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Sample records for actinide metal compounds

  1. Spin and orbital moments in actinide compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, B.; Wulff, M.; Lander, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    experiments designed to determine the magnetic moments at the actinide and transition-metal sublattice sites in compounds such as UFe2, NpCo2, and PuFe2 and to separate the spin and orbital components at the actinide sites. The results show, indeed, that the ratio of the orbital to spin moment is reduced...

  2. Photoelectron spectra of actinide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief overview of the application of photoelectron spectroscopy is presented for the study of actinide materials. Phenomenology as well as specific materials are discussed with illustrative examples

  3. Superconductivity in rare earth and actinide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rare earth and actinide compounds and the extraordinary superconducting and magnetic phenomena they exhibit are surveyed. The rare earth and actinide compounds described belong to three classes of novel superconducting materials: high temperature, high field superconductors (intermetallics and layered cuprates); superconductors containing localized magnetic moments; heavy fermion superconductors. Recent experiments on the resistive upper critical field of high Tc cuprate superconductors and the peak effect in the critical current density of the f-electron superconductor CeRu2 are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Prediction of thermodynamic properties of actinide and lanthanide compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Chunhai; NI Shijun; SUN Ying; CHEN Wenkai; ZHANG Chengjiang

    2008-01-01

    Several relationship models for thermodynamic functions of actinide and lanthanide compounds are built. The descriptors such as the difference of atomic radii between metal atoms and nonmetal atoms and the molecular mass are used in quantitative structure-activity/property relationships. The relative errors for entropy and heat capacity are less than 20% in the majority of gaseous compounds. Similar results are obtained from solid compounds.

  5. Calculated Atomic Volumes of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, H.; Andersen, O. K.; Johansson, B.

    1979-01-01

    The equilibrium atomic volume is calculated for the actinide metals. It is possible to account for the localization of the 5f electrons taking place in americium.......The equilibrium atomic volume is calculated for the actinide metals. It is possible to account for the localization of the 5f electrons taking place in americium....

  6. Preparation, properties, and some recent studies of the actinide metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haire, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    The actinide elements form a unique series of metals. The variation in their physial properties combined with the varying availability of the different elements offers a challenge to the preparative scientist. This article provides a brief review of selected methods used for preparing ..mu..g to kg amounts of the actinide metals and the properties of these metals. In addition, some recent studies on selected actinide metals are discussed. 62 refs.

  7. Synthesis and structural characterization of actinide oxalate compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxalic acid is a well-known reagent to recover actinides thanks to the very low solubility of An(IV) and An(III) oxalate compounds in acidic solution. Therefore, considering mixed-oxide fuel or considering minor actinides incorporation in ceramic fuel materials for transmutation, oxalic co-conversion is convenient to synthesize mixed oxalate compounds, precursors of oxide solid solutions. As the existing oxalate single crystal syntheses are not adaptable to the actinide-oxalate chemistry or to their manipulation constrains in gloves box, several original crystal growth methods were developed. They were first validate and optimized on lanthanides and uranium before the application to transuranium elements. The advanced investigations allow to better understand the syntheses and to define optimized chemical conditions to promote crystal growth. These new crystal growth methods were then applied to a large number of mixed An1(IV)-An2(III) or An1(IV)-An2(IV) systems and lead to the formation of the first original mixed An1(IV)-An2(III) and An1(IV)-An2(IV) oxalate single crystals. Finally thanks to the first thorough structural characterizations of these compounds, single crystal X-ray diffraction, EXAFS or micro-RAMAN, the particularly weak oxalate-actinide compounds structural database is enriched, which is essential for future studied nuclear fuel cycles. (author)

  8. Non-compound nucleus fission in actinide and pre-actinide regions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Tripathi; S Sodaye; K Sudarshan

    2015-08-01

    In this article, some of our recent results on fission fragment/product angular distributions are discussed in the context of non-compound nucleus fission. Measurement of fission fragment angular distribution in 28Si+176Yb reaction did not show a large contribution from the non-compound nucleus fission. Data on the evaporation residue cross-sections, in addition to those on mass and angular distributions, are necessary for better understanding of the contribution from non-compound nucleus fission in the pre-actinide region. Measurement of mass-resolved angular distribution of fission products in 20Ne+232Th reaction showed an increase in angular anisotropy with decreasing asymmetry of mass division. This observation can be explained based on the contribution from pre-equilibrium fission. Results of these studies showed that the mass dependence of anisotropy may possibly be used to distinguish pre-equilibrium fission and quasifission.

  9. Electronic Structure of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, B.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1982-01-01

    itinerant to localized 5f electron behaviour calculated to take place between plutonium and americium. From experimental data it is shown that the screening of deep core-holes is due to 5f electrons for the lighter actinide elements and 6d electrons for the heavier elements. A simplified model for the full...

  10. Hybridization effects in selected actinides and their compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khatib, Sami T.

    Many actinide systems exhibit 'unusual' phenomena that differ from the normal text-book behavior. This occurs because the 5f electrons of the actinides and their compounds experience a delicate balance between local-moment and itinerant magnetism. It is well established that strong-electron correlations affect the different properties in such systems. Even though the actinides and their compounds have been extensively studied in recent decades, both experimentally and theoretically, to date, no complete understanding of the full range of their properties has been achieved. My thesis focuses mainly on understanding the role of 5f electrons and their interactions with the electron states of the surrounding ligands. Particularly, the effect of the 5f-ligand hybridization in the development of bulk properties is investigated. The experimental studies utilized macroscopic techniques, such as magnetization, electrical-resistivity, specific-heat and resonant-ultrasound-spectroscopy measurements, as well as microscopic techniques, such as neutron-diffraction and muon-spin-resonance studies. The results are used to disentangle the importance of direct 5f--5f overlap and 5 f-ligand hybridization. The following features have been investigated in this thesis: (a) the dual nature of hybridization effects (magnetic moment reduction vs. exchange mediation) was studied for two isostructural uranium compounds U2Pd2Sn and U2Ni2 In; (b) the formation of complex magnetic structures and its connection to the hybridization effects was studied for UCuSn, UPdSn and UPdGe; (c) the tuning of the hybridization to critical values through substitutions was attempted for two single crystals of UCoAl1-xSn x and UNi1-xRh xAl alloys; (d) the effects of compositional deficiencies was studied for the copper-deficient compound in UCu1.5Sn 2; and finally, (e) the influence of strong electron correlations on the elastic properties was studied in the case of alpha-Pu.

  11. The chemical thermodynamics of actinide elements and compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation forms the twelfth part of a comprehensive assessment and selection of actinide thermodynamic data. The other parts of the compilation deal mostly with actinide elements and compounds. This part, which is the last one to be published in this Series, concerns inorganic actinide complexes in aqueous solution. The properties considered include the stability constant as a function of ionic strength and temperature and, whenever possible, enthalpy and entropy values. The present assessment is based on a literature survey that was terminated in early 1989. In tabulating literature data, only experimental results were used; estimates as well as recalculated data were ignored. Unlike in previous assessments of this kind in this assessment the selection of a best value is discussed and justified, and reasons are given for the rejection of data. In addition, our estimates of the thermodynamic properties, based on interrelationships between analogous systems, are given when this can be done reliably. Another essential aim of this assessment is to indicate those areas in which additional research is required. Refs

  12. Calculated Bulk Properties of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Andersen, O. K.; Johansson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Self-consistent relativistic calculations of the electronic properties for seven actinides (Ac-Am) have been performed using the linear muffin-tin orbitals method within the atomic-sphere approximation. Exchange and correlation were included in the local spin-density scheme. The theory explains t...... the variation of the atomic volume and the bulk modulus through the 5f series in terms of an increasing 5f binding up to plutonium followed by a sudden localisation (through complete spin polarisation) in americium...

  13. The advanced liquid metal reactor actinide recycle system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current U.S. National Energy Strategy includes four key goals for nuclear policy: enhance safety and design standards, reduce economic risk, reduce regulatory risk, and establish an effective high-level nuclear waste program. The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor Actinide Recycle System is consistent with these objectives. The system has the ability to fulfill multiple missions with the same basic design concept. In addition to providing an option for long-term energy security, the system can be effectively utilized for recycling of actinides in light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel, provide waste management flexibility, including the reduction in the waste quantity and storage time and utilization of the available energy potential of LWR spent fuel. The actinide recycle system is comprised of (1) a compact liquid metal (sodium) cooled reactor system with optimized passive safety characteristics, and (2) pyrometallurgical metal fuel cycle presently under development of Argonne National Laboratory. The waste reduction of LWR spent fuel is accomplished by transmutation or fissioning of the longer-lived transuranic isotopes to shorter-lived fission products in the reactor. In this presentation the economical and environmental incentive of the actinide recycle system is addressed and the status of development including licensing aspects is described. 3 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  14. Hydroxyaromatic compounds of tantalum, tungsten, and the lighter actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some hydroxyaromatic compounds of the elements tantalum, tungsten, thorium and uranium were prepared as well as the basic materials for these synthesis processes, i.e. metal halides and metal alkoxides. The hydroxyaromatic compounds were studied by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, 1H-NMR spectroscopy (if soluble in suitable solvents) and, in some cases, by X-ray fine structure analysis. (orig./EF)

  15. Electron-phonon coupling of the actinide metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, H. L.; Mertig, I.

    1985-01-01

    -phonon parameter λ is found to attain its maximum value in Ac, and they predict a transition temperature of 9K for this metal. In the light actinides Th through Pu, λ is found to be of order 0.4 and within a factor of 2 of experiments which is also the accuracy found in studies of the transition metals...... be related to the changeover from an s-to- d to an s-to-f electronic transition and a related change in the topology of the Fermi surface...

  16. Effect of organic compounds for the advection of actinide elements in the environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraoka, Susumu; Nagao, Seiya; Tanaka, Tadao [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Hiraki, Keizo; Nakaguchi, Yuzuru; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this studies is understood the effects of humic substances for the advection of actinide elements in the environments. These substances are a major role of dissolved organic matter in natural waters. In order to obtain the informations on the structure of metal-humic substances complexes, these substances were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. Observation the spectrum forms, peak positions of maximum intensity are related to these informations on the chemical structures and functional groups in organic compounds. Using three-dimensional excitation emission matrix (3-D EEM) spectroscopy, the characteristics of metal-humic substances complexes were studied. Observation the wavelengths and fluorescence intensity of the peaks were varied between humic substances before the complex to the metal and these substances after ones. Understanding the fluorescence properties of metal-humic substances complexes, working program of the 3-D EEM spectroscopy was studied to obtaining detailed data collection. New program was applied to copper-humic acid complex, the peak positions which different with before the complex and after ones were recorded. This program is supported by the interpreation of fluorescence properties in the metal-humic substances by the 3-D EEM spectroscopy. (author)

  17. Basic research on solvent extraction of actinide cations with diamide compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Yuji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-11-01

    Newly synthesized 4 diamide compounds were tested for solvent extraction of actinide cations. It is obvious that N,N`-dimethyl-N,N`-dihexyl-3-oxapentanediamide (DMDHOPDA) can extract Eu(III), Th(IV), U(VI), Np(V), and Am(III) into organic solvent. Other 3 diamides hardly extract actinide ions, which is supposed that the reasons come from the difference of their chemical structures. In the synergistic extraction with a diamide and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA), all diamides work as a extractant. Furthermore, by examining extracted species, it was confirmed that there are 4 kinds of chemical species of actinides with diamide and TTA. Finally, the mutual separation method of actinide (III), (IV), (V) and (VI) ions by solvent extraction using DMDHOPDA and TTA were developed. (author). 147 refs.

  18. Light metal compound casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konrad; J.; M.; PAPIS; Joerg; F.; LOEFFLER; Peter; J.; UGGOWITZER

    2009-01-01

    Compound casting’simplifies joining processes by directly casting a metallic melt onto a solid metal substrate. A continuously metallurgic transition is very important for industrial applications, such as joint structures of spaceframe constructions in transport industry. In this project, ‘compound casting’ of light metals is investigated, aiming at weight-saving. The substrate used is a wrought aluminium alloy of type AA5xxx, containing magnesium as main alloying element. The melts are aluminium alloys, containing various alloying elements (Cu, Si, Zn), and magnesium. By replacing the natural oxygen layer with a zinc layer, the inherent wetting difficulties were avoided, and compounds with flawless interfaces were successfully produced (no contraction defects, cracks or oxides). Electron microscopy and EDX investigations as well as optical micrographs of the interfacial areas revealed their continu- ously metallic constitution. Diffusion of alloying elements leads to heat-treatable microstructures in the vicinity of the joining interfaces in Al-Al couples. This permits significant variability of mechanical properties. Without significantly cutting down on wettability, the formation of low-melting intermetallic phases (Al3Mg2 and Al12Mg17 IMPs) at the interface of Al-Mg couples was avoided by applying a protective coating to the substrate.

  19. Light metal compound casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konrad J.M.PAPIS; Joerg F.LOEFFLER; Peter J.UGGOWITZER

    2009-01-01

    'Compound casting'simplifies joining processes by directly casting a metallic melt onto a solid metal substrate. A continuously metallurgic transition is very important for industrial applications, such as joint structures of spaceframe constructions in transport industry. In this project, 'compound casting' of light metals is investigated, aiming at weight-saving. The substrate used is a wrought aluminium alloy of type AA5xxx, containing magnesium as main alloying element. The melts are aluminium alloys, containing various alloying elements (Cu, Si, Zn), and magnesium. By replacing the natural oxygen layer with a zinc layer, the inherent wetting difficulties were avoided, and compounds with flawless interfaces were successfully produced (no contraction defects, cracks or oxides). Electron microscopy and EDX investigations as well as optical micrographs of the interfacial areas revealed their continu-ously metallic constitution. Diffusion of alloying elements leads to heat-treatable microstructures in the vicinity of the joining interfaces in Al-Al couples. This permits significant variability of mechanical properties. Without significantly cutting down on wettability, the formation of low-melting intermetallic phases (Al3Mg2 and AI12Mg17 IMPs) at the interface of Al-Mg couples was avoided by applying a protec-tive coating to the substrate.

  20. Calculation of binary phase diagrams between the actinide elements, rare earth elements, and transition metal elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attempts were made to apply the Kaufman method of calculating binary phase diagrams to the calculation of binary phase diagrams between the rare earths, actinides, and the refractory transition metals. Difficulties were encountered in applying the method to the rare earths and actinides, and modifications were necessary to provide accurate representation of known diagrams. To calculate the interaction parameters for rare earth-rare earth diagrams, it was necessary to use the atomic volumes for each of the phases: liquid, body-centered cubic, hexagonal close-packed, and face-centered cubic. Determination of the atomic volumes of each of these phases for each element is discussed in detail. In some cases, empirical means were necessary. Results are presented on the calculation of rare earth-rare earth, rare earth-actinide, and actinide-actinide diagrams. For rare earth-refractory transition metal diagrams and actinide-refractory transition metal diagrams, empirical means were required to develop values for the enthalpy of vaporization for rare earth elements and values for the constant (C) required when intermediate phases are present. Results of using the values determined for each element are presented

  1. Transition Metal Compounds Towards Holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Dieckmann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully proposed the application of transition metal compounds in holographic recording media. Such compounds feature an ultra-fast light-induced linkage isomerization of the transition-metal–ligand bond with switching times in the sub-picosecond regime and lifetimes from microseconds up to hours at room temperature. This article highlights the photofunctionality of two of the most promising transition metal compounds and the photophysical mechanisms that are underlying the hologram recording. We present the latest progress with respect to the key measures of holographic media assembled from transition metal compounds, the molecular embedding in a dielectric matrix and their impressive potential for modern holographic applications.

  2. The pressure-induced transformation B1 to B2 in actinide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phase transformation from NaCl structure (B1) to CsCl structure (B2) in actinide compounds has been studied using X-ray powder diffraction in the pressure range up to about 60 GPa. It is shown that the transition is sluggish, has a strong hysteresis and is accompanied with a volume change in the range 8-12%. These features are similar to those of the corresponding transition in the alkali halides and other compounds, indicating a common mechanism for the transformation as concerns the lattice geometry. (orig.)

  3. Method for decontamination of nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windt, Norman F.; Williams, Joe L.

    1983-01-01

    The invention is a process for decontaminating particulate nickel contaminated with actinide-metal fluorides. In one aspect, the invention comprises contacting nickel-fluoride-coated nickel with gaseous ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation thereof and effecting hydrogen-reduction of the nickel fluoride. The resulting nickel is heated to form a melt and a slag and to effect transfer of actinide metals from the melt into the slag. The melt and slag are then separated. In another aspect, nickel containing nickel oxide and actinide metals is contacted with ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation to effect conversion of the nickel oxide to the metal. The resulting nickel is then melted and separated as described. In another aspect nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides is contacted with both steam and ammonia. The resulting nickel then is melted and separated as described. The invention is characterized by higher nickel recovery, efficient use of ammonia, a substantial decrease in slag formation and fuming, and a valuable increase in the service life of the furnace liners used for melting.

  4. The uncertainty analysis of a liquid metal reactor for burning minor actinides from light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    The neutronics analysis of a liquid metal reactor for burning minor actinides has shown that uncertainties in the nuclear data of several key minor actinide isotopes can introduce large uncertainties in the predicted performance of the core. A comprehensive sensitivity and uncertainty analysis was performed on a 1200 MWth actinide burner designed for a low burnup reactivity swing, negative doppler coefficient, and low sodium void worth. Sensitivities were generated using depletion perturbation methods for the equilibrium cycle of the reactor and covariance data was taken ENDF-B/V and other published sources. The relative uncertainties in the burnup swing, doppler coefficient, and void worth were conservatively estimated to be 180%, 97%, and 46%, respectively. 5 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs. (Author)

  5. Alloy waste forms for metal fission products and actinides isolated by spent nuclear fuel treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste form alloys are being developed at Argonne National Laboratory for the disposal of remnant metallic wastes from an electrometallurgical process developed to treat spent nuclear fuel. This metal waste form consists of the fuel cladding (stainless steel or Zircaloy), noble metal fission products (e.g., Ru, Pd, Mo and Tc), and other metallic wastes. The main constituents of the metal waste stream are the cladding hulls (85 to 90 wt%); using the hulls as the dominant alloying component minimizes the overall waste volume as compared to vitrification or metal encapsulation. Two nominal compositions for the waste form are being developed: (1) stainless steel-15 wt% zirconium for stainless steel-clad fuels and (2) zirconium-8 wt% stainless steel for Zircaloy-clad fuels. The noble metal fission products are the primary source of radiation in the metal waste form. However, inclusion of actinides in the metal waste form is being investigated as an option for interim or ultimate storage. Simulated waste form alloys were prepared and analyzed to determine the baseline alloy microstructures and the microstructural distribution of noble metals and actinides. Corrosion tests of the metal waste form alloys indicate that they are highly resistant to corrosion

  6. Preparations and mechanism of hydrolysis of ([8]annulene)actinide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of hydrolysis for bis[8]annulene actinide and lanthanide complexes has been studied in detail. The uranium complex, uranocene, decomposes with good pseudo-first order kinetics (in uranocene) in 1 M degassed solutions of H2O in THF. Decomposition of a series of aryl-substituted uranocenes demonstrates that the hydrolysis rate is dependent on the electronic nature of the substituent (Hammett rho value = 2.1, r2 = 0.999), with electron-withdrawing groups increasing the rate. When D2O is substituted for H2O, kinetic isotope effects of 8 to 14 are found for a variety of substituted uranocenes. These results suggest a pre-equilibrium involving approach of a water molecule to the central metal, followed by rate determining proton transfer to the eight membered ring and rapid decomposition to products. Each of the four protonations of the complex has a significant isotope effect. The product ratio of cyclooctatriene isomers formed in the hydrolysis varies, depending on the central metal of the complex. However, the general mechanism of hydrolysis, established for uranocene, can be extended to the hydrolysis and alcoholysis of all the [8]annulene complexes of the lanthanides and actinides

  7. Preparations and mechanism of hydrolysis of ((8)annulene)actinide compounds. [Uranocene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, R.M. Jr.

    1985-07-01

    The mechanism of hydrolysis for bis(8)annulene actinide and lanthanide complexes has been studied in detail. The uranium complex, uranocene, decomposes with good pseudo-first order kinetics (in uranocene) in 1 M degassed solutions of H/sub 2/O in THF. Decomposition of a series of aryl-substituted uranocenes demonstrates that the hydrolysis rate is dependent on the electronic nature of the substituent (Hammett rho value = 2.1, r/sup 2/ = 0.999), with electron-withdrawing groups increasing the rate. When D/sub 2/O is substituted for H/sub 2/O, kinetic isotope effects of 8 to 14 are found for a variety of substituted uranocenes. These results suggest a pre-equilibrium involving approach of a water molecule to the central metal, followed by rate determining proton transfer to the eight membered ring and rapid decomposition to products. Each of the four protonations of the complex has a significant isotope effect. The product ratio of cyclooctatriene isomers formed in the hydrolysis varies, depending on the central metal of the complex. However, the general mechanism of hydrolysis, established for uranocene, can be extended to the hydrolysis and alcoholysis of all the (8)annulene complexes of the lanthanides and actinides.

  8. Revisiting the melting temperature of NpO2 and the challenges associated with high temperature actinide compound measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Böhler, R.; Welland, M.J.; De Bruycker, F.; Boboridis, K.; Janssen, A.; Eloirdi, R.; Konings, R.J.M.; Manara, D.

    2012-01-01

    This work revisits the melting behaviour of neptunium dioxide, an actinide compound which can be produced in the nuclear fuel during operation, and which has an important impact on the nuclear fuel and waste radioactivity especially on the very long term. The present experimental approach employs re

  9. Ultrasoft x-ray resonance emission bands of lanthanide and actinide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study is reported of the ultrasoft emission spectra of some lanthanide and actinide compounds at a low accelerating voltage in the X-ray tube: a strong and wide emission band was observed in the region of the giant resonance. The following results are shown: the lanthanum emission spectra in La2O3 obtained at accelerating voltages of 4, 1.5 and 0.5 KV and the absorption spectrum at the 4d threshold; similar measurements for Th in ThO2 (and absorption spectrum at the 5d threshold) and U in U3O8 (and absorption spectrum at the 5d threshold); and for Ce in CeO2 (and absorption spectrum at the 4d threshold). The results are discussed. (U.K.)

  10. Actinides in metallic waste from electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janney, D. E.; Keiser, D. D.

    2003-09-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a pyroprocessing-based technique for conditioning spent sodium-bonded nuclear-reactor fuel in preparation for long-term disposal. The technique produces a metallic waste form whose nominal composition is stainless steel with 15 wt.% Zr (SS-15Zr), up to ˜ 11 wt.% actinide elements (primarily uranium), and a few percent metallic fission products. Actual and simulated waste forms show similar eutectic microstructures with approximately equal proportions of iron solid solution phases and Fe-Zr intermetallics. This article reports on an analysis of simulated waste forms containing uranium, neptunium, and plutonium.

  11. Synthesis of actinide nitrides, phosphides, sulfides and oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Sluys, William G.; Burns, Carol J.; Smith, David C.

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing an actinide compound of the formula An.sub.x Z.sub.y wherein An is an actinide metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, x is selected from the group consisting of one, two or three, Z is a main group element atom selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur and y is selected from the group consisting of one, two, three or four, by admixing an actinide organometallic precursor wherein said actinide is selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, a suitable solvent and a protic Lewis base selected from the group consisting of ammonia, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide and water, at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an intermediate actinide complex, heating said intermediate actinide complex at temperatures and for time sufficient to form the actinide compound, and a process of depositing a thin film of such an actinide compound, e.g., uranium mononitride, by subliming an actinide organometallic precursor, e.g., a uranium amide precursor, in the presence of an effectgive amount of a protic Lewis base, e.g., ammonia, within a reactor at temperatures and for time sufficient to form a thin film of the actinide compound, are disclosed.

  12. Synthesis, growth, and studies (crystal chemistry, magnetic chemistry) of actinide-based intermetallic compounds and alloys with a 1.1.1 stoichiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of this research thesis reports the study of the synthesis and reactivity of intermetallic compounds with a 1.1.1 stoichiometry. It presents the thermal properties of 1.1.1 compounds: general presentation of physical transitions, and of solid solutions and formation heat, application to actinides (reactivity analysis from phase diagrams, techniques of crystal synthesis and crystal growth. It describes experimental techniques: synthesis, determination of fusion temperature by dilatometry, methods used for crystal growth, characterisation techniques (metallography, X ray diffraction on powders, dilatometry). It discusses the obtained results in terms of characterisation of synthesised samples, of crystal growth, and of measurements of fusion temperature. The second part addresses crystal chemistry studies: structure of compounds with a 1.1.1 stoichiometry (Laves structures, Zr, Ti and Pu compounds), techniques of analysis by X-ray diffraction (on powders and on single crystals), result interpretation (UNiX compounds, AnTAl compounds with T being a metal from group VIII, AnTGa compounds, AnNiGe compounds, distance comparison, structure modifications under pressure). The third part concerns physical issues. The author addresses the following topics: physical properties of intermetallic 1.1.1 compounds (magnetism of yttrium phases, behaviour of uranium-based Laves phases, analysis of pseudo-binary diagrams, physical characteristics of uranium-based 1.1.1 compounds, predictions of physical measurements), analysis techniques (Moessbauer spectroscopy, SQUID for Superconducting Quantum Interference Device), and result interpretation

  13. Actinide recycle utilizing oxide and metallic fuel in prism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PRISM is a modular, pool-type sodium-cooled fast reactor employing innovative, passive features to provide an extremely high level of public safety. The PRISM reactor design can accommodate both oxide and metallic fuel forms. A comparison of core design and performance of these forms is made for various options. These options include low fuel cycle cost options, maximum transuranic burning options, and the addition of rare earth elements to the fuel mix. (authors)

  14. Separation of actinides from lanthanides using acidic organophosphorus compounds: extraction chromatographic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The partitioning of actinides from HLW using TBP and CMPO generates a mixture of actinides and lanthanides as one of the secondary streams. The paper discusses the results of the extraction chromatographic separation using KSM-17 and HDEHP supported on Chromosorb-102. (author)

  15. Stainless steel-zirconium alloy waste forms for metallic fission products and actinides during treatment of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stainless steel-zirconium waste form alloys are being developed for the disposal of metallic wastes recovered from spent nuclear fuel using an electrometallurgical process developed by Argonne National Laboratory. The metal waste form comprises the fuel cladding, noble metal fission products and other metallic constituents. Two nominal waste form compositions are being developed: (1) stainless steel-15 wt% zirconium for stainless steel-clad fuels. The noble metal fission products are the primary source of radiation and their contribution to the waste form radioactivity has been calculated. The disposition of actinide metals in the waste alloys is also being explored. Simulated waste form alloys were prepared to study the baseline alloy microstructures and the microstructural distribution of noble metals and actinides, and to evaluate corrosion performance

  16. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 85. Transition and 12-14 Main Group Metals, Lanthanide, Actinide, and Ammonium Halates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2008-06-01

    This paper is the fourth and final volume in the halate solubility series. The solubility data for halates of transition metals, lanthanides, actinides, ammonium, and metallic elements of the main groups 12-14 are reviewed. Where appropriate, binary, ternary, and multicomponent systems are critically evaluated. Most of the solubility results were obtained in water or aqueous solutions of electrolytes. The solubility in organic solvents and aqueous-organic solvent mixtures is also collected in this volume. All these data were critically examined for their reliability. The best values were selected on the basis of critical evaluations and presented in tabular form. Fitting equations and graphical plots are also provided. When numerical data were not reported in an original publication, they were read out from figures and digitized by the compilers. The quantities, units, and symbols used in this volume are in accord with IUPAC recommendations. We always reported the original data and, if necessary, transferred them into the IUPAC recommended units and symbols. The literature on the solubility data was researched through 2002. The halates of these metals play a role in industrial processes. For example, some halates are essential as catalysts, heat stabilizers, and blanching reagents for manufacturing polymer products such as textiles and resins. Some iodates are used in pyrotechnic compounds for weather modification and colored smoke generation. The nonlinear halate crystals are important in construction of optical devices.

  17. Optimisation of composite metallic fuel for minor actinide transmutation in an accelerator-driven system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyttenhove, W.; Sobolev, V.; Maschek, W.

    2011-09-01

    A potential option for neutralization of minor actinides (MA) accumulated in spent nuclear fuel of light water reactors (LWRs) is their transmutation in dedicated accelerator-driven systems (ADS). A promising fuel candidate dedicated to MA transmutation is a CERMET composite with Mo metal matrix and (Pu, Np, Am, Cm)O 2-x fuel particles. Results of optimisation studies of the CERMET fuel targeting to increasing the MA transmutation efficiency of the EFIT (European Facility for Industrial Transmutation) core are presented. In the adopted strategy of MA burning the plutonium (Pu) balance of the core is minimized, allowing a reduction in the reactivity swing and the peak power form-factor deviation and an extension of the cycle duration. The MA/Pu ratio is used as a variable for the fuel optimisation studies. The efficiency of MA transmutation is close to the foreseen theoretical value of 42 kg TW -1 h -1 when level of Pu in the actinide mixture is about 40 wt.%. The obtained results are compared with the reference case of the EFIT core loaded with the composite CERCER fuel, where fuel particles are incorporated in a ceramic magnesia matrix. The results of this study offer additional information for the EFIT fuel selection.

  18. The Use of Molybdenum-Based Ceramic-Metal (CerMet) Fuel for the Actinide Management in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical and economic aspects of the use of molybdenum depleted in the isotope 95Mo (DepMo) for the transmutation of actinides in a light water reactor are discussed. DepMo has a low neutron absorption cross section and good physical and chemical properties. Therefore, DepMo is expected to be a good inert matrix in ceramic-metal fuel. The costs of the use of DepMo have been assessed, and it was concluded that these costs can be justified for the transmutation of the actinides neptunium, americium, and plutonium

  19. Optical spectra and electronic structure of actinide ions in compounds and in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a summary of theoretical and experimental studies of actinide spectra in condensed phases. Much of the work was accomplished at Argonne National Laboratory, but references to related investigations by others are included. Spectroscopic studies of the trivlent actinides are emphasized, as is the use of energy level parameters, evaluated from experimental data, to investigate systematic trends in electronic structure and other properties. Some reference is made to correlations with atomic spectra, as well as with spectra of the (II), (IV), and higher valence states. 207 refs., 39 figs., 38 tabs

  20. Recent progress in actinide borate chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2011-10-21

    The use of molten boric acid as a reactive flux for synthesizing actinide borates has been developed in the past two years providing access to a remarkable array of exotic materials with both unusual structures and unprecedented properties. [ThB(5)O(6)(OH)(6)][BO(OH)(2)]·2.5H(2)O possesses a cationic supertetrahedral structure and displays remarkable anion exchange properties with high selectivity for TcO(4)(-). Uranyl borates form noncentrosymmetric structures with extraordinarily rich topological relationships. Neptunium borates are often mixed-valent and yield rare examples of compounds with one metal in three different oxidation states. Plutonium borates display new coordination chemistry for trivalent actinides. Finally, americium borates show a dramatic departure from plutonium borates, and there are scant examples of families of actinides compounds that extend past plutonium to examine the bonding of later actinides. There are several grand challenges that this work addresses. The foremost of these challenges is the development of structure-property relationships in transuranium materials. A deep understanding of the materials chemistry of actinides will likely lead to the development of advanced waste forms for radionuclides present in nuclear waste that prevent their transport in the environment. This work may have also uncovered the solubility-limiting phases of actinides in some repositories, and allows for measurements on the stability of these materials. PMID:21915396

  1. Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Clusters, Actinide Complexes and Their Reactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan Balasubramanian

    2009-07-18

    This is a continuing DOE-BES funded project on transition metal and actinide containing species, aimed at the electronic structure and spectroscopy of transition metal and actinide containing species. While a long term connection of these species is to catalysis and environmental management of high-level nuclear wastes, the immediate relevance is directly to other DOE-BES funded experimental projects at DOE-National labs and universities. There are a number of ongoing gas-phase spectroscopic studies of these species at various places, and our computational work has been inspired by these experimental studies and we have also inspired other experimental and theoretical studies. Thus our studies have varied from spectroscopy of diatomic transition metal carbides to large complexes containing transition metals, and actinide complexes that are critical to the environment. In addition, we are continuing to make code enhancements and modernization of ALCHEMY II set of codes and its interface with relativistic configuration interaction (RCI). At present these codes can carry out multi-reference computations that included up to 60 million configurations and multiple states from each such CI expansion. ALCHEMY II codes have been modernized and converted to a variety of platforms such as Windows XP, and Linux. We have revamped the symbolic CI code to automate the MRSDCI technique so that the references are automatically chosen with a given cutoff from the CASSCF and thus we are doing accurate MRSDCI computations with 10,000 or larger reference space of configurations. The RCI code can also handle a large number of reference configurations, which include up to 10,000 reference configurations. Another major progress is in routinely including larger basis sets up to 5g functions in thee computations. Of course higher angular momenta functions can also be handled using Gaussian and other codes with other methods such as DFT, MP2, CCSD(T), etc. We have also calibrated our RECP

  2. Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Clusters, Actinide Complexes and Their Reactivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a continuing DOE-BES funded project on transition metal and actinide containing species, aimed at the electronic structure and spectroscopy of transition metal and actinide containing species. While a long term connection of these species is to catalysis and environmental management of high-level nuclear wastes, the immediate relevance is directly to other DOE-BES funded experimental projects at DOE-National labs and universities. There are a number of ongoing gas-phase spectroscopic studies of these species at various places, and our computational work has been inspired by these experimental studies and we have also inspired other experimental and theoretical studies. Thus our studies have varied from spectroscopy of diatomic transition metal carbides to large complexes containing transition metals, and actinide complexes that are critical to the environment. In addition, we are continuing to make code enhancements and modernization of ALCHEMY II set of codes and its interface with relativistic configuration interaction (RCI). At present these codes can carry out multi-reference computations that included up to 60 million configurations and multiple states from each such CI expansion. ALCHEMY II codes have been modernized and converted to a variety of platforms such as Windows XP, and Linux. We have revamped the symbolic CI code to automate the MRSDCI technique so that the references are automatically chosen with a given cutoff from the CASSCF and thus we are doing accurate MRSDCI computations with 10,000 or larger reference space of configurations. The RCI code can also handle a large number of reference configurations, which include up to 10,000 reference configurations. Another major progress is in routinely including larger basis sets up to 5g functions in thee computations. Of course higher angular momenta functions can also be handled using Gaussian and other codes with other methods such as DFT, MP2, CCSD(T), etc. We have also calibrated our RECP

  3. The local/non-local duality of 5f electrons in actinide compounds: A mean-field study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The local/non-local duality of 5f electrons in actinide compounds has been observed in a great variety of experiments including photo-emission spectroscopy, inelastic neutron scattering, muon spin relaxation measurements, and X-ray inelastic scattering. A general microscopic mechanism leading to the partial localization of 5f orbitals has been proposed within the so-called dual model. It is a generalized multi-orbital Hubbard model which includes the direct Coulomb interaction as well as the Hund's rule correlations. Using a generalized slave boson method, we study this model for an electronic filling corresponding to the prototype compound UPt3. We then analyse the calculated phase diagram and discuss the local/non-local and magnetic/non-magnetic phases in terms of orbitally dependent quasi-particle residues and partial electronic occupations.

  4. TUCS/phosphate mineralization of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-10-01

    This program has as its objective the development of a new technology that combines cation exchange and mineralization to reduce the concentration of heavy metals (in particular actinides) in groundwaters. The treatment regimen must be compatible with the groundwater and soil, potentially using groundwater/soil components to aid in the immobilization process. The delivery system (probably a water-soluble chelating agent) should first concentrate the radionuclides then release the precipitating anion, which forms thermodynamically stable mineral phases, either with the target metal ions alone or in combination with matrix cations. This approach should generate thermodynamically stable mineral phases resistant to weathering. The chelating agent should decompose spontaneously with time, release the mineralizing agent, and leave a residue that does not interfere with mineral formation. For the actinides, the ideal compound probably will release phosphate, as actinide phosphate mineral phases are among the least soluble species for these metals. The most promising means of delivering the precipitant would be to use a water-soluble, hydrolytically unstable complexant that functions in the initial stages as a cation exchanger to concentrate the metal ions. As it decomposes, the chelating agent releases phosphate to foster formation of crystalline mineral phases. Because it involves only the application of inexpensive reagents, the method of phosphate mineralization promises to be an economical alternative for in situ immobilization of radionuclides (actinides in particular). The method relies on the inherent (thermodynamic) stability of actinide mineral phases.

  5. Production and investigation of thin films of metal actinides (Pu, Am, Cm, Bk, Cf)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchenko, V. M.; Ryabinin, M. A.; Stupin, V. A.

    2010-03-01

    Under limited availability of transplutonium metals some special techniques and methods of their production have been developed that combine the process of metal reduction from a chemical compound and preparation of a sample for examination. In this situation the evaporation and condensation of metal onto a substrate becomes the only possible technology. Thin film samples of metallic 244Cm, 248Cm and 249Bk were produced by thermal reduction of oxides with thorium followed by deposition of the metals in the form of thin layers on tantalum substrates. For the production of 249Cf metal in the form of a thin layer the method of thermal reduction of oxide with lanthanum was used. 238Pu and 239Pu samples in the form of films were prepared by direct high temperature evaporation and condensation of the metal onto a substrate. For the production of 241Am films a gram sample of plutonium-241 metal was used containing about 18 % of americium at the time of production. Thermal decomposition of Pt5Am intermetallics in vacuum was used to produce americium metal with about 80% yield. Resistivity of the metallic 249Cf film samples was found to decrease exponentially with increasing temperature. The 249Cf metal demonstrated a tendency to form preferably a DHCP structure with the sample mass increasing. An effect of high specific activity on the crystal structure of 238Pu nuclide thin layers was studied either.

  6. Production and investigation of thin films of metal actinides (Pu, Am, Cm, Bk, Cf)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under limited availability of transplutonium metals some special techniques and methods of their production have been developed that combine the process of metal reduction from a chemical compound and preparation of a sample for examination. In this situation the evaporation and condensation of metal onto a substrate becomes the only possible technology. Thin film samples of metallic 244Cm, 248Cm and 249Bk were produced by thermal reduction of oxides with thorium followed by deposition of the metals in the form of thin layers on tantalum substrates. For the production of 249Cf metal in the form of a thin layer the method of thermal reduction of oxide with lanthanum was used. 238Pu and 239Pu samples in the form of films were prepared by direct high temperature evaporation and condensation of the metal onto a substrate. For the production of 241Am films a gram sample of plutonium-241 metal was used containing about 18 % of americium at the time of production. Thermal decomposition of Pt5Am intermetallics in vacuum was used to produce americium metal with about 80% yield. Resistivity of the metallic 249Cf film samples was found to decrease exponentially with increasing temperature. The 249Cf metal demonstrated a tendency to form preferably a DHCP structure with the sample mass increasing. An effect of high specific activity on the crystal structure of 238Pu nuclide thin layers was studied either.

  7. Detection of Metallic Compounds in Rocket Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Chris; Dunn, Dr. Robert

    1998-04-01

    Recent experiments using metal mixed in hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) fuel grains in small hybrid rocket indicates ion detectors may be effective in detection of metallic compounds in rocket plumes. We wanted to ascertain the extent to which the presence of metallic compounds in rocket plumes could be detected using ion probes and Gaussian rings. Charges that collide with or pass near the intruding probe are detected. Gaussian rings, short insulated cylindrical Gaussian surfaces, enclose the plume without intruding into the plume. Charges in the plume are detected by currents they induce in the cylinder.

  8. Spin–orbit coupling in actinide cations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Martin, Richard L.;

    2012-01-01

    The limiting case of Russell–Saunders coupling, which leads to a maximum spin alignment for the open shell electrons, usually explains the properties of high spin ionic crystals with transition metals. For actinide compounds, the spin–orbit splitting is large enough to cause a significantly reduc...... spin alignment. Novel concepts are used to explain the dependence of the spin alignment on the 5f shell occupation. We present evidence that the XPS of ionic actinide materials may provide direct information about the angular momentum coupling within the 5f shell....

  9. Synthesis and evaluation of water-soluble chelating polymers for the selective removal of actinide metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major goal of our research program is to develop polymer supported ion specific ligand systems for the removal of actinides and other hazardous metals from wastewaters. The advantage of water-soluble polymers in metal ion separation processes is that the homogeneity of the system allows for more rapid exchange kinetics than ion exchange or chelating resins. A number of water-soluble chelating polymers have been synthesized by the functionalization or commercially available polyamine precursors with various ligand moieties such as hydroxamates. The ability of these polymers to complex with metal ion to give soluble complexes which can be separated and concentrated by ultrafiltration under different pH conditions have been examined

  10. Performance comparison of metallic, actinide burning fuel in lead-bismuth and sodium cooled fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, K.D.; Herring, J.S.; Macdonald, P.E. [Idaho National Engineering and Environment Lab., Advanced Nuclear Energy, Idaho (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Various methods have been proposed to ''incinerate'' or ''transmute'' the current inventory of transuranic waste (TRU) that exits in spent light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel, and weapons plutonium. These methods include both critical (e.g., fast reactors) and non-critical (e.g., accelerator transmutation) systems. The work discussed here is part of a larger effort at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to investigate the suitability of lead and lead-alloy cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The neutronics of non fertile fuel loaded with 20 or 30-wt% light water reactor (LWR) plutonium plus minor actinides for use in a lead-bismuth cooled fast reactor are discussed in this paper, with an emphasis on the fuel cycle life and isotopic content. Calculations show that the average actinide burn rate is similar for both the sodium and lead-bismuth cooled cases ranging from -1.02 to -1.16 g/MWd, compared to a typical LWR actinide generation rate of 0.303 g/MWd. However, when using the same parameters, the sodium-cooled case went subcritical after 0.2 to 0.8 effective full power years, and the lead-bismuth cooled case ranged from 1.5 to 4.5 effective full power years. (author)

  11. Performance Comparison of Metallic, Actinide Burning Fuel in Lead-Bismuth and Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Kevan Dean; Herring, James Stephen; Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2001-04-01

    Various methods have been proposed to “incinerate” or “transmutate” the current inventory of trans-uranic waste (TRU) that exits in spent light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel, and weapons plutonium. These methods include both critical (e.g., fast reactors) and non-critical (e.g., accelerator transmutation) systems. The work discussed here is part of a larger effort at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to investigate the suitability of lead and lead-alloy cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The neutronics of non-fertile fuel loaded with 20 or 30-wt% light water reactor (LWR) plutonium plus minor actinides for use in a lead-bismuth cooled fast reactor are discussed in this paper, with an emphasis on the fuel cycle life and isotopic content. Calculations show that the average actinide burn rate is similar for both the sodium and lead-bismuth cooled cases ranging from -1.02 to -1.16 g/MWd, compared to a typical LWR actinide generation rate of 0.303 g/MWd. However, when using the same parameters, the sodium-cooled case went subcritical after 0.2 to 0.8 effective full power years, and the lead-bismuth cooled case ranged from 1.5 to 4.5 effective full power years.

  12. The clearance of Pu and Am from the respiratory system of rodents after the inhalation of oxide aerosols of these actinides either alone or in combination with other metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this series of studies in rodents the lung clearance and tissue distribution of both plutonium and americium have been measured following their inhalation as mixed actinide oxides either alone or in combination with other metals. The aerosols used were materials to which workers in the nuclear industry may be occupationally exposed or which could be generated in the event of an accident in a reactor core or fuel fabrication plant. The studies showed that, at least for some PuO2 aerosols, the lung model currently being used by ICRP for estimating tissue doses from inhaled actinides may overestimate, by about a factor of ten, the amount of plutonium translocated to the blood. The presence of oxides of other metals can, however, appreciably influence the clearance of plutonium from the lung. While in some mixtures plutonium dioxide behaves as an insoluble (Class Y) compound and in others as a soluble (Class W) compound, it may also have transportability characteristics between these two extremes. Americium-241 behaves as a soluble (Class W) compound when inhaled as the oxide. However, if it is present in trace quantities in mixed-oxide aerosols its behaviour depends upon that of the materials present in greatest mass. (author)

  13. Device for Detecting Actinides, Method for Detecting Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Fred J.; Wilkins-Stevens, Priscilla

    1998-10-29

    A heavy metal detector is provided comprising a first molecule and a second molecule, whereby the first and second molecules interact in a predetermined manner; a first region on the first molecule adapted to interact with an actinide; and a second region on the second molecule adapted to interact with the actinide, whereby the interactions of the actinide with the regions effect the predetermined manner of interaction between the molecules.

  14. Heavy metal screening in compounds feeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Toth

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals are generally classified as basic groups of pollutants that are now a days found in different environmental compartments. This is quite a large group of contaminants, which have different characteristics, effects on the environment and sources of origin. For environment pose the greatest risks, especially heavy metals produced by anthropogenic activities that adversely affect the health and vitality of organisms and natural environmental conditions. Livestock nutrition is among the main factors which affect not only the deficiency of livestock production and quality of food of animal origin, but they are also a factor affecting the safety and wholesomeness and the animal health. Compound feeds is characterized as a mixture of two or more feed grain. Containing organic, inorganic nutrients and specifically active compound feed meet the nutritional requirements of a given kind and age category of animals. They are used mainly in the diet of pigs, poultry, but also the nutrition of cattle, sheep, horses and other animal categories. The basic ingredients are cereals in proportion of 60-70 %. The aim of this thesis was to analyze the content of hazardous elements (copper, zinc, iron, manganese, cobalt, nickel, chromium, lead, cadmium, mercury in 15 samples of compound feeds and then evaluating their content in comparison with maximum limits laid down by Regulation of the Government of the Slovak Republic and Regulation Commission (EC.

  15. Photochemical route to actinide-transition metal bonds: synthesis, characterization and reactivity of a series of thorium and uranium heterobimetallic complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Ashleigh L; Lukens, Wayne W; Lu, Connie C; Arnold, John

    2014-03-01

    A series of actinide-transition metal heterobimetallics has been prepared, featuring thorium, uranium, and cobalt. Complexes incorporating the binucleating ligand N[ο-(NHCH2P(i)Pr2)C6H4]3 with either Th(IV) (4) or U(IV) (5) and a carbonyl bridged [Co(CO)4](-) unit were synthesized from the corresponding actinide chlorides (Th: 2; U: 3) and Na[Co(CO)4]. Irradiation of the resulting isocarbonyls with ultraviolet light resulted in the formation of new species containing actinide-metal bonds in good yields (Th: 6; U: 7); this photolysis method provides a new approach to a relatively unusual class of complexes. Characterization by single-crystal X-ray diffraction revealed that elimination of the bridging carbonyl and formation of the metal-metal bond is accompanied by coordination of a phosphine arm from the N4P3 ligand to the cobalt center. Additionally, actinide-cobalt bonds of 3.0771(5) Å and 3.0319(7) Å for the thorium and uranium complexes, respectively, were observed. The solution-state behavior of the thorium complexes was evaluated using (1)H, (1)H-(1)H COSY, (31)P, and variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy. IR, UV-vis/NIR, and variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements are also reported.

  16. Actinides: from heavy fermions to plutonium metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The actinide elements mark the emergence of 5f electrons. The f electrons possess sufficiently unusual characteristics that their participation in atomic binding often result in dramatic changes in properties. This provides an excellent opportunity to study the question of localization of electrons; a question that is paramount in predicting the physical and chemical properties of d and f electron transition metals. The transition region between localized (magnetic) and itinerant (often superconducting) behavior provides for many interesting phenomena such as structural instabilities (polymorphism), spin fluctuations, mixed valences, charge density waves, exceptional catalytic activity and hydrogen storage. This region offers most interesting behavior such as that exhibited by the actinide compounds UBe13 and UPt3. Both compounds are heavy-fermion superconductors in which both magnetic and superconducting behavior exist in the same electrons. The consequences of f-electron bonding (which appears greatest at Plutonium) show dramatic effects on phase stability, alloying behavior, phase transformations and mechanical behavior

  17. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide-Soluble Ligands for Extracting Actinide Metal Ions from Porous Solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joan Brennecke; Mark Dietz; Richard Barrans; Alabert Herlinger

    2003-07-03

    Numerous types of actinide-bearing waste materials are found throughout the DOE complex. Most of these wastes consist of large volumes of non-hazardous materials contaminated with relatively small quantities of actinide elements. Separation of these wastes into their inert and radioactive components would dramatically reduce the costs of stabilization and disposal. For example, the DOE is responsible for decontaminating concrete within 7000 surplus contaminated buildings. The best technology now available for removing surface contamination from concrete involves removing the surface layer by grit blasting, which produces a large volume of blasting residue containing a small amount of radioactive material. Disposal of this residue is expensive because of its large volume and fine particulate nature. Considerable cost savings would result from separation of the radioactive constituents and stabilization of the concrete dust. Similarly, gas diffusion plants for uranium enrichment contain valuable high-purity nickel in the form of diffusion barriers. Decontamination is complicated by the extremely fine pores in these barriers, which are not readily accessible by most cleaning techniques. A cost-effect method for the removal of radioactive contaminants would release this valuable material for salvage.

  18. Hybrid conducting polymer materials incorporating poly-oxo-metalates for extraction of actinides; Materiaux polymeres conducteurs hybrides incorporant des polyoxometallates pour l'extraction d'actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racimor, D

    2003-09-15

    The preparation and characterization of hybrid conducting polymers incorporating poly-oxo-metalates for extracting actinides is discussed. A study of the coordination of various lanthanide cations (Ce(III), Ce(IV), Nd(III)) by the mono-vacant poly-oxo-metalate {alpha}{sub 2}-[P{sub 2}W{sub 17}O{sub 61}]{sup 10-} showed significant differences according to the cation.. Various {alpha}-A-[PW{sub 9}O{sub 34}(RPO){sub 2}]{sup 5-} hybrids were synthesized and their affinity for actinides or lanthanides was demonstrated through complexation. The first hybrid poly-oxo-metallic lanthanide complexes were then synthesized, as was the first hybrid functionalized with a pyrrole group. The electro-polymerization conditions of this pyrrole remain still to be optimized. Poly-pyrrole materials incorporating {alpha}{sub 2}-[P{sub 2}W{sub 17}O{sub 61}]{sup 10-} or its neodymium or cerium complexes as doping agents proved to be the first conducting polymer incorporating poly-oxo-metalates capable of extracting plutonium from nitric acid. (author)

  19. Photochemical route to actinide-transition metal bonds: synthesis, characterization and reactivity of a series of thorium and uranium heterobimetallic complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Ashleigh; Lukens, Wayne; Lu, Connie; Arnold, John

    2014-04-01

    A series of actinide-transition metal heterobimetallics has been prepared, featuring thorium, uranium and cobalt. Complexes incorporating the binucleating ligand N[-(NHCH2PiPr2)C6H4]3 and Th(IV) (4) or U(IV) (5) with a carbonyl bridged [Co(CO)4]- unit were synthesized from the corresponding actinide chlorides (Th: 2; U: 3) and Na[Co(CO)4]. Irradiation of the isocarbonyls with ultraviolet light resulted in the formation of new species containing actinide-metal bonds in good yields (Th: 6; U: 7); this photolysis method provides a new approach to a relatively rare class of complexes. Characterization by single-crystal X-ray diffraction revealed that elimination of the bridging carbonyl is accompanied by coordination of a phosphine arm from the N4P3 ligand to the cobalt center. Additionally, actinide-cobalt bonds of 3.0771(5) and 3.0319(7) for the thorium and uranium complexes, respectively, were observed. The solution state behavior of the thorium complexes was evaluated using 1H, 1H-1H COSY, 31P and variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy. IR, UV-Vis/NIR, and variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements are also reported.

  20. Actinides-1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstracts of 134 papers which were presented at the Actinides-1981 conference are presented. Approximately half of these papers deal with electronic structure of the actinides. Others deal with solid state chemistry, nuclear physic, thermodynamic properties, solution chemistry, and applied chemistry

  1. Actinides-1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-09-01

    Abstracts of 134 papers which were presented at the Actinides-1981 conference are presented. Approximately half of these papers deal with electronic structure of the actinides. Others deal with solid state chemistry, nuclear physic, thermodynamic properties, solution chemistry, and applied chemistry.

  2. Task-specific ionic liquids for solubilizing metal compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Thijs, Ben

    2007-01-01

    The main goal of this PhD thesis was to design new task-specific ionic liquids with the ability to dissolve metal compounds. Despite the large quantity of papers published on ionic liquids, not much is known about the mechanisms of dissolving metals in ionic liquids or about metal-containing ionic liquids. Additionally, many of the commercially available ionic liquids exhibit a very limited solubilizing power for metal compounds, although this is for many applications like electrodeposition a...

  3. Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon

  4. Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, D.J.; Vernon, M.E.; Wright, S.A.

    1988-06-29

    A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

  5. Adventures in Actinide Chemistry: A Year of Exploring Uranium and Thorium in Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagano, Justin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-08

    The first part of this collection of slides is concerned with considerations when working with actinides. The topics discussed in the document as a whole are the following: Actinide chemistry vs. transition metal chemistry--tools we can use; New synthetic methods to obtain actinide hydrides; Actinide metallacycles: synthesis, structure, and properties; and Reactivity of actinide metallacycles.

  6. Adventures in Actinide Chemistry: A Year of Exploring Uranium and Thorium in Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of this collection of slides is concerned with considerations when working with actinides. The topics discussed in the document as a whole are the following: Actinide chemistry vs. transition metal chemistry--tools we can use; New synthetic methods to obtain actinide hydrides; Actinide metallacycles: synthesis, structure, and properties; and Reactivity of actinide metallacycles.

  7. [Biological activity of selenorganic compounds at heavy metal salts intoxication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusetskaya, N Y; Borodulin, V B

    2015-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of the antitoxic action of organoselenium compounds in heavy metal poisoning have been considered. Heavy metal toxicity associated with intensification of free radical oxidation, suppression of the antioxidant system, damage to macromolecules, mitochondria and the genetic material can cause apoptotic cell death or the development of carcinogenesis. Organic selenium compounds are effective antioxidants during heavy metal poisoning; they exhibit higher bioavailability in mammals than inorganic ones and they are able to activate antioxidant defense, bind heavy metal ions and reactive oxygen species formed during metal-induced oxidative stress. One of promising organoselenium compounds is diacetophenonyl selenide (DAPS-25), which is characterized by antioxidant and antitoxic activity, under conditions including heavy metal intoxication.

  8. Presence and Character of the 5f Electrons in the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, B.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Mårtensson, N.;

    1980-01-01

    The sensitivity of the Image level binding energy to the occupation of the 5f orbital is pointed out and used to demonstrate the presence of 5f electrons in the uranium metal. It is suggested that the valence band spectrum of uranium might contain satellites originating from excitations to locali...... and the critical separation is found to take place between plutonium and americium....

  9. Smart textile device using ion polymer metal compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Taro; Ihara, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a smart textile device that detects angular displacement of attached surface using ion polymer metal compound. The device was composed of ion polymer metal compound (IPMC) which was fabricated from Nafion resin by heat-press and chemical gold plating. The generated voltage from IPMC was measured as a function of bending angle. Fabricated IPMC device was weaved into a cotton cloth and multidirectional movements were detected. PMID:24109750

  10. Metal organic frameworks for removal of compounds from a fluid

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-03-03

    Embodiments provide a method of compound removal from a fluid. The method includes contacting one or more metal organic framework (MOF) compositions with a fluid and sorbing one or more compounds, such as CO2, H2S and condensable hydrocarbons. One or more of CO2, H2S and condensable hydrocarbons can be sorbed simultaneously or in series. The metal organic framework can be an M-soc-MOF.

  11. Research on the chemical speciation of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A demand for the safe and effective management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste generated from nuclear power plant draws increasing attention with the growth of nuclear power industry. The objective of this project is to establish the basis of research on the actinide chemistry by using advanced laser-based highly sensitive spectroscopic systems. Researches on the chemical speciation of actinides are prerequisite for the development of technologies related to nuclear fuel cycles, especially, such as the safe management of high level radioactive wastes and the chemical examination of irradiated nuclear fuels. For supporting these technologies, laser-based spectroscopies have been performed for the chemical speciation of actinide in an aqueous solutions and the quantitative analysis of actinide isotopes in spent nuclear fuels. In this report, results on the following subjects have been summarized. (1) Development of TRLFS technology for chemical speciation of actinides, (2) Development of LIBD technology for measuring solubility of actinides, (3) Chemical speciation of plutonium complexes by using a LWCC system, (4) Development of LIBS technology for the quantitative analysis of actinides, (5) Development of technology for the chemical speciation of actinides by CE, (6) Evaluation on the chemical reactions between actinides and humic substances, (7) Chemical speciation of actinides adsorbed on metal oxides surfaces, (8) Determination of actinide source terms of spent nuclear fuel

  12. Actinide co-conversion by internal gelation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suitable microstructures and homogenous microspheres of actinide compounds are of interest for future nuclear fuel or transmutation target concepts to prevent the generation and dispersal of actinide powder. Sol-gel routes are being investigated as one of the possible solutions for producing these compounds. Preliminary work is described involving internal gelation to synthesize mixed compounds including minor actinides, particularly mixed actinide or mixed actinide-inert element compounds. A parameter study is discussed to highlight the importance of the initial broth composition for obtaining gel microspheres without major defects (cracks, craters, etc.). In particular, conditions are defined to produce gel beads from Zr(IV)/Y(III)/Ce(III) or Zr(IV)/An(III) systems. After gelation, the heat treatment of these microspheres is described for the purpose of better understanding the formation of cracks after calcination and verifying the effective synthesis of an oxide solid-solution. (authors)

  13. Molecular and electronic structure of actinide hexa-cyanoferrates; Structure moleculaire et electronique des hexacyanoferrates d'actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonhoure, I

    2001-07-01

    The goal of this work is to improve our knowledge on the actinide-ligand bond properties. To this end, the hexacyanoferrate entities have been used as pre-organized ligand. We have synthesized, using mild chemistry, the following series of complexes: An{sup IV}[Fe{sup II}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O (An = Th, U, Np, Pu); Am{sup III}[Fe{sup III}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O; Pu {sup III}[Co{sup III}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O and K(H?)An{sup III}[Fe{sup II}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O (An = Pu, Am). The metal oxidation states have been obtained thanks to the {nu}{sub CN}, stretching vibration and to the actinide L{sub III} absorption edge studies. As Prussian Blue, the An{sup IV}[Fe{sup II}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O (An = Np, Pu) are class II of Robin and Day compounds. X-ray Diffraction has shown besides that these complexes crystallize in the P6{sub 3}/m space group, as the isomorphic LaKFe(CN){sub 6}.4H{sub 2}O complex used as structural model. The EXAFS oscillations at the iron K edge and at the An L{sub III} edge allowed to determine the An-N, An-O, Fe-C and Fe-N distances. The display of the multiple scattering paths for both edges explains the actinide contribution absence at the iron edge, whereas the iron signature is present at the actinide edge. We have shown that the actinide coordination sphere in actinides hexa-cyanoferrates is comparable to the one of lanthanides. However, the actinides typical behavior towards the lanthanides is brought to the fore by the An{sup IV} versus Ln{sup III} ions presence in this family of complexes. Contrarily to the 4f electrons, the 5f electrons influence the electronic properties of the compounds of this family. However, the gap between the An-N and Ln-N distances towards the corresponding metals ionic radii do not show any covalence bond evolution between the actinide and lanthanide series. (author)

  14. Recovering actinide values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actinide values are recovered from sodium carbonate scrub waste solutions containing these and other values along with organic compounds resulting from the radiolytic and hydrolytic degradation of neutral organophosphorus extractants such as tri-n butyl phosphate (TBP) and dihexyl-N, N-diethyl carbamylmethylene phosphonate (DHDECMP) which have been used in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear reactor fuels. The scrub waste solution is made acidic with mineral acid, to form a feed solution which is then contacted with a water-immiscible, highly polar organic extractant which selectively extracts the degradation products from the feed solution. The feed solution can then be processed to recover the actinides for storage or recycled back into the high-level waste process stream. The extractant can be recycled after stripping the degradation products with a neutral sodium carbonate solution. (author)

  15. Actinide recovery techniques utilizing electromechanical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under certain conditions, the separation of actinides using electromechanical techniques may be an effective means of residue processing. The separation of granular mixtures of actinides and other materials discussed in this report is based on appreciable differences in the magnetic and electrical properties of the actinide elements. In addition, the high density of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium, may render a simultaneous separation based on mutually complementary parameters. Both high intensity magnetic separation and electrostatic separation have been investigated for the concentration of an actinide waste stream. Waste stream constituents include an actinide metal alloy and broken quartz shards. The investigation of these techniques is in support of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept currently being developed at Argonne National Laboratory under the auspices of the Department of Energy

  16. Physiochemical and spectroscopic behavior of actinides and lanthanides in solution, their sorption on minerals and their compounds formed with macromolecules; Comportamiento fisicoquimico y espectroscopico de actinidos y lantanidos en solucion, su sorcion sobre minerales y sus compuestos formados con macromoleculas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez R, M., E-mail: melania.jimenez@inin.gob.m [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    From the chemical view point, the light actinides has been those most studied; particularly the uranium, because is the primordial component of the nuclear reactors. The chemical behavior of these elements is not completely defined, since they can behave as transition metals or metals of internal transition, as they are the lanthanides. The actinides are radioactive; between them they are emitters of radiation alpha, highly toxic, of live half long and some very long, and artificial elements. For all this, to know them sometimes is preferable to use their chemical similarity with the lanthanides and to study these. In particular, the migration of emitters of radiation alpha to the environment has been studied taking as model the uranium. It is necessary to mention that actinides and lanthanides elements are in the radioactive wastes of the nuclear reactors. In the Chemistry Department of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) the researches about the actinides and lanthanides began in 1983 and, between that year and 1995 several works were published in this field. In 1993 the topic was proposed as a Department project and from then around of 13 institutional projects and managerial activity have been developed, besides 4 projects approved by the National Council of Science and Technology. The objective of the projects already developed and of the current they have been contributing knowledge for the understanding of the chemical behavior of the lanthanides and actinides, as much in solution as in the solid state, their behavior in the environment and the chemistry of their complexes with recurrent and lineal macromolecules. (Author)

  17. Recovery of actinides from actinide-aluminium alloys by chlorination: Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Soucek, Pavel; Cassayre, Laurent; Eloirdi, Rachel; Malmbeck, Rikard; Meier, Roland; Nourry, Christophe; Claux, Benoit; Glatz, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    International audience; A chlorination route is being investigated for recovery of actinides from actinide-aluminium alloys, which originate from pyrochemical recovery of actinides from spent metallic nuclear fuel by electrochemical methods in molten LiCl-KCl. In the present work, the most important steps of this route were experimentally tested using U-Pu-Al alloy prepared by electrodeposition of U and Pu on solid aluminium plate electrodes. The investigated processes were vacuum distillatio...

  18. Raman scattering in transition metal compounds: Titanium and compounds of titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, J.; Ederer, D.L.; Shu, T. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The transition metal compounds form a very interesting and important set of materials. The diversity arises from the many states of ionization the transition elements may take when forming compounds. This variety provides ample opportunity for a large class of materials to have a vast range of electronic and magnetic properties. The x-ray spectroscopy of the transition elements is especially interesting because they have unfilled d bands that are at the bottom of the conduction band with atomic like structure. This group embarked on the systematic study of transition metal sulfides and oxides. As an example of the type of spectra observed in some of these compounds they have chosen to showcase the L{sub II, III} emission and Raman scattering in some titanium compounds obtained by photon excitation.

  19. Chemical compatibility between lithium compounds and transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim is to investigate the chemical reactions or otherwise of lithium compounds; Li7Pb2 (a tritium breeder), Li2O (breeder and impurity), Li3N and LiH (impurities) with containment and fusion reactor component metals - 316 and austenitic steels, titanium. Experimental details are given and results are summarized. (author)

  20. Covalent bonds against magnetism in transition metal compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streltsov, Sergey V; Khomskii, Daniel I

    2016-09-20

    Magnetism in transition metal compounds is usually considered starting from a description of isolated ions, as exact as possible, and treating their (exchange) interaction at a later stage. We show that this standard approach may break down in many cases, especially in 4d and 5d compounds. We argue that there is an important intersite effect-an orbital-selective formation of covalent metal-metal bonds that leads to an "exclusion" of corresponding electrons from the magnetic subsystem, and thus strongly affects magnetic properties of the system. This effect is especially prominent for noninteger electron number, when it results in suppression of the famous double exchange, the main mechanism of ferromagnetism in transition metal compounds. We study this mechanism analytically and numerically and show that it explains magnetic properties of not only several 4d-5d materials, including Nb2O2F3 and Ba5AlIr2O11, but can also be operative in 3d transition metal oxides, e.g., in CrO2 under pressure. We also discuss the role of spin-orbit coupling on the competition between covalency and magnetism. Our results demonstrate that strong intersite coupling may invalidate the standard single-site starting point for considering magnetism, and can lead to a qualitatively new behavior.

  1. Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs

  2. Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reavis, J.G.

    1985-06-01

    This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the actinide series shows the change between transition metal behavior and lanthanide behavior, between constant weak paramagnetism for thorium and strong Curie-Weiss paramagnetism for curium. Curium is shown to be the first metal of the actinide series to be magnetically ordered, its Neel temperature being 52K. The magnetic properties of the actinides depending on all the peripheral electrons, their electronic structure was studied and an attempt was made to determine it by means of a phenomenological model. Attempts were also made to interrelate the different physical properties which depend on the outer electronic structure

  4. Investigating Actinide Molecular Adducts From Absorption Edge Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Auwer, C.; Conradson, S.D.; Guilbaud, P.; Moisy, P.; Mustre de Leon, J.; Simoni, E.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-10-27

    Although Absorption Edge Spectroscopy has been widely applied to the speciation of actinide elements, specifically at the L{sub III} edge, understanding and interpretation of actinide edge spectra are not complete. In that sense, semi-quantitative analysis is scarce. In this paper, different aspects of edge simulation are presented, including semi-quantitative approaches. Comparison is made between various actinyl (U, Np) aquo or hydroxy compounds. An excursion into transition metal osmium chemistry allows us to compare the structurally related osmyl and uranyl hydroxides. The edge shape and characteristic features are discussed within the multiple scattering picture and the role of the first coordination sphere as well as contributions from the water solvent are described.

  5. Catalytic Organic Transformations Mediated by Actinide Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabell S. R. Karmel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This review article presents the development of organoactinides and actinide coordination complexes as catalysts for homogeneous organic transformations. This chapter introduces the basic principles of actinide catalysis and deals with the historic development of actinide complexes in catalytic processes. The application of organoactinides in homogeneous catalysis is exemplified in the hydroelementation reactions, such as the hydroamination, hydrosilylation, hydroalkoxylation and hydrothiolation of alkynes. Additionally, the use of actinide coordination complexes for the catalytic polymerization of α-olefins and the ring opening polymerization of cyclic esters is presented. The last part of this review article highlights novel catalytic transformations mediated by actinide compounds and gives an outlook to the further potential of this field.

  6. X-ray study of chemical bonding in actinides(IV) and lanthanides(III) hexa-cyanoferrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bimetallic cyanide molecular solids derived from Prussian blue are well known to foster long-range magnetic ordering and show an intense inter-valence charge transfer band resulting from an exchange interaction through the cyanide-bridge. For those reasons the ferrocyanide and ferricyanide building blocks have been chosen to study electronic delocalization and covalent character in actinide bonding using an experimental and theoretical approach based on X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In 2001, the actinide (IV) and early lanthanides (III) hexacyanoferrate have been found by powder X-ray diffraction to be isostructural (hexagonal, P63/m group). Here, extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) at the iron K-edge and actinide L3-edge have been undertaken to probe the local environment of both actinides and iron cations. In an effort to describe the cyano bridge, a double edge fitting procedure including both iron and actinide edges and based on multiple scattering approach has been developed. We have also investigated the electronic properties of these molecular solids. Low energy electronic transitions have been used iron L2,3 edge, nitrogen and carbon K-edge and also actinides N4,5 edge to directly probe the valence molecular orbitals of the complex. Using a phenomenological approach, a clear distinctive behaviour between actinides and lanthanides has been shown. Then a theoretical approach using quantum chemistry calculation has shown more specifically the effect of covalency in the actinide-ferrocyanide bond. More specifically, π interactions were underlined by both theoretical and experimental methods. Finally, in agreement with the ionic character of the lanthanide bonding no inter-valence charge transfer has been observed in the corresponding optical spectra of these compounds. On the contrary, optical spectra for actinides adducts (except for thorium) show an intense inter-valence charge transfer band like in the transition metal cases which is

  7. Synthesis, chemistry, and catalytic activity of complexes of lanthanide and actinide metals in unusual oxidation states and coordination environments. Progress report, February 1, 1981-January 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this research project are: (1) to demonstrate experimentally that the lanthanide and actinide metals have a more extensive chemistry than is presently known; (2) to develop a better understanding of the special features of the f orbital elements which will allow the design of f orbital complexes possessing unique chemical and physical properties; (3) to provide a basis for seeking unusual catalytic transformations involving these elements; and (4) to synthesize and explore the chemical and physical properties of mixed metal complexes which contain both lanthanide and transition metals. During the past year progress was made in each area. Some of the specific results are: (1) the first activation of CO by an organolanthanide complex was demonstrated; (2) the first, crystallograhically characterized, molecular lanthanide hydride complexes, the bridged dimers, [(C5H4R)2LnH(THF)]2 (R=H, CH3; Ln=Lu, Er, Y), were synthesized by hydrogenolysis of the appropriate (C5H4R)2Ln(C(CH3)3)(THF) complex; (3) [(C5H5)2(THF)ErH]2 was found to catalyze the homogeneous hydrogenation of alkynes; (4) the first trimetallic organolanthanide complex was synthesized; (5) the first polyhydridic organolanthanide complex was synthesized; (6) U(III) hydride was found to catalytically activate molecular hydrogen in alkene and alkyne hydrogenation reactions

  8. Lanthanides and actinides in ionic liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Binnemans, Koen

    2007-01-01

    This lecture gives an overview of the research possibilities offered by combining f-elements (lanthanides and actinides) with ionic liquids [1] Many ionic liquids are solvents with weakly coordinating anions. Solvation of lanthanide and actinide ions in these solvents is different from what is observed in conventional organic solvents and water. The poorly solvating behavior can also lead to the formation of coordination compounds with low coordination numbers. The solvation of f-elements can...

  9. Electrochemical decontamination of metallic waste contaminated with uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study on the electrolytic dissolution of SUS-304 and Inconel-600 specimen was carried out in neutral salt electrolyte to evaluate the applicability of electrochemical decontamination process for recycle ro self disposal with authorization of large amount of metallic wastes contamination with uranium compounds generated by dismantling a retired uranium conversion plant in Korea. Although the best electrolytic dissolution performance for the specimens was observed in a Na2SO4 electrolyte, a Na3NO3 neutral salt electrolyte, in which about 30% for SUS-304 and the same for Inconel-600 in the weight loss was shown in comparison with that in Na2 SO4 solution, was selected as an electrolyte for the electrochemical decontamination of metallic wastes with the consideration on the surface of system components contacted with nitric acid and the compatibility with lagoon wastes generated during the facility operation. The effects of current density, electrolytic dissolution time, and concentration of NaNO3 on the electrolytic dissolution of the specimens were investigated. On the basis of the results obtained through the basic inactive experiments, electrochemical decontamination tests using the specimens contaminated with uranium compounds such as UO2, AUC (ammonium uranyl carbonate) and ADU (ammonium diuranate) taken from an uranium conversion facility were performed in 1M NaNO3 solution with the current density of 100 mA/cm2. It was verified that the electrochemical decontamination of the metallic wastes contaminated uranium compounds was quite successful in a NaNO3 neutral salt electrolyte by reducing α and β radioactivities below the level of self disposal within 10 minutes regardless of the type of contaminants and the degree of contamination.

  10. The lanthanides and actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper relates the chemical properties of the actinides to their position in the Mendeleev periodic system. The changes in the oxidation states of the actinides with increasing atomic number are similar to those of the 3d elements. Monovalent and divalent actinides are very similar to alkaline and alkaline earth elements; in the 3+ and 4+ oxidation states they resemble d elements in the respective oxidation states. However, in their highest oxidation states the actinides display their individual properties with only a slight resemblance to d elements. Finally, there is a profound similarity between the second half of the actinides and the first half of the lanthanides

  11. Actinide metals with multiple bonds to carbon: synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of U(IV) and Th(IV) bis(iminophosphorano)methandiide pincer carbene complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guibin; Ferguson, Michael J; McDonald, Robert; Cavell, Ronald G

    2011-07-18

    Treatment of ThCl(4)(DME)(2) or UCl(4) with 1 equiv of dilithiumbis(iminophosphorano) methandiide, [Li(2)C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2)] (1), afforded the chloro actinide carbene complexes [Cl(2)M(C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2))] (2 (M = Th) and 3 (M = U)) in situ. Stable PCP metal-carbene complexes [Cp(2)Th(C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2))] (4), [Cp(2)U(C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2))] (5), [TpTh(C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2))Cl] (6), and [TpU(C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2))Cl] (7) were generated from 2 or 3 by further reaction with 2 equiv of thallium(I) cyclopentadienide (CpTl) in THF to yield 4 or 5 or with 1 equiv of potassium hydrotris(pyrazol-1-yl) borate (TpK) also in THF to give 6 or 7, respectively. The derivative complexes were isolated, and their crystal structures were determined by X-ray diffraction. All of these U (or Th)-carbene complexes (4-7) possess a very short M (Th or U)═carbene bond with evidence for multiple bond character. Gaussian 03 DFT calculations indicate that the M═C double bond is constructed by interaction of the 5f and 6d orbitals of the actinide metal with carbene 2p orbitals of both π and σ character. Complex 3 reacted with acetonitrile or benzonitrile to cyclo-add C≡N to the U═carbon double bond, thereby forming a new C-C bond in a new chelated quadridentate ligand in the bridged dimetallic complexes (9 and 10). A single carbon-U bond is retained. The newly coordinated uranium complex dimerizes with one equivalent of unconverted 3 using two chlorides and the newly formed imine derived from the nitrile as three connecting bridges. In addition, a new crystal structure of [CpUCl(3)(THF)(2)] (8) was determined by X-ray diffraction.

  12. Superconductivity of graphite intercalation compounds with alkali-metal amalgams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconductivity of the alkali-metal amalgam graphite intercalation compounds of stage 1 (C4KHg, C4RbHg) and stage 2 (C8KHg, C8RbHg) has been studied as well as that of the pristine amalgams (KHg, RbHg). The transition temperatures are 0.73, 0.99, 1.90, and 1.40 K for C4KHg, C4RbHg, C8KHg, and C8RbHg, respectively. The critical-field anisotropy ratio H/sup parallel//sub c/2/H/sup perpendicular//sub c/2 is about 10 for the stage 1 and about 15 to 40 for the stage 2. It is argued that electrons in the intercalant bands rather than the graphitic bands play the main role in the superconductivity. An interesting feature is that the stage-2 compound, which has a lower density of states at the Fermi level, has a higher transition temperature than the corresponding state-1 compound

  13. International Workshop on Orbital and Spin Magnetism of Actinides (IWOSMA-3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temmerman, W; Tobin, J; der Laan, G v

    2006-11-08

    This International Workshop on Orbital and Spin Magnetism of Actinides (IWOSMA) is the third in a series. The first workshop took place in Daresbury in 1999 and the second in Berkeley, CA, USA in 2002. These workshops are informal gatherings of theoreticians and experimentalists addressing the latest issues in the electronic and magnetic properties of actinides. The magnetism of transition metal systems and lanthanide systems is now fairly well understood, where d and f electrons can be described in a delocalized and localized model, respectively. On the other hand, actinide systems do not fit in such a description. The localization of the 5f is in between that of the 3d and 4f and the strong spin-orbit interaction necessitates a relativistic approach. Furthermore, electron correlation effects play a major role in these compounds. Recently, it has become possible to determine element-specific magnetic moments using neutron diffraction and x-ray scattering and absorption. The latter technique makes it even possible to separate the orbital and spin contribution to the total magnetic moment. The results are very interesting but difficult to reproduce with present state-of-art calculations. Not only a very large orbital polarization but also a large magnetic dipole term has been measured in cubic compounds, such as US. This allows for severe testing of the extra terms included in band theory to account for orbital polarization. It is also clear that deeper insight in magnetism can be obtained by studying the unusual behavior of the actinides. The recent development and application of such techniques as DMFT could contribute to the understanding of magnetism in actinides. Despite the fact that actinides for health reasons will find less application in technological market products, the understanding of their magnetic and electronic properties will no doubt provide key elements for a general description of electron correlation and relativistic effects.

  14. Metal, bond energy, and ancillary ligand effects on actinide-carbon σ-bond hydrogenolysis. A kinetic and mechanistic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A kineticmechanistic study of actinide hydrocarbyl ligand hydrogenolysis (An-R + H2 → An-H + RH) is reported. For the complex Cp'2TH(CH2-t-Bu)(O-t-Bu)(Cp' = eta5-Me5C5), the rate law is first-order in organoactinide and first-order in H2, with k/sub H2/k/sub D2/ = 2.5 (4) and k/sub THF/k/sub toluene/ = 2.9 (4). For a series of complexes, hydrogenolysis rates span a range of ca. 105 with Cp'2ThCH2C(CH3)2CH2 ≅ Cp'2U(CH2-t-Bu) (too rapid to measure accurately) > Cp'2Th(CH2-t-Bu)[OCH(t-Bu)2] = Cp'2Th(CH2-t-Bu)(O-t-Bu) > Cp'2Th(CH2-t-Bu)(Cl) > Me2Si(Me4C5)2Th(n-Bu)2 > Cp'2Th(n-Bu)2 ≅ Cp'2ThMe2 > Cp'2Th(Me)(O3SCF3) > Cp'2Th(n-Bu)[OCG(t-Bu)2] ≅ Cp'2Th(Me)[OSiMe2(t-Bu)] > Cp'2ZrMe2 = Cp'2Th(rho-C6H4NMe2)(O-tu-Bu) > Cp'2Th(Ph)(O-t-Bu) > Cp'2U(Me)[OCH(t-Bu)2] > Cp'2Th(Me)[OCH(t-Bu)2]. In the majority of cases, the rate law is cleanly first-order in organoactinide over 3 or more half-lives. However, for Cp'2ThMe2 → (Cp'2ThH2)2, an intermediate is observe by NMR that is probably [Cp'2Th(Me)(μ-H)]2. For Cp'2Th(Me)(O3SCF3), a follow-up reaction, which consumes Cp'2TH(H)(O3SCF3) is detected. Variable-temperature kinetic studies yield ΔH** = 3.7 (2) kcalmol and ΔS double dagger = -50.8 (7) eu for Cp'2Th(CH2-t-Bu)(O-t-Bu) and ΔH double dagger = 9 (2) kcalmol and ΔS double dagger = -45 (5) eu for Cp'2U(Me)[OCH(O-t-Bu)2

  15. THERMODYNAMICS OF THE ACTINIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, Burris B.

    1962-04-01

    Recent work on the thermodynamic properties of the transplutonium elements is presented and discussed in relation to trends in thermodynamic properties of the actinide series. Accurate values are given for room temperature lattice parameters of two crystallographic forms, (facecentred cubic) fcc and dhcp (double-hexagonal closepacked), of americium metal and for the coefficients of thermal expansion between 157 and 878 deg K (dhcp) and 295 to 633 deg K (fcc). The meiting point of the metal, and its magnetic susceptibility between 77 and 823 deg K are reported and the latter compared with theoretical values for the tripositive ion calculated from spectroscopic data. Similar data (crystallography, meiting point and magnetic susceptibility) are given for metallic curium. A value for the heat of formation of americium monoxide is reported in conjunction with crystallographic data on the monoxide and mononitride. A revision is made in the current value for the heat of formation of Am/O/sub 2/ and for the potential of the Am(III)-Am(IV) couple. The crystal structures and lattice parameters are reported for the trichloride, oxychloride and oxides of californium. (auth)

  16. Electrodeposition of alloys or compounds in molten salts and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Taxil P.; Chamelot P.; Massot L.; Hamel C.

    2003-01-01

    This article deals with the different modes of preparation of alloys or intermetallic compounds using the electrodeposition in molten salts, more particularly molten alkali fluorides. The interest in this process is to obtain new materials for high technology, particularly the compounds of reactive components such as actinides, rare earth and refractory metals. Two ways of preparation are considered: (i) electrocoating of the more reactive metal on a cathode made of the noble one and reaction...

  17. Overview of actinide chemistry in the WIPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucchini, Jean - Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, Michael K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, Hnin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, Juliet [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The year 2009 celebrates 10 years of safe operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the only nuclear waste repository designated to dispose defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste in the United States. Many elements contributed to the success of this one-of-the-kind facility. One of the most important of these is the chemistry of the actinides under WIPP repository conditions. A reliable understanding of the potential release of actinides from the site to the accessible environment is important to the WIPP performance assessment (PA). The environmental chemistry of the major actinides disposed at the WIPP continues to be investigated as part of the ongoing recertification efforts of the WIPP project. This presentation provides an overview of the actinide chemistry for the WIPP repository conditions. The WIPP is a salt-based repository; therefore, the inflow of brine into the repository is minimized, due to the natural tendency of excavated salt to re-seal. Reducing anoxic conditions are expected in WIPP because of microbial activity and metal corrosion processes that consume the oxygen initially present. Should brine be introduced through an intrusion scenario, these same processes will re-establish reducing conditions. In the case of an intrusion scenario involving brine, the solubilization of actinides in brine is considered as a potential source of release to the accessible environment. The following key factors establish the concentrations of dissolved actinides under subsurface conditions: (1) Redox chemistry - The solubility of reduced actinides (III and IV oxidation states) is known to be significantly lower than the oxidized forms (V and/or VI oxidation states). In this context, the reducing conditions in the WIPP and the strong coupling of the chemistry for reduced metals and microbiological processes with actinides are important. (2) Complexation - For the anoxic, reducing and mildly basic brine systems in the WIPP, the most important

  18. New Transition and Actinide Metal Complexes of 2-Carboxyphenyl-hydrazo-Benzoylacetone Ligand:Synthesis,Characterization and Biological Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KHALIL M.M.H.; MASHALY M.M.

    2008-01-01

    A new series of binary mononuclear complexes were prepared from the reaction of the hydrazone ligand,2-carboxyphenylhydrazo-benzoylacetone (H2L),with the metal ions,Cd(II),Cu(II),Ni(lI),Co01),Th(IV) and UO2(VI).The binary Cu(II) complex of H2L was reacted with the ligands 1,10-phenanthroline or 2-aminopyridine to form mixed-ligand complexes.The binary complexes of Cu(II) and Ni(II) are suggested to have octahedral configurations.The Cd(II) and Co(II) complexes are suggested to have tetrahedral and/or square-planar geometries,respectively.The Th(IV) and UO2(VI) complexes are suggested to have octahedral and dodecahedral geometries,respectively.The mixed-ligand complexes have octahedral configurations.The structures of all complexes and the corresponding thermal products were elucidated by elemental analyses,conductance,IR and electronic absorption spectra,magnetic moments,1H NMR and TG-DSC measurements as well as by mass spectroscopy.The ligand and some of the metal complexes were found to activate the enzyme pectinlyase.

  19. Sythesis of rare earth metal - GIC graphite intercalation compound in molten chloride system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Masafumi; Hagiwara, Rika; Ito, Yasuhiko [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1994-07-01

    Graphite intercalation compounds of ytterbium and neodymium have been prepared by interacting graphite and metals in molten chlorides. These rare earth metals can be suspended in molten chlorides in the presence of trichlorides via disproportionation reaction RE(0) + RE(III) = 2RE(II) at lower than 300 degC. Carbides-free compounds are obtained in these systems. (author).

  20. Coordination polymers: trapping of radionuclides and chemistry of tetravalent actinides (Th, U) carboxylates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of nuclear energy obviously raises the question of the presence of radionuclides in the environment. Currently, their mitigation is a major issue associated with nuclear chemistry. This thesis focuses on both the trapping of radionuclides by porous solids called Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOF) and the crystal chemistry of the carboxylate of tetravalent actinides (AnIV). The academic knowledge of the reactivity of carboxylate of AnIV could help the understanding of actinides speciation in environment. We focused on the sequestration of iodine by aluminum based MOF. The functionalization (electron-donor group) of the MOF drastically enhances the iodine capture capacity. The removal of light actinides (Th and U) from aqueous solution was also investigated as well as the stability of (Al)-MOF under γ radiation. More than twenty coordination polymers based on tetravalent actinides have been synthesized and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The use of controlled hydrolysis promotes the formation of coordination polymers exhibiting polynuclear cluster ([U4], [Th6], [U6] and [U38]). In order to understand the formation of the largest cluster, the ex-situ study of the solvo-thermal synthesis of compound {U38} has also been investigated. (author)

  1. The chemistry of molten salt mixtures: application to the reductive extraction of lanthanides and actinides by a liquid metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of a process of An/Ln separation by liquid - liquid extraction can be used for on-line purification of the molten salt in a molten salt nuclear reactor (Generation IV) as well as reprocessing various spent fuels. In order to establish the chemical properties of An and Ln in molten salt mediums, E - pO2 - diagrams were established for the relevant chemical elements. With the purpose of checking the possibilities of separating the An from Ln, the real activity coefficients in liquid metals were measured. An experimental protocol was developed and validated on the Gd/Ga system. It was then transferred to radioactive environment to measure the activity coefficient of Pu in Ga. The results made it possible to estimate the effectiveness of the Pu extraction and its separation from Gd and Ce. The selectivity was shown to decrease with the temperature and Al and Ga showed a good selectivity between Pu and the Ce in fluoride medium. (author)

  2. PREFACE: Actinides 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Linfeng; Tobin, James G.; Shuh, David K.

    2010-07-01

    This volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering consists of 98 papers that were presented at Actinides 2009, the 8th International Conference on Actinide Science held on 12-17 July 2009 in San Francisco, California, USA. This conference was jointly organized by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Actinides conference series started in Baden-Baden, Germany (1975) and this first conference was followed by meetings at Asilomar, CA, USA (1981), Aix-en-Provence, France (1985), Tashkent, USSR (1989), Santa Fe, NM, USA (1993), Baden-Baden, Germany (1997), Hayama, Japan (2001), and Manchester, UK (2005). The Actinides conference series provides a regular venue for the most recent research results on the chemistry, physics, and technology of the actinides and heaviest elements. Actinides 2009 provided a forum spanning a diverse range of scientific topics, including fundamental materials science, chemistry, physics, environmental science, and nuclear fuels. Of particular importance was a focus on the key roles that basic actinide chemistry and physics research play in advancing the worldwide renaissance of nuclear energy. Editors Linfeng Rao Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (lrao@lbl.gov) James G Tobin Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (tobin1@llnl.gov) David K Shuh Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (dkshuh@lbl.gov)

  3. Transformation of Heavy Metal Compounds during the Remediation of Contaminated Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Minkina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ameliorants, chalk, glauconite and semidecomposed cattle manure, on ordinary chernozem contaminated with Zn and Pb was studied in a long-term field experiment. The application of ameliorants significantly decreased the mobility of metals. Their effect depended on the ameliorant and was most significant at the simultaneous application of chalk and manure. This effect was presumably due to the strong binding of metals by carbonates through chemisorption and formation of lowsoluble Zn and Pb compounds and to the additional fixation in the form of complexes at the addition of organic material. The share of loosely bound metal compounds in the contaminated soils decreased to the level typical for the clean soils or even below. The general evolution of the transformation of metal compounds (from less to more firmly bound compounds accelerated by ameliorants remained for both metals.

  4. Distribution of actinide elements in sediments: leaching studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous investigations have shown that Fe and Mn oxides and organic matter can significantly influence the behavior of Pu and other actinides in the environment. A sequential leaching procedure has been developed in order to investigate the solid phase distribution of the actinides in riverine and marine sediments. Seven different sedimentary fractions are defined by this leaching experiment: an exchangeable metals fraction, an organic fraction, a carbonate fraction, a Mn oxide fraction, an amorphous Fe fraction, a crystalline Fe oxide fraction and a lattice-held or residual fraction. There is also the option of including a metal sufide fraction. A preliminary experiment, analyzing only the metals and not the actinide elements, indicates that this leaching procedure (with some modifications) is a viable procedure. The subsequent data should result in information concerning the geochemical history and behavior of these actinide elements in the environment

  5. The electrochemical properties of actinide amalgams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standard potentials are selected for actinides (An) and their amalgams. From the obtained results, energy characteristics are calculated and analyzed for alloy formation in An-Hg systems. It is found that solutions of the f-elements in mercury are very close in properties to amalgams of the alkali and alkaline-earth metals, except that, for the active Group III metals, the ion skeletons have a greater number of realizable charged states in the condensed phase

  6. Ionic Interactions in Actinide Tetrahalides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdeniz, Z.; Karaman, A.; Tosi, M. P.

    2001-05-01

    We determine a model of the ionic interactions in AX 4 compounds (where A is an atom in the actinide series from Th to Am and X = F, Cl, Br or I) by an analysis of data on the static and dynamic structure of their molecular monomers. The potential energy function that we adopt is taken from earlier work on rare-earth trihalides [Z. Akdeniz, Z. Q q e k and M. P. Tosi, Z. Naturforsch. 55a, 861 (2000)] and in particular allows for the electronic polarizability of the actinide ion. This polarizability quantitatively determines the antisymmetric-bending vibrational mode, but its magnitude remains compatible with a symmetric tetrahedral shape of the molecule at equilibrium. The fluorides have an especially high degree of ionic character, and the interionic-force parameters for each halide of the U, Np, Pu and Am series show regular trends, suggesting that extrapolations to the other transuranic-element halides may usefully be made. The Th compounds show some deviations from these trends, and the interionic-force model that we determine for ThCl4 differs somewhat from that obtained in a previous study. We therefore return on the evaluation of the relative stability of charged oligomers of ThCl4 and ZrCl4 and find confirmation of our earlier results on this problem.

  7. Subsurface Biogeochemistry of Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, Annie B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Univ. Relations and Science Education; Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst.

    2016-06-29

    A major scientific challenge in environmental sciences is to identify the dominant processes controlling actinide transport in the environment. It is estimated that currently, over 2200 metric tons of plutonium (Pu) have been deposited in the subsurface worldwide, a number that increases yearly with additional spent nuclear fuel (Ewing et al., 2010). Plutonium has been shown to migrate on the scale of kilometers, giving way to a critical concern that the fundamental biogeochemical processes that control its behavior in the subsurface are not well understood (Kersting et al., 1999; Novikov et al., 2006; Santschi et al., 2002). Neptunium (Np) is less prevalent in the environment; however, it is predicted to be a significant long-term dose contributor in high-level nuclear waste. Our focus on Np chemistry in this Science Plan is intended to help formulate a better understanding of Pu redox transformations in the environment and clarify the differences between the two long-lived actinides. The research approach of our Science Plan combines (1) Fundamental Mechanistic Studies that identify and quantify biogeochemical processes that control actinide behavior in solution and on solids, (2) Field Integration Studies that investigate the transport characteristics of Pu and test our conceptual understanding of actinide transport, and (3) Actinide Research Capabilities that allow us to achieve the objectives of this Scientific Focus Area (SFA and provide new opportunities for advancing actinide environmental chemistry. These three Research Thrusts form the basis of our SFA Science Program (Figure 1).

  8. Half-metallic ferromagnetism in the CsSe compound by density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaca, Mustafa; Kervan, Selçuk; Kervan, Nazmiye, E-mail: nkervan@gazi.edu.tr

    2015-08-05

    Graphical abstract: The ferromagnetic ground state of the CsSe compound is the most stable with CsCl-type structure with a total magnetic moment of 1 μ{sub B}/f.u. although this compound does not include transition metal atoms. The CsSe compound is half-metallic ferromagnet with a half-metallic band gap of 3.75 eV. The half-metallicity is also found to be robust with respect to the lattice distortion in the CsCl-type structure. The Curie temperature is estimated to be 390 K in the mean field approximation (MFA). - Highlights: • The CsSe compound is the most stable with CsCl-type structure. • The half-metallic band gap is about 3.5 eV for all types of structure. • The total magnetic moment is of 1 μ{sub B}/f.u. • The Curie temperature is estimated to be 390 K. - Abstract: The full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FPLAPW) method based on the density functional theory is used to investigate the structural, magnetic and half-metallic properties of the CsSe compound in the CsCl-type, NaCl-type, ZnS-type, NiAs-type and wurtzite structures. The results show that the ferromagnetic ground state of the CsSe compound is the most stable with CsCl-type structure with a total magnetic moment of 1 μ{sub B}/f.u. although this compound does not include transition metal atoms. The CsSe compound is half-metallic ferromagnet for all types of structure. The half-metallic band gap is about 3.5 eV for all types of structure. The Curie temperature is estimated to be 390 K in the mean field approximation (MFA)

  9. The ALMR actinide burning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced liquid-metal reactor (ALMR) actinide burning system is being developed under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to bring its unique capabilities to fruition for deployment in the early 21st century. The system consists of four major parts: the reactor plant, the metal fuel and its recycle, the processing of light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel to extract the actinides, and the development of a residual waste package. This paper addresses the status and outlook for each of these four major elements. The ALMR is being developed by an industrial group under the leadership of General Electric (GE) in a cost-sharing arrangement with the US Department of Energy. This effort is nearing completion of the advanced conceptual design phase and will enter the preliminary design phase in 1994. The innovative modular reactor design stresses simplicity, economics, reliability, and availability. The design has evolved from GE's PRISM design initiative and has progressed to the final stages of a prelicensing review by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); a safety evaluation report is expected by the end of 1993. All the major issues identified during this review process have been technically resolved. The next design phases will focus on implementation of the basic safety philosophy of passive shutdown to a safe, stable condition, even without scram, and passive decay heat removal. Economic projections to date show that it will be competitive with non- nuclear and advanced LWR nuclear alternatives

  10. Pyrometallurgical process of actinide metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jae Hyung; Kang, Young Ho; Woo, Mun Sik; Hwang, Sung Chan

    1999-06-01

    Major subject on pyrometallurgical partitioning technology is to separate transmutation elements (TRU) from rare earth elements(RE). Distribution coefficients of TRU and RE between molten chloride and liquid cadmium were measured for reductive extraction, and TRU were separated from RE in simplified molten chloride system by electrorefining. And separation efficiency between TRU and RE were estimated by using thermodynamics data. The results indicate that uranium, neptunium and plutonium are easy to separate from RE but some amount of RE accompany americium, and that processes have to be optimized to attain good separation efficiency of TRU. (author)

  11. Use of high gradient magnetic separation for actinide application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination of materials such as soils or waste water that contain radioactive isotopes, heavy metals, or hazardous components is a subject of great interest. Magnetic separation is a physical separation process that segregates materials on the basis of magnetic susceptibility. Because the process relies on physical properties, separations can be achieved while producing a minimum of secondary waste. Most traditional physical separation processes effectively treat particles larger than 70 microns. In many situations, the radioactive contaminants are found concentrated in the fine particle size fraction of less than 20 microns. For effective decontamination of the fine particle size fraction most current operations resort to chemical dissolution methods for treatment. High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is able to effectively treat particles from 90 to ∼0.1 micron in diameter. The technology is currently used on the 60 ton per hour scale in the kaolin clay industry. When the field gradient is of sufficiently high intensity, paramagnetic particles can be physically captured and separated from extraneous nonmagnetic material. Because all actinide compounds are paramagnetic, magnetic separation of actinide containing mixtures is feasible. The advent of reliable superconducting magnets also makes magnetic separation of weakly paramagnetic species attractive. HGMS work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is being developed for soil remediation, waste water treatment and treatment of actinide chemical processing residues. LANL and Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Company (LESAT) have worked on a co-operative research and development agreement (CRADA) to develop HGMS for radioactive soil decontamination. The program is designed to transfer HGMS from the laboratory and other industries for the commercial treatment of radioactive contaminated materials. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Structure and bonding in metal-rich compounds: pnictides, chalcides and halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is reviewed under the following headings: introduction (compounds included in the review; purpose of the review); MX compounds with M = transition metal and X = O,N,S or P; sulfides and selenides of the transition metals; transition-metal phosphides; alkali oxides; transition-metal oxides and nitrides with X/M < 1; metal-rich halides; conclusion. The references number 238. Compounds of the following principal elements of nuclear interest are included in the tables and text: Am, Ce, Cs, Eu, Gd, Hf, La, Mo, Np, Nb, Pu, Pr, Pa, Re, Ru, Sc, Ta, Tb, Th, W, U, V, Y, Zr. The information in the tables is presented under: structure type, space group, lattice parameters and remarks. (U.K.)

  13. Structurally defined allyl compounds of main group metals: coordination and reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Crispin; Okuda, Jun

    2013-05-10

    Organometallic allyl compounds are important as allylation reagents in organic synthesis, as polymerization catalysts, and as volatile metal precursors in material science. Whereas the allyl chemistry of synthetically relevant transition metals such as palladium and of the lanthanoids is well-established, that of main group metals has been lagging behind. Recent progress on allyl complexes of Groups 1, 2, and 12-16 now provides a more complete picture. This is based on a fundamental understanding of metal-allyl bonding interactions in solution and in the solid state. Furthermore, reactivity trends have been rationalized and new types of allyl-specific reactivity patterns have been uncovered. Key features include 1) the exploitation of the different types of metal-allyl bonding (highly ionic to predominantly covalent), 2) the use of synergistic effects in heterobimetallic compounds, and 3) the adjustment of Lewis acidity by variation of the charge of allyl compounds.

  14. A Case Study of In Silico Modelling of Ciprofloxacin Hydrochloride/Metallic Compound Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Stojkovic, Aleksandra; Parojcic, Jelena; Djuric, Zorica; Corrigan, Owen I.

    2013-01-01

    With the development of physiologically based absorption models, there is an increased scientific and regulatory interest in in silico modelling and simulation of drug–drug and drug–food interactions. Clinically significant interactions between ciprofloxacin and metallic compounds are widely documented. In the current study, a previously developed ciprofloxacin-specific in silico absorption model was employed in order to simulate ciprofloxacin/metallic compound interaction observed in vivo. C...

  15. Treatment of actinide-containing organic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method has been developed for reducing the volume of organic wastes and recovering the actinide elements. The waste, together with gaseous oxygen (air) is introduced into a molten salt, preferably an alkali metal carbonate such as sodium carbonate. The bath is kept at 7500 - 10000C and 0.5 - 10 atm to thermally decompose and partially oxidize the waste, while substantially reducing its volume. The gaseous effluent, mainly carbon dioxide and water vapour, is vented to the atmosphere through a series of filters to remove trace amounts of actinide elements or particulate alkali metal salts. The remaining combustion products are entrained in the molten salt. Part of the molten salt-combustion product mixture is withdrawn and mixed with an aqueous medium. Insoluble combustion products are then removed from the aqueous medium and are leached with a mixture of hydrofluoric and nitric acids to solubilize the actinide elements. The actinide elements are easily recovered from the acid solution using conventional techniques. (DN)

  16. PEROXOTITANATE- AND MONOSODIUM METAL-TITANATE COMPOUNDS AS INHIBITORS OF BACTERIAL GROWTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.

    2011-01-19

    Sodium titanates are ion-exchange materials that effectively bind a variety of metal ions over a wide pH range. Sodium titanates alone have no known adverse biological effects but metal-exchanged titanates (or metal titanates) can deliver metal ions to mammalian cells to alter cell processes in vitro. In this work, we test a hypothesis that metal-titanate compounds inhibit bacterial growth; demonstration of this principle is one prerequisite to developing metal-based, titanate-delivered antibacterial agents. Focusing initially on oral diseases, we exposed five species of oral bacteria to titanates for 24 h, with or without loading of Au(III), Pd(II), Pt(II), and Pt(IV), and measuring bacterial growth in planktonic assays through increases in optical density. In each experiment, bacterial growth was compared with control cultures of titanates or bacteria alone. We observed no suppression of bacterial growth by the sodium titanates alone, but significant (p < 0.05, two-sided t-tests) suppression was observed with metal-titanate compounds, particularly Au(III)-titanates, but with other metal titanates as well. Growth inhibition ranged from 15 to 100% depending on the metal ion and bacterial species involved. Furthermore, in specific cases, the titanates inhibited bacterial growth 5- to 375-fold versus metal ions alone, suggesting that titanates enhanced metal-bacteria interactions. This work supports further development of metal titanates as a novel class of antibacterials.

  17. Composites for removing metals and volatile organic compounds and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Paul R.; Coleman, Sabre J.; Reynolds, John G.

    2006-12-12

    Functionalized hydrophobic aerogel/solid support structure composites have been developed to remove metals and organic compounds from aqueous and vapor media. The targeted metals and organics are removed by passing the aqueous or vapor phase through the composite which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The composites adsorb the metals and the organics leaving a purified aqueous or vapor stream. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific functionalization of the aerogels tailored towards specific metals and/or organics. After adsorption, the composites can be disposed of or the targeted metals and/or organics can be reclaimed or removed and the composites recycled.

  18. Physicochemical aspects of inhibition of acid corrosion of metals by unsaturated organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdeev, Ya G.; Kuznetsov, Yurii I.

    2012-12-01

    The state-of-the-art in the development and improvement of methods for protecting metals from corrosion in mineral acid solutions using unsaturated organic compounds is considered. Characteristic features of the mechanism of their protective action on metal corrosion in acidic media are discussed. The bibliography includes 203 references.

  19. In-situ mineralization of actinides with phytic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach to the remediation of actinide contamination is described. A hydrolytically unstable organophosphorus compound, phytic acid, is introduced into the contaminated environment. In the short term (up to several hundred years), phytate acts as a cation exchanger to absorb mobile actinide ions from ground waters. Ultimately, phytate decomposes to release phosphate and promote the formation of insoluble phosphate mineral phases, considered an ideal medium to immobilize actinides, as it forms compounds with the lowest solubility of any candidate mineral species. This overview will discuss the rate of hydrolysis of phytic acid, the formation of lanthanide/actinide phosphate mineral forms, the cation exchange behavior of insoluble phytate, and results from laboratory demonstration of the application to soils from the Fernald site

  20. An atomic beam source for actinide elements: concept and realization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For ultratrace analysis of actinide elements and studies of their atomic properties with resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS), efficient and stable sources of actinide atomic beams are required. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the evaporation of actinide elements and oxides from a variety of metals were considered, including diffusion, desorption, and associative desorption. On this basis various sandwich-type filaments were studied. The most promising system was found to consist of tantalum as the backing material, an electrolytically deposited actinide hydroxide as the source of the element, and a titanium covering layer for its reduction to the metal. Such sandwich sources were experimentally proven to be well suited for the production of atomic beams of plutonium, curium, berkelium and californium at relatively low operating temperatures and with high and reproducible yields. (orig.)

  1. Electronic Structure and Geometries of Small Compound Metal Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-14

    During the tenure of the DOE grant DE-FG05-87EI145316 we have concentrated on equilibrium geometries, stability, and the electronic structure of transition metal-carbon clusters (met-cars), clusters designed to mimic the chemistry of atoms, and reactivity of homo-nuclear metal clusters and ions with various reactant molecules. It is difficult to describe all the research the authors have accomplished as they have published 38 papers. In this report, they outline briefly the salient features of their work on the following topics: (1) Designer Clusters: Building Blocks for a New Class of Solids; (2) Atomic Structure, Stability, and Electronic Properties of Metallo-Carbohedrenes; (3) Reactivity of Metal Clusters with H{sub 2} and NO; and (4) Anomalous Spectroscopy of Li{sub 4} Clusters.

  2. Electronic structure and properties of rare earth and actinide intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are 188 contributions, experimental and theoretical, a few on rare earth and actinide elements but mostly on rare earth and actinide intermetallic compounds and alloys. The properties dealt with include 1) crystal structure, 2) magnetic properties and magnetic structure, 3) magnetic phase transformations and valence fluctuations, 4) electrical properties and superconductivity and their temperature, pressure and magnetic field dependence. A few papers deal with crystal growth and novel measuring methods. (G.Q.)

  3. Single crystal growth of europium and ytterbium based intermetallic compounds using metal flux technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sumanta Sarkar; Sebastian C Peter

    2012-11-01

    This article covers the use of indium as a potential metal solvent for the crystal growth of europium and ytterbium-based intermetallic compounds. A brief view about the advantage of metal flux technique and the use of indium as reactive and non-reactive flux are outlined. Large single crystals of EuGe2, EuCoGe3 and Yb2AuGe3 compounds were obtained in high yield from the reactions of the elements in liquid indium. The results presented here demonstrate that considerable advances in the discovery of single crystal growth of complex phases are achievable utilizing molten metals as solvents.

  4. Alkali-doped metal-phthalocyanine and pentacene compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craciun, M.F.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to introduce charge carriers in organic molecular materials and control their concentration is of great relevance for both fundamental research and applications. In this thesis, it has been demonstrated that the electronic properties of Metal Phthalocyanines (MPc) and pentacene (PEN) mol

  5. The Systematic Study of the Organotransition Metal Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriedo, Gabino A.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is an extension of the conventional method for studying the organometallic chemistry of transition metals that may be useful to show how the various existing types of low-valence complexes can be constructed. This method allows students to design new types of complexes that may still be nonexistent. (CW)

  6. S-S bond reactivity in metal-perthiocarboxylato compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; Guijarro, Alejandro; González-Prieto, Rodrigo; Castillo, Oscar; Sanz Miguel, Pablo J; Zamora, Félix

    2010-02-14

    While M-percarboxylato species are elusive intermediates, their sulfur containing analogues are known in some cases. The feasibility of isolation of M-perthioacetato compounds allowed, in this work, to obtain new insights into the pathways that follow the reactivity of M-E-ER (E = O, S) fragments. Herein we report on the isolation of two new M-perthioacetato compounds: trans-[Pt(CH(3)CS(2)S)(2)] () and [Ni(CH(3)CSS)(CH(3)CS(2)S)] (), which have been fully characterized, including X-ray structures. Reactivity of these compounds towards PPh(3) has been studied combining UV-vis monitorization and NMR measurements. Overall the accumulated data suggest that the evolution of the perthioacetato ligand in complexes and by reaction with PPh(3) consists of a complex multistep pathway in which the sulfur transfer is preceded by electron transfer. Cyclic voltammetry measurements indicate that the transference of two electrons from the phosphorus to the sulfur atom is not concerted, suggesting that the first step of the reaction with PPh(3) is the monoelectronic electron transfer followed by P-S bond formation. The results presented here show a novel pathway in the field of S-S bond reactivity processes relevant in biological, synthetic systems and in hydrocarbon desulfurization processes.

  7. Recovery of actinides from actinide-aluminium alloys by chlorination: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souček, P.; Cassayre, L.; Eloirdi, R.; Malmbeck, R.; Meier, R.; Nourry, C.; Claux, B.; Glatz, J.-P.

    2014-04-01

    A chlorination route is being investigated for recovery of actinides from actinide-aluminium alloys, which originate from pyrochemical recovery of actinides from spent metallic nuclear fuel by electrochemical methods in molten LiCl-KCl. In the present work, the most important steps of this route were experimentally tested using U-Pu-Al alloy prepared by electrodeposition of U and Pu on solid aluminium plate electrodes. The investigated processes were vacuum distillation for removal of the salt adhered on the electrode, chlorination of the alloy by chlorine gas and sublimation of the AlCl3 formed. The processes parameters were set on the base of a previous thermochemical study and an experimental work using pure UAl3 alloy. The present experimental results indicated high efficiency of salt distillation and chlorination steps, while the sublimation step should be further optimised.

  8. Hydrothermal decomposition of actinide(IV oxalates: a new aqueous route towards reactive actinide oxide nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Olaf

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The hydrothermal decomposition of actinide(IV oxalates (An= Th, U, Pu at temperatures between 95 and 250 °C is shown to lead to the production of highly crystalline, reactive actinide oxide nanocrystals (NCs. This aqueous process proved to be quantitative, reproducible and fast (depending on temperature. The NCs obtained were characterised by X-ray diffraction and TEM showing their size to be smaller than 15 nm. Attempts to extend this general approach towards transition metal or lanthanide oxalates failed in the 95–250 °C temperature range. The hydrothermal decomposition of actinide oxalates is therefore a clean, flexible and powerful approach towards NCs of AnO2 with possible scale-up potential.

  9. Crossover from metal to insulator in dense lithium-rich compound CLi4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xilian; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Cui, Tian; Mao, Ho-kwang; Zhang, Huadi; Zhuang, Quan; Bao, Kuo; Zhou, Dawei; Liu, Bingbing; Zhou, Qiang; He, Zhi

    2016-03-01

    At room environment, all materials can be classified as insulators or metals or in-between semiconductors, by judging whether they are capable of conducting the flow of electrons. One can expect an insulator to convert into a metal and to remain in this state upon further compression, i.e., pressure-induced metallization. Some exceptions were reported recently in elementary metals such as all of the alkali metals and heavy alkaline earth metals (Ca, Sr, and Ba). Here we show that a compound of CLi4 becomes progressively less conductive and eventually insulating upon compression based on ab initio density-functional theory calculations. An unusual path with pressure is found for the phase transition from metal to semimetal, to semiconductor, and eventually to insulator. The Fermi surface filling parameter is used to describe such an antimetallization process. PMID:26884165

  10. The Eighth International Ural Seminar Radiation damage physics of metals and alloys. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book includes abstracts of the Eight International Ural Seminar Radiation damage physics of metals and alloys (Snezhinsk, 23 February - 1 March, 2009). Reports on the characteristics of point defects in different alloys and compounds including Fe-Cr(Ni) systems are presented. Effects of irradiation and strong deformation on changing microstructure and properties of metals and alloys are discussed. Gaseous impurities in irradiated metals and alloys, materials problems in nuclear and thermonuclear powers, physical properties and atomic defects in actinides and actinide alloys, and model analogs are discussed. Reports on physics of radiation effects in magnetics, superconductors, semiconductors and nonconductors, as well as technology and experimental technique, ion implantation are performed

  11. Synthesis and characterization of graphite-metal fluoride intercalation compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McQuillan, B.W.

    1981-04-01

    The compound C/sub x/AsF/sub 5/ was prepared and characterized by x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption, which show the presence of As(III) and As(V), and the As-F bond distances are consistent with AsF/sub 3/ and AsF/sup -//sub 6/, C/sup +//sub 8/AsF/sup -//sub 6/ and C/sup +//sub 8/OsF/sup -//sub 6/ were synthesized. The C/sub x/AsF/sub 6/ and numerous standard arsenic-flourine compounds were studied by x-ray absorption. Magnetic susceptibility of C/sup +//sub 8/OsF/sup -//sub 6/ confirms the high degree of oxidation in this compound. X-ray absorption studies were begun to determine the species present within the graphite when BrF/sub 3/ or GeF/sub 4/ + F/sub 2/ are added. In the BrF/sub 3/ case, Br/sub 2/ is evolved and only Br(III) is present in the graphite. The binary phase diagram XeF/sub 2/:Xe/sup +//sub 5/AsF/sup -//sub 6/ was investigated by melting point determination and Raman spectroscopy. This mixture near 1.3:1 forms a kinetically stable glass at room temperature and is molten at 50/sup 0/C. Several new species or phases are observed in the Raman spectra. These species have been assigned tentative structures.

  12. Actinide recovery from pyrochemical residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrated a new process for recovering plutonium and americium from pyrochemical waste. The method is based on chloride solution anion exchange at low acidity, or acidity that eliminates corrosive HCl fumes. Developmental experiments of the process flow chart concentrated on molten salt extraction (MSE) residues and gave >95% plutonium and >90% americium recovery. The recovered plutonium contained 62- from high-chloride low-acid solution. Americium and other metals are washed from the ion exchange column with lN HNO3-4.8M NaCl. After elution, plutonium is recovered by hydroxide precipitation, and americium is recovered by NaHCO3 precipitation. All filtrates from the process can be discardable as low-level contaminated waste. Production-scale experiments are in progress for MSE residues. Flow charts for actinide recovery from electro-refining and direct oxide reduction residues are presented and discussed

  13. Separation of Metal Chelates and Organometallic Compounds by Supercritical Fluid Chromatography%超临界流体色谱在金属络合物和金属有机化合物中的分析应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王少芬; 魏建谟

    2001-01-01

    超临界流体色谱(SFC)在色谱分离过程中能在较低的温度下分析对热不稳定的化合物,包括金属络合物和金属有机化合物。本文总结了近来文献报道的各种过渡金属、重金属、镧系和锕系以及铅、汞和锡的金属有机化合物的SFC分离,还讨论了SFC检测系统和金属有机化合物的溶解度的测定。%Supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) combines the hig h diffusion coefficients of gas chromatography (GC) and the solubility propertie s of liquid chromatography (LC). SFC generally requires lower temperatures for chromatographic separations and thus is more suitable for analyzing thermally l abile compounds including a number of metal chelates and organometallic compound s. SFC also allows interfacing between supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and chromatographic analysis of metal-containing compounds. A large number of metal chelates and organometallic compounds can be separated b y SFC. This article summarizes SFC separation of various chelates of transitio n metals, heavy metals, lanthanides and actinides as well as organometallic comp ounds of lead, mercury and tin reported in the recent literature. This articl e also discusses SFC detection systems and the determination of solubility of or ganometallic compounds by SFC.

  14. METALLIC COMPOUNDS IN THE PHASE OF THE RETICULATED IONIC POLYMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilii Gutsanu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Using the Mossbauer spectroscopy and other physical methods it was demonstrated the presence of different iron compounds like β-FeOOH, α-Fe2O3, and jarosite mineral type compounds: (R4N,H3O[Fe3(OH6(SO42] or coordination modes: {RCOO-Fe(L4-OOCR}1+, {R-CO2=Fe(X2=O2C-R}n, {R-COO-Fe(X4-OOC-R}n, and {(-NCH2CH2N-= Fe(X2 =(-NCH2CH2N-}, where X= H2O, OH-, SO42-., n= from 3- to 1+ in the ion-exchange resins (KU-2, AN-31, AV-17, Varian – AD, EDE-10P after the contact with sulphate of iron(III solutions at different conditions: type of solvent, temperature, air atmosphere. In special conditions the ultrafine superparamagnetic particles of Fe2O3 have been obtained

  15. Low-temperature properties of rare-earth and actinide iron phosphide compounds MFe4P/sub 12/ (M = La, Pr, Nd, and Th)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low-temperature properties of MFe4P/sub 12/ (M = La, Pr, Nd, and Th) single crystals have been studied by means of electrical-resistivity, magnetization, specific-heat, and magnetoresistivity measurements. Superconductivity among these compounds is known to occur only in LaFe4P/sub 12/, which has a superconducting transition temperature T/sub c/ of ∼4 K. The compounds PrFe4P/sub 12/ and NdFe4P/sub 12/ display features that suggest the occurrence of antiferromagnetic ordering below ∼6.2 K and ferromagnetic ordering below ∼2 K, respectively. Isothermal magnetization curves for PrFe4P/sub 12/ below 6 K reveal a spin-flop or metamagnetic transition

  16. Carbon based secondary compounds do not provide protection against heavy metal road pollutants in epiphytic macrolichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauslaa, Yngvar; Yemets, Olena A; Asplund, Johan; Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn

    2016-01-15

    Lichens are useful monitoring organisms for heavy metal pollution. They are high in carbon based secondary compounds (CBSCs) among which some may chelate heavy metals and thus increase metal accumulation. This study quantifies CBSCs in four epiphytic lichens transplanted for 6months on stands along transects from a highway in southern Norway to search for relationships between concentrations of heavy metals and CBSCs along a gradient in heavy metal pollutants. Viability parameters and concentrations of 21 elements including nutrients and heavy metals in these lichen samples were reported in a separate paper. Medullary CBSCs in fruticose lichens (Ramalina farinacea, Usnea dasypoga) were reduced in the most polluted sites, but not in foliose ones (Parmelia sulcata, Lobaria pulmonaria), whereas cortical CBSC did not change with distance from the road in any species. Strong positive correlations only occurred between the major medullary compound stictic acid present in L. pulmonaria and most heavy metals, consistent with a chelating role of stictic acid, but not of other studied CBSCs or in other species. However, heavy metal chelating did not protect L. pulmonaria against damage because this species experienced the strongest reduction in viability in the polluted sites. CBSCs with an accumulation potential for heavy metals should be quantified in lichen biomonitoring studies of heavy metals because they, like stictic acid, could overshadow pollutant inputs in some species rendering biomonitoring data less useful. In the two fruticose lichen species, CBSCs decreased with increasing heavy metal concentration, probably because heavy metal exposure impaired secondary metabolism. Thus, we found no support for a heavy metal protection role of any CBSCs in studied epiphytic lichens. No intraspecific relationships occurred between CBSCs versus N or C/N-ratio. Interspecifically, medullary CBSCs decreased and cortical CBSCs increased with increasing C/N-ratio.

  17. Sigma Team for Advanced Actinide Recycle FY2015 Accomplishments and Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Recycle (STAAR) has made notable progress in FY 2015 toward the overarching goal to develop more efficient separation methods for actinides in support of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) objective of sustainable fuel cycles. Research in STAAR has been emphasizing the separation of americium and other minor actinides (MAs) to enable closed nuclear fuel recycle options, mainly within the paradigm of aqueous reprocessing of used oxide nuclear fuel dissolved in nitric acid. Its major scientific challenge concerns achieving selectivity for trivalent actinides vs lanthanides. Not only is this challenge yielding to research advances, but technology concepts such as ALSEP (Actinide Lanthanide Separation) are maturing toward demonstration readiness. Efforts are organized in five task areas: 1) combining bifunctional neutral extractants with an acidic extractant to form a single process solvent, developing a process flowsheet, and demonstrating it at bench scale; 2) oxidation of Am(III) to Am(VI) and subsequent separation with other multivalent actinides; 3) developing an effective soft-donor solvent system for An(III) selective extraction using mixed N,O-donor or all-N donor extractants such as triazinyl pyridine compounds; 4) testing of inorganic and hybrid-type ion exchange materials for MA separations; and 5) computer-aided molecular design to identify altogether new extractants and complexants and theory-based experimental data interpretation. Within these tasks, two strategies are employed, one involving oxidation of americium to its pentavalent or hexavalent state and one that seeks to selectively complex trivalent americium either in the aqueous phase or the solvent phase. Solvent extraction represents the primary separation method employed, though ion exchange and crystallization play an important role. Highlights of accomplishments include: Confirmation of the first-ever electrolytic oxidation of Am(III) in a

  18. Sigma Team for Advanced Actinide Recycle FY2015 Accomplishments and Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Recycle (STAAR) has made notable progress in FY 2015 toward the overarching goal to develop more efficient separation methods for actinides in support of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) objective of sustainable fuel cycles. Research in STAAR has been emphasizing the separation of americium and other minor actinides (MAs) to enable closed nuclear fuel recycle options mainly within the paradigm of aqueous reprocessing of used oxide nuclear fuel dissolved in nitric acid. Its major scientific challenge concerns achieving selectivity for trivalent actinides vs lanthanides. Not only is this challenge yielding to research advances, but technology concepts such as ALSEP (Actinide Lanthanide Separation) are maturing toward demonstration readiness. Efforts are organized in five task areas: 1) combining bifunctional neutral extractants with an acidic extractant to form a single process solvent, developing a process flowsheet, and demonstrating it at bench scale; 2) oxidation of Am(III) to Am(VI) and subsequent separation with other multivalent actinides; 3) developing an effective soft-donor solvent system for An(III) selective extraction using mixed N,O-donor or all-N donor extractants such as triazinyl pyridine compounds; 4) testing of inorganic and hybrid-type ion exchange materials for MA separations; and 5) computer-aided molecular design to identify altogether new extractants and complexants and theory-based experimental data interpretation. Within these tasks, two strategies are employed, one involving oxidation of americium to its pentavalent or hexavalent state and one that seeks to selectively complex trivalent americium either in the aqueous phase or the solvent phase. Solvent extraction represents the primary separation method employed, though ion exchange and crystallization play an important role. Highlights of accomplishments include: Confirmation of the first-ever electrolytic oxidation of Am(III) in a

  19. JOWOG 22/2 - Actinide Chemical Technology (July 9-13, 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Jay M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Jacquelyn C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wayne, David M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schulte, Louis D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Finstad, Casey C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stroud, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mulford, Roberta Nancy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MacDonald, John M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turner, Cameron J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Sonya M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-05

    The Plutonium Science and Manufacturing Directorate provides world-class, safe, secure, and reliable special nuclear material research, process development, technology demonstration, and manufacturing capabilities that support the nation's defense, energy, and environmental needs. We safely and efficiently process plutonium, uranium, and other actinide materials to meet national program requirements, while expanding the scientific and engineering basis of nuclear weapons-based manufacturing, and while producing the next generation of nuclear engineers and scientists. Actinide Process Chemistry (NCO-2) safely and efficiently processes plutonium and other actinide compounds to meet the nation's nuclear defense program needs. All of our processing activities are done in a world class and highly regulated nuclear facility. NCO-2's plutonium processing activities consist of direct oxide reduction, metal chlorination, americium extraction, and electrorefining. In addition, NCO-2 uses hydrochloric and nitric acid dissolutions for both plutonium processing and reduction of hazardous components in the waste streams. Finally, NCO-2 is a key team member in the processing of plutonium oxide from disassembled pits and the subsequent stabilization of plutonium oxide for safe and stable long-term storage.

  20. Partial oxidation of methane over bimetallic copper- and nickel-actinide oxides (Th, U)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of partial oxidation of methane (POM) over bimetallic nickel- or copper-actinide oxides was undertaken. Binary intermetallic compounds of the type AnNi2 (An = Th, U) and ThCu2 were used as precursors and the products (2NiO.UO3, 2NiO.ThO2 and 2CuO.ThO2) characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and temperature-programmed reduction. The catalysts were active and selective for the conversion of methane to H2 and CO and stable for a period of time of ∼18 h on stream. The nickel catalysts were more active and selective than the copper catalyst and, under the same conditions, show a catalytic behaviour comparable to that of a platinum commercial catalyst, 5 wt% Pt/Al2O3. The catalytic activity increases when uranium replaces thorium and the selectivity of this type of materials is clearly different from that of single metal oxides and/or mechanical mixtures. The good catalytic behaviour of the bimetallic copper- and nickel-actinide oxides was attributed to an unusual interaction between copper or nickel oxide and the actinide oxide phase as showed by H2-TPR, XPS and Raman analysis of the catalysts before and after reaction.

  1. Modeling of Intermetallic Compounds Growth Between Dissimilar Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Wang, Yin; Prangnell, Philip; Robson, Joseph

    2015-09-01

    A model has been developed to predict growth kinetics of the intermetallic phases (IMCs) formed in a reactive diffusion couple between two metals for the case where multiple IMC phases are observed. The model explicitly accounts for the effect of grain boundary diffusion through the IMC layer, and can thus be used to explore the effect of IMC grain size on the thickening of the reaction layer. The model has been applied to the industrially important case of aluminum to magnesium alloy diffusion couples in which several different IMC phases are possible. It is demonstrated that there is a transition from grain boundary-dominated diffusion to lattice-dominated diffusion at a critical grain size, which is different for each IMC phase. The varying contribution of grain boundary diffusion to the overall thickening kinetics with changing grain size helps explain the large scatter in thickening kinetics reported for diffusion couples produced under different conditions.

  2. Reduction of Nitroaromatic Compounds on the Surface of Metallic Iron: Quantum Chemical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Leszczynski

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The initial reduction steps of nitroaromatic compounds on the surface of metallic iron have been studied theoretically using nitrobenzene (NB as a representative of nitroaromatic compounds. The quantum chemical cluster approximation within the semiempirical Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap for Metal Compounds method was applied to model the Fe(110 crystallographic surface, taken as a representative reactive surface for granular iron. This surface was modeled as a 39-atom two-layer metal cluster with rigid geometry. The associative and dissociative adsorption of nitrobenzene was considered. Based on our quantum chemical analysis, we suggest that the direct electron donation from the metal surface into the π* orbital of NB is a decisive factor responsible for subsequent transformation of the nitro group. Molecularly adsorbed NB interacts with metal iron exclusively through nitro moiety oxygens which occupy tri-coordinated positions on surface The charge transfer from metal to NB of approximately 2 atomic units destablizes the nitro group. As a result, the first dissociation of the N-O bond goes through a relatively low activation barrier. The adsorbed nitrosobenzene is predicted to be a stable surface species, though still quiet labile.

  3. Advanced Extraction Methods for Actinide/Lanthanide Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, M.J.

    2005-12-01

    The separation of An(III) ions from chemically similar Ln(III) ions is perhaps one of the most difficult problems encountered during the processing of nuclear waste. In the 3+ oxidation states, the metal ions have an identical charge and roughly the same ionic radius. They differ strictly in the relative energies of their f- and d-orbitals, and to separate these metal ions, ligands will need to be developed that take advantage of this small but important distinction. The extraction of uranium and plutonium from nitric acid solution can be performed quantitatively by the extraction with the TBP (tributyl phosphate). Commercially, this process has found wide use in the PUREX (plutonium uranium extraction) reprocessing method. The TRUEX (transuranium extraction) process is further used to coextract the trivalent lanthanides and actinides ions from HLLW generated during PUREX extraction. This method uses CMPO [(N, N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl) octylphenylphosphineoxide] intermixed with TBP as a synergistic agent. However, the final separation of trivalent actinides from trivalent lanthanides still remains a challenging task. In TRUEX nitric acid solution, the Am(III) ion is coordinated by three CMPO molecules and three nitrate anions. Taking inspiration from this data and previous work with calix[4]arene systems, researchers on this project have developed a C3-symmetric tris-CMPO ligand system using a triphenoxymethane platform as a base. The triphenoxymethane ligand systems have many advantages for the preparation of complex ligand systems. The compounds are very easy to prepare. The steric and solubility properties can be tuned through an extreme range by the inclusion of different alkoxy and alkyl groups such as methyoxy, ethoxy, t-butoxy, methyl, octyl, t-pentyl, or even t-pentyl at the ortho- and para-positions of the aryl rings. The triphenoxymethane ligand system shows promise as an improved extractant for both tetravalent and trivalent actinide recoveries form

  4. Actinides and rare earths complexation with adenosine phosphate nucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organophosphorus compounds are important molecules in both nuclear industry and living systems fields. Indeed, several extractants of organophosphorus compounds (such as TBP, HDEHP) are used in the nuclear fuel cycle reprocessing and in the biological field. For instance, the nucleotides are organophosphates which play a very important role in various metabolic processes. Although the literature on the interactions of actinides with inorganic phosphate is abundant, published studies with organophosphate compounds are generally limited to macroscopic and / or physiological approaches. The objective of this thesis is to study the structure of several organophosphorus compounds with actinides to reach a better understanding and develop new specific buildings blocks. The family of the chosen molecules for this procedure consists of three adenine nucleotides mono, bi and triphosphate (AMP, adenosine monophosphate - ADP, adenosine diphosphate - ATP, adenosine triphosphate) and an amino-alkylphosphate (AEP O-phosphoryl-ethanolamine). Complexes synthesis was conducted in aqueous and weakly acidic medium (2.8-4) for several lanthanides (III) (Lu, Yb, Eu) and actinides (U (VI), Th (IV) and Am (III)). Several analytical and spectroscopic techniques have been used to describe the organization of the synthesized complexes: spectrometric analysis performed by FTIR and NMR were used to identify the functional groups involved in the complexation, analysis by ESI-MS and pH-metric titration were used to determine the solution speciation and EXAFS analyzes were performed on Mars beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron, have described the local cation environment, for both solution and solid compounds. Some theoretical approaches of DFT were conducted to identify stable structures in purpose of completing the experimental studies. All solid complexes (AMP, ADP, ATP and AEP) have polynuclear structures, while soluble ATP complexes are mononuclear. For all synthesized complexes, it has been

  5. Factors affecting actinide solubility in a repository for spent fuel, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main tasks in the study were to get information on the chemical conditions in a repository for spent fuel and information on factors affecting releases of actinides from spent fuel and solubility of actinides in a repository for spent fuel. The work in this field started at the Reactor Laboratory of the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1982. This is a report on the effects on the main parameters, Eh, pH, carbonate, organic compounds, colloids, microbes and radiation on the actinide solubility in the nearfield of the repository. Another task has been to identify available models and reported experience from actinide solubility calculations with different codes. 167 refs

  6. Electrodeposition of alloys or compounds in molten salts and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taxil P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the different modes of preparation of alloys or intermetallic compounds using the electrodeposition in molten salts, more particularly molten alkali fluorides. The interest in this process is to obtain new materials for high technology, particularly the compounds of reactive components such as actinides, rare earth and refractory metals. Two ways of preparation are considered: (i electrocoating of the more reactive metal on a cathode made of the noble one and reaction between the two metals in contact, and (ii electrocoating on an inert cathode of the intermetallic compound by coreduction of the ions of each elements. The kinetic is controlled by the reaction at the electrolyte interface. A wide bibliographic survey on the preparation of various compounds (intermetallic compounds, borides, carbides… is given and a special attention is paid to the own experience of the authors in the preparation of these compounds and interpretation of their results.

  7. The electrochemical properties of actinide amalgams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selection of the values of standard potentials of An actinides and their amalgams was made. On the basis of the data obtained energy characteristics of alloy formation processes in the systems An-Hg were calculated and analyzed. It is ascertained that the properties of f-element solutions in mercury are similar to those of alkali and alkaline-earth metal amalgams with the only difference, i.e. in case of active metals of group 3 the number of realized charge value of ionic frames in condensed phase increases

  8. Quasi-One-Dimensional Metal-Insulator Transitions in Compound Semiconductor Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J. Z.; Fan, W.; Verstraete, M. J.; Zanolli, Z.; Fan, J.; Yang, X. B.; Xu, H.; Tong, S. Y.

    2016-09-01

    Existing examples of Peierls-type 1D systems on surfaces involve depositing metallic overlayers on semiconducting substrates, in particular, at step edges. Here we propose a new class of Peierls system on the (10 1 ¯0 ) surface of metal-anion wurtzite semiconductors. When the anions are bonded to hydrogen or lithium atoms, we obtain rows of threefold coordinated metal atoms that act as one-atom-wide metallic structures. First-principles calculations show that the surface is metallic, and below a certain critical temperature the surface will condense to a semiconducting state. The idea of surface scaffolding is introduced in which the rows are constrained to move along simple up-down and/or sideways displacements, mirroring the paradigm envisioned in Peierls's description. We predict that this type of insulating state should be visible in the partially hydrogenated (10 1 ¯0 ) surface of many wurtzite compounds.

  9. Modern x-ray spectral methods in the study of the electronic structure of actinide compounds: Uranium oxide UO2 as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Fine X-ray photo electron spectral (XPS structure of uranium dioxide UO2 in the binding energy (BE range 0-~č40 eV was associated mostly with the electrons of the outer (OVMO (0-15 eV BE and inner (IVMO (15-40 eV BE valence molecular orbitals formed from the incompletely U5f,6d,7s and O2p and completely filled U6p and O2s shells of neighboring uranium and oxygen ions. It agrees with the relativistic calculation results of the electronic structure for the UO812–(Oh cluster reflecting uranium close environment in UO2, and was confirmed by the X-ray (conversion electron, non-resonance and resonance O4,5(U emission, near O4,5(U edge absorption, resonance photoelectron, Auger spectroscopy data. The fine OVMO and IVMO related XPS structure was established to yield conclusions on the degree of participation of the U6p,5f electrons in the chemical bond, uranium close environment structure and interatomic distances in oxides. Total contribution of the IVMO electrons to the covalent part of the chemical bond can be comparable with that of the OVMO electrons. It has to be noted that the IVMO formation can take place in compounds of any elements from the periodic table. It is a novel scientific fact in solid-state chemistry and physics.

  10. Actinides: why are they important biologically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are discussed: actinide elements in energy systems; biological hazards of the actinides; radiation protection standards; and purposes of actinide biological research with regard to toxicity, metabolism, and therapeutic regimens

  11. Structure, production and properties of high-melting compounds and systems (hard materials and hard metals)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains contributions by various authors to the research project on the production, structure, and physical properties of high-melting compounds and systems (hard metals and hard materials), in particular WC-, TaC-, and MoC-base materials. (GSCH)

  12. A standardized evaluation of artifacts from metallic compounds during fast MR imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murakami, Shumei; Verdonschot, Rinus G; Kataoka, Miyoshi;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Metallic compounds present in the oral and maxillofacial regions (OMR) cause large artifacts during MR scanning. We quantitatively assessed these artifacts embedded within a phantom according to standards set by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). MATERIALS AND METHO...

  13. Technologies for Extracting Valuable Metals and Compounds from Geothermal Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Stephen [SIMBOL Materials

    2014-04-30

    Executive Summary Simbol Materials studied various methods of extracting valuable minerals from geothermal brines in the Imperial Valley of California, focusing on the extraction of lithium, manganese, zinc and potassium. New methods were explored for managing the potential impact of silica fouling on mineral extraction equipment, and for converting silica management by-products into commercial products.` Studies at the laboratory and bench scale focused on manganese, zinc and potassium extraction and the conversion of silica management by-products into valuable commercial products. The processes for extracting lithium and producing lithium carbonate and lithium hydroxide products were developed at the laboratory scale and scaled up to pilot-scale. Several sorbents designed to extract lithium as lithium chloride from geothermal brine were developed at the laboratory scale and subsequently scaled-up for testing in the lithium extraction pilot plant. Lithium The results of the lithium studies generated the confidence for Simbol to scale its process to commercial operation. The key steps of the process were demonstrated during its development at pilot scale: 1. Silica management. 2. Lithium extraction. 3. Purification. 4. Concentration. 5. Conversion into lithium hydroxide and lithium carbonate products. Results show that greater than 95% of the lithium can be extracted from geothermal brine as lithium chloride, and that the chemical yield in converting lithium chloride to lithium hydroxide and lithium carbonate products is greater than 90%. The product purity produced from the process is consistent with battery grade lithium carbonate and lithium hydroxide. Manganese and zinc Processes for the extraction of zinc and manganese from geothermal brine were developed. It was shown that they could be converted into zinc metal and electrolytic manganese dioxide after purification. These processes were evaluated for their economic potential, and at the present time Simbol

  14. Selective retention of basic compounds by metal aquo-ion affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Eiichi; Asakawa, Naoki

    2014-10-01

    A novel metal aquo-ion affinity chromatography has been developed for the analysis of basic compounds using heat-treated silica gel containing hydrated metal cations (metal aquo-ions) as the packing material. The packing materials of the metal aquo-ion affinity chromatography were prepared by the immobilization of a single metal component such as Fe(III), Al(III), Ag(I), and Ni(II) on silica gel followed by extensive heat treatment. The immobilized metals form aquo-ions to present cation-exchange ability for basic analytes and the cation-exchange ability for basic analytes depends on pKa of the immobilized metal species. In the present study, to evaluate the retention characteristics of metal aquo-ion affinity chromatography, the on-line solid-phase extraction of drugs was investigated. Obtained data clearly evidence the selective retention capability of metal aquo-ion affinity chromatography for basic analytes with sufficient capacity. PMID:25044622

  15. Ionic conduction in alkali metal doped ZnFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc ferric oxide (ZnFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/) has been synthesized by liquid phase chemical reaction from aqueous mixture of zinc chloride and ferric chloride in sodium hydroxide (4N) solution and effect of alkali metal on electrical characteristics was explored. The well characterized powder was pressed into pellets and dried at 80 degree C. Samples with alkali metal concentrations 10-100 ppm have been investigated to I-V measurements. The conductivity of pure compound (10-/sub 2/omega-cm)/sup-1/) lies in the semiconductor range but due to alkali metal doping the compound shows ionic conduction at room temperature. The ionic conduction is found to be increased as the dopant concentration increases.(author)

  16. A Initio Lcao Electronic Structure Calculations of Layered Transition Metal Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, William G.

    1987-09-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. In this work the electronic structure of three systems of layered transition metal compounds are examined using an ab initio tight binding (LCAO) method using the Xalpha exchange/correlation approximation: group VI ditellurides, group IV trichalcogenides and quaternary copper oxide defect-perovskites. A chemical pseudopotential argument is presented in order to justify the use of a small basis set of atomic orbitals. The group VI transition metal compounds MoTe_2 and WTe _2 show strong metal-metal interactions and MoTe_2 undergoes an unusual phase transition with the lattice parameter perpendicular to the layers decreasing with increasing temperature. The group IV transition metal trichalcogenides provide a useful series for study due to their quasi-1-dimensional character and the occurrence of two closely related structural variants. The atypical compound ZrTe_3 is given special attention because of its apparent semimetallic nature. The final group of compounds studied are the high Tc superconducting ceramics Ba-La-Cu-O and Ba-Y-Cu-O. The technological importance of compounds with zero resistance and showing the Meissner effect (expelling magnetic fields) above liquid nitrogen temperatures and the, as yet, undefined nature of the mechanism of superconductivity stresses the need to carefully examine the electronic structure of these materials. The role of oxygen vacancies, the charge state of the copper ions and the possibility of structural phase transitions are some of the topics considered here. The use of an atomic-orbital basis allows a comparatively straightforward description of the chemical bonding in a crystal--especially useful when the unit cell contains a large number of atoms.

  17. Biological metals and metal-targeting compounds in major neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnham, Kevin J; Bush, Ashley I

    2014-10-01

    Multiple abnormalities occur in the homeostasis of essential endogenous brain biometals in age-related neurodegenerative disorders, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. As a result, metals both accumulate in microscopic proteinopathies, and can be deficient in cells or cellular compartments. Therefore, bulk measurement of metal content in brain tissue samples reveal only the "tip of the iceberg", with most of the important changes occurring on a microscopic and biochemical level. Each of the major proteins implicated in these disorders interacts with biological transition metals. Tau and the amyloid protein precursor have important roles in normal neuronal iron homeostasis. Changes in metal distribution, cellular deficiencies, or sequestration in proteinopathies all present abnormalities that can be corrected in animal models by small molecules. These biochemical targets are more complex than the simple excess of metals that are targeted by chelators. In this review we illustrate some of the richness in the science that has developed in the study of metals in neurodegeneration, and explore its novel pharmacology.

  18. New spintronic superlattices composed of half-metallic compounds with zinc-blende structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, C. Y.; Qian, M. C.

    2004-12-01

    The successful growth of zinc-blende half-metallic compounds, namely CrAs and CrSb, in thin film forms offers a new direction to search for novel spintronic materials. By using a well documented first-principles algorithm, the VASP code, we predict the electronic and magnetic properties of superlattices made of these exciting half-metallic materials. Not only are the superlattices constructed with two of the half-metallic compounds (CrAs/MnAs) but also they are modelled to combine with both a III-V (GaAs-MnAs/CrAs/GaAs) and a IV-IV (MnC/SiC) semiconductor. We investigate variable thicknesses for the combinations. For every case, we find the equilibrium lattice constant as well as the lattice constant at which the superlattice exhibits the half-metallic properties. For CrAs/MnAs, the half-metallic properties are presented and the magnetic moments are shown to be the sum of the moments for MnAs and CrAs. The half-metallic properties of GaAs-MnAs/CrAs/GaAs are found to be crucially dependent on the completion of the d-p hybridization. The magnetic properties of MnC/SiC are discussed with respect to the properties of MnC.

  19. New spintronic superlattices composed of half-metallic compounds with zinc-blende structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, C Y; Qian, M C [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8677 (United States)

    2004-12-08

    The successful growth of zinc-blende half-metallic compounds, namely CrAs and CrSb, in thin film forms offers a new direction to search for novel spintronic materials. By using a well documented first-principles algorithm, the VASP code, we predict the electronic and magnetic properties of superlattices made of these exciting half-metallic materials. Not only are the superlattices constructed with two of the half-metallic compounds (CrAs/MnAs) but also they are modelled to combine with both a III-V (GaAs-MnAs/CrAs/GaAs) and a IV-IV (MnC/SiC) semiconductor. We investigate variable thicknesses for the combinations. For every case, we find the equilibrium lattice constant as well as the lattice constant at which the superlattice exhibits the half-metallic properties. For CrAs/MnAs, the half-metallic properties are presented and the magnetic moments are shown to be the sum of the moments for MnAs and CrAs. The half-metallic properties of GaAs-MnAs/CrAs/GaAs are found to be crucially dependent on the completion of the d-p hybridization. The magnetic properties of MnC/SiC are discussed with respect to the properties of MnC.

  20. Light-induced catalytic and cytotoxic properties of phosphorescent transition metal compounds with a d8 electronic configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Wai-Pong; Zou, Taotao; Sun, Raymond Wai-Yin; Che, Chi-Ming

    2013-07-28

    Transition metal compounds are well documented to have diverse applications such as in catalysis, light-emitting materials and therapeutics. In the areas of photocatalysis and photodynamic therapy, metal compounds of heavy transition metals are highly sought after because they can give rise to triplet excited states upon photoexcitation. The long lifetimes (more than 1 μs) of the triplet states of transition metal compounds allow for bimolecular reactions/processes such as energy transfer and/or electron transfer to occur. Reactions of triplet excited states of luminescent metal compounds with oxygen in cells may generate reactive oxygen species and/or induce damage to DNA, leading to cell death. This article recaps the recent findings on photochemical and phototoxic properties of luminescent platinum(II) and gold(III) compounds both from the literature and experimental results from our group.

  1. Synthesis of selective extractor for minor actinide elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Seung [Konyang University, Nonsan (Korea); Cho, Moon Hwan [Kangwon National University, Chunchon (Korea)

    1998-04-01

    To selectively co-separate the lanthanide and actinide elements (MA) such as Am or Cm ion from radioactive waste, synthesis of diamide derivatives has been accomplished. In addition, picoline amide derivatives were also synthesized for selectively separate the minor actinide elements from lanthanide elements. The content of research has don are as follows: (1) synthesis of diamide as co-extractant (2) introduction of n-tetradecyl to increase the lipophilicity (3) Picolyl chloride, intermediate of the final product, was synthesized by improved method rather than reported method. (4) The length of alkyl side chain was adjusted to increase the lipophilicity of free ligand and its derivatives able to selectively separate the actinide metal from lanthanide metal ions was successfully synthesized and determined their purity by analytical instruments. (author). 12 refs., 28 figs.

  2. Synthesis and light-emitting properties of organic electroluminescent compounds and their metal complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Jianzhong; Kim Sung-Hoon

    2004-01-01

    Several organic electroluminescent (EL) compounds, 2,2′-(1,4-phenylenedivinylene)bis-3,3-dimethyl-in- dolenine (1), 2,2′-(1,4-phenylenedivinylene)bis-benzoxazole (2), 2,2′-(1,4-phenylenedivinylene)bis-benzothiazole (3), 4,4′- (1,4-phenylenedivinylene)bis-quinoline (4), 2,2′-(1,4-phenyle- nedivinylene)bis-quinoline (5), 2,2′-(1,4-phenylenedivinyle- ne)bis-1,3,3-trimethyl-indolenine dichlo ride (6), 2,2′-(1,4- phenylene-divinylene)bis-1-hydro-3,3-dimethyl-indolenine dichloride (7), 2,2′-(1,4-phenylenedivinylene)bis-8-acetoxy- quinoline (8), 2,2′-(1,4-phenylenedivinylene)bis-8-hydroxyq- uinoline (9) and metal complexes of 9, Al(PHQ) (10) and Zn(PHQ) (11), have been synthesized and characterized. The crystal structure of 6 was determined. Light emitting properties of the prepared compounds have been investigated. 1 produces an orange-yellow emission (λmax = 575 nm). The cation, 6, gives a red emission (λmax = 607 nm), which is shifted 32 nm to the red compared to 1. 8 produces a yellow emission (λmax = 567 nm). The metal complex 10 gives a red emission (λmax = 610 nm), which is a red shift of 43 nm compared to 8. The change in structure in the prepared compound caused a change in the electron distribution in the compounds, which induces a large wavelength shift of the emitted-light. Thermal analysis showed that the decomposition temperatures of the metal complexes (10, 11) were higher than those for the smaller organic molecular compounds (1-9). Therefore, metal complexes (10, 11) can be used as EL materials over a larger temperature range.

  3. Optical techniques for actinide research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, substantial gains have been made in the development of spectroscopic techniques for electronic properties studies. These techniques have seen relatively small, but growing, application in the field of actinide research. Photoemission spectroscopies, reflectivity and absorption studies, and x-ray techniques will be discussed and illustrative examples of studies on actinide materials will be presented

  4. Actinide coordination chemistry: towards the limits of the periodic table; Chimie de coordination des actinides: vers les frontieres du tableau periodique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Auwer, C.; Moisy, P. [CEA Marcoule (DEN/DRCP/SCPS), 30 (France); Simoni, E. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire

    2009-05-15

    Actinide elements represent a distinct chemical family at the bottom of the periodic table. Among the major characteristics of this 14 element family is their high atomic numbers and their radioactivity. Actinide chemistry finds its roots in the history of the 20. century and plays a very important role in our contemporary world. Energetic as well as technical challenges are facing the development of nuclear energy. In this pedagogical introduction to actinide chemistry, the authors draw a comparison between the actinides family and the chemistry of two other families, lanthanides and transition metals. This article focuses on molecular and aqueous chemistry. It has been based on class notes aiming to present an overview of the chemical diversity of actinides, and its future challenges for modern science. (authors)

  5. Bifunctional compounds for controlling metal-mediated aggregation of the aβ42 peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anuj K; Pavlova, Stephanie T; Kim, Jaekwang; Finkelstein, Darren; Hawco, Nicholas J; Rath, Nigam P; Kim, Jungsu; Mirica, Liviu M

    2012-04-18

    Abnormal interactions of Cu and Zn ions with the amyloid β (Aβ) peptide are proposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Disruption of these metal-peptide interactions using chemical agents holds considerable promise as a therapeutic strategy to combat this incurable disease. Reported herein are two bifunctional compounds (BFCs) L1 and L2 that contain both amyloid-binding and metal-chelating molecular motifs. Both L1 and L2 exhibit high stability constants for Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) and thus are good chelators for these metal ions. In addition, L1 and L2 show strong affinity toward Aβ species. Both compounds are efficient inhibitors of the metal-mediated aggregation of the Aβ(42) peptide and promote disaggregation of amyloid fibrils, as observed by ThT fluorescence, native gel electrophoresis/Western blotting, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Interestingly, the formation of soluble Aβ(42) oligomers in the presence of metal ions and BFCs leads to an increased cellular toxicity. These results suggest that for the Aβ(42) peptide-in contrast to the Aβ(40) peptide-the previously employed strategy of inhibiting Aβ aggregation and promoting amyloid fibril dissagregation may not be optimal for the development of potential AD therapeutics, due to formation of neurotoxic soluble Aβ(42) oligomers.

  6. Generation, detection and characterization of gas-phase transition metal aggregates and compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of our research is to employ spectroscopic techniques to characterize the bound portions of the potential energy surface (PES) for chemical systems involving diatomic and triatomic transition metal molecules. The approach incorporates the generation and isolation of new metal compounds via supersonic laser ablation molecular beam techniques. Detection and characterization is achieved using high resolution dye laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. A major objective is to produce information which can be compared to theoretical predictions and thereby provide guidelines and insight into the development of reaction models

  7. The actinides-a beautiful ending of the Periodic Table

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Boerje [Condensed Matter Theory Group, Department of Physics, Uppsala University, Box 530, S-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Applied Materials Physics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Brinellvaegen 23, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: borje.johansson@fysik.uu.se; Li, Sa [Applied Materials Physics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Brinellvaegen 23, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284 (United States)

    2007-10-11

    The 5f elements, actinides, show many properties which have direct correspondence to the 4f transition metals, the lanthanides. The remarkable similarity between the solid state properties of compressed Ce and the actinide metals is pointed out in the present paper. The {alpha}-{gamma} transition in Ce is considered as a Mott transition, namely, from delocalized to localized 4f states. An analogous behavior is also found for the actinide series, where the sudden volume increase from Pu to Am can be viewed upon as a Mott transition within the 5f shell as a function of the atomic number Z. On the itinerant side of the Mott transition, the earlier actinides (Pa-Pu) show low symmetry structures at ambient conditions; while across the border, the heavier elements (Am-Cf) present the dhcp structure, an atomic arrangement typical for the trivalent lanthanide elements with localized 4f magnetic moments. The reason for an isostructural Mott transition of the f electron in Ce, as opposed to the much more complicated cases in the actinides, is identified. The strange appearance of the {delta}-phase (fcc) in the phase diagram of Pu is another consequence of the border line behavior of the 5f electrons. The path leading from {delta}-Pu to {alpha}-Pu is identified.

  8. Method for purifying bidentate organophosphorus compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Wallace W.

    1977-01-01

    Bidentate organophosphorus compounds useful for extracting actinide elements from acidic nuclear waste solutions are purified of undesirable acidic impurities by contacting the compounds with ethylene glycol which preferentially extracts the impurities found in technical grade bidentate compounds.

  9. X-ray absorption to determine the metal oxidation state of transition metal compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Mier, J.; Olalde-Velasco, P.; Carabalí-Sandoval, G.; Herrera-Pérez, G.; Chavira, E.; Yang, W.-L.; Denlinger, J.

    2013-07-01

    We present three examples where x-ray absorption at the transition metal L2,3 edges is used to investigate the valence states of various strongly correlated (SC) and technological relevant materials. Comparison with ligand field multiplet calculations is needed to determine the metal oxidation states. The examples are CrF2, the La1-xSrxCoO3 family and YVO3. For CrF2 the results indicate a disproportionation reaction that generates Cr+, Cr2+ and Cr3+ in different proportions that can be quantified directly from the x-ray spectra. Additionally, it is shown that Co2+ is present in the catalytic La1-xSrxCoO3 perovskite family. Finally, surface effects that change the vanadium valence are also found in YVO3 nanocrystals.

  10. Selective extraction of actinides from high level liquid wastes. Study of the possibilities offered by the Redox properties of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partitioning of high level liquid wastes coming from nuclear fuel reprocessing by the PUREX process, consists in the elimination of minor actinides (Np, Am, and traces of Pu and U). Among the possible processes, the selective extraction of actinides with oxidation states higher than three is studied. First part of this work deals with a preliminary step; the elimination of the ruthenium from fission products solutions using the electrovolatilization of the RuO4 compound. The second part of this work concerns the complexation and oxidation reactions of the elements U, Np, Pu and Am in presence of a compound belonging to the insaturated polyanions family: the potassium phosphotungstate. For actinide ions with oxidation state (IV) complexed with phosphotungstate anion the extraction mechanism by dioctylamine was studied and the use of a chromatographic extraction technic permitted successful separations between tetravalents actinides and trivalents actinides. Finally, in accordance with the obtained results, the basis of a separation scheme for the management of fission products solutions is proposed

  11. Technology Development and Production of Certain Chemical Platinum Metals Compounds at JSC "Krastsvetmet"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ILYASHEVICH V.D.; PAVLOVA E.I.; KORITSKAYA N.G.; MAMONOV S.N.; SHULGIN D.R.; MALTSEV E.V.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years JSC "Krastsvetmet" has successfully developed the production of chemically pure compounds of precious metals.Currently methods have been developed and facilities have been provided for industrial production of the following platinum metals compounds:- Rhodium (Ⅲ) chloride hydrate,rhodium (Ⅲ) chloride solution,rhodium ( Ⅲ) nitrate solution,rhodium ( Ⅲ)iodide,rhodium ( Ⅲ) sulfate,hydrated rhodium ( Ⅲ) oxide,ammonium hexachlororodiate,rhodium ( Ⅲ)phosphate solution,rhodium electrolytes;Iridium (Ⅳ) chloride hydrate,iridium (Ⅲ) chloride hydrate,ammonium hexachloroiridate (Ⅳ),hexachloriridium acid solution,hexachloriridium crystalline acid;- Ruthenium (Ⅲ) chloride hydrate,ruthenium (Ⅳ) hydroxide chloride,ruthenium (Ⅳ) hydroxide chloride solution,ammonium hexachlororuthenate,ruthenium (Ⅲ) chloride solution,potassium,diaquaoctachloronitrido diruthenate.The quality of the production meets the requirements of Russian and foreign consumers.

  12. Electrochemical decontamination of metallic wastes contaminated with uranium compounds in a neutral salt electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical decontamination process has been applied for recycle or self disposal with authorization of large amount of metallic wastes contaminated with uranium compounds such as UO2, ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC), ammonium di-uranate (ADU), and uranyl nitrate (UN) with tributylphosphate (TBP) and dodecane, which are generated by dismantling the contaminated system components and equipment of a retired uranium conversion plant in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Electrochemical decontamination for metallic wastes contaminated with uranium compounds was evaluated through the experiments on the electrolytic dissolution of stainless steel as the material of the system components in neutral concentration of electrolyte on the dissolution of the materials were evaluated. Decontamination performance tests using the specimens taken from a uranium conversion plant were quite successful with the application electrochemical decontamination conditions obtained through the basic studies on the electrolytic dissolution of structural material of the system components

  13. Thermodynamic Properties and Mixing Thermodynamic Parameter of Binary Metallic Melt Involving Compound Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian

    2005-01-01

    Based on the coexistence theory of metallic melts involving compound formation,the theoretical cal culation equations of mixing thermodynamic parameters are established by giving up some empirical parameters in the associated solution model.For Fe-Al,Mn-Al and Ni-Al,the calculated results agree well with the experimental values,testifying that these equations can exactly embody mixing thermodynamic characteristics of these melts.

  14. Separation of polar compounds using a flexible metal-organic framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motkuri, Radha K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Annapureddy, Harsha V.; Dang, Liem X.; Krishna, Rajamani; Nune, Satish K.; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Liu, Jian; McGrail, B. Peter

    2015-01-01

    A flexible metal-organic framework constructed from a flexible linker is shown to possess the capability of separating mixtures of polar compounds by exploiting the differences in the saturation capacities of the constituents. The separation possibilities with the flexible MOF include mixtures of propanol isomers, and various azeotropes. Transient breakthrough simulations show that these sorption-based separations are in favor of the component with higher saturation capacity.

  15. Trivalent metal ions based on inorganic compounds with in vitro inhibitory activity of matrix metalloproteinase 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hanyu; Qin, Yuan; Zhong, Weilong; Li, Cong; Liu, Xiang; Shen, Yehua

    2016-10-01

    Collagenase-3 (MMP-13) inhibitors have attracted considerable attention in recent years and have been developed as a therapeutic target for a variety of diseases, including cancer. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) can be inhibited by a multitude of compounds, including hydroxamic acids. Studies have shown that materials and compounds containing trivalent metal ions, particularly potassium hexacyanoferrate (III) (K3[Fe(CN)6]), exhibit cdMMP-13 inhibitory potential with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 1.3μM. The target protein was obtained by refolding the recombinant histidine-tagged cdMMP-13 using size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The secondary structures of the refolded cdMMP-13 with or without metal ions were further analyzed via circular dichroism and the results indicate that upon binding with metal ions, an altered structure with increased domain stability was obtained. Furthermore, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments demonstrated that K3[Fe(CN)6]is able to bind to MMP-13 and endothelial cell tube formation tests provide further evidence for this interaction to exhibit anti-angiogenesis potential. To the best of our knowledge, no previous report of an inorganic compound featuring a MMP-13 inhibitory activity has ever been reported in the literature. Our results demonstrate that K3[Fe(CN)6] is useful as a new effective and specific inhibitor for cdMMP-13 which may be of great potential for future drug screening applications. PMID:27542739

  16. Corrosion behavior of Zr(Fe, Cr)2 metallic compounds in 500 degree C superheated steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zr(Fe, Cr)2 metallic compounds with different Fe/Cr ratio of 1.75 and 4.50 were prepared by non-consumable arc melting. X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe and transmission electron microscopy were employed for analyzing the corrosion products, the composition distribution and structure morphology after corrosion test of Zr(Fe, Cr)2 metallic compound powder at 500 degree C superheated steam with different exposure time. The corrosion products are the same for Zr(Fe, Cr)2 with different Fe/Cr ratio, but the corrosion resistant is better for Fe/Cr ratio of 1.75 than that of 4.50. Cubic ZrO2 and alpha Fe(Cr) are formed at the beginning of Zr(Fe, Cr)2 oxidation, then monoclinic ZrO2 transformed from cubic ZrO2 and (Fe, Cr)3O4 are observed at the late stage of oxidation. When the segregation of iron and chromium atoms occurs during the oxidation of Zr(Fe, Cr)2 metallic compounds, the diffusion rate of iron atoms is faster than that of chromium atoms. Based on the results obtained in present work, the effect of second phase particles on the corrosion behavior of Zircaloy-4 has been discussed

  17. Strongly correlated transition metal compounds investigated by soft X-ray spectroscopies and multiplet calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez-Mier, J., E-mail: jimenez@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, 04510 México, DF (Mexico); Olalde-Velasco, P. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, 04510 México, DF (Mexico); The Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Herrera-Pérez, G.; Carabalí -Sandoval, G. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, 04510 México, DF (Mexico); Chavira, E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, UNAM, 04510 México, DF (Mexico); Yang, W.-L.; Denlinger, J. [The Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Direct probe of Mott–Hubbard (MH) to charge-transfer (CT) insulator transition in the MF{sub 2} (M = Cr–Zn) family of compounds was observed by combining F K and M L X-ray emission spectra (XES). This transition is evident as a crossover of the F-2p and M-3d occupied states. By combining F K XES data with F K edge X-ray absorption (XAS) data we directly obtained values for the M-3d Hubbard energy (U{sub dd}) and the F-2p to M-3d charge-transfer energy (Δ{sub CT}). Our results are in good agreement with the Zaanen–Sawatzky–Allen theory. We also present three examples where X-ray absorption at the transition metal L{sub 2,3} edges is used to study the oxidation state of various strongly correlated transition metal compounds. The metal oxidation state is obtained by direct comparison with crystal field multiplet calculations. The compounds are CrF{sub 2}, members of the La{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}CoO{sub 3} family, and the MVO{sub 3} (M = La and Y) perovskites.

  18. APPLICABILITY OF THE MASS ACTION LAW IN COMBINATION WITH THE COEXISTENCE THEORY OF METALLIC MELTS INVOLVING COMPOUND TO BINARY METALLIC MELTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Zhang

    2002-01-01

    Based on the atomicity and molecularity as well as the consistency of thermodynamicproperties and activities of metallic melts with their structures, the coexistence the-ory of metallic melts structure involving compound has been suggested. According tothis theory, the calculating models of mass action concentrations for different binarymetallic melts have been formulated. The calculated mass action concentrations agreewell with corresponding measured activities, which confirms that the suggested theorycan reflect the structural characteristics of metallic melts involving compound and thatthe mass action law is widely applicable to this kind of metallic melts.

  19. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of polyhydroxamate chelators for selective complexation of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific chelating polymers targeted for actinides have much relevance to problems involving remediation of nuclear waste. Goal is to develop polymer supported, ion specific extraction systems for removing actinides and other hazardous metal ions from wastewaters. This is part of an effort to develop chelators for removing actinide ions such as Pu from soils and waste streams. Selected ligands are being attached to polymeric backbones to create novel chelating polymers. These polymers and other water soluble and insoluble polymers have been synthesized and are being evaluated for ability to selectively remove target metal ions from process waste streams

  20. Safety Evaluation of Osun River Water Containing Heavy Metals and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeez, L; Salau, A K; Adewuyi, S O; Osineye, S O; Tijani, K O; Balogun, R O

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the pH, heavy metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Osun river water. It also evaluated its safety in rats. Heavy metals were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) while VOCs were determined by gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Male and female rats were exposed to Osun river water for three weeks and then sacrificed. The abundance of heavy metals in Osun river followed the trend Pb > Cd > Zn > Fe > Cr > Cu while VOCs followed the trend benzene water for three weeks had increased WBC, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), serum proteins and serum aminotransferases. There were also significant decreases in HCT, PLT, liver aminotransferases and liver glutathione compared to the control. These results show that the pollutants in Osun river water are capable of inducing hematological imbalance and liver cell injury. The toxicity induced in blood was sex-dependent affecting female rats more than male rats. PMID:27506174

  1. Concentration of actinides in the food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable concern is now being expressed over the discharge of actinides into the environment. This report presents a brief review of the chemistry of the actinides and examines the evidence for interaction of the actinides with some naturally-occurring chelating agents and other factors which might stimulate actinide concentration in the food chain of man. This report also reviews the evidence for concentration of actinides in plants and for uptake through the gastrointestinal tract. (author)

  2. Calorimetric assay of minor actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudy, C.; Bracken, D.; Cremers, T.; Foster, L.A.; Ensslin, N.

    1996-12-31

    This paper reviews the principles of calorimetric assay and evaluates its potential application to the minor actinides (U-232-4, Am-241, Am- 243, Cm-245, Np-237). We conclude that calorimetry and high- resolution gamma-ray isotopic analysis can be used for the assay of minor actinides by adapting existing methodologies for Pu/Am-241 mixtures. In some cases, mixtures of special nuclear materials and minor actinides may require the development of new methodologies that involve a combination of destructive and nondestructive assay techniques.

  3. Calorimetric assay of minor actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the principles of calorimetric assay and evaluates its potential application to the minor actinides (U-232-4, Am-241, Am- 243, Cm-245, Np-237). We conclude that calorimetry and high- resolution gamma-ray isotopic analysis can be used for the assay of minor actinides by adapting existing methodologies for Pu/Am-241 mixtures. In some cases, mixtures of special nuclear materials and minor actinides may require the development of new methodologies that involve a combination of destructive and nondestructive assay techniques

  4. A case study of in silico modelling of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride/metallic compound interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, Aleksandra; Parojcic, Jelena; Djuric, Zorica; Corrigan, Owen I

    2014-04-01

    With the development of physiologically based absorption models, there is an increased scientific and regulatory interest in in silico modelling and simulation of drug-drug and drug-food interactions. Clinically significant interactions between ciprofloxacin and metallic compounds are widely documented. In the current study, a previously developed ciprofloxacin-specific in silico absorption model was employed in order to simulate ciprofloxacin/metallic compound interaction observed in vivo. Commercially available software GastroPlus™ (Simulations Plus Inc., USA) based on the ACAT model was used for gastrointestinal (GI) simulations. The required input parameters, relating to ciprofloxacin hydrochloride physicochemical and pharmacokinetic characteristics, were experimentally determined, taken from the literature or estimated by GastroPlus™. Parameter sensitivity analysis (PSA) was used to assess the importance of selected input parameters (solubility, permeability, stomach and small intestine transit time) in predicting percent drug absorbed. PSA identified solubility and permeability as critical parameters affecting the rate and extent of ciprofloxacin absorption. Using the selected input parameters, it was possible to generate a ciprofloxacin absorption model, without/with metal cation containing preparations co-administration, which matched well the in vivo data available. It was found that reduced ciprofloxacin absorption in the presence of aluminium hydroxide, calcium carbonate or multivitamins/zinc was accounted for by reduced drug solubility. The impact of solubility-permeability interplay on ciprofloxacin absorption can be observed in the ciprofloxacin-aluminium interaction, while in ciprofloxacin-calcium and ciprofloxacin-zinc interactions, effect of solubility was more pronounced. The results obtained indicate that in silico model developed can be successfully used to complement relevant in vitro studies in the simulation of physicochemical

  5. Metallomics insights into the programmed cell death induced by metal-based anticancer compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cai-Ping; Lu, Yi-Ying; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2014-05-01

    Since the discovery of cisplatin more than 40 years ago, enormous research efforts have been dedicated to developing metal-based anticancer agents and to elucidating the mechanisms involved in the action of these compounds. Abnormal metabolism and the evasion of apoptosis are important hallmarks of malignant transformation, and the induction of apoptotic cell death has been considered to be a main pathway by which cytotoxic metal complexes combat cancer. However, many cancers have cellular defects involving the apoptotic machinery, which results in an acquired resistance to apoptotic cell death and therefore reduced chemotherapeutic effectiveness. Over the past decade, it has been revealed that a growing number of cell death pathways induced by metal complexes are not dependent on apoptosis. Metal complexes specifically triggering these alternative cell death pathways have been identified and explored as novel cancer treatment options. In this review, we discuss recent examples of metallomics studies on the different types of cell death induced by metal-based anticancer drugs, especially on the three major forms of programmed cell death (PCD) in mammalian cells: apoptosis, autophagy and regulated necrosis, also called necroptosis.

  6. Reversible optical sensor for the analysis of actinides in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work is presented a concept of reversible optical sensor for actinides. It is composed of a p doped conducing polymer support and of an anion complexing the actinides. The chosen conducing polymer is the thiophene-2,5-di-alkoxy-benzene whose solubility and conductivity are perfectly known. The actinides selective ligand is a lacunar poly-oxo-metallate such as P2W17O6110- or SiW11O398- which are strong anionic complexing agents of actinides at the oxidation state (IV) even in a very acid medium. The sensor is prepared by spin coating of the composite mixture 'polymer + ligand' on a conducing glass electrode and then tested towards its optical and electrochemical answer in presence of uranium (IV). The absorption change due to the formation of cations complexes by poly-oxo-metallate reveals the presence of uranium (IV). After the measurement, the sensor is regenerated by anodic polarization of the support and oxidation of the uranium (IV) into uranium (VI) which weakly interacts with the poly-oxo-metallate and is then released in solution. (O.M.)

  7. Impact of metal-induced degradation on the determination of pharmaceutical compound purity and a strategy for mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotterer, Sally K; Forbes, Robert A; Hammill, Cynthia L

    2011-04-01

    Case studies are presented demonstrating how exposure to traces of transition metals such as copper and/or iron during sample preparation or analysis can impact the accuracy of purity analysis of pharmaceuticals. Some compounds, such as phenols and indoles, react with metals in the presence of oxygen to produce metal-induced oxidative decomposition products. Compounds susceptible to metal-induced decomposition can degrade following preparation for purity analysis leading to falsely high impurity results. Our work has shown even metals at levels below 0.1 ppm can negatively impact susceptible compounds. Falsely low results are also possible when the impurities themselves react with metals and degrade prior to analysis. Traces of metals in the HPLC mobile phase can lead to chromatographic artifacts, affecting the reproducibility of purity results. To understand and mitigate the impact of metal induced decomposition, a proactive strategy is presented. The pharmaceutical would first be tested for reactivity with specific transition metals in the sample solvent/diluents and in the HPLC mobile phase. If found to be reactive, alternative sample diluents and/or mobile phases with less reactive solvents or addition of a metal chelator would be explored. If unsuccessful, glassware cleaning or sample solution refrigeration could be investigated. By employing this strategy during method development, robust purity methods would be delivered to the quality control laboratories, preventing future problems from potential sporadic contamination of glassware with metals. PMID:21163601

  8. Environmental research on actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers

  9. Exploring the reactivity of flavonoid compounds with metal-associated amyloid-β species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoming; Park, Hyun Min; Hyung, Suk-Joon; DeToma, Alaina S; Kim, Cheal; Ruotolo, Brandon T; Lim, Mi Hee

    2012-06-01

    Metal ions associated with amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides have been suggested to be involved in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but this remains unclear and controversial. Some attempts to rationally design or select small molecules with structural moieties for metal chelation and Aβ interaction (i.e., bifunctionality) have been made to gain a better understanding of the hypothesis. In order to contribute to these efforts, four synthetic flavonoid derivatives FL1-FL4 were rationally selected according to the principles of bifunctionality and their abilities to chelate metal ions, interact with Aβ, inhibit metal-induced Aβ aggregation, scavenge radicals, and regulate the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were studied using physical methods and biological assays. The compounds FL1-FL3 were able to chelate metal ions, but showed limited solubility in aqueous buffered solutions. In the case of FL4, which was most compatible with aqueous conditions, its binding affinities for Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) (nM and μM, respectively) were obtained through solution speciation studies. The direct interaction between FL4 and Aβ monomer was weak, which was monitored by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Employing FL1-FL4, no noticeable inhibitory effect on metal-mediated Aβ aggregation was observed. Among FL1-FL4, FL3, having 3-OH, 4-oxo, and 4'-N(CH(3))(2) groups, exhibited similar antioxidant activity to the vitamin E analogue, Trolox, and ca. 60% reduction in the amount of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) generated by Cu(2+)-Aβ in the presence of dioxygen (O(2)) and a reducing agent. Overall, the studies here suggest that although four flavonoid molecules were selected based on expected bifunctionality, their properties and metal-Aβ reactivity were varied depending on the structure differences, demonstrating that bifunctionality must be well tuned to afford desirable reactivity.

  10. Neutronics design study on a minor actinide burner for transmuting spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok

    1998-08-01

    A liquid metal reactor was designed for the primary purpose of burning the minor actinide waste from commercial light water reactors. The design was constrained to maintain acceptable safety performance as measured by the burnup reactivity swing, the doppler coefficient, and the sodium void worth. Sensitivity studies were performed for homogeneous and decoupled core designs, and a minor actinide burner design was determined to maximize actinide consumption and satisfy safety constraints. One of the principal innovations was the use of two core regions, with a fissile plutonium outer core and an inner core consisting only of minor actinides. The physics studies performed here indicate that a 1200 MWth core is able to transmute the annual minor actinide inventory of about 16 LWRs and still exhibit reasonable safety characteristics. (author). 34 refs., 22 tabs., 14 figs.

  11. Study of reactions of metals with sulphur and phosphorus compounds by pulsed temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anti-wear action of sulphur and phosphorus compounds which are usually added to gear-oils depends on chemical reactions with the metallic surfaces of the gears. These reactions occur both at the bulk oil temperature (approx. 100°C) and during high temperatures (approx. 600°C) of short duration when the gearteeth come into contact under lead. The temperature flashes were simulated in an apparatus in which short pulses of electric current were used to heat metal wires immersed in mineral oil containing S35 and P32 labelled compounds in solution. The radioactivity acquired by the wires was measured. The extent of the reactions was determined as a function of temperature and time and the results were interpreted in terms of conventional kinetic laws. The modification of the reaction rates by the presence of other compounds in the solution was studied. The effect of pre-formed surface films containing sulphur phosphorus, chlorine and/or oxygen was also determined. In explaining the results, the structure of the materials used and the diffusion processes whereby the reactions occur beyond the initial stages were considered. (author)

  12. Thermochemistry of some binary lead and transition metal compounds by high temperature direct synthesis calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meschel, S.V., E-mail: meschel@jfi.uchicago.edu [Illinois Institute of Technology,Thermal Processing Technology Center, 10 W. 32nd Street, Chicago, Illinois 60615 (United States); Gordon Center for Integrated Science, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Nash, P. [Illinois Institute of Technology,Thermal Processing Technology Center, 10 W. 32nd Street, Chicago, Illinois 60615 (United States); Chen, X.Q.; Wei, P. [Materials processing Modeling Division, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metals Research, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang City (China)

    2015-06-05

    Highlights: • Studied binary lead-transition metal alloys by high temperature calorimetry. • Determined the enthalpies of formation of 8 alloys. • Compared the measurements with predictions by the model of Miedema and by the ab initio method. - Abstract: The standard enthalpies of formation of some binary lead and transition metal compounds have been measured by high temperature direct synthesis calorimetry. The reported results are: Pb{sub 3}Sc{sub 5}(−61.3 ± 2.9); PbTi{sub 4}(−16.6 ± 2.4); Pb{sub 3}Y{sub 5}(−64.8 ± 3.6); Pb{sub 3}Zr{sub 5}(−50.6 ± 3.1); PbNb{sub 3}(−10.4 ± 3.4); PbRh(−16.5 ± 3.3); PbPd{sub 3}(−29.6 ± 3.1); PbPt(−34.7 ± 3.3) kJ/mole of atoms. We will compare our results with previously published measurements. We will also compare the experimental measurements with enthalpies of formation of transition metal compounds with elements in the same vertical column in the periodic table. We will compare our measurements with predicted values on the basis of the semi empirical model of Miedema and coworkers and with ab initio values when available.

  13. Thermochemistry of some binary lead and transition metal compounds by high temperature direct synthesis calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Studied binary lead-transition metal alloys by high temperature calorimetry. • Determined the enthalpies of formation of 8 alloys. • Compared the measurements with predictions by the model of Miedema and by the ab initio method. - Abstract: The standard enthalpies of formation of some binary lead and transition metal compounds have been measured by high temperature direct synthesis calorimetry. The reported results are: Pb3Sc5(−61.3 ± 2.9); PbTi4(−16.6 ± 2.4); Pb3Y5(−64.8 ± 3.6); Pb3Zr5(−50.6 ± 3.1); PbNb3(−10.4 ± 3.4); PbRh(−16.5 ± 3.3); PbPd3(−29.6 ± 3.1); PbPt(−34.7 ± 3.3) kJ/mole of atoms. We will compare our results with previously published measurements. We will also compare the experimental measurements with enthalpies of formation of transition metal compounds with elements in the same vertical column in the periodic table. We will compare our measurements with predicted values on the basis of the semi empirical model of Miedema and coworkers and with ab initio values when available

  14. Photo-induced charge-orbital switching in transition-metal compounds probed by photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takubo, K; Mizokawa, T [Department of Physics and Department of Complexity Science and Engineering, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Takubo, N; Miyano, K [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Matsumoto, N; Nagata, S, E-mail: takubo@sces.k.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Muroran Institute of Technology, 27-1 Mizumoto-cho, Muroran, Hokkaido, 050-8585 Japan (Japan)

    2009-02-01

    Transition-metal compounds with spin, charge, and orbital degrees of freedom tend to have frustrated electronic states coupled with local lattice distortions and to show drastic response to external stimuli such as photo-excitation. We have studied the charge-orbital states in perovskite-type Pr{sub 0.55}(Ca{sub 1-y}Sr{sub y}){sub 0.45}MnO{sub 3} thin films (PCSMO) and spinel-type CuIr{sub 2}S{sub 4} using photoemission spectroscopy combined with additional laser illumination. PCSMO and CuIr{sub 2}S{sub 4} are clear-cut examples of transition-metal compounds showing photo-induced metallic conductivities but the charge-orbital states in the two systems show contrasting responses to the photo-excitation. The charge-orbital states in PCSMO are stabilized by Jahn-Teller or Breathing-type lattice distortions and can be destroyed by photo-excitation. On the other hand, the charge-orbital states in CuIr{sub 2}S{sub 4} are stabilized by dimer formation and tend to be robust against photo-excitation.

  15. Measurement of standard potentials of actinides (U,Np,Pu,Am) in LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and separation of actinides from rare earths by electrorefining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrochemical separation of actinides from rare earths in LiCl-KCl eutectic-liquid metal systems has been studied. The electromotive forces of galvanic cells of the form, Ag vertical stroke Ag(I), LiCl-KCl parallel actinide(III), LiCl-KCl vertical stroke actinide, were measured and standard potentials were determined for uranium, neptunium and plutonium to be -1.283 V, -1.484 V and -1.593 V (at 450 C vs. Ag/AgCl (1wt%-AgCl)), respectively. A typical cyclic voltammogram of americium chloride has two cathodic peaks, which suggests reduction Am(III)→Am(II) occurs followed by reduction of Am(II) to americium metal. Standard potential of Am(II)/Am(0) was estimated to be -1.642 V. Electrorefining experiments to separate actinides (U, Np, Pu and Am) from rare earths (Y, La, Ce, Nd and Gd) in LiCl-KCl eutectic salt were carried out. It was shown that the actinide metals were recovered on the cathodes and that americium was the most difficult to separate from rare earths. The actinide separation will be achieved by means of the combination of electrorefining with multistage extraction. (orig.)

  16. Enhancement of nonlinear optical properties of compounds of silica glass and metallic nanoparticle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GHARAATI A; KAMALDAR A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce a method for enhancing the nonlinear optical properties in silica glass by using metallic nanoparticles. First, the T-matrix method is developed to calculate the effective dielectric constant for the compound of silica glass and metallic nanoparticles, both of which possess nonlinear dielectric constants. In the second step, the Maxwell–Garnetttheory is exploited to replace the spherical nanoparticles with cylindrical and ellipsoidal ones, facilitating the calculation of the third-order nonlinear effective susceptibility for a degenerate four-wave mixing case. The results are followed by numerical computations for silver, copper and gold nanoparticles. It is shown, graphically, that the maximum and minimum of the real part of thereflection coefficient for nanoparticles of silver occurs in smaller wavelengths compared to that of copper and gold. Further, it is found that spherical nanoparticles exhibit greater figure-of-merit compared to those with cylindrical or ellipsoidal geometries.

  17. Composite materials obtained by the ion-plasma sputtering of metal compound coatings on polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlebnikov, Nikolai; Polyakov, Evgenii; Borisov, Sergei; Barashev, Nikolai; Biramov, Emir; Maltceva, Anastasia; Vereshchagin, Artem; Khartov, Stas; Voronin, Anton

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the principle and examples composite materials obtained by deposition of metal compound coatings on polymer film substrates by the ion-plasma sputtering method are presented. A synergistic effect is to obtain the materials with structural properties of the polymer substrate and the surface properties of the metal deposited coatings. The technology of sputtering of TiN coatings of various thicknesses on polyethylene terephthalate films is discussed. The obtained composites are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is shown. The examples of application of this method, such as receiving nanocomposite track membranes and flexible transparent electrodes, are considered.

  18. Optical Parameters and Absorption of Azo Dye and Its Metal-Substituted Compound Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏斌; 吴谊群; 顾冬红; 干福熹

    2003-01-01

    We determine the complex refractive indices N ( N = n - ik), dielectric constants ε(ε = ε1 - iε2), and absorption coefficients α of a new azo dye [2-(6-methyl-2-benzothiazolyazo)-5-diethylaminophenol(MBADP)]-doped polymer and its nickel- and zinc-substituted compounds(Ni-MBADP and Zn-MBADP) spin-coated thin films from a scanning ellipsometer in the wavelength 400-700 nm region. Metal chelation strongly (about one times) enhances the optical and dielectric parameters at the peaks and results in a large bathochromic shift (50-60nm) of absorption band. Bathochromic shift of Ni-MBADP is about 10nm larger than that of Zn-MBADP due to different spatial configurations formed in the metal-azo complexes.

  19. Micro- and Nanostructured Metal Oxide Chemical Sensors for Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alim, M. A.; Penn, B. G.; Currie, J. R., Jr.; Batra, A. K.; Aggarwal, M. D.

    2008-01-01

    Aeronautic and space applications warrant the development of chemical sensors which operate in a variety of environments. This technical memorandum incorporates various kinds of chemical sensors and ways to improve their performance. The results of exploratory investigation of the binary composite polycrystalline thick-films such as SnO2-WO3, SnO2-In2O3, SnO2-ZnO for the detection of volatile organic compound (isopropanol) are reported. A short review of the present status of the new types of nanostructured sensors such as nanobelts, nanorods, nanotube, etc. based on metal oxides is presented.

  20. Evolution of metal-compound residues on the walls of plasma etching reactor and their effect on critical dimensions of high-k/metal gate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was found that critical dimensions of high-k/metal gates obey the multivariate linear approximation with the precision of 3σ=±0.86 nm, whose explanatory variables are amounts of metal compounds remaining on the plasma reactor walls. To measure their amounts, the authors assumed they are proportional to amounts of atoms sputtered out by Ar plasma and falling onto a Si wafers placed on a wafer stage. In this study, effects of metal compounds of W, Ti, Ta, and Hf, which are used to construct full-metal/high-k gates, were measured. It was found that Ti and Ta compounds dominate the fluctuation of critical dimensions and the dependency of their amount on wafer numbers being etched obeys a simple difference equation. From these results, they can estimate and minimize the fluctuations of critical dimensions in mass fabrications.

  1. High-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of metal compounds in neurodegenerative brain tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collingwood, J.F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M.R.; Batich, C.; Streit, W.J.; Eskin, T.; Terry, J.; Barrea, R.; Underhill, R.S.; Dobson, J. (IIT); (Keele); (Florida); (DRDC)

    2008-06-16

    Fluorescence mapping and microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy are used to detect, locate and identify iron biominerals and other inorganic metal accumulations in neurodegenerative brain tissue at sub-cellular resolution (< 5 microns). Recent progress in developing the technique is reviewed. Synchrotron X-rays are used to map tissue sections for metals of interest, and XANES and XAFS are used to characterize anomalous concentrations of the metals in-situ so that they can be correlated with tissue structures and disease pathology. Iron anomalies associated with biogenic magnetite, ferritin and haemoglobin are located and identified in an avian tissue model with a pixel resolution {approx} 5 microns. Subsequent studies include brain tissue sections from transgenic Huntington's mice, and the first high-resolution mapping and identification of iron biominerals in human Alzheimer's and control autopsy brain tissue. Technical developments include use of microfocus diffraction to obtain structural information about biominerals in-situ, and depositing sample location grids by lithography for the location of anomalies by conventional microscopy. The combined techniques provide a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds and related metals in tissue. The information to be gained from this approach has implications for future diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration, and for our understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  2. The electronic g matrix of some actinide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows: The molecular g-factors are crucial parameters in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. They parametrize the Zeeman effect that involves the interaction of a spin magnetic moment with a magnetic field. Before the 90's, g-factors were mostly calculated by semi-empirical methods while in the last decade, ab initio techniques have been developed based on wave functions or density functional theories either using a sum over states (SOS) expansion or using response theory [1]. We have recently proposed an alternative method based on wave function theory including spin-orbit effects by the SO-RASSI method [2]. This method has been applied with success to small molecules containing atoms until the third series of the transition metals and to a mixed-valence bimetallic complex[3] and in this work, it is applied to actinide complexes with a 5f1 configuration. To our knowledge, only few attempts have been made to calculate g-factors of actinide complexes from first principles [4, 5]. Relativistic effects in actinide complexes are important, so the deviation of g-factors from the value of the free electron is large and can even become negative. Most of the experiments measuring magnetic properties of actinide complexes date from the sixties. EPR and magnetic susceptibilities give the absolute values of the g-factors while experiment using circularly polarized light provide the sign of the product of the three factors. Magnetic properties of these compounds are easily understood using ligand field theory models. In the first part of this presentation, we will discuss the arbitrary character of the g-matrix and specially of the effect of phase factors and of the choice of the spin quantification axis and we will show that only the G tensor gg* has a physical significance. In the second part, equilibrium distances, excitation energies and g-factors of the AnXq-6 series with An = Pa,U,Np and X = F,Cl,Br are calculated using the

  3. Fluorite and mixed-metal Kagome-related topologies in metal-organic framework compounds: synthesis, structure, and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahata, Partha; Raghunathan, Rajamani; Banerjee, Debamalya; Sen, Diptiman; Ramasesha, S; Bhat, S V; Natarajan, S

    2009-06-01

    Two new three-dimensional metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) [Mn(2)(mu(3)-OH)(H(2)O)(2)(BTC)] x 2 H(2)O, I, and [NaMn(BTC)], II (BTC = 1,2,4-benzenetricarboxylate = trimellitate) were synthesized and their structures determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). In I, the Mn(4) cluster, [Mn(4)(mu(3)-OH)(2)(H(2)O)(4)O(12)], is connected with eight trimellitate anions and each trimellitate anion connects to four different Mn(4) clusters, resulting in a fluorite-like structure. In II, the Mn(2)O(8) dimer is connected with two Na(+) ions through carboxylate oxygen to form mixed-metal distorted Kagome-related two-dimensional -M-O-M- layers, which are pillared by the trimellitate anions forming the three-dimensional structure. The extra-framework water molecules in I are reversibly adsorbed and are also corroborated by powder XRD studies. The formation of octameric water clusters involving free and coordinated water molecules appears to be new. Interesting magnetic behavior has been observed for both compounds. Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies indicate a broadening of the signal below the ordering temperature and appear to support the findings of the magnetic studies.

  4. Chemistry of lower valent actinide halides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, K.H.; Hildenbrand, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    This research effort was concerned almost entirely with the first two members of the actinide series, thorium and uranium, although the work was later extended to some aspects of the neptunium-fluorine system in a collaborative program with Los Alamos National Laboratory. Detailed information about the lighter actinides will be helpful in modeling the properties of the heavier actinide compounds, which will be much more difficult to study experimentally. In this program, thermochemical information was obtained from high temperature equilibrium measurements made by effusion-beam mass spectrometry and by effusion-pressure techniques. Data were derived primarily from second-law analysis so as to avoid potential errors in third-law calculations resulting from uncertainties in spectroscopic and molecular constants. This approach has the additional advantage of yielding reaction entropies that can be checked for consistency with various molecular constant assignments for the species involved. In the U-F, U-Cl, and U-Br systems, all of the gaseous species UX, UX{sub 2}, UX{sub 3}, UX{sub 4}, and UX{sub 5}, where X represents the halogen, were identified and characterized; the corresponding species ThX, ThX{sub 2}, ThX{sub 3}, and ThX{sub 4} were studied in the Th-F, Th-Cl, and Th-Br systems. A number of oxyhalide species in the systems U-0-F, U-0-Cl, Th-0-F, and Th-O-Cl were studied thermochemically. Additionally, the sublimation thermodynamics of NpF{sub 4}(s) and NpO{sub 2}F{sub 2}(s) were studied by mass spectrometry.

  5. Phytosiderophore Effects on Subsurface Actinide Contaminants: Potential for Phytostabilization and Phytoextraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggiero, Christy

    2005-06-01

    This project seeks to understand the influence of phytosiderophore-producing plants (grasses, including crops such as wheat and barley) on the biogeochemistry of actinide and other metal contaminants in the subsurface environment, and to determine the potential of phytosiderophore-producing plants for phytostabilization and phytoextraction of actinides and some metal soil contaminants. Phytosiderophores are secreted by graminaceous plants such as barley and wheat for the solubilization, mobilization and uptake of Fe and other essential nutrients from soils. The ability for these phytosiderophores to chelate and absorb actinides using the same uptake system as for Fe is being investigated though characterization of actinide-phytosiderophore complexes (independently of plants), and characterization of plant uptake of such complexes. We may also show possible harm caused by these plants through increased chelation of actinides that increase in actinide mobilization & migration in the subsurface environment. This information can then be directly applied by either removal of harmful plants, or can be used to develop plant-based soil stabilization/remediation technologies. Such technologies could be the low-cost, low risk solution to many DOE actinide contamination problems.

  6. Sequestering agents for the removal of actinides from waste streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, K.N.; White, D.J.; Xu, Jide; Mohs, T.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The goal of this project is to take a biomimetic approach toward developing new separation technologies for the removal of radioactive elements from contaminated DOE sites. To achieve this objective, the authors are investigating the fundamental chemistry of naturally occurring, highly specific metal ion sequestering agents and developing them into liquid/liquid and solid supported actinide extraction agents. Nature produces sideophores (e.g., Enterobactin and Desferrioxamine B) to selectivity sequester Lewis acidic metal ions, in particular Fe(III), from its surroundings. These chelating agents typically use multiple catechols or hydroxamic acids to form polydentate ligands that chelate the metal ion forming very stable complexes. The authors are investigating and developing analogous molecules into selective chelators targeting actinide(IV) ions, which display similar properties to Fe(III). By taking advantage of differences in charge, preferred coordination number, and pH stability range, the transition from nature to actinide sequestering agents has been applied to the development of new and highly selective actinide extraction technologies. Additionally, the authors have shown that these chelating ligands are versatile ligands for chelating U(VI). In particular, they have been studying their coordination chemistry and fundamental interactions with the uranyl ion [UO{sub 2}]{sup 2+}, the dominant form of uranium found in aqueous media. With an understanding of this chemistry, and results obtained from in vivo uranium sequestration studies, it should be possible to apply these actinide(IV) extraction technologies to the development of new extraction agents for the removal of uranium from waste streams.

  7. Electrolytic decontamination of the dismantled metallic wastes contaminated with uranium compounds in neutral salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrolytic dissolution study was carried out to evaluate the applicability of electrochemical decontamination process using a neutral salt electrolyte as a decontamination technology for the recycle or self disposal with authorization of large amount of metallic wastes contaminated with uranium compounds generated by dismantling a retired uranium conversion plant using SUS-304 and Inconel-600 specimen as the main materials of internal system components of the plant. The effects of type of neutral salt as an electrolyte, current density, and concentration of electrolyte on the dissolution of the materials were evaluated. On the basis of the results obtained through the basic inactive experiments, electrochemical decontamination tests using the specimens contaminated with uranium compounds such as UO2, AUC (ammonium uranyl carbonate) and ADU (ammonium diuranate) taken from an uranium conversion plant were performed in Na2SO4 and NaNO3 solution. It was verified that the electrochemical decontamination of the dismantled metallic wastes was quite successful in Na2SO4 and NaNO3 neutral salt electrolyte by reducing β radioactivities below the level of self disposal with authorization within 10 minutes regardless of the type of contaminants and the degree of contamination

  8. Pressure induced structural phase transition in IB transition metal nitrides compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Shubhangi; Kaurav, Netram; Jain, A.; Shah, S.; Choudhary, K. K.

    2015-06-01

    Transition metal mononitrides are known as refractory compounds, and they have, relatively, high hardness, brittleness, melting point, and superconducting transition temperature, and they also have interesting optical, electronic, catalytic, and magnetic properties. Evolution of structural properties would be an important step towards realizing the potential technological scenario of this material of class. In the present study, an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP) is developed to investigate the pressure induced phase transitions in IB transition metal nitrides TMN [TM = Cu, Ag, and Au] compounds. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.

  9. Actinide coordination sphere in various U, Np and Pu nitrato coordination complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste management of nuclear fuel represents one of the major environmental concerns of the decade. To recycle fissile valuable materials, intimate knowledge of complexation mechanisms involved in the solvent extraction processes is indispensable. Evolution of the actinide coordination sphere of AnO2(NO3)2TBP-type complexes (an = U, Np, Pu; TBP = tributylphosphate) with the actinide valence state have been probed by XAS at the metal LIII edge. Dramatic changes in the actinide coordination sphere appeared when the An(VI) metal is reduced to An(IV). However, no significant evolution in the actinide environment has been noticed across the series UO22+, NpO22+ and PuO22+. (au)

  10. 33rd Actinide Separations Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, L M; Wilk, P A

    2009-05-04

    Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

  11. Pore size dynamics in interpenetrated metal organic frameworks for selective sensing of aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Matthew; Podolska, Anna; Heath, Charles; Baker, Murray V; Pejcic, Bobby

    2014-03-28

    The two-fold interpenetrated metal-organic framework, [Zn2(bdc)2(dpNDI)]n (bdc=1,4-benzenedicarboxylate, dpNDI=N'N'-di(4-pyridyl)-1,4,5,8-naphthalenediimide) can undergo structural re-arrangement upon adsorption of chemical species changing its pore structure. For a competitive binding process with multiple analytes of different sizes and geometries, the interpenetrated framework will adopt a conformation to maximize the overall binding interactions. In this study, we show for binary mixtures that there is a high selectivity for the larger methylated aromatic compounds, toluene and p-xylene, over the small non-methylated benzene. The dpNDI moiety within [Zn2(bdc)2(dpNDI)]n forms an exciplex with these aromatic compounds. The emission wavelength is dependent on the strength of the host-guest CT interaction allowing these compounds to be distinguished. We show that the sorption selectivity characteristics can have a significant impact on the fluorescence sensor response of [Zn2(bdc)2(dpNDI)]n towards environmentally important hydrocarbons based contaminants (i.e., BTEX, PAH). PMID:24636414

  12. Preparation of Metallic Aluminum Compound Particles by Submerged Arc Discharge Method in Aqueous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chih-Yu; Tseng, Kuo-Hsiung; Lin, Hong-Shiou

    2013-02-01

    Fine metal particles are produced by chemical methods, which add surfactants to control particle size and concentration. This study used the submerged arc discharge method (SADM) to prepare metal fluid containing nanoparticles and submicron particles in pure dielectric fluid (deionized water or alcohol). The process is fast and simple, and it does not require the addition of chemical agents. The SADM uses electrical discharge machining (EDM) equipment, and the key parameters of the production process include discharge voltage, current, and pulse discharge on-off duration. This study added a capacitive component between the electrodes and the electrode Z-axis regulation in the control parameters to render the aluminum fluid process smooth, which is the main difference of this article from the literature. The experimental results showed that SADM can produce aluminum particles from nanometer to submicron grade, and it can obtain different compounds from different dielectric fluids. The dielectric fluids used in this study were deionized water and ethanol, and aluminum hydroxide Al(OH)3 particles with suspending power and precipitated aluminum particles were obtained, respectively. The preparations of metal colloid and particles by the SADM process have the characteristics of low cost, high efficiency, high speed, and mass production. Thus, the process has high research value and developmental opportunities.

  13. Tuning the luminescence of metal-organic frameworks for detection of energetic heterocyclic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuexin; Feng, Xiao; Han, Tianyu; Wang, Shan; Lin, Zhengguo; Dong, Yuping; Wang, Bo

    2014-11-01

    Herein we report three metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), TABD-MOF-1, -2, and -3, constructed from Mg(2+), Ni(2+), and Co(2+), respectively, and deprotonated 4,4'-((Z,Z)-1,4-diphenylbuta-1,3-diene-1,4-diyl)dibenzoic acid (TABD-COOH). The fluorescence of these three MOFs is tuned from highly emissive to completely nonemissive via ligand-to-metal charge transfer by rational alteration of the metal ion. Through competitive coordination substitution, the organic linkers in the TABD-MOFs are released and subsequently reassemble to form emissive aggregates due to aggregation-induced emission. This enables highly sensitive and selective detection of explosives such as five-membered-ring energetic heterocyclic compounds in a few seconds with low detection limits through emission shift and/or turn-on. Remarkably, the cobalt-based MOF can selectively sense the powerful explosive 5-nitro-2,4-dihydro-3H-1,2,4-triazole-3-one with high sensitivity discernible by the naked eye (detection limit = 6.5 ng on a 1 cm(2) testing strip) and parts per billion-scale sensitivity by spectroscopy via pronounced fluorescence emission. PMID:25325884

  14. Safety Evaluation of Osun River Water Containing Heavy Metals and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeez, L; Salau, A K; Adewuyi, S O; Osineye, S O; Tijani, K O; Balogun, R O

    2015-12-20

    This study evaluated the pH, heavy metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Osun river water. It also evaluated its safety in rats. Heavy metals were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) while VOCs were determined by gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Male and female rats were exposed to Osun river water for three weeks and then sacrificed. The abundance of heavy metals in Osun river followed the trend Pb > Cd > Zn > Fe > Cr > Cu while VOCs followed the trend benzene < ethylbenzene < toluene < xylene. The concentrations of Pb, Cd and benzene were higher than the permissible limits of Standards Organization of Nigeria (SON) and World Health Organization (WHO) respectively. Rats exposed to Osun river water for three weeks had increased WBC, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), serum proteins and serum aminotransferases. There were also significant decreases in HCT, PLT, liver aminotransferases and liver glutathione compared to the control. These results show that the pollutants in Osun river water are capable of inducing hematological imbalance and liver cell injury. The toxicity induced in blood was sex-dependent affecting female rats more than male rats.

  15. Emergence of californium as the second transitional element in the actinide series

    OpenAIRE

    Cary, Samantha K.; Vasiliu, Monica; Baumbach, Ryan E.; Stritzinger, Jared T.; GREEN, THOMAS D.; Diefenbach, Kariem; Cross, Justin N.; Knappenberger, Kenneth L.; Liu, Guokui; Silver, Mark A.; DePrince, A. Eugene; Polinski, Matthew J.; Van Cleve, Shelley M.; House, Jane H.; Kikugawa, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    A break in periodicity occurs in the actinide series between plutonium and americium as the result of the localization of 5f electrons. The subsequent chemistry of later actinides is thought to closely parallel lanthanides in that bonding is expected to be ionic and complexation should not substantially alter the electronic structure of the metal ions. Here we demonstrate that ligation of californium(III) by a pyridine derivative results in significant deviations in the properties of the resu...

  16. Half-metallic ferromagnetism of RbSe and CsTe compounds: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huan-Huan; Ma, Run-Yu; Gao, Qiang; Li, Lei; Deng, Jian-Bo

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the electronic structures and magnetic properties of RbSe and CsTe compounds in CsCl, RS and ZB structures by using density functional theory calculation. It is shown that these two compounds exhibit half-metallic ferromagnetism with an integer magnetic moment of 1.00 μB per formula unit in all the three structures. Total energy calculations indicate the CsCl phase is more stable than the other two phases. We investigate these two compounds with CsCl structure in detail. The ferromagnetism results mainly from the spin-polarization of p states of anion Se (Te) for the two compounds.

  17. Actinides and Life's Origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Zachary

    2007-12-01

    There are growing indications that life began in a radioactive beach environment. A geologic framework for the origin or support of life in a Hadean heavy mineral placer beach has been developed, based on the unique chemical properties of the lower-electronic actinides, which act as nuclear fissile and fertile fuels, radiolytic energy sources, oligomer catalysts, and coordinating ions (along with mineralogically associated lanthanides) for prototypical prebiotic homonuclear and dinuclear metalloenzymes. A four-factor nuclear reactor model was constructed to estimate how much uranium would have been required to initiate a sustainable fission reaction within a placer beach sand 4.3 billion years ago. It was calculated that about 1-8 weight percent of the sand would have to have been uraninite, depending on the weight percent, uranium enrichment, and quantity of neutron poisons present within the remaining placer minerals. Radiolysis experiments were conducted with various solvents with the use of uraniumand thorium-rich minerals (metatorbernite and monazite, respectively) as proxies for radioactive beach sand in contact with different carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen reactants. Radiation bombardment ranged in duration of exposure from 3 weeks to 6 months. Low levels of acetonitrile (estimated to be on the order of parts per billion in concentration) were conclusively identified in 2 setups and tentatively indicated in a 3(rd) by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. These low levels have been interpreted within the context of a Hadean placer beach prebiotic framework to demonstrate the promise of investigating natural nuclear reactors as power production sites that might have assisted the origins of life on young rocky planets with a sufficiently differentiated crust/mantle structure. Future investigations are recommended to better quantify the complex relationships between energy release, radioactive grain size, fissionability, reactant phase, phosphorus

  18. A glass-encapsulated calcium phosphate wasteform for the immobilization of actinide-, fluoride-, and chloride-containing radioactive wastes from the pyrochemical reprocessing of plutonium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, I. W.; Metcalfe, B. L.; Fong, S. K.; Gerrard, L. A.; Strachan, D. M.; Scheele, R. D.

    2007-03-01

    Chloride-containing radioactive wastes are generated during the pyrochemical reprocessing of Pu metal. Immobilization of these wastes in borosilicate glass or Synroc-type ceramics is not feasible due to the very low solubility of chlorides in these hosts. Alternative candidates have therefore been sought including phosphate-based glasses, crystalline ceramics and hybrid glass/ceramic systems. These studies have shown that high losses of chloride or evolution of chlorine gas from the melt make vitrification an unacceptable solution unless suitable off-gas treatment facilities capable of dealing with these corrosive by-products are available. On the other hand, both sodium aluminosilicate and calcium phosphate ceramics are capable of retaining chloride in stable mineral phases, which include sodalite, Na 8(AlSiO 4) 6Cl 2, chlorapatite, Ca 5(PO 4) 3Cl, and spodiosite, Ca 2(PO 4)Cl. The immobilization process developed in this study involves a solid state process in which waste and precursor powders are mixed and reacted in air at temperatures in the range 700-800 °C. The ceramic products are non-hygroscopic free-flowing powders that only require encapsulation in a relatively low melting temperature phosphate-based glass to produce a monolithic wasteform suitable for storage and ultimate disposal.

  19. Half-metallic full-Heusler compound Ti{sub 2}NiAl: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei Feng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); Tang Chengchun, E-mail: tangcc@hebut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); Wang Shuangjin; He Wenchen [School of Science, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China)

    2011-04-28

    Research highlights: > Half-metallic compound of Ti{sub 2}NiAl by first principles calculations have been given. > It makes a beginning of exploration of new Ti{sub 2}-based half-metallic Heusler alloy. > The results may be useful to experimental synthesization of new Ti{sub 2}-based Heusler half-metal compounds. - Abstract: Full-Heusler compound Ti{sub 2}NiAl with Hg{sub 2}CuTi-type structure is demonstrated to be a new half-meltal ferromagnet by first-principles calculations. The compound has a complete (100%) spin polarization around the Fermi level in the total density of state. The band structure calculations show that the majority spin is strongly metallic, while the minority spin shows an insulating behavior. The compound has a total magnetic moment of -3.0 {mu}{sub B} per formula on first-principles calculations which complies well with the Slater-Pauling (SP) rule. Though having different atomic surroundings, the profiles of atom-projected density of states of Ti(A) and Ti(B) are similar. The half-metallic character is retained when the lattice constant ranging from -12.8% to +4.9%.

  20. Conception, synthesis and application of tripodands in actinide/lanthanide separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is the synthesis of C, H, O and N containing compounds able to separate '4f' and '5f' elements by liquid/liquid extraction. In a first part, the literature's study allow us to point out actinide and lanthanide ions actual nature and the different ways offered by organic chemistry to share two metallic ions between two liquid phases. On one hand, these trivalent cations' high coordination numbers drive us to synthesize tripodands with hard sites which were fitted for complexation. On the other hand, it appeared that carboxylate or even less-hard site like pyridine chelate selectively actinides, allowing separation. In a second part, 60 ligands were synthesized. In each of the ligands families, a structural parameter changes (site nature, distance between two neighbouring sites, sites respective orientation, lipophilicity and rigidity). 2,2-dihydroxymethyl-dodecanol and 1,3,5- tri(chlorocarbonyl) benzene were chosen as core. O-alkylation and amidation reactions were also peculiarly studied. Rekker's proceeding for lipophilicity calculation was used in order to establish a structure-activity relationship. In a third part, extraction assays with radioactive effluents (152Eu and 241Am) point out extraction and separation abilities of our compounds. Different operating ways were used according as ligand is soluble in aqueous or organic phase. Organic phase-soluble compounds were compared to DcH18C6, pyridine ones to 2,4,6-tri(2-pyridyl)-l,3,5-triazine (TPTZ) and carboxylate ones to diethylenetriamine-tetracetic acid (DTPA, Talspeak proceeding). The third phase phenomenon was encountered and studied. Influence of salt, pH and organic phase were also studied. (author)

  1. Perspectives from ab-initio and tight-binding: Applications to transition metal compounds and superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Vijay Shankar

    The experimental and theoretical study of transition metal compounds have occupied condensed matter physicists for the best part of the last century. The rich variety of physical behaviour exhibited by these compounds owes its origin to the subtle balance of the energy scales at play for the d orbitals. In this thesis, we study three different systems comprised of transition metal atoms from the third, the fourth, and the fifth group of the periodic table using a combination of ab-initio density functional theory (DFT) computations and effective tight-binding models for the electronic properties. We first consider the electronic properties of artificially fabricated perovskite superlattices of the form [(SrIrO3)m / SrTiO3] with integer m denoting the number of layers of SrIrO3. After discussing the results of experiments undertaken by our collaborators, we present the results of our DFT calculations and build tight-binding models for the m = 1 and m = 2 superlattices. The active ingredient is found to be the 5d orbitals with significant spin-orbit coupling. We then study the energies of magnetic ground states within DFT and compare and contrast our results with those obtained for the bulk Ruddlesden-Popper iridates. Together with experimental measurements, our results suggest that these superlattices are an exciting venue to probe the magnetism and metal-insulator transitions that occur from the intricate balance of the spin-orbit coupling and electron interactions, as has been reported for their bulk counterparts. Next, we consider alpha-RuCl3, a honeycomb lattice compound. We first show using DFT calculations in conjunction with experiments performed by our collaborators, how spin-orbit coupling in the 4d orbitals of Ru is essential to understand the insulating state realized in this compound. Then, in the latter half of the chapter, we study the magnetic ground states of a two-dimensional analogue of alpha-RuCl3 in weak and strong-coupling regimes obtained from

  2. Fabrication of actinide mononitride fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrication of actinide mononitride fuel in JAERI is summarized. Actinide mononitride and their solid solutions were fabricated by carbothermic reduction of the oxides in N2 or N2-H2 mixed gas stream. Sintering study was also performed for the preparation of pellets for the property measurements and irradiation tests. The products were characterized to be high-purity mononitride with a single phase of NaCl-type structure. Moreover, fuel pins containing uranium-plutonium mixed nitride pellets were fabricated for the irradiation tests in JMTR and JOYO. (author)

  3. Electrochemical separation of actinides and fission products in molten salt electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, R. L.; Grantham, L. F.; Fusselman, S. P.; Grimmett, D. L.; Roy, J. J.

    1995-09-01

    Molten salt electrochemical separation may be applied to accelerator-based conversion (ABC) and transmutation systems by dissolving the fluoride transport salt in LiCl-KCl eutectic solvent. The resulting fluoride-chloride mixture will contain small concentrations of fission product rare earths (La, Nd, Gd, Pr, Ce, Eu, Sm, and Y) and actinides (U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm). The Gibbs free energies of formation of the metal chlorides are grouped advantageously such that the actinides can be deposited on a solid cathode with the majority of the rare earths remaining in the electrolyte. Thus, the actinides are recycled for further transmutation. Rockwell and its partners have measured the thermodynamic properties of the metal chlorides of interest (rare earths and actinides) and demonstrated separation of actinides from rare earths in laboratory studies. A model is being developed to predict the performance of a commercial electrochemical cell for separations starting with PUREX compositions. This model predicts excellent separation of plutonium and other actinides from the rare earths in metal-salt systems.

  4. Metals elements and chlorinated compounds in cetaceans; Elementi metallici e composti organoclorurati in cetacei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardellicchio, N. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche. Ist. Sperimentale Talassografico, Taranto (Italy)

    1997-01-01

    Non-degradable pollutants determination in cetacea, high tropic level organisms, represents an evaluating element both for bioaccumulation phenomena and sea ecosystem quality. In this paper is shown determination results for metals, chlorinated pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in Stenella coeruleoalba specimens, beached along the coast of Puglia (Italy), in the period February-June 1987. Chemical-toxicological surveys verified that in there Mediterranean marine mammals pollutant accumulation is higher than in Atlantic species. Lipophylous toxical compounds transferred from mothers to offspring represents a high risk for their survival. even though this survey failed to establish a direct cause-effect relationship between pollutant levels and anatomical-pathological lesions, it is apparent that sea pollution phenomena are reflected negatively in the top of the food chains.

  5. Coordination compounds of nitrates and sulfates of some metals with isonicotinic acid hydrazide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complexes M(No3)2x2HINA, MSO4x2HINA, Cu(NO3)2xHINA, and CuSO4xHINAx1, 5C2H5OH (where M=Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd; HINA is hydrazide of isonicotinic acid) are obtained, their infrared (400-4000 cm-1) and Raman (50-4000 cm-1) spectra are studied. It is shown that HINA molecules in all compounds are bound with the metal by the nitrogen atoms of the amino group. In nickel, zink, and cadmium complexes the nitrogen atoms of the heterocycle are also bound with the central atom, thus forming tubazid bridges

  6. Pioneering Metal-Free Oxidative Coupling Strategy of Aromatic Compounds Using Hypervalent Iodine Reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Yasuyuki; Dohi, Toshifumi

    2015-10-01

    We started our hypervalent iodine research about 30 years ago in the mid-1980s. We soon successfully developed the single-electron-transfer oxidation ability of a hypervalent iodine reagent, specifically, phenyliodine(III) bis(trifluoroacetate) (PIFA), toward aromatic rings of phenyl ethers for forming aromatic cation radicals. This was one of the exciting and unexpected events in our research studies so far, and the discovery was reported in 1991. It also led to the next challenge, developing the metal-free oxidative couplings for C-H functionalizations and direct couplings between the C-H bonds of valuable aromatic compounds in organic synthesis. In order to realize the effective oxidative coupling, pioneering new aromatic ring activations was essential and several useful methodologies have been found for oxidizable arenes. The achievements regarding this objective obtained in our continuous research are herein summarized with classification of the aromatic ring activation strategies.

  7. Program and presentations of the 33th Actinide Days

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Journees des Actinides' (JDA) is an annual conference which provides a forum for discussions on all aspects related to the chemical and physical properties of the actinides. At the 2003 meeting, mainly the following properties were discussed of actinides and a number of actinide compounds and complexes: crystal structure, crystal-phase transformations and transformation temperatures; electrical properties including superconductivity and superconducting transition temperatures; magnetic properties; specific heat and other thermodynamic properties; electronic structure, especially in condensed matter; chemical and physico-chemical properties. The relevant experimental techniques were also dealt with, such as neutron diffraction; X-ray diffraction, in particular using synchrotron radiation; photoemission techniques, electron microscopy and spectroscopy, etc. Altogether 96 contributions were presented, of which 42 were oral presentations and 54 poster presentations. A program of the meeting and texts of both type of presentations were published in electronic form in the PDF format. All contributions were inputted to INIS; the full text of the program and the presentations has been incorporated into the INIS collection of non-conventional literature on CD-ROM. (A.K.)

  8. Application of humic compounds for remediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals: the benefits and risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motuzova, Galina; Barsova, Natalia; Stepanov, Andrey; Kiseleva, Violetta; Kolchanova, Ksenia; Starkova, Irina; Karpukhin, Mikhail

    2015-04-01

    found to contain only 3-9% of copper. The content of free Cu2+ ions in the sample extract was negligible. The samples used for field experiments were tested in laboratory to estimate their sorption capacity for Cu. For this purpose, 300 g of substrate (loam and mixed organic substrate) with addition of water (control) and humic preparation (same dose as in the field experiment) were kept in the laboratory for 1 week. Soil samples were then dried and brought into equilibrium with the solution of copper sulfate at concentration of 50 mg/l. The concentration of copper in the solution in equilibrium with HC was 2.5-4 times higher than in the control variant; absorption of copper by solid phase decreased by 5-6%. Results of the laboratory study were in good agreement with the results of the field experiment. Addition of HC increased the content of soluble organic matter and copper complexation by an order of magnitude and thus reduced the activity of copper ions in the liquid phase that was treated as a possible remediation effect of the humic compound for plants and biota. However the increased total metal content mainly in a migration-capable form (negatively charged complexes with organic matter) may increase the risk of contaminating ground waters with heavy metals. Therefore, application of the artificial humic compounds for remediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals requires monitoring and further development of means to prevent their migration.

  9. Actinides How well do we know their stellar production?

    CERN Document Server

    Goriely, S

    2001-01-01

    The reliable evaluation of the r-process production of the actinides and careful estimates of the uncertainties affecting these predictions are key ingredients especially in nucleo-cosmochronology studies based on the analysis of very metal-poor stars or on the composition of meteorites. This type of information is also required in order to make the best possible use of future high precision data on the actinide composition of galactic cosmic rays, of the local interstellar medium, or of meteoritic grains of presumed circumstellar origin. This paper provides the practitioners in these various fields with the most detailed and careful analysis of the r-process actinide production available to-date. In total, thirty-two different multi-event canonical calculations using different nuclear ingredients or astrophysics conditions are presented, and are considered to give a fair picture of the level of reliability of the predictions of the actinide production, at least in the framework of a simple r-process model. T...

  10. Analytical applications of superacid dissolution of actinide and lanthanide substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The superacid system HF/SbF5 is extraordinarily effective for total dissolution of actinide and lanthanide ceramic oxides, fluorides, and metals. Optical or gamma spectroscopy can be used directly on the solutions. Evaporation of the HF/SbF5 solvent under vacuum leaves a residue which is easily dissolved by ordinary mineral acids. The resulting aqueous solutions are readily amenable to conventional analytical methods. (author) 14 refs.; 1 tab

  11. Impact of actinide recycle on nuclear fuel cycle health risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this background paper is to summarize what is presently known about potential impacts on the impacts on the health risk of the nuclear fuel cycle form deployment of the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR)1 and Integral Fast Reactor (IF)2 technology as an actinide burning system. In a companion paper the impact on waste repository risk is addressed in some detail. Therefore, this paper focuses on the remainder of the fuel cycle

  12. Adsorption on Mesoporous Metal-Organic Frameworks in Solution: Aromatic and Heterocyclic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhvalov, Alexander

    2015-11-16

    Adsorption and desorption play major roles in separations, purification of water, waste streams, liquid fuels, catalysis, biomedicine and chromatography. Mesoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with pore sizes 2-50 nm are particularly suitable for adsorption of organic compounds in solution. Tens of thousands of aromatic and heterocyclic compounds are major components of liquid fuels, feedstock for industrial synthesis, solvents, dyestuffs, agricultural chemicals, medicinal drugs, food additives, and so forth. This Review provides a systematization and analysis of studies on adsorption/desorption on mesoporous MOFs in solution and their underlying chemical mechanisms. The (in)stability of mesoporous MOFs in water is critically discussed. Adsorption capacity and selectivity are covered for organic dyes, medicinal drugs, major components of liquid fuels, and miscellaneous industrial chemicals. Ionic interactions, Brønsted acid-base interactions, hydrogen bonding, coordination bonding, π-π interactions, and non-specific interactions are covered amongst adsorption mechanisms. The effects of post-synthetic modifications of mesoporous MOFs on their stability, adsorption capacity, selectivity, and mechanisms of adsorption and desorption are analyzed. To encourage research in this quickly growing field, we identify "niches" for which no application-oriented and/or mechanistic studies were reported. Perspectives and limitations of a wide use of mesoporous MOFs as industrial sorbents are discussed.

  13. Electronic Structures of Square Planar Coordinated Transition Metal Ions in Compounds with Gillespite Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林传易

    1990-01-01

    Electronic structures of square planar coordinated transition metal ions in BaCuSi4O10 and CaCrSi4O10 are investigated using the ligand-field theory(LFT),angular overlap model(AOM) and iterative extended Hueckel molecular orbital theory(IET).The electronic energy levels of the natural mineral dioptase are also investigated,in which the Cu2+ ions occupy the sites of pseudo D4h symmetry,Both LFT and AOM predict that the crystal-field levels of transition metal ions in these compounds follow such an order that E(2B1g)

  14. A synthetic, spectroscopic and magnetic susceptibility study of selected main group and transition metal fluoro compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cader, M.S.R.

    1992-01-01

    This study was initiated in order to synthesize and to investigate the magnetic properties of selected main group and transition metal cationic complexes, all stabilized by weakly basic fluoro anions derived either from the Broensted superacids HSO[sub 3]F and HSO[sub 3]CF[sub 3], or the Lewis acids SbF[sub 5] and AsF[sub 5]. The solvolysis of metal(II) fluorosulfates in excess SbF[sub 5] is found to be a useful synthetic route to the corresponding divalent hexafluoro antimonates. The Sn(SbF[sub 6])[sub 2] product from the above synthesis, and its precursor Sn(SO[sub 3]F)[sub 2], react with excess 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene(mes) to give the [pi]-arene adducts Sn(SbF[sub 6])[sub 2][center dot]2mes and Sn(SO[sub 3]F)[sub 2][center dot]mes in high yield. The adducts are characterized by elemental analysis and infrared spectra. The adduct formation is followed by [sup 119]Sn Moessbauer spectroscopy. The divalent fluorosulfates Ni(SO[sub 3]F)[sub 2], Pd(SO[sub 3]F)[sub 2], Pd(SO[sub 3]F)[sub 2] and Ag(SO[sub 3]F)[sub 2], precursors to the M(SbF[sub 6])[sub 2] compounds, and the mixed valency Pd(II) [Pd(IV)(SO[sub 3]F)[sub 6

  15. Adsorptive removal of nitrogen-containing compounds from fuel by metal-organic frameworks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoyang; Wang; Zhiguo; Sun; Linghao; Kong; Gang; Li

    2013-01-01

    The adsorptive denitrogenation from fuels over three metal-organic frameworks(MIL-96(Al),MIL-53(Al)and MIL-101(Cr))was studied by batch adsorption experiments.Four nitrogen-containing compounds(NCCs)pyridine,pyrrole,quinoline and indole were used as model NCCs in fuels to study the adsorption mechanism.The physicochemical properties of the adsorbents were characterized by XRD,N2physical adsorption,FT-IR spectrum and Hammett indicator method.The metal-organic frameworks(MOFs),especially the MIL-101(Cr)containing Lewis acid sites as well as high specific surface area,can adsorb large quantities of NCCs from fuels.In addition,the adsorptive capacity over MIL-101(Cr)will be different for NCCs with different basicity.The stronger basicity of the NCC is,the more it can be absorbed over MIL-101(Cr).Furthermore,pore size and shape also affect the adsorption capacity for a given adsorbate,which can be proved by the adsorption over MIL-53(Al)and MIL-96(Al).The pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir equation can be used to describe kinetics and thermodynamics of the adsorption process,respectively.Finally,the regeneration of the used adsorbent has been conducted successfully by just washing it with ethanol.

  16. Environmental research on actinide elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G. (eds.)

    1987-08-01

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers. (ACR)

  17. Serum heavy metals and hemoglobin related compounds in Saudi Arabia firefighters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Malki Abdulrahman L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Firefighters are frequently exposed to significant concentrations of hazardous materials including heavy metals, aldehydes, hydrogen chloride, dichlorofluoromethane and some particulates. Many of these materials have been implicated in the triggering of several diseases. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of fire smoke exposure on serum heavy metals and possible affection on iron functions compounds (total iron binding capacity, transferrin saturation percent, ferritin, unsaturated iron-binding capacity blood hemoglobin and carboxyhemoglobin,. Subjects and methods Two groups of male firefighter volunteers were included; the first included 28 firefighters from Jeddah city, while the second included 21 firefighters from Yanbu city with an overall age rang of 20–48 years. An additional group of 23 male non-firefighters volunteered from both cities as normal control subjects. Blood samples were collected from all volunteer subjects and investigated for relevant parameters. Results The results obtained showed that there were no statistically significant changes in the levels of serum heavy metals in firefighters as compared to normal control subjects. Blood carboxyhemoglobin and serum ferritin were statistically increased in Jeddah firefighters, (p Conclusion Such results might point to the need for more health protective and prophylactic measures to avoid such hazardous health effects (elevated Blood carboxyhemoglobin and serum ferritin and decreased serum TIBC and UIBC that might endanger firefighters working under dangerous conditions. Firefighters must be under regular medical follow-up through standard timetabled medical laboratory investigations to allow for early detection of any serum biochemical or blood hematological changes.

  18. Pyrometallurgical processes for recovery of actinide elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battles, J.E.; Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C.; Miller, W.E.

    1994-01-01

    A metallic fuel alloy, nominally U-20-Pu-lOZr, is the key element of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. Metallic fuel permits the use of an innovative, simple pyrometallurgical process, known as pyroprocessing, (the subject of this report), which features fused salt electrorefining of the spent fuel. Electrorefining separates the actinide elements from fission products, without producing a separate stream of plutonium. The plutonium-bearing product is contaminated with higher actinides and with a minor amount of rare earth fission products, making it diversion resistant while still suitable as a fuel material in the fast spectrum of the IFR core. The engineering-scale demonstration of this process will be conducted in the refurbished EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility, which has entered the start-up phase. An additional pyrometallurgical process is under development for extracting transuranic (TRU) elements from Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel in a form suitable for use as a feed to the IFR fuel cycle. Four candidate extraction processes have been investigated and shown to be chemically feasible. The main steps in each process are oxide reduction with calcium or lithium, regeneration of the reductant and recycle of the salt, and separation of the TRU product from the bulk uranium. Two processes, referred to as the lithium and salt transport (calcium reductant) processes, have been selected for engineering-scale demonstration, which is expected to start in late 1993. An integral part of pyroprocessing development is the treatment and packaging of high-level waste materials arising from the operations, along with the qualification of these waste forms for disposal in a geologic repository.

  19. Pyrometallurgical processes for recovery of actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A metallic fuel alloy, nominally U-20-Pu-lOZr, is the key element of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. Metallic fuel permits the use of an innovative, simple pyrometallurgical process, known as pyroprocessing, (the subject of this report), which features fused salt electrorefining of the spent fuel. Electrorefining separates the actinide elements from fission products, without producing a separate stream of plutonium. The plutonium-bearing product is contaminated with higher actinides and with a minor amount of rare earth fission products, making it diversion resistant while still suitable as a fuel material in the fast spectrum of the IFR core. The engineering-scale demonstration of this process will be conducted in the refurbished EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility, which has entered the start-up phase. An additional pyrometallurgical process is under development for extracting transuranic (TRU) elements from Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel in a form suitable for use as a feed to the IFR fuel cycle. Four candidate extraction processes have been investigated and shown to be chemically feasible. The main steps in each process are oxide reduction with calcium or lithium, regeneration of the reductant and recycle of the salt, and separation of the TRU product from the bulk uranium. Two processes, referred to as the lithium and salt transport (calcium reductant) processes, have been selected for engineering-scale demonstration, which is expected to start in late 1993. An integral part of pyroprocessing development is the treatment and packaging of high-level waste materials arising from the operations, along with the qualification of these waste forms for disposal in a geologic repository

  20. Organophosphorus reagents in actinide separations: Unique tools for production, cleanup and disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K. L.

    2000-01-12

    Interactions of actinide ions with phosphate and organophosphorus reagents have figured prominently in nuclear science and technology, particularly in the hydrometallurgical processing of irradiated nuclear fuel. Actinide interactions with phosphorus-containing species impact all aspects from the stability of naturally occurring actinides in phosphate mineral phases through the application of the bismuth phosphate and PUREX processes for large-scale production of transuranic elements to the development of analytical separation and environment restoration processes based on new organophosphorus reagents. In this report, an overview of the unique role of organophosphorus compounds in actinide production, disposal, and environment restoration is presented. The broad utility of these reagents and their unique chemical properties is emphasized.

  1. Nuclear data uncertainty analysis on a minor actinide burner for transmuting spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hangbok

    1998-08-01

    A comprehensive sensitivity and uncertainty analysis was performed on a 1200 MWt minor actinides burner designed for a low burnup reactivity swing, negative doppler coefficient, and low sodium void worth. Sensitivities of the performance parameters were generated using depletion perturbation methods for the constrained close fuel cycle of the reactor. The uncertainty analysis was performed using the sensitivity and covariance data taken from ENDF-B/V and other published sources. The uncertainty analysis of a liquid metal reactor for burning minor actinide has shown that uncertainties in the nuclear data of several key minor actinide isotopes can introduce large uncertainties in the predicted performance of the core. The relative uncertainties in the burnup swing, doppler coefficient, and void worth were conservatively estimated to be 180 %, 97 %, and 46 %, respectively. An analysis was performed to prioritize the minor actinide reactions for reducing the uncertainties. (author). 41 refs., 17 tabs., 1 fig.

  2. Effects of Different Lead Compounds on Growth and Heavy Metal Uptake of Wetland Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENHUAI-MAN; ZHENGCHUN-RONG; 等

    1991-01-01

    Effects of different lead compounds,PbCl2,Pb(NO3)2 and Pb(OAc)2,on the rice growth and uptake of lead and some microelements by wetland rice were studied.The results showed that the seed germination,rice seedling growth,chlorophyl content,grain yield and uptake of Pb,Cu,Zn,Fe and Mn by rice plant were affected by the chemical forms of Pb compunds added in soil to a certain degree.The germination rate and the amount of chlorophyl decreased remarkably with increasing Pb concentration,the root extension was restrained obviously by the presence of Pb,and the effect of PbCl2 was more evident than that of Pb(NO3)2 or Pb(OAc)2.The pot incubation test with yellow brown soil and redsoil showed that there was no significant regularity in effect of Pb on grain yield,but the difference in the influence of various Pb compounds on yield was clearer.The effect on the amount of Pb in straw and brown rice was in the sequence of Pb(NO3)2>Pb(OAc)2>PbCl1.In case the content of Pb in brown rice was 0.5mg/kg,the relative loading capacities of yellow brown soil for Pb added as PbCl2,Pb(OAc)2 and Pb(NO3)2 were 100,90 and 60 respectively.Pb uptake by wetland rice was closely related to the chemical species of Pb in soil,but there was no comparability among chemical forms of different Pb compounds in the same soil.The uptake of Cu,Zn,Fe and Mn by wetland rice was markedly affected by the addition of Pb,and different Pb compounds varied in their impacts on the uptake of other metals by different organs of wetland rice,e.g.the concentration of Fe in root increased significantly (r=0.92**),while opposite was true for Fe in brown rice (r=-0.92**) due to the application of Pb(OAc)2 in soil.These results demonstrate that the effect of accompanying anions of Pb on the physiological and biochemical processes of wetland rice was rather complex.

  3. Comparative Studies of Chemical Effects following Nuclear Reactions and Transformations on Metal Organic Phenyl Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the chemical effects created by the energetic recoil atoms of nuclear reactions in solids and liquids was made on the basis of a broad comparison of the products formed by (n, γ) and (n, 2n) processes in the metalphenyl compounds of germanium, tin, lead, arsenic and antimony. In addition, the radioactive recoil products formed after the K-capture process on Ge68 - tetraphenyl are compared with the results from the (n, γ) -process on Ga-triphenyl and the (n,p) process on Ge-tetra phenyl. Finally, the studies include the β- transition on Ge77-tetraphenyl to As77. Applying different separation methods, e.g. adsorption chromatography on alumina, ion exchange and electrophoresis, the various radioactive recoil products were separated and the individual yields determined. It was found that in nuclear reactions the compounds of the mentioned metals having identical ligands formed practically the same classes of recoil products. The yield distribution however reveals characteristic alterations between the (n, γ) and (n, 2n) reaction. Only a small influence on the yields is perceptible when irradiations are performed in liquids and solutions. The large differences found for the new compounds formed by nuclear transformations are striking, not only in the kind of typical products but also in their percentage yields. Thus, several recoil products of Ge and Ga with metalorganic character were found by nuclear reactions on Ge-tetraphenyl that could not be detected at all by the K-capture process on Ge68-tetraphenyl. The β- decay on Ge77-tetraphenyl produces practically the same chemical compounds as were observed by nuclear reactions. However, a remarkable increase in the portion of the labelled parent molecules (retention) is typical for the β- transition. The results are discussed on the basis of theoretical considerations of the amount of kinetic energy transferred to the reacting molecule by the nuclear recoil and the resulting excitation. The hypothesis is

  4. Actinide partitioning-transmutation program final report. I. Overall assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is concerned with an overall assessment of the feasibility of and incentives for partitioning (recovering) long-lived nuclides from fuel reprocessing and fuel refabrication plant radioactive wastes and transmuting them to shorter-lived or stable nuclides by neutron irradiation. The principal class of nuclides considered is the actinides, although a brief analysis is given of the partitioning and transmutation (P-T) of 99Tc and 129I. The results obtained in this program permit us to make a comparison of the impacts of waste management with and without actinide recovery and transmutation. Three major conclusions concerning technical feasibility can be drawn from the assessment: (1) actinide P-T is feasible, subject to the acceptability of fuels containing recycle actinides; (2) technetium P-T is feasible if satisfactory partitioning processes can be developed and satisfactory fuels identified (no studies have been made in this area); and (3) iodine P-T is marginally feasible at best because of the low transmutation rates, the high volatility, and the corrosiveness of iodine and iodine compounds. It was concluded on the basis of a very conservative repository risk analysis that there are no safety or cost incentives for actinide P-T. In fact, if nonradiological risks are included, the short-term risks of P-T exceed the long-term benefits integrated over a period of 1 million years. Incentives for technetium and iodine P-T exist only if extremely conservative long-term risk analyses are used. Further RD and D in support of P-T is not warranted

  5. Actinides recycling assessment in a thermal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Actinides recycling is assessed using BWR fuel assemblies. • Four fuel rods are substituted by minor actinides rods in a UO2 and in a MOX fuel assembly. • Performance of standard fuel assemblies and the ones with the substitution is compared. • Reduction of actinides is measured for the fuel assemblies containing minor actinides rods. • Thermal reactors can be used for actinides recycling. - Abstract: Actinides recycling have the potential to reduce the geological repository burden of the high-level radioactive waste that is produced in a nuclear power reactor. The core of a standard light water reactor is composed only by fuel assemblies and there are no specific positions to allocate any actinides blanket, in this assessment it is proposed to replace several fuel rods by actinides blankets inside some of the reactor core fuel assemblies. In the first part of this study, a single uranium standard fuel assembly is modeled and the amount of actinides generated during irradiation is quantified for use it as reference. Later, in the same fuel assembly four rods containing 6 w/o of minor actinides and using depleted uranium as matrix were replaced and depletion was simulated to obtain the net reduction of minor actinides. Other calculations were performed using MOX fuel lattices instead of uranium standard fuel to find out how much reduction is possible to obtain. Results show that a reduction of minor actinides is possible using thermal reactors and a higher reduction is obtained when the minor actinides are embedded in uranium fuel assemblies instead of MOX fuel assemblies

  6. Semivolatile organic compounds, organochlorine pesticides and heavy metals in sediments and risk assessment in Huaihe River of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The concentrations of semivolatile organic compounds, organochlorine pesticides and heavy metals in sediments from Jiangsu reach of Huaihe River, China, were presented. The organic compounds were extracted by acetone: n-hexane using a Soxhlet apparatus and concentrations were performed using HP6890 gas chromatography coupled by FID and ECD detector. The total contents of 8 heavy metals by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry or cold-vapor/atomic absorption spectrometry were developed. 30 semivolatile organic compounds were detected, including substituted benzenes, phenols, phthalates and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, from 0.01 to 3.01 mg/kg. 16 organochlorine pesticides were almost detected and from 0.010 to 2.339 μg/kg.Concentrations of major metals were 50 mg/kg or less, mean level of mercury was only 0.055 mg/kg. Compared to sediment quality guidelines (SQGs), concentrations of some semivolatile organic compounds were high enough to cause possible toxic effects to living resources. The organochlorine pesticides presented relatively low, lower than threshold effect concentrations (TECs), harmful effects on sediment-dwelling organisms were not expected. Chromium posed probable toxic effects to the living resources, other heavy metals had no threat temporarily according to SQGs.

  7. Bioavailability of Heavy Metals in Soil: Impact on Microbial Biodegradation of Organic Compounds and Possible Improvement Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishna Pillay

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Co-contamination of the environment with toxic chlorinated organic and heavy metal pollutants is one of the major problems facing industrialized nations today. Heavy metals may inhibit biodegradation of chlorinated organics by interacting with enzymes directly involved in biodegradation or those involved in general metabolism. Predictions of metal toxicity effects on organic pollutant biodegradation in co-contaminated soil and water environments is difficult since heavy metals may be present in a variety of chemical and physical forms. Recent advances in bioremediation of co-contaminated environments have focussed on the use of metal-resistant bacteria (cell and gene bioaugmentation, treatment amendments, clay minerals and chelating agents to reduce bioavailable heavy metal concentrations. Phytoremediation has also shown promise as an emerging alternative clean-up technology for co-contaminated environments. However, despite various investigations, in both aerobic and anaerobic systems, demonstrating that metal toxicity hampers the biodegradation of the organic component, a paucity of information exists in this area of research. Therefore, in this review, we discuss the problems associated with the degradation of chlorinated organics in co-contaminated environments, owing to metal toxicity and shed light on possible improvement strategies for effective bioremediation of sites co-contaminated with chlorinated organic compounds and heavy metals.

  8. Flexible metal-organic framework compounds: In situ studies for selective CO2 capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented that explore the dynamic structural changes occurring in two highly flexible nanocrystalline metal-organic framework (MOF) compounds during the adsorption and desorption of pure gases and binary mixtures. The Ni(1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene)[Ni(CN)4] and catena-bis(dibenzoylmethanato)-(4,4′-bipyridyl)nickel(II) chosen for this study are 3-D and 1-D porous coordination polymers (PCP) with a similar gate opening pressure response for CO2 isotherms at 303 K, but with differing degrees of flexibility for structural change to accommodate guest molecules. As such, they serve as a potential model system for evaluating the complex kinetics associated with dynamic structure changes occurring in response to gas adsorption in flexible MOF systems. Insights into the crystallographic changes occurring as the MOF pore structure expands and contracts in response to interactions with CO2, N2, and CO2/N2 mixtures have been obtained from in situ small-angle neutron scattering and neutron diffraction, combined with ex situ X-ray diffraction structure measurements. The role of structure in carbon capture functionality is discussed with reference to the ongoing characterization challenges and a possible materials-by-design approach. - Graphical abstract: We present in situ small-angle neutron scattering results for two flexible metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The figure shows that for one (NiBpene, high CO2 adsorption) the intensity of the Bragg peak for the expandable d-spacing most associated with CO2 adsorption varies approximately with the isotherm, while for the other (NiDBM-Bpy, high CO2 selectivity) the d-spacing, itself, varies with the isotherm. The cartoons show the proposed modes of structural change. - Highlights: • Dynamic structures of two flexible MOF CO2 sorbent compounds are compared in situ. • These porous solid sorbents serve as models for pure & dual gas adsorption. • Different degrees of structural freedom give different CO2 adsorption

  9. Flexible metal-organic framework compounds: In situ studies for selective CO{sub 2} capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, A.J., E-mail: andrew.allen@nist.gov [Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8520 (United States); Espinal, L.; Wong-Ng, W. [Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8520 (United States); Queen, W.L. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6102 (United States); The Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Brown, C.M. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6102 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Kline, S.R. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6102 (United States); Kauffman, K.L. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); Culp, J.T. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); URS Corporation, South Park, PA 15219 (United States); Matranga, C. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States)

    2015-10-25

    Results are presented that explore the dynamic structural changes occurring in two highly flexible nanocrystalline metal-organic framework (MOF) compounds during the adsorption and desorption of pure gases and binary mixtures. The Ni(1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene)[Ni(CN){sub 4}] and catena-bis(dibenzoylmethanato)-(4,4′-bipyridyl)nickel(II) chosen for this study are 3-D and 1-D porous coordination polymers (PCP) with a similar gate opening pressure response for CO{sub 2} isotherms at 303 K, but with differing degrees of flexibility for structural change to accommodate guest molecules. As such, they serve as a potential model system for evaluating the complex kinetics associated with dynamic structure changes occurring in response to gas adsorption in flexible MOF systems. Insights into the crystallographic changes occurring as the MOF pore structure expands and contracts in response to interactions with CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixtures have been obtained from in situ small-angle neutron scattering and neutron diffraction, combined with ex situ X-ray diffraction structure measurements. The role of structure in carbon capture functionality is discussed with reference to the ongoing characterization challenges and a possible materials-by-design approach. - Graphical abstract: We present in situ small-angle neutron scattering results for two flexible metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The figure shows that for one (NiBpene, high CO{sub 2} adsorption) the intensity of the Bragg peak for the expandable d-spacing most associated with CO{sub 2} adsorption varies approximately with the isotherm, while for the other (NiDBM-Bpy, high CO{sub 2} selectivity) the d-spacing, itself, varies with the isotherm. The cartoons show the proposed modes of structural change. - Highlights: • Dynamic structures of two flexible MOF CO{sub 2} sorbent compounds are compared in situ. • These porous solid sorbents serve as models for pure & dual gas adsorption. • Different

  10. Behavior of actinides in the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, J.C. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Nuclear Science Center; Lineberry, M.J. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Technology Development Div.

    1994-06-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development by Argonne National Laboratory uses metallic fuels instead of ceramics. This allows electrorefining of spent fuels and presents opportunities for recycling minor actinide elements. Four minor actinides ({sup 237}Np, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am) determine the waste storage requirements of spent fuel from all types of fission reactors. These nuclides behave the same as uranium and other plutonium isotopes in electrorefining, so they can be recycled back to the reactor without elaborate chemical processing. An experiment has been designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the high-energy neutron spectra of the IFR in consuming these four nuclides and plutonium. Eighteen sets of seven actinide and five light metal targets have been selected for ten day exposure in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 which serves as a prototype of the IFR. Post-irradiation analyses of the exposed targets by gamma, alpha, and mass spectroscopy are used to determine nuclear reaction-rates and neutron spectra. These experimental data increase the authors` confidence in their ability to predict reaction rates in candidate IFR designs using a variety of neutron transport and diffusion programs.

  11. Actinide chemistry in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Koichiro; Bell, Thomas James; Ikeda, Yasuhisa

    2013-04-01

    This Forum Article provides an overview of the reported studies on the actinide chemistry in ionic liquids (ILs) with a particular focus on several fundamental chemical aspects: (i) complex formation, (ii) electrochemistry, and (iii) extraction behavior. The majority of investigations have been dedicated to uranium, especially for the 6+ oxidation state (UO2(2+)), because the chemistry of uranium in ordinary solvents has been well investigated and uranium is the most abundant element in the actual nuclear fuel cycles. Other actinides such as thorium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curiumm, although less studied, are also of importance in fully understanding the nuclear fuel engineering process and the safe geological disposal of radioactive wastes. PMID:22873132

  12. Recovery of actinides from TBP-Na2Co3 scrub-waste solutions: the ARALEX process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A flowsheet for the recovery of actinides from TBP-Na2CO3 scrub-waste solutions has been developed, based on batch extraction data, and tested, using laboratory-scale countercurrent extraction techniques. The process, called the ARALEX process, uses 2-ethyl-1-hexanol (2-EHOH) to extract the TBP degradation products (HDBP and H2MBP) from acidified Na2CO3 scrub waste leaving the actinides in the aqueous phase. Dibutyl and monobutyl phosphoric acids are attached to the 2-EHOH molecules through hydrogen bonds, which also diminish the ability of the HDBP and H2MBP to complex actinides. Thus all actinides remain in the aqueous raffinate. Dilute sodium hydroxide solutions can be used to back-extract the dibutyl and monobutyl phosphoric acid esters as their sodium salts. The 2-EHOH can then be recycled. After extraction of the acidified carbonate waste with 2-EHOH, the actinides may be readily extracted from the raffinate with DHDECMP or, in the case of tetra- and hexavalent actinides, with TBP. The ARALEX process can also be applied to other actinide waste streams which contain appreciable concentrations of polar organic compounds (e.g., detergents) that interfere with conventional actinide ion exchange and liquid-liquid extraction procedures. 20 figures, 6 tables

  13. Recovery of actinides from TBP-Na/sub 2/Co/sub 3/ scrub-waste solutions: the ARALEX process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Bloomquist, C.A.A.; Mason, G.W.; Leonard, R.A.; Ziegler, A.A.

    1979-08-01

    A flowsheet for the recovery of actinides from TBP-Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ scrub-waste solutions has been developed, based on batch extraction data, and tested, using laboratory-scale countercurrent extraction techniques. The process, called the ARALEX process, uses 2-ethyl-1-hexanol (2-EHOH) to extract the TBP degradation products (HDBP and H/sub 2/MBP) from acidified Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ scrub waste leaving the actinides in the aqueous phase. Dibutyl and monobutyl phosphoric acids are attached to the 2-EHOH molecules through hydrogen bonds, which also diminish the ability of the HDBP and H/sub 2/MBP to complex actinides. Thus all actinides remain in the aqueous raffinate. Dilute sodium hydroxide solutions can be used to back-extract the dibutyl and monobutyl phosphoric acid esters as their sodium salts. The 2-EHOH can then be recycled. After extraction of the acidified carbonate waste with 2-EHOH, the actinides may be readily extracted from the raffinate with DHDECMP or, in the case of tetra- and hexavalent actinides, with TBP. The ARALEX process can also be applied to other actinide waste streams which contain appreciable concentrations of polar organic compounds (e.g., detergents) that interfere with conventional actinide ion exchange and liquid-liquid extraction procedures. 20 figures, 6 tables.

  14. Actinide Waste Forms and Radiation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, R. C.; Weber, W. J.

    Over the past few decades, many studies of actinides in glasses and ceramics have been conducted that have contributed substantially to the increased understanding of actinide incorporation in solids and radiation effects due to actinide decay. These studies have included fundamental research on actinides in solids and applied research and development related to the immobilization of the high level wastes (HLW) from commercial nuclear power plants and processing of nuclear weapons materials, environmental restoration in the nuclear weapons complex, and the immobilization of weapons-grade plutonium as a result of disarmament activities. Thus, the immobilization of actinides has become a pressing issue for the twenty-first century (Ewing, 1999), and plutonium immobilization, in particular, has received considerable attention in the USA (Muller et al., 2002; Muller and Weber, 2001). The investigation of actinides and

  15. Preparation of isotopes and sources of actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the C.E.A. possesses no isotopic separation facility, the productions of isotopes of actinide elements are performed: a) by neutron irradiation and chemical treatment of special targets, b) by milking decay products from stocks of aged actinide elements, c) by chemical treatment of alpha active wastes. These productions concern the following isotopes: 233U, 238Pu, 242Pu, 243Cm, 242Cm, 244Cm (a); 228Th, 229Th, 234U, 237U, 239Np, 240Pu, 241Am, 248Cm (b); 237Np, 241Am (c). These isotopes are produced to satisfy French and international needs and are sent to users in various forms: solutions, metals, oxides, fluorides, or in different sources forms. The preparation of the sources represents an important field of activities divided into two parts: 1/Industrial sources: production of large series of different sources, 2/ Scientific sources: production of sources suitable for a specific scientific problem. A large overview of these activities is given

  16. Actinide-specific sequestering agents and decontamination applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, William L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials and Molecular Research Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Raymond, Kenneth N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials and Molecular Research Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1981-04-07

    With the commercial development of nuclear reactors, the actinides have become very important industrial elements. A major concern of the nuclear industry is the biological hazard associated with nuclear fuels and their wastes. The acute chemical toxicity of tetravalent actinides, as exemplified by Th(IV), is similar to Cr(III) or Al(III). However, the acute toxicity of 239Pu(IV) is similar to strychnine, which is much more toxic than any of the non-radioactive metals such as mercury. Although the more radioactive isotopes of the transuranium elements are more acutely toxic by weight than plutonium, the acute toxicities of 239Pu, 241Am, and 244Cm are nearly identical in radiation dose, ~100 μCi/kg in rodents. Finally and thus, the extreme acute toxicity of 239Pu is attributed to its high specific activity of alpha emission.

  17. Intra-chain superexchange couplings in quasi-1D 3d transition-metal magnetic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Hongping; Tang, Yingying; Zhang, Suyun; He, Zhangzhen

    2016-07-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of the quasi-1D transition-metal borates PbMBO4 (M  =  Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co) have been investigated by density functional theory, including electronic correlation. The results evidence PbCrBO4 and PbFeBO4 as antiferromagnetic (AFM) semiconductors (intra-chain AFM and inter-chain FM) and PbMnBO4 as a ferromagnetic (FM) semiconductor (both intra- and inter-chain FM) in accordance with experimental observations. For non-synthesized PbTiBO4, PbVBO4, and PbCoBO4, the ground-state magnetic structures are paramagnetic, FM, and paramagnetic, respectively. In this series of compounds, there are two kinds of superexchange couplings dominating their magnetic properties, i.e. the direction M–M delocalization superexchange and indirect M–O–M correlation superexchange. For PbMBO4 with M 3+ d  n , n  ⩽  3 (M  =  V and Cr), the main intra-chain spin coupling is the M–M t 2g–t 2g direct delocalization superexchange, while for PbMBO4 with M 3+ d  n , n  >  3 (M  =  Mn and Fe), the main intra-chain spin coupling is the near 90° M–O–M e g–p–e g indirect correlation superexchange.

  18. Spiral magnetic order and pressure-induced superconductivity in transition metal compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yishu; Feng, Yejun; Cheng, J.-G.; Wu, W.; Luo, J. L.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic and superconducting ground states can compete, cooperate and coexist. MnP provides a compelling and potentially generalizable example of a material where superconductivity and magnetism may be intertwined. Using a synchrotron-based non-resonant X-ray magnetic diffraction technique, we reveal a spiral spin order in MnP and trace its pressure evolution towards superconducting order via measurements in a diamond anvil cell. Judging from the magnetostriction, ordered moments vanish at the quantum phase transition as pressure increases the electron kinetic energy. Spins remain local in the disordered phase, and the promotion of superconductivity is likely to emerge from an enhanced coupling to residual spiral spin fluctuations and their concomitant suppression of phonon-mediated superconductivity. As the pitch of the spiral order varies across the 3d transition metal compounds in the MnP family, the magnetic ground state switches between antiferromagnet and ferromagnet, providing an additional tuning parameter in probing spin-fluctuation-induced superconductivity. PMID:27708255

  19. Results of coupled channels calculations for the neutrons cross sections of a set of actinide nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gathers recents results of neutrons interactions with the following actinide nuclei: 230Th, 232Th, 234U, 238U, 242Pu, 246Cm and 252Cf from the use of the coupled channels optical model. Tabulations of the following quantities are given in Annexe: total, direct elastic and inelastic scattering (integrated and differential), and compound nucleus formation cross sections; ground state generalized transmission coefficients needed to calculate the cross sections of partial compound nucleus processes. This work was carried out within the framework of the IAEA-NDS Coordinated Research Programme on the Intercomparison of Actinide Neutron Cross Section Evaluations

  20. Long-term plant availability of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental releases of actinide elements raise issues about which data are very limited. Quantitative information is required to assess the long-term behavior of actinides and their potential hazards resulting from the transport through food chains leading to man. Of special interest is the effect of time on the changes in the availability of actinide elements for uptake by plants from soil. This study provides valuable information on the effects of weathering and aging on the uptake of actinides from soil by range and crop plants grown under realistic field conditions

  1. Chemistry of actinides and fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This task is concerned primarily with the fundamental chemistry of the actinide and fission product elements. Special efforts are made to develop research programs in collaboration with researchers at universities and in industry who have need of national laboratory facilities. Specific areas currently under investigation include: (1) spectroscopy and photochemistry of actinides in low-temperature matrices; (2) small-angle scattering studies of hydrous actinide and fission product polymers in aqueous and nonaqueous solvents; (3) kinetic and thermodynamic studies of complexation reactions in aqueous and nonaqueous solutions; and (4) the development of inorganic ion exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide separations. Recent results from work in these areas are summarized here

  2. Metal Complexes Containing Natural and and Artificial Radioactive Elements and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxana V. Kharissova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances (during the 2007–2014 period in the coordination and organometallic chemistry of compounds containing natural and artificially prepared radionuclides (actinides and technetium, are reviewed. Radioactive isotopes of naturally stable elements are not included for discussion in this work. Actinide and technetium complexes with O-, N-, N,O, N,S-, P-containing ligands, as well π-organometallics are discussed from the view point of their synthesis, properties, and main applications. On the basis of their properties, several mono-, bi-, tri-, tetra- or polydentate ligands have been designed for specific recognition of some particular radionuclides, and can be used in the processes of nuclear waste remediation, i.e., recycling of nuclear fuel and the separation of actinides and fission products from waste solutions or for analytical determination of actinides in solutions; actinide metal complexes are also usefulas catalysts forcoupling gaseous carbon monoxide,as well as antimicrobial and anti-fungi agents due to their biological activity. Radioactive labeling based on the short-lived metastable nuclide technetium-99m (99mTc for biomedical use as heart, lung, kidney, bone, brain, liver or cancer imaging agents is also discussed. Finally, the promising applications of technetium labeling of nanomaterials, with potential applications as drug transport and delivery vehicles, radiotherapeutic agents or radiotracers for monitoring metabolic pathways, are also described.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and thermal behaviour of solid-state compounds of benzoates with some bivalent transition metal ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano B. Siqueira

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state MBz compounds, where M stands for bivalent Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn and Bz is benzoate, have been synthesized. Simultaneous thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, infrared spectroscopy and complexometry were used to characterize and to study the thermal behaviour of these compounds. The procedure used in the preparation of the compounds via reaction of basic carbonates with benzoic acid is not efficient in eliminating excess acid. However the TG-DTA curves permitted to verify that the binary compounds can be obtained by thermosynthesis, because the benzoic acid can be eliminated before the thermal decomposition of these compounds. The results led to information about the composition, dehydration, thermal stability, thermal decomposition and structure of the isolated compounds. On heating, these compounds decompose in two (Mn, Co, Ni, Zn or three (Fe, Cu steps with formation of the respective oxide (Mn3O4, Fe2O3, Co3O4, NiO, CuO and ZnO as final residue. The theoretical and experimental spectroscopic studies suggest a covalent bidentate bond between ligand and metallic center.

  4. Comparative Study of f-Element Electronic Structure across a Series of Multimetallic Actinide, Lanthanide-Actinide and Lanthanum-Actinide Complexes Possessing Redox-Active Bridging Ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelter, Eric J.; Wu, Ruilian; Veauthier, Jacqueline M.; Bauer, Eric D.; Booth, Corwin H.; Thomson, Robert K.; Graves, Christopher R.; John, Kevin D.; Scott, Brian L.; Thompson, Joe D.; Morris, David E.; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L.

    2010-02-24

    A comparative examination of the electronic interactions across a series of trimetallic actinide and mixed lanthanide-actinide and lanthanum-actinide complexes is presented. Using reduced, radical terpyridyl ligands as conduits in a bridging framework to promote intramolecular metal-metal communication, studies containing structural, electrochemical, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy are presented for (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}An[-N=C(Bn)(tpy-M{l_brace}C{sub 5}Me4R{r_brace}{sub 2})]{sub 2} (where An = Th{sup IV}, U{sup IV}; Bn = CH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}; M = La{sup III}, Sm{sup III}, Yb{sup III}, U{sup III}; R = H, Me, Et) to reveal effects dependent on the identities of the metal ions and R-groups. The electrochemical results show differences in redox energetics at the peripheral 'M' site between complexes and significant wave splitting of the metal- and ligand-based processes indicating substantial electronic interactions between multiple redox sites across the actinide-containing bridge. Most striking is the appearance of strong electronic coupling for the trimetallic Yb{sup III}-U{sup IV}-Yb{sup III}, Sm{sup III}-U{sup IV}-Sm{sup III}, and La{sup III}-U{sup IV}-La{sup III} complexes, [8]{sup -}, [9b]{sup -} and [10b]{sup -}, respectively, whose calculated comproportionation constant K{sub c} is slightly larger than that reported for the benchmark Creutz-Taube ion. X-ray absorption studies for monometallic metallocene complexes of U{sup III}, U{sup IV}, and U{sup V} reveal small but detectable energy differences in the 'white-line' feature of the uranium L{sub III}-edges consistent with these variations in nominal oxidation state. The sum of this data provides evidence of 5f/6d-orbital participation in bonding and electronic delocalization in these multimetallic f-element complexes. An improved, high-yielding synthesis of 4{prime}-cyano-2,2{prime}:6{prime},2{double_prime}-terpyridine is also reported.

  5. The complex formation of selected actinides (U, Np, Cm) with microbial ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the urgent tasks in the field of nuclear technology is the final storage of radioactive substances. As a part of the safety requirements the protection of humans and the environment from the danger of radioactive substances in case of the release from the final storage is essential. For performing long-term safety calculations the detailed understanding of the physico-chemical effects and influences which cause the mobilisation and transport of actinides are necessary. The presented work was a discrete part of a project, which was focused on the clarification of the influence of microorganisms on the migration of actinides in case of the release of actinides from a final storage. The influence of microbial produced substances on the mobilisation of selected actinides was studied thereby. The microbial produced substances studied in this project were synthesized by bacteria from the Pseudomonas genus under special conditions. Fluorescent Pseudomonads secrete bacterial pyoverdin-type siderophores with a high potential to complex and transport metals, especially iron(III). The aim of the project was to determine how and under which conditions the bioligands are able to complex also radioactive substances and therefore to transport them. For this work the alpha-emitting actinides uranium, curium and neptunium were chosen because their long-life cycle and their radiotoxicity are a matter of particular interest. This work dealed with the interaction of the actinides U(VI), Np(V) and Cm(III) with model ligands simulating the functionality of the pyoverdins. So, such bioligands can essentially influence the behaviour of actinides in the environment. The results of this work contribute to a better understanding and assessment of the influence of the microbial ligands to the mobilisation and migration of the radionuclides. The outcomes could be used to quantify the actinide-mobilising effect of the bioligands, which are released, for example, in the vicinity of a

  6. Diffusion of alkali metals in the first stage graphite intercalation compounds by vdW-DFT calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhaohui; Ratvik, Arne Petter; Grande, Tor; Selbach, Sverre Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion of alkali metal cations in the first stage graphite intercalation compounds (GIC) LiC6, NaC6, NaC8 and KC8 has been investigated with density functional theory (DFT) calculations using the optPBE-vdW van der Waals functional. The formation energies of alkali vacancies, interstitials and Frenkel defects were calculated and vacancies were found to be the dominating point defects. The diffusion coefficients of the alkali metals in GIC were evaluated by a hopping model of point defects ...

  7. Actinides-lanthanides (neodymium) separation by electrolytic extraction in molten fluoride media; Separation actinides-lanthanides (neodyne) par extraction electrolytique en milieux fluorures fondus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamel, C

    2005-02-15

    The aim of this thesis is to assess the potentialities of pyrochemical processes for future nuclear fuels and Generation IV reactors (more particularly molten salt reactors). This study concerns the Actinides-Lanthanides and Lanthanides-Solvent separation by electrolytic extraction in molten fluoride media at high temperature. Three elements are selected for this study: neodymium (NdF{sub 3}), uranium (UF{sub 4}) and plutonium (PuF{sub 3}). Firstly, the electrochemical study of these three compounds in molten fluoride media is performed to evaluate the separations. Electrodeposition processes are studied and the values of formal potentials of U(III)/U(0), Pu(III)/Pu(0) and Nd(III)/Nd(0) are obtained in LiF-CaF{sub 2} eutectic mixture. Thermodynamically, the values of potentials differences are enough to separate U-Nd and Pu-Nd with a yield of extraction of 99.99%; this value is just sufficient for the Pu-Nd separation. Concerning the Nd-solvent separation this potential difference is too small. Next, the electrodeposition of solid metals on inert electrodes is performed. This study showed that the uranium and neodymium deposits are unstable in several fluoride media. In addition, the presence of salts in the dendritic metal is observed for the U solid deposits. Finally, a reactive cathode is used to improve these separation results and the shape of the deposits. The experimental results on nickel electrodes showed an improvement of the Pu-Nd separation and the Nd-solvent separation with the depolarization phenomenon of the metal deposit on the nickel. Moreover, U and Nd metal are stabilized in the alloy which allows the elimination of reactions with the solvent as observed for the solid deposit. The formation of liquids alloys makes also easier the recovery of these three. (author)

  8. Actinides-lanthanides (neodymium) separation by electrolytical extraction in molten fluoride media; Separation actinides-lanthanides (neodyne) par extraction electrolytique en milieux fluorures fondus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamel, C

    2005-02-15

    The aim of this thesis is to assess the potentialities of pyrochemical processes for futur nuclear fuels and Generation IV reactors (more particularly molten salt reactors). This study concerns the Actinides-Lanthanides and Lanthanides-Solvent separation by electrolytical extraction in molten fluoride media at high temperature. Three elements are selected for this study: neodymium (NdF{sub 3}), uranium (UF{sub 4}) and plutonium (PuF{sub 3}). Firstly, the electrochemical study of these three compounds in molten fluoride media is performed to evaluate the separations. Electrodeposition processes are studied and the values of formal potentials of U(III)/U(0), Pu(III)/Pu(0) and Nd(III)/Nd(0) are obtained in LiF-CaF{sub 2} eutectic mixture. Thermodynamically, the values of potentials differences are enough to separate U-Nd and Pu-Nd with a yield of extraction of 99.99%; this value is just sufficient for the Pu-Nd separation. Concerning the Nd-solvent separation this potential difference is too small. Next, the electrodeposition of solid metals on inert electrodes is performed. This study showed that the uranium and neodymium deposits are unstable in several fluoride media. In addition, the presence of salts in the dendritic metal is observed for the U solid deposits. Finally, a reactive cathode is used to improve these separation results and the shape of the deposits. The experimental results on nickel electrodes showed an improvement of the Pu-Nd separation and the Nd-solvent separation with the depolarisation phenomenon of the metal deposit on the nickel. Moreover, U and Nd metal are stabilized in the alloy which allows the elimination of reactions with the solvent as observed for the solid deposit. The formation of liquids alloys makes also easier the recovery of these three. (author)

  9. Chemical reactions of actinides with groundwater colloids. Studies of transferability of laboratory data to natural conditions. The aquiferous system in Gorleben. Interim report. Reported period: 1.2.1993-31.12.1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study deals with the chemical interreaction between actinides and groundwater-colloids in selected aquiferes in the overburden of the planned final storage site for radioactive matter near Gorleben (Lower Saxony). As colloids have other transport properties than dissolved metal ions the interaction of actinides and groundwater-colloids has an important influence on their migration and is therefore essentially important for longterm-safety analyses. In order to study interaction of actinides with groundwater-colloids selected groundwaters were conditioned with trace concentrations of the actinides TH, Np, Pu, Am and Cm. For hexavalent actinides one used the analytical data of natural uranium in the groundwaters. In order to determine the humic-colloid-bound parts of the actinides the conditioned ground waters were filtered with a pore width of 1 nm and actinide concentration was determined with radiometry. (orig./EF)

  10. Actinides: How well do we know their stellar production?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goriely, S.; Arnould, M.

    2001-12-01

    The reliable evaluation of the r-process production of the actinides and careful estimates of the uncertainties affecting these predictions are key ingredients especially in nucleo-cosmochronology studies based on the analysis of very metal-poor stars or on the composition of meteorites. This type of information is also required in order to make the best possible use of future high precision data on the actinide composition of galactic cosmic rays, of the local interstellar medium, or of meteoritic grains of presumed circumstellar origin. This paper provides the practitioners in these various fields with the most detailed and careful analysis of the r-process actinide production available to-date. This study is based on a version of the multi-event canonical model of the r-process which discards the largely used waiting point approximation. It considers also different combinations of models for the calculation of nuclear masses, beta -decay and fission rates. Two variants of the model used to predict nuclear reaction rates are adopted. In addition, the influence of the level of Pb and Bi production by the r-process on the estimated actinide production is evaluated by relying on the solar abundances of these two elements. In total, thirty-two different cases are presented, and are considered to give a fair picture of the level of reliability of the predictions of the actinide production, at least in the framework of a simple r-process model. This simplicity is imposed by our inability to identify the proper astrophysical sites for the r-process. As a guide to the practitioners, constraints on the actinide yield predictions and associated uncertainties are suggested on grounds of the measured abundances of r-nuclides, including Th and U, in the star CS 31082-001, and under the critical and questionable assumption of the ``universality'' of the r-process. We also define alternative constraints based on the nucleo-cosmochronological results derived from the present

  11. The chemistry of molten salt mixtures: application to the reductive extraction of lanthanides and actinides by a liquid metal; Chimie des melanges de sels fondus. Application a l'extraction reductrice d'actinides et de lanthanides par un metal liquide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finne, J

    2005-10-15

    The design of a process of An/Ln separation by liquid - liquid extraction can be used for on-line purification of the molten salt in a molten salt nuclear reactor (Generation IV) as well as reprocessing various spent fuels. In order to establish the chemical properties of An and Ln in molten salt mediums, E - pO{sub 2} - diagrams were established for the relevant chemical elements. With the purpose of checking the possibilities of separating the An from Ln, the real activity coefficients in liquid metals were measured. An experimental protocol was developed and validated on the Gd/Ga system. It was then transferred to radioactive environment to measure the activity coefficient of Pu in Ga. The results made it possible to estimate the effectiveness of the Pu extraction and its separation from Gd and Ce. The selectivity was shown to decrease with the temperature and Al and Ga showed a good selectivity between Pu and the Ce in fluoride medium. (author)

  12. Reversible optical sensor for the analysis of actinides in solution; Capteur optique reversible pour l'analyse des actinides en solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesage, B.; Picard, S. [CEA Marcoule, Dept. de Radiochimie et Procedes, Service de Chimie des Procedes de Separation, Lab. de Chimie des Actinides, 30 (France); Serein-Spirau, F.; Lereporte, J.P. [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Montpellier (ENSCM), CNRS UMR 5076, Lab. Heterochimie Moleculaire et Macromoleculaire, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    2007-07-01

    In this work is presented a concept of reversible optical sensor for actinides. It is composed of a p doped conducing polymer support and of an anion complexing the actinides. The chosen conducing polymer is the thiophene-2,5-di-alkoxy-benzene whose solubility and conductivity are perfectly known. The actinides selective ligand is a lacunar poly-oxo-metallate such as P{sub 2}W{sub 17}O{sub 61}{sup 10-} or SiW{sub 11}O{sub 39}{sup 8-} which are strong anionic complexing agents of actinides at the oxidation state (IV) even in a very acid medium. The sensor is prepared by spin coating of the composite mixture 'polymer + ligand' on a conducing glass electrode and then tested towards its optical and electrochemical answer in presence of uranium (IV). The absorption change due to the formation of cations complexes by poly-oxo-metallate reveals the presence of uranium (IV). After the measurement, the sensor is regenerated by anodic polarization of the support and oxidation of the uranium (IV) into uranium (VI) which weakly interacts with the poly-oxo-metallate and is then released in solution. (O.M.)

  13. Prompt fission neutron spectrum of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capote, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Chen, Y. -J. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China); Hambsch, F. J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre - IRRM, Geel (Belgium); Jurado, B. [CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3, Gradignan (France); Kornilov, N. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States); Lestone, J. P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Litaize, O. [CEA, DEN, DER, SPRC, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Morillon, B. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); Neudecker, D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Oberstedt, S. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre - IRRM, Geel (Belgium); Ohsawa, T. [Kinki Univ., Osaka-fu (Japan); Otuka, N. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Pronyaev, V. G. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Saxena, A. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Schmidt, K. H. [CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3, Gradignan (France); Serot, O. [CEA, DEN, DER, SPRC, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Shcherbakov, O. A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute of NRC " Kurchatov Institute" , Gatchina (Russian Federation); Shu, N. -C. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China); Smith, D. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Talou, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Trkov, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Tudora, A. C. [Univ. of Bucharest, Magurele (Romania); Vogt, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Vorobyev, A. S. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute of NRC " Kurchatov Institute" , Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-06

    Here, the energy spectrum of prompt neutron emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) "Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides" was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei.

  14. Design, selection, and characterization of thioflavin-based intercalation compounds with metal chelating properties for application in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Cristina; Sánchez de Groot, Natalia; Rimola, Albert; Alvarez-Larena, Angel; Lloveras, Vega; Vidal-Gancedo, José; Ventura, Salvador; Vendrell, Josep; Sodupe, Mariona; González-Duarte, Pilar

    2009-02-01

    Metal chelation is considered a rational therapeutic approach for interdicting Alzheimer's amyloid pathogenesis. At present, enhancing the targeting and efficacy of metal-ion chelating agents through ligand design is a main strategy in the development of the next generation of metal chelators. Inspired by the traditional dye Thioflavin-T, we have designed new multifunctional molecules that contain both amyloid binding and metal chelating properties. In silico techniques have enabled us to identify commercial compounds that enclose the designed molecular framework (M1), include potential antioxidant properties, facilitate the formation of iodine-labeled derivatives, and can be permeable through the blood-brain barrier. Iodination reactions of the selected compounds, 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBX), 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole (HBT), and 2-(2-aminophenyl)-1H-benzimidazole (BM), have led to the corresponding iodinated derivatives HBXI, HBTI, and BMI, which have been characterized by X-ray diffraction. The chelating properties of the latter compounds toward Cu(II) and Zn(II) have been examined in the solid phase and in solution. The acidity constants of HBXI, HBTI, and BMI and the formation constants of the corresponding ML and ML2 complexes [M = Cu(II), Zn(II)] have been determined by UV-vis pH titrations. The calculated values for the overall formation constants for the ML2 complexes indicate the suitability of the HBXI, HBTI, and BMI ligands for sequestering Cu(II) and Zn(II) metal ions present in freshly prepared solutions of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide. This was confirmed by Abeta aggregation studies showing that these compounds are able to arrest the metal-promoted increase in amyloid fibril buildup. The fluorescence features of HBX, HBT, BM, and the corresponding iodinated derivatives, together with fluorescence microscopy studies on two types of pregrown fibrils, have shown that HBX and HBT compounds could behave as potential markers for the presence

  15. Isolation and characterization of nanosheets containing few layers of the Aurivillius family of oxides and metal-organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanosheets containing few-layers of ferroelectric Aurivillius family of oxides, Bi2An−1BnO3n+3 (where A=Bi3+, Ba2+ etc. and B=Ti4+, Fe3+ etc.) with n=3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 have been prepared by reaction with n-butyllithium, followed by exfoliation in water. The few-layer samples have been characterized by Tyndall cones, atomic force microscopy, optical spectroscopy and other techniques. The few-layer species have a thickness corresponding to a fraction of the c-parameter along which axis the perovskite layers are stacked. Magnetization measurements have been carried out on the few-layer samples containing iron. Few-layer species of a few layered metal-organic compounds have been obtained by ultrasonication and characterized by Tyndall cones, atomic force microscopy, optical spectroscopy and magnetic measurements. Significant changes in the optical spectra and magnetic properties are found in the few-layer species compared to the bulk samples. Few-layer species of the Aurivillius family of oxides may find uses as thin layer dielectrics in photovoltaics and other applications. - Graphical abstract: Exfoliation of the layered Aurivillius oxides into few-layer nanosheets by chemical Li intercalation using n-BuLi followed by reaction in water. Exfoliation of the layered metal-organic compounds into few-layer nanosheets by ultrasonication. - Highlights: • Few-layer nanosheets of Aurivillius family of oxides with perovskite layers have been generated by lithium intercalation. • Few-layer nanosheets of few layered metal-organic compounds have been generated by ultrasonication. • Few-layer nanosheets of the Aurivillius oxides have been characterized by AFM, TEM and optical spectroscopy. • Aurivillius oxides containing Fe show layer dependent magnetic properties. • Exfoliated few-layer metal-organic compounds show changes in spectroscopic and magnetic properties compared with bulk materials

  16. Electrochemical reduction of actinides oxides in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactive metals are currently produced from their oxide by multiple steps reduction techniques. A one step route from the oxide to the metal has been suggested for metallic titanium production by electrolysis in high temperature molten chloride salts. In the so-called FFC process, titanium oxide is electrochemically reduced at the cathode, generating O2- ions, which are converted on a graphite anode into carbon oxide or dioxide. After this process, the spent salt can in principle be reused for several batches which is particularly attractive for a nuclear application in terms of waste minimization. In this work, the electrochemical reduction process of cerium oxide (IV) is studied in CaCl2 and CaCl2-KCl melts to understand the oxide reduction mechanism. Cerium is used as a chemical analogue of actinides. Electrolysis on 10 grams of cerium oxide are made to find optimal conditions for the conversion of actinides oxides into metals. The scale-up to hundred grams of oxide is also discussed. (author)

  17. Molecular cluster theory of chemical bonding in actinide oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronic structure of actinide monoxides AcO and dioxides AcO2, where Ac = Th, U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm and Bk has been studied by molecular cluster methods based on the first-principles one-electron local density theory. Molecular orbitals for nearest neighbor clusters AcO10-6 and AcO12-8 representative of monoxide and dioxide lattices were obtained using non-relativistic spin-restricted and spin-polarized Hartree-Fock-Slater models for the entire series. Fully relativistic Dirac-Slater calculations were performed for ThO, UO and NpO in order to explore magnitude of spin-orbit splittings and level shifts in valence structure. Self-consistent iterations were carried out for NpO, in which the NpO6 cluster was embedded in the molecular field of the solid. Finally, a ''moment polarized'' model which combines both spin-polarization and relativistic effects in a consistent fashion was applied to the NpO system. Covalent mixing of oxygen 2p and Ac 5f orbitals was found to increase rapidly across the actinide series; metal s,p,d covalency was found to be nearly constant. Mulliken atomic population analysis of cluster eigenvectors shows that free-ion crystal field models are unreliable, except for the light actinides. X-ray photoelectron line shapes have been calculated and are found to compare rather well with experimental data on the dioxides

  18. Electronic structure and ionicity of actinide oxides from first principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Z.;

    2010-01-01

    The ground-state electronic structures of the actinide oxides AO, A2O3, and AO2 (A=U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Bk, and Cf) are determined from first-principles calculations, using the self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation. Emphasis is put on the degree of f-electron localization, which...... for AO2 and A2O3 is found to follow the stoichiometry, namely, corresponding to A4+ ions in the dioxide and A3+ ions in the sesquioxides. In contrast, the A2+ ionic configuration is not favorable in the monoxides, which therefore become metallic. The energetics of the oxidation and reduction...... in the actinide dioxides is discussed, and it is found that the dioxide is the most stable oxide for the actinides from Np onward. Our study reveals a strong link between preferred oxidation number and degree of localization which is confirmed by comparing to the ground-state configurations of the corresponding...

  19. SYNTHESIS, STRUCTURE AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF N(4-ALLYL-3-THIOSEMICARBAZONES AND THEIR COORDINATION COMPOUNDS WITH SOME 3D METALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilii GRAUR

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a review of different N(4-allyl-3-thiosemicarbazones and their coordination compounds described in literature. N(4-allyl-3-thiosemicarbazide can form corresponding thiosemicarbazones with aliphatic, aromatic and heteroaromatic carbonyl compounds. In the presence of transitional metal ions they can form coordination compounds of different structures. Both coordination compounds and proligands manifest antitumor, antibacterial, antiviral, and antimalarial activities. Copper(II coordination compounds with these ligands manifest better antitumor activity than corresponding proligands. SINTEZA, STRUCTURA ŞI ACTIVITATEA BIOLOGICĂ A N(4-ALIL-3-TIOSEMICARBAZONELOR ŞI A COMPUŞILOR COORDINATIVI AI UNOR METALE 3D CU ACEŞTI LIGANZILucrarea prezintă o revistă a N(4-alil-3-tiosemicarbazonelor şi a compuşilor coordinativi cu aceşti liganzi descrise în literatura de specialitate. N(4-alil-3-tiosemicarbazida formează tiosemicarbazone cu aldehide şi cetone alifatice, aro­matice şi heteroaromatice. În prezenţa ionilor de metale de tranziţie acestea pot forma compuşi coordinativi cu diferite structuri. N(4-alil-3-tiosemicarbazonele şi compuşii coordinativi manifestă activitate antitumorală, antibacterială, antivirală şi antimalarică. Compuşii coordinativi ai cuprului cu aceşti liganzi manifestă activitate antitumorală sporită în comparaţie cu N(4-alil-3-tiosemicarbazonele corespunzătoare. 

  20. Actinide ion sensor for pyroprocess monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jue, Jan-fong; Li, Shelly X.

    2014-06-03

    An apparatus for real-time, in-situ monitoring of actinide ion concentrations which comprises a working electrode, a reference electrode, a container, a working electrolyte, a separator, a reference electrolyte, and a voltmeter. The container holds the working electrolyte. The voltmeter is electrically connected to the working electrode and the reference electrode and measures the voltage between those electrodes. The working electrode contacts the working electrolyte. The working electrolyte comprises an actinide ion of interest. The reference electrode contacts the reference electrolyte. The reference electrolyte is separated from the working electrolyte by the separator. The separator contacts both the working electrolyte and the reference electrolyte. The separator is ionically conductive to the actinide ion of interest. The reference electrolyte comprises a known concentration of the actinide ion of interest. The separator comprises a beta double prime alumina exchanged with the actinide ion of interest.

  1. ACTINIDE-SPECIFIC SEQUESTERING AGENTS AND DECONTAMINATION APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, William L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    1980-07-01

    We have briefly reviewed the biological hazards associated with the actinide elements. The most abundant transuranium element produced by both industrial nuclear power plants and nuclear weapons programs is plutonium. It is also potentially the most toxic - particularly due to its long-term hazard as a carcinogen if it is introduced into the body. This toxicity is due in large part to the chemical and biochemical similarities of Pu(IV) and Fe(III). Thus in mammals plutonium is transported and stored by the transport and storage systems for iron. This results in the concentration and long-term retention of an alpha-emitting radionuclide ({sup 239}Pu) at sites such as the bone marrow where cell division occurs at a high rate. The earliest attempts at removal of actinide contamination by chelation therapy were essentially heuristic in that sequestering agents known to be effective at binding other elements were tried with plutonium. The research described here is intended to be a rational approach that begins with the observation that since Fe(III) and Pu(IV) are so similar, and since microbes produce agents called siderophores that are extremely effective and selective sequestering agents for Fe(III), the construction of similar chelating agents for the actinides should be possible using the same chelating groups found in the siderophores. The incorporation of four such groups (primarily catechol and hydroxamic acid) results in multidentate chelating agents that can completely encapsulate the central actinide(IV) ion and achieve the eight-coordinate environment most favored by such ions. The continuing development and improvement of such sequestering agents has produced compounds which remove significant amounts of plutonium deposited in bone and which remove a greater fraction of the total body burden than any other chelation therapy developed to date.

  2. Exchange bias in a mixed metal oxide based magnetocaloric compound YFe0.5Cr0.5O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mohit K.; Singh, Karan; Mukherjee, K.

    2016-09-01

    We report a detailed investigation of magnetization, magnetocaloric effect and exchange bias studies on a mixed metal oxide YFe0.5Cr0.5O3 belonging to perovskite family. Our results reveal that the compound is in canted magnetic state (CMS) where ferromagnetic correlations are present in an antiferromagnetic state. Magnetic entropy change of this compound follows a power law (∆SM∼Hm) dependence of magnetic field. In this compound, inverse magnetocaloric effect (IMCE) is observed below 260 K while conventional magnetocaloric effect (CMCE) above it. The exponent 'm' is found to be independent of temperature and field only in the IMCE region. Investigation of temperature and magnetic field dependence studies of exchange bias, reveal a competition between effective Zeeman energy of the ferromagnetic regions and anisotropic exchange energy at the interface between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic regions. Variation of exchange bias due to temperature and field cycling is also investigated.

  3. Analysis of rhodium-base intermetallic compound, white metal and high speed steel by ICP-AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination procedures of major component of intermetallic compound and alloys which were difficult to dissolve was investigated with ICP-AES. NdRhxBy as intermetallic compound was dissolved in aqua regia, and the residue was fused with NaHSO4 · H2O. RhAl as intermetallic compound was dissolved in hydrochloric acid after fusion with NaHSO4 · H2O. Nd, Rh, B, Al and Cu in these samples were determined with correction of spectral interference caused by Nd. White metal was dissolved in mixture of nitric acid and hydrochloric acid containing tartaric acid for prevention of hydrolysis of Sn and Sb in the sample. Pb, Sn, Sb and Cu as major element in it were determined. High speed steel was dissolved in mixture of sulfuric acid and phosphoric acid. Mo, V, Co, W and Cr as minor component were determined. Spectral interferences caused by Fe, V and Co were corrected. (author)

  4. Validation of minor actinides fission neutron cross-sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Milan P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Verification of neutron fission cross-sections of minor actinides from some recently available evaluated nuclear data libraries was carried out by comparison of the reaction rates calculated by the MCNP6.1 computer code to the experimental values. The experimental samples, containing thin layers of 235U, 237Np, 238,239,240,241Pu, 242mAm, 243Cm, 245Cm, and 247Cm, deposited on metal support and foils of 235U (pseudo-alloy 27Al + 235U, 238U, natIn, 64Zn, 27Al, and multi-component sample alloy 27Al + 55Mn + natCu + natLu + 197Au, were irradiated in the channels of the tank containing fluorine salts 0.52NaF + 0.48ZrF4, labelled as the Micromodel Salt Blanket, inserted in the lattice centre of the MAKET heavy water critical assembly at the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow. This paper is a continuation of earlier initiated scientific-research activities carried out for validation of the evaluated fission cross-sections of actinides that were supposed to be used for the quality examination of the fuel design of the accelerator driven systems or fast reactors, and consequently, determination of transmutation rates of actinides, and therefore, determination of operation parameters of these reactor facilities. These scientific-research activities were carried out within a frame of scientific projects supported by the International Science and Technology Center and the International Atomic Energy Agency co-ordinated research activities, from 1999 to 2010. Obtained results confirm that further research is needed in evaluations in order to establish better neutron cross-section data for the minor actinides and selected nuclides which could be used in the accelerator driven systems or fast reactors.

  5. Chemical properties of the heavier actinides and transactinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical properties of each of the elements 99 (Es) through 105 are reviewed and their properties correlated with the electronic structure expected for 5f and 6d elements. A major feature of the heavier actinides, which differentiates them from the comparable lanthanides, is the increasing stability of the divalent oxidation state with increasing atomic number. The divalent oxidation state first becomes observable in the anhydrous halides of californium and increases in stability through the series to nobelium, where this valency becomes predominant in aqueous solution. In comparison with the analogous 4f electrons, the 5f electrons in the latter part of the series are more tightly bound. Thus, there is a lowering of the 5f energy levels with respect to the Fermi level as the atomic number increases. The metallic state of the heavier actinides has not been investigated except from the viewpoint of the relative volatility among members of the series. In aqueous solutions, ions of these elements behave as a normal trivalent actinides and lanthanides (except for nobelium). Their ionic radii decrease with increasing nuclear charge which is moderated because of increased screening of the outer 6p electrons by the 5f electrons. The actinide series of elements is completed with the element lawrencium (Lr) in which the electronic configuration is 5f147s27p. From Mendeleev's periodicity and Dirac-Fock calculations, the next group of elements is expected to be a d-transition series corresponding to the elements Hf through Hg. The chemical properties of elements 104 and 105 only have been studied and they indeed appear to show the properties expected of eka-Hf and eka-Ta. However, their nuclear lifetimes are so short and so few atoms can be produced that a rich variety of chemical information is probably unobtainable

  6. Chemical properties of the heavier actinides and transactinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulet, E.K.

    1981-01-01

    The chemical properties of each of the elements 99 (Es) through 105 are reviewed and their properties correlated with the electronic structure expected for 5f and 6d elements. A major feature of the heavier actinides, which differentiates them from the comparable lanthanides, is the increasing stability of the divalent oxidation state with increasing atomic number. The divalent oxidation state first becomes observable in the anhydrous halides of californium and increases in stability through the series to nobelium, where this valency becomes predominant in aqueous solution. In comparison with the analogous 4f electrons, the 5f electrons in the latter part of the series are more tightly bound. Thus, there is a lowering of the 5f energy levels with respect to the Fermi level as the atomic number increases. The metallic state of the heavier actinides has not been investigated except from the viewpoint of the relative volatility among members of the series. In aqueous solutions, ions of these elements behave as a normal trivalent actinides and lanthanides (except for nobelium). Their ionic radii decrease with increasing nuclear charge which is moderated because of increased screening of the outer 6p electrons by the 5f electrons. The actinide series of elements is completed with the element lawrencium (Lr) in which the electronic configuration is 5f/sup 14/7s/sup 2/7p. From Mendeleev's periodicity and Dirac-Fock calculations, the next group of elements is expected to be a d-transition series corresponding to the elements Hf through Hg. The chemical properties of elements 104 and 105 only have been studied and they indeed appear to show the properties expected of eka-Hf and eka-Ta. However, their nuclear lifetimes are so short and so few atoms can be produced that a rich variety of chemical information is probably unobtainable.

  7. An expert system for process planning of sheet metal parts produced on compound die for use in stamping industries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SACHIN SALUNKHE; DEEPAK PANGHAL; SHAILENDRA KUMAR; H M A HUSSEIN

    2016-08-01

    Process planning of sheet metal part is an important activity in the design of compound die. Traditional methods of carrying out this task are manual, tedious, time-consuming, error-prone and experiencebased. This paper describes the research work involved in the development of an expert system for process planning of sheet metal parts produced on compound die. The proposed system is organized in six modules. For development of system modules, domain knowledge acquired from various sources of knowledge acquisition is refined and then framed in form of ‘IF-Then’ variety of production rules. System modules are coded in AutoLISP language and user interface is created using visual basic (VB). The system is capable to automate various activities of process planning including blank modeling, blank nesting, determining punch force required, election of clearance between punch and die, identifying sheet metal operations, and determining proper sequence of operations for manufacturing the part. The proposed system can be implemented on a PC having VB and AutoCAD software, therefore its low cost of implementation makes it affordable even for small scale sheet metal industries.

  8. Characterization of partitioning relevant lanthanide and actinide complexes by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work the interaction of N-donor ligands, such as 2,6-Bis(5,6-dipropyl-1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)pyridine (nPrBTP) and 2,6-Bis(5-(2,2-dimethylpropyl)1H-pyrazol)-3-yl-pyridine (C5-BPP), with trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions was studied. Ligands of this type show a high selectivity for the separation of trivalent actinide ions over lanthanides from nitric acid solutions. However, the reason for this selectivity, which is crucial for future partitioning and transmutation strategies for radioactive wastes, is still unknown. So far, the selectivity of some N-donor ligands is supposed to be an effect of an increased covalency in the actinide-ligand bond, compared to the lanthanide compounds. NMR spectroscopy on paramagnetic metal complexes is an excellent tool for the elucidation of bonding modes. The overall paramagnetic chemical shift consists of two contributions, the Fermi Contact Shift (FCS), due to electron spin delocalisation through covalent bonds, and the Pseudo Contact Shift (PCS), which describes the dipolar coupling of the electron magnetic moment and the nuclear spin. By assessing the FCS share in the paramagnetic shift, the degree of covalency in the metal-ligand bond can be gauged. Several methods to discriminate FCS and PCS have been used on the data of the nPrBTP- and C5-BPP-complexes and were evaluated regarding their applicability on lanthanide and actinide complexes with N-donor ligands. The study comprised the synthesis of all Ln(III) complexes with the exceptions of Pm(III) and Gd(III) as well as the Am(III) complex as a representative of the actinide series with both ligands. All complexes were fully characterised (1H, 13C and 15N spectra) using NMR spectroscopy. By isotope enrichment with the NMR-active 15N in positions 8 and 9 in both ligands, resonance signals of these nitrogen atoms were detected for all complexes. The Bleaneymethod relies on different temperature dependencies for FCS (T-1) and PCS (T-2) that occur upon description

  9. Microbial Transformation of TRU and Mixed Waste: Actinide Speciation and Waste Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halada, Gary P

    2008-04-10

    In order to understand the susceptibility of transuranic and mixed waste to microbial degradation (as well as any mechanism which depends upon either complexation and/or redox of metal ions), it is essential to understand the association of metal ions with organic ligands present in mixed wastes. These ligands have been found in our previous EMSP study to limit electron transfer reactions and strongly affect transport and the eventual fate of radionuclides in the environment. As transuranic waste (and especially mixed waste) will be retained in burial sites and in legacy containment for (potentially) many years while awaiting treatment and removal (or remaining in place under stewardship agreements at government subsurface waste sites), it is also essential to understand the aging of mixed wastes and its implications for remediation and fate of radionuclides. Mixed waste containing actinides and organic materials are especially complex and require extensive study. The EMSP program described in this report is part of a joint program with the Environmental Sciences Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Stony Brook University portion of this award has focused on the association of uranium (U(VI)) and transuranic analogs (Ce(III) and Eu(III)) with cellulosic materials and related compounds, with development of implications for microbial transformation of mixed wastes. The elucidation of the chemical nature of mixed waste is essential for the formulation of remediation and encapsulation technologies, for understanding the fate of contaminant exposed to the environment, and for development of meaningful models for contaminant storage and recovery.

  10. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2006-06-01

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort.

  11. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2005-06-15

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort.

  12. Actinide consumption: Nuclear resource conservation without breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannum, W.H.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; McPheeters, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach to the nuclear power issue based on a metallic fast reactor fuel and pyrometallurgical processing of spent fuel is showing great potential and is approaching a critical demonstration phase. If successful, this approach will complement and validate the LWR reactor systems and the attendant infrastructure (including repository development) and will alleviate the dominant concerns over the acceptability of nuclear power. The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept is a metal-fueled, sodium-cooled pool-type fast reactor supported by a pyrometallurgical reprocessing system. The concept of a sodium cooled fast reactor is broadly demonstrated by the EBR-II and FFTF in the US; DFR and PFR in the UK; Phenix and SuperPhenix in France; BOR-60, BN-350, BN-600 in the USSR; and JOYO in Japan. The metallic fuel is an evolution from early EBR-II fuels. This fuel, a ternary U-Pu-Zr alloy, has been demonstrated to be highly reliable and fault tolerant even at very high burnup (160-180,000 MWd/MT). The fuel, coupled with the pool type reactor configuration, has been shown to have outstanding safety characteristics: even with all active safety systems disabled, such a reactor can survive a loss of coolant flow, a loss of heat sink, or other major accidents. Design studies based on a small modular approach show not only its impressive safety characteristics, but are projected to be economically competitive. The program to explore the feasibility of actinide recovery from spent LWR fuel is in its initial phase, but it is expected that technical feasibility could be demonstrated by about 1995; DOE has not yet committed funds to achieve this objective. 27 refs.

  13. Actinide consumption: Nuclear resource conservation without breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach to the nuclear power issue based on a metallic fast reactor fuel and pyrometallurgical processing of spent fuel is showing great potential and is approaching a critical demonstration phase. If successful, this approach will complement and validate the LWR reactor systems and the attendant infrastructure (including repository development) and will alleviate the dominant concerns over the acceptability of nuclear power. The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept is a metal-fueled, sodium-cooled pool-type fast reactor supported by a pyrometallurgical reprocessing system. The concept of a sodium cooled fast reactor is broadly demonstrated by the EBR-II and FFTF in the US; DFR and PFR in the UK; Phenix and SuperPhenix in France; BOR-60, BN-350, BN-600 in the USSR; and JOYO in Japan. The metallic fuel is an evolution from early EBR-II fuels. This fuel, a ternary U-Pu-Zr alloy, has been demonstrated to be highly reliable and fault tolerant even at very high burnup (160-180,000 MWd/MT). The fuel, coupled with the pool type reactor configuration, has been shown to have outstanding safety characteristics: even with all active safety systems disabled, such a reactor can survive a loss of coolant flow, a loss of heat sink, or other major accidents. Design studies based on a small modular approach show not only its impressive safety characteristics, but are projected to be economically competitive. The program to explore the feasibility of actinide recovery from spent LWR fuel is in its initial phase, but it is expected that technical feasibility could be demonstrated by about 1995; DOE has not yet committed funds to achieve this objective. 27 refs

  14. Metals, pesticides, and semivolatile organic compounds in sediment in Valley Forge National Historical Park, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Andrew G.; Sloto, Ronald A.

    1997-01-01

    The Schuylkill River flows through Valley Forge National Historical Park in Lower Providence and West Norriton Townships in Montgomery County, Pa. The concentration of selected metals, pesticides, semivolatile organic compounds, and total carbon in stream-bottom sediments from Valley Forge National Historical Park were determined for samples collected once at 12 sites in and around the Schuylkill River. Relatively low concentrations of arsenic, chromium, copper, and lead were detected in all samples. The concentrations of these metals are similar to concentrations in other stream-bottom sediment samples collected in the region. The concentrations of iron, manganese, and zinc were elevated in samples from four sites in the Schuylkill River, and the concentration of mercury was elevated in a sample from an impoundment along the river. The organophosphorus insecticide diazinon was detected in relatively low concentrations in half of the 12 samples analyzed. The organo-chlorine insecticide DDE was detected in all 12 samples analyzed; dieldrin was detected in 10 samples, chlordane, DDD, and DDT were detected in 9 samples, and heptachlor epoxide was detected in one sample. The concentrations of organo-chlorine and organophosphorus insecticides were relatively low and similar to concentrations in samples collected in the region. Detectable concentrations of 17 semivolatile organic compounds were measured in the 12 samples analyzed. The most commonly detected compounds were fluoranthene, phenanthrene, and pyrene. The maximum concentration detected was 4,800 micrograms per kilogram of phenanthrene. The highest concentrations of compounds were detected in Lamb Run, a small tributary to the Schuylkill River with headwaters in an industrial corporate center. The concentration of compounds in the Schuylkill River below Lamb Run is higher than the Schuylkill River above Lamb Run, indicating that sediment from Lamb Run is increasing the concentration of semivolatile organic

  15. Removal of actinides from dilute waste waters using polymer filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More stringent US Department of Energy discharge regulations for waste waters containing radionuclides (30 pCi/L total alpha) require the development of new processes to meet the new discharge limits for actinide metal ions, particularly americium and plutonium, while minimizing waste. We have been investigating a new technology, polymer filtration, that has the potential for effectively meeting these new limits. Traditional technology uses basic iron precipitation which produces large amounts of waste sludge. The new technology is based on using water-soluble chelating polymers with ultrafiltration for physical separation. The actinide metal ions are selectively bound to the polymer and can not pass through the membrane. Small molecules and nonbinding metals pass through the membrane. Advantages of polymer filtration technology compared to ion, exchange include rapid kinetics because the binding is occurring in a homogenous solution and no mechanical strength requirement on the polymer. We will present our results on the systematic development of a new class of water-soluble chelating polymers and their binding ability from dilute acid to near neutral waters

  16. Effect of central metal ions of analogous metal-organic frameworks on adsorption of organoarsenic compounds from water: plausible mechanism of adsorption and water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Jong Won; Tong, Minman; Jung, Beom K; Hasan, Zubair; Zhong, Chongli; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2015-01-01

    The adsorptive removal of organoarsenic compounds such as p-arsanilic acid (ASA) and roxarsone (ROX) from water using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been investigated for the first time. A MOF, iron benzenetricarboxylate (also called MIL-100-Fe) exhibits a much higher adsorption capacity for ASA and ROX than activated carbon, zeolite (HY), goethite, and other MOFs. The adsorption of ASA and ROX over MIL-100-Fe is also much more rapid than that over activated carbon. Moreover, the used MIL-100-Fe can be recycled by simply washing with acidic ethanol. Therefore, it is determined that a MOF such as MIL-100-Fe can be used to remove organoarsenic compounds from contaminated water because of its high adsorption capacity, rapid adsorption, and ready regeneration. Moreover, only one of three analogous MIL-100 species (MIL-100-Fe, rather than MIL-100-Al or MIL-100-Cr) can effectively remove the organoarsenic compounds. This selective and high adsorption over MIL-100-Fe, different from other analogous MIL-100 species, can be explained (through calculations) by the facile desorption of water from MIL-100-Fe as well as the large (absolute value) replacement energy (difference between the adsorption energies of the organoarsenic compounds and water) exhibited by MIL-100-Fe. A plausible adsorption/desorption mechanism is proposed based on the surface charge of the MOFs, FTIR results, calculations, and the reactivation results with respect to the solvents used in the experiments.

  17. Possibilities to optimize sodium cooled fast reactors with respect to Actinide burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimization of fast reactor cores with respect to the destruction of Minor Actinides starts from the question, whether the neutron spectrum can be hardened by changing the core geometry, core size or fuel type. Spectrum hardening would increase the destruction (fission) of actinides compared to their further production due to capture processes. Reference point of this study is the European Fast Reactor EFR. It is shown that a flat core geometry with metal fuel would offer an optimum and that small power units, i. e. smaller cores are most favourable

  18. Effects of complexing compounds on sorption of metal ions to cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevgren, Lars [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Inorganic chemistry

    2005-12-15

    This present report is a literature review addressing the effects of complexing ligands on the sorption of radionuclides to solid materials of importance for repositories of radioactive waste. Focus is put on laboratory studies of metal ion adsorption to cement in presence of chelating agents under strongly alkaline conditions. As background information, metal sorption to different mineral and cement phases in ligand free systems is described. Furthermore, surface complexation model (SCM) theories are introduced. According to surface complexation theories these interactions occur at specific binding sites at the particle/water interface. Adsorption of cationic metals is stronger at high pH, and the adsorption of anions occurs preferentially at low pH. The adsorption of ions to mineral surfaces is a result of both chemical bonding and electrostatic attraction between the ions and charged mineral surfaces. By combining uptake data with spectroscopic information the sorption can be explained on a molecular level by structurally sound surface complexation models. Most of the metal sorption studies reviewed are dealing with minerals exhibiting oxygen atoms at their surfaces, mainly oxides of Fe(II,III) and Al(III), and aluminosilicates. Investigations of radionuclides are focused on clay minerals, above all montmorillonite and illite. Which mechanism that is governing the metal ion adsorption to a given mineral is to a large extent depending on the metal adsorbed. For instance, sorption of Ni to montmorillonite can occur by formation of inner-sphere mononuclear surface complexes located at the edges of montmorillonite platelets and by formation of a Ni phyllosilicate phase parallel to montmorillonite layers. Also metal uptake to cement materials can occur by different mechanisms. Cationic metals can both be attached to cement (calcium silicate hydrate, CSH) and hardened cement paste (HCP) by formation of inner-sphere complexes at specific surface sites and by

  19. Effects of complexing compounds on sorption of metal ions to cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This present report is a literature review addressing the effects of complexing ligands on the sorption of radionuclides to solid materials of importance for repositories of radioactive waste. Focus is put on laboratory studies of metal ion adsorption to cement in presence of chelating agents under strongly alkaline conditions. As background information, metal sorption to different mineral and cement phases in ligand free systems is described. Furthermore, surface complexation model (SCM) theories are introduced. According to surface complexation theories these interactions occur at specific binding sites at the particle/water interface. Adsorption of cationic metals is stronger at high pH, and the adsorption of anions occurs preferentially at low pH. The adsorption of ions to mineral surfaces is a result of both chemical bonding and electrostatic attraction between the ions and charged mineral surfaces. By combining uptake data with spectroscopic information the sorption can be explained on a molecular level by structurally sound surface complexation models. Most of the metal sorption studies reviewed are dealing with minerals exhibiting oxygen atoms at their surfaces, mainly oxides of Fe(II,III) and Al(III), and aluminosilicates. Investigations of radionuclides are focused on clay minerals, above all montmorillonite and illite. Which mechanism that is governing the metal ion adsorption to a given mineral is to a large extent depending on the metal adsorbed. For instance, sorption of Ni to montmorillonite can occur by formation of inner-sphere mononuclear surface complexes located at the edges of montmorillonite platelets and by formation of a Ni phyllosilicate phase parallel to montmorillonite layers. Also metal uptake to cement materials can occur by different mechanisms. Cationic metals can both be attached to cement (calcium silicate hydrate, CSH) and hardened cement paste (HCP) by formation of inner-sphere complexes at specific surface sites and by

  20. Paving the way for the synthesis of a series of divalent actinide complexes: a theoretical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q-Y; Lan, J-H; Wang, C-Z; Cheng, Z-P; Chai, Z-F; Gibson, J K; Shi, W-Q

    2016-02-21

    Recently, the +2 formal oxidation state in soluble molecular complexes for lanthanides (La-Nd, Sm-Lu) and actinides (Th and U) has been discovered [W. J. Evans, et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2011, 133, 15914; J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2012, 134, 8420; J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2013, 135, 13310; Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 517]. To explore the nature of the bonding and stabilities of the low-valent actinide complexes, a series of divalent actinide species, [AnCp'3](-) (An[double bond, length as m-dash]Th-Am, Cp' = [η(5)-C5H4(SiMe3)](-)) have been investigated in THF solution using scalar relativistic density functional theory. The electronic structures and electron affinity properties were systematically studied to identify the interactions between the +2 actinide ions and Cp' ligands. The ground state electron configurations for the [AnCp'3](-) species are [ThCp'3](-) 6d(2), [PaCp'3](-) 5f(2)6d(1), [UCp'3](-) 5f(3)6d(1), [NpCp'3](-) 5f(5), [PuCp'3](-) 5f(6), and [AmCp'3](-) 5f(7), respectively, according to the MO analysis. The total bonding energy decreases from the Th- to the Am-complex and the electrostatic interactions mainly dominate the bonding between the actinide atom and ligands. The electron affinity analysis suggests that the reduction reaction of AnCp'3→ [AnCp'3](-) should become increasingly facile across the actinide series from Th to Am, in accord with the known An(iii/ii) reduction potentials. This work expands the knowledge on the low oxidation state chemistry of actinides, and further motivates and guides the synthesis of related low oxidation state compounds of 5f elements.

  1. Investigating the molecule-substrate interaction of prototypic tetrapyrrole compounds: Adsorption and self-metalation of porphine on Cu(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the adsorption and self-metalation of a prototypic tetrapyrrole compound, the free-base porphine (2H-P), on the Cu(111) surface. Our multitechnique study combines scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) results with near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data whose interpretation is supported by density functional theory calculations. In the first layer in contact with the copper substrate the molecules adsorb coplanar with the surface as shown by angle-resolved NEXAFS measurements. The quenching of the first resonance in the magic angle spectra of both carbon and nitrogen regions indicates a substantial electron transfer from the substrate to the LUMO of the molecule. The stepwise annealing of a bilayer of 2H-P molecules sequentially transforms the XP and NEXAFS signatures of the nitrogen regions into those indicative of the coordinated nitrogen species of the metalated copper porphine (Cu-P), i.e., we observe a temperature-induced self-metalation of the system. Pre- and post-metalation species are clearly discriminable by STM, corroborating the spectroscopic results. Similar to the free-base porphine, the Cu-P adsorbs flat in the first layer without distortion of the macrocycle. Additionally, the electron transfer from the copper surface to the molecule is preserved upon metalation. This behavior contrasts the self-metalation of tetraphenylporphyrin (2H-TPP) on Cu(111), where both the molecular conformation and the interaction with the substrate are strongly affected by the metalation process.

  2. Investigating the molecule-substrate interaction of prototypic tetrapyrrole compounds: Adsorption and self-metalation of porphine on Cu(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diller, K.; Klappenberger, F.; Allegretti, F.; Papageorgiou, A. C.; Fischer, S.; Wiengarten, A.; Joshi, S.; Seufert, K.; Ecija, D.; Auwaerter, W.; Barth, J. V. [Physik Department E20, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-04-21

    We report on the adsorption and self-metalation of a prototypic tetrapyrrole compound, the free-base porphine (2H-P), on the Cu(111) surface. Our multitechnique study combines scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) results with near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data whose interpretation is supported by density functional theory calculations. In the first layer in contact with the copper substrate the molecules adsorb coplanar with the surface as shown by angle-resolved NEXAFS measurements. The quenching of the first resonance in the magic angle spectra of both carbon and nitrogen regions indicates a substantial electron transfer from the substrate to the LUMO of the molecule. The stepwise annealing of a bilayer of 2H-P molecules sequentially transforms the XP and NEXAFS signatures of the nitrogen regions into those indicative of the coordinated nitrogen species of the metalated copper porphine (Cu-P), i.e., we observe a temperature-induced self-metalation of the system. Pre- and post-metalation species are clearly discriminable by STM, corroborating the spectroscopic results. Similar to the free-base porphine, the Cu-P adsorbs flat in the first layer without distortion of the macrocycle. Additionally, the electron transfer from the copper surface to the molecule is preserved upon metalation. This behavior contrasts the self-metalation of tetraphenylporphyrin (2H-TPP) on Cu(111), where both the molecular conformation and the interaction with the substrate are strongly affected by the metalation process.

  3. Radionuclides, Trace Metals, and Organic Compounds in Shells of Native Freshwater Mussels Along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River: 6000 Years Before Present to Current Times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. L. Tiller; T. E. Marceau

    2006-01-25

    This report documents concentrations of radionuclides, trace metals, and semivolatile organic compounds measured in shell samples of the western pearl shell mussel collected along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River.

  4. Review of magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effect in the intermetallic compounds of rare earth with low boiling point metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling-Wei, Li

    2016-03-01

    The magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in many rare earth (RE) based intermetallic compounds has been extensively investigated during the last two decades, not only due to their potential applications for magnetic refrigeration but also for better understanding of the fundamental problems of the materials. This paper reviews our recent progress on studying the magnetic properties and MCE in some binary or ternary intermetallic compounds of RE with low boiling point metal(s) (Zn, Mg, and Cd). Some of them exhibit promising MCE properties, which make them attractive for low temperature magnetic refrigeration. Characteristics of the magnetic transition, origin of large MCE, as well as the potential application of these compounds are thoroughly discussed. Additionally, a brief review of the magnetic and magnetocaloric properties in the quaternary rare earth nickel boroncarbides RENi2B2C superconductors is also presented. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374081 and 11004044), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. N150905001, L1509006, and N140901001), the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Postdoctoral Fellowships for Foreign Researchers (Grant No. P10060), and the Alexander von Humboldt (AvH) Foundation (Research stipend to L. Li).

  5. Recovery of actinides from actinide-aluminium alloys by chlorination: Part I

    OpenAIRE

    Cassayre, Laurent; Soucek, Pavel; Mendes, Eric; Malmbeck, Rikard; Nourry, Christophe; Eloirdi, Rachel; Glatz, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    Pyrochemical processes in molten LiCl–KCl are being developed in ITU for recovery of actinides from spent nuclear fuel. The fuel is anodically dissolved to the molten salt electrolyte and actinides are electrochemically reduced on solid aluminium cathodes forming solid actinide–aluminium alloys. A chlorination route is being investigated for recovery of actinides from the alloys. This route consists in three steps: Vacuum distillation for removal of the salt adhered on the electrode, chlorina...

  6. Toxicity assessment of heavy metals and organic compounds using CellSense biosensor with E.coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Wang; Xue Jiang Wang; Jian Fu Zhao; Ling Chen

    2008-01-01

    A new strategy using an amperometric biosensor with Escherichia coli(E.coli)that provides a rapid toxicity determination of chemical compounds is described.The CellSense biosensor system comprises a biological component immobilized in intimate contact with a transducer which converts the biochemical signal into a quantifiable electrical signal.Toxicity assessment of heavy metals using E.coli biosensors could be finished within 30 min and the 50% effective concentrations(EC50)values of four heavy metals were determined.The results shows that inhibitory effects of four heavy metals to E.coli can be ranked in a decreasing order of Hg2+>Cu2+>Zn2+>Ni2+,which accords to the results of conventional bacterial counting method.The toxicity test of organic compounds by using CellSense biosensor was also demonstrated.The CellSense biosensor with E.coli shows a good,reproducible behavior and can be used for reproducible measurements.

  7. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms : implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banaszak, J.E.; Reed, D.T.; Rittmann, B.E.

    1999-02-12

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, we assess how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. We describe how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility. We explain why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. We describe the development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions. Throughout, we identify the key research needs.

  8. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms : implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, we assess how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. We describe how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility. We explain why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. We describe the development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions. Throughout, we identify the key research needs

  9. Thin films of metal-organic compounds and metal nanoparticle-embedded polymers for nonlinear optical applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Philip Anthony; Shatabdi Porel; D Narayana Rao; T P Radhakrishnan

    2005-11-01

    Thin films based on two very different metal-organic systems are developed and some nonlinear optical applications are explored. A family of zinc complexes which form perfectly polar assemblies in their crystalline state are found to organize as uniaxially oriented crystallites in vapor deposited thin films on glass substrate. Optical second harmonic generation from these films is investigated. A simple protocol is developed for the in-situ fabrication of highly monodisperse silver nanoparticles in a polymer film matrix. The methodology can be used to produce free-standing films. Optical limiting capability of the nanoparticle-embedded polymer film is demonstrated.

  10. Metal-Organic Framework (MOF) Compounds: Photocatalysts for Redox Reactions and Solar Fuel Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakshinamoorthy, Amarajothi; Asiri, Abdullah M; García, Hermenegildo

    2016-04-25

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are crystalline porous materials formed from bi- or multipodal organic linkers and transition-metal nodes. Some MOFs have high structural stability, combined with large flexibility in design and post-synthetic modification. MOFs can be photoresponsive through light absorption by the organic linker or the metal oxide nodes. Photoexcitation of the light absorbing units in MOFs often generates a ligand-to-metal charge-separation state that can result in photocatalytic activity. In this Review we discuss the advantages and uniqueness that MOFs offer in photocatalysis. We present the best practices to determine photocatalytic activity in MOFs and for the deposition of co-catalysts. In particular we give examples showing the photocatalytic activity of MOFs in H2 evolution, CO2 reduction, photooxygenation, and photoreduction. PMID:26970539

  11. Fundamental Studies of the Reforming of Oxygenated Compounds over Supported Metal Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumesic, James A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-01-04

    The main objective of our research has been to elucidate fundamental concepts associated with controlling the activity, selectivity, and stability of bifunctional, metal-based heterogeneous catalysts for tandem reactions, such as liquid-phase conversion of oxygenated hydrocarbons derived from biomass. We have shown that bimetallic catalysts that combine a highly-reducible metal (e.g., platinum) with an oxygen-containing metal promoter (e.g., molybdenum) are promising materials for conversion of oxygenated hydrocarbons because of their high activity for selective cleavage for carbon-oxygen bonds. We have developed methods to stabilize metal nanoparticles against leaching and sintering under liquid-phase reaction conditions by using atomic layer deposition (ALD) to apply oxide overcoat layers. We have used controlled surface reactions to produce bimetallic catalysts with controlled particle size and controlled composition, with an important application being the selective conversion of biomass-derived molecules. The synthesis of catalysts by traditional methods may produce a wide distribution of metal particle sizes and compositions; and thus, results from spectroscopic and reactions kinetics measurements have contributions from a distribution of active sites, making it difficult to assess how the size and composition of the metal particles affect the nature of the surface, the active sites, and the catalytic behavior. Thus, we have developed methods to synthesize bimetallic nanoparticles with controlled particle size and controlled composition to achieve an effective link between characterization and reactivity, and between theory and experiment. We have also used ALD to modify supported metal catalysts by addition of promoters with atomic-level precision, to produce new bifunctional sites for selective catalytic transformations. We have used a variety of techniques to characterize the metal nanoparticles in our catalysts, including scanning transmission electron

  12. Emergence of californium as the second transitional element in the actinide series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Samantha K; Vasiliu, Monica; Baumbach, Ryan E; Stritzinger, Jared T; Green, Thomas D; Diefenbach, Kariem; Cross, Justin N; Knappenberger, Kenneth L; Liu, Guokui; Silver, Mark A; DePrince, A Eugene; Polinski, Matthew J; Van Cleve, Shelley M; House, Jane H; Kikugawa, Naoki; Gallagher, Andrew; Arico, Alexandra A; Dixon, David A; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    A break in periodicity occurs in the actinide series between plutonium and americium as the result of the localization of 5f electrons. The subsequent chemistry of later actinides is thought to closely parallel lanthanides in that bonding is expected to be ionic and complexation should not substantially alter the electronic structure of the metal ions. Here we demonstrate that ligation of californium(III) by a pyridine derivative results in significant deviations in the properties of the resultant complex with respect to that predicted for the free ion. We expand on this by characterizing the americium and curium analogues for comparison, and show that these pronounced effects result from a second transition in periodicity in the actinide series that occurs, in part, because of the stabilization of the divalent oxidation state. The metastability of californium(II) is responsible for many of the unusual properties of californium including the green photoluminescence. PMID:25880116

  13. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO{sub 2} (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO{sub 2+x}. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  14. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO2 (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO2+x. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  15. Preparation of actinide targets by electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautmann, N.; Folger, H.

    1989-10-01

    Actinide targets with varying thicknesses on different substrates have been prepared by electrodeposition either from aqueous solutions or from solutions of their nitrates in isopropyl alcohol. With these techniques the actinides can be deposited almost quantitatively on various backing materials within 15 to 30 min. Targets of thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium and californium with areal densities from almost carrier-free up to 1.4 mg/cm 2 on thin beryllium, carbon, titanium, tantalum and platinum foils have been prepared. In most cases, prior to the deposition, the actinides had to be purified chemically and for some of them, due to the limited amount of material available, recycling procedures were required. Applications of actinide targets in heavy-ion reactions are briefly discussed.

  16. Actinide research to solve some practical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are discussed: generation of plutonium inventories by nuclear power plants; resettlement of the Marshallese Islanders into an actinide contaminated environment; high radiation background areas of the world; and radiation hazards to uranium miners

  17. Electronic structure and correlation effects in actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albers, R.C.

    1998-12-01

    This report consists of the vugraphs given at a conference on electronic structure. Topics discussed are electronic structure, f-bonding, crystal structure, and crystal structure stability of the actinides and how they are inter-related.

  18. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  19. Advanced Aqueous Separation Systems for Actinide Partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Kenneth L.; Clark, Sue; Meier, G Patrick; Alexandratos, Spiro; Paine, Robert; Hancock, Robert; Ensor, Dale

    2012-03-21

    One of the most challenging aspects of advanced processing of spent nuclear fuel is the need to isolate transuranium elements from fission product lanthanides. This project expanded the scope of earlier investigations of americium (Am) partitioning from the lanthanides with the synthesis of new separations materials and a centralized focus on radiochemical characterization of the separation systems that could be developed based on these new materials. The primary objective of this program was to explore alternative materials for actinide separations and to link the design of new reagents for actinide separations to characterizations based on actinide chemistry. In the predominant trivalent oxidation state, the chemistry of lanthanides overlaps substantially with that of the trivalent actinides and their mutual separation is quite challenging.

  20. DFT and post-DFT studies of metallic MXY3-type compounds for low temperature TE applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, M.; Saifullah; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Ahmad, Rashid; Shafiq, M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, thermoelectric properties of carbon and nitrogen based twenty metallic antiperovskites MXY3 (M=Al, Ga, Ir, Mg, Pd, Pt, Rh; X=C, N; Y=Mn, Ni, Sc, Ti, Cr, Fe) using ab-initio density functional theory and post-DFT Boltzmann's techniques are investigated. The electronic properties of these compounds are also discussed. We find high values of Seebeck coefficient and small values of electronic thermal conductivity for AlCTi3, AlNSc3, AlCNi3, AlNTi3, GaCCr3 and MgCNi3 between -0.25 and 0.25 eV chemical potential. These results show high dimensionless figure of merit in metallic materials and therefore, we predict these materials can be potential candidates for low temperature thermoelectric applications.

  1. Relation between various chromium compounds and some other elements in fumes from manual metal arc stainless steel welding.

    OpenAIRE

    Matczak, W; Chmielnicka, J

    1993-01-01

    For the years 1987-1990 160 individual samples of manual metal arc stainless steel (MMA/SS) welding fumes from the breathing zone of welders in four industrial plants were collected. Concentrations of soluble and insoluble chromium (Cr) III and Cr VI compounds as well as of some other welding fume elements (Fe, Mn, Ni, F) were determined. Concentration of welding fumes in the breathing zone ranged from 0.2 to 23.4 mg/m3. Total Cr amounted to 0.005-0.991 mg/m3 (including 0.005-0.842 mg/m3 Cr V...

  2. Antimicrobial activity of seven metallic compounds against penicillinase producing and non-penicillinase producing strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    OpenAIRE

    Peeters, M.; Vanden Berghe, D; Meheus, A.

    1986-01-01

    The in vitro activity of seven metallic compounds was tested against penicillinase (beta lactamase) producing strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (PPNG) and non-PPNG strains. On a weight basis, the mercurials showed the greatest in vitro activity. Phenylmercuric borate, thiomersal, and mercuric chloride inhibited 90% of all strains at concentrations of 5 mg/l, 5 mg/l, and 20 mg/l respectively. Silver nitrate inhibited 90% of the strains at 80 mg/l and the MIC90 for mild silver protein was 200 mg...

  3. The Actinide Transition Revisited by Gutzwiller Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenhu; Lanata, Nicola; Yao, Yongxin; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    We revisit the problem of the actinide transition using the Gutzwiller approximation (GA) in combination with the local density approximation (LDA). In particular, we compute the equilibrium volumes of the actinide series and reproduce the abrupt change of density found experimentally near plutonium as a function of the atomic number. We discuss how this behavior relates with the electron correlations in the 5 f states, the lattice structure, and the spin-orbit interaction. Our results are in good agreement with the experiments.

  4. Lattice effects in the light actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, A.C.; Cort, B.; Roberts, J.A.; Bennett, B.I.; Brun, T.O.; Dreele, R.B. von [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Richardson, J.W. Jr. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The light actinides show a variety of lattice effects that do not normally appear in other regions of the periodic table. The article will cover the crystal structures of the light actinides, their atomic volumes, their thermal expansion behavior, and their elastic behavior as reflected in recent thermal vibration measurements made by neutron diffraction. A discussion of the melting points will be given in terms of the thermal vibration measurements. Pressure effects will be only briefly indicated.

  5. Transmutation of actinides in power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergelson, B R; Gerasimov, A S; Tikhomirov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Power reactors can be used for partial short-term transmutation of radwaste. This transmutation is beneficial in terms of subsequent storage conditions for spent fuel in long-term storage facilities. CANDU-type reactors can transmute the main minor actinides from two or three reactors of the VVER-1000 type. A VVER-1000-type reactor can operate in a self-service mode with transmutation of its own actinides.

  6. Evaluation of actinide partitioning and transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a few centuries of radioactive decay the long-lived actinides, the elements of atomic numbers 89-103, may constitute the main potential radiological health hazard in nuclear wastes. This is because all but a very few fission products (principally technetium-99 and iodine-129) have by then undergone radioactive decay to insignificant levels, leaving the actinides as the principal radionuclides remaining. It was therefore at first sight an attractive concept to recycle the actinides to nuclear reactors, so as to eliminate them by nuclear fission. Thus, investigations of the feasibility and potential benefits and hazards of the concept of 'actinide partitioning and transmutation' were started in numerous countries in the mid-1970s. This final report summarizes the results and conclusions of technical studies performed in connection with a four-year IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme, started in 1976, on the ''Environmental Evaluation and Hazard Assessment of the Separation of Actinides from Nuclear Wastes followed by either Transmutation or Separate Disposal''. Although many related studies are still continuing, e.g. on waste disposal, long-term safety assessments, and waste actinide management (particularly for low and intermediate-level wastes), some firm conclusions on the overall concept were drawn by the programme participants, which are reflected in this report

  7. Magnetic behavior of inorganic-organic hybrid phosphite compounds with 3-d transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The (C2H10N2)[M(HPO3)F3](MIII=V, Cr, Fe) [I], (C2H10N2)[M3(HPO3)4] (MII=Mn, Co) [II] and (C2H10N2)0.5[Fe(HPO3)2](MIII=V, Fe) [III] compounds have been synthesized by using mild hydrothermal conditions. The crystal structure of the compounds shows different dimensionality. The compounds exhibit antiferromagnetic behavior, with hysteresis loops for the bimetallic (C2H10N2)[Mn2.09Co0.91(HPO3)4] and (C2H10N2)0.5[V0.48Fe0.52(HPO3)2] phases, indicating the existence of a ferrimagnetic behavior probably due to a spin descompensation

  8. [Development of novel methods for synthesis of heterocyclic compounds catalyzed by transition metals in fluorinated alcohols].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Akio

    2008-08-01

    New possibilities for catalytic syntheses of lactone derivatives and nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds in fluorinated alcohols are described. The cationic Rh(I) catalyst in fluorinated alcohol solvents (hexafluoroisopropanol: HFIP, trifluoroethanol: TFE) brought about not only mild cycloaddition reactions of ester-tethered compounds but also a facile formation of indole derivatives by the aromatic amino-Claisen rearrangement of N-propargyl aniline derivatives. The use of HFIP as an additive exerted a remarkable effect on the Pictet-Spengler reaction catalyzed by the fluorinated surfactant-combined Brønsted acid catalyst in water.

  9. New electrolyte systems for capillary zone electrophoresis of metal cations and non-ionic organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Y.

    1995-06-19

    Excellent separations of metal ions can be obtained very quickly by capillary electrophoresis provided a weak complexing reagent is incorporated into the electrolyte to alter the effective mobilities of the sample ions. Indirect photometric detection is possible by also adding a UV-sensitive ion to the electrolyte. Separations are described using phthalate, tartrate, lactate or hydroxyisobutyrate as the complexing reagent. A separation of twenty-seven metal ions was achieved in only 6 min using a lactate system. A mechanism for the separation of lanthanides is proposed for the hydroxyisobutyrate system.

  10. HPIC separation and quantification of Ca and Fe in uranium metal and alloy compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the separation and quantification of Ca and Fe from uranium metal and uranium based alloy fuels employing ion chromatography (IC). Ca separation from other metal ions of alkali and alkaline groups was carried out on a cation exchange column and the same was detected and quantified by means of conductivity detector. In case of Fe, it was separated from other transition elements using chelation ion chromatography where detection and quantification was carried out photometrically after the addition of PAR as post column reagent. For both the analyses a preliminary column chromatography separation for eliminating the bulk matrix uranium was performed. (author)

  11. Structure of metal-rich (001) surfaces of III-V compound semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumpf, C.; Smilgies, D.; Landemark, E.;

    2001-01-01

    The atomic structure of the group-III-rich surface of III-V semiconductor compounds has been under intense debate for many years, yet none of the models agrees with the experimental data available. Here we present a model for the three-dimensional structure of the (001)-c(8x2) reconstruction on I...

  12. Depolymerization of organosolv lignin to aromatic compounds over Cu-doped porous metal oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barta, Katalin; Warner, Genoa R.; Beach, Evan S.; Anastas, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Isolated, solvent-extracted lignin from candlenut (Aleurites moluccana) biomass was subjected to catalytic depolymerization in methanol with an added pressure of H-2, using a porous metal oxide catalyst (PMO) derived from a Cu-doped hydrotalcite-like precursor. The Cu-PMO was effective in converting

  13. Simultaneous removal of metals and organic compounds from a heavily polluted soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szpyrkowicz, L. [University of Venice, Department of Environmental Sciences, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy)]. E-mail: lidia@unive.it; Radaelli, M. [University of Venice, Department of Environmental Sciences, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Bertini, S. [University of Venice, Department of Environmental Sciences, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Daniele, S. [University of Venice, Department of Physical Chemistry, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Casarin, F. [Via S. Trentin 5A, 30171 Mestre-Venice (Italy)

    2007-02-25

    The paper describes the results of treatment of soil samples, deriving from a dismissed industrial site, contaminated with several metals: Hg, Ni, Co, Zn, Pb, Cu, Cr, As and organic substances. The soil was subjected to remediation based on a process in which an oxidising leaching agent was produced electrochemically in-line in an undivided electrochemical cell reactor equipped with a Ti/Pt-Ir anode and a stainless steel cathode. Leaching of the soil samples was performed under dynamic conditions using a leaching column. A subsequent regeneration of the leaching solution, which consisted in electrodeposition of metals and electro-oxidation of organic substances, was carried out in a packed-bed reactor equipped with a centrally positioned graphite rod, serving as an anode, and stainless steel three-dimensional filling as a cathode. The study was focused on how and to which extent the metals present in the soil, as organic complexes, can be solubilised and how the process rates are impacted by the solution pH and other process variables. Data obtained under non-oxidising conditions, typically adopted for leaching of metals, are compared with the performance of chlorine-enriched leaching solutions. The results obtained under various conditions are also discussed in terms of the total organic carbon (TOC) removal from the water phase.

  14. A novel stir bar sorptive extraction coating based on monolithic material for apolar, polar organic compounds and heavy metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaojia; Qiu, Ningning; Yuan, Dongxing; Huang, Benli

    2009-04-15

    In this study, a novel stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) based on monolithic material (SBSEM) was prepared. The monolithic material was obtained by in situ copolymerization of vinylpyrrolidone and divinylbenzene in the presence of a porogen solvent containing cyclohexanol and 1-dodecanol with azobisisobutyronitrile as initiator. The influences of polymerization conditions on the extraction efficiencies were investigated, using phenol and p-nitrophenol as detected solutes. The monolithic material was characterized by various techniques, such as elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry, infrared spectroscopy. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were used to investigate the extraction efficiencies of SBSEM for apolar analytes. Hormones, aromatic amines and phenols were selected as test analytes to investigate the extraction efficiencies of SBSEM for weakly and strongly polar compounds. The results showed that the new SBSEM could enrich the above-mentioned organic compounds effectively. It is worthy to mention that the SBSEM can enrich some heavy metal ions, such as Cu(2+), Pb(2+), Cr(3+) and Cd(2+), through coordination adsorption. To our best knowledge, that is the first to use SBSE to enrich heavy metal ions. PMID:19174210

  15. Effects of Ga substitution on the structural and magnetic properties of half metallic Fe{sub 2}MnSi Heusler compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedro, S. S., E-mail: sandrapedro@uerj.br; Caraballo Vivas, R. J.; Andrade, V. M.; Cruz, C.; Paixão, L. S.; Contreras, C.; Costa-Soares, T.; Rocco, D. L.; Reis, M. S. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói-RJ (Brazil); Caldeira, L. [IF Sudeste MG, Campus Juiz de Fora - Núcleo de Física, Juiz de Fora-MG (Brazil); Coelho, A. A. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas - Unicamp, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Carvalho, A. Magnus G. [Laboratório Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, CNPEM, Campinas-SP (Brazil)

    2015-01-07

    The so-called half-metallic magnets have been proposed as good candidates for spintronic applications due to the feature of exhibiting a hundred percent spin polarization at the Fermi level. Such materials follow the Slater-Pauling rule, which relates the magnetic moment with the valence electrons in the system. In this paper, we study the bulk polycrystalline half-metallic Fe{sub 2}MnSi Heusler compound replacing Si by Ga to determine how the Ga addition changes the magnetic, the structural, and the half-metal properties of this compound. The material does not follow the Slater-Pauling rule, probably due to a minor structural disorder degree in the system, but a linear dependence on the magnetic transition temperature with the valence electron number points to the half-metallic behavior of this compound.

  16. Effects of metallic nanoparticle doped flux on the interfacial intermetallic compounds between lead-free solder ball and copper substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sujan, G.K., E-mail: sgkumer@gmail.com; Haseeb, A.S.M.A., E-mail: haseeb@um.edu.my; Afifi, A.B.M., E-mail: amalina@um.edu.my

    2014-11-15

    Lead free solders currently in use are prone to develop thick interfacial intermetallic compound layers with rough morphology which are detrimental to the long term solder joint reliability. A novel method has been developed to control the morphology and growth of intermetallic compound layers between lead-free Sn–3.0Ag–0.5Cu solder ball and copper substrate by doping a water soluble flux with metallic nanoparticles. Four types of metallic nanoparticles (nickel, cobalt, molybdenum and titanium) were used to investigate their effects on the wetting behavior and interfacial microstructural evaluations after reflow. Nanoparticles were dispersed manually with a water soluble flux and the resulting nanoparticle doped flux was placed on copper substrate. Lead-free Sn–3.0Ag–0.5Cu solder balls of diameter 0.45 mm were placed on top of the flux and were reflowed at a peak temperature of 240 °C for 45 s. Angle of contact, wetting area and interfacial microstructure were studied by optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It was observed that the angle of contact increased and wetting area decreased with the addition of cobalt, molybdenum and titanium nanoparticles to flux. On the other hand, wettability improved with the addition of nickel nanoparticles. Cross-sectional micrographs revealed that both nickel and cobalt nanoparticle doping transformed the morphology of Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} from a typical scallop type to a planer one and reduced the intermetallic compound thickness under optimum condition. These effects were suggested to be related to in-situ interfacial alloying at the interface during reflow. The minimum amount of nanoparticles required to produce the planer morphology was found to be 0.1 wt.% for both nickel and cobalt. Molybdenum and titanium nanoparticles neither appear to undergo alloying during reflow nor have any influence at the solder/substrate interfacial reaction. Thus, doping

  17. Fabrication of indigenous computer controlled photoacoustic spectrometer for actinide spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) monitoring the non-radiative de-excitation process is a powerful tool for investigating the absorption spectra of almost any type of samples like opaque solids, turbid solutions etc. Actinide compounds due to high probability of non-radiative relaxation process are good candidates for PAS investigations and also without any need for good optical quality crystals of these compounds. In addition, this technique is extremely useful for determination of thermal properties like thermal conductivity, diffusivity and related properties like phase transitions, thickness of thin film etc. In the present paper details of fabrication of indigenous PAS unit using low cost easily available components and interfacing this unit to a personal computer are given

  18. Predicting density functional theory total energies and enthalpies of formation of metal-nonmetal compounds by linear regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deml, Ann M.; O'Hayre, Ryan; Wolverton, Chris; Stevanović, Vladan

    2016-02-01

    The availability of quantitatively accurate total energies (Etot) of atoms, molecules, and solids, enabled by the development of density functional theory (DFT), has transformed solid state physics, quantum chemistry, and materials science by allowing direct calculations of measureable quantities, such as enthalpies of formation (Δ Hf ). Still, the ability to compute Etot and Δ Hf values does not, necessarily, provide insights into the physical mechanisms behind their magnitudes or chemical trends. Here, we examine a large set of calculated Etot and Δ Hf values obtained from the DFT+U -based fitted elemental-phase reference energies (FERE) approach [V. Stevanović, S. Lany, X. Zhang, and A. Zunger, Phys. Rev. B 85, 115104 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevB.85.115104] to probe relationships between the Etot/Δ Hf of metal-nonmetal compounds in their ground-state crystal structures and properties describing the compound compositions and their elemental constituents. From a stepwise linear regression, we develop a linear model for Etot, and consequently Δ Hf , that reproduces calculated FERE values with a mean absolute error of ˜80 meV/atom. The most significant contributions to the model include calculated total energies of the constituent elements in their reference phases (e.g., metallic iron or gas phase O2), atomic ionization energies and electron affinities, Pauling electronegativity differences, and atomic electric polarizabilities. These contributions are discussed in the context of their connection to the underlying physics. We also demonstrate that our Etot/Δ Hf model can be directly extended to predict the Etot and Δ Hf of compounds outside the set used to develop the model.

  19. Large scale simulations of the mechanical properties of layered transition metal ternary compounds for fossil energy power system applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, Wai-Yim [Univ. of Missouri, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2014-12-31

    Advanced materials with applications in extreme conditions such as high temperature, high pressure, and corrosive environments play a critical role in the development of new technologies to significantly improve the performance of different types of power plants. Materials that are currently employed in fossil energy conversion systems are typically the Ni-based alloys and stainless steels that have already reached their ultimate performance limits. Incremental improvements are unlikely to meet the more stringent requirements aimed at increased efficiency and reduce risks while addressing environmental concerns and keeping costs low. Computational studies can lead the way in the search for novel materials or for significant improvements in existing materials that can meet such requirements. Detailed computational studies with sufficient predictive power can provide an atomistic level understanding of the key characteristics that lead to desirable properties. This project focuses on the comprehensive study of a new class of materials called MAX phases, or Mn+1AXn (M = a transition metal, A = Al or other group III, IV, and V elements, X = C or N). The MAX phases are layered transition metal carbides or nitrides with a rare combination of metallic and ceramic properties. Due to their unique structural arrangements and special types of bonding, these thermodynamically stable alloys possess some of the most outstanding properties. We used a genomic approach in screening a large number of potential MAX phases and established a database for 665 viable MAX compounds on the structure, mechanical and electronic properties and investigated the correlations between them. This database if then used as a tool for materials informatics for further exploration of this class of intermetallic compounds.

  20. Hybrid compounds of Keggin polyoxotungstate with transition metal ion as the central atom. Synthesis, structure and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Min; Chen, Ya-Guang; Shi, Tian

    2016-02-01

    The compounds (Hbipy)2[Co(bipy)2(H2O)4]2(CoW12O40)·2bipy·7H2O (1) and [Ni2(Hbipy)2(bipy)(H2O)4(H2W12O40)]·5H2O (2) (bipy = 4,4-bipyridine) were synthesized hydrothermally and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, TG analyses, solid ultraviolet diffuse spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction method. In 1 the complex ions, [Co(bipy)2(H2O)4]2+, construct a supramolecular layer through π-π stacking interaction. The heteropolyanions with central Co atom and supramolecular layers are linked by hydrogen bonds. In 2 a 2D structure is formed from metatungstate anions and binuclear Ni-bipy complexes through the coordination of metatungstate anions and bipy to Ni ions. Between the layers and bipyridine molecules are the hydrogen bond interactions. The formation of 1 and 2 shows that the solution acidity and metal ions influence greatly the structure of the compounds. Solid ultraviolet diffusion results indicate that the compounds 1 and 2 are potential semiconductor materials. In 1 and 2 there exists a weak antiferromagnetic interaction.

  1. MOLECULAR SPECTROSCPY AND REACTIONS OF ACTINIDES IN THE GAS PHASE AND CRYOGENIC MATRICES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaven, Michael C.; Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim

    2009-02-01

    In this chapter we review the spectroscopic data for actinide molecules and the reaction dynamics for atomic and molecular actinides that have been examined in the gas phase or in inert cryogenic matrices. The motivation for this type of investigation is that physical properties and reactions can be studied in the absence of external perturbations (gas phase) or under minimally perturbing conditions (cryogenic matrices). This information can be compared directly with the results from high-level theoretical models. The interplay between experiment and theory is critically important for advancing our understanding of actinide chemistry. For example, elucidation of the role of the 5f electrons in bonding and reactivity can only be achieved through the application of experimentally verified theoretical models. Theoretical calculations for the actinides are challenging due the large numbers of electrons that must be treated explicitly and the presence of strong relativistic effects. This topic has been reviewed in depth in Chapter 17 of this series. One of the goals of the experimental work described in this chapter has been to provide benchmark data that can be used to evaluate both empirical and ab initio theoretical models. While gas-phase data are the most suitable for comparison with theoretical calculations, there are technical difficulties entailed in generating workable densities of gas-phase actinide molecules that have limited the range of species that have been characterized. Many of the compounds of interest are refractory, and problems associated with the use of high temperature vapors have complicated measurements of spectra, ionization energies, and reactions. One approach that has proved to be especially valuable in overcoming this difficulty has been the use of pulsed laser ablation to generate plumes of vapor from refractory actinide-containing materials. The vapor is entrained in an inert gas, which can be used to cool the actinide species to room

  2. Volatile organic compounds and trace metal level in some beers collected from Romanian market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voica, Cezara; Kovacs, Melinda; Vadan, Marius

    2013-11-01

    Beer is one of the most popular beverages at worldwide level. Through this study fifteen different types of beer collected from Romanian market were analysed in order to evaluate their mineral, trace element as well the their organic content. Importance of such characterization of beer samples is supported by the fact that their chemical composition can affect both taste and stability of beer, as well the consumer health. Minerals and trace elements analysis were performed on ICP-MS while organic compounds analysis was done through GC-MS. Through ICP-MS analysis, elements as Ca, Na, K and Mg were evidenced at mgṡkg-1 order while elements as Cr, Ba, Co, Ni were detected at lower level. After GC-MS analysis the major volatile compounds that were detected belong to alcohols namely ethanol, propanol, isobutanol, isoamyl alcohol and linalool. Selected fatty acids and esters were evidenced also in the studied beer samples.

  3. The Oxidation of Sulfur-Containing Compounds Using Heterogeneous Catalysts of Transition Metal Oxides Deposited on the Polymeric Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh Vu, Ngo; Dinh Bui, Nhi; Thi Minh, Thao; Thi Thanh Dam, Huong; Thi Tran, Hang

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the activity of heterogeneous catalysts of transition metal oxides deposited on the polymeric matrix in the oxidation of sulfur-containing compounds. It is shown that MnO2-10/CuO-10 has the highest catalytic activity. The physicomechanical properties of polymeric heterogeneous catalysts of transition-metal oxides, including the specific surface area, elongation at break and breaking strength, specific electrical resistance, and volume resistivity were studied by using an Inspekt mini 3 kN universal tensile machine in accordance with TCVN 4509:2006 at a temperature of 20 ± 2°C. Results show that heterogeneous polymeric catalysts were stable under severe reaction conditions. Scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive analysis are used to study the surfaces of the catalysts. Microstructural characterization of the catalysts is performed by using x-ray computed tomography. We demonstrate the potential application of polymeric heterogeneous catalysts of transition-metal oxides in industrial wastewater treatment.

  4. Palladium-mediated borylation of pentafluorosulfanyl functionalized compounds: the crucial role of metal fluorido complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Claudia; Braun, Thomas; Laubenstein, Reik; Braun, Beatrice

    2016-03-11

    Stoichiometric reactions of SF5 functionalized bromo or iodo aromatics at [Pd(PiPr3)2] (1) led to the oxidative addition products 3, 5 and 7. They were converted into their corresponding palladium fluorido complexes, which reacted readily with bis(pinacolato)diboron (B2pin2) to give the borylated SF5 aromatic compounds. Based on these studies a catalytic borylation of SF5 organyls was developed. PMID:26872070

  5. Structure and constitution of glass and steel compound in glass-metal composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research using methods of optical and scanning electronic microscopy was conducted and it discovered common factors on structures and diffusing zone forming after welding glass C49-1 and steel Ct3sp in technological process of creating new glass-metal composite. Different technological modes of steel surface preliminary oxidation welded with and without glass were investigated. The time of welding was varied from minimum encountering time to the time of stabilizing width of diffusion zone

  6. Structure and constitution of glass and steel compound in glass-metal composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyubimova, Olga N.; Morkovin, Andrey V.; Dryuk, Sergey A. [School of Engineering, Mechanics and Mathematical Modeling Department, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok, 690950 (Russian Federation); Nikiforov, Pavel A., E-mail: nikiforovpa@gmail.com [School of Engineering, Materials Science and Technology Department, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok, 690950 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    The research using methods of optical and scanning electronic microscopy was conducted and it discovered common factors on structures and diffusing zone forming after welding glass C49-1 and steel Ct3sp in technological process of creating new glass-metal composite. Different technological modes of steel surface preliminary oxidation welded with and without glass were investigated. The time of welding was varied from minimum encountering time to the time of stabilizing width of diffusion zone.

  7. Random and block copolymerization in metal oxide gel synthesis from metalorganic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    The introduction and development of the block copolymerization concept in metal oxide gel synthesis will in the future generate a new class of glass/microcrystalline materials. By the year 2004, better scientific understanding of the chemical principles controlling the distribution of network formers or modifiers in silicate gels will permit the synthesis of architecturally well-defined block polymers with unique high-performance behavior.

  8. Determination of polycyclic aromatic compounds and heavy metals in sludges from biological sewage treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzek, D; Janoszka, B; Dobosz, C; Warzecha, L; Bodzek, M

    1997-07-11

    The procedure of the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their derivatives in the sludges from biological sewage treatment plants has been worked out. The analysis included isolation of organic matter from sludges, separation of the extract into fractions of similar chemical character, qualitative-quantitative analysis of individual PAHs and their nitrogenated and oxygenated derivatives. Liquid-solid chromatography, solid-phase extraction and semipreparative band thin-layer chromatography techniques were used for the separation. Capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the separated fractions enabled identification of more than 21 PAHs, including hydrocarbons which contained 2-6 aromatic rings as well as their alkyl derivatives, 10 oxygen derivatives, 9 nitroarenes, aminoarenes and over 20 azaarenes and carbazoles. Using the capillary gas chromatography-flame ionization detection technique the content of 17 dominant PAHs was determined. The content of heavy metals was determined in investigated sludges with the use of atomic absorption spectrometry. The concentrations of the respective metals could be ranked in the order Cd coal mine wastes, taking into consideration the contents of toxic organic pollutants and heavy metals. PMID:9253190

  9. Metal compounds in zeolites as active components of chemisorption and catalysis. Quantum chemical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short review of possible catalitic active sites associated with various types of metal species in zoolite is presented. The structural and electronic peculiarity of aluminum ions in zeolite lattice and their distribution in the lattice are discussed on the basis of quantum chemical calculations in connection with the formation of Broensted activity of zeolites. Various molecular models of Lewis Acid Sites associated the extra-lattice oxide-hydroxide aluminum species have been investigated by means of density functional model cluster calculations using CO molecule as a probe. Probable ways of formation of the selective oxidation center in FeZSM-5 by decomposition of dinitrogen monoxide have been studied by ab-initio quantum chemical calculations. The immediate oxidizing site is reasonably represented by the binuclear iron-hydroxide cluster with peroxo-like fragment located between iron atoms. Various probable intermediates of the selective oxidation center formation resulted from interaction of a hydroperoxide molecule with a lattice titanium ion in titanium silicalite have been investigated by quantum chemical calculations. It was concluded that this reaction requires essential structural reconstruction in the vicinity of the titanium ion. Probability of this structural reconstruction is discussed. Possible reasons of an electron-deficient and electron-enriched state of metal particles entrapped in zoolite cavities are discussed. Also, various probable molecular models of such modified metal particles in zeolite are considered

  10. Zinc-blende compounds of transition elements with N, P, As, Sb, S, Se, and Te as half-metallic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanakis, Iosif; Mavropoulos, Phivos

    2003-03-01

    We report systematic first-principles calculations for ordered zinc-blende compounds of the transition metal elements V, Cr, and Mn with the sp elements N, P, As, Sb, S, Se, and Te, motivated by a recent fabrication of zinc-blende CrAs, CrSb, and MnAs. They show a ferromagnetic half-metallic behavior for a wide range of lattice constants. We discuss the origin and trends of half-metallicity, present the calculated equilibrium lattice constants, and examine the half-metallic behavior of their transition element terminated (001) surfaces.

  11. Emissions of organo-metal compounds via the leachate and gas pathway from two differently pre-treated municipal waste materials - A landfill reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to their broad industrial production and use as PVC-stabilisers, agro-chemicals and anti-fouling agents, organo-metal compounds are widely distributed throughout the terrestrial and marine biogeosphere. Here, we focused on the emission dynamics of various organo-metal compounds (e.g., di,- tri-, tetra-methyl tin, di-methyl mercury, tetra-methyl lead) from two different kinds of pre-treated mass waste, namely mechanically-biologically pre-treated municipal solid waste (MBP MSW) and municipal waste incineration ash (MWIA). In landfill simulation reactors, the emission of the organo-metal compounds via the leachate and gas pathway was observed over a period of 5 months simulating different environmental conditions (anaerobic with underlying soil layer/aerated/anaerobic). Both waste materials differ significantly in their initial amounts of organo-metal compounds and their environmental behaviour with regard to the accumulation and depletion rates within the solid material during incubation. For tri-methyl tin, the highest release rates in leachates were found in the incineration ash treatments, where anaerobic conditions in combination with underlying soil material significantly promoted its formation. Concerning the gas pathway, anaerobic conditions considerably favour the emission of organo-metal compounds (tetra-methyl tin, di-methyl mercury, tetra-methyl lead) in both the MBP material and especially in the incineration ash

  12. Solubility of actinide surrogates in nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the results of a study of actinide surrogates in a nuclear borosilicate glass to understand the effect of processing conditions (temperature and oxidizing versus reducing conditions) on the solubility limits of these elements. The incorporation of cerium oxide, hafnium oxide, and neodymium oxide in this borosilicate glass was investigated. Cerium is a possible surrogate for tetravalent and trivalent actinides, hafnium for tetravalent actinides, and neodymium for trivalent actinides. The material homogeneity was studied by optical, scanning electron microscopy. Cerium LIII XANES spectroscopy showed that the Ce3+/Cetotal ratio increased from about 0.5 to 0.9 as the processing temperature increased from 1100 to 1400 deg. C. Cerium LIII XANES spectroscopy also confirmed that the increased Ce solubility in glasses melted under reducing conditions was due to complete reduction of all the cerium in the glass. The most significant results pointed out in the current study are that the solubility limits of the actinide surrogates increases with the processing temperature and that Ce3+ is shown to be more soluble than Ce4+ in this borosilicate glass

  13. Waste disposal aspects of actinide separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two recent NRPB reports are summarized (Camplin, W.C., Grimwood, P.D. and White, I.F., The effects of actinide separation on the radiological consequences of disposal of high-level radioactive waste on the ocean bed, Harwell, National Radiological Protection Board, NRPB-R94 (1980), London, HMSO; Hill, M.D., White, I.F. and Fleishman, A.B., The effects of actinide separation on the radiological consequences of geologic disposal of high-level waste. Harwell, National Radiological Protection Board, NRPB-R95 (1980), London, HMSO). They describe preliminary environmental assessments relevant to waste arising from the reprocessing of PWR fuel. Details are given of the modelling of transport of radionuclides to man, and of the methodology for calculating effective dose equivalents in man. Emphasis has been placed on the interaction between actinide separation and the disposal options rather than comparison of disposal options. The reports show that the effects of actinide separation do depend on the disposal method. Conditions are outlined where the required substantial further research and development work on actinide separation and recycle would be justified. Toxicity indices or 'toxic potentials' can be misleading and should not be used to guide research and development. (U.K.)

  14. Evaluation of properties of concrete using fluosilicate salts and metal (Ni,W) compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gyu-Yong KIM; Eui-Bae LEE; Bae-Su KHIL; Seung-Hum LEE

    2009-01-01

    To improve watertightness and antibiosis of sewage structure concrete, the antimierobial watertight admixture was made with fluosilicate salts and antimicrobial compounds. And fresh properties, watertightness, harmlessness and antibiosis of concrete were investigated experimentally. As a result, the fresh properties of concrete were similar to those of an ordinary concrete, without setting time delay. Compressive strength and carbonation resistance of concrete were better than those of an ordinary concrete. Finally it was confirmed that the antimierobial watenight admixture of concrete had an antibiosis inhibiting SOB growth.

  15. Electronic, thermal, and superconducting properties of metal nitrides (MN) and metal carbides (MC) (M=V, Nb, Ta) compounds by first principles studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subhashree, G.; Sankar, S.; Krithiga, R. [Anna Univ., Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India). Condensed Matter Lab.

    2015-07-01

    Structural, electronic, and superconducting properties of carbides and nitrides of vanadium (V), niobium (Nb), and tantalum (Ta) (group V transition elements) have been studied by computing their electronic band structure characteristics. The electronic band structure calculations have been carried out based on the density functional theory (DFT) within the local density approximation (LDA) by using the tight binding linear muffin tin orbital method. The NaCl-type cubic structures of MN and MC (M=V, Nb, Ta) compounds have been confirmed from the electronic total energy minimum of these compounds. The ground state properties, such as equilibrium lattice constant (a{sub 0}), bulk modulus (B), and Wigner-Seitz radius (S{sub 0}) are determined and compared with available data. The electronic density of states reveals the metallic nature of the chosen materials. The electronic specific heat coefficient, Debye temperature, and superconducting transition temperature obtained from the band structure results are found to agree well with the earlier reported literature.

  16. Ambient air monitoring for organic compounds, acids, and metals at Los Alamos National Laboratory, January 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) contracted Radian Corporation (Radian) to conduct a short-term, intensive air monitoring program whose goal was to estimate the impact of chemical emissions from LANL on the ambient air environment. A comprehensive emission inventory had identified more than 600 potential air contaminants in LANL's emissions. A subset of specific target chemicals was selected for monitoring: 20 organic vapors, 6 metals and 5 inorganic acid vapors. These were measured at 5 ground level sampling sites around LANL over seven consecutive days in January 1991. The sampling and analytical strategy used a combination of EPA and NIOSH methods modified for ambient air applications

  17. Theoretical modelling of intermediate band solar cell materials based on metal-doped chalcopyrite compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios, P. [Instituto de Energia Solar and Dpt. de Tecnologias Especiales, ETSI de Telecomunicacion, UPM, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: pablop@etsit.upm.es; Sanchez, K. [Instituto de Energia Solar and Dpt. de Tecnologias Especiales, ETSI de Telecomunicacion, UPM, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Conesa, J.C. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, CSIC, Marie Curie 2, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, J.J. [Dpt. de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, 28080, Madrid (Spain); Wahnon, P. [Instituto de Energia Solar and Dpt. de Tecnologias Especiales, ETSI de Telecomunicacion, UPM, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-05-31

    Electronic structure calculations are carried out for CuGaS{sub 2} partially substituted with Ti, V, Cr or Mn to ascertain if some of these systems could provide an intermediate band material able to give a high efficiency photovoltaic cell. Trends in electronic level positions are analyzed and more accurate advanced theory levels (exact exchange or Hubbard-type methods) are used in some cases. The Ti-substituted system seems more likely to yield an intermediate band material with the desired properties, and furthermore seems realizable from the thermodynamic point of view, while those with Cr and Mn might give half-metal structures with applications in spintronics.

  18. Metal-based carboxamide-derived compounds endowed with antibacterial and antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Muhammad; Chohan, Zahid H; Winum, Jean-Yves; Akhtar, Javeed

    2014-08-01

    A series of three bioactive thiourea (carboxamide) derivatives, N-(dipropylcarbamothioyl)-thiophene-2-carboxamide (L(1)), N-(dipropylcarbamothioyl)-5-methylthiophene-2-carboxamide (L(2)) and 5-bromo-N-(dipropylcarbamothioyl)furan-2-carboxamide (L(3)) and their cobalt(II), copper(II), nickel(II) and zinc(II) complexes (1)-(12) have been synthesized and characterized by their IR,(1)H-NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and elemental analysis data. The Crystal structure of one of the ligand, N-(dipropylcarbamothioyl)thiophene-2-carboxamide (L(1)) and its nickel(II) and copper(II) complexes were determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. All the ligands and metal(II) complexes have been subjected to in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity against six bacterial species (Escherichia coli. Shigella flexneri. Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Salmonella typhi. Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and for antifungal activity against six fungal strains (Trichophyton longifusus. Candida albicans. Aspergillus flavus. Microsporum canis. Fusarium solani and Candida glabrata). The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal bioactivity data showed the metal(II) complexes to be more potent than the parent ligands against one or more bacterial and fungal strains. PMID:23914928

  19. Stabilization of actinides and lanthanides in unusually high oxidation states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eller, P.G.; Penneman, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical environments can be chosen which stabilize actinides and lanthanides in unusually high or low oxidation states and in unusual coordination. In many cases, one can rationalize the observed species as resulting from strong charge/size influences provided by specific sites in host lattices (e.g., Tb(IV) in BaTbO/sub 3/ or Am(IV) in polytungstate anions). In other cases, the unusual species can be considered from an acid-base viewpoint (e.g., U(III) in AsF/sub 5//HF solution or Pu(VII) in Li/sub 5/PuO/sub 6/). In still other cases, an interplay of steric and redox effects can lead to interesting comparisons (e.g., instability of double fluoride salts of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) relative to U, Np, and Am analogues). Generalized ways to rationalize compounds containing actinides and lanthanides in unusual valences (particularly high valences), including the above and numerous other examples, will form the focus of this paper. Recently developed methods for synthesizing high valent f-element fluorides using superoxidizers and superacids at low temperatures will also be described. 65 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. Effects of actinide burning on waste disposal at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Release rates of 15 radionuclides from waste packages expected to result from partitioning and transmutation of Light-Water Reactor (LWR) and Actinide-Burning Liquid-Metal Reactor (ALMR) spent fuel are calculated and compared to release rates from standard LWR spent fuel packages. The release rates are input to a model for radionuclide transport from the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain to the water table. Discharge rates at the water table are calculated and used in a model for transport to the accessible environment, defined to be five kilometers from the repository edge. Concentrations and dose rates at the accessible environment from spent fuel and wastes from reprocessing, with partitioning and transmutation, are calculated. Partitioning and transmutation of LWR and ALMR spent fuel reduces the inventories of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium in the high-level waste by factors of 40 to 500. However, because release rates of all of the actinides except curium are limited by solubility and are independent of package inventory, they are not reduced correspondingly. Only for curium is the repository release rate much lower for reprocessing wastes

  1. Enhanced Optical Transmission and Sensing of a Thin Metal Film Perforated with a Compound Subwavelength Circular Hole Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangnan; Liu, Guiqiang; Liu, Zhengqi; Hu, Ying; Cai, Zhengjie

    2015-12-01

    We propose and numerically investigate the optical transmission behaviors of a sub-wavelength metal film perforated with a two-dimensional square array of compound circular holes. Enhanced optical transmission is obtained by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, which can be mainly attributed to the excitation and coupling of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) and surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), and Fano Resonances. The redshift of the transmission peak can be achieved by enlarging the size and number of small holes, the environmental dielectric constant. These indicate that the proposed structure has potential applications in integrated optoelectronic devices such as plasmonic filters and sensors. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11464019, 11264017, 11004088), Young Scientist Development Program of China (No. 20142BCB23008) and the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province, China (Nos. 2014BAB212001, 20112BBE5033)

  2. Minior Actinide Doppler Coefficient Measurement Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolan E. Hertel; Dwayne Blaylock

    2008-04-10

    The "Minor Actinide Doppler Coefficient Measurement Assessment" was a Department of Energy (DOE) U-NERI funded project intended to assess the viability of using either the FLATTOP or the COMET critical assembly to measure high temperature Doppler coefficients. The goal of the project was to calculate using the MCNP5 code the gram amounts of Np-237, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-241, AM-241, AM-242m, Am-243, and CM-244 needed to produce a 1E-5 in reactivity for a change in operating temperature 800C to 1000C. After determining the viability of using the assemblies and calculating the amounts of each actinide an experiment will be designed to verify the calculated results. The calculations and any doncuted experiments are designed to support the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative in conducting safety analysis of advanced fast reactor or acceoerator-driven transmutation systems with fuel containing high minor actinide content.

  3. Research on Actinides in Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical/spectroscopic integrated measurement system was designed and set up for spectro-electrochemical measurements of lanthanide and actinide ions in high temperature molten salt media. A compact electrochemical cell and electrode system was also developed for the minimization of reactants, and consequently minimization of radioactive waste generation. By applying these equipment, oxidation and reduction behavior of lanthanide and actinide ions in molten salt media have been made. Also, thermodynamic parameter values are determined by interpreting the results obtained from electrochemical measurements. Several lanthanide ions exhibited fluorescence properties in molten salt. Also, UV-VIS measurement provided the detailed information regarding the oxidation states of lanthanide and actinide ions in high temperature molten salt media

  4. Coordination chemistry for new actinide separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amount of wastes and the number of chemical steps can be decreased by replacing the PUREX process extractant (TBP) by, N.N- dialkylamides (RCONR'2). Large amounts of deep underground storable wastes can be stored into sub-surface disposals if the long lived actinide isotopes are removed. Spent nuclear fuels reprocessing including the partitioning of the minor actinides Np, Am, Cm and their transmutation into short half lives fission products is appealing to the public who is not favorable to the deep underground storage of large amounts of long half lived actinide isotopes. In this paper coordination chemistry problems related to improved chemical separations by solvent extraction are presented. 2 tabs.; 4 refs

  5. Actinide phosphonate complexes in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complexes formed by actinides with carboxylic acids, polycarboxylic acids, and aminopolycarboxylic acids play a central role in both the basic and process chemistry of the actinides. Recent studies of f-element complexes with phosphonic acid ligands indicate that new ligands incorporating doubly ionizable phosphonate groups (-PO3H2) have many properties which are unique chemically, and promise more efficient separation processes for waste cleanup and environmental restoration. Simple diphosphonate ligands form much stronger complexes than isostructural carboxylates, often exhibiting higher solubility as well. In this manuscript recent studies of the thermodynamics and kinetics of f-element complexation by 1,1 and 1,2 diphosphonic acid ligands are described

  6. Sequential analysis of selected actinides in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monitoring of personnel by urinalysis for suspected contamination by actinides necessitated the development and implementation of an analytical scheme that will separate and identify alpha emitting radionuclides of these elements. The present work deals with Pu, Am, and Th. These elements are separated from an ashed urine sample by means of coprecipitation and ion exchange techniques. The final analysis is carried out by electroplating the actinides and counting in a α-spectrometer. Mean recoveries of these elements from urine are: Pu 64%, Am 74% and Th 69%. (auth)

  7. Actinide elements in aquatic and terrestrial environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: water-sediment interactions of U, Pu, Am, and Cm; relative availability of actinide elements from abiotic to aquatic biota; comparative uptake of transuranic elements by biota bordering Pond 3513; metabolic reduction of 239Np from Np(V) to Np(IV) in cotton rats; evaluation of hazards associated with transuranium releases to the biosphere; predicting Pu in bone; adsorption--solubility--complexation phenomena in actinide partitioning between sorbents and solution; comparative soil extraction data; and comparative plant uptake data

  8. Actinide and fission product separation and transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-07-01

    The second international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, took place in Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois United States, on 11-13 November 1992. The proceedings are presented in four sessions: Current strategic system of actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, progress in R and D on partitioning processes wet and dry, progress in R and D on transmutation and refinements of neutronic and other data, development of the fuel cycle processes fuel types and targets. (A.L.B.)

  9. Actinide and fission product separation and transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, took place in Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois United States, on 11-13 November 1992. The proceedings are presented in four sessions: Current strategic system of actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, progress in R and D on partitioning processes wet and dry, progress in R and D on transmutation and refinements of neutronic and other data, development of the fuel cycle processes fuel types and targets. (A.L.B.)

  10. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of PuMGa5 compounds within the LDA + U + SO method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukoyanov, A. V.; Shorikov, A. O.; Anisimov, V. I.; Dremov, V. V.

    2012-12-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of PuMGa5 compounds (M = Co, Fe, Ni, Rh, Ir) have been calculated within the LDA + U + SO method taking into account the strong electron-electron correlations and the spin-orbit coupling in the 5 f shell of the actinide metal. The features of the electronic structure, coupling type, electron configuration, and magnetic state of the plutonium ion have been considered depending on the type of transition metal in PuMGa5. The estimates of the effective magnetic moment of the plutonium ion agree well with the known experimental values. It has been shown that the occupancy of d states of the transition metal correlates with the appearance of superconductivity in the compounds of this class, providing the optimum doping regime in the electronic subsystem.

  11. Correlation of retention of lanthanide and actinide complexes with stability constants and their speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, A.; Sivaraman, N.; Viswanathan, K.S.; Ghosh, Suddhasattwa; Srinivasan, T.G.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Chemistry Group

    2013-03-01

    The present study describes a correlation that is developed from retention of lanthanide and actinide complexes with the stability constant. In these studies, an ion-pairing reagent, camphor-10-sulphonic acid (CSA) was used as the modifier and organic acids such as {alpha}-hydroxy isobutyric acid ({alpha}-HIBA), mandelic acid, lactic acid and tartaric acid were used as complexing reagent for elution. From these studies, a correlation has been established between capacity factor of a metal ion, concentration of ion-pairing reagent and complexing agent with the stability constant of metal complex. Based on these studies, it has been shown that the stability constant of lanthanide and actinide complexes can be estimated using a single lanthanide calibrant. Validation of the method was carried out with the complexing agents such as {alpha}-HIBA and lactic acid. It was also demonstrated that data from a single chromatogram can be used for estimation of stability constant at various ionic strengths. These studies also demonstrated that the method can be applied for estimation of stability constant of actinides with a ligand whose value is not reported yet, e.g., ligands of importance in the lanthanide-actinide separations, chelation therapy etc. The chromatographic separation method is fast and the estimation of stability constant can be done in a very short time, which is a significant advantage especially in dealing with radioactive elements. The stability constant data was used to derive speciation data of plutonium in different oxidation states as well as that of americium with {alpha}-HIBA. The elution behavior of actinides such as Pu and Am from reversed phase chromatographic technique could be explained based on these studies. (orig.)

  12. Phytoremediation of soils co-contaminated by organic compounds and heavy metals: Bioassays with Lupinus luteus L. and associated endophytic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Gutierrez-Gines, M. J.; Hernandez, A. J.; Perez-Leblic, M. I.; Pastor, J.; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2014-01-01

    In the central part of the Iberian Peninsula there are old sealed landfills containing soils co-contaminated by several heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Ni, As, Cr, Fe, Al, Mn) and organic pollutants of different families (hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides and other organochlorinated compounds, phenols and volatile compounds), which this work will address. We have focused on phytoremedial plants that are able to deal with this type of complex p...

  13. Simultaneous removal of organic compounds and heavy metals from soils by electrokinetic remediation with a modified cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturi, Kranti; Reddy, Krishna R

    2006-05-01

    Thousands of sites are contaminated with both heavy metals and organic compounds and these sites pose a major threat to public health and the environment. Previous studies have shown that electrokinetic remediation has potential to remove heavy metals and organic compounds when they exist individually in low permeability soils. This paper presents the feasibility of using cyclodextrins in electrokinetic remediation for the simultaneous removal of heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from low permeability soils. Kaolin was selected as a model low permeability soil and it was spiked with phenanthrene as well as nickel at concentrations of 500 mg kg-1 each to simulate typical mixed field contamination. Bench-scale electrokinetic experiments were conducted using hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) at low (1%) and high (10%) concentrations and using deionized water in control test. A periodic voltage gradient of 2VDC cm-1 (with 5 d on and 2 d off) was applied to all the tests, and 0.01 M NaOH was added during the experiments to maintain neutral pH conditions at anode. In all tests, nickel migrated as Ni2+ ions towards the cathode and most of it was precipitated as Ni(OH)2 within the soil close to the cathode due to high pH condition generated by electrolysis reaction. The solubility of phenanthrene in the flushing solution and the amount of electroosmotic flow controlled the migration and removal of phenanthrene in all the tests. Even though high flow was generated in tests using deionized water and 1% HPCD, migration and removal of phenanthrene was low due to low solubility of phenanthrene in these solutions. The test with 10% HPCD solution showed higher solubility of phenanthrene which caused it migrate towards the cathode, but further migration and removal was retarded due to reduced electric current and electroosmotic flow. Approximately one pore volume of flushing resulted in approximately 50% removal of phenanthrene from the soil near the

  14. Evaluation and testing of sequestering agents for the removal of actinides from waste streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D.C.; Romanovski, V.V.; Veeck, A.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to evaluate and test the complexing ability of a variety of promising new complexing agents synthesized by Professor Kenneth Raymond`s group at the University of California, Berkeley (ESP-CP TTP Number SF16C311). Some of these derivatives have already shown the potential for selectivity binding Pu(IV) in a wide range of solutions in the presence of other metals. Professor Raymond`s group uses molecular modeling to design and synthesize ligands based on modification of natural siderophores, or their analogs, for chelation of actinides. The ligands are then modified for use as liquid/liquid and solid/liquid extractants. The authors` group at the Glenn T. Seaborg Institute for Transactinium Science (ITS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory determines the complex formation constants between the ligands and actinide ions, the capacity and time dependence for uptake on the resins, and the effect of other metal ions and pH.

  15. Hypervalent Compounds as Ligands: I 3 -Anion Adducts with Transition Metal Pentacarbonyls

    KAUST Repository

    Rogachev, Andrey Yu.

    2013-06-17

    Just a couple of transition metal complexes of the familiar triiodide anion are known. To investigate the bonding in these, as well as isomeric possibilities, we examined theoretically adducts of I3 - with model organometallic fragments, [Cr(CO)5] and [Mn(CO) 5]+. Bonding energy computations were augmented by a Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) perturbation theory analysis and Energy Decomposition Analysis (EDA). The bonding between I3 - and the organometallic fragment is substantial, especially for the electrostatically driven anion-cation case. "End-on" coordination is favored by 5-13 kcal/mol over "side-on" (to the central I of I3 -), with a ∼10 kcal/mol barrier for isomerization. A developing asymmetry in the I-I bonding of "end-on" coordinated I 3 - led us to consider in some detail the obvious fragmentation to a coordinated I- and free I2. While the signs of incipient fragmentation in that direction are there, these is a definite advantage to maintaining some I- to I2 bonding in triiodide complexes. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  16. Chemical compatibility of HLW borosilicate glasses with actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During liquid storage of HLLW the formation of actinide enriched sludges is being expected. Also during melting of HLW glasses an increase of top-to-bottom actinide concentrations can take place. Both effects have been studied. Besides, the vitrification of plutonium enriched wastes from Pu fuel element fabrication plants has been investigated with respect to an isolated vitrification process or a combined one with the HLLW. It is shown that the solidification of actinides from HLLW and actinide waste concentrates will set no principal problems. The leaching of actinides has been measured in salt brine at 230C and 1150C. (orig.)

  17. Actinide recycle in LMFBRs as a waste management alternative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaman, S.L.

    1979-08-21

    A strategy of actinide burnup in fast reactor systems has been investigated as an approach for reducing the long term hazards and storage requirements of the actinide waste elements and their decay daughters. The actinide recycle studies also included plutonium burnup studies in the event that plutonium is no longer required as a fuel. Particular emphasis was placed upon the timing of the recycle program, the requirements for separability of the waste materials, and the impact of the actinides on the reactor operations and performance. It is concluded that actinide recycle and plutonium burnout are attractive alternative waste management concepts. 25 refs., 14 figs., 34 tabs.

  18. Imaging the formation of high-energy dispersion anomalies in the actinide UCoGa$_5$

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Tanmoy; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Joyce, John J.; Sarrao, John L.; Graf, Matthias J.

    2012-01-01

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to image the emergence of substaintial dispersion anomalies in the electronic renormalization of the actinide compound UCoGa$_5$ which was presumed to belong to a conventional Fermi liquid family. Kinks or abrupt breaks in the slope of the quasiparticle dispersion are detected both at low ($\\sim$130 meV) and high ($\\sim$1 eV) binding energies below the Fermi energy, ruling out any significant contribution of phonons. We perform numerica...

  19. Potentiometric Sensor for Real-Time Remote Surveillance of Actinides in Molten Salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natalie J. Gese; Jan-Fong Jue; Brenda E. Serrano; Guy L. Fredrickson

    2012-07-01

    A potentiometric sensor is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for real-time remote surveillance of actinides during electrorefining of spent nuclear fuel. During electrorefining, fuel in metallic form is oxidized at the anode while refined uranium metal is reduced at the cathode in a high temperature electrochemical cell containing LiCl-KCl-UCl3 electrolyte. Actinides present in the fuel chemically react with UCl3 and form stable metal chlorides that accumulate in the electrolyte. This sensor will be used for process control and safeguarding of activities in the electrorefiner by monitoring the concentrations of actinides in the electrolyte. The work presented focuses on developing a solid-state cation conducting ceramic sensor for detecting varying concentrations of trivalent actinide metal cations in eutectic LiCl-KCl molten salt. To understand the basic mechanisms for actinide sensor applications in molten salts, gadolinium was used as a surrogate for actinides. The ß?-Al2O3 was selected as the solid-state electrolyte for sensor fabrication based on cationic conductivity and other factors. In the present work Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 was prepared by ion exchange reactions between trivalent Gd3+ from GdCl3 and K+-, Na+-, and Sr2+-ß?-Al2O3 precursors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for characterization of Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 samples. Microfocus X-ray Diffraction (µ-XRD) was used in conjunction with SEM energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to identify phase content and elemental composition. The Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 materials were tested for mechanical and chemical stability by exposing them to molten LiCl-KCl based salts. The effect of annealing on the exchanged material was studied to determine improvements in material integrity post ion exchange. The stability of the ß?-Al2O3 phase after annealing was verified by µ-XRD. Preliminary sensor tests with different assembly designs will also be presented.

  20. The interaction of actinide and lanthanide ions with hemoglobin and its relevance to human and environmental toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Ali, Manjoor; Ningthoujam, Raghumani S; Gaikwad, Pallavi; Kumar, Mukesh; Nath, Bimalendu B; Pandey, Badri N

    2016-04-15

    Due to increasing use of lanthanides/actinides in nuclear and civil applications, understanding the impact of these metal ions on human health and environment is a growing concern. Hemoglobin (Hb), which occurs in all the kingdom of living organism, is the most abundant protein in human blood. In present study, effect of lanthanides and actinides [thorium: Th(IV), uranium: U(VI), lanthanum: La(III), cerium: Ce(III) and (IV)] on the structure and function of Hb has been investigated. Results showed that these metal ions, except Ce(IV) interacted with carbonyl and amide groups of Hb, which resulted in the loss of its alpha-helix conformation. However, beyond 75μM, these ions affected heme moiety. Metal-heme interaction was found to affect oxygen-binding of Hb, which seems to be governed by their closeness with the charge-to-ionic-radius ratio of iron(III). Consistently, Ce(IV) being closest to iron(III), exhibited a greater effect on heme. Binding constant and binding stoichiometry of Th(IV) were higher than that of U(VI). Experiments using aquatic midge Chironomus (possessing human homologous Hb) and human blood, further validated metal-Hb interaction and associated toxicity. Thus, present study provides a biochemical basis to understand the actinide/lanthanide-induced interference in heme, which may have significant implications for the medical and environmental management of lanthanides/actinides toxicity. PMID:26799219

  1. Synthesis of nanoporous carbohydrate metal-organic framework and encapsulation of selected organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghamdi, Saleh

    Cyclodextrin metal organic frameworks (CDMOFs) with different types of cyclodextrins (CDs) (i.e., Alpha, Beta and Gamma-CD) and coordination potassium ion sources (KOH) CDMOF-a and (C7H5KO2) CDMOF-b were synthesized and fully characterized. The physical and thermal properties of the successfully produced CDMOFs were evaluated using N2 gas sorption, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The N2 gas sorption isotherm revealed high uptake into the micropores (330 cm3.g -1 for Gamma-CDMOF-a) to macropore (125 cm3.g -1 for Gamma-CDMOF-b) structures with isotherm types I and II for Gamma-CDMOFs and Alpha-CDMOFs, respectively. The Langmuir specific surface area (SSA) of Gamma-CDMOF-a (1376 m2.g-1) was significantly higher than the SSA of Alpha-CDMOF-a (289 m2.g -1) and Beta-CDMOF-a (54 m2.g-1). The TGA of dehydrated CDMOF crystals showed the structures were thermally stable up to 300 °C. The XRD of the Gamma-CDMOFs and Alpha-CDMOFs showed a highly face-centered-cubic symmetrical structure. An Aldol condensation reaction occurred during the encapsulation of acetaldehyde, hexanal, trans-2-hexenal, and ethanol into Gamma-CDMOF-a, with a SSA of 1416 m2.g -1. However, Gamma-CDMOF-b with a SSA of 499 m2.g -1 was successfully used to encapsulate acetaldehyde. The maximum release of acetaldehyde from CDMOF-b was 53 mug of acetaldehyde per g of CDMOF, which is greater than previously reported acetaldehyde encapsulation on Beta-CD inclusion complexes.

  2. Proton and metal ion binding to natural organic polyelectrolytes-I. Studies with synthetic model compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinsky, J.A.; Reddy, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    A unified physico-chemical model, based on a modified Henderson-Hasselbalch equation, for the analysis of ion complexation reactions involving charged polymeric systems is presented and verified. In this model pH = pKa+p(??Ka) + log(??/1 - ??) where Ka is the intrinsic acid dissociation constant of the ionizable functional groups on the polymer, ??Ka is the deviation of the intrinsic constant due to electrostatic interaction between the hydrogen ion and the polyanion, and alpha (??) is the polyacid degree of ionization. Using this approach pKa values for repeating acidic units of polyacrylic (PAA) and polymethacrylic (PMA) acids were found to be 4.25 ?? 0.03 and 4.8 ?? 0.1, respectively. The polyion electrostatic deviation term derived from the potentiometric titration data (i.e. p(??Ka)) is used to calculate metal ion concentration at the complexation site on the surface of the polyanion. Intrinsic cobalt-polycarboxylate binding constants (7.5 for PAA and 5.6 for PMA), obtained using this procedure, are consistent with the range of published binding constants for cobalt-monomer carboxylate complexes. In two phase systems incorporation of a Donnan membrane potential term allows determination of the intrinsic pKa of a cross-linked PMA gel, pKa = 4.83, in excellent agreement with the value obtained for the linear polyelectrolyte and the monomer. Similarly, the intrinsic stability constant for cobalt ion binding to a PMA-gel (??CoPMA+ = 11) was found to be in agreement with the linear polyelectrolyte analogue and the published data for cobalt-carboxylate monodentate complexes. ?? 1984.

  3. Actinide sequestration using self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryxell, Glen E; Lin, Yuehe; Fiskum, Sandy; Birnbaum, Jerome C; Wu, Hong; Kemner, Ken; Kelly, Shelley

    2005-03-01

    Surfactant templated synthesis of mesoporous ceramics provides a versatile foundation upon which to create high efficiency environmental sorbents. These nanoporous ceramic oxides condense a huge amount of surface area into a very small volume. The ceramic oxide interface is receptive to surface functionalization through molecular self-assembly. The marriage of mesoporous ceramics with self-assembled monolayer chemistry creates a powerful new class of environmental sorbent materials called self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS). These SAMMS materials are highly efficient sorbents whose interfacial chemistry can be fine-tuned to selectively sequester a specific target species, such as heavy metals, tetrahedral oxometalate anions, and radionuclides. Details addressing the design, synthesis, and characterization of SAMMS materials specifically designed to sequester actinides, of central importance to the environmental cleanup necessary after 40 years of weapons-grade plutonium production, as well as evaluation of their binding affinities and kinetics are presented. PMID:15787373

  4. Actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The third international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation, took place in Cadarache France, on 12-14 December 1994. The proceedings are presented in six sessions : an introduction session, the major programmes and international cooperation, the systems studies, the reactors fuels and targets, the chemistry and a last discussions session. (A.L.B.)

  5. Report of the panel on inhaled actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some topics discussed are as follows: assessment of risks to man of inhaling actinides; use of estimates for developing protection standards; epidemiology of lung cancer in exposed human populations; development of respiratory tract models; and effects in animals: dose- and effect-modifying factors

  6. Actinide measurements by AMS using fluoride matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornett, R. J.; Kazi, Z. H.; Zhao, X.-L.; Chartrand, M. G.; Charles, R. J.; Kieser, W. E.

    2015-10-01

    Actinides can be measured by alpha spectroscopy (AS), mass spectroscopy or accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We tested a simple method to separate Pu and Am isotopes from the sample matrix using a single extraction chromatography column. The actinides in the column eluent were then measured by AS or AMS using a fluoride target matrix. Pu and Am were coprecipitated with NdF3. The strongest AMS beams of Pu and Am were produced when there was a large excess of fluoride donor atoms in the target and the NdF3 precipitates were diluted about 6-8 fold with PbF2. The measured concentrations of 239,240Pu and 241Am agreed with the concentrations in standards of known activity and with two IAEA certified reference materials. Measurements of 239,240Pu and 241Am made at A.E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory agree, within their statistical uncertainty, with independent measurements made using the IsoTrace AMS system. This work demonstrated that fluoride targets can produce reliable beams of actinide anions and that the measurement of actinides using fluorides agree with published values in certified reference materials.

  7. Actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The third international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation, took place in Cadarache France, on 12-14 December 1994. The proceedings are presented in six sessions : an introduction session, the major programmes and international cooperation, the systems studies, the reactors fuels and targets, the chemistry and a last discussions session. (A.L.B.)

  8. Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis. If a radiological dispersive device, improvised nuclear device or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean-up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organics present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well. (author)

  9. Placental transfer of plutonium and other actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is based on an extensive literature search. All data available from studies on placental transfer of plutonium and other actinides in man and animals have been collected and analysed, and the report presents the significant results as well as unresolved questions and knowledge gaps which may serve as a waypost to future research work. (orig./MG)

  10. Diphosphine dioxides as extractants for actinides (in connection with the problem of anomalous aryl strengthening of complexes)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction study of uranylnitrate, plutonium in trivalent, tetravalent and gexavalent states and trivalent americium, curium, praseodymium and promethium by alkyl, aromatic and mixed diphosphine dioxides is briefly outlined. The influence of diphosphine dioxide structures on their extraction capacity and, in particular, the problem of anomalous aryl strengthening of compounds, both of entropy and binding character, are considered. Perchlorate media, as opposed to nitrate ones, are characteristic for their high distribution coefficients and extraction equilibrium constants. Anomalous aryl strengthening of trivalent lanthanides and actinides can be applied, at the minimum, for solution purifications from the traces of actinides and lanthanides

  11. Effects of actinide burning on waste disposal at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partitioning the actinides in spent fuel and transmuting them in actinide-burning liquid-metal reactors (ALMRs) is a potential method of reducing public risks from the geologic disposal of nuclear waste. In this paper, the authors present a comparison of radionuclide releases from burial at Yucca Mountain of spent fuel and of ALMR wastes. Two waste disposal schemes are considered. In each, the heat generation of the wastes at emplacement is 9.88 x 107 W, the maximum for the repository. In the first scheme, the repository contains 86,700 tonnes of initial heavy metal (IHM) of light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. In the second scheme, all current LWRs operate for a 40-yr lifetime, producing a total of 84,000 tonnes IHM of spent fuel. This spent fuel is treated using a pyrochemical process in which 98.4% of the uranium and 99.8% of the neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium are extracted and fabricated into ALMR fuel, with the reprocessing wastes destined for the repository. The ALMR requires this fuel for its startup and first two reloads; thereafter, it is self-sufficient. Spent ALMR fuel is also pyrochemically reprocessed: 99.9% of the transuranics is recovered and recycled into ALMR fuel, and the wastes are placed in the repository. Thus, in the second scheme, the repository contains the wastes from reprocessing all of the LWR spent fuel plus the maximum amount of ALMR reprocessing wastes allowed in the repository based on its heat generation limit

  12. Separation and Identification of a Mixture of Group 6 Transition-Metal Carbonyl Compounds Using GC-MS in the General Chemistry Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Lawrence K.

    2004-01-01

    Students in the general chemistry course are advised to scrutinize data obtained by gas chromatograph (GC) for segregation, and mass spectroscopy (MS) for recognizing combination of group 6 transition-metal carbonyl compounds. The GC-MS method arouses students' interest, as it can be applied to real-world situations, such as the routine…

  13. Solid-state actinide acid phosphites from phosphorous acid melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, George N. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Burns, Peter C., E-mail: pburns@nd.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The reaction of UO{sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 3} at 100 °C and subsequent reaction with dimethylformamide (DMF) produces crystals of the compound (NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}){sub 2})[UO{sub 2}(HPO{sub 2}OH)(HPO{sub 3})]. This compound crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}/n and consists of layers of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids that share equatorial vertices with phosphite units, separated by dimethylammonium. In contrast, the reaction of phosphorous acid and actinide oxides at 210 °C produces a viscous syrup. Subsequent dilution in solvents and use of standard solution-state methods results in the crystallization of two polymorphs of the actinide acid phosphites An(HPO{sub 2}OH){sub 4} (An=U, Th) and of the mixed acid phosphite–phosphite U(HPO{sub 3})(HPO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)·2(H{sub 2}O). α- and β-An(HPO{sub 2}OH){sub 4} crystallize in space groups C2/c and P2{sub 1}/n, respectively, and comprise a three-dimensional network of An{sup 4+} cations in square antiprismatic coordination corner-sharing with protonated phosphite units, whereas U(HPO{sub 3})(HPO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}·(H{sub 2}O) crystallizes in a layered structure in space group Pbca that is composed of An{sup 4+} cations in square antiprismatic coordination corner-sharing with protonated phosphites and water ligands. We discuss our findings in using solid inorganic reagents to produce a solution-workable precursor from which solid-state compounds can be crystallized. - Graphical abstract: Reaction of UO{sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 3} at 100 °C and subsequent reaction with DMF produces crystals of (NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}){sub 2})[UO{sub 2}(HPO{sub 2}OH)(HPO{sub 3})] with a layered structure. Reaction of phosphorous acid and actinide oxides at 210 °C produces a viscous syrup and further solution-state reactions result in the crystallization of the actinide acid phosphites An(HPO{sub 2}OH){sub 4} (An=U, Th), with a three-dimensional network structure, and the mixed acid phosphite

  14. Advanced techniques in actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2014). Abstract book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    system U(VI)/acetate in aqueous solution independently investigated by different spectroscopic and quantum chemical methods applied by leading laboratories in geochemical research. Conformities as well as sources of discrepancies between the results of the different methods are to be evaluated, illuminating the potentials and limitations of coupling different spectroscopic and theoretical approaches as tools for the comprehensive study of actinide molecule complexes. The test is understood to stimulate scientific discussions, but not as a competitive exercise between the labs of the community. Hopefully, the second ATAS workshop will continue to bundle and strengthen respective research activities and ideally act as a nucleus for an international network, closely collaborating with international partners. I am confident that the workshop will deliver many exciting ideas, promote scientific discussions, stimulate new developments and collaborations and in such a way be prosperous. This workshop would not take place without the kind support of the HZDR administration which is gratefully acknowledged. Finally, the organizers cordially thank all public and private sponsors for generous funding which makes this meeting come true for scientists working on the heavy metal research field.

  15. Criticality analysis of aggregations of actinides from commerical nuclear waste in geological storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An underground nuclear-waste terminal-storage facility for either spent fuel elements or high level waste from a reprocessing plant will contain large amounts of fissionable actinides. Such a facility must be designed to preclude the concentration of these isotopes into a critical mass. Information on the critical masses of the various isotopes present in spent fuel or high level waste is required as part of such a design effort. This study provides this information. The results of this study will be used, in conjunction with geologic transport rates of the actinide compounds, to estimate mass formation probabilities in waste repositories. A computational model was developed as part of the study to perform criticality calculations rapidly and efficiently and to produce tables and plots of actinide concentration in geologic material versus critical mass. The criticality model uses a discrete ordinates approximation to neutron transport theory and treats six energy groups and spherical geometry. Neutron cross sections were obtained from ENDF/B-IV or ENDF/B-V cross section libraries. Critical masses calculated with the computational model were checked against experimental values and against more detailed calculational values and were found to be from 30 percent less to 10 percent greater. Critical mass calculations were made for five waste types, five waste ages, five actinide elements, and four geologic compositions. Minimum critical masses were calculated for over 400 combinations of the above variables. The relative importance for criticality of the various actinides and waste types is presented in terms of the number of possible critical masses per waste container

  16. The role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor in the future of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollaway, W.R.; Lidsky, L.M.; Miller, M.M.

    1990-12-01

    A preliminary assessment is made of the potential role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) in the future of nuclear power. The development of a usable actinide burning strategy could be an important factor in the acceptance and implementation of a next generation of nuclear power. First, the need for nuclear generating capacity is established through the analysis of energy and electricity demand forecasting models which cover the spectrum of bias from anti-nuclear to pro-nuclear. The analyses take into account the issues of global warming and the potential for technological advances in energy efficiency. We conclude, as do many others, that there will almost certainly be a need for substantial nuclear power capacity in the 2000--2030 time frame. We point out also that any reprocessing scheme will open up proliferation-related questions which can only be assessed in very specific contexts. The focus of this report is on the fuel cycle impacts of actinide burning. Scenarios are developed for the deployment of future nuclear generating capacity which exploit the advantages of actinide partitioning and actinide burning. Three alternative reactor designs are utilized in these future scenarios: The Light Water Reactor (LWR); the Modular Gas-Cooled Reactor (MGR); and the Integral Fast Reactor (FR). Each of these alternative reactor designs is described in some detail, with specific emphasis on their spent fuel streams and the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Four separation and partitioning processes are utilized in building the future nuclear power scenarios: Thermal reactor spent fuel preprocessing to reduce the ceramic oxide spent fuel to metallic form, the conventional PUREX process, the TRUEX process, and pyrometallurgical reprocessing.

  17. Quantitative mammalian cell mutagenesis and a preliminary study of the mutagenic potential of metallic compounds. [Cell system used was CHO/HGPRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsie, A.W.; Johnson, N.P.; Couch, D.B.; San Sebastian, J.R.; O' Neill, J.P.; Forbes, N.L.

    1978-01-01

    We have defined a set of stringent conditions required to quantify specific gene mutation in a mammalian cell system, CHO/HGPRT. Greater than 98% of the 6-thioguanine (TG)-resistant variants were shown to be deficient in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The sensitive and quantitative nature of this assay was utilized to study the structure-activity (mutagenicity) relationship of various classes of chemicals. Mutagenicity as determined in the CHO/HGPRT assay, appears to correlate well (76/83 (92%)) with the reported animal carcinogenicity of 108 chemicals studied. The system also appears to be suitable for studying the mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of metallic compounds. We found that cis-dichlorodiammine Pt(II) (cis-Pt(NH/sub 3/)/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/) (cis-DDP), one of the widely used inorganic antitumor agents, is cytotoxic and mutagenic. Mutagenicity of cis-DDP correlates with its binding to DNA. However, trans-DDP, (Pt(NH/sub 3/)/sub 4/)Cl/sub 2/, and K/sub 2/(PtCl/sub 4/) exhibit greatly reduced biological activities. Among 14 other metals studied, we found that carcinogenic metallic compounds, such as MnCl/sub 2/, NiCl/sub 2/, and BeSO/sub 4/ are mutagenic, while non-carcinogenic compounds such as MgCl/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/SeO/sub 3/ are not. Determination of metal mutagenicity is apparently complicated by the ionic composition of the medium. This may account in part for varying results in studies of the mutagenicity of other metallic compounds. Further refinement of the assay conditions, especially with respect to the ionic environment necessary for quantifying mutagenesis of each metallic agent, is in progress.

  18. Actinides and lanthanides under pressure: the pseudopotential approach; Actinides et terres rares sous pression: approche pseudopotentiel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, N

    2002-07-01

    In the Density Functional Theory Framework, the pseudopotential formalism offers a broader scope of study than other theoretical methods such as global relaxation of the parameters of the cell or ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. This method has been widely used to study light elements or transition metals but never to study f elements. We have generated two non local norm conserving Trouillier-Martins pseudopotentials (one in LDA and one in GGA) for the cerium. To check the validity of the pseudopotentials, we have calculated the equilibrium volume and the incompressibility modulus and compared our results to previous all-electron calculations. If the GGA and non linear core corrections are used, the equation of state is in a good agreement with the experimental equation of state. A static study of the previously proposed high pressure phases give a transitions fcc-a''(I)-bct. Using the pseudopotentials we have generated, an ab initio molecular dynamics simulation at constant pressure, in the region between 5 and 12 GPa where the stable phase of cerium is not well defined, lead us to predict that a centred monoclinic structure, as the a''(I) phase previously observed in some experiments, is the most stable phase. We have also generated pseudopotentials for the light actinides (Th, Pa, U and Np). We have study their phase transitions under pressure at zero temperature. We compared our results with all electron results. The structure parameters have always been relaxed in this study. And for the first time in pseudopotential calculation, the spin-orbit coupling has been taken into account. The curves describing the variation of the volume or the incompressibility modulus depending on the elements and the phase transitions are always in agreement with the one found in the all electron calculations. (author)

  19. Controllable formation of heterotrimetallic coordination compounds: systematically incorporating lanthanide and alkali metal ions into the manganese 12-metallacrown-4 framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Michael R; Boron, Thaddeus T; Lutter, Jacob C; Daly, Connor I; Zegalia, Kelcie A; Nimthong, Ruthairat; Ferrence, Gregory M; Zeller, Matthias; Kampf, Jeff W; Pecoraro, Vincent L; Zaleski, Curtis M

    2014-02-01

    The inclusion of Ln(III) ions into the 12-MC-4 framework generates the first heterotrimetallic complexes of this molecular class. The controllable and deliberate preparations of these compounds are demonstrated through 12 crystal structures of the Ln(III)M(I)(OAc)4[12-MCMn(III)(N)shi-4](H2O)4·6DMF complex, where OAc(-) is acetate, shi(3-) is salicylhydroximate, and DMF is N,N-dimethylformamide. Compounds 1-12 have M(I) as Na(I), and Ln(III) can be Pr(III) (1), Nd(III) (2), Sm(III) (3), Eu(III) (4), Gd(III) (5), Tb(III) (6), Dy(III) (7), Ho(III) (8), Er(III) (9), Tm(III) (10), Yb(III) (11), and Y(III) (12). An example with M(I) = K(I) and Ln(III) = Dy(III) is also reported (Dy(III)K(OAc)4[12-MCMn(III)(N)shi-4](DMF)4·DMF (14)). When La(III), Ce(III), or Lu(III) is used as the Ln(III) ions to prepare the Ln(III)Na(I)(OAc)4[12-MCMn(III)(N)shi-4] complex, the compound Na2(OAc)2[12-MCMn(III)(N)shi-4](DMF)6·2DMF·1.60H2O (13) results. For compounds 1-12, the identity of the Ln(III) ion affects the 12-MCMn(III)(N)shi-4 framework as the largest Ln(III), Pr(III), causes an expansion of the 12-MCMn(III)(N)shi-4 framework as demonstrated by the largest metallacrown cavity radius (0.58 Å for 1 to 0.54 Å for 11), and the Pr(III) causes the 12-MCMn(III)(N)shi-4 framework to be the most domed structure as evident in the largest average angle about the axial coordination of the ring Mn(III) ions (103.95° for 1 to 101.69° for 11). For 14, the substitution of K(I) for Na(I) does not significantly affect the 12-MCMn(III)(N)shi-4 framework as many of the structural parameters such as the metallacrown cavity radius (0.56 Å) fall within the range of compounds 1-12. However, the use of the larger K(I) ion does cause the 12-MCMn(III)(N)shi-4 framework to become more planar as evident in a smaller average angle about the axial coordination of the ring Mn(III) ions (101.35°) compared to the analogous Dy(III)/Na(I) (7) complex (102.40°). In addition to broadening the range of

  20. Occurrence and availability of prioritary compounds (chlorinated pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, alkylphenols and heavy metals) in freshwater sediments and fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim of this work was to determine priority organic and inorganic compounds in river sediments and fish and to study their availability. Twelve organ chlorinated compounds (OC), 40 polybromodiphenyl ethers (PBDEs), 2 alkylphenols (nonylphenol and octylphenol) (AP), and 9 heavy metals (HM) were investigated in samples taken in 20 locations along the Ebro river, in north east Spain. Sediment samples represent a stable matrix which indicate recent pollution episodes, whereas fish samples are good sentinels to monitor bioavailability and bioaccumulation. Compound selection was based on their inclusion in European priority lists (Directives 76/464/CEE and 60/2000/EU). The study area covered the Ebro hydrographic basin which is the main tributary in Spain and flows through large agricultural areas characterized by wines, corn and maize and represents an important water source for the many industrial and urban activities settled along its course. To control the quality of the river basin, and in accordance with EU Directives, priority pollutants have been determined in sediment and fish to determine most ubiquitous compounds, geographical distribution and bioavailability of pollutants to two different fish species. For such purpose, different analytical methods were developed to analyse all the above mentioned chemical species in the upper 2 cm sediment layer and in whole fish (Barbus graellsii, Cyprinus carpio). Among compounds studied, hexachlorocyclohexane, pentachlorophenol, aldrin, dieldrin and isodrin, and trichlorobenzene were never detected. All samples contained organic pollutants at total levels between 134 and 3199 μg/Kg-dw and total HM from 60.9 and 5131 mg/kg-dw, depending on sample location. For 18 of the 20 samples points, a correlation of 0.53 was found between total organic and total inorganic concentration. In sediment samples, among the 4 chemical groups studied, HM were present at levels between 0.17 and 4036 mg/kg dry weight (dw), being

  1. Occurrence and availability of prioritary compounds (chlorinated pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, alkylphenols and heavy metals) in freshwater sediments and fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim of this work was to determine priority organic and inorganic compounds in river sediments and fish and to study their availability. Twelve organ chlorinated compounds (OC), 40 polybromodiphenyl ethers (PBDEs), 2 alkylphenols (nonylphenol and octylphenol) (AP), and 9 heavy metals (HM) were investigated in samples taken in 20 locations along the Ebro river, in north east Spain. Sediment samples represent a stable matrix which indicate recent pollution episodes, whereas fish samples are good sentinels to monitor bioavailability and bioaccumulation. Compound selection was based on their inclusion in European priority lists (Directives 76/464/CEE and 60/2000/EU). The study area covered the Ebro hydrographic basin which is the main tributary in Spain and flows through large agricultural areas characterized by wines, corn and maize and represents an important water source for the many industrial and urban activities settled along its course. To control the quality of the river basin, and in accordance with EU Directives, priority pollutants have been determined in sediment and fish to determine most ubiquitous compounds, geographical distribution and bioavailability of pollutants to two different fish species. For such purpose, different analytical methods were developed to analyse all the above mentioned chemical species in the upper 2 cm sediment layer and in whole fish (Barbus graellsii, Cyprinus carpio). Among compounds studied, hexachlorocyclohexane, pentachlorophenol, aldrin, dieldrin and isodrin, and trichlorobenzene were never detected. All samples contained organic pollutants at total levels between 134 and 3199 μg/Kg-dw and total HM from 60.9 and 5131 mg/kg-dw, depending on sample location. For 18 of the 20 samples points, a correlation of 0.53 was found between total organic and total inorganic concentration. In sediment samples, among the 4 chemical groups studied, HM were present at levels between 0.17 and 4036 mg/kg dry weight (dw), being

  2. Metal organic frameworks as sorption media for volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds at ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellingiri, Kowsalya; Szulejko, Jan E.; Kumar, Pawan; Kwon, Eilhann E.; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Deep, Akash; Boukhvalov, Danil W.; Brown, Richard J. C.

    2016-06-01

    In this research, we investigated the sorptive behavior of a mixture of 14 volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (four aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, p-xylene, and styrene), six C2-C5 volatile fatty acids (VFAs), two phenols, and two indoles) against three metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), i.e., MOF-5, Eu-MOF, and MOF-199 at 5 to 10 mPa VOC partial pressures (25 °C). The selected MOFs exhibited the strongest affinity for semi-volatile (polar) VOC molecules (skatole), whereas the weakest affinity toward was volatile (non-polar) VOC molecules (i.e., benzene). Our experimental results were also supported through simulation analysis in which polar molecules were bound most strongly to MOF-199, reflecting the presence of strong interactions of Cu2+ with polar VOCs. In addition, the performance of selected MOFs was compared to three well-known commercial sorbents (Tenax TA, Carbopack X, and Carboxen 1000) under the same conditions. The estimated equilibrium adsorption capacity (mg.g‑1) for the all target VOCs was in the order of; MOF-199 (71.7) >Carboxen-1000 (68.4) >Eu-MOF (27.9) >Carbopack X (24.3) >MOF-5 (12.7) >Tenax TA (10.6). Hopefully, outcome of this study are expected to open a new corridor to expand the practical application of MOFs for the treatment diverse VOC mixtures.

  3. Highly selective and sensitive detection of metal ions and nitroaromatic compounds by an anionic europium(iii) coordination polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyisa Bogale, Raji; Ye, Junwei; Sun, Yuan; Sun, Tongxin; Zhang, Siqi; Rauf, Abdul; Hang, Cheng; Tian, Peng; Ning, Guiling

    2016-07-01

    A luminescent Eu(iii)-based coordination polymer, {[Eu(H2O)5(BTEC)][H(C5H6N2)]·3H2O} () has been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions using 1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid (H4BTEC) as a linker. Compound possesses an anionic zig-zag chain constructed from the BTEC ligands and [EuO4(H2O)5] nodes. The protonated 4-aminopyridine groups as guests are located between chains. exhibits the characteristic sharp emission bands of Eu(3+) at 578, 593, 615, 652 and 693 nm upon excitation at 290 nm. The strong emission of could be quenched effectively by trace amounts of Fe(3+) ions even in the presence of other metal ions including Al(3+), Ca(2+), Cd(2+), Co(2+), Cr(3+), Cu(2+), Fe(2+), K(+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Pd(2+) and Zn(2+). Similarly, also exhibits superior selectivity and sensitivity towards 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) compared with other competing interfering analytes, such as 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, 2,6-dinitrotolune, 4-nitrotoluene, nitrobenzene, 1,3-dinitrobenzene, o-xylene, nitromethane, nitropropane, phenol, 4-bromophenol and bromobenzene, through a fluorescence quenching mechanism. The possible fluorescence quenching mechanisms are discussed. Moreover, could be used as a visual fluorescent test paper for selectively detecting trace amounts of Fe(3+) and 4-NP.

  4. Theoretical Calculations for Magnetic Property of FeRh Inter-Metallic Compound with Site-Exchange Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneta, Yasunori; Ishino, Shiori; Chen, Ying; Iwata, Shuichi; Iwase, Akihiro

    2011-10-01

    To clarify the relationship between a magnetic property and a defect structure in FeRh inter-metallic compound theoretically, energy band calculations are performed based on the density functional theory. Under the assumption that the majority of defect structure is a type of site-exchanged one between Fe and Rh atoms, total energy for various magnetic structures is evaluated within a super-cell of 2×2×2 cubic cells. Due to the site-exchange defect pair of nearest neighbor Fe and Rh atoms in 12.5%/f.u. (f.u.: formula unit) density, the total energy increases by 1.91 eV/pair in the anti-ferromagnetic structure and 0.88 eV/pair in the ferromagnetic structure. Although the anti-ferromagnetic structure is the stable state at low temperatures in defect-free FeRh, it becomes unstable with an amount of the site-exchange defect density. Threshold defect density to stabilize ferromagnetic state is estimated to be 0.8%/f.u. This phenomenon is expected in ion irradiated FeRh.

  5. 3D Online Submicron Scale Observation of Mixed Metal Powder's Microstructure Evolution in High Temperature and Microwave Compound Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Kang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the influence on the mechanical properties caused by microstructure evolution of metal powder in extreme environment, 3D real-time observation of the microstructure evolution of Al-Ti mixed powder in high temperature and microwave compound fields was realized by using synchrotron radiation computerized topography (SR-CT technique; the spatial resolution was enhanced to 0.37 μm/pixel through the designed equipment and the introduction of excellent reconstruction method for the first time. The process of microstructure evolution during sintering was clearly distinguished from 2D and 3D reconstructed images. Typical sintering parameters such as sintering neck size, porosity, and particle size of the sample were presented for quantitative analysis of the influence on the mechanical properties and the sintering kinetics during microwave sintering. The neck size-time curve was obtained and the neck growth exponent was 7.3, which indicated that surface diffusion was the main diffusion mechanism; the reason was the eddy current loss induced by the external microwave fields providing an additional driving force for mass diffusion on the particle surface. From the reconstructed images and the curve of porosity and average particle size versus temperature, it was believed that the presence of liquid phase aluminum accelerated the densification and particle growth.

  6. Adsorption of volatile organic compounds by metal-organic frameworks MIL-101: influence of molecular size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Sun, Qian; Xue, Feng; Lin, Daohui

    2011-11-15

    Adsorption of gaseous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on metal-organic frameworks MIL-101, a novel porous adsorbent with extremely large Langmuir surface area of 5870 m(2)/g and pore volume of 1.85 cm(3)/g, and the influence of VOC molecular size and shape on adsorption were investigated in this study. We observed that MIL-101 is a potential superior adsorbent for the sorptive removal of VOCs including polar acetone and nonpolar benzene, toluene, ethylbeznene, and xylenes. MIL-101 is of higher adsorption capacities for all selected VOCs than zeolite, activated carbon and other reported adsorbents. Adsorption of VOCs on MIL-101 is captured by a pore filling mechanism, showing the size and shape selectivity of VOC molecules. These prove to be a negative linear relationship between the volume adsorption capacities of VOCs and their molecular cross-sectional area values. Most VOC molecules, such as acetone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and p-xylene, enter into MIL-101 pores with the planes having the minimum diameters. However, m-xylene and o-xylene may fill into the pores with the planes having the maximum diameters because of the preferred interaction of MIL-101 with the two methyl groups of adsorbate molecules.

  7. Minor actinide transmutation on PWR burnable poison rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Key issues associated with MA transmutation are the appropriate loading pattern. • Commercial PWRs are the only choice to transmute MAs in large scale currently. • Considerable amount of MA can be loaded to PWR without disturbing keff markedly. • Loading MA to PWR burnable poison rods for transmutation is an optimal loading pattern. - Abstract: Minor actinides are the primary contributors to long term radiotoxicity in spent fuel. The majority of commercial reactors in operation in the world are PWRs, so to study the minor actinide transmutation characteristics in the PWRs and ultimately realize the successful minor actinide transmutation in PWRs are crucial problem in the area of the nuclear waste disposal. The key issues associated with the minor actinide transmutation are the appropriate loading patterns when introducing minor actinides to the PWR core. We study two different minor actinide transmutation materials loading patterns on the PWR burnable poison rods, one is to coat a thin layer of minor actinide in the water gap between the zircaloy cladding and the stainless steel which is filled with water, another one is that minor actinides substitute for burnable poison directly within burnable poison rods. Simulation calculation indicates that the two loading patterns can load approximately equivalent to 5–6 PWR annual minor actinide yields without disturbing the PWR keff markedly. The PWR keff can return criticality again by slightly reducing the boric acid concentration in the coolant of PWR or removing some burnable poison rods without coating the minor actinide transmutation materials from PWR core. In other words, loading minor actinide transmutation material to PWR does not consume extra neutron, minor actinide just consumes the neutrons which absorbed by the removed control poisons. Both minor actinide loading patterns are technically feasible; most importantly do not need to modify the configuration of the PWR core and

  8. Actinide halides and their complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers are reviewed published since late 1967 to middle 1970. Problems involving the availability of actinoid halogenides with oxidation degrees from +6 to +2, actinoid oxihalogenides, and also halogenous actinoid complexes with oxidation degrees from +6 to +3, oxihalogenous actinoid complexes with valencies from +6 to -6. The NpF+L5, BKF4, CfF4, BKF3, CfF3 BKBr3, PaF5.2H2O and Pa2OF8 compounds with rhombic pseudocell with the parameters of a0=6.894A, b0=4.014A, c0=4.143A have been obtained for the first time. The process is described of the hew- synthesised ThOF with the face-centered lattice (a0=5.68A), hydrated U(5)-MU2F12 complexes where M=Co, Mi, Cu, and also MUF7 complexes where M=K1Rb, Cs. Csub(s)UFsub(7) is characterized by cubic symmetry with a0=5.54A. The crystal structure of the formally-divalent actinoid compound, ThI2, has been examined. In fact, this compound should be regarded as Th4+(e-)2I2. An interesting method for obtaining UOCl3 through a reaction between UO3 and MoCl5; UOF2.H2O from aqueous solution, and also a simple method for obtaining UCl5 by UO3 reduction with the silicon tetrachloride. The results of investigation of infrared spectra of halogenous and oxihalogenous actinoid complexes (valency from +6 to +4) with donor ligands

  9. 4f-3d interaction and magnetic anisotropy in ThMn12-type rare-earth transition-metal compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rare-earth (R) transition-metal (T) compounds of the R(T,M)12-type with R=Y or one of the heavy-rare-earth elements, T=Fe or Co and M=Ti, V, Mo or Si, have been studied at 4.2 K in the Amsterdam High-Field Installation in magnetic fields up to 38 T and at temperatures between 4.2 and 1000 K in other magnetometers. The 4f-3d interaction is derived from magnetization measurements on single-crystalline particles that are free to rotate in the applied fields. The stabilizing element M is shown to have a pronounced influence on the 4f-3d interaction strength in these compounds. The large variation in Curie temperatures of the Y compounds and the different types of magnetic anisotropy found in the Y compounds demonstrate that the element M plays an important role in establishing these properties as well. (orig.)

  10. Structure and properties of intermetallic ternary rare earth compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casper, Frederick

    2008-12-17

    The so called material science is an always growing field in modern research. For the development of new materials not only the experimental characterization but also theoretical calculation of the electronic structure plays an important role. A class of compounds that has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years is known as REME compounds. These compounds are often referred to with RE designating rare earth, actinide or an element from group 1-4, M representing a late transition metal from groups 8-12, and E belonging to groups 13-15. There are more than 2000 compounds with 1:1:1 stoichiometry belonging to this class of compounds and they offer a broad variety of different structure types. Although many REME compounds are know to exist, mainly only structure and magnetism has been determined for these compounds. In particular, in the field of electronic and transport properties relatively few efforts have been made. The main focus in this study is on compounds crystallizing in MgAgAs and LiGaGe structure. Both structures can only be found among 18 valence electron compounds. The f electrons are localized and therefor not count as valence electrons. A special focus here was also on the magnetoresistance effects and spintronic properties found among the REME compounds. An examination of the following compounds was made: GdAuE (E=In,Cd,Mg), GdPdSb, GdNiSb, REAuSn (RE=Gd,Er,Tm) and RENiBi (RE=Pr,Sm,Gd-Tm,Lu). The experimental results were compared with theoretic band structure calculations. The first half metallic ferromagnet with LiGaGe structure (GdPdSb) was found. All semiconducting REME compounds with MgAgAs structure show giant magnetoresistance (GMR) at low temperatures. The GMR is related to a metal-insulator transition, and the value of the GMR depends on the value of the spin-orbit coupling. Inhomogeneous DyNiBi samples show a small positive MR at low temperature that depends on the amount of metallic impurities. At higher fields the samples show a

  11. Microbial Transformations of Actinides and Other Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis,A.J.; Dodge, C. J.

    2009-01-07

    Microorganisms can affect the stability and mobility of the actinides and other radionuclides released from nuclear fuel cycle and from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Under appropriate conditions, microorganisms can alter the chemical speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution in the environment and the bioavailability. Dissolution or immobilization of radionuclides is brought about by direct enzymatic action or indirect non-enzymatic action of microorganisms. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of radionuclides have been extensively investigated, we have only limited information on the effects of microbial processes and biochemical mechanisms which affect the stability and mobility of radionuclides. The mechanisms of microbial transformations of the major and minor actinides U, Pu, Cm, Am, Np, the fission products and other radionuclides such as Ra, Tc, I, Cs, Sr, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the presence of electron donors and acceptors are reviewed.

  12. Interaction of actinide cations with synthetic polyelectrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding of Am+3, Th+4 and UO2+2 to polymaleic acid, polyethylenemaleic acid and polymethylvinylethermaleic acid has been measured by a solvent extraction technique at 250C and either 0.02 or 0.10 M ionic strength. The solutions were buffered over a pH range such that the percent of carboxylate groups ionized ranged from 25 to 74%. The binding was described by two constants, β1 and β2, which were evaluated after correction for complexation of the actinide cations by acetate and hydrolysis. For comparable degrees of ionization, all three polyelectrolytes showed similar binding strengths. In general, these results indicated that the binding of actinides to these synthetic polyelectrolytes is basically similar to that of natural polyelectrolytes such as humic and fulvic acids. (orig.)

  13. Actinide and fission product separation and transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-07-01

    The first international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, took place in Mito in Japan, on 6-8 November 1990. It starts with a number of general overview papers to give us some broad perspectives. Following that it takes a look at some basic facts about physics and about the quantities of materials it is talking about. Then it proceeds to some specific aspects of partitioning, starting with evolution from today commercially applied processes and going on to other possibilities. At the end of the third session it takes a look at the significance of partitioning and transmutation of actinides before it embarks on two sessions on transmutation, first in reactors and second in accelerators. The last session is designed to throw back into the discussion the main points which need to be looked at when considering future work in this area. (A.L.B.)

  14. MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF TRU AND MIXED WASTES: ACTINIDE SPECIATION AND WASTE VOLUME REDUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

    2006-06-01

    The overall goals of this research project are to determine the mechanism of microbial dissolution and stabilization of actinides in Department of Energy’s (DOE) TRU wastes, contaminated sludges, soils, and sediments. This includes (i) investigations on the fundamental aspects of microbially catalyzed radionuclide and metal transformations (oxidation/reduction reactions, dissolution, precipitation, chelation); (ii) understanding of the microbiological processes that control speciation and alter the chemical forms of complex inorganic/organic contaminant mixtures; and (iii) development of new and improved microbially catalyzed processes resulting in immobilization of metals and radionuclides in the waste with concomitant waste volume reduction.

  15. MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF TRU AND MIXED WASTES: ACTINIDE SPECIATION AND WASTE VOLUME REDUCTION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRANCIS, A.J.; DODGE, C.J.

    2006-11-16

    The overall goals of this research project are to determine the mechanism of microbial dissolution and stabilization of actinides in Department of Energy's (DOE) TRU wastes, contaminated sludges, soils, and sediments. This includes (1) investigations on the fundamental aspects of microbially catalyzed radionuclide and metal transformations (oxidation/reduction reactions, dissolution, precipitation, chelation); (2) understanding of the microbiological processes that control speciation and alter the chemical forms of complex inorganic/organic contaminant mixtures; and (3) development of new and improved microbially catalyzed processes resulting in immobilization of metals and radionuclides in the waste with concomitant waste volume reduction.

  16. MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF TRU AND MIXED WASTES: ACTINIDE SPECIATION AND WASTE VOLUME REDUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

    2006-06-01

    The overall goals of this research project are to determine the mechanism of microbial dissolution and stabilization of actinides in Department of Energy's (DOE) TRU wastes, contaminated sludges, soils, and sediments. This includes (1) investigations on the fundamental aspects of microbially catalyzed radionuclide and metal transformations (oxidation/reduction reactions, dissolution, precipitation, chelation); (2) understanding of the microbiological processes that control speciation and alter the chemical forms of complex inorganic/organic contaminant mixtures; and (3) development of new and improved microbially catalyzed processes resulting in immobilization of metals and radionuclides in the waste with concomitant waste volume reduction.

  17. Optimization studies for the prism alternative oxide core, and its response to the actinide burning strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PRISM advanced liquid metal reactor is designed by General Electric in a reference solution equipped by a metal fuelled core. An alternative oxide core is studied by General Electric and ENEA in the frame of a collaboration existing since 1989. This paper deals with the ENEA contribution on the oxide solution, aimed at the core optimization both from safety parameters and fuel cycle economy points of view. Moreover, synthetic information about ENEA evaluations about the minor actinide burning capability of the PRISM oxide core are given. (author)

  18. Advances in Synthesis and Application of Metal Phthalocyanine Compounds%酞菁金属化合物的合成与应用进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程振华; 蔡婷婷; 陈际海; 周文博; 刘咸尚; 夏道宏

    2012-01-01

    综述了主要涉及铁、钴、镍、铜和锌等过渡金属元素的酞菁金属化合物的研究进展.在单核酞菁金属合成的基础上,目前主要研究双核及多核酞菁金属的合成方法.在酞菁金属的芳环上引人种类不同、数目不同的各种取代基,能大大改善酞菁金属化合物的物理及化学性能,为酞菁金属新材料的应用提供基础.开发酞菁金属化合物的绿色化学合成路线是今后的发展方向.%Research progresses in synthesis and application of metal phthalocyanine compounds, which mainly includes transition metals, namely Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn, are introduced. The synthesis methods for dinuclear and polynuclear metal phthalocyanine compounds caught more attention now than that for uninuclear one. It is demonstrated that by the introduction of different kinds and different number of substituent groups to the aromatic rings of phthalocyanines, the physical and chemical properties of the metal phthalocyanine compounds are greatly changed, which is more favorable to the application of these new materials. The review points out that the development of the metal phthalocyanine compounds is trending towards green synthetic routes.

  19. Actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fourth international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation, took place in Mito City in Japan, on 111-13 September 1996. The proceedings are presented in six sessions: the major programmes and international cooperation, the partitioning and transmutation programs, feasibility studies, particular separation processes, the accelerator driven transmutation, and the chemistry of the fuel cycle. (A.L.B.)

  20. Actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The fourth international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation, took place in Mito City in Japan, on 111-13 September 1996. The proceedings are presented in six sessions: the major programmes and international cooperation, the partitioning and transmutation programs, feasibility studies, particular separation processes, the accelerator driven transmutation, and the chemistry of the fuel cycle. (A.L.B.)

  1. Electronic structure of high oxidation state actinide species: Theoretical and experimental approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilaire, Sandrine; Guillaumont, Dominique; Gutierez, Fabien; Denauwer, Christophe; Meyer, Daniel [CEA-DEN Ma DRCP/SCPS/LCAM BP 17171 30207 Bagnols sur ceze (France); Wastin, Franck; Colineau, Eric; Gouder, Thomas; Rebizant, Jean [EC-JRC Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340 Karlsruhe (Germany); Berthet, Jean-Claude [Service de Chimie Moleculaire, Bat. 125, pi e 25, Gif sur Yvette 91911 cedex (France); Simoni, Eric [IPN/Universite Paris XI, Orsay 91406 (France)

    2006-07-01

    Early actinides (U, Np, Pu, Am) show a particular linear bond actinyl-type structure in their highest oxidation state. The multiple-bond nature of this chemical pattern contributes to a drastic diminution of the charge on the metallic core inducing a strong stabilization of these high oxidation states. The potential participation of the early actinide 5f orbitals in the valence molecular shell is supposed to be one of the most important engines of this chemical specificity. In order to progress in the comprehension of this behavior, a study of the electronic and the geometric structures of some actinyl complexes with different electronic configurations is undertaken using theoretical and experimental approaches. (authors)

  2. Recovery of actinides from actinide–aluminium alloys by chlorination: Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souček, P., E-mail: pavel.soucek@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, JRC, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Cassayre, L. [Laboratoire de Génie Chimique (LGC), Département Procédés Electrochimiques, CNRS-UMR 5503, Université de Toulouse III – Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Eloirdi, R.; Malmbeck, R.; Meier, R.; Nourry, C.; Claux, B.; Glatz, J.-P. [European Commission, JRC, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    A chlorination route is being investigated for recovery of actinides from actinide–aluminium alloys, which originate from pyrochemical recovery of actinides from spent metallic nuclear fuel by electrochemical methods in molten LiCl–KCl. In the present work, the most important steps of this route were experimentally tested using U–Pu–Al alloy prepared by electrodeposition of U and Pu on solid aluminium plate electrodes. The investigated processes were vacuum distillation for removal of the salt adhered on the electrode, chlorination of the alloy by chlorine gas and sublimation of the AlCl{sub 3} formed. The processes parameters were set on the base of a previous thermochemical study and an experimental work using pure UAl{sub 3} alloy. The present experimental results indicated high efficiency of salt distillation and chlorination steps, while the sublimation step should be further optimised.

  3. RELATIVISTIC EFFECTS ON THE EQUATION OF STATE OF THE LIGHT ACTINIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landa, A; Soderlind, P

    2005-11-04

    The effect of the relativistic spin-orbit (SO) interaction on the bonding in the early actinides has been investigated by means of electronic-structure calculations. Specifically, the equation of state (EOS) for the face-centered cubic (fcc) model systems of these metals have been calculated from the first-principles density-functional theory (DFT). Traditionally, the SO interaction in electronic-structure methods is implemented as a perturbation to the Hamiltonian that is solved for basis functions that explicitly do not depend on SO coupling. Here this approximation is shown to compare well with the fully relativistic Dirac treatment. It is further shown that SO coupling has a gradually increasing effect on the EOS as one proceeds through the actinides and the effect is diminished as density increases.

  4. Successive change regularity of actinide properties with atomic number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and achievements on chemistry of actinide elements are summarised. The relations of properties of actinides to their electronic configurations of valence electronic shells are discussed. Some anomalies of solid properties, the radius contraction, the stable state effect of f7n-orbits (n = 0, 1, 2) and the tetrad effect of oxidation states, etc., with atomic number (Z) are described. 31 figures appended show directly the successive change regularity of actinide properties with Z

  5. Nuclear data for plutonium and minor actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some experience in the usage of different evaluations of neutron constants for plutonium isotopes and minor actinides (MA) is described. That experience was obtained under designing the ABBN-93 group data set which nowadays is used widely for neutronics calculations of different cores with different spectrum and shielding. Under testing of the ABBN-93 data set through different integral and macroscopic experiments the main attention was paid to fuel nuclides and cross sections for MA practically did not verify. That gave an opportunity to change MA nuclear data for more modern without verification of the hole system. This desire appeared with new data libraries JENDL-3.2, JEF-2.2 and ENDF/B-6.2, which was not accessible under designing the ABBN-93. At the same time with the reevaluation of the basic MA nuclear data the ABBN-93 and the library FOND-2 of evaluated nuclear data files, which used as the basis for retrieving of the ABBN-93 data, were added with not very important MA data. So the FOND-2 library nowadays contents nuclear data files for all actinides with the half-life time more 1 day and also those MA which produce long-life actinides

  6. Field Deployment for In-situ Metal and Radionuclide Stabilization by Microbial Metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C. E.; Knox, A. S.; Dixon, K. L.; Roseberry, R. J.; Kritzas, Y. G

    2005-09-26

    A novel biotechnology is reported here that was demonstrated at SRS that facilitates metal and actinide immobilization by incorporating the physiology and ecology of indigenous bacteria. This technology is based on our previous work with pyomelanin-producing bacteria isolated from SRS soils. Through tyrosine supplementation, overproduction of pyomelanin was achieved, which lead ultimately to metal and actinide immobilization, both in-vitro and in-situ. Pyomelanin is a recalcitrant microbial pigment and a humic type compound in the class of melanin pigments. Pyomelanin has electron shuttling and metal chelation capabilities and thus accelerates the bacterial reduction and/or immobilization of metals. Pyomelanin is produced outside the cell and either diffuses away or attaches to the cell surface. In either case, the reduced pyomelanin is capable of transferring electrons to metals as well as chelating metals. Because of its recalcitrance and redox cycling properties, pyomelanin molecules can be used over and over again for metal transformation. When produced in excess, pyomelanin produced by one bacterial species can be used by other species for metal reduction, thereby extending the utility of pyomelanin and further accelerating metal immobilization rates. Soils contaminated with Ni and U were the focus of this study in order to develop in-situ, metal bioimmobilization technologies. We have demonstrated pyomelanin production in soil from the Tims Branch area of SRS as a result of tyrosine amendments. These results were documented in laboratory soil column studies and field deployment studies. The amended soils demonstrated increased redox behavior and sequestration capacity of U and transition metals following pyomelanin production. Treatments incorporating tyrosine and lactate demonstrated the highest levels of pyomelanin production. In order to determine the potential use of this technology at other areas of SRS, pyomelanin producing bacteria were also quantified

  7. Site specific X-ray induced changes in organic and metal organic compounds and their influence on global radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to systematically investigate the effects of specific and global X-ray radiation damage to biological samples and obtain a conclusive model to describe the underlying principles. Based on the systematic studies performed in this work, it was possible to propose two conclusive mechanisms to describe X-ray induced photoreduction and global radiation damage. The influence of chemical composition, temperature and solvent on X-ray induced photoreduction was investigated by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction of two B12 cofactors - cyano- and methylcobalamin - as well as iron(II) and iron(III) complexes. The obtained results revealed that X-ray induced photoreduction is a ligand dependent process, with a redox reaction taking place within the complex. It could further be shown that selective hydrogen abstraction plays an important role in the process of X-ray induced photoreduction. Based on the experimental results of this work, a model to describe X-ray induced photoreduction of metal organic complexes could be proposed. The process of X-ray induced hydrogen abstraction was further investigated in a combined X-ray and neutron diffraction study on the amino acids L-serine and L-alanine, which were used as model compounds for proteins, and the nucleoside deoxythymidine (thymidine) as a model for DNA. A damage mechanism for L-serine could be found. It involves the abstraction of two hydrogen atoms, one from the hydroxyl group and one from the adjacent methylene group. Such a hydrogen abstraction results in the formation of a carbonyl group. X-ray diffraction measurements on cyano- and methylcobalamin as well as on three metal amino acid complexes, containing nickel(II) and copper(II), respectively, were conducted to investigate the contribution of X-ray induced photoreduction to global radiation damage. Results from these measurements combined with the results from L-serine, L-alanine and thymidine allowed

  8. Site specific X-ray induced changes in organic and metal organic compounds and their influence on global radiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, Desiree Ellen

    2012-07-15

    The aim of this work was to systematically investigate the effects of specific and global X-ray radiation damage to biological samples and obtain a conclusive model to describe the underlying principles. Based on the systematic studies performed in this work, it was possible to propose two conclusive mechanisms to describe X-ray induced photoreduction and global radiation damage. The influence of chemical composition, temperature and solvent on X-ray induced photoreduction was investigated by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction of two B12 cofactors - cyano- and methylcobalamin - as well as iron(II) and iron(III) complexes. The obtained results revealed that X-ray induced photoreduction is a ligand dependent process, with a redox reaction taking place within the complex. It could further be shown that selective hydrogen abstraction plays an important role in the process of X-ray induced photoreduction. Based on the experimental results of this work, a model to describe X-ray induced photoreduction of metal organic complexes could be proposed. The process of X-ray induced hydrogen abstraction was further investigated in a combined X-ray and neutron diffraction study on the amino acids L-serine and L-alanine, which were used as model compounds for proteins, and the nucleoside deoxythymidine (thymidine) as a model for DNA. A damage mechanism for L-serine could be found. It involves the abstraction of two hydrogen atoms, one from the hydroxyl group and one from the adjacent methylene group. Such a hydrogen abstraction results in the formation of a carbonyl group. X-ray diffraction measurements on cyano- and methylcobalamin as well as on three metal amino acid complexes, containing nickel(II) and copper(II), respectively, were conducted to investigate the contribution of X-ray induced photoreduction to global radiation damage. Results from these measurements combined with the results from L-serine, L-alanine and thymidine allowed

  9. Synthesis of hexahydropyrrolo[2,1-a]isoquinoline compound libraries through a Pictet-Spengler cyclization/metal-catalyzed cross coupling/amidation sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Rico; Cohrt, A Emil; Petersen, Michael Åxman; Wu, Peng; Clausen, Mads H; Nielsen, Thomas E

    2015-06-01

    Molecular libraries of natural product-like and structurally diverse compounds are attractive in early drug discovery campaigns. In here, we present synthetic methodology for library production of hexahydropyrrolo[2,1-a]isoquinoline (HPIQ) compounds. Two advanced HPIQ intermediates, both incorporating two handles for diversification, were synthesized through an oxidative cleavage/Pictet-Spengler reaction sequence in high overall yields. A subsequent metal-catalyzed cross coupling/amidation protocol was developed and its utility in library synthesis was validated by construction of a 20-membered natural product-like molecular library in good overall yields. PMID:25703308

  10. Poisoning of noble metal catalysts by arsenic and silicon compounds in an oxidizing atmosphere. Die Vergiftung von Edelmetall-Katalysatoren durch Arsen- und Siliziumverbindungen unter oxidierenden Verbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaizik, A.

    1984-01-12

    The dissertation deals with the poisoning of noble metal catalysts by arsenic and silicon compounds in an oxidizing atmosphere. The problem was studied in the field of catalytic exhaust and waste air post-combustion, but the findings can be applied to other catalytic processes in which arsenic and silicon compounds may occur as catalyst poisons. The following issues were investigated: 1. Kinetics of arsenic and silicon poisoning of platinum-containing carrier catalysts; 2. Regeneration of poisoned catalysts; 3. mathematical modelling of the poisoning processes.

  11. Bidentate organophosphorus solvent extraction process for actinide recovery and partition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Wallace W.

    1976-01-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction process for the recovery and partitioning of actinide values from acidic nuclear waste aqueous solutions, the actinide values including trivalent, tetravalent and hexavalent oxidation states is provided and includes the steps of contacting the aqueous solution with a bidentate organophosphorous extractant to extract essentially all of the actinide values into the organic phase. Thereafter the respective actinide fractions are selectively partitioned into separate aqueous solutions by contact with dilute nitric or nitric-hydrofluoric acid solutions. The hexavalent uranium is finally removed from the organic phase by contact with a dilute sodium carbonate solution.

  12. Optical spectroscopy of f-element compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is noted that the energies and intensities of transitions observed in the optical spectra of lanthanide (Ln) and actinide (An) compounds can typically be measured with a high degree of accuracy. The observed transitions can then be directly represented as upper state energy levels where the structure is induced by the environment. A discussion is presented of the systematic theoretical interpretation of these transitions both in terms of energy level structure and transition probability. Particularly for the trivalent lanthanides and actinides, the detail to which the interpretation can be carried is unique in the periodic table. The electronic structure of organometallic lanthanides and actinides is emphasized in the discussion. It is made clear that this type of ligand does not present any unique interpretive problems. The basic framework of the interpretation is not dependent upon the specific ionic environment. On the other hand, organometallic compounds represent a particularly interesting group in which to study excited state relaxation

  13. Development of metal cation compound-loaded S-doped TiO2 photocatalysts having a rutile phase under visible light

    OpenAIRE

    Ohno, T; Murakami, N.; Tsubota, T.; Nishimura, H.

    2008-01-01

    We have synthesized S (S4+)-doped TiO2 photocatalysts having a rutile phase. Rutile S-doped TiO2 photocatalysts loaded with metal ion compounds (Fe3+, Rh3+, Cu2+, Co3+, Ni2+, Cr3+) have also been prepared (S-doped TiO2-Mn+). The metal ions were adsorbed on the surfaces of S-doped TiO2 nanoparticles by impregnation methods (IM) or photodeposition methods (PH). The photocatalytic activities of S-doped TiO2 for oxidation of acetaldehyde in gas phase were drastically improved after adsorbing trea...

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Templated Ion Exchange Resins for the Selective Complexation of Actinide Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uy, O. Manual

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a polymeric extractant for the selective complexation of uranyl ions (and subsequently other actinyl and actinide ions) from aqueous solutions (lakes, streams, waste tanks and even body fluids). Chemical insights into what makes a good complexation site will be used to synthesize reagents tailor-made for the complexation of uranyl and other actinide ions. These insights, derived from studies of molecular recognition include ion coordination number and geometry, ionic size and ionic shape, as well as ion to ligand thermodynamic affinity. Selectivity for a specific actinide ion will be obtained by providing the polymers with cavities lined with complexing ligands so arranged as to match the charge, coordination number, coordination geometry, and size of the actinide metal ion. These cavity-containing polymers will be produced by using a specific ion (or surrogate) as a template around which monomeric complexing ligands will be polymerized. The complexing ligands will be ones containing functional groups known to form stable complexes with a specific ion and less stable complexes with other cations. Prior investigator's approaches for making templated resins for metal ions have had marginal success. We have extended and amended these methodologies in our work with Pb(II) and uranyl ion, by changing the order of the steps, by the inclusion of sonication, by using higher complex loading, and the selection of functional groups with better complexation constants. This has resulted in significant improvements to selectivity. The unusual shape of the uranyl ion suggests that this approach will result in even greater selectivities than already observed for Pb(II). Preliminary data obtained for uranyl templated polymers shows unprecedented selectivity and has resulted in the first ion selective electrode for uranyl ion.

  15. Radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds in water, eastern part of A and B irrigation district, Minidoka County, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Geological Survey, in response to a US Department of Energy request, collected and analyzed water samples from 15 sites in Minidoka County, Idaho. Samples were collected from 12 groundwater and 3 irrigation wastewater sites. Samples were analyzed for tritium, gross alpha-particle and beta-particle radioactivity, total uranium, radium, radon-222, strontium-90, gross gamma radioactivity, trace metals, purgeable organic compounds, nutrients, and pesticides. Seven samples had tritium concentrations larger than the reporting level, ranging from 0.045 ±0.013 to 0.106 ±0.013 pCi/ml. Ranges of dissolved concentrations for some other radionuclides or types of radioactivity follow: gross alpha-particles radioactivity as thorium-230 - 2.23 ±0.61 to 9.10 ±1.25 pCiL; gross beta-particle radioactivity as strontium-90 in equilibrium with yttrium-90 - 2.50 ±1.28 to 10.3 ±2.5 pCi/L; total uranium - 1.38 +/-0.16 to 5.22 ±1.02 microg/L; radium-226 - 0.0102 ±0.0064 to 0.149 ±0.024 pCi/L; and strontium-90 - from < the reporting level to 0.483 ±0.071 pCi/L. Concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen ranged from 0.94 to 5 mg/L. Tetrachloroethylene and benzene were present in water from an irrigation drain

  16. Advanced Aqueous Separation Systems for Actinide Partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Ken [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Martin, Leigh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lumetta, Gregg [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-04-02

    One of the most challenging aspects of advanced processing of used nuclear fuel is the separation of transplutonium actinides from fission product lanthanides. This separation is essential if actinide transmutation options are to be pursued in advanced fuel cycles, as lanthanides compete with actinides for neutrons in both thermal and fast reactors, thus limiting efficiency. The separation is difficult because the chemistry of Am3+ and Cm3+ is nearly identical to that of the trivalent lanthanides (Ln3+). The prior literature teaches that two approaches offer the greatest probability of devising a successful group separation process based on aqueous processes: 1) the application of complexing agents containing ligand donor atoms that are softer than oxygen (N, S, Cl-) or 2) changing the oxidation state of Am to the IV, V, or VI state to increase the essential differences between Am and lanthanide chemistry (an approach utilized in the PUREX process to selectively remove Pu4+ and UO22+ from fission products). The latter approach offers the additional benefit of enabling a separation of Am from Cm, as Cm(III) is resistant to oxidation and so can easily be made to follow the lanthanides. The fundamental limitations of these approaches are that 1) the soft(er) donor atoms that interact more strongly with actinide cations than lanthanides form substantially weaker bonds than oxygen atoms, thus necessitating modification of extraction conditions for adequate phase transfer efficiency, 2) soft donor reagents have been seen to suffer slow phase transfer kinetics and hydro-/radiolytic stability limitations and 3) the upper oxidation states of Am are all moderately strong oxidants, hence of only transient stability in media representative of conventional aqueous separations systems. There are examples in the literature of both approaches having been described. However, it is not clear at present that any extant process is sufficiently robust for application at the scale

  17. Half-metallic ferromagnetism in chalcopyrite type compounds ZnMX{sub 2} (M=Sc, V, Mn, Fe; X = P, As)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayalakshmi, D.; Kalpana, G., E-mail: g-kalpa@yahoo.com, E-mail: g-kalpa@annauniv.edu [Department of Physics, Anna University, Chennai – 600025 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Electronic structure and magnetic properties of ZnMX{sub 2} (M=Sc, V, Mn and Fe; X= As and P) compounds in body centred tetragonal chalcopyrite structure have been investigated using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) within the local spin density approximation (LSDA). The spin-polarized electronic band structure and density of states of all these compounds show that the spin-up electrons have metallic and the spin-down electrons have a semiconducting gap and the magnetic moment mainly originates from the strong spin polarization of 3d states of transition metal (M=Sc, V, Mn and Fe) atoms and p-like states of anion X (P and As) atoms.

  18. Performance of metal compound on thermolysis and electrolysis on sugar industries waste water treatment: COD and color removal with sludge analysis (batch-experiment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Omprakash

    2016-06-01

    The sugar cane industry is one of the most water demanding industries. Sugar industries consume and generate excess amount of water. The generated water contains organic compounds, which would cause pollution. The aim of this research work is to study the effectiveness of metal compound for treatment of sugar industry waste water by thermolysis and electrolysis process. The result shows ferrous metal catalyst shows 80 and 85 % chemical oxygen demand and color removal at pH 6, optimum mass loading 4 kg/m3, treatment temperature 85 °C and treatment time 9 h. When ferrous material was used as electrode, maximum 81 % chemical oxygen demand and 84 % color removal at pH 6, current density 156 Am-2, treatment time 120 min and anode consumption 0.7 g for 1.5 L wastewater were obtained.

  19. Pre-analysis separation and concentration of actinides in groundwater using a magnetic filtration/sorption method. I. Background and concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide variety of iron oxides has been used for the removal of radioactive and toxic metals from aqueous solutions. Natural magnetite and iron ferrite (FeO x Fe2O3) in a batch mode to remove actinides (Pu and Am) from wastewater have been utilized. Compared to the batch process, enhanced capacity for actinide removal was observed using supported magnetite in a column surrounded by an external magnetic field (0.3 tesla). The enhanced magnetite capacity in the column is primarily due to magnetic filtration of colloidal and submicron actinide particles along with some actinide complex and ion exchange sorption mechanisms. The removal of the magnetic field from around the column and use of a regenerating solution will easily remove the actinides loaded on the magnetite. The magnetic field-enhanced column process is under development for a variety of applications. Previous work on using ferrites for water treatment is reviewed and the potential for using the magnetic field-enhanced column process as a pre-analysis separation and concentration method for actinides in groundwater is discussed. (author)

  20. Programme and Abstracts. 38. Journees des Actinides together with the 7. School on the Physics and Chemistry of the Actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Journees des Actinides (JdA) is a traditional informal actinide forum, including physics, chemistry, and materials research. It regularly brings together experts from fields involved, taking place in a very informal way, emphasizing exchanges and discussions on current issues in actinide science. At the 38th JdA (10-15 April 2008; Wroclaw, Poland) scientific communications on the following topics on physics and chemistry of the actinides were presented: (a) inorganic and organometallic chemistry; (b) strongly correlated behaviour, superconductivity, quantum criticality; (c) materials science; (d) theory, electronic structure; (e) nuclear fuel cycle, environment

  1. Geochemical investigations into the retention of reactive carbon compounds for toxic heavy metals. Final report; Geochemische Untersuchungen zur Retention von reaktiven Kohlenstoffverbindungen fuer toxische Schwermetalle. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupsch, H.; Mansel, A.; Crustewitz, C.

    2003-03-01

    The composition, reactivity and stability of reactive organic carbon compounds adsorbed on geogenic matrices was investigated. The surface deposits of NOM and its dependence on geochemical parameters was investigated in selected geomatrices. The retention of toxic heavy metals on these surface deposits of NOM was investigated in consideration of the presence of hydroxy species and inorganic ligands. The investigations of the reactivity of the NOM species requires analyses of these compounds and of the heavy metals in the ultratracer region. This was possible by means of radiochemical methods that were further developed in the context of this project. Radioactive labeling of identified reactive carbon compounds, e.g. with radioactive iodine, on the one hand, and the use of radioactive Cu, Pb, Hg isotopes on the other hand enabled speciation analyses in the binary systems (heavy metal + geomatrix, heavy metal + reactive carbon compounds, reactive carbon compounds + geomatrix) and especially in the ternary system (heavy metal + geomatrix + reactive carbon compounds) in defined conditions. The special labelling techniques were a precondition for distribution measurements in the near-natural, low concentration range. (orig.) [German] Ziel des Projektes war es, mit der vorhandenen Analytik und Expertise die Zusammensetzung, die Reaktivitaet und die Stabilitaet der auf den geogenen Matrizes sorbierten reaktiven organischen Kohlenstoffverbindungen und die damit verbundenen Stoffumsaetze aufzuklaeren. An ausgewaehlten Geomatrizes wurde die Ausbildung von Oberflaechendepositen des NOM und deren Abhaengigkeit gegenueber geochemischen Parametern untersucht. Unter der Beruecksichtigung der Gegenwart von Hydroxyspezies und anorganischen Liganden wurde die Retention toxischer Schwermetalle an diesen Oberflaechendepositen des NOM untersucht. Die Untersuchungen zur Reaktivitaet der NOM-Spezies setzt eine Analytik dieser Verbindungen und der Schwermetalle im Ultraspurenbereich

  2. Transition metal-free oxidation of benzylic alcohols to carbonyl compounds by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of acidic silica gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ghafuri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation of alcohols to carbonyl compounds has become an important issue in the process industry as well as many other applications. In this method, various benzylic alcohols were successfully converted to corresponding aldehydes and ketones under transition metal-free condition using hydrogen peroxide in the presence of some amount of catalytic acidic silica gel. Silica gel is inexpensive and available. One of the most important features of this method is its short reaction time.

  3. Quantum Mechanical Investigation of the Electric and Thermal Characteristics of Magnetic Compound Fluid as a Semiconductor on Metal Combined with Rubber

    OpenAIRE

    Kunio Shimada

    2011-01-01

    By applying our developed intelligent fluid, magnetic compound fluid (MCF), to silicon oil rubber, we have made the MCF rubber highly sensitive to temperature and electric conduction. MCF is useful as an element material in haptic robot sensors and other related devices. By mixing metal particles in the silicon oil rubber and by applying a strong magnetic field to the rubber, high-density clusters of these particles can be formed. In a previous study, we investigated the electric current resu...

  4. Transmutation of minor actinide using thorium fueled BWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the methods to conduct transmutation of minor actinide is the use of BWR with thorium fuel. Thorium fuel has a specific behaviour of producing a little secondary minor actinides. Transmutation of minor actinide is done by loading it in the BWR with thorium fuel through two methods, namely close recycle and accumulation recycle. The calculation of minor actinide composition produced, weigh of minor actinide transmuted, and percentage of reminder transmutation was carried SRAC. The calculations were done to equivalent cell modeling from one fuel rod of BWR. The results show that minor actinide transmutation is more effective using thorium fuel than uranium fuel, through both close recycle and accumulation recycle. Minor actinide transmutation weight show that the same value for those recycle for 5th recycle. And most of all minor actinide produced from 5 unit BWR uranium fuel can transmuted in the 6th of close recycle. And, the minimal value of excess reactivity of the core is 12,15 % Δk/k, that is possible value for core operation

  5. Research needs in metabolism and dosimetry of the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are discussed: uranium mine and mill tailings; environmental standards; recommendations of NCRP and ICRP; metabolic models and health effects; life-time exposures to actinides and other alpha emitters; high-specific-activity actinide isotopes versus naturally occurring isotopic mixtures of uranium isotopes; adequacy of the n factor; and metabolism and dosimetry;

  6. Metal coordination chemistry: removal and recovery of metal compounds from heavy crude and shale oils with multidentate ligands. Annual report, October 1981-October 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    The separation and identification by HPLC-GFAA analysis of organic and organoarsenic compounds occurring in oil shale retort and process waters, shale oils and Green River Formation oil shale are described in this report. The molecular characterization of these compounds has given new insight into developing innovative methods for their removal from oil shale retorting products. Catechol (1,2-dihydrocylbenzene) derivatives of both inorganic and organoarsenic compounds may in fact provide the means by which these compounds can be successfully removed from the above mentioned retort products. In addition to model compounds experiments with catechols and characterized inorganic arsenic and organoarsenic compounds, we have also synthesized a polymer that was modified with catechol and are in the process of determining its reactivity with the characterized arsenic compounds. Progress in preparing these catechol-bonded polymers is discussed. In a complimentary study, we have performed molecular characterizations and profile identifications of vanadyl porphyrin and non-porphyrin complexes in various heavy crude petroleums and their asphaltenes by HPLC-GFAA analysis. Results are discussed. (DMC)

  7. Advancement of reprocessing technology. The forefront of the actinides/fission products separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject which is important for building the future back end process of nuclear fuel is the better compatibility of the sharp rise of economic efficiency with global environmental conditions, taking up the fuel cycle system for fast reactors as the object. Wet reprocessing PUREX process is excellent in its reliability and safety, but from the viewpoint of economic efficiency and the load on waste disposal, same pointing-out has been done. In high level waste liquid, trace minor actinides and large amount of Na salt are the problems. As the advancement of PUREX process, the research on the reduction of Na waste liquid is reported. As for the recent improvement, emphasis has been placed on the control of the behavior of Np, Tc and Pt family. As the wet type actinide separation process, transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process is the relatively new, powerful solvent extraction process. Its development is described. By using the real waste liquid generated by the PUREX test of the spent fuel from fast reactors, the multi-stage, opposite flow extraction test on bench scale has been carried out at the hot cell of Chemical Processing Facility. The separation of actinides using macrocyclic compounds is reported. (K.I.)

  8. Use of animal studies for assessing intakes of inhaled actinide-bearing dusts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the methodology used in the execution and interpretation of animal studies (mostly conducted at NRPB) designed to provide guidance on limits of intake and the effectiveness of chest monitoring for persons exposed to various uranium, plutonium, americium, and thorium bearing dusts. The lung retention and transportability characteristics of the actinides in humans have been predicted by combining the absorption rates into blood calculated from the animal studies with particle transport rates from the alveolar region of the human lung. This approach is compatible with the application of the new ICRP respiratory tract model. The results of the animal experiments demonstrate the diversity of the absorption rates for the different chemical forms of the actinides and their disparity from the default values proposed by ICRP for Type F, M, and S compounds in the absence of specific data. The predicted lung retention kinetics of the actinides in humans provide the basis for assessing the validity of chest monitoring; for this purpose the most recent ICRP values for doses per unit intake and deposition in the alveolar region of the lungs have been taken into account. The results show that for some dusts, the data can be interpreted with confidence, while for others the method is impracticable or has considerable uncertainty. Overall, the results support the ICRP recommendation that material specific information is to be preferred for setting limits on intake and interpreting monitoring data. The paper concludes with suggestions for further work. (author). 44 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  9. Selective Media for Actinide Collection and Pre-Concentration: Results of FY 2006 Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Hay, Benjamin P.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.; Warner, Marvin G.; Latesky, Stanley L.

    2006-11-17

    In this work, we have investigated new materials for potential use in automated radiochemical separations. The work can be divided into three primary tasks: (1) synthesis of new ligands with high affinity for actinide ions, (2) evaluation of new materials for actinide ion affinity, and (3) computational design of advanced ligand architectures for highly selective binding of actinide ions. Ligand Synthesis Work was conducted on synthesizing Kl?ui ligand derivatives containing functionalized pendant groups on the cyclopentadienyl ring. The functionalized pendent groups would allow these ligands to be attached to organic and inorganic solid supports. This work focused on synthesizing the compound Na[Cp?Co(PO(OC2H5)2)3], where Cp?= C5H4C(O)OCH3. Synthesizing this compound is feasible, but the method used in FY 2006 produced an impure material. A modified synthetic scheme has been developed and will be pursued in FY 2007. Work was also initiated on synthesizing bicyclic diamides functionalized for binding to polymeric resins or other surfaces. Researchers at the University of Oregon are collaborators in this work. To date, this effort has focused on synthesizing and characterizing a symmetrically substituted bicyclic diamide ligand with the ?COOH functionality. Again, this synthetic effort will continue into FY 2007. Separations Material Evaluation Work was conducted in FY 2006 to provide a more extensive set of data on the selectivity and affinity of extraction chromatography resins prepared by sorption of Kl?ui ligand onto an inert macroreticular polymeric support. Consistent with previous observations, it was found that these materials strongly bind tetravalent actinides. These materials also adsorb trivalent actinides at low nitric acid concentrations, but the affinity for the trivalent actinides decreases with increasing nitric acid concentration. These materials have relatively low affinity for U(VI), but they do sorb U(VI) to a greater extent than Am(III) at [HNO

  10. New metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this report is to estimate the exposure to various metals and metal compounds and discuss the available information of the possible toxic effects of these metals and compounds. In the first section, some metals are defined as those with either a large or a fast increasing exposure to living organisms. The available information on toxicity is discussed in the second section. In the third section interesting metals are defined as compounds having a large exposure and an apparent insufficient knowledge of their possible toxic effects. Comments on each of these metals are also to be found in the third section. (G.B.)

  11. Actinide management with commercial fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capability of plutonium-breeding and minor-actinide (MA) transmutation in the Japanese commercial sodium-cooled fast reactor offers one of practical solutions for obtaining sustainable energy resources as well as reducing radioactive toxicity and inventory. The reference core design meets the requirement of flexible breeding ratio from 1.03 to 1.2. The MA transmutation amount has been evaluated as 50-100 kg/GWey if the MA content in fresh fuel is 3-5 wt%, where about 30-40% of initial MA can be transmuted in the discharged fuel

  12. Actinide management with commercial fast reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohki, Shigeo

    2015-12-01

    The capability of plutonium-breeding and minor-actinide (MA) transmutation in the Japanese commercial sodium-cooled fast reactor offers one of practical solutions for obtaining sustainable energy resources as well as reducing radioactive toxicity and inventory. The reference core design meets the requirement of flexible breeding ratio from 1.03 to 1.2. The MA transmutation amount has been evaluated as 50-100 kg/GWey if the MA content in fresh fuel is 3-5 wt%, where about 30-40% of initial MA can be transmuted in the discharged fuel.

  13. Compilation of actinide neutron nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish nuclear data committee has compiled a selected set of neutron cross section data for the 16 most important actinide isotopes. The aim of the report is to present available data in a comprehensible way to allow a comparison between different evaluated libraries and to judge about the reliability of these libraries from the experimental data. The data are given in graphical form below about 1 ev and above about 10 keV shile the 2200 m/s cross sections and resonance integrals are given in numerical form. (G.B.)

  14. Status of nuclear data for actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzhovskii, B.Y.; Gorelov, V.P.; Grebennikov, A.N. [Russia Federal Nuclear Centre, Arzamas (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Nuclear data required for transmutation problem include many actinide nuclei. In present paper the analysis of neutron fission, capture, (n,2n) and (n,3n) reaction cross sections at energy region from thermal point to 14 MeV was carried out for Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm isotops using modern evaluated nuclear data libraries and handbooks of recommended nuclear data. Comparison of these data indicates on substantial discrepancies in different versions of files, that connect with quality and completeness of original experimental data.

  15. Supercritical fluid extraction studies on actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl nitrate and plutonium in its Pu (III) as well Pu (IV) form loaded onto a tissue paper was extracted completed from paper, glass, stainless steel as well as teflon matrices using modified SC-CO2. A further investigation on recovery of actinides independent of their drying period is expected to culminate into developing an universal procedure to handle Pu bearing waste for its recovery irrespective of its drying history and oxidation states. Such endeavors ultimately lead to the potential utility of the SFE technology for efficient nuclear waste management

  16. Recent progress in actinide borate chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, S.; Alekseev, E .V.; Depmeier, W.; Albrecht-Schmitt, T.E.

    2011-01-01

    The use of molten boric acid as a reactive flux for synthesizing actinide borates has been developed in the past two years providing access to a remarkable array of exotic materials with both unusual structures and unprecedented properties. [ThB(5)O(6)(OH)(6)][BO(OH)(2)]·2.5H(2)O possesses a cationic supertetrahedral structure and displays remarkable anion exchange properties with high selectivity for TcO(4)(-). Uranyl borates form noncentrosymmetric structures with extraordinarily rich topol...

  17. Actinide management with commercial fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohki, Shigeo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, O-arai-machi, Higashi-Ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    The capability of plutonium-breeding and minor-actinide (MA) transmutation in the Japanese commercial sodium-cooled fast reactor offers one of practical solutions for obtaining sustainable energy resources as well as reducing radioactive toxicity and inventory. The reference core design meets the requirement of flexible breeding ratio from 1.03 to 1.2. The MA transmutation amount has been evaluated as 50-100 kg/GW{sub e}y if the MA content in fresh fuel is 3-5 wt%, where about 30-40% of initial MA can be transmuted in the discharged fuel.

  18. Fission cross section measurements for minor actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fursov, B. [IPPE, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The main task of this work is the measurement of fast neutron induced fission cross section for minor actinides of {sup 238}Pu, {sup 242m}Am, {sup 243,244,245,246,247,248}Cm. The task of the work is to increase the accuracy of data in MeV energy region. Basic experimental method, fissile samples, fission detectors and electronics, track detectors, alpha counting, neutron generation, fission rate measurement, corrections to the data and error analysis are presented in this paper. (author)

  19. The electronic structure of the lanthanides and actinides, a comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Optical spectra of the two f-element series (the lanthanides and actinides) are comparable in many respects. For the trivalent ions isolated in single crystals, both series exhibit rich, narrow line spectra. These data can be analysed in terms of a parametric model based on a free-ion Hamiltonian plus the addition of a crystal field Hamiltonian. For most systems the agreement between the calculated and experimental energy levels is quite good. In the actinide series there appears to be a correlation between the magnitude of the crystal field and the inadequacy of the fits. The early actinides exhibit multiple oxidation states for which there is no precedent in the lanthanide series. The parametric model mentioned earlier has been utilized for some tetravalent actinide systems with reasonably good results. A selective survey of results describing the similarities and differences of various lanthanide and actinide systems will be given

  20. MOLECULAR SPECTROSCPY AND REACTIONS OF ACTINIDES IN THE GAS PHASE AND CRYOGENIC MATRICES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaven, Michael C.; Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim

    2009-02-01

    In this chapter we review the spectroscopic data for actinide molecules and the reaction dynamics for atomic and molecular actinides that have been examined in the gas phase or in inert cryogenic matrices. The motivation for this type of investigation is that physical properties and reactions can be studied in the absence of external perturbations (gas phase) or under minimally perturbing conditions (cryogenic matrices). This information can be compared directly with the results from high-level theoretical models. The interplay between experiment and theory is critically important for advancing our understanding of actinide chemistry. For example, elucidation of the role of the 5f electrons in bonding and reactivity can only be achieved through the application of experimentally verified theoretical models. Theoretical calculations for the actinides are challenging due the large numbers of electrons that must be treated explicitly and the presence of strong relativistic effects. This topic has been reviewed in depth in Chapter 17 of this series. One of the goals of the experimental work described in this chapter has been to provide benchmark data that can be used to evaluate both empirical and ab initio theoretical models. While gas-phase data are the most suitable for comparison with theoretical calculations, there are technical difficulties entailed in generating workable densities of gas-phase actinide molecules that have limited the range of species that have been characterized. Many of the compounds of interest are refractory, and problems associated with the use of high temperature vapors have complicated measurements of spectra, ionization energies, and reactions. One approach that has proved to be especially valuable in overcoming this difficulty has been the use of pulsed laser ablation to generate plumes of vapor from refractory actinide-containing materials. The vapor is entrained in an inert gas, which can be used to cool the actinide species to room

  1. Influence of microorganisms on the oxidation state distribution of multivalent actinides under anoxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Donald Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucchini, Jean - Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ams, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, M. K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, J. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-10

    The fate and potential mobility of multivalent actinides in the subsurface is receiving increased attention as the DOE looks to cleanup the many legacy nuclear waste sites and associated subsurface contamination. Plutonium, uranium and neptunium are the near-surface multivalent contaminants of concern and are also key contaminants for the deep geologic disposal of nuclear waste. Their mobility is highly dependent on their redox distribution at their contamination source as well as along their potential migration pathways. This redox distribution is often controlled, especially in the near-surface where organic/inorganic contaminants often coexist, by the direct and indirect effects of microbial activity. Under anoxic conditions, indirect and direct bioreduction mechanisms exist that promote the prevalence of lower-valent species for multivalent actinides. Oxidation-state-specific biosorption is also an important consideration for long-term migration and can influence oxidation state distribution. Results of ongoing studies to explore and establish the oxidation-state specific interactions of soil bacteria (metal reducers and sulfate reducers) as well as halo-tolerant bacteria and Archaea for uranium, neptunium and plutonium will be presented. Enzymatic reduction is a key process in the bioreduction of plutonium and uranium, but co-enzymatic processes predominate in neptunium systems. Strong sorptive interactions can occur for most actinide oxidation states but are likely a factor in the stabilization of lower-valent species when more than one oxidation state can persist under anaerobic microbiologically-active conditions. These results for microbiologically active systems are interpreted in the context of their overall importance in defining the potential migration of multivalent actinides in the subsurface.

  2. Water-soluble organophosphorus reagents for mineralization of heavy metals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K. L.

    1999-02-26

    In this report, we have described the principal stages of a two-step process for the in-situ stabilization of actinide ions in the environment. The combination of cation exchange and mineralization appears likely to provide a long-term solution to environments contaminated with heavy metals. Relying on a naturally occurring sequestering agent has obvious potential advantages from a regulatory standpoint. There are additional aspects of this technology requiring further elucidation, including the demonstration of the effect of these treatment protocols on the geohydrology of soil columns, further examination of the influence of humates and other colloidal species on cation uptake, and microbiological studies of phytate hydrolysis. We have learned during the course of this investigation that phytic acid is potentially available in large quantities. In the US alone, phytic acid is produced at an annual rate of several hundred thousand metric tons as a byproduct of fermentation processes (11). This material presently is not isolated for use. Instead, most of the insoluble phyate (as phytin) is being recycled along with the other solid fermentation residues for animal feed. This material is in fact considered undesirable in animal feed. The details of possible separation processes for phytate from these residues would have to be worked out before this untapped resource would be available for application to heavy metal sequestration. The results described emphasize the behavior of actinide and trivalent lanthanide metal ions, as these species are of primary interest to the Department of Energy for the cleanup of the former nuclear weapons production complex. While the specific demonstration includes this limited selection of metal ions, the technique should be readily applicable to any class of metal ions that form insoluble phosphate compounds under appropriate conditions. Further, though this demonstration has been conducted in the pH 5-8 range, it is conceivable that

  3. Characterization of partitioning relevant lanthanide and actinide complexes by NMR spectroscopy; Charakterisierung von partitioningrelevanten Lanthaniden- und Actinidenkomplexen mittels NMR-Spektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, Christian

    2016-01-15

    In the present work the interaction of N-donor ligands, such as 2,6-Bis(5,6-dipropyl-1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)pyridine (nPrBTP) and 2,6-Bis(5-(2,2-dimethylpropyl)1H-pyrazol)-3-yl-pyridine (C5-BPP), with trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions was studied. Ligands of this type show a high selectivity for the separation of trivalent actinide ions over lanthanides from nitric acid solutions. However, the reason for this selectivity, which is crucial for future partitioning and transmutation strategies for radioactive wastes, is still unknown. So far, the selectivity of some N-donor ligands is supposed to be an effect of an increased covalency in the actinide-ligand bond, compared to the lanthanide compounds. NMR spectroscopy on paramagnetic metal complexes is an excellent tool for the elucidation of bonding modes. The overall paramagnetic chemical shift consists of two contributions, the Fermi Contact Shift (FCS), due to electron spin delocalisation through covalent bonds, and the Pseudo Contact Shift (PCS), which describes the dipolar coupling of the electron magnetic moment and the nuclear spin. By assessing the FCS share in the paramagnetic shift, the degree of covalency in the metal-ligand bond can be gauged. Several methods to discriminate FCS and PCS have been used on the data of the nPrBTP- and C5-BPP-complexes and were evaluated regarding their applicability on lanthanide and actinide complexes with N-donor ligands. The study comprised the synthesis of all Ln(III) complexes with the exceptions of Pm(III) and Gd(III) as well as the Am(III) complex as a representative of the actinide series with both ligands. All complexes were fully characterised ({sup 1}H, {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N spectra) using NMR spectroscopy. By isotope enrichment with the NMR-active {sup 15}N in positions 8 and 9 in both ligands, resonance signals of these nitrogen atoms were detected for all complexes. The Bleaneymethod relies on different temperature dependencies for FCS (T{sup -1}) and PCS (T

  4. Onset of itinerant ferromagnetism associated with semiconductor-metal transition in TiNb1-CoSn half Heusler solid solution compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M A Kouacou; A A Koua; J T Zoueu; K Konan; J Pierre

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, the magnetic and transport properties of the TiNb1−CoSn solid solution compounds with half Heusler cubic MgAgAs-type structure have been studied. This work shows the onset of ferromagnetism associated with a semiconductor to metal transition. The transition occurs directly from ferromagnetic metal to semiconducting state as it is the case in the TiCoNi1−Sn series studied previously. A weak quantity of Ti in NbCoSn is sufficient to allow the appearance of ferromagnetic order and metallic state. The variations of the Curie temperature as a function of saturation and effective paramagnetic moments are related to the itinerant ferromagnetism model. A comparison is made with the TiCoSnSb1− series (also studied previously), where the transition from TiCoSn ferromagnetic metal to non-magnetic semiconductor TiCoSb occurs through an intermediate metallic Pauli-like state.

  5. Different transcriptional responses of heat shock protein 70/90 in the marine diatom Ditylum brightwellii exposed to metal compounds and endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, R; Lee, M-A; Ki, J-S

    2013-07-01

    Environmental hazard assessments using diatoms have been well documented; however, their molecular toxicology has not been sufficiently studied. In this study, we characterized heat shock protein (HSP) 70/90 of the diatom Ditylum brightwellii (Db) and evaluated their transcriptional profiles in response to various environmental stresses (e.g., thermal shocks and metal and non-metal pollutants). Putative DbHSP70 (658aa, 71.7 kDa) and DbHSP90 (707aa, 80.2 kDa) proteins had conserved HSP family motifs but different C-terminus motifs, that is, "EEVD" in DbHSP70 and "MEEVD" in DbHSP90. Phylogenetic analyses of both proteins showed that D. brightwellii was well clustered with other diatoms. Real-time PCR analysis showed that thermal stress considerably upregulated DbHSP70 and DbHSP90. As for chemical pollutants, DbHSP70 greatly responded to CuSO4 and NiSO4 exposure, but not CuCl2 or NiCl2. However, DbHSP90 was significantly upregulated by all the metal compounds tested (CuSO4, NiSO4, CuCl2, and NiCl2). Strikingly, the expression of both genes was not induced by the organic pollutants tested, such as endocrine-disrupting chemicals. These data suggest that DbHSP70 and DbHSP90 are differentially involved in the defense response against various environmental stressors. Moreover, metal toxicity may be specifically affected by the conjugated anion in the metal compounds (e.g., SO4(2-) and Cl(-)). PMID:23622879

  6. Actinide Solubility and Speciation in the WIPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-11-02

    The presentation begins with the role and need for nuclear repositories (overall concept, international updates (Sweden, Finland, France, China), US approach and current status), then moves on to the WIPP TRU repository concept (design, current status--safety incidents of February 5 and 14, 2014, path forward), and finally considers the WIPP safety case: dissolved actinide concentrations (overall approach, oxidation state distribution and redox control, solubility of actinides, colloidal contribution and microbial effects). The following conclusions are set forth: (1) International programs are moving forward, but at a very slow and somewhat sporadic pace. (2) In the United States, the Salt repository concept, from the perspective of the long-term safety case, remains a viable option for nuclear waste management despite the current operational issues/concerns. (3) Current model/PA prediction (WIPP example) are built on redundant conservatisms. These conservatisms are being addressed in the ongoing and future research to fill existing data gaps--redox control of plutonium by Fe(0, II), thorium (analog) solubility studies in simulated brine, contribution of intrinsic and biocolloids to the mobile concentration, and clarification of microbial ecology and effects.

  7. Fusion-Fission Burner for Transuranic Actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chan

    2013-10-01

    The 14-MeV DT fusion neutron spectrum from mirror confinement fusion can provide a unique capability to transmute the transuranic isotopes from light water reactors (LWR). The transuranic (TRU) actinides, high-level radioactive wastes, from spent LWR fuel pose serious worldwide problem with long-term decay heat and radiotoxicity. However, ``transmuted'' TRU actinides can not only reduce the inventory of the TRU in the spent fuel repository but also generate additional energy. Typical commercial LWR fuel assemblies for BWR (boiling water reactor) and PWR (pressurized water reactor) measure its assembly lengths with 4.470 m and 4.059 m, respectively, while its corresponding fuel rod lengths are 4.064 m and 3.851 m. Mirror-based fusion reactor has inherently simple geometry for transmutation blanket with steady-state reactor operation. Recent development of gas-dynamic mirror configuration has additional attractive feature with reduced size in central plasma chamber, thus providing a unique capability for incorporating the spent fuel assemblies into transmutation blanket designs. The system parameters for the gas-dynamic mirror-based hybrid burner will be discussed.

  8. Electronic structure of the actinide dioxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronic properties of the fluorite structured actinide dioxides have been investigated using the linear muffin tin orbital method in the atomic sphere approximation. CaF2 with the same structure was also studied because of the relative simplicity of its electronic structure and the greater amount of experimental data available. Band structures were calculated both non self consistently and self consistently. In the non self consistent calculations the effect of changing the approximation to the exchange-correlation potential and the starting atomic configurations was examined. Using the concepts of canonical bands the effects of hybridization were investigated. In particular the 5f electrons included in the band picture were found to mix more strongly into the valence band than indicated by experiment. On this basis the 5f electrons were not included in self consistent calculations which in the density functional formalism are capable of yielding ground state properties. Because of the non participation of the f electrons in the bonding UO2 only was considered as representative of the actinide dioxides. For comparison CaF2 was also examined. Using Pettifor's pressure formula to determine the equilibrium condition the lattice constants were calculated to be 0.5% and 5% respectively below the experimental values. (author)

  9. Comparison of actinides and fission products recycling scheme with the normal plutonium recycling scheme in fast reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salahuddin Asif

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple recycling of actinides and non-volatile fission products in fast reactors through the dry re-fabrication/reprocessing atomics international reduction oxidation process has been studied as a possible way to reduce the long-term potential hazard of nuclear waste compared to that resulting from reprocessing in a wet PUREX process. Calculations have been made to compare the actinides and fission products recycling scheme with the normal plutonium recycling scheme in a fast reactor. For this purpose, the Karlsruhe version of isotope generation and depletion code, KORIGEN, has been modified accordingly. An entirely novel fission product yields library for fast reactors has been created which has replaced the old KORIGEN fission products library. For the purposes of this study, the standard 26 groups data set, KFKINR, developed at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany, has been extended by the addition of the cross-sections of 13 important actinides and 68 most important fission products. It has been confirmed that these 68 fission products constitute about 95% of the total fission products yield and about 99.5% of the total absorption due to fission products in fast reactors. The amount of fissile material required to guarantee the criticality of the reactor during recycling schemes has also been investigated. Cumulative high active waste per ton of initial heavy metal is also calculated. Results show that the recycling of actinides and fission products in fast reactors through the atomics international reduction oxidation process results in a reduction of the potential hazard of radioactive waste.

  10. Generation and detection of metal ions and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions from the pretreatment processes for recycling spent lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Wang, Guangxu; Xu, Zhenming

    2016-06-01

    The recycling of spent lithium-ion batteries brings benefits to both economic and environmental terms, but it can also lead to contaminants in a workshop environment. This study focused on metals, non-metals and volatile organic compounds generated by the discharging and dismantling pretreatment processes which are prerequisite for recycling spent lithium-ion batteries. After discharging in NaCl solution, metal contents in supernate and concentrated liquor were detected. Among results of condition #2, #3, #4 and #5, supernate and concentrated liquor contain high levels of Na, Al, Fe; middle levels of Co, Li, Cu, Ca, Zn; and low levels of Mn, Sn, Cr, Zn, Ba, K, Mg, V. The Hg, Ag, Cr and V are not detected in any of the analyzed supernate. 10wt% NaCl solution was a better discharging condition for high discharge efficiency, less possible harm to environment. To collect the gas released from dismantled LIB belts, a set of gas collecting system devices was designed independently. Two predominant organic vapour compounds were dimethyl carbonate (4.298mgh(-1)) and tert-amylbenzene (0.749mgh(-1)) from one dismantled battery cell. To make sure the concentrations of dimethyl carbonate under recommended industrial exposure limit (REL) of 100mgL(-1), for a workshop on dismantling capacity of 1000kg spent LIBs, the minimum flow rate of ventilating pump should be 235.16m(3)h(-1). PMID:27021697

  11. Preparation and characterization of polyphase ceramic for fixation of actinides and fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two basic crystalline phases, a fluorite type, calcia stabilized zirconia, and a magnetoplumbite type, CaAl12O19, have been studied for incorporating the full range of waste compositions in to polyphase ceramic forms. The phase assemblage provides crystalline host phases, with stable mineral analogues, for many radionuclides in the waste. Fluorite is considered to be suitable host phase for the fixation of actinides and lanthanides. Magnetoplumbite-like structure can accommodate a wide range of elements with various charges and ionic radii. These kinds of compounds, in addition, present good chemical inertia. (author)

  12. Hydrothermal method of preparation of actinide(IV) phosphate hydrogenphosphate hydrates and study of their conversion into actinide(IV) phosphate diphosphate solid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacheux, N; Grandjean, S; Rousselle, J; Clavier, N

    2007-11-26

    Several compositions of Th2-x/2AnIVx/2(PO4)2(HPO4).H2O (An=U, Np, Pu) were prepared through hydrothermal precipitation from a mixture of nitric solutions containing cations and concentrated phosphoric acid. All the samples were fully characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis, and infrared spectroscopies to check for the existence of thorium-actinide(IV) phosphate hydrogenphosphate hydrates solid solutions. Such compounds were obtained as single phases, up to x=4 for uranium, x=2 for neptunium, and xpolyphase systems composed by beta-TAnPD, An2O(PO4)2, and/or alpha-AnP2O7 were formed. Finally, this hydrothermal route of preparation was applied successfully to the synthesis of an original phosphate-based compound incorporating simultaneously tetravalent uranium, neptunium and plutonium. PMID:17973479

  13. Extraction studies of actinides by diisoamyl alkyl and dibutyl phenyl phosphonates from nitric acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organophosphonates are more basic than phosphates and hence were reported as superior extractants than phosphates for extraction of uranium and thorium. The extraction of metals by neutral phosphorus based extractants is due to the basic nature of phosphoryl oxygen and mainly depends on the nature of substituents attached to the phosphorus atom. Hence, there is scope to develop phosphonate extractants having tailor-made properties for actinide separation and recovery. Diisoamyl butyl, amyl and hexyl phosphonates were synthesized by the Michaelis-Beeker reaction while dibutylphenyl phosphonate (DBPP) were synthesized from their corresponding aryl phosphorichloridate and alcohol in presence of a base

  14. Computational chemistry for nuclear waste characterization and processing. Relativistic quantum chemistry of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes some of the motivations and accomplishments of our grand challenge project of the same title and focuses upon the activities at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) funded the project, which finishes this fiscal year. Its objectives were to develop and apply the methods of relativistic quantum chemistry to assists in the understanding and prediction of the chemistry of actinide and lanthanide compounds. This is important to the DOE because the production of nuclear weapons at DOE facilities has left a serious legacy of environmental contamination, including millions of gallons of highly radioactive waste stored in hundreds of tanks that have exceeded their life expectancy. Much of the radioactive waste involves actinides, and their large atomic number implies that relativistic effects have important chemical consequences. By using modern non-relativistic quantum chemistry techniques, it is now possible to calculate to high accuracy the structures, energetics, and properties of molecules containing light elements. Our implementation of relativistic quantum chemical methods will, for the first time on massively parallel computers, provide capabilities for modeling heavy-element compounds similar to those currently available for light-element compounds. (author)

  15. Fabrication and characterization of nanostructured Fe3S4, an isostructural compound of half-metallic Fe3O4

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Peng

    2015-06-10

    High-purity, well-crystallized spinel Fe3S4 nanoplatelets were synthesized by the hydrothermal method, and the saturation magnetic moment of Fe3S4 was measured at 1.83 μB/f.u. The temperature-dependent resistivity of Fe3S4 was metallic-like for T < 180 K: room-temperature resistivity was measured at 7.711 × 103  μΩ cm. The anomalous Hall conductivity of Fe3S4 decreased with increasing longitudinal conductivity, in sharp contrast with the accepted theory of the anomalous Hall effect in a dirty-metal regime. Furthermore, negligible spin-dependent magnetoresistance was observed. Band structure calculations confirmed our experimental observations that Fe3S4 is a metal and not a half metal as expected.

  16. Gas core reactors for actinide transmutation. [uranium hexafluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, J. D.; Rust, J. H.; Wan, P. T.; Chow, S.

    1979-01-01

    The preliminary design of a uranium hexafluoride actinide transmutation reactor to convert long-lived actinide wastes to shorter-lived fission product wastes was analyzed. It is shown that externally moderated gas core reactors are ideal radiators. They provide an abundant supply of thermal neutrons and are insensitive to composition changes in the blanket. For the present reactor, an initial load of 6 metric tons of actinides is loaded. This is equivalent to the quantity produced by 300 LWR-years of operation. At the beginning, the core produces 2000 MWt while the blanket generates only 239 MWt. After four years of irradiation, the actinide mass is reduced to 3.9 metric tonnes. During this time, the blanket is becoming more fissile and its power rapidly approaches 1600 MWt. At the end of four years, continuous refueling of actinides is carried out and the actinide mass is held constant. Equilibrium is essentially achieved at the end of eight years. At equilibrium, the core is producing 1400 MWt and the blanket 1600 MWt. At this power level, the actinide destruction rate is equal to the production rate from 32 LWRs.

  17. Separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veliscek-Carolan, Jessica

    2016-11-15

    This review summarises the methods currently available to extract radioactive actinide elements from solutions of spent nuclear fuel. This separation of actinides reduces the hazards associated with spent nuclear fuel, such as its radiotoxicity, volume and the amount of time required for its' radioactivity to return to naturally occurring levels. Separation of actinides from environmental water systems is also briefly discussed. The actinide elements typically found in spent nuclear fuel include uranium, plutonium and the minor actinides (americium, neptunium and curium). Separation methods for uranium and plutonium are reasonably well established. On the other hand separation of the minor actinides from lanthanide fission products also present in spent nuclear fuel is an ongoing challenge and an area of active research. Several separation methods for selective removal of these actinides from spent nuclear fuel will be described. These separation methods include solvent extraction, which is the most commonly used method for radiochemical separations, as well as the less developed but promising use of adsorption and ion-exchange materials.

  18. Separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veliscek-Carolan, Jessica

    2016-11-15

    This review summarises the methods currently available to extract radioactive actinide elements from solutions of spent nuclear fuel. This separation of actinides reduces the hazards associated with spent nuclear fuel, such as its radiotoxicity, volume and the amount of time required for its' radioactivity to return to naturally occurring levels. Separation of actinides from environmental water systems is also briefly discussed. The actinide elements typically found in spent nuclear fuel include uranium, plutonium and the minor actinides (americium, neptunium and curium). Separation methods for uranium and plutonium are reasonably well established. On the other hand separation of the minor actinides from lanthanide fission products also present in spent nuclear fuel is an ongoing challenge and an area of active research. Several separation methods for selective removal of these actinides from spent nuclear fuel will be described. These separation methods include solvent extraction, which is the most commonly used method for radiochemical separations, as well as the less developed but promising use of adsorption and ion-exchange materials. PMID:27427893

  19. Separation of heavy metal from water samples--The study of the synthesis of complex compounds of heavy metal with dithiocarbamates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Sonila; Lazo, Pranvera; Ylli, Fatos; Stafilov, Trajce; Qarri, Flora; Marku, Elda

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity and persistence of heavy metal (HM) ions may cause several problems to marine organisms and human beings. For this reason, it is growing the interest in the chemistry of sulphur donor ligands such as dithiocarbamates (DDTC), due to their applications particularly in analytical chemistry sciences. The aim of this work has been the study of heavy metal complexes with DDTC and their application in separation techniques for the preconcentration and/or removing of heavy metals from the water solutions or the water ecosystems prior to their analysis. The HM-DDTC complexes were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR and UV-Vis spectroscopic methods. The elemental analysis and the yield of the synthesis (97.5-99.9%) revealed a good purity of the complexes. High values of complex formation yields of HM-DDTC complexes is an important parameter for quantitatively removing/and or preconcentration of heavy metal ions from water solution even at low concentration of heavy metals. Significant differences founded between the characteristic parameters of UV/Vis (λmax and ϵmax) and FTIR absorption spectra of the parent DDTC and HM-DDTC complexes revealed the complex formation. The presence of the peaks at the visible spectral zone is important to M(nd(10-m))-L electron charge transfer of the new complexes. The (C=N) (1450-1500 cm(-1)) and the un-splitting (C-S) band (950-1002 cm(-1)) in HM-DDTC FTIR spectra are important to the identification of their bidentate mode (HM[S2CNC4H10]2). The total CHCl3 extraction of trace level heavy metals from water samples after their complex formation with DDTC is reported in this article. PMID:26761072

  20. Electrodes modified with bismuth, antimony and tin precursor compounds for electrochemical stripping analysis of trace metals (a short review)

    OpenAIRE

    Lezi, Nikolitsa; Economou, Anastasios; Barek, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, intensive research is being carried out towards the development of “green” electrochemical sensors. Bismuth, antimony and tin electrodes have been proposed as potential substitutes of mercury electrodes in electrochemical stripping analysis of trace metals. The main advantage of these metals as electrode materials is their lower toxicity compared to mercury. Among the different configuration of bismuth, antimony and tin electrodes, one of the most attractive inv...

  1. Actinide recycle potential in the IFR [Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rising concern about the greenhouse effect reinforces the need to reexamine the question of a next-generation reactor concept that can contribute significantly toward substitution for fossil-based energy generation. Even with only the nuclear capacity on-line today, world-wide reasonably assured uranium resources would last for only about 50 years. If nuclear is to make a significant contribution, breeding is a fundamental requirement. Uranium resources can then be extended by two orders of magnitude, making nuclear essentially a renewable energy source. The key technical elements of the IFR concept are metallic fuel and fuel cycle technology based on pyroprocessing. Pyroprocessing is radically different from the conventional PUREX reprocessing developed for the LWR oxide fuel. Chemical feasibility of pyroprocessing has been demonstrated. The next major step in the IFR development program will be the full-scale pyroprocessing demonstration to be carried out in conjunction with EBR-II. IFR fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing can also have a dramatic impact on the waste management options, and in particular on the actinide recycling. 6 figs

  2. Actinide separation chemistry in nuclear waste streams and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The separation of actinide elements from various waste materials, produced either in nuclear fuel cycles or in past nuclear weapons production, represents a significant issue facing developed countries. Improvements in the efficiencies of the separation processes can be expected to occur as a result of better knowledge of the elements in these complex matrices. The Nuclear Science Committee of the OECD/NEA has established a task force of experts in actinide separation chemistry to review current and developing separation techniques and chemical processes. The report consist of eight chapters. In Chapter 1 the importance of actinide separation chemistry in the fields of waste management and its background are summarized.In Chapter 2 the types of waste streams are classified according to their relative importance, by physical form and by source of actinides. The basic data of actinide chemical thermodynamics, such as oxidation states, hydrolysis, complexation, sorption, Gibbs energies of formation, and volatility, were collected and are presented in Chapter 3. Actinide analyses related to separation processes are also mentioned in this chapter. The state of the art of actinide separation chemistry is classified in three groups, including hydrometallurgy, pyrochemical process and process based on fields, and is described in Chapter 4 along with the relationship of kinetics to separations. In Chapter 5 basic chemistry research needs and the inherent limitation on separation processes are discussed. Prioritization of research and development is discussed in Chapter 6 in the context of several attributes of waste management problems. These attributes include: mass or volume of waste; concentration of the actinide in the waste; expected difficulty of treating the wastes; short-term hazard of the waste; long-term hazard of the waste; projected cost of treatment; amount of secondary waste. Based on the priority, recommendations were made for the direction of future research

  3. Scenarios for the transmutation of actinides in CANDU reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyland, Bronwyn, E-mail: hylandb@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada); Gihm, Brian, E-mail: gihmb@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    With world stockpiles of used nuclear fuel increasing, the need to address the long-term utilization of this resource is being studied. Many of the transuranic (TRU) actinides in nuclear spent fuel produce decay heat for long durations, resulting in significant nuclear waste management challenges. These actinides can be transmuted to shorter-lived isotopes to reduce the decay heat period or consumed as fuel in a CANDU(R) reactor. Many of the design features of the CANDU reactor make it uniquely adaptable to actinide transmutation. The small, simple fuel bundle simplifies the fabrication and handling of active fuels. Online refuelling allows precise management of core reactivity and separate insertion of the actinides and fuel bundles into the core. The high neutron economy of the CANDU reactor results in high TRU destruction to fissile-loading ratio. This paper provides a summary of actinide transmutation schemes that have been studied in CANDU reactors at AECL, including the works performed in the past. The schemes studied include homogeneous scenarios in which actinides are uniformly distributed in all fuel bundles in the reactor, as well as heterogeneous scenarios in which dedicated channels in the reactor are loaded with actinide targets and the rest of the reactor is loaded with fuel. The transmutation schemes that are presented reflect several different partitioning schemes. Separation of americium, often with curium, from the other actinides enables targeted destruction of americium, which is a main contributor to the decay heat 100-1000 years after discharge from the reactor. Another scheme is group-extracted transuranic elements, in which all of the transuranic elements, plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), americium (Am), and curium (Cm) are extracted together and then transmuted. This paper also addresses ways of utilizing the recycled uranium, another stream from the separation of spent nuclear fuel, in order to drive the transmutation of other actinides.

  4. Analytical chemical system for the determination of heavy metals and organic compounds. Annual progress report, December 1, 1978-November 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siggia, S.; Barnes, R.M.

    1979-10-24

    Progress has been made in the synthesis and characterization of new resins for sequestering inorganic and organic compounds. The capabilities of the poly(dithiocarbamate) resin have been extended, a new poly(acrylamidoxime) resin prepared and characterized, and a series of resins for organic compounds prepared and tested. Limited actual sample analyses have been performed with these resins. A new inductively coupled plasma source, spectrometer, and computer system have been received and they are undergoing tests and installation. With this system in place, the multielement analysis of metals during the forthcoming period will insure the application of sequestering resins to practical analysis of energy-related materials. An automated sample handling and data system has been designed, some components purchased, and construction is scheduled for 1980.

  5. Analytical chemical system for the determination of heavy metals and organic compounds. Annual progress report, December 1, 1978-November 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress has been made in the synthesis and characterization of new resins for sequestering inorganic and organic compounds. The capabilities of the poly(dithiocarbamate) resin have been extended, a new poly(acrylamidoxime) resin prepared and characterized, and a series of resins for organic compounds prepared and tested. Limited actual sample analyses have been performed with these resins. A new inductively coupled plasma source, spectrometer, and computer system have been received and they are undergoing tests and installation. With this system in place, the multielement analysis of metals during the forthcoming period will insure the application of sequestering resins to practical analysis of energy-related materials. An automated sample handling and data system has been designed, some components purchased, and construction is scheduled for 1980

  6. Actinide immobilization in the subsurface environment by in-situ treatment with a hydrolytically unstable organophosphorus complexant: Uranyl uptake by calcium phytate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K.L.; Jensen, M.P.; Schmidt, M.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

    1998-06-12

    An attractive approach to decreasing the probability of actinide migration in the subsurface is to transform the ions into a less mobile form by remote treatment. We have under development a process that relies on a polyfunctional organophosphorus complexant to sequester the mobile metal ions by complexation/cation exchange. The insoluble complex subsequently decomposes, transforming the actinides into phosphate mineral forms as a thermodynamically stable isolation medium. In this report, we briefly describe the process with focus on the cation exchange behavior of the calcium salt of the organophosphorus sequestrant. (orig.) 8 refs.

  7. Effect of bioavailability on the fate of hydrophobic organic compounds and metal in treatment of young landfill leachate by membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfaghari, M; Droguia, P; Brar, S K; Buelna, G; Dubé, R

    2016-10-01

    Complex dissolved organic matter (DOM) present in landfill leachate provides reliable media for adsorption of highly hydrophobic contaminants, such as Di 2-ethyl hexyl phthalate (DEHP). In this research, the feasibility of submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR) for treatment of landfill leachate (LFL) was determined. Later, the operating conditions were optimized for removal of DEHP, COD, NH4(+) and PO4(3-), and finally the effect of bioavailability was examined by introduction of different concentrations of humic acid into the influent. The result revealed that presence of complex agglomerated organic compounds increased the removal efficiency of DEHP and COD, even though DEHP biodegradation rate in sludge dramatically decreased (from 58.8% to 12.8%). MBR retention of different metals in the absence and in the presence of recalcitrant DOM was also studied. Like DEHP, ternary interaction between metals, DOM, and sludge play a pivotal role in their removal efficiency and their concentration in sludge. PMID:27448320

  8. An emergency bioassay method for actinides in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiongxin; Kramer-Tremblay, Sheila

    2011-08-01

    A rapid bioassay method has been developed for the sequential measurements of actinides in human urine samples. The method involves actinide separation from a urine matrix by co-precipitation with hydrous titanium oxide (HTiO), followed by anion exchange and extraction chromatography column purification, and final counting by alpha spectrometry after cerium fluoride micro-precipitation. The minimal detectable activities for the method were determined to be 20 mBq L(-1) or less for plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes, with an 8-h sample turn-around time. Spike tests showed that this method would meet the requirements for actinide bioassay following a radiation emergency. PMID:21709501

  9. Distribution of actinides in SFR1; Aktinidfoerdelning i SFR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingemansson, Tor [ALARA Engineering, Skultuna (Sweden)

    2000-02-01

    The amount of actinides in the Swedish repository for intermediate level radioactive wastes has been estimated. The sources for the actinides are mainly the purification filters of the reactors and the used fuel pools. Defect fuel elements are the originating source of the actinides. It is estimated that the 12 Swedish reactors, in total, have had 2.2 kg of fuel dissolved in their systems since start-up. About 880 g of this amount has been brought to the intermediate-level repository.

  10. Report of the panel on practical problems in actinide biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Practical problems are classified as the need to make operational decisions, the need for regulatory assessment either of individual facilities or of generic actions, and the overt appearance of radiobiological effects in man or radioactivity in man or the environment. Topics discussed are as follows: simulated reactor accident; long term effects of low doses; effects of repeated exposures to actinides; inhaled uranium mine air contaminants; metabolism and dosimetry; environmental equilibrium models; patterns of alpha dosimetry; internal dose calculations; interfaces between actinide biology and environmental studies; removal of actinides deposited in the body; and research needs related to uranium isotopes

  11. Status report on actinide and fission product transmutation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management of radioactive waste is one of the key issues in today's political and public discussions on nuclear energy. One of the fields that looks into the future possibilities of nuclear technology is the neutronic transmutation of actinides and of some most important fission products. Studies on transmutation of actinides are carried out in various countries and at an international level. This status report which gives an up-to-date general overview of current and planned research on transmutation of actinides and fission products in non-OECD countries, has been prepared by a Technical Committee meeting organized by the IAEA in September 1995. 168 refs, 16 figs, 34 tabs

  12. Review of actinide nitride properties with focus on safety aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albiol, Thierry [CEA Cadarache, St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Arai, Yasuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    This report provides a review of the potential advantages of using actinide nitrides as fuels and/or targets for nuclear waste transmutation. Then a summary of available properties of actinide nitrides is given. Results from irradiation experiments are reviewed and safety relevant aspects of nitride fuels are discussed, including design basis accidents (transients) and severe (core disruptive) accidents. Anyway, as rather few safety studies are currently available and as many basic physical data are still missing for some actinide nitrides, complementary studies are proposed. (author)

  13. Actinide interactions at microbial interfaces: an interdisciplinary challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview on the current state of knowledge of microbial actinide interaction processes is presented. Several detailed examples of the interaction of aerobic soil bacteria (Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Deinococcus strains) with uranium and plutonium are discussed. Details of the nature of the bacterial functional groups involved in the interfacial actinide interaction process are reported. Based on time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) studies, molecular-level mechanistic details of the different interaction processes are discussed. Areas of this emerging field in actinide research are outlined where additional information and integrated interdisciplinary research is required

  14. Separating the Minor Actinides Through Advances in Selective Coordination Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Braley, Jenifer C.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Carter, Jennifer C.

    2012-08-22

    This report describes work conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 under the auspices of the Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Separation, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy. Researchers at PNNL and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) are investigating a simplified solvent extraction system for providing a single-step process to separate the minor actinide elements from acidic high-level liquid waste (HLW), including separating the minor actinides from the lanthanide fission products.

  15. Thermally unstable complexants: Stability of lanthanide/actinide complexes, thermal instability of the ligands, and applications in actinide separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K.L.; Rickert, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    Water soluble complexing agents are commonly used in separations to enhance the selectivity of both ion exchange and solvent extraction processes. Applications of this type in the treatment of nuclear wastes using conventional complexing agents have found mixed success due to the nature of the complexants. In addition, the residual solutions containing these species have led to potentially serious complications in waste storage. To overcome some of the limitations of carboxylic acid and aminopolycarboxylate ligands, we have initiated a program to investigate the complexing ability, thermal/oxidative instability, and separation potential of a group of water soluble organophosphorus compounds which we call Thermally Unstable Complexants, or simply TUCS. Complexants of this type appear to be superior to conventional analogues in a number of respects. In this report, we will summarize our research to date on the actinide/lanthanide complexes with a series of substituted methanediphosphonic acids, the kinetics of their oxidative decomposition, and a few applications which have been developed for their use. 17 refs., 5 figs., 3 tab.

  16. Electronic structure, Fermi surface and optical properties of metallic compound Be{sub 8}(B{sub 48})B{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H. [Institute of Complex Systems, FFPW, CENAKVA, University of South Bohemia in CB, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Azam, Sikander, E-mail: sikander.physicst@gmail.com [Institute of Complex Systems, FFPW, CENAKVA, University of South Bohemia in CB, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic); Alahmed, Z.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Chyský, Jan [Department of Instrumentation and Control Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, CTU in Prague, Technicka 4, 166 07 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2014-02-15

    The band structure, density of states, electronic charge density, Fermi surface and optical properties for B{sub 8}(Be{sub 48})B{sub 2} compound has been investigated in the support of density functional theory (DFT). The atomic positions of B{sub 8}(Be{sub 48})B{sub 2} compound were optimized by minimization of the forces acting on the atoms using the full potential linear augmented plane wave (FPLAPW) method. We have employed the local density approximation (LDA), generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and Engal-Vosko GGA (EVGGA) to indulgence the exchange correlation potential by solving Kohn–Sham equations. The result shows that the compound is metallic with sturdy hybridization near the Fermi energy level (E{sub F}). The density of states at Fermi energy, N(E{sub F}), is determined by the overlaping between B-p, B-s and Be-s states. This overlaping is strong enough indicating metallic origin with different values of N(E{sub F}). These values are 16.4, 16.27 and 14.89 states/eV, and the corresponding bare linear low-temperature electronic specific heat coefficient (γ) is found to be 2.84, 2.82 and 2.58 mJ/mol K{sup 2} for EVGGA, GGA and LDA respectively. There exists a strong hybridization between B-s and B-p states, also between B-s and Be-p states around the Fermi level. The Fermi surface is composed of three sheets. These sheets consist of set of holes and electrons. The bonding features of the compounds are analyzed using the electronic charge density in the (101 and −101) crystallographic planes and also the analyzing of charge density shows covalent bonding between B and B. The linear optical properties are also deliberated and discussed in particulars. - Highlights: • The compound is metallic. • The density of states at the Fermi energy is calculated. • The bare linear low-temperature electronic specific heat coefficient is obtained. • Fermi surface is composed of three sheets. • The bonding features are analyzed using the electronic

  17. Solidification of simulated actinides by natural zircon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jian-Wen; LUO Shang-Geng

    2004-01-01

    Natural zircon was used as precursor material to produce a zircon waste form bearing 20wt% simulated actinides (Nd2O3 and UO2) through a solid state reaction by a typical synroc fabrication process. The fabricated zircon waste form has relatively good physical properties (density 5.09g/cm3, open porosity 4.0%, Vickers hardness 715kg/mm2). The XRD, SEM/EDS and TEM/EDS analyses indicate that there are zircon phases containing waste elements formed through the reaction. The chemical durability and radiation stability are determined by the MCC-1method and heavy ion irradiation; the results show that the zircon waste form is highly leach resistance and relatively stable under irradiation (amorphous dose 0.7dpa). From this study, the method of using a natural mineral to solidify radioactive waste has proven to be feasible.

  18. Actinide elements in aquatic and terrestrial environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported in terrestrial ecology studies with regard to plutonium in biota from the White Oak Creek forest; comparative distribution of plutonium in two forest ecosystems; an ecosystem model of plutonium dynamics; actinide element metabolism in cotton rats; and crayfish studies. Progress is reported in aquatic studies with regard to transuranics in surface waters, frogs, benthic algae, and invertebrates from pond 3513; and radioecology of transuranic elements in cotton rats bordering waste pond 3513. Progress is also reported in stability of trivalent plutonium in White Oak Lake water; chemistry of plutonium, americium, curium, and uranium in pond water; uranium, thorium, and plutonium in small mammals; and effect of soil pretreatment on the distribution of plutonium

  19. Gamma spectroscopy of neutron rich actinide nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkenbach, Benedikt; Geibel, Kerstin; Vogt, Andreas; Hess, Herbert; Reiter, Peter; Steinbach, Tim; Schneiders, David [Koeln Univ. (Germany). IKP; Collaboration: AGATA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Excited states in neutron-rich actinide Th and U nuclei were investigated after multi nucleon transfer reactions employing the AGATA demonstrator and PRISMA setup at LNL (INFN, Italy). A primary {sup 136}Xe beam of 1 GeV hitting a {sup 238}U target was used to produce the nuclei of interest. Beam-like reaction products of Xe- and Ba isotopes after neutron transfer were selected by the PRISMA spectrometer. The recoil like particles were registered by a MCP detector inside the scattering chamber. Coincident γ-rays from excited states in beam and target like particles were measured with the position sensitive AGATA HPGe detectors. Improved Doppler correction and quality of the γ-spectra is based on the novel γ-ray tracking technique which was successfully exploited. First results on the collective properties of various Th and U isotopes are discussed.

  20. Studies of actinides in a superanoxic fjord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, P.

    1997-04-01

    Water column and sediment profiles of Pu, Am, Th and U have been obtained in the superanoxic Framvaren fjord, southern Norway. The concentration of bomb test fallout Pu, Am as well as `dissolved` Th in the bottom water are the highest recorded in the marine environment. The behaviour of the actinides in the anoxic water mass is to a large extent governed by the behaviour of the colloidal material. Ultrafiltration reveals that 40-60% of the actinides are associated to the large colloids, surprisingly this is valid also for U. The sediment acts as a source for Pu, Am, and Th to the water column but primarily as a sink for U. The remobilization of Pu, Am and Th is evident from the water column profiles which have similar diffusion shape profiles as other constituents originating from the sediments. The vertical eddy diffusion coefficient calculated from the Pu profile is in the same order of magnitude as reported from the H{sub 2}S profile. Decreased bottom water concentrations (but a constant water column inventory) between 1989 and 1995 as well as pore water Pu concentrations nearly identical to the overlaying bottom water indicates that the present Pu flux from the sediments are low. Contrary to Pu and Am, the water column Th inventory ({sup 232}Th and {sup 230}Th) continues to increase. The flux of {sup 232}Th from the sediments was determined from changes in water column inventory between 1989 and 1995 and from a pore water profile to be in the order of 2-8 Bq/m{sup 2}/y. 208 refs.