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Sample records for acquired pneumonia impact

  1. The impact of blood glucose on community-acquired pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Vestergaard; Egelund, Gertrud Baunbæk; Andersen, Stine Bang

    2017-01-01

    Hyperglycaemia is common in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and is a predictor of severe outcomes. Data are scarce regarding whether this association is affected by diabetes mellitus (DM) and also regarding its importance for severe outcomes in hospital. We determined the impact...

  2. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000146.htm Hospital-acquired pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an infection of the lungs ...

  3. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiere, H A; Niederman, M S

    1998-11-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in all age groups, especially the elderly, which is a patient population that continues to grow. Recently the spectrum and clinical picture of pneumonia has been changing as a reflection of this aging population; this requires a reassessment of and a new approach to the patient with pneumonia. Currently, pneumonia patients are classified as having either community-acquired or hospital-acquired infection rather than typical versus atypical. Patients who have CAP are categorized by age, presence of a coexisting medical illness, and the severity of the pneumonia. The rationale behind categorizing patients is to stratify them in terms of mortality risk to help determine the location of therapy (e.g., outpatient, inpatient, intensive care unit) and focus the choice of initial antimicrobial therapy. Once the decision to hospitalize a patient with pneumonia is made, the next step is to decide on an appropriate diagnostic evaluation and antibiotic therapy. Both decisions have evolved over the last several years since the publication of the American Thoracic Society's CAP guidelines. The current approach to the diagnostic work-up of pneumonia stresses a limited role of diagnostic tests and procedures. The antimicrobial regimen has now evolved into one that is empiric in nature and based on the age of the patient, the presence of coexisting medical disease, and the overall severity of the pneumonia. This process is a dynamic once because bacterial resistance to commonly used antibiotics can further complicate the course of pneumonia therapy, but the impact of resistance on outcome is less clear. Resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to penicillin is a prime example of this growing problem, and adjustment to pneumonia therapy may be required. A difficult but not uncommon problem in pneumonia patients is slow recovery and delayed resolution of radiographic infiltrates. Factors that impact

  4. Pneumonia - children - community acquired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronchopneumonia - children; Community-acquired pneumonia - children; CAP - children ... Viruses are the most common cause of pneumonia in infants and children. Ways your child can get CAP include: Bacteria and viruses living in the nose, sinuses, or mouth may spread ...

  5. Impact of pre-hospital antibiotic use on community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, A F; Viasus, D; Garcia-Vidal, C; Grillo, S; Molero, L; Dorca, J; Carratalà, J

    2014-09-01

    Information on the influence of pre-hospital antibiotic treatment on the causative organisms, clinical features and outcomes of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains scarce. We performed an observational study of a prospective cohort of non-immunosuppressed adults hospitalized with CAP between 2003 and 2012. Patients were divided into two groups: those who had received pre-hospital antibiotic treatment for the same episode of CAP and those who had not. A propensity score was used to match patients. Of 2179 consecutive episodes of CAP, 376 (17.3%) occurred in patients who had received pre-hospital antibiotic treatment. After propensity score matching, Legionella pneumophila was more frequently identified in patients with pre-hospital antibiotic treatment, while Streptococcus pneumoniae was less common (p sensitivity and specificity of the pneumococcal urinary antigen test for diagnosing pneumococcal pneumonia were similar in the two groups. Patients with pre-hospital antibiotic treatment were less likely to present fever (p 0.02) or leucocytosis (p 0.001). Conversely, chest X-ray cavitation was more frequent in these patients (p 0.04). No significant differences were found in the frequency of patients classified into high-risk Pneumonia Severity Index classes, in intensive care unit admission, or in 30-day mortality between the groups. In conclusion, L. pneumophila occurrence was nearly three times higher in patients who received pre-hospital antibiotics. After a propensity-adjusted analysis, no significant differences were found in prognosis between study groups. Pre-hospital antibiotic use should be considered when choosing aetiological diagnostic tests and empirical antibiotic therapy in patients with CAP. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  6. The etiology and impact of co-infections in children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Vikki G; Arnold, Sandra R; Bramley, Anna M; Ampofo, Krow; Williams, Derek J; Grijalva, Carlos G; Self, Wesley H; Anderson, Evan J; Wunderink, Richard G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Pavia, Andrew T; Jain, Seema; McCullers, Jonathan A

    2017-12-08

    Recognition that co-infections are common in children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is increasing, but gaps remain in our understanding of their frequency and importance. We analyzed data from 2219 children hospitalized with CAP and compared demographics, clinical characteristics, and outcomes between groups with viruses alone, bacteria alone, or co-infections. We also assessed the frequency of selected pairings of co-detected pathogens and their clinical characteristics. 576 (26%) of the children studied had a co-infection. Children with only virus detection were younger and more likely to be black and have co-morbidities such as asthma compared to those with bacteria alone. Children with virus-bacteria co-infections had a higher frequency of leukocytosis, consolidation on chest X-ray, increased length of stay, and more frequent parapneumonic effusions, intensive care unit admission, and need for mechanical ventilation when compared to viruses alone. Virus-virus co-infections were generally comparable to single virus infections, with the exception of the need for oxygen supplementation, which was higher during the first 24 hours of hospitalization in some virus-virus pairings. Co-infections occurred in 26% of children hospitalized for CAP. Children with bacterial infections, alone or complicated by a virus, have worse outcomes than children infected with a virus alone. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. The impact of community-acquired pneumonia on the health-related quality-of-life in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangen, Marie-Josée J; Huijts, Susanne M; Bonten, Marc J M; de Wit, G Ardine

    2017-03-14

    The sustained health-related quality-of-life of patients surviving community-acquired pneumonia has not been accurately quantified. The aim of the current study was to quantify differences in health-related quality-of-life of community-dwelling elderly with and without community-acquired pneumonia during a 12-month follow-up period. In a matched cohort study design, nested in a prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial on the efficacy of the 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine in community-dwelling persons of ≥65 years, health-related quality-of-life was assessed in 562 subjects hospitalized with suspected community-acquired pneumonia (i.e. diseased cohort) and 1145 unaffected persons (i.e. non-diseased cohort) matched to pneumonia cases on age, sex, and health status (EQ-5D-3L-index). Health-related quality-of-life was determined 1-2 weeks after hospital discharge/inclusion and 1, 6 and 12 months thereafter, using Euroqol EQ-5D-3L and Short Form-36 Health survey questionnaires. One-year quality-adjusted life years (QALY) were estimated for both diseased and non-diseased cohorts. Separate analyses were performed for pneumonia cases with and without radiologically confirmed community-acquired pneumonia. The one-year excess QALY loss attributed to community-acquired pneumonia was 0.13. Mortality in the post-discharge follow-up year was 8.4% in community-acquired pneumonia patients and 1.2% in non-diseased persons (p pneumonia patients, compared to non-diseased persons, but differences in health-related quality-of-life between radiologically confirmed and non-confirmed community-acquired pneumonia cases were not statistically significant. Community-acquired pneumonia was associated with a six-fold increased mortality and 16% lower quality-of-life in the post-discharge year among patients surviving hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia, compared to non-diseased persons. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00812084 .

  8. Pseudomona pseudomallei community acquired pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severiche, Diego

    1998-01-01

    This is the first published case report en Colombia about pseudomona pseudomallei community acquired pneumonia. This uncommon pathogen is from the epidemiological standpoint a very important one and medical community should be aware to look after it in those patients where no other etiological pathogen is recovered. A brief summary about epidemiology is showed, emphasizing those regions where it can be found. Likewise, comments about the differential diagnosis are important since it should be considered in those patients where tuberculosis is suspected. This is particularly representative for countries with high tuberculosis rates. Furthermore, a microbiological review is shown, emphasizing on isolation techniques, descriptions about therapeutics and other regarding treatment issues according international standards. Finally; a description about the clinical picture, laboratory findings, treatment and evolution of the case reported are shown for discussion

  9. Inadequate treatment of ventilator-associated and hospital-acquired pneumonia: Risk factors and impact on outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piskin Nihal

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Initial antimicrobial therapy (AB is an important determinant of clinical outcome in patients with severe infections as pneumonia, however well-conducted studies regarding prognostic impact of inadequate initial AB in patients who are not undergoing mechanical ventilation (MV are lacking. In this study we aimed to identify the risk factors for inadequate initial AB and to determine its subsequent impact on outcomes in both ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP and hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP. Methods We retrospectively studied the accuracy of initial AB in patients with pneumonia in a university hospital in Turkey. A total of 218 patients with HAP and 130 patients with VAP were included. For each patient clinical, radiological and microbiological data were collected. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis was used for risk factor analysis. Survival analysis was performed by using Kaplan-Meier method with Log-rank test. Results Sixty six percent of patients in VAP group and 41.3% of patients in HAP group received inadequate initial AB. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the risk factors for inadequate initial AB in HAP patients were; late-onset HAP (OR = 2.35 (95% CI, 1.05-5.22; p = 0.037 and APACHE II score at onset of HAP (OR = 1.06 (95% CI, 1.01-1.12; p = 0.018. In VAP patients; antibiotic usage in the previous three months (OR = 3.16 (95% CI, 1.27-7.81; p = 0.013 and admission to a surgical unit (OR = 2.9 (95% CI, 1.17-7.19; p = 0.022 were found to be independent risk factors for inadequate initial AB. No statistically significant difference in crude hospital mortality and 28-day mortality was observed between the treatment groups in both VAP and HAP. However we showed a significant increase in length of hospital stay, duration of mechanical ventilation and a prolonged clinical resolution in the inadequate AB group in both VAP and HAP. Conclusion Our data

  10. Inadequate treatment of ventilator-associated and hospital-acquired pneumonia: risk factors and impact on outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskin, Nihal; Aydemir, Hande; Oztoprak, Nefise; Akduman, Deniz; Comert, Fusun; Kokturk, Furuzan; Celebi, Guven

    2012-10-24

    Initial antimicrobial therapy (AB) is an important determinant of clinical outcome in patients with severe infections as pneumonia, however well-conducted studies regarding prognostic impact of inadequate initial AB in patients who are not undergoing mechanical ventilation (MV) are lacking. In this study we aimed to identify the risk factors for inadequate initial AB and to determine its subsequent impact on outcomes in both ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) and hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP). We retrospectively studied the accuracy of initial AB in patients with pneumonia in a university hospital in Turkey. A total of 218 patients with HAP and 130 patients with VAP were included. For each patient clinical, radiological and microbiological data were collected. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis was used for risk factor analysis. Survival analysis was performed by using Kaplan-Meier method with Log-rank test. Sixty six percent of patients in VAP group and 41.3% of patients in HAP group received inadequate initial AB. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the risk factors for inadequate initial AB in HAP patients were; late-onset HAP (OR = 2.35 (95% CI, 1.05-5.22; p = 0.037) and APACHE II score at onset of HAP (OR = 1.06 (95% CI, 1.01-1.12); p = 0.018). In VAP patients; antibiotic usage in the previous three months (OR = 3.16 (95% CI, 1.27-7.81); p = 0.013) and admission to a surgical unit (OR = 2.9 (95% CI, 1.17-7.19); p = 0.022) were found to be independent risk factors for inadequate initial AB. No statistically significant difference in crude hospital mortality and 28-day mortality was observed between the treatment groups in both VAP and HAP. However we showed a significant increase in length of hospital stay, duration of mechanical ventilation and a prolonged clinical resolution in the inadequate AB group in both VAP and HAP. Our data suggests that the risk factors for inadequate initial AB

  11. Impact of respiratory viruses in hospital-acquired pneumonia in the intensive care unit: A single-center retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubet, Paul; Voiriot, Guillaume; Houhou-Fidouh, Nadhira; Neuville, Mathilde; Bouadma, Lila; Lescure, Francois-Xavier; Descamps, Diane; Timsit, Jean-François; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Visseaux, Benoit

    2017-06-01

    Data on the frequency and role of respiratory viruses (RVs) in hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) are still scarce. We assessed the proportion of RVs and their impact on the outcome of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) in the intensive care unit (ICU). Cases of HAP were retrospectively selected among patients who underwent screening for RVs by multiplex PCR (mPCR) in the ICU of a French tertiary care hospital from May 2014 to April 2016. ICU length of stay and in-hospital mortality were compared between four groups defined according to the identified pathogens: virus only (V), virus/bacteria (V/B), bacteria only (B) and no pathogen (Neg). When available, previous mPCR was retrieved in order to assess possible chronic viral carriage. Overall, 95/999 (10%) ICU patients who underwent mPCR had HAP (V(17,18%), V/B(13,14%), B(60,63%), Neg(5,5%)). Median age was 61 years and 45 (47%) were immunocompromised. Influenza (27%) and rhinovirus (27%) were the most common RVs. V/B group had higher mortality rate than B and V groups (62% vs. 40% and 35%, p=0.3) and a significantly longer length of stay (31days (18-48)) than V group (5days (3-11), p=0.0002)) and B group (14.5days (5.5-25.5), p=0.007)). Among the 15 patients with available mPCR tests before viral HAP, seven were negative and eight were positive corresponding to long-term carriage of community-acquired viruses. RVs were detected in 32% of HAP patients who underwent mPCR. Two situations were encountered: (i) acute acquired viral infection; (ii) long-term viral carriage (mostly rhinovirus) especially in immunocompromised patients complicated by a virus/bacteria coinfection. The latter was associated with a longer length of stay and a trend toward a higher mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Prognostic implications of aspiration pneumonia in patients with community acquired pneumonia: A systematic review with meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Komiya, Kosaku; Rubin, Bruce K.; Kadota, Jun-ichi; Mukae, Hiroshi; Akaba, Tomohiro; Moro, Hiroshi; Aoki, Nobumasa; Tsukada, Hiroki; Noguchi, Shingo; Shime, Nobuaki; Takahashi, Osamu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Aspiration pneumonia is thought to be associated with a poor outcome in patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, there has been no systematic review regarding the impact of aspiration pneumonia on the outcomes in patients with CAP. This review was conducted using the MOOSE guidelines: Patients: patients defined CAP. Exposure: aspiration pneumonia defined as pneumonia in patients who have aspiration risk. Comparison: confirmed pneumonia in patients who were not considered to ...

  13. Community-acquired pneumonia: impact of empirical antibiotic therapy without respiratory fluoroquinolones nor third-generation cephalosporins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradelli, J; Risso, K; de Salvador, F G; Cua, E; Ruimy, R; Roger, P-M

    2015-03-01

    Guidelines for inpatients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) propose to use respiratory fluoroquinolone (RFQ) and/or third-generation cephalosporins (Ceph-3). However, broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy is associated with the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria. We established a guideline in which RFQ and Ceph-3 were excluded as a first course. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of our therapeutic choices for CAP on the length of hospital stay (LOS) and patient outcome. This was a cohort study of patients with CAP from July 2005 to June 2014. We compared patients benefiting from our guideline established in 2008 to those receiving non-consensual antibiotics. Disease severity was evaluated through the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). The empirical treatment for PSI III to V was a combination therapy of amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (AMX-C) + roxithromycin (RX) or AMX + ofloxacin. Adherence to guidelines was defined by the prescription of one of these antibiotic agents. Requirement for intensive care or death defined unfavorable outcome. Among 1,370 patients, 847 were treated according to our guideline (61.8 %, group 1) and 523 without concordant therapy (38.2 %, group 2). The mean PSI was similar: 82 vs. 83, p > 0.5. The mean LOS was lower in group 1: 7.6 days vs. 9.1 days, p < 0.001. An unfavorable outcome was less frequent in group 1: 5.4 % vs. 9.9 %, p = 0.001. In logistic regression models, concordant therapy was associated with a favorable outcome: adjusted odds ratio (AOR) [95 % confidence interval (CI)] 1.85 [1.20-2.88], p = 0.005. CAP therapy without RFQ and Ceph-3 use was associated with a shorter LOS and fewer unfavorable outcomes.

  14. Impact of infant pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on community acquired pneumonia hospitalization in all ages in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deursen, A M M; Schurink-Van't Klooster, T M; Man, W H; van de Kassteele, J; van Gageldonk-Lafeber, A B; Bruijning-Verhagen, P C J L; de Melker, H E; Sanders, E A M; Knol, M J

    2017-01-01

    The long-term impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines on pneumonia hospitalizations in all age-groups varies between countries. In the Netherlands, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was implemented for newborns in 2006 and replaced by PCV10 in 2011. We assessed the impact of PCVs

  15. The order of administration of macrolides and beta-lactams may impact the outcomes of hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia: results from the community-acquired pneumonia organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrani, Paula; Wiemken, Timothy L; Metersky, Mark L; Arnold, Forest W; Mattingly, William A; Feldman, Charles; Cavallazzi, Rodrigo; Fernandez-Botran, Rafael; Bordon, Jose; Ramirez, Julio A

    2018-01-01

    The beneficial effect of macrolides for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in combination with beta-lactams may be due to their anti-inflammatory activity. In patients with pneumococcal meningitis, the use of steroids improves outcomes only if they are administered before beta-lactams. The objective of this study was to compare outcomes in hospitalized patients with CAP when macrolides were administered before, simultaneously with, or after beta-lactams. Secondary data analysis of the Community-Acquired Pneumonia Organization (CAPO) International Cohort Study database. Study groups were defined based on the sequence of administration of macrolides and beta-lactams. The study outcomes were time to clinical stability (TCS), length of stay (LOS) and in-hospital mortality. Accelerated failure time models were used to evaluate the adjusted impact of sequential antibiotic administration and time-to-event outcomes, while a logistic regression model was used to evaluate their adjusted impact on mortality. A total of 99 patients were included in the macrolide before group and 305 in the macrolide after group. Administration of a macrolide before a beta-lactam compared to after a beta-lactam reduced TCS (3 vs. 4 days, p = .011), LOS (6 vs. 7 days, p = .002) and mortality (3 vs. 7.2%, p = .228). The administration of macrolides before beta-lactams was associated with a statistically significant decrease in TCS and LOS and a non-statistically significant decrease in mortality. The beneficial effect of macrolides in hospitalized patient with CAP may occur only if administered before beta-lactams.

  16. Impact of infant pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on community acquired pneumonia hospitalization in all ages in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deursen, A. M.M.; Schurink-van't Klooster, Tessa M; Man, W. H.; van de Kassteele, J.; van Gageldonk-Lafeber, Arianne B; Bruijning-Verhagen, P. C.J.L.; de Melker, Hester E.; Sanders, E. A.M.; Knol, Mirjam J.

    2017-01-01

    Background The long-term impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines on pneumonia hospitalizations in all age-groups varies between countries. In the Netherlands, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was implemented for newborns in 2006 and replaced by PCV10 in 2011. We assessed the

  17. Impact of an Educational Program to Reduce Healthcare Resources in Community-Acquired Pneumonia: The EDUCAP Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Adamuz

    Full Text Available Additional healthcare visits and rehospitalizations after discharge are frequent among patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and have a major impact on healthcare costs. We aimed to determine whether the implementation of an individualized educational program for hospitalized patients with CAP would decrease subsequent healthcare visits and readmissions within 30 days of hospital discharge.A multicenter, randomized trial was conducted from January 1, 2011 to October 31, 2014 at three hospitals in Spain. We randomly allocated immunocompetent adults patients hospitalized for CAP to receive either an individualized educational program or conventional information before discharge. The educational program included recommendations regarding fluid intake, adherence to drug therapy and preventive vaccines, knowledge and management of the disease, progressive adaptive physical activity, and counseling for alcohol and smoking cessation. The primary trial endpoint was a composite of the frequency of additional healthcare visits and rehospitalizations within 30 days of hospital discharge. Intention-to-treat analysis was performed.We assigned 102 patients to receive the individualized educational program and 105 to receive conventional information. The frequency of the composite primary end point was 23.5% following the individualized program and 42.9% following the conventional information (difference, -19.4%; 95% confidence interval, -6.5% to -31.2%; P = 0.003.The implementation of an individualized educational program for hospitalized patients with CAP was effective in reducing subsequent healthcare visits and rehospitalizations within 30 days of discharge. Such a strategy may help optimize available healthcare resources and identify post-acute care needs in patients with CAP.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN39531840.

  18. Immunomodulation in community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remmelts, H.H.F.

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common disease with considerable morbidity and mortality, despite effective antibiotic treatment. In this thesis, we showed that the major causative microorganisms in CAP trigger distinct inflammatory response profiles in the host. While an inflammatory

  19. Treatment of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young R; Houngue, Coovi; Hall, Ronald G

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is the sixth leading cause of death in the USA. Adherence to the 2007 Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society community-acquired pneumonia guidelines has been associated with improved clinical outcomes. However, choice between guideline-recommended treatments is at the discretion of the prescribing clinician. This review is intended to discuss the characteristics of these treatment options including dosing frequency, dose adjustment for renal/hepatic dysfunction, serious/common adverse events, drug interactions, lung penetration, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic target and effect of obesity to help guide antimicrobial selection. An increasing portion of patients are receiving expanded empiric coverage for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as recommended by the American Thoracic Society and Infectious Diseases Society of America for healthcare-associated pneumonia. However, this expanded coverage may not be achieving the desired improvements in clinical outcomes. We expect this increasingly diverse spectrum of patients with pneumonia to eventually result in the merger of these two guidelines to include all patients with pneumonia.

  20. [Health impact and treatment costs of community-acquired pneumonia in children in the first level of public attention in Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernztein, Ricardo; Drake, Ignacio

    2009-04-01

    Community acquired pneumonia in children remains an important cause of childhood deaths throughout the world that can be prevented by the use of antibiotics and access to medical care. Both were reduced in 2001 when Argentina suffered a severe social crisis. Among the responses to the crisis, the Remediar Program provided free essential medicines to the socially vulnerable population. Assess the health impact and costs of the provision of free medicines at the first level of public attention for childhood pneumonia. Three designs: 1. Ecological study with cross comparisons of diagnoses, prescriptions, beneficiaries by individual provinces of Remediar forms. children under 15 years old attended at 6 thousand health centres in Argentina, encompassing 24 Argentine provinces from March 2005 until February 2006. 2. Counterfactual approach. 3. Calculation of drug costs per unit of outcome. Over 15 million prescriptions were identified, 2,420 children under 1 year, 19,205 of 1 to 4 years and 15,977 from 5 to 14 years old with pneumonia. 90% of beneficiaries received antibiotics, most often amoxicillin. In children's under 5 years of age, Remediar coverage was 27.8%, with greater impact in the poorest provinces. The likely impact was 4,322 lives saved or 310,325 years of life lost avoided if mortality without antibiotics was 20%. Indigents who had children with pneumonia saved by medicines 14.3% of their income. Each life saved could have cost US $ 6.46 and each year of life lost averted US $ 0.09. This work highlights the impact of a low-cost health program for the treatment of vulnerable populations with childhood pneumonia in Argentina.

  1. Decrease in mortality in severe community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia: impact of improving antibiotic strategies (2000-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattarello, Simone; Borgatta, Bárbara; Solé-Violán, Jordi; Vallés, Jordi; Vidaur, Loreto; Zaragoza, Rafael; Torres, Antoni; Rello, Jordi

    2014-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare antibiotic prescribing practices and survival in the ICU for patients with pneumococcal severe community-acquired pneumonia (SCAP) between 2000 and 2013. This was a matched case-control study of two prospectively recorded cohorts in Europe. Eighty patients from the Community-Acquired Pneumonia en la Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos (CAPUCI) II study (case group) were matched with 80 patients from CAPUCI I (control group) based on the following: shock at admission, need of mechanical ventilation, COPD, immunosuppression, and age. Demographic data were comparable in the two groups. Combined antibiotic therapy increased from 66.2% to 87.5% (P < .01), and the percentage of patients receiving the first dose of antibiotic within 3 h increased from 27.5% to 70.0% (P < .01). ICU mortality was significantly lower (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.68-0.98) in cases, both in the whole population and in the subgroups of patients with shock (OR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.50-0.89) or receiving mechanical ventilation (OR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.55-0.96). In the multivariate analysis, ICU mortality increased in patients requiring mechanical ventilation (OR, 5.23; 95% CI, 1.60-17.17) and decreased in patients receiving early antibiotic treatment (OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.15-0.87) and combined therapy (OR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.07-0.51). In pneumococcal SCAP, early antibiotic prescription and use of combination therapy increased. Both were associated with improved survival.

  2. Severe leukopenia in Staphylococcus aureus-necrotizing, community-acquired pneumonia: risk factors and impact on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanafer, Nagham; Sicot, Nicolas; Vanhems, Philippe; Dumitrescu, Oana; Meyssonier, Vanina; Tristan, Anne; Bès, Michèle; Lina, Gérard; Vandenesch, François; Gillet, Yves; Etienne, Jérôme

    2013-08-01

    Necrotizing pneumonia attributed to Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive Staphylococcus aureus has mainly been reported in otherwise healthy children and young adults, with a high mortality rate. Erythroderma, airway bleeding, and leukopenia have been shown to be predictive of mortality. The objectives of this study were to define the characteristics of patients with severe leukopenia at 48-h hospitalization and to update our data regarding mortality predicting factors in a larger population than we had previously described. It was designed as a case-case study nested in a cohort study. A total of 148 cases of community-acquired, necrotizing pneumonia were included. The following data were collected: basic demographic information, medical history, signs and symptoms, radiological findings and laboratory results during the first 48 h of hospitalization. The study population was divided into 2 groups: (1) with severe leukopenia (leukocyte count ≤3,000 leukocytes/mL, n=62) and (2) without severe leukopenia (>3,000 leukocytes/mL, n=86). Median age was 22 years, and the male-to-female gender ratio was 1.5. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 41.2%. Death occurred in 75.8% of severe leukopenia cases with median survival time of 4 days, and in 16.3% of cases with leukocyte count >3,000/mL (Pleukopenia were influenza-like illness (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 4.45, 95% CI (95% confidence interval) 1.67-11.88, P=0.003), airway bleeding (aOR 4.53, 95% CI 1.85-11.13, P=0.001) and age over 30 years (aOR 2.69, 95% CI 1.08-6.68, P=0.033). A personal history of furuncles appeared to be protective (OR 0.11, 95% CI 0.01-0.96, P=0.046). S. aureus-necrotizing pneumonia is still an extremely severe disease in patients with severe leukopenia. Some factors could distinguish these patients, allowing better initial identification to initiate adapted, rapid administration of appropriate therapy.

  3. Community-acquired pneumonia among smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, Jordi; Blanquer, José; Bello, Salvador

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have left absolutely no doubt that tobacco increases susceptibility to bacterial lung infection, even in passive smokers. This relationship also shows a dose-response effect, since the risk reduces spectacularly 10 years after giving up smoking, returning to the level of non-smokers. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the causative microorganism responsible for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) most frequently associated with smoking, particularly in invasive pneumococcal disease and septic shock. It is not clear how it acts on the progress of pneumonia, but there is evidence to suggest that the prognosis for pneumococcal pneumonia is worse. In CAP caused by Legionella pneumophila, it has also been observed that smoking is the most important risk factor, with the risk rising 121% for each pack of cigarettes smoked a day. Tobacco use may also favor diseases that are also known risk factors for CAP, such as periodontal disease and upper respiratory viral infections. By way of prevention, while giving up smoking should always be proposed, the use of the pneumococcal vaccine is also recommended, regardless of the presence of other comorbidities. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Tsukamurella infection: a rare cause of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Yatin B; Goswami, Raktima; Bhanot, Nitin; Mehta, Zankhana; Simonelli, Paul

    2011-06-01

    A 79-year-old Asian man was admitted with community-acquired pneumonia. Antimycobacterial therapy was initiated when sputum smears revealed acid fast bacilli. The patient was, however, diagnosed to have pneumonia secondary to Tsukamurella spp. This is an exceedingly rare cause of pneumonia, especially in immunocompetent individuals. Clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment strategies of Tsukamurella pneumonia are discussed with a literature review.

  5. Ceftobiprole medocaril in the treatment of hospital-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheeren, Thomas W. L.

    2015-01-01

    Ceftobiprole medocaril is a fifth-generation cephalosporin approved in Europe as single-agent therapy for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP), excluding ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). It is rapidly converted to the active metabolite ceftobiprole following intravenous administration.

  6. Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannella, Hernán A; Luna, Carlos M

    2016-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) region. Poverty, socioeconomic factors, and malnutrition influence the incidence and outcome of CAP in LAC. In LAC, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequent microorganism responsible for CAP, (incidence: 24-78%); the incidence of atypical microorganisms is similar to other regions of the world. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a growing problem in the LAC region, with the Caribbean being the second most affected area worldwide after Sub-Saharan Africa. Pneumococcal pneumonia remains the most common cause of CAP in HIV-infected patients, but Pneumocystis jirovecii and tuberculosis (TB) are also common in this population. The heterogeneity of the health care systems and social inequity between different countries in LAC, and even between different settings inside the same country, is a difficult issue. TB, including multidrug-resistant TB, is several times more common in South American and Central American countries compared with North America. Furthermore, hantaviruses circulating in the Americas (new world hantaviruses) generate a severe respiratory disease called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, with an associated mortality as high as 50%. More than 30 hantaviruses have been reported in the Western Hemisphere, with more frequent cases registered in the southern cone (Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia, and Brazil). Respiratory viruses (particularly influenza) remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the elderly. Low rates of vaccination (against influenza as well as pneumococcus) may heighten the risk of these infections in low- and middle-income countries. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Atypical pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubairi, Ali Bin Sarwar; Zafar, Afia; Salahuddin, Nawal; Haque, Ahmed Suleman; Waheed, Shahan; Khan, Javaid Ahmed

    2012-07-01

    To determine the frequency of community-acquired respiratory pathogens with special focus on atypical organisms in patients presenting to a tertiary care facility with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The descriptive study on adult patients was conducted from February 2007 to March 2008 at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. It comprised 124 consenting patients of age 16 and above who presentd with a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia. The diagnostic modalities used were based on significant changes in antibody titer or persisting high antibody titers in the case of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chalmydia pneumoniae infections, or bacterial antigen in urine, in the case of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 infection. Pyogenic bacteria were identified on the results of respiratory secretions or blood cultures. Continuous data and categorical variables were worked out using SPSS version 15. Among the 124 patients enrolled, an etiologic agent was identified in 44 (35.4%) patients. The most common organism was Mycoplasma pneumoniae (n = 21, 17%), followed by Chlamydia pneumoniae (n = 15, 12%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 9, 7%), Haemophilus influenzae (n = 2, 1.6%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 2, 1.6%) and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 1, 0.8%). Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common organism isolated from blood cultures. No cases of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 were identified. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chalmydia pneumoniae are significant etiologic agents for community-acquired pneumonia occurring in Karachi. Local treatment guidelines for community-acquired pneumonia should include therapy directed specifically at these agents.

  8. Community-acquired pneumonia; Ambulant erworbene Pneumonien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poetter-Lang, S.; Herold, C.J. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Wien (Austria)

    2017-01-15

    The diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is often not possible based only on the clinical symptoms and biochemical parameters. For every patient with the suspicion of CAP, a chest radiograph in two planes should be carried out. Additionally, a risk stratification for the decision between outpatient therapy or hospitalization is recommended. Based on the evaluation of the different radiological patterns as well as their extent and distribution, a rough allocation to so-called pathogen groups as well as a differentiation between viral and bacterial infections are possible; however, because different pathogens cause different patterns an accurate correlation is not feasible by relying purely on imaging. The radiological findings serve as proof or exclusion of pneumonia and can also be used to evaluate the extent of the disease (e.g. monolobular, multilobular, unilateral or bilateral). In cases of prolonged disease, suspicion of complications (e.g. pleural effusion or empyema, necrotizing pneumonia or abscess) or comorbid conditions (e.g. underlying pulmonary or mediastinal diseases) computed tomography is an important diagnostic tool in addition to chest radiography. Ultrasound is often used to diagnose pleural processes (e.g. parapneumonic effusion or pleural empyema). (orig.) [German] Anhand der klinischen Symptome und laborchemischen Befundkonstellation alleine ist es oft nicht moeglich, die Diagnose einer ambulant erworbenen Pneumonie (''community-acquired pneumonia'', CAP) zu stellen. Bei jedem Patienten mit Verdacht auf CAP sollte eine Roentgenthoraxaufnahme in 2 Ebenen angefertigt werden. Weiter muss eine Risikostratifizierung im Sinne der Entscheidung ambulante Therapie vs. Hospitalisierung erfolgen. Anhand der Analyse radiologischer Muster sowie deren Verteilung und Ausdehnung koennen eine grobe Zuordnung zu sogenannten Erregergruppen sowie eine Differenzierung zwischen viralen und bakteriellen Infektionen gelingen. Da

  9. Mortality predictors in community-acquired pneumonia | Tanimowo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acquired pneumonia to themedicalwards of Ladoke Akintola University ofTeaching Hospital between Jan. 2003 andDec. 2005. The case notes of 65 patients admitted for community-acquired pneumoniawere studiedwith respect to their admission ...

  10. Which individuals are at increased risk of pneumococcal disease and why? Impact of COPD, asthma, smoking, diabetes, and/or chronic heart disease on community-acquired pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Antoni; Blasi, Francesco; Dartois, Nathalie; Akova, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Pneumococcal disease (including community-acquired pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease) poses a burden to the community all year round, especially in those with chronic underlying conditions. Individuals with COPD, asthma or who smoke, and those with chronic heart disease or diabetes mellitus have been shown to be at increased risk of pneumococcal disease compared with those without these risk factors. These conditions, and smoking, can also adversely affect patient outcomes, including short-term and long-term mortality rates, following pneumonia. Community-acquired pneumonia, and in particular pneumococcal pneumonia, is associated with a significant economic burden, especially in those who are hospitalised, and also has an impact on a patient's quality of life. Therefore, physicians should target individuals with COPD, asthma, heart disease or diabetes mellitus, and those who smoke, for pneumococcal vaccination at the earliest opportunity at any time of the year. PMID:26219979

  11. Severe community-acquired pneumonia : what's in a name?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterheert, JJ; Bonten, MJM; Hak, E; Schneider, MME; Hoepelman, AIM

    Purpose of review Formerly, patients with community-acquired pneumonia admitted to an intensive care unit were considered as having the severe form of the disease. Recently, guidelines have distinguished severe and non-severe community-acquired pneumonia based on clinical definitions. In this

  12. Undiagnosed Diabetes Mellitus in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Vestergaard; Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; Egelund, Gertrud Baunbæk

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is an important risk factor for community-acquired pneumonia, whereas the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and prediabetes in patients with community-acquired pneumonia is largely unknown. We aimed to determine the prevalence of prediabetes, undiagnosed...... diabetes mellitus, and risk factors associated with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus in a large European community-acquired pneumonia cohort. Methods: This was a multicenter prospective cohort study of hospitals and private practices in Germany and Austria encompassing 1961 adults with community......-acquired pneumonia included in the German Community-Acquired Pneumonia Competence Network (CAPNETZ) study between 2007 and 2014. The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and prediabetes was estimated based on hemoglobin A1c measurements. Logistic regression was used to assess risk factors for undiagnosed...

  13. [Clinical features and antimicrobial resistance of community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae in infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li-Yun; Wang, Ying-Jian; Li, Ji-Mei

    2012-11-01

    To study the clinical features and antimicrobial resistance of community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae in infants. The clinical data of 65 infants with community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae between 2007 and 2011 were retrospectively studied. Of the 65 infants, 37 cases (57%) were aged ≤3 months, 17 cases (26%) over 4 months, 7 cases (11%) over 7 months and 4 cases (6%) between 13 and 24 months. There were no significant differences in clinical manifestations and chest X-ray features between the infants with community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae and those with other bacterial pneumonia. Forty strains (62%) of ESBLs-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae were detected. Klebsiella pneumoniae was 100% sensitive to imipenem, meropenem and amikacin but resistant to penicillins and cephalosporins. The resistance rates of ESBLs-producing strains to penicillins, cephalosporins, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ampicillin/sulbactam, compound sulfamethoxazole, gentamycin, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam were significantly higher than for non-ESBLs-producing strains. ESBLs-producing strains also showed multiple-drug resistance. Community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae is common in infants aged ≤3 months. ESBLs-producing strains are prevalent in community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae and demonstrate both high rates of drug resistance and multiple-drug resistance.

  14. Biomarkers in Community-Acquired Pneumonia Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voskresenska Natalja

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents information on pneumonia (P patients with features of oxidative stress (OS. Identifying features of OS in patients with P is of interest not only for diagnosis, but also for monitoring of treatment efficiency. We recruited 73 patients with community-acquired P (CAP, previously healthy adults, both males and females with mean age of 68.0 ± 15.2, hospitalised, and 61 healthy control patients matched for age. For quantitative evaluation of lipid peroxidation in CAP patients, the levels of aldehydic lipid peroxidation products like malondialdehyde (MDA and 4- hydroxynon-2-enal (HNE were quantified. Furthermore, concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH and several antioxidant enzymes and selenium in plasma were determined. In CAP patients, decreased levels of GSH and plasma selenium were observed. Plasma levels of MDA, and HNE did significantly differ between patient and control groups. We also noted reduced activity of antioxidant enzymes, namely, glutation peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. Low antioxidant enzymes activity was associated with a more severe CAP pattern. Both GSH and antioxidant enzymes may serve as markers for inflammation-related OS in CAP patients, and measurement of these biomarkers may be a valid indentifier for its management.

  15. community acquired pneumonia among children admitted

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-01

    Sep 1, 2012 ... of other diseases after the hospital became a referral centre. Increased immunisation coverage and introduction of immunisation against haemophilus influenza tybe B and streptococcus pneumoniae could have contributed. In this study we identified factors that increased the risk of pneumonia in children.

  16. Severe community-acquired pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae in young female patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milačić Nena

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumonia is common agent causing community acquired pneumonia in younger population. However, the course of illness is usually benign and is rarely associated with pulmonary complications. We report a 27 years old female patient with unilateral pneumonia followed by pleural effusion and adhesions on the same side. This potential source of infection should be considered in young patients where resolution of symptoms from pneumonia is delayed.

  17. Prognostic value of lactate clearance in severe community acquired pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Kamel Abd Elaziz; Ahmed, Dief Abd Elgalil

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Severe community acquired pneumonia (SCAP) occurs in approximately 18–36% of all CAP and the mortality rate could be as high as 67% in patients with SCAP. Several studies have described a correlation between baseline lactate concentration and mortality of ICU patients. Aim of the work: To follow lactate clearance after admission for 24 h which could be an indicator of outcome in severe community acquired pneumonia. Patients and methods: Forty-six consecutively admitted adu...

  18. [Chlamydia pneumoniae in patients with acquired pneumonia in the Santiago of Chile community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobos, T; Saldías, F; Cartagena, C; Jover, E; Alvarez, M; Moreno, R

    1998-12-01

    The prevalence of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection varies according to the population and geographic area studied. To evaluate the incidence of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection in Chilean subjects with community acquired pneumonia. Between 1995 and 1997, patients with community acquired pneumonia attending two emergency rooms in Santiago, were studied. The diagnosis of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection was based on the detection of Chlamydia pneumoniae specific IgG antibody in samples from both the acute and convalescent phase, using an indirect microimmunofluorescent technique. Evidence of present infection was defined as seroconversion, a significant increase in the titer of the second sample and an initial titer equal or greater than 1/512. During the study period, 160 patients consulted and seven (six male), aged 54 +/- 27 years old, complied with the diagnostic criteria of present Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. These patients had no special clinical or radiological features. Five of seven patients improved without any specific treatment. Eight percent of this sample of patients with community acquired pneumonia had Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. This agent should be included in the design of empiric treatment schemes, although our results cast doubt on the pathogenic role of Chlamydia pneumoniae in pneumonia.

  19. Computed tomography in children with community-acquired pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronikou, Savvas [Bristol Royal Hospital for Children and the University of Bristol, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Bristol (United Kingdom); University of Cape Town, Department of Radiology, Cape Town (South Africa); Goussard, Pierre [Tygerberg Hospital, Stellenbosch University, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Cape Town (South Africa); Sorantin, Erich [Medical University Graz, Department of Radiology, Graz (Austria)

    2017-10-15

    Diagnostic imaging plays a significant role in both the diagnosis and treatment of complications of pneumonia in children and chest radiography is the imaging modality of choice. Computed tomography (CT) on the other hand, is not currently a first-line imaging tool for children with suspected uncomplicated community-acquired pneumonia and is largely reserved for when complications of pneumonia are suspected or there is difficulty in differentiating pneumonia from other pathology. This review outlines the situations where CT needs to be considered in children with pneumonia, describes the imaging features of the parenchymal and pleural complications of pneumonia, discusses how CT may have a wider role in developing countries where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis are prevalent, makes note of the role of CT scanning for identifying missed foreign body aspiration and, lastly, addresses radiation concerns. (orig.)

  20. Computed tomography in children with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronikou, Savvas; Goussard, Pierre; Sorantin, Erich

    2017-10-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays a significant role in both the diagnosis and treatment of complications of pneumonia in children and chest radiography is the imaging modality of choice. Computed tomography (CT) on the other hand, is not currently a first-line imaging tool for children with suspected uncomplicated community-acquired pneumonia and is largely reserved for when complications of pneumonia are suspected or there is difficulty in differentiating pneumonia from other pathology. This review outlines the situations where CT needs to be considered in children with pneumonia, describes the imaging features of the parenchymal and pleural complications of pneumonia, discusses how CT may have a wider role in developing countries where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis are prevalent, makes note of the role of CT scanning for identifying missed foreign body aspiration and, lastly, addresses radiation concerns.

  1. Computed tomography in children with community-acquired pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronikou, Savvas; Goussard, Pierre; Sorantin, Erich

    2017-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays a significant role in both the diagnosis and treatment of complications of pneumonia in children and chest radiography is the imaging modality of choice. Computed tomography (CT) on the other hand, is not currently a first-line imaging tool for children with suspected uncomplicated community-acquired pneumonia and is largely reserved for when complications of pneumonia are suspected or there is difficulty in differentiating pneumonia from other pathology. This review outlines the situations where CT needs to be considered in children with pneumonia, describes the imaging features of the parenchymal and pleural complications of pneumonia, discusses how CT may have a wider role in developing countries where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis are prevalent, makes note of the role of CT scanning for identifying missed foreign body aspiration and, lastly, addresses radiation concerns. (orig.)

  2. Diagnosis and Treatment of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Karymdzhanov

    2016-02-01

    The initial antibiotic therapy of community-acquired pneumonia is carried out empirically. In the treatment of severe community-acquired pneumonia in children from 2 months to 5 years, the drug of choice is amoxicillin orally. Macrolides are the drugs of choice for children aged 5 to 16 years. In severe pneumonia, drugs of choice are amoxicillin clavulanate, 2nd–4th generation cephalosporins. In general, the duration of antibiotic therapy in the community-acquired pneumonia caused by typical bacteria is 7–10 days, by atypical bacteria — 10–14 days. In the real clinical practice, the errors associated with the choice of drug, route of administration, dosage, regimen of application, length of treatment are frequent during antibacterial therapy.

  3. Changing bacteriological profile and mortality trends in community acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Khadanga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are very few and conflicting Indian data regarding the bacteriological etiology of community acquired pneumonia (CAP. Adding to this agony, there is no credible data from the eastern part of India. This is a cross-sectional study and descriptive in nature over a period of 1-year. Of the 464 cases of the study population, we could isolate aerobic bacteria in 149 patients (32.1%. Streptococcus pneumoniae has been identified as the most common organism causing CAP (68/149. Gram-negative bacilli (GNB as a group exceeded marginally over S. pneumoniae (69/149. Among GNB, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most common organism (31/69, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (29/69. Staphylococcus aureus was identified in (12/149 cases. Co-amoxyclav is still the most sensitive drug for S. pneumoniae. P. aeruginosa was most sensitive to imipenam followed by piperacillin-tazobactam.

  4. Prospective evaluation of pneumonia severity index in hospitalised patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Eerden, M. M.; de Graaff, C. S.; Bronsveld, W.; Jansen, H. M.; Boersma, W. G.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the pneumonia severity index (PSI) could adequately predict the severity of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and could be used as a severity of illness classification system. Furthermore, reasons that may influence the decision to admit low

  5. [Ceftaroline fosamil in community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calbo, Esther; Zaragoza, Rafael

    2014-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common infection in developed countries and causes a large number of hospital admissions and deaths. In recent years, the incidence of this disease has increased, caused by progressive population aging. Following the introduction of the conjugate vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae, there have been significant epidemiological changes that require close monitoring because of the possible emergence of new patterns of resistance. This article aims to review the role of ceftaroline fosamil, a new parenteral cephalosporin with antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens, in the treatment of pneumonia. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have shown the efficacy of ceftaroline fosamil against penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Additionally, ceftaroline has shown similar efficacy and safety to ceftriaxone in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia with severe prognosis (prognostic severity index III and IV) in two phase III clinical trials. Although a non-inferiority design was used for these clinical trials, some data suggest a superior efficacy of ceftaroline, with earlier clinical response and higher cure rate in infections caused by S. pneumoniae, making this drug particularly interesting for critically-ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit. Ceftaroline may also be considered for empirical and directed treatment of MRSA pneumonia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Solithromycin for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viasus, Diego; Ramos, Oscar; Ramos, Leidy; Simonetti, Antonella F; Carratalà, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is a major public health problem worldwide. In recent years, there has been an increase in the frequency of resistance to the antimicrobials such as β-lactams or macrolides which have habitually been used against the causative pathogens. Solithromycin, a next-generation macrolide, is the first fluoroketolide with activity against most of the frequently isolated bacteria in community-acquired pneumonia, including typical and atypical bacteria as well as macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. Areas covered: A detailed assessment of the literature relating to the antimicrobial activity, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties, efficacy, tolerability and safety of solithromycin for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia Expert commentary: Recent randomized controlled phase II/III trials have demonstrated the equivalent efficacy of oral and intravenous solithromycin compared with fluoroquinolones in patients with lower mild-to-moderate respiratory infections, and have shown that systemic adverse events are comparable between solithromycin and alternative treatments. However, studies of larger populations which are able to identify infrequent adverse events are now needed to confirm these findings. On balance, current data supports solithromycin as a promising therapy for empirical treatment in adults with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

  7. Community-acquired pneumonia: 2012 history, mythology, and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donowitz, Gerald R

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonia remains one of the major disease entities practicing physicians must manage. It is a leading cause of infection-related morbidity and mortality in all age groups, and a leading cause of death in those older than 65 years of age. Despite its frequency and importance, clinical questions have remained in the therapy of community-acquired pneumonia including when to start antibiotics, when to stop them, who to treat, and what agents to use. Answers to these questions have involved historical practice, mythology, and science-sometimes good science, and sometimes better science. How clinical decisions are made for patients with community-acquired pneumonia serves as an illustrative model for other problem areas of medicine and allows for insight as to how clinical decisions have been made and clinical practice established.

  8. Guiding therapy and adjunctive treatment in community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoorenberg, S.M.C.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Despite the availability of effective antibiotics and vaccines, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains the cause of significant morbidity and mortality worldwide.A major problem is that in absence of full spectrum rapid microbiology diagnostics, the antibiotic treatment at start is

  9. community acquired pneumonia or βhcg - Producing lung tumor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    She developed signs suggestive of βhCG-producing lung tumor with metastasis to the brain and succumbed to the illness before she could be referred for further evaluations and management. Key Words: Community acquired pneumonia, βhCG-producing lung tumor, Paraneoplastic Syndrome, Oculomotor Nerve Palsy.

  10. Antibiotic Treatment Strategies for Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Douwe F.; Van Werkhoven, Cornelis H.; Van Elden, Leontine J R; Thijsen, Steven F T; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; Boersma, Wim G.; Compaijen, Clara J.; Van Der Wall, Eva; Prins, Jan M.; Oosterheert, Jan J.; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The choice of empirical antibiotic treatment for patients with clinically suspected community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) who are admitted to non-intensive care unit (ICU) hospital wards is complicated by the limited availability of evidence. We compared strategies of empirical treatment

  11. Community-acquired Streptococcus viridans pneumonia in a healthy child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Fang-Yih; Wang, Chih-Chien; Chang, Yaw-Wen; Chen, Shyi-Jou

    2012-04-01

    Streptococcus viridans is usually considered to be nonpathogenic in healthy patients. Some strains become penicillin-resistant and cause life-threatening infections in immuno-compromised patients. We report an immunocompetent boy who had community-acquired S. viridans pneumonia that was resistant to penicillin. Clinicians should note local patterns of virulence and antibiotic resistance in S. viridans and adjust treatment strategies accordingly.

  12. Aetiology and outcome of severe community-acquired pneumonia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine the aetiological agents and outcome of severe community-acquired pneumonia (SCAP) in children admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) at Kalafong Hospital, Pretoria. Patients and methods. An audit was done after a protocol was implemented to identify the aetiological agents in ...

  13. Pattern of Community Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia in Kano, North ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the study was to determine the clinical pattern of bacterial community acquired pneumonia amongst patients admitted into medical wards in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano. The study was a descriptive prospective study incorporating consecutive adult patients aged fifteen years and above admitted ...

  14. Community-acquired pneumonia - a clinical approach to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The implementation of CAP guidelines can decrease patient mortality and limit antibiotic resistance. The South African Thoracic Society (SATS) has revised its guidelines for the management of CAP in adults. This article ...

  15. Community-acquired Pneumonia in Hospitalized Urban Young ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As part of a comprehensive hospital-based study of acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) in under-five urban Nigerian children, we sought to identify the possible clinical and investigative correlates of lobar versus bronchopneumonia, and the possible determinants of mortality in community-acquired pneumonia. Over a ...

  16. Clinico-pathological study of atypical pathogens in community-acquired pneumonia: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed Zaki, Maysaa; Goda, Tarek

    2009-04-30

    Atypical respiratory pathogens such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella species, and Chlamydia pneumoniae are isolated with increasing frequency from community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). This study highlights the importance of organisms responsible for CAP. One hundred consecutive patients with clinically and radiographically diagnosed CAP were evaluated from October 2005 to October 2006. Sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage, and blood samples were collected for microbiological culture. Determination was performed for specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) for Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, Coxiella burnettii, adenovirus, and influenza virus. The most common isolated bacteria was Streptococcus pneumoniae (22%) followed by Haemophilus influenzae (18%). Mycoplasma pneumoniae was isolated from 5% and Legionella pneumophila was isolated from 5% of patients. The most common positive serological reaction was for Chlamydia pneumoniae (30%) and Adenovirus (30%). In the study of accuracy of determination of specific IgM for Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila compared to culture, the sensitivity was 60% and 80% respectively, specificity was 93.7 %, and 98.9 % respectively, and accuracy was 92 % and 97 % respectively. This study highlights the prominence of mixed bacterial/viral infections in lower respiratory tract infection diagnosis. Our data showed that at least 30% of our patients had concurrent infections. This observation raises two important questions: 1) whether sequential or concurrent viral and bacterial infections have a synergistic impact on the evolution of disease in children; and 2) should diagnostic batteries for any patient with CAP include methods for detecting both the typical and atypical bacterial or viral pathogens.

  17. Atypical pathogen infection in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yun; Fei, Aihua

    2016-02-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a world wide cause of morbidity and mortality. The etiology of CAP is different between countries and changes over time. With the increasing incidence, atypical pathogens are attracting more and more attention all over the world. In many countries, atypical pathogens are one of the main pathogens of CAP, and even could be the most prevalent etiology in China. Atypical pathogen infections can cause multi-system complications, which leads to a worse prognosis. Although still controversial, empirical antibiotic coverage of atypical pathogens in CAP may improve outcomes, shorten length of hospitalization, reduce mortality and lower total hospitalization costs. The macrolide resistance rate of atypical pathogens, especially Mycoplasma Pneumoniae (M. Pneumoniae) is high, so fluoroquinolones or tetracyclines should be considered as alternative therapy.

  18. Failure of levofloxacin treatment in community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossi Paolo

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. High global incidence of macrolide and penicillin resistance has been reported, whereas fluoroquinolone resistance is uncommon. Current guidelines for suspected CAP in patients with co-morbidity factors and recent antibiotic therapy recommend initial empiric therapy using one fluoroquinolone or one macrolide associated to other drugs (amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, broad-spectrum cephalosporins. Resistance to fluoroquinolones is determined by efflux mechanisms and/or mutations in the parC and parE genes coding for topoisomerase IV and/or gyrA and gyrB genes coding for DNA gyrase. No clinical cases due to fluoroquinolone-resistant S. pneumoniae strains have been yet reported from Italy. Case presentation A 72-year-old patient with long history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and multiple fluoroquinolone treatments for recurrent lower respiratory tract infections developed fever, increased sputum production, and dyspnea. He was treated with oral levofloxacin (500 mg bid. Three days later, because of acute respiratory insufficiency, the patient was hospitalized. Levofloxacin treatment was supplemented with piperacillin/tazobactam. Microbiological tests detected a S. pneumoniae strain intermediate to penicillin (MIC, 1 mg/L and resistant to macrolides (MIC >256 mg/L and fluoroquinolones (MIC >32 mg/L. Point mutations were detected in gyrA (Ser81-Phe, parE (Ile460-Val, and parC gene (Ser79-Phe; Lys137-Asn. Complete clinical response followed treatment with piperacillin/tazobactam. Conclusion This is the first Italian case of community-acquired pneumonia due to a fluoroquinolone-resistant S. pneumoniae isolate where treatment failure of levofloxacin was documented. Molecular analysis showed a group of mutations that have not yet been reported from Italy and has been detected only twice in Europe. Treatment with piperacillin

  19. [Topical problems of empiric therapy of community-acquired pneumonia in outpatient practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, I I; Chorbinskaya, S A; Baryshnikonva, G A; Nikiforova, N V; Pokutniy, N F; Zverkov, I V; Maslovskyi, L V; Kotenko, K V

    2016-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is one of prevalent infectious respiratory diseases. Adequate treatment of community-acquired pneumonia, with consideration of the disease severity and microbial resistence, remains extremely topical. The article covers contemporary views of community-acquired pneumonia treatment standards. The authors described results of personal research aimed to study antibacterial treatment for community-acquired pneumonia on outpatient basis over 2004-2012, evaluated correspondence of the treatment to the national clinical recommendations.

  20. Sequential Therapy of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children

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    I.A. Karimdzhanov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study — to examine the effectiveness of sequential therapy of injectable and oral forms cephalosporins of II generation, cefuroxime sodium and cefprozil, in children with acute community-acquired pneumonia. We examined 53 child patients aged 6 months — 14 years with acute community-acquired pneumonia. Patients were divided into 2 groups: 1st group — 26 patients who treated with cefuroxime sodium intramuscularly, and 2nd — 27 patients who treated with cefuroxime sodium in first 3 days and then from the 4th day — with cefprozil suspension orally. Both groups of patients were comparable by forms and course of pneumonia. In the clinic to all patients were conducted conventional clinical and laboratory investigations. Complex therapy was not different in both groups. Efficacy of treatment was assessed in dynamics. When comparing the effectiveness of two antibiotic regimens (cefuroxime sodium parenterally and sequential regimen with replacement by cefprozil orally there were no differences in the dynamics of clinical course, laboratory and radiological data. Finding of the conducted investigations before treatment showed that majority of patients had clinical and radiological evidence of pneumonia: fever, cough, shortness of breath, tachycardia, physical and radiological changes in the lungs. Evaluation of treatment efficacy showed that by the end of treatment in both groups of patients there was a positive clinical and radiological dynamics of the disease, the body temperature returned to normal, symptoms of intoxication, physical changes in the lungs disappeared, focal and infiltrative changes disappeared completely. Thus, sequential therapy with cephalosporins of II generation, cefuroxime and cefprozil, in the treatment of acute community-acquired pneumonia in children is a quite effective and safe method with good tolerability and no side effects.

  1. Тhe features of severe community acquired pneumonia

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    Avramenko I.V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on data from a prospective analysis for the year of observation, the article presents information about the features of severe community acquired pneumonia in patients who were hospitalized at the department of pulmonology (or therapy, as well as department of the intensive care from three teaching hospitals in Dnepropetrovsk, namely "Dnipropetrovsk City Hospital №6», "Dnipropetrovsk City Hospital №2», "Dnipropetrovsk City Hospital №16», which are the clinical ones of "Dnepropetrovsk Medical Academy of the Ministry of Health Ukraine". Dependence of the severity of the condition shown on duration of illness before admission, features of season character of disease. The effect of breathing exercises on the course of the disease. The results can be the basis for a more personal approach to the development of diagnostic and therapeutic programs for patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia.

  2. Etiology of childhood community acquired pneumonia and its implications for vaccination

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    Nascimento-Carvalho Cristiana M.C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among children throughout the world. Vaccines are available for some organisms, but they are underutilized and/or still in development. To evaluate the potential impact of vaccines, we review studies in which the etiology of childhood community-acquired pneumonia was recorded. In North America and Europe (9 studies, the etiology of pneumonia was established in 62% of studied children (range 43%-88% by use of noninvasive specific methods for microbiologic diagnosis. The most often identified agents were S. pneumoniae (22%, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV (20%, Haemophilus influenzae (7%, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (15%. In Africa and South America (8 studies, bacteria were recovered from 56% (range 32%-68% of severely ill children studied by lung aspirate. The most often isolated bacteria were Streptococcus pneumoniae (33% and Haemophilus influenzae (21%. A high percentage of H. influenzae strains were not serotype b. Throughout the world, children requiring hospitalization were most likely to have infection caused by pneumococcus H. influenzae or RSV. Out patients also had Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Countries in Africa and Asia recorded 2 to 10 times more children with pneumonia (7 to 40/100 annually than in the USA. Widespread use of pneumococcal and H. influenzae type b conjugate vaccines could reduce the frequency of childhood pneumonia by one-third. Further reduction will require development of non-type b H. influenzae, RSV and M. pneumoniae vaccines. This could result in a > 50% reduction of pneumonia in children. This goal should be sought and achieved as soon as possible.

  3. Corticosteroids for all adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia?

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    Ger Rijkers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Corticosteroid therapy as adjunctive treatment in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a promising but controversial subject. The potentially beneficial effect of corticosteroids is based on the ability of steroids to dampen an excessive inflammatory response that often occurs in patients with CAP. This excessive inflammatory response can cause damage to the lungs and other organs, and is associated with poor outcome.

  4. Community Acquired Pneumonia Associated Fatal Secondary Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Arun Agarwal; Mudit Agarwal

    2018-01-01

    The burden of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) requiring hospitalization among adults is substantial and is a leading infectious cause of hospitalization and death. Severe CAP may rarely get complicated with secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). The term hemophagocytosis refers to the pathologic finding of activated macrophages engulfing erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, or their precursor cells in the bone marrow, liver, or lymph nodes; this being characteristic for hemoph...

  5. An unusual cause of community-acquired pneumonia

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    Jaimie Mittal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of fatal community-acquired pneumonia (CAP due to Acinetobacter baumannii, which is rarely reported in the northeastern United States. Previously reported cases originate from tropical and subtropical climates, and infection tends to have an aggressive course with a poor outcome. Appropriate antimicrobial therapy is crucial; however, the associated systemic inflammatory response may overwhelm host defenses, especially in patients with certain co-morbidities.

  6. [Community-acquired pneumonia: risk focus and family functionality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Castillo-Sánchez, David López; Sabag-Ruiz, Enrique; Díaz-Verduzco, Manuel de Jesús; Monzón-Vega, Mario Alonso

    2006-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is one of the five most prevalent causes of death worldwide; in Mexico, it accounts for more than 10% of the hospital admissions. To identify the risk factors and the kind of family functionality associated to community-acquired pneumonia among adult patients. With the prior authorization of the research and bioethics committees, a study of cases and controls took place, where both groups were asked about the following variables: alcohol consumption or active smoking, conditions of house and family functionality, anti-flu and anti-pneumococcal vaccination, disablement, and chronic pulmonary disease, among others. It was found that the significant variables were active smoking, disablement, pulmonary emphysema, chronic bronchitis, overcrowding at home, and alcohol consumption; and with a protective effect for this disease: a functional family and anti-pneumococcal vaccination. There are risk factors that predispose the development of community-acquired pneumonia, and that allow us to make a population profile in which some preventive strategy could diminish the frequency and lethality of this disease.

  7. Clinical Characteristics of Community-Acquired Viridans Streptococcal Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sun Ha; Choi, Keum-Ju; Lim, Jae-Kwang; Seo, Hyewon; Yoo, Seung-Soo; Lee, Jaehee; Lee, Shin-Yup; Kim, Chang-Ho; Park, Jae-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Viridans streptococci (VS) are a large group of streptococcal bacteria that are causative agents of community-acquired respiratory tract infection. However, data regarding their clinical characteristics are limited. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the clinical and radiologic features of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with or without parapneumonic effusion caused by VS. Methods Of 455 consecutive CAP patients with or without parapneumonic effusion, VS were isolated from the blood or pleural fluid in 27 (VS group, 5.9%) patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae was identified as a single etiologic agent in 70 (control group) patients. We compared various clinical parameters between the VS group and the control group. Results In univariate analysis, the VS group was characterized by more frequent complicated parapneumonic effusion or empyema and bed-ridden status, lower incidences of productive cough, elevated procalcitonin (>0.5 ng/mL), lower age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index score, and more frequent ground glass opacity (GGO) or consolidation on computed tomography (CT) scans. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that complicated parapneumonic effusion or empyema, productive cough, bed-ridden status, and GGO or consolidation on CT scans were independent predictors of community-acquired respiratory tract infection caused by VS. Conclusion CAP caused by VS commonly presents as complicated parapneumonic effusion or empyema. It is characterized by less frequent productive cough, more frequent bed-ridden status, and less common CT pulmonary parenchymal lesions. However, its treatment outcome and clinical course are similar to those of pneumococcal pneumonia. PMID:26175772

  8. Etiologic spectrum and occurrence of coinfections in children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wujun; Wu, Min; Zhou, Jing; Wang, Yuqing; Hao, Chuangli; Ji, Wei; Zhang, Xinxing; Gu, Wenjing; Shao, Xuejun

    2017-12-20

    Co-infections are common in childhood community acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, their etiological pattern and clinical impact remains inconclusive. Eight hundred forty-six consecutive children with CAP were evaluated prospectively for the presence of viral and bacterial pathogens. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were examined by direct immunofluorescence assay or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for viruses. PCR of nasopharyngeal aspirates and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed to detect M. pneumoniae. Bacteria was detected in blood, bronchoalveolar lavage specimen, or pleural fluid by culture. Causative pathogen was identified in 70.1% (593 of 846) of the patients. The most commonly detected pathogens were respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (22.9%), human rhinovirus (HRV) (22.1%), M. pneumoniae (15.8%). Coinfection was identified in 34.6% (293 of 846) of the patients. The majority of these (209 [71.3%] of 293) were mixed viral-bacterial infections. Age pneumonia pathogens.

  9. Community-acquired pneumonia in older patients: does age influence systemic cytokine levels in community-acquired pneumonia?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Emer

    2009-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of death in the elderly. The age-related increase in comorbid illnesses plays a part but the effect of aging on the immune response may be equally important. We aimed to evaluate patients with CAP for evidence of a muted response to infection in elderly patients admitted to hospital compared with a younger patient group.

  10. Early neurovascular uncoupling in the brain during community acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengarten, Bernhard; Krekel, Dennis; Kuhnert, Stefan; Schulz, Richard

    2012-12-12

    Sepsis leads to microcirculatory dysfunction and therefore a disturbed neurovascular coupling in the brain. To investigate if the dysfunction is also present in less severe inflammatory diseases we studied the neurovascular coupling in patients suffering from community acquired pneumonia. Patients were investigated in the acute phase of pneumonia and after recovery. The neurovascular coupling was investigated with a simultaneous electroencephalogram (EEG)-Doppler technique applying a visual stimulation paradigm. Resting EEG frequencies, visual evoked potentials as well as resting and stimulated hemodynamic responses were obtained. Disease severity was characterized by laboratory and cognitive parameters as well as related scoring systems. Data were compared to a control group. Whereas visually evoked potentials (VEP) remained stable a significant slowing and therefore uncoupling of the hemodynamic responses were found in the acute phase of pneumonia (Rate time: control group: 3.6 ± 2.5 vs. acute pneumonia: 1.6 ± 2.4 s; P early microcirculatory dysfunction in inflammatory syndromes that become evident in pre-septic conditions with a gradual decline according to disease severity.

  11. Role of Atypical Bacteria in Hospitalized Patients With Nursing Home-Acquired Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer-Junco, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) has been identified as one of the leading causes of mortality and hospitalization for long-term care residents. However, current and previous pneumonia guidelines differ on the appropriate management of NHAP in hospitalized patients, specifically in regard to the role of atypical bacteria such as Chlamydiae pneumonia, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Legionella.

  12. Prognostic value of severity indicators of nursing-home-acquired pneumonia versus community-acquired pneumonia in elderly patients

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    Ugajin M

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Motoi Ugajin, Kenichi Yamaki, Natsuko Hirasawa, Takanori Kobayashi, Takeo Yagi Department of Respiratory Medicine, Ichinomiya-Nishi Hospital, Ichinomiya City, Japan Background: The credibility of prognostic indicators in nursing-home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP is not clear. We previously reported a simple prognostic indicator in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP: blood urea nitrogen to serum albumin (B/A ratio. This retrospective study investigated the prognostic value of severity indicators in NHAP versus CAP in elderly patients. Methods: Patients aged ≥65 years and hospitalized because of NHAP or CAP within the previous 3 years were enrolled. Demographics, coexisting illnesses, laboratory and microbiological findings, and severity scores (confusion, urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and age ≥65 [CURB-65] scale; age, dehydration, respiratory failure, orientation disturbance, and pressure [A-DROP] scale; and pneumonia severity index [PSI] were retrieved from medical records. The primary outcome was mortality within 28 days of admission. Results: In total, 138 NHAP and 307 CAP patients were enrolled. Mortality was higher in NHAP (18.1% than in CAP (4.6% (P<0.001. Patients with NHAP were older and had lower functional status and a higher rate of do-not-resuscitate orders, heart failure, and cerebrovascular diseases. The NHAP patients more frequently had typical bacterial pathogens. Using the receiver-operating characteristics curve for predicting mortality, the area under the curve in NHAP was 0.70 for the A-DROP scale, 0.69 for the CURB-65 scale, 0.67 for the PSI class, and 0.65 for the B/A ratio. The area under the curve in CAP was 0.73 for the A-DROP scale, 0.76 for the CURB-65 scale, 0.81 for the PSI class, and 0.83 for the B/A ratio. Conclusion: Patient mortality was greater in NHAP than in CAP. Patient characteristics, coexisting illnesses, and detected pathogens differed greatly between NHAP and CAP. The existing severity indicators

  13. Pneumonia estafilocócica adquirida na comunidade Community-acquired staphylococcal pneumonia

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    José Wellington Alves dos Santos

    2008-09-01

    . METHODS: A retrospective and descriptive study was conducted in patients admitted to our hospital between January of 1992 and December of 2003. All of he patients included had been diagnosed with community-acquired pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus. All were older than 14 years of age, and none were intravenous drug users. RESULTS: Community-acquired pneumonia was identified in 332 cases, of which 24 (7.3% were identified as cases of staphylococcal pneumonia. Age ranged from 14 to 89 years. Fifteen patients were male, and nine were female. Twelve patients met the criteria for severe pneumonia. Chest X-rays showed unilateral consolidation in 14 cases, bilateral consolidation in 10, pleural effusion in 15, rapid radiological progression of pulmonary lesions in 14, cavitation in 6 and pneumothorax in 1. Most of the patients presented comorbidities, of which diabetes mellitus was the most common. Twelve patients presented complications such as empyema and septic shock. Four patients died, translating to a mortality rate of 16.6% in our sample. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical presentation of pneumonia caused by S. aureus is similar to that of pneumonia caused by other etiological agents. Radiological findings, epidemiological data and risk factors provide important clues to the diagnosis. These factors are important for clinical suspicion, since S. aureus is not typically addressed in empirical treatment.

  14. Is H3N2 Pneumonia Different from Other Community-Acquired Pneumonia?

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    Coşkun Doğan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the clinical, laboratory, radiological, and demographic data of H3N2 pneumonia cases hospitalized to the Pulmonology Department during H3N2 pandemics and compare them with non-H3N2 community-acquired pneumonia (CAP cases. Methods: The study population consisted of all CAP cases hospitalized to our Pulmonology Department between December 2013 and February 2014 during the influenza outbreak. The patient files were evaluated for physical findings, laboratory data, radiological findings, and treatment and outcome of cases. H3N2 was diagnosed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis of throat swabs. The clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings of H3N2 pneumonia cases were compared with those of non-H3N2 pneumonia cases. Mann–Whitney U test, Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, and logistic regression analysis by the forward step wise method were used for statistical analyses. P value0.05. The rates of treatment failure and/or transport to the intensive care unit with the need of invasive mechanical ventilation and mortality rates were also similar in both groups (p>0.05. Conclusion: H3N2 pneumonia/viral pneumonia is a member of CAP. Although the number of H3N2 cases are extremely small to draw a conclusion, the results of this study highlight that the clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings of H3N2 pneumonia cases are not different from those of non-H3N2 CAP cases.

  15. Elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia: optimal treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiem, Ulrich; Heppner, Hans-Jürgen; Pientka, Ludger

    2011-07-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common infectious disease that still causes substantial morbidity and mortality. Elderly people are frequently affected, and several issues related to care of this condition in the elderly have to be considered. This article reviews current recommendations of guidelines with a special focus on aspects of the care of elderly patients with CAP. The most common pathogen in CAP is still Streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by other pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Legionella species. Antimicrobial resistance is an increasing problem, especially with regard to macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae and fluoroquinolone-resistant strains. With regard to β-lactam antibacterials, resistance by H. influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis is important, as is the emergence of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The main management decisions should be guided by the severity of disease, which can be assessed by validated clinical risk scores such as CURB-65, a tool for measuring the severity of pneumonia based on assessment of confusion, serum urea, respiratory rate and blood pressure in patients aged ≥65 years. For the treatment of low-risk pneumonia, an aminopenicillin such as amoxicillin with or without a β-lactamase inhibitor is frequently recommended. Monotherapy with macrolides is also possible, although macrolide resistance is of concern. When predisposing factors for special pathogens are present, a β-lactam antibacterial combined with a β-lactamase inhibitor, or the combination of a β-lactam antibacterial, a β-lactamase inhibitor and a macrolide, may be warranted. If possible, patients who have undergone previous antibacterial therapy should receive drug classes not previously used. For hospitalized patients with non-severe pneumonia, a common recommendation is empirical antibacterial therapy with an aminopenicillin in combination with a β-lactamase inhibitor, or

  16. Efficacy of ceftobiprole in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welte, T.; Scheeren, Thomas; Rodriguez, Alejandro H.; Demange, A.; Engelhardt, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Ceftobiprole medocaril is a novel cephalosporin approved in Europe for the treatment of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) excluding ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Ceftobiprole exhibits broad bactericidal activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, including

  17. Community-acquired pneumonia and positive urinary antigen tests: Factors associated with targeted antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothes, A; Léotard, S; Nicolle, I; Smets, A; Chirio, D; Rotomondo, C; Tiger, F; Del Giudice, P; Perrin, C; Néri, D; Foucault, C; Della Guardia, M; Hyvernat, H; Roger, P-M

    2016-10-01

    The use of rapid microbiological tests is supported by antimicrobial stewardship policies. Targeted antibiotic therapy (TAT) for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with positive urinary antigen test (UAT) has been associated with a favorable impact on outcome. We aimed to determine the factors associated with TAT prescription. We conducted a retrospective multicenter study including all patients presenting with CAP and positive UAT for Streptococcus pneumoniae or Legionella pneumophila from January 2010 to December 2013. Patients presenting with aspiration pneumonia, coinfection, and neutropenia were excluded. CAP severity was assessed using the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). TAT was defined as the administration of amoxicillin for pneumococcal infection and either macrolides or fluoroquinolones (inactive against S. pneumoniae) for Legionella infection. A total of 861 patients were included, including 687 pneumococcal infections and 174 legionellosis from eight facilities and 37 medical departments. TAT was prescribed to 273 patients (32%). Four factors were found independently associated with a lower rate of TAT: a PSI score≥4 (OR 0.37), Hospital A (OR 0.41), hospitalization in the intensive care unit (OR 0.44), and cardiac comorbidities (OR 0.60). Four other factors were associated with a high rate of TAT: positive blood culture for S. pneumoniae (OR 2.32), Hospitals B (OR 2.34), E (OR 2.68), and H (OR 9.32). TAT in CAP with positive UAT was related to the hospitals as well as to patient characteristics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Independent radiographic prognostic factors in patients with hospital-treated community-acquired pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Textor, J.; Schild, H.; Ewig, S.; Luederitz, B.; Krollmann, G.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the independent prognostic impact of the chest radiograph for mortality from community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization. Methods: Chest radiographs of 67 patients with hospital-treated community-acquired pneumonia were analyzed with regard to the prognostic implications of radiographic patterns, extent and density of infiltrates, and its evolution during treatment. Results: Non-survivors had a significantly higher extent of infiltrates (p=0.008), density of infiltrates (p=0.05), and radiographic spread during follow-up within 48-72 hours (p=0.0001). In multivariate analysis, persistent or progressive infiltrates were associated with a 47fold increase, and persistent or progressive density of infiltrates with an 18fold increase in risk of mortality. The presence of both parameters could correctly predict 96% of survivors and 90% of non-survivors. Conclusions: The chest radiograph is an independent predictor of the severity of pneumonia. Both persistent or progressive infiltrates and persistent or progressive density of infiltrates are independently associated with mortality from community-acquired pneumonia. (orig.) [de

  19. Role of atypical pathogens in nursing home-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hon Ming; Ip, Margaret; Hui, Elsie; Chan, Paul K S; Hui, David S C; Woo, Jean

    2013-02-01

    No international consensus has been reached on the empirical use of antibiotics with atypical coverage in nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP). Aspiration is an important cause of NHAP, but it may not require antimicrobial treatment. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and clinical characteristics of AP infections and review the need for empirical antibiotics with atypical coverage in NHAP. A prospective cohort study. Four nursing homes with a total number of 772 residents. Patients were aged ≥ 65 years, hospitalized for NHAP, which was defined as the presence of respiratory symptoms and abnormal chest radiographs, from April 2006 to March 2007. Demographics, clinical parameters, and investigation results were recorded. Microbial investigations comprised sputum routine and mycobacterial cultures, blood and urine cultures, serology, and nasopharyngeal aspirate viral culture and polymerase chain reaction tests. Suspected aspiration pneumonitis was arbitrarily defined as NHAP without pathogens identified. After excluding lone bacteriuria, 108 episodes of NHAP in 94 patients were included. Twelve APs were detected in 11 patients. There was no clinical feature to distinguish between infections caused by APs and other pathogens. The commonest APs were Mycoplasma pneumoniae (6) and Chlamydophila pneumoniae (3). No Legionella pneumophila was detected by urinary antigen test. None of the patients with AP infection received antibiotics indicated for AP infections. However, AP infections did not result in mortality. No pathogen was isolated in 31.5% of cases. Patients without pathogens isolated were less likely to have purulent sputum and crepitations on chest auscultation, compared with those with pneumonia caused by identified pathogens. Atypical pathogens (APs) were not associated with mortality even in cases where the prescribed antibiotics did not cover APs. NHAP may not necessarily be treated with empirical antibiotics covering APs. Copyright © 2013

  20. Bacteremic community-acquired pneumonia due to Klebsiella pneumoniae: clinical and microbiological characteristics in Taiwan, 2001-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Tsung; Jeng, Yuan-Yu; Chen, Te-Li; Fung, Chang-Phone

    2010-10-25

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is the major cause of community-acquired pyogenic infections in Taiwan. This retrospective study evaluated the clinical and microbiological characteristics of bacteremic community-acquired pneumonia due to K. pneumoniae in Taiwanese adults. The clinical characteristics of bacteremic community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults due to K. pneumoniae were compared to those of adults with bacteremic CAP due to Streptococcus pneumoniae at a tertiary medical center in Taiwan from 2001-2008. Risk factors for mortality of bacteremic CAP due to K. pneumoniae were analyzed. All clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae were examined for capsular serotypes, hypermucoviscosity phenotype, aerobactin and rmpA gene. K. pneumoniae was the dominant cause of bacteremic CAP and was associated with a more fulminant course and a worse prognosis than bacteremic CAP due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Initial presentation with septic shock and respiratory failure were independent risk factors for both early and total mortality. Serotype K1 and K2 comprised around half of all isolates. There were no significant differences in the clinical characteristics of patients with bacteremic CAP due to K1/K2 and non-K1/K2 isolates. Hypermucoviscosity phenotype as well as the aerobactin and rmpA genes were highly prevalent in the K. pneumoniae isolates. K. pneumoniae continued to be the dominant cause of bacteremic CAP in Taiwanese adults during 2001-2008. Initial presentation with septic shock and respiratory failure were independent risk factors for both early and total mortality from K. pneumoniae bacteremic CAP. Serotypes K1/K2 comprised around half of all isolates, but did not predispose patients to a poor clinical outcome. Physicians should be aware of the poor prognosis of any patient with bacteremic K. pneumoniae CAP and monitor these patients more closely.

  1. Diagnostics for community-acquired and atypical pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustianowski, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    After decades of neglect, the importance of establishing an aetiological diagnosis for community-acquired and atypical pneumonias has increased dramatically in recent years--driven by the movement towards more rational use of antibiotics, the further spread of antimicrobial resistance, and advances in point-of-care assays that circumvent the diagnostic delays that result from the centralization of laboratories. There have been very few developments in patient sampling, or the direct visualization, culture, and serological detection of respiratory pathogens. There has, however, been significant interest in the development of improved and more clinically useful assays for the detection of pathogen nucleic acids and proteins, and also in the potential utility of the assessment of host response for tailoring therapy. The majority of patients have yet to benefit from any advances. However, nucleic acid, newer protein, and possibly host-response assays have significant potential to influence patient care in the near future.

  2. Hospital Resource Utilisation by Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, S

    2017-09-01

    Little data is available on the resource utilisation of patients admitted with Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) in Ireland. A retrospective review of 50 randomly-selected patients admitted to Beaumont Hospital with CAP was undertaken. The mean length of stay of patients with CAP was 12 days (+\\/- 16 days). All patients were emergency admissions, all had a chest x-ray, a C-reactive protein blood test, and occupied a public bed at some point during admission. Common antimicrobial therapies were intravenous (IV) amoxicillin\\/clavulanic acid and oral clarithromycin; 60% received physiotherapy. The estimated mean cost of CAP per patient was €14,802.17. Costs arising from admission to hospital with CAP are substantial, but efforts can be undertaken to ensure that resources are used efficiently to improve patient care such as discharge planning and fewer in-hospital ward transfers

  3. [Antibiotic therapy of hospital-acquired pneumonia and its pharmacoeconomics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolář, Milan; Htoutou Sedláková, Miroslava; Urbánek, Karel; Uvízl, Radomír; Adamus, Milan; Imwensi, O P

    2016-03-01

    Important hospital-acquired infections include pneumonia, mainly because of the increasing resistance of bacterial pathogens to antimicrobials and the associated potential failure of antibiotic therapy. The present study aimed at determining the most frequent etiological agents of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and assessing the relationship between 30-day mortality and adequacy of antibiotic therapy. Based on the obtained information, optimal patterns of antibiotic therapy were to be defined, including a pharmacoeconomic perspective. In patients with clinically confirmed HAP, bacterial etiological agents were identified, their susceptibility to antimicrobials was determined and statistical methods were used to assess the relationship between adequacy of antibiotic therapy and 30-day mortality. The study comprised 68 patients with clinically confirmed HAP. The most common etiological agents were strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30.8 %), Klebsiella pneumoniae (23.1 %) and Burkholderia cepacia complex (15.4 %). Gram-negative bacteria accounted for 86.5 % of all bacterial pathogens. The overall mortality reached 42.5 %. In the subgroup of patients with inadequate antibiotic therapy, 30-day mortality was significantly higher (83.3 %) than in the subgroup with adequate therapy (30.0 %; p = 0.002). The risk for 30-day mortality was 2.78 times higher in case of inadequate antibiotic therapy (95%CI: 1.52-5.07). The proportion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains was significantly higher in the subgroup of patients with inadequate antibiotic therapy than in those with adequate therapy (67 % vs. 27 %; p = 0.032). Results of the present study suggest a significant relationship between mortality of patients with HAP and ineffective antibiotic therapy due to resistance of the bacterial pathogen. Thus, it is clear that initial antibiotic therapy must be based on qualified assumption of sufficient activity against the most common bacterial pathogens and results of surveillance

  4. Rapidly fatal community-acquired pneumonia due to Klebsiella pneumoniae complicated with acute myocarditis and accelerated idioventricular rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Tzu-Yi; Lin, Chou-Jui; Lee, Shih-Wei; Chuang, Chun-Pin; Jong, Yuh-Shiun; Chen, Wen-Jone; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2012-08-01

    We describe a previously healthy 52-year-old man with rapidly fatal community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae. The patient developed acute renal dysfunction, accelerated idioventricular rhythm (acute myocarditis), lactic acidosis and septic shock. He died within 15 hours after admission despite intravenous levofloxacin (750 mg daily) and aggressive medical treatment. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Viral and bacterial aetiology of community-acquired pneumonia in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijskens, Elisabeth G. W.; van Erkel, Adriana J. M.; Palmen, Fernand M. H.; Buiting, Anton G. M.; Kluytmans, Jan A. J. W.; Rossen, John W. A.

    BACKGROUND: Modern molecular techniques reveal new information on the role of respiratory viruses in community-acquired pneumonia. In this study, we tried to determine the prevalence of respiratory viruses and bacteria in patients with community-acquired pneumonia who were admitted to the hospital.

  6. The role of procalcitonin in adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia--a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Peter; Lindhardt, Bjarne Ørskov

    2012-01-01

    Promising results in relation to severity assessment and treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) have recently been presented from the study of procalcitonin (PCT) levels in these patients.......Promising results in relation to severity assessment and treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) have recently been presented from the study of procalcitonin (PCT) levels in these patients....

  7. ABIFLOX EFFICACY IN COMPLEX THERAPY OF PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Lyadova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the study, during which the efficacy of levofloxacin in the treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia was evaluated. It was found that levofloxacin is a highly effective treatment for patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

  8. The role of atypical pathogens in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrie, Thomas J; Costain, Nicholas; La Scola, Bernard; Patrick, Ward; Forgie, Sarah; Xu, Zhaolin; McNeil, Shelly A

    2012-06-01

    The term atypical pneumonia was first used in 1938, and by the 1970s it was widely used to refer to pneumonia due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila (or other Legionella species), and Chlamydophila pneumoniae. However, in the purest sense all pneumonias other than the classic bacterial pneumonias are atypical. Currently many favor abolition of the term atypical pneumonia.This review categorizes atypical pneumonia pathogens as conventional ones; viral agents and emerging atypical pneumonia pathogens. We emphasize viral pneumonia because with the increasing availability of multiplex polymerase chain reaction we can identify the agent(s) responsible for viral pneumonia. By using a sensitive assay for procalcitonin one can distinguish between viral and bacterial pneumonia. This allows pneumonia to be categorized as bacterial or viral at the time of admission to hospital or at discharge from the emergency department and soon thereafter further classified as to the etiology, which should be stated as definite or probable. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. Health related quality of life in patients with community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia in France

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Luiz Flavio; Saba, Grèce; Ricard, Jean-Damien; Messika, Jonathan; Gaillat, Jacques; Bonnin, Pierre; Chidiac, Christian; Illes, Hajnal-Gabriela; Laurichesse, Henri; Detournay, Bruno; Petitpretz, Patrick; de Pouvourville, Gérard

    2018-01-01

    Background Community Acquired Pneumococcal Pneumonia is a lung infection that causes serious health problems and can lead to complications and death. The aim of this study was to observe and analyze health related quality of life after a hospital episode for patients with community acquired pneumococcal pneumonia in France. Methods A total of 524 individuals were enrolled prospectively in the study and were followed for 12 months after hospital discharge. Presence of streptococcus pneumoniae ...

  10. Costs and health care resource utilization among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with newly acquired pneumonia

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    Lin J

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Junji Lin,1 Yunfeng Li,2 Haijun Tian,2 Michael J Goodman,1 Susan Gabriel,2 Tara Nazareth,2 Stuart J Turner,2,3 Stephen Arcona,2 Kristijan H Kahler21Department of Pharmacotherapy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 2Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA; 3Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA Background: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are at increased risk for lung infections and other pathologies (eg, pneumonia; however, few studies have evaluated the impact of pneumonia on health care resource utilization and costs in this population. The purpose of this study was to estimate health care resource utilization and costs among COPD patients with newly acquired pneumonia compared to those without pneumonia. Methods: A retrospective claims analysis using Truven MarketScan® Commercial and Medicare databases was conducted. COPD patients with and without newly acquired pneumonia diagnosed between January 1, 2004 and September 30, 2011 were identified. Propensity score matching was used to create a 1:1 matched cohort. Patient demographics, comorbidities (measured by Charlson Comorbidity Index, and medication use were evaluated before and after matching. Health care resource utilization (ie, hospitalizations, emergency room [ER] and outpatient visits, and associated health care costs were assessed during the 12-month follow-up. Logistic regression was conducted to evaluate the risk of hospitalization and ER visits, and gamma regression models and two-part models compared health care costs between groups after matching. Results: In the baseline cohort (N=467,578, patients with newly acquired pneumonia were older (mean age: 70 versus [vs] 63 years and had higher Charlson Comorbidity Index scores (3.3 vs 2.6 than patients without pneumonia. After propensity score matching, the pneumonia cohort was nine times more likely

  11. Rhinovirus Viremia in Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Schneider, Eileen; Jain, Seema; Bramley, Anna M; Hymas, Weston; Stockmann, Chris; Ampofo, Krow; Arnold, Sandra R; Williams, Derek J; Self, Wesley H; Patel, Anami; Chappell, James D; Grijalva, Carlos G; Anderson, Evan J; Wunderink, Richard G; McCullers, Jonathan A; Edwards, Kathryn M; Pavia, Andrew T; Erdman, Dean D

    2017-11-27

    Rhinoviruses (RVs) are ubiquitous respiratory pathogens that often cause mild or subclinical infections. Molecular detection of RVs from the upper respiratory tract can be prolonged, complicating etiologic association in persons with severe lower respiratory tract infections. Little is known about RV viremia and its value as a diagnostic indicator in persons hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Sera from RV-positive children and adults hospitalized with CAP were tested for RV by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Rhinovirus species and type were determined by partial genome sequencing. Overall, 57 of 570 (10%) RV-positive patients were viremic, and all were children aged <10 years (n = 57/375; 15.2%). Although RV-A was the most common RV species detected from respiratory specimens (48.8%), almost all viremias were RV-C (98.2%). Viremic patients had fewer codetected pathogens and were more likely to have chest retractions, wheezing, and a history of underlying asthma/reactive airway disease than patients without viremia. More than 1 out of 7 RV-infected children aged <10 years hospitalized with CAP were viremic. In contrast with other RV species, RV-C infections were highly associated with viremia and were usually the only respiratory pathogen identified, suggesting that RV-C viremia may be an important diagnostic indicator in pediatric pneumonia. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Hospitalization among Children with Neurologic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millman, Alexander J.; Finelli, Lyn; Bramley, Anna M.; Peacock, Georgina; Williams, Derek J.; Arnold, Sandra R.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Anderson, Evan J.; McCullers, Jonathan A.; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Jain, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe and compare the clinical characteristics, outcomes, and etiology of pneumonia among children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with neurologic disorders, non-neurologic underlying conditions, and no underlying conditions. Study design Children <18 years old hospitalized with clinical and radiographic CAP were enrolled at 3 US children’s hospitals. Neurologic disorders included cerebral palsy, developmental delay, Down syndrome, epilepsy, non-Down syndrome chromosomal abnormalities, and spinal cord abnormalities. We compared the epidemiology, etiology, and clinical outcomes of CAP in children with neurologic disorders with those with non-neurologic underlying conditions, and those with no underlying conditions using bivariate, age-stratified, and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results From January 2010–June 2012, 2358 children with radiographically confirmed CAP were enrolled; 280 (11.9%) had a neurologic disorder (52.1% of these individuals also had non-neurologic underlying conditions), 934 (39.6%) had non-neurologic underlying conditions only, and 1144 (48.5%) had no underlying conditions. Children with neurologic disorders were older and more likely to require intensive care unit (ICU) admission than children with non-neurologic underlying conditions and children with no underlying conditions; similar proportions were mechanically ventilated. In age-stratified analysis, children with neurologic disorders were less likely to have a pathogen detected than children with non-neurologic underlying conditions. In multivariate analysis, having a neurologic disorder was associated with ICU admission for children ≥2 years of age. Conclusions Children with neurologic disorders hospitalized with CAP were less likely to have a pathogen detected and more likely to be admitted to the ICU than children without neurologic disorders. PMID:27017483

  13. Pharmacotherapy and the risk for community-acquired pneumonia

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    Mody Lona

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some forms of pharmacotherapy are shown to increase the risk of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether pharmacotherapy with proton pump inhibitors (PPI, inhaled corticosteroids, and atypical antipsychotics was associated with the increased risk for CAP in hospitalized older adults with the adjustment of known risk factors (such as smoking status and serum albumin levels. Methods A retrospective case-control study of adults aged 65 years or older at a rural community hospital during 2004 and 2006 was conducted. Cases (N = 194 were those with radiographic evidence of pneumonia on admission. The controls were patients without the discharge diagnosis of pneumonia or acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (N = 952. Patients with gastric tube feeding, ventilator support, requiring hemodialysis, metastatic diseases or active lung cancers were excluded. Results Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the current use of inhaled corticosteroids (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.56-5.35 and atypical antipsychotics (AOR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.23-4.15 was an independent risk factor for CAP after adjusting for confounders, including age, serum albumin levels, sex, smoking status, a history of congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease, and COPD, the current use of PPI, β2 agonist and anticholinergic bronchodilators, antibiotic(s, iron supplement, narcotics, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The crude OR and the AOR of PPI use for CAP was 1.41 [95% CI = 1.03 - 1.93] and 1.18 [95% CI = 0.80 - 1.74] after adjusting for the above confounders, respectively. Lower serum albumin levels independently increased the risk of CAP 1.89- fold by decreasing a gram per deciliter (AOR = 2.89, 95% CI = 2.01 - 4.16. Conclusion Our study reaffirmed that the use of inhaled corticosteroids and atypical antipsychotics was both

  14. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: How Physical and Radiological Examination Contribute to Successful Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishaba, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), particularly in young adults. Vital signs are usually normal except for temperature. On physical examination, general appearance is normal compared with that of typical pneumonia such as pneumococcal pneumonia patients. Mycoplasma sometimes causes ear infections such as otitis media. It is important to distinguish between typical pneumonia and atypical pneumonia such as mycoplasma pneumonia because having the right diagnosis allows for the use of the correct antibiotic to treat CAP while preventing development of drug-resistant bacteria and also decreasing medical cost. The symptoms and diagnosis of mycoplasma pneumonia is multi-fold. Auscultation of patients can demonstrate trace late inspiratory crackles or normal alveolar sounds; however, bilateral polyphonic wheezes can sometimes be heard because of bronchiolitis. With regard to radiological findings, a chest radiogragh often shows bilateral reticulonodular or patchy consolidation in both lower lobes. Pleural effusion is rarely observed in adult cases. Immunocompetent patients tend to reveal more extensive shadowing compared with immunocompromised patients. As serological diagnostic methods are not able to offer 100% reliable diagnosis, integration of physical and radiological examination is crucial to accurately diagnose mycoplasma pneumonia. Herein, I review the typical findings from physical examination and imaging patterns of patients with mycoplasma pneumonia. PMID:27379238

  15. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: Outpatient treatment and prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Tagarro García, A; Escribano Montaner, A; Figuerola Mulet, J; García García, J J; Moreno-Galdó, A; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Lliria, C; Ruiz Contreras, J; Saavedra Lozano, J

    2015-12-01

    There have been significant changes in community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children in the last decade. These changes relate to epidemiology and clinical presentation. Resistance to antibiotics is also a changing issue. These all have to be considered when treating CAP. In this document, two of the main Spanish pediatric societies involved in the treatment of CAP in children, propose a consensus concerning therapeutic approach. These societies are the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases. The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (CAV-AEP) has also been involved in the prevention of CAP. An attempt is made to provide up-to-date guidelines to all paediatricians. The first part of the statement presents the approach to ambulatory, previously healthy children. We also review the prevention with currently available vaccines. In a next second part, special situations and complicated forms will be addressed. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Differentiation of tuberculous pneumonia and community-acquired pneumonia; usefulness of chest radiography and serum CA-125

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dong Man; Kim, Jeong Sook; Kim, Young Hwan; Kim, Su Young; Hur, Gham; Choi, Soo Jeon

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether tuberculous pneumonia can be distinguished from community-acquired pneumonia on the basis of chest radiographic findings only and the diagnostic utility of differences in serum CA-125 levels. Forty-five patients with a high fever (>38 .deg. C) in whom chest radiography revealed lobar consolidation were retrospectively studied. In 27 cases, the presence of acid-fast bacilli in sputum (n=21), the isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from bronchoscopic biopsy tissue and sputum cultures (n=16), and improvement in the findings of serial radiography and in clinical symptoms during antituberculous therapy (n=1) let to a diagnosis of tuberculous pneumonia. A diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (n=18) was based on improvement in the serial radiographic findings obtained during antibacterial therapy (n=16), and the isolation of bacteria from sputum and pleural fluid culture (n=2). On the basis of independently analysed findings, radiologist determined the presence or absence of nodular density, cavitary lesions and loss of lung volume, while two radiologists differentiated between tuberculous pneumonia and community-acquired pneumonia. Initial chest radiographs of tuberculous pneumonia revealed nodular density in 89% of cases, cavitary lesions in 29%, and loss of lung volume nodular density was in 26%, while those of community-acquired pneumonia demonstrated nodular density in only 22%, cavitary lesions in 6%, and loss of lung volume in none was a significant statistical difference in nodular density, cavitary lesions and loss of lung volume (p < 0.005). The average serum CA-125 level in tuberculous pneumonia was 306.5 (range, 21.3-1078) U/ml, whereas the average level in community-acquired pneumonia was 38.0 (range, 11.3-114.8) U/ml (p < 0.005). Initial chest radiography can differentiate between tuberculous and community-acquired pneumonia on the basis of nodular density, cavitary lesions and loss of lung volume and differences in CA-125

  17. Determinants for hospitalization in " low-risk" community acquired pneumonia

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    Aliyu Muktar H

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variable decision in managing community acquired pneumonia (CAP is the initial site of care; in-patient versus outpatient. These variations persist despite comprehensive practice guidelines. Patients with a Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI score lower than seventy have low risk for complications and outpatient antibiotic management is recommended in this group. These patients are generally below the age of fifty years, non-nursing home residents, HIV negative and have no major cardiac, hepatic, renal or malignant diseases. Methods A retrospective analysis of 296 low-risk CAP patients evaluated within a year one period at St. Agnes Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland was undertaken. All patients were assigned a PSI score. 208 (70% were evaluated and discharged from the emergency department (E.D. to complete outpatient antibiotic therapy, while 88 (30% were hospitalized. Patients were sub-stratified into classes I-V according to PSI. A comparison of demographic, clinical, social and financial parameters was made between the E.D. discharged and hospitalized groups. Results Statistically significant differences in favor of the hospitalized group were noted for female gender (CI: 1.46-5.89, p= 0.0018, African Americans (CI: 0.31-0.73, p= 0.004, insurance coverage (CI: 0.19-0.63, p= 0.0034, temperature (CI: 0.04-0.09, p= 0.0001 and pulse rate (CI: 0.03-0.14, p= 0.0001. No statistically significant differences were observed between the two groups for altered mental status, hypotension, tachypnea, laboratory/radiological parameters and social indicators (p>0.05. The average length of stay for in-patients was 3.5 days at about eight time's higher cost than outpatient management. There was no difference in mortality or treatment failures between the two groups. The documentation rate and justifications for hospitalizing low risk CAP patients by admitting physicians was less than optimal. Conclusions High fever, tachycardia, female gender

  18. Prevention of hospital-acquired pneumonia in non-ventilated adult patients: a narrative review

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    Leonor Pássaro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumonia is one of the leading hospital-acquired infections worldwide and has an important impact. Although preventive measures for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP are well known, less is known about appropriate measures for prevention of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP. Aim The purpose of this narrative review is to provide an overview of the current standards for preventing HAP in non-ventilated adult patients. Methods A search of the literature up to May 2015 was conducted using Medline for guidelines published by national professional societies or professional medical associations. In addition, a comprehensive search for the following preventive measures was performed: hand hygiene, oral care, bed position, mobilization, diagnosis and treatment of dysphagia, aspiration prevention, viral infections and stress bleeding prophylaxis. Findings Regarding international guidelines, several measures were recommended for VAP, whilst no specific recommendations for HAP prevention in non-ventilated patients are available. There is reasonable evidence available that oral care is associated with a reduction in HAP. Early mobilization interventions, swift diagnosis and treatment of dysphagia, and multimodal programmes for the prevention of nosocomial influenza cross-infection, have a positive impact on HAP reduction. The impact of bed position and stress bleeding prophylaxis remains uncertain. Systematic antibiotic prophylaxis for HAP prevention should be avoided. Conclusion Scant literature and little guidance is available for the prevention of HAP among non-ventilated adult patients. In addition, the criteria used for the diagnosis of HAP and the populations targeted in the studies selected are heterogeneous. Oral care was the most studied measure and was commonly associated with a decrease in HAP rate, although a broad range of interventions are proposed. No robust evidence is available for other measures. Further high

  19. Outcome of community-acquired pneumonia with cardiac complications

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    R. Eman Shebl

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Cardiac complications are common in the admitted patients with pneumonia and they are associated with increased pneumonia severity and increased cardiovascular risk, these complications adds to the risk of mortality, so optimal management of these events may reduce the burden of death associated with this infection.

  20. [Community-acquired pneumonia with atypical (mycoplasmic and chlamydial) infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubnikov, G V; Poliakova, I G; Butakova, L Iu

    2009-01-01

    To perfect prehospital diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) of atypical etiology (mycoplastic--Mp and chlamydial--Ch). Routine clinical examinations, sputum seeding, enzyme immunoassay were made in 214 patients admitted to therapeutic departments of two large Barnaul hospitals. Mp CAP was diagnosed in 21.5%, Ch CAP--in 12.1%, combination--in 7.0% patients. Sputum seeding was made in 67 patients. Of them 41.8% patients were found to have bacterial infection. Atypical infection combined with bacterial in 44.1% patients. The above combination was more frequent in patients with Ch CAP than with Mp CAP (58.8 and 29.7%, respectively). Bacterial flora was detected in 39.1% CAP patients without atypical infection. A retrospective analysis of case histories in respect of prehospital stage discovered that CAP patients with atypical infection are characterized by more frequent contact with patients with acute respiratory viral infection and workers of services sector. CAP arises primarily in autumn and winter with morbidity correlating with acute respiratory diseases morbidity. CAP with atypical infection is characterized with prodromal period, late visit to the doctor, late hospitalization, late x-ray verification of the disease especially in Ch CAP. Mp CAP is more prevalent in young patients, Ch CAP occurs most frequently in young, presenile and senile patients. The presence of the prodromal period in CAP patients with atypical infection is the cause of mistakes in outpatient diagnosis. Instead of CAP such patients are often diagnosed to have acute respiratory viral infection (54.5%) or exacerbation of chronic bronchopulmonary disease (15.9%).

  1. Oxidative metabolism of neutrophils in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

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    Demidchik Lyudmila Andreevna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available At the present time, available views show our limited knowledge of the peculiarities of the functional status of neutrophils and their metabolism in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. The studying of changes of metabolic status of neutrophils can broaden our views about pneumonia pathogenesis and define datum points of therapeutic effect.

  2. Drug effects on the risk and prognosis of community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garde, E.M.W. van de

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents a series of studies exploring the hypothesis that both ACE-inhibitors and statins, besides their intended effects, reduce the risk of acquiring pneumonia. Furthermore, as the burden of pneumonia is not only determined by its incidence but also by a high mortality, another widely

  3. Atypical bacterial pathogens in community-acquired pneumonia in children: a hospital-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Jyotsna; Awasthi, Shally; Rajput, Anuradha; Tiwari, Manoj; Jain, Amita

    2009-04-01

    A total of 243 children aged one month to five years with World Health Organization defined severe community acquired pneumonia were studied for the presence of atypical bacterial pathogens: 24 were found positive for mycoplasma infection. There was no significant association with any of the clinical, laboratory and radiological variables in children with pneumonia by the atypical pathogen.

  4. Prognostic factors for early clinical failure in patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogewerf, M; Oosterheert, J J; Hak, E; Hoepelman, I M; Bonten, M J M

    2006-01-01

    For patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), clinical response during the first days of treatment is predictive of clinical outcome. As risk assessments can improve the efficiency of pneumonia management, a prospective cohort study to assess clinical, biochemical and microbiological

  5. Clinical characteristics and innate immunity in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endeman, H.

    2009-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the most common infectious disease requiring hospitalisation in the Western world. In spite of improving antibiotic regiments, CAP still has significant mortality. In non-immune compromised patients, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequently isolated

  6. Significance of anaerobes and oral bacteria in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Kei; Kawanami, Toshinori; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Noguchi, Shingo; Nagata, Shuya; Nishida, Chinatsu; Kido, Takashi; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Molecular biological modalities with better detection rates have been applied to identify the bacteria causing infectious diseases. Approximately 10-48% of bacterial pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia are not identified using conventional cultivation methods. This study evaluated the bacteriological causes of community-acquired pneumonia using a cultivation-independent clone library analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, and compared the results with those of conventional cultivation methods. Patients with community-acquired pneumonia were enrolled based on their clinical and radiological findings. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were collected from pulmonary pathological lesions using bronchoscopy and evaluated by both a culture-independent molecular method and conventional cultivation methods. For the culture-independent molecular method, approximately 600 base pairs of 16S ribosomal RNA genes were amplified using polymerase chain reaction with universal primers, followed by the construction of clone libraries. The nucleotide sequences of 96 clones randomly chosen for each specimen were determined, and bacterial homology was searched. Conventional cultivation methods, including anaerobic cultures, were also performed using the same specimens. In addition to known common pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia [Streptococcus pneumoniae (18.8%), Haemophilus influenzae (18.8%), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (17.2%)], molecular analysis of specimens from 64 patients with community-acquired pneumonia showed relatively higher rates of anaerobes (15.6%) and oral bacteria (15.6%) than previous reports. Our findings suggest that anaerobes and oral bacteria are more frequently detected in patients with community-acquired pneumonia than previously believed. It is possible that these bacteria may play more important roles in community-acquired pneumonia.

  7. Significance of anaerobes and oral bacteria in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Yamasaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular biological modalities with better detection rates have been applied to identify the bacteria causing infectious diseases. Approximately 10-48% of bacterial pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia are not identified using conventional cultivation methods. This study evaluated the bacteriological causes of community-acquired pneumonia using a cultivation-independent clone library analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, and compared the results with those of conventional cultivation methods. METHODS: Patients with community-acquired pneumonia were enrolled based on their clinical and radiological findings. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were collected from pulmonary pathological lesions using bronchoscopy and evaluated by both a culture-independent molecular method and conventional cultivation methods. For the culture-independent molecular method, approximately 600 base pairs of 16S ribosomal RNA genes were amplified using polymerase chain reaction with universal primers, followed by the construction of clone libraries. The nucleotide sequences of 96 clones randomly chosen for each specimen were determined, and bacterial homology was searched. Conventional cultivation methods, including anaerobic cultures, were also performed using the same specimens. RESULTS: In addition to known common pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia [Streptococcus pneumoniae (18.8%, Haemophilus influenzae (18.8%, Mycoplasma pneumoniae (17.2%], molecular analysis of specimens from 64 patients with community-acquired pneumonia showed relatively higher rates of anaerobes (15.6% and oral bacteria (15.6% than previous reports. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that anaerobes and oral bacteria are more frequently detected in patients with community-acquired pneumonia than previously believed. It is possible that these bacteria may play more important roles in community-acquired pneumonia.

  8. PNEUMOCOCCAL CAPSULAR ANTIGEN-DETECTION AND PNEUMOCOCCAL SEROLOGY IN PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOERSMA, WG; LOWENBERG, A; HOLLOWAY, Y; KUTTSCHRUTTER, H; SNIJDER, JAM; KOETER, GH

    1991-01-01

    Background Methods to determine the microbial cause of community acquired pneumonia include detection of pneumococcal antigen and measurement of pneumococcal capsular antibody response. Their usefulness compared with conventional microbiological techniques was investigated in patients with

  9. Ceftaroline fosamil for the treatment of hospital-acquired pneumonia and ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Keith S; Udeani, George; Cole, Phillip; Friedland, Hillel David

    2015-01-01

    Ceftaroline fosamil is a novel cephalosporin with bactericidal activity against common pathogens associated with hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Ceftaroline is inactive against extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing or AmpC-overexpressing Enterobacteriaceae and has limited activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. CAPTURE is a multicenter, retrospective study designed to collect information on contemporary clinical use of ceftaroline fosamil in the USA. Data on off-label use of ceftaroline fosamil for the treatment of patients with HAP/VAP between September 2013 and March 2014 are presented. Data were collected at participating study centers by randomized selection and review of patients' charts, and included patients' demographics, disease characteristics, pathogens isolated, antibiotic treatment and clinical outcomes. Patients receiving at least four consecutive doses of ceftaroline fosamil, with data available for determination of clinical cure, comprised the evaluable population. Clinical success was defined as either clinical cure with no further need for antibiotics treatment, or clinical improvement with a switch to another antibiotic. A total of 40 patients were evaluated: 27 with HAP and 13 with VAP. Demographics for patients with HAP and VAP were similar (59% male, mean age of 63 years and 54% male, mean age of 58 years, respectively). The clinical success rates were 75% overall, 82% in patients with HAP and 62% in patients with VAP. Clinical success rates for patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated were 58% in patients with HAP and 57% in patients with VAP. Ceftaroline fosamil was used as a second-line therapy in majority of patients (85%) with clinical success rates of 79% similar to the published literature. The CAPTURE study data support further evaluation of ceftaroline fosamil as an effective treatment option for HAP and VAP when a ceftaroline susceptible etiologic

  10. Non-HIV Pneumocystis pneumonia: do conventional community-acquired pneumonia guidelines under estimate its severity?

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    Asai Nobuhiro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-HIV Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP can occur in immunosuppressed patients having malignancy or on immunosuppressive agents. To classify severity, the A-DROP scale proposed by the Japanese Respiratory Society (JRS, the CURB-65 score of the British Respiratory Society (BTS and the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA are widely used in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP in Japan. To evaluate how correctly these conventional prognostic guidelines for CAP reflect the severity of non-HIV PCP, we retrospectively analyzed 21 patients with non-HIV PCP. Methods A total of 21 patients were diagnosed by conventional staining and polymerase chain reaction (PCR for respiratory samples with chest x-ray and computed tomography (CT findings. We compared the severity of 21 patients with PCP classified by A-DROP, CURB-65, and PSI. Also, patients’ characteristics, clinical pictures, laboratory results at first visit or admission and intervals from diagnosis to start of specific-PCP therapy were evaluated in both survivor and non-survivor groups. Results Based on A-DROP, 18 patients were classified as mild or moderate; respiratory failure developed in 15 of these 18 (83.3%, and 7/15 (46.7% died. Based on CURB-65, 19 patients were classified as mild or moderate; respiratory failure developed in 16/19 (84.2%, and 8 of the 16 (50% died. In contrast, PSI classified 14 as severe or extremely severe; all of the 14 (100% developed respiratory failure and 8/14 (57.1% died. There were no significant differences in laboratory results in these groups. The time between the initial visit and diagnosis, and the time between the initial visit and starting of specific-PCP therapy were statistically shorter in the survivor group than in the non-survivor group. Conclusions Conventional prognostic guidelines for CAP could underestimate the severity of non-HIV PCP, resulting in a therapeutic delay

  11. Prevalence and clinical presentations of atypical pathogens infection in community acquired pneumonia in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prapphal, Nuanchan; Suwanjutha, Subharee; Durongkaveroj, Pravin; Lochindarat, Sorasak; Kunakorn, Mongkol; Deerojanawong, Jitladda; Chantarojanasiri, Teerachai; Supanitayaonon, Yingsak; Janedittakarn, Pisit

    2006-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of atypical pneumonia and clinical presentations in patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP). A prospective multi-centered study was performed in patients aged > or = 2 years with the diagnosis of CAP who were treated at seven governmental hospitals in Bangkok from December 2001 to November 2002. The diagnosis of current infection was based on > or = 4 fold rise in antibody sera or persistently high antibody titers together with the presence of DNA of M. pneumoniae or C. pneumoniae in respiratory secretion or antigen of L. pneumophila in the urine. Clinical presentations were compared between patients with atypical pneumonia and unspecified pneumonia. Of 292 patients, 18.8% had current infection with atypical respiratory pathogens (M. pneumoniae 14.0%, C. pneumoniae 3.4%, L. pneumophila 0.4% and mixed infection 1.0%). Only age at presentation was significantly associated with atypical pneumonia in adults, while absence of dyspnea, lobar consolidation, and age > or = 5 years were significant findings for atypical pneumonia in children. The present study confirms the significance of atypical pathogens in adults and children. Moreover lobar consolidation is likely to predict atypical pneumonia in childhood CAP.

  12. Severe virus influenza A H1N1 related pneumonia and community-acquired pneumonia: differences in the evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardocci, Paula; Gullo, Caio Eduardo; Lobo, Suzana Margareth

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical, laboratory and evolution data of patients with severe influenza A H1N1 pneumonia and compare the data with that of patients with severe community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. Methods Cohort and retrospective study. All patients admitted to the intensive care unit between May 2009 and December 2010 with a diagnosis of severe pneumonia caused by the influenza A H1N1 virus were included in the study. Thirty patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia admitted within the same period were used as a control group. Severe community-acquired pneumonia was defined as the presence of at least one major severity criteria (ventilator or vasopressor use) or two minor criteria. Results The data of 45 patients were evaluated. Of these patients, 15 were infected with H1N1. When compared to the group with community-acquired pneumonia, patients from the H1N1 group had significantly lower leukocyte counts on admission (6,728±4,070 versus 16,038±7,863; p<0.05) and lower C-reactive protein levels (Day 2: 15.1±8.1 versus 22.1±10.9 mg/dL; p<0.05). The PaO2/FiO2 ratio values were lower in the first week in patients with H1N1. Patients who did not survive the H1N1 severe pneumonia had significantly higher levels of C-reactive protein and higher serum creatinine levels compared with patients who survived. The mortality rate was significantly higher in the H1N1 group than in the control group (53% versus 20%; p=0.056, respectivelly). Conclusion Differences in the leukocyte count, C-reactive protein concentrations and oxygenation profiles may contribute to the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with severe influenza A H1N1 virus-related pneumonia and community-acquired pneumonia. PMID:23917977

  13. The management of community-acquired pneumonia in the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faverio, Paola; Aliberti, Stefano; Bellelli, Giuseppe; Suigo, Giulia; Lonni, Sara; Pesci, Alberto; Restrepo, Marcos I.

    2014-01-01

    Pneumonia is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The elderly population has exponentially increased in the last decades and the current epidemiological trends indicate that it is expected to further increase. Therefore, recognizing the special needs of older people is of paramount importance. In this review we address the main differences between elderly and adult patients with pneumonia. We focus on several aspects, including the atypical clinical presentation of pneumonia in the elderly, the methods to assess severity of illness, the appropriate setting of care, and the management of comorbidities. We also discuss how to approach the common complications of severe pneumonia, including acute respiratory failure and severe sepsis. Moreover, we debate whether or not elderly patients are at higher risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and which risk factors should be considered when choosing the antibiotic therapy. We highlight the differences in the definition of clinical stability and treatment failure between adults and elderly patients. Finally, we review the main outcomes, preventive and supportive measures to be considered in elderly patients with pneumonia. PMID:24360244

  14. Community-acquired pneumonia management and outcomes in the era of health information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecham, Ian D; Vines, Caroline; Dean, Nathan C

    2017-11-01

    Pneumonia continues to be a leading cause of hospitalization and mortality. Implementation of health information technology (HIT) can lead to cost savings and improved care. In this review, we examine the literature on the use of HIT in the management of community-acquired pneumonia. We also discuss barriers to adoption of technology in managing pneumonia, the reliability and quality of electronic health data in pneumonia research, how technology has assisted pneumonia diagnosis and outcomes research. The goal of using HIT is to develop and deploy generalizable, real-time, computerized clinical decision support integrated into usual pneumonia care. A friendly user interface that does not disrupt efficiency and demonstrates improved clinical outcomes should result in widespread adoption. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  15. Point-of-care lung ultrasound in children with community acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Hayri Levent; Özkaya, Ahmet Kağan; Sarı Gökay, Sinem; Tolu Kendir, Özlem; Şenol, Hande

    2017-07-01

    To present lung ultrasound findings in children assessed with suspected pneumonia in the emergency department and to show the benefit of lung ultrasound in diagnosing pneumonia in comparison with chest X-rays. This observational prospective study was performed in the pediatric emergency department of a single center. Point of care lung ultrasound was performed on each child by an independent sonographer blinded to the patient's clinical and chest X-ray findings. Community acquired pneumonia was established as a final diagnosis by two clinicians based on the recommendations in the British Thoracic Society guideline. One hundred sixty children with a mean age of 3.3±4years and a median age of 1.4years (min-max 0.08-17.5years) were investigated. Final diagnosis in 149 children was community-acquired pneumonia. Lung ultrasound findings were compatible with pneumonia in 142 (95.3%) of these 149 children, while chest X-ray findings were compatible with pneumonia in 132 (88.5%). Pneumonia was confirmed with lung ultrasound in 15 of the 17 patients (11.4%) not evaluated as compatible with pneumonia at chest X-ray. While pneumonia could not be confirmed with lung ultrasound in seven (4.6%) patients, findings compatible with pneumonia were not determined at chest X-ray in two of these patients. When lung ultrasound and chest X-ray were compared as diagnostic tools, a significant difference was observed between them (p=0.041). This study shows that lung ultrasound is at least as useful as chest X-ray in diagnosing children with community-acquired pneumonia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Lung ultrasound for the diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Jacob A M; Andronikou, Savvas; Zar, Heather J

    2017-10-01

    Ultrasound (US) has been proposed as an alternative first-line imaging modality to diagnose community-acquired pneumonia in children. Lung US has the potential benefits over chest radiography of being radiation free, subject to fewer regulatory requirements, relatively lower cost and with immediate bedside availability of results. However, the uptake of lung US into clinical practice has been slow and it is not yet included in clinical guidelines for community-acquired pneumonia in children. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the equipment and techniques used to perform lung US in children with suspected pneumonia and the interpretation of relevant sonographic findings. We also summarise the current evidence of diagnostic accuracy and reliability of lung US compared to alternative imaging modalities in children and critically consider the strengths and limitations of lung US for use in children presenting with suspected community-acquired pneumonia.

  17. Guidelines for the use of chest radiographs in community-acquired pneumonia in children and adolescents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronikou, Savvas; Lambert, Elena; Hilder, Lucy [University of Bristol, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Bristol (United Kingdom); CRICBristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Halton, Jarred; Crumley, Iona; Kosack, Cara [Medecins Sans Frontieres, Diagnostic Network, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lyttle, Mark D. [Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Emergency Department, Bristol (United Kingdom); University of the West of England, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-15

    National guidance from the United Kingdom and the United States on community-acquired pneumonia in children states that chest radiographs are not recommended routinely in uncomplicated cases. The main reason in the ambulatory setting is that there is no evidence of a substantial impact on clinical outcomes. However clinical practice and adherence to guidance is multifactorial and includes the clinical context (developed vs. developing world), the confidence of the attending physician, the changing incidence of complications (according to the success of immunisation programs), the availability of alternative imaging (and its relationship to perceived risks of radiation) and the reliability of the interpretation of imaging. In practice, chest radiographs are performed frequently for suspected pneumonia in children. Time pressures facing clinicians at the front line, difficulties in distinguishing which children require admission, restricted bed numbers for admissions, imaging-resource limitations, perceptions regarding risk from procedures, novel imaging modalities and the probability of other causes for the child's presentation all need to be factored into a guideline. Other drivers that often weigh in, depending on the setting, include cost-effectiveness and the fear of litigation. Not all guidelines designed for the developed world can therefore be applied to the developing world, and practice guidelines require regular review in the context of new information. In addition, radiologists must improve radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia, reach consensus on the interpretive terminology that clarifies their confidence regarding the presence of pneumonia and act to replace one imaging technique with another whenever there is proof of improved accuracy or reliability. (orig.)

  18. Risk factors and antibiotic therapy in P. aeruginosa community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibila, Oriol; Laserna, Elena; Maselli, Diego Jose; Fernandez, Juan Felipe; Mortensen, Eric M; Anzueto, Antonio; Waterer, Grant; Restrepo, Marcos I

    2015-05-01

    Current guidelines recommend empirical treatment against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients with specific risk factors. However, evidence to support these recommendations is limited. We evaluate the risk factors and the impact of antimicrobial therapy in patients hospitalized with CAP due to P. aeruginosa. We performed a retrospective population-based study of >150 hospitals. Patients were included if they had a diagnosis of CAP and P. aeruginosa was identified as the causative pathogen. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using the presence of risk factors and 30-day mortality as the dependent measures. Seven hundred eighty-one patients with P. aeruginosa pneumonia were identified in a cohort of 62 689 patients with pneumonia (1.1%). Of these, 402 patients (0.6%) were included in the study and 379 (0.5%) were excluded due to health care-associated pneumonia or immunosuppression. In patients with CAP due to P. aeruginosa, 272 (67.8%) had no documented risk factors. These patients had higher rates of dementia and cerebrovascular disease. Empirical antibiotic therapy against P. aeruginosa within the first 48 h of presentation was independently associated with lower 30-day mortality in patients with CAP due to P. aeruginosa (hazard ratio (HR) 0.42, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.23-0.76) and in patients without risk factors for P. aeruginosa CAP (HR 0.40, 95% CI: 0.21-0.76). Risk factor recommended by current guidelines only detect one third of the patients admitted with CAP due to P. aeruginosa. Risk factors did not define the whole benefit observed due to empirical therapy covering P. aeruginosa. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. Guidelines for the use of chest radiographs in community-acquired pneumonia in children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronikou, Savvas; Lambert, Elena; Hilder, Lucy; Halton, Jarred; Crumley, Iona; Kosack, Cara; Lyttle, Mark D.

    2017-01-01

    National guidance from the United Kingdom and the United States on community-acquired pneumonia in children states that chest radiographs are not recommended routinely in uncomplicated cases. The main reason in the ambulatory setting is that there is no evidence of a substantial impact on clinical outcomes. However clinical practice and adherence to guidance is multifactorial and includes the clinical context (developed vs. developing world), the confidence of the attending physician, the changing incidence of complications (according to the success of immunisation programs), the availability of alternative imaging (and its relationship to perceived risks of radiation) and the reliability of the interpretation of imaging. In practice, chest radiographs are performed frequently for suspected pneumonia in children. Time pressures facing clinicians at the front line, difficulties in distinguishing which children require admission, restricted bed numbers for admissions, imaging-resource limitations, perceptions regarding risk from procedures, novel imaging modalities and the probability of other causes for the child's presentation all need to be factored into a guideline. Other drivers that often weigh in, depending on the setting, include cost-effectiveness and the fear of litigation. Not all guidelines designed for the developed world can therefore be applied to the developing world, and practice guidelines require regular review in the context of new information. In addition, radiologists must improve radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia, reach consensus on the interpretive terminology that clarifies their confidence regarding the presence of pneumonia and act to replace one imaging technique with another whenever there is proof of improved accuracy or reliability. (orig.)

  20. Are pathogenic leptospira species agents of community-acquired pneumonia? case reports of leptospirosis presenting as pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H. Gasem; H. Farida (Helmia); A. Ahmed (Ahmed); J.A. Severin (Juliëtte); A. Suryanto (Agus); B. Isbandrio; H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); R.A. Hartskeerl (Rudy); P.J. Van Den Broek (Peterhans J.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe report four Indonesian cases meeting the clinical and radiological criteria for community-acquired pneumonia and other findings suggestive of leptospirosis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses of serum and urine samples and serology confirmed the diagnosis of leptospirosis in each.

  1. Are Pathogenic Leptospira Species Agents of Community-Acquired Pneumonia? Case Reports of Leptospirosis Presenting as Pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gasem, M. Hussein; Farida, Helmia; Ahmed, Ahmed; Severin, Juliţte A.; Suryanto, Agus; Isbandrio, Bambang; Verbrugh, Henri A.; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.; van den Broek, Peterhans J.

    2016-01-01

    We report four Indonesian cases meeting the clinical and radiological criteria for community-acquired pneumonia and other findings suggestive of leptospirosis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses of serum and urine samples and serology confirmed the diagnosis of leptospirosis in each. Results of qPCR

  2. Hospital-acquired pneumonia in critically ill children: Incidence, risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mervat Gamal Eldin Mansour

    2012-02-21

    acquired infection in critically ill patients. National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) system reported that. HAP accounts for as much as 31% of all nosocomial infections acquired in medical intensive care units. (ICU).

  3. Hospital-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae infections in a paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    8. Coovadia YM, Johnson AP, Bhana RH, Hutchinson GR, George RC, Hafferjee. IE. Multiresistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in a neonatal nursery: The importance of maintenance of infection control policies and procedures in the prevention of outbreaks. J Hosp Infect 1992;22(3):197-205. 9. Cotton MF, Pieper CH, Kirsten GF, ...

  4. Community acquired pneumonia among children admitted in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To find out the hospital burden of pneumonia and preventable factors associated with the disease. Design: Prospective cross sectional study. Setting: The paediatric ward of Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital in Western Kenya. Subjects: All the children admitted to the paediatric wards and found to have clinical ...

  5. An Update on the Management Of Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Hsien Lee

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is the leading cause of infection-related death and represents the fifth cause of mortality in the elderly. There are several reported risk factors for acquiring pneumonia at an older age, such as alcoholism, lung and heart diseases, nursing home residence, and swallowing disorders. Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP is reviewed, with an emphasis on multidrug-resistant (MDR bacterial pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter species, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The clinical characteristics of pneumonia in the elderly differ substantially compared with younger patients, and the severity of the disease is strongly associated with increased age and age-related comorbid disorders. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the pathogen most frequently responsible for pneumonia in the elderly with early HAP without risk factors for MDR; enteric Gram-negative rods should be considered in nursing home-associated pneumonia, as well as anaerobes in patients with aspiration pneumonia. Special attention should be given to preventive measures such as vaccination, oral care, and nutrition. The management of HAP should be instituted early with: appropriate use of antibiotics in adequate doses; avoidance of excessive use of antibiotics by de-escalation of initial antibiotic therapy, based on microbiologic cultures and the clinical response of the patient; and reduction of the duration of treatment to the minimum effective period.

  6. Severe virus associated community acquired pneumonia: predictors of lethality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. O. Pertseva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that the influenza virus pathogenicity factors have been well studied in vitro, in vivo lack is presented in understanding of the those risk factors, objective and laboratory parameters, which related most of all to the fatal virus-associated community-aquired pneumonia (CAP. That is why the purpose of the study was to study the clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with severe virus-associated CAP during the 2015–2016 influenza epidemic and their role as predictors of patients’ mortality. To do this, patients with severe virus-associated CAP were examined. They were divided into 2 groups depending on the outcome of treatment: 1st- deaths from the virus-associated severe CAP and 2nd - patients with successful treatment of the severe virus-associated CAP. Special statistical method was used – one-dimensional analysis of variance to compare individual parameters between the two groups of patients (surviving and deceased. Pearson χ2 test (contingency table was used for categorical variables. Factors that were significant predictors of mortality as a result of univariate analysis were tested using multifactorial analysis using logistic regression. In the final model, each parameter must have had a significant impact on mortality. It was found that risk factors for death in patients with severe virus-associated CAP according to univariate analysis were: presence of obesity, disorders of consciousness, BH≥35 min, SaO2<80%, PaO2<50 mm Hg, mmHg PaCO2 ≥50 mmHg during hospitalization. Independent predictors of mortality according to the logistic regression are the presence of obesity, disorders of consciousness, PaO2<50 mm Hg, mmHg PaCO2 ≥50 mmHg. Given that among clinical and laboratory parameters key parameters that significantly influence the outcome, are indicators of the severity of hypoxia and hypoxemia, a major step in determining the severity of the patients with virus-associated severe emergency is

  7. The urinary antigen tests have high sensitivity in diagnosis of Pneumococcus caused community-acquired pneumonia posterior to antimicrobial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Zhou, Ming; Xiao, Wei; Ai, Biao; Liu, Xuezheng; Li, Yan

    2014-11-01

    Antibiotic treatment before microbiological test significant reduces the positive rate of culture methods of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The Binax NOW S. pneumoniae immunochromatographic test (ICT) has become a more commonly used procedure to diagnose S. pneumoniae from community-acquired pneumonia in adults. However, performance of this test after empirical antimicrobial therapy is uncertain. Therefore, in this prospective study, we evaluate the impact of antimicrobial therapy on sensitivity of ICT test in 487 hospitalized adult patients. The results showed that 192 (39.4 %) and 295 (60.6 %) specimens were collected before (Group 1) or after antibiotic treatment (Group 2), respectively. S. pneumoniae was detected by ICT in 21 (10.9 %) patients in the Group 1 and 39 (13.2 %) in the Group 2 and their positive rates were not different (P > 0.05). However, The positive rate of blood and pleural fluid was declined from 5.7 to 2.7 % and sputum, from 9.9 to 4.7 % after the antibiotic treatment, respectively. This study confirmed that the ICT urinary antigen test remained to have a high sensitivity for diagnosis of pneumococcal infection after empiric antibiotic treatment was started. The ICT urinary antigen test would have a potential to guide the right choice of therapy for pneumonia in adults earlier.

  8. Community-acquired pneumonia caused by carbapenem-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae: re-examining its prevention and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doi A

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Asako Doi,1,2 Kentaro Iwata,3 Hiroshi Takegawa,4 Kanji Miki,5 Yumi Sono,1,2 Hiroaki Nishioka,2 Jumpei Takeshita,6 Keisuke Tomii,7 Tsunekazu Haruta11Department of Infectious Diseases, 2Department of General Internal Medicine, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Kobe University Hospital, Japan; 4Department of Laboratory Medicine, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Japan; 5Hyogo Health Service Association, Hyogo, 6Foundation of Biochemical Research and Innovation, Osaka, 7Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Hyogo, JapanAbstract: A 73-year-old man with no significant past medical history or any history of health care visits was hospitalized for pneumonia. Sputum culture revealed multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, even to carbapenems. The patient was later treated successfully with levofloxacin. Throat cultures from his two grandchildren revealed S. pneumoniae with the same susceptibility pattern. Analysis for resistant genes revealed gPRSP (pbp1a + pbp2x + pbp2b gene variants in both the patient and his grandchildren, none of whom had received pneumococcal vaccines of any kind. This case illustrates the importance of the emergence of carbapenem-resistant S. pneumoniae. Non-rational use of carbapenems for community-acquired infections may be counterproductive. This case also highlights the importance of pneumococcal vaccinations in children and the elderly.Keywords: carbapenem resistance, Streptococcus pneumoniae, pneumonia

  9. Defining characteristics and risk indicators for diagnosing nursing home-acquired pneumonia and aspiration pneumonia in nursing home residents, using the electronically-modified Delphi Method.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollaar, V.; Maarel-Wierink, C. van der; Putten, G.J. van der; Sanden, W. van der; Swart, B.J. de; Baat, C. de

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In nursing home residents, it is not possible to distinguish pneumonia and aspiration pneumonia clinically. International literature reveals no consensus on which and how many characteristics and risk indicators must be present to diagnose (nursing home-acquired) pneumonia and aspiration

  10. Molecular Detection and Characterization of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Among Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Maureen H; Benitez, Alvaro J; Cross, Kristen E; Hicks, Lauri A; Kutty, Preeta; Bramley, Anna M; Chappell, James D; Hymas, Weston; Patel, Anami; Qi, Chao; Williams, Derek J; Arnold, Sandra R; Ampofo, Krow; Self, Wesley H; Grijalva, Carlos G; Anderson, Evan J; McCullers, Jonathan A; Pavia, Andrew T; Wunderink, Richard G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Jain, Seema; Winchell, Jonas M

    2015-09-01

    Background.  Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The molecular characteristics of M pneumoniae detected in patients hospitalized with CAP in the United States are poorly described. Methods.  We performed molecular characterization of M pneumoniae in nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs from children and adults hospitalized with CAP in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study, including P1 typing, multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), and macrolide susceptibility genotyping. Results.  Of 216 M pneumoniae polymerase chain reaction-positive specimens, 40 (18.5%) were obtained from adults and 176 (81.5%) from children. P1 type distribution differed between adults (64% type 1 and 36% type 2) and children (84% type 1, 13% type 2, and 3% variant) (P < .05) and among sites (P < .01). Significant differences in the proportions of MLVA types 4/5/7/2 and 3/5/6/2 were also observed by age group (P < .01) and site (P < .01). A macrolide-resistant genotype was identified in 7 (3.5%) specimens, 5 of which were from patients who had recently received macrolide therapy. No significant differences in clinical characteristics were identified among patients with various strain types or between macrolide-resistant and -sensitive M pneumoniae infections. Conclusions.  The P1 type 1 genotype and MLVA type 4/5/7/2 predominated, but there were differences between children and adults and among sites. Macrolide resistance was rare. Differences in strain types did not appear to be associated with differences in clinical outcomes. Whole genome sequencing of M pneumoniae may help identify better ways to characterize strains.

  11. Occupationally acquired Pasteurella multocida pneumonia in a healthy abattoir worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeepan, Shyamala; Tun Min, Sandy; Lai, Katy

    2016-01-01

    An otherwise healthy male abbatoir worker presented to his general practitioner with acute hypoxemia due to bronchopneumonia. His only occupational exposure was cleaning cow carcasses being prepared for consumption. Blood cultures were eventually positive for Pasteurella multocida. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Pasteurella multocida pneumonia in an abattoir worker, and illustrates the importance of considering this infection in patients with animal exposures.

  12. Community-acquired Haemophilus influenzae pneumonia--New insights from the CAPNETZ study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstner, Christina; Rohde, Gernot; Rupp, Jan; Schuette, Hartwig; Ott, Sebastian R; Hagel, Stefan; Harrison, Nicole; Thalhammer, Florian; von Baum, Heike; Suttorp, Norbert; Welte, Tobias; Pletz, Mathias W

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to identify clinical characteristics and to assess effectiveness of different initial antibiotic regimens in adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by Haemophilus influenzae. Characteristics were compared between patients with H. influenzae monoinfection versus CAP of other and unknown aetiology enrolled by the German prospective cohort study CAPNETZ. Impact of initial antibiotic treatment on "early clinical response" according to FDA criteria and overall clinical cure were analysed. H. influenzae was found in 176 out of 2790 patients with pathogen detection (6.3%). Characteristics significantly associated with a H. influenzae CAP (p influenzae was a common CAP pathogen, particularly in patients with previous pneumococcal vaccination and respiratory co-morbidities. Severity of illness and chronic liver disease were associated with a lower rate of "early clinical response". Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of Atypical Bacteria in Hospitalized Patients With Nursing Home-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Junco, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Background: Nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) has been identified as one of the leading causes of mortality and hospitalization for long-term care residents. However, current and previous pneumonia guidelines differ on the appropriate management of NHAP in hospitalized patients, specifically in regard to the role of atypical bacteria such as Chlamydiae pneumonia, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Legionella. Objectives: The purpose of this review is to evaluate clinical trials conducted in hospitalized patients with NHAP to determine the prevalence of atypical bacteria and thus the role for empiric antibiotic coverage of these pathogens in NHAP. Methods: Comprehensive MEDLINE (1966-April 2016) and Embase (1980-April 2016) searches were performed using the terms "atypical bacteria", "atypical pneumonia", "nursing-home acquired pneumonia", "pneumonia", "elderly", "nursing homes", and "long term care". Additional articles were retrieved from the review of references cited in the collected studies. Thirteen published clinical trials were identified. Results: In the majority of studies, atypical bacteria were infrequently identified in patients hospitalized with NHAP. However, when an active community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) cohort was available, the rate of atypical bacteria between NHAP and CAP study arms was similar. Only 3 studies in this review adhered to recommended strategies for investigating atypical bacteria; in 2 of these studies, C. pneumoniae was the most common pathogen identified in NHAP cohorts. Conclusion: Although atypical bacteria were uncommon in most NHAP studies in this review, suboptimal microbial investigations were commonly performed. To accurately describe the role of atypical bacteria in NHAP, more studies using validated diagnostic tests are needed.

  14. Acquired pneumonias in the community in adults: An etiologic prospective study with emphasis in the diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robledo, J; Sierra, P; Bedoya, F; Londono, A; Porras, A; Lujan, M; Correa, N; Mejia, GI; Realpe, T; Trujillo, H

    2003-01-01

    Is defined prospectively in adults the etiology of acquired pneumonia in the community (NAC) in three hospitals of the city of Medellin. The etiology of NAC in the studied group does not vary of the one reported in other countries, the pneumococo frequency and M. pneumoniae, suggests that the empiric therapies should contemplate these two pathologies, the resource toasted by the microbiology laboratory allows to define the etiology and the specific treatment

  15. Penicillin treatment for patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egelund, Gertrud Baunbæk; Jensen, Andreas Vestergaard; Andersen, Stine Bang

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a severe infection, with high mortality. Antibiotic strategies for CAP differ across Europe. The objective of the study was to describe the epidemiology of CAP in Denmark and evaluate the prognosis of patients empirically treated with penicillin......-G/V was commonly used and not associated with increased mortality in patients with mild to moderate pneumonia. Our results are in agreement with current conservative antibiotic strategy as outlined in the Danish guidelines....

  16. Atypical pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walking pneumonia; Community-acquired pneumonia - atypical ... Bacteria that cause atypical pneumonia include: Mycoplasma pneumonia is caused by the bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae . It often affects people younger than age 40. Pneumonia due ...

  17. Community-acquired pneumonia: economics of inpatient medical care vis-à-vis clinical severity,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojislav Cupurdija

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the direct and indirect costs of diagnosing and treating community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, correlating those costs with CAP severity at diagnosis and identifying the major cost drivers. Methods: This was a prospective cost analysis study using bottom-up costing. Clinical severity and mortality risk were assessed with the pneumonia severity index (PSI and the mental Confusion-Urea-Respiratory rate-Blood pressure-age ≥ 65 years (CURB-65 scale, respectively. The sample comprised 95 inpatients hospitalized for newly diagnosed CAP. The analysis was run from a societal perspective with a time horizon of one year. Results: Expressed as mean ± standard deviation, in Euros, the direct and indirect medical costs per CAP patient were 696 ± 531 and 410 ± 283, respectively, the total per-patient cost therefore being 1,106 ± 657. The combined budget impact of our patient cohort, in Euros, was 105,087 (66,109 and 38,979 in direct and indirect costs, respectively. The major cost drivers, in descending order, were the opportunity cost (lost productivity; diagnosis and treatment of comorbidities; and administration of medications, oxygen, and blood derivatives. The CURB-65 and PSI scores both correlated with the indirect costs of CAP treatment. The PSI score correlated positively with the overall frequency of use of health care services. Neither score showed any clear relationship with the direct costs of CAP treatment. Conclusions: Clinical severity at admission appears to be unrelated to the costs of CAP treatment. This is mostly attributable to unwarranted hospital admission (or unnecessarily long hospital stays in cases of mild pneumonia, as well as to over-prescription of antibiotics. Authorities should strive to improve adherence to guidelines and promote cost-effective prescribing practices among physicians in southeastern Europe.

  18. Penicillin as empirical therapy for patients hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia at a Danish hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, O; Glenthøj, Jonathan Peter; Dragsted, Ulrik Bak

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We report on the outcome of a study of patients hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia (HCAP) at a Danish university hospital. METHODOLOGY: In a retrospective study of 243 consecutive patients with radiographically verified HCAP, data on clinical and laboratory findings.......3%, respectively, p = 0.94, and the readmission rate 20.3%, 24.0%, and 14.8%, respectively; p = 0.63. CONCLUSION: Patients treated for community-acquired pneumonia at a Danish university hospital had clinical outcomes fully at height with findings from other countries, and half of the patients were successfully...

  19. Sensitivity, Specificity, and Positivity Predictors of the Pneumococcal Urinary Antigen Test in Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinos, Luis; Zalacain, Rafael; Menéndez, Rosario; Reyes, Soledad; Capelastegui, Alberto; Cillóniz, Catia; Rajas, Olga; Borderías, Luis; Martín-Villasclaras, Juan J; Bello, Salvador; Alfageme, Inmaculada; Rodríguez de Castro, Felipe; Rello, Jordi; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan; Gabarrús, Albert; Musher, Daniel M; Torres, Antoni

    2015-10-01

    Detection of the C-polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae in urine by an immune-chromatographic test is increasingly used to evaluate patients with community-acquired pneumonia. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of this test in the largest series of cases to date and used logistic regression models to determine predictors of positivity in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. We performed a multicenter, prospective, observational study of 4,374 patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. The urinary antigen test was done in 3,874 cases. Pneumococcal infection was diagnosed in 916 cases (21%); 653 (71%) of these cases were diagnosed exclusively by the urinary antigen test. Sensitivity and specificity were 60 and 99.7%, respectively. Predictors of urinary antigen positivity were female sex; heart rate≥125 bpm, systolic blood pressureantibiotic treatment; pleuritic chest pain; chills; pleural effusion; and blood urea nitrogen≥30 mg/dl. With at least six of all these predictors present, the probability of positivity was 52%. With only one factor present, the probability was only 12%. The urinary antigen test is a method with good sensitivity and excellent specificity in diagnosing pneumococcal pneumonia, and its use greatly increased the recognition of community-acquired pneumonia due to S. pneumoniae. With a specificity of 99.7%, this test could be used to direct simplified antibiotic therapy, thereby avoiding excess costs and risk for bacterial resistance that result from broad-spectrum antibiotics. We also identified predictors of positivity that could increase suspicion for pneumococcal infection or avoid the unnecessary use of this test.

  20. Severe pneumococcal pneumonia: impact of new quinolones on prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meybeck Agnes

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most guidelines have been proposing, for more than 15 years, a β-lactam combined with either a quinolone or a macrolide as empirical, first-line therapy of severe community acquired pneumonia (CAP requiring ICU admission. Our goal was to evaluate the outcome of patients with severe CAP, focusing on the impact of new rather than old fluoroquinolones combined with β-lactam in the empirical antimicrobial treatments. Methods Retrospective study of consecutive patients admitted in a 16-bed general intensive care unit (ICU, between January 1996 and January 2009, for severe (Pneumonia Severity Index > or = 4 community-acquired pneumonia due to non penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and treated with a β-lactam combined with a fluoroquinolone. Results We included 70 patients of whom 38 received a β-lactam combined with ofloxacin or ciprofloxacin and 32 combined with levofloxacin. Twenty six patients (37.1% died in the ICU. Three independent factors associated with decreased survival in ICU were identified: septic shock on ICU admission (AOR = 10.6; 95% CI 2.87-39.3; p = 0.0004, age > 70 yrs. (AOR = 4.88; 95% CI 1.41-16.9; p = 0.01 and initial treatment with a β-lactam combined with ofloxacin or ciprofloxacin (AOR = 4.1; 95% CI 1.13-15.13; p = 0.03. Conclusion Our results suggest that, when combined to a β-lactam, levofloxacin is associated with lower mortality than ofloxacin or ciprofloxacin in severe pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia.

  1. Community-Acquired Pneumonia: a Comparison between elderly and nonelderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jafari

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community-acquired pneumonia could be a life-threatening condition especially in elderly patients. The factors influencing the outcome in elderly patients are thought to be different from those in young adults. We compared the clinical and paraclinical profiles in elderly and nonelderly patients with community-acquired pneumonias. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, seventy nine patients who were hospitalized with community acquired pneumonia over a period of one year were included. Patients' medical records were reviewed; and data related to comorbid conditions, signs and symptoms, laboratory and radiographic findings were gathered using a checklist. Results: The clinical features, laboratory parameters and complications from pneumonia were almost similar in 41 elderly (group I, age ≥65years and 38 young (group II, age<65years subjects. Delirium was seen more in elderly group (p=0.05. The average body temperature and pulse rate were significantly higher in nonelderly group. Sixty one percent of elderly patients and 21% of young patients have Po2 less than 60 (p=0.02. Smoking (29.1%, neurological disturbances (19%, congestive heart failure (15.2%, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and diabetes mellitus (13.9% were associated comorbidities in both groups. In non elderly group, immune compromise and IV drug use were more common as underlying comorbid conditions. Two of three mortalities were due to elder patients. Conclusion: Community acquired pneumonia could have more serious clinical and abnormal laboratory features in the elderly than younger patients. Mortality rate may be higher in older patients. Comorbid conditions are frequently seen in both elderly and nonelderly patients with community acquired pneumonia, but IV drug use and immune compromise are more frequent in nonelderly patients.

  2. Advances in the causes and management of community acquired pneumonia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderink, Richard G; Waterer, Grant

    2017-07-10

    Community acquired pneumonia remains a common cause of morbidity and mortality. Usually, the causal organism is not identified and treatment remains empiric. Recent computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies have challenged the accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of pneumonia, and epidemiologic studies are changing our perspective of what causes community acquired pneumonia, especially the role of viral pathogens and the frequent finding of multiple pathogens. The past decade has seen increasing overuse of empiric coverage of meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic resistant Gram negative pathogens owing to inappropriate application of guidelines for healthcare associated pneumonia. Optimal treatment remains a matter for debate, especially in very sick patients, including the role of combination antibiotic therapy and corticosteroids. Pneumonia care bundles are being defined to improve outcomes. Increased recognition of both acute and long term cardiac complications is shifting our concept of pneumonia from an acute lung disease to a multisystem problem with adverse chronic health consequences. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. The Seropositivity Rate of Atypical Agents in Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia

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    Omer Deniz

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the IgM antibody positivities of atypical pneumonia agents in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, and to compare the results with controls. The serum samples which were collected from 87 adult patients and 21 healthy controls have been investigated by a commercial ELISA (Pneumobact ELISA IgM, Vircell, Spain in which four different atypical pneumonia agents were fixed onto a slide. In the patients group, IgM positivity rates for the agents were as follows, respectively; 2.3% for Legionella pneumophila, 56.3% Chlamydia pneumoniae, 33.3% for Mycoplasma pneumoniae, 9.2% for Coxiella burnetii. The rates of IgM positivities in the control group varied 7% for all of the agents except M. Pneumoniae and C. Pneumoniae and 2 of these controls were positive for L. Pneumophila IgM, one was positive for C. Burnetii IgM. According to the statistical evaluation, there were significant differences for IgM seropositivities to Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia Pneumoniae,between the patient and the control groups (p0.05. We showed that the seropositivity rate of atypical agents in patients with CAP was significantly higher when compared to healthy control group. This result suggests us, atypical agents might be responsible in CAP patients in a great amount. Furthermore, our study also suggests that clinical and radiological findings are not useful for discriminating atypical from typical pneumonia. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(4: 279-284

  4. The Seropositivity Rate of Atypical Agents in Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhan Karakoc Gunes

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the IgM antibody positivities of atypical pneumonia agents in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, and to compare the results with controls. The serum samples which were collected from 87 adult patients and 21 healthy controls have been investigated by a commercial ELISA (Pneumobact ELISA IgM, Vircell, Spain in which four different atypical pneumonia agents were fixed onto a slide. In the patients group, IgM positivity rates for the agents were as follows, respectively; 2.3% for Legionella pneumophila, 56.3% Chlamydia pneumoniae, 33.3% for Mycoplasma pneumoniae, 9.2% for Coxiella burnetii. The rates of IgM positivities in the control group varied 7% for all of the agents except M. Pneumoniae and C. Pneumoniae and 2 of these controls were positive for L. Pneumophila IgM, one was positive for C. Burnetii IgM. According to the statistical evaluation, there were significant differences for IgM seropositivities to Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia Pneumoniae,between the patient and the control groups (p0.05. We showed that the seropositivity rate of atypical agents in patients with CAP was significantly higher when compared to healthy control group. This result suggests us, atypical agents might be responsible in CAP patients in a great amount. Furthermore, our study also suggests that clinical and radiological findings are not useful for discriminating atypical from typical pneumonia. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(4.000: 279-284

  5. T cell responses in senior patients with community-acquired pneumonia related to disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Lu-Qin; Bi, Ying; Zhou, Shao-Wei; Chen, Zi-Dan; Wen, Jun; Shi, Jin; Mao, Ling; Wang, Ling

    2017-12-01

    Senior individuals older than 65 years of age are at a disproportionally higher risk of developing pneumonia. Impaired capacity to defend against airway infections may be one of the reasons. It is generally believed that weaker regulatory T cell responses may be beneficial to host defense against pathogens. In senior patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia, we investigated the frequencies and functions of regulatory T cells. Interestingly, we found that compared to age- and sex-matched healthy controls, senior pneumonia patients presented lower frequencies of Foxp3-expressing and Helios-expressing CD4 + T cells. The quantity of Foxp3 and Helios being expressed, measured by their mRNA transcription levels, was also lower in CD4 + T cells from pneumonia patients. Furthermore, following TCR and TGF-β stimulation, pneumonia patients presented impaired capacity to upregulate Foxp3 and Helios. Functional analyses revealed that CD4 + T cells from pneumonia patients secreted lower amounts of IL-10 and TGF-β, two cytokines critical to regulatory T cell-mediated suppression. Also, the expression of granzyme B and perforin, which were cytolytic molecules potentially utilized by regulatory T cells to mediate the elimination of antigen-presenting cells and effector T cells, were reduced in CD4 + CD25 + T cells from senior pneumonia patients. In addition, the CD4 + CD25 + T cells from senior pneumonia patients presented reduced capacity to suppress effector CD4 + and CD8 + T cell proliferation. Moreover, the value of pneumonia severity index was inversely correlated with several parameters of regulatory T cell function. Together, our results demonstrated that senior pneumonia patients presented a counterintuitive impairment in regulatory T cell responses that was associated with worse prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical evaluation of the need for carbapenems to treat community-acquired and healthcare-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Kanemoto, Koji; Tokuda, Yasuharu; Shiotani, Seiji; Hirose, Yumi; Suzuki, Masatsune; Ishikawa, Hiroichi

    2015-08-01

    Carbapenems have an overall broad antibacterial spectrum and should be protected against from the acquisition of drug resistance. The clinical advantages of carbapenem in cases of pneumonia have not been certified and the need for antipseudomonal antimicrobial agents to treat healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) remains controversial. We introduced an antimicrobial stewardship program for carbapenem and tazobactam/piperacillin use and investigated the effects of this program on the clinical outcomes of 591 pneumonia cases that did not require intensive care unit management, mechanical ventilation or treatment with vasopressor agents [221 patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and 370 patients with HCAP]. Compared with the pre-intervention period, age, comorbidities and the severity and etiology of pneumonia did not differ during the intervention period. Carbapenems were rarely used during the intervention period in cases of pneumonia (CAP: 12% vs. 1%, HCAP: 13% vs. 1%), while antipseudomonal beta-lactam use was reduced from 33% to 8% among cases with HCAP. This reduction in the rate of carbapenem administration did not have an impact on the prognosis in the cases of CAP, and the in-hospital mortality was lower among the patients with HCAP during the intervention period (15% vs. 5%, p = 0.013). The causes of death in the cases of HCAP were not directly related to pneumonia during the intervention period. The current study shows that carbapenem use can be avoided in cases of CAP or HCAP that are not in a critical condition. The frequent use of antipseudomonal beta-lactams does not improve the clinical outcomes of HCAP. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Severe Community-acquired Pneumonia Due to Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yu Chen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a common cause of sporadic community-acquired pneumonia, but culture-proven legionellosis is rarely diagnosed. There is no laboratory test for Legionnaires' disease that can detect all patients with the disease. Culture is the standard diagnostic method and should be initiated as soon as possible in suspected cases. We describe a rare case of community-acquired pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila serogroup 6. A 77-year-old man was admitted to a tertiary care hospital because of high fever, productive cough, and progressive dyspnea. Chest radiography showed bilateral pneumonia, which led to respiratory failure necessitating mechanical ventilatory support. Despite antibiotic therapy, his condition continued to deteriorate and acute renal failure also developed. Urine was negative for L. pneumophila. Culture of the sputum yielded L. pneumophila serogroup 6, although there was no elevation of the serum antibody titer. Pneumonia resolved gradually and he was extubated after treatment with levofloxacin followed by erythromycin. L. pneumophila other than serogroup 1 should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with suspected atypical community-acquired pneumonia.

  8. Critical appraisal of ceftaroline in the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and skin infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodman JJ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Julian J Goodman, Stanley I MartinDivision of Infectious Diseases, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Ceftaroline is a novel broad-spectrum cephalosporin ß-lactam antibiotic with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA as well as multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae among other routine Gram positive and Gram negative organisms. It has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs. Ceftaroline is approved for treatment of ABSSSI due to MRSA, however currently there are no data for pneumonia due to MRSA in humans. Herein we review the major clinical trials as well as ceftaroline microbiology, pharmacokinetics, and safety, followed by a look at further directions for investigation of this new agent.Keywords: ceftaroline, pneumonia, skin infection

  9. Fastidious intracellular bacteria as causal agents of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoth, Frédéric; Greub, Gilbert

    2010-07-01

    Intracellular bacteria are common causes of community-acquired pneumonia that grow poorly or not at all on standard culture media and do not respond to beta-lactam antibiotic therapy. Apart from well-established agents of pneumonia such as Legionella pneumophila, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Chlamydia psittaci and Coxiella burnetii, some new emerging pathogens have recently been recognized, mainly Parachlamydia acanthamoebae and Simkania negevensis, two Chlamydia-related bacteria. Most of them are causes of benign and self-limited infections. However, they may cause severe pneumonia in some cases (i.e., Legionnaires' disease) and they may cause outbreaks representing a public health problem deserving prompt recognition and appropriate therapy. Although extrapulmonary manifestations are often present, no clinical features allow them to be distinguished from classical bacterial agents of pneumonia such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. Thus, specific molecular diagnostic tools are very helpful for early recognition of the offending bacteria, whereas serology often only allows retrospective or late diagnosis. Macrolides remain the best empirical treatment of intracellular respiratory pathogens, although some observational studies suggest that quinolones may be superior for the treatment of legionellosis.

  10. Risk factors for cardiovascular events in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Allen T; Wiemken, Timothy L; Arnold, Forest W

    2013-12-01

    An increased risk of cardiovascular complications has been found in those with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Preliminary data suggest that pneumococcal pneumonia, more severe pneumonia, older age, renal disease, hypoalbuminemia, and inpatient sliding scale insulin administration contribute to risk. The objective of this study was to ascertain additional factors influencing cardiovascular events in CAP. This investigation was a retrospective cohort study of inpatients with CAP. Outcomes evaluated were development of a cardiovascular event during hospitalization, defined as acute pulmonary edema, cardiac arrhythmia, or myocardial infarction. Those with and without events were compared across cardiovascular- and pneumonia-specific variables by logistic regression to ascertain factors that independently increase risk or reduce risk. Of 3068 inpatients with pneumonia, 376 (12%) developed a cardiovascular event. Hyperlipidemia, more severe pneumonia, and Staphylococcus aureus or Klebsiella pneumoniae as etiologies were associated with increased risk, while statin use was associated with decreased risk. This study highlights variables in CAP patients that should make clinicians vigilant for the development of cardiac complications. Additional research is needed to determine if statins attenuate cardiac risk in CAP. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Use of proton pump inhibitors and the risk of community-acquired pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulmez, Sinem Ezgi; Holm, Anette; Frederiksen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) has been associated with an increased risk of pneumonia. We aimed to confirm this association and to identify the risk factors. METHODS: We conducted a population-based case-control study using data from the County of Funen, Denmark....... Cases (n=7642) were defined as all patients with a first-discharge diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia from a hospital during 2000 through 2004. We also selected 34 176 control subjects, who were frequency matched to the cases by age and sex. Data on the use of PPIs and other drugs......, on microbiological samples, on x-ray examination findings, and on comorbid conditions were extracted from local registries. Confounders were controlled by logistic regression. RESULTS: The adjusted odds ratio (OR) associating current use of PPIs with community-acquired pneumonia was 1.5 (95% confidence interval [CI...

  12. The aetiology of community-acquired pneumonia and implications for patient management.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gageldonk-Lafeber, A.B. van; Wever, P.C.; Lubben, I.M. van der; Jager, C.P. de; Meijer, A.; Vries, M.C. de; Elberse, K.; Sande, M.A.B. van der; Hoek, W. van der

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Understanding which pathogens are associated with clinical manifestation of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is important to optimise treatment. We performed a study on the aetiology of CAP and assessed possible implications for patient management in the Netherlands. METHODS: Patients

  13. Aetiology and resistance patterns of community-acquired pneumonia in León, Nicaragua

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matute, A J; Brouwer, W P; Hak, E; Delgado, E; Alonso, E; Hoepelman, I M

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a prevalence study to gain greater insight into the aetiology, bacterial resistance and risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in the region of León, Nicaragua. During the period from July 2002 to January 2005, all consecutive patients with signs and symptoms suggestive of

  14. Elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia are not treated according to current guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt Damsgaard, Tove; Klausen, Henrik Hedegaard; Christiansen, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly patients, and the most important cause of death in the developed world. Optimised treatment and care will benefit patients as well as the health economy. This study investigated in-hospital compliance...... with guidelines for treatment and care of patients with CAP....

  15. Revised SWAB guidelines for antimicrobial therapy of community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, JA; Prins, JM; Bonten, MJ; Degener, J; Janknegt, RE; Hollander, JMR; Jonkers, RE; Wijnands, WJ; Verheij, TJ; Sachs, APE; Kullberg, BJ

    The Dutch Working Party on Antibiotic Policy (SWAB) develops evidence-based guidelines, aimed at optimalisation of antibiotic use and limitation of the spread of antimicrobial resistance. A revision of the SWAB guideline for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), published in 1998, was

  16. PNEUMOCOCCAL ANTIGEN PERSISTENCE IN SPUTUM FROM PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOERSMA, WG; LOWENBERG, A; HOLLOWAY, Y; KUTTSCHRUTTER, H; SNIJDER, JAM; KOETER, GH

    The purpose of this study was to establish the diagnostic value of pneumococcal capsular antigen by comparing this with the results of Gram stain and culture in representative and nonrepresentative sputa during follow-up in patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Antigen was detected by a latex

  17. Recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the pneumonia acquired in the community in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The pneumonia acquired in the community in adults, is the acute infection of the pulmonary parenchyma that is developed away from the hospital environment, it is manifested in the first 48 hours from the entrance to the hospital or after seven days of having left. The supplement includes clinical square, epidemiology, etiology classification, diagnostic, treatment and prevention among others

  18. Atypical coverage in community-acquired pneumonia after outpatient beta-lactam monotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Werkhoven, Cornelis H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338003207; van de Garde, Ewoudt M W; Oosterheert, Jan Jelrik|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/234602236; Postma, Douwe F.; Bonten, Marc J.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123144337

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) after >48 h of outpatient beta-lactam monotherapy, coverage of atypical pathogens is recommended based on expert opinion. Methods In a post-hoc analysis of a large study of CAP treatment we included patients who received

  19. High-sensitivity cardiac troponin T predicts mortality after hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vestjens, Stefan M T; Spoorenberg, Simone M C; Rijkers, Ger T.; Grutters, Jan C; ten Berg, Jurriën M; Noordzij, Peter G.; Van de Garde, Ewoudt M.W.; Bos, Willem Jan W; Biesma, Douwe H.; Endeman, Henrik; Hardeman, Hans; Heijligenberg, Rik; Meijvis, Sabine C A; Remmelts, Hilde H.F.; van Velzen-Blad, Heleen; Voorn, Paul G P

    2017-01-01

    Background and objective: Mortality after hospitalization with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is high, compared with age-matched controls. Available evidence suggests a strong link with cardiovascular disease. Our aim was to explore the prognostic value of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T

  20. Markers of infectious disease emergencies: Focus on patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, C.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we explore the potential of several biomarkers of infection in infectious disease emergencies in general with a specific focus on community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), risk factors in the development of CAP and markers of infection in CAP as well as in specific etiologic forms of CAP,

  1. Predictors for individual patient antibiotic treatment effect in hospitalized community-acquired pneumonia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simonetti, A. F.; van Werkhoven, C. H.; Schweitzer, V. A.; Viasus, D.; Carratalà, J.; Postma, D. F.; Oosterheert, J. J.; Bonten, M. J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Our objective was to identify clinical predictors of antibiotic treatment effects in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) who were not in the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods: Post-hoc analysis of three prospective cohorts (from the Netherlands and Spain) of

  2. Hospitalization costs for community-acquired pneumonia in Dutch elderly : an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissink, Conrad E; Huijts, Susanne M; de Wit, G Ardine; Bonten, Marc J M; Mangen, Marie-Josée J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is one of the most common infections, especially in the elderly (≥65 years). The aim of this study was to quantify hospitalization costs for CAP in different age groups and in patients with different CAP risk profiles. Secondary objectives were to

  3. Elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia are not treated according to current guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt Damsgaard, Tove; Klausen, Henrik Hedegaard; Christiansen, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly patients, and the most important cause of death in the developed world. Optimised treatment and care will benefit patients as well as the health economy. This study investigated in-hospital compliance...

  4. Comparative efficacy of amoxicillin, cefuroxime and clarithromycin in the treatment of community acquired pneumonia in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurangzeb, B.; Hameed, A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical response to amoxicillin, cefuroxime and clarithromycin in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia in children and to see the cost effectiveness of each treatment. Subjects and Methods: Patients between 3 to 72 months of age, admitted in the hospital with community acquired pneumonia, were randomly divided into three groups 1,2,3. They were started on amoxicillin, cefuroxime and clarithromycin respectively. The patients were assessed daily. If there was no clinical improvements at 48 hours the antibiotic was changed. ANOVA statistical test was applied to see the clinical response to the treatment in the three groups. Cost effectiveness of the treatment was compared. Results: There was no statistical difference in the clinical response at 48 hours of initiating treatment and discharge (p>0.01 each). The mean hospital stay in group 1 and 2 was 3.3 days and group 3 was 3.2 days respectively (p>0.01). Ninety-seven percent patients in group 1 and 3, and 95% patients in group 2 showed clinical improvement. The cost of treatment of community acquired pneumonia for 8 days was Rs. 496/-, 730/-, 1018/- for amoxicillin, clarithromycin and cefuroxime respectively. Conclusion: Amoxicillin was found in the most cost effective followed by clarithromycin and cefuroxime respectively in the treatment of non-severe and severe community-acquired pneumonia. (author)

  5. Testing for Coccidioidomycosis among Community-Acquired Pneumonia Patients, Southern California, USA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Kaitlin; Xie, Fagen; Rieg, Gunter K.; Yu, Kalvin C.; Contreras, Richard; Truong, Jonathan; Fong, Kimberlee; Tseng, Hung Fu; Jacobsen, Steven J.; Mody, Rajal K.

    2018-01-01

    We conducted a cohort study to identify characteristics associated with testing for, and testing positive for, coccidioidomycosis among patients with community-acquired pneumonia in southern California, USA. Limited and delayed testing probably leads to underdiagnosis among non-Hispanic black, Filipino, or Hispanic patients and among high-risk groups, including persons in whom antimicrobial drug therapy has failed. PMID:29553315

  6. Clinical Predictors of Hospital-acquired Pneumonia Associated with Acute Ischemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Suárez Quesada

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: hospital-acquired pneumonia is a constant challenge given the current microbiological spectrum, antimicrobial resistance together with its high mortality, morbidity and hospital costs. Objective: to identify the clinical predictors of pneumonia associated with acute ischemic stroke. Methods: a prospective cohort study was conducted in 201 patients diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke consecutively admitted to the stroke unit of the General Carlos Manuel de Céspedes Teaching Hospital during the first seven days after the onset, from January 2012 through December 2013. The independent predictors of hospital-acquired pneumonia were obtained using multivariable logistic regression. Results: fifty six point seven percent were male. The mean age was 64.17 ± 14.33 years. Cases of hospital-acquired pneumonia associated with stroke accounted for 19, 9 %. Subjects who developed pneumonia were older (68.55 ± 13.51 vs. 63.08 ± 14.36 years, had a lower score in the Glasgow Coma Scale (8.00 ± 2.60 vs. 14.00 ± 2.82, and an increased number of leukocytes at admission (10.888 ± 3.487 vs. 9.233 ± 2.539 × 109/L. The following independent factors were identified: Glasgow Coma Scale ≤ 11 (OR: 26.099; 95 % CI 7.164-85.075, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR: 8.896; 95 % CI 1.203-65.779, dysphagia (OR: 7.652; 95 % CI 2.369- 24.720, history of heart failure (OR: 4.583; 95 % CI 1.240- 16.932 and dysarthria/severe motor aphasia (OR: 4.222; 95 % CI 1.374- 12.975. Conclusions: the resulting logistic regression model is valid for predicting post-stroke pneumonia based on data routinely acquired.

  7. [PECULIARITIES OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA IN CHILDREN WITH NEUROLOGICAL PATHOLOGY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubarenko, O; Kopiyka, G; Kravchenko, T; Koval, L; Gurienko, K

    2017-06-01

    Neurological disorders in children highly affect the course of pneumonia, its outcome and the development of possible complications. The aim of the study was to reveal clinical and paraclinical features of community-acquired pneumonia in younger children with neurologic pathology infantile cerebral palsy. Under observation were 37 children with community-acquired pneumonia aged 1 to 3 years that suffered from spastic forms of infantile cerebral palsy. The comparison group consisted of 30 children with community-acquired pneumonia without any concomitant neurological pathology. The age of the children in the comparison and study groups was the same. The results of the study show that the presence of infantile cerebral palsy allow to relate the child to the risk group of respiratory pathology development. The course of community-acquired pneumonia in children affected by infantile cerebral palsy is characterized by rapid progression of symptoms and severity of the condition, and the clinical picture also has a number of characteristic features. Thus, cough, local physical data, classical laboratory signs of inflammation in the form of leukocytosis with neutrophil shift were noticed significantly less often in children with infantile cerebral palsy. The debut of the disease was often accompanied by bronchial obstruction, the inflammatory process was localized in the lower parts of the lungs and often matched the side of the neurologically affected part of the body. Children with cerebral palsy required a longer hospital-stay and a prolonged course of antibiotic therapy. Therefore, the risk of pneumonia in children with infantile cerebral palsy should be taken into account at the primary stage of medical care for the creation of preventive programs.

  8. Inpatient management of community-acquired pneumonia at the European Gaza Hospital: a clinical audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyacoubi, Said; Abuowda, Yousef; Albarqouni, Loai; Böttcher, Bettina; Elessi, Khamis

    2018-02-21

    Disease severity scores such as CURB-65 are often used to guide the management of patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Early and adequate empirical antibiotic treatment reduces mortality. The aim of this study was to examine the severity assessment and management of patients presenting with community-acquired pneumonia at the European Gaza Hospital in the Gaza Strip and to compare this to the best available evidence. Medical records of all patients admitted to the European Gaza Hospital with a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia between Dec 1, 2015, and March 31, 2016, were reviewed retrospectively. Clinical practice was compared with recommendations for severity assessment and the management of community-acquired pneumonia, as reported in guidelines by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and the American Thoracic Society. Ethical approval was obtained from the General Directorate of Human Resources. 141 patients were admitted to the European Gaza Hospital with community-acquired pneumonia during the study period. Records of 41 patients were missing or could not be retrieved. The mean age of patients was 55·9 years (SD 20·2). Blood urea and nitrogen concentrations were not documented for 48 (48%) patients, and respiratory rate was not documented for 73 (73%) patients. The CURB-65 score was determined only for 12 (12%) patients. Microbiological testing was done only for two (2%) patients. Although 18 different antibiotic regimens were used, 81 (81%) patients received a β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy, either given alone (49 [49%] patients) or with another antibiotic (32 [32%] patients), which is in line with the recommendations for patients admitted to hospital with community-acquired pneumonia. 43 (43%) patients received anti-viral drugs, and 41 (41%) patients received corticosteroids. Clinicians were poorly adherent to current standards of care in severity assessment and management of community-acquired pneumonia

  9. A post hoc assessment of duration of protection in CAPiTA (Community Acquired Pneumonia immunization Trial in Adults)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patterson, Scott; Webber, Chris; Patton, Michael; Drews, Wayne; Huijts, Susanne M.; Bolkenbaas, Marieke; Gruber, William C.; Scott, Daniel A.; Bonten, Marc J M

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Community Acquired Pneumonia immunization Trial in Adults (CAPiTA) was conducted to evaluate 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) for the prevention of vaccine-type community-acquired pneumonia (VT-CAP) and vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease (VT-IPD) in adults

  10. Pharmacokinetics and Dosing of Ceftobiprole Medocaril for the Treatment of Hospital- and Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Different Patient Populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Torres; J.W. Mouton (Johan); Pea, F. (Federico)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are among the most common infections treated in the hospital setting, and together they place a significant burden on healthcare systems. Successful management of HAP and CAP depends on rapid initiation of empirical

  11. Evaluation of Sofia Fluorescent immunoassay analyzer for pneumococcal urinary antigen detection in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Diego; López-Olaizola, Maddi; de la Caba, Idoia; Cilla, Gustavo

    2017-10-01

    The Sofia Streptococcus pneumoniae FIA® test was prospectively evaluated in non-concentrated urine samples of 106 hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia. The test detected pneumococcal urinary antigen in 24/31 (77.4%) confirmed pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia episodes. The specificity of the test was 86.7% (92% after urine heating). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Ability of procalcitonin to predict bacteremia in patients with community acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Timón Zapata, Jesús; Laserna Mendieta, Emilio José; Parejo Miguez, Raquel; Flores Chacartegui, Manuel; Gallardo Schall, Pablo

    2014-04-07

    To analyze the usefulness and ability of procalcitonin (PCT) to predict the presence of bacteremia in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) or other bacteria. This is an observational, prospective and descriptive study involving patients who were diagnosed with CAP in our Emergency Department. Data collected included socio-demographic and comorbidity variables, Charlson index, stage in the Pneumonia Severity Index and criteria of severe NAC, microbiologic studies and biomarker determinations (PCT and C reactive protein). The follow-up was carried out during 30 days to calculate the predictive power and the diagnostic performance for bacteremia caused or not by S. pneumoniae. Four hundred and seventy-four patients were finally included in the study. Blood cultures were positive in 85 individuals (17.9%) and S. pneumoniae was identified as the responsible pathogen in 75 of them (88.4%) (in 5 cases together with another agent). The area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve for PCT to predict bacteremia (caused by S. pneumoniae or not) was 0.988 (95% confidence interval 0.908-0.995; P98% and>10, respectively. The most frequently isolated serotypes of S. pneumoniae were 19A, 7F, 1 and 3. The highest mean levels of PCT were found in serotypes 7F, 19A, 3 and 1, which showed statistically significant differences with regard to the others serotypes considered (P=.008). Serotypes associated with the highest percentage of severe sepsis-septic shock, 30-days mortality and multi-lobe or bilateral affection were 3, 1 and 19A; 1, 3 and 19A; and 3, 19A and 6A, respectively. PCT had a remarkable diagnostic ability to discard or suspect bacteremia and to guide the etiology of CAP caused by S. pneumoniae. Serotypes 1, 3, 19A and 7F showed greater frequency, systemic inflammatory response and clinical severity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. [Atypical pathogens in adult patients admitted with community-acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yi-hong; Deng, Rui; Fu, Rong-rong; Li, De-zhi; Chen, Jie; Chen, Yu-sheng; Hu, Cheng-ping; Li, Jia-shu; Wang, Rui-qin; Wei, Li-ping; Zhong, Xiao-ning; Tian, Gui-zhen; Mu, Lan; Wan, Huan-ying; Yu, Qin; He, Pei; Ma, Jian-jun; Gao, Zhan-cheng

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the current status of atypical pathogen associated infections in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults, and their clinical attributes. Clinical data, sputum specimens from acute phase, and paired sera from acute- and convalescent-phases of CAP in 153 adult patients were collected from May 2005 to May 2008 in multiple medical centers. Chlamydia pneumoniae (Cpn) IgG antibody, and Legionella pneumophila (LP) mixed IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies were determined by indirect immuno-fluorescent assay. Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mpn) mixed IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies were determined by passive agglutination assay. All the sputum specimens were routinely cultured for bacterial isolation. Fifty-two (34%) out of the 153 cases were diagnosed as atypical CAP per the paired serum-antibody assay. Forty-seven of the 52 atypical CAP cases were infected by one atypical pathogen, 38 with Cpn, 4 with Mpn, and 5 with LP, while 5 out of the 52 atypical CAP cases were infected by 2 pathogens, Cpn and Mpnin 2, Cpn and LP in 3 cases. Eleven cases (21.2%) out of the 52 patients with atypical pneumonia were complicated with bacterial infection. Except peripheral white blood count was significant increased in the group of typical (bacterial only) pneumonia (WBC > 10 × 10⁹)/L, P = 0.03), all the other clinical parameters did not show statistically significant difference between the typical and the atypical pneumonia groups. Our data suggest that Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila are common pathogens of adult CAP. Chlamydia pneumoniae might be the most frequent atypical pathogen associated with atypical CAP.

  14. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Requiring Hospitalization among U.S. Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Seema; Self, Wesley H; Wunderink, Richard G; Fakhran, Sherene; Balk, Robert; Bramley, Anna M; Reed, Carrie; Grijalva, Carlos G; Anderson, Evan J; Courtney, D Mark; Chappell, James D; Qi, Chao; Hart, Eric M; Carroll, Frank; Trabue, Christopher; Donnelly, Helen K; Williams, Derek J; Zhu, Yuwei; Arnold, Sandra R; Ampofo, Krow; Waterer, Grant W; Levine, Min; Lindstrom, Stephen; Winchell, Jonas M; Katz, Jacqueline M; Erdman, Dean; Schneider, Eileen; Hicks, Lauri A; McCullers, Jonathan A; Pavia, Andrew T; Edwards, Kathryn M; Finelli, Lyn

    2015-07-30

    Community-acquired pneumonia is a leading infectious cause of hospitalization and death among U.S. adults. Incidence estimates of pneumonia confirmed radiographically and with the use of current laboratory diagnostic tests are needed. We conducted active population-based surveillance for community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization among adults 18 years of age or older in five hospitals in Chicago and Nashville. Patients with recent hospitalization or severe immunosuppression were excluded. Blood, urine, and respiratory specimens were systematically collected for culture, serologic testing, antigen detection, and molecular diagnostic testing. Study radiologists independently reviewed chest radiographs. We calculated population-based incidence rates of community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization according to age and pathogen. From January 2010 through June 2012, we enrolled 2488 of 3634 eligible adults (68%). Among 2320 adults with radiographic evidence of pneumonia (93%), the median age of the patients was 57 years (interquartile range, 46 to 71); 498 patients (21%) required intensive care, and 52 (2%) died. Among 2259 patients who had radiographic evidence of pneumonia and specimens available for both bacterial and viral testing, a pathogen was detected in 853 (38%): one or more viruses in 530 (23%), bacteria in 247 (11%), bacterial and viral pathogens in 59 (3%), and a fungal or mycobacterial pathogen in 17 (1%). The most common pathogens were human rhinovirus (in 9% of patients), influenza virus (in 6%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (in 5%). The annual incidence of pneumonia was 24.8 cases (95% confidence interval, 23.5 to 26.1) per 10,000 adults, with the highest rates among adults 65 to 79 years of age (63.0 cases per 10,000 adults) and those 80 years of age or older (164.3 cases per 10,000 adults). For each pathogen, the incidence increased with age. The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization was highest among

  15. Clinical evaluation of the role of ceftaroline in the management of community acquired bacterial pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maselli DJ

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Diego J Maselli1, Juan F Fernandez1, Christine Y Whong2, Kelly Echevarria1,3, Anoop M Nambiar1,3, Antonio Anzueto1,3, Marcos I Restrepo1,3,41University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas, 2Memorial Hermann – Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX, 3South Texas Veterans Health Care System Audie l Murphy Division, San Antonio, TX, 4Veterans Evidence Research Dissemination and Implementation Center (VERDICT, San Antonio, TX, USAAbstract: Ceftaroline fosamil (ceftaroline was recently approved for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and complicated skin infections. This newly developed cephalosporin possesses a broad spectrum of activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Most importantly, ceftaroline demonstrates potent in vitro antimicrobial activity against multi-drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. In two Phase III, double-blinded, randomized, prospective trials (FOCUS 1 and FOCUS 2, ceftaroline was shown to be non-inferior to ceftriaxone for the treatment of CAP in hospitalized patients. Ceftaroline exhibits low resistance rates and a safety profile similar to that of other cephalosporins. In this review, we will evaluate the pharmacological characteristics, safety, antimicrobial properties, and efficacy of ceftaroline and its applications in the treatment of CAP.Keywords: s. pneumoniae, s. aureus, cephalosporins, pneumonia, ceftaroline, community acquired pneumonia

  16. Inflammatory biomarkers and prediction for intensive care unit admission in severe community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Paula; Ferrer, Miquel; Martí, Verónica; Reyes, Soledad; Martínez, Raquel; Menéndez, Rosario; Ewig, Santiago; Torres, Antoni

    2011-10-01

    Increased inflammatory response is related to severity and outcome in community-acquired pneumonia, but the role of inflammatory biomarkers in deciding intensive care unit admission is unknown. We assessed the relationship between inflammatory response, prediction for intensive care unit admission, delayed intensive care unit admission, and outcome in patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Prospective clinical study. Intensive care units of two university hospitals. We included 627 ward and 58 intensive care unit patients with community-acquired pneumonia, 36 with direct and 22 with delayed intensive care unit admission. Serum levels of C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and interleukin-10 at admission. We assessed the prediction for intensive care unit admission of biomarkers and the Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines minor criteria for severe community-acquired pneumonia. Procalcitonin (p=.001), C-reactive protein (p=.005), tumor necrosis factor-α (p=.042), and interleukin-6 (p=.003) levels were higher in intensive care unit-admitted patients; however, the Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines minor severity criteria predicted better intensive care unit admission (odds ratio, 12.03; 95% confidence interval, 5.13-28.20; pintensive care unit admission compared with 14 (23%) with levels above the cutoff (p=.032). In patients initially admitted to wards, procalcitonin (p=.012) and C-reactive protein (p=.039) were higher in those 22 patients subsequently transferred to the intensive care unit after adjusting for age, comorbidities, and Pneumonia Severity Index risk class. Despite initially admitted to wards, 14 (64%) patients with delayed intensive care unit admission had already criteria for severe community-acquired pneumonia at admission compared with 73 (12%) ward patients (pintensive care unit admission

  17. Role of Atypical Pathogens in the Etiology of Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Forest W; Summersgill, James T; Ramirez, Julio A

    2016-12-01

    Atypical pneumonia has been described for over 100 years, but some of the pathogens attributed to it have been identified only in the past decades. The most common pathogens are Chlamydia pneumoniae , Mycoplasma pneumoniae , and Legionella pneumophila . The epidemiology and pathophysiology of these three pathogens have been studied since their discovery, and are reviewed herein to provide better insight when evaluating these patients, which hopefully translates into improved care. The incidence of atypical pathogens has been shown to be approximately 22% worldwide, but this probably varies with location. The history and physical exam of a patient with atypical pneumonia reveals how patients share many signs and symptoms with their counterpart patients who have typical pneumonias; therefore, the diagnosis primarily depends on laboratory identification, which is evolving and improving. What started out as simple, but difficult to yield cultures, has progressed to modern molecular-based testing assays. Treatment is missed if an empiric regimen includes only monotherapy with a β-lactam antimicrobial; so, many country guidelines, including the Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines for community-acquired pneumonia, recommend using a regimen containing either a macrolide or a fluorinated quinolone. Once an atypical pathogen has been identified, evidence trends toward favoring a quinolone, but more data are needed to confirm. The concept of using combination therapy in severe patients is also explored. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. Fluoroquinolones in community-acquired pneumonia: guide to selection and appropriate use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Christopher R; Labreche, Matthew J; Attridge, Russell T

    2011-04-16

    Fluoroquinolone use has dramatically increased since the introduction of the first respiratory fluoroquinolone in the late 1990s. Over a relatively brief period of time, the respiratory fluoroquinolones have supplanted other first-line options as the predominant community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) therapy in hospitals. This article discusses the rise of the fluoroquinolone era, debates the comparative effectiveness of fluoroquinolones for CAP therapy, examines fluoroquinolone resistance and adverse drug reactions, and discusses new trends in pneumonia epidemiology and outcomes assessment. Overall, published data suggest that fluoroquinolone monotherapy is associated with improved patient survival compared with β-lactam monotherapy and similar survival to β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy. Fluoroquinolone monotherapy may be associated with shorter hospital length of stay compared with β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy, particularly in severe pneumonia or with high-dose therapy. There is insufficient evidence to conclude that any individual fluoroquinolone therapy is better than another with regards to patient mortality. Fluoroquinolones are generally well tolerated and Streptococcus pneumoniae resistance remains low; however, rare but serious adverse effects have been reported. Some members of the fluoroquinolone class have been removed from the market amidst safety concerns. Pneumonia classifications have changed and antipseudomonal fluoroquinolones may have a role in healthcare-associated pneumonia when administered in combination with other antipseudomonal and anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus therapies.

  19. [Increasing incidence of community-acquired pneumonia caused by atypical microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazón-Varela, M A; Alonso-Valle, H; Muñoz-Cacho, P; Gallo-Terán, J; Piris-García, X; Pérez-Mier, L A

    2017-09-01

    Knowing the most common microorganisms in our environment can help us to make proper empirical treatment decisions. The aim is to identify those microorganisms causing community-acquired pneumonia. An observational, descriptive and prospective study was conducted, including patients over 14 years with a clinical and radiographic diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia during a 383 consecutive day period. A record was made of sociodemographic variables, personal history, prognostic severity scales, progress, and pathogenic agents. The aetiological diagnosis was made using blood cultures, detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila urinary antigens, sputum culture, influenza virus and Streptococcus pyogenes detection. Categorical variables are presented as absolute values and percentages, and continuous variables as their means and standard deviations. Of the 287 patients included in the study (42% women, mean age 66±22 years), 10.45% died and 70% required hospital admission. An aetiological diagnosis was achieved in 43 patients (14.98%), with 16 microorganisms found in 59 positive samples. The most frequently isolated pathogen was Streptococcus pneumonia (24/59, 41%), followed by gram-negative enteric bacilli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens and Enterobacter cloacae isolated in 20% of the samples (12/59), influenza virus (5/59, 9%), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (3/59, 5%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2/59, 3%), Moraxella catarrhalis (2/59, 3%), Legionella pneumophila (2/59, 3%), and Haemophilus influenza (2/59, 3%). Polymicrobial infections accounted for 14% (8/59). A high percentage of atypical microorganisms causing community-acquired pneumonia were found. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of Bacterial and Viral Codetections With Mycoplasma pneumoniae Using the TaqMan Array Card in Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Maureen H; Cross, Kristen E; Benitez, Alvaro J; Hicks, Lauri A; Kutty, Preeta; Bramley, Anna M; Chappell, James D; Hymas, Weston; Patel, Anami; Qi, Chao; Williams, Derek J; Arnold, Sandra R; Ampofo, Krow; Self, Wesley H; Grijalva, Carlos G; Anderson, Evan J; McCullers, Jonathan A; Pavia, Andrew T; Wunderink, Richard G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Jain, Seema; Winchell, Jonas M

    2016-03-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae was detected in a number of patients with community-acquired pneumonia in a recent prospective study. To assess whether other pathogens were also detected in these patients, TaqMan Array Cards were used to test 216 M pneumoniae-positive respiratory specimens for 25 additional viral and bacterial respiratory pathogens. It is interesting to note that 1 or more codetections, predominantly bacterial, were identified in approximately 60% of specimens, with codetections being more common in children.

  1. Community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization among U.S. children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Seema; Williams, Derek J; Arnold, Sandra R; Ampofo, Krow; Bramley, Anna M; Reed, Carrie; Stockmann, Chris; Anderson, Evan J; Grijalva, Carlos G; Self, Wesley H; Zhu, Yuwei; Patel, Anami; Hymas, Weston; Chappell, James D; Kaufman, Robert A; Kan, J Herman; Dansie, David; Lenny, Noel; Hillyard, David R; Haynes, Lia M; Levine, Min; Lindstrom, Stephen; Winchell, Jonas M; Katz, Jacqueline M; Erdman, Dean; Schneider, Eileen; Hicks, Lauri A; Wunderink, Richard G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Pavia, Andrew T; McCullers, Jonathan A; Finelli, Lyn

    2015-02-26

    Incidence estimates of hospitalizations for community-acquired pneumonia among children in the United States that are based on prospective data collection are limited. Updated estimates of pneumonia that has been confirmed radiographically and with the use of current laboratory diagnostic tests are needed. We conducted active population-based surveillance for community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization among children younger than 18 years of age in three hospitals in Memphis, Nashville, and Salt Lake City. We excluded children with recent hospitalization or severe immunosuppression. Blood and respiratory specimens were systematically collected for pathogen detection with the use of multiple methods. Chest radiographs were reviewed independently by study radiologists. From January 2010 through June 2012, we enrolled 2638 of 3803 eligible children (69%), 2358 of whom (89%) had radiographic evidence of pneumonia. The median age of the children was 2 years (interquartile range, 1 to 6); 497 of 2358 children (21%) required intensive care, and 3 (<1%) died. Among 2222 children with radiographic evidence of pneumonia and with specimens available for bacterial and viral testing, a viral or bacterial pathogen was detected in 1802 (81%), one or more viruses in 1472 (66%), bacteria in 175 (8%), and both bacterial and viral pathogens in 155 (7%). The annual incidence of pneumonia was 15.7 cases per 10,000 children (95% confidence interval [CI], 14.9 to 16.5), with the highest rate among children younger than 2 years of age (62.2 cases per 10,000 children; 95% CI, 57.6 to 67.1). Respiratory syncytial virus was more common among children younger than 5 years of age than among older children (37% vs. 8%), as were adenovirus (15% vs. 3%) and human metapneumovirus (15% vs. 8%). Mycoplasma pneumoniae was more common among children 5 years of age or older than among younger children (19% vs. 3%). The burden of hospitalization for children with community-acquired pneumonia

  2. Statin Use and Hospital Length of Stay Among Adults Hospitalized With Community-acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havers, Fiona; Bramley, Anna M; Finelli, Lyn; Reed, Carrie; Self, Wesley H; Trabue, Christopher; Fakhran, Sherene; Balk, Robert; Courtney, D Mark; Girard, Timothy D; Anderson, Evan J; Grijalva, Carlos G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Wunderink, Richard G; Jain, Seema

    2016-06-15

    Prior retrospective studies suggest that statins may benefit patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) due to antiinflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. However, prospective studies of the impact of statins on CAP outcomes are needed. We determined whether statin use was associated with improved outcomes in adults hospitalized with CAP. Adults aged ≥18 years hospitalized with CAP were prospectively enrolled at 3 hospitals in Chicago, Illinois, and 2 hospitals in Nashville, Tennessee, from January 2010-June 2012. Adults receiving statins before and throughout hospitalization (statin users) were compared with those who did not receive statins (nonusers). Proportional subdistribution hazards models were used to examine the association between statin use and hospital length of stay (LOS). In-hospital mortality was a secondary outcome. We also compared groups matched on propensity score. Of 2016 adults enrolled, 483 (24%) were statin users; 1533 (76%) were nonusers. Statin users were significantly older, had more comorbidities, had more years of education, and were more likely to have health insurance than nonusers. Multivariable regression demonstrated that statin users and nonusers had similar LOS (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], .88-1.12), as did those in the propensity-matched groups (HR, 1.03; 95% CI, .88-1.21). No significant associations were found between statin use and LOS or in-hospital mortality, even when stratified by pneumonia severity. In a large prospective study of adults hospitalized with CAP, we found no evidence to suggest that statin use before and during hospitalization improved LOS or in-hospital mortality. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  3. Finnish guidelines for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and pertussis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapiainen, Terhi; Aittoniemi, Janne; Immonen, Johanna; Jylkkä, Heli; Meinander, Tuula; Nuolivirta, Kirsi; Peltola, Ville; Salo, Eeva; Seuri, Raija; Walle, Satu-Maaria; Korppi, Matti

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based guidelines are needed to harmonise and improve the diagnostics and treatment of children's lower respiratory tract infections. Following a professional literature search, an interdisciplinary working group evaluated and graded the available evidence and constructed guidelines for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and pertussis. The clinical guidelines state that chest radiography is not needed if the child is diagnosed with pneumonia and treated at home. Complications should be considered if there is no improvement after antimicrobial therapy and a paroxysmal cough can indicate pertussis, which is life-threatening in unvaccinated infants and can lead to respiratory failure. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A Case of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Young Woong; Jung, In Young; Ahn, Mi Young; Jeon, Yong Duk; Ann, Hea Won; Ahn, Jin Young; Ku, Nam Su; Han, Sang Hoon; Choi, Jun Young; Song, Young Goo; Kim, June Myung

    2017-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an aerobic Gram-negative coccobacillus that causes nosocomial pneumonia in patients on mechanical ventilation or previously treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics. Nevertheless, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by A. baumannii, especially multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains, is rare. We experienced the first case of CAP caused by MDR A. baumannii in Korea in a 78-year-old man. This case shows that MDR A. baumannii can cause CAP in Korea. Copyright © 2017 by The Korean Society of Infectious Diseases and Korean Society for Chemotherapy.

  5. Community-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess: an emerging infection in Ireland and Europe.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, R

    2013-02-05

    INTRODUCTION: Klebsiella pneumoniae has emerged as a predominant cause of community-acquired mono-microbial pyogenic liver abscess. This was first described in Taiwan and has been widely reported in Asia. This infectious entity has been described in Europe, with single case reports predominating. METHODS: We present three cases in one year from our institution in Ireland and review the European literature to date. RESULTS\\/CONCLUSION: Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome is now emerging in Europe and notably is not restricted to individuals of Asian descent.

  6. Radiological findings in three acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients with Rhodococcus equi pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinxin; Tang Xiaoping; Zhang Lieguang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the imaging appearances of Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in three patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome ( AIDS). Methods: Thoracic imaging appearances of' Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in three patients with AIDS were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The chest radiograph showed patchy consolidations and small nodules (n=3), large consolidations with multiple cavitations (n=2). CT showed large lobar or segmental consolidations with multiple cavitations (n=2), patchy consolidations (n=2), bronchiectasis (n=1), multiple small centrilobular nodules (n=2) and tree-in-bud patterns (n=2). Conclusion: The most common radiological findings in AIDS patients with Rhodococcus equi pulmonary infection are large consolidations with multiple cavitations and multiple centrilobular nodules. (authors)

  7. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Adult Community-Acquired Pneumonia: Outcomes and Predictors of Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Kollengode; Tan, Chuen Seng; Rycus, Peter; MacLaren, Graeme

    2017-05-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is a rescue therapy used to support severe cardiorespiratory failure. Data on outcomes from severe community-acquired pneumonia in adults receiving rescue extracorporeal membrane oxygenation are mainly confined to single-center experiences or specific pathogens. We examined data from the Extracorporeal Life Support Organisation registry to identify risk factors for poor outcomes in adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Retrospective data analysis. Extracorporeal Life Support Organization Registry database. We collected deidentified data on adult patients (> 18 yr) receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for community-acquired pneumonia between 2002 and 2012. Patients with incomplete data or brain death were excluded. The primary outcome measure was in-hospital mortality. Other measurements included demographic information, pre-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation mechanical ventilation and biochemical variables, inotrope requirements, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation mode, duration, and complications. Initial univariate analysis assessed potential associations between survival and various pre-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation factors. Variables with p values of less than 0.1 were considered for logistic regression analysis to identify predictors of mortality. None. One thousand fifty-five patients, who satisfied inclusion criteria, were included in the final analysis. There was an increase in the number of patients cannulated per annum over the 10-year period studied. Univariate analysis identified pre-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation variables associated with high mortality. Further multiple regression analysis identified certain pre-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation factors as predictors of mortality, including duration of mechanical ventilation prior to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, lower arterial pressure, fungal

  8. Role of 'atypical pathogens' among adult hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Grace; Ip, Margaret; Lee, Nelson; Rainer, Timothy H; Man, Shin Y; Cockram, Clive S; Antonio, Gregory E; Ng, Margaret H L; Chan, Michael H M; Chau, Shirley S L; Mak, Paulina; Chan, Paul K S; Ahuja, Anil T; Sung, Joseph J Y; Hui, David S C

    2009-11-01

    Agents such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila are recognized as important causes of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) worldwide. This study examined the role of these 'atypical pathogens' (AP) among adult hospitalized patients with CAP. A prospective, observational study of consecutive adult CAP (clinico-radiological diagnosis) patients hospitalized during 2004-2005 was conducted. Causal organisms were determined using cultures, antigen testing and paired serology. Clinical/laboratory/radiological variables and outcomes were compared between different aetiologies, and a clinical prediction rule for AP was constructed. There were 1193 patients studied (mean age 70.8 +/- 18.0 years, men 59.3%). Causal organisms were identified in 468 (39.2%) patients: 'bacterial' (48.7%), 'viral' (26.9%), 'AP' (28.6%). The AP infections comprised Mycoplasma or Chlamydophila pneumoniae (97.8%) and co-infection with bacteria/virus (30.6%). The majority of AP infections involved elderly patients (63.4%) with comorbidities (41.8%), and more than one-third of patients were classified as 'intermediate' or 'high' risk CAP on presentation (pneumonia severity index IV-V (35.1%); CURB-65 2-5 (42.5%)). Patients with AP infections had disease severities and outcomes similar to patients with CAP due to other organisms (oxygen therapy 29.1% vs 29.8%; non-invasive ventilation 3.7% vs 3.3%; admission to the intensive care unit 4.5% vs 2.7%; length of hospitalization 6 day vs 7 day; 30-day mortality: 2.2% vs 6.0%; overall P > 0.05). Age or =38.0 degrees C, respiratory rate 130 mmol/L, leucocyte count pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae as single/co-pathogens are important causes of severe pneumonia among older adults. No reliable clinical indicators exist, so empirical antibiotic coverage for hospitalized CAP patients may need to be considered.

  9. [Surveillance of hospital acquired pneumonia in Polish hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rózańska, Anna; Wójkowska-Mach, Jadwiga; Bulanda, Małgorzata; Heczko, Piotr B

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze epidemiology of hospital acquired infections in Polish hospitals, according to type and size of hospital. Data gathered between year 2002 and 2004 in the Active Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System, developed and conducted by Polish Society of Hospital Infections, were used in the analysis. Epidemiology of PNEU was described with the usage of cumulative incidence and incidence density rates. The average cumulative incidence rate was 0.29%; incidence density rate: 0.41 per thousand, and incidence density among ventilated patients: 1.57 per thousand. Differences in morbidity detected in hospitals were statistically important only in hospitals of different size. Morbidity of PNEU in intensive care units was much higher than in other wards, and differences were statistically important. PNEU and VAP epidemiology in Polish intensive care units indicates serious problems in hospital infections control: high values of morbidity in non-teaching ICUs reflect the huge risk of developing infections in Polish hospitals. Low rates in ICUs of teaching hospitals reflect lack of surveillance and detection of infections in such hospitals.

  10. Mycoplasma pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walking pneumonia; Community-acquired pneumonia - mycoplasma; Community-acquired pneumonia - atypical ... Mycoplasma pneumonia usually affects people younger than 40. People who live or work in crowded areas such as schools ...

  11. Undiagnosed Diabetes Mellitus in Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Andreas Vestergaard; Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; Egelund, Gertrud Baunbæk; Andersen, Stine Bang; Petersen, Pelle Trier; Benfield, Thomas; Witzenrath, Martin; Rohde, Gernot; Ravn, Pernille

    2017-11-29

    Diabetes mellitus is an important risk factor for community-acquired pneumonia, whereas the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and prediabetes in patients with community-acquired pneumonia is largely unknown. We aimed to determine the prevalence of prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes mellitus, and risk factors associated with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus in a large European community-acquired pneumonia cohort. This was a multicenter prospective cohort study of hospitals and private practices in Germany and Austria encompassing 1961 adults with community-acquired pneumonia included in the German Community-Acquired Pneumonia Competence Network (CAPNETZ) study between 2007 and 2014. The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and prediabetes was estimated based on hemoglobin A1c measurements. Logistic regression was used to assess risk factors for undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. Fifteen percent of patients had known diabetes mellitus. Among patients without known diabetes mellitus, 5.0% had undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and 37.5% had prediabetes. Male sex (odds ratio [OR], 2.45 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.35-4.45]), body mass index ≥25 kg/m2 (OR, 2.64 [95% CI, 1.48-4.72]), and hyperglycemia at admission (6-11 mM: OR, 2.93 [95% CI, 1.54-5.60] and ≥11 mM: OR, 44.76 [95% CI, 17.58-113.98]) were associated with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. Patients with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus had a higher 180-day mortality rate compared to patients without diabetes mellitus (12.1% vs 3.8%, respectively; P = .001). Undiagnosed diabetes mellitus was prevalent among community-acquired pneumonia. Male sex, overweight, and hyperglycemia at admission were associated with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. The long-term mortality among patients with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus was high compared to patients without diabetes mellitus. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For

  12. An audit of empiric antibiotic choice in the inpatient management of community-acquired pneumonia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Delaney, F

    2017-04-01

    Adherence to antimicrobial guidelines for empiric antibiotic prescribing in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has been reported to be worryingly low. We conducted a review of empiric antibiotic prescribing for sixty consecutive adult patients admitted to the Mercy University Hospital with a diagnosis of CAP. When analysed against local antimicrobial guidelines, guideline concordant empiric antibiotics were given in only 48% of cases, lower than the average rate in comparable studies. Concordance was 100% in cases where the CURB-65 pneumonia severity assessment score, on which the guidelines are based, was documented in the medical notes. The use of excessively broad spectrum and inappropriate antibiotics is a notable problem. This study supports the theory that lack of knowledge regarding pneumonia severity assessment tools and unfamiliarity with therapeutic guidelines are key barriers to guideline adherence, which remains a significant problem despite increased focus on antimicrobial stewardship programs in Ireland

  13. Moxifloxacin pharmacokinetic profile and efficacy evaluation in empiric treatment of community-acquired pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öbrink-Hansen, Kristina; Hardlei, Tore Forsingdal; Brock, Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of moxifloxacin at 400 mg/day in 18 patients treated empirically for community-acquired pneumonia. We developed a population pharmacokinetic model to assess the potential efficacy of moxifloxacin and to simulate the maximal MICs for which recommended pharmacokinetic......-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) estimates are obtained. Moxifloxacin plasma concentrations were determined the day after therapy initiation using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography. Peak drug concentrations (Cmax) and area under the free drug concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (fAUC0-24) values predicted...... for each patient were evaluated against epidemiological cutoff MIC values for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Legionella pneumophila. PK-PD targets adopted were a Cmax/MIC of ≥12.2 for all pathogens, an fAUC0-24/MIC of >34 for S. pneumoniae, and an fAUC0-24/MIC of >75 for H...

  14. Clinical utility of telavancin for treatment of hospital-acquired pneumonia: focus on non-ventilator-associated pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubinstein E

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ethan Rubinstein,1 Martin E Stryjewski,2 Steven L Barriere31University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada; 2Department of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, Centro de Educación Médica e Investigaciones Clínicas (CEMIC, Buenos Aires, Argentina; 3Theravance, Inc., South San Francisco, CA, USA Background: Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP is the most common health care-associated infection contributing to death. Studies have indicated that there may be differences in the causative pathogens and outcomes of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP and non-ventilator-associated pneumonia (NV-HAP. However, with limited NV-HAP-specific data available, treatment is generally based on data from studies of VAP. The Phase 3 Assessment of Telavancin for Treatment of Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia (ATTAIN studies were two double-blind randomized controlled trials that demonstrated the non-inferiority of telavancin to vancomycin for treatment of Gram-positive HAP. We conducted a post hoc subgroup analysis of patients enrolled in the ATTAIN studies who had NV-HAP. Methods: Data from the two ATTAIN studies were pooled, and patients with NV-HAP were analyzed. The all-treated (AT population consisted of all randomized patients who received ≥1 dose of study medication, and the clinically evaluable (CE population consisted of AT patients who were protocol-adherent or who died on or after study day 3, where death was attributable to the HAP episode under study. The primary endpoint was clinical response (cure, failure, or indeterminate at the follow-up/test of cure visit, conducted 7–14 days after the end of therapy. Results: A total of 1,076 patients (71.6% of overall ATTAIN AT population had NV-HAP (533 and 543 patients in the telavancin and vancomycin treatment groups, respectively. Clinical cure rates in the CE population were similar for patients with NV-HAP treated with telavancin and vancomycin (83.1% [201/242] and 84.1% [233/277], respectively. In

  15. [Cross-cultural adaptation of the community-acquired pneumonia score questionnaire in patients with mild-to-moderate pneumonia in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Vargas, Mónica Alejandra; Cortés, Jorge Alberto; Sánchez, Ricardo

    2017-01-24

    One of the strategies for the rational use of antibiotics is the use of the score for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP Score). This instrument clinically evaluates patients with community-acquired pneumonia, thereby facilitating decision making regarding the early and safe withdrawal of antibiotics. To generate a translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) Score questionnaire in Spanish. Authorization for cross-cultural adaptation of the Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) Score questionnaire was obtained; the recommendations of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) and the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) were carried out through the following stages: forward translation, reconciliation, backward translation, harmonization, obtaining a provisional questionnaire, and applying the questionnaire in a pilot test. The pilot test was conducted at a second-level public hospital in Bogotá after the study was approved by the ethics and research institutional boards. The changes suggested by the forward translators were applied. There were no discrepancies between the backward and forward translations, consequently, no revisions were necessary. Five items had modifications based on suggestions made by eleven patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia during the pilot test. A Spanish version of the Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) Score was crossculturally adapted and is now available.

  16. Nasopharyngeal bacterial carriage and antimicrobial resistance in underfive children with community acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cissy B. Kartasasmita

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung puncture is the best way to determine the etiology of pneumonia since it yields the highest rate of positive cultures. However, this procedure is difficult, especially for a study in the community. According to WHO, isolates to be tested for antimicrobial resistance in the community should be obtained from nasopharyngeal (NP swabs. Previous studies support the use of NP isolates to determine antimicrobial resistance patterns of isolates from children with pneumonia. The aim of our study was to know the bacterial patterns of the nasopharynx in underfive children with community acquired pneumonia and their antimicrobial resistance. The study was carried out in 4 Primary Health Clinics in Majalaya sub-district, Bandung, Indonesia. All underfives with cough or difficult breathing and classified as having non-severe pneumonia (WHO guidelines, were included in the study. Nasopharyngeal swabs (CDC/WHO Manual were obtained by the doctor, the swabs were placed in Amies transport medium and stored in a sterile jar before taken to the laboratory in the same day. All children were treated with co-trimoxazole. During the nine month study, 698 children with clinical signs of non-severe pneumonia were enrolled. About 25% of the nasopharyngeal specimens yielded bacterial isolates; the two most frequently found were S. pneumoniae and S. epidermidis. The antimicrobial resistance test to co-trimoxazole showed 48.2% S. pneumoniae strain had full resistance and 32.7% showed intermediate resistance to co-trimoxazole. This result is almost similar to other studies from Asian countries. It seems that H. influenzae is not a problem in the study area; however, further studies are needed.

  17. Androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer and the risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Blánaid M; Yin, Hui; Bladou, Franck; Ernst, Pierre; Azoulay, Laurent

    2017-07-01

    Androgens have been shown to influence both the immune system and lung tissue, raising the hypothesis that androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer may increase the risk of pneumonia. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether ADT is associated with an increased risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia in patients with prostate cancer. This was a population-based cohort study using the United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink linked to the Hospital Episode Statistics repository. The cohort consisted of 20 310 men newly diagnosed with non-metastatic prostate cancer between 1 April 1998 and 31 March 2015. Time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate adjusted HRs and 95% CIs for hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia associated with current and past use of ADT compared with non-use. During a mean follow-up of 4.3 years, there were 621 incident hospitalisations for community-acquired pneumonia (incidence rate: 7.2/1000 person-years). Current ADT use was associated with an 81% increased risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia (12.1 vs 3.8 per 1000 person-years, respectively; HR 1.81, 95% CI 1.47 to 2.23). The association was observed within the first six months of use (HR 1.73, 95% CI 1.23 to 2.42) and remained elevated with increasing durations of use (≥25 months; HR 1.79, 95% CI 1.39 to 2.30). In contrast, past ADT use was not associated with an increased risk (HR 1.23, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.60). The use of ADT is associated with an increased risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia in men with prostate cancer. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Etiology of community acquired pneumonia among children in India with special reference to atypical pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K Jagadish; Ashok Chowdary, K V; Usha, H C; Kulkarni, Maduri; Manjunath, V G

    2018-01-01

    The aim is to identify the etiology of community acquired pneumonia in children with special reference to atypical bacteria and viruses. A total of 94 pneumonia children were enrolled in the study. Sixty-seven did not have an etiological diagnosis by conventional culture. These children were subjected to immunofluorescence assay by Pneumoslide IgM. Ninety-four children were evaluated for etiology by conventional culture. Twenty-seven of them had the bacteriological diagnosis. Rest 67 were further analyzed for causative organism using Pneumoslide immunofluorescence test. Among this group, 38 (56.7%) had etiological diagnosis. Atypical bacteria were identified in 23 cases, most common being Mycoplasma pneumoniae and which was more common between 5 months and 2 years of age. Viruses were identified in 19 cases, and the most common virus was Respiratory syncytial virus. Mixed pathogens were identified in five children., M. pneumoniae was the common offending agent. Atypical bacteria and viruses play an important role as etiological agents in pneumonia in children. Pneumoslide IgM is useful for rapid detection of atypical bacteria and viruses.

  19. Community-acquired pneumonia in the elderly. Clinical and nutritional aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, R; Torres, A; el-Ebiary, M; Mensa, J; Estruch, R; Ruiz, M; Angrill, J; Soler, N

    1997-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in the elderly has a different clinical presentation than CAP in other age groups. Confusion, alteration of functional physical capacity, and decompensation of underlying illnesses may appear as unique manifestations. Malnutrition is also an associated feature of CAP in this population. We undertook a study to assess the clinical and nutritional aspects of CAP requiring hospitalization in elderly patients (over 65 yr of age). One hundred and one patients with pneumonia, consecutively admitted to a 1,000-bed teaching hospital over an 8-mo period, were studied (age: 78 +/- 8 yr, mean +/- SD). Nutritional aspects and the mental status of patients with pneumonia were compared with those of a control population (n = 101) matched for gender, age, and date of hospitalization. The main symptoms were dyspnea (n = 71), cough (n = 67), and fever (n = 64). The association of these symptoms with CAP was observed in only 32 patients. The most common associated conditions were cardiac disease (n = 38) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (n = 30). Seventy-seven (76%) episodes of pneumonia were clinically classified as typical and 24 as atypical. There was no association between the type of isolated microorganism and the clinical presentation of CAP, except for pleuritic chest pain, which was more common in pneumonia episodes caused by classical microorganisms (p = 0.02). This was confirmed by a multivariate analysis (relative risk [RR] = 11; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.7 to 65; p = 0.0099). The prevalence of chronic dementia was similar in the pneumonia cohort (n = 25) and control group (n = 18) (p = 0.22). However, delirium or acute confusion were significantly more frequent in the pneumonia cohort than in controls (45 versus 29 episodes; p = 0.019). Only 16 patients with pneumonia were considered to be well nourished, as compared with 47 control patients (p = 0.001). Kwashiorkor-like malnutrition was the predominant type of

  20. Penicillin as empirical therapy for patients hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia at a Danish hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, O; Glenthøj, Jonathan Peter; Dragsted, Ulrik Bak

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We report on the outcome of a study of patients hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia (HCAP) at a Danish university hospital. METHODOLOGY: In a retrospective study of 243 consecutive patients with radiographically verified HCAP, data on clinical and laboratory findings...... three months was 12% and the readmission rate within three months was 20%. The three treatment groups were comparable with respect to most demographic and clinical criteria at baseline. No significant differences in outcome between the groups were found: the mortality was 12.5%, 13.0%, and 10.......3%, respectively, p = 0.94, and the readmission rate 20.3%, 24.0%, and 14.8%, respectively; p = 0.63. CONCLUSION: Patients treated for community-acquired pneumonia at a Danish university hospital had clinical outcomes fully at height with findings from other countries, and half of the patients were successfully...

  1. Hospital-acquired pneumonia due to Leclercia adecarboxylata in a neurosurgical centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, M R; Ravikumar, R; Patra, N; Indiradevi, B

    2015-01-01

    Leclercia adecarboxylata, a gram-negative bacillus of the Enterobacteriaceae family, is an uncommonly identified human pathogen. The organism has been reported worldwide and isolated from various environmental sources. Most human infections are polymicrobial and commonly occur in immunocompromised hosts, although nosocomial infections in immunocompetent hosts have been documented. We describe three case reports of L. adecarboxylata isolation from cases of hospital acquired pneumonia admitted to a tertiary care center for neurosurgical care.

  2. Hospital-acquired pneumonia due to Leclercia adecarboxylata in a neurosurgical centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leclercia adecarboxylata , a gram-negative bacillus of the Enterobacteriaceae family, is an uncommonly identified human pathogen. The organism has been reported worldwide and isolated from various environmental sources. Most human infections are polymicrobial and commonly occur in immunocompromised hosts, although nosocomial infections in immunocompetent hosts have been documented. We describe three case reports of L. adecarboxylata isolation from cases of hospital acquired pneumonia admitted to a tertiary care center for neurosurgical care.

  3. Defining characteristics and risk indicators for diagnosing nursing home-acquired pneumonia and aspiration pneumonia in nursing home residents, using the electronically-modified Delphi Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollaar, Vanessa; van der Maarel-Wierink, Claar; van der Putten, Gert-Jan; van der Sanden, Wil; de Swart, Bert; de Baat, Cees

    2016-03-07

    In nursing home residents, it is not possible to distinguish pneumonia and aspiration pneumonia clinically. International literature reveals no consensus on which and how many characteristics and risk indicators must be present to diagnose (nursing home-acquired) pneumonia and aspiration pneumonia. The aim of this survey was to reach consensus among a panel of clinical medical experts in geriatrics and pulmonology about the characteristics required for diagnosing pneumonia, and about the risk indicators needed to consider the diagnosis aspiration pneumonia in nursing home residents with pneumonia. Literature review and three expert-rating iterations using the electronically-modified Delphi Method were carried out. After each expert rating iteration, data analysis was performed. Qualitative responses and additional (nursing home-acquired) pneumonia characteristics which were mentioned in reply to structured open-ended questions were summarised, whilst similar responses were combined and these combinations were ordered by frequency in order to use them in the next iteration. Characteristics which failed to reach consensus were considered as inconclusive and eliminated. Consensus was reached when at least 70 % of the participants agreed. Literature review revealed 16 currently used common characteristics for diagnosing (nursing home-acquired) pneumonia. No consensus was reached about characteristics and the number of characteristics required for diagnosing (nursing home-acquired) pneumonia. However, 57 % agreed that dyspnea, fever, deterioration of general functioning, tachypnea and crepitation with auscultation are the most important characteristics and the responses by the participants suggested that two or three characteristics should be present. Subsequently, 80 % of the participants agreed on the risk indicators dysphagia, choking incident, (history of) tube feeding, neurological disease and cognitive impairment for considering the diagnosis aspiration pneumonia

  4. Risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia among adults in Kenya: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthumbi, Esther; Lowe, Brett S; Muyodi, Cyprian; Getambu, Esther; Gleeson, Fergus; Scott, J Anthony G

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonia is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among adults worldwide; however, the risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia in Africa are not well characterized. The authors recruited 281 cases of community-acquired pneumonia and 1202 hospital controls among patients aged ≥15 years who attended Kilifi District Hospital/Coast Provincial General Hospital in Kenya between 1994 and 6. Cases were admissions with an acute illness with ≥2 respiratory signs and evidence of consolidation on a chest radiograph. Controls were patients without signs of pneumonia, frequency matched by age, sex and hospital. Risk factors related to socio-demographic factors, drug use, clinical history, contact patterns and exposures to indoor air pollution were investigated by questionnaire, anthropometric measurements and laboratory assays. Associations were evaluated using a hierarchical logistic regression model. Pneumonia was associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (Odds Ratio [OR] 2.06, 95% CI 1.44-3.08), anemia (OR 1.91, 1.31-2.74), splenomegaly (OR 2.04, 95% CI 1.14-3.41), recent history of pneumonia (OR 4.65, 95% CI 1.66-12.5), history of pneumonia >2 years previously (OR 17.13, 95% CI 5.01-60.26), coryza in the 2 weeks preceding hospitalization (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.44-3.03), current smoking (2.19, 95% CI 1.39-3.70), use of khat (OR 3.44, 95% CI 1.72-7.15), use of snuff (OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.35-5.49) and contact with several animal species. Presence of a Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) scar was associated with protection (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.32-0.82). The risk factors varied significantly by sex. Pneumonia in Kenyan adults was associated with global risk factors, such as HIV and smoking, but also with specific local factors like drug use and contact with animals. Intervention strategies should account for sex-specific differences in risk factors.

  5. 75 FR 73107 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0589] Draft Guidance for Industry on Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION...

  6. Long-Term Cognitive Impairment after Hospitalization for Community-Acquired Pneumonia: a Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Timothy D; Self, Wesley H; Edwards, Kathryn M; Grijalva, Carlos G; Zhu, Yuwei; Williams, Derek J; Jain, Seema; Jackson, James C

    2018-01-26

    Recent studies suggest older patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia are at risk for new-onset cognitive impairment. The characteristics of long-term cognitive impairment after pneumonia, however, have not been elucidated. To characterize long-term cognitive impairment among adults of all ages hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia. Prospective cohort study. Adults without severe preexisting cognitive impairment who were hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. At enrollment, we estimated baseline cognitive function with the Short Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE). At 2- and 12-month follow-up, we assessed cognition using the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) and tests of executive function, diagnosing cognitive impairment when results were ≥ 1.5 standard deviations below published age-adjusted means for the general population. We also identified subtypes of mild cognitive impairment using standard definitions. We assessed 58 (73%) of 80 patients who survived to 2-month follow-up and 57 (77%) of 74 who survived to 12-month follow-up. The median [range] age of survivors tested was 57 [19-97] years. Only 8 (12%) had evidence of mild cognitive impairment at baseline according to the Short IQCODE, but 21 (38%) at 2 months and 17 (30%) at 12 months had mild cognitive impairment per the RBANS. Moderate-to-severe cognitive impairment was common among adults ≥ 65 years [4/13 (31%) and 5/13 (38%) at 2 and 12 months, respectively] but also affected many of those impairment in multiple cognitive domains affected one-third of patients ≥ 65 years old and 20% of younger patients, and another third of survivors had mild cognitive impairment.

  7. The role of haloaerosolotherapy in immunorehabilitation of convalescents after community acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olha Lemko

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Investigation of the peculiarities of different haloaerosoltherapy regimes influence (treatment with different intensity of haloaerosol load upon non-specific defense and cellular immunity at convalescents after community acquired pneumonia. Objectives: patients with community acquired pneumonia in the early convalescence period (after completing antibiotic therapy, who received treatment in conditions of artificial rock salt aerosol medium (haloaerosoltherapy. Material and Methods. 42 patients with non-severe community acquired pneumonia were examined in the early convalescence period before and after the course of haloaerosoltherapy, which was prescribed after antibacterial therapy. Immunological studies included: evaluation of phagocytic activity of neutrophils (PhAN - the percentage of phagocytic neutrophils, phagocytic number (PhN - average number of latex particles absorbed by a neutrophil; metabolism of neutrophils in the test with nitroblue tetrasolium (NBT-test spontaneous and induced, which allowed to assess the functional reserve of neutrophils (FR; calculation of cytochemical coefficient (CCC for lysosomal cationic proteins (LCP and for myeloperoxidase (MPO of neutrophils; number of T- and B-lymphocytes and their subpopulations (CD3+ -, CD4+ -, CD8+ -, CD22+ - lymphocytes, calculation the number of 0- lymphocytes and the ratio of CD4+ /CD8+ lymphocytes. Laboratory examinations were also conducted in 21 practically healthy individuals (control group. Two regimes of haloaerosoltherapy were used in recovery treatment of patients with community acquired pneumonia: treating complex №1 (TC-1 with standard haloaerosol load and with increased haloaerosol load (TC-2. Results. After completion the antibiotic therapy at patients with community acquired pneumonia the moderate inhibition of phagocytic activity of neutrophils (47,6±0,58% to 55,5±1,14% in control group remained and was accompanied with a decrease in neutrophil bactericidal

  8. Value of intensive diagnostic microbiological investigation in low- and high-risk patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Eerden, M. M.; Vlaspolder, F.; de Graaff, C. S.; Groot, T.; Jansen, H. M.; Boersma, W. G.

    2005-01-01

    In a prospective study to evaluate the diagnostic yield of different microbiological tests in hospitalised patients with community-acquired pneumonia, material for microbiological investigation was obtained from 262 patients. Clinical samples consisted of the following: sputum for Gram staining,

  9. Detection and serotyping of pneumococci in community acquired pneumonia patients without culture using blood and urine samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elberse, Karin; van Mens, Suzan; Cremers, Amelieke J; Meijvis, Sabine C A; Vlaminckx, Bart; de Jonge, Marien I; Meis, Jacques F; Blauwendraat, Cornelis; van de Pol, Ingrid; Schouls, Leo M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of community acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients with antibiotics before laboratory-confirmed diagnosis leads to loss of knowledge on the causative bacterial pathogen. Therefore, an increasing number of pneumococcal infections is identified using non-culture based techniques.

  10. Analysis of the effectiveness of physical rehabilitation according spirographic indicators in community-acquired pneumonia during convalescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. S. Kalmykova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to make a program of physical rehabilitation for convalescents after community-acquired pneumonia, promotes normalization of respiratory function. The objectives of the study was to evaluate the dynamics spirographic indicators during convalescence community-acquired pneumonia. Material: the study involved 28 women aged 19 to 24 years with a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia after convalescent. Results: the positive influence of physiotherapy based dance aerobics; morning hygienic gymnastics; therapeutic massage and physical therapy on indicators of lung volumes, ventilation and bronchial patency according spirographic research. Conclusion: in community-acquired pneumonia during the convalescence period recommended physical rehabilitation, which includes curative gymnastics based on dance aerobics, morning hygienic gymnastics, massage therapy, physiotherapy. It improves the functionality of the cardiorespiratory system, nonspecific immunity and overall physical performance level.

  11. A quality improvement initiative to improve adherence to national guidelines for empiric management of community-acquired pneumonia in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Kylie A; Maxwell, David J; Pulver, Lisa K; Horn, Fiona; Robertson, Marion B; Kaye, Karen I; Peterson, Gregory M; Dollman, William B; Wai, Angela; Tett, Susan E

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the concordance of community-acquired pneumonia management in Australian emergency departments with national guidelines through a quality improvement initiative promoting concordant antibiotic use and use of a pneumonia severity assessment tool, the pneumonia severity index (PSI). and Drug use evaluation, a quality improvement methodology involving data collection, evaluation, feedback and education, was undertaken. Educational interventions included academic detailing, group feedback presentations and prescribing prompts. Data were collected on 20 consecutive adult community-acquired pneumonia emergency department presentations by each hospital for each of three audits. Two process indicators measured the impact of the interventions: documented PSI use and concordance of antibiotic prescribing with guidelines. Comparisons were performed using a Chi-squared test. Thirty-seven hospitals, including public, private, rural and metropolitan institutions, participated. Twenty-six hospitals completed the full study (range: 462-518 patients), incorporating two intervention phases and subsequent follow-up audits. The baseline audit of community-acquired pneumonia management demonstrated that practice was varied and mostly discordant with guidelines. Documented PSI use subsequently improved from 30/518 (6%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4-8) at baseline to 125/503 (25%, 95% CI 21-29; P education intervention.

  12. Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of Tuberculous Pneumonia: Comparison with Typical Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Kim, You Eun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Park, Mi Jung; Jeon, Kyoung Nyeo; Kim, Ho Cheol; Lee, Jong Deog; Kim, Jang Rak; Hwang, Young Sil

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical and radiological characteristics of tuberculous pneumonia (TBPn). We compared the clinical presentation, pneumonia severity index (PSI), and radiological findings of 51 TBPn patients with those of typical pulmonary tuberculosis (PulTB) and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients. The mean age of patients with TBPn was higher than that of patients with CAP or PulTB (66.6 ± 15.8 vs. 53.1 ± 17.1, 54.9 ± 15.7) (p < 0.05). Diabetes mellitus was more common in patients with TB than in those with CAP (24.1% vs. 8.2%) (p < 0.05). The PSI scores for TBPn and CAP were similar (79.5 ± 31.1 vs. 71.8 ± 28.3, respectively) and were higher than that for PulTB (64 ± 26.8) (p < 0.05). The ratio of lower lobe involvement was higher in TBPn and CAP than in PulTB (49% and 75.5% vs. 22.4%, respectively). Cavity formation and centrilobular nodules were more common in TBPn than in CAP (13.7% vs. 6.1% and 74.5% vs. 22.4%, respectively) (p < 0.05). Although TBPn shows a similar clinical presentation to CAP, it is more common in elderly patients and more commonly involves lower lobe involvement with cavity formation and centrilobular nodules. Therefore, in cases in which there may be diagnostic uncertainty, appropriate diagnostic procedures following these findings are required to differentiate these diseases.

  13. Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of Tuberculous Pneumonia: Comparison with Typical Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Community-Acquired Pneumonia

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    Lee, Seung Jun; Kim, You Eun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Park, Mi Jung; Jeon, Kyoung Nyeo; Kim, Ho Cheol; Lee, Jong Deog; Kim, Jang Rak; Hwang, Young Sil [College of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    To evaluate the clinical and radiological characteristics of tuberculous pneumonia (TBPn). We compared the clinical presentation, pneumonia severity index (PSI), and radiological findings of 51 TBPn patients with those of typical pulmonary tuberculosis (PulTB) and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients. The mean age of patients with TBPn was higher than that of patients with CAP or PulTB (66.6 {+-} 15.8 vs. 53.1 {+-} 17.1, 54.9 {+-} 15.7) (p < 0.05). Diabetes mellitus was more common in patients with TB than in those with CAP (24.1% vs. 8.2%) (p < 0.05). The PSI scores for TBPn and CAP were similar (79.5 {+-} 31.1 vs. 71.8 {+-} 28.3, respectively) and were higher than that for PulTB (64 {+-} 26.8) (p < 0.05). The ratio of lower lobe involvement was higher in TBPn and CAP than in PulTB (49% and 75.5% vs. 22.4%, respectively). Cavity formation and centrilobular nodules were more common in TBPn than in CAP (13.7% vs. 6.1% and 74.5% vs. 22.4%, respectively) (p < 0.05). Although TBPn shows a similar clinical presentation to CAP, it is more common in elderly patients and more commonly involves lower lobe involvement with cavity formation and centrilobular nodules. Therefore, in cases in which there may be diagnostic uncertainty, appropriate diagnostic procedures following these findings are required to differentiate these diseases.

  14. Australasian respiratory and emergency physicians do not use the pneumonia severity index in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serisier, David J; Williams, Sophie; Bowler, Simon D

    2013-02-01

    The value of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) severity scoring tools is almost exclusively reliant upon regular and accurate application in clinical practice. Until recently, the Australasian Therapeutic Guidelines has recommended the use of the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) in spite of poor user-friendliness. Electronic and postal survey of respiratory and emergency medicine physician and specialist registrar members of the Royal Australasian College was undertaken to assess the use of the PSI and the accuracy of its application to hypothetical clinical CAP scenarios. The confusion, urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure, age 65 or older (CURB-65) score was also assessed as a simpler alternative. Five hundred thirty-six (228 respiratory, 308 emergency) responses were received. Only 12% of respiratory and 35% of emergency physicians reported using the PSI always or frequently. The majority were unable to accurately approximate PSI scores, with significantly fewer respiratory than emergency physicians recording accurate severity classes (11.8% vs 21%, OR 0.50, 95% CI: 0.37-0.68, P Australasian specialist physicians primarily responsible for the acute management of CAP report infrequent use of the PSI and are unable to accurately apply its use to hypothetical scenarios. Furthermore, respiratory and emergency physicians contrasted distinctly in their use and application of the two commonest severity scoring systems--the recent recommendation of two further alternative scoring tools by Australian guidelines may add to this confusion. A simple, coordinated approach to pneumonia severity assessment across specialties in Australasia is needed. © 2012 The Authors. Respirology © 2012 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  15. Severe community-acquired Enterobacter pneumonia: a plea for greater awareness of the concept of health-care-associated pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with Enterobacter community-acquired pneumonia (EnCAP) were admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU). Our primary aim was to describe them as few data are available on EnCAP. A comparison with CAP due to common and typical bacteria was performed. Methods Baseline clinical, biological and radiographic characteristics, criteria for health-care-associated pneumonia (HCAP) were compared between each case of EnCAP and thirty age-matched typical CAP cases. A univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors independently associated with ENCAP. Their outcome was also compared. Results In comparison with CAP due to common bacteria, a lower leukocytosis and constant HCAP criteria were associated with EnCAP. Empiric antibiotic therapy was less effective in EnCAP (20%) than in typical CAP (97%) (p < 0.01). A delay in the initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy (3.3 ± 1.6 vs. 1.2 ± 0.6 days; p < 0.01) and an increase in duration of mechanical ventilation (8.4 ± 5.2 vs. 4.0 ± 4.3 days; p = 0.01) and ICU stay were observed in EnCAP patients. Conclusions EnCAP is a severe infection which is more consistent with HCAP than with typical CAP. This retrospectively suggests that the application of HCAP guidelines should have improved EnCAP management. PMID:21569334

  16. Cost Drivers of a Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia Phase 3 Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiopoulos, Stella; Calvert, Sara B; Brown, Carrie A; Awatin, Josephine; Tenaerts, Pamela; Holland, Thomas L; DiMasi, Joseph A; Getz, Kenneth A

    2018-01-06

    Studies indicate that the prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections, including hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia (HABP/VABP), has been rising. There are many challenges associated with these disease conditions and the ability to develop new treatments. Additionally, HABP/VABP clinical trials are very costly to conduct given their complex protocol designs and the difficulty in recruiting and retaining patients. With input from clinicians, representatives from industry, and the US Food and Drug Administration, we conducted a study to (1) evaluate the drivers of HABP/VABP phase 3 direct and indirect clinical trial costs; (2) to identify opportunities to lower these costs; and (3) to compare (1) and (2) to endocrine and oncology clinical trials. Benchmark data were gathered from proprietary and commercial databases and used to create a model that calculates the fully loaded (direct and indirect) cost of typical phase 3 HABP/VABP endocrine and oncology clinical trials. Results indicate that the cost per patient for a 200-site, 1000-patient phase 3 HABP/VABP study is $89600 per patient. The cost of screen failures and screen failure rates are the main cost drivers. Results indicate that biopharmaceutical companies and regulatory agencies should consider strategies to improve screening and recruitment to decrease HABP/VABP clinical trial costs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  17. Viruses and bacteria in sputum samples of children with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkinen, M; Lahti, E; Österback, R; Ruuskanen, O; Waris, M

    2012-03-01

    Few comprehensive studies have searched for viruses and bacteria in children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We identified 76 children hospitalized for pneumonia. Induced sputum samples were analysed for 18 viruses by antigen detection and PCR, and for six bacteria by culture and PCR. Viruses were found in 72% of samples, bacteria in 91%, and both in 66%. Rhinovirus (30%), human bocavirus (18%) and human metapneumovirus (14%) were the most commonly detected viruses. Two viruses were found in 22% of samples and three in 8%. The most common bacteria found were Streptococcus pneumoniae (50%), Haemophilus influenzae (38%), and Moraxella catarrhalis (28%). Rhinovirus-S. pneumoniae was the most commonly found combination of virus and bacterium (16%). All six children with treatment failure had both viruses and bacteria detected in the sputum. Otherwise, we found no special clinical characteristics in those with mixed viral-bacterial detections. With modern molecular diagnostic techniques, there are high rates of both viral and bacterial identification in childhood CAP. The clinical significance of mixed viral-bacterial infections remains unclear, although we found a potential association between them and treatment failure. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2011 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  18. Necrotizing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Satish Maharaj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cavities are not typically associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. CAP due to P. aeruginosa is rare and even less commonly causes necrotizing pneumonia. We report a case of P. aeruginosa CAP that progressed to necrotizing pneumonia and was eventually fatal. Procalcitonin (PCT has been well investigated in guiding antibiotic therapy (especially CAP in adults. In this case, PCT at presentation and sequentially was negative. We discuss this caveat and present hypotheses as to the sensitivity and specificity of PCT and C-reactive protein (CRP in these patients. To better characterize P. aeruginosa CAP, we undertook a review of cases indexed in PubMed from 2001 to 2016 (n=9. The data reveal that risk factors for P. aeruginosa CAP include smoking, alcohol use, obstructive lung disease, sinusitis, and hot tub use. The route of infection for P. aeruginosa CAP remains unknown. One of the most interesting findings on reviewing cases was that P. aeruginosa CAP involves the right upper lobe in the vast majority. We suggest that when physicians in the community see patients with distinctly upper lobe necrotizing or cavitary pneumonia, they should consider P. aeruginosa in their differential diagnosis. Further studies are needed to clarify route of infection, role of PCT and CRP, and optimal therapy including drug and duration.

  19. Association Between Hospitalization With Community-Acquired Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza Pneumonia and Prior Receipt of Influenza Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalva, Carlos G; Zhu, Yuwei; Williams, Derek J; Self, Wesley H; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T; Stockmann, Chris R; McCullers, Jonathan; Arnold, Sandra R; Wunderink, Richard G; Anderson, Evan J; Lindstrom, Stephen; Fry, Alicia M; Foppa, Ivo M; Finelli, Lyn; Bramley, Anna M; Jain, Seema; Griffin, Marie R; Edwards, Kathryn M

    2015-10-13

    Few studies have evaluated the relationship between influenza vaccination and pneumonia, a serious complication of influenza infection. To assess the association between influenza vaccination status and hospitalization for community-acquired laboratory-confirmed influenza pneumonia. The Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study was a prospective observational multicenter study of hospitalizations for community-acquired pneumonia conducted from January 2010 through June 2012 at 4 US sites. In this case-control study, we used EPIC data from patients 6 months or older with laboratory-confirmed influenza infection and verified vaccination status during the influenza seasons and excluded patients with recent hospitalization, from chronic care residential facilities, and with severe immunosuppression. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios, comparing the odds of vaccination between influenza-positive (case) and influenza-negative (control) patients with pneumonia, controlling for demographics, comorbidities, season, study site, and timing of disease onset. Vaccine effectiveness was estimated as (1 - adjusted odds ratio) × 100%. Influenza vaccination, verified through record review. Influenza pneumonia, confirmed by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction performed on nasal/oropharyngeal swabs. Overall, 2767 patients hospitalized for pneumonia were eligible for the study; 162 (5.9%) had laboratory-confirmed influenza. Twenty-eight of 162 cases (17%) with influenza-associated pneumonia and 766 of 2605 controls (29%) with influenza-negative pneumonia had been vaccinated. The adjusted odds ratio of prior influenza vaccination between cases and controls was 0.43 (95% CI, 0.28-0.68; estimated vaccine effectiveness, 56.7%; 95% CI, 31.9%-72.5%). Among children and adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia, those with laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated pneumonia, compared with those with pneumonia not

  20. Association between hospitalization with community acquired laboratory-confirmed influenza pneumonia and prior receipt of influenza vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalva, Carlos G.; Zhu, Yuwei; Williams, Derek J.; Self, Wesley H.; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T.; Stockmann, Chris R.; McCullers, Jonathan; Arnold, Sandra R.; Wunderink, Richard G.; Anderson, Evan J.; Lindstrom, Stephen; Fry, Alicia M.; Foppa, Ivo M.; Finelli, Lyn; Bramley, Anna M.; Jain, Seema; Griffin, Marie R.; Edwards, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Few studies have evaluated the relationship between influenza vaccination and pneumonia, a serious complication of influenza infection. Objective Assess the association between influenza vaccination status and hospitalization for community-acquired laboratory-confirmed influenza pneumonia. Design, Setting and Participants The Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study was a prospective observational multicenter study of hospitalizations for community-acquired pneumonia conducted from January 2010 through June 2012 in four US sites. We used EPIC study data from patients ≥6 months of age with laboratory-confirmed influenza infection and verified vaccination status during the influenza seasons, and excluded patients with recent hospitalization, from chronic care residential facilities, and with severe immunosuppression. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios, comparing the odds of vaccination between influenza-positive (cases) and influenza-negative (controls) pneumonia patients, controlling for demographics, co-morbidities, season, study site and timing of disease onset. Vaccine effectiveness was estimated as (1-odds ratio) × 100%. Exposure Influenza vaccination, verified through record review. Outcome Influenza pneumonia, confirmed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction performed on nasal/oropharyngeal swabs. Results Overall, 2767 patients hospitalized for pneumonia were eligible for the study; 162 (5.9%) were influenza positive. Twenty-eight (17%) of 162 cases with influenza-associated pneumonia and 766 (29%) of 2605 controls with influenza-negative pneumonia had been vaccinated. The adjusted odds ratio of prior influenza vaccination between cases and controls was 0.43 (95% CI 0.28–0.68 [estimated vaccine effectiveness 56.7% (95% CI 31.9–72.5)]). Conclusions and relevance Among children and adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia, those with laboratory confirmed influenza

  1. Efficacy of ceftaroline fosamil for bacteremia associated with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandourek, Alena; Smith, Alexander; Llorens, Lily; Thye, Dirk A; Eckburg, Paul B; Friedland, H David

    2014-02-01

    Few publications of prospective studies have described patient outcomes in community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP)-associated bacteremia. Our objective, in performing this subgroup analysis, was to assess outcomes in subjects with CABP-associated bacteremia in 2 randomized, double-blind clinical studies comparing treatment with ceftaroline fosamil versus ceftriaxone. Our analysis summarizes baseline subject demographics, distribution of baseline pathogens isolated from blood cultures, clinical response rates at Day 4, and clinical cure rates at end of therapy and test of cure (8 to 15 days after end of therapy) in subjects with bacteremic CABP in the ceFtarOline Community-acquired pneUmonia trial vS ceftriaxone in hospitalized patients (FOCUS) studies. In the FOCUS studies, 23 of 614 patients in the ceftaroline fosamil-treated group and 22 of 614 patients in the ceftriaxone-treated group had CABP-associated bacteremia. Baseline demographics were similar between groups. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common baseline bloodstream isolate. For subjects with CABP-associated bacteremia, clinical response/cure rates were similar at Day 4 (60.9% vs 59.1%), end of therapy (69.6% vs 72.7%), and test of cure (69.6% vs 68.2%) for ceftaroline fosamil and ceftriaxone, respectively. In subjects with CABP-associated bacteremia, ceftaroline fosamil demonstrated similar clinical outcomes at Day 4, end of therapy, and test of cure compared with ceftriaxone.

  2. Adherence to Therapeutic Guidelines for Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Australian Hospitals

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    N.R. Adler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in elderly patients, and is associated with a considerable economic burden on the healthcare system. The combination of high incidence and substantial financial costs necessitate accurate diagnosis and appropriate management of patients admitted with CAP. This article will discuss the rates of adherence to clinical guidelines, the use of severity scoring tools and the appropriateness of antimicrobial prescribing for patients diagnosed with CAP. The authors maintain that awareness of national and hospital guidelines is imperative to complement the physicians’ clinical judgment with evidence-based recommendations. Increased use of pneumonia severity assessment tools and greater adherence to therapeutic guidelines will enhance concordant antimicrobial prescribing for patients with CAP. A robust and multifaceted educational intervention, in combination with antimicrobial stewardship programs, may enhance compliance of CAP guidelines in clinical practice in Australia.

  3. A review of the role of Haemophilus influenzae in community-acquired pneumonia

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    Mary PE Slack

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In an era when Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib conjugate vaccine is widely used, the incidence of Hib as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP has dramatically declined. Non-typeable H. influenzae (NTHi strains and, occasionally, other encapsulated serotypes of H. influenzae are now the cause of the majority of invasive H. influenzae infections, including bacteraemic CAP. NTHi have long been recognised as an important cause of lower respiratory tract infection, including pneumonia, in adults, especially those with underlying diseases. The role of NTHi as a cause of non-bacteraemic CAP in children is less clear. In this review the evidence for the role of NTHi and capsulated strains of H. influenzae will be examined. 

  4. A review of the role of Haemophilus influenzae in community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary PE Slack

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In an era when Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib conjugate vaccine is widely used, the incidence of Hib as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP has dramatically declined. Non-typeable H. influenzae (NTHi strains and, occasionally, other encapsulated serotypes of H. influenzae are now the cause of the majority of invasive H. influenzae infections, including bacteraemic CAP. NTHi have long been recognised as an important cause of lower respiratory tract infection, including pneumonia, in adults, especially those with underlying diseases. The role of NTHi as a cause of non-bacteraemic CAP in children is less clear. In this review the evidence for the role of NTHi and capsulated strains of H. influenzae will be examined.

  5. The role of solithromycin in the management of bacterial community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bambeke, Françoise; Tulkens, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    The fluoroketolide solithromycin is 2-fold more potent in vitro than telithromycin against pneumococci (including macrolide-resistant strains) and Haemophilus influenzae and very active on pathogens causing atypical pneumonia. In contrast, it is a 30-fold less potent inhibitor of nicotinic receptors incriminated in telithromycin toxicity. In Phase II/III trials, oral solithromycin once-daily (800 mg on day 1; 400 mg on days 2-5) proved effective and safe when compared to respiratory fluoroquinolones for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). A Phase III intravenous trial vs. moxifloxacin has been recently completed for the same indication. Solithromycin may restore interest in ketolides as a first-line therapy for CAPB. Solithromycin safety should nevertheless be confirmed in larger populations allowing for detection of rare adverse events.

  6. Microbiology and prognostic factors of hospital- and community-acquired aspiration pneumonia in respiratory intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chaojie; Cheng, Zhenshun; Zhang, Li; Yang, Jiong

    2013-10-01

    Incidence of aspiration pneumonia in hospital-acquired pneumonia and community-acquired pneumonia is high; however, many features of this disease remain imprecise. Our objective was to characterize the microbial etiology and their antibiotic resistance and to determine the prognostic factors in aspiration pneumonia among patients admitted to a respiratory intensive care unit (RICU). A prospective survey was conducted in 112 patients exhibiting hospital-or community-acquired aspiration pneumonia in the RICU of a provincial general hospital from 2010-2012. Bronchoalveolar lavage sampling was collected, and then followed by standard culture and drug-sensitive test. Risk factors were analyzed by multivariate logistic analysis. One hundred twenty-eight strains were isolated in 94 patients, gram-negative bacilli (57.8%) was the predominant cultured microorganism, followed by fungus (28.9%) and gram-positive cocci (13.3%). The 5 main isolated bacteria demonstrated high and multiantibiotic resistance. The crude overall mortality was 43.8%, 50%, and 40%, respectively, in hospital- and community-acquired aspiration pneumonia group. Multivariate logistic analysis identified age older than 65 years, use of inotropic support, and ineffective initial therapy as independent risk factors of poor outcome. The predominant pathogenic bacteria of aspiration pneumonia in patients admitted to an RICU were antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and effective initial supportive management secured better prognosis. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Procalcitonin Accurately Identifies Hospitalized Children With Low Risk of Bacterial Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockmann, Chris; Ampofo, Krow; Killpack, Jarrett; Williams, Derek J; Edwards, Kathryn M; Grijalva, Carlos G; Arnold, Sandra R; McCullers, Jonathan A; Anderson, Evan J; Wunderink, Richard G; Self, Wesley H; Bramley, Anna; Jain, Seema; Pavia, Andrew T; Blaschke, Anne J

    2018-02-19

    Lower procalcitonin (PCT) concentrations are associated with reduced risk of bacterial community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults, but data in children are limited. We analyzed serum PCT concentrations from children hospitalized with radiographically confirmed CAP enrolled in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) Study. Blood and respiratory specimens were tested using multiple pathogen detection methods for typical bacteria (eg, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus), atypical bacteria (Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae), and respiratory viruses. Multivariable regression was used to assess associations between PCT concentrations and etiology and severity. Among 532 children (median age, 2.4 years; interquartile range [IQR], 1.0-6.3), patients with typical bacteria had higher PCT concentrations (±viruses; n = 54; median, 6.10; IQR, 0.84-22.79 ng/mL) than those with atypical bacteria (±viruses; n = 82; median, 0.10; IQR, 0.06-0.39 ng/mL), viral pathogens only (n = 349; median, 0.33; IQR, 0.12-1.35 ng/mL), or no pathogen detected (n = 47; median, 0.44; IQR, 0.10-1.83 ng/mL) (P < .001 for all). No child with PCT <0.1 ng/mL had typical bacteria detected. Procalcitonin <0.25 ng/mL featured a 96% negative predictive value (95% confidence interval [CI], 93-99), 85% sensitivity (95% CI, 76-95), and 45% specificity (95% CI, 40-50) in identifying children without typical bacterial CAP. Lower PCT concentrations in children hospitalized with CAP were associated with a reduced risk of typical bacterial detection and may help identify children who would not benefit from antibiotic treatment. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. The Clinical Utility of Serum YKL-40 Levels in Community Acquired Pneumonia

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    Halit Cınarka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We aimed to investigate the changes in blood levels of YKL-40 in patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of community acquired pneumonia (CAP before treatment and on the 7th day of treatment and to determine whether this can be used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in the disease.   Methodology: Sixty-two subjects including 40 with CAP and 22 healthy as a control group were enrolled to the study. Serum YKL-40 levels were measured in patients with CAP before treatment and on the seventh day of the treatment. Degrees of severity of pneumonia were evaluated according to CURB-65 and the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI.   Results: Mean serum YKL-40 levels of 89.24±98.67 ng/ml and 74.37±56.28 ng/ml were measured on the 1st and 7th days, respectively. The difference between two measurements was significant (p=0.003. A significant difference was also determined in serum YKL-40 level between control group and patient with CAP group on 1st and 7th days (p=0.001 and p<0.001, respectively. PSI and CURB-65 scores were not correlated with serum YKL-40 levels in patients with CAP.   Conclusion: The results show higher blood YKL-40 levels in patients in the CAP group compared to the controls. Elevated YKL-40 levels in blood specimens at the start of treatment in our pneumonia group, followed by a decrease one week later, may be regarded as evidence that blood YKL-40 levels can be used as an inflammation marker in clinical practice.   Keywords: Pneumonia; YKL-40; C-reactive protein

  9. Etiology and anti-microbial sensitivity of organisms causing community acquired pneumonia: A single hospital study

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    Resmi U Menon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to identify the common etiological pathogens causing community acquired pneumonia (CAP in our hospital and sensitivity patterns to the common antibiotics used. Materials and Methods: This study was undertaken in a 750 bedded multi-specialty referral hospital in Kerala catering to both urban and semi-urban populations. It is a prospective study of patients who attended the medical out-patient department and those admitted with a clinical diagnosis of CAP, during the year 2009. Data were collected based on detailed patient interview, clinical examination and laboratory investigations. The latter included sputum culture and sensitivity pattern. These were tabulated and percentage incidence of etiological pathogens calculated. The antimicrobial sensitivity pattern was also classified by percentage and expressed as bar diagram. Results: The study showed Streptococcus pneumoniae to be the most common etiological agent for CAP, in our hospital setting. The other organisms isolated in order of frequency were Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Alpha hemolytic streptococci, Escherichia coli, Beta hemolytic streptococci and atypical coli. S. pneumoniae was most sensitive to linezolid, followed by amoxicillin-clavulanate (augmentin, cloxacillin and ceftriaxone. Overall, the common pathogens causing CAP showed highest sensitivity to amikacin, followed by ofloxacin, gentamycin, amoxicillin-clavulanate (augmentin, ceftriaxone and linezolid. The least sensitivity rates were shown to amoxicillin and cefoperazone. Conclusion: In a hospital setting, empirical management for cases of CAP is not advisable. The present study has shown S. pneumoniae as the most likely pathogen and either linezolid or amikacin as the most likely effective antimicrobial in cases of CAP, in our setting.

  10. Differentiation of bacterial and non-bacterial community-acquired pneumonia by thin-section computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Isao; Ishida, Tadashi; Togashi, Kaori; Niimi, Akio; Koyama, Hiroshi; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Mishima, Michiaki

    2009-01-01

    Background and objective: The management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) depends, in part, on the identification of the causative agents. The objective of this study was to determine the potential of thin-section computed tomography (CT) in differentiating bacterial and non-bacterial pneumonia. Patients and methods: Thin-section CT studies were prospectively examined in hospitalized CAP patients within 2 days of admission, followed by retrospective assessment by two pulmonary radiologists. Thin-section CT findings on the pneumonias caused by each pathogen were examined, and two types of pneumonias were compared. Using multivariate logistic regression analyses, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were produced. Results: Among 183 CAP episodes (181 patients, 125 men and 56 women, mean age ± S.D.: 61.1 ± 19.7) examined by thin-section CT, the etiologies of 125 were confirmed (94 bacterial pneumonia and 31 non-bacterial pneumonia). Centrilobular nodules were specific for non-bacterial pneumonia and airspace nodules were specific for bacterial pneumonia (specificities of 89% and 94%, respectively) when located in the outer lung areas. When centrilobular nodules were the principal finding, they were specific but lacked sensitivity for non-bacterial pneumonia (specificity 98% and sensitivity 23%). To distinguish the two types of pneumonias, centrilobular nodules, airspace nodules and lobular shadows were found to be important by multivariate analyses. ROC curve analysis discriminated bacterial pneumonia from non-bacterial pneumonia among patients without underlying lung diseases, yielding an optimal point with sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 79%, respectively, but was less effective when all patients were analyzed together (70% and 84%, respectively). Conclusion: Thin-section CT examination was applied for the differentiation of bacterial and non-bacterial pneumonias. Though showing some potential, this examination at the present time would not

  11. Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know you have it. Walking pneumonia (also called atypical pneumonia because it's different from the typical bacterial pneumonia) ... ray and blood tests. People with bacterial or atypical pneumonia will probably be given antibiotics to take at ...

  12. Disease burden of intensive care unit-acquired pneumonia in China: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaowen; Yao, Zhiyuan; Zhan, Siyan; Yang, Zhirong; Wei, Dong; Zhang, Jing; Li, Jingyi; Kyaw, Moe H

    2014-12-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired pneumonia and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) are associated with poor clinical and economic outcomes. Data regarding ICU-acquired pneumonia and VAP are not readily available from developing countries, including China. The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the incidence, mortality rate, length of stay, and pathogens associated with ICU-acquired pneumonia in China. A meta-analysis and systematic review of 334 publications published between January 2007 and May 2012 and retrieved from the Chinese BioMedical database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP Chinese Science and Technique Journals database, Wanfang database, and PubMed was conducted. The incidences of ICU-acquired pneumonia and VAP were 16.2% (95% confidence interval (CI) 12.8-20.4%) and 33.7% (95% CI 31.4-36.1%), respectively; mortality rates were 37.4% (95% CI 24.6-52.2%) and 34.5% (95% CI 29.2-40.1%), respectively. The durations of stay in the ICU and hospital were 12.4 (95% CI 9.6-15.3) and 17.7 (95% CI 15.6-19.7) days and 18.0 (95% CI 16.5-19.6) and 30.5 (95% CI 26.4-34.7) days for ICU-acquired pneumonia and VAP, respectively. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (19.9%) and Acinetobacter baumannii (13.9%) were the most frequently isolated pathogens, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (11.9%) and Staphylococcus aureus (10.4%); 82.9% of S. aureus isolates were reported to be methicillin-resistant. ICU-acquired pneumonia/VAP remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients in the ICU in China. Data on organisms causing disease in this population could help guide appropriate prevention strategies and treatment. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Autonomic Dysfunction in Children with Acute Community-Acquired Pneumonia and the Ways of Drug Treatment

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    S.L. Nyankovsky

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the features of clinical course, intensity of toxic, asthenic syndromes, autonomic functioning in children of 7 years old with signs of community-acquired pneumonia based on instrumental autonomic testing and EEG findings. The probiotic Enterol and metabolic medication Stimol included into the treatment scheme fasten normalization of clinical, instrumental and functional parameters, reduce autonomic dysfunction, improve physical condition, adaptive opportunities, stress resistance, reduce imbalance between humoral-metabolic and central ergotropic influence, normalize responsiveness of parasympathetic nervous system and balance of autonomic modulation of cardiac rhythm, improve EEG findings.

  14. A case of newborn with community acquired pneumonia caused by Cupriavidus pauculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Banu; Dilli, Dilek; Zenciroğlu, Ayşegül; Okumuş, Nurullah; Ozkan, Sengül; Tanır, Gönül

    2012-01-01

    Cupriavidus pauculus is a gram-negative, aerobic, non-spore forming, non-fermentative motile bacillus. The bacillus can be isolated from water, bottled mineral water, and water from ultrafiltration systems in hospital setting. C. pauculus rarely causes human infections, however it may be an infectious agent especially in immunocompromised individuals. In this report, we present the first case of community acquired pneumonia caused by C. pauculus in a previously healthy newborn who was hospitalized in neonatal intensive care unit on postnatal day 16 because of respiratory distress.

  15. Hot Topics in Primary Care: Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia: Is There Anything New?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hans

    2017-04-01

    The management of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an ongoing challenge in the primary care setting. This is due, in part, to the fact that management guidelines in the United States were published nearly a decade ago. Furthermore, there has been a dearth of new treatments. But that may be about to change. Management guidelines are being updated by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and are expected to be released this summer. In addition, several new antibiotics for the treatment of CAP are on the horizon.

  16. Community acquired pneumonia in the elderly: the Pneumonia in Italian Acute Care for Elderly units (PIACE study protocol by the Italian Society of Hospital and Community Geriatrics (SIGOT

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    Filippo Luca Fimognari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is a frequent cause of hospital admission in elderly patients. Diagnosis of pneumonia in elderly persons with comorbidity may be challenging, due to atypical presentation and complex clinical scenarios. Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP arises out-of-hospital in subjects without previous contact with the healthcare system. Healthcare associated pneumonia (HCAP occurs in patients who have frequent contacts with the healthcare system and should be treated with empiric broad spectrum antibiotic therapy also covering multi-drug resistant (MDR pathogens. Recent findings, however, have questioned this approach, because the worse prognosis of HCAP compared to CAP may better reflect increased level of comorbidity and frailty (poor functional status, older age of HCAP patients, as well as poorer quality of hospital care provided to such patients, rather than pneumonia etiology by MDR pathogens. The Pneumonia in Italian Acute Care for Elderly units (PIACE Study, promoted by the Società Italiana di Geriatria Ospedale e Territorio (SIGOT, is an observational prospective cohort study of patients consecutively admitted because of pneumonia to hospital acute care units of Geriatrics throughout Italy. Detailed information regarding clinical presentation, diagnosis, etiology, comprehensive geriatric assessment, antibiotic therapy, possible complications and comorbidities was recorded to identify factors potentially predicting in-hospital mortality (primary endpoint, 3-month mortality, length of hospital stay, postdischarge rate of institutionalization and other secondary endpoints. This paper describes the rationale and method of PIACE Study and reviews the main evidence on pneumonia in the elderly.

  17. Rates and risk factors for recurrent pneumonia in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia: population-based prospective cohort study with 5 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, T T; Eurich, D T; Weir, D L; Marrie, T J; Majumdar, S R

    2014-07-01

    The rates and risk factors for developing recurrent pneumonia following hospitalization with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are poorly understood. We examined a population-based cohort of patients with CAP who survived hospital admission and who were free of pneumonia for at least 3 months. We collected clinical, functional, and medication-related information and pneumonia severity index (PSI). Using linked databases we followed patients for 5 years and captured any clinical episode of pneumonia 90 days or more post-discharge. We used Cox proportional hazards models (adjusted for age, sex, PSI, functional status, medications) to determine rates and independent correlates of recurrent pneumonia. The final cohort included 2709 inpatients; 43% were 75 years or older, 34% were not fully independent, and 56% had severe pneumonia. Over 5 years of follow-up, 245 (9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 8%-10%) patients developed recurrent pneumonia, and 156 (64%) of these episodes required hospitalization. Rate of recurrence was 3.0/100 person-years and median time to recurrence was 317 days (interquartile range, 177-569); 32 (13%) patients had 2 or more recurrences. In multivariable analyses only age >75 years (adjusted P = .047) and less than fully independent functional status (12% recurrence rate with impaired functional status vs 7% for fully independent; adjusted hazard ratio, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3-2.2; P pneumonia. One of 11 patients who survived CAP hospitalization had recurrent pneumonia over 5 years and those with impaired functional status were at particularly high risk. Recurrent pneumonia is common and more attention to preventive strategies at discharge and closer follow-up over the long-term seem warranted. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Ceftaroline Fosamil: A Review in Complicated Skin and Soft Tissue Infections and Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lesley J

    2016-11-01

    Intravenous ceftaroline fosamil (Zinforo™), a prodrug that is rapidly converted to its active metabolite ceftaroline, is approved for use in adults and children (from 2 months of age) with complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTIs) or community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). In several multinational trials, ceftaroline fosamil was an effective and generally well tolerated treatment in adult and paediatric patients with cSSTIs or CAP. In the phase 3 CANVAS trials, ceftaroline fosamil treatment was noninferior to vancomycin plus aztreonam in adults with cSSTIs. Based on a meta-analysis of three similarly designed, phase 3 trials (FOCUS 1, FOCUS 2 and an Asian trial), ceftaroline fosamil treatment was superior to ceftriaxone in adults with CAP of Pneumonia Outcomes Research Teams (PORT) risk class III or IV. Ceftaroline fosamil was also associated with high clinical cure rates in hospitalized children (aged 2 months to 17 years) with cSSTIs or CAP. With its broad spectrum of in vitro activity against clinically relevant Gram-positive [including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates] and Gram-negative pathogens implicated in cSSTIs and CAP, ceftaroline fosamil is an important treatment option for cSSTI and CAP in adults and children from the age of 2 months.

  19. Age-related risk factors for bacterial aetiology in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahuquillo-Arce, José M; Menéndez, Rosario; Méndez, Raúl; Amara-Elori, Isabel; Zalacain, Rafael; Capelastegui, Alberto; Aspa, Javier; Borderías, Luis; Martín-Villasclaras, Juan J; Bello, Salvador; Alfageme, Inmaculada; de Castro, Felipe Rodriguez; Rello, Jordi; Molinos, Luis; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan; Torres, Antoni

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of age and comorbidities, smoking and alcohol use on microorganisms in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A prospective multicentre study was performed with 4304 patients. We compared microbiological results, bacterial aetiology, smoking, alcohol abuse and comorbidities in three age groups: young adults (65 years). Bacterial aetiology was identified in 1522 (35.4%) patients. In seniors, liver disease was independently associated with Gram-negative bacteria (Haemophilus influenzae and Enterobacteriaceae), COPD with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (OR = 2.69 (1.46-4.97)) and Staphylococcus aureus (OR = 2.8 (1.24-6.3)) and neurological diseases with S. aureus. In adults, diabetes mellitus (DM) was a risk factor for Streptococcus pneumoniae and S. aureus, and COPD for H. influenzae (OR = 3.39 (1.06-10.83)). In young adults, DM was associated with S. aureus. Smoking was a risk factor for Legionella pneumophila regardless of age. Alcohol intake was associated with mixed aetiology and Coxiella burnetii in seniors, and with S. pneumoniae in young adults. It should be considered that the bacterial aetiology may differ according to the patient's age, comorbidities, smoking and alcohol abuse. More extensive microbiological testing is warranted in those with risk factors for infrequent microorganisms. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  20. Atypical aetiology in patients hospitalised with community-acquired pneumonia is associated with age, gender and season; a data-analysis on four Dutch cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raeven, Vivian M; Spoorenberg, Simone M C; Boersma, Wim G; van de Garde, Ewoudt M W; Cannegieter, Suzanne C; Voorn, G P Paul; Bos, Willem Jan W; van Steenbergen, Jim E; Meijvis, Sabine CA|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341012637

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Microorganisms causing community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) can be categorised into viral, typical and atypical (Legionella species, Coxiella burnetii, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Chlamydia species). Extensive microbiological testing to identify the causative microorganism is not standardly

  1. Community acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in a young athlete man: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahdar, Hossein Ali; Kazemian, Hossein; Bimanand, Lida; Zahedani, Shahram Shahraki; Feyisa, Seifu Gizaw; Taki, Elahe; Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Karami-Zarandi, Morteza

    2018-04-10

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is commonly known as nosocomial infection agent but rarely previously healthy peoples infected by P. aeruginosa. Here we report community acquired pneumonia in a 27 years old athleteman. 15 published P. aeruginosa CAP case reports are reviewed.1 53.3% of patients was female and 46.67% was male. The mean age was 44 years old (SD: ±13.54). In 8 report it is mentioned that the patient was smoker. Fatality rate was 46.6% and death rate was not significantly different between selected antibiotic regimen, sex and smoking in patient's outcome. Chest strike can be a risk factor for P. aeruginosa CAP in athlete people. Our reported patient treated by ciprofloxacin 400 mg per day and healed without any Secondary complication. Fast and timelymanner diagnosis and treatment is critical in Community acquired P. aeruginosapneumonia outcome. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Linezolid has unique immunomodulatory effects in post-influenza community acquired MRSA pneumonia.

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    Urvashi Bhan

    Full Text Available Post influenza pneumonia is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity, with mortality rates approaching 60% when bacterial infections are secondary to multi-drug resistant (MDR pathogens. Staphylococcus aureus, in particular community acquired MRSA (cMRSA, has emerged as a leading cause of post influenza pneumonia.Linezolid (LZD prevents acute lung injury in murine model of post influenza bacterial pneumonia.Mice were infected with HINI strain of influenza and then challenged with cMRSA at day 7, treated with antibiotics (LZD or Vanco or vehicle 6 hours post bacterial challenge and lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL harvested at 24 hours for bacterial clearance, inflammatory cell influx, cytokine/chemokine analysis and assessment of lung injury.Mice treated with LZD or Vanco had lower bacterial burden in the lung and no systemic dissemination, as compared to the control (no antibiotic group at 24 hours post bacterial challenge. As compared to animals receiving Vanco, LZD group had significantly lower numbers of neutrophils in the BAL (9×10(3 vs. 2.3×10(4, p < 0.01, which was associated with reduced levels of chemotactic chemokines and inflammatory cytokines KC, MIP-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-1β in the BAL. Interestingly, LZD treatment also protected mice from lung injury, as assessed by albumin concentration in the BAL post treatment with H1N1 and cMRSA when compared to vanco treatment. Moreover, treatment with LZD was associated with significantly lower levels of PVL toxin in lungs.Linezolid has unique immunomodulatory effects on host inflammatory response and lung injury in a murine model of post-viral cMRSA pneumonia.

  3. Microbiology and outcomes of community acquired pneumonia in non cystic-fibrosis bronchiectasis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polverino, Eva; Cilloniz, Catia; Menendez, Rosario; Gabarrus, Albert; Rosales-Mayor, Edmundo; Alcaraz, Victoria; Terraneo, Silvia; Puig de la Bella Casa, Jordi; Mensa, Josep; Ferrer, Miquel; Torres, Antoni

    2015-07-01

    It is general belief that Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) is characterized by frequent community-acquired pneumonia. Nonetheless, the knowledge on clinical characteristics of CAP in NCFBE is poor and no specific recommendations are available. We aim to investigate clinical and microbiological characteristics of NCFBE patients with CAP. Prospective observational study of 3495 CAP patients (2000-2011). We found 90 (2.0%) NCFBE-CAP that in comparison with non-bronchiectatic CAP (n, 3405) showed older age (mean ± [SD], NCFBE-CAP 73 ± 14 vs. CAP 65 ± 19yrs), more vaccinations (pneumococcal: 35% vs. 14%; influenza: 60% vs. 42%), comorbidities (n ≥ 2: 43% vs. 25%), previous antibiotics (38% vs. 22%), and inhaled steroids (53% vs. 16%) (p pneumoniae was the most frequent isolate in both groups (NCFBE-CAP 44.4% vs. CAP 42.7%; p = 0.821) followed by respiratory virus, mixed infections and atypical bacteria. Considering overall frequencies of the main pathogens (including monomicrobial and mixed infections) Pseudomonas aeruginosa (15.5% vs. 2.9%; p pneumoniae, are also involved in NCFBE-CAP but P. aeruginosa and other Enterobacteriaceae were globally more frequent than in CAP. Therefore, a wide microbiological investigation should be recommended in all NCFBE-CAP cases as well as routine pneumococcal vaccination for prevention of pneumonia. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ceftaroline in the management of complicated skin and soft tissue infections and community acquired pneumonia

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    Mpenge MA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mbiye A Mpenge,1 Alasdair P MacGowan2 1Department of Medical Microbiology, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol, England; 2Department of Medical Microbiology, North Bristol NHS Trust, Southmead Hospital, Bristol, England Abstract: Ceftaroline is a new parenteral cephalosporin approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTIs including those due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Ceftaroline has broad-spectrum activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and exerts its bactericidal effects by binding to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs, resulting in inhibition of bacterial cell wall synthesis. It binds to PBP 2a of MRSA with high affinity and also binds to all six PBPs in Streptococcus pneumoniae. In in vitro studies, ceftaroline demonstrated potent activity against Staphylococcus aureus (including MRSA and vancomycin-intermediate isolates, Streptococcus pneumoniae (including multidrug resistant isolates, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and many common gram-negative pathogens, excluding extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In Phase II and Phase III clinical trials, ceftaroline was noninferior to its comparator agents and demonstrated high clinical cure rates in the treatment of cSSTIs and CAP. It demonstrated favorable outcomes in patients treated for both regulatory-approved indications and unlicensed indications in a retrospective analysis. Ceftaroline is a safe and effective option for treatment in specific patient populations in which its efficacy and safety have been proven. This article reviews the challenges in the treatment of cSSTI and CAP, ceftaroline and its microbiology, pharmacology, efficacy, and safety data which support its use in

  5. Azithromycin is not associated with QT prolongation in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Lee Hilary; Gabin, Ahmad; Fawaz, Abdallah; Freedberg, Nahum Adam; Schwartz, Naama; Elias, Mazen; Saliba, Walid

    2015-10-01

    Large data-based studies have reported excess cardiovascular mortality in high-risk patients treated with azithromycin, but whether or not azithromycin causes QT prolongation remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of azithromycin treatment on QT prolongation in a cohort of patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) METHODS: One-hundred twenty-two hospitalized patients with CAP were enrolled in the study. We compared the baseline QTc, with daily post antibiotic QTc. Other risk factors for QT prolongation such as medication or electrolyte abnormalities were recorded. Ninety (73.8%) patients were treated with azithromycin (usually in combination with ceftriaxone), and 32 (26.2%) patients with other antibiotics (ampicillin-clavulanate, chloramphenicol, doxcycline, or ceftriaxone); 72.1% (88) of the cohort experienced QT lengthening; 72.7% with QT lengthening had a normal baseline QTc. Azithromycin was not associated with the post-antibiotic QTc. Wide (pathological) post-antibiotic QTc was associated with the pneumonia score. Every 10-point increase in the pneumonia score raised the risk for a pathological post antibiotic QTc by 1.249 (95%CI: 1.050-1.486). Analysis of patients with non-pathological baseline QTc revealed that pathological post-antibiotic QTc was only associated with previous stroke and not with the type of antibiotic. Azithromycin treatment was not associated with QT prolongation in patients with severe CAP. Nonetheless, in a large majority of hospitalized CAP patients, QT prolongation and pathological QTc develop regardless of the antibiotic used, especially in patients with previous stroke or a higher pneumonia score. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Risk factors for drug-resistant pathogens in community-acquired and healthcare-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, Yuichiro; Ito, Ryota; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Ando, Masahiko; Ichikawa, Motoshi; Shiraki, Akira; Goto, Yasuhiro; Fukui, Yasutaka; Iwaki, Mai; Okumura, Junya; Yamaguchi, Ikuo; Yagi, Tetsuya; Tanikawa, Yoshimasa; Sugino, Yasuteru; Shindoh, Joe; Ogasawara, Tomohiko; Nomura, Fumio; Saka, Hideo; Yamamoto, Masashi; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Ryujiro; Saito, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Takashi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2013-10-15

    Identification of patients with drug-resistant pathogens at initial diagnosis is essential for treatment of pneumonia. To elucidate clinical features of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP), and to clarify risk factors for drug-resistant pathogens in patients with CAP and HCAP. A prospective observational study was conducted in hospitalized patients with pneumonia at 10 institutions in Japan. Pathogens identified as not susceptible to ceftriaxone, ampicillin-sulbactam, macrolides, and respiratory fluoroquinolones were defined as CAP drug-resistant pathogens (CAP-DRPs). In total, 1,413 patients (887 CAP and 526 HCAP) were analyzed. CAP-DRPs were more frequently found in patients with HCAP (26.6%) than in patients with CAP (8.6%). Independent risk factors for CAP-DRPs were almost identical in patients with CAP and HCAP. These included prior hospitalization (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23-3.43), immunosuppression (AOR, 2.31; 95% CI, 1.05-5.11), previous antibiotic use (AOR, 2.45; 95% CI, 1.51-3.98), use of gastric acid-suppressive agents (AOR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.39-3.57), tube feeding (AOR, 2.43; 95% CI, 1.18-5.00), and nonambulatory status (AOR, 2.45; 95% CI, 1.40-4.30) in the combined patients with CAP and HCAP. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for counting the number of risk factors was 0.79 (95% CI, 0.74-0.84). The clinical profile of HCAP was different from that of CAP. However, physicians can predict drug resistance in patients with either CAP or HCAP by taking account of the cumulative number of the risk factors. Clinical trial registered with https://upload.umin.ac.jp/cgi-open-bin/ctr/ctr.cgi?function=brows&action=brows&type=summary&recptno=R000004001&language=E ; number UMIN000003306.

  7. Determining the Possible Etiology of Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia Using a Clone Library Analysis in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatera, Kazuhiro; Noguchi, Shingo; Yamasaki, Kei; Kawanami, Toshinori; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Naito, Keisuke; Akata, Kentaro; Kido, Takashi; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Noriho; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2017-05-01

    Obtaining precise etiological information regarding causative bacteria is important for the proper use of antimicrobials in hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP), which is associated with a high rate of mortality. The aim of this study was to comparatively investigate the bacterial diversity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in Japanese patients with HAP by the clone library method using the 16S rRNA gene. This study included Japanese patients with HAP who were treated at our hospital and referring hospitals. BALF specimens were obtained from pneumonia lesions identified on chest radiographs and/or computed tomography. Sputum specimens were also evaluated in patients with sputum production. Sixty-eight patients were ultimately enrolled. BALF cultivation revealed bacterial positivity in 53 of 68 (77.9%) patients, and Staphylococcus aureus (30.9%) was the most frequently isolated, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (16.2%), and Escherichia coli (10.3%). In contrast, the clone library analysis identified the presence of some bacterial phenotype in 65 of 68 (95.6%) patients, and streptococci (16.2%), Corynebacterium species (11.8%), anaerobes (10.3%) were frequently detected as the predominant phylotypes. Both methods tended to detect S. aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and E. coli in patients with late-onset pneumonia. In addition, the cases that phylotypes of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa were found to account for > 5% of the bacterial flora of each case were 42.9% and 72.7%, respectively. These results indicate that attention should be paid to the roles of gram-positive bacilli such as streptococci, Corynebacterium species and anaerobes, in addition to Gram-negative bacilli, in the pathogenesis of HAP.

  8. Necrotizing community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia: an emerging problem in correctional facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Nita; Kochie, Mary; Harber, Philip

    2011-03-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) skin infections have been common in prisons for more than a decade. However, CA-MRSA as a cause of pneumonia has been reported infrequently. This infection can present with flu-like symptoms and rapidly progress, possibly leading to death in a matter of days. Two cases of MRSA community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) associated with influenza-like illness in correctional officers employed in two separate prisons within the California prison system are presented. Both individuals were previously healthy, but one died of this disease. MRSA is an uncommon, but now recognized, cause of CAP. These cases are notable for their unique presentation and occurrence in non-health care, occupational settings. Prompt diagnosis and intervention by occupational health nurses and physicians are critical to improving outcomes, especially in high-risk settings such as prisons. These worksites need an effective occupational health program to manage MRSA, with adequate training for both employees and inmates.

  9. [Microbiologic spectrum and prognostic factors of hospital-acquired pneumonia cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevinç, Can; Sahbaz, Sibel; Uysal, Ulker; Kilinç, Oğuz; Ellidokuz, Hülya; Itil, Oya; Gülay, Zeynep; Yunusoğlu, Sedat; Sargun, Serdar; Akkoyun, Kürşat Kaan; Uçan, Eyüp Sabri

    2007-01-01

    Nosocomial infections are an important cause of preventable morbidity and mortality; they also result in significant socioeconomic cost. Nosocomial pneumonia (NCP) is defined as pneumonia, which occurs 48 hours after hospitalization or after discharge from the hospital. It is the second or third most frequent infection among all hospital acquired infections, and the mortality of NCP is higher than the other hospital acquired infections. Patients, diagnosed as NCP were retrospectively analyzed in order to detect microbiological agent and prognostic factors. We evaluated 173 patients, 67.0% of them were male and 33.0% female. Comorbid diseases were present in 94.2% and a medical procedure had been applied in 75.1% of cases. A single agent was isolated in 79.2% of the cases while a mixt infection was present in 13.3%. In 7.5% of the cases, cultures were negative. Endotracheal aspirates were the most common materials (38.9%) used for detected microorganism and sputum cultures were used in 16.8% of the cases. Most commonly encountered microorganism were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. and Staphylococcus aureus respectively. NCP developed on approximately 18th day of hospitalization. Overall mortality rate was 45.2%. The effects of diabetes mellitus and chronic pulmonary diseases on mortality rate were analized by logistic regression analysis and it's evaluated that the mortality rates increase 3.7 times with diabetes mellitus and 2.4 times with chronic pulmonary diseases. There was no effect of mechanical ventilation history on mortality.

  10. Prognostic scores and biomarkers for pediatric community-acquired pneumonia: how far have we come?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwaezuoke SN

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Samuel N Uwaezuoke,1 Adaeze C Ayuk2 1Pediatric Nephrology Firm, 2Pediatric Pulmonology Firm, Department of Pediatrics, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku-Ozalla, Enugu, Nigeria Abstract: This article aimed to review the current prognostic and diagnostic tools used for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and highlight those potentially applicable in children with CAP. Several scoring systems have been developed to predict CAP mortality risk and serve as guides for admission into the intensive care unit. Over the years, clinicians have adopted these tools for improving site-of-care decisions because of high mortality rates in the extremes of age. The major scoring systems designed for geriatric patients include the Pneumonia Severity Index and the confusion, uremia, respiratory rate, blood pressure, age >65 years (CURB-65 rule, as well as better predictors of intensive care unit admission, such as the systolic blood pressure, multilobar chest radiography involvement, albumin level, respiratory rate, tachycardia, confusion, oxygenation and arterial pH (SMART-COP score, the Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines, the criteria developed by España et al as well as the systolic blood pressure, oxygenation, age and respiratory rate (SOAR criteria. Only the modified predisposition, insult, response and organ dysfunction (PIRO score has so far been applied to children with CAP. Because none of the tools is without its limitations, there has been a paradigm shift to incorporate biomarkers because they are reliable diagnostic tools and good predictors of disease severity and outcome, irrespective of age group. Despite the initial preponderance of reports on their utility in geriatric CAP, much progress has now been made in demonstrating their usefulness in pediatric CAP. Keywords: community-acquired pneumonia, children, scoring systems, biomarkers 

  11. STUDY OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED BACTERIAL PNEUMONIAS PRESENTING TO TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

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    Ramakrishna Rachakonda

    2017-11-01

    diagnosed as having gram-positive cocci and nearly 15% gram-negative bacilli. 5.12% had mixed organisms and 28% had normal Gram stain study. 3.20% patients had fungal elements in Gram stain study. 127 out of 156 patients were positive for bacterial pathogens by culture. Commonest organism isolated was Streptococcus pneumonia in 32.69% followed by Staph aureus in 18.59%, Klebsiella in 8.97%, Pseudomonas in 5.76%, Haemophilus influenza in 4.48%, mixed pathogens in 8.97% and Citrobacter in 1.92%. No organism was isolated by culture in 18.58%. Streptococcus pneumonia and Haemophilus influenzae organisms isolated in these patients were sensitive to routine drugs in all these patients. Nearly, 10% of Staphylococci, 7% of Klebsiella and 22% Pseudomonas organisms are found resistant to the routine drugs. Tazobactam-Piperacillin resistance was seen in both Klebsiella and Pseudomonas species and both were sensitive to meropenem. CONCLUSION Community acquired pneumonia occurs in the older age group among the adult population. Smoking has a significant correlation with development of pneumonia. Predominant number of patients are male. Bilateral and bronchopneumonia pattern is the commonest presentation. Comorbidities and initial white blood cell concentration enhance the duration of hospital stay and the values are statistically significant. Commonest organism isolated is Streptococcus pneumonia followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella, Haemophilus and Pseudomonas. Staphylococci, Klebsiella and Pseudomonas species showed resistance. Tazobactam + Piperacillin resistance is seen among Klebsiella and Pseudomonas species isolated in our centre.

  12. Pneumonia adquirida na comunidade e derrame pleural parapneumônico relacionados a Mycoplasma pneumoniae em crianças e adolescentes Mycoplasma pneumoniae-related community-acquired pneumonia and parapneumonic pleural effusion in children and adolescents

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    Letícia Alves Vervloet

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a prevalência e as características da pneumonia adquirida na comunidade (PAC e derrames pleurais parapneumônicos (DPP relacionados a Mycoplasma pneumoniae em um grupo de crianças e adolescentes. MÉTODOS: Estudo observacional retrospectivo com 121 pacientes hospitalizados com PAC e DPP em um hospital de referência terciária, entre 2000 e 2008, divididos em seis grupos (G1 a G6 segundo o agente etiológico: M. pneumoniae com ou sem coinfecção, em 44 pacientes; outros agentes que não M. pneumoniae, em 77; M. pneumoniae sem coinfecção, em 34; Streptococcus pneumoniae, em 36; Staphylococcus aureus, em 31; e coinfecção M. pneumoniae/S. pneumoniae, em 9, respectivamente. RESULTADOS: Na comparação entre os grupos, G1 apresentou frequências maiores em gênero feminino, tosse seca, uso prévio de beta-lactâmicos e na duração dos sintomas até a admissão, assim como menor uso de assistência ventilatória e de drenagem torácica que G2, enquanto G3 teve maiores frequências em uso prévio de beta-lactâmicos e tosse seca, maior duração dos sintomas antes da admissão e menor frequência de uso de drenos torácicos que G4 e G5, ao passo que G3 teve média de idade maior e menor frequência de náuseas/vômitos que G4, assim como menor uso de assistência ventilatória que G5. A coinfecção M. pneumoniae/S. pneumoniae aumentou a duração dos sintomas até a admissão. CONCLUSÕES: Nesta amostra, a prevalência de PAC e DPP por M. pneumoniae foi de 12,75%. Embora a doença apresentasse quadros mais leves que aquela por outros organismos, a evolução foi mais prolongada. Nossos dados sugerem a necessidade de uma maior diligência na investigação de M. pneumoniae em crianças e adolescentes com PAC e DPP em nosso meio.OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and the characteristics of Mycoplasma pneumoniae-related community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and parapneumonic pleural effusion (PPE in children and adolescents

  13. Pneumonia adquirida na comunidade numa unidade de cuidados intensivos Community-acquired pneumonia in an intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Raquel Marques

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A pneumonia adquirida na comunidade (PAC é a principal causa de sépsis em cuidados intensivos de adultos. Com o objectivo de caracterizar o quadro clínico de PAC em cuidados intensivos, tratamento e avaliação de factores prognósticos, com especial relevância para a antibioterapia, realizou-se um estudo retrospectivo dos doentes admitidos numa UCI polivalente com PAC, de 1 de Junho de 2004 a 31 de Dezembro de 2006. Analisaram-se 76 doentes com uma idade média de 62,88 (18,75 anos. O APACHE II médio de 24,88 (9,75 e o SAPS 2 médio era de 51,18 (18,05, com mortalidade prevista de 47,27%. O microrganismo responsável foi identificado em 42,1% dos casos. O agente etiológico mais comum foi o Streptococcus pneumoniae, mas o grupo de agentes etiológicos mais frequentemente identificados foi o dos bacilos entéricos gramnegativos. A antibioterapia prévia mais usada foi a levofloxacina. O esquema de antibioterapia mais usado na admissão foi a associação ceftriaxone com azitromicina. Em 32 doentes em que foi possível avaliar a adequação terapêutica, 27 estavam sob esquemas de antibioterapia adequados. Foram submetidos a ventilação mecânica 66 doentes (86,8%, com uma duração mediana de 4 dias. A demora mediana foi de 5,3 dias. A mortalidade na unidade foi de 36,8% e a hospitalar de 55,26%. O índice SAPS 2, o valor de PCR, o potássio sérico e a antibioterapia inicial não adequada relacionaram-se com maior mortalidade. Após análise multivariada, apenas o índice SAPS II manteve significado estatístico. O uso da antibioterapia deve ser criterioso, tendo em conta os principais agentes e a sua susceptibilidade.Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is the leading cause of sepsis in adult critical care. We present a retrospective study of patients admitted to a polyvalent intensive care unit with CAP from 1st June 2004 - 31st December 2006. We analysed 76 patients with a mean age of 62.88 (18.75 years. Mean APACHE II score was 24.88 (9

  14. Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children Caused by Pneumococci of MLSB- and M-Phenotype: Clinical Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya A. Ilenkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The key to effective treatment of a bacterial infection is a rapid and proper selection of antimicrobial therapy. WHO and UNICEF developed the Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Pneumonia and Diarrhoea (GAPPD aimed to elimination of the preventable causes of child death by 2025 by optimizing diagnosis and treatment. The main pneumonia agents are fastidious microorganisms that require special nutrient media and cultivation conditions that are absent in many laboratories. Due to low effectiveness of the etiological diagnosis, the choice of antibiotic therapy for pneumonia in the practice of a pediatrician is usually empirical. The article describes clinical cases of community-acquired pneumonia in children caused by strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae with a multiple antibiotic resistance. The above experience can be used by pediatricians in everyday practice.

  15. Computed tomography findings of community-acquired Stenotrophomonas Maltophilia pneumonia in an immunocompetent patient: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Yoon Ki; Kim, Jeung Sook; Park, Seong Yeon; Oh, Jin Young; Kwon, Jae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S. maltophilia) is a rare, but globally emerging gram-negative multiple-drug-resistant organism usually found in a nosocomial setting in immunocompromised patients. To our best knowledge, computed tomography (CT) features of community-acquired S. maltophilia pneumonia have not been previously reported in an immunocompetent patient. Herein, we presented the CT findings of a previous healthy 56-year-old male with S. maltophilia pneumonia

  16. Computed tomography findings of community-acquired Stenotrophomonas Maltophilia pneumonia in an immunocompetent patient: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Yoon Ki; Kim, Jeung Sook; Park, Seong Yeon; Oh, Jin Young; Kwon, Jae Hyun [Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S. maltophilia) is a rare, but globally emerging gram-negative multiple-drug-resistant organism usually found in a nosocomial setting in immunocompromised patients. To our best knowledge, computed tomography (CT) features of community-acquired S. maltophilia pneumonia have not been previously reported in an immunocompetent patient. Herein, we presented the CT findings of a previous healthy 56-year-old male with S. maltophilia pneumonia.

  17. Community-acquired pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in critically-ill patients: systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Nuria Carballo; Marta de Antonio-Cuscó; Daniel Echeverría-Esnal; Sonia Luque; Esther Salas; Santiago Grau

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Despite methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) having often been associated with nosocomial pneumonia, the condition of some MRSA CAP patients is severe enough to warrant their being admitted to ICU. Objective: The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic review of the literature on antibiotic treatment of MRSA CAP in critically-ill patients. Material and methods: ...

  18. Ceftaroline Fosamil for the Treatment of Community-Acquired Pneumonia: from FOCUS to CAPTURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreno, Joseph J; Lodise, Thomas P

    2014-12-01

    Ceftaroline fosamil (ceftaroline hereafter) is the latest addition to the armamentarium for the treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). It is currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP), which is a recent FDA indication that centers on individuals with documented bacterial pneumonias that arise in the community setting. The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss the major findings from the Phase III CAP clinical trials as well as the clinical experience with ceftaroline among patients with CAP in the "Ceftaroline Assessment Program and Teflaro(®) Utilization Registry" (CAPTURE). In its two Phase III CAP trials, ceftaroline was compared to ceftriaxone among adults with radiographically confirmed CAP requiring hospitalization who were classified as Pneumonia Outcomes Research Team (PORT) risk class III or IV. Among patients with CAP, clinical success at test of cure was 84.3% vs 77.7% (difference 6.6%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6-11.8%) in those treated with ceftaroline and ceftriaxone, respectively, across the two Phase III clinical trials. Among patients with a culture-confirmed CABP, day 4 response rates were numerically higher, albeit non-significant, among patients that received ceftaroline vs. ceftriaxone (69.5% for ceftaroline vs. 59.4% for ceftriaxone, difference 10.1%, 95% CI, -0.6% to 20.6%). The efficacy of ceftaroline is supported by real-world observational data from CAPTURE for patients with both CAP and CABP. In addition, the CAPTURE program afforded an opportunity to assess the outcomes of patients who were excluded or limited in the original Phase III trials in a non-comparative fashion. These underrepresented patient populations with CAP included: patients that received prior antibiotics, patients in the ICU, patients with severe renal dysfunction, and those with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from respiratory or

  19. Racial variations in processes of care for patients with community-acquired pneumonia

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    Whittle Jeff

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients hospitalized with community acquired pneumonia (CAP have a substantial risk of death, but there is evidence that adherence to certain processes of care, including antibiotic administration within 8 hours, can decrease this risk. Although national mortality data shows blacks have a substantially increased odds of death due to pneumonia as compared to whites previous studies of short-term mortality have found decreased mortality for blacks. Therefore we examined pneumonia-related processes of care and short-term mortality in a population of patients hospitalized with CAP. Methods We reviewed the records of all identified Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized for pneumonia between 10/1/1998 and 9/30/1999 at one of 101 Pennsylvania hospitals, and randomly selected 60 patients at each hospital for inclusion. We reviewed the medical records to gather process measures of quality, pneumonia severity and demographics. We used Medicare administrative data to identify 30-day mortality. Because only a small proportion of the study population was black, we included all 240 black patients and randomly selected 720 white patients matched on age and gender. We performed a resampling of the white patients 10 times. Results Males were 43% of the cohort, and the median age was 76 years. After controlling for potential confounders, blacks were less likely to receive antibiotics within 8 hours (odds ratio with 95% confidence interval 0.6, 0.4–0.97, but were as likely as whites to have blood cultures obtained prior to receiving antibiotics (0.7, 0.3–1.5, to have oxygenation assessed within 24 hours of presentation (1.6, 0.9–3.0, and to receive guideline concordant antibiotics (OR 0.9, 0.6–1.7. Black patients had a trend towards decreased 30-day mortality (0.4, 0.2 to 1.0. Conclusion Although blacks were less likely to receive optimal care, our findings are consistent with other studies that suggest better risk-adjusted survival

  20. Hospital acquired pneumonia is linked to right hemispheric peri-insular stroke.

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    André Kemmling

    Full Text Available Hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP is a major complication of stroke. We sought to determine associations between infarction of specific brain regions and HAP.215 consecutive acute stroke patients with HAP (2003-2009 were carefully matched with 215 non-pneumonia controls by gender, then NIHSS, then age. Admission imaging and binary masks of infarction were registered to MNI-152 space. Regional atlas and voxel-based log-odds were calculated to assess the relationship between infarct location and the likelihood of HAP. An independently validated penalized conditional logistic regression model was used to identify HAP associated imaging regions.The HAP and control patients were well matched by gender (100%, age (95% within 5-years, NIHSS (98% within 1-point, infarct size, dysphagia, and six other clinical variables. Right hemispheric infarcts were more frequent in patients with HAP versus controls (43.3% vs. 34.0%, p = 0.054, whereas left hemispheric infarcts were more frequent in controls (56.7% vs. 44.7%, p = 0.012; there was no significant difference between groups in the rate of brainstem strokes (p = 1.0. Of the 10 most infarcted regions, only right insular cortex volume was different in HAP versus controls (20 vs. 12 ml, p = 0.02. In univariate analyses, the highest log-odds regions for pneumonia were right hemisphere, cerebellum, and brainstem. The best performing multivariate model selected 7 brain regions of infarction and 2 infarct volume-based variables independently associated with HAP.HAP is associated with right hemispheric peri-insular stroke. These associations may be related to autonomic modulation of immune mechanisms, supporting recent hypotheses of stroke mediated immune suppression.

  1. Hospital-acquired pneumonia after lung resection surgery is associated with characteristic cytokine gene expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    White, Mary

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Infection in humans has been linked with altered cytokine gene transcription. It is unclear whether this phenomenon is a consequence of an established disease process or precedes the infective process. The primary end point of this study was to determine whether hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) was associated with differential gene expression of interferon (IFN)-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and IL-23p19. The secondary end point was to identify whether alteration in gene expression preceded the clinical onset of infection. METHODS: Sixty consecutive patients undergoing elective thoracic surgery were recruited. HAP was diagnosed as per National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance guidelines. Messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels were analyzed preoperatively and 24 h and 5 days postoperatively. RESULTS: Forty-one patients had an uncomplicated recovery. Nineteen patients developed HAP. IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p35, IL-23p19, IL-27p28, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma mRNA and protein levels of IL-6, IL-23, and IFN-gamma in peripheral blood leukocytes were analyzed before surgery and 24 h and 5 days postsurgery. IL-23p19 mRNA levels were reduced in the pneumonia group (median, 4.19; 10th-90th centile range, 3.90-4.71) compared with the nonpneumonia group (4.50; 3.85-5.32) day 1 postsurgery (P=02). IFN-gamma mRNA levels were reduced in the pneumonia group (2.48; 1.20-3.20) compared with nonpneumonia group (2.81; 2.10-3.26) (P=03) day 5 postsurgery. Results are expressed as log to base 10 copy numbers of cytokine mRNA per 10 million beta-actin mRNA copy numbers. All values are given as median and 10th to 90th centile range. CONCLUSIONS: Cytokine gene expression is altered immediately following surgery in patients with postoperative HAP.

  2. Outcomes in elderly Danish citizens admitted with community-acquired pneumonia. Regional differences, in a public healthcare system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard Klausen, Henrik; Petersen, J; Lindhardt, T

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate regional differences in and risk factors for admission, length of stay, mortality, and readmission for community-acquired pneumonia in elderly Danish patients. METHODS: National registry study on elderly Danish citizens with an acute admission in 2009 owing to community....... RESULTS: A total of 11,332 elderly citizens were admitted with community-acquired pneumonia. Mortality during admission and 30-days from discharge were 11.6% and 16.2%, respectively. Readmission rates within 30 days of discharge were 12.3%. There were significantly differences between hospitals in length...

  3. Usefulness of Plasma YKL-40 in Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Severity in Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Ling Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasma YKL-40 level has been reported as playing a significant role in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. However, the correlation between plasma level of YKL-40 and the severity of CAP has not been reported. This study identifies the relationship between plasma level changes of the YKL-40 gene in adult patients hospitalized with CAP. The ELISA was used to measure the plasma YKL-40 level from 61 adult CAP patients before and after antibiotic treatment and from 60 healthy controls. The plasma YKL-40 levels were significantly increased in patients with CAP compared to normal controls. Moreover, the plasma concentration of YKL-40 correlated with the severity of CAP based on the pneumonia severity index (PSI score (r = 0.630, p < 0.001, the CURB-65 (confusion, uremia, respiratory rate, BP, age 65 years score (r = 0.640, p < 0.001, the Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II score (r = 0.539, p < 0.001 and length of hospital stay (r = 0.321, p = 0.011, respectively. In conclusion, plasma YKL-40 may play a role in the diagnosis and clinical assessment of CAP severity, which could potentially guide the development of treatment strategies.

  4. Predictors of Mortality for Nursing Home-Acquired Pneumonia: A Systematic Review

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    Naveen Dhawan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Current risk stratification tools, primarily used for CAP, are suboptimal in predicting nursing home acquired pneumonia (NHAP outcome and mortality. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate current evidence on the usefulness of proposed predictors of NHAP mortality. Methods. PubMed (MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases were searched for articles published in English between January 1978 and January 2014. The literature search elicited a total of 666 references; 580 were excluded and 20 articles met the inclusion criteria for the final analysis. Results. More studies supported the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI as a superior predictor of NHAP severity. Fewer studies suggested CURB-65 and SOAR (especially for the need of ICU care as useful predictors for NHAP mortality. There is weak evidence for biomarkers like C-reactive protein and copeptin as prognostic tools. Conclusion. The evidence supports the use of PSI as the best available indicator while CURB-65 may be an alternative prognostic indicator for NHAP mortality. Overall, due to the paucity of information, biomarkers may not be as effective in this role. Larger prospective studies are needed to establish the most effective predictor(s or combination scheme to help clinicians in decision-making related to NHAP mortality.

  5. Risk factors associated with potentially antibiotic-resistant pathogens in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prina, Elena; Ranzani, Otavio T; Polverino, Eva; Cillóniz, Catia; Ferrer, Miquel; Fernandez, Laia; Puig de la Bellacasa, Jorge; Menéndez, Rosario; Mensa, Josep; Torres, Antoni

    2015-02-01

    To identify pathogens that require different treatments in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), we propose an acronym, "PES" (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacteriaceae extended-spectrum β-lactamase-positive, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus). To compare the clinical characteristics and outcomes between patients with CAP caused by PES versus other pathogens, and to identify the risk factors associated with infection caused by PES. We conducted an observational prospective study evaluating only immunocompetent patients with CAP and an established etiological diagnosis. We included patients from nursing homes. We computed a score to identify patients at risk of PES pathogens. Of the 4,549 patients evaluated, we analyzed 1,597 who presented an etiological diagnosis. Pneumonia caused by PES was identified in 94 (6%) patients, with 108 PES pathogens isolated (n = 72 P. aeruginosa, n = 15 Enterobacteriaceae extended-spectrum β-lactamase positive, and n = 21 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus). These patients were older (P = 0.001), had received prior antibiotic treatment more frequently (P associated with increased risk of 30-day mortality (adjusted odds ratio = 2.51; 95% confidence interval = 1.20-5.25; P = 0.015). The area under the curve for the score we computed was 0.759 (95% confidence interval, 0.713-0.806; P risk factors could help to identify these microbial etiologies.

  6. Nationwide survey on the 2005 Guidelines for the Management of Community-Acquired Adult Pneumonia: validation of differentiation between bacterial pneumonia and atypical pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Akira; Goto, Hajime; Kohno, Shigeru; Matsushima, Toshiharu; Abe, Shosaku; Aoki, Nobuki; Shimokata, Kaoru; Mikasa, Keiichi; Niki, Yoshihito

    2012-03-01

    The Japanese Respiratory Society Guidelines for the Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) in Adults (JRS 2005) was published as a revision of the Basic Concept for the Management of CAP in Adults (JRS 2000). To evaluate the JRS 2005 criteria for differentiating between disease types and assessing the status of antimicrobial agent use in initial treatment, we conducted a prospective survey. The survey was conducted from July 2006 to March 2007 as a nationwide joint study by 200 institutions. The study subjects included patients aged ≥16 years of age who had CAP, and patients who met the inclusion criteria were consecutively enrolled. Disease type differentiation based on JRS 2005 and JRS 2000 was conducted. Disease type diagnosis was also performed based on test results. The sensitivity and specificity of disease type differentiation were calculated. The antimicrobial agents used in the initial treatment were classified as recommended or non-recommended based on JRS 2005. The validity of non-recommended antimicrobial agent use was investigated. A total of 1875 patients were analyzed. Differentiation of atypical pneumonia using the JRS 2005 criteria had higher sensitivity and lower specificity than differentiation using the JRS 2000 criteria. The antimicrobial agents recommended by JRS 2005 were used as initial treatment in a low number of cases. The efficacy of the recommended antimicrobial agents was similar to that of the non-recommended agents. JRS 2005 is advantageous in terms of reducing the number of items used in disease type differentiation. The recommended antimicrobial agents used for the initial treatment are believed to be appropriate. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Penicillin treatment for patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egelund, Gertrud Baunbæk; Jensen, Andreas Vestergaard; Andersen, Stine Bang

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a severe infection, with high mortality. Antibiotic strategies for CAP differ across Europe. The objective of the study was to describe the epidemiology of CAP in Denmark and evaluate the prognosis of patients empirically treated with penicillin......-G/V monotherapy. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study including hospitalized patients with x-ray confirmed CAP. We calculated the population-based incidence, reviewed types of empiric antibiotics and duration of antibiotic treatment. We evaluated the association between mortality and treatment with empiric...... penicillin-G/V using logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: We included 1320 patients. The incidence of hospitalized CAP was 3.1/1000 inhabitants. Median age was 71 years (IQR; 58-81) and in-hospital mortality was 8%. Median duration of antibiotic treatment was 10 days (IQR; 8-12). In total 45% were treated...

  8. Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Empyema Caused by Citrobacter koseri in an Immunocompetent Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Ariza-Prota

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrobacter species, belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae, are environmental organisms commonly found in soil, water, and the intestinal tracts of animals and humans. Citrobacter koseri is known to be an uncommon but serious cause of both sporadic and epidemic septicemia and meningitis in neonates and young infants. Most cases reported have occurred in immunocompromised hosts. The infections caused by Citrobacter are difficult to treat with usual broad spectrum antibiotics owing to rapid generation of mutants and have been associated with high death rates in the past. We believe this is the first case described in the literature of a community-acquired pneumonia and empyema caused by Citrobacter koseri in an immunocompetent adult patient.

  9. Should International Classification of Diseases codes be used to survey hospital-acquired pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfensberger, A; Meier, A H; Kuster, S P; Mehra, T; Meier, M-T; Sax, H

    2018-05-01

    As surveillance of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) is very resource intensive, alternatives for HAP surveillance are needed urgently. This study compared HAP rates according to routine discharge diagnostic codes of the International Classification of Diseases, 10 th Revision (ICD-10; ICD-HAP) with HAP rates according to the validated surveillance definitions of the Hospitals in Europe Link for Infection Control through Surveillance (HELICS/IPSE; HELICS-HAP) by manual retrospective re-evaluation of patient records. The positive predictive value of ICD-HAP for HELICS-HAP was 0.35, and sensitivity was 0.59. Therefore, the currently available ICD-10-based routine discharge data do not allow reliable identification of patients with HAP. Copyright © 2018 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lung scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer and community-acquired pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivonogov, Nikolay G.; Efimova, Nataliya Y.; Zavadovsky, Konstantin W.; Lishmanov, Yuri B.

    2016-08-01

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy was performed in 39 patients with verified diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in 14 patients with peripheral lung cancer. Ventilation/perfusion ratio, apical-basal gradients of ventilation (U/L(V)) and lung perfusion (U/L(P)), and alveolar capillary permeability of radionuclide aerosol were determined based on scintigraphy data. The study demonstrated that main signs of CAP were increases in ventilation/perfusion ratio, perfusion and ventilation gradient on a side of the diseased lung, and two-side increase in alveolar capillary permeability rate for radionuclide aerosol. Unlike this, scintigraphic signs of peripheral lung cancer comprise an increase in ventilation/perfusion ratio over 1.0 on a side of the diseased lung with its simultaneous decrease on a contralateral side, normal values of perfusion and ventilation gradients of both lungs, and delayed alveolar capillary clearance in the diseased lung compared with the intact lung.

  11. Lung scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer and community-acquired pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivonogov, Nikolay G., E-mail: kng@cardio-tomsk.ru [Research Institute of Cardiology, Kievskaya Street 111a, Tomsk, 634012 (Russian Federation); Efimova, Nataliya Y., E-mail: efimova@cardio-tomsk.ru; Zavadovsky, Konstantin W.; Lishmanov, Yuri B. [Research Institute of Cardiology, Kievskaya Street 111a, Tomsk, 634012 (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-02

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy was performed in 39 patients with verified diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in 14 patients with peripheral lung cancer. Ventilation/perfusion ratio, apical-basal gradients of ventilation (U/L(V)) and lung perfusion (U/L(P)), and alveolar capillary permeability of radionuclide aerosol were determined based on scintigraphy data. The study demonstrated that main signs of CAP were increases in ventilation/perfusion ratio, perfusion and ventilation gradient on a side of the diseased lung, and two-side increase in alveolar capillary permeability rate for radionuclide aerosol. Unlike this, scintigraphic signs of peripheral lung cancer comprise an increase in ventilation/perfusion ratio over 1.0 on a side of the diseased lung with its simultaneous decrease on a contralateral side, normal values of perfusion and ventilation gradients of both lungs, and delayed alveolar capillary clearance in the diseased lung compared with the intact lung.

  12. Community-acquired necrotizing pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus producing Panton–Valentine leukocidin in a Chinese teenager: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first report from Mainland China of necrotizing pneumonia due to PVL-positive CA-MRSA among those aged older than 1 year. CA-MRSA necrotizing pneumonia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of severe community-acquired pneumonia, particularly in previously healthy individuals.

  13. [Pathogen distribution and bacterial resistance in children with severe community-acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yun-Yun; Luo, Rong; Fu, Zhou

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the distribution of pathogens and bacterial resistance in children with severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A total of 522 children with severe CAP who were hospitalized in 2016 were enrolled as study subjects. According to their age, they were divided into infant group (402 infants aged 28 days to 1 year), young children group (73 children aged 1 to 3 years), preschool children group (35 children aged 3 to 6 years), and school-aged children group (12 children aged ≥6 years). According to the onset season, all children were divided into spring group (March to May, 120 children), summer group (June to August, 93 children), autumn group (September to November, 105 children), and winter group (December to February, 204 children). Sputum specimens from the deep airway were collected from all patients. The phoenix-100 automatic bacterial identification system was used for bacterial identification and drug sensitivity test. The direct immunofluorescence assay was used to detect seven common respiratory viruses. The quantitative real-time PCR was used to detect Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT). Of all the 522 children with severe CAP, 419 (80.3%) were found to have pathogens, among whom 190 (45.3%) had mixed infection. A total of 681 strains of pathogens were identified, including 371 bacterial strains (54.5%), 259 viral strains (38.0%), 12 fungal strains (1.8%), 15 MP strains (2.2%), and 24 CT strains (3.5%). There were significant differences in the distribution of bacterial, viral, MP, and fungal infections between different age groups (Presistance rates of Streptococcus pneumoniae to erythromycin, tetracycline, and clindamycin reached above 85%, and the drug-resistance rates of Staphylococcus aureus to penicillin, erythromycin, and clindamycin were above 50%; they were all sensitive to vancomycin and linezolid. The drug-resistance rates of Haemophilus influenzae to cefaclor and cefuroxime were above 60%, but it was

  14. Comorbidities as a driver of the excess costs of community-acquired pneumonia in U.S. commercially-insured working age adults

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    Polsky Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adults with certain comorbid conditions have a higher risk of pneumonia than the overall population. If treatment of pneumonia is more costly in certain predictable situations, this would affect the value proposition of populations for pneumonia prevention. We estimate the economic impact of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP for adults with asthma, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and congestive heart failure (CHF in a large U.S. commercially-insured working age population. Methods Data sources consisted of 2003 through 2007 Thomson Reuters MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters and Thomson Reuters Health Productivity and Management (HPM databases. Pneumonia episodes and selected comorbidities were identified by ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes. By propensity score matching, controls were identified for pneumonia patients. Excess direct medical costs and excess productivity cost were estimated by generalized linear models (GLM. Results We identified 402,831 patients with CAP between 2003 through 2007, with 25,560, 32,677, 16,343, and 5,062 episodes occurring in patients with asthma, diabetes, COPD and CHF, respectively. Mean excess costs (and standard error, SE of CAP were $14,429 (SE=44 overall. Mean excess costs by comorbidity subgroup were lowest for asthma ($13,307 (SE=123, followed by diabetes ($21,395 (SE=171 and COPD ($23,493 (SE=197; mean excess costs were highest for patients with CHF ($34,436 (SE=549. On average, indirect costs comprised 21% of total excess costs, ranging from 8% for CHF patients to 27% for COPD patients. Conclusions Compared to patients without asthma, diabetes, COPD, or CHF, the excess cost of CAP is nearly twice as high for patients with diabetes and COPD and nearly three times as high for patients with CHF. Indirect costs made up a significant but varying portion of excess CAP costs. Returns on prevention of pneumonia would therefore be higher in adults with these comorbidities.

  15. Klebsiella pneumoniae related community-acquired acute lower respiratory infections in Cambodia: Clinical characteristics and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rammaert Blandine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many Asian countries, Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP is the second pathogen responsible for community-acquired pneumonia. Yet, very little is known about KP etiology in ALRI in Cambodia, a country that has one of the weakest medical infrastructures in the region. We present here the first clinico-radiological description of KP community-acquired ALRI in hospitalized Cambodian patients. Methods Through ALRI surveillance in two provincial hospitals, KP was isolated from sputum and blood cultures, and identified by API20E gallery from patients ≥ 5 years-old with fever and respiratory symptoms onset ≤14 days. Antibiotics susceptibility testing was provided systematically to clinicians when bacteria were isolated. We collected patients' clinical, radiological and microbiological data and their outcome 3 months after discharge. We also compared KP-related with other bacteria-related ALRI to determine risk factors for KP infection. Results From April 2007 to December 2009, 2315 ALRI patients ≥ 5 years-old were enrolled including 587 whose bacterial etiology could be assigned. Of these, 47 (8.0% had KP infection; their median age was 55 years and 68.1% were females. Reported prior medication was high (42.5%. Patients' chest radiographs showed pneumonia (61.3% including 39% that were necrotizing, preexisting parenchyma lesions (29.5% and pleural effusions alone (4.5% and normal parenchyma (4.5%. Five patients had severe conditions on admission and one patient died during hospitalization. Of the 39 patients that were hospital discharged, 14 died including 12 within 1 month after discharge. Only 13 patients (28% received an appropriate antibiotherapy. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL - producing strains were found in 8 (17.0% patients. Female gender (Odds ratio (OR 2.1; p = 0.04 and diabetes mellitus (OR 3.1; p = 0.03 were independent risk factors for KP-related ALRI. Conclusions KP ALRI in Cambodia has high fatality rate

  16. Klebsiella pneumoniae related community-acquired acute lower respiratory infections in Cambodia: clinical characteristics and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammaert, Blandine; Goyet, Sophie; Beauté, Julien; Hem, Sopheak; Te, Vantha; Try, Patrich Lorn; Mayaud, Charles; Borand, Laurence; Buchy, Philippe; Guillard, Bertrand; Vong, Sirenda

    2012-01-10

    In many Asian countries, Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP) is the second pathogen responsible for community-acquired pneumonia. Yet, very little is known about KP etiology in ALRI in Cambodia, a country that has one of the weakest medical infrastructures in the region. We present here the first clinico-radiological description of KP community-acquired ALRI in hospitalized Cambodian patients. Through ALRI surveillance in two provincial hospitals, KP was isolated from sputum and blood cultures, and identified by API20E gallery from patients ≥ 5 years-old with fever and respiratory symptoms onset ≤14 days. Antibiotics susceptibility testing was provided systematically to clinicians when bacteria were isolated. We collected patients' clinical, radiological and microbiological data and their outcome 3 months after discharge. We also compared KP-related with other bacteria-related ALRI to determine risk factors for KP infection. From April 2007 to December 2009, 2315 ALRI patients ≥ 5 years-old were enrolled including 587 whose bacterial etiology could be assigned. Of these, 47 (8.0%) had KP infection; their median age was 55 years and 68.1% were females. Reported prior medication was high (42.5%). Patients' chest radiographs showed pneumonia (61.3% including 39% that were necrotizing), preexisting parenchyma lesions (29.5%) and pleural effusions alone (4.5%) and normal parenchyma (4.5%). Five patients had severe conditions on admission and one patient died during hospitalization. Of the 39 patients that were hospital discharged, 14 died including 12 within 1 month after discharge. Only 13 patients (28%) received an appropriate antibiotherapy. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) - producing strains were found in 8 (17.0%) patients. Female gender (Odds ratio (OR) 2.1; p = 0.04) and diabetes mellitus (OR 3.1; p = 0.03) were independent risk factors for KP-related ALRI. KP ALRI in Cambodia has high fatality rate, are more frequently found in women, and should be

  17. Detection of bacteria and viruses in the pleural effusion of children and adults with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimón, José María; Morales, María; Cilla, Gustavo; Vicente, Diego; Pérez-Trallero, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    To study the etiology and the utility of new molecular methods in the diagnosis of complicated pneumonia with empyema. Bacteria and viruses detection was performed by several traditional and molecular methods in the pleural fluid (PF) of 60 patients (38 children) with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Despite prior antimicrobial therapy in 49 (81.7%) CAP patients, an etiological diagnosis could be established in 41 (68.3%), 35 being (58.3%) Streptococcus pneumoniae. PF culture was positive in only 6 patients but each molecular test detected more than 82% of cases. Traditional culture methods have poor diagnostic sensitivity in PF because most CAP patients are under antimicrobial therapy when it is obtained. S. pneumoniae detection by molecular methods highly improves diagnosis.

  18. Radiological findings of community-acquired methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible staphylococcus aureus pediatric pneumonia in Hawaii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdem, Guliz; Bergert, Lora; Len, Kyra; Melish, Marian; Kon, Kevin; DiMauro, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus (CA-SA) infections are common among pediatric patients in Hawaii. We wanted to characterize the radiological features of methicillin-susceptible (CA-MSSA) and methicillin-resistant (CA-MRSA) staphylococcal pneumonia in Hawaiian children. We retrospectively reviewed medical records and imaging studies of children with SA pneumonia identified from 1996 through 2007. Of 40 children, 26 (65%) had CA-MRSA pneumonia and 14 patients (35%) had CA-MSSA pneumonia. CA-MRSA patients were significantly younger than CA-MSSA patients (65% younger than 1 year vs. 36% older). In a majority (62%) of CA-MRSA patients, the consolidation was unilateral; in most of the CA-MSSA cases (79%), the consolidation was bilateral. Fifty percent of the patients with CA-MRSA and 21% of those with CA-MSSA had pneumatoceles (P = 0.1). CA-MRSA patients more commonly had pleural effusions (85% vs. 64% for CA-MSSA) and pleural thickening (50% vs. 36% for CA-MSSA). This case series describes the radiologic characteristics of CA-MRSA and CA-MSSA pneumonia in children in a highly endemic area. We found that CA-MRSA pneumonias are unilateral in a majority of pediatric pneumonia cases, are more common in children 1 year or younger, and have higher rates of complications in comparison to CA-MSSA patients. (orig.)

  19. Radiological findings of community-acquired methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible staphylococcus aureus pediatric pneumonia in Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdem, Guliz; Bergert, Lora; Len, Kyra; Melish, Marian [University of Hawaii, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Honolulu, HI (United States); Kon, Kevin; DiMauro, Robert [Kapiolani Medical Center for Women and Children, Department of Radiology, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus (CA-SA) infections are common among pediatric patients in Hawaii. We wanted to characterize the radiological features of methicillin-susceptible (CA-MSSA) and methicillin-resistant (CA-MRSA) staphylococcal pneumonia in Hawaiian children. We retrospectively reviewed medical records and imaging studies of children with SA pneumonia identified from 1996 through 2007. Of 40 children, 26 (65%) had CA-MRSA pneumonia and 14 patients (35%) had CA-MSSA pneumonia. CA-MRSA patients were significantly younger than CA-MSSA patients (65% younger than 1 year vs. 36% older). In a majority (62%) of CA-MRSA patients, the consolidation was unilateral; in most of the CA-MSSA cases (79%), the consolidation was bilateral. Fifty percent of the patients with CA-MRSA and 21% of those with CA-MSSA had pneumatoceles (P = 0.1). CA-MRSA patients more commonly had pleural effusions (85% vs. 64% for CA-MSSA) and pleural thickening (50% vs. 36% for CA-MSSA). This case series describes the radiologic characteristics of CA-MRSA and CA-MSSA pneumonia in children in a highly endemic area. We found that CA-MRSA pneumonias are unilateral in a majority of pediatric pneumonia cases, are more common in children 1 year or younger, and have higher rates of complications in comparison to CA-MSSA patients. (orig.)

  20. [Effectiveness of the outpatient treatment of the community-acquired pneumonia: systematic review and meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelán-Martínez, Osvaldo Daniel; Hernández-Carbajal, Elizabeth; Contreras-García, Carlos Eduardo; Ojeda-Luna, Nancy Guadalupe; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is an important cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Therefore, our aim was to assess the efficacy and safety of outpatient treatment of community-acquired pneumonia. We systematically reviewed randomized clinical trials evaluating efficacy and safety of outpatient treatment (OPT) compared with inpatient treatment (IPT) of community-acquired pneumonia in patients without added co-morbidity. Relative Risk (RR) and 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) were calculated. From 4088 reviewed articles, two articles were included for meta-analysis, including 2324 patients. One study was conducted in adults, and the other was carried out in pediatric patients. Treatment setting was not significantly associated with treatment failure (RR 0.84 [95% CI 0.68, 1.02]). Death occurred in 6 of 2324 with no difference between the two groups (RR 0.56 [95 % CI 0.12-2.61]). Finally, no differences were seen in hospital readmission between groups (RR 0.82 [95 % CI 0.52-1.30]). Evidence shows that treatment setting of community-acquired pneumonia is not statistically associated with treatment failure or mortality.

  1. Efficacy of a respiratory physiotherapy intervention for intubated and mechanically ventilated adults with community acquired pneumonia: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lee, Lisa; Hill, Anne-Marie; Patman, Shane

    2017-06-01

    The objective of the review is to map evidence on the efficacy of a respiratory physiotherapy intervention for intubated and mechanically ventilated adults with community acquired pneumonia (CAP). Specifically, the review seeks to investigate if respiratory physiotherapy interventions can achieve the following for intubated and mechanically ventilated adults with CAP.

  2. Clinical cure and mortality outcomes with ceftobiprole medocaril versus ceftazidime plus linezolid in patients with early versus late-onset hospital-acquired pneumonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheeren, Thomas; Welte, T.; Capellier, G.; Saulay, Mikal; Engelhardt, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Ceftobiprole, the active moiety of the prodrug ceftobiprole medocaril, is a novel cephalosporin for intravenous use, approved in certain European countries for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) excluding ventilator-associated

  3. Detection of IgM and IgG antibodies to Chlamydophila pneumoniae in pediatric community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surinder Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Chlamydophila pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae is an emerging infectious agent with a spectrum of clinical manifestations including lower and upper respiratory tract infections. Aims: To investigate the role of C. pneumoniae in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs in children using serological tests. Settings and Design: Two hundred children, age 2 months to 12 years, hospitalized for community-acquired LRTIs were investigated for C. pneumoniae etiology. Materials and Methods: We investigated 200 children hospitalized for community-acquired LRTIs, using ELISA for detecting anti-C. pneumoniae IgM and IgG antibodies. The demographic, clinical and radiological findings for C. pneumoniae antibody positive and C. pneumoniae antibody negative cases were compared. Statistical Analysis Used: Data analysis was performed by Chi-square test and Fisher′s exact tests using Epi Info (2002. Results: Clinical and radiological findings in both the groups were comparable. Serological evidence of C. pneumoniae infection was observed in 12 (6% patients; specific IgM antibodies were detected in 11 (91.67%; specific IgG antibodies in 1 (8.33% patients, while 4-fold rise in C. pneumoniae IgG antibody titers were noted in none of the patients. Conclusions: C. pneumoniae has a role in community-acquired LRTIs, even in children aged < 5 years. Serological detection using ELISA would enable pediatricians in better management of C. pneumoniae infections.

  4. Validation of sputum Gram stain for treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and healthcare-associated pneumonia: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Hajime; Yamashiro, Shin; Kinjo, Kiyoshi; Tamaki, Hitoshi; Kishaba, Tomoo

    2014-10-18

    The usefulness of sputum Gram stain in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is controversial. There has been no study to evaluate the diagnostic value of this method in patients with healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of sputum Gram stain in etiological diagnosis and pathogen-targeted antibiotic treatment of CAP and HCAP. We conducted a prospective observational study on hospitalized patients with pneumonia admitted to our hospital from August 2010 to July 2012. Before administering antibiotics on admission, Gram stain was performed and examined by trained physicians immediately after sputum samples were obtained. We analyzed the quality of sputum samples and the diagnostic performance of Gram stain. We also compared pathogen-targeted antibiotic treatment guided by sputum Gram stain with empirical treatment. Of 670 patients with pneumonia, 328 were CAP and 342 were HCAP. Sputum samples were obtained from 591 patients, of these 478 samples were good quality. The sensitivity and specificity of sputum Gram stain were 62.5% and 91.5% for Streptococcus pneumoniae, 60.9% and 95.1% for Haemophilus influenzae, 68.2% and 96.1% for Moraxella catarrhalis, 39.5% and 98.2% for Klebsiella pneumoniae, 22.2% and 99.8% for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 9.1% and 100% for Staphylococcus aureus. The diagnostic yield decreased in patients who had received antibiotics or patients with suspected aspiration pneumonia. Pathogen-targeted treatment provided similar efficacy with a decrease in adverse events compared to empirical treatment. Sputum Gram stain is highly specific for the etiologic diagnosis and useful in guiding pathogen-targeted antibiotic treatment of CAP and HCAP.

  5. Clinical spectrum and diagnostic yields ofMycoplasma pneumoniaeas a causative agent of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Saroj; Chaudhry, Rama; Dhawan, Benu; Dey, Aparajit Ballav; Kabra, Sushil Kumar; Das, Bimal Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Infection with Mycoplasma pneumoniae ( M. pneumonia ) occurs worldwide which accounts for 15%-20% of cases of community-acquired pneumonia and indistinguishable clinically from other infectious causes of pneumonia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and to correlate it with other diagnostic methods such as culture, serology (ELISA), and conventional PCR along with the clinical signs and symptoms produced by M. pneumonia . A total of 130 patients of all age groups presenting with clinical features of lower respiratory tract infections were enrolled over a period of 1 year and 2 months in a tertiary care hospital in Delhi. M. pneumoni ae in throat swab samples was detected by real-time PCR, compared with culture, serology, conventional PCR, and clinical signs and symptoms. Univariate analyses were conducted to determine the association of M. pneumoniae infection among different categories of patients. Out of a total of 130 patients, 18 patients (14%) were positive for M. pneumoniae by any test; culture was positive in nine patients (50%), serology (IgM) in eight patients (44.4%), PCR in five patients (27.7%), and real-time PCR was positive in six patients (33.3%). Clinical signs and symptoms were higher in incidence in M. pneumoniae -positive patients. Age-matched healthy controls (30) were included in the study, and all were negative for any diagnostic test performed ( P = 0.026). It was concluded that combination of M. pneumoniae -specific testing modalities is required for the diagnosis of this etiological agent rather than a single diagnostic method.

  6. Assessment of ceftaroline fosamil in the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia due to Streptococcus pneumoniae: insights from two randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorr, Andrew F; Kollef, Marin; Eckburg, Paul B; Llorens, Lily; Friedland, H David

    2013-03-01

    Ceftaroline fosamil resulted in higher cure rates than ceftriaxone in patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in 2 randomized trials (FOCUS 1 and FOCUS 2). The present analysis examines the subgroup of patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae infection to determine whether the apparent difference in cure rates persists after adjusting for potential covariates. We retrospectively pooled subjects with S. pneumoniae isolated at baseline in the original studies and employed logistic regression to evaluate the independent relationship between clinical cure and treatment with ceftaroline. Covariates evaluated included demographics, severity of illness, bacteremia, and pathogen characteristics. The final cohort included 139 subjects (69 ceftaroline, 70 ceftriaxone). Unadjusted cure rates were 85.5% and 68.6% (P = 0.009) in the ceftaroline and ceftriaxone groups, respectively. After logistic regression, ceftaroline remained associated with higher cure rates. Our findings indicate that ceftaroline may result in improved outcomes of S. pneumoniae pneumonia. Formal clinical trials are warranted to confirm this hypothesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Hospitalization among Children with Neurologic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millman, Alexander J; Finelli, Lyn; Bramley, Anna M; Peacock, Georgina; Williams, Derek J; Arnold, Sandra R; Grijalva, Carlos G; Anderson, Evan J; McCullers, Jonathan A; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T; Edwards, Kathryn M; Jain, Seema

    2016-06-01

    To describe and compare the clinical characteristics, outcomes, and etiology of pneumonia among children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with neurologic disorders, non-neurologic underlying conditions, and no underlying conditions. Children <18 years old hospitalized with clinical and radiographic CAP were enrolled at 3 US children's hospitals. Neurologic disorders included cerebral palsy, developmental delay, Down syndrome, epilepsy, non-Down syndrome chromosomal abnormalities, and spinal cord abnormalities. We compared the epidemiology, etiology, and clinical outcomes of CAP in children with neurologic disorders with those with non-neurologic underlying conditions, and those with no underlying conditions using bivariate, age-stratified, and multivariate logistic regression analyses. From January 2010-June 2012, 2358 children with radiographically confirmed CAP were enrolled; 280 (11.9%) had a neurologic disorder (52.1% of these individuals also had non-neurologic underlying conditions), 934 (39.6%) had non-neurologic underlying conditions only, and 1144 (48.5%) had no underlying conditions. Children with neurologic disorders were older and more likely to require intensive care unit (ICU) admission than children with non-neurologic underlying conditions and children with no underlying conditions; similar proportions were mechanically ventilated. In age-stratified analysis, children with neurologic disorders were less likely to have a pathogen detected than children with non-neurologic underlying conditions. In multivariate analysis, having a neurologic disorder was associated with ICU admission for children ≥2 years of age. Children with neurologic disorders hospitalized with CAP were less likely to have a pathogen detected and more likely to be admitted to the ICU than children without neurologic disorders. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Relationship Between Body Mass Index and Outcomes Among Hospitalized Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramley, Anna M; Reed, Carrie; Finelli, Lyn; Self, Wesley H; Ampofo, Krow; Arnold, Sandra R; Williams, Derek J; Grijalva, Carlos G; Anderson, Evan J; Stockmann, Chris; Trabue, Christopher; Fakhran, Sherene; Balk, Robert; McCullers, Jonathan A; Pavia, Andrew T; Edwards, Kathryn M; Wunderink, Richard G; Jain, Seema

    2017-06-15

    The effect of body mass index (BMI) on community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) severity is unclear. We investigated the relationship between BMI and CAP outcomes (hospital length of stay [LOS], intensive care unit [ICU] admission, and invasive mechanical ventilation) in hospitalized CAP patients from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study, adjusting for age, demographics, underlying conditions, and smoking status (adults only). Compared with normal-weight children, odds of ICU admission were higher in children who were overweight (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.8) or obese (aOR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.4-3.2), and odds of mechanical ventilation were higher in children with obesity (aOR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.3-5.6). When stratified by asthma (presence/absence), these findings remained significant only in children with asthma. Compared with normal-weight adults, odds of LOS >3 days were higher in adults who were underweight (aOR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1-2.4), and odds of mechanical ventilation were lowest in adults who were overweight (aOR, 0.5; 95% CI, .3-.9). Children who were overweight or obese, particularly those with asthma, had higher odds of ICU admission or mechanical ventilation. In contrast, adults who were underweight had longer LOS. These results underscore the complex relationship between BMI and CAP outcomes. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Incidence and potential risk factors for hospital-acquired pneumonia in an emergency department of surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlund, Marie; Sjödahl, Rune; Pia Yngman-Uhlin, R N

    2017-04-01

    Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) is associated with high mortality and is the second most common nosocomial infection. The aim of this study was to calculate the incidence and to identify potential risk factors for HAP in an emergency ward for surgical patients admitted because of acute abdomen or trauma. A structured review of medical records was conducted. Patients diagnosed with pneumonia >48 h after admittance, were compared with a randomly chosen age-matched reference group. Ten variables judged as potential risk factors for HAP were studied in 90 patients. An emergency ward for surgical patients with acute abdomen or trauma at an Univerity hospital in Sweden. A total of 90 patients with HAP and 120 age-matched controls were included. Risk factors for HAP in patients at a surgical clinic. Of a total of 10 335 admitted patients, during 4.5 years the hospital stay was longer than 48 h in 4961 patients. Of these 90 (1.8%) fulfilled the strict criteria for HAP. Potential risk factors were suspected or verified aspiration (odds ratio (OR): 23.9) that was 2-fold higher than immobilization (OR: 11.2). Further, chronic pulmonary obstructive disease (COPD)/asthma, abdominal surgery and gastric retention/vomiting were risk factors for HAP. Verified or suspected aspiration was the dominating risk factor for HAP but also immobilization was frequently associated with HAP. Various established preventive measures should be implemented in the nursing care to reduce the frequency of HAP. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Cardiovascular Complications and Short-term Mortality Risk in Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violi, Francesco; Cangemi, Roberto; Falcone, Marco; Taliani, Gloria; Pieralli, Filippo; Vannucchi, Vieri; Nozzoli, Carlo; Venditti, Mario; Chirinos, Julio A; Corrales-Medina, Vicente F

    2017-06-01

    Previous reports suggest that community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with an enhanced risk of cardiovascular complications. However, a contemporary and comprehensive characterization of this association is lacking. In this multicenter study, 1182 patients hospitalized for CAP were prospectively followed for up to 30 days after their hospitalization for this infection. Study endpoints included myocardial infarction, new or worsening heart failure, atrial fibrillation, stroke, deep venous thrombosis, cardiovascular death, and total mortality. Three hundred eighty (32.2%) patients experienced intrahospital cardiovascular events (CVEs) including 281 (23.8%) with heart failure, 109 (9.2%) with atrial fibrillation, 89 (8%) with myocardial infarction, 11 (0.9%) with ischemic stroke, and 1 (0.1%) with deep venous thrombosis; 28 patients (2.4%) died for cardiovascular causes. Multivariable Cox regression analysis showed that intrahospital Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) class (hazard ratio [HR], 2.45, P = .027; HR, 4.23, P < .001; HR, 5.96, P < .001, for classes III, IV, and V vs II, respectively), age (HR, 1.02, P = .001), and preexisting heart failure (HR, 1.85, P < .001) independently predicted CVEs. One hundred three (8.7%) patients died by day 30 postadmission. Thirty-day mortality was significantly higher in patients who developed CVEs compared with those who did not (17.6% vs 4.5%, P < .001). Multivariable Cox regression analysis showed that intrahospital CVEs (HR, 5.49, P < .001) independently predicted 30-day mortality (after adjustment for age, PSI score, and preexisting comorbid conditions). CVEs, mainly those confined to the heart, complicate the course of almost one-third of patients hospitalized for CAP. More importantly, the occurrence of CVEs is associated with a 5-fold increase in CAP-associated 30-day mortality. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For

  11. Economic burden of community-acquired pneumonia among elderly patients: a Japanese perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konomura, Keiko; Nagai, Hideaki; Akazawa, Manabu

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the economic burden of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) among elderly patients in Japan. In addition, the study evaluated the relationship between total treatment cost and CAP risk factors. An administrative database was searched for elderly patients (≥ 65 years old) who had pneumonia (ICD-10 code: J12-J18) and an antibiotic prescription between 1 June 2014 and 31 May 2015. The all-cause total healthcare costs of outpatient and inpatient CAP episodes were calculated. This study evaluated data from 29,619 patients with CAP who experienced 14,450 outpatient CAP episodes and/or 20,314 inpatient CAP episodes. The mean ages were 77.5 ± 8.0 years and 81.5 ± 8.2 years among the outpatient and inpatient groups, respectively. The median treatment costs were US$346 (interquartile range: $195-551) per outpatient episode and US$4851 (interquartile range: $3313-7669) per inpatient episode. More severe cases had increased treatment costs at the treating hospitals. Male sex, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and liver dysfunction were associated with increased total treatment costs, while dementia, dialysis, and rheumatism were associated with high costs of treating a CAP episode. The economic burden of CAP might be decreased by reducing the number of hospitalizations for mild CAP and the incidence of severe CAP. Therefore, preventative care (e.g. oral hygiene or pneumococcus vaccination) is recommended for patients with related risk factors, such as male sex, older age, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, liver dysfunction, rheumatism, dementia, or dialysis.

  12. Nebulized Versus IV Amikacin as Adjunctive Antibiotic for Hospital and Ventilator-Acquired Pneumonia Postcardiac Surgeries: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Nehal A; Awdallah, Faten Farid; Abbassi, Maggie M; Sabry, Nirmeen A

    2018-01-01

    Nebulized antibiotics offer high efficacy due to significant local concentrations and safety with minimal blood levels. This study evaluates the efficacy and nephrotoxicity of nebulized versus IV amikacin in postcardiothoracic surgical patients with nosocomial pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant Gram- negative bacilli. Prospective, randomized, controlled study on surgical patients divided into two groups. Postcardiac surgery ICU. The first gtroup was administered IV amikacin 20 mg/kg once daily. The second group was prescribed amikacin nebulizer 400 mg twice daily. Both groups were co-administered IV piperacillin/tazobactam empirically. Recruited patients were diagnosed by either hospital-acquired pneumonia or ventilator-associated pneumonia where 56 (42.1%) patients were diagnosed with hospital-acquired pneumonia, 51 (38.34%) patients were diagnosed with early ventilator-associated pneumonia, and 26 (19.54%) patients with late ventilator-associated pneumonia. Clinical cure in both groups assessed on day 7 of treatment was the primary outcome. Efficacy was additionally evaluated through assessing the length of hospital stay, ICU stay, days on amikacin, days on mechanical ventilator, mechanical ventilator-free days, days to reach clinical cure, and mortality rate. Lower nephrotoxicity in the nebulized group was observed through significant preservation of kidney function (p < 0.001). Although both groups were comparable regarding length of hospital stay, nebulizer group showed shorter ICU stay (p = 0.010), lower number of days to reach complete clinical cure (p = 0.001), fewer days on mechanical ventilator (p = 0.035), and fewer days on amikacin treatment (p = 0.022). Nebulized amikacin showed better clinical cure rates, less ICU stay, and fewer days to reach complete recovery compared to IV amikacin for surgical patients with nosocomial pneumonia. It is also a less nephrotoxic option associated with less deterioration in kidney function.

  13. Community-acquired pneumonia in Chile: the clinical relevance in the detection of viruses and atypical bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchsinger, Vivian; Ruiz, Mauricio; Zunino, Enna; Martínez, María Angélica; Machado, Clarisse; Piedra, Pedro A; Fasce, Rodrigo; Ulloa, María Teresa; Fink, Maria Cristina; Lara, Pamela; Gebauer, Mónica; Chávez, Fernando; Avendaño, Luis F

    2013-11-01

    Adult community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a relevant worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality, however the aetiology often remains uncertain and the therapy is empirical. We applied conventional and molecular diagnostics to identify viruses and atypical bacteria associated with CAP in Chile. We used sputum and blood cultures, IgG/IgM serology and molecular diagnostic techniques (PCR, reverse transcriptase PCR) for detection of classical and atypical bacteria (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumoniae) and respiratory viruses (adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus, influenza virus, parainfluenzavirus, rhinovirus, coronavirus) in adults >18 years old presenting with CAP in Santiago from February 2005 to September 2007. Severity was qualified at admission by Fine's pneumonia severity index. Overall detection in 356 enrolled adults were 92 (26%) cases of a single bacterial pathogen, 80 (22%) cases of a single viral pathogen, 60 (17%) cases with mixed bacterial and viral infection and 124 (35%) cases with no identified pathogen. Streptococcus pneumoniae and RSV were the most common bacterial and viral pathogens identified. Infectious agent detection by PCR provided greater sensitivity than conventional techniques. To our surprise, no relationship was observed between clinical severity and sole or coinfections. The use of molecular diagnostics expanded the detection of viruses and atypical bacteria in adults with CAP, as unique or coinfections. Clinical severity and outcome were independent of the aetiological agents detected.

  14. Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a physical exam, and lab tests to diagnose pneumonia. Treatment depends on what kind you have. If bacteria are the cause, antibiotics should help. If you have viral pneumonia, your doctor may prescribe an antiviral medicine to ...

  15. Exame do escarro no manejo clínico dos pacientes com pneumonia adquirida na comunidade Sputum examination in the clinical management of community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Gilberto Haas Signori

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este estudo retrospectivo avaliou a freqüência do uso da bacteriologia do escarro no manejo clínico de pacientes com pneumonia adquirida na comunidade (PAC em um hospital geral, e se a utilização deste método modificou a mortalidade. MÉTODOS: Os prontuários de pacientes internados no Hospital Nossa Senhora da Conceição, em Porto Alegre (RS Brasil, para tratamento de PAC entre maio e novembro de 2004 foram revisados quanto aos seguintes aspectos: idade; sexo; gravidade da pneumonia (escore de Fine; presença de expectoração; bacteriologia do escarro; história de tratamento; resposta clínica; troca de tratamento; e mortalidade. RESULTADOS: Foram avaliados 274 pacientes com PAC, sendo 134 do sexo masculino. Dentre os 274 pacientes, 79 (28,8% apresentavam, de acordo com o escore de Fine, classe II; 45 (16,4%, classe III; 97 (35,4%, classe IV; e 53 (19,3%, classe V. Em 92 pacientes (33,6%, uma amostra de escarro foi colhida para exame bacteriológico. Obtivemos amostra válida em 37 casos (13,5% e diagnóstico etiológico em 26 (9,5%, o que resultou em modificação do tratamento em apenas 9 casos (3,3%. A mortalidade geral foi 18,6%. Idade acima de 65 anos, a gravidade da PAC e a ausência de escarro associaram-se à maior mortalidade. A bacteriologia do escarro não influenciou o desfecho clínico, nem a taxa de mortalidade. CONCLUSÃO: O exame do escarro foi uma ferramenta diagnóstica utilizada na minoria dos pacientes, e não trouxe benefício detectável no manejo clínico dos pacientes com PAC tratados em ambiente hospitalar.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of the use of sputum examination in the clinical management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP in a general hospital and to determine whether its use has an impact on mortality. METHODS: The medical records of CAP patients treated as inpatients between May and November of 2004 at the Nossa Senhora da Conceição Hospital, located in Porto Alegre, Brazil, were

  16. Spotlight on solithromycin in the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia: design, development, and potential place in therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Bryan J; Surani, Salim; Deol, Harmeet S; Mbadugha, Uche J; Udeani, George

    2017-01-01

    Community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) is a leading cause of death worldwide. However, antibacterial agents used to treat common pathogens in CABP are marked by adverse drug events and increasing antimicrobial resistance. Solithromycin is a new ketolide antibiotic, based on the macrolide antibiotic structure, being studied for use in CABP. It has efficacy in vitro against the common causative pathogens in CABP including Streptococcus pneumoniae , Haemophilus influenzae , and atypical pathogens. In Phase II and Phase III clinical trials, it has been demonstrated efficacious as a single agent for treatment of CABP with an apparently milder adverse event profile than alternative agents.

  17. Drug-resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates among Spanish middle aged and older adults with community-acquired pneumonia

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    Raga-Luria Xavier

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumococcal diseases remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Updated data on drug-resistance from different populations may be important to recognize changes in disease patterns. This study assessed current levels of penicilin resistance among Streptococcus Pneumoniae causing pneumonia in Spanish middle age and older adults. Methods Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested for 104 consecutive isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae recovered from patients 50 years or older with radiographically confirmed pneumonia in the region of Tarragona (Spain between 2002 and 2007. According to the minimum inhibitory concentration of tested antimicrobials (penicillin, erythromycin, cefotaxime and levofloxacin strains were classified as susceptible or resistant. Antimicrobial resistance was determined for early cases (2002–2004 and contemporary cases (2005–2007. Results Twenty-seven (25.9% were penicillin-resistant strains (19 strains with intermediate resistance and 8 strains with high resistance. Penicillin-resistance was higher in 2002–2004 than in 2005–2007 (39.5% vs 18.2%, p = 0.017. Of 27 penicillin-resistant strains, 10 (37% were resistant to erythromycin, 8 (29.6% to cefotaxime, 2 (7.4% to levofloxacin, and 4 (14.8% were identified as multidrug resistant. Case-fatality rate was higher among those patients who had an infection caused by any penicillin susceptible strain (16.9% than in those with infections due to penicillin-resistant strains. Conclusion Resistance to penicillin among Streptococcus pneumoniae remains high, but such resistance does not result in increased mortality in patients with pneumococcal pneumonia.

  18. Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and risk of hospitalization with community-acquired pneumonia in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, Binod; Jerrett, Michael; Burnett, Richard T; Marrie, Thomas; Arain, Altaf; Loeb, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the long-term effects of air pollution on pneumonia hospitalization in the elderly. To assess the effect of long-term exposure to ambient nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and fine particulate matter with diameter equal to or smaller than 2.5 microm (PM(2.5)) on hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia in older adults. We used a population-based case-control study in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. We enrolled 345 hospitalized patients aged 65 years or more for community-acquired pneumonia and 494 control participants, aged 65 years and more, randomly selected from the same community as cases from July 2003 to April 2005. Health data were collected by personal interview. Annual average levels of nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and PM(2.5) before the study period were estimated at the residential addresses of participants by inverse distance weighting, bicubic splined and land use regression methods and merged with participants' health data. Long-term exposure to higher levels of nitrogen dioxide and PM(2.5) was significantly associated with hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia (odds ratio [OR], 2.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.25 to 4.21; P = 0.007 and OR, 2.26; 95% CI, 1.20 to 4.24; P = 0.012, respectively, over the 5th-95th percentile range increase of exposure). Sulfur dioxide did not appear to have any association (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.59 to 1.61; P = 0.918). Results were somewhat sensitive to the choice of methods used to estimate air pollutant levels at residential addresses, although all risks from nitrogen dioxide and PM(2.5) exposure were positive and generally significant. In older adults, exposure to ambient nitrogen dioxide and PM(2.5) was associated with hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia.

  19. A worldwide perspective of atypical pathogens in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Forest W; Summersgill, James T; Lajoie, Andrew S; Peyrani, Paula; Marrie, Thomas J; Rossi, Paolo; Blasi, Francesco; Fernandez, Patricia; File, Thomas M; Rello, Jordi; Menendez, Rosario; Marzoratti, Lucia; Luna, Carlos M; Ramirez, Julio A

    2007-05-15

    Controversy still exists in the international literature regarding the need to use antimicrobials covering atypical pathogens when initially treating hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). In different regions of the world, monotherapy with a beta-lactam antimicrobial is common. We sought to correlate the incidence of CAP due to atypical pathogens in different regions of the world with the proportion of patients treated with an atypical regimen in those same regions. In addition, we sought to compare clinical outcomes of patients with CAP treated with and without atypical coverage. A secondary analysis was performed using two comprehensive international databases. World regions were defined as North America (I), Europe (II), Latin America (III), and Asia and Africa (IV). Time to reach clinical stability, length of hospital stay, and mortality were compared between patients treated with and without atypical coverage. The incidence of CAP due to atypical pathogens from 4,337 patients was 22, 28, 21, and 20% in regions I-IV, respectively. The proportion of patients treated with atypical coverage from 2,208 patients was 91, 74, 53, and 10% in regions I-IV, respectively. Patients treated with atypical coverage had decreased time to clinical stability (3.7 vs. 3.2 d, p atypical pathogens and the better outcomes associated with antimicrobial regimens with atypical coverage support empiric therapy for all hospitalized patients with CAP with a regimen that covers atypical pathogens.

  20. [Risk scores for community acquired pneumonia in elderly and geriatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflug, M A; Wesemann, T; Heppner, H J; Thiem, U

    2015-10-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is still an important and serious disease for elderly and geriatric patients. For epidemiological and clinical reasons it is important to collate the frequencies of the various degrees of severity of CAP and to obtain information on the spread and degree of the threat to the various risk groups by CAP. In outpatient treatment a simple to execute prognosis score can be used to objectify the assessment of the clinical status of a patient and to support therapeutic decision-making. For this purpose knowledge of the appropriate instruments should be available to potential users. Since the 1990s a variety of risk scores for stratification of CAP have been developed and evaluated. This article presents the content and value of the available risk scores whereby the advantages and disadvantages of the individual scores are critically compared. Special emphasis is placed on the importance of the risk scores for geriatric patients. At present the decision about outpatient or inpatient treatment is primarily based on the risk score CRB-65. Criteria for intensive care unit admissions are provided by the modified American Thoracic Society (ATS) set of criteria. Overall, risk scores are less reliable for elderly patients than for younger adults. For treatment decisions for the elderly, functional aspects should also be considered in addition to the aspects of risk scores discussed here. In particular, the decision about inpatient admission for elderly, geriatric CAP patients should be made on an individual basis taking the benefit-risk relationship into consideration.

  1. Ceftaroline fosamil for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, Christy; Vazquez, Jose A; Guervil, David J; Ramani, Ananthakrishnan; Jandourek, Alena; Cole, Phillip; Friedland, H David

    2015-01-01

    The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro(®) Utilization Registry (CAPTURE) is a multicenter study evaluating the clinical use of ceftaroline fosamil in patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) or acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection. Data were collected between August 2011 and February 2013, from 398 evaluable patients receiving treatment at 33 sites in the USA. This manuscript presents data collected from patients with CABP who received care in an intensive care unit (ICU) or in general medical wards (35% and 64% of evaluable patients, respectively). The majority of ICU and general medical ward patients had underlying comorbidities (78% and 74%, respectively), with structural lung disease being the most common (42% in the ICU and 40% in general medical wards). Patients admitted to the ICU had a longer duration of stay, a longer duration of symptoms before treatment, and a longer duration of ceftaroline fosamil therapy than did general medical ward patients. Most patients treated in the ICU and in general medical wards were given ceftaroline fosamil as second-line therapy (87% and 80%, respectively). The overall rate of clinical success for patients treated with ceftaroline fosamil was 68% in the ICU and 85% in the general medical wards. Clinical success for patients receiving ceftaroline fosamil as a second-line agent was 84% in the ICU and 86% in general medical wards. These findings indicate that ceftaroline fosamil is a viable treatment option for CABP, both in the ICU and in general medical wards.

  2. Ceftaroline fosamil for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udeani, George; Evans, John; Cole, Phillip; Friedland, H David

    2014-08-01

    The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro Utilization Registry (CAPTURE) is a multicenter study, assessing the contemporary use of ceftaroline fosamil in patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) or acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection. This article discusses the data collected from 528 evaluable patients with CABP, from 39 sites in the United States, between August 2011 and April 2013. The majority of patients (51%) were elderly (aged ≥ 65 years), most of whom were treated in general hospital wards (70%). Approximately one quarter of elderly patients had ≥ 2 comorbidities (26%), the most common of which was structural lung disease (51%). The majority of elderly patients received ceftaroline fosamil as second-line therapy (85%), concurrently with other antibiotics (61%). Similar patterns of ceftaroline fosamil usage were noted in younger patients (aged ceftaroline fosamil was 81% for elderly patients with CABP and 82% for younger patients. These data suggest that ceftaroline fosamil is a potentially effective treatment option for CABP in the elderly.

  3. Managing community acquired pneumonia in the elderly - the next generation of pharmacotherapy on the horizon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalakuhan, B; Echevarria, K L; Restrepo, M I

    2017-08-01

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, especially among the elderly. Antibiotic treatment for CAP in the elderly is particularly challenging for many reasons, including compliance issues, immunosuppression, polypharmacy and antimicrobial resistance. There are few available antibiotics that are able to address these concerns. Areas covered: After a systematic review of the current literature, we describe seven novel antibiotics that are currently in advanced stages of development (phase 3 and beyond) and show promise for the treatment of CAP in those over the age of 65. These antibiotics are: Solithromycin, Pristinamycin, Nemonaxacin, Lefamulin, Omadacycline, Ceftobiprole and Delafloxacin. Using a novel conceptual framework designed by the present authors, known as the 'San Antonio NIPS model', we evaluate their strengths and weaknesses based on their ability to address the unique challenges that face the elderly. Expert opinion: All seven antibiotics have potential value for effective utilization in the elderly, but to varying degrees based on their NIPS model score. The goal of this model is to reorganize a clinician's focus on antibiotic choices in the elderly and bring attention to a seldom discussed topic that may potentially become a health-care crisis in the next decade.

  4. Vitamin D Level and Risk of Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Sepsis

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    Anna J. Jovanovich

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has reported reduced serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD levels is associated with acute infectious illness. The relationship between vitamin D status, measured prior to acute infectious illness, with risk of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and sepsis has not been examined. Community-living individuals hospitalized with CAP or sepsis were age-, sex-, race-, and season-matched with controls. ICD-9 codes identified CAP and sepsis; chest radiograph confirmed CAP. Serum 25(OHD levels were measured up to 15 months prior to hospitalization. Regression models adjusted for diabetes, renal disease, and peripheral vascular disease evaluated the association of 25(OHD levels with CAP or sepsis risk. A total of 132 CAP patients and controls were 60 ± 17 years, 71% female, and 86% Caucasian. The 25(OHD levels <37 nmol/L (adjusted odds ratio (OR 2.57, 95% CI 1.08–6.08 were strongly associated with increased odds of CAP hospitalization. A total of 422 sepsis patients and controls were 65 ± 14 years, 59% female, and 91% Caucasian. The 25(OHD levels <37 nmol/L (adjusted OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.11–2.77 were associated with increased odds of sepsis hospitalization. Vitamin D status was inversely associated with risk of CAP and sepsis hospitalization in a community-living adult population. Further clinical trials are needed to evaluate whether vitamin D supplementation can reduce risk of infections, including CAP and sepsis.

  5. Risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia in adults in Europe: a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Antoni; Peetermans, Willy E; Viegi, Giovanni; Blasi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) causes considerable morbidity and mortality in adults, particularly in the elderly. Methods Structured searches of PubMed were conducted to identify up-to-date information on the incidence of CAP in adults in Europe, as well as data on lifestyle and medical risk factors for CAP. Results The overall annual incidence of CAP in adults ranged between 1.07 to 1.2 per 1000 person-years and 1.54 to 1.7 per 1000 population and increased with age (14 per 1000 person-years in adults aged ≥65 years). Incidence was also higher in men than in women and in patients with chronic respiratory disease or HIV infection. Lifestyle factors associated with an increased risk of CAP included smoking, alcohol abuse, being underweight, having regular contact with children and poor dental hygiene. The presence of comorbid conditions, including chronic respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, cerebrovascular disease, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, dementia, dysphagia, HIV or chronic renal or liver disease all increased the risk of CAP by twofold to fourfold. Conclusion A range of lifestyle factors and underlying medical conditions are associated with an increased risk of CAP in European adults. Understanding of the types of individual at greatest risk of CAP can help to ensure that interventions to reduce the risk of infection and burden of disease are targeted appropriately. PMID:24130229

  6. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, James D; Akram, Ahsan R; Singanayagam, Aran; Wilcox, Mark H; Hill, Adam T

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is strongly associated with anti-biotic treatment, and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the leading indication for anti-biotic prescription in hospitals. This study assessed the incidence of and risk factors for CDI in a cohort of patients hospitalized with CAP. We analysed data from a prospective, observational cohort of patients with CAP in Edinburgh, UK. Patients with diarrhoea were systematically screened for CDI, and risk factors were determined through time-dependent survival analysis. Overall, 1883 patients with CAP were included, 365 developed diarrhoea and 61 had laboratory-confirmed CDI. The risk factors for CDI were: age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.06 per year; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.08), total number of antibiotic classes received (HR, 3.01 per class; 95% CI, 2.32-3.91), duration of antibiotic therapy (HR, 1.09 per day; 95% CI, 1.00-1.19 and hospitalization status (HR, 13.1; 95% CI, 6.0-28.7). Antibiotic class was not an independent predictor of CDI when adjusted for these risk factors (P > 0.05 by interaction testing). These data suggest that reducing the overall antibiotic burden, duration of antibiotic treatment and duration of hospital stay may reduce the incidence of CDI in patients with CAP. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. The correlation between albumin levels with 30 days mortality in community acquired pneumonia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damayanti, N.; Abidin, A.; Keliat, E. N.

    2018-03-01

    The assessment of level severity ofCommunity-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) patient at the early admission to the hospital is critical because it will determine the severity of the disease and the subsequent management of the plan. Albumin can be used as a biomarker to assess the severity of CAP. To identify the correlation between albumin level at early admission in hospital with 30-day mortality in patients with CAP. It was a cohort study. We had examined of 50 CAP subject with theCURB-65 score (Confusion, Urea, Respiratory rate, Blood pressure, Age >65years), albumin, sputum culture at the early admission at Emergency Room (ER). Then, albumin levels associated with 30-day mortality was assessed using Chi-Square test. Analysis with chi-square test found a significant correlation between albumin level with 30-day mortality (p=0.001) and Relative Risk was 2.376 (95% CI 1.515-3.723). It means that patients with CAP who has severe hypoalbuminemia have a higher risk ofdying in 30 days with 2,376 times more significant than patients with mild to moderate hypoalbuminemia. In conclusion, albumin levels at early admission in the hospital correlate with 30-day mortality in CAP patients.

  8. Factors influencing ceftriaxone use in community-acquired pneumonia: Emergency doctors' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almatar, Maher Ali; Peterson, Gregory M; Thompson, Angus; Zaidi, Syed Tabish R

    2014-12-01

    To explore the perceptions of ED doctors regarding the use of ceftriaxone in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Face-to-face interviews were conducted with ED doctors in an Australian tertiary public hospital. A semi-structured interview method was used for collecting data and a framework analysis approach utilised to identify emerging themes regarding the influences on ED prescribers when using ceftriaxone for CAP. Eight interviews were performed (two consultants, four registrars and two residents). Five main themes emerged as influencing decisions regarding the selection of ceftriaxone for patients with CAP: (i) clinical intuition versus structured evaluation of severity; (ii) clinical uncertainty; (iii) prior experience; (iv) source of guidance; and (v) prescribing etiquette. As most cases of CAP are initially diagnosed and treated empirically in the ED, any interventions that aim to decrease inappropriate use of ceftriaxone for CAP should address the factors identified here that influence ED doctors' prescribing decisions. © 2014 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  9. Using data-driven rules to predict mortality in severe community acquired pneumonia.

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    Chuang Wu

    Full Text Available Prediction of patient-centered outcomes in hospitals is useful for performance benchmarking, resource allocation, and guidance regarding active treatment and withdrawal of care. Yet, their use by clinicians is limited by the complexity of available tools and amount of data required. We propose to use Disjunctive Normal Forms as a novel approach to predict hospital and 90-day mortality from instance-based patient data, comprising demographic, genetic, and physiologic information in a large cohort of patients admitted with severe community acquired pneumonia. We develop two algorithms to efficiently learn Disjunctive Normal Forms, which yield easy-to-interpret rules that explicitly map data to the outcome of interest. Disjunctive Normal Forms achieve higher prediction performance quality compared to a set of state-of-the-art machine learning models, and unveils insights unavailable with standard methods. Disjunctive Normal Forms constitute an intuitive set of prediction rules that could be easily implemented to predict outcomes and guide criteria-based clinical decision making and clinical trial execution, and thus of greater practical usefulness than currently available prediction tools. The Java implementation of the tool JavaDNF will be publicly available.

  10. [Prophylaxis of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Outbreaks with Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine. Prospects Analysis for Russian Military Community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guchev, I A; Klochkov, O I; Sinopalnikov, A I

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia and other diseases caused by pneumococci still remain the main factors of high morbidity and mortality rates throughout the world. Pneumococci as the leading pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), acute otitis media and sinusitis also cause a number of other serious systemic disorders including invasive infections with high mortality in spite of the antimicrobial resistance status and adequate antimicrobials choice. Pneumococcal infections are responsible for 5-35% or more of community-acquired pneumonias. The burden of pneumonia (up to 100-200 per thousand) is recorded among military recruits in training centers. Since the specific environment of the soldiers could be carrected, their health protection requires medical surveillance. For these reasons, polysaccharide and more immunogenic conjugated pneumococcal vaccines were developed. There is now an urgent need to understand whether such vaccines are effective in military conscripts. Controversy about the effectiveness and value of the polysaccharide (PPV-23) vaccine as a CAP morbidity restriction measure still persists. There were implemented plenty of metaanalyses of pneumococcal vaccines in adults. Some of them showed that the vaccine was effective against bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in 'low risk' healthy adults and elders. There have been a number of poor quality observational studies in Russia where 'all pneumonia cases' were considered as an endpoint. It remains controversial whether these observational studies provide adequate evidence to justify the use of the polysaccharide vaccine in the groups of healthy young men for whom it is being advocated. In our analysis we found weak evidence supporting pneumococcal vaccination with PPV-23 for this group. Nevertheless, favorable tendency was found to immunize. It is the reason for a trail to find pharmacoepidemiological support for vaccination by novel conjugated vaccines with better immunogenicity.

  11. Clinical course, neurohumoral and hemodynamic disorders in patients with stable angina pectoris on the background of community-acquired pneumonia

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    N. S. Mykhailovska

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Coronary heart disease is among the most common problems in cardiology. The magnitude of the problem of coronary heart disease is highlighted by estimates that more than 22% of cardiac deaths among women and 20% among men occur every year. The clinical course of coronary heart disease depends on traditional risk factors, coexisting nonspecific respiratory diseases, especially community acquired pneumonia. It is known that within 30 days after community-acquired pneumonia the hospitalizations rate because of exacerbation of coronary heart disease is increased. Objective: to study the clinical course, neurohumoral and hemodynamic changes in patients with coronary heart disease after community acquired pneumonia. Materials and methods: 51 patients with coronary heart disease: stable angina pectoris, 2-3 functional class (22 men and 29 women, from 52 to 78 years old. The patients were examined during the inpatient treatment. The study involved 2 separate groups of patients with coronary heart disease. One group included 31 patients with coronary heart disease and community acquired pneumonia (the principal group. The control group included 20 patients without pneumonia. Within the first 3 days in hospital the levels of total cholesterol, high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride (BIOLATEST, company PLIVA-Lachema, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (by solid-phase chemiluminescence analysis, daily monitoring of ECG («Kardiosens K»,Kharkov and ultrasonography («SONOACE» 8000SE were assessed. The data were processed by methods of variation statistics using application package «Statistica 11.0» by standard requirements. Results: The study showed that in the principal group dyspnea (2.8 times more, p <0.005, cardiac arrhythmia (by 33.39%, p <0.05 were observed frequently; lower levels of HDL-cholesterol by 25.28% (p <0.05, increased level of hs-CRP by 6.54-times (p <0.05 were revealed. The ECG monitoring data in the

  12. The Influence of Pharmaceutical Care Intervention on Inpatient Community Acquired Pneumonia: A Small Randomized Single Blind Study

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    Bobby Presley

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia, one of infectious diseases, becomes a major health care problem in Indonesia. The inappropriateness use of treatment can lead to greater unexpected health outcome and prolonged length of stay. A lot of research has proved that pharmacists, as a part of health care professionals, has important role in assuring patients to get the most optimal treatment benefit. The aim of this study is to identify the influence of pharmaceutical care intervention in reducing the length of stay of inpatients community acquired pneumonia. This experimental study involved 32 subjects with community acquired pneumonia hospitalized without any other infection between 18th August and 31st December 2010. Subjects were divided into two groups, i.e. intervention and control group, by simple random sampling technique. Intervention group received pharmaceutical care services i.e. drug related problems identification and solving based on Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe Classification and therapy guideline. Both group received hospital standard care. The primary outcome of this study was length of stay. All subjects were followed until 31 December 2010. Most of drug related problems identified in this study were classified as treatment effectiveness (intervention group 76.19% and control group 81.82% and treatment cost (intervention group 23.81% and control group 18.18%. Inappropriate use of antibiotic was the main cause for this drug related problems based on the pneumonia guideline. Ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin (28.21% were the most inappropriate used antibiotics found in this study. The mean of length of stay between intervention (6 days and control group (8 days was significantly different (P<0.05. Pharmaceutical care intervention significantly improved the length of stay of inpatients community acquired pneumonia.

  13. Empiric antibiotic coverage of atypical pathogens for community-acquired pneumonia in hospitalized adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliakim-Raz, Noa; Robenshtok, Eyal; Shefet, Daphna; Gafter-Gvili, Anat; Vidal, Liat; Paul, Mical; Leibovici, Leonard

    2012-09-12

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is caused by various pathogens, traditionally divided into 'typical' and 'atypical'. Initial antibiotic treatment of CAP is usually empirical, customarily covering both typical and atypical pathogens. To date, no sufficient evidence exists to support this broad coverage, while limiting coverage is bound to reduce toxicity, resistance and expense. The main objective was to estimate the mortality and proportion with treatment failure using regimens containing atypical antibiotic coverage compared to those that had typical coverage only. Secondary objectives included the assessment of adverse events. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) Issue 3, 2012 which includes the Acute Respiratory Infection Group's Specialized Register, MEDLINE (January 1966 to April week 1, 2012) and EMBASE (January 1980 to April 2012). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of adult patients hospitalized due to CAP, comparing antibiotic regimens with atypical coverage (quinolones, macrolides, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol, streptogramins or ketolides) to a regimen without atypical antibiotic coverage. Two review authors independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data from included trials. We estimated risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We assessed heterogeneity using a Chi(2) test. We included 28 trials, encompassing 5939 randomized patients. The atypical antibiotic was administered as monotherapy in all but three studies. Only one study assessed a beta-lactam combined with a macrolide compared to the same beta-lactam. There was no difference in mortality between the atypical arm and the non-atypical arm (RR 1.14; 95% CI 0.84 to 1.55), RR atypical arm. The atypical arm showed an insignificant trend toward clinical success and a significant advantage to bacteriological eradication, which disappeared when evaluating methodologically high quality studies alone. Clinical success for the atypical arm

  14. Empiric antibiotic coverage of atypical pathogens for community acquired pneumonia in hospitalized adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robenshtok, E; Shefet, D; Gafter-Gvili, A; Paul, M; Vidal, L; Leibovici, L

    2008-01-23

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is caused by various pathogens, traditionally divided to 'typical' and 'atypical'. Initial antibiotic treatment of CAP is usually empirical, customarily covering both typical and atypical pathogens. To date, no sufficient evidence exists to support this broad coverage, while limiting coverage is bound to reduce toxicity, resistance and expense. To assess the efficacy and need of adding antibiotic coverage for atypical pathogens in hospitalized patients with CAP, in terms of mortality and successful treatment. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2007, Issue 1) which includes the Acute Respiratory Infection Group's specialized register; MEDLINE (January 1966 to March 2007); and EMBASE (January 1980 to January 2007). Randomized trials of adult patients hospitalized due to CAP, comparing antibiotic regimens with atypical antibiotic coverage to a regimen without atypical antibiotic coverage. Two review authors independently appraised the quality of each trial and extracted the data from included trials. Relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated, assuming an intention-to-treat (ITT) basis for the outcome measures. Twenty five trials were included, encompassing 5244 randomized patients. There was no difference in mortality between the atypical arm and the non-atypical arm (RR 1.15; 95% CI 0.85 to 1.56). The atypical arm showed an insignificant trend toward clinical success and a significant advantage to bacteriological eradication, which disappeared when evaluating methodologically high-quality studies alone. Clinical success for the atypical arm was significantly higher for Legionella pneumophilae (L. pneumophilae) and non-significantly lower for pneumococcal pneumonia. There was no significant difference between the groups in the frequency of (total) adverse events, or those requiring discontinuation of treatment. However, gastrointestinal events

  15. The use of ertapenem for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia in routine hospital practice: a matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, D; Bravo-Ferrer, J M; Seoane-Pillado, T; Vázquez-Rodríguez, P; Ramos-Merino, L; Gutiérrez-Urbón, J M; Pita, S; Llinares, P

    2016-10-01

    The clinical response to ertapenem in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) at the setting of routine hospital practice has been scarcely evaluated. We retrospectively compared CAP cases treated with ertapenem or with other standard antimicrobials (controls) at a tertiary 1,434-bed center from 2005 to 2014. Out of 6,145 patients hospitalized with CAP, 64 (1%) ertapenem-treated and 128 controls were studied (PSI IV-V 72%, mean age 73 years.). A significant higher proportion of bedridden patients (41% vs. 21%), residence in nursing homes (19% vs. 7%), previous use of antibiotics (39% vs. 29%) and necrotizing (13% vs. 1%) or complicated (36% vs. 19%) pneumonia, was observed in the ertapenem vs. non-ertapenem patients. Initial treatment with ertapenem was independently associated with an earlier resolution of signs of infection. In patients aged 65 or older the independent risks factors for mortality were: PSI score (7.0, 95%CI 1.8-27.7), bedridden status (4.6, 95%CI 1.1-20.9) and Health Care Associated Pneumonia (HCAP) (4.6, 95%CI 1.3-16.5). First-line treatment with ertapenem was an independent protector factor in this subgroup of patients (0.1, 95%CI 0.1-0.7). Ertapenem showed a superior clinical response in frail elderly patients with complicated community-acquired pneumonia, and it may be considered as a first-line therapeutic regimen in this setting.

  16. X-linked agammaglobulinemia in community-acquired pneumonia cases revealed by immunoglobulin level screening at hospital admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancikova, Z; Freiberger, T; Vach, W; Trojanek, M; Rizzi, M; Janda, A

    2013-11-01

    In children with primary immunodeficiencies, the onset of symptoms precedes the diagnosis and the initiation of appropriate treatment by months or years. This delay in diagnosis is due to the fact that while these disorders are rare, some of the infections seen in immunodeficient patients are common. Defective antibody production represents the largest group among these disorders, with otitis, sinusitis and pneumonia as the most frequent initial manifestation. We performed a prospective study of humoral immunity in children hospitalized due to community-acquired pneumonia in tertiary care hospital. Out of 254 patients (131 boys, 123 girls, median age 4.5 years) recruited over 3 years, we found 2 boys (age 11 and 21 months) lacking serum immunoglobulins and circulating B cells. Subsequent genetic analysis confirmed diagnosis of X-linked agammaglobulinemia. Despite their immunodeficiency, the pneumonia was uncomplicated in both patients and did not call for immunological evaluation. However, the immunoglobulin screening at admission allowed for an early diagnosis of the immunodeficiency and timely initiation of immunoglobulin substitution, the key prerequisite for a favorable course of the disease.Simple and inexpensive immuno-globulin measurement during the manage-ment of hospitalized children with community-acquired pneumonia may help in early identification of patients with compromised humoral immunity and prevent serious complications. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. In vitro activity of tigecycline against patient isolates collected during phase 3 clinical trials for hospital acquired pneumonia

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    Peter J. Petersen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro activity of tigecycline was evaluated against 819 baseline pathogens isolated from 383 patients enrolled in the phase 3 clinical trial investigating the efficacy of tigecycline in hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP. The trials were global, enrolling patients in 27 countries. Tigecycline was active against the most prevalent pathogens in HAP, including gram-positive and gram-negative strains (90% of MICs ≤2 μg/mL for the entire collection. The spectrum of activity of tigecycline included important pathogens such as Staphylo- coccus aureus (including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii/calcoaceticus complex, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, and Enterobacter cloacae. As reported previously, a few genera, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Proteeae, were generally less susceptible to tigecycline by comparison to other gram-negative pathogens. The excellent in vitro, expanded, broad-spectrum activity of tigecycline in the clinical isolates confirmed the potential utility of tigecycline for pathogens associated with with hospital acquired pneumonia infections.

  18. Empyema associated with community-acquired pneumonia: A Pediatric Investigator's Collaborative Network on Infections in Canada (PICNIC study

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    Le Saux Nicole

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the incidence of serious morbidity with childhood pneumonia has decreased over time, empyema as a complication of community-acquired pneumonia continues to be an important clinical problem. We reviewed the epidemiology and clinical management of empyema at 8 pediatric hospitals in a period before the widespread implementation of universal infant heptavalent pneumococcal vaccine programs in Canada. Methods Health records for children Results 251 children met inclusion criteria; 51.4% were male. Most children were previously healthy and those ≤ 5 years of age comprised 57% of the cases. The median length of hospitalization was 9 days. Admissions occurred in all months but peaked in winter. Oxygen supplementation was required in 77% of children, 75% had chest tube placement and 33% were admitted to an intensive care unit. While similarity in use of pain medication, antipyretics and antimicrobial use was observed, a wide variation in number of chest radiographs and invasive procedures (thoracentesis, placement of chest tubes was observed between centers. The most common organism found in normally sterile samples (blood, pleural fluid, lung biopsy was Streptococcus pneumoniae. Conclusion Empyema occurs most commonly in children under five years and is associated with considerable morbidity. Variation in management by center was observed. Enhanced surveillance using molecular methods could improve diagnosis and public health planning, particularly with regard to the relationship between immunization programs and the epidemiology of empyema associated with community-acquired pneumonia in children.

  19. Causative agent distribution and antibiotic therapy assessment among adult patients with community acquired pneumonia in Chinese urban population

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    Liu Yong

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of predominant microbial patterns in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP constitutes the basis for initial decisions about empirical antimicrobial treatment, so a prospective study was performed during 2003–2004 among CAP of adult Chinese urban populations. Methods Qualified patients were enrolled and screened for bacterial, atypical, and viral pathogens by sputum and/or blood culturing, and by antibody seroconversion test. Antibiotic treatment and patient outcome were also assessed. Results Non-viral pathogens were found in 324/610 (53.1% patients among whom M. pneumoniae was the most prevalent (126/610, 20.7%. Atypical pathogens were identified in 62/195 (31.8% patients carrying bacterial pathogens. Respiratory viruses were identified in 35 (19% of 184 randomly selected patients with adenovirus being the most common (16/184, 8.7%. The nonsusceptibility of S. pneumoniae to penicillin and azithromycin was 22.2% (Resistance (R: 3.2%, Intermediate (I: 19.0% and 79.4% (R: 79.4%, I: 0%, respectively. Of patients (312 from whom causative pathogens were identified and antibiotic treatments were recorded, clinical cure rate with β-lactam antibiotics alone and with combination of a β-lactam plus a macrolide or with fluoroquinolones was 63.7% (79/124 and 67%(126/188, respectively. For patients having mixed M. pneumoniae and/or C. pneumoniae infections, a better cure rate was observed with regimens that are active against atypical pathogens (e.g. a β-lactam plus a macrolide, or a fluoroquinolone than with β-lactam alone (75.8% vs. 42.9%, p = 0.045. Conclusion In Chinese adult CAP patients, M. pneumoniae was the most prevalent with mixed infections containing atypical pathogens being frequently observed. With S. pneumoniae, the prevalence of macrolide resistance was high and penicillin resistance low compared with data reported in other regions.

  20. Clinical Features, Etiology and Outcomes of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Junyent, Joan; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Viasus, Diego; Millat-Martínez, Pere; Simonetti, Antonella; Santos, Mª Salud; Ardanuy, Carmen; Dorca, Jordi; Carratalà, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a frequent complication of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but previous studies are often contradictory. Objectives We aimed to ascertain the characteristics and outcomes of CAP in patients with COPD as well as to determine the risk factors for mortality and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in COPD patients with CAP. We also describe the etiology and outcomes of CAP in COPD patients receiving chronic oxygen therapy at home and those receiving inhaled steroids. Methods An observational analysis of a prospective cohort of hospitalized adults with CAP (1995–2011) was performed. Results We documented 4121 CAP episodes, of which 983 (23.9%) occurred in patients with COPD; the median FEV1 value was 50%, and 57.8% were classified as stage III or IV in the GOLD classification. Fifty-eight per cent of patients were receiving inhaled steroids, and 14.6% chronic oxygen therapy at home. Patients with COPD presented specific clinical features. S. pneumoniae was the leading causative organism overall, but P. aeruginosa was more frequent in COPD (3.4 vs. 0.5%; prisk factors for case-fatality rate in patients with COPD were multilobar pneumonia, P. aeruginosa pneumonia, and high-risk PSI classes. Prior pneumococcal vaccination was found to be protective. FEV1 was an independent risk factor for P. aeruginosa pneumonia. Conclusions CAP in patients with COPD presents specific characteristics and risk factors for mortality. Prior pneumococcal vaccine has a beneficial effect on outcomes. P. aeruginosa pneumonia is associated with low FEV1 values and poor prognosis. PMID:25166349

  1. Disease burden of community acquired pneumonia among children under 5 y old in China: A population based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; An, Zhijie; Yin, Dapeng; Liu, Yanmin; Huang, Zhuoying; Ma, Yujie; Li, Hui; Li, Qi; Wang, Huaqing

    2017-07-03

    To obtain the baseline data on the incidence and cost of community acquired pneumonia among under-5 children for future studies, and provide evidence for shaping China's strategies regarding pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV). Three townships from Heilongjiang, Hebei and Gansu Province and one community in Shanghai were selected as study areas. A questionnaire survey was conducted to collect data on incidence and cost of pneumonia among children under 5 y old in 2012. The overall incidence of clinically diagnosed pneumonia in children under 5 y old was 2.55%. The incidence in urban area was 7.97%, higher than that in rural areas (1.68%). However, no difference was found in the incidences of chest X-ray confirmed pneumonia between urban and rural areas (1.67% vs 1.23%). X-ray confirmed cases in rural and urban areas respectively accounted for 73.45% and 20.93% of all clinically diagnosed pneumonia. The hospitalization rate of all cases was 1.40%. Incidence and hospitalization rate of pneumonia decreased with age, with the highest rates found among children younger than one year and the lowest among children aged 4 (incidence: 4.25% vs 0.83%; hospitalization: 2.75% vs 0.36%). The incidence was slightly higher among boys (2.92% vs 2.08%). The total cost due to pneumonia for the participants was 1138 733 CNY. The average cost and median cost was 5722 CNY and 3540 CNY separately. Multivariate analysis showed that the only factor related to higher cost was hospitalization. The disease burden was high for children under 5 y old, especially the infant. PCV has not been widely used among children, and thus further health economics evaluation on introducing PCV into National Immunization Program should be conducted.

  2. Oral Antibiotics for Community acquired Pneumonia with Chest indrawing in Children Aged Below Five Years: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodha, Rakesh; Randev, Shivani; Kabra, Sushil K

    2016-06-08

    To determine the efficacy of oral antibiotics in under-five children with pneumonia and chest indrawing. We included controlled clinical trials (randomized or quasi randomized) that compared the efficacy of oral antibiotics versus parenteral antibiotics for treatment of community acquired pneumonia with chest indrawing (severe pneumonia as defined by the World Health Organizations guidelines) in children below 60 months of age. Data were extracted and managed using RevMan software. Main outcome variables were: treatment failure rate, relapse rate, death rate, need for hospitalization, and severe adverse effects. We identified four randomized controlled trials involving 4400 children who were diagnosed to have severe pneumonia but were feeding well and not hypoxic. Baseline characteristics of children in the two treatment arms (oral and parenteral antibiotics) were similar. In two studies, oral antibiotics were administered on an ambulatory basis, while in two, oral antibiotics were used in hospitalized children. Failure rate in children receiving oral antibiotics was 13% (288/2208) while that in children receiving parenteral antibiotics was 13.8% (302/2183) (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.78, 1.11). Failure rates were not affected by the type of oral antibiotic, or presence of wheeze. Relapse rates, hospitalization or serious adverse events were similar in the two groups. Children with tachypnea with chest indrawing without signs and symptoms of very severe pneumonia may be treated with oral antibiotics.

  3. Alcohol Use Disorders and Community-Acquired Pneumococcal Pneumonia: Associated Mortality, Prolonged Hospital Stay and Increased Hospital Spending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gili-Miner, Miguel; López-Méndez, Julio; Béjar-Prado, Luis; Ramírez-Ramírez, Gloria; Vilches-Arenas, Ángel; Sala-Turrens, José

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of alcohol use disorders (AUD) on community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia (CAPP) admissions, in terms of in-hospital mortality, prolonged stay and increased hospital spending. Retrospective observational study of a sample of CAPP patients from the minimum basic datasets of 87 Spanish hospitals during 2008-2010. Mortality, length of hospital stay and additional spending attributable to AUD were calculated after multivariate covariance analysis for variables such as age and sex, type of hospital, addictions and comorbidities. Among 16,202 non-elective admissions for CAPP in patients aged 18-74years, 2,685 had AUD. Patients admitted with CAPP and AUD were predominantly men with a higher prevalence of tobacco or drug use disorders and higher Charlson comorbidity index. Patients with CAPP and AUD had notably higher in-hospital mortality (50.8%; CI95%: 44.3-54.3%), prolonged length of stay (2.3days; CI95%: 2.0-2.7days) and increased costs (1,869.2€; CI95%: 1,498.6-2,239.8€). According to the results of this study, AUD in CAPP patients was associated with increased in-hospital mortality, length of hospital stay and hospital spending. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Solithromycin: A Novel Fluoroketolide for the Treatment of Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhanel, George G; Hartel, Erika; Adam, Heather; Zelenitsky, Sheryl; Zhanel, Michael A; Golden, Alyssa; Schweizer, Frank; Gorityala, Bala; Lagacé-Wiens, Philippe R S; Walkty, Andrew J; Gin, Alfred S; Hoban, Daryl J; Lynch, Joseph P; Karlowsky, James A

    2016-12-01

    Solithromycin is a novel fluoroketolide developed in both oral and intravenous formulations to address increasing macrolide resistance in pathogens causing community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). When compared with its macrolide and ketolide predecessors, solithromycin has several structural modifications which increase its ribosomal binding and reduce its propensity to known macrolide resistance mechanisms. Solithromycin, like telithromycin, affects 50S ribosomal subunit formation and function, as well as causing frame-shift errors during translation. However, unlike telithromycin, which binds to two sites on the ribosome, solithromycin has three distinct ribosomal binding sites. Its desosamine sugar interacts at the A2058/A2059 cleft in domain V (as all macrolides do), an extended alkyl-aryl side chain interacts with base pair A752-U2609 in domain II (similar to telithromycin), and a fluorine at C-2 of solithromycin provides additional binding to the ribosome. Studies describing solithromycin activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae have reported that it does not induce erm-mediated resistance because it lacks a cladinose moiety, and that it is less susceptible than other macrolides to mef-mediated efflux due to its increased ribosomal binding and greater intrinsic activity. Solithromycin has demonstrated potent in vitro activity against the most common CABP pathogens, including macrolide-, penicillin-, and fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates of S. pneumoniae, as well as Haemophilus influenzae and atypical bacterial pathogens. Solithromycin displays multi-compartment pharmacokinetics, a large volume of distribution (>500 L), approximately 67% bioavailability when given orally, and serum protein binding of 81%. Its major metabolic pathway appears to follow cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, with metabolites of solithromycin undergoing biliary excretion. Its serum half-life is approximately 6-9 h, which is sufficient for once-daily administration. Pharmacodynamic

  5. INFECTION WITH HHV-6 OF MILITARY MEN AFFECTED BY COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

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    Brusnik SV

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus, 6 type (HHV-6 was isolated at the end of the 20th century from the blood leukocytes of patients with lymphoproliferative diseases. Serological studies conducted in different countries, indicate ubiquitylation of the HHV-6 and the existence of two antigenic variants - HHV-6A and HHV-6B. Their high tropism is determined in vitro to lymphocytic, nervous and dendritic cells of the CNS. Virus replicates in many cell, primary and passaged cultures of different origins. The reproduction cycle of HHV-6 continues on average 4-5 days forming syncytiums and intracytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions. Significant destruction and lysis almost 90 % of infected cells is reported after 5-10 day of monitoring. The utility of experimentation investigating the role of HHV-6 in the development of acute and chronic diseases in respiratory tract is caused by the fact that many patients, particularly those with chronic diseases, have complaints to chronic fatigue, decreased performance and low-grade temperature more than 3-6 months. Several studies demonstrate the presence of HHV-6 in saliva, salivary and bronchiolar glands, in swabs from pharyngonasal cavity and gorge. Tropism of HHV-6 to oropharyngeal epithelium with the possibility of finding the virus in the saliva and swabs from pharyngonasal cavity and gorge was found at the end of 20th century. This fact gave the basis for work determining the level of infection by this pathogen in patients with infectious and inflammatory pathology of the respiratory tract. Materials and methods. Serological studies were conducted with 38 soldiers affected by community-acquired pneumonia. Most of the surveyed patients were ranged in age from 20 to 45 years old, middle age (32,5±1,5 years. Patients were in stationary treatment in the Kharkov military hospital. The criteria for inclusion in the study on the infection of HHV-6 were soldiers affected by community-acquired pneumonia with atypical course of

  6. Risk of heart failure after community acquired pneumonia: prospective controlled study with 10 years of follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrie, Thomas J; Minhas-Sandhu, Jasjeet K; Majumdar, Sumit R

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the attributable risk of community acquired pneumonia on incidence of heart failure throughout the age range of affected patients and severity of the infection. Design Cohort study. Setting Six hospitals and seven emergency departments in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, 2000-02. Participants 4988 adults with community acquired pneumonia and no history of heart failure were prospectively recruited and matched on age, sex, and setting of treatment (inpatient or outpatient) with up to five adults without pneumonia (controls) or prevalent heart failure (n=23 060). Main outcome measures Risk of hospital admission for incident heart failure or a combined endpoint of heart failure or death up to 2012, evaluated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards analyses. Results The average age of participants was 55 years, 2649 (53.1%) were men, and 63.4% were managed as outpatients. Over a median of 9.9 years (interquartile range 5.9-10.6), 11.9% (n=592) of patients with pneumonia had incident heart failure compared with 7.4% (n=1712) of controls (adjusted hazard ratio 1.61, 95% confidence interval 1.44 to 1.81). Patients with pneumonia aged 65 or less had the lowest absolute increase (but greatest relative risk) of heart failure compared with controls (4.8% v 2.2%; adjusted hazard ratio 1.98, 95% confidence interval 1.5 to 2.53), whereas patients with pneumonia aged more than 65 years had the highest absolute increase (but lowest relative risk) of heart failure (24.8% v 18.9%; adjusted hazard ratio 1.55, 1.36 to 1.77). Results were consistent in the short term (90 days) and intermediate term (one year) and whether patients were treated in hospital or as outpatients. Conclusion Our results show that community acquired pneumonia substantially increases the risk of heart failure across the age and severity range of cases. This should be considered when formulating post-discharge care plans and preventive strategies, and assessing downstream episodes

  7. Prevalence of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates in Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifpour, Mohammad; Gholipour, Abolfazl; Damavandi, Mohammad Sadegh

    2016-03-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a family member of Enterobacteriaceae. Isolates of K. pneumoniae produce enzymes that cause decomposition of third generation cephalosporins. These enzymes are known as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL). Resistance of K. pneumoniae to beta-lactamase antibiotics is commonly mediated by beta-lactamase genes. The aim of this study was to identify the ESBL produced by K. pneumoniae isolates that cause community-acquired and nosocomial urinary tract infections within a one-year period (2013 to 2014) in Kashani and Hajar university hospitals of Shahrekord, Iran. From 2013 to 2014, 150 strains of K. pneumoniae isolate from two different populations with nosocomial and community-acquired infections were collected. The strains were then investigated by double disk synergism and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The study population of 150 patients with nosocomial and community-acquired infections were divided to two groups of 75 each. We found that 48 of the K. pneumoniae isolates in the patients with nosocomial infection and 39 isolates in those with community-acquired infections produced ESBL. The prevalence of TEM1, SHV1 and VEB1 in ESBL-producing isolates in nosocomial patients was 24%, 29.3% and 10.6%, and in community-acquired patients, 17.3%, 22.7% and 8%, respectively. The prevalence of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolate is of great concern; therefore, continuous investigation seems essential to monitor ESBL-producing bacteria in patients with nosocomial and community-acquired infections.

  8. Community-acquired pneumonia in children. A changing spectrum of disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Roux, David M. [Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); New Somerset Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Cape Town (South Africa); Zar, Heather J. [Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2017-10-15

    Pneumonia remains the leading cause of death in children outside the neonatal period, despite advances in prevention and management. Over the last 20 years, there has been a substantial decrease in the incidence of childhood pneumonia and pneumonia-associated mortality. New conjugate vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae have contributed to decreases in radiologic, clinical and complicated pneumonia cases and have reduced hospitalization and mortality. The importance of co-infections with multiple pathogens and the predominance of viral-associated disease are emerging. Better access to effective preventative and management strategies is needed in low- and middle-income countries, while new strategies are needed to address the residual burden of disease once these have been implemented. (orig.)

  9. Community-acquired pneumonia in children. A changing spectrum of disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, David M.; Zar, Heather J.

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonia remains the leading cause of death in children outside the neonatal period, despite advances in prevention and management. Over the last 20 years, there has been a substantial decrease in the incidence of childhood pneumonia and pneumonia-associated mortality. New conjugate vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae have contributed to decreases in radiologic, clinical and complicated pneumonia cases and have reduced hospitalization and mortality. The importance of co-infections with multiple pathogens and the predominance of viral-associated disease are emerging. Better access to effective preventative and management strategies is needed in low- and middle-income countries, while new strategies are needed to address the residual burden of disease once these have been implemented. (orig.)

  10. Community-acquired pneumonia in children - a changing spectrum of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, David M; Zar, Heather J

    2017-10-01

    Pneumonia remains the leading cause of death in children outside the neonatal period, despite advances in prevention and management. Over the last 20 years, there has been a substantial decrease in the incidence of childhood pneumonia and pneumonia-associated mortality. New conjugate vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae have contributed to decreases in radiologic, clinical and complicated pneumonia cases and have reduced hospitalization and mortality. The importance of co-infections with multiple pathogens and the predominance of viral-associated disease are emerging. Better access to effective preventative and management strategies is needed in low- and middle-income countries, while new strategies are needed to address the residual burden of disease once these have been implemented.

  11. Oxidative stress in immunocompetent patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefler, S; Rodríguez, A; Martín-Loeches, I; Sanchez, V; Marín, J; Llauradó, M; Romeu, M; Díaz, E; Nogués, R; Giralt, M

    2014-03-01

    A comparison was made of the oxidative stress (OS) levels of patients with either viral or bacterial severe community-acquired pneumonia (sCAP) and of patients without infection (healthy volunteers (HV) and patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI)). A prospective observational study was made. Critically ill patients with sCAP. The TBARS level was measured as an index of oxidative injury. SOD, CAT and redox glutathione system (GSH, GSSG, GR, GPx) activities were measured as reflecting antioxidant capacity. Severity of illness was assessed by the APACHE II, SOFA and SIRS scores. Thirty-seven subjects were included: 15 patients with CAP (12 of bacterial origin [BCAP] and 3 due to 2009 A/H1N1 virus [VCAP]), 10 HV and 12 AMI patients. Intensive care CAP mortality was 26.7% (n=4). Plasmatic TBARS levels were higher in CAP patients than in HV, but similar to those recorded in AMI patients. In contrast, VCAP was associated with lower TBARS levels, and some components of the glutathione redox system were higher in BCAP patients and HV. The OS levels did not differ between survivors and non-survivors. Our results suggest the occurrence of higher OS in sCAP patients compared with HV. In contrast, lower TBARS levels were observed in VCAP patients, suggesting an increase of antioxidant activity related to the redox glutathione system. However, further research involving a larger cohort is needed in order to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  12. Atypical coverage in community-acquired pneumonia after outpatient beta-lactam monotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Werkhoven, Cornelis H; van de Garde, Ewoudt M W; Oosterheert, Jan Jelrik; Postma, Douwe F; Bonten, Marc J M

    2017-08-01

    In adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) after >48 h of outpatient beta-lactam monotherapy, coverage of atypical pathogens is recommended based on expert opinion. In a post-hoc analysis of a large study of CAP treatment we included patients who received beta-lactam monotherapy for >48 h before hospitalization. Length of hospital stay (LOS), 30-day mortality, and number of treatment escalations were compared for those that continued beta-lactam monotherapy and those that received atypical coverage at admission. Of 179 patients (median age 66 years (IQR 50-78), 100 (56%) male), 131 (73%) received additional atypical coverage at admission. These patients were younger, had less comorbidities, and longer symptom duration, compared to those that continued beta-lactam monotherapy. In crude analysis, median (IQR) LOS was 6 (4-8) and 6 (4-9) days, mortality was 2% and 4%, and treatment escalations occurred in 8 (17%) and 11 (8%) patients without and with atypical coverage, respectively. Adjusted effect ratios for absence of atypical coverage on LOS, mortality, and treatment escalation were 0.77 (95% CI 0.61-0.97), 0.37 (0.04-3.67), and 2.75 (0.94-8.09), respectively. In adults hospitalized with CAP after >48 h of outpatient beta-lactam monotherapy, not starting antibiotics with atypical coverage was associated with a trend towards more treatment escalations, without evidence of increased LOS or mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Oseltamivir Use Among Children and Adults Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oboho, Ikwo K; Bramley, Anna; Finelli, Lyn; Fry, Alicia; Ampofo, Krow; Arnold, Sandra R; Self, Wesley H; Williams, Derek J; Courtney, D Mark; Zhu, Yuwei; Anderson, Evan J; Grijalva, Carlos G; McCullers, Jonathan A; Wunderink, Richard G; Pavia, Andrew T; Edwards, Kathryn M; Jain, Seema

    2017-01-01

    Data on oseltamivir treatment among hospitalized community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients are limited. Patients hospitalized with CAP at 6 hospitals during the 2010-2012 influenza seasons were included. We assessed factors associated with oseltamivir treatment using logistic regression. Oseltamivir treatment was provided to 89 of 1627 (5%) children (<18 years) and 143 of 1051 (14%) adults. Among those with positive clinician-ordered influenza tests, 39 of 61 (64%) children and 37 of 48 (77%) adults received oseltamivir. Among children, oseltamivir treatment was associated with hospital A (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36-4.88), clinician-ordered testing performed (aOR, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.47-5.19), intensive care unit (ICU) admission (aOR, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.27-3.45), and age ≥2 years (aOR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.16-1.76). Among adults, oseltamivir treatment was associated with clinician-ordered testing performed (aOR, 8.38; 95% CI, 4.64-15.12), hospitals D and E (aOR, 3.46-5.11; 95% CI, 1.75-11.01), Hispanic ethnicity (aOR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.18-3.59), and ICU admission (aOR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.34-3.13). Among patients hospitalized with CAP during influenza season, oseltamivir treatment was moderate overall and associated with clinician-ordered testing, severe illness, and specific hospitals. Increased clinician education is needed to include influenza in the differential diagnosis for hospitalized CAP patients and to test and treat patients empirically if influenza is suspected. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  14. Do we really need blood cultures in treating patients with community-acquired pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdede, M; Denizbasi, A; Onur, O; Guneysel, O

    2010-01-01

    Positive blood cultures (BC) are considered a gold standard specific test for diagnosing and managing patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The aims of this study were to determine the positivity rate of BCs performed in patients with CAP, empirically started antibiotic regimens and conformity of the empirically started antibiotics with the results of BCs. Patients with the diagnosis of CAP with started empiric antibiotic treatment and performed BC test were included in the study. The BC set consisting of aerobic/anaerobic bottles was obtained from a single draw. Co-morbidities of patients, empirically started antibiotics and BC results were noted. Empiric antibiotics were checked as to whether they conform to BC results. The study included 262 patients with CAP. Majority of BC sets (195) revealed no bacterial growth. Of the total 262 sets of BCs, 67 (25.6%) sets displayed growth of organism and only 30 sets (11.5%) represented significant isolates. Commonly isolated microorganisms were Escherichia coli, Streptococcus species and Staphylococcus species. Ampicillin/Sulbactam and Fluoroquinolone combination was the leading antibiotic regimen chosen for the treatment (54.2%). The majority of patients had at least one co-morbidity. Ninety-six patients (37%) had a pulmonary disease, 74 (29%) had a malignancy, 74 (29%) had heart failure and 67 (26%) suffered from diabetes. Significantly positive results are rare (11.5%) and majority of blood cultures revealed negative results. BC tests may not be performed in all patients with CAP (Tab. 3, Ref. 11). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  15. Ceftaroline fosamil for community-acquired pneumonia and skin and skin structure infections: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hajj, Maguy Saffouh; Turgeon, Ricky D; Wilby, Kyle John

    2017-02-01

    Background Ceftaroline is a parentally administered cephalosporin that has an in vitro expanded spectrum of activity compared with other cephalosporins yet data is conflicting regarding its place in therapy. Aim of the Review To compare the efficacy and safety of ceftaroline against standard antibiotic regimens for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSIs). Method The databases of MEDLINE, EBSCO, and Embase were searched up to June 2016. Manual review of references was completed and experts in the field were contacted for unpublished data. Randomized controlled trials of ceftaroline in CAP or cSSSI populations were included. Outcomes included clinical cure, mortality, adverse events, serious adverse events, and discontinuation due to adverse events. Meta-analysis was used to pool results for these outcomes. We performed subgroup analyses for gram positive infections in CAP and infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in cSSSIs. Risk of bias was assessed for all studies. Results Six trials (three for each indication) were included, each of which had an unclear or high risk of bias in at least one domain. For CAP, ceftaroline was significantly more efficacious in achieving clinical cure than ceftriaxone [risk ratio (RR) 1.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.19; I 2  = 47%]. For cSSSIs, there was no significant difference in clinical cure between ceftaroline and vancomycin plus aztreonam (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.97-1.05; I 2  = 0%). No differences were found for overall mortality, serious adverse events, discontinuation due to adverse events, and overall adverse events. Conclusion Ceftaroline is a viable therapeutic alternative for patients with CAP and cSSSIs, yet identified risks of bias and poor external validity preclude it from being recommended as a first-line agent.

  16. Ceftaroline fosamil for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in the intensive care unit

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    Maggiore C

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Christy Maggiore,1 Jose A Vazquez,2 David J Guervil,3 Ananthakrishnan Ramani,4 Alena Jandourek,5 Phillip Cole,5 H David Friedland5 1Gulf Coast Medical Center, Panama City, FL, USA; 2Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA, USA; 3Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA; 4Mountain View Medical Practice (Columbia Memorial Hospital, Catskill, NY, USA; 5Cerexa, Inc., Oakland, CA, USA Abstract: The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro® Utilization Registry (CAPTURE is a multicenter study evaluating the clinical use of ceftaroline fosamil in patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP or acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection. Data were collected between August 2011 and February 2013, from 398 evaluable patients receiving treatment at 33 sites in the USA. This manuscript presents data collected from patients with CABP who received care in an intensive care unit (ICU or in general medical wards (35% and 64% of evaluable patients, respectively. The majority of ICU and general medical ward patients had underlying comorbidities (78% and 74%, respectively, with structural lung disease being the most common (42% in the ICU and 40% in general medical wards. Patients admitted to the ICU had a longer duration of stay, a longer duration of symptoms before treatment, and a longer duration of ceftaroline fosamil therapy than did general medical ward patients. Most patients treated in the ICU and in general medical wards were given ceftaroline fosamil as second-line therapy (87% and 80%, respectively. The overall rate of clinical success for patients treated with ceftaroline fosamil was 68% in the ICU and 85% in the general medical wards. Clinical success for patients receiving ceftaroline fosamil as a second-line agent was 84% in the ICU and 86% in general medical wards. These findings indicate that ceftaroline fosamil is a viable treatment option for CABP, both in the ICU and in general

  17. Pneumococcal vaccination reduces the risk of community-acquired pneumonia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Junko; Mori, Mitsuru; Ohnishi, Hirofumi; Tsugawa, Takeshi; Hori, Tsukasa; Yoto, Yuko; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    The seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced to Japan in 2009, after which there was a rapid decline in invasive pneumococcal disease. There are few data, however, on the effectiveness of PCV7 against community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We conducted an ambispective cohort study among children aged 0-6 years old who attended day-care centers. A total of 624 children at 10 day-care centers in Sapporo, Japan participated in the study. The parents reported whether their child had received PCV7 one or more times, as well as the exact dates of vaccination from records in maternal and child health handbooks marked by pediatricians. Each CAP event was reported by parents according to doctor diagnosis. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95%CI of CAP incidence reduced by PCV7 inoculation. During the observational period, 94 subjects contracted CAP. After adjusting for potentially confounding variables, inoculation with PCV7 was significantly associated with a reduced risk of CAP (HR, 0.22; 95%CI: 0.13-0.34). On stratified analysis by age, PCV7 was significantly associated with a reduced risk of CAP in both children aged <3 years (HR, 0.31; 95%CI: 0.14-0.71), and those ≥3 years (HR, 0.20; 95%CI: 0.09-0.43). PCV7 is highly effective in reducing the risk of CAP in children attending day-care centers. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  18. The Prevalence of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Danish Patients Hospitalised with Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

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    Melgaard, Dorte; Baandrup, Ulrik; Bøgsted, Martin; Bendtsen, Mette Dahl; Hansen, Tina

    2017-06-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) are prevalent conditions in the elderly. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between CAP, OD, and frailty in patients admitted to a department of respiratory medicine at a regional hospital. The outcome was mortality during hospitalization and within 30 days of discharge and rehospitalization within 30 days of discharge. A total of 154 consecutive patients (54.5% male, mean age 77.4 years (SD 11.51)) hospitalized because of CAP from September 1, 2013 to March 31, 2014 at North Denmark Regional Hospital were included in this study. The volume-viscosity swallow test was conducted for each patient. A total of 34.42% patients presented with OD. Patients with OD and CAP presented significant differences in age, CURB-65, and dementia compared with those of patients with CAP alone. The majority lived in nursing homes, had a lower body mass index, Barthel 20 score, and handgrip strength, and had poor oral health compared with patients with CAP only. Patients with OD presented an increased length of stay in hospital (P < 0.001), intra-hospital mortality (P < 0.001), and 30-day mortality rate (P < 0.001) compared with those of patients with CAP only. Their rate of rehospitalization 0-30 days after discharge was also increased (P < 0.001) compared with that of patients with CAP only. Thus, OD is related to frailty and poor outcome.

  19. Signs and symptoms indicative of community-acquired pneumonia in infants under six months

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    Maria de Fátima Bazhuni Pombo March

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of the clinical signs and symptoms predicting bacterial and viral pneumonia, in accordance with the Brazilian National Control Program for Acute Respiratory (ARI. METHODS: Observational prospective study. Seventy-six children from birth to six months of age who had pneumonia were studied in the emergency room. The patients were subdivided into two groups, based on radiological findings (gold-standard: 47 had bacterial pneumonia, and 29 had viral pneumonia. The frequencies, sensitivities, and specificities of the signs and symptoms were evaluated. RESULTS: The sensibilities and sensitivities of general findings in bacterial pneumonia were, respectively: fever 53.2%/40.0%; hypoactivity 68.4%/55.6% and prostration detected by the doctor 72.7%/55.0%. The same findings in viral pneumonias showed, respectively: 37.9%/40.0%, 66.7%/55.6% and 66.7%/55.6%. The sensibilities and sensitivities of respiratory findings in bacterial pneumonia were, respectively: coughing 66.0/38.1%, Respiratory rate = 50 ripm 76.6%/38.1%, altered respiratory auscultation 91.3%/10.5%, and chest indrawing 46.7%/80.0%. The same findings in viral pneumonias were, respectively: 69.0%/38.1%, 86.2%/38.1%, 85.7%/10.5% and 44.8%/80.0%. CONCLUSION: Analysis of signs and symptoms in each group did not distinguish bacterial from viral pneumonia. Our findings reinforce the adequacy of the ARI program in Brazil, which gives an early diagnosis of pneumonia, independent of its etiology.

  20. Prevalence of Atypical Pathogens in Patients With Cough and Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A Meta-Analysis.

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    Marchello, Christian; Dale, Ariella Perry; Thai, Thuy Nhu; Han, Duk Soo; Ebell, Mark H

    2016-11-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), acute cough, bronchitis, and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) are often caused by infections with viruses or Streptococcus pneumoniae . The prevalence of atypical pathogens Mycoplasma pneumoniae , Chlamydophila pneumoniae , Legionella pneumophila , and Bordetella pertussis among patients with these illnesses in the ambulatory setting has not been previously summarized. We set out to derive prevalence information from the existing literature. We performed a systematic review of MEDLINE for prospective, consecutive-series studies reporting the prevalence of M pneumoniae, C pneumoniae, L pneumophila and/or B pertussis in outpatients with cough, acute bronchitis, LRTI, or CAP. Articles were independently reviewed by 2 authors for inclusion and abstraction of data; discrepancies were resolved by consensus discussion. A meta-analysis was performed on each pathogen to calculate the pooled prevalence estimates using a random effects model of raw proportions. Fifty studies met our inclusion criteria. While calculated heterogeneity was high, most studies reported prevalence for each pathogen within a fairly narrow range. In patients with CAP, the overall prevalences of M pneumoniae and C pneumoniae were 10.1% (95% CI, 7.1%-13.1%) and 3.5% (95% CI, 2.2%-4.9%), respectively. Consistent with previous reports, M pneumoniae prevalence peaked in roughly 6-year intervals. Overall prevalence of L pneumophila was 2.7% (95% CI, 2.0%-3.4%), but the organism was rare in children, with only 1 case in 1,765. In patients with prolonged cough in primary care, the prevalence of B pertussis was 12.4% (95% CI, 4.9%-19.8%), although it was higher in studies that included only children (17.6%; 95% CI, 3.4%-31.8%). Atypical bacterial pathogens are relatively common causes of lower respiratory diseases, including cough, bronchitis, and CAP. Where surveillance data were available, we found higher prevalences in studies where all patients are tested for

  1. Amoxicillin, the Main Drug for Treating Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Otitis Media, Recommended but Often Not Followed

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    M. D. Bakradze

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Amoxicillin is the drug of choice for treating the majority of community-acquired respiratory tract infections in children, including pneumonia and acute otitis media according to both international and national guidelines. Nevertheless, the practice of not following these guidelines is widespread.Objective: Our aim was to study a range of antibiotics prescribed prior to hospitalization to children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and acute otitis media (AOM, and to evaluate their effectiveness.Methods. Observational study of children with hospital-verified diagnosis CAP or AOM.Results. Amoxicillin was prescribed to only 4.5% of children with CAP and 1% of patients with AOM; along with parenteral cephalosporines and amoxicillin/clavulanate in adequate doses therapy was started in 34 and 25% respectively. Other children received 3d generation oral cephalosporines or macrolides, which rendered a very low effectiveness (19 and 10% respectively. In view of a flagrant inconformity of the prescribed antibiotics and their doses to the guidelines, non-effective prescriptions were made for 72% of children with CAP and 69% — with AOM. For children with atypical pneumonia macrolides were prescribed in only 19%.Conclusion. Since amoxicillin remains the main drug for treating infections caused by an ever increasing number of resistant strains of S. pneumonia and S. pyogenes, it should be prescribed to children with CAP and AOM: its doses (as well as doses of amoxicillin/clavulanate should be not less than 45 mg/kg/d, and in risk group patients — 80–100 mg/kg/d. The pediatricians’ skills of differentiating atypical pneumonia should be improved.

  2. Mannose-binding lectin and l-ficolin polymorphisms in patients with community-acquired pneumonia caused by intracellular pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kempen, Gijs; Meijvis, Sabine; Endeman, Henrik; Vlaminckx, Bart; Meek, Bob; de Jong, Ben; Rijkers, Ger; Bos, Willem Jan

    2017-05-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the leading infectious disease requiring hospitalization in the western world. Genetic variability affecting the host response to infection may play a role in susceptibility and outcome in patients with CAP. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and l-ficolin (l-FCN) are two important activators of the complement system and they can enhance phagocytosis by opsonization. In a prospective cohort of 505 Dutch patients with CAP and 227 control participants we studied whether polymorphisms in the MBL (MBL2) and FCN (FCN2) genes influenced susceptibility and outcome. No difference in frequency of these genotypes was found between patients with CAP in general and controls. However, the +6424G>T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in FCN2 was more common in patients with a Coxiella burnetii pneumonia (P = 0·014). Moreover, the haplotypes coding for the highest MBL serum levels (YA/YA and YA/XA) predisposed to atypical pneumonia (C. burnetii, Legionella or Chlamydia species or Mycoplasma pneumoniae) compared with controls (P = 0·016). Furthermore, patients with these haplotypes were more often bacteraemic (P = 0·019). It can therefore be concluded that MBL2 and FCN2 polymorphisms are not major risk factors for CAP in general, but that the +6424G>T SNP in the FCN2 gene predisposes to C. burnetii pneumonia. In addition, patients with genotypes corresponding with high serum MBL levels are at risk for atypical pneumonia, possibly caused by enhanced phagocytosis, thereby promoting cell entry of these intracellular bacteria. © 2016 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Clinical course of community-acquired respiratory syncytial virus pneumonia in newborns hospitalized in neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Banu; Zenciroğlu, Ayşegül; Dilli, Dilek; Okumuş, Nurullah; İpek, M Sah; Aydın, Mustafa; Uzunalıç, Nuran; Hakan, Nilay; Kundak, Ahmet Afşin; Dursun, Arzu; Karadağ, Nilgün; Korukluoğlu, Gülay

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of pneumonia in infants worldwide. We aimed to evaluate the clinical course of community-acquired RSV pneumonia in newborns hospitalized in neonatal intensive care unit. All the newborns diagnosed as pneumonia were prospectively evaluated for RSV infection between November 2010 and April 2011. Fifty-four specimens of nasopharyngeal secretions were tested in parallel with the RAT and the multiplex real time polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR). Downes' score was used to assess the disease severity in patients with pneumonia. RAT has a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 78.5%, as the PCR technique target assay. Four of the patients with RSV pneumonia had secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) and all of four needed mechanical ventilation support. The first day Downes' score was positively correlated with time of intravenous fluid requirement (p= 0.001, r= 0.48), total oxygen need (p= 0.000, r= 0.63), and re-enteral feeding (p= 0.001, r= 0.46). Blood pH (p= 0.031, r= 0.46) were negatively correlated with Downes' score. The second day Downes' score was higher in patients with ASD than those of without ASD (3.8 ± 2.6 vs. 2 ± 1.1, p= 0.01). The most possible risk factor for longer hospital stay was the higher second day Downes' score (p= 0.02 OR: 1.9, CI 95% (1.1-3.2). All infants were discharged from hospital in a good health. RAT is sensitive and specific in detecting RSV infections in newborns. Physicians may use Downes' score for evaluation of disease severity in infants with RSV pneumonia. In these patients, ASD has increased the disease severity.

  4. Using the electronic medical record to identify community-acquired pneumonia: toward a replicable automated strategy.

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    Sylvain DeLisle

    Full Text Available Timely information about disease severity can be central to the detection and management of outbreaks of acute respiratory infections (ARI, including influenza. We asked if two resources: 1 free text, and 2 structured data from an electronic medical record (EMR could complement each other to identify patients with pneumonia, an ARI severity landmark.A manual EMR review of 2747 outpatient ARI visits with associated chest imaging identified x-ray reports that could support the diagnosis of pneumonia (kappa score  = 0.88 (95% CI 0.82∶0.93, along with attendant cases with Possible Pneumonia (adds either cough, sputum, fever/chills/night sweats, dyspnea or pleuritic chest pain or with Pneumonia-in-Plan (adds pneumonia stated as a likely diagnosis by the provider. The x-ray reports served as a reference to develop a text classifier using machine-learning software that did not require custom coding. To identify pneumonia cases, the classifier was combined with EMR-based structured data and with text analyses aimed at ARI symptoms in clinical notes.370 reference cases with Possible Pneumonia and 250 with Pneumonia-in-Plan were identified. The x-ray report text classifier increased the positive predictive value of otherwise identical EMR-based case-detection algorithms by 20-70%, while retaining sensitivities of 58-75%. These performance gains were independent of the case definitions and of whether patients were admitted to the hospital or sent home. Text analyses seeking ARI symptoms in clinical notes did not add further value.Specialized software development is not required for automated text analyses to help identify pneumonia patients. These results begin to map an efficient, replicable strategy through which EMR data can be used to stratify ARI severity.

  5. New Sepsis Definition (Sepsis-3) and Community-acquired Pneumonia Mortality. A Validation and Clinical Decision-Making Study.

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    Ranzani, Otavio T; Prina, Elena; Menéndez, Rosario; Ceccato, Adrian; Cilloniz, Catia; Méndez, Raul; Gabarrus, Albert; Barbeta, Enric; Bassi, Gianluigi Li; Ferrer, Miquel; Torres, Antoni

    2017-11-15

    The Sepsis-3 Task Force updated the clinical criteria for sepsis, excluding the need for systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria. The clinical implications of the proposed flowchart including the quick Sequential (Sepsis-related) Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) and SOFA scores are unknown. To perform a clinical decision-making analysis of Sepsis-3 in patients with community-acquired pneumonia. This was a cohort study including adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia from two Spanish university hospitals. SIRS, qSOFA, the Confusion, Respiratory Rate and Blood Pressure (CRB) score, modified SOFA (mSOFA), the Confusion, Urea, Respiratory Rate, Blood Pressure and Age (CURB-65) score, and Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) were calculated with data from the emergency department. We used decision-curve analysis to evaluate the clinical usefulness of each score and the primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Of 6,874 patients, 442 (6.4%) died in-hospital. SIRS presented the worst discrimination, followed by qSOFA, CRB, mSOFA, CURB-65, and PSI. Overall, overestimation of in-hospital mortality and miscalibration was more evident for qSOFA and mSOFA. SIRS had lower net benefit than qSOFA and CRB, significantly increasing the risk of over-treatment and being comparable with the "treat-all" strategy. PSI had higher net benefit than mSOFA and CURB-65 for mortality, whereas mSOFA seemed more applicable when considering mortality/intensive care unit admission. Sepsis-3 flowchart resulted in better identification of patients at high risk of mortality. qSOFA and CRB outperformed SIRS and presented better clinical usefulness as prompt tools for patients with community-acquired pneumonia in the emergency department. Among the tools for a comprehensive patient assessment, PSI had the best decision-aid tool profile.

  6. Community-acquired necrotizing pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus producing Panton–Valentine leukocidin in a Chinese teenager: case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Jie Chen; Yanping Luo; Shu Zhang; Zhixin Liang; Ying Wang; Ying Zhang; Guang Zhou; Yanhong Jia; Liangan Chen; Danyang She

    2014-01-01

    Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has now been established as an important community-acquired pathogen. Although necrotizing pneumonia caused by community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains producing Panton–Valentine leukocidin (PVL) has been reported with increasing frequency in many countries, it has been reported in only a few children younger than 1 year of age in Mainland China. Methods: We describe a case of life-threatening necrotizing pneumonia due to PVL-...

  7. The Most Common Detected Bacteria in Sputum of Patients with Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) Treated In Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukic, Vesna; Hadzic, Armin

    2016-10-01

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the most common infective pulmonary disease. To show the most common detected bacteria in bacterial culture of sputum in patients with CAP hospitalized in Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases and TB "Podhrastovi" in four-year period: from 2012 to 2015. This is the retrospective analysis. Each patient gave sputum 3 days in a row when admitted to hospital. Sputum has been examined: bacterial culture with antibiotics sensitivity, Gram stain, Mycobacterium tuberculosis; in cases with high temperature blood cultures were done; when we were suspicious about bronchial carcinoma bronchoscopy with BAL (bronchoalveolar lavage) was done. We show analyzed patients according to age, sex, whether they had pneumonia or bronchopneumonia, bacteria isolated in sputum and in BAL. 360 patients with CAP were treated in four-year period (247 males and 113 females). 167 or 43, 39 % had pneumonia (119 males and 48 females). Number of males was significantly bigger (χ 2 = 30,186; ppneumonia. Number of patients with negative bacterial culture of sputum (154- 79, 79%) was significantly bigger than number of patients with positive culture (39- 20, 21%) (χ 2 = 68,523; ppneumoniae was significantly most common detected bacterium compared with the number of other isolated bacteria; in pneumonia (χ 2 =33,222; p<0,001) and in bronchopneumonia (χ 2 =51,231; p<0,001). It is very important to detect the bacterial cause of CAP to administrate the targeted antibiotic therapy.

  8. The upper respiratory tract microbiome of hospitalised patients with community-acquired pneumonia of unknown aetiology: a pilot study

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    Timothy L Wiemken

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available   The composition of the upper respiratory tract microbiome may play an important role in the development of lower respiratory tract infections. Here, we characterised the microbiome of the nasopharynx and oropharynx of hospitalised patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP with unknown aetiology in an attempt to obtain insight into the aetiology of CAP. A random sample of 10 patients hospitalised with CAP previously enrolled in a separate clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov registry, Study ID: NCT01248715 in which a complete microbiological workup was not able to define an aetiology were analysed in this pilot study. This larger trial (n = 1,221 enrolled patients from 9 adult hospitals in Louisville, Kentucky, USA. Nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs were obtained for metagenomic analysis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR for Streptococcus pneumoniae was performed in all patients. One patient had a distinct nasophararyngeal microbiome consisting largely of Haemophilus influenzae. This was the only patient with a negative PCR for S. pneumoniae in both nasophararyngeal and oropharyngeal specimens. Overall, substantial differences were found between nasophararyngeal and oropharyngeal microbiomes. The upper respiratory tract microbiome of only one patient suggested H. influenzae as a probable aetiology of CAP. Although this was a pilot study of only 10 patients, the presence of S. pneumoniae in the upper respiratory tract of the other 9 patients warrants further investigation.

  9. Pattern of community acquired pneumonia in pregnant ladies in Ain Shams University hospitals

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    Aya M. Abdel Dayem

    2012-10-01

    Conclusion: Morbidity and mortality in pregnant patients with pneumonia continue to present a significant challenge. Early recognition of the diseases process and prompt treatment are required to ascertain an optimal outcome. The treatments in the gravid patients generally follow standard guide lines for the treatment of pneumonia in adults. Concern for fetal outcome should not delay treatment as improvement in maternal oxygenation and status is the best way to ensure fetal protection.

  10. Prevalence of Acquired Carbapenemase Genes in Klebsiella Pneumoniae by Multiplex PCR in Isfahan

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    Farzin Khorvash

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multi-drug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae has been considered as a serious global threat. This study was done to investigate carbapenemase producing genomes among K. pneumoniae isolates in Isfahan, Central Iran. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study from 2011 to 2012, 29 carbapenem resistant (according to disc diffusion method carbapenemase producing (according to modified Hodge test K. pneumoniae strains were collected from Intensive Care Unit (ICUs of Al-Zahra referral Hospital. In the strains with the lack of sensitivity to one or several carbapenems, beta-lactams, or beta-lactamases, there has been performed modified Hodge test to investigate carbapenmase and then only strains producing carbapenmases were selected for molecular methods. Results: In this study, there have been 29 cases of K. pneumoniae isolated from hospitalized patients in the (ICU. Three cases (10.3% contained blaVIM, 1 case (3.4% contained blaIMP, and 1 case (3.4% contained blaOXA. The genes blaNDM and blaKPC were not detected. Then, 16 cases (55.2% from positive cases of K. pneumoniae were related to the chip, 4 cases (13.8% to catheter, 6 cases (20.7% to urine, and 3 cases (10.3% to wound. Conclusion: It is necessary to monitor the epidemiologic changes of these carbapenemase genes in K. pneumoniae in our Hospital. More attention should be paid to nosocomial infection control measures. Other carbapenemase producing genes should be investigated.

  11. Spotlight on solithromycin in the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia: design, development, and potential place in therapy

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    Donald BJ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bryan J Donald,1,2 Salim Surani,3–5 Harmeet S Deol,1,6 Uche J Mbadugha,1 George Udeani1,7 1Department of Pharmacy, Corpus Christi Medical Center, Corpus Christi, TX, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Louisiana at Monroe, Monroe, LA, 3Department of Pulmonology/Critical Care, Corpus Christi Medical Center, Corpus Christi, TX, 4Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, College Station, TX, 5Department of Medicine, College of Osteopathic Medicine, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Denton, TX, 6Department of Pharmacy Services, Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT, 7Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, Kingsville, TX, USA Abstract: Community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP is a leading cause of death worldwide. However, antibacterial agents used to treat common pathogens in CABP are marked by adverse drug events and increasing antimicrobial resistance. Solithromycin is a new ketolide antibiotic, based on the macrolide antibiotic structure, being studied for use in CABP. It has efficacy in vitro against the common causative pathogens in CABP including Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and atypical pathogens. In Phase II and Phase III clinical trials, it has been demonstrated efficacious as a single agent for treatment of CABP with an apparently milder adverse event profile than alternative agents. Keywords: solithromycin, macrolide antibiotics, community-acquired bacterial pneumonia, CABP

  12. Community-acquired meningitis caused by a CG86 hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae strain: first case report in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melot, Bénédicte; Brisse, Sylvain; Breurec, Sébastien; Passet, Virginie; Malpote, Edith; Lamaury, Isabelle; Thiery, Guillaume; Hoen, Bruno

    2016-12-07

    Community-acquired bacterial meningitis due to Klebsiella pneumoniae has mainly been described in Southeast Asia and has a poor prognosis. Severe invasive infections caused by K. pneumoniae, including meningitis, are often due to hypervirulent strains (hvKP), which are characterized by capsular serotypes K1 and K2, a gene responsible for hypermucoviscosity, and the cluster for synthesis of the siderophore aerobactin. A 55 year old man with a history of essential hypertension, benign prostate hyperplasia, hyperlipidemia, obstructive sleep apnea, and chronic alcoholism was admitted for meningitis due to Klebsiella pneumoniae with a wild-type susceptibility profile. Its genomic features were consistent with a capsular K2 strain belonging to clonal group 86 (CG86) displaying the large virulence of Klebsiella plasmid (pLVPK) with heavy metal resistance gene clusters, aerobactin, rmpA. This is the first case of community-acquired meningitis caused by a hypervirulent strain of hvKP ever reported in the Caribbean.

  13. [Analysis of the efficiency of antimicrobial treatment for community-acquired pneumonia in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukova, O V; Ruina, O V; Kononova, S V; Konyshkina, T M

    To analyze actual drug consumption based on the defined daily dose (DDD analysis) and to analyze the utilization of drugs based on their proportion of the total defined daily doses (DU90% analysis) for the antimicrobial therapy of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in clinical practice at a hospital in Russia. The investigation materials were the data of 117 case histories of male (51.3%) and female (48.7%) patients hospitalized with CAP at Nizhny Novgorod City Clinical Hospital Five in 2015. The investigation enrolled all the patients admitted to the hospital over the analyzed period. DDD analysis and DU90% analysis were used as study methods. DDD analysis and DU90% analysis of antimicrobial therapy for CAP were carried out at the hospital in clinical practice during a year. The annual number of defined daily doses (NDDD) for antimicrobial drugs, the number of defined daily doses per 100 bed-days (NDDD/100 bed-days), and a drug load (g) per 1000 CAP patients per day and per CAP patient per year were determined. The largest NDDD/year for CAP treatment with ceftriaxone was 376 g, or 43.43 NDDD/100 bed-days, which is much higher than that with other antimicrobial agents. The daily drug load of ceftriaxone per 1,000 CAP patients was 8.8 g, which exceeds that of moxifloxacin by 18.7 times, azithromycin and levofloxacin by 5 times, and ampicillin/sulbactam by 2.3 times. The daily drug load of ceftriaxone per CAP patient was 3.2 g, which exceeds that of of ampicillin/sulbactam by 2.3 times, levofloxacin and azithromycin by 5 times, and moxifloxacin by 19 times. It may be recommended that the proportion of cephalosporins as drugs that promote the rise of resistance in microbes and their production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases should be further limited, the proportion of penicillins be extended, and the administered ampicillin/sulbactam be added, for example, by amoxicillin/clavulanate. Penicillins contribute to the rise of resistance to a lesser degree, and the use

  14. An evaluation of prescribing practices for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorj, Gereltuya; Hendrie, Delia; Parsons, Richard; Sunderland, Bruce

    2013-10-03

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in all age groups worldwide. It may be classified as mild/moderate or severe, the latter usually requiring hospitalisation. Although, there are many studies reported in relation to CAP, there is relatively little known about the treatment of CAP and its antibiotic use in Mongolia. The study aim was to evaluate prescribing practices for the treatment of mild/moderate CAP in Mongolia with respect to national prescribing guidelines. Written prescriptions with a written diagnosis of CAP included were collected prospectively and sequentially for ten weeks from a purposefully selected sample of community pharmacies in rural and urban areas of Mongolia. The data collected included the patient's age, gender, medication details, frequency and number of doses prescribed. Evaluation was with respect to the Mongolian Standard Treatment Guidelines (2005, 2008). Statistical differences between groups were tested using the Chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests. Prescriptions were collected from 22 pharmacies and represented the prescribing practices of 118 doctors. The study enrolled 394 (193 adults and 201 children) patients, with a median age for children of 2.0 years (range: 0.03-12) and adults of 33.0 years (range: 13-92).The most commonly prescribed drugs were aminopenicillins, vitamins, and mucolytics, with the median number of drugs being three per prescription. Inappropriate drug selection was similar for adults (57.7%) and children (56.6%), and the major reason for an overall frequency of inappropriate prescribing for adults was 89.0% and for children 78.0%. Doctors in urban areas prescribed more inappropriate drugs than those in rural areas for both children and adults, p = .0014. The proportion of prescribed injections was 28.4% for adults and 9.0% for children, and for adults was significantly higher in urban areas. The prescribing standard for non-hospitalized patients in Mongolia

  15. Soluble RAGE as a severity marker in community acquired pneumonia associated sepsis

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    Narvaez-Rivera Rodrigo M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is considered the most important cause of death from infectious disease in developed countries. Severity assessment scores partially address the difficulties in identifying high-risk patients. A lack of specific and valid pathophysiologic severity markers affect early and effective sepsis therapy. HMGB-1, sRAGE and RAGE have been involved in sepsis and their potential as severity markers has been proposed. The aim of this study was to evaluate HMGB-1, RAGE and sRAGE levels in patients with CAP-associated sepsis and determine their possible association with clinical outcome. Method We evaluated 33 patients with CAP-associated sepsis admitted to the emergency room and followed in the medical wards. Severity assessment scores (CURB-65, PSI, APACHE II, SOFA and serologic markers (HMGB-1, RAGE, sRAGE were evaluated on admission. Results Thirty patients with a diagnosis of CAP-associated sepsis were enrolled in the study within 24 hours after admission. Fourteen (46.6% had pandemic (H1N1 influenza A virus, 2 (6.6% had seasonal influenza A and 14 other diagnoses. Of the patients in the study group, 16 (53.3% had a fatal outcome. ARDS was observed in 17 (56.6% and a total of 22 patients had severe sepsis on admission (73%. The SOFA score showed the greatest difference between surviving and non-surviving groups (P = .003 with similar results in ARDS patients (P = .005. sRAGE levels tended to be higher in non-surviving (P = .058 and ARDS patients (P = .058. Logistic regression modeling demonstrated that SOFA (P = .013 and sRAGE (P = .05 were the only variables that modified the probability of a fatal outcome. Conclusion The association of elevated sRAGE with a fatal outcome suggests that it may have an independent causal effect in CAP. SOFA scores were the only clinical factor with the ability to identify surviving and ARDS patients.

  16. Community-acquired necrotizing pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in San Antonio de Areco, Argentina

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    Silvina Fernández

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is the first cause of skin and soft tissue infections, but can also produce severe diseases such as bacteremia, osteomyelitis and necrotizing pneumonia. Some S. aureus lineages have been described in cases of necrotizing pneumonia worldwide, usually in young, previously healthy patients. In this work, we describe a fatal case of necrotizing pneumonia due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus clone ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in an immunocompetent adult patient.

  17. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of community-acquired pneumonia in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: a retrospective analysis of 79 HIV/AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zhiyao; Rong, Xiajun; Cheng, Qijian; Zhou, Min; Gong, Qiming; Shi, Guochao; Wan, Huanying

    2014-07-01

    HIV infections are prevalent; however, the clinical characteristics of these patients are atypical. In the present study, we analysed 79 patients who were newly diagnosed with HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) at Ruijin Hospital between January 1998 and August 2011 to improve awareness of the physicians' diagnoses and to elucidate the risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and the progression to severe pneumonia or respiratory failure in AIDS patients. The patients were divided into a CAP group (A) and a non-CAP group (B). Furthermore, group A was divided into a severe pneumonia group (A1 ) and a non-severe pneumonia group (A2 ). The serum albumin (25.60 ± 5.31 vs 34.00 ± 6.90; P pneumonia or respiratory failure. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Hypoalbuminemia, influenza vaccination and other factors related to the development of pneumonia acquired outside hospitals in southern Japan: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Masakazu; Kondo, Kyoko; Fujisawa, Nobumitsu; Harada, Eiji; Tashiro, Hideki; Mizokami, Tetsuya; Nogami, Hiroko; Iwanaga, Tomoaki; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Suzuki, Kanzo; Ohfuji, Satoko; Fukushima, Wakaba; Hirota, Yoshio

    2016-02-01

    Pneumonia is the third largest cause of death in Japan. Pneumonia continues to be one of the most common causes of morbidity, hospitalization and mortality, especially in the elderly. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the factors related to the development of pneumonia acquired outside hospitals among the Japanese elderly. We carried out a hospital-based, case-control study. Cases were patients who had been newly diagnosed with pneumonia acquired outside hospitals. For each case, one to three controls were defined as outpatients with other diseases (not pneumonia) at the same hospitals. All participants (i.e. 50 cases and 110 controls) were aged 65 years and older. Compared with control participants, hypoalbuminemia (vaccination rate of seasonal influenza were lower in patients with pneumonia than control participants. Even after controlling for age, sex, hospital and aforementioned four factors, hypoalbuminemia (OR 9.19, 95% CI 3.70-22.81) increased the risk of pneumonia, whereas seasonal influenza vaccination (OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.16-0.85) reduced the risk. Even after excluding those who lived in a nursing home, hypoalbuminemina (OR 12.19, 95% CI 4.29-34.63) increased the risk of pneumonia. Hypoalbuminemia might be a risk factor for pneumonia among the elderly living in the community. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and Dosing of Ceftobiprole Medocaril for the Treatment of Hospital- and Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Different Patient Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Antonio; Mouton, Johan Willem; Pea, Federico

    2016-12-01

    Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are among the most common infections treated in the hospital setting, and together they place a significant burden on healthcare systems. Successful management of HAP and CAP depends on rapid initiation of empirical antibiotic therapy with broad-spectrum antibiotics. Ceftobiprole is a new-generation, broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic for the treatment of HAP (excluding ventilator-associated pneumonia) and CAP. It displays potent in vitro activity against a broad range of pathogens important in pneumonia. This review summarizes the pharmacokinetic profile of ceftobiprole, and considers the pharmacokinetic parameters and pharmacodynamics underlying the choice of dosing regimen. Ceftobiprole shows linear pharmacokinetics after single and multiple doses and is eliminated predominantly through the kidneys. Ceftobiprole is administered as a 500 mg intravenous infusion over 2 h every 8 h, and steady-state concentrations are reached on the first day of dosing. Dose adjustment is recommended for patients with moderate or severe renal impairment and for those with end-stage renal disease. Extending the infusion time of ceftobiprole to 4 h is recommended to optimize drug exposure in critically ill patients with augmented renal clearance. However, there is no need for dose adjustments based on age, sex or ethnicity, or for patients with severe obesity. Population pharmacokinetic modelling and Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the optimal dosing regimen for ceftobiprole in special patient populations, including paediatric patients. Future studies of ceftobiprole in patients with HAP and CAP would be of interest.

  20. Moxifloxacin monotherapy is effective in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia: the MOTIV study--a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Antoni; Garau, Javier; Arvis, Pierre; Carlet, Jean; Choudhri, Shurjeel; Kureishi, Amar; Le Berre, Marie-Aude; Lode, Hartmut; Winter, John; Read, Robert C

    2008-05-15

    The aim of this study was to show that sequential intravenous and oral moxifloxacin monotherapy (400 mg once per day) is as efficacious and safe as a combination regimen (intravenous ceftriaxone, 2 g once per day, plus sequential intravenous and oral levofloxacin, 500 mg twice per day) in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. We conducted a prospective, multicenter, randomized, double-blind noninferiority trial. Patients with a Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) of III-V were stratified on the basis of PSI risk class before randomization. The primary efficacy end point was clinical response at test of cure (4-14 days after the completion of treatment). Secondary efficacy end points were clinical and bacteriological response at end of treatment (days 7-14) and at follow-up assessment (21-28 days after the end of treatment), overall mortality, and mortality attributable to pneumonia. Seven hundred thirty-three patients were enrolled in the study (368 in the moxifloxacin arm and 365 in the comparator arm); 49% had a PSI of IV, and 10% had a PSI of V. Of 569 patients (291 in the moxifloxacin arm and 278 in the comparator arm) valid for per-protocol analysis, the overall clinical cure rates at test of cure were 86.9% for moxifloxacin and 89.9% for the comparator regimen (95% confidence interval, -8.1% to 2.2%). Bacteriological success at test of cure was 83.3% for moxifloxacin and 85.1% for the comparator regimen (95% confidence interval, -15.4% to 11.8%). There were no significant differences between moxifloxacin and comparator treatments in the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events or in mortality. Monotherapy with sequential intravenous/oral moxifloxacin was noninferior to treatment with ceftriaxone plus levofloxacin combination therapy in patients with community-acquired pneumonia who required hospitalization.

  1. An Update on Aerosolized Antibiotics for Treating Hospital-Acquired and Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, G Christopher; Swanson, Joseph M

    2017-12-01

    A significant percentage of patients with hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) have poor outcomes with intravenous antibiotics. It is not clear if adding aerosolized antibiotics improves treatment. This review is an update on using aerosolized antibiotics for treating HAP/VAP in adults. PubMed search using the terms "aerosolized antibiotics pneumonia," "nebulized antibiotics pneumonia," and "inhaled antibiotics pneumonia." Reference lists from identified articles were also searched. Clinical studies of aerosolized antibiotics for treating HAP/VAP in adults from July 2010 to March 2017. This article updates a previous review on this topic written in mid-2010. The size and quality of studies have improved dramatically in the recent time period compared to previous studies. However, there still are not large randomized controlled trials available. Colistin and aminoglycosides were the most commonly studied agents, and the most common pathogens were Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter. The clinical efficacy of adding aerosolized antibiotics was mixed. Approximately half of the studies showed better outcomes, and none showed worse outcomes. Aerosolized antibiotics appear to be relatively safe, though pulmonary adverse events can occur. Attention to proper administration technique in mechanically ventilated patients is required, including the use of vibrating plate nebulizers. Adding aerosolized antibiotics to intravenous antibiotics may improve the outcomes of adult patients with HAP/VAP in some settings. It seems reasonable to add aerosolized antibiotics in patients with multidrug-resistant organisms or who appear to be failing therapy. Clinicians should pay attention to potential adverse events and proper administration technique.

  2. Evolution of acute infection with atypical bacteria in a prospective cohort of children with community-acquired pneumonia receiving amoxicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento-Carvalho, Cristiana M; Xavier-Souza, Gabriel; Vilas-Boas, Ana-Luisa; Fontoura, Maria-Socorro H; Barral, Aldina; Puolakkainen, Mirja; Ruuskanen, Olli

    2017-08-01

    Atypical bacteria are treatable causative agents of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, there is no conclusive evidence that a child with CAP should receive empirical treatment against such agents. We assessed the possibility of association between clinical failure and acute infection by these bacteria among children with CAP treated with amoxicillin. Patients aged 2-59 months with non-severe CAP received amoxicillin during prospective follow-up. Acute and convalescent blood samples were collected. Probable acute infection by Mycoplasma pneumoniae (specific IgM antibodies), by Chlamydia pneumoniae or Chlamydia trachomatis (specific IgM antibodies and/or IgG/IgA titre change) was investigated. Outcomes were assessed during follow-up at 2, 5 and 14-28 days. Treatment failure included development of danger signs, persistent fever, tachypnoea or death. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01200706. Of 787 children, 86 (10.9%; 95% CI = 8.9%-13.3%) had acute M. pneumoniae infection. C. pneumoniae acute infection was found in 79 of 733 (10.8%; 95% CI = 8.7%-13.2%) and C. trachomatis was found in 3 of 28 (10.7%; 95% CI = 2.8%-26.5%) amoxicillin was substituted in 3.5% versus 2.7% among patients with or without acute infection by one of these bacteria ( P  =   0.6). The overall substitution rate of amoxicillin was very low. It is not necessary to give an empirical non-β-lactam antibiotic as a first-line option to treat every child between 2 and 59 months old with non-severe CAP. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. IL-6 and TNF-α serum levels are associated with early death in community-acquired pneumonia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacci, M R; Leme, R C P; Zing, N P C; Murad, N; Adami, F; Hinnig, P F; Feder, D; Chagas, A C P; Fonseca, F L A

    2015-05-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is amongst the leading causes of death worldwide. As inflammatory markers, cytokines can predict outcomes, if interpreted together with clinical data and scoring systems such as CURB-65, CRB, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II). The aim of this study was to determine the impact of inflammatory biomarkers on the early mortality of hospitalized CAP patients. Twenty-seven CAP patients needing hospitalization were enrolled for the study and samples of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), C-reactive protein (CRP), and homocystein were collected at the time of admission (day 1) as well as on the seventh day of the treatment. There was a significant reduction in the levels of IL-6 between the first and the second collections. Median IL-6 values decreased from 24 pg/mL (day 1) to 8 pg/mL (day 7) (P=0.016). The median levels of TNF-α were higher in patients: i) with acute kidney injury (AKI) (P=0.045), ii) requiring mechanical ventilation (P=0.040), iii) with short hospital stays (P=0.009), iv) admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) (P=0.040), v) who died early (P=0.003), and vi) with worse CRB scores (P=0.013). In summary, IL-6 and TNF-α levels were associated with early mortality of CAP patients. Longer admission levels demonstrated greater likelihood of early death and overall mortality, necessity of mechanical ventilation, and AKI.

  4. IL-6 and TNF-α serum levels are associated with early death in community-acquired pneumonia patients

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    M.R. Bacci

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is amongst the leading causes of death worldwide. As inflammatory markers, cytokines can predict outcomes, if interpreted together with clinical data and scoring systems such as CURB-65, CRB, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of inflammatory biomarkers on the early mortality of hospitalized CAP patients. Twenty-seven CAP patients needing hospitalization were enrolled for the study and samples of interleukin-1 (IL-1 and interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, C-reactive protein (CRP, and homocystein were collected at the time of admission (day 1 as well as on the seventh day of the treatment. There was a significant reduction in the levels of IL-6 between the first and the second collections. Median IL-6 values decreased from 24 pg/mL (day 1 to 8 pg/mL (day 7 (P=0.016. The median levels of TNF-α were higher in patients: i with acute kidney injury (AKI (P=0.045, ii requiring mechanical ventilation (P=0.040, iii with short hospital stays (P=0.009, iv admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU (P=0.040, v who died early (P=0.003, and vi with worse CRB scores (P=0.013. In summary, IL-6 and TNF-α levels were associated with early mortality of CAP patients. Longer admission levels demonstrated greater likelihood of early death and overall mortality, necessity of mechanical ventilation, and AKI.

  5. IL-6 and TNF-α serum levels are associated with early death in community-acquired pneumonia patients

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    Bacci, M.R.; Leme, R.C.P.; Zing, N.P.C. [Departamento de Cliníca Médica, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Murad, N. [Departamento de Cardiologia, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Adami, F.; Hinnig, P.F. [Departamento de Cliníca Médica, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Feder, D. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Chagas, A.C.P. [Departamento de Cardiologia, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, F.L.A. [Departamento de Cliníca Médica, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil)

    2015-02-24

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is amongst the leading causes of death worldwide. As inflammatory markers, cytokines can predict outcomes, if interpreted together with clinical data and scoring systems such as CURB-65, CRB, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II). The aim of this study was to determine the impact of inflammatory biomarkers on the early mortality of hospitalized CAP patients. Twenty-seven CAP patients needing hospitalization were enrolled for the study and samples of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), C-reactive protein (CRP), and homocystein were collected at the time of admission (day 1) as well as on the seventh day of the treatment. There was a significant reduction in the levels of IL-6 between the first and the second collections. Median IL-6 values decreased from 24 pg/mL (day 1) to 8 pg/mL (day 7) (P=0.016). The median levels of TNF-α were higher in patients: i) with acute kidney injury (AKI) (P=0.045), ii) requiring mechanical ventilation (P=0.040), iii) with short hospital stays (P=0.009), iv) admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) (P=0.040), v) who died early (P=0.003), and vi) with worse CRB scores (P=0.013). In summary, IL-6 and TNF-α levels were associated with early mortality of CAP patients. Longer admission levels demonstrated greater likelihood of early death and overall mortality, necessity of mechanical ventilation, and AKI.

  6. Coverage of atypical pathogens for hospitalised patients with community-acquired pneumonia is not guided by clinical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piso, Rein J; Arnold, Christiane; Bassetti, Stefano

    2013-09-19

    Although most experts recommend empirical antibiotic treatment, covering also atypical bacteria, for patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), the data are not clear for patients admitted to a general ward. European guidelines recommend starting empirical treatment with a beta-lactam antibiotic with or without a macrolide, but the with/without is not clarified. We investigated whether the use of antibiotic coverage for atypical pathogens was guided by clinical parameters. We retrospectively analysed 300 patients hospitalised with community-acquired pneumonia. Four parameters for possible atypical pneumonia (age pneumonia severity (pneumonia severity index [PSI], ICU admission, pO2 atypical pathogens. Correlations were calculated using the chi-square test for 2 x 2 tables. Patients younger than 55 years significantly more likely to receive coverage for atypical pathogens than older patients (odds ratio [OR] 2.68; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-5.5, p = 0.009). In patients with a PSI >III the proportion receiving coverage for atypical bacteria was even smaller than in patients with less severe pneumonia (OR 0.77; 95% CI 0.60-0.99, p = 0.03), but no difference was found for PSI >IV compared with PSI ≤IV (OR = 1.03; 95% CI 0.61-1.74, p = 0.9). The other clinical parameters had no effect on antibiotic coverage: ICU admission (OR =1.39; 95% CI 0.87-2.4, p = 0.15); pO2 >8 kPa or O2-Saturation >90% (OR 1.36; 95% CI 0.85-2.17, p = 0.19); abdominal symptoms (OR 1.06; 95% CI 0.51-2.25, p = 0.88); sodium atypical pathogens (r = 0.48). Mortality was no different between patients in whom atypical pathogens were covered compared with those with beta-lactam therapy alone (OR 1.2; 95% CI 0.66-2.25, p = 0.43). Physicians have difficulties deciding when to cover atypical pathogens in hospitalised patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Guidelines should clarify under what circumstances combination therapy is warranted.

  7. Influence of socioeconomic status on community-acquired pneumonia outcomes in elderly patients requiring hospitalization: a multicenter observational study

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    Carratalà Jordi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The associations between socioeconomic status and community-acquired pneumonia outcomes in adults have been studied although studies did not always document a relationship. The aim of this multicenter observational study was to determine the association between socioeconomic status and community-acquired pneumonia outcomes in the elderly, in the context of a public health system providing universal free care to the whole population. Methods A total of 651 patients aged ≥65 years hospitalized due to community-acquired pneumonia through the emergency departments of five Spanish public hospitals were recruited and followed up between May 2005 and January 2007. The primary outcomes studied were: length of stay, intensive care unit admission, overall mortality and readmission. Socioeconomic status was measured using both individual and community data: occupation [categorized in six social groups (I, II, III, IVa, IVb and V], educational level (≤ primary level or ≥ secondary level and disposable family income of the municipality or district of residence [>12,500 € (high municipality family income and ≤12,500 € (low municipality family income]. The six social groups were further categorized as upper/middle social class (groups I-IVb and lower class (group V. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed. OR and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated. All statistical tests were two tailed and statistical significance was established as p Results 17.7% of patients lived in a municipality or district with a high municipality family income and 63.6% were upper/middle social class (I-IVb. Only 15.7% of patients had a secondary education. The adjusted analysis showed no association between pneumonia outcomes and social class, educational level or municipality family income. However, length of stay increased significantly in patients in whom the factors, living alone and being a smoker or ex-smoker coincided (p

  8. Influence of Antibiotics on the Detection of Bacteria by Culture-Based and Culture-Independent Diagnostic Tests in Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Aaron M; Bramley, Anna M; Jain, Seema; Arnold, Sandra R; Ampofo, Krow; Self, Wesley H; Williams, Derek J; Anderson, Evan J; Grijalva, Carlos G; McCullers, Jonathan A; Pavia, Andrew T; Wunderink, Richard G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Winchell, Jonas M; Hicks, Lauri A

    2017-01-01

    Specimens collected after antibiotic exposure may reduce culture-based bacterial detections. The impact on culture-independent diagnostic tests is unclear. We assessed the effect of antibiotic exposure on both of these test results among patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Culture-based bacterial testing included blood cultures and high-quality sputum or endotracheal tube (ET) aspirates; culture-independent testing included urinary antigen testing (adults) for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal (NP/OP) swabs for Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae . The proportion of bacterial detections was compared between specimens collected before and after either any antibiotic exposure (prehospital and/or inpatient) or only prehospital antibiotics and increasing time after initiation of inpatient antibiotics. Of 4678 CAP patients, 4383 (94%) received antibiotics: 3712 (85%) only inpatient, 642 (15%) both inpatient and prehospital, and 29 (<1%) only prehospital. There were more bacterial detections in specimens collected before antibiotics for blood cultures (5.2% vs 2.6%; P < .01) and sputum/ET cultures (50.0% vs 26.8%; P < .01) but not urine antigen (7.0% vs 5.7%; P = .53) or NP/OP PCR (6.7% vs 5.4%; P = .31). For all diagnostic testing, bacterial detections declined with increasing time between inpatient antibiotic administration and specimen collection. Bacteria were less frequently detected in culture-based tests collected after antibiotics and in culture-independent tests that had longer intervals between antibiotic exposure and specimen collection. Bacterial yield could improve if specimens were collected promptly, preferably before antibiotics, providing data for improved antibiotic selection.

  9. Improvement of antibiotic therapy and ICU survival in severe non-pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia: a matched case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattarello, Simone; Lagunes, Leonel; Vidaur, Loreto; Solé-Violán, Jordi; Zaragoza, Rafael; Vallés, Jordi; Torres, Antoni; Sierra, Rafael; Sebastian, Rosa; Rello, Jordi

    2015-09-10

    We aimed to compare intensive care unit mortality due to non-pneumococcal severe community-acquired pneumonia between the periods 2000-2002 and 2008-2014, and the impact of the improvement in antibiotic strategies on outcomes. This was a matched case-control study enrolling 144 patients with non-pneumococcal severe pneumonia: 72 patients from the 2000-2002 database (CAPUCI I group) were paired with 72 from the 2008-2014 period (CAPUCI II group), matched by the following variables: microorganism, shock at admission, invasive mechanical ventilation, immunocompromise, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and age over 65 years. The most frequent microorganism was methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (22.1%) followed by Legionella pneumophila and Haemophilus influenzae (each 20.7%); prevalence of shock was 59.7%, while 73.6% of patients needed invasive mechanical ventilation. Intensive care unit mortality was significantly lower in the CAPUCI II group (34.7% versus 16.7%; odds ratio (OR) 0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.64-0.95; p = 0.02). Appropriate therapy according to microorganism was 91.5% in CAPUCI I and 92.7% in CAPUCI II, while combined therapy and early antibiotic treatment were significantly higher in CAPUCI II (76.4 versus 90.3% and 37.5 versus 63.9%; p antibiotic therapy (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.07-0.74) and early antibiotic treatment (OR 0.07, 95% CI 0.02-0.22) were independently associated with decreased intensive care unit mortality. In non-pneumococcal severe community-acquired pneumonia , early antibiotic administration and use of combined antibiotic therapy were both associated with increased intensive care unit survival during the study period.

  10. Emergence and Dissemination of ST131 Escherichia coli Isolates Among Patients with Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia in Asian Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Min Kyeong; Kang, Cheol-In; Kim, So Hyun; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; So, Thomas Man-Kit; Ha, Young Eun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the molecular epidemiology and microbiological characteristics of 51 Escherichia coli isolates causing hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) in eight Asian areas. Sequence type 131 (ST131) was the most prevalent among E. coli isolates causing HAP, especially in South Korea, Thailand, and the Philippines. The current study showed that CTX-M-15-producing E. coli ST131 has emerged in and disseminated among patients with HAP in Asia. Our data suggest that this pandemic clone poses an important public health threat even in nosocomial infections.

  11. Clinical presentation and diagnostic workup for community-acquired pneumonia: the Gulf Corporation Council CAP Working Group consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memish, Z A; Arabi, Y M; Ahmed, Q A; Al Jahdali, H; Shibl, A M; Niederman, M S

    2007-10-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is diagnosed on the basis of a suggestive history and compatible physical findings and new infiltrates on a chest radiograph. No criteria or combination of criteria based on history and physical examination have been found to be gold standard. With the rise in elderly Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) residents, CAP is likely to present with non-classical manifestations such as somnolence, new anorexia, and confusion and carries a worse outcome than CAP in their younger counterparts. Tuberculosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unresolving CAP in the GCC region. Diagnostic work up depends on severity of CAP, clinical course and underlying risk factors.

  12. The Impact of Hospital-Acquired Conditions on Medicare..

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in The Impact of Hospital-Acquired Conditions on Medicare Program Payments, published in Volume 4, Issue 4 of the Medicare and...

  13. Characteristic of the Oxidative Stress in Blood of Patients in Dependence of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muravlyova, Larissa; Molotov-Luchankiy, Vilen; Bakirova, Ryszhan; Klyuyev, Dmitriy; Demidchik, Ludmila; Lee, Valentina

    2016-03-15

    At the present time the alternation of the oxidative metabolism is considered as one of the leading pathogenic mechanisms in the development and progression of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However the nature and direction of the oxidative protein changes in CAP patient's blood had been almost unexplored. To define oxidative and modified proteins in erythrocytes and blood plasma of CAP patients. Blood plasma and erythrocytes obtained from: 42 patients with moderate severity pneumonia, 12 patients with grave severity pneumonia and 32 healthy volunteers. Content of advanced oxidation protein products, malondialdehyde and reactive carbonyl derivatives were estimated as indicators of the oxidative stress and oxidative damage of proteins. In patients with grave severity the level of oxidative proteins and MDA in erythrocytes exceeded both: control values and similar meanings in CAP patients with moderate severity. The further growth of MDA in this group patients' blood plasma was observed, but the level of oxidative proteins decreased in comparison with those in CAP patients with moderate severity. To sum up, our derived data show, that injury of erythrocytes' redox-status and blood plasma components plays an essential role in development and progression CAP.

  14. Community-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa-pneumonia in a previously healthy man occupationally exposed to metalworking fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Peixoto Ferraz de Campos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is well known and frequently found in hospitals and nursing care facilities, many cases are also reported outside these boundaries. In general, this pathogen infects debilitated patients either by comorbidities or by any form of immunodeficiency. In cases of respiratory infection, tobacco abuse seems to play an important role as a risk factor. In previously healthy patients, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP with P. aeruginosa as the etiological agent is extremely rare, and unlike the cases involving immunocompromised or hospitalized patients, the outcome is severe, and is fatal in up to 61.1% of cases. Aerosolized contaminated water or solutions are closely linked to the development of respiratory tract infection. In this setting, metalworking fluids used in factories may be implicated in CAP involving previously healthy people. The authors report the case of a middle-aged man who worked in a metalworking factory and presented a right upper lobar pneumonia with a rapid fatal outcome. P. aeruginosa was cultured from blood and tracheal aspirates. The autopsy findings confirmed a hemorrhagic necrotizing pneumonia with bacteria-invading vasculitis and thrombosis. A culture of the metalworking fluid of the factory was also positive for P. aeruginosa. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that both strains (blood culture and metalworking fluid were genetically indistinguishable. The authors highlight the occupational risk for the development of this P. aeruginosa-infection in healthy people.

  15. High incidence of community-acquired pneumonia among rapidly aging population in Japan: a prospective hospital-based surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Masahiro; Nakama, Takahiro; Ishida, Masayuki; Morimoto, Hitomi; Nagasaki, Yuka; Shiramizu, Rina; Hamashige, Naohisa; Chikamori, Masayuki; Yoshida, Laymyint; Ariyoshi, Koya; Suzuki, Motoi; Morimoto, Konosuke

    2014-01-01

    The age-group-specific incidence and etiological patterns of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) have not been fully established in Japan. A 2-year prospective surveillance was conducted in Kochi city, Western Japan. All CAP patients aged ≥15 years who visited a community-based hospital were enrolled in the study. Clinical samples were examined by conventional bacterial culture and urinary antigen tests, and 6 bacterial pathogens and 16 respiratory viruses were identified from sputum samples by multiplex polymerase chain reaction assays. The age-group-specific incidence of CAP was estimated using a population-based data set of the total number of outpatients in the whole city. Ninety of the 131 enrolled patients, 68.7% were positive for respiratory pathogens. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the leading bacterial pathogen identified (28.2%). Respiratory viruses were identified in 36 patients (27.5%), and human entero-rhinovirus was the most common (13.3%) among them. The estimated overall incidence of adult CAP in Kochi was 9.6 per 1,000 person-years (PY); the estimated age group-specific incidence was 3.4, 10.7, and 42.9 per 1,000 PY for those aged 15-64, 65-74, and ≥75 years, respectively. The high incidence of CAP in these rural city of Japan, probably reflects the substantial aged population. S. pneumoniae and respiratory viruses play important roles in CAP in all age groups.

  16. Characteristic of the Oxidative Stress in Blood of Patients in Dependence of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Severity

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    Larissa Muravlyova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: At the present time the alternation of the oxidative metabolism is considered as one of the leading pathogenic mechanisms in the development and progression of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. However the nature and direction of the oxidative protein changes in CAP patient’s blood had been almost unexplored. AIM: To define oxidative and modified proteins in erythrocytes and blood plasma of CAP patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Blood plasma and erythrocytes obtained from: 42 patients with moderate severity pneumonia, 12 patients with grave severity pneumonia and 32 healthy volunteers. Content of advanced oxidation protein products, malondialdehyde and reactive carbonyl derivatives were estimated as indicators of the oxidative stress and oxidative damage of proteins. RESULTS: In patients with grave severity the level of oxidative proteins and MDA in erythrocytes exceeded both: control values and similar meanings in CAP patients with moderate severity. The further growth of MDA in this group patients’ blood plasma was observed, but the level of oxidative proteins decreased in comparison with those in CAP patients with moderate severity. CONCLUSION: To sum up, our derived data show, that injury of erythrocytes’ redox-status and blood plasma components plays an essential role in development and progression CAP.

  17. Disease characteristics and management of hospitalised adolescents and adults with community-acquired pneumonia in China: a retrospective multicentre survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Zhou, Fei; Li, Hui; Xing, Xiqian; Han, Xiudi; Wang, Yiming; Zhang, Chunxiao; Suo, Lijun; Wang, Jingxiang; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Guangqiang; Yao, Xuexin; Yu, Hongxia; Wang, Lei; Liu, Meng; Xue, Chunxue; Liu, Bo; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Yanli; Xiao, Ying; Cui, Xiaojing; Li, Lijuan; Uyeki, Timothy M; Wang, Chen; Cao, Bin

    2018-02-15

    To describe the clinical characteristics and management of patients hospitalised with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in China. This was a multicentre, retrospective, observational study. 13 teaching hospitals in northern, central and southern China from 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2014 PARTICIPANTS: Information on hospitalised patients aged ≥14 years with radiographically confirmed pneumonia with illness onset in the community was collected using standard case report forms. Resource use for CAP management. Of 14 793 patients screened, 5828 with radiographically confirmed CAP were included in the final analysis. Low mortality risk patients with a CURB-65 score 0-1 and Pneumonia Severity Index risk class I-II accounted for 81.2% (4434/5594) and 56.4% (2034/3609) patients, respectively. 21.7% (1111/5130) patients had already achieved clinical stability on admission. A definite or probable pathogen was identified only in 12.7% (738/5828) patients. 40.9% (1575/3852) patients without pseudomonal infection risk factors received antimicrobial overtreatment regimens. The median duration between clinical stability to discharge was 5.0 days with 30-day mortality of 4.2%. These data demonstrated the overuse of health resources in CAP management, indicating that there is potential for improvement and substantial savings to healthcare systems in China. NCT02489578; Results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Gatifloxacin in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonias: a comparative trial of ceftriaxone, with or without macrolides, in hospitalized adult patients with mild to moderately severe pneumonia

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    J.S. Mendonça

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia is very common, but some of the cases do require hospitalization for treatment, particularly when older patients and/or co-morbidities are involved; both "typical" and "atypical" respiratory pathogens take part etiologically, and there is increasing concern about the emergence of resistance. There is interest in therapeutic options that can: a comprehend such a spectrum of bacteria and resistance; b allow parenteral to oral sequential treatment. We made a multicenter, prospective and randomized trial to compare the "standard" treatment of ceftriaxone IV alone or in combination with erythromycin IV, followed by clarithromycin PO (ceftriaxone treatment arm, with gatifloxacin IV, followed by oral administration (gatifloxacin treatment arm. The need for hospitalization was based on clinical criteria as judged by the investigators. Standardized criteria for diagnosis and follow-up were employed. Fifty-six patients were enrolled, with 48% over 65 years old, and there were frequent co-morbidities. Of these, 51 were clinically evaluable, 26 in the gatifloxacin and 25 in the ceftriaxone arm, with comparable success rates, 92% and 88%, respectively, even when major prognostic factors were considered. There were no serious adverse events or significant laboratory value changes attributable to the study drugs. Gatifloxacin as monotherapy (initially IV then orally until completion of treatment was shown to be effective and safe, comparable to ceftriaxone IV alone or in combination with a macrolide (initially IV then orally until completion of treatment, in empirical therapy for community-acquired pneumonias, for patients that, at the physician s discretion, require initial treatment as inpatients.

  19. [Diagnostic and prognostic power of biomarkers to improve the management of community acquired pneumonia in the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Timón Zapata, Jesús; Laserna Mendieta, Emilio José; Sicilia-Bravo, Isabel; Palomo-de Los Reyes, María José; Cabezas-Martínez, Angeles; Laín-Terés, Natividad; Estebaran-Martín, Josefa; Lozano-Ancín, Agustín; Cuena-Boy, Rafael

    2014-04-01

    To analyse the usefulness and performance of several biomarkers [C-reactive protein (CRP), mid-regional pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM), procalcitonin (PCT)] and lactate in predicting short- and medium-term mortality compared with the prognostic severity scales (PSS) usually employed for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in assessing the aetiological suspicion of infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae and bacteraemia. Observational, prospective and analytical study was conducted on patients who were diagnosed with CAP in our emergency department (ED). The data collected included socio-demographic and comorbidity variables, Charlson index, priority level according to the Spanish Triage System (STS), stage in the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) and in the CURB-65 (confusion, urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure and age ≥65years), criteria of severe CAP, microbiological studies, and biomarkers determinations. The patients were followed-up for 180days to calculate the prognostic power and the diagnostic performance for bacteraemia and aetiology. A total of 127patients were finally enrolled in the study. The 30-day mortality was 10.3% (13), and 22.6% (28) at 180 days. Blood cultures were positive in 29 patients (23%) and S.pneumoniae was identified as the responsible pathogen in 28 cases (22.2%). The area under the ROC curve (AUC-ROC) for lactate and MR-proADM to predict 30-day mortality was 0.898 (95%CI: 0.824-0.973; P0.85ng/ml, the NPV and the LR+ were 96.6% and 5.89%, respectively, to predict a S.pneumoniae infection. MR-proADM and lactate showed a similar or even better performance for 30-day intra-hospital mortality than PSI, CURB-65, STS and CAP severity criteria in patients diagnosed with CAP (P>.05). Furthermore, the MR-proADM capacity to predict 180-day mortality was higher than PSS and the rest of biomarkers (P>.05), and its AUC-ROC increased if it was used in combination with PSI, CURB65 and STS. The determination of PCT has a remarkable diagnostic

  20. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of severe community-acquired pneumonia in children after introduction of the 10-valent pneumococcal vaccine

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    Lima EJF

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Eduardo JF Lima,1,2 Maria JG Mello,1,2 Maria FPM Albuquerque,3 Maria IL Lopes,4 George HC Serra,2 Maria AZ Abreu-Lima,2 Jailson B Correia1 1Instituto de Medicina Integral Prof. Fernando Figueira - IMIP Recife; 2Faculdade, Pernambucana de Saúde - FPS Recife; 3Centro de Pesquisas Aggeu Magalhães, FIOCRUZ; 4Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco - UFPE, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil Background: Pneumonia is an important cause of morbimortality in Brazil, despite the extensive vaccination coverage and the socioeconomic improvement in the past years. Objective: To describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of severe community-acquired pneumonia in children after the introduction of the 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10. Methods: A prospective study included children <5 years old hospitalized for pneumonia between October 2010 and September 2013 in a tertiary hospital. Newborns and children with comorbidities were excluded. Pneumonia classification followed the clinical and radiological criteria established by World Health Organization (WHO. Clinical history, nutritional status, immunizations, diagnosis, disease course, and prognosis were analyzed. Results: Among 452 children, almost 70% were <2 years, with no sex differences, and 10% had weight-for-age z score below than -2.0. Family income was up to one minimum wage in half the households, and 40% of mothers had completed high school. The suitability of both influenza and PCV10 vaccine schedules was ~50%. The first medical care happened later than 72 hours after the onset of symptoms in 42% of cases. Pneumonia was classified as severe or very severe in 83.9% of patients and for 23% as complicated. Global mortality was 1.5%. Hypoxia, diagnosed in 51.5% of children, looked like a better prognosis predictor than the WHO classification. Conclusion: New strategies for health care are necessary, such as the incorporation of peripheral saturometry as the

  1. pneumoniae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the first report in 1967, the incidence of Penicillin Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pneu- mococcus) has risen steadily worldwide, and now complicates diagnostic and treatment strategies for infections due to this organism. More worrisome is the fact that in areas where Penicillin Resistant. Streptococcus ...

  2. Pro-adrenomedullin usefulness in the management of children with community-acquired pneumonia, a preliminar prospective observational study

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    Sardà Sánchez Marta

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In adult population with community acquired pneumonia high levels of pro-adrenomedullin (pro-ADM have been shown to be predictors of worse prognosis. The role of this biomarker in pediatric patients had not been analyzed to date. The objective of this study is to know the levels of pro-ADM in children with community acquired pneumonia (CAP and analyze the relation between these levels and the patients’ prognosis. Findings Prospective observational study including patients attended in the emergency service (January to October 2009 admitted to hospital with CAP and no complications at admission. The values for pro-ADM were analyzed in relation to: need for oxygen therapy, duration of oxygen therapy, fever and antibiotic therapy, complications, admission to the intensive care unit, and length of hospital stay. Fifty patients were included. Ten presented complications (7 pleural effusion. The median level of pro-ADM was 1.0065 nmol/L (range 0.3715 to 7.2840 nmol/L. The patients presenting complications had higher levels of pro-ADM (2.3190 vs. 1.1758 nmol/L, p = 0.013. Specifically, the presence of pleural effusion was associated with higher levels of pro-ADM (2.9440 vs. 1.1373 nmol/L, p  Conclusions In our sample of patients admitted to hospital with CAP, pro-ADM levels are related to the development of complications during hospitalization.

  3. Following in real time the impact of pneumococcal virulence factors in an acute mouse pneumonia model using bioluminescent bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Malek; Abdullah, Mohammed R; Schulz, Christian; Kohler, Thomas; Pribyl, Thomas; Jensch, Inga; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2014-02-23

    Pneumonia is one of the major health care problems in developing and industrialized countries and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in knowledge of this illness, the availability of intensive care units (ICU), and the use of potent antimicrobial agents and effective vaccines, the mortality rates remain high(1). Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading pathogen of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and one of the most common causes of bacteremia in humans. This pathogen is equipped with an armamentarium of surface-exposed adhesins and virulence factors contributing to pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The assessment of the in vivo role of bacterial fitness or virulence factors is of utmost importance to unravel S. pneumoniae pathogenicity mechanisms. Murine models of pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis are being used to determine the impact of pneumococcal factors at different stages of the infection. Here we describe a protocol to monitor in real-time pneumococcal dissemination in mice after intranasal or intraperitoneal infections with bioluminescent bacteria. The results show the multiplication and dissemination of pneumococci in the lower respiratory tract and blood, which can be visualized and evaluated using an imaging system and the accompanying analysis software.

  4. The risk of community-acquired pneumonia among 9803 patients with coeliac disease compared to the general population: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingone, F; Abdul Sultan, A; Crooks, C J; Tata, L J; Ciacci, C; West, J

    2016-07-01

    Patients with coeliac disease are considered as individuals for whom pneumococcal vaccination is advocated. To quantify the risk of community-acquired pneumonia among patients with coeliac disease, assessing whether vaccination against streptococcal pneumonia modified this risk. We identified all patients with coeliac disease within the Clinical Practice Research Datalink linked with English Hospital Episodes Statistics between April 1997 and March 2011 and up to 10 controls per patient with coeliac disease frequency matched in 10-year age bands. Absolute rates of community-acquired pneumonia were calculated for patients with coeliac disease compared to controls stratified by vaccination status and time of diagnosis using Cox regression in terms of adjusted hazard ratios (HR). Among 9803 patients with coeliac disease and 101 755 controls, respectively, there were 179 and 1864 first community-acquired pneumonia events. Overall absolute rate of pneumonia was similar in patients with coeliac disease and controls: 3.42 and 3.12 per 1000 person-years respectively (HR 1.07, 95% CI 0.91-1.24). However, we found a 28% increased risk of pneumonia in coeliac disease unvaccinated subjects compared to unvaccinated controls (HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.02-1.60). This increased risk was limited to those younger than 65, was highest around the time of diagnosis and was maintained for more than 5 years after diagnosis. Only 26.6% underwent vaccination after their coeliac disease diagnosis. Unvaccinated patients with coeliac disease under the age of 65 have an excess risk of community-acquired pneumonia that was not found in vaccinated patients with coeliac disease. As only a minority of patients with coeliac disease are being vaccinated there is a missed opportunity to intervene to protect these patients from pneumonia. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Impact of Chest Radiography on Antibiotic Treatment for Children With Suspected Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kyle A; Morrow, Christopher; Wingerter, Sarah L; Bachur, Richard G; Neuman, Mark I

    2016-08-01

    National guidelines discourage routine chest radiographs (CXRs) to confirm suspected pneumonia in children managed as outpatients. However, limiting CXRs may lead to antibiotic overuse. We examined the impact of CXRs and clinical suspicion on antibiotic treatment for children with suspected pneumonia. Children aged 3 months to 18 years undergoing CXR for suspected pneumonia in a pediatric emergency department were prospectively enrolled. Before CXR, physicians indicated their initial plan for antibiotics (yes or no) and clinical suspicion for radiographic pneumonia (75%). Subjects had radiographic pneumonia if their CXRs demonstrated definite or possible findings of pneumonia. We compared antibiotic treatment according to pre-CXR antibiotic plan and suspicion for pneumonia and CXR results. Among the 107 children with a plan for antibiotics before CXR, 72% ultimately received antibiotics compared with 19% of the 1503 children without a pre-CXR plan for antibiotics (P pneumonia were ultimately treated compared with 54% without radiographic pneumonia (P pneumonia were treated compared with 8% without radiographic pneumonia (P pneumonia was low (pneumonia, CXRs infrequently altered the initial plan for antibiotics. However, when clinical suspicion for pneumonia was low, the use of CXR may reduce unnecessary antibiotic use.

  6. THE METABOLIC ACTIVITY OF THE MICROFLORA OF THE OROPHARYNX IN CHILDREN WITH BRONCHITIS AND COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

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    E. A. Medvedeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Given a steady increase in the number of children with recurrent  respiratory tract infections, to develop methods of their rehabilitation, it is necessary to evaluate  factors of nonspecific resistance. Aim: To study metabolic activity of oropharyngeal microflora in children  with recurrent bronchitis and community-acquired pneumonia, based on determination of spectrum  of shortchain fatty acids (SCFA. Materials and methods: This prospective  study included  60 children with recurrent  respiratory  tract  infections  aged  from 3 to 7 years, hospitalized  for inpatient  treatment of bronchitis  (n = 30 and pneumonia (n = 30. The oropharyngeal microflora was assessed by classical bacteriological  method (in mucosal smears; SCFA levels in non-stimulated saliva were measured by gas liquid chromatography. Results: There was no significant difference  in qualitative  and  quantitative composition  of the oropharyngeal microflora between children  with  bronchitis  and  pneumonia. However, assessment of metabolic  functions showed some significant differences. Children with   bronchitis  showed  signs of microflora hyperactivation  with total  SCFA production up  to  118.4% (mean from that of the reference range, with predominant activation of aerobic bacteria (anaerobic index 66.8%. In children with pneumonia, microflora was suppressed (68.13% of the normal range, the difference with the bronchitis group being significant, p < 0.05, with predominance of strictly anaerobic  bacteria (anaerobic index 110.35% from the normal range, p < 0.05. Children with recurrent respiratory tract infections had the following common characteristics: prevalence  of bacterial proteolysis (70% of patients and butyric acid deficiency (63% from the normal level in bronchitis and 33%, in pneumonia, p > 0.05. Conclusion: The data obtained could be used to make a decision on the necessity of antibacterial therapy.

  7. [Current status of diagnosis and treatment of community-acquired pneumonia in Shanghai revealed by a questionnaire analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Zhang, J; Cheng, Q J; Xu, J F; Jie, Z J; Jiao, Y; Huang, Y; Qu, J M

    2018-04-12

    Objective: To understand the current status of diagnosis and treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) among doctors in various hospitals across Shanghai, for the purpose of promoting the 2016 clinical practice guidelines for adult CAP of China. Methods: A questionnaire was designed to address the common questions in CAP management. The responses were collected via WeChat and the data were analyzed. Results: A total of 1 254 valid questionnaires were received, 46.1% from tertiary , 26.4% from secondary and 27.5% from primary care hospitals. Of these valid respondents, 31.4% were respiratory physicians and 68.6% from non-respiratory physicians. When diagnosing CAP, 78.1% of the doctors would use chest CT in more than 50% of the patients. Regarding the tools for evaluating the severity of CAP, 60.3% of the respondents would prefer CURB-65. "Respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation and septic shock" were the most common criteria for admission to ICU. Blood culture was not widely used in severe CAP regardless of the level of hospitals ( P >0.05). The results of this survey showed that the top 5 pathogenic microorganisms of CAP were Streptococcus pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenza and Chlamydia pneumoniae. For non-severe CAP patients, all the doctors tended to select monotherapy. The most frequently used antimicrobial regimen for severe CAP was third- or fourth-generation cephalosporin monotherapy. As for combination therapy, the most frequently used regimen in tertiary hospitals was "carbapenem plus vancomycin" , while in primary and secondary hospitals it was "β-lactams plus macrolides" . More doctors from primary hospitals and non-respiratory medicine would consider "complete resolution of pulmonary opacity" as the indication to discontinue antimicrobial therapy or to discharge patients, and "prolonged high fever" , "large area consolidation" , "multiple lobe-segment involvement " as the indication for

  8. Clinical and Diagnostic Peculiarities of Immunological Adaptation in Children of the First Year of Life Suffering from Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Oleynik

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the immunological parameters in community-acquired pneumonia in infants born with very low birth weight. A comprehensive clinical, laboratory and instrumental examination had been carried out in children of the first year of life suffering from community-acquired pneumonia who were born with very low birth weight. In the vast majority of children the clinical pattern of community-acquired pneumonia manifested with respiratory syndrome, the symptoms of respiratory distress I–II degree, intoxication and the lack of temperature response. Due to immunological examination of infants born with very low birth weight disorders in cellular and humoral immune system, as well as reduced functional capacity of phagocytes had been detected.

  9. Atypical pneumonia linked to community-acquired staphylococcus aureus cross-transmission in the nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filleron, Anne; Lotthé, Anne; Jourdes, Emilie; Jeziorski, Eric; Prodhomme, Olivier; Didelot, Marie-Noëlle; Parer, Sylvie; Marchandin, Hélène; Cambonie, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    We report the observation of a necrotizing pneumonia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus harboring the Panton-Valentine leukocidin-encoding gene in a previously healthy neonate, with favorable clinical outcome in spite of extensive radiologic lesions. The case was linked to a cluster of 3 neonates colonized by Panton-Valentine leukocidin-producing, methicillin-resistant S. aureus through cross-transmission in the nursery, underlining the need to comply with standard infection control precautions in the maternity ward. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Diagnosing Viral and Atypical Pathogens in the Setting of Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterer, Grant W

    2017-03-01

    The 'atypical' pathogens causing pneumonia have long been problematic for physicians because we have had to rely on serologic tests to make a diagnosis. The introduction of polymerase chain reaction techniques revolutionized the diagnosis of respiratory infections and now a new wave of technologies promising faster, cheaper, and more comprehensive testing are becoming available. This review focuses principally on the diagnosis of Legionella, Mycoplasma, and influenza infections, but also covers recent publications on the cutting edge of diagnostic tools likely to transform the field of infectious diseases over the coming decade. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Macrolide therapy for community-acquired pneumonia due to atypical pathogens: outcome assessment at an early time point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    File, Thomas M; Eckburg, Paul B; Talbot, George H; Llorens, Lily; Friedland, H David

    2017-08-01

    Therapy directed against atypical pathogens in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is often recommended. This post-hoc analysis evaluated the effect of addition of a macrolide to ceftaroline fosamil or ceftriaxone treatment in atypical CAP. Two phase 3, double-blind, comparative safety and efficacy studies of ceftaroline fosamil vs. ceftriaxone, FOCUS 1 and FOCUS 2, enrolled adults with CAP. Only FOCUS 1 included 24-h adjunctive clarithromycin therapy for all patients on day 1. Day 4 and test-of-cure (TOC) outcomes were compared for adjunctive vs. no adjunctive therapy. Of 1240 enrolled patients, 130 patients with CAP due to atypical pathogens alone were included (FOCUS 1, n = 64; FOCUS 2, n = 66). Among patients infected with Mycoplasma pneumoniae and/or Chlamydophila pneumoniae alone, a higher clinical response rate was observed with clarithromycin plus ceftaroline fosamil or ceftriaxone compared with treatment without additional clarithromycin at day 4 [38/49 (77.6%; FOCUS 1) vs. 24/43 (55.8%; FOCUS 2)], but not at the TOC assessment [42/49 (85.7%; FOCUS 1) vs. 41/43 (95.3%; FOCUS 2)]. In patients infected with Legionella pneumophila alone, a higher clinical response rate with adjunctive clarithromycin therapy was observed at the TOC assessment alone [12/12 (100%; FOCUS 1) vs. 14/19 (73.7%; FOCUS 2)]. The unadjusted odds ratio of a favourable clinical response at day 4 with adjunctive clarithromycin vs. no adjunctive clarithromycin was 2.4 (95% confidence interval 1.1-5.1; P = 0.0299) for all pathogens combined. These results suggest that empirical antibiotic therapy against atypical pathogens may improve early clinical response rate. This hypothesis is best evaluated in a prospective trial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  12. Neumonia adquirida en la comunidad en dos poblaciones hospitalarias Community-acquired pneumonia in patients from two different hospitals

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    O. J. Caberlotto

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron en forma prospectiva pacientes con diagnóstico de neumonía adquirida en la comunidad que acudieron a la consulta en un hospital general y en un centro especializado en medicina respiratoria ubicados en la provincia de Buenos Aires, y que requirieron internación. Se evaluaron la distribución por sexo y edad, las comorbilidades asociadas, los agentes etiológicos, su incidencia y la mortalidad. Se incluyeron 52 pacientes (marzo 1998-febrero 1999 del Hospital General de Agudos Manuel Belgrano (HMB y 23 pacientes (junio 2000-mayo 2001 del Hospital del Tórax Dr. Antonio A. Cetrángolo (HCET. Se excluyeron pacientes con tuberculosis o micosis pulmonar, neoplasia de pulmón y diagnóstico serológico para HIV. Se completó una historia clínica y se realizaron estudios microbiológicos para gérmenes comunes, virus respiratorios y micobacterias. Para el estudio de los agentes productores de neumonías atípicas (Chlamydia spp, Coxiella burnetii, Mycoplasma pneumoniae y Legionella spp. y como complemento del estudio virológico, se utilizaron pruebas serológicas. No se observaron diferencias por sexo y edad en los dos grupos. En el HMB las comorbilidades más frecuentes fueron EPOC, diabetes e insuficiencia cardíaca, en tanto que en el HCET fueron EPOC, asma y fibrosis pulmonar. Se obtuvo un diagnóstico microbiológico en el 48% y 65.2% de los pacientes para ambos grupos. Los agentes hallados más frecuentemente fueron Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, influenza A y Legionella spp, este último germen con una incidencia del 12% en pacientes que evolucionaron favorablemente y que en su mayoría pertenecían al HMB. La mortalidad fue similar para ambos grupos (13.3%. En el HMB estuvo relacionada con la existencia de comorbilidades en 7 de 8 casos y en el HCET con el agravamiento de la insuficiencia respiratoria crónica.Patients hospitalized with community acquired pneumonia were studied prospectively in two hospitals

  13. Investigational drugs in phase I and phase II clinical trials for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liapikou, Adamantia; Cillóniz, Catia; Torres, Antoni

    2017-11-01

    Community acquired pneumonia is one of the main infections, remaining as a global cause of considerable morbidity and mortality. Successful treatment hinges on expedient delivery of appropriate antibiotic therapy tailored to both the likely pathogens and the severity of disease. Although antibiotic resistance is increasing and pharmaceutical companies continue to debate the profitability of introducing new antibacterial agents, an encouraging number of new molecules have recently been unveiled which target multidrug-resistant bacteria. Areas covered: Herein, the authors summarize the actual situation of novel antibiotics for CAP in phase I & II of development. For each set of compounds, the medical significance and possible clinical placement are discussed. Current treatment options from the most important international guidelines are also reviewed. Expert opinion: Our review shows that the new antibiotics in the pipeline belong to existing antibiotic classes as β-lactams, macrolides, quinolones, oxazolidinones, tetracyclines, lipoglycopeptides, and cyclic lipopeptides and a few with a narrow spectrum of activity are novel compounds directed against novel targets. With rising outpatient antibiotic resistance in pneumonia, some of the compounds discussed are being considered for more rapid advancement in the pipeline, helping to increase the number of agents in later stages of development.

  14. Prevalence and clinical features of respiratory syncytial virus in children hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia in northern Brazil

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    Lamarão Letícia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood pneumonia and bronchiolitis is a leading cause of illness and death in young children worldwide with Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV as the main viral cause. RSV has been associated with annual respiratory disease outbreaks and bacterial co-infection has also been reported. This study is the first RSV epidemiological study in young children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP in Belém city, Pará (Northern Brazil. Methods With the objective of determining the prevalence of RSV infection and evaluating the patients’ clinical and epidemiological features, we conducted a prospective study across eight hospitals from November 2006 to October 2007. In this study, 1,050 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples were obtained from hospitalized children up to the age of three years with CAP, and tested for RSV antigen by direct immunofluorescence assay and by Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR for RSV Group identification. Results RSV infection was detected in 243 (23.1% children. The mean age of the RSV-positive group was lower than the RSV-negative group (12.1 months vs 15.5 months, pppppp Conclusion The present study highlights the relevance of RSV infection in hospitalized cases of CAP in our region; our findings warrant the conduct of further investigations which can help design strategies for controlling the disease.

  15. Community-acquired pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila, the utility of PCR, and a review of the antibiotics used

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    Paul Zarogoulidis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Paul Zarogoulidis1,2, Ioanna Alexandropoulou1,2, Gioulia Romanidou3, Theocharis G Konstasntinidis1,2, Eirini Terzi3, S Saridou1, Athanasios Stefanis1, Kostas Zarogoulidis1,2, TC Constantinidis1,21Regional Laboratory of Public Health, East Macedonia-Thrace, Komotini, Greece; 2Laboratory of Hygiene and Environmental Protection, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, Komotini, Greece; 3Department of Internal Medicine, General Municipal Hospital (“Sismanoglio” of Komotini, Komotini, GreeceIntroduction: There are at least 40 types of Legionella bacteria, half of which are capable of producing disease in humans. The Legionella pneumophila bacterium, the root cause of Legionnaires’ disease, causes 90% of legionellosis cases.Case presentation: We describe the case of a 60-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus and arterial hypertension who was admitted to our hospital with fever and symptoms of respiratory infection, diarrhea, and acute renal failure. We used real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR to detect L. pneumophila DNA in peripheral blood and serum samples and urine antigen from a patient with pneumonia. Legionella DNA was detected in all two sample species when first collected.Conclusion: Since Legionella is a cause of 2% to 15% of all community-acquired pneumonias that require hospitalization, legionellosis should be taken into account in an atypical pulmonary infection and not be forgotten. Moreover, real-time PCR should be considered a useful diagnostic method.Keywords: Legionnaires’ disease, Lionella pneumophila

  16. Immunological changes in patients with community-acquired pneumonia with concomitant coronary artery disease during treatment with Simvastatin

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    V. V. Syvolap

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available (cellular and humoral immunity, mucosal immunity, the complement system, and so on. With features of immune system in the elderly people related some of clinical problems: hypersensitivity to non- and intra-hospital infections, subacute infection that increases concomitant diseases, especially cardiovascular. Aim of this work was determination of the characteristics of immunological changes in patients with community-acquired pneumonia and concomitant coronary heart disease and their dynamics during treatment with Simvastatin. Material and methods. 50 patients with community acquired pneumonia the third group and 30 healthy individuals were included in an open prospective study. Immunogram definition was made by lymphocytes phenotyping tests rosette of particles coated with monoclonal antibodies. Immunoglobulin G, A, M were determined by radial immunodiffusion Agar gel by Mancini using monospecific sera. Also absorption capacity of the neutrophil count phagocytic index, phagocytic index, neutrophil bacterial activity by a test restore them of nitroblue tetrazolium were defined. Results. Subanalysis in patients with pneumonia with concomitant coronary artery disease, who were randomly assigned to receiving simvastatin, after treatment showed a statistically significant increase of IgG to 18.6% (p=0.02 of 9.57±4.64 to 11.36±3.7. The rest of the performance was not likely changed. After treatment of pneumonia with concomitant coronary artery disease treated and not treated with Simvastatin group the following immunogram indicators significantly differed: the relative number of lymphocytes, the number of CD8 relative and absolute number of CD22 cells, complement activity, completion of the index of phagocytosis. Thus in patients receiving Simvastatin after treatment were lower rates relative number of CD8 cells by 38% (p=0.037 – 18.2±7.38 vs 25.1±8.0; complement activity by 33% (p=0.03 – 66.9±14.8 vs 89.0±17.8; the absolute number of CD22

  17. [Vaccination against community acquired pneumonia in adult patients. A position paper by Neumoexpertos en Prevención].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, E; Rivero, I; Vargas, D A; Mascarós, E; Díaz-Maroto, J L; Linares, M; Valdepérez, J; Gil, A; Molina, J; Jimeno, I; Ocaña, D; Martinón-Torres, F

    2016-10-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in adults. The annual incidence of CAP in adults in Spain ranges from 3 to 14 cases per 1,000 inhabitants. Current clinical guidelines primarily focus on the therapeutic approach to CAP rather than its prevention. The aim of this study is to develop and propose a practical guide for CAP prevention through vaccination in Spain according to available vaccines and evidence. A literature review and expert opinion. Pneumococcal and influenza vaccines are the main preventive tools available against CAP. Age, chronic diseases, and immunosuppression are risk factors for pneumonia, so these populations should be a priority for vaccination. In addition, influenza and pneumococcal vaccination is considered advisable in healthy adults under 60 years of age, and anyone with risk condition for CAP, irrespective of age. The influenza vaccine will be administered seasonally, while pneumococcal vaccination can be administered at any time of the year. Vaccination against pneumococcus and influenza in adults can help to reduce the burden of CAP and its associated complications. The available evidence supports the priority indications set out in this guide, and it would be advisable to try to achieve a wide circulation and practical implementation of these recommendations. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Community-acquired pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in critically-ill patients: systematic review

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    Nuria Carballo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Despite methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA having often been associated with nosocomial pneumonia, the condition of some MRSA CAP patients is severe enough to warrant their being admitted to ICU. Objective: The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic review of the literature on antibiotic treatment of MRSA CAP in critically-ill patients. Material and methods: An online search was conducted for locating articles on MRSA CAP in critically ill patients. Relevant publications were identified in PUBMED, the BestPractice database, UpToDate database and the Cochrane Library for articles published in English within the December 2001 - April 2016 time frame. Results: A total of 70 articles were found to have been published, 13 (18.8% having been included and 57 (81.4% excluded. Cohort studies were predominant, having totaled 16 in number (20.7% as compared to one sole cross-sectional study (3.5%. Conclusions: The experience in the treatment of MRSA CAP in patients requiring admission to ICU is quite limited. Vancomycin or linezolid seem to be the treatments of choice for MRSA CAP, although there not be any specific recommendation in this regard. It may be useful to use alternative routes, such as administration via aerosolized antibiotics, continuous infusion or in association with other antibiotics.

  19. Contemporary use of ceftaroline fosamil for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia: CAPTURE study experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Ananthakrishnan; Udeani, George; Evans, John; Jandourek, Alena; Cole, Phillip; Smith, Alexander; David Friedland, H

    2014-08-01

    The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro(®) Utilization Registry (CAPTURE) is a multicenter cohort study designed to collect information on the contemporary use of ceftaroline fosamil in the US. Data collected from 398 evaluable patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) (mean age 64 years) during the first 18 months of the study are presented. Most patients had co-morbidities (76%; primarily structural lung disease), and ≧2 signs and symptoms of CABP (76%). Overall clinical success was 79% which varied little with ceftaroline fosamil usage (monotherapy vs concurrent therapy; first-line vs second-line therapy). Most patients were discharged home (60%) or to another healthcare facility (35%). These data suggest that ceftaroline, in contemporary clinical use, is an effective antibiotic for the treatment of patients with CABP, including those with significant co-morbidities or who required a change of their prior antibiotic therapy.

  20. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic analyses for efficacy of ceftaroline fosamil in patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavnani, Sujata M; Hammel, Jeffrey P; Van Wart, Scott A; Rubino, Christopher M; Reynolds, Daniel K; Forrest, Alan; Khariton, Tatiana; Friedland, H David; Riccobene, Todd A; Ambrose, Paul G

    2013-12-01

    Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) analyses for efficacy using phase III trial data from patients treated with a ceftaroline fosamil dosing regimen of 600 mg intravenously (i.v.) every 12 h (q12h) for 5 to 7 days for community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) were conducted. High clinical and microbiological success rates (84.7 and 86.3%, respectively) and percentages of time during the dosing interval that free-drug steady-state concentrations remained above the MIC (f%T>MIC) (98.4% had f%T>MIC values of ≥63.3) were observed among 124 microbiologically evaluable patients. As a result, significant PK-PD relationships could not be identified. These data provide support for the use of a ceftaroline fosamil dosing regimen of 600 mg i.v. q12h to treat patients with CABP.

  1. Ceftaroline fosamil for treating skin and skin structure infections or community-acquired pneumonia in patients with renal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, Christy; Pasquale, Timothy; Cole, Phillip; Friedland, H David

    2015-01-01

    The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro(®) Utilization Registry (CAPTURE) is a multicenter retrospective study, conducted in the USA, describing the contemporary use of ceftaroline fosamil. Ceftaroline is primarily excreted by the kidneys and the dose should be reduced in patients with moderate to severe renal insufficiency. This article describes the clinical effectiveness of ceftaroline fosamil in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI) or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) patients with renal insufficiency. There were 985 ABSSSI patients and 344 CABP patients, of which 22 and 31%, respectively, had renal insufficiency. Ceftaroline fosamil was mostly administered to patients as second-line therapy. Overall clinical success was 78-91% among ABSSSI or CABP patients with renal insufficiency and, overall, >50% of patients were discharged to home. Ceftaroline fosamil is an effective treatment option for ABSSSI or CABP patients with renal insufficiency.

  2. Influence of HIV infection on the clinical presentation and outcome of adults with acute community-acquired pneumonia in Yaounde, Cameroon: a retrospective hospital-based study

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    Yone Eric Walter

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of HIV infection on the evolution of acute community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is still controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate possible differences in the clinical presentation and in-hospital outcomes of patients with CAP with and without HIV infection in a specialised service in Yaounde. Methods Medical files of 106 patients (51 men aged 15 years and above, admitted to the Pneumology service of the Yaounde Jamot Hospital between January 2008 and May 2012, were retrospectively studied. Results Sixty-two (58.5% patients were HIV infected. The median age of all patients was 40 years (interquartile range: 31.75-53 and there was no difference in the clinical and radiological profile of patients with and without HIV infection. The median leukocyte count (interquartile range was 14,600/mm3 (10,900-20,600 and 10,450/mm3 (6,400-16,850 respectively in HIV negative and HIV positive patients (p = 0.002. Median haemoglobin level (interquartile range was 10.8 g/dl (8.9-12 in HIV negative and 9.7 g/dl (8–11.6 in HIV positive patients (p = 0.025. In-hospital treatment failure on third day (39.5% vs. 25.5.1%, p = 0.137 and mortality rates (9% vs. 14.5%, p = 0.401 were similar between HIV negative and HIV positive patients. Conclusion Clinical and radiological features as well as response to treatment and in hospital fatal outcomes are similar in adult patients hospitalised with acute community-acquired pneumonia in Yaounde. In contrast, HIV infected patients tend to be more anaemic and have lower white cell counts than HIV negative patients. Larger prospective studies are needed to consolidate these findings.

  3. Isolation of ESBL-producing Bacteria from Sputum in Community-acquired Pneumonia or Healthcare-associated Pneumonia Does Not Indicate the Need for Antibiotics with Activity against This Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Hideyuki; Ito, Isao; Konishi, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yuki; Yamamoto, Yuko; Uchida, Tatsuya; Ohtani, Hideo; Yoshida, Yoshiharu

    2018-02-15

    Objective In the past decade, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria have increasingly frequently been isolated from various kinds of clinical specimens. However, the appropriate treatment of pneumonia in which ESBL-producing bacteria are isolated from sputum culture is poorly understood. To investigate whether or not ESBL-producing bacteria isolated from sputum in pneumonia cases should be treated as the causative bacteria. Methods and Patients In this retrospective study, we screened for patients, admitted between January 2009 and December 2015 in whom pneumonia was suspected and for whom sputum cultures yielded Escherichia coli or Klebsiella spp. isolates. We identified patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) or healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) from whom ESBL-producing bacteria had been isolated from sputum culture and to whom antibiotic treatment had been given with a diagnosis of pneumonia. We analyzed the patients' backgrounds and the effect of the antibiotic treatment for the initial 3-5 days. Results From 400 patients initially screened, 27 with ESBL-producing bacteria were secondarily screened. In this subset of patients, 15 were diagnosed with pneumonia, including 7 with CAP (5 E. coli and 2 K. pneumoniae) and 8 with HCAP (8 E. coli). These patients exhibited an average age of 84.1 years old, and 9 of 15 were men. No patients were initially treated with antimicrobials that are effective against isolated ESBL-producing bacteria. However, 13 of 15 patients showed improvement of pneumonia following the initial antibiotic treatment. Conclusion ESBL-producing bacteria isolated from sputum are not likely to be the actual causative organisms of pneumonia.

  4. Adherence with national guidelines in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia: results from the CAPO study in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Gur; Perez, Mario; Rodríguez, Benito; Hernández Voth, Ana; Perez, Jorge; Gnoni, Martin; Kelley, Robert; Wiemken, Timothy; Ramirez, Julio

    2015-04-01

    The Community-Acquired Pneumonia Organization (CAPO) is an international observational study in 130 hospitals, with a total of 31 countries, to assess the current management of hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). 2 Using the centralized database of CAPO was decided to conduct this study with the aim of evaluate the level of adherence with national guidelines in Venezuela, to define in which areas an intervention may be necessary to improve the quality of care of hospitalized patients with CAP. In this observational retrospective study quality indicators were used to evaluate the management of hospitalized patients with CAP in 8 Venezuelan's centers. The care of the patients was evaluated in the areas of: hospitalization, oxygen therapy, empiric antibiotic therapy, switch therapy, etiological studies, blood cultures indication, and prevention. The compliance was rated as good (>90%), intermediate (60% to 90%), or low (<60%). A total of 454 patients with CAP were enrolled. The empiric treatment administered within 8 hours of the patient arrival to the hospital was good (96%), but the rest of the indicators showed a low level of adherence (<60%). We can say that there are many areas in the management of CAP in Venezuela that are not performed according to the national guidelines of SOVETHORAX.1 In any quality improvement process the first step is to evaluate the difference between what is recommended and what is done in clinical practice. While this study meets this first step, the challenge for the future is to implement the processes necessary to improve the management of CAP in Venezuela. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Amoxicillin plus temocillin as an alternative empiric therapy for the treatment of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia: results from a retrospective audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habayeb, H; Sajin, B; Patel, K; Grundy, C; Al-Dujaili, A; Van de Velde, S

    2015-08-01

    A formulary decision was made at a large provider of acute hospital services in Surrey to replace piperacillin/tazobactam with amoxicillin+temocillin for the empiric treatment of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia. This decision was made because the use of broad-spectrum-β-lactam antibiotics is a known risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and for the selection of resistance. After the antibiotic formulary was changed, a retrospective audit was conducted to assess the effect of this change. Data from patients hospitalised between January 2011 and July 2012 for severe hospital-acquired pneumonia and treated empirically with piperacillin/tazobactam or amoxicillin+temocillin were reviewed retrospectively. Clinical characteristics of patients, data related to the episode of pneumonia, clinical success and incidence of significant diarrhoea and CDI were analysed. One hundred ninety-two episodes of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia in 188 patients were identified from hospital records. Ninety-eight patients received piperacillin/tazobactam and 94 amoxicillin+temocillin. At baseline, the two treatment groups were comparable, except that more patients with renal insufficiency were treated with piperacillin/tazobactam. Clinical success was comparable (80 versus 82 %; P = 0.86), but differences were observed between piperacillin/tazobactam and amoxicillin+temocillin for the rates of significant diarrhoea (34 versus 4 %, respectively; P amoxicillin+temocillin is a viable alternative to piperacillin/tazobactam for the treatment of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia. This combination appears to be associated with fewer gastrointestinal adverse events. Further studies are needed to evaluate the place of amoxicillin+temocillin as empiric treatment of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia.

  6. Enterovirus D68-associated community-acquired pneumonia in children living in Milan, Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, Susanna; Zampiero, Alberto; Ruggiero, Luca; Madini, Barbara; Niesters, Hubert; Principi, Nicola

    Background: An increasing number of children infected by enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) and affected by severe respiratory illness, muscle weakness and paralysis were described in the USA and Canada in 2014 Objectives: To investigate the potential involvement of EV-D68 in determining community-acquired

  7. Clinical characteristics of Q fever and etiology of community-acquired pneumonia in a tropical region of southern Taiwan: a prospective observational study.

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    Chung-Hsu Lai

    Full Text Available The clinical characteristics of Q fever are poorly identified in the tropics. Fever with pneumonia or hepatitis are the dominant presentations of acute Q fever, which exhibits geographic variability. In southern Taiwan, which is located in a tropical region, the role of Q fever in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP has never been investigated.During the study period, May 2012 to April 2013, 166 cases of adult CAP and 15 cases of acute Q fever were prospectively investigated. Cultures of clinical specimens, urine antigen tests for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila, and paired serologic assessments for Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and Q fever (Coxiella burnetii were used for identifying pathogens associated with CAP. From April 2004 to April 2013 (the pre-study period, 122 cases of acute Q fever were also included retrospectively for analysis. The geographic distribution of Q fever and CAP cases was similar. Q fever cases were identified in warmer seasons and younger ages than CAP. Based on multivariate analysis, male gender, chills, thrombocytopenia, and elevated liver enzymes were independent characteristics associated with Q fever. In patients with Q fever, 95% and 13.5% of cases presented with hepatitis and pneumonia, respectively. Twelve (7.2% cases of CAP were seropositive for C. burnetii antibodies, but none of them had acute Q fever. Among CAP cases, 22.9% had a CURB-65 score ≧2, and 45.8% had identifiable pathogens. Haemophilus parainfluenzae (14.5%, S. pneumoniae (6.6%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (4.8%, and Klebsiella pneumoniae (3.0% were the most common pathogens identified by cultures or urine antigen tests. Moreover, M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae, and co-infection with 2 pathogens accounted for 9.0%, 7.8%, and 1.8%, respectively.In southern Taiwan, Q fever is an endemic disease with hepatitis as the major presentation and is not a common etiology of CAP.

  8. Molecular etiological profile of atypical bacterial pathogens, viruses and coinfections among infants and children with community acquired pneumonia admitted to a national hospital in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle-Mendoza, Juana; Silva-Caso, Wilmer; Cornejo-Tapia, Angela; Orellana-Peralta, Fiorella; Verne, Eduardo; Ugarte, Claudia; Aguilar-Luis, Miguel Angel; De Lama-Odría, María Del Carmen; Nazario-Fuertes, Ronald; Esquivel-Vizcarra, Mónica; Casabona-Ore, Verónica; Weilg, Pablo; Del Valle, Luis J

    2017-12-06

    The main objective of this study was to detect the presence of 14 respiratory viruses and atypical bacteria (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae), via polymerase chain reaction in patients under 18 years old hospitalized due to community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) from Lima, Peru. Atypical pathogens were detected in 40% (58/146); viral etiologies in 36% (52/146) and coinfections in 19% (27/146). The most common etiological agent was M. pneumoniae (n = 47), followed by C. pneumoniae (n = 11). The most frequent respiratory viruses detected were: respiratory syncytial virus A (n = 35), influenza virus C (n = 21) and parainfluenza virus (n = 10). Viral-bacterial and bacterium-bacterium coinfections were found in 27 cases. In our study population, atypical bacteria (40%) were detected as frequently as respiratory viruses (36%). The presence of M. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae should not be underestimated as they can be commonly isolated in Peruvian children with CAP.

  9. Predictors of positive or negative legionella urinary antigen test in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roed, Torsten; Schønheyder, Henrik C; Nielsen, Henrik

    2015-07-01

    Legionella pneumonia remains a diagnostic challenge. The legionella urinary antigen test (LUT) primarily detects Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, accounting for 64% of Danish cases, and is often the only legionella test performed. We aimed to identify variables predictive of a positive or negative test result and to explore how the LUT was used in clinical practice. The study was an audit-based cohort study. LUT-positive patients were compared with three randomly selected age- and gender-matched LUT-negative referent patients admitted at a Danish university hospital during 2003-2013. Data were extracted from charts and databases. Positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR+ and LR-) were calculated. For CURB-65 and sepsis, sensitivity analyses were made due to incomplete data. In all, 25 cases were compared with 75 referents. Factors associated with LUT positivity included recent travel outside Scandinavia (LR + 5.3), Na(+) 200 mg/L (LR + 3.5), temperature > 39 °C (LR + 3.5), and CURB-65 score ≥ 3 (LR + 3.0-15.0, depending on the model). Decreasing the likelihood of LUT positivity were CRP LUT. The LUT is often used inappropriately and should be accompanied by PCR analysis.

  10. Radiological compromise and their relationship with the clinical course in the patients with pneumonia acquired in the community assisted in the Hospital San Juan de Dios de Bogota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, Jorge H; Saavedra, Carlos; Carrillo B, Jorge; Perez, Maria T

    1998-01-01

    In order to establish the relationship between the initial radiographic findings of patients with community - acquired pneumonia and their clinical course, a prospective study of 204 patients with this diagnosis was performed we found a statistically significant relationship between radiographic findings and the development of complications or death

  11. A tailored implementation strategy to reduce the duration of intravenous antibiotic treatment in community-acquired pneumonia: a controlled before-and-after study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, M.F.; Bruns, A.H.; Hulscher, M.E.; Gaillard, C.A.; Sankatsing, S.U.; Berkhout, F. Teding van; Emmelot-Vonk, M.H.; Kuck, E.M.; Steeghs, M.H.; Breeijen, J.H. den; Stellato, R.K.; Hoepelman, A.I.; Oosterheert, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    We previously showed that 40 % of clinically stable patients hospitalised for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are not switched to oral therapy in a timely fashion because of physicians' barriers. We aimed to decrease this proportion by implementing a novel protocol. In a multi-centre controlled

  12. How good is the evidence for the recommended empirical antimicrobial treatment of patients hospitalized because of community-acquired pneumonia? : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterheert, J J; Bonten, M J M; Hak, E; Schneider, M M E; Hoepelman, I M

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For years, monotherapy with a beta-lactam antibiotic (penicillin, amoxicillin or second-generation cephalosporin) was recommended as empirical therapy for patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A combination of a beta-lactam and a macrolide antibiotic was only recommended for

  13. The value of signs and symptoms in differentiating between bacterial, viral and mixed aetiology in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijskens, Elisabeth G. W.; Koopmans, Marion; Palmen, Fernand M. H.; van Erkel, Adriana J. M.; Mulder, Paul G. H.; Rossen, John W. A.

    Current diagnostics for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) include testing for a wide range of pathogens, which is costly and not always informative. We compared clinical and laboratory parameters of patients with CAP caused by different groups of pathogens to evaluate the potential for targeted

  14. SWAB/NVALT (Dutch Working Party on Antibiotic Policy and Dutch Association of Chest Physicians) Guidelines on the Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, W. J.; Bonten, M. J.; Boersma, W. G.; Jonkers, R. E.; Aleva, R. M.; Kullberg, B. J.; Schouten, J. A.; Degener, J. E.; Janknegt, R.; Verheij, T. J.; Sachs, A. P. E.; Prins, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch Working Party on Antibiotic Policy (SWAB) and the Dutch Association of Chest Physicians (NVALT) convened a joint committee to develop evidence-based guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The guidelines are intended for adult patients with CAP who

  15. Cause-specific long-term mortality rates in patients recovered from community-acquired pneumonia as compared with the general Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruns, A. H. W.; Oosterheert, J. J.; Cucciolillo, M. C.; el Moussaoui, R.; Groenwold, R. H. H.; Prins, J. M.; Hoepelman, A. I. M.

    2011-01-01

    Insights into long-term mortality, especially into the cause of death after initial recovery from an episode of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), may help in determining optimal preventive measures in such patients. Prospective observational cohort studies were conducted to compare cause-specific

  16. Evaluation of Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Zoonotic Pathogens in an Area with a High Density of Animal Farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijskens, E G W; Smit, L A M; Rossen, J W A; Heederik, D; Koopmans, M

    Intensive animal farming could potentially lead to outbreaks of infectious diseases. Clinicians are at the forefront of detecting unusual diseases, but the lack of specificity of zoonotic disease symptoms makes this a challenging task. We evaluated patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP)

  17. Viruses detected by systematic multiplex polymerase chain reaction in adults with suspected community-acquired pneumonia attending emergency departments in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, D; Le Floch, H; Houhou, N; Epelboin, L; Hausfater, P; Khalil, A; Ray, P; Duval, X; Claessens, Y-E; Leport, C

    2015-06-01

    Infectious agents associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are under-studied. This study attempted to identify viruses from the upper respiratory tract in adults visiting emergency departments for clinically suspected CAP. Adults with suspected CAP enrolled in the ESCAPED study (impact of computed tomography on CAP diagnosis) had prospective nasopharyngeal (NP) samples studied by multiplex PCR (targeting 15 viruses and four intracellular bacteria). An adjudication committee composed of infectious disease specialists, pneumologists and radiologists blinded to PCR results reviewed patient records, including computed tomography and day 28 follow up, to categorize final diagnostic probability of CAP as definite, probable, possible, or excluded. Among the 254 patients enrolled, 78 (31%) had positive PCR, which detected viruses in 72/254 (28%) and intracellular bacteria in 8 (3%) patients. PCR was positive in 44/125 (35%) patients with definite CAP and 21/83 (25%) patients with excluded CAP. The most frequent organisms were influenza A/B virus in 27 (11%), rhinovirus in 20 (8%), coronavirus in seven (3%), respiratory syncytial virus in seven (3%) and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in eight (3%) of 254 patients. Proportion of rhinovirus was higher in patients with excluded CAP compared with other diagnostic categories (p = 0.01). No such difference was observed for influenza virus. Viruses seem common in adults attending emergency departments with suspected CAP. A concomitant clinical, radiological and biological analysis of the patient's chart can contribute to either confirm their role, or suggest upper respiratory tract infection or shedding. Their imputability and impact in early management of CAP deserve further studies. NCT01574066. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dental and microbiological risk factors for hospital-acquired pneumonia in non-ventilated older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewan, Victoria C; Sails, Andrew D; Walls, Angus W G; Rushton, Steven; Newton, Julia L

    2015-01-01

    We obtained a time series of tongue/throat swabs from 90 patients with lower limb fracture, aged 65-101 in a general hospital in the North East of England between April 2009-July 2010. We used novel real-time multiplex PCR assays to detect S. aureus, MRSA, E. coli, P. aeruginosa, S. pneumoniae, H. influenza and Acinetobacter spp. We collected data on dental/denture plaque (modified Quigley-Hein index) and outcomes of clinician-diagnosed HAP. The crude incidence of HAP was 10% (n = 90), with mortality of 80% at 90 days post discharge. 50% of cases occurred within the first 25 days. HAP was not associated with being dentate, tooth number, or heavy dental/denture plaque. HAP was associated with prior oral carriage with E. coli/S. aureus/P.aeruginosa/MRSA (p = 0.002, OR 9.48 95% CI 2.28-38.78). The incidence of HAP in those with carriage was 35% (4% without), with relative risk 6.44 (95% CI 2.04-20.34, p = 0.002). HAP was associated with increased length of stay (Fishers exact test, p=0.01), with mean 30 excess days (range -11.5-115). Target organisms were first detected within 72 hours of admission in 90% participants, but HAP was significantly associated with S. aureus/MRSA/P. aeruginosa/E. coli being detected at days 5 (OR 4.39, 95%CI1.73-11.16) or 14 (OR 6.69, 95%CI 2.40-18.60). Patients with lower limb fracture who were colonised orally with E. coli/ S. aureus/MRSA/P. aeruginosa after 5 days in hospital were at significantly greater risk of HAP (p = 0.002).

  19. The Use of Polymerase Chain Reaction Amplification for the Detection of Viruses and Bacteria in Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siow, Wen Ting; Koay, Evelyn Siew-Chuan; Lee, Chun Kiat; Lee, Hong Kai; Ong, Venetia; Ngerng, Wang Jee; Lim, Hui Fang; Tan, Adeline; Tang, Julian Wei-Tze; Phua, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens are often not identified in severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), and the few studies using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques for virus detection are from temperate countries. This study assesses if PCR amplification improves virus and bacteria detection, and if viral infection contributes to mortality in severe CAP in a tropical setting, where respiratory pathogens have less well-defined seasonality. In this cohort study of patients with severe CAP in an intensive care unit, endotracheal aspirates for intubated patients and nasopharyngeal swabs for non-intubated patients were sent for PCR amplification for respiratory viruses. Blood, endotracheal aspirates for intubated patients, and sputum for non-intubated patients were analysed using a multiplex PCR system for bacteria. Out of 100 patients, using predominantly cultures, bacteria were identified in 42 patients; PCR amplification increased this number to 55 patients. PCR amplification identified viruses in 32 patients. In total, only bacteria, only viruses, and both bacteria and viruses were found in 37, 14, and 18 patients, respectively. The commonest viruses were influenza A H1N1/2009 and rhinovirus; the commonest bacterium was Streptococcus pneumoniae. Hospital mortality rates for patients with no pathogens, bacterial infection, viral infection, and bacterial-viral co-infection were 16.1, 24.3, 0, and 5.6%, respectively (p = 0.10). On multivariable analysis, virus detection was associated with lower mortality (adjusted odds ratio 0.12, 95% confidence interval 0.2-0.99; p = 0.049). Viruses and bacteria were detected in 7 of 10 patients with severe CAP with the aid of PCR amplification. Viral infection appears to be independently associated with lower mortality. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Nursing home-acquired pneumonia, dysphagia and associated diseases in nursing home residents: A retrospective, cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollaar, Vanessa R Y; van der Putten, Gert-Jan; van der Maarel-Wierink, Claar D; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; de Swart, Bert J M; de Baat, Cees; Creugers, Nico H J

    Nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) is a common infection among nursing home residents. There is also a high prevalence of dysphagia in nursing home residents and they suffer more often from comorbidity and multimorbidity. This puts nursing home residents at higher risk of (mortality from) NHAP. Therefore it is important to gain more insight into the incidence of NHAP and the associated medical conditions in nursing home residents with dysphagia. To investigate possible associations between NHAP and dysphagia in nursing home residents and to search for a medical risk profile for NHAP. A retrospective cross-sectional study. Three nursing homes in The Netherlands. 416 electronic medical files of nursing home residents aged 65 or older living in 3 nursing homes. Data about age, gender, diagnosis of dysphagia and/or pneumonia, medical diagnosis and possible cause of death of the nursing home residents were extracted from electronic medical files. The data of 373 electronic medical files were analyzed. A significant difference in the prevalence of dysphagia was found between the nursing homes (p nursing homes. Statistically significant higher incidence of NHAP was found in residents with dysphagia (p = 0.046). Residents with dysphagia had statistically significantly more diseases compared to residents without dysphagia (p = 0.001). Logistic regression analyses revealed no statistically significant associations between NHAP and the number of diseases and the ICD-10 diseases. Dysphagia was found to be a risk factor for NHAP. Awareness of the signs of dysphagia by nurses and other care providers is important for early recognition and management of dysphagia and prevention of NHAP. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. SMART-COP: a tool for predicting the need for intensive respiratory or vasopressor support in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Patrick G P; Wolfe, Rory; Whitby, Michael; Fine, Michael J; Fuller, Andrew J; Stirling, Robert; Wright, Alistair A; Ramirez, Julio A; Christiansen, Keryn J; Waterer, Grant W; Pierce, Robert J; Armstrong, John G; Korman, Tony M; Holmes, Peter; Obrosky, D Scott; Peyrani, Paula; Johnson, Barbara; Hooy, Michelle; Grayson, M Lindsay

    2008-08-01

    Existing severity assessment tools, such as the pneumonia severity index (PSI) and CURB-65 (tool based on confusion, urea level, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and age >or=65 years), predict 30-day mortality in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and have limited ability to predict which patients will require intensive respiratory or vasopressor support (IRVS). The Australian CAP Study (ACAPS) was a prospective study of 882 episodes in which each patient had a detailed assessment of severity features, etiology, and treatment outcomes. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify features at initial assessment that were associated with receipt of IRVS. These results were converted into a simple points-based severity tool that was validated in 5 external databases, totaling 7464 patients. In ACAPS, 10.3% of patients received IRVS, and the 30-day mortality rate was 5.7%. The features statistically significantly associated with receipt of IRVS were low systolic blood pressure (2 points), multilobar chest radiography involvement (1 point), low albumin level (1 point), high respiratory rate (1 point), tachycardia (1 point), confusion (1 point), poor oxygenation (2 points), and low arterial pH (2 points): SMART-COP. A SMART-COP score of >or=3 points identified 92% of patients who received IRVS, including 84% of patients who did not need immediate admission to the intensive care unit. Accuracy was also high in the 5 validation databases. Sensitivities of PSI and CURB-65 for identifying the need for IRVS were 74% and 39%, respectively. SMART-COP is a simple, practical clinical tool for accurately predicting the need for IRVS that is likely to assist clinicians in determining CAP severity.

  2. After-hours respiratory physiotherapy for intubated and mechanically ventilated patients with community-acquired pneumonia: An Australian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lee, Lisa; Hill, Anne-Marie; Patman, Shane

    2017-11-15

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common reason for admission to an intensive care unit for intubation and mechanical ventilation, and results in high morbidity and mortality. The primary aim of the study was to investigate availability and provision of respiratory physiotherapy, outside of normal business hours, for intubated and mechanically ventilated adults with CAP in Australian hospitals. A cross-sectional, mixed methods online survey was conducted. Participants were senior intensive care unit physiotherapists from 88 public and private hospitals. Main outcome measures included presence and nature of an after-hours physiotherapy service and factors perceived to influence the need for after-hours respiratory physiotherapy intervention, when the service was available, for intubated adult patients with CAP. Data were also collected regarding respiratory intervention provided after-hours by other ICU professionals. Response rate was 72% (n=75). An after-hours physiotherapy service was provided by n=31 (46%) hospitals and onsite after-hours physiotherapy presence was limited (22%), with a combination of onsite and on-call service reported by 19%. Treatment response (83%) was the most frequent factor for referring patients with CAP for after-hours physiotherapy intervention by the treating day-time physiotherapist. Nurses performing respiratory intervention (77%) was significantly associated with no available after-hours physiotherapy service (p=0.04). Physiotherapy after-hours service in Australia is limited, therefore it is common for intubated patients with CAP not to receive any respiratory physiotherapy intervention outside of normal business hours. In the absence of an after-hours physiotherapist, nurses were most likely to perform after-hours respiratory intervention to intubated patients with CAP. Further research is required to determine whether the frequency of respiratory physiotherapy intervention, including after-hours provision of treatment

  3. Usefulness of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 in differentiating between typical and atypical community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Chorng-Kuang; Hou, Sen-Kuang; Shih, Hsin-Chin; Yen, David Hung-Tsang; Huang, Chun-I; Lee, Chen-Hsen; Tang, Gau-Jun

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the clinical use of inflammatory marker triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)-1 at admission for differentiating between typical and atypical bacterial community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A prospective, noninterventional study of patients with CAP hospitalized through the emergency department was performed. Surface expression of TREM-1 was analyzed using flow cytometry on peripheral blood cells, and soluble TREM-1 (sTREM-1) concentration was determined in plasma. Eighty-eight patients with clinical suspicion of CAP were eligible. The causative pathogen was identified in 39 patients (44.3%). After excluding 4 mixed pneumonia cases, 21 typical and 14 atypical bacterial infections were enrolled. Patients with typical bacterial CAP demonstrated increased TREM-1 surface expression on monocytes and neutrophils. Median plasma sTREM-1 levels at admission were 65.2 pg/mL (range, 17.6-138.1 pg/mL) in patients with typical CAP and 25.9 pg/mL (range, 11.5-54.8 pg/mL) in patients with atypical CAP (P atypical pathogens with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.87 (95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.98). At a cutoff level of 44.2 pg/mL, sTREM-1 yielded a sensitivity of 81%, a specificity of 79%, a positive likelihood ratio of 3.79, and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.24. In newly admitted patients with CAP, determination of the TREM-1 levels may provide useful additional diagnostic information on the bacterial etiology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Reliability of Pro-adrenomedullin and Interleukin 1β in Predicting Severity of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Muhammet Furkan; Güzel, Ahmet; Açıkgöz, Mehmet; Okuyucu, Ali; Alaçam, Hasan

    2018-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children is one of the most important causes of mortality and morbidity in developing countries. Therefore, it is very important for clinicians to detect the presence and severity of pneumonia. Proadrenomedullin (Pro-ADM) and Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) are thought to have potential for CAP evaluation in children. We sought to investigate the value of Pro-ADM and IL-1β levels for severity assessment and outcome prediction in children with CAP. A total of 66 hospitalized CAP patients were included in a prospective observational study. Complete blood count, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), Pro-ADM and IL-1β levels were studied in blood samples obtained from the patients upon admission. Respiratory Clinical Score (RCS) was performed to determine the respiratory distress and severity. The comparison of data with laboratory-severity groups: serum CRP, Pro-ADM and IL-1β levels increased in parallel with the disease severity. Pro-ADM was the best biomarker for severity stratification. Logistic regression analysis revealed that RCS >6 points and Pro-ADM values >1.75 nmol/L combination had the most significant results (OR: 15.38, 95% CI 1.35-166.66, p =0.027). Moreover, a relationship was found between the high serum levels of IL-1β and requirement of intervention procedures in patients with pleural effusion. Serum Pro-ADM and IL-1β levels may offer additional risk/severity stratification in children with CAP. In addition, they may be helpful in predicting the development of complications, requirements for ntensive care unit admission, and intervention procedures. © 2018 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  5. A Randomized, Prospective Study of Pediatric Patients With Community-acquired Pneumonia Treated With Ceftaroline Versus Ceftriaxone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavino, Christopher R; Nemeth, Agnes; Korczowski, Bartosz; Bradley, John S; O'Neal, Tanya; Jandourek, Alena; Friedland, H David; Kaplan, Sheldon L

    2016-07-01

    Community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) remains a major infection among children, despite the use of pneumococcal vaccination. Ceftaroline fosamil is a broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic with activity against many bacteria, including Streptococcus pneumoniae (both penicillin-nonsusceptible and multidrug-resistant strains) and Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant S. aureus). This article describes the safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of ceftaroline fosamil in the treatment of pediatric patients hospitalized with CABP, from a randomized, active-controlled, observer-blinded clinical study (registration number NCT01530763). Pediatric patients were stratified into 4 age cohorts and randomized (3:1) to receive either intravenous ceftaroline fosamil or ceftriaxone, with optional oral switch for a total treatment duration of 5-14 days. Enrollment was planned for 160 patients. Data collected included demographics, infection characteristics and pathogens. Treatment-emergent adverse events, clinical outcomes, and microbiologic responses were assessed. Ceftaroline fosamil was well tolerated. Similar percentages of patients in the ceftaroline fosamil (55/121; 45%) and ceftriaxone (18/39; 46%) groups reported treatment-emergent adverse events. Coombs seroconversion was observed in 17% of patients in the ceftaroline fosamil group; however, no evidence of hemolytic anemia or hemolysis was found. No deaths were reported during the study. Ceftaroline fosamil had similar effectiveness to ceftriaxone, with high clinical cure rates at test-of-cure in the modified intent-to-treat population (94/107; 88% and 32/36; 89%, respectively). Three documented S. aureus infections were successfully treated in the ceftaroline group, including one caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus. The results of this study suggest that ceftaroline fosamil may be an important treatment option for pediatric patients hospitalized with CABP.

  6. Community-acquired pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in critically-ill patients: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo, Nuria; De Antonio-Cuscó, Marta; Echeverría-Esnal, Daniel; Luque, Sonia; Salas, Esther; Grau, Santiago

    2017-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Despite methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) having often been associated with nosocomial pneumonia, the condition of some MRSA CAP patients is severe enough to warrant their being admitted to ICU. The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic review of the literature on antibiotic treatment of MRSA CAP in critically-ill patients. An online search was conducted for locating articles on MRSA CAP in critically ill patients. Relevant publications were identified in PUBMED, the BestPractice database, UpToDate database and the Cochrane Library for articles published in English within the December 2001 - April 2016 time frame. A total of 70 articles were found to have been published, 13 (18.8%) having been included and 57 (81.4%) excluded. Cohort studies were predominant, having totaled 16 in number (20.7%) as compared to one sole cross-sectional study (3.5%). The experience in the treatment of MRSA CAP in patients requiring admission to ICU is quite limited. Vancomycin or linezolid seem to be the treatments of choice for MRSA CAP, although there not be any specific recommendation in this regard. It may be useful to use alternative routes, such as administration via aerosolized antibiotics, continuous infusion or in association with other antibiotics. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  7. PROGNOSTIC IMPACT OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED AND HOSPITAL-ACQUIRED HYPONATREMIA IN PATIENTS WITH DECOMPENSATED HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Shchekochikhin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare prognostic impact of community-acquired and hospital-acquired hyponatremia in hospitalized patients with decompensated heart failure Material and methods. Data of 120 patients with decompensated heart failure were analyzed. Hyponatremia was defined as serum sodium concentration of 135 mmol/l or less. Several outcomes were analyzed: mortality, transfer to intensive care unit (ICU, resistance to loop diuretics and worsening renal function.Results. 13.0% of patients had community-acquired hyponatremia, 9.6% - hospital-acquired hyponatremia. Community-acquired hyponatremia was associated with increased mortality [odds ratio (OR=7.8], admission to ICU (OR=19.1 and resistance to loop diuretics (OR=4.8. Hospital-acquired hyponatremia was associated with worsening renal function (OR=12.4.Conclusion. Both, community-acquired and hospital hyponatremia have negative impact in hospitalized patients with decompensated heart failure.

  8. PROGNOSTIC IMPACT OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED AND HOSPITAL-ACQUIRED HYPONATREMIA IN PATIENTS WITH DECOMPENSATED HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Shchekochikhin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare prognostic impact of community-acquired and hospital-acquired hyponatremia in hospitalized patients with decompensated heart failure Material and methods. Data of 120 patients with decompensated heart failure were analyzed. Hyponatremia was defined as serum sodium concentration of 135 mmol/l or less. Several outcomes were analyzed: mortality, transfer to intensive care unit (ICU, resistance to loop diuretics and worsening renal function.Results. 13.0% of patients had community-acquired hyponatremia, 9.6% - hospital-acquired hyponatremia. Community-acquired hyponatremia was associated with increased mortality [odds ratio (OR=7.8], admission to ICU (OR=19.1 and resistance to loop diuretics (OR=4.8. Hospital-acquired hyponatremia was associated with worsening renal function (OR=12.4.Conclusion. Both, community-acquired and hospital hyponatremia have negative impact in hospitalized patients with decompensated heart failure.

  9. Clopidogrel treatment and the incidence and severity of community acquired pneumonia in a cohort study and meta-analysis of antiplatelet therapy in pneumonia and critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, A Kendall; Dunn, Steven P; Feola, David J; Martin, Craig A; Charnigo, Richard; Li, Zhenyu; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed; Smyth, Susan S

    2013-02-01

    Platelet activation results in the release and upregulation of mediators responsible for immune cell activation and recruitment, suggesting that platelets play an active role in immunity. Animal models and retrospective data have demonstrated benefit of antiplatelet therapy on inflammatory mediator expression and clinical outcomes. This study sought to characterize effects of clopidogrel on the incidence and severity of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A retrospective cohort study was conducted of Kentucky Medicaid patients (2001-2005). The exposed cohort consisted of patients receiving at least six consecutive clopidogrel prescriptions; the non-exposed cohort was comprised of patients not prescribed clopidogrel. Primary endpoints included incidence of CAP and inpatient treatment. Secondary severity endpoints included mortality, intensive care unit admission, mechanical ventilation, sepsis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome/acute lung injury. CAP incidence was significantly greater in the exposed cohort (OR 3.39, 95% CI 3.27-3.51, p treatment was more common in the exposed cohort (OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.85-2.07, p < 0.0001), but no significant difference remained after adjustment. Trends favoring the exposed cohort were found for the secondary severity endpoints of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.07) and mortality (p = 0.10). Pooled analysis of published studies supports these findings. While clopidogrel use may be associated with increased CAP incidence, clopidogrel does not appear to increase--and may reduce--its severity among inpatients. Because this study was retrospective and could not quantify all variables (e.g., aspirin use), these findings should be explored prospectively.

  10. Effect of practical use of preoperative immunonutrition with Impact on prevention of postoperative pneumonia after esophagectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Masayuki; Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Akutsu, Yasunori; Shuto, Kiyohiko; Uesato, Masaya; Miyazawa, Yukimasa; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2009-01-01

    To clarify the clinical benefits of administering immune-enhancing diet, Impact, we examined retrospectively the effect of preoperative immunonutrition with Impact on prevention of postoperative pneumonia after esophagectomy. In 47 patients without preoperative radiotherapy, no patient who preoperatively administered Impact ≥2,250 mL failed to develop pneumonia. The patients whose postoperative hospital stay was more than 30 days were administered Impact ≤2,000 mL except for one case. These results suggest that even preoperative administration of less amount of Impact than an estimated maximum dose, depending on patients' condition, may be beneficial to prevent postoperative pneumonia and a long hospital stay after surgery. (author)

  11. Clinical effectiveness of exogenous L-arginine in patients with coronary heart disease after community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. O. Kulynych

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease and community acquired pneumonia associated with a higher risk for morbidity and mortality. The optimization of treatment of comorbid pathology by medicines which modify endothelium functional state is important. Aim: to study effect of exogenous L-arginine on clinical course of disease, markers of systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Materials and methods. 60 patients with CHD and CAP (the median 72.50 years, range 66.00; 75.00 were included into the study. Patients were randomized in 2 groups: first – 30 patients with basic therapy combined with L-arginine; and second – 30 patients with basic therapy. hs-CRP, neopterin, РАРР-А, NT-proBNP were measured by ELISA-TEST before treatment and 1 month after. Clinical course was assessed during 1 year of follow-up. Results. In the first group the hospitalization rate due to CHD and heart failure decompensation was significantly rare. Biomarkers changes in the 1st group were significant: hs-CRP was significantly decreased by 57.14 % (in the 2nd group – by 28.57 %; neopterin – by 36.57 % (in the 2nd group – by 20.91 %; РАРР-А – by 35.71 % (in the 2nd group – by 4.76 %. There was revealed a significant decreasing of NT-proBNP levels in patients receiving L-arginine by comparing with basic therapy: with the I stage of heart failure (HF – by 50.97 % vs 21.82 %, with the II-A stage of HF – by 43.82 % vs 5.61 % (p < 0.05. After 1 month of therapy patients from the 1st group had significantly lower rates of neopterin – by 16.46 %, and NT-proBNP – by 40.92 % in the subgroup of patients with II-A stage of HF (p < 0.05 compared with patients who received only the basic therapy. Conclusions. Combination of exogenous L-arginine and basic therapy in patients with CHD and CAP was associated with benign clinical course and positive changes of endothelium functional

  12. Mid-regional proadrenomedullin: An early marker of response in critically ill patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia?

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    J.M. Pereira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mid-regional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM is a novel biomarker with potential prognostic utility in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Purpose: To evaluate the value of MR-proADM levels at ICU admission for further severity stratification and outcome prediction, and its kinetics as an early predictor of response in severe CAP (SCAP. Materials and methods: Prospective, single-center, cohort study of 19 SCAP patients admitted to the ICU within 12 h after the first antibiotic dose. Results: At ICU admission median MR-proADM was 3.58 nmol/l (IQR: 2.83–10.00. No significant association was found between its serum levels at admission and severity assessed by SAPS II (Spearman's correlation = 0.24, p = 0.31 or SOFA score (SOFA < 10: <3.45 nmol/l vs. SOFA ≥ 10: 3.90 nmol/l, p = 0.74. Hospital and one-year mortality were 26% and 32%, respectively. No significant difference in median MR-proADM serum levels was found between survivors and non-survivors and its accuracy to predict hospital mortality was bad (aROC 0.53. After 48 h of antibiotic therapy, MR-proADM decreased in all but 5 patients (median −20%; IQR −56% to +0.1%. Its kinetics measured by the percent change from baseline was a good predictor of clinical response (aROC 0.80. The best discrimination was achieved by classifying patients according to whether MR-proADM decreased or not within 48 h. No decrease in MR-proADM serum levels significantly increased the chances of dying independently of general severity (SAPS II-adjusted OR 174; 95% CI 2–15,422; p = 0.024. Conclusions: In SCAP patients, a decrease in MR-proADM serum levels in the first 48 h after ICU admission was a good predictor of clinical response and better outcome. Keywords: Proadrenomedullin, Biomarkers, Severe community acquired pneumonia, Outcome, Critically ill patients

  13. Ceftaroline fosamil versus ceftriaxone for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia: individual patient data meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, Maria; Melnick, David; Iaconis, Joseph P; Sun, Fang; Zhong, Nan Shan; File, Thomas M; Llorens, Lily; Friedland, H David; Wilson, David

    2016-04-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of clinical trials of adults hospitalized with pneumonia outcomes research team (PORT) risk class 3-4 community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) receiving ceftaroline fosamil versus ceftriaxone. Three Phase III trials (clinicaltrials.gov registration numbers NCT00621504, NCT00509106 and NCT01371838) including 1916 hospitalized patients with CAP randomized 1:1 to empirical ceftaroline fosamil (600 mg every 12 h) or ceftriaxone (1-2 g every 24 h) for 5-7 days were included in the meta-analysis. Primary outcome was clinical response at the test-of-cure visit (8-15 days after end of treatment) in the PORT risk class 3-4 modified ITT (MITT) and clinically evaluable (CE) populations. Data were tested for heterogeneity (χ(2) test) and, if not significant, results were pooled and OR and 95% CI constructed. A logistic regression analysis assessed factors impacting cure rate and treatment interactions. Clinical cure rates in each trial consistently favoured ceftaroline fosamil versus ceftriaxone, with no evidence of heterogeneity. In the meta-analysis, ceftaroline fosamil was superior to ceftriaxone in the MITT (OR: 1.66; 95% CI 1.34, 2.06; P Ceftaroline fosamil was superior to ceftriaxone for empirical treatment of adults hospitalized with CAP. Receipt of prior antimicrobial therapy appeared to diminish the observed treatment effect. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Central Hemodynamics and Extravascular Lung Water Index in Varying Degrees of Community-Acquired Pneumonia

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    S. N. Avdeykin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the specific features of central hemodynamics (CH, extravascular lung water index (EVLWI, and pulmonary oxygenizing function in patients with different outcomes of treatment for severe communityacquired pneumonia (CAP.Subjects and methods. The retrospective study enrolled 57 patients with CAP. According to its outcome, there were 2 groups: 1 44 patients (33 men and 11 women, whose disease ended in recovery; 2 13 patients (8 men and 5 women, whose CAP resulted in a fatal out come. The groups did not differ in age (48.1±2.3 and 55.3±4.1 years and overall disease severity according to the APACHE II (21.5±0.8 and 25.2±2.1 scores and SOFA (8.7±0.2 and 9.7±1.0 scores scales (p<0.05. CAP was more severe in Group 2: 3.5±0.1 and 4.4±0.27 CURB65 scores (p>0.05. All the patients received identical antibiotic therapy. They underwent transpulmonary thermodilution according to the standard procedure. The indicators were daily recorded. The data were statistically processed. A corre lation analysis was made calculating the correlation coefficients (r. The significance of differences was estimated by the Student's ttest or Mann-Whitney test.Results. On day 1 of followup, the patients in both groups were prone to arterial hypotension, had tachycardia, lower or nearnormal central venous pressure (CVP. Group 1 versus Group 2 had higher cardiac index (CI (2.9±0.2 and 2.1±0.1 l/min/m2 and global ejection fraction (GEF (22.5±1 and 15.8±1.7% (p<0.05 and lower CVP (4.1±0.2 and 5.6±0.4 mm Hg (p<0.05. On day 3, Group 2 versus Group 1 had higher CVP (p<0.05 and lower CI, GEF, and some other cardiac pump function indicators. Admission EVLWI was virtually equally elevated in both groups. In Group 1, the indicator decreased later on and approached the normal values at 67 days of treatment. In Group 2, EVLWI remained high and did not virtually decrease. The indicator was ascertained to be inversely correlated with GEF on treatment days 1

  15. Computed tomography of the lungs in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. An early indicator of interstitial pneumonia

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    Hartelius, H.; Gaub, J.; Jensen, L.I.; Jensen, J.; Faber, V.

    Computed tomography of the chest was performed on 42 occasions as part of the diagnostic work-up in 26 homosexual men with, or suspected of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In 17 cases both the chest radiographs and the lung scans were abnormal, and bronchoscopy and/or lung biopsy established an etiologic diagnosis in the majority of these cases. In 9 cases CT of the lungs revealed unequivocal interstitial infiltration in the presence of a normal chest radiography, and subsequently and etiologic agent was demonstrated in all these cases. In 9 cases, patients with symptoms indicative of pulmonary infection had both a normal chest radiograph and a normal lung scan, and in none of these cases did the clinical course or additional diagnostic procedures indicate the presence of current opportunistic lung infection. CT of the lungs seems to identify accurately those patients with severe HIV-related diseases in whom invasive diagnostic procedures such as bronchoalveolar lavage and/or lung biopsy should be done.

  16. Summary of Canadian Guidelines for the Initial Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia: An Evidence-Based Update by the Canadian Infectious Disease Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society

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    Lionel A Mandell

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a serious illness with a significant impact on individual patients and society as a whole. Over the past several years, there have been significant advances in the knowledge and understanding of the etiology of the disease, and an appreciation of problems such as mixed infections and increasing antimicrobial resistance. The development of additional fluoroquinolone agents with enhanced activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae has been important as well. It was decided that the time had come to update and modify the previous CAP guidelines, which were published in 1993. The current guidelines represent a joint effort by the Canadian Infectious Diseases Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society, and they address the etiology, diagnosis and initial management of CAP. The diagnostic section is based on the site of care, and the treatment section is organized according to whether one is dealing with outpatients, inpatients or nursing home patients.

  17. Problems and solutions on issues of medical care quality in community-acquired pneumonia in hospitals of Saratov region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotsmanov Yu.F.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative assessment of diagnostics and treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP was carried out in ten therapeutic departments of urban and district hospitals of Saratov region, using quality indicators (Qls. Each case of CAP was assessed in expert health care quality (HCQ card according to the diagnostic and treatment quality federal standards and the basic Ql. The application of Ql in CAP patients allowed revealing the following: low CAP agent isolation rate; late hospitalization of CAP patients; low frequency of sputum bacteriological and bacterioscopic investigations prior to antibiotic therapy; insufficient frequency of step-by-step introduction of antibiotics. Recommendations on CAP patients dispenserization were not properly prescribed; recommendations on vaccination were absent. The basic measures of HCQ improvement are as follows: organizing for each CAP patient therapeutic and diagnostic quality control according to Ql; quick administrative decisions; using of HCQ expertise during the first 2-3 days of treatment to correct diagnosis and treatment; optimizing hospital diagnostic resources (laboratory and instrumental and rational pharmacotherapy

  18. Incidence and risk factors for hospital-acquired pneumonia after surgery for gastric cancer: results of prospective surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohri, Yasuhiko; Tonouchi, Hitoshi; Miki, Chikao; Kobayashi, Minako; Kusunoki, Masato

    2008-06-01

    Postoperative hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) is recognized as a major risk associated with surgery. Although upper abdominal surgery is known to have the highest incidence of postoperative HAP, little is known about the risk factors that contribute to HAP after gastric cancer surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors for HAP after elective surgery for gastric cancer. We conducted prospective surveillance of all elective gastric resections by surgeons in ten affiliated hospitals, including ours, from May 2001 to May 2005. The outcome of interest was postoperative HAP. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the predictive significance of variables in gastric cancer surgery. A total of 529 patients undergoing elective operations for gastric cancer were admitted to the program. Postoperative HAP was identified in 20 patients (3.6%). Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that male gender and intra- and/or postoperative blood transfusion were independently predictive of postoperative HAP. Male gender and intra- and/or postoperative blood transfusion were independent risk factors for the development of HAP after elective resection of gastric cancer. Surgeons should keep these risk factors in mind when managing postoperative patients.

  19. Population pharmacokinetics of ceftaroline in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wart, Scott A; Forrest, Alan; Khariton, Tatiana; Rubino, Christopher M; Bhavnani, Sujata M; Reynolds, Daniel K; Riccobene, Todd; Ambrose, Paul G

    2013-11-01

    Ceftaroline, the active form of ceftaroline fosamil, is a broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic. A population pharmacokinetic (PPK) model for ceftaroline was developed in NONMEM® using data from 185 healthy subjects and 92 patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI). Data from 128 patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) were used for external model validation. Healthy subjects received 50-2,000 mg ceftaroline fosamil via intravenous (IV) infusion over 1 hour or intramuscular (IM) injection q12h or q24h. ABSSSI and CABP patients received 600 mg of ceftaroline fosamil IV over 1 hour q12h. A three-compartment model with zero-order IV or parallel first-order IM input and first-order elimination described ceftaroline fosamil PK. A two-compartment model with first-order conversion of prodrug to ceftaroline and parallel linear and saturable elimination described ceftaroline PK. Creatinine clearance was the primary determinant of ceftaroline exposure. Good agreement between the observed data and both population (r(2)  = 0.93) and individual post-hoc (r(2)  = 0.98) predictions suggests the PPK model can adequately approximate ceftaroline PK using covariate information. Such a PPK model can evaluate dose adjustments for patients with renal impairment and generate ceftaroline exposures for use in pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic assessments of efficacy in patients with ABSSSI or CABP. © 2013, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  20. Association Between Initial Route of Fluoroquinolone Administration and Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized for Community-acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belforti, Raquel K; Lagu, Tara; Haessler, Sarah; Lindenauer, Peter K; Pekow, Penelope S; Priya, Aruna; Zilberberg, Marya D; Skiest, Daniel; Higgins, Thomas L; Stefan, Mihaela S; Rothberg, Michael B

    2016-07-01

    Fluoroquinolones have equivalent oral and intravenous bioavailability, but hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) generally are treated intravenously. Our objectives were to compare outcomes of hospitalized CAP patients initially receiving intravenous vs oral respiratory fluoroquinolones. This was a retrospective cohort study utilizing data from 340 hospitals involving CAP patients admitted to a non-intensive care unit (ICU) setting from 2007 to 2010, who received intravenous or oral levofloxacin or moxifloxacin. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included clinical deterioration (transfer to ICU, initiation of vasopressors, or invasive mechanical ventilation [IMV] initiated after the second hospital day), antibiotic escalation, length of stay (LOS), and cost. Of 36 405 patients who met inclusion criteria, 34 200 (94%) initially received intravenous treatment and 2205 (6%) received oral treatment. Patients who received oral fluoroquinolones had lower unadjusted mortality (1.4% vs 2.5%; P = .002), and shorter mean LOS (5.0 vs 5.3; P fluoroquinolones for CAP, there was no association between initial route of administration and outcomes. More patients may be treated orally without worsening outcomes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Risk factors for pulmonary embolism in patients preliminarily diagnosed with community-acquired pneumonia: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunfeng; Zhou, Qixing; Zou, Ying; Song, Xiaolian; Xie, Shuanshuan; Tan, Min; Zhang, Guoliang; Wang, Changhui

    2016-05-01

    D-dimer levels are increased in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). However, D-dimer levels are also increased in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The aim of this prospective cohort study was to examine the incidence and clinical features of patients preliminarily diagnosed with CAP and with increased D-dimer levels, and who finally were diagnosed with PE. Patients diagnosed with CAP and hospitalized in the Respiratory Department of the Tenth People's Hospital Affiliated to Tongji University between May 2011 and May 2013 were enrolled. D-dimer levels were measured routinely after admission. For patients with increased D-dimer levels, those suspected with PE underwent computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA). A total of 2387 patients with CAP was included: 724 (30.3 %) had increased D-dimer levels (median of 0.91 mg/L). CTPA was performed for 139 of the 724 patients (median D-dimer levels of 1.99 mg/L). Among the 139 patients, 80 were diagnosed with PE, and 59 without PE; D-dimer levels were 2.83 and 1.41 mg/L, respectively (p risk factors for PE. Presentation of PE and CAP are similar. Nevertheless, these results indicated that for hospitalized patients with CAP and elevated D-dimer levels, PE should be considered for those >60 years; with CHD, COPD, or lower limb varicosity; with chest pain, shortness of breath, hemoptysis, increased troponin I, or low fever.

  2. Usefulness and prognostic value of biomarkers in patients with community-acquired pneumonia in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; González Del Castillo, Juan; Candel, Francisco Javier

    2017-06-07

    Between all patients treated in the Emergency Department (ED), 1.35% are diagnosed with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). CAP is the main cause of death due to infectious disease (10-14%) and the most frequent reason of sepsis-septic shock in the ED. In the last decade, the search for objective tools to help establishing an early diagnosis, bacterial aetiology, severity, suspicion of bacteremia and the prognosis of mortality has increased. Biomarkers have shown their usefulness in this matter. Procalcitonin (obtains the highest accuracy for CAP diagnosis, bacterial aetiology and the presence of bacteremia), lactate (biomarker of hypoxia and tissue hypoperfusion) and proadrenomedullin (which has the greatest accuracy to predict mortality which in combination with the prognostic severity scales obtains even better results). The aim of this review is to highlight recently published scientific evidence and to compare the utility and prognostic accuracy of the biomarkers in CAP patients treated in the ED. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Risk Factors for Long-Term Mortality after Hospitalization for Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A 5-Year Prospective Follow-Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holter, Jan C; Ueland, Thor; Jenum, Pål A; Müller, Fredrik; Brunborg, Cathrine; Frøland, Stig S; Aukrust, Pål; Husebye, Einar; Heggelund, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Contributors to long-term mortality in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remain unclear, with little attention paid to pneumonia etiology. We examined long-term survival, causes of death, and risk factors for long-term mortality in adult patients who had been hospitalized for CAP, with emphasis on demographic, clinical, laboratory, and microbiological characteristics. Two hundred and sixty-seven consecutive patients admitted in 2008-2011 to a general hospital with CAP were prospectively recruited and followed up. Patients who died during hospital stay were excluded. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected within 48 hours of admission. Extensive microbiological work-up was performed to establish the etiology of CAP in 63% of patients. Mortality data were obtained from the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. Cox regression models were used to identify independent risk factors for all-cause mortality. Of 259 hospital survivors of CAP (median age 66 years), 79 (30.5%) died over a median of 1,804 days (range 1-2,520 days). Cumulative 5-year survival rate was 72.9% (95% CI 67.4-78.4%). Standardized mortality ratio was 2.90 for men and 2.05 for women. The main causes of death were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), vascular diseases, and malignancy. Independent risk factors for death were the following (hazard ratio, 95% CI): age (1.83 per decade, 1.47-2.28), cardiovascular disease (2.63, 1.61-4.32), COPD (2.09, 1.27-3.45), immunocompromization (1.98, 1.17-3.37), and low serum albumin level at admission (0.75 per 5 g/L higher, 0.58-0.96), whereas active smoking was protective (0.32, 0.14-0.74); active smokers were younger than non-smokers (P hospitalization for CAP and the impact of several well-known risk factors for death, and extend previous findings on the prognostic value of serum albumin level at hospital admission. Pneumonia etiology had no prognostic value, but this remains to be substantiated by further studies using

  4. Short-course versus long-course intravenous therapy with the same antibiotic for severe community-acquired pneumonia in children aged two months to 59 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassi, Zohra S; Imdad, Aamer; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2015-06-16

    Pneumonia remains the single leading cause of childhood mortality, causing an estimated 1.3 million childhood deaths each year in children under the age of five years. The greater burden of disease occurs in low-income countries, where medical resources and hospital-based management are poor. The World Health Organization (WHO) current evidence summaries recommend intravenous antibiotics for five days as first-line treatment for severe pneumonia. Although there is controversy around the specificity of clinical features in the diagnosis of pneumonia, the criteria for the diagnosis of severe pneumonia are better defined and widely used to triage children for referral and second-line therapy.Approximately 120 million new cases of pneumonia occur globally each year in children under five years of age, of which 14 million progress to severe episodes. Hospitalisation for severe pneumonia in children places a significant burden on both patients and their families, including substantial expense, loss of routine and decrease in quality of life. By reducing the duration of treatment in the hospital, this burden could potentially be lessened and possibly lead to better treatment compliance. To evaluate the efficacy of short-course (two to three days) versus long-course (five days) intravenous therapy with the same antibiotic for severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children aged two months to 59 months. We searched CENTRAL (2015, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1966 to January week 4, 2015) and EMBASE (1974 to February 2015). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the efficacy of short-course (two to three days) versus long-course (five days) intravenous antibiotic therapy for severe pneumonia in children aged two months to 59 months. We excluded children with any other debilitating disease, including those infected with HIV and we excluded children with signs and symptoms of very severe pneumonia (i.e. unable to drink or breast feed, vomiting, lethargic, unconscious

  5. Management of Adults With Hospital-acquired and Ventilator-associated Pneumonia: 2016 Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Thoracic Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalil, Andre C.; Metersky, Mark L.; Klompas, Michael; Muscedere, John; Sweeney, Daniel A.; Palmer, Lucy B.; Napolitano, Lena M.; O'Grady, Naomi P.; Bartlett, John G.; Carratalà, Jordi; El Solh, Ali A.; Ewig, Santiago; Fey, Paul D.; File, Thomas M.; Restrepo, Marcos I.; Roberts, Jason A.; Waterer, Grant W.; Cruse, Peggy; Knight, Shandra L.; Brozek, Jan L.

    2016-01-01

    It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances. These guidelines are intended for use by healthcare professionals who care for patients at risk for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), including specialists in infectious diseases, pulmonary diseases, critical care, and surgeons, anesthesiologists, hospitalists, and any clinicians and healthcare providers caring for hospitalized patients with nosocomial pneumonia. The panel's recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of HAP and VAP are based upon evidence derived from topic-specific systematic literature reviews. PMID:27418577

  6. Risk factors for in-hospital mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes complicated by community-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chung-Huei; Tsai, Jir-Shiong; Chen, I-Wen; Hsu, Brend Ray-Sea; Huang, Miau-Ju; Huang, Yu-Yao

    2015-10-01

    Patients with diabetes are at a high risk of infection-related morbidity and mortality. Klebsiella pneumoniae bacilli are prevalent among diabetic patients, especially in Asian populations. The present study aimed to identify risk factors for in-hospital mortality among diabetic patients complicated by community-acquired K. pneumoniae bacteremia. We evaluated the clinical characteristics of 341 Taiwanese type 2 diabetic patients who were treated for community-acquired K. pneumoniae bacteremia. We then analyzed outcome predictors, and in particular comorbidities and the site of infection. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 14.1%. Comorbid cancer was the leading factor, accounting for 32.1% of all cases of mortality. Pulmonary infection, primary bacteremia, afebrile or shock presentation and low serum albumin level were risk factors for in-hospital mortality. Regardless of comorbidities, pulmonary infection [odds ratio (OR) 10.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.02-57.09] and albumin level (OR 0.15, 95% CI 0.03-0.76) were the main risk predictors. The receiver operating characteristic curve indicated that a serum albumin level lower than 2.4 g/dL (71.1% sensitivity and 77.4% specificity) suggested a poor prognosis in the diabetic patients with K. pneumoniae bacteremia. In patients with pulmonary infection, the capsular serotypes of K. pneumoniae were not related to poor outcomes, and an initial presentation of blunted fever or shock were independent factors for mortality. Cancer, pulmonary infection, and low serum albumin levels were independent indicators of in-hospital mortality in the diabetic patients complicated by K. pneumoniae bacteremia. The sites of infection and host characteristics should always elicit medical attention when treating these patients. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. The Queensland experience of participation in a national drug use evaluation project, Community-acquired pneumonia – towards improving outcomes nationally (CAPTION

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    Tett Susan E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multicentre drug use evaluations are described in the literature infrequently and usually publish only the results. The purpose of this paper is to describe the experience of Queensland hospitals participating in the Community-Acquired Pneumonia Towards Improving Outcomes Nationally (CAPTION project, specifically evaluating the implementation of this project, detailing benefits and drawbacks of involvement in a national drug use evaluation program. Methods Emergency departments from nine hospitals in Queensland, Australia, participated in CAPTION, a national quality improvement project, conducted in 37 Australian hospitals. CAPTION was aimed at optimising prescribing in the management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia according to the recommendations of the Australian Therapeutic Guidelines: Antibiotic 12th edition. The project involved data collection, and evaluation, feedback of results and a suite of targeted educational interventions including audit and feedback, group presentations and academic detailing. A baseline audit and two drug use evaluation cycles were conducted during the 2-year project. The implementation of the project was evaluated using feedback forms after each phase of the project (audit or intervention. At completion a group meeting with the hospital coordinators identified positive and negative elements of the project. Results Evaluation by hospitals of their participation in CAPTION demonstrated both benefits and drawbacks. The benefits were grouped into the impact on the hospital dynamic such as; improved interdisciplinary working relationships (e.g. between pharmacist and doctor, recognition of the educational/academic role of the pharmacist, creation of ED Pharmacist positions and enhanced involvement with the National Prescribing Service, and personal benefits. Personal benefits included academic detailing training for participants, improved communication skills and opportunities to present at

  8. Community-acquired necrotizing pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus producing Panton-Valentine leukocidin in a Chinese teenager: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Luo, Yanping; Zhang, Shu; Liang, Zhixin; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Guang; Jia, Yanhong; Chen, Liangan; She, Danyang

    2014-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has now been established as an important community-acquired pathogen. Although necrotizing pneumonia caused by community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains producing Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) has been reported with increasing frequency in many countries, it has been reported in only a few children younger than 1 year of age in Mainland China. We describe a case of life-threatening necrotizing pneumonia due to PVL-positive CA-MRSA in a 15-year-old previously healthy female who presented with high fever, shivering, a dry cough, and dyspnea. Details of the clinical outcomes, microbiological data, and therapies for this patient were collected and compared with those of cases reported in the literature on CA-MRSA. Computed tomography (CT) findings showed cavitary consolidations in both lungs and bilateral pleural effusion. MRSA strains isolated from the patient's sputum and pleural fluid were susceptible to most non-β-lactam antimicrobial agents except for clindamycin and erythromycin. Both of these isolates tested positive for the mecA gene as well as PVL genes, and were identified as ST59-MRSA-SCCmec type IV-spa type t437. The patient was treated successfully with linezolid, fosfomycin, and teicoplanin. To our knowledge, this is the first report from Mainland China of necrotizing pneumonia due to PVL-positive CA-MRSA among those aged older than 1 year. CA-MRSA necrotizing pneumonia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of severe community-acquired pneumonia, particularly in previously healthy individuals. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Hospitalization Rate and Population-Based Incidence of Hospitalization for Community-Acquired Pneumonia Among Children in Suzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Wei; Shi, Ting; Zhang, Xiyan; Xue, Jian; Wang, Yin; Yu, Jia; Huang, Yukai; Lin, Sheng; Zhao, Genming; Tian, Jianmei; Zhang, Tao

    2018-03-22

    Data on hospitalization burden of CAP in children is very limited in China. This study aimed to estimate the hospitalization rate and population-based incidence of hospitalization of CAP for children <15 years of age in Suzhou, China. This was a retrospective study of children hospitalized in Soochow University Affiliated Children's Hospital (SCH) from January 2010 to December 2014. Children who were residents of downtown Suzhou, 29 days to <15 years of age, with discharge diagnosis codes (ICD-10) including J09 to J18 and J20 to J22 were included. All-cause clinical community-acquired pneumonia (CCAP) and radiographically confirmed pneumonia (RCAP) were identified based on individual medical chart review. The hospitalization rate (HR) and population-based cumulative incidence of hospitalization (HI) were calculated. Among 184,734 children <15 years old admitted to SCH during the study period, 31,302 children were identified as having CCAP, and 24,218 (77.4%) children confirmed as having RCAP. CCAP hospitalization occurred year round and peaked during winter and early spring. The overall HRs for CCAP and RCAP were 189.0 (95%CI, 187.1-190.9) and 146.2 (95%CI, 144-148) per 1,000 hospitalizations respectively, and the HIs per 100,000 children annually were CCAP, 3,235.8 (95%CI, 3207.3-3264.2) and RCAP, 2,503.5 (95%CI, 2,478.3-2,528.6). For children <5 years old, the HR for CCAP was 248.4 (95%CI, 245.9-250.9) and RCAP 194.0 (95%CI, 191.4-196.3) per 1,000 hospitalizations; the HI for CCAP was 6,956.2 (95%CI: 6,892.8-7,019.6) and 5,431.9 (95%CI: 5,375.4-5,488.4) per 100,000 children for RCAP. The highest HR and HI were observed in children 29 days to <6 months old: HR for CCAP was 407.4 (95%CI: 400.9-413.9) per 1,000 hospitalizations and HI for CCAP was 11,203.7 (95%CI: 11,026.8-11,380.6) per 100,000 children annually. There is a considerable burden of CAP among children <15 years of age in Suzhou, particularly among children 29 days to <6 months of age and during winter

  10. Valuable hematological indicators for the diagnosis and severity assessment of Chinese children with community-acquired pneumonia: Prealbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Jingjing; Shao, Xiaonan; Ma, Yibo; Lv, Darong

    2016-11-01

    Chest X-ray is a "golden standard" for the diagnosis and severity assessment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, it cannot be used as routine examination of CAP in children. The present study aims to investigate the roles of prealbumin (PA) in CAP in children and further determine the usefulness of PA in diagnosis and severity assessment of CAP in children.This was a retrospective analysis of 174 cases of hospitalized children with CAP. The following indicators were recorded: vital sign, inflammatory indexes, PA, and respiratory pathogens immunoglobulin M antibody test results. A total of 33 healthy children were selected as the control group. The results of laboratory tests between CAP and control groups were compared. CAP group was further divided into mild CAP and severe CAP groups, and vital signs and laboratory examination results of 2 groups were compared.The total positive rate of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in this study was 27.4%, and there was no significant difference in different seasons (P = 0.356). Compared with controls, there was no significant difference between procalcitonin and C-reactive protein in CAP group (P = 0.355, 0.061). The white blood cell count, percentage of neutrophils, neutrophil count, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in the CAP group were significantly higher than those in control group, and PA was significantly lower than that in the control group (all P children based on multivariate analysis (odds ratio: 0.974; 95% confidence interval: 0.956-0.993; P = 0.008). PA level in severe CAP group was significantly lower than in mild CAP group (P = 0.001). With a cutoff value of 125 mg/L, the sensitivity and specificity of PA for the severity assessment of CAP were 0.703 and 0.714, respectively.Combined with traditional inflammatory markers, PA may improve the diagnostic efficacy of CAP in children. PA can be used as a reference marker to complement the chest X-rays for severity assessment of children CAP.

  11. Process of care and prescription in pneumonia acquired in the community in university hospitals in Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Carlos Eli; Jaimes, Fabian A; Montufar, Franco E; Hincapie, Gustavo A; Morales, Alvaro; Acero, Rafael; Muneton, David; Gomez, Sujey; Cuenca, Diana Maria; Salinas, Juan Carlos; Zabaleta Joel E

    2003-01-01

    The objective is to describe the process of care and prescription practices for CAP patients in four university hospitals in Colombia. Patients older than 15 years with a diagnosis of CAP during the two years study period. Collection of demographic and clinical status data and management during the first day of consult, classification in severity groups according to fine's prediction rule. Evaluation of the frequency of use of ancillary diagnostic tests antimicrobials prescription and agreement with ATS guidelines according to severity group and hospital. 734 patients were included, mean age 56 years old, 50.5% males, mean length of stay 8.6 days, 39% fine's classes IV to V. Frequency of sputum sampling (overall cohort between hospitals rank) was 46% (10 - 67%), chest x-ray 95% (57-100%), blood cultures 34% (0 -63%) and arterial blood gas analysis 71% (10-88%). the use of ancillary diagnostic test had wide variation between hospitals and severity classes, specially for sputum and blood gases. At least 45 different antimicrobial protocols were used in the cohort. Overall agreement between actual prescription and guidelines recommendations was variable (mean 44%, range 22 to 72%) between groups and hospitals, but without significant impact on mortality. There are many differences between actual clinical practice and guidelines for the management of CAP and wide variations between hospitals, but the precise effect of the lack of guideline-adherence on mortality is unclear

  12. Occurrence and analysis of irp2 virulence gene in isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp. from microbiota and hospital and community-acquired infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza Lopes, Ana Catarina; Rodrigues, Juliana Falcão; Cabral, Adriane Borges; da Silva, Maíra Espíndola; Leal, Nilma Cintra; da Silveira, Vera Magalhães; de Morais Júnior, Marcos Antônio

    2016-07-01

    Eighty-five isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp., originating from hospital- and community-acquired infections and from oropharyngeal and faecal microbiota from patients in Recife-PE, Brazil, were analyzed regarding the presence of irp2 gene. This is a Yersinia typical gene involved in the synthesis of siderophore yersiniabactin. DNA sequencing confirmed the identity of irp2 gene in five K. pneumoniae, five Enterobacter aerogenes and one Enterobacter amnigenus isolates. To our knowledge in the current literature, this is the first report of the irp2 gene in E. amnigenus, a species considered an unusual human pathogen, and in K. pneumoniae and E. aerogenes isolates from the normal microbiota and from community infections, respectively. Additionally, the analyses of nucleotide and amino acid sequences suggest the irp2 genes derived from isolates used in this study are more closely related to that of Yersinia pestis P.CE882 than to that of Yersinia enterocolitica 8081. These data demonstrated that K. pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp. from normal microbiota and from community- and hospital-acquired infections possess virulence factors important for the establishment of extra-intestinal infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Improving antibiotic prescribing for adults with community acquired pneumonia: Does a computerised decision support system achieve more than academic detailing alone? – a time series analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Black James F

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ideal method to encourage uptake of clinical guidelines in hospitals is not known. Several strategies have been suggested. This study evaluates the impact of academic detailing and a computerised decision support system (CDSS on clinicians' prescribing behaviour for patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP. Methods The management of all patients presenting to the emergency department over three successive time periods was evaluated; the baseline, academic detailing and CDSS periods. The rate of empiric antibiotic prescribing that was concordant with recommendations was studied over time comparing pre and post periods and using an interrupted time series analysis. Results The odds ratio for concordant therapy in the academic detailing period, after adjustment for age, illness severity and suspicion of aspiration, compared with the baseline period was OR = 2.79 [1.88, 4.14], p Conclusion Deployment of a computerised decision support system was associated with an early improvement in antibiotic prescribing practices which was greater than the changes seen with academic detailing. The sustainability of this intervention requires further evaluation.

  14. Impacto de Streptococcus pneumoniae en las neumonías del niño latinoamericano Impact of Streptococcus pneumoniae in pneumonias of Latin American children

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    María Hortal

    2000-09-01

    xico (47,0% y los menores a Colombia (12,1%. La resistencia a la penicilina se asoció con un reducido número de serotipos capsulares, fundamentalmente el 14 y el 23F, el primero resistente a la penicilina y a la trimetoprima-sulfametoxazol, y el segundo multirresistente. La frecuencia de la resistencia a la trimetoprima-sulfametoxazol fue elevada en todos los países y el valor máximo correspondió a Argentina (58,0%. La disminución de la susceptibilidad al cloranfenicol tuvo baja frecuencia, salvo en Colombia (23,4%. La resistencia a la eritromicina fue baja en todos los países y todos los aislados fueron sensibles a la vancomicina.Community-acquired pneumonia is one of the leading causes of infant morbidity and mortality. Studies conducted in developing countries indicate that the most serious symptoms of pneumonia are associated with bacterial causes, mainly Streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Haemophilus influenzae type b. Managing those infections in children under two years of age is hindered by the lack of appropriate vaccines and by the decreased susceptibility of S. pneumoniae to penicillin and other antibiotics. In 1993, at the initiative of the Regional System for Vaccines of the Pan American Health Organization, and with funding from the Canadian International Development Agency, a study was designed to identify the S. pneumoniae capsular types that cause invasive disease in Latin American children under 5 years of age. The objective of the study was to determine the ideal composition of a conjugate vaccine that could be used in Latin America, and the penicillin susceptibility of the S. pneumoniae isolates. The initiative was undertaken in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Uruguay. This report analyzes the information that the participating countries generated on pneumococcal pneumonia. A total of 3 393 children were found with systemic S. pneumoniae infections, of which 1 578 corresponded to pneumonias. The analysis focused on 1 409 cases

  15. Short-course versus long-course intravenous therapy with the same antibiotic for severe community-acquired pneumonia in children aged two months to 59 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassi, Zohra S; Imdad, Aamer; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2017-10-11

    Pneumonia is a leading cause of childhood mortality from infectious disease, responsible for an estimated 1.3 million deaths annually in children under five years of age, many of which are in low-income countries. The World Health Organization recommends intravenous antibiotics for five days as first-line treatment for children with severe pneumonia. Although controversy exists regarding the specific clinical features used to diagnose pneumonia, the criteria for diagnosis of severe pneumonia are better defined and are widely used to triage children for referral and second-line therapy.In 2011 it was estimated that approximately 120 million new cases of pneumonia occur globally each year in children under five years of age, of which 14 million become severe episodes. Hospitalisation for severe pneumonia in children places a significant burden on both patients and their families, including substantial expense, loss of routine, and decrease in quality of life. By reducing the duration of hospital treatment, healthcare burdens could potentially be reduced and treatment compliance may improve.This is an update of a review published in 2015. To evaluate the efficacy of short-course (two to three days) versus long-course (five days) intravenous therapy (alone or in combination with oral antibiotics) with the same antibiotic for severe community-acquired pneumonia in children aged two months to 59 months. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 12), MEDLINE (1966 to December week 3, 2016), Embase (1974 to 22 December 2016), and four trials registers (23 August 2017), together with reference checking of all relevant trials and reviews. Randomised controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of short-course (two to three days) versus long-course (five days) intravenous antibiotic therapy (alone or in combination with oral antibiotics) for severe pneumonia in children aged two months to 59 months. We excluded children with any other

  16. Estado nutricional y mortalidad en neumonía de la comunidad Nutritional status and mortality in community acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Soledad Rodríguez-Pecci

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Las neumonías constituyen una causa mayor de morbimortalidad, y entre los factores de riesgo se incluye el estado nutricional. En el presente estudio se analizó la relación entre malnutrición y mortalidad en Neumonía Aguda de la Comunidad (NAC y se utilizó la Escala de Evaluación Global Subjetiva (EGS como método de valoración del estado nutricional de los pacientes con NAC. En este estudio prospectivo observacional se incluyeron en forma consecutiva 98 pacientes con NAC que requirieron hospitalización, de octubre de 2004 a septiembre de 2006. Se registraron características clínicas, bacteriológicas y de laboratorio y se evaluó nutricionalmente a cada paciente utilizando la EGS. El seguimiento se realizó hasta el alta médica, derivación o muerte. La persistencia de tos o fiebre, la presencia de derrame pleural, neoplasias o larga hospitalización se asociaron a peor pronóstico. La mortalidad aumentó proporcionalmente con el grado de desnutrición. Treinta y dos pacientes (32.65% fueron clasificados como categoría EGS-A; 44 (44.90% como EGS-B, y 22 (22.45% como EGS-C. Fallecieron 3 de 32 EGS-A (9.37%, 8 de 44 EGS-B (18.18% y 10 de 22 EGS-C. El riesgo de muerte fue significativamente mayor en el grupo EGS-C que en el EGS-A; OR = 6.085 (CI95% 1.071- 34.591 p = 0.042. Considerando la muerte como variable de egreso, la categoría EGS-A mostró el mayor valor predictivo negativo (0.906, y EGS-C el mayor valor predictivo positivo (0.455. La EGS realizada al ingreso fue un instrumento útil para identificar el estado nutricional y un buen pronosticador de riesgo de muerte en NAC.Pneumonias are a major cause of morbidity and mortality and their prognosis depends on many factors including nutritional status. This study analyzed the relationship between malnutrition and the risk of death in Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP patients. This is a prospective observational study. The Subjective Global Assessment (SGA was used as a screening

  17. Ceftaroline Fosamil for the Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia Secondary to Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections or Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez, Jose A.; Maggiore, Christy R.; Cole, Phillip; Smith, Alexander; Jandourek, Alena; Friedland, H. David

    2014-01-01

    Background The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro? Utilization Registry is designed to collect information on the clinical use of ceftaroline fosamil in the Unites States. This report presents data on the treatment of patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) secondary to acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). Methods Patients diagnosed with ABSSSI or CABP were identified through sequential review of rando...

  18. Poor outcomes of empiric ceftriaxone ± azithromycin for community-acquired pneumonia caused by methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Wonhee; Crandon, Jared L; Nicolau, David P

    2016-06-01

    While ceftriaxone 1 g q24h is commonly used for hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), the prescribing information recommends 2-4 g a day to treat methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA). Similarly, recent pharmacodynamic analyses suggest shortcomings of 1 g q24h against the bulk of the MSSA. We evaluated the outcomes of empiric ceftriaxone 1 g q24h ± azithromycin in patients with MSSA pneumonia, as compared with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Adult patients admitted to Hartford Hospital from 1/2005 to 12/2014 with respiratory culture for MSSA or S. pneumoniae were considered for inclusion. Non-ICU, CAP patients were included. Early clinical failure (ECF) was defined as persistent signs/symptoms or change of antibiotic due to poor response at 72-96 h. A multivariate analysis was performed to evaluate predictors of ECF. Over the study period, 403 MSSA and 227 S. pneumoniae positive respiratory cultures were identified. The majority of patients were excluded due to the following: no signs/symptoms of pneumonia, hospital-acquired pneumonia, alternative antibiotics, and polymicrobial infection. Thirty-nine patients met inclusion/exclusion criteria. All but three patients in the S. pneumoniae group received ceftriaxone + azithromycin. ECF was greater in the MSSA group (53 vs. 4 %, P = 0.003), as was length of stay (7.5 ± 5.4 vs. 4.6 ± 3.3 days, P = 0.006). When controlling for disease severity and macrolide non-susceptibility in a multivariate analysis, MSSA was significantly correlated with ECF (OR 12.3, 95 % CI 0.8-188.8). Poor clinical outcomes were observed in patients empirically treated with ceftriaxone ± azithromycin for MSSA CAP. Despite the popularity of ceftriaxone 1 g q24h, these data suggest this dose or compound may be inadequate for CAP caused by MSSA.

  19. Sequence patterns in the resolution of clinical instabilities in community-acquired pneumonia and association with outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougham, Gavin W; Ham, Sandra A; Ruhnke, Gregory W; Schulwolf, Elizabeth; Auerbach, Andrew D; Schnipper, Jeffrey L; Kaboli, Peter J; Wetterneck, Tosha B; Gonzalez, David; Arora, Vineet M; Meltzer, David O

    2014-04-01

    In patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), indicators of clinical instability at discharge (fever, tachycardia, tachypnea, hypotension, hypoxia, decreased oral intake and altered mental status) are associated with poor outcomes. It is not known whether the order of indicator stabilization is associated with outcomes. To describe variation in the sequences, including whether and in what order, indicators of clinical instability resolve among patients hospitalized with CAP, and to assess associations between patterns of stabilization and patient-level outcomes. DESIGN/PARTICIPANTS / MAIN MEASURES: Chart review ascertained whether and when indicators stabilized and other data for 1,326 adult CAP patients in six U.S. academic medical centers. The sequences of indicator stabilization were characterized using sequence analysis and grouped using cluster analysis. Associations between sequence patterns and 30-day mortality, length of stay (LOS), and total costs were modeled using regression analysis. We found 986 unique sequences of indicator stabilization. Sequence analysis identified eight clusters of sequences (patterns) derived by the order or speed in which instabilities resolved or remained at discharge and inpatient mortality. Two of the clusters (56% of patients) were characterized by almost complete stabilization prior to discharge alive, but differing in the rank orders of four indicators and time to maximum stabilization. Five other clusters (42% of patients) were characterized by one to three instabilities at discharge with variable orderings of indicator stabilization. In models with fast and almost complete stabilization as the referent, 30-day mortality was lowest in clusters with slow and almost complete stabilization or tachycardia or fever at discharge [OR = 0.73, 95% CI = (0.28-1.92)], and highest in those with hypoxia with instabilities in mental status or oral intake at discharge [OR = 3.99, 95% CI = (1.68-9.50)]. Sequences of

  20. Respiratory Viral Detection in Children and Adults: Comparing Asymptomatic Controls and Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.