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Sample records for acth-dependent cushings syndrome

  1. A critical reappraisal of bilateral adrenalectomy for ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reincke, Martin; Ritzel, Katrin; Oßwald, Andrea; Berr, Christina; Stalla, Günter; Hallfeldt, Klaus; Reisch, Nicole; Schopohl, Jochen; Beuschlein, Felix

    2015-10-01

    Our aim was to review short- and long-term outcomes of patients treated with bilateral adrenalectomy (BADx) in ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome. We reviewed the literature and analysed our experience with 53 patients treated with BADx since 1990 in our institution. BADx is considered if ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome is refractory to other treatment modalities. In Cushing's disease (CD), BADx is mainly used as an ultima ratio after transsphenoidal surgery and medical therapies have failed. In these cases, the time span between the first diagnosis of CD and treatment with BADx is relatively long (median 44 months). In ectopic Cushing's syndrome, the time from diagnosis to BADx is shorter (median 2 months), and BADx is often performed as an emergency procedure because of life-threatening complications of severe hypercortisolism. In both situations, BADx is relatively safe (median surgical morbidity 15%; median surgical mortality 3%) and provides excellent control of hypercortisolism; Cushing's-associated signs and symptoms are rapidly corrected, and co-morbidities are stabilised. In CD, the quality of life following BADx is rapidly improving, and long-term mortality is low. Specific long-term complications include the development of adrenal crisis and Nelson's syndrome. In ectopic Cushing's syndrome, long-term mortality is high but is mostly dependent on the prognosis of the underlying malignant neuroendocrine tumour. BADx is a relatively safe and highly effective treatment, and it provides adequate control of long-term co-morbidities associated with hypercortisolism. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  2. Second-line tests in the differential diagnosis of ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbot, Mattia; Trementino, Laura; Zilio, Marialuisa; Ceccato, Filippo; Albiger, Nora; Daniele, Andrea; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Mardari, Rodica; Rolma, Giuseppe; Boscaro, Marco; Arnaldi, Giorgio; Scaroni, Carla

    2016-10-01

    Diagnosing Cushing's syndrome (CS) can be a challenge, especially in ACTH-dependent CS, when it comes to detecting the origin of ACTH secretion. Retrospective data were collected on 170 patients with ACTH-dependent CS (149 CD, 21 EAS) referring to two endocrinology units, focusing on three non-invasive tests: dexamethasone 8 mg overnight challenge (HDDST); corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) assay and the desmopressin (DDAVP) test. Patients with EAS were slightly older and had higher ACTH, serum and urinary cortisol levels than patients with CD (p 52.7 % below the basal level suggested a pituitary origin with a SE of 88 % (95 % CI 81-93) and a SP of 90 % (95 % CI 68-99). There were no cases of EAS with positive responses to both these tests. Increases in ACTH and cortisol levels after the DDAVP test were also higher in CD than in EAS (p < 0.01), though the SE and SP were lower. Patients with CD showed a stronger response to HDDST and CRH, and the adopted cut-offs showed a good SE and SP in discriminating them from patients with EAS. Concordant tests indicated CD when positive, whereas no response to either test was highly suggestive of EAS. The DDAVP test was of limited utility in the diagnostic phase. In conclusion, the choice of tests may play an important part in the differential diagnosis of ACTH-dependent CS.

  3. A role for 11C-methionine PET imaging in ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulouri, Olympia; Steuwe, Andrea; Gillett, Daniel; Hoole, Andrew C; Powlson, Andrew S; Donnelly, Neil A; Burnet, Neil G; Antoun, Nagui M; Cheow, Heok; Mannion, Richard J; Pickard, John D; Gurnell, Mark

    2015-10-01

    We report our experience of functional imaging with (11)C-methionine positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) co-registered with 3D gradient echo (spoiled gradient recalled (SPGR)) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the investigation of ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome. Twenty patients with i) de novo Cushing's disease (CD, n=10), ii) residual or recurrent hypercortisolism following first pituitary surgery (±radiotherapy; n=8) or iii) ectopic Cushing's syndrome (n=2) were referred to our centre for functional imaging studies between 2010 and 2015. Six of the patients with de novo CD and five of those with persistent/relapsed disease had a suspected abnormality on conventional MRI. All patients underwent (11)C-methionine PET-CT. For pituitary imaging, co-registration of PET-CT images with contemporaneous SPGR MRI (1 mm slice thickness) was performed, followed by detailed mapping of (11)C-methionine uptake across the sella in three planes (coronal, sagittal and axial). This allowed us to determine whether suspected adenomas seen on structural imaging exhibited focal tracer uptake on functional imaging. In seven of ten patients with de novo CD, asymmetric (11)C-methionine uptake was observed within the sella, which co-localized with the suspected site of a corticotroph microadenoma visualised on SPGR MRI (and which was subsequently confirmed histologically following successful transsphenoidal surgery (TSS)). Focal (11)C-methionine uptake that correlated with a suspected abnormality on pituitary MRI was seen in five of eight patients with residual or recurrent Cushing's syndrome following first TSS (and pituitary radiotherapy in two cases). Two patients elected to undergo repeat TSS with histology confirming a corticotroph tumour in each case. In two patients with the ectopic ACTH syndrome, (11)C-methionine was concentrated in sites of distant metastases, with minimal uptake in the sellar region. (11)C-methionine PET-CT can aid the detection of

  4. Difficulties in the diagnosis of ACTH-dependent Cushings syndrome in a patient after left adrenalectomy and treated with glucocorticoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzezinska, B.; Junik, R.; Kaminska, A.; Zielinski, G.

    2009-01-01

    Cushings syndrome (CS), that is a consequence of chronic excess of corticosteroides, is most frequently of iatrogenic origin. Corticotropin secreting pituitary adenomas are responsible for most cases of endogenous Cushings syndrome. Difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment of ACTH-dependent Cushings syndrome concern with localization of the source of pathological ACTH secretion, particularly when magnetic resonance imaging is unable to identify the pituitary microadenoma. In this paper we present the case of a patient with symptoms of Cushings syndrome and describe problems with localization of the source of hypercortisolemia. The diagnostic process was additionally complicated by the treatment with corticosteroids, occasionally applied due to concomitant diseases. This delayed the right diagnosis and treatment. (authors)

  5. [Value of desmopressin stimulation test and high dose dexamethasone suppression testin the etiologic diagnosis of ACTH dependent Cushing's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Yu, Yerong; Tan, Huiwen; Wang, Chun; Li, Jianwei; An, Zhenmei; Liu, Yuping

    2016-03-22

    To investigate the value of desmopressin (DDAVP) stimulation test and high dose dexamethasone suppression test (HDDST) in establishing the cause of ACTH dependent Cushing's syndrome. The clinical data of patients with ACTH dependent Cushing's syndrome at West China Hospital from January 1, 2010 to September 30, 2015 was analyzed. The sensitivity and specificity of DDAVP stimulation test, HDDST, and the diagnostic accordance rate when the two tests were combined, were evaluated based on the diagnostic gold standard. A total of 85 patients with Cushing's disease and 10 patients with ectopic ACTH syndrome were included. The sensitivity and specificity of DDAVP stimulation test were 87% and 5/5, respectively, whereas those of HDDST were 79% and 8/10, respectively. The standard high dose dexamethasone suppression test showed a higher sensitivity than overnight 8 mg dexamethasone suppression test. When the two tests had consistent results, the diagnostic accordance rate was 100%. DDAVP stimulation test and HDDST are both efficient modalities for the diagnosis of Cushing's Disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome. The accuracy of diagnosis can be further improved by combining the two tests.

  6. Prolactin as a Marker of Successful Catheterization during IPSS in Patients with ACTH-Dependent Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S. T.; Raff, H.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Anomalous venous drainage can lead to false-negative inferior petrosal sinus sampling (IPSS) results. Baseline inferior petrosal sinus to peripheral (IPS/P) prolactin ratio higher than 1.8 ipsilateral to the highest ACTH ratio has been proposed to verify successful catheterization. Prolactin-normalized ACTH IPS/P ratios may differentiate Cushing's disease (CD) from ectopic ACTH syndrome (EAS). Objective: Our objective was to examine the utility of prolactin measurement during IPSS. Design, Setting, and Participants: We conducted a retrospective analysis of prolactin levels in basal and CRH-stimulated IPSS samples in ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome (2007–2010). Results: Twenty-five of 29 patients had a pathologically proven diagnosis (17 CD and eight EAS). IPSS results were partitioned into true positive for CD (n = 16), true negative (n = 7), false negative (n = 1), and false positive (n = 1). Prolactin IPS/P ratio suggested successful IPSS in eight of 11 with abnormal venograms. Baseline prolactin IPS/P ratio was helpful in two patients with abnormal venograms and false-negative (catheterization unsuccessful) or true-negative (catheterization successful) IPSS results; the normalized ratio correctly diagnosed their disease. Normalized ACTH IPS/P ratio was at least 1.3 in all with CD, but prolactin IPS/P ratios were misleadingly low in two. One patient with cyclic EAS had a false-positive IPSS when eucortisolemic (baseline prolactin IPS/P = 1.7; normalized ratio = 5.6). All other EAS patients had normalized ratios no higher than 0.7. Conclusion: Prolactin measurement and evaluation of the venogram can improve diagnostic accuracy when IPSS results suggest EAS but is not necessary with positive IPSS results. Confirmation of hypercortisolemia remains a prerequisite for IPSS. A normalized ratio of 0.7–1.3 was not diagnostic. PMID:22031511

  7. The role of inferior petrosal sinus sampling in ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome: review and joint opinion statement by members of the Italian Society for Endocrinology, Italian Society for Neurosurgery, and Italian Society for Neuroradiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecori Giraldi, Francesca; Cavallo, Luigi Maria; Tortora, Fabio; Pivonello, Rosario; Colao, Annamaria; Cappabianca, Paolo; Mantero, Franco

    2015-02-01

    In the management of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent Cushing's syndrome, inferior petrosal sinus sampling (IPSS) provides information for the endocrinologist, the neurosurgeon, and the neuroradiologist. To the endocrinologist who performs the etiological diagnosis, results of IPSS confirm or exclude the diagnosis of Cushing's disease with 80%-100% sensitivity and over 95% specificity. Baseline central-peripheral gradients have suboptimal accuracy, and stimulation with corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), possibly desmopressin, has to be performed. The rationale for the use of IPSS in this context depends on other diagnostic means, taking availability of CRH and reliability of dynamic testing and pituitary imaging into account. As regards the other specialists, the neuroradiologist may collate results of IPSS with findings at imaging, while IPSS may prove useful to the neurosurgeon to chart a surgical course. The present review illustrates the current standpoint of these 3 specialists on the role of IPSS.

  8. Cushing's syndrome during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W. J.; Berghout, A.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of Cushing's syndrome during pregnancy are reported, both due to an adrenal adenoma. The association of pregnancy and Cushing's syndrome has up to now been described in 48 patients (including our two cases); Cushing's syndrome was ACTH-independent in 59%, ACTH-dependent in 33%, and of

  9. Menstrual Abnormalities in a Woman with Acth-Dependent Pituitary Macroadenoma Mimicking Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Cheng Liao; Shih-Yi Lin; Hsin-Wang Lin; Kuang-Hua Chen; Lan-Hua Chang; Shun-Tien Chen; John Wang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Here, we present a case of ACTH-dependent pituitary macroadenoma (Cushing's disease) resulting in secondary amenorrhea mimicking polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Case Report: A 20-year-old nulligravid woman had been suffering from oligomenorrhea, amenorrhea, and moderate hirsutism since the age of 18 years. She visited a gynecologic clinic where PCOS was impressed according to the clinical manifestation and ultrasound finding. The patient responded to medication in the 1st year...

  10. Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypercortisolism; Cortisol excess; Glucocorticoid excess - Cushing syndrome ... The most common cause of Cushing syndrome is taking too much ... Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, and prednisolone ...

  11. Cushing syndrome: update on testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Hershel

    2015-03-01

    Endogenous hypercortisolism (Cushing syndrome) is one of the most enigmatic diseases in clinical medicine. The diagnosis and differential diagnosis of Cushing syndrome depend on proper laboratory evaluation. In this review, an update is provided on selected critical issues in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of Cushing syndrome: the use of late-night salivary cortisol in initial diagnosis and for postoperative surveillance, and the use of prolactin measurement to improve the performance of inferior petrosal sinus sampling to distinguish Cushing disease from ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome during differential diagnosis of ACTH-dependent Cushing syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cushing's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    宗, 友厚; 伊藤, 勇; 諏訪, 哲也; 武田, 純; MUNE, Tomoatsu

    2003-01-01

    Sixteen cases of verified Cushing's syndrome, and twelve cases of probable Cushing's syndrome were reviewed and data on them were compared with various reports on Cushing's syndrome in the literature.

  13. Imaging in Cushing's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahdev, Anju; Evanson, Jane; Reznek, Rodney H.; Grossman, Ashley B.

    2007-01-01

    Once the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome (CS) has been established, the main step is to differentiate between ACTH dependent and independent disease. In adults, 80% of CS is due to ACTH-dependent causes and 20% due to adrenal causes. ACTH-secreting neoplasms cause ACTH-dependent CS. These are usually anterior pituitary microadenomas, which result in the classic Cushing's disease. Non-pituitary ectopic sources of ACTH, such as a small-cell lung carcinoma or carcinoid tumours, are the source of the remainder of ACTH-dependent disease. In the majority of patients presenting with clinical and biochemical evidence of CS, modern non-invasive imaging can accurately and efficiently provide the cause and the nature of the underlying pathology. Imaging is essential for determining the source of ACTH in ectopic ACTH production, locating the pituitary tumours and distinguishing adrenal adenomas, carcinomas and hyperplasias. In our chapter we review the adrenal appearances in ACTH-dependent and ACTH-independent CS. We also include a discussion on the use of MRI and CT for the detection and management of pituitary ACTH secreting adenomas. CT of the chest, abdomen and pelvis with intravenous injection of contrast medium is the most sensitive imaging modality for the identification of the ectopic ACTH source and detecting adrenal pathology. MRI is used for characterising adrenal adenomas, problem solving in difficult cases and for detecting ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas. (author)

  14. Factitious Cushing's syndrome masquerading as Cushing's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thynne, Tilenka; White, Graham H; Burt, Morton G

    2014-03-01

    Factitious Cushing's syndrome is extremely rare. The diagnosis is challenging as cross-reactivity of synthetic corticosteroids or their metabolites in immunoassay measurements of plasma or urinary cortisol can make distinguishing between true and factitious Cushing's syndrome difficult. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) is usually suppressed in factitious Cushing's syndrome. A 54-year-old woman presented with clinical and biochemical features of Cushing's syndrome and an unsuppressed ACTH concentration. She denied recent exogenous corticosteroid use. Initial investigations revealed a markedly elevated urinary free cortisol, mildly elevated midnight salivary cortisol and normal morning cortisol concentration. Plasma ACTH was not suppressed at 13 ng/l (RR 10-60 ng/l). A pituitary MRI was normal, but inferior petrosal sinus sampling (IPSS) revealed a post corticotrophin releasing hormone ACTH ratio >20:1 in the left petrosal sinus. Ketoconazole therapy amplified discordance between the urinary free and morning plasma cortisol concentrations. Further investigation of this discordance using high-pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) revealed a urinary free cortisol excretion of only 20 nmol/24 h, but prednisolone excretion of 16,200 nmol/24 h. Factitious Cushing's syndrome can mimic endogenous ACTH-dependent hypercortisolism during initial investigations and IPSS. This case highlights the importance of (i) recognizing the significance of discordant results; (ii) using an ACTH assay capable of reliably differentiating ACTH-dependent from ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome; and (iii) appreciating that IPSS is only useful to localize the source of ACTH in confirmed ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome. In this case, measurement of corticosteroids by HPLC-MS/MS was essential in reaching the correct diagnosis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder. The cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a hormone that ... your body to make too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome is rare. Some symptoms are Upper body obesity ...

  16. Cyclical Cushing's syndrome due to an atypical thymic carcinoid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinardi, [No Value; van den Berg, G; Wolffenbuttel, BHR; Kema, IP; Dullaart, RPF

    A 43-year-old man presented with fluctuating symptoms of weight gain, shortness of breath, pretibial oedema, associated with anxiety and memory disturbances. Laboratory investigation revealed an adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-dependent cyclical Cushing's syndrome characterised by remarkable variations

  17. Menstrual Abnormalities in a Woman with Acth-Dependent Pituitary Macroadenoma Mimicking Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Cheng Liao

    2006-06-01

    Conclusion: PCOS is a common disease resulting in secondary amenorrhea. However, Cushing's syndrome resulting from pituitary macroadenoma should also be considered. Therefore, a careful history, observation, physical examination, and endocrine studies can differentiate between patients with PCOS and Cushing's disease.

  18. Exogenous Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing syndrome - corticosteroid induced; Corticosteroid-induced Cushing syndrome; Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome ... Cushing syndrome is a disorder that occurs when your body has a higher than normal level of the hormone ...

  19. Cushing's syndrome complicated by multiple opportunistic infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R. C.; Gallas, P. R.; Romijn, J. A.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    1998-01-01

    The case history of a 56-year-old man is described who suffered from severe adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-dependent Cushing's syndrome. The clinical course was complicated by simultaneous infections with Pneumocystis carinii, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus and

  20. What Causes Cushing's Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What causes Cushing syndrome? Cushing syndrome can develop for two reasons: Medication ... uhs ), thyroid, or thymus How Tumors Can Cause Cushing Syndrome Normally, the pituitary gland in the brain controls ...

  1. Crossing the other side of the algorithm: a challenging case of adrenal Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, Imelda Digna Soberano; Sandoval, Mark Anthony Santiago; Lantion-Ang, Frances Lina

    2011-12-01

    The diagnosis of endogenous Cushing's syndrome and its aetiology involved documenting the hypercotisolism and then determining whether that hypercortisolism is adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent (ACTH-dependent) or not. Hence, following the algorithm, an undetected ACTH level points to an adrenal Cushing's while a detectable or elevated ACTH level points to either a pituitary or ectopic Cushing's syndrome. The authors present a case of florid adrenal Cushing's syndrome initially presenting with a normal ACTH level, which led to the investigation for an ACTH-secreting tumour. Adding to the confusion, a MRI done showed an intrasellar focus. Knowledge of how ACTH-dependent (versus ACTH-independent) Cushing's syndrome manifests clinically, supported by results of repeat laboratory tests, led to the true diagnosis. This case illustrates that a detectable ACTH does not rule out an adrenal Cushing's syndrome nor does a positive pituitary imaging confirm Cushing's disease.

  2. Treatment of adrenocorticotropin-dependent cushing's syndrome: A consensus statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.M.K. Biller; A. Grossman (Ashley Barry); P.M. Stewart; S. Melmed (Shlomo); X. Bertagna; J. Bertherat (Jerome); M. Buchfelder; A. Colao (Annamaria); A.R.M.M. Hermus (Ad); L.J. Hofland (Leo); A. Klibanski; A. Lacroix; J.R. Lindsay; J. Newell-Price (John); L.K. Nieman; S. Petersenn; N. Sonino; G.K. Stalla (Günter); B. Swearingen; M.L. Vance; J.A.H. Wass (John); M. Boscaro

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Our objective was to evaluate the published literature and reach a consensus on the treatment of patients with ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome, because there is no recent consensus on the management of this rare disorder. Participants: Thirty-two leading endocrinologists,

  3. Treatment of adrenocorticotropin-dependent Cushing's syndrome: a consensus statement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biller, B.M.; Grossman, A.B.; Stewart, P.M.; Melmed, S.; Bertagna, X.; Bertherat, J.; Buchfelder, M.; Colao, A.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.; Hofland, L.J.; Klibanski, A.; Lacroix, A.; Lindsay, J.R.; Newell-Price, J.; Nieman, L.K.; Petersenn, S.; Sonino, N.; Stalla, G.K.; Swearingen, B.; Vance, M.L.; Wass, J.A.; Boscaro, M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to evaluate the published literature and reach a consensus on the treatment of patients with ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome, because there is no recent consensus on the management of this rare disorder. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-two leading endocrinologists, clinicians,

  4. Impact and Timing of Bilateral Adrenalectomy for Refractory ACTH-Dependent Cushing’s Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Lilah F.; Harris, Rachel S.; Milton, Denái R.; Waguespack, Steven G.; Habra, Mouhammed A.; Jimenez, Camilo; Vassilopoulou-Sellin, Rena; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Perrier, Nancy D.; Grubbs, Elizabeth G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In patients with refractory ACTH-dependent Cushing’s syndrome (CS), we evaluated steroidogenesis inhibition (SI) and bilateral adrenalectomy (BA) to predict which patients might benefit most from each treatment modality. Methods Clinical data from patients treated 1970-2012 were retrospectively reviewed by treatment group (SI or SI+BA). Validated severity scales were used to calculate metabolic (M) score (hypokalemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, proximal muscle weakness) and adverse events (AE) score (thrombosis, fracture, infection). Results 65 patients (16 pituitary, 49 ectopic) were treated with SI+BA (n=21,32%) or SI alone (n=44,68%). Presenting M scores and source of ACTH excess (ectopic vs. pituitary) were similar. Both groups improved metabolically after treatment. 39% of AEs in the SI+BA group occurred within 12 months of presentation. 24(55%) SI patients died (median survival 24.0 months); steroid excess contributed to 71%. Six SI+BA patients died (29%), including all 3 patients with recurrent CS after BA. Minor perioperative complications occurred in 7 patients (33%). Conclusions Post-treatment M and AE scores improved for all patients and 70% of AEs occurred in SI+BA patients within 12 months of presentation, emphasizing the importance of early surgical intervention. These data argue for the safety and efficacy of early BA in selected patients with uncontrollable CS. PMID:24383115

  5. Imaging in Cushing's syndrome; Imagem em sindrome de Cushing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahdev, Anju; Evanson, Jane [St. Bartholomew' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging; Reznek, Rodney H. [St. Bartholomew' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Institute of Cancer. Cancer Imaging; Grossman, Ashley B. [St. Bartholomew' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Endocrinology]. E-mail: anju.sahdev@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk

    2007-11-15

    Once the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome (CS) has been established, the main step is to differentiate between ACTH dependent and independent disease. In adults, 80% of CS is due to ACTH-dependent causes and 20% due to adrenal causes. ACTH-secreting neoplasms cause ACTH-dependent CS. These are usually anterior pituitary microadenomas, which result in the classic Cushing's disease. Non-pituitary ectopic sources of ACTH, such as a small-cell lung carcinoma or carcinoid tumours, are the source of the remainder of ACTH-dependent disease. In the majority of patients presenting with clinical and biochemical evidence of CS, modern non-invasive imaging can accurately and efficiently provide the cause and the nature of the underlying pathology. Imaging is essential for determining the source of ACTH in ectopic ACTH production, locating the pituitary tumours and distinguishing adrenal adenomas, carcinomas and hyperplasias. In our chapter we review the adrenal appearances in ACTH-dependent and ACTH-independent CS. We also include a discussion on the use of MRI and CT for the detection and management of pituitary ACTH secreting adenomas. CT of the chest, abdomen and pelvis with intravenous injection of contrast medium is the most sensitive imaging modality for the identification of the ectopic ACTH source and detecting adrenal pathology. MRI is used for characterising adrenal adenomas, problem solving in difficult cases and for detecting ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas. (author)

  6. Cushing's syndrome in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassi, Rossella; Ladu, Cristina; Vezzosi, Chiara; Mannelli, Massimo

    2015-02-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a rare condition in the general population and is even less common during pregnancy with only a few cases reported in literature. The diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome may be difficult during pregnancy because the typical features of the disorder and pregnancy may overlap. However, Cushing's syndrome results in increased fetal and maternal complications, and diagnosis and treatment are critical. This report describes a case of 26-year-old female at the 19th week of pregnancy with symptoms and signs of hypercortisolism, where ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome was diagnosed and treated by robotic laparoscopic adrenalectomy at the 21th week of gestation.

  7. Selenium-75-cholesterol imaging and computed tomography of the adrenal glands in differentiating the cause of Cushing's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.L.; Smith, J.A.; Mervis, B.; Roman, T.

    1983-01-01

    Measurement of 75 Se-cholesterol (Scintadren) uptake and computed tomography (CT) of the adrenal glands were compared as a means of differentiating the cause of Cushing's syndrome in 11 patients over a 2-year period. Quantitative Scintadren imaging differentiated adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-dependent disease from local adrenocortical lesions as the cause of Cushing's syndrome in all the patients studied. CT of the adrenal glands rapidly and accurately detected the adrenal mass lesions in 2 cases and was effective in documenting bilateral hyperplasia due to ectopic ACTH-dependent disease. However, in entopic ACTH (pituitary)-dependent disease the adrenal glands were of normal thickness in all but 2 patients, who had bilateral hyperplasia. Scintadren imaging and CT are useful non-invasive procedures for differentiating local adrenal disease from ACTH-dependent disease as the cause of Cushing's syndrome and should be the initial investigations once a firm clinical and biochemical diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome has been made

  8. Progestogens and Cushing's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harte, C

    2012-02-03

    We report 3 patients where Medroxyprogesterone Acetate (MPA = Provera) and Megestrol Acetate (Megace) in doses used for therapy of breast cancer, caused clinical hypercortisolism and Cushing\\'s syndrome. Studies of the toxicity of Medroxyprogesterone Acetate list the commonest adverse events at 500 mg\\/day as weight gain, water retention, increased blood pressure, tremor, moon face, sweating, muscle cramps, vaginal bleeding and increased appetite. Glucocorticoid-like effects are seen in up to 30% of patients treated for longer than 6 weeks with mostly large doses of the order of 1500 mg\\/day but Cushing\\'s syndrome has been reported in patients taking 400 mg\\/day. Neither the glucocorticoid-like effects or Cushing\\'s syndrome have been previously observed with Megestrol Acetate. In the elderly female population receiving progestogens for neoplastic disease the progestogen itself could be an appreciable cause of morbidity both by causing glucocorticoid-like effects and Cushing\\'s syndrome but also by lack of awareness of the danger of sudden withdrawal of these compounds when the hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is suppressed. The signs and symptoms could be easily overlooked unless appropriate testing for Cushing\\'s syndrome is carried out. While the progestogen may have to be continued indefinitely a dose decrease may be feasible with reduction of morbidity.

  9. Nuclear imaging for the Cushing's syndrome etiological diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocaudie, M.

    2000-01-01

    Etiologic diagnosing of a Cushing's syndrome relies upon the probabilities of the various causes of the pathologies. It takes advantage of the hormonal determinations to establish the mechanism of the hyper-secretion and of the radiological examination to detect morphological abnormalities. The scinti-scans are useful at this time only, to locate hyper-functioning tissue, to guide its resection and to suggest alternative option, either pharmaceutical or radio-metabolic. In the ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome, noriodocholesterol scintigraphy can indicate that the adrenocortical hyper-functioning is unilateral or that it is bilateral. In the ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome, the current somatostatin radio-analogs have not proven their efficiency in pituitary ACTH-producing tumours but they are useful in the diagnosis and the management of bronchial carcinoids as of other neuro-endocrine tumors with the para-neoplastic Cushing's syndrome. (author)

  10. Infrasellar pituitary gangliocytoma causing Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingue, Marie-Eve; Marbaix, Etienne; Do Rego, Jean-Luc; Col, Vincent; Raftopoulos, Christian; Duprez, Thierry; Vaudry, Hubert; Maiter, Dominique

    2015-10-01

    Pituitary gangliocytomas are uncommon neuronal tumours that may present with endocrine disorders, the most frequent being acromegaly caused by growth hormone hypersecretion. Cushing's syndrome is very rarely seen with gangliocytomas. We report the unique case of a 62 year-old woman whose clinical picture and endocrine testing clearly demonstrated adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-dependent Cushing's syndrome. Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging showed a 12-mm homogeneous, infra- and retrosellar mass first diagnosed as pituitary macroadenoma. Transsphenoidal surgery was performed and allowed complete resection of the tumour with sparing of normal anterior pituitary. Very low postoperative serum cortisol and ACTH levels were observed in the early postoperative period and the patient is still in remission 18 months after surgery, thus demonstrating that the resected lesion was entirely responsible for the clinical picture. Histological and immunocytochemical analyses demonstrated a benign tumour composed of mature neuronal cells suggestive of a gangliocytoma, expressing both ACTH and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). The tumour was surrounded by a rim of pituitary tissue containing ACTH-producing endocrine cells. Careful analysis of the resected lesion did not reveal any pituitary microadenoma. We search literature for similar cases and retraced only nine cases of gangliocytomas associated with Cushing's syndrome. In most of them, the tumour was combined with either pituitary corticotroph adenoma or hyperplasia. Our case represents a unique case of an infrasellar pituitary gangliocytoma which was able to cause Cushing's syndrome by both direct ACTH production and CRH-induced stimulation of neighbour normal corticotroph cells.

  11. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... person cured of Cushing’s syndrome might have some memory loss and slight mental decline. But the change is ... Categories: Family Health, Infants and Toddlers, Kids and Teens, Men, Seniors, WomenTags: acth, adenomas, hormone, sickness September ...

  12. Inferior petrosal sinus sampling in the diagnosis of adrenocorticotropin dependent Cushing syndrome with unknown origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Xuefeng; Yuan Dequan; Yue Ming; Feng Juanjuan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of inferior petrosal sinus sampling (IPSS) in the diagnosis of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) dependent Cushing syndrome (CS) with unknown origin. Methods: IPSS was carried out for the diagnosis of 16 cases with ACTH dependent CS who had not been identified after a series of dexamethasone suppression tests and radiological examinations. The ratio of inferior petrosal sinus/peripheral ACTH was assayed. The sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis of the Cushing disease were estimated. Results: The inferior petrosal sinus/peripheral ACTH ratio was over 2.0 in 13 cases. Twelve cases underwent surgery with pathological diagnosis of pituitary ACTH adenoma, 1 patient relieved after γ knife treatment. The ratio was < 2.0 in 3 cases including 2 pulmonary carcinoid and one pituitary ACTH adenoma. The sensitivity and specify of IPSS for the diagnosis of Cushing disease were 13/14 and 2/2 respectively. Conclusion: IPSS was a safe technique with high sensitivity, specify and infrequent complications in the diagnosis of ACTH dependent Cushing disease. It had great clinical value in the differential diagnosis of ACTH dependent Cushing disease with unknown origin. (authors)

  13. Bilateral catheterization of inferior petrosal sinous: Utility in Cushing syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, Maria D; Fajardo, Carmen; Esteban Enrique; Cosin Octavio, Valldecabres Carmen; Reig, Marian

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present our experience on bilateral and simultaneous inferior petrous sinus catheterization, on those patients with ACTH -dependent Cushing's syndrome. We describe the procedure and our results. Material and Method: A retrospective study was held between January 2003 and September 2009, including nine patients (2 men, 7 women) presenting ACTH - dependent Cushing's syndrome. Simultaneous inferior petrosal sinus catheterization was performed in all of them, sampling basal ACTH and after CRH stimulation. ACTH levels gradient in different pituitary locations and peripheral blood levels was recorded. Diagnosis was suggested when inappropriate and maintained hypercortisolemia. High urinary free cortisol levels and no response to dexamethasone suppression were detected. Eight out of nine patients had a prior negative imaging test result. Results: Inferior petrosal sinus bilateral catheterization was successfully performed in all cases, with no evidence of further complications. The results showed definitive diagnosis in all cases. In four patients ACTH levels gradient was lateralized to the left, leading to a specific surgical approach. One patient presented pituitary ACTH - secreting adenoma. Two other patients showed ectopic ACTH production, one showed suprarenal adenoma secreting ACTH and other one showed response to pituitary stimulation without side lateralisation, presenting a histological diagnosis of pituitary hyperplasia. Conclusion: Petrosal sinus catheterization is shown to be an efficient procedure to manage Cushing's syndrome differential diagnosis and to obtain specific anatomical information.

  14. Is There a Cure for Cushing's Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pinterest Email Print Is there a cure for Cushing syndrome? Untreated Cushing syndrome can be life-threatening—fortunately, most people with ... their previous strength. People who no longer have Cushing syndrome might be more likely to develop diabetes, high ...

  15. What Are the Treatments for Cushing's Syndrome?

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    ... Pinterest Email Print What are the treatments for Cushing syndrome? Treatment for Cushing syndrome depends on the reason for the extra cortisol in the body. 1 , 2 Medicine If Cushing syndrome is caused by glucocorticoid medicine taken to treat ...

  16. [The changes in renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system in different subtypes of Cushing's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jia; Dou, Jingtao; Yang, Guoqing; Zang, Li; Jin, Nan; Chen, Kang; Du, Jin; Gu, Weijun; Wang, Xianling; Yang, Lijuan; Lyu, Zhaohui; Ba, Jianming; Mu, Yiming; Lu, Juming; Li, Jiangyuan; Pan, Changyu

    2015-07-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a clinical condition resulting from chronic exposure to excess glucocorticoid. As a consequence, long-term hypercortisolism contributes significantly to the development of systemic disorders by direct and/or indirect effects. The present study was to analyze the changes of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system in different subtypes of Cushing's syndrome on the standard posture test. We retrospectively reviewed 150 patients with histologically confirmed Cushing's syndrome treated at the PLA General Hospital between 2002 and 2014. Among them, 128 patients were diagnosed as adreno-cortico-tropic-hormone (ACTH)-independent Cushing's syndrome, and 22 were ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome. All patients were undertaken the posture test. Plasma renin activity (PRA), angiotensin II, plasma aldosterone concertration (PAC) levels were measured before and after the test. Basal plasma PRA [0.5 (0.2,1.3)µg·L(-1)·h(-1), angiotensin II [(48.9±20.1) ng/L] and PAC [(285.0±128.1) pmol/L] levels were within the normal range in supine position. Compared with the subjects with ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome, the basal PAC levels were higher in subjects with ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome [(348.0±130.4) pmol/L vs (274.2±125.0) pmol/L, PCushing's syndrome [(49.7±26.4)%] was significantly lower than that in those with ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome [(81.2±69.3)%] upon upright posture stimulation (PCushing's syndrome was similar to that in normal control. The basal PAC level and its response to upright posture are differently associated with ACTH level in Cushing's syndrome.

  17. Endocrine hypertension – Cushing's syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Yashpal; Kotwal, Narendra; Menon, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is a major and frequent comorbid finding of Cushing's syndrome. This review discusses the etiology and pathophysiology of hypertension in Cushing's syndrome, while suggesting methods of management of this condition. It also provides an overview of diagnosis and management strategies in this disease. PMID:22145133

  18. Incompatibility between fasting and postprandial plasma glucose in patients with Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Michio; Kitamura, Tetsuhiro; Tamada, Daisuke; Tabuchi, Yukiko; Mukai, Kosuke; Morita, Shinya; Kasayama, Soji; Shimomura, Iichiro; Koga, Masafumi

    2016-11-30

    It is shown that glucocorticoids have discordant effects on plasma glucose concentration through their effects on hepatic glycogen deposition, gluconeogenesis and peripheral insulin resistance. Cushing's syndrome caused by cortisol overproduction is frequently accompanied with diabetes mellitus, but fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and post-glucose load plasma glucose levels are not examined in patients with Cushing's syndrome. The aim of this study was to investigate FPG, HbA1c and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) 2-h PG and their relationship in patients with Cushing's syndrome, in comparison with control subjects. Sixteen patients with Cushing's syndrome (ACTH-dependent 31%, ACTH-independent 69% and diabetes mellitus 50%) and 64 controls (32 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 32 non-diabetic subjects matched for age, sex and BMI) were enrolled in this study. HbA1c and FPG in the patients with Cushing's syndrome were not different from the controls, whereas the FPG/HbA1c ratio was significantly lower in the patients with Cushing's syndrome than the controls. OGTT 2-h PG was significantly higher in the non-diabetic patients with Cushing's syndrome than the non-diabetic controls, while HbA1c was not different between both groups and FPG was significantly lower in the patients with Cushing's syndrome than the controls. HOMA-β but not HOMA-R was significantly higher in the patients with Cushing's syndrome than the controls. In conclusion, FPG was rather lower in the patients with Cushing's syndrome than the controls. Postprandial PG or post-glucose loaded PG, but not FPG, is useful to evaluate the abnormality of glucose metabolism in patients with Cushing's syndrome.

  19. Cushing Syndrome: Diagnostic Workup and Imaging Features, With Clinical and Pathologic Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner-Bartak, Nicolaus A; Baiomy, Ali; Habra, Mouhammed Amir; Mukhi, Shalini V; Morani, Ajaykumar C; Korivi, Brinda R; Waguespack, Steven G; Elsayes, Khaled M

    2017-07-01

    Cushing syndrome (CS) is a constellation of clinical signs and symptoms resulting from chronic exposure to excess cortisol, either exogenous or endogenous. Exogenous CS is most commonly caused by administration of glucocorticoids. Endogenous CS is subdivided into two types: adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) dependent and ACTH independent. Cushing disease, which is caused by a pituitary adenoma, is the most common cause of ACTH-dependent CS for which pituitary MRI can be diagnostic, with bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling useful in equivocal cases. In ectopic ACTH production, which is usually caused by a tumor in the thorax (e.g., small cell lung carcinoma, bronchial and thymic carcinoids, or medullary thyroid carcinoma) or abdomen (e.g., gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors or pheochromocytoma), CT, MRI, and nuclear medicine tests are used for localizing the source of ACTH. In ACTH-independent CS, which is caused by various adrenal abnormalities, adrenal protocol CT or MRI is usually diagnostic.

  20. Mortality in Patients with Endogenous Cushing's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanmard, Pedram; Duan, Daisy; Geer, Eliza B

    2018-06-01

    Cushing's syndrome is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Cardiovascular events, sepsis, and thromboembolism are the leading causes of mortality. Patient's with Cushing's due to a pituitary adenoma and those with Cushing's due to benign adrenal adenoma have relatively good survival outcomes often mirroring that of the general population. Persistent or recurrent disease is associated with high mortality risk. Ectopic Cushing's syndrome and Cushing's due to adrenocortical carcinoma confer the highest mortality risk among Cushing's etiologies. Prompt diagnosis and treatment, and specific monitoring for and treatment of associated comorbidities are essential to decrease the burden of mortality from Cushing's. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. What Are the Symptoms of Cushing's Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pinterest Email Print What are the symptoms of Cushing syndrome? Most people with Cushing syndrome have a range of symptoms, 1 and one ... of other conditions. 3 , 4 Physically, someone with Cushing syndrome might: Be heavy or obese above the waist ...

  2. [Cyclic Cushing's Syndrome - rare or rarely recognized].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiałka, Marta; Doroszewska, Katarzyna; Mrozińska, Sandra; Milewicz, Tomasz; Stochmal, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic Cushing's syndrome is a type of Cushing's disease which is characterized by alternating periods of increasing and decreasing levels of cortisol in the blood. The diagnostic criteria for cyclic Cushing's syndrome are at least three periods of hypercortisolism alternating with at least two episodes of normal levels of serum cortisol concentration. The epidemiology, signs, symptoms, pathogenesis and treatment of cyclic Cushing's syndrome have been discussed.

  3. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Cushing's Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Print How do health care providers diagnose Cushing syndrome? Diagnosing Cushing syndrome can be complex and difficult. This syndrome is ... health care provider may try different tests. Diagnosing Cushing syndrome often requires several steps. If you are being ...

  4. Six controversial issues on subclinical Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodini, Iacopo; Albani, Adriana; Ambrogio, Alberto Giacinto; Campo, Michela; De Martino, Maria Cristina; Marcelli, Giorgia; Morelli, Valentina; Zampetti, Benedetta; Colao, Annamaria; Pivonello, Rosario

    2017-05-01

    Subclinical Cushing's syndrome is a condition of hypercortisolism in the absence of signs specific of overt cortisol excess, and it is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, hypertension, fragility fractures, cardiovascular events and mortality. The subclinical Cushing's syndrome is not rare, being estimated to be between 0.2-2 % in the adult population. Despite the huge number of studies that have been published in the recent years, several issues remain controversial for the subclinical Cushing's syndrome screening, diagnosis and treatment. The Altogether to Beat Cushing's syndrome Group was founded in 2012 for bringing together the leading Italian experts in the hypercortisolism-related diseases. This document represents the Altogether to Beat Cushing's syndrome viewpoint regarding the following controversial issues on Subclinical Cushing's syndrome (SCS): (1) Who has to be screened for subclinical Cushing's syndrome? (2) How to screen the populations at risk? (3) How to diagnose subclinical Cushing's syndrome in patients with an adrenal incidentaloma? (4) Which consequence of subclinical Cushing's syndrome has to be searched for? (5) How to address the therapy of choice in AI patients with subclinical Cushing's syndrome? (6) How to follow-up adrenal incidentaloma patients with subclinical Cushing's syndrome surgically or conservatively treated? Notwithstanding the fact that most studies that faced these points may have several biases (e.g., retrospective design, small sample size, different criteria for the subclinical Cushing's syndrome diagnosis), we believe that the literature evidence is sufficient to affirm that the subclinical Cushing's syndrome condition is not harmless and that the currently available diagnostic tools are reliable for identifying the majority of individuals with subclinical Cushing's syndrome.

  5. Limited Diagnostic Utility of Plasma Adrenocorticotropic Hormone for Differentiation between Adrenal Cushing Syndrome and Cushing Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, A Ram; Kim, Jung Hee; Hong, Eun Shil; Kim, I Kyeong; Park, Kyeong Seon; Ahn, Chang Ho; Kim, Sang Wan; Shin, Chan Soo; Kim, Seong Yeon

    2015-09-01

    Measurement of the plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level has been recommended as the first diagnostic test for differentiating between ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome (CS) and ACTH-dependent CS. When plasma ACTH values are inconclusive, a differential diagnosis of CS can be made based upon measurement of the serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) level and results of the high-dose dexamethasone suppression test (HDST). The aim of this study was to assess the utility of plasma ACTH to differentiate adrenal CS from Cushing' disease (CD) and compare it with that of the HDST results and serum DHEA-S level. We performed a retrospective, multicenter study from January 2000 to May 2012 involving 92 patients with endogenous CS. The levels of plasma ACTH, serum cortisol, 24-hour urine free cortisol (UFC) after the HDST, and serum DHEA-S were measured. Fifty-seven patients had adrenal CS and 35 patients had CD. The area under the curve of plasma ACTH, serum DHEA-S, percentage suppression of serum cortisol, and UFC after HDST were 0.954, 0.841, 0.950, and 0.997, respectively (all Pdisease, especially when the plasma ACTH level alone is not conclusive.

  6. Diagnosis and Management of 253 Cases with Cushing's syndrome in Imam Khomeini Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteghamati A.R

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Definite diagnosis and treatment of Cushing's syndrome is still a dilemma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of diagnostic tests and follow-up of patients with Cushing's syndrome."nMethods: Two hundred and fifty three consecutive cases with Cushing's syndrome during 1370-78 were studied. The screening tests were performed in all patients. High dose dexamethasone suppression test (HDDST and ACTH measurement were carried out. MRI/CT Scan were performed and compared with laboratory data and pathologic specimens as a gold standard test."nResults: The age range was 32±11 yrs. The most frequent symptoms were weakness; hypertension, typical striae, and depression .The frequency of hypertension in ACTH-dependent case were 77% vs. 36% in adrenal tumors (P< 0.001. HDDST was positive in 99% of micro and 71% of macroadenomas. Adrenal tumors showed 3.6% suppression but none in ectopic cases. HDDST had a sensitivity of 98%, specificity of 97% and accuracy equals to 98%. The frequency of different etiologies was as following: Cushing's disease in 64.8%, adrenal tumors in 32.8% and ectopic ACTH in 2.4% of patients. Trans-sphenoidal surgery (TSS was performed in 120 patients .The patients were followed for 53±25 months whose remission periods were 46.7±23.8 months (range 4-114 months. Survival analysis showed 93% remission rate in 12mo, 82% in 2yr and only 33% after 5yr.This recurrence didn't have any platue level."nConclusion: In our study, hypertension was more prevalent in ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome. HDDST had acceptable sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. Lifelong follow up of pituitary adenomas is inevitable in the case of progressive and gradual nature of recurrence in these tumors.

  7. Bilateral catheterization of the inferior petrosal sinuses in 23 cases of ACTh-dependent hypercoarisolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, E.; Nombela, L.; Brasa, J.

    1996-01-01

    Our purpose is to assess the results of catheterization of the inferior petrosal sinuses, a measure that is included in the diagnostic protocol for ACTH-dependent hypercortisolism. We analyzed retrospectively the data obtained for 23 patients (20 women and 3 men) subjected to this procedure. The test was complete (catheterization both inferior petrosal sinuses) in 21 patients (91%). The sensitivity in differentiating between Cushing's disease (n=21) and ectopic ACTH syndrome (n=21) was 95.2% after administration of CRH, with a specificity of 100%, and the positive predictive value for the intra pituitary localization of the micro adenoma (confirmed by histological study in 19 cases) was 61%. Catheterization of the inferior petrosal sinuses shows an elevated sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of Cushing's disease, although the positive predictive value for determining the intrapituitary localization of the adenoma is low. (Author) 12 refs

  8. Hyperthyroidism due to thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion after surgery for Cushing's syndrome: a novel cause of the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamada, Daisuke; Onodera, Toshiharu; Kitamura, Tetsuhiro; Yamamoto, Yuichi; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Murata, Yoshiharu; Otsuki, Michio; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2013-07-01

    Hyperthyroidism with the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of TSH (SITSH) occurred by a decrease in hydrocortisone dose after surgery for Cushing's syndrome. This is a novel cause of SITSH. The aim of this study was to describe and discuss 2 cases of SITSH patients that were found after surgery for Cushing's syndrome. We also checked whether SITSH occurred in 7 consecutive patients with Cushing's syndrome after surgery. A 45-year-old Japanese woman with ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome and a 37-year-old Japanese man with ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome presented SITSH caused by insufficient replacement of hydrocortisone for postoperative adrenal insufficiency. When the dose of hydrocortisone was reduced to less than 20 mg/d within 18 days after surgery, SITSH occurred in both cases. We examined whether the change of the hydrocortisone dose induced the secretion of TSH. Free T₃ and TSH were normalized by the hydrocortisone dose increase of 30 mg/d, and these were elevated by the dose decrease of 10 mg/d. We also checked TSH and thyroid hormone levels of the 7 consecutive patients with Cushing's syndrome after surgery. Six (66.6 %) of 9 patients showed SITSH. This is the first report that insufficient replacement of hydrocortisone after surgery for Cushing's syndrome caused SITSH. Hyperthyroidism by SITSH as well as adrenal insufficiency can contribute to withdrawal symptoms of hydrocortisone replacement. We need to consider the possibility of SITSH for the pathological evaluation of withdrawal syndrome of hydrocortisone replacement.

  9. Cushing's syndrome: a model for sarcopenic obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drey, Michael; Berr, Christina M; Reincke, Martin; Fazel, Julia; Seissler, Jochen; Schopohl, Jochen; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Zopp, Stefanie; Reisch, Nicole; Beuschlein, Felix; Osswald, Andrea; Schmidmaier, Ralf

    2017-09-01

    Obesity and its metabolic impairments are discussed as major risk factors for sarcopenia leading to sarcopenic obesity. Cushing's syndrome is known to be associated with obesity and muscle atrophy. We compared Cushing's syndrome with matched obese controls regarding body composition, physical performance, and biochemical markers to test the hypothesis that Cushing's syndrome could be a model for sarcopenic obesity. By propensity score matching, 47 controls were selected by body mass index and gender as obese controls. Fat mass and muscle mass were measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Muscle function was assessed by chair rising test and hand grip strength. Biochemical markers of glucose and lipid metabolism and inflammation (hsCRP) were measured in peripheral blood. Muscle mass did not differ between Cushing's syndrome and obese controls. However, Cushing's syndrome patients showed significantly greater chair rising time (9.5 s vs. 7.3 s, p = 0.008) and significantly lower hand grip strength (32.1 kg vs. 36.8 kg, p = 0.003). Cushing's syndrome patients with impaired fasting glucose have shown the highest limitations in hand grip strength and chair rising time. Similar to published data in ageing medicine, Cushing's syndrome patients show loss of muscle function that cannot be explained by loss of muscle mass. Impaired muscle quality due to fat infiltration may be the reason. This is supported by the observation that Cushing's syndrome patients with impaired glucose metabolism show strongest deterioration of muscle function. Research in sarcopenic obesity in elderly is hampered by confounding comorbidities and polypharmacy. As Cushing's syndrome patients are frequently free of comorbidities and as Cushing's syndrome is potentially curable we suggest Cushing's syndrome as a clinical model for further research in sarcopenic obesity.

  10. Invasive fungal infections in endogenous Cushing's syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffel, Rafael Selbach; Dora, José Miguel; Weinert, Letícia Schwerz; Aquino, Valério; Maia, Ana Luiza; Canani, Luis Henrique; Goldani, Luciano Z.

    2010-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a condition characterized by elevated cortisol levels that can result from either augmented endogenous production or exogenous administration of corticosteroids. The predisposition to fungal infections among patients with hypercortisolemia has been noted since Cushing's original description of the disease. We describe here a patient with endogenous Cushing's syndrome secondary to an adrenocortical carcinoma, who developed concomitant disseminated cryptococcosis and candidiasis in the course of his disease. PMID:24470886

  11. Management Strategies for Aggressive Cushing's Syndrome: From Macroadenomas to Ectopics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozza, Carlotta; Graziadio, Chiara; Giannetta, Elisa; Lenzi, Andrea; Isidori, Andrea M.

    2012-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is a rare but severe clinical condition represented by an excessive endogenous cortisol secretion and hence excess circulating free cortisol, characterized by loss of the normal feedback regulation and circadian rhythm of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis due to inappropriate secretion of ACTH from a pituitary tumor (Cushing's disease, CD) or an ectopic source (ectopic ACTH secretion, EAS). The remaining causes (20%) are ACTH independent. As soon as the diagnosis is established, the therapeutic goal is the removal of the tumor. Whenever surgery is not curative, management of patients with CS requires a major effort to control hypercortisolemia and associated symptoms. A multidisciplinary approach that includes endocrinologists, neurosurgeons, oncologists, and radiotherapists should be adopted. This paper will focus on traditional and novel medical therapy for aggressive ACTH-dependent CS. Several drugs are able to reduce cortisol levels. Their mechanism of action involves blocking adrenal steroidogenesis (ketoconazole, metyrapone, aminoglutethimide, mitotane, etomidate) or inhibiting the peripheral action of cortisol through blocking its receptors (mifepristone “RU-486”). Other drugs include centrally acting agents (dopamine agonists, somatostatin receptor agonists, retinoic acid, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ “PPAR-γ” ligands) and novel chemotherapeutic agents (temozolomide and tyrosine kinase inhibitors) which have a significant activity against aggressive pituitary or ectopic tumors. PMID:22934113

  12. Psychiatric disorders associated with Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratek, Agnieszka; Koźmin-Burzyńska, Agnieszka; Górniak, Eliza; Krysta, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Cushing's syndrome is the term used to describe a set of symptoms associated with hypercortisolism, which in most cases is caused by hypophysial microadenoma over-secreting adrenocorticotropic hormone. This endocrine disorder is often associated with psychiatric comorbidities. The most important include mood disorders, psychotic disorders, cognitive dysfunctions and anxiety disorders. The aim of this article was to review the prevalence, symptoms and consequences of psychiatric disorders in the course of Cushing's syndrome. We therefore performed a literature search using the following keywords: Cushing's syndrome and psychosis, Cushing's syndrome and mental disorders, Cushing's syndrome and depression, Cushing's syndrome and anxiety. The most prevalent psychiatric comorbidity of Cushing's syndrome is depression. Psychiatric manifestations can precede the onset of full-blown Cushing's syndrome and therefore be misdiagnosed. Despite the fact that treatment of the underlying endocrine disease in most cases alleviates psychiatric symptoms, the loss of brain volume persists. It is important to be alert to the symptoms of hypercortisolism in psychiatric patients to avoid misdiagnosis and enable them receiving adequate treatment.

  13. Structural brain abnormalities in Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauduin, Stephanie E E C; van der Wee, Nic J A; van der Werff, Steven J A

    2018-05-08

    Alongside various physical symptoms, patients with Cushing's disease and Cushing's syndrome display a wide variety of neuropsychiatric and cognitive symptoms, which are indicative of involvement of the central nervous system. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the structural brain abnormalities that are associated with Cushing's disease and Cushing's syndrome and their relation to behavioral and cognitive symptomatology. In this review, we discuss the gray matter structural abnormalities found in patients with active Cushing's disease and Cushing's syndrome, the reversibility and persistence of these changes and the white matter structural changes related to Cushing's syndrome. Recent findings are of particular interest because they provide more detailed information on localization of the structural changes as well as possible insights into the underlying biological processes. Active Cushing's disease and Cushing's syndrome is related to volume reductions of the hippocampus and in a prefrontal region involving the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and medial frontal gyrus (MFG). Whilst there are indications that the reductions in hippocampal volume are partially reversible, the changes in the ACC and MFG appear to be more persistent. In contrast to the volumetric findings, changes in white matter connectivity are typically widespread involving multiple tracts.

  14. Paraneoplastic Cushing Syndrome Due To Wilm's Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizan, Mahwish; Manzoor, Jaida; Saleem, Muhammad; Anwar, Saadia; Mehmood, Qaiser; Hameed, Ambreen; Ali, Agha Shabbir

    2017-05-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes are rare disorders that are triggered by an altered immune system response to neoplasm. Paraneoplastic syndromes may be the first or the most prominent manifestations of cancer. Wilm's tumor is the most frequent pediatric renal malignancy and usually presents with abdominal mass. Unusual presentations like acquired von Willebrand disease, sudden death due to pulmonary embolism and Cushing syndrome have been described in the literature. Cushing syndrome, as the presenting symptom of a malignant renal tumor in children, is a very rare entity. Few case reports are available in the literature exploring the option of preoperative chemotherapy as well as upfront nephrectomy. We report a rare case of paraneoplastic Cushing syndrome due to a Wilm's tumor. Based on gradual decrease of postoperative weight, blood pressure, serum adrenocorticotropic hormone, and plasma cortisol levels, along with histological confirmation of Wilm's tumor, paraneoplastic Cushing syndrome due to Wilm's tumor was confirmed.

  15. Paraneoplastic cushing syndrome due to wilm's tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faizan, M.; Anwar, S.; Hameed, A.; Manzoor, J.; Saleem, M.; Mehmood, Q.; Ali, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes are rare disorders that are triggered by an altered immune system response to neoplasm. Paraneoplastic syndromes may be the first or the most prominent manifestations of cancer. Wilm's tumor is the most frequent pediatric renal malignancy and usually presents with abdominal mass. Unusual presentations like acquired von Willebrand disease, sudden death due to pulmonary embolism and Cushing syndrome have been described in the literature. Cushing syndrome, as the presenting symptom of a malignant renal tumor in children, is a very rare entity. Few case reports are available in the literature exploring the option of preoperative chemotherapy as well as upfront nephrectomy. We report a rare case of paraneoplastic Cushing syndrome due to a Wilm's tumor. Based on gradual decrease of postoperative weight, blood pressure, serum adrenocorticotropic hormone, and plasma cortisol levels, alongwith histological confirmation of Wilm's tumor, paraneoplastic Cushing syndrome due to Wilm's tumor was confirmed. (author)

  16. Psychosomatic aspects of Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonino, Nicoletta; Fallo, Francesco; Fava, Giovanni A

    2010-06-01

    There has been growing interest in the psychosocial aspects of Cushing's syndrome, such as the role of life stress as a pathogenetic factor, the association with affective disorders, and the presence of residual symptoms after treatment. Interestingly, a temporal relationship between stressful life events and disease onset is relevant only to pituitary-dependent Cushing's disease, and not to the pituitary-independent forms. A number of psychiatric and psychological disturbances may be associated with the active hypercortisolemic state, regardless of its etiology. Within the high frequency of mood disorders (about 60%), major depression is the most common complication. Other psychopathological aspects include mania, anxiety disorders, psychological symptoms (demoralization, irritable mood, somatization) and cognitive impairment. Cognitive symptoms are associated with brain abnormalities (mainly loss of brain volume). Quality of life may be seriously compromised during both active and post-treatment phases. Long-standing hypercortisolism may imply a degree of irreversibility of the pathological process. Recovery, thus, may be delayed and be influenced by highly individualized affective responses. Outcomes of Cushing's syndrome treatment are not fully satisfactory. Within its great complexity, a conceptual shift from a merely biomedical care to a psychosomatic consideration of the person and his/her quality of life appears to be necessary to improve effectiveness. It is time to translate the research evidence that has accumulated into clinical practice initiatives. To patients who show persistence or even worsening of psychological distress upon adequate endocrine treatment psychiatric/psychological interventions should be readily available. Applying interdisciplinary expertise and addressing the needs for rehabilitation would markedly improve final outcome.

  17. Cushing's syndrome in infancy due to ectopic ACTH secretion by a sacro-coccygeal teratoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydzewska, Marta; Krawczuk-Rybak, Maryna; Zajkowska, Adrianna; Jurczuk, Natalia; Polnik, Dariusz; Szalecki, Mieczysław; Moszczyńska, Elżbieta; Savage, Martin O; Bossowski, Artur

    2017-04-01

    Adenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent Cushing's syndrome in infancy is extremely rare. We describe the case of a sacro-coccygeal ectopic ACTH-secreting immature teratoma in an infant who also presented the triad of defects characteristic of Currarino syndrome. A girl was born with a large immature teratoma in the sacro-coccygeal region associated with anal atresia. At the age of 7 days, the concentration of α-fetoprotein (AFP) was above the age-specific normal range. Two non-radical surgical excisions of the tumour were performed. At the age of 7 months, she developed polyphagia, acne, hirsutism, hypertension and hypokalemia with elevated ACTH and absence of serum cortisol circadian rhythm. Immunostaining of tumour tissue showed ACTH-immunoreactive cells. Due to unsuccessful therapy with ketoconazole and resistance to antihypertensive medications [blood pressure (BP) 210/160 mmHg], metyrapone was administered, which controlled her ACTH and cortisol levels in the normal range. Following further removal of tumour bulk after three operations during the first year of life, there was a decrease of BP to normal values. A rare case of ectopic ACTH syndrome causing Cushing's syndrome in infancy in the context of Currarino syndrome is reported. Radical surgery has resulted in excision of the tumour and current control of Cushing's syndrome.

  18. Cushing's Syndrome From Pituitary Microadenoma and Pulmonary Nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tating, Dan Louie Renz P; Montevirgen, Natasha Denise S; Cajucom, Loyda

    2016-03-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a state of cortisol excess, possibly from a tumor in the pituitary gland, the adrenal gland, or an ectopic nonpituitary ACTH-secreting source. The first form, pituitary in origin, was originally described by Harvey Cushing, MD, and was labeled as Cushing's disease. Long-term therapy with glucocorticoids also can lead to iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome.

  19. Adrenal Surgery for Cushing's Syndrome: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Dalmazi, Guido; Reincke, Martin

    2018-06-01

    Recent advances in the molecular pathogenesis and the natural history of Cushing's syndrome have improved the understanding of the management of this disease. The long-term efficacy of several cortisol-lowering medical treatments is currently under evaluation. However, adrenalectomy is a safe option for the treatment of patients affected by Cushing's syndrome. Unilateral adrenalectomy is the gold standard for treatment of adrenocortical adenomas associated with hypercortisolism. Bilateral adrenalectomy has been widely used in the past as definitive treatment of bilateral macronodular hyperplasia and persistent or recurrent Cushing's disease. The indication and the potential applications of this technique have been recently critically analyzed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Indexes in Cushing's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battocchio, Marialberta; Rebellato, Andrea; Grillo, Andrea; Dassie, Francesca; Maffei, Pietro; Bernardi, Stella; Fabris, Bruno; Carretta, Renzo; Fallo, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    Long-standing exposure to endogenous cortisol excess is associated with high cardiovascular risk. The aim of our study was to investigate arterial stiffness, which has been recognized as an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcome, in a group of patients with Cushing's syndrome. Twenty-four patients with Cushing's syndrome (3 males, mean age 49±13 years; 20 pituitary-dependent Cushing's disease and 4 adrenal adenoma) underwent 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and evaluation of cardiovascular risk factors. The Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index (AASI) and symmetric AASI (sAASI) were derived from ABPM tracings. Cushing patients were divided into 8 normotensive (NOR-CUSH) and 16 hypertensive (HYP-CUSH) patients, and were compared with 8 normotensive (NOR-CTR) and 16 hypertensive (HYP-CTR) control subjects, matched for demographic characteristics, 24-h ABPM and cardiometabolic risk factors. The AASI and sAASI indexes were significantly higher in Cushing patients than in controls, either in the normotensive (p=0.048 for AASI and p=0.013 for sAASI) or in the hypertensive (p=0.004 for AASI and p=0.046 for sAASI) group. No difference in metabolic parameters was observed between NOR-CUSH and NOR-CTR or between HYP-CUSH and HYP-CTR groups. AASI and sAASI were both correlated with urinary cortisol in patients with endogenous hypercortisolism (Spearman's rho=0.40, p=0.05, and 0.61, p=0.003, respectively), while no correlation was found in controls. Both AASI and sAASI are increased in Cushing syndrome, independent of BP elevation, and may represent an additional cardiovascular risk factor in this disease. The role of excess cortisol in arterial stiffness has to be further clarified. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Screening for Cushing's syndrome in obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozay Tiryakioglu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine the frequency of Cushing's syndrome (CS in obese patients devoid of specific clinical symptoms of Cushing's syndrome. METHODS: A total of 150 obese patients (129 female, 21 male; mean age 44.41 ± 13.34 yr; mean BMI 35.76 ± 7.13 were included in the study. As a first screening step, we measured 24-h urinary free cortisol (UFC. An overnight 1-mg dexamethasone suppression test was also performed on all patients. Urinary free cortisol levels above 100 μg/24 h were considered to be abnormal. Suppression of serum cortisol 100 μg/24 h were recorded in 37 patients (24%. Cushing's syndrome was diagnosed in 14 of the 150 patients (9.33%. Etiologic reasons for Cushing's syndrome were pituitary microadenoma (9 patients, adrenocortical adenoma (3 patients, and adrenocortical carcinoma (1 patient. CONCLUSION: A significant proportion (9.33% of patients with simple obesity were found to have Cushing's syndrome. These findings argue that obese patients should be routinely screened for Cushing's syndrome.

  2. Neuropsychiatric disorders in Cushing's syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivonello, Rosario; Simeoli, Chiara; De Martino, Maria Cristina; Cozzolino, Alessia; De Leo, Monica; Iacuaniello, Davide; Pivonello, Claudia; Negri, Mariarosaria; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Iasevoli, Felice; Colao, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous Cushing's syndrome (CS), a rare endocrine disorder characterized by cortisol hypersecretion, is associated with psychiatric and neurocognitive disorders. Major depression, mania, anxiety, and neurocognitive impairment are the most important clinical abnormalities. Moreover, patients most often complain of impairment in quality of life, interference with family life, social, and work performance. Surprisingly, after hypercortisolism resolution, despite the improvement of the overall prevalence of psychiatric and neurocognitive disorders, the brain volume loss at least partially persists and it should be noted that some patients may still display depression, anxiety, panic disorders, and neurocognitive impairment. This brief review aimed at describing the prevalence of psychiatric and neurocognitive disorders and their characterization both during the active and remission phases of CS. The last section of this review is dedicated to quality of life, impaired during active CS and only partially resolved after resolution of hypercortisolism. PMID:25941467

  3. NIH Researchers Find Potential Genetic Cause of Cushing Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2017 NIH researchers find potential genetic cause of Cushing syndrome Finding may lead to therapies that prevent pituitary ... mutations in the gene CABLES1 may lead to Cushing syndrome, a rare disorder in which the body overproduces ...

  4. Laparoscopic bilateral transperitoneal adrenalectomy for Cushing syndrome: surgical challenges and lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Sandeep; Yadav, Kunal; Sharma, Aditya P; Sethi, Vrishketan

    2013-06-01

    Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is well established for treatment of adrenal lesions. However, bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing syndrome is a challenging and time-consuming operation. We report our experience of laparoscopic bilateral adrenalectomy for this disease in 19 patients. From September 2009 to August 2012, we have operated 19 patients with Cushing syndrome and performed bilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy using the transperitoneal approach; synchronous in 15 patients and staged in 4 patients. In 15 patients, the surgery was carried out sequentially on both the sides in lateral position with intraoperative change in position. Complete adrenalectomy including periadrenal fat was carried out on both the sides. Nineteen patients were referred from Department of Endocrinology for bilateral adrenalectomy for adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH)-dependent and ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome. The indications for surgery were Cushing disease in 15 patients, occult/ectopic source of ACTH in 2 patients, and primary adrenal hyperplasia in 2 patients. Fifteen patients underwent bilateral adrenalectomy during the same operation. Four patients underwent staged procedures. All procedures were completed laparoscopically with no conversions. The mean operating time for simultaneous bilateral adrenalectomy was 210 minutes (range, 150 to 240 min). This included the repositioning and reprepping time. There were no major intraoperative complications. The average blood loss was 100 mL (range, 50 to 200 mL). None of the patients required blood transfusions in the postoperative period. The postoperative complications included minor port-site infection in 2 patients. One severely debilitated patient died on the 14th postoperative day because of hospital-acquired pneumonia. The remaining 18 patients have done well in terms of impact on the disease. Laparoscopic bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing syndrome is feasible and safe. It confers all the advantages of minimally invasive

  5. Cushing's Syndrome and Steroid Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernini, Giampaolo; Tricò, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's Syndrome (CS) is associated with a specific spectrum of dementia-like symptoms, including psychiatric disorders, such as major depression, anxiety and mania, and neurocognitive alterations, like impairment of memory and concentration. This pattern of clinical complications, which significantly impair the health-related quality of life of CS patients, is sometimes referred to as "steroid dementia syndrome" (SDS). The SDS is the result of anatomical and functional anomalies in brain areas involved in the processing of emotion and cognition, which are only partially restored after the biochemical remission of the disease. Therefore, periodical neuropsychiatric evaluations are recommended in all CS patients, and a long-term follow-up is required after normalization of hypercortisolism. Recent evidences demonstrate that three classes of drugs (glucocorticoid receptor antagonists, steroidogenesis inhibitors, and pituitary tumor-targeted drugs), which are used for medical treatment of CS, can rapidly relief neuropsychiatric symptoms of SDS. Furthermore, several psychoactive medications have demonstrated effectiveness in the treatment of symptoms induced by the acute or chronic glucocosteroid administration. In this paper, a review of the current and future patents for the treatment and prevention of CS and SDS will be presented.

  6. Inhalational Steroids and Iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A V, Raveendran

    2014-01-01

    Bronchial asthma (BA) and Allergic rhinitis (AR) are common clinical problems encountered in day to day practice, where inhalational corticosteroids (ICS) or intranasal steroids (INS) are the mainstay of treatment. Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome (CS) is a well known complication of systemic steroid administration. ICS /INS were earlier thought to be safe, but now more and more number of case reports of Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome have been reported, especially in those who are taking cytochrome P450 (CYP 450) inhibitors. Comparing to the classical clinical features of spontaneous Cushing syndrome, iatrogenic Cushing syndrome is more commonly associated with osteoporosis, increase in intra-ocular pressure, benign intracranial hypertension, aseptic necrosis of femoral head and pancreatitis, where as hypertension, hirsuitisum and menstrual irregularities are less common. Endocrine work up shows low serum cortisol level with evidence of HPA (hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal) axis suppression. In all patients with features of Cushing syndrome with evidence of adrenal suppression always suspect iatrogenic CS. Since concomitant administration of cytochrome P450 inhibitors in patients on ICS/INS can precipitate iatrogenic CS, avoidance of CYP450 inhibitors, its dose reduction or substitution of ICS are the available options. Along with those, measures to prevent the precipitation of adrenal crisis has to be taken. An update on ICS-/INS- associated iatrogenic CS and its management is presented here.

  7. Cushing's syndrome in childhood: update on genetics, treatment, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Maya

    2015-02-01

    To provide an update on the genes associated with Cushing's syndrome in children, as well as to familiarize the clinician with recent treatment guidelines and outcome data for children with Cushing's syndrome. The list of genes associated with Cushing's syndrome continues to grow. In addition, treatment for childhood Cushing's syndrome is evolving. As long-term follow-up data on children becomes available, clinicians need to be aware of the issues that require attention. Knowledge of the specific genetic causes of Cushing's syndrome has potential implications for treatment, surveillance, and counseling. Advances in surgical technique, radiation modalities, and medical therapies offer the potential for additional treatment options in Cushing's syndrome. Early identification and management of post-treatment morbidities in children treated for Cushing's syndrome is crucial in order to optimize care.

  8. A rare cause of Cushing's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkestad, Lars; Andersen, Marianne Skovsager; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg

    2014-01-01

    Excess glucocorticoid levels cause Cushing's syndrome (CS) and may be due to pituitary, adrenal or ectopic tumours. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels are useful in identifying adrenal tumours. In rare cases, ACTH-producing phaeochromocytomas are the cause of CS. We present two cases of ACTH...

  9. Cushing's syndrome in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Johanne Marie; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsebet; Jensen, Rikke Bodin Beck

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cushing's syndrome (CS) affects all age groups, but epidemiologic data in young patients are very limited. We therefore examined the incidence, prevalence and hospital morbidity of CS in children and adolescents. DESIGN: In a nationwide cohort study, we included all Danish citizens aged...

  10. Mutiple Spontaneous Rib Fractures in Patient with Cushing's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Je, Ji Hye; Seo, Ji Hye; Na, Young Ju; Yoo, Hye Jin

    2014-11-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) excess, including Cushing's syndrome, is a common cause of secondary osteoporosis. Thirty to fifty percent of Cushing's syndrome patients experience non-traumatic fractures, which is often the presenting manifestation of Cushing's syndrome. However, there have been rare cases of Cushing's syndrome diagnosed only based upon bone manifestations. We describe a case of Cushing's syndrome that was diagnosed in a 44-year-old woman who initially visited our hospital due to multiple non-traumatic rib fractures. She did not exhibit any other manifestations of Cushing's syndrome such as moon face, buffalo hump or abdominal striae. Initially, we evaluated her for bone metastases from a cancer of unknown origin, but there was no evidence of metastatic cancer. Instead, we found a left adrenal incidentaloma. As a result of the hormone study, she was diagnosed as having Cushing's syndrome. Interestingly, her bony manifestation of Cushing's syndrome, which was evident in the bone scan and bone mineral densitometry, completely recovered after a left adrenalectomy. Therefore, the possibility of Cushing's syndrome as a cause of secondary osteoporosis should be considered in young patients with non-traumatic multiple fractures, with or without any other typical features of Cushing's syndrome.

  11. Clinical Characteristics of Endogenous Cushing's Syndrome at a Medical Center in Southern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Shih-Chen; Wang, Pei-Wen; Liu, Rue-Tsuan; Chen, Jung-Fu; Hsieh, Ching-Jung; Kuo, Ming-Chun; Yang, Joseph W.; Lee, Wei-Ching; Cheng, Min-Hsiung; Lee, Tao-Chen

    2013-01-01

    From January 1987 to December 2011, over a total of 25 years, 84 patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS) were identified at a medical center in southern Taiwan. We observed a higher incidence of ACTH-independent CS (75%) than ACTH-dependent CS (25%). A higher incidence of adrenocortical adenoma (58.3%) than Cushing's disease (CD, 21.4%) was also found. The sensitivity of the definitive diagnostic tests for CS, including loss of plasma cortisol circadian rhythm, a baseline 24 h urinary free cortisol (UFC) value >80 μg, and overnight and 2-day low-dose dexamethasone suppression test, was between 94.4% and 100%. For the 2-day high-dose dexamethasone suppression test for the differential diagnosis of CD, the sensitivity of 0800 h plasma cortisol and 24 h UFC was 44.4% and 85.7%, respectively. For the differential diagnosis of adrenal CS, the sensitivities of the 0800 h plasma cortisol and 24 h UFC were 95.5% and 88.9%, respectively. In patients with ACTH-independent CS and ACTH-dependent CS, the baseline plasma ACTH levels were all below 29 pg/mL and above 37 pg/mL, respectively. The postsurgical hospitalization stay following retroperitoneoscopic adrenalectomy was shorter than that observed for transabdominal adrenalectomy (4.3 ± 1.6 versus 8.8 ± 3.7 days, P < 0.001). It was easy to develop retroperitoneal and peritoneal seeding of adrenocortical carcinoma via laparoscopic adrenalectomy. PMID:24062770

  12. Clinicopathological correlates of adrenal Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Kai; Gomez Hernandez, Karen; Mete, Ozgur

    2015-03-01

    Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is a rare endocrine disorder that incurs significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, due to glucocorticoid excess. It comprises adrenal (20%) and non-adrenal (80%) aetiologies. While the majority of cases are attributed to pituitary or ectopic corticotropin (ACTH) overproduction, primary cortisol-producing adrenal cortical lesions are increasingly recognised in the pathophysiology of Cushing's syndrome. Our understanding of this disease has progressed substantially over the past decade. Recently, important mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of adrenal hypercortisolism have been elucidated with the discovery of mutations in cyclic AMP signalling (PRKACA, PRKAR1A, GNAS, PDE11A, PDE8B), armadillo repeat containing 5 gene (ARMC5) a putative tumour suppressor gene, aberrant G-protein-coupled receptors, and intra-adrenal secretion of ACTH. Accurate subtyping of Cushing's syndrome is crucial for treatment decision-making and requires a complete integration of clinical, biochemical, imaging and pathology findings. Pathological correlates in the adrenal glands include hyperplasia, adenoma and carcinoma. While the most common presentation is diffuse adrenocortical hyperplasia secondary to excess ACTH production, this entity is usually treated with pituitary or ectopic tumour resection. Therefore, when confronted with adrenalectomy specimens in the setting of Cushing's syndrome, surgical pathologists are most commonly exposed to adrenocortical adenomas, carcinomas and primary macronodular or micronodular hyperplasia. This review provides an update on the rapidly evolving knowledge of adrenal Cushing's syndrome and discusses the clinicopathological correlations of this important disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Exophthalmos: A Forgotten Clinical Sign of Cushing's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Schenone Giugni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Exophthalmos is typically associated with Graves' ophthalmopathy. Although originally described by Harvey Cushing, exophthalmos is an underappreciated sign of Cushing's syndrome. We present a case of a 38-year-old female who presented with severe bilateral proptosis and was subsequently diagnosed with Cushings disease. We discuss the possible mechanisms causing exophthalmos in patients with either endogenous or exogenous hypercortisolemia.

  14. Cardiovascular autonomic function in Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallo, F; Maffei, P; Dalla Pozza, A; Carli, M; Della Mea, P; Lupia, M; Rabbia, F; Sonino, N

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic dysfunction is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. No data on sympathovagal balance are available in patients with Cushing's syndrome, in whom cardiovascular risk is high. We studied 10 patients with newly diagnosed Cushing's syndrome (1 male/9 females; age mean+/-SD, 47+/-10 yr) and 10 control subjects matched for age, sex, body mass index, and cardiovascular risk factors. In both groups there were 7 patients with arterial hypertension, 3 with diabetes mellitus, and 2 with obesity. Cardiac autonomic function was evaluated by analysis of short time heart rate variability (HRV) measures in frequency domain over 24-h, daytime, and nighttime. The 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and echocardiography were also performed. In comparison with controls, patients with Cushing's syndrome had lower 24-h (1.3+/-0.6 vs 3.7+/-1.5, mean+/-SD, p<0.01), daytime (2.0+/-1.4 vs 4.5+/-1.6, p<0.01), and night-time (1.0+/-0.4 vs 3.5+/-2.3, p<0.01) low-frequency/ high frequency (LF/HF) power ratio. In the presence of similar LF power, the difference was due to elevation in HF power in Cushing's syndrome compared to controls: 24-h, 12.7+/-6.7 vs 5.8+/-2.8, p<0.01; daytime, 10.2+/-7.3 vs 4.5+/-2.1, p<0.05; nighttime, 14.2+/-7.0 vs 7.8+/-4.7, p<0.05. Eight Cushing patients vs 4 controls had a non-dipping blood pressure profile. At echocardiography, Cushing patients had a greater left ventricular mass index and/or relative wall thickness, and impaired diastolic function, compared with controls. Compared to controls, patients with Cushing's syndrome showed a sympathovagal imbalance, characterized by a relatively increased parasympathetic activity. Whether this autonomic alteration is meant to counterbalance cortisol-induced effects on blood pressure and cardiac structure/function or has a different pathophysiological significance is still unknown.

  15. The difficulties of pseudo-Cushing's syndrome (or "non-neoplastic hypercortisolism").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabre, Olivier

    2018-06-01

    Pseudo-Cushing's syndrome covers different pathological conditions responsible for mild-to-moderate ACTH-dependent hypercortisolism, related not to an ACTH-secreting tumor but rather to CRH and/or AVP hypothalamic secretion through activation of various neural pathways, in patients generally displaying excess central adiposity. It is better termed "non-neoplastic hypercortisolism" (NNH). The main conditions implicated in NNH comprise: neuropsychiatric disorder, alcohol abuse, insulin-resistant obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome, and end-stage kidney disease. Glucocorticoid resistance is one differential diagnosis, as are some cases of primary adrenal disease with incompletely suppressed ACTH. Differentiating between NNH and mild-to-moderate Cushing's disease can be a real challenge. Clinical analysis, based on thorough history taking and screening for catabolic signs is essential; useful explorations include midnight serum or salivary cortisol and Dex/CRH and ddAVP stimulation response. Pituitary MRI suffers from limitations regarding both sensitivity and specificity, while bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling cannot distinguish between pituitary ACTH secretion by a tumor or by normal cells stimulated by endogenous CRH. Definitive diagnosis of functional etiology requires demonstrating that treatment of the underlying condition restores normal secretion of ACTH and cortisol, but this is not always possible. Lingering diagnostic uncertainty has to be accepted in certain patients, who will have to be followed up for some time before diagnosis can be considered more or less definitive. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Subclinical Cushing's syndrome: current concepts and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zografos, George N; Perysinakis, Iraklis; Vassilatou, Evangeline

    2014-01-01

    Clinically inapparent adrenal masses which are incidentally detected have become a common problem in everyday practice. Approximately 5-20% of adrenal incidentalomas present subclinical cortisol hypersecretion which is characterized by subtle alterations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis due to adrenal autonomy. This disorder has been described as subclinical Cushing's syndrome, since there is no typical clinical phenotype. The diagnosis of subclinical Cushing's syndrome is based on biochemical evaluation; however, there is still no consensus for the biochemical diagnostic criteria. An abnormal 1mg dexamethasone suppression test (DST) as initial screening test in combination with at least one other abnormal test of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis has been advocated by most experts for the diagnosis of subclinical Cushing's syndrome. DST is the main method of establishing the diagnosis, while there is inhomogeneity of the information that other tests provide. Arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus type 2 or impaired glucose tolerance, central obesity, osteoporosis/vertebral fractures and dyslipidemia are considered as detrimental effects of chronic subtle cortisol excess, although there is no proven causal relationship between subclinical cortisol hypersecretion and these morbidities. Therapeutic strategies include careful observation along with medical treatment of morbidities potentially related to subtle cortisol hypersecretion versus laparoscopic adrenalectomy. The optimal management of patients with subclinical Cushing's syndrome is not yet defined. The conservative approach is appropriate for the majority of these patients; however, the duration of follow-up and the frequency of periodical evaluation still remain open issues. Surgical resection may be beneficial for patients with hypertension, diabetes mellitus type 2 or abnormal glucose tolerance and obesity.

  17. Cushing's syndrome: aftermath of the cure

    OpenAIRE

    Pivonello, Rosario; De Martino, Maria Cristina; De Leo, Monica; Tauchmanovà, Libuse; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Lombardi, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria

    2007-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is a chronic and systemic disease caused by endogenous or exogenous hypercortisolism, associated with an increase of mortality rate due to the clinical consequences of glucocorticoid excess, especially cardiovascular diseases. After cure, usually obtained by the surgical removal of the tumor responsible for the disease, the normalization of cortisol secretion is not constantly followed by the recovery of the clinical complications developed during the active disease, a...

  18. Two Cases of. Cushing's Syndrome tumour and bilateral hyperplasia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two patients, one with Cushing's syndrome and one with Cushing's disease, are presented. In the first case the syndrome was caused by a tumour of the right suprarenal gland which was treated by unilateral adrenalectomy, and the second case was diagnosed as hyperplasia of the left suprarenal gland, eventually leading ...

  19. Severe Hypertension Secondary to Renal Artery Stenosis and Cushing's Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Zahrani, Ali S.; Al-Hajjaj, Alya; Al-Watban, Jehad; Kanaan, Imaduddin

    2005-01-01

    We present an unusual patient who simultaneously had severe renal artery stenosis RAS and Cushings syndrome. The case highlights the difficulty of reaching a specific diagnosis of Cushings syndrome and the possible interaction between Cushings syndrome and some other concurrent illnesses that this patient had. A 37-year old man presented with severe hypertension HTN and uncontrolled diabetes mellitus DM without clear physical signs of Cushings syndrome. He was found to have severe osteoporosis, proximal myopathy, several cutaneous warts, tinea versicolor, and chronic viral hepatitis. Captopril-stimulated renal scan and renal artery angiogram revealed severe RAS. Partial balloon dilatation of RAS led to improvement in HTN. Unexpectedly, urine free cortisol 24 hour was found extremely high. Serum adrenocorticotropic hormone ACTH was also elevated and high dose dexamethasone suppression tests were inconclusive. Several imaging studies failed to localize the source of ACTH. Despite normal MRI of the pituitary gland, bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling IPSS localized the source of ACTH secretion to the right side of the pituitary gland and right anterior hemihypophysectomy resulted in cure of Cushings disease, HTN, DM, and tinea versicolor with significant improvement in cutaneous warts, osteoporosis, and chronic hepatitis. In conclusion, RAS and Cushings syndrome may occur together. Significant hypercortisolemia can occur without clear signs of Cushings syndrome. Controlling hypercortisolemia is of paramount importance when treating chronic infections in patients with Cushing's syndrome. (author)

  20. Left ventricular structural and functional characteristics in Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Lupia, Mario; Salvetti, Massimo; Grigoletto, Consuelo; Sonino, Nicoletta; Boscaro, Marco; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Mantero, Franco; Fallo, Francesco

    2003-06-18

    This study was designed to evaluate left ventricular (LV) anatomy and function in patients with Cushing's syndrome. A high prevalence of LV hypertrophy and concentric remodeling has been reported in Cushing's syndrome, although no data have been reported on LV systolic and diastolic function. Forty-two consecutive patients with Cushing's syndrome and 42 control subjects, matched for age, gender, and blood pressure, were studied. Left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and relative wall thickness (RWT) were measured by echocardiography, endocardial and midwall fractional shortening (FS) were assessed, and diastolic filling was measured by Doppler transmitral flow. The RWT was significantly greater in Cushing patients than in controls. Left ventricular hypertrophy and concentric remodeling were observed in 10 and 26 patients with Cushing's syndrome, respectively. In Cushing patients, midwall FS was significantly reduced compared with controls (16.2 +/- 3% vs. 21 +/- 4.5%, p = 0.01). The ratio of transmitral E and A flow velocities was reduced and E deceleration time was prolonged in Cushing patients compared with controls (p = 0.03 and p < 0.001, respectively). In patients with Cushing's syndrome, cardiac structural changes are associated with reduced midwall systolic performance and with diastolic dysfunction that may contribute to the high risk of cardiovascular events observed in these patients.

  1. Prognosis of patients treated for Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulinas, Anna; Valassi, Elena; Webb, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Cushing syndrome (CS), due to an ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma, adrenal tumors, or ectopic ACTH secretion, causes hypercortisolism. CS is associated with major morbidity, especially metabolic and cardiovascular complications, osteoporosis, psychiatric changes, and cognitive impairment. Despite biochemical "cure" of hypercortisolism and clinical improvement after effective treatment, these complications are only partially reversible. Exacerbation of prior autoimmune diseases is also seen. All of these lead to quality of life impairment and increased mortality. This review addresses the main comorbidities and long-term consequences of CS despite clinical and biochemical "cure". Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Cushing's syndrome: Stepwise approach to diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lila, Anurag R.; Sarathi, Vijaya; Jagtap, Varsha S.; Bandgar, Tushar; Menon, Padmavathy; Shah, Nalini S.

    2011-01-01

    The projected prevalence of Cushing's syndrome (CS) inclusive of subclinical cases in the adult population ranges from 0.2–2% and it may no longer be considered as an orphan disease (2–3 cases/million/year). The recognition of CS by physicians is important for early diagnosis and treatment. Late-night salivary cortisol, dexamethasone suppressiontesti, or 24-h urine free cortisol are good screening tests. Positively screened cases need stepwise evaluation by an endocrinologist. This paper discusses the importance of screening for CS and suggests a stepwise diagnostic approach to a case of suspected hypercortisolism. PMID:22145134

  3. Severe Cushing's syndrome and bilateral pulmonary nodules: beyond ectopic ACTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares Bello, Carlos; van der Poest Clement, Emma; Feelders, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a rare disease that results from prolonged exposure to supraphysiological levels of glucocorticoids. Severe and rapidly progressive cases are often, but not exclusively, attributable to ectopic ACTH secretion. Extreme hypercortisolism usually has florid metabolic consequences and is associated with an increased infectious and thrombotic risk. The authors report on a case of a 51-year-old male that presented with severe Cushing's syndrome secondary to an ACTH-secreting pituitary macroadenoma, whose diagnostic workup was affected by concurrent subclinical multifocal pulmonary infectious nodules. The case is noteworthy for the atypically severe presentation of Cushing's disease, and it should remind the clinician of the possible infectious and thrombotic complications associated with Cushing's syndrome. Severe Cushing's syndrome is not always caused by ectopic ACTH secretion.Hypercortisolism is a state of immunosuppression, being associated with an increased risk for opportunistic infections.Infectious pulmonary infiltrates may lead to imaging diagnostic dilemmas when investigating a suspected ectopic ACTH secretion.Cushing's syndrome carries an increased thromboembolic risk that may even persist after successful surgical management.Antibiotic and venous thromboembolism prophylaxis should be considered in every patient with severe Cushing's syndrome.

  4. Iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome caused by intranasal steroid use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Fatma; Kirmizibekmez, Heves

    2017-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is common after oral steroid use and has also been reported following topical or inhaled use, but it is extremely uncommon after intranasal administration. This is the case of a 6-year-old child who developed Cushing's syndrome after intranasal application of dexamethasone sodium phosphate for a period of 6 months. Pediatricians and other clinical practitioners should be aware that high-dose and long-term nasal steroid administration may cause iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome characterized by complications of glucocorticoid excess as well as serious and even life-threatening complications of adrenal insufficiency.

  5. Diagnosis in the cushing's syndrome revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Marinis, L.; Mancini, A.; D'Amico, C.

    1986-01-01

    The diagnostic procedure for the differential diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome is reported in this paper based on the experience of 23 cases. Inappropiate cortisol secretion was established by an absent cortisol circadian rhythm and absent cortisol suppression after overnight dexamethasone suppression test. The ACTH serum levels were then determined in basal conditions and after insulin-induced hypoglycemia (0.15 U/kg b.w. insulin i.v.). ACTH was low or undetectable in 9 patients, and high or normal-high in 14 patients. In the first group of patients an adrenal trasmission computed tomography (CT) was performed and showd an adrenal adenima in 6 patients, adrenal carcinoma in 2 patients and hyperplasia of residual adrenal gland in 1 patient, who had previously undergone monolateral adrenalectomy. These patients underwent surgical treatment, except the patient with adrenal hyperplasia. In the second group of patients, negative in 4 patients, doubtful in 1 patient. Surgical exploration by transsphenoidal route was performed, and an ACTH-producing adenima removed in all cases. Radicalization with hypophysectomy was necessary in 2 patients, while other 2 patients are under observation for the suspicion of a recurrent pituitary tumor. In all patients adrenal scintiscan was also performed, and confirmed the suspicion pointed out by CT scan. A relatively simple protocol with a functional test (ACTH determination) and a morphological one (computed tomography), can be reliably applied in the differential diagnosis of Cushing syndrome

  6. Diagnosis in the cushing's syndrome revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Marinis, L; Mancini, A; D' Amico, C and others

    1986-01-01

    The diagnostic procedure for the differential diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome is reported in this paper based on the experience of 23 cases. Inappropiate cortisol secretion was established by an absent cortisol circadian rhythm and absent cortisol suppression after overnight dexamethasone suppression test. The ACTH serum levels were then determined in basal conditions and after insulin-induced hypoglycemia (0.15 U/kg b.w. insulin i.v.). ACTH was low or undetectable in 9 patients, and high or normal-high in 14 patients. In the first group of patients an adrenal trasmission computed tomography (CT) was performed and showd an adrenal adenima in 6 patients, adrenal carcinoma in 2 patients and hyperplasia of residual adrenal gland in 1 patient, who had previously undergone monolateral adrenalectomy. These patients underwent surgical treatment, except the patient with adrenal hyperplasia. In the second group of patients, negative in 4 patients, doubtful in 1 patient. Surgical exploration by transsphenoidal route was performed, and an ACTH-producing adenima removed in all cases. Radicalization with hypophysectomy was necessary in 2 patients, while other 2 patients are under observation for the suspicion of a recurrent pituitary tumor. In all patients adrenal scintiscan was also performed, and confirmed the suspicion pointed out by CT scan. A relatively simple protocol with a functional test (ACTH determination) and a morphological one (computed tomography), can be reliably applied in the differential diagnosis of Cushing syndrome. 62 refs.

  7. Dynamic changes of central thyroid functions in the management of Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogansen, Sema Ciftci; Yalin, Gulsah Yenidunya; Canbaz, Bulent; Tanrikulu, Seher; Yarman, Sema

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of central thyroid dysfunctions in Cushing's syndrome (CS). We also aimed to evaluate the frequency of hyperthyroidism due to the syndrome of the inappropriate secretion of TSH (SITSH), which was recently defined in patients with insufficient hydrocortisone replacement after surgery. We evaluated thyroid functions (TSH and free thyroxine [fT4]) at the time of diagnosis, during the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis recovery, and after surgery in 35 patients with CS. The patients were separated into two groups: ACTH-dependent CS (group 1, n = 20) and ACTH-independent CS (group 2, n = 15). Patients' clinical and laboratory findings were evaluated in five visits in the outpatient clinic of the endocrinology department. The frequency of baseline suppressed TSH levels and central hypothyroidism were determined to be 37% (n = 13) and 26% (n = 9), respectively. A negative correlation was found between baseline cortisol and TSH levels (r = -0.45, p = 0.006). All patients with central hypothyroidism and suppressed TSH levels showed recovery at the first visit without levothyroxine treatment. SITSH was not detected in any of the patients during the postoperative period. No correlation was found between prednisolone replacement after surgery and TSH or fT4 levels on each visit. Suppressed TSH levels and central hypothyroidism may be detected in CS, independent of etiology. SITSH was not detected in the early postoperative period due to our adequate prednisolone replacement doses.

  8. Surgical outcomes of laparoscopic adrenalectomy for patients with Cushing's and subclinical Cushing's syndrome: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazato, Minoru; Ishidoya, Shigeto; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Morimoto, Ryo; Kaiho, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Shigeyuki; Ito, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Haruo; Ito, Sadayoshi; Arai, Yoichi

    2011-12-01

    We retrospectively examined the outcome of patients who underwent laparoscopic adrenalectomy for Cushing's/subclinical Cushing's syndrome in our single institute. Between 1994 and 2008, a total of 114 patients (29 males and 85 females, median age 54 years) with adrenal Cushing's/subclinical Cushing's syndrome were studied. We compared the outcome of patients who underwent laparoscopic adrenalectomy between intraperitoneal and retroperitoneal approaches. Surgical complications were graded according to the Clavien grading system. We also examined the long-term results of subclinical Cushing's syndrome after laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Laparoscopic surgical outcome did not differ significantly between patients with Cushing's syndrome and those with subclinical Cushing's syndrome. Patients who underwent laparoscopic intraperitoneal adrenalectomy had longer operative time than those who received retroperitoneal adrenalectomy (188.2 min vs. 160.9 min). However, operative blood loss and surgical complications were similar between both approaches. There were no complications of Clavien grade III or higher in either intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal approach. We confirmed the improvement of hypertension and glucose tolerance in patients with subclinical Cushing's syndrome after laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy for adrenal Cushing's/subclinical Cushing's syndrome is safe and feasible in either intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal approach. The use of the Clavien grading system for reporting complications in the laparoscopic adrenalectomy is encouraged for a valuable quality assessment.

  9. Cushing's syndrome with an apparently normal CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlahos, L.; Strigaris, K.; Aliferopoulos, D.; Pontifex, G.

    1981-01-01

    A case of Cushing's syndrome is described in which the CT scan was considered as normal. The diagnosis was established with selective venography and blood sampling and was verified surgically. (orig.)

  10. Pulmonary mineralization in four dogs with Cushing's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, C.R.; Ackerman, N.; Monce, K.

    1994-01-01

    The clinical and imaging features of four dogs with Cushing's syndrome and pulmonary mineralization are reviewed. Three dogs presented with a primary complaint of respiratory distress/dyspnea. Three dogs had pituitary dependent Cushing's syndrome, while the remaining one dog had iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome. Each dog had clinical features typical for Cushing's syndrome. Two of the dogs were euthanized due to progressive hypoxemia. In each dog, the serum calcium, phosphorous, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine were normal. A generalized increase in unstructured interstitial pulmonary opacity with diffuse mineralization was noted on thoracic radiographs of all dogs. In one dog, an ill-defined nodular interstitial pattern of mineralization was present. Delayed bone phase scintigraphy using 99m Technetium methylene diphosphonate documented generalized pulmonary uptake in two dogs. 99m Technetium labeled microaggregated albumin lung perfusion scans were normal in these two dogs. 99m Tc-MDP scintigraphy can provide useful information in diagnosing pulmonary mineralization in Cushingoid dogs

  11. Case Of Iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome By Topical Triamcinolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zil-E-Ali, Ahsan; Janjua, Omer Hanif; Latif, Aiza; Aadil, Muhammad

    2018-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a collection of signs and symptoms due to hypercortisolism. Prolong use of topical steroid may cause this syndrome and suppression of hypothalamic and pituitary function, however such events are more common with oral and parenteral route. There are very few cases of Cushing's syndrome with a topical application amongst which triamcinolone is the rarest drug. We report a case of 11-year-old boy is presented who developed Cushing's disease by topical application. The child had body rashes for which the caregiver consulted a local quack, a topical cream of triamcinolone was prescribed. After application for three months, the patient became obese and developed a moon-like face. A thorough biochemical workup and diagnostic test for Cushing's disease was done to confirm. The following case report a dramatic example of development of the syndrome from chronic topical application of the least potent corticosteroid.

  12. Cushing's syndrome in pregnancy and neonatal hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, L; Masson, P; Millet, V; Simeoni, U

    2004-10-01

    Cushing's syndrome is rare in pregnancy but can cause spontaneous abortion, stillbirth or premature birth. We report a case of transient hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in a newborn whose mother had hypercortisolism due to a primary adrenal lesion. There was no family history of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. Follow-up revealed complete resolution of the cardiac abnormalities in the infant. Cushing's syndrome in the mother resolved after delivery. Although maternal hypercortisolism seldom results in symptomatic hypercortisolism in the newborn, hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy can occur.

  13. Primary thyroid disorders in endogenous Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepomniszcze, Hugo; Pitoia, Fabian; Katz, Silvia B; Chervin, Raul; Bruno, Oscar D

    2002-09-01

    To study the prevalence of primary thyroid disorders in patients who underwent endogenous hypercortisolism. Retrospective evaluation of 59 patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS) who had, at least, a record of thyroid palpation by expert endocrinologists and basal measurements of TSH by second generation assays. When available, tri-iodothyronine and thyroxine serum levels, TRH-TSH tests and anti-thyroid antibodies were also analyzed. There were two age- and gender-matched control groups. The 'goiter control group' comprised 118 healthy subjects who underwent thyroid palpation. The 'antibody control group' was composed of 40 individuals who attended the blood bank of our hospital. Antibodies against thyroperoxidase and measurements of TSH were analyzed in their blood samples. Available files of 83 CS patients admitted to our endocrine unit from 1985 to 1998 were examined. Fifty-nine patients (52 women and 7 men) with a mean age of 36.2 years (range 14-61 years) met the above requirements. Diagnosis of hypercortisolism had been established by a standard 1-mg overnight dexamethasone suppression test and urinary free cortisol (UFC). Etiological diagnosis involved dynamic testing, measurements of ACTH levels and imaging techniques. After treatment, all but one of the patients were cured or controlled of their hypercortisolism. This was established by the finding of subnormal serum cortisol concentrations and/or subnormal 24-h UFC levels. Primary thyroid disorders were defined by the presence of one or more of the following diagnostic criteria: (i) goiter, (ii) positive anti-thyroid antibodies and/or (iii) primary thyroid function abnormalities. Eighteen (30.5%) patients had goiter (diffuse in 78% and nodular in 22%), 14 (23.7%) had primary subclinical hypothyroidism and 5 (8.4%) had hyperthyroidism. In 41 patients evaluated for antithyroid antibodies, it was found that 23 (56.1%) had positive titers. In a group of patients in which thyroid autoantibodies were measured

  14. Cushing's syndrome: update on signs, symptoms and biochemical screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieman, Lynnette K

    2015-10-01

    Endogenous pathologic hypercortisolism, or Cushing's syndrome, is associated with poor quality of life, morbidity, and increased mortality. Early diagnosis may mitigate against this natural history of the disorder. The clinical presentation of Cushing's syndrome varies, in part related to the extent and duration of cortisol excess. When hypercortisolism is severe, its signs and symptoms are unmistakable. However, most of the signs and symptoms of Cushing's syndrome are common in the general population (e.g., hypertension and weight gain) and not all are present in every patient. In addition to classical features of glucocorticoid excess, such as proximal muscle weakness and wide purple striae, patients may present with the associated comorbidities that are caused by hypercortisolism. These include cardiovascular disease, thromboembolic disease, psychiatric and cognitive deficits, and infections. As a result, internists and generalists must consider Cushing's syndrome as a cause, and endocrinologists should search for and treat these comorbidities. Recommended tests to screen for Cushing's syndrome include 1  mg dexamethasone suppression, urine free cortisol, and late night salivary cortisol. These may be slightly elevated in patients with physiologic hypercortisolism, which should be excluded, along with exogenous glucocorticoid use. Each screening test has caveats and the choice of tests should be individualized based on each patient's characteristics and lifestyle. The objective of this review is to update the readership on the clinical and biochemical features of Cushing's syndrome that are useful when evaluating patients for this diagnosis. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  15. An update on Cushing syndrome in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratakis, Constantine A

    2018-04-09

    Cushing syndrome (CS) in childhood results mostly from the exogenous administration of glucocorticoids; endogenous CS is a rare disease. The latter is the main reason pediatric patients with CS escape diagnosis for too long. Other barriers to optimal care of a pediatric patient with CS include improper following of the proper sequence of testing for diagnosing CS, which stems from lack of understanding of pathophysiology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; lack of access to proper (i.e., experienced, state-of-the-art) surgical treatment; and unavailability of well-tolerated and effective medications to control hypercortisolemia. This report reviews the state-of-the-art in diagnosing CS and provides an update on the most recent discoveries in its genetics and treatment. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Factors predicting the duration of adrenal insufficiency in patients successfully treated for Cushing disease and nonmalignant primary adrenal Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prete, Alessandro; Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Bottiglieri, Filomena; Rota, Carlo Antonio; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Salvatori, Roberto; Corsello, Salvatore Maria

    2017-03-01

    Successful treatment of Cushing syndrome causes transient or permanent adrenal insufficiency deriving from endogenous hypercortisolism-induced hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal-axis suppression. We analyzed pre-treatment factors potentially affecting the duration of adrenal insufficiency. We conducted a retrospective analysis on patients successfully treated for Cushing disease (15 patients) who underwent transsphenoidal surgery, and nonmalignant primary adrenal Cushing syndrome (31 patients) who underwent unilateral adrenalectomy, divided into patients with overt primary adrenal Cushing syndrome (14 patients) and subclinical primary adrenal Cushing syndrome (17 patients). Epidemiological data, medical history, and hormonal parameters depending on the etiology of hypercortisolism were collected and compared to the duration of adrenal insufficiency. The median duration of follow-up after surgery for Cushing disease and primary adrenal Cushing syndrome was 70 and 48 months, respectively. In the Cushing disease group, the median duration of adrenal insufficiency after transsphenoidal surgery was 15 months: younger age at diagnosis and longer duration of signs and symptoms of hypercortisolism before diagnosis and surgery were associated with longer duration of adrenal insufficiency. The median duration of adrenal insufficiency was 6 months for subclinical primary adrenal Cushing syndrome and 18.5 months for overt primary adrenal Cushing syndrome. The biochemical severity of hypercortisolism, the grade of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal-axis suppression, and treatment with ketoconazole before surgery accounted for longer duration of adrenal insufficiency. In patients with Cushing disease, younger age and delayed diagnosis and treatment predict longer need for glucocorticoid replacement therapy after successful transsphenoidal surgery. In patients with primary adrenal Cushing syndrome, the severity of hypercortisolism plays a primary role in influencing the duration of

  17. Survey of 26 suprarenal scintigraphs on Cushing's syndrome patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venot, A.; Luton, J.P.; Roucayrol, J.C.; Bricaire, H.

    On the basis of the results of 26 Cushing's syndrome examinations some new scintigraphic aspects are described, suprarenal scintigraphy is compared with retroperitoneal insufflation, its value in the observation of a medical treatment of Cushing's disease is demonstrated and finally some preliminary results are given on the application in the same pathological context, of 75 Se-6-selenocholesterol which was compared with 131 I-19-iodocholesterol [fr

  18. A case of adrenal Cushing's syndrome with bilateral adrenal masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ya-Wun; Hwu, Chii-Min; Won, Justin Ging-Shing; Chu, Chia-Huei; Lin, Liang-Yu

    2016-01-01

    A functional lesion in corticotrophin (ACTH)-independent Cushing's syndrome is difficult to distinguish from lesions of bilateral adrenal masses. Methods for distinguishing these lesions include adrenal venous sampling and (131)I-6β-iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol ((131)I-NP-59) scintigraphy. We present a case of a 29-year-old Han Chinese female patient with a history of hypercholesterolaemia and polycystic ovary syndrome. She presented with a 6month history of an 8kg body weight gain and gradual rounding of the face. Serial examinations revealed loss of circadian rhythm of cortisol, elevated urinary free-cortisol level and undetectable ACTH level (Cushing's syndrome presenting with bilateral adrenal masses. The clinical presentation of Cushing' syndrome includes symptoms and signs of fat redistribution and protein-wasting features.The diagnosis of patients with ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome with bilateral adrenal masses is challenging for localisation of the lesion.Both adrenal venous sampling and (131)I-NP-59 scintigraphy are good methods to use in these patients with Cushing's syndrome presenting with bilateral adrenal masses.

  19. Cushing's syndrome: aftermath of the cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivonello, Rosario; De Martino, Maria Cristina; De Leo, Monica; Tauchmanovà, Libuse; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Lombardi, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria

    2007-11-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is a chronic and systemic disease caused by endogenous or exogenous hypercortisolism, associated with an increase of mortality rate due to the clinical consequences of glucocorticoid excess, especially cardiovascular diseases. After cure, usually obtained by the surgical removal of the tumor responsible for the disease, the normalization of cortisol secretion is not constantly followed by the recovery of the clinical complications developed during the active disease, and it is often followed by the development of novel clinical manifestations induced by the fall of cortisol levels. These evidences were mostly documented in patients with pituitary-dependent CS, after surgical resection of the pituitary tumor. Indeed, despite an improvement of the mortality rate, metabolic syndrome and the consequent cardiovascular risk have been found to partially persist after disease remission, strictly correlated to the insulin resistance. Skeletal diseases, mainly osteoporosis, improve after normalization of cortisol levels but require a long period of time or the use of specific treatment, mainly bisphosphonates, to reach the normalization of bone mass. A relevant improvement or resolution of mental disturbances has been described in patients cured from CS, although in several cases, cognitive decline persisted and psychological or psychiatric improvement was erratic, delayed, or incomplete. On the other hand, development or exacerbation of autoimmune disorders, mainly thyroid autoimmune diseases, was documented in predisposed patients with CS after disease remission. The totality of these complications persisting or occurring after successful treatment contribute to the impairment of quality of life registered in patients with CS after disease cure.

  20. Growth hormone deficiency in treated acromegaly and active Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formenti, Anna Maria; Maffezzoni, Filippo; Doga, Mauro; Mazziotti, Gherardo; Giustina, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in adults is characterized by reduced quality of life and physical fitness, skeletal fragility, increased weight and cardiovascular risk. It may be found in (over-) treated acromegaly as well as in active Cushing's syndrome. Hypopituitarism may develop in patients after definitive treatment of acromegaly, although the exact prevalence of GHD in this population is still uncertain because of limited awareness, and scarce and conflicting data so far available. Because GHD associated with acromegaly and Cushing's syndrome may yield adverse consequences on similar target systems, the final outcomes of some complications of both acromegaly and Cushing's syndrome may be further affected by the occurrence of GHD. It is still largely unknown, however, whether GHD in patients with post-acromegaly or active Cushing's syndrome (e.g. pharmacologic glucocorticoid treatment) may benefit from GH replacement. We review the diagnostic, clinical and therapeutic aspects of GHD in adults treated for acromegaly and in those with active Cushing's syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Adrenalectomy for Cushing's syndrome: do's and don'ts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduraru, D N; Nica, A; Carsote, M; Valea, A

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To present specific aspects of adrenalectomy for Cushing's syndrome (CS) by introducing well established aspects ("do's") and less known aspects ("don'ts"). Material and Method. This is a narrative review. Results. The "do's" for laparoscopic adrenalectomy (LA) are the following: it represents the "gold standard" for secretor and non-secretor adrenal tumors and the first line therapy for CS with an improvement of cardio-metabolic co-morbidities; the success rate depending on the adequate patients' selection and the surgeon's skills. The "don'ts" are large (>6-8 centimeters), locally invasive, malignant tumors requiring open adrenalectomy (OA). Robotic adrenalectomy is a new alternative for LA, with similar safety and conversion rate and lower pain drugs use. The "don'ts" are the following: lack of randomized controlled studies including oncologic outcome, different availability at surgical centers. Related to the sub-types of CS, the "do's" are the following: adrenal adenomas which are cured by LA, while adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) requires adrenalectomy as first line therapy and adjuvant mitotane therapy; synchronous bilateral adrenalectomy (SBA) is useful for Cushing's disease (only cases refractory to pituitary targeted therapy), for ectopic Cushing's syndrome (cases with unknown or inoperable primary site), and for bilateral cortisol producing adenomas. The less established aspects are the following: criteria of skilled surgeon to approach ACC; the timing of surgery in subclinical CS; the need for adrenal vein catheterization (which is not available in many centers) to avoid unnecessary SBA. Conclusion. Adrenalectomy for CS is a dynamic domain; LA overstepped the former OA area. The future will improve the knowledge related to RA while the cutting edge is represented by a specific frame of intervention in SCS, children and pregnant women. Abbreviations: ACC = adrenocortical carcinoma, ACTH = Adrenocorticotropic Hormone, CD = Cushing's disease, CS

  2. Treatment-related neuroendocrine prostate cancer resulting in Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Sundhar; Eisenberg, Adva; Foo, Wen Chi; Freedman, Jennifer; Armstrong, Andrew J; Moss, Larry G; Harrison, Michael R

    2016-12-01

    Here we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of a paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome (hypercortisolism) resulting from treatment-related neuroendocrine prostate cancer - a highly aggressive and difficult disease to treat. A 51-year-old man was started on androgen deprivation therapy after presenting with metastatic prostate cancer, characterized by diffuse osseous metastasis. Shortly thereafter, he developed progressive disease with biopsy proven neuroendocrine prostate cancer as well as symptoms of increased skin pigmentation, hypokalemia, hypertension, hyperglycemia and profound weakness, consistent with ectopic Cushing's syndrome. Molecular analysis of the patient's tumor through RNA sequencing showed high expression of several genes including CHGA, ASCL1, CALCA, HES6, PCSK1, CALCB and INSM1 confirming his neuroendocrine phenotype; elevated POMC expression was found, supporting the diagnosis of ectopic Cushing's syndrome. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  3. Cushing's syndrome: epidemiology and developments in disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Susmeeta T; Nieman, Lynnette K; Feelders, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a rare disorder resulting from prolonged exposure to excess glucocorticoids. Early diagnosis and treatment of Cushing's syndrome is associated with a decrease in morbidity and mortality. Clinical presentation can be highly variable, and establishing the diagnosis can often be difficult. Surgery (resection of the pituitary or ectopic source of adrenocorticotropic hormone, or unilateral or bilateral adrenalectomy) remains the optimal treatment in all forms of Cushing's syndrome, but may not always lead to remission. Medical therapy (steroidogenesis inhibitors, agents that decrease adrenocorticotropic hormone levels or glucocorticoid receptor antagonists) and pituitary radiotherapy may be needed as an adjunct. A multidisciplinary approach, long-term follow-up, and treatment modalities customized to each individual are essential for optimal control of hypercortisolemia and management of comorbidities.

  4. Gallium-68 DOTA-TATE Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography: Scintigraphic Changes of Adrenal Glands Following Management of Ectopic Cushing's Syndrome by Steroidogenesis Inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yu-Ting; Aziz, Shaikh Irfan; Kumar, Aravind S. Ravi

    2014-01-01

    In the era of emerging functional imaging techniques, an understanding of the effects of hormonal therapies on the scintigraphic appearance of endocrine organs is desirable to minimize the erroneous scan interpretation. The mechanisms by which changes in the scintigraphic appearance of endocrine organs occur however sometimes remain ambiguous. This case demonstrates the gallium-68 (Ga-68) DOTA-TATE positron emission tomography/computed tomography (CT) appearance of adrenal glands following management with steroidogenesis inhibitors. The potential mechanisms underlying this change are discussed. A 17-year-old boy with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) dependent Cushing's syndrome secondary to ectopic ACTH secretion underwent pre- and post-metyrapone and dexamethasone treatment Ga-68 DOTA-TATE scans 4 months apart. Pretreatment, both adrenals demonstrated normal symmetrical prominent Ga-68 DOTA-TATE uptake and normal CT appearance. The posttherapy scan revealed marked symmetrical suppression of Ga-68 DOTA-TATE uptake, but with bilateral adrenal hypertrophy on CT

  5. Morbidity of Cushing's Syndrome and Impact of Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Susan M; Valassi, Elena

    2018-06-01

    Cortisol excess in Cushing's syndrome is associated with metabolic, cardiovascular, and cognitive alterations, only partially reversible after resolution of hypercortisolism. Elevated cardiovascular risk may persist after eucortisolism has been achieved. Fractures and low bone mineral density are also described in Cushing's syndrome in remission. Hypercortisolism may induce irreversible structural and functional changes in the brain, leading to neuropsychiatric disorders in the active phase of the disease, which persist. Sustained deterioration of the cardiovascular system, bone remodeling, and cognitive function along with neuropsychological impairment are associated with high morbidity and poor quality of life before and after remission. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 131I-19-iodocholesterol adrenal scanning in Cushing's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbonnel, B.; Chatal, J.F.; Chupin, M.; Guillon, J.

    1976-01-01

    7 patients were investigated: 2 bilateral hyperplasia due to pituitary ACTH excess showed bilateral adrenal activity. 1 post-surgical remnant with recurrent Cushing's syndrome was detected. 1 adenoma showed unilateral intense activity and absent activity in the controlateral gland, even after ACTH treatment. 2 carcinomas were weakly imaged. In 1 case, hepatic metastasis showed 131 I-19-iodocholesterol uptake. Adrenal imaging with 131 I-19-iodocholesterol is not a good procedure for assessing hormonal function. It is a valuable and safe tool in the localization and diagnosis of adrenal lesions causing Cushing's syndrome, perhaps better than radiologic procedures. Radiation dosimetry is acceptable [fr

  7. Past and present in abdominal surgery management for Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilallonga, Ramon; Zafon, Carles; Fort, José Manuel; Mesa, Jordi; Armengol, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Data on specific abdominal surgery and Cushing's syndrome are infrequent and are usually included in the adrenalectomy reports. Current literature suggests the feasibility and reproducibility of the surgical adrenalectomies for patients diagnosed with non-functioning tumours and functioning adrenal tumours including pheochromocytoma, Conn's syndrome and Cushing's syndrome. Medical treatment for Cushing's syndrome is feasible but follow-up or clinical situations force the patient to undergo a surgical procedure. Laparoscopic surgery has become a gold standard nowadays in a broad spectrum of pathologies. Laparoscopic adrenalectomies are also standard procedures nowadays. However, despite the different characteristics and clinical disorders related to the laparoscopically removed adrenal tumours, the intraoperative and postoperative outcomes do not significantly differ in most cases between the different groups of patients, techniques and types of tumours. Tumour size, hormonal type and surgeon's experience could be different factors that predict intraoperative and postoperative complications. Transabdominal and retroperitoneal approaches can be considered. Outcomes for Cushing's syndrome do not differ depending on the surgical approach. Novel technologies and approaches such as single-port surgery or robotic surgery have proven to be safe and feasible. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is a safe and feasible approach to adrenal pathology, providing the patients with all the benefits of minimally invasive surgery. Single-port access and robotic surgery can be performed but more data are required to identify their correct role between the different surgical approaches. Factors such as surgeon's experience, tumour size and optimal technique can affect the outcomes of this surgery.

  8. Cushing's Syndrome: Where and How to Find It.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debono, Miguel; Newell-Price, John D

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome is challenging to endocrinologists as patients often present with an insidious history, together with subtle external clinical features. Moreover, complications of endogenous hypercortisolism, such as visceral obesity, diabetes, hypertension and osteoporosis, are conditions commonly found in the population, and discerning whether these are truly a consequence of hypercortisolism is not straightforward. To avoid misdiagnosis, a careful investigative approach is essential. The investigation of Cushing's syndrome is a three-step process. Firstly, after exclusion of exogenous glucocorticoid use, the decision to initiate investigations should be based on whether there is a clinical index of suspicion of the disease. Specific signs of endogenous hypercortisolism raise the a priori probability of a truly positive test. Secondly, if the probability of hypercortisolism is high, one should carry out specific tests as indicated by Endocrine Society guidelines. Populations with non-distinguishing features of Cushing's syndrome should not be screened routinely as biochemical tests have a high false-positive rate if used indiscriminately. Thirdly, once hypercortisolism is confirmed, one should move to establish the cause. This usually entails distinguishing between adrenal or pituitary-related causes and the remoter possibility of the ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome. It is crucial that the presence of Cushing's syndrome is established before any attempt at differential diagnosis. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Hypercoagulable State in Cushing's Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zaane, Bregje; Nur, Erfan; Squizzato, Alessandro; Dekkers, Olaf M.; Twickler, Marcel Th B.; Fliers, Eric; Gerdes, Victor E. A.; Büller, Harry R.; Brandjes, Dees P. M.

    2009-01-01

    Context: It has been debated whether an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) exists in patients with Cushing's syndrome. Objective: We aimed to summarize published literature on the effects of endogenous hypercortisolism on coagulation and fibrinolysis, as well as on the clinical outcome

  10. Pulsatile thyrotropin secretion in patients with Cushing's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaanse, R.; Brabant, G.; Endert, E.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    1994-01-01

    Pulsatile and circadian thyrotropin (TSH) secretion were studied in 16 healthy controls and in three patients with Cushing's syndrome who were studied twice (before and after treatment). Blood was sampled every 10 minutes over 24 hours for TSH (immunoradiometric assay [IRMA]). Mean 24-hour TSH in

  11. Chronic Glucocorticoid Hypersecretion in Cushing's Syndrome Exacerbates Cognitive Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Kathy; Forget, Helene; Cohen, Henri

    2009-01-01

    Cumulative exposure to glucocorticoid hormones (GC) over the lifespan has been associated with cognitive impairment and may contribute to physical and cognitive degeneration in aging. The objective of the present study was to examine whether the pattern of cognitive deficits in patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS), a disorder characterized by…

  12. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Cushing's Disease and Nelson's Syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marek, J.; Ježková, J.; Hána, V.; Kršek, M.; Liščák, R.; Vladyka, V.; Pecen, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2015), s. 376-384 ISSN 1386-341X Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : Cushing's disease * Nelson's syndrome * Gamma knife surgery * Pituitary adenoma Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 3.407, year: 2015

  13. The diagnostic value of late-night salivary cortisol for diagnosis of subclinical Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzu, Idris; Zuhur, Sayid Shafi; Demir, Nazan; Aktas, Gokce; Yener Ozturk, Feyza; Altuntas, Yuksel

    2016-01-01

    Late-night salivary cortisol is a frequently used and easily implemented diagnostically valuable test for the diagnosis of overt Cushing's syndrome. The use of late-night salivary cortisol in the diagnosis of subclinical Cushing's syndrome is somewhat controversial. In this study, we aimed to determine the diagnostic value of late-night salivary cortisol in diagnosing subclinical Cushing's syndrome and compare it with 24-hour urinary free cortisol levels (UFC). The study consisted of 33 cases of subclinical Cushing's syndrome, 59 cases of non-functioning adrenal adenoma, and 41 control subjects. Late-night salivary cortisol and UFC were measured in all the cases. The diagnosis of subclinical Cushing's syndrome was based on combined results of 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test > 1.8 μg/dL and ACTH Cushing's syndrome were significantly higher than in subjects with non-functioning adrenal adenoma and the control group (p Cushing's syndrome were determined as 82% and 60%, respectively. Using a cut-off value of 137 μg/day, the sensitivity and specificity of UFC was determined as 18% and 90%, respectively. Because the sensitivity of late-night salivary cortisol for the diagnosis of subclinical Cushing's syndrome is limited, using it as the sole screening test for subclinical Cushing's syndrome may lead to false negative results. However, using it as an adjunct test to other tests may be beneficial in the diagnosis of subclinical Cushing's syndrome. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (5): 487-492).

  14. Cushing's syndrome: from physiological principles to diagnosis and clinical care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Hershel; Carroll, Ty

    2015-01-01

    The physiological control of cortisol synthesis in the adrenal cortex involves stimulation of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) by hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and then stimulation of the adrenal by ACTH. The control loop of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis is closed by negative feedback of cortisol on the hypothalamus and pituitary. Understanding this system is required to master the diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment of endogenous hypercortisolism – Cushing's syndrome. Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is caused either by excess ACTH secretion or by autonomous cortisol release from the adrenal cortex. Diagnosis of cortisol excess exploits three physiological principles: failure to achieve the normal nadir in the cortisol diurnal rhythm, loss of sensitivity of ACTH-secreting tumours to cortisol negative feedback, and increased excretion of free cortisol in the urine. Differentiating a pituitary source of excess ACTH (Cushing's disease) from an ectopic source is accomplished by imaging the pituitary and sampling for ACTH in the venous drainage of the pituitary. With surgical removal of ACTH or cortisol-secreting tumours, secondary adrenal insufficiency ensues because of the prior suppression of the HPA axis by glucocorticoid negative feedback. Medical therapy is targeted to the anatomical location of the dysregulated component of the HPA axis. Future research will focus on new diagnostics and treatments of Cushing's syndrome. These are elegant examples of translational research: understanding basic physiology informs the development of new approaches to diagnosis and treatment. Appreciating pathophysiology generates new areas for inquiry of basic physiological and biochemical mechanisms. PMID:25480800

  15. Neonatal Cushing Syndrome: A Rare but Potentially Devastating Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsi, Christina; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2018-03-01

    Neonatal Cushing syndrome (CS) is most commonly caused by exogenous administration of glucocorticoids and rarely by endogenous hypercortisolemia. CS owing to adrenal lesions is the most common cause of endogenous CS in neonates and infants, and adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) represent most cases. Many ACTs develop in the context of a TP53 gene mutation, which causes Li-Fraumeni syndrome. More rarely, neonatal CS presents as part of other syndromes such as McCune-Albright syndrome or Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Management usually includes resection of the primary tumor with or without additional medical treatment, but manifestations may persist after resolution of hypercortisolemia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Symptomatic Cushing's syndrome and hyperandrogenemia in a steroid cell ovarian neoplasm: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedhom, Ramy; Hu, Sophia; Ohri, Anupam; Infantino, Dorian; Lubitz, Sara

    2016-10-12

    Malignant steroid cell tumors of the ovary are rare and frequently associated with hormonal abnormalities. There are no guidelines on how to treat rapidly progressive Cushing's syndrome, a medical emergency. A 67-year-old white woman presented to our hospital with rapidly developing signs and symptoms of Cushing's syndrome secondary to a steroid-secreting tumor. Her physical and biochemical manifestations of Cushing's syndrome progressed, and she was not amenable to undergoing conventional chemotherapy secondary to the debilitating effects of high cortisol. Her rapidly progressive Cushing's syndrome ultimately led to her death, despite aggressive medical management with spironolactone, ketoconazole, mitotane, and mifepristone. We report an unusual and rare case of Cushing's syndrome secondary to a malignant steroid cell tumor of the ovary. The case is highlighted to discuss the complications of rapidly progressive Cushing's syndrome, an underreported and often unrecognized endocrine emergency, and the best available evidence for treatment.

  17. Effect of Cushing's syndrome - Endogenous hypercortisolemia on cardiovascular autonomic functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyotsna, V P; Naseer, Ali; Sreenivas, V; Gupta, Nandita; Deepak, K K

    2011-02-24

    Cushing's syndrome is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It's also associated with other cardiac risk factors like hypertension, diabetes mellitus and obesity. Cardiovascular autonomic function impairment could predict cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Twenty five patients with Cushing's syndrome without diabetes and twenty five age matched healthy controls underwent a battery of cardiovascular autonomic function tests including deep breath test, Valsalva test, hand grip test, cold pressor test and response to standing from lying position. The rise in diastolic blood pressure on hand grip test and diastolic BP response to cold pressor test in Cushing's patients were significantly less compared to healthy controls (9.83 ± 3.90 vs 20.64 ± 9.55, p<0.001 and 10.09 ± 4.07 vs 15.33 ± 6.26, p<0.01 respectively). The E:I ratio on deep breathing test was also less in the patients in comparison to controls (1.36 ± 0.21 vs 1.53 ± 0.19, p<0.01). Seven patients underwent the same battery of tests 6 months after a curative surgery showing a trend towards normalization with significant improvement in expiratory to inspiratory ratio and sinus arrhythmia delta heart rate. To conclude, this study showed that chronic endogenous hypercortisolism in Cushing's is associated with an impaired sympathetic cardiovascular autonomic functioning. After a curative surgery, some of the parameters tend to improve. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A black adrenocortical adenoma causing Cushing's syndrome not imaged by radiocholesterol scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reschini, E.; Baldini, M.; Cantalamessa, L.

    1990-01-01

    In a 33-year-old female patient with left adrenal tumour and Cushing's syndrome, adrenocortical scintigraphy with radiocholesterol did not image the tumour nor the suppressed contralateral gland. Histology showed a black adrenocortical adenoma composed only of compact cells; there was no evidence of malignancy. This demonstrates that non-visualization of the adrenal glands in a patient with Cushing's syndrome is not invariably due to adrenal carcinoma. The literature on black adrenal adenomas causing Cushing's syndrome is reviewed. (orig.)

  19. Ritonavir and Topical Ocular Corticosteroid Induced Cushing's Syndrome in an Adolescent With HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainsbury, Paul G; Sharp, Jessica; Tappin, Alison; Hussey, Martin; Lenko, Alexandra; Foster, Caroline

    2017-05-01

    Cushing's syndrome after topical ocular corticosteroid use is extremely rare. We describe a case of symptomatic Cushing's syndrome in an adolescent male with sight-threatening vernal keratoconjunctivitis on antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection that included ritonavir, a potent cytochrome p450 CYP3A4 inhibitor. CYP3A4 inhibition reduces the metabolism of exogenous corticosteroids leading to suppression of endogenous steroid production and Cushing's syndrome.

  20. Complications of Cushing's syndrome: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivonello, Rosario; Isidori, Andrea M; De Martino, Maria Cristina; Newell-Price, John; Biller, Beverly M K; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-07-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a serious endocrine disease caused by chronic, autonomous, and excessive secretion of cortisol. The syndrome is associated with increased mortality and impaired quality of life because of the occurrence of comorbidities. These clinical complications include metabolic syndrome, consisting of systemic arterial hypertension, visceral obesity, impairment of glucose metabolism, and dyslipidaemia; musculoskeletal disorders, such as myopathy, osteoporosis, and skeletal fractures; neuropsychiatric disorders, such as impairment of cognitive function, depression, or mania; impairment of reproductive and sexual function; and dermatological manifestations, mainly represented by acne, hirsutism, and alopecia. Hypertension in patients with Cushing's syndrome has a multifactorial pathogenesis and contributes to the increased risk for myocardial infarction, cardiac failure, or stroke, which are the most common causes of death; risks of these outcomes are exacerbated by a prothrombotic diathesis and hypokalaemia. Neuropsychiatric disorders can be responsible for suicide. Immune disorders are common; immunosuppression during active disease causes susceptibility to infections, possibly complicated by sepsis, an important cause of death, whereas immune rebound after disease remission can exacerbate underlying autoimmune diseases. Prompt treatment of cortisol excess and specific treatments of comorbidities are crucial to prevent serious clinical complications and reduce the mortality associated with Cushing's syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Selective inferior petrosal sinus sampling without venous outflow diversion in the detection of a pituitary adenoma in Cushing's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andereggen, Lukas; Schroth, Gerhard; Gralla, Jan; Ozdoba, Christoph; Seiler, Rolf; Mariani, Luigi; Beck, Juergen; Widmer, Hans-Rudolf; Andres, Robert H.; Christ, Emanuel

    2012-01-01

    Conventional MRI may still be an inaccurate method for the non-invasive detection of a microadenoma in adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-dependent Cushing's syndrome (CS). Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) with ovine corticotropin-releasing hormone (oCRH) stimulation is an invasive, but accurate, intervention in the diagnostic armamentarium surrounding CS. Until now, there is a continuous controversial debate regarding lateralization data in detecting a microadenoma. Using BIPSS, we evaluated whether a highly selective placement of microcatheters without diversion of venous outflow might improve detection of pituitary microadenoma. We performed BIPSS in 23 patients that met clinical and biochemical criteria of CS and with equivocal MRI findings. For BIPSS, the femoral veins were catheterized bilaterally with a 6-F catheter and the inferior petrosal sinus bilaterally with a 2.7-F microcatheter. A third catheter was placed in the right femoral vein. Blood samples were collected from each catheter to determine ACTH blood concentration before and after oCRH stimulation. In 21 patients, a central-to-peripheral ACTH gradient was found and the affected side determined. In 18 of 20 patients where transsphenoidal partial hypophysectomy was performed based on BIPSS findings, microadenoma was histologically confirmed. BIPSS had a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 67% after oCRH stimulation in detecting a microadenoma. Correct localization of the adenoma was achieved in all Cushing's disease patients. BIPSS remains the gold standard in the detection of a microadenoma in CS. Our findings show that the selective placement of microcatheters without venous outflow diversion might further enhance better recognition to localize the pituitary tumor. (orig.)

  2. Does the corticoadrenal adenoma with ''pre-Cushing's syndrome'' exist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbonnel, B.; Chatal, J.F.; Ozanne, P.

    1981-01-01

    An adrenal tumor was discovered fortuitously in a patient with no clinical features of Cushing's syndrome. On adrenal imaging, there was good uptake in the nodule but no visualization of the contralateral adrenal. The latter was seen, however, in a second scan performed under ACTH treatment. In the hormone assessment, basal cortisol and 17-hydroxycorticoids were normal and cortisol diurnal variation was near normal, but a dexamethasone suppression test and ACTH responses to metyrapone and insulin hypoglycemia were abnormal. Eight months after excision of a spongiocytic-type adenoma, the remaining adrenal was visible on scintigram and the hormonal tests were normal. This pattern suggests that the clinical Cushing's syndrome was enough to partially suppress ACTH and, consequently, visualization of the contralateral gland

  3. Adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasm presenting with Cushing's syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabayegit Ozlem

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Oncocytic neoplasms occur in several organs and are most commonly found in the thyroid, kidneys and salivary glands. Oncocytic neoplasms of the adrenal cortex are extremely rare and are usually non-functioning. Case presentation We report the case of an adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasm with uncertain malignant potential in a 31-year-old man with Cushing's syndrome. The patient had been operated on following diagnosis of a 7 cm adrenal mass. Following surgery, the Cushing's syndrome resolved. The patient is still alive with no metastases one year after the surgery. Conclusion Adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasms must be considered in the differential diagnosis of both functioning and non-functioning adrenal masses.

  4. Pitfalls in the diagnosis and management of Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Vivek; El Asmar, Nadine; Selman, Warren R; Arafah, Baha M

    2015-02-01

    Despite many recent advances, the management of patients with Cushing's disease continues to be challenging. Cushing's syndrome is a complex metabolic disorder that is a result of excess glucocorticoids. Excluding the exogenous causes, adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas account for nearly 70% of all cases of Cushing's syndrome. The suspicion, diagnosis, and differential diagnosis require a logical systematic approach with attention paid to key details at each investigational step. A diagnosis of endogenous Cushing's syndrome is usually suspected in patients with clinical symptoms and confirmed by using multiple biochemical tests. Each of the biochemical tests used to establish the diagnosis has limitations that need to be considered for proper interpretation. Although some tests determine the total daily urinary excretion of cortisol, many others rely on measurements of serum cortisol at baseline and after stimulation (e.g., after corticotropin-releasing hormone) or suppression (e.g., dexamethasone) with agents that influence the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Other tests (e.g., measurements of late-night salivary cortisol concentration) rely on alterations in the diurnal rhythm of cortisol secretion. Because more than 90% of the cortisol in the circulation is protein bound, any alteration in the binding proteins (transcortin and albumin) will automatically influence the measured level and confound the interpretation of stimulation and suppression data, which are the basis for establishing the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome. Although measuring late-night salivary cortisol seems to be an excellent initial test for hypercortisolism, it may be confounded by poor sampling methods and contamination. Measurements of 24-hour urinary free-cortisol excretion could be misleading in the presence of some pathological and physiological conditions. Dexamethasone suppression tests can be affected by illnesses that alter the absorption of the drug (e

  5. Neuropsychiatric findings in Cushing syndrome and exogenous glucocorticoid administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkman, Monica N

    2013-09-01

    This article reviews the neuropsychiatric presentations elicited by spontaneous hypercortisolism and exogenous supraphysiologic glucocorticoids. Patients with Cushing disease and syndrome develop a depressive syndrome: irritable and depressed mood, decreased libido, disrupted sleep and cognitive decrements. Exogenous short-term glucocorticoid administration may elicit a hypomanic syndrome with mood, sleep and cognitive disruptions. Treatment options are discussed. Brain imaging and neuropsychological studies indicate elevated cortisol and other glucocorticoids are especially deleterious to hippocampus and frontal lobe. The research findings also shed light on neuropsychiatric abnormalities in conditions that have substantial subgroups exhibiting elevated and dysregulated cortisol: aging, major depressive disorder and Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Surgical management of Cushing Syndrome secondary to micronodular adrenal hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Anathea C.; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Patronas, Nicholas J.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Batista, Dalia; Alexander, H. Richard; Pingpank, James F.; Keil, Meg; Bartlett, David L.; Libutti, Steven K.

    2008-01-01

    Background We reviewed our experience with micronodular adrenal hyperplasia (MAH), its pigmented variant primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD), and the association with Carney’s Complex (CNC) in order to better characterize the disorders. Methods This study is a retrospective analysis of clinical data and operative reports of 34 patients identified with MAH and/or PPNAD who underwent resection between 1969 and 2006 at the Clinical Research Center, an inpatient research hospital, at the National Institutes of Health. Symptoms and anthropometric and biochemical data were used to evaluate effect of resection. Results Fifteen patients (44%) presented as adults and 19 (56%) as children. Twenty five patients (74%) presented with non-cyclic Cushing syndrome and nine patients (26%) presented with cyclic Cushing Syndrome. Thirty one patients underwent bilateral resection; this was curative biochemically in 30 patients. Fourteen operations were performed laparoscopically (41%), and 20 were perfomed as open resections (59%). There was one post-operative complication in the laparoscopic group (7%) and 6 complications in the open group (30%) (p=0.20). Follow-up was available for 25 patients (74%). Statistically significant improvements in anthropometrics were observed for both adults and children. The most frequent manifestation of CNC requiring additional operation was cardiac myxoma which was associated strongly with an atypical (cyclic) presentation of Cushing Syndrome (p=0.009). Conclusion Cushing Syndrome due to MAH and PPNAD may be cured by bilateral adrenal resection. All patients should be screened for manifestations of CNC at the time of adrenal diagnosis with particular attention to cardiac disease. PMID:18549891

  7. Gamma knife radiosurgery for Cushing's disease and Nelson's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Josef; Ježková, Jana; Hána, Václav; Kršek, Michal; Liščák, Roman; Vladyka, Vilibald; Pecen, Ladislav

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents our 18 years of experience in treating ACTH secreting adenomas (Cushing's disease and Nelson's syndrome) using the Leksell gamma knife (LGK) irradiation. Twenty-six patients with Cushing's disease were followed-up after LGK irradiation for 48-216 months (median 78 months). Seventeen patients had undergone previous surgery, in nine patients LGK irradiation was the primary therapy. Furthermore, 14 patients with Nelson's syndrome were followed-up for 30-204 months (median 144 months). LGK treatment resulted in hormonal normalization in 80.7 % of patients with Cushing's disease. Time to normalization was 6-54 months (median 30 months). The volume of the adenoma decreased in 92.3% (in 30.7% disappeared completely). There was no recurrence of the disease. In all 14 patients with Nelson's syndrome ACTH levels decreased (in two patients fully normalized) their ACTH levels. When checked up 5-10 years after irradiation regrowth of the adenoma was only detected in one patient (9.1%), in 27.3% adenoma volume remained unchanged, in 45.4% adenoma volume decreased and in 18.2% adenoma completely disappeared. Hypopituitarism did not develop in any patient where the critical dose to the pituitary and distal infundibulum was respected. LGK radiation represents an effective and well-tolerated option for the treatment of patients with Cushing's disease after unsuccessful surgery and may be valuable even as a primary treatment in patients who are not suitable for, or refuse, surgery. In the case of Nelson's syndrome it is possible to impede tumorous growth and control the size of the adenoma in almost all patients.

  8. Treatment of Cushing's Syndrome: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieman, Lynnette K.; Biller, Beverly M. K.; Findling, James W.; Murad, M. Hassan; Newell-Price, John; Savage, Martin O.; Tabarin, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective is to formulate clinical practice guidelines for treating Cushing's syndrome. Participants: Participants include an Endocrine Society-appointed Task Force of experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. The European Society for Endocrinology co-sponsored the guideline. Evidence: The Task Force used the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system to describe the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. The Task Force commissioned three systematic reviews and used the best available evidence from other published systematic reviews and individual studies. Consensus Process: The Task Force achieved consensus through one group meeting, several conference calls, and numerous e-mail communications. Committees and members of The Endocrine Society and the European Society of Endocrinology reviewed and commented on preliminary drafts of these guidelines. Conclusions: Treatment of Cushing's syndrome is essential to reduce mortality and associated comorbidities. Effective treatment includes the normalization of cortisol levels or action. It also includes the normalization of comorbidities via directly treating the cause of Cushing's syndrome and by adjunctive treatments (eg, antihypertensives). Surgical resection of the causal lesion(s) is generally the first-line approach. The choice of second-line treatments, including medication, bilateral adrenalectomy, and radiation therapy (for corticotrope tumors), must be individualized to each patient. PMID:26222757

  9. AN INDIVIDUALIZED APPROACH TO THE EVALUATION OF CUSHING SYNDROME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Susmeeta T

    2017-06-01

    Cushing syndrome (CS) is caused by chronic exposure to excess glucocorticoids. Early recognition and treatment of hypercortisolemia can lead to decreased morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis of CS and thereafter, establishing the cause can often be difficult, especially in patients with mild and cyclic hypercortisolism. Surgical excision of the cause of excess glucocorticoids is the optimal treatment for CS. Medical therapy (steroidogenesis inhibitors, medications that decrease adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH] levels or glucocorticoid antagonists) and pituitary radiotherapy may be needed as adjunctive treatment modalities in patients with residual, recurrent or metastatic disease, in preparation for surgery, or when surgery is contraindicated. A multidisciplinary team approach, individualized treatment plan and long-term follow-up are important for optimal management of hypercortisolemia and the comorbidities associated with CS. ACTH = adrenocorticotropic hormone; BIPSS = bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling; CBG = corticosteroid-binding globulin; CD = Cushing disease; CRH = corticotropin-releasing hormone; CS = Cushing syndrome; Dex = dexamethasone; DST = dexamethasone suppression test; EAS = ectopic ACTH syndrome; FDA = U.S. Food & Drug Administration; HDDST = high-dose DST; IPS/P = inferior petrosal sinus to peripheral; MRI = magnetic resonance imaging; NET = neuroendocrine tumor; PET = positron emission tomography; UFC = urinary free cortisol.

  10. Cushing disease revealed by bilateral atypical central serous chorioretinopathy: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovansili, Iama; Belange, Georeges; Affortit, Aude

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with Cushing disease revealed by bilateral central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR). We present the clinical history, physical findings, laboratory results, and imaging studies of a 53-year-old Chinese woman with a Cushing disease revealed by bilateral CSCR. The association with CSCR and the pertinent literature are reviewed. A 53-year-old patient initially presented to the Department of Ophthalmology with a 4-week history of decreased vision in the left eye. Standard ophthalmologic examination and fluorescein angiography established the diagnosis of bilateral CSCR. Systemic clinical signs and biochemical analysis indicated hypercortisolism. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pituitary gland showed a left-side lesion compatible with a microadenoma. The diagnosis of Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent Cushing syndrome secondary to a pituitary microadenoma was selected. Endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery was performed and the pituitary adenoma was successfully removed. The histology confirmed the presence of ACTH-immunopositive pituitary adenoma. Early postoperative morning cortisol levels indicated early remission. At 6 weeks postoperatively, the patient's morning cortisol remains undetectable, and serous retinal detachments had regressed. CSCR is an uncommon manifestation of endogenous Cushing syndrome. It can be the first presentation of hypercortisolism caused by Cushing disease. CSCR should be considered when assessing patients with Cushing syndrome complaining of visual disorders. On the other hand, it is useful in patients with an atypical form of CSCR to exclude Cushing's syndrome.

  11. Acute mesenteric ischemia and hepatic infarction after treatment of ectopic Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayasu, Shinobu; Murasawa, Shingo; Yamagata, Satoshi; Kageyama, Kazunori; Nigawara, Takeshi; Watanuki, Yutaka; Kimura, Daisuke; Tsushima, Takao; Sakamoto, Yoshiyuki; Hakamada, Kenichi; Terui, Ken; Daimon, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Patients with Cushing's syndrome and excess exogenous glucocorticoids have an increased risk for venous thromboembolism, as well as arterial thrombi. The patients are at high risk of thromboembolic events, especially during active disease and even in cases of remission and after surgery in Cushing's syndrome and withdrawal state in glucocorticoid users. We present a case of Cushing's syndrome caused by adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting lung carcinoid tumor. Our patient developed acute mesenteric ischemia after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery despite administration of sufficient glucocorticoid and thromboprophylaxis in the perioperative period. In addition, our patient developed hepatic infarction after surgical resection of the intestine. Then, the patient was supported by total parenteral nutrition. Our case report highlights the risk of microthrombi, which occurred in our patient after treatment of ectopic Cushing's syndrome. Guidelines on thromboprophylaxis and/or antiplatelet therapy for Cushing's syndrome are acutely needed. The present case showed acute mesenteric thromboembolism and hepatic infarction after treatment of ectopic Cushing's syndrome.Patients with Cushing's syndrome are at increased risk for thromboembolic events and increased morbidity and mortality.An increase in thromboembolic risk has been observed during active disease, even in cases of remission and postoperatively in Cushing's syndrome.Thromboprophylaxis and antiplatelet therapy should be considered in treatment of glucocorticoid excess or glucocorticoid withdrawal.

  12. Cushing's Syndrome and Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Hyperactivity in Chronic Central Serous Chorioretinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haalen, Femke M; van Dijk, Elon H C; Dekkers, Olaf M; Bizino, Maurice B; Dijkman, Greet; Biermasz, Nienke R; Boon, Camiel J F; Pereira, Alberto M

    2018-01-01

    Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC), a specific form of macular degeneration, has been reported as presenting manifestation of Cushing's syndrome. Furthermore, CSC has been associated with both exogenous hypercortisolism and endogenous Cushing's syndrome. It is important to know whether CSC patients should be screened for Cushing's syndrome. Although hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity in CSC has been suggested, no detailed evaluation of the HPA axis has been performed in a large cohort of CSC patients. This study aimed to investigate whether Cushing's syndrome prevalence is increased among chronic CSC (cCSC) patients and whether detailed endocrinological phenotyping indicates hyperactivity of the HPA axis. Cross-sectional study. 86 cCSC patients and 24 controls. Prevalence of Cushing's syndrome, HPA axis activity. None of the cCSC patients met the clinical or biochemical criteria of Cushing's syndrome. However, compared to controls, HPA axis activity was increased in cCSC patients, reflected by higher 24 h urinary free cortisol, and accompanying higher waist circumference and diastolic blood pressure, whereas circadian cortisol rhythm and feedback were not different. Chronic CSC patients did not report more stress or stress-related problems on questionnaires. No case of Cushing's syndrome was revealed in a large cohort of cCSC patients. Therefore, we advise against screening for Cushing's syndrome in CSC patients, unless additional clinical features are present. However, our results indicate that cCSC is associated with hyperactivity of the HPA axis, albeit not accompanied with perception of more psychosocial stress.

  13. Medical treatment of Cushing's syndrome: Adrenal-blocking drugs and ketaconazole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Feelders (Richard); L.J. Hofland (Leo); W.W. de Herder (Wouter)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCushing's syndrome is associated with serious morbidity and increased mortality. Irrespective of its cause, i.e. a pituitary adenoma, ectopic ACTH production or an adrenal neoplasia, Cushing's syndrome is primarily treated surgically. However, when surgery is unsuccessful or

  14. Cushing's syndrome and bone mineral density: lowest Z scores in young patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerden, A.W.A.; Heijer, M. den; Oyen, W.J.G.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Patients with Cushing's syndrome have a high prevalence of osteoporotic fractures. Little is known about factors determining bone mineral density (BMD) in these patients. Objective: To evaluate which factors influence BMD at the time of diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome. Methods: In 77

  15. Coagulation Profile Dynamics in Pediatric Patients with Cushing Syndrome: A Prospective, Observational Comparative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Birdwell, L. (Leah); M.B. Lodish (Maya Beth); Tirosh, A. (Amit); P. Chittiboina (Prashant); M. Keil (Mark); Lyssikatos, C. (Charlampos); Belyavskaya, E. (Elena); R.A. Feelders (Richard); C.A. Stratakis (Constantine)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective To evaluate the association between Cushing syndrome and hypercoagulability in children. Study design A prospective, observational study was performed of 54 patients with Cushing syndrome, 15.1 ± 3.9 years, treated at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center.

  16. Diagnosis and clinical genetics of Cushing syndrome in pediatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2016-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Endogenous Cushing syndrome (CS) in pediatrics is rare; it may be caused by tumors that produce corticotropin (ACTH) in the pituitary gland (this form of CS is called Cushing disease) or elsewhere (ectopic CS), tumors that produce corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) anywhere (mostly neuroendocrine tissues), and finally adrenocortical masses that produce cortisol, such as adrenocortical cancer (ACC) or adenomas, and bilateral adrenocortical hypeprlasia (BAHs). ACC is a very rare cause of CS in children but should be excluded first, especially among younger patients. CS in children is often caused by germline or somatic mutations in an expanding list of genes with implications for the prognosis of the patients and for their families. CS should be early recognized in children; otherwise, it can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. All patients with suspected CS should be referred to specialized clinical centers for work-up; these centers should have access to experienced endocrine and neurological surgeons. PMID:27241967

  17. A Case of Paraneoplastic Cushing Syndrome Presenting as Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Nonketotic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina E. Brzezniak

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoid tumors are neuroendocrine tumors that mainly arise in the gastrointestinal tract, lungs, and bronchi. Bronchopulmonary carcinoids have been associated with Cushing syndrome, which results from ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH secretion. We report the case of a 65-year-old man, a colonel in the US Air Force, with metastatic bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumors treated on a clinical trial who was hospitalized for complaints of increasing thirst, polydipsia, polyuria, weakness, and visual changes. Decompensated hyperglycemia suggested a diagnosis of hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS. Additional findings, which included hypokalemia, hypernatremia, hypertension, metabolic alkalosis, moon facies, and striae, raised a red flag for an ectopic ACTH syndrome. Elevated ACTH levels confirmed Cushing syndrome. Treatment with a fluid replacement and insulin drip resulted in immediate symptomatic improvement. Cushing syndrome should be considered in carcinoid patients with physical stigmata such as moon facies and striae. HHNS may be the presenting clinical feature in patients with impaired glucose metabolism.

  18. Cushing's syndrome associated with a bronchial adenoma. Possible periodic hormonogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, M S; Gutman, A; Bruderman, I; Myers, B; Griffel, W B

    1975-09-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic problems in a patient with ectopic ACTH syndrome caused by a malignant bronchial adenoma are discussed. Persistent Cushing's syndrome was present following apparent total adrenalectomy, but radioactive scanning with 131I-19-iodocholesterol showed the presence of residual adrenal tissue in the right suprarenal bed. Amelioration of the hypercortisolism occurred after removal of the bronchial adenoma. A paradoxical elevation of adrenocortical activity followed administration of dexamethasone and data are presented which suggest that periodic secretion of ACTH accounted for this phenomenon.

  19. Management Strategies for Aggressive Cushing's Syndrome: From Macroadenomas to Ectopics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlotta Pozza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cushing’s syndrome (CS is a rare but severe clinical condition represented by an excessive endogenous cortisol secretion and hence excess circulating free cortisol, characterized by loss of the normal feedback regulation and circadian rhythm of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis due to inappropriate secretion of ACTH from a pituitary tumor (Cushing’s disease, CD or an ectopic source (ectopic ACTH secretion, EAS. The remaining causes (20% are ACTH independent. As soon as the diagnosis is established, the therapeutic goal is the removal of the tumor. Whenever surgery is not curative, management of patients with CS requires a major effort to control hypercortisolemia and associated symptoms. A multidisciplinary approach that includes endocrinologists, neurosurgeons, oncologists, and radiotherapists should be adopted. This paper will focus on traditional and novel medical therapy for aggressive ACTH-dependent CS. Several drugs are able to reduce cortisol levels. Their mechanism of action involves blocking adrenal steroidogenesis (ketoconazole, metyrapone, aminoglutethimide, mitotane, etomidate or inhibiting the peripheral action of cortisol through blocking its receptors (mifepristone “RU-486”. Other drugs include centrally acting agents (dopamine agonists, somatostatin receptor agonists, retinoic acid, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ “PPAR-γ” ligands and novel chemotherapeutic agents (temozolomide and tyrosine kinase inhibitors which have a significant activity against aggressive pituitary or ectopic tumors.

  20. Adrenal incidentalomas showing unilateral concordant visualization by adrenocortical scintigraphy. Comparison with adenomas in Cushing's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Atsushi; Nakajo, Masayuki; Tsuchimochi, Shinsaku; Nakabeppu, Yoshiaki; Umanodan, Tomokazu

    2000-01-01

    An adrenocortical adenoma causing Cushing's syndrome (Cushing's adenoma) produces a unilateral concordant visualization (UCV) imaging pattern in which the adenoma is only visualized on radioiodocholesterol adrenocortical scintigraphy. But because this imaging pattern is also noted in some patients with adrenal incidentalomas, we examined whether the UCV-incidentaloma was essentially identical with Cushing's adenoma and would develop Cushing's syndrome. The subjects were 9 patients with UCV-incidentalomas (mean size, 30 mm; range, 20-45 mm) and 6 patients with Cushing's adenomas (mean size, 28 mm; range, 25-35 mm). Endocrinological evaluations showed several abnormalities including blunted diurnal rhythm of plasma cortisol within the normal range, low plasma ACTH and/or high 24-hr urinary 17-OHCS levels in 8 of 9 patients with UCV-incidentalomas, but these abnormalities did not meet the diagnostic criteria of Cushing's syndrome. Adrenal uptake of the tracer in the patients with UCV-incidentalomas was not statistically different from that in the patients with Cushing's adenomas and had no relationship with hormonal values in either patient group. Tumor size on CT correlated with the levels of 24-hr urinary 17-OHCS (r=0.75, p=0.02) and plasma cortisol at 7:00 (r=0.82, p=0.007) in the patients with UCV-incidentalomas, but not in the patients with Cushing's adenomas. Although 3 UCV-incidentalomas increased slightly in size, none of 9 patients with UCV-incidentalomas has developed Cushing's syndrome for 4 to 52 months. These results suggest that the UCV-incidentaloma may be essentially different from the Cushing's adenoma and unlikely to develop Cushing's syndrome. (author)

  1. Urinary free cortisol in the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome: how useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeniyi, I A; Ifedayo, A O; Fasanmade, O A; Olufemi, A F

    2013-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome results from chronic exposure to excessive circulating levels of glucocorticoids. To confirm the clinical suspicion, biochemical tests are needed. These biochemical tests include the measurement of excess total endogenous cortisol secretion assessed by 24-hour urinary free cortisol (UFC), loss of the normal feedback of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis assessed by suppressibility after dexamethasone testing, and disturbance of the normal circadian rhythm of cortisol secretion assessed by midnight serum or salivary cortisol. We searched the Medline, Pubmed, journal articles, WHO publications and reputable textbooks relating to Cushing's syndrome using publications from 1995 to 2011. UFC has been the classic screening test used to confirm hypercortisolemia as the first step in diagnostic work-up of Cushing's syndrome. Its long-term use in clinical practice has led to emergence of significant evidence regarding the utility of UFC in the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome. UFC would have been a simple diagnostic tool to use but for the drawbacks in the sample collection, different laboratory methods of assay, not easily determined normal range. UFC use as a screening test is not strongly favoured because cortisol is not uniformly secreted during the day, and the increased prevalence of mild, preclinical or cyclic Cushing's syndrome. A very high level of UFC negates the need for other test procedures in patients with obvious symptoms and signs of Cushing's syndrome. We therefore suggest that UFC should be used with other screening tests for Cushing's syndrome to increase diagnostic yield.

  2. Glycated albumin is set lower in relation to plasma glucose levels in patients with Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Tetsuhiro; Otsuki, Michio; Tamada, Daisuke; Tabuchi, Yukiko; Mukai, Kosuke; Morita, Shinya; Kasayama, Soji; Shimomura, Iichiro; Koga, Masafumi

    2013-09-23

    Glycated albumin (GA) is an indicator of glycemic control, which has some specific characters in comparison with HbA1c. Since glucocorticoids (GC) promote protein catabolism including serum albumin, GC excess state would influence GA levels. We therefore investigated GA levels in patients with Cushing's syndrome. We studied 16 patients with Cushing's syndrome (8 patients had diabetes mellitus and the remaining 8 patients were non-diabetic). Thirty-two patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 32 non-diabetic subjects matched for age, sex and BMI were used as controls. In the patients with Cushing's syndrome, GA was significantly correlated with HbA1c, but the regression line shifted downwards as compared with the controls. The GA/HbA1c ratio in the patients with Cushing's syndrome was also significantly lower than the controls. HbA1c in the non-diabetic patients with Cushing's syndrome was not different from the non-diabetic controls, whereas GA was significantly lower. In 7 patients with Cushing's syndrome who performed self-monitoring of blood glucose, the measured HbA1c was matched with HbA1c estimated from mean blood glucose, whereas the measured GA was significantly lower than the estimated GA. We clarified that GA is set lower in relation to plasma glucose levels in patients with Cushing's syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. PRKAR1A-negative familial Cushing's syndrome: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Lee Ling; Kitan, Normayah; Paramasivam, Sharmila Sunita; Ratnasingam, Jeyakantha; Ibrahim, Luqman; Chan, Siew Pheng; Tan, Alexander Tong Boon; Vethakkan, Shireene Ratna

    2015-12-01

    Determining the etiology of Cushing's syndrome is very challenging to endocrinologists, with most of the difficulty arising from subtype differentiation of adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent Cushing's syndrome. We present the pitfalls of evaluating a rare cause of adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing's syndrome in the transition period between adolescence and adulthood. A sibling pair with familial isolated primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease is described. The index case, a 20-year-old Chinese woman, presented with premenopausal osteoporosis with T12 compression fracture and young hypertension. Biochemical analysis confirmed adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing's syndrome (elevated 0800 h plasma cortisol 808 nmol/L with suppressed adrenocorticotropic hormone level Cushing's syndrome at age 18 years, with typical cushingoid habitus, but no osteoporosis or hypertension. His adrenal computed tomographic scans showed micronodularities over bilateral adrenal glands. He was successfully treated with bilateral adrenalectomy. Screening for Carney's complex and PRKAR1A gene mutation was negative. Signs and symptoms of Cushing's syndrome resolved after bilateral adrenalectomy for both patients. They were placed on lifelong glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy and long-term surveillance for Carney's complex. The cases of these two patients illustrate the difficulties involved in diagnosing primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, a variant of adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing's syndrome that is managed with bilateral adrenalectomy. A high index of suspicion for this disease is needed, especially in adolescents with adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing's syndrome who have a significant family history, features of Carney's complex, and no resolution of Cushing's syndrome after unilateral adrenalectomy. Patients with primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease can either have

  4. Cushing's syndrome after intralesional triamcinolone acetonide: a systematic review of the literature and multinational survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredman, Rafi; Tenenhaus, Mayer

    2013-06-01

    Intralesional triamcinolone acetonide (TAC) is a well-established treatment for keloids and hypertrophic scars. The present text provides a systematic review of all previously reported cases of Cushing's syndrome resulting from intralesional TAC in an effort to discover whether an association exists between dosage or frequency of injection and the subsequent development of Cushing's syndrome. Data collected from a multinational survey of plastic surgeons is presented and discussed to understand current trends in the use of TAC. Recommendations for early recognition of Cushing's syndrome, TAC dosages in children, and follow up guidelines are presented. A systematic review of the literature from 1950 to 2012 was performed to evaluate outcomes following intralesional TAC used for the treatment of scars. A confidential survey was sent to 4125 plastic surgeons, 102 responses from 9 countries were received. A total of 18 cases of Cushing's syndrome after intralesional TAC have been reported in the English world literature. Survey data reveals that at least 30% (25/84) of plastic surgeons exceed the recommended dosage of TAC and 47% (46/97) are not aware of Cushing's syndrome as a possible complication of intralesional TAC. Cushing's syndrome resulting from intralesional TAC has been reported multiple times in the literature. Published literature suggests that TAC administered within the most recent recommendations does not appear to place adult patients at increased risk for developing Cushing's syndrome. Children appear to be most at risk for developing Cushing's syndrome and yet insufficient recommendations currently exist with regard to their safe dosage. Intralesional dosage should not exceed 30 mg per month in children while noting that at least one reported case of Cushing's syndrome resulted from a smaller dose. Diligent follow up and patient education is advised for any patient treated with TAC so that complications can be recognized and addressed promptly

  5. Bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing's syndrome: Pros and cons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O P Prajapati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the outcome of patients undergoing bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing's syndrome (CS. Methods: All patients who underwent bilateral adrenalectomy for CS at the Department of Endocrine Surgery, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences hospital between 1991 and 2013 were included. Medical records were reviewed to obtain patient characteristics and follow-up data. Results: Twenty-seven patients were studied. Mean age was 28.74 ± 12.95 years (range 9–60, male:female ratio was 1.7:1. About half that is, 48.19% were of Cushing's disease (failed trans-sphenoidal surgery [TSS], 37.04% were of ectopic CS (ECS, and 14.81% were of CS due to bilateral adrenal pathology. Median follow-up period was 80.5 months. Before surgery, 74.1% patients had body mass index > which after surgery declined to <25 in 75% of them. Hypertension was present in 85.2% and after surgery resolved in 40%. Diabetes mellitus was present in 44.4% and after surgery resolved in 33% of them. Hirsutism and proximal muscle weakness were present in 55.6% and 70.4% patients, respectively, and after surgery improved markedly in all patients. Adrenal crisis developed in 36.3% and Nelson's syndrome in 41.7% patients during follow-up. Three patients died in perioperative period while three succumbed to the disease during follow-up. Two patients developed recurrence of endogenous cortisol production during the follow-up period. Conclusions: Bilateral adrenalectomy is a valid treatment option for palliating severe symptoms in Pituitary Cushing's with failed TSS and unlocalized ECS but the procedure is curative for CS due to bilateral adrenal disease. Overall morbidity and mortality is higher than other endocrine operations. Co-morbidities tend to be more severe and are a risk factor for mortality during the time patient survives.

  6. Cushing's like syndrome in typical bronchial carcinoid a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedicelli, Ilaria; Patriciello, Giuseppina; Scala, Giovanni; Sorrentino, Antonietta; Gravino, Gennaro; Patriciello, Pasquale; Zeppa, Pio; Di Crescenzo, Vincenzo; Vatrella, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome occurred in 1-5% of cases of bronchial carcinoids. In this paper we describe a case of typical bronchial carcinoid in a nonsmoker young male with clinical manifestations mimicking a Cushing's syndrome. The patient performed chest radiograph and computed tomography. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed the presence of an endobronchial mass occluding the bronchus intermedius. A rigid bronchoscopy was necessary for the conclusive diagnosis and for partial resection of the intraluminal tumor. Despite of the presence of Cushingoid features, the normal blood levels of ACTH and cortisol excluded the coexistence of a Cushing's syndrome. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling in the diagnosis of Cushing disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deipolyi AR

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Amy R Deipolyi,1 Rahmi Oklu21Vascular and Interventional Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA; 2Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS is a minimally invasive procedure performed in the workup of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH-dependent Cushing syndrome (CS. Because noninvasive tests in the evaluation of CS patients lack sensitivity, BIPSS is the gold standard in diagnosing Cushing disease (CD, which is a pituitary source of excess ACTH. Here, the pathophysiology of CD and procedural details of BIPSS are reviewed.Keywords: pituitary adenoma, Cushing disease, inferior petrosal sinus, venous sampling

  8. E2F1-mediated human POMC expression in ectopic Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Takako; Liu, Ning-Ai; Tone, Yukiko; Cuevas-Ramos, Daniel; Heltsley, Roy; Tone, Masahide; Melmed, Shlomo

    2016-11-01

    Cushing's syndrome is caused by excessive adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion derived from pituitary corticotroph tumors (Cushing disease) or from non-pituitary tumors (ectopic Cushing's syndrome). Hypercortisolemic features of ectopic Cushing's syndrome are severe, and no definitive treatment for paraneoplastic ACTH excess is available. We aimed to identify subcellular therapeutic targets by elucidating transcriptional regulation of the human ACTH precursor POMC (proopiomelanocortin) and ACTH production in non-pituitary tumor cells and in cell lines derived from patients with ectopic Cushing's syndrome. We show that ectopic hPOMC transcription proceeds independently of pituitary-specific Tpit/Pitx1 and demonstrate a novel E2F1-mediated transcriptional mechanism regulating hPOMC We identify an E2F1 cluster binding to the proximal hPOMC promoter region (-42 to +68), with DNA-binding activity determined by the phosphorylation at Ser-337. hPOMC mRNA expression in cancer cells was upregulated (up to 40-fold) by the co-expression of E2F1 and its heterodimer partner DP1. Direct and indirect inhibitors of E2F1 activity suppressed hPOMC gene expression and ACTH by modifying E2F1 DNA-binding activity in ectopic Cushing's cell lines and primary tumor cells, and also suppressed paraneoplastic ACTH and cortisol levels in xenografted mice. E2F1-mediated hPOMC transcription is a potential target for suppressing ACTH production in ectopic Cushing's syndrome. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  9. Cushing's syndrome: Stepwise approach to diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Lila, Anurag R.; Sarathi, Vijaya; Jagtap, Varsha S.; Bandgar, Tushar; Menon, Padmavathy; Shah, Nalini S.

    2011-01-01

    The projected prevalence of Cushing′s syndrome (CS) inclusive of subclinical cases in the adult population ranges from 0.2-2% and it may no longer be considered as an orphan disease (2-3 cases/million/year). The recognition of CS by physicians is important for early diagnosis and treatment. Late-night salivary cortisol, dexamethasone suppressiontesti, or 24-h urine free cortisol are good screening tests. Positively screened cases need stepwise evaluation by an endocrinologist. This paper disc...

  10. DIAGNOSIS OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Differentiation of pathologic/neoplastic hypercortisolism (Cushing's syndrome) from physiologic/non-neoplastic hypercortisolism (formerly known as pseudo-Cushing's syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findling, James W; Raff, Hershel

    2017-05-01

    Endogenous hypercortisolism (Cushing's syndrome) usually implies the presence of a pathologic condition caused by either an ACTH-secreting neoplasm or autonomous cortisol secretion from a benign or malignant adrenal neoplasm. However, sustained or intermittent hypercortisolism may also accompany many medical disorders that stimulate physiologic/non-neoplastic activation of the HPA axis (formerly known as pseudo-Cushing's syndrome); these two entities may share indistinguishable clinical and biochemical features. A thorough history and physical examination is often the best (and sometimes only) way to exclude pathologic/neoplastic hypercortisolism. The presence of alcoholism, renal failure, poorly controlled diabetes and severe neuropsychiatric disorders should always raise suspicion that the presence of hypercortisolism may be related to physiologic/non-neoplastic Cushing's syndrome. As late-night salivary cortisol and low-dose dexamethasone suppression have good sensitivity and negative predictive value, normal studies exclude Cushing's syndrome of any form. However, these tests have imperfect specificity and additional testing over time with clinical follow-up is often needed. When there is persistent diagnostic uncertainty, secondary tests such as the DDAVP stimulation test and the dexamethasone-CRH test may provide evidence for the presence or absence of an ACTH-secreting tumor. This review will define and characterize the numerous causes of physiologic/non-neoplastic hypercortisolism and provide a rational clinical and biochemical approach to distinguish it from pathologic/neoplastic hypercortisolism (true Cushing's syndrome). © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  11. A case of melanocytic cervical adenosquamous carcinoma complicated with Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Zhang, Y; Wang, L; Yang, X

    2017-01-01

    To date, cervical carcinoma complicated with Cushing's syndrome were all diagnosed as small cell carcinoma histo- logically, but not adenosquamous carcinoma. Here the authors present the diagnosis, management, and prognosis of a case of melanocytic cervical adenosquamous carcinoma complicated with Cushing's syndrome. A 28-year-old woman was admitted with the chief complaint of post-coital bleeding for one month. Gynecological examination revealed a nodular yellowish-pigmented vegetation (6x5 cm) on the cervix. Laboratory findings proved the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome. Histopathological diagnosis showed the adenosquamous carcinoma with melanoma differentiation. Immunohistochemical stainings for melanoma A and anti- adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were positive in the majority of the tumor cells, which indicated that this melanocytic cervical carcinoma lesion was the source of ectopic ACTH production resulting in Cushing's syndrome. This is a unique case of a rare type of cervical carcinoma.

  12. Immunoglobulins of patients with Cushing's syndrome due to pigmented adrenocortical micronodular dysplasia stimulate in vitro steroidogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wulffraat, N. M.; Drexhage, H. A.; Wiersinga, W. M.; van der Gaag, R. D.; Jeucken, P.; Mol, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The putative stimulation of adrenal steroid production by immunoglobulins (Igs) of five patients with pigmented adrenocortical micronodular dysplasia and clinical Cushing's syndrome was investigated. Ascorbate depletion, a process linked to steroid production, was measured by a cyto-chemical

  13. [CHALLENGES IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF CUSHING'S SYNDROME IN THE MODERN ERA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiegh, Leonard; Sheikh-Ahmad, Mohammad; Reut, Maria; Jubran, Yousef; Shechner, Carmela

    2015-12-01

    Cushing's syndrome results from prolonged and excessive exposure to medically prescribed corticosteroids, or from excess endogenous cortisol secretion. When endogenous cortisol secretion is suspected, several screening tests are conducted in order to confirm or to rule out the diagnosis. In recent years, as the cut-off point of cortisol concentration on the 1 mg overnight dexamethasone suppression test was lowered, the prevalence of Cushing's syndrome has increased, and more cases of mild syndromes, with negative results on one or more screening tests, have increasingly been reported. In this paper, we will describe the various screening tests used for Cushing's syndrome, and will discuss their degree of sensitivity in the diagnosis of mild cases. We conclude that, in cases of mild syndromes, the sensitivity of some tests appears to be notably lower than has been reported. Until recently, the major challenge has been to distinguish between pseudo-Cushing's states and Cushing's syndrome. Today, however, the challenge has become to avoid misdiagnosis of mild cases, presenting with normal results on some screening tests. The sensitivity of urinary free cortisol seems to be lower than previously reported. Therefore, we recommend not to rely solely on this test in ruling out Cushing's syndrome.

  14. Cushing syndrome: maybe not so uncommon of an endocrine disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaraldi, Federica; Salvatori, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Cushing syndrome (CS) is the result of extended exposure to excessive glucocorticoids from endogenous or exogenous sources. Traditionally, the most common cause of endogenous CS is a pituitary adenoma (Cushing disease). Less common causes are adrenocortical tumors and extrapituitary adrenocorticotropin-producing neoplasias. This review provides updated information regarding the potential for increased prevalence of CS in specific patient populations. Here the authors provide to family physicians clinical guidance for recognition of CS by presenting a case, discussing the advantages/disadvantages of the diagnostic tests, and discussing information about the treatment options. CS is expected to have an incidence of 10 to 15 people per million; however, studies of patients with diabetes, obesity, hypertension, and osteoporosis found a high prevalence of CS among these populations. The clinical manifestations of CS range from the distinctive clinical features (purple striae, facial plethora, proximal myopathy) to common conditions such as hypertension, obesity, and diabetes. Clinical practice guidelines recommend biochemical tests to screen patients for CS; however, the sensitivity and specificity of these tests vary, so a careful analysis must be performed to avoid misdiagnosis. CS is challenging to diagnose. Nevertheless, with a systematic approach to testing patients and an increased awareness of the high-risk patient populations, the disease can be identified in a timely manner.

  15. Massive Thoracoabdominal Aortic Thrombosis in a Patient with Iatrogenic Cushing Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Choi, Dong Hyun; Lee, Young Min; Kim, Bo Bae; Ki, Young Jae; Kim, Jin Hwa; Chung, Joong Wha; Koh, Young Youp; Kang, Joon Tae; Chae, Seung Seok

    2014-01-01

    Massive thoracoabdominal aortic thrombosis is a rare finding in patients with iatrogenic Cushing syndrome in the absence of any coagulation abnormality. It frequently represents an urgent surgical situation. We report the case of an 82-year-old woman with massive aortic thrombosis secondary to iatrogenic Cushing syndrome. A follow-up computed tomography scan showed a decreased amount of thrombus in the aorta after anticoagulation therapy alone.

  16. Course of depression in Cushing's syndrome: response to treatment and comparison with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonino, N; Fava, G A; Belluardo, P; Girelli, M E; Boscaro, M

    1993-01-01

    Depression in a common, life-threatening complication of Cushing's syndrome and may occur in several other endocrine disorders. It is not clear, however, whether distinct features pertain to hypercortisolism. We studied depression in Cushing's syndrome differentiating pituitary-dependent and pituitary-independent forms, its incidence compared to Graves' disease, and its appearance in the prodromal phase of both conditions. To 66 consecutive patients with Cushing's syndrome and 70 with Graves' disease, after treatment, a semistructured interview for depressive symptoms based on Paykel's clinical interview for depression was administered. In Cushing's syndrome, the response of depression to normalization of urinary cortisol levels was evaluated by Kellner's global rating method. There was a significant difference in the occurrence of depression (p Cushing's syndrome (62%) and Graves' disease (23%). Depression appeared in the prodromal phase in 27% of patients with Cushing's syndrome and in 14% of those with Graves' disease, but the difference was not significant. In Cushing's syndrome, there were no significant differences in depression between patients with pituitary-dependent (n = 41) and pituitary-independent (n = 20) forms, or in their response to treatment. About 70% of patients fully recovered from their depression, whereas there was no substantial change in the others and even worsening in 2. Our findings in Cushing's syndrome and Graves' disease are in agreement with previous investigations using specific diagnostic criteria for depression. We found a tendency for this symptom to manifest in the prodromal phase of both illnesses. An endocrine etiology should be, therefore, considered in depressed patients not responding to standard psychiatric treatment.

  17. Reduced DNA methylation of FKBP5 in Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resmini, Eugenia; Santos, Alicia; Aulinas, Anna; Webb, Susan M; Vives-Gilabert, Yolanda; Cox, Olivia; Wand, Gary; Lee, Richard S

    2016-12-01

    FKBP5 encodes a co-chaperone of HSP90 protein that regulates intracellular glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity. When it is bound to the glucocorticoid receptor complex, cortisol binds with lower affinity to glucocorticoid receptor. Cushing's syndrome is associated with memory deficits, smaller hippocampal volumes, and wide range of cognitive impairments. We aimed at evaluating blood DNA methylation of FKBP5 and its relationship with memory and hippocampal volumes in Cushing's syndrome patients. Polymorphism rs1360780 in FKBP5 has also been assessed to determine whether genetic variations can also govern CpG methylation. Thirty-two Cushing's syndrome patients and 32 matched controls underwent memory tests, 3-Tesla MRI of the brain, and DNA extraction from total leukocytes. DNA samples were bisulfite treated, PCR amplified, and pyrosequenced to assess a total of 41CpG-dinucleotides in the introns 1, 2, 5, and 7 of FKBP5. Significantly lower intronic FKBP5 DNA methylation in CS patients compared to controls was observed in ten CpG-dinucleotides. DNA methylation at these CpGs correlated with left and right HV (Intron-2-Region-2-CpG-3: LHV, r = 0.73, p = 0.02; RHV, r = 0.58, p = 0.03). Cured and active CS patients showed both lower methylation of intron 2 (92.37, 91.8, and 93.34 %, respectively, p = 0.03 for both) and of intron 7 (77.08, 73.74, and 79.71 %, respectively, p = 0.02 and p < 0.01) than controls. Twenty-two subjects had the CC genotype, 34 had the TC genotype, and eight had the TT genotype. Lower average DNA methylation in intron 7 was observed in the TT subjects compared to CC (72.5vs. 79.5 %, p = 0.02) and to TC (72.5 vs. 79.0 %, p = 0.03). Our data demonstrate, for the first time, a reduction of intronic DNA methylation of FKBP5 in CS patients.

  18. Cardiac structure and function in Cushing's syndrome: a cardiac magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenický, Peter; Redheuil, Alban; Roux, Charles; Salenave, Sylvie; Kachenoura, Nadjia; Raissouni, Zainab; Macron, Laurent; Guignat, Laurence; Jublanc, Christel; Azarine, Arshid; Brailly, Sylvie; Young, Jacques; Mousseaux, Elie; Chanson, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Patients with Cushing's syndrome have left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and dysfunction on echocardiography, but echo-based measurements may have limited accuracy in obese patients. No data are available on right ventricular (RV) and left atrial (LA) size and function in these patients. The objective of the study was to evaluate LV, RV, and LA structure and function in patients with Cushing's syndrome by means of cardiac magnetic resonance, currently the reference modality in assessment of cardiac geometry and function. Eighteen patients with active Cushing's syndrome and 18 volunteers matched for age, sex, and body mass index were studied by cardiac magnetic resonance. The imaging was repeated in the patients 6 months (range 2-12 mo) after the treatment of hypercortisolism. Compared with controls, patients with Cushing's syndrome had lower LV, RV, and LA ejection fractions (P Cushing's syndrome is associated with subclinical biventricular and LA systolic dysfunctions that are reversible after treatment. Despite skeletal muscle atrophy, Cushing's syndrome patients have an increased LV mass, reversible upon correction of hypercortisolism.

  19. Cushing's syndrome in type 2 diabetes patients with poor glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungunes, Askin; Sahin, Mustafa; Demirci, Taner; Ucan, Bekir; Cakir, Evrim; Arslan, Muyesser Sayki; Unsal, Ilknur Ozturk; Karbek, Basak; Calıskan, Mustafa; Ozbek, Mustafa; Cakal, Erman; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2014-12-01

    Cushing's syndrome may be more frequent in some specific patient groups such as type 2 diabetes and obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Cushing's syndrome in outpatients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycemic control despite at least 3-months insulin therapy. Outpatients with type 2 diabetes whose glycemic control is poor (Hb Alc value >7 %) despite receiving at least 3-months long insulin treatment (insulin alone or insulin with oral antidiabetics) were included. Patients with classic features of Cushing's syndrome were excluded. Overnight 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test (DST) was performed as a screening test. A total of 277 patients with type 2 diabetes whose glycemic control is poor (Hb Alc value >7 %) despite insulin therapy were included. Two of the 277 patients with type 2 diabetes were diagnosed with Cushing's syndrome (0.72 %). Hypertension was statistically more frequent in the patients with cortisol levels ≥1.8 μg/dL than the patients with cortisol levels Cushing's syndrome among patients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycemic control despite insulin therapy is much higher than in the general population. The patients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycemic control despite at least three months of insulin therapy should be additionally tested for Cushing's syndrome if they have high dose insülin requirements.

  20. Serum albumin-adjusted glycated albumin is an adequate indicator of glycemic control in patients with Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Tetsuhiro; Otsuki, Michio; Tamada, Daisuke; Tabuchi, Yukiko; Mukai, Kosuke; Morita, Shinya; Kasayama, Soji; Bando, Yukihiro; Shimomura, Iichiro; Koga, Masafumi

    2014-12-01

    We recently reported that glycated albumin (GA) in patients with Cushing's syndrome is low. In the present study, we examined whether serum albumin (SA)-adjusted GA (SAaGA) is an adequate indicator of glycemic control in patients with Cushing's syndrome. We studied 26 patients with Cushing's syndrome (13 patients without diabetes and 13 patients with diabetes). Twenty six non-diabetic subjects and 26 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus matched for age, sex and BMI were used as the controls. SAaGA was calculated using the regression formula between SA and GA in non-diabetic patients with Cushing's syndrome and non-diabetic subjects. SA showed a significant correlation with GA in non-diabetic patients with Cushing's syndrome and non-diabetic subjects. GA, but not SAaGA, in non-diabetic patients with Cushing's syndrome was significantly lower than that in the non-diabetic controls. Furthermore, the GA/HbA1c ratio, but not the SAaGA/HbA1c ratio, in diabetic patients with Cushing's syndrome was significantly lower than that in the diabetic controls. The measured GA in the patients with Cushing's syndrome was significantly lower than the estimated GA, but there was no difference between SAaGA and the estimated GA. The present findings suggest that SAaGA is an adequate indicator of the glycemic control in patients with Cushing's syndrome. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Metabolomic Biomarkers in Urine of Cushing's Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotłowska, Alicja; Puzyn, Tomasz; Sworczak, Krzysztof; Stepnowski, Piotr; Szefer, Piotr

    2017-01-29

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is a disease which results from excessive levels of cortisol in the human body. The disorder is associated with various signs and symptoms which are also common for the general population not suffering from compound hypersecretion. Thus, more sensitive and selective methods are required for the diagnosis of CS. This follow-up study was conducted to determine which steroid metabolites could serve as potential indicators of CS and possible subclinical hypercortisolism in patients diagnosed with so called non-functioning adrenal incidentalomas (AIs). Urine samples from negative controls ( n = 37), patients with CS characterized by hypercortisolism and excluding iatrogenic CS ( n = 16), and patients with non-functioning AIs with possible subclinical Cushing's syndrome ( n = 25) were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and gas chromatograph equipped with flame ionization detector (GC/FID). Statistical and multivariate methods were applied to investigate the profile differences between examined individuals. The analyses revealed hormonal differences between patients with CS and the rest of examined individuals. The concentrations of selected metabolites of cortisol, androgens, and pregnenetriol were elevated whereas the levels of tetrahydrocortisone were decreased for CS when opposed to the rest of the study population. Moreover, after analysis of potential confounding factors, it was also possible to distinguish six steroid hormones which discriminated CS patients from other study subjects. The obtained discriminant functions enabled classification of CS patients and AI group characterized by mild hypersecretion of cortisol metabolites. It can be concluded that steroid hormones selected by applying urinary profiling may serve the role of potential biomarkers of CS and can aid in its early diagnosis.

  2. Selective inferior petrosal sinus sampling without venous outflow diversion in the detection of a pituitary adenoma in Cushing's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andereggen, Lukas [Bern University Hospital, University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Bern (Switzerland); Bern University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Bern (Switzerland); Schroth, Gerhard; Gralla, Jan; Ozdoba, Christoph [Bern University Hospital, University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Bern (Switzerland); Seiler, Rolf; Mariani, Luigi; Beck, Juergen; Widmer, Hans-Rudolf; Andres, Robert H. [Bern University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Bern (Switzerland); Christ, Emanuel [Bern University Hospital, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Clinical Nutrition, Bern (Switzerland)

    2012-05-15

    Conventional MRI may still be an inaccurate method for the non-invasive detection of a microadenoma in adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-dependent Cushing's syndrome (CS). Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) with ovine corticotropin-releasing hormone (oCRH) stimulation is an invasive, but accurate, intervention in the diagnostic armamentarium surrounding CS. Until now, there is a continuous controversial debate regarding lateralization data in detecting a microadenoma. Using BIPSS, we evaluated whether a highly selective placement of microcatheters without diversion of venous outflow might improve detection of pituitary microadenoma. We performed BIPSS in 23 patients that met clinical and biochemical criteria of CS and with equivocal MRI findings. For BIPSS, the femoral veins were catheterized bilaterally with a 6-F catheter and the inferior petrosal sinus bilaterally with a 2.7-F microcatheter. A third catheter was placed in the right femoral vein. Blood samples were collected from each catheter to determine ACTH blood concentration before and after oCRH stimulation. In 21 patients, a central-to-peripheral ACTH gradient was found and the affected side determined. In 18 of 20 patients where transsphenoidal partial hypophysectomy was performed based on BIPSS findings, microadenoma was histologically confirmed. BIPSS had a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 67% after oCRH stimulation in detecting a microadenoma. Correct localization of the adenoma was achieved in all Cushing's disease patients. BIPSS remains the gold standard in the detection of a microadenoma in CS. Our findings show that the selective placement of microcatheters without venous outflow diversion might further enhance better recognition to localize the pituitary tumor. (orig.)

  3. Risk of cardiovascular events in people prescribed glucocorticoids with iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome: cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardet, Laurence; Petersen, Irene; Nazareth, Irwin

    2012-07-30

    To investigate whether there is an increased risk of cardiovascular events in people who exhibit iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome during treatment with glucocorticoids. Cohort study. 424 UK general practices contributing to The Health Improvement Network database. People prescribed systemic glucocorticoids and with a diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome (n = 547) and two comparison groups: those prescribed glucocorticoids and with no diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome (n = 3231) and those not prescribed systemic glucocorticoids (n = 3282). Incidence of cardiovascular events within a year after diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome or after a randomly selected date, and association between iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome and risk of cardiovascular events. 417 cardiovascular events occurred in 341 patients. Taking into account only the first event by patient (coronary heart disease n = 177, heart failure n = 101, ischaemic stroke n = 63), the incidence rates of cardiovascular events per 100 person years at risk were 15.1 (95% confidence interval 11.8 to 18.4) in those prescribed glucocorticoids and with a diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome, 6.4 (5.5 to 7.3) in those prescribed glucocorticoids without a diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome, and 4.1 (3.4 to 4.8) in those not prescribed glucocorticoids. In multivariate analyses adjusted for sex, age, intensity of glucocorticoid use, underlying disease, smoking status, and use of aspirin, diabetes drugs, antihypertensive drugs, lipid lowering drugs, or oral anticoagulant drugs, the relation between iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome and cardiovascular events was strong (adjusted hazard ratios 2.27 (95% confidence interval 1.48 to 3.47) for coronary heart disease, 3.77 (2.41 to 5.90) for heart failure, and 2.23 (0.96 to 5.17) for ischaemic cerebrovascular events). The adjusted hazard ratio for any cardiovascular event was 4.16 (2.98 to 5.82) when the group prescribed glucocorticoids and with

  4. Avascular necrosis of femoral heads post-adrenal surgery for Cushing's syndrome: a rare presentation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-01-31

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is a well-recognized complication of patients on high-dose steroids for a long time. Exogenous hypercortisolism is a well known cause of AVN and a number of cases have been reported. Cushing\\'s syndrome describes hypercortisolism of any cause endogenous or exogenous. A variety of traumatic and non-traumatic factors contribute to the aetiology of AVN although exogenous glucocorticoids administration and alcoholism are among the most common non-traumatic causes. AVN secondary to endogenous hypercortisolism is rare and very few case reports are available describing this complication. No literature is available on AVN presenting post-adrenal surgery. Here we present a young woman who presented with avascular necrosis of both hips 1 year after adrenalectomy for Cushing\\'s syndrome.

  5. Plasma Steroid Metabolome Profiling for Diagnosis and Subtyping Patients with Cushing Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhofer, Graeme; Masjkur, Jimmy; Peitzsch, Mirko; Di Dalmazi, Guido; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Grüber, Matthias; Fazel, Julia; Osswald, Andrea; Beuschlein, Felix; Reincke, Martin

    2018-03-01

    Diagnosis of Cushing syndrome requires a multistep process that includes verification of hypercortisolism followed by identification of the cause of adrenocortical hyperfunction. This study assessed whether pituitary, ectopic, and adrenal subtypes of Cushing syndrome were characterized by distinct plasma steroid profiles that might assist diagnosis. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, mass spectrometric measurements of a panel of 15 plasma steroids were applied to 222 patient samples tested for Cushing syndrome. Disease was excluded in 138 and confirmed in 51 patients with pituitary Cushing syndrome, 12 with ectopic adrenocorticotropin secretion, and 21 with adrenal disease. Another 277 age- and sex-matched hypertensive and normotensive volunteers were included for comparison. Compared with patients without disease, the largest increases in plasma steroids among patients with Cushing syndrome were observed for 11-deoxycortisol (289%), 21-deoxycortisol (150%), 11-deoxycorticosterone (133%), corticosterone (124%), and cortisol (122%). Patients with ectopic disease showed the most prominent increases, but there was considerable variation for other steroids according to subtype. Patients with adrenal disease had the lowest concentrations of androgens, whereas those with ectopic and pituitary disease showed the lowest concentrations of aldosterone. Plasma 18-oxocortisol was particularly low in ectopic disease. With the use of 10 selected steroids, subjects with and without different Cushing syndrome subtypes could be discriminated nearly as closely as with the use of salivary and urinary free cortisol, dexamethasone-suppressed cortisol, and plasma adrenocorticotropin (9.5% vs 5.8% misclassification). Patients with different subtypes of Cushing syndrome show distinctive plasma steroid profiles that may offer a supplementary single-test alternative for screening purposes. © 2017 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  6. Metabolic and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with Cushing's syndrome of different aetiologies during active disease and 1 year after remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Roberta; Picu, Andreea; Marinazzo, Elisa; D'Angelo, Valentina; Berardelli, Rita; Karamouzis, Ioannis; Forno, Daniela; Zinnà, Domenico; Maccario, Mauro; Ghigo, Ezio; Arvat, Emanuela

    2011-09-01

    Cushing's syndrome is associated with several comorbidities responsible for the increased cardiovascular risk, not only during the active phase but also after disease remission. In 29 patients with Cushing's syndrome (14 Cushing's diseases and 15 adrenal adenomas), waist circumference, fasting and 2-h glucose after oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), lipid profile and blood pressure were evaluated during the active disease and 1 year after remission and compared with those in 29 sex-, age- and BMI-matched controls. During the active disease, waist circumference, 2-h glucose after OGTT, total and LDL cholesterol were higher in patients with Cushing's syndrome than in controls (P Cushing's disease and adrenal adenomas. The prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia and hypertension was higher (P Cushing's syndrome (27%, 24%, 59% and 72%) than in controls (10%, 0%, 21% and 10%), with no significant difference between Cushing's disease and adrenal adenomas. One year following hormonal remission, waist circumference persisted higher than in controls (P Cushing's disease and adrenal adenomas. Metabolic and cardiovascular abnormalities were still present in both groups, although with a lower prevalence, as well as with a more marked decrease in adrenal adenomas (P Cushing's disease after hormonal remission. Pituitary hormonal deficiencies, hormonal replacement treatments and/or incomplete cure from Cushing's disease may account for these findings. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Ectopic ACTH syndrome complicated by multiple opportunistic infections treated with percutaneous ablation of the adrenal glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chrystal; Roberts, James Mark

    2017-11-14

    Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-related Cushing's syndrome can lead to multiple complications including severe immunosuppression. If the ACTH-secreting tumour cannot be found, definitive treatment is surgical adrenalectomy, typically followed by glucocorticoid replacement. Here, we present a case of fulminant respiratory failure secondary to coinfection with Pneumocystis jirovecii and cytomegalovirus in a patient with ectopic ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome with occult primary. Due to significant deconditioning, she was unable to undergo definitive adrenalectomy and instead underwent percutaneous microwave ablation of the adrenal glands. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. High prevalence of normal tests assessing hypercortisolism in subjects with mild and episodic Cushing's syndrome suggests that the paradigm for diagnosis and exclusion of Cushing's syndrome requires multiple testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, T C; Ghods, D E; Shahinian, H K; Zachery, L; Shayesteh, N; Seasholtz, S; Zuckerbraun, E; Lee, M L; McCutcheon, I E

    2010-11-01

    Many Endocrinologists believe that a single determination of eucortisolism or a single demonstration of appropriate suppression to dexamethasone excluded Cushing's syndrome, except in what was previously thought to be the rare patient with episodic or periodic Cushing's syndrome. We hypothesize that episodic Cushing's syndrome is relatively common and a single test assessing hypercortisolism may not be sufficient to accurately rule out or diagnose Cushing's syndrome and retrospectively examined the number of normal and abnormal tests assessing hypercortisolism performed on multiple occasions in 66 patients found to have mild and/or episodic Cushing's syndrome compared to a similar group of 54 patients evaluated for, but determined not to have Cushing's syndrome. We found that 65 of the 66 patients with Cushing's syndrome had at least one normal test of cortisol status and most patients had several normal tests. The probability of having Cushing's syndrome when one test was negative was 92% for 23:00 h salivary cortisol, 88% for 24-h UFC, 86% for 24-h 17OHS, and 54% for nighttime plasma cortisol. These results demonstrated that episodic hypercortisolism is highly prevalent in subjects with mild Cushing's syndrome and no single test was effective in conclusively diagnosing or excluding the condition. Rather, the paradigm for the diagnosis should be a careful history and physical examination and in those patients in whom mild Cushing's syndrome/disease is strongly suspected, multiple tests assessing hypercortisolism should be performed on subsequent occasions, especially when the patient is experiencing signs and symptoms of short-term hypercortisolism. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Sustained weight loss in patients treated with mifepristone for Cushing?s syndrome: a follow-up analysis of the SEISMIC study and long-term extension

    OpenAIRE

    Fein, Henry G.; Vaughan, T. Brooks; Kushner, Harvey; Cram, David; Nguyen, Dat

    2015-01-01

    Background Overweight and obesity are common among patients with Cushing?s syndrome (CS) and may persist in some patients even after ostensibly curative surgery, contributing to cardiometabolic dysfunction and increased cardiovascular risk. Mifepristone, a selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, was effective in controlling hyperglycemia in a 24-week trial of adults (N?=?50) with endogenous CS and associated type 2 diabetes mellitus/impaired glucose tolerance or hypertension who had fai...

  10. The Eosinophil Count Tends to Be Negatively Associated with Levels of Serum Glucose in Patients with Adrenal Cushing Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younghak Lee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundCushing syndrome is characterized by glucose intolerance, cardiovascular disease, and an enhanced systemic inflammatory response caused by chronic exposure to excess cortisol. Eosinopenia is frequently observed in patients with adrenal Cushing syndrome, but the relationship between the eosinophil count in peripheral blood and indicators of glucose level in patients with adrenal Cushing syndrome has not been determined.MethodsA retrospective study was undertaken of the clinical and laboratory findings of 40 patients diagnosed with adrenal Cushing syndrome at Chungnam National University Hospital from January 2006 to December 2016. Clinical characteristics, complete blood cell counts with white blood cell differential, measures of their endocrine function, description of imaging studies, and pathologic findings were obtained from their medical records.ResultsEosinophil composition and count were restored by surgical treatment of all of the patients with adrenal Cushing disease. The eosinophil count was inversely correlated with serum and urine cortisol, glycated hemoglobin, and inflammatory markers in the patients with adrenal Cushing syndrome.ConclusionSmaller eosinophil populations in patients with adrenal Cushing syndrome tend to be correlated with higher levels of blood sugar and glycated hemoglobin. This study suggests that peripheral blood eosinophil composition or count may be associated with serum glucose levels in patients with adrenal Cushing syndrome.

  11. The Eosinophil Count Tends to Be Negatively Associated with Levels of Serum Glucose in Patients with Adrenal Cushing Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Younghak; Yi, Hyon Seung; Kim, Hae Ri; Joung, Kyong Hye; Kang, Yea Eun; Lee, Ju Hee; Kim, Koon Soon; Kim, Hyun Jin; Ku, Bon Jeong; Shong, Minho

    2017-09-01

    Cushing syndrome is characterized by glucose intolerance, cardiovascular disease, and an enhanced systemic inflammatory response caused by chronic exposure to excess cortisol. Eosinopenia is frequently observed in patients with adrenal Cushing syndrome, but the relationship between the eosinophil count in peripheral blood and indicators of glucose level in patients with adrenal Cushing syndrome has not been determined. A retrospective study was undertaken of the clinical and laboratory findings of 40 patients diagnosed with adrenal Cushing syndrome at Chungnam National University Hospital from January 2006 to December 2016. Clinical characteristics, complete blood cell counts with white blood cell differential, measures of their endocrine function, description of imaging studies, and pathologic findings were obtained from their medical records. Eosinophil composition and count were restored by surgical treatment of all of the patients with adrenal Cushing disease. The eosinophil count was inversely correlated with serum and urine cortisol, glycated hemoglobin, and inflammatory markers in the patients with adrenal Cushing syndrome. Smaller eosinophil populations in patients with adrenal Cushing syndrome tend to be correlated with higher levels of blood sugar and glycated hemoglobin. This study suggests that peripheral blood eosinophil composition or count may be associated with serum glucose levels in patients with adrenal Cushing syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Korean Endocrine Society

  12. Glucocorticoid Regulation of Food-Choice Behavior in Humans: Evidence from Cushing's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Scott J; Couto, Lizette; Cohen, Vanessa; Lalazar, Yelena; Makotkine, Iouri; Williams, Nia; Yehuda, Rachel; Goldstein, Rita Z; Geer, Eliza B

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which glucocorticoids regulate food intake and resulting body mass in humans are not well-understood. One potential mechanism could involve modulation of reward processing, but human stress models examining effects of glucocorticoids on behavior contain important confounds. Here, we studied individuals with Cushing's syndrome, a rare endocrine disorder characterized by chronic excess endogenous glucocorticoids. Twenty-three patients with Cushing's syndrome (13 with active disease; 10 with disease in remission) and 15 controls with a comparably high body mass index (BMI) completed two simulated food-choice tasks (one with "explicit" task contingencies and one with "probabilistic" task contingencies), during which they indicated their objective preference for viewing high calorie food images vs. standardized pleasant, unpleasant, and neutral images. All participants also completed measures of food craving, and approximately half of the participants provided 24-h urine samples for assessment of cortisol and cortisone concentrations. Results showed that on the explicit task (but not the probabilistic task), participants with active Cushing's syndrome made fewer food-related choices than participants with Cushing's syndrome in remission, who in turn made fewer food-related choices than overweight controls. Corroborating this group effect, higher urine cortisone was negatively correlated with food-related choice in the subsample of all participants for whom these data were available. On the probabilistic task, despite a lack of group differences, higher food-related choice correlated with higher state and trait food craving in active Cushing's patients. Taken together, relative to overweight controls, Cushing's patients, particularly those with active disease, displayed a reduced vigor of responding for food rewards that was presumably attributable to glucocorticoid abnormalities. Beyond Cushing's, these results may have relevance for elucidating

  13. Cushing Syndrome in a 6-Month-Old Infant due to Adrenocortical Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volmar KeithE

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Cushing syndrome is rare in infancy and usually due to an adrenocortical tumor (ACT. We report an infant with Cushing syndrome due to adrenocortical carcinoma. The patient presented at six months of age with a three-month history of growth failure, rapid weight gain, acne, and irritability. Physical examination showed obesity, hypertension, and Cushingoid features. Biochemical evaluation showed very high serum cortisol, mildly elevated testosterone, and suppressed ACTH. Abdominal MRI revealed a heterogeneous right adrenal mass extending into the inferior vena cava. Evaluation for metastases was negative. The tumor was removed surgically en bloc. Pathologic examination demonstrated low mitotic rate, but capsular and vascular invasion. She received no adjuvant therapy. Her linear growth has improved and Cushingoid features resolved. Hormonal markers and quarterly PET scans have been negative for recurrence 24 months postoperatively. In conclusion, adrenocortical neoplasms in children are rare, but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Cushing syndrome.

  14. Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater causing ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Akihisa; Hayashi, Kazuki; Naitoh, Itaru; Seno, Kyoji; Okada, Yukiko; Ban, Tesshin; Kondo, Hiromu; Nishi, Yuji; Umemura, Shuichiro; Hori, Yasuki; Natsume, Makoto; Joh, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is rarely secreted by neuroendocrine tumors. Although neuroendocrine tumors may occur at any site in the gastrointestinal system, they very rarely occur in the ampulla of Vater and have a poor prognosis. The present study described the first Cushing's syndrome as a result of ectopic ACTH arising from the ampulla of Vater neuroendocrine carcinoma. A 69-year-old female was admitted with clinical features of Cushing's syndrome, confirmed biochemically by hypokalemia, and elevated levels of ACTH and cortisol. In further investigations, a tumor of the ampulla of Vater and liver metastases were detected. Pathological analysis of the biopsy confirmed a neuroendocrine carcinoma, which was immunohistochemically positive for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, cluster of differentiation 56 and ACTH. Therefore, the present study diagnosed a functional and metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater with ectopic ACTH production causing Cushing's syndrome. The patient succumbed to mortality 4 months later, despite administration of combined chemotherapy with irinotecan and cisplatin.

  15. Clinicopathological features of primary aldosteronism associated with subclinical Cushing's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraishi, Kiichiro; Yoshimoto, Takanobu; Tsuchiya, Kyoichiro; Minami, Isao; Doi, Masaru; Izumiyama, Hajime; Hirata, Yukio; Sasano, Hironobu

    2011-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA), an autonomous aldosterone hypersecretion from adrenal adenoma and/or hyperplasia, and subclinical Cushing syndrome (SCS), a mild but autonomous cortisol hypersecretion from adrenal adenoma without signs or symptoms of Cuhing's syndrome, are now well-recognized clinical entities of adrenal incidentaloma. However, the clinicopathological features of PA associated with SCS (PA/SCS) remain unknown. The present study was undertaken to study the prevalence of PA/SCS among PA patients diagnosed at our institute, and characterize their clinicopathlogical features. The prevalence of PA/SCS was 8 of 38 PA patients (21%) studied. These 8 PA/SCS patients were significantly older and had larger tumor, higher serum potassium levels, lower basal plasma levels of aldosterone, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) as well as lower response of aldosterone after ACTH stimulation than those in 12 patients with aldosterone-producing adenoma without hypercortisolism. All 8 PA/SCS patients showed unilateral uptake by adrenal scintigraphy at the ipsilateral side, whereas the laterality of aldosterone hypersecretion as determined by adrenal venous sampling varied from ipsilateral (3), contralateral (2), and bilateral side (2). 6 PA/SCS patients who underwent adrenalectomy required hydrocortisone replacement postoperatively. Histopathological analysis of the resected adrenal tumors from 5 PA/SCS patients revealed a single adenoma in 3, and double adenomas in 2, with varying degrees of positive immunoreactivities for steroidgenic enzymes 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD), P450 C17 ) by immunohistochemical study as well as CYP11B2 mRNA expression as measured by real-time radiotherapy-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In conclusion, PA/SCS consists of a variety of adrenal pathologies so that therapeutic approach differs depending on the disease subtype. (author)

  16. Medical Therapy for Cushing's Syndrome in the Twenty-first Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritos, Nicholas A; Biller, Beverly M K

    2018-06-01

    Medical therapy has a useful adjunctive role in many patients with Cushing's syndrome. Patients with pituitary corticotroph adenomas who have received radiation therapy to the sella require medical therapy until the effects of radiation therapy occur. In addition, patients with Cushing's syndrome who cannot undergo surgery promptly, including those who are acutely ill and cannot safely undergo tumor resection, may benefit from medical therapy as a bridge to surgery. Other possible candidates for medical therapy are those with unresectable tumors or those whose tumor location remains unknown despite adequate diagnostic evaluation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Suppression and Iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome as a Complication of Epidural Steroid Injections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Leary

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidural steroid injections are well accepted as a treatment for radicular back pain in appropriate candidates. While overall incidence of systemic side effects has not been well established, at least five biochemically proven cases of iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome have been reported as complications of epidural steroid treatment. We present an additional case of iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome and adrenal suppression in a middle-aged woman who received three epidural steroid injections over a four-month period. We review this case in the context of previous cases and discuss diagnostic and management issues.

  18. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring-derived short-term blood pressure variability is increased in Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebellato, Andrea; Grillo, Andrea; Dassie, Francesca; Sonino, Nicoletta; Maffei, Pietro; Martini, Chiara; Paoletta, Agostino; Fabris, Bruno; Carretta, Renzo; Fallo, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Cushing's syndrome is associated with high cardiovascular morbility and mortality. Blood pressure (BP) variability within a 24-h period is increasingly recognized as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. The aim of our study was to investigate the short-term BP variability indices in Cushing's syndrome. Twenty-five patients with Cushing's syndrome (mean age 49 ± 13 years, 4 males; 21 Cushing's disease and 4 adrenal adenoma patients) underwent 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) and evaluation of cardiovascular risk factors. Cushing patients were divided into 8 normotensive (NOR-CUSH) and 17 hypertensive (HYP-CUSH) patients and were compared with 20 normotensive (NOR-CTR) and 20 hypertensive (HYP-CTR) age-, sex-, and BMI-matched control subjects. Short-term BP variability was derived from ABPM and calculated as the following: (1) standard deviation (SD) of 24-h, daytime, and nighttime BP; (2) 24-h weighted SD of BP; and (3) average real variability (ARV), i.e., the average of the absolute differences between consecutive BP measurements over 24 h. In comparison with controls, patients with Cushing's syndrome, either normotensive or hypertensive, had higher 24-h and daytime SD of BP, as well as higher 24-h weighted SD and ARV of BP (P = 0.03 to P CUSH or between HYP-CTR and HYP-CUSH subgroups. ABPM-derived short-term BP variability is increased in Cushing's syndrome, independent of BP elevation. It may represent an additional cardiovascular risk factor in this disease. The role of excess cortisol in BP variability has to be further clarified.

  19. Adrenal incidentalomas showing unilateral concordant visualization by adrenocortical scintigraphy. Comparison with adenomas in Cushing's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tani, Atsushi; Nakajo, Masayuki; Tsuchimochi, Shinsaku; Nakabeppu, Yoshiaki; Umanodan, Tomokazu [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    2000-06-01

    An adrenocortical adenoma causing Cushing's syndrome (Cushing's adenoma) produces a unilateral concordant visualization (UCV) imaging pattern in which the adenoma is only visualized on radioiodocholesterol adrenocortical scintigraphy. But because this imaging pattern is also noted in some patients with adrenal incidentalomas, we examined whether the UCV-incidentaloma was essentially identical with Cushing's adenoma and would develop Cushing's syndrome. The subjects were 9 patients with UCV-incidentalomas (mean size, 30 mm; range, 20-45 mm) and 6 patients with Cushing's adenomas (mean size, 28 mm; range, 25-35 mm). Endocrinological evaluations showed several abnormalities including blunted diurnal rhythm of plasma cortisol within the normal range, low plasma ACTH and/or high 24-hr urinary 17-OHCS levels in 8 of 9 patients with UCV-incidentalomas, but these abnormalities did not meet the diagnostic criteria of Cushing's syndrome. Adrenal uptake of the tracer in the patients with UCV-incidentalomas was not statistically different from that in the patients with Cushing's adenomas and had no relationship with hormonal values in either patient group. Tumor size on CT correlated with the levels of 24-hr urinary 17-OHCS (r=0.75, p=0.02) and plasma cortisol at 7:00 (r=0.82, p=0.007) in the patients with UCV-incidentalomas, but not in the patients with Cushing's adenomas. Although 3 UCV-incidentalomas increased slightly in size, none of 9 patients with UCV-incidentalomas has developed Cushing's syndrome for 4 to 52 months. These results suggest that the UCV-incidentaloma may be essentially different from the Cushing's adenoma and unlikely to develop Cushing's syndrome. (author)

  20. Reassessing the reliability of the salivary cortisol assay for the diagnosis of Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Dou, Jingtao; Gu, Weijun; Yang, Guoqing; Lu, Juming

    2013-10-01

    The cortisol concentration in saliva is 10-fold lower than total serum cortisol and accurately reflects the serum concentration, both levels being lowest around midnight. The salivary cortisol assay measures free cortisol and is unaffected by confounding factors. This study analysed published data on the sensitivity and specificity of salivary cortisol levels in the diagnosis of Cushing syndrome. Data from studies on the use of different salivary cortisol assay techniques in the diagnosis of Cushing syndrome, published between 1998 and 2012 and retrieved using Ovid MEDLINE®, were analysed for variance and correlation. For the 11 studies analysed, mean sensitivity and specificity of the salivary cortisol assay were both >90%. Repeated measurements were easily made with this assay, enabling improved diagnostic accuracy in comparison with total serum cortisol measurements. This analysis confirms the reliability of the saliva cortisol assay as pragmatic tool for the accurate diagnosis of Cushing syndrome. With many countries reporting a rising prevalence of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and obesity--in which there is often a high circulating cortisol level--salivary cortisol measurement will help distinguish these states from Cushing syndrome.

  1. Zinc alpha-2 glycoprotein is overproduced in Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoté, Xavier; Aranda, Gloria B; Mora, Mireia; Casals, Gregori; Enseñat, Joaquim; Vidal, Oscar; Esteban, Yaiza; Halperin, Irene; Hanzu, Felicia A

    2017-01-01

    Cushing syndrome (CS), an endogenous hypercortisolemic condition with increased cardiometabolic morbidity, leads to development of abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes and proatherogenic dyslipidemia. Zinc alpha-2 glycoprotein (ZAG) is a recently characterized lipolytic adipokine implicated in regulation of adipose tissue metabolism and fat distribution. In vitro and animal studies suggest that glucocorticoids interact with ZAG secretion and action. To assess the relationship between ZAG and glucocorticoids in a human model of hypercortisolism, circulating ZAG levels were tested in patients with CS and its counterpart controls. An observational, cross-sectional study on 39 women, 13 with active CS and 26 controls matched by age and body mass index. Plasma ZAG levels (μg/ml) were measured by ELISA and correlated with hypercortisolism, metabolic, and phenotypic parameters. Plasma ZAG levels were significantly higher in patients with CS compared to controls (64.3±16.6 vs. 44.0±16.1, p=0.002). In a univariate analysis, ZAG levels positively correlated to 24-h urinary free cortisol (p=0.001), body mass index (p=0.02), non-esterified fatty acids (p=0.05), glucose (p=0.003), LDL-C (p=0.028), and type 2 diabetes mellitus (p=0.016), and were inversely related to total adiponectin levels (p=0.035). In a multivariate analysis, after adjusting for CS, ZAG levels only correlated with body mass index (p=0.012), type 2 diabetes mellitus (p=0.004), and glucose (p<0.001). This study provides initial evidence that plasma ZAG levels are higher in patients with CS as compared to controls. The close relationship of ZAG with metabolic and phenotypic changes in CS suggests that ZAG may play a significant role in adipose tissue changes in hypercortisolism. Copyright © 2017 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. White matter alterations in the brains of patients with active, remitted, and cured cushing syndrome: a DTI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, P; Santos, A; Vives-Gilabert, Y; Webb, S M; Sainz-Ruiz, A; Resmini, E; Crespo, I; de Juan-Delago, M; Gómez-Anson, B

    2015-06-01

    Cushing syndrome appears after chronic exposure to elevated glucocorticoid levels. Cortisol excess may alter white matter microstructure. Our purpose was to study WM changes in patients with Cushing syndrome compared with controls by using DTI and the influence of hypercortisolism. Thirty-five patients with Cushing syndrome and 35 healthy controls, matched for age, education, and sex, were analyzed through DTI (tract-based spatial statistics) for fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity (general linear model, family-wise error, and threshold-free cluster enhancement corrections, P Cushing syndrome with active hypercortisolism, 7 with Cushing syndrome with medication-remitted cortisol, 20 surgically cured, and 35 controls. Cardiovascular risk factors were used as covariates. In addition, correlations were analyzed among DTI values, concomitant 24-hour urinary free cortisol levels, and disease duration. There were widespread alterations (reduced fractional anisotropy, and increased mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity values; P Cushing syndrome compared with controls, independent of the cardiovascular risk factors present. Both active and cured Cushing syndrome subgroups showed similar changes compared with controls. Patients with medically remitted Cushing syndrome also had reduced fractional anisotropy and increased mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity values, compared with controls. No correlations were found between DTI maps and 24-hour urinary free cortisol levels or with disease duration. Diffuse WM alterations in patients with Cushing syndrome suggest underlying loss of WM integrity and demyelination. Once present, they seem to be independent of concomitant hypercortisolism, persisting after remission/cure. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  3. Personality characteristics and quality of life in patients treated for Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonino, Nicoletta; Bonnini, Stefano; Fallo, Francesco; Boscaro, Marco; Fava, Giovanni A

    2006-03-01

    Psychological distress does not always disappear upon proper endocrine treatment of Cushing's syndrome, and quality of life may still be compromised. Little is known on the personality correlates that may be involved. The aim of this study was to provide a controlled assessment of personality characteristics and quality of life in patients successfully treated for Cushing's syndrome. A single-centred, controlled, prospective study. Twenty-four consecutive outpatients who were in remission upon proper treatment of Cushing's syndrome for at least 1 year and no more than 3 years (20 with pituitary-dependent Cushing's disease and four with a cortisol-secreting adrenal adenoma; 5 M/19 F; mean age 34.5, SD = 10.6; range 18-57 years) were compared with 24 healthy control subjects matched for sociodemographic variables. Both patients and controls were administered two self-rating scales: (a) tridimensional personality questionnaire (TPQ), a 100-item inventory that yields three scales: novelty seeking, harm avoidance and reward dependence. (b) symptom rating test (SRT), a 46-item scale for assessing psychological distress and quality of life with six subscales (anxiety, depression, somatic symptoms, anger-hostility, cognitive symptoms, psychotic symptoms). There were no significant differences in personality dimensions, as measured by the TPQ, between patients and controls. The results did not change when the four patients with an adrenal adenoma were excluded and only the 20 with pituitary-dependent Cushing's disease were considered. As to the SRT scale, patients with Cushing's syndrome displayed significantly higher scores in anxiety (P= 0.046), depression (P= 0.013), and psychotic symptoms (P= 0.006), with a generalized compromised quality of life (P= 0.02). Again, no differences were found in evaluating the 20 patients with Cushing's disease separately. Even though personality traits other than those explored here may be involved, the results seem to exclude the

  4. Drawings reflect a new dimension of the psychological impact of long-term remission of Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemensma, Jitske; Daskalakis, Nikolaos P; van der Veen, Else M; Ramondt, Steven; Richardson, Stephanie K; Broadbent, Elizabeth; Romijn, Johannes A; Pereira, Alberto M; Biermasz, Nienke R; Kaptein, Adrian A

    2012-09-01

    Drawings can be used to assess perceptions of patients about their disease. We aimed to explore the utility of the drawing test and its relation to illness perceptions, quality of life (QoL), and clinical disease severity in patients after long-term remission of Cushing's syndrome. We conducted a cross-sectional study including 47 patients with long-term remission of Cushing's syndrome. Patients completed the drawing test, the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised, the Short-Form 36, the EuroQoL-5D, and the Cushing QoL. The Cushing's syndrome severity index was scored based on medical records. Characteristics of the drawings were strongly associated with the Cushing's syndrome severity index and severity ratings of health professionals (all P Cushing's syndrome because drawings do not share common properties with parameters of QoL or illness perceptions, but do represent the clinical severity of the disease. The assessment of drawings may enable doctors to appreciate the perceptions of patients with long-term remission of Cushing's syndrome and will lead the way in dispelling idiosyncratic beliefs.

  5. Reversible brain atrophy and cognitive impairment in an adolescent Japanese patient with primary adrenal Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Nobumasa; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Akiko; Kaneko, Masanori; Ishizawa, Masahiro; Furukawa, Kazuo; Abe, Takahiro; Matsubayashi, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Takaho; Hanyu, Osamu; Shimohata, Takayoshi; Sone, Hirohito

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is an endocrine disease resulting from chronic exposure to excessive glucocorticoids produced in the adrenal cortex. Although the ultimate outcome remains uncertain, functional and morphological brain changes are not uncommon in patients with this syndrome, and generally persist even after resolution of hypercortisolemia. We present an adolescent patient with Cushing's syndrome who exhibited cognitive impairment with brain atrophy. A 19-year-old Japanese male visited a local hospital following 5 days of behavioral abnormalities, such as money wasting or nighttime wandering. He had hypertension and a 1-year history of a rounded face. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed apparently diffuse brain atrophy. Because of high random plasma cortisol levels (28.7 μg/dL) at 10 AM, he was referred to our hospital in August 2011. Endocrinological testing showed adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent hypercortisolemia, and abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a 2.7 cm tumor in the left adrenal gland. The patient underwent left adrenalectomy in September 2011, and the diagnosis of cortisol-secreting adenoma was confirmed histologically. His hypertension and Cushingoid features regressed. Behavioral abnormalities were no longer observed, and he was classified as cured of his cognitive disturbance caused by Cushing's syndrome in February 2012. MRI performed 8 months after surgery revealed reversal of brain atrophy, and his subsequent course has been uneventful. In summary, the young age at onset and the short duration of Cushing's syndrome probably contributed to the rapid recovery of both cognitive dysfunction and brain atrophy in our patient. Cushing's syndrome should be considered as a possible etiological factor in patients with cognitive impairment and brain atrophy that is atypical for their age.

  6. Life-threatening Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia following treatment of severe Cushing's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhuis, J. K.; van den Berg, G.; Monteban-Kooistra, W. E.; Ligtenberg, J. J. M.; Tulleken, J. E.; Zijlstra, J. G.; Meertens, John

    We describe two patients with a severe Cushing's syndrome due to ectopic production of ACTH. Both patients developed a life-threatening Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) shortly after treatment of the hypercortisolism was started by means of inhibition of production of glucocorticoids and

  7. Diurnal Blood Pressure Variation in Pheochromocytoma, Primary Aldosteronism and Cushing's Syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zelinka, T.; Štrauch, B.; Pecen, Ladislav; Widimský jr., J.

    Roc. 18, c. 1 (2004), s. 107-111 ISSN 0950-9240 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00B107 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1030915 Keywords : primary aldosteronism * pheochromocytoma * Cushing's syndrome * cirardian blood pressure rhythm Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 1.930, year: 2004

  8. Le syndrome de cushing chez l'adolescent: à propos de 18 patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adolescent. Elle diffère de la pathologie adulte par le mode de présentation et la prise en charge. Il s'agit d'une étude rétrospective des dossiers de patients suivis pour syndrome de Cushing au service d'endocrinologie de Casablanca entre ...

  9. ECTOPIC CUSHING SYNDROME: A 10-YEAR EXPERIENCE FROM A TERTIARY CARE CENTER IN SOUTHERN INDIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyakumar, Samantha; Paul, Thomas Vizhalil; Asha, Hesargatta Shyamsunder; Gnanamuthu, Birla Roy; Paul, M J; Abraham, Deepak Thomas; Rajaratnam, Simon; Thomas, Nihal

    2017-08-01

    Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion is a less common cause of Cushing syndrome and is seen in 5 to 10% of cases with endogenous hypercortisolemia. We hereby describe our experience of patients with ectopic ACTH syndrome, who have been managed over the past 10 years at a tertiary care center in Southern India. The inpatient and outpatient records of patients from 2006 to 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. The clinical features, clinical history, biochemical values, imaging features, including radiologic findings and positron emission tomography scans, management, details of follow-up, and outcomes, were documented. We compared the biochemical findings in these patients with 20 consecutive patients with Cushing disease (Cushing syndrome of pituitary origin). A total of 21 patients were studied. The median age at presentation was 34 years (range, 19 to 55 years). Seven patients had thymic carcinoid, 7 had bronchial carcinoid, 3 had lung malignancies, 2 had medullary carcinoma thyroid, 1 patient had a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, and 1 patient had an occult source of ACTH. The most common clinical features at presentation were muscle weakness (95%), hyperpigmentation (90%), facial puffiness (76%), easy bruising (61%), edema (57%), and striae (52%). Extensive acne was seen in a large number of patients (43%). Only 3 patients (14%) had central obesity. The median 8 am cortisol was 55.5 μg/dL (range, 3.8 to 131 μg/dL), median 8 am ACTH was 207 pg/mL (range, 31.1 to 703 pg/mL), and the median 24-hour urinary free cortisol was 2,484 μg (range, 248 to 25,438 μg). Basal cortisol and ACTH, as well as midnight cortisol and ACTH level, were markedly higher in patients with ectopic Cushing syndrome as compared to patients with Cushing disease. Twelve of 21 patients had developed life-threatening infections by follow-up. Nine patients had undergone surgical intervention to address the primary tumor. However, only 1 patient exhibited a complete cure on

  10. Gestación y psicosis esteroidea en el curso del síndrome de Cushing Pregnancy and steroid psychosis in the course of Cushing's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marelys Yanes Quesada

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La gestación en el curso del síndrome de Cushing es infrecuente, así como el caso inverso; o sea, que se realice el diagnóstico de síndrome de Cushing durante la gestación. Sin embargo, es posible. Se presenta el caso clínico de una paciente femenina, de 28 años, con un adenoma cortical de suprarrenal derecha productor de cortisol, que en el curso de su enfermedad, resultó embarazada. Se decidió interrupción del embarazo debido al riesgo materno fetal. Durante la evolución del síndrome de Cushing presentó una psicosis esteroidea que requirió tratamiento medicamentoso. Después de realizada la adrenalectomía, se produjo remisión del cuadro clínico y bioquímico. Por tal razón, alertamos a la comunidad médica a insistir en el control preconcepcional de estas pacientes.Pregnancy in the course of Cushing syndrome is not frequent, as well as the contrary case, in other words, that diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome be made during pregnancy. However, it is possible. This is a clinical case of a female patient aged 28 with a cortical adenoma of the right suprarenal gland producing cortisol, which in the course of her disease became pregnant. We decide the termination of pregnancy due to mother-fetus risk. Over the course of Cushing's syndrome there was steroid psychosis requiring drug therapy. After the adrenalectomy threw was a remission of clinical and biochemical picture. Thus, it is necessary to alert the medical community to insist in preconception control of these patients.

  11. Intraocular pressure and its correlation with midnight plasma cortisol level in Cushing's disease and other endogenous Cushing's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarshini Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to measure intraocular pressure (IOP and evaluate the correlation between IOP and midnight plasma cortisol (MPC level in patients with Cushing's disease (CD and other endogenous Cushing's syndrome (ECS. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study from a single center including newly diagnosed patients with CD or ECS. All patients underwent detailed ophthalmological evaluation. IOP was measured by Goldmann applanation tonometry in the morning and evening on two consecutive days. MPC value was obtained for each patient. The data were compared using paired and unpaired t-test, Mann–Whitney U-test, and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Results: Among 32 patients, 22 were CD (68.75% and 10 patients were other ECS (31.25%. A total of 25 patients (78.12% in our study group had normal IOP (<22 mmHg, and seven patients (21.88% had increased IOP (≥22 mmHg. The percentage of patients with normal IOP was found to be significantly higher compared to percentage of patients with high IOP (P = 0.001 using one-sample Chi-square test. Mean MPC value was 468.6 ± 388.3 nmol/L in patients having IOP ≥22 mmHg and 658.5 ± 584 nmol/L in those with IOP <22 mmHg from both CD and ECS groups, but the difference was not statistically significant. No correlation was found between IOP and MPC (Spearman's rank correlation rho = −0.16 [P = 0.38]. Conclusion: In CD and ECS patients, IOP elevation is an uncommon feature, and high IOP in either group does not correlate with MPC level.

  12. Performance of the 4-mg intravenous dexamethasone suppression test in differentiating Cushing disease from pseudo-Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouvel, Migueline; Rabilloud, Muriel; Raverot, Véronique; Subtil, Fabien; Vouillarmet, Julien; Thivolet, Charles; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Borson-Chazot, Françoise; Pugeat, Michel; Raverot, Gérald

    2016-02-01

    Discriminating Cushing disease (CD) from pseudo-Cushing syndrome (PCS) is a challenging task that may be overcome with the 4-mg intravenous (IV) dexamethasone suppression test (DST). Assess the performance of the 4-mg IV DST in the differential diagnosis between CD and PCS in well-characterized patients. Retrospective comparative study of subjects seen in a tertiary care unit (November 2008 to July 2011). Thirty-six patients with PCS and 32 patients with CD underwent 4-mg IV dexamethasone infusions from 11 am to 3 pm. Areas Under ROC Curves (AUCs) were estimated and compared for ACTH and cortisol measured at 4 pm the same day (day 1) and 8 am the next day (day 2). The ROC curve of the marker with the highest AUC was used to determine the threshold with the highest specificity for 100% sensitivity. The AUC of ACTH at 8 am on day 2 was estimated at 98.4% (95% CI: [92.1-100]), which is significantly greater than that of ACTH at 4 pm on day 1 (P=0.04) and that of cortisol at 8 am on day 2 (P=0.05). For ACTH at 8 am on day 2, the threshold with the highest specificity for 100% sensitivity was estimated at 14.8 ng/L. At this threshold, the sensitivity was estimated at 100% [89-100] and the specificity at 83.3% [67-94]. The 4-mg IV DST is an easy and accurate tool in distinguishing CD from PCS. It deserves thus a better place in establishing the diagnosis of CD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Daily blood pressure profile in Cushing's syndrome before and after surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreze A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available No significant difference has been demonstrated in the altered circadian blood pressure pattern between the pituitary-dependent and adrenal forms of Cushing's syndrome before surgery. The effect of therapy, however, proved to be different. The mesor was normalized in the pituitary-dependent Cushing's syndrome more conspicuously for systolic than for diastolic blood pressure. In Cushing's syndrome due to adrenal adenoma, systolic and diastolic blood pressure mesors have been even significantly "overnormalized" after treatment, being 11 to 27 and 2 to 13 mmHg (95% confidence lower than corresponding mesors in controls. There was no difference between forms in the effect of treatment on blood pressure amplitudes, which remained significantly lower than in controls. Finally, acrophase patterns were partly normalized after treatment of the pituitary-dependent form only for diastolic blood pressure, while both systolic and diastolic blood pressure acrophases were normalized in the treated adrenal form. In conclusion, complete normalization of the pattern of daily blood pressure profile has not been achieved in either form of the syndrome. This may be one of the reasons for the reduced long-term survival after surgical cure of hypercortisolism, than expected.

  14. The diversity of abnormal hormone receptors in adrenal Cushing's syndrome allows novel pharmacological therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacroix A.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies from several groups have indicated that abnormal or ectopic expression and function of adrenal receptors for various hormones may regulate cortisol production in ACTH-independent hypercortisolism. Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP-dependent Cushing's syndrome has been described in patients with either unilateral adenoma or bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia; this syndrome results from the large adrenal overexpression of the GIP receptor without any activating mutation. We have conducted a systematic in vivo evaluation of patients with adrenal Cushing's syndrome in order to identify the presence of abnormal hormone receptors. In macronodular adrenal hyperplasia, we have identified, in addition to GIP-dependent Cushing's syndrome, other patients in whom cortisol production was regulated abnormally by vasopressin, ß-adrenergic receptor agonists, hCG/LH, or serotonin 5HT-4 receptor agonists. In patients with unilateral adrenal adenoma, the abnormal expression or function of GIP or vasopressin receptor has been found, but the presence of ectopic or abnormal hormone receptors appears to be less prevalent than in macronodular adrenal hyperplasia. The identification of the presence of an abnormal adrenal receptor offers the possibility of a new pharmacological approach to control hypercortisolism by suppressing the endogenous ligands or by using specific antagonists for the abnormal receptors.

  15. Cushing's syndrome and fetal features resurgence in adrenal cortex-specific Prkar1a knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Sahut-Barnola

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Carney complex (CNC is an inherited neoplasia syndrome with endocrine overactivity. Its most frequent endocrine manifestation is primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD, a bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia causing pituitary-independent Cushing's syndrome. Inactivating mutations in PRKAR1A, a gene encoding the type 1 alpha-regulatory subunit (R1alpha of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA have been found in 80% of CNC patients with Cushing's syndrome. To demonstrate the implication of R1alpha loss in the initiation and development of PPNAD, we generated mice lacking Prkar1a specifically in the adrenal cortex (AdKO. AdKO mice develop pituitary-independent Cushing's syndrome with increased PKA activity. This leads to autonomous steroidogenic genes expression and deregulated adreno-cortical cells differentiation, increased proliferation and resistance to apoptosis. Unexpectedly, R1alpha loss results in improper maintenance and centrifugal expansion of cortisol-producing fetal adrenocortical cells with concomitant regression of adult cortex. Our data provide the first in vivo evidence that loss of R1alpha is sufficient to induce autonomous adrenal hyper-activity and bilateral hyperplasia, both observed in human PPNAD. Furthermore, this model demonstrates that deregulated PKA activity favors the emergence of a new cell population potentially arising from the fetal adrenal, giving new insight into the mechanisms leading to PPNAD.

  16. Effectiveness of medical treatment for Cushing's syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broersen, Leonie H A; Jha, Meghna; Biermasz, Nienke R; Pereira, Alberto M; Dekkers, Olaf M

    2018-05-31

    To systematically review the effectiveness of medical treatment for Cushing's syndrome in clinical practice, regarding cortisol secretion, clinical symptom improvement, and quality of life. To assess the occurrence of side effects of these medical therapies. Eight electronic databases were searched in March 2017 to identify potentially relevant articles. Randomized controlled trials and cohort studies assessing the effectiveness of medical treatment in patients with Cushing's syndrome, were eligible. Pooled proportions were reported including 95% confidence intervals. We included 35 articles with in total 1520 patients in this meta-analysis. Most included patients had Cushing's disease. Pooled reported percentage of patients with normalization of cortisol ranged from 35.7% for cabergoline to 81.8% for mitotane in Cushing's disease. Patients using medication monotherapy showed a lower percentage of cortisol normalization compared to use of multiple medical agents (49.4 vs. 65.7%); this was even higher for patients with concurrent or previous radiotherapy (83.6%). Mild side effects were reported in 39.9%, and severe side effects were seen in 15.2% of patients after medical treatment. No meta-analyses were performed for clinical symptom improvement or quality of life due to lack of sufficient data. This meta-analysis shows that medication induces cortisol normalization effectively in a large percentage of patients. Medical treatment for Cushing's disease patients is thus a reasonable option in case of a contraindication for surgery, a recurrence, or in patients choosing not to have surgery. When experiencing side effects or no treatment effect, an alternate medical therapy or combination therapy can be considered.

  17. Case report of a bilateral adrenal myelolipoma associated with Cushing disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Se Yoon; Kwak, Mi Kyung; Kim, Hye Jeong; Park, Hyeong Kyu; Suh, Kyo-Il; Yoo, Myung Hi; Jin, So Young; Yun, Sumi; Byun, Dong Won

    2017-12-01

    Adrenal myelolipomas are rare benign tumors, composed of a variable mixture of mature adipose tissue and hematopoietic tissue. These tumors are frequently detected incidentally and are usually asymptomatic, and hormonally inactive. During a routine health checkup, a 52-year-old man was found to have a tumor on the bilateral adrenal glands. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a well-defined, heterogeneously enhanced bilateral adrenal mass, suggesting a myelolipoma. The hormonal evaluation revealed adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) dependent Cushing syndrome. The patient underwent left adrenalectomy, and transsphenoidal resection of a pituitary mass. The final diagnosis was adrenal myelolipoma associated with Cushing disease. Growth of right adrenal myelolipoma was detected during the 7-year follow-up. There were enhancing pituitary lesions in repeat magnetic resonance imaging of the sellar region, which implies persistent or recurrent pituitary adenoma. This case reinforces relationship between Cushing disease and adrenal myelolipoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported pathologically confirmed bilateral adrenal myelolipoma associated with Cushing disease. This report supports the idea that ACTH is associated with the development of adrenal myelolipoma. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Coexistence of Cushing syndrome from functional adrenal adenoma and Addison disease from immune-mediated adrenalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, Randall; Jimenez, Rafael E; Farrar, William; Malgor, Ramiro; Kohn, Leonard; Schwartz, Frank L

    2012-06-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented with an incidental adrenal adenoma and physical examination findings that included moderate obesity, a slight cervicothoracic fat pad ("buffalo hump"), increased supraclavicular fat pads, and white abdominal striae. Biochemical workup revealed elevated levels of 24-hour urinary free cortisol but normal serum morning cortisol and suppressed levels of corticotropin, suggestive of adrenal-dependent Cushing syndrome. The resected adrenal gland revealed macronodular cortical hyperplasia with a dominant nodule. Other findings included an absent cortisol response to corticotropin stimulation, presence of serum anti-21-hydroxylase antibodies, and mononuclear cell infiltration--consistent with adrenalitis. The findings represent, to the authors' knowledge, the first known case of a patient with coexistent functional cortisol-secreting macronodular adrenal tumor resulting in Cushing syndrome and immune-mediated adrenalitis resulting in Addison disease.

  19. Multiple osteoblastomas in a child with Cushing syndrome due to bilateral adrenal micronodular hyperplasias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeoh Won Yu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocorticotropin-independent adrenal hyperplasias are rare diseases, which are classified into macronodular (>1 cm and micronodular (≤1 cm hyperplasia. Micronodular adrenal hyperplasia is subdivided into primary pigmented adrenocortical disease and a limited or nonpigmented form 'micronodular adrenocortical disease (MAD', although considerable morphological and genetic overlap is observed between the 2 groups. We present an unusual case of a 44-month-old girl who was diagnosed with Cushing syndrome due to MAD. She had presented with spotty pigmentation on her oral mucosa, lips and conjunctivae and was diagnosed with multiple bone tumors in her femur, pelvis and skull base at the age of 8 years. Her bone tumor biopsies were compatible with osteoblastoma. This case highlights the importance of verifying the clinicopathologic correlation in Cushing syndrome and careful follow-up and screening for associated diseases.

  20. Residual manifestations of hypercortisolemia following surgical treatment in a patient with Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Sara K; Karaviti, Lefkothea P; Brandt, Mary L; Lopez, Monica E; Masand, Prakash; Devaraj, Sridevi; Hicks, John; Anderson, Lauren; Lodish, Maya; Keil, Meg; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-01-01

    Cushing Syndrome is difficult to diagnose, and the comorbidities and persistent late effects of hypercortisolemia after treatment of the primary disease are challenging for the patient and the endocrinologist. To report the case of a girl with obesity and hypertension, ultimately diagnosed with Cushing syndrome due to primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease. In this case, the complications of hypercortisolism persisted short term despite surgical intervention. A 4 year old morbidly obese African-American girl with developmental delay presented with hypertensive emergency in the ER and 18-month history of progressive weight gain. Her previous history included premature adrenarche, hypertension, seizures and a random high cortisol with suppressed ACTH. She was subsequently stabilized, and a diagnostic work-up persistently demonstrated elevated cortisol and suppressed ACTH. An abdominal MRI showed bilateral adrenal multinodular disease, consistent with multinodular hyperplasia of the adrenal glands. Based on these findings the patient underwent a bilateral adrenalectomy, which confirmed primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease. The patient had a complicated, protracted post-operative course requiring adjustment of therapy for persistent hypertension. Two months after surgery, she was readmitted to the Emergency Department with hyperpyrexia and hypertension and succumbed to the complications of sepsis. This case highlights the significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in treating children with Cushing syndrome. Resolution of the source of hypercortisolemia does not imply regression of hypertension or recovery of the immune system. Although the child underwent bilateral adrenalectomy, persistent consequences of prolonged severe hypercortisolism contributed to her death two months later.

  1. The hypertension of Cushing's syndrome: controversies in the pathophysiology and focus on cardiovascular complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidori, Andrea M.; Graziadio, Chiara; Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Cozzolino, Alessia; Ambrogio, Alberto G.; Colao, Annamaria; Corsello, Salvatore M.; Pivonello, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome is associated with increased mortality, mainly due to cardiovascular complications, which are sustained by the common development of systemic arterial hypertension and metabolic syndrome, which partially persist after the disease remission. Cardiovascular diseases and hypertension associated with endogenous hypercortisolism reveal underexplored peculiarities. The use of exogenous corticosteroids also impacts on hypertension and cardiovascular system, especially after prolonged treatment. The mechanisms involved in the development of hypertension differ, whether glucocorticoid excess is acute or chronic, and the source endogenous or exogenous, introducing inconsistencies among published studies. The pleiotropic effects of glucocorticoids and the overlap of the several regulatory mechanisms controlling blood pressure suggest that a rigorous comparison of in-vivo and in-vitro studies is necessary to draw reliable conclusions. This review, developed during the first ‘Altogether to Beat Cushing's syndrome’ workshop held in Capri in 2012, evaluates the most important peculiarities of hypertension associated with CS, with a particular focus on its pathophysiology. A critical appraisal of most significant animal and human studies is compared with a systematic review of the few available clinical trials. A special attention is dedicated to the description of the clinical features and cardiovascular damage secondary to glucocorticoid excess. On the basis of the consensus reached during the workshop, a pathophysiology-oriented therapeutic algorithm has been developed and it could serve as a first attempt to rationalize the treatment of hypertension in Cushing's syndrome. PMID:25415766

  2. Increased Adipocyte Size, Macrophage Infiltration, and Adverse Local Adipokine Profile in Perirenal Fat in Cushing's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roerink, Sean H P P; Wagenmakers, Margreet A E M; Langenhuijsen, Johan F; Ballak, Dov B; Rooijackers, Hanne M M; d'Ancona, Frank C; van Dielen, François M; Smit, Jan W A; Plantinga, Theo S; Netea-Maier, Romana T; Hermus, Ad R M M

    2017-08-01

    To analyze changes in fat cell size, macrophage infiltration, and local adipose tissue adipokine profiles in different fat depots in patients with active Cushing's syndrome. Subcutaneous (SC) and perirenal (PR) adipose tissue of 10 patients with Cushing's syndrome was compared to adipose tissue of 10 gender-, age-, and BMI-matched controls with regard to adipocyte size determined by digital image analysis on hematoxylin and eosin stainings, macrophage infiltration determined by digital image analysis on CD68 stainings, and adipose tissue leptin and adiponectin levels using fluorescent bead immunoassays and ELISA techniques. Compared to the controls, mean adipocyte size was larger in PR adipose tissue in patients. The percentage of macrophage infiltration of the PR adipose tissue and PR adipose tissue lysate leptin levels were higher and adiponectin levels were lower in SC and PR adipose tissue lysates in patients. The adiponectin levels were also lower in the SC adipose tissue supernatants of patients. Associations were found between the severity of hypercortisolism and PR adipocyte size. Cushing's syndrome is associated with hypertrophy of PR adipocytes and a higher percentage of macrophage infiltration in PR adipose tissue. These changes are associated with an adverse local adipokine profile. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  3. Cushing syndrome in a young woman due to primary pigmented nodular adrenal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackman, Kathryn L; Davis, Anna L; Curnow, Paul A; Serpell, Jonathan W; McLean, Catriona A; Topliss, Duncan J

    2010-01-01

    To report a case of Cushing syndrome due to apparently sporadic primary pigmented nodular adrenal disease in a young woman. We describe the clinical, biochemical, radiologic, and histologic findings of Cushing syndrome due to the rare condition of primary pigmented nodular adrenal disease. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 2-year history of worsening itch without rash over her shoulders and arms and weight gain, particularly around the abdomen and face. Careful questioning did not elicit any history of exogenous glucocorticoid use (systemic or topical), including hydrocortisone. On examination, the patient had a slightly rounded and plethoric face, a small buffalo hump, central adiposity, and thin skin with a few small striae on her inner thighs. No features of the Carney complex were observed. Investigations showed hypercortisolism with suppressed corticotropin and normal adrenal imaging despite documentation of enlarged adrenal glands at removal. High-dose dexamethasone administration was followed by a decrease in urinary free cortisol excretion rather than a paradoxical rise as previously reported in primary pigmented nodular adrenal disease. No mutations were detected in the PRKAR1A gene. Primary pigmented nodular adrenal disease should be suspected in patients with corticotropin-independent Cushing syndrome who have normal adrenal imaging. The role of genetic testing in apparently sporadic cases is not established, but cumulative experience may be helpful in defining the frequency of PRKAR1A mutations.

  4. Adrenocorticotropic Hormone-Independent Cushing Syndrome with Bilateral Cortisol-Secreting Adenomas

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    Eu Jeong Ku

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A 48-year-old woman was incidentally found to have bilateral adrenal masses, 2.8 cm in diameter on the right, and 2.3 cm and 1.7 cm in diameter on the left, by abdominal computed tomography. The patient had a medical history of hypertension, which was not being controlled by carvedilol, at a dose of 25 mg daily. She presented with signs and symptoms that suggested Cushing Syndrome. We diagnosed adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH-independent Cushing Syndrome based on the results of basal and dynamic hormone tests. Adrenal vein sampling (AVS was performed to localize a functioning adrenal cortical mass. AVS results were consistent with hypersecretion of cortisol from both adrenal glands, with a cortisol lateralization ratio of 1.1. Upon bilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy, bilateral ACTH-independent adrenal adenomas were found. The patient's signs and symptoms of Cushing Syndrome improved after surgery just as the blood pressure was normalized. After surgery, the patient was started on glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy.

  5. The diagnostic value of CT scan and selective venous sampling in Cushing's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negoro, Makoto; Kuwayama, Akio; Yamamoto, Naoto; Nakane, Toshichi; Yokoe, Toshio; Kageyama, Naoki; Ichihara, Kaoru; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Sakuma, Sadayuki

    1986-01-01

    We studied 24 patients with Cushing's syndrome in order to find the best way to confirm the pituitary adenoma preoperatively. At first, the sellar content was studied by means of a high-resolution CT scan in each patient. Second, by selective catheterization in the bilateral internal jugular vein and the inferior petrosal sinus, venous samples (c) were obtained for ACTH assay. Simultaneously, peripheral blood sampling (P) was made at the anterior cubital vein for the same purpose, and the C/P ratio was carefully calculated in each patient. If the C/P ratio exceeded 2, it was highly suggestive of the presence of pituitary adenoma. Even by an advanced high-resolution CT scan with a thickness of 2 mm, pituitary adenomas were detected in only 32 % of the patients studied. The result of image diagnosis in Cushing disease was discouraging. As for the chemical diagnosis, the results were as follows. At the early stage of this study, the catheterization was terminated in the jugular veins of nine patients. Among these, in five patients the presence of pituitary adenoma was predicted correctly in the preoperative stage. Later, by means of inferior petrosal sinus samplings, pituitary microadenomas were detected in ten patients among the twelve. Selective venous sampling for ACTH in the inferior petrosal sinus or jugular vein proved to be useful for the differential diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome when other diagnostic measures such as CT scan were inconclusive. (author)

  6. Combined Ovarian and Adrenal Venous Sampling in the Localization of Adrenocorticotropic Hormone-Independent Ectopic Cushing Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shi; Li, Ran; Zhang, Xiaobo; Lu, Lin; Li, Ji; Pan, Hui; Zhu, Huijuan

    2018-03-01

    Cushing syndrome is rarely caused by the secretion of cortisol from ovarian tumors. In clinical decision-making, it is important to determine whether the ovarian tumor is capable of secreting cortisol. Selective ovarian and adrenal venous sampling is scarcely reported in the localization of ACTH-independent ectopic Cushing syndrome. We present a case of 40-year-old Chinese woman who had weight gain, hirsutism, hypertension, and menstrual disorder over 6 months. Her physical examination and biochemical assessment revealed adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing syndrome. Adrenal computed tomography scan indicated no abnormality. A mass of 5.7 cm × 4.2 cm × 3.4 cm was discovered by pelvic ultrasonography. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy revealed no abnormal radioactivity intake. Combined ovarian and adrenal venous sampling together with a cortisol assay were conducted. Results revealed cortisol concentration of the right-side ovarian vein, left-side ovarian vein, and peripheral vein of 268.60, 29.00, and 35.18 μg/dL, respectively, suggesting a right-side ovarian origin. A right-side salpingo-oophorectomy was performed and the pathological diagnosis revealed ovarian steroid cell tumor, not otherwise specified. The cortisol level was substantially lower after the patient underwent surgery and symptoms of Cushing syndrome disappeared. At 3-year follow-up, the patient remained disease free, and no tumor was observed on pelvic ultrasonogram. Combined ovarian and adrenal venous sampling is valuable in the localization of adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent ectopic Cushing syndrome.

  7. Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome in patients receiving inhaled budesonide and itraconazole or ritonavir: two cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondin, Marie-Christine; Beauregard, Hugues; Serri, Omar

    2013-01-01

    To present two cases of iatrogenic Cushing syndrome caused by the interaction of budesonide, an inhaled glucocorticoid, with ritonavir and itraconazole. We present the clinical and biochemical data of two patients in whom diagnosis of Cushing syndrome was caused by this interaction. We also reviewed the pertinent literature and management options. A 71-year-old man was treated with inhaled budesonide for a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and itraconazole for a pulmonary aspergillosis. The patient rapidly developed a typical Cushing syndrome complicated by bilateral avascular necrosis of the femoral heads. Serum 8:00 AM cortisol concentrations were suppressed at 0.76 and 0.83 μg/dL on two occasions. The patient died 4 days later of a massive myocardial infarction. The second case is a 46-year-old woman who was treated for several years with inhaled budesonide for asthma. She was put on ritonavir, a retroviral protease inhibitor, for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In the following months, she developed typical signs of Cushing syndrome. Her morning serum cortisol concentration was 1.92 μg/dL. A cosyntropin stimulation test showed values of serum cortisol of Cushing syndrome and secondary adrenal insufficiency due to the association of inhaled corticosteroids with itraconazole or ritonavir.

  8. Two diagnoses become one? Rare case report of anorexia nervosa and Cushing?s syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sawicka, Nadia; Gryczy?ska, Maria; Sowi?ski, Jerzy; Tamborska-Zedlewska, Monika; Rucha?a, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Nadia Sawicka,* Maria Gryczyńska,* Jerzy Sowiński, Monika Tamborska-Zedlewska, Marek Ruchała Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Internal Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis impairment in anorexia nervosa is marked by hypercortisolemia, and psychiatric disorders occur in the majority of patients with Cushing’s syndrome. Here we report a patient diagnosed...

  9. PRKAR1A mutation causing pituitary-dependent Cushing disease in a patient with Carney complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Florian W; Winhofer, Yvonne; Iacovazzo, Donato; Korbonits, Márta; Wolfsberger, Stefan; Knosp, Engelbert; Trautinger, Franz; Höftberger, Romana; Krebs, Michael; Luger, Anton; Gessl, Alois

    2017-08-01

    Carney complex (CNC) is an autosomal dominant condition caused, in most cases, by an inactivating mutation of the PRKAR1A gene, which encodes for the type 1 alpha regulatory subunit of protein kinase A. CNC is characterized by the occurrence of endocrine overactivity, myxomas and typical skin manifestations. Cushing syndrome due to primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) is the most frequent endocrine disease observed in CNC. Here, we describe the first case of a patient with CNC and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent Cushing disease due to a pituitary corticotroph adenoma. Loss-of-heterozygosity analysis of the pituitary tumour revealed loss of the wild-type copy of PRKAR1A , suggesting a role of this gene in the pituitary adenoma development. PRKAR1A loss-of-function mutations can rarely lead to ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas in CNC patients. Pituitary-dependent disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Cushing syndrome in CNC patients. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  10. The Many Faces of Primary Aldosteronism and Cushing Syndrome: A Reflection of Adrenocortical Tumor Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mete, Ozgur; Duan, Kai

    2018-01-01

    Adrenal cortical tumors constitute a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with distinct clinical, morphological, and molecular features. Recent discoveries of specific genotype-phenotype correlations in adrenal cortical adenomas have transformed our understanding of their respective endocrine syndromes. Indeed, a proportion of patients with primary aldosteronism are now known to harbor adrenal cortical adenomas with heterogeneous molecular alterations ( KCNJ5, ATP1A1, ATP2B3 , and CACNA1D ) involving the calcium/calmodulin kinase signaling pathway. Several lines of evidence suggest that KCNJ5 -mutant aldosterone-producing adenomas have distinct clinicopathological phenotype compared to those harboring ATP1A1, ATP2B3 , and CACNA1D mutations. Benign adrenal cortical tumors presenting with Cushing syndrome often have diverse mutations ( PRKACA, PRKAR1A, GNAS, PDE11A , and PDE8B ) involving the cyclic AMP signaling pathway. In addition to cortisol-producing adenomas, bilateral micronodular adrenocortical disease and primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (PBMAH) have also expanded the spectrum of benign neoplasms causing adrenal Cushing disease. The recent discovery of inactivating ARMC5 germline mutations in PBMAH has challenged the old belief that this disorder is mainly a sporadic disease. Emerging evidence suggests that PBMAH harbors multiple distinct clonal proliferations, reflecting the heterogeneous genomic landscape of this disease. Although most solitary adrenal cortical tumors are sporadic, there is an increasing recognition that inherited susceptibility syndromes may also play a role in their pathogenesis. This review highlights the molecular and morphological heterogeneity of benign adrenal cortical neoplasms, reflected in the diverse presentations of primary aldosteronism and adrenal Cushing syndrome.

  11. The Many Faces of Primary Aldosteronism and Cushing Syndrome: A Reflection of Adrenocortical Tumor Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Mete

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal cortical tumors constitute a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with distinct clinical, morphological, and molecular features. Recent discoveries of specific genotype–phenotype correlations in adrenal cortical adenomas have transformed our understanding of their respective endocrine syndromes. Indeed, a proportion of patients with primary aldosteronism are now known to harbor adrenal cortical adenomas with heterogeneous molecular alterations (KCNJ5, ATP1A1, ATP2B3, and CACNA1D involving the calcium/calmodulin kinase signaling pathway. Several lines of evidence suggest that KCNJ5-mutant aldosterone-producing adenomas have distinct clinicopathological phenotype compared to those harboring ATP1A1, ATP2B3, and CACNA1D mutations. Benign adrenal cortical tumors presenting with Cushing syndrome often have diverse mutations (PRKACA, PRKAR1A, GNAS, PDE11A, and PDE8B involving the cyclic AMP signaling pathway. In addition to cortisol-producing adenomas, bilateral micronodular adrenocortical disease and primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (PBMAH have also expanded the spectrum of benign neoplasms causing adrenal Cushing disease. The recent discovery of inactivating ARMC5 germline mutations in PBMAH has challenged the old belief that this disorder is mainly a sporadic disease. Emerging evidence suggests that PBMAH harbors multiple distinct clonal proliferations, reflecting the heterogeneous genomic landscape of this disease. Although most solitary adrenal cortical tumors are sporadic, there is an increasing recognition that inherited susceptibility syndromes may also play a role in their pathogenesis. This review highlights the molecular and morphological heterogeneity of benign adrenal cortical neoplasms, reflected in the diverse presentations of primary aldosteronism and adrenal Cushing syndrome.

  12. Concordance of the late night salivary cortisol in patients with Cushing's syndrome and elevated urine-free cortisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Suhail A R; Clark, Justin; Russell, Anthony W

    2013-04-01

    The concordance of the late night salivary cortisol (LNSC) results with the 24-h urine-free cortisol (UFC) results in the biochemical screening for Cushing's syndrome is unknown. We investigated this in a population of Cushing's syndrome subjects. We used meta-analytic methods to pool proportions of LNSC-positive subjects from diagnostic evaluations of Cushing's syndrome subjects where both tests were performed and the UFC was elevated (any level). Cushing's syndrome was confirmed in all subjects by two out of three conventional tests. LNSC was collected between 22:00 to 24:00 h and measured around the same time period as the UFC. Minimum cutoffs of ≥4 and ≥10 nmol/L were used to determine concordance with the UFC and studies were limited to those that used radioimmunoassays or electrochemiluminiscence immunoassays for LNSC. The concordance of LNSC ≥4 nmol/L was 97 % (95 % CI 95-99 %) and studies were homogeneous. With LNSC ≥10 nmol/L, there was heterogeneity and two groups were discernible with a pooled concordance of 69 % (95 % CI 60-77 %) and 95 % (95 % CI 92-97 %). Within these sub-groups, studies were homogeneous and there was no difference between them in collection methods, assays used, geographic location, year of publication, or the quality of the underlying studies. The LNSC at a very specific cutoff detects at best 95 % of cases and at worst 69 % of cases of Cushing's syndrome that are UFC positive. The two tests become equivalent at the more sensitive cutoff (>4 nmol/L). We conclude that, given its many benefits and the currently documented equivalence to the UFC, the LNSC should replace the conventional 24-h UFC as the frontline test when screening for Cushing's syndrome.

  13. Unusual cause for recurrent Cushing syndrome and its diagnosis by computed tomography and NP-59 radiocholesterol scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, R.D.; Herwig, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    Cushing syndrome can recur following an adrenalectomy. One of the primary causes is recurrence of adrenal carcinoma either locally or from metastases. Hyperplasia and hyperfunction of adrenal remnants may also occur if there is pituitary stimulation. We have a patient in whom recurrent Cushing syndrome developed from small nonmalignant deposits of adrenal tissue in the perirenal adipose tissue following adrenalectomy of a benign adenoma. These deposits were identifiable by computed tomography. A false-negative NP-59 iodocholesterol scan was instructive in pointing out some problems in the interpretation of this type of scan for adrenal tissue

  14. A comparison of the use of urinary cortisol to creatinine ratios and nocturnal salivary cortisol in the evaluation of cyclicity in patients with Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, U M; Hunter, S J; McDonnell, M; Mullan, K R; Atkinson, A B

    2013-01-01

    Cyclical Cushing's syndrome is detected in our center by collecting sequential early morning urine (EMU) samples for cortisol to creatinine ratio over 28 d. The Endocrine Society suggests that nocturnal salivary cortisol (NSC) may be used to assess patients for cyclical Cushing's. However, there is only very limited evidence that it correlates with EMU testing or that it demonstrates cycling over 28 d. We sought to correlate NSC with EMU results collected the following morning and to determine whether NSC could be used to detect cyclical Cushing's. An observation study of 28-d collections for NSC and EMU was performed in a tertiary referral center over 1 yr. A 28-d collection of NSC and EMU was performed in 10 patients with confirmed or suspected Cushing's syndrome. The main outcome of the study was the correlation of salivary and urinary cortisol with graphical assessment of results for cycling. Eleven collections were performed. One patient with cyclical Cushing's completed the collection before and after cabergoline therapy. Two hundred seventy matched salivary and urinary results were correlated (r = 0.79; P Cushing's, EMU and NSC followed a similar cyclical pattern. In one patient with recurrent cyclical Cushing's, cortisol was elevated in both saliva and urine but with more prominent cycles in saliva. NSC correlated well with EMU. NSC detected all cases of cyclical Cushing's. Therefore, NSC may prove to be an additional option or replacement for EMU in detecting cyclical Cushing's syndrome.

  15. Analysis of adrenocortical hyperplasia by computed tomography in patients with Cushing's disease, idiopathic hyperaldosteronism and adrenogenital syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komiya, Ichiro; Ohara, Noriko; Nagasawa, Yoshitaka; Asawa, Takayuki; Hashizume, Kiyoshi; Takasu, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Takashi.

    1994-01-01

    We assessed the usefulness and reliability of computed tomography (CT scan) in evaluating adrenal hyperplasia in 38 patients, including 14 with Cushing's disease, 17 with idiopathic hyperaldosteronism (IHA), and 7 with the adrenogenital syndrome (AGS). Eighty-two normal subjects were also examined. We analyzed the shape of the adrenal gland and quantitated its thickness, width and length. Visual inspection revealed V-shaped right adrenal glands in 100% of patients with Cushing's disease, 94% of patients with IHA, 100% of patients with AGS and in 41% of the normal subjects. Triangular left adrenal glands were observed in 100% of patients with Cushing's disease, 82% of patients with IHA, 67% of patients with AGS and in 12% of the normal subjects. Quantitative analysis showed that the right adrenal gland was significantly thicker and longer in patients with Cushing's disease, IHA and in those with AGS than in normal subjects. The right adrenal gland was significantly wider in the patients with Cushing's disease and AGS than in control subjects. The left adrenal gland was significantly wider and longer in patients with Cushing's disease and AGS than in the normal controls. Analysis of individual data indicated that the upper limit of normal for thickness of the right adrenal was 7 mm. Therefore, adrenal hyperplasia was strongly suggested when the right adrenal gland was more than 7 mm thick. Our findings suggest that the CT scan is useful and reliable in diagnosing adrenal hyperplasia. (author)

  16. Multiple endocrine adenomatosis with Cushing's disease and the amenorrhea-galactorrhea syndrome responsive to proton beam irradiation

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    Veseley, D.L.; Fass, F.H.

    1981-09-01

    Multiple endocrine adenomatosis (MEA) or neoplasia is a hereditary disorder consisting of tumors of hyperplasia of several endocrine glands. In MEA-1 the pituitary, parathyroids, and pancreatic islets are most frequently involved, while in MEA-2 the thyroid (medullary carcinoma of the thyroid), parathyroids,and adrenals (pheochromocytomas) are the endocrine glands most likely to be involved. Cushings's syndrome may occur in MEA-1 and has also been found in patients with MEA-2, where the cause of Cushing's syndrome is usually ectopic ACTH production from medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. Recently, there have been reports of amenorrhea-galactorrhea syndrome in patients with MEA-1, and confirmation that hyperprolactinemia is associated with this syndrom has been found in patients with MEA-1. The present report details a patient who has been followed up for 20 years since she first presented with amenorrhea and galactorrhea. Ten years after first being seen she was noted to have Cushing's syndrom and hyperparathyroidism due to parathyroid hyperplasia. Both the amenorrhea-galactorrhea syndrome and Cushing's sydrome disappeared with proton beam irradiation to the pituitary.

  17. Multiple endocrine adenomatosis with Cushing's disease and the amenorrhea-galactorrhea syndrome responsive to proton beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veseley, D.L.; Fass, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    Multiple endocrine adenomatosis (MEA) or neoplasia is a hereditary disorder consisting of tumors of hyperplasia of several endocrine glands. In MEA-1 the pituitary, parathyroids, and pancreatic islets are most frequently involved, while in MEA-2 the thyroid (medullary carcinoma of the thyroid), parathyroids,and adrenals (pheochromocytomas) are the endocrine glands most likely to be involved. Cushings's syndrome may occur in MEA-1 and has also been found in patients with MEA-2, where the cause of Cushing's syndrome is usually ectopic ACTH production from medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. Recently, there have been reports of amenorrhea-galactorrhea syndrome in patients with MEA-1, and confirmation that hyperprolactinemia is associated with this syndrom has been found in patients with MEA-1. The present report details a patient who has been followed up for 20 years since she first presented with amenorrhea and galactorrhea. Ten years after first being seen she was noted to have Cushing's syndrom and hyperparathyroidism due to parathyroid hyperplasia. Both the amenorrhea-galactorrhea syndrome and Cushing's sydrome disappeared with proton beam irradiation to the pituitary

  18. Ectopic Cushing' syndrome caused by a neuroendocrine carcinoma of the mesentery

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    Petersenn Stephan

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ACTH overproduction within the pituitary gland or ectopically leads to hypercortisolism. Here, we report the first case of Cushing' syndrome caused by an ectopic ACTH-secreting neuroendocrine carcinoma of the mesentery. Moreover, diagnostic procedures and pitfalls associated with ectopic ACTH-secreting tumors are demonstrated and discussed. Case presentation A 41 year-old man presented with clinical features and biochemical tests suggestive of ectopic Cushing's syndrome. First, subtotal thyroidectomy was performed without remission of hypercortisolism, because an octreotide scan showed increased activity in the left thyroid gland and an ultrasound revealed nodules in both thyroid lobes one of which was autonomous. In addition, the patient had a 3 mm hypoenhancing lesion of the neurohypophysis and a 1 cm large adrenal tumor. Surgical removal of the pituitary lesion within the posterior lobe did not improve hypercortisolism and we continued to treat the patient with metyrapone to block cortisol production. At 18-months follow-up from initial presentation, we detected an ACTH-producing neuroendocrine carcinoma of the mesentery by using a combination of octreotide scan, computed tomography scan, and positron emission tomography. Intraoperatively, use of a gamma probe after administration of radiolabeled 111In-pentetreotide helped identify the mesenteric neuroendocrine tumor. After removal of this carcinoma, the patient improved clinically. Laboratory testing confirmed remission of hypercortisolism. An octreotide scan 7 months after surgery showed normal results. Conclusion This case underscores the diagnostic challenge in identifying an ectopic ACTH-producing tumor and the pluripotency of cells, in this case of mesenteric cells that can start producing and secreting ACTH. It thereby helps elucidate the pathogenesis of neuroendocrine tumors. This case also suggests that patients with ectopic Cushing's syndrome and an octreotide

  19. Ectopic Cushing' syndrome caused by a neuroendocrine carcinoma of the mesentery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasshauer, Mathias; Paschke, Ralf; Koch, Christian A; Lincke, Thomas; Witzigmann, Helmut; Kluge, Regine; Tannapfel, Andrea; Moche, Michael; Buchfelder, Michael; Petersenn, Stephan; Kratzsch, Juergen

    2006-01-01

    ACTH overproduction within the pituitary gland or ectopically leads to hypercortisolism. Here, we report the first case of Cushing' syndrome caused by an ectopic ACTH-secreting neuroendocrine carcinoma of the mesentery. Moreover, diagnostic procedures and pitfalls associated with ectopic ACTH-secreting tumors are demonstrated and discussed. A 41 year-old man presented with clinical features and biochemical tests suggestive of ectopic Cushing's syndrome. First, subtotal thyroidectomy was performed without remission of hypercortisolism, because an octreotide scan showed increased activity in the left thyroid gland and an ultrasound revealed nodules in both thyroid lobes one of which was autonomous. In addition, the patient had a 3 mm hypoenhancing lesion of the neurohypophysis and a 1 cm large adrenal tumor. Surgical removal of the pituitary lesion within the posterior lobe did not improve hypercortisolism and we continued to treat the patient with metyrapone to block cortisol production. At 18-months follow-up from initial presentation, we detected an ACTH-producing neuroendocrine carcinoma of the mesentery by using a combination of octreotide scan, computed tomography scan, and positron emission tomography. Intraoperatively, use of a gamma probe after administration of radiolabeled 111 In-pentetreotide helped identify the mesenteric neuroendocrine tumor. After removal of this carcinoma, the patient improved clinically. Laboratory testing confirmed remission of hypercortisolism. An octreotide scan 7 months after surgery showed normal results. This case underscores the diagnostic challenge in identifying an ectopic ACTH-producing tumor and the pluripotency of cells, in this case of mesenteric cells that can start producing and secreting ACTH. It thereby helps elucidate the pathogenesis of neuroendocrine tumors. This case also suggests that patients with ectopic Cushing's syndrome and an octreotide scan positive in atypical locations may benefit from

  20. Clinical Characteristics and Metabolic Features of Patients with Adrenal Incidentalomas with or without Subclinical Cushing's Syndrome

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    Bo-Yeon Kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe aim of this study was to examine the clinical characteristics of adrenal incidentalomas discovered by computed tomography (CT and to investigate metabolic features of subclinical Cushing's syndrome (SCS in patients with adrenal incidentalomas in a tertiary hospital in Korea.MethodsThis retrospective study examined the clinical aspects of 268 patients with adrenal incidentalomas discovered by CT at Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital. Clinical data and endocrine function of the patients as well as histological findings were obtained from medical records, while anatomic characteristics were analyzed by reviewing imaging studies. Hormonal tests for pheochromocytoma, Cushing's syndrome, and aldosterone-secreting adenoma were performed.ResultsMost (n=218, 81.3% cases were nonfunctioning tumors. Of the 50 patients with functioning tumors (18.7%, 19 (7.1% were diagnosed with SCS, nine (3.4% with overt Cushing's syndrome, 12 (4.5% with primary aldosteronism, and 10 (3.7% with pheochromocytoma. Malignant tumors (both primary and metastatic were rare (n=2, 0.7%. Body mass index, fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and total cholesterol were significantly higher in patients with SCS in comparison with those with nonfunctioning tumors. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension were significantly higher in patients with SCS compared with those with nonfunctioning tumors.ConclusionFunctioning tumors, especially those with subclinical cortisol excess, are commonly found in patients with adrenal incidentalomas, although malignancy is rare. In addition, patients with SCS in adrenal incidentalomas have adverse metabolic and cardiovascular profiles.

  1. Circulatory Immune Cells in Cushing Syndrome: Bystanders or Active Contributors to Atherometabolic Injury? A Study of Adhesion and Activation of Cell Surface Markers

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    Gloria Aranda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids (GC induce cardiometabolic risk while atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammation involving immunity. GC are immune suppressors, and the adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH has immune modulator activities. Both may act in atherothrombotic inflammation involving immune cells (IMNC. Aim. To investigate adhesion and activation surface cell markers (CDs of peripheral IMNC in endogenous Cushing syndrome (CS and the immune modulator role of ACTH. Material and Methods. 16 ACTH-dependent CS (ACTH-D, 10 ACTH-independent (ACTH-ID CS, and 16 healthy controls (C were included. Leukocytes (Leuc, monocytes (MN, lymphocytes (Lym, and neutrophils (N were analyzed by flow cytometry for atherosclerosis previously associated with CDs. Results. Leuc, N, and MN correlated with CS (p<0.05, WC (p<0.001, WHR (p=0.003, BMI (p<0.001, and hs-CRP (p<0.001. CD14++CD16+ (p=0.047; CD14+CD16++ (p=0.053 MN; CD15+ (p=0.027; CD15+CD16+ (p=0.008 N; and NK-Lym (p=0.019 were higher in CS. CD14+CD16++ MN were higher in ACTH-ID (8.9 ± 3.5% versus ACTH-D CS (4.2 ± 1.9% versus C (4.9 ± 2.3%. NK-Lym correlated with c-LDL (r = 0.433, p=0.039 and CD15+ N with hs-CRP (r = 0.446, p=0.037. In multivariate analysis, Leuc, N, and MN depended on BMI (p=0.021, WC (p=0.002, and WHR (p=0.014, while CD15+ and CD15+CD16+ N on hypercortisolism and CS (p=0.035. Conclusion. In CS, IMNC present changes in activation and adhesion CDs implicated in atherothrombotic inflammation. ACTH-IDCS presents a particular IMNC phenotype, possibly due to the absence of the immune modulator effect of ACTH.

  2. Adrenal scintigraphy using 131I-19-iodocholesterol in the exploration of Cushing's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbonnel, B.; Chupin, M.; Guillon, J.; Chatal, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    On the basis of 7 cases representing the essential types of aetiology of Cushing's syndrome, it is possible to define the value, limitations and role of adrenal scintigraphy using 131 I-19-iodocholesterol in the diagnostic investigation of hypercortisolism. The essential value of the investigation is morphological rather than functional. Adrenal scintigraphy has the same role in diagnostic investigation as various radiological procedures such as pneumoperitoneum and angiography. The latter, however, are technically difficult and fraught with risk, in contrast to the isotopic examination. The principle limitations of the method are not dosimetric but lie in the relative difficulty of interpretation of the documents obtained [fr

  3. Whole body computed tomographic findings of each one case with primary aldosteronism and Cushing syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamata, Shuji; Kawamura, Koro; Nakamura, Motoyuki

    1980-01-01

    We here report each one case with primary aldosteronism (male, 28 years old) and Cushing syndrome (female, 37 years old). Both of the cases showed characteristic clinical signs of hypertension and typical laboratory findings of adreno-hormonal assays. In performance of whole body computed tomography, clear pictures of tumorous adenomas in both cases were taken and the sizes of adenomas in picture were completely same as the masses obtained by the lateral adrenectomies. As a result, the whole body computed tomography is very useful to diagnose the diseases of adrenal adenoma and hyperplasia. (author)

  4. The 10:00-11:00 pm urine cortisol/creatinine ratio. An alternative to late-night salivary cortisol for the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Oscar D; Rossi, María A; Juárez-Allen, Lea; Serra, Héctor A; Albiero, María C

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate interchangeability of two tests to diagnose Cushing's syndrome. We compared 10:00-11:00 PM urinary free cortisol/creatinine ratio (UFC/Cr) with late night 11:00 PM salivary cortisol (LNSC) in normal and obese controls vs. patients with Cushing's syndrome. Mean UFC/Cr did not differ between 69 normal and 62 obese controls (9.9 ± 7.9 vs. 9.7 ± 9.3) whereas 116 Cushing's patients had significantly higher values (277.0 ± 318.0; z: -11.1 and -10.2, respectively; p Cushing's patients (24.8 ± 23.3; z: -7.22 and -6.96, respectively, p Cushing's syndrome.

  5. [Paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome, a real diagnostic and therapeutic challenge: A case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, A; Moumen, A; Massine El Hammoumi, M; Hajhouji, S; El Jadi, H; Anas Guerboub, A; Elmoussaoui, S; Mayaudon, H; Hassane Kabiri, E; Hakkou, K; Belmejdoub, G

    2015-12-01

    Paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome is a rare cause of endogenous hypercortisolism attributable to ectopic ACTH secretion by non-pituitary tumors. Imaging and biochemical results are often inconclusive and differential diagnosis with Cushing's disease can then be challenging. Moreover, these tumors may be occult and difficult to find and thus the need of new imaging tools such as (18)FDG-PET scan and (18)DOPA-PET scan. We report a 50-year-old man who presented with very aggressive clinical features related to Cushing's syndrome. Biological work-up confirmed the hypercortisolism and was consistent with an ectopic ACTH secretion. Conventional localization techniques failed to show any tumor and bilateral adrenalectomy was performed because of life-threatening complications. Two years later, thoracic computed tomography reveals an 11 mm mass in the left lower pulmonary lobe, (18)FDG-PET scan found a non-specific mild hypermetabolism of the lung nodule, and the (18)DOPA-PET scan confirmed the high uptake of this nodule suggesting an endocrine carcinoma. Histology confirmed a typical carcinoid tumor. The tumor cells stained positive for ACTH, CD56, chromogranin and synaptophysin. This case illustrates the dilemma between the need for morphological diagnosis of the ectopic ACTH source and control of the life-threatening hypercortisolism. (18)FDG-PET scan and (18)DOPA-PET scan should be considered early as a secondary diagnostic tool when conventional imagery fails to show any tumor. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. VENOUS SAMPLING FOR CUSHING DISEASE: COMPARISON OF INTERNAL JUGULAR VEIN AND INFERIOR PETROSAL SINUS SAMPLING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radvany, Martin G; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Gallia, Gary L; Wand, Gary S; Salvatori, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Because magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) fails to detect many adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenomas, inferior petrosal sinus sampling (IPSS) is considered the gold standard to differentiate Cushing disease (CD) from ectopic ACTH secretion syndrome (EAS). Some authors have suggested internal jugular vein sampling (IJVS) as an alternative to IPSS. We simultaneously compared IJVS to IPSS in 30 consecutive patients referred for ACTH-dependent Cushing syndrome and equivocal MRI exams. Five sites were simultaneously sampled in each patient (right and left IPS, right and left IJV, and femoral vein) before and after the administration of corticotrophin-releasing hormone or desmopressin. The test was considered consistent with CD when the IPS to peripheral ratio was >2 at baseline or >3 after stimulus and the IJV to peripheral ratio was >1.7 at baseline or >2 after stimulus. In 27 of 30 patients, IPSS results were consistent with a central source of ACTH. Two of the other 3 patients had EAS (one lung carcinoid and one occult), and 1 patient had pathology-proven CD. The sensitivity of IPSS was 96.4%. Only 64.2% of these patients had results meeting criteria for a central source of ACTH by IJVS criteria. Twenty patients with centralizing IPPS have undergone pituitary surgery. Of these, the central origin of excessive ACTH was confirmed with certainty in 16 patients. Among these 16 patients, the IPSS sensitivity was 93.8%, whereas 5 patients had false-negative IJVS (68.7% sensitivity). These results do not support the routine use of IJVS in establishing if the pituitary is the source of excessive ACTH. ACTH = adrenocorticotropic hormone CD = Cushing disease CRH = corticotrophin-releasing hormone CS = Cushing syndrome DDAVP = desmopressin EAS = ectopic ACTH secretion IJVS = internal jugular vein sampling IPSS = inferior petrosal sinus sampling JVS = jugular venous sampling MRI = magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. Evaluation of steroid laboratory tests and adrenal gland imaging with radiocholesterol in the aetiological diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbarino, A.; De Marinis, L.; Liberale, I.; Menini, E.

    1979-01-01

    Basal values of the urinary excretion of 17-oxogenic steroids and serum levels of cortisol were not satisfactory in the differentiation of 'suspected' subjects from patients with true Cushing's syndrome. With a RIA method for serum cortisol determination, the overnight dexamethasone suppression test provided the most reliable single test in establishing adrenocortical hyperfunction. Thirty-five normal subjects, fifty-nine obese patients, thirteen 'suspected' patients and thirteen patients with disease states other than Cushing's syndrome had suppressed values below 4.0 μg/100 ml. None of the ten patients with Cushing's syndrome had a cortisol concentration less than 16.3 μg/100ml. Adrenal gland scintigraphy after radiocholesterol injection is a more valuable tool than the metyrapone test and the high-dose dexamethasone suppression test in the localization and differential diagnosis of adrenocortical lesions causing Cushing's syndrome. It obviates the need for angiographic procedure in the localization of adenomas. It is a reliable technique for identifying functioning adrenal remnants. Therefore a schedule is proposed for studying patients with suspected adrenocortical hyperfunction. (author)

  8. Hypertensive crisis in pregnancy due to a metamorphosing pheochromocytoma with postdelivery Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, Katharina; Gruber, Matthias; Masjkur, Jimmy; Steenblock, Charlotte; Peitzsch, Mirko; Meinel, Jörn; Lenders, Jacques; Bornstein, Stefan; Eisenhofer, Graeme

    2018-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas in pregnancy are rare but potentially lethal. Even rarer is the combination of pheochromocytoma in pregnancy with subsequent development of ectopic Cushing's syndrome. We report a 36-year-old woman, previously diagnosed with essential hypertension, who developed severe hypertension in pregnancy complicated by insulin-dependent gestational diabetes. A cesarean section was performed at 32 weeks following a hypertensive crisis after routine administration of betamethasone. Postnatal persistence of signs and symptoms of catecholamine excess led to the diagnosis of a left adrenal pheochromocytoma. Between diagnosis and planned tumor removal, the patient developed signs and symptoms of Cushing's syndrome (facial edema and hirsutism, myopathy and fatigue). Biochemical testing confirmed hypercortisolism with extremely elevated levels of plasma adrenocorticotropin, urinary cortisol and multiple steroids of a plasma panel that were all normal at previous testing. The previously noradrenergic tumor also started producing epinephrine. Histopathological examination confirmed the pheochromocytoma, which was also immunohistochemically positive for adrenocorticotropin. Full post-surgical recovery was sustained with normal blood pressure and biochemical findings after one year. This report not only underlines the chameleon behavior of pheochromocytoma but also illustrates its potential for a metamorphosing presentation. Corticosteroid administration in pregnancy requires a cautious approach in patients with hypertension.

  9. Markers of atherosclerosis in patients with Cushing's syndrome: a meta-analysis of literature studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupoli, Roberta; Ambrosino, Pasquale; Tortora, Anna; Barba, Livia; Lupoli, Gelsy Arianna; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario

    2017-05-01

    Several studies reported an increased cardiovascular (CV) risk in Cushing's syndrome (CS). We performed a meta-analysis on the impact of CS on major markers of atherosclerosis. Studies on intima-media thickness (IMT), carotid plaques prevalence, and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in CS patients and controls were searched in the PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and EMBASE. Differences between cases and controls were expressed as mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for continuous variables, and as Odds Ratio (OR) with 95%CI for dichotomous variables. Fourteen studies (332 CS, 462 controls) were included. Compared with controls, CS patients showed higher IMT (MD: 0.20 mm; 95% CI: 0.12, 0.28; p Cushing's syndrome (CS). In the present meta-analysis we demonstrated that CS is associated with an increased intima-media thickness, higher prevalence of carotid plaques, and lower flow-mediated dilation as compared with controls. These data consistently suggest the need for a strict monitoring of early signs of subclinical atherosclerosis in CS patients.

  10. A Case of Cushing's Syndrome with Multiple Adrenocortical Adenomas Composed of Compact Cells and Clear Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Masahiro; Yoshimoto, Takanobu; Ota, Mitsutane; Numasawa, Mitsuyuki; Sasahara, Yuriko; Takeuchi, Takato; Nakano, Yujiro; Oohara, Norihiko; Murakami, Masanori; Bouchi, Ryotaro; Minami, Isao; Tsuchiya, Kyoichiro; Hashimoto, Koshi; Izumiyama, Hajime; Kawamura, Naoko; Kihara, Kazunori; Negi, Mariko; Akashi, Takumi; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Sasano, Hironobu; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-01

    A 58-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for Cushingoid features and diagnosed as adrenal Cushing's syndrome due to a right adrenocortical mass (60 × 55 mm). The mass was composed of three different tumors; the first one was homogeneously lipid-poor neoplasm measuring 20 × 13 mm located at the most dorsal region, the second one was heterogeneous and lipid-rich tumor containing multiple foci of calcification measuring 50 × 32 mm located at the central region, and the last one was heterogeneous harboring dilated and tortuous vessels and lipid-poor one measuring 35 × 18 mm at the most ventral region of the adrenal gland. A right adrenalectomy was subsequently performed by open surgery. Macroscopic and microscopic analyses revealed that all three tumors were adrenocortical adenomas; the first one represents a pigmented adrenocortical adenoma, the second one adrenocortical adenoma associated with degeneration, and the third one adrenocortical adenoma harboring extensive degeneration. Immunohistochemical analysis of the steroidogenic enzymes also revealed that all of the tumors had the capacity of synthesizing cortisol. This is a very rare case of Cushing's syndrome caused by multiple adrenocortical adenomas including a pigmented adenoma. Immunohistochemical analysis of steroidogenic enzymes contributed to understanding of steroidogenesis in each of these three different adrenocortical adenomas in this case.

  11. Adrenal scintigraphy with 131I-19 iodocholesterol. Interest in Cushing syndrome investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuidard, Claudine.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the physico-chemical properties of 131 I-19-iodocholesterol is followed by a study of its metabolism in both animals and man, giving for the latter the doses delivered to different organs and especially to the gonads. The exploration technique is then described. Scintigraphic examinations are performed on the 3rd day, the 8th day and sometimes the 15th day after injection. However the uptake rate at the adrenal gland depends essentially on the causes of the illness affecting the suprarenal. In Cushing's syndrome the uptake rate is relatively fast and the 1st scintigraphic examination must therefore be carried out earlier (48 hours after injection). The value of isotopic exploration in the etiological evaluation of hypercortisolism is shown to be chiefly morphological, the scintigraphic image serving as a guide to etiological diagnosis. If too adrenal glands are visible this is a sign of bilateral suprerenal hyperplasia. Only one gland clearly visible indicates an adenoma, with functional hypoplasia of the contralateral gland. On the other hand an absence of fixation in the presence of a certain Cushing syndrome would point to malignant cortical carcinoma [fr

  12. Frequency of Cushing's syndrome due to ACTH-secreting adrenal medullary lesions: a retrospective study over 10 years from a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falhammar, Henrik; Calissendorff, Jan; Höybye, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome due to ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone production from adrenal medullary lesions has occasionally been described. We retrospectively reviewed all 164 cases of Cushing's syndrome and 77 cases of pheochromocytomas during 10 years. Of all cases with Cushing's syndrome, only two cases (1.2 %) were due to ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone production from adrenal medullary lesions (one case of pheochromocytoma and one case of adrenal medullary hyperplasia). Of all pheochromocytomas only the above-mentioned case (1.3 %) also gave rise to an ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome. The clinical presentation of adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting pheochromocytoma and adrenal medullary hyperplasia can be anything from mild to dramatic. These are rare conditions important to bear in mind in the workup of a patient with Cushing's syndrome or with pheochromocytoma. The identification of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone secretion from adrenal medullary lesions can be life-saving.

  13. [Severe metabolic alkalosis following hypokalemia from a paraneoplastic Cushing syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, L; Daenen, S; Kouatchet, A; Soltner, C; Alquier, P

    2001-12-01

    Metabolic alkalosis is frequently observed in critically ill patients. Etiologies are numerous but endocrinal causes are rare. We report a case of a patient with severe respiratory insufficiency, metabolic alkalosis and hypokalemia. The evolution was fatal. Further explorations revealed an ectopic Adrenocorticotropine Hormone syndrome. The initial tumor was probably a small cell lung carcinoma.

  14. Cushing's syndrome: epidemiology and developments in disease management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma ST

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Susmeeta T Sharma,1 Lynnette K Nieman,1 Richard A Feelders2 1Program in Reproductive and Adult Endocrinology, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands Abstract: Cushing’s syndrome is a rare disorder resulting from prolonged exposure to excess glucocorticoids. Early diagnosis and treatment of Cushing’s syndrome is associated with a decrease in morbidity and mortality. Clinical presentation can be highly variable, and establishing the diagnosis can often be difficult. Surgery (resection of the pituitary or ectopic source of adrenocorticotropic hormone, or unilateral or bilateral adrenalectomy remains the optimal treatment in all forms of Cushing’s syndrome, but may not always lead to remission. Medical therapy (steroidogenesis inhibitors, agents that decrease adrenocorticotropic hormone levels or glucocorticoid receptor antagonists and pituitary radiotherapy may be needed as an adjunct. A multidisciplinary approach, long-term follow-up, and treatment modalities customized to each individual are essential for optimal control of hypercortisolemia and management of comorbidities. Keywords: Cushing’s syndrome, hypercortisolemia, treatment, epidemiology

  15. MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Management of Cushing's syndrome during pregnancy: solved and unsolved questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brue, Thierry; Amodru, Vincent; Castinetti, Frederic

    2018-06-01

    With fewer than 200 reported cases, Cushing's syndrome (CS) in pregnancy remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. In normal pregnancies, misleading signs may be observed such as striae or hypokalemia, while plasma cortisol and urinary free cortisol may rise up to 2- to 3-fold. While the dexamethasone suppression test is difficult to use, reference values for salivary cortisol appear valid. Apart from gestational hypertension, differential diagnosis includes pheochromocytoma and primary aldosteronism. The predominant cause is adrenal adenoma (sometimes without decreased ACTH), rather than Cushing's disease. There are considerable imaging pitfalls in Cushing's disease. Aberrant receptors may, in rare cases, lead to increased cortisol production during pregnancy in response to HCG, LHRH, glucagon, vasopressin or after a meal. Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is rare and has poor prognosis. Active CS during pregnancy is associated with a high rate of maternal complications: hypertension or preeclampsia, diabetes, fractures; more rarely, cardiac failure, psychiatric disorders, infection and maternal death. Increased fetal morbidity includes prematurity, intrauterine growth retardation and less prevalently stillbirth, spontaneous abortion, intrauterine death and hypoadrenalism. Therapy is also challenging. Milder cases can be managed conservatively by controlling comorbidities. Pituitary or adrenal surgery should ideally be performed during the second trimester and patients should then be treated for adrenal insufficiency. Experience with anticortisolic drugs is limited. Metyrapone was found to allow control of hypercortisolism, with a risk of worsening hypertension. Cabergoline may be an alternative option. The use of other drugs is not advised because of potential teratogenicity and/or lack of information. Non-hormonal (mechanical) contraception is recommended until sustained biological remission is obtained. © 2018 European Society of Endocrinology.

  16. Assessment of vertebral microarchitecture in overt and mild Cushing's syndrome using trabecular bone score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinolas, Helene; Grouthier, Virginie; Mehsen-Cetre, Nadia; Boisson, Amandine; Winzenrieth, Renaud; Schaeverbeke, Thierry; Mesguich, Charles; Bordenave, Laurence; Tabarin, Antoine

    2018-05-21

    Osteoporotic fractures associated with Cushing's syndrome (CS) may occur despite normal bone mineral density (BMD). Few studies have described alterations in vertebral microarchitecture in glucocorticoid-treated patients and during CS. Trabecular bone score (TBS) estimates trabecular microarchitecture from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry acquisitions. Our aim was to compare vertebral BMD and TBS in patients with overt CS and mild autonomous cortisol secretion (MACE), and following cure of overt CS. University Hospital. Monocentric retrospective cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of consecutive patients. A total of 110 patients were studied: 53 patients had CS (35, 11 and 7 patients with Cushing's disease, bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia and ectopic ACTH secretion respectively); 39 patients had MACE (10 patients with a late post-operative recurrence of Cushing's disease and 29 patients with adrenal incidentalomas); 18 patients with non-secreting adrenal incidentalomas. 14 patients with overt CS were followed for up to 2 years after cure. Vertebral osteoporosis at BMD and degraded microarchitecture at TBS were found in 24% and 43% of patients with CS, respectively (P < .03). As compared to patients with nonsecreting incidentalomas, patients with MACE had significantly decreased TBS (P < .04) but not BMD. Overt fragility fractures tended to be associated with low TBS (P = .07) but not with low BMD. TBS, but not BMD values, decreased with the intensity of hypercortisolism independently of its aetiology (P < .01). Following remission of CS, TBS improved more markedly and rapidly than BMD (10% vs 3%, respectively; P < .02). Trabecular bone score may be a promising, noninvasive, widely available and inexpensive complementary tool for the routine assessment of the impact of CS and MACE on bone in clinical practice. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Profound amplification of secretory-burst mass and anomalous regularity of ACTH secretory process in patients with Nelson's syndrome compared with Cushing's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aken, Maarten O.; Pereira, Alberto M.; van den Berg, Gerrit; Romijn, Johannes A.; Veldhuis, Johannes D.; Roelfsema, Ferdinand

    2004-01-01

    As described originally, Nelson's syndrome is characterized by grossly elevated ACTH concentrations, a sellar mass and skin hyperpigmentation emerging in the course of Cushing's disease after bilateral adrenalectomy. No detailed studies have defined whether the mechanisms directing ACTH secretion

  18. Cushing syndrome and the anesthesiologist, two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudin Domi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cushing′s syndrome (CS is associated with reduced life quality and increased mortality, mostly due to cardiovascular disease. The features of this syndrome are central obesity, moon facies, facial plethora, supraclavicular fat pads, buffalo hump, and purple striae. Other complications include hyperglycemia, hypertension, proximal muscle weakness, skin thinning, menstrual irregularities, amenorrhea and osteopenia. These make perioperative and anesthetic management difficult and present a challenge to the operating team, especially the anaesthesiologist. In this paper, we present two such cases of CS, which were treated with adrenalectomy. We aim to highlight the special care and precautions that need to be taken while administering anesthesia, and in the post operatory period. Anaesthesia induction in the two cases of CS was done prior to the adrenalectomy procedure and special pre and post operative care was taken. Continuous intra operative monitoring of vitals and checking for the stability of the haemodynamics was performed. With adequate care and using advanced anesthetic techniques, the patients showed uneventful post operative recovery. Though the anesthetic management of patients with CS is difficult, desired results can be achieved with continuous monitoring and special precautions.

  19. A Challenging Case of an Ectopic Cushing Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Menezes Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchopulmonary carcinoids are rare pulmonary neoplasms although they account for most cases of ectopic ACTH syndromes. When feasible, the mainstay treatment is surgical resection of the tumor. We report the case of a 52-year-old woman with signs and symptoms suggestive of hypercortisolism for 12 months, admitted to our department because of community acquired pneumonia. Blood hormone analysis showed increased levels of ACTH and urinary free cortisol and nonsuppressibility to high- and low-dose dexamethasone tests. Pituitary MRI showed no lesion and no central-to-peripheral ACTH gradient was present in bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling. CRH stimulation test suggested an ectopic ACTH source. Thoracic CT scan revealed a nodular region measuring 12 mm located in the inferior lingular lobule of the left superior lung with negative uptake by 18-FDG-PET scan and negative SRS. The patient was successfully treated with an atypical lung resection and histology revealed an atypical bronchial carcinoid tumor with positive ACTH immunoreactivity. This was an interesting case because the patient was admitted due to pneumonia that may have been associated with her untreated and chronic hypercortisolism and a challenging case of ectopic ACTH syndrome due to conflicting results on the diagnostic exams.

  20. PATIENTS' PERCEPTION ON CLINICAL OUTCOME AND QUALITY OF LIFE AFTER A DIAGNOSIS OF CUSHING SYNDROME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoian, Vardan; Biller, Beverly M K; Webb, Susan M; Campbell, Karen K; Hodin, Richard A; Phitayakorn, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Excess cortisol production (Cushing syndrome, CS) is a chronic disease affecting many organ systems and impacting quality of life (QoL). This study analyzed factors associated with self-reported QoL, including aspects related to the diagnosis and treatment modalities of CS. In collaboration with the Cushing's Support and Research Foundation (CSRF), surveys using a validated QoL instrument were sent to CSRF members. Data were analyzed for associations between QoL and demographic, treatment, and disease factors. A total of 269 patients completed the survey. Respondents were 89.9% female, and the mean age was 48 years (SD 12, range 16-76). Respondents visited a median of 4 physicians (range 1-40) prior to the diagnosis of CS, with a median of 5 years (mean 7, SD 5, range 1-30) to obtain a diagnosis, showing a statistically significant negative correlation (Pdisease, highlighting the need for awareness about the disorder. Patients in remission had better QoL, emphasizing the importance of disease control.

  1. A thymic neuroendocrine tumour in a young female: a rare cause of relapsing and remitting Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, M J; Farah, G; Stokes, V J; Wang, L M; Grossman, A B

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a young female patient with a rare cause of relapsing and remitting Cushing's syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion from a thymic neuroendocrine tumour. A 34-year-old female presented with a constellation of symptoms of Cushing's syndrome, including facial swelling, muscle weakness and cognitive impairment. We use the terms 'relapsing and remitting' in this case report, given the unpredictable time course of symptoms, which led to a delay of 2 years before the correct diagnosis of hypercortisolaemia. Diagnostic workup confirmed ectopic ACTH secretion, and a thymic mass was seen on mediastinal imaging. The patient subsequently underwent thymectomy with complete resolution of her symptoms. Several case series have documented the association of Cushing's syndrome with thymic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs), although to our knowledge there are a few published cases of patients with relapsing and remitting symptoms. This case is also notable for the absence of features of the MEN-1 syndrome, along with the female gender of our patient and her history of non-smoking. Ectopic corticotrophin (ACTH) secretion should always be considered in the diagnostic workup of young patients with Cushing's syndromeThere is a small but growing body of literature describing the correlation between ectopic ACTH secretion and thymic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs)The possibility of a MEN-1 syndrome should be considered in all patients with thymic NETs, and we note the observational association with male gender and cigarette smoking in this cohortAn exception to these associations is the finding of relatively high incidence of thymic NETs among female non-smoking MEN-1 patients in the Japanese compared with Western populationsThe relapsing and remitting course of our patient's symptoms is noteworthy, given the paucity of this finding among other published cases.

  2. ATR-101, a selective ACAT1 inhibitor, decreases ACTH-stimulated cortisol concentrations in dogs with naturally occurring Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Daniel K; Fritz, Michele C; Schall, William D; Bari Olivier, N; Smedley, Rebecca C; Pearson, Paul G; Bailie, Marc B; Hunt, Stephen W

    2018-05-02

    Cushing's syndrome in humans shares many similarities with its counterpart in dogs in terms of etiology (pituitary versus adrenal causes), clinical signs, and pathophysiologic sequelae. In both species, treatment of pituitary- and adrenal-dependent disease is met with limitations. ATR-101, a selective inhibitor of ACAT1 (acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase 1), is a novel small molecule therapeutic currently in clinical development for the treatment of adrenocortical carcinoma, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, and Cushing's syndrome in humans. Previous studies in healthy dogs have shown that ATR-101 treatment led to rapid, dose-dependent decreases in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulated cortisol levels. The purpose of this clinical study was to investigate the effects of ATR-101 in dogs with Cushing's syndrome. ATR-101 pharmacokinetics and activity were assessed in 10 dogs with naturally-occurring Cushing's syndrome, including 7 dogs with pituitary-dependent disease and 3 dogs with adrenal-dependent disease. ATR-101 was administered at 3 mg/kg PO once daily for one week, followed by 30 mg/kg PO once daily for one (n = 4) or three (n = 6) weeks. Clinical, biochemical, adrenal hormonal, and pharmacokinetic data were obtained weekly for study duration. ATR-101 exposure increased with increasing dose. ACTH-stimulated cortisol concentrations, the primary endpoint for the study, were significantly decreased with responders (9 of 10 dogs) experiencing a mean ± standard deviation reduction in cortisol levels of 50 ± 17% at study completion. Decreases in pre-ACTH-stimulated cortisol concentrations were observed in some dogs although overall changes in pre-ACTH cortisol concentrations were not significant. The compound was well-tolerated and no serious drug-related adverse effects were reported. This study highlights the potential utility of naturally occurring canine Cushing's syndrome as a model for human disease and provides proof of

  3. Cushing's Syndrome in a Morbidly Obese Patient Undergoing Evaluation before Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Borsoi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cushing's syndrome (CS is extremely rare in morbidly obese patients. To date, no occurrences in obese patients with BMI above 60 kg/m2 have been reported in the literature. Case Report: This case report describes a patient who was admitted to the ward of the Clinical Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism of the Medical University of Vienna in preparation for bariatric surgery. The patient was a 49-year-old female who showed morbid obesity (BMI 61.6 kg/m2, hypertension, and substituted hypothyroidism. Preoperative work-up revealed CS due to an adrenal adenoma. Therefore, the patient underwent unilateral adrenalectomy followed by bariatric surgery 6 months later. Conclusion: Since undiagnosed CS might result in severe perioperative complications in a population already at increased risk, this case report underlines the importance of careful endocrine evaluation of morbidly obese patients. After all, even rare endocrine causes should be excluded.

  4. Determination of free urinary cortisol in cushing's syndrome using reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Kinio Sugawara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Determination of free urinary cortisol is a test of choice in the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome. In this study, cortisol was quantified using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC in urine samples previously extracted with ether and using triamcinolone acetonide as internal standard (IS. A BDS-Hypersil-C18® column, water-acetonitrile (72:28; v/v, with a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min and detection at 243 nm were used. This method showed to be both effective and efficient, with sensitivity and linearity ranging from 2.50 to 150 μg/L, and can be used in substitution to the radioimmunoassay technique within this concentration range.

  5. Laparoscopic Bilateral Adrenalectomy in a patient of Cushing syndrome: A Challenge for the Anaesthesiologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma K Dahanukar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of Cushing syndrome who underwent laparoscopic bilateral adrenalectomy and discuss her intraoperative management and postoperative course in ICU, especially pulmonary oedema, that occurred within 3 hours after resection (half life of cortisol is 80-110 minutes. [1] She was diagnosed to have bilateral adrenal hyperplasia with no pituitary involvement on CT scan. Preoperative workup revealed hypokalemia, anaemia, hypertension and hyperglycemia. She was posted for laparoscopic bilateral adrenalectomy. She received general anaesthesia; we did not give epidural analgesia as the patient had fracture of body of L1 vertebrae. Her intra-operative course was uneventful. Post-operative concerns included acute adrenal insufficiency, hypoglycaemia, hypotension and hyperkalemia, which were successfully managed in ICU. Patient was then given oral corticosteroids. One month later she was reassessed and was in better health.

  6. Hypertrophic remodeling of subcutaneous small resistance arteries in patients with Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoni, Damiano; Porteri, Enzo; De Ciuceis, Carolina; Rodella, Luigi F; Paiardi, Silvia; Rizzardi, Nicola; Platto, Caterina; Boari, Gianluca E M; Pilu, Annamaria; Tiberio, Guido A M; Giulini, Stefano M; Favero, Gaia; Rezzani, Rita; Rosei, Claudia Agabiti; Bulgari, Giuseppe; Avanzi, Daniele; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti

    2009-12-01

    Structural alterations of small resistance arteries in essential hypertensive patients (EH) are mostly characterized by inward eutrophic remodeling. However, we observed hypertrophic remodeling in patients with renovascular hypertension, in those with acromegaly, as well as in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, suggesting a relevant effect of humoral growth factors on vascular structure, even independent from the hemodynamic load. Cortisol may stimulate the renin-angiotensin system and may induce cardiac hypertrophy. However, presently no data are available about small artery structure in patients with Cushing's syndrome. We have investigated the structure of sc small resistance arteries in 12 normotensive subjects (NT), in 12 EH subjects, and in eight patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS). Small arteries from sc fat were dissected and mounted on a micromyograph. The normalized internal diameter, media thickness, media to lumen ratio, and the media cross-sectional area were measured, as well as indices of oxidative stress. Demographic variables were similar in the three groups, except for clinic blood pressure. The media to lumen ratio was significantly greater in EH and CS, compared with NT; no difference was observed between EH and CS. The media cross-sectional area was significantly greater in CS compared with EH and with NT. An increased vascular oxidative stress was present in CS, as demonstrated by increased levels of superoxide anions, cyclooxygenase-1 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microvessels. Our results suggest the presence of hypertrophic remodeling in sc small resistance arteries of CS, probably as a consequence of growth-promoting properties of circulating cortisol and/or increased vascular oxidative stress.

  7. Spontaneous resolution of avascular necrosis of femoral heads following cure of Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazderska, A; Crowther, S; Govender, P; Conlon, K C; Sherlock, M; Gibney, J

    2016-01-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is a rare presenting feature of endogenous hypercortisolism. If left untreated, complete collapse of the femoral head may ensue, necessitating hip replacement in up to 70% of patients. The majority of the described patients with AVN due to endogenous hypercortisolaemia required surgical intervention. A 36-year-old female, investigated for right leg pain, reported rapid weight gain, bruising and secondary amenorrhoea. She had abdominal adiposity with violaceous striae, facial plethora and hirsutism, atrophic skin, ecchymosis and proximal myopathy. Investigations confirmed cortisol excess (cortisol following low-dose 48h dexamethasone suppression test 807nmol/L; 24h urinary free cortisol 1443nmol (normalAVN. She underwent right adrenalectomy and steroid replacement was commenced. Four months after surgery, leg pain had resolved and mobility was normal. Repeat MRI showed marked improvement of radiological abnormalities in both femoral heads, consistent with spontaneous healing of AVN. We report a case of Cushing's syndrome due to primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, presenting with symptomatic AVN of both hips. This was managed conservatively from an orthopaedic perspective. Following cure of hypercortisolaemia, the patient experienced excellent recovery and remains symptom free 4 years after adrenalectomy. This is the first report of a favourable outcome over long-term follow-up of a patient with bilateral AVN of the hip, which reversed with treatment of endogenous hypercortisolaemia. AVN of femoral head can be a presenting feature of hypercortisolism, both endogenous and exogenous.Rarely, treatment of hypercortisolaemia can reverse AVN without the need for orthopaedic intervention.Primary pigmented nodular adrenal disease is a rare cause of ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome.

  8. Is it worthwhile to screen patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus for subclinical Cushing's syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budyal, Sweta; Jadhav, Swati Sachin; Kasaliwal, Rajeev; Patt, Hiren; Khare, Shruti; Shivane, Vyankatesh; Lila, Anurag R; Bandgar, Tushar; Shah, Nalini S

    2015-01-01

    Variable prevalence of subclinical Cushing's syndrome (SCS) has been reported in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), making the need for screening in this population uncertain. It is unknown if this variability is solely due to study-related methodological differences or a reflection of true differences in ethnic predisposition. The objective of this study is to explore the prevalence of SCS in Asian Indian patients with T2DM. In this prospective single center study conducted in a tertiary care referral center, 993 T2DM outpatients without any discriminatory clinical features (easy bruising, facial plethora, proximal muscle weakness, and/or striae) of hypercortisolism underwent an overnight 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test (ODST). ODST serum cortisol ≥1.8 μg/dl was considered positive, and those with positive results were subjected to 48 h, 2 mg/day low dose DST (LDDST). A stepwise evaluation for endogenous hypercortisolism was planned for patients with LDDST serum cortisol ≥1.8 μg/dl. Patients with positive ODST and negative LDDST were followed up clinically and re-evaluated a year later for the development of clinically evident Cushing's syndrome (CS). In this largest single center study reported to date, we found 37 out of 993 (3.72%) patients had ODST serum cortisol ≥1.8 μg/dl. None of them had LDDST cortisol ≥1.8 μg/dl, nor did they develop clinically evident CS over a follow-up period of 1 year. Specificity of ODST for screening of CS was 96.3% in our cohort. None of the T2DM outpatients in our cohort had SCS, hence cautioning against routine biochemical screening for SCS in this cohort. We suggest screening be based on clinical suspicion only. PMID:26420669

  9. Syndroom van Cushing. II. Nieuwe behandelingen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aken, M. O.; Feelders, R. A.; van der Lely, A. J.; Romijn, J. A.; Lamberts, S. W. J.; de Herder, W. W.

    2006-01-01

    Several new therapeutic options both medicinal and surgical, have emerged for the treatment of Cushing's syndrome. In Cushing's disease caused by an adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) secreting pituitary adenoma, the introduction ofendoscopic pituitary surgery offers better visualization of the sella than

  10. Relationship of serum lipids to adrenal-gland uptake of 6β-[131I] iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol in Cushing's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valk, T.W.; Gross, M.D.; Freitas, J.E.; Swanson, D.P.; Schteingart, D.E.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    An alteration in serum cholesterol levels has been suggested as a possible modifier of adrenal uptake of the cholesterol analog, 6β-[ 131 I]iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol (NP-59). To assess the effect of hypercholesterolemia upon NP-59 adrenal uptake, patients with Cushing's syndrome (eight with pituitary-dependent, four with ACTH-independent, and two with ectopic-ACTH syndrome) were selected for retrospective analysis based on the availability of serum cholesterol (n = 14) and triglyceride (n = 10) concentrations obtained at the time of adrenal scintigraphy. A negative correlation (r = -0.78, p < 0.01) was found between NP-59 uptake and serum cholesterol levels in patients with pituitary-dependent Cushing's disease. Compared with pituitary-dependent disease, the ectopic-ACTH syndrome and ACTH-independent states demonstrated equal or greater adrenal uptake of NP-59 at similar serum cholesterol concentrations. Serum triglyceride concentrations did not correlate with total adrenal uptake of NP-59 in any of the patient groups studied. Increased serum cholesterol concentrations are associated with diminished adrenal uptake of NP-59, and in some cases may limit the diagnoic efficacy of adrenal scintigraphy in Cushing's syndrome

  11. LUPUS ERITEMATOSO SISTÉMICO SÍNDROME DE CUSHING Y PSIQUIATRÍA DE ENLACE Erythematous systemic lupus, Cushing`s syndrome and psychiatric

    OpenAIRE

    Ludwig Pájaro Silva

    2005-01-01

    Se presenta el caso de una paciente con diagnóstico de lupus eritematoso sistémico y síndrome de Cushing quien presentó síntomas afectivos de características depresivas e insomnio de conciliación, quien recibió múltiples tratamientos farmacológicos con pobre respuesta inicial. La psiquiatría de enlace consolida una alternativa de tratamiento multidisciplinario para una aproximación más eficiente a las patologías médicas con síntomas psiquiátricos.We present a case of systemic erythematosus lu...

  12. Paediatric cyclical Cushing's disease due to corticotroph cell hyperplasia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Noctor, E

    2015-06-01

    Cushing\\'s disease is very rare in the paediatric population. Although uncommon, corticotroph hyperplasia causing Cushing\\'s syndrome has been described in the adult population, but appears to be extremely rare in children. Likewise, cyclical cortisol hypersecretion, while accounting for 15 % of adult cases of Cushing\\'s disease, has only rarely been described in the paediatric population. Here, we describe a very rare case of a 13-year old boy with cyclical cortisol hypersecretion secondary to corticotroph cell hyperplasia.

  13. In what clinical settings should Cushing´s syndrome be suspected? ¿En qué situaciones clínicas debe sospecharse un síndrome de Cushing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar D. Bruno

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite its low frequency, endogenous Cushing's syndrome is not an exceptional clinical entity. A growing number of cases are currently derived to specialized centers suggesting an increasing knowledge of the clinical features of hypercortisolism by specialists of diverse branches of clinical medicine. Clinical signs derive from an exaggeration of the physiological actions of cortisol inducing protein breakdown, hyperglycemia, fat mobilization, dyslipidemia, hydrosaline retention, immunosuppression and increased susceptibility to infection. Despite its low specificity, symptoms such as unexplained development of central obesity, mood changes, fatigue, weakness, myopathy, easy bruisability, red striae, arterial hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia, are suggestive of the diagnosis. From an epidemiological point of view, Cushing's syndrome is to be suspected and consequently searched for among patients with uncontrolled high blood pressure or diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, polycystic ovarian syndrome, osteoporosis, depression or adrenal incidentaloma. True Cushing's syndrome has to be differentiated from pseudo syndromes. Most sensitive physical signs for discriminating Cushing's syndrome from pseudo-Cushing states are the presence of supraclavicular fat pads, myopathy, thin skin and easy bruising. The recognition of the clinical manifestations of Cushing's syndrome and of the sub-populations at risk of contracting the disease should be improved through medical education at the medical school and at postgraduate levels. Clinical detection of Cushing's syndrome must be performed mainly by non-endocrinologists, yet its etiological diagnosis and therapeutic management is to be carried out in highly experienced and specialized centers, to ensure the best results in the treatment of this really challenging endocrine disturbance.El síndrome de Cushing no es una entidad clínica excepcional, pese a su baja frecuencia. El creciente número de

  14. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Neoplasia Type 1 Thyroid Disease & Pregnancy Primary Hyperparathyroidism Prolactinoma National Hormone and Pituitary Program (NHPP): Information for ... Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información de la ...

  15. Small cell carcinoma of the prostate presenting with Cushing Syndrome. A narrative review of an uncommon condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Camino, José Antonio; Losada-Vila, Beatriz; De Ancos-Aracil, Cristina Lucía; Rodríguez-Lajusticia, Laura; Tardío, Juan Carlos; Zapatero-Gaviria, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the prostate is an uncommon condition; there are very few cases in which presenting symptoms are consistent with Cushing Syndrome (CS). We report a new case in which CS triggers the suspicion of an SCC of the prostate and a review of the published cases of SCC of the prostate presenting with CS. The origin of these neoplasms is still unclear. It may be suspected when laboratory features appear in patients diagnosed with prostatic adenocarcinoma which becomes resistant to specific therapy. SCC usually occurs after the 6th decade. Patients suffering SCC of the prostate presenting with CS usually present symptoms such as hypertension, hyperglycemia, alkalosis or hypokalemia; cushingoid phenotype is less frequent. Cortisol and ACTH levels are often high. Prostatic-specific antigen levels are usually normal. CT scan is the preferred imaging test to localize the lesion, but its performance may be improved by adding other tests, such as FDG-PET scan. All patients have metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Lymph nodes, liver and bone are the most frequent metastases sites. Surgery and Ketokonazole are the preferred treatments for CS. The prognosis is very poor: 2- and 5-year survival rates are 27.5 and 14.3%, respectively. Key messages When a patient presents with ectopic Cushing Syndrome but lungs are normal, an atypical localization should be suspected. We should suspect a prostatic origin if Cushing Syndrome is accompanied by obstructive inferior urinary tract symptoms or in the setting of a prostatic adenocarcinoma with rapid clinical and radiological progression with relatively low PSA levels. Although no imaging test is preferred to localize these tumors, FDG-PET-TC can be very useful. Hormone marker scintigraphy (e.g. somatostatin) could be used too. As Cushing Syndrome is a paraneoplastic phenomenon, treatment of the underlying disease may help control hypercortisolism manifestations. These tumors are usually metastatic by the

  16. Megavoltage pituitary irradiation in the management of Cushing's disease and Nelson's syndrome: long-term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howlett, T.A.; Plowman, P.N.; Wass, J.A.H.; Rees, L.H.; Jones, A.E.; Besser, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report the long-term follow-up (up to 17.3 years) of the clinical and biochemical effects of megavoltage pituitary irradiation (radiotherapy;RT), administered as primary or secondary therapy, for pituitary Cushing's disease and Nelson's syndrome in 52 patients. Irradiation was administered, from a 4-15 MeV linear accelerator, via a three-field technique, to a total dose of 4500 cGy (rad) in 25 fractions over 35 days. (author)

  17. Coagulation Profile in Patients with Different Etiologies for Cushing Syndrome: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirosh, Amit; Lodish, Maya; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Belyavskaya, Elena; Feelders, Richard A; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2017-05-01

    Previous studies reported a higher prevalence of venous-thromboembolic events among patients with Cushing disease (CD) compared to those with ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome (CS) from adrenal sources. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the coagulation profile of patients with CS from different etiologies. A prospective observational study was conducted at a clinical research center. The study included adult patients admitted for evaluation of suspected CS (n=85), that were divided into 3 groups: CD (n=22), ACTH-independent CS from an adrenal tumor/hyperplasia (adrenal CS, n=21), and a control group consisting of subjects with negative screening for CS (rule-out CS, n=42). Coagulation profiles were drawn before and 8.5±4.3 months after surgery (trans-sphenoidal or adrenalectomy, n=18), and included fibrinogen, Factor VIII (FVIII), von Willebrand factor antigen (vWF:Ag), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), antithrombin III (ATIII), Protein C (PC), Protein S (PS), α2-antiplasmin (α2AP), and aPTT measurements. Patients with CD had higher baseline mean cortisol levels, ATIII activity and vWF:Ag levels compared with adrenal CS. Differences in ATIII activity and vWF:Ag levels remained even after controlling for BMI, and ATIII after also controlling for 24-h urinary free cortisol collections. Our study showed for the first time the differences in coagulation profiles between various etiologies of CS. We assume that the higher cortisol burden among CD patients may explain the differences found in the coagulation profile as well as the higher risk for VTE compared with primary adrenal CS patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Updates on the role of adrenal steroidogenesis inhibitors in Cushing's syndrome: a focus on novel therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleseriu, Maria; Castinetti, Frederic

    2016-12-01

    Endogenous Cushing's syndrome (CS) is a rare disease that results from exposure to high levels of cortisol; Cushing's disease (CD) is the most frequent form of CS. Patients with CS suffer from a variety of comorbidities that increase the risk of mortality. Surgical resection of the disease-causing lesion is generally the first-line treatment of CS. However, some patients may not be eligible for surgery due to comorbidities, and approximately 25 % of patients, especially those with CD, have recurrent disease. For these patients, adrenal steroidogenesis inhibitors may control cortisol elevation and subsequent symptomatology. CS is rare overall, and clinical studies of adrenal steroidogenesis inhibitors are often small and, in many cases, data are limited regarding the efficacy and safety of these treatments. Our aim was to better characterize the profiles of efficacy and safety of currently available adrenal steroidogenesis inhibitors, including drugs currently in development. We performed a systematic review of the literature regarding adrenal steroidogenesis inhibitors, focusing on novel drugs. Currently available adrenal steroidogenesis inhibitors, including ketoconazole, metyrapone, etomidate, and mitotane, have variable efficacy and significant side effects, and none are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for CS. Therefore, there is a clear need for novel, prospectively studied agents that have greater efficacy and a low rate of adverse side effects. Efficacy and safety data of current and emerging adrenal steroidogenesis inhibitors, including osilodrostat (LCI699) and levoketoconazole (COR-003), show promising results that will have to be confirmed in larger-scale phase 3 studies (currently ongoing). The management of CS, and particularly CD, remains challenging. Adrenal steroidogenesis inhibitors can be of major interest to control the hypercortisolism at any time point, either before or after surgery, as discussed in this review.

  19. Accuracy of immunoassay and mass spectrometry urinary free cortisol in the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, G; Careaga, M; Hanzu, F A; Patrascioiu, I; Ríos, P; Mora, M; Morales-Romero, B; Jiménez, W; Halperin, I; Casals, G

    2016-10-01

    Urinary free cortisol (UFC) determination by highly specific methods as mass spectrometry instead of commercially available antibody-based immunoassays is increasingly recommended. However, clinical comparisons of both analytical approaches in the screening of Cushing's syndrome (CS) are not available. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of mass spectrometry versus immunoassay measurements of 24 h-UFC in the screening of CS. Cross-sectional study of 33 histologically confirmed CS patients: 25 Cushing's disease, 5 adrenal CS and 3 ectopic CS; 92 non-CS patients; and 35 healthy controls. UFC by immunoassay (UFCxIA) and mass spectrometry (UFCxMS), urinary free cortisone (UFCo) and UFC:UFCo ratio were measured, together with creatinine-corrected values. Sensitivity, specificity, AUC and Landis and Koch concordance index were determined. AUC for UFCxIA and UFCxMS were 0.77 (CI 0.68-0.87) and 0.77 (CI 0.67-0.87) respectively, with a kappa coefficient 0.60 and strong Landis and Koch concordance index. The best calculated cutoff values were 359 nmol/24 h for UFCxIA (78 % sensitivity, 62 % specificity) and 258.1 nmol/24 h for UCFxMS (53 % sensitivity, 86 % specificity). The upper limit of UFCxIA and UCFxMS reference ranges were 344.7 and 169.5 nmol/24 h respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for CS diagnosis at these cutpoints were 84 and 56 % for UFCxIA and 81 and 54 % for UFCxMS. According to our data, both methods present a very similar diagnostic value. However, results suggest that lower cutoff points for mass spectrometry may be necessary in order to improve clinical sensitivity.

  20. Therapeutic compounds for Cushing's syndrome: a patent review (2012-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Yin, Lina; Hu, Qingzhong

    2016-11-01

    Endogenous Cushing's syndrome (CS) is a set of disorders caused by chronic exposure to excess glucocorticoids induced by neuroendocrine tumors in pituitary, adrenals, and infrequently other sites (ectopic ACTH syndrome). Due to various comorbidities, CS patients exhibit higher risks of cardiovascular diseases and thus increased mortality. Pharmaceutical therapy is an important constituent of treatment regimen. Areas covered: Patents published since 2012 are reviewed, which claim therapeutic compounds interfering with ACTH secretion and down-stream signal transduction, inhibiting cortisol biosynthesis and antagonizing glucocorticoid receptors. Advances focus on a) new analogues with improved efficacy and PK properties or less off-target toxicity; b) existing drugs (candidates) being repurposed to treat CS; and c) novel strategies such as selective inhibition of CYP11B1. Expert opinion: New compounds against established targets need to be developed because current drugs lack selectivity leading to off-target toxicity. Selective inhibition of CYP11B1 is a novel alternative strategy and is potentially versatile in controlling all types of hypercortisolism. Selective multi-targeting enzymes in steroidogenesis network is promising due to potential synergistic effects. However, doses toward each targets are not feasible to adjust because the corresponding intrinsic potencies are rigid. Targeting PRKACA mutations is promising in treating CS caused by adrenal adenomas.

  1. Impacto de la acromegalia y el síndrome de Cushing sobre la salud, una perspectiva vivencial Impact of acromegaly and the Cushing's syndrome, a prospect experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loraine Ledón Llanes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: describir el impacto de la acromegalia y el síndrome de Cushing sobre la salud, desde la perspectiva de personas con estas enfermedades. Métodos: se utilizó un diseño descriptivo, transversal y metodología cualitativa. Participaron 12 mujeres y 8 varones con cambios corporales resultantes de estas enfermedades, atendidos en el Instituto Nacional de Endocrinología, en La Habana, Cuba. Se realizaron entrevistas en profundidad y técnicas psicológicas proyectivas. El material recogido fue transcrito íntegramente, sometido a codificación, interpretación y triangulación. Los aspectos éticos fueron considerados. Resultados: emergieron 5 categorías interconectadas que fundamentaron el impacto de dichas enfermedades sobre la salud: la construcción de sus manifestaciones en términos de síntoma, las trayectorias para acceder a los servicios de salud, la comunicación del diagnóstico, el origen de la enfermedad y su valoración como experiencia de vida. Conclusiones: desde la perspectiva de los sujetos, la acromegalia y el síndrome de Cushing provocaron un impacto significativo de salud como resultado de: sus manifestaciones psíquicas y corporales, las características del proceso de atención y el diagnóstico. El género, las particularidades de la enfermedad y la escasa difusión de información sobre estas enfermedades influyeron sobre las decisiones de salud. El cuerpo se reconstruyó como desvalorizado, y la enfermedad se estructuró como proceso que provocó modificaciones globales en sus vidas.Objective: to describe the impact of acromegaly and the Cushing's syndrome on health, from the prospective of the persons presenting these diseases. Methods: a descriptive, cross-sectional design and qualitative methodology were used. Twelve women and 8 men with body changes caused by these diseases, seen in the National Institute of Endocrinology in La Habana, Cuba, participated in this study. Interviews in depth were applied as

  2. Iatrogenic cushing syndrome secondary to a probable interaction between voriconazole and budesonide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Whitney; Chastain, Cody A; Wright, Patty W

    2014-07-01

    Oral budesonide is commonly used for the management of Crohn's disease given its high affinity for glucocorticoid receptors and low systemic activity due to extensive first-pass metabolism through hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. Voriconazole, a second-generation triazole antifungal agent, is both a substrate and potent inhibitor of CYP isoenzymes, specifically CYP2C19, CYP2C9, and CYP3A4; thus, the potential for drug-drug interactions with voriconazole is high. To our knowledge, drug-drug interactions between voriconazole and corticosteroids have not been specifically reported in the literature. We describe a 48-year-old woman who was receiving oral budesonide 9 mg/day for the management of Crohn's disease and was diagnosed with fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans esophagitis; oral voriconazole 200 mg every 12 hours for 3 weeks was prescribed for treatment. Because the patient experienced recurrent symptoms of dysphagia, a second 3-week course of voriconazole therapy was taken. Seven weeks after originally being prescribed voriconazole, she came to her primary care clinic with elevated blood pressure, lower extremity edema, and weight gain; she was prescribed a diuretic and evaluated for renal dysfunction. At a follow-up visit 6 weeks later with her specialty clinic, the patient's blood pressure was elevated, and her physical examination was notable for moon facies, posterior cervical fat pad prominence, and lower extremity pitting edema. Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome due to a drug-drug interaction between voriconazole and budesonide was suspected, and voriconazole was discontinued. Budesonide was continued as previously prescribed for her Crohn's disease. On reevaluation 2 months later, the patient's Cushingoid features had markedly regressed. To our knowledge, this is the first published case report of iatrogenic Cushing syndrome due to a probable interaction between voriconazole and oral budesonide. In patients presenting with Cushingoid features who

  3. [Diagnostic value of urinary free cortisol in the subclinical Cushing's syndrome in patients with adrenal incidentaloma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L L; Zhao, L; Dou, J T; Yang, G Q; Gu, W J; Lü, Z H; Ba, J M; Mu, Y M

    2017-12-12

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of 24 h urinary free cortisol (24 h UFC) in the diagnosis of subclinical Cushing's syndrome (SCS), and explore the best diagnostic cut-off value. Methods: The clinical data of patients with adrenal incidentaloma in Chinese PLA General Hospital between January 2008 and December 2016 was retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. All SCS patients were diagnosed based on the current Cushing's syndrome (CS) guidelines and confirmed by histopathology and then treated as study group, and additional patients with non-functional adrenal adenoma (NFA) were enrolled as control group. ROC curve was used to evaluate efficacy of 24 h UFC and 24 h UFC to creatinine ratio (UFCCR), and explore their best cut-off values. Results: There were 161 patients with NFA, of which contained 84 males and 77 females, with a mean age of (51.02±10.49) years old. There were 88 patients with SCS, of which contained 26 males and 62 females, with a mean age of (51.74±10.29) years old. The 24 h UFC and UFCCR levels were significant higher in SCS group than those in NFA group[510 (363, 698) nmol vs 335 (209, 467) nmol for 24 h UFC, and 7.82(4.79, 12.13) ml vs 4.82(2.41, 6.57)ml for UFCCR, both P <0.05]. ROC analysis showed that the optimal cut-off for 24 h UFC was 480 nmol (AUC 0.716, 95% CI: 0.648-0.784, with a sensitivity of 58.0% and a specificity of 79.4%) and the optimal cut-off for UFCCR was 6.84 ml (AUC 0.729, 95% CI: 0.662-0.796, with a sensitivity of 59.1% and a specificity of 78.7%). Conclusions: The recommended cut-off points of 24 h UFC and UFCCR for diagnosing SCS in AI patients were 480 nmol and 6.84 ml, respectively.

  4. A perforated diverticulum in Cushing's disease

    OpenAIRE

    de Havenon, Adam; Ehrenkranz, Joel

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of perforated colonic diverticulum in Cushing's disease. Although perforated diverticuli have been described in patients with Cushing's syndrome secondary to exogenous glucocorticoids, this complication has not been described in patients with Cushing's disease. Patients with hypercortisolism, from either exogenous or endogenous sources, should be monitored for diverticular perforation.

  5. Differential diagnosis of adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing syndrome: role of adrenal venous sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Raquel G; Agrawal, Reshma; Berney, Daniel M; Reznek, Rodney; Matson, Matthew; Grossman, Ashley B; Druce, Maralyn R

    2012-01-01

    To outline the potential role for adrenal venous sampling in the diagnosis and management of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-independent Cushing syndrome (CS). We present a case description and discuss the management of a 59-year-old woman with an 8-year history of weight gain, centripetal obesity, a round plethoric face, skin thinning, easy bruising, hirsutism, and progressive muscle weakness. The patient reported a prior personal history of asthma, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and bilateral leg ulcers, but she denied having any personal or family history of endocrinopathy and was not taking any corticosteroid medication. Elevated midnight serum cortisol, failure to suppress cortisol levels with a low-dose dexamethasone suppression test, and undetectable plasma ACTH all indicated ACTH-independent CS. Additional investigations including dynamic tests and adrenal imaging were supported by adrenal venous sampling in order to make a diagnosis and formulate a management plan. She was ultimately noted to have bilateral functioning adrenal nodules (adenoma and adenolipoma) and underwent successful bilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy, with postoperative glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement. Adrenal venous sampling may be an important step in the differential diagnosis of CS and localization of the source of cortisol excess. It may distinguish pheochromocytoma or benign nonfunctioning adrenal nodules from cortisol-secreting adenomas and may avoid unnecessary bilateral adrenalectomy. It can also ensure that the correct operation is completed, if required, and thus avoid the increased morbidity and mortality associated with repeated surgical interventions.

  6. Germline PRKACA amplification leads to Cushing syndrome caused by 3 adrenocortical pathologic phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, J Aidan; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-01-01

    We describe the pathology of 5 patients with germline PRKACA copy number gain and Cushing syndrome: 4 males and 1 female, aged 2 to 43 years, including a mother and son. Imaging showed normal or slightly enlarged adrenal glands in 4 patients and a unilateral mass in the fifth. Biochemically, the patients had corticotropin-independent hypercortisolism. Four underwent bilateral adrenalectomy; unilateral adrenalectomy was performed in the patient with the adrenal mass. Pathologically, 3 patients, including the 1 with the tumor (adenoma), had primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease with extranodular cortical atrophy and mild intracapsular and extracapsular extension of cortical cells. The other 2 patients had cortical hyperplasia and prominent capsular and extracapsular micronodular cortical hyperplasia. Immunoperoxidase staining revealed differences for synaptophysin, inhibin-A, and Ki-67 (nuclei) in the atrophic cortices (patients 1, 2, and 3) and hyperplastic cortices (patients 4 and 5) and for Ki-67 (nuclei) and vimentin in the extracortical nodules in the 2 groups of patients. β-Catenin stained the cell membrane, cytoplasm, and nuclei of the adenoma. The patients were well at follow-up (1-23 years); 24-hour urinary cortisol excretion was elevated in the patient who had unilateral adrenalectomy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Discovery of Cushing's Syndrome After Bariatric Surgery: Multicenter Series of 16 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javorsky, Bradley R; Carroll, Ty B; Tritos, Nicholas A; Salvatori, Roberto; Heaney, Anthony P; Fleseriu, Maria; Biller, Beverly M K; Findling, James W

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the importance of considering Cushing's syndrome (CS) as a potential etiology for weight gain and metabolic complications in patients undergoing bariatric surgery (BS). This is a retrospective chart review case series of patients (n = 16) with CS from five tertiary care centers in the USA who had BS. Median age at BS surgery was 35.5 years (median 2.5 years between BS and CS surgery). CS was not identified in 12 patients prior to BS. Four patients had CS surgery prior to BS, without recognition of recurrent or persistent CS until after BS. Median body mass index (BMI) values before BS, nadir after BS, prior to surgery for CS, and after surgery for CS were 47, 31, 38, and 35 kg/m(2), respectively. Prior to BS, 55 % of patients had hypertension and 55 % had diabetes mellitus. Only 17 % had resolution of hypertension or diabetes mellitus after BS. CS may be under-recognized in patients undergoing BS. Testing for CS should be performed prior to BS in patients with features of CS and in post-operative BS patients with persistent hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or excessive weight regain. Studies should be conducted to determine the role of prospective testing for CS in subjects considering BS.

  8. Decreased prefrontal functional brain response during memory testing in women with Cushing's syndrome in remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragnarsson, Oskar; Stomby, Andreas; Dahlqvist, Per; Evang, Johan A; Ryberg, Mats; Olsson, Tommy; Bollerslev, Jens; Nyberg, Lars; Johannsson, Gudmundur

    2017-08-01

    Neurocognitive dysfunction is an important feature of Cushing's syndrome (CS). Our hypothesis was that patients with CS in remission have decreased functional brain responses in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus during memory testing. In this cross-sectional study we included 19 women previously treated for CS and 19 controls matched for age, gender, and education. The median remission time was 7 (IQR 6-10) years. Brain activity was studied with functional magnetic resonance imaging during episodic- and working-memory tasks. The primary regions of interest were the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. A voxel-wise comparison of functional brain responses in patients and controls was performed. During episodic-memory encoding, patients displayed lower functional brain responses in the left and right prefrontal gyrus (pright inferior occipital gyrus (pbrain responses in the left posterior hippocampus in patients (p=0.05). During episodic-memory retrieval, the patients displayed lower functional brain responses in several brain areas with the most predominant difference in the right prefrontal cortex (pbrain response during a more complex working memory task compared with a simpler one. In conclusion, women with CS in long-term remission have reduced functional brain responses during episodic and working memory testing. This observation extends previous findings showing long-term adverse effects of severe hypercortisolaemia on brain function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Impaired decision-making and selective cortical frontal thinning in Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Iris; Esther, Granell-Moreno; Santos, Alicia; Valassi, Elena; Yolanda, Vives-Gilabert; De Juan-Delago, Manel; Webb, Susan M; Gómez-Ansón, Beatriz; Resmini, Eugenia

    2014-12-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is caused by a glucocorticoid excess. This hypercortisolism can damage the prefrontal cortex, known to be important in decision-making. Our aim was to evaluate decision-making in CS and to explore cortical thickness. Thirty-five patients with CS (27 cured, eight medically treated) and thirty-five matched controls were evaluated using Iowa gambling task (IGT) and 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess cortical thickness. The IGT evaluates decision-making, including strategy and learning during the test. Cortical thickness was determined on MRI using freesurfer software tools, including a whole-brain analysis. There were no differences between medically treated and cured CS patients. They presented an altered decision-making strategy compared to controls, choosing a lower number of the safer cards (P behaviour was driven by short-term reward and long-term punishment, indicating learning problems because they did not use previous experience as a feedback factor to regulate their choices. These alterations in decision-making and the decreased cortical thickness in frontal areas suggest that chronic hypercortisolism promotes brain changes which are not completely reversible after endocrine remission. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Primary Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of Thymus Caused Cushing Syndrome: 
Surgical Treatment and Prognosis Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li LI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of thymus (pNECT is a rare thymic neoplasm. Some pNECTs could produce an adrenocorticotropic hormone and cause Cushing syndrome (CS. The aim os this study is to discuss the diagnostic technique and surgical management of pNECT-caused CS and analyze prognosis factors to improve the clinical experience of the disease. Methods The outcome of surgery and follow-up of 14 cases (eight males and six females of pNECT-caused CS were retrospectively analyzed from November 1987 to June 2013. Result The median age of the patients was 29, and the median duration of the disease was four months (1 month-44 months. All cases exhibited clinical evidence for the diagnosis of CS, and thoracic computed tomography (CT was used to detect thymic tumors. Surgical treatment significantly decreased the concentration of both serum cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (P<0.01 but caused one death in the perioperative period. With multidisciplinary therapy, the median survival was 38 months. Conclusion pNECT-caused CS is a rare disease with aggressive characteristics and unclear prognosis. Early diagnosis and therapy is a challenge for clinicians. Thoracic CT is important for disease location and preoperative evaluation and should be routinely applied to all CS patients to allow early surgery and improved prognosis.

  11. [Primary Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of Thymus Caused Cushing Syndrome: Surgical Treatment and Prognosis Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Chen, Yeye; Li, Shanqing; Liu, Hongsheng; Huang, Cheng; Qin, Yingzhi

    2015-07-01

    Primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of thymus (pNECT) is a rare thymic neoplasm. Some pNECTs could produce an adrenocorticotropic hormone and cause Cushing syndrome (CS). The aim os this study is to discuss the diagnostic technique and surgical management of pNECT-caused CS and analyze prognosis factors to improve the clinical experience of the disease. The outcome of surgery and follow-up of 14 cases (eight males and six females) of pNECT-caused CS were retrospectively analyzed from November 1987 to June 2013. The median age of the patients was 29, and the median duration of the disease was four months (1 month-44 months). All cases exhibited clinical evidence for the diagnosis of CS, and thoracic computed tomography (CT) was used to detect thymic tumors. Surgical treatment significantly decreased the concentration of both serum cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (Pdisease with aggressive characteristics and unclear prognosis. Early diagnosis and therapy is a challenge for clinicians. Thoracic CT is important for disease location and preoperative evaluation and should be routinely applied to all CS patients to allow early surgery and improved prognosis.

  12. Do patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have an increased prevalence of Cushing's syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Krarup, Thure; Hagen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    increased production of cortisol and thus represent patients with CS. The aim of this review was to evaluate the prevalence of CS in patients with T2DM. A search was performed in PubMed and Medline. We found seven prospective studies, two case-control studies and two cross-sectional studies......Many clinical features are common for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and Cushing's syndrome (CS) such as central obesity, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Patients with CS often have T2DM. Because T2DM is much more frequent than CS, it is possible that some patients with T2DM have...... with T2DM varies widely between the different studies, ranging from 0-9.4%. This may be due to patient selection, differences in test methodology (including choice of test), cutoff values and different cortisol assays. The true prevalence of CS in T2DM has not been determined. We need more studies...

  13. Pathophysiology of Cushing's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehm, H L; Voigt, K H

    1979-01-01

    The term Cushing's disease is applied to those cases of Cushing's syndrome in which hypercortisolism is secondary to inappropriate secretion of ACTH by the pituitary. Studies on control of ACTH secretion in these patients reveal: (a) that the episodic secretion of ACTH is similar to the normal; however, frequency and amplitude of the secretory episodes lack the normal circadian rhythm; (b) that ACTH release can be stimulated by vasopressin and metyrapone in a normal or above-normal manner; and (c) that it can be suppressed by large doses of corticosteroids. When the dynamic aspects of the ACTH response to corticosteroid administration are studied, it appears that the normally negative differential feedback mechanism is converted into a positive one, whereas the delayed, integral mechanism is undisturbed. Patients with Cushing's disease in the presence of obvious pituitary tumors cannot be distinguished from those without pituitary tumors by studying only the pituitary function. All these and other well-known facts would favor the concept that ACTH secretion in Cushing's disease is under hypothalamic control whether or not a pituitary tumor is present. Moreover, there are observations that suggest that brain centers superior to the hypophysiotropic area of the hypothalamus are involved in the pathophysiology of Cushing's disease. This concept has led to the discovery of neurotropic drugs that are able to induce complete remission of Cushing's syndrome in a cerain percentage of patients. In some patients with severe psychiatric diseases, neuroendocrine abnormalities are present that resemble closely those characteristic for Cushing's disease. With the most refined neuroradiological methods, pituitary microadenomas are demonstrable in approximately 70% of patients with Cushing's disease, and this number compares well with those of earlier autopsy findings (70 to 80%). In a small number of patients (4 to 10%), these tumors are large and can easily be detected by

  14. Staged Bilateral Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy for Infantile ACTH-independent Cushing's Syndrome (Bilateral Micronodular Non-pigmented Adrenal Hyperplasia): A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simforoosh, Nasser; Razzaghy Azar, Maryam; Soltani, Mohmmad Hossein; Nourbakhsh, Mona; Shemshaki, Hamidreza

    2017-08-29

    ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome is an uncommon disorder in children. While laparoscopic adrenalectomy is well-established in adults, it is rarely used in infants and is associated with some concerns. A seven-month infant was referred to our hospital due to progressive signs and symptoms of Cushing's syndrome. Laboratory data confirmed ACTH-independent hypercortisolism. No history of exogenous corticosteroid contact was observed. The patient underwent left transperitoneal laparoscopic adrenalectomy when she was 7 months old, nevertheless,complete response was not seen. The patient underwent right laparoscopic adrenalectomy (contra-lateral adrenal gland) when she was 20 months old. The signs and symptoms of Cushing's syndrome began to resolve and serum and urine cortisol levels became normal 3 months after the second surgery. laparoscopic adrenalectomy is safe and feasible in infants, and in this case, relieved patient of the symptoms and saved her life.

  15. Otolaryngic manifestations of Cushing disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Edward C; Peng, Kevin A; Suh, Jeffrey D; Bergsneider, Marvin; Wang, Marilene B

    2017-08-01

    Cushing disease is a relatively rare cause of Cushing syndrome secondary to a hyperfunctioning pituitary adenoma. In addition to signs and symptoms of hypercortisolism, Cushing disease may present with diverse otolaryngic manifestations, which may guide diagnosis and management. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients who were found to have Cushing disease and who underwent transnasal transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas between January 1, 2007, and July 1, 2014, at a tertiary academic medical center. There were 37 consecutive patients in this series with Cushing disease caused by a pituitary adenoma. Fifteen (41%) patients complained of visual changes. Five (14%) patients suffered from obstructive sleep apnea. Four (11%) patients had thyroid disease. Other symptoms included hearing loss, vertigo, tinnitus, epistaxis, dysphagia, and salivary gland swelling. Although Cushing disease traditionally presents with classic "Cushingoid" systemic features, it also may present with various otolaryngic manifestations. A thorough workup by otolaryngologists is critical in the comprehensive management of these patients.

  16. Biosynthesis of Various Steroids in vitro by Isolated Adrenal Cells in Primary Aldosteronism, Cushing's Syndrome, and Adrenogenital Syndrome due to Adrenocortical Adenoma

    OpenAIRE

    MIZUNO, SHIGERU; FUNAHASHI, HIROOMI

    1981-01-01

    To a further understanding of the role of steroid hormones in adrenal disorders, we have prepared free cell system of adrenal cells, using adrenal tissues that had been removed by operation from (i) cases of Cushing's syndrome due to adrenocortical adenoma or adrenocortical hyperplasia, (ii) a case of primary aldosteronism, and (iii) a patient with virilizing adrenal tumor. Twelve important steroid hormones were measured, such as pregnenolone, cortisol and aldosterone, which were produced by ...

  17. Consequences of low birth weight, maternal illiteracy and poor access to medical care in rural India: infantile iatrogenic Cushing syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Karande, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Home delivery, low birth weight babies and maternal illiteracy among the poor in rural India are frequent. The rural poor prefer to seek healthcare from private providers, most of whom have no formal medical training and buy medicines from private pharmacies without a prescription owing to a weakly regulated environment. This report is of a 4-month-old baby from a remote village in northern India, who presented with exogenous Cushing syndrome. This baby was a full-term low birth weight home d...

  18. Síndrome de Cushing por adenomielolipoma. Presentación de caso Cushing's syndrome caused by adenomyelolipoma. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idania Teresa Mora López

    2012-04-01

    and 8mgs of dexamethasone. Cushing's syndrome was confirmed. Right adrenalectomy and freeze-biopsy were performed reporting an adenomyelolipoma of 7 cms x 6 cms of the right adrenal gland.

  19. Increased Urinary Extracellular Vesicle Sodium Transporters in Cushing's Syndrome with Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Mahdi; Bovée, Dominique M; van der Lubbe, Nils; Danser, Alexander H J; Zietse, Robert; Feelders, Richard A; Hoorn, Ewout J

    2018-05-02

    Increased renal sodium reabsorption contributes to hypertension in Cushing's syndrome (CS). Renal sodium transporters can be analyzed non-invasively in urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs). To analyze renal sodium transporters in uEVs of patients with CS and hypertension. Observational study. University hospital. uEVs were isolated by ultracentrifugation and analyzed by immunoblotting in 10 CS patients and 7 age-matched healthy subjects. In 7 CS patients uEVs were analyzed before and after treatment. uEV protein abundance. The 10 CS patients were divided in those with suppressed and non-suppressed renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS, n = 5/group). CS patients with suppressed RAAS had similar blood pressure but significantly lower serum potassium than CS patients with non-suppressed RAAS. Compared to healthy subjects, only those with suppressed RAAS had higher phosphorylated Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter type 2 (pNKCC2) and higher total and phosphorylated Na+-Cl- cotransporter (NCC) in uEVs. Serum potassium but not urinary free cortisol correlated with pNKCC2, pNCC, and NCC in uEVs. Treatment of CS reversed the increases in pNKCC2, NCC, and pNCC. CS increases renal sodium transporter abundance in uEVs especially in patients with hypertension and suppressed RAAS. As potassium has recently been identified as an important driver of NCC activity, low serum potassium may also contribute to increased renal sodium reabsorption and hypertension in CS. These results may also be relevant for hypertension induced by exogenous glucocorticoids.

  20. Clinical study on postoperative steroid hormon replacement for preclinical Cushing's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Nozomu; Koide, Haruhisa; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Miki, Jun; Kimura, Takahiro; Egawa, Shin

    2009-01-01

    Diagnostic criteria for preclinical Cushing's syndrome (PCS) were reported in 1996. However, requirement of postoperative steroid hormone replacement is still controversial issue. In this study, we observed recent surgical cases retrospectively and evaluate the use of postoperative steroid hormone replacement. Eighteen patients with PCS underwent surgery from 1997 to 2007 in Jikei University Hospital. Thirteen of them received postoperative steroid hormone replacement. We investigated preoperative hormone activity by 131 I-adosterol scintigraphy and suppression of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and evaluated the requirement of postoperative steroid hormone replacement. Preoperative serum cortisol was normal range in all patients. Serum ACTH was suppressed in 10 of them (56%). In 131 I-adosterol scintigraphy, accumulation in ipsilateral side was observed in all patients. Accumulation in contralateral side was observed in 13 patients whose serum ACTH had tendency to be suppressed. Mean period of steroid hormone replacement was 19.8 weeks. Patients with lower preoperative ACTH tended to require longer period until withdrawal of steroid hormone replacement. In addition, patients received steroid hormone replacement with higher starting dose significantly required longer period. Three of them had complications during tapering of steroid hormone. Postoperative adrenal insufficiency is important issue as postoperative management of PCS patients whose function of contralateral adrenal or pituitary gland is suppressed. 131 I-adosterol scintigraphy and preoperative serum ACTH were important factors to evaluate the requirement of postoperative steroid hormone replacement. Especially, patients with low preoperative serum ACTH tended to require long duration of postoperative steroid hormone replacement. On the other hand, patients with accumulation of contralateral side in 131 I-adosterol scintigraphy and without suppression of serum ACTH may not require steroid hormone

  1. Resposta do ACTH plasmático ao estímulo com CRH ou CRH + desmopressina em pacientes com síndrome de Cushing ACTH- dependente submetidos a cateterismo bilateral simultâneo dos seios petrosos inferiores Response of plasmatic ACTH to CRH or combined CRH/desmopressin stimulation in patients with ACTHdependent Cushing's syndrome submitted to simultaneous bilateral petrosal sinuses sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Maria Carneiro do Rêgo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar a resposta do ACTH plasmático após estímulo com CRH ou CRH + desmopressina em pacientes com síndrome de Cushing ACTH-dependente que realizaram cateterismo bilateral simultâneo dos seios petrosos inferiores. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: O procedimento foi realizado em 21 pacientes - 14 mulheres e 7 homens - com síndrome de Cushing ACTH-dependente no período de janeiro de 1998 a dezembro de 2003. Após a cateterização de ambos os seios petrosos, amostras de sangue para ACTH foram colhidas, simultaneamente, nos seios petrosos e veia periférica, tanto no estado basal como após três e cinco minutos da administração de CRH humano (100 mg (6 pacientes ou CRH + desmopressina (100 mg + 10 mg (15 pacientes. RESULTADOS: Aos três minutos, houve aumento percentual do ACTH tanto no grupo CRH (257,77 ± 240,36 no seio petroso direito e 718,78 ± 1.358,82 no seio petroso esquerdo [média ± desvio-padrão] como no grupo CRH + desmopressina (1.263,35 ± 1.842,91 no seio petroso direito [p = 0,06] e 583,93 ± 1.020,03 no seio petroso esquerdo [p = 0,83]. Aos cinco minutos houve declínio percentual do ACTH no grupo do CRH (181,07 ± 217,39 no seio petroso direito e 188,25 ± 270,15 no seio petroso esquerdo e aumento progressivo no grupo do CRH + desmopressina (1.365,29 ± 1.832,31 no seio petroso direito [p = 0,03] e 866,43 ± 1.431,72 no seio petroso esquerdo [p = 0,11]. Nos três pacientes com secreção ectópica não houve gradiente. CONCLUSÃO: A estimulação combinada CRH + desmopressina induziu maior produção de ACTH em adenomas corticotróficos em comparação ao CRH, o que pode melhorar a sensibilidade diagnóstica deste procedimento.OBJECTIVE: To compare the responses of plasmatic ACTH to CRH or combined CRH/desmopressin stimulation in patients with ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome submitted to simultaneous, bilateral inferior petrosal sinuses sampling. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The procedure was performed in 21 patients - 14

  2. Cushing's Support and Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... high blood pressure, type II diabetes, polycystic ovarian syndrome, endometriosis, obesity, adult acne, metabolic disease, and panic attacks, but not Cushing's. After diagnosis and treatment, my weight is back to normal, and I ...

  3. Psychiatric phenomenology in Cushing's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loosen, P T; Chambliss, B; DeBold, C R; Shelton, R; Orth, D N

    1992-07-01

    We evaluated 20 patients with Cushing's disease (i.e., Cushing's syndrome due to ACTH-secreting pituitary microadenoma) and 20 patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R (SCID) and Research Diagnostic Criteria. The diagnosis of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) was most common in Cushing's disease (79%), followed by MDD (68%), and Panic Disorder (PD) including subthreshold PD (53%). The combination of MDD and GAD and/or PD was also common in Cushing's disease (63%). Behavioral symptoms, if present, usually first occurred at or after the onset of the first physical symptoms. However, the onset of PD was associated with more chronic stages of Cushing's disease. In both Cushing's disease and MDD, more female than male relatives suffered from MDD, whereas more male than female relatives suffered from substance abuse. The data demonstrate a syndrome of anxious depression in patients with active Cushing's disease; such comorbidility has not been previously noted. The data also point to intriguing epidemiological, clinical, and biological associations between Cushing's disease, MDD and substance abuse.

  4. Clinical Investigation of Adrenal Incidentalomas in Japanese Patients of the Fukuoka Region with Updated Diagnostic Criteria for Sub-clinical Cushing's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Ichiro; Sugimoto, Kaoru; Miyajima, Tetsumasa; Ide, Tomoko; Minezaki, Midori; Takeshita, Kaori; Takahara, Saori; Nakagawa, Midori; Fujimura, Yuki; Kudo, Tadachika; Miyajima, Shigero; Taira, Hiroshi; Ohe, Kenji; Ishii, Tatsu; Yanase, Toshihiko; Kobayashi, Kunihisa

    2018-04-27

    Objectives We retrospectively investigated the clinical and endocrinological characteristics of adrenal incidentalomas. Methods We studied 61 patients who had been diagnosed with adrenal incidentalomas and had undergone detailed clinical and endocrinological evaluations while hospitalized. We used common criteria to diagnose the functional tumors, but for sub-clinical Cushing's syndrome, we used an updated set of diagnosis criteria: serum cortisol ≥1.8 μg/dL after a positive response to a 1-mg dexamethasone suppression test if the patient has a low morning ACTH level (Cushing's syndrome and sub-clinical Cushing's syndrome), and 25 (41.0%) had non-functional tumors. Compared with the non-functional tumor group, the primary aldosteronism group and the cortisol-secreting adenoma group were significantly younger and had significantly lower rates of hypokalemia, whereas the pheochromocytoma group had significantly larger tumors and a significantly lower body mass index. Conclusion Our study found a larger percentage of functional tumors among adrenal incidentalomas than past reports, partly because we used a lower serum cortisol level after a dexamethasone suppression test to diagnose sub-clinical Cushing's syndrome and because all of the patients were hospitalized and could therefore receive more detailed examinations. Young patients with hypokalemia or lean patients with large adrenal tumors warrant particularly careful investigation.

  5. Aberrant expression of glucagon receptors in adrenal glands of a patient with Cushing's syndrome and ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria de Miguel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH independent bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH is a rare cause of Cushing´s syndrome, characterized by bilateral adrenal lesions and excess cortisol production despite ACTH suppression. Cortisol synthesis is produced in response to abnormal activation of G-protein- coupled receptors, such as gastric inhibitory peptide, vasopressin, beta adrenergic agonists, LH/hCG and serotonin receptors. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of glucagon receptors in adrenal glands from an AIMAH patient. A patient with ACTH-independent Cushing´s syndrome and bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia was screened for altered activation of adrenal receptors by physiological (mixed meal and pharmacological (gonadotrophin releasing hormone, ACTH and glucagon tests. The results showed abnormally high levels of serum cortisol after stimulation with glucagon. Hypercortisolism was successfully managed with ketoconazole treatment. Interestingly, a 4-month treatment with a somatostatin analogue (octreotide was also able to reduce cortisol secretion. Finally, Cushing's syndrome was cured after bilateral adrenalectomy. Abnormal mRNA expression for glucagon receptor in the patient´s adrenal glands was observed by Real-Time PCR procedure. These results strongly suggest that the mechanism of AIMAH causing Cushing´s syndrome in this case involves the illicit activation of adrenal glucagon receptors. This is the first case reported of AIMAH associated with ectopic glucagon receptors.

  6. Cushing's Syndrome caused by pigmented adrenocortical micro nodular dysplasia - A familial case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Segovia, I; Gallowitsch, H J; Kresnik, E; Kumnig, G; Mikosch, P; Lind, P [Dept.of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, LKH Klagenfurt (Austria)

    2002-09-01

    Introduction: We present a Case of Cushing's syndrome (CS) in a 16 year old male adolescent. Adrenocortical micro nodular dysplasia is a rare cause of CS. It mostly develops in the first two decades of life. In pathogenesis a stimulatory effect of circulating Immunoglobulins on adrenal steroidogenesis has been postulated. Familial cases have been reported in relation to Carney's Syndrome. We report the clinical case at first diagnosis and preoperative follow up of 1 year prior to treatment. The leading symptoms were severe bilateral (fibrotic) gynaecomastia, weight gain and growth retardation, without hypertension,but osteoporosis, secondary hypogonadism and glucose intolerance. Laboratory findings and the results of functional tests were diagnostic for CS. In addition LDH (I-131 Isotopes), CK, Lipoproteins, GPT, Androstendion, Prolactin were elevated. MRI abdomen revealed a slight enlargement of the adrenals, and suspected a bilateral micro nodular dysplasia. Iodo-cholesterol-scan under dexamethason suppression showed a diffuse bilateral Iodo-cholesterol uptake confirming the autonomous production of cortisol bilateral in the adrenals.Whole body bone scan showed a diffuse reduced diphosphonate uptake in the skeleton and the growth plates. The bone mineral density was significantly reduced.Radiologically osteoporosis was overt. The rapid increase of free urinary cortisol excretion/24h within one year of observation led to a total bilateral adrenalectomy. Postoperative 5 year follow up examinations. Documentation of the outcome and recovery of clinical signs,symptoms and laboratory findings, discussion about the most appropriate long-term substitution therapy. Familial anamnesis:affected family member was the father (micro nodular bilateral adrenocortical dysplasia), the aunt (pararenal incidentaloma, histologically lipoma) and a cousin (micro nodular adrenocortical dysplasia). Sequential analysis of the menin gene from the patient was negative.The detection of

  7. Cushing's Syndrome caused by pigmented adrenocortical micro nodular dysplasia - A familial case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Segovia, I.; Gallowitsch, H.J.; Kresnik, E.; Kumnig, G.; Mikosch, P.; Lind, P.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: We present a Case of Cushing's syndrome (CS) in a 16 year old male adolescent. Adrenocortical micro nodular dysplasia is a rare cause of CS. It mostly develops in the first two decades of life. In pathogenesis a stimulatory effect of circulating Immunoglobulins on adrenal steroidogenesis has been postulated. Familial cases have been reported in relation to Carney's Syndrome. We report the clinical case at first diagnosis and preoperative follow up of 1 year prior to treatment. The leading symptoms were severe bilateral (fibrotic) gynaecomastia, weight gain and growth retardation, without hypertension,but osteoporosis, secondary hypogonadism and glucose intolerance. Laboratory findings and the results of functional tests were diagnostic for CS. In addition LDH (I-131 Isotopes), CK, Lipoproteins, GPT, Androstendion, Prolactin were elevated. MRI abdomen revealed a slight enlargement of the adrenals, and suspected a bilateral micro nodular dysplasia. Iodo-cholesterol-scan under dexamethason suppression showed a diffuse bilateral Iodo-cholesterol uptake confirming the autonomous production of cortisol bilateral in the adrenals.Whole body bone scan showed a diffuse reduced diphosphonate uptake in the skeleton and the growth plates. The bone mineral density was significantly reduced.Radiologically osteoporosis was overt. The rapid increase of free urinary cortisol excretion/24h within one year of observation led to a total bilateral adrenalectomy. Postoperative 5 year follow up examinations. Documentation of the outcome and recovery of clinical signs,symptoms and laboratory findings, discussion about the most appropriate long-term substitution therapy. Familial anamnesis:affected family member was the father (micro nodular bilateral adrenocortical dysplasia), the aunt (pararenal incidentaloma, histologically lipoma) and a cousin (micro nodular adrenocortical dysplasia). Sequential analysis of the menin gene from the patient was negative.The detection of

  8. Ketoconazole therapy: an efficacious alternative to achieve eucortisolism in patients with Cushing&'s syndrome Tratamiento con ketoconazol: Una alternativa eficaz para lograr el eucortisolismo en pacientes con síndrome de Cushing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Moncet

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Cushing&'s syndrome (CS is a serious condition requiring drug management in diverse clinical settings. Fifty four patients (44 females, 10 males with CS, aged 14-63, received ketoconazole (KTZ prior to surgery (n= 27, as complementary therapy after surgery and/or radiotherapy (n= 16, or as primary treatment (n= 11. It was given at a 600 (500 - 600 mg/day (median - CI95 maintenance dose for periods ranging from 15 days to 13 years. Clinical signs, hepatic enzymes and urinary free cortisol (UFC were evaluated before and during KTZ treatment. UFC normalised or decreased to subnormal values in 85% of the patients, in 5 to 150 days after starting treatment; although failing to normalise, UFC decreased to 12-48% of pre-treatment values in the remaining patients. Clinical signs improved throughout. Side effects were adrenal insufficiency (18.5%, reversible hepatic toxicity (11%, allergic skin rash (5.5% and gastric intolerance (3.7%; in 11% of patients, an "escape phenomenon" was observed. Twenty-four out of the total (44.4% were treated for prolonged periods, from one up to 13 years. In conclusion, this study confirms that KTZ is an effective and generally well tolerated treatment for CS particularly: a shortly before surgery, b because of persistent hypercortisolism after surgery or awaiting the results of radiotherapy, c as a reasonable option in patients with CS of unknown aetiology and, d as long-term therapy in any case of unsolved hypercortisolism after failure of current treatments.El síndrome de Cushing (SC es un trastorno grave que requiere frecuentemente tratamiento medicamentoso. Cincuenta y cuatro pacientes (44 mujeres, 10 varones de 14-63 años de edad con SC, recibieron ketoconazol (KTZ previo a cirugía (n=27, como complemento luego de cirugía y/o radioterapia (n=16, o como tratamiento primario (n=11. La dosis de mantenimiento fue de 600 (500 - 600 mg/día (mediana-IC95 durante 15 días a 13 años. Los signos clínicos, hepatograma y

  9. Novel somatic mutations in the catalytic subunit of the protein kinase A as a cause of adrenal Cushing's syndrome: a European multicentric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Dalmazi, Guido; Kisker, Caroline; Calebiro, Davide; Mannelli, Massimo; Canu, Letizia; Arnaldi, Giorgio; Quinkler, Marcus; Rayes, Nada; Tabarin, Antoine; Laure Jullié, Marie; Mantero, Franco; Rubin, Beatrice; Waldmann, Jens; Bartsch, Detlef K; Pasquali, Renato; Lohse, Martin; Allolio, Bruno; Fassnacht, Martin; Beuschlein, Felix; Reincke, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Somatic mutations in PRKACA gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (PKA), have been recently found in a high proportion of sporadic adenomas associated with Cushing's syndrome. The aim was to analyze the PRKACA mutation in a large cohort of patients with adrenocortical masses. Samples from nine European centers were included (Germany, n = 4; Italy, n = 4; France, n = 1). Samples were drawn from 149 patients with nonsecreting adenomas (n = 32 + 2 peritumoral), subclinical hypercortisolism (n = 36), Cushing's syndrome (n = 64 + 2 peritumoral), androgen-producing tumors (n = 4), adrenocortical carcinomas (n = 5 + 2 peritumoral), and primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasias (n = 8). Blood samples were available from patients with nonsecreting adenomas (n = 15), subclinical hypercortisolism (n = 10), and Cushing's syndrome (n = 35). Clinical and hormonal data were collected. DNA amplification by PCR of exons 6 and 7 of the PRKACA gene and direct sequencing were performed. PRKACA heterozygous mutations were found in 22/64 samples of Cushing's syndrome patients (34%). No mutations were found in peritumoral tissue and blood samples or in other tumors examined. The c.617A>C (p.Leu206Arg) occurred in 18/22 patients. Furthermore, two novel mutations were identified: c.600_601insGTG/p.Cys200_Gly201insVal in three patients and c.639C>G+c.638_640insATTATCCTGAGG/p.Ser213Arg+p.Leu212_Lys214insIle-Ile-Leu-Arg) in one. All the mutations involved a region implicated in interaction between PKA regulatory and catalytic subunits. Patients with somatic PRKACA mutations showed higher levels of cortisol after dexamethasone test and a smaller adenoma size, compared with nonmutated subjects. These data confirm and extend previous observations that somatic PRKACA mutations are specific for adrenocortical adenomas causing Cushing's syndrome.

  10. Forkhead box O3 plays a role in skeletal muscle atrophy through expression of E3 ubiquitin ligases MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 in Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seol-Hee; Lee, Hae-Ahm; Kim, Mina; Lee, Eunjo; Sohn, Uy Dong; Kim, Inkyeom

    2017-06-01

    Cushing's syndrome is caused by overproduction of the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), which stimulates the adrenal grand to make cortisol. Skeletal muscle wasting occurs in pathophysiological response to Cushing's syndrome. The forkhead box (FOX) protein family has been implicated as a key regulator of muscle loss under conditions such as diabetes and sepsis. However, the mechanistic role of the FOXO family in ACTH-induced muscle atrophy is not understood. We hypothesized that FOXO3a plays a role in muscle atrophy through expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, muscle RING finger protein-1 (MuRF-1), and atrogin-1 in Cushing's syndrome. For establishment of a Cushing's syndrome animal model, Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with osmotic minipumps containing ACTH (40 ng·kg -1 ·day -1 ). ACTH infusion significantly reduced muscle weight. In ACTH-infused rats, MuRF-1, atrogin-1, and FOXO3a were upregulated and the FOXO3a promoter was targeted by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Transcriptional activity and expression of FOXO3a were significantly decreased by the GR antagonist RU486. Treatment with RU486 reduced MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 expression in accordance with reduced enrichment of FOXO3a and Pol II on the promoters. Knockdown of FOXO3a prevented dexamethasone-induced MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 expression. These results indicate that FOXO3a plays a role in muscle atrophy through expression of MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 in Cushing's syndrome. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Posterior retroperitoneoscopic adrenal surgery for clinical and subclinical Cushing's syndrome in patients with bilateral adrenal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Aoife J; Seeliger, Barbara; Alesina, Pier F; Walz, Martin K

    2017-08-01

    The treatment of hypercortisolism for patients with bilateral adrenal disease (BAD) is controversial. Bilateral total adrenalectomy results in permanent hypocortisolaemia requiring lifelong steroid replacement. A more conservative surgical approach, with less than bilateral total adrenalectomy (leaving functional adrenal tissue either unilaterally or bilaterally), represents an alternative option; however, long-term outcome or recurrence data are limited. We report our experience with the surgical management of hypercortisolism caused by BAD. Between 2004 and 2016, 42 patients (12 male, 30 female; mean age 58 ± 10 years) with clinical or subclinical Cushing's syndrome (CS/sCS) caused by BAD underwent adrenal surgery via the posterior retroperitoneoscopic approach. Adrenal surgery was defined as "adrenalectomy" when total gland excision was performed or "resection" when a partial or subtotal adrenal resection was performed. Clinical, radiological and biochemical parameters were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively. Seventy adrenal operations performed in total included unilateral resection (n = 3), unilateral adrenalectomy (n = 15), bilateral resection (n = 9), adrenalectomy and contralateral resection (n = 14) and bilateral total adrenalectomy (n = 3). Median operating time was 47.5 min (30-150) with no difference between unilateral and bilateral (synchronous included) procedures (p = 0.15). Mortality was zero. Clavien-Dindo grade of postoperative complications was I (n = 5) and IV (n = 3). All but one patient with CS and 17/31 patients with sCS received postoperative steroid supplementation for a median duration of 20 (1.5-129) months. After median follow-up of 40 months (3-129), the remission rate was 92%; 11 patients required ongoing steroid supplementation. There were three biochemical recurrences (two underwent contralateral resection); two patients with new/progressive radiological nodularity are biochemically eucortisolaemic. A

  12. Dyslipidemia and chronic inflammation markers are correlated with telomere length shortening in Cushing's syndrome.

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    Anna Aulinas

    Full Text Available Cushing's syndrome (CS increases cardiovascular risk (CVR and adipocytokine imbalance, associated with an increased inflammatory state. Telomere length (TL shortening is a novel CVR marker, associated with inflammation biomarkers. We hypothesized that inflammatory state and higher CVR in CS might be related to TL shortening, as observed in premature aging.To evaluate relationships between TL, CVR and inflammation markers in CS.In a cross-sectional study, 77 patients with CS (14 males, 59 pituitary-, 17 adrenal- and 1 ectopic-origin; 21 active disease and 77 age-, gender-, smoking-matched controls were included. Total white blood cell TL was measured by TRF-Southern technique. Clinical data and blood samples were collected (lipids, adrenal function, glucose. Adiponectin, interleukin-6 (IL6 and C-reactive protein (CRP were available in a subgroup of patients (n=32. Correlations between TL and clinical features were examined and multiple linear regression analysis was performed to investigate potential predictors of TL.Dyslipidemic CS had shorter TL than non-dyslipidemic subjects (7328±1274 vs 7957±1137 bp, p<0.05. After adjustment for age and body mass index, cured and active CS dyslipidemic patients had shorter TL than non-dyslipidemic CS (cured: 7187±1309 vs 7868±1104; active: 7203±1262 vs 8615±1056, respectively, p<0.05. Total cholesterol and triglycerides negatively correlated with TL (r-0.279 and -0.259, respectively, p<0.05, as well as CRP and IL6 (r-0.412 and -0.441, respectively, p<0.05. No difference in TL according the presence of other individual CVR factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity were observed in CS or in the control group. Additional TL shortening was observed in dyslipidemic obese patients who were also hypertensive, compared to those with two or less CVR factors (6956±1280 vs 7860±1180, respectively, p<0.001. Age and dyslipidemia were independent negative predictors of TL.TL is shortened in dyslipidemic CS

  13. Conventional and Nuclear Medicine Imaging in Ectopic Cushing's Syndrome: A Systematic Review

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    Isidori, Andrea M.; Sbardella, Emilia; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Boschetti, Mara; Vitale, Giovanni; Colao, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Context: Ectopic Cushing's Syndrome (ECS) can be a diagnostic challenge with the hormonal source difficult to find. This study analyzes the accuracy of imaging studies in ECS localization. Evidence Acquisition: Systematic review of medical literature for ECS case series providing individual patient data on at least one conventional imaging technique (computed tomography [CT]/magnetic resonance imaging) and one of the following: 111In-pentetreotide (OCT), 131I/123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine, 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), 18F-fluorodopa-PET (F-DOPA-PET), 68Ga-DOTATATE-PET/CT or 68Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT scan (68Gallium-SSTR-PET/CT). Evidence Summary: The analysis comprised 231 patients (females, 50.2%; age, 42.6 ± 17 y). Overall, 52.4% (121/231) had “overt” ECS, 18.6% had “occult” ECS, and 29% had “covert” ECS. Tumors were located in the lung (55.3%), mediastinum-thymus (7.9%), pancreas (8.5%), adrenal glands (6.4%), gastrointestinal tract (5.4%), thyroid (3.7%), and other sites (12.8%), and primary tumors were mostly bronchial neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) (54.8%), pancreatic NETs (8%), mediastinum-thymus NETs (6.9%), gastrointestinal NETs (5.3%), pheochromocytoma (6.4%), neuroblastoma (3.2%), and medullary thyroid carcinoma (3.2%). Tumors were localized by CT in 66.2% (137/207), magnetic resonance imaging in 51.5% (53/103), OCT in 48.9% (84/172), FDG-PET in 51.7% (46/89), F-DOPA-PET in 57.1% (12/21), 131/123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine in 30.8% (4/13), and 68Gallium-SSTR-PET/CT in 81.8% (18/22) of cases. Molecular imaging discovered 79.1% (53/67) of tumors unidentified by conventional radiology, with OCT the most commonly used, revealing the tumor in 64%, followed by FDG-PET in 59.4%. F-DOPA-PET was used in only seven covert cases (sensitivity, 85.7%). Notably, 68Gallium-SSTR-PET/CT had 100% sensitivity among covert cases. Conclusions: Nuclear medicine improves the sensitivity of conventional radiology when tumor site

  14. Management of Cushing disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritos, Nicholas A; Biller, Beverly M K; Swearingen, Brooke

    2011-05-01

    Cushing disease is caused by a corticotroph tumor of the pituitary gland. Patients with Cushing disease are usually treated with transsphenoidal surgery, as this approach leads to remission in 70-90% of cases and is associated with low morbidity when performed by experienced pituitary gland surgeons. Nonetheless, among patients in postoperative remission, the risk of recurrence of Cushing disease could reach 20-25% at 10 years after surgery. Patients with persistent or recurrent Cushing disease might, therefore, benefit from a second pituitary operation (which leads to remission in 50-70% of cases), radiation therapy to the pituitary gland or bilateral adrenalectomy. Remission after radiation therapy occurs in ∼85% of patients with Cushing disease after a considerable latency period. Interim medical therapy is generally advisable after patients receive radiation therapy because of the long latency period. Bilateral adrenalectomy might be considered in patients who do not improve following transsphenoidal surgery, particularly patients who are very ill and require rapid control of hypercortisolism, or those wishing to avoid the risk of hypopituitarism associated with radiation therapy. Adrenalectomized patients require lifelong adrenal hormone replacement and are at risk of Nelson syndrome. The development of medical therapies with improved efficacy might influence the management of this challenging condition.

  15. Consequences of low birth weight, maternal illiteracy and poor access to medical care in rural India: infantile iatrogenic Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karande, Sunil

    2015-08-21

    Home delivery, low birth weight babies and maternal illiteracy among the poor in rural India are frequent. The rural poor prefer to seek healthcare from private providers, most of whom have no formal medical training and buy medicines from private pharmacies without a prescription owing to a weakly regulated environment. This report is of a 4-month-old baby from a remote village in northern India, who presented with exogenous Cushing syndrome. This baby was a full-term low birth weight home delivery. As the baby was not growing well, treatment was started at 1 month by a private doctor with betamethasone drops The mother on her own volition continued giving the betamethasone drops by buying the medicine over the counter from a private pharmacy. This case highlights the gaps in essential health services in rural India and the steps being taken to improve the situation. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. Acute development of Cushing syndrome in an HIV-infected child on atazanavir/ritonavir based antiretroviral therapy

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    Gueorgui Dubrocq

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available An 11-year-old male with perinatally acquired human immune deficiency virus (HIV infection on antiretroviral regimen, which included abacavir plus lamivudine (Epzicom, didanosine, ritonavir and atazanavir presented with bilateral axillary striae, increased appetite, fatigue, facial swelling and acute weight gain. Two months prior to presentation, the patient had received a diagnostic and therapeutic intra-articular triamcinolone injection in the knee for pain relief and subsequently became progressively swollen in the face, developed striae bilaterally at the axillae, experienced increased appetite, fatigue and an 8 pound weight gain. During the endocrine workup, suspicion for adrenal insufficiency prompted 24-h urine collection for free cortisol, which was found to be undetectable (below LLQ of 1.0 μg/L. This prompted further evaluation of the hypothalamic–pituitary axis (HPA by standard dose adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH stimulation test. A 250 μg cosyntropin stimulation test was performed and confirmed HPA axis suppression. Baseline cortisol level was <1 μg/dL and stimulated cortisol level at 30 min was 3.8 μg/dL. The patient was diagnosed with iatrogenic Cushing syndrome and suppression of HPA axis secondary to the drug interaction between ritonavir (RTV and intra-articular triamcinolone injection. Following endocrine evaluation and workup, the patient was admitted for planned orthopaedic procedure including elective left hamstring lengthening, distal femoral osteotomy and patellar tendon advancement. Taking into consideration the diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing syndrome, at the start of the surgical procedure, 100 mg IV stress dose of hydrocortisone followed by 50 mg hydrocortisone every 8 h for 24 h was administered. Stress dosing was discontinued 24 h after the procedure. Throughout the hospitalization and upon discharge, the patient continued his ART. From initial presentation, patient has remained clinically stable throughout

  17. Affective alterations in patients with Cushing's syndrome in remission are associated with decreased BDNF and cortisone levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valassi, E; Crespo, I; Keevil, B G; Aulinas, A; Urgell, E; Santos, A; Trainer, P J; Webb, S M

    2017-02-01

    Affective alterations and poorer quality of life often persist in patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS) in remission. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) and is highly expressed in brain areas controlling mood and response to stress. Our aims were to assess affective alterations after long-term remission of CS and evaluate whether they are associated with serum BDNF, salivary cortisol (SalF) and/or cortisone (SalE) concentrations. Thirty-six CS patients in remission (32 females/4 males; mean age (±s.d.), 48.8 ± 11.8 years; median duration of remission, 72 months) and 36 gender-, age- and BMI-matched controls were included. Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Positive Affect Negative Affect Scale (PANAS), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and EuroQoL and CushingQoL questionnaires were completed and measured to evaluate anxiety, depression, stress perception and quality of life (QoL) respectively. Salivary cortisol was measured using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/TMS). BDNF was measured in serum using an ELISA. Remitted CS patients showed worse scores in all questionnaires than controls: STAI (P BDNF was observed in CS vs controls (P = 0.038), and low BDNF was associated with more anxiety (r = -0.247, P = 0.037), depression (r = -0.249, P = 0.035), stress (r = -0.277, P = 0.019) and affective balance (r = 0.243, P = 0.04). Morning salivary cortisone was inversely associated with trait anxiety (r = -0.377, P = 0.040) and depressed affect (r = -0.392, P = 0.032) in CS patients. Delay to diagnosis was associated with depressive symptoms (BDI-II: r = 0.398, P = 0.036 and CES-D: r = 0.449, P = 0.017) and CushingQoL scoring (r = -0.460, P BDNF levels are associated with affective alterations in 'cured' CS patients, including depression, anxiety and impaired stress perception. Elevated levels of

  18. Effect of hypercortisolism control on high blood pressure in Cushing's syndrome Efecto del control del hipercortisolismo sobre la hipertensión arterial en el síndrome de Cushing

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    Reynaldo M. Gómez

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Many hypertensive patients affected by endogenous Cushing's syndrome (CS persist with high blood pressure (HBP despite good control of cortisol excess. We assessed the effect of preoperative ketoconazole administration and of definitive treatment of CS on arterial hypertension and analysed the factors involved in the persistence of hypertension. We assessed retrospectively 71 patients with CS and HBP (60 women, 11 men; 50 pituitary, 21 adrenal successfully treated by surgery and/or radiotherapy; 19 of them received ketoconazole (KNZ before surgery. After treatment, patients were divided into those with persistent high blood pressure (PHBP and those with normal blood pressure (NBP. As possible predictive factors for PHBP we analysed age, duration and family history of HBP, pre-treatment 24 hour urinary free cortisol (24h-UFC and body mass index (BMI. HBP normalized in 53 out of 71 patients (74.6%, regardless of the origin of Cushing's syndrome. PHBP patients were older (p=0.003, had longer duration (p=0.007 and higher systolic blood pressure before treatment (p=0.046 than NBP patients. Thirteen out of 19 patients (68.4% treated with ketoconazole, normalized their hypertension and remained normotensive after successful surgery. Five patients became normotensive only after surgery. In conclusion: a blood pressure levels normalized in most patients after remission of CS; b ketoconazole was effective for the control of HBP, and seems to be a good indicator of post-surgical outcome, and c higher age at presentation, longer duration of hypertension and higher systolic blood pressure figures before treatment negatively influence normalization of blood pressure after resolution of Cushing's syndrome.Muchos pacientes con síndrome de Cushing (SC permanecen hipertensos a pesar del control del exceso glucocorticoideo. Investigamos el efecto de la administración de ketoconazol (KNZ y del tratamiento definitivo del SC sobre la hipertensión arterial (HTA

  19. Not all glucocorticoid-induced obesity is the same: differences in adiposity among various diagnostic groups of Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, E; Lodish, M; Keil, M; Lyssikatos, C; de la Luz Sierra, M; Nesterova, M; Stratakis, C A

    2014-11-01

    The cAMP signaling pathway is implicated in bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasias (BAHs), which are often associated with ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome (CS). Although CS is invariably associated with obesity and is frequently associated with PKA signaling defects, we recently reported that its different forms appear to also present with variable weight gain and adiposity. The present study was aimed at characterizing further the phenotypic and molecular differences in periadrenal adipose tissue (PAT) among patients with subtypes of CS, by anthropometric/biochemical analyses and quantification of PKA expression and activity in BAHs in comparison to a non-CS group with aldosterone producing adenomas (APAs). Glucocorticoid levels, serum parameters, and BMI were analyzed among a larger patient cohort including those with different forms of CS, APAs, and Cushing disease. Abdominal CT scans were available for a small subset of patients examined for fat distribution. PAT collected during adrenalectomy was assayed for PKA activity, cAMP, and PKA expression. BMI and BMI z-score were lower in adults with PPNAD with PRKAR1A mutations and in pediatric patients with PPNAD with and without PRKAR1A mutations, respectively. Patients with PPNAD had higher cAMP levels in PAT and different fat distribution. Thus, PKA activity in PAT differed between CS diagnostic groups. Increased cAMP and PKA activity may have contributed to phenotypic differences among subtypes of CS. In agreement with the known roles of cAMP signaling in the regulation of adiposity, patients with PPNAD were less obese than other patients with CS. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Experience with 99mTc-tektrotyd in the diagnosis of ectopic localization of acth-secreting tumors in patients with cushings syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikova, T.G.; Makeev, S.S.; Koval', S.S.; Guk, N.A.

    2015-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of Cushings disease is often carried out with Cushings syndrome, caused by the presence of tumors producing bioactive ACTH or ACTH-like substance. The aim of the study was to determine the effectiveness of the use of scintigraphy with 99m Tc-Tektrotyd in the diagnosis of ectopic localization of ACTH-secreting tumors in patients with Cushings syndrome. The survey of 25 patients with elevated levels of ACTH in the peripheral blood, allowed in 10 (40 %) patients identify foci of increased uptake radiopharmaceutical analog of somatostatin. It was found that the scintigraphy 99m Tc-Tektrotyd is sensitive and specific method in determining the foci of ectopic ACTH production. The use of scintigraphy with 99m Tc-Tektrotyd may be a good alternative to studies with octreotide labeled with 1U In or 123 I in the diagnosis of ectopic ACTH syndrome due to lower radiation dose to the patient, the higher picture quality and greater availability of this radiopharmaceutical

  1. Use of quantitative ultrasound of the hand phalanges in the diagnosis of two different osteoporotic syndromes: Cushing's syndrome and postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camozzi, V; Carraro, V; Zangari, M; Fallo, F; Mantero, F; Luisetto, G

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the ability of the quantitative ultrasound of the hand phalanges to detect different types of osteoporosis resulting from different pathogenetic mechanisms. For this purpose, postmenopausal and glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis was studied. Thirteen female patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS) resulting from pituitary-dependent bilateral adrenal hyperplasia (10 patients) and from adrenal adenoma (3 patients), and 32 postmenopausal osteoporotic (OP) women, were examined. The two groups of patients were comparable for body mass index (BMI), but CS patients were significantly younger than OP ones (CS 44.5+/-11.6; OP: 73.9+/-3.6). All the patients had femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) T-score less than -2.0. Cushing patients had a femoral neck BMD similar to that of OP patients (CS: 603+/-66 mg/cm2; OP: 628+/-69 mg/cm2; p=0.19). In contrast, amplitude-dependent speed of sound (AD-SoS) was significantly higher in CS patients than in OP patients (CS: 1997+/-91 m/s; OP: 1707+/-114 m/s; p<0.0001). By adjusting DXA and ultrasound parameters according to age, femoral neck BMD was significantly lower in CS patients and AD-SoS remained significantly higher than in OP patients. These findings indicate that these two different kinds of osteoporosis can be distinguished by ultrasonography and that ultrasound parameters alone cannot be used for evaluating skeletal status in CS patients.

  2. Rapid response of hypercortisolism to vandetanib treatment in a patient with advanced medullary thyroid cancer and ectopic Cushing syndrome

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    Pitoia Fabian; Bueno, Fernanda; Schmidt, Angelica; Lucas, Sabrina; Cross, Graciela, E-mail: fpitoia@intramed.net [Division de Endocrinologia, Hospital de Clinicas, Universidad de Buenos Aires Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-08-15

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) may rarely present with paraneoplastic syndromes. Among the most frequent ones are the appearance of diarrhea and ectopic Cushing syndrome (ECS). The ECS in the context of MTC is usually present in patients with distant metastatic disease. The use of drugs such as ketoconazole, metyrapone, somatostatin analogs and etomidate have been ineffective alternatives to control hypercortisolism in these patients. Bilateral adrenalectomy is often required to manage this situation. Recently, the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has been shown to be a useful tool to achieve eucortisolism in patients with metastatic MTC and ECS. We present a patient with sporadic advanced persistent and progressive MTC with lymph node and liver metastases, which after 16 years of followup developed an ECS. After one month of 300 mg/day vandetanib treatment, a biochemical and clinical response of the ECS was achieved but it did not result in significant reduction of tumor burden. However the patient reached criteria for stable disease according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST 1.1) after 8 months of follow-up. (author)

  3. Bilateral symmetrical adrenal hypermetabolism on FDG PET/CT due to Cushing syndrome in well differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, G E; Soyluoglu Demir, S; Sarikaya, A

    2016-01-01

    The (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan has been suggested for whole-body imaging to identify ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone secreting tumours, but there are some challenges involved. The case of a patient is presented, who was admitted with the pre-diagnosis of ectopic ACTH syndrome. On the CT, a nodular lesion was detected in the medial segment of the right lung. The FDG uptake of the lesion seemed to be increased visually, but was not pathological quantitatively (SUVmax: 1.8) on the PET/CT. There was also diffuse increased uptake (SUVmax: 14.2) in the enlarged adrenal glands. The lesion was reported as a possible malignant lesion with low FDG affinity, such as a low grade neuroendocrine tumour, while the diffuse enlarged adrenal glands with high uptake were interpreted as diffusely hyperplasic, due to Cushing's syndrome. The patient was treated with a surgical wedge resection. The histopathological diagnosis confirmed that the tumour was a grade 1 well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  4. Rapid response of hypercortisolism to vandetanib treatment in a patient with advanced medullary thyroid cancer and ectopic Cushing syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitoia Fabian; Bueno, Fernanda; Schmidt, Angelica; Lucas, Sabrina; Cross, Graciela

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) may rarely present with paraneoplastic syndromes. Among the most frequent ones are the appearance of diarrhea and ectopic Cushing syndrome (ECS). The ECS in the context of MTC is usually present in patients with distant metastatic disease. The use of drugs such as ketoconazole, metyrapone, somatostatin analogs and etomidate have been ineffective alternatives to control hypercortisolism in these patients. Bilateral adrenalectomy is often required to manage this situation. Recently, the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has been shown to be a useful tool to achieve eucortisolism in patients with metastatic MTC and ECS. We present a patient with sporadic advanced persistent and progressive MTC with lymph node and liver metastases, which after 16 years of followup developed an ECS. After one month of 300 mg/day vandetanib treatment, a biochemical and clinical response of the ECS was achieved but it did not result in significant reduction of tumor burden. However the patient reached criteria for stable disease according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST 1.1) after 8 months of follow-up. (author)

  5. Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy with 177Lu-DOTATATE for Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumor Occurring in Association with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 and Cushing's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Chinna; Basu, Sandip

    2017-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumor (NET) occurring in association with other endocrine syndromes forms a distinct entity. The aim was to assess the therapy response profile of the routine peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) in this relatively uncommon but clinically challenging subgroup of patients. A retrospective analysis was undertaken from the case records from those who were treated with 177 Lu-DOTATATE for metastatic NET. In addition to assessing the therapeutic efficacy, emphasis was also given to study lesional sites and scan pattern. A total of 5 cases were found: In this series of five cases, four belonged to multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome; in these four MEN1 syndrome patients, the primary site of NET was thymic region ( n = 1), duodenum ( n = 1), and pancreas ( n = 2). The fifth case was of Cushing's syndrome with the primary site of NET in the thymus. A good symptomatic response was observed in all MEN1 syndrome cases (100%) and progression of symptoms in the patient with Cushing's syndrome. The biochemical response (assessed by measurement of tumor marker serum chromogranin A) demonstrated very good partial response (defined by more than 75% reduction of tumor marker) in 2 MEN1 cases and Cushing's syndrome, good partial response (25-75% reduction of tumor marker) in the remaining 2 MEN1 cases. Scan wise (assessed by technetium [ 99m Tc]-hydrazinonicotinamide [HYNIC]-tektrotyd [TOC]/ 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC/TATE positron emission tomography-computed tomography [PET-CT] and fluorodeoxyglucose [FDG] PET-CT) partial response was observed in 3 MEN1 cases, stable disease was noted in one MEN1 case and disease progression was noted in the patient with Cushing's syndrome. The change in FDG uptake was found to be an important sensitive scan parameter in the treatment evaluation of NETs compared to somatostatin receptor-based imaging in the cases with low MiB1 index. In our series, good palliative response to 177 Lu-DOTA-octreotate (DOTATATE) PRRT was

  6. HIV infection and Cushing's disease

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    Lalić Tijana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: People with AIDS can have a dysfunction of the hypothalamic - pituitary-adrenal axis. With regard to HIV infection, most often mentioned is iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome or Pseudo-Cushing's Syndrome. So far there are described only two cases of Cushing disease in HIV -infected persons. Case report: A 48-year-old patient, after eleven years of HIV infection and a year since the introduction of HAART, was diagnosed with Cushing's disease based on cushingoid habitus, lack of suppression of cortisol in screening, elevated ACTH and pituitary tumor. She had transfenoidal surgery and histopathologic findings corresponded to basophilic adenoma. After the operation, short time on hydrocortisone substitution, she generally felt well with regular ART. Four years later, again easily bruising, facial redness, oily skin with acne, weight gain, uneven distribution of stomach adipose tissue, sweating, oligomenorrhea and high blood pressure. There was no rest/relapse of tumor on control pituitary MRI. Initially, elevated ACTH, valid cortisol in daily profiles, later the absence of the suppression of cortisol after 4 mg (LDST and 8 mg (HDST of dexamethasone along with maintenance of higher ACTH, indicate recurrence of clinical and laboratory relapse wherefore ketoconazole was introduced. Despite increasing doses of ketoconazole, she held slightly higher morning cortisol, ACTH and with persisting Cushing's syndrome. Conclusion: The coexistence of the two entities could lead to overlapping metabolic and phenotypic characteristics and the interaction between and/or synergism.

  7. Plasma adiponectin levels are increased despite insulin resistance in corticotropin-releasing hormone transgenic mice, an animal model of Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinahara, Masayuki; Nishiyama, Mitsuru; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Nakayama, Shuichi; Noguchi, Toru; Kambayashi, Machiko; Okada, Yasushi; Tsuda, Masayuki; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P; Hashimoto, Kozo; Terada, Yoshio

    2009-01-01

    Adiponectin (AdN), an adipokine derived from the adipose tissue, has an insulin-sensitizing effect, and plasma AdN is shown to be decreased in obesity and/or insulin resistant state. To clarify whether changes in AdN are also responsible for the development of glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance, we examined AdN concentration in plasma and AdN expression in the adipose tissue, using corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) transgenic mouse (CRH-Tg), an animal model of Cushing syndrome. We found, unexpectedly, that plasma AdN levels in CRHTg were significantly higher than those in wild-type littermates (wild-type: 19.7+/-2.5, CRH-Tg: 32.4+/-3.1 microg/mL, pAdN mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in the adipose tissue of CRH-Tg. Bilateral adrenalectomy in CRH-Tg eliminated both their Cushing's phenotype and their increase in plasma AdN levels (wild-type/sham: 9.4+/-0.5, CRH-Tg/sham: 15.7+/-2.0, CRH-Tg/ADX: 8.5+/-0.4 microg/mL). These results strongly suggest that AdN is not a major factor responsible for the development of insulin resistance in Cushing syndrome. Our data also suggest that glucocorticoid increases plasma AdN levels but decreases AdN expression in adipocytes, the latter being explained possibly by the decrease in AdN metabolism in the Cushing state.

  8. Adrenal scintigraphy with 131I-19-iodocholesterol in the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome associated with adrenal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barliev, G.B.

    1979-01-01

    Seven patients with Cushing's syndrome secondary to adrenocortial tumors were studied using 131 I-19-iodocholesterol. The diagnoses of all cases were verified histologically. In three cases with adenoma the uptake of the tracer was in the tumor only, while the two patients with adrenocortical carcinoma failed to show adrenal accumulation of the labelled compound. In two patients there was a hyperplasia-like scintigraphic pattern, while the stimulation and suppression biochemical tests suggested adrenal tumor. One of these cases was verified as a mixed form (adenoma plus hyperplasia), and the tumor bearing gland was significantly larger on the scan which helped the preoperative localization. In the other case, verified as bilateral multiple adrenocortical adenomas, the autonomus function of both adrenals was proved by dexamethasone suppression scanning. It seems reasonable to use the latter as an adjunctive diagnostic procedure in patients where there is a discrepancy between the standard scintiscan and the biochemical indexes of adrenal hyperfunction. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 MBE [de

  9. A Cushing's syndrome patient's severe insomnia and morning blood pressure surge both improved after her left adrenal tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Yuki; Ibaraki, Ai; Asada, Satoshi; Tominaga, Mitsuhiro; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Tsuchihashi, Takuya; Eguchi, Kazuo; Kario, Kazuomi; Taketomi, Akira

    2016-12-01

    Underlying mechanisms of the elevated risks of hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Cushing's syndrome (CS) are unclear. We treated an adult woman with CS because of a cortisol-secreting adrenal tumor. After tumor resection, the 24-h blood pressure (BP) level improved from 156/91 to 131/84 mmHg; the morning BP surprisingly improved from 174/98 to 127/93 mmHg, although we reduced her antihypertensive medication. Her sleep quality (by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) improved from 7 to 2 points. Disturbed circadian BP rhythm is often observed in CS, but was reported only as altered nocturnal BP fall. This is the first report showing the disappearance of the morning BP surge evaluated by ambulatory BP monitoring with postsurgery sleep quality improvement. Poor-quality sleep, followed by exaggerated morning BP surge may thus be a cause of CS-related cardiovascular events. Sleep quality and BP circadian rhythm evaluations may clarify hypertension and high CVD risk in CS.

  10. ACTH-producing pheochromocytoma: clinical considerations and concise review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhoff, M. F.; Dekkers, O. M.; Vleming, L. J.; Smit, J. W. A.; Romijn, J. A.; Pereira, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a patient with a rare cause of ectopic ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome, caused by a pheochromocytoma. The case provides clues for a detailed discussion on the pitfalls and diagnostic difficulties in establishing the correct underlying cause of ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome. It

  11. Ectopic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH syndrome from metastatic small cell carcinoma: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahani Sadeka

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cushing's Syndrome (CS which is caused by isolated Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH production, rather than adrenocorticotropin (ACTH production, is extremely rare. Methods We describe the clinical presentation, course, laboratory values and pathologic findings of a patient with isolated ectopic CRH causing CS. We review the literature of the types of tumors associated with this unusual syndrome and the behavior of these tumors by endocrine testing. Results A 56 year old woman presented with clinical and laboratory features consistent with ACTH-dependent CS. Pituitary imaging was normal and cortisol did not suppress with a high dose dexamethasone test, consistent with a diagnosis of ectopic ACTH. CT imaging did not reveal any discrete lung lesions but there were mediastinal and abdominal lymphadenopathy and multiple liver lesions suspicious for metastatic disease. Laboratory testing was positive for elevated serum carcinoembryonic antigen and the neuroendocrine marker chromogranin A. Serum markers of carcinoid, medullary thyroid carcinoma, and pheochromocytoma were in the normal range. Because the primary tumor could not be identified by imaging, biopsy of the presumed metastatic liver lesions was performed. Immunohistochemistry was consistent with a neuroendocrine tumor, specifically small cell carcinoma. Immunostaining for ACTH was negative but was strongly positive for CRH and laboratory testing revealed a plasma CRH of 10 pg/ml (normal 0 to 10 pg/ml which should have been suppressed in the presence of high cortisol. Conclusions This case illustrates the importance of considering the ectopic production of CRH in the differential diagnosis for presentations of ACTH-dependent Cushing's Syndrome.

  12. Internal jugular vein adrenocorticotropic hormone estimation for diagnosis of adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent Cushing′s syndrome: Ultrasound-guided direct jugular vein sample collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Prakash Sahoo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of Study: To assess the utility of internal jugular vein (IJV / peripheral adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH gradient in determining the etiology of ACTH- dependent Cushing′s syndrome. Materials and Methods: Patients with ACTH-dependent Cushing′s syndrome, (except children less than 12 years, had IJV blood collection under ultrasound guidance using a linear 7 MHZ probe. Blood was collected with a 21 G needle at the level of mandible with the patient in supine position. Six ml of blood was collected sequentially from right and left internal jugular veins for ACTH and prolactin estimation. Peripheral blood for ACTH and prolactin was taken from a previously placed IV cannula in the antecubital vein. Results: Thirty patients (20 F, 10 M, age 14 to 50 yrs were enrolled for this study. Source of ACTH excess was pituitary in 22, ectopic ACTH in 4, and unknown in 4 cases. Using an IJV: Peripheral ACTH ratio of ≥ 1.6, 15 out of 22 Cushing′s disease patients were correctly identified. However, 1 out of 4 ectopic Cushing also had IJV: Peripheral ratio ≥ 1.6. Overall, it had sensitivity of 68% with specificity of 75% while MRI pituitary and HDDST had sensitivity of 86% and 59%, respectively, with specificity of 100% each. Conclusion: IJV: Peripheral ACTH gradient was observed in 68% of patients with Cushing′s disease. Simultaneous IJV and peripheral sample collection with CRH stimulation may improve sensitivity and specificity of this test.

  13. Cushing disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Esteche, V.; Menafra Prieto, M.; Ormaechea Gorricho, R.; Vignolo Scalone, G.; Larre Borges, A.

    1998-01-01

    A review of the Cushings disease in its various aspects. It highlights the importance of early diagnosis to avoid repercussions hypercortisolism secondary to parenchymal. We describe the findings in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), noting that the pituitary adenoma is often of small size and sometimes not visible on MRI. The treatment of choice remains surgical treatment other contingencies exist for particular cases (Author) [es

  14. Diagnosis of Icenko-Cushing's disease and syndrome by angiography and the determination of the content of hormones in blood samples from the adrenal vein and vena cava inferior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yugrinov, O.G.; Slavnov, V.N.; Rybakov, S.I.; Yakovlev, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the procedure of a comprehensive examination of patients with hypercorticoidism including angiography of the adrenals and the determination of the hydrocortisone level in the blood. The results of the studies on 32 patients with Icenko-Cushing's syndrome and 95 patients with Icenko-Cushing's disease are presented. X-ray appearance of the focal and diffuse adrenal disorders is described. The authors provide some data on the concentration of hydrocortisone in blood samples and on the content of corticotropin The importance of these data for diagnosis and differential diagnosis of Icenko-Cushing's disease and syndrome is shown. In the authors' opinion, the chief method in this diagnostic complex should be selective adrenal venography

  15. Antiphospholipid Syndrome: primary or secondary to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus? Description of a clinical case of avitaminosis D in premenopausal woman with pseudo-Cushing syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Turrin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Low vitamin D levels have been described in obese individuals and in some autoimmune diseases, such as Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE and primary antiphospholipid syndrome (pAPS. In particular, more than 50% of premenopausal women with pAPS have hypovitaminosis D. In this issue we report a case of an obese, premenopausal, and hypertensive woman with pseudo-Cushing syndrome, affected by deep venous thrombosis associated with pulmonary embolism after rib fracture who presented hypovitaminosis D. 7 years before, diagnosis of pAPS had been made after the detection of thrombocytopenia (present at a young age and arterial ischemia of a lower limb. For seven years she was treated with acetylsalicylic acid without complications. We found positive anti-dsDNA antibodies, a triple antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL positivity and levels of vitamin D < 4 µg/l. The case report arises some questions: is vitamin D deficiency due to obesity or APS? Is the positivity of anti-dsDNA indicative of progression to SLE? Is preventive therapy with hydroxychloroquine indicated? Does the high-risk aPL profile justify a high-intensity and life-long anticoagulation regimen?http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/cmi.v8i2.912

  16. Comparison of 1 mg and 2 mg overnight dexamethasone suppression tests for the screening of Cushing's syndrome in obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Mustafa; Kebapcilar, Levent; Taslipinar, Abdullah; Azal, Omer; Ozgurtas, Taner; Corakci, Ahmet; Akgul, Emin Ozgur; Taslipinar, Mine Yavuz; Yazici, Mahmut; Kutlu, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is currently a major public health problem and one of the potential underlying causes of obesity in a minority of patients is Cushing's syndrome (CS). Traditionally, the gold standard screening test for CS is 1 mg dexamethasone overnight suppression test. However, it is known that obese subjects have high false positive results with this test. We have therefore compared the 1 mg and 2 mg overnight dexamethasone suppression tests in obese subjects. Patients whose serum cortisol after ODST was >50 nM underwent and a low-dose dexamethasone suppression test (LDDST); 24-hour urine cortisol was collected for basal urinary free cortisol (UFC). For positive results after overnight 1-mg dexamethasone suppression test we also performed the overnight 2-mg dexamethasone suppression test. We prospectively evaluated 100 patients (22 men and 78 women, ranging in age from 17 to 73 years with a body mass index (BMI) >30 kg/m2 who had been referred to our hospital-affiliated endocrine clinic because of simple obesity. Suppression of serum cortisol to suppression. Thyroid function tests, lipid profiles, homocysteine, antithyroglobulin, anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody levels, vitamin B12, folate levels, insulin resistance [by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)] and 1.0 mg postdexamethasone (postdex) suppression cortisol levels were measured. We found an 8% false-positive rate in 1 mg overnight test and 2% in 2 mg overnight test (p=0.001). There was no correlation between the cortisol levels after ODST and other parameters. Our results indicate that the 2 mg overnight dexamethasone suppression test (ODST) is more convenient and accurate than 1-mg ODST as a screening test for excluding CS in subjects with simple obesity.

  17. Verbal and visual memory performance and hippocampal volumes, measured by 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging, in patients with Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resmini, Eugenia; Santos, Alicia; Gómez-Anson, Beatriz; Vives, Yolanda; Pires, Patricia; Crespo, Iris; Portella, Maria J; de Juan-Delago, Manel; Barahona, Maria-José; Webb, Susan M

    2012-02-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) affects cognition and memory. Our objective was to evaluate memory and hippocampal volumes (HV) on 3-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3T MRI) in CS patients and controls. Thirty-three CS patients (11 active, 22 cured) and 34 controls matched for age, sex, and education underwent Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test and Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure memory tests. Gray matter and HV were calculated on 3T MRI, using FreeSurfer image analyses software. No differences in HV were observed between active and cured CS or controls. Memory performance was worse in CS patients than controls (P visual memory (P = 0.04) than controls. In 12 CS patients, memory was below normative cutoff values for verbal (n = 6, cured), visual memory (n = 10, six cured) or both (n = 4); these patients with severe memory impairments showed smaller HV compared with their matched controls (P = 0.02 with verbal impairment; P = 0.03 with visual impairment). They were older (P = 0.04), had shorter education (P = 0.02), and showed a trend toward longer duration of hypercortisolism (P = 0.07) than the remaining CS patients. Total (P = 0.004) and cortical (P = 0.03) brain gray matter volumes were decreased in CS compared with controls, indicating brain atrophy, whereas subcortical gray matter (which includes HV) was reduced only in the 12 patients with severe memory impairment. Verbal and visual memory is worse in CS patients than controls, even after biochemical cure. HV was decreased only in those whose memory scores were below normative cutoff values.

  18. Cushing disease with pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Raju A; Acharya, Shrikrishna V; Bandgar, Tushar R; Menon, Padma S; Shah, Nalini S

    2012-07-01

    Pregnancy occurs rarely in patients with Cushing syndrome (CS) due to hypercortisolism. So far, about 150 cases of CS in pregnancy have been reported in the literature. We describe a 22-year-old female who presented in pregnancy with clinical features of CS. She delivered at 34 weeks of gestation and baby had transient adrenal insufficiency in the neonatal period. Mother underwent transsphenoidal surgery 1 year postpartum and on follow up she is under remission. Neonatal hypoadrenalism should be anticipated in maternal CS.

  19. Neuroendocrine axis of stress, metabolic syndrome and psychiatric disorders in cushing's sindrome Ejes neuroendocrinos del estrés, síndrome metabólico y alteraciones psiquiátricas del síndrome de Cushing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leidy Alexandra Lezcano Tobón

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of abnormalities of the hypophysishypothalamus- adrenal gland axis (HHA in the ongoing stress and depression is analyzed. Besides, it is evidenced that some problems, until recently considered merely endocrine-metabolic such as Cushing's syndrome (either clinical or subclinical and obesity (mainly when it is part of the metabolic syndrome may have a common etiological basis, be it a primary event, a comorbidity or a trigger in individuals with genetic susceptibility to states of maladaptative chronic stress. Some harmful effects of severe and/or ongoing hypercortisolism on some brain areas and the possibility of permanent alterations in some neuronal circuits are described. Finally, and according to some clinical evidences, the potential therapeutic role of antiglucocorticoids in the management of refractory depression is explored, as well as the role that early psychiatric intervention and antidepressant pharmacological treatment may play in some patients with the metabolic syndrome or increased cardiovascular risk. Se analiza el papel de las anormalidades del eje hipotálamo-hipófisis-adrenales (HHA en el estrés sostenido y la depresión. Además se pone en evidencia que algunos problemas hasta hace poco considerados puramente endocrino-metabólicos como el síndrome de Cushing (SC (clínico o subclínico y la obesidad, principalmente cuando hace parte del síndrome metabólico (SM, pueden tener una base etiológica común, como evento primario, comorbilidad o disparador en individuos con susceptibilidad genética a los estados de estrés crónico maladaptativo. Se describen algunas acciones lesivas del hipercortisolismo severo y/o sostenido en algunas áreas cerebrales y la posibilidad de producir alteraciones permanentes en algunos circuitos neuronales. Por último se explora, de acuerdo con algunas evidencias clínicas, el papel terapéutico potencial de fármacos antiglucocorticoides en el manejo de la depresión refractaria y

  20. Luteinizing hormone (LH)-responsive Cushing's syndrome: the demonstration of LH receptor messenger ribonucleic acid in hyperplastic adrenal cells, which respond to chorionic gonadotropin and serotonin agonists in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Feelders (Richard); W.W. de Herder (Wouter); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); L.J. Hofland (Leo); P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter); M. Verhoef-Post (Miriam); A.P.N. Themmen (Axel); F.H. de Jong (Frank); H.J. Bonjer (Jaap); A.J. Clark (Adrian); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn a substantial part of adrenal adenomas and hyperplasias from patients with Cushing's syndrome, cortisol production is controlled by the expression of aberrant hormone receptors on adrenocortical cells. We present in vivo and in vitro data of two patients with a

  1. Incidence and late prognosis of cushing's syndrome: a population based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholm, J; Juul, Svend; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde

    2001-01-01

    The main purpose was to assess the incidence and late outcome of Cushing’s syndrome, particularly in Cushing’s disease. Information for all patients diagnosed with Cushing’s syndrome during an 11-yr period in Denmark was retrieved. The incidence was 1.2–1.7/million·yr (Cushing’s disease), 0.......6/million·yr (adrenal adenoma) and 0.2/million·yr (adrenal carcinoma). Other types of Cushing’s syndrome were rare. In 139 patients with nonmalignant disease, 11.1% had died during follow-up (median, 8.1 yr; range, 3.1–14.0), yielding a standard mortality ratio (SMR) of 3.68 [95% confidence interval (CI), 2...... syndrome is rare and is associated with increased mortality, in patients with no concurrent malignancy also; 2) the excess mortality was mainly observed during the first year of disease; and 3) the impaired quality of health in long-term survivors of Cushing’s disease is not fully explained....

  2. Impaired microvascular reactivity and endothelial function in patients with Cushing's syndrome: Influence of arterial hypertension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prázný, M.; Ježková, J.; Horová, E.; Lazárová, V.; Hána, V.; Kvasnička, J.; Pecen, Ladislav; Marek, J.; Škrha, J.; Kršek, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 1 (2008), s. 13-22 ISSN 0862-8408 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : Cushing’s syndrome * vascular reactivity * endothelial function * oxidative stress * laser Doppler flowmetry Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.653, year: 2008

  3. Multiple Salivary Cortisol Measurements Are a Useful Tool to Optimize Metyrapone Treatment in Patients with Cushing's Syndromes Treatment: Case Presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kenichi; Fukuoka, Hidenori; Odake, Yukiko; Nakajima, Shinsuke; Tachibana, Mariko; Ito, Jun; Hosokawa, Yusei; Yamada, Tomoko; Miura, Hiroshi; Suematsu, Natsu; Matsumoto, Ryusaku; Bando, Hironori; Suda, Kentaro; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Iguchi, Genzo; Ogawa, Wataru; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    Measuring salivary cortisol is both convenient and non-invasive for patients; however, its usefulness as a marker for monitoring medical therapy has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of multiple salivary cortisol measurements in patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS) during medical therapy. Six patients with CS (three with cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenoma and three with ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma) were recruited. Samples for morning serum cortisol, urinary free cortisol (UFC), and multiple salivary cortisol levels were collected before and during metyrapone treatment. The area under the curve (AUC) and mean value (MV) of daily salivary cortisol levels were calculated. In five out of six patients, UFC were normalized; however, multiple salivary cortisol measurements revealed an impaired diurnal cortisol rhythm in these patients. To verify the usefulness of multiple salivary cortisol measurements, we performed a prospective case study of a patient in whom the excess secretion of cortisol was not controlled (UFC 211 μg/day) with 2,250 mg/day in four divided doses of metyrapone. Multiple measurements of salivary cortisol revealed that cortisol levels elevated before the next administration. Accordingly, we shortened the interval by increasing the number of administration from four to five times per day, with a slight increment of daily dose of 2,500 mg. These optimizations resulted in a drastic improvement of diurnal pattern as well as UFC level (101 μg/day). Changes in both the MV and AUC of salivary cortisol levels were more correlated with those in UFC levels (Correlation coefficient 0.75, p  = 0.007, and 0.70, p  = 0.017) than those in the morning serum cortisol levels (0.42, p  = 0.200), indicating that multiple salivary cortisol measurements reflect more precisely the excess secretion of cortisol. Our preliminary data suggest that multiple salivary cortisol measurements can be a useful

  4. Perioperative Endocrine Therapy for Patients with Cushing's Syndrome Undergoing Retroperitoneal Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo Cui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate the efficacy and safety of perioperative endocrine therapy (PET for patients with Cushing’s syndrome (CS undergoing retroperitoneal laparoscopic adrenalectomy (RLA. Methods. The novel, simplified PET modality of 82 patients who underwent RLA procedures for CS were studied. Clinical manifestations were observed for all patients on days 1 and 5 postoperatively, and clinical data, such as blood pressure (BP, levels of serum cortisol, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH, blood glucose, and electrolytes, were acquired and analyzed. Results. Supraphysiological doses of glucocorticoid were administered during the perioperative period, and the dosage was reduced gradually. In all 82 cases, the RLAs were performed successfully without any perioperative complication, such as steroid withdrawal symptoms. The patient’s symptoms and signs were improved quickly and safely during the hospital days. The serum cortisol and potassium levels were rather stable on days 1 and 5 postoperatively, and most were within the normal range. The clinical manifestations, serum levels of cortisol, ACTH, and potassium in most patients restored to normal gradually after several months (mean, 6.7 ± 1.2 months, except for one patient undergoing bilateral adrenalectomy. Conclusions. This perioperative endocrine therapy for patients with Cushing’s syndrome (mainly for adrenocortical adenoma undergoing retro-laparoscopic adrenalectomy is both effective and safe.

  5. Unmasking sarcoidosis following surgery for Cushing disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diernæs, Jon Erik; Bygum, Anette; Poulsen, Per L

    2016-01-01

    We present a patient with Cushing disease apparently suppressing sarcoidosis, which was unmasked following surgical resection of a pituitary adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-producing microadenoma. Case report and a short review of the literature published in this area. A 46-year-old Caucasian woman pr...... successful treatment of Cushing syndrome may have a flare-up or emergence of a corticosteroid-responsive disease.......We present a patient with Cushing disease apparently suppressing sarcoidosis, which was unmasked following surgical resection of a pituitary adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-producing microadenoma. Case report and a short review of the literature published in this area. A 46-year-old Caucasian woman...... for which the patient underwent transphenoidal resection. Maintenance corticosteroid therapy was implemented, and the signs and symptoms of Cushing disease began to resolve. Three months after surgery, multiple erythematous painful nodules developed on the patient's arms. Erythema nodosum (EN) was diagnosed...

  6. A patient with Alzheimer's disease complicated by elderly-onset Cushing's syndrome who had undergone surgical treatment for adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Yoshinori; Mizoguchi, Yoshito; Noguchi, Tomoyuki; Arai, Takeo; Fukuyama, Junko; Kato, Takahiro A; Kawashima, Toshiro; Monji, Akira

    2016-07-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is a rare disorder, especially in older people. Loss of brain volume and neurocognitive impairment of varying degrees has been demonstrated in patients with CS. However, there is a large difference between the median age of presentation of CS and that of Alzheimer's disease. We herein report a case of a patient with Alzheimer's disease complicated by elderly-onset CS who had undergone surgical treatment for adrenal hyperplasia. Surgical correction of hypercortisolism seems to have slowed the progression of brain volume loss and cognitive dysfunction and improved psychiatric symptoms such as visual hallucination, restlessness, and psychomotor excitement. These improvements have remarkably reduced the burden on the patient's caregivers. The present case suggests that subclinical CS may be present, particularly in rapidly progressive dementia, and that surgical treatment of CS for neuropsychiatric symptoms is useful. © 2015 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2015 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  7. Cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with adrenal incidentalomas that are either non-secreting or associated with intermediate phenotype or subclinical Cushing's syndrome: a 15-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Dalmazi, Guido; Vicennati, Valentina; Garelli, Silvia; Casadio, Elena; Rinaldi, Eleonora; Giampalma, Emanuela; Mosconi, Cristina; Golfieri, Rita; Paccapelo, Alexandro; Pagotto, Uberto; Pasquali, Renato

    2014-05-01

    Incidental discovery of adrenal masses has increased over the past few years. Mild alterations in cortisol secretion without clinical signs of overt hypercortisolism (subclinical Cushing's syndrome) are a common finding in patients with these tumours. Although metabolic alterations and increased cardiovascular risk have been noted in patients with subclinical Cushing's syndrome, incidence of cardiovascular events and mortality in the long term have not been assessed. We aimed to ascertain the frequency of new cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with non-secreting adrenal incidentalomas, tumours of intermediate phenotype, or those causing subclinical Cushing's syndrome. From January, 1995, to September, 2010, consecutive outpatients with adrenal incidentalomas who were referred to the endocrinology unit of S Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy, were enrolled into our study. Individuals were assessed every 18-30 months for the first 5 years (mean follow-up 7·5 [SD 3·2] years, range 26 months to 15 years). Cortisol concentrations after the 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test (DST) were used to define non-secreting (+50 nmol/L) and intermediate phenotype (50-138 nmol/L) adrenal incidentalomas and subclinical Cushing's syndrome (+138 nmol/L). At the end of follow-up, patients were reclassified as having either unchanged or worsened secreting patterns from baseline. 198 outpatients were assessed; at the end of follow-up, 114 patients had stable non-secreting adrenal incidentalomas, 61 had either a stable intermediate phenotype or subclinical Cushing's syndrome, and 23 had a pattern of secretion that had worsened. By comparison with patients with stable non-secreting adrenal incidentalomas, the incidence of cardiovascular events was higher in individuals with a stable intermediate phenotype or subclinical Cushing's syndrome (6·7% vs 16·7%; p=0·04) and in those with worsened secreting patterns (6·7% vs 28·4%; p=0·02). Cardiovascular events were

  8. Ectopic Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: Backache, which occurs with routine activities Bone pain or tenderness Collection of fat between the shoulders and above the collar bone Rib and spine fractures caused by thinning of the bones Weak muscles, ...

  9. Cushing Syndrome: Other FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Legislation and Public Policy (OLPP) Office of Science Policy, Reporting, and Program Analysis (OSPRA) Division of Extramural Research (DER) Extramural Scientific Branches Grants Management Branch (GMB) Office of Committee Management ( ...

  10. Case report of severe Cushing's syndrome in medullary thyroid cancer complicated by functional diabetes insipidus, aortic dissection, jejunal intussusception, and paraneoplastic dysautonomia: remission with sorafenib without reduction in cortisol concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Muhammad M; Duaiji, Najla; Mutairi, Ghazi; Aklabi, Sabah; Qattan, Nasser; Abouzied, Mohei El-Din M; Sous, Mohamed W

    2015-09-09

    Normalization of cortisol concentration by multikinase inhibitors have been reported in three patients with medullary thyroid cancer-related Cushing's syndrome. Aortic dissection has been reported in three patients with Cushing's syndrome. Diabetes insipidus without intrasellar metastasis, intestinal intussusception, and paraneoplastic dysautonomia have not been reported in medullary thyroid cancer. An adult male with metastatic medullary thyroid cancer presented with hyperglycemia, hypernatremia, hypokalemia, hypertension, acne-like rash, and diabetes insipidus (urine volume >8 L/d, osmolality 190 mOsm/kg). Serum cortisol, adrenocorticoitropic hormone, dehydroepiandrostenedione sulfate, and urinary free cortisol were elevated 8, 20, 4.4, and 340 folds, respectively. Pituitary imaging was normal. Computed tomography scan revealed jejunal intussusception and incidental abdominal aortic dissection. Sorafenib treatment was associated with Cushing's syndrome remission, elevated progesterone (>10 fold), normalization of dehydroepiandrostenedione sulfate, but persistently elevated cortisol concentration. Newly-developed proximal lower limb weakness and decreased salivation were associated with elevated ganglionic neuronal acetylcholine receptor (alpha-3) and borderline P/Q type calcium channel antibodies. Extreme cortisol concentration may have contributed to aortic dissection and suppressed antidiuretic hormone secretion; which combined with hypokalemia due cortisol activation of mineralocorticoid receptors, manifested as diabetes insipidus. This is the first report of paraneoplastic dysautonomia and jejunal intussusception in medullary thyroid cancer, they may be related to medullary thyroid cancer's neuroendocrine origin and metastasis, respectively. Remission of Cushing's syndrome without measurable reduction in cortisol concentration suggests a novel cortisol-independent mechanism of action or assay cross-reactivity. Normalization of dehydroepiandrostenedione

  11. Current status of adrenalectomy for Cushing's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunicardi, F.C.; Rosman, P.M.; Lesser, K.L.; Andersen, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate the current use of adrenalectomy in the treatment of Cushing's disease, we reviewed seven consecutive patients who have undergone adrenalectomy for Cushing's disease at this medical center during 1983 to 1984. Seventy-one percent (5/7) had pituitary, or type I, Cushing's disease, while 29% (2/7) had adrenal, or type II, Cushing's disease from either an adenoma or an adrenocortical carcinoma. Presenting signs and symptoms, either initially or at the time of recurrence, were typical of Cushing's syndrome. Four of five patients with type I disease had recurrent disease after transphenoidal hypophysectomy, bilateral adrenalectomy, or unilateral adrenalectomy. In three of five patients, medical therapy of hypercortisolism was abandoned because of adverse side effects. Preoperative evaluation in all patients included cortisol and ACTH levels, dexamethasone suppression tests, and computerized tomography (both abdominal and head). In patients with a prior history of adrenalectomy, radiocholesterol scans were also performed and were useful. Angiographic procedures were not required in these patients. In patients with type I disease, posterior operative approaches were used. In patients with type II disease, an anterolateral approach was used. Posterolateral incisions are preferred over Hugh-Young incisions and provide better exposure with a reduced risk of poor wound healing. Morbidity and mortality included one death and three nonhealing wounds. In the six surviving patients, symptoms resolved with variable frequency. Findings suggestive of Nelson's syndrome (hyperpigmentation) have occurred in two patients; serial computerized tomographic scans fail to reveal evidence of pituitary tumors

  12. Ectopic corticotroph syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penezić Zorana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is a clinical state resulting from prolonged, inappropriate exposure to excessive endogenous secretion of Cortisol and hence excess circulating free cortisol, characterized by loss of the normal feedback mechanisms of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and the normal circadian rhythm of cortisol secretion [2]. The etiology of Cushing's syndrome may be excessive ACTH secretion from the pituitary gland, ectopic ACTH secretion by nonpituitary tumor, or excessive autonomous secretion of cortisol from a hyperfunctioning adrenal adenoma or carcinoma. Other than this broad ACTH-dependent and ACTH-independent categories, the syndrome may be caused by ectopic CRH secretion, PPNAD, MAH, ectopic action of GIP or catecholamines, and other adrenel-dependent processes associated with adrenocortical hyperfunction. CASE REPORT A 31 year-old men with b-month history of hyperpigmentation, weight gain and proximal myopathy was refereed to Institute of Endocrinology for evaluation of hypercortisolism. At admission, patient had classic cushingoid habit with plethoric face, dermal and muscle atrophy, abdominal strie rubrae and centripetal obesity. The standard laboratory data showed hyperglycaemia and hypokaliemia with high potassium excretion level. The circadian rhythm of cortisol secretion was blunted, with moderately elevated ACTH level, and without cortisol suppression after low-dose and high-dose dexamethason suppression test. Urinary 5HIAA was elevated. Abdominal and sellar region magnetic resonance imaging was negative. CRH stimulation resulted in ACTH increase of 87% of basal, but without significant increase of cortisol level, only 7%. Thoracal CT scan revealed 14 mm mass in right apical pulmonary segment. A wedge resection of anterior segment of right upper lobe was performed. Microscopic evaluation showed tumor tissue consisting of solid areas of uniform, oval cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm and centrally

  13. Acute mesenteric ischemia and hepatic infarction after treatment of ectopic Cushing’s syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Shinobu Takayasu; Shingo Murasawa; Satoshi Yamagata; Kazunori Kageyama; Takeshi Nigawara; Yutaka Watanuki; Daisuke Kimura; Takao Tsushima; Yoshiyuki Sakamoto; Kenichi Hakamada; Ken Terui; Makoto Daimon

    2017-01-01

    Summary Patients with Cushing?s syndrome and excess exogenous glucocorticoids have an increased risk for venous thromboembolism, as well as arterial thrombi. The patients are at high risk of thromboembolic events, especially during active disease and even in cases of remission and after surgery in Cushing?s syndrome and withdrawal state in glucocorticoid users. We present a case of Cushing?s syndrome caused by adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting lung carcinoid tumor. Our patient developed a...

  14. Sustained weight loss in patients treated with mifepristone for Cushing's syndrome: a follow-up analysis of the SEISMIC study and long-term extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fein, Henry G; Vaughan, T Brooks; Kushner, Harvey; Cram, David; Nguyen, Dat

    2015-10-27

    Overweight and obesity are common among patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS) and may persist in some patients even after ostensibly curative surgery, contributing to cardiometabolic dysfunction and increased cardiovascular risk. Mifepristone, a selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, was effective in controlling hyperglycemia in a 24-week trial of adults (N = 50) with endogenous CS and associated type 2 diabetes mellitus/impaired glucose tolerance or hypertension who had failed or were not candidates for surgery (SEISMIC, Study of the Efficacy and Safety of Mifepristone in the Treatment of Endogenous Cushing's Syndrome). This analysis examines long-term weight change among patients who received mifepristone in SEISMIC and enrolled in a long-term safety extension (LTE) study. Patients completing the 24-week SEISMIC study and subsequent 6-week off-drug safety evaluation were invited to enroll in the LTE study. Mifepristone doses at the end of SEISMIC were the LTE starting doses. Body weight measures were reviewed at baseline and week 24 of SEISMIC and at LTE month 6, 12, 18, 24, and final visit (last observation collected during the LTE study). Of the 30 patients enrolled in the LTE, evaluable weight data were available for 29 (20/29 female; mean age of 44.7 ± 11.2 years). These patients received mifepristone for a median of 29.2 months (range 8.4-41.9). Mean ± SD weight from SEISMIC baseline to LTE final visit decreased by 10.3 ± 16.3 kg (mean 105.4 ± 34.3 kg to 95.1 ± 32.9 kg), a 9.3 % decrease from baseline weight (P = 0.0008). Of the 29 LTE patients, 18 (62.1 %) lost ≥ 5 % of body weight by the end of the initial 24-week treatment period; this ≥5 % weight loss persisted in 83.3 % (15/18) at LTE final visit. Ten patients (34.5 %) lost ≥ 10 % of initial body weight by week 24 of SEISMIC, which persisted in 80 % at LTE final visit. No new safety signals were detected with long-term mifepristone use. Clinically meaningful weight loss achieved during

  15. Cushing syndrome secondary to a medullary thyroid carcinoma: report of a case and review of the literature = Síndrome de Cushing secundario a carcinoma medular de tiroides: descripción de un caso y revisión de la literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez Restrepo, Johnayro

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 29-year old female who was evaluated because of a thyroid tumor. The initial pathological classification was an insular thyroid carcinoma. There was strong involvement in the neck, mediastinum and lungs. Three years after receiving specific therapy for her thyroid neoplasia, she developed a Cushing syndrome and liver lesions suggestive of metastases from the primary tumor. A review of the previous pathological material revealed a medullary thyroid carcinoma producing ACTH, instead of the insular carcinoma. Based on this case a review of the literature is presented.

  16. Cushing's disease and craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackland, F M; Stanhope, R; Preece, M A

    1987-01-01

    A 14-year old girl presented with growth failure and Cushing's disease. Histological examination confirmed a craniopharyngioma but failed to show that the tumour secreted adrenocorticotrophic hormone. We suggest that her Cushing's disease was caused by hypothalamic dysfunction associated with increased corticotrophin-releasing hormone secretion, secondary to the craniopharyngioma. Images Figure PMID:2823728

  17. Aberrant expression of glucagon receptors in adrenal glands of a patient with Cushing's syndrome and ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia Expresion aberrante de receptores de glucagón en tejido adrenal de un paciente con síndrome de Cushing e hiperplasia adrenal macronodular indedependiente de ACTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria de Miguel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH independent bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH is a rare cause of Cushing´s syndrome, characterized by bilateral adrenal lesions and excess cortisol production despite ACTH suppression. Cortisol synthesis is produced in response to abnormal activation of G-protein- coupled receptors, such as gastric inhibitory peptide, vasopressin, beta adrenergic agonists, LH/hCG and serotonin receptors. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of glucagon receptors in adrenal glands from an AIMAH patient. A patient with ACTH-independent Cushing´s syndrome and bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia was screened for altered activation of adrenal receptors by physiological (mixed meal and pharmacological (gonadotrophin releasing hormone, ACTH and glucagon tests. The results showed abnormally high levels of serum cortisol after stimulation with glucagon. Hypercortisolism was successfully managed with ketoconazole treatment. Interestingly, a 4-month treatment with a somatostatin analogue (octreotide was also able to reduce cortisol secretion. Finally, Cushing's syndrome was cured after bilateral adrenalectomy. Abnormal mRNA expression for glucagon receptor in the patient´s adrenal glands was observed by Real-Time PCR procedure. These results strongly suggest that the mechanism of AIMAH causing Cushing´s syndrome in this case involves the illicit activation of adrenal glucagon receptors. This is the first case reported of AIMAH associated with ectopic glucagon receptors.La hiperplasia adrenal macronodular bilateral independiente de ACTH (HAMIA es una causa infrecuente de Síndrome de Cushing, caracterizada por lesiones adrenales bilaterales, hipercortisolismo y ACTH plasmática suprimida. La síntesis de cortisol estaría regulada a través de ligandos de receptores asociados a proteína G que se expresan en forma aberrante en la corteza de las glándulas adrenales. El objetivo de este trabajo es analizar

  18. ACTH overexpressing pituitary hyperplasia in a patient with ectopic ACTH-syndrome due to carcinoid of the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Konstantinovna Dzeranova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic ACTH-syndrome is the most diagnostically challenging  variant of endogenous hypercortisolism. Particularly difficult differential diagnosis of this syndrome is from Cushing's disease (CD, as currently there is no single test sufficiently accurate to differentiate accurately ectopic ACTH production from the pituitary. The main functional tests are based on the fact that the vast majority of ectopic ACTH production is autonomous and suppresses one from pituitary. But in some cases this is not observed, and then the data obtained all necessary laboratory and instrumental research evidence in favor of central genesis of CD in a patient with ACTH ectopic secretion, which can lead to inappropriate treatment. If you confirm the ectopic ACTH-syndrome, it may take quite a long time of searching for the pathological focus, as there is no sufficiently precise imaging and diagnostic method for determining the localization of ectopic source of ACTH production. Thus, the differential diagnosis of ACTH-dependent hypercortisolism and localization of the ectopic tumor is the cornerstone of early and radical treatment of patients. We present a difficult clinical case of a patient having a pituitary hyperplasia with excessive ACTH expression with primary ectopic ACTH syndrome caused by lung carcinoid.

  19. Cushing's disease: pituitary imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, S.; Ammini, A.C.; Bhatia, R.; Gupta, R.; Berry, M.; Sarkar, C.; Mahajan, H.

    1994-01-01

    Fourteen patients with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent hypercortisolism underwent pituitary scanning with computed axial tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Computed tomography revealed pituitary macroadenomas in two patients, pituitary hyperplasia in one and suspicion of pituitary microadenoma in one. Thirteen patients underwent MRI. One with a macroadenoma diagnosed on CT did not undergo MRI. The MRI revealed a pituitary macroadenoma in one, microadenoma in three and hyperplasia in two cases. Magnetic resonance imaging following gadolinium diethylene triamine penta acetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhancement revealed four more pituitary microadenomas. All patients who had pituitary adenomas (micro and macro) and hyperplasia underwent trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery. One of the two patients, who had an enlarged pituitary on imaging but no demonstrable adenoma, was found to have a microadenoma at surgery. It is concluded that patients with ACTH dependent hypercortisolism should undergo MRI of the pituitary gland to identify/localize corticotroph pituitary ademonas. The study should include Gd-DTPA enhancement in cases where the scan is normal. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs

  20. Fibromyalgia in a Patient with Cushing's Disease Accompanied by Central Hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Nobumasa; Katada, Shinichi; Yamada, Takaho; Mezaki, Naomi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Akiko; Hanyu, Osamu; Yoneoka, Yuichiro; Kawachi, Izumi; Shimohata, Takayoshi; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Sone, Hirohito

    A 39-year-old woman with a 3-year history of a rounded face developed widespread myalgia. Detailed examinations revealed no disorders that could explain the pain other than concomitant Cushing's disease and central hypothyroidism. Both the hypercortisolemia and hypothyroidism completely resolved after the patient underwent surgery to treat Cushing's disease, but she continued to experience unresolved myalgia and met the diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia. Few studies have so far investigated patients with fibromyalgia associated with Cushing's syndrome. In our case, the hypothyroidism caused by Cushing's disease probably played an important role in triggering and exacerbating fibromyalgia. This highlights the need to examine the endocrine function in patients with muscle pain.

  1. A patient with Cushing disease lateralizing a pituitary adenoma by inferior petrosal sinus sampling using desmopressin: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Hee Lim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old girl was referred for evaluation of the etiology of Cushing syndrome. During the previous 2 years, she had experienced weight gain, secondary amenorrhea, growth retardation, and back pain. Random serum cortisol level, 24-hour urinary free cortisol excretion, and overnight and low-dose dexamethasone suppression tests suggested Cushing syndrome. Midnight adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH level and high-dose dexamethasone suppression test confirmed Cushing disease. Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging was suspicious for microadenoma. To eliminate ectopic ACTH syndrome, and lateralize the pituitary tumor, inferior petrosal sinus sampling (IPSS was performed by desmopressin use to stimulate ACTH. Finally, the patient was diagnosed with Cushing disease due to ACTH-secreting pituitary microadenoma, lateralized to the left side; subsequently underwent transsphenoidal surgery. Here we report a case of a 14-year-old girl diagnosed with Cushing disease with a pituitary tumor lateralized by IPSS using desmopressin, which is very rare in pediatric Cushing disease.

  2. A patient with Cushing disease lateralizing a pituitary adenoma by inferior petrosal sinus sampling using desmopressin: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joo Hee; Kim, Soo Jung; Jung, Mo Kyung; Kim, Ki Eun; Kwon, Ah Reum; Chae, Hyun Wook; Kim, Duk Hee; Kim, Ho-Seong

    2016-03-01

    A 14-year-old girl was referred for evaluation of the etiology of Cushing syndrome. During the previous 2 years, she had experienced weight gain, secondary amenorrhea, growth retardation, and back pain. Random serum cortisol level, 24-hour urinary free cortisol excretion, and overnight and low-dose dexamethasone suppression tests suggested Cushing syndrome. Midnight adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level and high-dose dexamethasone suppression test confirmed Cushing disease. Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging was suspicious for microadenoma. To eliminate ectopic ACTH syndrome, and lateralize the pituitary tumor, inferior petrosal sinus sampling (IPSS) was performed by desmopressin use to stimulate ACTH. Finally, the patient was diagnosed with Cushing disease due to ACTH-secreting pituitary microadenoma, lateralized to the left side; subsequently underwent transsphenoidal surgery. Here we report a case of a 14-year-old girl diagnosed with Cushing disease with a pituitary tumor lateralized by IPSS using desmopressin, which is very rare in pediatric Cushing disease.

  3. Bilateral Testicular Tumors Resulting in Recurrent Cushing Disease After Bilateral Adrenalectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puar, Troy; Engels, Manon; van Herwaarden, Antonius E; Sweep, Fred C G J; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, Christina; Kamphuis-van Ulzen, Karin; Chortis, Vasileios; Arlt, Wiebke; Stikkelbroeck, Nike; Claahsen-van der Grinten, Hedi L; Hermus, Ad R M M

    2017-02-01

    Recurrence of hypercortisolism in patients after bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing disease is extremely rare. We present a 27-year-old man who previously underwent bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing disease with complete clinical resolution. Cushingoid features recurred 12 years later, with bilateral testicular enlargement. Hormonal tests confirmed adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent Cushing disease. Surgical resection of the testicular tumors led to clinical and biochemical remission. Gene expression analysis of the tumor tissue by quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed high expression of all key steroidogenic enzymes. Adrenocortical-specific genes were 5.1 × 105 (CYP11B1), 1.8 × 102 (CYP11B2), and 6.3 × 104 (MC2R) times higher than nonsteroidogenic fibroblast control. This correlated with urine steroid metabolome profiling showing 2 fivefold increases in the excretion of the metabolites of 11-deoxycortisol, 21-deoxycortisol, and total glucocorticoids. Leydig-specific genes were 4.3 × 101 (LHCGR) and 9.3 × 100 (HSD17B3) times higher than control, and urinary steroid profiling showed twofold increased excretion of the major androgen metabolites androsterone and etiocholanolone. These distinctly increased steroid metabolites were suppressed by dexamethasone but unresponsive to human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation, supporting the role of ACTH, but not luteinizing hormone, in regulating tumor-specific steroid excess. We report bilateral testicular tumors occurring in a patient with recurrent Cushing disease 12 years after bilateral adrenalectomy. Using mRNA expression analysis and steroid metabolome profiling, the tumors demonstrated both adrenocortical and gonadal steroidogenic properties, similar to testicular adrenal rest tumors found in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, suggesting the presence of pluripotent cells even in patients without congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society

  4. A Case Report of Cushing's Disease Presenting as Hair Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkowitz, Emily G; Cossman, Jack P; Fournier, John B

    2017-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a rare endocrine disorder that comprises a large group of signs and symptoms resulting from chronic exposure to excess corticosteroids. Most cases of Cushing's syndrome are due to increased adrenocorticotropic hormone production from a pituitary adenoma, which is referred to as Cushing's disease. Most of the signs and symptoms are nonspecific and common in the general population, making a diagnosis often challenging. However, several dermatological manifestations, such as fragile skin, easy bruising, and reddish purple striae, are more discriminatory. Because uncontrolled Cushing's syndrome of any etiology is associated with substantial morbidity, including increased cardiovascular disease and mortality, it is important to make an early diagnosis. Unfortunately, median delays of 2 years to diagnosis have been reported. We report a case of a woman who had multiple dermatological findings, including facial plethora, easy bruising, violaceous striae, hirsutism, and acne, the latter 2 signs reflecting androgen excess. Of interest, our patient presented with a chief complaint of hair loss, a common complaint in the general population that occurs with a greater frequency in patients with Cushing's disease and is attributed to androgenetic alopecia, but it is rarely the presenting symptom.

  5. The Treatment of Cushing's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leo, Monica; Cozzolino, Alessia; Colao, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Cushing's disease (CD), or pituitary-dependent Cushing's syndrome, is a severe endocrine disease caused by a corticotroph pituitary tumor and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The first-line treatment for CD is pituitary surgery, which is followed by disease remission in around 78% and relapse in around 13% of patients during the 10-year period after surgery, so that nearly one third of patients experience in the long-term a failure of surgery and require an additional second-line treatment. Patients with persistent or recurrent CD require additional treatments, including pituitary radiotherapy, adrenal surgery, and/or medical therapy. Pituitary radiotherapy is effective in controlling cortisol excess in a large percentage of patients, but it is associated with a considerable risk of hypopituitarism. Adrenal surgery is followed by a rapid and definitive control of cortisol excess in nearly all patients, but it induces adrenal insufficiency. Medical therapy has recently acquired a more important role compared to the past, due to the recent employment of novel compounds able to control cortisol secretion or action. Currently, medical therapy is used as a presurgical treatment, particularly for severe disease; or as postsurgical treatment, in cases of failure or incomplete surgical tumor resection; or as bridging therapy before, during, and after radiotherapy while waiting for disease control; or, in selected cases, as primary therapy, mainly when surgery is not an option. The adrenal-directed drug ketoconazole is the most commonly used drug, mainly because of its rapid action, whereas the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, mifepristone, is highly effective in controlling clinical comorbidities, mainly glucose intolerance, thus being a useful treatment for CD when it is associated with diabetes mellitus. Pituitary-directed drugs have the advantage of acting at the site responsible for CD, the pituitary tumor. Among this group of drugs, the dopamine

  6. GH response to GHRH combined with pyridostigmine or arginine in different conditions of low somatotrope secretion in adulthood: obesity and Cushing's syndrome in comparison with hypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procopio, M; Maccario, M; Savio, P; Valetto, M R; Aimaretti, G; Grottoli, S; Oleandri, S E; Baffoni, C; Tassone, F; Arvat, E; Camanni, F; Ghigo, E

    1999-01-01

    Diagnosing GH deficiency in adults is difficult due to the age-related variations of GH/IGF-I axis and the influence of nutrition. Nowadays, GH replacement is allowed for patients with GH peak to provocative stimuli nutrition status. We aimed to verify the GH response to GHRH (1 mg/kg i.v.) combined with pyridostigmine (PD, 120 mg p.o.) or arginine (ARG, 0.5 g/kg i.v.), in 26 hypopituitaric patients (GHD), in 11 obese women (OB), in 8 women with Cushing's syndrome (CS), and in 72 control subjects (NS). IGF-I levels in GHD were lower than those in OB (p < 0.01) and in CS (p < 0.01) which, in turn, were lower to those in NS (p < 0.02). In NS, the GH peak responses to GHRH + PD and GHRH + ARG were similar and the minimum normal GH peak was 16.5 mg/L. GHD had GH responses similar, lower than those in NS (p < 0.01) and always below the normal limit. However, only 12/20 and 8/14 had peaks < 3 micrograms/L; conventionally, below this limit severe GH deficiency is shown and rhGH replacement is allowed. In OB, the GH responses to GHRH + PD and GHRH + ARG were similar, lower (p < 0.01) and higher (p < 0.01) than those in NS and GHD, respectively. Six out of 11 OB had GH peaks below the normal limits but nobody < 3 micrograms/L. In CS, the GH response to GHRH + PD was lower than that to GHRH + ARG (p < 0.01); both these responses were lower than those in NS (p < 0.01) and even in OB (p < 0.01) but higher than those in GHD (p < 0.01). All and 7/8 CS had GH peaks lower than normal limits after PD + GHRH and ARG + GHRH, respectively while 6/8 showed GH peak < 3 micrograms/L after PD + GHRH but only 1 after ARG + GHRH. Present data demonstrate that the maximal somatotrope secretory capacity is reduced in OB and even more in CS. From a diagnostic point of view, PD + GHRH and ARG + GHRH tests distinguish OB from severe GHD. As hypercortisolism impairs the activity of cholinesterase inhibitors, only ARG + GHRH, but not PD + GHRH is a reliable test to explore the maximal somatotrope

  7. Efficacy of dexamethasone suppression test during the diagnosis of primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease in Chinese adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shi; Li, Ran; Lu, Lin; Duan, Lian; Zhang, Xuebin; Tong, Anli; Pan, Hui; Zhu, Huijuan; Lu, Zhaolin

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the cut-off value of the ratio of 24 h urinary free cortisol (24 h UFC) levels post-dexamethasone to prior-dexamethasone in dexamethasone suppression test (DST) during the diagnosis of primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease in Chinese adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing syndrome. Retrospective study. The patients diagnosed with primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD, n = 25), bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (BMAH, n = 27), and adrenocortical adenoma (ADA, n = 84) were admitted to the Peking Union Medical College Hospital from 2001 to 2016. Serum cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and 24 h UFC were measured before and after low-dose dexamethasone suppression test (LDDST) and high-dose dexamethasone suppression test (HDDST). After LDDST and HDDST, 24 h UFC elevated in patients with PPNAD (paired t-test, P = 0.007 and P = 0.001), while it remained unchanged in the BMAH group (paired t-test, P = 0.471 and P = 0.414) and decreased in the ADA group (paired t-test, P = 0.002 and P = 0.004). The 24 h UFC level after LDDST was higher in PPNAD and BMAH as compared to ADA (P < 0.017), while no significant difference was observed between PPNAD and BMAH. After HDDST, 24 h UFC was higher in patients with PPNAD as compared to that of ADA and BMAH (P < 0.017). The cut-off value of 24 h UFC (Post-L-Dex)/(Pre-L-Dex) was 1.16 with 64.0% sensitivity and 77.9% specificity, and the cut-off value of 24 h UFC (Post-H-Dex)/(Pre-H-Dex) was 1.08 with 84.0% sensitivity and 75.6% specificity. The ratio of post-dexamethasone to prior-dexamethasone had a unique advantage in distinguishing PPNAD from BMAH and ADA.

  8. Strongyloides stercoralis Hyperinfection Syndrome Presenting as Severe, Recurrent Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Leading to a Diagnosis of Cushing Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Brittany; Chi, Nai-Wen; Hansen, Lawrence A.; Lee, Roland R.; U, Hoi-Sang; Savides, Thomas J.; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old male immigrant from Ethiopia presented for consultation after 3 years of hematochezia/melena requiring > 25 units of blood transfusions. Physical examination revealed severe proximal muscle wasting and weakness, central obesity, proptosis, and abdominal striae, accompanied by eosinophilia, elevated hemoglobin A1c, elevated 24-hour urinary cortisol, lack of suppression of 8 am cortisol levels by 1 mg dexamethasone, and inappropriately elevated random adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level. Histopathological examination of gastrointestinal biopsies showed large numbers of Strongyloides stercoralis, indicating Strongyloides hyperinfection. Treatment with 2 days of ivermectin led to resolution of gastrointestinal bleeding. This syndrome was due to chronic immunosuppression from a pituitary ACTH (corticotroph) microadenoma, of which resection led to gradual normalization of urine cortisol, improved glycemic control, resolution of eosinophilia, and no recurrence of infection. PMID:26195463

  9. Osteoporosis in Сhildren with Itsenko — Cushing Disease: Etiology, Pathogenesis, Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Ryznychuk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The review describes the etiology, pathogenetic mechanisms of osteoporosis in children with Itsenko — Cushing syndrome. The new methods for the diagnosis of osteoporosis in children were also analyzed.

  10. Unmasking sarcoidosis following surgery for Cushing disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diernaes, Jon E F; Bygum, Anette; Poulsen, Per L

    2016-01-01

    We present a patient with Cushing disease apparently suppressing sarcoidosis, which was unmasked following surgical resection of a pituitary adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-producing microadenoma. Case report and a short review of the literature published in this area. A 46-year-old Caucasian woman presented with symptoms of hypercortisolism such as progressive weight gain, Cushingoid appearance, proximal myopathy, easy bruising, and amenorrhea. Blood testing including inferior petrosal sinus sampling uncovered an ACTH-producing microadenoma in the right aspect of the anterior pituitary gland for which the patient underwent transphenoidal resection. Maintenance corticosteroid therapy was implemented, and the signs and symptoms of Cushing disease began to resolve. Three months after surgery, multiple erythematous painful nodules developed on the patient's arms. Erythema nodosum (EN) was diagnosed clinically and a suspicion of underlying sarcoidosis was substantiated by lung imaging and elevated plasma interleukin (IL)-2 receptor. One month later, the lesions spontaneously resolved without therapy other than maintenance glucocorticoid replacement. Physicians should be aware that patients undergoing successful treatment of Cushing syndrome may have a flare-up or emergence of a corticosteroid-responsive disease.

  11. Cushing's disease; inferior petrosal sinus venography and samplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Tae Sub; Suh, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Ik; Lee, Hyun Chul; Huh, Kap Bum; Kim, Young Soo; Chung, Sang Sup

    1991-01-01

    Hypersecretion of ACTH in patients with Cushing's syndrome originates from either a pituitary tumor (Cushing's disease) or an ectopic ACTH-secreting tumor. These 2 entities may be clinically indistinguishable, and additional difficulty arise because pituitary microadenomas may be radiologically occult. Recently, bilateral selective venous sampling from the inferior petrosal sinuses became the procedure of choice for confirming a false negative study of a combined hormonal test and pituitary ACTH hypersecretion. We performed selective venous catheterization and sampling for ACTH. The central location of the lesion was detected in 1 case (intersinus gradient = 1.1 : 1), and the remaining 5 cases revealed lateralization of the lesions (intersinus gradient = 3.7 - 20.1 : 1), which correlated well with transsphenoidal microadenomectomies in all the cases. We concluded that selective venous ACTH sampling from the inferior petroal sinus is a reliable and useful aid in the diagnosis of Cushing's disease when standard clinical and biochemical studies are inconclusive

  12. Harvey Cushing Treated the First Known Patient With Carney Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Cynthia J; Stratakis, Constantine A; Faucz, Fabio Rueda; London, Edra; Stathopoulou, Chaido; Allgauer, Michael; Quezado, Martha; Dagradi, Terry; Spencer, Dennis D; Lodish, Maya

    2017-10-01

    Carney complex (CNC) is a syndrome characterized by hyperplasia of endocrine organs and may present with clinical features of Cushing syndrome and acromegaly due to functional adrenal and pituitary gland tumors. CNC has been linked to mutations in the regulatory subunit of protein kinase A type I-alpha ( PRKAR1A ) gene. Tissue samples were taken from the hypothalamus or thalamus or tumors of patients with pituitary adenomas seen and operated on by neurosurgeon Harvey Cushing between 1913 and 1932. Following DNA extraction, sequencing for genes of interest was attempted, including PRKAR1A , AIP , USP8 , GNAS1 , and GPR101 , to explore the possibility that these mutations associated with acromegaly, CNC, and Cushing syndrome have been conserved over time. We report a patient described by Dr. Cushing in 1914 with a clinical presentation and postmortem findings suggestive of CNC. Genetic sequencing of the hypothalamus and pituitary adenoma revealed a germline heterozygous p.Arg74His mutation in the PRKAR1A gene, a codon previously described as mutated in CNC, but with a novel amino acid change. This patient is, to our knowledge, the first molecularly confirmed individual with CNC. This case demonstrates the power of modern genetics in studying archived tissues and the importance of recording detailed clinical notes in the diagnosis of disease.

  13. Hipertensión secundaria a Síndrome de Cushing

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez del Río, Francisco Javier; Bravo Morales, Macarena; Portillo Sánchez, José; Martín Dávila, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    En un pequeño grupo de hipertensos puede identificarse una causa, responsable del aumento de las cifras de presión arterial, como el Síndrome de Cushing, que supone el 0,2-0,6% de los casos. Presentamos el caso de un paciente diagnosticado de hipertensión secundaria a Síndrome de Cushing. In a small group of hypertensive patients a cause of elevated blood pressure levels can be identified, such as Cushing syndrome, which corresponds to 0.2-0.6% of cases. We present the case of a patient di...

  14. Recent developments in canine Cushing’s syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galac, S.

    Cushing’s syndrome or hypercortisolism is in most of the cases ACTH-dependent due to ACTH hypersecretion by a pituitary corticotroph adenoma, however, the ectopic ACTH secretion has been now described in a dog as well. In the remaining cases, hypercortisolism is ACTH-independent and results from

  15. Treating Cushing's Disease in Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Updates Treating Cushing's Disease in Dogs Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... FDA Consumer Health Information Your 9-year old dog has been drinking a lot more lately and ...

  16. Estados de pseudo-Cushing

    OpenAIRE

    Romanholi, Daniella J.P.C.; Salgado, Luiz Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Síndromes de pseudo-Cushing são um grupo heterogêneo de doenças, incluindo alcoolismo, anorexia nervosa, obesidade visceral e depressão, que compartilham muitas das características clínicas e bioquímicas da síndrome de Cushing. Os mecanismos responsáveis para a gênese da síndrome de pseudo-Cushing são fracamente compreendidos. Tem sido sugerido que o hipercortisolismo da síndrome de pseudo-Cushing pode ser resultante do aumento da secreção do hormônio liberador de corticotrofina (CRH) hipotal...

  17. Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome in a case of duodenal neuroendocrine tumor presenting with liver metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Khare

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH syndrome is an uncommon disorder and comprises about 15% of all patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS. Duodenal carcinoids are rare, indolent tumors usually associated with a benign progression. We hereby report a rare case of CS resulting from ectopic ACTH secretion from a duodenal neuroendocrine tumor (NET presenting with liver metastasis. A 37-year-old female presented with abdominal discomfort and dyspepsia of 1-month duration. Ultrasound abdomen suggested a well-defined hypoechoic lesion in the left lobe of the liver, suggestive of neoplasia. On clinical examination, she had Cushingoid features and persistent hypokalemia. Midnight ACTH and cortisol levels were grossly elevated at 1027 pg/ml (n < 46 pg/ml and 87.56 μg/dl (n < 7.5 μg/ml, respectively. Both overnight and high-dose dexamethasone suppression test confirmed nonsuppressed cortisol levels - 86.04 and 84.42 μg/dl (n < 1.8 μg/ml, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging brain showed a structurally normal pituitary gland. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed hepatic lesion with bilateral adrenal enlargement. A diagnosis of ectopic ACTH-dependent CS was made. Intraoperatively, a duodenal lesion of 0.5 cm × 0.5 cm was identified alongside an 8 cm × 6 cm exophytic lesion in segment IV of the liver. Frozen section of the duodenal lesion was positive for NET. She underwent a Whipple's surgery, cholecystectomy, and left hepatic lobectomy. Postoperatively, she showed clinical and biochemical remission. Herewith, we report the third case of duodenal carcinoid tumor presenting as ectopic ACTH syndrome and the first with liver metastasis.

  18. Overnight Dexamethasone Suppression Test in the Diagnosis of Cushing's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Esfahanian

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Realizing the cause of Cushing's Syndrome (CS is one of the most challenging processes in clinical endocrinology. The long high dose dexamethasone suppression test (standard test is costly and need an extended inpatient stay. In this study we want to show the clinical utility of the overnight 8 mg dexamethasone suppression test (DST for differential diagnosis of CS in a referral center. Retrospectively from 2002-2005 we selected the patients of endocrinology ward in Imam hospital who were admitted with the diagnosis of Cushing syndrome and had 8 mg DST (modified test along with classic DST. In modified test a decrease in an 8 AM serum cortisol level of 50% or more is thought to indicate suppression and we compared the results of modified test with standard test. This test had been done on 42 patients: 10 male (23% and 32 female (76%. The mean age of patients was 31.39 (15-63, 32 with proven pituitary Cushing's disease, 7 with primary adrnal tumors and 3 with ectopic ACTH syndrome. The standard test according to 50% suppression of UFC had 90.62% sensitivity, and according to 90% suppression had 43.75% sensitivity. The sensitivity of this test was 71.85% for serum cortisol suppression. The modified test (8 mg overnight DST had 78% sensitivity. All of these tests had 100% specificity for the diagnosis of Cushing's disease. The positive predictive vale (PPV of all of these tests was 100%. The negative predictive value (NPV of modified test for the diagnosis of Cushing's disease was 58.82%. In standard test the NPV of serum cortisol was 52.6%, UFC 50% had 76.9% NPV and UFC 90% had 35.7% NPV. The results of serum cortisol suppression in modified test is better than standard test. Although 50% suppression of UFC in standard test had greater sensitivity than modified test, collecting of urine is difficult, time consuming and needing hospitalization, so we advice modified test that is much simpler and more convenient instead of standard test in the first

  19. Macroadenomas Causing Cushing’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydin K

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Kortikotrope Hypophysen-Makroadenome vs. Mikroadenome als Ursache des Morbus Cushing. Ziel: Kortikotrope Hypophysen- Makroadenome werden für eine geringe Zahl von Fällen des Cushing-Syndroms verantwortlich gemacht, man geht jedoch davon aus, dass ihre genaue Prävalenz unterschätzt wird. Des Weiteren fallen die klinischen und biochemischen Manifestationen kortikotroper Makro- und Mikroadenome sehr unterschiedlich aus und in bisherigen Studien wurde nur eine geringe Anzahl von Patienten eingeschlossen. In dieser Arbeit analysieren und vergleichen wir die klinischen Charakteristika und biochemischen Eigenschaften von Patienten mit kortikotropen Makro- und Mikroadenomen, die Morbus Cushing verursachen. Methoden: Wir schlossen 107 Patienten mit M. Cushing ein (67 Mikroadenome, 40 Makroadenome. Klinische Charakteristika, biochemische Analysen des Hyperkortisolismus, Ergebnisse des Hypophysen-Imaging, Behandlungsmodalitäten sowie Raten für Remission und Wiederauftreten wurden erfasst. Ergebnisse: Das Durchschnittsalter der Patienten lag bei 46,5 ± 11,4 Jahren für Makroadenome und 37,3 ± 12,1 Jahre für Mikroadenome (p 0,001. Die Geschlechterverteilung war bei den Makroadenompatienten gleich, während bei den Mikroadenompatienten ein Vorherrschen der Frauen offensichtlich war (p = 0,001. Verglichen mit den Makro- war die klinische Evidenz des Hyperkortisolismus bei den Mikroadenomen stärker ausgeprägt. Obwohl die Präsentation der klinischen Manifestationen unterschiedlich war, waren die biochemische Analyse des Hyperkortisolismus (inklusive Basalkortisol, ACTH, 24-Stunden-Harnkortisol-Levels und Ansprechen auf eine niedrig dosierte Dexamethason-Suppression zwischen den Gruppen ähnlich. Die Unterdrückbarkeit des Serumkortisols nach Gabe von hochdosiertem Dexamethason war für Makroadenome niedriger, erreichte aber keine Signifikanz (p = 0,074. Die Remissionsraten nach dem ersten hypophysenchirurgischen Eingriff (67,5 vs. 82,8 % sowie die

  20. Polikistik Over Sendromu Tanılı Hastaların Cushing Sendromu Açısından Taranması

    OpenAIRE

    Şahin, Serap Baydur; Sezgin, Hacer; Ayaz, Teslime; Gür, Emine Uslu; İlkkılıç, Kadir; Algün, Ekrem

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and Cushing's syndrome share several clinical features such as hirsutism, irregular menses, obesity, glucose intolerance and dyslipidemia. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Cushing's syndrome in patients who were admitted with the complaints of hirsutism and/or irregular menses and were diagnosed with PCOS. Material and Methods: One hundred nine patients with PCOS (aged 14-35 years) were included in the study. We ...

  1. Diabetes in Cushing Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazziotti, G; Formenti, A M; Frara, S; Maffezzoni, F; Doga, M; Giustina, A

    2017-05-01

    This review focuses on the pathophysiological and clinical aspects of diabetes mellitus occurring in patients with Cushing disease (CD). Insulin resistance and impairment in insulin secretion are both involved in the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid-induced diabetes. Correction of glucocorticoid excess does not always resolve abnormalities of glucose homeostasis, and correction of hyperglycaemia is specifically required. In fact, insulin resistance may persist even after correction of glucocorticoid excess and diabetes needs to be treated for long term. On the other hand, emerging drugs used in the treatment of CD, such as the novel somatostatin analog pasireotide, may have direct effects on glucose homeostasis regardless of control of cortisol excess. Diabetes mellitus is a frequent and early complication of CD with important diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic implications. Specifically, diagnosis of CD in patients with diabetes may be difficult due to potential misinterpretation of markers of cortisol hypersecretion. Moreover, diabetes mellitus is often difficult to be controlled in CD requiring a careful and dedicated therapeutic approach. Finally, the coexistence of diabetes may influence the therapeutic decision making in CD, since drugs used in this setting may variably influence glucose homeostasis regardless of control of hypercortisolism.

  2. Diagnostic usefulness of 3 tesla MRI of the brain for cushing disease in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Erina; Ozawa, Ayako; Matoba, Kaori; Motoki, Takanori; Tajima, Asako; Miyata, Ichiro; Ito, Junko; Inoshita, Naoko; Yamada, Syozo; Ida, Hiroyuki

    2011-10-01

    It is sometimes difficult to confirm the location of a microadenoma in Cushing disease. Recently, we experienced an 11-yr-old female case of Cushing disease with hyperprolactinemia. She was referred to our hospital because of decrease of height velocity with body weight gain. On admission, she had typical symptoms of Cushing syndrome. Although no pituitary microadenomas were detected on 1.5 Tesla MRI of the brain, endocrinological examinations including IPS and CS sampling were consistent with Cushing disease with hyperprolactinemia. Oral administration of methyrapone instead of neurosurgery was started after discharge, but subsequent 3 Tesla MRI of the brain clearly demonstrated a 3-mm less-enhanced lesion in the left side of the pituitary gland. Finally, transsphenoidal surgery was performed, and a 3.5-mm left-sided microadenoma was resected. Compared with 1.5 Tesla MRI, 3 Tesla MRI offers the advantage of a higher signal to noise ratio (SNR), which provides higher resolution and proper image quality. Therefore, 3 Tesla MRI is a very useful tool to localize microadenomas in Cushing disease in children as well as in adults. It will be the first choice of radiological examinations in suspected cases of Cushing disease.

  3. Health care resource use and costs among patients with cushing disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Brooke; Wu, Ning; Chen, Shih-Yin; Pulgar, Sonia; Biller, Beverly M K

    2011-01-01

    To assess health care costs associated with Cushing disease and to determine changes in overall and comorbidity-related costs after surgical treatment. In this retrospective cohort study, patients with Cushing disease were identified from insurance claims databases by International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes for Cushing syndrome (255.0) and either benign pituitary adenomas (227.3) or hypophysectomy (07.6×) between 2004 and 2008. Each patient with Cushing disease was age- and sex-matched with 4 patients with nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas and 10 population control subjects. Comorbid conditions and annual direct health care costs were assessed within each calendar year. Postoperative changes in health care costs and comorbidity-related costs were compared between patients presumed to be in remission and those with presumed persistent disease. Of 877 identified patients with Cushing disease, 79% were female and the average age was 43.4 years. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia were more common among patients with Cushing disease than in patients with nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas or in control patients (PCushing disease had significantly higher total health care costs (2008: $26 440 [Cushing disease] vs $13 708 [nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas] vs $5954 [population control], Pdisease-related costs with remission. A significant increase in postoperative health care costs was observed in those patients not in remission. Patients with Cushing disease had more comorbidities than patients with nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas or control patients and incurred significantly higher annual health care costs; these costs decreased after successful surgery and increased after unsuccessful surgery.

  4. Usefulness of composite methionine-positron emission tomography/3.0-tesla magnetic resonance imaging to detect the localization and extent of early-stage Cushing adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Hidetoshi; Abe, Takehiko; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2010-04-01

    Fifty to eighty percent of Cushing disease is diagnosed by typical endocrine responses. Recently, the number of diagnoses of Cushing disease without typical Cushing syndrome has been increasing; therefore, improving ways to determine the localization of the adenoma and making an early diagnosis is important. This study was undertaken to determine the present diagnostic accuracy for Cushing microadenoma and to compare the differences in diagnostic accuracy between MR imaging and PET/MR imaging. During the past 3 years the authors analyzed the diagnostic accuracy in a series of 35 patients with Cushing adenoma that was verified by surgical pituitary exploration. All 35 cases of Cushing disease, including 20 cases of "overt" and 15 cases of "preclinical" Cushing disease, were studied. Superconductive MR images (1.5 or 3.0 T) and composite images from FDG-PET or methionine (MET)-PET and 3.0-T MR imaging were compared with the localization of adenomas verified by surgery. The diagnostic accuracy of superconductive MR imaging for detecting the localization of Cushing microadenoma was only 40%. The causes of unsatisfactory results for superconductive MR imaging were false-negative results (10 cases), false-positive results (6 cases), and instances of double pituitary adenomas (3 cases). In contrast, the accuracy of microadenoma localization using MET-PET/3.0-T MR imaging was 100% and that of FDG-PET/3.0-T MR imaging was 73%. Moreover, the adenoma location was better delineated on MET-PET/MR images than on FDG-PET/MR images. There was no significant difference in maximum standard uptake value of adenomas evaluated by MET-PET between preclinical Cushing disease and overt Cushing disease. Composite MET-PET/3.0-T MR imaging is useful for the improvement of the delineation of Cushing microadenoma and offers high-quality detectability for early-stage Cushing adenoma.

  5. Major Harvey Cushing's difficulties with the British and American armies during World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Michael E

    2014-08-01

    This historical review explores Harvey Cushing's difficulties with both the British and American armies during his World War I service to definitively examine the rumor of his possible court martial. It also provides a further understanding of Cushing the man. While in France during World War I, Cushing was initially assigned to British hospital units. This service began in May 1917 and ended abruptly in May 1918 when the British cashiered him for repeated censorship violations. Returning to American command, he feared court martial. The army file on this matter (retrieved from the United States National Archives) indicates that US Army authorities recommended that Cushing be reprimanded and returned to the US for his violations. The army carried out neither recommendation, and no evidence exists that a court martial was considered. Cushing's army career and possible future academic life were protected by the actions of his surgical peers and Merritte Ireland, Chief Surgeon of the US Army in France. After this censorship episode, Cushing was made a neurosurgical consultant but was also sternly warned that further rule violations would not be tolerated by the US Army. Thereafter, despite the onset of a severe peripheral neuropathy, probably Guillian Barré's syndrome, Cushing was indefatigable in ministering to neurosurgical needs in the US sector in France. Cushing's repeated defying of censorship regulations reveals poor judgment plus an initial inability to be a "team player." The explanations he offered for his censorship violations showed an ability to bend the truth. Cushing's war journal is unclear as to exactly what transpired between him and the British and US armies. It also shows no recognition of the help he received from others who were instrumental in preventing his ignominious removal from service in France. Had that happened, his academic future and ability to train future neurosurgical leaders may have been seriously threatened. Cushing's foibles

  6. Sustained remission of Cushing's disease with mitotane and pituitary irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schteingart, D.E.; Tsao, H.S.; Taylor, C.I.; McKenzie, A.; Victoria, R.; Therrien, B.A.

    1980-01-01

    Low doses of mitotane were given orally to 36 patients with Cushing's disease, concurrently with or after pituitary cobalt irradiation. Clinical and biochemical remission occurred in 29. The response to treatment occurred early in 17 patients and late in 12. The different pattern of response to mitotane was not related to the dose given or to its serum level. Early biochemical indicators of adrenal suppression with mitotane were a sharp decrease in adrenal response to the infusion of ACTH and in plasma levels of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. Although mitotane was given together with pituitary irradiation, initial remission was due mainly to the adrenal effect of mitotane. Plasma ACTH levels were still elevated when cortisol had returned to normal. In seventeen of the 29 patients who responded to treatment drug therapy has been discontinued, and they remain in remission of Cushing's syndrome. Side-effects have been dose dependent, with anorexia, nausea, decreased memory, and gynecomastia in men being the commonest

  7. Cushing?s disease: a multidisciplinary overview of the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Buliman, A; Tataranu, LG; Paun, DL; Mirica, A; Dumitrache, C

    2016-01-01

    Cushing?s disease is considered a rare condition characterized by the hypersecretion of the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) due to a pituitary adenoma that ultimately causes endogenous hypercortisolism by stimulating the adrenal glands. The clinical signs suggesting Cushing?s disease, such as obesity, moon face, hirsutism, and facial plethora are already present on presentation. Endogenous hypercortisolism is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic manifestations,...

  8. Diagnosis of Cushing's disease in children: a challenge for the radiologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalifa, G.; Adamsbaum, C.; Carel, J.C.; Andre, C.; Bougneres, P.F.; Chaussain, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Cushing's disease is the most common cause of Cushing's syndrome in children and is almost always related to over secretion of ACTH by the pituitary gland. It is important to identify a secreting adenoma prior to surgery. Seven cases studied with MRI are reviewed. In five cases the MRI findings suggested adenoma. Three secreting adenomas were confirmed at surgery. One case was in fact a cyst of the pars intermedia, and nothing could be found in the last case. Two patients presented with apparently normal findings on MRI, which was confirmed. There is a close correlation between identifying an adenoma and the success of surgery. (orig.)

  9. The treatment of Cushing's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamberts, S.W.J.; Lange, S.A. de; Singh, R.; Fermin, H.; Klijn, J.G.M.; Jong, F.H. de; Birkenhaeger, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    This study compares the results of transsphenoidal operation in 11 consecutive patients with Cushing's disease with those obtained in 29 patients by unilateral adrenalectomy followed by external pituitary irradiation (4500 rad). It is concluded that transsphenoidal surgery is the treatment of choice but if no transient adrenal insufficiency develops after removal of the pituitary (micro)adenoma, then additional external pituitary irradiation seems suitable treatment. (Auth.)

  10. Cushing disease in a toddler: not all obese children are just fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Megan; Hoe, Francis

    2009-08-01

    Cushing disease is exceedingly rare in children, especially in those under the age of 2 years. This case report describes an 18-month-old female child who presented with morbid obesity, decreased linear growth, and reversal of developmental milestones. Her diagnosis was delayed; however, she was successfully treated by surgical excision of the microadenoma. This was followed by resolution of signs and symptoms of Cushing syndrome. Although the patient's hypertension resolved, linear growth improved and development began to progress, she is still developmentally delayed and now has hypopituitarism. Review of this case, as well as a handful of other cases of infantile Cushing disease in the literature, suggests that features such as hypertension and slowed linear growth, which are rare in nutritional causes of obesity in infants, can help identify this rare, but life-threatening, illness among an increasing number of overweight infants.

  11. Pituitary gland imaging in Cushing's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonneville, J.F.; Cattin, F.; Bonneville, F.; Schillo, F.; Jacquet, G.

    2003-01-01

    Specific MR techniques are r-required for optimal detection of adrenocorticotropic hormone secreting adenomas responsible for Cushing's disease. Adequate MR sequences, high resolution coronal T1 and T2 - weighted images, dynamic MR imaging, post-gadolinium delayed images, dose of gadolinium adjusted for each sequence can routinely demonstrate pituitary adenomas less than 3 mm in Cushing's disease. (authors)

  12. Hypoadrenia following adrenal venography in Cushing's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goth, M.; Szilagy, G.; Irsy, G.; Szabolcs, I.; Berentey, E.; Molnar, F.; Magyar, E.

    1984-01-01

    Three patients with Cushing's disease are reported. In two patients the hyperfunction of the adrenal glands creased following selective adrenal venography, moreover hypoadrenia has developed. In the third case necrosis following venography was proved by surgery and confirmed by histology. Regarding the therapeutic possibilities of Cushing's diesease the use of this diagnostic procedure is taken into consideration but not recommended. (orig.)

  13. Cushing's disease in the elderly patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritza Cardosa Samón

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cushing's disease arises from increased ACTH secretion from a pituitary tumor that stimulates the area fasciculata of the adrenal cortex and produces hypersecretion of glucocorticoids. Objectives: To explain the clinical and humoral manifestations of Cushing's disease in elderly adults. Methods: The article is a descriptive and retrospective study of a case report on a 62 year old patient that is admitted to our Center with manifestations of facial plethora and centripetal obesity. Onset was characterized by hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Definitive diagnosis was Cushing's disease from a macroadenoma with increased ACTH secretion.

  14. Cyclin E-Mediated Human Proopiomelanocortin Regulation as a Therapeutic Target for Cushing Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning-Ai; Araki, Takako; Cuevas-Ramos, Daniel; Hong, Jiang; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Tone, Yukiko; Tone, Masahide; Melmed, Shlomo

    2015-07-01

    /E2F1 signaling is a previously unappreciated molecular mechanism underlying neuroendocrine regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, providing a subcellular therapeutic target for small molecule cyclin-dependent kinase 2 inhibitors of pituitary ACTH-dependent hypercortisolism, ie, Cushing disease.

  15. Latest diagnostic approaches to determine the cause of ACTH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of a 50-year-old woman who was referred for the evaluation of possible ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome (CS) is described. The localisation of ... and facial plethora. On bone mineral density assessment she had ..... the source of EC, PET/CT using 68 Ga-DOTA-labelled octreotide analogues had the best ...

  16. Treatment of Cushing disease: overview and recent findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Mancini

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Tatiana Mancini1, Teresa Porcelli2, Andrea Giustina21Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, San Marino Hospital, San Marino, Republic of San Marino, 2Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Brescia, Brescia, ItalyAbstract: Endogenous Cushing syndrome is an endocrine disease caused by excessive secretion of adrenocorticotropin hormone in approximately 80% of cases, usually by a pituitary corticotroph adenoma (Cushing disease [CD]. It is a heterogeneous disorder requiring a multidisciplinary and individualized approach to patient management. The goals of treatment of CD include the reversal of clinical features, the normalization of biochemical changes with minimal morbidity, and long-term control without recurrence. Generally, the treatment of choice is the surgical removal of the pituitary tumor by transsphenoidal approach, performed by an experienced surgeon. Considering the high recurrence rate, other treatments should be considered. Second-line treatments include more radical surgery, radiation therapy, medical therapy, and bilateral adrenalectomy. Drug treatment has been targeted at the hypothalamic or pituitary level, at the adrenal gland, and also at the glucocorticoid receptor level. Frequently, medical therapy is performed before surgery to reduce the complications of the procedure, reducing the effects of severe hypercortisolism. Commonly, in patients in whom surgery has failed, medical management is often essential to reduce or normalize the hypercortisolemia, and should be attempted before bilateral adrenalectomy is considered. Medical therapy can be also useful in patients with CD while waiting for pituitary radiotherapy to take effect, which can take up to 10 years or more. So far, results of medical treatment of CD have not been particularly relevant; however, newer tools promise to change this scenario. The aim of this review is to analyze the results and experiences with old and new medical

  17. Cushing syndrome due to adrenal tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: Backache, which occurs with routine activities Bone pain or tenderness Collection of fat between the shoulders and above the collar bone Rib and spine fractures caused by thinning of the bones Weak muscles, ...

  18. Neuropsychiatric and cardiometabolic comorbidities in patients with previously diagnosed Cushing's disease: a longitudinal observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Dimopoulou, C; Geraedts, V; Stalla, G K; Sievers, C

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Only few studies have systematically investigated neuropsychiatric aspects in patients with Cushing's disease (CD). Pain syndromes have been described in patients with pituitary adenomas, but so far no systematical investigation has been conducted in patients with CD. Additionally, CD has an association with cardiometabolic comorbidities which ultimately leads to increased morbidity and mortality. Long-term treatment of the hypercortisolic state cannot prevent the persistence of...

  19. Cabergoline therapy for Cushing disease throughout pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Irene; Ehsanipoor, Robert M

    2013-08-01

    Cushing disease during pregnancy is rare and is associated with significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Transsphenoidal pituitary surgery is the first-line therapy; however, in cases of failed surgery or in patients who are not surgical candidates, medical therapy has been used to control symptoms. A 29-year-old woman with Cushing disease and a noncurative transsphenoidal pituitary surgery was successfully treated with cabergoline, a dopamine agonist. After approximately 1 year of therapy, she became pregnant. She was maintained on high-dose cabergoline throughout her pregnancy and had an uncomplicated antenatal course. She went into spontaneous labor at 38 weeks of gestation and delivered a healthy female neonate. Cabergoline can be used to manage Cushing disease successfully during pregnancy with an opportunity for a favorable outcome.

  20. Subtle cognitive impairments in patients with long-term cure of Cushing's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemensma, Jitske; Kokshoorn, Nieke E.; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Keijser, Bart-Jan S. A.; Wassenaar, Moniek J. E.; Middelkoop, Huub A. M.; Pereira, Alberto M.; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    Active Cushing's disease is associated with cognitive impairments. We hypothesized that previous hypercortisolism in patients with Cushing's disease results in irreversible impairments in cognitive functioning. Therefore, our aim was to assess cognitive functioning after long-term cure of Cushing's

  1. Cushing Disease in a patient with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasturi, Kannan; Fernandes, Lucas; Quezado, Martha; Eid, Mary; Marcus, Leigh; Chittiboina, Prashant; Rappaport, Mark; Stratakis, Constantine A; Widemann, Brigitte; Lodish, Maya

    2017-06-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN2B) is a rare autosomal-dominant cancer syndrome characterized in part by metastatic medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) and pheochromocytoma. Cushing disease is a rare cause of endogenous hypercortisolism in children. We describe a 21-year-old African-American male who was diagnosed at age 10 with an ACTH-secreting pituitary microadenoma. At age 16 he developed medullary thyroid cancer and was found to have multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B with the characteristic M918T mutation of the RET proto-oncogene. Following thyroidectomy, he was initiated on Vandetanib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and has since had stable disease over the last 5 years. Our patient is the first individual with MEN2B to be described with Cushing disease. The RET oncogene may play a role in pituitary tumorigenesis; alternatively, the coexistence of these two entities may represent an extremely rare coincidence.

  2. Cushing's disease: diagnostic evaluation, therapeutics and prognostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, M.A.A.; Jugue, S.M.; Moura, O.M.D.; Gross, K.; Halpern, A.; Nicolau, W.; Liberman, B.; Bloise, W.; Mendonca, B.; Cabral, N.D.; Marino Junior, R.; Wajchenberg, B.L.

    1992-01-01

    Aspects as clinical, diagnosis, laboratory tests and radiological evaluations concerning Cushing's disease are analysed in 56 patients. Several options of non medicamental therapy are presented. The relationship between preoperative data (hormonal and radiological information), postoperative findings and hypophyseal adenomectomy is discussed. (M.A.C.)

  3. Medical treatment of Cushing disease: new targets, new hope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleseriu, Maria

    2015-03-01

    This article provides an update on current medical therapies for the treatment of Cushing disease. This information will be of value in determining patients' suitability for certain medical treatments. An approach of combining drugs from the same or different classes could potentially increase the number of patients in whom Cushing can be controlled while minimizing adverse effects, although larger studies are needed. Successful clinical management of patients with Cushing disease remains a challenge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Syndromes that Link the Endocrine System and Genitourinary Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özlük, Yasemin; Kılıçaslan, Işın

    2015-01-01

    The endocrine system and genitourinary tract unite in various syndromes. Genitourinary malignancies may cause paraneoplastic endocrine syndromes by secreting hormonal substances. These entities include Cushing`s syndrome, hypercalcemia, hyperglycemia, polycythemia, hypertension, and inappropriate ADH or HCG production. The most important syndromic scenarios that links these two systems are hereditary renal cancer syndromes with specific genotype/phenotype correlation. There are also some very rare entities in which endocrine and genitourinary systems are involved such as Carney complex, congenital adrenal hyperplasia and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. We will review all the syndromes regarding manifestations present in endocrine and genitourinary organs.

  5. Dermatofitose por Tricophyton rubrum como infecção oportunista em pacientes com doença de Cushing Dermatophytosis caused by Tricophyton rubrum as an opportunistic infection in patients with Cushing disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isy Peixoto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O dermatófito Trichophyton rubrum é um agente comum nas micoses superficiais, podendo apresentar lesões extensas pauci-inflamatórias de evolução crônica, especialmente em imunocomprometidos. O hipercortisolismo, na síndrome de Cushing, aumenta o risco de infecções, resultado do efeito imunossupressor dos glicocorticóides. Os casos relatados apresentam duas formas distintas de dermatofitose, em pacientes com doença de Cushing, causadas por Tricophyton rubrum e posterior remissão após normalização da cortisolemia.Trichophyton rubrum is a common agent found in superficial mycoses, which present ample nonin?ammatory lesions, with chronic evolution, especially in immunocompromised patients. The hypercortisolism in Cushing's syndrome increases the risk of infections as a result of the immunosuppressive effect of glucocorticoids. The reported cases here refer to two different types of dermatophytosis caused by Trichophyton rubrum in patients with Cushing's disease, resistant to antifungal treatment. The disease remitted after the levels of cortisol went back to normal.

  6. Pasireotid: Eine neue Therapieoption bei Morbus Cushing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luger A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Im Behandlungsalgorithmus des Morbus Cushing war bisher keine zugelassene pharmakologische Behandlungsmöglichkeit verfügbar. Mit dem Multirezeptor-Somatostatinanalogon Pasireotid steht nun mit der im April 2012 erfolgten Zulassung die erste, spezifisch für die Therapie dieses Krankheitsbildes entwickelte Substanz zur Verfügung. Die Studienevidenz belegt eine schnelle und nachhaltige Reduktion der ACTH- und Kortisolproduktion mit klinischer Besserung bei einem Großteil der Patienten.

  7. Pituitary Apoplexy due to the Diagnostic Test in a Cushing"s Disease Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzu, Fatih; Unal, Mustafa; Gul, Sanser; Bayraktaroglu, Taner

    2018-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a medical condition that needs urgent diagnosis and treatment. It may occur spontaneously or may be precipitated by a variety of reasons including dynamic endocrine tests. Although pituitary apoplexy is usually seen in nonfunctional pituitary adenoma, it can also be seen in ACTH secreting macroadenomas. ACTH secreting adenomas present usually as microadenomas and in these patients apoplexy is rarely seen. In this paper we present a 30-year-old male patient with a history of Cushing"s disease who suffered from pituitary apoplexy after the 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test. He underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery and his symptoms and signs were significantly improved.

  8. Computed tomography of adrenal Cushing's adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takayuki

    1990-01-01

    CT findings of 22 patients with surgically confirmed adrenal Cushing's adenomas were compared with pathologic findings. The cut surfaces of the adenomas showed mixture of yellow and brown areas in various proportions and were classified into three patterns; speckled brown areas in yellow background, geometrically brown areas in yellow background, totally brown or black surface. The maximum diameters of the cut surfaces were measured. The CT appearances of Cushing's adenomas after intravenous contrast administration have various patterns of enhancement and classified into three patterns; speckled, geometrical, and homoenous. The maximum diameters of the adenomas in CT images were also measured. Correlation between the CT and gross appearances of the specimens showed that while brown areas in adenomas were strongly enhanced, yellow areas were poorly enhanced. Histologically, brown areas in adenomas consist of compact-like cells with rich intercellular space and yellow areas consist of clear-like cells with poor intercellular space. The patterns of contrast enhancement some to depend on the cell types of adenomas. Difference in the intercellular space between compact and clear-like cells may have altered the patterns of contrast enhancement. The study also revealed that predominantly brownish adenomas were smaller in size than predominantly yellowish ones. As compact-like cells which make up the brown areas in Cushing's adenoma are thought to be more active in producing and secreting steroid hormones than clear-like cells, this result suggests that clinical symptoms may appear earlier in predominantly brownish adenomas than in predominantly yellowish ones. (author)

  9. Harvey Cushing's ghosts: death and hauntings in modern medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Paul

    2011-06-01

    The passing of Yale School of Medicine's 2010 Bicentennial occasions a moment of reflecting on the past, present, and future of medical education and research at Yale and beyond. Last June, a ribbon-cutting ceremony inaugurated the opening of the Cushing Center in the Cushing-Whitney Medical Library. Named after Harvey Cushing, an early 20th-century neurosurgeon and former Yale College alum, the dual education/exhibition space now houses hundreds of gross brain specimens constituting the Cushing Tumor Registry. Originally a personal collection, Cushing donated his numerous medical specimens, photographs, and other medical relics from his deathbed, relinquishing the brains to Yale only under the condition that a suitable space be erected to preserve the many specimens. Some 70 years later and after nearly being destroyed, Cushing's wish is fully realized: The once desiccated, hidden brains have been painstakingly restored and are now on view in the Cushing Center. The brains express Cushing's singular and spectral worldview as a surgeon, artist, athlete, soldier, book collector, and historian.

  10. Computerized tomography of adrenal glands in the investigation of Cushing's syn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abucham Filho, J.; Albertotti, C.; Kater, C.E.; Vieira, J.G.H.; Chacra, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Computerized tomography of the adrenal glands was performed in 10 patients with Cushing's syndrome using a G.E. 8800 CT/T Body Scanner. The tomographic findings of unilateral adrenal masses in 4 patients were confirmed by surgery. In the remaining 6 patients, computerized tomography did not identify any masses, and both glands were well visualized and showed normal shape. In these patients, measurement of the adrenal glands revealed both normal (n=1) and enlarged glands (n=5). The findings of adrenalectomy (n=4) or transphenoidal surgery and follow-up (n=2) established the diagnosis of adrenal phyperplasia in all patients. (Author) [pt

  11. Single-Session CT-Guided Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Bilateral Adrenal Gland Hyperplasia Due to Ectopic ACTH Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, Asha; Shyn, Paul B.; Vivian, Mark A.; Ng, Ju-Mei; Tuncali, Kemal; Lorch, Jorchen H.; Zaheer, Sarah N.; Gordon, Michael S.; Silverman, Stuart G.

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral adrenalectomy is currently the only available treatment for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent Cushing’s syndrome (ectopic ACTH syndrome) that is refractory to pharmacologic therapy. We describe two patients with refractory ectopic ACTH syndrome who were treated with CT-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of both hyperplastic adrenal glands in a single session: One was not a surgical candidate, and the other had undergone unsuccessful surgery. Following the procedure, both patients achieved substantial decreases in serum cortisol, symptomatic improvement, and decreased anti-hypertensive medication requirements

  12. Single-Session CT-Guided Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Bilateral Adrenal Gland Hyperplasia Due to Ectopic ACTH Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarma, Asha, E-mail: ashasarma@gmail.com; Shyn, Paul B., E-mail: pshyn@partners.org [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States); Vivian, Mark A. [University of Manitoba, Department of Radiology (Canada); Ng, Ju-Mei [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology (United States); Tuncali, Kemal [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States); Lorch, Jorchen H. [Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine (United States); Zaheer, Sarah N.; Gordon, Michael S. [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Department of Endocrinology (United States); Silverman, Stuart G. [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Bilateral adrenalectomy is currently the only available treatment for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent Cushing’s syndrome (ectopic ACTH syndrome) that is refractory to pharmacologic therapy. We describe two patients with refractory ectopic ACTH syndrome who were treated with CT-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of both hyperplastic adrenal glands in a single session: One was not a surgical candidate, and the other had undergone unsuccessful surgery. Following the procedure, both patients achieved substantial decreases in serum cortisol, symptomatic improvement, and decreased anti-hypertensive medication requirements.

  13. Pituitary gland imaging in Cushing's disease; IRM - Maladie de Cushing. L'imagerie hypophysaire dans la maladie de Cushing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonneville, J.F.; Cattin, F.; Bonneville, F.; Schillo, F.; Jacquet, G. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 25 - Besancon (France)

    2003-02-01

    Specific MR techniques are r-required for optimal detection of adrenocorticotropic hormone secreting adenomas responsible for Cushing's disease. Adequate MR sequences, high resolution coronal T1 and T2 - weighted images, dynamic MR imaging, post-gadolinium delayed images, dose of gadolinium adjusted for each sequence can routinely demonstrate pituitary adenomas less than 3 mm in Cushing's disease. (authors)

  14. A 7-month-old infant with cushing's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, R.; Hamid, M.H.; Sarwar, M.; Butt, T.A.; Qureshi, A.; Malik, N.

    2013-01-01

    Cushings disease in children is not rare but in infants it is quite rare and an important medical condition needing proper line of investigations and management options. Craniopharyngioma as a cause of Cushings disease is well reported and practical inference of the condition is of clinical importance. Craniopharyngioma generally affects children at 5 - 10 years of age and is rarely seen in infancy. It usually manifests as endocrinological deficits such as short stature, delayed puberty, and obesity. We report the case of a 7 months old infant who presented with obesity and Cushing disease associated with craniopharyngioma. (author)

  15. ACTH-Secreting tumor of cecum. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N S Kuznetsov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic hormonesecreting of cecum are rare. We report the case of a 52yearold woman with a typical clin ical picture of Cushing disease. Diagnostic tests confirmed ACTH dependent Cushing’s syndrome, which is caused by neuroendocrine tumor of the cecum. Due to the rarity of the disease, we believe it appropriate to share our experience of this group of patients.

  16. Paradoxical response to dexamethasone and spontaneous hypocortisolism in Cushing's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lila, Anurag R; Sarathi, Vijaya; Bandgar, Tushar R; Shah, Nalini S

    2013-01-01

    Paradoxical response to dexamethasone and spontaneous development of hypocortisolism are rare features of Cushing's disease. We report a 13-year-old boy with Cushing's disease owing to a pituitary macroadenoma. On initial evaluation, he had partial suppression of serum cortisol by dexamethasone. He developed transient hypocortisolism after first adenomectomy, but the disease recurred after 1 year. Repeat evaluation showed recurrent hypercortisolism and paradoxical response to dexamethasone. H...

  17. POSTSURGICAL RECURRENT CUSHING DISEASE: CLINICAL BENEFIT OF EARLY INTERVENTION IN PATIENTS WITH NORMAL URINARY FREE CORTISOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Ty B; Javorsky, Bradley R; Findling, James W

    2016-10-01

    To assess the performance of biochemical markers in the detection of recurrent Cushing disease (CD), as well as the potential benefit of early intervention in recurrent CD patients with elevated late-night salivary cortisol (LNSC) and normal urinary free cortisol (UFC). The design was a single-center, retrospective chart review. Patients treated by the authors from 2008-2013 were included. Recurrence was defined by postsurgical remission of CD with subsequent abnormal LNSC, UFC, or dexamethasone suppression test (DST). We identified 15 patients with postsurgical recurrent CD after initial remission; all but one underwent testing with LNSC, DST, and UFC. Although 12 of 15 patients had normal UFC at time of recurrence, DST was abnormal in 11 of 15, and all 14 patients with LNSC results had ≥1 elevated measurement. Nine patients (7 with normal UFC) showed radiologic evidence of a pituitary tumor at time of recurrence. Among the 14 patients with available follow-up data, 12 have demonstrated significant improvement since receiving treatment. Five patients underwent repeat pituitary surgery and 4 achieved clinical and biochemical remission. Eight patients received mifepristone or cabergoline, and 6 showed clinical and/or biochemical improvement. Three patients (2 with prior mifepristone) underwent bilateral adrenalectomy and 2 demonstrated significant clinical improvements. LNSC is more sensitive than UFC or DST for detection of CD recurrence. Prompt intervention when LNSC is elevated, despite normal UFC, may yield significant clinical benefit for many patients with CD. Early treatment for patients with recurrent CD should be prospectively evaluated, utilizing LNSC elevation as an early biochemical marker. ACTH = adrenocorticotropic hormone CD = Cushing disease CS = Cushing syndrome CV = coefficient of variation DST = dexamethasone suppression test IPSS = inferior petrosal sinus sampling LNSC = late-night salivary cortisol QoL = quality of life TSS = transsphenoidal

  18. BIOCHEMICAL CONTROL DURING LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP OF 230 ADULT PATIENTS WITH CUSHING DISEASE: A MULTICENTER RETROSPECTIVE STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geer, Eliza B; Shafiq, Ismat; Gordon, Murray B; Bonert, Vivien; Ayala, Alejandro; Swerdloff, Ronald S; Katznelson, Laurence; Lalazar, Yelena; Manuylova, Ekaterina; Pulaski-Liebert, Karen J; Carmichael, John D; Hannoush, Zeina; Surampudi, Vijaya; Broder, Michael S; Cherepanov, Dasha; Eagan, Marianne; Lee, Jackie; Said, Qayyim; Neary, Maureen P; Biller, Beverly M K

    2017-08-01

    Cushing disease (CD) results from excessive exposure to glucocorticoids caused by an adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting pituitary tumor. Inadequately treated CD is associated with significant morbidity and elevated mortality. Multicenter data on CD patients treated in routine clinical practice are needed to assess treatment outcomes in this rare disorder. The study purpose was to describe the burden of illness and treatment outcomes for CD patients. Eight pituitary centers in four U.S. regions participated in this multicenter retrospective chart review study. Subjects were CD patients diagnosed at ≥18 years of age within the past 20 years. Descriptive statistical analyses were conducted to examine presenting signs, symptoms, comorbidities, and treatment outcomes. Of 230 patients, 79% were female (median age at diagnosis, 39 years; range, 18 to 78 years). Length of follow-up was 0 to 27.5 years (median, 1.9 years). Pituitary adenomas were 0 to 51 mm. The most common presenting comorbidities included hypertension (67.3%), polycystic ovary syndrome (43.5%), and hyperlipidemia (41.5%). Biochemical control was achieved with initial pituitary surgery in 41.4% patients (91 of 220), not achieved in 50.0% of patients (110 of 220), and undetermined in 8.6% of patients (19 of 220). At the end of follow-up, control had been achieved with a variety of treatment methods in 49.1% of patients (110 of 224), not achieved in 29.9% of patients (67 of 224), and undetermined in 21.0% of patients (47 of 224). Despite multiple treatments, at the end of follow-up, biochemical control was still not achieved in up to 30% of patients. These multicenter data demonstrate that in routine clinical practice, initial and long-term control is not achieved in a substantial number of patients with CD. BLA = bilateral adrenalectomy CD = Cushing disease CS = Cushing syndrome eCRF = electronic case report form MRI = magnetic resonance imaging PCOS = polycystic ovary syndrome.

  19. Cortisol, obesity and the metabolic syndrome: A cross-sectional study of obese subjects and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham, SB; Rubino, D; Sinaii, N; Ramsey, S; Nieman, LK

    2013-01-01

    Circulating cortisol and psychosocial stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity and metabolic syndrome. To evaluate these relationships, we performed a cross-sectional study of 369 overweight and obese subjects and 60 healthy volunteers and reviewed the previous literature. Overweight and obese subjects had at least two other features of Cushing?s syndrome. They underwent measurements representing cortisol dynamics (24h urine cortisol excretion (UFC), bedtime salivary cortisol, 1 m...

  20. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling using vasopressin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Kotwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Anatomical localization of pituitary adenoma can be challenging in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome, and bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS is considered gold standard in this regard. Stimulation using corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH improves the sensitivity of BIPSS, however, same is not easily available in India. Therefore, we undertook this study of BIPPS using vasopressin as agent for stimulation owing to its ability to stimulate V3 receptors present on corticotrophs. Aims: To study the tumor localization and lateralization in difficult to localize cases of ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome by bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling using vasopressin for corticotroph stimulation. Settings and Design: Prospective observational study. Subjects and Methods: Six patients (5 females meeting inclusion criteria underwent BIPSS using vasopressin for stimulation. Results: All six patients had nonsuppressible overnight and low dose dexamethasone suppression test with elevated plasma ACTH levels suggestive of ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome. High dose dexamethasone suppression test showed suppressible cortisol in two cases, and microadenoma was seen in two patients on magnetic resonance imaging pituitary. Contrast enhanced computed tomography of the abdomen showed left adrenal hyperplasia in one case and anterior mediastinal mass with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia another. Using BIPSS four patients were classified as having Cushing's disease that was confirmed histopathologically following surgery. Of the remaining two, one had primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, and another had thymic carcinoid with ectopic ACTH production as the cause of Cushing's syndrome. No serious adverse events were noted. Conclusions: Vasopressin may be used instead of CRH and desmopressin for stimulation in BIPSS.

  1. Paradoxical response to dexamethasone and spontaneous hypocortisolism in Cushing's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lila, Anurag R; Sarathi, Vijaya; Bandgar, Tushar R; Shah, Nalini S

    2013-01-01

    Paradoxical response to dexamethasone and spontaneous development of hypocortisolism are rare features of Cushing's disease. We report a 13-year-old boy with Cushing's disease owing to a pituitary macroadenoma. On initial evaluation, he had partial suppression of serum cortisol by dexamethasone. He developed transient hypocortisolism after first adenomectomy, but the disease recurred after 1 year. Repeat evaluation showed recurrent hypercortisolism and paradoxical response to dexamethasone. He underwent second surgery and, postoperatively, hypercostisolism persisted even after 2 years of surgery. Repeat evaluations after 8 years of second surgery revealed persistent hypocortisolism despite residual tumour of same size and similar plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels. We have also shown that the paradoxical increase in serum cortisol was preceded by a paradoxical increase in ACTH. The paradoxical response persisted despite hypocortisolism. This patient with Cushing's disease had two very rare features: paradoxical response to dexamethasone and spontaneous development of hypocortisolism. PMID:23365169

  2. Candida albicans endophthalmitis in a patient with a non-functioning pituitary adenoma evolving into Cushing׳s disease: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Kyoung Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A 53-year-old woman presented with complaints of blurred vision in the left eye. She had been treated for recurrent non-functioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA. A vitreous biopsy followed by histopathologic examination showed the presence of Candida albicans. Meanwhile, Cushing׳s disease was diagnosed and gamma knife surgery was performed. Vitrectomy and antifungal treatment improved ocular infection and inflammation. Herein, we describe the first case of C. albicans endophthalmitis in a patient with NFPA evolving into Cushing׳s disease.

  3. Long-term follow-up of low-dose external pituitary irradiation for Cushing's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littley, M.D.; Shalet, S.M.; Beardwell, C.G.; Ahmed, S.R.; Sutton, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-four patients (three male) with Cushing's disease, aged between 11 and 67 years, were treated with low-dose external pituitary irradiation (20 Gy in eight fractions over 10-12 days) and followed for between 13 and 171 months (median 93 months). Eleven patients (46%) went into remission 4-36 months after irradiation, but five subsequently relapsed. In this series, the low incidence of radiation-induced hypopituitarism and absence of other complications attributable to radiotherapy suggest that low-dose pituitary irradiation may be a useful treatment option in selected patients. However, long-term follow-up has demonstrated a high relapse rate and failure to prevent Nelson's syndrome in adrenalectomized patients, indicating that it should not be used as primary treatment in preference to selective adenomectomy. (author)

  4. Thin-section CT of Cushing's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Tatsuo; Kuwayama, Akio; Katoh, Tetsuo; Ichihara, Kaoru; Kageyama, Naoki; Nakamura, Koji.

    1983-01-01

    Using 1.5 mm contiguous sections with a GE CT/T 8800 scanner, we investigated the sellar regions of 22 cases of Cushing's diseases which had been diagnosed endocrinologically. Each sellar turcica was normal in size, and in only 5 cases were there significant findings on 2 mm-thick sellar-floor polytomography. Nine tumors appeared as regions of a hypodense area, and three tumors were diagnosed by indirect signs, for example, stalk deviation and diaphragmatic plane asymmetry. The other 10 cases, especially those previously operated on or irradiated, were diagnosed as falsely positive or negative. Because it is best of the microadenomas appear hypodense within the strongly contrast-enhanced anterior pituitary glands, it is better for scans to be obtained immediately after rapid intravenous contrast infusion. Hypodense areas of microadenomas are best demonstrated on direct coronal scans or reversed scans of 1.5 mm-thickness thin-slice sections. By these methods, microadenomas, if they are over 5-6 mm in diameter, can appear as hypodense. Sellar floor findings by means of thin-section CT were more sensitive than those of polytomography and had more advantages in local diagnosis. If the tumor were over 4 mm in diameter, local changes in the sellar floor could be demonstrated by thin-section CT, but by polytomography no changes in the sellar floor could be demonstrated until the tumor size reached 6 mm. (author)

  5. Sulfur amino acids in Cushing's disease: insight in homocysteine and taurine levels in patients with active and cured disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggiano, Antongiulio; Melis, Daniela; Alfieri, Raffaele; De Martino, MariaCristina; Filippella, Mariagiovanna; Milone, Francesco; Lombardi, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria; Pivonello, Rosario

    2005-12-01

    Cushing's syndrome is associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. Although a series of cardiovascular risk factors have been identified, sulfur amino acids (SAAs), recently indicated as independent cardiovascular risk factors, have been poorly investigated in patients with Cushing's syndrome. The aim of this cross-sectional controlled study was to evaluate serum and urinary levels and urinary excretion rate (ER) of SAAs in patients with Cushing's disease (CD) during the active disease and after long-term disease remission. Forty patients with CD (20 with active disease and 20 with cured disease for at least 5 yr) and 40 controls entered the study. Serum and urinary concentrations and urinary ER of SAAs, namely methionine, cystine, homocysteine, and taurine, were measured by means of cationic exchange HPLC. Serum folic acid and vitamin B12 levels were also evaluated in patients and controls and correlated to SAA levels. CD patients with active disease had higher serum and urinary concentrations of cystine and homocysteine, and lower serum and higher urinary concentrations and ER of taurine than cured patients and controls. Vitamin B12 levels were significantly decreased in patients with active disease compared with cured patients and controls, whereas folic acid levels were slightly decreased in patients than in controls. In patients with active CD, urinary cortisol concentrations were significantly and inversely correlated to serum taurine and directly correlated to taurine urinary ER, and fasting serum glucose levels were significantly correlated to taurine urinary ER. At the multiple regression analysis, urinary cortisol concentrations were the best predictors of taurine ER. CD is associated with hyperhomocysteinemia and hypotaurinemia. Glucocorticoid excess, acting directly or indirectly, seems to be the most responsible for this imbalance in SAA levels. The long-term disease remission is accompanied by normalization of SAA levels. Hyperhomocysteinemia and

  6. [Management of hypercortisolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, C; Fierrard, H; Bertagna, X; Raffin-Sanson, M-L

    2008-04-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a rare but frequently considered disease. Its diagnosis can lead to some difficulties, including confirming the effective endogenous hypercortisolism and determining its cause. The severity of this disease, the diversity of its complications and the multiple therapeutic options make its management challenging. The aim of this review is to present the most recent data about management of Cushing's syndrome, especially diagnostic approaches and therapeutic options. Our references were obtained by screening MEDLINE database from 1996 to 2006. We also included some anterior reviews and consensus statements. We retained the following points: midnight salivary cortisol is a useful tool in the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome; the desmopressin test can help to distinguish between Cushing's syndrome and "pseudoCushing's" due to alcohol consumption or psychiatric disorders; cavernous sinus and inferior petrosal sinus sampling is indicated in the evaluation of ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndromes when pituitary imaging is normal or equivocal or when dynamic tests are contradictory; multislice computed-tomography of the chest and the abdomen and somatostatin analogue scintigraphy, eventually combined, are the best imaging procedures in occult ectopic ACTH syndromes; patients with Cushing's disease should be referred to a neurosurgeon experienced in corticotroph adenomas surgery; metabolic consequences of Cushing's syndrome, such as cardiovascular risk factors and osteoporosis need an aggressive treatment. The incidence of Cushing's syndrome is only 1/100000 per year. However, hypercortisolism is diagnosed by systematic evaluation in 2 to 5% of patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes and adrenal incidentalomas. Endocrinological management of the disease improves metabolic disorders in these patients. If these results are confirmed, screening for Cushing's syndrome should be systematically performed in these populations.

  7. Insights on accelerated skeletal repair in Cushing's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Young Kim

    2015-06-01

    In this patient, spontaneous recovery of trabecular bone architecture was reflected by the early correction in TBS. Subsequent TPTD treatment was associated with marked improvement in BMD, presumably due to enhanced mineralization. Complete skeletal repair was achieved by this two-step mechanism in a very short time following successful surgical treatment for Cushing's disease.

  8. Fat deposition in the cavernous sinus in Cushing disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachow, T.B.; Hesselink, J.R.; Aaron, J.O.; Davis, K.R.; Taveras, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Fat density in the cavernous sinus on computed tomography (CT) is described in 6 out of 16 (37.5%) patients with Cushing disease. This finding may aid in making a specific diagnosis in patients with a pituitary mass. It was not seen in 30 random CT studies of the sella; however, supra seller fat was incidentally noted in the patient with acromegaly

  9. Fat deposition in the cavernous sinus in Cushing disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachow, T.B.; Hesselink, J.R.; Aaron, J.O.; Davis, K.R.; Taveras, J.M.

    1984-10-01

    Fat density in the cavernous sinus on computed tomography (CT) is described in 6 out of 16 (37.5%) patients with Cushing disease. This finding may aid in making a specific diagnosis in patients with a pituitary mass. It was not seen in 30 random CT studies of the sella; however, supra seller fat was incidentally noted in the patient with acromegaly.

  10. Kinderen met obesitas en afbuigende lengtegroeicurve: ziekte van Cushing?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wezel, Esther M.; van Santen, Hanneke M.; van Furth, Wouter R.; Reneman, Liesbeth; Bisschop, Peter H.; van Trotsenburg, A. S. Paul

    2012-01-01

    We describe two children who presented with extreme weight gain and failure to grow in height, and who were both diagnosed with Cushing's disease. Following preoperative metyrapone treatment, both children successfully underwent curative transsphenoidal surgery. While obesity is a common and

  11. Glucocorticoid receptors in anorexia nervosa and Cushing's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invitti, C; Redaelli, G; Baldi, G; Cavagnini, F

    1999-06-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa do not display cushingoid features in spite of elevated cortisol plasma levels. Whether a cortisol resistance or a reduced availability of the metabolic substrates necessary to develop the effect of glucocorticoids is responsible for this has not been established. Twenty-two patients with severe restrictive anorexia nervosa, 10 patients with active Cushing's disease, and 24 healthy volunteers without psychiatric disorders or mood alterations were investigated. Glucocorticoid receptor characteristics were examined on mononuclear leukocytes by measuring [3H]dexamethasone binding and the effect of dexamethasone on [3H]thymidine incorporation, which represents an index of DNA synthesis. The number of glucocorticoid receptors on mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) was comparable in patients with anorexia nervosa, patients with active Cushing's disease, and normal subjects (binding capacity 3.3 +/- 0.23 vs. 3.7 +/- 0.30 and 3.5 +/- 0.20 fmol/10(6) cells). Conversely, glucocorticoid receptor affinity was significantly decreased in anorexia nervosa as well as in Cushing's patients compared to control subjects (dissociation constant 4.0 +/- 0.31 and 4.1 +/- 0.34 vs. 2.9 +/- 0.29 nmol/L, p Cushing's patients compared to control subjects (p Cushing's disease. In patients with anorexia nervosa, the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into the MNL was inversely correlated with urinary free cortisol levels. These data indicate that the lack of cushingoid features in patients with anorexia nervosa is not ascribable to a reduced sensitivity to glucocorticoids but is more likely due to the paucity of metabolic substrates.

  12. Cushing Disease Presenting as Primary Psychiatric Illness: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Sean A; Rosebush, Patricia I; Smyth, Harley S; Mazurek, Michael F

    2015-11-01

    We report the case of a woman with long-standing refractory depression and psychotic features who was eventually diagnosed with Cushing disease. After surgical treatment of a pituitary adenoma, she experienced gradual psychiatric recovery and was eventually able to discontinue all psychotropic medication. We review the psychiatric components of Cushing disease, implications of psychiatric illnesses for the treatment and prognosis of Cushing disease, and potential pathophysiological mechanisms linking glucocorticoid excess to psychiatric illness.

  13. The utility of preoperative acth/cortisol ratio for the diagnosis and prognosis of cushing's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alev Selek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Cushing's syndrome (CS is a rare disease having diagnostic difficulties. Many diagnostic tests have been defined but none of these are diagnostic alone. Determination of the cause is another problem which sometimes requires more sophisticated and invasive procedures. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the utility of pretreatment plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH/cortisol ratios in patients with confirmed endogenous CS for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of CS. Materials and Methods: This retrospective evaluation included 145 patients with the diagnosis of CS, 119 patients with Cushing's disease (CD, and 26 patients with ACTH-independent CS (AICS, in a university hospital. Furthermore, 114 individuals in whom CS diagnosis was excluded with at least one negative screening test were enrolled to the study as control group. The clinical, laboratory, imaging, postsurgical pathologic records and also clinical follow-up data of all patients were evaluated. Results: The median basal ACTH/cortisol ratio of the patients with CD was significantly higher than AICS and controls. A cutoff ACTH/cortisol ratio >2.5 was found to be diagnostic for CD with 82% specificity and 63% sensitivity. Among CD group, patients with recurrent disease had higher preoperative ACTH levels and ACTH/cortisol ratio than patients with sustained remission. Furthermore, these patients had more invasive, atypical, and larger tumors. Conclusion: An ACTH/cortisol ratio >2.5 would be beneficial to diagnose CD together with other diagnostic tests. It is a simple test with no additional cost. Higher ratios might be related with larger, invasive, and atypical adenoma and also might be helpful to predict recurrence.

  14. LONG-TERM OUTCOME OF THE DIFFERENT TREATMENT ALTERNATIVES FOR RECURRENT AND PERSISTENT CUSHING DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-de-Los-Monteros, Ana Laura; Sosa-Eroza, Ernesto; Espinosa, Etual; Mendoza, Victoria; Arreola, Rocio; Mercado, Moises

    2017-07-01

    Treatment alternatives for persistent and recurrent Cushing disease (CD) include pituitary surgical re-intervention, radiation therapy (RT), pharmacotherapy, and bilateral adrenalectomy (BA). The decision of which of these alternatives is better suited for the individual patient rests on clinical judgment and the availability of resources. This retrospective cohort study was performed at a referral center to evaluate the long-term efficacy of different secondary interventions for persistent and recurrent CD. We evaluated the hospital charts of 84 patients (77 female, median age 34 years, median follow up 6.3 years) with CD diagnosed, treated, and followed at our multidisciplinary clinic according to a pre-established protocol. Of the 81 patients who were initially treated with transsphenoidal surgery (TSS), 61.7% had a long-lasting remission, 16% had persistent disease, and 22% achieved remission but relapsed during follow-up. The most frequently used secondary treatment was pituitary re-intervention, followed by ketoconazole, RT, and BA. Early remissions were observed in 66.6% of the re-operated and in 58.3% of the radiated patients; long-lasting remission was achieved in 33.3% and 41.6% of these patients, respectively. Nelson syndrome developed in 41.6% of the patients who underwent BA. Upon last follow-up, 88% of all the patients are in remission, and 9.5% are biochemically controlled with ketoconazole. The efficacy of treatment alternatives for recurrent or persistent CD varies considerably among patients and multiple interventions are often required to achieve long-lasting remission. ACTH = adrenocorticotrophic hormone; BA = bilateral adrenalectomy; CBG = cabergoline; CD = Cushing disease; CV = coefficient of variation; DXM = dexamethasone; IQR = interquartile range; RT = radiation therapy; SRS = stereotactic radiosurgery; TSS = transsphenoidal surgery; UFC = urinary free cortisol; ULN = upper limit of normal.

  15. [Psychiatric disorders in patients with Cushing's disease before and after neurosurgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnjidiae, Zivko; Karloviae, Dalibor; Buljan, Danijel; Malencia, Masa; Kovak-Mufiae, Ana; Kostanjsak, Lidija

    2011-01-01

    Cushing's disease which is a consequence of ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma leads to hypercortisolism. Cushing's disease is associated with several psychiatric disturbances. The aim of the present study was to identify which psychiatric disorders were present in patients with Cushing's disease over a 2-year period and to monitor their general psychiatric condition. Additionally, the study aimed to examine the relationship between the duration of Cushing's disease, and the severity of psychiatric conditions based on psychiatric rating scales. The study included 39 patients with Cushing's disease that underwent neurosurgery for ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas. The transsphenoidal approach (the standard microsurgery technique) was performed in all patients. ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas were confirmed based on immunohistochemistry in all patients. Psychiatric conditions in the patients were identified using the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI) and ICD 10 diagnostic criteria at 3 time points: prior to surgery, and 6 and 48 months post surgery. The Cushing's disease patients exhibited statistically significant improvement in their psychiatric condition, according to the CGI, 6 and 48 months post surgery. There wasn't any significant correlation between the duration of Cushing's disease and psychiatric status, as measured by the CGI prior to surgery, 6 months post surgery, or 48 months post surgery. Patients with Cushing's disease had a significant level psychiatric disturbance that remitted after surgery. There wasn't a significant correlation between the duration of Cushing's disease and psychiatric status.

  16. AACE/ACE Disease State Clinical Review: Medical Management of Cushing Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrahian, Amir H; Yuen, Kevin C J; Hoffman, Andrew R

    2014-07-01

    To review available medical therapies for patients with Cushing disease and to provide a roadmap for their use in clinical practice. PubMed searches were performed to identify all of the available published data on medical management of Cushing disease. Medical therapy is usually not the first-line treatment for patients with Cushing disease but may be used to improve clinical manifestations of Cushing disease in patients who are not suitable candidates for surgery, following unsuccessful surgery or recurrence, or as a "bridge therapy" in those who have undergone radiotherapy. Medical therapy may also be used in preoperative preparation of patients with severe disease. Current available medical options for patients with Cushing disease include centrally acting agents, steroidogenesis inhibitors, and a glucocorticoid receptor antagonists. At present, there are no head-to-head studies comparing the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of different U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)- and non-FDA-approved drugs in patients with Cushing disease. With the initiation of new studies and the completion of ongoing clinical trials, the number of FDA-approved drugs for medical treatment of Cushing disease is expected to increase. Medical therapy has an important adjunctive role in the management of patients with Cushing disease. The decision to initiate medical treatment depends on many factors, including patient characteristics and preference. Long-term studies are needed to better define the clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability of medical treatment of Cushing disease, including the role of combination therapies.

  17. Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery for Remission of Cushing Disease Caused by Ectopic Intracavernous Macroadenoma: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutourousiou, Maria; Winstead, Welby I

    2017-02-01

    Complete surgical resection of an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenoma is the gold standard of treatment of Cushing disease. Ectopic location of these adenomas is an extremely rare condition that may compromise the diagnosis and surgical success. We present the first case of an ectopic intracavernous ACTH-secreting macroadenoma totally resected with endoscopic endonasal surgery (EES). A 36-year-old woman presented with Cushing syndrome. Increased ACTH, serum cortisol, and free urine cortisol levels were identified; however, pituitary magnetic resonance imaging failed to show a pituitary tumor; instead, a parasellar lesion in the left cavernous sinus (CS) was noticed. Inferior petrosal sinus sampling showed a significant central to peripheral and lateralized left-sided ACTH gradient. The patient underwent EES. No tumor was found in the sella; however, the left CS was widely explored and a tumor was found lateral to the paraclival segment of the carotid artery. There were no complications after EES. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of an ACTH-secreting adenoma. During the immediate postoperative course, serum cortisol levels decreased lower than 5 μg/dL. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging showed complete tumor resection. At 20 months follow-up, the patient remained in clinical and biochemical remission of Cushing disease. Only 12 cases of ectopic intracavernous ACTH-secreting adenomas have been reported and all were microadenomas. The presence of an ectopic ACTH-secreting macroadenoma in the CS represents a surgical challenge. EES is the ideal approach for complete resection of ectopic intracavernous adenomas, allowing for a wide exploration of the CS with no surgical complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nelson syndrome: historical perspectives and current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornyak, Mark; Weiss, Martin H; Nelson, Don H; Couldwell, William T

    2007-01-01

    The appearance of an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-producing tumor after bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing disease was first described by Nelson in 1958. The syndrome that now bears his name was characterized by hyperpigmentation, a sellar mass, and increased plasma ACTH levels. The treatment of Cushing disease has changed drastically since the 1950s, when the choice was adrenalectomy. Thus, the occurrence, diagnosis, and treatment of Nelson syndrome have changed as well. In the modern era of high-resolution neuroimaging, transsphenoidal microneurosurgery, and stereotactic radiosurgery, Nelson syndrome has become a rare entity. The authors describe the history of the diagnosis and treatment of Nelson syndrome. In light of the changes described, the authors believe this disease must be reevaluated in the contemporary era and a modern paradigm adopted.

  19. Nelson syndrome: definition and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, T M; Adams, E; Wass, J A H

    2014-01-01

    Nelson syndrome is an important complication of treatment with total bilateral adrenalectomy (TBA) for patients with refractory Cushing's disease. Although early cases of Nelson syndrome often presented with the clinical features of large sellar masses, the modern face of Nelson syndrome has changed primarily due to earlier detection (with highly resolved magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and sensitive ACTH assays) and greater awareness of the condition, resulting in reduced morbidity and mortality. Although lack of administration of neoadjuvant pituitary radiotherapy post-TBA surgery may predict future development of Nelson syndrome, other predictive factors remain controversial. Therefore, Nelson syndrome should be screened for closely and long-term in all patients with a history of Cushing's disease and TBA. The diagnosis of Nelson syndrome remains controversial, and the pathogenesis of this condition is incompletely understood. Current hypotheses include the "released negative feedback" mechansism (residual pituitary corticotropinoma cells are "released" from the negative feedback effects of cortisol following TBA), and the "aggressive corticotropinoma" mechanism (Nelson syndrome is most likely to develop in those patients with refractory treatments - including TBA - for an underlying aggressive corticotropinoma). Effective management of Nelson syndrome with pituitary surgery and radiotherapy is often a challenge. Other therapies (such as Gamma Knife surgery and temozolomide) play an important role and merit further research into their efficacy and placement in the management pathway of Nelson syndrome. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Successful treatment of Cushing's disease using yttrium-90 rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, M.C.; Doyle, F.H.; Mashiter, K.; Joplin, G.F.

    1982-01-01

    Interstitial irradiation using yttrium-90 ( 90 Y) rods implanted by needle into the pituitary gland was used as primary treatment in 16 patients with pituitary dependent Cushing's disease. Clinical and biochemical remission was observed within three to six months in 13 and in the remaining three after a supplementary implant. There was no perioperative morbidity. Follow-up from the time of definitive operation ranged from six to 123 months (mean 39). No recurrence has been observed. The return of a normal diurnal cortisol rhythm has been observed in 10/12 patients studied after remission. Some form of long-term pituitary hormone replacement therapy was required in only the six patients who had received the largest irradiation dose. Implantation of 90 Y is safe and effective treatment for patients with Cushing's disease, comparing favourably with selective trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery. (author)

  1. Transsphenoidal surgery in Cushing disease: The challenging microadenoma (Local experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria Wael K.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cushing disease is uncommon challenging disease. The adenomas are usually small in size in most case making the disease diagnosis and management is sometimes difficult. In some cases, the tumor cannot be identified on imaging studies and in many cases the adenoma is eccentric in location adding more difficulties to the trans-sphenoid approach for excision of such tricky tumors.

  2. Treatment of Cushing's disease in juveniles with intestinal pituitary irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassar, J.; Doyle, F.H.; Mashiter, K.; Joplin, G.F.

    1979-01-01

    Nine juvenile patients (five boys and four girls aged 10-18) with Cushing's disease were treated with pituitary implantation of 198 Au and/or 90 Y. No patient had any surgical complication from this procedure. At the latest assessment. 3 months to 17 years after operation, Cushing's disease was in remission in all the patients; the response time following operation was a few days to 3 months. Radiology of the pituitary fossa at time of pituitary implantation was normal in all patients and remains so. The final height in six patients is 149-172 cm (59-67.5 inches) and three patients who continue to grow have increased by 13.6 and 3 cm since implantation. Only one patient required full pituitary hormone replacement therapy, and he had been previously treated by external irradiation, and one other patient failed to complete puberty. In all the other seven sexual maturation is normal and one has fathered two children. It is concluded that pituitary implantation with interstitial irradiation is a satisfactory form of treatment for Cushing's disease in juveniles. (author)

  3. Medical treatment of Cushing's disease: Overview and recent findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Smooke Praw

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie Smooke Praw1, Anthony P Heaney1,21Department of Medicine, 2Department of Neurosurgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Cushing's disease, due to pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH hypersecretion, is the most common etiology of spontaneous excess cortisol production. The majority of pituitary tumors causing Cushing's disease measure <1 cm and the excess morbidity associated with these tumors is mostly due to the effects of elevated, nonsuppressible, ACTH levels leading to adrenal steroid hypersecretion. Elevated circulating cortisol levels lead to abnormal fat deposition, hypertension, diabetes, coronary artery disease, osteoporosis, muscle weakness and psychological disturbances. At experienced centers, initial surgical remission rate via transnasal, transphenoidal resection approaches 80% for tumors less than 1 cm, but may be as low as 30% for larger lesions and long-term recurrence in all groups approaches 25%. Residual disease may be managed with more radical surgery, pituitary-directed radiation, bilateral adrenalectomy, or medical therapy. This paper addresses current and novel therapies in various stages of development for Cushing’s disease.Keywords: Cushing's disease, treatment, pasireotide, PPAR-γ, 11 β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase inhibitors, dopamine agonists

  4. Predictors of resource utilization in transsphenoidal surgery for Cushing disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Andrew S; Chapple, Kristina

    2013-08-01

    The short-term cost associated with subspecialized surgical care is an increasingly important metric and economic concern. This study sought to determine factors associated with hospital charges in patients undergoing transsphenoidal surgery for Cushing disease in an effort to identify the drivers of resource utilization. The authors analyzed the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) hospital discharge database from 2007 to 2009 to determine factors that influenced hospital charges in patients who had undergone transsphenoidal surgery for Cushing disease. The NIS discharge database approximates a 20% sample of all inpatient admissions to nonfederal US hospitals. A multistep regression model was developed that adjusted for patient demographics, acuity measures, comorbidities, hospital characteristics, and complications. In 116 hospitals, 454 transsphenoidal operations were performed. The mean hospital charge was $48,272 ± $32,060. A multivariate regression model suggested that the primary driver of resource utilization was length of stay (LOS), followed by surgeon volume, hospital characteristics, and postoperative complications. A 1% increase in LOS increased hospital charges by 0.60%. Patient charges were 13% lower when performed by high-volume surgeons compared with low-volume surgeons and 22% lower in large hospitals compared with small hospitals. Hospital charges were 12% lower in cases with no postoperative neurological complications. The proposed model accounted for 46% of hospital charge variance. This analysis of hospital charges in transsphenoidal surgery for Cushing disease suggested that LOS, hospital characteristics, surgeon volume, and postoperative complications are important predictors of resource utilization. These findings may suggest opportunities for improvement.

  5. Outcome of Cushing's disease following transsphenoidal surgery in a single center over 20 years.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hassan-Smith, Zaki K

    2012-04-01

    Historically, Cushing\\'s disease (CD) was associated with a 5-yr survival of just 50%. Although advances in CD management have seen mortality rates improve, outcome from transsphenoidal surgery (TSS), the current first-line treatment, varies significantly between centers.

  6. Bilateral Testicular Tumors Resulting in Recurrent Cushing Disease After Bilateral Adrenalectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puar, T.; Engels, M.; Herwaarden, A.E. van; Sweep, F.C.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.; Kamphuis-van Ulzen, K.; Chortis, V.; Arlt, W.; Stikkelbroeck, N.; Claahsen-van der Grinten, H.L.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.

    2017-01-01

    Context: Recurrence of hypercortisolism in patients after bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing disease is extremely rare. Patient: We present a 27-year-old man who previously underwent bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing disease with complete clinical resolution. Cushingoid features recurred 12 years

  7. A 12-month phase 3 study of pasireotide in Cushing's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colao, Annamaria; Petersenn, Stephan; Newell-Price, John

    2012-01-01

    Cushing's disease is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Pasireotide, a potential therapy, has a unique, broad somatostatin-receptor-binding profile, with high binding affinity for somatostatin-receptor subtype 5.......Cushing's disease is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Pasireotide, a potential therapy, has a unique, broad somatostatin-receptor-binding profile, with high binding affinity for somatostatin-receptor subtype 5....

  8. Quality of life in patients after long-term biochemical cure of cushing's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.O. van Aken (Maarten); A.M. Pereira (Alberto); N.R. Biermasz; S.W. van Thiel (Sjoerd); H. Hoftijzer (Hendrieke); J.W.A. Smit (Jan); F. Roelfsema (Ferdinand); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); J.A. Romijn (Johannes)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractTo evaluate the long-term impact of cured Cushing's disease on subjective well-being, we assessed quality of life by validated health-related questionnaires in 58 patients cured from Cushing's disease by transsphenoidal surgery (n = 58), some of whom received additional radiotherapy (n =

  9. Quality of life in patients after long-term biochemical cure of Cushing's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aken, M. O.; Pereira, A. M.; Biermasz, N. R.; van Thiel, S. W.; Hoftijzer, H. C.; Smit, J. W. A.; Roelfsema, F.; Lamberts, S. W. J.; Romijn, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term impact of cured Cushing's disease on subjective well-being, we assessed quality of life by validated health-related questionnaires in 58 patients cured from Cushing's disease by transsphenoidal surgery (n = 58), some of whom received additional radiotherapy (n = 11) and/or

  10. Gêmeas idênticas discordantes para a doença de Cushing: relato de caso Identical twins discordant for Cushing's disease: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCELO MAIA PINHEIRO

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available A doença de Cushing é rara em crianças e sua ocorrência em gêmeos é ainda mais rara. O presente estudo relata a ocorrência de gêmeas idênticas discordantes quanto à doença de Cushing. Uma das gêmeas, desenvolveu síndrome de Cushing aos 10 anos de idade. Sua investigação demonstrou cortisol urinário elevado, ACTH sérico elevado e testes de supressão com dexametasona compatíveis com doença de Cushing. A RMN mostrou macroadenoma hipofisário que foi operado por via transesfenoidal. O estudo imuno-histoquímico confirmou a presença de células produtoras de ACTH. A paciente entrou em remissão clínica e laboratorial desde a cirurgia. Após o desaparecimento dos estigmas do Cushing, a paciente reiniciou ganho estatural, mas permanece menor que sua irmã gêmea. Esta última permanece saudável 4 anos após o início da doença de sua irmã. Este é o terceiro caso do gênero relatado na literatura. Estes achados sugerem que fatores não genéticos estão envolvidos na gênese da doença de Cushing.Cushing's disease is rare in children and its ocurrence in identical twins is extremely rare. This paper reports on identical twins discordant for Cushing's disease. One of them first presented with a cushingoid phenotype by the age of 10. Her evaluation showed an increased urinary free-cortisol and serum ACTH. Her pattern in the dexametazone supression tests was compatible with Cushing's disease. MRI disclosed a pituitary macroadenoma which was removed by the transesphenoidal approach. Immunohistochemical studies of the tumor showed the presence of ACTH-producing cells. The patient went into clinical and laboratorial remission after surgery. She re-started to grow after the disappearance of the Cushing's phenotype but she is still shorter than her healthy sister. The latter remains disease-free 4 years after her sister's diagnosis. This represents the third such case reported in the literature. Our findings suggest that acquired

  11. Refractory Post-Herpetic Neuralgia As An Initial Presentation Of Olfactory Neuroblastoma-Related Ectopic ACTH Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Hung Lin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a woman aged 64 years with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH syndrome caused by olfactory neuroblastoma as an initial presentation of refractory post-herpetic neuralgia. The manifestations such as cushingoid appearance and endocrine abnormalities are compatible with Cushing's syndrome. Brain computed tomography revealed a sellar mass. A biopsy revealed olfactory neuroblastoma. Immunohistochemical staining further defined the tumor as an ACTH-secreting neuroblastoma. Subsequent opportunistic infections by Candida glabrata fungemia and multiple drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii pneumonia occurred during hospitalization as a complication of severe hypercortisolism. Before any therapy for Cushing's syndrome and neuroblastoma could be initiated, the patient died from sepsis and multiorgan failure. We propose that Cushing's syndrome is more complex than what clinicians thought, and that meticulous cerebral imaging studies are crucial.

  12. Ectopic ACTH syndrome: a clinical challenge | Tsabedze | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A patient was managed in our endocrinology unit with ectopic Cushing's syndrome from an adrenocorticotropic hormoneproducing neuroendocrine carcinoma of the anal canal. There was limited response to standard therapy, which made it difficult to correct the electrolyte and metabolic derangements associated with the ...

  13. DHEA(S)--a novel marker in Cushing's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, T; Schmidt, N O; Vettorazzi, E; Aberle, J; Mengel, M; Flitsch, J

    2013-03-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA(S)) is a multi-functional steroid implicated in a broad range of biological effects, including obesity, diabetes, bone metabolism, neuroprotection, and anti-tumorigenesis. It has not yet undergone wider research in the context of Cushing's disease. The objective of this study was to determine if perioperative blood levels of DHEA(S) correlate with levels of ACTH and cortisol, and therefore may be useful as a new, additional marker for the early definition of cure in patients suffering from Cushing's disease. Forty-two consecutive patients undergoing transsphenoidal surgery for Cushing's disease from September 2009 to September 2010 were perioperatively monitored for ACTH, cortisol, and DHEA(S). Pre-operative blood samples revealed ACTH levels of median 65 ng/l (range 11-1,183 ng/l, standard deviation 183.76), cortisol of median 257 μg/l (range 93-803 μg/l, standard deviation 140.88), and DHEA(S) of median 2.22 mg/l (range 0.44-7.79 mg/l, standard deviation 1.82) according to the pathology of Cushing's disease. Postoperative blood samples drawn over a 7-day time span showed a drop in median ACTH to just 14.5 % (median: 9 ng/l, range 2-44, standard deviation 12.75) of its median preoperative figure. Median cortisol levels were reduced to 6.9 % (median: 18 μg/l, range 10-190 μg/l, standard deviation 38.04) of their preoperative values and DHEA(S) levels decreased to 17 % (median: 0.38 mg/l, range 0.05-2.29, standard deviation 0.51). In persistent disease, no patient showed a drop in DHEA(S) below 38 % of its preoperative figures. DHEA(S) shows the potential to become an additional marker in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients. However, it needs to be examined further, including whether DHEA(S) may also be a useful predictor of recovery of the HPA-axis after successful surgery.

  14. Bienestar psicológico de personas con síndrome de Cushing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica María Novoa-Gómez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio exploratorio es analizar la relación entre el bienestar psicológico y las condiciones médicas y terapéuticas de personas con diagnóstico de síndrome de Cushing. Los instrumentos utilizados fueron el Índice de Bienestar subjetivo (The Psychological Well-Being Index; Dupuy, 1984 y el Cushing’s Syndrome Severity Index (CSI. La selección de la muestra se realizó por conveniencia; considerando que es un síndrome de muy baja incidencia, se estableció contacto con cinco pacientes. Se utilizaron estadísticos descriptivos que facilitaron la obtención de información sobre la muestra. Los resulatdos permiten concluir que la severidad de los síntomas asociados al síndorme, evaluados a través del CSI, implican malestar moderado en el bienestar psicológico, corroborando lo señalado por la literatura, así como que las alteraciones de orden psicológico influyen en el proceso de enfermedad o recuperación.

  15. A case with post-irradiation cerebral vascular disease accompanied by Cushing's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinoda, Keiichi; Kuriyama, Takanobu; Kimura, Fumiharu; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Takamatsu, Junta; Mozai, Toshiji

    1986-01-01

    A 37-year-old man with Cushing's disease developed cerebral infarction 13 years after Co-60 irradiation of a total dose of 60 Gy for pituitary adenoma. Cerebral angiography showed stenosis or occlusion of the bilateral carotid arteries and basilar artery which were in the radiation fields. A basophilic adenoma was resected, and symptoms of Cushing's disease have resolved. The vascular lesions are likely to be not only radiation-induced, but also stimulated by hyperlipemia and hypertension associated with Cushing's disease. It is recommended to eliminate factors, such as hyperlipemia and hypertension, stimulatig vascular damage in the management of patients treated with radiation therapy. The relevant literature is reviewed. (Namekawa, K.)

  16. Radiation and combined treatment of Itsenko -Cushing's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkanov, A.I.; Morozov, A.I.; Pirogov, A.I.; Postnikov, D.A.; Shadyeva, M.M.; Roshchina, V.S.; Devyatykh, Yu.N.

    1980-01-01

    The authors made observations of 123 patients with the Itsenko - Cushing disease. The mild form of the disease was diagnosed in 27.7 per cent of the patients; moderate in 52 percent, and severe in 20.3 per cent of the patients. A total of 78 patients underwent tele-gamma-therapy in doses of 40-45 Gy, and 45 patients underwent combined treatment consisting in unilateral adrenalectomy and irradiation with the same doses. Protracted remissions with a reverse development of the symptoms of the disease were reached in 69.2 per cent of the patients who had undergone radiation treatment and in 64.4 per cent of the patients who had undergone combined treatment. Radiotherapy was most effective in patients with mild and moderate forms of Itsenko-Cushing's disease, in case of a severe form combined treatment is indicated. Optimal single focal doses are 1.6-1.8 Gy, and cumulative ones 40-45 Gy

  17. An unusual case of ectopic ACTH syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhauck, M J; Pöpperl, G; Rachinger, W; Giese, A; Auernhammer, C J; Spitzweg, C

    2012-02-01

    Ectopic ACTH-syndrome is a rare cause of Cushing's disease. Despite extensive diagnostic procedures the source of ACTH secretion often remains occult. This case describes a 45-year old woman with an ectopic Cushing's syndrome. Extensive imaging procedures including CT scan of chest and abdomen, octreotide scan and MRI of the chest and pituitary did not reveal the source of ACTH secretion. In consideration of an occult source of ACTH secretion we started a therapeutic trial with cabergoline (0.5 mg/d), a dopamine receptor agonist, which has been shown to be effective in ectopic Cushing's syndrome. 2 months after cabergoline treatment had been initiated, ACTH and cortisol levels normalized in association with significant improvement of the clinical symptoms. During follow-up a [(68)Ga-DOTA-dPhe(1), Tyr(3)]-octreotate ([(68)Ga-DOTA]-TATE) PET-CT was performed revealing a somatostatin receptor positive lesion in the right sphenoidal sinus suggesting the source of ACTH secretion. The patient was cured by transnasal resection of the polypoid lesion, which was immunohistochemically characterized as an ACTH-positive neuroendocrine tumor. This case report demonstrates the management of ectopic ACTH-syndrome by molecularly -targeted therapy with dopamine receptor -agonists as well as improved detection of the ectopic ACTH source by novel imaging modalities, such as [(68)Ga-DOTA]-TATE PET specifically targeting somatostatin receptor subtype-2 with high affinity. © J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Cushing's disease: a multidisciplinary overview of the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buliman, A; Tataranu, L G; Paun, D L; Mirica, A; Dumitrache, C

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's disease is considered a rare condition characterized by the hypersecretion of the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) due to a pituitary adenoma that ultimately causes endogenous hypercortisolism by stimulating the adrenal glands. The clinical signs suggesting Cushing's disease, such as obesity, moon face, hirsutism, and facial plethora are already present on presentation. Endogenous hypercortisolism is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic manifestations, as well as respiratory disorders, psychiatric complications, osteoporosis and infections, leading to high rates of morbidity and mortality. It is vital to diagnose Cushing's disease as early as possible and to implement a treatment plan to lead to a successful prognosis and a low number of complications. The goal of this article was to review the clinical, diagnostic and treatment aspects of Cushing's disease using the most recent available guidelines.

  19. Preserved GLP-1 effects in a diabetic patient with Cushing's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritzel, R A; Kleine, N; Holst, Jens Juul

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: A patient with diabetes mellitus, who participated in a study with intravenous administration of GLP-1, was later found to have Cushing's disease (markedly elevated 24 h urinary cortisol excretion and inadequate suppression of fasting cortisol with 2 mg dexamethasone). His diabetic state...... mellitus due to Cushing's disease with GLP-1 actions in typical type 2 diabetes. DESIGN AND METHODS: GLP-1 (1.2 pmol/kg/min) and placebo had been infused into ten patients with diabetes mellitus over 4 h in the fasting state. The results from the patient with Cushing's disease (C) were compared to the data...... with Cushing's disease compared to those with type 2 diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: The insulinotropic, glucagonostatic and glucose-lowering actions of GLP-1 in a patient with diabetes mellitus due to cortisol excess were similar to actions in typical type 2 diabetes. Therefore incretin mimetics might be a novel...

  20. The case of Cushings disease imaging by SPECT examination without manifestation of adenoma in MRI examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierach, M.; Pufal, J.; Pilecki, S.; Junik, R.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the possibility of imaging the pathological accumulation of 99mT c-MIBI in the pituitary gland in patients with Cushings disease when MRI examination does not show microadenomas. Cushings disease was diagnosed in a 27 year old male on the basis of clinical and biochemical findings. The blood cortisol level of the patient was elevated (the average level was 47 microgram/dl) and it showed no changeability of day and night rhythm. In the patient with Cushing's disease, during the SPECT examination, an increased accumulation of 99mT c-MIBI in the pituitary gland was noticed. MRI scanning was negative. Single photon emission computed tomography using 99mT c-MIBI is a useful and sensitive means of pituitary gland microadenoma detection in patients with Cushings disease when microadenoma is not detected during MRI scanning and when the results of dexamethasone suppression test is positive. (author)

  1. Harvey Cushing, the spine surgeon: the surgical treatment of Pott disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bydon, Ali; Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H; Pendleton, Courtney; McGirt, Matthew J; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2011-08-01

    Review of historical archival records. Describe Harvey Cushing's patients with spinal pathology. Harvey Cushing was a pioneer of modern surgery but his work on spine remains largely unknown. Review of the Chesney Medical Archives of the Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1896 to 1912. This is the first time that Cushing's spinal cases while he was at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, including those with Pott disease, have been described.Cushing treated three young men with psoas abscesses secondary to Pott disease during his residency: he drained the abscesses, debrided any accompanying necrotic vertebral bodies, irrigated the cavity with salt, and left the incision open to close by secondary intention. Although Cushing used Koch's "tuberculin therapy" (of intravenous administration of isolated tubercular bacilli) in one patient, he did not do so in the other two, likely because of the poor response of this first patient. Later in his tenure, Cushing performed a laminectomy on a patient with kyphosis and paraplegia secondary to Pott disease. These cases provide a view of Cushing early in his career, pointing to the extraordinary degree of independence that he had during his residency under William Steward Halsted; these cases may have been important in the surgical upbringing both of Cushing and his coresident, William Stevenson Baer, who became the first professor of Orthopedics at Johns Hopkins Hospital. At the turn of the last century, Pott disease was primarily treated by immobilization with bed rest, braces, and plaster-of-paris jackets; some surgeons also employed gradual correction of the deformity by hyperextension. Patients who failed a trial of conservative therapy (of months to years) were treated with a laminectomy. However, the limitations of these strategies led to the development of techniques that form the basis of contemporary spine surgery-instrumentation and fusion.

  2. Roentgenoendovascular destruction of the adrenals in Icenko-Cushing's diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yugrinov, O.G.; Komissarenko, I.V.; Cheban, A.K.; Rybakov, S.I.; Eremenko, V.N.; Makarenko, G.I.; Sheptukha, A.I.; Chernij, Ya.M.

    1986-01-01

    The principle of nonoperative adrenalectomy by means of the destruction of the adrenals with the help of roentgenoendovascular intervention was developed. It was based on a transcatheter transvenous route of delivery of a radiopaque agent which was used to control on X-ray screen mechanical damage of the adrenal structural elements (destruction) at the expense of artificial exceeding of the capacity of its venous bed. Excess of the radiopaque agent was deposited in the paravasal spaces of the adrenal on its entire length. Transcatheter transvenous destruction of the adrenals (TTDA) was performed in 97 patients: unilateral TTDA in 62, bilateral in 35. TTDA is a method of choice in the treatment of Icenko-Cushing's disease, in some patients it is an alternative to surgery

  3. Neuropsychiatric disorders and cognitive dysfunction in patients with Cushing's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-fan; Li, Yun-feng; Chen, Xiao; Sun, Qing-fang

    2013-08-01

    To review the main neuropsychiatric disorders and cognitive deficits in patients with Cushing's disease (CD) and the associated pathophysiological mechanisms underlying CD. These mechanistic details may provide recommendations for preventing or treating the cognitive impairments and mood disorders in patients with CD. Data were obtained from papers on psychiatric and cognitive complications in CD published in English within the last 20 years. To perform the PubMed literature search, the following keywords were input: cushing's disease, cognitive, hippocampal, or glucocorticoids. Studies were selected if they contained data relevant to the topic addressed in the particular section. Because of the limited length of this article, we have frequently referenced recent reviews that contain a comprehensive amalgamation of literature rather than the actual source papers. Patients with active CD not only suffer from many characteristic clinical features, but also show some neuropsychiatric disorders and cognitive impairments. Among the psychiatric manifestations, the common ones are emotional instability, depressive disorder, anxious symptoms, impulsivity, and cognitive impairment. Irreversible effects of previous glucocorticoid (GC) excess on the central nervous system, such as hippocampal and the basal ganglia, is the most reasonable reason. Excess secretion of cortisol brings much structural and functional changes in hippocampal, such as changes in neurogenesis and morphology, signaling pathway, gene expression, and glutamate accumulation. Hippocampal volume loss can be found in most patients with CD, and decreased glucose utilization caused by GCs may lead to brain atrophy, neurogenesis impairment, inhibition of long-term potentiation, and decreased neurotrophic factors; these may also explain the mechanisms of GC-induced brain atrophy and hippocampal changes. Brain atrophy and hippocampal changes caused by excess secretion of cortisol are thought to play a significant

  4. Postoperative plasma cortisol levels predict long-term outcome in patients with Cushing's disease and determine which patients should be treated with pituitary irradiation after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaki, Toshihiro; Tsushima, Toshio; Hizuka, Naomi; Odagiri, Emi; Murata, Yoji; Takano, Kazue; Suda, Toshihiro

    2001-01-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery is the treatment of choice for ACTH-producing pituitary adenoma (Cushing's disease) and pituitary irradiation is widely considered the most appropriate treatment for patients with Cushing's disease for whom transsphenoidal surgery has been unsuccessful. We studied 49 consecutive patients who underwent transsphenoidal surgery for the treatment of Cushing's disease at Tokyo Women's Medical University from 1977-1997 with a mean follow-up duration of 87.6 months (range, 24-253 months). We examined the relationship between postoperative endocrinological data, assessed between 3 and 8 weeks after surgery, and long-term outcome and efficacy of pituitary irradiation after surgery. Long-term remission was defined as the regression of the symptom and signs of Cushing's syndrome, and restoration of normal levels of plasma ACTH, cortisol and urinary free cortisol, together with adequate suppression of morning plasma cortisol levels following the administration of low dose (1 mg) of dexamethasone. Thirty patients had no additional treatment after pituitary surgery. Only 1 of 25 patients (4%) whose postoperative plasma cortisol level was less than 2 μg/dl developed recurrent disease whereas 3 out of 5 patients with postoperative plasma cortisol levels higher than 2 μg/dl relapsed. Postoperative external pituitary radiation was used to treat the remaining 19 patients. Four patients who received radiation therapy had a low or undetectable postoperative plasma cortisol level (<2 μg/dl, 56 nmol/L) and all of these patients developed hypopituitarism whereas 5 patients with subnormal plasma cortisol levels (2.0-10.0 μg/dl) remained in remission. Among 10 patients with persistent disease after surgery, 6 entered remission 6-47 months after irradiation but one of them subsequently relapsed after 108 months. These results suggest that additional therapy should be avoided in patients with a postoperative plasma cortisol less than 2 μg/dl because relapse is

  5. Recent advances in the diagnosis of Cushing’s syndrome in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, H.S.; Galac, S.

    2010-01-01

    Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract. 2010 Mar;40(2):259-67. Recent advances in the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome in dogs. Kooistra HS, Galac S. Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 108, 3584 CM Utrecht, The Netherlands.

  6. On the shoulders of giants: Harvey Cushing's experience with acromegaly and gigantism at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1896-1912.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pendleton, C.; Adams, H.; Salvatori, R.; Wand, G.; Quinones-Hinojosa, A.

    2011-01-01

    A review of Dr. Cushing's surgical cases at Johns Hopkins Hospital revealed new information about his early operative experience with acromegaly. Although in 1912 Cushing published selective case studies regarding this work, a review of all his operations for acromegaly during his early years has

  7. Long-term predictive value of postsurgical cortisol concentrations for cure and risk of recurrence in Cushing's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, Alberto M.; van Aken, Maarten O.; van Dulken, Hans; Schutte, Pieter J.; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Smit, Jan W. A.; Roelfsema, Ferdinand; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2003-01-01

    We assessed the value of postoperative plasma cortisol concentrations to predict cure and recurrence of Cushing's disease after transsphenoidal surgery (TS). Seventy-eight of 80 consecutive patients treated by TS for Cushing's disease were evaluated. TS cured 72% (n = 56) of the patients. Two weeks

  8. Successful long-term treatment of Cushing disease with mifepristone (RU486).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basina, Marina; Liu, Hau; Hoffman, Andrew R; Feldman, David

    2012-01-01

    We describe a girl with Cushing disease for whom surgery and radiation treatments failed and the subsequent clinical course with mifepristone therapy. We present the patient's clinical, biochemical, and imaging findings. A 16-year-old girl presented with classic Cushing disease. After transsphenoidal surgery, Cyberknife radiosurgery, ketoconazole, and metyrapone did not control her disease, and she was prescribed mifepristone, which was titrated to a maximal dosage of 1200 mg daily with subsequent symptom improvement. Mifepristone (RU486) is a high-affinity, nonselective antagonist of the glucocorticoid receptor. There is limited literature on its use as an off-label medication to treat refractory Cushing disease. Over her 8-year treatment with mifepristone, her therapy was complicated by hypertension and hypokalemia requiring spironolactone and potassium chloride. She received a 2-month drug holiday every 4 to 6 months to allow for withdrawal menstrual bleeding with medroxyprogesterone acetate. Urinary cortisol, serum cortisol, and corticotropin levels remained elevated during mifepristone drug holidays. While on mifepristone, her signs and symptoms of Cushing disease resolved. Repeated magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated stable appearance of the residual pituitary mass. Bilateral adrenalectomy was performed, and mifepristone was discontinued after 95 months of medical therapy. We describe the longest duration of mifepristone therapy thus reported for the treatment of refractory Cushing disease. Mifepristone effectively controlled all signs and symptoms of hypercortisolism. Menstruating women who take the drug on a long-term basis should receive periodic drug holidays to allow for menses. The lack of reliable serum biomarkers to monitor the success of mifepristone therapy requires careful clinical judgment and may make its use difficult in Cushing disease.

  9. The Cushing Reflex: Oliguria as a Reflection of an Elevated Intracranial Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Leyssens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oliguria is one of the clinical hallmarks of renal failure. The broad differential diagnosis is well known, but a rare cause of oliguria is intracranial hypertension (ICH. The actual knowledge to explain this relationship is scarce. Almost all literature is about animals where authors describe the Cushing reflex in response to ICH. We hypothesize that the Cushing reflex is translated towards the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with a subsequent reduction in medullary blood flow and oliguria. Recently, we were confronted with a patient who had complicated pituitary surgery and displayed multiple times an oliguria while he developed ICH.

  10. Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome presenting as hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis and hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor C Abdulla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH syndrome is an uncommon cause of hypercortisolism, which should be considered in patients with hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis and hypertension in the context of lung neoplasm. We report a 60-year-old male patient with severe hypertension, metabolic alkalosis, and hypokalemia as the initial manifestations of an ACTH-secreting small cell lung carcinoma. Ectopic Cushing's syndrome should always be ruled out in patients with severe hypertension and hypokalemia.

  11. Clinical Characteristics of Endogenous Cushing’s Syndrome at a Medical Center in Southern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chen Tung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available From January 1987 to December 2011, over a total of 25 years, 84 patients with Cushing’s syndrome (CS were identified at a medical center in southern Taiwan. We observed a higher incidence of ACTH-independent CS (75% than ACTH-dependent CS (25%. A higher incidence of adrenocortical adenoma (58.3% than Cushing’s disease (CD, 21.4% was also found. The sensitivity of the definitive diagnostic tests for CS, including loss of plasma cortisol circadian rhythm, a baseline 24 h urinary free cortisol (UFC value >80 μg, and overnight and 2-day low-dose dexamethasone suppression test, was between 94.4% and 100%. For the 2-day high-dose dexamethasone suppression test for the differential diagnosis of CD, the sensitivity of 0800 h plasma cortisol and 24 h UFC was 44.4% and 85.7%, respectively. For the differential diagnosis of adrenal CS, the sensitivities of the 0800 h plasma cortisol and 24 h UFC were 95.5% and 88.9%, respectively. In patients with ACTH-independent CS and ACTH-dependent CS, the baseline plasma ACTH levels were all below 29 pg/mL and above 37 pg/mL, respectively. The postsurgical hospitalization stay following retroperitoneoscopic adrenalectomy was shorter than that observed for transabdominal adrenalectomy (4.3 ± 1.6 versus 8.8 ± 3.7 days, P<0.001. It was easy to develop retroperitoneal and peritoneal seeding of adrenocortical carcinoma via laparoscopic adrenalectomy.

  12. Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for cushing disease: techniques, outcomes, and predictors of remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, Robert M; Reames, Davis L; Chen, Ching-Jen; Laws, Edward R; Jane, John A

    2013-02-01

    The efficacy of endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery (ETS) for Cushing disease has not been clearly established. To assess efficacy of a pure endoscopic approach for treatment of Cushing disease and determine predictors of remission. A prospectively acquired database of 61 patients undergoing ETS was reviewed. Remission was defined as postoperative morning serum cortisol of Cushing [100%], macroadenomas [87%]). At 2- to 3-month evaluations, 45 of 49 patients (91.8%) were in remission. Fifty patients were followed for at least 12 months (mean, 28 months; range, 12-72). Forty-two (84%) achieved remission from a single ETS. In these patients, there was no significant difference in remission rates between microadenomas (93%), magnetic resonance imaging-negative (70%), and macroadenomas (77%). Patients with history of previous surgery (n = 14, 23%) were 9 times less likely to achieve follow-up remission (P = .021). In-house cortisol level of Cushing disease provides high rates of remission with low rates of complications regardless of size. Although patients with a history of previous surgery are less likely to achieve remission, the majority can still achieve remission following treatment.

  13. Evidence for orphan nuclear receptor TR4 in the etiology of Cushing disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, Li; Bergsneider, Marvin; Mirsadraei, Leili; Young, Steven H.; Jonker, Johan W.; Downes, Michael; Yong, William H.; Evans, Ronald M.; Heaney, Anthony P.

    2013-01-01

    Cushing disease (CD) is a life-threatening disorder attributed to excess pituitary tumor-derived adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and adrenal steroid secretion caused by pituitary tumors. Whereas CD was first described in 1932, the underlying genetic basis driving tumor growth and ACTH secretion

  14. Long-term follow-up on Cushing disease patient after transsphenoidal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insook Jeong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cushing disease is caused by excessive adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH production by the pituitary adenoma. Transsphenoidal surgery is its first-line treatment. The incidence of Cushing disease in children and adolescents is so rare that long-term prognoses have yet to be made in most cases. We followed-up on a 16-year-old male Cushing disease patient who presented with rapid weight gain and growth retardation. The laboratory findings showed increased 24-hour urine free cortisol and lack of overnight cortisol suppression by low-dose dexamethasone test. The serum cortisol and 24-hour urine free cortisol, by high-dose dexamethasone test, also showed a lack of suppression, and a bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling suggested lateralization of ACTH secretion from the right-side pituitary gland. However, after a right hemihypophysectomy by the transsphenoidal approach, the 24-hour urine free cortisol levels were persistently high. Thus the patient underwent a total hypophysectomy, since which time he has been treated with hydrocortisone, levothyroxine, recombinant human growth hormone, and testosterone enanthate. Intravenous bisphosphonate for osteoporosis had been administered for three years. At his current age of 26 years, his final height had attained the target level range; his bone mineral density was normal, and his pubic hair was Tanner stage 4. This report describes the long-term treatment course of a Cushing disease patient according to growth profile, pubertal status, and responses to hormone replacement therapy. The clinical results serve to emphasize the importance of growth optimization, puberty, and bone health in the treatment management of Cushing disease patients who have undergone transsphenoidal surgery.

  15. Long-term follow-up on Cushing disease patient after transsphenoidal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Insook; Oh, Moonyeon; Kim, Ja Hye; Cho, Ja Hyang; Choi, Jin-Ho; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2014-09-01

    Cushing disease is caused by excessive adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) production by the pituitary adenoma. Transsphenoidal surgery is its first-line treatment. The incidence of Cushing disease in children and adolescents is so rare that long-term prognoses have yet to be made in most cases. We followed-up on a 16-year-old male Cushing disease patient who presented with rapid weight gain and growth retardation. The laboratory findings showed increased 24-hour urine free cortisol and lack of overnight cortisol suppression by low-dose dexamethasone test. The serum cortisol and 24-hour urine free cortisol, by high-dose dexamethasone test, also showed a lack of suppression, and a bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling suggested lateralization of ACTH secretion from the right-side pituitary gland. However, after a right hemihypophysectomy by the transsphenoidal approach, the 24-hour urine free cortisol levels were persistently high. Thus the patient underwent a total hypophysectomy, since which time he has been treated with hydrocortisone, levothyroxine, recombinant human growth hormone, and testosterone enanthate. Intravenous bisphosphonate for osteoporosis had been administered for three years. At his current age of 26 years, his final height had attained the target level range; his bone mineral density was normal, and his pubic hair was Tanner stage 4. This report describes the long-term treatment course of a Cushing disease patient according to growth profile, pubertal status, and responses to hormone replacement therapy. The clinical results serve to emphasize the importance of growth optimization, puberty, and bone health in the treatment management of Cushing disease patients who have undergone transsphenoidal surgery.

  16. Repeated transsphenoidal pituitary surgery (TS) via the endoscopic technique: a good therapeutic option for recurrent or persistent Cushing's disease (CD).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenmakers, M.A.; Netea-Maier, R.T.; Lindert, E.J. van; Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: No data on results of repeated transsphenoidal surgery via the endoscopic technique for patients with persistent or recurrent Cushing's disease are available. DESIGN AND PATIENTS: We retrospectively evaluated the remission rates and complications of repeated transsphenoidal surgery via

  17. Sellar door: Harvey Cushing's entry into the pituitary gland, the unabridged Johns Hopkins experience 1896-1912.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Courtney; Adams, Hadie; Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2013-02-01

    To review the original surgical records from the Johns Hopkins Hospital, and analyze the records of patients Cushing treated for pituitary disorders from 1896 to 1912. Following IRB approval, and through the courtesy of the Alan Mason Chesney Archives, we reviewed the original surgical files from the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Patients presenting with pituitary-related symptoms, who underwent surgical treatment directed at the pituitary gland, were selected for further review. Thirty-seven patients who underwent surgical intervention for pituitary disorders were found. Of these patients, 12 were mentioned only briefly in Cushing's 1912 monograph, whereas 6 were not described at all. The remaining 19 were documented by Cushing in his 1912 monograph. Cushing used three main surgical approaches to the pituitary: transsphenoidal, transcranial, and the subfrontal "omega incision." There were 6 inpatient deaths. The mean time to last follow-up was 41.0 months. At follow-up, headache was the most common unresolved symptom. This review highlights Cushing's accomplishments in the surgical treatment of suspected pituitary pathology during his early career as a young attending at Johns Hopkins Hospital. It reveals new information about patients whom Cushing did not include in his publications detailing his surgical experience at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prolactinomas, Cushing's disease and acromegaly: debating the role of medical therapy for secretory pituitary adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonert Vivien S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pituitary adenomas are associated with a variety of clinical manifestations resulting from excessive hormone secretion and tumor mass effects, and require a multidisciplinary management approach. This article discusses the treatment modalities for the management of patients with a prolactinoma, Cushing's disease and acromegaly, and summarizes the options for medical therapy in these patients. First-line treatment of prolactinomas is pharmacotherapy with dopamine agonists; recent reports of cardiac valve abnormalities associated with this class of medication in Parkinson's disease has prompted study in hyperprolactinemic populations. Patients with resistance to dopamine agonists may require other treatment. First-line treatment of Cushing's disease is pituitary surgery by a surgeon with experience in this condition. Current medical options for Cushing's disease block adrenal cortisol production, but do not treat the underlying disease. Pituitary-directed medical therapies are now being explored. In several small studies, the dopamine agonist cabergoline normalized urinary free cortisol in some patients. The multi-receptor targeted somatostatin analogue pasireotide (SOM230 shows promise as a pituitary-directed medical therapy in Cushing's disease; further studies will determine its efficacy and safety. Radiation therapy, with medical adrenal blockade while awaiting the effects of radiation, and bilateral adrenalectomy remain standard treatment options for patients not cured with pituitary surgery. In patients with acromegaly, surgery remains the first-line treatment option when the tumor is likely to be completely resected, or for debulking, especially when the tumor is compressing neurovisual structures. Primary therapy with somatostatin analogues has been used in some patients with large extrasellar tumors not amenable to surgical cure, patients at high surgical risk and patients who decline surgery. Pegvisomant is indicated in patients

  19. A retrospective study of secondary diabetes prevalence in Pheochromocytoma, Cushing and Acromegal patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastan Hagh M

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Some of the endocrinologic diseases, especially Acromegaly, Cushing and Pheochromocytoma have multiple effects on blood glucose metabolism and regulation in non-diabetic patients. In this retrospective survey, records of patients of Tehran Medical Sciences University hospitals have been reviewd. Of 124 Acromegals, GTT was performed for 51 patients, being impaired in 18%. To evaluate diabetes, FBS and BS of 90 patients were checked, overt diabetes was detected in 27%. Among 90 Cushing patients, blood glucose was checked in 60 cases, 47% of these patients had levels above the normal range, and 39% had glucosuria. Among 80 Pheochromocytoma patients, 16 cases (26.5% had overt diabetes. In comparison with other studied, we have obtained a little different results concerning diabetes and impaired GTT prevalence

  20. Pituitary function following megavoltage therapy for Cushings' disease; long term follow up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpe, G.F.; Kendall-Taylor, P.; Prescott, R.W.G.; Ross, W.M.; Davison, C.; Watson, M.J.; Cook, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    Eight patients who had received megavoltage therapy for Cushings' disease 5-12 years previously have been reviewed. The long term response to this therapy was assessed with respect to efficacy of treatment in inducing continued remission and disturbance of hypothalamic-pituitary function. One patient showed clear evidence of relapse of Cushings' disease. One patient had unequivocal hypopituitarism. Basal levels of growth hormone (GH), TSH, LH, and FSH were not statistically different from controls, but provocative testing revealed significant abnormalities of response of cortisol/ACTH, GH, prolactin and LH. Six out of eight patients had absent diurnal cortisol variation and five patients had elevated serum prolactin levels. Thus, in this group of patients normal pituitary-adrenal function has not been satisfactorily restored. It is clear that significant disturbances of hypothalamic-pituitary function follow megavoltage therapy and these may progress to overt hypopituitarism. (author)

  1. Postoperative plasma cortisol levels predict long-term outcome in patients with Cushing's disease and determine which patients should be treated with pituitary irradiation after surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imaki, Toshihiro; Tsushima, Toshio; Hizuka, Naomi; Odagiri, Emi; Murata, Yoji; Takano, Kazue [Tokyo Women' s Medical Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Endocrinology; Suda, Toshihiro

    2001-02-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery is the treatment of choice for ACTH-producing pituitary adenoma (Cushing's disease) and pituitary irradiation is widely considered the most appropriate treatment for patients with Cushing's disease for whom transsphenoidal surgery has been unsuccessful. We studied 49 consecutive patients who underwent transsphenoidal surgery for the treatment of Cushing's disease at Tokyo Women's Medical University from 1977-1997 with a mean follow-up duration of 87.6 months (range, 24-253 months). We examined the relationship between postoperative endocrinological data, assessed between 3 and 8 weeks after surgery, and long-term outcome and efficacy of pituitary irradiation after surgery. Long-term remission was defined as the regression of the symptom and signs of Cushing's syndrome, and restoration of normal levels of plasma ACTH, cortisol and urinary free cortisol, together with adequate suppression of morning plasma cortisol levels following the administration of low dose (1 mg) of dexamethasone. Thirty patients had no additional treatment after pituitary surgery. Only 1 of 25 patients (4%) whose postoperative plasma cortisol level was less than 2 {mu}g/dl developed recurrent disease whereas 3 out of 5 patients with postoperative plasma cortisol levels higher than 2 {mu}g/dl relapsed. Postoperative external pituitary radiation was used to treat the remaining 19 patients. Four patients who received radiation therapy had a low or undetectable postoperative plasma cortisol level (<2 {mu}g/dl, 56 nmol/L) and all of these patients developed hypopituitarism whereas 5 patients with subnormal plasma cortisol levels (2.0-10.0 {mu}g/dl) remained in remission. Among 10 patients with persistent disease after surgery, 6 entered remission 6-47 months after irradiation but one of them subsequently relapsed after 108 months. These results suggest that additional therapy should be avoided in patients with a postoperative plasma cortisol less

  2. Endoscopic vs. microscopic transsphenoidal surgery for Cushing's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broersen, Leonie H A; Biermasz, Nienke R; van Furth, Wouter R; de Vries, Friso; Verstegen, Marco J T; Dekkers, Olaf M; Pereira, Alberto M

    2018-05-16

    Systematic review and meta-analysis comparing endoscopic and microscopic transsphenoidal surgery for Cushing's disease regarding surgical outcomes (remission, recurrence, and mortality) and complication rates. To stratify the results by tumor size. Nine electronic databases were searched in February 2017 to identify potentially relevant articles. Cohort studies assessing surgical outcomes or complication rates after endoscopic or microscopic transsphenoidal surgery for Cushing's disease were eligible. Pooled proportions were reported including 95% confidence intervals. We included 97 articles with 6695 patients in total (5711 microscopically and 984 endoscopically operated). Overall, remission was achieved in 5177 patients (80%), with no clear difference between both techniques. Recurrence was around 10% and short term mortality surgery (12.9 vs. 4.0%), whereas transient diabetes insipidus occurred less often (11.3 vs. 21.7%). For microadenomas, results were comparable between both techniques. For macroadenomas, the percentage of patients in remission was higher after endoscopic surgery (76.3 vs. 59.9%), and the percentage recurrence lower after endoscopic surgery (1.5 vs. 17.0%). Endoscopic surgery for patients with Cushing's disease reaches comparable results for microadenomas, and probably better results for macroadenomas than microscopic surgery. This is present despite the presumed learning curve of the newer endoscopic technique, although confounding cannot be excluded. Based on this study, endoscopic surgery may thus be considered the current standard of care. Microscopic surgery can be used based on neurosurgeon's preference. Endocrinologists and neurosurgeons in pituitary centers performing the microscopic technique should at least consider referring Cushing's disease patients with a macroadenoma.

  3. American views of Sir Victor Horsley in the era of Cushing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Kurt R; Schulder, Michael

    2018-03-09

    Sir Victor Horsley was a pioneering British neurosurgeon known for his numerous neurosurgical, scientific, and sociopolitical contributions. Although word of these surgical and scientific achievements quickly spread throughout Europe and North America in the late 19th century, much of modern neurosurgery's view of Horsley has been colored by a single anecdote from John Fulton's biography of Harvey Cushing. In this account, Cushing observes a frenetic Horsley hastily removing a Gasserian ganglion from a patient in the kitchen of a British mansion. Not long after, Cushing left Britain saying that he had little to learn from British neurosurgery. The authors of this paper examined contemporary views of Horsley to assess what his actual reputation was in the US and Canada. The authors conducted a thorough search of references to Horsley using the following sources: American surgical and neurosurgical textbooks; major biographies; diary entries and letters; PubMed; newspaper articles; and surgical and neurosurgical texts. The positive reception of his work is corroborated by invitations for Horsley to speak in America. Research additionally revealed that Horsley had numerous personal and professional relationships with prominent Americans in medicine, including William Osler, John Wheelock Elliot, Ernest Sachs, and (yes) Harvey Cushing. Horsley's contributions to medicine and science were heavily reported in American newspapers; outside of neurosurgery, his strong opposition to the antivivisectionists and his support for alcohol prohibition were widely reported in popular media. Horsley's contributions to neurosurgery in America are undeniable. Writings from and about prominent Americans reveal that he was viewed favorably by those who had met him. Frequent publication of his views in the American media suggests that medical professionals and the public in the US valued his contributions on scientific as well as social issues. Horsley died too young, but not without the

  4. Outcome of Microscopic Transsphenoidal Surgery in Cushing Disease: A Case Series of 96 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirvani, Manochehr; Motiei-Langroudi, Rouzbeh; Sadeghian, Homa

    2016-03-01

    To analyze the results of transsphenoidal surgery in patients with Cushing disease and outcome. Retrospective analysis of the records of 96 patients with Cushing disease from 1997 to 2012. There were 73 females and 23 males, with a mean follow-up of 44 months (range, 3-13 years). The sex ratio was significantly different in children and teenagers versus adults. Magnetic resonance imaging showed microadenoma, macroadenoma, and no adenoma in 66, 18, and 12 patients, respectively. There was no surgical mortality. Early remission (normal 24-hour urinary free cortisol and basal serum cortisol transsphenoidal surgery that resulted in remission in 12 patients (70.6%). The other 5 patients were referred for gamma knife radiosurgery or bilateral adrenalectomy. Transsphenoidal surgery is a safe and highly efficient procedure in the treatment of Cushing disease. Macroadenomas, cavernous sinus invasion, and harder tumor consistencies, however, are associated with lower remission rates (higher disease persistence) and younger age, higher preoperative cortisol levels, and longer follow-up periods are associated with higher recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Predictors of long-term remission after transsphenoidal surgery in Cushing's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellán Galiana, Pablo; Fajardo Montañana, Carmen; Riesgo Suárez, Pedro Antonio; Gómez Vela, José; Escrivá, Carlos Meseguer; Lillo, Vicente Rovira

    2013-10-01

    There is no consensus on the remission criteria for Cushing's disease or on the definition of disease recurrence after transsphenoidal surgery, and comparison of the different published series is therefore difficult. A long-term recurrence rate of Cushing's disease ranging from 2%-25% has been reported. Predictors of long-term remission reported include: 1) adenoma-related factors (aggressiveness, size, preoperative identification in MRI), 2) surgery-related factors, mainly neurosurgeon experience, 3) clinical factors, of which dependence on and duration of glucocorticoid treatment are most important, and 4) biochemical factors. Among the latter, low postoperative cortisol levels, less than 2 mcg/dL predict for disease remission. However, even when undetectable plasma cortisol levels are present, long-term recurrence may still occur and lifetime follow-up is required. We report the preliminary results of the first 20 patients with Cushing's disease operated on at our hospital using nadir cortisol levels less than 2 mcg/dl as remission criterion. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. CyberKnife Radiosurgery in the Multimodal Management of Patients with Cushing Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Justin M; Sala, Elisa; Amorin, Alvaro; Martinez, Hector; Bhowmik, Aprotim C; Chang, Steven D; Soltys, Scott G; Harsh, Griffith R; Katznelson, Laurence

    2018-04-01

    Surgery is the primary treatment for Cushing disease. When surgery is unsuccessful in normalizing hypercortisolism, adjuvant radiation, such as stereotactic radiosurgery, may be useful to improve biochemical control. This retrospective study included a cohort of consecutive patients treated with CyberKnife (CK) radiosurgery for active Cushing disease at Stanford Hospital and Clinics. As first-line treatment, all patients underwent transsphenoidal surgery with histologic demonstration of an adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing pituitary adenoma. CK was performed as adjuvant therapy for persistent or recurrent disease. The median time between surgery and CK was 14 ± 34 months. Before CK, median maximal diameter of tumors was 9 mm (range, 7-32 mm), with cavernous sinus invasion in all patients (100%) and abutment of the optic chiasm in 1 patient (14.2%). With an average follow-up of 55.4 months, normalization of hypercortisolism was achieved in 4 patients (57.1%): 2 patients (28.5%) achieved normalization of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis without glucocorticoid replacement, and 2 patients developed hypoadrenalism (28.5%). The median time to biochemical remission was 12.5 months. Hypopituitarism occurred in only 1 patient (14.2%), and no patients had visual complications. Time between surgery and radiotherapy of Cushing disease, we demonstrate that CK is an effective treatment with rare complications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cushing`s disease: Fibrinogen and D-dimer levels fail to normalize despite early postoperative remission - a prospective, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witek, Przemysław; Zieliński, Grzegorz; Szamotulska, Katarzyna; Witek, Joanna; Kamiński, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Effective transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) for Cushing`s disease (CD) normalizes cortisol levels and reduces complications of hypercortisolism. However, there is evidence of increased cardiovascular morbidity even after successful surgery. A prospective, controlled study on the dynamics of fibrinogen and D-dimer levels with a six-month follow-up after an effective TSS for CD. Forty patients with CD and forty healthy age- and sex-matched subjects were included. We assessed ACTH, urinary and serum cortisol, and fibrinogen and D-dimer levels before TSS and during follow-up. Baseline BMI (P < 0.001), fibrinogen (P = 0.002), and D-dimer (P = 0.001) levels in CD patients were significantly higher than those in healthy controls. High fibrinogen levels in the CD group were independent of BMI, and were positively associated with hsCRP (rS = 0.61, P < 0.001) and arterial hypertension (P = 0.029). After the six-month follow-up we confirmed a sustained difference between the remission group and controls in fibrinogen and D-dimer levels (P = 0.001 and P = 0.017, respectively). Despite early biochemical remission of CD the levels of fibrinogen and D-dimer failed to decrease. This probably contributes to the high risk of thrombotic events and indicates the need for a close follow-up for signs of thromboembolic and cardiovascular complications in patients with early CD remission. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (3): 283-291).

  8. Outcome of using the histological pseudocapsule as a surgical capsule in Cushing disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Jay; Smith, Rene; DeVroom, Hetty L; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Stratakis, Constantine A; Nieman, Lynnette K; Oldfield, Edward H

    2009-09-01

    Many patients with Cushing disease still have active or recurrent disease after pituitary surgery. The histological pseudocapsule of a pituitary adenoma is a layer of compressed normal anterior lobe that surrounds the adenoma and can be used during surgery to identify and guide removal of the tumor. In this study the authors examined the results of using the pseudocapsule as a surgical capsule in the resection of adenomas in patients with Cushing disease. The authors reviewed a prospective database of data obtained in patients with Cushing disease who underwent surgery. The analysis included all cases in which a lesion was identified during surgery and in which the lesion was believed to be confined to the pituitary gland in patients with Cushing disease between January 1990 and March 2007. Since the objective was to determine the success of using the pseudocapsule as a surgical capsule, patients with invasive tumors and patients in whom no lesion was identified during surgery-challenging cases for surgical success-were excluded from analysis. In 261 patients an encapsulated adenoma was identified at surgery. Tumor was visible on MR imaging in 135 patients (52%); in 126 patients (48%) MR imaging detected no tumor. The range of tumor size overlapped considerably in the groups with positive and negative MR imaging results, indicating that in addition to size other features of the adenoma influence the results of MR imaging. In 252 patients hypercortisolism resolved after the first operation, whereas in 9 patients (3 with positive MR imaging and 6 with negative MR imaging) early reoperation was required. Hypercortisolism resolved in all 261 patients (256 with hypocortisolism and 5 with eucortisolism) before hospital discharge. Forty-six patients (18%) had postoperative electrolyte abnormalities (30 with hyponatremia and 16 with diabetes insipidus), but only 2 patients required treatment at discharge. The mean clinical follow-up duration was 84 months (range 12

  9. Physiological Basis for the Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Adrenal Disorders: Cushing’s Syndrome, Adrenal Insufficiency, and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Hershel; Sharma, Susmeeta T.; Nieman, Lynnette K.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a classic neuroendocrine system. One of the best ways to understand the HPA axis is to appreciate its dynamics in the variety of diseases and syndromes that affect it. Excess glucocorticoid activity can be due to endogenous cortisol overproduction (spontaneous Cushing’s syndrome) or exogenous glucocorticoid therapy (iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome). Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome can be subdivided into ACTH-dependent and ACTH-independent, the latter of which is usually due to autonomous adrenal overproduction. The former can be due to a pituitary corticotroph tumor (usually benign) or ectopic ACTH production from tumors outside the pituitary; both of these tumor types overexpress the proopiomelanocortin gene. The converse of Cushing’s syndrome is the lack of normal cortisol secretion and is usually due to adrenal destruction (primary adrenal insufficiency) or hypopituitarism (secondary adrenal insufficiency). Secondary adrenal insufficiency can also result from a rapid discontinuation of long-term, pharmacological glucocorticoid therapy because of HPA axis suppression and adrenal atrophy. Finally, mutations in the steroidogenic enzymes of the adrenal cortex can lead to congenital adrenal hyperplasia and an increase in precursor steroids, particularly androgens. When present in utero, this can lead to masculinization of a female fetus. An understanding of the dynamics of the HPA axis is necessary to master the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of pituitary-adrenal diseases. Furthermore, understanding the pathophysiology of the HPA axis gives great insight into its normal control. PMID:24715566

  10. [Corticotropic axis and chronic stress in abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boullu-Ciocca, S; Verger, P; Bocquier, A; Oliver, C

    2005-12-03

    Several indicators of corticotropic axis hyperactivity have been observed in common abdominal obesity, which is clinically similar to the obesity found in Cushing's syndrome. Corticotropic axis hyperactivity may be involved in the development and metabolic and cardiovascular complications of abdominal obesity. Several mechanisms may be responsible for this hormonal dysregulation: genetic, lifestyle, and nutritional factors, and chronic stress. We note the necessity of methodologically-impeccable clinical studies for an objective evaluation of the role of stress in obesity.

  11. Cushing's syndrome due to pharmacological interaction in a cystic fibrosis patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Main, K M; Skov, M; Sillesen, Ida Blok

    2002-01-01

    and 1,600 microg budesonide. The patient experienced symptoms of striae, moon-face, increased facial hair growth, mood swings, headaches, weight gain, irregular menstruation despite oral contraceptives and increasing insulin requirement for diabetes mellitus. Endocrine investigations revealed total...

  12. The usefulness of tomodensitometry in the aetiological diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome [hypercorticism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delisle, F.

    1996-01-01

    By using tomodensitometry it is possible to observe, during the same examination, the pituitary region and the adrenal glands. Possible abnormalities in these regions can be interpreted to determine the cause of spontaneous hypercorticism and in this way treatment can be better adapted to the situation

  13. Decreased ligand affinity rather than glucocorticoid receptor down-regulation in patients with endogenous Cushing's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.A.T.M. Huizenga (Nannette); W.W. de Herder (Wouter); J.W. Koper (Jan); P. de Lange (Pieter); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); F.H. de Jong (Frank); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: Glucocorticoids (GCs) serve a variety of important functions throughout the body. The synthesis and secretion of GCs are under the strict influence of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis. The mechanisms of action of GCs are mediated by the

  14. Giant adrenal tumor presenting as Cushing's syndrome and pheochromocytoma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puskal Kumar Bagchi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 35-year-old lady who presented with Cushingoid features and associated raised urinary metanephrine. The patient underwent open adrenelectomy. Histopathological examination revealed adreno-cortical carcinoma with microscopic lymphovascular invasion. Postoperative period was uneventful and is on follow-up for the last one year and is doing well.

  15. Extended low-dose dexamethasone suppression test for diagnosis of atypical Cushing's syndrome in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, K M; Frank, L A; Morandi, F; Whittemore, J C

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate extension of the low-dose dexamethasone suppression (LDDS) test from 8 h to 12 h to detect possible hypercortisolemia associated with atypical hyperadrenocorticism (AHAC). Twelve client-owned dogs were enrolled in the study: 6 healthy dogs (group 1) and 6 dogs with suspected AHAC (group 2). Baseline EDTA plasma samples were collected for endogenous ACTH determination using an immunoradiometric assay. Serum samples were collected before and at 4, 8, 10, and 12 h post-administration of 0.01 mg/kg dexamethasone IV for cortisol concentration determination via chemiluminescent assay. Mean endogenous ACTH concentration did not differ between groups (group 1: 22.4 pg/mL, group 2: 20.0 pg/mL; P > 0.2). Mean baseline cortisol concentration also did not differ significantly between groups (group 1: 3.03 μg/dL, group 2: 4.95 μg/dL; P > 0.2) nor was there any difference in mean cortisol concentration between the groups at any other time point (P > 0.2). The cortisol concentration from 1 dog in group 2 suppressed to 0.7 μg/dL at 8 h but increased to 1.5 μg/dL at 10 h and 3.7 μg/dL at 12 h post-dexamethasone. Based on results of this study, use of an extended LDDS test could not differentiate between healthy dogs and dogs with AHAC. Diagnosis of AHAC should continue to be based on prior established criteria until new testing has been identified. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Impaired microvascular reactivity and endothelial function in patients with Cushing's syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Durovcová, V.; Prázný, M.; Ježková, J.; Horová, E.; Hána, V.; Kvasnička, J.; Pecen, Ladislav; Marek, J.; Škrha, J.; Kršek, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 16, - (2008), P400 ISSN 1479-6848. [European Congress of Endocrinology. 03.05.2008-07.05.2008, Berlin] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  17. Genetics Home Reference: primary macronodular adrenal hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Support and Research Foundation: Genetic Changes Found in Cushing's Disease, Adrenal Tumors, and Adrenal Hyperplasia MalaCards: acth-independent ... macronodular adrenal hyperplasia 2 Merck Manual (Home Edition): Cushing ... Adrenal Diseases Foundation: Cushing's Syndrome Orphanet: Cushing syndrome due to ...

  18. Síndrome de Cushing: é possível simplificar e padronizar sua abordagem diagnóstica?

    OpenAIRE

    Rollin, Guilherme A.F.S.; Czepielewski, Mauro A.

    2003-01-01

    A síndrome de Cushing representa um desafio diagnóstico, requerendo suspeita clínica apurada, conhecimento adequado da regulação hormonal do eixo hipotálamo-hipófise-adrenal, aplicação precisa de testes funcionais que estimulam ou inibem este eixo e a indicação de exames de imagem resolutivos para as diversas etiologias investigadas. Neste artigo, discutimos a abordagem diagnóstica da síndrome de Cushing, analisando a aplicação dos diversos testes utilizados tanto para o diagnóstico sindrômic...

  19. A rare case of multiple pituitary adenomas in an adolescent Cushing disease presenting as a vertebral compression fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yeon Song

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cushing disease in children and adolescents, especially with multiple pituitary adenomas (MPAs, is very rare. We report 17-year-old boy with MPAs. He presented with a vertebral compression fracture, weight gain, short stature, headache, and hypertension. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, only a left pituitary microadenoma was found. After surgery, transient clinical improvement was observed but headache and hypertension were observed again after 3 months later. Follow-up MRI showed a newly developed right pituitary microadenoma 6 months after the surgery. The need for careful clinical and radiographic follow-up should be emphasized in the search for potential MPAs in patients with persistent Cushing disease.

  20. A rare case of multiple pituitary adenomas in an adolescent Cushing disease presenting as a vertebral compression fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji-Yeon; Mun, Sue-Jean; Sung, Soon-Ki; Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Baik, Seung-Kug; Kim, Jee Yeon; Cheon, Chong-Kun; Kim, Su-Young; Kim, Yoo-Mi

    2017-09-01

    Cushing disease in children and adolescents, especially with multiple pituitary adenomas (MPAs), is very rare. We report 17-year-old boy with MPAs. He presented with a vertebral compression fracture, weight gain, short stature, headache, and hypertension. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), only a left pituitary microadenoma was found. After surgery, transient clinical improvement was observed but headache and hypertension were observed again after 3 months later. Follow-up MRI showed a newly developed right pituitary microadenoma 6 months after the surgery. The need for careful clinical and radiographic follow-up should be emphasized in the search for potential MPAs in patients with persistent Cushing disease.

  1. Metabolic complications of endogenous Cushing: patient selection for screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zh E Belaya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims: this study evaluates the most common associations of symptoms and complications in patients with Cushing’s syndrome (CS in order to choose a potential population to be screened for CS and estimates the diagnostic accuracy of first line screening tests (cortisol, ACTH to differentiate ACTH-ectopic CS from Cushing’s disease. Materials and Methods: The clinical data of 259 patients with proven CS during 2001–2011 was analyzed. The clinical presentations of 197 patients (159 Cushing’s disease, 28 ACTH-ectopic CS and 10 cases of benign cortisol-secreting adrenal adenoma were compared according to the cause of hypercortisolism. ROC-analysis was performed to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of the first line tests (cortisol, ACTH to suggest ACTH-ectopic CS. A threshold for the test with the highest area under the curves was chosen based on the maximum sum of the sensitivity and specificity. Results: The most frequent complaints were related to fatigue, muscle weakness, weight gain and changes in appearance (facial plethora and fullness, striae. Among the complications of CS the most frequent were being overweight or obese (71%, hypertension (63%, dislipoproteinemia (41%, low traumatic fractures (43% and steroid-induced diabetes (31%. In women, 16% were older than 50, in those who were younger amenorrhea was registered in 43%. The patients with ACTH-ectopic CS had higher rate of low traumatic fractures (p=0.04, increased serum late-night cortisol, 24 hours urinary free cortisol, morning and evening ACTH and lower levels of potassium (p<0.01 for all parameters. Plasma late-night ACTH measurements showed the highest AUC (0,811 (95% CI 0,712–0,909 to differentiate ACTH-ectopic CS from Cushing’s disease. A cut off value of 108.9 pg/ml for late-night ACTH yielded a sensitivity of 60,7% and a specificity of 79%. Conclusions: patients with a coexistence of obesity, muscle weakness, fatigue, some components of metabolic syndrome and especially

  2. Outcome of Transsphenoidal Surgery for Cushing Disease: A Single-Center Experience Over 32 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, William F; Barkan, Ariel L; Hollon, Todd; Sakharova, Alla; Sack, Jayson; Brahma, Barunashish; Schteingart, David E

    2016-02-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery is the standard approach for treating Cushing disease. Evidence is needed to document effectiveness. To analyze results of transsphenoidal surgery in 276 consecutive patients, including 19 children. Medical records were reviewed for patients treated initially with surgery for Cushing disease from 1980 to 2012. Radiographic features, pathology, remissions, recurrences, and complications were recorded. Patients were categorized for statistical analysis based on tumor size (microadenomas, macroadenomas, and negative imaging) and remission type (type 1 = morning cortisol ≤3 μg/dL; type 2 = morning cortisol normal). Females comprised 78% of patients and were older than men. Imaging showed 50% microadenomas, 13% macroadenomas, and 37% negative for tumor. Remission rates for microadenomas, macroadenomas, and negative imaging were 89%, 66%, and 71%, respectively. Patients with microadenomas were more likely to have type 1 remission. Pathology showed adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting adenomas in 82% of microadenomas, in 100% of macroadenomas, and in 43% of negative imaging. The incidence of hyperplasia was 8%. The finding of hyperplasia or no tumor on pathology predicted treatment failure. The recurrence rate was 17%, with an average time to recurrence of 4.0 years. Patients with type 1 remission had a lower rate of recurrence (13% type 1 vs 50% type 2) and a longer time to recurrence. Children had similar imaging findings, remission rates, and pathology. There were no operative deaths. Transsphenoidal surgery provides a safe and effective treatment for Cushing disease. For both adults and children, the best outcomes occurred in patients with microadenomas and/or those with type 1 remission.

  3. Detection of adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary adenomas by magnetic resonance imaging in children and adolescents with cushing disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Dalia; Courkoutsakis, Nickolas A; Oldfield, Edward H; Griffin, Kurt J; Keil, Meg; Patronas, Nickolas J; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2005-09-01

    We recently showed that pre- and postcontrast spoiled gradient-recalled acquisition in the steady-state (SPGR) was superior to conventional pre- and postcontrast T-1 weighted spin echo (SE) acquisition magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnostic evaluation of pituitary tumors in adult patients. The present investigation assessed the use of SPGR vs. SE-MRI in the diagnostic evaluation of ACTH-secreting tumors in children and adolescents with Cushing disease. Data were analyzed retrospectively from a series of patients seen over 7 yr (1997-2004). The setting for this study was a tertiary care referral center. Thirty children with Cushing disease (13 females and 17 males with a mean age of 12 +/- 3 yr) were studied. Imaging results were compared with surgical and pathological findings and the clinical outcome. Twenty-eight patients had microadenomas, and two had macroadenomas; the latter were identified by both MRI techniques. Precontrast SE and SPGR-MRI identified four and six of the microadenomas, respectively. Postcontrast SPGR-MRI identified the location of the tumor in 18 of 28 patients, whereas postcontrast SE-MRI identified the location and accurately estimated the size of the tumor in only five patients (P children and adolescents with Cushing disease. Postcontrast SPGR-MRI was superior to SE-MRI and should be used in addition to conventional SE-MRI in the pituitary evaluation of children and adolescents with suspected Cushing disease.

  4. Clinical features of GH deficiency and effects of 3 years of GH replacement in adults with controlled Cushing's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höybye, Charlotte; Ragnarsson, Oskar; Jönsson, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    Patients in remission from Cushing's disease (CD) have many clinical features that are difficult to distinguish from those of concomitant GH deficiency (GHD). In this study, we evaluated the features of GHD in a large cohort of controlled CD patients, and assessed the effect of GH treatment....

  5. Currently used and investigational drugs for Cushing´s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciato, Denis; Mumbach, Aizhar G; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Stalla, Günter K

    2017-01-01

    Cushing's disease (CD) is caused by a corticotroph adenoma of the pituitary gland that secretes excess adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) causing increased morbidity and mortality. Surgery is the treatment of choice, but is not always successful. Alternatives include radiotherapy, adrenal surgery, and pharmaceutical therapy. The latter is increasingly gaining momentum due to the recent development of compounds that reduce hypercortisolaemia or its symptoms, acting through different mechanisms. Areas covered: In this article, the authors provide a complete overview of the treatment options for Cushing´s disease, including adrenal-directed, tumor-targeted, and peripheral therapies that are currently used or in development, and discuss their potential advantages and limitations. Expert opinion: Considering the lack of long-term remission in up to half of the patients after surgery, and the delayed response to radiotherapy along with potential side effects, there is a strong need for an effective pharmaceutical treatment. Pasireotide, mifepristone, ketoconazole and metyrapone have been approved by regulatory authorities but their use remains limited due to considerable costs and side effects. Research in this field has focused recently on the improvement of pre-existing drugs and the development of safe new ones. However, few approaches aim at targeting the source of the disease, the ACTH-secreting adenoma.

  6. Long-term results of stereotactic radiosurgery to the pituitary gland in Cushing's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degerblad, M.; Raehn, T.; Bergstrand, G.; Thoren, M.

    1986-01-01

    Gamma radiation from 60 Co delivered with stereotactic technique was given to the pituitary gland in 35 patients, aged 18-65 years, with Cushing's disease. The doses were 70-100 Gy in each single irradiation. The size of the sella turcica was normal in the majority of the patients. The observation time was 3-9 years in 29 patiens. Out of them, 14 (48%) obtained clinical remission and normal urinary cortisol after one irradiation. Eight achieved remission after two to four irradiations. In total, 22 out of 29 patients (76%) obtained remission. In 12 of them remission was obtained in 1 year and in another 10 within 3 years. No recurrences were observed. Improvement was seen in 2 patients after one and three irradiations. Bilateral adrenalectomy was performed in 5 patients owing to unsatisfactory effect of irradiation. Pituitary insufficiency with gonadotropin, thyrotropin or cortocotropin failure was demonstrated in 12 of 22 patients in remission. This occurred 4 months to 7 years after the first irradiation. Another 6 patients were followed less than 3 years after the first irradiation. Two obtained remission after the first treatment, whereas the other 4 improved. Stereotactic pituitary irradiation is suggested as a non-invasive therapeutic alternative in Cushing's disease for example in patients with considerable surgical risk or as a supplement to pituitary microsurgery. (author)

  7. Results of treatment of Icenko-Cushing disease with proton beam irradiation of the pituitary gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marova, E.I.; Starkova, N.T.; Kirpatovskaya, L.E.; Kolesnikova, G.S.; Bukhman, A.I.; Rozhinskaya, L.Ya.; Bel'chenko, L.V.

    1987-01-01

    Proton beam therapy was given to 98 patients with Icenko-Cushing disease aged 15 to 40. Mild cases were treated by proton beam irradiation only while severe cases were managed using proton beam therapy combined with unilateral adrenalectomy or ortho-para-DDD. Catamnesis duration varied from 3 to 5 years. In most cases the exposure dose was 80-90 Gy (50-110 Gy). The procedure was well tolerated by all the patients. A dynamic multipolar converting method with 15-20 entrance poles in the left temporal area was employed (with the beam energy of 200 MeV). Stabilization of the course of disease and some clinical improvement were observed in most of the patients 3-4 months after proton beam therapy. In 6-36 months after irradiation 90% of the patients showed normal biochemical indices and the absence of any clinical signs of the disease. Thus the results of proton beam therapy of 98 patients with Icenko-Cushing disease after a follow-up of 3-5 years showed a high efficacy of this type of treatment. The method can be used alone or in combination with unilateral adrenalectomy as well as with oral administration of ortho-para-DDD

  8. Comorbidity and cardiovascular risk factors in adult GH deficiency following treatment for Cushing's disease or non-functioning pituitary adenomas during childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ragnarsson, Oskar; Höybye, Charlotte; Jönsson, Peter J

    2012-01-01