clinic. Over the years, an increasing number of studies have reported on the crosstalk between EGFR and other receptors that can contribute to accelerated cancer development or even acquisition of resistance to anti-EGFR therapies. Combined targeting of EGFR and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a rational strategy to potentiate anti-cancer treatment and possibly retard resistance development. In the present study, we have pursued this by encapsulating the kinase inhibitor AG538 in anti-EGFR nanobody-liposomes. The thus developed dual-active nanobody-liposomes associated with EGFR-(over)expressing cells in an EGFR-specific manner and blocked both EGFR and IGF-1R activation, due to the presence of the EGFR-blocking nanobody EGa1 and the anti-IGF-1R kinase inhibitor AG538 respectively. AG538-loaded nanobody-liposomes induced a strong inhibition of tumor cell proliferation even upon short-term exposure followed by a drug-free wash-out period. Therefore, AG538-loaded nanobody-liposomes are a promising anti-cancer formulation due to efficient intracellular delivery of AG538 in combination with antagonistic and downregulating properties of the EGa1 nanobody-liposomes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Tumor-Targeted Silencing of Bcl-2/Bcl-xl by Self-Assembled Sirna-Nanovectors as a Novel Molecular Therapy for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xu, Liang

    2007-01-01

    The major goal of this Concept Award project is to explore the anti-Her-2 antibody as targeting ligand to establish the self-assembled nanovectors for targeted siRNA delivery to Her-2(+) breast cancer. Our hypothesis is (1...

  6. Tumor Targeting Using Anti–Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (ior egf/r3 Immunoconjugate with a Tetraaza Macrocyclic Agent (DO3A-EA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri Mishra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling inhibition represents a highly promising arena for the application of molecularly targeted cancer therapies. EGFR conjugated metal chelates have been proposed as potential imaging agents for cancers that overexpress EGFR receptors. Through improved understanding of EGFR biology in human cancers, there is anticipation that more tumor-selective therapy approaches with diminished collateral normal tissue toxicity can be advanced. We report here on the results with a thermodynamically stable chelate, 1,4,7-tris(carboxymethyl-10-(2-aminoethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (DO3A-EA and anti-EGFr (ior egf/r3 conjugate to develop immunospecifc imaging agent. Conjugation and labelling with anti-EGFr was performed using standard procedure and subjected to purification on size exclusion chromatography. The conjugated antibodies were labeled with a specific activity 20-30 mCi/mg of protein. Labeling efficiencies were measured by ascending paper chromatography on ITLC-SG strips. Radiolabeling of the immunoconjugate was found to be 98.5 ± 0.30%. 99mTc-DO3A-EA-EGFr conjugate was studied in athymic mice bearing U-87MG, MDA-MB-468 tumors following intravenous injection. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies confirmed long circulation times (t1/2(fast= 45 min and t1/2(slow=4 hours 40 min and efficient accumulation in tumors. Biodistribution studies in athymic mice grafted with U-87MG human glioblastoma multiforme and Hela human cervical carcinoma tumors revealed significant localization of 99mTc-labeled antibodies conjugate in tumors and reduced accumulation in normal organs. This new chelating agent is promising for immunoscintigraphy since good tumour-to-normal organ contrast could be demonstrated. These properties can be exploited for immunospecifc contrast agents in nuclear medicine and SPECT imaging.

  7. Noninvasive 89Zr-Transferrin PET Shows Improved Tumor Targeting Compared with 18F-FDG PET in MYC-Overexpressing Human Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kelly E; Dilling, Thomas R; Abdel-Atti, Dalya; Edwards, Kimberly J; Evans, Michael J; Lewis, Jason S

    2018-01-01

    The current standard for breast PET imaging is 18 F-FDG. The heterogeneity of 18 F-FDG uptake in breast cancer limits its utility, varying greatly among receptor status, histopathologic subtypes, and proliferation markers. 18 F-FDG PET often exhibits nonspecific internalization and low specificity and sensitivity, especially with tumors smaller than 1 cm 3 MYC is a protein involved in oncogenesis and is overexpressed in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Increased surface expression of transferrin receptor (TfR) is a downstream event of MYC upregulation and has been validated as a clinically relevant target for molecular imaging. Transferrin labeled with 89 Zr has successfully identified MYC status in many cancer subtypes preclinically and been shown to predict response and changes in oncogene status via treatment with small-molecule inhibitors that target MYC and PI3K signaling pathways. We hypothesized that 89 Zr-transferrin PET will noninvasively detect MYC and TfR and improve upon the current standard of 18 F-FDG PET for MYC-overexpressing TNBC. Methods: In this study, 89 Zr-transferrin and 18 F-FDG imaging were compared in preclinical models of TNBC. TNBC cells (MDA-MB-157, MDA-MB-231, and Hs578T) were treated with bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) inhibitors JQ1 and OTX015 (0.5-1 μM). Cell proliferation, gene expression, and protein expression were assayed to explore the effects of these inhibitors on MYC and TfR. Results: Head-to-head comparison showed that 89 Zr-transferrin targets TNBC tumors significantly better ( P Myc and TfR gene expression was decreased upon treatment with BRD4 inhibitors and c-MYC small interfering RNA ( P MYC and TfR protein expression, along with receptor-mediated internalization of transferrin, was also significantly decreased upon drug treatment in MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-157 cells ( P MYC via TfR-targeted PET imaging in TNBC. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  8. Anionic clay as the drug delivery vehicle: tumor targeting function of layered double hydroxide-methotrexate nanohybrid in C33A orthotopic cervical cancer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi G

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Goeun Choi,1 Huiyan Piao,1 Zeid A Alothman,2 Ajayan Vinu,3 Chae-Ok Yun,4 Jin-Ho Choy1 1Center for Intelligent Nano-Bio Materials, Department of Chemistry and Nano Science, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea; 2Advanced Materials Research Chair, Chemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 3Future Industries Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA, Australia; 4Department of Bioengineering, College of Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea Abstract: Methotrexate (MTX, an anticancer agent, was successfully intercalated into the anionic clay, layered double hydroxides to form a new nanohybrid drug. The coprecipitation and subsequent hydrothermal method were used to prepare chemically, structurally, and morphologically well-defined two-dimensional drug-clay nanohybrid. The resulting two-dimensional drug-clay nanohybrid showed excellent colloidal stability not only in deionized water but also in an electrolyte solution of Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium with 10% fetal bovine serum, in which the average particle size in colloid and the polydispersity index were determined to be around 100 and 0.250 nm, respectively. The targeting property of the nanohybrid drug was confirmed by evaluating the tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-liver ratios of the MTX with anionic clay carrier, and these ratios were compared to those of free MTX in the C33A orthotopic cervical cancer model. The biodistribution studies indicated that the mice treated with the former showed 3.5-fold higher tumor-to-liver ratio and fivefold higher tumor-to-blood ratio of MTX than those treated with the latter at 30 minutes postinjection. Keywords: anionic clay, biodistribution, cervical cancer, colloidal stability, layered double hydroxide, methotrexate 

  9. The Necessity for the Military Assistance Command--Vietnam Studies and Observations Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    include hunger strikes and self-immolations by Buddhist monks , throughout the summer.58 As the situation wore on, Diem lost the support of his...quickly waning. A seemingly minor incident in the late spring of 1963 involving the segments of the majority Buddhist population quickly morphed into a...of other senior military leaders, was the climax of the Buddhist Crisis, which had emerged several months prior. The success of the overthrow was

  10. Strategic Intelligence Observations from the Pre-Vietnam and Pre-9/11 Periods for the Intelligence Professional and the Policy-Maker

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    the drawing board.” It came back optimistic.106 6/11/63 Buddhist ‘demonstration’ in So Vietnam, with monk Thich Quang Duc self- immolation. Receives...Vietnamese sponsored insurgency. This in part was caused by sensational media coverage of monks lighting themselves on fire in protest to President...The compartmentalization observation from the 9/11 Report was that the FBI and other domestic agencies did not have routine access to foreign

  11. Investigation of the outcomes and varieties of violent suicides during a period of twenty years in Ilam, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosra Azizpour

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: One of the main objectives of this study was identification of high risk groups who used the invasive methods for suicide commitments, based on their epidemiological characteristics such as gender and age. The results showed that women and elderly individuals were among the high-risk groups who committed completed suicide using the invasive methods and self-immolation attributed the most frequent method among invasive methods for suicide in Ilam province which resulted in death.

  12. Process for radioisotope recovery and system for implementing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meikrantz, David H [Idaho Falls, ID; Todd, Terry A [Aberdeen, ID; Tranter, Troy J [Idaho Falls, ID; Horwitz, E Philip [Naperville, IL

    2009-10-06

    A method of recovering daughter isotopes from a radioisotope mixture. The method comprises providing a radioisotope mixture solution comprising at least one parent isotope. The at least one parent isotope is extracted into an organic phase, which comprises an extractant and a solvent. The organic phase is substantially continuously contacted with an aqueous phase to extract at least one daughter isotope into the aqueous phase. The aqueous phase is separated from the organic phase, such as by using an annular centrifugal contactor. The at least one daughter isotope is purified from the aqueous phase, such as by ion exchange chromatography or extraction chromatography. The at least one daughter isotope may include actinium-225, radium-225, bismuth-213, or mixtures thereof. A liquid-liquid extraction system for recovering at least one daughter isotope from a source material is also disclosed.

  13. A comparison of suicidal behavior by burns five years before and five years after the 2011 Tunisian Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khelil, Mehdi; Zgarni, Amine; Ben Mohamed, Mounir; Allouche, Mohamed; Benzarti, Anis; Banasr, Ahmed; Hamdoun, Moncef

    2017-06-01

    In Tunisia, the phenomenon of self-immolation has increased dramatically since the self-burn of Mohamed Bouazizi which occurred on 17 December 2010. The aim of our study was to compare the casualties' profile of suicide by self-immolation before and after the Tunisian Revolution over a period of 10 years (2006-2015). We conducted a retrospective review including all the cases of self-immolation suicides that occurred in Northern Tunisia five years before and five years after the January 2011 Revolution. We excluded cases of self-immolations committed in governorates other than the north of Tunisia as well as casualties of accidental or criminal burns and those where the context could evoke suicidal immolation but the self-inflicted nature has not been confirmed. The study sample was subdivided in two groups according to the Revolution date: before the Revolution (2006-2010) and after the Revolution (2011-2015). We compared for each group data related to the age, gender, marital status, employment, mental disease history, previous suicide attempts and threats, place of suicide and its motive, the type of fire accelerator, the hospitalization and the average body surface area burned. The number (n=48/24.5% before 2011) of suicide by self-immolation has tripled during the post-revolution period (2011-2015) with a stable trend. The average age (35.6±13.4) has not changed. The male remained predominant before and after the Revolution (sex ratio of respectively 1.67 and 3.23). Marital status (victims being single in n=81 cases/41.3%) and the employment (unemployed in n=128/65.3%) of the casualties have not changed either after 2011. Fewer cases with psychiatric history were reported (n=21/43.7% before against n=52/35.1% after). Self-immolation increased in public places (n=9/18.7% before against n=50/33.8% after) and in an administration (n=2/4.2% before against n=19/12.8% after). More suicides after 2011 were due to financial problems (n=2/4.2% before against n=30

  14. Factors associated with the choice of suicide method in Kermanshah Province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Mehran; Jalilian, Abdollah; Rezaei-Zangeneh, Ramin; Salari, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Identification of factors in the choice of suicide methods is important in understanding the phenomenon. We aimed to quantify the effect of gender, age, living area, education level and marital status on the choice of suicide method among residents of Kermanshah province in the west of Iran. A cross-sectional study of all completed suicides from March 2006 to September 2013. Kermanshah Province, Iran. Data were extracted from suicide forms in the electronic files of the Forensic Medicine Organization. A total of 1901 (1138 men), suicide cases were identified. After preliminary analysis, a multinomial logistic model was fitted to the data to test and quantify the impact of each influential factor on the choice of suicide method. The relative risk of each suicide method over hanging as the reference method was estimated by calculating relative-risk ratios from the multinomial logistic model. Relative risk of suicide by self-immolation, drug and toxic poisoning and firearms. We found that women are at a higher relative risk than men for suicide by self-immolation, intentional drug poisoning and toxic poisoning. The relative risk of suicide by self-immolation and intentional drug poisoning was higher for urban residents and young individuals. On the other hand, men and rural residents were at higher relative risk of suicide by firearm. In Kermanshah province, the impact of rapid social changes on women and the availability of firearms in rural areas and drugs in urban households require more attention in any suicide prevention planning. The lack of data prevented analysis of factors that may be more influential in choosing suicide.

  15. Epidemiological study of suicide by physical methods between 1993 and 2013 in Ilam province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizpour, Yosra; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Kaikhavani, Satar; Bagheri, Maryam

    2017-08-23

    Suicide by aggressive physical methods such as firearms, hanging, and jumping is well known; however, different factors may influence a person while selecting a particular method. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiological factors involved in the selection and use of different physical methods for suicide over a long-term period in Ilam province, Iran. The present study was conducted retrospectively between 1993 and 2013 using recorded data from a comprehensive system for registration of suicide attempts in Ilam University of Medical Sciences. The epidemiological characteristics included person, time and place variables, and the outcomes of the suicide attempts. The chi square, univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used for data analysis. Totally, 1516 suicide attempts were evaluated (the annual incidence rate: 19/100,000 individuals). The most commonly used suicide method in females (88.4%) and males (38.9%) was self-immolation. Furthermore, the annual incidence rate among males and females was within the age group of 15-24 years (24.6 and 47.8/100,000 individuals). The risk of death by suicide in the age group of 55-64 years was 2.93 compared with the age group of 10-14 years (OR = 2.93; 95% CI = 0.64-13.54, P = 0.168). This study revealed that self-immolation was the most selected physical method of suicide and had the highest incidence rate, and inflicted the survivors with severe physical and mental complications. In order to reduce the use of physical methods, especially self-immolation, life skills training becomes more important than ever.

  16. Dual fluorescent HPMA copolymers for passive tumor targeting with pH-sensitive drug release: synthesis and characterization of distribution and tumor accumulation in mice by noninvasive multispectral optical imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hoffmann, S.; Vystrčilová, Lucie; Ulbrich, Karel; Etrych, Tomáš; Caysa, H.; Mueller, T.; Mäder, K.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2012), s. 652-663 ISSN 1525-7797 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00500803; GA ČR GAP301/11/0325 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : fluorescence dyes * star-like HPMA polymer carriers * diagnostics of tumors Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 5.371, year: 2012

  17. Preparation, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of polymeric nanoparticles based on hyaluronic acid-poly(butyl cyanoacrylate and D-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate for tumor-targeted delivery of morin hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbad S

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarra Abbad,1,2 Cheng Wang,1 Ayman Yahia Waddad,1 Huixia Lv,1 Jianping Zhou11Department of Pharmaceutics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmacy, Abou Bekr Belkaid University, Tlemcen, AlgeriaAbstract: Herein, we describe the preparation of a targeted cellular delivery system for morin hydrate (MH, based on a low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid-poly(butyl cyanoacrylate (HA-PBCA block copolymer. In order to enhance the therapeutic effect of MH, D-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS was mixed with HA-PBCA during the preparation process. The MH-loaded HA-PBCA “plain” nanoparticle (MH-PNs and HA-PBCA/TPGS “mixed” nanoparticles (MH-MNs were concomitantly characterized in terms of loading efficiency, particle size, zeta potential, critical aggregation concentration, and morphology. The obtained MH-PNs and MH-MNs exhibited a spherical morphology with a negative zeta potential and a particle size less than 200 nm, favorable for drug targeting. Remarkably, the addition of TPGS resulted in about 1.6-fold increase in drug-loading. The in vitro cell viability experiment revealed that MH-MNs enhanced the cytotoxicity of MH in A549 cells compared with MH solution and MH-PNs. Furthermore, blank MNs containing TPGS exhibited selective cytotoxic effects against cancer cells without diminishing the viability of normal cells. In addition, the cellular uptake study indicated that MNs resulted in 2.28-fold higher cellular uptake than that of PNs, in A549 cells. The CD44 receptor competitive inhibition and the internalization pathway studies suggested that the internalization mechanism of the nanoparticles was mediated mainly by the CD44 receptors through a clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway. More importantly, MH-MNs exhibited a higher in vivo antitumor potency and induced more tumor cell apoptosis than did MH-PNs, following intravenous administration to S180 tumor-bearing mice. Overall, the results imply that the developed nanoparticles are promising vehicles for the targeted delivery of lipophilic anticancer drugs.Keywords: anti-tumor effect, hyaluronic acid, TPGS, morin hydrate, nanoparticles

  18. The availability of a functional tumor targeting T-cell repertoire determines the anti-tumor efficiency of combination therapy with anti-CTLA-4 and anti-4-1BB antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Pedersen, Sara Ram; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    2013-01-01

    It has previously been found that combination therapy with anti-CTLA-4 and anti-4-1BB antibodies may enhance tumor immunity. However, this treatment is not efficient against all tumors, and it has been suggested that variations in tumor control may reflect differences in the immunogenicity of dif...

  19. Poly(ethyl glyoxylate)-Poly(ethylene oxide) Nanoparticles: Stimuli-Responsive Drug Release via End-to-End Polyglyoxylate Depolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Bo; Gillies, Elizabeth R

    2017-08-07

    The ability to disrupt polymer assemblies in response to specific stimuli provides the potential to release drugs selectively at certain sites or conditions in vivo. However, most stimuli-responsive delivery systems require many stimuli-initiated events to release drugs. "Self-immolative polymers" offer the potential to provide amplified responses to stimuli as they undergo complete end-to-end depolymerization following the cleavage of a single end-cap. Herein, linker end-caps were developed to conjugate self-immolative poly(ethyl glyoxylate) (PEtG) with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) to form amphiphilic block copolymers. These copolymers were self-assembled to form nanoparticles in aqueous solution. Cleavage of the linker end-caps were triggered by a thiol reducing agent, UV light, H 2 O 2 , and combinations of these stimuli, resulting in nanoparticle disintegration. Low stimuli concentrations were effective in rapidly disrupting the nanoparticles. Nile red, doxorubin, and curcumin were encapsulated into the nanoparticles and were selectively released upon application of the appropriate stimulus. The ability to tune the stimuli-responsiveness simply by changing the linker end-cap makes this new platform highly attractive for applications in drug delivery.

  20. Cyclotron production of cesium radionuclides as analogues for francium-221 biodistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, R.; McDevitt, M.; Sheh, Y.; Lom, C.; Qiao, J.; Cai, S.; Burnazi, E.; Nacca, A.; Pillarsetty, N.; Jaggi, J.; Scheinberg, D.

    2005-01-01

    In our clinical investigations focussing on improved therapeutic treatment of specific tumors we have concentrated on a targeted therapy approach utilizing designed radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies as the cytotoxic reagent. The physical characteristics of the alpha particle emitting radionuclide bismuth-213 including the short half-life of 45.6 min, has shown promise for the treatment of specific cancers such as leukemias and lymphomas or micrometastatic carcinomas. In an effort to increase the cytocidal effect of the HuM195, a humanized monoclonal antibody carrier to the CD33 antigen expressed on leukemia cells, our focus is directed toward an 'internal' nano-generator composed of Ac-225 radionuclide, the parent of the bismuth-213. The actinium-225 radionuclide decays through several short-lived, alpha emitting daughters including francium-221, astatine-217 and bismuth-213. In order to study the biodistribution and the pharmacokinetics of the individual daughter nuclide, francium-221, the cyclotron production and separation of cesium radionuclides, specifically cesium-132, from a natural xenon gas target was undertaken. The choice of cesium as an analogue for francium was predicated upon both elements being in Group 1A alkali metals and cesium radionuclide possesses a sufficient half-life to allow biodistribution studies to be performed. The preliminary experimental results of this investigation are presented

  1. Selective alpha-particle mediated depletion of tumor vasculature with vascular normalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspreet Singh Jaggi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal regulation of angiogenesis in tumors results in the formation of vessels that are necessary for tumor growth, but compromised in structure and function. Abnormal tumor vasculature impairs oxygen and drug delivery and results in radiotherapy and chemotherapy resistance, respectively. Alpha particles are extraordinarily potent, short-ranged radiations with geometry uniquely suitable for selectively killing neovasculature.Actinium-225 ((225Ac-E4G10, an alpha-emitting antibody construct reactive with the unengaged form of vascular endothelial cadherin, is capable of potent, selective killing of tumor neovascular endothelium and late endothelial progenitors in bone-marrow and blood. No specific normal-tissue uptake of E4G10 was seen by imaging or post-mortem biodistribution studies in mice. In a mouse-model of prostatic carcinoma, (225Ac-E4G10 treatment resulted in inhibition of tumor growth, lower serum prostate specific antigen level and markedly prolonged survival, which was further enhanced by subsequent administration of paclitaxel. Immunohistochemistry revealed lower vessel density and enhanced tumor cell apoptosis in (225Ac-E4G10 treated tumors. Additionally, the residual tumor vasculature appeared normalized as evident by enhanced pericyte coverage following (225Ac-E4G10 therapy. However, no toxicity was observed in vascularized normal organs following (225Ac-E4G10 therapy.The data suggest that alpha-particle immunotherapy to neovasculature, alone or in combination with sequential chemotherapy, is an effective approach to cancer therapy.

  2. Tumor Immunotargeting Using Innovative Radionuclides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Kraeber-Bodéré

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews some aspects and recent developments in the use of antibodies to target radionuclides for tumor imaging and therapy. While radiolabeled antibodies have been considered for many years in this context, only a few have reached the level of routine clinical use. However, alternative radionuclides, with more appropriate physical properties, such as lutetium-177 or copper-67, as well as alpha-emitting radionuclides, including astatine-211, bismuth-213, actinium-225, and others are currently reviving hopes in cancer treatments, both in hematological diseases and solid tumors. At the same time, PET imaging, with short-lived radionuclides, such as gallium-68, fluorine-18 or copper-64, or long half-life ones, particularly iodine-124 and zirconium-89 now offers new perspectives in immuno-specific phenotype tumor imaging. New antibody analogues and pretargeting strategies have also considerably improved the performances of tumor immunotargeting and completely renewed the interest in these approaches for imaging and therapy by providing theranostics, companion diagnostics and news tools to make personalized medicine a reality.

  3. Synthesis of new bivalent peptides for applications in the Affinity Enhancement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandeau, L; Benoist, E; Loussouarn, A; Ouadi, A; Lesaec, P; Mougin, M; Faivre-Chauvet, A; Le Boterff, J; Chatal, J F; Barbet, J; Gestin, J F

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility of two-step radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of cancer by the Affinity Enhancement System (AES) has been demonstrated in experimental and clinical studies. This technique, associating a bispecific antibody and a bivalent peptide radiolabeled with iodine-131, has been developed to reduce toxicity and to improve therapeutic efficacy compared to one-step targeting methods. The use of AES with different beta-emitters such as rhenium-188, samarium-153, or lutetium-177 or alpha-emitters such as actinium-225 or bismuth-213 is now considered. Thus three new peptides, designed to allow for the coupling of a variety of bifunctional chelating agents BCA, were synthesized by associating two glycyl-succinyl-histamine (GSH) arms, which are recognized by the 679 monoclonal antibody (mAb-679), with different binding agents, such as p-nitrophenylalanine or N,N-bis(carboxymethyl)-4-N'-(9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl)aminobenzylamine. Immunoreactivity and serum stability evaluation were performed for each synthesized peptide. One of the three peptides (LM218) proved to be more stable than the others, and three different BCAs were coupled to LM218 (CITC-DTPA, CITC-TTHA, and CITC-CHXA''DTPA). One of these products, LM218-BzTTHA was radiolabeled with indium-111 without loss of immunoreactivity toward the mAb-679. These new peptides will allow pretargeted RIT with a large variety of radionuclides, to adapt the choice of the radionuclide (LET, half-life, penetrating emission) to the nature and size of targeted tumors.

  4. Tumor immunotargeting using innovative radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Rousseau, Caroline; Bodet-Milin, Caroline; Mathieu, Cédric; Guérard, François; Frampas, Eric; Carlier, Thomas; Chouin, Nicolas; Haddad, Ferid; Chatal, Jean-François; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Chérel, Michel; Barbet, Jacques

    2015-02-11

    This paper reviews some aspects and recent developments in the use of antibodies to target radionuclides for tumor imaging and therapy. While radiolabeled antibodies have been considered for many years in this context, only a few have reached the level of routine clinical use. However, alternative radionuclides, with more appropriate physical properties, such as lutetium-177 or copper-67, as well as alpha-emitting radionuclides, including astatine-211, bismuth-213, actinium-225, and others are currently reviving hopes in cancer treatments, both in hematological diseases and solid tumors. At the same time, PET imaging, with short-lived radionuclides, such as gallium-68, fluorine-18 or copper-64, or long half-life ones, particularly iodine-124 and zirconium-89 now offers new perspectives in immuno-specific phenotype tumor imaging. New antibody analogues and pretargeting strategies have also considerably improved the performances of tumor immunotargeting and completely renewed the interest in these approaches for imaging and therapy by providing theranostics, companion diagnostics and news tools to make personalized medicine a reality.

  5. Cyclotron production of cesium radionuclides as analogues for francium-221 biodistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finn, R. [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States) and Cyclotron Core Facility, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States)]. E-mail: finnr@mskcc.org; McDevitt, M. [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Sheh, Y. [Cyclotron Core Facility, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Lom, C. [Cyclotron Core Facility, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Qiao, J. [Cyclotron Core Facility, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Cai, S. [Cyclotron Core Facility, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Burnazi, E. [Cyclotron Core Facility, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Nacca, A. [Cyclotron Core Facility, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Pillarsetty, N. [Cyclotron Core Facility, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Jaggi, J. [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Scheinberg, D. [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    In our clinical investigations focussing on improved therapeutic treatment of specific tumors we have concentrated on a targeted therapy approach utilizing designed radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies as the cytotoxic reagent. The physical characteristics of the alpha particle emitting radionuclide bismuth-213 including the short half-life of 45.6 min, has shown promise for the treatment of specific cancers such as leukemias and lymphomas or micrometastatic carcinomas. In an effort to increase the cytocidal effect of the HuM195, a humanized monoclonal antibody carrier to the CD33 antigen expressed on leukemia cells, our focus is directed toward an 'internal' nano-generator composed of Ac-225 radionuclide, the parent of the bismuth-213. The actinium-225 radionuclide decays through several short-lived, alpha emitting daughters including francium-221, astatine-217 and bismuth-213. In order to study the biodistribution and the pharmacokinetics of the individual daughter nuclide, francium-221, the cyclotron production and separation of cesium radionuclides, specifically cesium-132, from a natural xenon gas target was undertaken. The choice of cesium as an analogue for francium was predicated upon both elements being in Group 1A alkali metals and cesium radionuclide possesses a sufficient half-life to allow biodistribution studies to be performed. The preliminary experimental results of this investigation are presented.

  6. Images of God used by self-injurious burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossoehme, D H; Springer, L S

    1999-08-01

    Suicide by burning and other forms of self-injurious behaviors which involve burning are sometimes considered to have religious overtones. The ritual death of widows upon their husband's funeral pyre is closely associated with Hindu beliefs. Buddhists have used self-immolation as a form of protest. The Judaeo-Christian traditions have imagery of fire as cleansing and purifying; there is also secular imagery associating fire with images of condemnation and evil. Previous studies have described religiosity as a common theme among survivors. The present study describes the ways in which persons who inflicted self-injurious behaviors through burning, including attempted suicide, imagine the Divinity and use religious language to give meaning to their experience.

  7. Attempted suicides in India: a comprehensive look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddichha, Sahoo; Prasad, M N V; Saxena, Mukul Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Suicide continues to be one of the biggest killers in the world, with suicide rates varying between 8.1 and 58.3/100,000 population for different parts of India. Andhra Pradesh, the fourth largest state in India, is responsible for more than 11% of these. Unfortunately, most suicides are under-reported and there is scant data on attempted suicides. This study aimed to comprehensively study the characteristics of attempted suicides in Andhra Pradesh and using the primary data, make secondary projections for the forthcoming years. Using Patient Care Record (PCR) forms of all emergencies serviced by 108, the first comprehensive emergency service in India, an analysis of all cases was done to detect possible suicides during the period January-December 2007. A follow up 48 hours later was then done to confirm status and diagnosis. A total of 1007 cases were recorded as confirmed suicides. Hanging and insecticide poisoning (72%) were the most common methods used. Males preferred hanging and insecticide poisoning while females preferred self-immolation and hanging as common methods. Self-immolation and insecticide poisoning had the highest mortality (41.6%). Estimates of attempted suicides for the year 2008 revealed a mean of 3.2-3.8 per 1000 population for males, 3.3-3.7 per 1000 population for females and 6.4-7.6 per 1000 population combined. A serious epidemic of suicides seems to be in store in the coming years unless preventive steps in the form of policy changes are undertaken. Restricting access to poisonous substances or prescription drugs and taking into consideration the prevailing social, economic and cultural factors could help in reducing numbers. Starting tele-help services or offering brief interventions during hospital stays are other programs which may be considered.

  8. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R combined with recombinant methioninase and cisplatinum eradicates an osteosarcoma cisplatinum-resistant lung metastasis in a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) mouse model: decoy, trap and kill chemotherapy moves toward the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Kei; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Miyake, Kentaro; Miyake, Masuyo; Li, Shukuan; Han, Qinghong; Tan, Yuying; Zhao, Ming; Li, Yunfeng; Nelson, Scott D; Dry, Sarah M; Singh, Arun S; Elliott, Irmina A; Russell, Tara A; Eckardt, Mark A; Yamamoto, Norio; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Kimura, Hiroaki; Miwa, Shinji; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Eilber, Fritz C; Hoffman, Robert M

    2018-04-10

    In the present study, a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model of recurrent cisplatinum (CDDP)-resistant metastatic osteosarcoma was treated with Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R), which decoys chemoresistant quiescent cancer cells to cycle, and recombinant methioninase (rMETase), which selectively traps cancer cells in late S/G 2 , and chemotherapy. The PDOX models were randomized into the following groups 14 days after implantation: G1, control without treatment; G2, CDDP (6 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, weekly, for 2 weeks); G3, rMETase (100 unit/mouse, i.p., daily, for 2 weeks). G4, S. typhimurium A1-R (5 × 10 7 CFU/100 μl, i.v., weekly, for 2 weeks); G5, S. typhimurium A1-R (5 × 10 7 CFU/100 μl, i.v., weekly, for 2 weeks) combined with rMETase (100 unit/mouse, i.p., daily, for 2 weeks); G6, S. typhimurium A1-R (5 × 10 7 CFU/100 μl, i.v., weekly, for 2 weeks) combined with rMETase (100 unit/mouse, i.p., daily, for 2 weeks) and CDDP (6 mg/kg, i.p. injection, weekly, for 2 weeks). On day 14 after initiation, all treatments except CDDP alone, significantly inhibited tumor growth compared to untreated control: (CDDP: p = 0.586; rMETase: p = 0.002; S. typhimurium A1-R: p = 0.002; S. typhimurium A1-R combined with rMETase: p = 0.0004; rMETase combined with both S. typhimurium A1-R and CDDP: p = 0.0001). The decoy, trap and kill combination of S. typhimurium A1-R, rMETase and CDDP was the most effective of all therapies and was able to eradicate the metastatic osteosarcoma PDOX.

  9. Alpha Emitting Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals for Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chérel, Michel; Barbet, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Today, cancer treatments mainly rely on surgery or external beam radiation to remove or destroy bulky tumors. Chemotherapy is given when tumours cannot be removed or when dissemination is suspected. However, these approaches cannot permanently treat all cancers and relapse occurs in up to 50% of the patients’ population. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) are effective against some disseminated and metastatic diseases, although they are rarely curative. Most preclinical and clinical developments in this field have involved electron-emitting radionuclides, particularly iodine-131, yttrium-90 and lutetium-177. The large range of the electrons emitted by these radionuclides reduces their efficacy against very small tumour cell clusters or isolated tumour cells present in residual disease and in many haematological tumours (leukaemia, myeloma). The range of alpha particles in biological tissues is very short, less than 0.1 mm, which makes alpha emitters theoretically ideal for treatment of such isolated tumour cells or micro-clusters of malignant cells. Thus, over the last decade, a growing interest for the use of alpha-emitting radionuclides has emerged. Research on targeted alpha therapy (TAT) began years ago in Nantes through cooperation between Subatech, a nuclear physics laboratory, CRCNA, a cancer research centre with a nuclear oncology team and ITU (Karlsruhe, Germany). CD138 was demonstrated as a potential target antigen for Multiple Myeloma, which is a target of huge clinical interest particularly suited for TAT because of the disseminated nature of the disease consisting primarily of isolated cells and small clusters of tumour cells mainly localized in the bone marrow. Thus anti-CD138 antibodies were labelled with bismuth-213 from actinium-225/bismuth-213 generators provided by ITU and used to target multiple myeloma cells. In vitro studies showed cell cycle arrest, synergism with chemotherapy and very little induction

  10. Cancer radioimmunotherapy with alpha-emitting nuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couturier, Olivier [INSERM U 601, Nantes (France); Place Alexis Ricordeau, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nantes, Cedex (France); Supiot, Stephane; Degraef-Mougin, Marie; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Carlier, Thomas; Chatal, Jean-Francois; Davodeau, Francois; Cherel, Michel [INSERM U 601, Nantes (France)

    2005-04-01

    In lymphoid malignancies and in certain solid cancers such as medullary thyroid carcinoma, somewhat mixed success has been achieved when applying radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with {beta}-emitters for the treatment of refractory cases. The development of novel RIT with {alpha}-emitters has created new opportunities and theoretical advantages due to the high linear energy transfer (LET) and the short path length in biological tissue of {alpha}-particles. These physical properties offer the prospect of achieving selective tumoural cell killing. Thus, RIT with {alpha}-emitters appears particularly suited for the elimination of circulating single cells or cell clusters or for the treatment of micrometastases at an early stage. However, to avoid non-specific irradiation of healthy tissues, it is necessary to identify accessible tumoural targets easily and rapidly. For this purpose, a small number of {alpha}-emitters have been investigated, among which only a few have been used for in vivo preclinical studies. Another problem is the availability and cost of these radionuclides; for instance, the low cost and the development of a reliable actinium-225/bismuth-213 generator were probably determining elements in the choice of bismuth-213 in the only human trial of RIT with an {alpha}-emitter. This article reviews the literature concerning monoclonal antibodies radiolabelled with {alpha}-emitters that have been developed for possible RIT in cancer patients. The principal radio-immunoconjugates are considered, starting with physical and chemical properties of {alpha}-emitters, their mode of production, the possibilities and difficulties of labelling, in vitro studies and finally, when available, in vivo preclinical and clinical studies. (orig.)

  11. Cancer radioimmunotherapy with alpha-emitting nuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, Olivier; Supiot, Stéphane; Degraef-Mougin, Marie; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Carlier, Thomas; Chatal, Jean-François; Davodeau, François; Cherel, Michel

    2005-05-01

    In lymphoid malignancies and in certain solid cancers such as medullary thyroid carcinoma, somewhat mixed success has been achieved when applying radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with beta-emitters for the treatment of refractory cases. The development of novel RIT with alpha-emitters has created new opportunities and theoretical advantages due to the high linear energy transfer (LET) and the short path length in biological tissue of alpha-particles. These physical properties offer the prospect of achieving selective tumoural cell killing. Thus, RIT with alpha-emitters appears particularly suited for the elimination of circulating single cells or cell clusters or for the treatment of micrometastases at an early stage. However, to avoid non-specific irradiation of healthy tissues, it is necessary to identify accessible tumoural targets easily and rapidly. For this purpose, a small number of alpha-emitters have been investigated, among which only a few have been used for in vivo preclinical studies. Another problem is the availability and cost of these radionuclides; for instance, the low cost and the development of a reliable actinium-225/bismuth-213 generator were probably determining elements in the choice of bismuth-213 in the only human trial of RIT with an alpha-emitter. This article reviews the literature concerning monoclonal antibodies radiolabelled with alpha-emitters that have been developed for possible RIT in cancer patients. The principal radio-immunoconjugates are considered, starting with physical and chemical properties of alpha-emitters, their mode of production, the possibilities and difficulties of labelling, in vitro studies and finally, when available, in vivo preclinical and clinical studies.

  12. Cancer radioimmunotherapy with alpha-emitting nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, Olivier; Supiot, Stephane; Degraef-Mougin, Marie; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Carlier, Thomas; Chatal, Jean-Francois; Davodeau, Francois; Cherel, Michel

    2005-01-01

    In lymphoid malignancies and in certain solid cancers such as medullary thyroid carcinoma, somewhat mixed success has been achieved when applying radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with β-emitters for the treatment of refractory cases. The development of novel RIT with α-emitters has created new opportunities and theoretical advantages due to the high linear energy transfer (LET) and the short path length in biological tissue of α-particles. These physical properties offer the prospect of achieving selective tumoural cell killing. Thus, RIT with α-emitters appears particularly suited for the elimination of circulating single cells or cell clusters or for the treatment of micrometastases at an early stage. However, to avoid non-specific irradiation of healthy tissues, it is necessary to identify accessible tumoural targets easily and rapidly. For this purpose, a small number of α-emitters have been investigated, among which only a few have been used for in vivo preclinical studies. Another problem is the availability and cost of these radionuclides; for instance, the low cost and the development of a reliable actinium-225/bismuth-213 generator were probably determining elements in the choice of bismuth-213 in the only human trial of RIT with an α-emitter. This article reviews the literature concerning monoclonal antibodies radiolabelled with α-emitters that have been developed for possible RIT in cancer patients. The principal radio-immunoconjugates are considered, starting with physical and chemical properties of α-emitters, their mode of production, the possibilities and difficulties of labelling, in vitro studies and finally, when available, in vivo preclinical and clinical studies. (orig.)

  13. TRASH TO TREASURE: CONVERTING COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE INTO WEAPONS AGAINST CANCER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholas, R.G.; Lacy, N.H.; Butz, T.R.; Brandon, N.E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of its commitment to clean up Cold War legacy sites, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated an exciting and unique project to dispose of its inventory of uranium-233 (233U) stored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and extract isotopes that show great promise in the treatment of deadly cancers. In addition to increasing the supply of potentially useful medical isotopes, the project will rid DOE of a nuclear concern and cut surveillance and security costs. For more than 30 years, DOE's ORNL has stored over 1,200 containers of fissile 233U, originally produced for several defense-related projects, including a pilot study that looked at using 233U as a commercial reactor fuel. This uranium, designated as special nuclear material, requires expensive security, safety, and environmental controls. It has been stored at an ORNL facility, Building 3019A, that dates back to the Manhattan Project. Down-blending the material to a safer form, rather than continuing to store it, will eliminate a $15 million a year financial liability for the DOE and increase the supply of medical isotopes by 5,700 percent. During the down-blending process, thorium-229 (229Th) will be extracted. The thorium will then be used to extract actinium-225 (225Ac), which will ultimately supply its progeny, bismuth-213 (213Bi), for on-going cancer research. The research includes Phase II clinical trials for the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia at Sloan-Kettering Memorial Cancer Center in New York, as well as other serious cancers of the lungs, pancreas, and kidneys using a technique known as alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy. Alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy is based on the emission of alpha particles by radionuclides. 213Bi is attached to a monoclonal antibody that targets specific cells. The bismuth then delivers a high-powered but short-range radiation dose, effectively killing the cancerous cells but sparing the surrounding tissue. Production of the actinium and

  14. Termination of Safeguards on ULWBR Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivan R. Thomas; Ernest L. Laible

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management, has approved the disposition of 31 metric tons of Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor (ULWBR) material in canisters stored within dry wells of the Underground Fuel Storage Facility at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). This unirradiated material consists primarily of ceramic pellets of thorium oxide in stainless steel cladding, but it also contains 300 kilograms of uranium that is 98 wt% U-233. The ULWBR material was not processed at the INTEC because it was incompatible with prior chemical separation schemes. Other economical recovery options have not been identified, and expressions of interest for consolidating the material with existing projects at other DOE sites have not been received. The U-233 could be used for producing the medical isotope Actinium-225, but the proof-of-principle demonstration and follow-on pilot program have not been developed to the point of requiring production quantities of U-233. Consequently, the selected disposition of the ULWBR material was burial as Low Level Waste at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which required terminating safeguards controls for the contained Category II quantity of Attractiveness Level D special nuclear material (SNM). The requested termination followed the twelve point evaluation criteria of the Historical Defense Program Discard Guidance and included a security analysis for evaluating the risks of theft, diversion, and radiological sabotage associated with the material. Continuity of knowledge in the book inventory was assured by documenting that the original shipper's measurements accurately reflected the quantities of materials received and that the ULWBR materials had remained under adequate physical protection and had been subject to periodic physical inventories. The method selected for substantiating the book values as the basis for terminating safeguards was the nondestructive assay used during physical

  15. DNA double strand breaks as predictor of efficacy of the alpha-particle emitter Ac-225 and the electron emitter Lu-177 for somatostatin receptor targeted radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Graf

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Key biologic effects of the alpha-particle emitter Actinium-225 in comparison to the beta-particle emitter Lutetium-177 labeled somatostatin-analogue DOTATOC in vitro and in vivo were studied to evaluate the significance of γH2AX-foci formation. METHODS: To determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE between the two isotopes (as - biological consequence of different ionisation-densities along a particle-track, somatostatin expressing AR42J cells were incubated with Ac-225-DOTATOC and Lu-177-DOTATOC up to 48 h and viability was analyzed using the MTT assay. DNA double strand breaks (DSB were quantified by immunofluorescence staining of γH2AX-foci. Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. In vivo uptake of both radiolabeled somatostatin-analogues into subcutaneously growing AR42J tumors and the number of cells displaying γH2AX-foci were measured. Therapeutic efficacy was assayed by monitoring tumor growth after treatment with activities estimated from in vitro cytotoxicity. RESULTS: Ac-225-DOTATOC resulted in ED50 values of 14 kBq/ml after 48 h, whereas Lu-177-DOTATOC displayed ED50 values of 10 MBq/ml. The number of DSB grew with increasing concentration of Ac-225-DOTATOC and similarly with Lu-177-DOTATOC when applying a factor of 700-fold higher activity compared to Ac-225. Already 24 h after incubation with 2.5-10 kBq/ml, Ac-225-DOTATOC cell-cycle studies showed up to a 60% increase in the percentage of tumor cells in G2/M phase. After 72 h an apoptotic subG1 peak was also detectable. Tumor uptake for both radio peptides at 48 h was identical (7.5%ID/g, though the overall number of cells with γH2AX-foci was higher in tumors treated with 48 kBq Ac-225-DOTATOC compared to tumors treated with 30 MBq Lu-177-DOTATOC (35% vs. 21%. Tumors with a volume of 0.34 ml reached delayed exponential tumor growth after 25 days (44 kBq Ac-225-DOTATOC and after 21 days (34 MBq Lu-177-DOTATOC. CONCLUSION: γH2AX-foci formation, triggered

  16. TRASH TO TREASURE: CONVERTING COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE INTO WEAPONS AGAINST CANCER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas, R.G.; Lacy, N.H.; Butz, T.R.; Brandon, N.E.

    2004-10-06

    As part of its commitment to clean up Cold War legacy sites, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated an exciting and unique project to dispose of its inventory of uranium-233 (233U) stored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and extract isotopes that show great promise in the treatment of deadly cancers. In addition to increasing the supply of potentially useful medical isotopes, the project will rid DOE of a nuclear concern and cut surveillance and security costs. For more than 30 years, DOE's ORNL has stored over 1,200 containers of fissile 233U, originally produced for several defense-related projects, including a pilot study that looked at using 233U as a commercial reactor fuel. This uranium, designated as special nuclear material, requires expensive security, safety, and environmental controls. It has been stored at an ORNL facility, Building 3019A, that dates back to the Manhattan Project. Down-blending the material to a safer form, rather than continuing to store it, will eliminate a $15 million a year financial liability for the DOE and increase the supply of medical isotopes by 5,700 percent. During the down-blending process, thorium-229 (229Th) will be extracted. The thorium will then be used to extract actinium-225 (225Ac), which will ultimately supply its progeny, bismuth-213 (213Bi), for on-going cancer research. The research includes Phase II clinical trials for the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia at Sloan-Kettering Memorial Cancer Center in New York, as well as other serious cancers of the lungs, pancreas, and kidneys using a technique known as alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy. Alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy is based on the emission of alpha particles by radionuclides. 213Bi is attached to a monoclonal antibody that targets specific cells. The bismuth then delivers a high-powered but short-range radiation dose, effectively killing the cancerous cells but sparing the surrounding tissue. Production of the actinium and

  17. Geographical Proximity is not Enough: How Culture Shaped Placement, Spatiality, and the Outcomes of the Arab Spring's Uprising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesya Venger

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the phenomenon of the Arab Spring against the background of cultural traditions and attitudes that sustained these protests and carried them across borders of more than twenty countries in the Middle East in a move of cultural contagion of conflict (Gelfand et al. 2012. Tracing the placement and spatiality of the Arab Spring uprisings, their media and ideascapes (Appadurai 1990, this paper draws upon theoretical frameworks of Homi Bhabha’s (2004 third space, Margaret Kuhn’s (2003 radical space, and Geert Hofstede’s (2014 cultural indicators. Given the information about self-immolations as the events that stirred the uprisings in the Arab Spring’s countries in 2010-2012, it explores how patterns of contagion of conflict have been operating through specific cultural conditions during successful protests that led to the change of regime as opposed to failed protests that did not. The paper offers a cultural profile of the Arab Spring countries, discussing its implications for the countries’ governance regarding the existence of inter-networked places of protests, significance of their cultural traditions, and their linkage to success or failure of the protests.

  18. “I could still see her in my mind’s eye”: Water and Maternal Imagery in Uwe Johnson’s Anniversaries: From the Life of Gesine Cresspahl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Rupprecht

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the writings of East German author Uwe Johnson (1934-84 in terms of his experimental style—specifically transitions between descriptive passages—in conjunction with maternal imagery, as discussed through reference to Susan Suleiman’s concept of a “1.5 generation” of Holocaust survivors. A non-Jewish German author, Johnson addresses German history from the position of the perpetrators, yet born in 1934, he experienced National Socialism from the point of view of a child. In his tetralogy, Anniversaries: From the Life of Gesine Cresspahl (1970-83, feelings of guilt and attempts to understand the German past are negotiated through the maternal figure. This figure is linked, in turn, to water as both a structural and symbolic element throughout the novel. As this article demonstrates, the effect of “blurred boundaries” is achieved through water, which functions as paradigm for the mother-daughter relationship: the narrator-protagonist Gesine’s memory is shaped by the experience of near-drowning before the eyes of her mother, Lisbeth, who commits suicide via self-immolation during Reichskristallnacht . As this article concludes, the author himself seems caught in the predicament of Suleiman’s 1.5 Generation, where perception is blurred, and immersing oneself in (imaginary bodies of water becomes a response to the madness of fascism.

  19. Epidemiology and outcome of 2,590 burned patients in Northwest Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S N; Rashtchi, V; Kamali, K; Moghimi, M H

    2017-06-30

    Burns are calamities with considerable morbidity and mortality rates. We attempted to examine the epidemiology of burns in Zanjan city, in northwest Iran, by a systematic study of existing information. The medical files of 2,590 thermal burn patients treated in our hospital in Zanjan city, Iran, from December 2010 to November 2016 were studied. Patient information, including age, sex, burn degree, season, cause of burn, hospital stay and treatment results were analyzed. About 65% of the patients were male (n=1691). Most burns (92.8%) were less than 30% total body surface area. Mean age and hospital stay were 25.4 years old and 9.1 days, respectively. The most common causes of burn were hot liquids, gas explosion and fire, respectively. Except for self-immolation, which was more common among men, there was no significant relationship between cause of burn and the studied variables. The six-year mortality rate was 2.9%, and was more common in the years 2011 to 2013. In addition, distribution of causes of burn had a significant trend (variation). Fire burn had a decreasing trend and gas and chemical burn had increasing trends in this period. In northwest Iran the causes of burn changed over the six years. Chemical burns, gas explosion burns and burn mortality increased. Some of these results were due to economic and pharmaceutical sanctions in Iran. Because of Iran's industrial development, it is recommended that preventive measures for chemical, gas and electrical burns be conducted.

  20. Epidemiology of burns throughout the World. Part II: intentional burns in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Michael D

    2012-08-01

    A significant number of burns and deaths from fire are intentionally wrought. Rates of intentional burns are unevenly distributed throughout the world; India has a particularly high rate in young women whereas in Europe rates are higher in men in mid-life. Data from hospitalized burn patients worldwide reveal incidence rates for assault by fire and scalds ranging from 3% to 10%. The average proportion of the body surface area burned in an assault by fire or scalds is approximately 20%. In different parts of the world, attempted burning of others or oneself can be attributed to different motives. Circumstances under which assaults occur fall largely into the categories of interpersonal conflict, including spousal abuse, elder abuse, or interactions over contentious business transactions. Contributing social factors to assaults by burning include drug and alcohol abuse, non-constructive use of leisure time, non-participation in religious and community activities, unstable relationships, and extramarital affairs. Although the incidence of self-mutilation and suicide attempts by burning are relatively low, deliberate self-harm carries a significant risk of death, with an overall mortality rate of 65% worldwide. In those who resort to self-immolation, circumstantial themes reflect domestic discord, family dysfunction, and the social ramifications of unemployment. Preventing injurious burn-related violence requires a multifaceted approach, including legislation and enforcement, education, and advocacy. Better standardized assessment tools are needed to screen for risks of abuse and for psychiatric disorders in perpetrators. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. Chemical signal activation of an organocatalyst enables control over soft material formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trausel, Fanny; Maity, Chandan; Poolman, Jos M; Kouwenberg, D S J; Versluis, Frank; van Esch, Jan H; Eelkema, Rienk

    2017-10-12

    Cells can react to their environment by changing the activity of enzymes in response to specific chemical signals. Artificial catalysts capable of being activated by chemical signals are rare, but of interest for creating autonomously responsive materials. We present an organocatalyst that is activated by a chemical signal, enabling temporal control over reaction rates and the formation of materials. Using self-immolative chemistry, we design a deactivated aniline organocatalyst that is activated by the chemical signal hydrogen peroxide and catalyses hydrazone formation. Upon activation of the catalyst, the rate of hydrazone formation increases 10-fold almost instantly. The responsive organocatalyst enables temporal control over the formation of gels featuring hydrazone bonds. The generic design should enable the use of a large range of triggers and organocatalysts, and appears a promising method for the introduction of signal response in materials, constituting a first step towards achieving communication between artificial chemical systems.Enzymes regulated by chemical signals are common in biology, but few such artificial catalysts exist. Here, the authors design an aniline catalyst that, when activated by a chemical trigger, catalyses formation of hydrazone-based gels, demonstrating signal response in a soft material.

  2. Inhibition of Mitochondrial Bioenergetics by Esterase-Triggered COS/H2S Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Andrea K; Marcatti, Michela; Szabo, Csaba; Szczesny, Bartosz; Pluth, Michael D

    2017-08-18

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is an important biological mediator, and synthetic H 2 S donating molecules provide an important class of investigative tools for H 2 S research. Here, we report esterase-activated H 2 S donors that function by first releasing carbonyl sulfide (COS), which is rapidly converted to H 2 S by the ubiquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). We report the synthesis, self-immolative decomposition, and H 2 S release profiles of the developed scaffolds. In addition, the developed esterase-triggered COS/H 2 S donors exhibit higher levels of cytotoxicity than equivalent levels of Na 2 S or the common H 2 S donors GYY4137 and AP39. Using cellular bioenergetics measurements, we establish that the developed donors reduce cellular respiration and ATP synthesis in BEAS 2B human lung epithelial cells, which is consistent with COS/H 2 S inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase in the mitochondrial respiratory chain although not observed with common H 2 S donors at the same concentrations. Taken together, these results may suggest that COS functions differently than H 2 S in certain biological contexts or that the developed donors are more efficient at delivering H 2 S than other common H 2 S-releasing motifs.

  3. Impact of the Tunisian Revolution on homicide and suicide rates in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khelil, Mehdi; Gharbaoui, Meriem; Farhani, Fethia; Zaafrane, Malek; Harzallah, Hana; Allouche, Mohamed; Zhioua, Mongi; Hamdoun, Moncef

    2016-12-01

    To analyze the impact of the Tunisian Revolution on suicide and homicide patterns in Tunisia. It is a retrospective, cross-sectional study, including all the cases of homicides and suicides that occurred during an 8-year period (2007-2014) in Northern Tunisia. We compared data before and after the revolution. After the revolution, the number of suicides rose 1.7 times, with a prevalence rising from 1.8 to 3.12 suicides per 100,000 persons per year. Homicides rose 1.3 times after the revolution. For both manner of death, victims were mostly males, aged between 20 and 39 years, living in urban areas. Hanging and self-immolation rose, respectively, 1.8 and 3 times after 2011. We observed suicide cases most frequently occurred in public places and in front of public administration after 2011. Homicide victims' profile and circumstances showed a single variation which is an increase in number of cases happening in rural areas. Our results proved a short-term impact of the transition period on homicides and suicides. Urgent preventive measures are needed especially to decrease the suicide rates.

  4. Adsorption of Cathepsin B-sensitive peptide conjugated DOX on nanodiamonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Shanshan; Shao Jianqun [School of Chemical Biology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069 (China); Gao Lifang [Center for Food and Drug Safety Evaluation of Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069 (China); Qi Yingzhe [School of Chemical Biology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069 (China); Ye Ling, E-mail: lingye@ccmu.edu.cn [School of Chemical Biology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069 (China)

    2011-08-01

    Drug delivery mediated by nanodiamonds (NDs) has shown great promise in controlled drug release field. In present study, dipeptide (Phe-Lys) conjugated antitumor drug doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) with self-immolative p-aminobenzylcarbonyl (PABC) spacer was non-covalently bound to carboxylated NDs via the electrostatic interactions. HIV-1 trans-activating transcriptor peptide (TAT) was additionally integrated to this ND-based delivery system in order to enhance the transmembrane efficiency. Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and zeta potentials were applied to characterize the DOX and TAT loaded ND delivery platform. The adsorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics for the adsorption of peptide conjugated DOX onto NDs were investigated. It was found that the adsorption fitted well with the Freundlich model and conformed to pseudo-second order kinetics. It also showed that the adsorption was a spontaneous and exothermic process. Therefore, our work offered a facile way to formulate a ND-based drug delivery platform with multifunctionality in a layer by layer adsorption fashion.

  5. Adsorption of Cathepsin B-sensitive peptide conjugated DOX on nanodiamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shanshan; Shao Jianqun; Gao Lifang; Qi Yingzhe; Ye Ling

    2011-01-01

    Drug delivery mediated by nanodiamonds (NDs) has shown great promise in controlled drug release field. In present study, dipeptide (Phe-Lys) conjugated antitumor drug doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) with self-immolative p-aminobenzylcarbonyl (PABC) spacer was non-covalently bound to carboxylated NDs via the electrostatic interactions. HIV-1 trans-activating transcriptor peptide (TAT) was additionally integrated to this ND-based delivery system in order to enhance the transmembrane efficiency. Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and zeta potentials were applied to characterize the DOX and TAT loaded ND delivery platform. The adsorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics for the adsorption of peptide conjugated DOX onto NDs were investigated. It was found that the adsorption fitted well with the Freundlich model and conformed to pseudo-second order kinetics. It also showed that the adsorption was a spontaneous and exothermic process. Therefore, our work offered a facile way to formulate a ND-based drug delivery platform with multifunctionality in a layer by layer adsorption fashion.

  6. Suicide Mortality Trends in Four Provinces of Iran with the Highest Mortality, from 2006-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari Kangavari, Hajar; Shojaei, Ahmad; Hashemi Nazari, Seyed Saeed

    2017-06-14

    Suicide is a major cause of unnatural deaths in the world. Its incidence is higher in western provinces of Iran. So far, there has not been any time series analysis of suicide in western provinces. The purpose of this study was to analyze suicide mortality data from 2006 to 2016 as well as to forecast the number of suicides for 2017 in four provinces of Iran (Ilam, Kermanshah and Lorestan and Kohgiluyeh and Boyer-Ahmad). Descriptive-analytic study. Data were analyzed by time- series analysis using R software. Three automatic methods (Auto.arima, ETS (Error Transitional Seasonality) and time series linear model (TSLM)) were fitted on the data. The best model after cross validation according to the mean absolute error measure was selected for forecasting. Totally, 7004 suicidal deaths occurred of which, 4259 were male and 2745 were female. The mean age of the study population was (32.05 ± 15.48 yr). Hanging and self-immolation were the most frequent types of suicide in men and women, respectively. The maximum and minimum number of suicides was occurred in July and August as well as January respectively. It is suggested that intervention measures should be designed in order to decrease the suicide rate particularly in the age group of 15-29 yr, and implemented as a pilot study, especially in these four provinces of Iran, which have a relatively high suicide rate.

  7. Epidemiologic Study of Suicidal Attempt Cases in Fars Province, South of Iran, 2010-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Naghshvarian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The reduction of suicidal attempts as one of the most important goals is improvement of societies’ health status. The present study aimed to assess the epidemiologic aspects of suicide cases in Fars province in 2010-2011. Methods: A total of 9714 suicide cases in Fars province, south of Iran, in 2010-2011 were enrolled in this cross-sectional study through census. The study data were collected using suicide registry forms in the health centers affiliated to Fars province department of health services and analyzed using SPSS, version 17. Results: The rate of suicide attempts was 116.5 per 100,000 population in Fars province (93per 100,000 among men and 141.5 per 100,000 among women. The results showed significant differences between the suicide rates based on sex, age group, place of living, and season of the year (P<0.001. Most of these cases were female (59.4%, single (52.9%, 15-24 years old (56.4%, had high school education (25.8%, lived in urban areas (69.6% and were female homemakers (30.3%. Based on the data, however, the largest number of suicide deaths resulted from self-immolation (56.7%. Conclusion: The present study findings revealed different rates of suicidal attempts based on sex and age group. Also, the importance of education and mental support, especially among women and singles, and also preventive measures in the context of uncontrolled immigration from the countryside to the large cities seems to essential more than ever. Yet, defects in some findings, particularly information about etiology, suggest that more researches should be conducted and suicide data registry and reporting systems should be improved

  8. Suicide Methods in Asia: Implications in Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kevin Chien-Chang; Chen, Ying-Yeh; Yip, Paul S. F.

    2012-01-01

    As the largest continent in the World, Asia accounts for about 60% of World suicides. Preventing suicide by restricting access to suicide methods is one of the few evidence-based suicide prevention strategies. However, there has been a lack of systematic exploration of suicide methods in Asian countries. To amend this shortage, the current review examines the leading suicide methods in different Asian countries, their trend, their age- and sex- specific characteristics, and their implications for suicide prevention. In total, 42 articles with leading suicide methods data in 17 Asian countries/regions were retrieved. The epidemiologic characteristics and recent trends of common suicide methods reflect specific socio-cultural, economic, and religious situations in the region. Common suicide methods shift with the introduction of technologies and constructions, and have specific age- or sex-characteristics that may render the restriction of suicide methods not equally effective for all sex and age sub-groups. Charcoal burning, pesticide poisoning, native plant poisoning, self-immolation, and jumping are all prominent examples. In the information society, suicide prevention that focuses on suicide methods must monitor and control the innovation and spread of knowledge and practices of suicide “technologies”. It may be more cost-effective to design safety into technologies as a way of suicide prevention while there is no rash of suicides yet by the new technologies. Further research on suicide methods is important for public health approaches to suicide prevention with sensitivity to socio-cultural, economic, and religious factors in different countries. PMID:22690187

  9. Suicide Methods in Asia: Implications in Suicide Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S. F. Yip

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available As the largest continent in the World, Asia accounts for about 60% of World suicides. Preventing suicide by restricting access to suicide methods is one of the few evidence-based suicide prevention strategies. However, there has been a lack of systematic exploration of suicide methods in Asian countries. To amend this shortage, the current review examines the leading suicide methods in different Asian countries, their trend, their age- and sex- specific characteristics, and their implications for suicide prevention. In total, 42 articles with leading suicide methods data in 17 Asian countries/regions were retrieved. The epidemiologic characteristics and recent trends of common suicide methods reflect specific socio-cultural, economic, and religious situations in the region. Common suicide methods shift with the introduction of technologies and constructions, and have specific age- or sex-characteristics that may render the restriction of suicide methods not equally effective for all sex and age sub-groups. Charcoal burning, pesticide poisoning, native plant poisoning, self-immolation, and jumping are all prominent examples. In the information society, suicide prevention that focuses on suicide methods must monitor and control the innovation and spread of knowledge and practices of suicide “technologies”. It may be more cost-effective to design safety into technologies as a way of suicide prevention while there is no rash of suicides yet by the new technologies. Further research on suicide methods is important for public health approaches to suicide prevention with sensitivity to socio-cultural, economic, and religious factors in different countries.

  10. Comparative genomic analyses of the cyanobacterium, Lyngbya aestuarii BL J, a powerful hydrogen producer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita eKothari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The filamentous, non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Lyngbya aestuarii is an important contributor to marine intertidal microbial mats system worldwide. The recent isolate L. aestuarii BL J, is an unusually powerful hydrogen producer. Here we report a morphological, ultrastructural and genomic characterization of this strain to set the basis for future systems studies and applications of this organism. The filaments contain circa 17 μm wide trichomes, composed of stacked disk-like short cells (2 μm long, encased in a prominent, laminated exopolysaccharide sheath. Cellular division occurs by transversal centripetal growth of cross-walls, where several rounds of division proceed simultaneously. Filament division occurs by cell self-immolation of one or groups of cells (necridial cells at the breakage point. Short, sheath-less, motile filaments (hormogonia are also formed. Morphologically and phylogenetically L. aestuarii belongs to a clade of important cyanobacteria that include members of the marine Trichodesmiun and Hydrocoleum genera, as well as terrestrial Microcoleus vaginatus strains, and alkalyphilic strains of Arthrospira. A draft genome of strain BL J was compared to those of other cyanobacteria in order to ascertain some of its ecological constraints and biotechnological potential. The genome had an average GC content of 41.1 %. Of the 6.87 Mb sequenced, 6.44 Mb was present as large contigs (>10,000 bp. It contained 6515 putative protein-encoding genes, of which, 43 % encode proteins of known functional role, 26 % corresponded to proteins with domain or family assignments, 19.6 % encode conserved hypothetical proteins, and 11.3 % encode apparently unique hypothetical proteins. The strain’s genome reveals its adaptations to a life of exposure to intense solar radiation and desiccation. It likely employs the storage compounds, glycogen and cyanophycin but no polyhydroxyalkanoates, and can produce the osmolytes, trehalose and glycine

  11. Multifunctional Biodegradable Polyacrylamide Nanocarriers for Cancer Theranostics - A “See and Treat” Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Shouyan; Kim, Gwangseong; Lee, Yong-Eun Koo; Hah, Hoe Jin; Ethirajan, Manivannan; Pandey, Ravindra K.; Kopelman, Raoul

    2012-01-01

    We describe here the development of multifunctional nanocarriers, based on amine functionalized biodegradable polyacrylamide nanoparticles (NPs), for cancer theranostics, including active tumor targeting, fluorescence imaging and photodynamic therapy. The structural design involves adding primary amino groups and biodegradable crosslinkers during the NP polymerization, while incorporating photodynamic and fluorescent imaging agents into the NP matrix, and conjugating PEG and tumor-targeting l...

  12. Proton irradiation augments the reduction in tumor progression observed with advanced age

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proton irradiation is touted for its improved tumor targeting due to the physical advantages of ion beams for radiotherapy. Recent studies from our laboratory have...

  13. Radioimmunotherapy is an effective adjuvant treatment after cytoreductive surgery of experimental colonic peritoneal carcinomatosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppe, M.J.; Hendriks, T.; Boerman, O.C.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Bleichrodt, R.P.

    2006-01-01

    Because tumor targeting with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies is more efficient in small lesions, radioimmunotherapy is considered most suitable for minimal or microscopic residual disease. The aim of the present studies was to assess the efficacy of adjuvant radiommunotherapy using radiolabeled

  14. Targeted radiosensitization of cells expressing truncated DNA polymerase {beta}.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neijenhuis, S.; Verwijs-Janssen, M.; Broek, Bart van den; Begg, A.C.; Vens, C.

    2010-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is an effective anticancer treatment, although failures still occur. To improve radiotherapy, tumor-targeted strategies are needed to increase radiosensitivity of tumor cells, without influencing normal tissue radiosensitivity. Base excision repair (BER) and single-strand

  15. Mechanism for Clastogenic Activity of Naphthalene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, Bruce A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-29

    Naphthalene incubations form DNA adducts in vitro in a dose dependent manner in both mouse and rat tissues. Rodent tissue incubations with naphthalene indicate that naphthalene forms as many DNA adducts as Benzo(a)pyrene, a known DNA binding carcinogen. The mouse airway has the greatest number of DNA adducts, corresponding to the higher metabolic activation of naphthalene in this location. Both rat tissues, the rat olfactory (tumor target) and the airways (non-tumor target), have similar levels of NA-DNA adducts, indicating that short term measures of initial adduct formation do not directly correlate with sites of tumor formation in the NTP bioassays.

  16. Mechanism for Clastogenic Activity of Naphthalene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, Bruce A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-06-24

    Naphthalene incubations form DNA adducts in vitro in a dose dependent manner in both mouse and rat tissues. Rodent tissue incubations with naphthalene indicate that naphthalene forms as many DNA adducts as Benzo(a)pyrene, a known DNA binding carcinogen. The mouse airway has the greatest number of DNA adducts, corresponding to the higher metabolic activation of naphthalene in this location. Both rat tissues, the rat olfactory (tumor target) and the airways (non-tumor target), have similar levels of NA-DNA adducts, indicating that short term measures of initial adduct formation do not directly correlate with sites of tumor formation in the NTP bioassays.

  17. DNA/RNA-based formulations for treatment of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Zhaolu; Zeng, Xianghui

    2017-01-01

    utilized targets are not effective enough as monotherapy for breast cancer. Secondly, the requirements for co-delivery system make the preparation of formulation more complicated. Thirdly, nanoparticles with the modification of tumor-targeting ligands could be more unstable in circulation and normal...

  18. Strains, Mechanism, and Perspective: Salmonella-Based Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Zhi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, investigation of bacterial-based tumor therapy has regained focus due to progress in molecular, cellular, and microbial biology. Many bacteria such as Salmonella, Listeria, Escherichia, and Clostridium have proved to have tumor targeting and in some cases even tumor-destroying phenotypes. Furthermore, bacterial clinical treatments for cancer have been improved by combination with other therapeutic methods such as chemotherapeutic drugs and radioactive agents. Synthetic biology techniques have also driven the development of new bacterial-based cancer therapies. However, basic questions about the mechanisms of bacterial-mediated tumor targeting and destruction are still being elucidated. In this review, we focus on three tumor-therapeutic Salmonella models, the most intensively studied bacterial genus in this field. One of these Salmonella models is our Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 derived strain CRC2631, engineered to minimize toxicity but maximize tumor-targeting and destruction effects. The other two are VNP20009 and A1-R. We compare the means by which these therapeutic candidate strain models were selected for study, their tumor targeting and tumor destruction phenotypes in vitro and in vivo, and what is currently known about the mechanisms by which they target and destroy tumors.

  19. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of polymer conjugates actively targeted using RGD-based peptides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Böhmová, Eliška; Pola, Robert; Pechar, Michal; Janoušková, Olga; Zuska, K.; Etrych, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 6, 4 (Suppl) (2017), s. 91 ISSN 2325-9604. [International Conference and Exhibition on Nanomedicine and Drug Delivery. 29.05.2017-31.05.2017, Osaka] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-17207S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polymer drug carriers * HPMA * peptide tumor targeting Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  20. AdEasy-based cloning system to generate tropism expanded replicating adenoviruses expressing transgenes late in the viral life cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lie-A-Ling, M.; Bakker, C. T.; Wesseling, J. G.; Bosma, P. J.

    2005-01-01

    Replicating adenoviral vectors (RAds) hold great promise for the treatment of cancer. Significant therapeutic effects of these vectors do not only rely on tumor targeting but also on efficient release of viral progeny from host cells. Cytotoxic genes expressed late in the adenoviral life cycle can

  1. Immunoscintigraphy as Potential Tool in the Clinical Evaluation of HER2/neu Targeted Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkers, Eli C. F.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; Brouwers, Adrienne H.; Hooge, Marjolijn N. Lub-de

    2008-01-01

    Many new targeted anticancer drugs have been developed. In order for these drugs to be effective, the tumor target has to be present during treatment. Currently there are only a few biomarkers available to help the physician select the appropriate targeted drug for the patient and often tumor tissue

  2. Tumor Imaging in Patients with Advanced Tumors Using a New 99mTc-Radiolabeled Vitamin B12 Derivative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sah, Bert-Ram; Schibli, Roger; Waibel, Robert

    2014-01-01

    -pool clearance. The best image quality was achieved with a predose of 20-100 ug of cold cobalamin. The mean patient dose was 2.7 ± 0.9 mSv/patient. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, we report for the first time on (99m)Tc-PAMA-cobalamin imaging in patients with metastatic cancer disease and show that tumor targeting...

  3. Effect of radiotherapy and hyperthermia on the tumor accumulation of HPMA copolymer-based drug delivery systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lammers, T.; Peschke, P.; Kühnlein, R.; Šubr, Vladimír; Ulbrich, Karel; Debus, J.; Huber, P. E.; Hennink, W. E.; Storm, G.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 3 (2007), s. 333-341 ISSN 0168-3659 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/05/2255 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : HPMA * drug delivery * tumor targeting Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.756, year: 2007

  4. Synthesis and characterization of folate-poly(ethylene glycol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    polyethylenimine as a non-viral carrier for tumor-targeted gene delivery. ... It was concluded that FA-PEG-CHI-g-PEI, which has improved transfection efficiency and FRs specificity in vitro and in vivo, may be useful in gene therapy. Key words: Folate ...

  5. Multifunctional Nucleic Acids for Tumor Cell Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pofahl, Monika; Wengel, Jesper; Mayer, Günter

    2014-01-01

    -proliferative and antimiR function in one 37-nucleotide nucleic acid molecule. It inhibits cancer cell growth and induces gene expression that is pathologically damped by an oncomir. These findings will have a strong impact on future developments regarding aptamer- and antimiR-related applications for tumor targeting...

  6. The Nature of Magnetic State of Small Fe3O4 Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dolinšek

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the nature of the magnetic state of 4 nm and 7 nm magnetite Fe3O4 nanoparticles and show that they form a collective superspin glass state. Magnetic force on the nanoparticles relevant to the tumor targeting application was determined as well.

  7. Cisplatin Loaded Hyaluronic Acid Modified TiO2 Nanoparticles for Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy of Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enling Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel tumor-targeting titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles modified with hyaluronic acid (HA were developed to explore the feasibility of exploiting the pH-responsive drug release property of TiO2 and the tumor-targeting ability of HA to construct a tumor-targeting cisplatin (CDDP delivery system (HA-TiO2 for potential neoadjuvant chemotherapy of ovarian cancer. The experimental results indicated that CDDP release from the HA-TiO2 nanoparticles was significantly accelerated by decreasing pH from 7.4 to 5.0, which is of particular benefit to cancer therapy. CDDP-loaded HA-TiO2 nanoparticles increased the accumulation of CDDP in A2780 ovarian cancer cells via HA-mediated endocytosis and exhibited superior anticancer activity in vitro. In vivo real-time imaging assay revealed that HA-TiO2 nanoparticles possessed preferable tumor-targeting ability which might potentially minimize the toxic side effects of CDDP in clinical application.

  8. Enhancing Tumor Penetration of Nanomedicines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Qingxue; Ojha, Tarun; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan; Shi, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Tumor-targeted nanomedicines have been extensively applied to alter the drawbacks and enhance the efficacy of chemotherapeutics. Despite the large number of preclinical nanomedicine studies showing initial success, their therapeutic benefit in the clinic has been rather modest, which is partially

  9. Targeted imaging in oncologic surgery : preclinical studies utilizing near-infrared fluorescence and radioactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, M.C.

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) is an intraoperative imaging technique already introduced and validated in the clinic for sentinel lymph node mapping and biliary imaging. Conjugating a NIR-dye to a specific tumor-targeting vehicle dramatically enhances the specificity of this technique. Hence, a

  10. Metabolic radiotherapy: development and perspectives; Radiotherapie metabolique: developpement et perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatal, J.F. [Centre Rene Gauducheau, 44 - Nantes (France)

    1999-10-01

    The internal radiotherapy is going to be developed these next years in nuclear oncology, because of the availability of new vectors of radioisotopes. Often used as palliative techniques, it can have a curative efficiency, even foe the treatment of solid tumors, if it is applied with high activities to small size tumors targets and in association with others therapies such chemotherapy. (N.C.)

  11. Effects of linker variation on the in vitro and in vivo characteristics of an 111In-labeled RGD peptide.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, I.; Liu, S.; Kruijtzer, J.A.; Soede, A.C.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Liskamp, R.M.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Boerman, O.C.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Due to the selective expression of the alpha(v)beta3 integrin in tumors, radiolabeled arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptides are attractive candidates for tumor targeting. Minor modifications of these peptides could have a major impact on in vivo characteristics. In this study,

  12. Quantitative 89Zr immuno-PET for in vivo scouting of 90Y-labeled monoclonal antibodies in xenograft-bearing nude mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verel, I.; Visser, G.W.; Boellaard, R.; Boerman, O.C.; Eerd-Vismale, J.E.M. van; Snow, G.B.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Dongen, G.A.M.S. van

    2003-01-01

    Immuno-PET as a scouting procedure before radioimmunotherapy (RIT) aims at the confirmation of tumor targeting and the accurate estimation of radiation dose delivery to both tumor and normal tissues. Immuno-PET with (89)Zr-labeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and (90)Y-mAb RIT might form such a

  13. Nanobody-based cancer therapy of solid tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kijanka, Marta|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328212792; Dorresteijn, Bram|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31401635X; Oliveira, Sabrina; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071919481

    The development of tumor-targeted therapies using monoclonal antibodies has been successful during the last 30 years. Nevertheless, the efficacy of antibody-based therapy is still limited and further improvements are eagerly awaited. One of the promising novel developments that may overcome the

  14. Preparation of magnetic nanoparticles and their application to magnetic targeting drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guiping; Wang Yongxian

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles barrier is a novel kind of drug delivery system for magnetic targeting drugs, which can effectively deliver the drug to a tumor target site and increase therapeutic benefit, with the side effects minimized. This article summarizes the most outstanding papers on the of magnetic nanoparticles used as the targeting drug's delivery systems. (authors)

  15. An off-on fluorescence probe targeting mitochondria based on oxidation-reduction response for tumor cell and tissue imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hanchun; Cao, Li; Zhao, Weiwei; Zhang, Suge; Zeng, Man; Du, Bin

    2017-10-01

    In this study, a tumor-targeting poly( d, l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) loaded "off-on" fluorescent probe nanoparticle (PFN) delivery system was developed to evaluate the region of tumor by off-on fluorescence. The biodegradability of the nanosize PFN delivery system readily released the probe under tumor acidic conditions. The probe with good biocompatibility was used to monitor the intracellular glutathione (GSH) of cancer cells and selectively localize to mitochondria for tumor imaging. The incorporated tumor-targeting probe was based on the molecular photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism preventing fluorescence ("off" state) and could be easily released under tumor acidic conditions. However, the released tumor-targeting fluorescence probe molecule was selective towards GSH with high selectivity and an ultra-sensitivity for the mitochondria of cancer cells and tissues significantly increasing the probe molecule fluorescence signal ("on" state). The tumor-targeting fluorescence probe showed sensitivity to GSH avoiding interference from cysteine and homocysteine. The PFNs could enable fluorescence-guided cancer imaging during cancer therapy. This work may expand the biological applications of PFNs as a diagnostic reagent, which will be beneficial for fundamental research in tumor imaging. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Nanomedicine in veterinary oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Yin; Rodriguez, Carlos O; Li, Yuanpei

    2015-08-01

    Nanomedicine is an interdisciplinary field that combines medicine, engineering, chemistry, biology and material sciences to improve disease management and can be especially valuable in oncology. Nanoparticle-based agents that possess functions such as tumor targeting, imaging and therapy are currently under intensive investigation. This review introduces the basic concept of nanomedicine and the classification of nanoparticles. Because of their favorable pharmacokinetics, tumor targeting properties, and resulting superior efficacy and toxicity profiles, nanoparticle-based agents can overcome several limitations associated with conventional diagnostic and therapeutic protocols in veterinary oncology. The two most important tumor targeting mechanisms (passive and active tumor targeting) and their dominating factors (i.e. shape, charge, size and nanoparticle surface display) are discussed. The review summarizes published clinical and preclinical studies that utilize different nanoformulations in veterinary oncology, as well as the application of nanoparticles for cancer diagnosis and imaging. The toxicology of various nanoformulations is also considered. Given the benefits of nanoformulations demonstrated in human medicine, nanoformulated drugs are likely to gain more traction in veterinary oncology. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. New Strategies in Cancer Nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S

    2016-01-01

    We review recent progress in cancer nanomedicine, including stimulus-responsive drug delivery systems and nanoparticles responding to light for phototherapy or tumor imaging. In addition, several new strategies to improve the circulation of nanoparticles in vivo, tumor penetration, and tumor targeting are discussed. The application of nanomedicine in cancer immunology, a relatively new type of cancer therapy, is also highlighted.

  18. Stimuli-Responsive Programmed Specific Targeting in Nanomedicine

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Sheng; Huang, Peng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-01-01

    Both passive targeting and actively enhanced cellular internalization play significant roles in tumor-targeted therapy. Programmed specific targeting, as a novel targeting strategy that exploits stimuli-responsive structures, expects that nanocarriers show high stability during blood circulation for efficient passive targeting, then respond to tumor internal or external stimuli and transform into more cell-interactive forms upon arrival at the tumor tissue for enhanced cellular internalizatio...

  19. Radiosensitizing Silica Nanoparticles encapsulating Docetaxel for Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Belz, Jodi; Castilla-Ojo, Noelle; Sridhar, Srinivas; Kumar, Rajiv

    2017-01-01

    The applications of nanoparticles in oncology include enhanced drug delivery, efficient tumor targeting, treatment monitoring and diagnostics. The ‘theranostic properties’ associated with nanoparticles have shown enhanced delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs with superior imaging capabilities and minimal toxicities. In conventional chemotherapy, only a fraction of the administered drug reaches the tumor site or cancer cells. For successful translation of these formulations, it is imperative to ...

  20. Feasibility and safety of cavity-directed stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases at a high-volume medical center

    OpenAIRE

    Rava, Paul; Rosenberg, Jennifer; Jamorabo, Daniel; Sioshansi, Shirin; DiPetrillo, Thomas; Wazer, David E.; Hepel, Jaroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Our objective was to report safety and efficacy of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to the surgical bed following resection of brain metastases. Methods: Eighty-seven consecutive patients who underwent cavity-directed SRS to the operative bed for the treatment of brain metastases between 2002 and 2010 were evaluated. SRS required a gadolinium-enhanced, high-resolution, T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for tumor targeting and delivered a median dose of 18 Gy (14-22 Gy) presc...

  1. A catalog of HLA type, HLA expression, and neo-epitope candidates in human cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Boegel, Sebastian; L?wer, Martin; Bukur, Thomas; Sahin, Ugur; Castle, John C

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cell lines are a tremendous resource for cancer biology and therapy development. These multipurpose tools are commonly used to examine the genetic origin of cancers, to identify potential novel tumor targets, such as tumor antigens for vaccine devel?opment, and utilized to screen potential therapies in preclinical studies. Mutations, gene expression, and drug sensitivity have been determined for many cell lines using next-generation sequencing (NGS). However, the human leukocyte antige...

  2. Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Prostate Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chandratre, Shantanu S.; Dash, Alekha K.

    2014-01-01

    The relapse of cancer after first line therapy with anticancer agents is a common occurrence. This recurrence is believed to be due to the presence of a subpopulation of cells called cancer stem cells in the tumor. Therefore, a combination therapy which is susceptible to both types of cells is desirable. Delivery of this combinatorial approach in a nanoparticulate system will provide even a better therapeutic outcome in tumor targeting. The objective of this study was to develop and character...

  3. Peptide-targeted polymer cancerostatics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Böhmová, Eliška; Pola, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, Suppl. 2 (2016), S153-S164 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : HPMA copolymers * tumor targeting * peptides Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016 http://www.biomed.cas.cz/physiolres/pdf/65%20Suppl%202/65_S153.pdf

  4. A Polyamine Oxidizing Enzyme as a Drug to Treat Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    T Maeda H. Tumor-targeting chemotherapy by a xanthine oxidase -polymer t generates oxygen-free radicals in tumor tissue. Cancer Res (2000) 60:666-71...serum amine oxidase (SAO) as effective treatments for breast cancer using a mouse model. Hopefully, this approach, or a variation thereof, could be...pure enzyme, it is proposed that freshly prepared oxidase is required. In the future, will carry out smaller scale purifications, and only use the

  5. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells as a Trojan horse: A cellular vehicle for the delivery of oncolytic viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ping-Ying; Chen, Hui-Ming; Chen, Shu-Hsia

    2013-08-01

    We have recently demonstrated that oncolytic vesicular stomatitis viruses can be efficiently and selectively delivered to neoplastic lesions by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Importantly, the loading of viruses onto MDSCs inhibited their immunosuppressive properties and endowed them with immunostimulatory and tumoricidal functions. Our study demonstrates the potential use of MDSCs as a Trojan horse for the tumor-targeted delivery of various anticancer therapeutics.

  6. Computer modelling of response of the Modelo-2 gamma probe used in intraoperative localisation of tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatal, J.F.; Curtert, C.; Daniel, G.; Kopec, M.; Lenda, A.; Wasilewska-Radwanska, M.; Strozik, P.

    1998-01-01

    During the last decade hand-held gamma probes have been introduced into both tumor localisation and surgery. The technique, labelled RIGA (radioimmuno-guided endoscopy), proved to be of help in various stages of the patient treatment preoperational (localisation, as accurate, as possible of even small-size tumor targets), intraoperational (an on-line assessment of the efficiency of the radical surgery) and postoperational, identification of possible local recurrence and metastases

  7. Clinical Cancer Therapy by NK Cells via Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kory L. Alderson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are powerful effector cells that can be directed to eliminate tumor cells through tumor-targeted monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. Some tumor-targeted mAbs have been successfully applied in the clinic and are included in the standard of care for certain malignancies. Strategies to augment the antitumor response by NK cells have led to an increased understanding of how to improve their effector responses. Next-generation reagents, such as molecularly modified mAbs and mAb-cytokine fusion proteins (immunocytokines, ICs designed to augment NK-mediated killing, are showing promise in preclinical and some clinical settings. Continued research into the antitumor effects induced by NK cells and tumor-targeted mAbs suggests that additional intrinsic and extrinsic factors may influence the antitumor response. Therefore more research is needed that focuses on evaluating which NK cell and tumor criteria are best predictive of a clinical response and which combination immunotherapy regimens to pursue for distinct clinical settings.

  8. Improved Pharmacokinetics Following PEGylation and Dimerization of a c(RGD-ACH-K) Conjugate Used for Tumor Positron Emission Tomography Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Woong; Lee, Yong Jin; Shin, Un Chol; Kim, Suhng Wook; Kim, Byung Il; Lee, Kyo Chul; Kim, Jung Young; Park, Ji-Ae

    2016-10-01

    Improving the in vivo pharmacokinetics (PK) of positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers is of critical importance to tumor diagnosis and therapy. In the case of peptide-based radiotracers, the modification and addition of a linker or spacer functional group often offer faster in vivo pharmacokinetic behavior. In this study, the authors introduced two new PEGlyated dimeric c(RGD-ACH-K) conjugates, in which an aminocyclohexane carboxylic acid (ACH) is inserted into the ring chain of the cyclic RGD peptides, with a common bifunctional chelator (DOTA or NOTA) used for labeling with radiometals (including 68 Ga and 64 Cu). The addition of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and dimerization of c(RGD-ACH-K) affected the PK of the renal system and the tumor-targeting ability, relative to unmodified molecule. As a result, both 64 Cu-DOTA-E[c(RGD-ACH-K)] 2 (complex 1) and 64 Cu-NOTA-E[c(RGD-ACH-K)] 2 (complex 2) exhibited specific tumor-targeting properties relative to tumor-blocking control group, most likely resulting from improved in vivo tumor imaging. The in vivo tumor-to-blood ratio of the 64 Cu(NOTA) complex shows better PET imaging than that of the 64 Cu(DOTA) complex, which should lead to improved dosimetry and increased suitability for noninvasive monitoring of tumor growth or tumor-targeted radionuclide therapy.

  9. Inhibition of proliferative and invasive capacities of breast cancer cells by arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanhua; Meng, Li; Wang, Hui; Chen, Rui; Wang, Rui; Ma, Xiangyi; Xu, Gang; Zhou, Jianfeng; Wang, Shixuan; Lu, Yunping; Ma, Ding

    2006-01-01

    The Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence was selected by using phage-display peptides to target tumors, focusing on targeting alpha(v) integrins in tumor blood vessels. Recent studies suggest that peptides containing the RGD sequence can bind to tumor cells, as well as tumor endothelial cells. To investigate whether the RGD peptide has other effects on tumor cells expressing alpha(v) integrins, besides its tumor targeting capability, we designed and synthesized a 10-amino peptide that contained the RGD sequence in a cyclic conformation with a disulfide bond, which specifically bound to breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. We found that this RGD peptide, GCGGRGDGGC, inhibited tumor cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, and also induced apoptosis and G1-phase cell cycle arrest in both of the cell lines that bound and internalized the peptide. Normal ovarian epithelial cells, which did not bind the RGD peptide, were unaffected. RGD peptide treatment also reduced cell invasiveness in both cell lines in vitro. This study suggests that the RGD peptide not only possesses tumor targeting capacity, but also has direct tumor cytotoxic and invasiveness inhibition effects dependent on the blockage of alpha(v) integrin activity, which would make it more efficient in tumor targeting therapy.

  10. Facile synthesis of near-infrared CuInS2/ZnS quantum dots and glycol-chitosan coating for in vivo imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong

    2017-07-01

    This study describes the synthesis method of water-soluble, low-toxicity, photostable highly luminescent probes based on I-III-VI2 type semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and the possibility of tumor targeting in living animals. Cd-free high-quality CuInS2/ZnS core/shell QDs were synthesized, and their surfaces were reacted with mercaptoundecanoic acid for aqueous phase transfer followed by reaction with glycol-chitosan; lastly, Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) integrin-binding peptide was covalently attached for in vivo tumor targeting. Dowtherm A, a highly viscous heat-transfer organic fluid, was used to control semiconductor crystal growth at high temperature (>230 °C) during organic synthesis. The structural and optical properties of the resulting CuInS2/ZnS QDs were investigated. The average diameters of CuInS2 and CuInS2/ZnS QDs were 3.0 and 3.7 nm, respectively. Cell toxicity and in vivo tumor targetability in RR1022 cancer cell-xenografted mice were further evaluated using cRGDyk-tagged glycol-chitosan-coated CuInS2/ZnS QDs. Glycol-chitosan-coated MUA-QDs displayed a Z-average diameter of 203.8 ± 7.67 nm in water by dynamic light scattering.

  11. Dual delivery systems based on polyamine analog BENSpm as prodrug and gene delivery vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu

    -SS-BEN) capable of intracellular release of BENSpm using thiolytically sensitive dithiobenzyl carbamate linker. Similar activity on SSAT enzyme induction by Lipo-SS-BEN compared with BENSpm free drug verified the success of this prodrug design. Biodegradability of Lipo-SS-BEN contributed to decreased toxicity compared with nondegradable control LipoBEN. However, decreased enhancement of TRAIL activity was observed for Lipo-SS-BEN when compared with BENSpm, indicating that the lipid-related toxicity diminished the synergism. In addition, compared with LipoBEN and DOTAP, decreased transfection efficiency of Lipo-SS-BEN demonstrated instability of Lipo-SS-BEN in extracellular environment. In order to design a dual delivery vector with reduced vector toxicity and improved linker stability, we employed dendritic polyglycerol (PG) as a safe carrier backbone, onto which BENSpm was conjugated through carbamate linkage (PG-BEN). Polymers with norspermine (PG-Nor) shell and amine-terminated PG (PG-NH2) were synthesized as controls. The BENSpm dual vector PG-BEN demonstrated superior gene delivery function, and showed decreased toxicity compared with the control polymers. However, compared with BENSpm, which depleted all natural polyamines, PG-BEN only down-regulated intracellular putrescine levels. In addition, no free BENSpm was detected in PG-BEN treated cells. These results suggested that in order to take full advantage of BENSpm anticancer activity, alternative linker chemistry needs to be further explored. We then incorporated bis(2-hydroxyethyl) disulfide as a self-immolative linker to synthesize polymer prodrugs of BENSpm (DSS-BEN). The proposed mechanism of BENSpm release from DSS-BEN contains two steps: disulfide bond is first cleaved in the reducing intracellular space, then the intermediate further undergoes slow intramolecular cyclization to release free BENSpm. Cell line-dependent BENSpm release after DSS-BEN treatment was observed using HPLC analysis, demonstrating the

  12. Multi-small molecule conjugations as new targeted delivery carriers for tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan L

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lingling Shan,1 Ming Liu,2 Chao Wu,1 Liang Zhao,1 Siwen Li,3 Lisheng Xu,1 Wengen Cao,1 Guizhen Gao,1 Yueqing Gu3 1Institute of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Biology and Food Engineering, Suzhou University, Suzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Biology, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD, USA; 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Science and Technology, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: In response to the challenges of cancer chemotherapeutics, including poor physicochemical properties, low tumor targeting ability, and harmful side effects, we developed a new tumor-targeted multi-small molecule drug delivery platform. Using paclitaxel (PTX as a model therapeutic, we prepared two prodrugs, ie, folic acid-fluorescein-5(6-isothiocyanate-arginine-paclitaxel (FA-FITC-Arg-PTX and folic acid-5-aminofluorescein-glutamic-paclitaxel (FA-5AF-Glu-PTX, composed of folic acid (FA, target, amino acids (Arg or Glu, linker, and fluorescent dye (fluorescein in vitro or near-infrared fluorescent dye in vivo in order to better understand the mechanism of PTX prodrug targeting. In vitro and acute toxicity studies demonstrated the low toxicity of the prodrug formulations compared with the free drug. In vitro and in vivo studies indicated that folate receptor-mediated uptake of PTX-conjugated multi-small molecule carriers induced high antitumor activity. Notably, compared with free PTX and with PTX-loaded macromolecular carriers from our previous study, this multi-small molecule-conjugated strategy improved the water solubility, loading rate, targeting ability, antitumor activity, and toxicity profile of PTX. These results support the use of multi-small molecules as tumor-targeting drug delivery systems. Keywords: multi-small molecules, paclitaxel, prodrugs, targeting, tumor therapy

  13. Ascorbyl palmitate/d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate monoester mixed micelles for prolonged circulation and targeted delivery of compound K for antilung cancer therapy in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Youwen Zhang, Deyin Tong, Daobiao Che, Bing Pei, Xiaodong Xia, Gaofeng Yuan, Xin Jin Department of Hospital Pharmacy, The First Hospital of Suqian, Suqian, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The roles of ginsenoside compound K (CK in inhibiting tumor have been widely recognized in recent years. However, low water solubility and significant P-gp efflux have restricted its application. In this study, CK ascorbyl palmitate (AP/d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate monoester (TPGS mixed micelles were prepared as a delivery system to increase the absorption and targeted antitumor effect of CK. Consequently, the solubility of CK increased from 35.2±4.3 to 1,463.2±153.3 µg/mL. Furthermore, in an in vitro A549 cell model, CK AP/TPGS mixed micelles significantly inhibited cell growth, induced G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest, induced cell apoptosis, and inhibited cell migration compared to free CK, all indicating that the developed micellar delivery system could increase the antitumor effect of CK in vitro. Both in vitro cellular fluorescence uptake and in vivo near-infrared imaging studies indicated that AP/TPGS mixed micelles can promote cellular uptake and enhance tumor targeting. Moreover, studies in the A549 lung cancer xenograft mouse model showed that CK AP/TPGS mixed micelles are an efficient tumor-targeted drug delivery system with an effective antitumor effect. Western blot analysis further confirmed that the marked antitumor effect in vivo could likely be due to apoptosis promotion and P-gp efflux inhibition. Therefore, these findings suggest that the AP/TPGS mixed micellar delivery system could be an efficient delivery strategy for enhanced tumor targeting and antitumor effects. Keywords: ginsenoside CK, ascorbyl palmitate, TPGS, mixed micelles, anti-tumor therapy

  14. An improved99mTc-HYNIC-(Ser)3-LTVSPWY peptide with EDDA/tricine as co-ligands for targeting and imaging of HER2 overexpression tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadust, Fatemeh; Ahmadpour, Sajjad; Aligholikhamseh, Nazan; Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2018-01-20

    Overexpression of human epidermal receptor 2 (HER2) has given the opportunity for targeting and delivering of imaging radiotracers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the 99m Tc-HYNIC-(EDDA/tricine)-(Ser) 3 -LTVSPWY peptide for tumor targeting and imaging of tumor with overexpression of HER2. The HYNIC-(Ser) 3 -LTVSPWY was labeled with 99m Tc in presence of EDDA/tricine mixture as co-ligands. The in vitro and in vivo studies of this radiolabeled peptide were performed for cellular specific binding and tumor targeting. The high radiochemical purity of 99m Tc-HYNIC (EDDA/tricine)-(Ser) 3 -LTVSPWY was obtained to be 99%. It exhibited high stability in normal saline and human serum. In HER2 binding affinity study, a significant reduction in uptake of radiolabeled peptide (7.7 fold) was observed by blocking SKOV-3 cells receptors with unlabeled peptide. The K D and B max values for this radiolabeled peptide were determined as 3.3 ± 1.0 nM and 2.9 ± 0.3 × 10 6 CPM/pMol, respectively. Biodistribution study revealed tumor to blood and tumor to muscle ratios about 6.9 and 4 respectively after 4 h. Tumor imaging by gamma camera demonstrated considerable high contrast tumor uptake. This developed 99m Tc-HYNIC-(Ser) 3 -LTVSPWY peptide selectively targeted on HER2 tumor and exhibited a high target uptake combined with acceptable low background activity for tumor imaging in mice. The results of this study and its comparison with another study showed that 99m Tc-HYNIC-(EDDA/tricine)-(Ser) 3 -LTVSPWY is much better than previously reported radiolabeled peptide as 99m Tc-CSSS-LTVSPWY for HER2 overexpression tumor targeting and imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of chitosan nanoparticles containing 5-[125I] Iodo-2'-deoxyuridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chen; Liu Fenju; Song Miaoli; Zhong Hanbin; Shi Yan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To prepare the chitosan nanoparticles loading 5-[ 125 I] Iodo-2'-deoxyuridine ( 125 I-UdR-CS-DLN) at 100-200 nm in diameter, and analyze the characteristic of drug sustained-releasing and tumor targeting. Methods: Orthogonal experimental design and One-way analysis were applied to optimize the preparation of 125 IUdR-CS-DLN using tripolyphosphate cross-linking. Dynamic dialysis was utilized to investigate the in vitro releasing characteristics of the nanoparticles. The tumor targeting effect of the nanoparticles was observed with laser confocal microscopy. Results: The optimal conditions for preparing the nanoparticles at particle diameters (70.39 ± 5.12 ) nm (PDI 0.16 ± 0.012) were 1 g/L of CS, 2 g/L of TPP, stirring rate 600 r/min, relative molecular mass of CS 3 × 103. The TEM results showed that the exterior of the nanoparticles was spheroid, with a uniform and fine dispersivity. The optimized condition with the initial 125 I-UdR concentration of 2. 96 MBq/ml at pH5 provided the highest loading capacity (1253.55 MBq/g) and the highest entrapment rate (42.35% ). The in vitro releasing curves of 125 I-UdR-CS-DLN followed Higuchi equation, shown a characteristic of long-acting preparation.Laser confocal microscopy observations approved that the tumor cells uptake of FITC-CS-nanoparticles were significantly more than that of normal cells. Conclusions: Chitosan nanoparticles loading 125 I-UdR at diameters range 127.81 ± 15.25 nm (PDI 0.240 ± 0.035) were successfully prepared with the optimized conditions, and showed a characteristic of sustained-releasing and tumor targeting. The chitosan-based nanotechnology provided a new and efficient approach for the application of 125 I-UdR in intracellular radiotherapy for tumor. (authors)

  16. Synthesis and in vitro experiments of carcinoma vascular endothelial targeting polymeric nano-micelles combining small particle size and supermagnetic sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Pan, Jielin; Xu, Qilan; Li, Hao; Wang, Jianhao; Zhang, Chao; Hong, Guobin

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To construct carcinoma vascular endothelial-targeted polymeric nanomicelles with high magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sensitivity and to evaluate their biological safety and in vitro tumor-targeting effect, and to monitor their feasibility using clinical MRI scanner. Method: Amphiphilic block copolymer, poly(ethylene glycol)- b -poly(ε-caprolactone) (PEG-PCL) was synthesized via the ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone (CL) initiated by poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), in which cyclic pentapeptide Arg-Gly-Asp (cRGD) was conjugated with the terminal of hydrophilic PEG block. During the self-assembly of PEG-PCL micelles, superparamagnetic γ-Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles (11 nm) was loaded into the hydrophobic core. The cRGD-terminated γ-Fe 2 O 3 -loaded polymeric micelles targeting to carcinoma vascular endothelial cells, were characterized in particle size, morphology, loading efficiency and so on, especially high MRI sensitivity in vitro. Normal hepatic vascular endothelial cells (ED25) were incubated with the resulting micelles for assessing their safety. Human hepatic carcinoma vascular endothelial cells (T3A) were cultured with the resulting micelles to assess the micelle uptake using Prussian blue staining and the cell signal intensity using MRI. Results: All the polymeric micelles exhibited ultra-small particle sizes with approximately 50 nm, high relaxation rate, and low toxicity even at high iron concentrations. More blue-stained iron particles were present in the targeting group than the non-targeting and competitive inhibition groups. In vitro MRI showed T 2 WI and T 2 relaxation times were significantly lower in the targeting group than in the other two groups. Conclusion: γ-Fe 2 O 3 -loaded PEG-PCL micelles not only possess ultra-small size and high superparamagnetic sensitivity, also can be actively targeted to carcinoma vascular endothelial cells by tumor-targeted cRGD. It appears to be a promising contrast agent for tumor-targeted

  17. Radio-immunotherapy of solid tumors; La radio-immunotherapie des tumeurs solides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatal, J.F.; Faivre Chauvet, A.; Bardies, M.; Kraeber-Bodere, F.; Barbet, J. [Federation Inter-hospitaliere de Medecine Nucleaire, INSERM U 463, 44 - Nantes (France)

    2001-11-01

    A convincing efficacy of radio-immunotherapy of solid tumors has not been documented yet in clinical studies. Consequently, a methodological optimization is needed within the scope in increasing absorbed doses delivered to tumor targets by amplifying cumulative tumor activity and in the same time in reducing absorbed doses delivered normal organs. Multi-step pre-targeting techniques allow to approach these goals. The most developed technique is based on the high affinity for biotin. In a first step an anti-tumor antibody coupled to avidin or biodin is injected. In a second step, 24 hours later, the circulating residual immuno-conjugate is bound to a molecular complex and eliminated through the reticulo endothelial system of the liver ('chase'phase). A third step, a few hours later, consists in injecting biotin coupled to DOTA chelating agent and labeled with yttrium 90. This small molecule rapidly diffuses to tumor targets and binds to pre-localized immuno-conjugate. Another technique, designed and developed in France, is based on antigen-antibody affinity. In a first step an anti-tumor / anti-hapten bi-specific antibody is injected and, in a second step, a few days later, the small hapten molecule is radiolabeled with I-131 and injected. It diffuses rapidly to the tumor targets and binds to the anti-hapten arm of the pre-localized bi-specific antibody. An alternative way to increase radio-immunotherapy efficacy consists in combining this low-dose rate irradiation to radiosensitizing molecules within the scope of an additive or supra additive effect which has previously documented. (author)

  18. RGDS- and SIKVAVS-modified superporous poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) scaffolds for tissue engineering applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macková, Hana; Plichta, Zdeněk; Proks, Vladimír; Kotelnikov, Ilya; Kučka, Jan; Hlídková, Helena; Horák, Daniel; Kubinová, Šárka; Jiráková, Klára

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 11 (2016), s. 1621-1631 ISSN 1616-5187 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-14961S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-02702S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk(CZ) 7F14057 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : polymer drug carriers * tumor targeting * enzymatic release Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry; FH - Neurology (UEM-P) Impact factor: 3.238, year: 2016

  19. Target tumor hypoxia with 2-nitroimidazole-ICG dye conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Zanganeh, Saeid; Mohammad, Innus; Aguirre, Andres; Wang, Tianheng; Yang, Yi; Kuhn, Liisa; Smith, Michael; Zhu, Quing

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we have synthesized a second generation tumor hypoxia targeted 2-nitroimidazole-ICG conjugate using piperazine linker (2-nitro-ICG-p) and validated its performance in in vivo tumor targeting. The results have shown that tumor hypoxia can be targeted with twice higher signal strength beyond three hours post-injection while the un-targeted ICG has completely washed out. The improvement of the second generation 2-nitro-ICG-p dyes is 1.2-1.3 times over the first generation 2-nitro-ICG dyes using ethanol linker beyond 3 hours post-injection which is the optimal time-window for evaluating tumor hypoxia.

  20. Biological evaluation of boronated unnatural amino acids as new boron carriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabalka, G.W. [Departments of Radiology and Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)], E-mail: kabalka@utk.edu; Yao, M.-L.; Marepally, S.R. [Departments of Radiology and Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Chandra, S. [Cornell SIMS Laboratory, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Snee Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2009-07-15

    There is a pressing need for new and more efficient boron delivery agents to tumor cells for use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A class of boronated unnatural cyclic amino acids has demonstrated a remarkable selectivity toward tumors in animal and cell culture models, far superior to currently used agents in clinical BNCT. One of these amino acids, 1-amino-3-boronocyclopentanecarboxylic acid (ABCPC), has shown a tumor to blood ratio of 8 and a tumor to normal brain ratio of nearly 21 in a melanoma bearing mouse model. This work represents further biological characterization of this compound for tumor targeting in an EMT6 murine mammary carcinoma mouse model and a T98G human glioblastoma cell line. Female BALB/c mice bearing EMT6 tumors were injected with the fructose complex form of racemic mixtures of cis and trans isomers of ABCPC in identical concentrations. Boron concentrations were measured in the tumor, blood, brain, skin, and liver tissues at 1, 3, and 5 h post-injection. These observations revealed a remarkable difference in racemic mixtures of cis and trans isomers in tumor targeting by boron. This implies that further separation of the L and D forms of this compound may enhance tumor targeting to an even higher degree than that provided by the racemic mixtures. Since the uptake measurements were made in homogenized tumor and normal tissues, little is known about the subcellular location of the boron arising from the various isomeric forms of the amino acid. To study subcellular delivery of boron from ABCPC in T98G human glioblastoma cells, we employed secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based technique of ion microscopy, which is capable of quantitatively imaging isotopic (elemental) gradients in cells and tissues at 500 nm spatial resolution. The T98G cells were exposed to the nutrient medium containing 100 ppm boron equivalent of a mixture of both L and D isomers of ABCPC in the form of a fructose complex for 1 h. Following this treatment

  1. Advanced smart-photosensitizers for more effective cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Wooram; Cho, Soojeong; Han, Jieun; Shin, Heejun; Na, Kun; Lee, Byeongdu; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2017-12-19

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) based upon the use of light and photosensitizers (PSs) has been used as a novel treatment approach for a variety of tumors. It, however, has several major limitations in the clinic: poor water solubility, long-term phototoxicity, low tumor targeting efficacy, and limited light penetration. With advances in nanotechnology, materials science, and clinical interventional imaging procedures, various smart-PSs have been developed for improving their cancer-therapeutic efficacy while reducing the adverse effects. Here, we briefly review state-of-the-art smart-PSs and discuss the future directions of PDT technology.

  2. A rare case of synchronous renal cell carcinoma of the bladder presenting with gross hematuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Kruck

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A 57-year old man was referred to the Urology Department due to gross hematuria; abdominal ultrasound revealed an unspecific solid tumor of the left bladder wall. Ultrasound, transurethral resection of the bladder mass with subsequent histological analysis, thoracic and abdominal computed tomography-scan and brain magnetic resonance imaging were performed. He was diagnosed with a bladder metastasis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC with concomitant bone, pulmonary, and cerebral metastatic disease of a primary RCC of the right kidney. Management: Transurethral resection of the bladder mass, cerebral and bone radiotherapy, removal of the primary tumor, targeted systemic therapy with mTOR followed by tyrosine kinase inhibition.

  3. HPMA copolymer conjugate with pirarubicin: In vitro and ex vivo stability and drug release study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Islam, W.; Fang, J.; Etrych, Tomáš; Chytil, Petr; Ulbrich, Karel; Sakoguchi, A.; Kusakabe, K.; Maeda, H.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 536, č. 1 (2018), s. 108-115 ISSN 0378-5173 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-02986S; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) JSPS-16-05 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : EPR effect * HPMA copolymer * tumor-targeting Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry OBOR OECD: Pharmacology and pharmacy Impact factor: 3.649, year: 2016

  4. Development of chimeric gene promoters responsive to hypoxia and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Aiqing; Yu Jinming

    2004-01-01

    The authors describe two systems that make use of gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy, regulated by radiation or hypoxic-responsive promoters. The use of treatment-, condition- or tumor-specific promoters to control gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy is one such method for targeting gene expression to the tumor. The development of such strategies that achieve tumor targeted expression of genes via selective promoters will enable improved specificity and targeting thereby addressing one of the major limitations of cancer gene therapy

  5. Spatiotemporal Control of Doxorubicin Delivery from “Stealth-Like” Prodrug Micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Li; Schneider, Gregory F.; Campbell, Frederick

    2017-01-01

    In the treatment of cancer, targeting of anticancer drugs to the tumor microenvironment is highly desirable. Not only does this imply accurate tumor targeting but also minimal drug release en route to the tumor and maximal drug release once there. Here we describe high-loading, “stealth-like” doxorubicin micelles as a pro-drug delivery system, which upon light activation, leads to burst-like doxorbicin release. Through this approach, we show precise spatiotemporal control of doxorubicin delivery to cells in vitro. PMID:28937592

  6. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 22. Proceedings; Experimentelle Strahlentherapie und Klinische Strahlenbiologie. Bd. 22. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Michael; Cordes, Nils; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Krause, Mechthild; Petersen, Cordula; Rodemannn, H. Peter; Zips, Daniel (eds.)

    2013-03-01

    The proceedings of the 22th Symposium on experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiotherapy contain lectures and poster on the following issues: Radiation induced immuno-targeting of tumors; targeting in the radiotherapy; biomarkers; targeting; radio-oncological therapy of rectal carcinoma - contribution of radiobiology for therapy optimization; biomarkers for radiation sensibility; resistance mechanisms of tumors; resistance mechanisms of normal tissue; micro ambience, P13L inhibition in radiotherapy: improvement of the local tumor control by molecular mechanisms or the influence of the tumor micro-ambience? DNA repair; radiation effects and technical development.

  7. Biological Evaluation of Boronated Unnatural Amino Acids as New Boron Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabalka, G.W.; Yao, M.-L.; Marepally, S.R.; Chandra, S.

    2010-01-01

    There is a pressing need for new and more efficient boron delivery agents to tumor cells for use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A class of boronated unnatural cyclic amino acids has demonstrated a remarkable selectivity toward tumors in animal and cell culture models, far superior to currently used agents in clinical BNCT. One of these amino acids, 1-amino-3-boronocyclopentanecarboxylic acid (ABCPC), has shown a tumor to blood ratio of 8 and a tumor to normal brain ratio of nearly 21 in a melanoma bearing mouse model. This work represents further biological characterization of this compound for tumor targeting in an EMT6 murine mammary carcinoma mouse model and a T98G human glioblastoma cell line. Female BALB/c mice bearing EMT6 tumors were injected with the fructose complex form of racemic mixtures of cis- and trans isomers of ABCPC in identical concentrations. Boron concentrations were measured in the tumor, blood, brain, skin, and liver tissues at 1, 3, and 5 hr post injection. These observations revealed a remarkable difference in racemic mixtures of cis and trans isomers in tumor targeting by boron. This implies that further separation of the L and D forms of this compound may enhance tumor targeting to an even higher degree than that provided by the racemic mixtures. Since the uptake measurements were made in homogenized tumor and normal tissues, little is known about the subcellular location of the boron arising from the various isomeric forms of the amino acid. To study subcellular delivery of boron from ABCPC in T98G human glioblastoma cells, we employed secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based technique of ion microscopy, which is capable of quantitatively imaging isotopic (elemental) gradients in cells and tissues at 500 nm spatial resolution. The T98G cells were exposed to the nutrient medium containing 100 ppm boron equivalent of a mixture of both L and D isomers of ABCPC in the form of a fructose complex for 1 hr. Following this

  8. Immunotherapy with GD2 specific monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, N.K.V.; Medof, E.M.; Munn, D.

    1988-01-01

    Targeted immunotherapy focuses anti-tumor activity of antibodies and effector cells, which are actively developed by the host or adoptively transferred, onto tumor cells and into tumor sites. Such tumor selective therapy can be more specific and efficient. The value of such an approach is evident in the classical interaction of antibodies. This paper reports that the ganglioside G D2 is an ideal antigen for specific tumor targeting because of its relative lack of heterogeneity among human neuroblastoma, its high density on tumor cells, its lack of antigen modulation upon binding to antibody, and its restricted distribution in normal tissues

  9. Present status and prospects of internal radiotherapy; Etat actuel et perspectives de la radiotherapie interne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatal, J.F. [Institut de Cancerologie, 44 - Nantes (France)

    1994-12-31

    The experience of the last 40 years has shown that internal radiotherapy generally produces palliative results for macroscopic tumor targets and curative results for the microscopic ones. The short-term prospects for internal radiotherapy concern essentially palliative treatment of painful bone metastases of osteophilic cancers (breast or prostate) for antalgic purposes. Radioimmunotherapy may ultimately play a determinant role in the curative treatment of microscopic residual disease resulting from several types of radiosensitive cancer (lymphoma, neuroblastoma or small-cell lung cancer). In all cases, internal radiotherapy should be integrated into a coherent strategy associating complementary therapeutic modalities. (author). 16 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Selective modification of NMR relaxation time in human colorectal carcinoma by using gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid conjugated with monoclonal antibody 19-9.

    OpenAIRE

    Curtet, C; Tellier, C; Bohy, J; Conti, M L; Saccavini, J C; Thedrez, P; Douillard, J Y; Chatal, J F; Koprowski, H

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody 19-9 (mAb 19-9) against human colon adenocarcinoma was conjugated with gadolinium X diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd X DTPA) and used as a contrast agent in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in an effort to improve tumor target selectivity in nude mice. The data indicate that Gd X DTPA-mAb 19-9 in solution decreased the T1 relaxation of water protons at 90 MHz in direct proportion to the gadolinium concentration, and this effect was greater than in Gd X DTPA solutions...

  11. Present status and prospects of internal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatal, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    The experience of the last 40 years has shown that internal radiotherapy generally produces palliative results for macroscopic tumor targets and curative results for the microscopic ones. The short-term prospects for internal radiotherapy concern essentially palliative treatment of painful bone metastases of osteophilic cancers (breast or prostate) for antalgic purposes. Radioimmunotherapy may ultimately play a determinant role in the curative treatment of microscopic residual disease resulting from several types of radiosensitive cancer (lymphoma, neuroblastoma or small-cell lung cancer). In all cases, internal radiotherapy should be integrated into a coherent strategy associating complementary therapeutic modalities. (author). 16 refs., 2 figs

  12. Seamless Integration of Detection and Therapy for Breast Cancer using Targeted Engineered Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Zacher et al., 1980), an M13 -derived filamentous phage , displaying short peptides (Smith and Scott, 1993) and evaluated them for tumor targeting and...then incubated with a 1:200 dilution of the primary anti- M13 phage antibody (Amer- sham) in PBS containing 1% BSA at RT for 2 hr, washed with PBS...libraries of peptides (14–17). In fact, combinatorial peptide libraries displayed from pIII protein of an M13 -derived phage have now been successfully

  13. Biological Effects of Nonionizing Electromagnetic Radiation. Volume 8, Number 1. A Digest of Current Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    e hat lung, toumor tiJssuLe niopate s we re r aN- region associated with metastable atit i i-r, eox v etrat ion s tate which wais deter- high dipole ...a corresponding electric viniratlon cs 5 m, i Umr xygenation d:e reased to 47 and -4 sazt after large dipole moments of reaction-activaitej vit- anid...immed latel 1A,-e :1 Dept. Genie Electrique , Kcole Plyt o: ., , B C,, , i not i nsi de the tumor. Target terp;.-ratures 6079, station A"", Montrea

  14. Final Report: 8th International Symposium on Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) for Cancer, May 15, 1998 - May 15, 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, M.F.

    1999-01-01

    The 8th International Symposium on Neutron Capture Therapy for Cancer (8th ISNCTC) was held in La Jolla, CA on Sept. 13-18, 1998. This biennial meeting of the International Society for Neutron Capture Therapy (ISNCT) was hosted by Society President M.F. Hawthorne (UCLA Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry). The Symposium brought together scientists (300 registrants from 21 countries) from diverse fields to report the latest developments in NCT. Topics of the 275 papers presented (30 plenary lectures, 81 oral presentations, and 164 posters) included the physics of neutron sources, chemistry of tumor-targeting agents, dosimetry, radiobiological studies, and clinical applications

  15. Multifunctional gold nanostar conjugates for tumor imaging and combined photothermal and chemo-therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiyan; Zhang, Xin; Dai, Shuhang; Ma, Yuxiang; Cui, Sisi; Achilefu, Samuel; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-01-01

    Uniform gold nanostars (Au NS) were conjugated with cyclic RGD (cRGD) and near infrared (NIR) fluorescence probe (MPA) or anti-cancer drug (DOX) to obtain multi-functional nanoconstructs, Au-cRGD-MPA and Au-cRGD-DOX respectively. The NIR contrast agent Au-cRGD-MPA was shown to have low cytotoxicity. Using tumor cells and tumor bearing mice, these imaging nanoparticles demonstrated favorable tumor-targeting capability mediated by RGD peptide binding to its over-expressed receptor on the tumor cells. The multi-therapeutic analogue, Au-cRGD-DOX, integrates targeting tumor, chemotherapy and photo-thermotherapy into a single system. The synergistic effect of photo-thermal therapy and chemotherapy was demonstrated in different tumor cell lines and in vivo using S180 tumor-bearing mouse models. The viability of MDA-MB-231 cells was only 40 % after incubation with Au-cRGD-DOX and irradiation with NIR light. Both tail vein and intratumoral injections showed Au-cRGD-DOX treated mice exhibiting the slowest tumor increase. These results indicate that the multifunctional nanoconstruct is a promising combined therapeutic agent for tumor-targeting treatment, with the potential to enhance the anti-cancer treatment outcomes.

  16. Four-dimensional targeting error analysis in image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riboldi, M; Baroni, G; Sharp, G C; Chen, G T Y

    2009-01-01

    Image-guided therapy (IGT) involves acquisition and processing of biomedical images to actively guide medical interventions. The proliferation of IGT technologies has been particularly significant in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), as a way to increase the tumor targeting accuracy. When IGRT is applied to moving tumors, image guidance becomes challenging, as motion leads to increased uncertainty. Different strategies may be applied to mitigate the effects of motion: each technique is related to a different technological effort and complexity in treatment planning and delivery. The objective comparison of different motion mitigation strategies can be achieved by quantifying the residual uncertainties in tumor targeting, to be detected by means of IGRT technologies. Such quantification requires an extension of targeting error theory to a 4D space, where the 3D tumor trajectory as a function of time measured (4D Targeting Error, 4DTE). Accurate 4DTE analysis can be represented by a motion probability density function, describing the statistical fluctuations of tumor trajectory. We illustrate the application of 4DTE analysis through examples, including weekly variations in tumor trajectory as detected by 4DCT, respiratory gating via external surrogates and real-time tumor tracking.

  17. Investigating the effect of tumor vascularization on magnetic targeting in vivo using retrospective design of experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Kuo-Ching; Bai, Jie; Lorrio, Silvia; Wang, Julie Tzu-Wen; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T

    2016-11-01

    Nanocarriers take advantages of the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) to accumulate passively in solid tumors. Magnetic targeting has shown to further enhance tumor accumulation in response to a magnetic field gradient. It is widely known that passive accumulation of nanocarriers varies hugely in tumor tissues of different tumor vascularization. It is hypothesized that magnetic targeting is likely to be influenced by such factors. In this work, magnetic targeting is assessed in a range of subcutaneously implanted murine tumors, namely, colon (CT26), breast (4T1), lung (Lewis lung carcinoma) cancer and melanoma (B16F10). Passively- and magnetically-driven tumor accumulation of the radiolabeled polymeric magnetic nanocapsules are assessed with gamma counting. The influence of tumor vasculature, namely, the tumor microvessel density, permeability and diameter on passive and magnetic tumor targeting is assessed with the aid of the retrospective design of experiment (DoE) approach. It is clear that the three tumor vascular parameters contribute greatly to both passive and magnetically targeted tumor accumulation but play different roles when nanocarriers are targeted to the tumor with different strategies. It is concluded that tumor permeability is a rate-limiting factor in both targeting modes. Diameter and microvessel density influence passive and magnetic tumor targeting, respectively. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. GSH-Activated NIR Fluorescent Prodrug for Podophyllotoxin Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yajing; Zhu, Shaojia; Gu, Kaizhi; Guo, Zhiqian; Huang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Mingwei; Amin, Hesham M; Zhu, Weihong; Shi, Ping

    2017-09-06

    Theranostic prodrug therapy enables the targeted delivery of anticancer drugs with minimized adverse effects and real-time in situ monitoring of activation of the prodrugs. In this work, we report the synthesis and biological assessment of the near-infrared (NIR) prodrug DCM-S-PPT and its amphiphilic copolymer (mPEG-DSPE)-encapsulated nanoparticles. DCM-S-PPT is composed of podophyllotoxin (PPT) as the anticancer moiety and a dicyanomethylene-4H-pyran (DCM) derivative as the NIR fluorescent reporter, which are linked by a thiol-specific cleavable disulfide bond. In vitro experiments indicated that DCM-S-PPT has low cytotoxicity and that glutathione (GSH) can activate DCM-S-PPT resulting in PPT release and a concomitant significant enhancement in NIR fluorescence at 665 nm. After being intravenously injected into tumor-bearing nude mice, DCM-S-PPT exhibited excellent tumor-activated performance. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that mPEG-DSPE as a nanocarrier loaded with DCM-S-PPT (mPEG-DSPE/DCM-S-PPT) showed even greater tumor-targeting performance than DCM-S-PPT on account of the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Its tumor-targeting ability and specific drug release in tumors make DCM-S-PPT a promising prodrug that could provide a significant strategy for theranostic drug delivery systems.

  19. Quantitative analysis of proton boron fusion therapy (PBFT) in various conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Joo-Young; Yoon, Do-Kun; Suh, Tae Suk [College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    From the theoretical point of view, the PBFT has some strong advantages over currently existing radiotherapy methods. First, boron-based tumor targeting is required prior to performing the treatments such as boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Tumor targeting should be performed before the BNCT by injecting the boronate compound. If boron is not taken up by the normal tissue, the normal tissue can be spared the irradiation by alpha particles. When boron uptake occurs in the target region, selective therapy is possible by neutron capture reaction of labeled boron particles in the target region. Likewise, when boron is distributed in the tumor region for the PBFT, the proposed method can represent a more critical discriminative therapy than either the BNCT or conventional particle therapy. In the conventional proton therapy, in order to deliver a dose to a tumor, the proton beam energy has to be adjusted along the tumor region (e.g., shape and depth). The proton therapy aims at delivering the maximal dose to the tumor by using protons only. In this study, the effectiveness of the PBFT with respect to several physical parameters was evaluated quantitatively by using Monte Carlo simulations. We confirmed that the PBFT can be used to perform critical discriminative therapy. Also, the results of our studies can be used for constructing the PFBT dose database that can be utilized in treatment planning systems (TPSs)

  20. A kernel-based method for markerless tumor tracking in kV fluoroscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Homma, Noriyasu; Ichiji, Kei; Abe, Makoto; Sugita, Norihiro; Takai, Yoshihiro; Narita, Yuichiro; Yoshizawa, Makoto

    2014-09-07

    Markerless tracking of respiration-induced tumor motion in kilo-voltage (kV) fluoroscopic image sequence is still a challenging task in real time image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Most of existing markerless tracking methods are based on a template matching technique or its extensions that are frequently sensitive to non-rigid tumor deformation and involve expensive computation. This paper presents a kernel-based method that is capable of tracking tumor motion in kV fluoroscopic image sequence with robust performance and low computational cost. The proposed tracking system consists of the following three steps. To enhance the contrast of kV fluoroscopic image, we firstly utilize a histogram equalization to transform the intensities of original images to a wider dynamical intensity range. A tumor target in the first frame is then represented by using a histogram-based feature vector. Subsequently, the target tracking is then formulated by maximizing a Bhattacharyya coefficient that measures the similarity between the tumor target and its candidates in the subsequent frames. The numerical solution for maximizing the Bhattacharyya coefficient is performed by a mean-shift algorithm. The proposed method was evaluated by using four clinical kV fluoroscopic image sequences. For comparison, we also implement four conventional template matching-based methods and compare their performance with our proposed method in terms of the tracking accuracy and computational cost. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method is superior to conventional template matching-based methods.

  1. Carrier-free, functionalized pure drug nanorods as a novel cancer-targeted drug delivery platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanan; Yang, Yinlong; An, Feifei; Liu, Zhuang; Zhang, Xiujuan; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2013-01-01

    A one-dimensional drug delivery system (1D DDS) is highly attractive since it has distinct advantages such as enhanced drug efficiency and better pharmacokinetics. However, drugs in 1D DDSs are all encapsulated in inert carriers, and problems such as low drug loading content and possible undesirable side effects caused by the carriers remain a serious challenge. In this paper, a novel, carrier-free, pure drug nanorod-based, tumor-targeted 1D DDS has been developed. Drugs are first prepared as nanorods and then surface functionalized to achieve excellent water dispersity and stability. The resulting drug nanorods show enhanced internalization rates mainly through energy-dependent endocytosis, with the shape-mediated nanorod (NR) diffusion process as a secondary pathway. The multiple endocytotic mechanisms lead to significantly improved drug efficiency of functionalized NRs with nearly ten times higher cytotoxicity than those of free molecules and unfunctionalized NRs. A targeted drug delivery system can be readily achieved through surface functionalization with targeting group linked amphipathic surfactant, which exhibits significantly enhanced drug efficacy and discriminates between cell lines with high selectivity. These results clearly show that this tumor-targeting DDS demonstrates high potential toward specific cancer cell lines.

  2. An IL12-IL2-antibody fusion protein targeting Hodgkin's lymphoma cells potentiates activation of NK and T cells for an anti-tumor attack.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Jahn

    Full Text Available Successful immunotherapy of Hodgkin's disease is so far hampered by the striking unresponsiveness of lymphoma infiltrating immune cells. To mobilize both adoptive and innate immune cells for an anti-tumor attack we fused the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL2 and IL12 to an anti-CD30 scFv antibody in a dual cytokine fusion protein to accumulate both cytokines at the malignant CD30(+ Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells in the lymphoma lesion. The tumor-targeted IL12-IL2 fusion protein was superior in activating resting T cells to amplify and secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines compared to targeted IL2 or IL12 alone. NK cells were also activated by the dual cytokine protein to secrete IFN-γ and to lyse target cells. The tumor-targeted IL12-IL2, when applied by i.v. injection to immune-competent mice with established antigen-positive tumors, accumulated at the tumor site and induced tumor regression. Data demonstrate that simultaneous targeting of two cytokines in a spatial and temporal simultaneous fashion to pre-defined tissues is feasible by a dual-cytokine antibody fusion protein. In the case of IL12 and IL2, this produced superior anti-tumor efficacy implying the strategy to muster a broader immune cell response in the combat against cancer.

  3. Absolute MR thermometry using nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, Roel; Sprinkhuizen, Sara M; Crielaard, Bart J; Ippel, Johannes H; Boelens, Rolf; Bakker, Chris J G; Storm, Gert; Lammers, Twan; Bartels, Lambertus W

    2014-01-01

    Accurate time-resolved temperature mapping is crucial for the safe use of hyperthermia-mediated drug delivery. We here propose a magnetic resonance imaging temperature mapping method in which drug delivery systems serve not only to improve tumor targeting, but also as an accurate and absolute nano-thermometer. This method is based on the temperature-dependent chemical shift difference between water protons and the protons in different groups of drug delivery systems. We show that the chemical shift of the protons in the ethylene oxide group in polyethylene glycol (PEG) is temperature-independent, whereas the proton resonance of water decreases with increasing temperature. The frequency difference between both resonances is linear and does not depend on pH and physiological salt conditions. In addition, we show that the proton resonance of the methyl group in N-(2-hydroxypropyl)-methacrylamide (HPMA) is temperature-independent. Therefore, PEGylated liposomes, polymeric mPEG-b-pHPMAm-Lac2 micelles and HPMA copolymers can provide a temperature-independent reference frequency for absolute magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry. Subsequently, we show that multigradient echo MR imaging with PEGylated liposomes in situ allows accurate, time-resolved temperature mapping. In conclusion, nanocarrier materials may serve as highly versatile tools for tumor-targeted drug delivery, acting not only as hyperthermia-responsive drug delivery systems, but also as accurate and precise nano-thermometers. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells in gastrointestinal cancers – current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin J

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Jiwei Qin,1 Yue Zhao,2 Yan Wang,1 Christopher Betzler,2 Felix C Popp,2 Arvid Sen Gupta,2 Daniela Augsburger,2 Peter Camaj,2 Peter J Nelson,3 Christiane J Bruns2 1Department of Surgery, University of Munich, Munich, Germany; 2Department of Surgery, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany; 3Clinical Biochemistry Group, Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik IV, University of Munich, Munich, Germany Abstract: Mesenchymal stem (or stromal cells (MSCs are nonhematopoietic progenitor cells that can be obtained from bone marrow and adipose tissue. Due to the ability of MSCs to migrate to damaged and cancerous tissue, this behavior of MSCs has been exploited as a tumor-targeting strategy for cell-based cancer therapy to improve the efficacy and minimize the toxicity of current gene therapy approaches in the treatment of cancers. In this review, we focus on the current developments of MSC-based gene therapy in gastrointestinal cancer studies, in particular, the role of MSCs as tumor-targeted therapy vehicles and the prospects in their clinical application. Keywords: mesenchymal stem cells, gastrointestinal cancers, cancer therapy

  5. MO-D-BRC-04: Multiple-Criteria Optimization Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaghue, J.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment planning is a central part of radiation therapy, including delineation in tumor volumes and critical organs, setting treatment goals of prescription doses to the tumor targets and tolerance doses to the critical organs, and finally generation of treatment plans to meet the treatment goals. National groups like RTOG have led the effort to standardize treatment goals of the prescription doses to the tumor targets and tolerance doses to the critical organs based on accumulated knowledge from decades of abundant clinical trial experience. The challenge for each clinical department is how to achieve or surpass these set goals within the time constraints of clinical practice. Using fifteen testing cases from different treatment sites such as head and neck, prostate with and without pelvic lymph nodes, SBRT spine, we will present clinically utility of advanced planning tools, including knowledge based, automatic based, and multiple criteria based tools that are clinically implemented. The objectives of this session are: Understand differences among these three advanced planning tools Provide clinical assessments on the utility of the advanced planning tools Discuss clinical challenges of treatment planning with large variations in tumor volumes and their relationships with adjacent critical organs. Ping Xia received research grant from Philips. Jackie Wu received research grant from Varian; P. Xia, Research support by Philips and Varian; Q. Wu, NIH, Varian Medical

  6. MO-D-BRC-03: Knowledge-Based Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment planning is a central part of radiation therapy, including delineation in tumor volumes and critical organs, setting treatment goals of prescription doses to the tumor targets and tolerance doses to the critical organs, and finally generation of treatment plans to meet the treatment goals. National groups like RTOG have led the effort to standardize treatment goals of the prescription doses to the tumor targets and tolerance doses to the critical organs based on accumulated knowledge from decades of abundant clinical trial experience. The challenge for each clinical department is how to achieve or surpass these set goals within the time constraints of clinical practice. Using fifteen testing cases from different treatment sites such as head and neck, prostate with and without pelvic lymph nodes, SBRT spine, we will present clinically utility of advanced planning tools, including knowledge based, automatic based, and multiple criteria based tools that are clinically implemented. The objectives of this session are: Understand differences among these three advanced planning tools Provide clinical assessments on the utility of the advanced planning tools Discuss clinical challenges of treatment planning with large variations in tumor volumes and their relationships with adjacent critical organs. Ping Xia received research grant from Philips. Jackie Wu received research grant from Varian; P. Xia, Research support by Philips and Varian; Q. Wu, NIH, Varian Medical

  7. Synthesis and characterization of near IR fluorescent albumin nanoparticles for optical detection of colon cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Sarit; Pellach, Michal [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel); Kam, Yossi [Institute for Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12065, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Grinberg, Igor; Corem-Salkmon, Enav [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel); Rubinstein, Abraham [Institute for Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12065, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Margel, Shlomo, E-mail: shlomo.margel@mail.biu.ac.il [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2013-03-01

    Near IR (NIR) fluorescent human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles hold great promise as contrast agents for tumor diagnosis. HSA nanoparticles are considered to be biocompatible, non-toxic and non-immunogenic. In addition, NIR fluorescence properties of these nanoparticles are important for in vivo tumor diagnostics, with low autofluorescence and relatively deep penetration of NIR irradiation due to low absorption of biomatrices. The present study describes the synthesis of new NIR fluorescent HSA nanoparticles, by entrapment of a NIR fluorescent dye within the HSA nanoparticles, which also significantly increases the photostability of the dye. Tumor-targeting ligands such as peanut agglutinin (PNA) and anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibodies (anti-CEA) were covalently conjugated to the NIR fluorescent albumin nanoparticles, increasing the potential fluorescent signal in tumors with upregulated corresponding receptors. Specific colon tumor detection by the NIR fluorescent HSA nanoparticles was demonstrated in a chicken embryo model and a rat model. In future work we also plan to encapsulate cancer drugs such as doxorubicin within the NIR fluorescent HSA nanoparticles for both colon cancer imaging and therapy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Near IR human serum albumin nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticles were shown to be physically and chemically stable and photostable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumor-targeting ligands were covalently conjugated to the nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific colon cancer tumor detection was demonstrated in chicken-embryo and rat models.

  8. CT/FMT dual-model imaging of breast cancer based on peptide-lipid nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoqiang; Lin, Qiaoya; Lian, Lichao; Qian, Yuan; Lu, Lisen; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most harmful cancers in human. Its early diagnosis is expected to improve the patients' survival rate. X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in tumor detection for obtaining three-dimentional information. Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (FMT) imaging combined with near-infrared fluorescent dyes provides a powerful tool for the acquisition of molecular biodistribution information in deep tissues. Thus, the combination of CT and FMT imaging modalities allows us to better differentiate diseased tissues from normal tissues. Here we developed a tumor-targeting nanoparticle for dual-modality imaging based on a biocompatible HDL-mimicking peptide-phospholipid scaffold (HPPS) nanocarrier. By incorporation of CT contrast agents (iodinated oil) and far-infrared fluorescent dyes (DiR-BOA) into the hydrophobic core of HPPS, we obtained the FMT and CT signals simultaneously. Increased accumulation of the nanoparticles in the tumor lesions was achieved through the effect of the tumor-targeting peptide on the surface of nanoparticle. It resulted in excellent contrast between lesions and normal tissues. Together, the abilities to sensitively separate the lesions from adjacent normal tissues with the aid of a FMT/CT dual-model imaging approach make the targeting nanoparticles a useful tool for the diagnostics of breast cancer.

  9. Synthesis, characterization and theranostic evaluation of Indium-111 labeled multifunctional superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolata, Hamidreza; Abbasi Davani, Fereydoun; Afarideh, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Indium-111 labeled, Trastuzumab-Doxorubicin Conjugated, and APTES-PEG coated magnetic nanoparticles were designed for tumor targeting, drug delivery, controlled drug release, and dual-modal tumor imaging. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were synthesized by thermal decomposition method to obtain narrow size particles. To increase SPIONs circulation time in blood and decrease its cytotoxicity in healthy tissues, SPIONs surface was modified with 3-Aminopropyltriethoxy Silane (APTES) and then were functionalized with N-Hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester of Polyethylene Glycol Maleimide (NHS-PEG-Mal) to conjugate with thiolated 3,6,9,15-tetraazabicyclo[9.3.1]pentadeca-1(15),11,13-triene-3,6, 9,-triacetic acid (PCTA) bifunctional chelator (BFC) and Trastuzumab antibody. In order to tumor SPECT/MR imaging, SPIONs were labeled with Indium-111 (T 1/2 = 2.80d). NHS ester of monoethyl malonate (MEM-NHS) was used for conjugation of Doxorubicin (DOX) chemotherapeutic agent onto SPIONs surface. Mono-Ethyl Malonate allows DOX molecules to be attached to SPIONs via pH-sensitive hydrazone bonds which lead to controlled drug release in tumor region. Active and passive tumor targeting were achieved through incorporated anti-HER2 (Trastuzumab) antibody and EPR effect of solid tumors for nanoparticles respectively. In addition to in vitro assessments of modified SPIONs in SKBR3 cell lines, their theranostic effects were evaluated in HER2 + breast tumor bearing BALB/c mice via biodistribution study, dual-modal molecular imaging and tumor diameter measurements

  10. Photo-acoustic imaging of blue nanoparticle targeted brain tumor for intra-operative glioma delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Wang, Xueding; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Hah, HoeJin; Kim, Gwangseong; Chen, Thomas; Orrienger, Daniel; Sagher, Oren; Kopelman, Raoul

    2011-07-01

    Distinguishing the tumor from the background neo-plastic tissue is challenging for cancer surgery such as surgical resection of glioma. Attempts have been made to use visible or fluorescent markers to delineate the tumors during surgery. However, the systemic injection of the dyes requires high dose, resulting in negative side effects. A novel method to delineate rat brain tumors intra-operatively, as well as post-operatively, using a highly sensitive photoacoustic imaging technique enhanced by tumor targeting blue nanoparticle as contrast agent is demonstrated. The nanoparticles are made of polyacrylamide (PAA) matrix with covalently linked Coomassie-Blue dye. They contain 7.0% dye and the average size is 80nm. Their surface was conjugated with F3 peptide for active tumor targeting. These nanoparticles are nontoxic, chemically inert and have long plasma circulation lifetime, making them suitable as nanodevices for imaging using photoacoustics. Experiments on phantoms and rat brains tumors ex-vivo demonstrate the high sensitivity of photoacoustic imaging in delineating the tumor, containing contrast agent at concentrations too low to be visualized by eye. The control tumors without nanoparticles did not show any enhanced signal. This study shows that photoacoustic imaging facilitated with the nanoparticle contrast agent could contribute to future surgical procedures for glioma.

  11. Enhanced antitumor efficacy of cisplatin for treating ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo via transferrin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Huifang; Jin, Hongwei; Zhuo, Huiqin; Huang, Heqing

    2017-07-11

    Cisplatin is a widely used anticancer drug, while non-targeted delivery, development of drug resistance, and serious side effects significantly limit its clinical use. In order to improve the tumor-targeting properties of cisplatin, transferrin (Tf) was employed as a carrier to transfer cisplatin into cancer cells via transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) mediated endocytosis. The binding ability of cisplatin and Tf could be improved by pretreating Tf with 10% ethanol, and the binding number of cisplatin for each Tf molecule could reach to 40 without structural or functional impairment of Tf. The Tf-cisplatin complex could be delivered into human ovarian carcinoma cells high efficiently. In tumor-bearing nude-mice model, the Tf-cisplatin complex inhibited tumor growth in vivo more effectively than free cisplatin, with less toxicity in other tissues. Tumor targeting efficiency of the Tf-cisplatin complex was supported by in vivo and ex vivo imaging and platinum residues detected in each ex vivo organ. These data suggested that Tf-cisplatin  was more effective and less drug-resistance than cisplatin, with targeting to tumor cells. Therefore, Tf-mediated delivery of cisplatin is a potential strategy for targeted delivery into tumor cells.

  12. Selecting Targets for Tumor Imaging: An Overview of Cancer-Associated Membrane Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin C. Boonstra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor targeting is a booming business: The global therapeutic monoclonal antibody market accounted for more than $78 billion in 2012 and is expanding exponentially. Tumors can be targeted with an extensive arsenal of monoclonal antibodies, ligand proteins, peptides, RNAs, and small molecules. In addition to therapeutic targeting, some of these compounds can also be applied for tumor visualization before or during surgery, after conjugation with radionuclides and/or near-infrared fluorescent dyes. The majority of these tumor-targeting compounds are directed against cell membrane-bound proteins. Various categories of targetable membrane-bound proteins, such as anchoring proteins, receptors, enzymes, and transporter proteins, exist. The functions and biological characteristics of these proteins determine their location and distribution on the cell membrane, making them more, or less, accessible, and therefore, it is important to understand these features. In this review, we evaluate the characteristics of cancer-associated membrane proteins and discuss their overall usability for cancer targeting, especially focusing on imaging applications.

  13. Glypican-3 Targeting of Liver Cancer Cells Using Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James O. Park

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging is essential in accurately detecting, staging, and treating primary liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC], one of the most prevalent and lethal malignancies. We developed a novel multifunctional nanoparticle (NP specifically targeting glypican-3 (GPC3, a proteoglycan implicated in promotion of cell growth that is overexpressed in most HCCs. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to confirm the differential GPC3 expression in two human HCC cells, Hep G2 (high and HLF (negligible. These cells were treated with biotin-conjugated GPC3 monoclonal antibody (αGPC3 and subsequently targeted using superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs conjugated to streptavidin and Alexa Fluor 647. Flow cytometry demonstrated that only GPC3-expressing Hep G2 cells were specifically targeted using this αGPC3-NP conjugate (fourfold mean fluorescence over nontargeted NP, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI experiments showed similar findings (threefold R2 relaxivity. Confocal fluorescence microscopy localized the αGPC3 NPs only to the cell surface of GPC3-expressing Hep G2 cells. Further characterization of this construct demonstrated a negatively charged, monodisperse, 50 nm NP, ideally suited for tumor targeting. This GPC3-specific NP system, with dual-modality imaging capability, may enhance pretreatment MRI, enable refined intraoperative HCC visualization by near-infrared fluorescence, and be potentially used as a carrier for delivery of tumor-targeted therapies, improving patient outcomes.

  14. Targeted Tumor Therapy Based on Nanodiamonds Decorated with Doxorubicin and Folic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Tae-Kyung; Baek, Seung Woon; Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Rhee, Chang-Kyu; Choi, Sung-Wook

    2017-02-01

    The fabrication of nanodiamond (ND)-based drug carriers for tumor-targeted drug delivery is described. The ND clusters with an average size of 52.84 nm are fabricated using a simple fluidic device combined with a precipitation method and then conjugated with folic acid (FA) and doxorubicin (Dox) via carbodiimide chemistry to obtain FA/Dox-modified ND (FA/Dox-ND) clusters. Cell culture experiments revealed that KB (folate receptor-positive) cells are preferentially ablated by FA/Dox-ND clusters compared to A549 (folate receptor-negative) cells. In vivo results revealed that FA/Dox-ND clusters are specifically accumulated in tumor tissues after intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice, effectively reducing the volume of tumor. Based on these results, this study suggests that FA/Dox-ND clusters can be a good candidate as tumor-targeted nanovehicles for delivery of antitumor drug. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Polymer-Mediated Delivery of siRNAs to Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Variables Affecting Specificity and Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Farra

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the advances in anticancer therapies, their effectiveness for many human tumors is still far from being optimal. Significant improvements in treatment efficacy can come from the enhancement of drug specificity. This goal may be achieved by combining the use of therapeutic molecules with tumor specific effects and delivery carriers with tumor targeting ability. In this regard, nucleic acid-based drug (NABD and particularly small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, are attractive molecules due to the possibility to be engineered to target specific tumor genes. On the other hand, polymeric-based delivery systems are emerging as versatile carriers to generate tumor-targeted delivery systems. Here we will focus on the most recent findings in the selection of siRNA/polymeric targeted delivery systems for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, a human tumor for which currently available therapeutic approaches are poorly effective. In addition, we will discuss the most attracting and, in our opinion, promising siRNA-polymer combinations for HCC in relation to the biological features of HCC tissue. Attention will be also put on the mathematical description of the mechanisms ruling siRNA-carrier delivery, this being an important aspect to improve effectiveness reducing the experimental work.

  16. MRI-guided targeting delivery of doxorubicin with reduction-responsive lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu B

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Bo Wu,1,2 Shu-Ting Lu,1 Kai Deng,2 Hui Yu,2 Can Cui,2 Yang Zhang,2 Ming Wu,2 Ren-Xi Zhuo,2 Hai-Bo Xu,1 Shi-Wen Huang2 1Department of Radiology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 2Key Laboratory of Biomedical Polymers, Ministry of Education, Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: In recent years, there has been increasing interest in developing a multifunctional nanoscale platform for cancer monitoring and chemotherapy. However, there is still a big challenge for current clinic contrast agents to improve their poor tumor selectivity and response. Herein, we report a new kind of Gd complex and folate-coated redox-sensitive lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticle (Gd-FLPNP for tumor-targeted magnetic resonance imaging and therapy. Gd-FLPNPs can simultaneously accomplish diagnostic imaging, and specific targeting and controlled release of doxorubicin (DOX. They exhibit good monodispersity, excellent size stability, and a well-defined core-shell structure. Paramagnetic nanoparticles based on gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-bis-cetylamine have paramagnetic properties with an approximately two-fold enhancement in the longitudinal relaxivity compared to clinical used Magnevist. For targeted and reduction-sensitive drug delivery, Gd-FLPNPs released DOX faster and enhanced cell uptake in vitro, and exhibited better antitumor effect both in vitro and in vivo. Keywords: redox-sensitive, tumor-targeted, gadolinium, contrast agents, PLGA

  17. Biodegradable polymers for targeted delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppalapudi, Sindhu; Jain, Anjali; Domb, Abraham J; Khan, Wahid

    2016-06-01

    Biodegradable polymers have been used for more than three decades in cancer treatment and have received increased interest in recent years. A range of biodegradable polymeric drug delivery systems designed for localized and systemic administration of therapeutic agents as well as tumor-targeting macromolecules has entered into the clinical phase of development, indicating the significance of biodegradable polymers in cancer therapy. This review elaborates upon applications of biodegradable polymers in the delivery and targeting of anti-cancer agents. Design of various drug delivery systems based on biodegradable polymers has been described. Moreover, the indication of polymers in the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs via passive, active targeting, and localized drug delivery are also covered. Biodegradable polymer-based drug delivery systems have the potential to deliver the payload to the target and can enhance drug availability at desired sites. Systemic toxicity and serious side effects observed with conventional cancer therapeutics can be significantly reduced with targeted polymeric systems. Still, there are many challenges that need to be met with respect to the degradation kinetics of the system, diffusion of drug payload within solid tumors, targeting tumoral tissue and tumor heterogeneity.

  18. Dual targeting and enhanced cytotoxicity to HER2-overexpressing tumors by immunoapoptotin-armored mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yanhui; Xi, Yujing; Cao, Zhongyuan; Xiang, Geng; Ni, Qingrong; Zhang, Rui; Chang, Jing; Du, Xiao; Yang, Angang; Yan, Bo; Zhao, Jing

    2016-10-10

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising vehicles for the delivery of anticancer agents in cancer therapy. However, the tumor targeting of loaded therapeutics is essential. Here, we explored a dual-targeting strategy to incorporate tumor-tropic MSC delivery with HER2-specific killing by the immunoapoptotin e23sFv-Fdt-tBid generated in our previous studies. The MSC engineering allowed simultaneous immunoapoptotin secretion and bioluminescence detection of the modified MSCs. Systemic administration of the immunoapoptotin-engineered MSCs was investigated in human HER2-reconstituted syngeneic mouse models of orthotopic and metastatic breast cancer, as well as in a xenograft nude mouse model of orthotopic gastric cancer. In vivo dual tumor targeting was confirmed by local accumulation of the bioluminescence-imaged MSCs and persistence of His-immunostained immunoapoptotins in tumor sites. The added tumor preference of MSC-secreted immunoapoptotins resulted in a significantly stronger antitumor effect compared with purified immunoapoptotins and Jurkat-delivered immunoapoptotins. This immunoapoptotin-armored MSC strategy provides a rationale for its use in extended malignancies by combining MSC mobility with redirected immunoapoptotins against a given tumor antigen. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Core-shell nanocarriers with high paclitaxel loading for passive and active targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhu; Lv, Yaqi; Cao, Hui; Yao, Jing; Zhou, Jianping; He, Wei; Yin, Lifang

    2016-06-01

    Rapid blood clearance and premature burst release are inherent drawbacks of conventional nanoparticles, resulting in poor tumor selectivity. iRGD peptide is widely recognized as an efficient cell membrane penetration peptide homing to αVβ3 integrins. Herein, core-shell nanocapsules (NCs) and iRGD-modified NCs (iRGD-NCs) with high drug payload for paclitaxel (PTX) were prepared to enhance the antitumor activities of chemotherapy agents with poor water solubility. Improved in vitro and in vivo tumor targeting and penetration were observed with NCs and iRGD-NCs; the latter exhibited better antitumor activity because iRGD enhanced the accumulation and penetration of NCs in tumors. The NCs were cytocompatible, histocompatible, and non-toxic to other healthy tissues. The endocytosis of NCs was mediated by lipid rafts in an energy-dependent manner, leading to better cytotoxicity of PTX against cancer cells. In contrast with commercial product, PTX-loaded NCs (PTX-NCs) increased area under concentration-time curve (AUC) by about 4-fold, prolonged mean resident time (MRT) by more than 8-fold and reduced the elimination rate constant by greater than 68-fold. In conclusion, the present nanocarriers with high drug-loading capacity represent an efficient tumor-targeting drug delivery system with promising potential for cancer therapy.

  20. Carrier-free, functionalized pure drug nanorods as a novel cancer-targeted drug delivery platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yanan; An Feifei; Zhang Xiaohong; Yang Yinlong; Liu Zhuang; Zhang Xiujuan

    2013-01-01

    A one-dimensional drug delivery system (1D DDS) is highly attractive since it has distinct advantages such as enhanced drug efficiency and better pharmacokinetics. However, drugs in 1D DDSs are all encapsulated in inert carriers, and problems such as low drug loading content and possible undesirable side effects caused by the carriers remain a serious challenge. In this paper, a novel, carrier-free, pure drug nanorod-based, tumor-targeted 1D DDS has been developed. Drugs are first prepared as nanorods and then surface functionalized to achieve excellent water dispersity and stability. The resulting drug nanorods show enhanced internalization rates mainly through energy-dependent endocytosis, with the shape-mediated nanorod (NR) diffusion process as a secondary pathway. The multiple endocytotic mechanisms lead to significantly improved drug efficiency of functionalized NRs with nearly ten times higher cytotoxicity than those of free molecules and unfunctionalized NRs. A targeted drug delivery system can be readily achieved through surface functionalization with targeting group linked amphipathic surfactant, which exhibits significantly enhanced drug efficacy and discriminates between cell lines with high selectivity. These results clearly show that this tumor-targeting DDS demonstrates high potential toward specific cancer cell lines. (paper)

  1. A bispecific peptide based near-infrared probe for in vivo tumor diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Li; Chen, Wei R.; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-02-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR and HER2 are members of recepeter tyrosine kinase family. Overexpression of EGFR and HER2 has been observed in a variety of human tumors, making these receptors promising targets for tumor diagnosis. An affibody targeting HER2 and a nanobody targeting EGFR were reported before. In this Manuscript, we described an bispecific peptide combined with an affibody and a nanonbody through a linker―(G4S)3 . And the bispecific peptide was labeled with near-infrared (NIR) fluorochrome ICG-Der-02 for in vivo tumor EGFR and HER2 targeting. Afterwards, the EGFR and HER2 specificity of the fluorescent probe was tested in vitro for receptor binding assay and fluorescence microscopy and in vivo for subcutaneous MDA-MB-231 tumor targeting. The results indicated that the bispecific peptide had a high affinity to EGFR and HER2. Besides, in vitro and in vivo tumor targeting experiment indicated that the ICG-Der-02-( bispecific peptide) showed excellent tumor activity accumulation. Noninvasive NIR fluorescence imaging is able to detect tumor EGFR and HER2 expression based upon the highly potent bispecific peptide probe.

  2. Oncolytic Adenovirus: Strategies and Insights for Vector Design and Immuno-Oncolytic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusi-Kerttula, Hanni; Hulin-Curtis, Sarah; Davies, James; Parker, Alan L.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) are commonly used both experimentally and clinically, including oncolytic virotherapy applications. In the clinical area, efficacy is frequently hampered by the high rates of neutralizing immunity, estimated as high as 90% in some populations that promote vector clearance and limit bioavailability for tumor targeting following systemic delivery. Active tumor targeting is also hampered by the ubiquitous nature of the Ad5 receptor, hCAR, as well as the lack of highly tumor-selective targeting ligands and suitable targeting strategies. Furthermore, significant off-target interactions between the viral vector and cellular and proteinaceous components of the bloodstream have been documented that promote uptake into non-target cells and determine dose-limiting toxicities. Novel strategies are therefore needed to overcome the obstacles that prevent efficacious Ad deployment for wider clinical applications. The use of less seroprevalent Ad serotypes, non-human serotypes, capsid pseudotyping, chemical shielding and genetic masking by heterologous peptide incorporation are all potential strategies to achieve efficient vector escape from humoral immune recognition. Conversely, selective vector arming with immunostimulatory agents can be utilized to enhance their oncolytic potential by activation of cancer-specific immune responses against the malignant tissues. This review presents recent advantages and pitfalls occurring in the field of adenoviral oncolytic therapies. PMID:26610547

  3. Clinically Applicable Monte Carlo–based Biological Dose Optimization for the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancers With Spot-Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan Chan Tseung, Hok Seum, E-mail: wanchantseung.hok@mayo.edu; Ma, Jiasen; Kreofsky, Cole R.; Ma, Daniel J.; Beltran, Chris

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: Our aim is to demonstrate the feasibility of fast Monte Carlo (MC)–based inverse biological planning for the treatment of head and neck tumors in spot-scanning proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Recently, a fast and accurate graphics processor unit (GPU)–based MC simulation of proton transport was developed and used as the dose-calculation engine in a GPU-accelerated intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) optimizer. Besides dose, the MC can simultaneously score the dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LET{sub d}), which makes biological dose (BD) optimization possible. To convert from LET{sub d} to BD, a simple linear relation was assumed. By use of this novel optimizer, inverse biological planning was applied to 4 patients, including 2 small and 1 large thyroid tumor targets, as well as 1 glioma case. To create these plans, constraints were placed to maintain the physical dose (PD) within 1.25 times the prescription while maximizing target BD. For comparison, conventional intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and IMPT plans were also created using Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) in each case. The same critical-structure PD constraints were used for the IMRT, IMPT, and biologically optimized plans. The BD distributions for the IMPT plans were obtained through MC recalculations. Results: Compared with standard IMPT, the biologically optimal plans for patients with small tumor targets displayed a BD escalation that was around twice the PD increase. Dose sparing to critical structures was improved compared with both IMRT and IMPT. No significant BD increase could be achieved for the large thyroid tumor case and when the presence of critical structures mitigated the contribution of additional fields. The calculation of the biologically optimized plans can be completed in a clinically viable time (<30 minutes) on a small 24-GPU system. Conclusions: By exploiting GPU acceleration, MC-based, biologically optimized plans were created for

  4. Thermal characteristics of thermobrachytherapy surface applicators for treating chest wall recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunachalam, K; Maccarini, P F; Craciunescu, O I; Stauffer, P R; Schlorff, J L

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate temperature and thermal dose distributions of thermobrachytherapy surface applicators (TBSAs) developed for concurrent or sequential high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and microwave hyperthermia treatment of chest wall recurrence and other superficial diseases. A steady-state thermodynamics model coupled with the fluid dynamics of a water bolus and electromagnetic radiation of the hyperthermia applicator is used to characterize the temperature distributions achievable with TBSAs in an elliptical phantom model of the human torso. Power deposited by 915 MHz conformal microwave array (CMA) applicators is used to assess the specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions of rectangular (500 cm 2 ) and L-shaped (875 cm 2 ) TBSAs. The SAR distribution in tissue and fluid flow distribution inside the dual-input dual-output (DIDO) water bolus are coupled to solve the steady-state temperature and thermal dose distributions of the rectangular TBSA (R-TBSA) for superficial tumor targets extending 10-15 mm beneath the skin surface. Thermal simulations are carried out for a range of bolus inlet temperature (T b = 38-43 deg. C), water flow rate (Q b = 2-4 L min -1 ) and tumor blood perfusion (ω b = 2-5 kg m -3 s -1 ) to characterize their influence on thermal dosimetry. Steady-state SAR patterns of the R- and L-TBSA demonstrate the ability to produce conformal and localized power deposition inside the tumor target sparing surrounding normal tissues and nearby critical organs. Acceptably low variation in tissue surface cooling and surface temperature homogeneity was observed for the new DIDO bolus at a 2 L min -1 water flow rate. Temperature depth profiles and thermal dose volume histograms indicate bolus inlet temperature (T b ) to be the most influential factor on thermal dosimetry. A 42 deg. C water bolus was observed to be the optimal choice for superficial tumors extending 10-15 mm from the surface even under significant blood perfusion

  5. Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Dual-Modality Glyco-Nanoparticles for Tumor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Yang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available d-Glucosamine (DG was conjugated to a core-cross linked polymeric micelle (CCPM system equipped with both a near-infrared fluorophore (NIRF and a gamma emitter (111In. The resultant nano-scale tumor-targeting imaging tracer, 111In-DG-NIRF-CCPM, selectively accumulated in a human epithelial carcinoma A-431 xenograft model in mice. At 24 hrs post injection, the tumor uptake was 2.62 ± 0.80 % of the injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g. Tumors were clearly delineated in both single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and optical imaging. The results suggest that the prepared imaging tracer is a promising agent for tumor diagnosis.

  6. Intracellular Disassembly of Self-Quenched Nanoparticles Turns NIR Fluorescence on for Sensing Furin Activity in Cells and in Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yue; Zhang, Jia; Cao, Qinjingwen; An, Linna; Liang, Gaolin

    2015-06-16

    There has been no report on enzyme-controlled disassembly of self-quenched NIR fluorescent nanoparticles turning fluorescence on for specific detection/imaging of the enzyme's activity in vitro and in vivo. Herein, we reported the rational design of new NIR probe 1 whose fluorescence signal was self-quenched upon reduction-controlled condensation and subsequent assembly of its nanoparticles (i.e., 1-NPs). Then disassembly of 1-NPs by furin turned the fluorescence on. Employing this enzymatic strategy, we successfully applied 1-NPs for NIR detection of furin in vitro and NIR imaging furin activity in living cells. Moreover, we also applied 1-NPs for discriminative NIR imaging of MDA-MB-468 tumors in nude mice. This NIR probe 1 might be further developed for tumor-targeted imaging in routine preclinical studies or even in patients in the future.

  7. DARPins: a true alternative to antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpp, Michael T; Amstutz, Patrick

    2007-03-01

    Designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) are a promising class of non-immunoglobulin proteins that can offer advantages over antibodies for target binding in drug discovery and drug development. DARPins have been successfully used, for example, for the inhibition of kinases, proteases and drug-exporting membrane proteins. DARPins specifically targeting the cancer marker HER2 have also been generated and were shown to function in both in vitro diagnostics and in vivo tumor targeting. DARPins are ideally suited for in vivo imaging or delivery of toxins or other therapeutic payloads because of their favorable molecular properties, including small size and high stability. The low-cost production in bacteria and the rapid generation of many target-specific DARPins make the DARPin approach useful for drug discovery. Additionally, DARPins can be easily generated in multispecific formats, offering the potential to target an effector DARPin to a specific organ or to target multiple receptors with one molecule composed of several DARPins.

  8. Glucose-functionalized gold nanoparticles as a metabolically targeted CT contrast agent for distinguishing tumors from non-malignant metabolically active processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreifuss, Tamar; Motiei, Menachem; Betzer, Oshra; Popovtzer, Aron; Abourbeh, Galith; Mishani, Eyal; Popovtzer, Rachela

    2017-02-01

    The highly used cancer imaging technique, [18F]FDG-PET, is based on the increased glucose metabolic activity in tumors. However, since there are other biological processes that exhibit increased metabolic activity, in particular inflammation, this methodology is prone to non-specificity for cancer. Herein we describe the development of a novel nanoparticle-based approach, utilizes Glucose-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles (GF-GNPs) as a metabolically targeted CT contrast agent. Our method has demonstrated specific tumor targeting and has successfully differentiated between cancer and inflammation in a combined tumor-inflammation mouse model, due to dissimilarities in vasculatures in different pathologic conditions. This novel approach provides new capabilities in cancer imaging, and can be applicable to a wide range of cancers.

  9. Targeted therapy in renal cell carcinoma: moving from molecular agents to specific immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedke, Jens; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Singh-Jasuja, Harpreet; Stevanović, Stefan; Behnes, Carl-Ludwig; Stenzl, Arnulf

    2014-02-01

    Non-specific immunotherapy has been for a long time a standard treatment option for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma but was redeemed by specific targeted molecular therapies, namely the VEGF and mTOR inhibitors. After moving treatment for mRCC to specific molecular agents with a well-defined mode of action, immunotherapy still needs this further development to increase its accuracy. Nowadays, an evolution from a rather non-specific cytokine treatment to sophisticated targeted approaches in specific immunotherapy led to a re-launch of immunotherapy in clinical studies. Recent steps in the development of immunotherapy strategies are discussed in this review with a special focus on peptide vaccination which aims at a tumor targeting by specific T lymphocytes. In addition, different combinatory strategies with immunomodulating agents like cyclophosphamide or sunitinib are outlined, and the effects of immune checkpoint modulators as anti-CTLA-4 or PD-1 antibodies are discussed.

  10. Dosimetric commissioning of a CBCT system for IGRT purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso, R.; Ascencion, Y.; Castillo, D.; Linares, H.; Argota, R.; Garcia, F.

    2015-01-01

    During the last few years the use of tomographic imaging systems based on kilo voltage, cone shaped photon beams (kV-CBCT) for ensuring an accurate positioning of patients in radiotherapy treatments has expanded to low income departments, such as those existing in public health systems of low and middle income countries (LMIC). Although several dosimetric studies have been published so far, showing results of collateral dose in patients exposed to kV-CBCT studies for image guidance radiotherapy purposes (IGRT), their main objective is to demonstrate that these doses are significantly lower than the prescribed dose to the target volume and even the dose to organs and healthy tissues. In the actual study a methodology is proposed to reduce the CBCT dose during IGRT procedures for tumor targets located in the thorax region, where motion management is crucial. Criteria for dose optimization, based on image quality indexes and automated positioning accuracy, were implemented. (Author)

  11. Preclinical Evaluation of Raman Nanoparticle Biodistribution for their Potential Use in Clinical Endoscopy Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zavaleta, Cristina L; Hartman, Keith B; Miao, Zheng

    2011-01-01

    toxicity. In this study, the natural biodistribution of gold surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles is evaluated by radiolabeling them with (64) Cu and imaging their localization over time using micropositron emission tomography (PET). Mice are injected either intravenously (IV...... intestine (5 h = 10.37% ID g(-1) ; 24 h = 0.42% ID g(-1) ) with minimal uptake in other organs. Raman imaging of excised tissues correlate well with biodistribution data. These results suggest that the topical application of SERS nanoparticles in the mouse colon appears to minimize their systemic...... with endoscopy. The use of an accessory Raman endoscope in conjunction with topically administered tumor-targeting Raman nanoparticles during a routine colonoscopy could offer a new way to sensitively detect dysplastic lesions while circumventing Raman's limited depth of penetration and avoiding systemic...

  12. Overview and recent advances in the treatment of neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, Sarah B; Smith, Valeria; Doherty, Erin; Zhao, Sibo; McCarty, Scott; Zage, Peter E

    2017-04-01

    Children with neuroblastoma have widely divergent outcomes, ranging from cure in >90% of patients with low risk disease to neuroblastoma, allowing for more accurate risk stratification and treatment reduction in many cases, although newer treatment strategies for children with high-risk and relapsed neuroblastoma are needed to improve outcomes. Areas covered: Neuroblastoma epidemiology, diagnosis, risk stratification, and recent advances in treatment of both newly diagnosed and relapsed neuroblastoma. Expert commentary: The identification of newer tumor targets and of novel cell-mediated immunotherapy agents may lead to novel therapeutic approaches, and clinical trials for regimens designed to target individual genetic aberrations in tumors are underway. A combination of therapeutic modalities will likely be required to improve survival and cure rates for patients with high-risk neuroblastoma.

  13. Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines in Prostate Cancer: The Quest for Intermediate Markers of Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joseph W.; Bilusic, Marijo; Heery, Christopher J.; Madan, Ravi A., E-mail: madanr@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Medical Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2012-11-21

    Despite recent advances in cancer immunotherapy, no prospectively validated intermediate biomarkers exist to predict response. These biomarkers are highly desirable given modern immunotherapy’s paradoxical pattern of clinical benefit; that is, improvement in overall survival without short-term change in progression. Immunotherapy clinical trials have evaluated biomarkers that may correlate with clinical outcomes. Many of them are performed on peripheral blood to evaluate the systemic response, such as tumor-targeted humoral and cellular immunity, and cytokine responses. Accumulating evidence suggests that immune infiltrates in tumors may suggest evidence for the therapy’s mechanism of action, and have greater potential for providing prognostic and predictive information. In addition, a non-immunologic biomarker, such as tumor growth kinetics, may explain this paradoxical pattern of clinical benefit, and predict survival in patients treated with an immunotherapy. Prospective assessment and validation of these and other intermediate markers would be required to better understand their potential clinical role.

  14. NK cell imaging by in vitro and in vivo labelling approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galli, F.; Histed, S. N.; Aras, O.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a particular lymphocyte subset with a documented cytotoxic activity against cancer cells. Evidence of NK antitumoral effect led researchers to focus on the development of immunotherapies aimed at augmenting NK recruitment and infiltration into tumor and their anti-cancer functions. Studies in animal models proved that the right combination of drugs, cytokines, chemokines and other factors might be used to enhance or suppress tumor targeting by NK cells. Therefore, it would be necessary to have a tool to non-invasively monitor the efficacy of such novel therapies. Available imaging techniques comprise magnetic resonance, optical and nuclear medicine imaging with a pool of compounds that ranges from radiolabelled nanoparticles and radiopharmaceuticals to fluorescent probes. Each tracer and technique has its own pros and cons, but till now, no one emerged as superior among the others.

  15. Boron Drug Delivery via Encapsulated Magnetic Nanocomposites: A New Approach for BNCT in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghuai Zhu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ortho-carborane cages have been successfully attached to modified magnetic nanoparticles via catalytic azide-alkyne cycloadditions between 1-R-2-butyl-Ortho-C2B10H10(R=Me,3;Ph,4 and propargyl group-enriched magnetic nanoparticles. A loading amount of 9.83 mmol boron atom/g starch-matrixed magnetic nanoparticles has been reached. The resulting nanocomposites have been found to be highly tumor-targeted vehicles under the influence of an external magnetic field (1.14T, yielding a high boron concentration of 51.4 μg/g tumor and ratios of around 10 : 1 tumor to normal tissues.

  16. Current Perspectives on In Vivo Noninvasive Tracking of Extracellular Vesicles with Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Gangadaran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and preclinical in vivo tracking of extracellular vesicles (EVs are a crucial tool for the development and optimization of EV-based diagnosis and treatment. EVs have gained interest due to their unique properties that make them excellent candidates for biological applications. Noninvasive in vivo EV tracking has allowed marked progress towards elucidating the mechanisms and functions of EVs in real time in preclinical and clinical studies. In this review, we summarize several molecular imaging methods that deal with EVs derived from different cells, which have allowed investigations of EV biodistribution, as well as their tracking, delivery, and tumor targeting, to determine their physiological functions and to exploit imaging-derived information for EV-based theranostics.

  17. Yttrium-90 for cancer radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hupf, H.B.; Wanek, P.M.; Barbosa, B.; Poggenburg, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    An ideal radiopharmaceutical for cancer therapy must provide a sufficient radiation dose to destroy all the viable malignant cells while sparing normal cells of critical body organs. The strategy implies a radionuclide with high linear energy transfer, a moderate range in tissue and a high equilibrium dose constant be delivered specifically to target cells. Yttrium-90 coupled with tumor-cell-specific antibody approaches the ideal product necessary for radioimmunotherapy. Yttrium-90 is separated from its fission by-product parent Sr-90, purified and aseptically coupled with an antibody conjugate to prepare a therapy radiopharmaceutical. The same antibody conjugate is labeled with In-111 and used after injection for estimating tumor targeting and therapy planning. A dedicated robotic facility has been constructed for safe handling of the large quantities of radioactive materials used. Several Phase 1 clinical protocols using the Y-90 and In-111 antibody labeled matched pair have been initiated, providing excellent safety results and several tumor remissions

  18. Like a bolt from the blue: phthalocyanines in biomedical optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekkat, Nawal; van den Bergh, Hubert; Nyokong, Tebello; Lange, Norbert

    2011-12-23

    The purpose of this review is to compile preclinical and clinical results on phthalocyanines (Pcs) as photosensitizers (PS) for Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) and contrast agents for fluorescence imaging. Indeed, Pcs are excellent candidates in these fields due to their strong absorbance in the NIR region and high chemical and photo-stability. In particular, this is mostly relevant for their in vivo activation in deeper tissular regions. However, most Pcs present two major limitations, i.e., a strong tendency to aggregate and a low water-solubility. In order to overcome these issues, both chemical tuning and pharmaceutical formulation combined with tumor targeting strategies were applied. These aspects will be developed in this review for the most extensively studied Pcs during the last 25 years, i.e., aluminium-, zinc- and silicon-based Pcs.

  19. Development and validation of chemical features-based proton-coupled folate transporter/activity and reduced folate carrier/activity models (pharmacophores).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Khushbu; Raghavan, Sudhir; Hou, Zhanjun; Matherly, Larry H; Gangjee, Aleem

    2018-05-01

    All clinically used antifolates lack transport selectivity for tumors over normal cells resulting in dose-limiting toxicities. There is growing interest in developing novel tumor-targeted cytotoxic antifolates with selective transport into tumors over normal cells via the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) over the ubiquitously expressed reduced folate carrier (RFC). A lack of X-ray crystal structures or predictive models for PCFT or RFC has hindered structure-aided drug design for PCFT-selective therapeutics. Four-point validated models (pharmacophores) were generated for PCFT/Activity (HBA, NI, RA, RA) and RFC/Activity (HBD, NI, HBA, HBA) based on inhibition (IC 50 ) of proliferation of isogenic Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells engineered to express only human PCFT or only RFC. Our results revealed substantial differences in structural features required for transport of novel molecules by these transporters which can be utilized for developing transporter-selective antifolates. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Delivery of paclitaxel using nanoparticles composed of poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(butylene oxide) (PEO-PBO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijiang; Yao, Ju; Zhang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Yingxin; Xu, Chang; Lee, Robert J; Yu, Gary; Yu, Bo; Teng, Lesheng

    2018-01-01

    An amphiphilic block copolymer poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(butylene oxide) (PEO-PBO) was evaluated as a carrier for therapeutic delivery of paclitaxel (PTX). PEO-PBO and PTX form nanoparticles (NPs) by self-assembly upon hydration. The size of these NPs was about 92.71nm and the zeta potential was -5.06mV, which met the requirements for passive tumor targeting through the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Compared with a commonly used block copolymer poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly-D,L-(lactic acid) (PEG-PDLLA), PEO-PBO forms nanoparticles with superior pharmacokinetic, biodistribution, and tumor inhibitory properties. Meanwhile, results of hemolysis study and CMC determination showed that PEO-PBO had better biocompatibility and stability than PEG-PDLLA. These data suggest that PEO-PBO has potential for application in drug delivery and warrant further evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Intratumoral administration of IL2- and TNF-based fusion proteins cures cancer without establishing protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziffels, Barbara; Pretto, Francesca; Neri, Dario

    2018-03-01

    The combination of tumor-targeting IL2- and TNF-based antibody-cytokine fusions has exhibited encouraging results in mouse and men. Here, we studied their combination to assess efficacy and mechanism of action in four different immunocompetent mouse models of cancer. Mice receiving a single intratumoral injection of F8-IL2, F8-TNF or the combination were investigated for tumor-infiltrating leukocytes and rechallenged when cured. In three models, a proportion of treated animals could be cured, most probably by infiltrating NK and CD8 + T cells. Most of the cured mice did not acquire protective immunity when rechallenged with the same tumor cell line. Immunocompetent mouse tumor models may not be adequate enough to predict the search for more efficacious therapy regimens.

  2. Clinical development of reovirus for cancer therapy: An oncolytic virus with immune-mediated antitumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jun; Sachdev, Esha; Mita, Alain C; Mita, Monica M

    2016-03-26

    Reovirus is a double-stranded RNA virus with demonstrated oncolysis or preferential replication in cancer cells. The oncolytic properties of reovirus appear to be dependent, in part, on activated Ras signaling. In addition, Ras-transformation promotes reovirus oncolysis by affecting several steps of the viral life cycle. Reovirus-mediated immune responses can present barriers to tumor targeting, serve protective functions against reovirus systemic toxicity, and contribute to therapeutic efficacy through antitumor immune-mediated effects via innate and adaptive responses. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the broad anticancer activity of wild-type, unmodified type 3 Dearing strain reovirus (Reolysin(®)) across a spectrum of malignancies. The development of reovirus as an anticancer agent and available clinical data reported from 22 clinical trials will be reviewed.

  3. Trojan horse lymphocytes: a vesicular stomatitis virus-specific T-cell clone lyses target cells by carrying virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hom, R C; Soman, G; Finberg, R

    1989-10-01

    We have isolated a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-specific CD4+ CD8- murine T-cell clone. This clone proliferates only in response to VSV and lyses infected tumor cells bearing class II major histocompatibility antigens in short-term chromium release assays. In addition, the cell has VSV antigens on its surface and is capable of killing uninfected tumor cells without major histocompatibility antigen restriction in a 2-day assay. This latter cytolytic activity is eliminated by anti-VSV antibody, indicating that its lytic activity is provided by the virus. [35S]methionine labeling and immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that viral protein translation is initiated after incubation of the clone with a tumor target cell, defining this as the mechanism of its cytolytic activity.

  4. Factors affecting the stability of drug-loaded polymeric micelles and strategies for improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Weisai; Li, Caibin; Wang, Zhiyu; Zhang, Wenli, E-mail: zwllz@163.com; Liu, Jianping, E-mail: liujianpingljp@hotmail.com [China Pharmaceutical University, Department of Pharmaceutics (China)

    2016-09-15

    Polymeric micelles (PMs) self-assembled by amphiphilic block copolymers have been used as promising nanocarriers for tumor-targeted delivery due to their favorable properties, such as excellent biocompatibility, prolonged circulation time, favorable particle sizes (10–100 nm) to utilize enhanced permeability and retention effect and the possibility for functionalization. However, PMs can be easily destroyed due to dilution of body fluid and the absorption of proteins in system circulation, which may induce drug leakage from these micelles before reaching the target sites and compromise the therapeutic effect. This paper reviewed the factors that influence stability of micelles in terms of thermodynamics and kinetics consist of the critical micelle concentration of block copolymers, glass transition temperature of hydrophobic segments and polymer–polymer and polymer–cargo interaction. In addition, some effective strategies to improve the stability of micelles were also summarized.Graphical Abstract.

  5. Surface engineering of graphene-based nanomaterials for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Sixiang; Chen, Feng; Ehlerding, Emily B; Cai, Weibo

    2014-09-17

    Graphene-based nanomaterials have attracted tremendous interest over the past decade due to their unique electronic, optical, mechanical, and chemical properties. However, the biomedical applications of these intriguing nanomaterials are still limited due to their suboptimal solubility/biocompatibility, potential toxicity, and difficulties in achieving active tumor targeting, just to name a few. In this Topical Review, we will discuss in detail the important role of surface engineering (i.e., bioconjugation) in improving the in vitro/in vivo stability and enriching the functionality of graphene-based nanomaterials, which can enable single/multimodality imaging (e.g., optical imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and therapy (e.g., photothermal therapy, photodynamic therapy, and drug/gene delivery) of cancer. Current challenges and future research directions are also discussed and we believe that graphene-based nanomaterials are attractive nanoplatforms for a broad array of future biomedical applications.

  6. Cell membrane-based nanoparticles: a new biomimetic platform for tumor diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixiang Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking inspiration from nature, the biomimetic concept has been integrated into drug delivery systems in cancer therapy. Disguised with cell membranes, the nanoparticles can acquire various functions of natural cells. The cell membrane-coating technology has pushed the limits of common nano-systems (fast elimination in circulation to more effectively navigate within the body. Moreover, because of the various functional molecules on the surface, cell membrane-based nanoparticles (CMBNPs are capable of interacting with the complex biological microenvironment of the tumor. Various sources of cell membranes have been explored to camouflage CMBNPs and different tumor-targeting strategies have been developed to enhance the anti-tumor drug delivery therapy. In this review article we highlight the most recent advances in CMBNP-based cancer targeting systems and address the challenges and opportunities in this field.

  7. Enzymatically triggered multifunctional delivery system based on hyaluronic acid micelles

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Tumor targetability and stimuli responsivity of drug delivery systems (DDS) are key factors in cancer therapy. Implementation of multifunctional DDS can afford targetability and responsivity at the same time. Herein, cholesterol molecules (Ch) were coupled to hyaluronic acid (HA) backbones to afford amphiphilic conjugates that can self-assemble into stable micelles. Doxorubicin (DOX), an anticancer drug, and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles (NPs), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, were encapsulated by Ch-HA micelles and were selectively released in the presence of hyaluronidase (Hyals) enzyme. Cytotoxicity and cell uptake studies were done using three cancer cell lines (HeLa, HepG2 and MCF7) and one normal cell line (WI38). Higher Ch-HA micelles uptake was seen in cancer cells versus normal cells. Consequently, DOX release was elevated in cancer cells causing higher cytotoxicity and enhanced cell death. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  8. Mesoporous multifunctional upconversion luminescent and magnetic "nanorattle" materials for targeted chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Braun, Gary B; Pallaoro, Alessia; Zhang, Yichi; Shi, Yifeng; Cui, Daxiang; Moskovits, Martin; Zhao, Dongyuan; Stucky, Galen D

    2012-01-11

    Nanorattles consisting of hydrophilic, rare-earth-doped NaYF(4) shells each containing a loose magnetic nanoparticle were fabricated through an ion-exchange process. The inner magnetic Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles are coated with a SiO(2) layer to avoid iron leaching in acidic biological environments. This multifunctional mesoporous nanostructure with both upconversion luminescent and magnetic properties has excellent water dispersibility and a high drug-loading capacity. The material emits visible luminescence upon NIR excitation and can be directed by an external magnetic field to a specific target, making it an attractive system for a variety of biological applications. Measurements on cells incubated with the nanorattles show them to have low cytotoxicity and excellent cell imaging properties. In vivo experiments yield highly encouraging tumor shrinkage with the antitumor drug doxorubicin (DOX) and significantly enhanced tumor targeting in the presence of an applied magnetic field. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  9. Bifunctional antibodies for radioimmunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatal, J F; Faivre-Chauvet, A; Bardies, M; Peltier, P; Gautherot, E; Barbet, J

    1995-04-01

    In two-step targeting technique using bifunctional antibodies, a nonradiolabeled immunoconjugate with slow uptake kinetics (several days) is initially injected, followed by a small radiolabeled hapten with fast kinetics (several hours) that binds to the bispecific immunoconjugate already taken up by the tumor target. In patients with colorectal or medullary thyroid cancer, clinical studies performed with an anti-CEA/anti-DTPA-indium bifunctional antibody and an indium-111-labeled di-DTPA-TL bivalent hapten showed that tumor uptake was not modified compared to results for F(ab')2 fragments of the same anti-CEA antibody directly labeled with indium-111, whereas the radioactivity of normal tissues was significantly reduced (3- to 6-fold). The fast tumor uptake kinetics (several hours) and high or very high tumor-to-normal tissue ratios obtained with the bifunctional antibody technique are favorable parameters for efficient radioimmunotherapy.

  10. Hand-held gamma radioimmunodetection. Feasibility study by phantom simulating: clinic results; Radioimmunodetection per-operatoire. Etude de faisabilite par simulation a l`aide d`un fantome, resultats cliniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtet, C.; Giacalone, F.; Bardies, M.; Peltier, P.; Thedrez, P.; Chatal, J.F. [Institut de Biologie, 44 - Nantes (France); Daniel, G.; Regnard, P. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. des Applications et de la Metrologie des Rayonnements Ionisants

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the detection feasibility of small tumoral (colon carcinoma and thyroid medullary cancer) or non tumoral targets (osteoid osteoma) using an hand-held gamma probe. Patients have been injected with a radiotracer ({sup 111}In or {sup 99m}Tc, labelled or non labelled to monoclonal antibody). Clinical results are reported comparing hand-held gamma probe results with biodistribution studies after specimen resection. In order to improve this attractive method it is necessary to enhance ratios between the signal/background and counts between tumoral tissues/normal tissues. Complementary study has been performed with an abdominal phantom simulating different tumor sizes and liver and vascular background. (authors). 3 figs., 8 refs.

  11. Delivery of therapeutic radioisotopes using nanoparticle platforms: potential benefit in systemic radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Longjiang; Chen, Hongwei; Wang, Liya; Liu, Tian; Yeh, Julie; Lu, Guangming; Yang, Lily; Mao, Hui

    2010-12-03

    Radiation therapy is an effective cancer treatment option in conjunction with chemotherapy and surgery. Emerging individualized internal and systemic radiation treatment promises significant improvement in efficacy and reduction of normal tissue damage; however, it requires cancer cell targeting platforms for efficient delivery of radiation sources. With recent advances in nanoscience and nanotechnology, there is great interest in developing nanomaterials as multifunctional carriers to deliver therapeutic radioisotopes for tumor targeted radiation therapy, to monitor their delivery and tumor response to the treatment. This paper provides an overview on developing nanoparticles for carrying and delivering therapeutic radioisotopes for systemic radiation treatment. Topics discussed in the review include: selecting nanoparticles and radiotherapy isotopes, strategies for targeting nanoparticles to cancers, together with challenges and potential solutions for the in vivo delivery of nanoparticles. Some examples of using nanoparticle platforms for the delivery of therapeutic radioisotopes in preclinical studies of cancer treatment are also presented.

  12. Combining radiation and immunotherapy: a new systemic therapy for solid tumors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chad; Wang, Xiaohong; Soh, Hendrick; Seyedin, Steven; Cortez, Maria Angelica; Krishnan, Sunil; Massarelli, Erminia; Hong, David; Naing, Aung; Diab, Adi; Gomez, Daniel; Ye, Huiping; Heymach, John; Komaki, Ristuko; Allison, James P; Sharma, Padmanee; Welsh, James W

    2014-09-01

    With the recent success of checkpoint inhibitors and other immunomodulating agents, there has been renewed interest in the combination of such agents with radiation. The biologic premise behind such a strategy is that the tumor-antigen release achieved by localized radiation will promote specific tumor targeting by the adaptive immune system, which can be augmented further by systemic immune-stimulating agents. In this manner, clinicians hope to induce a phenomenon known as the abscopal effect, whereby localized radiation results in immune-mediated tumor regression in disease sites well outside of the radiation field. Herein, we present a comprehensive overview of the early clinical and preclinical evidence behind this approach. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Metastatic Group 3 Medulloblastoma in a Patient With Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: Case Description and Molecular Characterization of the Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moavero, Romina; Folgiero, Valentina; Carai, Andrea; Miele, Evelina; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Po, Agnese; Diomedi Camassei, Francesca; Lepri, Francesca Romana; Vigevano, Federico; Curatolo, Paolo; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Colafati, Giovanna S; Locatelli, Franco; Tornesello, Assunta; Mastronuzzi, Angela

    2016-04-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common pediatric brain tumor. We describe a child with tuberous sclerosis complex that developed a Group 3, myc overexpressed, metastatic medulloblastoma (MB). Considering the high risk of treatment-induced malignancies, a tailored therapy, omitting radiation, was given. Based on the evidence of mammalian target of rapamycin mTORC, mTOR Complex; RAS, Rat sarcoma; RAF, rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma (mTOR) pathway activation in the tumor, targeted therapy was applied resulting in complete remission of disease. Although the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway plays a role in MB, we did not find TSC1/TSC2 (TSC, tuberous sclerosis complex) mutation in our patient. We speculate that a different pathway resulting in mTOR activation is the basis of both TSC and MB in this child; H&E, haematoxilin and eosin; Gd, gadolinium. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. General strategy for the protection of organs at risk in IMRT therapy of a moving body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abolfath, Ramin M.; Papiez, Lech [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    We investigated protection strategies of organs at risk (OARs) in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). These strategies apply to delivery of IMRT to moving body anatomies that show relative displacement of OAR in close proximity to a tumor target. We formulated an efficient genetic algorithm which makes it possible to search for global minima in a complex landscape of multiple irradiation strategies delivering a given, predetermined intensity map to a target. The optimal strategy was investigated with respect to minimizing the dose delivered to the OAR. The optimization procedure developed relies on variability of all parameters available for control of radiation delivery in modern linear accelerators, including adaptation of leaf trajectories and simultaneous modification of beam dose rate during irradiation. We showed that the optimization algorithms lead to a significant reduction in the dose delivered to OAR in cases where organs at risk move relative to a treatment target.

  15. Increasing the safety and efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell therapy is a promising cancer treatment that has recently been undergoing rapid development. However, there are still some major challenges, including precise tumor targeting to avoid off-target or “on-target/off-tumor” toxicity, adequate T cell infiltration and migration to solid tumors and T cell proliferation and persistence across the physical and biochemical barriers of solid tumors. In this review, we focus on the primary challenges and strategies to design safe and effective CAR T cells, including using novel cutting-edge technologies for CAR and vector designs to increase both the safety and efficacy, further T cell modification to overcome the tumor-associated immune suppression, and using gene editing technologies to generate universal CAR T cells. All these efforts promote the development and evolution of CAR T cell therapy and move toward our ultimate goal—curing cancer with high safety, high efficacy, and low cost.

  16. 99m Tc-anti-epidermal growth factor receptor nanobody for tumor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piramoon, Majid; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Omidfar, Kobra; Noaparast, Zohreh; Abedi, Seyed Mohammad

    2017-04-01

    Nanobodies are important biomolecules for tumor targeting. In this study, we synthesized and labeled anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) nanobody OA-cb6 with 99m Tc(CO) 3 + and evaluated its characteristics for targeting the EGFR in the A431 human epidermal carcinoma cell line. Nanobody radiolabeling was achieved with high yield and radiochemical purity, and the radioconjugate was stable. Biodistribution results in nude mice exhibited a favorable tumor-to-muscle ratio at 4-hr postinjection, and tumor location was visualized at 4 hr after injection of radiolabeled nanobody. Our result showed that the OA-cb6- 99m Tc-tricarbonyl radiolabeled nanobody is a promising radiolabeled biomolecule for tumor imaging in cancers with high EGFR overexpression. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Liposomal cancer therapy: exploiting tumor characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasgaard, Thomas; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2010-01-01

    of cancer treatments. In the search for more effective cancer treatments, nanoparticle- based drug delivery systems, such as liposomes, that are capable of delivering their drug payload selectively to cancer cells are among the most promising approaches. Areas covered in this review: This review provides...... an overview of current strategies for improving the different stages of liposomal cancer therapy, which involve transporting drug-loaded liposomes through the bloodstream, increasing tumor accumulation, and improving drug release and cancer cell uptake after accumulation at the tumor target site. What......Importance of the field: More than 10 million people worldwide are diagnosed with cancer each year, and the development of effective cancer treatments is consequently of great significance. Cancer therapy is unfortunately hampered by severe dose-limiting side effects that reduce the efficacy...

  18. New Advances in Nanotechnology-Based Diagnosis and Therapeutics for Breast Cancer: An Assessment of Active-Targeting Inorganic Nanoplatforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falagan-Lotsch, Priscila; Grzincic, Elissa M; Murphy, Catherine J

    2017-01-18

    Breast cancer is a major cause of suffering and mortality among women. Limitations in the current diagnostic methods and treatment approaches have led to new strategies to positively impact the survival rates and quality of life of breast cancer patients. Nanotechnology offers a real possibility of mitigating breast cancer mortality by early-stage cancer detection and more precise diagnosis as well as more effective treatments with minimal side effects. The current nanoplatforms approved for breast cancer therapeutics are based on passive tumor targeting using organic nanoparticles and have not provided the expected significant improvements in the clinic. In this review, we present the emerging approaches in breast cancer nanomedicine based on active targeting using versatile inorganic nanoplatforms with biomedical relevance, such as gold, silica, and iron oxide nanoparticles, as well as their efficacy in breast cancer imaging, drug and gene delivery, thermal therapy, combinational therapy, and theranostics in preclinical studies. The main challenges for clinical translation and perspectives are discussed.

  19. Chimeric antigen receptor engineering: a right step in the evolution of adoptive cellular immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Jose A; Reidy, Adair; Mirandola, Leonardo; Trotter, Kayley; Suvorava, Natallia; Figueroa, Alejandro; Konala, Venu; Aulakh, Amardeep; Littlefield, Lauren; Grizzi, Fabio; Rahman, Rakhshanda Layeequr; Jenkins, Marjorie R; Musgrove, Breeanna; Radhi, Saba; D'Cunha, Nicholas; D'Cunha, Luke N; Hermonat, Paul L; Cobos, Everardo; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2015-03-01

    Cancer immunotherapy comprises different therapeutic strategies that exploit the use of distinct components of the immune system, with the common goal of specifically targeting and eradicating neoplastic cells. These varied approaches include the use of specific monoclonal antibodies, checkpoint inhibitors, cytokines, therapeutic cancer vaccines and cellular anticancer strategies such as activated dendritic cell (DC) vaccines, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and, more recently, genetically engineered T cells. Each one of these approaches has demonstrated promise, but their generalized success has been hindered by the paucity of specific tumor targets resulting in suboptimal tumor responses and unpredictable toxicities. This review will concentrate on recent advances on the use of engineered T cells for adoptive cellular immunotherapy (ACI) in cancer.

  20. Delivery of therapeutic radioisotopes using nanoparticle platforms: potential benefit in systemic radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Longjiang; Chen, Hongwei; Wang, Liya; Liu, Tian; Yeh, Julie; Lu, Guangming; Yang, Lily; Mao, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an effective cancer treatment option in conjunction with chemotherapy and surgery. Emerging individualized internal and systemic radiation treatment promises significant improvement in efficacy and reduction of normal tissue damage; however, it requires cancer cell targeting platforms for efficient delivery of radiation sources. With recent advances in nanoscience and nanotechnology, there is great interest in developing nanomaterials as multifunctional carriers to deliver therapeutic radioisotopes for tumor targeted radiation therapy, to monitor their delivery and tumor response to the treatment. This paper provides an overview on developing nanoparticles for carrying and delivering therapeutic radioisotopes for systemic radiation treatment. Topics discussed in the review include: selecting nanoparticles and radiotherapy isotopes, strategies for targeting nanoparticles to cancers, together with challenges and potential solutions for the in vivo delivery of nanoparticles. Some examples of using nanoparticle platforms for the delivery of therapeutic radioisotopes in preclinical studies of cancer treatment are also presented. PMID:24198480

  1. Immunotherapy: New Strategies for the Treatment of Gynecologic Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourla, Ariel Bulua; Zamarin, Dmitriy

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, the ability of cancer cells to evade immune destruction has become recognized as one of the hallmarks of cancer. This understanding has paved the way for the development of novel therapeutic agents that can enhance activation of antitumor immune responses or reverse immunosuppressive mechanisms through which tumors escape immune-mediated rejection. The treatment of gynecologic cancers remains a therapeutic challenge, as these malignancies are often diagnosed in advanced stages, and many patients relapse despite appropriate management. Clinical trials have shown efficacy for various immunotherapeutic strategies, especially the use of tumor-targeting antibodies; enhancement of tumor antigen presentation, such as with vaccines and toll-like receptor agonists; and agents targeting immunosuppressive mechanisms, such as checkpoint blockade inhibitors. Emerging data on new and combination approaches currently under investigation provide a strong rationale for these approaches. PMID:26791846

  2. Ultrasound molecular imaging of ovarian cancer with CA-125 targeted nanobubble contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yong; Hernandez, Christopher; Yuan, Hai-Xia; Lilly, Jacob; Kota, Pavan; Zhou, Haoyan; Wu, Hanping; Exner, Agata A

    2017-10-01

    Ultrasound is frequently utilized in diagnosis of gynecologic malignancies such as ovarian cancer. Because epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is often characterized by overexpression of cancer antigen 125 (CA-125), ultrasound contrast agents able to target this molecular signature could be a promising complementary strategy. In this work, we demonstrate application of CA-125-targeted echogenic lipid and surfactant-stabilized nanobubbles imaged with standard clinical contrast harmonic ultrasound for imaging of CA-125 positive OVCAR-3 tumors in mice. Surface functionalization of the nanobubbles with a CA-125 antibody achieved rapid significantly (P CA-125 negative SKOV-3 tumors. Targeted nanobubbles also exhibited increased tumor retention and prolonged echogenicity compared to untargeted nanobubbles. Data suggest that ultrasound molecular imaging using CA-125 antibody-conjugated nanobubbles may contribute to improved diagnosis of EOC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Imaging targeted at tumor with 188Re-labeled VEGF189 exon 6-encoded peptide and effects of the transfecting truncated KDR gene in tumor-bearing nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Zhexue; Li Qianwei; Liu Guangyuan; Luo Chaoxue; Xie Ganfeng; Zheng Lei; Huang Dingde

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Planar imaging of 188 Re-labeled vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) 189 exon 6-encoded peptide (QKRKRKKSRYKS) with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in tumor-bearing nude mice and effects of the transfecting truncated KDR gene on its imaging were investigated, so as to provide a basis for further applying the peptide to tumor-targeted radionuclide treatment. Methods: QKRKRKKSRYKS, coupling with mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG 3 ) chelator was labeled with 188 Re; then in vivo distribution, planar imaging with SPECT and blocking experiment in tumor-bearing nude mice were analyzed. Recombinant adenovirus vectors carrying the truncated KDR gene were constructed to transfect tumor tissues to evaluate the effects of truncated KDR on the in vivo distribution and tumor planar imaging of 188 Re-MAG 3 -QKRKRKKSRYKS in tumor-bearing nude mice. Results: The labeled peptide exhibited a sound receptor binding activity. Planar imaging with SPECT demonstrated significant radioactivity accumulation in tumor 1 h after injection of the labeled peptide and disappearance of radioactivity 3 h later. Significant radioactivity accumulation was also observed in the liver, intestines and kidneys but was not obvious in other tissues. An hour after injection of the labeled peptide, the percentage of the injected radioactive dose per gram (%ID/g) of tumor and tumor/contralateral muscle tissues ratio were 1.98±0.38 and 2.53±0.33, respectively, and increased to 3.08±0.84 and 3.61±0.59 in the group transfected with the truncated KDR gene, respectively, and radioactivity accumulation in tumor with planar imaging also increased significantly in the transfection group. Conclusion: 188 Re-MAG 3 -QKRKRKKSRYKS can accumulate in tumor tissues, which could be increased by the transfection of truncated KDR gene. This study provides a basis for further applying the peptide to tumor targeted radionuclide imaging and treatment.

  4. Enhanced effect of photodynamic therapy in ovarian cancer using a nanoparticle drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhao; Sun, Liping; Lu, Zaijun; Su, Xuantao; Yang, Qifeng; Qu, Xun; Li, Li; Song, Kun; Kong, Beihua

    2015-09-01

    Nanoparticles are promising novel drug delivery carriers that allow tumor targeting and controlled drug release. In the present study, we prepared poly butyl-cyanoacrylate nanoparticles (PBCA-NP) entrapped with hypocrellin B (HB) to improve the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in ovarian cancer. An ovarian cancer ascites model using Fischer 344 rats and PBCA-NP entrapped with HB (HB-PBCA-NP) were formed successfully. The pharmacodynamic characteristics and biodistribution of the HB-PBCA-NP system were evaluated by comparison with HB dimethyl sulfoxide (HB-DMSO) and testing at various time-points following intraperitoneal drug administration. HB-PBCA-NP-based PDT combined with cytoreductive surgery was then administrated to the tumor-bearing animals. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed to assess the therapeutic effect of the nanoparticle system. The serum HB concentration peaked 4 h after drug administration in the nanoparticle system, and 1 h with HB-DMSO. The peak exposure time of tumor tissues was also extended (4 vs. 2 h), and PBCA-NP remained present for much longer than HB-DMSO. Although PDT combined with surgery prolonged the survival time significantly compared with surgery alone (84 days, PNP- or HB-DMSO-based PDT after cytoreductive surgery (99 vs. 95 days, P=0.293). PBCA-NP exhibited potential advantages in controlled drug release and tumor targeting, which was beneficial for HB-based PDT. PDT combined with surgery prolonged the survival time, suggesting that this might be an alternative treatment option for ovarian cancer.

  5. Thiol antioxidant-functionalized CdSe/ZnS quantum dots: synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hong; Mortensen, Luke J; DeLouise, Lisa A

    2013-03-01

    Nanotechnology is a growing industry with wide ranging applications in consumer product and technology development. In the biomedical field, nanoparticles are finding increasing use as imaging agents for biomolecular labeling and tumor targeting. The nanoparticle physiochemical properties must be tailored for the specific application. For example, nanoparticle chemical and physical stability in the biological milieu (no oxidation, aggregation, agglomeration or toxicity) are often required. Nanoparticles used for biomolecular fluorescent imaging should also have high quantum yield (QY). The aim of this paper is to examine the QY, stability, and cell toxicity of a series of positive, negative and neutral surface charge quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles. Simple protocols are described to prepare water soluble QDs by modifying the surface with thiol containing antioxidant ligands and polymers keeping the QD core/shell composition constant. The ligands used to produce negatively charged QDs include glutathione (GSH), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), tiopronin (TP), bucilliamine (BUC), and mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA). Ligands used to produce positively charged QDs include cysteamine (CYS) and polyethylenimine (PEI). Dithiothreitol (DTT) was used to produce neutral charged QDs. Commercially available nonaqueous octadecylamine (ODA) capped QDs served as the starting material. Our results suggest that QD uptake and cytotoxicity are both dependent on surface ligand coating composition. The negative charged GSH coated QDs show superior performance exhibiting low cytotoxicity, high stability, high QY and therefore are best suited for bioimaging applications. PEI coated QD also show superior performance exhibiting high QY and stability. However, they are considerably more cytotoxic due to their high positive charge which is an advantageous property that can be exploited for gene transfection and/or tumor targeting applications. The synthetic procedures

  6. SMAC mimetic BV6 enables sensitization of resistant tumor cells but also affects cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells: a potential challenge for combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva eRettinger

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is an established treatment option for high-risk hematological malignancies, and may also be offered to patients with solid malignancies refractory to conventional therapies. In case of patients’ relapse, refractory tumor cells may then be targeted by cellular therapy-based combination strategies. Here, we investigated the potential of small molecule IAP inhibitor (SMAC mimetic BV6 in increasing cytokine-induced killer (CIK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against different tumor targets. Four hour pre-incubation with 2.5 μMol BV6 moderately enhanced CIK cell-mediated lysis of hematological (H9, THP-1, Tanoue and solid malignancies (RH1, RH30, TE671. However, BV6 also increased apoptosis of non-malignant cells like peripheral blood mononuclear cells and most notably had an inhibitory effect on immune cells potentially limiting their cytotoxic potential. Hence, cytotoxicity increased in a dose dependent manner when BV6 was removed before CIK cells were added to tumor targets. However, cytotoxic potential was not further increasable by extending BV6 pre-incubation period of target cells from four to 12 hours. Molecular studies revealed that BV6 sensitization of target cells involved activation of caspases. Here we provide evidence that SMAC mimetic may sensitize targets cells for CIK cell-induced cell death. However, BV6 also increased apoptosis of non-malignant cells like CIK cells and peripheral mononuclear cells. These findings may therefore be important for cell- and small molecule IAP inhibitor- based combination therapies of resistant cancers after allogeneic HSCT.

  7. Novel fluorescence nanobubbles for contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging in rabbit VX2 hepatocellular carcinoma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Houqiang; Wang, Wei; He, Xiaoling; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) such as SonoVue or Optison have been used widely in clinic for contrast-enhanced vascular imaging. However, microbubbles UCAs display limitations in tumor-targeted imaging due to the large sizes, nanoscaled UCAs has consequently attracted increasing attentions. In this work, we synthesized nanobubbles (NBs) by ultrasonic cavitation method, then a fluorescent marker of Alexa Fluor 680 was conjugated to the shell in order to observe the localization of NBs in tumor tissue. Measurement of fundamental characteristics showed that the NBs had homogeneous distribution of mean diameter of 267.9 +/- 19.2 nm and polydispersity index of 0.410 +/- 0.056. To assess in vivo tumor-selectivity of NBs, we established the rabbits VX2 hepatocellular carcinoma model though surgical implantation method. After the rabbits were intravenous administered of NBs, contrast-enhanced sonograms was observed in the surrounding of VX2 tumor, which showed there are rich capillaries in the tumor periphery. We additionally investigated the toxic of the NBs by hematoxylin-eosin staining. The results indicated that the NBs is a biocompatible non-toxic lipid system. Furthermore, the VX2 tumors and major organs were analyzed using ex vivo fluorescence imaging to confirm the targeted selectivity of NBs, and the results verified that the NBs were capable of targeting VX2 tumor. Confocal laser scanning microscopy examination showed that the NBs can traverse the VX2 tumor capillaries and target to the hepatocellular carcinoma tumor cells. All these results suggested that the newly prepared NBs have a potential application in molecular imaging and tumor-targeting therapy.

  8. EXPERIENCE OF SUCCESSFUL ACNEFORM ERUPTIONS TREATMENT IN PATIENT WITH MULTIPLE MELANOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Minkina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe the results of the joint monitoring and diversified treatment of oncologists and dermatologists those patient with multiple recurrent melanoma who received over a long period a targeted anti-cancer therapy, which was complicated by side-effect as widespread acneform rush, resistant to traditional treatment. Patient A., born in 1988, was followed up and got a treatment more than 2 years in oncology out-patient clinic diagnosed with “Melanoma of the front surface of the left leg T2bN0M0 IIA”. Subsequently, the patient was verified metastasis in the inginal lymph nodes, in the soft tissues of the hips, to liver. Acute adverse reaction has developed in a short time after getting the anti-tumor target therapy as generalized acneform rush and itching of the skin. Skin symptoms accompanied by pronounced psychological and emotional stress, therefore, dermatologists have been invited to provide additional medical assistance to this patient. Due to the fact that subsequent traditional anti-acne algorithms of topical and oral treatment was not such effective, there was made a decision to use an alternative supporting external therapy, which did not have similar examples of usage previously. Results. External application of tacrolimus ointment in combination with other drugs and then as a mono-therapy, allows us in a rather short period achieve a stable and pronounced regression of skin pathological lesions, to return to the previously cancelled initial drug dose of the anti-tumor target therapy, to change significantly components of the patient’s quality of life. Conclusion. The search for additional and alternative treatment approaches for similar patients, as in our case, remains relevant for specialists and patients themselves. This case is an example of alternative approach to the tacrolimus topical application in patient with drug-mediated acneform rush.

  9. Novel aspects of application of cadmium telluride quantum dots nanostructures in radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazaeli, Yousef; Zare, Hakimeh; Karimi, Shokufeh; Rahighi, Reza; Feizi, Shahzad

    2017-08-01

    In the last two decades, quantum dots nanomaterials have garnered a great deal of scientific interest because of their unique properties. Quantum dots (QDs) are inorganic fluorescent nanocrystals in the size range between 1 and 20 nm. Due to their structural properties, they possess distinctive properties and behave in different way from crystals in macro scale, in many branches of human life. Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) were labeled with 68Ga radio nuclide for fast in vivo targeting and coincidence imaging of tumors. Using instant paper chromatography, the physicochemical properties of the Cadmium telluride quantum dots labeled with 68Ga NPs (68Ga@ CdTe QDs) were found high enough stable in organic phases, e.g., a human serum, to be reliably used in bioapplications. In vivo biodistribution of the 68Ga@ CdTe QDs nanoconposite was investigated in rats bearing fibro sarcoma tumor after various post-injection periods of time. The 68Ga NPs exhibited a rapid as well as high tumor uptake in a very short period of time (less than 10 min), resulting in an efficient tumor targeting/imaging agent. Meantime, the low lipophilicity of the 68Ga NPs caused to their fast excretion throughout the body by kidneys (as also confirmed by the urinary tract). Because of the short half-life of 68Ga radionuclide, the 68Ga@ CdTe QDs with an excellent tumor targeting/imaging and fast washing out from the body can be suggested as one of the most effective and promising nanomaterials in nanotechnology-based cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  10. SU-F-T-186: A Treatment Planning Study of Normal Tissue Sparing with Robustness Optimized IMPT, 4Pi IMRT, and VMAT for Head and Neck Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J; Li, X; Ding, X; Kabolizadeh, P; Guerrero, T [Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Nguyen, D; Woods, K; Tran, A; Sheng, K [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We performed a retrospective dosimetric comparison study between the robustness optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (RO-IMPT), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and the non-coplanar 4? intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). These methods represent the most advanced radiation treatment methods clinically available. We compare their dosimetric performance for head and neck cancer treatments with special focus on the OAR sparing near the tumor volumes. Methods: A total of 11 head and neck cases, which include 10 recurrent cases and one bilateral case, were selected for the study. Different dose levels were prescribed to tumor target depending on disease and location. Three treatment plans were created on commercial TPS systems for a novel noncoplanar 4π method (20 beams), VMAT, and RO-IMPT technique (maximum 4 fields). The maximum patient positioning error was set to 3 mm and the maximum proton range uncertainty was set to 3% for the robustness optimization. Line dose profiles were investigated for OARs close to tumor volumes. Results: All three techniques achieved 98% coverage of the CTV target and most photon plans had less than 110% of the hot spots. The RO-IMPT plans show superior tumor dose homogeneity than 4? and VMAT plans. Although RO-IMPT has greater R50 dose spillage to the surrounding normal tissue than 4π and VMAT, the RO-IMPT plans demonstrate better or comparable OAR (parotid, mandible, carotid, oral cavity, pharynx, and etc.) sparing for structures closely abutting tumor targets. Conclusion: The RO-IMPT’s ability of OAR sparing is benchmarked against the C-arm linac based non-coplanar 4π technique and the standard VMAT method. RO-IMPT consistently shows better or comparable OAR sparing even for tissue structures closely abutting treatment target volume. RO-IMPT further reduces treatment uncertainty associated with proton therapy and delivers robust treatment plans to both unilateral and bilateral head and neck cancer

  11. Drug targeting to tumors: principles, pitfalls and (pre-) clinical progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Twan; Kiessling, Fabian; Hennink, Wim E; Storm, Gert

    2012-07-20

    Many different systems and strategies have been evaluated for drug targeting to tumors over the years. Routinely used systems include liposomes, polymers, micelles, nanoparticles and antibodies, and examples of strategies are passive drug targeting, active drug targeting to cancer cells, active drug targeting to endothelial cells and triggered drug delivery. Significant progress has been made in this area of research both at the preclinical and at the clinical level, and a number of (primarily passively tumor-targeted) nanomedicine formulations have been approved for clinical use. Significant progress has also been made with regard to better understanding the (patho-) physiological principles of drug targeting to tumors. This has led to the identification of several important pitfalls in tumor-targeted drug delivery, including I) overinterpretation of the EPR effect; II) poor tumor and tissue penetration of nanomedicines; III) misunderstanding of the potential usefulness of active drug targeting; IV) irrational formulation design, based on materials which are too complex and not broadly applicable; V) insufficient incorporation of nanomedicine formulations in clinically relevant combination regimens; VI) negligence of the notion that the highest medical need relates to metastasis, and not to solid tumor treatment; VII) insufficient integration of non-invasive imaging techniques and theranostics, which could be used to personalize nanomedicine-based therapeutic interventions; and VIII) lack of (efficacy analyses in) proper animal models, which are physiologically more relevant and more predictive for the clinical situation. These insights strongly suggest that besides making ever more nanomedicine formulations, future efforts should also address some of the conceptual drawbacks of drug targeting to tumors, and that strategies should be developed to overcome these shortcomings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. "Gold nanoparticles composite-folic acid conjugated graphene oxide nanohybrids" for targeted chemo-thermal cancer ablation: In vitro screening and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Gaurav; Chopra, Vianni; Tyagi, Amit; Rath, Goutam; Sharma, Rakesh K; Goyal, Amit K

    2017-01-01

    Nano-graphene oxide (GO) nanometal composite (specifically nanogold and nanosilver) have shown to be a promising material for anticancer therapeutics. Owing to their high drug loading capacity, photothermal and synergizing effects, it is very important to exploit them for targeted chemo-thermal cancer therapeutics. In this work, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were selected as the composite metal, folic acid (FA) was taken as GO surface functionalization moiety for active tumor targeting of model anticancer drug Doxorubicin (Dox). AuNPs composite-folate conjugated graphene oxide (FA-GO@Au) nano-platforms were synthesized and characterized in detail. Near-infrared (NIR) sensitivity resulted in an aggravated release of both Dox and ionic gold from the nanohybrid surface. Simultaneous delivery of Dox and AuNPs in the cellular vicinity was further enhanced after localized NIR exposure which resulted in significantly improved cancer cell toxicity. Mechanistic evaluation revealed G0/G1 phase arrest due to increased DNA intercalation and provoked early apoptosis under NIR influence. Pharmacokinetics and organ distribution studies were carried out in healthy mice and rabbits to estimate the actual bio fate of these nanohybrids. In vivo studies showed substantial tumor regression in solid tumor model in Balb/c mice and NIR exposure induced photo-thermal effects further resulted in better tumor management. Study provides substantial evidences both at in vitro and in vivo level to support the fact that NIR induced local photo-thermal effects can solely be used as a tumor targeting tool. This NIR dependent nanohybrid approach presents a precise and flexible strategy for targeted chemotherapy and photo-thermal tumor ablation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. SU-F-T-186: A Treatment Planning Study of Normal Tissue Sparing with Robustness Optimized IMPT, 4Pi IMRT, and VMAT for Head and Neck Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Li, X; Ding, X; Kabolizadeh, P; Guerrero, T; Nguyen, D; Woods, K; Tran, A; Sheng, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We performed a retrospective dosimetric comparison study between the robustness optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (RO-IMPT), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and the non-coplanar 4? intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). These methods represent the most advanced radiation treatment methods clinically available. We compare their dosimetric performance for head and neck cancer treatments with special focus on the OAR sparing near the tumor volumes. Methods: A total of 11 head and neck cases, which include 10 recurrent cases and one bilateral case, were selected for the study. Different dose levels were prescribed to tumor target depending on disease and location. Three treatment plans were created on commercial TPS systems for a novel noncoplanar 4π method (20 beams), VMAT, and RO-IMPT technique (maximum 4 fields). The maximum patient positioning error was set to 3 mm and the maximum proton range uncertainty was set to 3% for the robustness optimization. Line dose profiles were investigated for OARs close to tumor volumes. Results: All three techniques achieved 98% coverage of the CTV target and most photon plans had less than 110% of the hot spots. The RO-IMPT plans show superior tumor dose homogeneity than 4? and VMAT plans. Although RO-IMPT has greater R50 dose spillage to the surrounding normal tissue than 4π and VMAT, the RO-IMPT plans demonstrate better or comparable OAR (parotid, mandible, carotid, oral cavity, pharynx, and etc.) sparing for structures closely abutting tumor targets. Conclusion: The RO-IMPT’s ability of OAR sparing is benchmarked against the C-arm linac based non-coplanar 4π technique and the standard VMAT method. RO-IMPT consistently shows better or comparable OAR sparing even for tissue structures closely abutting treatment target volume. RO-IMPT further reduces treatment uncertainty associated with proton therapy and delivers robust treatment plans to both unilateral and bilateral head and neck cancer

  14. [{sup 131}I]FIAU labeling of genetically transduced, tumor-reactive lymphocytes: cell-level dosimetry and dose-dependent toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanzonico, Pat [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Koehne, Guenther; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; O' Reilly, Richard J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Allogeneic Transplantation Service, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Immunology Program, New York, NY (United States); Gallardo, Humilidad F. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Gene Transfer and Somatic Cell Engineering Facility, New York, NY (United States); Doubrovin, Mikhail; Blasberg, Ronald G. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Neurology, New York, NY (United States); Finn, Ronald [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Radiochemistry and Cyclotron Core Facility, New York, NY (United States); Riviere, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Immunology Program, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Gene Transfer and Somatic Cell Engineering Facility, New York, NY (United States); Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2006-09-15

    Donor T cells have been shown to be reactive against and effective in adoptive immunotherapy of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lymphomas which develop in some leukemia patients post marrow transplantation. These T cells may be genetically modified by incorporation of a replication-incompetent viral vector (NIT) encoding both an inactive mutant nerve growth factor receptor (LNGFR), as an immunoselectable surface marker, and a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK), rendering the cells sensitive to ganciclovir. The current studies are based on the selective HSV-TK-catalyzed trapping (phosphorylation) of the thymidine analog [{sup 131}I]-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuransyl-5-iodo-uracil (FIAU) as a means of stably labeling such T cells for in vivo trafficking (including tumor targeting) studies. Because of the radiosensitivity of lymphocytes and the potentially high absorbed dose to the nucleus from intracellular {sup 131}I (even at tracer levels), the nucleus absorbed dose (D{sub n}) and dose-dependent immune functionality were evaluated for NIT {sup +} T cells labeled ex vivo in [{sup 131}I ]FIAU-containing medium. Based on in vitro kinetic studies of [{sup 131}I ]FIAU uptake by NIT {sup +} T cells, D{sub n} was calculated using an adaptation of the MIRD formalism and the recently published MIRD cellular S factors. Immune cytotoxicity of [{sup 131}I ]FIAU-labeled cells was assayed against {sup 51}Cr-labeled target cells [B-lymphoblastoid cells (BLCLs) ] in a standard 4-h release assay. At median nuclear absorbed doses up to 830 cGy, a {sup 51}Cr-release assay against BLCLs showed no loss of immune cytotoxicity, thus demonstrating the functional integrity of genetically transduced, tumor-reactive T cells labeled at this dose level for in vivo cell trafficking and tumor targeting studies. (orig.)

  15. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-dependent tumor growth inhibition by a vascular endothelial growth factor–superantigen conjugate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Qingwen; Jiang, Songmin; Han, Baohui; Sun, Tongwen; Li, Zhengnan; Zhao, Lina; Gao, Qiang; Sun, Jialin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We construct and purify a fusion protein VEGF–SEA. ► VEGF–SEA strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors. ► T cells driven by VEGF–SEA were accumulated around tumor cells bearing VEGFR by mice image model. ► VEGF–SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester CTLs into the tumor site. ► The induced CTLs could release the cytokines, perforins and granzyme B to kill the tumor cells. -- Abstract: T cells are major lymphocytes in the blood and passengers across the tumor vasculature. If these T cells are retained in the tumor site, a therapeutic potential will be gained by turning them into tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). A fusion protein composed of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) with a D227A mutation strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors (control versus VEGF–SEA treated with 15 μg, mean tumor weight: 1.128 g versus 0.252 g, difference = 0.876 g). CD4 + and CD8 + T cells driven by VEGF–SEA were accumulated around VEGFR expressing tumor cells and the induced CTLs could release the tumoricidal cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Meanwhile, intratumoral CTLs secreted cytolytic pore-forming perforin and granzyme B proteins around tumor cells, leading to the death of tumor cells. The labeled fusion proteins were gradually targeted to the tumor site in an imaging mice model. These results show that VEGF–SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester active infiltrating CTLs into the tumor site to kill tumor cells, and could therefore be a potential therapeutical drug for a variety of cancers.

  16. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylation and DNA Methylation Improves Gene Expression Mediated by the Adeno-Associated Virus/Phage in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Hajitou

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage (phage, viruses that infect bacteria only, have become promising vectors for targeted systemic delivery of genes to cancer, although, with poor efficiency. We previously designed an improved phage vector by incorporating cis genetic elements of adeno-associated virus (AAV. This novel AAV/phage hybrid (AAVP specifically targeted systemic delivery of therapeutic genes into tumors. To advance the AAVP vector, we recently introduced the stress-inducible Grp78 tumor specific promoter and found that this dual tumor-targeted AAVP provides persistent gene expression, over time, in cancer cells compared to silenced gene expression from the CMV promoter in the parental AAVP. Herein, we investigated the effect of histone deacetylation and DNA methylation on AAVP-mediated gene expression in cancer cells and explored the effect of cell confluence state on AAVP gene expression efficacy. Using a combination of AAVP expressing the GFP reporter gene, flow cytometry, inhibitors of histone deacetylation, and DNA methylation, we have demonstrated that histone deacetylation and DNA methylation are associated with silencing of gene expression from the CMV promoter in the parental AAVP. Importantly, inhibitors of histone deacetylases boost gene expression in cancer cells from the Grp78 promoter in the dual tumor-targeted AAVP. However, cell confluence had no effect on AAVP-guided gene expression. Our findings prove that combination of histone deacetylase inhibitor drugs with the Grp78 promoter is an effective approach to improve AAVP-mediated gene expression in cancer cells and should be considered for AAVP-based clinical cancer gene therapy.

  17. Natural material-decorated mesoporous silica nanoparticle container for multifunctional membrane-controlled targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Y

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Yan Hu,1 Lei Ke,2 Hao Chen,1 Ma Zhuo,1 Xinzhou Yang,1 Dan Zhao,1 Suying Zeng,1 Xincai Xiao1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Science, South-Central University for Nationalities, 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: To avoid the side effects caused by nonspecific targeting, premature release, weak selectivity, and poor therapeutic efficacy of current nanoparticle-based systems used for drug delivery, we fabricated natural material-decorated nanoparticles as a multifunctional, membrane-controlled targeted drug delivery system. The nanocomposite material coated with a membrane was biocompatible and integrated both specific tumor targeting and responsiveness to stimulation, which improved transmission efficacy and controlled drug release. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs, which are known for their biocompatibility and high drug-loading capacity, were selected as a model drug container and carrier. The membrane was established by the polyelectrolyte composite method from chitosan (CS which was sensitive to the acidic tumor microenvironment, folic acid-modified CS which recognizes the folate receptor expressed on the tumor cell surface, and a CD44 receptor-targeted polysaccharide hyaluronic acid. We characterized the structure of the nanocomposite as well as the drug release behavior under the control of the pH-sensitive membrane switch and evaluated the antitumor efficacy of the system in vitro. Our results provide a basis for the design and fabrication of novel membrane-controlled nanoparticles with improved tumor-targeting therapy. Keywords: multifunctional, membrane-controlled, natural materials, mesoporous silica nanoparticles, targeted drug delivery

  18. A new PET tracer specific for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hui; Cai, Weibo; Chen, Kai; Li, Zi-Bo; Kashefi, Amir; He, Lina; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2007-01-01

    Noninvasive positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) expression could be a valuable tool for evaluation of patients with a variety of malignancies, and particularly for monitoring those undergoing antiangiogenic therapies that block VEGF/VEGFR-2 function. The aim of this study was to develop a VEGFR-2-specific PET tracer. The D63AE64AE67A mutant of VEGF 121 (VEGF DEE ) was generated by recombinant DNA technology. VEGF 121 and VEGF DEE were purified and conjugated with DOTA for 64 Cu labeling. The DOTA conjugates were tested in vitro for VEGFR-2 specificity and functional activity. In vivo tumor targeting efficacy and pharmacokinetics of 64 Cu-labeled VEGF 121 and VEGF DEE were compared using an orthotopic 4T1 murine breast tumor model. Blocking experiments, biodistribution studies, and immunofluorescence staining were carried out to confirm the noninvasive imaging results. Cell binding assay demonstrated that VEGF DEE had about 20-fold lower VEGFR-1 binding affinity and only slightly lower VEGFR-2 binding affinity as compared with VEGF 121 . MicroPET imaging studies revealed that both 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF 121 and 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF DEE had rapid and prominent activity accumulation in VEGFR-2-expressing 4T1 tumors. The renal uptake of 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF DEE was significantly lower than that of 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF 121 as rodent kidneys expressed high levels of VEGFR-1 based on immunofluorescence staining. Blocking experiments and biodistribution studies confirmed the VEGFR specificity of 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF DEE . We have developed a VEGFR-2-specific PET tracer, 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF DEE . It has comparable tumor targeting efficacy to 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF 121 but much reduced renal toxicity. This tracer may be translated into the clinic for imaging tumor angiogenesis and monitoring antiangiogenic treatment efficacy. (orig.)

  19. CPP2-p16MIS treatment–induced colon carcinoma cell death in vitro and prolonged lifespan of tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lifeng; Chen, Haijin; Yu, Jinlong; Lin, Xiaohua; Qi, Jia; Cui, Chunhui; Xie, Lang; Huang, Shuxin

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are a research hotspot due to their noninvasive delivery ability. Among the identified CPPs, the TAT and R8 peptides have been preferentially applied to transduction into different cells. However, this process is nonselective among various cells. Recent research suggested that CPP2 could selectively penetrate human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Using in vitro experiments, the mean fluorescence intensity of fluorescein isothiocyanate–labeled CPPs (CPPs-FITC) incubated with different cell lines was compared to corroborate the colon tumor targeting ability of CPP2. The targeting ability of CPP2 was determined in the same way in tumor-bearing mice. We synthesized antitumor peptides by fusing CPP2 to the minimal inhibitory sequence of p16 (p16MIS), which had the ability to restore the function of lost p16, the expression of which was absent in tumor cell lines of various origins. The antitumor effect of the combined peptide was tested in both CRC cell lines and tumor-bearing mice. In each CRC cell line, the mean fluorescence intensity of CPP2-FITC was higher than that of the TAT-FITC (p < 0.001) and R8-FITC (p < 0.001) groups. CPP2-p16MIS, the targeting carrier, showed a higher antitumor response in the in vitro cell research. CPP2-p16MIS showed a prolonged mean lifespan of tumor-bearing mice, further characterizing its role in specific tumor-targeting ability in vivo. Survival analysis showed that the mice treated with CPP2-p16MIS had significantly longer survival than the mice treated with phosphate-buffered saline (p < 0.05) or those treated with control peptides, including the CPP2 (p < 0.05) and p16MIS (p < 0.05) groups. CPP2 could more selectively penetrate CRC cells than TAT or R8 as well as effectively deliver the p16MIS to the tumor

  20. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-dependent tumor growth inhibition by a vascular endothelial growth factor-superantigen conjugate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Qingwen [Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai 200433 (China); State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Jiang, Songmin [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Han, Baohui [Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai 200433 (China); Sun, Tongwen [Wuhan Junyu Innovation Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Wuhan 430079 (China); Li, Zhengnan; Zhao, Lina; Gao, Qiang [College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Sun, Jialin, E-mail: jialin_sun@126.com [Wuhan Junyu Innovation Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We construct and purify a fusion protein VEGF-SEA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around tumor cells bearing VEGFR by mice image model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester CTLs into the tumor site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The induced CTLs could release the cytokines, perforins and granzyme B to kill the tumor cells. -- Abstract: T cells are major lymphocytes in the blood and passengers across the tumor vasculature. If these T cells are retained in the tumor site, a therapeutic potential will be gained by turning them into tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). A fusion protein composed of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) with a D227A mutation strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors (control versus VEGF-SEA treated with 15 {mu}g, mean tumor weight: 1.128 g versus 0.252 g, difference = 0.876 g). CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around VEGFR expressing tumor cells and the induced CTLs could release the tumoricidal cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Meanwhile, intratumoral CTLs secreted cytolytic pore-forming perforin and granzyme B proteins around tumor cells, leading to the death of tumor cells. The labeled fusion proteins were gradually targeted to the tumor site in an imaging mice model. These results show that VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester active infiltrating CTLs into the tumor site to kill tumor cells, and could therefore be a potential therapeutical drug for a variety of cancers.

  1. Novel aspects of application of cadmium telluride quantum dots nanostructures in radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazaeli, Yousef; Feizi, Shahzad [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Radiation Application Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zare, Hakimeh; Karimi, Shokufeh [Yazd University, Department of Physics, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahighi, Reza [Sharif University of Technology, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    In the last two decades, quantum dots nanomaterials have garnered a great deal of scientific interest because of their unique properties. Quantum dots (QDs) are inorganic fluorescent nanocrystals in the size range between 1 and 20 nm. Due to their structural properties, they possess distinctive properties and behave in different way from crystals in macro scale, in many branches of human life. Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) were labeled with {sup 68}Ga radio nuclide for fast in vivo targeting and coincidence imaging of tumors. Using instant paper chromatography, the physicochemical properties of the Cadmium telluride quantum dots labeled with {sup 68}Ga NPs ({sup 68}Ga rate at CdTe QDs) were found high enough stable in organic phases, e.g., a human serum, to be reliably used in bioapplications. In vivo biodistribution of the {sup 68}Ga rate at CdTe QDs nanoconposite was investigated in rats bearing fibro sarcoma tumor after various post-injection periods of time. The {sup 68}Ga NPs exhibited a rapid as well as high tumor uptake in a very short period of time (less than 10 min), resulting in an efficient tumor targeting/imaging agent. Meantime, the low lipophilicity of the {sup 68}Ga NPs caused to their fast excretion throughout the body by kidneys (as also confirmed by the urinary tract). Because of the short half-life of {sup 68}Ga radionuclide, the {sup 68}Ga rate at CdTe QDs with an excellent tumor targeting/imaging and fast washing out from the body can be suggested as one of the most effective and promising nanomaterials in nanotechnology-based cancer diagnosis and therapy. (orig.)

  2. A Novel Method for Assessment of Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxicity Using Image Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somanchi, Srinivas S; McCulley, Kelsey J; Somanchi, Anitha; Chan, Leo L; Lee, Dean A

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to the innate arm of the immune system and though activated NK cells can modulate immune responses through the secretion of cytokines, their primary effector function is through target cell lysis. Accordingly, cytotoxicity assays are central to studying NK cell function. The 51Chromium release assay, is the "gold standard" for cytotoxicity assay, however, due to concerns over toxicity associated with the use and disposal of radioactive compounds there is a significant interest in non-radioactive methods. We have previously used the calcein release assay as a non-radioactive alternative for studying NK cell cytotoxicity. In this study, we show that the calcein release assay varies in its dynamic range for different tumor targets, and that the entrapped calcein could remain unreleased within apoptotic bodies of lysed tumor targets or incompletely released resulting in underestimation of percent specific lysis. To overcome these limitations, we developed a novel cytotoxicity assay using the Cellometer Vision Image Cytometer and compared this method to standard calcein release assay for measuring NK cell cytotoxicity. Using tumor lines K562, 721.221, and Jurkat, we demonstrate here that image cytometry shows significantly higher percent specific lysis of the target cells compared to the standard calcein release assay within the same experimental setup. Image cytometry is able to accurately analyze live target cells by excluding dimmer cells and smaller apoptotic bodies from viable target cell counts. The image cytometry-based cytotoxicity assay is a simple, direct and sensitive method and is an appealing option for routine cytotoxicity assay.

  3. Integrin-mediated targeting of protein polymer nanoparticles carrying a cytostatic macrolide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Pu

    chapter illustrates how to tune the ELP sequence and architecture for either coassembly or sorting of distinct proteins into microdomains within a living cell. Passive tumor targeting utilizing enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect has limited efficiency in targeting non-leaky tumors such as MDA-MB-468 breast tumor; however, an RGD tri-peptide decorated micelle nanoparticle can effectively accumulate in tumor site via integrin-mediated active tumor targeting. Different from inefficient and cytotoxic chemical linkage reactions, an elastin-based multi-functional nanocarrier can be assembled by genetic protein fusion and micelle co-assembly technology. The novel drug carrier contains the cognate Rapamycin (Rapa) receptor -- FK506 binding protein (FKBP) as the high-avidity drug binding domain and an RGD peptide as the active tumor targeting domain. Here we show that by co-assembling FKBP and RGD contained protein polymers into mixed micelle nanoparticles, they not only competently targeted endothelial and tumor cells in cell assays, but specifically delivered the drug with a slow release half-life of 38h. It was demonstrated that the active tumor targeting formulation of Rapa more effectively suppressed tumor growth compared to the passive tumor targeting formulation and free drug in tumor regression studies of mouse MDA-MB-468 xenografts. We believe that the exciting results will provide a new tool for the development of next-generation "smart" multi-functional drug carriers. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  4. Development and evaluation of bevacizumab-modified pegylated cationic liposomes using cellular and in vivo models of human pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuesters, Geoffrey M.

    Targeting the tumor vascular supply in a homogenous manner is a difficult task to achieve with the use of pegylated cationic liposomes (PCLs) alone. Our formulation consisting of bevacizumab conjugated to the distal end of PEG on PCLs was thus developed in an effort to eliminate some of this heterogeneity as well as to increase tumor targeting overall. This study focuses on pancreatic cancer, which has the poorest five-year survival rate of all cancers because of its late diagnosis. The addition of bevacizumab will target tumor areas because it binds to VEGF which is secreted by tumors in high levels. In vitro, we showed that pancreatic cancer cells (Capan-1, HPAF-II and PANC-1) all secrete VEGF into media at different levels, with Capan-1 producing the most and HPAF-II producing the least. A murine endothelial cell line, MS1-VEGF, produces and secretes the most VEGF. A human microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) was grown in two different conditions, with and without VEGF in the media. Modifying PCLs with bevacizumab enhanced the binding and uptake of PCLs by some pancreatic and endothelial cells in vitro, particularly the cells that had or secreted the most significant amount of VEGF in the media. This translated into enhanced tumor targeting in a biodistribution study using a Capan-1 subcutaneous pancreatic tumor model. This also showed enhanced blood retention compared to the unmodified PCLs while it diminished uptake by the spleen and increased uptake by the kidney. To test the therapeutic benefit of this enhanced uptake and targeting, an anti-angiogenic agent, 2-methoxyestradiol was incorporated into the formulation with 20% incorporation efficiency. Both the unmodified and modified drug-loaded PCLs were the least efficacious against Capan-1, moderately effective against HPAF-II, PANC-1, MS1-VEGF and HMEC-1 grown without VEGF in the media and most efficacious against HMEC-1 grown with VEGF which had the most VEGF present in the media. Multiple in vivo

  5. Use of the functional imaging modalities, f MRI r CBV and PET FDG, alters radiation therapy 3-D treatment planning in patients with malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzek, M.; Pardo, F.S.; Busierre, M.; Lev, M.; Fischman, A.; Denny, N.; Hanser, B.; Rosen, B.R.; Smith, A.; Aronen, H.

    1995-01-01

    Background: Malignant gliomas present one of the most difficult challenges to definitive radiation therapy, not only with respect to local control, but also with respect to clinical functional status. While tumor target volume definitions for malignant gliomas are often based on CT and conventional MRI, the functional imaging modalities, echo planar r CBV (regional cerebral blood volume mapping) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET, are more sensitive modalities for the detection of neovascularization, perhaps one of the earliest signs of glial tumor initiation and progression. Methods: In order to address the clinical utility of functional imaging in radiation therapy 3-D treatment planning, we compared tumor target volume definitions and overall dosimetry in patients either undergoing co-registration of conventional Gadolinium-enhanced MRI, or co-registration of functional imaging modalities, prior to radiation therapy 3-D treatment planning. Fourteen patients were planned using 3-D radiation therapy treatment planning, either with or without inclusion of data on functional imaging. All patients received proton beam, as well as megavoltage x-ray radiation therapy, with the ratio of photon:proton optimized to the individual clinical case at hand. Both PET FDG and f MRI scans were obtained postoperatively pre-radiation, during radiation therapy, one month following completion of radiation therapy, and at three month follow-up intervals. Dose volume histograms were constructed in order to assess dose optimization, not only with respect to tumor, but also with respect to normal tissue tolerance (e.g., motor strip, dominant speech area, brainstem, optic nerves). Results: In 5 of 14 cases, functional imaging modalities, as compared with conventional MRI and CT, contributed additional information that was useful in radiation therapy treatment planning. In general, both fMRI rCBV and PET FDG uptake decreased during the course of radiation therapy. In 1 patient, however, fMRI r

  6. Cytolysin a expressing E. coli a promising candidate for imageable therapeutic probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Vu Hong; Phan, Thuy Xuan; Hong, Yeoung Jin; Min, Jung Joon

    2007-01-01

    Using bacteria for cancer treatment has a long history. Discovery of optical reporter genes consisting of fluorescent and luminescent protein facilitates the monitor of bacteria in vivo, non-invasively and repeatedly. E. coli, the natural enteric bacteria possessing capacity of tumor-targeting ability, seems to be suitable candidate for cancer treatment. In this study, we established the strain light-emitting E. coli for diagnostic purpose and Cytolysin A (Cly A) expressing E. coli for therapeutic purpose. E. coli (MG1655, wild type strain) was transformed plasmid pUC19 carrying lux gene to create the light expressing bacteria and test the tumor targeting-capacity by injecting the bacteria into CT26-tumor bearing mice via tail vein. On the other hand, for therapeutic purpose, plasmid containing Cly A gene, which is encoded for a pore-forming protein toxin, was introduced into E. coli. The toxicity of Cly A was evaluated in vitro by inoculating the bacteria with various cultured cancer cell lines. On the other hand, to test the therapeutic effect, the bacteria were injected intratumorally and intravenously into s.c.CT26-bearing as well as CT26-lung metastasized Balb/c mice. In vivo imaging data showed that the E. coli strains selectively located in the tumor. The in vitro result showed that the number of death cells were significantly higher in the samples containing E. coli expressing Cly A (E. coli Cly A) compared with the samples containing wild type strain. The growth of tumors was repressed in mice injected with either E. coli Cly A (significantly) or wild type E. coli (mildly), while tumors in no treatment group still grew fast. Furthermore, the tumors inoculated with E. coli cly A were necrotized but not with wild type E. coli. In the CT26-lung metastasized mouse model, the life span of mice was elongated when inject E. coli and longer in the group injected with E. coli cly A. Cly A expressing E. coli can become an effective candidate for imageable

  7. Comparison of biological properties of 99mTc-labeled cyclic RGD Peptide trimer and dimer useful as SPECT radiotracers for tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Zuo-Quan; Yang, Yong; Fang, Wei; Liu, Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study sought to evaluate a 99m Tc-labeled trimeric cyclic RGD peptide ( 99m Tc-4P-RGD 3 ) as the new radiotracer for tumor imaging. The objective was to compare its biological properties with those of 99m Tc-3P-RGD 2 in the same animal model. Methods: HYNIC-4P-RGD 3 was prepared by reacting 4P-RGD 3 with excess HYNIC-OSu in the presence of diisopropylethylamine. 99m Tc-4P-RGD 3 was prepared using a kit formulation, and evaluated for its tumor-targeting capability and biodistribution properties in the BALB/c nude mice with U87MG human glioma xenografts. Planar and SPECT imaging studies were performed in athymic nude mice with U87MG glioma xenografts. For comparison purpose, 99m Tc-3P-RGD 2 (a α v β 3 -targeted radiotracer currently under clinical evaluation for tumor imaging in cancer patients) was also evaluated in the same animal models. Blocking experiments were used to demonstrate the α v β 3 specificity of 99m Tc-4P-RGD 3 . Results: 99m Tc-4P-RGD 3 was prepared with > 95% RCP and high specific activity (~ 200 GBq/μmol). 99m Tc-4P-RGD 3 and 99m Tc-3P-RGD 2 shared almost identical tumor uptake and similar biodistribution properties. 99m Tc-4P-RGD 3 had higher uptake than 99m Tc-3P-RGD 2 in the intestines and kidneys; but it showed better metabolic stability. The U87MG tumors were clearly visualized by SPECT with excellent contrast with 99m Tc-4P-RGD 3 and 99m Tc-3P-RGD 2 . Conclusion: Increasing peptide multiplicity from 3P-RGD 2 to 4P-RGD 3 offers no advantages with respect to the tumor-targeting capability. 99m Tc-4P-RGD 3 is as good a SPECT radiotracer as 99m Tc-3P-RGD 2 for imaging α v β 3 -positive tumors. -- Graphical abstract: This report presents evaluations of a 99m Tc-labeled cyclic RGD peptide trimer ( 99m Tc-4P-RGD 3 ) as the new SPECT radiotracer for tumor imaging. It was found that 99m Tc-4P-RGD 3 was able to accumulate in the xenografted U87MG tumors with high specificity. Display Omitted

  8. Noninvasive monitoring of early antiangiogenic therapy response in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma xenograft model using MRI with RGD-conjugated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Y

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Yanfen Cui,1,* Caiyuan Zhang,1,* Ran Luo,1 Huanhuan Liu,1 Zhongyang Zhang,1 Tianyong Xu,2 Yong Zhang,2 Dengbin Wang11Department of Radiology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 2MR Advanced Application and Research Center, GE Healthcare China, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD-based nanoprobes allow specific imaging of integrin αvβ3, a protein overexpressed during angiogenesis. Therefore, this study applied a novel RGD-coupled, polyacrylic acid (PAA-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO (referred to as RGD-PAA-USPIO in order to detect tumor angiogenesis and assess the early response to antiangiogenic treatment in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC xenograft model by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI.Materials and methods: The binding specificity of RGD-PAA-USPIO with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs was confirmed by Prussian blue staining and transmission electron microscopy in vitro. The tumor targeting of RGD-PAA-USPIO was evaluated in the NPC xenograft model. Later, mice bearing NPC underwent MRI at baseline and after 4 and 14 days of consecutive treatment with Endostar or phosphate-buffered saline (n=10 per group.Results: The specific uptake of the RGD-PAA-USPIO nanoparticles was mainly dependent on the interaction between RGD and integrin αvβ3 of HUVECs. The tumor targeting of RGD-PAA-USPIO was observed in the NPC xenograft model. Moreover, the T2 relaxation time of mice in the Endostar-treated group decreased significantly compared with those in the control group both on days 4 and 14, consistent with the immunofluorescence results of CD31 and CD61 (P<0.05.Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the magnetic resonance molecular nanoprobes, RGD-PAA-USPIOs, allow noninvasive in vivo imaging of tumor angiogenesis and assessment of the early response to antiangiogenic treatment in

  9. Labelling of anti-human bladder tumor chimeric antibody with 99Tcm and radioimmunoimaging of bladder carcinoma xenograft in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunli; Wang Rongfu; Fu Zhanli; Bai Yin; Ding Yi; Yu Lizhang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the in vitro immunoreactivity and in vivo tissue distribution, tumor targeting property of anti-human bladder tumor human-murine chimeric antibody (ch-BDI) labeled with 99 Tc m and to investigate its possibility for being used in guiding diagnosis and guiding therapy of bladder cancer. Methods: The ch-BDI was labeled with 99 Tc m by improved Schwarz method and the labeled antibody was purified by Sephadex G-50. Labeling yield and radiochemical purity were measured by paper chromatography. The immunoreactive fraction and association constant (K a ) were measured by Lindmo method and Scatchard analysis, respectively. 11.1 MBq (30 μg) 99 Tc m -ch-BDI was intravenously injected into nude mice bearing human bladder cancer xenografts in the right thigh and radioimmunoimaging (RII) was performed 2, 6, 20 and 24 h postinjection. The images were processed by region of interest (ROI) method to acquire the counts of whole body and the tumor and the counts ratios of tumor to contralateral normal tissue or to tissues of other non-tumor bearing organs. The mice were killed after 24 h postinjection imaging and tissue distribution was measured. %ID/g and target to nontarget (T/NT) ratios were calculated. Results: The labeling yield and radiochemical purity of 99 Tc m -ch-BDI were (66.5±7.3)% and >90%, respectively. The immunoreactive fraction was 76% and K a was 3.56 x 10 9 L/mol. RII showed that the tumor was clearly visualized 6 h postinjection and becoming clearer along with time prolonging. The radioactivity of whole body decreased rapidly with time, whereas the radioactivity of the tumor decreased slowly. The T/NT ratios was increased with time. Biodistribution results showed that tumor uptake was 17.4%ID/g 24 h postinjection. T/NT ratios were very high except for the kidney. T/NT ratios for brain, muscle, intestinal wall, bone and heart wall were 136.0, 55.1, 39.3, 29.7 and 27.9, respectively. Conclusion: 99 Tc m -ch-BDI exhibits excellent

  10. Dendritic cells fused with different pancreatic carcinoma cells induce different T-cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andoh Y

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiaki Andoh,1,2 Naohiko Makino,2 Mitsunori Yamakawa11Department of Pathological Diagnostics, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata, JapanBackground: It is unclear whether there are any differences in the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and CD4+CD25high regulatory T-cells (Tregs among dendritic cells (DCs fused with different pancreatic carcinomas. The aim of this study was to compare the ability to induce cytotoxicity by human DCs fused with different human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and to elucidate the causes of variable cytotoxicity among cell lines.Methods: Monocyte-derived DCs, which were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, were fused with carcinoma cells such as Panc-1, KP-1NL, QGP-1, and KP-3L. The induction of CTL and Tregs, and cytokine profile of PBMCs stimulated by fused DCs were evaluated.Results: The cytotoxicity against tumor targets induced by PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with QGP-1 (DC/QGP-1 was very low, even though PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with other cell lines induced significant cytotoxicity against the respective tumor target. The factors causing this low cytotoxicity were subsequently investigated. DC/QGP-1 induced a significant expansion of Tregs in cocultured PBMCs compared with DC/KP-3L. The level of interleukin-10 secreted in the supernatants of PBMCs cocultured with DC/QGP-1 was increased significantly compared with that in DC/KP-3L. Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex class I expression and increased secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor were observed with QGP-1, as well as in the other cell lines.Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity induced by DCs fused with pancreatic cancer cell lines was different between each cell line, and that the reduced cytotoxicity of DC/QGP-1 might be related to the increased secretion of interleukin-10 and the extensive induction of Tregs

  11. Brain tumor magnetic targeting and biodistribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles linked with 70-kDa heat shock protein study by nonlinear longitudinal response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevtsov, Maxim A., E-mail: shevtsov-max@mail.ru [Institute of Cytology of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Tikhoretsky Ave. 4, St. Petersburg 194064 (Russian Federation); A.L. Polenov Russian Research Scientific Institute of Neurosurgery, Mayakovsky str. 12, St. Petersburg 191014 (Russian Federation); Nikolaev, Boris P. [Research Institute of Highly Pure Biopreparations, Pudozhskaya str. 12, St. Petersburg 197110 (Russian Federation); Ryzhov, Vyacheslav A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, NRC Kurchatov Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Yakovleva, Ludmila Y. [Research Institute of Highly Pure Biopreparations, Pudozhskaya str. 12, St. Petersburg 197110 (Russian Federation); Dobrodumov, Anatolii V. [Institute of Macromolecular Compounds of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Bolshoi pr. 31, St. Petersburg 199004 (Russian Federation); Marchenko, Yaroslav Y. [Research Institute of Highly Pure Biopreparations, Pudozhskaya str. 12, St. Petersburg 197110 (Russian Federation); Margulis, Boris A. [Institute of Cytology of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Tikhoretsky Ave. 4, St. Petersburg 194064 (Russian Federation); Pitkin, Emil [The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, 3730 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Guzhova, Irina V. [Institute of Cytology of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Tikhoretsky Ave. 4, St. Petersburg 194064 (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    Brain tumor targeting efficiency and biodistribution of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles conjugated with heat shock protein Hsp70 (SPION–Hsp70) were evaluated in experimental glioma model. Synthesized conjugates were characterized using the method of longitudinal nonlinear response of magnetic nanoparticles to a weak ac magnetic field with measurements of second harmonic of magnetization (NLR-M{sub 2}). Cellular interaction of magnetic conjugates was analyzed in 9L glioma cell culture. The biodistribution of the nanoparticles and their accumulation in tumors was assessed by the latter approach as well. The efficacy of Hsp70-conjugates for contrast enhancement in the orthotopic model of 9L glioma was assessed by MR imaging (11 T). Magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with Hsp70 had the relaxivity properties of the MR-negative contrast agents. Morphological observation and cell viability test demonstrated good biocompatibility of Hsp70-conjugates. Analysis of the T{sub 2}-weighted MR scans in tumor-bearing rats demonstrated the high efficacy of Hsp70-conjugates in contrast enhancement of the glioma in comparison to non-conjugated nanoparticles. High contrast enhancement of the glioma was provided by the accumulation of the SPION–Hsp70 particles in the glioma tissue (as shown by the histological assay). Biodistribution analysis by NLR-M{sub 2} measurements evidenced the many-fold increase (~40) in the tumor-to-normal brain uptake ratio in the Hsp70-conjugates treated animals. Biodistribution pattern of Hsp70-decorated nanoparticles differed from that of non-conjugated SPIONs. Coating of the magnetic nanoparticles with Hsp70 protein enhances the tumor-targeting ability of the conjugates that could be applied in the MR imaging of the malignant brain tumors. - Highlights: • Second-harmonic nonlinear magnetic response is used for biodistribution analysis. • NLR-M{sub 2} ensures high sensibility in detection of SPIONs in tissue. • SPION–Hsp70 conjugates

  12. Folate-targeted polymeric micelles loaded with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide: combined small size and high MRI sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong GB

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Guo-bin Hong,1,2 Jing-xing Zhou,2 Ren-xu Yuan31Department of Radiology, Fifth Affiliated Hospital, Zhuhai, 2Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, 3School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, ChinaAbstract: Targeted delivery of contrast agents is a highly desirable strategy for enhancing diagnostic efficiency and reducing side effects and toxicity. Water-soluble and tumor-targeting superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs were synthesized by loading hydrophobic SPIONs into micelles assembled from an amphiphilic block copolymer poly(ethylene glycol-poly(ε-caprolactone (PEG-PCL bearing folate in the distal ends of PEG chains. Compared to the water-soluble SPIONs obtained by small molecular surfactant coating, ultrasmall SPION encapsulation with PEG-PCL micelles (PEG-PCL-SPIONs simultaneously increases transverse (r2 and decreases longitudinal (r1 magnetic resonance (MR relaxivities of water proton in micelle solution, leading to a notably high r2/r1 ratio up to 78, which makes the PEG-PCL-SPIONs a highly sensitive MR imaging (MRI T2 contrast agent. The mean size of folate-attached SPION micelles (Fa-PEG-PCL-SPIONs is 44 ± 3 nm on average, ideal for in vivo MRI applications in which long circulation is greatly determined by small particle size and is highly desirable. Prussian blue staining of BEL-7402 cells over-expressing folate receptors, after incubation with micelle-containing medium, demonstrated that folate functionalization of the magnetic particles significantly enhanced their cell uptake. The potential of Fa-PEG-PCL-SPIONs as a potent MRI probe for in vivo tumor detection was assessed. At 3 hours after intravenous injection of the Fa-PEG-PCL-SPION solution into mice bearing subcutaneous xenografts of human BEL-7402 hepatoma, a 41.2% signal intensity decrease was detected in the T2-weighted MR images of the tumor, indicating the efficient accumulation of Fa

  13. Low-density lipoprotein-coupled micelles with reduction and pH dual sensitivity for intelligent co-delivery of paclitaxel and siRNA to breast tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu WJ

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Wen-jing Zhu,1,* Shu-di Yang,1,* Chen-xi Qu,1 Qiao-ling Zhu,1,2 Wei-liang Chen,1 Fang Li,1 Zhi-qiang Yuan,1 Yang Liu,1 Ben-gang You,1 Xue-nong Zhang1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou, 2Department of Clinical Medicine, Nanjing Gulou Hospital, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Multidrug resistance (MDR is a major obstacle for the clinical therapy of malignant human cancers. The discovery of RNA interference provides efficient gene silencing within tumor cells for reversing MDR. In this study, a new “binary polymer” low-density lipoprotein–N-succinyl chitosan–cystamine–urocanic acid (LDL–NSC–SS–UA with dual pH/redox sensitivity and targeting effect was synthesized for the co-delivery of breast cancer resistance protein small interfering RNA (siRNA and paclitaxel (PTX. In vivo, the co-delivering micelles can accumulate in tumor tissue via the enhanced permeability and retention effect and the specific recognition and combination of LDL and LDL receptor, which is overexpressed on the surface of tumor cell membranes. The siRNA–PTX-loaded micelles inhibited gene and drug release under physiological conditions while promoting fast release in an acid microenvironment or in the presence of glutathione. The micelles escaped from the lysosome through the proton sponge effect. Additionally, the micelles exhibited superior antitumor activity and downregulated the protein and mRNA expression levels of breast cancer resistance protein in MCF-7/Taxol cells. The biodistribution and antitumor studies proved that the siRNA–PTX-loaded micelles possessed prolonged circulation time with a remarkable tumor-targeting effect and effectively inhibited tumor growth. Therefore, the novel dual pH/redox-sensitive polymers co-delivering siRNA and PTX with excellent biocompatibility and effective reversal of MDR demonstrate a considerable

  14. In vivo study of doxorubicin-loaded cell-penetrating peptide-modified pH-sensitive liposomes: biocompatibility, bio-distribution, and pharmacodynamics in BALB/c nude mice bearing human breast tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Y

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Yuan Ding,1,* Wei Cui,2,* Dan Sun,1 Gui-Ling Wang,1 Yu Hei,1 Shuai Meng,1 Jian-Hua Chen,3 Ying Xie,1 Zhi-Qiang Wang4 1Beijing Key Laboratory of Molecular Pharmaceutics and New Drug Delivery Systems, Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, 2School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 3School of Medicine, Jianghan University, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kent State University Geauga, Burton, OH, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: In vivo evaluation of drug delivery vectors is essential for clinical translation. In BALB/c nude mice bearing human breast cancer tumors, we investigated the biocompatibility, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of doxorubicin (DOX-loaded novel cell-penetrating peptide (CPP-modified pH-sensitive liposomes (CPPL (referred to as CPPL(DOX with an optimal CPP density of 4%. In CPPL, a polyethylene glycol (PEG derivative formed by conjugating PEG with stearate via acid-degradable hydrazone bond (PEG2000-Hz-stearate was inserted into the surface of liposomes, and CPP was directly attached to liposome surfaces via coupling with stearate to simultaneously achieve long circulation time in blood and improve the selectivity and efficacy of CPP for tumor targeting. Compared to PEGylated liposomes, CPPL enhanced DOX accumulation in tumors up to 1.9-fold (p<0.01 and resulted in more cell apoptosis as a result of DNA disruption as well as a relatively lower tumor growth ratio (T/C%. Histological examination did not show any signs of necrosis or inflammation in normal tissues, but large cell dissolving areas were found in tumors following the treatment of animals with CPPL(DOX. Our findings provide important and detailed information regarding the distribution of CPPL(DOX in vivo and reveal their abilities of tumor penetration and potential for the treatment of

  15. Folic acid-targeted disulfide-based cross-linking micelle for enhanced drug encapsulation stability and site-specific drug delivery against tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Yumin Zhang,1,* Junhui Zhou,2,* Cuihong Yang,1 Weiwei Wang,3 Liping Chu,1 Fan Huang,1 Qiang Liu,1 Liandong Deng,2 Deling Kong,3 Jianfeng Liu,1 Jinjian Liu1 1Tianjin Key Laboratory of Radiation Medicine and Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, 2Department of Polymer Science and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, 3Tianjin Key Laboratory of Biomaterial Research, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally in this work Abstract: Although the shortcomings of small molecular antitumor drugs were efficiently improved by being entrapped into nanosized vehicles, premature drug release and insufficient tumor targeting demand innovative approaches that boost the stability and tumor responsiveness of drug-loaded nanocarriers. Here, we show the use of the core cross-linking method to generate a micelle with enhanced drug encapsulation ability and sensitivity of drug release in tumor. This kind of micelle could increase curcumin (Cur delivery to HeLa cells in vitro and improve tumor accumulation in vivo. We designed and synthesized the core cross-linked micelle (CCM with polyethylene glycol and folic acid-polyethylene glycol as the hydrophilic units, pyridyldisulfide as the cross-linkable and hydrophobic unit, and disulfide bond as the cross-linker. CCM showed spherical shape with a diameter of 91.2 nm by the characterization of dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscope. Attributed to the core cross-linking, drug-loaded CCM displayed higher Nile Red or Cur-encapsulated stability and better sensitivity to glutathione than noncross-linked micelle (NCM. Cellular uptake and in vitro antitumor studies proved the enhanced endocytosis and better cytotoxicity of CCM-Cur against

  16. Cellular uptake mechanism and comparative evaluation of antineoplastic effects of paclitaxel–cholesterol lipid emulsion on triple-negative and non-triple-negative breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Jun Ye,1,2 Xuejun Xia,1,2 Wujun Dong,1,2 Huazhen Hao,1,2 Luhua Meng,1,2 Yanfang Yang,1,2 Renyun Wang,1,2 Yuanfeng Lyu,3 Yuling Liu1,2 1State Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substance and Function of Natural Medicines, 2Beijing Key Laboratory of Drug Delivery Technology and Novel Formulation, Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 3School of Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: There is no effective clinical therapy for triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs, which have high low-density lipoprotein (LDL requirements and express relatively high levels of LDL receptors (LDLRs on their membranes. In our previous study, a novel lipid emulsion based on a paclitaxel–cholesterol complex (PTX-CH Emul was developed, which exhibited improved safety and efficacy for the treatment of TNBC. To date, however, the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular trafficking of PTX-CH Emul have not been investigated. In order to offer powerful proof for the therapeutic effects of PTX-CH Emul, we systematically studied the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular trafficking of PTX-CH Emul and made a comparative evaluation of antineoplastic effects on TNBC (MDA-MB-231 and non-TNBC (MCF7 cell lines through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The in vitro antineoplastic effects and in vivo tumor-targeting efficiency of PTX-CH Emul were significantly more enhanced in MDA-MB-231-based models than those in MCF7-based models, which was associated with the more abundant expression profile of LDLR in MDA-MB-231 cells. The results of the cellular uptake mechanism indicated that PTX-CH Emul was internalized into breast cancer cells through the LDLR-mediated internalization pathway via clathrin-coated pits, localized in lysosomes, and then released into the cytoplasm, which was consistent with the internalization pathway and intracellular trafficking of native

  17. Image registration: An essential part of radiation therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenman, Julian G.; Miller, Elizabeth P.; Tracton, Gregg; Cullip, Tim J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: We believe that a three-dimensional (3D) registration of nonplanning (diagnostic) imaging data with the planning computed tomography (CT) offers a substantial improvement in tumor target identification for many radiation therapy patients. The purpose of this article is to review and discuss our experience to date. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the charts and treatment planning records of all patients that underwent 3D radiation treatment planning in our department from June 1994 to December 1995, to learn which patients had image registration performed and why it was thought they would benefit from this approach. We also measured how much error would have been introduced into the target definition if the nonplanning imaging data had not been available and only the planning CT had been used. Results: Between June 1994 and December 1995, 106 of 246 (43%) of patients undergoing 3D treatment planning had image registration. Four reasons for performing registration were identified. First, some tumor volumes have better definition on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) than on CT. Second, a properly contrasted diagnostic CT sometimes can show the tumor target better than can the planning CT. Third, the diagnostic CT or MR may have been preoperative, with the postoperative planning CT no longer showing the tumor. Fourth, the patient may have undergone cytoreductive chemotherapy so that the postchemotherapy planning CT no longer showed the original tumor volume. In patients in whom the planning CT did not show the tumor volume well an analysis was done to determine how the treatment plan was changed with the addition of a better tumor-defining nonplanning CT or MR. We have found that the use of this additional imaging modality changed the tumor location in the treatment plan at least 1.5 cm for half of the patients, and up to 3.0 cm for ((1)/(4)) of the patients. Conclusions: Multimodality and/or sequential imaging can substantially aid in better tumor

  18. Synthesis and biological evaluation of potent αvβ3-integrin receptor antagonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijkgraaf, Ingrid; Kruijtzer, John A.W.; Frielink, Cathelijne; Soede, Annemieke C.; Hilbers, Hans W.; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Corstens, Frans H.M.; Liskamp, Rob M.J.; Boerman, Otto C.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: α v β 3 Integrin is expressed in sprouting endothelial cells in growing tumors, whereas it is absent in quiescent blood vessels. In addition, various tumor cell types express α v β 3 integrin. α v β 3 Integrin, a transmembrane heterodimeric protein, binds to the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) amino acid sequence of extracellular matrix proteins such as vitronectin and plays a pivotal role in invasion, proliferation and metastasis. Due to the selective expression of α v β 3 integrin in tumors, radiolabeled RGD peptides and peptidomimetics are attractive candidates for tumor targeting. Methods: A cyclic RGD peptide, a peptoid-peptide hybrid, an all-peptoid and a peptidomimetic compound were synthesized, conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazadodecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and radiolabeled with 111 In. Their in vitro and in vivo α v β 3 -binding characteristics were determined. Results: IC 5 values were 236 nM for DOTA-E-c(RGDfK), 219 nM for DOTA-peptidomimetic, >10 mM for DOTA-all-peptoid and 9.25 mM for the peptoid-peptide hybrid DOTA-E-c(nRGDfK). 111 In-labeled compounds, except for [ 111 In]DOTA-all-peptoid, showed specific uptake in human α v β 3 -expressing tumors xenografted in athymic mice. Tumor uptake for [ 111 In]DOTA-E-c(RGDfK) was 1.73±0.4% ID/g (2 h postinjection) and that of [ 111 In]DOTA-peptidomimetic was 2.04±0.3% ID/g. Tumor uptake for the peptoid-peptide hybrid [ 111 In]DOTA-E-c(nRGDfK) was markedly lower (0.45±0.07% ID/g). The all-peptoid [ 111 In]DOTA-E-c(nRGnDnFnK) did not show specific uptake in tumors (0.11±0.04% ID/g). Conclusions: The peptidomimetic compound and the cyclic RGD peptide have a high affinity for α v β 3 integrin, and these compounds have better tumor-targeting characteristics than the peptoid-peptide hybrid and the all-peptoid

  19. Phase I Study of 68Ga-HER2-Nanobody for PET/CT Assessment of HER2 Expression in Breast Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyaerts, Marleen; Xavier, Catarina; Heemskerk, Johannes; Devoogdt, Nick; Everaert, Hendrik; Ackaert, Chloé; Vanhoeij, Marian; Duhoux, Francois P; Gevaert, Thierry; Simon, Philippe; Schallier, Denis; Fontaine, Christel; Vaneycken, Ilse; Vanhove, Christian; De Greve, Jacques; Lamote, Jan; Caveliers, Vicky; Lahoutte, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status is one of the major tumor characteristics in breast cancer to guide therapy. Anti-HER2 treatment has clear survival advantages in HER2-positive breast carcinoma patients. Heterogeneity in HER2 expression between primary tumor and metastasis has repeatedly been described, resulting in the need to reassess HER2 status during the disease course. To avoid repeated biopsy with potential bias due to tumor heterogeneity, Nanobodies directed against HER2 have been developed as probes for molecular imaging. Nanobodies, which are derived from unique heavy-chain-only antibodies, are the smallest antigen-binding antibody fragments and have ideal characteristics for PET imaging. The primary aims were assessment of safety, biodistribution, and dosimetry. The secondary aim was to investigate tumor-targeting potential. In total, 20 women with primary or metastatic breast carcinoma (score of 2+ or 3+ on HER2 immunohistochemical assessment) were included. Anti-HER2-Nanobody was labeled with (68)Ga via a NOTA derivative. Administered activities were 53-174 MBq (average, 107 MBq). PET/CT scans for dosimetry assessment were obtained at 10, 60, and 90 min after administration. Physical evaluation and blood analysis were performed for safety evaluation. Biodistribution was analyzed for 11 organs using MIM software; dosimetry was assessed using OLINDA/EXM. Tumor-targeting potential was assessed in primary and metastatic lesions. No adverse reactions occurred. A fast blood clearance was observed, with only 10% of injected activity remaining in the blood at 1 h after injection. Uptake was seen mainly in the kidneys, liver, and intestines. The effective dose was 0.043 mSv/MBq, resulting in an average of 4.6 mSv per patient. The critical organ was the urinary bladder wall, with a dose of 0.406 mGy/MBq. In patients with metastatic disease, tracer accumulation well above the background level was demonstrated in most identified sites of

  20. Self-assembled nanoparticles based on the c(RGDfk peptide for the delivery of siRNA targeting the VEGFR2 gene for tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu L

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Li Liu,1 Xiaoxia Liu,1 Qian Xu,1 Ping Wu,2 Xialin Zuo,3 Jingjing Zhang,1 Houliang Deng,1 Zhuomin Wu,1 Aimin Ji1 1Department of Pharmacy, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmacy, Chengdu Integrated TCM & Western Medicine Hospital, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China; 3Institute of Neurosciences and the Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Key Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Channelopathies of Guangdong Province and the Ministry of Education of China, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The clinical application of small interfering RNA (siRNA has been restricted by their poor intracellular uptake, low serum stability, and inability to target specific cells. During the last several decades, a great deal of effort has been devoted to exploring materials for siRNA delivery. In this study, biodegradable, tumor-targeted, self-assembled peptide nanoparticles consisting of cyclo(Arg–Gly–Asp–d–Phe–Lys-8–amino–3,6–dioxaoctanoic acid–β–maleimidopropionic acid (hereafter referred to as RPM were found to be an effective siRNA carrier both in vitro and in vivo. The nanoparticles were characterized based on transmission electron microscopy, circular dichroism spectra, and dynamic light scattering. In vitro analyses showed that the RPM/VEGFR2-siRNA exhibited negligible cytotoxicity and induced effective gene silencing. Delivery of the RPM/VEGFR2 (zebrafish-siRNA into zebrafish embryos resulted in inhibition of neovascularization. Administration of RPM/VEGFR2 (mouse-siRNA to tumor-bearing nude mice led to a significant inhibition of tumor growth, a marked reduction of vessels, and a downregulation of VEGFR2 (messenger RNA and protein in tumor tissue. Furthermore, the levels of IFN-α, IFN-γ, IL-12, and IL-6 in mouse serum, assayed via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, did not indicate any immunogenicity of the RPM/VEGFR2

  1. MUC16 provides immune protection by inhibiting synapse formation between NK and ovarian tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Migneault Martine

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer cells utilize a variety of mechanisms to evade immune detection and attack. Effective immune detection largely relies on the formation of an immune synapse which requires close contact between immune cells and their targets. Here, we show that MUC16, a heavily glycosylated 3-5 million Da mucin expressed on the surface of ovarian tumor cells, inhibits the formation of immune synapses between NK cells and ovarian tumor targets. Our results indicate that MUC16-mediated inhibition of immune synapse formation is an effective mechanism employed by ovarian tumors to evade immune recognition. Results Expression of low levels of MUC16 strongly correlated with an increased number of conjugates and activating immune synapses between ovarian tumor cells and primary naïve NK cells. MUC16-knockdown ovarian tumor cells were more susceptible to lysis by primary NK cells than MUC16 expressing controls. This increased lysis was not due to differences in the expression levels of the ligands for the activating receptors DNAM-1 and NKG2D. The NK cell leukemia cell line (NKL, which does not express KIRs but are positive for DNAM-1 and NKG2D, also conjugated and lysed MUC16-knockdown cells more efficiently than MUC16 expressing controls. Tumor cells that survived the NKL challenge expressed higher levels of MUC16 indicating selective lysis of MUC16low targets. The higher csMUC16 levels on the NKL resistant tumor cells correlated with more protection from lysis as compared to target cells that were never exposed to the effectors. Conclusion MUC16, a carrier of the tumor marker CA125, has previously been shown to facilitate ovarian tumor metastasis and inhibits NK cell mediated lysis of tumor targets. Our data now demonstrates that MUC16 expressing ovarian cancer cells are protected from recognition by NK cells. The immune protection provided by MUC16 may lead to selective survival of ovarian cancer cells that are more efficient in

  2. Monitoring bacteriolytic therapy of salmonella typhimurium with optical imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun A; Min, Jung Joon; Moon, Sung Min; Kim, Hyun Ju; Kim, Sung Mi; Song, Ho Cheon; Choy, Hyon E.; Bom, Hee Seung

    2005-01-01

    Systemically administrated Salmonella has been studied for targeting tumor and developed as an anticancer agent. In Salmonella, because msbB gene plays role in the terminal myristoylation of lipid A and induces tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-a) -mediated septic shock, Salmonella msbB mutant strain is safe and useful for tumor-targeting therapy. Here we report that Salmonella msbB mutant strain induce onco lysis after intravenous injection in tumor bearing mice. The CT26 mouse colon cancer cells were stably transfected with firefly luciferase gene and subcutaneously implantated in Balb/C mice. After establishing subcutaneous tumor mass, we intravenously injected 1x108 cfu Salmonella msbB mutant strain or MG1655 E coli strain. Not only tumor size but also total photon flux from the tumor mass were monitored. everyday and compared among experimental groups (No treatment, Salmonella treatment, E. coli MG1655 treatment group). After intraperitoneal injection of D-Iuciferin (3 mg/animal), in vivo optical imaging for firefly luciferase was performed using cooled CCD camera. Imaging signal from Salmonella injected group were significantly lower than that of no treatment or E. coli treatment group on day 2 after injection. On day 4 after injection, imaging signal of salmonella-injected group was 43.8 or 20.7 times lower than that of no treatment or E. coli treatment group, respectively (no treatment: 2.78E+07 p/s/cm 2 /sr, Salmonella treatment: 6.35E+05 p/s/cm 2 /sr, E. coli treatment: 1.29E+07 p/s/cm 2 /sr, P<0.05). However. when we injected E. coli MG1655 into tumor bearing mice, the intensity of imaging signal was not different from no treatment group. These findings suggest that Salmonella msbB mutant strain retains its tumor-targeting properties and have therapeutical effect. Bioluminescent tumor bearing animal model was useful for assessing tumor viability after bacteriolytic therapy using Salmonella

  3. Exploring spatial overlap of high-uptake regions derived from dual tracer positron emission tomography-computer tomography imaging using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and 18F-fluorodeoxythymidine in nonsmall cell lung cancer patients: a prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Li, Chengqiang; Hu, Man; Lu, Jie; Shi, Xiaorong; Xing, Ligang; Sun, Xindong; Fu, Zheng; Yu, Jinming; Meng, Xue

    2015-05-01

    % SUVmax) and FLT (determined by 80% SUVmax) uptake subtargets exhibited higher TCP without significant elevated NTCP of lung, esophagus, spinal cord, and heart.Dual tracer PET/CT of FDG and FLT is suggested for NSCLC patients to guide tumor target delineation in clinical practice. FDG PET/CT is necessary whereas FLT PET/CT may be optional when guiding tumor target delineation clinically. Additional information from randomized trials is required to validate.

  4. Prognostic and predictive value of DAMPs and DAMP-associated processes in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka eFucikova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It is now clear that human neoplasms form, progress and respond to therapy in the context of an intimate crosstalk with the host immune system. In particular, accumulating evidence demonstrates that the efficacy of most, if not all, chemo- and radiotherapeutic agents commonly employed in the clinic critically depends on the (reactivation of tumor-targeting immune response. One of the mechanisms whereby conventional chemotherapeutics, targeted anticancer agents and radiotherapy can provoke a therapeutically relevant, adaptive immune response against malignant cells is commonly known as „immunogenic cell death (ICD. Importantly, dying cancer cells are perceived as immunogenic only when they emit a set of immunostimulatory signals upon the activation of intracellular stress response pathways. The emission of these signals, which are generally referred to as „damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs, may therefore predict whether patients will respond to chemotherapy or not, at least in some settings. Here, we review clinical data indicating that DAMPs and DAMP-associated stress responses might have prognostic or predictive value for cancer patients.

  5. Effect of ultrasound irradiation on bacterial internalization and bacteria-mediated gene transfer to cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Kazuaki; Yamada, Ryuji; Meisaku, Hitomi; Shimizu, Nobuaki

    2014-05-01

    The present study demonstrates that ultrasound irradiation can facilitate bacteria-mediated gene delivery (bactofection). Escherichia coli modified with avidin were employed as a vehicle for delivery of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene, a model heterologous gene, into the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Avidin-mediated binding of E. coli to MCF-7 cells enhanced the internalization of E. coli by approximately 17%, irrespective of the use of ultrasound irradiation. Furthermore, the use of ultrasound irradiation increased the internalization by approximately 5%, irrespective of the presence of avidin on the E. coli cell surface. The percentages of GFP-expressing MCF-7 cells at 24h after bactofection were below 0.5% and 2% for the case with only avidin-modification of E. coli cell surface and only ultrasound irradiation, respectively. However, combining avidin modification with the ultrasound treatment increased this value to 8%. Thus, the use of avidin-modified bacteria in conjunction with ultrasound irradiation has potential as an effective strategy for tumor-targeted bactofection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Activated Charge-Reversal Polymeric Nano-System: The Promising Strategy in Drug Delivery for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichen Hu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Various polymeric nanoparticles (NPs with optimal size, tumor-targeting functionalization, or microenvironment sensitive characteristics have been designed to solve several limitations of conventional chemotherapy. Nano-sized polymeric drug carrier systems have remarkably great advantages in drug delivery and cancer therapy, which are still plagued with severe deficiencies, especially insufficient cellular uptake. Recently, surface charge of medical NPs has been demonstrated to play an important role in cellular uptake. NPs with positive charge show higher affinity to anionic cell membranes such that with more efficient cellular internalization, but otherwise cause severe aggregation and fast clearance in circulation. Thus, surface charge-reversal NPs, specifically activated at the tumor site, have shown to elegantly resolve the enhanced cellular uptake in cancer cells vs. non-specific protein adsorption dilemma. Herein, this review mainly focuses on the effect of tumor-site activated surface charge reversal NPs on tumor treatment, including the activated mechanisms and various applications in suppressing cancer cells, killing cancer stem cell and overcoming multidrug resistance, with the emphasis on recent research in these fields. With the comprehensive and in-depth understanding of the activated surface charge reversal NPs, this approach might arouse great interest of scientific research on enhanced efficient polymeric nano-carriers in cancer therapy.

  7. Flavonoid-modified surfaces: multifunctional bioactive biomaterials with osteopromotive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-fibrotic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba, Alba; Satué, María; Gómez-Florit, Manuel; Hierro-Oliva, Margarita; Petzold, Christiane; Lyngstadaas, Staale P; González-Martín, María Luisa; Monjo, Marta; Ramis, Joana M

    2015-03-11

    Flavonoids are small polyphenolic molecules of natural origin with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial properties. Here, a bioactive surface based on the covalent immobilization of flavonoids taxifolin and quercitrin on titanium substrates is presented, using (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) as coupling agent. FTIR and XPS measurements confirm the grafting of the flavonoids to the surfaces. Using 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate (DPBA, a flavonoid-specific dye), the modified surfaces are imaged by fluorescence microscopy. The bioactivity of the flavonoid-modified surfaces is evaluated in vitro with human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) and human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and compared to that of simple flavonoid coatings prepared by drop casting. Flavonoid-modified surfaces show anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic potential on HGF. In addition, Ti surfaces covalently functionalized with flavonoids promote the differentiation of hUC-MSCs to osteoblasts--enhancing the expression of osteogenic markers, increasing alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition; while drop-casted surfaces do not. These findings could have a high impact in the development of advanced implantable medical devices like bone implants. Given the broad range of bioactivities of flavonoid compounds, these surfaces are ready to be explored for other biomedical applications, e.g., as stent surface or tumor-targeted functionalized nanoparticles for cardiovascular or cancer therapies. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Characterization of long-circulating cationic nanoparticle formulations consisting of a two-stage PEGylation step for the delivery of siRNA in a breast cancer tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Emmanuel A; Osooly, Maryam; Strutt, Dita; Masin, Dana; Yang, Youngjoo; Yan, Hong; Bally, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) has been used widely in liposomal formulations as a strategy to inhibit opsonization by plasma proteins and to prolong liposome plasma circulation time. PEG can be incorporated onto the surface of liposomes either during the spontaneous self-assembling process or inserted after vesicle formation. The advantages of employing the PEG postinsertion method include improved drug encapsulation efficiency and the ability to incorporate PEG conjugates for enhanced cell binding and uptake. In this study, we propose to evaluate a cationic lipid nanoparticle formulation containing two PEGylation steps: pre- and post-siRNA insertion. Our results indicate that formulations consisting of the extra PEG post-insertion step significantly increased siRNA circulation in the plasma by two-folds in comparison with the formulations consisting of only the single PEGylation step. Moreover, this formulation was able to efficiently carry siRNA to the tumor site, increase siRNA stability and significantly downregulate luciferase mRNA expression by >50% when compared with the controls in an intraperitoneal and subcutaneous breast cancer tumor model. Overall, our cationic lipid nanoparticle formulation displayed enhanced plasma circulation, reduced liver accumulation, enhanced tumor targeting, and effective gene knockdown--demonstrating excellent utility for the delivery of siRNA. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Mangiferin functionalized radioactive gold nanoparticles (MGF-198AuNPs) in prostate tumor therapy: green nanotechnology for production, in vivo tumor retention and evaluation of therapeutic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Yasiri, A Y; Khoobchandani, M; Cutler, C S; Watkinson, L; Carmack, T; Smith, C J; Kuchuk, M; Loyalka, S K; Lugão, A B; Katti, K V

    2017-10-31

    We report here an innovative feature of green nanotechnology-focused work showing that mangiferin-a glucose functionalized xanthonoid, found in abundance in mango peels-serves dual roles of chemical reduction and in situ encapsulation, to produce gold nanoparticles with optimum in vivo stability and tumor specific characteristics. The interaction of mangiferin with a Au-198 gold precursor affords MGF- 198 AuNPs as the beta emissions of Au-198 provide unique advantages for tumor therapy while gamma rays are used for the quantitative estimation of gold within the tumors and various organs. The laminin receptor specificity of mangiferin affords specific accumulation of therapeutic payloads of this new therapeutic agent within prostate tumors (PC-3) of human prostate tumor origin induced in mice which overexpress this receptor subtype. Detailed in vivo therapeutic efficacy studies, through the intratumoral delivery of MGF- 198 AuNPs, show the retention of over 80% of the injected dose (ID) in prostate tumors up to 24 h. By three weeks post treatment, tumor volumes of the treated group of animals showed an over 5 fold reduction as compared to the control saline group. New opportunities for green nanotechnology and a new paradigm of using mangiferin as a tumor targeting agent in oncology for the application of MGF- 198 AuNPs in the treatment of cancer are discussed.

  10. Characterization of human γδ T lymphocytes infiltrating primary malignant melanomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Cordova

    Full Text Available T lymphocytes are often induced naturally in melanoma patients and infiltrate tumors. Given that γδ T cells mediate antigen-specific killing of tumor cells, we studied the representation and the in vitro cytokine production and cytotoxic activity of tumor infiltrating γδ T cells from 74 patients with primary melanoma. We found that γδ T cells represent the major lymphocyte population infiltrating melanoma, and both Vδ1(+ and Vδ2(+ cells are involved. The majority of melanoma-infiltrating γδ cells showed effector memory and terminally-differentiated phenotypes and, accordingly, polyclonal γδ T cell lines obtained from tumor-infiltrating immune cells produced IFN-γ and TNF-α and were capable of killing melanoma cell lines in vitro. The cytotoxic capability of Vδ2 cell lines was further improved by pre-treatment of tumor target cells with zoledronate. Moreover, higher rate of γδ T cells isolation and percentages of Vδ2 cells correlate with early stage of development of melanoma and absence of metastasis. Altogether, our results suggest that a natural immune response mediated by γδ T lymphocytes may contribute to the immunosurveillance of melanoma.

  11. IGF1 Receptor Targeted Theranostic Nanoparticles for Targeted and Image-Guided Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyu; Qian, Weiping; Uckun, Fatih M; Wang, Liya; Wang, Y Andrew; Chen, Hongyu; Kooby, David; Yu, Qian; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Staley, Charles A; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2015-08-25

    Overcoming resistance to chemotherapy is a major and unmet medical challenge in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Poor drug delivery due to stromal barriers in the tumor microenvironment and aggressive tumor biology are additional impediments toward a more successful treatment of pancreatic cancer. In attempts to address these challenges, we developed IGF1 receptor (IGF1R)-directed, multifunctional theranostic nanoparticles for targeted delivery of therapeutic agents into IGF1R-expressing drug-resistant tumor cells and tumor-associated stromal cells. These nanoparticles were prepared by conjugating recombinant human IGF1 to magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) carrying the anthracycline doxorubicin (Dox) as the chemotherapeutic payload. Intravenously administered IGF1-IONPs exhibited excellent tumor targeting and penetration in an orthotopic patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model of pancreatic cancer featuring enriched tumor stroma and heterogeneous cancer cells. IGF1R-targeted therapy using the theranostic IGF1-IONP-Dox significantly inhibited the growth of pancreatic PDX tumors. The effects of the intratumoral nanoparticle delivery and therapeutic responses in the orthotopic pancreatic PDX tumors could be detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with IONP-induced contrasts. Histological analysis showed that IGF1R-targeted delivery of Dox significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptotic cell death of pancreatic cancer cells. Therefore, further development of IGF1R-targeted theranostic IONPs and MRI-guided cancer therapy as a precision nanomedicine may provide the basis for more effective treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  12. Tumor cell-targeted delivery of CRISPR/Cas9 by aptamer-functionalized lipopolymer for therapeutic genome editing of VEGFA in osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chao; Li, Fangfei; Wang, Luyao; Zhang, Zong-Kang; Wang, Chao; He, Bing; Li, Jie; Chen, Zhihao; Shaikh, Atik Badshah; Liu, Jin; Wu, Xiaohao; Peng, Songlin; Dang, Lei; Guo, Baosheng; He, Xiaojuan; Au, D W T; Lu, Cheng; Zhu, Hailong; Zhang, Bao-Ting; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2017-12-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is a highly aggressive pediatric cancer, characterized by frequent lung metastasis and pathologic bone destruction. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), highly expressed in OS, not only contributes to angiogenesis within the tumor microenvironment via paracrine stimulation of vascular endothelial cells, but also acts as an autocrine survival factor for tumor cell themselves, thus making it a promising therapeutic target for OS. CRISPR/Cas9 is a versatile genome editing technology and holds tremendous promise for cancer treatment. However, a major bottleneck to achieve the therapeutic potential of the CRISPR/Cas9 is the lack of in vivo tumor-targeted delivery systems. Here, we screened an OS cell-specific aptamer (LC09) and developed a LC09-functionalized PEG-PEI-Cholesterol (PPC) lipopolymer encapsulating CRISPR/Cas9 plasmids encoding VEGFA gRNA and Cas9. Our results demonstrated that LC09 facilitated selective distribution of CRISPR/Cas9 in both orthotopic OS and lung metastasis, leading to effective VEGFA genome editing in tumor, decreased VEGFA expression and secretion, inhibited orthotopic OS malignancy and lung metastasis, as well as reduced angiogenesis and bone lesion with no detectable toxicity. The delivery system simultaneously restrained autocrine and paracrine VEGFA signaling in tumor cells and could facilitate translating CRISPR-Cas9 into clinical cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Bacteria-mediated in vivo delivery of quantum dots into solid tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying [Single-molecule and Nanobiology Lab., Dept. of Biophysics, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China); Zhou, Mei [Dept. of Radiation Medicine, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China); Luo, Dan; Wang, Lijun; Hong, Yuankai [Single-molecule and Nanobiology Lab., Dept. of Biophysics, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China); Yang, Yepeng, E-mail: yangyepeng@bjmu.edu.cn [Dept. of Radiation Medicine, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China); Sha, Yinlin, E-mail: shyl@hsc.pku.edu.cn [Single-molecule and Nanobiology Lab., Dept. of Biophysics, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China); Biomed-X Center, Peking University, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New approach using the probiotic Bifidobacterium bifidum as a vehicle to deliver QDs into the deep tissue of solid tumors in vivo was achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifidobacterium bifidum delivery system has intrinsic biocompatibility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The targeting efficacy was improved by folic acids. -- Abstract: Semiconductor nanocrystals, so-called quantum dots (QDs), promise potential application in bioimaging and diagnosis in vitro and in vivo owing to their high-quality photoluminescence and excellent photostability as well as size-tunable spectra. Here, we describe a biocompatible, comparatively safe bacteria-based system that can deliver QDs specifically into solid tumor of living animals. In our strategy, anaerobic bacterium Bifidobacterium bifidum (B. bifidum) that colonizes selectively in hypoxic regions of animal body was successfully used as a vehicle to load with QDs and transported into the deep tissue of solid tumors. The internalization of lipid-encapsuled QDs into B. bifidum was conveniently carried by electroporation. To improve the efficacy and specificity of tumor targeting, the QDs-carrying bacterium surface was further conjugated with folic acids (FAs) that can bind to the folic acid receptor overexpressed tumor cells. This new approach opens a pathway for delivering different types of functional cargos such as nanoparticles and drugs into solid tumor of live animals for imaging, diagnosis and therapy.

  14. A new head-mounted display-based augmented reality system in neurosurgical oncology: a study on phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Fabrizio; Meola, Antonio; Carbone, Marina; Sinceri, Sara; Cagnazzo, Federico; Denaro, Ennio; Esposito, Nicola; Ferrari, Mauro; Ferrari, Vincenzo

    2017-12-01

    Benefits of minimally invasive neurosurgery mandate the development of ergonomic paradigms for neuronavigation. Augmented Reality (AR) systems can overcome the shortcomings of commercial neuronavigators. The aim of this work is to apply a novel AR system, based on a head-mounted stereoscopic video see-through display, as an aid in complex neurological lesion targeting. Effectiveness was investigated on a newly designed patient-specific head mannequin featuring an anatomically realistic brain phantom with embedded synthetically created tumors and eloquent areas. A two-phase evaluation process was adopted in a simulated small tumor resection adjacent to Broca's area. Phase I involved nine subjects without neurosurgical training in performing spatial judgment tasks. In Phase II, three surgeons were involved in assessing the effectiveness of the AR-neuronavigator in performing brain tumor targeting on a patient-specific head phantom. Phase I revealed the ability of the AR scene to evoke depth perception under different visualization modalities. Phase II confirmed the potentialities of the AR-neuronavigator in aiding the determination of the optimal surgical access to the surgical target. The AR-neuronavigator is intuitive, easy-to-use, and provides three-dimensional augmented information in a perceptually-correct way. The system proved to be effective in guiding skin incision, craniotomy, and lesion targeting. The preliminary results encourage a structured study to prove clinical effectiveness. Moreover, our testing platform might be used to facilitate training in brain tumour resection procedures.

  15. Optogenetic control of chemokine receptor signal and T-cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuexin; Hyun, Young-Min; Lim, Kihong; Lee, Hyunwook; Cummings, Ryan J.; Gerber, Scott A.; Bae, Seyeon; Cho, Thomas Yoonsang; Lord, Edith M.; Kim, Minsoo

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer of ex vivo-generated immune-promoting or tolerogenic T cells to either enhance immunity or promote tolerance in patients has been used with some success. However, effective trafficking of the transferred cells to the target tissue sites is the main barrier to achieving successful clinical outcomes. Here we developed a strategy for optically controlling T-cell trafficking using a photoactivatable (PA) chemokine receptor. Photoactivatable-chemokine C-X-C motif receptor 4 (PA-CXCR4) transmitted intracellular CXCR4 signals in response to 505-nm light. Localized activation of PA-CXCR4 induced T-cell polarization and directional migration (phototaxis) both in vitro and in vivo. Directing light onto the melanoma was sufficient to recruit PA-CXCR4–expressing tumor-targeting cytotoxic T cells and improved the efficacy of adoptive T-cell transfer immunotherapy, with a significant reduction in tumor growth in mice. These findings suggest that the use of photoactivatable chemokine receptors allows remotely controlled leukocyte trafficking with outstanding spatial resolution in tissues and may be feasible in other cell transfer therapies. PMID:24733886

  16. A multi-functional nanoplatform for tumor synergistic phototherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huijuan; Jiao, Xiaojing; Chen, Qianqian; Ji, Yandan; Zhang, Xiaoge; Zhu, Xing; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2016-02-01

    Phototherapy, which mainly includes photothermal treatment (PTT) and photodynamic treatment (PDT), is a photo-initiated, noninvasive and effective approach for cancer treatment. The high accumulation of photosensitizers (PSs) in a targeted tumor is still a major challenge for efficient light conversion, to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and local hyperthermia. In this study, a simple and efficient hyaluronic acid (HA)-modified nanoplatform (HA-TiO2@MWCNTs) with high tumor-targeting ability, excellent phototherapy efficiency, low light-associated side effects and good water solubility was developed. It could be an effective carrier to load hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME), owing to the tubular conjugate structure. Apart from this, the as-prepared TiO2@MWCNTs nanocomposites could also be used as PSs for tumor PTT and PDT. Those results in vitro and in vivo showed that the anti-tumor effect of this system-mediated PTT/PDT were significantly better than those of single treatment manner. In addition, this drug delivery system could realize high ratio of drug loading, sustained drug release, prolonged circulation in vivo and active targeted accumulation in tumor. These results suggest that HA-TiO2@MWCNTs/HMME has high potential for tumor synergistic phototherapy as a smart theranostic nanoplatform.

  17. A multi-functional nanoplatform for tumor synergistic phototherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Huijuan; Jiao, Xiaojing; Chen, Qianqian; Ji, Yandan; Zhang, Xiaoge; Zhu, Xing; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2016-01-01

    Phototherapy, which mainly includes photothermal treatment (PTT) and photodynamic treatment (PDT), is a photo-initiated, noninvasive and effective approach for cancer treatment. The high accumulation of photosensitizers (PSs) in a targeted tumor is still a major challenge for efficient light conversion, to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and local hyperthermia. In this study, a simple and efficient hyaluronic acid (HA)-modified nanoplatform (HA-TiO 2 @MWCNTs) with high tumor-targeting ability, excellent phototherapy efficiency, low light-associated side effects and good water solubility was developed. It could be an effective carrier to load hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME), owing to the tubular conjugate structure. Apart from this, the as-prepared TiO 2 @MWCNTs nanocomposites could also be used as PSs for tumor PTT and PDT. Those results in vitro and in vivo showed that the anti-tumor effect of this system-mediated PTT/PDT were significantly better than those of single treatment manner. In addition, this drug delivery system could realize high ratio of drug loading, sustained drug release, prolonged circulation in vivo and active targeted accumulation in tumor. These results suggest that HA-TiO 2 @MWCNTs/HMME has high potential for tumor synergistic phototherapy as a smart theranostic nanoplatform. (paper)

  18. Sub-100 nm biodegradable nanoparticles: in vitro release features and toxicity testing in 2D and 3D cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biondi, Marco; Guarnieri, Daniela; Yu Hui; Belli, Valentina; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2013-01-01

    A big challenge in tumor targeting by nanoparticles (NPs), taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention effect, is the fabrication of small size devices for enhanced tumor penetration, which is considered fundamental to improve chemotherapy efficacy. The purposes of this study are (i) to engineer the formulation of doxorubicin-loaded poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)–block–poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) NPs to obtain <100 nm devices and (ii) to translate standard 2D cytotoxicity studies to 3D collagen systems in which an initial step gradient of the NPs is present. Doxorubicin release can be prolonged for days to weeks depending on the NP formulation and the pH of the release medium. Sub-100 nm NPs are effectively internalized by HeLa cells in 2D and are less cytotoxic than free doxorubicin. In 3D, <100 nm NPs are significantly more toxic than larger ones towards HeLa cells, and the cell death rate is affected by the contributions of drug release and device transport through collagen. Thus, the reduction of NP size is a fundamental feature from both a technological and a biological point of view and must be properly engineered to optimize the tumor response to the NPs. (paper)

  19. Toxic clinical hypoxic radiation sensitizers plus radiation-induced toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    The operational definition espoused twelve years ago that clinical hypoxic radiation sensitizers should be nontoxic interferes with the recognition and research of useful radiation sensitizers. Eight years ago the toxic antitumor drug cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II) was reported to be a hypoxic radiation sensitizer and the selective antitumor action of this drug was stressed as potentially creating tumor-targeted radiation sensitization. This rationale of oxidative antitumor drugs as toxic and targeted clinical sensitizers is useful, and has led to the study reported here. The antitumor drug cis-(1,1-cyclobutane-dicarboxylato)diammineplatinum(II), or JM-8, is being tested in clinical trials. Cells of S. typhimurium in PBS in the presence of 0.2mM JM-8 are found to be sensitized to irradiation under hypoxic, but not oxic, conditions. JM-8 is nontoxic to bacteria at this concentration, but upon irradiation the JM-8 solution becomes highly toxic. This radiation induced toxicity of JM-8 preferentially develops from hypoxic solution, and thus contributes to the rationale of hypoxic tumor cell destruction

  20. Development of pH sensitive 2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate based nanoparticles for photodynamic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Cheng-Liang; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Lin, Wuu-Jyh [Isotope Application Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, PO Box 3-27, Longtan, Taoyuan 325, Taiwan (China); Yang, Li-Yuan; Yang, Shu-Jyuan; Shieh, Ming-Jium [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine and College of Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Section 1, Jen-Ai Road, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Lai, Ping-Shan, E-mail: soloman@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Chung-Hsing University, 250, Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)

    2010-04-16

    Photodynamic therapy is an effective treatment for tumors that involves the administration of light-activated photosensitizers. However, most photosensitizers are insoluble and non-specific. To target the acid environment of tumor sites, we synthesized three poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate-co-2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate (PEGMA-co-DPA) copolymers capable of self-assembly to form pH sensitive nanoparticles in an aqueous environment, as a means of encapsulating the water-insoluble photosensitizer, meso-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (m-THPC). The critical aggregation pH of the PEGMA-co-DPA polymers was 5.8-6.6 and the critical aggregation concentration was 0.0045-0.0089 wt% at pH 7.4. Using solvent evaporation, m-THPC loaded nanoparticles were prepared with a high drug encapsulation efficiency (approximately 89%). Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy revealed the spherical shape and 132 nm diameter of the nanoparticles. The in vitro release rate of m-THPC at pH 5.0 was faster than at pH 7.0 (58% versus 10% m-THPC released within 48 h, respectively). The in vitro photodynamic therapy efficiency was tested with the HT-29 cell line. m-THPC loaded PEGMA-co-DPA nanoparticles exhibited obvious phototoxicity in HT-29 colon cancer cells after light irradiation. The results indicate that these pH sensitive nanoparticles are potential carriers for tumor targeting and photodynamic therapy.

  1. Studies of the antitumor and immunomodulatory characteristics of an extract of Momordica charantia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunnick, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    An extract from the fruit of the bitter melon (BME), Momordica charantia is able to act as a biological response modifier in the murine system. Injection of 8 μg of BME protein, intraperitoneally induces an infiltration of lymphocytes into the peritoneal cavity. These peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) are cytotoxic to a wide range of tumor targets, including the NK sensitive tumor cell line, YAC-1. Injections of BME given twice a week augments tumor cytotoxic PEC, for 4 weeks. Fractionation of BME induced PEC revealed that the non-specific, tumor cytotoxic population of PEC were non-adherent mononuclear cells. Fractionation of PEC using unit gravity sedimentation revealed that the cytotoxic population is either a neutrophil or a large granular lymphocyte (LGL) as observed in the 51 Cr-release assay. The antitumor activity of the BME which confers a tumor-dormant state on L1210 tumor-bearing mice was found to correlate with an increase in tumor cytotoxic cells in the PEC of BME injected mice. Tumor-bearing mice which received treatment with saline did not exhibit any tumor cytotoxic activity. Oral administration of the BME augmented splenic NK cytotoxicity. BME is highly antigenic. The formation of antibodies against the BME is detectable by a solid-phase radioimmunoassay after three weeks of ip injections (two/week). The mechanism of NK activation is still unknown. Results indicated that a BME does not induce the production of interleukin-2 or interferon

  2. Studies of the antitumor and immunomodulatory characteristics of an extract of Momordica charantia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunnick, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    An extract from the fruit of the bitter melon (BME), Momordica charantia is able to act as a biological response modifier in the murine system. Injection of 8 ..mu..g of BME protein, intraperitoneally induces an infiltration of lymphocytes into the peritoneal cavity. These peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) are cytotoxic to a wide range of tumor targets, including the NK sensitive tumor cell line, YAC-1. Injections of BME given twice a week augments tumor cytotoxic PEC, for 4 weeks. Fractionation of BME induced PEC revealed that the non-specific, tumor cytotoxic population of PEC were non-adherent mononuclear cells. Fractionation of PEC using unit gravity sedimentation revealed that the cytotoxic population is either a neutrophil or a large granular lymphocyte (LGL) as observed in the /sup 51/Cr-release assay. The antitumor activity of the BME which confers a tumor-dormant state on L1210 tumor-bearing mice was found to correlate with an increase in tumor cytotoxic cells in the PEC of BME injected mice. Tumor-bearing mice which received treatment with saline did not exhibit any tumor cytotoxic activity. Oral administration of the BME augmented splenic NK cytotoxicity. BME is highly antigenic. The formation of antibodies against the BME is detectable by a solid-phase radioimmunoassay after three weeks of ip injections (two/week). The mechanism of NK activation is still unknown. Results indicated that a BME does not induce the production of interleukin-2 or interferon.

  3. An Inter-Projection Interpolation (IPI) Approach with Geometric Model Restriction to Reduce Image Dose in Cone Beam CT (CBCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Kong, Fengchong; Ren, Lei; Jin, Jian-Yue

    2014-09-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging is a key step in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) to improve tumor targeting. The quality and imaging dose of CBCT are two important factors. However, X-ray scatter in the large cone beam field usually induces image artifacts and degrades the image quality for CBCT. A synchronized moving grid (SMOG) approach has recently been proposed to resolve this issue and shows great promise. However, the SMOG technique requires two projections in the same gantry angle to obtain full information due to signal blockage by the grid. This study aims to develop an inter-projection interpolation (IPI) method to estimate the blocked image information. This approach will require only one projection in each gantry angle, thus reducing the scan time and patient dose. IPI is also potentially suitable for sparse-view CBCT reconstruction to reduce the imaging dose. To be compared with other state-of-the-art spatial interpolation (called inpainting) methods in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on a Catphan and head phantoms, IPI increases SNR from 15.3dB and 12.7dB to 29.0dB and 28.1dB, respectively. The SNR of IPI on sparse-view CBCT reconstruction can achieve from 28dB to 17dB for undersample projection sets with gantry angle interval varying from 1 to 3 degrees for both phantoms.

  4. Novel bright-emission small-molecule NIR-II fluorophores for in vivo tumor imaging and image-guided surgery† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc00251c Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yao; Ding, Mingmin; Zeng, Xiaodong; Xiao, Yuling; Wu, Huaping; Zhou, Hui; Ding, Bingbing; Qu, Chunrong; Hou, Wei; Er-bu, AGA; Zhang, Yejun; Cheng, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Though high brightness and biocompatible small NIR-II dyes are highly desirable in clinical or translational cancer research, their fluorescent cores are relatively limited and their synthetic processes are somewhat complicated. Herein, we have explored the design and synthesis of novel NIR-II fluorescent materials (H1) without tedious chromatographic isolation with improved fluorescence performance (QY ≈ 2%) by introducing 2-amino 9,9-dialkyl-substituted fluorene as a donor into the backbone. Several types of water-soluble and biocompatible NIR-II probes: SXH, SDH, and H1 NPs were constructed via different chemical strategies based on H1, and then their potential to be used in in vivo tumor imaging and image-guided surgery in the NIR-II region was explored. High levels of uptake were obtained for both passive and active tumor targeting probes SXH and SDH. Furthermore, high resolution imaging of blood vessels on tumors and the whole body of living mice using H1 NPs for the first time has demonstrated precise NIR-II image-guided sentinel lymph node (SLN) surgery. PMID:28507722

  5. NIR light-induced tumor phototherapy using photo-stable ICG delivery system based on inorganic hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huijuan; Zhang, Xiaoge; Zhu, Xing; Chen, Jianjiao; Chen, Qianqian; Zhang, Hongling; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2018-01-01

    NIR responsive inorganic hybrid (Ti@GO) was synthesized. It could absorb NIR light and convert it into local hyperthermia and ROS synchronously. Ti@GO was firstly developed as a photosensitizer and a photothermal agent to realize tumor PTT and PDT. For anti-tumor application, HA was grafted on Ti@GO simultaneously as water solubility improver and tumor targeting moiety. ICG was chosen as a model drug. Results demonstrated that HA-Ti@GO could remarkably improve ICG stability and drug accumulation in 4T1 cells, enhance tumor phototherapy efficiency and reduce light-associated side effects. HA-Ti@GO/ICG under NIR laser irradiation showed a significant decreased cell viability of 20.7±2.6% and a high DNA damage degree of 82.4±8.3%. Moreover, in vivo results showed that HA-Ti@GO/ICG plus NIR laser achieved almost complete tumor regression on 4T1 tumor-bearing mice, with a tumor volume of 67.0 mm 3 . Taken together, our study provided a promising strategy to realize synergistic PTT/PDT tumor therapy with a single NIR light. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Novel bright-emission small-molecule NIR-II fluorophores forin vivotumor imaging and image-guided surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yao; Ding, Mingmin; Zeng, Xiaodong; Xiao, Yuling; Wu, Huaping; Zhou, Hui; Ding, Bingbing; Qu, Chunrong; Hou, Wei; Er-Bu, Aga; Zhang, Yejun; Cheng, Zhen; Hong, Xuechuan

    2017-05-01

    Though high brightness and biocompatible small NIR-II dyes are highly desirable in clinical or translational cancer research, their fluorescent cores are relatively limited and their synthetic processes are somewhat complicated. Herein, we have explored the design and synthesis of novel NIR-II fluorescent materials ( H1 ) without tedious chromatographic isolation with improved fluorescence performance (QY ≈ 2%) by introducing 2-amino 9,9-dialkyl-substituted fluorene as a donor into the backbone. Several types of water-soluble and biocompatible NIR-II probes: SXH , SDH , and H1 NPs were constructed via different chemical strategies based on H1 , and then their potential to be used in in vivo tumor imaging and image-guided surgery in the NIR-II region was explored. High levels of uptake were obtained for both passive and active tumor targeting probes SXH and SDH . Furthermore, high resolution imaging of blood vessels on tumors and the whole body of living mice using H1 NPs for the first time has demonstrated precise NIR-II image-guided sentinel lymph node (SLN) surgery.

  7. NIR-triggered high-efficient photodynamic and chemo-cascade therapy using caspase-3 responsive functionalized upconversion nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Na; Wu, Baoyan; Hu, Xianglong; Xing, Da

    2017-10-01

    Stimuli-responsive nanoparticles with multiple therapeutic/diagnostic functions are highly desirable for effective tumor treatment. Herein novel caspase-3 responsive functionalized upconversion nanoparticles (CFUNs) were fabricated with three-in-one functional integration: near-infrared (NIR) triggered photodynamic damage along with caspase-3 activation, subsequent caspase-3 responsive drug release, and cascade chemotherapeutic activation. CFUNs were formulated from the self-assembly of caspase-3 responsive doxorubicin (DOX) prodrug tethered with DEVD peptide (DEVD-DOX), upconversion nanoparticles (UCNP), a photosensitizer (pyropheophorbide-a methyl ester, MPPa), and tumor-targeting cRGD-PEG-DSPE to afford multifunctional CFUNs, MPPa/UCNP-DEVD-DOX/cRGD. Upon cellular uptake and NIR irradiation, the visible light emission of UCNP could excite MPPa to produce reactive oxygen species for photodynamic therapy (PDT) along with the activation of caspase-3, which further cleaved DEVD peptide to release DOX within tumor cells, thus accomplishing NIR-triggered PDT and cascade chemotherapy. CFUNs presented silent therapeutic potency and negligible cytotoxicity in the dark, whereas in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated the NIR-triggered cascade therapeutic activation and tumor inhibition due to consecutive PDT and chemotherapy. Current NIR-activated cascade tumor therapy with two distinct mechanisms is significantly favorable to overcome multidrug resistance and tumor heterogeneity for persistent tumor treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cit/CuS@Fe3O4-based and enzyme-responsive magnetic nanoparticles for tumor chemotherapy, photothermal, and photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiali; Huang, Heqing; Zhang, Yingjie; Zhang, Huijuan; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2017-02-01

    Safe and efficient drug delivery in a controllable fashion, especially remote and repeatable switch of on-demand drug release, is the subject of widespread attention. A kind of magnetic nanoparticles (DOX-Cit/CuS@Fe 3 O 4 -NPs) simultaneously consisted of Cit/CuS@Fe 3 O 4 and doxorubicin (DOX) was presented. The drug release from DOX-Cit/CuS@Fe 3 O 4 -NPs could be successfully triggered by the presence of gelatinase, showing great promise for tumor-targeted drug release through an enzymatic degradation mechanism. Compared with free DOX, DOX-Cit/CuS@Fe 3 O 4 -NPs could not only specially deliver Cit/CuS@Fe 3 O 4 and DOX into MCF-7 cells, but also could greatly improve the quantity of ROS produced in MCF-7 cells under of 980 nm laser irradiation. DOX-Cit/CuS@Fe 3 O 4 -NPs also had highly selective accumulation at tumor tissue of S 180 tumor-bearing mice, which were along with a magnet near the tumor site. Furthermore, when combined with NIR laser irridation, DOX-Cit/CuS@Fe 3 O 4 -NPs showed a higher antitumor efficacy than the individual therapies in vitro and in vivo. This study showed that DOX-Cit/CuS@Fe 3 O 4 -NPs could be used as a platform for tumor chemotherapy, photothermal and photodynamic therapy.

  9. Succinimide Formation from an NGR-Containing Cyclic Peptide: Computational Evidence for Catalytic Roles of Phosphate Buffer and the Arginine Side Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota Kirikoshi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR motif and its deamidation product isoAsp-Gly-Arg (isoDGR have recently attracted considerable attention as tumor-targeting ligands. Because an NGR-containing peptide and the corresponding isoDGR-containing peptide target different receptors, the spontaneous NGR deamidation can be used in dual targeting strategies. It is well known that the Asn deamidation proceeds via a succinimide derivative. In the present study, we computationally investigated the mechanism of succinimide formation from a cyclic peptide, c[CH2CO-NGRC]-NH2, which has recently been shown to undergo rapid deamidation in a phosphate buffer. An H2PO4− ion was explicitly included in the calculations. We employed the density functional theory using the B3LYP functional. While geometry optimizations were performed in the gas phase, hydration Gibbs energies were calculated by the SM8 (solvation model 8 continuum model. We have found a pathway leading to the five-membered ring tetrahedral intermediate in which both the H2PO4− ion and the Arg side chain act as catalyst. This intermediate, once protonated at the NH2 group on the five-membered ring, was shown to easily undergo NH3 elimination leading to the succinimide formation. This study is the first to propose a possible catalytic role for the Arg side chain in the NGR deamidation.

  10. A Double-Switch Cell Fusion-Inducible Transgene Expression System for Neural Stem Cell-Based Antiglioma Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumei Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in neural stem cell- (NSC- based tumor-targeted gene therapy showed that NSC vectors expressing an artificially engineered viral fusogenic protein, VSV-G H162R, could cause tumor cell death specifically under acidic tumor microenvironment by syncytia formation; however, the killing efficiency still had much room to improve. In the view that coexpression of another antitumoral gene with VSV-G can augment the bystander effect, a synthetic regulatory system that triggers transgene expression in a cell fusion-inducible manner has been proposed. Here we have developed a double-switch cell fusion-inducible transgene expression system (DoFIT to drive transgene expression upon VSV-G-mediated NSC-glioma cell fusion. In this binary system, transgene expression is coregulated by a glioma-specific promoter and targeting sequences of a microRNA (miR that is highly expressed in NSCs but lowly expressed in glioma cells. Thus, transgene expression is “switched off” by the miR in NSC vectors, but after cell fusion with glioma cells, the miR is diluted and loses its suppressive effect. Meanwhile, in the syncytia, transgene expression is “switched on” by the glioma-specific promoter. Our in vitro and in vivo experimental data show that DoFIT successfully abolishes luciferase reporter gene expression in NSC vectors but activates it specifically after VSV-G-mediated NSC-glioma cell fusion.

  11. Nanotargeted Radionuclides for Cancer Nuclear Imaging and Internal Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gann Ting

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Current progress in nanomedicine has exploited the possibility of designing tumor-targeted nanocarriers being able to deliver radionuclide payloads in a site or molecular selective manner to improve the efficacy and safety of cancer imaging and therapy. Radionuclides of auger electron-, α-, β-, and γ-radiation emitters have been surface-bioconjugated or after-loaded in nanoparticles to improve the efficacy and reduce the toxicity of cancer imaging and therapy in preclinical and clinical studies. This article provides a brief overview of current status of applications, advantages, problems, up-to-date research and development, and future prospects of nanotargeted radionuclides in cancer nuclear imaging and radiotherapy. Passive and active nanotargeting delivery of radionuclides with illustrating examples for tumor imaging and therapy are reviewed and summarized. Research on combing different modes of selective delivery of radionuclides through nanocarriers targeted delivery for tumor imaging and therapy offers the new possibility of large increases in cancer diagnostic efficacy and therapeutic index. However, further efforts and challenges in preclinical and clinical efficacy and toxicity studies are required to translate those advanced technologies to the clinical applications for cancer patients.

  12. Mapping Extracellular pH of Gliomas in Presence of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles: Towards Imaging the Distribution of Drug-Containing Nanoparticles and Their Curative Effect on the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Maritim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since brain’s microvasculature is compromised in gliomas, intravenous injection of tumor-targeting nanoparticles containing drugs (D-NPs and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO-NPs can deliver high payloads of drugs while allowing MRI to track drug distribution. However, therapeutic effect of D-NPs remains poorly investigated because superparamagnetic fields generated by SPIO-NPs perturb conventional MRI readouts. Because extracellular pH (pHe is a tumor hallmark, mapping pHe is critical. Brain pHe is measured by biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts (BIRDS with lanthanide agents, by detecting paramagnetically shifted resonances of nonexchangeable protons on the agent. To test the hypothesis that BIRDS-based pHe readout remains uncompromised by presence of SPIO-NPs, we mapped pHe in glioma-bearing rats before and after SPIO-NPs infusion. While SPIO-NPs accumulation in the tumor enhanced MRI contrast, the pHe inside and outside the MRI-defined tumor boundary remained unchanged after SPIO-NPs infusion, regardless of the tumor type (9L versus RG2 or agent injection method (renal ligation versus coinfusion with probenecid. These results demonstrate that we can simultaneously and noninvasively image the specific location and the healing efficacy of D-NPs, where MRI contrast from SPIO-NPs can track their distribution and BIRDS-based pHe can map their therapeutic impact.

  13. Immunomodulation in C57Bl/6 mice following consumption of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) from Lake Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleland, G.B.; McElroy, P.J.; Sonstegard, R.A. (McMaster Univ. Medical Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada))

    1989-01-01

    This report describes studies designed to assess the immunomodulatory effects associated with the consumption of coho salmon containing halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) and other compounds naturally bioaccumulated from Lake Ontario. Diets containing 33% coho salmon from Lake Ontario or the Pacific Ocean were fed to juvenile C57Bl/6 mice for 2-4 mo. Following 60 d, the mice that consumed Lake Ontario salmon had reduced IgM, IgG, and IgA plaque-forming cell responses to sheep erythrocytes. No changes were observed in total numbers of spleen lymphocytes, total T-lymphocytes or T-lymphocyte subsets as determined by flow cytometry. Cellular immunity, assessed by the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response to allogeneic tumor target cells, was not altered following dietary exposure to Lake Ontario coho salmon for 4 mo. The observed humoral immunomodulation correlated with elevated PCB levels in the Lake Ontario salmon diets. The levels of pollutants such as mercury, tin compounds and other metals, PCDDs, and PCDFs were not examined.

  14. Robotized High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) system for treatment of mobile organs using motion tracking by ultrasound imaging: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanel, Laure-Anais; Nageotte, Florent; Vappou, Jonathan; Luo, Jianwen; Cuvillon, Loic; de Mathelin, Michel

    2015-01-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is a very promising method for ablation of solid tumors. However, intra-abdominal organ motion, principally due to breathing, is a substantial limitation that results in incorrect tumor targeting. The objective of this work is to develop an all-in-one robotized HIFU system that can compensate motion in real-time during HIFU treatment. To this end, an ultrasound visual servoing scheme working at 20 Hz was designed. It relies on the motion estimation by using a fast ultrasonic speckle tracking algorithm and on the use of an interleaved imaging/HIFU sonication sequence for avoiding ultrasonic wave interferences. The robotized HIFU system was tested on a sample of chicken breast undergoing a vertical sinusoidal motion at 0.25 Hz. Sonications with and without motion compensation were performed in order to assess the effect of motion compensation on thermal lesions induced by HIFU. Motion was reduced by more than 80% thanks to this ultrasonic visual servoing system.

  15. Targeting of systemically-delivered magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia using a noninvasive, static, external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulauf, Grayson D.; Trembly, B. Stuart; Giustini, Andrew J.; Flint, Brian R.; Strawbridge, Rendall R.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2013-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges of nanoparticle cancer therapy is the delivery of adequate numbers of nanoparticles to the tumor site. Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have many favorable qualities, including their nontoxic composition, the wide range of diameters in which they can be produced, the cell-specific cytotoxic heating that results from their absorption of energy from a nontoxic, external alternating magnetic field (AMF), and the wide variety of functional coatings that can be applied. Although IONPs can be delivered via an intra-tumoral injection to some tumors, the resulting tumor IONP distribution is generally inadequate; additionally, local tumor injections do not allow for the treatment of systemic or multifocal disease. Consequently, the ultimate success of nanoparticle based cancer therapy likely rests with successful systemic, tumor-targeted IONP delivery. In this study, we used a surface-based, bilateral, noninvasive static magnetic field gradient produced by neodymium-boron-iron magnets (80 T/m to 130 T/m in central plane between magnets), a rabbit ear model, and systemically-delivered starch-coated 100 nm magnetic (iron oxide) nanoparticles to demonstrate a spatially-defined increase in the local tissue accumulation of IONPs. In this non-tumor model, the IONPs remained within the local vascular space. It is anticipated that this technique can be used to enhance IONP delivery significantly to the tumor parenchyma/cells. PMID:24073325

  16. Inhalable magnetic nanoparticles for targeted hyperthermia in lung cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukha, Tanmoy; Wiedmann, Timothy S; Panyam, Jayanth

    2013-07-01

    Lung cancer (specifically, non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Poor response rates and survival with current treatments clearly indicate the urgent need for developing an effective means to treat NSCLC. Magnetic hyperthermia is a non-invasive approach for tumor ablation, and is based on heat generation by magnetic materials, such as superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles, when subjected to an alternating magnetic field. However, inadequate delivery of magnetic nanoparticles to tumor cells can result in sub-lethal temperature change and induce resistance while non-targeted delivery of these particles to the healthy tissues can result in toxicity. In our studies, we evaluated the effectiveness of tumor-targeted SPIO nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia of lung cancer. EGFR-targeted, inhalable SPIO nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized for targeting lung tumor cells as well as for magnetic hyperthermia-mediated antitumor efficacy in a mouse orthotopic model of NSCLC. Our results show that EGFR targeting enhances tumor retention of SPIO nanoparticles. Further, magnetic hyperthermia treatment using targeted SPIO nanoparticles resulted in significant inhibition of in vivo lung tumor growth. Overall, this work demonstrates the potential for developing an effective anticancer treatment modality for the treatment of NSCLC based on targeted magnetic hyperthermia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. APPLICATION OF IMAGE ANALYSIS METHODS FOR ISOCENTER QUALITY ASSURANCE IN RADIOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Niedźwiecki

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the major procedures for testing the geometrical accuracy of devices used in radiotherapy treatments is the test of the geometrical position of the radiation isocenter. The importance of the test reflects the fact that geometrical position of the radiation isocenter generally affects the tumor targeting. At present the geometric accuracy is assessed with the Winston-Lutz test which checks the position of an image of a ball marker with the respect to the center of the radiation field as projected on a detector plane. Obviously, determination of coordinates of a single marker is not sufficient to fully account for a complicated geometry of a therapeutic device. The purpose of the study was to design a new image analysis tool to better determine the isocenter. The proposed automated procedure for determining isocenter position uses projection data acquired for a special cube phantom. The projection images of a phantom are acquired for various angles of rotation of the gantry. A procedure is proposed to extract some geometric characteristics of a therapeutic device from the projection images.

  18. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of anti-nucleolin-targeted magnetic PLGA nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin as a theranostic agent for enhanced targeted cancer imaging and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosafer, Jafar; Abnous, Khalil; Tafaghodi, Mohsen; Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2017-04-01

    A superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs)/doxorubicin (Dox) co-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-based nanoparticles targeted with AS1411 aptamer (Apt) against murine C26 colon carcinoma cells is successfully developed via a modified multiple emulsion solvent evaporation method for theranostic purposes. The mean size of SPIO/Dox-NPs (NPs) was 130nm with a narrow particle size distribution and Dox loading of 3.0%. The SPIO loading of 16.0% and acceptable magnetic properties are obtained and analyzed using thermogravimetric and vibration simple magnetometer analysis, respectively. The best release profile from NPs was observed in PBS at pH 7.4, in which very low burst release was observed. Nucleolin is a targeting ligand to facilitate anti-tumor delivery of AS1411-targeted NPs. The Apt conjugation to NPs (Apt-NPs) enhanced cellular uptake of Dox in C26 cancer cells. Apt-NPs enhance the cytotoxicity effect of Dox followed by a significantly higher tumor inhibition and prolonged animal survival in mice bearing C26 colon carcinoma xenografts. Furthermore, Apt-NPs enhance the contrast of magnetic resonance images in tumor site. Altogether, these Apt-NPs could be considered as a powerful tumor-targeted delivery system for their potential as dual therapeutic and diagnostic applications in cancers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Hypoxia in tumors: pathogenesis-related classification, characterization of hypoxia subtypes, and associated biological and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaupel, Peter; Mayer, Arnulf

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a hallmark of tumors leading to (mal-)adaptive processes, development of aggressive phenotypes and treatment resistance. Based on underlying mechanisms and their duration, two main types of hypoxia have been identified, coexisting with complex spatial and temporal heterogeneities. Chronic hypoxia is mainly caused by diffusion limitations due to enlarged diffusion distances and adverse diffusion geometries (e.g., concurrent vs. countercurrent microvessels, Krogh- vs. Hill-type diffusion geometry) and, to a lesser extent, by hypoxemia (e.g., in anemic patients, HbCO formation in heavy smokers), and a compromised perfusion or flow stop (e.g., due to disturbed Starling forces or intratumor solid stress). Acute hypoxia mainly results from transient disruptions in perfusion (e.g., vascular occlusion by cell aggregates), fluctuating red blood cell fluxes or short-term contractions of the interstitial matrix. In each of these hypoxia subtypes oxygen supply is critically reduced, but perfusion-dependent nutrient supply, waste removal, delivery of anticancer or diagnostic agents, and repair competence can be impaired or may not be affected. This detailed differentiation of tumor hypoxia may impact on our understanding of tumor biology and may aid in the development of novel treatment strategies, tumor detection by imaging and tumor targeting, and is thus of great clinical relevance.

  20. Sex Hormone Receptor Repertoire in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald M. Higa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Classification of breast cancer as endocrine sensitive, hormone dependent, or estrogen receptor (ER positive refers singularly to ERα. One of the oldest recognized tumor targets, disruption of ERα-mediated signaling, is believed to be the mechanistic mode of action for all hormonal interventions used in treating this disease. Whereas ERα is widely accepted as the single most important predictive factor (for response to endocrine therapy, the presence of the receptor in tumor cells is also of prognostic value. Even though the clinical relevance of the two other sex hormone receptors, namely, ERβ and the androgen receptor remains unclear, two discordant phenomena observed in hormone-dependent breast cancers could be causally related to ERβ-mediated effects and androgenic actions. Nonetheless, our understanding of regulatory molecules and resistance mechanisms remains incomplete, further compromising our ability to develop novel therapeutic strategies that could improve disease outcomes. This review focuses on the receptor-mediated actions of the sex hormones in breast cancer.

  1. SMAC-armed vaccinia virus induces both apoptosis and necroptosis and synergizes the efficiency of vinblastine in HCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qiang; Huang, Yuanyong; Chen, Lieyang; Gu, JinFa; Zhou, Xiumei

    2014-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has particularly high incidence rate in Asia and its resistance to the chemotherapeutic drugs and cell death make it intractable. Vaccinia virus (VV) is a potential vehicle and has been widely used in cancer therapy. SMAC/DIABLO is a critical factor in activating caspases and eliminating inhibition of IAPs when the programmed cell death is promoted. In this study, we constructed a tumor-targeted vaccinia virus carrying SMAC/DIABLO gene that was knocked in the region of viral thymidine kinase gene (VV-SMAC). Our results showed that VV-SMAC efficiently infected and destroyed HCC cells via triggering both caspase-dependent apoptosis and necroptosis with depletion of IAPs. Furthermore, ripoptosome, a prerequisite complex of necroptosis, was assembled and induced by VV-SMAC. In addition, the combination of VV-SMAC and vinblastine represented a synergistic effect on HCC cells. In summary, our data suggest that VV-SMAC is a potential candidate and combination of VV-SMAC and vinblastine may provide a new avenue in treatment of HCC.

  2. Regulating cytokine function enhances safety and activity of genetic cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hannah; Sampath, Padma; Hou, Weizhou; Thorne, Stephen H

    2013-01-01

    Genetic therapies, including transfected immune cells and viral vectors, continue to show clinical responses as systemically deliverable and targeted therapeutics, with the first such approaches having been approved for cancer treatment. The majority of these employ cytokine transgenes. However, expression of cytokines early after systemic delivery can result in increased toxicity and nonspecific induction of the immune response. In addition, premature immune-mediated clearance of the therapy may result, especially for viral-based approaches. Here, it was initially verified that cytokine (interleukin (IL)2) or chemokine (CCL5) expression from a systemically delivered oncolytic virus resulted in reduced oncolytic activity and suboptimal immune activation, while IL2 also resulted in increased toxicity. However, all these limitations could be overcome through incorporation of exogenous regulation of cytokine or chemokine transgene function through fusion of a small and externally controllable destabilizing domain to the protein of interest. Regulation allowed an initial phase without cytokine function, permitting enhanced delivery and oncolytic activity before activation of cytokine function and a subsequent phase of enhanced and tumor-targeted immunotherapeutic activity. As a result of this exogenous regulation of cytokine function, both oncolytic and immune-mediated mechanisms of action were optimized, greatly enhancing therapeutic activity, while toxicity was significantly reduced.

  3. Slp-76 is a critical determinant of NK cell-mediated recognition of missing-self targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Kristin; Endale, Mehari; Cashman, Siobhan; Fang, Hao; Mattner, Jochen; Hildeman, David; Hoebe, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    Absence of MHC class I expression is an important mechanism by which NK cells recognize a variety of target cells, yet the pathways underlying “missing-self” recognition, including the involvement of activating receptors, remain poorly understood. Using ENU mutagenesis in mice, we identified a germline mutant, designated Ace, with a marked defect in NK cell-mediated recognition and elimination of “missing-self” targets. The causative mutation was linked to chromosome 11 and identified as a missense mutation [Thr428Ile] in the SH2 domain of Slp-76—a critical adapter molecule downstream of ITAM-containing surface receptors. The Slp-76 Ace mutation behaved as a hypomorphic allele—while no major defects were observed in conventional T cell development/function, a marked defect in NK cell-mediated elimination of β2-Microglobulin (β2M)-deficient target cells was observed. Further studies revealed Slp-76 to control NK cell receptor expression and maturation, however, activation of Slp-76ace/ace NK cells through ITAM-containing NK cell receptors or allogeneic/tumor target cells appeared largely unaffected. Imagestream analysis of the NK-β2M−/− target cell synapse, revealed a specific defect in actin recruitment to the conjugate synapse in Slp-76ace/ace NK cells. Overall these studies establish Slp-76 as a critical determinant of NK cell development and NK cell-mediated elimination of missing-self target cells. PMID:25929249

  4. Chemoradiotherapy of cancer using boronated monoclonal antibodies. Progress report, December 1, 1982-November 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloway, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility was established of using antibodies for the delivery of 10 B. Problems faced included 1) preservation of antibody activity following boronation, 2) antigenic receptor site density of the target cells, and 3) delivery of a critical number of 10 B atoms per cell. The linkage of a heavily boronated polymeric species to antibody by means of a single functional group allow for the delivery of a large number 10 B atoms per antibody molecule without a significant reduction in affinity. Both the polyclonally derived anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) and the monoclonal anti-colorectal carcinoma antibody (17-1A) recognize antigens that are expressed with a density of approximately 10 6 epitopes per cell. The major concept that we advance is that just as effective cancer chemotherapy is based on the use of a combination of drugs, similarly a combination of compounds could be employed to deliver the requisite amount of 10 B to tumor target cells. This could include compounds such as Na 2 B 12 H 11 Sh together with boronated antibodies directed against tumor associated antigens. (DT)

  5. Shigella mediated depletion of macrophages in a murine breast cancer model is associated with tumor regression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Galmbacher

    Full Text Available A tumor promoting role of macrophages has been described for a transgenic murine breast cancer model. In this model tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs represent a major component of the leukocytic infiltrate and are associated with tumor progression. Shigella flexneri is a bacterial pathogen known to specificly induce apotosis in macrophages. To evaluate whether Shigella-induced removal of macrophages may be sufficient for achieving tumor regression we have developed an attenuated strain of S. flexneri (M90TDeltaaroA and infected tumor bearing mice. Two mouse models were employed, xenotransplantation of a murine breast cancer cell line and spontanous breast cancer development in MMTV-HER2 transgenic mice. Quantitative analysis of bacterial tumor targeting demonstrated that attenuated, invasive Shigella flexneri primarily infected TAMs after systemic administration. A single i.v. injection of invasive M90TDeltaaroA resulted in caspase-1 dependent apoptosis of TAMs followed by a 74% reduction in tumors of transgenic MMTV-HER-2 mice 7 days post infection. TAM depletion was sustained and associated with complete tumor regression.These data support TAMs as useful targets for antitumor therapy and highlight attenuated bacterial pathogens as potential tools.

  6. Preparation and biological activity studies of resveratrol loaded ionically cross-linked chitosan-TPP nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Wang, Yaping; Yang, Hao; Liu, Xiangyu; Lu, Zhong

    2017-11-01

    Nanoparticles with size range of 10-500nm can be efficiently delivered into cancer cells by the Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) effect. Here, we prepared resveratrol (Res) loaded chitosan (CS) nanoparticles with the size of 172-217nm by an ionic cross-linking method, with sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) as the cross-linking agent, to improve the stability, solubility and tumors targeting of the natural anti-cancer drug Res. The prepared Res loaded CS-TPP nanoparticles presented long-term storage stability and UV light stability. The cumulative drug release from nanoparticles in mimetic tumor tissue condition (pH 6.5) was higher than that in physiological condition (pH 7.4). Further, Res-loaded CS-TPP nanoparticles maintained the antioxidant activity of Res even after UV light irradiation. Cell viability study shows that the as prepared drug loaded nanoparticles had similar antiproliferative activity on hepatocellular carcinoma cells SMMC 7721 and lower cytotoxicity on normal hepatocyte cells L02 compared with free Res. Fluorescence microscopy observation revealed that the nanoparticles were efficiently taken in by SMMC 7721 cells. This work indicates the potential use of drug loaded CS-TPP nanoparticles for the efficient delivery of bioactive Res for chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Design and conduct of early-phase radiotherapy trials with targeted therapeutics: lessons from the PRAVO experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ree, Anne Hansen; Hollywood, Donal

    2013-07-01

    New strategies to facilitate the improvement of physical and integrated biological optimization of high-precision treatment protocols are an important priority for modern radiation oncology. From a clinical perspective, as knowledge accumulates from molecular radiobiology, there is a complex and exciting opportunity to investigate novel approaches to rational patient treatment stratification based on actionable tumor targets, together with the appropriate design of next-generation early-phase radiotherapy trials utilizing targeted therapeutics, to formally evaluate relevant clinical and biomarker endpoints. A unique aspect in the development pathway of systemic agents with presumed radiosensitizing activity will also be the need for special attention on patient eligibility and the rigorous definition of radiation dose-volume relationships and potential dose-limiting toxicities. Based on recent experience from systematically investigating histone deacetylase inhibitors as radiosensitizing agents, from initial studies in preclinical tumor models through the conduct of a phase I clinical study to evaluate tumor activity of the targeted agent as well as patient safety and tumor response to the combined treatment modality, this communication will summarize principles relating to early clinical evaluation of combining radiotherapy and targeted therapeutics. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Mechanisms of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity and implications for future clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Ho; Jenrow, Kenneth A.; Brown, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    To summarize current knowledge regarding mechanisms of radiation-induced normal tissue injury and medical countermeasures available to reduce its severity. Advances in radiation delivery using megavoltage and intensity-modulated radiation therapy have permitted delivery of higher doses of radiation to well-defined tumor target tissues. Injury to critical normal tissues and organs, however, poses substantial risks in the curative treatment of cancers, especially when radiation is administered in combination with chemotherapy. The principal pathogenesis is initiated by depletion of tissue stem cells and progenitor cells and damage to vascular endothelial microvessels. Emerging concepts of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity suggest that the recovery and repopulation of stromal stem cells remain chronically impaired by long-lived free radicals, reactive oxygen species, and pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines resulting in progressive damage after radiation exposure. Better understanding the mechanisms mediating interactions among excessive generation of reactive oxygen species, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and activated macrophages, and role of bone marrow-derived progenitor and stem cells may provide novel insight on the pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury of tissues. Further understanding the molecular signaling pathways of cytokines and chemokines would reveal novel targets for protecting or mitigating radiation injury of tissues and organs.

  9. SN-38 loading capacity of hydrophobic polymer blend nanoparticles: formulation, optimization and efficacy evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimchevska, Simona; Geskovski, Nikola; Petruševski, Gjorgji; Chacorovska, Marina; Popeski-Dimovski, Riste; Ugarkovic, Sonja; Goracinova, Katerina

    2017-03-01

    One of the most important problems in nanoencapsulation of extremely hydrophobic drugs is poor drug loading due to rapid drug crystallization outside the polymer core. The effort to use nanoprecipitation, as a simple one-step procedure with good reproducibility and FDA approved polymers like Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and Polycaprolactone (PCL), will only potentiate this issue. Considering that drug loading is one of the key defining characteristics, in this study we attempted to examine whether the nanoparticle (NP) core composed of two hydrophobic polymers will provide increased drug loading for 7-Ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (SN-38), relative to NPs prepared using individual polymers. D-optimal design was applied to optimize PLGA/PCL ratio in the polymer blend and the mode of addition of the amphiphilic copolymer Lutrol ® F127 in order to maximize SN-38 loading and obtain NPs with acceptable size for passive tumor targeting. Drug/polymer and polymer/polymer interaction analysis pointed to high degree of compatibility and miscibility among both hydrophobic polymers, providing core configuration with higher drug loading capacity. Toxicity studies outlined the biocompatibility of the blank NPs. Increased in vitro efficacy of drug-loaded NPs compared to the free drug was confirmed by growth inhibition studies using SW-480 cell line. Additionally, the optimized NP formulation showed very promising blood circulation profile with elimination half-time of 7.4 h.

  10. Mechanisms of cell penetration and cytotoxicity of ultrasmall Au nanoparticles conjugated to doxorubicin and/or targeting peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Jay; Poon, Wilson; Zhang, Xuan

    2015-03-01

    The goals of this work were to determine whether conjugation of any of four selected peptides to Au nanoparticles improved their delivery to B16 melanoma in vitro and in vivo. In in vitro cytotoxicity assays, peptides and conjugates were endocytosed but did not escape from endosomes. None of the peptides showed any cytotoxicity, with or without conjugation to the nanoparticles. The combination of peptides and doxorubicin did not improve upon the cytotoxicity of gold-doxorubicin alone. We then tested targeting in vivo using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to quantify the concentration of Au in the organs of B16 tumor-bearing mice 4, 24, and 72 h after intravenous Au nanoparticle injection. These experiments showed that in some cases, peptide conjugation improved upon the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. A peptide based upon the myxoma virus and the cyclic RGD peptide were both effective at tumor targeting; myxoma was more effective with un-PEGylated particles, and cRGD with PEGylated particles. The FREG and melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) peptides did not improve targeting. These results suggest that these peptides may improve delivery of Au particles to tumors, but also may prevent entry of particles into cell nuclei.

  11. β-cyclodextrin functionalized poly (5-amidoisophthalicacid) grafted Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles: A novel biocompatible nanocomposite for targeted docetaxel delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasi, Roghayeh [Department of Chemistry, University of Zanjan, P.O. Box 45195-313, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khoobi, Mehdi [Department of Pharmaceutical Biomaterials and Medical Biomaterials Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknejad, Hassan [Department of Tissue Engineering, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ramazani, Ali [Department of Chemistry, University of Zanjan, P.O. Box 45195-313, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ma’mani, Leila [Department of Nanotechnology, Agricultural Biotechnology Research Institute of Iran (ABRII), Agricultural Research, Education and Extension Organization (AREEO), Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bahadorikhalili, Saeed [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shafiee, Abbas, E-mail: ashafiee@ams.ac.ir [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Thiol-lactam initiated radical polymerization (TLIRP) was successfully employed to prepare poly-N−5-acrylamidoisophthalicacid grafted onto Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs@PAIP). β-Cyclodextrin (CD) was then conjugated to the carboxylic groups of the prepared MNPs via carbodiimide activation. Subsequently, tumor-targeting folic acid (FA) was attached to the hydroxyl groups of CD on the surface of the latter MNPs to increase the site-specific intracellular delivery. The prepared MNPs were fully characterized by FTIR, VSM, TGA, XRD, FE-SEM and TEM. Docetaxel (DTX) as hydrophobic anticancer drug was loaded via host-guest inclusion complexation with CD and the release profile of the system was studied at different pH. The effect of MNPs on the cell viability was evaluated for the human embryonic kidney normal cell line (HEK293) as well as HeLa and MDA-MB-231 cancerous cell lines and the results did not show any apparent cytotoxic effect. In comparison, DTX loaded MNPs reduced the growth of HeLa and MDA-MB-231 cells more than free DTX. Intracellular uptake ability of DTX loaded MNPs was also studied using fluorescent microscopy and showed cellular uptake about 90% after 4 h treatment. - Highlights: • MNPs@PAIP-CD-FA nanoparticles as a carrier of Doctexal have excellent physical properties. • These nanoparticles are superparamagnetic, biocompatible and non-toxic. • The constructed nanocarrier showed suitable loading capacity and entrapment efficiency.

  12. Cell penetrating peptides: efficient vectors for delivery of nanoparticles, nanocarriers, therapeutic and diagnostic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkhani, Samad Mussa; Valizadeh, Alireza; Karami, Hadi; Mohammadi, Samane; Sohrabi, Nasrin; Badrzadeh, Fariba

    2014-07-01

    Efficient delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic molecules to the cells and tissues is a difficult challenge. The cellular membrane is very effective in its role as a selectively permeable barrier. While it is essential for cell survival and function, also presents a major barrier for intracellular delivery of cargo such as therapeutic and diagnostic agents. In recent years, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), that are relatively short cationic and/or amphipathic peptides, received great attention as efficient cellular delivery vectors due to their intrinsic ability to enter cells and mediate uptake of a wide range of macromolecular cargo such as plasmid DNA (pDNA), small interfering RNA (siRNAs), drugs, and nanoparticulate pharmaceutical carriers. This review discusses the various uptake mechanisms of these peptides. Furthermore, we discuss recent advances in the use of CPP for the efficient delivery of nanoparticles, nanocarriers, DNA, siRNA, and anticancer drugs to the cells. In addition, we have been highlighting new results for improving endosomal escape of CPP-cargo molecules. Finally, pH-responsive and activable CPPs for tumor-targeting therapy have been described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Experimental investigation of the penetration of ultrasound nanobubbles in a gastric cancer xenograft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaozhou; Wang, Luofu; Guo, Yanli; Tong, Haipeng; Li, Lang; Ding, Jun; Huang, Haiyun

    2013-08-01

    Nanobubbles as a type of ultrasound contrast agent have attracted much interest in recent years due to their many advantages, such as strong penetrating power and high stability. However, there is still insufficient morphological evidence concerning gas-filled nanobubbles in tumor tissue spaces and tumor angiogenesis. We used a gastric cancer xenograft as an example to study this question. Nanobubbles with a particle size of 435.2 ± 60.53 nm were prepared and compared with SonoVue® microbubbles in vitro and in vivo, and they exhibited a superior contrast imaging effect. After excluding the impact of the nanobubbles in blood vessels through saline flush, we used an ultrasound burst and frozen sectioning to investigate the distribution of nanobubbles in the gastric cancer xenografts and confirmed this by transmission electron microscopy. Preliminary results showed that the nanobubbles were able to pass through the gaps between the endothelial cells in the tumor vascular system to enter the tissue space. These findings could provide morphological evidence for extravascular ultrasound imaging of tumors and serve as a foundation for the application of nanobubbles in extravascular tumor-targeted ultrasonic diagnostics and therapy.

  14. Targeted gold nanoparticles enable molecular CT imaging of cancer: an in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuveni, Tobi; Motiei, Menachem; Romman, Zimam; Popovtzer, Aron; Popovtzer, Rachela

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, advances in molecular biology and cancer research have led to the identification of sensitive and specific biomarkers that associate with various types of cancer. However, in vivo cancer detection methods with computed tomography, based on tracing and detection of these molecular cancer markers, are unavailable today. This paper demonstrates in vivo the feasibility of cancer diagnosis based on molecular markers rather than on anatomical structures, using clinical computed tomography. Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor conjugated gold nanoparticles (30 nm) were intravenously injected into nude mice implanted with human squamous cell carcinoma head and neck cancer. The results clearly demonstrate that a small tumor, which is currently undetectable through anatomical computed tomography, is enhanced and becomes clearly visible by the molecularly-targeted gold nanoparticles. It is further shown that active tumor targeting is more efficient and specific than passive targeting. This noninvasive and nonionizing molecular cancer imaging tool can facilitate early cancer detection and can provide researchers with a new technique to investigate in vivo the expression and activity of cancer-related biomarkers and molecular processes. PMID:22131831

  15. Dual-functionalized nanoparticles loaded microbubbles for enhancement of drug uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingjia; Zhang, Xia; Luo, Wanxian; Wang, Dongxiao; Yang, Li; Wang, Jianguo; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Shiyu; Luo, Shuyi; Wang, Ying

    2018-07-01

    The application of microbubble (MB)-assisted ultrasound (US) can combine the advantages of real-time imaging and targeted drug delivery. However, the drug loading capacity of MB is limited restricting its application in antitumor procedure. In contrast, nanoparticles (NPs) can carry drugs more efficiently, but adverse side effect induced by unspecific accumulation can not be ignored. Herein, we developed a dual-functionalized NP loaded MB to investigate its potential feasibility for tumor-targeted drug delivery. Firstly, we prepared NPs using heparin as backbone. Targeting ligand folate and cell-penetrating ligand Tat peptide were conjugated to the backbone to deliver paclitaxel (H-F-Tat-P NPs). Subsequently, the dual-functionalized NPs were incorporated with MBs via avidin-biotin linkage to fabricate H-F-Tat-P NPs loaded MBs (NPs-loaded MBs). The combined strategy can take profit of dual functionalities from NPs and sonoporation effect from MBs triggered by US. The prepared NPs have been characterized. The excellent cellular uptake of NPs were qualitative and quantitative analysis by flow cytometry and confocal microscope, the results indicated that it was attributed to not only dual functionalities but also US effect. Foremost, the NPs-loaded MBs combined with US exhibited significant cytotoxicity on both folate receptor (FR) overexpressing and deficiency cells. The combination of dual-functionalized NPs and MBs with US is expected to be a promising strategy for targeted anticancer drug delivery and ultrasound imaging simultaneously. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrasound-sensitive nanoparticle aggregates for targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Anne-Laure; Korin, Netanel; Kanapathipillai, Mathumai; Mammoto, Akiko; Mammoto, Tadanori; Jiang, Amanda; Mannix, Robert; Uzun, Oktay; Johnson, Christopher; Bhatta, Deen; Cuneo, Garry; Ingber, Donald E

    2017-09-01

    Here we describe injectable, ultrasound (US)-responsive, nanoparticle aggregates (NPAs) that disintegrate into slow-release, nanoscale, drug delivery systems, which can be targeted to selective sites by applying low-energy US locally. We show that, unlike microbubble based drug carriers which may suffer from stability problems, the properties of mechanical activated NPAs, composed of polymer nanoparticles, can be tuned by properly adjusting the polymer molecular weight, the size of the nanoparticle precursors as well as the percentage of excipient utilized to hold the NPA together. We then apply this concept to practice by fabricating NPAs composed of nanoparticles loaded with Doxorubicin (Dox) and tested their ability to treat tumors via ultrasound activation. Mouse studies demonstrated significantly increased efficiency of tumor targeting of the US-activated NPAs compared to PLGA nanoparticle controls (with or without US applied) or intact NPAs. Importantly, when the Dox-loaded NPAs were injected and exposed to US energy locally, this increased ability to concentrate nanoparticles at the tumor site resulted in a significantly greater reduction in tumor volume compared to tumors treated with a 20-fold higher dose of the free drug. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nanotargeted Radionuclides for Cancer Nuclear Imaging and Internal Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Gann; Chang, Chih-Hsien; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Lee, Te-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Current progress in nanomedicine has exploited the possibility of designing tumor-targeted nanocarriers being able to deliver radionuclide payloads in a site or molecular selective manner to improve the efficacy and safety of cancer imaging and therapy. Radionuclides of auger electron-, α-, β-, and γ-radiation emitters have been surface-bioconjugated or after-loaded in nanoparticles to improve the efficacy and reduce the toxicity of cancer imaging and therapy in preclinical and clinical studies. This article provides a brief overview of current status of applications, advantages, problems, up-to-date research and development, and future prospects of nanotargeted radionuclides in cancer nuclear imaging and radiotherapy. Passive and active nanotargeting delivery of radionuclides with illustrating examples for tumor imaging and therapy are reviewed and summarized. Research on combing different modes of selective delivery of radionuclides through nanocarriers targeted delivery for tumor imaging and therapy offers the new possibility of large increases in cancer diagnostic efficacy and therapeutic index. However, further efforts and challenges in preclinical and clinical efficacy and toxicity studies are required to translate those advanced technologies to the clinical applications for cancer patients. PMID:20811605

  18. TH-AB-206-01: Advances in Radionuclide Therapy - From Radioiodine to Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humm, J.

    2016-01-01

    In the past few decades, the field of nuclear medicine has made long strides with the continued advancement of related sciences and engineering and the availability of diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides. Leveraging these advancements while combining the advantages of therapeutic and diagnostic radionuclides into one radiopharmaceutical has also created a new subfield “theranostics” in nuclear medicine that has the potential to further propel the field into the future. This session is composed of two talks; one focused on the physics principles of theranostics from properties of beta and alpha emitting radionuclides to dosimetric models and quantification; while the second describes preclinical and clinical applications of theranostics and discusses the challenges and opportunities of bringing them to the clinic. At the end of the session the listener should be able to identify: The different properties of beta and alpha emitting radionuclides Which radionuclides are selected for which nuclear medicine therapies and why How PET can be used to accurately quantify the uptake of tumor targeting molecules How individualized dosimetry can be performed from the management of thyroid cancer to novel radiolabeled antibody therapies Promising pre-clinical radiopharmaceutical pairs in prostate cancer and melanoma. Promising clinical Theranostics in neuroendocrine cancers. Challenges of bringing Theranostics to the clinic. E. Delpassand, RITA Foundation -Houston; SBIR Grant; CEO and share holder of RadioMedix.

  19. Physics and radiobiology of heavy charged particles in relation to the use of ion beams for therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, G.; Haberer, T.; Schardt, D.; Scholz, M.

    1993-07-01

    Heavy charged particles are the most advanced tool of an external subcutane radiotherapy of deep seated tumors. Small angular- and lateral-scattering and the increase of the energy deposition with penetration depth are the physical basis for a more efficient tumor targeting. High biological efficiency in the tumor is the prerequisite for a successful treatment of tumors radioresistant against sparsely ionizing radiation. The possibility to perform target conform irradiation and to control the achieved/actual distribution using PET techniques guarantees that biological highly efficient stepping particles can be restricted to the tumor volume only. Although the physical and radiobiological properties of ion beams are very favourable for therapy, the necessity to produce these particles in an accelerator restricts a general application of heavy ions up to now. Presently the heavy ion accelerator SIS at GSI is the only source of heavy ion beams, sufficient in energy and intensity for therapy. A therapy unit is in preparation at GSI, the status of this project is given at the end of the paper. (orig.)

  20. CRISPR-Cas9 as a Powerful Tool for Efficient Creation of Oncolytic Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yuan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of oncolytic viruses has led to an emerging new class of cancer therapeutics. Although the safety profile has been encouraging, the transition of oncolytic viruses to the clinical setting has been a slow process due to modifications. Therefore, a new generation of more potent oncolytic viruses needs to be exploited, following our better understanding of the complex interactions between the tumor, its microenvironment, the virus, and the host immune response. The conventional method for creation of tumor-targeted oncolytic viruses is based on homologous recombination. However, the creation of new mutant oncolytic viruses with large genomes remains a challenge due to the multi-step process and low efficiency of homologous recombination. The CRISPR-associated endonuclease Cas9 has hugely advanced the potential to edit the genomes of various organisms due to the ability of Cas9 to target a specific genomic site by a single guide RNA. In this review, we discuss the CRISPR-Cas9 system as an efficient viral editing method for the creation of new oncolytic viruses, as well as its potential future applications in the development of oncolytic viruses. Further, this review discusses the potential of off-target effects as well as CRISPR-Cas9 as a tool for basic research into viral biology.

  1. Folate Functionalized Boron Nitride Nanotubes and their Selective Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells: Implications for their Use as Boron Carriers in Clinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofani, Gianni; Raffa, Vittoria; Menciassi, Arianna; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2008-11-25

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is increasingly being used in the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including cerebral glioblastoma multiforme. The main requirement for this therapy is selective targeting of tumor cells by sufficient quantities of (10)B atoms required for their capture/irradiation with low-energy thermal neutrons. The low content of boron targeting species in glioblastoma multiforme accounts for the difficulty in selective targeting of this very malignant cerebral tumor by this radiation modality. In the present study, we have used for the first time boron nitride nanotubes as carriers of boron atoms to overcome this problem and enhance the selective targeting and ablative efficacy of BNCT for these tumors. Following their dispersion in aqueous solution by noncovalent coating with biocompatible poly-l-lysine solutions, boron nitride nanotubes were functionalized with a fluorescent probe (quantum dots) to enable their tracking and with folic acid as selective tumor targeting ligand. Initial in vitro studies have confirmed substantive and selective uptake of these nanovectors by glioblastoma multiforme cells, an observation which confirms their potential clinical application for BNCT therapy for these malignant cerebral tumors.

  2. Folate Functionalized Boron Nitride Nanotubes and their Selective Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells: Implications for their Use as Boron Carriers in Clinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciofani Gianni

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT is increasingly being used in the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including cerebral glioblastoma multiforme. The main requirement for this therapy is selective targeting of tumor cells by sufficient quantities of10B atoms required for their capture/irradiation with low-energy thermal neutrons. The low content of boron targeting species in glioblastoma multiforme accounts for the difficulty in selective targeting of this very malignant cerebral tumor by this radiation modality. In the present study, we have used for the first time boron nitride nanotubes as carriers of boron atoms to overcome this problem and enhance the selective targeting and ablative efficacy of BNCT for these tumors. Following their dispersion in aqueous solution by noncovalent coating with biocompatible poly-l-lysine solutions, boron nitride nanotubes were functionalized with a fluorescent probe (quantum dots to enable their tracking and with folic acid as selective tumor targeting ligand. Initial in vitro studies have confirmed substantive and selective uptake of these nanovectors by glioblastoma multiforme cells, an observation which confirms their potential clinical application for BNCT therapy for these malignant cerebral tumors.

  3. Inhibitory effect of live-attenuated Listeria monocytogenes-based vaccines expressing MIA gene on malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yue; Zhang, Na; Jiang, Ping; Chen, Siyuan; Chu, Shujuan; Hamze, Firas; Wu, Yan; Luo, Qin; Feng, Aiping

    2012-08-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM), a Gram-positive facultative intracellular bacterium, can be used as an effective exogenous antigen expression vector in tumor-target therapy. But for successful clinical application, it is necessary to construct attenuated LM stain that is safe yet retains the potency of LM based on the full virulent pathogen. In this study, attenuated LM and recombinants of LM expressing melanoma inhibitory activity (MIA) were constructed successfully. The median lethal dose (LD(50)) and invasion efficiency of attenuated LM strains were detected. The recombinants were utilized for immunotherapy of animal model of B16F10 melanoma. The level of MIA mRNA expression in tumor tissue was detected by using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with specific sequence, meanwhile the anti-tumor immune response was assayed by flow cytometric analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) assay. The results showed the toxicity and invasiveness of attenuated LM were decreased as compared with LM, and attenuated LM expressing MIA, especially the double-genes attenuated LM recombinant, could significantly induce anti-tumor immune response and inhibit tumor growth. This study implicates attenuated LM may be a safer and more effective vector for immunotherapy of melanoma.

  4. Therapy of Ewing's sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunst, J.; Sauer, R.

    1993-01-01

    Therapy of Ewing's sarcoma requires a qualified clinical, radiological, and pathohistological diagnosis and, in particular, an optimal therapy by an experienced team of oncological specialists. Important prognostic factors are the presence of hematogenous metastases at diagnosis, the initial tumor volume, the response to chemotherapy, and adequate local therapy. Presently, cure rates of more than 60% can be achieved for localized Ewing's sarcoma by combination of local therapy and chemotherapy. The four-drug combination VACA (vincristin, actinomycin D, cyclophosphamide, adriamycin) can be considered as cytostatic gold standard. More aggressive regimens (VAIA, EVAIA, autologous bone marrow transplant) may be beneficial in subgroups and are under investigation. Concerning local therapy adequate radiotherapy plays a major role and achieves the same survival rates as radical surgery, comparable patient selection provided. Several factors have impact on radiotherapeutic results, especially total dose (45 Gy large volume, 55 Gy to the primary tumor), target volume (safety margin at least 2 cm according to the pretreatment volume, at least 5 cm in proximal and distal extension of long bones), timing of radiotherapy (as early as possible) and quality of treatment. Radiotherapy as sole local treatment is indicated in inoperable lesions (spine, sacrum, skull) and in small, good-responding tumors. High-risk patients should receive combined radiotherapeutic-surgical treatment, preferably as pre-operative irradiation. The value of hyperfractionation is not yet proven despite theoretical advantages. (orig.) [de

  5. A Simulation Study for Radiation Treatment Planning Based on the Atomic Physics of the Proton-Boron Fusion Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sunmi; Yoon, Do-Kun; Shin, Han-Back; Jung, Joo-Young; Kim, Moo-Sub; Kim, Kyeong-Hyeon; Jang, Hong-Seok; Suh, Tae Suk [the Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this research is to demonstrate, based on a Monte Carlo simulation code, the procedure of radiation treatment planning for proton-boron fusion therapy (PBFT). A discrete proton beam (60 - 120 MeV) relevant to the Bragg peak was simulated using a Monte Carlo particle extended (MCNPX, Ver. 2.6.0, National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM, USA) simulation code. After computed tomography (CT) scanning of a virtual water phantom including air cavities, the acquired CT images were converted using the simulation source code. We set the boron uptake regions (BURs) in the simulated water phantom to achieve the proton-boron fusion reaction. Proton sources irradiated the BUR, in the phantom. The acquired dose maps were overlapped with the original CT image of the phantom to analyze the dose volume histogram (DVH). We successfully confirmed amplifications of the proton doses (average: 130%) at the target regions. From the DVH result for each simulation, we acquired a relatively accurate dose map for the treatment. A simulation was conducted to characterize the dose distribution and verify the feasibility of proton boron fusion therapy (PBFT). We observed a variation in proton range and developed a tumor targeting technique for treatment that was more accurate and powerful than both conventional proton therapy and boron-neutron capture therapy.

  6. In vivo evaluation of cetuximab-conjugated poly(γ-glutamic acid)-docetaxel nanomedicines in EGFR-overexpressing gastric cancer xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeranganathan, Maya; Uthaman, Saji; Sarmento, Bruno; Mohan, Chethampadi Gopi; Park, In-Kyu; Jayakumar, Rangasamy

    2017-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), upregulated in gastric cancer patients, is an oncogene of interest in the development of targeted cancer nanomedicines. This study demonstrates in silico modeling of monoclonal antibody cetuximab (CET MAb)-conjugated docetaxel (DOCT)-loaded poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) nanoparticles (Nps) and evaluates the in vitro/in vivo effects on EGFR-overexpressing gastric cancer cells (MKN-28). Nontargeted DOCT-γ-PGA Nps (NT Nps: 110±40 nm) and targeted CET MAb-DOCT-γ-PGA Nps (T Nps: 200±20 nm) were prepared using ionic gelation followed by 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl)carbodiimide–N-Hydoxysuccinimide (EDC–NSH) chemistry. Increased uptake correlated with enhanced cytotoxicity induced by targeted Nps to EGFR +ve MKN-28 compared with nontargeted Nps as evident from MTT and flow cytometric assays. Nanoformulated DOCT showed a superior pharmacokinetic profile to that of free DOCT in Swiss albino mice, indicating the possibility of improved therapeutic effect in the disease model. Qualitative in vivo imaging showed early and enhanced tumor targeted accumulation of CET MAb-DOCT-γ-PGA Nps in EGFR +ve MKN-28–based gastric cancer xenograft, which exhibited efficient arrest of tumor growth compared with nontargeted Nps and free DOCT. Thus, actively targeted CET MAb-DOCT-γ-PGA Nps could be developed as a substitute to conventional nonspecific chemotherapy, and hence could become a feasible strategy for cancer therapy for EGFR-overexpressing gastric tumors. PMID:29033568

  7. Molecular Imaging of Proteases in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunan Yang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteases play important roles during tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Various molecular imaging techniques have been employed for protease imaging: optical (both fluorescence and bioluminescence, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, and positron emission tomography (PET. In this review, we will summarize the current status of imaging proteases in cancer with these techniques. Optical imaging of proteases, in particular with fluorescence, is the most intensively validated and many of the imaging probes are already commercially available. It is generally agreed that the use of activatable probes is the most accurate and appropriate means for measuring protease activity. Molecular imaging of proteases with other techniques (i.e. MRI, SPECT, and PET has not been well-documented in the literature which certainly deserves much future effort. Optical imaging and molecular MRI of protease activity has very limited potential for clinical investigation. PET/SPECT imaging is suitable for clinical investigation; however the optimal probes for PET/SPECT imaging of proteases in cancer have yet to be developed. Successful development of protease imaging probes with optimal in vivo stability, tumor targeting efficacy, and desirable pharmacokinetics for clinical translation will eventually improve cancer patient management. Not limited to cancer, these protease-targeted imaging probes will also have broad applications in other diseases such as arthritis, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction.

  8. Preclinical assessment and pilot study using anti-CEA monoclonal antibody 1B2 for colorectal carcinoma imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Akihiko; Shimada, Hideaki; Okazumi, Shin-ichi; Imaseki, Hideo; Suzuki, Takao; Ochiai, Takenori; Miyoshi, Takeyoshi; Seito, Tsutomu

    2008-01-01

    Preclinical assessment of radio-labeled monoclonal antibodies is essential to the understanding of target-specific tumor localization. The purpose of this study is to prepare for fundamental evaluation of antibodies and to validate the clinical usefulness of the candidate considered useful for practice through preclinical assessment. The immunoreactivity and affinity constant of three kinds of monoclonal antibody (1A4, 1B2, 4H11: CEA-specific) were evaluated with the method of cell binding assay. Tumor localization and biodisrtibution were performed in tumor-bearing athymic mice. Five patients of colorectal cancer underwent radioimmunodetection with 99mTc. Histological analysis was performed to evaluate the tumor localization of injected antibody. The immunoreactive fraction value of 1B2 is the highest than the other antibodies. The difference between the antibody affinities among three antibodies although were rather small. In an animal model, 1B2 obtained more highly tumor targeting and cleared more rapidly from the blood than the other two antibodies did. Pilot study using 1B2 was successful in all cases without background imaging. Visualization of tumor sites surgically removed revealed positive CEA and IgG immunostaining. The preparation for preclinical assessment of the characteristic parameters is practically valuable for clinical application of radiolabeled antibodies.

  9. The development of a highly specific radiochemical compound based on labeled 99mtc recombinant molecules for targeted imaging of cells with the overexpression of Her-2 / neu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga D. Bragina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is a urgent need to search for new diagnostic methods that allow us to reveal malignant tumors with the overexpression of Her-2/neu with high accuracy. In recent years radioisotope methods have been actively developing to identify specific tumor targets, with antibodies being the “targeting” module.The purpose of the study. Creation of a chemically stable radiochemical compound for the imaging of cells with the overexpression of Her-2/neu.Materials and methods. The study was conducted using two human adenocarcinoma cell lines with expression (BT-474 and without expression (MCF-7 Her-2/neu. The specificity of the binding of the test complex with Her-2/neu receptor was determined by direct radiometric and planar scintigraphy. To evaluate the differences in quantitative characteristics between the groups a non-parametric Mann – Whitney test was used.Results. The yield of the labeled complex was more than 91% and the radiochemical frequency was more than 94%. When performing a visual scintigraphic evaluation, a much higher accumulation rate of the studied radiopharmaceutical preparation (RFP was observed in the culture of cells with overexpression of the surface Her-2/neu receptor. Direct radiometric results also demonstrated a higher accumulation of RFPs in the human BT-474 mammary adenocarcinoma cell line with Her-2/neu overexpression in comparison with the control group.Conclusion. Preclinical studies demonstrated high stability of the test compound, as well as its accumulation in the group of cells with Her-2/neu overexpression

  10. Therapy of Ewing's sarcoma. Therapie des Ewing-Sarkoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunst, J. (Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik, Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany)); Sauer, R. (Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik, Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany))

    1993-12-01

    Therapy of Ewing's sarcoma requires a qualified clinical, radiological, and pathohistological diagnosis and, in particular, an optimal therapy by an experienced team of oncological specialists. Important prognostic factors are the presence of hematogenous metastases at diagnosis, the initial tumor volume, the response to chemotherapy, and adequate local therapy. Presently, cure rates of more than 60% can be achieved for localized Ewing's sarcoma by combination of local therapy and chemotherapy. The four-drug combination VACA (vincristin, actinomycin D, cyclophosphamide, adriamycin) can be considered as cytostatic gold standard. More aggressive regimens (VAIA, EVAIA, autologous bone marrow transplant) may be beneficial in subgroups and are under investigation. Concerning local therapy adequate radiotherapy plays a major role and achieves the same survival rates as radical surgery, comparable patient selection provided. Several factors have impact on radiotherapeutic results, especially total dose (45 Gy large volume, 55 Gy to the primary tumor), target volume (safety margin at least 2 cm according to the pretreatment volume, at least 5 cm in proximal and distal extension of long bones), timing of radiotherapy (as early as possible) and quality of treatment. Radiotherapy as sole local treatment is indicated in inoperable lesions (spine, sacrum, skull) and in small, good-responding tumors. High-risk patients should receive combined radiotherapeutic-surgical treatment, preferably as pre-operative irradiation. The value of hyperfractionation is not yet proven despite theoretical advantages. (orig.)

  11. Currently used and investigational drugs for Cushing´s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciato, Denis; Mumbach, Aizhar G; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Stalla, Günter K

    2017-01-01

    Cush