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Sample records for actin-binding scaffold protein

  1. Control of nuclear organization by F-actin binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfisterer, Karin; Jayo, Asier; Parsons, Maddy

    2017-01-06

    The regulation of nuclear shape and deformability is a key factor in controlling diverse events from embryonic development to cancer cell metastasis, but the mechanisms governing this process are still unclear. Our recent study demonstrated an unexpected role for the F-actin bundling protein fascin in controlling nuclear plasticity through a direct interaction with Nesprin-2. Nesprin-2 is a component of the LINC complex that is known to couple the F-actin cytoskeleton to the nuclear envelope. We demonstrated that fascin, which is predominantly associated with peripheral F-actin rich filopodia, binds directly to Nesprin-2 at the nuclear envelope in a range of cell types. Depleting fascin or specifically blocking the fascin-Nesprin-2 complex leads to defects in nuclear polarization, movement and cell invasion. These studies reveal a novel role for an F-actin bundling protein in control of nuclear plasticity and underline the importance of defining nuclear-associated roles for F-actin binding proteins in future.

  2. Identification of Actin-Binding Proteins from Maize Pollen

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    Staiger, C.J.

    2004-01-13

    Specific Aims--The goal of this project was to gain an understanding of how actin filament organization and dynamics are controlled in flowering plants. Specifically, we proposed to identify unique proteins with novel functions by investigating biochemical strategies for the isolation and characterization of actin-binding proteins (ABPs). In particular, our hunt was designed to identify capping proteins and nucleation factors. The specific aims included: (1) to use F-actin affinity chromatography (FAAC) as a general strategy to isolate pollen ABPs (2) to produce polyclonal antisera and perform subcellular localization in pollen tubes (3) to isolate cDNA clones for the most promising ABPs (4) to further purify and characterize ABP interactions with actin in vitro. Summary of Progress By employing affinity chromatography on F-actin or DNase I columns, we have identified at least two novel ABPs from pollen, PrABP80 (gelsolin-like) and ZmABP30, We have also cloned and expressed recombinant protein, as well as generated polyclonal antisera, for 6 interesting ABPs from Arabidopsis (fimbrin AtFIM1, capping protein a/b (AtCP), adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (AtCAP), AtCapG & AtVLN1). We performed quantitative analyses of the biochemical properties for two of these previously uncharacterized ABPs (fimbrin and capping protein). Our studies provide the first evidence for fimbrin activity in plants, demonstrate the existence of barbed-end capping factors and a gelsolin-like severing activity, and provide the quantitative data necessary to establish and test models of F-actin organization and dynamics in plant cells.

  3. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Kovar, D. R.; Staiger, C. J.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.; Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  4. Multiple actin binding domains of Ena/VASP proteins determine actin network stiffening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Brian S; van der Meulen, Stef; Noguera, Philippe; Alonso-Latorre, Baldomero; Plastino, Julie; Koenderink, Gijsje H

    2012-11-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (Ena/VASP) is an actin binding protein, important for actin dynamics in motile cells and developing organisms. Though VASP's main activity is the promotion of barbed end growth, it has an F-actin binding site and can form tetramers, and so could additionally play a role in actin crosslinking and bundling in the cell. To test this activity, we performed rheology of reconstituted actin networks in the presence of wild-type VASP or mutants lacking the ability to tetramerize or to bind G-actin and/or F-actin. We show that increasing amounts of wild-type VASP increase network stiffness up to a certain point, beyond which stiffness actually decreases with increasing VASP concentration. The maximum stiffness is 10-fold higher than for pure actin networks. Confocal microscopy shows that VASP forms clustered actin filament bundles, explaining the reduction in network elasticity at high VASP concentration. Removal of the tetramerization site results in significantly reduced bundling and bundle clustering, indicating that VASP's flexible tetrameric structure causes clustering. Removing either the F-actin or the G-actin binding site diminishes VASP's effect on elasticity, but does not eliminate it. Mutating the F-actin and G-actin binding site together, or mutating the F-actin binding site and saturating the G-actin binding site with monomeric actin, eliminates VASP's ability to increase network stiffness. We propose that, in the cell, VASP crosslinking confers only moderate increases in linear network elasticity, and unlike other crosslinkers, VASP's network stiffening activity may be tuned by the local concentration of monomeric actin.

  5. An actin cytoskeleton with evolutionarily conserved functions in the absence of canonical actin-binding proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Paredez, Alexander R.; Assaf, Zoe June; Sept, David; Timofejeva, Ljudmilla; Dawson, Scott C.; Wang, Chung-Ju Rachel; Cande, W. Z.

    2011-01-01

    Giardia intestinalis, a human intestinal parasite and member of what is perhaps the earliest-diverging eukaryotic lineage, contains the most divergent eukaryotic actin identified to date and is the first eukaryote known to lack all canonical actin-binding proteins (ABPs). We sought to investigate the properties and functions of the actin cytoskeleton in Giardia to determine whether Giardia actin (giActin) has reduced or conserved roles in core cellular processes. In vitro polymerization of gi...

  6. Functional Analysis of Actin-Binding Proteins in the Central Nervous System of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qi; Roblodowski, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Using Drosophila actin-binding protein Dunc-115 as model system, this chapter describes a MARCM (mosaic analysis with a repressible cell marker)-based method for analyzing cytoskeletal components for their functions in the nervous system. Following a concise description about the principle, a step-by-step protocol is provided for generating the needed stocks and for histological analysis. Additional details and explanations have been given in the accompanying notes. Together, this should form a practical and sufficient recipe for performing at the single-cell-level loss-of-function and gain-of-function analyses of proteins associated with the cytoskeleton.

  7. Resemblance of actin-binding protein/actin gels to covalently crosslinked networks

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    Janmey, Paul A.; Hvidt, Søren; Lamb, Jennifer; Stossel, Thomas P.

    1990-05-01

    THE maintainance of the shape of cells is often due to their surface elasticity, which arises mainly from an actin-rich cytoplasmic cortex1,2. On locomotion, phagocytosis or fission, however, these cells become partially fluid-like. The finding of proteins that can bind to actin and control the assembly of, or crosslink, actin filaments, and of intracellular messages that regulate the activities of some of these actin-binding proteins, indicates that such 'gel sol' transformations result from the rearrangement of cortical actin-rich networks3. Alternatively, on the basis of a study of the mechanical properties of mixtures of actin filaments and an Acanthamoeba actin-binding protein, α-actinin, it has been proposed that these transformations can be accounted for by rapid exchange of crosslinks between actin filaments4: the cortical network would be solid when the deformation rate is greater than the rate of crosslink exchange, but would deform or 'creep' when deformation is slow enough to permit crosslinker molecules to rearrange. Here we report, however, that mixtures of actin filaments and actin-binding protein (ABP), an actin crosslinking protein of many higher eukaryotes, form gels Theologically equivalent to covalently crosslinked networks. These gels do not creep in response to applied stress on a time scale compatible with most cell-surface movements. These findings support a more complex and controlled mechanism underlying the dynamic mechanical properties of cortical cytoplasm, and can explain why cells do not collapse under the constant shear forces that often exist in tissues.

  8. Three-dimensional structure of actin filaments and of an actin gel made with actin-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederman, R; Amrein, P C; Hartwig, J

    1983-05-01

    Purified muscle actin and mixtures of actin and actin-binding protein were examined in the transmission electron microscope after fixation, critical point drying, and rotary shadowing. The three-dimensional structure of the protein assemblies was analyzed by a computer-assisted graphic analysis applicable to generalized filament networks. This analysis yielded information concerning the frequency of filament intersections, the filament length between these intersections, the angle at which filaments branch at these intersections, and the concentration of filaments within a defined volume. Purified actin at a concentration of 1 mg/ml assembled into a uniform mass of long filaments which overlap at random angles between 0 degrees and 90 degrees. Actin in the presence of macrophage actin-binding protein assembled into short, straight filaments, organized in a perpendicular branching network. The distance between branch points was inversely related to the molar ratio of actin-binding protein to actin. This distance was what would be predicted if actin filaments grew at right angles off of nucleation sites on the two ends of actin-binding protein dimers, and then annealed. The results suggest that actin in combination with actin-binding protein self-assembles to form a three-dimensional network resembling the peripheral cytoskeleton of motile cells.

  9. Identification of actin binding protein, ABP-280, as a binding partner of human Lnk adaptor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X; Li, Y; Schembri-King, J; Jakes, S; Hayashi, J

    2000-08-01

    Human Lnk (hLnk) is an adaptor protein with multiple functional domains that regulates T cell activation signaling. In order to identify cellular Lnk binding partners, a yeast two-hybrid screening of human spleen cDNA library was carried out using human hLnk as bait. A polypeptide sequence identical to the C-terminal segment of the actin binding protein (ABP-280) was identified as a hLnk binding protein. The expressed hLnk and the FLAG tagged C-terminal 673 amino acid residues of ABP-280 or the endogenous ABP-280 in COS-7 cells could be co-immunoprecipitated using antibodies either to hLnk, FLAG or ABP-280, respectively. Furthermore, immunofluorescence confocal microscope showed that hLnk and ABP-280 co-localized at the plasma membrane and at juxtanuclear region of COS-7 cells. In Jurkat cells, the endogenous hLnk also associates with the endogenous ABP-280 indicating that the association of these two proteins is physiological. The interacting domains of both proteins were mapped using yeast two-hybrid assays. Our results indicate that hLnk binds to the residues 2006-2454 (repeats 19-23C) of ABP-280. The domain in hLnk that associates with ABP-280 was mapped to an interdomain region of 56 amino acids between pleckstrin homology and Src homology 2 domains. These results suggest that hLnk may exert its regulatory role through its association with ABP-280.

  10. F-actin-binding protein drebrin regulates CXCR4 recruitment to the immune synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Martínez, Manuel; Gordón-Alonso, Mónica; Cabrero, José Román; Barrero-Villar, Marta; Rey, Mercedes; Mittelbrunn, María; Lamana, Amalia; Morlino, Giulia; Calabia, Carmen; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Shirao, Tomoaki; Vázquez, Jesús; González-Amaro, Roberto; Veiga, Esteban; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2010-04-01

    The adaptive immune response depends on the interaction of T cells and antigen-presenting cells at the immune synapse. Formation of the immune synapse and the subsequent T-cell activation are highly dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. In this work, we describe that T cells express drebrin, a neuronal actin-binding protein. Drebrin colocalizes with the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and F-actin at the peripheral supramolecular activation cluster in the immune synapse. Drebrin interacts with the cytoplasmic tail of CXCR4 and both proteins redistribute to the immune synapse with similar kinetics. Drebrin knockdown in T cells impairs the redistribution of CXCR4 and inhibits actin polymerization at the immune synapse as well as IL-2 production. Our data indicate that drebrin exerts an unexpected and relevant functional role in T cells during the generation of the immune response.

  11. Comparative mapping of the actin-binding protein 280 genes in human and mouse

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    Gariboldi, M.; Canzian, F.; Manenti, G.; De Gregorio, L. (Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy)); Maestrini, E.; Rivella, S. (Istituto di Genetica Biochimica ed Evoluzionistica, Pavia (Italy)); Chatterjee, A.; Herman, G.E. (Universita di Bari (Italy)); Archidiacono, N.; Antonacci, R. (Institute for Molecular Genetics, Houston, TX (United States)) (and others)

    1994-05-15

    Two genes encode actin-binding protein 280 isoforms. ABP-280 or filamin (FLN1) is present in the cytoskeleton of many cell types, whereas expression of FLN2 is limited to skeletal muscle and heart. FLN1 maps to human chromosome Xq28, and, by physical mapping in YAC clones, the authors have mapped the homologous murine locus (Fln1) to mouse chromosome X, in a region of syntenic homology with human chromosome X. They mapped FLN2 to human chromosome 7q32-q35 by analysis of somatic cell hybrids containing portions of chromosome 7, and, by using a mapping panel from an interspecific murine cross, they mapped the corresponding murine locus (Fln2) to murine chromosome 6 in a region homologous to human chromosome 7. 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Comparative mapping of the actin-binding protein 280 genes in human and mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gariboldi, M; Maestrini, E; Canzian, F; Manenti, G; De Gregorio, L; Rivella, S; Chatterjee, A; Herman, G E; Archidiacono, N; Antonacci, R

    1994-05-15

    Two genes encode actin-binding protein 280 isoforms. ABP-280 or filamin (FLN1) is present in the cytoskeleton of many cell types, whereas expression of FLN2 is limited to skeletal muscle and heart. FLN1 maps to human chromosome Xq28, and, by physical mapping in YAC clones, we have mapped the homologous murine locus (Fln1) to mouse chromosome X, in a region of syntenic homology with human chromosome X. We mapped FLN2 to human chromosome 7q32-q35 by analysis of somatic cell hybrids containing portions of chromosome 7, and, by using a mapping panel from an interspecific murine cross, we mapped the corresponding murine locus (Fln2) to murine chromosome 6 in a region homologous to human chromosome 7.

  13. Association of dopamine D(3) receptors with actin-binding protein 280 (ABP-280).

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    Li, Ming; Li, Chuanyu; Weingarten, Paul; Bunzow, James R; Grandy, David K; Zhou, Qun Yong

    2002-03-01

    Proteins that bind to G protein-coupled receptors have been identified as regulators of receptor localization and signaling. In our previous studies, a cytoskeletal protein, actin-binding protein 280 (ABP-280), was found to associate with the third cytoplasmic loop of dopamine D(2) receptors. In this study, we demonstrate that ABP-280 also interacts with dopamine D(3) receptors, but not with D(4) receptors. Similar to the dopamine D(2) receptor, the D(3)/ABP-280 association is of signaling importance. In human melanoma M2 cells lacking ABP-280, D(3) receptors were unable to inhibit forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) production significantly. D(4) receptors, however, exhibited a similar degree of inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP production in ABP-280-deficient M2 cells and ABP-280-replent M2 subclones (A7 cells). Further experiments revealed that the D(3)/ABP-280 interaction was critically dependent upon a 36 amino acid carboxyl domain of the D(3) receptor third loop, which is conserved in the D(2) receptor but not in the D(4) receptor. Our results demonstrate a subtype-specific regulation of dopamine D(2)-family receptor signaling by the cytoskeletal protein ABP-280.

  14. The Actin-Binding Protein α-Adducin Is Required for Maintaining Axon Diameter

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    Sérgio Carvalho Leite

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The actin-binding protein adducin was recently identified as a component of the neuronal subcortical cytoskeleton. Here, we analyzed mice lacking adducin to uncover the function of this protein in actin rings. α-adducin knockout mice presented progressive axon enlargement in the spinal cord and optic and sciatic nerves, followed by axon degeneration and loss. Using stimulated emission depletion super-resolution microscopy, we show that a periodic subcortical actin cytoskeleton is assembled in every neuron type inspected including retinal ganglion cells and dorsal root ganglia neurons. In neurons devoid of adducin, the actin ring diameter increased, although the inter-ring periodicity was maintained. In vitro, the actin ring diameter adjusted as axons grew, suggesting the lattice is dynamic. Our data support a model in which adducin activity is not essential for actin ring assembly and periodicity but is necessary to control the diameter of both actin rings and axons and actin filament growth within rings.

  15. Modulation of dopamine D(2) receptor signaling by actin-binding protein (ABP-280).

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    Li, M; Bermak, J C; Wang, Z W; Zhou, Q Y

    2000-03-01

    Proteins that bind to G protein-coupled receptors have recently been identified as regulators of receptor anchoring and signaling. In this study, actin-binding protein 280 (ABP-280), a widely expressed cytoskeleton-associated protein that plays an important role in regulating cell morphology and motility, was found to associate with the third cytoplasmic loop of dopamine D(2) receptors. The specificity of this interaction was originally identified in a yeast two-hybrid screen and confirmed by protein binding. The functional significance of the D(2) receptor-ABP-280 association was evaluated in human melanoma cells lacking ABP-280. D(2) receptor agonists were less potent in inhibiting forskolin-stimulated cAMP production in these cells. Maximal inhibitory responses of D(2) receptor activation were also reduced. Further yeast two-hybrid experiments showed that ABP-280 association is critically dependent on the carboxyl domain of the D(2) receptor third cytoplasmic loop, where there is a potential serine phosphorylation site (S358). Serine 358 was replaced with aspartic acid to mimic the effects of receptor phosphorylation. This mutant (D(2)S358D) displayed compromised binding to ABP-280 and coupling to adenylate cyclase. PKC activation also generated D(2) receptor signaling attenuation, but only in ABP-containing cells, suggesting a PKC regulatory role in D(2)-ABP association. A mechanism for these results may be derived from a role of ABP-280 in the clustering of D(2) receptors, as determined by immunocytochemical analysis in ABP-deficient and replete cells. Our results suggest a new molecular mechanism of modulating D(2) receptor signaling by cytoskeletal protein interaction.

  16. EhNCABP166: a nucleocytoplasmic actin-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica.

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    Campos-Parra, A D; Hernández-Cuevas, N A; Hernandez-Rivas, R; Vargas, M

    2010-07-01

    The actin cytoskeleton consists of multiple actin binding proteins (ABPs) that participate cooperatively in different cellular functions such as the maintenance of polarity and cell motility as well as the invasion of target cells and regulation of gene expression, among others. Due to the important role of ABPs in the pathogenesis of Entamoeba histolytica, the role of a new nucleocytoplasmic ABP from E. histolytica named EhNCABP166 was investigated. The EhNCABP166 gene encodes a protein with an estimated molecular weight of 166kDa. Structurally, this peptide is composed of two CH domains arranged in tandem at the N-terminus of the protein, followed by an alpha-helical region containing a number of different domains with a low level of homology. Two (Bin1/Amphiphysin/Rvs167) (BAR) domains, one GTPase-binding/formin 3 homology (GBD/FH3) domain, three Bcl2-associated athanogene (BAG) domains, one basic-leucine zipper (bZIP) domain and one poly(A)-binding protein C-terminal (PABC) domain were also present. Molecular and biochemical studies showed that the EhNCABP166 protein is transcribed and translated in trophozoites of E. histolytica. It was also shown that the CH domains are functional and bind to F-actin, whereas the BAR and GBD/FH3 domains interact in vitro and in vivo with different families of GTPases such as Rho and Ras, and with different phosphoinositides. These findings suggest that these domains have the conserved functional properties described in other eukaryotic systems. These domains also interacted with additional GTPase and lipid targets that have not been previously described. Finally, cellular studies showed that EhNCABP166 is localized to the cytoplasm and nucleus of E. histolytica and that it has an important role in phagocytosis, proliferation, and motility of E. histolytica.

  17. An actin cytoskeleton with evolutionarily conserved functions in the absence of canonical actin-binding proteins.

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    Paredez, Alexander R; Assaf, Zoe June; Sept, David; Timofejeva, Ljudmilla; Dawson, Scott C; Wang, Chung-Ju Rachel; Cande, W Z

    2011-04-12

    Giardia intestinalis, a human intestinal parasite and member of what is perhaps the earliest-diverging eukaryotic lineage, contains the most divergent eukaryotic actin identified to date and is the first eukaryote known to lack all canonical actin-binding proteins (ABPs). We sought to investigate the properties and functions of the actin cytoskeleton in Giardia to determine whether Giardia actin (giActin) has reduced or conserved roles in core cellular processes. In vitro polymerization of giActin produced filaments, indicating that this divergent actin is a true filament-forming actin. We generated an anti-giActin antibody to localize giActin throughout the cell cycle. GiActin localized to the cortex, nuclei, internal axonemes, and formed C-shaped filaments along the anterior of the cell and a flagella-bundling helix. These structures were regulated with the cell cycle and in encysting cells giActin was recruited to the Golgi-like cyst wall processing vesicles. Knockdown of giActin demonstrated that giActin functions in cell morphogenesis, membrane trafficking, and cytokinesis. Additionally, Giardia contains a single G protein, giRac, which affects the Giardia actin cytoskeleton independently of known target ABPs. These results imply that there exist ancestral and perhaps conserved roles for actin in core cellular processes that are independent of canonical ABPs. Of medical significance, the divergent giActin cytoskeleton is essential and commonly used actin-disrupting drugs do not depolymerize giActin structures. Therefore, the giActin cytoskeleton is a promising drug target for treating giardiasis, as we predict drugs that interfere with the Giardia actin cytoskeleton will not affect the mammalian host.

  18. NAC1 is an actin-binding protein that is essential for effective cytokinesis in cancer cells.

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    Yap, Kai Lee; Fraley, Stephanie I; Thiaville, Michelle M; Jinawath, Natini; Nakayama, Kentaro; Wang, Jianlong; Wang, Tian-Li; Wirtz, Denis; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2012-08-15

    NAC1 is a transcriptional corepressor protein that is essential to sustain cancer cell proliferation and migration. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of NAC1 function in cancer cells remain unknown. In this study, we show that NAC1 functions as an actin monomer-binding protein. The conserved BTB protein interaction domain in NAC1 is the minimal region for actin binding. Disrupting NAC1 complex function by dominant-negative or siRNA strategies reduced cell retraction and abscission during late-stage cytokinesis, causing multinucleation in cancer cells. In Nac1-deficient murine fibroblasts, restoring NAC1 expression was sufficient to partially avert multinucleation. We found that siRNA-mediated silencing of the actin-binding protein profilin-1 in cancer cells caused a similar multinucleation phenotype and that NAC1 modulated the binding of actin to profillin-1. Taken together, our results indicate that the NAC1/actin/profilin-1 complex is crucial for cancer cell cytokinesis, with a variety of important biologic and clinical implications.

  19. Phosphorylation of the actin binding protein Drebrin at S647 is regulated by neuronal activity and PTEN.

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    Patricia Kreis

    Full Text Available Defects in actin dynamics affect activity-dependent modulation of synaptic transmission and neuronal plasticity, and can cause cognitive impairment. A salient candidate actin-binding protein linking synaptic dysfunction to cognitive deficits is Drebrin (DBN. However, the specific mode of how DBN is regulated at the central synapse is largely unknown. In this study we identify and characterize the interaction of the PTEN tumor suppressor with DBN. Our results demonstrate that PTEN binds DBN and that this interaction results in the dephosphorylation of a site present in the DBN C-terminus--serine 647. PTEN and pS647-DBN segregate into distinct and complimentary compartments in neurons, supporting the idea that PTEN negatively regulates DBN phosphorylation at this site. We further demonstrate that neuronal activity increases phosphorylation of DBN at S647 in hippocampal neurons in vitro and in ex vivo hippocampus slices exhibiting seizure activity, potentially by inducing rapid dissociation of the PTEN:DBN complex. Our results identify a novel mechanism by which PTEN is required to maintain DBN phosphorylation at dynamic range and signifies an unusual regulation of an actin-binding protein linked to cognitive decline and degenerative conditions at the CNS synapse.

  20. The actin-binding protein capulet genetically interacts with the microtubule motor kinesin to maintain neuronal dendrite homeostasis.

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    Paul M B Medina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurons require precise cytoskeletal regulation within neurites, containing microtubule tracks for cargo transport in axons and dendrites or within synapses containing organized actin. Due to the unique architecture and specialized function of neurons, neurons are particularly susceptible to perturbation of the cytoskeleton. Numerous actin-binding proteins help maintain proper cytoskeletal regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: From a Drosophila forward genetic screen, we identified a mutation in capulet--encoding a conserved actin-binding protein--that causes abnormal aggregates of actin within dendrites. Through interaction studies, we demonstrate that simultaneous genetic inactivation of capulet and kinesin heavy chain, a microtubule motor protein, produces elongate cofilin-actin rods within dendrites but not axons. These rods resemble actin-rich structures induced in both mammalian neurodegenerative and Drosophila Alzheimer's models, but have not previously been identified by loss of function mutations in vivo. We further demonstrate that mitochondria, which are transported by Kinesin, have impaired distribution along dendrites in a capulet mutant. While Capulet and Cofilin may biochemically cooperate in certain circumstances, in neuronal dendrites they genetically antagonize each other. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study is the first molecularly defined loss of function demonstration of actin-cofilin rods in vivo. This study suggests that simultaneous, seemingly minor perturbations in neuronal dendrites can synergize producing severe abnormalities affecting actin, microtubules and mitochondria/energy availability in dendrites. Additionally, as >90% of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's cases are sporadic this study suggests mechanisms by which multiple mutations together may contribute to neurodegeneration instead of reliance on single mutations to produce disease.

  1. The parafibromin tumor suppressor protein interacts with actin-binding proteins actinin-2 and actinin-3

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    Marx Stephen J

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germline and somatic inactivating mutations in the HRPT2 gene occur in the inherited hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome, in some cases of parathyroid cancer and in some cases of familial hyperparathyroidism. HRPT2 encodes parafibromin. To identify parafibromin interacting proteins we used the yeast two-hybrid system for screening a heart cDNA library with parafibromin as the bait. Results Fourteen parafibromin interaction positive preys representing 10 independent clones encoding actinin-2 were isolated. Parafibromin interacted with muscle alpha-actinins (actinin-2 and actinin-3, but not with non-muscle alpha-actinins (actinin-1 and actinin-4. The parafibromin-actinin interaction was verified by yeast two-hybrid, GST pull-down, and co-immunoprecipitation. Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed that the N-terminal region of parafibromin interacted with actinins. In actin sedimentation assays parafibromin did not dissociate skeletal muscle actinins from actin filaments, but interestingly, parafibromin could also bundle/cross-link actin filaments. Parafibromin was predominantly nuclear in undifferentiated proliferating myoblasts (C2C12 cells, but in differentiated C2C12 myotubes parafibromin co-localized with actinins in the cytoplasmic compartment. Conclusion These data support a possible contribution of parafibromin outside the nucleus through its interaction with actinins and actin bundling/cross-linking. These data also suggest that actinins (and actin participate in sequestering parafibromin in the cytoplasmic compartment.

  2. The Dynamic Pollen Tube Cytoskeleton: Live Cell Studies Using Actin-Binding and Microtubule-Binding Reporter Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alice Y. Cheung; Qiao-hong Duan; Silvia Santos Costa; Barend H.J.de Graaf; Veronica S.Di Stilio; Jose Feijo; Hen-Ming Wu

    2008-01-01

    Pollen tubes elongate within the pistil to transport sperm cells to the embryo sac for fertilization.Growth occurs exclusively at the tube apex,rendering pollen tube elongation a most dramatic polar cell growth process.A hall-mark pollen tube feature is its cytoskeleton,which comprises elaborately organized and dynamic actin microfilaments and microtubules.Pollen tube growth is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton;its organization and regulation have been exalined extensively by various approaches.including fluorescent protein labeled actin-binding proteins in live cell studies.Using the previously described GFP-NtADF1 and GFP-LIADF1, and a new actin reporter protein NtPLIM2b-GFP,we re-affirm that the predominant actin structures in elongating tobacco and lily pollen tubes are long,streaming actin cables along the pollen tube shank,and a subapical structure comprising shorter actin cables.The subapical collection of actin microfilaments undergoes dynamic changes,giving rise to the appearance of structures that range from basket-or funnel-shaped,mesh-like to a subtle ring.NtPLIM2b-GFP is used in combination with a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Rho GTPases,AtROP-GEF1,to illustrate the use of these actin reporter proteins to explore the linkage between the polar cell growth process and its actin cytoskeleton.Contrary to the actin cytoskeleton,microtubules appear not to play a direct role in supporting the polar cell growth process in angiosperm pollen tubes.Using a microtubule reporter protein based on the microtubule end-binding protein from Arabidopsis AtEB1,GFP-AtEB1,we show that the extensive microtubule network in elongating pollen tubes displays varying degrees of dynamics.These reporter proteins provide versatile tools to explore the functional connection between major structural and signaling components of the polar pollen tube growth process.

  3. Actin-binding Rho activating protein is expressed in the central nervous system of normal adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihua Liu; Jutta Schaper; Mingying Luo; Baolin Yang; Xiaoqiong Wu; Wu Zhu; Yinglu Guan; Weijun Cai; Kerstin Troidl; Wolfgang Schaper

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies show that actin-binding Rho activating protein (Abra) is expressed in cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. In this study, we investigated the expression profile of Abra in the central nervous system of normal adult rats by confocal immunofluorescence.Results show ed that Abra immunostaining was located in neuronal nuclei, cytoplasm and processes in the central nervous system, with the strongest staining in the nuclei; in the cerebral cortex, Abra positive neuronal bodies and processes were distributed in six cortical layers including molecular layer, external granular layer, external pyramidal layer, internal granular layer, internal pyramidal layer and polymorphic layer; in the hippocampus, the cell bodies of Abra positive neurons were distributed evenly in pyramidal layer and granular layer, with pos itive processes in molecular layer and orien layer; in the cerebellar cortex, Abra staining showed the positive neuronal cell bodies in Purkinje cell layer and granular layer and positive processes in molecular layer; in the spinal cord, Abra-immunopositive products covered the whole gray matter and w hite matter; co-localization studies showed that Abra was co-stained with F-actin in neuronal cytoplasm and processes, but weakly in the nuclei. In addition, in the hippocampus, Abra was co-stained with F-actin only in neuronal processes, but not in the cell body. This study for the first time presents a comprehensive overview of Abra expression in the central nervous system, providing insights for further investigating the role of Abra in the mature central nervous system.

  4. Unconventional actins and actin-binding proteins in human protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, C M; Thiyagarajan, S; Sahasrabuddhe, A A

    2015-06-01

    Actin and its regulatory proteins play a key role in several essential cellular processes such as cell movement, intracellular trafficking and cytokinesis in most eukaryotes. While these proteins are highly conserved in higher eukaryotes, a number of unicellular eukaryotic organisms contain divergent forms of these proteins which have highly unusual biochemical and structural properties. Here, we review the biochemical and structural properties of these unconventional actins and their core binding proteins which are present in commonly occurring human protozoan parasites.

  5. An actin-binding protein, CAP, is expressed in a subset of rat taste bud cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Y; Yasuoka, A; Asano-Miyoshi, M; Abe, K; Emori, Y

    2001-02-12

    Single cell cDNA libraries were constructed from taste bud cells of rat circumvallate papillae. Using three steps of screening, including differential hybridization, sequence analyses and in situ hybridization, a clone encoding a rat homolog of yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) was identified to be highly expressed in a subset of taste bud cells.

  6. Crystal structure of the actin binding domain of the cyclase-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodatko, Tetyana; Fedorov, Alexander A; Grynberg, Marcin; Patskovsky, Yury; Rozwarski, Denise A; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Kondraskina, Elena; Irving, Tom; Godzik, Adam; Almo, Steven C

    2004-08-24

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is a modular actin monomer binding protein that directly regulates filament dynamics and has been implicated in a number of complex developmental and morphological processes, including mRNA localization and the establishment of cell polarity. The crystal structure of the C-terminal dimerization and actin monomer binding domain (C-CAP) reveals a highly unusual dimer, composed of monomers possessing six coils of right-handed beta-helix flanked by antiparallel beta-strands. Domain swapping, involving the last two strands of each monomer, results in the formation of an extended dimer with an extensive interface. This structural and biochemical characterization provides new insights into the organization and potential mechanistic properties of the multiprotein assemblies that integrate dynamic actin processes into the overall physiology of the cell. An unanticipated finding is that the unique tertiary structure of the C-CAP monomer provides a structural model for a wide range of molecules, including RP2 and cofactor C, proteins involved in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and tubulin maturation, respectively, as well as several uncharacterized proteins that exhibit very diverse domain organizations. Thus, the unusual right-handed beta-helical fold present in C-CAP appears to support a wide range of biological functions.

  7. The actin-binding proteins eps8 and gelsolin have complementary roles in regulating the growth and stability of mechanosensory hair bundles of mammalian cochlear outer hair cells.

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    Jennifer Olt

    Full Text Available Sound transduction depends upon mechanosensitive channels localized on the hair-like bundles that project from the apical surface of cochlear hair cells. Hair bundles show a stair-case structure composed of rows of stereocilia, and each stereocilium contains a core of tightly-packed and uniformly-polarized actin filaments. The growth and maintenance of the stereociliary actin core are dynamically regulated. Recently, it was shown that the actin-binding protein gelsolin is expressed in the stereocilia of outer hair cells (OHCs and in its absence they become long and straggly. Gelsolin is part of a whirlin scaffolding protein complex at the stereocilia tip, which has been shown to interact with other actin regulatory molecules such as Eps8. Here we investigated the physiological effects associated with the absence of gelsolin and its possible overlapping role with Eps8. We found that, in contrast to Eps8, gelsolin does not affect mechanoelectrical transduction during immature stages of development. Moreover, OHCs from gelsolin knockout mice were able to mature into fully functional sensory receptors as judged by the normal resting membrane potential and basolateral membrane currents. Mechanoelectrical transducer current in gelsolin-Eps8 double knockout mice showed a profile similar to that observed in the single mutants for Eps8. We propose that gelsolin has a non-overlapping role with Eps8. While Eps8 is mainly involved in the initial growth of stereocilia in both inner hair cells (IHCs and OHCs, gelsolin is required for the maintenance of mature hair bundles of low-frequency OHCs after the onset of hearing.

  8. XIRP2, an Actin-Binding Protein Essential for Inner Ear Hair-Cell Stereocilia

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    Déborah I. Scheffer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hair cells of the inner ear are mechanoreceptors for hearing and balance, and proteins highly enriched in hair cells may have specific roles in the development and maintenance of the mechanotransduction apparatus. We identified XIRP2/mXinβ as an enriched protein likely to be essential for hair cells. We found that different isoforms of this protein are expressed and differentially located: short splice forms (also called XEPLIN are targeted more to stereocilia, whereas two long isoforms containing a XIN-repeat domain are in both stereocilia and cuticular plates. Mice lacking the Xirp2 gene developed normal stereocilia bundles, but these degenerated with time: stereocilia were lost and long membranous protrusions emanated from the nearby apical surfaces. At an ultrastructural level, the paracrystalline actin filaments became disorganized. XIRP2 is apparently involved in the maintenance of actin structures in stereocilia and cuticular plates of hair cells, and perhaps in other organs where it is expressed.

  9. Simiate is an Actin binding protein involved in filopodia dynamics and arborisation of neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin eDerlig

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Actin cytoskeleton constitutes the functional base for a multitude of cellular processes extending from motility and migration to cell mechanics and morphogenesis. The latter is particularly important to neuronal cells since the accurate functioning of the brain crucially depends on the correct arborisation of neurons, a process that requires the formation of several dozens to hundreds of dendritic branches. Recently, a model was proposed where different transcription factors are detailed to distinct facets and phases of dendritogenesis and exert their function by acting on the Actin cytoskeleton, however, the proteins involved as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown.Here, we demonstrate that Simiate, a protein previously indicated to activate transcription, directly associates with both, G- and F-Actin and in doing so, affects Actin polymerisation and Actin turnover in living cells. Imaging studies illustrate that Simiate particularly influences filopodia dynamics and specifically increases the branching of proximal, but not distal dendrites of developing neurons. The data suggests that Simiate functions as a direct molecular link between transcription regulation on one side, and dendritogenesis on the other, wherein Simiate serves to coordinate the development of proximal and distal dendrites by acting on the Actin cytoskeleton of filopodia and on transcription regulation, hence supporting the novel model.

  10. Actin-binding protein (ABP-280) filamin gene (FLN) maps telomeric to the color vision locus (R/GCP) and centromeric to G6PD in Xq28

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorlin, J.B. (Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States) Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)); Henske, E.; Hartwig, J.H.; Kwiatkowski, D.J. (Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)); Warren, S.T.; Kunst, C.B. (Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)); D' Urso, M.; Palmieri, G. (International Institute of Genetics and Biophysics, Naples, (Italy)); Bruns, G. (Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Actin-binding protein-280 (ABP-280) is a dimeric actin filament-crosslinking protein that promotes orthogonal branching of actin filaments and links actin filaments to membrane glycoproteins. The authors have mapped the ABP-280 filamin gene (FLN) to Xq28 by Southern blot analysis of somatic cell hybrid lines, by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and through identification of portions of the FLN gene within cosmids and YACs mapped to Xq28. The FLN gene is found within a 200-kb region centromeric to the G6PD locus and telomeric to DSX52 and the color vision locus. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Actin-binding proteins implicated in the formation of the punctate actin foci stimulated by the self-incompatibility response in Papaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulter, Natalie S; Staiger, Christopher J; Rappoport, Joshua Z; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2010-03-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a key target for signaling networks and plays a central role in translating signals into cellular responses in eukaryotic cells. Self-incompatibility (SI) is an important mechanism responsible for preventing self-fertilization. The SI system of Papaver rhoeas pollen involves a Ca(2+)-dependent signaling network, including massive actin depolymerization as one of the earliest cellular responses, followed by the formation of large actin foci. However, no analysis of these structures, which appear to be aggregates of filamentous (F-)actin based on phalloidin staining, has been carried out to date. Here, we characterize and quantify the formation of F-actin foci in incompatible Papaver pollen tubes over time. The F-actin foci increase in size over time, and we provide evidence that their formation requires actin polymerization. Once formed, these SI-induced structures are unusually stable, being resistant to treatments with latrunculin B. Furthermore, their formation is associated with changes in the intracellular localization of two actin-binding proteins, cyclase-associated protein and actin-depolymerizing factor. Two other regulators of actin dynamics, profilin and fimbrin, do not associate with the F-actin foci. This study provides, to our knowledge, the first insights into the actin-binding proteins and mechanisms involved in the formation of these intriguing structures, which appear to be actively formed during the SI response.

  12. Two separate functions are encoded by the carboxyl-terminal domains of the yeast cyclase-associated protein and its mammalian homologs. Dimerization and actin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelicof, A; Protopopov, V; David, D; Lin, X Y; Lustgarten, V; Gerst, J E

    1996-07-26

    The yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated protein, CAP, was identified as a component of the RAS-activated cyclase complex. CAP consists of two functional domains separated by a proline-rich region. One domain, which localizes to the amino terminus, mediates RAS signaling through adenylyl cyclase, while a domain at the carboxyl terminus is involved in the regulation of cell growth and morphogenesis. Recently, the carboxyl terminus of yeast CAP was shown to sequester actin, but whether this function has been conserved, and is the sole function of this domain, is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the carboxyl-terminal domains of CAP and CAP homologs have two separate functions. We show that carboxyl-terminals of both yeast CAP and a mammalian CAP homolog, MCH1, bind to actin. We also show that this domain contains a signal for dimerization, allowing both CAP and MCH1 to form homodimers and heterodimers. The properties of actin binding and dimerization are mediated by separate regions on the carboxyl terminus; the last 27 amino acids of CAP being critical for actin binding. Finally, we present evidence that links a segment of the proline-rich region of CAP to its localization in yeast. Together, these results suggest that all three domains of CAP proteins are functional.

  13. Mapping of two genes encoding isoforms of the actin binding protein ABP-280, a dystrophin like protein, to Xq28 and to chromosome 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestrini, E; Patrosso, C; Mancini, M; Rivella, S; Rocchi, M; Repetto, M; Villa, A; Frattini, A; Zoppè, M; Vezzoni, P

    1993-06-01

    ABP-280 is a ubiquitous actin binding protein present in the cytoskeleton of many different cell types. ABP-280 was mapped to distal Xq28, 50-60 kb downstream of the Green Colour Pigment (GCP) genes. To establish if ABP-280 may be a candidate for one of the muscle disease localized by linkage analysis to distal Xq28 we looked for alternative forms of ABP-280 mRNA. Several different ABP-280 mRNAs were indeed identified: two are X-linked and are produced by alternative splicing of a small exon of 24 nucleotides. At least one additional gene encoding a RNA more than 70% identical to ABP-280 in the 1700 bp sequenced has also been found. It was mapped to chromosome 7. While both forms of the X-linked ABP-280 are ubiquitous, the gene on chromosome 7 is highly expressed only in skeletal muscle and heart. The two genes were therefore excellent candidates for the X-linked and for the autosomal dominant form of the Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy (EDMD) both of which have been described. So far, however we were unable to demonstrate mutations in the coding region or affecting the alternative splicing of the X-linked form of ABP-280, in several patients studied, and we think that it is quite unlikely that this is the gene responsible for EDMD.

  14. Drosophila myosin-XX functions as an actin-binding protein to facilitate the interaction between Zyx102 and actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yang; White, Howard D; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2014-01-21

    The class XX myosin is a member of the diverse myosin superfamily and exists in insects and several lower invertebrates. DmMyo20, the class XX myosin in Drosophila, is encoded by dachs, which functions as a crucial downstream component of the Fat signaling pathway, influencing growth, affinity, and gene expression during development. Sequence analysis shows that DmMyo20 contains a unique N-terminal extension, the motor domain, followed by one IQ motif, and a C-terminal tail. To investigate the biochemical properties of DmMyo20, we expressed several DmMyo20 truncated constructs containing the motor domain in the baculovirus/Sf9 system. We found that the motor domain of DmMyo20 had neither ATPase activity nor the ability to bind to ATP, suggesting that DmMyo20 does not function as a molecular motor. We found that the motor domain of DmMyo20 could specifically bind to actin filaments in an ATP-independent manner and enhance the interaction between actin filaments and Zyx102, a downstream component of DmMyo20 in the Fat signaling pathway. These results suggest that DmMyo20 functions as a scaffold protein, but not as a molecular motor, in a signaling pathway controlling cell differentiation.

  15. Identification of regions within the Legionella pneumophila VipA effector protein involved in actin binding and polymerization and in interference with eukaryotic organelle trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugalhão, Joana N; Mota, Luís Jaime; Franco, Irina S

    2016-02-01

    The Legionella pneumophila effector protein VipA is an actin nucleator that co-localizes with actin filaments and early endosomes in infected macrophages and which interferes with organelle trafficking when expressed in yeast. To identify the regions of VipA involved in its subcellular localization and functions, we ectopically expressed specific VipA mutant proteins in eukaryotic cells. This indicated that the characteristic punctate distribution of VipA depends on its NH2 -terminal (amino acid residues 1-133) and central coiled-coil (amino acid residues 133-206) regions, and suggested a role for the COOH-terminal (amino acid residues 206-339) region in association with actin filaments and for the NH2 -terminal in co-localization with early endosomes. Co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro assays showed that the COOH-terminal region of VipA is necessary and sufficient to mediate actin binding, and is essential but insufficient to induce microfilament formation. Assays in yeast revealed that the NH2 and the COOH-terminal regions, and possibly an NPY motif within the NH2 region of VipA, are necessary for interference with organelle trafficking. Overall, this suggests that subversion of eukaryotic vesicular trafficking by VipA involves both its ability to associate with early endosomes via its NH2 -terminal region and its capacity to bind and polymerize actin through its COOH-terminal region.

  16. Phosphorylation of actin-binding protein (ABP-280; filamin) by tyrosine kinase p56lck modulates actin filament cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal Sharma, C; Goldmann, Wolfgang H

    2004-01-01

    Actin-binding protein (ABP-280; filamin) is a phosphoprotein present in the periphery of the cytoplasm where it can cross-link actin filaments, associate with lipid membranes, and bind to membrane surface receptors. Given its function and localization in the cell, we decided to investigate the possibility of whether it serves as substrate for p56lck, a lymphocyte-specific member of the src family of protein tyrosine kinases associated with cell surface glycoproteins. The interaction of p56lck with membrane glycoproteins is important for cell development and functional activation. Here, we show that purified p56lck interacts and catalyzes in vitro kinase reactions. Tyrosine phosphorylation by p56lck is restricted to a single peptide of labeled ABP-280 shown by protease digest. The addition of phorbol ester to cells results in the inhibition of phosphorylation of ABP-280 by p56lck. These results show a decrease in phosphorylation suggesting conformationally induced regulation. Dynamic light scattering confirmed increased actin filament cross-linking due to phosphorylation of ABP-280 by p56lck.

  17. Actin-binding protein coronin 1A controls osteoclastic bone resorption by regulating lysosomal secretion of cathepsin K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmae, Saori; Noma, Naruto; Toyomoto, Masayasu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Takeiri, Masatoshi; Fuji, Hiroaki; Takemoto, Kenji; Iwaisako, Keiko; Fujita, Tomoko; Takeda, Norihiko; Kawatani, Makoto; Aoyama, Mineyoshi; Hagiwara, Masatoshi; Ishihama, Yasushi; Asagiri, Masataka

    2017-01-01

    Osteoclasts degrade bone matrix proteins via the secretion of lysosomal enzymes. However, the precise mechanisms by which lysosomal components are transported and fused to the bone-apposed plasma membrane, termed ruffled border membrane, remain elusive. Here, we identified coronin 1A as a negative regulator of exocytotic release of cathepsin K, one of the most important bone-degrading enzymes in osteoclasts. The modulation of coronin 1A expression did not alter osteoclast differentiation and extracellular acidification, but strongly affected the secretion of cathepsin K and osteoclast bone-resorption activity, suggesting the coronin 1A-mediated regulation of lysosomal trafficking and protease exocytosis. Further analyses suggested that coronin 1A prevented the lipidation-mediated sorting of the autophagy-related protein LC3 to the ruffled border and attenuated lysosome–plasma membrane fusion. In this process, the interactions between coronin 1A and actin were crucial. Collectively, our findings indicate that coronin 1A is a pivotal component that regulates lysosomal fusion and the secretion pathway in osteoclast-lineage cells and may provide a novel therapeutic target for bone diseases. PMID:28300073

  18. Investigation of hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity in mice deficient in the actin-binding protein Drebrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmes, Claudia G.; Mack, Till G. A.; Ledderose, Julia; Schmitz, Dietmar; Wozny, Christian; Eickholt, Britta J.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamic regulation of the actin cytoskeleton plays a key role in controlling the structure and function of synapses. It is vital for activity-dependent modulation of synaptic transmission and long-term changes in synaptic morphology associated with memory consolidation. Several regulators of actin dynamics at the synapse have been identified, of which a salient one is the postsynaptic actin stabilising protein Drebrin (DBN). It has been suggested that DBN modulates neurotransmission and changes in dendritic spine morphology associated with synaptic plasticity. Given that a decrease in DBN levels is correlated with cognitive deficits associated with ageing and dementia, it was hypothesised that DBN protein abundance instructs the integrity and function of synapses. We created a novel DBN deficient mouse line. Analysis of gross brain and neuronal morphology revealed no phenotype in the absence of DBN. Electrophysiological recordings in acute hippocampal slices and primary hippocampal neuronal cultures showed that basal synaptic transmission, and both long-term and homeostatic synaptic plasticity were unchanged, suggesting that loss of DBN is not sufficient in inducing synapse dysfunction. We propose that the overall lack of changes in synaptic function and plasticity in DBN deficient mice may indicate robust compensatory mechanisms that safeguard cytoskeleton dynamics at the synapse. PMID:28198431

  19. LATS1 tumor suppressor is a novel actin-binding protein and negative regulator of actin polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stacy Visser-Grieve; Zhonghua Zhou; Yi-Min She; He Huang; Terry D Cyr; Tian Xu; Xiaolong Yang

    2011-01-01

    Dear Editor,The LATS tumor suppressor,conserved from Drosophila (dlats) to humans (LATS1,LATS2),plays a vital role in maintaining cellular homeostasis in humans since loss of either LATS1 or LATS2 leads to the development of numerous cancer types such as breast cancer and leukemia [1].Apart from its roles as a Ser/Thr kinase within the emerging Hippo pathway regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis,ultimately leading to the control of organ size and tumorigenesis [2],LATS is also implicated in a broad range of functions including regulation of genetic stability,transcription,and protein stability [1 ].Recently,tumor suppressors have also been shown to affect the later stages of tumorigenesis,including metastasis.Among this group of metastasis regulators are genes that can directly affect actin dynamics by binding to F-actin,such as the tumor suppressors p53 [3],NF2 [4] and APC [5].

  20. Arabidopsis AtADF1 is Functionally Affected by Mutations on Actin Binding Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Hai Dong; Wei-Ping Tang; Jia-Yao Liu

    2013-01-01

    The plant actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) binds to both monomeric and filamentous actin,and is directly involved in the depolymerization of actin filaments.To better understand the actin binding sites of the Arabidopsis thaliana L.AtADF1,we generated mutants of AtADF1 and investigated their functions in vitro and in vivo.Analysis of mutants harboring amino acid substitutions revealed that charged residues (Arg98 and Lys100) located at the α-helix 3 and forming an actin binding site together with the N-terminus are essential for both G-and F-actin binding.The basic residues on the β-strand 5 (K82/A) and the α-helix 4 (R135/A,R137/A) form another actin binding site that is important for F-actin binding.Using transient expression of CFP-tagged AtADF1 mutant proteins in onion (Allium cepa) peel epidermal cells and transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana L.plants overexpressing these mutants,we analyzed how these mutant proteins regulate actin organization and affect seedling growth.Our results show that the ADF mutants with a lower affinity for actin filament binding can still be functional,unless the affinity foractin monomers is also affected.The G-actin binding activity of the ADF plays an essential role in actin binding,depolymerization of actin polymers,and therefore in the control of actin organization.

  1. [Alternative scaffold proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovskaia, L E; Shingarova, L N; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2011-01-01

    Review is devoted to the challenging direction in modem molecular biology and bioengineering - the properties of alternative scaffold proteins (ASP) and methods for obtaining ASP binding molecules. ASP molecules incorporate conservative protein core and hypervariable regions, providing for the binding function. Structural classification of ASP includes several types which differ also in their molecular targets and potential applications. Construction of artificial binding proteins on the ASP basis implies a combinatorial library design with subsequent selection of specific binders with the use of phage display or the modem cell-free systems. Alternative binding proteins on non-immunoglobulin scaffolds find broad applications in different fields ofbiotechnology and molecular medicine.

  2. Arabidopsis group le formins localize to specific cell membrane domains, interact with actin-binding proteins and cause defects in cell expansion upon aberrant expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deeks, M.J.; Cvrcková, F.; Machesky, L.M.; Mikitová, V.; Ketelaar, T.; Zársky, V.; Davies, B.; Hussey, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    ¿ The closely related proteins AtFH4 and AtFH8 represent the group Ie clade of Arabidopsis formin homologues. The subcellular localization of these proteins and their ability to affect the actin cytoskeleton were examined. ¿ AtFH4 protein activity was identified using fluorimetric techniques. Intera

  3. Hypotonicity causes actin reorganization and recruitment of the actin-binding ERM protein moesin in membrane protrusions in collecting duct principal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamma, G.; Procino, G.; Svelto, M.; Valenti, G.

    2007-01-01

    Hypotonicity-induced cell swelling is characterized by a modification in cell architecture associated with actin cytoskeleton remodeling. The ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) family proteins are important signal transducers during actin reorganization regulated by the monomeric G proteins of the Rho famil

  4. Actin-binding protein regulation by microRNAs as a novel microbial strategy to modulate phagocytosis by host cells: the case of N-Wasp and miR-142-3p

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo eBettencourt

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is a successful intracellular pathogen that thrives in macrophages (Mφs. There is a need to better understand how Mtb hijacks cellular processes like phagolysosome biogenesis, a classical pathogenesis determinant. A central feature to this microbial strategy is the manipulation of actin in Mφs. Here, we examine the role of microRNAs (miRNAs as a potential mechanism in the regulation of actin-mediated events leading to phagocytosis in the context of mycobacteria infection. Given that non-virulent Mycobacterium smegmatis also controls actin filamentation to prolong its instracellular survival inside host cells, our approach was to perform a global transcriptomic approach to assess the modulation of miRNAs upon M. smegmatis infection of the murine Mφ cell line, J774A.1. This approach yielded miR-142-3p as a top candidate to be involved in the regulation of actin dynamics required in phagocytosis. We unequivocally demonstrate miR-142-3p targets N-Wasp, an actin-binding protein required during microbial challenge. A gain-of-function approach for miR-142-3p revealed a down-regulation of N-Wasp expression accompanied by a decrease of mycobacteria intake, while a loss-of-function approach yielded the reciprocal increase of the phagocytosis process. Equally important, we show Mtb induces the early expression of miR-142-3p and down-regulates N-Wasp protein levels in both the murine J774A.1 cell line and primary human Mφs. As proof of principle, the partial siRNA-mediated knock down of N-Wasp resulted in a decrease of Mtb intake by human Mφs, reflected in lower levels of colony-forming units counts over time. We therefore propose the modulation of miRNAs as a novel strategy in mycobacterial infection to control factors involved in actin filamentation and other early events of phagolysosome biogenesis, such as the case presented here for miR-142-3p influencing N-Wasp activity during the phagocytosis process.

  5. The Evolution of the Actin Binding NET Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eHawkins

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The arabidopsis Networked protein superfamily are plant-specific actin binding proteins which specifically label different membrane compartments and identify specialized sites of interaction between actin and membranes unique to plants. There are 13 members of the superfamily in arabidopsis which group into 4 distinct clades or subfamilies. NET homologues are absent from the genomes of metazoa and fungi, furthermore in Plantae NET sequences are also absent from the genome of mosses and more ancient extant plant clades. A single subfamily of the NET proteins are found encoded in the club moss genome; an extant species of the earliest vascular plants. Gymnosperms have examples from subfamilies 4 and 3 with a hybrid form of NET1 and 2 which shows characteristics of both NET1 and NET2. In addition to NET3 and 4 subfamilies, the NET1 and pollen-expressed NET2 subfamilies are only found as independent sequences in angiosperms. This is consistent with the divergence of reproductive actin. The four subfamilies are conserved across monocots and eudicots with the numbers of members of each clade expanding at this point due in part to regions of genome duplication. Since the emergence of the NET superfamily at the dawn of vascular plants they have continued to develop and diversify in a manner which has mirrored the divergence and complexity of plant species through evolution in the ‘March of Progress’.

  6. Scaffolds for blocking protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberger, Stefan J; Lee, Song-Gil; Chmielewski, Jean

    2007-01-01

    Due to the pivotal roles that protein-protein interactions play in a plethora of biological processes, the design of therapeutic agents targeting these interactions has become an attractive and important area of research. The development of such agents is faced with a variety of challenges. Nevertheless, considerable progress has been made in the design of proteomimetics capable of disrupting protein-protein interactions. Those inhibitors based on molecular scaffold designs hold considerable interest because of the ease of variation in regard to their displayed functionality. In particular, protein surface mimetics, alpha-helical mimetics, beta-sheet/beta-strand mimetics, as well as beta-turn mimetics have successfully modulated protein-protein interactions involved in such diseases as cancer and HIV. In this review, current progress in the development of molecular scaffolds designed for the disruption of protein-protein interactions will be discussed with an emphasis on those active against biological targets.

  7. Filament assembly by Spire: key residues and concerted actin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasson, Amy S; Bois, Justin S; Pham, Duy Stephen L; Yoo, Haneul; Quinlan, Margot E

    2015-02-27

    The most recently identified class of actin nucleators, WASp homology domain 2 (WH2) nucleators, use tandem repeats of monomeric actin-binding WH2 domains to facilitate actin nucleation. WH2 domains are involved in a wide variety of actin regulatory activities. Structurally, they are expected to clash with interprotomer contacts within the actin filament. Thus, the discovery of their role in nucleation was surprising. Here we use Drosophila Spire (Spir) as a model system to investigate both how tandem WH2 domains can nucleate actin and what differentiates nucleating WH2-containing proteins from their non-nucleating counterparts. We found that the third WH2 domain in Spir (Spir-C or SC) plays a unique role. In the context of a short nucleation construct (containing only two WH2 domains), placement of SC in the N-terminal position was required for the most potent nucleation. We found that the native organization of the WH2 domains with respect to each other is necessary for binding to actin with positive cooperativity. We identified two residues within SC that are critical for its activity. Using this information, we were able to convert a weak synthetic nucleator into one with activity equal to a native Spir construct. Lastly, we found evidence that SC binds actin filaments, in addition to monomers.

  8. Comparative genome analysis of cortactin and HSI : the significance of the F-actin binding repeat domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, AGSH; Schuuring-Scholtes, E; Seggelen, VV; Kluin, PM; Schuuring, E

    2005-01-01

    Background: In human carcinomas, overexpression of cortactin correlates with poor prognosis. Cortactin is an F-actin-binding protein involved in cytoskeletal rearrangements and cell migration by promoting actin-related protein (Arp)2/3 mediated actin polymerization. It shares a high amino acid seque

  9. Tailor-made ezrin actin binding domain to probe its interaction with actin in-vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Shrivastava

    Full Text Available Ezrin, a member of the ERM (Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin protein family, is an Actin-plasma membrane linker protein mediating cellular integrity and function. In-vivo study of such interactions is a complex task due to the presence of a large number of endogenous binding partners for both Ezrin and Actin. Further, C-terminal actin binding capacity of the full length Ezrin is naturally shielded by its N-terminal, and only rendered active in the presence of Phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2 or phosphorylation at the C-terminal threonine. Here, we demonstrate a strategy for the design, expression and purification of constructs, combining the Ezrin C-terminal actin binding domain, with functional elements such as fusion tags and fluorescence tags to facilitate purification and fluorescence microscopy based studies. For the first time, internal His tag was employed for purification of Ezrin actin binding domain based on in-silico modeling. The functionality (Ezrin-actin interaction of these constructs was successfully demonstrated by using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy. This design can be extended to other members of the ERM family as well.

  10. Systematic Prediction of Scaffold Proteins Reveals New Design Principles in Scaffold-Mediated Signal Transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfei Hu

    Full Text Available Scaffold proteins play a crucial role in facilitating signal transduction in eukaryotes by bringing together multiple signaling components. In this study, we performed a systematic analysis of scaffold proteins in signal transduction by integrating protein-protein interaction and kinase-substrate relationship networks. We predicted 212 scaffold proteins that are involved in 605 distinct signaling pathways. The computational prediction was validated using a protein microarray-based approach. The predicted scaffold proteins showed several interesting characteristics, as we expected from the functionality of scaffold proteins. We found that the scaffold proteins are likely to interact with each other, which is consistent with previous finding that scaffold proteins tend to form homodimers and heterodimers. Interestingly, a single scaffold protein can be involved in multiple signaling pathways by interacting with other scaffold protein partners. Furthermore, we propose two possible regulatory mechanisms by which the activity of scaffold proteins is coordinated with their associated pathways through phosphorylation process.

  11. The actin-binding protein Canoe/AF-6 forms a complex with Robo and is required for Slit-Robo signaling during axon pathfinding at the CNS midline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slováková, Jana; Speicher, Stephan; Sánchez-Soriano, Natalia; Prokop, Andreas; Carmena, Ana

    2012-07-18

    Axon guidance is a key process during nervous system development and regeneration. One of the best established paradigms to study the mechanisms underlying this process is the axon decision of whether or not to cross the midline in the Drosophila CNS. An essential regulator of that decision is the well conserved Slit-Robo signaling pathway. Slit guidance cues act through Robo receptors to repel axons from the midline. Despite good progress in our knowledge about these proteins, the intracellular mechanisms associated with Robo function remain poorly defined. In this work, we found that the scaffolding protein Canoe (Cno), the Drosophila orthologue of AF-6/Afadin, is essential for Slit-Robo signaling. Cno is expressed along longitudinal axonal pioneer tracts, and longitudinal Robo/Fasciclin2-positive axons aberrantly cross the midline in cno mutant embryos. cno mutant primary neurons show a significant reduction of Robo localized in growth cone filopodia and Cno forms a complex with Robo in vivo. Moreover, the commissureless (comm) phenotype (i.e., lack of commissures due to constitutive surface presentation of Robo in all neurons) is suppressed in comm, cno double-mutant embryos. Specific genetic interactions between cno, slit, robo, and genes encoding other components of the Robo pathway, such as Neurexin-IV, Syndecan, and Rac GTPases, further confirm that Cno functionally interacts with the Slit-Robo pathway. Our data argue that Cno is a novel regulator of the Slit-Robo signaling pathway, crucial for regulating the subcellular localization of Robo and for transducing its signaling to the actin cytoskeleton during axon guidance at the midline.

  12. Comparative genome analysis of cortactin and HS1: the significance of the F-actin binding repeat domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seggelen Vera

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In human carcinomas, overexpression of cortactin correlates with poor prognosis. Cortactin is an F-actin-binding protein involved in cytoskeletal rearrangements and cell migration by promoting actin-related protein (Arp2/3 mediated actin polymerization. It shares a high amino acid sequence and structural similarity to hematopoietic lineage cell-specific protein 1 (HS1 although their functions differ considerable. In this manuscript we describe the genomic organization of these two genes in a variety of species by a combination of cloning and database searches. Based on our analysis, we predict the genesis of the actin-binding repeat domain during evolution. Results Cortactin homologues exist in sponges, worms, shrimps, insects, urochordates, fishes, amphibians, birds and mammalians, whereas HS1 exists in vertebrates only, suggesting that both genes have been derived from an ancestor cortactin gene by duplication. In agreement with this, comparative genome analysis revealed very similar exon-intron structures and sequence homologies, especially over the regions that encode the characteristic highly conserved F-actin-binding repeat domain. Cortactin splice variants affecting this F-actin-binding domain were identified not only in mammalians, but also in amphibians, fishes and birds. In mammalians, cortactin is ubiquitously expressed except in hematopoietic cells, whereas HS1 is mainly expressed in hematopoietic cells. In accordance with their distinct tissue specificity, the putative promoter region of cortactin is different from HS1. Conclusions Comparative analysis of the genomic organization and amino acid sequences of cortactin and HS1 provides inside into their origin and evolution. Our analysis shows that both genes originated from a gene duplication event and subsequently HS1 lost two repeats, whereas cortactin gained one repeat. Our analysis genetically underscores the significance of the F-actin binding domain in

  13. Concentration profiles of actin-binding molecules in lamellipodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcke, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Motile cells form lamellipodia in the direction of motion, which are flat membrane protrusions containing an actin filament network. The network flows rearward relative to the leading edge of the lamellipodium due to actin polymerization at the front. Thus, actin binding molecules are subject to transport towards the rear of the cell in the bound state and diffuse freely in the unbound state. We analyze this reaction-diffusion-advection process with respect to the concentration profiles of these species and provide an analytic approximation for them. Network flow may cause a depletion zone of actin binding molecules close to the leading edge. The existence of such zone depends on the free molecule concentration in the cell body, on the ratio of the diffusion length to the distance bound molecules travel rearward with the flow before dissociating, and the ratio of the diffusion length to the width of the region with network flow and actin binding. Our calculations suggest the existence of depletion zones for the F-actin cross-linkers filamin and α-actinin in fish keratocytes (and other cell types), which is in line with the small elastic moduli of the F-actin network close to the leading edge found in measurements of the force motile cells are able to exert.

  14. A human β-III-spectrin spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 mutation causes high-affinity F-actin binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Adam W.; Crain, Jonathan; Thomas, David D.; Hays, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 (SCA5) is a human neurodegenerative disease that stems from mutations in the SPTBN2 gene encoding the protein β-III-spectrin. Here we investigated the molecular consequence of a SCA5 missense mutation that results in a L253P substitution in the actin-binding domain (ABD) of β-III-spectrin. We report that the L253P substitution in the isolated β-III-spectrin ABD causes strikingly high F-actin binding affinity (Kd = 75.5 nM) compared to the weak F-actin binding affinity of the wild-type ABD (Kd = 75.8 μM). The mutation also causes decreased thermal stability (Tm = 44.6 °C vs 59.5 °C). Structural analyses indicate that leucine 253 is in a loop at the interface of the tandem calponin homology (CH) domains comprising the ABD. Leucine 253 is predicted to form hydrophobic contacts that bridge the CH domains. The decreased stability of the mutant indicates that these bridging interactions are probably disrupted, suggesting that the high F-actin binding affinity of the mutant is due to opening of the CH domain interface. These results support a fundamental role for leucine 253 in regulating opening of the CH domain interface and binding of the ABD to F-actin. This study indicates that high-affinity actin binding of L253P β-III-spectrin is a likely driver of neurodegeneration. PMID:26883385

  15. Human RNASET2 derivatives as potential anti-angiogenic agents: actin binding sequence identification and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesiel-Nuttman, Liron; Doron, Shani; Schwartz, Betty; Shoseyov, Oded

    2015-01-01

    Human RNASET2 (hRNASET2) has been demonstrated to exert antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic effects independent of its ribonuclease capacity. We suggested that RNASET2 exerts its antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic activities via binding to actin and consequently inhibits cell motility. We focused herein on the identification of the actin binding site of hRNASET2 using defined sequences encountered within the whole hRNASET2 protein. For that purpose we designed 29 different hRNASET2-derived peptides. The 29 peptides were examined for their ability to bind immobilized actin. Two selected peptides-A103-Q159 consisting of 57 amino acids and peptide K108-K133 consisting of 26 amino acids were demonstrated to have the highest actin binding ability and concomitantly the most potent anti-angiogenic activity. Further analyses on the putative mechanisms associated with angiogenesis inhibition exerted by peptide K108-K133 involved its location during treatment within the HUVE cells. Peptide K108-K133 readily penetrates the cell membrane within 10 min of incubation. In addition, supplementation with angiogenin delays the entrance of peptide K108-K133 to the cell suggesting competition on the same cell internalization route. The peptide was demonstrated to co-localize with angiogenin, suggesting that both molecules bind analogous cellular epitopes, similar to our previously reported data for ACTIBIND and trT2-50. PMID:25815360

  16. Protein Scaffolding for Small Molecule Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, David [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-09-14

    We aim to design hybrid catalysts for energy production and storage that combine the high specificity, affinity, and tunability of proteins with the potent chemical reactivities of small organometallic molecules. The widely used Rosetta and RosettaDesign methodologies will be extended to model novel protein / small molecule catalysts in which one or many small molecule active centers are supported and coordinated by protein scaffolding. The promise of such hybrid molecular systems will be demonstrated with the nickel-phosphine hydrogenase of DuBois et. al.We will enhance the hydrogenase activity of the catalyst by designing protein scaffolds that incorporate proton relays and systematically modulate the local environment of the catalyticcenter. In collaboration with DuBois and Shaw, the designs will be experimentally synthesized and characterized.

  17. Identification of sucrose synthase as an actin-binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, H.; Huber, J. L.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that sucrose synthase (SuSy) binds both G- and F-actin: (i) presence of SuSy in the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction of microsomal membranes (i.e. crude cytoskeleton fraction); (ii) co-immunoprecipitation of actin with anti-SuSy monoclonal antibodies; (iii) association of SuSy with in situ phalloidin-stabilized F-actin filaments; and (iv) direct binding to F-actin, polymerized in vitro. Aldolase, well known to interact with F-actin, interfered with binding of SuSy, suggesting that a common or overlapping binding site may be involved. We postulate that some of the soluble SuSy in the cytosol may be associated with the actin cytoskeleton in vivo.

  18. Interactome of invadopodia scaffold protein TKS5

    OpenAIRE

    Kropyvko S. V.

    2015-01-01

    TKS5 is a scaffold protein that takes part in invadopodia functioning and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. TKS5 is a critical component of invadopodia as its absence results in the loss of cancer cells ability to form these invasive structures. TKS5 is phosphorylated by SRC kinase and consequently interacts with the membrane phosphatidylinositol phosphates launching the invadopodia formation process. At later stages TKS5 regulates the actin cytoskeleton reorganization and extracellul...

  19. Membrane-mediated interaction between strongly anisotropic protein scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonatan Schweitzer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Specialized proteins serve as scaffolds sculpting strongly curved membranes of intracellular organelles. Effective membrane shaping requires segregation of these proteins into domains and is, therefore, critically dependent on the protein-protein interaction. Interactions mediated by membrane elastic deformations have been extensively analyzed within approximations of large inter-protein distances, small extents of the protein-mediated membrane bending and small deviations of the protein shapes from isotropic spherical segments. At the same time, important classes of the realistic membrane-shaping proteins have strongly elongated shapes with large and highly anisotropic curvature. Here we investigated, computationally, the membrane mediated interaction between proteins or protein oligomers representing membrane scaffolds with strongly anisotropic curvature, and addressed, quantitatively, a specific case of the scaffold geometrical parameters characterizing BAR domains, which are crucial for membrane shaping in endocytosis. In addition to the previously analyzed contributions to the interaction, we considered a repulsive force stemming from the entropy of the scaffold orientation. We computed this interaction to be of the same order of magnitude as the well-known attractive force related to the entropy of membrane undulations. We demonstrated the scaffold shape anisotropy to cause a mutual aligning of the scaffolds and to generate a strong attractive interaction bringing the scaffolds close to each other to equilibrium distances much smaller than the scaffold size. We computed the energy of interaction between scaffolds of a realistic geometry to constitute tens of kBT, which guarantees a robust segregation of the scaffolds into domains.

  20. The conserved Tarp actin binding domain is important for chlamydial invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis J Jewett

    Full Text Available The translocated actin recruiting phosphoprotein (Tarp is conserved among all pathogenic chlamydial species. Previous reports identified single C. trachomatis Tarp actin binding and proline rich domains required for Tarp mediated actin nucleation. A peptide antiserum specific for the Tarp actin binding domain was generated and inhibited actin polymerization in vitro and C. trachomatis entry in vivo, indicating an essential role for Tarp in chlamydial pathogenesis. Sequence analysis of Tarp orthologs from additional chlamydial species and C. trachomatis serovars indicated multiple putative actin binding sites. In order to determine whether the identified actin binding domains are functionally conserved, GST-Tarp fusions from multiple chlamydial species were examined for their ability to bind and nucleate actin. Chlamydial Tarps harbored variable numbers of actin binding sites and promoted actin nucleation as determined by in vitro polymerization assays. Our findings indicate that Tarp mediated actin binding and nucleation is a conserved feature among diverse chlamydial species and this function plays a critical role in bacterial invasion of host cells.

  1. 吗啡依赖大鼠不同脑区肌动蛋白及其结合蛋白的表达变化%Changes in the expression of actin and actin-binding protein in the brain of morphine dependent rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫彩珍; 于亮; 刘川; 郝晓玲; 王天魁

    2011-01-01

    Aim To investigate the expression of actin and actin-binding protein p-cofilin in several brain regions of morphine dependent rats. Methods Fourtytwo male SD rats were randomly divided into morphine dependent I week group ( group M1 ), morphine dependent 2 weeks group ( group M2 ) and morphine dependent 4 weeks group ( group M4 ) with 7 animals in each group. Every morphine dependent group had corresponding control group. In morphine dependent group the animals were given intraperitoneally increasing doses of morphine starting from 5, 10, 15, 20.3 0 , 40 , 5 0 mg · kg-1 three times a day for7 days .Rats in control group received the equal volume of saline. In group M2 and group M4 the animals received continuously 50 mg · kg-1 morphine injection once a day for 1 or 3 weeks respectively. Rats were sacrificed by decapitation 5 hours after the last injection. The brain regions including prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum and thalamus were separated and frozen until assay. The expression of actin and actin-binding protein p-cofilin in several brain regions of rats were determined by Western blot. Results Compared with the control group, the ratio of F-actin to C-actin in prefrontal cortex of group M2 and group M4 was upregulated by 53% ( P <0. 05 ) and 102% ( P <0. 01 )respectively. The expression of p-cofilin in prefrontal cortex of group M2 and group M4 was up-regulated by 93% ( P < 0. 01 ) and 88% ( P < 0. 01 ) respectively.The ratio of F-actin to G-actin in hippocampus of group M4 was up-regulated by 94% ( P < 0. 01 ). The expression of p-cofilin in hippocampus of group M2 and group M4 was up-regulated by 45% ( P < 0. 05 ) and 30% ( P < 0. 05 )respectively. The expression of p-cofilin in striatum of group M2 and group M4 was downregulated by 25%( P < 0. 05 )and 30%( P <0. 05 )respectively. Conclusion Chronic morphine treatment can induce the development of morphine dependence,which accompanies with actin rearrangments in

  2. Interactome of invadopodia scaffold protein TKS5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kropyvko S. V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available TKS5 is a scaffold protein that takes part in invadopodia functioning and reactive oxygen species (ROS production. TKS5 is a critical component of invadopodia as its absence results in the loss of cancer cells ability to form these invasive structures. TKS5 is phosphorylated by SRC kinase and consequently interacts with the membrane phosphatidylinositol phosphates launching the invadopodia formation process. At later stages TKS5 regulates the actin cytoskeleton reorganization and extracellular matrix degradation. TKS5 also regulates the production of ROS, which are the important signal regulators of different cellular functions.

  3. New partners of TKS4 scaffold protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kropyvko S. V.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available TKS4 scaffold protein is involved in the formation of invadopodia, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS by tumor cells and other cellular processes. Aim. To identify new TKS4 partners involved in the actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and endo-/exocytosis. Methods. The GST pull-down assay was used to identify the interaction. Results. We revealed that TKS4 SH3 domains interact with the actin cytoskeleton reorganization proteins N-WASP and CR16, as well as with DNM2, SYNJ1 and OPHN1 which are involved in endo-/exocytosis. We also tested the WIP, WIRE, SHIP2, RhoU, RhoV and NUMB proteins, but their interaction with the SH3 domains of TKS4 was not found. Conclusions. The SH3 domains of TKS4 interact with N-WASP, DNM2, SYNJ1, OPHN1 and weakly with CR16 in vitro.

  4. Soy Protein Scaffold Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Karen B.

    Developing functional biomaterials using highly processable materials with tailorable physical and bioactive properties is an ongoing challenge in tissue engineering. Soy protein is an abundant, natural resource with potential use for regenerative medicine applications. Preliminary studies show that soy protein can be physically modified and fabricated into various biocompatible constructs. However, optimized soy protein structures for tissue regeneration (i.e. 3D porous scaffolds) have not yet been designed. Furthermore, little work has established the in vivo biocompatibility of implanted soy protein and the benefit of using soy over other proteins including FDA-approved bovine collagen. In this work, freeze-drying and 3D printing fabrication processes were developed using commercially available soy protein to create porous scaffolds that improve cell growth and infiltration compared to other soy biomaterials previously reported. Characterization of scaffold structure, porosity, and mechanical/degradation properties was performed. In addition, the behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells seeded on various designed soy scaffolds was analyzed. Biological characterization of the cell-seeded scaffolds was performed to assess feasibility for use in liver tissue regeneration. The acute and humoral response of soy scaffolds implanted in an in vivo mouse subcutaneous model was also investigated. All fabricated soy scaffolds were modified using thermal, chemical, and enzymatic crosslinking to change properties and cell growth behavior. 3D printing allowed for control of scaffold pore size and geometry. Scaffold structure, porosity, and degradation rate significantly altered the in vivo response. Freeze-dried soy scaffolds had similar biocompatibility as freeze-dried collagen scaffolds of the same protein content. However, the soy scaffolds degraded at a much faster rate, minimizing immunogenicity. Interestingly, subcutaneously implanted soy scaffolds affected blood

  5. Dual release of proteins from porous polymeric scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sohier, J.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; Cabrol, N.; Blitterswijk, van C.; Groot, de K.; Bezemer, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    To create porous scaffolds releasing in a controlled and independent fashion two different proteins, a novel approach based on protein-loaded polymeric coatings was evaluated. In this process, two water-in-oil emulsions are forced successively through a prefabricated scaffold to create coatings, con

  6. Engineering protein scaffolds for protein separation, biocatalysis and nanotechnology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang

    Globally, there is growing appreciation for developing a sustainable economy that uses eco-efficient bio-processes. Biotechnology provides an increasing range of tools for industry to help reduce cost and improve environmental performance. Inspired by the naturally evolved machineries of protein scaffolds and their binding ligands, synthetic protein scaffolds were engineered based on cohesin-dockerin interactions and metal chelating peptides to tackle the challenges and make improvements in three specific areas: (1) protein purification, (2) biofuel cells, and (3) nanomaterial synthesis. The first objective was to develop efficient and cost-effective non-chromatographic purification processes to purify recombinant proteins in an effort to meet the dramatically growing market of protein drugs. In our design, the target protein was genetically fused with a dockerin domain from Clostridium thermocellum and direct purification and recovery was achieved using thermo-responsive elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) scaffold containing the cohesin domain from the same species. By exploiting the highly specific interaction between the dockerin and cohesin domain and the reversible aggregation property of ELP, highly purified and active dockerin-tagged proteins, such as endoglucanase CelA, chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) and enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), were recovered directly from crude cell extracts in a single purification step with yields achieving over 90%. Incorporation of a self-cleaving intein domain enabled rapid removal of the affinity tag from the target proteins by another cycle of thermal precipitation. The purification cost can be further reduced by regenerating and recycling the ELP-cohesin capturing scaffolds. However, due to the high binding affinity between cohesin and dockerin domains, the bound dockerin-intein tag cannot be completely disassociated from ELP-cohesin scaffold after binding. Therefore, a truncated dockerin with the calcium

  7. Novel blood protein based scaffolds for cardiovascular tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuhn Antonia I.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in cardiovascular tissue engineering is the fabrication of scaffolds, which provide appropriate morphological and mechanical properties while avoiding undesirable immune reactions. In this study electrospinning was used to fabricate scaffolds out of blood proteins for cardiovascular tissue engineering. Lyophilised porcine plasma was dissolved in deionised water at a final concentration of 7.5% m/v and blended with 3.7% m/v PEO. Electrospinning resulted in homogeneous fibre morphologies with a mean fibre diameter of 151 nm, which could be adapted to create macroscopic shapes (mats, tubes. Cross-linking with glutaraldehyde vapour improved the long-term stability of protein based scaffolds in comparison to untreated scaffolds, resulting in a mass loss of 41% and 96% after 28 days of incubation in aqueous solution, respectively.

  8. Elliptical structure of phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs encapsulated by scaffold proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skar-Gislinge, Nicholas; Simonsen, Jens Bæk; Mortensen, Kell

    2010-01-01

    -angle neutron scattering in combination with variable-temperature studies of synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering on nanodiscs in solution, we show that the fundamental nanodisc unit, consisting of a lipid bilayer surrounded by amphiphilic scaffold proteins, possesses intrinsically an elliptical shape....... The temperature dependence of the curvature of the nanodiscs prepared with two different phospholipid types (DLPC and POPC) shows that it is the scaffold protein that determines the overall elliptical shape and that the nanodiscs become more circular with increasing temperature. Our data also show...... that the hydrophobic bilayer thickness is, to a large extent, dictated by the scaffolding protein and adjusted to minimize the hydrophobic mismatch between protein and phospholipid. Our conclusions result from a new comprehensive and molecular-based model of the nanodisc structure and the use of this to analyze...

  9. Scaffolding proteins in membrane trafficking : the role of ELKS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, K.L.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular membrane trafficking is an essential cellular process that involves cooperation of many factors such as scaffolding proteins, GTPases and SNAREs. These proteins work together to ensure proper delivery of different membrane-enclosed cargoes to specific cellular destinations. In this the

  10. Mitochondrial Band-7 family proteins: scaffolds for respiratory chain assembly?

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The band-7 protein family comprises a diverse set of membrane-bound proteins characterized by the presence of a conserved domain. The exact function of this band-7 domain remains elusive, but examples from animal and bacterial stomatin-type proteins demonstrate binding to lipids and the ability to assemble into membrane-bound oligomers that form putative scaffolds. Some members, such as prohibitins (PHB) and human stomatin-like protein 2 (HsSLP2), localize to the mitochondrial inner membrane ...

  11. Using Protein Dimers to Maximize the Protein Hybridization Efficiency with Multisite DNA Origami Scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikash Verma

    Full Text Available DNA origami provides a versatile platform for conducting 'architecture-function' analysis to determine how the nanoscale organization of multiple copies of a protein component within a multi-protein machine affects its overall function. Such analysis requires that the copy number of protein molecules bound to the origami scaffold exactly matches the desired number, and that it is uniform over an entire scaffold population. This requirement is challenging to satisfy for origami scaffolds with many protein hybridization sites, because it requires the successful completion of multiple, independent hybridization reactions. Here, we show that a cleavable dimerization domain on the hybridizing protein can be used to multiplex hybridization reactions on an origami scaffold. This strategy yields nearly 100% hybridization efficiency on a 6-site scaffold even when using low protein concentration and short incubation time. It can also be developed further to enable reliable patterning of a large number of molecules on DNA origami for architecture-function analysis.

  12. Using Protein Dimers to Maximize the Protein Hybridization Efficiency with Multisite DNA Origami Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vikash; Mallik, Leena; Hariadi, Rizal F.; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Skiniotis, Georgios; Joglekar, Ajit P.

    2015-01-01

    DNA origami provides a versatile platform for conducting ‘architecture-function’ analysis to determine how the nanoscale organization of multiple copies of a protein component within a multi-protein machine affects its overall function. Such analysis requires that the copy number of protein molecules bound to the origami scaffold exactly matches the desired number, and that it is uniform over an entire scaffold population. This requirement is challenging to satisfy for origami scaffolds with many protein hybridization sites, because it requires the successful completion of multiple, independent hybridization reactions. Here, we show that a cleavable dimerization domain on the hybridizing protein can be used to multiplex hybridization reactions on an origami scaffold. This strategy yields nearly 100% hybridization efficiency on a 6-site scaffold even when using low protein concentration and short incubation time. It can also be developed further to enable reliable patterning of a large number of molecules on DNA origami for architecture-function analysis. PMID:26348722

  13. Using Protein Dimers to Maximize the Protein Hybridization Efficiency with Multisite DNA Origami Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vikash; Mallik, Leena; Hariadi, Rizal F; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Skiniotis, Georgios; Joglekar, Ajit P

    2015-01-01

    DNA origami provides a versatile platform for conducting 'architecture-function' analysis to determine how the nanoscale organization of multiple copies of a protein component within a multi-protein machine affects its overall function. Such analysis requires that the copy number of protein molecules bound to the origami scaffold exactly matches the desired number, and that it is uniform over an entire scaffold population. This requirement is challenging to satisfy for origami scaffolds with many protein hybridization sites, because it requires the successful completion of multiple, independent hybridization reactions. Here, we show that a cleavable dimerization domain on the hybridizing protein can be used to multiplex hybridization reactions on an origami scaffold. This strategy yields nearly 100% hybridization efficiency on a 6-site scaffold even when using low protein concentration and short incubation time. It can also be developed further to enable reliable patterning of a large number of molecules on DNA origami for architecture-function analysis.

  14. Targeted translational regulation using the PUF protein family scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Amy; Prigge, Andrew; Opperman, Laura; Wickens, Marvin

    2011-09-20

    Regulatory complexes formed on mRNAs control translation, stability, and localization. These complexes possess two activities: one that binds RNA and another--the effector--that elicits a biological function. The Pumilio and FBF (PUF) protein family of RNA binding proteins provides a versatile scaffold to design and select proteins with new specificities. Here, the PUF scaffold is used to target translational activation and repression of specific mRNAs, and to induce specific poly(A) addition and removal. To do so, we linked PUF scaffold proteins to a translational activator, GLD2, or a translational repressor, CAF1. The chimeric proteins activate or repress the targeted mRNAs in Xenopus oocytes, and elicit poly(A) addition or removal. The magnitude of translational control relates directly to the affinity of the RNA-protein complex over a 100-fold range of K(d). The chimeric proteins act on both reporter and endogenous mRNAs: an mRNA that normally is deadenylated during oocyte maturation instead receives poly(A) in the presence of an appropriate chimera. The PUF-effector strategy enables the design of proteins that affect translation and stability of specific mRNAs in vivo.

  15. Gold nanoparticle capture within protein crystal scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Ann E.; Huber, Thaddaus R.; Ni, Thomas W.; Hartje, Luke F.; Appel, Karina L.; Yost, Jarad W.; Ackerson, Christopher J.; Snow, Christopher D.

    2016-06-01

    DNA assemblies have been used to organize inorganic nanoparticles into 3D arrays, with emergent properties arising as a result of nanoparticle spacing and geometry. We report here the use of engineered protein crystals as an alternative approach to biologically mediated assembly of inorganic nanoparticles. The protein crystal's 13 nm diameter pores result in an 80% solvent content and display hexahistidine sequences on their interior. The hexahistidine sequence captures Au25(glutathione)~17 (nitrilotriacetic acid)~1 nanoclusters throughout a chemically crosslinked crystal via the coordination of Ni(ii) to both the cluster and the protein. Nanoparticle loading was validated by confocal microscopy and elemental analysis. The nanoparticles may be released from the crystal by exposure to EDTA, which chelates the Ni(ii) and breaks the specific protein/nanoparticle interaction. The integrity of the protein crystals after crosslinking and nanoparticle capture was confirmed by single crystal X-ray crystallography.DNA assemblies have been used to organize inorganic nanoparticles into 3D arrays, with emergent properties arising as a result of nanoparticle spacing and geometry. We report here the use of engineered protein crystals as an alternative approach to biologically mediated assembly of inorganic nanoparticles. The protein crystal's 13 nm diameter pores result in an 80% solvent content and display hexahistidine sequences on their interior. The hexahistidine sequence captures Au25(glutathione)~17 (nitrilotriacetic acid)~1 nanoclusters throughout a chemically crosslinked crystal via the coordination of Ni(ii) to both the cluster and the protein. Nanoparticle loading was validated by confocal microscopy and elemental analysis. The nanoparticles may be released from the crystal by exposure to EDTA, which chelates the Ni(ii) and breaks the specific protein/nanoparticle interaction. The integrity of the protein crystals after crosslinking and nanoparticle capture was

  16. Artificial leucine rich repeats as new scaffolds for protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baabur-Cohen, Hemda; Dayalan, Subashini; Shumacher, Inbal; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2011-04-15

    The leucine rich repeat (LRR) motif that participates in many biomolecular recognition events in cells was suggested as a general scaffold for producing artificial receptors. We describe here the design and first total chemical synthesis of small LRR proteins, and their structural analysis. When evaluating the tertiary structure as a function of different number of repeating units (1-3), we were able to find that the 3-repeats sequence, containing 90 amino acids, folds into the expected structure.

  17. Effect of oxidative stress on homer scaffolding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Nepliouev

    Full Text Available Homer proteins are a family of multifaceted scaffolding proteins that participate in the organization of signaling complexes at the post-synaptic density and in a variety of tissues including striated muscle. Homer isoforms form multimers via their C-terminal coiled coil domains, which allows for the formation of a polymeric network in combination with other scaffolding proteins. We hypothesized that the ability of Homer isoforms to serve as scaffolds would be influenced by oxidative stress. We have found by standard SDS-PAGE of lysates from adult mouse skeletal muscle exposed to air oxidation that Homer migrates as both a dimer and monomer in the absence of reducing agents and solely as a monomer in the presence of a reducing agent, suggesting that Homer dimers exposed to oxidation could be modified by the presence of an inter-molecular disulfide bond. Analysis of the peptide sequence of Homer 1b revealed the presence of only two cysteine residues located adjacent to the C-terminal coiled-coil domain. HEK 293 cells were transfected with wild-type and cysteine mutant forms of Homer 1b and exposed to oxidative stress by addition of menadione, which resulted in the formation of disulfide bonds except in the double mutant (C246G, C365G. Exposure of myofibers from adult mice to oxidative stress resulted in decreased solubility of endogenous Homer isoforms. This change in solubility was dependent on disulfide bond formation. In vitro binding assays revealed that cross-linking of Homer dimers enhanced the ability of Homer 1b to bind Drebrin, a known interacting partner. Our results show that oxidative stress results in disulfide cross-linking of Homer isoforms and loss of solubility of Homer scaffolds. This suggests that disulfide cross-linking of a Homer polymeric network may contribute to the pathophysiology seen in neurodegenerative diseases and myopathies characterized by oxidative stress.

  18. A Pareto-optimal refinement method for protein design scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivón, Lucas Gregorio; Moretti, Rocco; Baker, David

    2013-01-01

    Computational design of protein function involves a search for amino acids with the lowest energy subject to a set of constraints specifying function. In many cases a set of natural protein backbone structures, or "scaffolds", are searched to find regions where functional sites (an enzyme active site, ligand binding pocket, protein-protein interaction region, etc.) can be placed, and the identities of the surrounding amino acids are optimized to satisfy functional constraints. Input native protein structures almost invariably have regions that score very poorly with the design force field, and any design based on these unmodified structures may result in mutations away from the native sequence solely as a result of the energetic strain. Because the input structure is already a stable protein, it is desirable to keep the total number of mutations to a minimum and to avoid mutations resulting from poorly-scoring input structures. Here we describe a protocol using cycles of minimization with combined backbone/sidechain restraints that is Pareto-optimal with respect to RMSD to the native structure and energetic strain reduction. The protocol should be broadly useful in the preparation of scaffold libraries for functional site design.

  19. Identification of Protein Palmitoylation Inhibitors from a Scaffold Ranking Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Laura D.; Lenhart, Brian J.; Mitchell, David A.; Santos, Radleigh G.; Giulianotti, Marc A.; Deschenes, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The addition of palmitoyl moieties to proteins regulates their membrane targeting, subcellular localization, and stability. Dysregulation of the enzymes which catalyzed the palmitoyl addition and/or the substrates of these enzymes have been linked to cancer, cardiovascular, and neurological disorders, implying these enzymes and substrates are valid targets for pharmaceutical intervention. However, current chemical modulators of zDHHC PAT enzymes lack specificity and affinity, underscoring the need for screening campaigns to identify new specific, high affinity modulators. This report describes a mixture based screening approach to identify inhibitors of Erf2 activity. Erf2 is the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PAT responsible for catalyzing the palmitoylation of Ras2, an ortholog of the human Ras oncogene proteins. A chemical library developed by the Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies consists of more than 30 million compounds designed around 68 molecular scaffolds that are systematically arranged into positional scanning and scaffold ranking formats. We have used this approach to identify and characterize several scaffold backbones and R-groups that reduce or eliminate the activity of Erf2 in vitro. Here, we present the analysis of one of the scaffold backbones, bis-cyclic piperazine. We identified compounds that inhibited Erf2 auto-palmitoylation activity using a fluorescence-based, coupled assay in a high throughput screening (HTS) format and validated the hits utilizing an orthogonal gel-based assay. Finally, we examined the effects of the compounds on cell growth in a yeast cell-based assay. Based on our results, we have identified specific, high affinity palmitoyl transferase inhibitors that will serve as a foundation for future compound design. PMID:27009891

  20. αT-Catenin Is a Constitutive Actin-binding α-Catenin That Directly Couples the Cadherin·Catenin Complex to Actin Filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickline, Emily D; Dale, Ian W; Merkel, Chelsea D; Heier, Jonathon A; Stolz, Donna B; Kwiatkowski, Adam V

    2016-07-22

    α-Catenin is the primary link between the cadherin·catenin complex and the actin cytoskeleton. Mammalian αE-catenin is allosterically regulated: the monomer binds the β-catenin·cadherin complex, whereas the homodimer does not bind β-catenin but interacts with F-actin. As part of the cadherin·catenin complex, αE-catenin requires force to bind F-actin strongly. It is not known whether these properties are conserved across the mammalian α-catenin family. Here we show that αT (testes)-catenin, a protein unique to amniotes that is expressed predominantly in the heart, is a constitutive actin-binding α-catenin. We demonstrate that αT-catenin is primarily a monomer in solution and that αT-catenin monomer binds F-actin in cosedimentation assays as strongly as αE-catenin homodimer. The β-catenin·αT-catenin heterocomplex also binds F-actin with high affinity unlike the β-catenin·αE-catenin complex, indicating that αT-catenin can directly link the cadherin·catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton. Finally, we show that a mutation in αT-catenin linked to arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, V94D, promotes homodimerization, blocks β-catenin binding, and in cardiomyocytes disrupts localization at cell-cell contacts. Together, our data demonstrate that αT-catenin is a constitutively active actin-binding protein that can physically couple the cadherin·catenin complex to F-actin in the absence of tension. We speculate that these properties are optimized to meet the demands of cardiomyocyte adhesion.

  1. Protein: MPB4 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ABP-280 homolog, Actin-binding-like protein, Beta-filamin, Filamin homolog 1, Filamin-3, Thyroid autoantige...n, Truncated actin-binding protein 9606 Homo sapiens O75369 2317 2EED, 3FER, 2DIA, 2DLG, 2EE6, 2WA5, 2EE9, 2

  2. Novel polymeric scaffolds using protein microbubbles as porogen and growth factor carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Ashwin; Thevenot, Paul; Dey, Jagannath; Shen, Jinhui; Sun, Man-Wu; Yang, Jian; Tang, Liping

    2010-02-01

    Polymeric tissue engineering scaffolds prepared by conventional techniques like salt leaching and phase separation are greatly limited by their poor biomolecule-delivery abilities. Conventional methods of incorporation of various growth factors, proteins, and/or peptides on or in scaffold materials via different crosslinking and conjugation techniques are often tedious and may affect scaffold's physical, chemical, and mechanical properties. To overcome such deficiencies, a novel two-step porous scaffold fabrication procedure has been created in which bovine serum albumin microbubbles (henceforth MB) were used as porogen and growth factor carriers. Polymer solution mixed with MB was phase separated and then lyophilized to create porous scaffold. MB scaffold triggered substantially lesser inflammatory responses than salt-leached and conventional phase-separated scaffolds in vivo. Most importantly, the same technique was used to produce insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)-eluting porous scaffolds, simply by incorporating IGF-1-loaded MB (MB-IGF-1) with polymer solution before phase separation. In vitro such MB-IGF-1 scaffolds were able to promote cell growth to a much greater extent than scaffold soaked in IGF-1, confirming the bioactivity of the released IGF-1. Further, such MB-IGF-1 scaffolds elicited IGF-1-specific collagen production in the surrounding tissue in vivo. This novel growth factor-eluting scaffold fabrication procedure can be used to deliver a range of single or combination of bioactive biomolecules to substantially promote cell growth and function in degradable scaffold.

  3. Intersectin (ITSN) Family of Scaffolds Function as Molecular Hubs in Protein Interaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Members of the intersectin (ITSN) family of scaffold proteins consist of multiple modular domains, each with distinct ligand preferences. Although ITSNs were initially implicated in the regulation of endocytosis, subsequent studies have revealed a more complex role for these scaffold proteins in regulation of additional biochemical pathways. In this study, we performed a high throughput yeast two-hybrid screen to identify additional pathways regulated by these scaffolds. Although several know...

  4. Mammalian verprolin CR16 acts as a modulator of ITSN scaffold proteins association with actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropyvko, Sergii; Gryaznova, Tetyana; Morderer, Dmytro; Rynditch, Alla

    2017-03-18

    Actin cytoskeleton rearrangements are required for normal cell functioning, and their deregulation leads to various pathologies. Members of two mammalian protein families - ITSNs (ITSN1 and ITSN2) and verprolins (WIP, CR16 and WIRE) are involved in Cdc42/N-WASP/Arp2/3 signaling pathway-mediated remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Recently we demonstrated that ITSNs interact with the actin-regulating protein WIP. Here, we show that other member of verprolin family, CR16, also forms complexes with ITSN1 and ITSN2 in human cell lines. The actin-binding protein CR16 modulates ITSN/β-actin association. Moreover, overexpressed CR16 promoted co-localization of ITSN1 with F-actin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Our data demonstrated that CR16 mRNA is expressed in glioblastoma and breast tumors. These findings provide the basis for further functional investigations of the ITSN/CR16 complex that may play an important role in actin remodeling and cellular invasion.

  5. Early events of fertilization in sea urchin eggs are sensitive to actin-binding organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Jong T; Limatola, Nunzia; Vasilev, Filip; Santella, Luigia

    2014-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that many aspects of the intracellular Ca(2+) increase in fertilized eggs of starfish are significantly influenced by the state of the actin cytoskeleton. In addition, the actin cytoskeleton appeared to play comprehensive roles in modulating cortical granules exocytosis and sperm entry during the early phase of fertilization. In the present communication, we have extended our work to sea urchin which is believed to have bifurcated from the common ancestor in the phylogenetic tree some 500 million years ago. To corroborate our earlier findings in starfish, we have tested how the early events of fertilization in sea urchin eggs are influenced by four different actin-binding drugs that promote either depolymerization or stabilization of actin filaments. We found that all the actin drugs commonly blocked sperm entry in high doses and significantly reduced the speed of the Ca(2+) wave. At low doses, however, cytochalasin B and phalloidin increased the rate of polyspermy. Overall, certain aspects of Ca(2+) signaling in these eggs were in line with the morphological changes induced by the actin drugs. That is, the time interval between the cortical flash and the first Ca(2+) spot at the sperm interaction site (the latent period) was significantly prolonged in the eggs pretreated with cytochalasin B or latrunculin A, whereas the Ca(2+) decay kinetics after the peak was specifically attenuated in the eggs pretreated with jasplakinolide or phalloidin. In addition, the sperm interacting with the eggs pretreated with actin drugs often generated multiple Ca(2+) waves, but tended to fail to enter the egg. Thus, our results indicated that generation of massive Ca(2+) waves is neither indicative of sperm entry nor sufficient for cortical granules exocytosis in the inseminated sea urchin eggs, whereas the structure and functionality of the actin cytoskeleton are the major determining factors in the two processes.

  6. Fibrous scaffolds loaded with protein prepared by blend or coaxial electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wei; Yang, Fang; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Bian, Zhuan; Fan, Mingwen; Chen, Zhi; Jansen, John A

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to fabricate polycaprolactone-based nanofibrous scaffolds with incorporated protein via either the blend or coaxial electrospinning technique. Both techniques were compared with respect to processing set-up and scaffold characteristics as well as the release kinetics and biological activity of the loaded protein. Bovine serum albumin was used as a model protein to determine release profiles, while alkaline phosphatase was used to determine protein activity after the electrospinning process. Coaxial electrospinning resulted in a uniform fiber morphology with a core-shell structure, and a homogeneous protein distribution throughout the core of the fibers. In contrast, blend electrospinning formed bead-like fibers with a heterogeneous protein distribution in the fibers. The coaxial scaffold exhibited more sustained release profiles than the comparative blend scaffold, and the additive poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) in the coaxial scaffold accelerated protein release. Both electrospinning processes decreased the biological activity of the incorporated protein, but coaxial electrospinning with PEG as an additive showed up to 75% preservation of the initial biological activity. Thus, coaxial electrospinning was demonstrated to be superior to blend electrospinning for the preparation of nanofibrous scaffolds with a uniform fibrous structure and protein distribution and sustained protein release kinetics as well as high preservation of the protein activity.

  7. Fibrous scaffolds loaded with protein prepared by blend or coaxial electrospinning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, W.; Yang, F.; Beucken, J.J.J.P. van den; Bian, Z.; Fan, M.; Chen, Z.; Jansen, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to fabricate polycaprolactone-based nanofibrous scaffolds with incorporated protein via either the blend or coaxial electrospinning technique. Both techniques were compared with respect to processing set-up and scaffold characteristics as well as the release kinetics

  8. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of an SH3 domain from the IB1 scaffold protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dar, Imran; Bonny, Christophe; Pedersen, Jan Torleif

    2003-01-01

    IB1 is a mammalian scaffold protein that interacts with components of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signal-transduction pathway mainly via its protein-protein interaction domains. Crystallization of the key Src homology 3 (SH3) domain of IB1 has been achieved. Crystallization experiments....... These are the first crystallographic data on a scaffold molecule such as IB1 to be reported....

  9. The Lnx family proteins function as molecular scaffolds for Numb family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, D S; Northcutt, G M; Kurschner, C

    2001-11-01

    Drosophila Numb functions as a cell fate determinant during neurogenesis. We isolated a novel mammalian protein, Lnx2, which interacts with mammalian Numb and Numblike. Lnx2 and the related Lnx1 are multimodular proteins that bind to Numb via their NPXY motifs. In addition, Lnx proteins form oligomers either via their PDZ domains binding to PDZ-binding consensus motifs located in their C-termini or by homophilic oligomerization of their RING fingers. Therefore, Lnx proteins may form large networks by homomeric binding. In situ hybridization analysis revealed complementary patterns of Lnx1 and Lnx2 expression in developing and adult brain, although in several structures they are present in the same cell populations. Moreover, their expression patterns overlap with those of the Numb proteins. Oligomerization of Lnx2 and Numb binding occurs simultaneously. Therefore, our findings suggest that Lnx proteins may serve as molecular scaffolds that localize unrelated, interacting proteins, such as Numb, to specific subcellular sites.

  10. Smooth muscle archvillin is an ERK scaffolding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Samudra S; Kengni, Edouard; Appel, Sarah; Gallant, Cynthia; Kim, Hak Rim; Leavis, Paul; DeGnore, Jon; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2009-06-26

    ERK influences a number of pathways in all cells, but how ERK activities are segregated between different pathways has not been entirely clear. Using immunoprecipitation and pulldown experiments with domain-specific recombinant fragments, we show that smooth muscle archvillin (SmAV) binds ERK and members of the ERK signaling cascade in a domain-specific, stimulus-dependent, and pathway-specific manner. MEK binds specifically to the first 445 residues of SmAV. B-Raf, an upstream regulator of MEK, constitutively interacts with residues 1-445 and 446-1250. Both ERK and 14-3-3 bind to both fragments, but in a stimulus-specific manner. Phosphorylated ERK is associated only with residues 1-445. An ERK phosphorylation site was determined by mass spectrometry to reside at Ser132. A phospho-antibody raised to this site shows that the site is phosphorylated during alpha-agonist-mediated ERK activation in smooth muscle tissue. Phosphorylation of SmAV by ERK decreases the association of phospho-ERK with SmAV. These results, combined with previous observations, indicate that SmAV serves as a new ERK scaffolding protein and provide a mechanism for regulation of ERK binding, activation, and release from the signaling complex.

  11. Arabidopsis scaffold protein RACK1A interacts with diverse environmental stress and photosynthesis related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Nabanita; Dozier, Uvetta; Deslandes, Laurent; Somssich, Imre E; Ullah, Hemayet

    2013-05-01

    Scaffold proteins are known to regulate important cellular processes by interacting with multiple proteins to modulate molecular responses. RACK1 (Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1) is a WD-40 type scaffold protein, conserved in eukaryotes, from Chlamydymonas to plants and humans, expresses ubiquitously and plays regulatory roles in diverse signal transduction and stress response pathways. Here we present the use of Arabidopsis RACK1A, the predominant isoform of a 3-member family, as a bait to screen a split-ubiquitin based cDNA library. In total 97 proteins from dehydration, salt stress, ribosomal and photosynthesis pathways are found to potentially interact with RACK1A. False positive interactions were eliminated following extensive selection based growth potentials. Confirmation of a sub-set of selected interactions is demonstrated through the co-transformation with individual plasmid containing cDNA and the respective bait. Interaction of diverse proteins points to a regulatory role of RACK1A in the cross-talk between signaling pathways. Promoter analysis of the stress and photosynthetic pathway genes revealed conserved transcription factor binding sites. RACK1A is known to be a multifunctional protein and the current identification of potential interacting proteins and future in vivo elucidations of the physiological basis of such interactions will shed light on the possible molecular mechanisms that RACK1A uses to regulate diverse signaling pathways.

  12. Structural Insights for Engineering Binding Proteins Based on Non-Antibody Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Engineered binding proteins derived from non-antibody scaffolds constitute an increasingly prominent class of reagents in both research and therapeutic applications. The growing number of crystal structures of these “alternative” scaffold-based binding proteins in complex with their targets illustrate the mechanisms of molecular recognition that are common among these systems and those unique to each. This information is useful for critically assessing and improving/expanding engineering stra...

  13. Scaffold State Switching Amplifies, Accelerates, and Insulates Protein Kinase C Signaling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Eric C.; Redden, John M.; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly L.; Saucerman, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Scaffold proteins localize two or more signaling enzymes in close proximity to their downstream effectors. A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are a canonical family of scaffold proteins known to bind protein kinase A (PKA) and other enzymes. Several AKAPs have been shown to accelerate, amplify, and specify signal transduction to dynamically regulate numerous cellular processes. However, there is little theory available to mechanistically explain how signaling on protein scaffolds differs from solution biochemistry. In our present study, we propose a novel kinetic mechanism for enzymatic reactions on protein scaffolds to explain these phenomena, wherein the enzyme-substrate-scaffold complex undergoes stochastic state switching to reach an active state. This model predicted anchored enzymatic reactions to be accelerated, amplified, and insulated from inhibition compared with those occurring in solution. We exploited a direct interaction between protein kinase C (PKC) and AKAP7α as a model to validate these predictions experimentally. Using a genetically encoded PKC activity reporter, we found that both the strength and speed of substrate phosphorylation were enhanced by AKAP7α. PKC tethered to AKAP7α was less susceptible to inhibition from the ATP-competitive inhibitor Gö6976 and the substrate-competitive inhibitor PKC 20-28, but not the activation-competitive inhibitor calphostin C. Model predictions and experimental validation demonstrated that insulation is a general property of scaffold tethering. Sensitivity analysis indicated that these findings may be applicable to many other scaffolds as well. Collectively, our findings provide theoretical and experimental evidence that scaffold proteins can amplify, accelerate, and insulate signal transduction. PMID:24302730

  14. The actin-interacting protein AIP1 is essential for actin organization and plant development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, T.; Anthony, R.G.; Voigt, B.; Menzel, D.; Hussey, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    Cell division, growth, and cytoplasmic organization require a dynamic actin cytoskeleton. The filamentous actin (F-actin) network is regulated by actin binding proteins that modulate actin dynamics. These actin binding proteins often have cooperative interactions [1 and 2]. In particular, actin inte

  15. Orthogonal dual-modification of proteins for the engineering of multivalent protein scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Mühlberg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To add new tools to the repertoire of protein-based multivalent scaffold design, we have developed a novel dual-labeling strategy for proteins that combines residue-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids with chemical oxidative aldehyde formation at the N-terminus of a protein. Our approach relies on the selective introduction of two different functional moieties in a protein by mutually orthogonal copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC and oxime ligation. This method was applied to the conjugation of biotin and β-linked galactose residues to yield an enzymatically active thermophilic lipase, which revealed specific binding to Erythrina cristagalli lectin by SPR binding studies.

  16. INSIGHTS INTO THE REGULATION OF 5-HT2A RECEPTORS BY SCAFFOLDING PROTEINS AND KINASES

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, Bryan L.; Allen, John A.; Yadav, Prem N.

    2008-01-01

    5-HT2A serotonin receptors are essential molecular targets for the actions of LSD-like hallucinogens and atypical antipsychotic drugs. 5-HT2A serotonin receptors also mediate a variety of physiological processes in peripheral and central nervous systems including platelet aggregation, smooth muscle contraction, and the modulation of mood and perception. Scaffolding proteins have emerged as important regulators of 5-HT2A receptors and our recent studies suggest multiple scaffolds exist for 5-H...

  17. Protein Corona Influences Cell-Biomaterial Interactions in Nanostructured Tissue Engineering Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpooshan, Vahid; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Zhao, Mingming; Wei, Ke; Sivanesan, Senthilkumar; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Malkovskiy, Andrey V; Gladstone, Andrew B; Cohen, Jeffrey E; Yang, Phillip C; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Bernstein, Daniel; Woo, Y Joseph; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar

    2015-07-22

    Biomaterials are extensively used to restore damaged tissues, in the forms of implants (e.g. tissue engineered scaffolds) or biomedical devices (e.g. pacemakers). Once in contact with the physiological environment, nanostructured biomaterials undergo modifications as a result of endogenous proteins binding to their surface. The formation of this macromolecular coating complex, known as 'protein corona', onto the surface of nanoparticles and its effect on cell-particle interactions are currently under intense investigation. In striking contrast, protein corona constructs within nanostructured porous tissue engineering scaffolds remain poorly characterized. As organismal systems are highly dynamic, it is conceivable that the formation of distinct protein corona on implanted scaffolds might itself modulate cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Here, we report that corona complexes formed onto the fibrils of engineered collagen scaffolds display specific, distinct, and reproducible compositions that are a signature of the tissue microenvironment as well as being indicative of the subject's health condition. Protein corona formed on collagen matrices modulated cellular secretome in a context-specific manner ex-vivo, demonstrating their role in regulating scaffold-cellular interactions. Together, these findings underscore the importance of custom-designing personalized nanostructured biomaterials, according to the biological milieu and disease state. We propose the use of protein corona as in situ biosensor of temporal and local biomarkers.

  18. Traffic of p24 Proteins and COPII Coat Composition Mutually Influence Membrane Scaffolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcangelo, Jennifer G; Crissman, Jonathan; Pagant, Silvere; Čopič, Alenka; Latham, Catherine F; Snapp, Erik L; Miller, Elizabeth A

    2015-05-18

    Eukaryotic protein secretion requires efficient and accurate delivery of diverse secretory and membrane proteins. This process initiates in the ER, where vesicles are sculpted by the essential COPII coat. The Sec13p subunit of the COPII coat contributes to membrane scaffolding, which enforces curvature on the nascent vesicle. A requirement for Sec13p can be bypassed when traffic of lumenally oriented membrane proteins is abrogated. Here we sought to further explore the impact of cargo proteins on vesicle formation. We show that efficient ER export of the p24 family of proteins is a major driver of the requirement for Sec13p. The scaffolding burden presented by the p24 complex is met in part by the cargo adaptor Lst1p, which binds to a subset of cargo, including the p24 proteins. We propose that the scaffolding function of Lst1p is required to generate vesicles that can accommodate difficult cargo proteins that include large oligomeric assemblies and asymmetrically distributed membrane proteins. Vesicles that contain such cargoes are also more dependent on scaffolding by Sec13p, and may serve as a model for large carrier formation in other systems.

  19. Structure-property relationship of regenerated spider silk protein nano/microfibrous scaffold fabricated by electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiaozhen; Xu, Shuiling; Zhang, Hong; Gu, Li; Xu, Yepei; Ko, Frank

    2014-11-01

    The regenerated Araneus ventricosus spider dragline silk protein fibrous scaffold with moderate strength and flexibility was fabricated by electrospinning and post treatment with 90 vol % acetone. The effect of collection method on the morphology of regenerated spider silk protein (RSSP) fibrous scaffold, the effects of the post treatment solvents and their concentrations on the molecular conformation, crystallinity and mechanical properties were studied. The results show that the morphology was affected by the solvent used in the coagulation bath. The molecular conformation, crystallinity and mechanical property of this scaffold were strongly affected by the kind of post treatment solvent and slightly influenced by its concentration when it was higher than 50 vol %. The degradation rate of this scaffold was very slow and resulting in little pH change of the degradation medium within 5 months. PC 12 cells were cultured on the electrospun RSSP fibrous scaffold and in its extraction fluid to examine the changes of PC 12 cells after different times of culture. The results show that the electrospun RSSP fibrous scaffold had good biocompatibility with PC 12 cells.

  20. Enhanced PC12 cells proliferation with self-assembled S-layer proteins scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babolmorad, Ghazal; Emtiazi, Giti; Ghaedi, Kamran; Jodeiri, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Finding 3D biocompatible and biodegradable scaffold is important in tissue engineering which plays a critical role in transplanting methods. Several biomaterials, such as poly-L-lactide, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), poly(L-lactic acid)/poly(lactide-co-glycolide), alginate, collagen gel, and so on, have been applied as scaffold to culture cells in 3D environment. The most significant problem of the synthetic materials is lack of biocompatibility and bioactivity. Herein, self assemble S-layer proteins are used as a scaffold for PC12 cells culturing. For this purpose, S-layer protein was extracted from Bacillus coagulans HN68. Then, extracted S-layer was studied by SDS page and AFM. Using MTS test and Immunochemistry staining methods, the effect of self assembled S-layer scaffold on proliferation of PC12 cells was assayed. This study provides that S-layer could be an appropriate scaffold for PC12 cells culturing. Even though poly-L-ornithine is a common scaffold in PC12 cells culturing, the results show that (PLO)/S-layer is more protective.

  1. Design and modular parallel synthesis of a MCR derived α-helix mimetic protein-protein interaction inhibitor scaffold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antuch, Walfrido; Menon, Sanjay; Chen, Quin-Zene; Lu, Yingchun; Sakamuri, Sukumar; Beck, Barbara; Schauer-Vukašinović, Vesna; Agarwal, Seema; Hess, Sibylle; Dömling, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    A terphenyl α-helix mimetic scaffold recognized to be capable of disrupting protein-protein interactions was structurally morphed into an easily amenable and versatile multicomponent reaction (MCR) backbone. The design, modular in-parallel library synthesis, initial cell based biological data, and p

  2. A new biocompatible delivery scaffold containing heparin and bone morphogenetic protein 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanyaphoo Suphannee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Silicon-substituted calcium phosphate (Si-CaP was developed in our laboratory as a biomaterial for delivery in bone tissue engineering. It was fabricated as a 3D-construct of scaffolds using chitosan-trisodium polyphosphate (TPP cross-linked networks. In this study, heparin was covalently bonded to the residual -NH2 groups of chitosan on the scaffold applying carbodiimide chemistry. Bonded heparin was not leached away from scaffold surfaces upon vigorous washing or extended storage. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2 was bound to conjugated scaffolds by ionic interactions between the negatively charged SO42- clusters of heparin and positively charged amino acids of rhBMP-2. The resulting scaffolds were inspected for bone regenerative capacity by subcutaneous implanting in rats. Histological observation and mineralization assay were performed after 4 weeks of implantation. Results from both in vitro and in vivo experiments suggest the potential of the developed scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications in the future.

  3. Reconstitution and dissection of the 600-kDa Srv2/CAP complex: roles for oligomerization and cofilin-actin binding in driving actin turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero-Monzon, Omar; Jonasson, Erin M; Bertling, Enni; Talarico, Lou; Chaudhry, Faisal; Sihvo, Maarit; Lappalainen, Pekka; Goode, Bruce L

    2009-04-17

    Srv2/cyclase-associated protein is expressed in virtually all plant, animal, and fungal organisms and has a conserved role in promoting actin depolymerizing factor/cofilin-mediated actin turnover. This is achieved by the abilities of Srv2 to recycle cofilin from ADP-actin monomers and to promote nucleotide exchange (ATP for ADP) on actin monomers. Despite this important and universal role in facilitating actin turnover, the mechanism underlying Srv2 function has remained elusive. Previous studies have demonstrated a critical functional role for the G-actin-binding C-terminal half of Srv2. Here we describe an equally important role in vivo for the N-terminal half of Srv2 in driving actin turnover. We pinpoint this activity to a conserved patch of surface residues on the N-terminal dimeric helical folded domain of Srv2, and we show that this functional site interacts with cofilin-actin complexes. Furthermore, we show that this site is essential for Srv2 acceleration of cofilin-mediated actin turnover in vitro. A cognate Srv2-binding site is identified on a conserved surface of cofilin, suggesting that this function likely extends to other organisms. In addition, our analyses reveal that higher order oligomerization of Srv2 depends on its N-terminal predicted coiled coil domain and that oligomerization optimizes Srv2 function in vitro and in vivo. Based on these data, we present a revised model for the mechanism by which Srv2 promotes actin turnover, in which coordinated activities of its N- and C-terminal halves catalyze sequential steps in recycling cofilin and actin monomers.

  4. Integrated regulation of motor-driven organelle transport by scaffolding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Meng-meng; Holzbaur, Erika L F

    2014-10-01

    Intracellular trafficking pathways, including endocytosis, autophagy, and secretion, rely on directed organelle transport driven by the opposing microtubule motor proteins kinesin and dynein. Precise spatial and temporal targeting of vesicles and organelles requires the integrated regulation of these opposing motors, which are often bound simultaneously to the same cargo. Recent progress demonstrates that organelle-associated scaffolding proteins, including Milton/TRAKs (trafficking kinesin-binding protein), JIP1, JIP3 (JNK-interacting proteins), huntingtin, and Hook1, interact with molecular motors to coordinate activity and sustain unidirectional transport. Scaffolding proteins also bind to upstream regulatory proteins, including kinases and GTPases, to modulate transport in the cell. This integration of regulatory control with motor activity allows for cargo-specific changes in the transport or targeting of organelles in response to cues from the complex cellular environment.

  5. A new mode of SAM domain mediated oligomerization observed in the CASKIN2 neuronal scaffolding protein

    KAUST Repository

    Smirnova, Ekaterina

    2016-08-22

    Background: CASKIN2 is a homolog of CASKIN1, a scaffolding protein that participates in a signaling network with CASK (calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine kinase). Despite a high level of homology between CASKIN2 and CASKIN1, CASKIN2 cannot bind CASK due to the absence of a CASK Interaction Domain and consequently, may have evolved undiscovered structural and functional distinctions.

  6. Artificial Metalloenzymes for Asymmetric Catalysis by Creation of Novel Active Sites in Protein and DNA Scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drienovska, Ivana; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Artificial metalloenzymes have emerged as a promising new approach to asymmetric catalysis. In our group, we are exploring novel artificial metalloenzyme designs involving creation of a new active site in a protein or DNA scaffold that does not have an existing binding pocket. In this review, we giv

  7. Structure-function studies of an engineered scaffold protein derived from stefin A. I: Development of the SQM variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Toni; Stadler, Lukas Kurt Josef; Busby, Michael; Song, Qifeng; Buxton, Anthony T; Wagner, Simon D; Davis, Jason J; Ko Ferrigno, Paul

    2010-05-01

    Non-antibody scaffold proteins are used for a range of applications, especially the assessment of protein-protein interactions within human cells. The search for a versatile, robust and biologically neutral scaffold previously led us to design STM (stefin A triple mutant), a scaffold derived from the intracellular protease inhibitor stefin A. Here, we describe five new STM-based scaffold proteins that contain modifications designed to further improve the versatility of our scaffold. In a step-by-step approach, we introduced restriction sites in the STM open reading frame that generated new peptide insertion sites in loop 1, loop 2 and the N-terminus of the scaffold protein. A second restriction site in 'loop 2' allows substitution of the native loop 2 sequence with alternative oligopeptides. None of the amino acid changes interfered significantly with the folding of the STM variants as assessed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Of the five scaffold variants tested, one (stefin A quadruple mutant, SQM) was chosen as a versatile, stable scaffold. The insertion of epitope tags at varying positions showed that inserts into loop 1, attempted here for the first time, were generally well tolerated. However, N-terminal insertions of epitope tags in SQM had a detrimental effect on protein expression.

  8. Protein mimics by attachment of cyclic peptides to molecular scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Langemheen, W.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between proteins is important in all biological functions. In practically every cellular process protein complexes have been identified as essential components. Defects or disturbance in the regulation of protein-protein interactions are responsible for many diseases. Therefore, the

  9. NF-κB signaling pathways regulated by CARMA family of scaffold proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marzenna Blonska; Xin Lin

    2011-01-01

    The NF-κB family of transcription factors plays a crucial role in cell activation,survival and proliferation.Its aberrant activity results in cancer,immunodeficiency or autoimmune disorders.Over the past two decades,tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of the signals that regulate NF-κB activation,especially how scaffold proteins link different receptors to the NF-κB-activating complex,the IκB kinase complex.The growing number of these scaffolds underscores the complexity of the signaling networks in different cell types.In this review,we discuss the role of scaffold molecules in signaling cascades induced by stimulation of antigen receptors,G-protein-coupled receptors and C-type Lectin receptors,resulting in NF-κB activation.Especially,we focus on the family of Caspase recruitment domain(CARD)-containing proteins known as CARMA and their function in activation of NF-κB,as well as the link of these scaffolds to the development of various neoplastic diseases through regulation of NF-κB.

  10. A molecular switch in the scaffold NHERF1 enables misfolded CFTR to evade the peripheral quality control checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Cláudia A; Matos, Ana Margarida; Dias-Alves, Ângela; Pereira, Joana F; Uliyakina, Inna; Barros, Patrícia; Amaral, Margarida D; Matos, Paulo

    2015-05-19

    The peripheral protein quality control (PPQC) checkpoint removes improperly folded proteins from the plasma membrane through a mechanism involving the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP (carboxyl terminus of Hsc70 interacting protein). PPQC limits the efficacy of some cystic fibrosis (CF) drugs, such as VX-809, that improve trafficking to the plasma membrane of misfolded mutants of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), including F508del-CFTR, which retains partial functionality. We investigated the PPQC checkpoint in lung epithelial cells with F508del-CFTR that were exposed to VX-809. The conformation of the scaffold protein NHERF1 (Na(+)/H(+) exchange regulatory factor 1) determined whether the PPQC recognized "rescued" F508del-CFTR (the portion that reached the cell surface in VX-809-treated cells). Activation of the cytoskeletal regulator Rac1 promoted an interaction between the actin-binding adaptor protein ezrin and NHERF1, triggering exposure of the second PDZ domain of NHERF1, which interacted with rescued F508del-CFTR. Because binding of F508del-CFTR to the second PDZ of NHERF1 precluded the recruitment of CHIP, the coexposure of airway cells to Rac1 activator nearly tripled the efficacy of VX-809. Interference with the NHERF1-ezrin interaction prevented the increase of efficacy of VX-809 by Rac1 activation, but the actin-binding domain of ezrin was not required for the increase in efficacy. Thus, rather than mainly directing anchoring of F508del-CFTR to the actin cytoskeleton, induction of ezrin activation by Rac1 signaling triggered a conformational change in NHERF1, which was then able to bind and stabilize misfolded CFTR at the plasma membrane. These insights into the cell surface stabilization of CFTR provide new targets to improve treatment of CF.

  11. Templated self-assembly of quantum dots from aqueous solution using protein scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, Amy Szuchmacher [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Soto, Carissa M [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Wilson, Charmaine D [Geo-Centers, Incorporated, Newton, MA 02459 (United States); Whitley, Jessica L [Geo-Centers, Incorporated, Newton, MA 02459 (United States); Moore, Martin H [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Sapsford, Kim E [George Mason University, 10910 University Boulevard, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Lin, Tianwei [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Chatterji, Anju [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Johnson, John E [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Ratna, Banahalli R [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2006-10-28

    Short, histidine-containing peptides can be conjugated to lysine-containing protein scaffolds to controllably attach quantum dots (QDs) to the scaffold, allowing for generic attachment of quantum dots to any protein without the use of specially engineered domains. This technique was used to bind quantum dots from aqueous solution to both chicken IgG and cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), a 30 nm viral particle. These quantum dot-protein assemblies were studied in detail. The IgG-QD complexes were shown to retain binding specificity to their antigen after modification. The CPMV-QD complexes have a local concentration of quantum dots greater than 3000 nmol ml{sup -1}, and show a 15% increase in fluorescence quantum yield over free quantum dots in solution.

  12. The DBHS proteins SFPQ, NONO and PSPC1: a multipurpose molecular scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Gavin J; Bond, Charles S; Fox, Archa H

    2016-05-19

    Nuclear proteins are often given a concise title that captures their function, such as 'transcription factor,' 'polymerase' or 'nuclear-receptor.' However, for members of the Drosophila behavior/human splicing (DBHS) protein family, no such clean-cut title exists. DBHS proteins are frequently identified engaging in almost every step of gene regulation, including but not limited to, transcriptional regulation, RNA processing and transport, and DNA repair. Herein, we present a coherent picture of DBHS proteins, integrating recent structural insights on dimerization, nucleic acid binding modalities and oligomerization propensity with biological function. The emerging paradigm describes a family of dynamic proteins mediating a wide range of protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, on the whole acting as a multipurpose molecular scaffold. Overall, significant steps toward appreciating the role of DBHS proteins have been made, but we are only beginning to understand the complexity and broader importance of this family in cellular biology.

  13. Nanoscale programmable sequence-specific patterning of DNA scaffolds using RecA protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R.; Davies, A. G.; Wälti, C.

    2012-09-01

    Molecular self-assembly inherent to many biological molecules, in conjunction with suitable molecular scaffolds to facilitate programmable positioning of nanoscale objects, offers a promising approach for the integration of functional nanoscale complexes into macroscopic host devices. Here, we report the use of the protein RecA as a means of highly efficient programmable patterning of double-stranded (ds)DNA molecules with molecular-scale precision at specific locations along the DNA strand. RecA proteins form nucleoprotein filaments with single-stranded (ss)DNA molecules, which are chosen to be of sequence homologous to the desired binding region on the dsDNA scaffold. We show that the patterning yield can be in excess of 85% and we demonstrate that concurrent patterning of multiple locations on the same dsDNA scaffold can be achieved with separation between the assembled nucleoprotein filaments of less than 4 nm. This is an important prerequisite for this programmable and flexible DNA scaffold patterning technique to be employed in molecular- and nanoscale assembly applications.

  14. Calcium Phosphate Scaffolds Combined with Bone Morphogenetic Proteins or Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to review the current status of calcium phosphate (CaP scaffolds combined with bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in the field of bone tissue engineering (BTE. Date Sources: Data cited in this review were obtained primarily from PubMed and Medline in publications from 1979 to 2014, with highly regarded older publications also included. The terms BTE, CaP, BMPs, and MSC were used for the literature search. Study Selection: Reviews focused on relevant aspects and original articles reporting in vitro and/or in vivo results concerning the efficiency of CaP/BMPs or CaP/MSCs composites were retrieved, reviewed, analyzed, and summarized. Results: An ideal BTE product contains three elements: Scaffold, growth factors, and stem cells. CaP-based scaffolds are popular because of their outstanding biocompatibility, bioactivity, and osteoconductivity. However, they lack stiffness and osteoinductivity. To solve this problem, composite scaffolds of CaP with BMPs have been developed. New bone formation by CaP/BMP composites can reach levels similar to those of autografts. CaP scaffolds are compatible with MSCs and CaP/MSC composites exhibit excellent osteogenesis and stiffness. In addition, a CaP/MSC/BMP scaffold can repair bone defects more effectively than an autograft. Conclusions: Novel BTE products possess remarkable osteoconduction and osteoinduction capacities, and exhibit balanced degradation with osteogenesis. Further work should yield safe, viable, and efficient materials for the repair of bone lesions.

  15. Calcium Phosphate Scaffolds Combined with Bone Morphogenetic Proteins or Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Bone Tissue Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Sun; Hui-Lin Yang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:The purpose of this study was to review the current status of calcium phosphate (CaP) scaffolds combined with bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the field of bone tissue engineering (BTE).Date Sources:Data cited in this review were obtained primarily from PubMed and Medline in publications from 1979 to 2014,with highly regarded older publications also included.The terms BTE,CaP,BMPs,and MSC were used for the literature search.Study Selection:Reviews focused on relevant aspects and original articles reporting in vitro and/or in vivo results concerning the efficiency of CaP/BMPs or CaP/MSCs composites were retrieved,reviewed,analyzed,and summarized.Results:An ideal BTE product contains three elements:Scaffold,growth factors,and stem cells.CaP-based scaffolds are popular because of their outstanding biocompatibility,bioactivity,and osteoconductivity.However,they lack stiffness and osteoinductivity.To solve this problem,composite scaffolds of CaP with BMPs have been developed.New bone formation by CaP/BMP composites can reach levels similar to those of autografts.CaP scaffolds are compatible with MSCs and CaP/MSC composites exhibit excellent osteogenesis and stiffness.In addition,a CaP/MSC/BMP scaffold can repair bone defects more effectively than an autograft.Conclusions:Novel BTE products possess remarkable osteoconduction and osteoinduction capacities,and exhibit balanced degradation with osteogenesis.Further work should yield safe,viable,and efficient materials for the repair of bone lesions.

  16. Actin organization, bristle morphology, and viability are affected by actin capping protein mutations in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Regulation of actin filament length and orientation is important in many actin-based cellular processes. This regulation is postulated to occur through the action of actin-binding proteins. Many actin-binding proteins that modify actin in vitro have been identified, but in many cases, it is not known if this activity is physiologically relevant. Capping protein (CP) is an actin-binding protein that has been demonstrated to control filament length in vitro by binding to the barbed ends and pre...

  17. RACK1, A Multifaceted Scaffolding Protein: Structure and Function

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Adams, David R

    2011-10-06

    Abstract The Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) is a member of the tryptophan-aspartate repeat (WD-repeat) family of proteins and shares significant homology to the β subunit of G-proteins (Gβ). RACK1 adopts a seven-bladed β-propeller structure which facilitates protein binding. RACK1 has a significant role to play in shuttling proteins around the cell, anchoring proteins at particular locations and in stabilising protein activity. It interacts with the ribosomal machinery, with several cell surface receptors and with proteins in the nucleus. As a result, RACK1 is a key mediator of various pathways and contributes to numerous aspects of cellular function. Here, we discuss RACK1 gene and structure and its role in specific signaling pathways, and address how posttranslational modifications facilitate subcellular location and translocation of RACK1. This review condenses several recent studies suggesting a role for RACK1 in physiological processes such as development, cell migration, central nervous system (CN) function and circadian rhythm as well as reviewing the role of RACK1 in disease.

  18. Optimization of protein cross-linking in bicomponent electrospun scaffolds for therapeutic use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papa, Antonio [Institute for Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials, National Research Council of Italy (IPCB-CNR), V.le Kennedy 54, Naples 80125 (Italy); IMAST SCaRL, Piazza Bovio 22, 80133 Naples (Italy); Guarino, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.guarino@cnr.it; Cirillo, Valentina; Oliviero, Olimpia; Ambrosio, Luigi [Institute for Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials, National Research Council of Italy (IPCB-CNR), V.le Kennedy 54, Naples 80125 (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    Bio-instructive electrospun scaffolds based on the combination of synthetic polymers, such as PCL or PLLA, and natural polymers (e.g., collagen) have been extensively investigated as temporary extracellular matrix (ECM) analogues able to support cell proliferation and stem cell differentiation for the regeneration of several tissues. The growing use of natural polymers as carrier of bioactive molecules is introducing new ideas for the design of polymeric drug delivery systems based on electrospun fibers with improved bioavailability, therapeutic efficacy and programmed drug release. In particular, the release mechanism is driven by the use of water soluble proteins (i.e., collagen, gelatin) which fully degrade in in vitro microenvironment, thus delivering the active principles. However, these protein are generally rapidly digested by enzymes (i.e., collagenase) produced by many different cell types, both in vivo and in vitro with significant drawbacks in tissue engineering and controlled drug delivery. Here, we aim at investigating different chemical strategies to improve the in vitro stability and mechanical strength of scaffolds against enzymatic degradation, by modifying the biodegradation rates of proteins embedded in bicomponent fibers. By comparing scaffolds treated by different cross-linking agents (i.e., GC, EDC, BDDGE), we have provided an extensive morphological/chemical/physical characterization via SEM and TGA to identify the best conditions to control drug release via protein degradation from bicomponent fibers without compromising in vitro cell response.

  19. Optimization of protein cross-linking in bicomponent electrospun scaffolds for therapeutic use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Antonio; Guarino, Vincenzo; Cirillo, Valentina; Oliviero, Olimpia; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    Bio-instructive electrospun scaffolds based on the combination of synthetic polymers, such as PCL or PLLA, and natural polymers (e.g., collagen) have been extensively investigated as temporary extracellular matrix (ECM) analogues able to support cell proliferation and stem cell differentiation for the regeneration of several tissues. The growing use of natural polymers as carrier of bioactive molecules is introducing new ideas for the design of polymeric drug delivery systems based on electrospun fibers with improved bioavailability, therapeutic efficacy and programmed drug release. In particular, the release mechanism is driven by the use of water soluble proteins (i.e., collagen, gelatin) which fully degrade in in vitro microenvironment, thus delivering the active principles. However, these protein are generally rapidly digested by enzymes (i.e., collagenase) produced by many different cell types, both in vivo and in vitro with significant drawbacks in tissue engineering and controlled drug delivery. Here, we aim at investigating different chemical strategies to improve the in vitro stability and mechanical strength of scaffolds against enzymatic degradation, by modifying the biodegradation rates of proteins embedded in bicomponent fibers. By comparing scaffolds treated by different cross-linking agents (i.e., GC, EDC, BDDGE), we have provided an extensive morphological/chemical/physical characterization via SEM and TGA to identify the best conditions to control drug release via protein degradation from bicomponent fibers without compromising in vitro cell response.

  20. Protein scaffolds for selective enrichment of metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Chuan; Zhou, Lu; Bosscher, Michael

    2016-02-09

    Polypeptides comprising high affinity for the uranyl ion are provided. Methods for binding uranyl using such proteins are likewise provided and can be used, for example, in methods for uranium purification or removal.

  1. "Bio"-macromolecules: polymer-protein conjugates as emerging scaffolds for therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchmann, Dorothee E; Carberry, Tom P; Weck, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Polymer-protein conjugates are biohybrid macromolecules derived from covalently connecting synthetic polymers with polypeptides. The resulting materials combine the properties of both worlds: chemists can engineer polymers to stabilize proteins, to add functionality, or to enhance activity; whereas biochemists can exploit the specificity and complexity that Nature has bestowed upon its macromolecules. This has led to a wealth of applications, particularly within the realm of biomedicine. Polymer-protein conjugation has expanded to include scaffolds for drug delivery, tissue engineering, and microbial inhibitors. This feature article reflects upon recent developments in the field and discusses the applications of these hybrids from a biomaterials standpoint.

  2. Fibrous scaffolds made by co-electrospinning soluble eggshell membrane protein with biodegradable synthetic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xi; Li, Qiang; Lu, Jian-Wei; Guo, Zhao-Xia; Sun, Zhao-Hui; Yu, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Soluble eggshell membrane protein (SEP), isolated from natural eggshell membrane, was co-electrospun with biodegradable synthetic polymers poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) in various proportions from 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP) solutions in order to prepare fibrous scaffolds having simultaneously good mechanical properties and biocompatibility. The fiber morphology was observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy, showing uniform fibers with diameter of 1.2-1.0 and 1.3-0.7 um for PPC/SEP and PLA/SEP blend fibers, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy observation shows that the blend fibers have domain-matrix phase morphology with fiber-like SEP domains in the PPC or PLA matrix, indicating the occurrence of phase separation, although interaction exists between PPC (or PLA) and SEP, as revealed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The mechanical properties were evaluated by uniaxial tensile tests and showed that both the tensile strength and elongation at break increase with increasing incorporation of PPC (or PLA). The surface composition was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and SEP was found on the fiber surfaces, and as a result the surfaces of the fibrous scaffolds are superhydrophilic. NIH3T3 cell culture tests demonstrate that the PPC/SEP and PLA/SEP blend fibrous scaffolds have a much improved biocompatibility compared to pure PPC or PLA fibrous scaffolds.

  3. Mechanical spectroscopy of retina explants at the protein level employing nanostructured scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayazur Rahman, S; Reichenbach, Andreas; Zink, Mareike; Mayr, Stefan G

    2016-04-14

    Development of neuronal tissue, such as folding of the brain, and formation of the fovea centralis in the human retina are intimately connected with the mechanical properties of the underlying cells and the extracellular matrix. In particular for neuronal tissue as complex as the vertebrate retina, mechanical properties are still a matter of debate due to their relation to numerous diseases as well as surgery, where the tension of the retina can result in tissue detachment during cutting. However, measuring the elasticity of adult retina wholemounts is difficult and until now only the mechanical properties at the surface have been characterized with micrometer resolution. Many processes, however, such as pathological changes prone to cause tissue rupture and detachment, respectively, are reflected in variations of retina elasticity at smaller length scales at the protein level. In the present work we demonstrate that freely oscillating cantilevers composed of nanostructured TiO2 scaffolds can be employed to study the frequency-dependent mechanical response of adult mammalian retina explants at the nanoscale. Constituting highly versatile scaffolds with strong tissue attachment for long-term organotypic culture atop, these scaffolds perform damped vibrations as fingerprints of the mechanical tissue properties that are derived using finite element calculations. Since the tissue adheres to the nanostructures via constitutive proteins on the photoreceptor side of the retina, the latter are stretched and compressed during vibration of the underlying scaffold. Probing mechanical response of individual proteins within the tissue, the proposed mechanical spectroscopy approach opens the way for studying tissue mechanics, diseases and the effect of drugs at the protein level.

  4. Scaffolding protein SPIDR/KIAA0146 connects the Bloom syndrome helicase with homologous recombination repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Li; Han, Jinhua; Liu, Ting; Dong, Shunli; Xie, Feng; Chen, Hongxia; Huang, Jun

    2013-06-25

    The Bloom syndrome gene product, BLM, is a member of the highly conserved RecQ family. An emerging concept is the BLM helicase collaborates with the homologous recombination (HR) machinery to help avoid undesirable HR events and to achieve a high degree of fidelity during the HR reaction. However, exactly how such coordination occurs in vivo is poorly understood. Here, we identified a protein termed SPIDR (scaffolding protein involved in DNA repair) as the link between BLM and the HR machinery. SPIDR independently interacts with BLM and RAD51 and promotes the formation of a BLM/RAD51-containing complex of biological importance. Consistent with its role as a scaffolding protein for the assembly of BLM and RAD51 foci, cells depleted of SPIDR show increased rate of sister chromatid exchange and defects in HR. Moreover, SPIDR depletion leads to genome instability and causes hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents. We propose that, through providing a scaffold for the cooperation of BLM and RAD51 in a multifunctional DNA-processing complex, SPIDR not only regulates the efficiency of HR, but also dictates the specific HR pathway.

  5. The human Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 is a membrane scaffold protein for extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendus-Altenburger, Ruth; Pedraz-Cuesta, Elena; Olesen, Christina W;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is an S/T kinase with more than 200 known substrates, and with critical roles in regulation of cell growth and differentiation and currently no membrane proteins have been linked to ERK2 scaffolding. METHODS AND RESULTS: Here, we identify...... the human Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (hNHE1) as a membrane scaffold protein for ERK2 and show direct hNHE1-ERK1/2 interaction in cellular contexts. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and immunofluorescence analysis we demonstrate that ERK2 scaffolding by hNHE1 occurs by one of three D...... and ERK2, and provides a molecular mechanism for the important ERK2 scaffolding function of the membrane protein hNHE1, which regulates the phosphorylation of both hNHE1 and ERK2....

  6. Staphylococcal Bap Proteins Build Amyloid Scaffold Biofilm Matrices in Response to Environmental Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taglialegna, Agustina; Navarro, Susanna; Ventura, Salvador; Garnett, James A; Matthews, Steve; Penades, José R; Lasa, Iñigo; Valle, Jaione

    2016-06-01

    Biofilms are communities of bacteria that grow encased in an extracellular matrix that often contains proteins. The spatial organization and the molecular interactions between matrix scaffold proteins remain in most cases largely unknown. Here, we report that Bap protein of Staphylococcus aureus self-assembles into functional amyloid aggregates to build the biofilm matrix in response to environmental conditions. Specifically, Bap is processed and fragments containing at least the N-terminus of the protein become aggregation-prone and self-assemble into amyloid-like structures under acidic pHs and low concentrations of calcium. The molten globule-like state of Bap fragments is stabilized upon binding of the cation, hindering its self-assembly into amyloid fibers. These findings define a dual function for Bap, first as a sensor and then as a scaffold protein to promote biofilm development under specific environmental conditions. Since the pH-driven multicellular behavior mediated by Bap occurs in coagulase-negative staphylococci and many other bacteria exploit Bap-like proteins to build a biofilm matrix, the mechanism of amyloid-like aggregation described here may be widespread among pathogenic bacteria.

  7. Staphylococcal Bap Proteins Build Amyloid Scaffold Biofilm Matrices in Response to Environmental Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taglialegna, Agustina; Navarro, Susanna; Ventura, Salvador; Garnett, James A.; Matthews, Steve; Penades, José R.; Lasa, Iñigo; Valle, Jaione

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are communities of bacteria that grow encased in an extracellular matrix that often contains proteins. The spatial organization and the molecular interactions between matrix scaffold proteins remain in most cases largely unknown. Here, we report that Bap protein of Staphylococcus aureus self-assembles into functional amyloid aggregates to build the biofilm matrix in response to environmental conditions. Specifically, Bap is processed and fragments containing at least the N-terminus of the protein become aggregation-prone and self-assemble into amyloid-like structures under acidic pHs and low concentrations of calcium. The molten globule-like state of Bap fragments is stabilized upon binding of the cation, hindering its self-assembly into amyloid fibers. These findings define a dual function for Bap, first as a sensor and then as a scaffold protein to promote biofilm development under specific environmental conditions. Since the pH-driven multicellular behavior mediated by Bap occurs in coagulase-negative staphylococci and many other bacteria exploit Bap-like proteins to build a biofilm matrix, the mechanism of amyloid-like aggregation described here may be widespread among pathogenic bacteria. PMID:27327765

  8. Evolutionary implications of localization of the signaling scaffold protein parafusin to both cilia and the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satir, Birgit Hegner; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Liu, Li; Lethan, Mette; Satir, Peter; Christensen, Søren Tvorup

    2015-02-01

    Parafusin (PFUS), a 63 kDa protein first discovered in the eukaryote Paramecium and known for its role in apicomplexan exocytosis, provides a model for the common origin of cellular systems employing scaffold proteins for targeting and signaling. PFUS is closely related to eubacterial rather than archeal phosphoglucomutases (PGM) - as we proved by comparison of their 88 sequences - but has no PGM activity. Immunofluorescence microscopy analysis with a PFUS-specific peptide antibody showed presence of this protein around the base region of primary cilia in a variety of mammalian cell types, including mouse embryonic (MEFs) and human foreskin fibroblasts (hFFs), human carcinoma stem cells (NT-2 cells), and human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Further, PFUS localized to the nucleus of fibroblasts, and prominently to nucleoli of MEFs. Localization studies were confirmed by Western blot analysis, showing that the PFUS antibody specifically recognizes a single protein of ca. 63 kDa in both cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. Finally, immunofluorescence microscopy analysis showed that PFUS localized to nuclei and cilia in Paramecium. These results support the suggestion that PFUS plays a role in signaling between nucleus and cilia, and that the cilium and the nucleus both evolved around the time of eukaryotic emergence. We hypothesize that near the beginnings of eukaryotic cell evolution, scaffold proteins such as PFUS arose as peripheral membrane protein identifiers for cytoplasmic membrane trafficking and were employed similarly during the subsequent evolution of exocytic, nuclear transport, and ciliogenic mechanisms.

  9. Degradable polyester scaffolds with controlled surface chemistry combining minimal protein adsorption with specific bioactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafahrend, Dirk; Heffels, Karl-Heinz; Beer, Meike V.; Gasteier, Peter; Möller, Martin; Boehm, Gabriele; Dalton, Paul D.; Groll, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Advanced biomaterials and scaffolds for tissue engineering place high demands on materials and exceed the passive biocompatibility requirements previously considered acceptable for biomedical implants. Together with degradability, the activation of specific cell-material interactions and a three-dimensional environment that mimics the extracellular matrix are core challenges and prerequisites for the organization of living cells to functional tissue. Moreover, although bioactive signalling combined with minimization of non-specific protein adsorption is an advanced modification technique for flat surfaces, it is usually not accomplished for three-dimensional fibrous scaffolds used in tissue engineering. Here, we present a one-step preparation of fully synthetic, bioactive and degradable extracellular matrix-mimetic scaffolds by electrospinning, using poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) as the matrix polymer. Addition of a functional, amphiphilic macromolecule based on star-shaped poly(ethylene oxide) transforms current biomedically used degradable polyesters into hydrophilic fibres, which causes the suppression of non-specific protein adsorption on the fibres’ surface. The subsequent covalent attachment of cell-adhesion-mediating peptides to the hydrophilic fibres promotes specific bioactivation and enables adhesion of cells through exclusive recognition of the immobilized binding motifs. This approach permits synthetic materials to directly control cell behaviour, for example, resembling the binding of cells to fibronectin immobilized on collagen fibres in the extracellular matrix of connective tissue.

  10. Synthetic protein scaffolds based on peptide motifs and cognate adaptor domains for improving metabolic productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselm H.C. Horn

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of many cellular processes relies on the defined interaction among different proteins within the same metabolic or signaling pathway. Consequently, a spatial colocalization of functionally interacting proteins has frequently emerged during evolution. This concept has been adapted within the synthetic biology community for the purpose of creating artificial scaffolds. A recent advancement of this concept is the use of peptide motifs and their cognate adaptor domains. SH2, SH3, GBD, and PDZ domains have been used most often in research studies to date. The approach has been successfully applied to the synthesis of a variety of target molecules including catechin, D-glucaric acid, H2, hydrochinone, resveratrol, butyrate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and mevalonate. Increased production levels of up to 77-fold have been observed compared to non-scaffolded systems. A recent extension of this concept is the creation of a covalent linkage between peptide motifs and adaptor domains, which leads to a more stable association of the scaffolded systems and thus bears the potential to further enhance metabolic productivity.

  11. Influence of Histidine-Containing Tags on the Biodistribution of ADAPT Scaffold Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbo, Sarah; Garousi, Javad; Åstrand, Mikael; Honarvar, Hadis; Orlova, Anna; Hober, Sophia; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2016-03-16

    Engineered scaffold proteins (ESP) are high-affinity binders that can be used as probes for radionuclide imaging. Histidine-containing tags enable both efficient purification of ESP and radiolabeling with (99m)Tc(CO)3. Earlier studies demonstrated that the use of a histidine-glutamate-histidine-glutamate-histidine-glutamate (HE)3-tag instead of the commonly used hexahistidine (H6)-tag reduces hepatic uptake of radiolabeled ESP and short peptides. Here, we investigated the influence of histidine-containing tags on the biodistribution of a novel type of ESP, ADAPTs. A series of anti-HER2 ADAPT probes having H6- or (HE)3-tags in the N-termini were prepared. The constructs, (HE)3-ADAPT6 and H6-ADAPT6, were labeled with two different nuclides, (99m)Tc or (111)In. The labeling with (99m)Tc(CO)3 utilized the histidine-containing tags, while (111)In was attached through a maleimido derivative of DOTA conjugated to the N-terminus. For (111)In-labeled ADAPTs, the use of (HE)3 provided a significantly (p histidine-containing tags on the biodistribution of the novel ADAPT scaffold proteins was different compared to its influence on other ESPs studied so far. Apparently, the effect of a histidine-containing tag on the biodistribution is highly dependent on the scaffold composition of the ESP.

  12. Nanofibrous yet injectable polycaprolactone-collagen bone tissue scaffold with osteoprogenitor cells and controlled release of bone morphogenetic protein-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Gayathri; Bialorucki, Callan [Department of Bioengineering, College of Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Yildirim-Ayan, Eda, E-mail: eda.yildirimayan@utoledo.edu [Department of Bioengineering, College of Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we developed a nanofibrous, yet injectable orthobiologic tissue scaffold that is capable of hosting osteoprogenitor cells and controlling kinetic release profile of the encapsulated pro-osteogenic factor without diminishing its bioactivity over 21 days. This innovative injectable scaffold was synthesized by incorporating electrospun and subsequently O{sub 2} plasma-functionalized polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers within the collagen type-I solution along with MC3T3-E1 cells (pre-osteoblasts) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2). Through changing the PCL nanofiber concentration within the injectable scaffolds, we were able to tailor the mechanical strength, protein retention capacity, bioactivity preservation, and osteoinductive potential of the scaffolds. The nanofibrous internal structure of the scaffold allowed us to use a low dose of BMP2 (200 ng/ml) to achieve osteoblastic differentiation in in vitro culture. The osteogenesis capacity of the injectable scaffolds were evaluated though measuring MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation, ALP activity, matrix mineralization, and early- and late-osteoblast specific gene expression profiles over 21 days. The results demonstrated that the nanofibrous injectable scaffold provides not only an osteoinductive environment for osteoprogenitor cells to differentiate, but also a suitable biomechanical and biochemical environment to act as a reservoir for osteogenic factors with controlled release profile. - Highlights: • Injectable nanofibrous scaffold with osteoprogenitor cells and BMP2 was synthesized. • PCL nanofiber concentration within collagen scaffold affected the BMP2 retention and bioactivity. • Optimal PCL concentration was identified for mechanical stability, injectability, and osteogenic activity. • Scaffolds exhibited long-term osteoinductive capacity for bone repair and regeneration.

  13. Carbohydrate particles as protein carriers and scaffolds: physico-chemical characterization and collagen stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Ivone; Rocha, Sandra; Loureiro, Joana A.; do Carmo Pereira, Maria; Ivanova, Galya; Coelho, Manuel

    2012-09-01

    The preservation of protein properties after entrapping into polymeric matrices and the effects of drying the emulsions still remains uncertain and controversial. Carbohydrate particles were designed and prepared by homogenization of gum arabic and maltodextrin mixture, with collagen hydrolysate (CH) followed by spray-drying. The encapsulation of CH in the carbohydrate matrix was achieved with an efficiency of 85 ± 2 %. The morphology and the size of the particles, before (40-400 nm) and after spray-drying (maltodextrin matrices to entrap and preserve CH original properties after the spray-drying process and support the potential of the polymeric scaffold for protein delivery and tissue engineering.

  14. Adaptive Assembly: Maximizing the Potential of a Given Functional Peptide with a Tailor-Made Protein Scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hideki; Honda, Shinya

    2015-09-17

    Protein engineering that exploits known functional peptides holds great promise for generating novel functional proteins. Here we propose a combinatorial approach, termed adaptive assembly, which provides a tailor-made protein scaffold for a given functional peptide. A combinatorial library was designed to create a tailor-made scaffold, which was generated from β hairpins derived from a 10-residue minimal protein "chignolin" and randomized amino acid sequences. We applied adaptive assembly to a peptide with low affinity for the Fc region of human immunoglobulin G, generating a 54-residue protein AF.p17 with a 40,600-fold enhanced affinity. The crystal structure of AF.p17 complexed with the Fc region revealed that the scaffold fixed the active conformation with a unique structure composed of a short α helix, β hairpins, and a loop-like structure. Adaptive assembly can take full advantage of known peptides as assets for generating novel functional proteins.

  15. BLNK: molecular scaffolding through 'cis'-mediated organization of signaling proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Christopher W; Dalton, Mark; Ishiai, Masamichi; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Chan, Andrew C

    2002-12-02

    Assembly of intracellular macromolecular complexes is thought to provide an important mechanism to coordinate the generation of second messengers upon receptor activation. We have previously identified a B cell linker protein, termed BLNK, which serves such a scaffolding function in B cells. We demonstrate here that phosphorylation of five tyrosine residues within human BLNK nucleates distinct signaling effectors following B cell antigen receptor activation. The phosphorylation of multiple tyrosine residues not only amplifies PLCgamma-mediated signaling but also supports 'cis'-mediated interaction between distinct signaling effectors within a large molecular complex. These data demonstrate the importance of coordinate phosphorylation of molecular scaffolds, and provide insights into how assembly of macromolecular complexes is required for normal receptor function.

  16. Scaffolds, levers, rods and springs: diverse cellular functions of long coiled-coil proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, A; Meier, I

    2004-08-01

    Long alpha-helical coiled-coil proteins are involved in a variety of organizational and regulatory processes in eukaryotic cells. They provide cables and networks in the cyto- and nucleoskeleton, molecular scaffolds that organize membrane systems, motors, levers, rotating arms and possibly springs. A growing number of human diseases are found to be caused by mutations in long coiled-coil proteins. This review summarizes our current understanding of the multifaceted group of long coiled-coil proteins in the cytoskeleton, nucleus, Golgi and cell division apparatus. The biophysical features of coiled-coil domains provide first clues toward their contribution to the diverse protein functions and promise potential future applications in the area of nanotechnology. Combining the power of fully sequenced genomes and structure prediction algorithms, it is now possible to comprehensively summarize and compare the complete inventory of coiled-coil proteins of different organisms.

  17. PTP1B-dependent regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling by the actin-binding protein Mena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hughes, Shannon K; Oudin, Madeleine J; Tadros, Jenny; Neil, Jason; Del Rosario, Amanda; Joughin, Brian A; Ritsma, Laila; Wyckoff, Jeff; Vasile, Eliza; Eddy, Robert; Philippar, Ulrike; Lussiez, Alisha; Condeelis, John S; van Rheenen, Jacco; White, Forest; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Gertler, Frank B

    2015-01-01

    During breast cancer progression, alternative mRNA splicing produces functionally distinct isoforms of Mena, an actin regulator with roles in cell migration and metastasis. Aggressive tumor cell subpopulations express Mena(INV), which promotes tumor cell invasion by potentiating EGF responses. Howev

  18. The human Na+/H+ exchanger 1 is a membrane scaffold protein for extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendus-Altenburger, Ruth; Pedraz Cuesta, Elena; Olesen, Christina Wilkens

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is an S/T kinase with more than 200 known substrates, and with critical roles in regulation of cell growth and differentiation and currently no membrane proteins have been linked to ERK2 scaffolding. METHODS AND RESULTS: Here, we identify...... the human Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (hNHE1) as a membrane scaffold protein for ERK2 and show direct hNHE1-ERK1/2 interaction in cellular contexts. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and immunofluorescence analysis we demonstrate that ERK2 scaffolding by hNHE1 occurs by one of three D...... in vitro, in a distinct temporal order, with the phosphorylation rates at the individual sites being modulated by the docking sites in a distant dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS: This work characterizes a new type of scaffolding complex, which we term a "shuffle complex", between the disordered hNHE1-tail...

  19. The association of the JNK scaffold protein, WDR62, with the mixed lineage kinase 3, MLK3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Hadad

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs form a kinase tier module in which MAPK, MAP2K and MAP3K are held by scaffold proteins. The scaffold proteins serve as a protein platform for selective and spatial kinase activation. The precise mechanism by which the scaffold proteins function has not yet been fully explained. WD40-repeat protein 62, WDR62 is a novel scaffold protein of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK pathway. WDR62 is a 1523 a.a. long protein with no significant sequence homology to a known gene. Previously WDR62 was shown to associate with JNK and MKK4/7 in a modular fashion. Here, we show that WDR62 is able to associate with multiple members of the MAP3K of the mixed lineage kinase family and we map WDR62-MLK3 interacting domains. We identify two separable interacting domains within WDR62 and MLK3 proteins that can cross associate. MLK3 association with WDR62 is independent of JNK and MKK4/7 domains and activities. CDC42 activation disrupts WDR62-MLK3 association independent of MLK3 kinase activity.

  20. Emerging role of the scaffolding protein Dlg1 in vesicle trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Laurence

    2013-09-01

    Discs large 1 (Dlg1) is a modular scaffolding protein implicated in the control of cell polarity through assembly of specific multiprotein complexes, including receptors, ion channels and signaling proteins, at specialized zones of the plasma membrane. Recent data have shown that in addition to these well-known interaction partners, Dlg1 may also recruit components of the vesicle trafficking machinery either to the plasma membrane or to transport vesicles. Here, we discuss Dlg1 function in vesicle formation, targeting, tethering and fusion, in both the exocytotic and endocytotic pathways. These pathways contribute to cell functions as major and diverse as glutamatergic activity in the neurons, membrane homeostasis in Schwann cell myelination, insulin stimulation of glucose transport in adipocytes, or endothelial secretion of the hemostatic protein, von Willebrand factor (VWF).

  1. RNA regulatory networks diversified through curvature of the PUF protein scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilinski, Daniel; Qiu, Chen; Lapointe, Christopher P; Nevil, Markus; Campbell, Zachary T; Tanaka Hall, Traci M; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-09-14

    Proteins bind and control mRNAs, directing their localization, translation and stability. Members of the PUF family of RNA-binding proteins control multiple mRNAs in a single cell, and play key roles in development, stem cell maintenance and memory formation. Here we identified the mRNA targets of a S. cerevisiae PUF protein, Puf5p, by ultraviolet-crosslinking-affinity purification and high-throughput sequencing (HITS-CLIP). The binding sites recognized by Puf5p are diverse, with variable spacer lengths between two specific sequences. Each length of site correlates with a distinct biological function. Crystal structures of Puf5p-RNA complexes reveal that the protein scaffold presents an exceptionally flat and extended interaction surface relative to other PUF proteins. In complexes with RNAs of different lengths, the protein is unchanged. A single PUF protein repeat is sufficient to induce broadening of specificity. Changes in protein architecture, such as alterations in curvature, may lead to evolution of mRNA regulatory networks.

  2. Phage display selection of tight specific binding variants from a hyperthermostable Sso7d scaffold protein library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ning; Schmitt, Margaret A; Fisk, John D

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies, the quintessential biological recognition molecules, are not ideal for many applications because of their large size, complex modifications, and thermal and chemical instability. Identifying alternative scaffolds that may be evolved into tight, specific binding molecules with improved physical properties is of increasing interest, particularly for biomedical applications in resource-limited environments. Hyperthermophilic organisms, such as Sulfolobus solfataricus, are an attractive source of highly stable proteins that may serve as starting points for alternative molecular recognition scaffolds. We describe the first application of phage display to identify binding proteins based on the S. solfataricus protein Sso7d scaffold. Sso7d is a small cysteine-free DNA-binding protein (approximately 7 kDa, 63 amino acids), with a melting temperature of nearly 100 °C. Tight-binding Sso7d variants were selected for a diverse set of protein targets from a 10(10) member library, demonstrating the versatility of the scaffold. These Sso7d variants are able to discriminate among closely related human, bovine and rabbit serum albumins. Equilibrium dissociation constants in the nanomolar to low micromolar range were measured via competitive ELISA. Importantly, the Sso7d variants continue to bind their targets in the absence of the phage context. Furthermore, phage-displayed Sso7d variants retain their binding affinity after exposure to temperatures up to 70 °C. Taken together, our results suggest that the Sso7d scaffold will be a complementary addition to the range of non-antibody scaffold proteins that may be utilized in phage display. Variants of hyperthermostable binding proteins have potential applications in diagnostics and therapeutics for environments with extreme conditions of storage and deployment.

  3. A new method for the production of gelatin microparticles for controlled protein release from porous polymeric scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkizilcik, Asya; Tuzlakoglu, Kadriye

    2014-03-01

    Tissue engineering using scaffolds and growth factors is a crucial approach in bone regeneration and repair. The combination of bioactive agents carrying microparticles with porous scaffolds can be an efficient solution when controlled release of bio-signalling molecules is required. The present study was based on a recent approach using a biodegradable scaffold and protein-loaded microparticles produced in an innovative manner in which protein loss is minimized during the loading process. Bovine serum albumin (BSA)-loaded gelatin microparticles were obtained by grinding freeze-dried membranes of gelatin and BSA. Porous scaffolds (250-355 µm pore size) produced from a polyactide (PLLA) and polycaprolactone (PCL) blend by salt leaching/supercritical CO₂ methods were used for the experiments. Gelatin microparticles containing three different BSA amounts were incorporated into the porous scaffolds by using a surfactant. In vitro release profiles showed up to 90% protein loading efficiency. This novel method appears to be an effective approach for producing particles that can minimize protein loss during the loading process.

  4. The Biological Function of the Prion Protein: A Cell Surface Scaffold of Signaling Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    The prion glycoprotein (PrPC) is mostly located at the cell surface, tethered to the plasma membrane through a glycosyl-phosphatydil inositol (GPI) anchor. Misfolding of PrPC is associated with the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), whereas its normal conformer serves as a receptor for oligomers of the β-amyloid peptide, which play a major role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). PrPC is highly expressed in both the nervous and immune systems, as well as in other organs, but its functions are controversial. Extensive experimental work disclosed multiple physiological roles of PrPC at the molecular, cellular and systemic levels, affecting the homeostasis of copper, neuroprotection, stem cell renewal and memory mechanisms, among others. Often each such process has been heralded as the bona fide function of PrPC, despite restricted attention paid to a selected phenotypic trait, associated with either modulation of gene expression or to the engagement of PrPC with a single ligand. In contrast, the GPI-anchored prion protein was shown to bind several extracellular and transmembrane ligands, which are required to endow that protein with the ability to play various roles in transmembrane signal transduction. In addition, differing sets of those ligands are available in cell type- and context-dependent scenarios. To account for such properties, we proposed that PrPC serves as a dynamic platform for the assembly of signaling modules at the cell surface, with widespread consequences for both physiology and behavior. The current review advances the hypothesis that the biological function of the prion protein is that of a cell surface scaffold protein, based on the striking similarities of its functional properties with those of scaffold proteins involved in the organization of intracellular signal transduction pathways. Those properties are: the ability to recruit spatially restricted sets of binding molecules involved in specific signaling

  5. Identification of Obscure yet Conserved Actin-Associated Proteins in Giardia lamblia

    OpenAIRE

    Paredez, Alexander R.; Nayeri, Arash; Xu, Jennifer W.; Krtková, Jana; Cande, W. Zacheus

    2014-01-01

    Consistent with its proposed status as an early branching eukaryote, Giardia has the most divergent actin of any eukaryote and lacks core actin regulators. Although conserved actin-binding proteins are missing from Giardia, its actin is utilized similarly to that of other eukaryotes and functions in core cellular processes such as cellular organization, endocytosis, and cytokinesis. We set out to identify actin-binding proteins in Giardia using affinity purification coupled with mass spectros...

  6. Biomimetic repeat protein derived from Xenopus tropicalis for fibrous scaffold fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yunkyeoung; Yang, Yun Jung; Jung, Dooyup; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2015-12-01

    Collagen, silk, and elastin are the fibrous proteins consist of representative amino acid repeats. Because these proteins exhibited distinguishing mechanical properties, they have been utilized in diverse applications, such as fiber-based sensors, filtration membranes, supporting materials, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Despite their infinite prevalence and potential, most studies have only focused on a few repeat proteins. In this work, the hypothetical protein with a repeat motif derived from the frog Xenopus tropicalis was obtained and characterized for its potential as a novel protein-based material. The codon-optimized recombinant frog repeat protein, referred to as 'xetro', was produced at a high rate in a bacterial system, and an acid extraction-based purified xetro protein was successfully fabricated into microfibers and nanofibers using wet spinning and electrospinning, respectively. Specifically, the wet-spun xetro microfibers demonstrated about 2- and 1.5-fold higher tensile strength compared with synthetic polymer polylactic acid and cross-linked collagen, respectively. In addition, the wet-spun xetro microfibers showed about sevenfold greater stiffness than collagen. Therefore, the mass production potential and greater mechanical properties of the xetro fiber may result in these fibers becoming a new promising fiber-based material for biomedical engineering.

  7. Recent advances in protein kinase inhibition: current molecular scaffolds used for inhibitor synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, D R; Lydon, N B; Nunes, J J

    1999-07-01

    Early efforts to discover and develop protein kinase inhibitors have focused largely on a small group of oncology targets such as the EGFR and PKC enzymes. More recently, hundreds of protein kinases have been identified at the genetic level, many of which are now being assigned functions in a variety of signaling pathways. Additionally, mutagenesis and X-ray crystallographic studies have further defined common structural features associated with binding of the ATP cofactor within a conserved ATP binding cleft. These studies have also demonstrated significant differences in the ATP binding cleft between individual kinases, providing a molecular basis for understanding and exploiting inhibitor specificity. The current review will focus on recent developments in the field of ATP site-directed inhibitors with particular emphasis on the major scaffolds being derivatized to take advantage of variable regions of the active site.

  8. Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton by an interaction of IQGAP related protein GAPA with filamin and cortexillin I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhanjan Mondal

    Full Text Available Filamin and Cortexillin are F-actin crosslinking proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum allowing actin filaments to form three-dimensional networks. GAPA, an IQGAP related protein, is required for cytokinesis and localizes to the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. Here we describe a novel interaction with Filamin which is required for cytokinesis and regulation of the F-actin content. The interaction occurs through the actin binding domain of Filamin and the GRD domain of GAPA. A similar interaction takes place with Cortexillin I. We further report that Filamin associates with Rac1a implying that filamin might act as a scaffold for small GTPases. Filamin and activated Rac associate with GAPA to regulate actin remodelling. Overexpression of filamin and GAPA in the various strains suggests that GAPA regulates the actin cytoskeleton through interaction with Filamin and that it controls cytokinesis through association with Filamin and Cortexillin.

  9. Targeting diverse protein-protein interaction interfaces with α/β-peptides derived from the Z-domain scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checco, James W; Kreitler, Dale F; Thomas, Nicole C; Belair, David G; Rettko, Nicholas J; Murphy, William L; Forest, Katrina T; Gellman, Samuel H

    2015-04-14

    Peptide-based agents derived from well-defined scaffolds offer an alternative to antibodies for selective and high-affinity recognition of large and topologically complex protein surfaces. Here, we describe a strategy for designing oligomers containing both α- and β-amino acid residues ("α/β-peptides") that mimic several peptides derived from the three-helix bundle "Z-domain" scaffold. We show that α/β-peptides derived from a Z-domain peptide targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can structurally and functionally mimic the binding surface of the parent peptide while exhibiting significantly decreased susceptibility to proteolysis. The tightest VEGF-binding α/β-peptide inhibits the VEGF165-induced proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We demonstrate the versatility of this strategy by showing how principles underlying VEGF signaling inhibitors can be rapidly extended to produce Z-domain-mimetic α/β-peptides that bind to two other protein partners, IgG and tumor necrosis factor-α. Because well-established selection techniques can identify high-affinity Z-domain derivatives from large DNA-encoded libraries, our findings should enable the design of biostable α/β-peptides that bind tightly and specifically to diverse targets of biomedical interest. Such reagents would be useful for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  10. Suppression of apoptosis by enhanced protein adsorption on polymer/hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering is a promising alternative to bone grafting. Scaffolds play a critical role in tissue engineering. Composite scaffolds made of biodegradable polymers and bone mineral-like inorganic compounds have been reported to be advantageous over plain polymer scaffolds by our group and others. In this study, we compared cellular and molecular events during the early periods of osteoblastic cell culture on poly(l-lactic acid)/hydroxyapatite (PLLA/HAP) composite scaffolds with thos...

  11. Biophysical characterization and modeling of human Ecdysoneless (ECD protein supports a scaffolding function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas P. Schafer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The human homolog of Drosophila ecdysoneless protein (ECD is a p53 binding protein that stabilizes and enhances p53 functions. Homozygous deletion of mouse Ecd is early embryonic lethal and Ecd deletion delays G1-S cell cycle progression. Importantly, ECD directly interacts with the Rb tumor suppressor and competes with the E2F transcription factor for binding to Rb. Further studies demonstrated ECD is overexpressed in breast and pancreatic cancers and its overexpression correlates with poor patient survival. ECD overexpression together with Ras induces cellular transformation through upregulation of autophagy. Recently we demonstrated that CK2 mediated phosphorylation of ECD and interaction with R2TP complex are important for its cell cycle regulatory function. Considering that ECD is a component of multiprotein complexes and its crystal structure is unknown, we characterized ECD structure by circular dichroism measurements and sequence analysis software. These analyses suggest that the majority of ECD is composed of α-helices. Furthermore, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS analysis showed that deletion fragments, ECD(1–432 and ECD(1–534, are both well-folded and reveals that the first 400 residues are globular and the next 100 residues are in an extended cylindrical structure. Taking all these results together, we speculate that ECD acts like a structural hub or scaffolding protein in its association with its protein partners. In the future, the hypothetical model presented here for ECD will need to be tested experimentally.

  12. A targeted library screen reveals a new inhibitor scaffold for protein kinase D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuj Tandon

    Full Text Available Protein kinase D (PKD has emerged as a potential therapeutic target in multiple pathological conditions, including cancer and heart diseases. Potent and selective small molecule inhibitors of PKD are valuable for dissecting PKD-mediated cellular signaling pathways and for therapeutic application. In this study, we evaluated a targeted library of 235 small organic kinase inhibitors for PKD1 inhibitory activity at a single concentration. Twenty-eight PKD inhibitory chemotypes were identified and six exhibited excellent PKD1 selectivity. Five of the six lead structures share a common scaffold, with compound 139 being the most potent and selective for PKD vs PKC and CAMK. Compound 139 was an ATP-competitive PKD1 inhibitor with a low double-digit nanomolar potency and was also cell-active. Kinase profiling analysis identified this class of small molecules as pan-PKD inhibitors, confirmed their selectivity again PKC and CAMK, and demonstrated an overall favorable selectivity profile that could be further enhanced through structural modification. Furthermore, using a PKD homology model based on similar protein kinase structures, docking modes for compound 139 were explored and compared to literature examples of PKD inhibition. Modeling of these compounds at the ATP-binding site of PKD was used to rationalize its high potency and provide the foundation for future further optimization. Accordingly, using biochemical screening of a small number of privileged scaffolds and computational modeling, we have identified a new core structure for highly potent PKD inhibition with promising selectivity against closely related kinases. These lead structures represent an excellent starting point for the further optimization and the design of selective and therapeutically effective small molecule inhibitors of PKD.

  13. A novel Rho-dependent pathway that drives interaction of fascin-1 with p-Lin-11/Isl-1/Mec-3 kinase (LIMK 1/2 to promote fascin-1/actin binding and filopodia stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayo Asier

    2012-08-01

    applicability for analyzing the activities of actin-binding proteins in intact cells.

  14. Structural and functional characterization of an iron-sulfur cluster assembly scaffold protein-SufA from Plasmodium vivax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Zarna Rajeshkumar; Saxena, Vishal; Saggu, Gagandeep Singh; Yadav, Sushil Kumar; Pareek, R P; Kochar, Sanjay Kumar; Kochar, Dhanpat Kumar; Garg, Shilpi

    2016-07-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are utilized as prosthetic groups in all living organisms for diverse range of cellular processes including electron transport in respiration and photosynthesis, sensing of ambient conditions, regulation of gene expression and catalysis. In Plasmodium, two Fe-S cluster biogenesis pathways are reported, of which the Suf pathway in the apicoplast has been shown essential for the erythrocytic stages of the parasite. While the initial components of this pathway detailing the sulfur mobilization have been elucidated, the components required for the assembly and transfer of Fe-S clusters are not reported from the parasite. In Escherichia coli, SufB acts as a scaffold protein and SufA traffics the assembled Fe-S cluster from SufB to target apo-proteins. However, in Plasmodium, the homologs of these proteins are yet to be characterized for their function. Here, we report a putative SufA protein from Plasmodium vivax with signature motifs of A-type scaffold proteins, which is evolutionarily conserved. The presence of the [Fe4S4](3+) cluster under reduced conditions was confirmed by UV-visible and EPR spectroscopy and the interaction of these clusters with the conserved cysteine residues of chains A and B of PvSufA, validates its existence as a dimer, similar to that in E. coli. The H-bond interactions at the PvSufA-SufB interface demonstrate SufA as a scaffold protein in conjunction with SufB for the pre-assembly of Fe-S clusters and their transfer to the target proteins. Co-localization of the protein to the apicoplast further provides an experimental evidence of a functional scaffold protein SufA for the biogenesis of Fe-S clusters in apicoplast of Plasmodium.

  15. Enhanced healing of rabbit segmental radius defects with surface-coated calcium phosphate cement/bone morphogenetic protein-2 scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yi; Hou, Juan; Yin, ManLi [Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wang, Jing, E-mail: biomatwj@163.com [Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Liu, ChangSheng, E-mail: csliu@sh163.net [Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); The State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2014-11-01

    Large osseous defects remain a difficult clinical problem in orthopedic surgery owing to the limited effective therapeutic options, and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is useful for its potent osteoinductive properties in bone regeneration. Here we build a strategy to achieve prolonged duration time and help inducting new bone formation by using water-soluble polymers as a protective film. In this study, calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffolds were prepared as the matrix and combined with sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Na), hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC), and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) respectively to protect from the digestion of rhBMP-2. After being implanted in the mouse thigh muscles, the surface-modified composite scaffolds evidently induced ectopic bone formation. In addition, we further evaluated the in vivo effects of surface-modified scaffolds in a rabbit radius critical defect by radiography, three dimensional micro-computed tomographic (μCT) imaging, synchrotron radiation-based micro-computed tomographic (SRμCT) imaging, histological analysis, and biomechanical measurement. The HPMC-modified CPC scaffold was regarded as the best combination for segmental bone regeneration in rabbit radius. - Highlights: • A simple surface-coating method was used to fabricate composite scaffolds. • Growth factor was protected from rapid depletion via superficial coating. • Significant promotion of bone regeneration was achieved. • HPMC-modification displayed optimal effect of bone regeneration.

  16. IQGAP1: A microtubule-microfilament scaffolding protein with multiple roles in nerve cell development and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jausoro, Ignacio; Mestres, Iván; Remedi, Mónica; Sanchez, Mónica; Cáceres, Alfredo

    2012-11-01

    In this article, we review our current understanding of the biology of IQ domain-containing GTPase-Activating Protein 1, IQGAP1, a scaffolding protein with multiple binding partners, which is widely expressed among different cell types, including neurons, and capable of linking Rho-GTPase signaling with cytosleletal elements and environmental cues. Interestingly, a series of recent studies suggest that IQGAP family members have an important role in neuronal development, synaptic plasticity and nervous system disorders involving alterations in spine density.

  17. Detection of estradiol at an electrochemical immunosensor with a Cu UPD|DTBP-Protein G scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Xinhai; Zhang, Jiamei; Feng, Heqing; Liu, Xiuhua; Wong, Danny K Y

    2012-05-15

    A copper monolayer was formed on a gold electrode surface via underpotential deposition (UPD) method to construct a Cu UPD|DTBP-Protein G immunosensor for the sensitive detection of 17β-estradiol. Copper UPD monolayer can minimize the non-specific adsorption of biological molecules on the immunosensor surface and enhance the binding efficiency between immunosensor surface and thiolated Protein G. The crosslinker DTBP (Dimethyl 3,3'-dithiobispropionimidate · 2HCl) has strong ability to immobilize Protein G molecules on the electrode surface and the immobilized Protein G provides an orientation-controlled binding of antibodies. A monolayer of propanethiol was firstly self-assembled on the gold electrode surface, and a copper monolayer was deposited via UPD on the propanethiol modified electrode. Propanethiol monolayer helps to stabilize the copper monolayer by pushing the formation and stripping potentials of the copper UPD monolayer outside the potential range in which copper monolayer can be damaged easily by oxygen in air. A droplet DTBP-Protein G was then applied on the modified electrode surface followed by the immobilization of estradiol antibody. Finally, a competitive immunoassay was conducted between estradiol-BSA (bovine serum albumin) conjugate and free estradiol for the limited binding sites of estradiol antibody. Square wave voltammetry (SWV) was employed to monitor the electrochemical reduction current of ferrocenemethanol and the SWV current decreased with the increase of estradiol-BSA conjugate concentration at the immunosensor surface. Calibration of immunosensors in waste water samples spiked with 17β-estradiol yielded a linear response up to ≈ 2200 pg mL(-1), a sensitivity of 3.20 μA/pg mL(-1) and a detection limit of 12 pg mL(-1). The favorable characteristics of the immunosensors such as high selectivity, sensitivity and low detection limit can be attributed to the Cu UPD|DTBP-Protein G scaffold.

  18. Synthesis of a metal binding protein designed on the alpha/beta scaffold of charybdotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierret, B; Virelizier, H; Vita, C

    1995-12-01

    The alpha/beta scaffold of the scorpion toxin charybdotoxin has been used for the engineering of a metal binding site. Nine substitutions, including three histidines as metal ligands, have been introduced into the original toxin sequence. The newly designed sequence, 37 amino acids long, has been assembled by solid-phase synthesis and HBTU (2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)-1,1,3,3-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate) coupling of Fmoc-protected amino acids. Formation of the three disulfide bonds occurred efficiently and rapidly in the presence of glutathione, and this post-synthesis modification has facilitated the purification task enormously. The process of synthesis and purification was performed in less than a week with an overall 10.2% yield. Circular dichroism analysis showed that the newly designed protein is folded in a alpha/beta structure, similarly to the parent toxin. Electronic absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism and gel filtration experiments have been used to show that Cu2+ and Zn2+ ions bind with high affinity to the newly engineered protein. These results demonstrate that the alpha/beta fold, common to all scorpion toxins, is a very versatile basic structure, tolerant for substitutions and able to present new sequences in a predetermined conformation. The chemical approach is shown to be effective, rapid and practical for the production of novel designed small proteins.

  19. Mechanically unfolding proteins: The effect of unfolding history and the supramolecular scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinober, Rebecca C.; Brockwell, David J.; Beddard, Godfrey S.; Blake, Anthony W.; Olmsted, Peter D.; Radford, Sheena E.; Smith, D. Alastair

    2002-01-01

    The mechanical resistance of a folded domain in a polyprotein of five mutant I27 domains (C47S, C63S I27)5is shown to depend on the unfolding history of the protein. This observation can be understood on the basis of competition between two effects, that of the changing number of domains attempting to unfold, and the progressive increase in the compliance of the polyprotein as domains unfold. We present Monte Carlo simulations that show the effect and experimental data that verify these observations. The results are confirmed using an analytical model based on transition state theory. The model and simulations also predict that the mechanical resistance of a domain depends on the stiffness of the surrounding scaffold that holds the domain in vivo, and on the length of the unfolded domain. Together, these additional factors that influence the mechanical resistance of proteins have important consequences for our understanding of natural proteins that have evolved to withstand force. PMID:12441375

  20. Synapse associated protein 102 (SAP102 binds the C-terminal part of the scaffolding protein neurobeachin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Lauks

    Full Text Available Neurobeachin (Nbea is a multidomain scaffold protein abundant in the brain, where it is highly expressed during development. Nbea-null mice have severe defects in neuromuscular synaptic transmission resulting in lethal paralysis of the newborns. Recently, it became clear that Nbea is important also for the functioning of central synapses, where it is suggested to play a role in trafficking membrane proteins to both, the pre- and post-synaptic sites. So far, only few binding partners of Nbea have been found and the precise mechanism of their trafficking remains unclear. Here, we used mass spectrometry to identify SAP102, a MAGUK protein implicated in trafficking of the ionotropic glutamate AMPA- and NMDA-type receptors during synaptogenesis, as a novel Nbea interacting protein in mouse brain. Experiments in heterologous cells confirmed this interaction and revealed that SAP102 binds to the C-terminal part of Nbea that contains the DUF, PH, BEACH and WD40 domains. Furthermore, we discovered that introducing a mutation in Nbea's PH domain, which disrupts its interaction with the BEACH domain, abolishes this binding, thereby creating an excellent starting point to further investigate Nbea-SAP102 function in the central nervous system.

  1. Synapse associated protein 102 (SAP102) binds the C-terminal part of the scaffolding protein neurobeachin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauks, Juliane; Klemmer, Patricia; Farzana, Fatima; Karupothula, Ramesh; Zalm, Robbert; Cooke, Nancy E; Li, Ka Wan; Smit, August B; Toonen, Ruud; Verhage, Matthijs

    2012-01-01

    Neurobeachin (Nbea) is a multidomain scaffold protein abundant in the brain, where it is highly expressed during development. Nbea-null mice have severe defects in neuromuscular synaptic transmission resulting in lethal paralysis of the newborns. Recently, it became clear that Nbea is important also for the functioning of central synapses, where it is suggested to play a role in trafficking membrane proteins to both, the pre- and post-synaptic sites. So far, only few binding partners of Nbea have been found and the precise mechanism of their trafficking remains unclear. Here, we used mass spectrometry to identify SAP102, a MAGUK protein implicated in trafficking of the ionotropic glutamate AMPA- and NMDA-type receptors during synaptogenesis, as a novel Nbea interacting protein in mouse brain. Experiments in heterologous cells confirmed this interaction and revealed that SAP102 binds to the C-terminal part of Nbea that contains the DUF, PH, BEACH and WD40 domains. Furthermore, we discovered that introducing a mutation in Nbea's PH domain, which disrupts its interaction with the BEACH domain, abolishes this binding, thereby creating an excellent starting point to further investigate Nbea-SAP102 function in the central nervous system.

  2. Diurnal rhythms in neurexins transcripts and inhibitory/excitatory synapse scaffold proteins in the biological clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Shapiro-Reznik

    Full Text Available The neurexin genes (NRXN1/2/3 encode two families (α and β of highly polymorphic presynaptic proteins that are involved in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic balance. Recent studies indicate that neuronal activation and memory formation affect NRXN1/2/3α expression and alternative splicing at splice sites 3 and 4 (SS#3/SS#4. Neurons in the biological clock residing in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus (SCN act as self-sustained oscillators, generating rhythms in gene expression and electrical activity, to entrain circadian bodily rhythms to the 24 hours day/night cycles. Cell autonomous oscillations in NRXN1/2/3α expression and SS#3/SS#4 exons splicing and their links to rhythms in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic balance in the circadian clock were explored. NRXN1/2/3α expression and SS#3/SS#4 splicing, levels of neurexin-2α and the synaptic scaffolding proteins PSD-95 and gephyrin (representing excitatory and inhibitory synapses, respectively were studied in mRNA and protein extracts obtained from SCN of C3H/J mice at different times of the 24 hours day/night cycle. Further studies explored the circadian oscillations in these components and causality relationships in immortalized rat SCN2.2 cells. Diurnal rhythms in mNRXN1α and mNRXN2α transcription, SS#3/SS#4 exon-inclusion and PSD-95 gephyrin and neurexin-2α levels were found in the SCN in vivo. No such rhythms were found with mNRXN3α. SCN2.2 cells also exhibited autonomous circadian rhythms in rNRXN1/2 expression SS#3/SS#4 exon inclusion and PSD-95, gephyrin and neurexin-2α levels. rNRXN3α and rNRXN1/2β were not expressed. Causal relationships were demonstrated, by use of specific siRNAs, between rNRXN2α SS#3 exon included transcripts and gephyrin levels in the SCN2.2 cells. These results show for the first time dynamic, cell autonomous, diurnal rhythms in expression and splicing of NRXN1/2 and subsequent effects on the expression of neurexin-2α and postsynaptic

  3. Evidence for adenylate cyclase as a scaffold protein for Ras2-Ira interaction in Saccharomyces cerevisie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Sonia; Paiardi, Chiara; Pardons, Katrien; Winderickx, Joris; Martegani, Enzo

    2014-05-01

    Data in literature suggest that budding yeast adenylate cyclase forms a membrane-associated complex with the upstream components of the cAMP/PKA pathway. Here we provide evidences that adenylate cyclase (Cyr1p) acts as a scaffold protein keeping Ras2 available for its regulatory factors. We show that in a strain with deletion of the CYR1 gene (cyr1Δ pde2Δ msn2Δ msn4Δ) the basal Ras2-GTP level is very high and this is independent on the lack of feedback inhibition that could result from the absence of adenylate cyclase activity. Moreover, strains effected either in the intrinsic adenylate cyclase activity (fil1 strain) or in the stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by active G-proteins (lcr1 strain) had a normal basal and glucose-induced Ras2-GTP level, indicating that adenylate cyclase activity does not influence the Ras2 activation state and suggesting that Cyr1 protein is required for the proper interaction between Ras2 and the Ira proteins. We also provide evidence that the two Ras-binding sites mapped on Cyr1p are required for the signalling complex assembly. In fact, we show that the cyr1Δ strain expressing CYR1 alleles lacking either the LRR region or the C-terminal domain still have a high basal and glucose-induced Ras2-GTP level. In contrast, a mutant expressing a Cyr1 protein only missing the N-terminal domain showed a normal Ras2 activation pattern. Likewise, the Ras2-GTP levels are comparable in the wild type strain and the srv2Δ strain, supporting the hypothesis that Cap is not essential for the Ras-adenylate cyclase interaction.

  4. Carbohydrate particles as protein carriers and scaffolds: physico-chemical characterization and collagen stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peres, Ivone; Rocha, Sandra; Loureiro, Joana A.; Carmo Pereira, Maria do [University of Porto, LEPAE, Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering (Portugal); Ivanova, Galya [Universidade do Porto, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias (Portugal); Coelho, Manuel, E-mail: mcoelho@fe.up.pt [University of Porto, LEPAE, Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering (Portugal)

    2012-09-15

    The preservation of protein properties after entrapping into polymeric matrices and the effects of drying the emulsions still remains uncertain and controversial. Carbohydrate particles were designed and prepared by homogenization of gum arabic and maltodextrin mixture, with collagen hydrolysate (CH) followed by spray-drying. The encapsulation of CH in the carbohydrate matrix was achieved with an efficiency of 85 {+-} 2 %. The morphology and the size of the particles, before (40-400 nm) and after spray-drying (<20 {mu}m), were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Measurements of the nuclear relaxation times and application of diffusion ordered spectroscopy, obtained through pulsed field gradient NMR experiments, have been performed to determine the structure of the CH-polysaccharide conjugates and to clarify the mechanism of CH immobilization in the polysaccharide matrix. In vitro release profiles in ultrapure water and in cellular medium reveal that the diffusion rate of CH from the polymeric matrix to the dialysis solution decreases in average 30-50 % over time, compared to free CH molecules. In cellular medium at 37 Degree-Sign C, the complete release of CH from the particles is achieved only after 24 h, demonstrating a significant decrease in the CH mass transfer process when compared with free CH. The findings of this study outline the ability of gum arabic/maltodextrin matrices to entrap and preserve CH original properties after the spray-drying process and support the potential of the polymeric scaffold for protein delivery and tissue engineering.

  5. Scaffold proteins LACK and TRACK as potential drug targets in kinetoplastid parasites: Development of inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nir Qvit

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic diseases cause ∼500,000 deaths annually and remain a major challenge for therapeutic development. Using a rational design based approach, we developed peptide inhibitors with anti-parasitic activity that were derived from the sequences of parasite scaffold proteins LACK (Leishmania's receptor for activated C-kinase and TRACK (Trypanosoma receptor for activated C-kinase. We hypothesized that sequences in LACK and TRACK that are conserved in the parasites, but not in the mammalian ortholog, RACK (Receptor for activated C-kinase, may be interaction sites for signaling proteins that are critical for the parasites' viability. One of these peptides exhibited leishmanicidal and trypanocidal activity in culture. Moreover, in infected mice, this peptide was also effective in reducing parasitemia and increasing survival without toxic effects. The identified peptide is a promising new anti-parasitic drug lead, as its unique features may limit toxicity and drug-resistance, thus overcoming central limitations of most anti-parasitic drugs.

  6. Aggregation of scaffolding protein DISC1 dysregulates phosphodiesterase 4 in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Motomasa; Ishizuka, Koko; Nekooki-Machida, Yoko; Endo, Ryo; Takashima, Noriko; Sasaki, Hideyuki; Komi, Yusuke; Gathercole, Amy; Huston, Elaine; Ishii, Kazuhiro; Hui, Kelvin Kai-Wan; Kurosawa, Masaru; Kim, Sun-Hong; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Takimoto, Eiki; Houslay, Miles D; Sawa, Akira

    2017-04-03

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a polyglutamine (polyQ) disease caused by aberrant expansion of the polyQ tract in Huntingtin (HTT). While motor impairment mediated by polyQ-expanded HTT has been intensively studied, molecular mechanisms for nonmotor symptoms in HD, such as psychiatric manifestations, remain elusive. Here we have demonstrated that HTT forms a ternary protein complex with the scaffolding protein DISC1 and cAMP-degrading phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) to regulate PDE4 activity. We observed pathological cross-seeding between DISC1 and mutant HTT aggregates in the brains of HD patients as well as in a murine model that recapitulates the polyQ pathology of HD (R6/2 mice). In R6/2 mice, consequent reductions in soluble DISC1 led to dysregulation of DISC1-PDE4 complexes, aberrantly increasing the activity of PDE4. Importantly, exogenous expression of a modified DISC1, which binds to PDE4 but not mutant HTT, normalized PDE4 activity and ameliorated anhedonia in the R6/2 mice. We propose that cross-seeding of mutant HTT and DISC1 and the resultant changes in PDE4 activity may underlie the pathology of a specific subset of mental manifestations of HD, which may provide an insight into molecular signaling in mental illness in general.

  7. Quantification of extracellular matrix proteins from a rat lung scaffold to provide a molecular readout for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Ryan C; Calle, Elizabeth A; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Niklason, Laura E; Hansen, Kirk C

    2015-04-01

    The use of extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds, derived from decellularized tissues for engineered organ generation, holds enormous potential in the field of regenerative medicine. To support organ engineering efforts, we developed a targeted proteomics method to extract and quantify extracellular matrix components from tissues. Our method provides more complete and accurate protein characterization than traditional approaches. This is accomplished through the analysis of both the chaotrope-soluble and -insoluble protein fractions and using recombinantly generated stable isotope labeled peptides for endogenous protein quantification. Using this approach, we have generated 74 peptides, representing 56 proteins to quantify protein in native (nondecellularized) and decellularized lung matrices. We have focused on proteins of the ECM and additional intracellular proteins that are challenging to remove during the decellularization procedure. Results indicate that the acellular lung scaffold is predominantly composed of structural collagens, with the majority of these proteins found in the insoluble ECM, a fraction that is often discarded using widely accepted proteomic methods. The decellularization procedure removes over 98% of intracellular proteins evaluated and retains, to varying degrees, proteoglycans and glycoproteins of the ECM. Accurate characterization of ECM proteins from tissue samples will help advance organ engineering efforts by generating a molecular readout that can be correlated with functional outcome to drive the next generation of engineered organs.

  8. Self-assembly of silk-elastinlike protein polymers into three-dimensional scaffolds for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Like

    Production of brand new protein-based materials with precise control over the amino acid sequences at single residue level has been made possible by genetic engineering, through which artificial genes can be developed that encode protein-based materials with desired features. As an example, silk-elastinlike protein polymers (SELPs), composed of tandem repeats of amino acid sequence motifs from Bombyx mori (silkworm) silk and mammalian elastin, have been produced in this approach. SELPs have been studied extensively in the past two decades, however, the fundamental mechanism governing the self-assembly process to date still remains largely unresolved. Further, regardless of the unprecedented success when exploited in areas including drug delivery, gene therapy, and tissue augmentation, SELPs scaffolds as a three-dimensional cell culture model system are complicated by the inability of SELPs to provide the embedded tissue cells with appropriate biochemical stimuli essential for cell survival and function. In this dissertation, it is reported that the self-assembly of silk-elastinlike protein polymers (SELPs) into nanofibers in aqueous solutions can be modulated by tuning the curing temperature, the size of the silk blocks, and the charge of the elastin blocks. A core-sheath model was proposed for nanofiber formation, with the silk blocks in the cores and the hydrated elastin blocks in the sheaths. The folding of the silk blocks into stable cores -- affected by the size of the silk blocks and the charge of the elastin blocks -- plays a critical role in the assembly of silk-elastin nanofibers. The assembled nanofibers further form nanofiber clusters on the microscale, and the nanofiber clusters then coalesce into nanofiber micro-assemblies, interconnection of which eventually leads to the formation of three-dimensional scaffolds with distinct nanoscale and microscale features. SELP-Collagen hybrid scaffolds were also fabricated to enable independent control over the

  9. Putting oesophageal cancer on the RACK A study of the RACK1 scaffolding protein in oesophageal adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose There is a need to identify new therapeutic targets for oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Deoxycholic acid is a component of gastro-oesophageal refluxate and is believed to promote oesophageal adenocarcinoma. RACK1 is an intracellular scaffolding protein whose expression is altered in many cancers. The role of RACK1 in oesophageal adenocarcinoma has not been investigated. The purpose of this study is to examine the expression of RACK1 in oesophageal adenocarcinoma and to a...

  10. Membrane remodeling by the double-barrel scaffolding protein of poxvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Kyung Hyun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to most enveloped viruses, poxviruses produce infectious particles that do not acquire their internal lipid membrane by budding through cellular compartments. Instead, poxvirus immature particles are generated from atypical crescent-shaped precursors whose architecture and composition remain contentious. Here we describe the 2.6 Å crystal structure of vaccinia virus D13, a key structural component of the outer scaffold of viral crescents. D13 folds into two jellyrolls decorated by a head domain of novel fold. It assembles into trimers that are homologous to the double-barrel capsid proteins of adenovirus and lipid-containing icosahedral viruses. We show that, when tethered onto artificial membranes, D13 forms a honeycomb lattice and assembly products structurally similar to the viral crescents and immature particles. The architecture of the D13 honeycomb lattice and the lipid-remodeling abilities of D13 support a model of assembly that exhibits similarities with the giant mimivirus. Overall, these findings establish that the first committed step of poxvirus morphogenesis utilizes an ancestral lipid-remodeling strategy common to icosahedral DNA viruses infecting all kingdoms of life. Furthermore, D13 is the target of rifampicin and its structure will aid the development of poxvirus assembly inhibitors.

  11. CARMA3: A novel scaffold protein in regulation of NF-κB activation and diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    CARD recruited membrane associated protein 3 (CARMA3) is a novel scaffold protein. It belongs to the CARMA protein family, and is known to activate nuclear factor (NF)- κB. However, it is still unknown which receptor functions upstream of CARMA3 to trigger NF-κB activation. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that CARMA3 serves as an indispensable adaptor protein in NF-κB signaling under some G protein-coupled receptors (GP- CRs), such as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor and angiotensin (Ang) Ⅱ receptor. Mechanistically, CARMA3 recruits its essential downstream molecules Bcl10 and MALT1 to form the CBM (CARMA3-Bcl10-MALT1) signalosome whereby it triggers NF-κB activation. GPCRs and NF-κB play pivotal roles in the regulation of various cellular functions, therefore, aberrant regulation of the GPCR/NF-κB signaling axis leads to the development of many types of diseases, such as cancer and atherogenesis. Recently, the GPCR/CARMA3/NF-κB signaling axis has been confirmed in these specific diseases and it plays crucial roles in the pathogenesis of disease progression. In ovarian cancer cell lines, knockdown of CARMA3 abolishes LPA receptor-induced NF-κB activation, and reduces LPA-induced ovarian cancer invasion. In vascular smooth cells, downregulation of CARMA3 substantially impairs Ang-Ⅱ-receptor-induced NF-κB activation, and in vivo studies have confirmed that Bcl10- deficient mice are protected from developing Ang-Ⅱ-receptor-induced atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysms. In this review, we summarize the biology of CARMA3, describe the role of the GPCR/CARMA3/NF-κB signaling axis in ovarian cancer and atherogenesis, and speculate about the potential roles of this signaling axis in other types of cancer and diseases. With a significant increase in the identification of LPA- and Ang-Ⅱ-like ligands, such as endothelin-1, which also activates NF-κB via CARMA3 and contributes to the development of many diseases, CARMA3 is emerging as a novel

  12. HOMER2, a stereociliary scaffolding protein, is essential for normal hearing in humans and mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hela Azaiez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hearing loss is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. More than 80 genes have been implicated to date, and with the advent of targeted genomic enrichment and massively parallel sequencing (TGE+MPS the rate of novel deafness-gene identification has accelerated. Here we report a family segregating post-lingual progressive autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL. After first excluding plausible variants in known deafness-causing genes using TGE+MPS, we completed whole exome sequencing in three hearing-impaired family members. Only a single variant, p.Arg185Pro in HOMER2, segregated with the hearing-loss phenotype in the extended family. This amino acid change alters a highly conserved residue in the coiled-coil domain of HOMER2 that is essential for protein multimerization and the HOMER2-CDC42 interaction. As a scaffolding protein, HOMER2 is involved in intracellular calcium homeostasis and cytoskeletal organization. Consistent with this function, we found robust expression in stereocilia of hair cells in the murine inner ear and observed that over-expression of mutant p.Pro185 HOMER2 mRNA causes anatomical changes of the inner ear and neuromasts in zebrafish embryos. Furthermore, mouse mutants homozygous for the targeted deletion of Homer2 present with early-onset rapidly progressive hearing loss. These data provide compelling evidence that HOMER2 is required for normal hearing and that its sequence alteration in humans leads to ADNSHL through a dominant-negative mode of action.

  13. Plasma treatment induces internal surface modifications of electrospun poly(L-lactic) acid scaffold to enhance protein coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Seo, Hyok; Hee Lee, Mi; Kwon, Byeong-Ju; Kim, Hye-Lee; Park, Jong-Chul [Cellbiocontrol Laboratory, Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Jin Lee, Seung [Department of Industrial Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bong-Jin; Wang, Kang-Kyun; Kim, Yong-Rok [Department of Chemistry, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-21

    Advanced biomaterials should also be bioactive with regard to desirable cellular responses, such as selective protein adsorption and cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. To enhance cell-material interactions, surface modifications have commonly been performed. Among the various surface modification approaches, atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma has been used to change a hydrophobic polymer surface to a hydrophilic surface. Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA)-derived scaffolds lack cell recognition signals and the hydrophobic nature of PLLA hinders cell seeding. To make PLLA surfaces more conducive to cell attachment and spreading, surface modifications may be used to create cell-biomaterial interfaces that elicit controlled cell adhesion and maintain differentiated phenotypes. In this study, (He) gaseous atmospheric plasma glow discharge was used to change the characteristics of a 3D-type polymeric scaffold from hydrophobic to hydrophilic on both the outer and inner surfaces of the scaffold and the penetration efficiency with fibronectin was investigated. Field-emission scanning electron microscope images showed that some grooves were formed on the PLLA fibers after plasma treatment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data also showed chemical changes in the PLLA structure. After plasma treatment, -CN (285.76 eV) was increased in C1s and -NH{sub 2} (399.70 eV) was increased significantly and –N=CH (400.80 eV) and –NH{sub 3}{sup +} (402.05 eV) were newly appeared in N1s. These changes allowed fibronectin to penetrate into the PLLA scaffold; this could be observed by confocal microscopy. In conclusion, helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment was effective in modifying the polymeric scaffold, making it hydrophilic, and this treatment can also be used in tissue engineering research as needed to make polymers hydrophilic.

  14. Designed armadillo repeat proteins as general peptide-binding scaffolds: consensus design and computational optimization of the hydrophobic core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmeggiani, Fabio; Pellarin, Riccardo; Larsen, Anders Peter;

    2007-01-01

    Armadillo repeat proteins are abundant eukaryotic proteins involved in several cellular processes, including signaling, transport, and cytoskeletal regulation. They are characterized by an armadillo domain, composed of tandem armadillo repeats of approximately 42 amino acids, which mediates...... interactions with peptides or parts of proteins in extended conformation. The conserved binding mode of the peptide in extended form, observed for different targets, makes armadillo repeat proteins attractive candidates for the generation of modular peptide-binding scaffolds. Taking advantage of the large...... number of repeat sequences available, a consensus-based approach combined with a force field-based optimization of the hydrophobic core was used to derive soluble, highly expressed, stable, monomeric designed proteins with improved characteristics compared to natural armadillo proteins. These sequences...

  15. Solution structure and peptide binding of the PTB domain from the AIDA1 postsynaptic signaling scaffolding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Smirnova

    Full Text Available AIDA1 links persistent chemical signaling events occurring at the neuronal synapse with global changes in gene expression. Consistent with its role as a scaffolding protein, AIDA1 is composed of several protein-protein interaction domains. Here we report the NMR structure of the carboxy terminally located phosphotyrosine binding domain (PTB that is common to all AIDA1 splice variants. A comprehensive survey of peptides identified a consensus sequence around an NxxY motif that is shared by a number of related neuronal signaling proteins. Using peptide arrays and fluorescence based assays, we determined that the AIDA1 PTB domain binds amyloid protein precursor (APP in a similar manner to the X11/Mint PTB domain, albeit at reduced affinity (∼10 µM that may allow AIDA1 to effectively sample APP, as well as other protein partners in a variety of cellular contexts.

  16. Effects of synthetic cohesin-containing scaffold protein architecture on binding dockerin-enzyme fusions on the surface of Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieczorek Andrew S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The microbial synthesis of fuels, commodity chemicals, and bioactive compounds necessitates the assemblage of multiple enzyme activities to carry out sequential chemical reactions, often via substrate channeling by means of multi-domain or multi-enzyme complexes. Engineering the controlled incorporation of enzymes in recombinant protein complexes is therefore of interest. The cellulosome of Clostridium thermocellum is an extracellular enzyme complex that efficiently hydrolyzes crystalline cellulose. Enzymes interact with protein scaffolds via type 1 dockerin/cohesin interactions, while scaffolds in turn bind surface anchor proteins by means of type 2 dockerin/cohesin interactions, which demonstrate a different binding specificity than their type 1 counterparts. Recombinant chimeric scaffold proteins containing cohesins of different specificity allow binding of multiple enzymes to specific sites within an engineered complex. Results We report the successful display of engineered chimeric scaffold proteins containing both type 1 and type 2 cohesins on the surface of Lactococcus lactis cells. The chimeric scaffold proteins were able to form complexes with the Escherichia coli β-glucuronidase fused to either type 1 or type 2 dockerin, and differences in binding efficiencies were correlated with scaffold architecture. We used E. coli β-galactosidase, also fused to type 1 or type 2 dockerins, to demonstrate the targeted incorporation of two enzymes into the complexes. The simultaneous binding of enzyme pairs each containing a different dockerin resulted in bi-enzymatic complexes tethered to the cell surface. The sequential binding of the two enzymes yielded insights into parameters affecting assembly of the complex such as protein size and position within the scaffold. Conclusions The spatial organization of enzymes into complexes is an important strategy for increasing the efficiency of biochemical pathways. In this study

  17. Skeletal Muscle Regeneration on Protein-Grafted and Microchannel-Patterned Scaffold for Hypopharyngeal Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhisen Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of tissue engineering, polymeric materials with high biocompatibility like polylactic acid and polyglycolic acid have been widely used for fabricating living constructs. For hypopharynx tissue engineering, skeletal muscle is one important functional part of the whole organ, which assembles the unidirectionally aligned myotubes. In this study, a polyurethane (PU scaffold with microchannel patterns was used to provide aligning guidance for the seeded human myoblasts. Due to the low hydrophilicity of PU, the scaffold was grafted with silk fibroin (PU-SF or gelatin (PU-Gel to improve its cell adhesion properties. Scaffolds were observed to degrade slowly over time, and their mechanical properties and hydrophilicities were improved through the surface grafting. Also, the myoblasts seeded on PU-SF had the higher proliferative rate and better differentiation compared with those on the control or PU-Gel. Our results demonstrate that polyurethane scaffolds seeded with myoblasts hold promise to guide hypopharynx muscle regeneration.

  18. Skeletal muscle regeneration on protein-grafted and microchannel-patterned scaffold for hypopharyngeal tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhisen; Guo, Shanshan; Ye, Dong; Chen, Jingjing; Kang, Cheng; Qiu, Shejie; Lu, Dakai; Li, Qun; Xu, Kunjie; Lv, Jingjing; Zhu, Yabin

    2013-01-01

    In the field of tissue engineering, polymeric materials with high biocompatibility like polylactic acid and polyglycolic acid have been widely used for fabricating living constructs. For hypopharynx tissue engineering, skeletal muscle is one important functional part of the whole organ, which assembles the unidirectionally aligned myotubes. In this study, a polyurethane (PU) scaffold with microchannel patterns was used to provide aligning guidance for the seeded human myoblasts. Due to the low hydrophilicity of PU, the scaffold was grafted with silk fibroin (PU-SF) or gelatin (PU-Gel) to improve its cell adhesion properties. Scaffolds were observed to degrade slowly over time, and their mechanical properties and hydrophilicities were improved through the surface grafting. Also, the myoblasts seeded on PU-SF had the higher proliferative rate and better differentiation compared with those on the control or PU-Gel. Our results demonstrate that polyurethane scaffolds seeded with myoblasts hold promise to guide hypopharynx muscle regeneration.

  19. Towards the synthesis of hydroxyapatite/protein scaffolds with controlled porosities: bulk and interfacial shear rheology of a hydroxyapatite suspension with protein additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Michael; Bodnar, Pedro Marcus; Hess, Ulrike; Treccani, Laura; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2013-10-01

    The synthesis of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds is essential for biomedical applications such as bone tissue engineering and replacement. One way to induce macroporosity, which is needed to support bone in-growth, is to use protein additives as foaming agents. Another reason to use protein additives is the potential to introduce a specific biofunctionality to the synthesized scaffolds. In this work, we study the rheological properties of a hydroxyapatite suspension system with additions of the proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LSZ) and fibrinogen (FIB). Both the rheology of the bulk phase as well as the interfacial shear rheology are studied. The bulk rheological data provides important information on the setting behavior of the thixotropic suspension, which we find to be faster with the addition of FIB and LSZ and much slower with BSA. Foam bubble stabilization mechanisms can be rationalized via interfacial shear rheology and we show that it depends on the growth of interfacial films at the suspension/air interface. These interfacial films support the stabilization of bubbles within the ceramic matrix and thereby introduce macropores. Due to the weak interaction of the protein molecules with the hydroxyapatite particles of the suspension, we find that BSA forms the most stable interfacial films, followed by FIB. LSZ strongly interacts with the hydroxyapatite particles and thus only forms thin films with very low elastic moduli. In summary, our study provides fundamental rheological insights which are essential for tailoring hydroxyapatite/protein suspensions in order to synthesize scaffolds with controlled porosities.

  20. Optimization of the silk scaffold sericin removal process for retention of silk fibroin protein structure and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teh, Thomas K H; Toh, Siew-Lok; Goh, James C H, E-mail: dosgohj@nus.edu.s, E-mail: dostkh@nus.edu.s, E-mail: bietohsl@nus.edu.s [Division of Bioengineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2010-06-01

    In the process of removing sericin (degumming) from a raw silk scaffold, the fibroin structural integrity is often challenged, leading to mechanical depreciation. This study aims to identify the factors and conditions contributing to fibroin degradation during alkaline degumming and to perform an optimization study of the parameters involved to achieve preservation of fibroin structure and properties. The methodology involves degumming knitted silk scaffolds for various durations (5-90 min) and temperatures (60-100 {sup 0}C). Mechanical agitation and use of the refreshed solution during degumming are included to investigate how these factors contribute to degumming efficiency and fibroin preservation. Characterizations of silk fibroin morphology, mechanical properties and protein components are determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), single fiber tensile tests and gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), respectively. Sericin removal is ascertained via SEM imaging and a protein fractionation method involving SDS-PAGE. The results show that fibroin fibrillation, leading to reduced mechanical integrity, is mainly caused by prolonged degumming duration. Through a series of optimization, knitted scaffolds are observed to be optimally degummed and experience negligible mechanical and structural degradation when subjected to alkaline degumming with mechanical agitation for 30 min at 100 {sup 0}C.

  1. A three-dimensional multiporous fibrous scaffold fabricated with regenerated spider silk protein/poly(l-lactic acid) for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiaozhen; Sun, Chengjun

    2015-02-01

    An axially aligned three-dimensional (3-D) fibrous scaffold was fabricated with regenerated spider silk protein (RSSP)/poly (l-lactic acid) (PLLA) through electrospinning and post treatment. The morphology, mechanical and degradation properties of the scaffold were controlled through the weight ratio of RSSP to PLLA, the thickness of the scaffold and the treatment time. The scaffold with a weight ratio of 2:3 (RSSP:PLLA) had a nanoleaves-on-nanofibers hierarchical nanostructure; the length and thickness of the nanoleaves were about 400 and 30 nm, respectively. The holes of the scaffolds ranged from hundreds of nanometers to several microns. The scaffold showed an ideal mechanical property that it was stiff when dry, but became soft once hydrated in the culture medium. Its degradation rate was very slow in the first 2 months, and then accelerated in the following 2 months. The pH values of the degradation mediums of all the samples remained in the range of 7.40-7.12 during degradation for 6 months. It had good biocompatibility with PC 12 cells. The aligned hierarchical nanostructure could guide the directions of the axon extension. This scaffold has a potential application in Tissue Engineering and controlled release. This study provides a method to produce synthetic or natural biodegradable polymer scaffold with tailored morphology, mechanical, and degradation properties.

  2. The menagerie of human lipocalins: a natural protein scaffold for molecular recognition of physiological compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefner, André; Skerra, Arne

    2015-04-21

    all higher organisms, physiologically important members of this family have long been known in the human body, for example with the plasma retinol-binding protein that serves for the transport of vitamin A. This prototypic human lipocalin was the first for which a crystal structure was solved. Notably, several other lipocalins were discovered and assigned to this protein class before the term itself became familiar, which explains their diverse names in the scientific literature. To date, up to 15 distinct members of the lipocalin family have been characterized in humans, and during the last two decades the three-dimensional structures of a dozen major subtypes have been elucidated. This Account presents a comprehensive overview of the human lipocalins, revealing common structural principles but also deviations that explain individual functional features. Taking advantage of modern methods for combinatorial protein design, lipocalins have also been employed as scaffolds for the construction of artifical binding proteins with novel ligand specificities, so-called Anticalins, hence opening perspectives as a new class of biopharmaceuticals for medical therapy.

  3. Protein growth factors loaded highly porous chitosan scaffold: A comparison of bone healing properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandi, Samit K., E-mail: samitnandi1967@gmail.com [Department of Veterinary Surgery and Radiology, West Bengal University of Animal and Fishery Sciences, Kolkata (India); Kundu, Biswanath, E-mail: biswa_kundu@rediffmail.com [Bioceramics and Coating Division, CSIR—Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata (India); Basu, Debabrata [Bioceramics and Coating Division, CSIR—Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata (India)

    2013-04-01

    Present study aimed to investigate and compare effectiveness of porous chitosan alone and in combination with insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) in bone healing. Highly porous (85 ± 2%) with wide distribution of macroporous (70–900 μm) chitosan scaffolds were fabricated as bone substitutes by employing a simple liquid hardening method using 2% (w/v) chitosan suspension. IGF-1 and BMP-2 were infiltrated using vacuum infiltration with freeze drying method. Adsorption efficiency was found to be 87 ± 2 and 90 ± 2% for BMP-2 and IGF-1 respectively. After thorough material characterization (pore details, FTIR and SEM), samples were used for subsequent in vivo animal trial. Eighteen rabbit models were used to evaluate and compare control (chitosan) (group A), chitosan with IGF-1 (group B) and chitosan with BMP-2 (group C) in the repair of critical size bone defect in tibia. Radiologically, there was evidence of radiodensity in defect area from 60th day (initiated on 30th day) in groups B and C as compared to group A and attaining nearly bony density in most of the part at day 90. Histological results depicted well developed osteoblastic proliferation around haversian canal along with proliferating fibroblast, vascularization and reticular network which was more pronounced in group B followed by groups C and A. Fluorochrome labeling and SEM studies in all groups showed similar outcome. Hence, porous chitosan alone and in combination with growth factors (GFs) can be successfully used for bone defect healing with slight advantage of IGF-1 in chitosan samples. - Highlights: ► Fabrication and characterization of porous chitosan with or without IGF-1 and BMP-2 ► Highly porous growth factor loaded chitosan studied in animal subjects for 3 months ► Parameters studied: histopathology, radiology and fluorochrome labeling ► IGF-1 loaded porous chitosan found to be very effective for bone defect healing.

  4. Real-time quantification of proteins secreted by artificial connective tissue made from uni- or multidirectional collagen I scaffolds and oral mucosa fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos, Rosa Helena; Suesca, Edward; Millán, Diana; González, José Manuel; Fontanilla, Marta R

    2014-03-04

    Previously, we found that oral autologous artificial connective tissue (AACT) had a different protein secretion profile to that of clot-embedded AACT. Other oral mucosa substitutes, having different cell types and scaffolds, had dissimilar secretion profiles of proteins (including that for AACT) that influence healing outcome; thus, to ascertain the profiles of factors secreted by artificial tissue and whether they are influenced by their microstructure might help in understanding their bioactivity. An important component of tissue microstructure is the fiber orientation of the scaffold used for manufacturing it. This work developed a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) methodology to quantify factors secreted by oral artificial connective tissue (ACT) in culture medium, and a method to manufacture unidirectional laminar collagen I scaffolds. The SPR methodology was used for assessing differences in the protein secretion profile of ACT made with collagen scaffolds having different fiber orientation (unidirectional vs multidirectional). Oral fibroblasts seeded onto unidirectional scaffolds increased the secretion of six factors involved in modulating healing compared to those seeded onto multidirectional scaffolds. Histological analysis of uni- and multidirectional ACT showed that cells differ in their alignment and morphology. This SPR-methodology led to nanoscale detection of paracrine factors and might be useful to study biomarkers of three-dimensional cell growth, cell differentiation, and wound-healing progression.

  5. The Chromatin Scaffold Protein SAFB1 Renders Chromatin Permissive for DNA Damage Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmeyer, Matthias; Toledo Lazaro, Luis Ignacio; Gudjonsson, Thorkell

    2013-01-01

    the chromatin-associated scaffold attachment factor SAFB1 as a component of the DNA damage response and show that SAFB1 cooperates with histone acetylation to allow for efficient γH2AX spreading and genotoxic stress signaling. SAFB1 undergoes a highly dynamic exchange at damaged chromatin in a poly...

  6. Multiple turnover transfer of [2Fe2S] clusters by the iron-sulfur cluster assembly scaffold proteins IscU and IscA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Ta, Dennis; Vickery, Larry E

    2005-08-19

    IscU/Isu and IscA/Isa (and related NifU and SufA proteins) have been proposed to serve as molecular scaffolds for preassembly of [FeS] clusters to be used in the biogenesis of iron-sulfur proteins. In vitro studies demonstrating transfer of preformed scaffold-[FeS] complexes to apoprotein acceptors have provided experimental support for this hypothesis, but investigations to date have yielded only single-cluster transfer events. We describe an in vitro assay system that allows for real-time monitoring of [FeS] cluster formation using circular dichroism spectroscopy and use this to investigate de novo [FeS] cluster formation and transfer from Escherichia coli IscU and IscA to apo-ferredoxin. Both IscU and IscA were found to be capable of multiple cycles of [2Fe2S] cluster formation and transfer suggesting that these scaffold proteins are capable of acting "catalytically." Kinetic studies further showed that cluster transfer exhibits Michaelis-Menten behavior indicative of complex formation of holo-IscU and holo-IscA with apoferredoxin and consistent with a direct [FeS] cluster transfer mechanism. Analysis of the dependence of the rate of cluster transfer, however, revealed enhanced efficiency at low ratios of scaffold to acceptor protein suggesting participation of a transient, labile scaffold-[FeS] species in the transfer process.

  7. Targeting diverse protein–protein interaction interfaces with α/β-peptides derived from the Z-domain scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checco, James W.; Kreitler, Dale F.; Thomas, Nicole C.; Belair, David G.; Rettko, Nicholas J.; Murphy, William L.; Forest, Katrina T.; Gellman, Samuel H. (UW)

    2015-04-14

    Peptide-based agents derived from well-defined scaffolds offer an alternative to antibodies for selective and high-affinity recognition of large and topologically complex protein surfaces. Here, we describe a strategy for designing oligomers containing both α- and β-amino acid residues ("α/β-peptides") that mimic several peptides derived from the three-helix bundle "Z-domain" scaffold. We show that α/β-peptides derived from a Z-domain peptide targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can structurally and functionally mimic the binding surface of the parent peptide while exhibiting significantly decreased susceptibility to proteolysis. The tightest VEGF-binding α/β-peptide inhibits the VEGF₁₆₅-induced proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We demonstrate the versatility of this strategy by showing how principles underlying VEGF signaling inhibitors can be rapidly extended to produce Z-domain–mimetic α/β-peptides that bind to two other protein partners, IgG and tumor necrosis factor-α. Because well-established selection techniques can identify high-affinity Z-domain derivatives from large DNA-encoded libraries, our findings should enable the design of biostable α/β-peptides that bind tightly and specifically to diverse targets of biomedical interest. Such reagents would be useful for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  8. NifS-mediated assembly of [4Fe-4S] clusters in the N- and C-terminal domains of the NifU scaffold protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Archer D; Jameson, Guy N L; Dos Santos, Patricia C; Agar, Jeffrey N; Naik, Sunil; Krebs, Carsten; Frazzon, Jeverson; Dean, Dennis R; Huynh, Boi Hanh; Johnson, Michael K

    2005-10-04

    NifU is a homodimeric modular protein comprising N- and C-terminal domains and a central domain with a redox-active [2Fe-2S](2+,+) cluster. It plays a crucial role as a scaffold protein for the assembly of the Fe-S clusters required for the maturation of nif-specific Fe-S proteins. In this work, the time course and products of in vitro NifS-mediated iron-sulfur cluster assembly on full-length NifU and truncated forms involving only the N-terminal domain or the central and C-terminal domains have been investigated using UV-vis absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopies, coupled with analytical studies. The results demonstrate sequential assembly of labile [2Fe-2S](2+) and [4Fe-4S](2+) clusters in the U-type N-terminal scaffolding domain and the assembly of [4Fe-4S](2+) clusters in the Nfu-type C-terminal scaffolding domain. Both scaffolding domains of NifU are shown to be competent for in vitro maturation of nitrogenase component proteins, as evidenced by rapid transfer of [4Fe-4S](2+) clusters preassembled on either the N- or C-terminal domains to the apo nitrogenase Fe protein. Mutagenesis studies indicate that a conserved aspartate (Asp37) plays a critical role in mediating cluster transfer. The assembly and transfer of clusters on NifU are compared with results reported for U- and Nfu-type scaffold proteins, and the need for two functional Fe-S cluster scaffolding domains on NifU is discussed.

  9. The Scaffold Protein Muscle A-Kinase Anchoring Protein β Orchestrates Cardiac Myocyte Hypertrophic Signaling Required for the Development of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritzer, Michael D.; Li, Jinliang; Passariello, Catherine L.; Gayanilo, Marjorie; Thakur, Hrishikesh; Dayan, Joseph; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Kapiloff, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac myocyte hypertrophy is regulated by an extensive intracellular signal transduction network. In vitro evidence suggests that the scaffold protein muscle A-kinase anchoring protein β (mAKAPβ) serves as a nodal organizer of hypertrophic signaling. However, the relevance of mAKAPβ signalosomes to pathological remodeling and heart failure in vivo remains unknown. Methods and Results Using conditional, cardiac myocyte–specific gene deletion, we now demonstrate that mAKAPβ expression in mice is important for the cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload and catecholamine toxicity. mAKAPβ targeting prevented the development of heart failure associated with long-term transverse aortic constriction, conferring a survival benefit. In contrast to 29% of control mice (n=24), only 6% of mAKAPβ knockout mice (n=31) died in the 16 weeks of pressure overload (P=0.02). Accordingly, mAKAPβ knockout inhibited myocardial apoptosis and the development of interstitial fibrosis, left atrial hypertrophy, and pulmonary edema. This improvement in cardiac status correlated with the attenuated activation of signaling pathways coordinated by the mAKAPβ scaffold, including the decreased phosphorylation of protein kinase D1 and histone deacetylase 4 that we reveal to participate in a new mAKAP signaling module. Furthermore, mAKAPβ knockout inhibited pathological gene expression directed by myocyte-enhancer factor-2 and nuclear factor of activated T-cell transcription factors that associate with the scaffold. Conclusions mAKAPβ orchestrates signaling that regulates pathological cardiac remodeling in mice. Targeting of the underlying physical architecture of signaling networks, including mAKAPβ signalosome formation, may constitute an effective therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of pathological remodeling and heart failure. PMID:24812305

  10. Discs large 1 (Dlg1) scaffolding protein participates with clathrin and adaptator protein complex 1 (AP-1) in forming Weibel-Palade bodies of endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Monique; Léger, Thibaut; Desvaux, Raphaëlle; Walch, Laurence

    2013-05-03

    Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) are specific cigar-shaped granules that store von Willebrand factor (VWF) for its regulated secretion by endothelial cells. The first steps of the formation of these granules at the trans-Golgi network specifically require VWF aggregation and an external scaffolding complex that contains the adaptator protein complex 1 (AP-1) and clathrin. Discs large 1 (Dlg1) is generally considered to be a modular scaffolding protein implicated in the control of cell polarity in a large variety of cells by specific recruiting of receptors, channels, or signaling proteins to specialized zones of the plasma membrane. We propose here that in endothelial cells, Dlg1, in a complex with AP-1 and clathrin, participates in the biogenesis of WPBs. Supporting data show that Dlg1 colocalizes with microtubules, intermediate filaments, and Golgi markers. Tandem mass spectrometry experiments led to the identification of clathrin as an Dlg1-interacting partner. Interaction was confirmed by in situ proximity ligation assays. Furthermore, AP-1 and VWF immunoprecipitate and colocalize with Dlg1 in the juxtanuclear zone. Finally, Dlg1 depletion by siRNA duplexes disrupts trans-Golgi network morphology and WPB formation. Our results provide the first evidence for an unexpected role of Dlg1 in controlling the formation of specific secretory granules involved in VWF exocytosis in endothelial cells.

  11. All Dact (Dapper/Frodo scaffold proteins dimerize and exhibit conserved interactions with Vangl, Dvl, and serine/threonine kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheyette Benjamin NR

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Dact family of scaffold proteins was discovered by virtue of binding to Dvl proteins central to Wnt and Planar Cell Polarity (PCP signaling. Subsequently Dact proteins have been linked to a growing list of potential partners implicated in β-catenin-dependent and β-catenin-independent forms of Wnt and other signaling. To clarify conserved and non-conserved roles for this protein family, we systematically compared molecular interactions of all three murine Dact paralogs by co-immunoprecipitation of proteins recombinantly expressed in cultured human embryonic kidney cells. Results Every Dact paralog readily formed complexes with the Vangl, Dvl, and CK1δ/ε proteins of species ranging from fruit flies to humans, as well as with PKA and PKC. Dact proteins also formed complexes with themselves and with each other; their conserved N-terminal leucine-zipper domains, which have no known binding partners, were necessary and sufficient for this interaction, suggesting that it reflects leucine-zipper-mediated homo- and hetero-dimerization. We also found weaker, though conserved, interactions of all three Dact paralogs with the catenin superfamily member p120ctn. Complex formation with other previously proposed partners including most other catenins, GSK3, LEF/TCF, HDAC1, and TGFβ receptors was paralog-specific, comparatively weak, and/or more sensitive to empirical conditions. Conclusions Combined with published functional evidence from targeted knock-out mice, these data support a conserved role for Dact proteins in kinase-regulated biochemistry involving Vangl and Dvl. This strongly suggests that a principal role for all Dact family members is in the PCP pathway or a molecularly related signaling cascade in vertebrates.

  12. Selective Allosteric Antagonists for the G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPRC6A Based on the 2-Phenylindole Privileged Structure Scaffold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Henrik; Boesgaard, Michael Worch; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a biological target class of fundamental importance in drug therapy. The GPRC6A receptor is a newly deorphanized class C GPCR that we recently reported for the first allosteric antagonists based on the 2-arylindole privileged structure scaffold (e.g., 1...

  13. Characterizing the N- and C-terminal Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO)-interacting Motifs of the Scaffold Protein DAXX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escobar-Cabrera, E.; Okon, M.; Lau, D.K.W.; Dart, C.F.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.; McIntosh, L.P.

    2011-01-01

    DAXX is a scaffold protein with diverse roles that often depend upon binding SUMO via its N- and/or C-terminal SUMO-interacting motifs (SIM-N and SIM-C). Using NMR spectroscopy, we characterized the in vitro binding properties of peptide models of SIM-N and SIM-C to SUMO-1 and SUMO-2. In each case,

  14. Construction of TNF-binding proteins by grafting hypervariable regions of F10 antibody on human fibronectin domain scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovskaya, L E; Shingarova, L N; Kryukova, E A; Boldyreva, E F; Yakimov, S A; Guryanova, S V; Novoseletsky, V N; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of various diseases. To study the possibility of constructing TNF-binding proteins by grafting hypervariable regions of immunoglobulins (CDR), we have replaced amino acid sequences of loops from the tenth type III domain of human fibronectin ((10)Fn3) by amino acid sequences of CDR from the light and heavy chains of the anti-TNF antibody F10. The assessment of TNF-binding properties of the resulting proteins by ELISA has revealed the highest activity of Hd3 containing sequences CDR-H1 and CDR-H2 of the antibody F10 and of Hd2 containing sequences CDR-H1 and CDR-H3. The proteins constructed by us on the fibronectin domain scaffold specifically bound TNF during Western blotting and also weakened its cytotoxic effect on L929 line cells. The highest neutralizing activity was demonstrated by the proteins Hd2 and Hd3, which induced, respectively, 10- and 50-fold increase in the EC(50) of TNF.

  15. PRO40 is a scaffold protein of the cell wall integrity pathway, linking the MAP kinase module to the upstream activator protein kinase C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Teichert

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways are crucial signaling instruments in eukaryotes. Most ascomycetes possess three MAPK modules that are involved in key developmental processes like sexual propagation or pathogenesis. However, the regulation of these modules by adapters or scaffolds is largely unknown. Here, we studied the function of the cell wall integrity (CWI MAPK module in the model fungus Sordaria macrospora. Using a forward genetic approach, we found that sterile mutant pro30 has a mutated mik1 gene that encodes the MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK of the proposed CWI pathway. We generated single deletion mutants lacking MAPKKK MIK1, MAPK kinase (MAPKK MEK1, or MAPK MAK1 and found them all to be sterile, cell fusion-deficient and highly impaired in vegetative growth and cell wall stress response. By searching for MEK1 interaction partners via tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified previously characterized developmental protein PRO40 as a MEK1 interaction partner. Although fungal PRO40 homologs have been implicated in diverse developmental processes, their molecular function is currently unknown. Extensive affinity purification, mass spectrometry, and yeast two-hybrid experiments showed that PRO40 is able to bind MIK1, MEK1, and the upstream activator protein kinase C (PKC1. We further found that the PRO40 N-terminal disordered region and the central region encompassing a WW interaction domain are sufficient to govern interaction with MEK1. Most importantly, time- and stress-dependent phosphorylation studies showed that PRO40 is required for MAK1 activity. The sum of our results implies that PRO40 is a scaffold protein for the CWI pathway, linking the MAPK module to the upstream activator PKC1. Our data provide important insights into the mechanistic role of a protein that has been implicated in sexual and asexual development, cell fusion, symbiosis, and pathogenicity in different fungal systems.

  16. Recombinant Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 Stimulates the Remodeling Chitosan-Based Porous Scaffold Into Hyaline-like Cartilage: Study in Heterotopic Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurshat M. Gaifullin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To study the morphology of remodeling the chitosan-based three-dimensional porous scaffold, containing bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 for chondroinduction, the experiments with heterotopic implantation using 28 Wistar rats were carried out. Scaffolds with growth factor (n=12 or without it (n=12, against intact control (n=4 were implanted subcutaneously. Classical methods of histology and morphometry as well as immune histochemical markers (CD-68, CD-31, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and osteonectin expression, one used to investigate zone of remodeling in euthanized animals at 4 and 8 weeks after implantation. The BMP-2 application provides more intensive and rapid new cartilage formation from the scaffold matter. The additional chondroinductive effect proved more intensive settlement and proliferation of chondral cells in the regenerate, expression of chondral phenotype with the building the hyaline-like matrix, and the supporting necessary balance between the matrix metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors.

  17. In vivo evaluation of whey protein-based biofilms as scaffolds for cutaneous cell cultures and biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouabhia, Mahmoud [Faculte de medecine dentaire, GREB, Universite Laval, Quebec (Ciheam) G1K 7P4 (Canada); Gilbert, Vanessa [Unite de Biotechnologie, Institut des biomateriaux, Hopital Saint-Francois d' Assise, CHUQ, 10 de l' Espinay, Quebec G1L 3L5 (Canada); Wang Hongxum [Unite de Biotechnologie, Institut des biomateriaux, Hopital Saint-Francois d' Assise, CHUQ, 10 de l' Espinay, Quebec G1L 3L5 (Canada); Subirade, Muriel [Chaire de recherche du Canada sur les proteines, bio-systemes et aliments fonctionnels, Centre de Recherche INAF/STELA, Universite Laval, Quebec (Ciheam) G1K 7P4 (Canada)

    2007-03-01

    This study evaluated the toxicity, biodegradability and immunogenicity of newly developed whey protein-based biofilms for possible use as biomaterials for medical applications. Biofilms were prepared using (A) a whey protein isolate plasticized with either diethylene glycol (DEG) or glycerol (GLY), and (B) {beta}-lactoglobulin ({beta}LGA) plasticized with DEG. The biofilms were implanted subcutaneously into Balb/c mice. Analyses were performed at various time points. At 15, 30 and 60 days post-implantation, no necrotic zones or exudates were present at the recipient sites. The biofilms began to degrade as early as 15 days post-implantation, as evidenced by erosion and crumbling. The macroscopic observations were supported by tissue analyses revealing no tissue necrosis or degradation and confirming that the biodegradation of the biofilms began as early as 15 days post-implantation and was almost complete after 60 days. The biodegradation was accompanied by significant leukocyte infiltration at 15 days which significantly decreased at 60 days. The absence of splenomagaly in the implanted mice confirms that these biofilms were not immunogenic. Whey protein-based biofilms are biocompatible and biodegradable and may be of interest for medical applications such as scaffolds for cutaneous cell cultures and skin recovery in burn patients.

  18. Cellulose hydrolysis ability of a Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome containing small-size scaffolding protein CipA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lan; Mori, Yutaka; Sermsathanaswadi, Junjarus; Apiwatanapiwat, Waraporn; Kosugi, Akihiko

    2015-10-20

    Mutant Clostridium thermocellum YM72 that produces small-size scaffolding protein CipA (ssCipA) was isolated from wild-type YM4. Sequencing of ssCipA revealed that two domains, cohesin 6 and cohesin 7, were not present. Cellulosome prepared from YM72 exhibited a significant reduction of hydrolysis ability on crystalline celluloses such as Sigmacell type-20 and cellulose from Halocynthia. To investigate this influence in vitro, artificial cellulosomes were assembled as recombinant CipA (rCipA) and ssCipA (rssCipA) using native free-cellulosomal subunits. The cellulosome assembled using rssCipA showed a 1.8-fold decrease in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose compared with that of rCipA. However, no significant differences in the hydrolysis of carboxymethylcellulose and acid-swollen cellulose were observed. One protein band was missing from the complex that was assembled using rssCipA (confirmed by native-PAGE). The missing protein was identified as CelJ, which is a major cellulosomal subunit. This suggests that insufficient cooperation of CelJ into the cellulosome results in the significant reduction of hydrolysis toward crystalline cellulose. These results indicate that cohesin 6 and 7 may be responsible for the cooperation of CelJ through cohesin and dockerin interactions, and adequate cooperation of CelJ into the cellulosome is important for significant hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose.

  19. In vivo evaluation of whey protein-based biofilms as scaffolds for cutaneous cell cultures and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Gilbert, Vanessa; Wang, Hongxum; Subirade, Muriel

    2007-03-01

    This study evaluated the toxicity, biodegradability and immunogenicity of newly developed whey protein-based biofilms for possible use as biomaterials for medical applications. Biofilms were prepared using (A) a whey protein isolate plasticized with either diethylene glycol (DEG) or glycerol (GLY), and (B) beta-lactoglobulin (betaLGA) plasticized with DEG. The biofilms were implanted subcutaneously into Balb/c mice. Analyses were performed at various time points. At 15, 30 and 60 days post-implantation, no necrotic zones or exudates were present at the recipient sites. The biofilms began to degrade as early as 15 days post-implantation, as evidenced by erosion and crumbling. The macroscopic observations were supported by tissue analyses revealing no tissue necrosis or degradation and confirming that the biodegradation of the biofilms began as early as 15 days post-implantation and was almost complete after 60 days. The biodegradation was accompanied by significant leukocyte infiltration at 15 days which significantly decreased at 60 days. The absence of splenomagaly in the implanted mice confirms that these biofilms were not immunogenic. Whey protein-based biofilms are biocompatible and biodegradable and may be of interest for medical applications such as scaffolds for cutaneous cell cultures and skin recovery in burn patients.

  20. Multiplexed multi-scale imaging: novel roles for the scaffold protein IQGAP1 in epithelial cell development (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweikhard, Volker

    2016-02-01

    The precise sub-cellular spatial localization of multi-protein complexes is increasingly recognized as a key mechanism governing the organization of mammalian cells. Consequently, there is a need for novel microscopy techniques capable of investigating such sub-cellular architectures in comprehensive detail. Here, we applied a novel multiplexed STORM super-resolution microscopy technique, in combination with high-throughput immunofluorescence microscopy and live-cell imaging, to investigate the roles of the scaffold protein IQGAP1 in epithelial cells. IQGAP1 is known to orchestrate a wide range of biological processes, including intracellular signaling, cytoskeletal regulation, cell-cell adhesion, and protein trafficking, by forming distinct complexes with a number of known interaction partners, and recruiting these complexes to specific subcellular locations. Our results demonstrate that, in addition to supporting epithelial adherens junctions by associating with specialized cortical actin structures, IQGAP1 plays a second role in which it controls the confinement of a unique, previously undocumented class of membranous compartments to the basal actin cortex. These largely immotile yet highly dynamic structures appear transiently as cells merge into clusters and establish of apical-basolateral (epithelial) polarity, and are identified as an intermediate compartment in the endocytic recycling pathways for cell junction complexes and cell surface receptors. Although these two functions of IQGAP1 occur in parallel and largely independently of each other, they both support the maturation and maintenance of polarized epithelial cell architectures.

  1. The multiple Tudor domain-containing protein TDRD1 is a molecular scaffold for mouse Piwi proteins and piRNA biogenesis factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathioudakis, Nikolas; Palencia, Andres; Kadlec, Jan; Round, Adam; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Sattler, Michael; Pillai, Ramesh S.; Cusack, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs expressed in the germline of animals. They associate with Argonaute proteins of the Piwi subfamily, forming ribonucleoprotein complexes that are involved in maintaining genome integrity. The N-terminal region of some Piwi proteins contains symmetrically dimethylated arginines. This modification is thought to enable recruitment of Tudor domain-containing proteins (TDRDs), which might serve as platforms mediating interactions between various proteins in the piRNA pathway. We measured the binding affinity of the four individual extended Tudor domains (TDs) of murine TDRD1 protein for three different methylarginine-containing peptides from murine Piwi protein MILI. The results show a preference of TD2 and TD3 for consecutive MILI peptides, whereas TD4 and TD1 have, respectively, lower and very weak affinity for any peptide. The affinity of TD1 for methylarginine peptides can be restored by a single-point mutation back to the consensus aromatic cage sequence. These observations were confirmed by pull-down experiments with endogenous Piwi and Piwi-associated proteins. The crystal structure of TD3 bound to a methylated MILI peptide shows an unexpected orientation of the bound peptide, with additional contacts of nonmethylated residues being made outside of the aromatic cage, consistent with solution NMR titration experiments. Finally, the molecular envelope of the four tandem Tudor domains of TDRD1, derived from small angle scattering data, reveals a flexible, elongated shape for the protein. Overall, the results show that TDRD1 can accommodate different peptides from different proteins, and can therefore act as a scaffold protein for complex assembly in the piRNA pathway. PMID:22996915

  2. Composites containing albumin protein or cyanoacrylate adhesives and biodegradable scaffolds: II. In vivo wound closure study in a rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; Duffy, Mark T.; Bloom, Jeffrey N.; Soller, Eric C.; Gilmour, Travis M.; Hoffman, Grant T.; Edward, Deepak

    2004-07-01

    Our Scaffold-Enhanced Biological Adhesive (SEBA) system was investigated as an alternative to sutures or adhesives alone for repair of wounds. Two scaffold materials were investigated: (i) a synthetic biodegradable material fabricated from poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid); and (ii) a biologic material, small intestinal submucosa, manufactured by Cook BioTech. Two adhesive materials were also investigated: (i) a biologic adhesive composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5mg/ml indocyanine green dye mixed in deionized water, and activated with an 808-nm diode laser; and (ii) Ethicon"s Dermabond, a 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate. The tensile strength and time-to-failure of skin incisions repaired in vivo in a rat model were measured at seven days postoperative. Incisions closed by protein solder alone, by Dermabond alone, or by suture, were also tested for comparison. The tensile strength of repairs formed using the SEBA system were 50% to 65% stronger than repairs formed by suture or either adhesive alone, with significantly less variations within each experimental group (average standard deviations of 15% for SEBA versus 38% for suture and 28% for adhesive alone). In addition, the time-to-failure curves showed a longevity not previously seen with the suture or adhesive alone techniques. The SEBA system acts to keep the dermis in tight apposition during the critical early phase of wound healing when tissue gaps are bridged by scar and granulation tissue. It has the property of being more flexible than either of the adhesives alone and may allow the apposed edges to move in conjunction with each other as a unit for a longer period of time and over a greater range of stresses than adhesives alone. This permits more rapid healing and establishment of integrity since the microgaps between the dermis edges are significantly reduced. By the time the scaffolds are sloughed from the wound site, there is greater strength and healing than that produced by adhesive alone or

  3. Protein stability in stored decellularized heart valve scaffolds and diffusion kinetics of protective molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shangping; Oldenhof, Harriëtte; Dai, Xiaolei; Haverich, Axel; Hilfiker, Andres; Harder, Michael; Wolkers, Willem F

    2014-02-01

    Decellularized tissues can be used as matrix implants. The aims of this study were to investigate protein stability and solvent accessibility in decellularized pulmonary heart valve tissues. Protein denaturation profiles of tissues were studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Protein solvent accessibility of tissue exposed to D2O, and diffusion kinetics of various protective molecules were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Little changes were observed in the protein denaturation temperature during storage, at either 5 or 40°C. Glycerol was found to stabilize proteins; it increased the protein denaturation temperature. The stabilizing effect of glycerol disappeared after washing the sample with saline solution. Hydrogen-to-deuterium exchange rates of protein amide groups were fastest in leaflet tissue, followed by artery and muscle tissue. Diffusion of glycerol was found to be fastest in muscle tissue, followed by artery and leaflet tissue. Diffusion coefficients were derived and used to estimate the time needed to reach saturation. Fixation of tissue with glutaraldehyde had little effects on exchange and diffusion rates. Diffusion rates decreased with increasing molecular size. Proteins in decellularized heart valve tissue are stable during storage. Glycerol increases protein stability in a reversible manner. Solvent accessibility studies of protein amide groups provide an additional tool to study proteins in tissues. Diffusion coefficients can be derived to simulate diffusion kinetics of protective molecules in tissues. This study provides novel tools to evaluate protein stability and solvent accessibility in tissues, which can be used to develop biopreservation strategies.

  4. Identification of obscure yet conserved actin-associated proteins in Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredez, Alexander R; Nayeri, Arash; Xu, Jennifer W; Krtková, Jana; Cande, W Zacheus

    2014-06-01

    Consistent with its proposed status as an early branching eukaryote, Giardia has the most divergent actin of any eukaryote and lacks core actin regulators. Although conserved actin-binding proteins are missing from Giardia, its actin is utilized similarly to that of other eukaryotes and functions in core cellular processes such as cellular organization, endocytosis, and cytokinesis. We set out to identify actin-binding proteins in Giardia using affinity purification coupled with mass spectroscopy (multidimensional protein identification technology [MudPIT]) and have identified >80 putative actin-binding proteins. Several of these have homology to conserved proteins known to complex with actin for functions in the nucleus and flagella. We validated localization and interaction for seven of these proteins, including 14-3-3, a known cytoskeletal regulator with a controversial relationship to actin. Our results indicate that although Giardia lacks canonical actin-binding proteins, there is a conserved set of actin-interacting proteins that are evolutionarily indispensable and perhaps represent some of the earliest functions of the actin cytoskeleton.

  5. Fibrinogen and fibrin based micro and nano scaffolds incorporated with drugs, proteins, cells and genes for therapeutic biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajangam, Thanavel; An, Seong Soo A

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, many types of natural and synthetic polymer-based micro- and nanocarriers, with exciting properties and applications, have been developed for application in various types of tissue regeneration, including bone, cartilage, nerve, blood vessels, and skin. The development of suitable polymers scaffold designs to aid the repair of specific cell types have created diverse and important potentials in tissue restoration. Fibrinogen (Fbg)- and fibrin (Fbn)-based micro- and nanostructures can provide suitable natural matrix environments. Since these primary materials are abundantly available in blood as the main coagulation proteins, they can easily interact with damaged tissues and cells through native biochemical interactions. Fbg- and Fbn-based micro and nanostructures can also be consecutively furnished/or encapsulated and specifically delivered, with multiple growth factors, proteins, and stem cells, in structures designed to aid in specific phases of the tissue regeneration process. The present review has been carried out to demonstrate the progress made with micro and nanoscaffold applications and features a number of applications of Fbg- and Fbn-based carriers in the field of biomaterials, including the delivery of drugs, active biomolecules, cells, and genes, that have been effectively used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  6. Urolithin as a converging scaffold linking ellagic acid and coumarin analogues: design of potent protein kinase CK2 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozza, Giorgio; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Bonvini, Paolo; Zorzi, Elisa; Pasquale, Riccardo; Rosolen, Angelo; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Meggio, Flavio; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Moro, Stefano

    2011-12-09

    Casein kinase 2 (CK2) is a ubiquitous, essential, and highly pleiotropic protein kinase; its abnormally high constitutive activity is suspected to underlie its pathogenic potential in neoplasia and other relevant diseases. Previously, using different in silico screening approaches, two potent and selective CK2 inhibitors were identified by our group: ellagic acid, a naturally occurring tannic acid derivative (K(i)=20 nM) and 3,8-dibromo-7-hydroxy-4-methylchromen-2-one (DBC, K(i)=60 nM). Comparing the crystallographic binding modes of both ellagic acid and DBC, an X-ray structure-driven merging approach was taken to design novel CK2 inhibitors with improved target affinity. A urolithin moiety is proposed as a possible bridging scaffold between the two known CK2 inhibitors, ellagic acid and DBC. Optimization of urolithin A as the bridging moiety led to the identification of 4-bromo-3,8-dihydroxy-benzo[c]chromen-6-one as a novel, potent and selective CK2 inhibitor, which shows a K(i) value of 7 nM against the protein kinase, representing a significant improvement in affinity for the target compared with the two parent fragments.

  7. Fibrinogen and fibrin based micro and nano scaffolds incorporated with drugs, proteins, cells and genes for therapeutic biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajangam T

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Thanavel Rajangam, Seong Soo A An Department of Bionanotechnology, Gachon University, Seongnam-Si, Republic of Korea Abstract: Over the past two decades, many types of natural and synthetic polymer-based micro- and nanocarriers, with exciting properties and applications, have been developed for application in various types of tissue regeneration, including bone, cartilage, nerve, blood vessels, and skin. The development of suitable polymers scaffold designs to aid the repair of specific cell types have created diverse and important potentials in tissue restoration. Fibrinogen (Fbg- and fibrin (Fbn-based micro- and nanostructures can provide suitable natural matrix environments. Since these primary materials are abundantly available in blood as the main coagulation proteins, they can easily interact with damaged tissues and cells through native biochemical interactions. Fbg- and Fbn-based micro and nanostructures can also be consecutively furnished/or encapsulated and specifically delivered, with multiple growth factors, proteins, and stem cells, in structures designed to aid in specific phases of the tissue regeneration process. The present review has been carried out to demonstrate the progress made with micro and nanoscaffold applications and features a number of applications of Fbg- and Fbn-based carriers in the field of biomaterials, including the delivery of drugs, active biomolecules, cells, and genes, that have been effectively used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Keywords: biomaterial, polymer composite, cross-linking, growth factor, drug delivery, controlled release, tissue regeneration

  8. Isolation of the new antigen receptor from wobbegong sharks, and use as a scaffold for the display of protein loop libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, S D; Krishnan, U V; Hattarki, M; De Gori, R; Irving, R A; Hudson, P J

    2001-08-01

    The new antigen receptor (NAR) from nurse sharks consists of an immunoglobulin variable domain attached to five constant domains, and is hypothesised to function as an antigen-binding antibody-like molecule. To determine whether the NAR is present in other species we have isolated a number of new antigen receptor variable domains from the spotted wobbegong shark (Orectolobus maculatus) and compared their structure to that of the nurse shark protein. To determine whether these wNARs can function as antigen-binding proteins, we have used them as scaffolds for the construction of protein libraries in which the CDR3 loop was randomised, and displayed the resulting recombinant domains on the surface of fd bacteriophages. On selection against several protein antigens, the highest affinity wNAR proteins were generated against the Gingipain K protease from Porphyromonas gingivalis. One wNAR protein bound Gingipain K specifically by ELISA and BIAcore analysis and, when expressed in E. coli and purified by affinity chromatography, eluted from an FPLC column as a single peak consistent with folding into a monomeric protein. Naturally occurring nurse shark and wobbegong NAR variable domains exhibit conserved cysteine residues within the CDR1 and CDR3 loops which potentially form disulphide linkages and enhance protein stability; proteins isolated from the in vitro NAR wobbegong library showed similar selection for such paired cysteine residues. Thus, the New Antigen Receptor represents a protein scaffold with possible stability advantages over conventional antibodies when used in in vitro molecular libraries.

  9. Fibrin glue is a candidate scaffold for long-term therapeutic protein expression in spontaneously differentiated adipocytes in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyagi, Yasuyuki [Center for Advanced Medicine, Chiba University Hospital, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Department of Genome Research and Clinical Application, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Kuroda, Masayuki, E-mail: kurodam@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Center for Advanced Medicine, Chiba University Hospital, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Department of Genome Research and Clinical Application, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Asada, Sakiyo [Center for Advanced Medicine, Chiba University Hospital, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Department of Genome Research and Clinical Application, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Tanaka, Shigeaki; Konno, Shunichi; Tanio, Masami; Aso, Masayuki [CellGenTech, Inc., Chiba (Japan); Okamoto, Yoshitaka [Center for Advanced Medicine, Chiba University Hospital, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Nakayama, Toshinori [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Saito, Yasushi [Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Bujo, Hideaki [Department of Genome Research and Clinical Application, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan)

    2012-01-01

    Adipose tissue is expected to provide a source of cells for protein replacement therapies via auto-transplantation. However, the conditioning of the environment surrounding the transplanted adipocytes for their long-term survival and protein secretion properties has not been established. We have recently developed a preparation procedure for preadipocytes, ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs), as a therapeutic gene vehicle suitable for stable gene product secretion. We herein report the results of our evaluation of using fibrin glue as a scaffold for the transplanted ccdPAs for the expression of a transduced gene in a three-dimensional culture system. The ccdPAs secreted the functional protein translated from an exogenously transduced gene, as well as physiological adipocyte proteins, and the long viability of ccdPAs (up to 84 days) was dependent on the fibrinogen concentrations. The ccdPAs spontaneously accumulated lipid droplets, and their expression levels of the transduced exogenous gene with its product were maintained for at least 56 days. The fibrinogen concentration modified the adipogenic differentiation of ccdPAs and their exogenous gene expression levels, and the levels of exogenously transduced gene expression at the different fibrinogen concentrations were dependent on the extent of adipogenic differentiation in the gel. These results indicate that fibrin glue helps to maintain the high adipogenic potential of cultured adipocytes after passaging in a 3D culture system, and suggests that once they are successfully implanted at the transplantation site, the cells exhibit increased expression of the transduced gene with adipogenic differentiation.

  10. Design of compound libraries based on natural product scaffolds and protein structure similarity clustering (PSSC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balamurugan, Rengarajan; Dekker, Frank J; Waldmann, Herbert; Dekker, Frans

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in structural biology, bioinformatics and combinatorial chemistry have significantly impacted the discovery of small molecules that modulate protein functions. Natural products which have evolved to bind to proteins may serve as biologically validated starting points for the design o

  11. Developmental Scaffolding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgi, Franco; Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The concept of scaffolding has wide resonance in several scientific fields. Here we attempt to adopt it for the study of development. In this perspective, the embryo is conceived as an integral whole, comprised of several hierarchical modules as in a recurrent circularity of emerging patterns....... Within the developmental hierarchy, each module yields an inter-level relationship that makes it possible for the scaffolding to mediate the production of selectable variations. Awide range of genetic, cellular and morphological mechanisms allows the scaffolding to integrate these modular variations...... into a functionally coordinate unit. A genetic scaffolding accounts for the inherited invariance of pattern formation during the embryo’s growth. At higher level, cells behave as agents endowed with the capacity to interpret any scaffolding variation as signs. The full hierarchy of a multi-level scaffolding...

  12. The clathrin adaptor Dab2 recruits EH domain scaffold proteins to regulate integrin β1 endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teckchandani, Anjali; Mulkearns, Erin E; Randolph, Timothy W; Toida, Natalie; Cooper, Jonathan A

    2012-08-01

    Endocytic adaptor proteins facilitate cargo recruitment and clathrin-coated pit nucleation. The prototypical clathrin adaptor AP2 mediates cargo recruitment, maturation, and scission of the pit by binding cargo, clathrin, and accessory proteins, including the Eps-homology (EH) domain proteins Eps15 and intersectin. However, clathrin-mediated endocytosis of some cargoes proceeds efficiently in AP2-depleted cells. We found that Dab2, another endocytic adaptor, also binds to Eps15 and intersectin. Depletion of EH domain proteins altered the number and size of clathrin structures and impaired the endocytosis of the Dab2- and AP2-dependent cargoes, integrin β1 and transferrin receptor, respectively. To test the importance of Dab2 binding to EH domain proteins for endocytosis, we mutated the EH domain-binding sites. This mutant localized to clathrin structures with integrin β1, AP2, and reduced amounts of Eps15. Of interest, although integrin β1 endocytosis was impaired, transferrin receptor internalization was unaffected. Surprisingly, whereas clathrin structures contain both Dab2 and AP2, integrin β1 and transferrin localize in separate pits. These data suggest that Dab2-mediated recruitment of EH domain proteins selectively drives the internalization of the Dab2 cargo, integrin β1. We propose that adaptors may need to be bound to their cargo to regulate EH domain proteins and internalize efficiently.

  13. An Ipomoea batatas iron-sulfur cluster scaffold protein gene, IbNFU1, is involved in salt tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degao Liu

    Full Text Available Iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis involving the nitrogen fixation (Nif proteins has been proposed as a general mechanism acting in various organisms. NifU-like protein may play an important role in protecting plants against abiotic and biotic stresses. An iron-sulfur cluster scaffold protein gene, IbNFU1, was isolated from a salt-tolerant sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam. line LM79 in our previous study, but its role in sweetpotato stress tolerance was not investigated. In the present study, the IbNFU1 gene was introduced into a salt-sensitive sweetpotato cv. Lizixiang to characterize its function in salt tolerance. The IbNFU1-overexpressing sweetpotato plants exhibited significantly higher salt tolerance compared with the wild-type. Proline and reduced ascorbate content were significantly increased, whereas malonaldehyde (MDA content was significantly decreased in the transgenic plants. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and photosynthesis were significantly enhanced in the transgenic plants. H2O2 was also found to be significantly less accumulated in the transgenic plants than in the wild-type. Overexpression of IbNFU1 up-regulated pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS and pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (P5CR genes under salt stress. The systemic up-regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging genes was found in the transgenic plants under salt stress. These findings suggest that IbNFU1gene is involved in sweetpotato salt tolerance and enhances salt tolerance of the transgenic sweetpotato plants by regulating osmotic balance, protecting membrane integrity and photosynthesis and activating ROS scavenging system.

  14. Muscle A-Kinase Anchoring Protein-α is an Injury-Specific Signaling Scaffold Required for Neurotrophic- and Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate-Mediated Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophic factor and cAMP-dependent signaling promote the survival and neurite outgrowth of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs after injury. However, the mechanisms conferring neuroprotection and neuroregeneration downstream to these signals are unclear. We now reveal that the scaffold protein muscle A-kinase anchoring protein-α (mAKAPα is required for the survival and axon growth of cultured primary RGCs. Although genetic deletion of mAKAPα early in prenatal RGC development did not affect RGC survival into adulthood, nor promoted the death of RGCs in the uninjured adult retina, loss of mAKAPα in the adult increased RGC death after optic nerve crush. Importantly, mAKAPα was required for the neuroprotective effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and cyclic adenosine-monophosphate (cAMP after injury. These results identify mAKAPα as a scaffold for signaling in the stressed neuron that is required for RGC neuroprotection after optic nerve injury.

  15. Interplay between self-assembled structure of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and osteoblast functions in three-dimensional titanium alloy scaffolds: Stimulation of osteogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nune, K C; Kumar, A; Murr, L E; Misra, R D K

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional cellular scaffolds are receiving significant attention in bone tissue engineering to treat segmental bone defects. However, there are indications of lack of significant osteoinductive ability of three-dimensional cellular scaffolds. In this regard, the objective of the study is to elucidate the interplay between bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-2) and osteoblast functions on 3D mesh structures with different porosities and pore size that were fabricated by electron beam melting. Self-assembled dendritic microstructure with interconnected cellular-type morphology of BMP-2 on 3D scaffolds stimulated osteoblast functions including adhesion, proliferation, and mineralization, with prominent effect on 2-mm mesh. Furthermore, immunofluorescence studies demonstrated higher density and viability of osteoblasts on lower porosity mesh structure (2 mm) as compared to 3- and 4-mm mesh structures. Enhanced filopodia cellular extensions with extensive cell spreading was observed on BMP-2 treated mesh structures, a behavior that is attributed to the unique self-assembled structure of BMP-2 that effectively communicates with the cells. The study underscores the potential of BMP-2 in imparting osteoinductive capability to the 3D printed scaffolds.

  16. Fluorescent Magnesium Nanocomplex in Protein Scaffold for Cell Nuclei Imaging Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandya, Alok [Ahmedabad Univ. (India); Tripathi, Apritam [Ahmedabad Univ. (India); Purohit, Rahul [Ahmedabad Univ. (India); Singh, Sanjay [Ahmedabad Univ. (India); Nandasiri, Manjula I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Karakoti, Ajay S. [Ahmedabad Univ. (India); Singh, Surinder P. [National Physical Lab., New Delhi (India); Shanker, Rishi [Ahmedabad Univ. (India)

    2015-10-27

    Here in, we report a facile strategy for the synthesis of water-soluble ultra-fine blue emitting fluorescent Magnesium nanoparticles-protein complex (MgNC). This MgNC is demonstrated to exhibit excellent photo stability and biocompatibility. It was also observed that MgNC stain cell nuclei with high specifcity.

  17. Structural insights into yeast histone chaperone Hif1: a scaffold protein recruiting protein complexes to core histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hejun; Zhang, Mengying; He, Wei; Zhu, Zhongliang; Teng, Maikun; Gao, Yongxiang; Niu, Liwen

    2014-09-15

    Yeast Hif1 [Hat1 (histone acetyltransferase 1)-interacting factor], a homologue of human NASP (nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein), is a histone chaperone that is involved in various protein complexes which modify histones during telomeric silencing and chromatin reassembly. For elucidating the structural basis of Hif1, in the present paper we demonstrate the crystal structure of Hif1 consisting of a superhelixed TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domain and an extended acid loop covering the rear of TPR domain, which represent typical characteristics of SHNi-TPR [Sim3 (start independent of mitosis 3)-Hif1-NASP interrupted TPR] proteins. Our binding assay indicates that Hif1 could bind to the histone octamer via histones H3 and H4. The acid loop is shown to be crucial for the binding of histones and may also change the conformation of the TPR groove. By binding to the core histone complex Hif1 may recruit functional protein complexes to modify histones during chromatin reassembly.

  18. Distinct and overlapping functions of the cullin E3 ligase scaffolding proteins CUL4A and CUL4B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The cullin 4 subfamily of genes includes CUL4A and CUL4B, which share a mostly identical amino acid sequence aside from the elongated N-terminal region in CUL4B. Both act as scaffolding proteins for modular cullin RING ligase 4 (CRL4) complexes which promote the ubiquitination of a variety of substrates. CRL4 function is vital to cells as loss of both genes or their shared substrate adaptor protein DDB1 halts proliferation and eventually leads to cell death. Due to their high structural similarity, CUL4A and CUL4B share a substantial overlap in function. However, in some cases, differences in subcellular localization, spatiotemporal expression patterns and stress-inducibility preclude functional compensation. In this review, we highlight the most essential functions of the CUL4 genes in: DNA repair and replication, chromatin-remodeling, cell cycle regulation, embryogenesis, hematopoiesis and spermatogenesis. CUL4 genes are also clinically relevant as dysregulation can contribute to the onset of cancer and CRL4 complexes are often hijacked by certain viruses to promote viral replication and survival. Also, mutations in CUL4B have been implicated in a subset of patients suffering from syndromic X-linked intellectual disability (AKA mental retardation). Interestingly, the antitumor effects of immunomodulatory drugs are caused by their binding to the CRL4CRBN complex and re-directing the E3 ligase towards the Ikaros transcription factors IKZF1 and IKZF3. Because of their influence over key cellular functions and relevance to human disease, CRL4s are considered promising targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26344709

  19. Phthalocyanines as Molecular Scaffolds to Block Disease-Associated Protein Aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente-Gabioud, Ariel A; Miotto, Marco C; Chesta, María E; Lombardo, Verónica; Binolfi, Andres; Fernández, Claudio O

    2016-05-17

    The aggregation of proteins into toxic conformations plays a critical role in the development of different neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Creutzfled-Jakob's disease (CJD). These disorders share a common pathological mechanism that involves the formation of aggregated protein species including toxic oligomers and amyloid fibrils. The aggregation of alpha-synuclein (αS) in PD and the amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) and tau protein in AD results in neuronal death and disease onset. In the case of CJD, the misfolding of the physiological prion protein (PrP) induces a chain reaction that results in accumulation of particles that elicit brain damage. Currently, there is no preventive therapy for these diseases and the available therapeutic approaches are based on the treatment of the symptoms rather than the underlying causes of the disease. Accordingly, the aggregation pathway of these proteins represents a useful target for therapeutic intervention. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of amyloid formation and its inhibition is of high clinical importance. The design of small molecules that efficiently inhibit the aggregation process and/or neutralize its associated toxicity constitutes a promising tool for the development of therapeutic strategies against these disorders. In this accounts, we discuss current knowledge on the anti-amyloid activity of phthalocyanines and their potential use as drug candidates in neurodegeneration. These tetrapyrrolic compounds modulate the amyloid assembly of αS, tau, Aβ, and the PrP in vitro, and protect cells from the toxic effects of amyloid aggregates. In addition, in scrapie-infected mice, these compounds showed important prophylactic antiscrapie properties. The structural basis for the inhibitory effect of phthalocyanines on amyloid filament assembly relies on specific π-π interactions between the aromatic ring system of these molecules and aromatic residues in the

  20. Scaffold-forming and Adhesive Contributions of Synthetic Laminin-binding Proteins to Basement Membrane Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Karen K; Capizzi, Stephanie; Yurchenco, Peter D

    2009-03-27

    Laminins that possess three short arms contribute to basement membrane assembly by anchoring to cell surfaces, polymerizing, and binding to nidogen and collagen IV. Although laminins containing the alpha4 and alpha5 subunits are expressed in alpha2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy, they may be ineffective substitutes because they bind weakly to cell surfaces and/or because they lack the third arm needed for polymerization. We asked whether linker proteins engineered to bind to deficient laminins that provide such missing activities would promote basement membrane assembly in a Schwann cell model. A chimeric fusion protein (alphaLNNd) that adds a short arm terminus to laminin through the nidogen binding locus was generated and compared with the dystrophy-ameliorating protein miniagrin (mAgrin) that binds to the laminin coiled-coil dystroglycan and sulfatides. alphaLNNd was found to mediate laminin binding to collagen IV, to bind to galactosyl sulfatide, and to selectively convert alpha-short arm deletion-mutant laminins LmDeltaalphaLN and LmDeltaalphaLN-L4b into polymerizing laminins. This protein enabled polymerization-deficient laminin but not an adhesion-deficient laminin lacking LG domains (LmDeltaLG) to assemble an extracellular matrix on Schwann cell surfaces. mAgrin, on the other hand, enabled LmDeltaLG to form an extracellular matrix on cell surfaces without increasing accumulation of non-polymerizing laminins. These gain-of-function studies reveal distinct polymerization and anchorage contributions to basement membrane assembly in which the three different LN domains mediate the former, and the LG domains provide primary anchorage with secondary contributions from the alphaLN domain. These findings may be relevant for an understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of laminin deficiency states.

  1. Comparative study of osteogenic potential of a composite scaffold incorporating either endogenous bone morphogenetic protein-2 or exogenous phytomolecule icaritin: an in vitro efficacy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S-H; Wang, X-L; Xie, X-H; Zheng, L-Z; Yao, D; Wang, D-P; Leng, Y; Zhang, G; Qin, L

    2012-08-01

    A local delivery system with sustained and efficient release of therapeutic agents from an appropriate carrier is desirable for orthopedic applications. Novel composite scaffolds made of poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) with tricalcium phosphate (PLGA/TCP) were fabricated by an advanced low-temperature rapid prototyping technique, which incorporated either endogenous bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) (PLGA/TCP/BMP-2) or phytomolecule icaritin (ICT) (PLGA/TCP/ICT) at low, middle and high doses. PLGA/TCP served as control. In vitro degradation, osteogenesis and release tests showed statistical differences among PLGA/TCP/ICT, PLGA/TCP and PLGA/TCP/BMP-2 groups, where PLGA/TCP/ICT had the desired slow release of bioactive icaritin in a dose-dependent manner, whereas there was almost no BMP-2 release from the PLGA/TCP/BMP-2 scaffolds. PLGA/TCP/ICT significantly increased more ALP activity, upregulated mRNA expression of osteogenic genes and enhanced calcium deposition and mineralization in rabbit bone marrow stem cells cultured on scaffolds compared with the other two groups. These results indicate the desired degradation rate, osteogenic capability and release property in PLGA/TCP/ICT composite scaffold, as icaritin preserved its bioactivity and structure after incorporation, while PLGA/TCP/BMP-2 did not show an initially expected osteogenic potential, owing to loss of the original bioactivity of BMP-2 during its incorporation and fabrication procedure. The results suggest that PLGA/TCP composite scaffolds incorporating osteogenic ICT might be a promising approach for bone tissue bioengineering and regeneration.

  2. A study of the spatial protein organization of the postsynaptic density isolated from porcine cerebral cortex and cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun-Hong, Yen; Chih-Fan, Chuang; Chia-Wei, Chang; Yen-Chung, Chang

    2011-10-01

    Postsynaptic density (PSD) is a protein supramolecule lying underneath the postsynaptic membrane of excitatory synapses and has been implicated to play important roles in synaptic structure and function in mammalian central nervous system. Here, PSDs were isolated from two distinct regions of porcine brain, cerebral cortex and cerebellum. SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analyses indicated that cerebral and cerebellar PSDs consisted of a similar set of proteins with noticeable differences in the abundance of various proteins between these samples. Subsequently, protein localization in these PSDs was analyzed by using the Nano-Depth-Tagging method. This method involved the use of three synthetic reagents, as agarose beads whose surface was covalently linked with a fluorescent, photoactivable, and cleavable chemical crosslinker by spacers of varied lengths. After its application was verified by using a synthetic complex consisting of four layers of different proteins, the Nano-Depth-Tagging method was used here to yield information concerning the depth distribution of various proteins in the PSD. The results indicated that in both cerebral and cerebellar PSDs, glutamate receptors, actin, and actin binding proteins resided in the peripheral regions within ∼ 10 nm deep from the surface and that scaffold proteins, tubulin subunits, microtubule-binding proteins, and membrane cytoskeleton proteins found in mammalian erythrocytes resided in the interiors deeper than 10 nm from the surface in the PSD. Finally, by using the immunoabsorption method, binding partner proteins of two proteins residing in the interiors, PSD-95 and α-tubulin, and those of two proteins residing in the peripheral regions, elongation factor-1α and calcium, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α subunit, of cerebral and cerebellar PSDs were identified. Overall, the results indicate a striking similarity in protein organization between the PSDs isolated from porcine cerebral cortex and cerebellum

  3. Development of Scaffolds for Light Harvesting and Photocatalysis from the Coat Protein of Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedeo, Michel Toussaint

    The utility of a previously developed TMV-based light harvesting system has been dramatically expanded through the introduction of reactive handles for the site-specific modification of the interior and exterior surfaces. Further experiments to reengineer the coat protein have produced structures with unique, unexpected, and useful assembly properties that complement the newly available surface modifications. Energy transfer from chromophores in the RNA channel of self-assembled TMV structures to the exterior was made possible by conjugation of acceptor dyes and porphyrins to the N-terminus. By repositioning the N-terminus to the pore through circular permutation, this process was repeated to create structures that mimic the light harvesting 1 complex of photosynthetic bacteria. To study and improve upon natural photosynthesis, closely packed chromophore arrays and gold nanoparticles were tethered to the pore of stabilized TMV disks through introduction of a uniquely reactive lysine. Finally, a dimeric TMV coat protein was produced to control the distribution and arrangement of synthetic groups with synergistic activity.

  4. Actin-organising properties of the muscular dystrophy protein myotilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Nandelstadh, Pernilla; Grönholm, Mikaela; Moza, Monica; Lamberg, Arja; Savilahti, Harri; Carpén, Olli

    2005-10-15

    Myotilin is a sarcomeric Z-disc protein that binds F-actin directly and bundles actin filaments, although it does not contain a conventional actin-binding domain. Expression of mutant myotilin leads to sarcomeric alterations in the dominantly inherited limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1A and in myofibrillar myopathy/desmin-related myopathy. Together, with previous in vitro studies, this indicates that myotilin has an important function in the assembly and maintenance of Z-discs. This study characterises further the interaction between myotilin and actin. Functionally important regions in myotilin were identified by actin pull-down and yeast two-hybrid assays and with a novel strategy that combines in vitro DNA transposition-based peptide insertion mutagenesis with phenotype analysis in yeast cells. The shortest fragment to bind actin was the second Ig domain together with a short C-terminal sequence. Concerted action of the first and second Ig domain was, however, necessary for the functional activity of myotilin, as verified by analysis of transposon mutants, actin binding and phenotypic effect in mammalian cells. Furthermore, the Ig domains flanked with N- and C-terminal regions were needed for actin-bundling, indicating that the mere actin-binding sequence was insufficient for the actin-regulating activity. None of the four known disease-associated mutations altered the actin-organising ability. These results, together with previous studies in titin and kettin, identify the Ig domain as an actin-binding unit.

  5. Semiotic scaffolding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Life processes at all levels (from the genetic to the behavioral) are coordinated by semiotic interactions between cells, tissues, membranes, organs, or individuals and tuned through evolution to stabilize important functions. A stabilizing dynamics based on a system of semiotic scaffoldings...... implies that genes do not control the life of organisms, they merely scaffold it. The nature-nurture dynamics is thus far more complex and open than is often claimed. Contrary to physically based interactions, semiotic interactions do not depend on any direct causal connection between the sign vehicle...... semiotic scaffolding is not, of course, exclusive for phylogenetic and ontogenetic development, it is also an important dynamical element in cultural evolution....

  6. Design of pH sensitive binding proteins from the hyperthermophilic Sso7d scaffold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimish Gera

    Full Text Available We have engineered pH sensitive binding proteins for the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G (hIgG (hFc using two different strategies - histidine scanning and random mutagenesis. We obtained an hFc-binding protein, Sso7d-hFc, through mutagenesis of the Sso7d protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus; Sso7d-hFc was isolated from a combinatorial library of Sso7d mutants using yeast surface display. Subsequently, we identified a pH sensitive mutant, Sso7d-his-hFc, through systematic evaluation of Sso7d-hFc mutants containing single histidine substitutions. In parallel, we also developed a yeast display screening strategy to isolate a different pH sensitive hFc binder, Sso7d-ev-hFc, from a library of mutants obtained by random mutagenesis of a pool of hFc binders. In contrast to Sso7d-hFc, both Sso7d-his-hFc and Sso7d-ev-hFc have a higher binding affinity for hFc at pH 7.4 than at pH 4.5. The Sso7d-mutant hFc binders can be recombinantly expressed at high yield in E. coli and are monomeric in solution. They bind an epitope in the CH3 domain of hFc that has high sequence homology in all four hIgG isotypes (hIgG(1-4, and recognize hIgG(1-4 as well as deglycosylated hIgG in western blotting assays. pH sensitive hFc binders are attractive candidates for use in chromatography, to achieve elution of IgG under milder pH conditions. However, the surface density of immobilized hFc binders, as well as the avidity effect arising from the multivalent interaction of dimeric hFc with the capture surface, influences the pH dependence of dissociation from the capture surface. Therefore, further studies are needed to evaluate if the Sso7d mutants identified in this study are indeed useful as affinity ligands in chromatography.

  7. The scaffold protein MEK Partner 1 is required for the survival of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, Mihaela; Wang, Limin; Conrad, Susan E

    2012-07-09

    MEK Partner 1 (MP1 or MAPKSP1) is a scaffold protein that has been reported to function in multiple signaling pathways, including the ERK, PAK and mTORC pathways. Several of these pathways influence the biology of breast cancer, but MP1's functional significance in breast cancer cells has not been investigated. In this report, we demonstrate a requirement for MP1 expression in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer cells. MP1 is widely expressed in both ER-positive and negative breast cancer cell lines, and in non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial cell lines. However, inhibition of its expression using siRNA duplexes resulted in detachment and apoptosis of several ER-positive breast cancer cell lines, but not ER-negative breast cancer cells or non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells. Inhibition of MP1 expression in ER-positive MCF-7 cells did not affect ERK activity, but resulted in reduced Akt1 activity and reduced ER expression and activity. Inhibition of ER expression did not result in cell death, suggesting that decreased ER expression is not the cause of cell death. In contrast, pharmacological inhibition of PI3K signaling did induce cell death in MCF-7 cells, and expression of a constitutively active form of Akt1 partially rescued the cell death observed when the MP1 gene was silenced in these cells. Together, these results suggest that MP1 is required for pro-survival signaling from the PI3K/Akt pathway in ER-positive breast cancer cells.

  8. Carbon nanotube interaction with extracellular matrix proteins producing scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonelli FM

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Fernanda MP Tonelli,1 Anderson K Santos,1 Katia N Gomes,2 Eudes Lorençon,2 Silvia Guatimosim,3 Luiz O Ladeira,2 Rodrigo R Resende11Cell Signaling and Nanobiotechnology Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 2Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 3Intracellular Cardiomiocyte Signaling Laboratory, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, BrazilAbstract: In recent years, significant progress has been made in organ transplantation, surgical reconstruction, and the use of artificial prostheses to treat the loss or failure of an organ or bone tissue. In recent years, considerable attention has been given to carbon nanotubes and collagen composite materials and their applications in the field of tissue engineering due to their minimal foreign-body reactions, an intrinsic antibacterial nature, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and the ability to be molded into various geometries and forms such as porous structures, suitable for cell ingrowth, proliferation, and differentiation. Recently, grafted collagen and some other natural and synthetic polymers with carbon nanotubes have been incorporated to increase the mechanical strength of these composites. Carbon nanotube composites are thus emerging as potential materials for artificial bone and bone regeneration in tissue engineering.Keywords: carbon nanotubes, tissue engineering, extracellular matrix proteins, collagen, hyaluronic acid, stem cells

  9. Composites containing albumin protein or cyanoacrylate adhesives and biodegradable scaffolds: I. Acute wound closure study in a rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Grant T.; Soller, Eric C.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; Duffy, Mark T.; Bloom, Jeffrey N.; Gilmour, Travis M.; Gonnerman, Krista N.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.

    2004-07-01

    Composite adhesives composed of biodegradable scaffolds impregnated with a biological or synthetic adhesive were investigated for use in wound closure as an alternative to using either one of the adhesives alone. Two different scaffold materials were investigated: (i) a synthetic biodegradable material fabricated from poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid); and (ii) a biological material, small intestinal sub mucosa, manufactured by Cook BioTech. The biological adhesive was composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5mg/ml indocyanine green dye mixed in deionized water, and activated with an 808-nm diode laser. The synthetic adhesive was Ethicon's Dermabond, a 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate. The tensile strength of skin incisions repaired ex vivo in a rat model, by adhesive alone or in combination with a scaffold, as well as the time-to-failure, were measured and compared. The tensile strength of repairs formed using the scaffold-enhanced biological adhesives were on average, 80% stronger than their non-enhanced counterparts, with an accompanying increase in the time-to-failure of the repairs. These results support the theory that a scaffold material with an irregular surface that bridges the wound provides a stronger, more durable and consistent adhesion, due to the distribution of the tensile stress forces over the many micro-adhesions provided by the irregular surface, rather than the one large continuous adhesive contact. This theory is also supported by several previous ex vivo experiments demonstrating enhanced tensile strength of irregular versus smooth scaffold surfaces in identical tissue repairs performed on bovine thoracic aorta, liver, spleen, small intestine and lung tissue.

  10. Scaffolded biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minelli, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    Descriptions and interpretations of the natural world are dominated by dichotomies such as organism vs. environment, nature vs. nurture, genetic vs. epigenetic, but in the last couple of decades strong dissatisfaction with those partitions has been repeatedly voiced and a number of alternative perspectives have been suggested, from perspectives such as Dawkins' extended phenotype, Turner's extended organism, Oyama's Developmental Systems Theory and Odling-Smee's niche construction theory. Last in time is the description of biological phenomena in terms of hybrids between an organism (scaffolded system) and a living or non-living scaffold, forming unit systems to study processes such as reproduction and development. As scaffold, eventually, we can define any resource used by the biological system, especially in development and reproduction, without incorporating it as happens in the case of resources fueling metabolism. Addressing biological systems as functionally scaffolded systems may help pointing to functional relationships that can impart temporal marking to the developmental process and thus explain its irreversibility; revisiting the boundary between development and metabolism and also regeneration phenomena, by suggesting a conceptual framework within which to investigate phenomena of regular hypermorphic regeneration such as characteristic of deer antlers; fixing a periodization of development in terms of the times at which a scaffolding relationship begins or is terminated; and promoting plant galls to legitimate study objects of developmental biology.

  11. Using in vitro maturation and cell-free expression to explore [FeFe] hydrogenase activation and protein scaffolding requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swartz, James [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2017-01-25

    Final Project Report describing work to elucidate mechanisms for the activation of [FeFe]-hydrogenases and to explore the impact of the polypeptide scaffolding on the function of the Fe-S redox and catalytic centers with emphasis on improving oxygen tolerance.

  12. Structure and function of a G-actin sequestering protein with a vital role in malaria oocyst development inside the mosquito vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hliscs, Marion; Sattler, Julia M; Tempel, Wolfram; Artz, Jennifer D; Dong, Aiping; Hui, Raymond; Matuschewski, Kai; Schüler, Herwig

    2010-04-09

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are evolutionary conserved G-actin-binding proteins that regulate microfilament turnover. CAPs have a modular structure consisting of an N-terminal adenylate cyclase binding domain, a central proline-rich segment, and a C-terminal actin binding domain. Protozoan parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa, such as Cryptosporidium and the malaria parasite Plasmodium, express small CAP orthologs with homology to the C-terminal actin binding domain (C-CAP). Here, we demonstrate by reverse genetics that C-CAP is dispensable for the pathogenic Plasmodium blood stages. However, c-cap(-) parasites display a complete defect in oocyst development in the insect vector. By trans-species complementation we show that the Cryptosporidium parvum ortholog complements the Plasmodium gene functions. Purified recombinant C. parvum C-CAP protein binds actin monomers and prevents actin polymerization. The crystal structure of C. parvum C-CAP shows two monomers with a right-handed beta-helical fold intercalated at their C termini to form the putative physiological dimer. Our results reveal a specific vital role for an apicomplexan G-actin-binding protein during sporogony, the parasite replication phase that precedes formation of malaria transmission stages. This study also exemplifies how Plasmodium reverse genetics combined with biochemical and structural analyses of orthologous proteins can offer a fast track toward systematic gene characterization in apicomplexan parasites.

  13. Designs for the self-assembly of open and closed macromolecular structures and a molecular switch using DNA methyltransferases to order proteins on nucleic acid scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steven S.

    2002-06-01

    The methyltransferase-directed addressing of fusion proteins to DNA scaffolds offers an approach to the construction of protein/nucleic acid biostructures with potential in a variety of applications. The technology is currently only limited by the yield of high occupancy structures. However, current evidence shows that DNA scaffolds that contain three or four targeted proteins can be reliably constructed. This permits a variety of macromolecular designs, several of which are given in this paper. Designs for open and closed two-dimensional and three-dimensional assemblies and a design for a molecular switch are discussed. The closed two-dimensional assembly takes the form of a square, and could find application as a component of other systems including a macromolecular rotaxane. The closed three-dimensional system takes the form of a trigonal bipyramid and could find application as a macromolecular carcerand. The molecular switch could find application as a peptide biosensor. Guidelines for the construction and structural verification of these designs are reported.

  14. Induction of bone formation in biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds by bone morphogenetic protein-2 and primary osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, L A; Rath, S N; Maier, A K; Beier, J P; Arkudas, A; Greil, P; Horch, R E; Kneser, U

    2014-03-01

    Bone tissue engineering strategies mainly depend on porous scaffold materials. In this study, novel biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) matrices were generated by 3D-printing. High porosity was achieved by starch consolidation. This study aimed to characterise the porous BCP-scaffold properties and interactions of osteogenic cells and growth factors under in vivo conditions. Five differently treated constructs were implanted subcutaneously in syngeneic rats: plain BCP constructs (group A), constructs pre-treated with BMP-2 (group B; 1.6 µg BMP-2 per scaffold), seeded with primary osteoblasts (OB) (group C), seeded with OB and BMP-2 (group D) and constructs seeded with OB and pre-cultivated in a flow bioreactor for 6 weeks (group E). After 2, 4 and 6 weeks, specimens were explanted and subjected to histological and molecular biological analyses. Explanted scaffolds were invaded by fibrovascular tissue without significant foreign body reactions. Morphometric analysis demonstrated significantly increased bone formation in samples from group D (OB + BMP-2) compared to all other groups. Samples from groups B-E displayed significant mRNA expression of bone-specific genes after 6 weeks. Pre-cultivation in the flow bioreactor (group E) induced bone formation comparable with group B. In this study, differences in bone distribution between samples with BMP-2 or osteoblasts could be observed. In conclusion, combination of osteoblasts and BMP-2 synergistically enhanced bone formation in novel ceramic scaffolds. These results provide the basis for further experiments in orthotopic defect models with a focus on future applications in orthopaedic and reconstructive surgery.

  15. Mechanical properties, biological activity and protein controlled release by poly(vinyl alcohol)–bioglass/chitosan–collagen composite scaffolds: A bone tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pon-On, Weeraphat, E-mail: fsciwpp@ku.ac.th [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol; Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Thongbunchoo, Jirawan; Krishnamra, Nateetip [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University (Thailand); Department of Physiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University (Thailand); Tang, I-Ming [ThEP Center, Commission of Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Rd. (Thailand); Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, composite scaffolds made with different weight ratios (0.5:1, 1:1 and 2:1) of bioactive glass (15Ca:80Si:5P) (BG)/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) (PVABG) and chitosan (Chi)/collagen (Col) (ChiCol) were prepared by three mechanical freeze–thaw followed by freeze-drying to obtain the porous scaffolds. The mechanical properties and the in vitro biocompatibility of the composite scaffolds to simulated body fluid (SBF) and to rat osteoblast-like UMR-106 cells were investigated. The results from the studies indicated that the porosity and compressive strength were controlled by the weight ratio of PVABG:ChiCol. The highest compressive modulus of the composites made was 214.64 MPa which was for the 1:1 weight ratio PVABG:ChiCol. Mineralization study in SBF showed the formation of apatite crystals on the PVABG:ChiCol surface after 7 days of incubation. In vitro cell availability and proliferation tests confirmed the osteoblast attachment and growth on the PVABG:ChiCol surface. MTT and ALP tests on the 1:1 weight ratio PVABG:ChiCol composite indicated that the UMR-106 cells were viable. Alkaline phosphatase activity was found to increase with increasing culturing time. In addition, we showed the potential of PVABG:ChiCol drug delivery through PBS solution studies. 81.14% of BSA loading had been achieved and controlled release for over four weeks was observed. Our results indicated that the PVABG:ChiCol composites, especially the 1:1 weight ratio composite exhibited significantly improved mechanical, mineral deposition, biological properties and controlled release. This made them potential candidates for bone tissue engineering applications. - Graphical abstract: Mechanical properties, biological activity and protein controlled release by poly(vinyl alcohol)–bioglass/chitosan–collagen composite scaffolds: A bone tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • Preparation of PVABG:ChiCol hybrid composites and their bioactivities • Mechanical

  16. Determination of the critical residues responsible for cardiac myosin binding protein C's interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Md Shenuarin; Gulick, James; Osinska, Hanna; Gupta, Manish; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    Despite early demonstrations of myosin binding protein C's (MyBP-C) interaction with actin, different investigators have reached different conclusions regarding the relevant and necessary domains mediating this binding. Establishing the detailed structure-function relationships is needed to fully understand cMyBP-C's ability to impact on myofilament contraction as mutations in different domains are causative for familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We defined cMyBP-C's N-terminal structural domains that are necessary or sufficient to mediate interactions with actin and/or the head region of the myosin heavy chain (S2-MyHC). Using a combination of genetics and functional assays, we defined the actin binding site(s) present in cMyBP-C. We confirmed that cMyBP-C's C1 and m domains productively interact with actin, while S2-MyHC interactions are restricted to the m domain. Using residue-specific mutagenesis, we identified the critical actin binding residues and distinguished them from the residues that were critical for S2-MyHC binding. To validate the structural and functional significance of these residues, we silenced the endogenous cMyBP-C in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRC) using cMyBP-C siRNA, and replaced the endogenous cMyBP-C with normal or actin binding-ablated cMyBP-C. Replacement with actin binding-ablated cMyBP-C showed that the mutated protein did not incorporate into the sarcomere normally. Residues responsible for actin and S2-MyHC binding are partially present in overlapping domains but are unique. Expression of an actin binding-deficient cMyBP-C resulted in abnormal cytosolic distribution of the protein, indicating that interaction with actin is essential for the formation and/or maintenance of normal cMyBP-C sarcomeric distribution.

  17. Plant villin, lily P-135-ABP, possesses G-actin binding activity and accelerates the polymerization and depolymerization of actin in a Ca2+-sensitive manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Etsuo; Tominaga, Motoki; Mabuchi, Issei; Tsuji, Yasunori; Staiger, Christopher J; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Shimmen, Teruo

    2005-10-01

    From germinating pollen of lily, two types of villins, P-115-ABP and P-135-ABP, have been identified biochemically. Ca(2+)-CaM-dependent actin-filament binding and bundling activities have been demonstrated for both villins previously. Here, we examined the effects of lily villins on the polymerization and depolymerization of actin. P-115-ABP and P-135-ABP present in a crude protein extract prepared from germinating pollen bound to a DNase I affinity column in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Purified P-135-ABP reduced the lag period that precedes actin filament polymerization from monomers in the presence of either Ca(2+) or Ca(2+)-CaM. These results indicated that P-135-ABP can form a complex with G-actin in the presence of Ca(2+) and this complex acts as a nucleus for polymerization of actin filaments. However, the nucleation activity of P-135-ABP is probably not relevant in vivo because the assembly of G-actin saturated with profilin, a situation that mimics conditions found in pollen, was not accelerated in the presence of P-135-ABP. P-135-ABP also enhanced the depolymerization of actin filaments during dilution-mediated disassembly. Growth from filament barbed ends in the presence of Ca(2+)-CaM was also prevented, consistent with filament capping activity. These results suggested that lily villin is involved not only in the arrangement of actin filaments into bundles in the basal and shank region of the pollen tube, but also in regulating and modulating actin dynamics through its capping and depolymerization (or fragmentation) activities in the apical region of the pollen tube, where there is a relatively high concentration of Ca(2+).

  18. SHOP: scaffold hopping by GRID-based similarity searches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Rikke; Linusson, Anna; Zamora, Ismael

    2007-01-01

    A new GRID-based method for scaffold hopping (SHOP) is presented. In a fully automatic manner, scaffolds were identified in a database based on three types of 3D-descriptors. SHOP's ability to recover scaffolds was assessed and validated by searching a database spiked with fragments of known...... ligands of three different protein targets relevant for drug discovery using a rational approach based on statistical experimental design. Five out of eight and seven out of eight thrombin scaffolds and all seven HIV protease scaffolds were recovered within the top 10 and 31 out of 31 neuraminidase...... scaffolds were in the 31 top-ranked scaffolds. SHOP also identified new scaffolds with substantially different chemotypes from the queries. Docking analysis indicated that the new scaffolds would have similar binding modes to those of the respective query scaffolds observed in X-ray structures...

  19. The presence of multiple cellular defects associated with a novel G50E iron-sulfur cluster scaffold protein (ISCU) mutation leads to development of mitochondrial myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Prasenjit Prasad; Kumar, S K Praveen; Srivastava, Shubhi; Sinha, Devanjan; Pareek, Gautam; D'Silva, Patrick

    2014-04-11

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are versatile cofactors involved in regulating multiple physiological activities, including energy generation through cellular respiration. Initially, the Fe-S clusters are assembled on a conserved scaffold protein, iron-sulfur cluster scaffold protein (ISCU), in coordination with iron and sulfur donor proteins in human mitochondria. Loss of ISCU function leads to myopathy, characterized by muscle wasting and cardiac hypertrophy. In addition to the homozygous ISCU mutation (g.7044G→C), compound heterozygous patients with severe myopathy have been identified to carry the c.149G→A missense mutation converting the glycine 50 residue to glutamate. However, the physiological defects and molecular mechanism associated with G50E mutation have not been elucidated. In this report, we uncover mechanistic insights concerning how the G50E ISCU mutation in humans leads to the development of severe ISCU myopathy, using a human cell line and yeast as the model systems. The biochemical results highlight that the G50E mutation results in compromised interaction with the sulfur donor NFS1 and the J-protein HSCB, thus impairing the rate of Fe-S cluster synthesis. As a result, electron transport chain complexes show significant reduction in their redox properties, leading to loss of cellular respiration. Furthermore, the G50E mutant mitochondria display enhancement in iron level and reactive oxygen species, thereby causing oxidative stress leading to impairment in the mitochondrial functions. Thus, our findings provide compelling evidence that the respiration defect due to impaired biogenesis of Fe-S clusters in myopathy patients leads to manifestation of complex clinical symptoms.

  20. Tetrameric far-red fluorescent protein as a scaffold to assemble an octavalent peptide nanoprobe for enhanced tumor targeting and intracellular uptake in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haiming; Yang, Jie; Jin, Honglin; Huang, Chuan; Fu, Jianwei; Yang, Fei; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Zhihong

    2011-06-01

    Relatively weak tumor affinities and short retention time in vivo hinder the application of targeting peptides in tumor molecular imaging. Multivalent strategies based on various scaffolds have been utilized to improve the ability of peptide-receptor binding or extend the clearance time of peptide-based probes. Here, we use a tetrameric far-red fluorescent protein (tfRFP) as a scaffold to create a self-assembled octavalent peptide fluorescent nanoprobe (Octa-FNP) using a genetic engineering approach. The multiligand connecting, fluorophore labeling and nanostructure formation of Octa-FNP were performed in one step. In vitro studies showed Octa-FNP is a 10-nm fluorescent probe with excellent serum stability. Cellular uptake of Octa-FNP by human nasopharyngeal cancer 5-8F cells is 15-fold of tetravalent probe, ∼80-fold of monovalent probe and ∼600-fold of nulvalent tfRFP. In vivo enhanced tumor targeting and intracellular uptake of Octa-FNP were confirmed using optical imaging and Western blot analysis. It achieved extremely high contrast of Octa-FNP signal between tumor tissue and normal organs, especially seldom Octa-FNP detected in liver and spleen. Owing to easy preparation, precise structural and functional control, and multivalent effect, Octa-FNP provides a powerful tool for tumor optical molecular imaging and evaluating the targeting ability of numerous peptides in vivo.

  1. Structural and biochemical characterization of human PR70 in isolation and in complex with the scaffolding subunit of protein phosphatase 2A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Dovega

    Full Text Available Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a major Ser/Thr phosphatase involved in the regulation of various cellular processes. PP2A assembles into diverse trimeric holoenzymes, which consist of a scaffolding (A subunit, a catalytic (C subunit and various regulatory (B subunits. Here we report a 2.0 Å crystal structure of the free B''/PR70 subunit and a SAXS model of an A/PR70 complex. The crystal structure of B''/PR70 reveals a two domain elongated structure with two Ca2+ binding EF-hands. Furthermore, we have characterized the interaction of both binding partner and their calcium dependency using biophysical techniques. Ca2+ biophysical studies with Circular Dichroism showed that the two EF-hands display different affinities to Ca2+. In the absence of the catalytic C-subunit, the scaffolding A-subunit remains highly mobile and flexible even in the presence of the B''/PR70 subunit as judged by SAXS. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry studies and SAXS data support that PR70 and the A-subunit have high affinity to each other. This study provides additional knowledge about the structural basis for the function of B'' containing holoenzymes.

  2. Locomotor proteins in tissues of primary tumors and metastases of ovarian and breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondakova, I. V.; Yunusova, N. V.; Spirina, L. V.; Shashova, E. E.; Kolegova, E. S.; Kolomiets, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Villert, A. B.

    2016-08-01

    The paper discusses the capability for active movement in an extracellular matrix, wherein remodeling of the cytoskeleton by actin binding proteins plays a significant role in metastases formation. We studied the expression of actin binding proteins and β-catenin in tissues of primary tumors and metastases of ovarian and breast cancer. Contents of p45 Ser β-catenin and the actin severing protein gelsolin were decreased in metastases of ovarian cancer relative to primary tumors. The level of the cofilin, functionally similar to gelsolin, was significantly higher in metastases compared to primary ovarian and breast tumor tissue. In breast cancer, significant increase in the number of an actin monomer binder protein thymosin-β4 was observed in metastases as compared to primary tumors. The data obtained suggest the involvement of locomotor proteins in metastases formation in ovarian and breast cancer.

  3. Neuronal Networks on Nanocellulose Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Malin; Brackmann, Christian; Puchades, Maja; Brattås, Karoline; Ewing, Andrew; Gatenholm, Paul; Enejder, Annika

    2015-11-01

    Proliferation, integration, and neurite extension of PC12 cells, a widely used culture model for cholinergic neurons, were studied in nanocellulose scaffolds biosynthesized by Gluconacetobacter xylinus to allow a three-dimensional (3D) extension of neurites better mimicking neuronal networks in tissue. The interaction with control scaffolds was compared with cationized nanocellulose (trimethyl ammonium betahydroxy propyl [TMAHP] cellulose) to investigate the impact of surface charges on the cell interaction mechanisms. Furthermore, coatings with extracellular matrix proteins (collagen, fibronectin, and laminin) were investigated to determine the importance of integrin-mediated cell attachment. Cell proliferation was evaluated by a cellular proliferation assay, while cell integration and neurite propagation were studied by simultaneous label-free Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scattering and second harmonic generation microscopy, providing 3D images of PC12 cells and arrangement of nanocellulose fibrils, respectively. Cell attachment and proliferation were enhanced by TMAHP modification, but not by protein coating. Protein coating instead promoted active interaction between the cells and the scaffold, hence lateral cell migration and integration. Irrespective of surface modification, deepest cell integration measured was one to two cell layers, whereas neurites have a capacity to integrate deeper than the cell bodies in the scaffold due to their fine dimensions and amoeba-like migration pattern. Neurites with lengths of >50 μm were observed, successfully connecting individual cells and cell clusters. In conclusion, TMAHP-modified nanocellulose scaffolds promote initial cellular scaffold adhesion, which combined with additional cell-scaffold treatments enables further formation of 3D neuronal networks.

  4. Compound soft regenerated skull material for repairing dog skull defects using bone morphogenetic protein as an inductor and nanohydroxyapatite as a scaffold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhidong Shi; Mingwang Liu; Zhongzong Qin; Qinmei Wang; Ying Guo; Haiyong He; Zhonghe Yu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In previous studies of skull defects and regeneration, bone morphogenetic protein as an inductor and nanohydroxyapatite as a scaffold have been cocultured with osteoblasts.OBJECTIVE: To verify the characteristics of the new skull regenerated material after compound soft regenerated skull material implantatiom.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The self-control and inter-group control animal experiment was perfurmed at the Sun Yat-sen University, China from February to July 2007.MATERIALS: Twenty-tour healthy adult dogs of both genders weighing 15-20 kg were used in this study. Nanohydroxyapatite as a scaffold was cocultured with osteoblasts. Using demineralized canine bone matrix as a carrier, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 was employed to prepare compound soft regenerated skull material. Self-designed compound soft regenerated skull material was implanted in models of skull defects.METHODS: Animals were randomly assigned into two groups, Group A (n = 16) and Group B (n = 8).Bilateral 2.5-cm-diameter full-thickness parietal skull defects were made in all animals. In Group A, the right side was reconstructed with calcium alginate gel, osteoblasts, and nanomcter bone meal composite;the left side was reconstructed with calcium alginate gel, osteoblasts, nanometer bone meal and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 composite. In Group B, the right side was kept as a simple skull detect, and the left side was reconstructed with calcium alginate gel, osteoblasts, nanometer bone meal and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 composite.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Bone regeneration and histopathological changes at the site of the skull defect were observed with an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope after surgery.The ability to form bone was measured by alizarin red S staining. In vitro cultured osteoblasts were observed for morphology.RESULTS: One month following surgery, newly formed bone trabeculae mostly covered the

  5. Protein-releasing polymeric scaffolds induce fibrochondrocytic differentiation of endogenous cells for knee meniscus regeneration in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang H; Rodeo, Scott A; Fortier, Lisa Ann; Lu, Chuanyong; Erisken, Cevat; Mao, Jeremy J

    2014-12-10

    Regeneration of complex tissues, such as kidney, liver, and cartilage, continues to be a scientific and translational challenge. Survival of ex vivo cultured, transplanted cells in tissue grafts is among one of the key barriers. Meniscus is a complex tissue consisting of collagen fibers and proteoglycans with gradient phenotypes of fibrocartilage and functions to provide congruence of the knee joint, without which the patient is likely to develop arthritis. Endogenous stem/progenitor cells regenerated the knee meniscus upon spatially released human connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor-β3 (TGFβ3) from a three-dimensional (3D)-printed biomaterial, enabling functional knee recovery. Sequentially applied CTGF and TGFβ3 were necessary and sufficient to propel mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells, as a heterogeneous population or as single-cell progenies, into fibrochondrocytes that concurrently synthesized procollagens I and IIα. When released from microchannels of 3D-printed, human meniscus scaffolds, CTGF and TGFβ3 induced endogenous stem/progenitor cells to differentiate and synthesize zone-specific type I and II collagens. We then replaced sheep meniscus with anatomically correct, 3D-printed scaffolds that incorporated spatially delivered CTGF and TGFβ3. Endogenous cells regenerated the meniscus with zone-specific matrix phenotypes: primarily type I collagen in the outer zone, and type II collagen in the inner zone, reminiscent of the native meniscus. Spatiotemporally delivered CTGF and TGFβ3 also restored inhomogeneous mechanical properties in the regenerated sheep meniscus. Survival and directed differentiation of endogenous cells in a tissue defect may have implications in the regeneration of complex (heterogeneous) tissues and organs.

  6. Partial loss of the DNA repair scaffolding protein, Xrcc1, results in increased brain damage and reduced recovery from ischemic stroke in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Canugovi, Chandrika; Yoon, Jeong Seon; Wilson, David M; Croteau, Deborah L; Mattson, Mark P; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative DNA damage is mainly repaired by base excision repair (BER). Previously, our laboratory showed that mice lacking the BER glycosylases 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) or nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (Neil1) recover more poorly from focal ischemic stroke than wild-type mice. Here, a mouse model was used to investigate whether loss of 1 of the 2 alleles of X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (Xrcc1), which encodes a nonenzymatic scaffold protein required for BER, alters recovery from stroke. Ischemia and reperfusion caused higher brain damage and lower functional recovery in Xrcc1(+/-) mice than in wild-type mice. Additionally, a greater percentage of Xrcc1(+/-) mice died as a result of the stroke. Brain samples from human individuals who died of stroke and individuals who died of non-neurological causes were assayed for various steps of BER. Significant losses of thymine glycol incision, abasic endonuclease incision, and single nucleotide incorporation activities were identified, as well as lower expression of XRCC1 and NEIL1 proteins in stroke brains compared with controls. Together, these results suggest that impaired BER is a risk factor in ischemic brain injury and contributes to its recovery.

  7. 基因重组蛛丝蛋白-聚乙烯醇复合支架材料的制备%Preparation of recombinant spider silk protein-polyvinyl alcohol composite scaffold material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏梅红; 涂桂云; 陈登龙; 李敏

    2008-01-01

    目的探讨致孔剂NaCl粒径和比例、变性剂和聚乙烯醇(PVA)等因素对基因重组蛛丝蛋白-PVA复合支架材料形态及性能的影响.方法基因重组蛛丝蛋白溶解于98%甲酸,采用冷冻干燥粒子滤沥法制备重组蛛丝蛋白-PVA复合多孔支架;采用扫描电子显微镜观察支架的形态;采用单纤维强力试验机测试支架机械性能.结果乙醇作变性剂制得的多孔支架力学性能较好,支架的断裂应力、断裂比强度均提高5倍以上,断裂伸长率可达12.21%.以粒径<500μm的NaCl为致孔剂制得的多孔支架力学性能较好.高分子材料PVA能明显改善重组蛛丝蛋白多孔支架的件能.结论重组蛛丝蛋白-PVA复合支架材料有望在组织工程领域得以应用.%Objective To investigate the effects of many factors such as porogen, denaturant and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) polymer on the structure and properties of recombinant spider silk protein-PVA composite scaffold material. Methods The silk fibrous protein solution was prepared by dissolving the recombinant spider silk protein in 98% formic acid. Recombinant spider silk protein-PVA composite porous scaffolds were prepared by freeze-drying and particle-leaching method. Scanning electron microscope was used to observe the conformation of the scaffolds. Single strand strength testing machine was used to test the mechanical property of the scaffolds. Results Mechanical property of the scaffolds was better with ethanol as denaturant. Breaking stress and break specific tenacity enhanced by over 5 times. Breaking elongation ratio could reach 12.21%. Using NaCt ( ψ<500 μm) as porogen, or the introduction of PVA could improve the performances of porous scaffold evidently. Conclusion Recombinant spider silk protein-PVA composite porous scaffolds will have a prospective application in tissue engineering.

  8. The αRep artificial repeat protein scaffold: a new tool for crystallization and live cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio-Lepiniec, Marie; Urvoas, Agathe; Chevrel, Anne; Guellouz, Asma; Ferrandez, Yann; Mesneau, Agnès; de la Sierra-Gallay, Ines Li; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Desmadril, Michel; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Minard, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    We have designed a new family of artificial proteins, named αRep, based on HEAT (acronym for Huntingtin, elongation factor 3 (EF3), protein pphosphatase 2A (PP2A), yeast kinase Tor1) repeat proteins containing an α-helical repeated motif. The sequence of the repeated motifs, first identified in a thermostable archae protein was optimized using a consensus design strategy and used for the construction of a library of artificial proteins. All proteins from this library share the same general fold but differ both in the number of repeats and in five highly randomized amino acid positions within each repeat. The randomized side chains altogether provide a hypervariable surface on αRep variants. Sequences from this library are efficiently expressed as soluble, folded and very stable proteins. αRep binders with high affinity for various protein targets were selected by phage display. Low micromolar to nanomolar dissociation constants between partners were measured and the structures of several complexes (specific αRep/protein target) were solved by X-ray crystallography. Using GFP as a model target, it was demonstrated that αReps can be used as bait in pull-down experiments. αReps can be expressed in eukaryotic cells and specifically interact with their target addressed to different cell compartments.

  9. The Role of Actin-Capping Protein and Src signalling in tissue growth and apoptosis during Drosophila wing development

    OpenAIRE

    Jezowska, Barbara Zofia

    2012-01-01

    Dissertation presented to obtain the Ph.D degree in Developmental Biology The actin cytoskeleton controls numerous cellular processes, including cell morphology and polarity, endocytosis, intracellular trafficking, contractility and cell division. Actin filament growth, stability and disassembly are controlled by a plethora of actin-binding proteins. Among them Capping Protein is a highly conserved αβ heterodimer, which binds the barbed ends of actin filaments, inhibiting addit...

  10. Architecture of the Yeast Mitochondrial Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Machinery: THE SUB-COMPLEX FORMED BY THE IRON DONOR, Yfh1 PROTEIN, AND THE SCAFFOLD, Isu1 PROTEIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranatunga, Wasantha; Gakh, Oleksandr; Galeano, Belinda K; Smith, Douglas Y; Söderberg, Christopher A G; Al-Karadaghi, Salam; Thompson, James R; Isaya, Grazia

    2016-05-06

    The biosynthesis of Fe-S clusters is a vital process involving the delivery of elemental iron and sulfur to scaffold proteins via molecular interactions that are still poorly defined. We reconstituted a stable, functional complex consisting of the iron donor, Yfh1 (yeast frataxin homologue 1), and the Fe-S cluster scaffold, Isu1, with 1:1 stoichiometry, [Yfh1]24·[Isu1]24 Using negative staining transmission EM and single particle analysis, we obtained a three-dimensional reconstruction of this complex at a resolution of ∼17 Å. In addition, via chemical cross-linking, limited proteolysis, and mass spectrometry, we identified protein-protein interaction surfaces within the complex. The data together reveal that [Yfh1]24·[Isu1]24 is a roughly cubic macromolecule consisting of one symmetric Isu1 trimer binding on top of one symmetric Yfh1 trimer at each of its eight vertices. Furthermore, molecular modeling suggests that two subunits of the cysteine desulfurase, Nfs1, may bind symmetrically on top of two adjacent Isu1 trimers in a manner that creates two putative [2Fe-2S] cluster assembly centers. In each center, conserved amino acids known to be involved in sulfur and iron donation by Nfs1 and Yfh1, respectively, are in close proximity to the Fe-S cluster-coordinating residues of Isu1. We suggest that this architecture is suitable to ensure concerted and protected transfer of potentially toxic iron and sulfur atoms to Isu1 during Fe-S cluster assembly.

  11. Efficacy of whey protein gel networks as potential viability-enhancing scaffolds for cell immobilization of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, S B; Gee, V L; Ross, R P; Stanton, C; Fitzgerald, G F; Brodkorb, A

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated cell immobilization of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in three separate protein products: native, denatured and hydrolysed whey protein isolate (WPI). Treatments were assessed for their ability to enhance probiotic survival during storage, heat stress and ex vivo gastric incubation. Spatial distribution of probiotic cells within immobilized treatments was evaluated by atomic force and confocal scanning laser microscopy, while cell viability was enumerated by plate count and flow cytometry (FACS). Microscopic analysis of denatured treatments revealed an oasis of immobilized cells, phase-separated from the surrounding protein matrix; an environmental characteristic analogous to hydrolysed networks. Cell immobilization in hydrolysed and denatured WPI enhanced survival by 6.1+/-0.1 and 5.8+/-0.1 log10 cycles, respectively, following 14 day storage at 37 degrees C and both treatments generated thermal protection at 57 degrees C (7.3+/-0.1 and 6.5+/-0.1 log(10) cfu/ml). Furthermore, denatured WPI enhanced probiotic protection (8.9+/-0.2 log(10) cfu/ml) following 3h gastric incubation at 37 degrees C. In conclusion, hydrolysed or denatured WPI were the most suitable matrices for cell immobilization, while native protein provided the weakest safeguard against thermal and acid stress, thus making it possible to envision whey protein gel networks as protective substrates for cell immobilization applications.

  12. Assembly of the novel five-component apicomplexan multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex is driven by the hybrid scaffold protein Tg-p43.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M van Rooyen

    Full Text Available In Toxoplasma gondii, as in other eukaryotes, a subset of the amino-acyl-tRNA synthetases are arranged into an abundant cytoplasmic multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (MARS complex. Through a series of genetic pull-down assays, we have identified the enzymes of this complex as: methionyl-, glutaminyl-, glutamyl-, and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases, and we show that the N-terminal GST-like domain of a partially disordered hybrid scaffold protein, Tg-p43, is sufficient for assembly of the intact complex. Our gel filtration studies revealed significant heterogeneity in the size and composition of isolated MARS complexes. By targeting the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases subunit, which was found exclusively in the complete 1 MDa complex, we were able to directly visualize MARS particles in the electron microscope. Image analyses of the negative stain data revealed the observed heterogeneity and instability of these complexes to be driven by the intrinsic flexibility of the domain arrangements within the MARS complex. These studies provide unique insights into the assembly of these ubiquitous but poorly understood eukaryotic complexes.

  13. Crystal Structure of Bacillus subtilis Cysteine Desulfurase SufS and Its Dynamic Interaction with Frataxin and Scaffold Protein SufU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastian Blauenburg

    Full Text Available The biosynthesis of iron sulfur (Fe-S clusters in Bacillus subtilis is mediated by a SUF-type gene cluster, consisting of the cysteine desulfurase SufS, the scaffold protein SufU, and the putative chaperone complex SufB/SufC/SufD. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of the SufS homodimer in its product-bound state (i.e., in complex with pyrodoxal-5'-phosphate, alanine, Cys361-persulfide. By performing hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/DX experiments, we characterized the interaction of SufS with SufU and demonstrate that SufU induces an opening of the active site pocket of SufS. Recent data indicate that frataxin could be involved in Fe-S cluster biosynthesis by facilitating iron incorporation. H/DX experiments show that frataxin indeed interacts with the SufS/SufU complex at the active site. Our findings deepen the current understanding of Fe-S cluster biosynthesis, a complex yet essential process, in the model organism B. subtilis.

  14. A dimer of the Toll-like receptor 4 cytoplasmic domain provides a specific scaffold for the recruitment of signalling adaptor proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Núñez Miguel

    Full Text Available The Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 is a class I transmembrane receptor expressed on the surface of immune system cells. TLR4 is activated by exposure to lipopolysaccharides derived from the outer membrane of Gram negative bacteria and forms part of the innate immune response in mammals. Like other class 1 receptors, TLR4 is activated by ligand induced dimerization, and recent studies suggest that this causes concerted conformational changes in the receptor leading to self association of the cytoplasmic Toll/Interleukin 1 receptor (TIR signalling domain. This homodimerization event is proposed to provide a new scaffold that is able to bind downstream signalling adaptor proteins. TLR4 uses two different sets of adaptors; TRAM and TRIF, and Mal and MyD88. These adaptor pairs couple two distinct signalling pathways leading to the activation of interferon response factor 3 (IRF-3 and nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB respectively. In this paper we have generated a structural model of the TLR4 TIR dimer and used molecular docking to probe for potential sites of interaction between the receptor homodimer and the adaptor molecules. Remarkably, both the Mal and TRAM adaptors are strongly predicted to bind at two symmetry-related sites at the homodimer interface. This model of TLR4 activation is supported by extensive functional studies involving site directed mutagenesis, inhibition by cell permeable peptides and stable protein phosphorylation of receptor and adaptor TIR domains. Our results also suggest a molecular mechanism for two recent findings, the caspase 1 dependence of Mal signalling and the protective effects conferred by the Mal polymorphism Ser180Leu.

  15. Analysis of in vitro bioactivity data extracted from drug discovery literature and patents: Ranking 1654 human protein targets by assayed compounds and molecular scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Southan Christopher

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the classic Hopkins and Groom druggable genome review in 2002, there have been a number of publications updating both the hypothetical and successful human drug target statistics. However, listings of research targets that define the area between these two extremes are sparse because of the challenges of collating published information at the necessary scale. We have addressed this by interrogating databases, populated by expert curation, of bioactivity data extracted from patents and journal papers over the last 30 years. Results From a subset of just over 27,000 documents we have extracted a set of compound-to-target relationships for biochemical in vitro binding-type assay data for 1,736 human proteins and 1,654 gene identifiers. These are linked to 1,671,951 compound records derived from 823,179 unique chemical structures. The distribution showed a compounds-per-target average of 964 with a maximum of 42,869 (Factor Xa. The list includes non-targets, failed targets and cross-screening targets. The top-278 most actively pursued targets cover 90% of the compounds. We further investigated target ranking by determining the number of molecular frameworks and scaffolds. These were compared to the compound counts as alternative measures of chemical diversity on a per-target basis. Conclusions The compounds-per-protein listing generated in this work (provided as a supplementary file represents the major proportion of the human drug target landscape defined by published data. We supplemented the simple ranking by the number of compounds assayed with additional rankings by molecular topology. These showed significant differences and provide complementary assessments of chemical tractability.

  16. Frataxin directly stimulates mitochondrial cysteine desulfurase by exposing substrate-binding sites, and a mutant Fe-S cluster scaffold protein with frataxin-bypassing ability acts similarly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Alok; Gordon, Donna M; Pain, Jayashree; Stemmler, Timothy L; Dancis, Andrew; Pain, Debkumar

    2013-12-27

    For iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster synthesis in mitochondria, the sulfur is derived from the amino acid cysteine by the cysteine desulfurase activity of Nfs1. The enzyme binds the substrate cysteine in the pyridoxal phosphate-containing site, and a persulfide is formed on the active site cysteine in a manner depending on the accessory protein Isd11. The persulfide is then transferred to the scaffold Isu, where it combines with iron to form the Fe-S cluster intermediate. Frataxin is implicated in the process, although it is unclear where and how, and deficiency causes Friedreich ataxia. Using purified proteins and isolated mitochondria, we show here that the yeast frataxin homolog (Yfh1) directly and specifically stimulates cysteine binding to Nfs1 by exposing substrate-binding sites. This novel function of frataxin does not require iron, Isu1, or Isd11. Once bound to Nfs1, the substrate cysteine is the source of the Nfs1 persulfide, but this step is independent of frataxin and strictly dependent on Isd11. Recently, a point mutation in Isu1 was found to bypass many frataxin functions. The data presented here show that the Isu1 suppressor mimics the frataxin effects on Nfs1, explaining the bypassing activity. We propose a regulatory mechanism for the Nfs1 persulfide-forming activity. Specifically, at least two separate conformational changes must occur in the enzyme for optimum activity as follows: one is mediated by frataxin interaction that exposes the "buried" substrate-binding sites, and the other is mediated by Isd11 interaction that brings the bound substrate cysteine and the active site cysteine in proximity for persulfide formation.

  17. Scaffold-forming and Adhesive Contributions of Synthetic Laminin-binding Proteins to Basement Membrane Assembly*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    McKee, Karen K.; Capizzi, Stephanie; Yurchenco, Peter D.

    2009-01-01

    Laminins that possess three short arms contribute to basement membrane assembly by anchoring to cell surfaces, polymerizing, and binding to nidogen and collagen IV. Although laminins containing the α4 and α5 subunits are expressed in α2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy, they may be ineffective substitutes because they bind weakly to cell surfaces and/or because they lack the third arm needed for polymerization. We asked whether linker proteins engineered to bind...

  18. Biphasic Alteration of the Inhibitory Synapse Scaffold Protein Gephyrin in Early and Late Stages of an Alzheimer Disease Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Eva; Gorgas, Karin; Schlicksupp, Andrea; Groß, Dagmar; Kins, Stefan; Kirsch, Joachim; Kuhse, Jochen

    2016-09-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) is thought to begin many years before the diagnosis of dementia. Accumulating evidence indicates the involvement of GABAergic neurotransmission in the physiopathology of AD. However, in comparison to excitatory synapses, the structural and functional alterations of inhibitory synapses in AD are less well characterized. We studied the expression and distribution of proteins specific for inhibitory synapses in hippocampal areas of APPPS1 mice at different ages. Interestingly, by immunoblotting and confocal fluorescence microscopy, we disclosed a robust increase in the expression of gephyrin, an organizer of ligand-gated ion channels at inhibitory synapses in hippocampus CA1 and dentate gyrus of young presymptomatic APPPS1 mice (1 to 3 months) as compared to controls. The postsynaptic γ2-GABA(A)-receptor subunit and the presynaptic vesicular inhibitory amino acid transporter protein showed similar expression patterns. In contrast, adult transgenic animals (12 months) displayed decreased levels of these proteins in comparison to wild type in hippocampus areas devoid of amyloid plaques. Within most plaques, strong gephyrin immunoreactivity was detected, partially colocalizing with vesicular amino acid transporter and GABA(A)-receptor γ2 subunit immunoreactivities. Our results indicate a biphasic alteration in expression of hippocampal inhibitory synapse components in AD. Altered inhibition of neurotransmission might be an early prognostic marker and might even be involved in the pathogenesis of AD.

  19. Stress response and virulence functions of the Acinetobacter baumannii NfuA Fe-S scaffold protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbler, Daniel L; Park, Thomas M; Arivett, Brock A; Penwell, William F; Greer, Samuel M; Woodruff, Tessa M; Tierney, David L; Actis, Luis A

    2012-06-01

    To successfully establish an infection, Acinetobacter baumannii must overcome the iron starvation and oxidative stress imposed by the human host. Although previous studies have shown that ATCC 19606(T) cells acquire iron via the acinetobactin-mediated siderophore system, little is known about intracellular iron metabolism and its relation to oxidative stress in this pathogen. Screening of an insertion library resulted in the isolation of the ATCC 19606(T) derivative 1644, which was unable to grow in iron-chelated media. Rescue cloning and DNA sequencing showed that the insertion inactivated a gene coding for an NfuA Fe-S cluster protein ortholog, without any effect on the expression of the acinetobactin system. The nfuA mutant was also more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and cumene hydroperoxide than the parental strain. The iron chelation- and oxidative-stress-deficient responses of this mutant were corrected when complemented with either the ATCC 19606(T) parental allele or the Escherichia coli MG1655 nfuA ortholog. Furthermore, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analyses showed that the ATCC 19606(T) NfuA ortholog has iron-binding properties compatible with the formation of [Fe-S] cluster protein. Ex vivo and in vivo assays using human epithelial cells and Galleria mellonella, respectively, showed that NfuA is critical for bacterial growth independent of their capacity to acquire iron or the presence of excess of free iron. Taken together, these observations indicate that the A. baumannii NfuA ortholog plays a role in intracellular iron utilization and protection from oxidative-stress responses that this pathogen could encounter during the infection of the human host.

  20. The scaffolding protein NHERF1 sensitizes EGFR-dependent tumor growth, motility and invadopodia function to gefitinib treatment in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellizzi, Antonia; Greco, Maria Raffaella; Rubino, Rosa; Paradiso, Angelo; Forciniti, Stefania; Zeeberg, Katrine; Cardone, Rosa Angela; Reshkin, Stephan Joel

    2015-03-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients cannot be treated with endocrine therapy or targeted therapies due to lack of related receptors. These patients overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), but are resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and anti-EGFR therapies. Mechanisms suggested for resistance to TKIs include EGFR independence, mutations and alterations in EGFR and in its downstream signalling pathways. Ligand-induced endocytosis and degradation of EGFR play important roles in the downregulation of the EGFR signal suggesting that its activity could be regulated by targeting its trafficking. Evidence in normal cells showing that the scaffolding protein Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) can associate with EGFR to regulate its trafficking, led us to hypothesize that NHERF1 expression levels could regulate EGFR trafficking and functional expression in TNBC cells and, in this way, modulate its role in progression and response to treatment. We investigated the subcellular localization of NHERF1 and its interaction with EGFR in a metastatic basal like TNBC cell model, MDA-MB‑231, and the role of forced NHERF1 overexpression and/or stimulation with EGF on the sensitivity to EGFR specific TKI treatment with gefitinib. Stimulation with EGF induces an interaction of NHERF1 with EGFR to regulate its localization, degradation and function. NHERF1 overexpression is sufficient to drive its interaction with EGFR in non-stimulated conditions, inhibits EGFR degradation and increases its retention time in the plasma membrane. Importantly, NHERF1 overexpression strongly sensitized the cell to the pharmacological inhibition by gefitinib of EGFR-driven growth, motility and invadopodia-dependent ECM proteolysis. The further determination of how the NHERF1‑EGFR interaction is regulated may improve our understanding of TNBC resistance to the action of existing anticancer drugs.

  1. Postsynaptic scaffolds for nicotinic receptors on neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert A NEFF III; David GOMEZ-VARELA; Catarina C FERNANDES; Darwin K BERG

    2009-01-01

    Complex postsynaptic scaffolds determine the structure and signaling capabilities of glutamatergic synapses. Recent studies indicate that some of the same scaffold components contribute to the formation and function of nicotinic synapses on neurons. PDZ-containing proteins comprising the PSD-95 family co-localize with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and mediate downstream signaling in the neurons. The PDZ-proteins also promote functional nicotinic innerva- tion of the neurons, as does the scaffold protein APC and transmembrane proteins such as neuroligin and the EphB2 recep- tor. In addition, specific chaperones have been shown to facilitate nAChR assembly and transport to the cell surface. This review summarizes recent results in these areas and raises questions for the future about the mechanism and synaptic role of nAChR trafficking.

  2. The scaffold protein p140Cap limits ERBB2-mediated breast cancer progression interfering with Rac GTPase-controlled circuitries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Silvia; Chapelle, Jennifer; Salemme, Vincenzo; Aramu, Simona; Russo, Isabella; Vitale, Nicoletta; Verdun di Cantogno, Ludovica; Dallaglio, Katiuscia; Castellano, Isabella; Amici, Augusto; Centonze, Giorgia; Sharma, Nanaocha; Lunardi, Serena; Cabodi, Sara; Cavallo, Federica; Lamolinara, Alessia; Stramucci, Lorenzo; Moiso, Enrico; Provero, Paolo; Albini, Adriana; Sapino, Anna; Staaf, Johan; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Bertalot, Giovanni; Pece, Salvatore; Tosoni, Daniela; Confalonieri, Stefano; Iezzi, Manuela; Di Stefano, Paola; Turco, Emilia; Defilippi, Paola

    2017-01-01

    The docking protein p140Cap negatively regulates tumour cell features. Its relevance on breast cancer patient survival, as well as its ability to counteract relevant cancer signalling pathways, are not fully understood. Here we report that in patients with ERBB2-amplified breast cancer, a p140Cap-positive status associates with a significantly lower probability of developing a distant event, and a clear difference in survival. p140Cap dampens ERBB2-positive tumour cell progression, impairing tumour onset and growth in the NeuT mouse model, and counteracting epithelial mesenchymal transition, resulting in decreased metastasis formation. One major mechanism is the ability of p140Cap to interfere with ERBB2-dependent activation of Rac GTPase-controlled circuitries. Our findings point to a specific role of p140Cap in curbing the aggressiveness of ERBB2-amplified breast cancers and suggest that, due to its ability to impinge on specific molecular pathways, p140Cap may represent a predictive biomarker of response to targeted anti-ERBB2 therapies. PMID:28300085

  3. Engineering a Biocompatible Scaffold with Either Micrometre or Nanometre Scale Surface Topography for Promoting Protein Adsorption and Cellular Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Le

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface topographical features on biomaterials, both at the submicrometre and nanometre scales, are known to influence the physicochemical interactions between biological processes involving proteins and cells. The nanometre-structured surface features tend to resemble the extracellular matrix, the natural environment in which cells live, communicate, and work together. It is believed that by engineering a well-defined nanometre scale surface topography, it should be possible to induce appropriate surface signals that can be used to manipulate cell function in a similar manner to the extracellular matrix. Therefore, there is a need to investigate, understand, and ultimately have the ability to produce tailor-made nanometre scale surface topographies with suitable surface chemistry to promote favourable biological interactions similar to those of the extracellular matrix. Recent advances in nanoscience and nanotechnology have produced many new nanomaterials and numerous manufacturing techniques that have the potential to significantly improve several fields such as biological sensing, cell culture technology, surgical implants, and medical devices. For these fields to progress, there is a definite need to develop a detailed understanding of the interaction between biological systems and fabricated surface structures at both the micrometre and nanometre scales.

  4. SHOP: receptor-based scaffold hopping by GRID-based similarity searches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Rikke; Liljefors, Tommy; Sørensen, Morten D

    2009-01-01

    A new field-derived 3D method for receptor-based scaffold hopping, implemented in the software SHOP, is presented. Information from a protein-ligand complex is utilized to substitute a fragment of the ligand with another fragment from a database of synthetically accessible scaffolds. A GRID......-based interaction profile of the receptor and geometrical descriptions of a ligand scaffold are used to obtain new scaffolds with different structural features and are able to replace the original scaffold in the protein-ligand complex. An enrichment study was successfully performed verifying the ability of SHOP...... to find known active CDK2 scaffolds in a database. Additionally, SHOP was used for suggesting new inhibitors of p38 MAP kinase. Four p38 complexes were used to perform six scaffold searches. Several new scaffolds were suggested, and the resulting compounds were successfully docked into the query proteins....

  5. The protein scaffold of the lipocalin odorant-binding protein is suitable for the design of new biosensors for the detection of explosive components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramoni, Roberto [Dipartimento di Produzioni Animali, Universita degli Studi di Parma (Italy); Bellucci, Stefano [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Grycznyski, Ignacy [University of North Texas, Forth Worth, TX (United States); Grycznyski, Zigmunt [University of North Texas, Forth Worth, TX (United States); Grolli, Stefano [Dipartimento di Produzioni Animali, Universita degli Studi di Parma (Italy); Staiano, Maria [Istituto di Biochimica della Proteine, CNR, Naples (Italy); Bellis, Giovanni De [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Micciulla, Federico [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Pastore, Roberto [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Tiberia, Alessandra [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Conti, Virna [Dipartimento di Produzioni Animali, Universita degli Studi di Parma (Italy); Merli, Elisa [Dipartimento di Produzioni Animali, Universita degli Studi di Parma (Italy); Varriale, Antonio [Istituto di Biochimica della Proteine, CNR, Naples (Italy); Rossi, Mose' [Istituto di Biochimica della Proteine, CNR, Naples (Italy); D' Auria, Sabato [Istituto di Biochimica della Proteine, CNR, Naples (Italy)

    2007-10-03

    The detection of hazard exposure is a current priority, including the detection of traces of explosive molecules in different environments like luggage storage rooms and public places, and is becoming a major requirement for homeland security. In the present study we carried out a preliminary investigation on the binding capacities of four forms of the lipocalin odorant-binding protein (OBP) for the detection of explosive components such as diphenylamine, dimethyl-phthalate, resorcinol and dinitrotoluene. The experimental results, showing that OBP binds these compounds with affinity constants ranging between 80 nM and 10.6 mM, indicate that this protein can be used as a probe for the realization of a biosensor to sense explosive compounds.

  6. Monothiol glutaredoxin Grx5 interacts with Fe-S scaffold proteins Isa1 and Isa2 and supports Fe-S assembly and DNA integrity in mitochondria of fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoung-Dong; Chung, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Kyung-Chang [Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, Institute of Microbiology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Roe, Jung-Hye, E-mail: jhroe@snu.ac.kr [Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, Institute of Microbiology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-12

    Mitochondrial monothiol glutaredoxins that bind Fe-S cluster are known to participate in Fe-S cluster assembly. However, their precise role has not been well understood. Among three monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx3, 4, and 5) in Schizosaccharomyces pombe only Grx5 resides in mitochondria. The {Delta}grx5 mutant requires cysteine on minimal media, and does not grow on non-fermentable carbon source such as glycerol. We found that the mutant is low in the activity of Fe-S enzymes in mitochondria as well as in the cytoplasm. Screening of multi-copy suppressor of growth defects of the mutant identified isa1{sup +} gene encoding a putative A-type Fe-S scaffold, in addition to mas5{sup +} and hsc1{sup +} genes encoding putative chaperones for Fe-S assembly process. Examination of other scaffold and chaperone genes revealed that isa2{sup +}, but not isu1{sup +} and ssc1{sup +}, complemented the growth phenotype of {Delta}grx5 mutant as isa1{sup +} did, partly through restoration of Fe-S enzyme activities. The mutant also showed a significant decrease in the amount of mitochondrial DNA. We demonstrated that Grx5 interacts in vivo with Isa1 and Isa2 proteins in mitochondria by observing bimolecular fluorescence complementation. These results indicate that Grx5 plays a central role in Fe-S assembly process through interaction with A-type Fe-S scaffold proteins Isa1 and Isa2, each of which is an essential protein in S. pombe, and supports mitochondrial genome integrity as well as Fe-S assembly.

  7. Aβ(1-42) oligomer-induced leakage in an in vitro blood-brain barrier model is associated with up-regulation of RAGE and metalloproteinases, and down-regulation of tight junction scaffold proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Wenbin; Cao, Lan; Liu, Lumei; Zhang, Chunyan; Kalionis, Bill; Tai, Xiantao; Li, Yaming; Xia, Shijin

    2015-07-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that abnormal deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in the brain is responsible for endothelial cell damage and consequently leads to blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage. However, the mechanisms underlying BBB disruption are not well described. We employed an monolayer BBB model comprising bEnd.3 cell and found that BBB leakage was induced by treatment with Aβ(1-42), and the levels of tight junction (TJ) scaffold proteins (ZO-1, Claudin-5, and Occludin) were decreased. Through comparisons of the effects of the different components of Aβ(1-42), including monomer (Aβ(1-42)-Mono), oligomer (Aβ(1-42)-Oligo), and fibril (Aβ(1-42)-Fibril), our data confirmed that Aβ(1-42)-Oligo is likely to be the most important damage factor that results in TJ damage and BBB leakage in Alzheimer's disease. We found that the incubation of bEnd.3 cells with Aβ(1-42) significantly up-regulated the level of receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE). Co-incubation of a polyclonal antibody to RAGE and Aβ(1-42)-Oligo in bEnd.3 cells blocked RAGE suppression of Aβ(1-42)-Oligo-induced alterations in TJ scaffold proteins and reversed Aβ(1-42)-Oligo-induced up-regulation of RAGE, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9. Furthermore, we found that these effects induced by Aβ(1-42)-Oligo treatment were effectively suppressed by knockdown of RAGE using small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection. We also found that GM 6001, a broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor, partially reversed the Aβ(1-42)-Oligo-induced inhibitor effects in bEnd.3 cells. Thus, these results suggested that RAGE played an important role in Aβ-induced BBB leakage and alterations of TJ scaffold proteins, through a mechanism that involved up-regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9.

  8. Structural basis for the recognition of the scaffold protein Frmpd4/Preso1 by the TPR domain of the adaptor protein LGN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Hiroki; Yuzawa, Satoru; Sumimoto, Hideki

    2015-02-01

    The adaptor protein LGN interacts via the N-terminal domain comprising eight tetratricopeptide-repeat (TPR) motifs with its partner proteins mInsc, NuMA, Frmpd1 and Frmpd4 in a mutually exclusive manner. Here, the crystal structure of the LGN TPR domain in complex with human Frmpd4 is described at 1.5 Å resolution. In the complex, the LGN-binding region of Frmpd4 (amino-acid residues 990-1011) adopts an extended structure that runs antiparallel to LGN along the concave surface of the superhelix formed by the TPR motifs. Comparison with the previously determined structures of the LGN-Frmpd1, LGN-mInsc and LGN-NuMA complexes reveals that these partner proteins interact with LGN TPR1-6 via a common core binding region with consensus sequence (E/Q)XEX4-5(E/D/Q)X1-2(K/R)X0-1(V/I). In contrast to Frmpd1, Frmpd4 makes additional contacts with LGN via regions N- and C-terminal to the core sequence. The N-terminal extension is replaced by a specific α-helix in mInsc, which drastically increases the direct contacts with LGN TPR7/8, consistent with the higher affinity of mInsc for LGN. A crystal structure of Frmpd4-bound LGN in an oxidized form is also reported, although oxidation does not appear to strongly affect the interaction with Frmpd4.

  9. The dynamics of scaffolding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Geert, P. L. C.; Steenbeek, H.W.

    2005-01-01

    In this article we have reinterpreted a relatively standard definition of scaffolding in the context of dynamic systems theory. Our main point is that scaffolding cannot be understood outside the context of a dynamic approach of learning and (formal or informal) teaching. We provide a dynamic system

  10. NF-κB and enhancer-binding CREB protein scaffolded by CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300 proteins regulate CD59 protein expression to protect cells from complement attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yiqun; Teng, Xiaoyan; Wang, Na; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Jianfeng; Ding, Peipei; Qiao, Qian; Wang, Qingkai; Zhang, Long; Yang, Chaoqun; Yang, Zhangmin; Chu, Yiwei; Du, Xiang; Zhou, Xuhui; Hu, Weiguo

    2014-01-31

    The complement system can be activated spontaneously for immune surveillance or induced to clear invading pathogens, in which the membrane attack complex (MAC, C5b-9) plays a critical role. CD59 is the sole membrane complement regulatory protein (mCRP) that restricts MAC assembly. CD59, therefore, protects innocent host cells from attacks by the complement system, and host cells require the constitutive and inducible expression of CD59 to protect themselves from deleterious destruction by complement. However, the mechanisms that underlie CD59 regulation remain largely unknown. In this study we demonstrate that the widely expressed transcription factor Sp1 may regulate the constitutive expression of CD59, whereas CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300 bridge NF-κB and CREB, which surprisingly functions as an enhancer-binding protein to induce the up-regulation of CD59 during in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-triggered complement activation, thus conferring host defense against further MAC-mediated destruction. Moreover, individual treatment with LPS, TNF-α, and the complement activation products (sublytic MAC (SC5b-9) and C5a) could increase the expression of CD59 mainly by activating NF-κB and CREB signaling pathways. Together, our findings identify a novel gene regulation mechanism involving CBP/p300, NF-κB, and CREB; this mechanism suggests potential drug targets for controlling various complement-related human diseases.

  11. Gelatin–PMVE/MA composite scaffold promotes expansion of embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabra, Hemlata [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India); Gupta, Priyanka [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India); IITB-Monash Research Academy, Mumbai (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia); Verma, Paul J. [Turretfield Research Centre, South Australian Research and Development Institute, Rosedale, South Australia (Australia); Jadhav, Sameer; Bellare, Jayesh R. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India)

    2014-04-01

    We introduce a new composite scaffold of gelatin and polymethyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic anhydride (PMVE/MA) for expansion of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in an in vitro environment. To optimize the scaffold, we prepared a gelatin scaffold (G) and three composite scaffolds namely GP-1, GP-2, and GP-3 with varying PMVE/MA concentrations (0.2–1%) and characterized them by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), swelling study, compression testing and FTIR. SEM micrographs revealed interconnected porous structure in all the scaffolds. The permissible hemolysis ratio and activation of platelets by scaffolds confirmed the hemocompatibility of scaffolds. Initial biocompatibility assessment of scaffolds was conducted using hepatocarcinoma (Hep G2) cells and adhesion, proliferation and infiltration of Hep G2 cells in depth of scaffolds were observed, proving the scaffold's biocompatibility. Further Oct4B2 mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), which harbor a green fluorescence protein transgene under regulatory control of the Oct4 promotor, were examined for expansion on scaffolds with MTT assay. The GP-2 scaffold demonstrated the best cell proliferation and was further explored for ESC adherence and infiltration in depth (SEM and confocal), and pluripotent state of mESCs was assessed with the expression of Oct4-GFP and stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 (SSEA-1). This study reports the first demonstration of biocompatibility of gelatin–PMVE/MA composite scaffold and presents this scaffold as a promising candidate for embryonic stem cell based tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Composite scaffolds of gelatin and PMVE/MA were prepared by freeze-drying method. • SEM micrographs showed porous structure in all scaffolds of varying pore dimension. • GP-2 composite exhibited better cellular response in comparison to other scaffolds. • mESCs proliferated and expressed Oct-4 and SSEA-1, when cultured on GP-2 scaffold.

  12. PspA can form large scaffolds in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standar, Kerstin; Mehner, Denise; Osadnik, Hendrik; Berthelmann, Felix; Hause, Gerd; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Brüser, Thomas

    2008-10-29

    The phage shock protein A (PspA) of Escherichia coli stabilizes the cytoplasmic membrane under stress conditions. Here we demonstrate that PspA can form hollow spherical or prolate spheroidal particles of about 30-40nm diameter with a scaffold-like arrangement of protein subunits at the surface. The 'PspA-scaffold' is the basic structure that is common to all particles. The PspA-scaffold may be of fundamental importance, as it could allow PspA to stabilize the integrity of membranes through numerous contact points over a large surface area.

  13. PspA can form large scaffolds in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Standar, Kerstin; Mehner, Denise; Osadnik, Hendrik; Berthelmann, Felix; Hause, Gerd; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Brüser, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The phage shock protein A (PspA) of Escherichia coli stabilizes the cytoplasmic membrane under stress conditions. Here we demonstrate that PspA can form hollow spherical or prolate spheroidal particles of about 30-40nm diameter with a scaffold-like arrangement of protein subunits at the surface. The 'PspA-scaffold' is the basic structure that is common to all particles. The PspA-scaffold may be of fundamental importance, as it could allow PspA to stabilize the integrity of membranes through n...

  14. ASP-56, a new actin sequestering protein from pig platelets with homology to CAP, an adenylate cyclase-associated protein from yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieselmann, R; Mann, K

    1992-02-24

    A new 56 kDa actin-binding protein (ASP-56) was isolated from pig platelet lysate. In falling ball viscosimetry it caused a reduction in viscosity that could be attributed to a decrease in the concentration of polymeric actin. Fluorescence measurements with NBD-labelled actin showed reduction of polymeric actin, too. These results could be explained by sequestering of actin in a non-polymerizable 1:1 ASP-56/actin complex. Sequencing of about 20 tryptic peptides of ASP-56 and comparison with known sequences revealed about 60% homology to the adenylate cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from yeast.

  15. Mechanical properties, biological activity and protein controlled release by poly(vinyl alcohol)-bioglass/chitosan-collagen composite scaffolds: a bone tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pon-On, Weeraphat; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol; Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Thongbunchoo, Jirawan; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Tang, I-Ming

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, composite scaffolds made with different weight ratios (0.5:1, 1:1 and 2:1) of bioactive glass (15Ca:80Si:5P) (BG)/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) (PVABG) and chitosan (Chi)/collagen (Col) (ChiCol) were prepared by three mechanical freeze-thaw followed by freeze-drying to obtain the porous scaffolds. The mechanical properties and the in vitro biocompatibility of the composite scaffolds to simulated body fluid (SBF) and to rat osteoblast-like UMR-106 cells were investigated. The results from the studies indicated that the porosity and compressive strength were controlled by the weight ratio of PVABG:ChiCol. The highest compressive modulus of the composites made was 214.64 MPa which was for the 1:1 weight ratio PVABG:ChiCol. Mineralization study in SBF showed the formation of apatite crystals on the PVABG:ChiCol surface after 7 days of incubation. In vitro cell availability and proliferation tests confirmed the osteoblast attachment and growth on the PVABG:ChiCol surface. MTT and ALP tests on the 1:1 weight ratio PVABG:ChiCol composite indicated that the UMR-106 cells were viable. Alkaline phosphatase activity was found to increase with increasing culturing time. In addition, we showed the potential of PVABG:ChiCol drug delivery through PBS solution studies. 81.14% of BSA loading had been achieved and controlled release for over four weeks was observed. Our results indicated that the PVABG:ChiCol composites, especially the 1:1 weight ratio composite exhibited significantly improved mechanical, mineral deposition, biological properties and controlled release. This made them potential candidates for bone tissue engineering applications.

  16. Graphene oxide scaffold accelerates cellular proliferative response and alveolar bone healing of tooth extraction socket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Erika; Miyaji, Hirofumi; Kato, Akihito; Takita, Hiroko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Momose, Takehito; Ogawa, Kosuke; Murakami, Shusuke; Sugaya, Tsutomu; Kawanami, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) consisting of a carbon monolayer has been widely investigated for tissue engineering platforms because of its unique properties. For this study, we fabricated a GO-applied scaffold and assessed the cellular and tissue behaviors in the scaffold. A preclinical test was conducted to ascertain whether the GO scaffold promoted bone induction in dog tooth extraction sockets. For this study, GO scaffolds were prepared by coating the surface of a collagen sponge scaffold with 0.1 and 1 µg/mL GO dispersion. Scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), physical testing, cell seeding, and rat subcutaneous implant testing. Then a GO scaffold was implanted into a dog tooth extraction socket. Histological observations were made at 2 weeks postsurgery. SEM observations show that GO attached to the surface of collagen scaffold struts. The GO scaffold exhibited an interconnected structure resembling that of control subjects. GO application improved the physical strength, enzyme resistance, and adsorption of calcium and proteins. Cytocompatibility tests showed that GO application significantly increased osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation. In addition, an assessment of rat subcutaneous tissue response revealed that implantation of 1 µg/mL GO scaffold stimulated cellular ingrowth behavior, suggesting that the GO scaffold exhibited good biocompatibility. The tissue ingrowth area and DNA contents of 1 µg/mL GO scaffold were, respectively, approximately 2.5-fold and 1.4-fold greater than those of the control. Particularly, the infiltration of ED2-positive (M2) macrophages and blood vessels were prominent in the GO scaffold. Dog bone-formation tests showed that 1 µg/mL GO scaffold implantation enhanced bone formation. New bone formation following GO scaffold implantation was enhanced fivefold compared to that in control subjects. These results suggest that GO was biocompatible and had high bone-formation capability for the scaffold

  17. Quantitative proteomics identifies Gemin5, a scaffolding protein involved in ribonucleoprotein assembly, as a novel partner for eukaryotic initiation factor 4E

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fierro-Monti, Ivo; Mohammed, Shabaz; Matthiesen, Rune

    2006-01-01

    Protein complexes are dynamic entities; identification and quantitation of their components is critical in elucidating functional roles under specific cellular conditions. We report the first quantitative proteomic analysis of the human cap-binding protein complex. Components and proteins...

  18. PLGA Microspheres Incorporated Gelatin Scaffold: Microspheres Modulate Scaffold Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Indranil Banerjee; Debasish Mishra; Maiti, Tapas K.

    2009-01-01

    Freeze drying is one of the popular methods of fabrication for poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres incorporated polymer scaffolds. However, the consequence of microspheres incorporation on physical and biological properties of scaffold has not been studied yet. In this study, attempt has been made to characterize the effect of PLGA microsphere incorporation on the physical properties of freeze-dried gelatin scaffold and its influence on cytocompatibility. Scaffolds loaded with va...

  19. Grafting of protein-protein binding sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A strategy for grafting protein-protein binding sites is described. Firstly, key interaction residues at the interface of ligand protein to be grafted are identified and suitable positions in scaffold protein for grafting these key residues are sought. Secondly, the scaffold proteins are superposed onto the ligand protein based on the corresponding Ca and Cb atoms. The complementarity between the scaffold protein and the receptor protein is evaluated and only matches with high score are accepted. The relative position between scaffold and receptor proteins is adjusted so that the interface has a reasonable packing density. Then the scaffold protein is mutated to corresponding residues in ligand protein at each candidate position. And the residues having bad steric contacts with the receptor proteins, or buried charged residues not involved in the formation of any salt bridge are mutated. Finally, the mutated scaffold protein in complex with receptor protein is co-minimized by Charmm. In addition, we deduce a scoring function to evaluate the affinity between mutated scaffold protein and receptor protein by statistical analysis of rigid binding data sets.

  20. Scaffold mining of kinase hinge binders in crystal structure database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Li; Rai, Brajesh; Lunney, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinases are the second most prominent group of drug targets, after G-protein-coupled receptors. Despite their distinct inhibition mechanisms, the majority of kinase inhibitors engage the conserved hydrogen bond interactions with the backbone of hinge residues. We mined Pfizer internal crystal structure database (CSDb) comprising of several thousand of public as well as internal X-ray binary complexes to compile an inclusive list of hinge binding scaffolds. The minimum ring scaffolds with directly attached hetero-atoms and functional groups were extracted from the full compounds by applying a rule-based filtering procedure employing a comprehensive annotation of ATP-binding site of the human kinase complements. The results indicated large number of kinase inhibitors of diverse chemical structures are derived from a relatively small number of common scaffolds, which serve as the critical recognition elements for protein kinase interaction. Out of the nearly 4,000 kinase-inhibitor complexes in the CSDb we identified approximately 600 unique scaffolds. Hinge scaffolds are overwhelmingly flat with very little sp3 characteristics, and are less lipophilic than their corresponding parent compounds. Examples of the most common as well as the uncommon hinge scaffolds are presented. Although the most common scaffolds are found in complex with multiple kinase targets, a large number of them are uniquely bound to a specific kinase, suggesting certain scaffolds could be more promiscuous than the others. The compiled collection of hinge scaffolds along with their three-dimensional binding coordinates could serve as basis set for hinge hopping, a practice frequently employed to generate novel invention as well as to optimize existing leads in medicinal chemistry.

  1. Semiotic Scaffolding in Mathematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Mikkel Willum; Misfeldt, Morten

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the notion of semiotic scaffolding in relation to mathematics by considering its influence on mathematical activities, and on the evolution of mathematics as a research field. We will do this by analyzing the role different representational forms play in mathematical...... cognition, and more broadly on mathematical activities. In the main part of the paper, we will present and analyze three different cases. For the first case, we investigate the semiotic scaffolding involved in pencil and paper multiplication. For the second case, we investigate how the development of new...... in both mathematical cognition and in the development of mathematics itself, but mathematical cognition cannot itself be reduced to the use of semiotic scaffolding....

  2. Semiotic scaffolding of multicellularity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    semiotic scaffoldings had to be invented in order to prevent this. While a unicellular self may go on to live practically forever, the multicellular self most often must run through an individuation process ending in the death of the individual. Due to basic differences in cells of plants, fungi...... of fertilization and thereby the need for a whole new set of elaborate semiotic scaffoldings. Multicellularity also opened the door to the formation symbiotic relations where cells with different genomes might collaborate or at least coexist inside the same body. All in all multicellularity led to an enormous...... diversification both of morphology space and the space of sensomotoric elaborations. New means for scaffolding of this expansion and diversification of possible life forms into functional patterns called for a corresponding growth in the space of semiotic tools (chemical processes, heat, light, sound, volatile...

  3. A scaffold-filter model for studying the chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Zheng, Li; Fan, Hong S; Zhang, Xing D

    2017-01-01

    This study was undertaken to explore the synergistic effect of scaffold materials and a cartilage-like environment on the chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells. Because stem cells encapsulated in a cartilage scaffold will be induced by scaffold molecules as well as permeable molecules from the surroundings, it is impossible to optimize a chondro-inducible scaffold without considering environmental sensitivity. How do we know if a designed scaffold will be sufficient prior to implantation? In this study, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (bMSCs) were seeded in various scaffolds, including collagen hydrogel, collage/sodium alginate hydrogel, collagen sponge and silk fibroin sponge. The cell-scaffold complex was encapsulated in a filter pocket to avoid direct contact with co-cultured chondrocytes. Scaffolds differed in the ability to adsorb inducible molecules expressed by chondrocytes, as evidenced by various expressions of cartilage specific proteins and genes. Collagen hydrogel unexpectedly supported chondrogenic differentiation in an environment filled with chondrocytes secretion better than other reinforced scaffolds, which is consistent with the previous experiment in vivo. This result indicated that the environmental sensitivity of a scaffold is important for in vivo chondro-induction. This in vitro scaffold-filter model may be useful as a precursor to investigate the chondro-inducing potential of various scaffolds for cartilage repair.

  4. Histological and radiographic evaluation of the muscle tissue of rats after implantation of bone morphogenic protein (rhBMP-2 in a scaffold of inorganic bone and after stimulation with low-power laser light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengtson Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study histologically and radiologically evaluates the muscle tissue of rats after implantation of bone morphogenic protein (rhBMP-2 in a natural inorganic bone mineral scaffold from a bull calf femur and irradiation with low-power light laser. Materials and Methods: The right and left hind limbs of 16 rats were shaved and an incision was made in the muscle on the face corresponding to the median portion of the tibia, into which rhBMP-2 in a scaffold of inorganic bone was implanted. Two groups of limbs were formed: control (G1 and laser irradiation (G2. G2 received diode laser light applied in the direction of the implant, at a dose of 8 J/cm2 for three minutes. On the 7th, 21st, 40th and 112th days after implantation, hind limbs of 4 animals were radiographed and their implants removed together with the surrounding tissue for study under the microscope. The histological results were graded as 0=absence, 1=slight presence, 2=representative and 3=very representative, with regard to the following events: formation of osteoid structure, acute inflammation, chronic inflammation, fibrin deposition, neovascularization, foreign-body granuloma and fibrosis. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in these events at each evaluation times, between the two groups (P > 0.05; Mann-Whitney test. Nevertheless, it could be concluded that the natural inorganic bone matrix with rhBMP-2, from the femur of a bull calf, is a biocompatible combination. Conclusions: Under these conditions, the inductive capacity of rhBMP-2 for cell differentiation was inhibited. There was a slight acceleration in tissue healing in the group that received irradiation with low-power laser light.

  5. Purification of capping protein using the capping protein binding site of CARMIL as an affinity matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmert, Kirsten; Uruno, Takehito; Hammer, John A

    2009-10-01

    Capping protein (CP) is a ubiquitously expressed, heterodimeric actin binding protein that is essential for normal actin dynamics in cells. The existing methods for purifying native CP from tissues and recombinant CP from bacteria are time-consuming processes that involve numerous conventional chromatographic steps and functional assays to achieve a homogeneous preparation of the protein. Here, we report the rapid purification of Acanthamoeba CP from amoeba extracts and recombinant mouse CP from E. coli extracts using as an affinity matrix GST-fusion proteins containing the CP binding site from Acanthamoeba CARMIL and mouse CARMIL-1, respectively. This improved method for CP purification should facilitate the in vitro analysis of CP structure, function, and regulation.

  6. Tissue regeneration in vivo within recombinant spidroin 1 scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisenovich, Mikhail M; Pustovalova, Olga; Shackelford, Julia; Vasiljeva, Tamara V; Druzhinina, Tatiana V; Kamenchuk, Yana A; Guzeev, Vitaly V; Sokolova, Olga S; Bogush, Vladimir G; Debabov, Vladimir G; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Agapov, Igor I

    2012-05-01

    One of the major tasks of tissue engineering is to produce tissue grafts for the replacement or regeneration of damaged tissue, and natural and recombinant silk-based polymer scaffolds are promising candidates for such grafts. Here, we compared two porous scaffolds made from different silk proteins, fibroin of Bombyx mori and a recombinant analog of Nephila clavipes spidroin 1 known as rS1/9, and their biocompatibility and degradation behavior in vitro and in vivo. The vascularization and intergrowth of the connective tissue, which was penetrated with nerve fibers, at 8 weeks after subcutaneous implantation in Balb/c mice was more profound using the rS1/9 scaffolds. Implantation of both scaffolds into bone defects in Wistar rats accelerated repair compared to controls with no implanted scaffold at 4 weeks. Based on the number of macrophages and multinuclear giant cells in the subcutaneous area and the number of osteoclasts in the bone, regeneration was determined to be more effective after the rS1/9 scaffolds were implanted. Microscopic examination of the morphology of the matrices revealed differences in their internal microstructures. In contrast to fibroin-based scaffolds, the walls of the rS1/9 scaffolds were visibly thicker and contained specific micropores. We suggest that the porous inner structure of the rS1/9 scaffolds provided a better micro-environment for the regenerating tissue, which makes the matrices derived from the recombinant rS1/9 protein favorable candidates for future in vivo applications.

  7. Plant-Derived Human Collagen Scaffolds for Skin Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, James J.; Drexler, Jason W.; Das, Amitava; Roy, Sashwati; Shilo, Shani; Shoseyov, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly formed using proteins extracted from animal tissues, such as bovine hide. Risks associated with the use of these materials include hypersensitivity and pathogenic contamination. Human-derived proteins lower the risk of hypersensitivity, but possess the risk of disease transmission. Methods engineering recombinant human proteins using plant material provide an alternate source of these materials without the risk of disease transmission or concerns regarding variability. To investigate the utility of plant-derived human collagen (PDHC) in the development of engineered skin (ES), PDHC and bovine hide collagen were formed into tissue engineering scaffolds using electrospinning or freeze-drying. Both raw materials were easily formed into two common scaffold types, electrospun nonwoven scaffolds and lyophilized sponges, with similar architectures. The processing time, however, was significantly lower with PDHC. PDHC scaffolds supported primary human cell attachment and proliferation at an equivalent or higher level than the bovine material. Interleukin-1 beta production was significantly lower when activated THP-1 macrophages where exposed to PDHC electrospun scaffolds compared to bovine collagen. Both materials promoted proper maturation and differentiation of ES. These data suggest that PDHC may provide a novel source of raw material for tissue engineering with low risk of allergic response or disease transmission. PMID:23298216

  8. Polymeric Scaffolds in Tissue Engineering Application: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahatheeswaran Dhandayuthapani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Current strategies of regenerative medicine are focused on the restoration of pathologically altered tissue architectures by transplantation of cells in combination with supportive scaffolds and biomolecules. In recent years, considerable interest has been given to biologically active scaffolds which are based on similar analogs of the extracellular matrix that have induced synthesis of tissues and organs. To restore function or regenerate tissue, a scaffold is necessary that will act as a temporary matrix for cell proliferation and extracellular matrix deposition, with subsequent ingrowth until the tissues are totally restored or regenerated. Scaffolds have been used for tissue engineering such as bone, cartilage, ligament, skin, vascular tissues, neural tissues, and skeletal muscle and as vehicle for the controlled delivery of drugs, proteins, and DNA. Various technologies come together to construct porous scaffolds to regenerate the tissues/organs and also for controlled and targeted release of bioactive agents in tissue engineering applications. In this paper, an overview of the different types of scaffolds with their material properties is discussed. The fabrication technologies for tissue engineering scaffolds, including the basic and conventional techniques to the more recent ones, are tabulated.

  9. Development of a porcine renal extracellular matrix scaffold as a platform for kidney regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seock Hwan; Chun, So Young; Chae, Seon Yeong; Kim, Jin Rae; Oh, Se Heang; Chung, Sung Kwang; Lee, Jin Ho; Song, Phil Hyun; Choi, Gyu-Seog; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kwon, Tae Gyun

    2015-04-01

    Acellular scaffolds, possessing an intact three-dimensional extracellular matrix (ECM) architecture and biochemical components, are promising for regeneration of complex organs, such as the kidney. We have successfully developed a porcine renal acellular scaffold and analyzed its physical/biochemical characteristics, biocompatibility, and kidney reconstructive potential. Segmented porcine kidney cortexes were treated with either 1% (v/v) Triton X-100 (Triton) or sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Scanning electron microscopy showed both treatments preserved native tissue architecture, including porosity and composition. Swelling behavior was higher in the Triton-treated compared with the SDS-treated scaffold. Maximum compressive strength was lower in the Triton-treated compared with the SDS-treated scaffold. Attenuated total reflective-infrared spectroscopy showed the presence of amide II (-NH) in both scaffolds. Furthermore, richer ECM protein and growth factor contents were observed in the Triton-treated compared with SDS-treated scaffold. Primary human kidney cell adherence, viability, and proliferation were enhanced on the Triton-treated scaffold compared with SDS-treated scaffold. Following murine in vivo implantation, tumorigenecity was absent for both scaffolds after 8 weeks and in the Triton-treated scaffold only, glomeruli-like structure formation and neovascularity were observed. We identified 1% Triton X-100 as a more suitable decellularizing agent for porcine renal ECM scaffolds prior to kidney regeneration.

  10. Advances in Study on Scaffold/matrix Attachment Region Binding Protein 1%核基质结合区结合蛋白质1研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗金波; 乔炜

    2012-01-01

    Change of nuclear matrix associated protein is one of the major phenotypes of malignant tumor cells leading to alteration in chromatin folding, the change of fidelity of genome replication and gene expression. Aberrant expression of matrix attachment region (MAR) binding proteins (MARBPs) modulates the chromatin constitution and disruption of transcriptional network that leads to oncogenesis. Some of these proteins are expressed specifically in tumor tissue and could be served as promising diagnostic or prognostic markers. Scaffold/matrix attachment region binding protein 1 (SMAR1) expression is drastically down-regulated in breast cancer. This article reviewed the roles of SMAR1 in cell growth, apoptosis and tumorigenesis.%核基质相关蛋白改变是恶性肿瘤细胞的主要表现形式,可使染色质发生折叠、基因复制保真度和基因表达发生改变.核基质结合区(MAR)结合蛋白(MARBPs)表达异常可影响染色质构成、干扰转录调控程序,致肿瘤形成.某些MARBPs特异性表达于肿瘤组织,是肿瘤诊断和预后的指标.核基质结合区结合蛋白质1(SMAR1)在乳腺癌中的表达急剧下调.本文就SMAR1在细胞生长、凋亡和肿瘤形成中的作用作一综述.

  11. Highly ordered structures of peptides by using molecular scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriuchi, Toshiyuki; Hirao, Toshikazu

    2004-06-20

    Protein secondary structures such as alpha-helices, beta-sheets, and beta-turns are important in inducing the three-dimensional structure and biological activity of proteins. Designing secondary structure mimics composed of short peptides has attracted much attention not only to gain fundamental insight into the factors affecting protein folding but also to develop pharmacologically useful compounds, artificial receptors, asymmetric catalysts, and new materials. In this tutorial review, we focus on molecular scaffolds employed to induce beta-sheet-like structure in attached peptide chains, thereby creating highly ordered molecular structures, and discuss the versatility of these molecular scaffolds to regulate the attached peptide strands in the appropriate dimensions.

  12. Cyclase-associated proteins: CAPacity for linking signal transduction and actin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubberstey, Andrew V; Mottillo, Emilio P

    2002-04-01

    Many extracellular signals elicit changes in the actin cytoskeleton, which are mediated through an array of signaling proteins and pathways. One family of proteins that plays a role in regulating actin remodeling in response to cellular signals are the cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs). CAPs are highly conserved monomeric actin binding proteins present in a wide range of organisms including yeast, fly, plants, and mammals. The original CAP was isolated as a component of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase complex that serves as an effector of Ras during nutritional signaling. CAPs are multifunctional molecules that contain domains involved in actin binding, adenylyl cyclase association in yeast, SH3 binding, and oligomerization. Genetic studies in yeast have implicated CAPs in vesicle trafficking and endocytosis. CAPs play a developmental role in multicellular organisms, and studies of Drosophila have illuminated the importance of the actin cytoskeleton during eye development and in establishing oocyte polarity. This review will highlight the critical structural and functional domains of CAPs, describe recent studies that have implied important roles for these proteins in linking cell signaling with actin polymerization, and highlight their roles in vesicle trafficking and development.

  13. Evidence for an uncommon alpha-actinin protein in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricheux, G; Coffe, G; Pradel, N; Brugerolle, G

    1998-09-15

    As part of our ongoing project of identification of actin-binding proteins implicated in the cell transition (flagellate to amoeboid/adherent) of Trichomonas vaginalis, we have characterized an alpha-actinin-related protein in this parasite. The protein (P100) has a molecular mass of 100 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.5. A monoclonal antibody raised against this protein co-localizes with the actin network. P100 gene transcripts are co-expressed with actin throughout the cell cycle. Analysis of the deduced protein sequence reveals three domains: an N-terminal actin-binding region; a central region rich in alpha-helix; and a C-terminal domain with Ca(2+)-binding capacity. Whereas the N- and C-terminal regions are well-conserved as compared to other alpha-actinins, we observe in the central region an atypical distribution of residues in five repeats. The sequence of the repeats does not show any homology with the rod domain of the other alpha-actinins, except for the first repeat which shows some similarity. The four other repeats of T. vaginalis P100 appear to result from a duplication event which is not detectable in the other sequences.

  14. Strategies for neurotrophin-3 and chondroitinase ABC release from freeze-cast chitosan-alginate nerve-guidance scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Nicola L; Hunger, Philipp M; Donius, Amalie E; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Wheatley, Margaret A

    2017-01-01

    Freeze casting, or controlled unidirectional solidification, can be used to fabricate chitosan-alginate (C-A) scaffolds with highly aligned porosity that are suitable for use as nerve-guidance channels. To augment the guidance of growth across a spinal cord injury lesion, these scaffolds are now evaluated in vitro to assess their ability to release neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and chondroitinase ABC (chABC) in a controlled manner. Protein-loaded microcapsules were incorporated into C-A scaffolds prior to freeze casting without affecting the original scaffold architecture. In vitro protein release was not significantly different when comparing protein loaded directly into the scaffolds with release from scaffolds containing incorporated microcapsules. NT-3 was released from the C-A scaffolds for 8 weeks in vitro, while chABC was released for up to 7 weeks. Low total percentages of protein released from the scaffolds over this time period were attributed to limitation of diffusion by the interpenetrating polymer network matrix of the scaffold walls. NT-3 and chABC released from the scaffolds retained bioactivity, as determined by a neurite outgrowth assay, and the promotion of neurite growth across an inhibitory barrier of chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans. This demonstrates the potential of these multifunctional scaffolds for enhancing axonal regeneration through growth-inhibiting glial scars via the sustained release of chABC and NT-3. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Crystal Structure of the Human Cytomegalovirus pUL50-pUL53 Core Nuclear Egress Complex Provides Insight into a Unique Assembly Scaffold for Virus-Host Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, Sascha A; Egerer-Sieber, Claudia; Sticht, Heinrich; Sevvana, Madhumati; Hohl, Katharina; Milbradt, Jens; Muller, Yves A; Marschall, Manfred

    2015-11-13

    Nuclear replication of cytomegalovirus relies on elaborate mechanisms of nucleocytoplasmic egress of viral particles. Thus, the role of two essential and conserved viral nuclear egress proteins, pUL50 and pUL53, is pivotal. pUL50 and pUL53 heterodimerize and form a core nuclear egress complex (NEC), which is anchored to the inner nuclear membrane and provides a scaffold for the assembly of a multimeric viral-cellular NEC. Here, we report the crystal structure of the pUL50-pUL53 heterodimer (amino acids 1-175 and 50-292, respectively) at 2.44 Å resolution. Both proteins adopt a globular fold with mixed α and β secondary structure elements. pUL53-specific features include a zinc-binding site and a hook-like N-terminal extension, the latter representing a hallmark element of the pUL50-pUL53 interaction. The hook-like extension (amino acids 59-87) embraces pUL50 and contributes 1510 Å(2) to the total interface area (1880 Å(2)). The pUL50 structure overall resembles the recently published NMR structure of the murine cytomegalovirus homolog pM50 but reveals a considerable repositioning of the very C-terminal α-helix of pUL50 upon pUL53 binding. pUL53 shows structural resemblance with the GHKL domain of bacterial sensory histidine kinases. A close examination of the crystal structure indicates partial assembly of pUL50-pUL53 heterodimers to hexameric ring-like structures possibly providing additional scaffolding opportunities for NEC. In combination, the structural information on pUL50-pUL53 considerably improves our understanding of the mechanism of HCMV nuclear egress. It may also accelerate the validation of the NEC as a unique target for developing a novel type of antiviral drug and improved options of broad-spectrum antiherpesviral therapy.

  16. Mineralization Content Alters Osteogenic Responses of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells on Hydroxyapatite/Polycaprolactone Composite Nanofiber Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketul C. Popat

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic tissue scaffolds have a high potential impact for patients experiencing osteogenesis imperfecta. Using electrospinning, tissue scaffolds composed of hydroxyapatite/polycaprolactone (HAp/PCL composite nanofibers were fabricated with two different HAp concentrations—1% and 10% of the solid scaffold weight. After physico-chemical scaffold characterization, rat bone marrow stromal cells were cultured on the composite scaffolds in maintenance medium and then in osteogenic medium. Quantitative PCR, colorimetric assays, immunofluorescent labeling, and electron microscopy measured osteogenic cell responses to the HAp/PCL scaffolds. In maintenance conditions, both Hap/PCL scaffolds and control scaffolds supported cell colonization through seven days with minor differences. In osteogenic conditions, the 10% HAp scaffolds exhibited significantly increased ALP assay levels at week 3, consistent with previous reports. However, qPCR analysis demonstrated an overall decrease in bone matrix-associated genes on Hap/PCL scaffolds. Osteopontin and osteocalcin immunofluorescent microscopy revealed a trend that both mineralized scaffolds had greater amounts of both proteins, though qPCR results indicated the opposite trend for osteopontin. Additionally, type I collagen expression decreased on HAp scaffolds. These results indicate that cells are sensitive to minor changes in mineral content within nanofibers, even at just 1% w/w, and elucidating the sensing mechanism may lead to optimized osteogenic scaffold designs.

  17. Scaffolding students’ assignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot, Marie Falkesgaard

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses scaffolding in typical student assignments in mother tongue learning materials in upper secondary education in Denmark and the United Kingdom. It has been determined that assignments do not have sufficient scaffolding end features to help pupils understand concepts and build...... objects. The article presents the results of empirical research on tasks given in Danish and British learning materials. This work is based on a further development of my PhD thesis: “Learning materials in the subject of Danish” (Slot 2010). The main focus is how cognitive models (and subsidiary explicit...... learning goals) can help students structure their argumentative and communica-tive learning processes, and how various multimodal representations can give more open-ended learning possibilities for collaboration. The article presents a short introduction of the skills for 21st century learning and defines...

  18. Scaffold: Quantum Programming Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    included popular classical high-level imperative programming languages (C/C++, Java) [16, 25, 11], hardware description languages ( Verilog ) [13], C-to...hardware languages (System-C) [14] and existing quantum programming languages (QCL) [23]. • Variant of C and Verilog : Scaffold syntax was chosen to be...very similar to C (and to some extent Verilog HDL.) This reflects our belief that expressing computations in terms of familiar iterative and imperative

  19. 14-3-3 proteins act as scaffolds for GmMYB62 and GmMYB176 and regulate their intracellular localization in soybean

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Isoflavonoids are plant natural compounds predominantly found in leguminous plant. They play important functions in both nitrogen fixation and stress resistance. Many clinical studies have linked dietary intake of isoflavonoids to human health benefits. Binding of 14-3-3 proteins to GmMYB176, an isoflavonoid regulator, modulates expression of key isoflavonoids gene expression and its biosynthesis. We have recently demonstrated that the interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with GmMYB176 regulates nu...

  20. Phox homology band 4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin-like proteins function as molecular scaffolds that interact with cargo receptors and Ras GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghai, Rajesh; Mobli, Mehdi; Norwood, Suzanne J; Bugarcic, Andrea; Teasdale, Rohan D; King, Glenn F; Collins, Brett M

    2011-05-10

    Following endocytosis, the fates of receptors, channels, and other transmembrane proteins are decided via specific endosomal sorting pathways, including recycling to the cell surface for continued activity. Two distinct phox-homology (PX)-domain-containing proteins, sorting nexin (SNX) 17 and SNX27, are critical regulators of recycling from endosomes to the cell surface. In this study we demonstrate that SNX17, SNX27, and SNX31 all possess a novel 4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin (FERM)-like domain. SNX17 has been shown to bind to Asn-Pro-Xaa-Tyr (NPxY) sequences in the cytoplasmic tails of cargo such as LDL receptors and the amyloid precursor protein, and we find that both SNX17 and SNX27 display similar affinities for NPxY sorting motifs, suggesting conserved functions in endosomal recycling. Furthermore, we show for the first time that all three proteins are able to bind the Ras GTPase through their FERM-like domains. These interactions place the PX-FERM-like proteins at a hub of endosomal sorting and signaling processes. Studies of the SNX17 PX domain coupled with cellular localization experiments reveal the mechanistic basis for endosomal localization of the PX-FERM-like proteins, and structures of SNX17 and SNX27 determined by small angle X-ray scattering show that they adopt non-self-assembling, modular structures in solution. In summary, this work defines a novel family of proteins that participate in a network of interactions that will impact on both endosomal protein trafficking and compartment specific Ras signaling cascades.

  1. Dynamic regulation of a cell adhesion protein complex including CADM1 by combinatorial analysis of FRAP with exponential curve-fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai-Yageta, Mika; Maruyama, Tomoko; Suzuki, Takashi; Ichikawa, Kazuhisa; Murakami, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Protein components of cell adhesion machinery show continuous renewal even in the static state of epithelial cells and participate in the formation and maintenance of normal epithelial architecture and tumor suppression. CADM1 is a tumor suppressor belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecule and forms a cell adhesion complex with an actin-binding protein, 4.1B, and a scaffold protein, MPP3, in the cytoplasm. Here, we investigate dynamic regulation of the CADM1-4.1B-MPP3 complex in mature cell adhesion by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis. Traditional FRAP analysis were performed for relatively short period of around 10 min. Here, thanks to recent advances in the sensitive laser detector systems, we examine FRAP of CADM1 complex for longer period of 60 min and analyze the recovery with exponential curve-fitting to distinguish the fractions with different diffusion constants. This approach reveals that the fluorescence recovery of CADM1 is fitted to a single exponential function with a time constant (τ) of approximately 16 min, whereas 4.1B and MPP3 are fitted to a double exponential function with two τs of approximately 40-60 sec and 16 min. The longer τ is similar to that of CADM1, suggesting that 4.1B and MPP3 have two distinct fractions, one forming a complex with CADM1 and the other present as a free pool. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching analysis supports the presence of a free pool of these proteins near the plasma membrane. Furthermore, double exponential fitting makes it possible to estimate the ratio of 4.1B and MPP3 present as a free pool and as a complex with CADM1 as approximately 3:2 and 3:1, respectively. Our analyses reveal a central role of CADM1 in stabilizing the complex with 4.1B and MPP3 and provide insight in the dynamics of adhesion complex formation.

  2. Part I. Cobalt thiolate complexes modeling the active site of cobalt nitrile hydratase. Part II. Formation of inorganic nanoparticles on protein scaffolding in Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Irene Yuk Man

    scaffolding for inorganic mineralization. US nanoclusters of discreet size seem to grow in the presence of E165C in aqueous solution spontaneously. Commercially available mono(maleimido)undecagold seem to bind only to E165C through the reactive cysteine side chains. Reduction of Au3+ to elemental gold in solution with E165C, generates long, linear structures of approximately 100-nm diameter.

  3. Exploitation of cholane scaffold for the discovery of potent and selective farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and G-protein coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GP-BAR1) ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festa, Carmen; Renga, Barbara; D'Amore, Claudio; Sepe, Valentina; Finamore, Claudia; De Marino, Simona; Carino, Adriana; Cipriani, Sabrina; Monti, Maria Chiara; Zampella, Angela; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2014-10-23

    Nuclear and G-protein coupled receptors are considered major targets for drug discovery. FXR and GP-BAR1, two bile acid-activated receptors, have gained increasing consideration as druggable receptors. Because endogenous bile acids often target both receptor families, the development of selective ligands has been proven difficult, exposing patients to side effects linked to an unwanted activation of one of the two receptors. In the present study, we describe a novel library of semisynthetic bile acid derivatives obtained by modifications on the cholane scaffold. The pharmacological characterization of this library led to the discovery of 7α-hydroxy-5β-cholan-24-sulfate (7), 6β-ethyl-3α,7β-dihydroxy-5β-cholan-24-ol (EUDCOH, 26), and 6α-ethyl-3α, 7α-dihydroxy-24-nor-5β-cholan-23-ol (NorECDCOH, 30) as novel ligands for FXR and GP-BAR1 that might hold utility in the treatment of FXR and GP-BAR1 mediated disorders.

  4. Olfactory receptor signaling is regulated by the post-synaptic density 95, Drosophila discs large, zona-occludens 1 (PDZ) scaffold multi-PDZ domain protein 1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dooley, Ruth

    2009-12-01

    The unique ability of mammals to detect and discriminate between thousands of different odorant molecules is governed by the diverse array of olfactory receptors expressed by olfactory sensory neurons in the nasal epithelium. Olfactory receptors consist of seven transmembrane domain G protein-coupled receptors and comprise the largest gene superfamily in the mammalian genome. We found that approximately 30% of olfactory receptors possess a classical post-synaptic density 95, Drosophila discs large, zona-occludens 1 (PDZ) domain binding motif in their C-termini. PDZ domains have been established as sites for protein-protein interaction and play a central role in organizing diverse cell signaling assemblies. In the present study, we show that multi-PDZ domain protein 1 (MUPP1) is expressed in the apical compartment of olfactory sensory neurons. Furthermore, on heterologous co-expression with olfactory sensory neurons, MUPP1 was shown to translocate to the plasma membrane. We found direct interaction of PDZ domains 1 + 2 of MUPP1 with the C-terminus of olfactory receptors in vitro. Moreover, the odorant-elicited calcium response of OR2AG1 showed a prolonged decay in MUPP1 small interfering RNA-treated cells. We have therefore elucidated the first building blocks of the putative \\'olfactosome\\

  5. A PDZ-Like Motif in the Biliary Transporter ABCB4 Interacts with the Scaffold Protein EBP50 and Regulates ABCB4 Cell Surface Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quitterie Venot

    Full Text Available ABCB4/MDR3, a member of the ABC superfamily, is an ATP-dependent phosphatidylcholine translocator expressed at the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. Defects in the ABCB4 gene are associated with rare biliary diseases. It is essential to understand the mechanisms of its canalicular membrane expression in particular for the development of new therapies. The stability of several ABC transporters is regulated through their binding to PDZ (PSD95/DglA/ZO-1 domain-containing proteins. ABCB4 protein ends by the sequence glutamine-asparagine-leucine (QNL, which shows some similarity to PDZ-binding motifs. The aim of our study was to assess the potential role of the QNL motif on the surface expression of ABCB4 and to determine if PDZ domain-containing proteins are involved. We found that truncation of the QNL motif decreased the stability of ABCB4 in HepG2-transfected cells. The deleted mutant ABCB4-ΔQNL also displayed accelerated endocytosis. EBP50, a PDZ protein highly expressed in the liver, strongly colocalized and coimmunoprecipitated with ABCB4, and this interaction required the QNL motif. Down-regulation of EBP50 by siRNA or by expression of an EBP50 dominant-negative mutant caused a significant decrease in the level of ABCB4 protein expression, and in the amount of ABCB4 localized at the canalicular membrane. Interaction of ABCB4 with EBP50 through its PDZ-like motif plays a critical role in the regulation of ABCB4 expression and stability at the canalicular plasma membrane.

  6. Instruction, Cognitive Scaffolding, and Motivational Scaffolding in Writing Center Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackiewicz, Jo; Thompson, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we quantitatively analyze the discourse of experienced writing center tutors in 10 highly satisfactory conferences. Specifically, we analyze tutors' instruction, cognitive scaffolding, and motivational scaffolding, all tutoring strategies identified in prior research from other disciplines as educationally effective. We find that…

  7. A Novel Albumin-Based Tissue Scaffold for Autogenic Tissue Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei-Shan; -Liang Lee, I.; Yu, Wei-Lin; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Jane, Wann-Neng; Shen, Hsin-Hsin

    2014-07-01

    Tissue scaffolds provide a framework for living tissue regeneration. However, traditional tissue scaffolds are exogenous, composed of metals, ceramics, polymers, and animal tissues, and have a defined biocompatibility and application. This study presents a new method for obtaining a tissue scaffold from blood albumin, the major protein in mammalian blood. Human, bovine, and porcine albumin was polymerised into albumin polymers by microbial transglutaminase and was then cast by freeze-drying-based moulding to form albumin tissue scaffolds. Scanning electron microscopy and material testing analyses revealed that the albumin tissue scaffold possesses an extremely porous structure, moderate mechanical strength, and resilience. Using a culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a model, we showed that MSCs can be seeded and grown in the albumin tissue scaffold. Furthermore, the albumin tissue scaffold can support the long-term osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. These results show that the albumin tissue scaffold exhibits favourable material properties and good compatibility with cells. We propose that this novel tissue scaffold can satisfy essential needs in tissue engineering as a general-purpose substrate. The use of this scaffold could lead to the development of new methods of artificial fabrication of autogenic tissue substitutes.

  8. 调控黑色素瘤转移的新信号蛋白: Syntenin%Syntenin: a novel PDZ domain-containing scaffolding protein associated with human melanoma metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-bo Yang; James B. McCarthy

    2007-01-01

    Syntenin蛋白在多种肿瘤中表达增强,最近被认为是一个新的黑色素瘤转移调节因子.作为一类支架信号蛋白,Syntenin通过它的两个PDZ 功能基团可与许多细胞膜受体胞内末端或细胞内的信号分子结合,调控多种重要的细胞生理过程和信号传导途径,包括细胞膜受体的聚集,细胞内蛋白质的转运,细胞骨架的重建,转录因子的激活,以增强肿瘤细胞的生长、黏附以及肿瘤的血管生成、侵袭和转移能力.本文简要综述了syntenin的结构和功能,相关的信号途径,及其在黑色素瘤研究领域的最新进展.%Syntenin is overexpressed in multiple human cancers and is newly recognized as a novel regulator in melanoma metastasis. It functions as a scaffolding protein, via its two PDZ domains interacting with multiple transmembrane and cytoplasmic partners to regulate many of the major signaling pathways involved in various cellular processes, such as cell surface receptor clustering, protein trafficking, cytoskeleton remodeling, and activation of transcription factor, and results in the increased abilities for tumor cell growth, adhesion, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. The present article attempts to review the structure and functions of syntenin by summarizing our current knowledge on the interacting partners and diverse signaling pathways related to syntenin, and highlight the importance of syntenin as a new potential therapeutic target for the aggressive human melanoma.

  9. An antifungal protein from Ginkgo biloba binds actin and can trigger cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ningning; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Mühlhäuser, Philipp; Liu, Qiong; Riemann, Michael; Ulrich, Anne S; Nick, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Ginkbilobin is a short antifungal protein that had been purified and cloned from the seeds of the living fossil Ginkgo biloba. Homologues of this protein can be detected in all seed plants and the heterosporic fern Selaginella and are conserved with respect to domain structures, peptide motifs, and specific cysteine signatures. To get insight into the cellular functions of these conserved motifs, we expressed green fluorescent protein fusions of full-length and truncated ginkbilobin in tobacco BY-2 cells. We show that the signal peptide confers efficient secretion of ginkbilobin. When this signal peptide is either cleaved or masked, ginkbilobin binds and visualizes the actin cytoskeleton. This actin-binding activity of ginkbilobin is mediated by a specific subdomain just downstream of the signal peptide, and this subdomain can also coassemble with actin in vitro. Upon stable overexpression of this domain, we observe a specific delay in premitotic nuclear positioning indicative of a reduced dynamicity of actin. To elucidate the cellular response to the binding of this subdomain to actin, we use chemical engineering based on synthetic peptides comprising different parts of the actin-binding subdomain conjugated with the cell-penetrating peptide BP100 and with rhodamine B as a fluorescent reporter. Binding of this synthetic construct to actin efficiently induces programmed cell death. We discuss these findings in terms of a working model, where ginkbilobin can activate actin-dependent cell death.

  10. The Oligomerization Domain of VP3, the Scaffolding Protein of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus, Plays a Critical Role in Capsid Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraver, Antonio; Oña, Ana; Abaitua, Fernando; González, Dolores; Clemente, Roberto; Ruiz-Díaz, Jose A.; Castón, Jose R.; Pazos, Florencio; Rodriguez, Jose F.

    2003-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) capsids are formed by a single protein layer containing three polypeptides, pVP2, VP2, and VP3. Here, we show that the VP3 protein synthesized in insect cells, either after expression of the complete polyprotein or from a VP3 gene construct, is proteolytically degraded, leading to the accumulation of product lacking the 13 C-terminal residues. This finding led to identification of the VP3 oligomerization domain within a 24-amino-acid stretch near the C-terminal end of the polypeptide, partially overlapping the VP1 binding domain. Inactivation of the VP3 oligomerization domain, by either proteolysis or deletion of the polyprotein gene, abolishes viruslike particle formation. Formation of VP3-VP1 complexes in cells infected with a dual recombinant baculovirus simultaneously expressing the polyprotein and VP1 prevented VP3 proteolysis and led to efficient virus-like particle formation in insect cells. PMID:12743301

  11. Fabrication and biocompatibility of poly(L-lactic acid) and chitosan composite scaffolds with hierarchical microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Tao, E-mail: taolou72@aliyun.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Wang, Xuejun [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Yan, Xu [College of Physics & Collaborative Innovation Center for Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials and Optoelectronic Devices, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Miao, Yu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Long, Yun-Ze, E-mail: yunzelong@163.com [College of Physics & Collaborative Innovation Center for Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials and Optoelectronic Devices, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Yin, Hai-Lei [Department of Osteology, No. 401 Hospital of P. L. A., Qingdao 266071 (China); Sun, Bin [College of Physics & Collaborative Innovation Center for Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials and Optoelectronic Devices, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Song, Guojun [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China)

    2016-07-01

    The scaffold microstructure is crucial to reconstruct tissue normal functions. In this article, poly(L-lactic acid) and chitosan fiber (PLLA/CTSF) composite scaffolds with hierarchical microstructures both in fiber and pore sizes were successfully fabricated by combining thermal induced phase separation and salt leaching techniques. The composite scaffolds consisted of a nanofibrous PLLA matrix with diameter of 50–500 nm, and chitosan fibers with diameter of about 20 μm were homogenously distributed in the PLLA matrix as a microsized reinforcer. The composite scaffolds also had high porosity (> 94%) and hierarchical pore size, which were consisted of both micropores (50 nm–10 μm) and macropores (50–300 μm). By tailoring the microstructure and chemical composition, the mechanical property, pH buffer and protein adsorption capacity of the composite scaffold were improved significantly compared with those of PLLA scaffold. Cell culture results also revealed that the PLLA/CTSF composite scaffolds supported MG-63 osteoblast proliferation and penetration. - Highlights: • Composite scaffolds fabricated by combining thermal induced phase separation and salt leaching techniques • Hierarchical microstructure both in fiber and pore sizes • The scaffold microenvironment facilitates the protein adsorption, cell proliferation and penetration.

  12. Biomimetic apatite-coated porous PVA scaffolds promote the growth of breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Mao; Mohanty, Pravansu; Ghosh, Gargi, E-mail: gargi@umich.edu

    2014-11-01

    Recapitulating the native environment of bone tissue is essential to develop in vitro models of breast cancer bone metastasis. The bone is a composite material consisting of organic matrix and inorganic mineral phase, primarily hydroxyapatite. In this study, we report the mineralization of porous poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffolds upon incubation in modified Hanks' Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) for 14 days. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the deposited minerals have composition similar to hydroxyapatite. The study demonstrated that the rate of nucleation and growth of minerals was faster on surfaces of less porous scaffolds. However, upon prolonged incubation, formation of mineral layer was observed on the surface of all the scaffolds. In addition, the study also demonstrated that 3D mineralization only occurred for scaffolds with highly interconnected porous networks. The mineralization of the scaffolds promoted the adsorption of serum proteins and consequently, the adhesion and proliferation of breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • Porous PVA scaffolds fabricated via mechanical agitation followed by freeze-drying. • Mineralization of the scaffold was carried out by utilizing biomimetic approach. • Mineralization resulted in increased protein adsorption on the scaffold. • Increased breast cancer cell growth was observed on mineralized scaffolds.

  13. Microporous dermal-mimetic electrospun scaffolds pre-seeded with fibroblasts promote tissue regeneration in full-thickness skin wounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul P Bonvallet

    Full Text Available Electrospun scaffolds serve as promising substrates for tissue repair due to their nanofibrous architecture and amenability to tailoring of chemical composition. In this study, the regenerative potential of a microporous electrospun scaffold pre-seeded with dermal fibroblasts was evaluated. Previously we reported that a 70% collagen I and 30% poly(Ɛ-caprolactone electrospun scaffold (70:30 col/PCL containing 160 μm diameter pores had favorable mechanical properties, supported fibroblast infiltration and subsequent cell-mediated deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM, and promoted more rapid and effective in vivo skin regeneration when compared to scaffolds lacking micropores. In the current study we tested the hypothesis that the efficacy of the 70:30 col/PCL microporous scaffolds could be further enhanced by seeding scaffolds with dermal fibroblasts prior to implantation into skin wounds. To address this hypothesis, a Fischer 344 (F344 rat syngeneic model was employed. In vitro studies showed that dermal fibroblasts isolated from F344 rat skin were able to adhere and proliferate on 70:30 col/PCL microporous scaffolds, and the cells also filled the 160 μm pores with native ECM proteins such as collagen I and fibronectin. Additionally, scaffolds seeded with F344 fibroblasts exhibited a low rate of contraction (~14% over a 21 day time frame. To assess regenerative potential, scaffolds with or without seeded F344 dermal fibroblasts were implanted into full thickness, critical size defects created in F344 hosts. Specifically, we compared: microporous scaffolds containing fibroblasts seeded for 4 days; scaffolds containing fibroblasts seeded for only 1 day; acellular microporous scaffolds; and a sham wound (no scaffold. Scaffolds containing fibroblasts seeded for 4 days had the best response of all treatment groups with respect to accelerated wound healing, a more normal-appearing dermal matrix structure, and hair follicle regeneration

  14. Microstructure and properties of nano-fibrous PCL-b-PLLA scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L He

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Nano-fibrous scaffolds which could potentially mimic the architecture of extracellular matrix (ECM have been considered a good candidate matrix for cell delivery in tissue engineering applications. In the present study, a semicrystalline diblock copolymer, poly(e-caprolactone-block-poly(L-lactide (PCL-b-PLLA, was synthesized and utilized to fabricate nano-fibrous scaffolds via a thermally induced phase separation process. Uniform nano-fibrous networks were created by quenching a PCL-b-PLLA/THF homogenous solution to -20ºC or below, followed by further gelation for 2 hours due to the presence of PLLA and PCL microcrystals. However, knot-like structures as well as continuously smooth pellicles appeared among the nano-fibrous network with increasing gelation temperature. DSC analysis indicated that the crystallization of PCL segments was interrupted by rigid PLLA segments, resulting in an amorphous phase at high gelation temperatures. Combining TIPS (thermally induced phase separation with salt-leaching methods, nano-fibrous architecture and interconnected pore structures (144±36 mm in diameter with a high porosity were created for in vitro culture of chondrocytes. Specific surface area and protein adsorption on the surface of the nano-fibrous scaffold were three times higher than on the surface of the solid-walled scaffold. Chondrocytes cultured on the nano-fibrous scaffold exhibited a spherical condrocyte-like phenotype and secreted more cartilage-like extracellular matrix (ECM than those cultured on the solid-walled scaffold. Moreover, the protein and DNA contents of cells cultured on the nano-fibrous scaffold were 1.2-1.4 times higher than those on the solid-walled scaffold. Higher expression levels of collagen II and aggrecan mRNA were induced on the nano-fibrous scaffold compared to on the solid-walled scaffold. These findings demonstrated that scaffolds with a nano-fibrous architecture could serve as superior scaffolds for cartilage tissue

  15. Boron containing poly-(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doğan, Ayşegül; Demirci, Selami [Department of Genetics and Bioengineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Yeditepe University 34755 Istanbul (Turkey); Bayir, Yasin [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ataturk University, 25240, Erzurum (Turkey); Halici, Zekai [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, 25240, Erzurum (Turkey); Karakus, Emre [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ataturk University, 25240, Erzurum (Turkey); Aydin, Ali [Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, 25240, Erzurum (Turkey); Cadirci, Elif [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ataturk University, 25240, Erzurum (Turkey); Albayrak, Abdulmecit [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, 25240, Erzurum (Turkey); Demirci, Elif [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, 25240, Erzurum (Turkey); Karaman, Adem [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, 25240, Erzurum (Turkey); Ayan, Arif Kursat [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, 25240, Erzurum (Turkey); Gundogdu, Cemal [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, 25240, Erzurum (Turkey); Şahin, Fikrettin, E-mail: fsahin@yeditepe.edu.tr [Department of Genetics and Bioengineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Yeditepe University 34755 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2014-11-01

    Scaffold-based bone defect reconstructions still face many challenges due to their inadequate osteoinductive and osteoconductive properties. Various biocompatible and biodegradable scaffolds, combined with proper cell type and biochemical signal molecules, have attracted significant interest in hard tissue engineering approaches. In the present study, we have evaluated the effects of boron incorporation into poly-(lactide-co-glycolide-acid) (PLGA) scaffolds, with or without rat adipose-derived stem cells (rADSCs), on bone healing in vitro and in vivo. The results revealed that boron containing scaffolds increased in vitro proliferation, attachment and calcium mineralization of rADSCs. In addition, boron containing scaffold application resulted in increased bone regeneration by enhancing osteocalcin, VEGF and collagen type I protein levels in a femur defect model. Bone mineralization density (BMD) and computed tomography (CT) analysis proved that boron incorporated scaffold administration increased the healing rate of bone defects. Transplanting stem cells into boron containing scaffolds was found to further improve bone-related outcomes compared to control groups. Additional studies are highly warranted for the investigation of the mechanical properties of these scaffolds in order to address their potential use in clinics. The study proposes that boron serves as a promising innovative approach in manufacturing scaffold systems for functional bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Boron containing PLGA scaffolds were developed for bone tissue engineering. • Boron incorporation increased cell viability and mineralization of stem cells. • Boron containing scaffolds increased bone-related protein expression in vivo. • Implantation of stem cells on boron containing scaffolds improved bone healing.

  16. Apical Scaffolding Protein NHERF2 Modulates the Localization of Alternatively Spliced Plasma Membrane Ca2+ Pump 2B Variants in Polarized Epithelial Cells*

    OpenAIRE

    Padányi, Rita; Xiong, Yuning; Antalffy, Géza; Lór, Krisztina; Pászty, Katalin; STREHLER, EMANUEL E.; Enyedi, Ágnes

    2010-01-01

    The membrane localization of the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase isoform 2 (PMCA2) in polarized cells is determined by alternative splicing; the PMCA2w/b splice variant shows apical localization, whereas the PMCA2z/b and PMCA2x/b variants are mostly basolateral. We previously reported that PMCA2b interacts with the PDZ protein Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 2 (NHERF2), but the role of this interaction for the specific membrane localization of PMCA2 is not known. Here we show that co-expressio...

  17. Nanostructured polymeric scaffolds for orthopaedic regenerative engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Meng; James, Roshan; Laurencin, Cato T; Kumbar, Sangamesh G

    2012-03-01

    Successful regeneration necessitates the development of three-dimensional (3-D) tissue-inducing scaffolds that mimic the hierarchical architecture of native tissue extracellular matrix (ECM). Cells in nature recognize and interact with the surface topography they are exposed to via ECM proteins. The interaction of cells with nanotopographical features such as pores, ridges, groves, fibers, nodes, and their combinations has proven to be an important signaling modality in controlling cellular processes. Integrating nanotopographical cues is especially important in engineering complex tissues that have multiple cell types and require precisely defined cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions on the nanoscale. Thus, in a regenerative engineering approach, nanoscale materials/scaffolds play a paramount role in controlling cell fate and the consequent regenerative capacity. Advances in nanotechnology have generated a new toolbox for the fabrication of tissue-specific nanostructured scaffolds. For example, biodegradable polymers such as polyesters, polyphosphazenes, polymer blends and composites can be electrospun into ECM-mimicking matrices composed of nanofibers, which provide high surface area for cell attachment, growth, and differentiation. This review provides the fundamental guidelines for the design and development of nanostructured scaffolds for the regeneration of various tissue types in human upper and lower extremities such as skin, ligament, tendon, and bone. Examples focusing on the collective work of our laboratory in those areas are discussed to demonstrate the regenerative efficacy of this approach. Furthermore, preliminary strategies and significant challenges to integrate these individual tissues into one complex organ through regenerative engineering-based integrated graft systems are also discussed.

  18. In vitro refolding of heterodimeric CapZ expressed in E. coli as inclusion body protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmert, K; Vullhorst, D; Hinssen, H

    2000-02-01

    CapZ is a heterodimeric Ca(2+)-independent actin binding protein which plays an important role in organizing the actin filament lattice of cross-striated muscle cells. It caps the barbed end of actin filaments and promotes nucleation of actin polymerization, thereby regulating actin filament length. Here we report the expression of the two muscle-specific isoforms alpha2 and beta1, from chicken in Escherichia coli as individual subunits using the pQE60 expression vector and the subsequent renaturation of the functional CapZ heterodimer from inclusion bodies. Optimal renaturation conditions were obtained both by simultaneous refolding of urea-solubilized subunits and by rapid dilution into a buffer containing 20% glycerol, 5 mM EGTA, 2 mM DTT, 1 mM PMSF, and 100 mM Tris, pH 7.4. The refolding mixture was incubated for 24 h at 15 degrees C and the protein was concentrated by ultrafiltration. Biochemical characterization of the recombinant heterodimer revealed actin binding activities indistinguishable from those of native CapZ as purified from chicken skeletal muscle. Using the same protocol, we were able to refold the beta1, but not the alpha2 isoform as a single polypeptide, indicating a role for beta1 as a molecular template for the folding of alpha2. The reported recombinant approach leads to high yields of active heterodimer and allows the renaturation and characterization of the beta subunit.

  19. Electrospun multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Wang, Min

    2014-03-01

    Tissue engineering holds great promises in providing successful treatments of human body tissue loss that current methods are unable to treat or unable to achieve satisfactory clinical outcomes. In scaffold-based tissue engineering, a highperformance scaffold underpins the success of a tissue engineering strategy and a major direction in the field is to create multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds for enhanced biological performance and for regenerating complex body tissues. Electrospinning can produce nanofibrous scaffolds that are highly desirable for tissue engineering. The enormous interest in electrospinning and electrospun fibrous structures by the science, engineering and medical communities has led to various developments of the electrospinning technology and wide investigations of electrospun products in many industries, including biomedical engineering, over the past two decades. It is now possible to create novel, multicomponent tissue engineering scaffolds with multiple functions. This article provides a concise review of recent advances in the R & D of electrospun multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds. It also presents our philosophy and research in the designing and fabrication of electrospun multicomponent scaffolds with multiple functions.

  20. Graphene oxide scaffold accelerates cellular proliferative response and alveolar bone healing of tooth extraction socket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida E

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Erika Nishida,1 Hirofumi Miyaji,1 Akihito Kato,1 Hiroko Takita,2 Toshihiko Iwanaga,3 Takehito Momose,1 Kosuke Ogawa,1 Shusuke Murakami,1 Tsutomu Sugaya,1 Masamitsu Kawanami11Department of Periodontology and Endodontology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Sapporo, Japan; 2Support Section for Education and Research, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Sapporo, Japan; 3Laboratory of Histology and Cytology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, JapanAbstract: Graphene oxide (GO consisting of a carbon monolayer has been widely investigated for tissue engineering platforms because of its unique properties. For this study, we fabricated a GO-applied scaffold and assessed the cellular and tissue behaviors in the scaffold. A preclinical test was conducted to ascertain whether the GO scaffold promoted bone induction in dog tooth extraction sockets. For this study, GO scaffolds were prepared by coating the surface of a collagen sponge scaffold with 0.1 and 1 µg/mL GO dispersion. Scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, physical testing, cell seeding, and rat subcutaneous implant testing. Then a GO scaffold was implanted into a dog tooth extraction socket. Histological observations were made at 2 weeks postsurgery. SEM observations show that GO attached to the surface of collagen scaffold struts. The GO scaffold exhibited an interconnected structure resembling that of control subjects. GO application improved the physical strength, enzyme resistance, and adsorption of calcium and proteins. Cytocompatibility tests showed that GO application significantly increased osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation. In addition, an assessment of rat subcutaneous tissue response revealed that implantation of 1 µg/mL GO scaffold stimulated cellular ingrowth behavior, suggesting that the GO scaffold exhibited good biocompatibility. The tissue ingrowth area and DNA contents of 1

  1. Scaffolding Biomaterials for Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Cao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Completely repairing of damaged cartilage is a difficult procedure. In recent years, the use of tissue engineering approach in which scaffolds play a vital role to regenerate cartilage has become a new research field. Investigating the advances in biological cartilage scaffolds has been regarded as the main research direction and has great significance for the construction of artificial cartilage. Native biological materials and synthetic polymeric materials have their advantages and disadvantages. The disadvantages can be overcome through either physical modification or biochemical modification. Additionally, developing composite materials, biomimetic materials, and nanomaterials can make scaffolds acquire better biocompatibility and mechanical adaptability.

  2. Fabrication of uniformly cell-laden porous scaffolds using a gas-in-liquid templating technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Takayuki; Aokawa, Ryuta; Shigemitsu, Takamasa; Kawakami, Koei; Yoshida, Masahiro

    2015-11-01

    Design of porous scaffolds in tissue engineering field was challenging. Uniform immobilization of cells in the scaffolds with high porosity was essential for homogeneous tissue formation. The present study was aimed at fabricating uniformly cell-laden porous scaffolds with porosity >74% using the gas-in-liquid foam templating technique. To this end, we used gelatin, microbial transglutaminase and argon gas as a scaffold material, cross-linker of the protein and porogen of scaffold, respectively. We confirmed that a porosity of >74% could be achieved by increasing the gas volume delivered to a gelatin solution. Pore size in the scaffold could be controlled by stirring speed, stirring time and the pore size of the filter through which the gas passed. The foaming technique enabled us to uniformly immobilize a human hepatoblastoma cell line in scaffold. Engraftment efficiency of the cell line entrapped within the scaffold in nude mice was higher than that of cells in free-form. These results showed that the uniformly cell-laden porous scaffolds were promising for tissue engineering.

  3. Boron containing poly-(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Ayşegül; Demirci, Selami; Bayir, Yasin; Halici, Zekai; Karakus, Emre; Aydin, Ali; Cadirci, Elif; Albayrak, Abdulmecit; Demirci, Elif; Karaman, Adem; Ayan, Arif Kursat; Gundogdu, Cemal; Sahin, Fikrettin

    2014-11-01

    Scaffold-based bone defect reconstructions still face many challenges due to their inadequate osteoinductive and osteoconductive properties. Various biocompatible and biodegradable scaffolds, combined with proper cell type and biochemical signal molecules, have attracted significant interest in hard tissue engineering approaches. In the present study, we have evaluated the effects of boron incorporation into poly-(lactide-co-glycolide-acid) (PLGA) scaffolds, with or without rat adipose-derived stem cells (rADSCs), on bone healing in vitro and in vivo. The results revealed that boron containing scaffolds increased in vitro proliferation, attachment and calcium mineralization of rADSCs. In addition, boron containing scaffold application resulted in increased bone regeneration by enhancing osteocalcin, VEGF and collagen type I protein levels in a femur defect model. Bone mineralization density (BMD) and computed tomography (CT) analysis proved that boron incorporated scaffold administration increased the healing rate of bone defects. Transplanting stem cells into boron containing scaffolds was found to further improve bone-related outcomes compared to control groups. Additional studies are highly warranted for the investigation of the mechanical properties of these scaffolds in order to address their potential use in clinics. The study proposes that boron serves as a promising innovative approach in manufacturing scaffold systems for functional bone tissue engineering.

  4. Self-assembly model, hepatocytes attachment and inflammatory response for silk fibroin/chitosan scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    She Zhending; Feng Qingling [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu Weiqiang, E-mail: biomater@mail.tsinghua.edu.c [Center for Advanced Materials and Biotechnology, Research Institute of Tsinghua University in Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518057 (China)

    2009-08-15

    Silk fibroin is an attractive natural fibrous protein for biomedical application due to its good biocompatibility and high tensile strength. Silk fibroin is apt to form a sheet-like structure during the freeze-drying process, which is not suitable for the scaffold of tissue engineering. In our former study, the adding of chitosan promoted the self-assembly of silk fibroin/chitosan (SFCS) into a three-dimensional (3D) homogeneous porous structure. In this study, a model of the self-assembly is proposed; furthermore, hepatocytes attachment and inflammatory response for the SFCS scaffold were examined. The rigid chain of chitosan may be used as a template for beta-sheet formation of silk fibroin, and this may break the sheet structure of the silk fibroin scaffold and promote the formation of a 3D porous structure of the SFCS scaffold. Compared with the polylactic glycolic acid scaffold, the SFCS scaffold further facilitates the attachment of hepatocytes. To investigate the inflammatory response, SFCS scaffolds were implanted into the greater omentum of rats. From the results of implantation, we could demonstrate in vivo that the implantation of SFCS scaffolds resulted in only slight inflammation. Keeping the good histocompatibility and combining the advantages of both fibroin and chitosan, the SFCS scaffold could be a prominent candidate for soft tissue engineering, for example, in the liver.

  5. Collagen a natural scaffold for biology and engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collagen, the most abundant protein in mammals, constitutes a quarter of the animal's total weight. The unique structure of fibrous collagens, a long triple helix that further associates into fibers, provides an insoluble scaffold that gives strength and form to the skin, tendons, bones, cornea and...

  6. Three-dimensional polycaprolactone scaffold via needleless electrospinning promotes cell proliferation and infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dawei; Wu, Tong; He, Nanfei; Wang, Jing; Chen, Weiming; He, Liping; Huang, Chen; Ei-Hamshary, Hany A; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Ke, Qinfei; Mo, Xiumei

    2014-09-01

    Electrospinning has been widely used in fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds. Currently, most of the electrospun nanofibers performed like a conventional two-dimensional (2D) membrane, which hindered their further applications. Moreover, the low production rate of the traditional needle-electrospinning (NE) also limited the commercialization. In this article, disc-electrospinning (DE) was utilized to fabricate a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold consisting of porous macro/nanoscale fibers. The morphology of the porous structure was investigated by scanning electron microscopy images, which showed irregular pores of nanoscale spreading on the surface of DE polycaprolactone (PCL) fibers. Protein adsorption assessment illustrated the porous structure could significantly enhance proteins pickup, which was 55% higher than that of solid fiber scaffolds. Fibroblasts were cultured on the scaffold. The results demonstrated that DE fiber scaffold could enhance initial cell attachment. In the 7 days of culture, fibroblasts grew faster on DE fiber scaffold in comparison with solid fiber, solvent cast (SC) film and TCP. Fibroblasts on DE fibers showed a stretched shape and integrated with the porous surface tightly. Cells were also found to migrate into the DE scaffold up to 800μm. Results supported the use of DE PCL fibers as a 3D tissue engineering scaffold in soft tissue regeneration.

  7. Multilayered Magnetic Gelatin Membrane Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Sangram K.; Goranov, Vitaly; Dash, Mamoni; Russo, Alessandro; Shelyakova, Tatiana; Graziosi, Patrizio; Lungaro, Lisa; Riminucci, Alberto; Uhlarz, Marc; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Rivas, Jose; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas; Rajadas, Jayakumar; De Smedt, Stefaan; Braeckmans, Kevin; Kaplan, David L.; Dediu, V. Alek

    2016-01-01

    A versatile approach for the design and fabrication of multilayer magnetic scaffolds with tunable magnetic gradients is described. Multilayer magnetic gelatin membrane scaffolds with intrinsic magnetic gradients were designed to encapsulate magnetized bioagents under an externally applied magnetic field for use in magnetic-field-assisted tissue engineering. The temperature of the individual membranes increased up to 43.7 °C under an applied oscillating magnetic field for 70 s by magnetic hyperthermia, enabling the possibility of inducing a thermal gradient inside the final 3D multilayer magnetic scaffolds. On the basis of finite element method simulations, magnetic gelatin membranes with different concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles were assembled into 3D multilayered scaffolds. A magnetic-gradient-controlled distribution of magnetically labeled stem cells was demonstrated in vitro. This magnetic biomaterial–magnetic cell strategy can be expanded to a number of different magnetic biomaterials for various tissue engineering applications. PMID:26451743

  8. Functionalizable oligoprolines as molecular scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Yvonne A; Kuemin, Michael; Wennemers, Helma

    2011-01-01

    Azidoproline (Azp) containing oligoprolines are conformationally well-defined, helical molecular scaffolds that allow for facile functionalization. Within this article we describe the synthesis of Azp-containing oligoprolines and different strategies to introduce functional moieties. In addition, the influence of factors such as substituents at the y-position of proline as well as functional groups at the termini on the conformational stability of the molecular scaffolds are briefly presented.

  9. Development of a gene-activated scaffold platform for tissue engineering applications using chitosan-pDNA nanoparticles on collagen-based scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, Rosanne M; Tierney, Erica G; Curtin, Caroline M; Cryan, Sally-Ann; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2015-07-28

    Biomaterial scaffolds that support cell infiltration and tissue formation can also function as platforms for the delivery of therapeutics such as drugs, proteins, and genes. As burst release of supraphysiological quantities of recombinant proteins can result in adverse side effects, the objective of this study was to explore the potential of a series of collagen-based scaffolds, developed in our laboratory, as gene-activated scaffold platforms with potential in a range of tissue engineering applications. The potential of chitosan, a biocompatible material derived from the shells of crustaceans, as a gene delivery vector was assessed using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). A transfection efficiency of >45% is reported which is similar to what is achieved with polyethyleneimine (PEI), a non-viral gold standard vector, without causing cytotoxic side effects. When the optimised chitosan nanoparticles were incorporated into a series of collagen-based scaffolds, sustained transgene expression from MSCs seeded on the scaffolds was maintained for up to 28days and interestingly the composition of the scaffold had an effect on transfection efficiency. These results demonstrate that by simply varying the scaffold composition and the gene (or combinations thereof) chosen; the system has potential for a myriad of therapeutic applications.

  10. Studies on the mitotic chromosome scaffold of Allium sativum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAOJIAN; SHAOBOJIN; 等

    1995-01-01

    An argentophilic structure is present in the metaphase chromosomes of garlic(Allium sativum),Cytochemical studies indicate that the main component of the structure is non-histone proteins(NHPs).The results of light and electron microscopic observations reveal that the chromosme NHP scaffold is a network which is composed of fibres and granules and distributed throughout the chromosomes.In the NHP network,there are many condensed regions that are connected by redlatively looser regions.The distribution of the condensed regions varies in individual chromosomes.In some of the chromosomes the condensed regions are lognitudinally situsted in the central part of a chromatid while in others these regions appear as coillike transverse bands.At early metaphase.scaffolds of the sister chromatids of a chromosome are linked to each other in the centromeric region,meanwhile,they are connected by scafold materials along the whole length of the chromosome.At late metaphase,however,the connective scaffold materials between the two sister chromatids disappear gradually and the chromatids begin to separate from one another at their ends.but the chromatids are linked together in the centromeric region until anaphase.This connection seems to be related to the special structure of the NHP scaffold formed in the centromeric region.The morphological features and dynamic changes of the chromosome scaffold are discussed.

  11. Smart scaffolds in bone tissue engineering: A systematicreview of literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saeed Reza Motamedian; Sepanta Hosseinpour; Mitra Ghazizadeh Ahsaie; Arash Khojasteh

    2015-01-01

    AIM To improve osteogenic differentiation and attachmentof cells.METHODS: An electronic search was conducted inPubMed from January 2004 to December 2013. Studieswhich performed smart modifications on conventionalbone scaffold materials were included. Scaffoldswith controlled release or encapsulation of bioactivemolecules were not included. Experiments which did notinvestigate response of cells toward the scaffold (cellattachment, proliferation or osteoblastic differentiation)were excluded.RESULTS: Among 1458 studies, 38 met the inclusion andexclusion criteria. The main scaffold varied extensivelyamong the included studies. Smart modificationsincluded addition of growth factors (group Ⅰ-11 studies),extracellular matrix-like molecules (group Ⅱ-13 studies)and nanoparticles (nano-HA) (group Ⅲ-17 studies). In allgroups, surface coating was the most commonly appliedapproach for smart modification of scaffolds. In group I,bone morphogenetic proteins were mainly used as growthfactor stabilized on polycaprolactone (PCL). In groupⅡ, collagen 1 in combination with PCL, hydroxyapatite(HA) and tricalcium phosphate were the most frequentscaffolds used. In the third group, nano-HA with PCL andchitosan were used the most. As variable methods wereused, a thorough and comprehensible compare betweenthe results and approaches was unattainable.CONCLUSION: Regarding the variability in methodologyof these in vitro studies it was demonstrated that smartmodification of scaffolds can improve tissue properties.

  12. Solvent/Non-Solvent Sintering To Make Microsphere Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurencin, Cato T.; Brown, Justin L.; Nair, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    A solvent/non-solvent sintering technique has been devised for joining polymeric microspheres to make porous matrices for use as drug-delivery devices or scaffolds that could be seeded with cells for growing tissues. Unlike traditional sintering at elevated temperature and pressure, this technique is practiced at room temperature and pressure and, therefore, does not cause thermal degradation of any drug, protein, or other biochemical with which the microspheres might be loaded to impart properties desired in a specific application. Also, properties of scaffolds made by this technique are more reproducible than are properties of comparable scaffolds made by traditional sintering. The technique involves the use of two miscible organic liquids: one that is and one that is not a solvent for the affected polymer. The polymeric microspheres are placed in a mold having the size and shape of the desired scaffold, then the solvent/non-solvent mixture is poured into the mold to fill the void volume between the microspheres, then the liquid mixture is allowed to evaporate. Some of the properties of the resulting scaffold can be tailored through choice of the proportions of the liquids and the diameter of the microspheres.

  13. Characterization and in vitro cytocompatibility of piezoelectric electrospun scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, N; Lee, Y-S; Shanmugasundaram, S; Jaffe, M; Arinzeh, T L

    2010-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that electrical charges influence cell behavior (e.g. enhancement of nerve regeneration, cell adhesion, cell morphology). Thus, piezoelectric scaffolds might be useful for various tissue engineering applications. Fibrous scaffolds were successfully fabricated from permanent piezoelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (PVDF-TrFE) by the electrospinning technique. Scanning electron microscopy and capillary flow analyses verified that the fiber mats had an average fiber diameter of 970 +/- 480 nm and a mean pore diameter of 1.7 microm, respectively. Thermally stimulated depolarization current spectroscopy measurements confirmed the piezoelectric property of the PVDF-TrFE fibrous scaffolds by the generation of a spontaneous current with the increase in temperature in the absence of an electric field, which was not detected in the unprocessed PVDF-TrFE powder. Differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results showed that the electrospinning process increased the crystallinity and presence of the polar, beta-phase crystal compared with the unprocessed powder. Confocal fluorescence microscopy and a cell proliferation assay demonstrated spreading and increased cell numbers (human skin fibroblasts) over time on PVDF-TrFE scaffolds, which was comparable with tissue culture polystyrene. The relative quantity of gene expression for focal adhesion proteins (measured by real-time RT-PCR) increased in the following order: paxillin PVDF-TrFE scaffolds in the field of regenerative medicine.

  14. ScaffoldSeq: Software for characterization of directed evolution populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldring, Daniel R; Holec, Patrick V; Hackel, Benjamin J

    2016-07-01

    ScaffoldSeq is software designed for the numerous applications-including directed evolution analysis-in which a user generates a population of DNA sequences encoding for partially diverse proteins with related functions and would like to characterize the single site and pairwise amino acid frequencies across the population. A common scenario for enzyme maturation, antibody screening, and alternative scaffold engineering involves naïve and evolved populations that contain diversified regions, varying in both sequence and length, within a conserved framework. Analyzing the diversified regions of such populations is facilitated by high-throughput sequencing platforms; however, length variability within these regions (e.g., antibody CDRs) encumbers the alignment process. To overcome this challenge, the ScaffoldSeq algorithm takes advantage of conserved framework sequences to quickly identify diverse regions. Beyond this, unintended biases in sequence frequency are generated throughout the experimental workflow required to evolve and isolate clones of interest prior to DNA sequencing. ScaffoldSeq software uniquely handles this issue by providing tools to quantify and remove background sequences, cluster similar protein families, and dampen the impact of dominant clones. The software produces graphical and tabular summaries for each region of interest, allowing users to evaluate diversity in a site-specific manner as well as identify epistatic pairwise interactions. The code and detailed information are freely available at http://research.cems.umn.edu/hackel. Proteins 2016; 84:869-874. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Composite Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterial and scaffold development underpins the advancement of tissue engineering. Traditional scaffolds based on biodegradable polymers such as poly(lactic acid and poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid are weak and non-osteoconductive. For bone tissue engineering, polymer-based composite scaffolds containing bioceramics such as hydroxyapatite can be produced and used. The bioceramics can be either incorporated in the scaffolds as a dispersed secondary phase or form a thin coating on the pore surface of polymer scaffolds. This bioceramic phase renders the scaffolds bioactive and also strengthens the scaffolds. There are a number of methods that can be used to produce bioceramic-polymer composite scaffolds. This paper gives an overview of our efforts in developing composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

  16. Scaffolding in Assisted Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available On-The-Job Training, developed as direct instruction, is one of the earliest forms of training. This method is still widely in use today because it requires only a person who knows how to do the task, and the tools the person uses to do the task. This paper is intended to be a study of the methods used in education in Knowledge Society, with more specific aspects in training the trainers; as a result of this approach, it promotes scaffolding in assisted instruction as a reflection of the digital age for the learning process. Training the trainers in old environment with default techniques and designing the learning process in assisted instruction, as an application of the Vygotskian concept of the zone of proximal development (ZPD to the area of computer literacy for the younger users, generate diversity in educational communities and requires standards for technology infrastructure, standards for the content, developed as a concepts map, and applications for personalized in-struction, based on ZPD theory.

  17. Open-Porous Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Adult Liver Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Finoli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver cell culture within three-dimensional structures provides an improved culture system for various applications in basic research, pharmacological screening, and implantable or extracorporeal liver support. Biodegradable calcium-based scaffolds in such systems could enhance liver cell functionality by providing endothelial and hepatic cell support through locally elevated calcium levels, increased surface area for cell attachment, and allowing three-dimensional tissue restructuring. Open-porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds were fabricated and seeded with primary adult human liver cells, which were embedded within or without gels of extracellular matrix protein collagen-1 or hyaluronan. Metabolic functions were assessed after 5, 15, and 28 days. Longer-term cultures exhibited highest cell numbers and liver specific gene expression when cultured on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in collagen-1. Endothelial gene expression was induced in cells cultured on scaffolds without extracellular matrix proteins. Hydroxyapatite induced gene expression for cytokeratin-19 when cells were cultured in collagen-1 gel while culture in hyaluronan increased cytokeratin-19 gene expression independent of the use of scaffold in long-term culture. The implementation of hydroxyapatite composites with extracellular matrices affected liver cell cultures and cell differentiation depending on the type of matrix protein and the presence of a scaffold. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds enable scale-up of hepatic three-dimensional culture models for regenerative medicine applications.

  18. Toward an efficient approach to identify molecular scaffolds possessing selective or promiscuous compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongye, Austin B; Medina-Franco, José L

    2013-10-01

    The concept of a recurrent scaffold present in a series of structures is common in medicinal drug discovery. We present a scaffold analysis of compounds screened across 100 sequence-unrelated proteins to identify scaffolds that drive promiscuity or selectivity. Selectivity and promiscuity play a major role in traditional and poly-pharmacological drug design considerations. The collection employed here is the first publicly available data set containing the complete screening profiles of more than 15 000 compounds from different sources. In addition, no scaffold analysis of this data set has been reported. The protocol described here employs the Molecular Equivalence Index tool to facilitate the selection of Bemis-Murcko frameworks in the data set, which contain at least five compounds and Scaffold Hunter to generate a hierarchical tree of scaffolds. The annotation of the scaffold tree with protein-binding profile data enabled the successful identification of mostly highly specific compounds, due to data set constraints. We also applied this approach to a public set of 1497 small molecules screened non-uniformly across a panel of 172 protein kinases. The approach is general and can be applied to any other data sets and activity readout.

  19. Open-Porous Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Adult Liver Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finoli, Anthony; Schmelzer, Eva; Over, Patrick; Nettleship, Ian; Gerlach, Joerg C

    2016-01-01

    Liver cell culture within three-dimensional structures provides an improved culture system for various applications in basic research, pharmacological screening, and implantable or extracorporeal liver support. Biodegradable calcium-based scaffolds in such systems could enhance liver cell functionality by providing endothelial and hepatic cell support through locally elevated calcium levels, increased surface area for cell attachment, and allowing three-dimensional tissue restructuring. Open-porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds were fabricated and seeded with primary adult human liver cells, which were embedded within or without gels of extracellular matrix protein collagen-1 or hyaluronan. Metabolic functions were assessed after 5, 15, and 28 days. Longer-term cultures exhibited highest cell numbers and liver specific gene expression when cultured on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in collagen-1. Endothelial gene expression was induced in cells cultured on scaffolds without extracellular matrix proteins. Hydroxyapatite induced gene expression for cytokeratin-19 when cells were cultured in collagen-1 gel while culture in hyaluronan increased cytokeratin-19 gene expression independent of the use of scaffold in long-term culture. The implementation of hydroxyapatite composites with extracellular matrices affected liver cell cultures and cell differentiation depending on the type of matrix protein and the presence of a scaffold. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds enable scale-up of hepatic three-dimensional culture models for regenerative medicine applications.

  20. Nanostructured gel scaffolds for osteogenesis through biological assembly of biopolymers via specific nucleobase pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ming; Yan, Jingxuan; Tan, Huaping; Ben, Dandan; He, Qiuling; Huang, Zhongwei; Hu, Xiaohong

    2014-11-01

    Biopolymer-based gel scaffolds have great potential in the field of tissue regenerative medicine. In this work, a nanostructured biopolymer gel scaffold via specific pairing of functionalized nucleobases was developed for specifically targeted drug delivery and in vitro osteogenesis. The biopolymer gel system was established by the Watson-Crick base pairing between thymine and adenine via the hydrogen bonding. As gel scaffold precursors, opposite charged polysaccharide derivatives, e.g. quaternized cellulose and heparin, could be additionally crosslinked by extra electrostatic interactions. The potential application of this gel scaffold in bone tissue engineering was confirmed by encapsulation behavior of osteoblasts. In combination with cell growth factor, e.g. bone morphogenetic protein, the nanostructured gel scaffold exhibited beneficial effects on osteoblast activity and differentiation, which suggested a promising future for local treatment of pathologies involving bone loss.

  1. Silk-Hydroxyapatite Nanoscale Scaffolds with Programmable Growth Factor Delivery for Bone Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhaozhao; Fan, Zhihai; Huang, Xiaowei; Lu, Qiang; Xu, Weian; Kaplan, David L

    2016-09-21

    Osteoinductive biomaterials are attractive for repairing a variety of bone defects, and biomimetic strategies are useful toward developing bone scaffolds with such capacity. Here, a multiple biomimetic design was developed to improve the osteogenesis capacity of composite scaffolds consisting of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (HA) and silk fibroin (SF). SF nanofibers and water-dispersible HA nanoparticles were blended to prepare the nanoscaled composite scaffolds with a uniform distribution of HA with a high HA content (40%), imitating the extracellular matrix (ECM) of bone. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) was loaded in the SF scaffolds and HA to tune BMP-2 release. In vitro studies showed the preservation of BMP-2 bioactivity in the composite scaffolds, and programmable sustained release was achieved through adjusting the ratio of BMP-2 loaded on SF and HA. In vitro and in vivo osteogenesis studies demonstrated that the composite scaffolds showed improved osteogenesis capacity under suitable BMP-2 release conditions, significantly better than that of BMP-2 loaded SF-HA composite scaffolds reported previously. Therefore, these biomimetic SF-HA nanoscaled scaffolds with tunable BMP-2 delivery provide preferable microenvironments for bone regeneration.

  2. In vitro and in vivo biocompatibility studies of a recombinant analogue of spidroin 1 scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisenovich, M M; Pustovalova, O L; Arhipova, A Yu; Vasiljeva, T V; Sokolova, O S; Bogush, V G; Debabov, V G; Sevastianov, V I; Kirpichnikov, M P; Agapov, I I

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to generate porous scaffolds from the genetically engineered protein, an analogue of Nephila clavipes spidroin 1 (rS1/9) and to assess the properties of new rS1/9 scaffolds essential for bioengineering. The salt leaching technique was used to make the rS1/9 scaffolds of interconnected macroporous structure with spontaneously formed micropores. The tensile strength of scaffolds was 18 ± 5 N/cm(2). Scaffolds were relatively stable in a phosphate buffer but degraded in oxidizing environment after 11 weeks of incubation. Applicability of the recombinant spidroin 1 as a substrate for cell culture was demonstrated by successful 3T3 cells growth on the surface of rS1/9 films (270 ± 20 cells/mm(2) vs. 97 ± 8 cells/mm(2) on the glass surface, p 0.05), whereas the initial distribution was 58% ± 7% and 11% ± 8%, respectively; p < 0.05). The rS1/9 scaffolds implanted subcutaneously into Balb/c mice were well tolerated. Over a 2-month period, the scaffolds promoted an ingrowth of de novo formed vascularized connective tissue elements and nerve fibers. Thus, scaffolds made of the novel recombinant spidroin 1 analogue are potentially applicable in tissue engineering.

  3. Mesoporous bioactive glass nanolayer-functionalized 3D-printed scaffolds for accelerating osteogenesis and angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yali; Xia, Lunguo; Zhai, Dong; Shi, Mengchao; Luo, Yongxiang; Feng, Chun; Fang, Bing; Yin, Jingbo; Chang, Jiang; Wu, Chengtie

    2015-11-01

    The hierarchical microstructure, surface and interface of biomaterials are important factors influencing their bioactivity. Porous bioceramic scaffolds have been widely used for bone tissue engineering by optimizing their chemical composition and large-pore structure. However, the surface and interface of struts in bioceramic scaffolds are often ignored. The aim of this study is to incorporate hierarchical pores and bioactive components into the bioceramic scaffolds by constructing nanopores and bioactive elements on the struts of scaffolds and further improve their bone-forming activity. Mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG) modified β-tricalcium phosphate (MBG-β-TCP) scaffolds with a hierarchical pore structure and a functional strut surface (~100 nm of MBG nanolayer) were successfully prepared via 3D printing and spin coating. The compressive strength and apatite-mineralization ability of MBG-β-TCP scaffolds were significantly enhanced as compared to β-TCP scaffolds without the MBG nanolayer. The attachment, viability, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, osteogenic gene expression (Runx2, BMP2, OPN and Col I) and protein expression (OPN, Col I, VEGF, HIF-1α) of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) as well as the attachment, viability and angiogenic gene expression (VEGF and HIF-1α) of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in MBG-β-TCP scaffolds were significantly upregulated compared with conventional bioactive glass (BG)-modified β-TCP (BG-β-TCP) and pure β-TCP scaffolds. Furthermore, MBG-β-TCP scaffolds significantly enhanced the formation of new bone in vivo as compared to BG-β-TCP and β-TCP scaffolds. The results suggest that application of the MBG nanolayer to modify 3D-printed bioceramic scaffolds offers a new strategy to construct hierarchically porous scaffolds with significantly improved physicochemical and biological properties, such as mechanical properties, osteogenesis, angiogenesis and protein expression for bone tissue

  4. Osteogenic Capacity of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells is Preserved Following Triggering of Shape Memory Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ling-Fang; Wang, Jing; Baker, Richard M; Wang, Guirong; Mather, Patrick T; Henderson, James H

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in shape memory polymers have enabled the study of programmable, shape-changing, cytocompatible tissue engineering scaffolds. For treatment of bone defects, scaffolds with shape memory functionality have been studied for their potential for minimally invasive delivery, conformal fitting to defect margins, and defect stabilization. However, the extent to which the osteogenic differentiation capacity of stem cells resident in shape memory scaffolds is preserved following programmed shape change has not yet been determined. As a result, the feasibility of shape memory polymer scaffolds being employed in stem cell-based treatment strategies remains unclear. To test the hypothesis that stem cell osteogenic differentiation can be preserved during and following triggering of programmed architectural changes in shape memory polymer scaffolds, human adipose-derived stem cells were seeded in shape memory polymer foam scaffolds or in shape memory polymer fibrous scaffolds programmed to expand or contract, respectively, when warmed to body temperature. Osteogenic differentiation in shape-changing and control scaffolds was compared using mineral deposition, protein production, and gene expression assays. For both shape-changing and control scaffolds, qualitatively and quantitatively comparable amounts of mineral deposition were observed; comparable levels of alkaline phosphatase activity were measured; and no significant differences in the expression of genetic markers of osteogenesis were detected. These findings support the feasibility of employing shape memory in scaffolds for stem cell-based therapies for bone repair.

  5. Laser 3D printing with sub-microscale resolution of porous elastomeric scaffolds for supporting human bone stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrochenko, Peter E; Torgersen, Jan; Gruber, Peter; Hicks, Lucas A; Zheng, Jiwen; Kumar, Girish; Narayan, Roger J; Goering, Peter L; Liska, Robert; Stampfl, Jürgen; Ovsianikov, Aleksandr

    2015-04-01

    A reproducible method is needed to fabricate 3D scaffold constructs that results in periodic and uniform structures with precise control at sub-micrometer and micrometer length scales. In this study, fabrication of scaffolds by two-photon polymerization (2PP) of a biodegradable urethane and acrylate-based photoelastomer is demonstrated. This material supports 2PP processing with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. The high photoreactivity of the biophotoelastomer permits 2PP processing at a scanning speed of 1000 mm s(-1), facilitating rapid fabrication of relatively large structures (>5 mm(3)). These structures are custom printed for in vitro assay screening in 96-well plates and are sufficiently flexible to enable facile handling and transplantation. These results indicate that stable scaffolds with porosities of greater than 60% can be produced using 2PP. Human bone marrow stromal cells grown on 3D scaffolds exhibit increased growth and proliferation compared to smooth 2D scaffold controls. 3D scaffolds adsorb larger amounts of protein than smooth 2D scaffolds due to their larger surface area; the scaffolds also allow cells to attach in multiple planes and to completely infiltrate the porous scaffolds. The flexible photoelastomer material is biocompatible in vitro and is associated with facile handling, making it a viable candidate for further study of complex 3D-printed scaffolds.

  6. Mesoporous bioactive glass surface modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) electrospun fibrous scaffold for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shijie; Jian, Zhiyuan; Huang, Linsheng; Xu, Wei; Liu, Shaohua; Song, Dajiang; Wan, Zongmiao; Vaughn, Amanda; Zhan, Ruisen; Zhang, Chaoyue; Wu, Song; Hu, Minghua; Li, Jinsong

    2015-01-01

    A mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG) surface modified with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) electrospun fibrous scaffold for bone regeneration was prepared by dip-coating a PLGA electrospun fibrous scaffold into MBG precursor solution. Different surface structures and properties were acquired by different coating times. Surface morphology, chemical composition, microstructure, pore size distribution, and hydrophilicity of the PLGA-MBG scaffold were characterized. Results of scanning electron microscopy indicated that MBG surface coating made the scaffold rougher with the increase of MBG content. Scaffolds after MBG modification possessed mesoporous architecture on the surface. The measurements of the water contact angles suggested that the incorporation of MBG into the PLGA scaffold improved the surface hydrophilicity. An energy dispersive spectrometer evidenced that calcium-deficient carbonated hydroxyapatite formed on the PLGA-MBG scaffolds after a 7-day immersion in simulated body fluid. In vitro studies showed that the incorporation of MBG favored cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on the PLGA scaffolds. Moreover, the MBG surface-modified PLGA (PLGA-MBG) scaffolds were shown to be capable of providing the improved adsorption/release behaviors of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). It is very significant that PLGA-MBG scaffolds could be effective for BMP-2 delivery and bone regeneration.

  7. Regulated assembly of a supramolecular centrosome scaffold in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodruff, J. B.; Wueseke, O.; Viscardi, V.

    2015-01-01

    -like kinase-1 and SPD-2/Cep192. Only the assembled SPD-5 networks, and not unassembled SPD-5 protein, functioned as a scaffold for other PCM proteins. Thus, PCM size and binding capacity emerge from the regulated polymerization of one coiled-coil protein to form a porous network....... are not well understood. In Caenorhabditis elegans, PCM assembly requires the coiled-coil protein SPD-5. We found that recombinant SPD-5 could polymerize to form micrometer-sized porous networks in vitro. Network assembly was accelerated by two conserved regulators that control PCM assembly in vivo, Polo...

  8. Synthesis of the TACO scaffold as a new selectively deprotectable conformationally restricted triazacyclophane based scaffold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Arwin J; van de Langemheen, Helmus; Ciaffoni, Adriano; Schilder, Kitty E; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of a new triazacyclophane scaffold (TACO scaffold) containing three selectively deprotectable amines is described. The TACO scaffold is conformationally more constrained than our frequently used TAC scaffold, due to introduction of a substituent on the para position of the benzoic acid

  9. Factorial Study of Compressive Mechanical Properties and Primary In Vitro Osteoblast Response of PHBV/PLLA Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naznin Sultana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For bone tissue regeneration, composite scaffolds containing biodegradable polymers and nanosized osteoconductive bioceramics have been regarded as promising biomimetic systems. Polymer blends of poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV and poly(L-lactic acid (PLLA can be used as the polymer matrix to control the degradation rate. In order to render the scaffolds osteoconductive, nano-sized hydroxyapatite (nHA particles can be incorporated into the polymer matrix. In the first part of this study, a factorial design approach to investigate the influence of materials on the initial compressive mechanical properties of the scaffolds was studied. In the second part, the protein adsorption behavior and the attachment and morphology of osteoblast-like cells (Saos-2 of the scaffolds in vitro were also studied. It was observed that nHA incorporated PHBV/PLLA composite scaffolds adsorbed more bovine serum albumin (BSA protein than PHBV or PHBV/PLLA scaffolds. In vitro studies also revealed that the attachment of human osteoblastic cells (SaOS-2 was significantly higher in nHA incorporated PHBV/PLLA composite scaffolds. From the SEM micrographs of nHA incorporated PHBV/PLLA composite scaffolds seeded with SaOS-2 cells after a 7-day cell culture period, it was observed that the cells were well expanded and spread in all directions on the scaffolds.

  10. Geometrical versus Random β-TCP Scaffolds: Exploring the Effects on Schwann Cell Growth and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czisch, Christopher; Witek, Lukasz; Shi, Yang; Smay, Jim; Plant, Giles W.; Yang, Yunzhi

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that Schwann cells (SCs) play a role in nerve regeneration; however, their role in innervating a bioceramic scaffold for potential application in bone regeneration is still unknown. Here we report the cell growth and functional behavior of SCs on β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds arranged in 3D printed-lattice (P-β-TCP) and randomly-porous, template-casted (N-β-TCP) structures. Our results indicate that SCs proliferated well and expressed the phenotypic markers p75LNGFR and the S100-β subunit of SCs as well as displayed growth morphology on both scaffolds, but SCs showed spindle-shaped morphology with a significant degree of SCs alignment on the P-β-TCP scaffolds, seen to a lesser degree in the N-β-TCP scaffold. The gene expressions of nerve growth factor (β-ngf), neutrophin–3 (nt–3), platelet-derived growth factor (pdgf-bb), and vascular endothelial growth factor (vegf-a) were higher at day 7 than at day 14. While no significant differences in protein secretion were measured between these last two time points, the scaffolds promoted the protein secretion at day 3 compared to that on the cell culture plates. These results together imply that the β-TCP scaffolds can support SC cell growth and that the 3D-printed scaffold appeared to significantly promote the alignment of SCs along the struts. Further studies are needed to investigate the early and late stage relationship between gene expression and protein secretion of SCs on the scaffolds with refined characteristics, thus better exploring the potential of SCs to support vascularization and innervation in synthetic bone grafts. PMID:26444999

  11. Geometrical versus Random β-TCP Scaffolds: Exploring the Effects on Schwann Cell Growth and Behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Sweet

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have demonstrated that Schwann cells (SCs play a role in nerve regeneration; however, their role in innervating a bioceramic scaffold for potential application in bone regeneration is still unknown. Here we report the cell growth and functional behavior of SCs on β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP scaffolds arranged in 3D printed-lattice (P-β-TCP and randomly-porous, template-casted (N-β-TCP structures. Our results indicate that SCs proliferated well and expressed the phenotypic markers p75LNGFR and the S100-β subunit of SCs as well as displayed growth morphology on both scaffolds, but SCs showed spindle-shaped morphology with a significant degree of SCs alignment on the P-β-TCP scaffolds, seen to a lesser degree in the N-β-TCP scaffold. The gene expressions of nerve growth factor (β-ngf, neutrophin-3 (nt-3, platelet-derived growth factor (pdgf-bb, and vascular endothelial growth factor (vegf-a were higher at day 7 than at day 14. While no significant differences in protein secretion were measured between these last two time points, the scaffolds promoted the protein secretion at day 3 compared to that on the cell culture plates. These results together imply that the β-TCP scaffolds can support SC cell growth and that the 3D-printed scaffold appeared to significantly promote the alignment of SCs along the struts. Further studies are needed to investigate the early and late stage relationship between gene expression and protein secretion of SCs on the scaffolds with refined characteristics, thus better exploring the potential of SCs to support vascularization and innervation in synthetic bone grafts.

  12. Functionally graded electrospun scaffolds with tunable mechanical properties for vascular tissue regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Vinoy [Center for Nanoscale Materials and Biointegration (CNMB), Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), AL 35294 (United States); Zhang Xing [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), AL 35294 (United States); Catledge, Shane A [Center for Nanoscale Materials and Biointegration (CNMB), Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), AL 35294 (United States); Vohra, Yogesh K [Center for Nanoscale Materials and Biointegration (CNMB), Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), AL 35294 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Electrospun tubular scaffolds (4 mm inner diameter) based on bio-artificial blends of polyglyconate (Maxon (registered) ) and proteins such as gelatin and elastin having a spatially designed multilayer structure were prepared for use as vascular tissue scaffolds. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of scaffolds showed a random nanofibrous morphology with fiber diameter in the range of 200-400 nm for protein-blended Maxon, which mimics the nanoscale dimensions of collagen (50-500 nm). The scaffolds have a well interconnected pore structure and porosity up to 82%, with protein blending and multi-layering in contrast to electrospun Maxon (registered) scaffolds (67%). Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry results confirmed the blended composition and crystallinity of fibers. Uniaxial tensile testing revealed a strength of 14.46 {+-} 0.42 MPa and a modulus of 15.44 {+-} 2.53 MPa with a failure strain of 322.5 {+-} 10% for a pure Maxon (registered) scaffold. The blending of polyglyconate with biopolymers decreased the tensile properties in general, with an exception of the tensile modulus (48.38 {+-} 2 MPa) of gelatin/Maxon mesh, which was higher than that of the pure Maxon (registered) scaffold. Trilayered tubular scaffolds of gelatin/elastin, gelatin/elastin/Maxon and gelatin/Maxon (GE-GEM-GM) that mimic the complex trilayer matrix structure of natural artery have been prepared by sequential electrospinning. Tensile testing under dry conditions revealed a tensile strength of 2.71 {+-} 0.2 MPa and a modulus of 20.4 {+-} 3 MPa with a failure strain of 140 {+-} 10%. However, GE-GEM-GM scaffolds tested under wet conditions after soaking in a phosphate buffered saline medium at 37 {sup 0}C for 24 h exhibited mechanical properties (2.5 MPa tensile strength and 9 MPa tensile modulus) comparable to those of native femoral artery.

  13. Functionally graded electrospun scaffolds with tunable mechanical properties for vascular tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Vinoy; Zhang, Xing; Catledge, Shane A; Vohra, Yogesh K

    2007-12-01

    Electrospun tubular scaffolds (4 mm inner diameter) based on bio-artificial blends of polyglyconate (Maxon) and proteins such as gelatin and elastin having a spatially designed multilayer structure were prepared for use as vascular tissue scaffolds. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of scaffolds showed a random nanofibrous morphology with fiber diameter in the range of 200-400 nm for protein-blended Maxon, which mimics the nanoscale dimensions of collagen (50-500 nm). The scaffolds have a well interconnected pore structure and porosity up to 82%, with protein blending and multi-layering in contrast to electrospun Maxon scaffolds (67%). Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry results confirmed the blended composition and crystallinity of fibers. Uniaxial tensile testing revealed a strength of 14.46 +/- 0.42 MPa and a modulus of 15.44 +/- 2.53 MPa with a failure strain of 322.5 +/- 10% for a pure Maxon scaffold. The blending of polyglyconate with biopolymers decreased the tensile properties in general, with an exception of the tensile modulus (48.38 +/- 2 MPa) of gelatin/Maxon mesh, which was higher than that of the pure Maxon scaffold. Trilayered tubular scaffolds of gelatin/elastin, gelatin/elastin/Maxon and gelatin/Maxon (GE-GEM-GM) that mimic the complex trilayer matrix structure of natural artery have been prepared by sequential electrospinning. Tensile testing under dry conditions revealed a tensile strength of 2.71 +/- 0.2 MPa and a modulus of 20.4 +/- 3 MPa with a failure strain of 140 +/- 10%. However, GE-GEM-GM scaffolds tested under wet conditions after soaking in a phosphate buffered saline medium at 37 degrees C for 24 h exhibited mechanical properties (2.5 MPa tensile strength and 9 MPa tensile modulus) comparable to those of native femoral artery.

  14. Geometrical versus Random β-TCP Scaffolds: Exploring the Effects on Schwann Cell Growth and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Lauren; Kang, Yunqing; Czisch, Christopher; Witek, Lukasz; Shi, Yang; Smay, Jim; Plant, Giles W; Yang, Yunzhi

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that Schwann cells (SCs) play a role in nerve regeneration; however, their role in innervating a bioceramic scaffold for potential application in bone regeneration is still unknown. Here we report the cell growth and functional behavior of SCs on β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds arranged in 3D printed-lattice (P-β-TCP) and randomly-porous, template-casted (N-β-TCP) structures. Our results indicate that SCs proliferated well and expressed the phenotypic markers p75LNGFR and the S100-β subunit of SCs as well as displayed growth morphology on both scaffolds, but SCs showed spindle-shaped morphology with a significant degree of SCs alignment on the P-β-TCP scaffolds, seen to a lesser degree in the N-β-TCP scaffold. The gene expressions of nerve growth factor (β-ngf), neutrophin-3 (nt-3), platelet-derived growth factor (pdgf-bb), and vascular endothelial growth factor (vegf-a) were higher at day 7 than at day 14. While no significant differences in protein secretion were measured between these last two time points, the scaffolds promoted the protein secretion at day 3 compared to that on the cell culture plates. These results together imply that the β-TCP scaffolds can support SC cell growth and that the 3D-printed scaffold appeared to significantly promote the alignment of SCs along the struts. Further studies are needed to investigate the early and late stage relationship between gene expression and protein secretion of SCs on the scaffolds with refined characteristics, thus better exploring the potential of SCs to support vascularization and innervation in synthetic bone grafts.

  15. Molecular Recognition within Synaptic Scaffolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlendsson, Simon

    function. At the molecular level PICK1 contains both a BAR and a PDZ domain making it quite unique. Especially the specificity and promiscuity of the PICK1 PDZ domain seems to be more complicated than normally seen for PDZ domains. Also, the ability of PICK1 to form dimeric structures via its central BAR...... by the spatial architecture of the synapse itself. In this thesis, the molecular scaffolding mechanisms of PICK1 have been investigated in both isolated and near native conditions. Our findings have significantly benefitted the general understanding of how PICK1 and PDZ domain scaffolding works. In the first......-inhibitory mechanism of PICK1 and allows the N-BAR domains or the PDZ domains themselves to cluster and shape membranes. Finally, we utilized our in-solution structural knowledge to investigate the scaffolding events in context of a native cell membrane. We initially showed that we were able to qualitatively assess...

  16. Development of a bone reconstruction technique using a solid free-form fabrication (SFF)-based drug releasing scaffold and adipose-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Woo; Kim, Ki-Joo; Kang, Kyung Shin; Chen, Shaochen; Rhie, Jong-Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2013-07-01

    For tissue regeneration, three essential components of scaffolds, signals (biomolecules), and cells are required. Moreover, because bony defects are three-dimensional in many clinical circumstances, an exact 3D scaffold is important. Therefore, we proposed an effective reconstruction tool for cranial defects using human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) and a 3D functional scaffold fabricated by solid free-form fabrication (SFF) technology that secretes biomolecules. We fabricated poly(propylene fumarate)-based 3D scaffolds with embedded microsphere-deliverable bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) by microstereolithography. BMP-2-loaded SFF scaffolds with/without hADSCs (SFF/BMP/hADSCs scaffolds and SFF/BMP scaffolds, respectively) and BMP-2-unloaded SFF scaffolds (SFF scaffolds) were then implanted in rat crania, and in vivo bone formation was observed. Analyses of bone formation areas using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) showed the superiority of SFF/BMP/hADSCs scaffolds. Hematoxylin and eosin stain, Masson's trichrome stain, and collagen type-I stain supported the results of the micro-CT scan. And human leukocyte antigen-ABC showed that seeded, differentiated hADSCs were well grown and changed to the bone tissue at the inside of the scaffold. Results showed that our combination of a functional 3D scaffold and hADSCs may be a useful tool for improving the reconstruction quality of severe bony defects in which thick bone is required.

  17. Biologically improved nanofibrous scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaarathy, V; Venugopal, J; Gandhimathi, C; Ponpandian, N; Mangalaraj, D; Ramakrishna, S

    2014-11-01

    Nanofibrous structure developed by electrospinning technology provides attractive extracellular matrix conditions for the anchorage, migration and differentiation of stem cells, including those responsible for regenerative medicine. Recently, biocomposite nanofibers consisting of two or more polymeric blends are electrospun more tidily in order to obtain scaffolds with desired functional and mechanical properties depending on their applications. The study focuses on one such an attempt of using copolymer Poly(l-lactic acid)-co-poly (ε-caprolactone) (PLACL), silk fibroin (SF) and Aloe Vera (AV) for fabricating biocomposite nanofibrous scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering. SEM micrographs of fabricated electrospun PLACL, PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV nanofibrous scaffolds are porous, beadless, uniform nanofibers with interconnected pores and obtained fibre diameter in the range of 459 ± 22 nm, 202 ± 12 nm and 188 ± 16 nm respectively. PLACL, PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV electrospun mats obtained at room temperature with an elastic modulus of 14.1 ± 0.7, 9.96 ± 2.5 and 7.0 ± 0.9 MPa respectively. PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers have more desirable properties to act as flexible cell supporting scaffolds compared to PLACL for the repair of myocardial infarction (MI). The PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers had a contact angle of 51 ± 12° compared to that of 133 ± 15° of PLACL alone. Cardiac cell proliferation was increased by 21% in PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers compared to PLACL by day 6 and further increased to 42% by day 9. Confocal analysis for cardiac expression proteins myosin and connexin 43 was observed better by day 9 compared to all other nanofibrous scaffolds. The results proved that the fabricated PLACL/SF/AV nanofibrous scaffolds have good potentiality for the regeneration of infarcted myocardium in cardiac tissue engineering.

  18. Microwave-assisted synthesis of porous chitosan-modified montmorillonite-hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Sumanta; Kaur, Tejinder; Thirugnanam, A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a porous chitosan-organically modified montmorillonite-hydroxyapatite (CS-OM-HA) composite scaffold was developed by combining microwave irradiation and gas foaming method. Hydroxyapatite (HA) particles of size ∼ 65 nm were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The prepared composite scaffolds were characterized using ATR-FTIR, XRD, mercury intrusion porosimeter (MIP) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies. The synergistic effect of HA and OM on the mechanical and in vitro biological properties (swelling, degradation, protein adsorption and bioactivity) of the composite scaffolds were evaluated. Swelling, degradation, mechanical property, bioactivity and protein adsorption studies of CS-OM-HA composite scaffolds have shown desirable results in comparison with the pure CS and CS-OM composite scaffolds. CS-OM-HA composite scaffolds were also found to be non-cytotoxic to MG 63 osteoblast cell lines. From the study, it can be concluded that the novel CS-OM-HA composite scaffold with improved mechanical and in vitro biological properties has wide potential in non-load bearing bone tissue engineering applications.

  19. The Gas2 family protein Pigs is a microtubule +TIP that affects cytoskeleton organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girdler, Gemma C; Applewhite, Derek A; Perry, Wick M G; Rogers, Stephen L; Röper, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Coordination between different cytoskeletal systems is crucial for many cell biological functions, including cell migration and mitosis, and also plays an important role during tissue morphogenesis. Proteins of the class of cytoskeletal crosslinkers, or cytolinkers, have the ability to interact with more than one cytoskeletal system at a time and are prime candidates to mediate any coordination. One such class comprises the Gas2-like proteins, combining a conserved calponin-homology-type actin-binding domain and a Gas2 domain predicted to bind microtubules (MTs). This domain combination is also found in spectraplakins, huge cytolinkers that play important roles in many tissues in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Here, we dissect the ability of the single Drosophila Gas2-like protein Pigs to interact with both actin and MT cytoskeletons, both in vitro and in vivo, and illustrate complex regulatory interactions that determine the localisation of Pigs to and its effects on the cytoskeleton.

  20. Biomaterials & scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergal J. O'Brien

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Every day thousands of surgical procedures are performed to replace or repair tissue that has been damaged through disease or trauma. The developing field of tissue engineering (TE aims to regenerate damaged tissues by combining cells from the body with highly porous scaffold biomaterials, which act as templates for tissue regeneration, to guide the growth of new tissue. This article describes the functional requirements, and types, of materials used in developing state of the art of scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Furthermore, it describes the challenges and where future research and direction is required in this rapidly advancing field.

  1. Binding assay and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of ACTIBIND, a protein with anticarcinogenic and antiangiogenic activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeuw, Marina de [Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Roiz, Levava [The Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, The Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, PO Box 12, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Smirnoff, Patricia; Schwartz, Betty [The Institute of Biochemistry, Food Science and Nutrition, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel); Shoseyov, Oded [The Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, The Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, PO Box 12, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Almog, Orna, E-mail: almogo@bgu.ac.il [Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2007-08-01

    Native ACTIBIND was successfully crystallized and it was shown that the interaction between ACTIBIND and actin is in a molar ratio of 1:2, with a binding constant of 16.17 × 10{sup 4} M{sup −1}. ACTIBIND is a T2 RNase extracellular glycoprotein produced by the mould Aspergillus niger B1 (CMI CC 324626) that possesses anticarcinogenic and antiangiogenic activities. ACTIBIND was found to be an actin-binding protein that interacts with rabbit muscle actin in a 1:2 molar ratio (ACTIBIND:actin) with a binding constant of 16.17 × 10{sup 4} M{sup −1}. Autoclave-treated ACTIBIND (EI-ACTIBIND) lost its RNase activity, but its actin-binding ability was conserved. ACTIBIND crystals were grown using 20% PEG 3350, 0.2 M ammonium dihydrogen phosphate solution at room temperature (293 K). One to four single crystals appeared in each droplet within a few days and grew to approximate dimensions of 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 mm after about two weeks. Diffraction studies of these crystals at low temperature (100 K) indicated that they belong to the P3{sub 1}21 space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 78, b = 78, c = 104 Å.

  2. Binding assay and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of ACTIBIND, a protein with anticarcinogenic and antiangiogenic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, Marina; Roiz, Levava; Smirnoff, Patricia; Schwartz, Betty; Shoseyov, Oded; Almog, Orna

    2007-01-01

    ACTIBIND is a T2 RNase extracellular glycoprotein produced by the mould Aspergillus niger B1 (CMI CC 324626) that possesses anticarcinogenic and antiangiogenic activities. ACTIBIND was found to be an actin-binding protein that interacts with rabbit muscle actin in a 1:2 molar ratio (ACTIBIND:actin) with a binding constant of 16.17 × 104  M −1. Autoclave-treated ACTIBIND (EI-ACTIBIND) lost its RNase activity, but its actin-binding ability was conserved. ACTIBIND crystals were grown using 20% PEG 3350, 0.2 M ammonium dihydrogen phosphate solution at room temperature (293 K). One to four single crystals appeared in each droplet within a few days and grew to approximate dimensions of 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 mm after about two weeks. Diffraction studies of these crystals at low temperature (100 K) indicated that they belong to the P3121 space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 78, b = 78, c = 104 Å. PMID:17671376

  3. Functional stability of endothelial cells on a novel hybrid scaffold for vascular tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankajakshan, Divya; Krishnan, Lissy K [Thrombosis Research Unit, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Poojapura, Trivandrum 695 012 (India); Krishnan V, Kalliyana, E-mail: lissykk@sctimst.ac.i [Division of Polymer Technology, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Poojapura, Trivandrum 695 012 (India)

    2010-12-15

    Porous and pliable conduits made of biodegradable polymeric scaffolds offer great potential for the development of blood vessel substitutes but they generally lack signals for cell proliferation, survival and maintenance of a normal phenotype. In this study we have prepared and evaluated porous poly({epsilon}-caprolactone) (PCL) integrated with fibrin composite (FC) to get a biomimetic hybrid scaffold (FC PCL) with the biological properties of fibrin, fibronectin (FN), gelatin, growth factors and glycosaminoglycans. Reduced platelet adhesion on a human umbilical vein endothelial cell-seeded hybrid scaffold as compared to bare PCL or FC PCL was observed, which suggests the non-thrombogenic nature of the tissue-engineered scaffold. Analysis of real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) after 5 days of endothelial cell (EC) culture on a hybrid scaffold indicated that the prothrombotic von Willebrand factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) were quiescent and stable. Meanwhile, dynamic expressions of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase indicated the desired cell phenotype on the scaffold. On the hybrid scaffold, shear stress could induce enhanced nitric oxide release, which implicates vaso-responsiveness of EC grown on the tissue-engineered construct. Significant upregulation of mRNA for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, collagen IV and elastin, in EC was detected by RT-PCR after growing them on the hybrid scaffold and FC-coated tissue culture polystyrene (FC TCPS) but not on FN-coated TCPS. The results indicate that the FC PCL hybrid scaffold can accomplish a remodeled ECM and non-thrombogenic EC phenotype, and can be further investigated as a scaffold for cardiovascular tissue engineering. (communication)

  4. Laser Sintered Magnesium-Calcium Silicate/Poly-ε-Caprolactone Scaffold for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Yang Tsai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we manufacture and analyze bioactive magnesium–calcium silicate/poly-ε-caprolactone (Mg–CS/PCL 3D scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Mg–CS powder was incorporated into PCL, and we fabricated the 3D scaffolds using laser sintering technology. These scaffolds had high porosity and interconnected-design macropores and structures. As compared to pure PCL scaffolds without an Mg–CS powder, the hydrophilic properties and degradation rate are also improved. For scaffolds with more than 20% Mg–CS content, the specimens become completely covered by a dense bone-like apatite layer after soaking in simulated body fluid for 1 day. In vitro analyses were directed using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs on all scaffolds that were shown to be biocompatible and supported cell adhesion and proliferation. Increased focal adhesion kinase and promoted cell adhesion behavior were observed after an increase in Mg–CS content. In addition, the results indicate that the Mg–CS quantity in the composite is higher than 10%, and the quantity of cells and osteogenesis-related protein of hMSCs is stimulated by the Si ions released from the Mg–CS/PCL scaffolds when compared to PCL scaffolds. Our results proved that 3D Mg–CS/PCL scaffolds with such a specific ionic release and good degradability possessed the ability to promote osteogenetic differentiation of hMSCs, indicating that they might be promising biomaterials with potential for next-generation bone tissue engineering scaffolds.

  5. Coaching Conversations: Enacting Instructional Scaffolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Sharan A.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed coaching conversations and interviews of four coach/teacher partnerships for specific ways in which kindergarten and first-grade teachers, and coaches, conceptualized instructional scaffolding for guided reading. Interview transcripts were coded for coaches' and teachers' specific hypotheses/ ideas regarding instructional…

  6. Collagen IV-modified scaffolds improve islet survival and function and reduce time to euglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Woon Teck; Salvay, David M; Silliman, Michael A; Zhang, Xiaomin; Bannon, Zachary G; Kaufman, Dixon B; Lowe, William L; Shea, Lonnie D

    2013-11-01

    Islet transplantation on extracellular matrix (ECM) protein-modified biodegradable microporous poly(lactide-co-glycolide) scaffolds is a potential curative treatment for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Collagen IV-modified scaffolds, relative to control scaffolds, significantly decreased the time required to restore euglycemia from 17 to 3 days. We investigated the processes by which collagen IV-modified scaffolds enhanced islet function and mediated early restoration of euglycemia post-transplantation. We characterized the effect of collagen IV-modified scaffolds on islet survival, metabolism, and insulin secretion in vitro and early- and intermediate-term islet mass and vascular density post-transplantation and correlated these with early restoration of euglycemia in a syngeneic mouse model. Control scaffolds maintained native islet morphologies and architectures as well as collagen IV-modified scaffolds in vivo. The islet size and vascular density increased, while β-cell proliferation decreased from day 16 to 113 post-transplantation. Collagen IV-modified scaffolds promoted islet cell viability and decreased early-stage apoptosis in islet cells in vitro-phenomena that coincided with enhanced islet metabolic function and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These findings suggest that collagen IV-modified scaffolds promote the early restoration of euglycemia post-transplantation by enhancing islet metabolism and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These studies of ECM proteins, in particular collagen IV, and islet function provide key insights for the engineering of a microenvironment that would serve as a platform for enhancing islet transplantation as a viable clinical therapy for T1DM.

  7. Biofunctionalisation of polymeric scaffolds for neural tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T Y; Forsythe, J S; Parish, C L; Nisbet, D R

    2012-11-01

    Patients who experience injury to the central or peripheral nervous systems invariably suffer from a range of dysfunctions due to the limited ability for repair and reconstruction of damaged neural tissue. Whilst some treatment strategies can provide symptomatic improvement of motor and cognitive function, they fail to repair the injured circuits and rarely offer long-term disease modification. To this end, the biological molecules, used in combination with neural tissue engineering scaffolds, may provide feasible means to repair damaged neural pathways. This review will focus on three promising classes of neural tissue engineering scaffolds, namely hydrogels, electrospun nanofibres and self-assembling peptides. Additionally, the importance and methods for presenting biologically relevant molecules such as, neurotrophins, extracellular matrix proteins and protein-derived sequences that promote neuronal survival, proliferation and neurite outgrowth into the lesion will be discussed.

  8. Chitin Scaffolds in Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Furuike

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering/regeneration is based on the hypothesis that healthy stem/progenitor cells either recruited or delivered to an injured site, can eventually regenerate lost or damaged tissue. Most of the researchers working in tissue engineering and regenerative technology attempt to create tissue replacements by culturing cells onto synthetic porous three-dimensional polymeric scaffolds, which is currently regarded as an ideal approach to enhance functional tissue regeneration by creating and maintaining channels that facilitate progenitor cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. The requirements that must be satisfied by such scaffolds include providing a space with the proper size, shape and porosity for tissue development and permitting cells from the surrounding tissue to migrate into the matrix. Recently, chitin scaffolds have been widely used in tissue engineering due to their non-toxic, biodegradable and biocompatible nature. The advantage of chitin as a tissue engineering biomaterial lies in that it can be easily processed into gel and scaffold forms for a variety of biomedical applications. Moreover, chitin has been shown to enhance some biological activities such as immunological, antibacterial, drug delivery and have been shown to promote better healing at a faster rate and exhibit greater compatibility with humans. This review provides an overview of the current status of tissue engineering/regenerative medicine research using chitin scaffolds for bone, cartilage and wound healing applications. We also outline the key challenges in this field and the most likely directions for future development and we hope that this review will be helpful to the researchers working in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  9. Modified silk fibroin scaffolds with collagen/decellularized pulp for bone tissue engineering in cleft palate: Morphological structures and biofunctionalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangkert, Supaporn [Biological Materials for Medicine Research Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla90110 (Thailand); Meesane, Jirut, E-mail: jirutmeesane999@yahoo.co.uk [Biological Materials for Medicine Research Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla90110 (Thailand); Kamonmattayakul, Suttatip [Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Preventive Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla90110 (Thailand); Chai, Wen Lin [Faculty of Dentistry, Department of General Dental Practice and Oral and Maxillofacial Imaging, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2016-01-01

    Cleft palate is a congenital malformation that generates a maxillofacial bone defect around the mouth area. The creation of performance scaffolds for bone tissue engineering in cleft palate is an issue that was proposed in this research. Because of its good biocompatibility, high stability, and non-toxicity, silk fibroin was selected as the scaffold of choice in this research. Silk fibroin scaffolds were prepared by freeze-drying before immerging in a solution of collagen, decellularized pulp, and collagen/decellularized pulp. Then, the immersed scaffolds were freeze-dried. Structural organization in solution was observed by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The molecular organization of the solutions and crystal structure of the scaffolds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The weight increase of the modified scaffolds and the pore size were determined. The morphology was observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Mechanical properties were tested. Biofunctionalities were considered by seeding osteoblasts in silk fibroin scaffolds before analysis of the cell proliferation, viability, total protein assay, and histological analysis. The results demonstrated that dendrite structure of the fibrils occurred in those solutions. Molecular organization of the components in solution arranged themselves into an irregular structure. The fibrils were deposited in the pores of the modified silk fibroin scaffolds. The modified scaffolds showed a beta-sheet structure. The morphological structure affected the mechanical properties of the silk fibroin scaffolds with and without modification. Following assessment of the biofunctionalities, the modified silk fibroin scaffolds could induce cell proliferation, viability, and total protein particularly in modified silk fibroin with collagen/decellularized pulp. Furthermore, the histological analysis indicated that the cells could adhere in modified silk fibroin

  10. Polyurethane-based scaffolds for myocardial tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiono, Valeria; Mozetic, Pamela; Boffito, Monica; Sartori, Susanna; Gioffredi, Emilia; Silvestri, Antonella; Rainer, Alberto; Giannitelli, Sara Maria; Trombetta, Marcella; Nurzynska, Daria; Di Meglio, Franca; Castaldo, Clotilde; Miraglia, Rita; Montagnani, Stefania; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2014-02-06

    Bi-layered scaffolds with a 0°/90° lay-down pattern were prepared by melt-extrusion additive manufacturing (AM) using a poly(ester urethane) (PU) synthesized from poly(ε-caprolactone) diol, 1,4-butandiisocyanate and l-lysine ethyl ester dihydrochloride chain extender. Rheological analysis and differential scanning calorimetry of the starting material showed that compression moulded PU films were in the molten state at a higher temperature than 155°C. The AM processing temperature was set at 155°C after verifying the absence of PU thermal degradation phenomena by isothermal thermogravimetry analysis and rheological characterization performed at 165°C. Scaffolds highly reproduced computer-aided design geometry and showed an elastomeric-like behaviour which is promising for applications in myocardial regeneration. PU scaffolds supported the adhesion and spreading of human cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs), whereas they did not stimulate CPC proliferation after 1-14 days culture time. In the future, scaffold surface functionalization with bioactive peptides/proteins will be performed to specifically guide CPC behaviour.

  11. Building bone tissue: matrices and scaffolds in physiology and biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riminucci M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Deposition of bone in physiology involves timed secretion, deposition and removal of a complex array of extracellular matrix proteins which appear in a defined temporal and spatial sequence. Mineralization itself plays a role in dictating and spatially orienting the deposition of matrix. Many aspects of the physiological process are recapitulated in systems of autologous or xenogeneic transplantation of osteogenic precursor cells developed for tissue engineering or modeling. For example, deposition of bone sialoprotein, a member of the small integrin-binding ligand, N-linked glycoprotein family, represents the first step of bone formation in ectopic transplantation systems in vivo. The use of mineralized scaffolds for guiding bone tissue engineering has revealed unexpected manners in which the scaffold and cells interact with each other, so that a complex interplay of integration and disintegration of the scaffold ultimately results in efficient and desirable, although unpredictable, effects. Likewise, the manner in which biomaterial scaffolds are "resorbed" by osteoclasts in vitro and in vivo highlights more complex scenarios than predicted from knowledge of physiological bone resorption per se. Investigation of novel biomaterials for bone engineering represents an essential area for the design of tissue engineering strategies.

  12. Muscle giants: molecular scaffolds in sarcomerogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini; Ackermann, Maegen A; Bowman, Amber L; Yap, Solomon V; Bloch, Robert J

    2009-10-01

    Myofibrillogenesis in striated muscles is a highly complex process that depends on the coordinated assembly and integration of a large number of contractile, cytoskeletal, and signaling proteins into regular arrays, the sarcomeres. It is also associated with the stereotypical assembly of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the transverse tubules around each sarcomere. Three giant, muscle-specific proteins, titin (3-4 MDa), nebulin (600-800 kDa), and obscurin (approximately 720-900 kDa), have been proposed to play important roles in the assembly and stabilization of sarcomeres. There is a large amount of data showing that each of these molecules interacts with several to many different protein ligands, regulating their activity and localizing them to particular sites within or surrounding sarcomeres. Consistent with this, mutations in each of these proteins have been linked to skeletal and cardiac myopathies or to muscular dystrophies. The evidence that any of them plays a role as a "molecular template," "molecular blueprint," or "molecular ruler" is less definitive, however. Here we review the structure and function of titin, nebulin, and obscurin, with the literature supporting a role for them as scaffolding molecules and the contradictory evidence regarding their roles as molecular guides in sarcomerogenesis.

  13. Selective laser sintering fabrication of nano-hydroxyapatite/poly-ε-caprolactone scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Y

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Yan Xia,1,* Panyu Zhou,1,* Xiaosong Cheng,1,* Yang Xie,1,* Chong Liang,2 Chao Li,1 Shuogui Xu1,2 1Department of Orthopedics, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Neurosurgery, The 81 Hospital of People's Liberation Army of China, Nanjing, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The regeneration of functional tissue in osseous defects is a formidable challenge in orthopedic surgery. In the present study, a novel biomimetic composite scaffold, here called nano-hydroxyapatite (HA/poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL was fabricated using a selective laser sintering technique. The macrostructure, morphology, and mechanical strength of the scaffolds were characterized. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM showed that the nano-HA/PCL scaffolds exhibited predesigned, well-ordered macropores and interconnected micropores. The scaffolds have a range of porosity from 78.54% to 70.31%, and a corresponding compressive strength of 1.38 MPa to 3.17 MPa. Human bone marrow stromal cells were seeded onto the nano-HA/PCL or PCL scaffolds and cultured for 28 days in vitro. As indicated by the level of cell attachment and proliferation, the nano-HA/PCL showed excellent biocompatibility, comparable to that of PCL scaffolds. The hydrophilicity, mineralization, alkaline phosphatase activity, and Alizarin Red S staining indicated that the nano-HA/PCL scaffolds are more bioactive than the PCL scaffolds in vitro. Measurements of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2 release kinetics showed that after nano-HA was added, the material increased the rate of rhBMP-2 release. To investigate the in vivo biocompatibility and osteogenesis of the composite scaffolds, both nano-HA/PCL scaffolds and PCL scaffolds were implanted in rabbit femur defects for 3, 6, and 9 weeks. The wounds were studied radiographically and histologically. The in vivo results showed

  14. Mining for bioactive scaffolds with scaffold networks: improved compound set enrichment from primary screening data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varin, Thibault; Schuffenhauer, Ansgar; Ertl, Peter; Renner, Steffen

    2011-07-25

    Identification of meaningful chemical patterns in the increasing amounts of high-throughput-generated bioactivity data available today is an increasingly important challenge for successful drug discovery. Herein, we present the scaffold network as a novel approach for mapping and navigation of chemical and biological space. A scaffold network represents the chemical space of a library of molecules consisting of all molecular scaffolds and smaller "parent" scaffolds generated therefrom by the pruning of rings, effectively leading to a network of common scaffold substructure relationships. This algorithm provides an extension of the scaffold tree algorithm that, instead of a network, generates a tree relationship between a heuristically rule-based selected subset of parent scaffolds. The approach was evaluated for the identification of statistically significantly active scaffolds from primary screening data for which the scaffold tree approach has already been shown to be successful. Because of the exhaustive enumeration of smaller scaffolds and the full enumeration of relationships between them, about twice as many statistically significantly active scaffolds were identified compared to the scaffold-tree-based approach. We suggest visualizing scaffold networks as islands of active scaffolds.

  15. Inactivation of Tor proteins affects the dynamics of endocytic proteins in early stage of endocytosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Brandon Tenay; Evin Kimberlin; Michelle Williams; Juliette Denise; Joshua Fakilahyel; Kyoungtae Kim

    2013-06-01

    Tor2 is an activator of the Rom2/Rho1 pathway that regulates -factor internalization. Since the recruitment of endocytic proteins such as actin-binding proteins and the amphiphysins precedes the internalization of -factor, we hypothesized that loss of Tor function leads to an alteration in the dynamics of the endocytic proteins. We report here that endocytic proteins, Abp1 and Rvs167, are less recruited to endocytic sites not only in tor2 but also tor1 mutants. Furthermore, we found that the endocytic proteins Rvs167 and Sjl2 are completely mistargeted to the cytoplasm in tor1tor2ts double mutant cells. We also demonstrate here that the efficiency of endocytic internalization or scission in all tor mutants was drastically decreased. In agreement with the Sjl2 mislocalization, we found that in tor1tor2ts double mutant cells, as well as other tor mutant cells, the overall PIP2 level was dramatically increased. Finally, the cell wall chitin content in tor2ts and tor1tor2ts mutant cells was also significantly increased. Taken together, both functional Tor proteins, Tor1 and Tor2, are essentially required for proper endocytic protein dynamics at the early stage of endocytosis.

  16. A scaffold-enhanced light-activated surgical adhesive technique: surface selection for enhanced tensile strength in wound repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, Eric C.; Hoffman, Grant T.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; Duffy, Mark T.; Bloom, Jeffrey N.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.

    2004-07-01

    An ex vivo study was conducted to determine the effect of the irregularity of the scaffold surface on the tensile strength of repairs formed using our Scaffold-Enhanced Biological Adhesive (SEBA). Two different scaffold materials were investigated: (i) a synthetic biodegradable material fabricated from poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid); and (ii) a biological material, small intestinal submucosa, manufactured by Cook BioTech. The scaffolds were doped with protein solder composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5mg/ml indocyanine green dye mixed in deionized water, and activated with an 808-nm diode laser. The tensile strength of repairs performed on bovine thoracic aorta, liver, spleen, small intestine and lung, using the smooth and irregular surfaces of the above scaffold-enhanced materials were measured and the time-to-failure was recorded. The tensile strength of repairs formed using the irregular surfaces of the scaffolds were consistently higher than those formed using the smooth surfaces of the scaffolds. The largest difference was observed on repairs formed on the aorta and small intestine, where the repairs were, on average, 50% stronger using the irregular versus the smooth scaffold surfaces. In addition, the time-to-failure of repairs formed using the irregular surfaces of the scaffolds were between 50% and 100% longer than that achieved using the smooth surfaces of the scaffolds. It has previously been shown that distributing or dispersing the adhesive forces over the increased surface area of the scaffold, either smooth or irregular, produces stronger repairs than albumin solder alone. The increase in the absolute strength and longevity of repairs seen in this new study when the irregular surfaces of the scaffolds are used is thought to be due to the distribution of forces between the many independent micro-adhesions provided by the irregular surfaces.

  17. The Selective Autophagy Receptor p62 Forms a Flexible Filamentous Helical Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Ciuffa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The scaffold protein p62/SQSTM1 is involved in protein turnover and signaling and is commonly found in dense protein bodies in eukaryotic cells. In autophagy, p62 acts as a selective autophagy receptor that recognizes and shuttles ubiquitinated proteins to the autophagosome for degradation. The structural organization of p62 in cellular bodies and the interplay of these assemblies with ubiquitin and the autophagic marker LC3 remain to be elucidated. Here, we present a cryo-EM structural analysis of p62. Together with structures of assemblies from the PB1 domain, we show that p62 is organized in flexible polymers with the PB1 domain constituting a helical scaffold. Filamentous p62 is capable of binding LC3 and addition of long ubiquitin chains induces disassembly and shortening of filaments. These studies explain how p62 assemblies provide a large molecular scaffold for the nascent autophagosome and reveal how they can bind ubiquitinated cargo.

  18. Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food Service Resources Additional Resources About FAQ Contact Protein Protein is found throughout the body—in muscle, ... the heart and respiratory system, and death. All Protein Isn’t Alike Protein is built from building ...

  19. Three-Dimensional Stiff Graphene Scaffold on Neural Stem Cells Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qinqin; Yang, Lingyan; Jiang, Ziyun; Song, Qin; Xiao, Miao; Zhang, Dong; Ma, Xun; Wen, Tieqiao; Cheng, Guosheng

    2016-12-21

    Physical cues of the scaffolds, elasticity, and stiffness significantly guide adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of stem cells. In addressable microenvironments constructed by three-dimensional graphene foams (3D-GFs), neural stem cells (NSCs) interact with and respond to the structural geometry and mechanical properties of porous scaffolds. Our studies aim to investigate NSC behavior on the various stiffness of 3D-GFs. Two kinds of 3D-GFs scaffolds present soft and stiff properties with elasticity moduli of 30 and 64 kPa, respectively. Stiff scaffold enhanced NSC attachment and proliferation with vinculin and integrin gene expression were up-regulated by 2.3 and 1.5 folds, respectively, compared with the soft one. Meanwhile, up-regulated Ki67 expression and almost no variation of nestin expression in a group of the stiff scaffold were observed, implying that the stiff substrate fosters NSC growth and keeps the cells in an active stem state. Furthermore, NSCs grown on stiff scaffold exhibited enhanced differentiation to astrocytes. Interestingly, differentiated neurons on stiff scaffold are suppressed since growth associated protein-43 expression was significantly improved by 5.5 folds.

  20. Selective functionalization of nanofiber scaffolds to regulate salivary gland epithelial cell proliferation and polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantara, Shraddha I; Soscia, David A; Sequeira, Sharon J; Jean-Gilles, Riffard P; Castracane, James; Larsen, Melinda

    2012-11-01

    Epithelial cell types typically lose apicobasal polarity when cultured on 2D substrates, but apicobasal polarity is required for directional secretion by secretory cells, such as salivary gland acinar cells. We cultured salivary gland epithelial cells on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanofiber scaffolds that mimic the basement membrane, a specialized extracellular matrix, and examined cell proliferation and apicobasal polarization. Although cells proliferated on nanofibers, chitosan-coated nanofiber scaffolds stimulated proliferation of salivary gland epithelial cells. Although apicobasal cell polarity was promoted by the nanofiber scaffolds relative to flat surfaces, as determined by the apical localization of ZO-1, it was antagonized by the presence of chitosan. Neither salivary gland acinar nor ductal cells fully polarized on the nanofiber scaffolds, as determined by the homogenous membrane distribution of the mature tight junction marker, occludin. However, nanofiber scaffolds chemically functionalized with the basement membrane protein, laminin-111, promoted more mature tight junctions, as determined by apical localization of occludin, but did not affect cell proliferation. To emulate the multifunctional capabilities of the basement membrane, bifunctional PLGA nanofibers were generated. Both acinar and ductal cell lines responded to signals provided by bifunctional scaffolds coupled to chitosan and laminin-111, demonstrating the applicability of such scaffolds for epithelial cell types.

  1. Enhancement of neurite outgrowth in neuron cancer stem cells by growth on 3-D collagen scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chih-Hao [Department of Electrical Engineering, I-Shou University, Taiwan, ROC (China); Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering, I-Shou University, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kuo, Shyh Ming [Department of Biomedical Engineering, I-Shou University, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Guei-Sheung [Centre for Eye Research Australia, University of Melbourne (Australia); Chen, Wan-Nan U. [Department of Biological Science and Technology, I-Shou University, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chuang, Chin-Wen [Department of Electrical Engineering, I-Shou University, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Li-Feng, E-mail: liulf@isu.edu.tw [Department of Biological Science and Technology, I-Shou University, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) behave high multiply of growth on collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement of NCSCs neurite outgrowth on porous collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3-D collagen culture of NCSCs shows an advance differentiation than 2-D culture. -- Abstract: Collagen is one component of the extracellular matrix that has been widely used for constructive remodeling to facilitate cell growth and differentiation. The 3-D distribution and growth of cells within the porous scaffold suggest a clinical significance for nerve tissue engineering. In the current study, we investigated proliferation and differentiation of neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) on a 3-D porous collagen scaffold that mimics the natural extracellular matrix. We first generated green fluorescence protein (GFP) expressing NCSCs using a lentiviral system to instantly monitor the transitions of morphological changes during growth on the 3-D scaffold. We found that proliferation of GFP-NCSCs increased, and a single cell mass rapidly grew with unrestricted expansion between days 3 and 9 in culture. Moreover, immunostaining with neuronal nuclei (NeuN) revealed that NCSCs grown on the 3-D collagen scaffold significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth. Our findings confirmed that the 80 {mu}m porous collagen scaffold could enhance attachment, viability and differentiation of the cancer neural stem cells. This result could provide a new application for nerve tissue engineering and nerve regeneration.

  2. Chitosan-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microsphere-based scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: in vitro degradation and in vivo bone regeneration studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Nukavarapu, Syam P; Deng, Meng; Jabbarzadeh, Ehsan; Kofron, Michelle D; Doty, Stephen B; Abdel-Fattah, Wafa I; Laurencin, Cato T

    2010-09-01

    Natural polymer chitosan and synthetic polymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA) have been investigated for a variety of tissue engineering applications. We have previously reported the fabrication and in vitro evaluation of a novel chitosan/PLAGA sintered microsphere scaffold for load-bearing bone tissue engineering applications. In this study, the in vitro degradation characteristics of the chitosan/PLAGA scaffold and the in vivo bone formation capacity of the chitosan/PLAGA-based scaffolds in a rabbit ulnar critical-sized-defect model were investigated. The chitosan/PLAGA scaffold showed slower degradation than the PLAGA scaffold in vitro. Although chitosan/PLAGA scaffold showed a gradual decrease in compressive properties during the 12-week degradation period, the compressive strength and compressive modulus remained in the range of human trabecular bone. Chitosan/PLAGA-based scaffolds were able to guide bone formation in a rabbit ulnar critical-sized-defect model. Microcomputed tomography analysis demonstrated that successful bridging of the critical-sized defect on the sides both adjacent to and away from the radius occurred using chitosan/PLAGA-based scaffolds. Immobilization of heparin and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 on the chitosan/PLAGA scaffold surface promoted early bone formation as evidenced by complete bridging of the defect along the radius and significantly enhanced mechanical properties when compared to the chitosan/PLAGA scaffold. Furthermore, histological analysis suggested that chitosan/PLAGA-based scaffolds supported normal bone formation via intramembranous formation.

  3. Analog series-based scaffolds: computational design and exploration of a new type of molecular scaffolds for medicinal chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimova, Dilyana; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Computational design of and systematic search for a new type of molecular scaffolds termed analog series-based scaffolds. Materials & methods: From currently available bioactive compounds, analog series were systematically extracted, key compounds identified and new scaffolds isolated from them. Results: Using our computational approach, more than 12,000 scaffolds were extracted from bioactive compounds. Conclusion: A new scaffold definition is introduced and a computational methodology developed to systematically identify such scaffolds, yielding a large freely available scaffold knowledge base.

  4. Proteomic analysis of ACTN4-interacting proteins reveals it's a putative involvement in mRNA metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khotin, Mikhail, E-mail: h_mg@mail.ru [Department of Cell Cultures, Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tikhoretsky av., 4, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Turoverova, Lidia [Department of Cell Cultures, Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tikhoretsky av., 4, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Aksenova, Vasilisa [Department of Cell Cultures, Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tikhoretsky av., 4, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Department of Genetics, St. Petersburg State University, Universitetskaya nab., 7/9, 199034 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Barlev, Nikolai [Department of Cell Cultures, Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tikhoretsky av., 4, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Department of Biochemistry, University of Leicester, Lancaster Road, Leicester LE1 9HN (United Kingdom); Borutinskaite, Veronika Viktorija [Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linkoeping University, SE-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden); Department of Developmental Biology, Institute of Biochemistry, LT-08662 Vilnius (Lithuania); Vener, Alexander [Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linkoeping University, SE-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden); Bajenova, Olga [Department of Genetics, St. Petersburg State University, Universitetskaya nab., 7/9, 199034 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Magnusson, Karl-Eric [Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linkoeping University, SE-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden); Pinaev, George P. [Department of Cell Cultures, Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tikhoretsky av., 4, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tentler, Dmitri, E-mail: dtentler@mail.cytspb.rssi.ru [Department of Cell Cultures, Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tikhoretsky av., 4, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2010-06-25

    Alpha-actinin 4 (ACTN4) is an actin-binding protein. In the cytoplasm, ACTN4 participates in structural organisation of the cytoskeleton via cross-linking of actin filaments. Nuclear localisation of ACTN4 has also been reported, but no clear role in the nucleus has been established. In this report, we describe the identification of proteins associated with ACTN4 in the nucleus. A combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE) and MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry revealed a large number of ACTN4-bound proteins that are involved in various aspects of mRNA processing and transport. The association of ACTN4 with different ribonucleoproteins suggests that a major function of nuclear ACTN4 may be regulation of mRNA metabolism and signaling.

  5. Cell polarity proteins and spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Xiao, Xiang; Lui, Wing-Yee; Lee, Will M; Mruk, Dolores; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-11-01

    When the cross-section of a seminiferous tubule from an adult rat testes is examined microscopically, Sertoli cells and germ cells in the seminiferous epithelium are notably polarized cells. For instance, Sertoli cell nuclei are found near the basement membrane. On the other hand, tight junction (TJ), basal ectoplasmic specialization (basal ES, a testis-specific actin-rich anchoring junction), gap junction (GJ) and desmosome that constitute the blood-testis barrier (BTB) are also located near the basement membrane. The BTB, in turn, divides the epithelium into the basal and the adluminal (apical) compartments. Within the epithelium, undifferentiated spermatogonia and preleptotene spermatocytes restrictively reside in the basal compartment whereas spermatocytes and post-meiotic spermatids reside in the adluminal compartment. Furthermore, the heads of elongating/elongated spermatids point toward the basement membrane with their elongating tails toward the tubule lumen. However, the involvement of polarity proteins in this unique cellular organization, in particular the underlying molecular mechanism(s) by which polarity proteins confer cellular polarity in the seminiferous epithelium is virtually unknown until recent years. Herein, we discuss latest findings regarding the role of different polarity protein complexes or modules and how these protein complexes are working in concert to modulate Sertoli cell and spermatid polarity. These findings also illustrate polarity proteins exert their effects through the actin-based cytoskeleton mediated by actin binding and regulatory proteins, which in turn modulate adhesion protein complexes at the cell-cell interface since TJ, basal ES and GJ utilize F-actin for attachment. We also propose a hypothetical model which illustrates the antagonistic effects of these polarity proteins. This in turn provides a unique mechanism to modulate junction remodeling in the testis to support germ cell transport across the epithelium in

  6. Alginate/nanohydroxyapatite scaffolds with designed core/shell structures fabricated by 3D plotting and in situ mineralization for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yongxiang; Lode, Anja; Wu, Chengtie; Chang, Jiang; Gelinsky, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Composite scaffolds, especially polymer/hydroxyapatite (HAP) composite scaffolds with predesigned structures, are promising materials for bone tissue engineering. Various methods including direct mixing of HAP powder with polymers or incubating polymer scaffolds in simulated body fluid for preparing polymer/HAP composite scaffolds are either uncontrolled or require long times of incubation. In this work, alginate/nano-HAP composite scaffolds with designed pore parameters and core/shell structures were fabricated using 3D plotting technique and in situ mineralization under mild conditions (at room temperature and without the use of any organic solvents). Light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, microcomputer tomography, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were applied to characterize the fabricated scaffolds. Mechanical properties and protein delivery of the scaffolds were evaluated, as well as the cell response to the scaffolds by culturing human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSC). The obtained data indicate that this method is suitable to fabricate alginate/nano-HAP composite scaffolds with a layer of nano-HAP, coating the surface of the alginate strands homogeneously and completely. The surface mineralization enhanced the mechanical properties and improved the cell attachment and spreading, as well as supported sustaining protein release, compared to pure alginate scaffolds without nano-HAP shell layer. The results demonstrated that the method provides an interesting option for bone tissue engineering application.

  7. Fabrication and evaluation of a sustained-release chitosan-based scaffold embedded with PLGA microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kedong, E-mail: kedongsong@dlut.edu.cn [Dalian R and D Center for Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu, Yingchao [Dalian R and D Center for Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Macedo, Hugo M. [Biological Systems Engineering Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Jiang, Lili; Li, Chao; Mei, Guanyu [Dalian R and D Center for Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu, Tianqing, E-mail: liutq@dlut.edu.cn [Dalian R and D Center for Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2013-04-01

    Nutrient depletion within three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds is one of the major hurdles in the use of this technology to grow cells for applications in tissue engineering. In order to help in addressing it, we herein propose to use the controlled release of encapsulated nutrients within polymer microspheres into chitosan-based 3D scaffolds, wherein the microspheres are embedded. This method has allowed maintaining a stable concentration of nutrients within the scaffolds over the long term. The polymer microspheres were prepared using multiple emulsions (w/o/w), in which bovine serum albumin (BSA) and poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) were regarded as the protein pattern and the exoperidium material, respectively. These were then mixed with a chitosan solution in order to form the scaffolds by cryo-desiccation. The release of BSA, entrapped within the embedded microspheres, was monitored with time using a BCA kit. The morphology and structure of the PLGA microspheres containing BSA before and after embedding within the scaffold were observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). These had a round shape with diameters in the range of 27–55 μm, whereas the chitosan-based scaffolds had a uniform porous structure with the microspheres uniformly dispersed within their 3D structure and without any morphological change. In addition, the porosity, water absorption and degradation rate at 37 °C in an aqueous environment of 1% chitosan-based scaffolds were (92.99 ± 2.51) %, (89.66 ± 0.66) % and (73.77 ± 3.21) %, respectively. The studies of BSA release from the embedded microspheres have shown a sustained and cumulative tendency with little initial burst, with (20.24 ± 0.83) % of the initial amount released after 168 h (an average rate of 0.12%/h). The protein concentration within the chitosan-based scaffolds after 168 h was found to be (11.44 ± 1.81) × 10{sup −2} mg/mL. This novel chitosan-based scaffold embedded with PLGA microspheres has proven to be a

  8. Multi-scale osteointegration and neovascularization of biphasic calcium phosphate bone scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Sheeny K.

    Bone grafts are utilized clinically to guide tissue regeneration. Autologous bone and allogeneic bone are the current clinical standards. However, there are significant limitations to their use. To address the need for alternatives to autograft and allograft, researchers have worked to develop synthetic grafts, also referred to as scaffolds. Despite extensive efforts in this area, a gap persists between basic research and clinical application. In particular, solutions for repairing critical size and/or load-bearing defects are lacking. The aim of this thesis work was to address two critical barriers preventing design of successful tissue engineering constructs for bone regeneration within critical size and/or load-bearing defects. Those barriers are insufficient osteointegration and slow neovascularization. In this work, the effects of scaffold microporosity, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 delivery and endothelial colony forming cell vasculogenesis were evaluated in the context of bone formation in vivo. This was accomplished to better understand the role of these factors in bone regeneration, which may translate to improvements in tissue engineering construct design. Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) scaffolds with controlled macro- and microporosity were implanted in porcine mandibular defects. Evaluation of the BCP scaffolds after in vivo implantation showed, for the first time, osteocytes embedded in bone within scaffold micropores (regenerating bone and this has significant implications with regard to improved scaffold mechanical properties. The presence of osteocytes within scaffold micropores is an indication of scaffold osteoinductivity because a chemotactic factor must be present to induce cell migration into pores on the order of the cell diameter. It is likely that the scaffold undergoes in vivo modifications involving formation of a biological apatite layer within scaffold micropores and possibly co-precipitation of endogenous

  9. Alginate based scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente, J.F.A.; Valente, T.A.M. [CICS-UBI - Centro de Investigacao em Ciencias da Saude, Faculdade de Ciencias da Saude, Universidade da Beira Interior, Covilha (Portugal); Alves, P.; Ferreira, P. [CIEPQPF, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Universidade de Coimbra, Polo II, Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030-290 Coimbra (Portugal); Silva, A. [Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespaciais, Universidade da Beira Interior, Covilha (Portugal); Correia, I.J., E-mail: icorreia@ubi.pt [CICS-UBI - Centro de Investigacao em Ciencias da Saude, Faculdade de Ciencias da Saude, Universidade da Beira Interior, Covilha (Portugal)

    2012-12-01

    The design and production of scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration is yet unable to completely reproduce the native bone properties. In the present study new alginate microparticle and microfiber aggregated scaffolds were produced to be applied in this area of regenerative medicine. The scaffolds' mechanical properties were characterized by thermo mechanical assays. Their morphological characteristics were evaluated by isothermal nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. The density of both types of scaffolds was determined by helium pycnometry and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Furthermore, scaffolds' cytotoxic profiles were evaluated in vitro by seeding human osteoblast cells in their presence. The results obtained showed that scaffolds have good mechanical and morphological properties compatible with their application as bone substitutes. Moreover, scaffold's biocompatibility was confirmed by the observation of cell adhesion and proliferation after 5 days of being seeded in their presence and by non-radioactive assays. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Design and production of scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microparticle and microfiber alginate scaffolds were produced through a particle aggregation technique; Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scaffolds' mechanically and biologically properties were characterized through in vitro studies;.

  10. Construction of a 3D rGO-collagen hybrid scaffold for enhancement of the neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Yu, Xin; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Tang, Wei; Li, Zhou; Mou, Xiaoning; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhonglin

    2016-01-01

    The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold because the surface of the scaffold can determine the fate of stem cells. A conductive surface is required for a scaffold to direct stem cells toward neural differentiation. However, most conductive polymers are toxic and not amenable to biological degradation, which restricts the design of neural tissue engineering scaffolds. In this study, we used a bioactive three-dimensional (3D) porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM), which is mainly composed of type I collagen, as a basic material and successfully assembled a layer of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets on the surface of the PADM channels to obtain a porous 3D, biodegradable, conductive and biocompatible PADM-rGO hybrid neural tissue engineering scaffold. Compared with the PADM scaffold, assembling the rGO into the scaffold did not induce a significant change in the microstructure but endowed the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold with good conductivity. A comparison of the neural differentiation of rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was performed by culturing the MSCs on PADM and PADM-rGO scaffolds in neuronal culture medium, followed by the determination of gene expression and immunofluorescence staining. The results of both the gene expression and protein level assessments suggest that the rGO-assembled PADM scaffold may promote the differentiation of MSCs into neuronal cells with higher protein and gene expression levels after 7 days under neural differentiation conditions. This study demonstrated that the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold is a promising scaffold for neural tissue engineering; this scaffold can not only support the growth of MSCs at a high proliferation rate but also enhance the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells.The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold

  11. Ceramic Identity Contributes to Mechanical Properties and Osteoblast Behavior on Macroporous Composite Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kent Leach

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Implants formed of metals, bioceramics, or polymers may provide an alternative to autografts for treating large bone defects. However, limitations to each material motivate the examination of composites to capitalize on the beneficial aspects of individual components and to address the need for conferring bioactive behavior to the polymer matrix. We hypothesized that the inclusion of different bioceramics in a ceramic-polymer composite would alter the physical properties of the implant and the cellular osteogenic response. To test this, composite scaffolds formed from poly(lactide-co-glycolide (PLG and either hydroxyapatite (HA, β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP, or bioactive glass (Bioglass 45S®, BG were fabricated, and the physical properties of each scaffold were examined. We quantified cell proliferation by DNA content, osteogenic response of human osteoblasts (NHOsts to composite scaffolds by alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, and changes in gene expression by qPCR. Compared to BG-PLG scaffolds, HA-PLG and TCP-PLG composite scaffolds possessed greater compressive moduli. NHOsts on BG-PLG substrates exhibited higher ALP activity than those on control, HA-, or TCP-PLG scaffolds after 21 days, and cells on composites exhibited a 3-fold increase in ALP activity between 7 and 21 days versus a minimal increase on control scaffolds. Compared to cells on PLG controls, RUNX2 expression in NHOsts on composite scaffolds was lower at both 7 and 21 days, while expression of genes encoding for bone matrix proteins (COL1A1 and SPARC was higher on BG-PLG scaffolds at both time points. These data demonstrate the importance of selecting a ceramic when fabricating composites applied for bone healing.

  12. Tropomyosin is localized in the nuclear matrix and chromosome scaffold of physarum polycephalum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENGXIANLU; XIAOGUANGWANG; 等

    1999-01-01

    The nuclei and chromosomes were isolated from plasmodia of Physarum polycephalum.The nuclear matrix and chromosome scaffold were obtained after the DNA and most of the proteins were extracted with DNase I and 2 M NaCl.SD-PAGE analyses revealed that the nuclear matrix and chromosome scaffold contained a 37 kD polypeptide which is equivalent to tropomyosin in molecular weight.Immunofluorescence observations upon slide preparations labeled with anti-tropomyosin antibody showed that the nuclear matrix and chromosome scaffold emanated bright fluorescence,suggesting the presence of the antigen in them.Immunodotting results confirmed the presence of tropomyosin in the nuclear matrix and chromosome scaffold.Immunoelectron microscopic observations further demonstrated that tropomyosin was dispersively distributed in the interphase nuclei and metaphase chromosomes.

  13. Interphotoreceptor matrix-poly(ϵ-caprolactone composite scaffolds for human photoreceptor differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Baranov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering has been widely applied in different areas of regenerative medicine, including retinal regeneration. Typically, artificial biopolymers require additional surface modification (e.g. with arginine–glycine–aspartate-containing peptides or adsorption of protein, such as fibronectin, before cell seeding. Here, we describe an alternative approach for scaffold design: the manufacture of hybrid interphotoreceptor matrix-poly (ϵ-caprolactone scaffolds, in which the insoluble extracellular matrix of the retina is incorporated into a biodegradable polymer well suited for transplantation. The incorporation of interphotoreceptor matrix did not change the topography of polycaprolactone film, although it led to a slight increase in hydrophilic properties (water contact angle measurements. This hybrid scaffold provided sufficient stimuli for human retinal progenitor cell adhesion and inhibited proliferation, leading to differentiation toward photoreceptor cells (expression of Crx, Nrl, rhodopsin, ROM1. This scaffold may be used for transplantation of retinal progenitor cells and their progeny to treat retinal degenerative disorders.

  14. Polyacrylamide scaffolds for studying cellular response to substrate stiffness in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Keng-Hui

    2013-03-01

    Recent developments in two-dimensional (2D) culture substrates with tunable stiffness and patterned adhesion ligands have demonstrated that biochemical and mechanical cues regulate the biological functions of living cells. We have extended these cell culture platforms into three dimensions (3D), as in complex biological systems, by producing highly ordered scaffolds of polyacrylamide coated with extracellular matrix proteins. We characterized parameters for the scaffold fabrication. We then grew individual fibroblasts in the identical pores of our scaffolds, examing cellular morphological, cytoskeletal, and adhesion properties. We have observed rich variety of morphologies and anchoring strategies assumed by cells growing on our tunable 3D polyacrylamide scaffolds to demonstrate the richness of cell-mciroenvironment interactions when cell adhesions are not confined to 2D surfaces.

  15. Biologically improved nanofibrous scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaarathy, V. [Centre for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, NUSNNI, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore); Department of Nanoscience and Technology, School of Physical Sciences, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India); Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, 138673 (Singapore); Venugopal, J., E-mail: nnijrv@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, NUSNNI, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore); Gandhimathi, C. [Centre for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, NUSNNI, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore); Ponpandian, N.; Mangalaraj, D. [Department of Nanoscience and Technology, School of Physical Sciences, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India); Ramakrishna, S. [Centre for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, NUSNNI, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-11-01

    Nanofibrous structure developed by electrospinning technology provides attractive extracellular matrix conditions for the anchorage, migration and differentiation of stem cells, including those responsible for regenerative medicine. Recently, biocomposite nanofibers consisting of two or more polymeric blends are electrospun more tidily in order to obtain scaffolds with desired functional and mechanical properties depending on their applications. The study focuses on one such an attempt of using copolymer Poly(L-lactic acid)-co-poly (ε-caprolactone) (PLACL), silk fibroin (SF) and Aloe Vera (AV) for fabricating biocomposite nanofibrous scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering. SEM micrographs of fabricated electrospun PLACL, PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV nanofibrous scaffolds are porous, beadless, uniform nanofibers with interconnected pores and obtained fibre diameter in the range of 459 ± 22 nm, 202 ± 12 nm and 188 ± 16 nm respectively. PLACL, PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV electrospun mats obtained at room temperature with an elastic modulus of 14.1 ± 0.7, 9.96 ± 2.5 and 7.0 ± 0.9 MPa respectively. PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers have more desirable properties to act as flexible cell supporting scaffolds compared to PLACL for the repair of myocardial infarction (MI). The PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers had a contact angle of 51 ± 12° compared to that of 133 ± 15° of PLACL alone. Cardiac cell proliferation was increased by 21% in PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers compared to PLACL by day 6 and further increased to 42% by day 9. Confocal analysis for cardiac expression proteins myosin and connexin 43 was observed better by day 9 compared to all other nanofibrous scaffolds. The results proved that the fabricated PLACL/SF/AV nanofibrous scaffolds have good potentiality for the regeneration of infarcted myocardium in cardiac tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Fabricated nanofibrous scaffolds are porous, beadless and uniform structures. • PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers improve the

  16. Identification of a cyclase-associated protein (CAP) homologue in Dictyostelium discoideum and characterization of its interaction with actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottwald, U; Brokamp, R; Karakesisoglou, I; Schleicher, M; Noegel, A A

    1996-02-01

    In search for novel actin binding proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum we have isolated a cDNA clone coding for a protein of approximately 50 kDa that is highly homologous to the class of adenylyl cyclase-associated proteins (CAP). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the amino-terminal part of CAP is involved in the regulation of the adenylyl cyclase whereas the loss of the carboxyl-terminal domain results in morphological and nutritional defects. To study the interaction of Dictyostelium CAP with actin, the complete protein and its amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal domains were expressed in Escherichia coli and used in actin binding assays. CAP sequestered actin in a Ca2+ independent way. This activity was localized to the carboxyl-terminal domain. CAP and its carboxyl-terminal domain led to a fluorescence enhancement of pyrene-labeled G-actin up to 50% indicating a direct interaction, whereas the amino-terminal domain did not enhance. In polymerization as well as in viscometric assays the ability of the carboxyl-terminal domain to sequester actin and to prevent F-actin formation was approximately two times higher than that of intact CAP. The sequestering activity of full length CAP could be inhibited by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), whereas the activity of the carboxyl-terminal domain alone was not influenced, suggesting that the amino-terminal half of the protein is required for the PIP2 modulation of the CAP function. In profilin-minus cells the CAP concentration is increased by approximately 73%, indicating that CAP may compensate some profilin functions in vivo. In migrating D. discoideum cells CAP was enriched at anterior and posterior plasma membrane regions. Only a weak staining of the cytoplasm was observed. In chemotactically stimulated cells the protein was very prominent in leading fronts. The data suggest an involvement of D. discoideum CAP in microfilament reorganization near the plasma membrane in a PIP2-regulated manner.

  17. Decellularized Tooth Bud Scaffolds for Tooth Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W; Vazquez, B; Oreadi, D; Yelick, P C

    2017-01-01

    Whole tooth regeneration approaches currently are limited by our inability to bioengineer full-sized, living replacement teeth. Recently, decellularized organ scaffolds have shown promise for applications in regenerative medicine by providing a natural extracellular matrix environment that promotes cell attachment and tissue-specific differentiation leading to full-sized organ regeneration. We hypothesize that decellularized tooth buds (dTBs) created from unerupted porcine tooth buds (TBs) can be used to guide reseeded dental cell differentiation to form whole bioengineered teeth, thereby providing a potential off-the-shelf scaffold for whole tooth regeneration. Porcine TBs were harvested from discarded 6-mo-old pig jaws, and decellularized by successive sodium dodecyl sulfate/Triton-X cycles. Four types of replicate implants were used in this study: 1) acellular dTBs; 2) recellularized dTBs seeded with porcine dental epithelial cells, human dental pulp cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (recell-dTBs); 3) dTBs seeded with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 (dTB-BMPs); and 4) freshly isolated nondecellularized natural TBs (nTBs). Replicate samples were implanted into the mandibles of host Yucatan mini-pigs and grown for 3 or 6 mo. Harvested mandibles with implanted TB constructs were fixed in formalin, decalcified, embedded in paraffin, sectioned, and analyzed via histological methods. Micro-computed tomography (CT) analysis was performed on harvested 6-mo samples prior to decalcification. All harvested constructs exhibited a high degree of cellularity. Significant production of organized dentin and enamel-like tissues was observed in dTB-recell and nTB implants, but not in dTB or dTB-BMP implants. Micro-CT analyses of 6-mo implants showed the formation of organized, bioengineered teeth of comparable size to natural teeth. To our knowledge, these results are the first to describe the potential use of dTBs for functional whole tooth regeneration.

  18. Tropoelastin coated PLLA-PLGA scaffolds promote vascular network formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Shira; Szklanny, Ariel A; Yeo, Giselle C; Shandalov, Yulia; Kosobrodova, Elena; Weiss, Anthony S; Levenberg, Shulamit

    2017-04-01

    The robust repair of large wounds and tissue defects relies on blood flow. This vascularization is the major challenge faced by tissue engineering on the path to forming thick, implantable tissue constructs. Without this vasculature, oxygen and nutrients cannot reach the cells located far from host blood vessels. To make viable constructs, tissue engineering takes advantage of the mechanical properties of synthetic materials, while combining them with ECM proteins to create a natural environment for the tissue-specific cells. Tropoelastin, the precursor of the elastin, is the ECM protein responsible for elasticity in diverse tissues, including robust blood vessels. Here, we seeded endothelial cells with supporting cells on PLLA/PLGA scaffolds treated with tropoelastin, and examined the morphology, expansion and maturity of the newly formed vessels. Our results demonstrate that the treated scaffolds elicit a more expanded, complex and developed vascularization in comparison to the untreated group. Implantation of tropoelastin-treated scaffolds into mouse abdominal muscle resulted in enhanced perfusion of the penetrating vasculature and improved integration. This study points to the great potential of these combined materials in promoting the vascularization of implanted engineered constructs, which can be further exploited in the fabrication of clinically relevant engineered tissues.

  19. Cell–scaffold interaction within engineered tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Haiping; Liu, Yuanyuan, E-mail: Yuanyuan_liu@shu.edu.cn; Jiang, Zhenglong; Chen, Weihua; Yu, Yongzhe; Hu, Qingxi

    2014-05-01

    The structure of a tissue engineering scaffold plays an important role in modulating tissue growth. A novel gelatin–chitosan (Gel–Cs) scaffold with a unique structure produced by three-dimensional printing (3DP) technology combining with vacuum freeze-drying has been developed for tissue-engineering applications. The scaffold composed of overall construction, micro-pore, surface morphology, and effective mechanical property. Such a structure meets the essential design criteria of an ideal engineered scaffold. The favorable cell–matrix interaction supports the active biocompatibility of the structure. The structure is capable of supporting cell attachment and proliferation. Cells seeded into this structure tend to maintain phenotypic shape and secreted large amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM) and the cell growth decreased the mechanical properties of scaffold. This novel biodegradable scaffold has potential applications for tissue engineering based upon its unique structure, which acts to support cell growth. - Highlights: • The scaffold is not only for providing a surface for cell residence but also for determining cell phenotype and retaining structural integrity. • The mechanical property of scaffold can be affected by activities of cell. • The scaffold provides a microenvironment for cell attachment, growth, and migration.

  20. Porous Calcium Phosphate Ceramic Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the biological response of two porous calcium phosphate ceramics,hydroxyapatite (HA) and hydroxyapaptite/ β-tricalcium phosphate ( HA / β- TCP ) scaffolds. Three different cell types, a human osteoblastic cell line (HOS), primary human osteoblasts (HOB) and human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), were used to examine biocompatibility and osteoinductive capacity. The experimental results showed both materials were highly biocompatible and proliferation was significantly greater on pure HA ( P <0.01 ), with a peak in proliferation at day 7. Protein levels were significantly higher ( P < 0.05) than the control Thermanox ( TMX(tm)) for both test materials. Osteoinduction of MSCs was observed on both test materials,with cells seeded on HA/ β- TCP showing greater alkaline phosphatase activity compared to HA alone, indicating an enhancement in osteoinductive property. Both materials show good potential for use as tissue engineered scaffolds.

  1. Carbohydrate mimetics and scaffolds: sweet spots in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla, Laura; La Ferla, Barbara; Airoldi, Cristina; Zona, Cristiano; Orsato, Alexandre; Shaikh, Nasrin; Russo, Laura; Nicotra, Francesco

    2010-04-01

    Several glycoprocessing enzymes and glycoreceptors have been recognized as important targets for therapeutic intervention. This concept has inspired the development of important classes of therapeutics, such as anti-influenza drugs inhibiting influenza virus neuraminidase, anti-inflammatory drugs targeting lectin-sialyl-Lewis X interaction and glycosidase inhibitors against HIV, Gaucher's disease, hepatitis and cancer. These therapeutics are mainly carbohydrate mimics in which proper modifications permit stronger interactions with the target protein, higher stability, better pharmacokinetic properties and easier synthesis. Furthermore, the conformational rigidity and polyfunctionality of carbohydrates stimulate their use as scaffolds for the generation of libraries by combinatorial decoration with different pharmacophores. This mini-review will present examples of how to exploit carbohydrates mimics and scaffolds in drug research.

  2. Enhanced in vitro osteoblast differentiation on TiO2 scaffold coated with alginate hydrogel containing simvastatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Pullisaar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a three-dimensional porous bone graft material as vehicle for simvastatin delivery and to investigate its effect on primary human osteoblasts from three donors. Highly porous titanium dioxide (TiO2 scaffolds were submerged into simvastatin containing alginate solution. Microstructure of scaffolds, visualized by scanning electron microscopy and micro-computed tomography, revealed an evenly distributed alginate layer covering the surface of TiO2 scaffold struts. Progressive and sustained simvastatin release was observed for up to 19 days. No cytotoxic effects on osteoblasts were observed by scaffolds with simvastatin when compared to scaffolds without simvastatin. Expression of osteoblast markers (collagen type I alpha 1, alkaline phosphatase, bone morphogenetic protein 2, osteoprotegerin, vascular endothelial growth factor A and osteocalcin was quantified using real-time reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. Secretion of osteoprotegerin, vascular endothelial growth factor A and osteocalcin was analysed by multiplex immunoassay (Luminex. The relative expression and secretion of osteocalcin was significantly increased by cells cultured on scaffolds with 10 µM simvastatin when compared to scaffolds without simvastatin after 21 days. In addition, secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor A was significantly enhanced from cells cultured on scaffolds with both 10 nM and 10 µM simvastatin when compared to scaffolds without simvastatin at day 21. In conclusion, the results indicate that simvastatin-coated TiO2 scaffolds can support a sustained release of simvastatin and induce osteoblast differentiation. The combination of the physical properties of TiO2 scaffolds with the osteogenic effect of simvastatin may represent a new strategy for bone regeneration in defects where immediate load is wanted or unavailable.

  3. Scaffolding in teacher-student interaction: a decade of research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pol, J.; Volman, M.; Beishuizen, J.

    2010-01-01

    Although scaffolding is an important and frequently studied concept, much discussion exists with regard to its conceptualizations, appearances, and effectiveness. Departing from the last decade’s scaffolding literature, this review scrutinizes these three areas of scaffolding. First, contingency, fa

  4. XB130: A novel adaptor protein in cancer signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHANG, RUIYAO; ZHANG, JINGYAO; WU, QIFEI; MENG, FANDI; LIU, CHANG

    2016-01-01

    Adaptor proteins are functional proteins that contain two or more protein-binding modules to link signaling proteins together, which affect cell growth and shape and have no enzymatic activity. The actin filament-associated protein (AFAP) family is an important member of the adaptor proteins, including AFAP1, AFAP1L1 and AFAP1L2/XB130. AFAP1 and AFAP1L1 share certain common characteristics and function as an actin-binding protein and a cSrc-activating protein. XB130 exhibits certain unique features in structure and function. The mRNA of XB130 is expressed in human spleen, thyroid, kidney, brain, lung, pancreas, liver, colon and stomach, and the most prominent disease associated with XB130 is cancer. XB130 has a controversial effect on cancer. Studies have shown that XB130 can promote cancer progression and downregulation of XB130-reduced growth of tumors derived from certain cell lines. A higher mRNA level of XB130 was shown to be associated with a better survival in non-small cell lung cancer. Previous studies have shown that XB130 can regulate cell growth, migration and invasion and possibly has the effect through the cAMP-cSrc-phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway. Except for cancer, XB130 is also associated with other pathological or physiological procedures, such as airway repair and regeneration. PMID:26998266

  5. Preparation of poly(ethylene glycol/polylactide hybrid fibrous scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni P

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available PeiYan Ni, ShaoZhi Fu, Min Fan, Gang Guo, Shuai Shi, JinRong Peng, Feng Luo, ZhiYong QianState Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Polylactide (PLA electrospun fibers have been reported as a scaffold for bone tissue engineering application, however, the great hydrophobicity limits its broad application. In this study, the hybrid amphiphilic poly(ethylene glycol (PEG/hydrophobic PLA fibrous scaffolds exhibited improved morphology with regular and continuous fibers compared to corresponding blank PLA fiber mats. The prepared PEG/PLA fibrous scaffolds favored mesenchymal stem cell (MSC attachment and proliferation by providing an interconnected porous extracellular environment. Meanwhile, MSCs can penetrate into the fibrous scaffold through the interstitial pores and integrate well with the surrounding fibers, which is very important for favorable application in tissue engineering. More importantly, the electrospun hybrid PEG/PLA fibrous scaffolds can enhance MSCs to differentiate into bone-associated cells by comprehensively evaluating the representative markers of the osteogenic procedure with messenger ribonucleic acid quantitation and protein analysis. MSCs on the PEG/PLA fibrous scaffolds presented better differentiation potential with higher messenger ribonucleic acid expression of the earliest osteogenic marker Cbfa-1 and mid-stage osteogenic marker Col I. The significantly higher alkaline phosphatase activity of the PEG/PLA fibrous scaffolds indicated that these can enhance the differentiation of MSCs into osteoblast-like cells. Furthermore, the higher messenger ribonucleic acid level of the late osteogenic differentiation markers OCN (osteocalcin and OPN (osteopontin, accompanied by the positive Alizarin red S staining, showed better maturation of osteogenic induction on the PEG/PLA fibrous scaffolds at the

  6. Ultrasensitive Scaffold-Dependent Protease Sensors with Large Dynamic Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Viktor; Nabi, Masuda; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2017-03-28

    The rational construction of synthetic protein switches with predefined input-output parameters constitutes a key goal of synthetic biology with many potential applications ranging from metabolic engineering to diagnostics. Yet, generally applicable strategies to construct tailor-engineered protein switches have so far remained elusive. Here, we use SpyTag/SpyCatcher-mediated protein ligation to engineer modularly organized, scaffold-dependent protease sensors that exploit a combination of affinity targeting and protease-inducible protein-protein interactions. We use this architecture to create a suite of integrated signal sensing and amplification circuits that can detect the activity of α-thrombin and prostate specific antigen with a dynamic range covering 5 orders of magnitude. We determine the key design features critical for signal transmission between protease-based sensors, transducers, and actuators.

  7. NMR structural characterization of the N-terminal domain of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from Dictyostelium discoideum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavoungou, Chrystelle [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Germany); Israel, Lars [Ludwig Maximilians-University, Adolf Butenandt Institute, Cell Biology (Germany); Rehm, Till; Ksiazek, Dorota; Krajewski, Marcin; Popowicz, Grzegorz [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Germany); Noegel, Angelika A. [University of Cologne, Institute for Biochemistry (Germany); Schleicher, Michael [Ludwig Maximilians-University, Adolf Butenandt Institute, Cell Biology (Germany); Holak, Tad A. [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Germany)

    2004-05-15

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are highly conserved, ubiquitous actin binding proteins that are involved in microfilament reorganization. The N-termini of CAPs play a role in Ras signaling and bind adenylyl cyclase; the C-termini bind to G-actin. We report here the NMR characterization of the amino-terminal domain of CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum (CAP(1-226)). NMR data, including the steady state {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N heteronuclear NOE experiments, indicate that the first 50 N-terminal residues are unstructured and that this highly flexible serine-rich fragment is followed by a stable, folded core starting at Ser 51. The NMR structure of the folded core is an {alpha}-helix bundle composed of six antiparallel helices, in a stark contrast to the recently determined CAP C-terminal domain structure, which is solely built by {beta}-strands.

  8. NMR structural characterization of the N-terminal domain of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavoungou, Chrystelle; Israel, Lars; Rehm, Till; Ksiazek, Dorota; Krajewski, Marcin; Popowicz, Grzegorz; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Holak, Tad A

    2004-05-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are highly conserved, ubiquitous actin binding proteins that are involved in microfilament reorganization. The N-termini of CAPs play a role in Ras signaling and bind adenylyl cyclase; the C-termini bind to G-actin. We report here the NMR characterization of the amino-terminal domain of CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum (CAP(1-226)). NMR data, including the steady state (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear NOE experiments, indicate that the first 50 N-terminal residues are unstructured and that this highly flexible serine-rich fragment is followed by a stable, folded core starting at Ser 51. The NMR structure of the folded core is an alpha-helix bundle composed of six antiparallel helices, in a stark contrast to the recently determined CAP C-terminal domain structure, which is solely built by beta-strands.

  9. Metacognitive scaffolding during collaborative learning: a promising combination

    OpenAIRE

    Molenaar, Inge; Sleegers, Peter; Boxtel, van, M.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the effect of computerized scaffolding with different scaffolds (structuring vs. problematizing) on intra-group metacognitive interaction. In this study, we investigate 4 types of intra-group social metacognitive activities; namely ignored, accepted, shared and co-constructed metacognitive activities in 18 triads (6 control groups; no scaffolds and 12 experimental groups; 6 structuring scaffolds and 6 problematizing scaffolds).We found that groups receiving scaffolding s...

  10. Enhanced osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells on poly(L-lactide) nanofibrous scaffolds containing carbon nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Shun; Yang, Xiaoping; Mei, Fang; Tang, Yan; Li, Xiaoli; Shi, Yuzhou; Mao, Jifu; Zhang, Hongquan; Cai, Qing

    2015-04-01

    Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), such as carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene, are highlighted in bone regeneration because of their osteoinductive properties. Their combinations with nanofibrous polymeric scaffolds, which mimic the morphology of natural extracellular matrix of bone, arouse keen interest in bone tissue engineering. To this end, CNM were incorporated into nanofibrous poly(L-lactic acid) scaffolds by thermal-induced phase separation. The CNM-containing composite nanofibrous scaffolds were biologically evaluated by both in vitro co-culture of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and in vivo implantation. The nanofibrous structure itself demonstrated significant enhancement in cell adhesion, proliferation and oseogenic differentiation of BMSCs, and with the incorporation of CNM, the composite nanofibrous scaffolds further promoted osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs significantly. Between the two CNMs, graphene showed stronger effect in promoting osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs than CNT. The results of in vivo experiments revealed that the composite nanofibrous scaffolds had both good biocompatibility and strong ability in inducing osteogenesis. CNMs could remarkably enhance the expression of osteogenesis-related proteins as well as the formation of type I collagen. Similarly, the graphene-containing composite nanofibrous scaffolds demonstrated the strongest effect on inducing osteogenesis in vivo. These findings demonstrated that CNM-containing composite nanofibrous scaffolds were obviously more efficient in promoting osteogenesis than pure polymeric scaffolds.

  11. The Enhancement of Osteogenesis by Scaffold Based on Mineralized Recombinant Human-like Collagen Loading with rhBMP-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Bin; ZHENG Qixin; GUO Xiaodong; WU Yongchao; WANG Yu; CUI Fuzai

    2009-01-01

    A biomimetic scaffold based on mineralized recombinant collagen,nano-hydroxyapatite/recombinant human-like collagen/poly(lactic acid)(nHA/RHLC/PLA),was prepared with recombinant human bone morphogenic protein-2(rhBMP-2)for improving the os-teoinductive property of the scaffold.The nHA/RHLC/PLA scaffolds loaded with 10μg rhBMP-2 and the unloaded scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in the rat model.The osteogenetic capacity of these composites was evaluated by CT scan,ALP activity test and histological observation at 4 and 8 weeks after implantation.The experimental results indicated that the osteogenic capability of the scaffolds loaded with rhBMP-2 was superior to the unloaded scaffold.It was concluded that rhBMP-2 can enhance the osteoinductive property of the nHA/RHLC/PLA scaffold and the nHA/RHLC/PLA scaffold loaded with rhBMP-2 have the good potential of being used in bone tissue engineering.

  12. The effect of the fibre orientation of electrospun scaffolds on the matrix production of rabbit annulus fibrosus-derived stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Liu; Caihong Zhu; Jun Li; Pinghui Zhou; Min Chen; Huilin Yang; Bin Li

    2015-01-01

    Annulus fibrosus (AF) tissue engineering has recently received increasing attention as a treatment for intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration;however, such engineering remains challenging because of the remarkable complexity of AF tissue. In order to engineer a functional AF replacement, the fabrication of cell-scaffold constructs that mimic the cellular, biochemical and structural features of native AF tissue is critical. In this study, we fabricated aligned fibrous polyurethane scaffolds using an electrospinning technique and used them for culturing AF-derived stem/progenitor cells (AFSCs). Random fibrous scaffolds, also prepared via electrospinning, were used as a control. We compared the morphology, proliferation, gene expression and matrix production of AFSCs on aligned scaffolds and random scaffolds. There was no apparent difference in the attachment or proliferation of cells cultured on aligned scaffolds and random scaffolds. However, compared to cells on random scaffolds, the AFSCs on aligned scaffolds were more elongated and better aligned, and they exhibited higher gene expression and matrix production of collagen-I and aggrecan. The gene expression and protein production of collagen-II did not appear to differ between the two groups. Together, these findings indicate that aligned fibrous scaffolds may provide a favourable microenvironment for the differentiation of AFSCs into cells similar to outer AF cells, which predominantly produce collagen-I matrix.

  13. A comparative study on in vitro osteogenic priming potential of electron spun scaffold PLLA/HA/Col, PLLA/HA, and PLLA/Col for tissue engineering application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji Raghavendran, Hanumantha Rao; Puvaneswary, Subramaniam; Talebian, Sepehr; Murali, Malliga R; Raman Murali, Malliga; Naveen, Sangeetha V; Vasudevaraj Naveen, Sangeetha; Krishnamurithy, G; McKean, Robert; Kamarul, Tunku

    2014-01-01

    A comparative study on the in vitro osteogenic potential of electrospun poly-L-lactide/hydroxyapatite/collagen (PLLA/HA/Col, PLLA/HA, and PLLA/Col) scaffolds was conducted. The morphology, chemical composition, and surface roughness of the fibrous scaffolds were examined. Furthermore, cell attachment, distribution, morphology, mineralization, extracellular matrix protein localization, and gene expression of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) differentiated on the fibrous scaffolds PLLA/Col/HA, PLLA/Col, and PLLA/HA were also analyzed. The electrospun scaffolds with a diameter of 200-950 nm demonstrated well-formed interconnected fibrous network structure, which supported the growth of hMSCs. When compared with PLLA/H%A and PLLA/Col scaffolds, PLLA/Col/HA scaffolds presented a higher density of viable cells and significant upregulation of genes associated with osteogenic lineage, which were achieved without the use of specific medium or growth factors. These results were supported by the elevated levels of calcium, osteocalcin, and mineralization (PCol/HA scaffolds exhibited superior osteoinductivity, when compared with PLLA/Col or PLLA/HA scaffolds. These findings indicated that the fibrous structure and synergistic action of Col and nano-HA with high-molecular-weight PLLA played a vital role in inducing osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. The data obtained in this study demonstrated that the developed fibrous PLLA/Col/HA biocomposite scaffold may be supportive for stem cell based therapies for bone repair, when compared with the other two scaffolds.

  14. Biocompatibility and Structural Features of Biodegradable Polymer Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasonova, M V; Glushkova, T V; Borisov, V V; Velikanova, E A; Burago, A Yu; Kudryavtseva, Yu A

    2015-11-01

    We performed a comparative analysis of physicochemical properties and biocompatibility of scaffolds of different composition on the basis of biodegradable polymers fabricated by casting and electrospinning methods. For production of polyhydroxyalkanoate-based scaffolds by electrospinning method, the optimal concentration of the polymer was 8-10%. Fiber diameter and properties of the scaffold produced by electrospinning method depended on polymer composition. Addition of polycaprolactone increased elasticity of the scaffolds. Bio- and hemocompatibility of the scaffolds largely depended on the composition formulation and method of scaffold fabrication. Polylactide introduced into the composition of polyhydroxybutyrate-oxyvalerate scaffolds accelerated degradation and increased adhesive properties of the scaffolds.

  15. Design of biomimetic and bioactive cold plasma-modified nanostructured scaffolds for enhanced osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Holmes, Benjamin; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to design a biomimetic and bioactive tissue-engineered bone construct via a cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) treatment for directed osteogenic differentiation of human bone morrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Porous nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite/chitosan scaffolds were fabricated via a lyophilization procedure. The nanostructured bone scaffolds were then treated with CAP to create a more favorable surface for cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. The CAP-modified scaffolds were characterized via scanning electron microscope, Raman spectrometer, contact angle analyzer, and white light interferometer. In addition, optimal CAP treatment conditions were determined. Our in vitro study shows that MSC adhesion and infiltration were significantly enhanced on CAP modified scaffolds. More importantly, it was demonstrated that CAP-modified nanostructured bone constructs can greatly promote total protein, collagen synthesis, and calcium deposition after 3 weeks of culture, thus making them a promising implantable scaffold for bone regeneration. Moreover, the fibronectin and vitronection adsorption experiments by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated that more adhesion-mediated protein adsorption on the CAP-treated scaffolds. Since the initial specific protein absorption on scaffold surfaces can lead to further recruitment as well as activation of favorable cell functions, it is suggested that our enhanced stem cell growth and osteogenic function may be related to more protein adsorption resulting from surface roughness and wettability modification. The CAP modification method used in this study provides a quick one-step process for cell-favorable tissue-engineered scaffold architecture remodeling and surface property alteration.

  16. MoVrp1, a putative verprolin protein, is required for asexual development and infection in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin; Zhang, Shengpei; Yin, Ziyi; Liu, Muxing; Li, Bing; Zhang, Haifeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2017-01-01

    Endocytosis is a crucial cellular process in eukaryotic cells which involves clathrin and/or adaptor proteins, lipid kinases, phosphatases and the actin cytoskeleton. Verprolin proteins, such as Vrp1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are conserved family proteins that regulate actin binding and endocytosis. Here, we identified and characterized MoVrp1 as the yeast Vrp1 homolog in Magnaporthe oryzae. Deletion of the MoVRP1 gene resulted in defects in vegetative growth, asexual development, and infection of the host plant. The ∆Movrp1 mutants also exhibited decreased extracellular peroxidase and laccase activities and showed defects in colony pigmentation, hyphal surface hydrophobicity, cell wall integrity, autophagy, endocytosis, and secretion of avirulent effector. Our studies provided new evidences that MoVrp1 involved in actin cytoskeleton is important for growth, morphogenesis, cellular trafficking, and fungal pathogenesis. PMID:28117435

  17. A practice scaffolding interactive platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundsgaard, Jeppe

    2009-01-01

    , structures the students' activity, and interactively supports subject learning. A PracSIP facilitates students' development of complex competencies, and at the same time it supports the students' development of skills defined in the curriculum. The paper introduces the concept, presents the theoretical......A Practice Scaffolding Interactive Platform (PracSIP) is a social learning platform which supports students in collaborative project based learning by simulating a professional practice. A PracSIP puts the core tools of the simulated practice at the students' disposal, it organizes collaboration...

  18. A bioengineered drug-Eluting scaffold accelerated cutaneous wound healing In diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hao; Ding, Guoshan; Shi, Xiaoming; Guo, Wenyuan; Ni, Zhijia; Fu, Hong; Fu, Zhiren

    2016-09-01

    Hyperglycemia in diabetic patients can greatly hinder the wound healing process. In this study we investigated if the engagement of F4/80(+) murine macrophages could accelerate the cutaneous wound healing in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice. To facilitate the engagement of macrophages, we engineered a drug-eluting electrospun scaffold with a payload of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). MCP-1 could be readily released from the scaffold within 3 days. The electrospun scaffold showed no cytotoxic effects on human keratinocytes in vitro. Full-thickness excisional cutaneous wound was created in diabetic mice. The wound fully recovered within 10 days in mice treated with the drug-eluting scaffold. In contrast, the wound took 14 days to fully recover in control groups. The use of drug-eluting scaffold also improved the re-epithelialization. Furthermore, we observed a larger population of F4/80(+) macrophages in the wound bed of mice treated with drug-eluting scaffolds on day 3. This marked increase of macrophages in the wound bed could have contributed to the accelerated wound healing. Our study shed new light on an immuno-engineering solution for wound healing management in diabetic patients.

  19. PGS:Gelatin Nanofibrous Scaffolds with Tunable Mechanical and Structural Properties for Engineering Cardiac Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaziha, Mahshid; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Shin, Su-Ryon; Annabi, Nasim; Masoumi, Nafiseh; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    A significant challenge in cardiac tissue engineering is the development of biomimetic grafts that can potentially promote myocardial repair and regeneration. A number of approaches have used engineered scaffolds to mimic the architecture of the native myocardium tissue and precisely regulate cardiac cell functions. However previous attempts have not been able to simultaneously recapitulate chemical, mechanical, and structural properties of the myocardial extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we utilized an electrospinning approach to fabricate elastomeric biodegradable poly(glycerol-sebacate) (PGS):gelatin scaffolds with a wide range of chemical composition, stiffness and anisotropy. Our findings demonstrated that through incorporation of PGS, it is possible to create nanofibrous scaffolds with well-defined anisotropy that mimics the left ventricular myocardium architecture. Furthermore, we studied attachment, proliferation, differentiation and alignment of neonatal rat cardiac fibroblast cells (CFs) as well as protein expression, alignment, and contractile function of cardiomyocyte (CMs) on PGS:gelatin scaffolds with variable amount of PGS. Notably, aligned nanofibrous scaffold, consisting of 33 wt. % PGS, induced optimal synchronous contractions of CMs while significantly enhanced cellular alignment. Overall, our study suggests that the aligned nanofibrous PGS:gelatin scaffold support cardiac cell organization, phenotype and contraction and could potentially be used to develop clinically relevant constructs for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:23747008

  20. Application of Collagen Scaffold in Tissue Engineering: Recent Advances and New Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanjuan Dong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Collagen is the main structural protein of most hard and soft tissues in animals and the human body, which plays an important role in maintaining the biological and structural integrity of the extracellular matrix (ECM and provides physical support to tissues. Collagen can be extracted and purified from a variety of sources and offers low immunogenicity, a porous structure, good permeability, biocompatibility and biodegradability. Collagen scaffolds have been widely used in tissue engineering due to these excellent properties. However, the poor mechanical property of collagen scaffolds limits their applications to some extent. To overcome this shortcoming, collagen scaffolds can be cross-linked by chemical or physical methods or modified with natural/synthetic polymers or inorganic materials. Biochemical factors can also be introduced to the scaffold to further improve its biological activity. This review will summarize the structure and biological characteristics of collagen and introduce the preparation methods and modification strategies of collagen scaffolds. The typical application of a collagen scaffold in tissue engineering (including nerve, bone, cartilage, tendon, ligament, blood vessel and skin will be further provided. The prospects and challenges about their future research and application will also be pointed out.

  1. Porous hydroxyapatite/gelatine scaffolds with ice-designed channel-like porosity for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Elena; Valentini, Federica; Tampieri, Anna

    2008-11-01

    A cryogenic process, including freeze-casting and drying has been performed to obtain hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds (approx. diameter 10 mm, height 20 mm) with completely lamellar morphology due to preferentially aligned channel-like pores. Changing the process parameters that influence the cold transmission efficiency from the bottom to the top of the poured HA slurry, lamellar ice crystals with different thickness grew throughout the samples. After sintering, scaffolds with porosity features nearly resembling the ice ones were obtained. The interconnection of pores and the ability of the scaffolds to be rapidly penetrated by synthetic body fluid has been proven. Biohybrid HA/gel composites were prepared, infiltrating HA lamellar scaffolds (45-55 vol.% of porosity) with a 10wt.% solution of gelatine. Colouring genipine was used to cross-link gelatine and clearly show the distribution of the protein in the composite. The compressive mechanical properties of lamellar scaffolds improved with the addition of gelatine: the strength increased up to 5-6 times, while the elastic modulus and strain approximately doubled. The effectiveness of the cross-linkage has been preliminarily verified following scaffold degradation in synthetic body fluid.

  2. Information Scaffolding: Application to Technical Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Catherine Claire

    2010-01-01

    Information Scaffolding is a user-centered approach to information design; a method devised to aid "everyday" authors in information composition. Information Scaffolding places a premium on audience-centered documents by emphasizing the information needs and motivations of a multimedia document's intended audience. The aim of this…

  3. Teaching Writing: A Multilayered Participatory Scaffolding Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    This article adds to the research on teachers' writing pedagogy. It reviews and challenges the research literature on scaffolding as an instructional practice and presents a more inclusive framework for analysis. As student participation and voice were absent from much of the literature, a participatory scaffolding framework was developed to…

  4. Composite scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutos, Franklin T; Guilak, Farshid

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering remains a promising therapeutic strategy for the repair or regeneration of diseased or damaged tissues. Previous approaches have typically focused on combining cells and bioactive molecules (e.g., growth factors, cytokines and DNA fragments) with a biomaterial scaffold that functions as a template to control the geometry of the newly formed tissue, while facilitating the attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of embedded cells. Biomaterial scaffolds also play a crucial role in determining the functional properties of engineered tissues, including biomechanical characteristics such as inhomogeneity, anisotropy, nonlinearity or viscoelasticity. While single-phase, homogeneous materials have been used extensively to create numerous types of tissue constructs, there continue to be significant challenges in the development of scaffolds that can provide the functional properties of load-bearing tissues such as articular cartilage. In an attempt to create more complex scaffolds that promote the regeneration of functional engineered tissues, composite scaffolds comprising two or more distinct materials have been developed. This paper reviews various studies on the development and testing of composite scaffolds for the tissue engineering of articular cartilage, using techniques such as embedded fibers and textiles for reinforcement, embedded solid structures, multi-layered designs, or three-dimensionally woven composite materials. In many cases, the use of composite scaffolds can provide unique biomechanical and biological properties for the development of functional tissue engineering scaffolds.

  5. Evaluation of emulsion electrospun polycaprolactone/hyaluronan/epidermal growth factor nanofibrous scaffolds for wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenbei; Qian, Yuna; Li, Linhao; Pan, Lianhong; Njunge, Lucy W; Dong, Lili; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing scaffolds provide cells with structural integrity and can also deliver biological agents to establish a skin tissue-specific microenvironment to regulate cell functions and to accelerate the healing process. In this study, we fabricated biodegradable nanofibrous scaffolds with an emulsion electrospinning technique. The scaffolds were composed of polycaprolactone, hyaluronan and encapsulating epidermal growth factor. The morphology and core-sheath structure of the nanofibers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The scaffolds were also characterized for chemical composition and hydrophilicity with a Fourier-transform infrared analysis, energy dispersive spectroscopy and the water contact angle. An in vitro model protein bovine serum albumin and epidermal growth factor release study was conducted to evaluate the sustained release potential of the core-sheath structured nanofibers with and without the hyaluronan component. Additionally, an in vitro cultivation of human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT) and fibroblasts on polycaprolactone/hyaluronan and polycaprolactone/hyaluronan-epidermal growth factor scaffolds showed a significant synergistic effect of hyaluronan and epidermal growth factor on cell proliferation and infiltration. Furthermore, there was an up-regulation of the wound-healing-related genes collagen I, collagen III and TGF-β in polycaprolactone/hyaluronan/epidermal growth factor scaffolds compared with control groups. In the full-thickness wound model, the enhanced regeneration of fully functional skin was facilitated by epidermal regeneration in the polycaprolactone/hyaluronan/epidermal growth factor treatment group. Our findings suggest that bioactivity and hemostasis of the hyaluronan-based nanofibrous scaffolds have the capability to encapsulate and control the release of growth factors that can serve as skin tissue engineering scaffolds for wound healing.

  6. Structural diversity of biologically interesting datasets: a scaffold analysis approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanna Varun

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent public availability of the human metabolome and natural product datasets has revitalized "metabolite-likeness" and "natural product-likeness" as a drug design concept to design lead libraries targeting specific pathways. Many reports have analyzed the physicochemical property space of biologically important datasets, with only a few comprehensively characterizing the scaffold diversity in public datasets of biological interest. With large collections of high quality public data currently available, we carried out a comparative analysis of current day leads with other biologically relevant datasets. Results In this study, we note a two-fold enrichment of metabolite scaffolds in drug dataset (42% as compared to currently used lead libraries (23%. We also note that only a small percentage (5% of natural product scaffolds space is shared by the lead dataset. We have identified specific scaffolds that are present in metabolites and natural products, with close counterparts in the drugs, but are missing in the lead dataset. To determine the distribution of compounds in physicochemical property space we analyzed the molecular polar surface area, the molecular solubility, the number of rings and the number of rotatable bonds in addition to four well-known Lipinski properties. Here, we note that, with only few exceptions, most of the drugs follow Lipinski's rule. The average values of the molecular polar surface area and the molecular solubility in metabolites is the highest while the number of rings is the lowest. In addition, we note that natural products contain the maximum number of rings and the rotatable bonds than any other dataset under consideration. Conclusions Currently used lead libraries make little use of the metabolites and natural products scaffold space. We believe that metabolites and natural products are recognized by at least one protein in the biosphere therefore, sampling the fragment and scaffold

  7. The Rtt107 BRCT scaffold and its partner modification enzymes collaborate to promote replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Lisa; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2016-07-03

    Faithful duplication of the entire genome during each cell cycle is key for genome maintenance. Each stage of DNA replication, including initiation, progression, and termination, is tightly regulated. Some of these regulations enable replisomes to overcome tens of thousands of template obstacles that block DNA synthesis. Previous studies have identified a large number of proteins that are dedicated to this mission, including protein modification enzymes and scaffold proteins. Protein modification enzymes can bestow fast and reversible changes on many substrates, and thus are ideal for coordinating multiple events needed to promptly overcome replication impediments. Scaffold proteins can support specific protein-protein interactions that enable protein complex formation, protein recruitment, and partner enzyme functions. Taken together with previous studies, our recent work elucidates that a group of modification and scaffold proteins form several complexes to aid replication progression and are particularly important for synthesizing large replicons. Additionally, our work reveals that the intrinsic plasticity of the replication initiation program can be used to compensate for deficient replication progression. (1).

  8. Elastin-Coated Biodegradable Photopolymer Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Barenghi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main open issues in modern vascular surgery is the nonbiodegradability of implants used for stent interventions, which can lead to small caliber-related thrombosis and neointimal hyperplasia. Some new, resorbable polymeric materials have been proposed to substitute traditional stainless-steel stents, but so far they were affected by poor mechanical properties and low biocompatibility. In this respect, a new material, polypropylene fumarate (PPF, may be considered as a promising candidate to implement the development of next generation stents, due to its complete biodegradability, and excellent mechanical properties and the ease to be precisely patterned. Besides all these benefits, PPF has not been tested yet for vascular prosthesis, mainly because it proved to be almost inert, while the ability to elicit a specific biological function would be of paramount importance in such critical surgery applications. Here, we propose a biomimetic functionalization process, aimed at obtaining specific bioactivation and thus improved cell-polymer interaction. Porous PPF-based scaffolds produced by deep-UV photocuring were coated by elastin and the functionalized scaffolds were extensively characterized, revealing a stable bound between the protein and the polymer surface. Both 3T3 and HUVEC cell lines were used for in vitro tests displaying an enhancement of cells adhesion and proliferation on the functionalized scaffolds.

  9. Hyaluronan scaffold supports osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow concentrate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, C; Desando, G; Ferrari, A; Zini, N; Mariani, E; Grigolo, B

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions are considered a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. Currently, the treatments available are often unsatisfactory and unable to stimulate tissue regeneration. Tissue engineering offers a new therapeutic strategy, taking into account the role exerted by cells, biomaterial and growth factors in restoring tissue damage. In this light, Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) have been indicated as a fascinating tool for regenerative medicine thanks to their ability to differentiate into bone, cartilage and adipose tissue. However, in vitro-cultivation of MSCs could be associated with some risks such as de-differentiation/reprogramming, infection and contaminations of the cells. To overcome these shortcomings, a new approach is represented by the use of Bone Marrow Concentrate (BMC), that could allow the delivery of cells surrounded by their microenvironment in injured tissue. For this purpose, cells require a tridimensional scaffold that can support their adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. This study is focused on the potentiality of BMC seeded onto a hyaluronan-based scaffold (Hyaff-11) to differentiate into osteogenic lineage. This process depends on the specific interaction between cells derived from bone marrow (surrounded by their niche) and scaffold, that create an environment able to support the regeneration of damaged tissue. The data obtained from the present study demonstrate that BMC grown onto Hyaff-11 are able to differentiate toward osteogenic sense, producing specific osteogenic genes and matrix proteins.

  10. SYNTHETIC HYDROGELS AS SCAFFOLDS FOR MANIPULATING ENDOTHELIUM CELL BEHAVIORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-mei Chen; Jing-jing Yang; Yoshihito Osada; Jian Ping Gong

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic hydrogels can be used as scaffolds that not only favor endothelial cells (ECs) proliferation but also manipulate the behaviors and functions of the ECs. In this review paper, the effect of chemical structure, Young’s modulus (E) and zeta potential (ζ) of synthetic hydrogel scaffolds on static cell behaviors, including cell morphology, proliferation,cytoskeleton structure and focal adhesion, and on dynamic cell behaviors, including migration velocity and morphology oscillation, as well as on EC function such as anti-platelet adhesion, are reported. It was found that negatively charged hydrogels, poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonie sodium) (PNaAMPS) and poly(sodium p-styrene sulphonate) (PNaSS), can directly promote cell proliferation, with no need of surface modification by any cell-adhesive proteins or peptides at the environment of serum-containing medium. In addition, the Young’s modulus (E) and zeta potential (ζ) of hydrogel scaffolds are quantitatively tuned by copolymer hydrogels, poly(NaAMPS-co-DMAAm) and poly(NaSS-co-DMAAm), in which the two kinds of negatively charged monomers NaAMPS and NaSS are copolymerized with neutral monomer, N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMAAm). It was found that the critical zeta potential of hydrogels manipulating EC morphology, proliferation, and motility is ζcritical = -20.83 mV and ζcritical = -14.0 mV for poly(NaAMPS-co-DMAAm) and poly(NaSS-co-DMAAm), respectively. The above mentioned EC behaviors well correlate with the adsorption of fibronectin,a kind of cell-adhesive protein, on the hydrogel surfaces. Furthermore, adhered platelets on the EC monolayers cultured on the hydrogel scaffolds obviously decreases with an increase of the Young’s modulus (E) of the hydrogels, especially when E > 60 kPa. Glycocalyx assay and gene expression of ECs demonstrate that the anti-platelet adhesion well correlates with the EC-specific glycocalyx. The above investigation suggests that understanding the relationship

  11. Preparation of uniaxial multichannel silk fibroin scaffolds for guiding primary neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Yahong; Yan, Shuqin; Yang, Yumin; Zhao, Huijing; Li, Mingzhong; Lu, Shenzhou; Kaplan, David L

    2012-07-01

    Physical guidance cues have been exploited to stimulate neuron adhesion and neurite outgrowth. In the present study, three-dimensional (3-D) silk fibroin scaffolds with uniaxial multichannels (42-142 μm in diameter) were prepared by a directional temperature field freezing technique, followed by lyophilization. By varying the initial silk fibroin concentration, the chemical potential and quantity of free water around cylindrical ice crystals could be controlled to control the cross-section morphology of the scaffold channels. Aligned ridges also formed on the inner surface of the multichannels in parallel to the direction of the channels. In vitro, primary hippocampal neurons were seeded in these 3-D silk fibroin scaffolds with uniaxial multichannels of ∼120 μm in diameter. The morphology of the neurons was multipolar and alignment along the scaffold channels was observed. Cell-cell networks and cell-matrix interactions established by newly formed axons were observed after 7 days in culture. These neurons expressed β-III-tubulin, nerve filament and microtubule-associated protein, while glial fibrillary acidic protein immunofluorescence was barely above background. The ridges on the inner surface of the channels played a critical role in the adhesion and extension of neurons by providing continuous contact guidance. These new 3-D silk scaffolds with uniaxial multichannels provided a favorable microenvironment for the development of hippocampal neurons by guiding axonal elongation and cell migration.

  12. Titanate nanotube coatings on biodegradable photopolymer scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beke, S., E-mail: szabolcs.beke@iit.it [Department of Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Kőrösi, L. [Department of Biotechnology, Nanophage Therapy Center, Enviroinvest Corporation, Kertváros u. 2, H-7632, Pécs (Hungary); Scarpellini, A. [Department of Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Anjum, F.; Brandi, F. [Department of Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy)

    2013-05-01

    Rigid, biodegradable photopolymer scaffolds were coated with titanate nanotubes (TNTs) by using a spin-coating method. TNTs were synthesized by a hydrothermal process at 150 °C under 4.7 bar ambient pressure. The biodegradable photopolymer scaffolds were produced by mask-assisted excimer laser photocuring at 308 nm. For scaffold coating, a stable ethanolic TNT sol was prepared by a simple colloid chemical route without the use of any binding compounds or additives. Scanning electron microscopy along with elemental analysis revealed that the scaffolds were homogenously coated by TNTs. The developed TNT coating can further improve the surface geometry of fabricated scaffolds, and therefore it can further increase the cell adhesion. Highlights: ► Biodegradable scaffolds were produced by mask-assisted UV laser photocuring. ► Titanate nanotube deposition was carried out without binding compounds or additives. ► The titanate nanotube coating can further improve the surface geometry of scaffolds. ► These reproducible platforms will be of high importance for biological applications.

  13. Versatile convergent synthesis of a three peptide loop containing protein mimic of whooping cough pertactin by successive Cu(I)-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition on an orthogonal alkyne functionalized TAC-scaffold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werkhoven, Paul R; van de Langemheen, Helmus; van der Wal, Steffen; Kruijtzer, John A W; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic mimics of discontinuous epitopes may have a wide range of potential applications, including synthetic vaccines and inhibition of protein-protein interactions. However, synthetic access to these relatively complex peptide molecular constructs is limited. This paper describes a versatile con

  14. Scaffolding With and Through Videos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otrel-Cass, Kathrin; Khoo, Elaine; Cowie, Bronwen

    2012-01-01

    In New Zealand and internationally claims are being made about the potential for information and communication technologies (ICTs) to transform teaching and learning. However, the theoretical underpinnings explaining the complex interplay between the content, pedagogy and technology a teacher needs...... to consider must be expanded. This article explicates theoretical and practical ideas related to teachers’ application of their ICT technology, pedagogy, and content knowledge (TPACK) in science. The article unpacks the social and technological dimensions of teachers’ use of TPACK when they use digital videos...... to scaffold learning. It showcases the intricate interplay between teachers’ knowledge about content, digital video technology, and students’ learning needs based on a qualitative study of two science teachers and their students in a New Zealand primary school....

  15. Semiotic Scaffolding in Living Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    The apparently purposeful nature of living systems is obtained through a sophisticated network of semiotic controls whereby biochemical, physiological and behavioral processes become tuned to the needs of the system. The operation of these semiotic controls takes place and is enabled across...... a diversity of levels. Such semiotic controls may be distinguished from ordinary deterministic control mechanisms through an inbuilt anticipatory capacity based on a distinct kind of causation that I call here "semiotic causation" to denote the bringing about of changes under the guidance of interpretation...... in a local .context. Anticipation through the skilled interpretation of indicators of temporal relations in the context of a particular survival project (or life strategy) guides organismic behavior towards local ends. This network of semiotic controls establishes an enormously complex semiotic scaffolding...

  16. Analytical and experimental bearing capacities of system scaffolds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jui-lin PENG; Tsong YEN; Ching-chi KUO; Siu-lai CHAN

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the structural behavior and bearing capacity of system scaffolds. The research showed that the critical load of a system scaffold structure without diagonal braces is similar to that of a door-shaped steel scaffold structure. Joint stiffness between vertical props in system scaffolds can be defined based on a comparison between analytical and experimental results. When the number of scaffold stories increases, the critical loads of system scaffolds decrease. Diagonal braces markedly enhance the critical load of system scaffolds. The coupling joint position between vertical props should be kept away from story-to-story joints to prevent a reduction in critical loads. The critical load of a system scaffold decreases as the quantity of extended vertical props at the bottom of the structure increases. A large Christmas tree set up by system scaffolds under various loads was used as an example for analysis and to check the design of system scaffolds.

  17. Computational Exploration of Molecular Scaffolds in Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ye; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-05-12

    The scaffold concept is widely applied in medicinal chemistry. Scaffolds are mostly used to represent core structures of bioactive compounds. Although the scaffold concept has limitations and is often viewed differently from a chemical and computational perspective, it has provided a basis for systematic investigations of molecular cores and building blocks, going far beyond the consideration of individual compound series. Over the past 2 decades, alternative scaffold definitions and organization schemes have been introduced and scaffolds have been studied in a variety of ways and increasingly on a large scale. Major applications of the scaffold concept include the generation of molecular hierarchies, structural classification, association of scaffolds with biological activities, and activity prediction. This contribution discusses computational approaches for scaffold generation and analysis, with emphasis on recent developments impacting medicinal chemistry. A variety of scaffold-based studies are discussed, and a perspective on scaffold methods is provided.

  18. Intracellular assembly of cyanophage Syn5 proceeds through a scaffold-containing procapsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raytcheva, Desislava A; Haase-Pettingell, Cameron; Piret, Jacqueline M; King, Jonathan A

    2011-03-01

    Syn5 is a marine cyanophage that is propagated on the marine photosynthetic cyanobacterial strain Synechococcus sp. WH8109 under laboratory conditions. Cryoelectron images of this double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) phage reveal an icosahedral capsid with short tail appendages and a single novel hornlike structure at the vertex opposite the tail. Despite the major impact of cyanophages on life in the oceans, there is limited information on cyanophage intracellular assembly processes within their photosynthetic hosts. The one-step growth curve of Syn5 demonstrated a short cycle with an eclipse period of ∼45 min, a latent phase of ∼60 min, and a burst size of 20 to 30 particles per cell at 28°C. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis of cell lysates at different times after infection showed the synthesis of major virion proteins and their increase as the infection progressed. The scaffolding protein of Syn5, absent from virions, was identified in the lysates and expressed from the cloned gene. It migrated anomalously on SDS-PAGE, similar to the phage T7 scaffolding protein. Particles lacking DNA but containing the coat and scaffolding proteins were purified from Syn5-infected cells using CsCl centrifugation followed by sucrose gradient centrifugation. Electron microscopic images of the purified particles showed shells lacking condensed DNA but filled with protein density, presumably scaffolding protein. These findings suggest that the cyanophages form infectious virions through the initial assembly of scaffolding-containing procapsids, similar to the assembly pathways for the enteric dsDNA bacteriophages. Since cyanobacteria predate the enteric bacteria, this procapsid-mediated assembly pathway may have originated with the cyanophages.

  19. Structure and mechanism of mouse cyclase-associated protein (CAP1) in regulating actin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Silvia; Collins, Agnieszka; Golden, Leslie; Sokolova, Olga; Goode, Bruce L

    2014-10-31

    Srv2/CAP is a conserved actin-binding protein with important roles in driving cellular actin dynamics in diverse animal, fungal, and plant species. However, there have been conflicting reports about whether the activities of Srv2/CAP are conserved, particularly between yeast and mammalian homologs. Yeast Srv2 has two distinct functions in actin turnover: its hexameric N-terminal-half enhances cofilin-mediated severing of filaments, while its C-terminal-half catalyzes dissociation of cofilin from ADP-actin monomers and stimulates nucleotide exchange. Here, we dissected the structure and function of mouse CAP1 to better understand its mechanistic relationship to yeast Srv2. Although CAP1 has a shorter N-terminal oligomerization sequence compared with Srv2, we find that the N-terminal-half of CAP1 (N-CAP1) forms hexameric structures with six protrusions, similar to N-Srv2. Further, N-CAP1 autonomously binds to F-actin and decorates the sides and ends of filaments, altering F-actin structure and enhancing cofilin-mediated severing. These activities depend on conserved surface residues on the helical-folded domain. Moreover, N-CAP1 enhances yeast cofilin-mediated severing, and conversely, yeast N-Srv2 enhances human cofilin-mediated severing, highlighting the mechanistic conservation between yeast and mammals. Further, we demonstrate that the C-terminal actin-binding β-sheet domain of CAP1 is sufficient to catalyze nucleotide-exchange of ADP-actin monomers, while in the presence of cofilin this activity additionally requires the WH2 domain. Thus, the structures, activities, and mechanisms of mouse and yeast Srv2/CAP homologs are remarkably well conserved, suggesting that the same activities and mechanisms underlie many of the diverse actin-based functions ascribed to Srv2/CAP homologs in different organisms.

  20. Widespread Recurrent Patterns of Rapid Repeat Evolution in the Kinetochore Scaffold KNL1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromer, Eelco; Snel, Berend; Kops, Geert J P L

    2015-01-01

    The outer kinetochore protein scaffold KNL1 is essential for error-free chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. A critical feature of KNL1 is an array of repeats containing MELT-like motifs. When phosphorylated, these motifs form docking sites for the BUB1-BUB3 dimer that regulates chromo

  1. Interphotoreceptor matrix-poly(ϵ-caprolactone) composite scaffolds for human photoreceptor differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Petr Baranov; Andrew Michaelson; Joydip Kundu; Carrier, Rebecca L; Michael Young

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering has been widely applied in different areas of regenerative medicine, including retinal regeneration. Typically, artificial biopolymers require additional surface modification (e.g. with arginine–glycine–aspartate-containing peptides or adsorption of protein, such as fibronectin), before cell seeding. Here, we describe an alternative approach for scaffold design: the manufacture of hybrid interphotore...

  2. Composite scaffold of poly(vinyl alcohol) and interfacial polyelectrolyte complexation fibers for controlled biomolecule delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutiongco, Marie Francene A; Choo, Royden K T; Shen, Nathaniel J X; Chua, Bryan M X; Sju, Ervi; Choo, Amanda W L; Le Visage, Catherine; Yim, Evelyn K F

    2015-01-01

    Controlled delivery of hydrophilic proteins is an important therapeutic strategy. However, widely used methods for protein delivery suffer from low incorporation efficiency and loss of bioactivity. The versatile interfacial polyelectrolyte complexation (IPC) fibers have the capacity for precise spatiotemporal release and protection of protein, growth factor, and cell bioactivity. Yet its weak mechanical properties limit its application and translation into a viable clinical solution. To overcome this limitation, IPC fibers can be incorporated into polymeric scaffolds such as the biocompatible poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel (PVA). Therefore, we explored the use of a composite scaffold of PVA and IPC fibers for controlled biomolecule release. We first observed that the permeability of biomolecules through PVA films were dependent on molecular weight. Next, IPC fibers were incorporated in between layers of PVA to produce PVA-IPC composite scaffolds with different IPC fiber orientation. The composite scaffold demonstrated excellent mechanical properties and efficient biomolecule incorporation. The rate of biomolecule release from PVA-IPC composite grafts exhibited dependence on molecular weight, with lysozyme showing near-linear release for 1 month. Angiogenic factors were also incorporated into the PVA-IPC grafts, as a potential biomedical application of the composite graft. While vascular endothelial growth factor only showed a maximum cumulative release of 3%, the smaller PEGylated-QK peptide showed maximum release of 33%. Notably, the released angiogenic biomolecules induced endothelial cell activity thus indicating retention of bioactivity. We also observed lack of significant macrophage response against PVA-IPC grafts in a rabbit model. Showing permeability, mechanical strength, precise temporal growth factor release, and bioinertness, PVA-IPC fibers composite scaffolds are excellent scaffolds for controlled biomolecule delivery in soft tissue engineering.

  3. Composite scaffold of poly(vinyl alcohol and interfacial polyelectrolyte complexation fibers for controlled biomolecule delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Francene Arnobit Cutiongco

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Controlled delivery of hydrophilic proteins is an important therapeutic strategy. However, widely used methods for protein delivery suffer from low incorporation efficiency and loss of bioactivity. The versatile interfacial polyelectrolyte complexation (IPC fibers have the capacity for precise spatiotemporal release and protection of protein, growth factor and cell bioactivity. Yet its weak mechanical properties limit its application and translation into a viable clinical solution. To overcome this limitation, IPC fibers can be incorporated into polymeric scaffolds such as the biocompatible poly(vinyl alcohol hydrogel (PVA. Therefore, we explored the use of a composite scaffold of PVA and IPC fibers for controlled biomolecule release. We first observed that the permeability of biomolecules through PVA films were dependent on molecular weight, with lysozyme showing near-linear release for 1 month. Next, IPC fibers were incorporated in between layers of PVA to produce PVA-IPC composite scaffolds with different IPC fiber orientation. The composite scaffold demonstrated excellent mechanical properties and efficient biomolecule incorporation. The rate of biomolecule release from PVA-IPC composite grafts exhibited dependence on molecular weight. Angiogenic factors were also incorporated into the PVA-IPC grafts, as a potential biomedical application of the composite graft. While vascular endothelial growth factor only showed a maximum cumulative release of 3%, the smaller PEGylated-QK peptide showed maximum release of 33%. Notably, the released angiogenic biomolecules induced endothelial cell metabolic activity thus indicating retention of bioactivity. We also observed lack of significant macrophage response against PVA-IPC grafts in a rabbit model. Showing permeability, mechanical strength, precise temporal growth factor release and bioinertness, PVA-IPC fibers composite scaffolds are excellent scaffolds for controlled biomolecule delivery in soft

  4. Enhanced healing of rat calvarial defects with MSCs loaded on BMP-2 releasing chitosan/alginate/hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning He

    Full Text Available In this study, we designed a chitosan/alginate/hydroxyapatite scaffold as a carrier for recombinant BMP-2 (CAH/B2, and evaluated the release kinetics of BMP-2. We evaluated the effect of the CAH/B2 scaffold on the viability and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs by scanning electron microscopy, MTS, ALP assay, alizarin-red staining and qRT-PCR. Moreover, MSCs were seeded on scaffolds and used in a 8 mm rat calvarial defect model. New bone formation was assessed by radiology, hematoxylin and eosin staining 12 weeks postoperatively. We found the release kinetics of BMP-2 from the CAH/B2 scaffold were delayed compared with those from collagen gel, which is widely used for BMP-2 delivery. The BMP-2 released from the scaffold increased MSC differentiation and did not show any cytotoxicity. MSCs exhibited greater ALP activity as well as stronger calcium mineral deposition, and the bone-related markers Col1α, osteopontin, and osteocalcin were upregulated. Analysis of in vivo bone formation showed that the CAH/B2 scaffold induced more bone formation than other groups. This study demonstrates that CAH/B2 scaffolds might be useful for delivering osteogenic BMP-2 protein and present a promising bone regeneration strategy.

  5. Ca/calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of endocytic scaffold ITSN1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morderer D. Ye.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ITSN1 is an endocytic scaffold protein with a prominent function in synaptic transmission. It is known that Ca signaling is crucial for the regulation of synaptic proteins functioning. Aim. Checking the possibility of Ca/calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of ITSN1. Methods. Affinity chromatography, in vitro kinase reaction, Western blotting, gel staining with fluorescent stains. Results. We show that the fraction of calmodulin-binding proteins is able to phosphorylate the recombinant fragments encoding the coiled-coil region and the SH3 domain-containing region of ITSN1 in the presence of Ca ions and calmodulin. Conclusions. The coiled-coil region and the SH3 domain-containing region of ITSN1 undergo Ca/calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation in vitro, suggesting a possible regulation of ITSN1 by Ca signaling.

  6. FERM family proteins and their importance in cellular movements and wound healing (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosanquet, David C; Ye, Lin; Harding, Keith G; Jiang, Wen G

    2014-07-01

    Motility is a requirement for a number of biological processes, including embryonic development, neuronal development, immune responses, cancer progression and wound healing. Specific to wound healing is the migration of endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other key cellular players into the wound space. Aberrations in wound healing can result in either chronic wounds or abnormally healed wounds. The protein 4.1R, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM) superfamily consists of over 40 proteins all containing a three lobed N-terminal FERM domain which binds a variety of cell-membrane associated proteins and lipids. The C-terminal ends of these proteins typically contain an actin-binding domain (ABD). These proteins therefore mediate the linkage between the cell membrane and the actin cytoskeleton, and are involved in cellular movements and migration. Certain FERM proteins have been shown to promote cancer metastasis via this very mechanism. Herein we review the effects of a number of FERM proteins on wound healing and cancer. We show how these proteins typically aid wound healing through their effects on increasing cellular migration and movements, but also typically promote metastasis in cancer. We conclude that FERM proteins play important roles in cellular migration, with markedly different outcomes in the context of cancer and wound healing.

  7. Scaffolding Instruction on Business English Writing Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱迪

    2014-01-01

    The scaffolding instruction is to help students probe into knowledge learning independently, and achieve the construction of knowledge and information finally by constructing a series of appropriate conceptual frameworks and concrete teaching circumstances. This instruction has been extensively applied and has been proved to be very effective in teaching in western countries. But in China very few empirical studies have been carried out on the scaffolding instruction, especial y in the field of teaching Business English writing.

  8. The Nanogel-Based Scaffold in Endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirieh, Sanam

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a degradable nanogel-based scaffold with antibacterial content. Methods: This nanogel design consisted of the cross-linker, polyethyleneglycol (PEG 4600) with 3-dimensional network. This polymer degrades over time ( 30 days), delivering a controlled release of antibiotic. Amoxicillin was added to the scaffold with 25 wt% (n=26). Nanogel-scaffold only and amoxicillin only were used as controls. Agar diffusion test against E. faecalis was performed at eight time intervals (days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 21, 30). One-Way ANOVA was used to compare the antibacterial properties of experimental groups at the eight different times. Results: The antibacterial properties for experimental plates, at the different times, were not significantly different (F=.624, p=.74). Based on the profile, the scaffold-only group showed a smaller inhibition zone compared to the two other groups. The antibacterial profiles for the experimental group and the antibiotic-only group were similar. Conclusion: This particular scaffold presented antibacterial properties. Findings suggest that nanogel-modified scaffolds may have potential use for drug-delivery in endodontics..

  9. Antimicrobial Cu-bearing stainless steel scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Ren, Ling; Li, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Shuyuan; Sercombe, Timothy B; Yang, Ke

    2016-11-01

    Copper-bearing stainless steel scaffolds with two different structures (Body Centered Cubic and Gyroid labyrinth) at two solid fractions (25% and 40%) were fabricated from both 316L powder and a mixture of 316L and elemental Cu powder using selective laser melting, and relative 316L scaffolds were served as control group. After processing, the antimicrobial testing demonstrated that the 316L-Cu scaffolds presented excellent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, and the cell viability assay indicated that there was no cytotoxic effect of 316L-Cu scaffolds on rat marrow mesenchymal stem cells. As such, these have the potential to reduce implant-associated infections. The Cu was also found to homogeneously distribute within the microstructure by scanning electronic microcopy. The addition of Cu would not significantly affect its strength and stiffness compared to 316L scaffold, and the stiffness of all the scaffolds (3-20GPa) is similar to that of bone and much less than that of bulk stainless steel. Consequently, fabrication of such low stiffness porous structures, especially coupled with the addition of antimicrobial Cu, may provide a new direction for medical stainless steels.

  10. A review: fabrication of porous polyurethane scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janik, H; Marzec, M

    2015-03-01

    The aim of tissue engineering is the fabrication of three-dimensional scaffolds that can be used for the reconstruction and regeneration of damaged or deformed tissues and organs. A wide variety of techniques have been developed to create either fibrous or porous scaffolds from polymers, metals, composite materials and ceramics. However, the most promising materials are biodegradable polymers due to their comprehensive mechanical properties, ability to control the rate of degradation and similarities to natural tissue structures. Polyurethanes (PUs) are attractive candidates for scaffold fabrication, since they are biocompatible, and have excellent mechanical properties and mechanical flexibility. PU can be applied to various methods of porous scaffold fabrication, among which are solvent casting/particulate leaching, thermally induced phase separation, gas foaming, emulsion freeze-drying and melt moulding. Scaffold properties obtained by these techniques, including pore size, interconnectivity and total porosity, all depend on the thermal processing parameters, and the porogen agent and solvents used. In this review, various polyurethane systems for scaffolds are discussed, as well as methods of fabrication, including the latest developments, and their advantages and disadvantages.

  11. Interaction of actin and the chloroplast protein import apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouhet, Juliette; Gray, John C

    2009-07-10

    Actin filaments are major components of the cytoskeleton and play numerous essential roles, including chloroplast positioning and plastid stromule movement, in plant cells. Actin is present in pea chloroplast envelope membrane preparations and is localized at the surface of the chloroplasts, as shown by agglutination of intact isolated chloroplasts by antibodies to actin. To identify chloroplast envelope proteins involved in actin binding, we have carried out actin co-immunoprecipitation and co-sedimentation experiments on detergent-solubilized pea chloroplast envelope membranes. Proteins co-immunoprecipitated with actin were identified by mass spectrometry and by Western blotting and included the Toc159, Toc75, Toc34, and Tic110 components of the TOC-TIC protein import apparatus. A direct interaction of actin with Escherichia coli-expressed Toc159, but not Toc33, was shown by co-sedimentation experiments, suggesting that Toc159 is the component of the TOC complex that interacts with actin on the cytosolic side of the outer envelope membrane. The physiological significance of this interaction is unknown, but it may play a role in the import of nuclear-encoded photosynthesis proteins.

  12. Concave Pit-Containing Scaffold Surfaces Improve Stem Cell-Derived Osteoblast Performance and Lead to Significant Bone Tissue Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusella-De Angelis, Maria Gabriella; Laino, Gregorio; Piattelli, Adriano; Pacifici, Maurizio; De Rosa, Alfredo; Papaccio, Gianpaolo

    2007-01-01

    Background Scaffold surface features are thought to be important regulators of stem cell performance and endurance in tissue engineering applications, but details about these fundamental aspects of stem cell biology remain largely unclear. Methodology and Findings In the present study, smooth clinical-grade lactide-coglyolic acid 85:15 (PLGA) scaffolds were carved as membranes and treated with NMP (N-metil-pyrrolidone) to create controlled subtractive pits or microcavities. Scanning electron and confocal microscopy revealed that the NMP-treated membranes contained: (i) large microcavities of 80–120 µm in diameter and 40–100 µm in depth, which we termed primary; and (ii) smaller microcavities of 10–20 µm in diameter and 3–10 µm in depth located within the primary cavities, which we termed secondary. We asked whether a microcavity-rich scaffold had distinct bone-forming capabilities compared to a smooth one. To do so, mesenchymal stem cells derived from human dental pulp were seeded onto the two types of scaffold and monitored over time for cytoarchitectural characteristics, differentiation status and production of important factors, including bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We found that the microcavity-rich scaffold enhanced cell adhesion: the cells created intimate contact with secondary microcavities and were polarized. These cytological responses were not seen with the smooth-surface scaffold. Moreover, cells on the microcavity-rich scaffold released larger amounts of BMP-2 and VEGF into the culture medium and expressed higher alkaline phosphatase activity. When this type of scaffold was transplanted into rats, superior bone formation was elicited compared to cells seeded on the smooth scaffold. Conclusion In conclusion, surface microcavities appear to support a more vigorous osteogenic response of stem cells and should be used in the design of therapeutic substrates to improve bone repair and

  13. Chitosan-collagen porous scaffold and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we successfully constructed a composite of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and a chitosan-collagen scaffold in vitro, transplanted either the composite or bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells alone into the ischemic area in animal models, and compared their effects. At 14 days after co-transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and the hitosan-collagen scaffold, neurological function recovered noticeably. Vascular endothelial growth factor expression and nestin-labeled neural precursor cells were detected in the ischemic area, surrounding tissue, hippocampal dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Simultaneously, a high level of expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and a low level of expression of neuron-specific enolase were visible in BrdU-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. These findings suggest that transplantation of a composite of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and a chitosan-collagen scaffold has a neuroprotective effect following ischemic stroke.

  14. Enhanced cellulose degradation by nano-complexed enzymes: Synergism between a scaffold-linked exoglucanase and a free endoglucanase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraïs, Sarah; Heyman, Arnon; Barak, Yoav; Caspi, Jonathan; Wilson, David B; Lamed, Raphael; Shoseyov, Oded; Bayer, Edward A

    2010-06-01

    Protein molecular scaffolds are attracting interest as natural candidates for the presentation of enzymes and acceleration of catalytic reactions. We have previously reported evidence that the stable protein 1 (SP1) from Populustremula can be employed as a molecular scaffold for the presentation of either catalytic or structural binding (cellulosomal cohesin) modules. In the present work, we have displayed a potent exoglucanase (Cel6B) from the aerobic cellulolytic bacterium, Thermobifida fusca, on a cohesin-bearing SP1 scaffold. For this purpose, a chimaeric form of the enzyme, fused to a cellulosomal dockerin module, was prepared. Full incorporation of 12 dockerin-bearing exoglucanase molecules onto the cohesin-bearing scaffold was achieved. Cellulase activity was tested on two cellulosic substrates with different levels of crystallinity, and the activity of the scaffold-linked exoglucanase was significantly reduced, compared to the free dockerin-containing enzyme. However, addition of relatively low concentrations of a free wild-type endoglucanase (T. fusca Cel5A) that bears a cellulose-binding module, in combination with the complexed exoglucanase resulted in a marked rise in activity on both cellulosic substrates. The endoglucanase cleaves internal sites of the cellulose chains, and the new chain ends of the substrate were now readily accessible to the scaffold-borne exoglucanase, thereby resulting in highly effective, synergistic degradation of cellulosic substrates.

  15. Signs, dispositions, and semiotic scaffolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Eliseo

    2015-12-01

    scaffolding. These interactions transpire between energetic causal chains and a wide range of converging semiotic transactions unfolding within each individual organism and between organisms and their environment. The perspective advanced here helps elucidate the manner in which physical and semiotic causation cooperate in an orchestrated fashion, giving rise to an ever-expanding profusion of scaffolding structures and processes. Using simple examples I outline some mechanisms that bring about this orchestration as well as the resultant channeling activities that eventually merge and find their culmination in the enactment of goal-oriented behavior.

  16. Nanocomposite scaffold fabrication by incorporating gold nanoparticles into biodegradable polymer matrix: Synthesis, characterization, and photothermal effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrasoul, Gaser N; Farkas, Balazs; Romano, Ilaria; Diaspro, Alberto; Beke, Szabolcs

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticle incorporation into scaffold materials is a valuable route to deliver various therapeutic agents, such as drug molecules or large biomolecules, proteins (e.g. DNA or RNA) into their targets. In particular, gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) with their low inherent toxicity, tunable stability and high surface area provide unique attributes facilitating new delivery strategies. A biodegradable, photocurable polymer resin, polypropylene fumarate (PPF) along with Au NPs were utilized to synthesize a hybrid nanocomposite resin, directly exploitable in stereolithography (SL) processes. To increase the particles' colloidal stability, the Au NP nanofillers were coated with polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP). The resulting resin was used to fabricate a new type of composite scaffold via mask projection excimer laser stereolithography. The thermal properties of the nanocomposite scaffolds were found to be sensitive to the concentration of NPs. The mechanical properties were augmented by the NPs up to 0.16μM, though further increase in the concentration led to a gradual decrease. Au NP incorporation rendered the biopolymer scaffolds photosensitive, i.e. the presence of Au NPs enhanced the optical absorption of the scaffolds as well, leading to possible localized temperature rise when irradiated with 532nm laser, known as the photothermal effect.

  17. Microporous polymeric 3D scaffolds templated by the layer-by-layer self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulraj, Thomas; Feoktistova, Natalia; Velk, Natalia; Uhlig, Katja; Duschl, Claus; Volodkin, Dmitry

    2014-08-01

    Polymeric scaffolds serve as valuable supports for biological cells since they offer essential features for guiding cellular organization and tissue development. The main challenges for scaffold fabrication are i) to tune an internal structure and ii) to load bio-molecules such as growth factors and control their local concentration and distribution. Here, a new approach for the design of hollow polymeric scaffolds using porous CaCO3 particles (cores) as templates is presented. The cores packed into a microfluidic channel are coated with polymers employing the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. Subsequent core elimination at mild conditions results in formation of the scaffold composed of interconnected hollow polymer microspheres. The size of the cores determines the feature dimensions and, as a consequence, governs cellular adhesion: for 3T3 fibroblasts an optimal microsphere size is 12 μm. By making use of the carrier properties of the porous CaCO3 cores, the microspheres are loaded with BSA as a model protein. The scaffolds developed here may also be well suited for the localized release of bio-molecules using external triggers such as IR-light.

  18. Neocellularization and neovascularization of nanosized bioactive glass-coated decellularized trabecular bone scaffolds

    KAUST Repository

    Gerhardt, Lutz Christian

    2012-09-11

    In this study, the in vivo recellularization and neovascularization of nanosized bioactive glass (n-BG)-coated decellu-larized trabecular bone scaffolds were studied in a rat model and quantified using stereological analyses. Based on the highest amount of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secreted by human fibroblasts grown on n-BG coatings (0-1.245 mg/cm 2), decellularized trabecular bone samples (porosity: 43-81%) were coated with n-BG particles. Grown on n-BG particles at a coating density of 0.263 mg/cm2, human fibroblasts produced 4.3 times more VEGF than on uncoated controls. After 8 weeks of implantation in Sprague-Dawley rats, both uncoated and n-BG-coated samples were well infiltrated with newly formed tissue (47-48%) and blood vessels (3-4%). No significant differences were found in cellularization and vascularization between uncoated bone s