WorldWideScience

Sample records for actinium 207

  1. Actinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, C.

    1977-01-01

    There are only very few investigations dealing with the chemical and physical properties of actinium, the lanthanum homologue in the actinide series, 227 Ac, the only long-lived isotope can be produced in gram amounts only by neutron irradiation of 226 Ra, the amounts occurring in nature are too low for isolation (about 1 μg 227 Ac/1 uranium ore). Experimental work with 227 Ac gives rise to a lot of problems due to the radiation characteristics of the 227 Ac daughter nuclides. Therefore, the metal and the only ten solid compounds, prepared up to now, have been isolated in the microgram scale. Due to the high specific activity of 227 Ac, the preparation of a lot of compounds, e.g. metal-organic compounds seems to be very difficult, if not impossible. The properties of actinium in aqueous solutions have been deduced from experiments in the tracer scale only. The present investigations on actinium show that only the oxidation state + 3 exists - only radiopolarographic studies indicate the possibility of a lower valancy state (Ac 2+ ). - This review will give a critical and comprehensive description on the present knowledge about this element. The presently decreasing interest in the development of thermionic batteries using 227 Ac 2 O 3 radionuclide also implies that there will be only small progress in the chemistry of this radio-element in the near future. (orig.) [de

  2. The sorption of polonium, actinium and protactinium onto geological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Berry, J.A.; Brownsword, M.; Heath, T.G.; Ilett, D.J.; McCrohon, R.; Tweed, C.J.; Yui, M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a combined experimental and modeling program of generic sorption studies to increase confidence in the performance assessment for a potential high-level radioactive waste repository in Japan. The sorption of polonium, actinium and protactinium onto geological materials has been investigated. Sorption of these radioelements onto bentonite, tuff and granodiorite from equilibrated de-ionized water was studied under reducing conditions at room temperature. In addition, the sorption of actinium and protactinium was investigated at 60 C. Thermodynamic chemical modeling was carried out to aid interpretation of the results

  3. The sorption of polonium, actinium and protactinium onto geological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Berry, J.A.; Brownsword, M.; Heath, T.G.; Ilett, D.J.; McCrohon, R.; Tweed, C.J.; Yui, M.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes a combined experimental and modeling program of generic sorption studies to increase confidence in the performance assessment for a potential high-level radioactive waste repository in Japan. The sorption of polonium, actinium and protactinium onto geological materials has been investigated. Sorption of these radioelements onto bentonite, tuff and granodiorite from equilibrated de-ionized water was studied under reducing conditions at room temperature. In addition, the sorption of actinium and protactinium was investigated at 60 C. Thermodynamic chemical modeling was carried out to aid interpretation of the results.

  4. Separation of Actinium 227 from the uranium minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Tarango, S.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to separate Actinium 227, whose content is 18%, from the mineral carnotite found in Gomez Chihuahua mountain range in Mexico. The mineral before processing is is pre-concentrated and passed, first through anionic exchange resins, later the eluate obtained is passed through cationic resins. The resins were 20-50 MESH QOWEX and 100-200 MESH 50 X 8-20 in some cased 200-400 MESH AG 50W-X8, 1X8 in other cases. The eluates from the ionic exchange were electrodeposited on stainless steel polished disc cathode and platinum electrode as anode; under a current ODF 10mA for 2.5 to 5 hours and of 100mA for .5 of an hour. it was possible to identify the Actinium 227 by means of its descendents, TH-227 and RA-223, through alpha spectroscopy. Due to the radiochemical purity which the electro deposits were obtained the Actinium 227 was low and was not quantitatively determined. A large majority of the members of the natural radioactive series 3 were identified and even alpha energies reported in the literature with very low percentages of non-identified emissions were observed. We conclude that a more precise study is needed concerning ionic exchange and electrodeposit to obtain an Actinium 227 of radiochemical purity. (Author)

  5. Application of partition chromatography method for separation and analysis of actinium radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinitsina, G.S.; Shestakova, I.A.; Shestakov, B.I.; Plyushcheva, N.A.; Malyshev, N.A.; Belyatskij, A.F.; Tsirlin, V.A.

    1979-01-01

    The method of partition chromatography is considered with the use of different extractants for the extraction of actinium-227, actinium-225 and actinium-228. It is advisable to extract actinium-227 from the irradiated radium with the help of D2FGFK. The use of 2DEGFK allows us to separate actinium-227 from alkaline and alkaline-earth elements. Amines have a higher radiative stability. An express-method has been developed for the identification of actinium-227 with TOA by its intrinsic α-emission in nonequilibrium preparations of irradiated radium-226 of small activity. Actinium-225 is extracted from uranium-233 with due regard for the fact that U, Th, and Ac are extracted differently by TBP from HNO 3 solutions. With the help of the given procedure one can reach the purifying coefficient of 10 4 . Actinium-228 is extracted from the radiummesothorium preparations by a deposition of decay products, including polonium-210 on the iron hydroxyde. Actinium-228 extraction from the mixture of radium radionuclides is performed by the partition chromatography method on D2EGFK. All the procedures for separation of actinium isotopes by the above methods are described

  6. Separation of protactinum, actinium, and other radionuclides from proton irradiated thorium target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassbender, Michael E.; Radchenko, Valery

    2018-04-24

    Protactinium, actinium, radium, radiolanthanides and other radionuclide fission products were separated and recovered from a proton-irradiated thorium target. The target was dissolved in concentrated HCl, which formed anionic complexes of protactinium but not with thorium, actinium, radium, or radiolanthanides. Protactinium was separated from soluble thorium by loading a concentrated HCl solution of the target onto a column of strongly basic anion exchanger resin and eluting with concentrated HCl. Actinium, radium and radiolanthanides elute with thorium. The protactinium that is retained on the column, along with other radionuclides, is eluted may subsequently treated to remove radionuclide impurities to afford a fraction of substantially pure protactinium. The eluate with the soluble thorium, actinium, radium and radiolanthanides may be subjected to treatment with citric acid to form anionic thorium, loaded onto a cationic exchanger resin, and eluted. Actinium, radium and radiolanthanides that are retained can be subjected to extraction chromatography to separate the actinium from the radium and from the radio lanthanides.

  7. Separation of actinium-227 from its daughter products by cationic resins technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nastasi, M.J.C.

    1976-01-01

    A method for separating actinium-227 from its daughter products based on ion exchange principle is shown. Radionuclides mixture in perchloric acid 8,5 N and chloridric acid 0,5 N medium pass by a cationic resin column. Thorium-227 and actinium-227, which are retained by the resin, are eluted with nitric acid 6 N which releases actinium-227 while oxalic acid 7% is used for thorium-227 elution [pt

  8. Short history of radioactivity. No. XIII. The actinium and thorium series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalmers, T W

    1950-06-16

    Discussions of the actinium disintegration series (about 1905), the /sup 235/U or actinium series (as it is accepted today), the disintegration of thorium (about 1905), the thorium series in the modern form, and the 4n, 4n + 1, 4n + 2, and 4n + 3 series are presented.

  9. Actinium-225 and Bismuth-213 Alpha Particle Immunotherapy of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheinberg, D.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclides with appropriate half-lives and emission characteristics that would be potent enough to kill neoplastic cells in the small quantities that reach targets in vivo, include the high linear energy transfer (LET) alpha emitters such as Actinium-225 and Bi-213. We developed methods for the attachment of radiometals via bifunctional chelates to monoclonal antibodies (mAb) without loss of immunoreactivity. We developed alphaemitting Bi-213 lintuzumab constructs, characterized and qualified them in preclinical models, and took them into human clinical trials in patients with AML. Safety, anti-leukemic activity, and complete responses (CR’s) have been demonstrated through phase 2 trilas. Bi-213 is produced in a portable small generator device based on Ac- 225 in the hospital nuclear medicine lab. The isotope is then purified, attached to the antibody, and the product is qualified and processed. Despite this success, the major obstacle to the widespread use of these drugs remains the short 213 Bi half-life (46 minutes), which poses a large logistical hurdle before injection and limits its delivery to only the most accessible cancer cells after injection

  10. Production of Actinium-225 via High Energy Proton Induced Spallation of Thorium-232

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, James T.; Nolen, Jerry; Vandergrift, George; Gomes, Itacil; Kroc, Tom; Horwitz, Phil; McAlister, Dan; Bowers, Del; Sullivan, Vivian; Greene, John

    2011-12-30

    The science of cancer research is currently expanding its use of alpha particle emitting radioisotopes. Coupled with the discovery and proliferation of molecular species that seek out and attach to tumors, new therapy and diagnostics are being developed to enhance the treatment of cancer and other diseases. This latest technology is commonly referred to as Alpha Immunotherapy (AIT). Actinium-225/Bismuth-213 is a parent/daughter alpha-emitting radioisotope pair that is highly sought after because of the potential for treating numerous diseases and its ability to be chemically compatible with many known and widely used carrier molecules (such as monoclonal antibodies and proteins/peptides). Unfortunately, the worldwide supply of actinium-225 is limited to about 1,000mCi annually and most of that is currently spoken for, thus limiting the ability of this radioisotope pair to enter into research and subsequently clinical trials. The route proposed herein utilizes high energy protons to produce actinium-225 via spallation of a thorium-232 target. As part of previous R and D efforts carried out at Argonne National Laboratory recently in support of the proposed US FRIB facility, it was shown that a very effective production mechanism for actinium-225 is spallation of thorium-232 by high energy proton beams. The base-line simulation for the production rate of actinium-225 by this reaction mechanism is 8E12 atoms per second at 200 MeV proton beam energy with 50 g/cm2 thorium target and 100 kW beam power. An irradiation of one actinium-225 half-life (10 days) produces {approx}100 Ci of actinium-225. For a given beam current the reaction cross section increases slightly with energy to about 400 MeV and then decreases slightly for beam energies in the several GeV regime. The object of this effort is to refine the simulations at proton beam energies of 400 MeV and above up to about 8 GeV. Once completed, the simulations will be experimentally verified using 400 MeV and 8 Ge

  11. Amides with nitrogenous heterocyclic substituent, their manufacturing process and their use to draw out selectively Actinium series (III) and to separate them in particular from Lanthanides (III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuillerdier, C.; Musikas, C.

    1993-01-01

    Present invention is concerned with new amides with nitrogenous heterocyclic substituent utilizable to separate trivalent actinium series from trivalent lanthanides. In these molecules, it is possible to obtain particularly covalent liaison which has more affinity with 5f series, that is to say actinium series; included a manufacturing process for these amides with nitrogenous heterocyclic substituent

  12. Analysis of the gamma spectra of the uranium, actinium, and thorium decay series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momeni, M.H.

    1981-09-01

    This report describes the identification of radionuclides in the uranium, actinium, and thorium series by analysis of gamma spectra in the energy range of 40 to 1400 keV. Energies and absolute efficiencies for each gamma line were measured by means of a high-resolution germanium detector and compared with those in the literature. A gamma spectroscopy method, which utilizes an on-line computer for deconvolution of spectra, search and identification of each line, and estimation of activity for each radionuclide, was used to analyze soil and uranium tailings, and ore

  13. Application of ion exchange and extraction chromatography to the separation of actinium from proton-irradiated thorium metal for analytical purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchenko, V; Engle, J W; Wilson, J J; Maassen, J R; Nortier, F M; Taylor, W A; Birnbaum, E R; Hudston, L A; John, K D; Fassbender, M E

    2015-02-06

    Actinium-225 (t1/2=9.92d) is an α-emitting radionuclide with nuclear properties well-suited for use in targeted alpha therapy (TAT), a powerful treatment method for malignant tumors. Actinium-225 can also be utilized as a generator for (213)Bi (t1/2 45.6 min), which is another valuable candidate for TAT. Actinium-225 can be produced via proton irradiation of thorium metal; however, long-lived (227)Ac (t1/2=21.8a, 99% β(-), 1% α) is co-produced during this process and will impact the quality of the final product. Thus, accurate assays are needed to determine the (225)Ac/(227)Ac ratio, which is dependent on beam energy, irradiation time and target design. Accurate actinium assays, in turn, require efficient separation of actinium isotopes from both the Th matrix and highly radioactive activation by-products, especially radiolanthanides formed from proton-induced fission. In this study, we introduce a novel, selective chromatographic technique for the recovery and purification of actinium isotopes from irradiated Th matrices. A two-step sequence of cation exchange and extraction chromatography was implemented. Radiolanthanides were quantitatively removed from Ac, and no non-Ac radionuclidic impurities were detected in the final Ac fraction. An (225)Ac spike added prior to separation was recovered at ≥ 98%, and Ac decontamination from Th was found to be ≥ 10(6). The purified actinium fraction allowed for highly accurate (227)Ac determination at analytical scales, i.e., at (227)Ac activities of 1-100 kBq (27 nCi to 2.7 μCi). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Developments towards in-gas-jet laser spectroscopy studies of actinium isotopes at LISOL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raeder, S.; Bastin, B.; Block, M.; Creemers, P.; Delahaye, P.; Ferrer, R.; Fléchard, X.; Franchoo, S.; Ghys, L.; Gaffney, L.P.; Granados, C.; Heinke, R.; Hijazi, L.

    2016-01-01

    To study exotic nuclides at the borders of stability with laser ionization and spectroscopy techniques, highest efficiencies in combination with a high spectral resolution are required. These usually opposing requirements are reconciled by applying the in-gas-laser ionization and spectroscopy (IGLIS) technique in the supersonic gas jet produced by a de Laval nozzle installed at the exit of the stopping gas cell. Carrying out laser ionization in the low-temperature and low density supersonic gas jet eliminates pressure broadening, which will significantly improve the spectral resolution. This article presents the required modifications at the Leuven Isotope Separator On-Line (LISOL) facility that are needed for the first on-line studies of in-gas-jet laser spectroscopy. Different geometries for the gas outlet and extraction ion guides have been tested for their performance regarding the acceptance of laser ionized species as well as for their differential pumping capacities. The specifications and performance of the temporarily installed high repetition rate laser system, including a narrow bandwidth injection-locked Ti:sapphire laser, are discussed and first preliminary results on neutron-deficient actinium isotopes are presented indicating the high capability of this novel technique.

  15. Developments towards in-gas-jet laser spectroscopy studies of actinium isotopes at LISOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeder, S., E-mail: s.raeder@gsi.de [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Bastin, B. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, B.P. 55027, 14076 Caen (France); Block, M. [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut für Kernchemie, Johannes Gutenberg Universität, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Creemers, P. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Delahaye, P. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, B.P. 55027, 14076 Caen (France); Ferrer, R. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Fléchard, X. [LPC Caen, ENSICAEN, Université de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, Caen (France); Franchoo, S. [Institute de Physique Nucléaire (IPN) d’Orsay, 91406 Orsay, Cedex (France); Ghys, L. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Center, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Gaffney, L.P.; Granados, C. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Heinke, R. [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universität, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Hijazi, L. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, B.P. 55027, 14076 Caen (France); and others

    2016-06-01

    To study exotic nuclides at the borders of stability with laser ionization and spectroscopy techniques, highest efficiencies in combination with a high spectral resolution are required. These usually opposing requirements are reconciled by applying the in-gas-laser ionization and spectroscopy (IGLIS) technique in the supersonic gas jet produced by a de Laval nozzle installed at the exit of the stopping gas cell. Carrying out laser ionization in the low-temperature and low density supersonic gas jet eliminates pressure broadening, which will significantly improve the spectral resolution. This article presents the required modifications at the Leuven Isotope Separator On-Line (LISOL) facility that are needed for the first on-line studies of in-gas-jet laser spectroscopy. Different geometries for the gas outlet and extraction ion guides have been tested for their performance regarding the acceptance of laser ionized species as well as for their differential pumping capacities. The specifications and performance of the temporarily installed high repetition rate laser system, including a narrow bandwidth injection-locked Ti:sapphire laser, are discussed and first preliminary results on neutron-deficient actinium isotopes are presented indicating the high capability of this novel technique.

  16. At R207

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    The photo shows the fast electronics racks of the experiment R207 by the CERN-Holland-Manchester Collaboration. R207 aimed at the study of diffraction dissociation and formation at small momentum transfers. Gerjan Bobbink and Alan Rudge stand in front of the racks.

  17. 18 CFR 385.207 - Petitions (Rule 207).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... section 23(b) of the Federal Power Act is treated as a petition for a declaratory order. (c) Except as... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Petitions (Rule 207). 385.207 Section 385.207 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION...

  18. At R207

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    With R207 the CERN-Holland-Manchester Collaboration studied proton-proton diffraction dissociation at small momentum transfer. This followed, at Intersection 2, the study of correlations associated with high transverse momentum particles by Daresbury-Liverpool-RHEL Collaboration (R205) and of multiplicity and rapidity distributions in diffractive collisions by CERN-Holland-Lancaster-Manchester (R206), and used part of the previous set-up.

  19. At R207

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    At the centre, a barrel shaped hodoscope surrounds the beams' crossing point. It was previously used for experiments R205 and R206 which did run in 1974. After their completion in mid 1975 the equipment of R205 was removed, and that of R206 was modified and rearranged to create two small angle spectrometers, one on each side of the intersection, for experiment R207 (diffraction dissociation and formation at small momentum transfer), by the CERN-Holland-Manchester Collaboration. (see also photos 7508109X and 7508113X) Here on the right, Lars Leistam.

  20. 40 CFR 240.207 - Aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aesthetics. 240.207 Section 240.207 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.207 Aesthetics. ...

  1. 7 CFR 868.207 - Moisture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Moisture. 868.207 Section 868.207 Agriculture... Application of Standards § 868.207 Moisture. Water content in rough rice as determined by an approved device..., “approved device” shall include the Motomco Moisture Meter and any other equipment that is approved by the...

  2. 30 CFR 90.207 - Compliance sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-COAL MINERS WHO HAVE EVIDENCE OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF PNEUMOCONIOSIS Sampling Procedures § 90.207 Compliance sampling. (a) The operator shall take five valid respirable dust samples for... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance sampling. 90.207 Section 90.207...

  3. 19 CFR 207.109 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discovery. 207.109 Section 207.109 Customs Duties... and Committee Proceedings § 207.109 Discovery. (a) Discovery methods. All parties may obtain discovery under such terms and limitations as the administrative law judge may order. Discovery may be by one or...

  4. 20 CFR 498.207 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discovery. 498.207 Section 498.207 Employees... § 498.207 Discovery. (a) For the purpose of inspection and copying, a party may make a request to...) Any form of discovery other than that permitted under paragraph (a) of this section, such as requests...

  5. 40 CFR 59.207 - Test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test methods. 59.207 Section 59.207 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL... Compound Emission Standards for Consumer Products § 59.207 Test methods. Each manufacturer or importer...

  6. 19 CFR 207.24 - Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hearing. 207.24 Section 207.24 Customs Duties... EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES Final Determinations, Short Life Cycle Products § 207.24 Hearing. (a) In general. The Commission shall hold a hearing concerning an investigation before making a final...

  7. 19 CFR 207.66 - Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hearing. 207.66 Section 207.66 Customs Duties... EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES Five-Year Reviews § 207.66 Hearing. (a) In general. The Commission shall hold a hearing in each full review. The date of the hearing shall be specified in the scheduling notice...

  8. 5 CFR 430.207 - Monitoring performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monitoring performance. 430.207 Section 430.207 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Performance Appraisal for General Schedule, Prevailing Rate, and Certain Other Employees § 430.207...

  9. 5 CFR 630.207 - Travel time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Travel time. 630.207 Section 630.207... and General Provisions for Annual and Sick Leave § 630.207 Travel time. The travel time granted an employee under section 6303(d) of title 5, United States Code, is inclusive of the time necessarily...

  10. 48 CFR 207.171-3 - Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Policy. 207.171-3 Section... DEFENSE ACQUISITION PLANNING ACQUISITION PLANNING Acquisition Plans 207.171-3 Policy. DoD policy is to... it is anticipated that a prime contract will be awarded without adequate price competition, and the...

  11. 31 CFR 560.207 - Prohibited investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prohibited investment. 560.207... § 560.207 Prohibited investment. Except as otherwise authorized pursuant to this part, and... investment by a United States person in Iran or in property (including entities) owned or controlled by the...

  12. 49 CFR 393.207 - Suspension systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... braking system. The vehicle shall be level (not tilting to the left or right). Air leakage shall not be... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension systems. 393.207 Section 393.207... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Frames, Cab and Body Components, Wheels, Steering, and Suspension Systems § 393...

  13. 48 CFR 207.172 - Human research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Human research. 207.172... OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION PLANNING ACQUISITION PLANNING Acquisition Plans 207.172 Human research. Any DoD component sponsoring research involving human subjects— (a) Is responsible for oversight of...

  14. 31 CFR 800.207 - Covered transaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Covered transaction. 800.207 Section 800.207 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF..., which could result in control of a U.S. business by a foreign person. ...

  15. 50 CFR 223.207 - Approved TEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Approved TEDs. 223.207 Section 223.207 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Restrictions Applicable to Threatened Marine and Anadromous Specie...

  16. 40 CFR 86.207-94 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false [Reserved] 86.207-94 Section 86.207-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF... Year Gasoline-Fueled New Light-Duty Vehicles, New Light-Duty Trucks and New Medium-Duty Passenger...

  17. 24 CFR 207.259 - Insurance benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insurance benefits. 207.259 Section... Contract of Insurance § 207.259 Insurance benefits. (a) Method of payment. Upon either an assignment of the... of mortgage. If the mortgage is assigned to the Commissioner, the insurance benefits shall be paid in...

  18. Dicty_cDB: SLH207 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH207 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U11514-1 SLH207P (Link to Original site) SLH2...07F 689 SLH207Z 675 SLH207P 1364 - - Show SLH207 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH2...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH207Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH2...07P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH207 (SLH207Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH2...**yi Homology vs CSM-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value SLH207 (SLH207Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH2

  19. 19 CFR 207.107 - Motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR FROM SUBSIDIZED... and Committee Proceedings § 207.107 Motions. (a) Presentation and disposition. (1) After issuance of...

  20. 48 CFR 207.401 - Acquisition considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION PLANNING ACQUISITION PLANNING Equipment Lease or Purchase 207.401... prepare and provide the contracting officer with the justification supporting the decision to lease or purchase. ...

  1. 24 CFR 51.207 - Special circumstances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Handling Conventional Fuels or Chemicals of an Explosive or Flammable Nature § 51.207 Special circumstances..., require the application of this subpart C with respect to a substance not listed in appendix I to this...

  2. 10 CFR 207.8 - Judicial actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Coordination Act of 1974 § 207.8 Judicial actions. (a) Enforcement of subpoenas; contempt. Any United States... such an order of the court may be punished by the court as contempt. (b) Injunctions. Whenever it...

  3. 49 CFR 219.207 - Fatality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Post-Accident Toxicological Testing § 219.207 Fatality. (a) In the..., United States Code (but not the agent of the Secretary for purposes of the Federal Tort Claims Act...

  4. Dicty_cDB: VHK207 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHK207 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16260-1 VHK207P (Link to Original site) VHK2...07F 371 VHK207Z 713 VHK207P 1064 - - Show VHK207 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHK2...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHK2-A/VHK207Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHK2...07P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHK207 (VHK207Q) /CSM/VH/VHK2-A/VHK2...ducing significant alignments: (bits) Value N ( BJ446805 ) Dictyostelium discoideum cDNA clone:ddv63k21, 3'

  5. 48 CFR 2917.207 - Exercising options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exercising options. 2917... AND CONTRACT TYPES SPECIAL CONTRACTING METHODS Options 2917.207 Exercising options. The contracting officer must use a standardized determination and finding before exercising an option in accordance with...

  6. 48 CFR 33.207 - Contractor certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contractor certification... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PROTESTS, DISPUTES, AND APPEALS Disputes and Appeals 33.207 Contractor certification. (a) Contractors shall provide the certification specified in paragraph (c) of this section when...

  7. 40 CFR 2.207 - Class determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Confidentiality of Business Information § 2.207 Class determinations. (a) The General Counsel may make and issue a... items of business information; (2) One or more characteristics common to all such items of information... § 2.204(b)(1), § 2.204(d), § 2.205(d), or § 2.206. However, the existence of a class determination...

  8. 30 CFR 75.207 - Pillar recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Roof Support § 75.207 Pillar recovery. Pillar recovery shall be... be left in place. (b) Before mining is started in a pillar split or lift— (1) At least two rows of breaker posts or equivalent support shall be installed— (i) As close to the initial intended breakline as...

  9. 20 CFR 655.207 - Adverse effect rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adverse effect rates. 655.207 Section 655.207... Agricultural Employment § 655.207 Adverse effect rates. (a) Except as otherwise provided in this section, the adverse effect rates for all agricultural and logging employment shall be the prevailing wage rates in the...

  10. 8 CFR 207.7 - Derivatives of refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Derivatives of refugees. 207.7 Section 207... REFUGEES § 207.7 Derivatives of refugees. (a) Eligibility. A spouse, as defined in section 101(a)(35) of..., shall be granted refugee status if accompanying or following-to-join the principal alien. An...

  11. 19 CFR 207.69 - Publication of determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Publication of determinations. 207.69 Section 207.69 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS... SUBSIDIZED EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES Five-Year Reviews § 207.69 Publication of determinations. Whenever...

  12. 19 CFR 207.115 - Petition for review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Petition for review. 207.115 Section 207.115... and Committee Proceedings § 207.115 Petition for review. (a) The petition and responses. (1) Any party... Secretary a petition for review, except that a party who has defaulted may not petition for review of any...

  13. 19 CFR 207.11 - Contents of petition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Contents of petition. 207.11 Section 207.11... SUBSIDIZED EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES Preliminary Determinations § 207.11 Contents of petition. (a) The petition shall be signed by the petitioner or its duly authorized officer, attorney, or agent, and shall...

  14. 47 CFR 25.207 - Cessation of emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cessation of emissions. 25.207 Section 25.207 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.207 Cessation of emissions. Space stations shall be made capable of ceasing radio...

  15. 27 CFR 26.207 - Destruction of marks and brands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... brands. 26.207 Section 26.207 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Products Coming Into the United States From the Virgin Islands § 26.207 Destruction of marks and brands. The marks, brands, and serial numbers required by this part to be placed on barrels, casks, or similar...

  16. 47 CFR 90.207 - Types of emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Types of emissions. 90.207 Section 90.207... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.207 Types of emissions. Unless specified elsewhere in this part, stations will be authorized emissions as provided for in paragraphs (b) through (n) of...

  17. 42 CFR 50.207 - Sterilization by hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sterilization by hysterectomy. 50.207 Section 50.207 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS POLICIES OF GENERAL APPLICABILITY Sterilization of Persons in Federally Assisted Family Planning Projects § 50.207...

  18. 5 CFR 842.207 - Air traffic controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air traffic controllers. 842.207 Section 842.207 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-BASIC ANNUITY Eligibility § 842.207 Air traffic controllers. (a) An employee who separates from...

  19. 28 CFR 2.207 - Supervision reports to Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supervision reports to Commission. 2.207 Section 2.207 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS, YOUTH OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS District of Columbia Supervised Releasees § 2.207 Supervision reports to Commission. A...

  20. 20 CFR 725.207 - Determination of dependency; divorced spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of dependency; divorced spouse. 725.207 Section 725.207 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...) § 725.207 Determination of dependency; divorced spouse. For the purpose of augmenting benefits, an...

  1. Dicty_cDB: VSH207 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VS (Link to library) VSH207 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U12548-1 VSH207P (Link... to Original site) VSH207F 228 VSH207Z 107 VSH207P 335 - - Show VSH207 Library VS (Link to library) Clone ID VSH207 (Link to dict...yBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig Contig-U12548-1 Original site URL http://dict...ents: (bits) Value N ( AU267072 ) Dictyostelium discoideum vegetative cDNA clone:VS... 206 2e-58 2 ( AC116982 ) Dict...yostelium discoideum chromosome 2 map 3622643... 206 4e-49 1 ( AU267073 ) Dict

  2. Resonance capture cross section of 207Pb

    CERN Document Server

    Domingo-Pardo, C.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Bisterzo, S.; Calvino, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapico, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillman, I.; Dolfini, R.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Gallino, R.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Kappeler, F.; Karamanis, D.; Karadimos, D.; Kerveno, M.; Ketlerov, V.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P.M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; Oshima, M.; O'Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M.C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2006-01-01

    The radiative neutron capture cross section of 207Pb has been measured at the CERN neutron time of flight installation n_TOF using the pulse height weighting technique in the resolved energy region. The measurement has been performed with an optimized setup of two C6D6 scintillation detectors, which allowed us to reduce scattered neutron backgrounds down to a negligible level. Resonance parameters and radiative kernels have been determined for 16 resonances by means of an R-matrix analysis in the neutron energy range from 3 keV to 320 keV. Good agreement with previous measurements was found at low neutron energies, whereas substantial discrepancies appear beyond 45 keV. With the present results, we obtain an s-process contribution of 77(8)% to the solar abundance of 207Pb. This corresponds to an r-process component of 23(8)%, which is important for deriving the U/Th ages of metal poor halo stars.

  3. 48 CFR 217.207 - Exercise of options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exercise of options. 217..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SPECIAL CONTRACTING METHODS Options 217.207 Exercise of options. (c) In addition to the requirements at FAR 17.207(c), exercise an option only after...

  4. 5 CFR 532.207 - Time schedule for wage surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Time schedule for wage surveys. 532.207... PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS Prevailing Rate Determinations § 532.207 Time schedule for wage surveys. (a) Wage... and the collection of wage data by visits to establishments. (c) A wage-change survey shall be made...

  5. 7 CFR 1280.207 - Term of office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Term of office. 1280.207 Section 1280.207 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... INFORMATION ORDER Lamb Promotion, Research, and Information Order Lamb Promotion, Research, and Information...

  6. 49 CFR 195.207 - Transportation of pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transportation of pipe. 195.207 Section 195.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY...

  7. 19 CFR 207.63 - Circulation of draft questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Circulation of draft questionnaires. 207.63... SUBSIDIZED EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES Five-Year Reviews § 207.63 Circulation of draft questionnaires. (a) The Director shall circulate draft questionnaires to the parties for comment in each full review. (b...

  8. 8 CFR 207.9 - Termination of refugee status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Termination of refugee status. 207.9... REFUGEES § 207.9 Termination of refugee status. The refugee status of any alien (and of the spouse or child... district director in whose district the alien is found if the alien was not a refugee within the meaning of...

  9. 8 CFR 207.6 - Control over approved refugee numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Control over approved refugee numbers. 207... ADMISSION OF REFUGEES § 207.6 Control over approved refugee numbers. Current numerical accounting of approved refugees is maintained for each special group designated by the President. As refugee status is...

  10. The diarylquinoline TMC207 for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diacon, Andreas H.; Pym, Alexander; Grobusch, Martin; Patientia, Ramonde; Rustomjee, Roxana; Page-Shipp, Liesl; Pistorius, Christoffel; Krause, Rene; Bogoshi, Mampedi; Churchyard, Gavin; Venter, Amour; Allen, Jenny; Palomino, Juan Carlos; de Marez, Tine; van Heeswijk, Rolf P. G.; Lounis, Nacer; Meyvisch, Paul; Verbeeck, Johan; Parys, Wim; de Beule, Karel; Andries, Koen; Mc Neeley, David F.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The diarylquinoline TMC207 offers a new mechanism of antituberculosis action by inhibiting mycobacterial ATP synthase. TMC207 potently inhibits drug-sensitive and drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro and shows bactericidal activity in patients who have drug-susceptible

  11. 5 CFR 362.207 - Withdrawal and readmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Withdrawal and readmission. 362.207... PRESIDENTIAL MANAGEMENT FELLOWS PROGRAM Program Administration § 362.207 Withdrawal and readmission. (a...) An agency must notify OPM when a Fellow or Senior Fellow withdraws from the Program. (b) Readmission...

  12. 41 CFR 101-39.207 - Reimbursement for services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... sufficient to recover applicable costs. Failure by using agencies to reimburse GSA for vehicle services will... or neglect. (e) Agencies may be charged for recovery of expenses for repairs or services to GSA IFMS... services. 101-39.207 Section 101-39.207 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property...

  13. 5 CFR 2606.207 - Accounting of disclosures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accounting of disclosures. 2606.207... ACT RULES Access to Records and Accounting of Disclosures § 2606.207 Accounting of disclosures. (a... accounting of disclosures will be retained for at least five years or for the life of the record, whichever...

  14. 40 CFR 6.207 - Environmental impact statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Environmental impact statements. 6.207... ACTIONS EPA's NEPA Environmental Review Procedures § 6.207 Environmental impact statements. (a) The Responsible Official will prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) (see 40 CFR 1508.11) for major...

  15. 5 CFR 591.207 - Which areas are COLA areas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Which areas are COLA areas? 591.207 Section 591.207 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS ALLOWANCES AND DIFFERENTIALS Cost-of-Living Allowance and Post Differential-Nonforeign Areas Cost-Of-Living...

  16. 23 CFR 633.207 - Construction labor and materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Construction labor and materials. 633.207 Section 633... OPERATIONS REQUIRED CONTRACT PROVISIONS Federal-Aid Contracts (Appalachian Contracts) § 633.207 Construction labor and materials. (a) Construction and materials shall be in accordance with the State highway...

  17. 23 CFR 230.207 - Sources of assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Services for Minority, Disadvantaged, and Women Business Enterprises § 230.207 Sources of assistance. It is the policy of the FHWA that all potential sources of assistance to minority business enterprises be...

  18. Radiotherapy combined with Tegafur (FT-207s) for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Yoshiro

    1981-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) has anti-tumor effects as an anti-metabolite, but it cannot pass the Blood-Brain-Barrier (BBB). FT-207 a masked-compound of 5-FU, is easily lipid soluble and is able to pass the BBB. Twenty eight patients of primary brain tumor and 8 patients of metastatic brain tumor were treated with irradiation combined with 750 mg of FT-207 suppository. Twenty four patients of primary brain tumor were treated only with irradiation as control. The mean survival time was 20.4 +- 11.8 months for the combined therapy group and 17.6 +- 8.6 months for the control. The concentration of FT-207 and 5-FU in serum and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was investigated after administration of 750 mg of FT-207 suppository per annum. The maximum concentration of FT-207 and of 5-FU in serum was 20.4 +- 11.8 mcg/ml and 0.06 +- 0.02 mcg/ml, respectively. There were observed several side effects, such as anorexia, nausea, exanthema and etc. These side effects were not so great as to interrupt the therapy at the dose level of 750 mg of FT-207. However, at the dose of 1500 mg, one case showed disturbance of consciousness, to which attention should be called. (author)

  19. A note on {sup 207}Bi in environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossew, P. [European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre, Institute of Environment and Sustainability, Radioactivity Environmental Monitoring Group. Via Fermi 1, I-21020 Ispra, Vatican City State, Holy See (Italy)]. E-mail: peter.bossew@jrc.it; Lettner, H. [Institute of Physics and Biophysics, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunner Strasse 34, A-5020 Salzburg (Austria)]. E-mail: herbert.lettner@sbg.ac.at; Hubmer, A. [Institute of Physics and Biophysics, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunner Strasse 34, A-5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2006-07-01

    Traces of the radionuclide {sup 207}Bi were identified in soil and cryoconite (glacier sediment) samples from Alpine regions of Austria. This nuclide has been produced in thermonuclear explosions mainly in the early 1960s and subsequently dispersed in the atmosphere. Activity concentrations up to 22 Bq/kg d.m. have been found. The ratio {sup 207}Bi:{sup 137}Cs(global fallout) equals (1.70 {+-} 0.12)10{sup -3}, which is in accordance with literature data. When low levels of {sup 207}Bi are assessed by gamma spectrometry, corrections must be made for a gamma line produced in the lead shield by neutron activation due to cosmic neutrons.

  20. 48 CFR 517.207 - Exercise of options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exercise of options. 517... METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SPECIAL CONTRACTING METHODS Options 517.207 Exercise of options. Before exercising an option, you must: (a) Synopsize it unless you meet of the following conditions: (1) The option...

  1. 48 CFR 3417.207 - Exercise of options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exercise of options. 3417... REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SPECIAL CONTRACTING METHODS Options 3417.207 Exercise of options. If any provision in a contract requires that an option may only be exercised within a specified...

  2. 48 CFR 17.207 - Exercise of options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exercise of options. 17... METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SPECIAL CONTRACTING METHODS Options 17.207 Exercise of options. (a) When exercising an option, the contracting officer shall provide written notice to the contractor within the time...

  3. 48 CFR 317.207 - Exercise of options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exercise of options. 317... METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SPECIAL CONTRACTING METHODS Options 317.207 Exercise of options. (h) Before exercising an option for a subsequent performance period/additional quantity under a multiple-year contract...

  4. 48 CFR 1517.207 - Exercise of options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Exercise of options. 1517... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SPECIAL CONTRACTING METHODS Options 1517.207 Exercise of options. (a) Unless otherwise approved by the Chief of the Contracting Office, contracts for services employing option...

  5. 48 CFR 52.207-5 - Option To Purchase Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Option To Purchase....207-5 Option To Purchase Equipment. As prescribed in 7.404, insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Option To Purchase Equipment (FEB 1995) (a) The Government may purchase the equipment...

  6. 14 CFR 135.207 - VFR: Helicopter surface reference requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false VFR: Helicopter surface reference... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.207 VFR: Helicopter surface reference requirements. No person may operate a helicopter under VFR unless that person has visual surface reference or...

  7. 48 CFR 415.207 - Handling proposals and information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Information 415.207 Handling proposals and information. (a) Throughout the source selection process, agency... Proposals RFP Offeror 1. To the best of my knowledge and belief, no conflict of interest exists that may... otherwise result in a biased opinion or an unfair advantage. If a potential conflict of interest arises or...

  8. 27 CFR 46.207 - Articles held in bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Articles held in bond. 46... Tubes Held for Sale on April 1, 2009 Inventories § 46.207 Articles held in bond. If the dealer is a manufacturer or an export warehouse proprietor and holds articles in TTB bond on April 1, 2009, the floor...

  9. 12 CFR 207.4 - Fulfillment of the CRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... REPORTING OF CRA-RELATED AGREEMENTS (REGULATION G) § 207.4 Fulfillment of the CRA. (a) List of factors that... party to the agreement— (i) Home-purchase, home-improvement, small business, small farm, community... institution that is evaluated on the basis of a strategic plan, any element of the strategic plan, as...

  10. 5 CFR 551.207 - Professional exemption criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 551.207 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY... criteria. To qualify for the professional exemption, an employee's primary duty must be the performance of work requiring knowledge of an advanced type in a field of science or learning customarily acquired by...

  11. 15 CFR 2011.207 - Suspension of the certificate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., SYRUPS AND MOLASSES Specialty Sugar § 2011.207 Suspension of the certificate system. (a) Suspension. The.... Notice of such suspension and the effective date thereof shall be published in the Federal Register. (b... such reinstatement and the effective date thereof shall be published in the Federal Register. (c...

  12. 48 CFR 1815.207-70 - Release of proposal information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Announcements of Opportunity and NASA Research Announcements; (ii) Unsolicited proposals; and (iii) SBIR and... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Release of proposal... Receipt of Proposals and Information 1815.207-70 Release of proposal information. (a) NASA personnel...

  13. 24 CFR 983.207 - Condition of contract units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PROJECT-BASED VOUCHER (PBV) PROGRAM Housing Assistance Payments Contract § 983.207... in accordance with the HQS. The PHA may not make any HAP payment to the owner for a contract unit.... Such remedies include termination of housing assistance payments, abatement or reduction of housing...

  14. 19 CFR 207.102 - Initiation of proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SUBSIDIZED EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES Implementing Regulations for the North American Free Trade Agreement... and Committee Proceedings § 207.102 Initiation of proceedings. (a) Upon completion of the inquiry, (1... charged is beyond the jurisdiction of the Commission and within the jurisdiction of another Free Trade...

  15. 21 CFR 207.26 - Amendments to registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... made for the purpose of changing the name of the manufacturer of a drug product under § 201.1 of this chapter. Changes in the names of officers and directors of the corporations do not require such amendment... Domestic Drug Establishments § 207.26 Amendments to registration. Changes in individual ownership...

  16. 12 CFR 207.6 - Disclosure of covered agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... DISCLOSURE AND REPORTING OF CRA-RELATED AGREEMENTS (REGULATION G) § 207.6 Disclosure of covered agreements... CRA public file by insured depository institution or affiliate. An insured depository institution and...) by placing a copy of the covered agreement in the insured depository institution's CRA public file if...

  17. 30 CFR 70.207 - Bimonthly sampling; mechanized mining units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bimonthly sampling; mechanized mining units. 70... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Sampling Procedures § 70.207 Bimonthly sampling; mechanized mining units. (a) Each operator shall take five valid respirable dust samples...

  18. 48 CFR 47.207-5 - Contractor responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contractor....207-5 Contractor responsibilities. Contractor responsibilities vary with the kinds of freight to be... furnished by the contractor. Otherwise, state that the contractor shall furnish clean and sound closed-type...

  19. 27 CFR 9.207 - Outer Coastal Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Outer Coastal Plain. 9.207... Outer Coastal Plain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Outer Coastal Plain”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Outer Coastal Plain” is a term of viticultural...

  20. Isomer shifts of the octupole doublet in muonic 207Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budick, B.; Anigstein, R.; Kast, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Isomer shifts in the doublet 5/2 + , 7/2 + levels in muonic 207 Pb have been measured. The shifts are essentially the same as in the core 3 - collective state. They support the hypothesis that the octupole vibration does not conserve volume. (orig.)

  1. 34 CFR 682.207 - Due diligence in disbursing a loan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Due diligence in disbursing a loan. 682.207 Section 682.207 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF... § 682.207 Due diligence in disbursing a loan. (a)(1) This section prescribes procedures for lenders to...

  2. 27 CFR 44.207a - To a foreign-trade zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false To a foreign-trade zone. 44.207a Section 44.207a Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... of Shipment § 44.207a To a foreign-trade zone. Where tobacco products, and cigarette papers and tubes...

  3. 34 CFR 668.207 - Preventing evasion of the consequences of cohort default rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preventing evasion of the consequences of cohort default rates. 668.207 Section 668.207 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... Cohort Default Rates § 668.207 Preventing evasion of the consequences of cohort default rates. (a...

  4. 28 CFR 45.3 - Disciplinary proceedings under 18 U.S.C. 207(j).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... 207(j). 45.3 Section 45.3 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES § 45.3 Disciplinary proceedings under 18 U.S.C. 207(j). (a) Upon a determination by the Assistant... authorized by 18 U.S.C. 207(j), or subjected to other appropriate disciplinary action under that statute. The...

  5. 9 CFR 113.207 - Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus. 113.207 Section 113.207 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.207 Encephalomyelitis...

  6. 41 CFR 101-27.207-3 - Marking material to show extended shelf life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... extended shelf life. 101-27.207-3 Section 101-27.207-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.2-Management of Shelf-Life Materials § 101-27.207-3 Marking material to show extended shelf life. When the shelf-life period of Type II material (except for critical end-use items as...

  7. 49 CFR 40.207 - What is the effect of a cancelled drug test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is the effect of a cancelled drug test? 40.207 Section 40.207 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in Drug Tests § 40.207 What is the effect of...

  8. 48 CFR 616.207 - Firm-fixed-price, level-of-effort term contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Firm-fixed-price, level-of-effort term contracts. 616.207 Section 616.207 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Fixed-Price Contracts 616.207 Firm-fixed-price...

  9. 48 CFR 16.207 - Firm-fixed-price, level-of-effort term contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Firm-fixed-price, level-of-effort term contracts. 16.207 Section 16.207 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Fixed-Price Contracts 16.207 Firm-fixed...

  10. 33 CFR 207.10 - Charles River, Mass.; dam of Charles River Basin Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Charles River, Mass.; dam of Charles River Basin Commission. 207.10 Section 207.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.10 Charles River, Mass.; dam of...

  11. 5 CFR 880.207 - Adjustment of accounts after finding of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adjustment of accounts after finding of death. 880.207 Section 880.207 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL... Procedures § 880.207 Adjustment of accounts after finding of death. After a missing annuitant is determined...

  12. 33 CFR 207.580 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.580 Section 207.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.580 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.; use...

  13. 48 CFR 47.207-2 - Duration of contract and time of performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... performance of segments of a major job; e.g., an office relocation for which the work phases must be... time of performance. 47.207-2 Section 47.207-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL...-Related Services 47.207-2 Duration of contract and time of performance. The contracting officer shall— (a...

  14. 49 CFR 238.207 - Link between coupling mechanism and car body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Link between coupling mechanism and car body. 238.207 Section 238.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.207 Link between coupling mechanism and car body. All...

  15. 42 CFR 441.207 - Drugs and devices and termination of ectopic pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... APPLICABLE TO SPECIFIC SERVICES Abortions § 441.207 Drugs and devices and termination of ectopic pregnancies... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drugs and devices and termination of ectopic pregnancies. 441.207 Section 441.207 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...

  16. 31 CFR 515.207 - Entry of vessels engaged in trade with Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... with Cuba. 515.207 Section 515.207 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... REGULATIONS Prohibitions § 515.207 Entry of vessels engaged in trade with Cuba. Except as specifically... place in Cuba to engage in the trade of goods or the purchase or provision of services, may enter a U.S...

  17. 24 CFR 207.252e - Method of payment of mortgage insurance premiums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... insurance premiums. 207.252e Section 207.252e Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing... Premiums § 207.252e Method of payment of mortgage insurance premiums. In the cases that the Commissioner... mortgagees, that mortgage insurance premiums be remitted electronically. [63 FR 1303, Jan. 8, 1998] ...

  18. In vivo release of FT-207 from irradiation polymerized composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Huaijiang; Kou Qinghe; Song Juzhong; Peng Tao; Chen Xiaohui; Zhang Dexi

    1999-01-01

    Polymer-drugs composite with long periods of controlled slow release was made by radiation induced polymerization in room temperature. In experiment in vivo, the composite was implanted subcutaneously the back of rabbits. The concentration of 1-(2-tetrahydrofuryl)-5-fluorouracil (FT-207) was determined by HPLC. The results of test showed that the concentration of serum drug is 1.0 μg/mL after 1 week in the polymer-drug composites group. The drug concentration of tissue surrounding the composites is 76.2 +- 10.4 μg/mL. The drug concentration in the far organ (e.g.the lung 1.2 +- 0.5 μg/mL) is lower than the tissue surrounding the composite. The serum drug is higher and shorter time by the routine methods. The serum concentration of FT-207 is lower an retarded by implanted

  19. The half-life of 207Bi and decays of 211At and 211Po

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanokura, M.; Kudo, H.; Nakahara, H.; Miyano, K.; Ohya, S.; Nitoh, O.

    1978-01-01

    The half-life of 207 Bi was obtained from the genetic relation between 207 Po and 207 Bi, and between 211 At and 207 Bi. The half-life was found to be 33.4 +- 0.8 y. The half-life of 207 Po was determined to be 5.81 +- 0.04 h by following the decay of the characteristic γ-rays from 207 Po. The half-life of 211 At was determined to be 7.23 +- 0.02 h by following the decay of γ-rays and α-particles from 211 At and 211 Po. The half-lives determined in the present work for 207 Po and 211 At agree with the literature although the half-life of 207 Bi differs considerably from the currently accepted value of 38 y. The branching ratio of 211 At decaying through EC and α-decay modes was determined together with the branching ratios of the three α-particles emitted from 211 Po. (Auth.)

  20. 21 CFR 207.25 - Information required in registration and drug listing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Information required in registration and drug listing. 207.25 Section 207.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... manufactured by a registered blood bank, a copy of all current labeling (except that only one representative...

  1. 48 CFR 32.207 - Administration and payment of commercial financing payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... contractual information, and the account(s) (see 32.206(d)) to be charged for the payment. (c) Management of... of commercial financing payments. 32.207 Section 32.207 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Commercial Item...

  2. 49 CFR 375.207 - What items must be in my advertisements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What items must be in my advertisements? 375.207 Section 375.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS TRANSPORTATION OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS IN INTERSTATE...

  3. 9 CFR 381.207 - Small importations for consignee's personal use, display, or laboratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Small importations for consignee's personal use, display, or laboratory analysis. 381.207 Section 381.207 Animals and Animal Products FOOD...

  4. 20 CFR 726.207 - Discharge by the carrier of obligations and duties of operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discharge by the carrier of obligations and duties of operator. 726.207 Section 726.207 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, AS AMENDED BLACK LUNG BENEFITS...

  5. 19 CFR 207.8 - Questionnaires to have the force of subpoenas; subpoena enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Questionnaires to have the force of subpoenas; subpoena enforcement. 207.8 Section 207.8 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION... Questionnaires to have the force of subpoenas; subpoena enforcement. Any questionnaire issued by the Commission...

  6. 50 CFR 648.207 - Herring Research Set-Aside (RSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Herring Research Set-Aside (RSA). 648.207... Measures for the Atlantic Herring Fishery § 648.207 Herring Research Set-Aside (RSA). (a) NMFS shall... authorized to utilize RSA, based on the selection criteria described in the RFP. (d) NMFS shall consider each...

  7. 30 CFR 250.207 - What ancillary activities may I conduct?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... surveys; or (c) Studies that model potential oil and hazardous substance spills, drilling muds and... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What ancillary activities may I conduct? 250.207 Section 250.207 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE...

  8. 33 CFR 207.60 - Federal Dam, Hudson River, Troy, N.Y.; pool level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal Dam, Hudson River, Troy, N.Y.; pool level. 207.60 Section 207.60 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS..., N.Y.; pool level. (a) Whenever the elevation of the pool created by the Federal dam at Troy, N.Y...

  9. 33 CFR 207.600 - Rochester (Charlotte) Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rochester (Charlotte) Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.600 Section 207.600 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF... (Charlotte) Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. (a)-(b) [Reserved] (c) No vessel shall moor or...

  10. 7 CFR 1744.207 - Investment not to jeopardize loan security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Investment not to jeopardize loan security. 1744.207... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POST-LOAN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES COMMON TO GUARANTEED AND INSURED TELEPHONE LOANS Borrower Investments § 1744.207 Investment not to jeopardize loan security. A borrower shall...

  11. Core excitations across the neutron shell gap in 207Tl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Wilson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The single closed-neutron-shell, one proton–hole nucleus 207Tl was populated in deep-inelastic collisions of a 208Pb beam with a 208Pb target. The yrast and near-yrast level scheme has been established up to high excitation energy, comprising an octupole phonon state and a large number of core excited states. Based on shell-model calculations, all observed single core excitations were established to arise from the breaking of the N=126 neutron core. While the shell-model calculations correctly predict the ordering of these states, their energies are compressed at high spins. It is concluded that this compression is an intrinsic feature of shell-model calculations using two-body matrix elements developed for the description of two-body states, and that multiple core excitations need to be considered in order to accurately calculate the energy spacings of the predominantly three-quasiparticle states.

  12. 24 CFR 207.252c - Premiums-mortgages insured pursuant to section 238(c) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... All of the provisions of §§ 207.252 and 207.252a governing mortgage insurance premiums shall apply to... insurance premiums due on such mortgages in accordance with §§ 207.252 and 207.252a shall be calculated on... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Premiums-mortgages insured pursuant...

  13. 30 CFR 204.207 - Who will approve, deny, or modify my request for accounting and auditing relief?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for accounting and auditing relief? 204.207 Section 204.207 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT... Accounting and Auditing Relief § 204.207 Who will approve, deny, or modify my request for accounting and auditing relief? (a) If there is not a State concerned for your marginal property, only MMS will decide...

  14. 20 CFR 703.207 - Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... amount fixed by the Office under the regulations in this part shall deposit any negotiable securities... deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. 703.207 Section 703.207 Employees' Benefits... AND RELATED STATUTES INSURANCE REGULATIONS Insurance Carrier Security Deposit Requirements § 703.207...

  15. 31 CFR 575.207 - Prohibited transactions relating to travel to Iraq or to activities within Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... or Iraq; (b) Relating to travel and activities for the conduct of the official business of the United... travel to Iraq or to activities within Iraq. 575.207 Section 575.207 Money and Finance: Treasury... TREASURY IRAQI SANCTIONS REGULATIONS Prohibitions § 575.207 Prohibited transactions relating to travel to...

  16. Nuclear orientation and NMR/ON of sup(205,207)Po

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, P.; Walitzki, H.; Freitag, K.; Hildebrand, H.; Schloesser, K.

    1983-01-01

    sup(205,207)Po have been implanted with an isotope separator on-line into cold host matrices of Fe, Ni, Zn and Be. Nuclear magnetic resonance of oriented 207 Po has been observed in Fe and Ni, of 205 Po in Fe. From the dependence of the resonance frequency on external magnetic field the g-factor of 207 Po was derived. Using this value the magnetic hyperfine fields of Po in Fe and Ni were obtained. From the temperature dependence of the anisotropies of #betta#-lines in the decay of sup(205,207)Po the multipole mixing of several transitions was derived. The electric interaction frequencies #betta#sub(Q)=eQVsub(zz)/h in the hosts Zn and Be were measured. (orig./WL)

  17. 12 CFR 207.11 - Other definitions and rules of construction used in this part.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM DISCLOSURE AND REPORTING OF CRA-RELATED AGREEMENTS (REGULATION G) § 207.11... (ii) The NGEP that is a party to the agreement makes a CRA communication, as described in § 207.3. (b) Control. “Control” is defined in section 2(a) of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1841(a)). (c) CRA...

  18. 41 CFR 301-71.207 - What internal policies and procedures must we establish for travel reimbursement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 71-AGENCY TRAVEL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS Travel Claims for Reimbursement... should submit a travel claim (including whether to use a standard form or an agency form and whether the... and procedures must we establish for travel reimbursement? 301-71.207 Section 301-71.207 Public...

  19. 33 CFR 207.590 - Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.590 Section 207.590 Navigation and Navigable... Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. (a) The term “canal... immediately to the Black Rock Lock, foot of Bridge Street, Buffalo, N.Y., telephone 876-5454. (k) Ferry Street...

  20. 49 CFR 236.207 - Electric lock on hand-operated switch; control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., AND APPLIANCES Automatic Block Signal Systems Standards § 236.207 Electric lock on hand-operated switch; control. Electric lock on hand-operated switch shall be controlled so that it cannot be unlocked... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electric lock on hand-operated switch; control...

  1. 49 CFR 399.207 - Truck and truck-tractor access requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... Exception. If air and electrical connections necessary to couple or uncouple a truck-tractor from a trailer... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Truck and truck-tractor access requirements. 399... Vehicles § 399.207 Truck and truck-tractor access requirements. (a) General rule. Any person entering or...

  2. Core breaking and octupole low-spin states in $^{207}$ Tl

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the low-spin level structure of the $^{207}$Tl nucleus populated by the $\\beta$- decay of $^{207}$Hg. While $^{207}$Tl is a single-proton hole nucleus, the majority of the observed states will have a three-particle structure thus requiring the breaking of the neutron or proton core, or a collective octupole phonon coupled to the single proton hole. Thus information will be obtained on the single particle orbitals in the vicinity of the N=126 and Z=82 magic numbers, and on the size of the shell gap. The results will be used to improve the predictive power of the shell model for more exotic nuclei as we move to lighter N=126 nuclei.The experiment will use the ISOLDE Decay station, and will take advantage of the $^{207}$Hg beam from the molten lead target. A test on the feasibility to produce an $^{208}$Hg beam from the same target, with the aim to study the $\\beta$-decay into $^{208}$Tl, could be performed at the same time.

  3. 14 CFR 302.207 - Cases to be decided on written submissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... administrative law judge is otherwise required by the public interest. (b) The standards employed in deciding... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cases to be decided on written submissions....207 Cases to be decided on written submissions. (a) Applications under this subpart will be decided on...

  4. 46 CFR 308.207 - War risk protection and indemnity insurance policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false War risk protection and indemnity insurance policy. 308... OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Protection and Indemnity Insurance § 308.207 War risk protection and indemnity insurance policy. The standard form of war risk protection and indemnity insurance policy, Form MA...

  5. 48 CFR 1815.207-71 - Appointing non-Government evaluators as special Government employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...; (2) Unsolicited proposals; and (3) SBIR and STTR proposals. [63 FR 9954, Feb. 27, 1998, as amended at... BY NEGOTIATION Solicitation and Receipt of Proposals and Information 1815.207-71 Appointing non... employee shall be made by: (1) The NASA Headquarters personnel office when the release of proposal...

  6. 24 CFR 207.259a - Waiver of title objection; mortgages formerly Commissioner-held.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES MULTIFAMILY HOUSING MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Rights and Duties of Mortgagee Under the Contract of Insurance § 207.259a Waiver of... any lien or other adverse interest that was senior to the mortgage on the date of the original sale of...

  7. 46 CFR 117.207 - Survival craft-vessels operating on lakes, bays, and sounds routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival craft-vessels operating on lakes, bays, and... 49 PASSENGERS LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS Number and Type of Survival Craft § 117.207 Survival craft—vessels operating on lakes, bays, and sounds routes. (a) Each vessel with overnight...

  8. 46 CFR 180.207 - Survival craft-vessels operating on lakes, bays, and sounds routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival craft-vessels operating on lakes, bays, and... Survival Craft § 180.207 Survival craft—vessels operating on lakes, bays, and sounds routes. (a) Except as... warm water is not required to carry survival craft. (d) A vessel certificated to operate on lakes, bays...

  9. 33 CFR 207.50 - Hudson River Lock at Troy, N.Y.; navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hudson River Lock at Troy, N.Y..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.50 Hudson River Lock at Troy, N.Y.; navigation. (a...) [Reserved] (n) Trespass on U.S. property. Trespass on U.S. property, or willful injury to the banks, masonry...

  10. Measurements of time differential perturbated angular gamma-gamma correlations in the /sup 207/Bi decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ashok; Soni, S K; Pancholi, S K; Gupta, S L [Delhi Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics

    1976-10-01

    The results are presented of measuring the differential perturbed angular ..gamma gamma..-correlations for the ..gamma.. 1063.62 - ..gamma.. 569.67 keV cascade in /sup 207/Bi. The results obtained are analyzed and compared with data of other authors.

  11. 12 CFR 207.5 - Related agreements considered a single agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... RESERVE SYSTEM DISCLOSURE AND REPORTING OF CRA-RELATED AGREEMENTS (REGULATION G) § 207.5 Related... of the CRA. (b) Substantively related contracts. All written contracts to which an insured depository... each such contract is in fulfillment of the CRA, if the contracts were negotiated in a coordinated...

  12. 48 CFR 36.207 - Pricing fixed-price construction contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pricing fixed-price... Contracting for Construction 36.207 Pricing fixed-price construction contracts. (a) Generally, firm-fixed... methods. (b) Lump-sum pricing shall be used in preference to unit pricing except when— (1) Large...

  13. 33 CFR 207.440 - St. Marys Falls Canal and Locks, Mich.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false St. Marys Falls Canal and Locks... CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.440 St... include all of the natural waters of the St. Marys River on the U.S. side of the International Boundary...

  14. Study of 207Tl126 Produced in Deep-Inelastic Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson E.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Deep-inelastic collisions of a 208Pb beam on a 208Pb target were performed using the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory. The Gammasphere detector array was used for the detection of prompt and delayed gamma-rays of the reaction products.207Tl is one proton away from the 208Pb doubly-magic nucleus. Its low-energy level structure is dominated by the single proton-hole states πs1/2−1, πd3/2−1 and πh11/2−1. The 11/2− state is isomeric with T1/2 = 1.33(11 s. The reaction partner of 207Tl is 209Bi, which has arelatively well established level scheme compared to 207Tl. Cross-coincidences between these two nuclei were used to confirm or establish levels above the 11/2− isomeric state in 207Tl. These states are obtained via breaking of the neutron core. Angular correlation analysis was performed on known transitions in 208Pb, proving the applicability of this method for multipolarity assignment.

  15. Isolation and partial characterization of antimicrobial compounds from a new strain Streptomyces sp. CN207

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slama, Nedra; Lazim, Hadeer; Barkallah, Insaf; Limam, Ferid

    2008-01-01

    A distinct streptomyces strains were isolated from Tunisian soil. the isolate designed CN207, was assigned to the genus streptomyces on the basis of morphological and chemotaxonomic criteria. A 16S rDNA sequence of the isolate was determined. Streptomyces sp CN207 secreted large amount antibiotic against gram positive bacteria, gram negative bacteria, yeast and fungi on his barley (HB) medium. (HB) medium was found to be suitable substrate of the medium for CN207 production. Maximum yield of CN207 product (700 mg/ml) after optimize fermentation process. Bioactive molecules from strain CN207 were extracted with ethyl acetate and analyzed by PTLC using silica gel plates.The separated compounds were visualiszed under UV at 254 nm and the active spots were detected by bioautography on silica gel plates using salmonella thyphimurium NRRL B4420 and Staphylococcus aureus CDC 103 as indicator microorganisms. The crude extract (8.36 g) was fractionated on Sep-pack column (C18 cartridge) and elution was performed using a discontinue gradient of methanol-water. Two active fractions eluted by 20% and 40% of methanol were obtained. The bioactive compounds were separated by preparative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on a C18 reversed phase column and eluted with a linear gradient of acetonitrile -water in presence of 0.1% formic acid. The peaks were collected separately, concentrated and bioassayed against the routine indicator microorganisms. The absorption spectrum of the active molecules was determined with a shimadzu UV-160 a spectrophotometer. Determination of the chemical structure of these compounds on the basis on their IR, COSY and H 1: C13 is in progress

  16. 33 CFR 207.610 - St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation of the harbor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation of the harbor and U.S. breakwater. 207.610 Section 207... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.610 St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and...

  17. 207Pb and 205Tl NMR on Perovskite Type Crystals APbX3 (A = Cs, Tl, X = Br, I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Surendra; Weiden, Norbert; Weiss, Alarich

    1987-11-01

    By 205Tl and 207Pb NM R the chemical shift in polycrystalline samples of binary halides AX, BX2 and ternary halides ABX3 (A = Cs, Tl; B = Pb; X = Br, I) was studied at room temperature. The chemical shift tensors δ ( 205Tl) and δ (207Pb) were determined in magnitude and orientation on single crystals of the orthorhombic TlPbI3. The components of the δ(205Tl) tensor are δx (205Tl) || a = 611ppm; δy (205Tl) || b = 680 ppm; δZ(205Tl) || c = 1329 ppm; δiso(205Tl) = 873.3 ppm (with respect to 3.4 molar aqueous solution of TlOOCCH3). The chemical shift tensor of 207Pb in TlPbI3 shows two orientations. One of them is: δx (207Pb) = 3760 ppm, inclined 30° from b towards c, δy(207Pb) || a = 3485 ppm, δz(207Pb) = 2639 ppm inclined 120° from b towards c. δiso(207Pb) = 3295 ppm (with respect to saturated aqueous solution of Pb(NO3)2). The results are discussed with respect to the crystal structure and a model to explain orientation and anisotropy of the tensors δ(205Tl) and δ(207Pb) in TlPbI3 is proposed. In the system CsPbBr3-x Ix δ(207Pb) was studied on polycrystalline samples. The chemical shift increases with increasing x and negative excess shift is observed.

  18. High-power diode-side-pumped rod Tm:YAG laser at 2.07 μm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Caili; Niu, Yanxiong; Du, Shifeng; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Zhichao; Li, Fangqin; Xu, Jialin; Bo, Yong; Peng, Qinjun; Cui, Dafu; Zhang, Jingyuan; Xu, Zuyan

    2013-11-01

    We report a high-power diode-laser (LD) side-pumped rod Tm:YAG laser of around 2 μm. The laser was water-cooled at 8°C and yielded a maximum output power of 267 W at 2.07 μm, which is the highest output power for an all solid-state cw 2.07 μm rod Tm:YAG laser reported as far as we know. The corresponding optical-optical conversion efficiency was 20.7%, and the slope efficiency was about 29.8%, respectively.

  19. Nuclear excitation in the reaction 207Pb(μ-,ν6n)201Tl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budick, B.; Anigstein, R.; Kast, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    A probability of roughly 1% has been measured for the formation of the first excited state of 201 Tl following muon capture on 207 Pb. A probability of this magnitude for 6 neutron emission may indicate structure in the nuclear excitation function near 54 MeV. An alternative interpretation is provided by muon capture on a correlated np pair in analogy with pion absorption. (orig.)

  20. Analisis Film Horor Indonesia Produksi Tahun 2014 (Studi Kasus: Mall Klender dan Kamar 207

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedi Sukatno Sembiring Meliala

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Film horor erat kaitannya dengan tokoh antagonis yang menimbulkan ketakutan pada penonton dalam bentuk makhluk supranatural seperti hantu, roh jahat dan sebagainya. Karakteristik film dengan genre horor membuat penonton terbawa suasana dengan alur ceritanya yang menakutkan. Namun, beberapa dari film horor Indonesia menyajikan adegan-adegan yang kurang sopan bahkan tergolong asusila atau porno. Untuk itu, penelitian ini ingin melihat apakah terdapat konten pornografi pada film Mall Klender dan Kamar 207 yang merupakan film horor Indonesia terlaris di tahun 2014. Analisis dilakukan dengan melihat pandangan dan penilaian 30 responden dengan karakteristik yaitu penonton film horor Indonesia yang berusia 20-40 tahun. Berdasarkan hasil analisis, tidak didapatkan konten pornografi pada film Mall Klender dan Kamar 207. Adegan-adegan yang terindikasi sebagai konten pornografi ternyata masih dapat diterima oleh penonton sebagai adegan yang berada dalam batas kewajaran dan mendukung pembawaan suasana dan kesan dalam cerita yang disampaikan. Kata Kunci: film horror Indonesia, analisis konten, pornografi Abstract The horror film is closely related to the antagonist that causes fear for audience in the form of supernatural creatures such as ghosts, demons and so on. Characteristic of the horor film is to make the audience carried away with the scary plot. However, some of the existing Indonesian horror film presents scenes that classified as obscene or pornographic. Therefore, this study wanted to see if there are any pornographic content on the film Klender Mall and Room 207 is the best-selling Indonesian horror movie in 2014. The analysis was done by looking at the view and assessment of 30 respondents which are Indonesian horror movie goers aged 20-40 years. Based on the analysis, there is no founding of pornographic content on the film Klender Mall and Room 207. The scenes that indicated as pornographic content was still acceptable by the audience

  1. Investigation of 207 nm UV radiation for degradation of organic dye ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The photo-degradation of organic dye C.I. Acid Red 213 (AR-213) was achieved by 207 nm UV radiation emitted from a planar KrBr* excimer lamp without addition of oxidants at varying initial pH values. Precipitates were found to be generated when the irradiated solution of initial acid pH was adjusted to alkaline pH and ...

  2. Near-degeneracy in Excited Vibrational States of 207PbF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawhorter, Richard; Nguyen, Alexander; Kim, Yongrak; Biekert, Andreas; Sears, Trevor; Grabow, Jens-Uwe; Kudashov, A. D.; Skripnikov, L. V.; Titov, A. V.; Petrov, A. N.

    2017-04-01

    High-resolution Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy studies of 207PbF have demonstrated the near-degeneracy of two levels of opposite parity. These have attracted attention for the study of parity violation effects and the variation of fundamental constants using 207PbF. Further theoretical work has improved our detailed understanding of both 207PbF and 208PbF, and furthermore recently indicated that the finely split +/- parity levels grow monotonically closer for higher vibrational states. Our experimental results for v = 0-3 confirm this, and are in excellent agreement with our extended theoretical calculations up to v = 4; both will be presented. TJS acknowledges support from Contract No. DE-SC0012704 with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, supported by its Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences within the Office of Basic Energy Sciences., as do RM, AB, YK, & AN from Pomona College & J-UG from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG).

  3. 206Pb/207Pb ratios in dry deposit samples from the Metropolitan Zone of Mexico Valle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, T.; Lartigue, J.; Marquez, C.

    2007-01-01

    206 Pb/ 207 Pb isotope ratios of dry deposit samples in the Metropolitan Zone of Mexico Valley (MZMV) were determined and correlated with some contemporary environmental material such as gasoline, urban dust, etc., as possible pollution sources, the latter presenting different signatures. 206 Pb/ 207 Pb ratios were determined in samples 'as is' by ICP-MS, using an Elan-6100. A standard material NIST-981 was used to monitor accuracy and to correct mass fractionation. The calculated enrichment factors of lead (taking rubidium as a conservative endogenous element) show its anthropogenic origin with percentages higher than 97.65%. 206 Pb/ 207 Pb ratio in dry deposit samples ranges from 0.816 to a maximum of 1.154, following a normal distribution. Arithmetic mean was 0.9967±0.0864 lower than those of possible pollution sources: 1.1395±0.0165 for gasoline, 1.071±0.008 for industrially derived lead and, for the more radiogenic natural soil and urban dust values ranging from 1.2082±0.022 to 1.211±0.108. The possible origin of lead in gasoline used prior to 1960 is discussed. (author)

  4. 5 CFR 892.207 - Can I make changes to my FEHB enrollment while I am participating in premium conversion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL FLEXIBLE BENEFITS PLAN: PRE-TAX PAYMENT OF HEALTH BENEFITS PREMIUMS Eligibility and Participation § 892.207 Can I make...

  5. Nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of 207Pb2+ in Pb(NO3)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, O.; Nolle, A.

    1980-01-01

    The NMR signals of 207 Pb were observed in a single crystal of Pb(NO 3 ) 2 and could be assigned to the four different Pb 2+ sites by the dependence of the linewidths on the orientation. Four different nuclear magnetic shielding tensors with equal principal values but with different characteristic vectors could be determined. The symmetry of the shielding tensors is in agreement with the symmetry at the Pb 2+ sites. It is shown, that intermolecular contributions can not account for the anisotropy of the nuclear magnetic shielding, which is 3 0 / 00 of the isotropic absolute magnetic shielding. (orig.)

  6. Clinical study of FT-207 suppository for head and neck malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomioka, Masashi; Usami, Masami; Sakamoto, Ayako

    1982-01-01

    Futraful suppository 1.5g per day was administered to 33 patients with head and neck malignancies. Among 33 cases which entered into the study, 16 cases were evaluated. Out of 16 evaluable cases, complete responses (CRs) were obtained in 4 cases and partial responses (PRs) in 7 cases. An overall response rate including 4 CRs and 7 PRs was 68.8%. Side effects due to FT-207 suppository were developed in 14 cases out of 33 patients (42.4%) Side effects such as anal pain, anorexia, diarrhea, pigmentation, exanthema and nail change were observed. No severe side effect was encountered. (author)

  7. Suggested search for 207Pb nuclear Schiff moment in PbTiO3 ferroelectric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhamedjanov, T.N.; Sushkov, O.P.

    2005-01-01

    We suggest two types of experiments, NMR and macroscopic magnetometry, with solid PbTiO 3 to search for the nuclear Schiff moment of 207 Pb. Both kinds of experiments promise substantial improvement over the presently achieved sensitivities. Statistical considerations show that the improvement of the current sensitivity can be up to ten orders of magnitude for the magnetometry experiment and up to seven orders of magnitude for the NMR experiment. Such significant enhancement is due to the strong internal electric field of the ferroelectric, as well as due to the possibility to cool the nuclear-spin subsystem in the compound down to nanokelvin temperatures

  8. Investigation on the parity violation in the 207Pb(npol, γ)208Pb reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abov, Yu.G.; Ermakov, O.N.; Karpikhin, I.L.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the investigation of P-odd asymmetry in the emission of γ-rays after absorption of transverse-polarized neutrons by nuclei 207 Pb are given. The measurements were carried out on polarized thermal neutron beam of the ITEP reactor. The obtained upper limit of the P-odd asymmetry coefficient is 1.7x10 -5 at the 90% confidence level. This result may be crucial for one-particle (valent) mechanism of the mixing of compound resonance wave function componets having opposite parities

  9. Fission threshold determination of 209Bi and sup(204,206,207,208)Pb by electrofission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuerck, D.

    1975-01-01

    At the Darmstadt electron linear accelerator the cross sections for the electrofission of 209 Bi were measured for electron energies between 24 and 70 MeV, for the separated lead isotopes sup(204,206,207,208)Pb between 38 and 50 MeV. For the determination of the fission thresholds the cross sections were examined by the virtuel photon method using calculations in first Born approximation for the point nucleus with Coulomb wave functions. The analytic functions fitting the fission probability were based on level densities after the Fermi-gas-model. (orig./WL) [de

  10. First direct observation of bound-state beta-decay: Measurements of branching and lifetime of 207Tl81+ fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutin, D.

    2005-08-01

    The first experimental observation of bound-state beta-decay showed, that due solely to the electron stripping, a stable nuclide, e.g. 163 Dy, became unstable. Also a drastic modification of the half-life of bare 187 Re, from 4.12(2) x 10 10 years down to 32.9(20) years, could be observed. It was mainly due to the possibility for the mother nuclide to decay into a previously inaccessible nuclear level of the daughter nuclide. It was proposed to study a nuclide where this decay mode was competing with continuum-state beta-decay, in order to measure their respective branchings. The ratio β b /β c could also be evaluated for the first time. 207 Tl was chosen due to its high atomic number, and Q-value of about 1.4 MeV, small enough to enhance the β b probability and large enough to allow the use of time-resolved Schottky Mass Spectrometry (SMS) to study the evolution of mother and bound-state beta-decay daughter ions. The decay properties of the ground state and isomeric state of 207 Tl 81+ have been investigated at the GSI accelerator facility in two separate experiments. For the first time β-decay where the electron could go either to a bound state (atomic orbitals) and lead to 207 Pb 81+ as a daughter nuclide, or to a continuum state and lead to 207 Pb 82+ , has been observed. The respective branchings of these two processes could be measured as well. The deduced total nuclear half-life of 255(17) s for 207 Tl 81+ , was slightly modified with respect to the half-life of the neutral atom of 286(2) s. It was nevertheless in very good agreement with calculations based on the assumption that the beta-decay was following an allowed type of transition. The branching β b /β c =0.192(20), was also in very good agreement with the same calculations. The application of stochastic precooling allowed to observe in addition the 1348 keV short-lived isomeric state of 207 Tl. The half-life of this isomeric state was measured as 1.47(32) s, which shows a small deviation

  11. Precise determination of the neutron scattering length of lead isotopes 204Pb,207Pb and 208Pb by neutron interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioffe, A.; Ermakov, O.; Karpikhin, I.; Krupchitsky, P.; Mikula, P.; Lukas, P.; Vrana, M.

    2000-01-01

    The neutron scattering length of lead isotopes 204 Pb, 207 Pb and 208 Pb are determined by a set of neutron interferometry experiments. The obtained values b (208) =9.494(30) fm, b (207) =9.286(16) fm, b (204) =10.893(78) fm have much higher accuracy then current table data. Together with the precise value of b for natural lead, these results represent a complete set of data and allow one to calculate b (206) =9.221(69) fm, which is in the very good agreement with the present day experimental value. (orig.)

  12. VECTOR AND TENSOR ANALYZING POWERS IN THE PB-208(D)OVER-RIGHT-ARROW,T)PB-207 REACTION AT 200 AND 360 MEV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDEWIELE, J; LANGEVINJOLIOT, H; GUILLOT, J; ROSIER, LH; WILLIS, A; MORLET, M; DUHAMELCHRETIEN, G; GERLIC, E; TOMASIGUSTAFSSON, E; BLASI, N; MICHELETTI, S; VANDERWERF, SY

    Cross sections and vector and tensor analyzing powers for the main levels in Pb-207 have been measured via the Pb-208(d over arrow pointing right, t)Pb-207 reaction at 200 and 360 MeV incident energies. A(y) and A(yy) spin observables allow a clear identification of the valence levels, especially at

  13. 20 CFR 652.207 - How does a State meet the requirement for universal access to services provided under the Act?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does a State meet the requirement for universal access to services provided under the Act? 652.207 Section 652.207 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT... exercising this discretion, a State must meet the Act's requirements. (b) These requirements are: (1) Labor...

  14. 33 CFR 207.320 - Mississippi River, Twin City Locks and Dam, St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minn.; pool level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mississippi River, Twin City... § 207.320 Mississippi River, Twin City Locks and Dam, St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minn.; pool level. In... the Twin City Locks and Dam, Minneapolis, in the interest of navigation, and supersedes rules and...

  15. 75 FR 26839 - Metrics and Standards for Intercity Passenger Rail Service under Section 207 of the Passenger...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... and Standards for Intercity Passenger Rail Service under Section 207 of the Passenger Rail Investment... performance and service quality of intercity passenger train operations. In compliance with the statute, the... Intercity Passenger Rail Service,'' on the FRA's Web site. Simultaneously, the FRA published a notice in the...

  16. Utilization of Skills in the Care of Patients with Deviations in Psychosocial Adaptation (NS 207): Competency-Based Course Syllabus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Tanya G.

    "Utilization of Skills in the Care of Patients with Deviations in Psychosocial Adaptation" (NS 207) is an associate degree nursing course offered at Chattanooga State Technical Community College. The course stresses the individual as a system in his/her psychosocial adaptation to internal and external stressors, and highlights the…

  17. 5 CFR 2641.207 - One-year restriction on any former private sector assignee under the Information Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... private sector assignee under the Information Technology Exchange Program representing, aiding, counseling... CONFLICT OF INTEREST RESTRICTIONS Prohibitions § 2641.207 One-year restriction on any former private sector... one year after the termination of his assignment from a private sector organization to an agency under...

  18. 45 CFR 46.207 - Research not otherwise approvable which presents an opportunity to understand, prevent, or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Additional Protections for Pregnant Women, Human Fetuses and Neonates Involved in Research § 46.207 Research not otherwise approvable...: science, medicine, ethics, law) and following opportunity for public review and comment, including a...

  19. 23 CFR 420.207 - What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the requirements for research, development, and..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND RESEARCH PLANNING AND RESEARCH PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION Research, Development and Technology Transfer Program Management § 420.207 What are the requirements for research...

  20. A synthetic superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic EUK-207 mitigates radiation dermatitis and promotes wound healing in irradiated rat skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doctrow, Susan R; Lopez, Argelia; Schock, Ashley M; Duncan, Nathan E; Jourdan, Megan M; Olasz, Edit B; Moulder, John E; Fish, Brian L; Mäder, Marylou; Lazar, Jozef; Lazarova, Zelmira

    2013-04-01

    In the event of a radionuclear attack or nuclear accident, the skin would be the first barrier exposed to radiation, though skin injury can progress over days to years following exposure. Chronic oxidative stress has been implicated as being a potential contributor to the progression of delayed radiation-induced injury to skin and other organs. To examine the causative role of oxidative stress in delayed radiation-induced skin injury, including impaired wound healing, we tested a synthetic superoxide dismutase (SOD)/catalase mimetic, EUK-207, in a rat model of combined skin irradiation and wound injury. Administered systemically, beginning 48 hours after irradiation, EUK-207 mitigated radiation dermatitis, suppressed indicators of tissue oxidative stress, and enhanced wound healing. Evaluation of gene expression in irradiated skin at 30 days after exposure revealed a significant upregulation of several key genes involved in detoxication of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. This gene expression pattern was primarily reversed by EUK-207 therapy. These results demonstrate that oxidative stress has a critical role in the progression of radiation-induced skin injury, and that the injury can be mitigated by appropriate antioxidant compounds administered 48 hours after exposure.

  1. Candida Osteomyelitis: Analysis of 207 Pediatric and Adult Cases (1970–2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamaletsou, Maria N.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Sipsas, Nikolaos V.; Moriyama, Brad; Alexander, Elizabeth; Roilides, Emmanuel; Brause, Barry; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, management, and outcome of Candida osteomyelitis are not well understood. Methods. Cases of Candida osteomyelitis from 1970 through 2011 were reviewed. Underlying conditions, microbiology, mechanisms of infection, clinical manifestations, antifungal therapy, and outcome were studied in 207 evaluable cases. Results. Median age was 30 years (range, ≤ 1 month to 88 years) with a >2:1 male:female ratio. Most patients (90%) were not neutropenic. Localizing pain, tenderness, and/or edema were present in 90% of patients. Mechanisms of bone infection followed a pattern of hematogenous dissemination (67%), direct inoculation (25%), and contiguous infection (9%). Coinciding with hematogenous infection, most patients had ≥2 infected bones. When analyzed by age, the most common distribution of infected sites for adults was vertebra (odds ratio [OR], 0.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], .04–.25), rib, and sternum; for pediatric patients (≤18 years) the pattern was femur (OR, 20.6; 95% CI, 8.4–48.1), humerus, then vertebra/ribs. Non-albicans Candida species caused 35% of cases. Bacteria were recovered concomitantly from 12% of cases, underscoring the need for biopsy and/or culture. Candida septic arthritis occurred concomitantly in 21%. Combined surgery and antifungal therapy were used in 48% of cases. The overall complete response rate of Candida osteomyelitis of 32% reflects the difficulty in treating this infection. Relapsed infection, possibly related to inadequate duration of therapy, occurred among 32% who ultimately achieved complete response. Conclusions. Candida osteomyelitis is being reported with increasing frequency. Localizing symptoms are usually present. Vertebrae are the most common sites in adults vs femora in children. Timely diagnosis of Candida osteomyelitis with extended courses of 6–12 months of antifungal therapy, and surgical intervention, when indicated, may improve

  2. 207-nm UV Light-A Promising Tool for Safe Low-Cost Reduction of Surgical Site Infections. II: In-Vivo Safety Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonanno, Manuela; Stanislauskas, Milda; Ponnaiya, Brian; Bigelow, Alan W; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Xu, Yanping; Shuryak, Igor; Smilenov, Lubomir; Owens, David M; Brenner, David J

    2016-01-01

    UVC light generated by conventional germicidal lamps is a well-established anti-microbial modality, effective against both bacteria and viruses. However, it is a human health hazard, being both carcinogenic and cataractogenic. Earlier studies showed that single-wavelength far-UVC light (207 nm) generated by excimer lamps kills bacteria without apparent harm to human skin tissue in vitro. The biophysical explanation is that, due to its extremely short range in biological material, 207 nm UV light cannot penetrate the human stratum corneum (the outer dead-cell skin layer, thickness 5-20 μm) nor even the cytoplasm of individual human cells. By contrast, 207 nm UV light can penetrate bacteria and viruses because these cells are physically much smaller. To test the biophysically-based hypothesis that 207 nm UV light is not cytotoxic to exposed mammalian skin in vivo. Hairless mice were exposed to a bactericidal UV fluence of 157 mJ/cm2 delivered by a filtered Kr-Br excimer lamp producing monoenergetic 207-nm UV light, or delivered by a conventional 254-nm UV germicidal lamp. Sham irradiations constituted the negative control. Eight relevant cellular and molecular damage endpoints including epidermal hyperplasia, pre-mutagenic UV-associated DNA lesions, skin inflammation, and normal cell proliferation and differentiation were evaluated in mice dorsal skin harvested 48 h after UV exposure. While conventional germicidal UV (254 nm) exposure produced significant effects for all the studied skin damage endpoints, the same fluence of 207 nm UV light produced results that were not statistically distinguishable from the zero exposure controls. As predicted by biophysical considerations and in agreement with earlier in vitro studies, 207-nm light does not appear to be significantly cytotoxic to mouse skin. These results suggest that excimer-based far-UVC light could potentially be used for its anti-microbial properties, but without the associated hazards to skin of conventional

  3. Mutation of cis-proline 207 in mitochondrial creatine kinase to alanine leads to increased acid stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstner, M; Müller, A; Rognan, D; Kriechbaum, M; Wallimann, T

    1998-07-01

    We show that the mutation of an uncharged residue far from the active site to another uncharged residue can have effects on the active site without disturbing the overall structure of the protein. Cis-proline 207 of mitochondrial creatine kinase was mutated to alanine. The mutant showed a decrease in the pH-optimum for ATP synthesis by 1.5 units while the maximum relative activity was lowered to 53% of the wild-type enzyme. In the direction of ATP consumption, the pH optimum was lowered by 1.3 units and the maximum relative activity was 49% of the wild-type enzyme. The enzyme kinetic parameters Km and Kd for the substrates did not change dramatically, indicating a largely unperturbed active site. Small-angle X-ray scattering was used to investigate the structural change concomitant with the mutation, yielding a scattering profile only slightly different from that of the wild-type enzyme. Neither the radius of gyration nor the molecular mass showed any significant differences, leading to the conclusion that quarternary organization and fold of the mutant and the wild-type enzymes were similar. Theoretical analysis suggests the most probable primary source of structural change to be a transition of residue 207 peptide bond torsional angle co from the cis to the trans configuration.

  4. 207,208Pb(n,xnγ) reactions for neutron energies from 3 to 200 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vonach, H.; Pavlik, A.; Chadwick, M.B.; Haight, R.C.; Nelson, R.O.; Wender, S.A.; Young, P.G.

    1994-01-01

    High-resolution γ-ray spectra from the interaction of neutrons in the energy range from 3 to 200 MeV with 207,208 Pb were measured with the white neutron source at the weapons neutron research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. From these data, excitation functions for prominent γ transitions in 200,202,204,206,207,208 Pb were derived from threshold to 200 MeV incident neutron energy. These γ-production cross sections reflect the excitation cross sections for the respective residual nuclei. The results are compared with the predictions of nuclear reaction calculations based on the exciton model for precompound emission, the Hauser-Feshbach theory for compound nucleus decay, and coupled channels calculations to account for direct excitation of collective levels. Good agreement was obtained over the entire energy range covered in the experiment with reasonable model parameters. The results of this work clearly demonstrate that multiple preequilibrium emission has to be taken into account above about 40 MeV, and that the level density model of Ignatyuk, which accounts for the gradual disappearance of shell effects with increasing excitation energy, should be used instead of the Gilbert-Cameron and backshifted Fermi-gas models if excitation energies exceed about 30 MeV. No indication for a reduction of the nuclear moment of inertia below the rigid body value was found

  5. Routine lead isotope determinations using a lead-207-lead-204 double spike: a long-term assessment of analytical precision and accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodhead, J.D.; McCulloch, M.T.; Volker, F.

    1995-01-01

    Lead-isotope data obtained on a multicollector mass spectrometer over a four year period using a 207 Pb- 204 Pb double spike to correct for the effects of mass discrimination, are reported. Considerable improvements in both precision and accuracy over conventional correction procedures were noted, without recourse to rigorous loading or run conditions. An external precision in 206 Pb/ 204 Pb, 207 Pb/ 204 Pb and 208 Pb/ 204 Pb ratios ± 0.003, 0.003 and 0.01 (2 x standard deviation), respectively, is routinely obtainable independent of minor variations in loading and run parameters. (author)

  6. 2.07-micron CW diode-laser-pumped Tm,Ho:YLiF4 room-temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Hamid

    1989-01-01

    Continuous-wave action is obtained at 2.07 microns from a 2-mm-long Tm-sensitized Ho:YLiF4 crystal at room temperature when longitudinally pumped by a pair of diode-laser arrays. Laser output power at 300 K is 26 mW, with a 30-percent slope efficiency and a lasing threshold of 108 mW. A maximum output power of 187 mW is obtained from a 4-mm-long crystal at 77 K, with a 67 percent slope efficiency. A preliminary demonstration of cavity Q switching produced 165 microJ of pulse energy at a repetition rate of 100 Hz.

  7. A walk-free centroid method for lifetime measutement of 207Pb 569.7 keV state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Jiahui; Liu Jingyi; Xiao Genlai

    1988-01-01

    An improvement have been made in acquiring data of delayed coincidence spectra with ND-620 data acquisition system and off-line data analysis program. The delayed and anti-delayed coincidence spectra can be obtained in one run. The difference of their centroids is the mean lifetime τ. The centroid position of a delayed coincidence spectrum is the zero time of another delayed coincidence spectrum, so the requirement of measuring prompt time spectrum is avoided. The walk of prompt and delayed coincidence spectrum coming from different run are resolved and the walk during the measurement is compensated partly. The delayed coincidence time spectra of 207 Pb 569.7 keV state are measured and the half lifetime is calculated via three different methods (slop method, convolution method, centroid shift). The final value of half lifetime is 129.5±1.4ps. THe experimental reduced transition probability is compared with theoretical values

  8. 41 CFR 302-9.207 - What will I be reimbursed if I transport my POV from a point of origin or to a destination that...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... reimbursed if I transport my POV from a point of origin or to a destination that is different from my... Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE OF PROPERTY 9-ALLOWANCES... From a Post of Duty § 302-9.207 What will I be reimbursed if I transport my POV from a point of origin...

  9. SPIN DETERMINATION OF VALENCE AND INNER HOLE STATES VIA THE PB-208((D)OVER-RIGHT-ARROW,T)PB-207 REACTION AT ED=200 MEV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LANGEVINJOLIOT, H; VANDEWIELE, J; GUILLOT, J; GERLIC, E; ROSIER, LH; WILLIS, A; MORLET, M; DUHAMELCHRETIEN, G; TOMASIGUSTAFSSON, E; BLASI, N; MICHELETTI, S; VANDERWERF, SY

    Highly excited neutron hole states in Pb-207 have been studied via the (d, over arrow pointing right, t) reaction at E(d) = 200 MeV using for the first time a polarized beam, with both vector and tensor components. The determination of overlapping neutron hole response functions takes advantage of

  10. 33 CFR 207.170d - Taylor Creek, navigation lock (S-193) across the entrance to Taylor Creek at Lake Okeechobee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Taylor Creek, navigation lock (S-193) across the entrance to Taylor Creek at Lake Okeechobee, Okeechobee, Fla.; use, administration..., DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.170d Taylor Creek, navigation lock...

  11. 33 CFR 207.425 - Calumet River, Ill.; Thomas J. O'Brien Lock and Controlling Works and the use, administration and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calumet River, Ill.; Thomas J. O... DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.425 Calumet River, Ill.; Thomas J. O'Brien Lock and Controlling Works... paragraph (a)(1) of this section. (b) Lock—(1) Operation. The Thomas J. O'Brien Lock and Dam is part of the...

  12. 207-nm UV Light—A Promising Tool for Safe Low-Cost Reduction of Surgical Site Infections. II: In-Vivo Safety Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonanno, Manuela; Stanislauskas, Milda; Ponnaiya, Brian; Bigelow, Alan W.; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Xu, Yanping; Shuryak, Igor; Smilenov, Lubomir; Owens, David M.; Brenner, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background UVC light generated by conventional germicidal lamps is a well-established anti-microbial modality, effective against both bacteria and viruses. However, it is a human health hazard, being both carcinogenic and cataractogenic. Earlier studies showed that single-wavelength far-UVC light (207 nm) generated by excimer lamps kills bacteria without apparent harm to human skin tissue in vitro. The biophysical explanation is that, due to its extremely short range in biological material, 207 nm UV light cannot penetrate the human stratum corneum (the outer dead-cell skin layer, thickness 5–20 μm) nor even the cytoplasm of individual human cells. By contrast, 207 nm UV light can penetrate bacteria and viruses because these cells are physically much smaller. Aims To test the biophysically-based hypothesis that 207 nm UV light is not cytotoxic to exposed mammalian skin in vivo. Methods Hairless mice were exposed to a bactericidal UV fluence of 157 mJ/cm2 delivered by a filtered Kr-Br excimer lamp producing monoenergetic 207-nm UV light, or delivered by a conventional 254-nm UV germicidal lamp. Sham irradiations constituted the negative control. Eight relevant cellular and molecular damage endpoints including epidermal hyperplasia, pre-mutagenic UV-associated DNA lesions, skin inflammation, and normal cell proliferation and differentiation were evaluated in mice dorsal skin harvested 48 h after UV exposure. Results While conventional germicidal UV (254 nm) exposure produced significant effects for all the studied skin damage endpoints, the same fluence of 207 nm UV light produced results that were not statistically distinguishable from the zero exposure controls. Conclusions As predicted by biophysical considerations and in agreement with earlier in vitro studies, 207-nm light does not appear to be significantly cytotoxic to mouse skin. These results suggest that excimer-based far-UVC light could potentially be used for its anti-microbial properties, but without

  13. First direct observation of bound-state beta-decay. Measurements of branching and lifetime of {sup 207}Tl{sup 81+} fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutin, D.

    2005-08-01

    The first experimental observation of bound-state beta-decay showed, that due solely to the electron stripping, a stable nuclide, e.g. {sup 163}Dy, became unstable. Also a drastic modification of the half-life of bare {sup 187}Re, from 4.12(2) x 10{sup 10} years down to 32.9(20) years, could be observed. It was mainly due to the possibility for the mother nuclide to decay into a previously inaccessible nuclear level of the daughter nuclide. It was proposed to study a nuclide where this decay mode was competing with continuum-state beta-decay, in order to measure their respective branchings. The ratio {beta}{sub b}/{beta}{sub c} could also be evaluated for the first time. {sup 207}Tl was chosen due to its high atomic number, and Q-value of about 1.4 MeV, small enough to enhance the {beta}{sub b} probability and large enough to allow the use of time-resolved Schottky Mass Spectrometry (SMS) to study the evolution of mother and bound-state beta-decay daughter ions. The decay properties of the ground state and isomeric state of {sup 207}Tl{sup 81+} have been investigated at the GSI accelerator facility in two separate experiments. For the first time {beta}-decay where the electron could go either to a bound state (atomic orbitals) and lead to {sup 207}Pb{sup 81+} as a daughter nuclide, or to a continuum state and lead to {sup 207}Pb{sup 82+}, has been observed. The respective branchings of these two processes could be measured as well. The deduced total nuclear half-life of 255(17) s for {sup 207}Tl{sup 81+}, was slightly modified with respect to the half-life of the neutral atom of 286(2) s. It was nevertheless in very good agreement with calculations based on the assumption that the beta-decay was following an allowed type of transition. The branching {beta}{sub b}/{beta}{sub c}=0.192(20), was also in very good agreement with the same calculations. The application of stochastic precooling allowed to observe in addition the 1348 keV short-lived isomeric state of {sup

  14. Linear free energy relationship applied to trivalent cations with lanthanum and actinium oxide and hydroxide structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragavan, Anpalaki J.

    2006-01-01

    Linear free energy relationships for trivalent cations with crystalline M 2 O 3 and, M(OH) 3 phases of lanthanides and actinides were developed from known thermodynamic properties of the aqueous trivalent cations, modifying the Sverjensky and Molling equation. The linear free energy relationship for trivalent cations is as ΔG f,MvX 0 =a MvX ΔG n,M 3+ 0 +b MvX +β MvX r M 3+ , where the coefficients a MvX , b MvX , and β MvX characterize a particular structural family of MvX, r M 3+ is the ionic radius of M 3+ cation, ΔG f,MvX 0 is the standard Gibbs free energy of formation of MvX and ΔG n,M 3+ 0 is the standard non-solvation free energy of the cation. The coefficients for the oxide family are: a MvX =0.2705, b MvX =-1984.75 (kJ/mol), and β MvX =197.24 (kJ/molnm). The coefficients for the hydroxide family are: a MvX =0.1587, b MvX =-1474.09 (kJ/mol), and β MvX =791.70 (kJ/molnm).

  15. An eighteen-membered macrocyclic ligand for actinium-225 targeted alpha therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiele, Nikki A.; MacMillan, Samantha N.; Wilson, Justin J.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The 18-membered macrocycle H 2 macropa was investigated for 225 Ac chelation in targeted alpha therapy (TAT). Radiolabeling studies showed that macropa, at submicromolar concentration, complexed all 225 Ac (26 kBq) in 5 min at RT. [ 225 Ac(macropa)] + remained intact over 7 to 8 days when challenged with either excess La 3+ ions or human serum, and did not accumulate in any organ after 5 h in healthy mice. A bifunctional analogue, macropa-NCS, was conjugated to trastuzumab as well as to the prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeting compound RPS-070. Both constructs rapidly radiolabeled 225 Ac in just minutes at RT, and macropa-Tmab retained >99 % of its 225 Ac in human serum after 7 days. In LNCaP xenograft mice, 225 Ac-macropa-RPS-070 was selectively targeted to tumors and did not release free 225 Ac over 96 h. These findings establish macropa to be a highly promising ligand for 225 Ac chelation that will facilitate the clinical development of 225 Ac TAT for the treatment of soft-tissue metastases. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. The marine geochemistry of actinium-227: Evidence for its migration through sediment pore water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Yoshiyuki; Yamada, Masatoshi; Nikaido, Hirofumi

    1990-01-01

    227 Ac with a half life of 21.8 years has a potential utility as a tracer of deep water circulation and mixing studies on time scales less than 100 years. Here the authors present the first measurement of 227 Ac profile in the pore water of Northwest Pacific deep-sea sediment and in the ∼10,000 m long water column of Izu-Ogasawara Trench. The results clearly show that 227 Ac is supplied from the sediment to the overlying water through migration in the pore water. The model calculation indicates that the molecular diffusion alone through sediment porewater can support only a half of the standing crop of excess 227 Ac in the water column and the enhanced supply of 227 Ac by particle mixing is necessary to account for the remainder. Thus, bioturbation in the deep sea plays an important role in controlling the flux of some short-lived radionuclides such as 227 Ac and 228 Ra across the sediment-water interface

  17. A Radium-223 microgenerator from cyclotron-produced trace Actinium-227

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou, Diane S.; Pickett, Juile; Mattson, John E.; Thorek, Daniel L.J.

    2017-01-01

    The alpha particle emitter Radium-223 dichloride ("2"2"3RaCl_2) has recently been approved for treatment of late-stage bone metastatic prostate cancer. There is considerable interest in studying this new agent outside of the clinical setting, however the supply of "2"2"3Ra is limited and expensive. We have engineered a "2"2"3Ra microgenerator using traces of "2"2"7Ac previously generated from cyclotron-produced "2"2"5Ac. Radiochemically pure "2"2"3RaCl_2 was made, characterized, evaluated in vivo, and the source was recovered in high yield for regeneration of the microgenerator. - Highlights: • A "2"2"3Ra microgenerator was built using residual "2"2"7Ac from cyclotron-produced "2"2"5Ac. • Following "2"2"5Ac decay, the residual "2"2"7Ac was processed into pure "2"2"3Ra. • "2"2"7Ac and "2"2"7Th were recovered in high yield for a permanent supply of "2"2"3Ra. • Clinically supplied and generator-produced "2"2"3Ra have equivalent in vivo distribution. • Microdose column provides sufficient material for research use.

  18. An eighteen-membered macrocyclic ligand for actinium-225 targeted alpha therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiele, Nikki A.; MacMillan, Samantha N.; Wilson, Justin J. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Chemistry and Chemical Biology; Brown, Victoria; Jermilova, Una; Ramogida, Caterina F.; Robertson, Andrew K.H.; Schaffer, Paul; Radchenko, Valery [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Life Science Div.; Kelly, James M.; Amor-Coarasa, Alejandro; Nikolopoulou, Anastasia; Ponnala, Shashikanth; Williams, Clarence Jr.; Babich, John W. [Radiology, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Cristina [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy and Centre for Comparative Medicine

    2017-11-13

    The 18-membered macrocycle H{sub 2}macropa was investigated for {sup 225}Ac chelation in targeted alpha therapy (TAT). Radiolabeling studies showed that macropa, at submicromolar concentration, complexed all {sup 225}Ac (26 kBq) in 5 min at RT. [{sup 225}Ac(macropa)]{sup +} remained intact over 7 to 8 days when challenged with either excess La{sup 3+} ions or human serum, and did not accumulate in any organ after 5 h in healthy mice. A bifunctional analogue, macropa-NCS, was conjugated to trastuzumab as well as to the prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeting compound RPS-070. Both constructs rapidly radiolabeled {sup 225}Ac in just minutes at RT, and macropa-Tmab retained >99 % of its {sup 225}Ac in human serum after 7 days. In LNCaP xenograft mice, {sup 225}Ac-macropa-RPS-070 was selectively targeted to tumors and did not release free {sup 225}Ac over 96 h. These findings establish macropa to be a highly promising ligand for {sup 225}Ac chelation that will facilitate the clinical development of {sup 225}Ac TAT for the treatment of soft-tissue metastases. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. New method for large scale production of medically applicable Actinium-225 and Radium-223

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, R.A.; Vasilyev, A.N.; Ostapenko, V.; Kalmykov, S.N.; Zhuikov, B.L.; Ermolaev, S.V.; Lapshina, E.V.

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-emitters ( 211 At, 212 Bi, 213 Bi, 223 Ra, 225 Ac) are promising for targeted radiotherapy of cancer. Only two alpha decays near a cell membrane result in 50% death of cancer cell and only a single decay inside the cell is required for this. 225 Ac may be used either directly or as a mother radionuclide in 213 Bi isotope generator. Production of 225 Ac is provided by three main suppliers - Institute for Transuranium Elements in Germany, Oak Ridge National Laboratory in USA and Institute of Physics and Power Engineering in Obninsk, Russia. The current worldwide production of 225 Ac is approximately 1.7 Ci per year that corresponds to only 100-200 patients that could be treated annually. The common approach for 225 Ac production is separation from mother 229 Th or irradiation of 226 Ra with protons in a cyclotron. Both the methods have some practical limitations to be applied routinely. 225 Ac can be also produced by irradiation of natural thorium with medium energy protons . Cumulative cross sections of 225 Ac, 227 Ac, 227 Th, 228 Th formations have been obtained recently. Thorium targets (1-9 g) were irradiated by 114-91 MeV proton beam (1-50 μA) at INR linear accelerator. After dissolution in 8 M HNO 3 + 0.004 M HF thorium was removed by double LLX by HDEHP in toluene (1:1). Ac and REE were pre-concentrated and separated from Ra and most fission products by DGA-Resin (Triskem). After washing out by 0.01 M HNO 3 Ac was separated from REE by TRU Resin (Triskem) in 3 M HNO 3 media. About 6 mCi 225 Ac were separated in hot cell with chemical yield 85%. The method may be upscaled for production of Ci amounts of the radionuclide. The main impurity is 227 Ac (0.1% at the EOB) but it does not hinder 225 Ac from being used for medical 225 Ac/ 213 Bi generators. (author)

  20. 207-nm UV light - a promising tool for safe low-cost reduction of surgical site infections. I: in vitro studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Buonanno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: 0.5% to 10% of clean surgeries result in surgical-site infections, and attempts to reduce this rate have had limited success. Germicidal UV lamps, with a broad wavelength spectrum from 200 to 400 nm are an effective bactericidal option against drug-resistant and drug-sensitive bacteria, but represent a health hazard to patient and staff. By contrast, because of its limited penetration, ~200 nm far-UVC light is predicted to be effective in killing bacteria, but without the human health hazards to skin and eyes associated with conventional germicidal UV exposure. AIMS: The aim of this work was to test the biophysically-based hypothesis that ~200 nm UV light is significantly cytotoxic to bacteria, but minimally cytotoxic or mutagenic to human cells either isolated or within tissues. METHODS: A Kr-Br excimer lamp was used, which produces 207-nm UV light, with a filter to remove higher-wavelength components. Comparisons were made with results from a conventional broad spectrum 254-nm UV germicidal lamp. First, cell inactivation vs. UV fluence data were generated for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA bacteria and also for normal human fibroblasts. Second, yields of the main UV-associated pre-mutagenic DNA lesions (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 photoproducts were measured, for both UV radiations incident on 3-D human skin tissue. RESULTS: We found that 207-nm UV light kills MRSA efficiently but, unlike conventional germicidal UV lamps, produces little cell killing in human cells. In a 3-D human skin model, 207-nm UV light produced almost no pre-mutagenic UV-associated DNA lesions, in contrast to significant yields induced by a conventional germicidal UV lamp. CONCLUSIONS: As predicted based on biophysical considerations, 207-nm light kills bacteria efficiently but does not appear to be significantly cytotoxic or mutagenic to human cells. Used appropriately, 207-nm light may have the potential for safely and inexpensively

  1. 207-nm UV light - a promising tool for safe low-cost reduction of surgical site infections. I: in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonanno, Manuela; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Bigelow, Alan W; Trivedi, Sheetal; Lowy, Franklin D; Spotnitz, Henry M; Hammer, Scott M; Brenner, David J

    2013-01-01

    0.5% to 10% of clean surgeries result in surgical-site infections, and attempts to reduce this rate have had limited success. Germicidal UV lamps, with a broad wavelength spectrum from 200 to 400 nm are an effective bactericidal option against drug-resistant and drug-sensitive bacteria, but represent a health hazard to patient and staff. By contrast, because of its limited penetration, ~200 nm far-UVC light is predicted to be effective in killing bacteria, but without the human health hazards to skin and eyes associated with conventional germicidal UV exposure. The aim of this work was to test the biophysically-based hypothesis that ~200 nm UV light is significantly cytotoxic to bacteria, but minimally cytotoxic or mutagenic to human cells either isolated or within tissues. A Kr-Br excimer lamp was used, which produces 207-nm UV light, with a filter to remove higher-wavelength components. Comparisons were made with results from a conventional broad spectrum 254-nm UV germicidal lamp. First, cell inactivation vs. UV fluence data were generated for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) bacteria and also for normal human fibroblasts. Second, yields of the main UV-associated pre-mutagenic DNA lesions (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 photoproducts) were measured, for both UV radiations incident on 3-D human skin tissue. We found that 207-nm UV light kills MRSA efficiently but, unlike conventional germicidal UV lamps, produces little cell killing in human cells. In a 3-D human skin model, 207-nm UV light produced almost no pre-mutagenic UV-associated DNA lesions, in contrast to significant yields induced by a conventional germicidal UV lamp. As predicted based on biophysical considerations, 207-nm light kills bacteria efficiently but does not appear to be significantly cytotoxic or mutagenic to human cells. Used appropriately, 207-nm light may have the potential for safely and inexpensively reducing surgical-site infection rates, including those of drug

  2. Valence and inner proton hole states in 207Tl via the (d,3He) reaction at 108 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langevin-Joliot, H.; Gerlic, E.; Guillot, J.; Van de Wiele, J.

    1983-01-01

    The excitation energy spectra of the residual nucleus 207 Tl have been investigated up to 14 MeV using the (d, 3 He) reaction at 108 MeV. New groups and high lying structures are first observed up to 8.3 MeV, in addition to the five known low lying levels. Beyond a minimum at 7.13 MeV, weaker structures are observed riding over an asymetric bump located around 9 MeV. DWBA analysis of angular distributions have allowed l attributions and the determination of valence and inner hole spectroscopic factors. It is found that the valence levels at 1.33 MeV, 1.67 MeV and 3.47 MeV exhaust respectively about 65%, 60% and 45% of the 1hsub(11/2), 2dsub(5/2) and 1gsub(7/2) sum rules. The missing strengths are found below 8.3 MeV. The 2dsub(5/2) and 1gsub(7/2) holes contribute mainly to some well concentrated groups, whereas the 1hsub(11/2) strength is distributed more smoothly. Small contributions of 1gsub(9/2) and 2p strengths are tentatively identified below 7.13 MeV. The highest lying energy region up to 14 MeV may approximately account for the 1gsub(9/2) and (1fsub(5/2)) total sum-rule and about 70% of the 2p strength. The 1gsub(9/2) strength gives the largest contribution to the asymetric bump around 9 MeV. The deduced experimental strength functions are compared with theoretical calculations

  3. 207Pb-206Pb zircon ages of eastern and western Dharwar craton, southern India : Evidence for contemporaneous Archaean crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maibam, B.; Goswami, J. N.; Srinivasan, R.

    2009-04-01

    Dharwar craton is one of the major Archaean crustal blocks in the Indian subcontinent. The craton is comprised of two blocks, western and eastern. The western domain is underlain by orthogneisses and granodiorites (ca. 2.9-3.3 Ga) collectively termed as Peninsular Gneiss [e.g., 1] interspersed with older tracts of metasedimentary and metamorphosed igneous suites (Sargur Group and Dharwar Group; [2]). The eastern part of the craton is dominated by Late Archaean (2.50-2.75 Ga) granitoids and their gneissic equivalents. They are interspersed with schist belts (also of Sargur Group and Dharwar Group), which are lithologically similar to the Dharwar Supergroup in the western block, but are in different metamorphic dress. Here we report 207Pb-206Pb age of zircons separated from the metasedimentary and gneissic samples from the two blocks to constrain the evolution of the Dharwar craton during the early Archaean. Detrital zircons of the metasedimentary rocks from both the blocks show a wide range of overlapping ages between ~2.9 to >3.5 Ga. Zircon ages of the orthogneisses from the two blocks showed that most of the analysed grains of the eastern Dharwar block are found to be of the age as old as the western Dharwar gneisses. Imprints of younger events could be discerned from the presence of overgrowths in zircons from the studied samples throughout the craton. Our data suggest that crust forming cycles in the two blocks of the Dharwar craton occurred contemporaneously during the Archaean. References [1] Beckinsale, R.D., Drury, S.A., Holt, R.W. (1980) Nature 283, 469-470. [2] Swami Nath J., Ramakrishnan M., Viswanatha M.N. (1976) Rec. Geol. Surv. Ind., 107, 149-175.

  4. 204 - 207 Suleiman

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMIN

    2011-12-02

    Dec 2, 2011 ... insecticidal activities against the two insect pests of stored grains of maize ... If the plant powders reduce adult longevity and fitness, the number of ... physical contact and caused suffocation among the adult weevils. Powder of ...

  5. 204 - 207 Suleiman

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMIN

    2011-12-02

    Dec 2, 2011 ... important role in protection of stored grains from insect invasion during storage. Key words: ... for their insecticidal value, but there was no much progress in ... Neem. Dogon-Yaro. Meliaceae. Seeds. 2. Jatropha curcas L.

  6. Completion Report for Well ER-20-7: Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-04-28

    Well ER-20-7 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in June 2009 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to further investigate migration of radionuclides from the nearby, up-gradient TYBO and BENHAM underground nuclear tests, which originally was discovered at Well Cluster ER-20-5. This well also provided detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section that will reduce uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. The main 44.45-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 681.8 meters and cased with 33.97-centimeter casing to 671.7 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.12 centimeters, and the well was drilled to total depth of 894.9 meters. The completion string, set to the depth of 890.0 meters, consists of 14.13-centimeter stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.37-centimeter carbon-steel casing. The 14.13-centimeter stainless-steel casing has one continuous slotted interval open to the Topopah Spring aquifer. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 meters, sidewall core samples from 20 depth intervals, various geophysical logs, water quality (primarily tritium) measurements, and water level measurements. The well penetrated 894.9 meters of Tertiary volcanic rock, including two saturated welded-tuff aquifers. A fluid level measurement was obtained during open-hole geophysical well logging for the upper, Tiva Canyon, aquifer at the depth of 615.7 meters on June 19, 2009. The fluid level measured in the open hole on June 27, 2009,after the total depth was reached and the upper aquifer was cased off, was also at the depth of 615.7 meters. Preliminary field measurements indicated 1

  7. Draft genome sequence of four coccolithoviruses: Emiliania huxleyi virus EhV-88, EhV-201, EhV-207, and EhV-208.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissimov, Jozef I; Worthy, Charlotte A; Rooks, Paul; Napier, Johnathan A; Kimmance, Susan A; Henn, Matthew R; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Allen, Michael J

    2012-03-01

    The Coccolithoviridae are a group of viruses which infect the marine coccolithophorid microalga Emiliania huxleyi. The Emiliania huxleyi viruses (known as EhVs) described herein have 160- to 180-nm diameter icosahedral structures, have genomes of approximately 400 kbp, and consist of more than 450 predicted coding sequences (CDSs). Here, we describe the genomic features of four newly sequenced coccolithoviruses (EhV-88, EhV-201, EhV-207, and EhV-208) together with their draft genome sequences and their annotations, highlighting the homology and heterogeneity of these genomes to the EhV-86 model reference genome.

  8. Spectroscopic study of 206,207,208Pb isotopes by high resolution analysis of 24.5 MeV proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallois, G.

    1968-03-01

    206,207,208 pb have been studied by 24.5 MeV proton inelastic scattering with a resolution of 20 keV. The angular distributions of the differential cross-sections corresponding to the different excited levels have been measured in a large angular region and analysed with the DWBA.This work shows that it exists between 4 and 5 MeV of excitation energy some strongly excited levels corresponding to transfer momenta l = 2, 4, 6 and 8. The single particle-hole models do not explain these states; so it will probably be necessary to introduce some several particle - hole configurations. (author) [fr

  9. Developments of 207Pb, 208Pb and 209Bi target wheels in the synthesis of 107Ns, 108Hs and 109Mt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folger, H.; Hartmann, W.; Hessberger, F.P.; Hofmann, S.; Klemm, J.; Muenzenberg, G.; Ninov, V.; Schmidt, K.H.; Schoett, H.J.; Thalheimer, W.; Armbruster, P.

    1993-05-01

    The developments of 207 Pb, 208 Pb and 209 Bi target wheels and their applications in heavy-ion fusion reactions are reviewed. In both, fabrication and use, the centers of the evaporator or accelerator beams are focussed at wheel radii of 155 mm to specially shaped frames which generate very homogeneous target layers and very constant reaction and counting rates in the experiment. Target areas of up to ∼98% of a wheel's circumference of 974 mm can be provided. The preparation procedures for necessary C backings and protecting layers of C are described, and details are given for the developments of high-vacuum evaporations of 207 Pb, 208 Pb and 209 Bi with deposition yields of 35-55% from tantalum crucibles. The applications of the target wheels in heavy-ion fusion reactions with beams of 54 Cr and 58 Fe at energies near the Coulomb barrier and intensities of ∼10 12 particles/s are mentioned. The target parameters for the production runs of the new chemical elements 107 Ns, 108 Hs and 109 Mt are included. (orig.)

  10. Study of multi-nucleon transfer reactions in {sup 58,} {sup 64}Ni + {sup 207}Pb collisions at the velocity filter SHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comas, V.F.; Heinz, S.; Ackermann, D.; Heredia, J.A.; Hessberger, F.P.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Hofmann, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Institut fuer Physik, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    We investigated multi-nucleon transfer reactions in collisions of {sup 58}Ni + {sup 207}Pb and {sup 64}Ni + {sup 207}Pb at Coulomb barrier energies. The new aspect is that we used a velocity filter (SHIP at GSI) for the separation of the heavy target-like transfer products from background events. The isotopic identification was performed via the {alpha} decay properties of the reaction products. The goal of the experiment was to study the characteristics of multi-nucleon transfer reactions in the region of heavy nuclei and the applicability of existing separation and detection techniques, which are usually used for identification of heavy fusion-evaporation residues, to heavy transfer products. This was motivated by recent theoretical results from macroscopic-microscopic models which suggest deep inelastic transfer reactions in heavy systems as a means to produce new neutron-rich isotopes in the region of N = 126 and in the region of superheavy nuclei. In this paper we present the isotopic yields, the excitation functions and the excitation energies of the heavy transfer products with Z > 82 as well as the influence of shell effects on the reaction products. The influence of the different neutron numbers of the projectiles is also discussed. (orig.)

  11. Tests of the methods of analysis of picosecond lifetimes and measurement of the half-life of the 569.6 keV level in 207Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, E. de; Kawakami, H.; Lima, A. de; Hichwa, R.; Ramayya, A.V.; Hamilton, J.H.; Dunn, W.; Kim, H.J.

    1978-01-01

    Customarily one extracts the half-life of the nuclear state from a delayed time spectrum by an analysis of the centroid shift, the slope and lately by the convolution method. Recently there have been two formulas relating the centroid shift to the half-life of the nuclear state. These two procedures can give different results for the half-life when Tsub(1/2) the same order or less than the time width of one channel. An extensive investigation of these two formulas and precedures has been made by measuring the half-life of the first excited state in 207 Pb at 569.6 keV. This analysis confirms Bay's formula relating the centroid shift to the half-life of the state. The half-life of the 569.6 keV level in 207 Pb is measured to be (129+-3) ps in excellent agreement with Weisskopf's single particle estimate of 128 ps for an E2 transition. (Auth.)

  12. Performance Analysis of Wavelet Channel Coding in COST207-based Channel Models on Simulated Radio-over-Fiber Systems at the W-Band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalcante, Lucas Costa Pereira; Silveira, Luiz F. Q.; Rommel, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Millimeter wave communications based on photonic technologies have gained increased attention to provide optic fiber-like capacity in wireless environments. However, the new hybrid fiber-wireless channel represents new challenges in terms of signal transmission performance analysis. Traditionally......, such systems use diversity schemes in combination with digital signal processing (DSP) techniques to overcome effects such as fading and inter-symbol interference (ISI). Wavelet Channel Coding (WCC) has emerged as a technique to minimize the fading effects of wireless channels, which is a mayor challenge...... in systems operating in the millimeter wave regime. This work takes the WCC one step beyond by performance evaluation in terms of bit error probability, over time-varying, frequency-selective multipath Rayleigh fading channels. The adopted propagation model follows the COST207 norm, the main international...

  13. Calculations and Evaluations of Cross Sections for n + 204,206,207,208,natPb Reactions in the En ≤ 250 MeV Energy Range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Yinlu; Shen Qingbiao; Zhang Zhengjun; Cai Chonghai

    2005-01-01

    The quality and reliability of the computational simulation of a macroscopic nuclear device are directly related to the quality of the underlying basic nuclear data. To meet these needs, according to advanced nuclear models that account for details of nuclear structure and the quantum nature of nuclear reaction and the experimental data of total, nonelastic, and elastic scattering cross sections, and elastic scattering angular distributions of Pb and its isotopes, all cross sections of neutron-induced reaction, angular distributions, energy spectra, especially the double-differential cross sections for neutron, proton, deuteron, triton, helium, and alpha emissions are calculated and analyzed for n + 204,206,207,208,nat Pb at incident neutron energies below 20 MeV by using the UNF nuclear model code. At neutron incident energies 20 n ≤ 250 MeV, MEND codes are used. Theoretical calculations are compared with existing experimental data and other evaluated data from ENDF/B-VI and JENDL-3

  14. Competition between excited core states and 1homega single-particle excitations at comparable energies in {sup 207}Pb from photon scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietralla, N., E-mail: pietralla@ikp.tu-darmstadt.d [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Nuclear Structure Laboratory, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Koeln (Germany); Li, T.C. [Nuclear Structure Laboratory, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Fritzsche, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Ahmed, M.W. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL), Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Ahn, T.; Costin, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Nuclear Structure Laboratory, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Koeln (Germany); Enders, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Li, J. [Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory (DFELL), Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Mueller, S.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Pinayev, I.V. [Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory (DFELL), Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Ponomarev, V.Yu.; Savran, D. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Tonchev, A.P.; Tornow, W.; Weller, H.R. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL), Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Werner, V. [A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory (WNSL), Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Wu, Y.K. [Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory (DFELL), Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Zilges, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Koeln (Germany)

    2009-10-26

    The Pb(gamma{sup -}>,gamma{sup '}) photon scattering reaction has been studied with the nearly monochromatic, linearly polarized photon beams at the High Intensity gamma-ray Source (HIgammaS) at the DFELL. Azimuthal scattering intensity asymmetries measured with respect to the polarization plane of the beam have been used for the first time to assign both the spin and parity quantum numbers of dipole excited states of {sup 206,207,208}Pb at excitation energies in the vicinity of 5.5 MeV. Evidence for dominant particle-core coupling is deduced from these results along with information on excitation energies and electromagnetic transition matrix elements. Implications of the existence of weakly coupled states built on highly excited core states in competition with 1homega single particle (hole) excitations at comparable energies are discussed.

  15. Physiological studies of environmental pollutants. Progress report, September 1, 1975--May 31, 1976. [/sup 210/Po, /sup 203/Pb, /sup 201/Tl, /sup 207/Bi, /sup 65/Zn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lengemann, F W; Wentworth, R A

    1976-01-01

    In the past year we have looked at the transfer of some members of the actinide decay series into milk of goats. These were /sup 210/Po, /sup 203/Pb, /sup 201/Tl and /sup 207/Bi. All of these appeared in milk after oral ingestion but at levels less than 1 percent per liter. In addition we have looked at the transfer of /sup 65/Zn into milk of goats after oral and I.V. doses; the experiments are incomplete at this time. In controlled temperature studies it was found that 6.6 times as much radioiodine was secreted into milk when goats were at 33/sup 0/ as opposed to 5/sup 0/C. When radioiodine is put into the mammary gland the transfer from milk to body is rapid; more rapid than is the case for /sup 65/Zn. The analysis of these data indicate the need for a model capable of handling expansion of a compartment.

  16. Vildagliptin and its metabolite M20.7 induce the expression of S100A8 and S100A9 in human hepatoma HepG2 and leukemia HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Mitsutoshi; Karaki, Fumika; Fujii, Hideaki; Atsuda, Koichiro; Itoh, Tomoo; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2016-10-19

    Vildagliptin is a potent, orally active inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. It has been reported that vildagliptin can cause hepatic dysfunction in patients. However, the molecular-mechanism of vildagliptin-induced liver dysfunction has not been elucidated. In this study, we employed an expression microarray to determine hepatic genes that were highly regulated by vildagliptin in mice. We found that pro-inflammatory S100 calcium-binding protein (S100) a8 and S100a9 were induced more than 5-fold by vildagliptin in the mouse liver. We further examined the effects of vildagliptin and its major metabolite M20.7 on the mRNA expression levels of S100A8 and S100A9 in human hepatoma HepG2 and leukemia HL-60 cells. In HepG2 cells, vildagliptin, M20.7, and sitagliptin - another DPP-4 inhibitor - induced S100A9 mRNA. In HL-60 cells, in contrast, S100A8 and S100A9 mRNAs were significantly induced by vildagliptin and M20.7, but not by sitagliptin. The release of S100A8/A9 complex in the cell culturing medium was observed in the HL-60 cells treated with vildagliptin and M20.7. Therefore, the parental vildagliptin- and M20.7-induced release of S100A8/A9 complex from immune cells, such as neutrophils, might be a contributing factor of vildagliptin-associated liver dysfunction in humans.

  17. Spectroscopic study of {sup 206,207,208}Pb isotopes by high resolution analysis of 24.5 MeV proton scattering; Etude spectroscopique des isotopes 206, 207 et 208 du plomb par analyse a haute resolution de la diffusion de protons de 24,5 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallois, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-03-01

    {sup 206,207,208}pb have been studied by 24.5 MeV proton inelastic scattering with a resolution of 20 keV. The angular distributions of the differential cross-sections corresponding to the different excited levels have been measured in a large angular region and analysed with the DWBA.This work shows that it exists between 4 and 5 MeV of excitation energy some strongly excited levels corresponding to transfer momenta l = 2, 4, 6 and 8. The single particle-hole models do not explain these states; so it will probably be necessary to introduce some several particle - hole configurations. (author) [French] Les isotopes 206, 207 et 208 du plomb ont ete etudies par diffusion inelastique de protons de 24,5 MeV avec une resolution de 20 keV. Les distributions angulaires des sections efficaces differentielles correspondant aux differents niveaux excites ont ete mesurees sur un large domaine angulaire et analysees a l'aide de la DWBA. Ce travail met en evidence l'existence, entre 4 et 5 MeV d'excitation, de niveaux fortement excites correspondant a des moments de transfert de 2, 4, 6 et 8. Les modeles a simple particule-trou ne rendant pas compte de ces niveaux, il faudra sans doute recourir a des configurations a plusieurs particules-trous pour les expliquer. (auteur)

  18. Experiments on multi-nucleon transfer reactions with the systems {sup 58,64}Ni+{sup 207}Pb at SHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandovich Comas Lijachev, Victor

    2012-07-01

    This work presents experimental results on multi-nucleon transfer reactions in the collision systems {sup 58}Ni+{sup 207}Pb and {sup 64}Ni+{sup 207}Pb which were measured at the velocity filter SHIP at GSI. The reactions were performed at beam energies below and up to 10% above the Coulomb barrier. The work was motivated by theoretical predictions to apply multi-nucleon transfer reactions in heavy systems to synthesize new neutron-rich isotopes in the region of superheavy nuclei with Z>100 and in the region of the closed neutron shell N=126. The expected cross-sections for the production of these nuclei in transfer reactions are small and reach typically nanobarn and below. Therefore, efficient separation techniques have to be applied and the detection system must allow for the identification of single nuclei. A dedicated experimental setup to study such rare transfer products does not exist presently. But already existing facilities which are used for the synthesis of superheavy fusion products meet the requirements for the detection of rare reaction products. In this context, the velocity filter SHIP offers the possibility to separate heavy target-like transfer products from projectiles and projectile-like reaction products before they reach the detection system where the particles are identified by their alpha-decay properties. At SHIP, a cross-section limit of 10 pb can be reached at usual beam intensities. In the present work on collisions of {sup 58,64}Ni+{sup 207}Pb the influence of the projectile neutron number on the cross-sections, isotopic distributions and excitation energies of the transfer products was studied. Especially with the more neutron-rich {sup 64}Ni projectiles a transfer of up to seven protons and eight neutrons to the target nucleus was observed. The largest cross-sections for the most neutron-rich isotopes were reached at the beam energies around the Coulomb barrier. The transfer was accompanied by the full dissipation of the available

  19. Enzymatic function of loop movement in enolase: preparation and some properties of H159N, H159A, H159F, and N207A enolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, John M; Glover, Claiborne V C; Holland, Michael J; Lebioda, Lukasz

    2003-05-01

    The hypothesis that His159 in yeast enolase moves on a polypeptide loop to protonate the phosphoryl of 2-phosphoglycerate to initiate its conversion to phosphoenolpyruvate was tested by preparing H159N, H159A, and H159F enolases. These have 0.07%-0.25% of the native activity under standard assay conditions and the pH dependence of maximum velocities of H159A and H159N mutants is markedly altered. Activation by Mg2+ is biphasic, with the smaller Mg2+ activation constant closer to that of the "catalytic" Mg2+ binding site of native enolase and the larger in the mM range in which native enolase is inhibited. A third Mg2+ may bind to the phosphoryl, functionally replacing proton donation by His159. N207A enolase lacks an intersubunit interaction that stabilizes the closed loop(s) conformation when 2-phosphoglycerate binds. It has 21% of the native activity, also exhibits biphasic Mg2+ activation, and its reaction with the aldehyde analogue of the substrate is more strongly inhibited than is its normal enzymatic reaction. Polypeptide loop(s) closure may keep a proton from His159 interacting with the substrate phosphoryl oxygen long enough to stabilize a carbanion intermediate.

  20. Předpjatý most číslo 207 přes rychlostní komunikaci R2 na Slovensku

    OpenAIRE

    Ježek, Rostislav

    2015-01-01

    V diplomové práci „Předpjatý most číslo 207 přes rychlostní komunikaci R2 na Slovensku“ jsou vypracovány tři varianty řešení přemostění. Cílem práce je zhodnotit navržené varianty a provést podrobný návrh nosné konstrukce vybrané varianty. Součástí práce je zohlednění vlivu výstavby. K podrobné statické analýze byla zvolena varianta komorového mostu s šikmými stěnami o třech polích. Tato dodatečně předpjatá konstrukce je posouzena dle platných Evropských norem. Analýza konstrukce je provedena...

  1. Influência de abelhas africanizadas na concentração de açúcares no néctar de soja (Glycine max L. Merrill var. Coodetec 207 = Influence of africanized honeybees on sugar concentration in the nectar of soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill var. Coodetec 207

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloi Machado Alves

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo foi avaliar a concentração de açúcares no néctar de soja (Glycine max L. Merrill em áreas com ou sem a presença de abelhas Apis mellifera L. Foi utilizada a variedade Coodetec 207 em quatro tratamentos: área de 24 m2 coberta com colônia de abelhas africanizadas em seu interior; área semicoberta com livre acesso para insetos visitantes; área livre e área coberta sem abelhas. As flores foram coletadas durante três dias, a cada 2h. e a concentração dos açúcares totais por flor foi determinada por espectrofotometria. A área coberta com abelha apresentou maior concentração de açúcares totais em relação à área coberta sem abelhas e livre, contudo, aconcentração de açúcares totais na área livre não diferiu da concentração observada na área coberta sem abelhas. Houve redução na concentração média de sacarose na área livre, diferindo das concentrações nas demais áreas. A concentração média de glicose não diferiu entre os tratamentos, enquanto que a de frutose não apresentou diferença entre as áreas cobertas com abelhas, semicoberta e livre. A variedade Coodetec 207 da soja apresentou maior concentração total de açúcares e de frutose nas áreas cobertas com abelhas. Contudo, a presença de Apis mellifera não interferiu nesta concentração de açúcares no néctar das flores de soja desta variedade.This research was carried out to evaluate the sugar concentration in soybean nectar in areas with Africanized honeybee colonies. The var. Coodetec 207 was used in four treatments: 24 m2 covered area with Africanized honeybee colony inside, semi-covered area for free insect visitation, uncovered area, and covered area without insect visitation. Flowers were harvested for three days at two-hour intervals, and the total sugar concentration per flower was determined by spectrophotometry. The covered area with Africanized honeybee colony presented higher sugar concentration than the covered area

  2. Purification of radium-226 for the manufacturing of actinium-225 in a cyclotron for alpha-immunotherapy; Radium-Aufreinigung zur Herstellung von Actinium-225 am Zyklotron fuer die Alpha-Immuntherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, Sebastian Markus

    2014-09-23

    The thesis describes the development of methods for the purification of Ra-226. The objective was to obtain the radionuclide in the quality that is needed to be used as starting material in the manufacturing process for Ac-225 via proton-irradiated Ra-226. The radionuclide has been gained efficiently out of huge excesses of impurities. The high purity of the obtained radium affords its use as staring material in a pharmaceutical manufacturing process.

  3. Renal uptake of bismuth-213 and its contribution to kidney radiation dose following administration of actinium-225-labeled antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, J; O' Donoghue, J A; Humm, J L [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Jaggi, J S [Bristol-Myers Squibb, Plainsboro, NJ (United States); Ruan, S; Larson, S M [Nuclear Medicine Service Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); McDevitt, M; Scheinberg, D A, E-mail: schwarj1@mskcc.org [Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry, Sloan-Kettering Institute, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2011-02-07

    Clinical therapeutic studies using {sup 225}Ac-labeled antibodies have begun. Of major concern is renal toxicity that may result from the three alpha-emitting progeny generated following the decay of {sup 225}Ac. The purpose of this study was to determine the amount of {sup 225}Ac and non-equilibrium progeny in the mouse kidney after the injection of {sup 225}Ac-huM195 antibody and examine the dosimetric consequences. Groups of mice were sacrificed at 24, 96 and 144 h after injection with {sup 225}Ac-huM195 antibody and kidneys excised. One kidney was used for gamma ray spectroscopic measurements by a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The second kidney was used to generate frozen tissue sections which were examined by digital autoradiography (DAR). Two measurements were performed on each kidney specimen: (1) immediately post-resection and (2) after sufficient time for any non-equilibrium excess {sup 213}Bi to decay completely. Comparison of these measurements enabled estimation of the amount of excess {sup 213}Bi reaching the kidney ({gamma}-ray spectroscopy) and its sub-regional distribution (DAR). The average absorbed dose to whole kidney, determined by spectroscopy, was 0.77 (SD 0.21) Gy kBq{sup -1}, of which 0.46 (SD 0.16) Gy kBq{sup -1} (i.e. 60%) was due to non-equilibrium excess {sup 213}Bi. The relative contributions to renal cortex and medulla were determined by DAR. The estimated dose to the cortex from non-equilibrium excess {sup 213}Bi (0.31 (SD 0.11) Gy kBq{sup -1}) represented {approx}46% of the total. For the medulla the dose contribution from excess {sup 213}Bi (0.81 (SD 0.28) Gy kBq{sup -1}) was {approx}80% of the total. Based on these estimates, for human patients we project a kidney-absorbed dose of 0.28 Gy MBq{sup -1} following administration of {sup 225}Ac-huM195 with non-equilibrium excess {sup 213}Bi responsible for approximately 60% of the total. Methods to reduce renal accumulation of radioactive progeny appear to be necessary for the success of {sup 225}Ac radioimmunotherapy.

  4. Purification of radium-226 for the manufacturing of actinium-225 in a cyclotron for alpha-immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, Sebastian Markus

    2014-01-01

    The thesis describes the development of methods for the purification of Ra-226. The objective was to obtain the radionuclide in the quality that is needed to be used as starting material in the manufacturing process for Ac-225 via proton-irradiated Ra-226. The radionuclide has been gained efficiently out of huge excesses of impurities. The high purity of the obtained radium affords its use as staring material in a pharmaceutical manufacturing process.

  5. Distribution of trace elements in land plants and botanical taxonomy with special reference to rare earth elements and actinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Mutsuo

    1989-01-01

    Distribution profiles of trace elements in land plants were studied by neutron activation analysis and radioactivity measurements without activation. Number of botanical samples analyzed were more than three thousand in which more than three hundred botanical species were included. New accumulator plants of Co, Cr, Zn, Cd, rare earth elements, Ac, U, etc., were found. Capabilities of accumulating trace elements can be related to the botanical taxonomy. Discussions are given from view points of inorganic chemistry as well as from botanical physiology

  6. Spectroscopic factors measurement of the five first energy levels of lead 208 nucleus using the 208Pb(e,e'p207Tl* huge pulse transfer reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medaglia, R.

    1999-08-01

    In this work, the spectral functions and the spectroscopic factors of the first five energy levels of the lead 208 nucleus have been measured using the 208 Pb(e,e'p) 207 Tl * reaction. The aim is to characterize the effect of the nuclear environment on pulse and energy distributions of protons. In order to minimize the ejected proton-residual nucleus interactions in the final state, the measurement has been performed at 750 and 570 MeV/c pulse transfers, and thus for proton kinetic energies of 263 MeV and 161 MeV, contrarily to a previous measurement performed at 100 MeV. A kinematics with a transverse electromagnetic coupling, instead of a longitudinal one, has been used because of the important coupling dependence observed for medium nuclei. The experiment has been carried out at the NIKHEF electron accelerator and smoothing ring. The pulse distributions of the first five energy levels for a proton pulse range of 0 to 300 MeV/c have been extracted from the (e,e'p) cross sections. An integration of model-dependent distributions gives the spectroscopic factors which indicate the number of protons of each level. These data rae compared to models that include both the proton interactions in the final state and the coulomb distortions. The Pavie model reproduces well the observed distributions and the transfer dependence, while the Ohio model does not. The spectroscopic factors obtained with the Pavie model are the same for both transfers and are 20% higher as an average than the previous experiment performed at 450 MeV/c. However, they are 30% below the shell model. The uncertain estimation of the reaction mechanisms does not allow to consider this reduction as being due exclusively to nuclear structure effects. (J.S.)

  7. 49 CFR 571.207 - Standard No. 207; Seating systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... standard establishes requirements for seats, their attachment assemblies, and their installation to....2. General performance requirements. When tested in accordance with S5, each occupant seat shall... than a school bus; a passenger seat on a school bus with a GVWR greater than 4,536 kilograms (10,000...

  8. Sports injury and illness incidence in the Rio de Janeiro 2016 Olympic Summer Games: A prospective study of 11274 athletes from 207 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soligard, Torbjørn; Steffen, Kathrin; Palmer, Debbie; Alonso, Juan Manuel; Bahr, Roald; Lopes, Alexandre Dias; Dvorak, Jiri; Grant, Marie-Elaine; Meeuwisse, Willem; Mountjoy, Margo; Pena Costa, Leonardo Oliveira; Salmina, Natalia; Budgett, Richard; Engebretsen, Lars

    2017-09-01

    To describe the pattern of injuries and illnesses sustained during the Games of the XXXI Olympiad, hosted by Rio de Janeiro from 5 to 21 August 2016. We recorded the daily incidence of athlete injuries and illnesses (1) through the reporting of all National Olympic Committee (NOC) medical teams and (2) in the polyclinic and medical venues by the Rio 2016 medical staff. In total, 11 274 athletes (5089 women, 45%; 6185 men, 55%) from 207 NOCs participated in the study. NOC and Rio 2016 medical staff reported 1101 injuries and 651 illnesses, equalling 9.8 injuries and 5.4 illnesses per 100 athletes over the 17-day period. Altogether, 8% of the athletes incurred at least one injury and 5% at least one illness. The injury incidence was highest in BMX cycling (38% of the athletes injured), boxing (30%), mountain bike cycling (24%), taekwondo (24%), water polo (19%) and rugby (19%), and lowest in canoe slalom, rowing, shooting, archery, swimming, golf and table tennis (0%-3%). Of the 1101 injuries recorded, 40% and 20% were estimated to lead to ≥1 and >7 days of absence from sport, respectively. Women suffered 40% more illnesses than men. Illness was generally less common than injury, with the highest incidence recorded in diving (12%), open-water marathon (12%), sailing (12%), canoe slalom (11%), equestrian (11%) and synchronised swimming (10%). Illnesses were also less severe; 18% were expected to result in time loss. Of the illnesses, 47% affected the respiratory system and 21% the gastrointestinal system. The anticipated problem of infections in the Rio Olympic Games did not materialise, as the proportion of athletes with infectious diseases mirrored that of recent Olympic Games (3%). Overall, 8% of the athletes incurred at least one injury during the Olympic Games, and 5% an illness, which is slightly lower than in the Olympic Summer Games of 2008 and 2012. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All

  9. In vitro anticancer activity of Betulinic acid and derivatives thereof on equine melanoma cell lines from grey horses and in vivo safety assessment of the compound NVX-207 in two horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebscher, G; Vanchangiri, K; Mueller, Th; Feige, K; Cavalleri, J-M V; Paschke, R

    2016-02-25

    Betulinic acid, a pentacyclic triterpene, and its derivatives are promising compounds for cancer treatment in humans. Melanoma is not only a problem for humans but also for grey horses as they have a high potential of developing melanoma lesions coupled to the mutation causing their phenotype. Current chemotherapeutic treatment carries the risk of adverse health effects for the horse owner or the treating veterinarian by exposure to antineoplastic compounds. Most treatments have low prospects for systemic tumor regression. Thus, a new therapy is needed. In this in vitro study, Betulinic acid and its two derivatives B10 and NVX-207, both with an improved water solubility compared to Betulinic acid, were tested on two equine melanoma cell lines (MelDuWi and MellJess/HoMelZh) and human melanoma (A375) cell line. We could demonstrate that all three compounds especially NVX-207 show high cytotoxicity on both equine melanoma cell lines. The treatment with these compounds lead to externalization of phosphatidylserines on the cell membrane (AnnexinV-staining), DNA-fragmentation (cell cycle analysis) and activation of initiator and effector caspases (Caspase assays). Our results indicate that the apoptosis is induced in the equine melanoma cells by all three compounds. Furthermore, we succeed in encapsulating the most active compound NVX-207 in 2-Hydroxyprolyl-β-cyclodextrine without a loss of its activity. This formulation can be used as a promising antitumor agent for treating grey horse melanoma. In a first tolerability evaluation in vivo the formulation was administered every one week for 19 consecutive weeks and well tolerated in two adult melanoma affected horses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Spin and parity assignments to dipole excitations of the odd-mass nucleus {sup 207}Pb from nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments with linearly-polarized {gamma}-ray beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietralla, N; Fritzsche, M; Savran, D [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Li, T C [Nuclear Structure Laboratory, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Ahmed, M W; Tonchev, A P; Tornow, W; Weller, H R [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL), Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Werner, V, E-mail: pietralla@ikp.tu-darmstadt.d [A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory (WNSL), Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Pb({gamma}-vector ,{gamma}') photon scattering reactions were studied [1] with the nearly monochromatic, linearly polarized photon beams at the High Intensity {gamma}-ray Source (HI{gamma}S) at the DFELL. Azimuthal scattering intensity asymmetries measured with respect to the polarization plane of the beam have been used for the first time to assign both the spin and parity quantum numbers of dipole excited states of {sup 206,207,208}Pb at excitation energies in the vicinity of 5.5 MeV. Evidence for dominant particle-core coupling is deduced from these results along with information on excitation energies and electromagnetic transition matrix elements.

  11. micrOMEGAs 2.0.7: a program to calculate the relic density of dark matter in a generic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, G.; Boudjema, F.; Pukhov, A.; Semenov, A.

    2007-12-01

    micrOMEGAs2.0.7 is a code which calculates the relic density of a stable massive particle in an arbitrary model. The underlying assumption is that there is a conservation law like R-parity in supersymmetry which guarantees the stability of the lightest odd particle. The new physics model must be incorporated in the notation of CalcHEP, a package for the automatic generation of squared matrix elements. Once this is done, all annihilation and coannihilation channels are included automatically in any model. Cross-sections at v=0, relevant for indirect detection of dark matter, are also computed automatically. The package includes three sample models: the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM), the MSSM with complex phases and the NMSSM. Extension to other models, including non supersymmetric models, is described. Program summaryTitle of program:micrOMEGAs2.0.7 Catalogue identifier:ADQR_v2_1 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADQR_v2_1.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:216 529 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:1 848 816 Distribution format:tar.gz Programming language used:C and Fortran Computer:PC, Alpha, Mac, Sun Operating system:UNIX (Linux, OSF1, SunOS, Darwin, Cygwin) RAM:17 MB depending on the number of processes required Classification:1.9, 11.6 Catalogue identifier of previous version:ADQR_v2_0 Journal version of previous version:Comput. Phys. Comm. 176 (2007) 367 Does the new version supersede the previous version?:Yes Nature of problem:Calculation of the relic density of the lightest stable particle in a generic new model of particle physics. Solution method:In numerically solving the evolution equation for the density of dark matter, relativistic formulae for the thermal average are used. All tree

  12. 73Ge, 119Sn and 207Pb: general cooperative effects of single atom ligands on the NMR signals observed in tetrahedral [MXnY4-n] (M = Ge, Sn, Pb; 1 ≤ n ≤ 4; X, Y = Cl, Br, I) coordination compounds of heavier XIV group elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, M; De Castro, F; Fanizzi, F P

    2017-02-28

    An inverse linear relationship between 73 Ge, 119 Sn and 207 Pb NMR chemical shifts and the overall sum of ionic radii of coordinated halido ligands has been discovered in tetrahedral [MX n Y 4-n ] (M = Ge, Sn, Pb; 1 ≤ n ≤ 4; X, Y = Cl, Br, I) coordination compounds. This finding is consistent with a previously reported correlation found in octahedral, pentacoordinate and square planar platinum complexes. The effect of the coordinated halido ligands acting on the metal as shielding conducting rings is therefore confirmed also by 73 Ge, 119 Sn and 207 Pb NMR spectroscopy.

  13. U/Pb (SHRIMP), 207Pb/206Pb, Rb/Sr, Sm/Nd e K/Ar geochronology of granite-greenstone terrains of Gaviao Block: implications for the Proterozoic and Archean evolution of Sao Francisco Craton, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal, Luiz Rogerio Bastos

    1998-01-01

    The Gaviao Block (GB) in the northern portion of the Sao Francisco Craton-Northeast of Brazil, constitutes one of the oldest Archean fragments of the South American Platform Archean crust. GB underwent several events of juvenile accretion and reworking of continental crust along its evolutionary history, notably between the Archean and the Paleoproterozoic. 207 Pb/ 206 Pb isotopic analyses were carried out in two zircons populations from strongly migmatized TTG terranes found in the proximity of Brumado: the first population (7 crystals) is taken as representative of the crystallization period of the TTG terranes at 3300 ± 45 Ma; the second (2 crystals) represents the age of the first even of metamorphism/migmatization at 2910 ± 10 Ma. 207 Pb/ 206 Pb analyses in zircons from an outcrop of non-migmatized TTG in the area yielded a 3202 ± 15 Ma age (4 crystals), interpreted to be the crystallization period of the gneiss protolith. Sm/Nd analyses on the TTG rocks of the Brumado region yielded T DM model ages varying between 3.26 and 3.36 Ga and ε Nd (t) between -3.5 and +0.7. These data suggest the occurrence of juvenile accretions to the continental crust during the Archean, with differential involvement of crustal materials. The geochemical data of rare earth elements corresponding to the TTG terranes revealed moderate LRRE contents (La N =83,5), low HREE contents (La N =2,5) and a fairly fractionated pattern (La/Yb) N =34, besides lack of negative Eu anomaly, showing that these rocks have similar compositions to those TTG terranes of cratonic continents, as well as some Archean rocks from CSF (e.g. Sete Voltas, Boa Vista). Finally, the youngest ages present in GB rocks (ca. 1.2-0.45 Ga) represent the role played by tectono thermal events, which produced partial or total rejuvenation of the Rb/Sr and K/Ar isotopic systems during the Espinhaco and Brasiliano cycles. In particular, K/Ar ages illustrate the effect of younger regional cooling episodes related to the

  14. Multijet-Produktion in der $e^+e^--$Annihilation von $\\sqrt{s}=$89 GeV bis 207 GeV Messung der starken Kopplung $\\alpha_s$ aus der Vierjetrate

    CERN Document Server

    Flagmeyer, Uwe

    2001-01-01

    Hadronic events from the data collected with the DELPHI detector at LEP within an energy range from 89 GeV to 207 GeV are selected and their jet rates are determined. The measurement of jet rates give no indication for an excess of multi jet events at high energies. The four jet rate is compared to next to leading order calculations. Studies on the influence of the renormalisation scale μ are performed confirming previous DELPHI results on optimised scales. Applying scale optimisation methods allows a precise measurement of the strong coupling αs from LEP1 data. The final result is obtained by the CAMBRIDGE algorithm: = 0:1175 ± 0:0010(exp:) ± 0:0017(hadr:) ± 0:0007(scale) . The comparison of αs as measured at the Z and at higher energies gives access to the energy dependence (running) of the strong coupling. The logarithmic energy slope, again obtained from Cambridge, is measured to be = 1:14 ± 0:25(stat:) ± 0:25(sys:) , while the QCD prediction for this quantity is 1.28. The results in are in good ...

  15. Deeply bound π- states in 207Pb formed in the 208Pb(d,3He) reaction. II. Deduced binding energies and widths and the pion-nucleus interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itahashi, K.; Oyama, K.; Hayano, R. S.; Gilg, H.; Gillitzer, A.; Knülle, M.; Münch, M.; Schott, W.; Kienle, P.; Geissel, H.; Iwasa, N.; Münzenberg, G.; Hirenzaki, S.; Toki, H.; Yamazaki, T.

    2000-08-01

    We find a remarkable agreement of the excitation energy spectrum of the 208Pb(d,3He) reaction measured at Td=600 MeV near the π- production threshold with its theoretical prediction. Their comparison leads us to assign the distinct narrow peak observed at about 5 MeV below the threshold to the formation of bound pionic states π-⊗207Pb of the quasisubstitutional configurations (2p)π-(3p3/2,3p1/2)-1n. A small bump observed on the tail of the peak is assigned to the pionic 1s state. The binding energies (Bnl) and the widths (Γnl) of the pionic orbitals are deduced to be B2p=5.13+/-0.02 (stat)+/-0.12 (syst) MeV and Γ2p=0.43+/-0.06 (stat)+/-0.06 (syst) MeV by decomposing the experimental spectrum into the pionic 1s and 2p components. While B2p and Γ2p are determined with small ambiguity, B1s and Γ1s are strongly correlated with each other, and are affected by the relative 1s/2p cross section ratio assumed, since the 1s component is observed only as an unresolved bump. Thus, we have to allow large uncertainties 6.6 MeV

  16. 12 CFR 207.3 - CRA communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... communication. A CRA communication is any of the following— (1) Any written or oral comment or testimony... contacts with a Federal banking agency. An oral or written communication with a Federal banking agency is... communication; (ii) More than 3 years before the parties entered into the agreement, in the case of any oral...

  17. 7 CFR 1951.207 - State supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) SERVICING AND COLLECTIONS Servicing of Community and Direct Business... (available in any FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 office) and applicable State laws and...

  18. 47 CFR 15.207 - Conducted limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... apply to carrier current systems operating as intentional radiators on frequencies below 30 MHz. In lieu... current system containing their fundamental emission within the frequency band 535-1705 kHz and intended.../50 ohms LISN. (3) Carrier current systems operating below 30 MHz are also subject to the radiated...

  19. GPCR Interaction: 207 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available LP2) and secretin (SecR), and interfaces of GLP2 B Glucagon-like peptide Type 2 GLP2 C Secretin ... SecR Experi...ment SecR does not interact with CTR (calcitonin receptor). 18401761 BRET, FRET NP_004237.1 ...

  20. 47 CFR 54.207 - Service areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... company to be other than such company's study area, the Commission will consider that proposed definition... definition of a service area served by a rural telephone company. (2) The Commission shall issue a Public... to consider a definition of a service area served by a rural telephone company that is different from...

  1. 21 CFR 207.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the drug, any change in the identity or quantity of the active ingredient(s), any change in the identity or quantity of the inactive ingredient(s) where quantitative listing of all ingredients is.... (7) Establishment means a place of business under one management at one general physical location...

  2. 5 CFR 179.207 - Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS CLAIMS COLLECTION STANDARDS... explain why the matter cannot be resolved by review of the documentary evidence alone (4 CFR 102.3(c)). (b... official determines that the matter cannot be resolved by review of documentary evidence alone (e.g., when...

  3. 10 CFR 207.2 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... to energy and fuels such as corporate structure and proprietary relationships, costs, prices, capital... business purpose, wherever situated, domiciled, or doing business, who directly or through other persons subject to their control does business in any part of the United States. United States, when used in the...

  4. 7 CFR 62.207 - Official assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) LIVESTOCK, MEAT, AND OTHER...

  5. Publications | Page 207 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Through books, articles, research publications, and studies, we aim to widen ... in the country consider that starting a business is a desirable career choice. ... some adaptation actions were implemented to enhance urban and rural interactions.

  6. 20.7 Peripheral nerve disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930394 A1—10 year follow—up study of 82cases of methamidophos induced delayedpolyneuropathy.Z1HENG Rongyuan (郑荣远),etal.Neurol Dept,Wenzhou Med Coll.325000.Chin J Industr Hyg & Occupat Dis 1992;10(6):344—347.A1—10 year follow—up study of 82 cases ofmethamidophos induced delayed polyneuropathywas reported.82 cases were classified into threetypes:motor (36.6%),sensory—motor (61%)and Guillain-Barre syndrome (2.4%).As awhole,the sensory disturbances disappearedwithin 2—3 months;the autonomic nerve func-tional disorder vanished within 3—6 months;

  7. 14 CFR 1274.207 - Extended agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... additional restrictions on the recipient in terms of validating performance and accounting for funds expended... that will exceed $5 million and have a period of performance in excess of 5 years shall require the..., period of performance and funding levels; therefore, new proposals, certifications, and technical...

  8. 14 CFR 67.207 - Mental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... sympathomimetics; hallucinogens; phencyclidine or similarly acting arylcyclohexylamines; cannabis; inhalants; and... person is dependent on a substance, other than tobacco or ordinary xanthine-containing (e.g., caffeine...

  9. 22 CFR 207.01 - Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... filed against the employee in his or her individual capacity as a result of conduct taken within the... to indemnify an employee or to settle a personal damage claim shall be contingent upon the...

  10. 19 CFR 207.91 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR FROM SUBSIDIZED... appearance in the panel review. Date of Service means the day a document is deposited in the mail or... holiday, it shall be extended to the next working day; Extraordinary challenge committee means the...

  11. Publications | Page 207 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Reconstruction of Haiti : Strengthening Argentina's Capacity for Effective Cooperation (Phase II); final technical report, May 2009 - April 2012 (open access). The project produced knowledge through research on the current traits of international cooperation, in particular the meaning and prospects of trends such as ...

  12. 48 CFR 12.207 - Contract type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... fixed-price with economic price adjustment contracts (e.g., by limiting the value or length of the time... when— (i) The prices are established based on a firm-fixed-price or fixed-price with economic price... pricing structure is not practicable. The D&F for this contract shall be approved one level above the...

  13. 24 CFR 207.251 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... laws of the State, district or territory in which the real estate is located, together with the credit.... (d) The term insured mortgage means a mortgage which has been insured by the endorsement of the credit instrument by the Commissioner, or his duly authorized representative. (e) The term contract of...

  14. 23 CFR 645.207 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... inspection and copying from the FHWA Washington Headquarters and all FHWA Division Offices as prescribed in... also mean the utility company inclusive of any substantially owned or controlled subsidiary. For the...

  15. No. 207-Genital Herpes: Gynaecological Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Money, Deborah; Steben, Marc

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this guideline is to provide recommendations to gynaecology health care providers on optimal management of genital herpes. More effective prevention of complications and transmission of genital herpes. Medline was searched for articles published in French and English related to genital herpes and gynaecology. Additional articles were identified through the references of these articles. All study types and recommendation reports were reviewed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. 47 CFR 18.207 - Technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... applicant filing for the equipment authorization. (d) The FCC Identifier, trade name(s), and/or model number... pertinent operating characteristics. (f) A report of measurements, including a list of the measuring equipment used, and a statement of the date when the measuring equipment was last calibrated and when the...

  17. 47 CFR 97.207 - Space station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... FCC. (c) The following frequency bands and segments are authorized to space stations: (1) The 17 m, 15... notifications to the International Bureau, FCC, Washington, DC 20554. (1) A pre-space notification within 30... risk of collision and a description of what measures the space station operator plans to take to avoid...

  18. 19 CFR 207.100 - Sanctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... appropriate circumstances, include such person's partners, associates, employers and employees, for a... facts underlying the prohibited act to the ethics panel or other disciplinary body of the appropriate... partner, associate, employer, and employee described in paragraph (a)(2) of this section is entitled to...

  19. 77 FR 207 - National Mentoring Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-03

    ... mentoring programs that pair children with positive role models, foster leadership skills, and put them on... mentor's steady and dependable support can inspire a child to strive for success and instill in them the... members and their loved ones, we are funding new mentorship opportunities for children from military...

  20. Publications | Page 207 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC works with developing-country researchers and institutions to build local capacity through funding, knowledge sharing, and training. Through books, articles, research publications, and studies, we aim to widen the impact of our investment and advance development research. We share the results of our funded ...

  1. U/Pb (SHRIMP), {sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb, Rb/Sr, Sm/Nd e K/Ar geochronology of granite-greenstone terrains of Gaviao Block: implications for the Proterozoic and Archean evolution of Sao Francisco Craton, Brazil; Geocronologia U/Pb (SHRIMP), {sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb, Rb/Sr, Sm/Nd e K/Ar dos terrenos granito-greenstone do Bloco do Gaviao: implicacoes para a evolucao arqueana e proterozoica do craton do Sao Francisco, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, Luiz Rogerio Bastos

    1998-07-01

    The Gaviao Block (GB) in the northern portion of the Sao Francisco Craton-Northeast of Brazil, constitutes one of the oldest Archean fragments of the South American Platform Archean crust. GB underwent several events of juvenile accretion and reworking of continental crust along its evolutionary history, notably between the Archean and the Paleoproterozoic. {sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb isotopic analyses were carried out in two zircons populations from strongly migmatized TTG terranes found in the proximity of Brumado: the first population (7 crystals) is taken as representative of the crystallization period of the TTG terranes at 3300 {+-} 45 Ma; the second (2 crystals) represents the age of the first even of metamorphism/migmatization at 2910 {+-} 10 Ma. {sup 207} Pb/{sup 206} Pb analyses in zircons from an outcrop of non-migmatized TTG in the area yielded a 3202 {+-} 15 Ma age (4 crystals), interpreted to be the crystallization period of the gneiss protolith. Sm/Nd analyses on the TTG rocks of the Brumado region yielded T{sub DM} model ages varying between 3.26 and 3.36 Ga and {epsilon}{sub Nd}{sup (t)} between -3.5 and +0.7. These data suggest the occurrence of juvenile accretions to the continental crust during the Archean, with differential involvement of crustal materials. The geochemical data of rare earth elements corresponding to the TTG terranes revealed moderate LRRE contents (La{sub N}=83,5), low HREE contents (La{sub N}=2,5) and a fairly fractionated pattern (La/Yb){sub N}=34, besides lack of negative Eu anomaly, showing that these rocks have similar compositions to those TTG terranes of cratonic continents, as well as some Archean rocks from CSF (e.g. Sete Voltas, Boa Vista). Finally, the youngest ages present in GB rocks (ca. 1.2-0.45 Ga) represent the role played by tectono thermal events, which produced partial or total rejuvenation of the Rb/Sr and K/Ar isotopic systems during the Espinhaco and Brasiliano cycles. In particular, K/Ar ages illustrate the

  2. Di-μ-cyanido-tetra­cyanido(5,5,7,12,12,14-hexa­methyl-1,4,8,11-tetra­aza­cyclo­tetra­decane)[N-(quinolin-8-yl)quinoline-2-carboxamidato]diiron(III)nickel(II) 2.07-hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuqi; Zhou, Hongbo; Shen, Xiaoping

    2013-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title complex, [Fe2Ni(C19H12N3O)2(CN)6(C16H36N4)]·2.07H2O, contains one [Fe(qcq)(CN)3]− anion, half a [Ni(teta)]2+ cation and two partially occupied inter­stitial water mol­ecules [qcq− is the N-(quinolin-8-yl)quinoline-2-carboxamidate anion and teta is 5,5,7,12,12,14-hexa­methyl-1,4,8,11-tetra­aza­cyclo­tetra­deca­ne]. In the complex mol­ecule, two [Fe(qcq)(CN)3]− anions additionally coordinate the central [Ni(teta)]2+ cation through cyanide groups in a trans mode, resulting in a trinuclear structure with the Ni2+ cation lying on an inversion centre. The two inter­stitial water mol­ecules are partially occupied, with occupancy factors of 0.528 (10) and 0.506 (9). O—H⋯O and O—H⋯N hydrogen bonding involving the two lattice water molecules and the carbonyl function and a teta N atom in an adjacent cluster leads to the formation of layers extending parallel to (010). PMID:23723777

  3. Di-μ-cyanido-tetra-cyanido(5,5,7,12,12,14-hexa-methyl-1,4,8,11-tetra-aza-cyclo-tetra-decane)[N-(quinolin-8-yl)quinoline-2-carboxamidato]diiron(III)nickel(II) 2.07-hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuqi; Zhou, Hongbo; Shen, Xiaoping

    2013-05-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title complex, [Fe2Ni(C19H12N3O)2(CN)6(C16H36N4)]·2.07H2O, contains one [Fe(qcq)(CN)3](-) anion, half a [Ni(teta)](2+) cation and two partially occupied inter-stitial water mol-ecules [qcq(-) is the N-(quinolin-8-yl)quinoline-2-carboxamidate anion and teta is 5,5,7,12,12,14-hexa-methyl-1,4,8,11-tetra-aza-cyclo-tetra-deca-ne]. In the complex mol-ecule, two [Fe(qcq)(CN)3](-) anions additionally coordinate the central [Ni(teta)](2+) cation through cyanide groups in a trans mode, resulting in a trinuclear structure with the Ni(2+) cation lying on an inversion centre. The two inter-stitial water mol-ecules are partially occupied, with occupancy factors of 0.528 (10) and 0.506 (9). O-H⋯O and O-H⋯N hydrogen bonding involving the two lattice water molecules and the carbonyl function and a teta N atom in an adjacent cluster leads to the formation of layers extending parallel to (010).

  4. 14 CFR 91.207 - Emergency locator transmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... incident to design and testing; (5) New aircraft while engaged in flight operations incident to their... Administrator for research and development purposes; (8) Aircraft while used for showing compliance with... view of the pilot to show “ELT not installed.” (ii) No person may operate the aircraft more than 90...

  5. 30 CFR 207.5 - Contract and sales agreement retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... production are to be maintained by the lessee and made available upon request during normal working hours to... Accounting Office, or other persons authorized to receive such documents, or shall be submitted to MMS within...

  6. 48 CFR 207.106 - Additional requirements for major systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... (vi) Use of build-to-print approaches to enable production through multiple sources. (vii) Acquisition...(d)(4)(A) from requiring offers for development or production of major systems that would enable the... analysis of the total value, in terms of innovative design, life-cycle costs, and other pertinent factors...

  7. 19 CFR 207.15 - Written briefs and conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR FROM... in connection with its presentation a party may file witness testimony with the Secretary no later...

  8. WE-A-207-01: Memorial Lecturer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller-Runkel, R

    2015-01-01

    The Medical Physics community lost one of its early pioneers in radiation oncology physics, Jacques Ovadia, who passed away in April of 2014 at the age of 90. Jacques received his Ph.D. in Nuclear Physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana in 1951. Subsequently, under the guidance of John Laughlin, he was introduced to the field of Medical Physics. When John moved to Memorial Sloan Kettering, Jacques followed him. There he gained clinical experience and expertise in the then cutting-edge field of high energy electron beam therapy. In 1956, Jacques joined Dr. Erich Uhlmann at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago where one of the country’s first high energy medical linear accelerators had just been installed. During his 35 year tenure, Dr. Ovadia built a strong Medical Physics department that merged in 1984 with that of the University of Chicago. Jacques pioneered the use of high energy electron beams to treat deep seated tumors, multiple-field chest wall irradiation with variable electron energies, and even anticipated the current interest in high energy electron beam grid-therapy. At an early stage, he introduced a simulator, computerized treatment planning and in-house developed record and verify software. He retired in 1990 as Professor emeritus in Radiation and Cellular Biology at the University of Chicago. Dr. Ovadia was an early and strong supporter of AAPM. He was present at the Chicago ROMPS meeting where the decision was made to form an independent professional society for medical physics. He served as AAPM president in 1976. Jacques Ovadia is survived by his wife of 58 years, Florence, their daughter Corinne Graefe and son Marc Ovadia, MD, as well as four grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Jacques’ dynamic and ever enthusiastic personality inspired all who collaborated with him. He will be greatly missed

  9. RCT: Module 2.07, Respiratory Protection, Course 8773

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillmer, Kurt T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-10

    Internal dosimetry controls require the use of engineering controls to prevent the internal deposition of radioactive and nonradiological contaminants. However, when engineering and administrative controls are not available or feasible, respiratory protection may be necessary. The radiation control technician (RCT) should know and apply the considerations used in determining the respiratory protection equipment that is most appropriate for the job. The inappropriate use of or the use of the wrong respiratory protection equipment may result in undesirable health effects. This course will prepare the student with the skills necessary for RCT qualification by passing quizzes, tests, and the RCT Comprehensive Phase 1, Unit 2 Examination (TEST 27566) and will provide in-the-field skills.

  10. TH-B-207B-00: Pediatric Image Quality Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This imaging educational program will focus on solutions to common pediatric image quality optimization challenges. The speakers will present collective knowledge on best practices in pediatric imaging from their experience at dedicated children’s hospitals. One of the most commonly encountered pediatric imaging requirements for the non-specialist hospital is pediatric CT in the emergency room setting. Thus, this educational program will begin with optimization of pediatric CT in the emergency department. Though pediatric cardiovascular MRI may be less common in the non-specialist hospitals, low pediatric volumes and unique cardiovascular anatomy make optimization of these techniques difficult. Therefore, our second speaker will review best practices in pediatric cardiovascular MRI based on experiences from a children’s hospital with a large volume of cardiac patients. Learning Objectives: To learn techniques for optimizing radiation dose and image quality for CT of children in the emergency room setting. To learn solutions for consistently high quality cardiovascular MRI of children

  11. 19 CFR 207.45 - Investigation to review outstanding determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FAIR VALUE OR FROM SUBSIDIZED EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES Terminated, Suspended, and Continued... description of changed circumstances sufficient to warrant the institution of a review investigation by the... of the receipt of a request, the Commission shall determine whether the request shows changed...

  12. 7 CFR 400.207 - Representative licensing and certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... insurance; (5) Liability insurance; or (6) Fire insurance and allied lines. The Contractor must submit... INSURANCE CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Agency Sales and Service... policies are issued, which license authorizes the sales of insurance in any one or more of the following...

  13. 48 CFR 871.207 - Payment of tuition or fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... prorated on the basis of attendance, regardless of the refund policy. (3) If an institution customarily charges for the amount of credit or number of hours of attendance for which a trainee enrolls, payment may... policy providing for a graduated scale of charges for purposes of determining refunds may be paid part or...

  14. 29 CFR 2200.207 - Pre-hearing conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE... parties will discuss the following: settlement of the case; the narrowing of issues; an agreed statement of issues and facts; defenses; witnesses and exhibits; motions; and any other pertinent matter...

  15. 19 CFR 207.68 - Final comments on information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... comment may address the accuracy, reliability, or probative value of such information by reference to... INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR FROM...

  16. 19 CFR 207.30 - Comment on information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., reliability, or probative value of such information by reference to information elsewhere in the record, in... OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR FROM...

  17. TH-B-207B-02: Optimizing Pediatic Cardiovascular MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, J.

    2016-01-01

    This imaging educational program will focus on solutions to common pediatric image quality optimization challenges. The speakers will present collective knowledge on best practices in pediatric imaging from their experience at dedicated children’s hospitals. One of the most commonly encountered pediatric imaging requirements for the non-specialist hospital is pediatric CT in the emergency room setting. Thus, this educational program will begin with optimization of pediatric CT in the emergency department. Though pediatric cardiovascular MRI may be less common in the non-specialist hospitals, low pediatric volumes and unique cardiovascular anatomy make optimization of these techniques difficult. Therefore, our second speaker will review best practices in pediatric cardiovascular MRI based on experiences from a children’s hospital with a large volume of cardiac patients. Learning Objectives: To learn techniques for optimizing radiation dose and image quality for CT of children in the emergency room setting. To learn solutions for consistently high quality cardiovascular MRI of children

  18. 48 CFR 1415.207-71 - Confidentiality of proposal evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... THE INTERIOR CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Solicitation and... evaluators and advisors shall sign a Conflict of Interest Certificate and a Confidentiality Certificate in a... outside the Government shall take into consideration requirements for avoiding individual conflicts of...

  19. Dicty_cDB: SHL207 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GYSLNNNFYISETPFSLASTTHIDKTFISTNKE AIIVDTIKKAEDGTSFVVRVYESFGGATTFNFTSSILPIPFKSIIECNGLEEVNQSSKSY KFNDTIKINPFEIKTFRFISN*klkiklinky...DTIKINPFEIKTFRFISN*klkiklinkyknkf Translated Amino Acid sequence (All Frames) Frame A: ---*hklgfrki*scrt*mgr...ASTTHIDKTFISTNKE AIIVDTIKKAEDGTSFVVRVYESFGGATTFNFTSSILPIPFKSIIECNGLEEVNQSSKSY KFN

  20. 207 EFFECTS OF HOT AND COLD WATER PRE- TREATMENTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The treatments used were immersion of the seeds in cold water (at room o temperature) for 8, 12 and ... goat, sheep and cattle in the semi arid regions due to the palatability of its ... visible signs of infestation were selected out of the total seeds ...

  1. 47 CFR 13.207 - Preparing an examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... consist of a plain language text or code group message sent in the international Morse code at no less... examination. Each five letters of the alphabet must be counted as one word or one code group. Each numeral...

  2. Translating cultural transition in Kgebetli Moele’s Room 207

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S. Ibinga

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the issue of cultural translation in a postapartheid text through the analysis of language, setting and discourse to highlight cultural transition in a society where socio-political mutations elicit new literary codes and symbols. The discussion is developed around concepts such as gender and ethnic identity or citizenship in a geographical environment where multi- and transcultural identities are endlessly being contested. The concept of translation is explored to show how Moele’s text represents cultural transition within a postapartheid urban context by analysing the authorial transposition of everyday experience into the textual fabric. The article also examines how the narrative voice negotiates across the current multicultural divide in order to highlight cultural change both in South African literature and in society as a whole. This article addresses in the discussion the controversial debate raised by Michael Titlestad’s (2007 review of the book published in the “Sunday times” on 25 March in which the critic evinces a negative reception of the book. This is used as a point of departure in order to explore a wide range of possibilities that fiction can offer by means of textual representation of the daily experience of black people in a postapartheid urban context.

  3. TU-AB-207-01: Introduction to Tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sechopoulos, I.

    2015-01-01

    Digital Tomosynthesis (DT) is becoming increasingly common in breast imaging and many other applications. DT is a form of computed tomography in which a limited set of projection images are acquired over a small angular range and reconstructed into a tomographic data set. The angular range and number of projections is determined both by the imaging task and equipment manufacturer. For example, in breast imaging between 9 and 25 projections are acquired over a range of 15° to 60°. It is equally valid to treat DT as the digital analog of classical tomography - for example, linear tomography. In fact, the name “tomosynthesis” is an acronym for “synthetic tomography”. DT shares many common features with classical tomography, including the radiographic appearance, dose, and image quality considerations. As such, both the science and practical physics of DT systems is a hybrid between CT and classical tomographic methods. This lecture will consist of three presentations that will provide a complete overview of DT, including a review of the fundamentals of DT, a discussion of testing methods for DT systems, and a description of the clinical applications of DT. While digital breast tomosynthesis will be emphasized, analogies will be drawn to body imaging to illustrate and compare tomosynthesis methods. Learning Objectives: To understand the fundamental principles behind tomosynthesis, including the determinants of image quality and dose. To learn how to test the performance of tomosynthesis imaging systems. To appreciate the uses of tomosynthesis in the clinic and the future applications of tomosynthesis

  4. TU-AB-207-03: Tomosynthesis: Clinical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maidment, A.

    2015-01-01

    Digital Tomosynthesis (DT) is becoming increasingly common in breast imaging and many other applications. DT is a form of computed tomography in which a limited set of projection images are acquired over a small angular range and reconstructed into a tomographic data set. The angular range and number of projections is determined both by the imaging task and equipment manufacturer. For example, in breast imaging between 9 and 25 projections are acquired over a range of 15° to 60°. It is equally valid to treat DT as the digital analog of classical tomography - for example, linear tomography. In fact, the name “tomosynthesis” is an acronym for “synthetic tomography”. DT shares many common features with classical tomography, including the radiographic appearance, dose, and image quality considerations. As such, both the science and practical physics of DT systems is a hybrid between CT and classical tomographic methods. This lecture will consist of three presentations that will provide a complete overview of DT, including a review of the fundamentals of DT, a discussion of testing methods for DT systems, and a description of the clinical applications of DT. While digital breast tomosynthesis will be emphasized, analogies will be drawn to body imaging to illustrate and compare tomosynthesis methods. Learning Objectives: To understand the fundamental principles behind tomosynthesis, including the determinants of image quality and dose. To learn how to test the performance of tomosynthesis imaging systems. To appreciate the uses of tomosynthesis in the clinic and the future applications of tomosynthesis

  5. TU-AB-207-00: Digital Tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Digital Tomosynthesis (DT) is becoming increasingly common in breast imaging and many other applications. DT is a form of computed tomography in which a limited set of projection images are acquired over a small angular range and reconstructed into a tomographic data set. The angular range and number of projections is determined both by the imaging task and equipment manufacturer. For example, in breast imaging between 9 and 25 projections are acquired over a range of 15° to 60°. It is equally valid to treat DT as the digital analog of classical tomography - for example, linear tomography. In fact, the name “tomosynthesis” is an acronym for “synthetic tomography”. DT shares many common features with classical tomography, including the radiographic appearance, dose, and image quality considerations. As such, both the science and practical physics of DT systems is a hybrid between CT and classical tomographic methods. This lecture will consist of three presentations that will provide a complete overview of DT, including a review of the fundamentals of DT, a discussion of testing methods for DT systems, and a description of the clinical applications of DT. While digital breast tomosynthesis will be emphasized, analogies will be drawn to body imaging to illustrate and compare tomosynthesis methods. Learning Objectives: To understand the fundamental principles behind tomosynthesis, including the determinants of image quality and dose. To learn how to test the performance of tomosynthesis imaging systems. To appreciate the uses of tomosynthesis in the clinic and the future applications of tomosynthesis

  6. MO-AB-207-04: ACR Update in Mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berns, E. [University of Colorado Health Science (United States)

    2015-06-15

    A goal of an imaging accreditation program is to ensure adequate image quality, verify appropriate staff qualifications, and to assure patient and personnel safety. Currently, more than 35,000 facilities in 10 modalities have been accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), making the ACR program one of the most prolific accreditation options in the U.S. In addition, ACR is one of the accepted accreditations required by some state laws, CMS/MIPPA insurance and others. Familiarity with the ACR accreditation process is therefore essential to clinical diagnostic medical physicists. Maintaining sufficient knowledge of the ACR program must include keeping up-to-date as the various modality requirements are refined to better serve the goals of the program and to accommodate newer technologies and practices. This session consists of presentations from authorities in four ACR accreditation modality programs, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, and mammography. Each speaker will discuss the general components of the modality program and address any recent changes to the requirements. Learning Objectives: To understand the requirements of the ACR MR Accreditation program. The discussion will include accreditation of whole-body general purpose magnets, dedicated extremity systems well as breast MRI accreditation. Anticipated updates to the ACR MRI Quality Control Manual will also be reviewed. To understand the requirements of the ACR CT accreditation program, including updates to the QC manual as well as updates through the FAQ process. To understand the requirements of the ACR nuclear medicine accreditation program, and the role of the physicist in annual equipment surveys and the set up and supervision of the routine QC program. To understand the current ACR MAP Accreditation requirement and present the concepts and structure of the forthcoming ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual and Program.

  7. TU-AB-207-03: Tomosynthesis: Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maidment, A. [Univ Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Digital Tomosynthesis (DT) is becoming increasingly common in breast imaging and many other applications. DT is a form of computed tomography in which a limited set of projection images are acquired over a small angular range and reconstructed into a tomographic data set. The angular range and number of projections is determined both by the imaging task and equipment manufacturer. For example, in breast imaging between 9 and 25 projections are acquired over a range of 15° to 60°. It is equally valid to treat DT as the digital analog of classical tomography - for example, linear tomography. In fact, the name “tomosynthesis” is an acronym for “synthetic tomography”. DT shares many common features with classical tomography, including the radiographic appearance, dose, and image quality considerations. As such, both the science and practical physics of DT systems is a hybrid between CT and classical tomographic methods. This lecture will consist of three presentations that will provide a complete overview of DT, including a review of the fundamentals of DT, a discussion of testing methods for DT systems, and a description of the clinical applications of DT. While digital breast tomosynthesis will be emphasized, analogies will be drawn to body imaging to illustrate and compare tomosynthesis methods. Learning Objectives: To understand the fundamental principles behind tomosynthesis, including the determinants of image quality and dose. To learn how to test the performance of tomosynthesis imaging systems. To appreciate the uses of tomosynthesis in the clinic and the future applications of tomosynthesis.

  8. TU-AB-207-00: Digital Tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    Digital Tomosynthesis (DT) is becoming increasingly common in breast imaging and many other applications. DT is a form of computed tomography in which a limited set of projection images are acquired over a small angular range and reconstructed into a tomographic data set. The angular range and number of projections is determined both by the imaging task and equipment manufacturer. For example, in breast imaging between 9 and 25 projections are acquired over a range of 15° to 60°. It is equally valid to treat DT as the digital analog of classical tomography - for example, linear tomography. In fact, the name “tomosynthesis” is an acronym for “synthetic tomography”. DT shares many common features with classical tomography, including the radiographic appearance, dose, and image quality considerations. As such, both the science and practical physics of DT systems is a hybrid between CT and classical tomographic methods. This lecture will consist of three presentations that will provide a complete overview of DT, including a review of the fundamentals of DT, a discussion of testing methods for DT systems, and a description of the clinical applications of DT. While digital breast tomosynthesis will be emphasized, analogies will be drawn to body imaging to illustrate and compare tomosynthesis methods. Learning Objectives: To understand the fundamental principles behind tomosynthesis, including the determinants of image quality and dose. To learn how to test the performance of tomosynthesis imaging systems. To appreciate the uses of tomosynthesis in the clinic and the future applications of tomosynthesis.

  9. MO-AB-207-02: ACR Update in MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, R. [Vanderbilt Medical Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    A goal of an imaging accreditation program is to ensure adequate image quality, verify appropriate staff qualifications, and to assure patient and personnel safety. Currently, more than 35,000 facilities in 10 modalities have been accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), making the ACR program one of the most prolific accreditation options in the U.S. In addition, ACR is one of the accepted accreditations required by some state laws, CMS/MIPPA insurance and others. Familiarity with the ACR accreditation process is therefore essential to clinical diagnostic medical physicists. Maintaining sufficient knowledge of the ACR program must include keeping up-to-date as the various modality requirements are refined to better serve the goals of the program and to accommodate newer technologies and practices. This session consists of presentations from authorities in four ACR accreditation modality programs, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, and mammography. Each speaker will discuss the general components of the modality program and address any recent changes to the requirements. Learning Objectives: To understand the requirements of the ACR MR Accreditation program. The discussion will include accreditation of whole-body general purpose magnets, dedicated extremity systems well as breast MRI accreditation. Anticipated updates to the ACR MRI Quality Control Manual will also be reviewed. To understand the requirements of the ACR CT accreditation program, including updates to the QC manual as well as updates through the FAQ process. To understand the requirements of the ACR nuclear medicine accreditation program, and the role of the physicist in annual equipment surveys and the set up and supervision of the routine QC program. To understand the current ACR MAP Accreditation requirement and present the concepts and structure of the forthcoming ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual and Program.

  10. TU-AB-207-01: Introduction to Tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sechopoulos, I. [Emory University (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Digital Tomosynthesis (DT) is becoming increasingly common in breast imaging and many other applications. DT is a form of computed tomography in which a limited set of projection images are acquired over a small angular range and reconstructed into a tomographic data set. The angular range and number of projections is determined both by the imaging task and equipment manufacturer. For example, in breast imaging between 9 and 25 projections are acquired over a range of 15° to 60°. It is equally valid to treat DT as the digital analog of classical tomography - for example, linear tomography. In fact, the name “tomosynthesis” is an acronym for “synthetic tomography”. DT shares many common features with classical tomography, including the radiographic appearance, dose, and image quality considerations. As such, both the science and practical physics of DT systems is a hybrid between CT and classical tomographic methods. This lecture will consist of three presentations that will provide a complete overview of DT, including a review of the fundamentals of DT, a discussion of testing methods for DT systems, and a description of the clinical applications of DT. While digital breast tomosynthesis will be emphasized, analogies will be drawn to body imaging to illustrate and compare tomosynthesis methods. Learning Objectives: To understand the fundamental principles behind tomosynthesis, including the determinants of image quality and dose. To learn how to test the performance of tomosynthesis imaging systems. To appreciate the uses of tomosynthesis in the clinic and the future applications of tomosynthesis.

  11. MO-AB-207-01: ACR Update in CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNitt-Gray, M. [UCLA School of Medicine (United States)

    2015-06-15

    A goal of an imaging accreditation program is to ensure adequate image quality, verify appropriate staff qualifications, and to assure patient and personnel safety. Currently, more than 35,000 facilities in 10 modalities have been accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), making the ACR program one of the most prolific accreditation options in the U.S. In addition, ACR is one of the accepted accreditations required by some state laws, CMS/MIPPA insurance and others. Familiarity with the ACR accreditation process is therefore essential to clinical diagnostic medical physicists. Maintaining sufficient knowledge of the ACR program must include keeping up-to-date as the various modality requirements are refined to better serve the goals of the program and to accommodate newer technologies and practices. This session consists of presentations from authorities in four ACR accreditation modality programs, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, and mammography. Each speaker will discuss the general components of the modality program and address any recent changes to the requirements. Learning Objectives: To understand the requirements of the ACR MR Accreditation program. The discussion will include accreditation of whole-body general purpose magnets, dedicated extremity systems well as breast MRI accreditation. Anticipated updates to the ACR MRI Quality Control Manual will also be reviewed. To understand the requirements of the ACR CT accreditation program, including updates to the QC manual as well as updates through the FAQ process. To understand the requirements of the ACR nuclear medicine accreditation program, and the role of the physicist in annual equipment surveys and the set up and supervision of the routine QC program. To understand the current ACR MAP Accreditation requirement and present the concepts and structure of the forthcoming ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual and Program.

  12. TU-EF-207-00: Advances in Breast Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    Breast imaging technology is advancing on several fronts. In digital mammography, the major technological trend has been on optimization of approaches for performing combined mammography and tomosynthesis using the same system. In parallel, photon-counting slot-scan mammography is now in clinical use and more efforts are directed towards further development of this approach for spectral imaging. Spectral imaging refers to simultaneous acquisition of two or more energy-windowed images. Depending on the detector and associated electronics, there are a number of ways this can be accomplished. Spectral mammography using photon-counting detectors can suppress electronic noise and importantly, it enables decomposition of the image into various material compositions of interest facilitating quantitative imaging. Spectral imaging can be particularly important in intravenously injected contrast mammography and eventually tomosynthesis. The various approaches and applications of spectral mammography are discussed. Digital breast tomosynthesis relies on the mechanical movement of the x-ray tube to acquire a number of projections in a predefined arc, typically from 9 to 25 projections over a scan angle of +/−7.5 to 25 degrees depending on the particular system. The mechanical x-ray tube motion requires relatively long acquisition time, typically between 3.7 to 25 seconds depending on the system. Moreover, mechanical scanning may have an effect on the spatial resolution due to internal x-ray filament or external mechanical vibrations. New x-ray source arrays have been developed and they are aimed at replacing the scanned x-ray tube for improved acquisition time and potentially for higher spatial resolution. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis in a single system places increased demands on certain functional aspects of the detector and overall performance, particularly in the tomosynthesis mode due to lower photon fluence per projection. This may require fast-frame acquisition and symmetric or asymmetric pixel binning in some systems. Recent studies investigated the performance of increased conversion layer thickness for contrast-enhanced imaging of the breast in dual-energy acquisition mode. In other direct conversion detectors operating in the avalanche mode, sensitivities close to the single photon response are also explored for mammography and breast tomosynthesis. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Dedicated breast CT brings x-ray imaging of the breast to true tomographic 3D imaging. It can eliminate the tissue superposition problem and does not require physical compression of the breast. Using cone beam geometry and a flat-panel detector, several hundred projections are acquired and reconstructed to near isotropic voxels. Multiplanar reconstruction facilitates viewing the breast volume in any desired orientation. Ongoing clinical studies, the current state-of-the art, and research to advance the technology are described. Learning Objectives: To understand the ongoing developments in x-ray imaging of the breast To understand the approaches and applications of spectral mammography To understand the potential advantages of distributed x-ray source arrays for digital breast tomosynthesis To understand the ongoing developments in detector technology for digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis To understand the current state-of-the-art for dedicated cone-beam breast CT and research to advance the technology. Research collaboration with Koning Corporation.

  13. 47 CFR 73.207 - Minimum distance separation between stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... kW ERP and 100 meters antenna HAAT (or equivalent lower ERP and higher antenna HAAT based on a class... which have been notified internationally as Class A are limited to a maximum of 3.0 kW ERP at 100 meters... internationally as Class AA are limited to a maximum of 6.0 kW ERP at 100 meters HAAT, or the equivalent; (iii) U...

  14. 33 CFR 207.800 - Collection of navigation statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of time and/or for a specified remuneration from the lessee. Commercial movements on an affreightment... remuneration for the movement of vessels or for the transportation of goods or passengers on the navigable... to the Director of the Water Resources Support Center, Casey Building, Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060...

  15. 24 CFR 207.258a - Title requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... MULTIFAMILY HOUSING MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Rights and Duties of Mortgagee Under... the mortgage was filed for record, with the exception of such liens or other matters affecting the...

  16. MO-AB-207-04: ACR Update in Mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berns, E.

    2015-01-01

    A goal of an imaging accreditation program is to ensure adequate image quality, verify appropriate staff qualifications, and to assure patient and personnel safety. Currently, more than 35,000 facilities in 10 modalities have been accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), making the ACR program one of the most prolific accreditation options in the U.S. In addition, ACR is one of the accepted accreditations required by some state laws, CMS/MIPPA insurance and others. Familiarity with the ACR accreditation process is therefore essential to clinical diagnostic medical physicists. Maintaining sufficient knowledge of the ACR program must include keeping up-to-date as the various modality requirements are refined to better serve the goals of the program and to accommodate newer technologies and practices. This session consists of presentations from authorities in four ACR accreditation modality programs, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, and mammography. Each speaker will discuss the general components of the modality program and address any recent changes to the requirements. Learning Objectives: To understand the requirements of the ACR MR Accreditation program. The discussion will include accreditation of whole-body general purpose magnets, dedicated extremity systems well as breast MRI accreditation. Anticipated updates to the ACR MRI Quality Control Manual will also be reviewed. To understand the requirements of the ACR CT accreditation program, including updates to the QC manual as well as updates through the FAQ process. To understand the requirements of the ACR nuclear medicine accreditation program, and the role of the physicist in annual equipment surveys and the set up and supervision of the routine QC program. To understand the current ACR MAP Accreditation requirement and present the concepts and structure of the forthcoming ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual and Program

  17. MO-AB-207-02: ACR Update in MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.

    2015-01-01

    A goal of an imaging accreditation program is to ensure adequate image quality, verify appropriate staff qualifications, and to assure patient and personnel safety. Currently, more than 35,000 facilities in 10 modalities have been accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), making the ACR program one of the most prolific accreditation options in the U.S. In addition, ACR is one of the accepted accreditations required by some state laws, CMS/MIPPA insurance and others. Familiarity with the ACR accreditation process is therefore essential to clinical diagnostic medical physicists. Maintaining sufficient knowledge of the ACR program must include keeping up-to-date as the various modality requirements are refined to better serve the goals of the program and to accommodate newer technologies and practices. This session consists of presentations from authorities in four ACR accreditation modality programs, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, and mammography. Each speaker will discuss the general components of the modality program and address any recent changes to the requirements. Learning Objectives: To understand the requirements of the ACR MR Accreditation program. The discussion will include accreditation of whole-body general purpose magnets, dedicated extremity systems well as breast MRI accreditation. Anticipated updates to the ACR MRI Quality Control Manual will also be reviewed. To understand the requirements of the ACR CT accreditation program, including updates to the QC manual as well as updates through the FAQ process. To understand the requirements of the ACR nuclear medicine accreditation program, and the role of the physicist in annual equipment surveys and the set up and supervision of the routine QC program. To understand the current ACR MAP Accreditation requirement and present the concepts and structure of the forthcoming ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual and Program

  18. 48 CFR 47.207-1 - Qualifications of offerors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... clause at 52.247-2, Permits, Authorities, or Franchises, when regulated transportation is involved. The... that it is in the Government's interest not to apply the requirement for holding or obtaining State... interest not to apply the requirements for holding or obtaining State authority to operate within the State...

  19. 24 CFR 941.207 - Displacement, relocation, and acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., the PHA shall issue a general information notice (described in 49 CFR 24.203(a)) to each occupant of... section), the PHA shall issue an appropriate written notice to each person occupying the property. Those... demonstrate compliance with this section, including data indicating the race, ethnic, gender and disability...

  20. 48 CFR 5.207 - Preparation and transmittal of synopses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the World Trade Organization Government Procurement Agreement and Free Trade Agreements.” (iii) If the... the synopsis: “One or more of the items under this acquisition is subject to the World Trade Organization Government Procurement Agreement and Free Trade Agreements.” (14) In the case of noncompetitive...

  1. 29 CFR 779.207 - Related activities in retail operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ACT AS APPLIED TO RETAILERS OF GOODS OR SERVICES Employment to Which the Act May Apply; Enterprise... store are “related activities,” even if the store sells a great variety of different types of goods and... of goods or services, of any type, are related activities and they will be considered one enterprise...

  2. 24 CFR 3286.207 - Process for obtaining installation license.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... installation license must submit verification of the experience required in § 3286.205(a). This verification may be in the form of statements by past or present employers or a self-certification that the applicant meets those experience requirements, but HUD may contact the applicant for additional verification...

  3. 24 CFR 207.258 - Insurance claim requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... in 24 CFR part 200, subpart B, of its intention to file an insurance claim and of its election either..., ledger cards, documents, books, papers, and accounts relating to the mortgage transaction. (iv) All...

  4. 24 CFR 3282.207 - Manufactured home consumer manual requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Homeowners are encouraged to report defects in writing, including, but not limited to, email, written letter... will create a dated record of the report: for example, by certified mail, by fax, or by email. When... with the dispute resolution provider in writing, or by making a request by phone. No particular format...

  5. 5 CFR 330.207 - Selection from RPL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... employees enrolled on the RPL. (b) Retention standing order. For each vacancy to be filled, the agency shall.... Within a subgroup, an agency may select an individual without regard to order of retention standing. A... be filled, the agency rates qualified individuals according to their job experience and education. To...

  6. 47 CFR 80.207 - Classes of emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... communications employing a modulated carrier the carrier must be keyed and modulated by an audio frequency. (c..., 16, 17 A1A, J2A, J2B, J2D. DSC 6 F1B, J2B. NB-DP 14, 16 F1B, J2B, J2D. Facsimile F1C, F3C, J2C, J3C. 156-162 MHz 2 F1B, F2B, F2C, F3C, F1D, F2D. DSC G2B. 216-220 MHz 3 F1B, F2B, F2C, F3C. 1626.5-1646.5...

  7. MO-B-207B-01: Harmonization & Robustness in Radiomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Court, L. [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Feature extraction for radiomics studies typically comprises the following stages: Imaging, segmentation, image processing, and feature extraction. Each of these stages has associated uncertainties that can affect the quality of a radiomics model created using the resulting image features. For example, the imaging device manufacturer and model have been shown to impact the values of image features, as have pixel size and imaging protocol parameters. Image processing, such as low-pass filtering to reduce noise, also changes calculated image features and should be designed to optimize the information content of the resulting features. The details of certain feature algorithms, such as co-occurrence matrix bin sizes, are also important, and should be optimized for specific radiomics tasks. The volume of the region of interest should be considered as image features can be related to volume and can give unanticipated results when the volumes are too small. In this session we will describe approaches to quantify the variabilities in radiomics studies, including the most recent results quantifying these variabilities for CT, MRI and PET imaging. We will discuss methods to optimize image processing and feature extraction in order to maximize the information content of the image features. Finally, we will describe work to harmonize imaging protocols and feature calculations to help minimize uncertainties in radiomics studies. Learning Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be able to: Identify the sources of uncertainty in radiomics studies (CT, PET, and MRI imaging) Describe methods for quantifying the magnitude of uncertainties Describe approaches for mitigating the effects of the uncertainties on radiomics models Funding from NIH, CPRIT, Varian, Elekta; L. Court, NCI, CPRIT, Varian, Elekta.

  8. MO-B-207B-00: Harmonization & Robustness in Radiomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Feature extraction for radiomics studies typically comprises the following stages: Imaging, segmentation, image processing, and feature extraction. Each of these stages has associated uncertainties that can affect the quality of a radiomics model created using the resulting image features. For example, the imaging device manufacturer and model have been shown to impact the values of image features, as have pixel size and imaging protocol parameters. Image processing, such as low-pass filtering to reduce noise, also changes calculated image features and should be designed to optimize the information content of the resulting features. The details of certain feature algorithms, such as co-occurrence matrix bin sizes, are also important, and should be optimized for specific radiomics tasks. The volume of the region of interest should be considered as image features can be related to volume and can give unanticipated results when the volumes are too small. In this session we will describe approaches to quantify the variabilities in radiomics studies, including the most recent results quantifying these variabilities for CT, MRI and PET imaging. We will discuss methods to optimize image processing and feature extraction in order to maximize the information content of the image features. Finally, we will describe work to harmonize imaging protocols and feature calculations to help minimize uncertainties in radiomics studies. Learning Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be able to: Identify the sources of uncertainty in radiomics studies (CT, PET, and MRI imaging) Describe methods for quantifying the magnitude of uncertainties Describe approaches for mitigating the effects of the uncertainties on radiomics models Funding from NIH, CPRIT, Varian, Elekta; L. Court, NCI, CPRIT, Varian, Elekta.

  9. 48 CFR 207.103 - Agency-head responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... agency. (ii) Written plans are not required in acquisitions for a final buy out or one-time buy. The terms “final buy out” and “one-time buy” refer to a single contract that covers all known present and future requirements. This exception does not apply to a multiyear contract or a contract with options or...

  10. 27 CFR 555.207 - Construction of type 1 magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... constructed of, or covered with, a nonsparking material. (3) Wood frame wall construction. The exterior of... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Construction of type 1... Construction of type 1 magazines. A type 1 magazine is a permanent structure: a building, an igloo or “Army...

  11. 29 CFR 1952.207 - Changes to approved plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 1910.142) in agriculture (except for agricultural temporary labor camps associated with egg, poultry or red meat production, or the post-harvest processing of agricultural or horticultural commodities). The... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...

  12. 33 CFR 207.460 - Fox River, Wis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... all boats, vessels, tows, rafts and floating things, both powered and nonpowered, in the canals and... the purpose desired. Applicants will be required to establish over their signature the fact that due...

  13. WE-H-207B-04: Strategies for Adaptive RT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, O. [Washington University School of Medicine (United States)

    2016-06-15

    In recent years, steady progress has been made towards the implementation of MRI in external beam radiation therapy for processes ranging from treatment simulation to in-room guidance. Novel procedures relying mostly on MR data are currently implemented in the clinic. This session will cover topics such as (a) commissioning and quality control of the MR in-room imagers and simulators specific to RT, (b) treatment planning requirements, constraints and challenges when dealing with various MR data, (c) quantification of organ motion with an emphasis on treatment delivery guidance, and (d) MR-driven strategies for adaptive RT workflows. The content of the session was chosen to address both educational and practical key aspects of MR guidance. Learning Objectives: Good understanding of MR testing recommended for in-room MR imaging as well as image data validation for RT chain (e.g. image transfer, filtering for consistency, spatial accuracy, manipulation for task specific); Familiarity with MR-based planning procedures: motivation, core workflow requirements, current status, challenges; Overview of the current methods for the quantification of organ motion; Discussion on approaches for adaptive treatment planning and delivery. T. Stanescu - License agreement with Modus Medical Devices to develop a phantom for the quantification of MR image system-related distortions.; T. Stanescu, N/A.

  14. WE-H-207B-00: MRgRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    In recent years, steady progress has been made towards the implementation of MRI in external beam radiation therapy for processes ranging from treatment simulation to in-room guidance. Novel procedures relying mostly on MR data are currently implemented in the clinic. This session will cover topics such as (a) commissioning and quality control of the MR in-room imagers and simulators specific to RT, (b) treatment planning requirements, constraints and challenges when dealing with various MR data, (c) quantification of organ motion with an emphasis on treatment delivery guidance, and (d) MR-driven strategies for adaptive RT workflows. The content of the session was chosen to address both educational and practical key aspects of MR guidance. Learning Objectives: Good understanding of MR testing recommended for in-room MR imaging as well as image data validation for RT chain (e.g. image transfer, filtering for consistency, spatial accuracy, manipulation for task specific); Familiarity with MR-based planning procedures: motivation, core workflow requirements, current status, challenges; Overview of the current methods for the quantification of organ motion; Discussion on approaches for adaptive treatment planning and delivery. T. Stanescu - License agreement with Modus Medical Devices to develop a phantom for the quantification of MR image system-related distortions.; T. Stanescu, N/A.

  15. WE-H-207B-01: Commissioning and QC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanescu, T. [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    In recent years, steady progress has been made towards the implementation of MRI in external beam radiation therapy for processes ranging from treatment simulation to in-room guidance. Novel procedures relying mostly on MR data are currently implemented in the clinic. This session will cover topics such as (a) commissioning and quality control of the MR in-room imagers and simulators specific to RT, (b) treatment planning requirements, constraints and challenges when dealing with various MR data, (c) quantification of organ motion with an emphasis on treatment delivery guidance, and (d) MR-driven strategies for adaptive RT workflows. The content of the session was chosen to address both educational and practical key aspects of MR guidance. Learning Objectives: Good understanding of MR testing recommended for in-room MR imaging as well as image data validation for RT chain (e.g. image transfer, filtering for consistency, spatial accuracy, manipulation for task specific); Familiarity with MR-based planning procedures: motivation, core workflow requirements, current status, challenges; Overview of the current methods for the quantification of organ motion; Discussion on approaches for adaptive treatment planning and delivery. T. Stanescu - License agreement with Modus Medical Devices to develop a phantom for the quantification of MR image system-related distortions.; T. Stanescu, N/A.

  16. 33 CFR 135.207 - Insurance as evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OFFSHORE OIL POLLUTION COMPENSATION FUND... the Fund Administrator as evidence of financial responsibility shall be issued by an insurer that is acceptable to the Fund Administrator. Those insurers may include domestic and foreign insurance companies...

  17. Dicty_cDB: SSE207 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GFYYINQAGRNARFHLDEFIYNSL YGNNSYEYATNSTLACASNMATYMCSYTFVGTTPPCNALW*xhvqmdllmevklfhlhlf qtvnxkvqvhpdcsainmkglm...LAEEYIVRDVVGGFYYINQAGRNARFHLDEFIYNSL YGNNSYEYATNSTLACASNMATYMCSYTFVGTTPPCNALW*xhvqmdllmevklfhlhlf qtvnxkvqvh

  18. 12 CFR 207.2 - Definition of covered agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the interest rate on the loan or whether the organization intends or is authorized to re-loan the... understanding that meets all of the following criteria— (1) The agreement is in writing. (2) The parties to the... concerning written arrangements or understandings—(1) Example 1. A NGEP meets with an insured depository...

  19. WE-A-207-01: Memorial Lecturer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller-Runkel, R [St. Margaret Mercy Healthcare Centers, Hammond, IN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The Medical Physics community lost one of its early pioneers in radiation oncology physics, Jacques Ovadia, who passed away in April of 2014 at the age of 90. Jacques received his Ph.D. in Nuclear Physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana in 1951. Subsequently, under the guidance of John Laughlin, he was introduced to the field of Medical Physics. When John moved to Memorial Sloan Kettering, Jacques followed him. There he gained clinical experience and expertise in the then cutting-edge field of high energy electron beam therapy. In 1956, Jacques joined Dr. Erich Uhlmann at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago where one of the country’s first high energy medical linear accelerators had just been installed. During his 35 year tenure, Dr. Ovadia built a strong Medical Physics department that merged in 1984 with that of the University of Chicago. Jacques pioneered the use of high energy electron beams to treat deep seated tumors, multiple-field chest wall irradiation with variable electron energies, and even anticipated the current interest in high energy electron beam grid-therapy. At an early stage, he introduced a simulator, computerized treatment planning and in-house developed record and verify software. He retired in 1990 as Professor emeritus in Radiation and Cellular Biology at the University of Chicago. Dr. Ovadia was an early and strong supporter of AAPM. He was present at the Chicago ROMPS meeting where the decision was made to form an independent professional society for medical physics. He served as AAPM president in 1976. Jacques Ovadia is survived by his wife of 58 years, Florence, their daughter Corinne Graefe and son Marc Ovadia, MD, as well as four grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Jacques’ dynamic and ever enthusiastic personality inspired all who collaborated with him. He will be greatly missed.

  20. 10 CFR 26.207 - Waivers and exceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... determination; and (ii) A supervisor assesses the individual face to face and determines that there is... potential for circadian degradations in alertness and performance considering the time of day for which the... controlled; (3) Licensees shall ensure that the timing of the face-to-face supervisory assessment that is...

  1. 40 CFR 180.207 - Trifluralin; tolerances for residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-dipropyl-p-toluidine, in or on the following raw agricultural commodities: Commodity Parts per million... Barley, straw 0.05 Bean, mung, sprouts 2.0 Carrot, roots 1.0 Celery 0.05 Corn, field, forage 0.05 Corn..., group 8 0.05 Vegetable, leaves of root and tuber, group 2 0.05 Vegetable, legume, group 6 0.05 Vegetable...

  2. 38 CFR 3.207 - Void or annulled marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Void or annulled marriage... Void or annulled marriage. Proof that a marriage was void or has been annulled should consist of: (a... marriage void, together with such other evidence as may be required for a determination. (b) Annulled. A...

  3. 33 CFR 207.750 - Puget Sound Area, Wash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... fastened with tight-fitting covers. To preclude a concentration of potentially explosive vapors, no paint... permitted aboard vessels with cargoes of fuel or explosives. (ix) All vessels carrying hazardous cargoes... walls, or over the piers or grounds forming a part of the canal or its appurtenances. All persons in...

  4. All projects related to | Page 207 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Setting the Greater Mekong Subregion - Development Analysis Network's Research Agenda 2012-2014 ... is a collaborative development research network of leading research institutes and ... But where's the evidence to support the theory?

  5. TH-B-207B-00: Pediatric Image Quality Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    This imaging educational program will focus on solutions to common pediatric image quality optimization challenges. The speakers will present collective knowledge on best practices in pediatric imaging from their experience at dedicated children’s hospitals. One of the most commonly encountered pediatric imaging requirements for the non-specialist hospital is pediatric CT in the emergency room setting. Thus, this educational program will begin with optimization of pediatric CT in the emergency department. Though pediatric cardiovascular MRI may be less common in the non-specialist hospitals, low pediatric volumes and unique cardiovascular anatomy make optimization of these techniques difficult. Therefore, our second speaker will review best practices in pediatric cardiovascular MRI based on experiences from a children’s hospital with a large volume of cardiac patients. Learning Objectives: To learn techniques for optimizing radiation dose and image quality for CT of children in the emergency room setting. To learn solutions for consistently high quality cardiovascular MRI of children.

  6. TH-B-207B-02: Optimizing Pediatic Cardiovascular MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, J. [Ann & Robert H. Lurie Childrens Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    This imaging educational program will focus on solutions to common pediatric image quality optimization challenges. The speakers will present collective knowledge on best practices in pediatric imaging from their experience at dedicated children’s hospitals. One of the most commonly encountered pediatric imaging requirements for the non-specialist hospital is pediatric CT in the emergency room setting. Thus, this educational program will begin with optimization of pediatric CT in the emergency department. Though pediatric cardiovascular MRI may be less common in the non-specialist hospitals, low pediatric volumes and unique cardiovascular anatomy make optimization of these techniques difficult. Therefore, our second speaker will review best practices in pediatric cardiovascular MRI based on experiences from a children’s hospital with a large volume of cardiac patients. Learning Objectives: To learn techniques for optimizing radiation dose and image quality for CT of children in the emergency room setting. To learn solutions for consistently high quality cardiovascular MRI of children.

  7. 21 CFR 207.10 - Exemptions for establishments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... regulating dispensing of prescription drugs and that do not manufacture or process drugs for sale other than... drugs at retail. The supplying of prescription drugs by these pharmacies to a practitioner licensed to... laws regulating the practices of pharmacy or medicine and that regularly engage in dispensing...

  8. WE-H-207B-00: MRgRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, steady progress has been made towards the implementation of MRI in external beam radiation therapy for processes ranging from treatment simulation to in-room guidance. Novel procedures relying mostly on MR data are currently implemented in the clinic. This session will cover topics such as (a) commissioning and quality control of the MR in-room imagers and simulators specific to RT, (b) treatment planning requirements, constraints and challenges when dealing with various MR data, (c) quantification of organ motion with an emphasis on treatment delivery guidance, and (d) MR-driven strategies for adaptive RT workflows. The content of the session was chosen to address both educational and practical key aspects of MR guidance. Learning Objectives: Good understanding of MR testing recommended for in-room MR imaging as well as image data validation for RT chain (e.g. image transfer, filtering for consistency, spatial accuracy, manipulation for task specific); Familiarity with MR-based planning procedures: motivation, core workflow requirements, current status, challenges; Overview of the current methods for the quantification of organ motion; Discussion on approaches for adaptive treatment planning and delivery. T. Stanescu - License agreement with Modus Medical Devices to develop a phantom for the quantification of MR image system-related distortions.; T. Stanescu, N/A

  9. WE-H-207B-01: Commissioning and QC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanescu, T.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, steady progress has been made towards the implementation of MRI in external beam radiation therapy for processes ranging from treatment simulation to in-room guidance. Novel procedures relying mostly on MR data are currently implemented in the clinic. This session will cover topics such as (a) commissioning and quality control of the MR in-room imagers and simulators specific to RT, (b) treatment planning requirements, constraints and challenges when dealing with various MR data, (c) quantification of organ motion with an emphasis on treatment delivery guidance, and (d) MR-driven strategies for adaptive RT workflows. The content of the session was chosen to address both educational and practical key aspects of MR guidance. Learning Objectives: Good understanding of MR testing recommended for in-room MR imaging as well as image data validation for RT chain (e.g. image transfer, filtering for consistency, spatial accuracy, manipulation for task specific); Familiarity with MR-based planning procedures: motivation, core workflow requirements, current status, challenges; Overview of the current methods for the quantification of organ motion; Discussion on approaches for adaptive treatment planning and delivery. T. Stanescu - License agreement with Modus Medical Devices to develop a phantom for the quantification of MR image system-related distortions.; T. Stanescu, N/A

  10. WE-H-207B-04: Strategies for Adaptive RT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, O.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, steady progress has been made towards the implementation of MRI in external beam radiation therapy for processes ranging from treatment simulation to in-room guidance. Novel procedures relying mostly on MR data are currently implemented in the clinic. This session will cover topics such as (a) commissioning and quality control of the MR in-room imagers and simulators specific to RT, (b) treatment planning requirements, constraints and challenges when dealing with various MR data, (c) quantification of organ motion with an emphasis on treatment delivery guidance, and (d) MR-driven strategies for adaptive RT workflows. The content of the session was chosen to address both educational and practical key aspects of MR guidance. Learning Objectives: Good understanding of MR testing recommended for in-room MR imaging as well as image data validation for RT chain (e.g. image transfer, filtering for consistency, spatial accuracy, manipulation for task specific); Familiarity with MR-based planning procedures: motivation, core workflow requirements, current status, challenges; Overview of the current methods for the quantification of organ motion; Discussion on approaches for adaptive treatment planning and delivery. T. Stanescu - License agreement with Modus Medical Devices to develop a phantom for the quantification of MR image system-related distortions.; T. Stanescu, N/A

  11. Dicty_cDB: VFA207 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0.005 1 AB022770 |AB022770.1 Human rotavirus mRNA for NSP2, complete cds. 52 0.005 1 X57944 |X57944.1 Human rotavirus...clone RP11-291E21 from 4, complete sequence. 42 0.011 5 Z21640 |Z21640.1 Bovine rotavirus (Strain RF) mRNA f

  12. Evaluation of Cross-Section Data from Threshold to 40 MeV for some Neutron Reactions Important for Fusion Dosimetry Applications. Part 2 Evaluation of the Excitation Functions for the 59Co(n,3n)57Co, 89Y(n,2n)88Y, 93Nb(n,2n)92mNb, 169Tm(n,2n)168Tm and 209Bi(n,3n)207Bi Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolotarev, K.I.

    2010-11-01

    Evaluations of cross sections and their associated covariance matrices have been carried out for five dosimetry reactions: excitation functions were re-evaluated for the 89 Y(n,2n) 88 Y, 93 Nb(n,2n) 92 mNb and 169 Tm(n,2n) 168 Tm reactions over the neutron energy range from threshold up to 40 MeV; excitation functions were re-evaluated for the 59 Co(n,3n) 57 Co and 209 Bi(n,3n) 207 Bi reactions over the neutron energy range from threshold to 85 and 45 MeV, respectively. Uncertainties in the cross sections for all of those reactions were also derived in the form of relative covariance matrices. Benchmark calculations performed for 235 U thermal fission and 252 Cf spontaneous fission neutron spectra show that the integral cross sections calculated from the newly evaluated excitation functions exhibit improved agreement with related experimental data when compared with the equivalent data from the IRDF-2002 library. (author)

  13. : tous les projets | Page 207 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sujet: ENTREPRENEURSHIP, SOCIAL ASPECTS, BUSINESS SERVICES, INNOVATIONS, Capacity building, BUSINESS CREATION ... L'épidémie de tabagisme qui touche le Panama met en évidence l'importance de se doter de mesures fiscales rigoureuses et d'autres mesures de lutte propres à fléchir la demande.

  14. WE-D-207-02: Capturing Data Elements and the Role of Imaging Informatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, W.

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, Lung Cancer is responsible for more cancer deaths than the next four cancers combined. In addition, the 5 year survival rate for lung cancer patients has not improved over the past 40 to 50 years. To combat this deadly disease, in 2002 the National Cancer Institute launched a very large Randomized Control Trial called the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). This trial would randomize subjects who had substantial risk of lung cancer (due to age and smoking history) into either a Chest X-ray arm or a low dose CT arm. In November 2010, the National Cancer Institute announced that the NLST had demonstrated 20% fewer lung cancer deaths among those who were screened with low-dose CT than with chest X-ray. In December 2013, the US Preventive Services Task Force recommended the use of Lung Cancer Screening using low dose CT and a little over a year later (Feb. 2015), CMS announced that Medicare would also cover Lung Cancer Screening using low dose CT. Thus private and public insurers are required to provide Lung Cancer Screening programs using CT to the appropriate population(s). The purpose of this Symposium is to inform medical physicists and prepare them to support the implementation of Lung Screening programs. This Symposium will focus on the clinical aspects of lung cancer screening, requirements of a screening registry for systematically capturing and tracking screening patients and results (such as required Medicare data elements) as well as the role of the medical physicist in screening programs, including the development of low dose CT screening protocols. Learning Objectives: To understand the clinical basis and clinical components of a lung cancer screening program, including eligibility criteria and other requirements. To understand the data collection requirements, workflow, and informatics infrastructure needed to support the tracking and reporting components of a screening program. To understand the role of the medical physicist in implementing Lung Cancer Screening protocols for CT, including utilizing resources such as the AAPM Protocols and the ACR Designated Lung Screening Center program. UCLA Department of Radiology has an Institutional research agreement with Siemens Healthcare; Dr. McNitt-Gray has been a recipient of Research Support from Siemens Healthcare in the past. Dr. Aberle has been a Member of Advisory Boards for the LUNGevity Foundation (2011-present) and Siemens Medical Solutions. (2013)

  15. MO-FG-207-00: Technological Advances in PET/MR Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee

  16. TH-AB-207A-04: Assessment of Patients’ Cumulative Effective Dose From CT Examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; Sepahdari, A; Beckett, K; Oshiro, T; McNitt-Gray, M [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The Joint Commission requires institutions to consider patient’s age and recent imaging exams when deciding on the most appropriate type of imaging exam. Additionally, knowing patient’s imaging history can help prevent duplicate scans. Radiation dose management software affords new opportunities to identify and utilize patients with high cumulative doses as one proxy for subsequent review of imaging history and opportunities in avoiding redundant exams. Methods: Using dose management software (Radimetrics, Bayer Healthcare) a total of 72073 CT examinations performed from Jan 2015 to Jan 2016 were examined to categorize patients with a cumulative effective dose of 100 mSv and above. This threshold was selected based on epidemiological studies on populations exposed to radiation, which demonstrate a statistical increase of cancer risk at doses above 100 mSv. Histories of patients with highest cumulative dose and highest number of exams were further investigated by a Radiologist for appropriateness of recurrent studies and potential opportunities for reduction. Results: Out of 34762 patients, 927 (2.7%) were identified with a cumulative dose of 100 mSv and above. The highest cumulative dose (842 mSv) belonged to an oncology patient who underwent 2 diagnostic exams and 9 interventional ablative CT guided procedures. The patient with highest number of exams (56 counts) and cumulative dose of 170 mSv was a 17 year old trauma patient. An imaging history review of these two patients did not suggest any superfluous scans. Conclusion: Our limited pilot study suggests that recurrent CT exams for patients with oncologic or severe trauma history may be warranted and appropriate. As a result, for future studies we will be focusing on high dose patient cohorts not associated with oncology or severe trauma. Additionally, the review process itself has suggested areas for potential improvement in patient care, including improved documentation and Radiologist involvement in patient management. Dr. McNitt-Gray’s disclosures: Institutional research agreement, Siemens Healthcare; Past recipient, research grant support, Siemens Healthcare; Consultant, Toshiba America Medical Systems; Consultant, Samsung Electronics.

  17. 76 FR 207 - Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Proposed Transit Improvements to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    .... ADDRESSES: Comments will be accepted at the public scoping meetings or they may be sent to Mr. Steve Hands... crucial transit asset into a state of good repair, while reducing travel times, improving access to job...

  18. 7 CFR 330.207 - Permits for movement of organisms issued by other agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... pests, any further conditions of movement to carry out the purposes of the Plant Protection Act which...) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FEDERAL PLANT PEST REGULATIONS...

  19. 21 CFR 207.37 - Inspection of registrations and drug listings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Management Team (HFD-095), Office of Information Technology, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food...) Information that has become a matter of public knowledge. (x) A list of drug products containing a particular... the information will be available for public disclosure if it has become a matter of public knowledge...

  20. WE-H-207A-07: Image-Based Versus Atlas-Based Internal Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallahpoor, M; Abbasi, M [Vali-Asr Hospital, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parach, A [Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kalantari, F [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is known as the gold standard method for internal dosimetry. It requires radionuclide distribution from PET or SPECT and body structure from CT for accurate dose calculation. The manual or semi-automatic segmentation of organs from CT images is a major obstacle. The aim of this study is to compare the dosimetry results based on patient’s own CT and a digital humanoid phantom as an atlas with pre-specified organs. Methods: SPECT-CT images of a 50 year old woman who underwent bone pain palliation with Samarium-153 EDTMP for osseous metastases from breast cancer were used. The anatomical date and attenuation map were extracted from SPECT/CT and three XCAT digital phantoms with different BMIs (i.e. matched (38.8) and unmatched (35.5 and 36.7) with patient’s BMI that was 38.3). Segmentation of patient’s organs in CT image was performed using itk-SNAP software. GATE MC Simulator was used for dose calculation. Specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) and S-values were calculated for the segmented organs. Results: The differences between SAFs and S-values are high using different anatomical data and range from −13% to 39% for SAF values and −109% to 79% for S-values in different organs. In the spine, the clinically important target organ for Samarium Therapy, the differences in the S-values and SAF values are higher between XCAT phantom and CT when the phantom with identical BMI is employed (53.8% relative difference in S-value and 26.8% difference in SAF). However, the whole body dose values were the same between the calculations based on the CT and XCAT with different BMIs. Conclusion: The results indicated that atlas-based dosimetry using XCAT phantom even with matched BMI for patient leads to considerable errors as compared to image-based dosimetry that uses the patient’s own CT Patient-specific dosimetry using CT image is essential for accurate results.

  1. State planning policy 2/07: protection of extractive resources results in certainty of materials supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-09-15

    Extractive resources are primary source materials used for building infrastructure such as roads, ports, airports, bridges, railways, factories, hospitals, schools and homes. The Policy seeks to protect those essential and finite construction materials for future and existing extraction purposes. Population increases in south-east Queensland the upgrading of rail and port facilities to export coal and other minerals will form a major part in the expansion of extractive industry. Over $4 billion has been committed by the Government and industry to coal infrastructure developments such as upgrades at RG Tanna, Barney Point and the proposed Wiggins Island coal terminals at Gladstone, the Dalryample Bay and Hay Point terminals near Mackay and the Abbot Point coal terminal near Bower. The new Bauhinia regional railway will service the Rolleston coal mines.

  2. WE-A-207-02: Electron Beam Therapy - Current Status and Future Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q. [Duke University Medical Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    In memory of the significant contribution of Dr. Jacques Ovadia to electron beam techniques, this session will review recent, advanced techniques which are reinvigorating the science of electron beam radiation therapy. Recent research efforts in improving both the applicability and quality of the electron beam therapy will be discussed, including modulated electron beam radiotherapy (MERT) and dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR). Learning Objectives: To learn about recent advances in electron beam therapy, including modulated electron beam therapy and dynamic electron arc therapy (DEAR). Put recent advances in the context of work that Dr. Ovadia pursued during his career in medical physics.

  3. SU-C-207B-02: Maximal Noise Reduction Filter with Anatomical Structures Preservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maitree, R; Guzman, G; Chundury, A; Roach, M; Yang, D [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: All medical images contain noise, which can result in an undesirable appearance and can reduce the visibility of anatomical details. There are varieties of techniques utilized to reduce noise such as increasing the image acquisition time and using post-processing noise reduction algorithms. However, these techniques are increasing the imaging time and cost or reducing tissue contrast and effective spatial resolution which are useful diagnosis information. The three main focuses in this study are: 1) to develop a novel approach that can adaptively and maximally reduce noise while preserving valuable details of anatomical structures, 2) to evaluate the effectiveness of available noise reduction algorithms in comparison to the proposed algorithm, and 3) to demonstrate that the proposed noise reduction approach can be used clinically. Methods: To achieve a maximal noise reduction without destroying the anatomical details, the proposed approach automatically estimated the local image noise strength levels and detected the anatomical structures, i.e. tissue boundaries. Such information was used to adaptively adjust strength of the noise reduction filter. The proposed algorithm was tested on 34 repeating swine head datasets and 54 patients MRI and CT images. The performance was quantitatively evaluated by image quality metrics and manually validated for clinical usages by two radiation oncologists and one radiologist. Results: Qualitative measurements on repeated swine head images demonstrated that the proposed algorithm efficiently removed noise while preserving the structures and tissues boundaries. In comparisons, the proposed algorithm obtained competitive noise reduction performance and outperformed other filters in preserving anatomical structures. Assessments from the manual validation indicate that the proposed noise reduction algorithm is quite adequate for some clinical usages. Conclusion: According to both clinical evaluation (human expert ranking) and qualitative assessment, the proposed approach has superior noise reduction and anatomical structures preservation capabilities over existing noise removal methods. Senior Author Dr. Deshan Yang received research funding form ViewRay and Varian.

  4. SU-F-207-16: CT Protocols Optimization Using Model Observer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, H; Fan, J; Kupinski, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the performance of different CT protocols using task-based measures of image quality. This work studies the task of size and the contrast estimation of different iodine concentration rods inserted in head- and body-sized phantoms using different imaging protocols. These protocols are designed to have the same dose level (CTDIvol) but using different X-ray tube voltage settings (kVp). Methods: Different concentrations of iodine objects inserted in a head size phantom and a body size phantom are imaged on a 64-slice commercial CT scanner. Scanning protocols with various tube voltages (80, 100, and 120 kVp) and current settings are selected, which output the same absorbed dose level (CTDIvol). Because the phantom design (size of the iodine objects, the air gap between the inserted objects and the phantom) is not ideal for a model observer study, the acquired CT images are used to generate simulation images with four different sizes and five different contracts iodine objects. For each type of the objects, 500 images (100 x 100 pixels) are generated for the observer study. The observer selected in this study is the channelized scanning linear observer which could be applied to estimate the size and the contrast. The figure of merit used is the correct estimation ratio. The mean and the variance are estimated by the shuffle method. Results: The results indicate that the protocols with 100 kVp tube voltage setting provides the best performance for iodine insert size and contrast estimation for both head and body phantom cases. Conclusion: This work presents a practical and robust quantitative approach using channelized scanning linear observer to study contrast and size estimation performance from different CT protocols. Different protocols at same CTDIvol setting could Result in different image quality performance. The relationship between the absorbed dose and the diagnostic image quality is not linear

  5. 48 CFR 852.207-70 - Report of employment under commercial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... contracting officer with the following: (i) A list of employment openings including salaries and benefits, and... of employment; (v) The date of rejection of the offer, if applicable, and the salary and benefits... personnel exercising the right of first refusal, along with their completed job application forms. (2...

  6. TH-B-207B-01: Optimizing Pediatric CT in the Emergency Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodge, C.

    2016-01-01

    This imaging educational program will focus on solutions to common pediatric image quality optimization challenges. The speakers will present collective knowledge on best practices in pediatric imaging from their experience at dedicated children’s hospitals. One of the most commonly encountered pediatric imaging requirements for the non-specialist hospital is pediatric CT in the emergency room setting. Thus, this educational program will begin with optimization of pediatric CT in the emergency department. Though pediatric cardiovascular MRI may be less common in the non-specialist hospitals, low pediatric volumes and unique cardiovascular anatomy make optimization of these techniques difficult. Therefore, our second speaker will review best practices in pediatric cardiovascular MRI based on experiences from a children’s hospital with a large volume of cardiac patients. Learning Objectives: To learn techniques for optimizing radiation dose and image quality for CT of children in the emergency room setting. To learn solutions for consistently high quality cardiovascular MRI of children

  7. TU-AB-207A-03: Image Quality, Dose, and Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, F. [The Cleveland Clinic (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Practicing medical physicists are often time charged with the tasks of evaluating and troubleshooting complex image quality issues related to CT scanners. This course will equip them with a solid and practical understanding of common CT imaging chain and its major components with emphasis on acquisition physics and hardware, reconstruction, artifacts, image quality, dose, and advanced clinical applications. The core objective is to explain the effects of these major system components on the image quality. This course will not focus on the rapid-changing advanced technologies given the two-hour time limit, but the fundamental principles discussed in this course may facilitate better understanding of those more complicated technologies. The course will begin with an overview of CT acquisition physics and geometry. X-ray tube and CT detector are important acquisition hardware critical to the overall image quality. Each of these two subsystems consists of several major components. An in-depth description of the function and failure modes of these components will be provided. Examples of artifacts related to these failure modes will be presented: off-focal radiation, tube arcing, heel effect, oil bubble, offset drift effect, cross-talk effect, and bad pixels. The fundamentals of CT image reconstruction will first be discussed on an intuitive level. Approaches that do not require rigorous derivation of mathematical formulations will be presented. This is followed by a detailed derivation of the Fourier slice theorem: the foundation of the FBP algorithm. FBP for parallel-beam, fan-beam, and cone-beam geometries will be discussed. To address the issue of radiation dose related to x-ray CT, recent advances in iterative reconstruction, their advantages, and clinical applications will also be described. Because of the nature of fundamental physics and mathematics, limitations in data acquisition, and non-ideal conditions of major system components, image artifact often arise in the reconstructed images. Because of the limited scope of this course, only major imaging artifacts, their appearance, and possible mitigation and corrections will be discussed. Assessment of the performance of a CT scanner is a complicated subject. Procedures to measure common image quality metrics such as high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast detectability, and slice profile will be described. The reason why these metrics used for FBP may not be sufficient for statistical iterative reconstruction will be explained. Optimizing radiation dose requires comprehension of CT dose metrics. This course will briefly describe various dose metrics, and interaction with acquisition parameters and patient habitus. CT is among the most frequently used imaging tools due to its superior image quality, easy to operate, and a broad range of applications. This course will present several interesting CT applications such as a mobile CT unit on an ambulance for stroke patients, low dose lung cancer screening, and single heartbeat cardiac CT. Learning Objectives: Understand the function and impact of major components of X-ray tube on the image quality. Understand the function and impact of major components of CT detector on the image quality. Be familiar with the basic procedure of CT image reconstruction. Understand the effect of image reconstruction on CT image quality and artifacts. Understand the root causes of common CT image artifacts. Be familiar with image quality metrics especially high and low contrast resolution, noise power spectrum, slice sensitivity profile, etc. Understand why basic image quality metrics used for FBP may not be sufficient to characterize the performance of advanced iterative reconstruction. Be familiar with various CT dose metrics and their interaction with acquisition parameters. New development in advanced CT clinical applications. JH: Employee of GE Healthcare. FD: No disclosure.; J. Hsieh, Jiang Hsieh is an employee of GE Healthcare.

  8. 12 CFR 303.207 - Restricted activities for critically undercapitalized institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... institution is required to provide notice to the appropriate federal banking agency. Materiality will be... liabilities at a rate that would increase the institution's weighted average cost of funds to a level...

  9. Estudo retrospectivo de 207 casos de tumores mamários em gatas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Togni

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivos determinar os tumores mais prevalentes em gatos e relacionar os tumores mamários a alguns de seus fatores prognósticos. Os arquivos do Laboratório de Patologia Veterinária (LPV da Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM foram revisados e um total de 1.427 protocolos de biopsias e necropsias de felinos, entre 2000 e 2011, foi encontrado. Com base nas informações dos arquivos, foi estabelecida a relação entre os tumores e alguns fatores como sexo, idade, raça, estado reprodutivo, uso de contraceptivos, número e localização das glândulas afetadas, ulcerações, tamanho do neoplasma, metástases distantes e para os linfonodos. Assim, observou-se que os tumores de mama foram o segundo diagnóstico mais prevalente, após os tumores de pele. Todos os gatos com tumores mamários eram fêmeas, sendo os sem raça definida e os idosos os mais afetados. Os neoplasmas malignos foram diagnosticados com maior frequência, seguidos pelos tumores não neoplásicos e pelos neoplasmas benignos. Os tumores menores eram, na sua maioria, carcinomas. Ulcerações estavam presentes não só em neoplasmas malignos, mas também em alterações não neoplásicas. Metástases distantes foram encontradas principalmente nos pulmões e na pele.

  10. New high spin states and isomers in the {sup 208}Pb and {sup 207}Pb nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broda, R.; Wrzesinski, J.; Pawlat, T. [and others

    1996-12-31

    The two most prominent examples of the heavy doubly closed shell (DCS) nuclei, {sup 208}Pb and {sup 132}Sn, are not accessible by conventional heavy-ion fusion processes populating high-spin states. This experimental difficulty obscured for a long time the investigation of yrast high-spin states in both DCS and neighboring nuclei and consequently restricted the study of the shell model in its most attractive regions. Recent technical development of multidetector gamma arrays opened new ways to exploit more complex nuclear processes which populate the nuclei of interest with suitable yields for gamma spectroscopy and involve population of moderately high spin states. This new possibility extended the range of accessible spin values and is a promising way to reach new yrast states. Some of these states are expected to be of high configurational purity and can be a source of important shell model parameters which possibly can be used later to check the validity of the spherical shell model description at yet higher spin and higher excitation energy. The nuclei in the closest vicinity of {sup 132}Sn are produced in spontaneous fission and states with spin values up to I=14 can be reached in fission gamma spectroscopy studies with the presently achieved sensitivity of gamma arrays. New results on yrast states in the {sup 134}Te and {sup 135}I nuclei populated in fission of the {sup 248}Cm presented at this conference illustrate such application of the resolving power offered by modern gamma techniques.

  11. SU-C-207A-04: Accuracy of Acoustic-Based Proton Range Verification in Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, KC; Sehgal, CM; Avery, S; Vander Stappen, F

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the accuracy and dose required for acoustic-based proton range verification (protoacoustics) in water. Methods: Proton pulses with 17 µs FWHM and instantaneous currents of 480 nA (5.6 × 10 7 protons/pulse, 8.9 cGy/pulse) were generated by a clinical, hospital-based cyclotron at the University of Pennsylvania. The protoacoustic signal generated in a water phantom by the 190 MeV proton pulses was measured with a hydrophone placed at multiple known positions surrounding the dose deposition. The background random noise was measured. The protoacoustic signal was simulated to compare to the experiments. Results: The maximum protoacoustic signal amplitude at 5 cm distance was 5.2 mPa per 1 × 10 7 protons (1.6 cGy at the Bragg peak). The background random noise of the measurement was 27 mPa. Comparison between simulation and experiment indicates that the hydrophone introduced a delay of 2.4 µs. For acoustic data collected with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 21, deconvolution of the protoacoustic signal with the proton pulse provided the most precise time-of-flight range measurement (standard deviation of 2.0 mm), but a systematic error (−4.5 mm) was observed. Conclusion: Based on water phantom measurements at a clinical hospital-based cyclotron, protoacoustics is a potential technique for measuring the proton Bragg peak range with 2.0 mm standard deviation. Simultaneous use of multiple detectors is expected to reduce the standard deviation, but calibration is required to remove systematic error. Based on the measured background noise and protoacoustic amplitude, a SNR of 5.3 is projected for a deposited dose of 2 Gy.

  12. WE-AB-207B-01: Dose Tolerance for SBRT/SABR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) / stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is gaining popularity, but quantitative dose tolerance has still been lacking. To improve this, the April 2016 issue of Seminars in Radiation Oncology will have normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for 10 critical structures: optic pathway, cochlea, oral mucosa, esophagus, chestwall, aorta, bronchi, duodenum, small bowel, and spinal cord. Methods: The project included more than 1500 treatments in 1–5 fractions using CyberKnife, Gamma Knife, or LINAC, with 60 authors from 15 institutions. NTCP models were constructed from the 97 grade 2–3 complications, predominantly scored using the common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAEv4). Dose volume histogram (DVH) data from each institutional dataset was loaded into the DVH Evaluator software (DiversiLabs, LLC, Huntingdon Valley, Pa) for modeling. The current state of the literature for the critical structures was depicted using DVH Risk Maps: comparative graphs of dose tolerance limits that can include estimated risk levels, reported complications, DVH data for study patients, as well as high- and low-risk dose tolerance limits. Results: For relatively acceptable toxicity like grade 1–3 rib fractures and chestwall pain, the high-risk limits have 50% risk and the low-risk limits have 5% risk. Emami et al (IJROBP 1991 May 15;21(1):109–22) used 50% and 5% risk levels for all structures, whereas this effort used clinically acceptable ranges for each: in structures like aorta or spinal cord where complications must be avoided, the high- and low-risk limits have about 3% and 1% risk, respectively, in this issue of Seminars. These statistically based guidelines can help ensure plan quality for each patient. Conclusion: NTCP for SBRT is now becoming available. Hypofractionated dose tolerance can be dramatically different than extrapolations of conventional fractionation so NTCP analysis of the SBRT/SBRT data is important to ensure safe clinical practice. Dr. Grimm, designed and holds intellectual property rights to the DVH Evaluator software tool which is an FDA-cleared product in commercial use, and was used to analyze the data.

  13. WE-AB-207B-01: Dose Tolerance for SBRT/SABR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) / stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is gaining popularity, but quantitative dose tolerance has still been lacking. To improve this, the April 2016 issue of Seminars in Radiation Oncology will have normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for 10 critical structures: optic pathway, cochlea, oral mucosa, esophagus, chestwall, aorta, bronchi, duodenum, small bowel, and spinal cord. Methods: The project included more than 1500 treatments in 1–5 fractions using CyberKnife, Gamma Knife, or LINAC, with 60 authors from 15 institutions. NTCP models were constructed from the 97 grade 2–3 complications, predominantly scored using the common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAEv4). Dose volume histogram (DVH) data from each institutional dataset was loaded into the DVH Evaluator software (DiversiLabs, LLC, Huntingdon Valley, Pa) for modeling. The current state of the literature for the critical structures was depicted using DVH Risk Maps: comparative graphs of dose tolerance limits that can include estimated risk levels, reported complications, DVH data for study patients, as well as high- and low-risk dose tolerance limits. Results: For relatively acceptable toxicity like grade 1–3 rib fractures and chestwall pain, the high-risk limits have 50% risk and the low-risk limits have 5% risk. Emami et al (IJROBP 1991 May 15;21(1):109–22) used 50% and 5% risk levels for all structures, whereas this effort used clinically acceptable ranges for each: in structures like aorta or spinal cord where complications must be avoided, the high- and low-risk limits have about 3% and 1% risk, respectively, in this issue of Seminars. These statistically based guidelines can help ensure plan quality for each patient. Conclusion: NTCP for SBRT is now becoming available. Hypofractionated dose tolerance can be dramatically different than extrapolations of conventional fractionation so NTCP analysis of the SBRT/SBRT data is important to ensure safe clinical practice. Dr. Grimm, designed and holds intellectual property rights to the DVH Evaluator software tool which is an FDA-cleared product in commercial use, and was used to analyze the data.

  14. WE-D-207-01: Background and Clinical Implementation of a Screening Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberle, D.

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, Lung Cancer is responsible for more cancer deaths than the next four cancers combined. In addition, the 5 year survival rate for lung cancer patients has not improved over the past 40 to 50 years. To combat this deadly disease, in 2002 the National Cancer Institute launched a very large Randomized Control Trial called the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). This trial would randomize subjects who had substantial risk of lung cancer (due to age and smoking history) into either a Chest X-ray arm or a low dose CT arm. In November 2010, the National Cancer Institute announced that the NLST had demonstrated 20% fewer lung cancer deaths among those who were screened with low-dose CT than with chest X-ray. In December 2013, the US Preventive Services Task Force recommended the use of Lung Cancer Screening using low dose CT and a little over a year later (Feb. 2015), CMS announced that Medicare would also cover Lung Cancer Screening using low dose CT. Thus private and public insurers are required to provide Lung Cancer Screening programs using CT to the appropriate population(s). The purpose of this Symposium is to inform medical physicists and prepare them to support the implementation of Lung Screening programs. This Symposium will focus on the clinical aspects of lung cancer screening, requirements of a screening registry for systematically capturing and tracking screening patients and results (such as required Medicare data elements) as well as the role of the medical physicist in screening programs, including the development of low dose CT screening protocols. Learning Objectives: To understand the clinical basis and clinical components of a lung cancer screening program, including eligibility criteria and other requirements. To understand the data collection requirements, workflow, and informatics infrastructure needed to support the tracking and reporting components of a screening program. To understand the role of the medical physicist in implementing Lung Cancer Screening protocols for CT, including utilizing resources such as the AAPM Protocols and the ACR Designated Lung Screening Center program. UCLA Department of Radiology has an Institutional research agreement with Siemens Healthcare; Dr. McNitt-Gray has been a recipient of Research Support from Siemens Healthcare in the past. Dr. Aberle has been a Member of Advisory Boards for the LUNGevity Foundation (2011-present) and Siemens Medical Solutions. (2013)

  15. 40 CFR 600.207-86 - Calculation of fuel economy values for a model type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... calculation of the original base level fuel economy values), and (iii) All subconfigurations within the new... a new base level. The new base level is identical to the existing base level except that it shall be considered, for the purposes of this paragraph, as containing a new basic engine. The manufacturer will be...

  16. 40 CFR 600.207-93 - Calculation of fuel economy values for a model type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... calculation of the original base level fuel economy values); and (iii) All subconfigurations within the new... a new base level. The new base level is identical to the existing base level except that it shall be considered, for the purposes of this paragraph, as containing a new basic engine. The manufacturer will be...

  17. TU-CD-207-11: Patient-Driven Automatic Exposure Control for Dedicated Breast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, A; Gazi, P; Seibert, J; Boone, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To implement automatic exposure control (AEC) in dedicated breast CT (bCT) on a patient-specific basis using only the pre-scan scout views. Methods: Using a large cohort (N=153) of bCT data sets, the breast effective diameter (D) and width in orthogonal planes (Wa,Wb) were calculated from the reconstructed bCT image and pre-scan scout views, respectively. D, Wa, and Wb were measured at the breast center-of-mass (COM), making use of the known geometry of our bCT system. These data were then fit to a second-order polynomial “D=F(Wa,Wb)” in a least squares sense in order to provide a functional form for determining the breast diameter. The coefficient of determination (R 2 ) and mean percent error between the measured breast diameter and fit breast diameter were used to evaluate the overall robustness of the polynomial fit. Lastly, previously-reported bCT technique factors derived from Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the tube current required for each breast diameter in order to match two-view mammographic dose levels. Results: F(Wa,Wb) provided fitted breast diameters in agreement with the measured breast diameters resulting in R 2 values ranging from 0.908 to 0.929 and mean percent errors ranging from 3.2% to 3.7%. For all 153 bCT data sets used in this study, the fitted breast diameters ranged from 7.9 cm to 15.7 cm corresponding to tube current values ranging from 0.6 mA to 4.9 mA in order to deliver the same dose as two-view mammography in a 50% glandular breast with a 80 kV x-ray beam and 16.6 second scan time. Conclusion: The present work provides a robust framework for AEC in dedicated bCT using only the width measurements derived from the two orthogonal pre-scan scout views. Future work will investigate how these automatically chosen exposure levels affect the quality of the reconstructed image

  18. WE-H-207A-09: Theoretical Limits to Molecular Biomarker Detection Using Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, J [Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (United States); Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Estimate the limits of molecular biomarker detection using magnetic nanoparticle methods like in vivo ELISA. Methods: Magnetic nanoparticles in an alternating magnetic field produce a magnetization that can be detected at exceedingly low levels because the signal at the harmonic frequencies is uniquely produced by the nanoparticles. Because the magnetization can also be used to characterize the nanoparticle rotational freedom, the bound state can be found. If the nanoparticles are coated with molecules that bind the desired biomarker, the rotational freedom reflects the biomarker concentration. The irreducible noise limit is the thermal noise or Johnson noise of the tissue and the contrast that can be measured must be larger than that limit. The contrast produced is a function of the applied field and depends strongly on nanoparticle volume. We have estimated the contrast using a Langevin function of a single composite variable to approximate the full stochastic Langevin equation for nanoparticle dynamics. Results: The thermal noise for a bandwidth reasonable for spectroscopy suggests mid zeptomolar (10–21) to low attomolar (10–18) concentrations can be measured in a volume that is 10cm in scale. The suggested sensitivity is far below the physiologically concentrations of almost all critical biomarkers including cytokines (picomolar), hormones (nanomolar) and heat shock proteins. Conclusion: The sensitivity of in vivo ELISA concentration measurements should be sufficient to measure physiological concentrations of critical biomarkers like cytokines in vivo. Further the sensitivity should be sufficient to measure concentrations of other biomarkers that are six to eight orders of magnitude lower in concentration than immune signaling molecules like cytokines. NIH - 1U54CA151662-01 Department of Radiology.

  19. WE-B-207-00: CT Lung Cancer Screening Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The US National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) was a multi-center randomized, controlled trial comparing a low-dose CT (LDCT) to posterior-anterior (PA) chest x-ray (CXR) in screening older, current and former heavy smokers for early detection of lung cancer. Recruitment was launched in September 2002 and ended in April 2004 when 53,454 participants had been randomized at 33 screening sites in equal proportions. Funded by the National Cancer Institute this trial demonstrated that LDCT screening reduced lung cancer mortality. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) cited NLST findings and conclusions in its deliberations and analysis of lung cancer screening. Under the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the USPSTF favorable recommendation regarding lung cancer CT screening assisted in obtaining third-party payers coverage for screening. The objective of this session is to provide an introduction to the NLST and the trial findings, in addition to a comprehensive review of the dosimetry investigations and assessments completed using individual NLST participant CT and CXR examinations. Session presentations will review and discuss the findings of two independent assessments, a CXR assessment and the findings of a CT investigation calculating individual organ dosimetry values. The CXR assessment reviewed a total of 73,733 chest x-ray exams that were performed on 92 chest imaging systems of which 66,157 participant examinations were used. The CT organ dosimetry investigation collected scan parameters from 23,773 CT examinations; a subset of the 75,133 CT examinations performed using 97 multi-detector CT scanners. Organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated using a Monte Carlo code. An experimentally-validated CT scanner simulation was coupled with 193 adult hybrid computational phantoms representing the height and weight of the current U.S. population. The dose to selected organs was calculated using the organ dose library and the abstracted scan parameters. This session will review the results and summarize the individualized doses to major organs and the mean effective dose and CTDIvol estimate for 66,157 PA chest and 23,773 CT examinations respectively, using size-dependent computational phantoms coupled with Monte Carlo calculations. Learning Objectives: Review and summarize relevant NLST findings and conclusions. Understand the scope and scale of the NLST specific to participant dosimetry. Provide a comprehensive review of NLST participant dosimetry assessments. Summarize the results of an investigation providing individualized organ dose estimates for NLST participant cohorts

  20. MO-DE-207-04: Imaging educational program on solutions to common pediatric imaging challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, R.

    2015-01-01

    This imaging educational program will focus on solutions to common pediatric imaging challenges. The speakers will present collective knowledge on best practices in pediatric imaging from their experience at dedicated children’s hospitals. The educational program will begin with a detailed discussion of the optimal configuration of fluoroscopes for general pediatric procedures. Following this introduction will be a focused discussion on the utility of Dual Energy CT for imaging children. The third lecture will address the substantial challenge of obtaining consistent image post -processing in pediatric digital radiography. The fourth and final lecture will address best practices in pediatric MRI including a discussion of ancillary methods to reduce sedation and anesthesia rates. Learning Objectives: To learn techniques for optimizing radiation dose and image quality in pediatric fluoroscopy To become familiar with the unique challenges and applications of Dual Energy CT in pediatric imaging To learn solutions for consistent post-processing quality in pediatric digital radiography To understand the key components of an effective MRI safety and quality program for the pediatric practice

  1. TU-EF-207-05: Dedicated Cone-beam Breast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedantham, S. [Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Breast imaging technology is advancing on several fronts. In digital mammography, the major technological trend has been on optimization of approaches for performing combined mammography and tomosynthesis using the same system. In parallel, photon-counting slot-scan mammography is now in clinical use and more efforts are directed towards further development of this approach for spectral imaging. Spectral imaging refers to simultaneous acquisition of two or more energy-windowed images. Depending on the detector and associated electronics, there are a number of ways this can be accomplished. Spectral mammography using photon-counting detectors can suppress electronic noise and importantly, it enables decomposition of the image into various material compositions of interest facilitating quantitative imaging. Spectral imaging can be particularly important in intravenously injected contrast mammography and eventually tomosynthesis. The various approaches and applications of spectral mammography are discussed. Digital breast tomosynthesis relies on the mechanical movement of the x-ray tube to acquire a number of projections in a predefined arc, typically from 9 to 25 projections over a scan angle of +/−7.5 to 25 degrees depending on the particular system. The mechanical x-ray tube motion requires relatively long acquisition time, typically between 3.7 to 25 seconds depending on the system. Moreover, mechanical scanning may have an effect on the spatial resolution due to internal x-ray filament or external mechanical vibrations. New x-ray source arrays have been developed and they are aimed at replacing the scanned x-ray tube for improved acquisition time and potentially for higher spatial resolution. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis in a single system places increased demands on certain functional aspects of the detector and overall performance, particularly in the tomosynthesis mode due to lower photon fluence per projection. This may require fast-frame acquisition and symmetric or asymmetric pixel binning in some systems. Recent studies investigated the performance of increased conversion layer thickness for contrast-enhanced imaging of the breast in dual-energy acquisition mode. In other direct conversion detectors operating in the avalanche mode, sensitivities close to the single photon response are also explored for mammography and breast tomosynthesis. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Dedicated breast CT brings x-ray imaging of the breast to true tomographic 3D imaging. It can eliminate the tissue superposition problem and does not require physical compression of the breast. Using cone beam geometry and a flat-panel detector, several hundred projections are acquired and reconstructed to near isotropic voxels. Multiplanar reconstruction facilitates viewing the breast volume in any desired orientation. Ongoing clinical studies, the current state-of-the art, and research to advance the technology are described. Learning Objectives: To understand the ongoing developments in x-ray imaging of the breast To understand the approaches and applications of spectral mammography To understand the potential advantages of distributed x-ray source arrays for digital breast tomosynthesis To understand the ongoing developments in detector technology for digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis To understand the current state-of-the-art for dedicated cone-beam breast CT and research to advance the technology. Research collaboration with Koning Corporation.

  2. 19 CFR 207.93 - Protection of proprietary information during panel and committee proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Government of Mexico who the Canadian Minister of Trade or the Mexican Secretary of Economia, as the case may... Economia, as the case may be, has notified the Commission Secretary that such person requires access. (4...

  3. Bataan nuclear power plant unit no. 1. Progress report no. 207

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This report presents the accomplishment of the National Power Corporation (NPC) for the month of August 1994. The highlights of the report were the following: a) issuance of preservation task orders; b) total expenses for the preservation and maintenance of the plant; c) completion of underwater structures and fabrication of the stop logs; d) repaired of two dry type transformers; e) inventory of excess construction materials; and f) investigations of vehicular accident. Also in this period, delegates from different institutions and organizations and schools were given briefings and tour of the plant facilities as part of public information campaign. ills

  4. Hyperspectral Imagery for the Main Eight Hawaiian Islands:Oahu (207a-0613-272217)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project is a cooperative effort among the National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment; the...

  5. TU-AB-207-02: Testing of Body and Breast Tomosynthesis Sytems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A.

    2015-01-01

    Digital Tomosynthesis (DT) is becoming increasingly common in breast imaging and many other applications. DT is a form of computed tomography in which a limited set of projection images are acquired over a small angular range and reconstructed into a tomographic data set. The angular range and number of projections is determined both by the imaging task and equipment manufacturer. For example, in breast imaging between 9 and 25 projections are acquired over a range of 15° to 60°. It is equally valid to treat DT as the digital analog of classical tomography - for example, linear tomography. In fact, the name “tomosynthesis” is an acronym for “synthetic tomography”. DT shares many common features with classical tomography, including the radiographic appearance, dose, and image quality considerations. As such, both the science and practical physics of DT systems is a hybrid between CT and classical tomographic methods. This lecture will consist of three presentations that will provide a complete overview of DT, including a review of the fundamentals of DT, a discussion of testing methods for DT systems, and a description of the clinical applications of DT. While digital breast tomosynthesis will be emphasized, analogies will be drawn to body imaging to illustrate and compare tomosynthesis methods. Learning Objectives: To understand the fundamental principles behind tomosynthesis, including the determinants of image quality and dose. To learn how to test the performance of tomosynthesis imaging systems. To appreciate the uses of tomosynthesis in the clinic and the future applications of tomosynthesis

  6. MO-AB-207-00: ACR Update in MR, CT, Nuclear Medicine, and Mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    A goal of an imaging accreditation program is to ensure adequate image quality, verify appropriate staff qualifications, and to assure patient and personnel safety. Currently, more than 35,000 facilities in 10 modalities have been accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), making the ACR program one of the most prolific accreditation options in the U.S. In addition, ACR is one of the accepted accreditations required by some state laws, CMS/MIPPA insurance and others. Familiarity with the ACR accreditation process is therefore essential to clinical diagnostic medical physicists. Maintaining sufficient knowledge of the ACR program must include keeping up-to-date as the various modality requirements are refined to better serve the goals of the program and to accommodate newer technologies and practices. This session consists of presentations from authorities in four ACR accreditation modality programs, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, and mammography. Each speaker will discuss the general components of the modality program and address any recent changes to the requirements. Learning Objectives: To understand the requirements of the ACR MR Accreditation program. The discussion will include accreditation of whole-body general purpose magnets, dedicated extremity systems well as breast MRI accreditation. Anticipated updates to the ACR MRI Quality Control Manual will also be reviewed. To understand the requirements of the ACR CT accreditation program, including updates to the QC manual as well as updates through the FAQ process. To understand the requirements of the ACR nuclear medicine accreditation program, and the role of the physicist in annual equipment surveys and the set up and supervision of the routine QC program. To understand the current ACR MAP Accreditation requirement and present the concepts and structure of the forthcoming ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual and Program.

  7. TU-EF-207-02: Spectral Mammography Based on Photon Counting Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molloi, S. [University of California (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Breast imaging technology is advancing on several fronts. In digital mammography, the major technological trend has been on optimization of approaches for performing combined mammography and tomosynthesis using the same system. In parallel, photon-counting slot-scan mammography is now in clinical use and more efforts are directed towards further development of this approach for spectral imaging. Spectral imaging refers to simultaneous acquisition of two or more energy-windowed images. Depending on the detector and associated electronics, there are a number of ways this can be accomplished. Spectral mammography using photon-counting detectors can suppress electronic noise and importantly, it enables decomposition of the image into various material compositions of interest facilitating quantitative imaging. Spectral imaging can be particularly important in intravenously injected contrast mammography and eventually tomosynthesis. The various approaches and applications of spectral mammography are discussed. Digital breast tomosynthesis relies on the mechanical movement of the x-ray tube to acquire a number of projections in a predefined arc, typically from 9 to 25 projections over a scan angle of +/−7.5 to 25 degrees depending on the particular system. The mechanical x-ray tube motion requires relatively long acquisition time, typically between 3.7 to 25 seconds depending on the system. Moreover, mechanical scanning may have an effect on the spatial resolution due to internal x-ray filament or external mechanical vibrations. New x-ray source arrays have been developed and they are aimed at replacing the scanned x-ray tube for improved acquisition time and potentially for higher spatial resolution. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis in a single system places increased demands on certain functional aspects of the detector and overall performance, particularly in the tomosynthesis mode due to lower photon fluence per projection. This may require fast-frame acquisition and symmetric or asymmetric pixel binning in some systems. Recent studies investigated the performance of increased conversion layer thickness for contrast-enhanced imaging of the breast in dual-energy acquisition mode. In other direct conversion detectors operating in the avalanche mode, sensitivities close to the single photon response are also explored for mammography and breast tomosynthesis. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Dedicated breast CT brings x-ray imaging of the breast to true tomographic 3D imaging. It can eliminate the tissue superposition problem and does not require physical compression of the breast. Using cone beam geometry and a flat-panel detector, several hundred projections are acquired and reconstructed to near isotropic voxels. Multiplanar reconstruction facilitates viewing the breast volume in any desired orientation. Ongoing clinical studies, the current state-of-the art, and research to advance the technology are described. Learning Objectives: To understand the ongoing developments in x-ray imaging of the breast To understand the approaches and applications of spectral mammography To understand the potential advantages of distributed x-ray source arrays for digital breast tomosynthesis To understand the ongoing developments in detector technology for digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis To understand the current state-of-the-art for dedicated cone-beam breast CT and research to advance the technology. Research collaboration with Koning Corporation.

  8. TU-EF-207-04: Advances in Detector Technology for Breast Tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, W. [SUNY Stony Brook (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Breast imaging technology is advancing on several fronts. In digital mammography, the major technological trend has been on optimization of approaches for performing combined mammography and tomosynthesis using the same system. In parallel, photon-counting slot-scan mammography is now in clinical use and more efforts are directed towards further development of this approach for spectral imaging. Spectral imaging refers to simultaneous acquisition of two or more energy-windowed images. Depending on the detector and associated electronics, there are a number of ways this can be accomplished. Spectral mammography using photon-counting detectors can suppress electronic noise and importantly, it enables decomposition of the image into various material compositions of interest facilitating quantitative imaging. Spectral imaging can be particularly important in intravenously injected contrast mammography and eventually tomosynthesis. The various approaches and applications of spectral mammography are discussed. Digital breast tomosynthesis relies on the mechanical movement of the x-ray tube to acquire a number of projections in a predefined arc, typically from 9 to 25 projections over a scan angle of +/−7.5 to 25 degrees depending on the particular system. The mechanical x-ray tube motion requires relatively long acquisition time, typically between 3.7 to 25 seconds depending on the system. Moreover, mechanical scanning may have an effect on the spatial resolution due to internal x-ray filament or external mechanical vibrations. New x-ray source arrays have been developed and they are aimed at replacing the scanned x-ray tube for improved acquisition time and potentially for higher spatial resolution. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis in a single system places increased demands on certain functional aspects of the detector and overall performance, particularly in the tomosynthesis mode due to lower photon fluence per projection. This may require fast-frame acquisition and symmetric or asymmetric pixel binning in some systems. Recent studies investigated the performance of increased conversion layer thickness for contrast-enhanced imaging of the breast in dual-energy acquisition mode. In other direct conversion detectors operating in the avalanche mode, sensitivities close to the single photon response are also explored for mammography and breast tomosynthesis. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Dedicated breast CT brings x-ray imaging of the breast to true tomographic 3D imaging. It can eliminate the tissue superposition problem and does not require physical compression of the breast. Using cone beam geometry and a flat-panel detector, several hundred projections are acquired and reconstructed to near isotropic voxels. Multiplanar reconstruction facilitates viewing the breast volume in any desired orientation. Ongoing clinical studies, the current state-of-the art, and research to advance the technology are described. Learning Objectives: To understand the ongoing developments in x-ray imaging of the breast To understand the approaches and applications of spectral mammography To understand the potential advantages of distributed x-ray source arrays for digital breast tomosynthesis To understand the ongoing developments in detector technology for digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis To understand the current state-of-the-art for dedicated cone-beam breast CT and research to advance the technology. Research collaboration with Koning Corporation.

  9. MO-AB-207-03: ACR Update in Nuclear Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkness, B. [Henry Ford Hospital System (United States)

    2015-06-15

    A goal of an imaging accreditation program is to ensure adequate image quality, verify appropriate staff qualifications, and to assure patient and personnel safety. Currently, more than 35,000 facilities in 10 modalities have been accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), making the ACR program one of the most prolific accreditation options in the U.S. In addition, ACR is one of the accepted accreditations required by some state laws, CMS/MIPPA insurance and others. Familiarity with the ACR accreditation process is therefore essential to clinical diagnostic medical physicists. Maintaining sufficient knowledge of the ACR program must include keeping up-to-date as the various modality requirements are refined to better serve the goals of the program and to accommodate newer technologies and practices. This session consists of presentations from authorities in four ACR accreditation modality programs, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, and mammography. Each speaker will discuss the general components of the modality program and address any recent changes to the requirements. Learning Objectives: To understand the requirements of the ACR MR Accreditation program. The discussion will include accreditation of whole-body general purpose magnets, dedicated extremity systems well as breast MRI accreditation. Anticipated updates to the ACR MRI Quality Control Manual will also be reviewed. To understand the requirements of the ACR CT accreditation program, including updates to the QC manual as well as updates through the FAQ process. To understand the requirements of the ACR nuclear medicine accreditation program, and the role of the physicist in annual equipment surveys and the set up and supervision of the routine QC program. To understand the current ACR MAP Accreditation requirement and present the concepts and structure of the forthcoming ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual and Program.

  10. TU-EF-207-01: Introductory Remarks on Recent Advances in Breast Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karellas, A. [University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Breast imaging technology is advancing on several fronts. In digital mammography, the major technological trend has been on optimization of approaches for performing combined mammography and tomosynthesis using the same system. In parallel, photon-counting slot-scan mammography is now in clinical use and more efforts are directed towards further development of this approach for spectral imaging. Spectral imaging refers to simultaneous acquisition of two or more energy-windowed images. Depending on the detector and associated electronics, there are a number of ways this can be accomplished. Spectral mammography using photon-counting detectors can suppress electronic noise and importantly, it enables decomposition of the image into various material compositions of interest facilitating quantitative imaging. Spectral imaging can be particularly important in intravenously injected contrast mammography and eventually tomosynthesis. The various approaches and applications of spectral mammography are discussed. Digital breast tomosynthesis relies on the mechanical movement of the x-ray tube to acquire a number of projections in a predefined arc, typically from 9 to 25 projections over a scan angle of +/−7.5 to 25 degrees depending on the particular system. The mechanical x-ray tube motion requires relatively long acquisition time, typically between 3.7 to 25 seconds depending on the system. Moreover, mechanical scanning may have an effect on the spatial resolution due to internal x-ray filament or external mechanical vibrations. New x-ray source arrays have been developed and they are aimed at replacing the scanned x-ray tube for improved acquisition time and potentially for higher spatial resolution. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis in a single system places increased demands on certain functional aspects of the detector and overall performance, particularly in the tomosynthesis mode due to lower photon fluence per projection. This may require fast-frame acquisition and symmetric or asymmetric pixel binning in some systems. Recent studies investigated the performance of increased conversion layer thickness for contrast-enhanced imaging of the breast in dual-energy acquisition mode. In other direct conversion detectors operating in the avalanche mode, sensitivities close to the single photon response are also explored for mammography and breast tomosynthesis. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Dedicated breast CT brings x-ray imaging of the breast to true tomographic 3D imaging. It can eliminate the tissue superposition problem and does not require physical compression of the breast. Using cone beam geometry and a flat-panel detector, several hundred projections are acquired and reconstructed to near isotropic voxels. Multiplanar reconstruction facilitates viewing the breast volume in any desired orientation. Ongoing clinical studies, the current state-of-the art, and research to advance the technology are described. Learning Objectives: To understand the ongoing developments in x-ray imaging of the breast To understand the approaches and applications of spectral mammography To understand the potential advantages of distributed x-ray source arrays for digital breast tomosynthesis To understand the ongoing developments in detector technology for digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis To understand the current state-of-the-art for dedicated cone-beam breast CT and research to advance the technology. Research collaboration with Koning Corporation.

  11. TU-AB-207-02: Testing of Body and Breast Tomosynthesis Sytems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A. [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Digital Tomosynthesis (DT) is becoming increasingly common in breast imaging and many other applications. DT is a form of computed tomography in which a limited set of projection images are acquired over a small angular range and reconstructed into a tomographic data set. The angular range and number of projections is determined both by the imaging task and equipment manufacturer. For example, in breast imaging between 9 and 25 projections are acquired over a range of 15° to 60°. It is equally valid to treat DT as the digital analog of classical tomography - for example, linear tomography. In fact, the name “tomosynthesis” is an acronym for “synthetic tomography”. DT shares many common features with classical tomography, including the radiographic appearance, dose, and image quality considerations. As such, both the science and practical physics of DT systems is a hybrid between CT and classical tomographic methods. This lecture will consist of three presentations that will provide a complete overview of DT, including a review of the fundamentals of DT, a discussion of testing methods for DT systems, and a description of the clinical applications of DT. While digital breast tomosynthesis will be emphasized, analogies will be drawn to body imaging to illustrate and compare tomosynthesis methods. Learning Objectives: To understand the fundamental principles behind tomosynthesis, including the determinants of image quality and dose. To learn how to test the performance of tomosynthesis imaging systems. To appreciate the uses of tomosynthesis in the clinic and the future applications of tomosynthesis.

  12. Creative Accounting Model for Increasing Banking Industries’ Competitive Advantage in Indonesia (P.197-207

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriyati Supriyati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bank Indonesia demands that the national banks should improve their transparency of financial condition and performance for public in line with the development of their products and activities. Furthermore, the banks’ financial statements of Bank Indonesia have become the basis for determining the status of their soundness. In fact, they tend to practice earnings management in order that they can meet the criteria required by Bank Indonesia. For internal purposes, the initiative of earning management has a positive impact on the performance of management. However, for the users of financial statements, it may differ, for example for the value of company, length of time the financial audit, and other aspects of tax evasion by the banks. This study tries to find out 1 the effect of GCG on Earnings Management, 2 the effect of earning management on Company value, the Audit Report Lag, and Taxation, and 3 the effect of Audit Report Lag on Corporate Value and Taxation. This is a quantitative research with the data collected from the bank financial statements, GCG implementation report, and the banks’ annual reports of 2003-2013. There were 41 banks taken using purposive sampling, as listed on the Indonesia Stock Exchange. The results showed that the implementation of GCG affects the occurrence of earning management. Accounting policy flexibility through earning management is expected to affect the length of the audit process and the accuracy of the financial statements presentation on public side. This research is expected to provide managerial implications in order to consider the possibility of earnings management practices in the banking industry. In the long term, earning management is expected to improve the banks’ competitiveness through an increase in the value of the company. Explicitly, earning management also affects the tax avoidance; therefore, the banks intend to pay lower taxes without breaking the existing legislation Taxation Provisions.Keywords: Good Corporate Governance (GCG, earning management, Audit Report lag, Company value, and tax avoidance

  13. 27 CFR 70.207 - Civil actions by persons other than taxpayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... senior lien upon the taxpayer's property under certain circumstances although legal rights to enforce the..., or a lien on, such property which is senior to the interest of the United States; and (ii) That such... claim that the person: (i) Has an interest in or lien on such property junior to that of the United...

  14. 78 FR 40194 - Proposed Information Collection Request of the ETA 207, Nonmonetary Determination Activities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... requested data can be provided in the desired format, reporting burden (time and financial resources) is... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Proposed Information Collection Request... opportunity to comment on proposed and/or continuing collection of information in accordance with the...

  15. 25 CFR 166.207 - What provisions will be contained in a permit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Payment method; (j) Range unit number or name; (k) Animal identification requirements; (l) A description... making improvements, if any; (o) A right of entry by the BIA for purposes of inspection or enforcement...

  16. MO-AB-207-00: ACR Update in MR, CT, Nuclear Medicine, and Mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    A goal of an imaging accreditation program is to ensure adequate image quality, verify appropriate staff qualifications, and to assure patient and personnel safety. Currently, more than 35,000 facilities in 10 modalities have been accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), making the ACR program one of the most prolific accreditation options in the U.S. In addition, ACR is one of the accepted accreditations required by some state laws, CMS/MIPPA insurance and others. Familiarity with the ACR accreditation process is therefore essential to clinical diagnostic medical physicists. Maintaining sufficient knowledge of the ACR program must include keeping up-to-date as the various modality requirements are refined to better serve the goals of the program and to accommodate newer technologies and practices. This session consists of presentations from authorities in four ACR accreditation modality programs, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, and mammography. Each speaker will discuss the general components of the modality program and address any recent changes to the requirements. Learning Objectives: To understand the requirements of the ACR MR Accreditation program. The discussion will include accreditation of whole-body general purpose magnets, dedicated extremity systems well as breast MRI accreditation. Anticipated updates to the ACR MRI Quality Control Manual will also be reviewed. To understand the requirements of the ACR CT accreditation program, including updates to the QC manual as well as updates through the FAQ process. To understand the requirements of the ACR nuclear medicine accreditation program, and the role of the physicist in annual equipment surveys and the set up and supervision of the routine QC program. To understand the current ACR MAP Accreditation requirement and present the concepts and structure of the forthcoming ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual and Program

  17. MO-AB-207-03: ACR Update in Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, B.

    2015-01-01

    A goal of an imaging accreditation program is to ensure adequate image quality, verify appropriate staff qualifications, and to assure patient and personnel safety. Currently, more than 35,000 facilities in 10 modalities have been accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), making the ACR program one of the most prolific accreditation options in the U.S. In addition, ACR is one of the accepted accreditations required by some state laws, CMS/MIPPA insurance and others. Familiarity with the ACR accreditation process is therefore essential to clinical diagnostic medical physicists. Maintaining sufficient knowledge of the ACR program must include keeping up-to-date as the various modality requirements are refined to better serve the goals of the program and to accommodate newer technologies and practices. This session consists of presentations from authorities in four ACR accreditation modality programs, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, and mammography. Each speaker will discuss the general components of the modality program and address any recent changes to the requirements. Learning Objectives: To understand the requirements of the ACR MR Accreditation program. The discussion will include accreditation of whole-body general purpose magnets, dedicated extremity systems well as breast MRI accreditation. Anticipated updates to the ACR MRI Quality Control Manual will also be reviewed. To understand the requirements of the ACR CT accreditation program, including updates to the QC manual as well as updates through the FAQ process. To understand the requirements of the ACR nuclear medicine accreditation program, and the role of the physicist in annual equipment surveys and the set up and supervision of the routine QC program. To understand the current ACR MAP Accreditation requirement and present the concepts and structure of the forthcoming ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual and Program

  18. TU-EF-207-05: Dedicated Cone-beam Breast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedantham, S.

    2015-01-01

    Breast imaging technology is advancing on several fronts. In digital mammography, the major technological trend has been on optimization of approaches for performing combined mammography and tomosynthesis using the same system. In parallel, photon-counting slot-scan mammography is now in clinical use and more efforts are directed towards further development of this approach for spectral imaging. Spectral imaging refers to simultaneous acquisition of two or more energy-windowed images. Depending on the detector and associated electronics, there are a number of ways this can be accomplished. Spectral mammography using photon-counting detectors can suppress electronic noise and importantly, it enables decomposition of the image into various material compositions of interest facilitating quantitative imaging. Spectral imaging can be particularly important in intravenously injected contrast mammography and eventually tomosynthesis. The various approaches and applications of spectral mammography are discussed. Digital breast tomosynthesis relies on the mechanical movement of the x-ray tube to acquire a number of projections in a predefined arc, typically from 9 to 25 projections over a scan angle of +/−7.5 to 25 degrees depending on the particular system. The mechanical x-ray tube motion requires relatively long acquisition time, typically between 3.7 to 25 seconds depending on the system. Moreover, mechanical scanning may have an effect on the spatial resolution due to internal x-ray filament or external mechanical vibrations. New x-ray source arrays have been developed and they are aimed at replacing the scanned x-ray tube for improved acquisition time and potentially for higher spatial resolution. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis in a single system places increased demands on certain functional aspects of the detector and overall performance, particularly in the tomosynthesis mode due to lower photon fluence per projection. This may require fast-frame acquisition and symmetric or asymmetric pixel binning in some systems. Recent studies investigated the performance of increased conversion layer thickness for contrast-enhanced imaging of the breast in dual-energy acquisition mode. In other direct conversion detectors operating in the avalanche mode, sensitivities close to the single photon response are also explored for mammography and breast tomosynthesis. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Dedicated breast CT brings x-ray imaging of the breast to true tomographic 3D imaging. It can eliminate the tissue superposition problem and does not require physical compression of the breast. Using cone beam geometry and a flat-panel detector, several hundred projections are acquired and reconstructed to near isotropic voxels. Multiplanar reconstruction facilitates viewing the breast volume in any desired orientation. Ongoing clinical studies, the current state-of-the art, and research to advance the technology are described. Learning Objectives: To understand the ongoing developments in x-ray imaging of the breast To understand the approaches and applications of spectral mammography To understand the potential advantages of distributed x-ray source arrays for digital breast tomosynthesis To understand the ongoing developments in detector technology for digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis To understand the current state-of-the-art for dedicated cone-beam breast CT and research to advance the technology. Research collaboration with Koning Corporation

  19. 40 CFR 211.207 - Computation of the noise -reduction rating (NRR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Computation of the noise -reduction... of the noise -reduction rating (NRR). Calculate the NRR for hearing protective devices by... “A”-weighting relative response corrections applied to any sound levels at the indicated octave band...

  20. Sud du Sahara | Page 207 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Read more about Variabilité du climat et conditions d'accès aux ressources en eau et de leur utilisation dans les quartiers informels de Ouagadougou, au Burkina Faso. Langue French. Read more about Crise du virus Ebola : Améliorer la communication scientifique et le journalisme local en période d'urgence et après une ...

  1. TU-EF-207-02: Spectral Mammography Based on Photon Counting Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molloi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Breast imaging technology is advancing on several fronts. In digital mammography, the major technological trend has been on optimization of approaches for performing combined mammography and tomosynthesis using the same system. In parallel, photon-counting slot-scan mammography is now in clinical use and more efforts are directed towards further development of this approach for spectral imaging. Spectral imaging refers to simultaneous acquisition of two or more energy-windowed images. Depending on the detector and associated electronics, there are a number of ways this can be accomplished. Spectral mammography using photon-counting detectors can suppress electronic noise and importantly, it enables decomposition of the image into various material compositions of interest facilitating quantitative imaging. Spectral imaging can be particularly important in intravenously injected contrast mammography and eventually tomosynthesis. The various approaches and applications of spectral mammography are discussed. Digital breast tomosynthesis relies on the mechanical movement of the x-ray tube to acquire a number of projections in a predefined arc, typically from 9 to 25 projections over a scan angle of +/−7.5 to 25 degrees depending on the particular system. The mechanical x-ray tube motion requires relatively long acquisition time, typically between 3.7 to 25 seconds depending on the system. Moreover, mechanical scanning may have an effect on the spatial resolution due to internal x-ray filament or external mechanical vibrations. New x-ray source arrays have been developed and they are aimed at replacing the scanned x-ray tube for improved acquisition time and potentially for higher spatial resolution. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis in a single system places increased demands on certain functional aspects of the detector and overall performance, particularly in the tomosynthesis mode due to lower photon fluence per projection. This may require fast-frame acquisition and symmetric or asymmetric pixel binning in some systems. Recent studies investigated the performance of increased conversion layer thickness for contrast-enhanced imaging of the breast in dual-energy acquisition mode. In other direct conversion detectors operating in the avalanche mode, sensitivities close to the single photon response are also explored for mammography and breast tomosynthesis. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Dedicated breast CT brings x-ray imaging of the breast to true tomographic 3D imaging. It can eliminate the tissue superposition problem and does not require physical compression of the breast. Using cone beam geometry and a flat-panel detector, several hundred projections are acquired and reconstructed to near isotropic voxels. Multiplanar reconstruction facilitates viewing the breast volume in any desired orientation. Ongoing clinical studies, the current state-of-the art, and research to advance the technology are described. Learning Objectives: To understand the ongoing developments in x-ray imaging of the breast To understand the approaches and applications of spectral mammography To understand the potential advantages of distributed x-ray source arrays for digital breast tomosynthesis To understand the ongoing developments in detector technology for digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis To understand the current state-of-the-art for dedicated cone-beam breast CT and research to advance the technology. Research collaboration with Koning Corporation

  2. TU-EF-207-01: Introductory Remarks on Recent Advances in Breast Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karellas, A.

    2015-01-01

    Breast imaging technology is advancing on several fronts. In digital mammography, the major technological trend has been on optimization of approaches for performing combined mammography and tomosynthesis using the same system. In parallel, photon-counting slot-scan mammography is now in clinical use and more efforts are directed towards further development of this approach for spectral imaging. Spectral imaging refers to simultaneous acquisition of two or more energy-windowed images. Depending on the detector and associated electronics, there are a number of ways this can be accomplished. Spectral mammography using photon-counting detectors can suppress electronic noise and importantly, it enables decomposition of the image into various material compositions of interest facilitating quantitative imaging. Spectral imaging can be particularly important in intravenously injected contrast mammography and eventually tomosynthesis. The various approaches and applications of spectral mammography are discussed. Digital breast tomosynthesis relies on the mechanical movement of the x-ray tube to acquire a number of projections in a predefined arc, typically from 9 to 25 projections over a scan angle of +/−7.5 to 25 degrees depending on the particular system. The mechanical x-ray tube motion requires relatively long acquisition time, typically between 3.7 to 25 seconds depending on the system. Moreover, mechanical scanning may have an effect on the spatial resolution due to internal x-ray filament or external mechanical vibrations. New x-ray source arrays have been developed and they are aimed at replacing the scanned x-ray tube for improved acquisition time and potentially for higher spatial resolution. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis in a single system places increased demands on certain functional aspects of the detector and overall performance, particularly in the tomosynthesis mode due to lower photon fluence per projection. This may require fast-frame acquisition and symmetric or asymmetric pixel binning in some systems. Recent studies investigated the performance of increased conversion layer thickness for contrast-enhanced imaging of the breast in dual-energy acquisition mode. In other direct conversion detectors operating in the avalanche mode, sensitivities close to the single photon response are also explored for mammography and breast tomosynthesis. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Dedicated breast CT brings x-ray imaging of the breast to true tomographic 3D imaging. It can eliminate the tissue superposition problem and does not require physical compression of the breast. Using cone beam geometry and a flat-panel detector, several hundred projections are acquired and reconstructed to near isotropic voxels. Multiplanar reconstruction facilitates viewing the breast volume in any desired orientation. Ongoing clinical studies, the current state-of-the art, and research to advance the technology are described. Learning Objectives: To understand the ongoing developments in x-ray imaging of the breast To understand the approaches and applications of spectral mammography To understand the potential advantages of distributed x-ray source arrays for digital breast tomosynthesis To understand the ongoing developments in detector technology for digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis To understand the current state-of-the-art for dedicated cone-beam breast CT and research to advance the technology. Research collaboration with Koning Corporation

  3. TU-EF-207-04: Advances in Detector Technology for Breast Tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, W.

    2015-01-01

    Breast imaging technology is advancing on several fronts. In digital mammography, the major technological trend has been on optimization of approaches for performing combined mammography and tomosynthesis using the same system. In parallel, photon-counting slot-scan mammography is now in clinical use and more efforts are directed towards further development of this approach for spectral imaging. Spectral imaging refers to simultaneous acquisition of two or more energy-windowed images. Depending on the detector and associated electronics, there are a number of ways this can be accomplished. Spectral mammography using photon-counting detectors can suppress electronic noise and importantly, it enables decomposition of the image into various material compositions of interest facilitating quantitative imaging. Spectral imaging can be particularly important in intravenously injected contrast mammography and eventually tomosynthesis. The various approaches and applications of spectral mammography are discussed. Digital breast tomosynthesis relies on the mechanical movement of the x-ray tube to acquire a number of projections in a predefined arc, typically from 9 to 25 projections over a scan angle of +/−7.5 to 25 degrees depending on the particular system. The mechanical x-ray tube motion requires relatively long acquisition time, typically between 3.7 to 25 seconds depending on the system. Moreover, mechanical scanning may have an effect on the spatial resolution due to internal x-ray filament or external mechanical vibrations. New x-ray source arrays have been developed and they are aimed at replacing the scanned x-ray tube for improved acquisition time and potentially for higher spatial resolution. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis in a single system places increased demands on certain functional aspects of the detector and overall performance, particularly in the tomosynthesis mode due to lower photon fluence per projection. This may require fast-frame acquisition and symmetric or asymmetric pixel binning in some systems. Recent studies investigated the performance of increased conversion layer thickness for contrast-enhanced imaging of the breast in dual-energy acquisition mode. In other direct conversion detectors operating in the avalanche mode, sensitivities close to the single photon response are also explored for mammography and breast tomosynthesis. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Dedicated breast CT brings x-ray imaging of the breast to true tomographic 3D imaging. It can eliminate the tissue superposition problem and does not require physical compression of the breast. Using cone beam geometry and a flat-panel detector, several hundred projections are acquired and reconstructed to near isotropic voxels. Multiplanar reconstruction facilitates viewing the breast volume in any desired orientation. Ongoing clinical studies, the current state-of-the art, and research to advance the technology are described. Learning Objectives: To understand the ongoing developments in x-ray imaging of the breast To understand the approaches and applications of spectral mammography To understand the potential advantages of distributed x-ray source arrays for digital breast tomosynthesis To understand the ongoing developments in detector technology for digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis To understand the current state-of-the-art for dedicated cone-beam breast CT and research to advance the technology. Research collaboration with Koning Corporation

  4. 24 CFR 982.207 - Waiting list: Local preferences in admission to program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... with non-discrimination and equal opportunity requirements listed at § 5.105(a) of this title. (ii) A..., color, ethnic origin, gender, religion, disability, or age of any member of an applicant family. (iv) A... preference area. (v) Applicants who are working or who have been notified that they are hired to work in a...

  5. 19 CFR 207.101 - Reporting of prohibited act and commencement of investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the North American Free Trade Agreement Procedures for Imposing Sanctions for Violation of the... inquiry to determine whether there is reasonable cause to believe that a person or persons have committed... Commission assign an administrative law judge to oversee the inquiry. (d) At the conclusion of the inquiry...

  6. 20 CFR 429.207 - What are the procedures for filing a claim?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... considered a claim under the MPCECA if it constitutes a demand for compensation from SSA. A demand is required to be for a specific sum of money. (b) Award. The SSA Claims Officer is authorized to settle... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the procedures for filing a claim...

  7. WE-FG-207B-08: Dual-Energy CT Iodine Accuracy Across Vendors and Platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, M; Wood, C; Cody, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although a major benefit of dual-energy CT is its quantitative capabilities, it is critical to understand how results vary by scanner manufacturer and/or model before making clinical patient management decisions. Each manufacturer utilizes a specific dual-energy CT approach; cross-calibration may be required for facilities with more than one dual-energy CT scanner type. Methods: A solid dual-energy quality control phantom (Gammex, Inc.; Appleton, WI) representing a large body cross-section containing three Iodine inserts (2mg/ml, 5mg/ml, 15 mg/ml) was scanned on these CT systems: GE HD-750 (80/140kVp), prototype GE Revolution CT with GSI (80/140kVp), Siemens Flash (80/140kVp and 100/140kVp), and Philips IQon (120kVp and 140kVp). Iodine content was measured in units of concentration (mg/ml) from a single 5mm-thick central image. Three to five acquisitions were performed on each scanner platform in order to compute standard deviation. Scan acquisitions were approximately dose-matched (∼25mGy CTDIvol) and image parameters were as consistent as possible (thickness, kernel, no noise reduction applied). Results: Iodine measurement error ranges were −0.24-0.16 mg/ml for the 2mg/ml insert (−12.0 − 8.0%), −0.28–0.26 mg/ml for the 5mg/ml insert (−5.6 − 5.2%), and −1.16−0.99 mg/ml for the 15mg/ml insert (−7.7 − 6.6%). Standard deviations ranged from 0 to 0.19 mg/ml for the repeated acquisitions from each scanner. The average iodine measurement error and standard deviation across all systems and inserts was −0.21 ± 0.48 mg/ml (−1.5 ± 6.48%). The largest absolute measurement error was found in the 15mg/ml iodine insert. Conclusion: There was generally good agreement in Iodine quantification across 3 dual-energy CT manufacturers and 4 scanner models. This was unexpected given the widely different underlying dual-energy CT mechanisms employed. Future work will include additional scanner platforms, independent verification of the Iodine insert standard concentrations (especially the 15 mg/ml insert), and how much measurement variability can be clinically tolerated. This research has been supported by funds from Dr. William Murphy, Jr., the John S. Dunn, Sr. Distinguished Chair in Diagnostic Imaging at MD Anderson Cancer Center.

  8. TU-G-207-01: CT Imaging Using Energy-Sensitive Photon-Counting Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, K.

    2015-01-01

    Last few years has witnessed the development of novel of X-ray imaging modalities, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT, and X-ray acoustic/fluorescence/luminescence imaging. This symposium will present the recent advances of these emerging X-ray imaging modalities and update the attendees with knowledge in various related topics, including X-ray photon-counting detectors, X-ray physics underlying the emerging applications beyond the traditional X-ray imaging, image reconstruction for the novel modalities, characterization and evaluation of the systems, and their practical implications. In addition, the concept and practical aspects of X-ray activatable targeted nanoparticles for molecular X-ray imaging will be discussed in the context of X-ray fluorescence and luminescence CT. Learning Objectives: Present background knowledge of various emerging X-ray imaging techniques, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT and X-ray fluorescence/luminescence CT. Discuss the practical need, technical aspects and current status of the emerging X-ray imaging modalities. Describe utility and future impact of the new generation of X-ray imaging applications

  9. TU-G-207-00: Emerging Applications of X-Ray Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Last few years has witnessed the development of novel of X-ray imaging modalities, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT, and X-ray acoustic/fluorescence/luminescence imaging. This symposium will present the recent advances of these emerging X-ray imaging modalities and update the attendees with knowledge in various related topics, including X-ray photon-counting detectors, X-ray physics underlying the emerging applications beyond the traditional X-ray imaging, image reconstruction for the novel modalities, characterization and evaluation of the systems, and their practical implications. In addition, the concept and practical aspects of X-ray activatable targeted nanoparticles for molecular X-ray imaging will be discussed in the context of X-ray fluorescence and luminescence CT. Learning Objectives: Present background knowledge of various emerging X-ray imaging techniques, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT and X-ray fluorescence/luminescence CT. Discuss the practical need, technical aspects and current status of the emerging X-ray imaging modalities. Describe utility and future impact of the new generation of X-ray imaging applications

  10. SU-C-207B-02: Maximal Noise Reduction Filter with Anatomical Structures Preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maitree, R; Guzman, G; Chundury, A; Roach, M; Yang, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: All medical images contain noise, which can result in an undesirable appearance and can reduce the visibility of anatomical details. There are varieties of techniques utilized to reduce noise such as increasing the image acquisition time and using post-processing noise reduction algorithms. However, these techniques are increasing the imaging time and cost or reducing tissue contrast and effective spatial resolution which are useful diagnosis information. The three main focuses in this study are: 1) to develop a novel approach that can adaptively and maximally reduce noise while preserving valuable details of anatomical structures, 2) to evaluate the effectiveness of available noise reduction algorithms in comparison to the proposed algorithm, and 3) to demonstrate that the proposed noise reduction approach can be used clinically. Methods: To achieve a maximal noise reduction without destroying the anatomical details, the proposed approach automatically estimated the local image noise strength levels and detected the anatomical structures, i.e. tissue boundaries. Such information was used to adaptively adjust strength of the noise reduction filter. The proposed algorithm was tested on 34 repeating swine head datasets and 54 patients MRI and CT images. The performance was quantitatively evaluated by image quality metrics and manually validated for clinical usages by two radiation oncologists and one radiologist. Results: Qualitative measurements on repeated swine head images demonstrated that the proposed algorithm efficiently removed noise while preserving the structures and tissues boundaries. In comparisons, the proposed algorithm obtained competitive noise reduction performance and outperformed other filters in preserving anatomical structures. Assessments from the manual validation indicate that the proposed noise reduction algorithm is quite adequate for some clinical usages. Conclusion: According to both clinical evaluation (human expert ranking) and qualitative assessment, the proposed approach has superior noise reduction and anatomical structures preservation capabilities over existing noise removal methods. Senior Author Dr. Deshan Yang received research funding form ViewRay and Varian.

  11. TH-A-207B-00: Shear-Wave Imaging and a QIBA US Biomarker Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of tissue elastic properties is a relatively new and powerful approach to one of the oldest and most important diagnostic tools. Imaging of shear wave speed with ultrasound is has been added to most high-end ultrasound systems. Understanding this exciting imaging mode aiding its most effective use in medicine can be a rewarding effort for medical physicists and other medical imaging and treatment professionals. Assuring consistent, quantitative measurements across the many ultrasound systems in a typical imaging department will constitute a major step toward realizing the great potential of this technique and other quantitative imaging. This session will target these two goals with two presentations. A. Basics and Current Implementations of Ultrasound Imaging of Shear Wave Speed and Elasticity - Shigao Chen, Ph.D. Learning objectives-To understand: Introduction: Importance of tissue elasticity measurement Strain vs. shear wave elastography (SWE), beneficial features of SWE The link between shear wave speed and material properties, influence of viscosity Generation of shear waves External vibration (Fibroscan) ultrasound radiation force Point push Supersonic push (Aixplorer) Comb push (GE Logiq E9) Detection of shear waves Motion detection from pulse-echo ultrasound Importance of frame rate for shear wave imaging Plane wave imaging detection How to achieve high effective frame rate using line-by-line scanners Shear wave speed calculation Time to peak Random sample consensus (RANSAC) Cross correlation Sources of bias and variation in SWE Tissue viscosity Transducer compression or internal pressure of organ Reflection of shear waves at boundaries B. Elasticity Imaging System Biomarker Qualification and User Testing of Systems – Brian Garra, M.D. Learning objectives-To understand: Goals Review the need for quantitative medical imaging Provide examples of quantitative imaging biomarkers Acquaint the participant with the purpose of the RSNA Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Alliance and the need for such an organization Review the QIBA process for creating a quantitative biomarker Summarize steps needed to verify adherence of site, operators, and imaging systems to a QIBA profile Underlying Premise and Assumptions Objective, quantifiable results are needed to enhance the value of diagnostic imaging in clinical practice Reasons for quantification Evidence based medicine requires objective, not subjective observer data Computerized decision support tools (eg CAD) generally require quantitative input. Quantitative, reproducible measures are more easily used to develop personalized molecular medical diagnostic and treatment systems What is quantitative imaging? Definition from Imaging Metrology Workshop The Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Alliance Formation 2008 Mission Structure Example Imaging Biomarkers Being Explored Biomarker Selection Groundwork Draft Protocol for imaging and data evaluation QIBA Profile Drafting Equipment and Site Validation Technical Clinical Site and Equipment QA and Compliance Checking Ultrasound Elasticity Estimation Biomarker US Elasticity Estimation Background Current Status and Problems Biomarker Selection-process and outcome US SWS for Liver Fibrosis Biomarker Work Groundwork Literature search and analysis results Phase I phantom testing-Elastic phantoms Phase II phantom testing-Viscoelastic phantoms Digital Simulated Data Protocol and Profile Drafting Protocol: based on UPICT and existing literature and standards bodies protocols Profile-Current claims, Manufacturer specific appendices What comes after the profile Profile Validation Technical validation Clinical validation QA and Compliance Possible approaches Site Operator testing Site protocol re-evaluation Imaging system Manufacturer testing and attestation User acceptance testing and periodic QA Phantom Tests Digital Phantom Based Testing Standard QA Testing Remediation Schemes Profile Evolution Towards additional applications Towards higher accuracy and precision Supported in part by NIH contract HHSN268201300071C from NIBIB. Collaboration with GE Global Research, no personal support.; S. Chen, Some technologies described in this presentation have been licensed. Mayo Clinic and Dr. Chen have financial interests these technologies.

  12. WE-FG-207A-00: Advances in Dedicated Breast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively investigating dedicated breast CT. The development of large-area flat-panel detectors with field-of-view sufficient to image the entire breast in each projection enabled development of flat-panel cone-beam breast CT. More recently, the availability of complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detectors with lower system noise and finer pixel pitch, combined with the development of x-ray tubes with focal spot dimensions similar to mammography systems, has shown improved spatial resolution and could improve visualization of microcalcifications. These technological developments promise clinical translation of low-dose cone-beam breast CT. Dedicated photon-counting breast CT (pcBCT) systems represent a novel detector design, which provide high spatial resolution (∼ 100µm) and low mean glandular dose (MGD). The CdTe-based direct conversion detector technology was previously evaluated and confirmed by simulations and basic experiments on laboratory setups [Kalender et al., Eur Radiol 22: 1–8, 2012]. Measurements of dose, technical image quality parameters, and surgical specimens on a pcBCT scanner have been completed. Comparative evaluation of surgical specimens showed that pcBCT outperformed mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis with respect to 3D spatial resolution, detectability of calcifications, and soft tissue delineation. Major barriers to widespread clinical use of BCT relate to radiation dose, imaging of microcalcifications, and adequate coverage of breast tissue near the chest wall. Adequate chest wall coverage is also technically challenging but recent progress in x-ray tube, detector and table design now enables full breast coverage in the majority of patients. At this time, BCT has been deemed to be suitable for diagnostic imaging but not yet for screening. The mean glandular dose (MGD) from BCT has been reported to be between 5.7 to 27.8 mGy, and this range is comparable to, and within the range of, the MGD of 2.6 to 31.6 mGy in diagnostic mammography. In diagnostic studies, the median MGD from BCT and mammography were 12.6 and 11.1 mGy, respectively [Vedantham et al., Phys Med Biol. 58: 7921–36, 2013]. Moreover, in diagnostic imaging of the breast the location of the lesion is known and therefore characterization and not detection is by far the primary consideration. The role of bCT is particularly compelling for diagnostic imaging of the breast because it may replace in part the multiple mammographic views of the breast under vigorous compression. Other non-screening potential applications of bCT include the assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy [Vedantham et al., J Clin Imaging Sci 4, 64, 2014] and pre-surgical evaluation. Learning Objectives: To understand the metrics used to evaluate screening and diagnostic imaging To understand the benefits and limitations of current clinical modalities To understand how breast CT can improve over current clinical modalities To note the early attempts to translate breast CT to the clinic in 1970s-1990s To understand the recent developments in low-dose cone-beam breast CT To understand the recent developments in photon-counting breast CT To understand the radiation dose, clinical translation, and recent developments in diagnostic imaging with breast CT Supported in part by NIH grants R21 CA134128, R01 CA128906 and R01 CA195512. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the official views of the NIH or the NCI.; S. Vedantham, Funding sources: Supported in part by NIH/NCI grants R01 CA128906 and R01 CA195512. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the official views of the NIH/NCI. Disclosures: Research collaboration with Koning Corporation, West Henrietta, NY. Conflicts of Interest: J. Boone, This research was supported in part by NIH grant R01CA181081; W. Kalender, WK is founder and CEO of CT Imaging GmbH Erlangen, Germany.; A. Karellas, NIH R21 CA134128, R01 CA128906, and R01 CA195512 and Research collaboration with Koning Corporation.

  13. WE-FG-207A-02: Why We Need Breast CT? - Clinical Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Connell, A.

    2016-01-01

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively investigating dedicated breast CT. The development of large-area flat-panel detectors with field-of-view sufficient to image the entire breast in each projection enabled development of flat-panel cone-beam breast CT. More recently, the availability of complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detectors with lower system noise and finer pixel pitch, combined with the development of x-ray tubes with focal spot dimensions similar to mammography systems, has shown improved spatial resolution and could improve visualization of microcalcifications. These technological developments promise clinical translation of low-dose cone-beam breast CT. Dedicated photon-counting breast CT (pcBCT) systems represent a novel detector design, which provide high spatial resolution (∼ 100µm) and low mean glandular dose (MGD). The CdTe-based direct conversion detector technology was previously evaluated and confirmed by simulations and basic experiments on laboratory setups [Kalender et al., Eur Radiol 22: 1–8, 2012]. Measurements of dose, technical image quality parameters, and surgical specimens on a pcBCT scanner have been completed. Comparative evaluation of surgical specimens showed that pcBCT outperformed mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis with respect to 3D spatial resolution, detectability of calcifications, and soft tissue delineation. Major barriers to widespread clinical use of BCT relate to radiation dose, imaging of microcalcifications, and adequate coverage of breast tissue near the chest wall. Adequate chest wall coverage is also technically challenging but recent progress in x-ray tube, detector and table design now enables full breast coverage in the majority of patients. At this time, BCT has been deemed to be suitable for diagnostic imaging but not yet for screening. The mean glandular dose (MGD) from BCT has been reported to be between 5.7 to 27.8 mGy, and this range is comparable to, and within the range of, the MGD of 2.6 to 31.6 mGy in diagnostic mammography. In diagnostic studies, the median MGD from BCT and mammography were 12.6 and 11.1 mGy, respectively [Vedantham et al., Phys Med Biol. 58: 7921–36, 2013]. Moreover, in diagnostic imaging of the breast the location of the lesion is known and therefore characterization and not detection is by far the primary consideration. The role of bCT is particularly compelling for diagnostic imaging of the breast because it may replace in part the multiple mammographic views of the breast under vigorous compression. Other non-screening potential applications of bCT include the assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy [Vedantham et al., J Clin Imaging Sci 4, 64, 2014] and pre-surgical evaluation. Learning Objectives: To understand the metrics used to evaluate screening and diagnostic imaging To understand the benefits and limitations of current clinical modalities To understand how breast CT can improve over current clinical modalities To note the early attempts to translate breast CT to the clinic in 1970s-1990s To understand the recent developments in low-dose cone-beam breast CT To understand the recent developments in photon-counting breast CT To understand the radiation dose, clinical translation, and recent developments in diagnostic imaging with breast CT Supported in part by NIH grants R21 CA134128, R01 CA128906 and R01 CA195512. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the official views of the NIH or the NCI.; S. Vedantham, Funding sources: Supported in part by NIH/NCI grants R01 CA128906 and R01 CA195512. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the official views of the NIH/NCI. Disclosures: Research collaboration with Koning Corporation, West Henrietta, NY. Conflicts of Interest: J. Boone, This research was supported in part by NIH grant R01CA181081; W. Kalender, WK is founder and CEO of CT Imaging GmbH Erlangen, Germany.; A. Karellas, NIH R21 CA134128, R01 CA128906, and R01 CA195512 and Research collaboration with Koning Corporation.

  14. WE-FG-207A-01: Introduction to Dedicated Breast CT - Early Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedantham, S.

    2016-01-01

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively investigating dedicated breast CT. The development of large-area flat-panel detectors with field-of-view sufficient to image the entire breast in each projection enabled development of flat-panel cone-beam breast CT. More recently, the availability of complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detectors with lower system noise and finer pixel pitch, combined with the development of x-ray tubes with focal spot dimensions similar to mammography systems, has shown improved spatial resolution and could improve visualization of microcalcifications. These technological developments promise clinical translation of low-dose cone-beam breast CT. Dedicated photon-counting breast CT (pcBCT) systems represent a novel detector design, which provide high spatial resolution (∼ 100µm) and low mean glandular dose (MGD). The CdTe-based direct conversion detector technology was previously evaluated and confirmed by simulations and basic experiments on laboratory setups [Kalender et al., Eur Radiol 22: 1–8, 2012]. Measurements of dose, technical image quality parameters, and surgical specimens on a pcBCT scanner have been completed. Comparative evaluation of surgical specimens showed that pcBCT outperformed mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis with respect to 3D spatial resolution, detectability of calcifications, and soft tissue delineation. Major barriers to widespread clinical use of BCT relate to radiation dose, imaging of microcalcifications, and adequate coverage of breast tissue near the chest wall. Adequate chest wall coverage is also technically challenging but recent progress in x-ray tube, detector and table design now enables full breast coverage in the majority of patients. At this time, BCT has been deemed to be suitable for diagnostic imaging but not yet for screening. The mean glandular dose (MGD) from BCT has been reported to be between 5.7 to 27.8 mGy, and this range is comparable to, and within the range of, the MGD of 2.6 to 31.6 mGy in diagnostic mammography. In diagnostic studies, the median MGD from BCT and mammography were 12.6 and 11.1 mGy, respectively [Vedantham et al., Phys Med Biol. 58: 7921–36, 2013]. Moreover, in diagnostic imaging of the breast the location of the lesion is known and therefore characterization and not detection is by far the primary consideration. The role of bCT is particularly compelling for diagnostic imaging of the breast because it may replace in part the multiple mammographic views of the breast under vigorous compression. Other non-screening potential applications of bCT include the assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy [Vedantham et al., J Clin Imaging Sci 4, 64, 2014] and pre-surgical evaluation. Learning Objectives: To understand the metrics used to evaluate screening and diagnostic imaging To understand the benefits and limitations of current clinical modalities To understand how breast CT can improve over current clinical modalities To note the early attempts to translate breast CT to the clinic in 1970s-1990s To understand the recent developments in low-dose cone-beam breast CT To understand the recent developments in photon-counting breast CT To understand the radiation dose, clinical translation, and recent developments in diagnostic imaging with breast CT Supported in part by NIH grants R21 CA134128, R01 CA128906 and R01 CA195512. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the official views of the NIH or the NCI.; S. Vedantham, Funding sources: Supported in part by NIH/NCI grants R01 CA128906 and R01 CA195512. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the official views of the NIH/NCI. Disclosures: Research collaboration with Koning Corporation, West Henrietta, NY. Conflicts of Interest: J. Boone, This research was supported in part by NIH grant R01CA181081; W. Kalender, WK is founder and CEO of CT Imaging GmbH Erlangen, Germany.; A. Karellas, NIH R21 CA134128, R01 CA128906, and R01 CA195512 and Research collaboration with Koning Corporation.

  15. 48 CFR 47.207-3 - Description of shipment, origin, and destination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., hazardous material, whether packed for export, or unusual value. (d) Exclusion of freight. The contracting officer shall (1) clearly identify any freight or types of shipments that are subject to exclusion; e.g... clause substantially the same as the clause at 52.247-7, Freight Excluded, when any commodities or types...

  16. 19 CFR 207.7 - Limited disclosure of certain business proprietary information under administrative protective...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... corresponding information about a competitor (pricing, product design, etc.). (4) Forms and determinations. (i... information pursuant to this paragraph, the authorized applicant need not file a new application in the final...

  17. MO-FG-207-00: Technological Advances in PET/MR Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee.

  18. TU-AB-207A-03: Image Quality, Dose, and Clinical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, F.

    2016-01-01

    Practicing medical physicists are often time charged with the tasks of evaluating and troubleshooting complex image quality issues related to CT scanners. This course will equip them with a solid and practical understanding of common CT imaging chain and its major components with emphasis on acquisition physics and hardware, reconstruction, artifacts, image quality, dose, and advanced clinical applications. The core objective is to explain the effects of these major system components on the image quality. This course will not focus on the rapid-changing advanced technologies given the two-hour time limit, but the fundamental principles discussed in this course may facilitate better understanding of those more complicated technologies. The course will begin with an overview of CT acquisition physics and geometry. X-ray tube and CT detector are important acquisition hardware critical to the overall image quality. Each of these two subsystems consists of several major components. An in-depth description of the function and failure modes of these components will be provided. Examples of artifacts related to these failure modes will be presented: off-focal radiation, tube arcing, heel effect, oil bubble, offset drift effect, cross-talk effect, and bad pixels. The fundamentals of CT image reconstruction will first be discussed on an intuitive level. Approaches that do not require rigorous derivation of mathematical formulations will be presented. This is followed by a detailed derivation of the Fourier slice theorem: the foundation of the FBP algorithm. FBP for parallel-beam, fan-beam, and cone-beam geometries will be discussed. To address the issue of radiation dose related to x-ray CT, recent advances in iterative reconstruction, their advantages, and clinical applications will also be described. Because of the nature of fundamental physics and mathematics, limitations in data acquisition, and non-ideal conditions of major system components, image artifact often arise in the reconstructed images. Because of the limited scope of this course, only major imaging artifacts, their appearance, and possible mitigation and corrections will be discussed. Assessment of the performance of a CT scanner is a complicated subject. Procedures to measure common image quality metrics such as high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast detectability, and slice profile will be described. The reason why these metrics used for FBP may not be sufficient for statistical iterative reconstruction will be explained. Optimizing radiation dose requires comprehension of CT dose metrics. This course will briefly describe various dose metrics, and interaction with acquisition parameters and patient habitus. CT is among the most frequently used imaging tools due to its superior image quality, easy to operate, and a broad range of applications. This course will present several interesting CT applications such as a mobile CT unit on an ambulance for stroke patients, low dose lung cancer screening, and single heartbeat cardiac CT. Learning Objectives: Understand the function and impact of major components of X-ray tube on the image quality. Understand the function and impact of major components of CT detector on the image quality. Be familiar with the basic procedure of CT image reconstruction. Understand the effect of image reconstruction on CT image quality and artifacts. Understand the root causes of common CT image artifacts. Be familiar with image quality metrics especially high and low contrast resolution, noise power spectrum, slice sensitivity profile, etc. Understand why basic image quality metrics used for FBP may not be sufficient to characterize the performance of advanced iterative reconstruction. Be familiar with various CT dose metrics and their interaction with acquisition parameters. New development in advanced CT clinical applications. JH: Employee of GE Healthcare. FD: No disclosure.; J. Hsieh, Jiang Hsieh is an employee of GE Healthcare.

  19. Tank 241-T-105, cores 205 and 207 analytical results for the final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esch, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    This document is the final laboratory report for tank 241-T-105 push mode core segments collected between June 24, 1997 and June 30, 1997. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Field,1997), the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (Safety DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995) and Tank 241-T-105 Sample Analysis (memo) (Field, 1997a). The analytical results are included in Table 1. None of the subsamples submitted for the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis or total alpha activity (AT) exceeded the notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Field, 1997). The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and not considered in this report

  20. WE-FG-207B-02: Material Reconstruction for Spectral Computed Tomography with Detector Response Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J; Gao, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Different from the conventional computed tomography (CT), spectral CT based on energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is able to provide the unprecedented material composition. However, an important missing piece for accurate spectral CT is to incorporate the detector response function (DRF), which is distorted by factors such as pulse pileup and charge-sharing. In this work, we propose material reconstruction methods for spectral CT with DRF. Methods: The polyenergetic X-ray forward model takes the DRF into account for accurate material reconstruction. Two image reconstruction methods are proposed: a direct method based on the nonlinear data fidelity from DRF-based forward model; a linear-data-fidelity based method that relies on the spectral rebinning so that the corresponding DRF matrix is invertible. Then the image reconstruction problem is regularized with the isotropic TV term and solved by alternating direction method of multipliers. Results: The simulation results suggest that the proposed methods provided more accurate material compositions than the standard method without DRF. Moreover, the proposed method with linear data fidelity had improved reconstruction quality from the proposed method with nonlinear data fidelity. Conclusion: We have proposed material reconstruction methods for spectral CT with DRF, whichprovided more accurate material compositions than the standard methods without DRF. Moreover, the proposed method with linear data fidelity had improved reconstruction quality from the proposed method with nonlinear data fidelity. Jiulong Liu and Hao Gao were partially supported by the NSFC (#11405105), the 973 Program (#2015CB856000), and the Shanghai Pujiang Talent Program (#14PJ1404500).

  1. Acta Theologica 2015: 2 207 M. Nel Identity-driven churches: Who ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and systematic study that produces a wealth of contextual biblical ideas concerning ... debates and empirical data that have emerged and are still emerging concerning ... conversation lies a challenge: to recover and deepen the church's.

  2. WE-B-207-00: CT Lung Cancer Screening Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    The US National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) was a multi-center randomized, controlled trial comparing a low-dose CT (LDCT) to posterior-anterior (PA) chest x-ray (CXR) in screening older, current and former heavy smokers for early detection of lung cancer. Recruitment was launched in September 2002 and ended in April 2004 when 53,454 participants had been randomized at 33 screening sites in equal proportions. Funded by the National Cancer Institute this trial demonstrated that LDCT screening reduced lung cancer mortality. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) cited NLST findings and conclusions in its deliberations and analysis of lung cancer screening. Under the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the USPSTF favorable recommendation regarding lung cancer CT screening assisted in obtaining third-party payers coverage for screening. The objective of this session is to provide an introduction to the NLST and the trial findings, in addition to a comprehensive review of the dosimetry investigations and assessments completed using individual NLST participant CT and CXR examinations. Session presentations will review and discuss the findings of two independent assessments, a CXR assessment and the findings of a CT investigation calculating individual organ dosimetry values. The CXR assessment reviewed a total of 73,733 chest x-ray exams that were performed on 92 chest imaging systems of which 66,157 participant examinations were used. The CT organ dosimetry investigation collected scan parameters from 23,773 CT examinations; a subset of the 75,133 CT examinations performed using 97 multi-detector CT scanners. Organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated using a Monte Carlo code. An experimentally-validated CT scanner simulation was coupled with 193 adult hybrid computational phantoms representing the height and weight of the current U.S. population. The dose to selected organs was calculated using the organ dose library and the abstracted scan parameters. This session will review the results and summarize the individualized doses to major organs and the mean effective dose and CTDIvol estimate for 66,157 PA chest and 23,773 CT examinations respectively, using size-dependent computational phantoms coupled with Monte Carlo calculations. Learning Objectives: Review and summarize relevant NLST findings and conclusions. Understand the scope and scale of the NLST specific to participant dosimetry. Provide a comprehensive review of NLST participant dosimetry assessments. Summarize the results of an investigation providing individualized organ dose estimates for NLST participant cohorts.

  3. WE-D-207-00: CT Lung Cancer Screening and the Medical Physicist: Moving Forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, Lung Cancer is responsible for more cancer deaths than the next four cancers combined. In addition, the 5 year survival rate for lung cancer patients has not improved over the past 40 to 50 years. To combat this deadly disease, in 2002 the National Cancer Institute launched a very large Randomized Control Trial called the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). This trial would randomize subjects who had substantial risk of lung cancer (due to age and smoking history) into either a Chest X-ray arm or a low dose CT arm. In November 2010, the National Cancer Institute announced that the NLST had demonstrated 20% fewer lung cancer deaths among those who were screened with low-dose CT than with chest X-ray. In December 2013, the US Preventive Services Task Force recommended the use of Lung Cancer Screening using low dose CT and a little over a year later (Feb. 2015), CMS announced that Medicare would also cover Lung Cancer Screening using low dose CT. Thus private and public insurers are required to provide Lung Cancer Screening programs using CT to the appropriate population(s). The purpose of this Symposium is to inform medical physicists and prepare them to support the implementation of Lung Screening programs. This Symposium will focus on the clinical aspects of lung cancer screening, requirements of a screening registry for systematically capturing and tracking screening patients and results (such as required Medicare data elements) as well as the role of the medical physicist in screening programs, including the development of low dose CT screening protocols. Learning Objectives: To understand the clinical basis and clinical components of a lung cancer screening program, including eligibility criteria and other requirements. To understand the data collection requirements, workflow, and informatics infrastructure needed to support the tracking and reporting components of a screening program. To understand the role of the medical physicist in implementing Lung Cancer Screening protocols for CT, including utilizing resources such as the AAPM Protocols and the ACR Designated Lung Screening Center program. UCLA Department of Radiology has an Institutional research agreement with Siemens Healthcare; Dr. McNitt-Gray has been a recipient of Research Support from Siemens Healthcare in the past. Dr. Aberle has been a Member of Advisory Boards for the LUNGevity Foundation (2011-present) and Siemens Medical Solutions. (2013)

  4. 24 CFR 207.252a - Premiums-operating loss loans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Premiums—operating loss loans. (a) The mortgagee, upon the insurance endorsement of the increase loan credit instrument covering the operating loss loan, shall pay to the Commissioner a first mortgage...

  5. 40 CFR 90.207 - Credit calculation and manufacturer compliance with emission standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... = Production×(Standard—FEL)×Power×Useful life×Load Factor Where: Production = eligible production as defined in this part. Annual production projections are used to project credit availability for initial... kilowatt hour. Power = the maximum modal power of the certification test engine, in kilowatts, as...

  6. 33 CFR 207.20 - Cape Cod Canal, Mass.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... basis. A patrol vessel is manned and operational 24-hours a day. (c) Communications. There is a marine... section. Low powered vessels will be required to await slack water or favorable current for canal transit... Fair Tide—30 Minutes Slack Tide—45 Minutes The minimun running time between the Administration Office...

  7. TH-A-207B-00: Shear-Wave Imaging and a QIBA US Biomarker Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Imaging of tissue elastic properties is a relatively new and powerful approach to one of the oldest and most important diagnostic tools. Imaging of shear wave speed with ultrasound is has been added to most high-end ultrasound systems. Understanding this exciting imaging mode aiding its most effective use in medicine can be a rewarding effort for medical physicists and other medical imaging and treatment professionals. Assuring consistent, quantitative measurements across the many ultrasound systems in a typical imaging department will constitute a major step toward realizing the great potential of this technique and other quantitative imaging. This session will target these two goals with two presentations. A. Basics and Current Implementations of Ultrasound Imaging of Shear Wave Speed and Elasticity - Shigao Chen, Ph.D. Learning objectives-To understand: Introduction: Importance of tissue elasticity measurement Strain vs. shear wave elastography (SWE), beneficial features of SWE The link between shear wave speed and material properties, influence of viscosity Generation of shear waves External vibration (Fibroscan) ultrasound radiation force Point push Supersonic push (Aixplorer) Comb push (GE Logiq E9) Detection of shear waves Motion detection from pulse-echo ultrasound Importance of frame rate for shear wave imaging Plane wave imaging detection How to achieve high effective frame rate using line-by-line scanners Shear wave speed calculation Time to peak Random sample consensus (RANSAC) Cross correlation Sources of bias and variation in SWE Tissue viscosity Transducer compression or internal pressure of organ Reflection of shear waves at boundaries B. Elasticity Imaging System Biomarker Qualification and User Testing of Systems – Brian Garra, M.D. Learning objectives-To understand: Goals Review the need for quantitative medical imaging Provide examples of quantitative imaging biomarkers Acquaint the participant with the purpose of the RSNA Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Alliance and the need for such an organization Review the QIBA process for creating a quantitative biomarker Summarize steps needed to verify adherence of site, operators, and imaging systems to a QIBA profile Underlying Premise and Assumptions Objective, quantifiable results are needed to enhance the value of diagnostic imaging in clinical practice Reasons for quantification Evidence based medicine requires objective, not subjective observer data Computerized decision support tools (eg CAD) generally require quantitative input. Quantitative, reproducible measures are more easily used to develop personalized molecular medical diagnostic and treatment systems What is quantitative imaging? Definition from Imaging Metrology Workshop The Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Alliance Formation 2008 Mission Structure Example Imaging Biomarkers Being Explored Biomarker Selection Groundwork Draft Protocol for imaging and data evaluation QIBA Profile Drafting Equipment and Site Validation Technical Clinical Site and Equipment QA and Compliance Checking Ultrasound Elasticity Estimation Biomarker US Elasticity Estimation Background Current Status and Problems Biomarker Selection-process and outcome US SWS for Liver Fibrosis Biomarker Work Groundwork Literature search and analysis results Phase I phantom testing-Elastic phantoms Phase II phantom testing-Viscoelastic phantoms Digital Simulated Data Protocol and Profile Drafting Protocol: based on UPICT and existing literature and standards bodies protocols Profile-Current claims, Manufacturer specific appendices What comes after the profile Profile Validation Technical validation Clinical validation QA and Compliance Possible approaches Site Operator testing Site protocol re-evaluation Imaging system Manufacturer testing and attestation User acceptance testing and periodic QA Phantom Tests Digital Phantom Based Testing Standard QA Testing Remediation Schemes Profile Evolution Towards additional applications Towards higher accuracy and precision Supported in part by NIH contract HHSN268201300071C from NIBIB. Collaboration with GE Global Research, no personal support.; S. Chen, Some technologies described in this presentation have been licensed. Mayo Clinic and Dr. Chen have financial interests these technologies.

  8. WE-H-207B-02: MR-Driven RT Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, M. [UCLA School of Medicine (United States)

    2016-06-15

    In recent years, steady progress has been made towards the implementation of MRI in external beam radiation therapy for processes ranging from treatment simulation to in-room guidance. Novel procedures relying mostly on MR data are currently implemented in the clinic. This session will cover topics such as (a) commissioning and quality control of the MR in-room imagers and simulators specific to RT, (b) treatment planning requirements, constraints and challenges when dealing with various MR data, (c) quantification of organ motion with an emphasis on treatment delivery guidance, and (d) MR-driven strategies for adaptive RT workflows. The content of the session was chosen to address both educational and practical key aspects of MR guidance. Learning Objectives: Good understanding of MR testing recommended for in-room MR imaging as well as image data validation for RT chain (e.g. image transfer, filtering for consistency, spatial accuracy, manipulation for task specific); Familiarity with MR-based planning procedures: motivation, core workflow requirements, current status, challenges; Overview of the current methods for the quantification of organ motion; Discussion on approaches for adaptive treatment planning and delivery. T. Stanescu - License agreement with Modus Medical Devices to develop a phantom for the quantification of MR image system-related distortions.; T. Stanescu, N/A.

  9. TH-AB-207A-04: Assessment of Patients’ Cumulative Effective Dose From CT Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; Sepahdari, A; Beckett, K; Oshiro, T; McNitt-Gray, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The Joint Commission requires institutions to consider patient’s age and recent imaging exams when deciding on the most appropriate type of imaging exam. Additionally, knowing patient’s imaging history can help prevent duplicate scans. Radiation dose management software affords new opportunities to identify and utilize patients with high cumulative doses as one proxy for subsequent review of imaging history and opportunities in avoiding redundant exams. Methods: Using dose management software (Radimetrics, Bayer Healthcare) a total of 72073 CT examinations performed from Jan 2015 to Jan 2016 were examined to categorize patients with a cumulative effective dose of 100 mSv and above. This threshold was selected based on epidemiological studies on populations exposed to radiation, which demonstrate a statistical increase of cancer risk at doses above 100 mSv. Histories of patients with highest cumulative dose and highest number of exams were further investigated by a Radiologist for appropriateness of recurrent studies and potential opportunities for reduction. Results: Out of 34762 patients, 927 (2.7%) were identified with a cumulative dose of 100 mSv and above. The highest cumulative dose (842 mSv) belonged to an oncology patient who underwent 2 diagnostic exams and 9 interventional ablative CT guided procedures. The patient with highest number of exams (56 counts) and cumulative dose of 170 mSv was a 17 year old trauma patient. An imaging history review of these two patients did not suggest any superfluous scans. Conclusion: Our limited pilot study suggests that recurrent CT exams for patients with oncologic or severe trauma history may be warranted and appropriate. As a result, for future studies we will be focusing on high dose patient cohorts not associated with oncology or severe trauma. Additionally, the review process itself has suggested areas for potential improvement in patient care, including improved documentation and Radiologist involvement in patient management. Dr. McNitt-Gray’s disclosures: Institutional research agreement, Siemens Healthcare; Past recipient, research grant support, Siemens Healthcare; Consultant, Toshiba America Medical Systems; Consultant, Samsung Electronics.

  10. MO-DE-207-04: Imaging educational program on solutions to common pediatric imaging challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamurthy, R. [Texas Children’s Hospital: Pediatric MRI Quality, Artifacts, and Safety (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This imaging educational program will focus on solutions to common pediatric imaging challenges. The speakers will present collective knowledge on best practices in pediatric imaging from their experience at dedicated children’s hospitals. The educational program will begin with a detailed discussion of the optimal configuration of fluoroscopes for general pediatric procedures. Following this introduction will be a focused discussion on the utility of Dual Energy CT for imaging children. The third lecture will address the substantial challenge of obtaining consistent image post -processing in pediatric digital radiography. The fourth and final lecture will address best practices in pediatric MRI including a discussion of ancillary methods to reduce sedation and anesthesia rates. Learning Objectives: To learn techniques for optimizing radiation dose and image quality in pediatric fluoroscopy To become familiar with the unique challenges and applications of Dual Energy CT in pediatric imaging To learn solutions for consistent post-processing quality in pediatric digital radiography To understand the key components of an effective MRI safety and quality program for the pediatric practice.

  11. PS2-07: The Association of Cyberbullying with Cardiovascular Health in Adolescents: A Preliminary Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy-Bushrow, Andrea; Johnson, Dayna; Joseph, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims With increasing access to the internet and other technology, adolescents may become victims of online harassment, referred to as cyberbullying. Cyberbullying may cause worry, fear, and distress among youth, all which increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adults. To our knowledge, no study has examined the potential association of cyberbullying with CVD risk factors in adolescents. We examined the association of cyberbullying with overweight/obesity and elevated blood pressure (BP) among healthy adolescents. Methods Adolescents age 14–17 years and parent/guardian were invited to a research visit between November, 2009 and present. Height, weight, and BP were measured by trained staff and internet experiences quantified by questionnaire. Race was defined as African-American or other race. Cyberbullying was defined as self-report in the past year of being worried or threatened because of being bothered or harassed online or of being embarrassed by others online. Overweight/ obesity was defined as BMI >=85th percentile for gender and age. Elevated BP was defined as a SBP or DBP >=90th percentile for gender, age and height. Logistic regression models were fit to estimate the association of cyberbulling with overweight/obesity or elevated BP. Results As of October, 2010, 190 adolescents with complete data have been recruited into the study. Mean age was 16.5±1.0 years; 76 (40%) were male and 112 (59.0%) were African-American. Mean BMI of adolescents was 24.2±6.4 kg/m^2 and mean SBP and DBP were 117.7±11.3 mmHg and 63.9±7.1mmHg, respectively; 62 (32.6%) were classified as overweight/obese and 28 (14.7%) had an elevated BP. A total of 29 (15.3%) adolescents reported being cyberbullied; older adolescents (P=0.061) were more likely and African-Americans (P=0.040) were less likely to report being cyberbullied. Gender was not associated with cyberbullying (P=0.143). Cyberbullying was not associated with overweight/obesity (P=0.951) or elevated BP (P=0.701), after adjustment for other risk factors. Conclusions CVD risk factors in youth track into adulthood, thus early-life experiences represent important and potentially modifiable predictors of adult disease. In this study, self-reported experiences of cyberbullying were not associated with being overweight/obese or with elevated BP. Continued study of psychosocial risk factors, including cyberbullying, with adolescent CVD health is warranted.

  12. TU-CD-207-11: Patient-Driven Automatic Exposure Control for Dedicated Breast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, A; Gazi, P [Biomedical Engineering Graduate Group, University of California Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Department of Radiology, UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Seibert, J; Boone, J [Department of Radiology, UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California Davis, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To implement automatic exposure control (AEC) in dedicated breast CT (bCT) on a patient-specific basis using only the pre-scan scout views. Methods: Using a large cohort (N=153) of bCT data sets, the breast effective diameter (D) and width in orthogonal planes (Wa,Wb) were calculated from the reconstructed bCT image and pre-scan scout views, respectively. D, Wa, and Wb were measured at the breast center-of-mass (COM), making use of the known geometry of our bCT system. These data were then fit to a second-order polynomial “D=F(Wa,Wb)” in a least squares sense in order to provide a functional form for determining the breast diameter. The coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) and mean percent error between the measured breast diameter and fit breast diameter were used to evaluate the overall robustness of the polynomial fit. Lastly, previously-reported bCT technique factors derived from Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the tube current required for each breast diameter in order to match two-view mammographic dose levels. Results: F(Wa,Wb) provided fitted breast diameters in agreement with the measured breast diameters resulting in R{sup 2} values ranging from 0.908 to 0.929 and mean percent errors ranging from 3.2% to 3.7%. For all 153 bCT data sets used in this study, the fitted breast diameters ranged from 7.9 cm to 15.7 cm corresponding to tube current values ranging from 0.6 mA to 4.9 mA in order to deliver the same dose as two-view mammography in a 50% glandular breast with a 80 kV x-ray beam and 16.6 second scan time. Conclusion: The present work provides a robust framework for AEC in dedicated bCT using only the width measurements derived from the two orthogonal pre-scan scout views. Future work will investigate how these automatically chosen exposure levels affect the quality of the reconstructed image.

  13. 19 CFR 207.46 - Investigations concerning certain countervailing duty orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR FROM SUBSIDIZED EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES Terminated, Suspended, and... section. (ii) Information concerning current and projected production capacity in the exporting country of... should contain the following information: (1) A description and identification of the relevant domestic...

  14. 40 CFR 91.207 - Credit calculation and manufacturer compliance with emission standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... engine family in kW (sales weighted). The power of each configuration is the rated output in kilowatts as... emission standards. (a) For each engine family, certification emission credits (positive or negative) are... of nitrogen credit status for an engine family, whether generating positive credits or negative...

  15. WE-FG-207A-02: Why We Need Breast CT? - Clinical Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Connell, A. [University of Rochester Medical Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively investigating dedicated breast CT. The development of large-area flat-panel detectors with field-of-view sufficient to image the entire breast in each projection enabled development of flat-panel cone-beam breast CT. More recently, the availability of complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detectors with lower system noise and finer pixel pitch, combined with the development of x-ray tubes with focal spot dimensions similar to mammography systems, has shown improved spatial resolution and could improve visualization of microcalcifications. These technological developments promise clinical translation of low-dose cone-beam breast CT. Dedicated photon-counting breast CT (pcBCT) systems represent a novel detector design, which provide high spatial resolution (∼ 100µm) and low mean glandular dose (MGD). The CdTe-based direct conversion detector technology was previously evaluated and confirmed by simulations and basic experiments on laboratory setups [Kalender et al., Eur Radiol 22: 1–8, 2012]. Measurements of dose, technical image quality parameters, and surgical specimens on a pcBCT scanner have been completed. Comparative evaluation of surgical specimens showed that pcBCT outperformed mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis with respect to 3D spatial resolution, detectability of calcifications, and soft tissue delineation. Major barriers to widespread clinical use of BCT relate to radiation dose, imaging of microcalcifications, and adequate coverage of breast tissue near the chest wall. Adequate chest wall coverage is also technically challenging but recent progress in x-ray tube, detector and table design now enables full breast coverage in the majority of patients. At this time, BCT has been deemed to be suitable for diagnostic imaging but not yet for screening. The mean glandular dose (MGD) from BCT has been reported to be between 5.7 to 27.8 mGy, and this range is comparable to, and within the range of, the MGD of 2.6 to 31.6 mGy in diagnostic mammography. In diagnostic studies, the median MGD from BCT and mammography were 12.6 and 11.1 mGy, respectively [Vedantham et al., Phys Med Biol. 58: 7921–36, 2013]. Moreover, in diagnostic imaging of the breast the location of the lesion is known and therefore characterization and not detection is by far the primary consideration. The role of bCT is particularly compelling for diagnostic imaging of the breast because it may replace in part the multiple mammographic views of the breast under vigorous compression. Other non-screening potential applications of bCT include the assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy [Vedantham et al., J Clin Imaging Sci 4, 64, 2014] and pre-surgical evaluation. Learning Objectives: To understand the metrics used to evaluate screening and diagnostic imaging To understand the benefits and limitations of current clinical modalities To understand how breast CT can improve over current clinical modalities To note the early attempts to translate breast CT to the clinic in 1970s-1990s To understand the recent developments in low-dose cone-beam breast CT To understand the recent developments in photon-counting breast CT To understand the radiation dose, clinical translation, and recent developments in diagnostic imaging with breast CT Supported in part by NIH grants R21 CA134128, R01 CA128906 and R01 CA195512. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the official views of the NIH or the NCI.; S. Vedantham, Funding sources: Supported in part by NIH/NCI grants R01 CA128906 and R01 CA195512. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the official views of the NIH/NCI. Disclosures: Research collaboration with Koning Corporation, West Henrietta, NY. Conflicts of Interest: J. Boone, This research was supported in part by NIH grant R01CA181081; W. Kalender, WK is founder and CEO of CT Imaging GmbH Erlangen, Germany.; A. Karellas, NIH R21 CA134128, R01 CA128906, and R01 CA195512 and Research collaboration with Koning Corporation.

  16. WE-FG-207A-00: Advances in Dedicated Breast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively investigating dedicated breast CT. The development of large-area flat-panel detectors with field-of-view sufficient to image the entire breast in each projection enabled development of flat-panel cone-beam breast CT. More recently, the availability of complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detectors with lower system noise and finer pixel pitch, combined with the development of x-ray tubes with focal spot dimensions similar to mammography systems, has shown improved spatial resolution and could improve visualization of microcalcifications. These technological developments promise clinical translation of low-dose cone-beam breast CT. Dedicated photon-counting breast CT (pcBCT) systems represent a novel detector design, which provide high spatial resolution (∼ 100µm) and low mean glandular dose (MGD). The CdTe-based direct conversion detector technology was previously evaluated and confirmed by simulations and basic experiments on laboratory setups [Kalender et al., Eur Radiol 22: 1–8, 2012]. Measurements of dose, technical image quality parameters, and surgical specimens on a pcBCT scanner have been completed. Comparative evaluation of surgical specimens showed that pcBCT outperformed mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis with respect to 3D spatial resolution, detectability of calcifications, and soft tissue delineation. Major barriers to widespread clinical use of BCT relate to radiation dose, imaging of microcalcifications, and adequate coverage of breast tissue near the chest wall. Adequate chest wall coverage is also technically challenging but recent progress in x-ray tube, detector and table design now enables full breast coverage in the majority of patients. At this time, BCT has been deemed to be suitable for diagnostic imaging but not yet for screening. The mean glandular dose (MGD) from BCT has been reported to be between 5.7 to 27.8 mGy, and this range is comparable to, and within the range of, the MGD of 2.6 to 31.6 mGy in diagnostic mammography. In diagnostic studies, the median MGD from BCT and mammography were 12.6 and 11.1 mGy, respectively [Vedantham et al., Phys Med Biol. 58: 7921–36, 2013]. Moreover, in diagnostic imaging of the breast the location of the lesion is known and therefore characterization and not detection is by far the primary consideration. The role of bCT is particularly compelling for diagnostic imaging of the breast because it may replace in part the multiple mammographic views of the breast under vigorous compression. Other non-screening potential applications of bCT include the assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy [Vedantham et al., J Clin Imaging Sci 4, 64, 2014] and pre-surgical evaluation. Learning Objectives: To understand the metrics used to evaluate screening and diagnostic imaging To understand the benefits and limitations of current clinical modalities To understand how breast CT can improve over current clinical modalities To note the early attempts to translate breast CT to the clinic in 1970s-1990s To understand the recent developments in low-dose cone-beam breast CT To understand the recent developments in photon-counting breast CT To understand the radiation dose, clinical translation, and recent developments in diagnostic imaging with breast CT Supported in part by NIH grants R21 CA134128, R01 CA128906 and R01 CA195512. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the official views of the NIH or the NCI.; S. Vedantham, Funding sources: Supported in part by NIH/NCI grants R01 CA128906 and R01 CA195512. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the official views of the NIH/NCI. Disclosures: Research collaboration with Koning Corporation, West Henrietta, NY. Conflicts of Interest: J. Boone, This research was supported in part by NIH grant R01CA181081; W. Kalender, WK is founder and CEO of CT Imaging GmbH Erlangen, Germany.; A. Karellas, NIH R21 CA134128, R01 CA128906, and R01 CA195512 and Research collaboration with Koning Corporation.

  17. WE-FG-207A-04: Performance Characteristics of Photon-Counting Breast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalender, W. [University of Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively investigating dedicated breast CT. The development of large-area flat-panel detectors with field-of-view sufficient to image the entire breast in each projection enabled development of flat-panel cone-beam breast CT. More recently, the availability of complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detectors with lower system noise and finer pixel pitch, combined with the development of x-ray tubes with focal spot dimensions similar to mammography systems, has shown improved spatial resolution and could improve visualization of microcalcifications. These technological developments promise clinical translation of low-dose cone-beam breast CT. Dedicated photon-counting breast CT (pcBCT) systems represent a novel detector design, which provide high spatial resolution (∼ 100µm) and low mean glandular dose (MGD). The CdTe-based direct conversion detector technology was previously evaluated and confirmed by simulations and basic experiments on laboratory setups [Kalender et al., Eur Radiol 22: 1–8, 2012]. Measurements of dose, technical image quality parameters, and surgical specimens on a pcBCT scanner have been completed. Comparative evaluation of surgical specimens showed that pcBCT outperformed mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis with respect to 3D spatial resolution, detectability of calcifications, and soft tissue delineation. Major barriers to widespread clinical use of BCT relate to radiation dose, imaging of microcalcifications, and adequate coverage of breast tissue near the chest wall. Adequate chest wall coverage is also technically challenging but recent progress in x-ray tube, detector and table design now enables full breast coverage in the majority of patients. At this time, BCT has been deemed to be suitable for diagnostic imaging but not yet for screening. The mean glandular dose (MGD) from BCT has been reported to be between 5.7 to 27.8 mGy, and this range is comparable to, and within the range of, the MGD of 2.6 to 31.6 mGy in diagnostic mammography. In diagnostic studies, the median MGD from BCT and mammography were 12.6 and 11.1 mGy, respectively [Vedantham et al., Phys Med Biol. 58: 7921–36, 2013]. Moreover, in diagnostic imaging of the breast the location of the lesion is known and therefore characterization and not detection is by far the primary consideration. The role of bCT is particularly compelling for diagnostic imaging of the breast because it may replace in part the multiple mammographic views of the breast under vigorous compression. Other non-screening potential applications of bCT include the assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy [Vedantham et al., J Clin Imaging Sci 4, 64, 2014] and pre-surgical evaluation. Learning Objectives: To understand the metrics used to evaluate screening and diagnostic imaging To understand the benefits and limitations of current clinical modalities To understand how breast CT can improve over current clinical modalities To note the early attempts to translate breast CT to the clinic in 1970s-1990s To understand the recent developments in low-dose cone-beam breast CT To understand the recent developments in photon-counting breast CT To understand the radiation dose, clinical translation, and recent developments in diagnostic imaging with breast CT Supported in part by NIH grants R21 CA134128, R01 CA128906 and R01 CA195512. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the official views of the NIH or the NCI.; S. Vedantham, Funding sources: Supported in part by NIH/NCI grants R01 CA128906 and R01 CA195512. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the official views of the NIH/NCI. Disclosures: Research collaboration with Koning Corporation, West Henrietta, NY. Conflicts of Interest: J. Boone, This research was supported in part by NIH grant R01CA181081; W. Kalender, WK is founder and CEO of CT Imaging GmbH Erlangen, Germany.; A. Karellas, NIH R21 CA134128, R01 CA128906, and R01 CA195512 and Research collaboration with Koning Corporation.

  18. 20 CFR 416.207 - You do not give us permission to contact financial institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Eligibility Reasons Why You May Not Get Ssi... consider a deemor's income and resources available to you ends, e.g. when spouses separate or divorce or a...

  19. 33 CFR 207.270 - Tallahatchie River, Miss., between Batesville and the mouth; logging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Tallahatchie River, Miss., between Batesville and the mouth; logging. (a) The floating of “sack”, rafts, or of... sufficient capacity to properly manage the movement of the raft and to keep it from being an obstruction to...

  20. People and things. CERN Courier, October 1980, v. 20(7)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The article reports on achievements of various people, staff changes and position opportunities within the CERN organization and contains news updates on upcoming or past events. Now available is the first volume to be published of Pauli's scientific correspondence. It contains some 240 letters written to or by Wolfgang Pauli during the years 1919-1929. It is based on the Pauli Letter Collection of over 2000 originals or copies gathered together largely through the initiative of Mrs. Pauli, with the support of colleagues, and which is now held at CERN. In the July/August edition of 'Europhysics News', J. Lemonne, past President of the Belgian Physical Society and Belgian delegate to the CERN Council, reviews physics activities in Belgium to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the Society

  1. Sexospécificités | Page 207 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Au Sri Lanka, un projet pilote communautaire alliant technologies de pointe et réseaux de bénévoles permet d'alerter les villages côtiers en cas de danger ... guerre, a donné du poids à une étude visant à évaluer le pouvoir du développement ...

  2. SU-F-207-16: CT Protocols Optimization Using Model Observer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, H [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Fan, J [CT Systems Engineering, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin (United States); Kupinski, M [Univ Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the performance of different CT protocols using task-based measures of image quality. This work studies the task of size and the contrast estimation of different iodine concentration rods inserted in head- and body-sized phantoms using different imaging protocols. These protocols are designed to have the same dose level (CTDIvol) but using different X-ray tube voltage settings (kVp). Methods: Different concentrations of iodine objects inserted in a head size phantom and a body size phantom are imaged on a 64-slice commercial CT scanner. Scanning protocols with various tube voltages (80, 100, and 120 kVp) and current settings are selected, which output the same absorbed dose level (CTDIvol). Because the phantom design (size of the iodine objects, the air gap between the inserted objects and the phantom) is not ideal for a model observer study, the acquired CT images are used to generate simulation images with four different sizes and five different contracts iodine objects. For each type of the objects, 500 images (100 x 100 pixels) are generated for the observer study. The observer selected in this study is the channelized scanning linear observer which could be applied to estimate the size and the contrast. The figure of merit used is the correct estimation ratio. The mean and the variance are estimated by the shuffle method. Results: The results indicate that the protocols with 100 kVp tube voltage setting provides the best performance for iodine insert size and contrast estimation for both head and body phantom cases. Conclusion: This work presents a practical and robust quantitative approach using channelized scanning linear observer to study contrast and size estimation performance from different CT protocols. Different protocols at same CTDIvol setting could Result in different image quality performance. The relationship between the absorbed dose and the diagnostic image quality is not linear.

  3. 76 FR 5518 - Federal Housing Administration (FHA): Refinancing an Existing Cooperative Under Section 207...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ... project is for rental or cooperative housing, HUD's regulations limit section 223(f) financing to rental... financing to rental projects. A recent HUD report on U.S. Housing Market Conditions \\2\\ indicated that... provide that ``a mortgage financing the purchase or refinance of an existing rental housing project or...

  4. TH-B-207B-01: Optimizing Pediatric CT in the Emergency Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodge, C. [Texas Children’s Hospital (United States)

    2016-06-15

    This imaging educational program will focus on solutions to common pediatric image quality optimization challenges. The speakers will present collective knowledge on best practices in pediatric imaging from their experience at dedicated children’s hospitals. One of the most commonly encountered pediatric imaging requirements for the non-specialist hospital is pediatric CT in the emergency room setting. Thus, this educational program will begin with optimization of pediatric CT in the emergency department. Though pediatric cardiovascular MRI may be less common in the non-specialist hospitals, low pediatric volumes and unique cardiovascular anatomy make optimization of these techniques difficult. Therefore, our second speaker will review best practices in pediatric cardiovascular MRI based on experiences from a children’s hospital with a large volume of cardiac patients. Learning Objectives: To learn techniques for optimizing radiation dose and image quality for CT of children in the emergency room setting. To learn solutions for consistently high quality cardiovascular MRI of children.

  5. WE-H-207B-02: MR-Driven RT Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, M.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, steady progress has been made towards the implementation of MRI in external beam radiation therapy for processes ranging from treatment simulation to in-room guidance. Novel procedures relying mostly on MR data are currently implemented in the clinic. This session will cover topics such as (a) commissioning and quality control of the MR in-room imagers and simulators specific to RT, (b) treatment planning requirements, constraints and challenges when dealing with various MR data, (c) quantification of organ motion with an emphasis on treatment delivery guidance, and (d) MR-driven strategies for adaptive RT workflows. The content of the session was chosen to address both educational and practical key aspects of MR guidance. Learning Objectives: Good understanding of MR testing recommended for in-room MR imaging as well as image data validation for RT chain (e.g. image transfer, filtering for consistency, spatial accuracy, manipulation for task specific); Familiarity with MR-based planning procedures: motivation, core workflow requirements, current status, challenges; Overview of the current methods for the quantification of organ motion; Discussion on approaches for adaptive treatment planning and delivery. T. Stanescu - License agreement with Modus Medical Devices to develop a phantom for the quantification of MR image system-related distortions.; T. Stanescu, N/A

  6. WE-DE-207A-04: Advances in Radiological Neuro-Endovascular Interventional Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudin, S. [University at Buffalo (SUNY) School of Medicine (United States)

    2016-06-15

    1. Parallels in the evolution of x-ray angiographic systems and devices used for minimally invasive endovascular therapy Charles Strother - DSA, invented by Dr. Charles Mistretta at UW-Madison, was the technology which enabled the development of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. As DSA became widely available and the potential benefits for accessing the cerebral vasculature from an endovascular approach began to be apparent, industry began efforts to develop tools for use in these procedures. Along with development of catheters, embolic materials, pushable coils and the GDC coils there was simultaneous development and improvement of 2D DSA image quality and the introduction of 3D DSA. Together, these advances resulted in an enormous expansion in the scope and numbers of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. The introduction of flat detectors for c-arm angiographic systems in 2002 provided the possibility of the angiographic suite becoming not just a location for vascular imaging where physiological assessments might also be performed. Over the last decade algorithmic and hardware advances have been sufficient to now realize this potential in clinical practice. The selection of patients for endovascular treatments is enhanced by this dual capability. Along with these advances has been a steady reduction in the radiation exposure required so that today, vascular and soft tissue images may be obtained with equal or in many cases less radiation exposure than is the case for comparable images obtained with multi-detector CT. Learning Objectives: To understand the full capabilities of today’s angiographic suite To understand how c-arm cone beam CT soft tissue imaging can be used for assessments of devices, blood flow and perfusion. Advances in real-time x-ray neuro-endovascular image guidance Stephen Rudin - Reacting to the demands on real-time image guidance for ever finer neurovascular interventions, great improvements in imaging chains are being pursued. For the highest spatial and temporal resolution, x-ray guidance with fluoroscopy and angiography although dominant are still being vastly improved. New detectors such as the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and x-ray source designs that enable higher outputs while maintaining small focal spots will be highlighted along with new methods for minimizing the radiation dose to patients. Additionally, new platforms for training and device testing that include patient-specific 3D printed vascular phantoms and new metrics such as generalized relative object detectability for objectively inter-comparing systems will be discussed. This will improve the opportunity for better evaluation of these technological advances which should contribute to the safety and efficacy of image guided minimally invasive neuro-endovascular procedures. Learning Objectives: To understand the operation of new x-ray imaging chain components such as detectors and sources To be informed about the latest testing methods, with 3D printed vascular phantoms, and new evaluation metrics for advanced imaging in x-ray image guided neurovascular interventions Advances in cone beam CT anatomical and functional imaging in angio-suite to enable one-stop-shop stroke imaging workflow Guang-Hong Chen - The introduction of flat-panel detector based cone-beam CT in clinical angiographic imaging systems enabled treating physicians to obtain three-dimensional anatomic roadmaps for bony structure, soft brain tissue, and vasculatures for treatment planning and efficacy checking after the procedures. However, much improvement is needed to reduce image artifacts, reduce radiation dose, and add potential functional imaging capability to provide four-dimensional dynamic information of vasculature and brain perfusion. In this presentation, some of the new techniques developed to address radiation dose issues, image artifact reduction and brain perfusion using C-arm cone-beam CT imaging system will be introduced for the audience. Learning Objectives: To understand the clinical need of one-stop-shop stroke imaging workflow To understand to technical challenges in cone beam CT perfusion To understand the potential technical solutions to enable one-stop-shop imaging workflow Recent advances in devices used in neuro--interventions Mattew Gounis - Over the past two decades, there has been explosive development of medical devices that have revolutionized the endovascular treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. There is now Level 1, Class A evidence that intra-arterial, mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke is superior to medical management; and similarly that minimally invasive, endovascular repair of ruptured brain aneurysms is superior to surgical treatment. Stent-retrievers are now standard of care for emergent large vessel occlusions causing a stroke, with a number of patients need to treat for good clinical outcomes as low as 4. Recent technologies such as flow diverters and disrupters, intracranial self-expanding stents, flexible large bore catheters that can reach vessels beyond the circle of Willis, stent-retrievers, and super-compliant balloons are the result of successful miniaturization of design features and novel manufacturing technologies capable of building these devices. This is a rapidly evolving field, and the device technology enabling such advancements will be reviewed. Importantly, image-guidance technology has not kept pace in neurointervention and the ability to adequately characterize these devices in vivo remains a significant opportunity. Learning Objectives: A survey of devices used in neurointerventions, their materials and essential design characteristics Funding support received from NIH and DOD; Funding support received from GE Healthcare; Funding support received from Siemens AX; Patent royalties received from GE Healthcare; G. Chen, Funding received from NIH; funding received from DOD; funding received from GE Healthcare; funding received from Siemens AX.; M. Gounis, consultant for Codman Neurovascular and Stryker Neurovascular; Holds stock in InNeuroCo Inc, research grants: NIH, Medtronic Neurovascular, Microvention/Terumo, Cerevasc LLC, Gentuity, Codman Neurovascular, Philips Healthcare, Stryker Neurovascular, Tay Sachs Foundation, and InNeuroCo Inc.; S. Rudin, Supported in part by NIH Grant R01EB002873 and the Toshiba Medical System Corp.

  7. WE-DE-207A-03: Recent Advances in Devices Used in Neuro--Interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gounis, M. [University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)

    2016-06-15

    1. Parallels in the evolution of x-ray angiographic systems and devices used for minimally invasive endovascular therapy Charles Strother - DSA, invented by Dr. Charles Mistretta at UW-Madison, was the technology which enabled the development of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. As DSA became widely available and the potential benefits for accessing the cerebral vasculature from an endovascular approach began to be apparent, industry began efforts to develop tools for use in these procedures. Along with development of catheters, embolic materials, pushable coils and the GDC coils there was simultaneous development and improvement of 2D DSA image quality and the introduction of 3D DSA. Together, these advances resulted in an enormous expansion in the scope and numbers of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. The introduction of flat detectors for c-arm angiographic systems in 2002 provided the possibility of the angiographic suite becoming not just a location for vascular imaging where physiological assessments might also be performed. Over the last decade algorithmic and hardware advances have been sufficient to now realize this potential in clinical practice. The selection of patients for endovascular treatments is enhanced by this dual capability. Along with these advances has been a steady reduction in the radiation exposure required so that today, vascular and soft tissue images may be obtained with equal or in many cases less radiation exposure than is the case for comparable images obtained with multi-detector CT. Learning Objectives: To understand the full capabilities of today’s angiographic suite To understand how c-arm cone beam CT soft tissue imaging can be used for assessments of devices, blood flow and perfusion. Advances in real-time x-ray neuro-endovascular image guidance Stephen Rudin - Reacting to the demands on real-time image guidance for ever finer neurovascular interventions, great improvements in imaging chains are being pursued. For the highest spatial and temporal resolution, x-ray guidance with fluoroscopy and angiography although dominant are still being vastly improved. New detectors such as the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and x-ray source designs that enable higher outputs while maintaining small focal spots will be highlighted along with new methods for minimizing the radiation dose to patients. Additionally, new platforms for training and device testing that include patient-specific 3D printed vascular phantoms and new metrics such as generalized relative object detectability for objectively inter-comparing systems will be discussed. This will improve the opportunity for better evaluation of these technological advances which should contribute to the safety and efficacy of image guided minimally invasive neuro-endovascular procedures. Learning Objectives: To understand the operation of new x-ray imaging chain components such as detectors and sources To be informed about the latest testing methods, with 3D printed vascular phantoms, and new evaluation metrics for advanced imaging in x-ray image guided neurovascular interventions Advances in cone beam CT anatomical and functional imaging in angio-suite to enable one-stop-shop stroke imaging workflow Guang-Hong Chen - The introduction of flat-panel detector based cone-beam CT in clinical angiographic imaging systems enabled treating physicians to obtain three-dimensional anatomic roadmaps for bony structure, soft brain tissue, and vasculatures for treatment planning and efficacy checking after the procedures. However, much improvement is needed to reduce image artifacts, reduce radiation dose, and add potential functional imaging capability to provide four-dimensional dynamic information of vasculature and brain perfusion. In this presentation, some of the new techniques developed to address radiation dose issues, image artifact reduction and brain perfusion using C-arm cone-beam CT imaging system will be introduced for the audience. Learning Objectives: To understand the clinical need of one-stop-shop stroke imaging workflow To understand to technical challenges in cone beam CT perfusion To understand the potential technical solutions to enable one-stop-shop imaging workflow Recent advances in devices used in neuro--interventions Mattew Gounis - Over the past two decades, there has been explosive development of medical devices that have revolutionized the endovascular treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. There is now Level 1, Class A evidence that intra-arterial, mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke is superior to medical management; and similarly that minimally invasive, endovascular repair of ruptured brain aneurysms is superior to surgical treatment. Stent-retrievers are now standard of care for emergent large vessel occlusions causing a stroke, with a number of patients need to treat for good clinical outcomes as low as 4. Recent technologies such as flow diverters and disrupters, intracranial self-expanding stents, flexible large bore catheters that can reach vessels beyond the circle of Willis, stent-retrievers, and super-compliant balloons are the result of successful miniaturization of design features and novel manufacturing technologies capable of building these devices. This is a rapidly evolving field, and the device technology enabling such advancements will be reviewed. Importantly, image-guidance technology has not kept pace in neurointervention and the ability to adequately characterize these devices in vivo remains a significant opportunity. Learning Objectives: A survey of devices used in neurointerventions, their materials and essential design characteristics Funding support received from NIH and DOD; Funding support received from GE Healthcare; Funding support received from Siemens AX; Patent royalties received from GE Healthcare; G. Chen, Funding received from NIH; funding received from DOD; funding received from GE Healthcare; funding received from Siemens AX.; M. Gounis, consultant for Codman Neurovascular and Stryker Neurovascular; Holds stock in InNeuroCo Inc, research grants: NIH, Medtronic Neurovascular, Microvention/Terumo, Cerevasc LLC, Gentuity, Codman Neurovascular, Philips Healthcare, Stryker Neurovascular, Tay Sachs Foundation, and InNeuroCo Inc.; S. Rudin, Supported in part by NIH Grant R01EB002873 and the Toshiba Medical System Corp.

  8. WE-FG-207A-01: Introduction to Dedicated Breast CT - Early Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedantham, S. [University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively investigating dedicated breast CT. The development of large-area flat-panel detectors with field-of-view sufficient to image the entire breast in each projection enabled development of flat-panel cone-beam breast CT. More recently, the availability of complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detectors with lower system noise and finer pixel pitch, combined with the development of x-ray tubes with focal spot dimensions similar to mammography systems, has shown improved spatial resolution and could improve visualization of microcalcifications. These technological developments promise clinical translation of low-dose cone-beam breast CT. Dedicated photon-counting breast CT (pcBCT) systems represent a novel detector design, which provide high spatial resolution (∼ 100µm) and low mean glandular dose (MGD). The CdTe-based direct conversion detector technology was previously evaluated and confirmed by simulations and basic experiments on laboratory setups [Kalender et al., Eur Radiol 22: 1–8, 2012]. Measurements of dose, technical image quality parameters, and surgical specimens on a pcBCT scanner have been completed. Comparative evaluation of surgical specimens showed that pcBCT outperformed mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis with respect to 3D spatial resolution, detectability of calcifications, and soft tissue delineation. Major barriers to widespread clinical use of BCT relate to radiation dose, imaging of microcalcifications, and adequate coverage of breast tissue near the chest wall. Adequate chest wall coverage is also technically challenging but recent progress in x-ray tube, detector and table design now enables full breast coverage in the majority of patients. At this time, BCT has been deemed to be suitable for diagnostic imaging but not yet for screening. The mean glandular dose (MGD) from BCT has been reported to be between 5.7 to 27.8 mGy, and this range is comparable to, and within the range of, the MGD of 2.6 to 31.6 mGy in diagnostic mammography. In diagnostic studies, the median MGD from BCT and mammography were 12.6 and 11.1 mGy, respectively [Vedantham et al., Phys Med Biol. 58: 7921–36, 2013]. Moreover, in diagnostic imaging of the breast the location of the lesion is known and therefore characterization and not detection is by far the primary consideration. The role of bCT is particularly compelling for diagnostic imaging of the breast because it may replace in part the multiple mammographic views of the breast under vigorous compression. Other non-screening potential applications of bCT include the assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy [Vedantham et al., J Clin Imaging Sci 4, 64, 2014] and pre-surgical evaluation. Learning Objectives: To understand the metrics used to evaluate screening and diagnostic imaging To understand the benefits and limitations of current clinical modalities To understand how breast CT can improve over current clinical modalities To note the early attempts to translate breast CT to the clinic in 1970s-1990s To understand the recent developments in low-dose cone-beam breast CT To understand the recent developments in photon-counting breast CT To understand the radiation dose, clinical translation, and recent developments in diagnostic imaging with breast CT Supported in part by NIH grants R21 CA134128, R01 CA128906 and R01 CA195512. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the official views of the NIH or the NCI.; S. Vedantham, Funding sources: Supported in part by NIH/NCI grants R01 CA128906 and R01 CA195512. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the official views of the NIH/NCI. Disclosures: Research collaboration with Koning Corporation, West Henrietta, NY. Conflicts of Interest: J. Boone, This research was supported in part by NIH grant R01CA181081; W. Kalender, WK is founder and CEO of CT Imaging GmbH Erlangen, Germany.; A. Karellas, NIH R21 CA134128, R01 CA128906, and R01 CA195512 and Research collaboration with Koning Corporation.

  9. WE-A-207-02: Electron Beam Therapy - Current Status and Future Directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q.

    2015-01-01

    In memory of the significant contribution of Dr. Jacques Ovadia to electron beam techniques, this session will review recent, advanced techniques which are reinvigorating the science of electron beam radiation therapy. Recent research efforts in improving both the applicability and quality of the electron beam therapy will be discussed, including modulated electron beam radiotherapy (MERT) and dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR). Learning Objectives: To learn about recent advances in electron beam therapy, including modulated electron beam therapy and dynamic electron arc therapy (DEAR). Put recent advances in the context of work that Dr. Ovadia pursued during his career in medical physics

  10. WE-DE-207A-03: Recent Advances in Devices Used in Neuro--Interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gounis, M.

    2016-01-01

    1. Parallels in the evolution of x-ray angiographic systems and devices used for minimally invasive endovascular therapy Charles Strother - DSA, invented by Dr. Charles Mistretta at UW-Madison, was the technology which enabled the development of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. As DSA became widely available and the potential benefits for accessing the cerebral vasculature from an endovascular approach began to be apparent, industry began efforts to develop tools for use in these procedures. Along with development of catheters, embolic materials, pushable coils and the GDC coils there was simultaneous development and improvement of 2D DSA image quality and the introduction of 3D DSA. Together, these advances resulted in an enormous expansion in the scope and numbers of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. The introduction of flat detectors for c-arm angiographic systems in 2002 provided the possibility of the angiographic suite becoming not just a location for vascular imaging where physiological assessments might also be performed. Over the last decade algorithmic and hardware advances have been sufficient to now realize this potential in clinical practice. The selection of patients for endovascular treatments is enhanced by this dual capability. Along with these advances has been a steady reduction in the radiation exposure required so that today, vascular and soft tissue images may be obtained with equal or in many cases less radiation exposure than is the case for comparable images obtained with multi-detector CT. Learning Objectives: To understand the full capabilities of today’s angiographic suite To understand how c-arm cone beam CT soft tissue imaging can be used for assessments of devices, blood flow and perfusion. Advances in real-time x-ray neuro-endovascular image guidance Stephen Rudin - Reacting to the demands on real-time image guidance for ever finer neurovascular interventions, great improvements in imaging chains are being pursued. For the highest spatial and temporal resolution, x-ray guidance with fluoroscopy and angiography although dominant are still being vastly improved. New detectors such as the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and x-ray source designs that enable higher outputs while maintaining small focal spots will be highlighted along with new methods for minimizing the radiation dose to patients. Additionally, new platforms for training and device testing that include patient-specific 3D printed vascular phantoms and new metrics such as generalized relative object detectability for objectively inter-comparing systems will be discussed. This will improve the opportunity for better evaluation of these technological advances which should contribute to the safety and efficacy of image guided minimally invasive neuro-endovascular procedures. Learning Objectives: To understand the operation of new x-ray imaging chain components such as detectors and sources To be informed about the latest testing methods, with 3D printed vascular phantoms, and new evaluation metrics for advanced imaging in x-ray image guided neurovascular interventions Advances in cone beam CT anatomical and functional imaging in angio-suite to enable one-stop-shop stroke imaging workflow Guang-Hong Chen - The introduction of flat-panel detector based cone-beam CT in clinical angiographic imaging systems enabled treating physicians to obtain three-dimensional anatomic roadmaps for bony structure, soft brain tissue, and vasculatures for treatment planning and efficacy checking after the procedures. However, much improvement is needed to reduce image artifacts, reduce radiation dose, and add potential functional imaging capability to provide four-dimensional dynamic information of vasculature and brain perfusion. In this presentation, some of the new techniques developed to address radiation dose issues, image artifact reduction and brain perfusion using C-arm cone-beam CT imaging system will be introduced for the audience. Learning Objectives: To understand the clinical need of one-stop-shop stroke imaging workflow To understand to technical challenges in cone beam CT perfusion To understand the potential technical solutions to enable one-stop-shop imaging workflow Recent advances in devices used in neuro--interventions Mattew Gounis - Over the past two decades, there has been explosive development of medical devices that have revolutionized the endovascular treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. There is now Level 1, Class A evidence that intra-arterial, mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke is superior to medical management; and similarly that minimally invasive, endovascular repair of ruptured brain aneurysms is superior to surgical treatment. Stent-retrievers are now standard of care for emergent large vessel occlusions causing a stroke, with a number of patients need to treat for good clinical outcomes as low as 4. Recent technologies such as flow diverters and disrupters, intracranial self-expanding stents, flexible large bore catheters that can reach vessels beyond the circle of Willis, stent-retrievers, and super-compliant balloons are the result of successful miniaturization of design features and novel manufacturing technologies capable of building these devices. This is a rapidly evolving field, and the device technology enabling such advancements will be reviewed. Importantly, image-guidance technology has not kept pace in neurointervention and the ability to adequately characterize these devices in vivo remains a significant opportunity. Learning Objectives: A survey of devices used in neurointerventions, their materials and essential design characteristics Funding support received from NIH and DOD; Funding support received from GE Healthcare; Funding support received from Siemens AX; Patent royalties received from GE Healthcare; G. Chen, Funding received from NIH; funding received from DOD; funding received from GE Healthcare; funding received from Siemens AX.; M. Gounis, consultant for Codman Neurovascular and Stryker Neurovascular; Holds stock in InNeuroCo Inc, research grants: NIH, Medtronic Neurovascular, Microvention/Terumo, Cerevasc LLC, Gentuity, Codman Neurovascular, Philips Healthcare, Stryker Neurovascular, Tay Sachs Foundation, and InNeuroCo Inc.; S. Rudin, Supported in part by NIH Grant R01EB002873 and the Toshiba Medical System Corp.

  11. WE-DE-207A-04: Advances in Radiological Neuro-Endovascular Interventional Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudin, S.

    2016-01-01

    1. Parallels in the evolution of x-ray angiographic systems and devices used for minimally invasive endovascular therapy Charles Strother - DSA, invented by Dr. Charles Mistretta at UW-Madison, was the technology which enabled the development of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. As DSA became widely available and the potential benefits for accessing the cerebral vasculature from an endovascular approach began to be apparent, industry began efforts to develop tools for use in these procedures. Along with development of catheters, embolic materials, pushable coils and the GDC coils there was simultaneous development and improvement of 2D DSA image quality and the introduction of 3D DSA. Together, these advances resulted in an enormous expansion in the scope and numbers of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. The introduction of flat detectors for c-arm angiographic systems in 2002 provided the possibility of the angiographic suite becoming not just a location for vascular imaging where physiological assessments might also be performed. Over the last decade algorithmic and hardware advances have been sufficient to now realize this potential in clinical practice. The selection of patients for endovascular treatments is enhanced by this dual capability. Along with these advances has been a steady reduction in the radiation exposure required so that today, vascular and soft tissue images may be obtained with equal or in many cases less radiation exposure than is the case for comparable images obtained with multi-detector CT. Learning Objectives: To understand the full capabilities of today’s angiographic suite To understand how c-arm cone beam CT soft tissue imaging can be used for assessments of devices, blood flow and perfusion. Advances in real-time x-ray neuro-endovascular image guidance Stephen Rudin - Reacting to the demands on real-time image guidance for ever finer neurovascular interventions, great improvements in imaging chains are being pursued. For the highest spatial and temporal resolution, x-ray guidance with fluoroscopy and angiography although dominant are still being vastly improved. New detectors such as the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and x-ray source designs that enable higher outputs while maintaining small focal spots will be highlighted along with new methods for minimizing the radiation dose to patients. Additionally, new platforms for training and device testing that include patient-specific 3D printed vascular phantoms and new metrics such as generalized relative object detectability for objectively inter-comparing systems will be discussed. This will improve the opportunity for better evaluation of these technological advances which should contribute to the safety and efficacy of image guided minimally invasive neuro-endovascular procedures. Learning Objectives: To understand the operation of new x-ray imaging chain components such as detectors and sources To be informed about the latest testing methods, with 3D printed vascular phantoms, and new evaluation metrics for advanced imaging in x-ray image guided neurovascular interventions Advances in cone beam CT anatomical and functional imaging in angio-suite to enable one-stop-shop stroke imaging workflow Guang-Hong Chen - The introduction of flat-panel detector based cone-beam CT in clinical angiographic imaging systems enabled treating physicians to obtain three-dimensional anatomic roadmaps for bony structure, soft brain tissue, and vasculatures for treatment planning and efficacy checking after the procedures. However, much improvement is needed to reduce image artifacts, reduce radiation dose, and add potential functional imaging capability to provide four-dimensional dynamic information of vasculature and brain perfusion. In this presentation, some of the new techniques developed to address radiation dose issues, image artifact reduction and brain perfusion using C-arm cone-beam CT imaging system will be introduced for the audience. Learning Objectives: To understand the clinical need of one-stop-shop stroke imaging workflow To understand to technical challenges in cone beam CT perfusion To understand the potential technical solutions to enable one-stop-shop imaging workflow Recent advances in devices used in neuro--interventions Mattew Gounis - Over the past two decades, there has been explosive development of medical devices that have revolutionized the endovascular treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. There is now Level 1, Class A evidence that intra-arterial, mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke is superior to medical management; and similarly that minimally invasive, endovascular repair of ruptured brain aneurysms is superior to surgical treatment. Stent-retrievers are now standard of care for emergent large vessel occlusions causing a stroke, with a number of patients need to treat for good clinical outcomes as low as 4. Recent technologies such as flow diverters and disrupters, intracranial self-expanding stents, flexible large bore catheters that can reach vessels beyond the circle of Willis, stent-retrievers, and super-compliant balloons are the result of successful miniaturization of design features and novel manufacturing technologies capable of building these devices. This is a rapidly evolving field, and the device technology enabling such advancements will be reviewed. Importantly, image-guidance technology has not kept pace in neurointervention and the ability to adequately characterize these devices in vivo remains a significant opportunity. Learning Objectives: A survey of devices used in neurointerventions, their materials and essential design characteristics Funding support received from NIH and DOD; Funding support received from GE Healthcare; Funding support received from Siemens AX; Patent royalties received from GE Healthcare; G. Chen, Funding received from NIH; funding received from DOD; funding received from GE Healthcare; funding received from Siemens AX.; M. Gounis, consultant for Codman Neurovascular and Stryker Neurovascular; Holds stock in InNeuroCo Inc, research grants: NIH, Medtronic Neurovascular, Microvention/Terumo, Cerevasc LLC, Gentuity, Codman Neurovascular, Philips Healthcare, Stryker Neurovascular, Tay Sachs Foundation, and InNeuroCo Inc.; S. Rudin, Supported in part by NIH Grant R01EB002873 and the Toshiba Medical System Corp.

  12. Review on transactinium isotope build-up and decay in reactor fuel and related sensitivities to cross section changes and results and main conclusions of the IAEA-Advisory Group Meeting on Transactinium Nuclear Data, held at Karlsruhe, November 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuesters, H.; Lalovic, M.

    1976-04-01

    In this report a review is given on the actinium isotope build-up and decay in LWRs, LMFBRs and HTRs. The dependence of the corresponding physical aspects on reactor type, fuel cycle strategy, calculational methods and cross section uncertainties is discussed. Results from postirradiation analyses and from integral experiments in fast zero power assemblies are compared with theoretical predictions. Some sensitivity studies about the influence of actinium nuclear data uncertainties on the isotopic concentration, decay heat, and the radiation out-put in fuel and waste are presented. In a second part, the main results of the IAEA-Advisory Group Meeting on Transactinium Nuclear Data are summarized and discussed. (orig.) [de

  13. TH-EF-207A-04: A Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Cone Beam CT Technique for Evaluation of Renal Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z; Shi, J; Yang, Y [University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a simple but robust method for the early detection and evaluation of renal functions using dynamic contrast enhanced cone beam CT technique. Methods: Experiments were performed on an integrated imaging and radiation research platform developed by our lab. Animals (n=3) were anesthetized with 20uL Ketamine/Xylazine cocktail, and then received 200uL injection of iodinated contrast agent Iopamidol via tail vein. Cone beam CT was acquired following contrast injection once per minute and up to 25 minutes. The cone beam CT was reconstructed with a dimension of 300×300×800 voxels of 130×130×130um voxel resolution. The middle kidney slices in the transvers and coronal planes were selected for image analysis. A double exponential function was used to fit the contrast enhanced signal intensity versus the time after contrast injection. Both pixel-based and region of interest (ROI)-based curve fitting were performed. Four parameters obtained from the curve fitting, namely the amplitude and flow constant for both contrast wash in and wash out phases, were investigated for further analysis. Results: Robust curve fitting was demonstrated for both pixel based (with R{sup 2}>0.8 for >85% pixels within the kidney contour) and ROI based (R{sup 2}>0.9 for all regions) analysis. Three different functional regions: renal pelvis, medulla and cortex, were clearly differentiated in the functional parameter map in the pixel based analysis. ROI based analysis showed the half-life T1/2 for contrast wash in and wash out phases were 0.98±0.15 and 17.04±7.16, 0.63±0.07 and 17.88±4.51, and 1.48±0.40 and 10.79±3.88 minutes for the renal pelvis, medulla and cortex, respectively. Conclusion: A robust method based on dynamic contrast enhanced cone beam CT and double exponential curve fitting has been developed to analyze the renal functions for different functional regions. Future study will be performed to investigate the sensitivity of this technique in the detection of radiation induced kidney dysfunction.

  14. 33 CFR 207.180 - All waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico (except the Mississippi River, its tributaries...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... displayed at all locks as follows: (i) From sunset to sunrise. One green light shall indicate the lock is... projection or cargo loaded in such a manner that is liable to damage the structure. (v) Vessels having chains..., loading and unloading supplies, and making emergency repairs in the vicinity of locks so long as...

  15. TH-CD-207A-05: Lung Surface Deformation Vector Fields Prediction by Monitoring Respiratory Surrogate Signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasehi Tehrani, J; Wang, J; McEwan, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we developed and evaluated a method for predicting lung surface deformation vector fields (SDVFs) based on surrogate signals such as chest and abdomen motion at selected locations and spirometry measurements. Methods: A Patient-specific 3D triangular surface mesh of the lung region at end-expiration (EE) phase was obtained by threshold-based segmentation method. For each patient, a spirometer recorded the flow volume changes of the lungs; and 192 selected points at a regular spacing of 2cm X 2cm matrix points over a total area of 34cm X 24cm on the surface of chest and abdomen was used to detect chest wall motions. Preprocessing techniques such as QR factorization with column pivoting (QRCP) were employed to remove redundant observations of the chest and abdominal area. To create a statistical model between the lung surface and the corresponding surrogate signals, we developed a predictive model based on canonical ridge regression (CRR). Two unique weighting vectors were selected for each vertex on the surface of the lung, and they were optimized during the training process using the all other phases of 4D-CT except the end-inspiration (EI) phase. These parameters were employed to predict the vertices locations of a testing data set, which was the EI phase of 4D-CT. Results: For ten lung cancer patients, the deformation vector field of each vertex of lung surface mesh was estimated from the external motion at selected positions on the chest wall surface plus spirometry measurements. The average estimation of 98th percentile of error was less than 1 mm (AP= 0.85, RL= 0.61, and SI= 0.82). Conclusion: The developed predictive model provides a non-invasive approach to derive lung boundary condition. Together with personalized biomechanical respiration modelling, the proposed model can be used to derive the lung tumor motion during radiation therapy accurately from non-invasive measurements.

  16. WE-DE-207A-00: Advances in Image-Guided Neurointerventions-Clinical Pull and Technology Push

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    1. Parallels in the evolution of x-ray angiographic systems and devices used for minimally invasive endovascular therapy Charles Strother - DSA, invented by Dr. Charles Mistretta at UW-Madison, was the technology which enabled the development of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. As DSA became widely available and the potential benefits for accessing the cerebral vasculature from an endovascular approach began to be apparent, industry began efforts to develop tools for use in these procedures. Along with development of catheters, embolic materials, pushable coils and the GDC coils there was simultaneous development and improvement of 2D DSA image quality and the introduction of 3D DSA. Together, these advances resulted in an enormous expansion in the scope and numbers of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. The introduction of flat detectors for c-arm angiographic systems in 2002 provided the possibility of the angiographic suite becoming not just a location for vascular imaging where physiological assessments might also be performed. Over the last decade algorithmic and hardware advances have been sufficient to now realize this potential in clinical practice. The selection of patients for endovascular treatments is enhanced by this dual capability. Along with these advances has been a steady reduction in the radiation exposure required so that today, vascular and soft tissue images may be obtained with equal or in many cases less radiation exposure than is the case for comparable images obtained with multi-detector CT. Learning Objectives: To understand the full capabilities of today’s angiographic suite To understand how c-arm cone beam CT soft tissue imaging can be used for assessments of devices, blood flow and perfusion. Advances in real-time x-ray neuro-endovascular image guidance Stephen Rudin - Reacting to the demands on real-time image guidance for ever finer neurovascular interventions, great improvements in imaging chains are being pursued. For the highest spatial and temporal resolution, x-ray guidance with fluoroscopy and angiography although dominant are still being vastly improved. New detectors such as the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and x-ray source designs that enable higher outputs while maintaining small focal spots will be highlighted along with new methods for minimizing the radiation dose to patients. Additionally, new platforms for training and device testing that include patient-specific 3D printed vascular phantoms and new metrics such as generalized relative object detectability for objectively inter-comparing systems will be discussed. This will improve the opportunity for better evaluation of these technological advances which should contribute to the safety and efficacy of image guided minimally invasive neuro-endovascular procedures. Learning Objectives: To understand the operation of new x-ray imaging chain components such as detectors and sources To be informed about the latest testing methods, with 3D printed vascular phantoms, and new evaluation metrics for advanced imaging in x-ray image guided neurovascular interventions Advances in cone beam CT anatomical and functional imaging in angio-suite to enable one-stop-shop stroke imaging workflow Guang-Hong Chen - The introduction of flat-panel detector based cone-beam CT in clinical angiographic imaging systems enabled treating physicians to obtain three-dimensional anatomic roadmaps for bony structure, soft brain tissue, and vasculatures for treatment planning and efficacy checking after the procedures. However, much improvement is needed to reduce image artifacts, reduce radiation dose, and add potential functional imaging capability to provide four-dimensional dynamic information of vasculature and brain perfusion. In this presentation, some of the new techniques developed to address radiation dose issues, image artifact reduction and brain perfusion using C-arm cone-beam CT imaging system will be introduced for the audience. Learning Objectives: To understand the clinical need of one-stop-shop stroke imaging workflow To understand to technical challenges in cone beam CT perfusion To understand the potential technical solutions to enable one-stop-shop imaging workflow Recent advances in devices used in neuro--interventions Mattew Gounis - Over the past two decades, there has been explosive development of medical devices that have revolutionized the endovascular treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. There is now Level 1, Class A evidence that intra-arterial, mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke is superior to medical management; and similarly that minimally invasive, endovascular repair of ruptured brain aneurysms is superior to surgical treatment. Stent-retrievers are now standard of care for emergent large vessel occlusions causing a stroke, with a number of patients need to treat for good clinical outcomes as low as 4. Recent technologies such as flow diverters and disrupters, intracranial self-expanding stents, flexible large bore catheters that can reach vessels beyond the circle of Willis, stent-retrievers, and super-compliant balloons are the result of successful miniaturization of design features and novel manufacturing technologies capable of building these devices. This is a rapidly evolving field, and the device technology enabling such advancements will be reviewed. Importantly, image-guidance technology has not kept pace in neurointervention and the ability to adequately characterize these devices in vivo remains a significant opportunity. Learning Objectives: A survey of devices used in neurointerventions, their materials and essential design characteristics Funding support received from NIH and DOD; Funding support received from GE Healthcare; Funding support received from Siemens AX; Patent royalties received from GE Healthcare; G. Chen, Funding received from NIH; funding received from DOD; funding received from GE Healthcare; funding received from Siemens AX.; M. Gounis, consultant for Codman Neurovascular and Stryker Neurovascular; Holds stock in InNeuroCo Inc, research grants: NIH, Medtronic Neurovascular, Microvention/Terumo, Cerevasc LLC, Gentuity, Codman Neurovascular, Philips Healthcare, Stryker Neurovascular, Tay Sachs Foundation, and InNeuroCo Inc.; S. Rudin, Supported in part by NIH Grant R01EB002873 and the Toshiba Medical System Corp.

  17. WE-AB-207A-06: Progressive Dose Control for Cone Beam CT with Deformation Assisted Temporal Nonlocal Means Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L; Shen, C; Wang, J; Jiang, S; Jia, X

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging dose, we previously proposed a progressive dose control (PDC) scheme to employ temporal correlation between CBCT images at different fractions for image quality enhancement. A temporal non-local means (TNLM) method was developed to enhance quality of a new low-dose CBCT using existing high-quality CBCT. To enhance a voxel value, the TNLM method searches for similar voxels in a window. Due to patient deformation among the two CBCTs, a large searching window was required, reducing image quality and computational efficiency. This abstract proposes a deformation-assisted TNLM (DA-TNLM) method to solve this problem. Methods: For a low-dose CBCT to be enhanced using a high-quality CBCT, we first performed deformable image registration between the low-dose CBCT and the high-quality CBCT to approximately establish voxel correspondence between the two. A searching window for a voxel was then set based on the deformation vector field. Specifically, the search window for each voxel was shifted by the deformation vector. A TNLM step was then applied using only voxels within this determined window to correct image intensity at the low-dose CBCT. Results: We have tested the proposed scheme on simulated CIRS phantom data and real patient data. The CITS phantom was scanned on Varian onboard imaging CBCT system with coach shifting and dose reducing for each time. The real patient data was acquired in four fractions with dose reduced from standard CBCT dose to 12.5% of standard dose. It was found that the DA-TNLM method can reduce total dose by over 75% on average in the first four fractions. Conclusion: We have developed a PDC scheme which can enhance the quality of image scanned at low dose using a DA-TNLM method. Tests in phantom and patient studies demonstrated promising results.

  18. Oahu Hyperspectral Imagery 2000 (207a-0613-272217) - Visual Interpretation from Remote Sensing Imagery Main Eight Hawaiian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project is a cooperative effort between the National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment,...

  19. WE-EF-207-02: The Rotate-Plus-Shift C-Arm Trajectory: Theory and First Clinical Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritschl, L; Kachelriess, M; Kuntz, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The proposed method enables the acquisition of a complete dataset for 3D reconstruction of C-Arm data using less than 180° rotation. Methods: Typically a C–arm cone–beam CT scan is performed using a circle–like trajectory around a region of interest. Therefore an angular range of at least 180° plus fan–angle must be covered to ensure a completely sampled data set. This fact defines some constraints on the geometry and technical specifications of a C–arm system, for example a larger C radius or a smaller C opening respectively. This is even more important for mobile C-arm devices which are typically used in surgical applications.To overcome these limitations we propose a new trajectory which requires only 180° minusfan–angle of rotation for a complete data set. The trajectory consists of three parts: A rotation of the C around a defined iso–center and two translational movements parallel to the detector plane at the begin and at the end of the rotation (rotate plus shift trajectory). This enables the acquisition of a completely sampled dataset using only 180° minus fan–angle of rotation. Results: For the evaluation of the method we show simulated and measured data. The results show, that the rotate plus shift scan yields equivalent image quality compared to the short scan which is assumed to be the gold standard for C-arm CT today. Compared to the pure rotational scan over only 165°, the rotate plus shift scan shows strong improvements in image quality. Conclusion: The proposed method makes 3D imaging using C–arms with less than 180° rotation range possible. This enables integrating full 3D functionality into a C- arm device without any loss of handling and usability for 2D imaging

  20. TH-CD-207B-10: Effect of CT Reconstruction Filter On Measured Hounsfield Values in Lung Nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, K; Reiser, I; Sanchez, A; Chung, J; MacMahon, H; Lu, Z [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Measured Hounsfield numbers in CT are used by radiologists to determine the presence of calcium or fat in lung nodules, either of which suggests a benign diagnosis. However, substantial variations in Hounsfield number may arise due to the use of different reconstruction parameters such as the filter/kernel, leading to measurement inaccuracies. This quality improvement project was developed to demonstrate measurement pitfalls and to identify acceptable conditions for incorporating Hounsfield values as a factor in lung nodule diagnosis. Methods: 12 mm-diameter spheres of polyurethane and urethane foam were placed into an anthropomorphic chest phantom, and 10 mm-diameter tubes with varying iodine concentrations were placed into a 16 cm PMMA cylindrical phantom. Additionally, 11 mm-diameter PMMA and HDPE spheres were placed in a 10 cm PMMA cylindrical phantom. Phantoms were scanned at 120 kVp using a Siemens Biograph mCT and on a Philips iCT and reconstructed using various reconstruction filters. Results: For the Siemens system, both sharp kernels and smooth kernels altered the Hounsfield numbers. Hounsfield numbers varied within a range of 8.9 HU for urethane foam and varied within 58.7 HU for polyurethane. The iodine measurements varied up to 37.9 HU for the lowest concentration. For the Philips system, Hounsfield numbers were relatively consistent but were higher for the “Detail” and “Lung Enhanced” filters, varying by 36.9 HU for PMMA and 15.9 HU for HDPE. Conclusion: Reconstruction filters can change the measured Hounsfield numbers of nodular objects, especially with detail-enhancing (sharpening) filters commonly used in lung imaging. Measured values should only be used for diagnostic decision support with filters that have demonstrated accuracy and consistency. While filter accuracy statements are available from manufacturers, radiologists are likely not aware of the extent of potential variations that can occur in a clinical setting.

  1. WE-FG-207B-03: Multi-Energy CT Reconstruction with Spatial Spectral Nonlocal Means Regularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, B [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Shen, C; Ouyang, L; Yang, M; Jiang, S; Jia, X [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Zhou, L [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Multi-energy computed tomography (MECT) is an emerging application in medical imaging due to its ability of material differentiation and potential for molecular imaging. In MECT, image correlations at different spatial and channels exist. It is desirable to incorporate these correlations in reconstruction to improve image quality. For this purpose, this study proposes a MECT reconstruction technique that employes spatial spectral non-local means (ssNLM) regularization. Methods: We consider a kVp-switching scanning method in which source energy is rapidly switched during data acquisition. For each energy channel, this yields projection data acquired at a number of angles, whereas projection angles among channels are different. We formulate the reconstruction task as an optimziation problem. A least square term enfores data fidelity. A ssNLM term is used as regularization to encourage similarities among image patches at different spatial locations and channels. When comparing image patches at different channels, intensity difference were corrected by a transformation estimated via histogram equalization during the reconstruction process. Results: We tested our method in a simulation study with a NCAT phantom and an experimental study with a Gammex phantom. For comparison purpose, we also performed reconstructions using conjugate-gradient least square (CGLS) method and conventional NLM method that only considers spatial correlation in an image. ssNLM is able to better suppress streak artifacts. The streaks are along different projection directions in images at different channels. ssNLM discourages this dissimilarity and hence removes them. True image structures are preserved in this process. Measurements in regions of interests yield 1.1 to 3.2 and 1.5 to 1.8 times higher contrast to noise ratio than the NLM approach. Improvements over CGLS is even more profound due to lack of regularization in the CGLS method and hence amplified noise. Conclusion: The proposed ssNLM method for kVp-switching MECT reconstruction can achieve high quality MECT images.

  2. 5 CFR 1304.4608 - Administrative Enforcement Procedures (18 U.S.C. 207(j); 5 CFR 737.27).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES POST EMPLOYMENT CONFLICT OF INTEREST § 1304.4608... examine witnesses and to submit physical evidence; the right to confront and cross-examine adverse... promulgated thereunder has been made. The Director may prohibit the former Government employee from appearance...

  3. High Dose Cyclophosphamide without Stem Cell Rescue in 207 Patients with Aplastic anemia and other Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeZern, Amy E.; Petri, Michelle; Drachman, Daniel B.; Kerr, Doug; Hammond, Edward R.; Kowalski, Jeanne; Tsai, Hua-Ling; Loeb, David M.; Anhalt, Grant; Wigley, Fredrick; Jones, Richard J.; Brodsky, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    High-dose cyclophosphamide has long been used an anticancer agent, a conditioning regimen for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and as potent immunosuppressive agent in autoimmune diseases including aplastic anemia. High-dose cyclophosphamide is highly toxic to lymphocytes but spares hematopoietic stem cells because of their abundant levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase, the major mechanism of cyclophosphamide inactivation. High dose cyclophosphamide therapy induces durable remissions in most patients with acquired aplastic anemia. Moreover, high-dose cyclophosphamide without hematopoietic stem cell rescue has shown activity in a variety of other severe autoimmune diseases. Here we review the history of cyclophosphamide as is applies to aplastic anemia (AA) and other autoimmune diseases. Included here are the historical data from early patients treated for AA as well as an observational retrospective study in a single tertiary care hospital. This latter component was designed to assess the safety and efficacy of high-dose cyclophosphamide therapy without stem cell rescue in patients with refractory autoimmune diseases. We analyzed fully the 140 patients with severe, progressive autoimmune diseases treated. All patients discussed here received cyclophosphamide, 50 mg/kg per day for 4 consecutive days. Response, relapse and overall survival were measured. Response was defined as a decrease in disease activity in conjunction with a decrease or elimination of immune modulating drugs. Relapse was defined as worsening disease activity and/or a requirement of an increase in dose of, or administration of new, immunosuppressive medications. Hematologic recovery occurred in all patients. The overall response rate of the was 95%, and 44% of those patients remain progression-free with a median follow up time of 36 (range 1–120) months for the 140 patients analyzed together. The overall actuarial and event free survival across all diseases at 60 months is 90.7% and 20.6%, respectively. High- dose cyclophosphamide without stem cell rescue is well-tolerated and induces a high rate of remissions in severe autoimmune diseases. PMID:21358440

  4. SU-C-207B-04: Automated Segmentation of Pectoral Muscle in MR Images of Dense Breasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verburg, E; Waard, SN de; Veldhuis, WB; Gils, CH van; Gilhuijs, KGA [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a fully automated method for segmentation of the pectoral muscle boundary in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of dense breasts. Methods: Segmentation of the pectoral muscle is an important part of automatic breast image analysis methods. Current methods for segmenting the pectoral muscle in breast MRI have difficulties delineating the muscle border correctly in breasts with a large proportion of fibroglandular tissue (i.e., dense breasts). Hence, an automated method based on dynamic programming was developed, incorporating heuristics aimed at shape, location and gradient features.To assess the method, the pectoral muscle was segmented in 91 randomly selected participants (mean age 56.6 years, range 49.5–75.2 years) from a large MRI screening trial in women with dense breasts (ACR BI-RADS category 4). Each MR dataset consisted of 178 or 179 T1-weighted images with voxel size 0.64 × 0.64 × 1.00 mm3. All images (n=16,287) were reviewed and scored by a radiologist. In contrast to volume overlap coefficients, such as DICE, the radiologist detected deviations in the segmented muscle border and determined whether the result would impact the ability to accurately determine the volume of fibroglandular tissue and detection of breast lesions. Results: According to the radiologist’s scores, 95.5% of the slices did not mask breast tissue in such way that it could affect detection of breast lesions or volume measurements. In 13.1% of the slices a deviation in the segmented muscle border was present which would not impact breast lesion detection. In 70 datasets (78%) at least 95% of the slices were segmented in such a way it would not affect detection of breast lesions, and in 60 (66%) datasets this was 100%. Conclusion: Dynamic programming with dedicated heuristics shows promising potential to segment the pectoral muscle in women with dense breasts.

  5. SU-C-207B-07: Deep Convolutional Neural Network Image Matching for Ultrasound Guidance in Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, N; Najafi, M; Hancock, S; Hristov, D [Stanford University Cancer Center, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Robust matching of ultrasound images is a challenging problem as images of the same anatomy often present non-trivial differences. This poses an obstacle for ultrasound guidance in radiotherapy. Thus our objective is to overcome this obstacle by designing and evaluating an image blocks matching framework based on a two channel deep convolutional neural network. Methods: We extend to 3D an algorithmic structure previously introduced for 2D image feature learning [1]. To obtain the similarity between two 3D image blocks A and B, the 3D image blocks are divided into 2D patches Ai and Bi. The similarity is then calculated as the average similarity score of Ai and Bi. The neural network was then trained with public non-medical image pairs, and subsequently evaluated on ultrasound image blocks for the following scenarios: (S1) same image blocks with/without shifts (A and A-shift-x); (S2) non-related random block pairs; (S3) ground truth registration matched pairs of different ultrasound images with/without shifts (A-i and A-reg-i-shift-x). Results: For S1 the similarity scores of A and A-shift-x were 32.63, 18.38, 12.95, 9.23, 2.15 and 0.43 for x=ranging from 0 mm to 10 mm in 2 mm increments. For S2 the average similarity score for non-related block pairs was −1.15. For S3 the average similarity score of ground truth registration matched blocks A-i and A-reg-i-shift-0 (1≤i≤5) was 12.37. After translating A-reg-i-shift-0 by 0 mm, 2 mm, 4 mm, 6 mm, 8 mm, and 10 mm, the average similarity scores of A-i and A-reg-i-shift-x were 11.04, 8.42, 4.56, 2.27, and 0.29 respectively. Conclusion: The proposed method correctly assigns highest similarity to corresponding 3D ultrasound image blocks despite differences in image content and thus can form the basis for ultrasound image registration and tracking.[1] Zagoruyko, Komodakis, “Learning to compare image patches via convolutional neural networks', IEEE CVPR 2015,pp.4353–4361.

  6. TH-CD-207A-07: Prediction of High Dimensional State Subject to Respiratory Motion: A Manifold Learning Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W; Sawant, A; Ruan, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The development of high dimensional imaging systems (e.g. volumetric MRI, CBCT, photogrammetry systems) in image-guided radiotherapy provides important pathways to the ultimate goal of real-time volumetric/surface motion monitoring. This study aims to develop a prediction method for the high dimensional state subject to respiratory motion. Compared to conventional linear dimension reduction based approaches, our method utilizes manifold learning to construct a descriptive feature submanifold, where more efficient and accurate prediction can be performed. Methods: We developed a prediction framework for high-dimensional state subject to respiratory motion. The proposed method performs dimension reduction in a nonlinear setting to permit more descriptive features compared to its linear counterparts (e.g., classic PCA). Specifically, a kernel PCA is used to construct a proper low-dimensional feature manifold, where low-dimensional prediction is performed. A fixed-point iterative pre-image estimation method is applied subsequently to recover the predicted value in the original state space. We evaluated and compared the proposed method with PCA-based method on 200 level-set surfaces reconstructed from surface point clouds captured by the VisionRT system. The prediction accuracy was evaluated with respect to root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) for both 200ms and 600ms lookahead lengths. Results: The proposed method outperformed PCA-based approach with statistically higher prediction accuracy. In one-dimensional feature subspace, our method achieved mean prediction accuracy of 0.86mm and 0.89mm for 200ms and 600ms lookahead lengths respectively, compared to 0.95mm and 1.04mm from PCA-based method. The paired t-tests further demonstrated the statistical significance of the superiority of our method, with p-values of 6.33e-3 and 5.78e-5, respectively. Conclusion: The proposed approach benefits from the descriptiveness of a nonlinear manifold and the prediction reliability in such low dimensional manifold. The fixed-point iterative approach turns out to work well practically for the pre-image recovery. Our approach is particularly suitable to facilitate managing respiratory motion in image-guide radiotherapy. This work is supported in part by NIH grant R01 CA169102-02.

  7. Oahu Hyperspectral Imagery 2000 (207b-0613-272217) - Visual Interpretation from Remote Sensing Imagery Main Eight Hawaiian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project is a cooperative effort between the National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment,...

  8. TH-AB-207A-03: Skin Dose to Patients Receiving Multiple CTA and CT Exams of the Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawfel, RD; Young, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To measure patient skin dose from CT angiography (CTA) and CT exams of the head, and determine if patients having multiple exams could receive cumulative doses that approach or exceed deterministic thresholds. Methods: This study was HIPAA compliant and conducted with IRB approval. Patient skin doses were measured over a 4 month period using nanoDot OSL dosimeters placed on the head of 52 patients for two CT scanners. On each scanner, 26 patients received CT exams (scanner 1: 10 females, 16 males, mean age 64.2 years; scanner 2: 18 females, 8 males, mean age 61.2 years). CT exam dose metrics, CTDIvol and dose-length product (DLP) were recorded for each exam. Additionally, skin dose was measured on an acrylic skull phantom in each scanner and on a neuro-interventional imaging system using clinical protocols. Measured dose data was used to estimate peak skin dose (PSD) for 4 patients receiving multiple exams including CTA, head CT, and cerebral angiography. Results: For scanner 1, the mean PSD for CTA exams (98.9 ± 5.3 mGy) and for routine head CT exams (39.2 ± 3.7 mGy) agreed reasonably well with the PSD measured on the phantom, 105.4 mGy and 40.0 mGy, respectively. Similarly for scanner 2, the mean PSD for CTA exams (98.8 ± 7.4 mGy) and for routine head CT exams (42.9 ± 9.4 mGy) compared well with phantom measurements, 95.2 mGy and 37.6 mGy, respectively. In addition, the mean PSD was comparable between scanners for corresponding patient exams, CTA and routine head CT respectively. PSD estimates ranged from 1.9 – 4.5 Gy among 4 patients receiving multiple exams. Conclusion: Patients having several exams including both CTA and routine head CT may receive cumulative doses approaching or exceeding the threshold for single dose deterministic effects.

  9. MO-DE-207B-03: Improved Cancer Classification Using Patient-Specific Biological Pathway Information Via Gene Expression Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, M; Craft, D [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an efficient, pathway-based classification system using network biology statistics to assist in patient-specific response predictions to radiation and drug therapies across multiple cancer types. Methods: We developed PICS (Pathway Informed Classification System), a novel two-step cancer classification algorithm. In PICS, a matrix m of mRNA expression values for a patient cohort is collapsed into a matrix p of biological pathways. The entries of p, which we term pathway scores, are obtained from either principal component analysis (PCA), normal tissue centroid (NTC), or gene expression deviation (GED). The pathway score matrix is clustered using both k-means and hierarchical clustering, and a clustering is judged by how well it groups patients into distinct survival classes. The most effective pathway scoring/clustering combination, per clustering p-value, thus generates various ‘signatures’ for conventional and functional cancer classification. Results: PICS successfully regularized large dimension gene data, separated normal and cancerous tissues, and clustered a large patient cohort spanning six cancer types. Furthermore, PICS clustered patient cohorts into distinct, statistically-significant survival groups. For a suboptimally-debulked ovarian cancer set, the pathway-classified Kaplan-Meier survival curve (p = .00127) showed significant improvement over that of a prior gene expression-classified study (p = .0179). For a pancreatic cancer set, the pathway-classified Kaplan-Meier survival curve (p = .00141) showed significant improvement over that of a prior gene expression-classified study (p = .04). Pathway-based classification confirmed biomarkers for the pyrimidine, WNT-signaling, glycerophosphoglycerol, beta-alanine, and panthothenic acid pathways for ovarian cancer. Despite its robust nature, PICS requires significantly less run time than current pathway scoring methods. Conclusion: This work validates the PICS method to improve cancer classification using biological pathways. Patients are classified with greater specificity and physiological relevance as compared to current gene-specific approaches. Focus now moves to utilizing PICS for pan-cancer patient-specific treatment response prediction.

  10. SU-C-207B-05: Tissue Segmentation of Computed Tomography Images Using a Random Forest Algorithm: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polan, D [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Brady, S; Kaufman, R [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Develop an automated Random Forest algorithm for tissue segmentation of CT examinations. Methods: Seven materials were classified for segmentation: background, lung/internal gas, fat, muscle, solid organ parenchyma, blood/contrast, and bone using Matlab and the Trainable Weka Segmentation (TWS) plugin of FIJI. The following classifier feature filters of TWS were investigated: minimum, maximum, mean, and variance each evaluated over a pixel radius of 2n, (n = 0–4). Also noise reduction and edge preserving filters, Gaussian, bilateral, Kuwahara, and anisotropic diffusion, were evaluated. The algorithm used 200 trees with 2 features per node. A training data set was established using an anonymized patient’s (male, 20 yr, 72 kg) chest-abdomen-pelvis CT examination. To establish segmentation ground truth, the training data were manually segmented using Eclipse planning software, and an intra-observer reproducibility test was conducted. Six additional patient data sets were segmented based on classifier data generated from the training data. Accuracy of segmentation was determined by calculating the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between manual and auto segmented images. Results: The optimized autosegmentation algorithm resulted in 16 features calculated using maximum, mean, variance, and Gaussian blur filters with kernel radii of 1, 2, and 4 pixels, in addition to the original CT number, and Kuwahara filter (linear kernel of 19 pixels). Ground truth had a DSC of 0.94 (range: 0.90–0.99) for adult and 0.92 (range: 0.85–0.99) for pediatric data sets across all seven segmentation classes. The automated algorithm produced segmentation with an average DSC of 0.85 ± 0.04 (range: 0.81–1.00) for the adult patients, and 0.86 ± 0.03 (range: 0.80–0.99) for the pediatric patients. Conclusion: The TWS Random Forest auto-segmentation algorithm was optimized for CT environment, and able to segment seven material classes over a range of body habitus and CT protocol parameters with an average DSC of 0.86 ± 0.04 (range: 0.80–0.99).

  11. WE-AB-207B-07: Dose Cloud: Generating “Big Data” for Radiation Therapy Treatment Plan Optimization Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folkerts, MM [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Long, T; Tian, Z; Jia, X; Chen, M; Lu, W; Jiang, SB [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Radke, RJ [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a tool to generate large sets of realistic virtual patient geometries and beamlet doses for treatment optimization research. This tool enables countless studies exploring the fundamental interplay between patient geometry, objective functions, weight selections, and achievable dose distributions for various algorithms and modalities. Methods: Generating realistic virtual patient geometries requires a small set of real patient data. We developed a normalized patient shape model (PSM) which captures organ and target contours in a correspondence-preserving manner. Using PSM-processed data, we perform principal component analysis (PCA) to extract major modes of variation from the population. These PCA modes can be shared without exposing patient information. The modes are re-combined with different weights to produce sets of realistic virtual patient contours. Because virtual patients lack imaging information, we developed a shape-based dose calculation (SBD) relying on the assumption that the region inside the body contour is water. SBD utilizes a 2D fluence-convolved scatter kernel, derived from Monte Carlo simulations, and can compute both full dose for a given set of fluence maps, or produce a dose matrix (dose per fluence pixel) for many modalities. Combining the shape model with SBD provides the data needed for treatment plan optimization research. Results: We used PSM to capture organ and target contours for 96 prostate cases, extracted the first 20 PCA modes, and generated 2048 virtual patient shapes by randomly sampling mode scores. Nearly half of the shapes were thrown out for failing anatomical checks, the remaining 1124 were used in computing dose matrices via SBD and a standard 7-beam protocol. As a proof of concept, and to generate data for later study, we performed fluence map optimization emphasizing PTV coverage. Conclusions: We successfully developed and tested a tool for creating customizable sets of virtual patients suitable for large-scale radiation therapy optimization research.

  12. WE-AB-207B-11: Optimizing Tumor Control Probability in Radiation Therapy Treatment - Application to HDR Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (Georgia); Yuan, F [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GEORGIA (United States); Templeton, A [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Yao, R [Columbus Regional Healthcare, Columbus, GA (United States); Chu, J [Rush University Medical Center, Oak Brook, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The ultimate goal of radiotherapy treatment planning is to find a treatment that will yield a high tumor-control-probability(TCP) with an acceptable normal-tissue-complication probability(NTCP). Yet most treatment planning today is not based upon optimization of TCPs and NTCPs, but rather upon meeting physical dose and volume constraints defined by the planner. We design treatment plans that optimize TCP directly and contrast them with the clinical dose-based plans. PET image is incorporated to evaluate gain in TCP for dose escalation. Methods: We build a nonlinear mixed integer programming optimization model that maximizes TCP directly while satisfying the dose requirements on the targeted organ and healthy tissues. The solution strategy first fits the TCP function with a piecewise-linear approximation, then solves the problem that maximizes the piecewise linear approximation of TCP, and finally performs a local neighborhood search to improve the TCP value. To gauge the feasibility, characteristics, and potential benefit of PET-image guided dose escalation, initial validation consists of fifteen cervical cancer HDR patient cases. These patients have all received prior 45Gy of external radiation dose. For both escalated strategies, we consider 35Gy PTV-dose, and two variations (37Gy-boost to BTV vs 40Gy-boost) to PET-image-pockets. Results: TCP for standard clinical plans range from 59.4% - 63.6%. TCP for dose-based PET-guided escalated-dose-plan ranges from 63.8%–98.6% for all patients; whereas TCP-optimized plans achieves over 91% for all patients. There is marginal difference in TCP among those with 37Gy-boosted vs 40Gy-boosted. There is no increase in rectum and bladder dose among all plans. Conclusion: Optimizing TCP directly results in highly conformed treatment plans. The TCP-optimized plan is individualized based on the biological PET-image of the patients. The TCP-optimization framework is generalizable and has been applied successfully to other external-beam delivery modalities. A clinical trial is on-going to gauge the clinical significance. Partially supported by the National Science Foundation.

  13. SU-E-J-207: Effect of Pulse Sequence Parameters On Geometric Distortions Induced by a Titanium Brachytherapy Applicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shea, S; Diak, A; Surucu, M; Harkenrider, M; Yacoub, J; Roeske, J; Small, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of readout bandwidth and voxel size on the appearance of distortion artifacts caused by a titanium brachytherapy applicator. Methods: An acrylic phantom was constructed to rigidly hold a MR conditional, titanium Fletcher-Suit-Delclos-style applicator set (Varian Medical Systems) for imaging on CT (Philips Brilliance) and 1.5T MRI (Siemens Magnetom Aera). Several variants of MRI parameters were tried for 2D T2-weighted turbo spin echo imaging in comparison against the standard clinical protocol with the criteria to keep relative SNR loss less than 20% and imaging time as short as possible. Two 3D sequences were also used for comparison with similar parameters. The applicator tandem was segmented on axial CT images (0.4×0.4×1.5mm 3 resolution) and the CT images were registered to the 3D MR images in Eclipse (Varian). The applicator volume was then overlaid on all MRI sets in 3D-Slicer and distances were measured from the tandem tip to the MRI artifact edge in right/left/superior and anterior/posterior/superior directions from coronal and sagittal 2D acquisitions, respectively, or 3D data reformats. Artifact regions were also manually contoured in coronal/sagittal orientations for area measurements. Results: As would be expected, reductions in voxel size and increases in readout bandwidth reduced artifact size (average max artifact length decreased by 0.95 mm and average max area decrease by 0.27 cm 2 ). Interestingly, bandwidth increases yielded reductions in area (0.19 cm 2 ) and in distance measurements (1 mm) even with voxel increases, as compared to a standard protocol. This could be useful when high performance protocols are not feasible due to long imaging times. Conclusion: We have characterized artifacts caused by cervical brachytherapy applicator across multiple sequence parameters at 1.5T. Future work will focus on finalizing an optimal protocol that balances artifact reduction with imaging time and then testing this new protocol in patients

  14. WE-EF-207-05: Monte Carlo Dosimetry for a Dedicated Cone-Beam CT Head Scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Xu, J; Dang, H; Stayman, J W; Aygun, N; Koliatsos, V E; Siewerdsen, J H [Johns Hopkins University, Balitmore, MD (United States); Wang, X; Foos, D H [Carestream Health, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) is an attractive platform for point-of-care imaging of traumatic brain injury and intracranial hemorrhage. This work implements and evaluates a fast Monte-Carlo (MC) dose estimation engine for development of a dedicated head CBCT scanner, optimization of acquisition protocols, geometry, bowtie filter designs, and patient-specific dosimetry. Methods: Dose scoring with a GPU-based MC CBCT simulator was validated on an imaging bench using a modified 16 cm CTDI phantom with 7 ion chamber shafts along the central ray for 80–100 kVp (+2 mm Al, +0.2 mm Cu). Dose distributions were computed in a segmented CBCT reconstruction of an anthropomorphic head phantom with 4×10{sup 5} tracked photons per scan (5 min runtime). Circular orbits with angular span ranging from short scan (180° + fan angle) to full rotation (360°) were considered for fixed total mAs per scan. Two aluminum filters were investigated: aggressive bowtie, and moderate bowtie (matched to 16 cm and 32 cm water cylinder, respectively). Results: MC dose estimates showed strong agreement with measurements (RMSE<0.001 mGy/mAs). A moderate (aggressive) bowtie reduced the dose, per total mAs, by 20% (30%) at the center of the head, by 40% (50%) at the eye lens, and by 70% (80%) at the posterior skin entrance. For the no bowtie configuration, a short scan reduced the eye lens dose by 62% (from 0.08 mGy/mAs to 0.03 mGy/mAs) compared to full scan, although the dose to spinal bone marrow increased by 40%. For both bowties, the short scan resulted in a similar 40% increase in bone marrow dose, but the reduction in the eye lens was more pronounced: 70% (90%) for the moderate (aggressive) bowtie. Conclusions: Dose maps obtained with validated MC simulation demonstrated dose reduction in sensitive structures (eye lens and bone marrow) through combination of short-scan trajectories and bowtie filters. Xiaohui Wang and David Foos are employees of Carestream Health.

  15. SU-F-207-06: CT-Based Assessment of Tumor Volume in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qayyum, F; Armato, S; Straus, C; Husain, A; Vigneswaran, W; Kindler, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the potential utility of computed tomography (CT) scans in the assessment of physical tumor bulk in malignant pleural mesothelioma patients. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma were used for this study. A CT scan was acquired for each patient prior to surgical resection of the tumor (median time between scan and surgery: 27 days). After surgery, the ex-vivo tumor volume was measured by a pathologist using a water displacement method. Separately, a radiologist identified and outlined the tumor boundary on each CT section that demonstrated tumor. These outlines then were analyzed to determine the total volume of disease present, the number of sections with outlines, and the mean volume of disease per outlined section. Subsets of the initial patient cohort were defined based on these parameters, i.e. cases with at least 30 sections of disease with a mean disease volume of at least 3mL per section. For each subset, the R- squared correlation between CT-based tumor volume and physical ex-vivo tumor volume was calculated. Results: The full cohort of 28 patients yielded a modest correlation between CT-based tumor volume and the ex-vivo tumor volume with an R-squared value of 0.66. In general, as the mean tumor volume per section increased, the correlation of CT-based volume with the physical tumor volume improved substantially. For example, when cases with at least 40 CT sections presenting a mean of at least 2mL of disease per section were evaluated (n=20) the R-squared correlation increased to 0.79. Conclusion: While image-based volumetry for mesothelioma may not generally capture physical tumor volume as accurately as one might expect, there exists a set of conditions in which CT-based volume is highly correlated with the physical tumor volume. SGA receives royalties and licensing fees through the University of Chicago for computer-aided diagnosis technology

  16. MO-DE-207B-08: Radiomic CT Features Complement Semantic Annotations to Predict EGFR Mutations in Lung Adenocarcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios Velazquez, E; Parmar, C; Narayan, V; Aerts, H [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Liu, Y; Gillies, R [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the complementary value of quantitative radiomic features to that of radiologist-annotated semantic features in predicting EGFR mutations in lung adenocarcinomas. Methods: Pre-operative CT images of 258 lung adenocarcinoma patients were available. Tumors were segmented using the sing-click ensemble segmentation algorithm. A set of radiomic features was extracted using 3D-Slicer. Test-retest reproducibility and unsupervised dimensionality reduction were applied to select a subset of reproducible and independent radiomic features. Twenty semantic annotations were scored by an expert radiologist, describing the tumor, surrounding tissue and associated findings. Minimum-redundancy-maximum-relevance (MRMR) was used to identify the most informative radiomic and semantic features in 172 patients (training-set, temporal split). Radiomic, semantic and combined radiomic-semantic logistic regression models to predict EGFR mutations were evaluated in and independent validation dataset of 86 patients using the area under the receiver operating curve (AUC). Results: EGFR mutations were found in 77/172 (45%) and 39/86 (45%) of the training and validation sets, respectively. Univariate AUCs showed a similar range for both feature types: radiomics median AUC = 0.57 (range: 0.50 – 0.62); semantic median AUC = 0.53 (range: 0.50 – 0.64, Wilcoxon p = 0.55). After MRMR feature selection, the best-performing radiomic, semantic, and radiomic-semantic logistic regression models, for EGFR mutations, showed a validation AUC of 0.56 (p = 0.29), 0.63 (p = 0.063) and 0.67 (p = 0.004), respectively. Conclusion: Quantitative volumetric and textural Radiomic features complement the qualitative and semi-quantitative radiologist annotations. The prognostic value of informative qualitative semantic features such as cavitation and lobulation is increased with the addition of quantitative textural features from the tumor region.

  17. TU-CD-207-04: Radiation Exposure Comparisons of CESM with 2D FFDM and 3D Tomosynthesis Mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, J; Boltz, T; Pavlicek, W [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: While mammography is considered the standard for front-line breast cancer screening, image sensitivity and specificity can be affected by factors like dense breast tissue. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) shows promising initial results for dense breasts but comes at the cost of increased dose compared with full-field-digital-mammography (FFDM). The goal of this study is to quantitatively assess the dose increase of CESM in comparison with 2D-FFDM and 3D-Tomo at varying breast thickness. Methods: The experiments were conducted on a Hologic-Selenia-Dimensions system that performed 2D-FFDM, 3D-Tomo and CESM (high and low energies) on regular (50/50) and dense (70/30) breast tissue-mimicking phantoms. Both the phantoms had 6, 1-cm thick slabs (total thickness 6cm), compressed at 20-lbs using an 18×24 paddle. A single exposure was performed for each of the 3 mammo techniques with the following settings: AEC-Auto; Focal Spot-Large; kVp-Auto; mAs- Auto, Target/Filter combination-Auto; AEC Sensor/Exposure compensation Step-2/0. Average glandular dose (AGD) in mGy was obtained and compared as a function of breast thickness (1 – 6 cm) for both the phantom types. Results: The study shows that dose from the total CESM from 50/50 phantom at a breast thickness of a) 4.5 cm was 37.5% higher than 2D-FFDM and 30% higher than 3D-Tomo, b) 6 cm was 36.2% higher than 2D-FFDM and 41% higher than 3D-Tomo. For a dense breast tissue of 70/30 phantom, it was found that CESM dose at a breast thickness of: a) 4.5 cm was 33.3% higher than 2D-FFDM and 28.8% higher than 3D-Tomo, b) 6 cm was 35.4% higher than 2D-FFDM and 48.0% higher than 3D-Tomo. The overall CESM dose for the dense breast phantom was 12.5% higher at 4.5cm and 35% higher at 6 cm compared to the 50/50 phantom. Conclusion: This quantitative comparison study showed that CESM technique has an increased radiation dose compared to conventional 2D-FFDM and 3D-Tomo.

  18. TH-CD-207B-03: How to Quantify Temporal Resolution in X-Ray MDCT Imaging?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budde, A [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); GE Healthcare Technologies, Madison, WI (United States); Li, Y; Chen, G [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Hsieh, J [GE Healthcare Technologies, Brookfield, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In modern CT scanners, a quantitative metric to assess temporal response, namely, to quantify the temporal resolution (TR), remains elusive. Rough surrogate metrics, such as half of the gantry rotation time for single source CT, a quarter of the gantry rotation time for dual source CT, or measurements of motion artifact’s size, shape, or intensity have previously been used. In this work, a rigorous framework which quantifies TR and a practical measurement method are developed. Methods: A motion phantom was simulated which consisted of a single rod that is in motion except during a static period at the temporal center of the scan, termed the TR window. If the image of the motion scan has negligible motion artifacts compared to an image from a totally static scan, then the system has a TR no worse than the TR window used. By repeating this comparison with varying TR windows, the TR of the system can be accurately determined. Motion artifacts were also visually assessed and the TR was measured across varying rod motion speeds, directions, and locations. Noiseless fan beam acquisitions were simulated and images were reconstructed with a short-scan image reconstruction algorithm. Results: The size, shape, and intensity of motion artifacts varied when the rod speed, direction, or location changed. TR measured using the proposed method, however, was consistent across rod speeds, directions, and locations. Conclusion: Since motion artifacts vary depending upon the motion speed, direction, and location, they are not suitable for measuring TR. In this work, a CT system with a specified TR is defined as having the ability to produce a static image with negligible motion artifacts, no matter what motion occurs outside of a static window of width TR. This framework allows for practical measurement of temporal resolution in clinical CT imaging systems. Funding support: GE Healthcare; Conflict of Interest: Employee, GE Healthcare.

  19. TH-CD-207B-03: How to Quantify Temporal Resolution in X-Ray MDCT Imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budde, A; Li, Y; Chen, G; Hsieh, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In modern CT scanners, a quantitative metric to assess temporal response, namely, to quantify the temporal resolution (TR), remains elusive. Rough surrogate metrics, such as half of the gantry rotation time for single source CT, a quarter of the gantry rotation time for dual source CT, or measurements of motion artifact’s size, shape, or intensity have previously been used. In this work, a rigorous framework which quantifies TR and a practical measurement method are developed. Methods: A motion phantom was simulated which consisted of a single rod that is in motion except during a static period at the temporal center of the scan, termed the TR window. If the image of the motion scan has negligible motion artifacts compared to an image from a totally static scan, then the system has a TR no worse than the TR window used. By repeating this comparison with varying TR windows, the TR of the system can be accurately determined. Motion artifacts were also visually assessed and the TR was measured across varying rod motion speeds, directions, and locations. Noiseless fan beam acquisitions were simulated and images were reconstructed with a short-scan image reconstruction algorithm. Results: The size, shape, and intensity of motion artifacts varied when the rod speed, direction, or location changed. TR measured using the proposed method, however, was consistent across rod speeds, directions, and locations. Conclusion: Since motion artifacts vary depending upon the motion speed, direction, and location, they are not suitable for measuring TR. In this work, a CT system with a specified TR is defined as having the ability to produce a static image with negligible motion artifacts, no matter what motion occurs outside of a static window of width TR. This framework allows for practical measurement of temporal resolution in clinical CT imaging systems. Funding support: GE Healthcare; Conflict of Interest: Employee, GE Healthcare.

  20. 33 CFR 207.640 - Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel Barge Lock and Approach Canals; use, administration, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... damage by their operations to the lock or other structures. They must use great care not to strike any.... All tow lines or hawsers must be hauled as short as practicable for safe handling of tows. (15) Crew... sufficient number of men to handle lines in mooring craft and to move barges and other craft into and out of...

  1. TH-CD-207B-07: Noise Modeling of Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) for Photon Counting CT Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Z; Zheng, X; Deen, J; Peng, H [McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Xing, L [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) has recently emerged as a promising photodetector for biomedical imaging applications. Due to its high multiplication gain (comparable to PMT), fast timing, low cost and compactness, it is considered a good candidate for photon counting CT. Dark noise is a limiting factor which impacts both energy resolution and detection dynamic range. Our goal is to develop a comprehensive model for noise sources for SiPM sensors. Methods: The physical parameters used in this work were based upon a test SPAD fabricated in 130nm CMOS process. The SPAD uses an n+/p-well junction, which is isolated from the p-substrate by a deep n-well junction. Inter-avalanche time measurement was used to record the time interval between two adjacent avalanche pulses. After collecting 1×106 counts, the histogram was obtained and multiple exponential fitting process was used to extract the lifetime associated with the traps within the bandgap. Results: At room temperature, the breakdown voltage of the SPAD is ∼11.4V and shows a temperature coefficient of 7.7mV/°C. The dark noise of SPAD increases with both the excess biasing voltage and temperature. The primary dark counts from the model were validated against the measurement results. A maximum relative error of 8.7% is observed at 20 °C with an excess voltage of 0.5V. The probabilities of after-pulsing are found to be dependent of both temperature and excess voltage. With 0.5V excess voltage, the after-pulsing probability is 63.5% at - 30 °C and drops to ∼6.6% at 40 °C. Conclusion: A comprehensive noise model for SPAD sensor was proposed. The model takes into account of static, dynamic and statistical behavior of SPADs. We believe that this is the first SPAD circuit simulation model that includes the band-to-band tunneling dark noise contribution and temporal dependence of the after-pulsing probability.

  2. TU-EF-207-03: Advances in Stationary Breast Tomosynthesis Using Distributed X-Ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, O. [The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Breast imaging technology is advancing on several fronts. In digital mammography, the major technological trend has been on optimization of approaches for performing combined mammography and tomosynthesis using the same system. In parallel, photon-counting slot-scan mammography is now in clinical use and more efforts are directed towards further development of this approach for spectral imaging. Spectral imaging refers to simultaneous acquisition of two or more energy-windowed images. Depending on the detector and associated electronics, there are a number of ways this can be accomplished. Spectral mammography using photon-counting detectors can suppress electronic noise and importantly, it enables decomposition of the image into various material compositions of interest facilitating quantitative imaging. Spectral imaging can be particularly important in intravenously injected contrast mammography and eventually tomosynthesis. The various approaches and applications of spectral mammography are discussed. Digital breast tomosynthesis relies on the mechanical movement of the x-ray tube to acquire a number of projections in a predefined arc, typically from 9 to 25 projections over a scan angle of +/−7.5 to 25 degrees depending on the particular system. The mechanical x-ray tube motion requires relatively long acquisition time, typically between 3.7 to 25 seconds depending on the system. Moreover, mechanical scanning may have an effect on the spatial resolution due to internal x-ray filament or external mechanical vibrations. New x-ray source arrays have been developed and they are aimed at replacing the scanned x-ray tube for improved acquisition time and potentially for higher spatial resolution. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis in a single system places increased demands on certain functional aspects of the detector and overall performance, particularly in the tomosynthesis mode due to lower photon fluence per projection. This may require fast-frame acquisition and symmetric or asymmetric pixel binning in some systems. Recent studies investigated the performance of increased conversion layer thickness for contrast-enhanced imaging of the breast in dual-energy acquisition mode. In other direct conversion detectors operating in the avalanche mode, sensitivities close to the single photon response are also explored for mammography and breast tomosynthesis. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Dedicated breast CT brings x-ray imaging of the breast to true tomographic 3D imaging. It can eliminate the tissue superposition problem and does not require physical compression of the breast. Using cone beam geometry and a flat-panel detector, several hundred projections are acquired and reconstructed to near isotropic voxels. Multiplanar reconstruction facilitates viewing the breast volume in any desired orientation. Ongoing clinical studies, the current state-of-the art, and research to advance the technology are described. Learning Objectives: To understand the ongoing developments in x-ray imaging of the breast To understand the approaches and applications of spectral mammography To understand the potential advantages of distributed x-ray source arrays for digital breast tomosynthesis To understand the ongoing developments in detector technology for digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis To understand the current state-of-the-art for dedicated cone-beam breast CT and research to advance the technology. Research collaboration with Koning Corporation.

  3. 33 CFR 207.160 - All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... lock is available, a green light, semaphore or flag will be displayed; when not available, a red light, semaphore or flag will be displayed. No vessels or rafts shall approach within 300 feet of any lock entrance...

  4. TU-CD-207-02: Quantification of Breast Lesion Compositions Using Low-Dose Spectral Mammography: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, H; Ding, H; Sennung, D; Kumar, N; Molloi, S [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of measuring breast lesion composition with spectral mammography using physical phantoms and bovine tissue. Methods: Phantom images were acquired with a spectral mammography system with a silicon-strip based photon-counting detector. Plastic water and adipose-equivalent phantoms were used to calibrate the system for dual-energy material decomposition. The calibration phantom was constructed in range of 2–8 cm thickness and water densities in the range of 0% to 100%. A non-linear rational fitting function was used to calibrate the imaging system. The phantom studies were performed with uniform background phantom and non-uniform background phantom. The breast lesion phantoms (2 cm in diameter and 0.5 cm in thickness) were made with water densities ranging from 0 to 100%. The lesion phantoms were placed in different positions and depths on the phantoms to investigate the accuracy of the measurement under various conditions. The plastic water content of the lesion was measured by subtracting the total decomposed plastic water signal from a surrounding 2.5 mm thick border outside the lesion. In addition, bovine tissue samples composed of 80 % lean were imaged as background for the simulated lesion phantoms. Results: The thickness of measured and known water contents was compared. The rootmean-square (RMS) errors in water thickness measurements were 0.01 cm for the uniform background phantom, 0.04 cm for non-uniform background phantom, and 0.03 cm for 80% lean bovine tissue background. Conclusion: The results indicate that the proposed technique using spectral mammography can be used to accurately characterize breast lesion compositions.

  5. SU-C-207B-06: Comparison of Registration Methods for Modeling Pathologic Response of Esophageal Cancer to Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riyahi, S; Choi, W; Bhooshan, N; Tan, S; Zhang, H; Lu, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare linear and deformable registration methods for evaluation of tumor response to Chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods: Linear and multi-resolution BSpline deformable registration were performed on Pre-Post-CRT CT/PET images of 20 patients with esophageal cancer. For both registration methods, we registered CT using Mean Square Error (MSE) metric, however to register PET we used transformation obtained using Mutual Information (MI) from the same CT due to being multi-modality. Similarity of Warped-CT/PET was quantitatively evaluated using Normalized Mutual Information and plausibility of DF was assessed using inverse consistency Error. To evaluate tumor response four groups of tumor features were examined: (1) Conventional PET/CT e.g. SUV, diameter (2) Clinical parameters e.g. TNM stage, histology (3)spatial-temporal PET features that describe intensity, texture and geometry of tumor (4)all features combined. Dominant features were identified using 10-fold cross-validation and Support Vector Machine (SVM) was deployed for tumor response prediction while the accuracy was evaluated by ROC Area Under Curve (AUC). Results: Average and standard deviation of Normalized mutual information for deformable registration using MSE was 0.2±0.054 and for linear registration was 0.1±0.026, showing higher NMI for deformable registration. Likewise for MI metric, deformable registration had 0.13±0.035 comparing to linear counterpart with 0.12±0.037. Inverse consistency error for deformable registration for MSE metric was 4.65±2.49 and for linear was 1.32±2.3 showing smaller value for linear registration. The same conclusion was obtained for MI in terms of inverse consistency error. AUC for both linear and deformable registration was 1 showing no absolute difference in terms of response evaluation. Conclusion: Deformable registration showed better NMI comparing to linear registration, however inverse consistency of transformation was lower in linear registration. We do not expect to see significant difference when warping PET images using deformable or linear registration. This work was supported in part by the National Cancer Institute Grants R01CA172638.

  6. WE-AB-207A-10: Transmission Characteristics of a Two Dimensional Antiscatter Grid Prototype for CBCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altunbas, C; Kavanagh, B; Miften, M [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Scattered radiation remains to be a major contributor to image quality degradation in CBCT. To address the scatter problem, a focused, 2D antiscatter grid (2DASG) prototype was designed, and fabricated using additive manufacturing processes. Its scatter and primary transmission properties were characterized using a linac mounted CBCT system. Methods: The prototype 2DASG was composed of rectangular grid holes separated by tungsten septa, and has a grid pitch of 2.91 mm, grid ratio of 8, and a septal thickness of 0.1 mm. Each grid hole was aligned or focused towards the x-ray source in half-fan (i.e. offset detector) geometry of the Varian TrueBeam CBCT system. Scatter and primary transmission experiments were performed by using acrylic blocks and the beam-stop method. Transmission properties of a radiographic ASG (1DASG) (grid ratio of 10) was also performed by using the identical setup. Results: At 30 cm phantom thickness, scatter to primary ratio (SPR) was 4.51 without any ASG device. SPR was reduced to 1.28 with 1DASG, and it was further reduced to 0.28 with 2DASG. Scatter transmission fraction (Ts) of 1DASG was 21%, and Ts was reduced to 5.8% with 2DASG. The average primary transmission fraction (Tp) of 1DASG was 70.6%, whereas Tp increased to 85.1% with 2DASG. Variation of Tp across 40 cm length (the long axis of flat panel detector) was 2.6%. Conclusion: When compared to conventional ASGs, the focused 2DASG can vastly improve scatter suppression and primary transmission performance. Due to precise alignment of 2DASG’s grid holes with respect to beam divergence, high degree of primary transmission through the 2DASG was maintained across the full length of the prototype. We strongly believe that robust scatter rejection and primary transmission characteristics of our 2DASG can translate into both improved quantitative accuracy and soft tissue resolution in linac mounted CBCT systems.

  7. 33 CFR 207.718 - Navigation locks and approach channels, Columbia and Snake Rivers, Oreg. and Wash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... comments and will evaluate the expected energy situation, water supply, and recreation use of the lock to.... The regulations in this section shall not relieve owners and/or operators of vessels from liability..., shall not enter the lock unless provided with suitable buffers and fenders. Vessels having chains, lines...

  8. TH-EF-207A-05: Feasibility of Applying SMEIR Method On Small Animal 4D Cone Beam CT Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Y; Zhang, Y; Shao, Y; Wang, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Small animal cone beam CT imaging has been widely used in preclinical research. Due to the higher respiratory rate and heat beats of small animals, motion blurring is inevitable and needs to be corrected in the reconstruction. Simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) method, which uses projection images of all phases, proved to be effective in motion model estimation and able to reconstruct motion-compensated images. We demonstrate the application of SMEIR for small animal 4D cone beam CT imaging by computer simulations on a digital rat model. Methods: The small animal CBCT imaging system was simulated with the source-to-detector distance of 300 mm and the source-to-object distance of 200 mm. A sequence of rat phantom were generated with 0.4 mm 3 voxel size. The respiratory cycle was taken as 1.0 second and the motions were simulated with a diaphragm motion of 2.4mm and an anterior-posterior expansion of 1.6 mm. The projection images were calculated using a ray-tracing method, and 4D-CBCT were reconstructed using SMEIR and FDK methods. The SMEIR method iterates over two alternating steps: 1) motion-compensated iterative image reconstruction by using projections from all respiration phases and 2) motion model estimation from projections directly through a 2D-3D deformable registration of the image obtained in the first step to projection images of other phases. Results: The images reconstructed using SMEIR method reproduced the features in the original phantom. Projections from the same phase were also reconstructed using FDK method. Compared with the FDK results, the images from SMEIR method substantially improve the image quality with minimum artifacts. Conclusion: We demonstrate that it is viable to apply SMEIR method to reconstruct small animal 4D-CBCT images.

  9. 10 CFR 1015.207 - Suspension or revocation of eligibility for loans and loan guaranties, licenses, permits, or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... redelegated only to the Deputy Chief Financial Officer of DOE. DOE may extend credit after the delinquency has... privileges, DOE will seek legal advice from counsel concerning the impact of the Bankruptcy Code...

  10. WE-G-207-05: Relationship Between CT Image Quality, Segmentation Performance, and Quantitative Image Feature Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J; Nishikawa, R [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Reiser, I [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Boone, J [UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Segmentation quality can affect quantitative image feature analysis. The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between computed tomography (CT) image quality, segmentation performance, and quantitative image feature analysis. Methods: A total of 90 pathology proven breast lesions in 87 dedicated breast CT images were considered. An iterative image reconstruction (IIR) algorithm was used to obtain CT images with different quality. With different combinations of 4 variables in the algorithm, this study obtained a total of 28 different qualities of CT images. Two imaging tasks/objectives were considered: 1) segmentation and 2) classification of the lesion as benign or malignant. Twenty-three image features were extracted after segmentation using a semi-automated algorithm and 5 of them were selected via a feature selection technique. Logistic regression was trained and tested using leave-one-out-cross-validation and its area under the ROC curve (AUC) was recorded. The standard deviation of a homogeneous portion and the gradient of a parenchymal portion of an example breast were used as an estimate of image noise and sharpness. The DICE coefficient was computed using a radiologist’s drawing on the lesion. Mean DICE and AUC were used as performance metrics for each of the 28 reconstructions. The relationship between segmentation and classification performance under different reconstructions were compared. Distributions (median, 95% confidence interval) of DICE and AUC for each reconstruction were also compared. Results: Moderate correlation (Pearson’s rho = 0.43, p-value = 0.02) between DICE and AUC values was found. However, the variation between DICE and AUC values for each reconstruction increased as the image sharpness increased. There was a combination of IIR parameters that resulted in the best segmentation with the worst classification performance. Conclusion: There are certain images that yield better segmentation or classification performance. The best segmentation Result does not necessarily lead to the best classification Result. This work has been supported in part by grants from the NIH R21-EB015053. R Nishikawa is receives royalties form Hologic, Inc.

  11. TU-EF-207-03: Advances in Stationary Breast Tomosynthesis Using Distributed X-Ray Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, O.

    2015-01-01

    Breast imaging technology is advancing on several fronts. In digital mammography, the major technological trend has been on optimization of approaches for performing combined mammography and tomosynthesis using the same system. In parallel, photon-counting slot-scan mammography is now in clinical use and more efforts are directed towards further development of this approach for spectral imaging. Spectral imaging refers to simultaneous acquisition of two or more energy-windowed images. Depending on the detector and associated electronics, there are a number of ways this can be accomplished. Spectral mammography using photon-counting detectors can suppress electronic noise and importantly, it enables decomposition of the image into various material compositions of interest facilitating quantitative imaging. Spectral imaging can be particularly important in intravenously injected contrast mammography and eventually tomosynthesis. The various approaches and applications of spectral mammography are discussed. Digital breast tomosynthesis relies on the mechanical movement of the x-ray tube to acquire a number of projections in a predefined arc, typically from 9 to 25 projections over a scan angle of +/−7.5 to 25 degrees depending on the particular system. The mechanical x-ray tube motion requires relatively long acquisition time, typically between 3.7 to 25 seconds depending on the system. Moreover, mechanical scanning may have an effect on the spatial resolution due to internal x-ray filament or external mechanical vibrations. New x-ray source arrays have been developed and they are aimed at replacing the scanned x-ray tube for improved acquisition time and potentially for higher spatial resolution. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis in a single system places increased demands on certain functional aspects of the detector and overall performance, particularly in the tomosynthesis mode due to lower photon fluence per projection. This may require fast-frame acquisition and symmetric or asymmetric pixel binning in some systems. Recent studies investigated the performance of increased conversion layer thickness for contrast-enhanced imaging of the breast in dual-energy acquisition mode. In other direct conversion detectors operating in the avalanche mode, sensitivities close to the single photon response are also explored for mammography and breast tomosynthesis. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Dedicated breast CT brings x-ray imaging of the breast to true tomographic 3D imaging. It can eliminate the tissue superposition problem and does not require physical compression of the breast. Using cone beam geometry and a flat-panel detector, several hundred projections are acquired and reconstructed to near isotropic voxels. Multiplanar reconstruction facilitates viewing the breast volume in any desired orientation. Ongoing clinical studies, the current state-of-the art, and research to advance the technology are described. Learning Objectives: To understand the ongoing developments in x-ray imaging of the breast To understand the approaches and applications of spectral mammography To understand the potential advantages of distributed x-ray source arrays for digital breast tomosynthesis To understand the ongoing developments in detector technology for digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis To understand the current state-of-the-art for dedicated cone-beam breast CT and research to advance the technology. Research collaboration with Koning Corporation

  12. TU-CD-207-05: A Novel Digital Tomosynthesis System Using Orthogonal Scanning Technique: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, C [University of Florida Health Science Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Kauweloa, K [UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX (United States); Chung, Y; Han, Y [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ju, S [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: As an alternative to full tomographic imaging technique such as cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), there is growing interest to adopt digital tomosynthesis (DTS) for the use of diagnostic as well as therapeutic applications. The aim of this study is to propose a new DTS system using novel orthogonal scanning technique, which can provide superior image quality DTS images compared to the conventional DTS scanning system. Methods: Unlike conventional DTS scanning system, the proposed DTS is reconstructed with two sets of orthogonal patient scans. 1) X-ray projections that are acquired along transverse trajectory and 2) an additional sets of X-ray projections acquired along the vertical direction at the mid angle of the previous transverse scan. To reconstruct DTS, we have used modified filtered backprojection technique to account for the different scanning directions of each projection set. We have evaluated the performance of our method using numerical planning CT data of liver cancer patient and a physical pelvis phantom experiment. The results were compared with conventional DTS techniques with single transverse and vertical scanning. Results: The experiments on both numerical simulation as well as physical experiment showed that the resolution as well as contrast of anatomical structures was much clearer using our method. Specifically, the image quality comparing with transversely scanned DTS showed that the edge and contrast of anatomical structures along Left-Right (LR) directions was comparable however, considerable discrepancy and enhancement could be observed along Superior-Inferior (SI) direction using our method. The opposite was observed when vertically scanned DTS was compared. Conclusion: In this study, we propose a novel DTS system using orthogonal scanning technique. The results indicated that the image quality of our novel DTS system was superior compared to conventional DTS system. This makes our DTS system potentially useful in various on-line clinical applications.

  13. SU-C-207B-07: Deep Convolutional Neural Network Image Matching for Ultrasound Guidance in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, N; Najafi, M; Hancock, S; Hristov, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Robust matching of ultrasound images is a challenging problem as images of the same anatomy often present non-trivial differences. This poses an obstacle for ultrasound guidance in radiotherapy. Thus our objective is to overcome this obstacle by designing and evaluating an image blocks matching framework based on a two channel deep convolutional neural network. Methods: We extend to 3D an algorithmic structure previously introduced for 2D image feature learning [1]. To obtain the similarity between two 3D image blocks A and B, the 3D image blocks are divided into 2D patches Ai and Bi. The similarity is then calculated as the average similarity score of Ai and Bi. The neural network was then trained with public non-medical image pairs, and subsequently evaluated on ultrasound image blocks for the following scenarios: (S1) same image blocks with/without shifts (A and A-shift-x); (S2) non-related random block pairs; (S3) ground truth registration matched pairs of different ultrasound images with/without shifts (A-i and A-reg-i-shift-x). Results: For S1 the similarity scores of A and A-shift-x were 32.63, 18.38, 12.95, 9.23, 2.15 and 0.43 for x=ranging from 0 mm to 10 mm in 2 mm increments. For S2 the average similarity score for non-related block pairs was −1.15. For S3 the average similarity score of ground truth registration matched blocks A-i and A-reg-i-shift-0 (1≤i≤5) was 12.37. After translating A-reg-i-shift-0 by 0 mm, 2 mm, 4 mm, 6 mm, 8 mm, and 10 mm, the average similarity scores of A-i and A-reg-i-shift-x were 11.04, 8.42, 4.56, 2.27, and 0.29 respectively. Conclusion: The proposed method correctly assigns highest similarity to corresponding 3D ultrasound image blocks despite differences in image content and thus can form the basis for ultrasound image registration and tracking.[1] Zagoruyko, Komodakis, “Learning to compare image patches via convolutional neural networks', IEEE CVPR 2015,pp.4353–4361.

  14. 33 CFR 207.300 - Ohio River, Mississippi River above Cairo, Ill., and their tributaries; use, administration, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... one but employees of the United States shall move any lock machinery except as directed by the... Lock 2, near Buchanan, Ky. Operation of Lock 2 and Lock 3 near Fort Gay, W. Va. has been discontinued...

  15. 33 CFR 207.420 - Chicago River, Ill.; Sanitary District controlling works, and the use, administration, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the sign reading “Stop” on the south guide wall and shall not proceed into the lock until so directed..., is 23.0 feet. The east end of the northeast guide wall shall be marked by an intermittent red light... southeast guide wall and the west end of the southwest guide wall shall be marked by an intermittent white...

  16. WE-DE-207B-12: Scatter Correction for Dedicated Cone Beam Breast CT Based On a Forward Projection Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, L; Zhu, L [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (Georgia); Vedantham, S; Karellas, A [University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The image quality of dedicated cone-beam breast CT (CBBCT) is fundamentally limited by substantial x-ray scatter contamination, resulting in cupping artifacts and contrast-loss in reconstructed images. Such effects obscure the visibility of soft-tissue lesions and calcifications, which hinders breast cancer detection and diagnosis. In this work, we propose to suppress x-ray scatter in CBBCT images using a deterministic forward projection model. Method: We first use the 1st-pass FDK-reconstructed CBBCT images to segment fibroglandular and adipose tissue. Attenuation coefficients are assigned to the two tissues based on the x-ray spectrum used for imaging acquisition, and is forward projected to simulate scatter-free primary projections. We estimate the scatter by subtracting the simulated primary projection from the measured projection, and then the resultant scatter map is further refined by a Fourier-domain fitting algorithm after discarding untrusted scatter information. The final scatter estimate is subtracted from the measured projection for effective scatter correction. In our implementation, the proposed scatter correction takes 0.5 seconds for each projection. The method was evaluated using the overall image spatial non-uniformity (SNU) metric and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) with 5 clinical datasets of BI-RADS 4/5 subjects. Results: For the 5 clinical datasets, our method reduced the SNU from 7.79% to 1.68% in coronal view and from 6.71% to 3.20% in sagittal view. The average CNR is improved by a factor of 1.38 in coronal view and 1.26 in sagittal view. Conclusion: The proposed scatter correction approach requires no additional scans or prior images and uses a deterministic model for efficient calculation. Evaluation with clinical datasets demonstrates the feasibility and stability of the method. These features are attractive for clinical CBBCT and make our method distinct from other approaches. Supported partly by NIH R21EB019597, R21CA134128 and R01CA195512.The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

  17. WE-EF-207-03: Design and Optimization of a CBCT Head Scanner for Detection of Acute Intracranial Hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J; Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Dang, H; Stayman, J; Aygun, N; Koliatsos, V; Siewerdsen, JH [Johns Hopkins University, Balitmore, MD (United States); Wang, X; Foos, DH [Carestream Health, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To design a dedicated x-ray cone-beam CT (CBCT) system suitable to deployment at the point-of-care and offering reliable detection of acute intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), traumatic brain injury (TBI), stroke, and other head and neck injuries. Methods: A comprehensive task-based image quality model was developed to guide system design and optimization of a prototype head scanner suitable to imaging of acute TBI and ICH. Previously reported models were expanded to include the effects of x-ray scatter correction necessary for detection of low contrast ICH and the contribution of bit depth (digitization noise) to imaging performance. Task-based detectablity index provided the objective function for optimization of system geometry, x-ray source, detector type, anti-scatter grid, and technique at 10–25 mGy dose. Optimal characteristics were experimentally validated using a custom head phantom with 50 HU contrast ICH inserts imaged on a CBCT imaging bench allowing variation of system geometry, focal spot size, detector, grid selection, and x-ray technique. Results: The model guided selection of system geometry with a nominal source-detector distance 1100 mm and optimal magnification of 1.50. Focal spot size ∼0.6 mm was sufficient for spatial resolution requirements in ICH detection. Imaging at 90 kVp yielded the best tradeoff between noise and contrast. The model provided quantitation of tradeoffs between flat-panel and CMOS detectors with respect to electronic noise, field of view, and readout speed required for imaging of ICH. An anti-scatter grid was shown to provide modest benefit in conjunction with post-acquisition scatter correction. Images of the head phantom demonstrate visualization of millimeter-scale simulated ICH. Conclusions: Performance consistent with acute TBI and ICH detection is feasible with model-based system design and robust artifact correction in a dedicated head CBCT system. Further improvements can be achieved with incorporation of model-based iterative reconstruction techniques also within the scope of the task-based optimization framework. David Foos and Xiaohui Wang are employees of Carestream Health.

  18. 33 CFR 207.100 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... enter or pass through any part of the waterway will be contingent on the vessel's having adequate... facilities are of limited capacity, and permission to occupy them for periods exceeding 24 hours must be...

  19. SU-D-207B-02: Early Grade Classification in Meningioma Patients Combining Radiomics and Semantics Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coroller, T; Bi, W; Abedalthagafi, M; Aizer, A; Wu, W; Greenwald, N; Beroukhim, R; Al-Mefty, O; Santagata, S; Dunn, I; Alexander, B; Huang, R; Aerts, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical management of meningioma is guided by its grade and biologic behavior. Currently, diagnosis of tumor grade follows surgical resection and histopathologic review. Reliable techniques for pre-operative determination of tumor behavior are needed. We investigated the association between imaging features extracted from preoperative gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MRI and meningioma grade. Methods: We retrospectively examined the pre-operative MRI for 139 patients with de novo WHO grade I (63%) and grade II (37%) meningiomas. We investigated the predictive power of ten semantic radiologic features as determined by a neuroradiologist, fifteen radiomic features, and tumor location. Conventional (volume and diameter) imaging features were added for comparison. AUC was computed for continuous and χ 2 for discrete variables. Classification was done using random forest. Performance was evaluated using cross validation (1000 iterations, 75% training and 25% validation). All p-values were adjusted for multiple testing. Results: Significant association was observed between meningioma grade and tumor location (p<0.001) and two semantic features including intra-tumoral heterogeneity (p<0.001) and overt hemorrhage (p=0.01). Conventional (AUC 0.61–0.67) and eleven radiomic (AUC 0.60–0.70) features were significant from random (p<0.05, Noether test). Median AUC values for classification of tumor grade were 0.57, 0.71, 0.72 and 0.77 respectively for conventional, radiomic, location, and semantic features after using random forest. By combining all imaging data (semantic, radiomic, and location), the median AUC was 0.81, which offers superior predicting power to that of conventional imaging descriptors for meningioma as well as radiomic features alone (p<0.05, permutation test). Conclusion: We demonstrate a strong association between radiologic features and meningioma grade. Pre-operative prediction of tumor behavior based on imaging features offers promise for guiding personalized medicine and improving patient management.

  20. TU-G-207-03: High Spatial Resolution and High Sensitivity X-Ray Fluorescence Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, L.

    2015-01-01

    Last few years has witnessed the development of novel of X-ray imaging modalities, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT, and X-ray acoustic/fluorescence/luminescence imaging. This symposium will present the recent advances of these emerging X-ray imaging modalities and update the attendees with knowledge in various related topics, including X-ray photon-counting detectors, X-ray physics underlying the emerging applications beyond the traditional X-ray imaging, image reconstruction for the novel modalities, characterization and evaluation of the systems, and their practical implications. In addition, the concept and practical aspects of X-ray activatable targeted nanoparticles for molecular X-ray imaging will be discussed in the context of X-ray fluorescence and luminescence CT. Learning Objectives: Present background knowledge of various emerging X-ray imaging techniques, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT and X-ray fluorescence/luminescence CT. Discuss the practical need, technical aspects and current status of the emerging X-ray imaging modalities. Describe utility and future impact of the new generation of X-ray imaging applications

  1. SU-D-207B-01: Radiomics Feature Reproducibility From Repeat CT Scans of Patients with Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, P; Wang, J; Zhong, H; Zhou, Z; Shen, L; Hu, W; Zhang, Z [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the reproducibility of radiomics features by repeating computed tomographic (CT) scans in rectal cancer. To choose stable radiomics features for rectal cancer. Methods: 40 rectal cancer patients were enrolled in this study, each of whom underwent two CT scans within average 8.7 days (5 days to 17 days), before any treatment was delivered. The rectal gross tumor volume (GTV) was distinguished and segmented by an experienced oncologist in both CTs. Totally, more than 2000 radiomics features were defined in this study, which were divided into four groups (I: GLCM, II: GLRLM III: Wavelet GLCM and IV: Wavelet GLRLM). For each group, five types of features were extracted (Max slice: features from the largest slice of target images, Max value: features from all slices of target images and choose the maximum value, Min value: minimum value of features for all slices, Average value: average value of features for all slices, Matrix sum: all slices of target images translate into GLCM and GLRLM matrices and superpose all matrices, then extract features from the superposed matrix). Meanwhile a LOG (Laplace of Gauss) filter with different parameters was applied to these images. Concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) and inter-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated to assess the reproducibility. Results: 403 radiomics features were extracted from each type of patients’ medical images. Features of average type are the most reproducible. Different filters have little effect for radiomics features. For the average type features, 253 out of 403 features (62.8%) showed high reproducibility (ICC≥0.8), 133 out of 403 features (33.0%) showed medium reproducibility (0.8≥ICC≥0.5) and 17 out of 403 features (4.2%) showed low reproducibility (ICC≥0.5). Conclusion: The average type radiomics features are the most stable features in rectal cancer. Further analysis of these features of rectal cancer can be warranted for treatment monitoring and prognosis prediction.

  2. MO-DE-207A-11: Sparse-View CT Reconstruction Via a Novel Non-Local Means Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z; Qi, H; Wu, S; Xu, Y; Zhou, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Sparse-view computed tomography (CT) reconstruction is an effective strategy to reduce the radiation dose delivered to patients. Due to its insufficiency of measurements, traditional non-local means (NLM) based reconstruction methods often lead to over-smoothness in image edges. To address this problem, an adaptive NLM reconstruction method based on rotational invariance (RIANLM) is proposed. Methods: The method consists of four steps: 1) Initializing parameters; 2) Algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) reconstruction using raw projection data; 3) Positivity constraint of the image reconstructed by ART; 4) Update reconstructed image by using RIANLM filtering. In RIANLM, a novel similarity metric that is rotational invariance is proposed and used to calculate the distance between two patches. In this way, any patch with similar structure but different orientation to the reference patch would win a relatively large weight to avoid over-smoothed image. Moreover, the parameter h in RIANLM which controls the decay of the weights is adaptive to avoid over-smoothness, while it in NLM is not adaptive during the whole reconstruction process. The proposed method is named as ART-RIANLM and validated on Shepp-Logan phantom and clinical projection data. Results: In our experiments, the searching neighborhood size is set to 15 by 15 and the similarity window is set to 3 by 3. For the simulated case with a resolution of 256 by 256 Shepp-Logan phantom, the ART-RIANLM produces higher SNR (35.38dB<24.00dB) and lower MAE (0.0006<0.0023) reconstructed image than ART-NLM. The visual inspection demonstrated that the proposed method could suppress artifacts or noises more effectively and preserve image edges better. Similar results were found for clinical data case. Conclusion: A novel ART-RIANLM method for sparse-view CT reconstruction is presented with superior image. Compared to the conventional ART-NLM method, the SNR and MAE from ART-RIANLM increases 47% and decreases 74%, respectively.

  3. WE-H-207A-06: Hypoxia Quantification in Static PET Images: The Signal in the Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, H; Yeung, I; Milosevic, M; Jaffray, D; Kueng, R; Shek, T; Driscoll, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of hypoxia from PET images is of considerable clinical interest. In the absence of dynamic PET imaging the hypoxic fraction (HF) of a tumor has to be estimated from voxel values of activity concentration of a radioactive hypoxia tracer. This work is part of an effort to standardize quantification of tumor hypoxic fraction from PET images. Methods: A simple hypoxia imaging model in the tumor was developed. The distribution of the tracer activity was described as the sum of two different probability distributions, one for the normoxic (and necrotic), the other for the hypoxic voxels. The widths of the distributions arise due to variability of the transport, tumor tissue inhomogeneity, tracer binding kinetics, and due to PET image noise. Quantification of HF was performed for various levels of variability using two different methodologies: a) classification thresholds between normoxic and hypoxic voxels based on a non-hypoxic surrogate (muscle), and b) estimation of the (posterior) probability distributions based on maximizing likelihood optimization that does not require a surrogate. Data from the hypoxia imaging model and from 27 cervical cancer patients enrolled in a FAZA PET study were analyzed. Results: In the model, where the true value of HF is known, thresholds usually underestimate the value for large variability. For the patients, a significant uncertainty of the HF values (an average intra-patient range of 17%) was caused by spatial non-uniformity of image noise which is a hallmark of all PET images. Maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) is able to directly optimize for the weights of both distributions, however, may suffer from poor optimization convergence. For some patients, MLE-based HF values showed significant differences to threshold-based HF-values. Conclusion: HF-values depend critically on the magnitude of the different sources of tracer uptake variability. A measure of confidence should also be reported.

  4. WE-H-207A-06: Hypoxia Quantification in Static PET Images: The Signal in the Noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, H; Yeung, I; Milosevic, M; Jaffray, D [University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada); Kueng, R [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada); Inselspital Bern, Bern, Switzerland. (Switzerland); Shek, T; Driscoll, B [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of hypoxia from PET images is of considerable clinical interest. In the absence of dynamic PET imaging the hypoxic fraction (HF) of a tumor has to be estimated from voxel values of activity concentration of a radioactive hypoxia tracer. This work is part of an effort to standardize quantification of tumor hypoxic fraction from PET images. Methods: A simple hypoxia imaging model in the tumor was developed. The distribution of the tracer activity was described as the sum of two different probability distributions, one for the normoxic (and necrotic), the other for the hypoxic voxels. The widths of the distributions arise due to variability of the transport, tumor tissue inhomogeneity, tracer binding kinetics, and due to PET image noise. Quantification of HF was performed for various levels of variability using two different methodologies: a) classification thresholds between normoxic and hypoxic voxels based on a non-hypoxic surrogate (muscle), and b) estimation of the (posterior) probability distributions based on maximizing likelihood optimization that does not require a surrogate. Data from the hypoxia imaging model and from 27 cervical cancer patients enrolled in a FAZA PET study were analyzed. Results: In the model, where the true value of HF is known, thresholds usually underestimate the value for large variability. For the patients, a significant uncertainty of the HF values (an average intra-patient range of 17%) was caused by spatial non-uniformity of image noise which is a hallmark of all PET images. Maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) is able to directly optimize for the weights of both distributions, however, may suffer from poor optimization convergence. For some patients, MLE-based HF values showed significant differences to threshold-based HF-values. Conclusion: HF-values depend critically on the magnitude of the different sources of tracer uptake variability. A measure of confidence should also be reported.

  5. TH-A-207B-01: Basics and Current Implementations of Ultrasound Imaging of Shear Wave Speed and Elasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of tissue elastic properties is a relatively new and powerful approach to one of the oldest and most important diagnostic tools. Imaging of shear wave speed with ultrasound is has been added to most high-end ultrasound systems. Understanding this exciting imaging mode aiding its most effective use in medicine can be a rewarding effort for medical physicists and other medical imaging and treatment professionals. Assuring consistent, quantitative measurements across the many ultrasound systems in a typical imaging department will constitute a major step toward realizing the great potential of this technique and other quantitative imaging. This session will target these two goals with two presentations. A. Basics and Current Implementations of Ultrasound Imaging of Shear Wave Speed and Elasticity - Shigao Chen, Ph.D. Learning objectives-To understand: Introduction: Importance of tissue elasticity measurement Strain vs. shear wave elastography (SWE), beneficial features of SWE The link between shear wave speed and material properties, influence of viscosity Generation of shear waves External vibration (Fibroscan) ultrasound radiation force Point push Supersonic push (Aixplorer) Comb push (GE Logiq E9) Detection of shear waves Motion detection from pulse-echo ultrasound Importance of frame rate for shear wave imaging Plane wave imaging detection How to achieve high effective frame rate using line-by-line scanners Shear wave speed calculation Time to peak Random sample consensus (RANSAC) Cross correlation Sources of bias and variation in SWE Tissue viscosity Transducer compression or internal pressure of organ Reflection of shear waves at boundaries B. Elasticity Imaging System Biomarker Qualification and User Testing of Systems – Brian Garra, M.D. Learning objectives-To understand: Goals Review the need for quantitative medical imaging Provide examples of quantitative imaging biomarkers Acquaint the participant with the purpose of the RSNA Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Alliance and the need for such an organization Review the QIBA process for creating a quantitative biomarker Summarize steps needed to verify adherence of site, operators, and imaging systems to a QIBA profile Underlying Premise and Assumptions Objective, quantifiable results are needed to enhance the value of diagnostic imaging in clinical practice Reasons for quantification Evidence based medicine requires objective, not subjective observer data Computerized decision support tools (eg CAD) generally require quantitative input. Quantitative, reproducible measures are more easily used to develop personalized molecular medical diagnostic and treatment systems What is quantitative imaging? Definition from Imaging Metrology Workshop The Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Alliance Formation 2008 Mission Structure Example Imaging Biomarkers Being Explored Biomarker Selection Groundwork Draft Protocol for imaging and data evaluation QIBA Profile Drafting Equipment and Site Validation Technical Clinical Site and Equipment QA and Compliance Checking Ultrasound Elasticity Estimation Biomarker US Elasticity Estimation Background Current Status and Problems Biomarker Selection-process and outcome US SWS for Liver Fibrosis Biomarker Work Groundwork Literature search and analysis results Phase I phantom testing-Elastic phantoms Phase II phantom testing-Viscoelastic phantoms Digital Simulated Data Protocol and Profile Drafting Protocol: based on UPICT and existing literature and standards bodies protocols Profile-Current claims, Manufacturer specific appendices What comes after the profile Profile Validation Technical validation Clinical validation QA and Compliance Possible approaches Site Operator testing Site protocol re-evaluation Imaging system Manufacturer testing and attestation User acceptance testing and periodic QA Phantom Tests Digital Phantom Based Testing Standard QA Testing Remediation Schemes Profile Evolution Towards additional applications Towards higher accuracy and precision Supported in part by NIH contract HHSN268201300071C from NIBIB. Collaboration with GE Global Research, no personal support.; S. Chen, Some technologies described in this presentation have been licensed. Mayo Clinic and Dr. Chen have financial interests these technologies.

  6. TH-CD-207A-09: Stay On Target: Dynamic, Patient-Specific Templates of Fiducial Marker Clusters for IGRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, W; Miften, M; Jones, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic SBRT relies on extremely accurate delivery of ablative radiation doses to the target, and intra-fractional tracking of fiducial markers can facilitate improvements in dose delivery. However, this requires algorithms that are able to find fiducial markers with high speed and accuracy. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel marker tracking algorithm that is robust against many of the common errors seen with traditional template matching techniques. Methods: Using CBCT projection images, a method was developed to create detailed template images of fiducial marker clusters without prior knowledge of the number of markers, their positions, or their orientations. Briefly, the method (i) enhances markers in projection images, (ii) stabilizes the cluster’s position, (iii) reconstructs the cluster in 3D, and (iv) precomputes a set of static template images dependent on gantry angle. Furthermore, breathing data were used to produce 4D reconstructions of clusters, yielding dynamic template images dependent on gantry angle and breathing amplitude. To test these two approaches, static and dynamic templates were used to track the motion of marker clusters in more than 66,000 projection images from 75 CBCT scans of 15 pancreatic SBRT patients. Results: For both static and dynamic templates, the new technique was able to locate marker clusters present in projection images 100% of the time. The algorithm was also able to correctly locate markers in several instances where only some of the markers were visible due to insufficient field-of-view. In cases where clusters exhibited deformation and/or rotation during breathing, dynamic templates resulted in cross-correlation scores up to 70% higher than static templates. Conclusion: Patient-specific templates provided complete tracking of fiducial marker clusters in CBCT scans, and dynamic templates helped to provide higher cross-correlation scores for deforming/rotating clusters. This novel algorithm provides an extremely accurate method to detect fiducial markers during treatment. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems to Miften and Jones.

  7. SU-D-207A-01: Female Pelvic Synthetic CT Generation Based On Joint Shape and Intensity Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L; Jolly, S; Cao, Y; Vineberg, K; Fessler, J; Balter, J [University Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for generating female pelvic synthetic CT (MRCT) images from a single MR scan and evaluate its utility in radiotherapy. Methods: Under IRB-approval, an imaging sequence (T1-VIBE-Dixon) was acquired for 10 patients. This sequence yields 3 useful image volumes of different contrast (“in-phase” T1-weighted, fat and water). A previously published pelvic bone shape model was used to generate a rough bone mask for each patient. A modified fuzzy c-means classification was performed on the multi spectral MR data, with a regularization term that utilizes the prior knowledge provided by the bone mask and addresses the intensity overlap between different tissue types. A weighted sum of classification probabilities with attenuation values yielded MRCT volumes. The mean absolute error (MAE) between MRCT and real CT on various regions was calculated following deformable alignment (Velocity). Intensity modulated Treatment plans based on actual CT and MRCT were made and compared. Results: The average/standard deviation of MAE across 10 patients was 10.1/6.7 HU for muscle, 6.7/4.6 HU for fat, 136.9/53.5 HU for bony tissues under 850 HU (97% of total bone volume), 188.9/119.3 HU for bony tissues above 850 HU and 17.3/13.3 HU for intrapelvic soft tissues. Calculated doses were comparable for plans generated on CT and calculated using MRCT densities or vice versa, with differences in PTV D99% (mean/σ) of (–0.1/0.2 Gy) and (0.3/0.2 Gy), PTV D0.5cc of (–0.3/0.2 Gy) and (–0.4/1.7 Gy). OAR differences were similarly small for comparable structures, with differences in bowel V50Gy of (–0.3/0.2%) and (0.0/0.2%), femur V30Gy of (0.7/1.2%) and (0.2/1.2%), sacrum V20GY of (0.0/0.1%) and (–0.1/1.1%) and mean pelvic V20Gy of (0.0/0.1%) and (0.6/1.8%). Conclusion: MRCT based on a single imaging sequence in the female pelvis is feasible, with acceptably small variations in attenuation estimates and calculated doses to target and critical organs. Work supported by NIHR01EB016079.

  8. 33 CFR 207.260 - Yazoo Diversion Canal, Vicksburg, Miss., from its mouth at Kleinston Landing to Fisher Street...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... fastened with chains or wire rope that it cannot be separated or bag out or materially change its shape... route. Rafts shall not be of greater dimensions than 50 feet wide by 600 feet long, and if longer than 300 feet they shall be handled by two tugs; and in all cases they must be handled by sufficient tug...

  9. SU-D-207A-05: Investigating Sparse-Sampled MRI for Motion Management in Thoracic Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabouri, P; Sawant, A; Arai, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Sparse sampling and reconstruction-based MRI techniques represent an attractive strategy to achieve sufficiently high image acquisition speed while maintaining image quality for the task of radiotherapy guidance. In this study, we examine rapid dynamic MRI using a sparse sampling sequence k-t BLAST in capturing motion-induced, cycle-to-cycle variations in tumor position. We investigate the utility of long-term MRI-based motion monitoring as a means of better characterizing respiration-induced tumor motion compared to a single-cycle 4DCT. Methods: An MRI-compatible, programmable, deformable lung motion phantom with eleven 1.5 ml water marker tubes was placed inside a 3.0 T whole-body MR scanner (Philips Ingenia). The phantom was programmed with 10 lung tumor motion traces previously recorded using the Synchrony system. 2D+t image sequences of a coronal slice were acquired using a balanced-SSFP sequence combined with k-t BLAST (accn=3, resolution=0.66×0.66×5 mm3; acquisition time = 110 ms/slice). kV fluoroscopic (ground truth) and 4DCT imaging was performed with the same phantom setup and motion trajectories. Marker positions in all three modalities were segmented and tracked using an opensource deformable image registration package, NiftyReg. Results: Marker trajectories obtained from rapid MRI exhibited <1 mm error compared to kv Fluoro trajectories in the presence of complex motion including baseline shifts and changes in respiratory amplitude, indicating the ability of MRI to monitor motion with adequate geometric fidelity for the purpose of radiotherapy guidance. In contrast, the trajectory derived from 4DCT exhibited significant errors up to 6 mm due to cycle-to-cycle variations and baseline shifts. Consequently, 4DCT was found to underestimate the range of marker motion by as much as 50%. Conclusion: Dynamic MRI is a promising tool for radiotherapy motion management as it permits for longterm, dose-free, soft-tissue-based monitoring of motion, yielding richer and more accurate information about tumor position and motion range compared to the current state-of-the-art, 4DCT. This work was partially supported through research funding from National Institutes of Health (R01CA169102).

  10. TH-CD-207A-08: Simulated Real-Time Image Guidance for Lung SBRT Patients Using Scatter Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redler, G; Cifter, G; Templeton, A; Lee, C; Bernard, D; Liao, Y; Zhen, H; Turian, J; Chu, J [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a comprehensive Monte Carlo-based model for the acquisition of scatter images of patient anatomy in real-time, during lung SBRT treatment. Methods: During SBRT treatment, images of patient anatomy can be acquired from scattered radiation. To rigorously examine the utility of scatter images for image guidance, a model is developed using MCNP code to simulate scatter images of phantoms and lung cancer patients. The model is validated by comparing experimental and simulated images of phantoms of different complexity. The differentiation between tissue types is investigated by imaging objects of known compositions (water, lung, and bone equivalent). A lung tumor phantom, simulating materials and geometry encountered during lung SBRT treatments, is used to investigate image noise properties for various quantities of delivered radiation (monitor units(MU)). Patient scatter images are simulated using the validated simulation model. 4DCT patient data is converted to an MCNP input geometry accounting for different tissue composition and densities. Lung tumor phantom images acquired with decreasing imaging time (decreasing MU) are used to model the expected noise amplitude in patient scatter images, producing realistic simulated patient scatter images with varying temporal resolution. Results: Image intensity in simulated and experimental scatter images of tissue equivalent objects (water, lung, bone) match within the uncertainty (∼3%). Lung tumor phantom images agree as well. Specifically, tumor-to-lung contrast matches within the uncertainty. The addition of random noise approximating quantum noise in experimental images to simulated patient images shows that scatter images of lung tumors can provide images in as fast as 0.5 seconds with CNR∼2.7. Conclusions: A scatter imaging simulation model is developed and validated using experimental phantom scatter images. Following validation, lung cancer patient scatter images are simulated. These simulated patient images demonstrate the clinical utility of scatter imaging for real-time tumor tracking during lung SBRT.

  11. WE-FG-207A-03: Low-Dose Cone-Beam Breast CT: Physics and Technology Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boone, J.

    2016-01-01

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively investigating dedicated breast CT. The development of large-area flat-panel detectors with field-of-view sufficient to image the entire breast in each projection enabled development of flat-panel cone-beam breast CT. More recently, the availability of complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detectors with lower system noise and finer pixel pitch, combined with the development of x-ray tubes with focal spot dimensions similar to mammography systems, has shown improved spatial resolution and could improve visualization of microcalcifications. These technological developments promise clinical translation of low-dose cone-beam breast CT. Dedicated photon-counting breast CT (pcBCT) systems represent a novel detector design, which provide high spatial resolution (∼ 100µm) and low mean glandular dose (MGD). The CdTe-based direct conversion detector technology was previously evaluated and confirmed by simulations and basic experiments on laboratory setups [Kalender et al., Eur Radiol 22: 1–8, 2012]. Measurements of dose, technical image quality parameters, and surgical specimens on a pcBCT scanner have been completed. Comparative evaluation of surgical specimens showed that pcBCT outperformed mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis with respect to 3D spatial resolution, detectability of calcifications, and soft tissue delineation. Major barriers to widespread clinical use of BCT relate to radiation dose, imaging of microcalcifications, and adequate coverage of breast tissue near the chest wall. Adequate chest wall coverage is also technically challenging but recent progress in x-ray tube, detector and table design now enables full breast coverage in the majority of patients. At this time, BCT has been deemed to be suitable for diagnostic imaging but not yet for screening. The mean glandular dose (MGD) from BCT has been reported to be between 5.7 to 27.8 mGy, and this range is comparable to, and within the range of, the MGD of 2.6 to 31.6 mGy in diagnostic mammography. In diagnostic studies, the median MGD from BCT and mammography were 12.6 and 11.1 mGy, respectively [Vedantham et al., Phys Med Biol. 58: 7921–36, 2013]. Moreover, in diagnostic imaging of the breast the location of the lesion is known and therefore characterization and not detection is by far the primary consideration. The role of bCT is particularly compelling for diagnostic imaging of the breast because it may replace in part the multiple mammographic views of the breast under vigorous compression. Other non-screening potential applications of bCT include the assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy [Vedantham et al., J Clin Imaging Sci 4, 64, 2014] and pre-surgical evaluation. Learning Objectives: To understand the metrics used to evaluate screening and diagnostic imaging To understand the benefits and limitations of current clinical modalities To understand how breast CT can improve over current clinical modalities To note the early attempts to translate breast CT to the clinic in 1970s-1990s To understand the recent developments in low-dose cone-beam breast CT To understand the recent developments in photon-counting breast CT To understand the radiation dose, clinical translation, and recent developments in diagnostic imaging with breast CT Supported in part by NIH grants R21 CA134128, R01 CA128906 and R01 CA195512. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the official views of the NIH or the NCI.; S. Vedantham, Funding sources: Supported in part by NIH/NCI grants R01 CA128906 and R01 CA195512. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the official views of the NIH/NCI. Disclosures: Research collaboration with Koning Corporation, West Henrietta, NY. Conflicts of Interest: J. Boone, This research was supported in part by NIH grant R01CA181081; W. Kalender, WK is founder and CEO of CT Imaging GmbH Erlangen, Germany.; A. Karellas, NIH R21 CA134128, R01 CA128906, and R01 CA195512 and Research collaboration with Koning Corporation.

  12. WE-FG-207A-05: Dedicated Breast CT as a Diagnostic Imaging Tool: Physics and Clinical Feasibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karellas, A.

    2016-01-01

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively investigating dedicated breast CT. The development of large-area flat-panel detectors with field-of-view sufficient to image the entire breast in each projection enabled development of flat-panel cone-beam breast CT. More recently, the availability of complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detectors with lower system noise and finer pixel pitch, combined with the development of x-ray tubes with focal spot dimensions similar to mammography systems, has shown improved spatial resolution and could improve visualization of microcalcifications. These technological developments promise clinical translation of low-dose cone-beam breast CT. Dedicated photon-counting breast CT (pcBCT) systems represent a novel detector design, which provide high spatial resolution (∼ 100µm) and low mean glandular dose (MGD). The CdTe-based direct conversion detector technology was previously evaluated and confirmed by simulations and basic experiments on laboratory setups [Kalender et al., Eur Radiol 22: 1–8, 2012]. Measurements of dose, technical image quality parameters, and surgical specimens on a pcBCT scanner have been completed. Comparative evaluation of surgical specimens showed that pcBCT outperformed mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis with respect to 3D spatial resolution, detectability of calcifications, and soft tissue delineation. Major barriers to widespread clinical use of BCT relate to radiation dose, imaging of microcalcifications, and adequate coverage of breast tissue near the chest wall. Adequate chest wall coverage is also technically challenging but recent progress in x-ray tube, detector and table design now enables full breast coverage in the majority of patients. At this time, BCT has been deemed to be suitable for diagnostic imaging but not yet for screening. The mean glandular dose (MGD) from BCT has been reported to be between 5.7 to 27.8 mGy, and this range is comparable to, and within the range of, the MGD of 2.6 to 31.6 mGy in diagnostic mammography. In diagnostic studies, the median MGD from BCT and mammography were 12.6 and 11.1 mGy, respectively [Vedantham et al., Phys Med Biol. 58: 7921–36, 2013]. Moreover, in diagnostic imaging of the breast the location of the lesion is known and therefore characterization and not detection is by far the primary consideration. The role of bCT is particularly compelling for diagnostic imaging of the breast because it may replace in part the multiple mammographic views of the breast under vigorous compression. Other non-screening potential applications of bCT include the assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy [Vedantham et al., J Clin Imaging Sci 4, 64, 2014] and pre-surgical evaluation. Learning Objectives: To understand the metrics used to evaluate screening and diagnostic imaging To understand the benefits and limitations of current clinical modalities To understand how breast CT can improve over current clinical modalities To note the early attempts to translate breast CT to the clinic in 1970s-1990s To understand the recent developments in low-dose cone-beam breast CT To understand the recent developments in photon-counting breast CT To understand the radiation dose, clinical translation, and recent developments in diagnostic imaging with breast CT Supported in part by NIH grants R21 CA134128, R01 CA128906 and R01 CA195512. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the official views of the NIH or the NCI.; S. Vedantham, Funding sources: Supported in part by NIH/NCI grants R01 CA128906 and R01 CA195512. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the official views of the NIH/NCI. Disclosures: Research collaboration with Koning Corporation, West Henrietta, NY. Conflicts of Interest: J. Boone, This research was supported in part by NIH grant R01CA181081; W. Kalender, WK is founder and CEO of CT Imaging GmbH Erlangen, Germany.; A. Karellas, NIH R21 CA134128, R01 CA128906, and R01 CA195512 and Research collaboration with Koning Corporation.

  13. WE-H-207A-03: The Universality of the Lognormal Behavior of [F-18]FLT PET SUV Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarpelli, M; Eickhoff, J; Perlman, S; Jeraj, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Log transforming [F-18]FDG PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) has been shown to lead to normal SUV distributions, which allows utilization of powerful parametric statistical models. This study identified the optimal transformation leading to normally distributed [F-18]FLT PET SUVs from solid tumors and offers an example of how normal distributions permits analysis of non-independent/correlated measurements. Methods: Forty patients with various metastatic diseases underwent up to six FLT PET/CT scans during treatment. Tumors were identified by nuclear medicine physician and manually segmented. Average uptake was extracted for each patient giving a global SUVmean (gSUVmean) for each scan. The Shapiro-Wilk test was used to test distribution normality. One parameter Box-Cox transformations were applied to each of the six gSUVmean distributions and the optimal transformation was found by selecting the parameter that maximized the Shapiro-Wilk test statistic. The relationship between gSUVmean and a serum biomarker (VEGF) collected at imaging timepoints was determined using a linear mixed effects model (LMEM), which accounted for correlated/non-independent measurements from the same individual. Results: Untransformed gSUVmean distributions were found to be significantly non-normal (p<0.05). The optimal transformation parameter had a value of 0.3 (95%CI: −0.4 to 1.6). Given the optimal parameter was close to zero (which corresponds to log transformation), the data were subsequently log transformed. All log transformed gSUVmean distributions were normally distributed (p>0.10 for all timepoints). Log transformed data were incorporated into the LMEM. VEGF serum levels significantly correlated with gSUVmean (p<0.001), revealing log-linear relationship between SUVs and underlying biology. Conclusion: Failure to account for correlated/non-independent measurements can lead to invalid conclusions and motivated transformation to normally distributed SUVs. The log transformation was found to be close to optimal and sufficient for obtaining normally distributed FLT PET SUVs. These transformations allow utilization of powerful LMEMs when analyzing quantitative imaging metrics.

  14. Oahu Hyperspectral Imagery 2000 (207a-0613-332211) - Visual Interpretation from Remote Sensing Imagery Main Eight Hawaiian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project is a cooperative effort between the National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment,...

  15. Oahu Hyperspectral Imagery 2000 (207b-0613-332211) - Visual Interpretation from Remote Sensing Imagery Main Eight Hawaiian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project is a cooperative effort between the National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment,...

  16. MO-FG-207-03: Maximizing the Utility of Integrated PET/MRI in Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behr, S. [University of California (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee.

  17. TH-A-207B-02: QIBA Ultrasound Elasticity Imaging System Biomarker Qualification and User Testing of Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garra, B.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of tissue elastic properties is a relatively new and powerful approach to one of the oldest and most important diagnostic tools. Imaging of shear wave speed with ultrasound is has been added to most high-end ultrasound systems. Understanding this exciting imaging mode aiding its most effective use in medicine can be a rewarding effort for medical physicists and other medical imaging and treatment professionals. Assuring consistent, quantitative measurements across the many ultrasound systems in a typical imaging department will constitute a major step toward realizing the great potential of this technique and other quantitative imaging. This session will target these two goals with two presentations. A. Basics and Current Implementations of Ultrasound Imaging of Shear Wave Speed and Elasticity - Shigao Chen, Ph.D. Learning objectives-To understand: Introduction: Importance of tissue elasticity measurement Strain vs. shear wave elastography (SWE), beneficial features of SWE The link between shear wave speed and material properties, influence of viscosity Generation of shear waves External vibration (Fibroscan) ultrasound radiation force Point push Supersonic push (Aixplorer) Comb push (GE Logiq E9) Detection of shear waves Motion detection from pulse-echo ultrasound Importance of frame rate for shear wave imaging Plane wave imaging detection How to achieve high effective frame rate using line-by-line scanners Shear wave speed calculation Time to peak Random sample consensus (RANSAC) Cross correlation Sources of bias and variation in SWE Tissue viscosity Transducer compression or internal pressure of organ Reflection of shear waves at boundaries B. Elasticity Imaging System Biomarker Qualification and User Testing of Systems – Brian Garra, M.D. Learning objectives-To understand: Goals Review the need for quantitative medical imaging Provide examples of quantitative imaging biomarkers Acquaint the participant with the purpose of the RSNA Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Alliance and the need for such an organization Review the QIBA process for creating a quantitative biomarker Summarize steps needed to verify adherence of site, operators, and imaging systems to a QIBA profile Underlying Premise and Assumptions Objective, quantifiable results are needed to enhance the value of diagnostic imaging in clinical practice Reasons for quantification Evidence based medicine requires objective, not subjective observer data Computerized decision support tools (eg CAD) generally require quantitative input. Quantitative, reproducible measures are more easily used to develop personalized molecular medical diagnostic and treatment systems What is quantitative imaging? Definition from Imaging Metrology Workshop The Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Alliance Formation 2008 Mission Structure Example Imaging Biomarkers Being Explored Biomarker Selection Groundwork Draft Protocol for imaging and data evaluation QIBA Profile Drafting Equipment and Site Validation Technical Clinical Site and Equipment QA and Compliance Checking Ultrasound Elasticity Estimation Biomarker US Elasticity Estimation Background Current Status and Problems Biomarker Selection-process and outcome US SWS for Liver Fibrosis Biomarker Work Groundwork Literature search and analysis results Phase I phantom testing-Elastic phantoms Phase II phantom testing-Viscoelastic phantoms Digital Simulated Data Protocol and Profile Drafting Protocol: based on UPICT and existing literature and standards bodies protocols Profile-Current claims, Manufacturer specific appendices What comes after the profile Profile Validation Technical validation Clinical validation QA and Compliance Possible approaches Site Operator testing Site protocol re-evaluation Imaging system Manufacturer testing and attestation User acceptance testing and periodic QA Phantom Tests Digital Phantom Based Testing Standard QA Testing Remediation Schemes Profile Evolution Towards additional applications Towards higher accuracy and precision Supported in part by NIH contract HHSN268201300071C from NIBIB. Collaboration with GE Global Research, no personal support.; S. Chen, Some technologies described in this presentation have been licensed. Mayo Clinic and Dr. Chen have financial interests these technologies.

  18. TH-CD-207A-08: Simulated Real-Time Image Guidance for Lung SBRT Patients Using Scatter Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redler, G; Cifter, G; Templeton, A; Lee, C; Bernard, D; Liao, Y; Zhen, H; Turian, J; Chu, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a comprehensive Monte Carlo-based model for the acquisition of scatter images of patient anatomy in real-time, during lung SBRT treatment. Methods: During SBRT treatment, images of patient anatomy can be acquired from scattered radiation. To rigorously examine the utility of scatter images for image guidance, a model is developed using MCNP code to simulate scatter images of phantoms and lung cancer patients. The model is validated by comparing experimental and simulated images of phantoms of different complexity. The differentiation between tissue types is investigated by imaging objects of known compositions (water, lung, and bone equivalent). A lung tumor phantom, simulating materials and geometry encountered during lung SBRT treatments, is used to investigate image noise properties for various quantities of delivered radiation (monitor units(MU)). Patient scatter images are simulated using the validated simulation model. 4DCT patient data is converted to an MCNP input geometry accounting for different tissue composition and densities. Lung tumor phantom images acquired with decreasing imaging time (decreasing MU) are used to model the expected noise amplitude in patient scatter images, producing realistic simulated patient scatter images with varying temporal resolution. Results: Image intensity in simulated and experimental scatter images of tissue equivalent objects (water, lung, bone) match within the uncertainty (∼3%). Lung tumor phantom images agree as well. Specifically, tumor-to-lung contrast matches within the uncertainty. The addition of random noise approximating quantum noise in experimental images to simulated patient images shows that scatter images of lung tumors can provide images in as fast as 0.5 seconds with CNR∼2.7. Conclusions: A scatter imaging simulation model is developed and validated using experimental phantom scatter images. Following validation, lung cancer patient scatter images are simulated. These simulated patient images demonstrate the clinical utility of scatter imaging for real-time tumor tracking during lung SBRT.

  19. WE-FG-207B-11: Objective Image Characterization of Spectral CT with a Dual-Layer Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozguner, O; Halliburton, S; Dhanantwari, A; Utrup, S; Wen, G; Jordan, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain objective reference data for the spectral performance on a dual-layer detector CT platform (IQon, Philips) and compare virtual monoenergetic to conventional CT images. Methods: Scanning was performed using the hospital’s clinical adult body protocol: helical acquisition at 120kVp, with CTDIvol=15mGy. Multiple modules (591, 515, 528) of a CATPHAN 600 phantom and a 20 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom were scanned. No modifications to the standard protocol were necessary to enable spectral imaging. Both conventional and virtual monoenergetic images were generated from acquired data. Noise characteristics were assessed through Noise Power Spectra (NPS) and pixel standard deviation from water phantom images. Spatial resolution was evaluated using Modulation Transfer Functions (MTF) of a tungsten wire as well as resolution bars. Low-contrast detectability was studied using contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of a low contrast object. Results: MTF curves of monoenergetic and conventional images were almost identical. MTF 50%, 10%, and 5% levels for monoenergetic images agreed with conventional images within 0.05lp/cm. These observations were verified by the resolution bars, which were clearly resolved at 7lp/cm but started blurring at 8lp/cm for this protocol in both conventional and 70 keV images. NPS curves indicated that, compared to conventional images, the noise power distribution of 70 keV monoenergetic images is similar (i.e. noise texture is similar) but exhibit a low frequency peak at keVs higher and lower than 70 keV. Standard deviation measurements show monoenergetic images have lower noise except at 40 keV where it is slightly higher. CNR of monoenergetic images is mostly flat across keV values and is superior to that of conventional images. Conclusion: Values for standard image quality metrics are the same or better for monoenergetic images compared to conventional images. Results indicate virtual monoenergetic images can be used without any loss in image quality or noise penalties relative to conventional images. This study was performed as part of a research agreement among Philips Healthcare, University Hospitals of Cleveland, and Case Western Reserve University.

  20. 19 CFR 10.207 - Procedures for filing duty-free treatment claim and submitting supporting documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., product, or manufacture of a beneficiary country—(i) Declaration. In a case involving an article covered... growth, product, or manufacture of a single beneficiary country as defined in § 10.202(a), the exporter... submit the declaration in a timely fashion will result in a denial of duty-free treatment. (iii) Value...