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Sample records for acquired neuroprotection induced

  1. Neuroprotective Treatment of Laser-Induced Retinal Injuries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosner, Mordechai

    2001-01-01

    .... It is not possible to prevent all these injuries and there is no treatment. This study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of dextromethorphan, memantine and brimonidine in our rat model of laser- induced retinal-lesions Methods...

  2. Neuroprotective effect of paeonol against isoflurane- induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cells [3]. Neuroinflammation has been reported to be involved in volatile anesthetic-induced ... genus Paeonia and a key active principle of plants such ... housing conditions of 12 h day/night cycle and ..... human esophageal cancer cell lines.

  3. Phytoceramide Shows Neuroprotection and Ameliorates Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seikwan Oh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The function and the role phytoceramide (PCER and phytosphingosine (PSO in the central nervous system has not been well studied. This study was aimed at investigating the possible roles of PCER and PSO in glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in cultured neuronal cells and memory function in mice. Phytoceramide showed neuro-protective activity in the glutamate-induced toxicity in cultured cortical neuronal cells. Neither phytosphingosine nor tetraacetylphytosphingosine (TAPS showed neuroproective effects in neuronal cells. PCER (50 mg/kg, p.o. recovered the scopolamine-induced reduction in step-through latency in the passive avoidance test; however, PSO did not modulate memory function on this task. The ameliorating effects of PCER on spatial memory were confirmed by the Morris water maze test. In conclusion, through behavioral and neurochemical experimental results, it was demonstrated that central administration of PCER produces amelioration of memory impairment. These results suggest that PCER plays an important role in neuroprotection and memory enhancement and PCER could be a potential new therapeutic agent for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease.

  4. Neuroprotective effects of statins against amyloid β-induced neurotoxicity

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    Hsin-Hua Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests that disruption of the homeostasis of lipid metabolism affects the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. In particular, dysregulation of cholesterol homeostasis in the brain has been reported to considerably increase the risk of developing AD. Thus, dysregulation of lipid homeostasis may increase the amyloid β (Aβ levels by affecting amyloid precursor protein (APP cleavage, which is the most important risk factor involved in the pathogenesis of AD. Previous research demonstrated that Aβ can trigger neuronal insulin resistance, which plays an important role in response to Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in AD. Epidemiological studies also suggested that statin use is associated with a decreased incidence of AD. Therefore, statins are believed to be a good candidate for conferring neuroprotective effects against AD. Statins may play a beneficial role in reducing Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Their effect involves a putative mechanism beyond its cholesterol-lowering effects in preventing Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of the protective effect of statins have not been clearly determined in Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Given that statins may provide benefits beyond the inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase, these drugs may also improve the brain. Thus, statins may have beneficial effects on impaired insulin signaling by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in neuronal cells. They play a potential therapeutic role in targeting Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity.

  5. Neuroprotection by Caffeine in Hyperoxia-Induced Neonatal Brain Injury

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    Stefanie Endesfelder

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequelae of prematurity triggered by oxidative stress and free radical-mediated tissue damage have coined the term “oxygen radical disease of prematurity”. Caffeine, a potent free radical scavenger and adenosine receptor antagonist, reduces rates of brain damage in preterm infants. In the present study, we investigated the effects of caffeine on oxidative stress markers, anti-oxidative response, inflammation, redox-sensitive transcription factors, apoptosis, and extracellular matrix following the induction of hyperoxia in neonatal rats. The brain of a rat pups at postnatal Day 6 (P6 corresponds to that of a human fetal brain at 28–32 weeks gestation and the neonatal rat is an ideal model in which to investigate effects of oxidative stress and neuroprotection of caffeine on the developing brain. Six-day-old Wistar rats were pre-treated with caffeine and exposed to 80% oxygen for 24 and 48 h. Caffeine reduced oxidative stress marker (heme oxygenase-1, lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide, and glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC, promoted anti-oxidative response (superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxin 1, and sulfiredoxin 1, down-regulated pro-inflammatory cytokines, modulated redox-sensitive transcription factor expression (Nrf2/Keap1, and NFκB, reduced pro-apoptotic effectors (poly (ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1, apoptosis inducing factor (AIF, and caspase-3, and diminished extracellular matrix degeneration (matrix metalloproteinases (MMP 2, and inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP 1/2. Our study affirms that caffeine is a pleiotropic neuroprotective drug in the developing brain due to its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic properties.

  6. Radiated-induced brain injury: advance of molecular mechanisms and neuroprotection strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Bo; Wang Xuejian

    2007-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms of radiated-induced brain injury (RBI) remain incompletely clear. Pathophysiological data indicate that the development of RBI involves complex and dynamic interactions between neurons, glia, and vascular endothelial cells within thecentral nervous system (CNS). Radiated-induced injury in the CNS can be modulated by the therapies directed at altering steps in the cascade of events leading to the clinical expression of normal tissue injury. Some neuroprotective strategies are also addressed in the review. (authors)

  7. Exogenous agmatine has neuroprotective effects against restraint-induced structural changes in the rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Meng-Yang; Wang, Wei-Ping; Cai, Zheng-Wei; Regunathan, Soundar; Ordway, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Agmatine is an endogenous amine derived from decarboxylation of arginine catalysed by arginine decarboxylase. Agmatine is considered a novel neuromodulator and possesses neuroprotective properties in the central nervous system. The present study examined whether agmatine has neuroprotective effects against repeated restraint stress-induced morphological changes in rat medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 6 h of restraint stress daily for 21 days. Immunohistochemical staining with β-tubulin III showed that repeated restraint stress caused marked morphological alterations in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Stress-induced alterations were prevented by simultaneous treatment with agmatine (50 mg/kg/day, i.p.). Interestingly, endogenous agmatine levels, as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus as well as in the striatum and hypothalamus of repeated restraint rats were significantly reduced as compared with the controls. Reduced endogenous agmatine levels in repeated restraint animals were accompanied by a significant increase of arginine decarboxylase protein levels in the same regions. Moreover, administration of exogenous agmatine to restrained rats abolished increases of arginine decarboxylase protein levels. Taken together, these results demonstrate that exogenously administered agmatine has neuroprotective effects against repeated restraint-induced structural changes in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. These findings indicate that stress-induced reductions in endogenous agmatine levels in the rat brain may play a permissive role in neuronal pathology induced by repeated restraint stress. PMID:18364017

  8. Methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic toxicity prevented owing to the neuroprotective effects of salicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrash-Williams, Bessy; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S; Bhattacharya, Dwipayan; Ahuja, Manuj; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu; Dhanasekaran, Muralikrishnan

    2016-06-01

    Methamphetamine (Schedule-II drug, U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration) is one of the most abused illicit drug following cocaine, marijuana, and heroin in the USA. There are numerous health impairments and substantial economic burden caused by methamphetamine abuse. Salicylic acid, potent anti-inflammatory drug and a known neuroprotectant has shown to protect against toxicity-induced by other dopaminergic neurotoxins. Hence, in this study we investigated the neuroprotective effects of salicylic acid against methamphetamine-induced toxicity in mice. The current study investigated the effects of sodium salicylate and/or methamphetamine on oxidative stress, monoamine oxidase, mitochondrial complex I & IV activities using spectrophotometric and fluorimetric methods. Behavioral analysis evaluated the effect on movement disorders-induced by methamphetamine. Monoaminergic neurotransmitter levels were evaluated using high pressure liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection. Methamphetamine caused significant generation of reactive oxygen species and decreased complex-I activity leading to dopamine depletion. Striatal dopamine depletion led to significant behavioral changes associated with movement disorders. Sodium salicylate (50 & 100mg/kg) significantly scavenged reactive oxygen species, blocked mitochondrial dysfunction and exhibited neuroprotection against methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. In addition, sodium salicylate significantly blocked methamphetamine-induced behavioral changes related to movement abnormalities. One of the leading causative theories in nigral degeneration associated with movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease is exposure to stimulants, drugs of abuse, insecticide and pesticides. These neurotoxic substances can induce dopaminergic neuronal insult by oxidative stress, apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation. Salicylic acid due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects could provide neuroprotection against the

  9. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α mediates neuroprotection of hypoxic postconditioning against global cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tingna; Zhan, Lixuan; Liang, Donghai; Hu, Jiaoyue; Lu, Zhiwei; Zhu, Xinyong; Sun, Weiwen; Liu, Liu; Xu, En

    2014-10-01

    Hypoxia administered after transient global cerebral ischemia (tGCI) has been shown to induce neuroprotection in adult rats, but the underlying mechanisms for this protection are unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that hypoxic postconditioning (HPC) induces neuroprotection through upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and that this involves phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) pathways. The expression of HIF-1α, VEGF, and cleaved caspase-9 were determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. As pharmacologic interventions, the HIF-1α inhibitor 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2), PI3K inhibitor LY294002, p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580, and MEK inhibitor U0126 were administered before HPC or after tGCI. We found that HPC maintained the higher expression of HIF-1α and VEGF and decreased cleaved caspase-9 levels in CA1 after tGCI. These effects were reversed by 2ME2 administered before HPC, and the neuroprotection of HPC was abolished. LY294002 and SB203580 decreased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF after HPC, whereas U0126 increased HIF-1α and VEGF after tGCI. These findings suggested that HIF-1α exerts neuroprotection induced by HPC against tGCI through VEGF upregulation and cleaved caspase-9 downregulation, and that the PI3K, p38 MAPK, and MEK pathways are involved in the regulation of HIF-1α and VEGF.

  10. Electroacupuncture preconditioning-induced neuroprotection may be mediated by glutamate transporter type 2

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xiaoling; Yin, Jinbo; Li, Liaoliao; Ma, Lei; Tan, Hongying; Deng, Jiao; Chen, Shaoyang; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2013-01-01

    Electroacupuncture has been shown to induce a preconditioning effect in the brain. The mechanisms for this protection are not fully elucidated. We hypothesize that this protection is mediated by excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) that have been shown to be neuroprotective. To test this hypothesis, two-month old male Sprague-Dawley rats and EAAT type 3 (EAAT3) knockout mice received or did not receive 30-min electroacupuncture once a day for 5 consecutive days. They were subjected to a...

  11. Neuroprotective effect of curcumin-loaded lactoferrin nano particles against rotenone induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollimpelli, V Satish; Kumar, Prashant; Kumari, Sonali; Kondapi, Anand K

    2016-05-01

    Curcumin is known to have neuroprotective role and possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory activities. Rotenone, a flavonoid induced neurotoxicity in dopaminergic cells is being widely studied in Parkinson's Disease (PD) research. In the present study, curcumin loaded lactoferrin nano particles prepared by sol-oil chemistry were used to protect dopaminergic cell line SK-N-SH against rotenone induced neurotoxicity. These curcumin loaded nano particles were of 43-60 nm diameter size and around 100 nm hydrodynamic size as assessed by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis respectively. The encapsulation efficiency was 61.3% ± 2.4%. Cellular uptake of curcumin through these nano particles was confirmed by confocal imaging and spectrofluorimetric analysis. The curcumin loaded lactoferrin nanoparticles showed greater intracellular drug uptake, sustained retention and greater neuroprotection than soluble counterpart. Neuroprotective activity was characterized through viability assays and by estimating ROS levels. Furthermore rotenone induced PD like features were characterized by decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase expression and increase in α-synuclein expression. Taken together curcumin loaded lactoferrin nanoparticles could be a promising drug delivery strategy against neurotoxicity in dopaminergic neurons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 mediates erythropoietin-induced neuroprotection in hypoxia ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souvenir, Rhonda; Fathali, Nancy; Ostrowski, Robert P; Lekic, Tim; Zhang, John H; Tang, Jiping

    2011-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that erythropoietin (EPO) is neuroprotective in both in vivo and in vitro models of hypoxia ischemia. However these studies hold limited clinical translations because the underlying mechanism remains unclear and the key molecules involved in EPO-induced neuroprotection are still to be determined. This study investigated if tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and its upstream regulator signaling molecule Janus kinase-2 (JAK-2) are critical in EPO-induced neuroprotection. Hypoxia ischemia (HI) was modeled in-vitro by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) and in-vivo by a modified version of Rice-Vannucci model of HI in 10-day-old rat pups. EPO treated cells were exposed to AG490, an inhibitor of JAK-2 or TIMP-1 neutralizing antibody for 2h with OGD. Cell death, phosphorylation of JAK-2 and signal transducers and activators of transcription protein-3 (STAT-3), TIMP-1 expression, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity were measured and compared with normoxic group. Hypoxic ischemic animals were treated one hour following HI and evaluated 48 h after. Our data showed that EPO significantly increased cell survival, associated with increased TIMP-1 activity, phosphorylation of JAK-2 and STAT-3, and decreased MMP-9 activity in vivo and in vitro. EPO's protective effects were reversed by inhibition of JAK-2 or TIMP-1 in both models. We concluded that JAK-2, STAT-3 and TIMP-1 are key mediators of EPO-induced neuroprotection during hypoxia ischemia injury. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Specific Conditions for Resveratrol Neuroprotection against Ethanol-Induced Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Gonthier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. 3,5,4′-Trihydroxy-trans-stilbene, a natural polyphenolic compound present in wine and grapes and better known as resveratrol, has free radical scavenging properties and is a potent protector against oxidative stress induced by alcohol metabolism. Today, the mechanism by which ethanol exerts its toxicity is still not well understood, but it is generally considered that free radical generation plays an important role in the appearance of structural and functional alterations in cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective action of resveratrol against ethanol-induced brain cell injury. Methods. Primary cultures of rat astrocytes were exposed to ethanol, with or without a pretreatment with resveratrol. We examined the dose-dependent effects of this resveratrol pretreatment on cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by ethanol. Cytotoxicity was assessed using the MTT reduction test. Genotoxicity was evidenced using single cell gel electrophoresis. In addition, DNA staining with fluorescent dyes allowed visualization of nuclear damage using confocal microscopy. Results. Cell pretreatment with low concentrations of trans-resveratrol (0.1–10 μM slowed down cell death and DNA damage induced by ethanol exposure, while higher concentrations (50–100 μM enhanced these same effects. No protection by cis-resveratrol was observed. Conclusion. Protection offered by trans-resveratrol against ethanol-induced neurotoxicity was only effective for low concentrations of this polyphenol.

  14. The neuroprotective effect of hyperbaric oxygen treatment on laser-induced retinal damage in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnevskia-Dai, Victoria; Belokopytov, Mark; Dubinsky, Galina; Nachum, Gal; Avni, Isaac; Belkin, Michael; Rosner, Mordechai

    2005-04-01

    Retinal damage induced by mechanical trauma, ischemia or laser photocoagulation increases considerably by secondary degeneration processes. The spread of damage may be ameliorated by neuroprotection that is aimed at reducing the extent of the secondary degeneration and promote healing processes. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment consists of inspiration of oxygen at higher than one absolute atmospheric pressure. Improved neural function was observed in patients with acute brain trauma or ischemia treated with HBO. This study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) on laser induced retinal damage in a rat model. Standard argon laser lesions were created in 25 pigmented rats divided into three groups: Ten rats were treated immediately after the irradiation with HBO three times during the first 24 hr followed by 12 consecutive daily treatments. Five rats received a shorter treatment regimen of 10 consecutive HBO treatments. The control group (10 rats) underwent the laser damage with no additional treatment. The retinal lesions were evaluated 20 days after the injury. All outcome measures were improved by the longer HBO treatment (Ptreatment was less effective, showing an increase only in nuclei density at the central area of lesion (Pretinal damage in a rat model. In the range of HBO exposures studied, longer exposure provides more neuroprotection. These results encourage further evaluation of the potential therapeutic use of hyperbaric oxygen in diseases and injuries of the retina.

  15. Neuroprotective effect of lithium after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Namgue; Choi, Yun-Sik; Kim, Seong Yun; Kim, Hee Jung

    2017-01-01

    Status epilepticus is the most common serious neurological condition triggered by abnormal electrical activity, leading to severe and widespread cell loss in the brain. Lithium has been one of the main drugs used for the treatment of bipolar disorder for decades, and its anticonvulsant and neuroprotective properties have been described in several neurological disease models. However, the therapeutic mechanisms underlying lithium's actions remain poorly understood. The muscarinic receptor agonist pilocarpine is used to induce status epilepticus, which is followed by hippocampal damage. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of lithium post-treatment on seizure susceptibility and hippocampal neuropathological changes following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. Status epilepticus was induced by administration of pilocarpine hydrochloride (320 mg/kg, i.p.) in C57BL/6 mice at 8 weeks of age. Lithium (80 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered 15 minutes after the pilocarpine injection. After the lithium injection, status epilepticus onset time and mortality were recorded. Lithium significantly delayed the onset time of status epilepticus and reduced mortality compared to the vehicle-treated group. Moreover, lithium effectively blocked pilocarpine-induced neuronal death in the hippocampus as estimated by cresyl violet and Fluoro-Jade B staining. However, lithium did not reduce glial activation following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. These results suggest that lithium has a neuroprotective effect and would be useful in the treatment of neurological disorders, in particular status epilepticus.

  16. Decreased extracellular adenosine levels lead to loss of hypoxia-induced neuroprotection after repeated episodes of exposure to hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Cui

    Full Text Available Achieving a prolonged neuroprotective state following transient ischemic attacks (TIAs is likely to effectively reduce the brain damage and neurological dysfunction associated with recurrent stroke. HPC is a phenomenon in which advanced exposure to mild hypoxia reduces the stroke volume produced by a subsequent TIA. However, this neuroprotection is not long-lasting, with the effects reaching a peak after 3 days. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the use of multiple episodes of hypoxic exposure at different time intervals to induce longer-term protection in a mouse stroke model. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to different hypoxic preconditioning protocols: a single episode of HPC or five identical episodes at intervals of 3 days (E3d HPC or 6 days (E6d HPC. Three days after the last hypoxic exposure, temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO was induced. The effects of these HPC protocols on hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF regulated gene mRNA expression were measured by quantitative PCR. Changes in extracellular adenosine concentrations, known to exert neuroprotective effects, were also measured using in vivo microdialysis and high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC. Neuroprotection was provided by E6d HPC but not E3d HPC. HIF-regulated target gene expression increased significantly following all HPC protocols. However, E3d HPC significantly decreased extracellular adenosine and reduced cerebral blood flow in the ischemic region with upregulated expression of the adenosine transporter, equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1. An ENT1 inhibitor, propentofylline increased the cerebral blood flow and re-established neuroprotection in E3d HPC. Adenosine receptor specific antagonists showed that adenosine mainly through A1 receptor mediates HPC induced neuroprotection. Our data indicate that cooperation of HIF-regulated genes and extracellular adenosine is necessary for HPC-induced neuroprotection.

  17. Neuroprotective effects of ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides against oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin-zhi; Liao, Ying; Li, Wei; Guo, Li-mei

    2017-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides have protective effects against apoptosis in neurons exposed to ischemia/reperfusion injury, but the mechanisms are unclear. The goal of this study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the effects of ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides against oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was used to induce apoptosis in cultured cerebellar granule cells. In these cells, ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides remarkably suppressed H2O2-induced apoptosis, decreased expression of caspase-3, Bax and Bim and increased that of Bcl-2. These findings suggested that ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides regulate expression of apoptosis-associated proteins, inhibit oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis and, therefore, have significant neuroprotective effects. PMID:28761429

  18. Neuroprotective effect of α-mangostin and curcumin against iodoacetate-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Fermín, Laura María; González-Reyes, Susana; Tarco-Álvarez, Nadia Gabriela; Hernández-Nava, Marisol; Orozco-Ibarra, Marisol; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2012-09-01

    Curcumin is a phenolic yellow curry pigment with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities and α-mangostin is a xanthone isolated from mangosteen fruit with antioxidant properties. Iodoacetate (IAA) is an inhibitor of the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that induces a model of metabolic inhibition in neurons where reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is a significant mechanism. Furthermore, it has been shown that the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protects against IAA-induced neuronal death. To study the effects of α-mangostin and curcumin against the IAA-induced cell death and on HO-1 expression in primary cultures of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). CGNs were treated with curcumin or α-mangostin before the addition of IAA. Cell viability and ROS production were measured 24 and 4 hours after IAA addition, respectively. HO-1 expression was measured by western blot. Both α-mangostin and curcumin pretreatment ameliorated the neuronal death induced by IAA in a concentration-dependent way, which was associated with an amelioration of IAA-induced ROS formation. In addition, it was found that α-mangostin and curcumin induced HO-1 expression. Treatment with α-mangostin and curcumin provided a neuroprotective effect against IAA in primary cultures of CGNs, an effect associated with an amelioration of the IAA-induced ROS production. HO-1 induced by these antioxidants may also be involved in the neuroprotective effect. Future work will be required to determine whether α-mangostin may cross the blood-brain barrier and achieve enough bioavailability to elicit a protective response in the brain being an effective nutraceutical compound for preventive therapy of neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of Scrophularia striata extract against oxidative stress-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadmehr, Abbas; Oghyanous, Keyvan Alizadeh; Hajiaghaee, Reza; Amirghofran, Zahra; Azadbakht, Mohammad

    2013-11-01

    In this study, the neuroprotective effect of Scrophularia striata Boiss (Scrophulariaceae) extract, a plant growing in northeastern of Iran, against oxidative stress-induced neurocytotoxicity in PC12 was evaluated. The PC12 cell line pretreated with different concentrations (10, 50, 100, and 200 μg/ml) of the extract and then treated with H2O2 to induce oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. Survival of the cells, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and apoptosis were measured using MTT assay, fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, and annexin V/propidium iodide, respectively. Moreover, the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) was used to evaluate the antioxidant capacity of the plant extract. Phytochemical assay by thin layer chromatography showed that the main components, including phenolic compounds, phenyl propanoids and flavonoids, were presented in the S. striata extract. The extract in concentrations of 50-200 μg/ml protected PC12 cells from H2O2-induced toxicity. The survival of the cells at concentration of 200 μg/ml was 64 % compared to that of H2O2 alone-treated cells (48 %) (p extract also dose-dependently reduced intracellular ROS production (p extract showed antioxidative effects and decreased apoptotic cells. Collectively, these findings indicated the ability of S. striata to decrease ROS generation and cell apoptosis and also suggest the presence of the neuroprotective agents in this plant.

  20. The neuroprotective effect of lovastatin on MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity is not mediated by PON2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Vidal, Yoshajandith; Montes, Sergio; Tristan-López, Luis; Anaya-Ramos, Laura; Teiber, John; Ríos, Camilo; Baron-Flores, Verónica; Monroy-Noyola, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of the pigmented dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta with subsequent striatal dopamine (DA) deficiency and increased lipid peroxidation. The etiology of the disease is still unclear and it is thought that PD may be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. In the search of new pharmacological options, statins have been recognized for their potential application to treat PD, due to their antioxidant effect. The aim of this work is to contribute in the characterization of the neuroprotective effect of lovastatin in a model of PD induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)). Male Wistar rats (200-250 g) were randomly allocated into 4 groups and administered for 7 days with different pharmacological treatments. Lovastatin administration (5 mg/kg) diminished 40% of the apomorphine-induced circling behavior, prevented the striatal DA depletion and lipid peroxides formation by MPP(+) intrastriatal injection, as compared to the group of animals treated only with MPP(+). Lovastatin produced no change in paraoxonase-2 (PON2) activity. It is evident that lovastatin conferred neuroprotection against MPP(+)-induced protection but this effect was not associated with the induction of PON2 in the rat striatum. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Nootropic, neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects of phloretin in scopolamine induced amnesia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghumatkar, Priya J; Patil, Sachin P; Jain, Pankaj D; Tambe, Rufi M; Sathaye, Sadhana

    2015-08-01

    Phloretin (PHL), a dihydrochalcone flavonoid usually present in the roots and leaves of apple tree. In vitro study on GT1-7 immortalized hypothalamic neurons exposed to amyloid beta (25-35), demonstrated that PHL significantly influenced membrane fluidity and potential. PHL also significantly decreased excitotoxicity by restoring the calcium homeostasis in the same. Thus, PHL proves to be a promising therapeutic moiety which should be further screened in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the nootropic, neuroprotective and neurotrophic roles of PHL in the subacute scopolamine induced amnesia in mice. In this study, mice were pretreated with PHL 2.5mg/kg, 5mg/kg, 10mg/kg and Donepezil (DON) 1mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p) for 14days. The last 7days of treatment regimen included daily injection of SCP 1.5mg/kg to induce cognitive deficits. Mice were subjected to behavioral analysis. Biochemical estimation of the brain homogenates for acetylcholinesterase and oxidative stress biomarkers were conducted. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis for the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was carried out particularly in the hippocampus. PHL was found to significantly improve the performance of mice in Morris water maze test (Pnootropic, neuroprotective and neurotrophic activities in SCP induced memory impaired mice and hence, is a promising therapeutic moiety in the treatment of AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neuroprotective effect of Feronia limonia on ischemia reperfusion induced brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhunde, Purushottam B; Saher, Sana; Ali, Syed Ayaz

    2014-01-01

    Brain stroke is a leading cause of death without effective treatment. Feronia limonia have potent antioxidant activity and can be proved as neuroprotective against ischemia-reperfusion induced brain injury. We studied the effect of methanolic extract of F. limonia fruit (250 mg/kg, 500 mg/kg body weight, p.o.) and Vitamin E as reference standard drug on 30 min induced ischemia, followed by reperfusion by testing the neurobehavioral tests such as neurodeficit score, rota rod test, hanging wire test, beam walk test and elevated plus maze. The biochemical parameters, which were measured in animals brain were catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde and nitric oxide in control and treated rats. The methanolic extract of F. limonia fruit (250 mg/kg, 500 mg/kg body weight, p.o.) treated groups showed a statistically significant improvement in the neurobehavioral parameters such as motor performance (neurological status, significant increase in grasping ability, forelimb strength improvement in balance and co-ordination). The biochemical parameters in the brains of rats showed a significant reduction in the total nitrite (P < 0.01) and lipid peroxidation (P < 0.01), also a significant enhanced activity of enzymatic antioxidants such as catalase (P < 0.01) and SOD (P < 0.05). These observations suggest the neuroprotective and antioxidant activity of F. limonia and Vitamin E on ischemia reperfusion induced brain injury and may require further evaluation.

  3. Gender difference in the neuroprotective effect of rat bone marrow mesenchymal cells against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Yu, Jian-Xiong

    2016-05-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can reduce retinal ganglion cell death and effectively prevent vision loss. Previously, we found that during differentiation, female rhesus monkey bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells acquire a higher neurogenic potential compared with male rhesus monkey bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. This suggests that female bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have a stronger neuroprotective effect than male bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Here, we first isolated and cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from female and male rats by density gradient centrifugation. Retinal tissue from newborn rats was prepared by enzymatic digestion to obtain primary retinal ganglion cells. Using the transwell system, retinal ganglion cells were co-cultured with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells under hypoxia. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry and caspase-3 activity assay. We found a marked increase in apoptotic rate and caspase-3 activity of retinal ganglion cells after 24 hours of hypoxia compared with normoxia. Moreover, apoptotic rate and caspase-3 activity of retinal ganglion cells significantly decreased with both female and male bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell co-culture under hypoxia compared with culture alone, with more significant effects from female bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Our results indicate that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells exert a neuroprotective effect against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells, and also that female cells have greater neuroprotective ability compared with male cells.

  4. Neuroprotective effects of phytosterol esters against high cholesterol-induced cognitive deficits in aged rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Xu; Wenfang, Li; Jing, Cheng; Meng, Chen; Chengcheng, Ding; Jiqu, Xu; Shuang, Rong

    2017-03-22

    Accumulating epidemiological and experimental studies have confirmed that a high-cholesterol diet is detrimental to cognitive performance in animal models. Phytosterols, a class of naturally occurring structural components in plant foods, have been demonstrated to possess cholesterol-lowering and antioxidant effects. Phytosterol esters (PSE) are esters of phytosterol. The aim of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of PSE on cognitive deficit induced by a cholesterol-enriched diet in aged rats, and to explore their underlying mechanisms for these effects. Based on their Morris water maze performance, the latencies differed by <1.5 standard deviations (SDs) on days 3-5 of testing, 60 rats were chosen from 12-month-old female Sprague Dawley aged rats and were randomized into three groups, which were fed either a control diet, a high cholesterol diet (HCD) or a high-cholesterol diet supplemented with 2% PSE (HCD + PSE) for 6 months. In our study, we found that PSE treatment maintained the body weight balance, reduced the serum lipid levels, and improved the cognitive performance of aged rats in the Morris water maze test, as evaluated by shortened escape latencies. Importantly, histological and immunohistochemical results in the brain showed that PSE supplementation may have a neuroprotective effect that alleviates neuroinflammation in aged rats. This neuroprotective effect significantly inhibited degeneration, resulting in a significant increase in the number of pyramidal cells and an apparent decrease in the number of astrocytes compared to rats that were fed only a HCD. Furthermore, PSE improved cholinergic activities by restoring the acetylcholine (ACh) content and decreasing acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the cerebral cortex, as well as by elevating choline acetyl transferase (ChAT) activity in the hippocampus and the cerebral cortex. These results suggest that PSE can play a useful role in alleviating cognitive deficit induced by a

  5. Dose-dependent neuroprotective effect of enoxaparin on cold-induced traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Ilknur; Gunal, M Yalcin; Ayturk, Nilufer; Kilic, Ulkan; Ozansoy, Mehmet; Kilic, Ertugrul

    2017-05-01

    Recent evidence exists that enoxaparin can reduce brain injury because of its anticoagulant activity. To investigate the potential therapeutic effect of enoxaparin on cold-induced traumatic brain injury, at 20 minutes after modeling, male BALB/c mouse models of cold-induced traumatic brain injury were intraperitoneally administered 3 and 10 mg/kg enoxaparin or isotonic saline solution. Twenty-four hours later, enoxaparin at 10 mg/kg greatly reduced infarct volume, decreased cell apoptosis in the cortex and obviously increased serum level of total antioxidant status. By contrast, administration of enoxaparin at 3 mg/kg did not lead to these changes. These findings suggest that enoxaparin exhibits neuroprotective effect on cold-induced traumatic brain injury in a dose-dependent manner.

  6. Neuroprotective effect of curcumin in arsenic-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rajesh S; Shukla, Rajendra K; Sankhwar, Madhu Lata; Patel, Devendra K; Ansari, Reyaz W; Pant, Aditya B; Islam, Fakhrul; Khanna, Vinay K

    2010-09-01

    Our recent studies have shown that arsenic-induced neurobehavioral toxicity is protected by curcumin by modulating oxidative stress and dopaminergic functions in rats. In addition, the neuroprotective effect of curcumin has been investigated on arsenic-induced alterations in biogenic amines, their metabolites and nitric oxide (NO), which play an important role in neurotransmission process. Decrease in the levels of dopamine (DA, 28%), norepinephrine (NE, 54%), epinephrine (EPN, 46%), serotonin (5-HT, 44%), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC, 20%) and homovanillic acid (HVA, 31%) in corpus striatum; DA (51%), NE (22%), EPN (47%), 5-HT (25%), DOPAC (34%) and HVA (41%) in frontal cortex and DA (35%), NE (35%), EPN (29%), 5-HT (54%), DOPAC (37%) and HVA (46%) in hippocampus, observed in arsenic (sodium arsenite, 20 mg/kg body weight, p.o., 28 days) treated rats exhibited a trend of recovery in rats simultaneously treated with arsenic and curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight, p.o., 28 days). Increased levels of NO in corpus striatum (2.4-fold), frontal cortex (6.1-fold) and hippocampus (6.2-fold) in arsenic-treated rats were found decreased in rats simultaneously treated with arsenic and curcumin. It is evident that curcumin modulates levels of brain biogenic amines and NO in arsenic-exposed rats and these results further strengthen its neuroprotective efficacy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Electroacupuncture preconditioning-induced neuroprotection may be mediated by glutamate transporter type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoling; Yin, Jinbo; Li, Liaoliao; Ma, Lei; Tan, Hongying; Deng, Jiao; Chen, Shaoyang; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2013-10-01

    Electroacupuncture has been shown to induce a preconditioning effect in the brain. The mechanisms for this protection are not fully elucidated. We hypothesize that this protection is mediated by excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) that have been shown to be neuroprotective. To test this hypothesis, two-month old male Sprague-Dawley rats and EAAT type 3 (EAAT3) knockout mice received or did not receive 30-min electroacupuncture once a day for five consecutive days. They were subjected to a 120-min middle cerebral arterial occlusion (MCAO) at 24h after the last electroacupuncture. Neurological outcome was assessed 2days after the MCAO. Brain tissues were harvested at 24h after the last electroacupuncture for Western blotting. Rats subjected to electroacupuncture at the Baihui acupoint had smaller brain infarct volumes and better neurological deficit scores than control rats. Electroacupuncture increased EAAT type 2 (EAAT2) in the cerebral cortex, tended to increase EAAT3 in the hippocampus, and had no effect on EAAT type 1 expression. Dihydrokainate, an EAAT2 inhibitor, worsened the neurological outcome of rats with electroacupuncture pretreatment. Electroacupuncture pretreatment at the Baihui acupoint increased EAAT2 in the cerebral cortex and improved the neurological outcome of EAAT3 knockout mice. Together, our results suggest that EAAT2 may mediate the electroacupuncture preconditioning-induced neuroprotection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 3-hydroxymorphinan is neurotrophic to dopaminergic neurons and is also neuroprotective against LPS-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Qin, Liya; Wang, Tongguang; Wei, Sung-Jen; Gao, Hui-ming; Liu, Jie; Wilson, Belinda; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Wanqin; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD). We recently reported that dextromethorphan (DM), an active ingredient in a variety of widely used anticough remedies, protected dopaminergic neurons in rat primary mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated degeneration and provided potent protection for dopaminergic neurons in a MPTP mouse model. The underlying mechanism for the protective effect of DM was attributed to its anti-inflammatory activity through inhibition of microglia activation. In an effort to develop more potent compounds for the treatment of PD, we have screened a series of analogs of DM, and 3-hydroxymorphinan (3-HM) emerged as a promising candidate for this purpose. Our study using primary mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures showed that 3-HM provided more potent neuroprotection against LPS-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity than its parent compound. The higher potency of 3-HM was attributed to its neurotrophic effect in addition to the anti-inflammatory effect shared by both DM and 3-HM. First, we showed that 3-HM exerted potent neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects on dopaminergic neurons in rat primary mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures treated with LPS. The neurotrophic effect of 3-HM was glia-dependent since 3-HM failed to show any protective effect in the neuron-enriched cultures. We subsequently demonstrated that it was the astroglia, not the microglia, that contributed to the neurotrophic effect of 3-HM. This conclusion was based on the reconstitution studies, in which we added different percentages of microglia (10-20%) or astroglia (40-50%) back to the neuron-enriched cultures and found that 3-HM was neurotrophic after the addition of astroglia, but not microglia. Furthermore, 3-HM-treated astroglia-derived conditioned media exerted a significant neurotrophic effect on dopaminergic neurons. It appeared likely that 3-HM caused the release of neurotrophic factor

  9. Foliar application of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) inducers for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nbuensanteai

    2013-08-14

    Aug 14, 2013 ... induced by chitosan and BTH were involved in defense mechanism, reflecting the strong direct positive effect that chitosan ... to control plant diseases based on the systemic acquired resistance ... salicylic acid (SA) as a signal molecule and is associated ... treated plants for SAR relating chemical analyses.

  10. Neuroprotective Role of Intermittent Hypobaric Hypoxia in Unpredictable Chronic Mild Stress Induced Depression in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deep, Satayanarayan; Prasad, Dipti; Singh, Shashi Bala; Khan, Nilofar

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic exposure results in several pathophysiological conditions associated with nervous system, these include acute and chronic mountain sickness, loss of memory, and high altitude cerebral edema. Previous reports have also suggested the role of hypoxia in pathogenesis of depression and related psychological conditions. On the other hand, sub lethal intermittent hypoxic exposure induces protection against future lethal hypoxia and may have beneficial effect. Therefore, the present study was designed to explore the neuroprotective role of intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (IHH) in Unpredictable Chronic Mild Stress (UCMS) induced depression like behaviour in rats. The IHH refers to the periodic exposures to hypoxic conditions interrupted by the normoxic or lesser hypoxic conditions. The current study examines the effect of IHH against UCMS induced depression, using elevated plus maze (EPM), open field test (OFT), force swim test (FST), as behavioural paradigm and related histological and molecular approaches. The data indicated the UCMS induced depression like behaviour as evident from decreased exploration activity in OFT with increased anxiety levels in EPM, and increased immobility time in the FST; whereas on providing the IHH (5000m altitude, 4hrs/day for two weeks) these behavioural changes were ameliorated. The morphological and molecular studies also validated the neuroprotective effect of IHH against UCMS induced neuronal loss and decreased neurogenesis. Here, we also explored the role of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in anticipatory action of IHH against detrimental effect of UCMS as upon blocking of BDNF-TrkB signalling the beneficial effect of IHH was nullified. Taken together, the findings of our study demonstrate that the intermittent hypoxia has a therapeutic potential similar to an antidepressant in animal model of depression and could be developed as a preventive therapeutic option against this pathophysiological state. PMID:26901349

  11. Neuroprotective Role of Intermittent Hypobaric Hypoxia in Unpredictable Chronic Mild Stress Induced Depression in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neetu Kushwah

    Full Text Available Hypoxic exposure results in several pathophysiological conditions associated with nervous system, these include acute and chronic mountain sickness, loss of memory, and high altitude cerebral edema. Previous reports have also suggested the role of hypoxia in pathogenesis of depression and related psychological conditions. On the other hand, sub lethal intermittent hypoxic exposure induces protection against future lethal hypoxia and may have beneficial effect. Therefore, the present study was designed to explore the neuroprotective role of intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (IHH in Unpredictable Chronic Mild Stress (UCMS induced depression like behaviour in rats. The IHH refers to the periodic exposures to hypoxic conditions interrupted by the normoxic or lesser hypoxic conditions. The current study examines the effect of IHH against UCMS induced depression, using elevated plus maze (EPM, open field test (OFT, force swim test (FST, as behavioural paradigm and related histological and molecular approaches. The data indicated the UCMS induced depression like behaviour as evident from decreased exploration activity in OFT with increased anxiety levels in EPM, and increased immobility time in the FST; whereas on providing the IHH (5000m altitude, 4hrs/day for two weeks these behavioural changes were ameliorated. The morphological and molecular studies also validated the neuroprotective effect of IHH against UCMS induced neuronal loss and decreased neurogenesis. Here, we also explored the role of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF in anticipatory action of IHH against detrimental effect of UCMS as upon blocking of BDNF-TrkB signalling the beneficial effect of IHH was nullified. Taken together, the findings of our study demonstrate that the intermittent hypoxia has a therapeutic potential similar to an antidepressant in animal model of depression and could be developed as a preventive therapeutic option against this pathophysiological state.

  12. Neuroprotective influence of taurine on fluoride-induced biochemical and behavioral deficits in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedara, Isaac A; Abolaji, Amos O; Idris, Umar F; Olabiyi, Bolanle F; Onibiyo, Esther M; Ojuade, TeminiJesu D; Farombi, Ebenezer O

    2017-01-05

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have demonstrated that excessive exposure to fluoride induced neurodevelopmental toxicity both in humans and animals. Taurine is a free intracellular β-amino acid with antioxidant and neuroprotective properties. The present study investigated the neuroprotective mechanism of taurine by evaluating the biochemical and behavioral characteristics in rats exposed to sodium fluoride (NaF) singly in drinking water at 15 mg/L alone or orally co-administered by gavage with taurine at 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight for 45 consecutive days. Locomotor behavior was assessed using video-tracking software during a 10-min trial in a novel environment while the brain structures namely the hypothalamus, cerebrum and cerebellum of the rats were processed for biochemical determinations. Results showed that taurine administration prevented NaF-induced locomotor and motor deficits namely decrease in total distance travelled, total body rotation, maximum speed, absolute turn angle along with weak forelimb grip, increased incidence of fecal pellets and time of grooming, immobility and negative geotaxis. The taurine mediated enhancement of the exploratory profiles of NaF-exposed rats was supported by track and occupancy plot analyses. Moreover, taurine prevented NaF-induced increase in hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxidation levels but increased acetylcholinesterase and the antioxidant enzymes activities in the hypothalamus, cerebrum and cerebellum of the rats. Collectively, taurine protected against NaF-induced neurotoxicity via mechanisms involving the restoration of acetylcholinesterase activity and antioxidant status with concomitant inhibition of lipid peroxidation in the brain of rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Minoxidil is a potential neuroprotective drug for paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Fan; Chen, Li-Hsien; Yeh, Yu-Min; Wu, Pei-Ying; Chen, Yih-Fung; Chang, Lian-Yun; Chang, Jang-Yang; Shen, Meng-Ru

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common side effect of cancer treatment. No medication has been shown to be effective in the treatment of CIPN. This study aims to integrate the image-based high-content screening, mouse behavior models and mechanistic cell-based assays to discover potential neuroprotective drugs. Among screened compounds, minoxidil showed the most potent neuroprotective effect against paclitaxel, with regard to neurite outgrowth of dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Minoxidil protected mice from thermal insensitivity and alleviated mechanical allodynia in paclitaxel-treated mice. The ultrastructure and quantified G-ratio of myelin integrity of sciatic nerve tissues supported the observations in mouse behavioral tests. The mechanistic study on DRG neurons suggested that minoxidil suppressed neuroinflammation and remodeled the dysregulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis provoked by paclitaxel. Importantly, minoxidil showed a synergistic anti-tumor effect with paclitaxel both in tumor xenograft models of cervical and breast cancer. Interestingly, the quantitative assays on hair length and hair growth both exhibited that minoxidil significantly improved the hair quality after chemotherapy. Since minoxidil is a drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the safety and biocompatibility are well documented. The immediate next step is to launch an early-stage clinical trial intending to prevent CIPN by minoxidil. PMID:28349969

  14. Neuroprotective efficacy of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic dysfunctions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rajesh S; Chandravanshi, Lalit P; Shukla, Rajendra K; Sankhwar, Madhu L; Ansari, Reyaz W; Shukla, Pradeep K; Pant, Aditya B; Khanna, Vinay K

    2011-12-01

    Our recent studies have shown that curcumin protects arsenic induced neurotoxicity by modulating oxidative stress, neurotransmitter levels and dopaminergic system in rats. As chronic exposure to arsenic has been associated with cognitive deficits in humans, the present study has been carried out to implore the neuroprotective potential of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic dysfunctions in rats. Rats treated with arsenic (sodium arsenite, 20mg/kg body weight, p.o., 28 days) exhibited a significant decrease in the learning activity, assessed by passive avoidance response associated with decreased binding of (3)H-QNB, known to label muscarinic-cholinergic receptors in hippocampus (54%) and frontal cortex (27%) as compared to controls. Decrease in the activity of acetylcholinesterase in hippocampus (46%) and frontal cortex (33%), staining of Nissl body, immunoreactivity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and expression of ChAT protein in hippocampal region was also observed in arsenic treated rats as compared to controls. Simultaneous treatment with arsenic and curcumin (100mg/kg body weight, p.o., 28 days) increased learning and memory performance associated with increased binding of (3)H-QNB in hippocampus (54%), frontal cortex (25%) and activity of acetylcholinesterase in hippocampus (41%) and frontal cortex (29%) as compared to arsenic treated rats. Increase in the expression of ChAT protein, immunoreactivity of ChAT and staining of Nissl body in hippocampal region was also observed in rats simultaneously treated with arsenic and curcumin as compared to those treated with arsenic alone. The results of the present study suggest that curcumin significantly modulates arsenic induced cholinergic dysfunctions in brain and also exhibits neuroprotective efficacy of curcumin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Valproic acid potentiates curcumin-mediated neuroprotection in Lipopolysaccharide induced rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira eZaky

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of neuroinflammation is complex and comprises multifactorial, involving both genetic and environmental factors during which diverse genetic and epigenetic modulations are implicated. Curcumin (Cur, and valproic acid (VPA, histone deacetylase 1 inhibitor, have neuroprotective effects. The present study was designed with an aim to investigate the ability of co-treatment of both compounds (Cur or VPA (200mg/kg for four weeks to augment neuroprotection and enhance brain recovery from intra-peritoneal (IP injection of (250 µg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated neuroinflammatory condition on rat brain cortex. Cortex activation and the effects of combined treatment and production of proinflammatory mediators, COX-2, APE1 and nitric oxide/iNOS were investigated. Neuroinflammation development was assessed by histological analyses and by investigating associated indices (BACE1, APP, PSEN-1 and PSEN-2. Furthermore we measured the expression profile of let-7 miRNAs members a, b, c, e and f in all groups, a highly abundant regulator of gene expression in the CNS. Protein and mRNA levels of neuroinflammation markers COX-2, BACE1, APP and iNOS were also attenuated by combined therapy. On the other hand, assessment of the indicated five let-7 members, showed distinct expression profile pattern in the different groups. Let-7 a, b and c disappeared in the induced group, an effect that was partially suppressed by co-addition of either Cur or VPA. These data suggest that the combined treatment induced significantly the expression of the five members when compared to rats treated with Cur or VPA only as well as to self-recovery group, which indicates a possible benefit from the synergistic effect of Cur-VPA combination as therapeutic agents for neuroinflammation and its associated disorders. The mechanism elucidated here highlights the particular drug-induced expression profile of let-7 family as new targets for future pharmacological development.

  16. Neuroprotective effect of curcumin on okadaic acid induced memory impairment in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekar, N; Dwivedi, Subhash; Tota, Santosh Kumar; Kamat, Pradeep Kumar; Hanif, Kashif; Nath, Chandishwar; Shukla, Rakesh

    2013-09-05

    Okadaic acid (OKA) has been observed to cause memory impairment in human subjects having seafood contaminated with dinoflagellate (Helicondria okadai). OKA induces tau hyperphosphorylation and oxidative stress leading to memory impairment as our previous study has shown. Curcumin a natural antioxidant has demonstrated neuroprotection in various models of neurodegeneration. However, the effect of curcumin has not been explored in OKA induced memory impairment. Therefore, present study evaluated the effect of curcumin on OKA (100ng, intracerebrally) induced memory impairment in male Swiss albino mice as evaluated in Morris water maze (MWM) and passive avoidance tests (PAT). OKA administration resulted in memory impairment with a decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF) (measured by laser doppler flowmetry), ATP level and increased mitochondrial (Ca(2+))i, neuroinflammation (increased TNF-α, IL-1β, COX-2 and GFAP), oxidative-nitrosative stress, increased Caspase-9 and cholinergic dysfunction (decreased AChE activity/expression and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expression) in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice brain. Oral administration of curcumin (50mg/kg) for 13 days significantly improved memory function in both MWM and PAT along with brain energy metabolism, CBF and cholinergic function. It decreased mitochondrial (Ca(2+))i, and ameliorated neuroinflammation and oxidative-nitrostative stress in different brain regions of OKA treated mice. Curcumin also inhibited astrocyte activation as evidenced by decreased GFAP expression. This neuroprotective effect of curcumin is due to its potent anti-oxidant action thus confirming previous studies. Therefore, use of curcumin should be encouraged in people consuming sea food (contaminated with dinoflagellates) to prevent cognitive impairment. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Curcumin confers neuroprotection against alcohol-induced hippocampal neurodegeneration via CREB-BDNF pathway in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Motevalian, Manijeh; Fatima, Sulail; Hashemi, Hajar; Gholami, Mina

    2017-03-01

    Alcohol abuse causes severe damage to the brain neurons. Studies have reported the neuroprotective effects of curcumin against alcohol-induced neurodegeneration. However, the precise mechanism of action remains unclear. Seventy rats were equally divided into 7 groups (10 rats per group). Group 1 received normal saline (0.7ml/rat) and group 2 received alcohol (2g/kg/day) for 21days. Groups 3, 4, 5 and 6 concurrently received alcohol (2g/kg/day) and curcumin (10, 20, 40 and 60mg/kg, respectively) for 21days. Animals in group 7 self- administered alcohol for 21days. Group 8 treated with curcumin (60mg/kg, i.p.) alone for 21days. Open Field Test (OFT) was used to investigate motor activity in rats. Hippocampal oxidative, antioxidative and inflammatory factors were evaluated. Furthermore, brain cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were studied at gene level by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In addition, protein expression for BDNF, CREB, phosphorylated CREB (CREB-P), Bax and Bcl-2 was determined by western blotting. Voluntary and involuntary administration of alcohol altered motor activity in OFT, and curcumin treatment inhibited this alcohol-induced motor disturbance. Also, alcohol administration augmented lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial oxidized glutathione (GSSG), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and Bax levels in isolated hippocampal tissues. Furthermore, alcohol-induced significant reduction were observed in reduced form of glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities and CREB, BDNF and Bcl-2 levels. Also curcumin alone did not change the behavior and biochemical and molecular parameters. Curcumin can act as a neuroprotective agent against neurodegenerative effects of alcohol abuse, probably via activation of CREB-BDNF signaling pathway

  18. Neuregulin-1 is neuroprotective in a rat model of organophosphate-induced delayed neuronal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yonggang; Lein, Pamela J.; Liu, Cuimei; Bruun, Donald A.; Giulivi, Cecilia; Ford, Gregory D.; Tewolde, Teclemichael; Ross-Inta, Catherine; Ford, Byron D.

    2012-01-01

    Current medical countermeasures against organophosphate (OP) nerve agents are effective in reducing mortality, but do not sufficiently protect the CNS from delayed brain damage and persistent neurological symptoms. In this study, we examined the efficacy of neuregulin-1 (NRG-1) in protecting against delayed neuronal cell death following acute intoxication with the OP diisopropylflurophosphate (DFP). Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were pretreated with pyridostigmine (0.1 mg/kg BW, i.m.) and atropine methylnitrate (20 mg/kg BW, i.m.) prior to DFP (9 mg/kg BW, i.p.) intoxication to increase survival and reduce peripheral signs of cholinergic toxicity but not prevent DFP-induced seizures or delayed neuronal injury. Pretreatment with NRG-1 did not protect against seizures in rats exposed to DFP. However, neuronal injury was significantly reduced in most brain regions by pretreatment with NRG-1 isoforms NRG-EGF (3.2 μg/kg BW, i.a) or NRG-GGF2 (48 μg/kg BW, i.a.) as determined by FluroJade-B labeling in multiple brain regions at 24 h post-DFP injection. NRG-1 also blocked apoptosis and oxidative stress-mediated protein damage in the brains of DFP-intoxicated rats. Administration of NRG-1 at 1 h after DFP injection similarly provided significant neuroprotection against delayed neuronal injury. These findings identify NRG-1 as a promising adjuvant therapy to current medical countermeasures for enhancing neuroprotection against acute OP intoxication. -- Highlights: ► NRG-1 blocked DFP induced neuronal injury. ► NRG-1 did not protect against seizures in rats exposed to DFP. ► NRG-1 blocked apoptosis and oxidative stress in the brains of DFP-intoxicated rats. ► Administration of NRG-1 at 1 h after DFP injection prevented delayed neuronal injury.

  19. Neuroprotective effects of bee venom acupuncture therapy against rotenone-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Wagdy K B; Assaf, Naglaa; ElShebiney, Shaimaa A; Salem, Neveen A

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, is characterized by dopaminergic neurodegeneration, mitochondrial impairment, and oxidative stress. Exposure of animals to rotenone induces a range of responses characteristic of PD, including reactive oxygen species production and dopaminergic cell death. Although l-dopa is the drug of choice for improving core symptoms of PD, it is associated with involuntary movements. The current study was directed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of bee venom acupuncture therapy (BVA) against rotenone-induced oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and apoptosis in PD mouse model. Forty male Swiss mice were divided into four groups: (1) received saline solution orally and served as normal control, (2) received rotenone (1.5 mg/kg, s.c. every other day for 6 doses), (3) received rotenone concomitantly with l-dopa (25 mg/kg, daily, p.o. for 6 days), and finally (4) received rotenone concomitantly with BVA (0.02 ml once every 3 days for two weeks). Rotenone-treated mice showed impairment in locomotor behavior and a significant reduction in brain dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, GSH levels, and paraoxonase activity, whereas a significant increase was observed in brain malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-β levels besides DNA damage, and over-expression of caspase-3, Bax, and Bcl-2 genes. Significant improvement of the aforementioned parameters was demonstrated after BVA compared to l-dopa therapy. In conclusion, bee venom normalized all the neuroinflammatory and apoptotic markers and restored brain neurochemistry after rotenone injury. Therefore, BVA is a promising neuroprotective therapy for PD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. From Chemotherapy-Induced Emesis to Neuroprotection: Therapeutic Opportunities for 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhfouri, Gohar; Mousavizadeh, Kazem; Mehr, Sharam Ejtemaei; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Zirak, Mohammad Reza; Ghia, Jean-Eric; Rahimian, Reza

    2015-12-01

    5-HT3 receptor antagonists are extensively used as efficacious agents in counteracting chemotherapy-induced emesis. Recent investigations have shed light on other potential effects (analgesic, anxiolytic, and anti-psychotic). Some studies have reported neuroprotective properties for the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists in vitro and in vivo. When administered to Aβ-challenged rat cortical neurons, 5-HT3 receptor antagonists substantially abated apoptosis, elevation of cytosolic Ca(2), glutamate release, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and caspase-3 activity. In addition, in vivo studies show that 5-HT3 receptor antagonists possess, alongside their anti-emetic effects, notable immunomodulatory properties in CNS. We found that pretreatment with tropisetron significantly improved neurological deficits and diminished leukocyte transmigration into the brain, TNF-α level, and brain infarction in a murine model of embolic stroke. Our recent investigation revealed that tropisetron protects against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in vivo through both 5-HT3 receptor-dependent and -independent pathways. Tropisetron, in vitro, was found to be an efficacious inhibitor of the signaling pathway leading to the activation of pro-inflammatory NF-κB, a transcription factor pivotal to the upregulation of several neuroinflammatory mediators in brain. This mini review summarizes novel evidence concerning effects of 5-HT3 antagonists and their possible mechanisms of action in ameliorating neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. Further, we discuss some newly synthesized 5-HT3 receptor antagonists with dual properties of 5-HT3 receptor blockade/alpha-7 nicotinic receptor activator and their potential in management of memory impairment. Since 5-HT3 receptor antagonists possess a large therapeutic window, they can constitute a scaffold for design and synthesis of new neuroprotective medications.

  1. Neuroprotective effect of ebselen against intracerebroventricular streptozotocin-induced neuronal apoptosis and oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsal, Cuneyt; Oran, Mustafa; Albayrak, Yakup; Aktas, Cevat; Erboga, Mustafa; Topcu, Birol; Uygur, Ramazan; Tulubas, Feti; Yanartas, Omer; Ates, Ozkan; Ozen, Oguz Aslan

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the neuroprotective effect of ebselen against intracerebroventricular streptozotocin (ICV-STZ)-induced oxidative stress and neuronal apoptosis in rat brain. A total of 30 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups of 10 animals each: control, ICV-STZ, and ICV-STZ treated with ebselen. The ICV-STZ group rats were injected bilaterally with ICV-STZ (3 mg/kg) on days 1 and 3, and ebselen (10 mg/kg/day) was administered for 14 days starting from 1st day of ICV-STZ injection to day 14. Rats were killed at the end of the study and brain tissues were removed for biochemical and histopathological investigation. Our results demonstrated, for the first time, the neuroprotective effect of ebselen on Alzheimer's disease (AD) model in rats. Our present study, in ICV-STZ group, showed significant increase in tissue malondialdehyde levels and significant decrease in enzymatic antioxidants superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in the frontal cortex tissue. The histopathological studies in the brain of rats also supported that ebselen markedly reduced the ICV-STZ-induced histopathological changes and well preserved the normal histological architecture of the frontal cortex tissue. The number of apoptotic neurons was increased in frontal cortex tissue after ICV-STZ administration. Treatment of ebselen markedly reduced the number of degenerating apoptotic neurons. The study demonstrates the effectiveness of ebselen, as a powerful antioxidant, in preventing the oxidative damage and morphological changes caused by ICV-STZ in rats. Thus, ebselen may have a therapeutic value for the treatment of AD. © The Author(s) 2013.

  2. Bioassay-Guided Isolation of Neuroprotective Compounds from Uncaria rhynchophylla against Beta-Amyloid-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Yan-Fang; Lin, Zhi-Xiu; Mao, Qing-Qiu; Hu, Zhen; Zhao, Ming; Che, Chun-Tao; Ip, Siu-Po

    2012-01-01

    Uncaria rhynchophylla is a component herb of many Chinese herbal formulae for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Previous study in our laboratory has demonstrated that an ethanol extract of Uncaria rhynchophylla ameliorated cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease induced by D-galactose. However, the active ingredients of Uncaria rhynchophylla responsible for the anti-Alzheimer's disease activity have not been identified. This study aims to identify the active ingredients of Uncaria rhynchophylla by a bioassay-guided fractionation approach and explore the acting mechanism of these active ingredients by using a well-established cellular model of Alzheimer's disease, beta-amyloid- (Aβ-) induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. The results showed that six alkaloids, namely, corynoxine, corynoxine B, corynoxeine, isorhynchophylline, isocorynoxeine, and rhynchophylline were isolated from the extract of Uncaria rhynchophylla. Among them, rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline significantly decreased Aβ-induced cell death, intracellular calcium overloading, and tau protein hyperphosphorylation in PC12 cells. These results suggest that rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline are the major active ingredients responsible for the protective action of Uncaria rhynchophylla against Aβ-induced neuronal toxicity, and their neuroprotective effect may be mediated, at least in part, by inhibiting intracellular calcium overloading and tau protein hyperphosphorylation.

  3. Bioassay-Guided Isolation of Neuroprotective Compounds from Uncaria rhynchophylla against Beta-Amyloid-Induced Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Fang Xian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncaria rhynchophylla is a component herb of many Chinese herbal formulae for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Previous study in our laboratory has demonstrated that an ethanol extract of Uncaria rhynchophylla ameliorated cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease induced by D-galactose. However, the active ingredients of Uncaria rhynchophylla responsible for the anti-Alzheimer’s disease activity have not been identified. This study aims to identify the active ingredients of Uncaria rhynchophylla by a bioassay-guided fractionation approach and explore the acting mechanism of these active ingredients by using a well-established cellular model of Alzheimer’s disease, beta-amyloid- (Aβ- induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. The results showed that six alkaloids, namely, corynoxine, corynoxine B, corynoxeine, isorhynchophylline, isocorynoxeine, and rhynchophylline were isolated from the extract of Uncaria rhynchophylla. Among them, rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline significantly decreased Aβ-induced cell death, intracellular calcium overloading, and tau protein hyperphosphorylation in PC12 cells. These results suggest that rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline are the major active ingredients responsible for the protective action of Uncaria rhynchophylla against Aβ-induced neuronal toxicity, and their neuroprotective effect may be mediated, at least in part, by inhibiting intracellular calcium overloading and tau protein hyperphosphorylation.

  4. Neuroprotective and Therapeutic Effect of Caffeine on the Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease Induced by Rotenone.

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    Khadrawy, Yasser A; Salem, Ahmed M; El-Shamy, Karima A; Ahmed, Emad K; Fadl, Nevein N; Hosny, Eman N

    2017-09-03

    The present study aimed to investigate the protective and therapeutic effects of caffeine on rotenone-induced rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Rats were divided into control, PD model induced by rotenone (1.5 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.) for 45 days), protected group injected with caffeine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) and rotenone for 45 days (during the development of PD model), and treated group injected with caffeine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) for 45 days after induction of PD model. The data revealed a state of oxidative and nitrosative stress in the midbrain and the striatum of animal model of PD as indicated from the increased lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide levels and the decreased reduced glutathione level and activities of glutathione-S-transferase and superoxide dismutase. Rotenone induced a decrease in acetylcholinesterase and Na + /K + -ATPase activities and an increase in tumor necrosis factor-α level in the midbrain and the striatum. Protection and treatment with caffeine ameliorated the oxidative stress and the changes in acetylcholinesterase and Na + /K + -ATPase activities induced by rotenone in the midbrain and the striatum. This was associated with improvement in the histopathological changes induced in the two areas of PD model. Caffeine protection and treatment restored the depletion of midbrain and striatal dopamine induced by rotenone and prevented decline in motor activities (assessed by open field test) and muscular strength (assessed by traction and hanging tests) and improved norepinephrine level in the two areas. The present study showed that caffeine offered a significant neuroprotection and treatment against neurochemical, histopathological, and behavioral changes in a rotenone-induced rat model of PD.

  5. Unraveling the mechanism of neuroprotection of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic dysfunctions in rats

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    Srivastava, Pranay [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Yadav, Rajesh S. [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Department of Crimnology and Forensic Science, Harisingh Gour University, Sagar 470 003 (India); Chandravanshi, Lalit P.; Shukla, Rajendra K.; Dhuriya, Yogesh K.; Chauhan, Lalit K.S. [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Dwivedi, Hari N. [Babu Banarasi Das University, BBD City, Faizabad Road, Lucknow 227 015 (India); Pant, Aditiya B. [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Khanna, Vinay K., E-mail: vkkhanna1@gmail.com [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India)

    2014-09-15

    Earlier, we found that arsenic induced cholinergic deficits in rat brain could be protected by curcumin. In continuation to this, the present study is focused to unravel the molecular mechanisms associated with the protective efficacy of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits. Exposure to arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats resulted to decrease the expression of CHRM2 receptor gene associated with mitochondrial dysfunctions as evident by decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential, activity of mitochondrial complexes and enhanced apoptosis both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in comparison to controls. The ultrastructural images of arsenic exposed rats, assessed by transmission electron microscope, exhibited loss of myelin sheath and distorted cristae in the mitochondria both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus as compared to controls. Simultaneous treatment with arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) and curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats was found to protect arsenic induced changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential and activity of mitochondrial complexes both in frontal cortex and hippocampus. Alterations in the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and ultrastructural damage in the frontal cortex and hippocampus following arsenic exposure were also protected in rats simultaneously treated with arsenic and curcumin. The data of the present study reveal that curcumin could protect arsenic induced cholinergic deficits by modulating the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins in the brain. More interestingly, arsenic induced functional and ultrastructural changes in the brain mitochondria were also protected by curcumin. - Highlights: • Neuroprotective mechanism of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits studied • Curcumin protected arsenic induced enhanced expression of stress markers in rat brain • Arsenic compromised mitochondrial electron transport chain protected

  6. Unraveling the mechanism of neuroprotection of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic dysfunctions in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Pranay; Yadav, Rajesh S.; Chandravanshi, Lalit P.; Shukla, Rajendra K.; Dhuriya, Yogesh K.; Chauhan, Lalit K.S.; Dwivedi, Hari N.; Pant, Aditiya B.; Khanna, Vinay K.

    2014-01-01

    Earlier, we found that arsenic induced cholinergic deficits in rat brain could be protected by curcumin. In continuation to this, the present study is focused to unravel the molecular mechanisms associated with the protective efficacy of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits. Exposure to arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats resulted to decrease the expression of CHRM2 receptor gene associated with mitochondrial dysfunctions as evident by decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential, activity of mitochondrial complexes and enhanced apoptosis both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in comparison to controls. The ultrastructural images of arsenic exposed rats, assessed by transmission electron microscope, exhibited loss of myelin sheath and distorted cristae in the mitochondria both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus as compared to controls. Simultaneous treatment with arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) and curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats was found to protect arsenic induced changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential and activity of mitochondrial complexes both in frontal cortex and hippocampus. Alterations in the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and ultrastructural damage in the frontal cortex and hippocampus following arsenic exposure were also protected in rats simultaneously treated with arsenic and curcumin. The data of the present study reveal that curcumin could protect arsenic induced cholinergic deficits by modulating the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins in the brain. More interestingly, arsenic induced functional and ultrastructural changes in the brain mitochondria were also protected by curcumin. - Highlights: • Neuroprotective mechanism of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits studied • Curcumin protected arsenic induced enhanced expression of stress markers in rat brain • Arsenic compromised mitochondrial electron transport chain protected

  7. Intranasal mucoadhesivemicroemulsion for neuroprotective effect of curcuminin mptp induced Parkinson model

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    Snigdha Das Mandal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of curcumin against inflammation-mediated dopaminergic neurodegeneration in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP mice model of Parkinson's disease (PD. Curcumin loaded sodium hyaluronate based mucoadhesive microemulsion (CMME was developed by using Box Behnken design of Response surface method (RSM and was characterized. Male C57BL/6 mice were first treated with four intraperitoneal injections of MPTP (20 mg/kg of body weight at 2 h intervals followed CMME intranasal administration for 14 days at 2.86 mg of curcumin/kg of body weight per once a day. Optimal CMME containing 3% Capmul MCM as oil phase, 37 % of Accenon CC and Transcutol HP at 2.5:1 ratio and 0.5% sodium hyaluronate was stable, non-ciliotoxic with 57.66 nm±3.46 as average globule size. PdI value (0.190 ± 0.19 and TEM result depicted the narrow size distribution of CMME.All three independent variables had a significant effect (p<0.05 on the responses and the designed model was significant for all taken responses. In-vivo results revealed significant reduction of MPTP-mediated dopamine depletion after nasal administration of CMME. MPTP intoxication significantly decreased striatal DA content to 21.29 % which was then elevated to 55.37% after intranasal curcumin treatment. Significant improvement in motor performance as well as gross behavioural activity of mice was observed from rota-rod and open field test findings. Findings of the investigation revealed the symptomatic neuroprotection of curcumin against MPTP-induced neurodegradation in the striatum and hence could be considered as a promising approach to treat PD.

  8. Neuroprotective effect of resveratrol against scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in rats

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    Pushpalatha Bunadri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to examine the neuroprotective effect of resveratrol on cognitive impairment induced by scopolamine, a muscarinic antagonist, in rats. Memory impairment was induced by administration of scopolamine (1 mg/kg intraperitoneally. Cognitive functions were assessed using radial arm maze, an active avoidance paradigm. Oxidative stress parameters like malondialdehyde, catalase and superoxide dismutase were assessed and acetylcholinesterase activity was estimated. More working and reference memory errors in the radial arm maze test and fewer avoidances in the active avoidance test were observed with scopolamine in the 1 mg/kg i.p.-treated animals. This phenomenon is a clear indication of memory impairment. Oral administration of resveratrol (20 mg/kg inhibited the occurrence of higher working, reference memory errors and prevented the incidence of less avoidances. Resveratrol appeared to have exerted memory-enhancing effects by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity and prevented the rise in malondialdehyde levels and loss of antioxidant enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase, showing antioxidant potential. Based on the above results of behavioral and biochemical studies, it can be concluded that resveratrol protected against scopolamine-induced loss of cognition. The results also indicate that resveratrol is an antioxidant and an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, and it is likely that resveratrol’s protective effect is related to its antioxidant and cholinesterase inhibitory effects.

  9. Neuroprotective Effect of Dexmedetomidine on Hyperoxia-Induced Toxicity in the Neonatal Rat Brain

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    Marco Sifringer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dexmedetomidine is a highly selective agonist of α2-receptors with sedative, anxiolytic, analgesic, and anesthetic properties. Neuroprotective effects of dexmedetomidine have been reported in various brain injury models. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dexmedetomidine on neurodegeneration, oxidative stress markers, and inflammation following the induction of hyperoxia in neonatal rats. Six-day-old Wistar rats received different concentrations of dexmedetomidine (1, 5, or 10 µg/kg bodyweight and were exposed to 80% oxygen for 24 h. Sex-matched littermates kept in room air and injected with normal saline or dexmedetomidine served as controls. Dexmedetomidine pretreatment significantly reduced hyperoxia-induced neurodegeneration in different brain regions of the neonatal rat. In addition, dexmedetomidine restored the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio and attenuated the levels of malondialdehyde, a marker of lipid peroxidation, after exposure to high oxygen concentration. Moreover, administration of dexmedetomidine induced downregulation of IL-1β on mRNA and protein level in the developing rat brain. Dexmedetomidine provides protections against toxic oxygen induced neonatal brain injury which is likely associated with oxidative stress signaling and inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that dexmedetomidine may have a therapeutic potential since oxygen administration to neonates is sometimes inevitable.

  10. Neuroprotective activities of curcumin and quercetin with potential relevance to mitochondrial dysfunction induced by oxaliplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseem, Mohammad; Parvez, Suhel

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral neurotoxicity is one of the serious dose-limiting side effects of oxaliplatin (Oxa) when used in the treatment of malignant conditions. It is documented that it elicits major side effects specifically neurotoxicity due to oxidative stress forcing the patients to limit its clinical use in long-term treatment. Oxidative stress has been proven to be involved in Oxa-induced toxicity including neurotoxicity. The mitochondria have recently emerged as targets for anticancer drugs in various kinds of toxicity including neurotoxicity that can lead to neoplastic disease. However, there is paucity of literature involving the role of the mitochondria in mediating Oxa-induced neurotoxicity and its underlying mechanism is still debatable. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-dependent damage caused by Oxa on isolated brain mitochondria under in vitro conditions. The study was also designed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of nutraceuticals, curcumin (CMN), and quercetin (QR) on Oxa-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress and respiratory chain complexes in the brain of rats. Oxidative stress biomarkers, levels of nonenzymatic antioxidants, activities of enzymatic antioxidants, and mitochondrial complexes were evaluated against the neurotoxicity induced by Oxa. Pretreatment with CMN and QR significantly replenished the mitochondrial lipid peroxidation levels and protein carbonyl content induced by Oxa. CMN and QR ameliorated altered nonenzymatic and enzymatic antioxidants and complex enzymes of mitochondria. We conclude that CMN and QR, by attenuating oxidative stress as evident by mitochondrial dysfunction, hold promise as agents that can potentially reduce Oxa-induced adverse effects in the brain.

  11. Neuroprotection of Grape Seed Extract and Pyridoxine against Triton-Induced Neurotoxicity

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    Heba M. Abdou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Triton WR-1339 administration causes neurotoxicity. Natural products and herbal extracts can attenuate cerebral injury. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective role of grape seed extract and/or vitamin B6 against triton-induced neurotoxicity. Thirty-five adult male albino rats of the Sprague-Dawley strain, weighing 140–145 g, were divided into five groups: control, triton, grape seed extract + triton, grape seed extract + triton + vitamin B6, and vitamin B6 + triton. The hematological and biochemical analyses were carried out. Alteration in iNOS mRNA gene expression was determined using reverse-transcriptase PCR analysis. In addition, qualitative DNA fragmentation was examined using agarose gel electrophoresis. Triton-treatment caused significant disturbances in the hematological parameters, the neurological functions, and the antioxidant profile. Also, triton significantly increased the iNOS mRNA expression and DNA damage. Our results showed that grape seed extract and/or vitamin B6 could attenuate all the examined parameters. These natural substances could exhibit protective effects against triton-induced neurological damage because of their antioxidative and antiapoptotic capacities.

  12. Neuroprotective effect of curcumin on hippocampal injury in 6-OHDA-induced Parkinson's disease rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiaqing; Song, Shilei; Li, Jian; Liang, Tao

    2014-06-01

    Clinically, Parkinson's disease (PD)-related neuronal lesions commonly occur. The purpose of this study is to investigate potential therapeutic effect of curcumin against hippocampal damage of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-PD rat model. These results showed that curcumin significantly increased the body weight of 6-OHDA-impaired rats (Pcurcumin-treated PD rats were effectively ameliorated as shown in open field test (Pcurcumin increased the contents of monoaminergic neurotransmitters (PCurcumin effectively alleviated the 6-OHDA-induced hippocampal damage as observed in hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining. Furthermore, curcumin obviously up-regulated hippocampal brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB, phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) protein expressions, respectively as shown in Western blot analysis. These findings demonstrated that curcumin mediated the neuroprotection against 6-OHDA-induced hippocampus neurons in rats, which the underlying mechanism is involved in activating BDNF/TrkB-dependent pathway for promoting neural regeneration of hippocampal tissue. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. The neuroprotective effects of purslane (Portulaca oleracea) on rotenone-induced biochemical changes and apoptosis in brain of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E

    2013-09-01

    Purslane (Portulaca oleraceae L.), a member of the Portulacaceae family, is widespread as a weed and has been ranked as the eighth most common plant in the world. In order to evaluate purslane herbal aqueous juice as a neuroprotective agent, the antioxidant activity of purslane juice was assessed in vitro and the neuroprotective effects of purslane (1.5 mL/Kg bwt) on rotenone (12 mg/Kg bwt for 12 days) induced biochemical changes and apoptosis in striatum of rats were also examined. The repeated administration of rotenone produced dramatic increases in intercellular content of calcium, dopamine metabolites and apoptosis in the striatum. In addition, rotenone administration caused significant decrease in complex I activity. These biochemical changes and apoptosis inductions were effectively counteracted by administration of purslane. Overall, the present study demonstrated the neuroprotective role of purslane in the striatum and proposes its prophylactic potential against developing brain damage and Parkinson's disease induction followed by rotenone administration, and that purslane may be considered as a potential neuroprotective agent against environmental factors affecting the function of the dopaminergic system.

  14. Neuroprotective effect of melatonin on soluble Aβ1-42-induced cortical neurodegeneration via Reelin-Dab1 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chunli; Wang, Pan; Zhang, Shuman; Ren, Lili; Lv, Yiheng; Yin, Rui; Bi, Jing

    2017-07-01

    Soluble Aβ 1-42 oligomers play a vital role in the development and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Melatonin could delay the progress of AD through multiple mechanisms. Reelin-Dab1 signaling plays an important role in AD, including neuronal function and synaptic plasticity. However, whether melatonin could exert its neuroprotective function against soluble Aβ 1-42 -induced neurotoxicity during AD development through regulating Reelin-Dab1 signaling remains poorly understood. AD rat model was established by soluble Aβ 1-42 repeated intracerebroventricular injection. Using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses, the effect of melatonin on synaptic plasticity, neuritic degeneration, and astrocyte activation was investigated in cerebral cortex. Meanwhile, the expression of Reelin and Dab1 was also examined in cerebral cortex. In our in vitro study, Reelin-Dab1 signaling was inhibited by Reelin antibody, and neuroprotective effect of melatonin against Aβ 1-42 was further determined. Melatonin ameliorated the neurotoxiciy and astrocyte activation induced by Aβ 1-42 in the cerebral cortex. Melatonin also blocked the reduction in Reelin and Dab1 expression induced by Aβ 1-42 . Using in vitro study, Reelin inactivation completely abolished the protective effect of melatonin against Aβ 1-42 -induced neurotoxicity. Melatonin might play its neuroprotective role against Aβ 1-42 through mediating Reelin-Dab1 signaling pathway. Melatonin could be a safe and remarkable therapeutic candidate for AD and other aged-associated neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Neuroprotective effects of α-iso-cubebene against glutamate-induced damage in the HT22 hippocampal neuronal cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Young; Jung, Won Jung; Kang, Jum Soon; Kim, Cheol-Min; Park, Geuntae; Choi, Young-Whan

    2015-02-01

    Since oxidative stress is critically involved in excitotoxic damage, we sought to determine whether the activation of the transcription factors, cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2, also known as NFE2L2), by α-iso-cubebene is involved in its protective effects against glutamate-induced neuronal cell death. Pre-treatment with α-iso-cubebene significantly attenuated glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in mouse hippocampus-derived neuronal cells. α-iso-cubebene also reduced the glutamate-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and calcium influx, thus preventing apoptotic cell death. α-iso-cubebene inhibited glutamate-induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and, consequently, inhibited the release of the apoptosis-inducing factor from the mitochondria. Immunoblot anlaysis revealed that the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) by glutamate was reduced in the presence of α-iso-cubebene. α-iso-cubebene activated protein kinase A (PKA), CREB and Nrf2, which mediate the expression of the antioxidant enzymes, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase [quinone] 1 (NQO1), involved in neuroprotection. In addition, α-iso-cubebene induced the expression of antioxidant responsive element and CRE transcriptional activity, thus conferring neuroprotection against glutamate-induced oxidative injury. α-iso-cubebene also induced the expression of Nrf2-dependent genes encoding HO-1 and NQO1. Furthermore, the knockdown of CREB and Nrf2 by small interfering RNA attenuated the neuroprotective effects of α-iso-cubebene. Taken together, our results indicate that α-iso-cubebene protects HT22 cells from glutamate-induced oxidative damage through the activation of Nrf2/HO-1/NQO-1, as well as through the PKA and CREB signaling pathways.

  16. Synthesis of new heterocyclic compounds based on pyrazolopyridine scaffold and evaluation of their neuroprotective potential in MPP+-induced neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouha, Jabrane; Loubidi, Mohammed; Bouali, Jamila; Hamri, Salha; Hafid, Abderrafia; Suzenet, Franck; Guillaumet, Gérald; Dagcı, Taner; Khouili, Mostafa; Aydın, Fadime; Saso, Luciano; Armagan, Güliz

    2017-03-31

    Neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease affect millions of people in the world. Thus several new approaches to treat brain disorders are under development. The aim of the present study is to synthesize potential neuroprotective heterocyclic compounds based on pyrazolopyridine derivatives and then to evaluate their effects in MPP + -induced neurodegeneration in human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y cells). The effects of the compounds on cell viability were measured by MTT assay and the changes in apoptosis-related proteins including bax, Bcl-2, Bcl-xl and caspase-3 were investigated by western blot technique. Based on the cell viability results obtained by MTT assay, the percentage of neuroprotection-induced by compounds against MPP + -induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells was between 20% and 30% at 5 μM concentrations of all synthesized compounds. Moreover, the downregulation in pro-apoptotic proteins including bax and caspase-3 were found following the novel synthesized compounds treatments and these effects were observed in a dose-dependent manner. Our results provide an evidence that these heterocyclic compounds based on pyrazolopyridine derivatives may have a role on dopaminergic neuroprotection via antiapoptotic pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. The role and dynamics of β-catenin in precondition induced neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury.

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    Gali Umschweif

    Full Text Available Preconditioning via heat acclimation (34°C 30 d results in neuroprotection from traumatic brain injury due to constitutive as well as dynamic changes triggered by the trauma. Among these changes is Akt phosphorylation, which decreases apoptosis and induces HIF1α. In the present study we investigated the Akt downstream GSK3β/β-catenin pathway and focused on post injury alternations of β catenin and its impact on the cellular response in preconditioned heat acclimated mice. We found that the reduction in motor disability is accompanied with attenuation of depressive like behavior in heat acclimated mice that correlates with the GSK3β phosphorylation state. Concomitantly, a robust β catenin phosphorylation is not followed by its degradation, or by reduced nuclear accumulation. Enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of β catenin in the injured area weakens the β catenin-N cadherin complex. Membrane β catenin is transiently reduced in heat acclimated mice and its recovery 7 days post TBI is accompanied by induction of the synaptic marker synaptophysin. We suggest a set of cellular events following traumatic brain injury in heat acclimated mice that causes β catenin to participate in cell-cell adhesion alternations rather than in Wnt signaling. These events may contribute to synaptogenesis and the improved motor and cognitive abilities seen heat acclimated mice after traumatic brain injury.

  18. Neuro-protective effect of rutin against Cisplatin-induced neurotoxic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutairi, Mashal M; Alanazi, Wael A; Alshammari, Musaad A; Alotaibi, Moureq Rashed; Alhoshani, Ali R; Al-Rejaie, Salim Salah; Hafez, Mohamed M; Al-Shabanah, Othman A

    2017-09-29

    Cisplatin is widely used chemotherapeutic agent for cancer treatment with limited uses due to its neurotoxic side effect. The aim of this study was to determine the potential preventive effects of rutin on the brain of cisplatin- neurotoxic rat model. Forty rats were divided into four groups. Group-1 (control group) was intra-peritoneal (IP) injected with 2.5 ml/kg saline. Group-2 (rutin group) was orally administrated 30 mg/kg rutin dissolved in water for 14 days. Group-3 (cisplatin group) was IP received 5 mg/kg cisplatin single dose. Group-4 (rutin and cisplatin group) was orally administrated 30 mg/kg rutin dissolved in water for 14 days with a single dose of 5 mg/kg cisplatin IP on day ten. Brain tissues from frontal cortex was used to extract RNA, the gene expression levels of paraoxonase-1 (PON-1), PON-2, PON-3, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPAR-δ), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) was investigated by Real-time PCR. Cisplatin significantly decreased the expression levels of PON-1, PON-3, PPAR-δ and GPX whereas significantly increased PON-2 expression levels. Co-administration of Rutin prevented the cisplatin-induced toxicity by restoring the alteration in the studied genes to normal values as in the control group. This study showed that Rutin has neuroprotective effect and reduces cisplatin- neurotoxicity with possible mechanism via the antioxidant pathway.

  19. Neuroprotective Effects of Germinated Brown Rice in Rotenone-Induced Parkinson's-Like Disease Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chompoopong, Supin; Jarungjitaree, Sunit; Punbanlaem, Tideeporn; Rungruang, Thanaporn; Chongthammakun, Sukumal; Kettawan, Aikkarach; Taechowisan, Thongchai

    2016-09-01

    The effects of germinated brown rice (GBR) on the motor deficits and the dopaminergic (DA) cell death were investigated in Parkinson's-like disease (PD) rats. Reactive oxidative species generated by chronic subcutaneous injection of rotenone (RT) lead to neuronal apoptosis particularly in the nigrostriatal DA system and produce many features of PD, bradykinesis, postural instability and rigidity. In this study, 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA), previously reported to inhibit RT-induced DA cell death, was used as the positive control. Results show that pretreatment with GBR as well as 4-PBA significantly enhanced the motor activity after RT injection, and GBR affected significantly in open field test, only in the ambulation but not the mobility duration, and ameliorated the time to orient down (t-turn) and total time to descend the pole (t-total) in pole test as compared to RT group, but significantly lowered both t-turn and t-total only in 4-PBA group. The percentage of apoptotic cells in brain measured by flow cytometry and the inflammatory effect measured by ELISA of TNF-α showed significant increase in RT group as compared to the control (CT) group at P < 0.05. Apoptotic cells in RT group (85.98 %) showed a significant (P < 0.05) increase versus CT group (17.50 %), and this effect was attenuated in GBR+RT group by decreasing apoptotic cells (79.32 %), whereas, increased viable cells (17.94 %) versus RT group (10.79 %). GBR in GBR + RT group could decrease TNF-α both in the serum and in brain. In summary, GBR showed a neuroprotective effect in RT-induced PD rats, and it may be useful as a value-added functional food to prevent neurodegenerative disease or PD.

  20. The new inhibitor of monoamine oxidase, M30, has a neuroprotective effect against dexamethasone-induced brain cell apoptosis

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    Shakevia Johnson

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Stress detrimentally affects the brain and body and can lead to or be accompanied by depression. Although stress and depression may contribute to each other, the exact molecular mechanism underlying the effects is unclear. However, there is a correlation between stress and an increase in glucocorticoid secretion which causes a subsequent increase in monoamine oxidase (MAO activity during stress. Consequently, MAO inhibitors have been used as traditional antidepressant drugs. Cellular treatment with the synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone (a cellular stressor, has been reported to markedly increase both MAO A and MAO B catalytic activities, as well as apoptosis. This study compares the neuroprotective abilities of M30 (a new generation inhibitor of both MAO A and MAO B with rasagiline (Azilect®, another new MAO B inhibitor and selegiline (Deprenyl®, a traditional MAO B inhibitor in the prevention of dexamethasone-induced brain cell death and MAO activity in human neuroblastoma cells, SH-SY5Y. M30 demonstrated the highest inhibitory effect on MAO A; however, M30 showed the lowest inhibitory effect on MAO B enzymatic activity in comparison to rasagiline and selegiline. Although, M30 exhibited the greatest neuroprotective effect by decreasing cell death rates and apoptotic DNA damage compared to rasagiline and selegiline, these neuroprotective effects of M30 were, overall, similar to rasagiline. Summarily, M30 has a generally greater impact on neuroprotection than the MAO B inhibitors, selegiline and rasagiline. Our results suggest that M30 may have great potential in alleviating disorders involving increases in both MAO A and MAO B, such as stress-induced disorders.

  1. Ginger and Propolis Exert Neuroprotective Effects against Monosodium Glutamate-Induced Neurotoxicity in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama K. Hussein

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system cytotoxicity is linked to neurodegenerative disorders. The objective of the study was to investigate whether monosodium glutamate (MSG neurotoxicity can be reversed by natural products, such as ginger or propolis, in male rats. Four different groups of Wistar rats were utilized in the study. Group A served as a normal control, whereas group B was orally administered with MSG (100 mg/kg body weight, via oral gavage. Two additional groups, C and D, were given MSG as group B along with oral dose (500 mg/kg body weight of either ginger or propolis (600 mg/kg body weight once a day for two months. At the end, the rats were sacrificed, and the brain tissue was excised and levels of neurotransmitters, ß-amyloid, and DNA oxidative marker 8-OHdG were estimated in the brain homogenates. Further, formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded brain sections were used for histopathological evaluation. The results showed that MSG increased lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, neurotransmitters, and 8-OHdG as well as registered an accumulation of ß-amyloid peptides compared to normal control rats. Moreover, significant depletions of glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and catalase as well as histopathological alterations in the brain tissue of MSG-treated rats were noticed in comparison with the normal control. In contrast, treatment with ginger greatly attenuated the neurotoxic effects of MSG through suppression of 8-OHdG and β-amyloid accumulation as well as alteration of neurotransmitter levels. Further improvements were also noticed based on histological alterations and reduction of neurodegeneration in the brain tissue. A modest inhibition of the neurodegenerative markers was observed by propolis. The study clearly indicates a neuroprotective effect of ginger and propolis against MSG-induced neurodegenerative disorders and these beneficial effects could be attributed to the polyphenolic compounds present in these natural products.

  2. Hepatoprotection and neuroprotection induced by low doses of IGF-II in aging rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barhoum Rima

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GH and IGFs serum levels decline with age. Age-related changes appear to be associated to decreases in these anabolic hormones. We have previously demonstrated that IGF-I replacement therapy improves insulin resistance, lipid metabolism and reduces oxidative damage (in brain and liver in aging rats. Using the same experimental model, the aim of this work was to study whether the exogenous administration of IGF-II, at low doses, acts analogous to IGF-I in aging rats. Methods Three experimental groups were included in this study: young healthy controls (yCO, 17 weeks old; untreated old rats (O, 103 weeks old; and aging rats treated with IGF-II (O+IGF-II, 2 μg * 100 g body weight-1 * day-1 for 30 days. Analytical parameters were determined in serum by routine laboratory methods using an autoanalyzer (Cobas Mira; Roche Diagnostic System, Basel, Switzerland. Serum levels of hormones (testosterone, IGF-I and insulin were assessed by RIA. Serum Total Antioxidant Status was evaluated using a colorimetric assay. Mitochondrial membrane potential was evaluated using rhodamine 123 dye (adding different substrates to determine the different states. ATP synthesis in isolated mitochondria was determined by an enzymatic method. Results Compared with young controls, untreated old rats showed a reduction of IGF-I and testosterone levels with a decrease of serum total antioxidant status (TAS. IGF-II therapy improved serum antioxidant capability without modifying testosterone and IGF-I circulating concentrations. In addition, IGF-II treatment reduced oxidative damage in brain and liver, improving antioxidant enzyme activities and mitochondrial function. IGF-II was also able to reduce cholesterol and triglycerides levels increasing free fatty acids concentrations. Conclusions We demonstrate that low doses of IGF-II induce hepatoprotective, neuroprotective and metabolic effects, improving mitochondrial function, without affecting testosterone and

  3. Neuroprotection by hypoxic preconditioning involves upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 in a prenatal model of acute hypoxia.

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    Giusti, Sebastián; Fiszer de Plazas, Sara

    2012-02-01

    The molecular pathways underlying the neuroprotective effects of preconditioning are promising, potentially drugable targets to promote cell survival. However, these pathways are complex and are not yet fully understood. In this study we have established a paradigm of hypoxic preconditioning based on a chick embryo model of normobaric acute hypoxia previously developed by our group. With this model, we analyzed the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) stabilization during preconditioning in HIF-1 signaling after the hypoxic injury and in the development of a neuroprotective effect against the insult. To this end, we used a pharmacological approach, based on the in vivo administration of positive (Fe(2+), ascorbate) and negative (CoCl(2)) modulators of the activity of HIF-prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs), the main regulators of HIF-1. We have found that preconditioning has a reinforcing effect on HIF-1 accumulation during the subsequent hypoxic injury. In addition, we have also demonstrated that HIF-1 induction during hypoxic preconditioning is necessary to obtain an enhancement in HIF-1 accumulation and to develop a tolerance against a subsequent hypoxic injury. We provide in vivo evidence that administration of Fe(2+) and ascorbate modulates HIF accumulation, suggesting that PHDs might be targets for neuroprotection in the CNS. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Neuroprotective effects of scutellarin against hypoxic-ischemic-induced cerebral injury via augmentation of antioxidant defense capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hong; Hu, Li-Min; Wang, Shao-Xia; Wang, Yu-Lin; Shi, Fang; Li, Hui; Liu, Yang; Kang, Li-Yuan; Gao, Xiu-Mei

    2011-12-31

    An increasing number of studies has indicated that hypoxic-ischemic-induced cerebral injury is partly mediated via oxidative stress. Recent researches have focused on searching for drug and herbal manipulations to protect against hypoxic-ischemic-induced oxidative cell damage. Scutellarin is a flavonoid derived from the Erigeron breviscapus (vant.) and has been reported to exhibit neuroprotective properties. However, its precise mechanism, particularly its antioxidation mechanism, remains elusive. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of scutellarin on middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced brain damage in rats, and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced toxicity in primary culture of rat cortical neurons. In vivo, intraperitoneal injections of scutellarin (20 and 60 mg/kg) improved the neurological score and diminished the percentage of brain infarct volume. At the same time, scutellarin significantly increased superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) activities and glutathione (GSH) level in ischemic brain tissues, enhancing endogenous antioxidant activity. Moreover, pretreatment of scutellarin (25, 50 and 100 μM) protected neurons against lethal stimuli, decreased the percentage of apoptotic cells and inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in OGD-induced primary cortical neurons in vitro. These results suggest that the preventive and therapeutic potential of scutellarin in cerebral injury patients is, at least in part, ascribed to augmentation of cellular antioxidant defense capacity.

  5. Aquaporin-4 inhibition mediates piroxicam-induced neuroprotection against focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rodents.

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    Bhattacharya, Pallab; Pandey, Anand Kumar; Paul, Sudip; Patnaik, Ranjana; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporin-4(AQP4) is an abundant water channel protein in brain that regulates water transport to maintain homeostasis. Cerebral edema resulting from AQP4 over expression is considered to be one of the major determinants for progressive neuronal insult during cerebral ischemia. Although, both upregulation and downregulation of AQP4 expression is associated with brain pathology, over expression of AQP4 is one of the chief contributors of water imbalance in brain during ischemic pathology. We have found that Piroxicam binds to AQP4 with optimal binding energy value. Thus, we hypothesized that Piroxicam is neuroprotective in the rodent cerebral ischemic model by mitigating cerebral edema via AQP4 regulation. Rats were treated with Piroxicam OR placebo at 30 min prior, 2 h post and 4 h post 60 minutes of MCAO followed by 24 hour reperfusion. Rats were evaluated for neurological deficits and motor function just before sacrifice. Brains were harvested for infarct size estimation, water content measurement, biochemical analysis, RT-PCR and western blot experiments. Piroxicam pretreatment thirty minutes prior to ischemia and four hour post reperfusion afforded neuroprotection as evident through significant reduction in cerebral infarct volume, improvement in motor behavior, neurological deficit and reduction in brain edema. Furthermore, ischemia induced surge in levels of nitrite and malondialdehyde were also found to be significantly reduced in ischemic brain regions in treated animals. This neuroprotection was found to be associated with inhibition of acid mediated rise in intracellular calcium levels and also downregulated AQP4 expression. Findings of the present study provide significant evidence that Piroxicam acts as a potent AQP4 regulator and renders neuroprotection in focal cerebral ischemia. Piroxicam could be clinically exploited for the treatment of brain stroke along with other anti-stroke therapeutics in future.

  6. Neuroprotective Effect of Fisetin Against Amyloid-Beta-Induced Cognitive/Synaptic Dysfunction, Neuroinflammation, and Neurodegeneration in Adult Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ali, Tahir; Park, Hyun Young; Badshah, Haroon; Rehman, Shafiq Ur; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2017-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating and progressive neurodegenerative disease and is characterized pathologically by the accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) and the hyperphosphorylation of tau proteins in the brain. The deposition of Aβ aggregates triggers synaptic dysfunction, hyperphosphorylation of tau, and neurodegeneration, which lead to cognitive disorders. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of fisetin in the Aβ 1-42 mouse model of AD. Single intracerebroventricular injections of Aβ 1-42 (3 μl/5 min/mouse) markedly induced memory/synaptic deficits, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration. Intraperitoneal injections of fisetin at a dose of 20 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks starting 24 h after Aβ 1-42 injection significantly decreased the Aβ 1-42 -induced accumulation of Aβ, BACE-1 expression, and hyperphosphorylation of tau protein at serine 413. Fisetin treatment also markedly reversed Aβ 1-42 -induced synaptic dysfunction by increasing the levels of both presynaptic (SYN and SNAP-25) and postsynaptic proteins (PSD-95, SNAP-23, p-GluR1 (Ser 845), p-CREB (Ser 133) and p-CAMKII (Thr 286) and ultimately improved mouse memory, as observed in the Morris water maze test. Fisetin significantly activated p-PI3K, p-Akt (Ser 473), and p-GSK3β (Ser 9) expression in Aβ 1-42 -treated mice. Moreover, fisetin prevented neuroinflammation by suppressing various activated neuroinflammatory mediators and gliosis; it also suppressed the apoptotic neurodegeneration triggered by Aβ 1-42 injections in the mouse hippocampus. Fluorojade-B and immunohistochemical staining for caspase-3 revealed that fisetin prevented neurodegeneration in Aβ 1-42 -treated mice. Our results suggest that fisetin has a potent neuroprotective effect against Aβ 1-42 -induced neurotoxicity. These results demonstrate that polyphenolic flavonoids such as fisetin could be a beneficial, effective and safe neuroprotective agent for preventing neurological disorders such as AD.

  7. The Neuroprotective Effect of Curcumin Against Nicotine-Induced Neurotoxicity is Mediated by CREB-BDNF Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Motevalian, Manijeh; Fatima, Sulail; Faraji, Fahimeh; Mozaffari, Shiva

    2017-10-01

    Nicotine abuse adversely affects brain and causes apoptotic neurodegeneration. Curcumin- a bright yellow chemical compound found in turmeric is associated with neuroprotective properties. The current study was designed to evaluate the role of CREB-BDNF signaling in mediating the neuroprotective effects of curcumin against nicotine-induced apoptosis, oxidative stress and inflammation in rats. Sixty adult male rats were divided randomly into six groups. Group 1 received 0.7 ml/rat normal saline, group 2 received 6 mg/kg nicotine. Groups 3, 4, 5 and 6 were treated concurrently with nicotine (6 mg/kg) and curcumin (10, 20, 40 and 60 mg/kg i.p. respectively) for 21 days. Open Field Test (OFT) was used to evaluate the motor activity. Hippocampal oxidative, anti-oxidant, inflammatory and apoptotic factors were evaluated. Furthermore, phosphorylated brain cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (P-CREB) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were studied at gene and protein levels. We found that nicotine disturbed the motor activity in OFT and simultaneous treatment with curcumin (40 and 60 mg/kg) reduced the nicotine-induced motor activity disturbances. In addition, nicotine treatment increased lipid peroxidation and the levels of GSH, IL-1β, TNF-α and Bax, while reducing Bcl-2, P-CREB and BDNF levels in the hippocampus. Nicotine also reduced the activity of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in hippocampus. In contrast, various doses of curcumin attenuated nicotine-induced apoptosis, oxidative stress and inflammation; while elevating P-CREB and BDNF levels. Thus, curcumin via activation of P-CREB/BDNF signaling pathway, confers neuroprotection against nicotine-induced inflammation, apoptosis and oxidative stress.

  8. IGF-II promotes neuroprotection and neuroplasticity recovery in a long-lasting model of oxidative damage induced by glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Montañez, E; Millon, C; Boraldi, F; Garcia-Guirado, F; Pedraza, C; Lara, E; Santin, L J; Pavia, J; Garcia-Fernandez, M

    2017-10-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) is a naturally occurring hormone that exerts neurotrophic and neuroprotective properties in a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases and ageing. Accumulating evidence suggests that the effects of IGF-II in the brain may be explained by its binding to the specific transmembrane receptor, IGFII/M6P receptor (IGF-IIR). However, relatively little is known regarding the role of IGF-II through IGF-IIR in neuroprotection. Here, using adult cortical neuronal cultures, we investigated whether IGF-II exhibits long-term antioxidant effects and neuroprotection at the synaptic level after oxidative damage induced by high and transient levels of corticosterone (CORT). Furthermore, the involvement of the IGF-IIR was also studied to elucidate its role in the neuroprotective actions of IGF-II. We found that neurons treated with IGF-II after CORT incubation showed reduced oxidative stress damage and recovered antioxidant status (normalized total antioxidant status, lipid hydroperoxides and NAD(P) H:quinone oxidoreductase activity). Similar results were obtained when mitochondria function was analysed (cytochrome c oxidase activity, mitochondrial membrane potential and subcellular mitochondrial distribution). Furthermore, neuronal impairment and degeneration were also assessed (synaptophysin and PSD-95 expression, presynaptic function and FluoroJade B® stain). IGF-II was also able to recover the long-lasting neuronal cell damage. Finally, the effects of IGF-II were not blocked by an IGF-IR antagonist, suggesting the involvement of IGF-IIR. Altogether these results suggest that, in or model, IGF-II through IGF-IIR is able to revert the oxidative damage induced by CORT. In accordance with the neuroprotective role of the IGF-II/IGF-IIR reported in our study, pharmacotherapy approaches targeting this pathway may be useful for the treatment of diseases associated with cognitive deficits (i.e., neurodegenerative disorders, depression, etc

  9. Neuroprotection with metformin and thymoquinone against ethanol-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration in prenatal rat cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullah Ikram

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to ethanol during early development triggers severe neuronal death by activating multiple stress pathways and causes neurological disorders, such as fetal alcohol effects or fetal alcohol syndrome. This study investigated the effect of ethanol on intracellular events that predispose developing neurons for apoptosis via calcium-mediated signaling. Although the underlying molecular mechanisms of ethanol neurotoxicity are not completely determined, mitochondrial dysfunction, altered calcium homeostasis and apoptosis-related proteins have been implicated in ethanol neurotoxicity. The present study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective mechanisms of metformin (Met and thymoquinone (TQ during ethanol toxicity in rat prenatal cortical neurons at gestational day (GD 17.5. Results We found that Met and TQ, separately and synergistically, increased cell viability after ethanol (100 mM exposure for 12 hours and attenuated the elevation of cytosolic free calcium [Ca2+]c. Furthermore, Met and TQ maintained normal physiological mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔψM, which is typically lowered by ethanol exposure. Increased cytosolic free [Ca2+]c and lowered mitochondrial transmembrane potential after ethanol exposure significantly decreased the expression of a key anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2, increased expression of Bax, and stimulated the release of cytochrome-c from mitochondria. Met and TQ treatment inhibited the apoptotic cascade by increasing Bcl-2 expression. These compounds also repressed the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 and reduced the cleavage of PARP-1. Morphological conformation of cell death was assessed by TUNEL, Fluoro-Jade-B, and PI staining. These staining methods demonstrated more cell death after ethanol treatment, while Met, TQ or Met plus TQ prevented ethanol-induced apoptotic cell death. Conclusion These findings suggested that Met and TQ are strong protective agents against ethanol-induced

  10. Indirect application of near infrared light induces neuro-protection in a mouse model of parkinsonism - an abscopal neuro-protective effective evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnstone, D.M.; Spana, S.; Purushothuman, S.; Stone, J.; Mitrofanis, J.; Johnstone, D.M.; Spana, S.; Purushothuman, S.; Stone, J.; El Massri, N.; Mitrofanis, J.; Moro, C.; Torres, N.; Chabrol, C.; De Jaeger, X.; Reinhart, F.; Benabid, A.L.; Wang, X.S.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown near infrared light (NIr), directed transcranially, mitigates the loss of dopaminergic cells in MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine)-treated mice, a model of parkinsonism. These findings complement others suggesting NIr treatment protects against damage from various insults. However one puzzling feature of NIr treatment is that unilateral exposure can lead to a bilateral healing response, suggesting NIr may have 'indirect' protective effects. We investigated whether remote NIr treatment is neuro-protective by administering different MPTP doses (50-, 75-, 100-mg/kg) to mice and treating with 670-nm light directed specifically at either the head or body. Our results show that, despite no direct irradiation of the damaged tissue, remote NIr treatment produces a significant rescue of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells in the substantia nigra pars compacta at the milder MPTP dose of 50-mg/kg (30% increase vs sham-treated MPTP mice, p≤ 0.05). However this protection did not appear as robust as that achieved by direct irradiation of the head (50% increase vs sham-treated MPTP mice, p ≤0.001). There was no quantifiable protective effect of NIr at higher MPTP doses, irrespective of the delivery mode. Astrocyte and microglia cell numbers in substantia nigra pars compacta were not influenced by either mode of NIr treatment. In summary, the findings suggest that treatment of a remote tissue with NIr is sufficient to induce protection of the brain, reminiscent of the 'abscopal effect' sometimes observed in radiation treatment of metastatic cancer. This discovery has implications for the clinical translation of light-based therapies, providing an improved mode of delivery over trans-cranial irradiation. (authors)

  11. Morus alba leaf extract mediates neuroprotection against glyphosate-induced toxicity and biochemical alterations in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebai, Olfa; Belkhir, Manel; Boujelben, Adnen; Fattouch, Sami; Amri, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that glyphosate exposure is associated with oxidative stress and some neurological disorders such as Parkinson's pathology. Therefore, phytochemicals, in particular phenolic compounds, have attracted increasing attention as potential agents for neuroprotection. In the present study, we investigate the impact of glyphosate on the rat brain following i.p. injection and the possible molecular target of neuroprotective activity of the phenolic fraction from Morus alba leaf extract (MALE) and its ability to reduce oxidative damage in the brain. Wistar rats from 180 to 240 g were i.p. treated with a single dose of glyphosate (100 mg kg -1 b.w.) or MALE (100 μg mL -1  kg -1 b.w.) for 2 weeks. Brain homogenates were used to evaluate neurotoxicity induced by the pesticide. For this, biochemical parameters were measured. Data shows that MALE regulated oxidative stress and counteracted glyphosate-induced deleterious effects and oxidative damage in the brain, as it abrogated LDH, protein carbonyls, and malonyldialdehyde. MALE also appears to be able to scavenge H 2 O 2 levels, maintain iron and Ca 2+ homeostasis, and increase SOD activity. Thus, in vivo results showed that mulberry leaf extract is a potent protector against glyphosate-induced toxicity, and its protective effect could result from synergism or antagonism between the various bioactive phenolic compounds in the acetonic fraction from M. alba leaf extract.

  12. Neuroprotective Properties of Compounds Extracted from Dianthus superbus L. against Glutamate-induced Cell Death in HT22 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Bo-Ra; Yang, Hye Jin; Weon, Jin Bae; Lee, Jiwoo; Eom, Min Rye; Ma, Choong Je

    2016-01-01

    Dianthus superbus L. has been used in Chinese herbal medicine as a diuretic and anti-inflammatory agent. In this study, we isolated ten bioactive compounds from D. superbus and evaluated their neuroprotective activity against glutamate-induced cell death in the hippocampal neuronal HT22 cells. New compound, (E)-methyl-4-hydroxy-4-(8a-methyl-3-oxodecahydronaphthalen-4a-yl) (1) and, nine known compounds, diosmetin-7-O (2'',6''-di-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-pentyl ester benzenepropanoic acid (3), vanillic acid (4), 4-hydroxy-benzeneacetic acid (5), 4-methoxybenzeneacetic acid (6), (E)-4-methoxycinnamic acid (7), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethanol (8), hydroferulic acid (9), and methyl hydroferulate (10), were isolated by bioactivity-guided separation. Structures of the isolated compounds were identified on the basis of (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), (13)C NMR, and two-dimensional NMR spectra, while their neuroprotective properties were evaluated by performing the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. D. superbus extract had a neuroprotective effect and isolated 10 compounds. Among the compounds, compounds 5 and 6 effectively protected HT22 cells against glutamate toxicity. In conclusion, the extract of D. superbus and compounds isolated from it exhibited neuroprotective properties, suggesting therapeutic potential for applications in neurotoxic diseases. D. superbus extract significantly protected on glutamate-induced cell death in HT22 cellsNew compound, (E)-methyl-4-hydroxy-4-(8a-methyl-3-oxodecahydronaphthalen-4a-yl) (1) and, nine known compounds, diosmetin-7-O(2'',6''-di-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-pentyl ester benzenepropanoic acid (3), vanillic acid (4), 4-hydroxy-benzeneacetic acid (5), 4-methoxybenzeneacetic acid (6), (E)-4-methoxycinnamic acid (7), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethanol (8), hydroferulic acid (9), and methyl hydroferulate (10

  13. Hemopexin induces neuroprotection in the rat subjected to focal cerebral ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Beibei; Cai, Min; Fang, Zongping; Wei, Haidong; Zhu, Fangyun; Li, Guochao; Dong, Hailong; Xiong, Lize

    2013-01-01

    Background The plasma protein hemopexin (HPX) exhibits the highest binding affinity to free heme. In vitro experiments and gene-knock out technique have suggested that HPX may have a neuroprotective effect. However, the expression of HPX in the brain was not well elucidated and its expression after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury was also poorly studied. Furthermore, no in vivo data were available on the effect of HPX given centrally on the prognosis of focal cerebral ischemia. Results I...

  14. Inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α suppresses neuroprotective endogenous erythropoietin from astrocytes mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor-2α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaya, Yoshiaki; Aoyama, Mineyoshi; Tamura, Tetsuya; Kakita, Hiroki; Kato, Shin; Hida, Hideki; Saitoh, Shinji; Asai, Kiyofumi

    2014-12-01

    Interest in erythropoietin (EPO) as a neuroprotective mediator has grown since it was found that systemically administered EPO is protective in several animal models of disease. However, given that the blood-brain barrier limits EPO entry into the brain, alternative approaches that induce endogenous EPO production in the brain may be more effective clinically and associated with fewer untoward side-effects. Astrocytes are the main source of EPO in the central nervous system. In the present study we investigated the effect of the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) on hypoxia-induced upregulation of EPO in rat brain. Hypoxia significantly increased EPO mRNA expression in the brain and kidney, and this increase was suppressed by TNFα in vivo. In cultured astrocytes exposed to hypoxic conditions for 6 and 12 h, TNFα suppressed the hypoxia-induced increase in EPO mRNA expression in a concentration-dependent manner. TNFα inhibition of hypoxia-induced EPO expression was mediated primarily by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α rather than HIF-1α. The effects of TNFα in reducing hypoxia-induced upregulation of EPO mRNA expression probably involve destabilization of HIF-2α, which is regulated by the nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway. TNFα treatment attenuated the protective effects of astrocytes on neurons under hypoxic conditions via EPO signaling. The effective blockade of TNFα signaling may contribute to the maintenance of the neuroprotective effects of EPO even under hypoxic conditions with an inflammatory response. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Catalpol Induces Neuroprotection and Prevents Memory Dysfunction through the Cholinergic System and BDNF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the role and mechanism of catalpol on neuroprotective effects and memory enhancing effects simultaneously, neuroprotective effects of catalpol were assessed by neurological deficits score, TTC staining, and cerebral blood flow detecting. Morris water maze was employed to investigate its effects on learning and memory and then clarify its possible mechanisms relating the central cholinergic system and BDNF. Edaravone and oxiracetam were used for positive control drugs based on its different action. Results showed that catalpol and edaravone significantly facilitated neurological function recovery, reduced infarction volume, and increased cerebral blood flow in stroke mice. Catalpol and oxiracetam decreased the escape latency significantly and increased the numbers of crossing platform obviously. The levels of ACh, ChAT, and BDNF in catalpol group were increased in a dose-dependent manner, and AChE declined with a U-shaped dose-response curve. Moreover, the levels of muscarinic AChR subtypes M1 and M2 in hippocampus were considerably raised by catalpol. These results demonstrated that catalpol may be useful for neuroprotection and memory enhancement, and the mechanism may be related to the central cholinergic system.

  16. Neuroprotective and nootropic activity of Clitorea ternatea Linn.(Fabaceae leaves on diabetes induced cognitive decline in experimental animals

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    Karuna A Talpate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Ethanol extract of Clitorea ternatea (EECT was evaluated in diabetes-induced cognitive decline rat model for its nootropic and neuroprotective activity. Materials and Methods: Effect on spatial working memory, spatial reference memory and spatial working-reference memory was evaluated by Y maze, Morris water maze and Radial arm maze respectively. Neuroprotective effects of EECT was studied by assaying acetylcholinesterase, lipid peroxide, superoxide dismutase (SOD, total nitric oxide (NO, catalase (CAT and glutathione (GSH levels in the brain of diabetic rats. Results: The EECT (200 and 400 mg/kg was found to cause significant increase in spatial working memory ( P < 0.05, spatial reference memory ( P < 0.001 and spatial working-reference ( P < 0.001 in retention trials on Y maze, Morris water maze and Radial arm maze respectively. Whereas significant decrease in acetylcholinesterase activity ( P < 0.05, lipid peroxide ( P < 0.001, total NO ( P < 0.001 and significant increase in SOD, CAT and GSH levels was observed in animals treated with EECT (200 and 400 mg/kg compared to diabetic control group. Conclusions: The present data indicates that Clitorea ternatea tenders protection against diabetes induced cognitive decline and merits the need for further studies to elucidate its mode of action.

  17. Neuroprotective Effects of Germinated Brown Rice against Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Cell Death in Human SH-SY5Y Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Iqbal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The neuroprotective and antioxidative effects of germinated brown rice (GBR, brown rice (BR and commercially available γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA against cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells have been investigated. Results show that GBR suppressed H2O2-mediated cytotoxicity and induced G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest in SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, GBR reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP and prevented phosphatidylserine (PS translocation in SH-SY5Y cells, key features of apoptosis, and subsequent cell death. GBR exhibited better neuroprotective and antioxidative activities as compared to BR and GABA. These results indicate that GBR possesses high antioxidative activities and suppressed cell death in SH-SY5Y cells by blocking the cell cycle re-entry and apoptotic mechanisms. Therefore, GBR could be developed as a value added functional food to prevent neurodegenerative diseases caused by oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  18. Hepato- and neuro-protective influences of biopropolis on thioacetamide-induced acute hepatic encephalopathy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Rasha E; Salama, Abeer A A; Abdel-Rahman, Rehab F; Ogaly, Hanan A

    2017-05-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric syndrome that ultimately occurs as a complication of acute or chronic liver failure; accompanied by hyperammonemia. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of biopropolis as a hepato- and neuro-protective agent using thioacetamide (TAA)-induced acute HE in rats as a model. Sixty Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups: Group 1 (normal control) received only saline and paraffin oil. Group 2 (hepatotoxic control) received TAA (300 mg/kg, once). Groups 3, 4, and 5 received TAA followed by vitamin E (100 mg/kg) and biopropolis (100 and 200 mg/kg), respectively, daily for 30 days. Evidences of HE were clearly detected in TAA-hepatotoxic group including significant elevation in the serum level of ammonia, liver functions, increased oxidative stress in liver and brain, apoptotic DNA fragmentation and overexpression of iNOS gene in brain tissue. The findings for groups administered biopropolis, highlighted its efficacy as a hepato- and neuro-protectant through improving the liver functions, oxidative status and DNA fragmentation as well as suppressing the brain expression of iNOS gene. In conclusion, biopropolis, at a dose of 200 mg/kg per day protected against TAA-induced HE through its antioxidant and antiapoptotic influence; therefore, it can be used as a protective natural product.

  19. Alkaloids from the hook-bearing branch of Uncaria rhynchophylla and their neuroprotective effects against glutamate-induced HT22 cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wen; Yue, Si-Jia; Sun, Jia-Hong; Simpkins, James W.; Zhang, Lin; Yuan, Dan

    2015-01-01

    One new alkaloid, 4-geissoschizine N-oxide methyl ether (1), was isolated from the EtOH extract of the hook-bearing branch of Uncaria rhynchophylla, together with 10 known alkaloids, 3-epi-geissoschizine methyl ether (2) isolated from U. rhynchophylla for the first time, geissoschizine methyl ether (3), 4-hirsuteine N-oxide (4), hirsuteine (5), hirsutine (6), 3α-dihydro-cadambine (7), 3β-isodihydro-cadambine (8), cadambine (9), strictosamide (10), and akuammigine (11). The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods including UV, ESI-QTOF MS, NMR, and circular dichroism experiments. Neuroprotective effects of 1–9 were investigated against 3 mM glutamate-induced HT22 cell death. The activity assay showed that 2, 3, 5, and 6 exhibited potent neuroprotective effects against glutamate-induced HT22 cell death. However, only weak neuroprotective activities were observed for 1, 4, 7, 8, and 9. PMID:24899363

  20. Retinal neuroprotection by hypoxic preconditioning is independent of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha expression in photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiersch, Markus; Lange, Christina; Joly, Sandrine; Heynen, Severin; Le, Yun Zheng; Samardzija, Marijana; Grimm, Christian

    2009-06-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1 alpha in the retina and protects photoreceptors against light-induced cell death. HIF-1 alpha is one of the major transcription factors responding to low oxygen tension and can differentially regulate a large number of target genes. To analyse whether photoreceptor-specific expression of HIF-1 alpha is essential to protect photoreceptors by hypoxic preconditioning, we knocked down expression of HIF-1 alpha specifically in photoreceptor cells, using the cyclization recombinase (Cre)-lox system. The Cre-mediated knockdown caused a 20-fold reduced expression of Hif-1 alpha in the photoreceptor cell layer. In the total retina, RNA expression was reduced by 65%, and hypoxic preconditioning led to only a small increase in HIF-1 alpha protein levels. Accordingly, HIF-1 target gene expression after hypoxia was significantly diminished. Retinas of Hif-1 alpha knockdown animals did not show any pathological alterations, and tolerated hypoxic exposure in a comparable way to wild-type retinas. Importantly, the strong neuroprotective effect of hypoxic preconditioning against light-induced photoreceptor degeneration persisted in knockdown mice, suggesting that hypoxia-mediated survival of light exposure does not depend on an autocrine action of HIF-1 alpha in photoreceptor cells. Hypoxia-mediated stabilization of HIF-2 alpha and phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT 3) were not affected in the retinas of Hif-1 alpha knockdown mice. Thus, these factors are candidates for regulating the resistance of photoreceptors to light damage after hypoxic preconditioning, along with several potentially neuroprotective genes that were similarly induced in hypoxic knockdown and control mice.

  1. Hemopexin induces neuroprotection in the rat subjected to focal cerebral ischemia.

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    Dong, Beibei; Cai, Min; Fang, Zongping; Wei, Haidong; Zhu, Fangyun; Li, Guochao; Dong, Hailong; Xiong, Lize

    2013-06-10

    The plasma protein hemopexin (HPX) exhibits the highest binding affinity to free heme. In vitro experiments and gene-knock out technique have suggested that HPX may have a neuroprotective effect. However, the expression of HPX in the brain was not well elucidated and its expression after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury was also poorly studied. Furthermore, no in vivo data were available on the effect of HPX given centrally on the prognosis of focal cerebral ischemia. In the present study, we systematically investigated expression of HPX in normal rat brain by immunofluorescent staining. The results showed that HPX was mainly expressed in vascular system and neurons, as well as in a small portion of astrocytes adjacent to the vessels in normal rat brain. Further, we determined the role of HPX in the process of focal cerebral ischemic injury and explored the effects of HPX treatment in a rat model of transient focal cerebral ischemia. After 2 h' middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by 24 h' reperfusion, the expression of HPX was increased in the neurons and astrocytes in the penumbra area, as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot techniques. Intracerebroventricular injection of HPX at the onset of reperfusion dose-dependently reduced the infarct volumes and improved measurements of neurological function of the rat subjected to transient focal cerebral ischemia. The neuroprotective effects of HPX sustained for up to 7 days after experiments. Our study provides a new insight into the potential neuroprotective role of HPX as a contributing factor of endogenous protective mechanisms against focal cerebral ischemia injury, and HPX might be developed as a potential agent for treatment of ischemic stroke.

  2. The neuroprotective effects of an ethanolic turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) extract against trimethyltin-induced oxidative stress in rats.

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    Yuliani, Sapto; Mustofa; Partadiredja, Ginus

    2018-03-07

    Oxidative stress is known to contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. An ethanolic turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) extract containing curcumin has been reported to produce antioxidant effects. The present study aims to investigate the possible neuroprotective effects of the ethanolic turmeric extract against trimethyltin (TMT)-induced oxidative stress in Sprague Dawley rats. The ethanolic turmeric extract and citicoline were administered to the TMT exposed rats from day 1 to day 28 of the experiment. The TMT injection was administered on day 8 of the experiment. The plasma and brain malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, and the activities of the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) enzymes in the brain were examined at the end of the experiment. The administration of 200 mg/kg bw of the ethanolic turmeric extract prevented oxidative stress by decreasing the plasma and brain MDA levels and increasing the SOD, CAT, and GPx enzyme activities and GSH levels in the brain. These effects seem to be comparable to those of citicoline. The ethanolic turmeric extract at a dose of 200 mg/kg bw may exert neuroprotective effects on TMT-exposed Sprague Dawley rats by preventing them from oxidative stress.

  3. Neuroprotective potential of curcumin in combination with piperine against 6-hydroxy dopamine induced motor deficit and neurochemical alterations in rats.

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    Singh, Shamsher; Kumar, Puneet

    2017-02-01

    6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA) is a neurotoxin which on intranigral administration produces severe nigrostriatal damage with motor and cognitive deficit in animals. Curcumin (CMN) in combination with bioenhancer piperine (PP) in 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinsonian rats was used to investigate the antioxidant, neuromodulatory and neuroprotective mechanisms. Hemi-Parkinson's rat model was developed with intranigral infusion of 6-OHDA (8 μg/2 μl, once, unilaterally), treatment with CMN (25 and 50 mg/kg) and combination of PP (2.5 mg/kg) with CMN (25 mg/kg) was given daily for 21 days starting from the 7th day after 6-OHDA infusion. The behavioral (locomotor, grip strength, and narrow beam walk) parameters were studied on weekly basis. On 22nd day, isolated brain preparations were subjected to biochemical (lipid peroxidation, glutathione, and nitrite), neuroinflammatory (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF- α), and neurochemical (DA, NE, 5- HT, GABA, Glutamate, DOPAC, HVA, and 5-HIAA) analysis. Oral administration of CMN had significantly prevented behavioral, neuroinflammatory, and neurochemical changes and preserved the antioxidant potential of the nigrostriatum in rats treated with 6-OHDA. In the present study, PP and CMN had afforded a better neuroprotective effect compared to alone treatment on behavior, biochemical, neuroinflammatory, and neurochemical parameters in rats.

  4. GPER1 mediates estrogen-induced neuroprotection against oxygen-glucose deprivation in the primary hippocampal neurons.

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    Zhao, Tian-Zhi; Shi, Fei; Hu, Jun; He, Shi-Ming; Ding, Qian; Ma, Lian-Ting

    2016-07-22

    It is well-known that the neuroprotective effects of estrogen have potential in the prevention and amelioration of ischemic and degenerative neurological disorders, while the underlying mechanisms for estrogen actions are undefined. As an important mediator for the non-genomic functions of estrogen, GPER1 (G Protein-coupled Estrogen Receptor 1) has been suggested to involve in the beneficial roles of estrogen in neural cells. Here our studies on primary hippocampal neurons have focused on GPER1 in an in vitro model of ischemia using oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). GPER1 expression in the primary hippocampal neurons was stimulated by the OGD treatments. Both E2 (estradiol) and E2-BSA (membrane impermeable estradiol by covalent conjugation of bovine serum albumin) attenuated OGD-induced cell death in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons. Importantly, this membrane-mediated estrogen function requires GPER1 protein. Knocking down of GPER1 diminished, while overexpression of GPER1 potentiated, the protective roles of E2/E2-BSA following OGD. Additionally, the downstream mechanisms employed by membrane-associated estrogen signaling were found to include PI3K/Akt-dependent Ask1 inhibition in the primary hippocampal neurons. Overall, these research results could enhance our understanding of the neuroprotective actions for estrogen, and provide a new therapeutic target for improving stroke outcome and ameliorating degenerative neurological diseases. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Neuroprotective effects of lentivirus-mediated cystathionine-beta-synthase overexpression against 6-OHDA-induced parkinson's disease rats.

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    Yin, Wei-Lan; Yin, Wei-Guo; Huang, Bai-Sheng; Wu, Li-Xiang

    2017-09-14

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is age-related neurodegenerative disorder by a progressive loss of dopaminergic(DA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) and striatum, which is at least partly associated with α-synuclein protein accumulation in these neurons. Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) plays an important role in the nervous system. Studies have shown that H 2 S has a protective effect on PD. However, as a kind of gas molecules, H 2 S is lively, volatile, and not conducive to scientific research and clinical application. Cystathionine-beta-synthase(CBS) is the main enzymes of synthesis of H 2 S in the brain. In order to examine the neuroprotective effects of CBS on PD, we detected the effects of CBS overexpression on 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned PD rats using lentivirus-mediated gene transfection techniques. In the injured SN of 6-OHDA-induced PD rats, the CBS expression and the endogenous H 2 S level markedly decreased, while administration of lentivirus-mediated CBS overexpression increased the CBS expression and the endogenous H 2 S production.CBS overexpression dramatically reversed apomorphine-induced rotation of the 6-OHDA model rats, decreased the number of TUNEL-positive neurons and the loss of the nigral DA neurons,specifically inhibited 6-OHDA-induced oxidase stress injury, and down-regulated the expression of α-synuclein(α-SYN) in the injured SN. NaHS (an H 2 S donor) had similar effects to CBS overexpression, while Amino-oxyacetate(AOAA, a CBS inhibitor) had opposite effects on PD rats. In summary, we demonstrated that CBS overexpression was able to provide neuroprotective on PD rats and improving the expression of CBS may be a potential therapeutic method for PD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. GGF2 is neuroprotective in a rat model of cavernous nerve injury-induced erectile dysfunction.

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    Burnett, Arthur L; Sezen, Sena F; Hoke, Ahmet; Caggiano, Anthony O; Iaci, Jennifer; Lagoda, Gwen; Musicki, Biljana; Bella, Anthony J

    2015-04-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a major complication of radical prostatectomy, commonly associated with penile neuropathy. In animal models of peripheral nerve injury, glial growth factor-2 (GGF2), a member of the neuregulin family of growth factors, has neuroprotective and neurorestorative properties, but this potential has not been established after cavernous nerve (CN) injury. The effectiveness of GGF2 in preserving axonal integrity and recovering erectile function in a rat model of radical prostatectomy-associated CN injury. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent bilateral CN crush injury (BCNI) or sham surgery. Rats were administered GGF2 (0.5, 5, or 15 mg/kg) or vehicle subcutaneously 24 hour pre and 24-hour post-BCNI, and once weekly for 5 weeks. Erectile function was assessed in response to electrical stimulation of the CN. CN survival was assessed by fluorogold retrograde axonal tracing in major pelvic ganglia (MPG). Unmyelinated axons in the CNs were quantitated by electron microscopy. Erectile function recovery, CN survival, and unmyelinated CN axon preservation in response to GGF2 treatment following BCNI. Erectile function was decreased (P cells in the MPG was reduced (P Schwann cells in the BCNI group was higher (P Schwann cell compared with the BCNI group. GGF2 promotes erectile function recovery following CN injury in conjunction with preserving unmyelinated CN fibers. Our findings suggest the clinical opportunity to develop GGF2 as a neuroprotective therapy for radical prostatectomy. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  7. Neuroprotective effect of Portulaca oleracea extracts against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesion of dopaminergic neurons

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    WALESKA B. MARTINS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The Portulaca oleracea L. (Portulacaceae is a cosmopolitan species with a wide range of biological activities, including antioxidant and neuroprotective actions. We investigated the effects of P. oleracea extracts in a 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson's disease, a debilitating disorder without effective treatments. Chemical profiles of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of whole plant were analyzed by thin layer chromatography and the antioxidant activity was assessed by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrilhidrazila method. Male Wistar rats received intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine and were treated with vehicle or extracts (oral, 200 and 400 mg/kg daily for two weeks. The behavioral open field test was conducted at days 1 and 15. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed 4 weeks after surgery to quantify tyrosine-hydroxylase cell counts in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Extracts presented antioxidant activity in concentrations above 300 µg/kg. The chromatographic analysis revealed the presence of Levodopa, alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins, tannins, terpenoids and polysaccharides. Both extracts improved motor recovery 15 days after lesion and protected from tyrosine-hydroxylase cell loss after 4 weeks, but these effects were more evident for the aqueous extract. Because the dopamine precursor is present, in addition to antioxidant compounds and neuroprotective effects, P. oleracea can be considered as potential strategy for treating Parkinson's disease.

  8. Neuroprotective effect of Portulaca oleracea extracts against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesion of dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Waleska B; Rodrigues, Sheyla A; Silva, Hatamy K; Dantas, Camila G; Júnior, Waldecy DE Lucca; Filho, Lauro Xavier; Cardoso, Juliana C; Gomes, Margarete Z

    2016-09-01

    The Portulaca oleracea L. (Portulacaceae) is a cosmopolitan species with a wide range of biological activities, including antioxidant and neuroprotective actions. We investigated the effects of P. oleracea extracts in a 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson's disease, a debilitating disorder without effective treatments. Chemical profiles of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of whole plant were analyzed by thin layer chromatography and the antioxidant activity was assessed by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrilhidrazila method. Male Wistar rats received intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine and were treated with vehicle or extracts (oral, 200 and 400 mg/kg) daily for two weeks. The behavioral open field test was conducted at days 1 and 15. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed 4 weeks after surgery to quantify tyrosine-hydroxylase cell counts in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Extracts presented antioxidant activity in concentrations above 300 µg/kg. The chromatographic analysis revealed the presence of Levodopa, alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins, tannins, terpenoids and polysaccharides. Both extracts improved motor recovery 15 days after lesion and protected from tyrosine-hydroxylase cell loss after 4 weeks, but these effects were more evident for the aqueous extract. Because the dopamine precursor is present, in addition to antioxidant compounds and neuroprotective effects, P. oleracea can be considered as potential strategy for treating Parkinson's disease.

  9. Neuroprotective Effect of Tea Polyphenols on Oxyhemoglobin Induced Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Mice

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    Haizhen Mo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tea polyphenols are of great benefit to the treatment of several neurodegenerative diseases. In order to explore the neuroprotective effects of tea polyphenols and their potential mechanisms, an established in vivo subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH model was used and alterations of mitochondrial function, ATP content, and cytochrome c (cyt c in cerebral cortex were detected. This study showed that the alteration of mitochondrial membrane potential was an early event in SAH progression. The trend of ATP production was similar to that of mitochondrial membrane potential, indicating that the lower the mitochondrial membrane potential, lesser the ATP produced. Due to mitochondrial dysfunction, more cyt c was released in the SAH group. Interestingly, the preadministration of tea polyphenols significantly rescued the mitochondrial membrane potential to basal level, as well as the ATP content and the cyt c level in the brain cortex 12 h after SAH. After pretreatment with tea polyphenols, the neurological outcome was also improved. The results provide strong evidence that tea polyphenols enhance neuroprotective effects by inhibiting polarization of mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing ATP content, and blocking cyt c release.

  10. Neuroprotective and antioxidant effects of Thalassia testudinum extract BM-21, against acrylamide-induced neurotoxicity in mice

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    Roberto Menéndez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Context: Acrylamide (ACR neurotoxicity is associated with the enhancement of lipid peroxidation and the reduction of the antioxidative capacity distal axon and nerve terminal regions. The aqueous ethanolic extract of the marine plant Thalassia testudinum, named BM-21, have shown antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Aims: To determine the neuroprotective and the antioxidant effects of BM-21, standardized to thalassiolin B content (5.8 ± 0.9%, on acrylamide (ACR-induced distal axonopathy in male OF-1 mice. Methods: Animals were administered with ACR (70 mg/kg, s.c., 4 weeks, and BM-21 was co-administered p.o at the doses of 4, 40 and 400 mg/kg. The effect of BM-21 on neurobehavioral indexes (rota-rod test, compound muscle action potential (CMAP of the sciatic nerve and oxidative stress parameters were investigated. Results: BM-21 significantly prevented the neurobehavioral sings of neurotoxicity and the alteration of CMAP amplitude and velocity. The lowest dose (4 mg/kg failed to ameliorate these parameters whereas the highest dose (400 mg/kg was the most active. BM-21 (400 mg/kg significantly restored total hydroperoxides (THP and glutathione (GSH in the sciatic nerve as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px activities. Additionally, the extract also modified THP, GSH and the activity of SOD in cerebellum and brain towards the standard values. Conclusions: BM-21 given at doses that prevented ACR-induced neurotoxicity also produced antioxidant effect in the sciatic nerve, cerebellum and brain. Thus, the neuroprotective activity of BM-21 in this model seems to be mediated at least partly by its antioxidative properties.

  11. Neuroprotective effects of oleuropein against cognitive dysfunction induced by colchicine in hippocampal CA1 area in rats.

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    Pourkhodadad, Soheila; Alirezaei, Masoud; Moghaddasi, Mehrnoush; Ahmadvand, Hassan; Karami, Manizheh; Delfan, Bahram; Khanipour, Zahra

    2016-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with decline in memory. The role of oxidative stress is well known in the pathogenesis of the disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate pretreatment effects of oleuropein on oxidative status and cognitive dysfunction induced by colchicine in the hippocampal CA1 area. Male Wistar rats were pretreated orally once daily for 10 days with oleuropein at doses of 10, 15 and 20 mg/kg. Thereafter, colchicine (15 μg/rat) was administered into the CA1 area of the hippocampus to induce cognitive dysfunction. The Morris water maze was used to assess learning and memory. Biochemical parameters such as glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities, nitric oxide and malondialdehyde concentrations were measured to evaluate the antioxidant status in the rat hippocampus. Our results indicated that colchicine significantly impaired spatial memory and induced oxidative stress; in contrast, oleuropein pretreatment significantly improved learning and memory retention, and attenuated the oxidative damage. The results clearly indicate that oleuropein has neuroprotective effects against colchicine-induced cognitive dysfunction and oxidative damage in rats.

  12. Neuroprotective Effects of Erucin against 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Oxidative Damage in a Dopaminergic-like Neuroblastoma Cell Line

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    Giorgio Cantelli-Forti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress (OS contributes to the cascade leading to the dysfunction or death of dopaminergic neurons during Parkinson’s disease (PD. A strategy to prevent the OS of dopaminergic neurons may be the use of phytochemicals as inducers of endogenous antioxidants and phase 2 enzymes. In this study, we demonstrated that treatment of the dopaminergic-like neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line with isothiocyanate erucin (ER, a compound of cruciferous vegetables, resulted in significant increases of both total glutathione (GSH levels and total antioxidant capacity at the cytosolic level. The increase of GSH levels was associated with an increase in the resistance of SH-SY5Y cells to neuronal death, in terms of apoptosis, induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA. The pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with ER was also shown to prevent the redox status impairment, in terms of intracellular ROS and O2•− formation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, early events that are initiators of the apoptotic process, induced by 6-OHDA. Last, the antiapoptotic and antioxidant effects of ER were abolished by buthionine sulfoximine, supporting the main role of GSH in the neuroprotective effects recorded by ER. These results suggest that ER may prevent the oxidative damage induced by 6-OHDA.

  13. Moderate Ethanol Preconditioning of Rat Brain Cultures Engenders Neuroprotection Against Dementia-Inducing Neuroinflammatory Proteins: Possible Signaling Mechanisms

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    Neafsey, Edward J.; Wang, Kewei; Achille, Nicholas J.; Mitchell, Robert M.; Sivaswamy, Sreevidya

    2010-01-01

    There is no question that chronic alcohol (ethanol) abuse, a leading worldwide problem, causes neuronal dysfunction and brain damage. However, various epidemiologic studies in recent years have indicated that in comparisons with abstainers or never-drinkers, light/moderate alcohol consumers have lower risks of age-dependent cognitive decline and/or dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Such reduced risks have been variously attributed to favorable circulatory and/or cerebrovascular effects of moderate ethanol intake, but they could also involve ethanol “preconditioning” phenomena in brain glia and neurons. Here we summarize our experimental studies showing that moderate ethanol preconditioning (MEP; 20–30 mM ethanol) of rat brain cultures prevents neurodegeneration due to β-amyloid, an important protein implicated in AD, and to other neuroinflammatory proteins such as gp120, the human immunodeficiency virus 1 envelope protein linked to AIDS dementia. The MEP neuroprotection is associated with suppression of neurotoxic protein-evoked initial increases in [Ca+2]i and proinflammatory mediators—e.g., superoxide anion, arachidonic acid, and glutamate. Applying a sensor → transducer → effector model to MEP, we find that onset of neuroprotection correlates temporally with elevations in “effector” heat shock proteins (HSP70, HSP27, and phospho-HSP27). The effector status of HSPs is supported by the fact that inhibiting HSP elevations due to MEP largely restores gp120-induced superoxide potentiation and subsequent neurotoxicity. As upstream mediators, synaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors may be initial prosurvival sensors of ethanol, and protein kinase C epsilon and focal adhesion kinase are likely transducers during MEP that are essential for protective HSP elevations. Regarding human consumption, we speculate that moderate ethanol intake might counter incipient cognitive deterioration during advanced aging or AD by exerting preconditioning

  14. Moderate ethanol preconditioning of rat brain cultures engenders neuroprotection against dementia-inducing neuroinflammatory proteins: possible signaling mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Michael A; Neafsey, Edward J; Wang, Kewei; Achille, Nicholas J; Mitchell, Robert M; Sivaswamy, Sreevidya

    2010-06-01

    There is no question that chronic alcohol (ethanol) abuse, a leading worldwide problem, causes neuronal dysfunction and brain damage. However, various epidemiologic studies in recent years have indicated that in comparisons with abstainers or never-drinkers, light/moderate alcohol consumers have lower risks of age-dependent cognitive decline and/or dementia, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Such reduced risks have been variously attributed to favorable circulatory and/or cerebrovascular effects of moderate ethanol intake, but they could also involve ethanol "preconditioning" phenomena in brain glia and neurons. Here we summarize our experimental studies showing that moderate ethanol preconditioning (MEP; 20-30 mM ethanol) of rat brain cultures prevents neurodegeneration due to beta-amyloid, an important protein implicated in AD, and to other neuroinflammatory proteins such as gp120, the human immunodeficiency virus 1 envelope protein linked to AIDS dementia. The MEP neuroprotection is associated with suppression of neurotoxic protein-evoked initial increases in [Ca(+2)](i) and proinflammatory mediators--e.g., superoxide anion, arachidonic acid, and glutamate. Applying a sensor --> transducer --> effector model to MEP, we find that onset of neuroprotection correlates temporally with elevations in "effector" heat shock proteins (HSP70, HSP27, and phospho-HSP27). The effector status of HSPs is supported by the fact that inhibiting HSP elevations due to MEP largely restores gp120-induced superoxide potentiation and subsequent neurotoxicity. As upstream mediators, synaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors may be initial prosurvival sensors of ethanol, and protein kinase C epsilon and focal adhesion kinase are likely transducers during MEP that are essential for protective HSP elevations. Regarding human consumption, we speculate that moderate ethanol intake might counter incipient cognitive deterioration during advanced aging or AD by exerting preconditioning

  15. Neuroprotective Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy in Acute Stages of TNBS-Induced Colitis in Guinea-Pigs.

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    Ainsley M Robinson

    Full Text Available The therapeutic benefits of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, such as homing ability, multipotent differentiation capacity and secretion of soluble bioactive factors which exert neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, have been attributed to attenuation of autoimmune, inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we aimed to determine the earliest time point at which locally administered MSC-based therapies avert enteric neuronal loss and damage associated with intestinal inflammation in the guinea-pig model of colitis.At 3 hours after induction of colitis by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene-sulfonate (TNBS, guinea-pigs received either human bone marrow-derived MSCs, conditioned medium (CM, or unconditioned medium by enema into the colon. Colon tissues were collected 6, 24 and 72 hours after administration of TNBS. Effects on body weight, gross morphological damage, immune cell infiltration and myenteric neurons were evaluated. RT-PCR, flow cytometry and antibody array kit were used to identify neurotrophic and neuroprotective factors released by MSCs.MSC and CM treatments prevented body weight loss, reduced infiltration of leukocytes into the colon wall and the myenteric plexus, facilitated repair of damaged tissue and nerve fibers, averted myenteric neuronal loss, as well as changes in neuronal subpopulations. The neuroprotective effects of MSC and CM treatments were observed as early as 24 hours after induction of inflammation even though the inflammatory reaction at the level of the myenteric ganglia had not completely subsided. Substantial number of neurotrophic and neuroprotective factors released by MSCs was identified in their secretome.MSC-based therapies applied at the acute stages of TNBS-induced colitis start exerting their neuroprotective effects towards enteric neurons by 24 hours post treatment. The neuroprotective efficacy of MSC-based therapies can be exerted independently to their anti

  16. Neuroprotective effect of bee venom is mediated by reduced astrocyte activation in a subchronic MPTP-induced model of Parkinson's disease.

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    Kim, Mi Eun; Lee, Joo Yeon; Lee, Kyung Moon; Park, Hee Ra; Lee, Eunjin; Lee, Yujeong; Lee, Jun Sik; Lee, Jaewon

    2016-08-01

    Bee venom (BV), also known as apitoxin, is widely used in traditional oriental medicine to treat immune-related diseases. Recent studies suggest that BV could be beneficial for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease next to Alzheimer's disease, and PD pathologies are closely associated with neuroinflammation. Previous studies have suggested the neuroprotective effects of BV in animal models of PD are due to the modulation of inflammation. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the anti-neuroinflammatory effect of BV have not been elucidated in astrocytes. Here, the authors investigated the neuroprotective effects of BV and pramipexole (PPX; a positive control) in a subchronic MPTP-induced murine PD model. Both BV and PPX prevented MPTP-induced impairments in motor performance and reduced dopaminergic neuron loss, and furthermore, these neuroprotective effects of BV and PPX were found to be associated with reduced astroglial activation in vivo PD model. However, in MPP(+) treated primary cultured astrocytes, BV modulated astrocyte activation, whereas PPX did not, indicating that the neuroprotective effects of PPX were not mediated by neuroinflammation. These findings suggest that BV should be considered a potential therapeutic or preventive agent for PD and other neuroinflammatory associated disorders.

  17. Progesterone induces neuroprotection following reperfusion-promoted mitochondrial dysfunction after focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

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    Andrabi, Syed Suhail; Parvez, Suhel; Tabassum, Heena

    2017-06-01

    Organelle damage and increases in mitochondrial permeabilization are key events in the development of cerebral ischemic tissue injury because they cause both modifications in ATP turnover and cellular apoptosis/necrosis. Early restoration of blood flow and improvement of mitochondrial function might reverse the situation and help in recovery following an onset of stroke. Mitochondria and related bioenergetic processes can be effectively used as pharmacological targets. Progesterone (P4), one of the promising neurosteroids, has been found to be neuroprotective in various models of neurological diseases, through a number of mechanisms. This influenced us to investigate the possible role of P4 in the mitochondria-mediated neuroprotective mechanism in an ischemic stroke model of rat. In this study, we have shown the positive effect of P4 administration on behavioral deficits and mitochondrial health in an ischemic stroke injury model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). After induction of tMCAO, the rats received an initial intraperitoneal injection of P4 (8 mg/kg body weight) or vehicle at 1 h post-occlusion followed by subcutaneous injections at 6, 12 and 18 h. Behavioral assessment for functional deficits included grip strength, motor coordination and gait analysis. Findings revealed a significant improvement with P4 treatment in tMCAO animals. Staining of isolated brain slices from P4-treated rats with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) showed a reduction in the infarct area in comparison to the vehicle group, indicating the presence of an increased number of viable mitochondria. P4 treatment was also able to attenuate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, as well as block the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), in the tMCAO injury model. In addition, it was also able to ameliorate the altered mitochondrial membrane potential and respiration ratio in the ischemic animals, thereby suggesting that P4 has

  18. Neuroprotective Effect of Ginkgolide B on Bupivacaine-Induced Apoptosis in SH-SY5Y Cells

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    Li, Le; Zhang, Qing-guo; Lai, Lu-ying; Wen, Xian-jie; Zheng, Ting; Cheung, Chi-wai; Zhou, Shu-qin; Xu, Shi-yuan

    2013-01-01

    Local anesthetics are used routinely and effectively. However, many are also known to activate neurotoxic pathways. We tested the neuroprotective efficacy of ginkgolide B (GB), an active component of Ginkgo biloba, against ROS-mediated neurotoxicity caused by the local anesthetic bupivacaine. SH-SY5Y cells were treated with different concentrations of bupivacaine alone or following preincubation with GB. Pretreatment with GB increased SH-SY5Y cell viability and attenuated intracellular ROS accumulation, apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, and ER stress. GB suppressed bupivacaine-induced mitochondrial depolarization and mitochondria complex I and III inhibition and increased cleaved caspase-3 and Htra2 expression, which was strongly indicative of activation of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis with concomitantly enhanced expressions of Grp78, caspase-12 mRNA, protein, and ER stress. GB also improved ultrastructural changes indicative of mitochondrial and ER damage induced by bupivacaine. These results implicate bupivacaine-induced ROS-dependent mitochondria, ER dysfunction, and apoptosis, which can be attenuated by GB through its antioxidant property. PMID:24228138

  19. Curcumin exerts neuroprotective effects against homocysteine intracerebroventricular injection-induced cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataie, Amin; Sabetkasaei, Masoumeh; Haghparast, Abbas; Moghaddam, Akbar Hajizadeh; Ataee, Ramin; Moghaddam, Shiva Nasiraei

    2010-08-01

    Aging is the major risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases and oxidative stress and is involved in their pathophysiology. Oxidative stress can induce neuronal damage and modulate intracellular signaling, ultimately leading to neuronal death by apoptosis or necrosis. In this study we investigated the neuroprotective properties of the natural polyphenolic antioxidant compound, curcumin, against homocysteine (Hcy) neurotoxicity. Curcumin (5, 15, or 45 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally once daily for a period of 10 days beginning 5 days prior to Hcy (0.2 micromol/microl) intracerebroventricular injection in rats. Biochemical and behavioral studies, including passive avoidance learning and locomotor activity tests, were evaluated 24 hours after the last injection of curcumin or vehicle. Results indicated that Hcy induces lipid peroxidation and increases malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide anion (SOA) levels in whole rat brain. In addition, Hcy impaired memory retention in the passive avoidance learning test. However, curcumin treatment significantly decreased MDA and SOA levels and improved learning and memory in rats. These results suggest that Hcy may induce lipid peroxidation in rat brain and that polyphenol treatment (curcumin) improves learning and memory deficits by protecting the nervous system against oxidative stress.

  20. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rb1 on high glucose-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

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    Liu, Di; Zhang, Hong; Gu, Wenjuan; Liu, Yuqin; Zhang, Mengren

    2013-01-01

    Ginsenoside Rb1 is one of the main active principles in traditional herb ginseng and has been reported to have a wide variety of neuroprotective effects. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, so the present study aimed to observe the effects of ginsenoside Rb1 on ER stress signaling pathways in high glucose-treated hippocampal neurons. The results from MTT, TUNEL labeling and Annexin V-FITC/PI/Hoechst assays showed that incubating neurons with 50 mM high glucose for 72 h decreased cell viability and increased the number of apoptotic cells whereas treating neurons with 1 μM Rb1 for 72 h protected the neurons against high glucose-induced cell damage. Further molecular mechanism study demonstrated that Rb1 suppressed the activation of ER stress-associated proteins including protein kinase RNA (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK) and C/EBP homology protein (CHOP) and downregulation of Bcl-2 induced by high glucose. Moreover, Rb1 inhibited both the elevation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by high glucose. In addition, the high glucose-induced cell apoptosis, activation of ER stress, ROS accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction can also be attenuated by the inhibitor of ER stress 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) and anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine(NAC). In conclusion, these results suggest that Rb1 may protect neurons against high glucose-induced cell injury through inhibiting CHOP signaling pathway as well as oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  1. Acquired amylase production induced by radiotherapy in a myeloma patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamakawa, Tamami; Nagoshi, Haruhisa; Takahashi, Atushi [Saint Marianna Univ., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    1995-10-01

    A 55-year-old patient with multiple myeloma (IgG-{lambda}) diagnosed in November 1988 was admitted because of bone pain throughout the body. After plasmapheresis and several courses of chemotherapy, a massive tumor of the left thoracic wall involving the rib appeared. Radiotherapy was performed to ameliorate the severe chest pain, after which myelomatous pleural effusion appeared on the left side. The serum, urine and pleural effusion revealed increased activity of amylase of the salivary type. Amylase activity was also detected in the supernatant of myeloma cells cultured from pleural effusion. We reviewed 12 cases of ectopic amylase-producing multiple myeloma. All the cases except one have been reported from Japan, and hyperamylasemia in these cases was detected at diagnosis or during course of the illness. Moreover, cytogenetic analysis of myeloma cells of previous reports revealed structural abnormalities including chromosome 1, near the amylase gene locus. This case also showed t (1; 10) (q21?; q26) by examination of 8 metaphase derived from bone marrow. These observations suggested that ectopic amylase production was induced by irradiation to the plasmacytoma of thoracic wall. (author).

  2. Acquired amylase production induced by radiotherapy in a myeloma patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, Tamami; Nagoshi, Haruhisa; Takahashi, Atushi

    1995-01-01

    A 55-year-old patient with multiple myeloma (IgG-λ) diagnosed in November 1988 was admitted because of bone pain throughout the body. After plasmapheresis and several courses of chemotherapy, a massive tumor of the left thoracic wall involving the rib appeared. Radiotherapy was performed to ameliorate the severe chest pain, after which myelomatous pleural effusion appeared on the left side. The serum, urine and pleural effusion revealed increased activity of amylase of the salivary type. Amylase activity was also detected in the supernatant of myeloma cells cultured from pleural effusion. We reviewed 12 cases of ectopic amylase-producing multiple myeloma. All the cases except one have been reported from Japan, and hyperamylasemia in these cases was detected at diagnosis or during course of the illness. Moreover, cytogenetic analysis of myeloma cells of previous reports revealed structural abnormalities including chromosome 1, near the amylase gene locus. This case also showed t (1; 10) (q21?; q26) by examination of 8 metaphase derived from bone marrow. These observations suggested that ectopic amylase production was induced by irradiation to the plasmacytoma of thoracic wall. (author)

  3. Neuroprotective Effects of α-Tocotrienol on Kainic Acid-Induced Neurotoxicity in Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bae Hwan Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin E, such as alpha-tocopherol (ATPH and alpha-tocotrienol (ATTN, is a chain-breaking antioxidant that prevents the chain propagation step during lipid peroxidation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ATTN on KA-induced neuronal death using organotypic hippocampal slice culture (OHSC and compared the neuroprotective effects of ATTN and ATPH. After 15 h KA (5 µM treatment, delayed neuronal death was detected in the CA3 region and reactive oxygen species (ROS formation and lipid peroxidation were also increased. Both co-treatment and post-treatment of ATPH (100 µM or ATTN (100 µM significantly increased the cell survival and reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells in the CA3 region. Increased dichlorofluorescein (DCF fluorescence and levels of thiobarbiturate reactive substances (TBARS were decreased by ATPH and ATTN treatment. These data suggest that ATPH and ATTN treatment have protective effects on KA-induced cell death in OHSC. ATTN treatment tended to be more effective than ATPH treatment, even though there was no significant difference between ATPH and ATTN in co-treatment or post-treatment.

  4. Neuroprotective effect of curcumin-I in copper-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in rats: A possible link with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaoui, Abdellatif; Chatoui, Hicham; El Hiba, Omar; Gamrani, Halima

    2017-11-01

    Numerous findings indicate an involvement of heavy metals in the neuropathology of several neurodegenerative disorders, especially Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous studies have demonstrated that Copper (Cu) exhibits a potent neurotoxic effect on dopaminergic neurons and triggers profound neurobehavioral alterations. Curcumin is a major component of Curcuma longa rhizomes and a powerful medicinal plant that exerts many pharmacological effects. However, the neuroprotective action of curcumin on Cu-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity is yet to be investigated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of acute Cu-intoxication (10mg/kg B.W. i.p) for 3days on the dopaminergic system and locomotor performance as well as the possible therapeutic efficacy of curcumin I (30mg/kg B.W.). Intoxicated rats showed a significant loss of Tyrosine Hydroxylase (TH) expression within substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the striatal outputs. This was correlated with a clear decrease in locomotor performance. Critically, curcumin-I co-treatment reversed these changes and showed a noticeable protective effect; both TH expression and locomotor performance was reinstated in intoxicated rats. These results demonstrate altered dopaminergic innervations following Cu intoxication and a new therapeutic potential of curcumin against Cu-induced dopaminergic neurotransmission failure. Curcumin may therefore prevent heavy metal related Parkinsonism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A comparative study of neuroprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors against scopolamine-induced memory impairments in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talha Jawaid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The comparative study of neuroprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors against scopolamine-induced neuroinflammation in albino Wistar rats was studied. Male albino rats were administered with scopolamine to induce memory impairment. The standard nootropic agent, piracetam (200 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.], perindopril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.], enalapril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.], and ramipril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.] were administered in different group of animals for 5 days. On 5 th day, scopolamine (1 mg/kg b.w., i.p. was administered after 60 min of the last dose of test drug. Memory function was evaluated in Morris water maze (MWM test and pole climbing test (PCT. Biochemical estimations like glutathione (GSH, malondialdehyde (MDA, and acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain were estimated after completion of behavior study. All three test groups shows improvement in learning and memory in comparison to control group. Perindopril treated group showed a more effective significant decrease in escape latency time and transfer latency time compared to enalapril and ramipril treated group on day 4 in MWM test and PCT, respectively. Perindopril shows a significant reduction in MDA level and acetylcholinesterase activity and a significant rise in GSH level compared to enalapril and ramipril. The finding of this study indicates that Perindopril is more effective in memory retention compared to enalapril and ramipril.

  6. Neuroprotective effects of the polyphenolic antioxidant agent, Curcumin, against homocysteine-induced cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataie, Amin; Sabetkasaei, Masoumeh; Haghparast, Abbas; Moghaddam, Akbar Hajizadeh; Kazeminejad, Behrang

    2010-10-01

    Aging is the major risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases and oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of these diseases. In this study, the possible antioxidant and neuroprotective properties of the polyphenolic antioxidant compound, Curcumin against homocysteine (Hcy) neurotoxicity was investigated. Curcumin (5 and 50mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally once daily for a period of 10 days beginning 5 days prior to Hcy (0.2 micromol/microl) intrahippocampal injection in rats. Biochemical and behavioral studies, including passive avoidance learning and locomotor activity tests were studied 24h after the last Curcumin or its vehicle injection. We detected Malondialdehyde (MDA) and Super oxide anion (SOA) in rats' hippocampi. Results indicated that Hcy could induce lipid peroxidation and increase MDA and SOA levels in rats' hippocampi. Additionally, Hcy impaired memory retention in passive avoidance learning test. However, Curcumin treatment decreased MDA and SOA levels significantly as well as improved learning and memory in rats. Histopathological analysis also indicated that Hcy could decrease hippocampus cell count and Curcumin inhibited this toxic effect. These results suggest that Hcy may induce lipid peroxidation in rats' hippocampi and polyphenol treatment (Curcumin) improved learning and memory deficits by protecting the nervous system against Hcy toxicity. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A neuroprotective astrocyte state is induced by neuronal signal EphB1 but fails in ALS models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyzack, Giulia E; Hall, Claire E; Sibley, Christopher R; Cymes, Tomasz; Forostyak, Serhiy; Carlino, Giulia; Meyer, Ione F; Schiavo, Giampietro; Zhang, Su-Chun; Gibbons, George M; Newcombe, Jia; Patani, Rickie; Lakatos, András

    2017-10-27

    Astrocyte responses to neuronal injury may be beneficial or detrimental to neuronal recovery, but the mechanisms that determine these different responses are poorly understood. Here we show that ephrin type-B receptor 1 (EphB1) is upregulated in injured motor neurons, which in turn can activate astrocytes through ephrin-B1-mediated stimulation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3). Transcriptional analysis shows that EphB1 induces a protective and anti-inflammatory signature in astrocytes, partially linked to the STAT3 network. This is distinct from the response evoked by interleukin (IL)-6 that is known to induce both pro inflammatory and anti-inflammatory processes. Finally, we demonstrate that the EphB1-ephrin-B1 pathway is disrupted in human stem cell derived astrocyte and mouse models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Our work identifies an early neuronal help-me signal that activates a neuroprotective astrocytic response, which fails in ALS, and therefore represents an attractive therapeutic target.

  8. microRNA-21a-5p/PDCD4 axis regulates mesenchymal stem cell-induced neuroprotection in acute glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wenru; Li, Zuohong; Jia, Y; Zhu, Yingting; Cai, Wenjia; Wan, Peixing; Zhang, Yingying; Zheng, Song Guo; Zhuo, Yehong

    2017-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been demonstrated to have promising therapeutic benefits for a variety of neurological diseases; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we showed that intravitreal infusion of MSCs promoted retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival in a mouse model of acute glaucoma, with significant inhibition of microglial activation, production of TNF-α, IL-1β, and reactive oxygen species, as well as caspase-8 and caspase-3 activation. In vitro, MSCs inhibited both caspase-8-mediated RGC apoptosis and microglial activation, partly via the action of stanniocalcin 1 (STC1). Furthermore, we found that microRNA-21a-5p (miR-21) and its target, PDCD4, were essential for STC1 production and the neuroprotective property of MSCs in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, miR-21 overexpression or PDCD4 knockdown augmented MSC-mediated neuroprotective effects on acute glaucoma. These data highlight a previously unrecognized neuroprotective mechanism by which the miR-21/PDCD4 axis induces MSCs to secrete STC1 and other factors that exert neuroprotective effects. Therefore, modulating the miR-21/PDCD4 axis might be a promising strategy for clinical treatment of acute glaucoma and other neurological diseases. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Neuroprotective Effect of Puerarin on Glutamate-Induced Cytotoxicity in Differentiated Y-79 Cells via Inhibition of ROS Generation and Ca(2+) Influx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Zhu, Xue; Zhang, Kai; Wu, Zhifeng; Sun, Song; Zhou, Fanfan; Zhu, Ling

    2016-07-11

    Glutamate toxicity is estimated to be the key cause of photoreceptor degeneration in the pathogenesis of retinal degenerative diseases. Oxidative stress and Ca(2+) influx induced by glutamate are responsible for the apoptosis process of photoreceptor degeneration. Puerarin, a primary component of Kudzu root, has been widely used in the clinical treatment of retinal degenerative diseases in China for decades; however, the detailed molecular mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. In this study, the neuroprotective effect of puerarin against glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in the differentiated Y-79 cells was first investigated through cytotoxicity assay. Then the molecular mechanism of this effect regarding anti-oxidative stress and Ca(2+) hemostasis was further explored with indirect immunofluorescence, flow cytometric analysis and western blot analysis. Our study showed that glutamate induced cell viability loss, excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, calcium overload and up-regulated cell apoptosis in differentiated Y-79 cells, which effect was significantly attenuated with the pre-treatment of puerarin in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, our data indicated that the neuroprotective effect of puerarin was potentially mediated through the inhibition of glutamate-induced activation of mitochondrial-dependent signaling pathway and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-dependent apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1(ASK-1)/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/p38 signaling pathway. The present study supports the notion that puerarin may be a promising neuroprotective agent in the prevention of retinal degenerative diseases.

  10. Neuro-overprotection? A functional evaluation of clomethiazole-induced neuroprotection following hypoxic-ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilby, K L; Kelly, M E; McIntyre, D C; Robertson, H A

    2005-01-01

    , for the first time, that the kindling model can serve as a sensitive measure of function-related neuroprotective efficacy in animal models of ischemia.

  11. Drug-induced Hypothermia by 5HT1A Agonists Provide Neuroprotection in Experimental Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Flemming Fryd; Hasseldam, Henrik; Nybro Smith, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Drug-induced hypothermia reduces brain damage in animal stroke models and is an undiscovered potential in human stroke treatment. We studied hypothermia induced by the serotonergic agonists S14671 (1-[2-(2-thenoylamino)ethyl]-4[1-(7- methoxynaphtyl)]piperazine) and ipsapirone in a rat...... therapeutic hypothermia....

  12. Neuroprotective effects of α-iso-cubebenol on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Young; Choi, Yung Hyun; Park, Geuntae; Choi, Young-Whan

    2015-09-01

    α-Iso-cubebenol is a natural compound isolated from Schisandra chinensis, and is reported to have beneficial bioactivity including anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor activities. Glutamate-induced oxidative neuronal damage has been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. Here we investigated the mechanisms of α-iso-cubebenol protection of mouse hippocampus-derived neuronal cells (HT22 cells) from apoptotic cell death induced by the major excitatory neurotransmitter, glutamate. Pretreatment with α-iso-cubebenol markedly attenuated glutamate-induced loss of cell viability and release of lactate dehydrogenase), in a dose-dependent manner. α-Iso-cubebenol significantly reduced glutamate-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species and calcium accumulation. Strikingly, α-iso-cubebenol inhibited glutamate-induced mitochondrial depolarization, which releases apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria. α-Iso-cubebenol also suppressed glutamate-induced phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases. Furthermore, α-iso-cubebenol induced CREB phosphorylation and Nrf-2 nuclear accumulation and increased the promoter activity of ARE and CREB in HT22 cells. α-Iso-cubebenol also upregulated the expression of phase-II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes such as HO-1 and NQO1. Subsequent studies revealed that the inhibitory effects of α-iso-cubebenol on glutamate-induced apoptosis were abolished by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of CREB and Nrf-2. These findings suggest that α-iso-cubebenol prevents excitotoxin-induced oxidative damage to neurons by inhibiting apoptotic cell death, and might be a potential preventive or therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hepato- and neuro-protective effects of watermelon juice on acute ethanol-induced oxidative stress in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omolola R. Oyenihi

    Full Text Available Chronic and acute alcohol exposure has been extensively reported to cause oxidative stress in hepatic and extra-hepatic tissues. Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus is known to possess various beneficial properties including; antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-diabetic, anti-ulcerogenic effects. However, there is a lack of pertinent information on its importance in acute alcohol-induced hepato- and neuro-toxicity. The present study evaluated the potential protective effects of watermelon juice on ethanol-induced oxidative stress in the liver and brain of male Wistar rats. Rats were pre-treated with the watermelon juice at a dose of 4 ml/kg body weight for a period of fifteen days prior to a single dose of ethanol (50%; 12 ml/kg body weight. Ethanol treatment reduced body weight gain and significantly altered antioxidant status in the liver and brain. This is evidenced by the significant elevation of malondialdehyde (MDA concentration; depletion in reduced glutathione (GSH levels and an increased catalase (CAT activity in the brain and liver. There was no significant difference in the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPX in the liver and brain.Oral administration of watermelon juice for fifteen (15 days prior to ethanol intoxication, significantly reduced the concentration of MDA in the liver and brain of rats. In addition, water melon pre-treatment increased the concentration of GSH and normalized catalase activity in both tissues in comparison to the ethanol control group. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of phenol, alkaloids, saponins, tannins and steroids in watermelon juice. Our findings indicate that watermelon juice demonstrate anti-oxidative effects in ethanol-induced oxidation in the liver and brain of rats; which could be associated with the plethora of antioxidant phyto-constituents present there-in. Keywords: Watermelon, Neuro-protective, Hepatoprotective, Ethanol intoxication

  14. Neuroprotective effects of tenuigenin on neurobehavior, oxidative stress, and tau hyperphosphorylation induced by intracerebroventricular streptozotocin in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Bo Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tenuigenin (TEN, a major active component of the Chinese herb Polygala tenuifolia root, has been used to improve memory and cognitive function in Traditional Chinese Medicine for centuries. PURPOSE: The present study was designed to explore the possible neuroprotective effect of TEN on the streptozotocin (STZ-induced rat model of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (sAD. METHODS: STZ was injected twice intracerebroventrically (3 mg/kg, ICV on alternate days (day 1 and day 3 in Rats. Daily treatment with TEN (2, 4, and 8 mg/kg starting from the first dose of STZ for 28 days. Memory-related behaviors were evaluated using the Morris water maze test. Hyperphosphorylation of tau proteins in hippocampus were measured by western blot assay. Superoxide dismutase activities, malondialdehyde, glutathione peroxidase and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal adducts contents were also measured in the hippocampus.RESULTS: Treatment with TEN significantly improved STZ-induced cognitive damage, markedly reduced changes in malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal adducts, and significantly inhibited STZ-induced reduction in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities in the hippocampus. In addition, TEN decreased hyperphosphorylation of tau resulting from intracerebroventricular STZ (ICV-STZ injection, and Nissl staining results showed that TEN has protective effects on hippocampal neurons. CONCLUSION: These results provide experimental evidence demonstrating preventive effect of TEN on cognitive dysfunction, oxidative stress, and hyperphosphorylation of tau in ICV-STZ rats. This study indicates that TEN may have beneficial effects in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as AD.

  15. Lithium-Induced Neuroprotection is Associated with Epigenetic Modification of Specific BDNF Gene Promoter and Altered Expression of Apoptotic-Regulatory Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar eDwivedi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder (BD, one of the most debilitating mental disorders, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Lithium is the first line of treatment option for BD and is often used for maintenance therapy. Recently, the neuroprotective action of lithium has gained tremendous attention, given that BD is associated with structural and functional abnormalities of the brain. However, the precise molecular mechanism by which lithium exerts its neuroprotective action is not clearly understood. In hippocampal neurons, the effects of lithium on neuronal viability against glutamate-induced cytotoxicity, dendritic length and number, and expression and methylation of BDNF promoter exons and expression of apoptotic regulatory genes were studied. In rat hippocampal neurons, lithium not only increased dendritic length and number, but also neuronal viability against glutamate-induced cytotoxicity. While lithium increased the expression of BDNF as well as genes associated with neuroprotection such as Bcl2 and Bcl-XL, it decreased the expression of pro-apoptotic genes Bax, Bad, and caspases 3. Interestingly, lithium activated transcription of specific exon IV to induce BDNF gene expression. This was accompanied by hypomethylation of BDNF exon IV promoter. This study delineates mechanisms by which lithium mediates its effects in protecting neurons.

  16. PPARγ agonists improve survival and neurocognitive outcomes in experimental cerebral malaria and induce neuroprotective pathways in human malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Serghides

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria (CM is associated with a high mortality rate, and long-term neurocognitive impairment in approximately one third of survivors. Adjunctive therapies that modify the pathophysiological processes involved in CM may improve outcome over anti-malarial therapy alone. PPARγ agonists have been reported to have immunomodulatory effects in a variety of disease models. Here we report that adjunctive therapy with PPARγ agonists improved survival and long-term neurocognitive outcomes in the Plasmodium berghei ANKA experimental model of CM. Compared to anti-malarial therapy alone, PPARγ adjunctive therapy administered to mice at the onset of CM signs, was associated with reduced endothelial activation, and enhanced expression of the anti-oxidant enzymes SOD-1 and catalase and the neurotrophic factors brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and nerve growth factor (NGF in the brains of infected mice. Two months following infection, mice that were treated with anti-malarials alone demonstrated cognitive dysfunction, while mice that received PPARγ adjunctive therapy were completely protected from neurocognitive impairment and from PbA-infection induced brain atrophy. In humans with P. falciparum malaria, PPARγ therapy was associated with reduced endothelial activation and with induction of neuroprotective pathways, such as BDNF. These findings provide insight into mechanisms conferring improved survival and preventing neurocognitive injury in CM, and support the evaluation of PPARγ agonists in human CM.

  17. Glutamine acts as a neuroprotectant against DNA damage, beta-amyloid and H2O2-induced stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Chen

    Full Text Available Glutamine is the most abundant free amino acid in the human blood stream and is 'conditionally essential' to cells. Its intracellular levels are regulated both by the uptake of extracellular glutamine via specific transport systems and by its intracellular synthesis by glutamine synthetase (GS. Adding to the regulatory complexity, when extracellular glutamine is reduced GS protein levels rise. Unfortunately, this excess GS can be maladaptive. GS overexpression is neurotoxic especially if the cells are in a low-glutamine medium. Similarly, in low glutamine, the levels of multiple stress response proteins are reduced rendering cells hypersensitive to H(2O(2, zinc salts and DNA damage. These altered responses may have particular relevance to neurodegenerative diseases of aging. GS activity and glutamine levels are lower in the Alzheimer's disease (AD brain, and a fraction of AD hippocampal neurons have dramatically increased GS levels compared with control subjects. We validated the importance of these observations by showing that raising glutamine levels in the medium protects cultured neuronal cells against the amyloid peptide, Aβ. Further, a 10-day course of dietary glutamine supplementation reduced inflammation-induced neuronal cell cycle activation, tau phosphorylation and ATM-activation in two different mouse models of familial AD while raising the levels of two synaptic proteins, VAMP2 and synaptophysin. Together, our observations suggest that healthy neuronal cells require both intracellular and extracellular glutamine, and that the neuroprotective effects of glutamine supplementation may prove beneficial in the treatment of AD.

  18. Can Medical Herbs Stimulate Regeneration or Neuroprotection and Treat Neuropathic Pain in Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Schröder

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced neuropathy (CIPN has a relevant impact on the quality of life of cancer patients. There are no curative conventional treatments, so further options have to be investigated. We conducted a systematic review in English and Chinese language databases to illuminate the role of medical herbs. 26 relevant studies on 5 single herbs, one extract, one receptor-agonist, and 8 combinations of herbs were identified focusing on the single herbs Acorus calamus rhizoma, Cannabis sativa fructus, Chamomilla matricaria, Ginkgo biloba, Salvia officinalis, Sweet bee venom, Fritillaria cirrhosae bulbus, and the herbal combinations Bu Yang Huan Wu, modified Bu Yang Huan Wu plus Liuwei Di Huang, modified Chai Hu Long Gu Mu Li Wan, Geranii herba plus Aconiti lateralis praeparata radix , Niu Che Sen Qi Wan (Goshajinkigan, Gui Zhi Jia Shu Fu Tang (Keishikajutsubuto, Huang Qi Wu Wu Tang (Ogikeishigomotsuto, and Shao Yao Gan Cao Tang (Shakuyakukanzoto. The knowledge of mechanism of action is still limited, the quality of clinical trials needs further improvement, and studies have not yielded enough evidence to establish a standard practice, but a lot of promising substances have been identified. While CIPN has multiple mechanisms of neuronal degeneration, a combination of herbs or substances might deal with multiple targets for the aim of neuroprotection or neuroregeneration in CIPN.

  19. Neuroprotective and Antiamnesic Effects of Mitragyna inermis Willd (Rubiaceae on Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bougolla Pahaye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess memory improvement and neuroprotective and antioxidant effects of Mitragyna inermis (M. inermis leaf decoction on the central nervous system. Methodology. Leaf decoction of M. inermis was tested on learning and memory in normal and scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment in mice using memory behavioral tests such as the Morris water maze, object recognition task, and elevated plus maze. Oxidative stress enzymes—catalase, superoxide dismutase, and the thiobarbituric acid reactive substance, a product of lipid peroxidation—were quantified. In each test, mice 18 to 25 g were divided into groups of 5. Results. The extract reversed the effects of scopolamine in mice. The extract significantly increased discrimination index in the object recognition task test and inflexion ratio in the elevated plus maze test. The times spent in target quadrant in MWM increased while the transfer latency decreased in mice treated by M. inermis at the dose of 196.5 mg/kg. The activity levels of superoxide dismutase and catalase were significantly increased, whereas the thiobarbituric acid reactive substance was significantly decreased after 8 consecutive days of treatment with M. inermis at the dose of 393 mg/kg. Conclusion. These results suggest that M. inermis leaf extract possess potential antiamnesic effects.

  20. Nickel exposure induces oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA in Neuro2a cells: the neuroprotective roles of melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shang-Cheng; He, Min-Di; Lu, Yong-Hui; Li, Li; Zhong, Min; Zhang, Yan-Wen; Wang, Yuan; Yu, Zheng-Ping; Zhou, Zhou

    2011-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play important roles in the neurotoxicity of nickel. Because mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is highly vulnerable to oxidative stress and melatonin can efficiently protect mtDNA against oxidative damage in various pathological conditions, the aims of this study were to determine whether mtDNA oxidative damage was involved in the neurotoxicity of nickel and to assay the neuroprotective effects of melatonin in mtDNA. In this study, we exposed mouse neuroblastoma cell lines (Neuro2a) to different concentrations of nickel chloride (NiCl(2), 0.125, 0.25, and 0.5 mm) for 24 hr. We found that nickel significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial superoxide levels. In addition, nickel exposure increased mitochondrial 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OHdG) content and reduced mtDNA content and mtDNA transcript levels. Consistent with this finding, nickel was found to destroy mtDNA nucleoid structure and decrease protein levels of Tfam, a key protein component for nucleoid organization. However, all the oxidative damage to mtDNA induced by nickel was efficiently attenuated by melatonin pretreatment. Our results suggest that oxidative damage to mtDNA may account for the neurotoxicity of nickel. Melatonin has great pharmacological potential in protecting mtDNA against the adverse effects of nickel in the nervous system. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Neuroprotective effect of Cucumis melo Var. flexuosus leaf extract on the brains of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Doaa S

    2017-02-01

    The central nervous system is one of the most vulnerable organs affected by the oxidative stress associated with diabetes mellitus. Healthy food provides an important source for antioxidants. Therefore, the protective effect of Cucumis melo var. flexuosus (C. melo var. flexuosus) leaf extract on the brains of diabetic rats was investigated. Adult male albino rats divided into 5 groups of 6 rats each were assigned into a normal control group and four diabetic groups. Diabetes was induced in rats by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 60 mg/kg bw). One of the four diabetic groups was left untreated and was considered as a diabetic control group while the three other groups were treated with C. melo var. flexuosus leaf extract at the doses of 30, 60 and 120 mg/kg bw for a period of 30 days. After completion of experimental duration plasma and brains were used for evaluating biochemical changes. The obtained data showed that C. melo var. flexuosus leaf extract treatment lowered blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin, brain tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin levels, brain malondialdehyde content and caspase-3 activity. Furthermore, the treatment resulted in a marked increase in plasma dopamine, melatonin, brain vascular endothelial growth factor-A levels, brain catalase and superoxide dismutase activities. From the present study, it can be concluded that the C. melo var. flexuosus leaf extract exerts a neuroprotective effect against oxidative damage associated with diabetes.

  2. Neuroprotective effect of Quince leaf hydroalcoholic extract on intracerebroventricular streptozotocin-induced oxidative stress in cortical tissue of rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Hajizadeh Moghaddam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Oxidative stress is a result of the imbalance between free radicals and the antioxidant system of the body. Increased oxidative stress in brain causes dysfunction of brain activities, destruction of neurons, and disease such as Alzheimer. Antioxidants, for example vitamins, phenolic compounds and flavonoids have been extensively investigated as potential therapeutic agents in vitro and in vivo for prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present experimental study, the neuro-protective effect of quince leaf hydroalcoholic extract (QLHE on intracerebroventricular streptozotocin (icv-STZ-induced oxidative stress in cortical tissue of rat brain was examined. Methods: In the present experimental research, forty-two Wistar rats were randomly divided into control, sham, icv-STZ and icv-STZ treated with QLHE groups. The ICV-STZ group rats were injected unilaterally with ICV-STZ (3 mg/kg using a stereotactic device and QLHE (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg/day were administered for 6 weeks starting from 3 weeks before of ICV-STZ injection. The rats were killed at the end of the study and their brain cortical tissue superoxide dismutase and catalase activity were measured. The assay of catalase and superoxide dismutase was performed by following the Genet method. The amount of protein was determined according to the Bradford method.The statistical analysis was performed using one way ANOVA. Data were expressed as mean±SD and  P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The present study indicated that in the ICV-STZ group showed significant decrease (P<0.001 in enzymatic antioxidants superoxide dismutase and catalase in the cortical tissue of the brain. Treatment of different doses of QLHE significantly increased superoxide dismutase and catalase activity compared to icv-STZ group (P<0.001 in cortical tissue of the brain. Conclusion: The study demonstrated the effectiveness of quince leaf hydroalcoholic extract as a powerful antioxidant

  3. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-bo Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginsenoside Rg1 is the major pharmacologically active component of ginseng, and is reported to have various therapeutic actions. To determine whether it induces the differentiation of neural stem cells, and whether neural stem cell transplantation after induction has therapeutic effects on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, we cultured neural stem cells in 10-80 µM ginsenoside Rg1. Immunohistochemistry revealed that of the concentrations tested, 20 mM ginsenoside Rg1 had the greatest differentiation-inducing effect and was the concentration used for subsequent experiments. Whole-cell patch clamp showed that neural stem cells induced by 20 µM ginsenoside Rg1 were more mature than non-induced cells. We then established neonatal rat models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy using the suture method, and ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells were transplanted via intracerebroventricular injection. These tests confirmed that neural stem cells induced by ginsenoside had fewer pathological lesions and had a significantly better behavioral capacity than model rats that received saline. Transplanted neural stem cells expressed neuron-specific enolase, and were mainly distributed in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The present data suggest that ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells can promote the partial recovery of complicated brain functions in models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  4. Neuroprotective effect of S-allyl-l-cysteine derivatives against endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cytotoxicity is independent of calpain inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Toru; Kosuge, Yasuhiro; Saito, Hiroaki; Uchiyama, Taketo; Wada, Taira; Shimba, Shigeki; Ishige, Kumiko; Miyairi, Shinichi; Makishima, Makoto; Ito, Yoshihisa

    2016-03-01

    S-allyl-l-cysteine (SAC) is known to have neuroprotective properties. We synthesized various SAC derivatives and tested their effects on endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced neurotoxicity in cultured hippocampal neurons (HPNs). Among the compounds tested, S-propyl-l-cysteine (SPC) exhibited the strongest neuroprotective activity in HPNs, followed by S-ethyl-l-cysteine (SEC) and S-methyl-l-cysteine (SMC). Unlike SAC and SMC, SPC and SEC did not have inhibitory activity on μ-calpain, suggesting that the mechanism underlying the protective activity of SPC and SEC differs from that of SAC. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Pharmacological Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Neuroprotective effect of ginger in the brain of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Akabawy, Gehan; El-Kholy, Wael

    2014-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus results in neuronal damage caused by increased intracellular glucose leading to oxidative stress. Recent evidence revealed the potential of ginger for reducing diabetes-induced oxidative stress markers. The aim of this study is to investigate, for the first time, whether the antioxidant properties of ginger has beneficial effects on the structural brain damage associated with diabetes. We investigated the observable neurodegenerative changes in the frontal cortex, dentate gyrus, and cerebellum after 4, 6, and 8 weeks of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in rats and the effect(s) of ginger (500 mg/kg/day). Sections of frontal cortex, dentate gyrus, and cerebellum were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and examined using light microscopy. In addition, quantitative immunohistochemical assessments of the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, caspase-3, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and Ki67 were performed. Our results revealed a protective role of ginger on the diabetic brain via reducing oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. In addition, this study revealed that the beneficial effect of ginger was also mediated by modulating the astroglial response to the injury, reducing AChE expression, and improving neurogenesis. These results represent a new insight into the beneficial effects of ginger on the structural alterations of diabetic brain and suggest that ginger might be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of diabetic-induced damage in brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Neuroprotective Effect of Zhen Tian Wan on Pial strip-Induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    toshiba

    effects on ischemia-induced neuronal injury. ... continuous access to food and water and were ... surgeries head position was adjusted to place ... (2.0m in diameter, 0.35m high) constructed of ... of the protein sample was combined with the.

  7. Paraquat induces oxidative stress and neuronal cell death; neuroprotection by water-soluble Coenzyme Q10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, S.; Somayajulu, M.; Sikorska, M.; Borowy-Borowski, H.; Pandey, S.

    2004-01-01

    Neuronal cell death induced by oxidative stress is correlated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and stroke. The causes of sporadic forms of age-related neurodegenerative diseases are still unknown. Recently, a correlation between paraquat exposure and neurodegenerative diseases has been observed. Paraquat, a nonselective herbicide, was once widely used in North America and is still routinely used in Taiwan. We have used differentiated Human Neuroblastoma (SHSY-5Y) cells as an in vitro model to study the mechanism of cell death induced by paraquat. We observed that paraquat-induced oxidative stress in differentiated SHSY-5Y cells as indicated by an increase in the production of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, apoptosis was evident as indicated by cellular and nuclear morphology and DNA fragmentation. Interestingly, pretreatment of SHSY-5Y cells with water-soluble Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ 10 ) before paraquat exposure inhibited ROS generation. Pretreatment with CoQ 10 also significantly reduced the number of apoptotic cells and DNA fragmentation. We also analyzed the effect of paraquat and CoQ 10 on isolated mitochondria. Our results indicated that treatment with paraquat induced the generation of ROS from isolated mitochondria and depolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Pretreatment with CoQ 10 was able to inhibit ROS generation from isolated mitochondria as well as the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential. Our results indicate that water-soluble CoQ 10 can prevent oxidative stress and neuronal damage induced by paraquat and therefore, can be used for the prevention and therapy of neurodegenerative diseases caused by environmental toxins

  8. Pitavastatin treatment induces neuroprotection through the BDNF-TrkB signalling pathway in cultured cerebral neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Fu, Zhenqiang; Wang, Menghan; Nan, Xiaofei; Zhang, Boai

    2018-05-01

    Along with their lipid-lowering effect, statins have been reported to have neuroprotective function in both in vivo and in vitro models of neurodegenerative diseases. We conducted this study in order to uncover the he neuroprotective effect of the lipophilic statin pitavastatin (PTV) and investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms using primary cultured cerebral neurons exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). The primary cultured cerebral neurons were randomly assigned into four groups: the control group, the pitavastatin treatment group, the OGD group and the OGD + pitavastatin treatment group. The pitavastatin's concentration were set as follows: 1μM, 15μM, 30μM. After 3 hours OGD treatment, we use MTT method to assessment cell viability, immunofluorescence to observe neuron morphology and western blot method analysis the BDNF, TrkB. PTV at concentrations of 1 μM and 15 μM elevated the survival rate of cortical neurons exposed to OGD, whereas 30 μM PTV did not show such an effect. Moreover, PTV promoted neuronal dendrite growth at concentrations of 1 μM and 15 μM. Increased expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) were observed in both of the following two scenarios: when neurons were treated with PTV for 48 hours and when PTV was added after the OGD procedure. Pitavastatin treatment induces neuroprotection in cultured cerebral neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation this neuroprotection induced by PTV involves the BDNF-TrkB signalling pathway.

  9. Constraint-induced movement therapy for children with acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt Pedersen, Kristina; Pallesen, H.; Kristensen, H. K.

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 125-137 Danish children with acquired brain injury (ABI) require rehabilitation annually, 30-40 of these at a highly specialized level. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) has shown significant effects in increasing function in children with cerebral palsy. More knowledge of h...

  10. Hypoxic preconditioning induces neuroprotective stanniocalcin-1 in brain via IL-6 signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westberg, Johan A; Serlachius, Martina; Lankila, Petri

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Exposure of animals for a few hours to moderate hypoxia confers relative protection against subsequent ischemic brain damage. This phenomenon, known as hypoxic preconditioning, depends on new RNA and protein synthesis, but its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood...... originally reported expression of mammalian STC-1 in brain neurons and showed that STC-1 guards neurons against hypercalcemic and hypoxic damage. METHODS: We treated neural Paju cells with IL-6 and measured the induction of STC-1 mRNA. In addition, we quantified the effect of hypoxic preconditioning on Stc-1...... mRNA levels in brains of wild-type and IL-6 deficient mice. Furthermore, we monitored the Stc-1 response in brains of wild-type and transgenic mice, overexpressing IL-6 in the astroglia, before and after induced brain injury. RESULTS: Hypoxic preconditioning induced an upregulated expression of Stc...

  11. Neuroprotective Activity of Curcumin in Combination with Piperine against Quinolinic Acid Induced Neurodegeneration in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shamsher; Kumar, Puneet

    2016-01-01

    Quinolinic acid (QA) is an excitotoxin that induces Huntington's-like symptoms in animals and humans. Curcumin (CMN) is a well-known antioxidant but the major problem is its bioavailability. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the effect of CMN in the presence of piperine against QA-induced excitotoxic cell death in rats. QA was administered intrastriatally at a dose of 200 nmol/2 µl saline, bilaterally. CMN (25 and 50 mg/kg/day, p.o.) and combination of CMN (25 mg/kg/day, p.o.) and with piperine (2.5 mg/kg/day, p.o.) was administered daily for the next 21 days. Body weight and behavioral parameters were observed on 1st, 7th, 14th and 21st day. On the 22nd day, animals were sacrificed and striatum was isolated for biochemical (LPO, nitrite and GSH), neuroinflammatory (interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) and neurochemical (dopamine, norepinephrine, GABA, glutamate, 5-HT, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid) estimation. CMN treatment showed beneficial effect against QA-induced motor deficit, biochemical and neurochemical abnormalities in rats. Combination of piperine (2.5 mg/kg/day, p.o.) with CMN (25 mg/kg/day, p.o.) significantly enhanced its protective effect as compared to treatment with CMN alone. This study has revealed that the combination of CMN and piperine showed strong antioxidant and protective effect against QA-induced behavioral and neurological alteration in rats. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Bioassay-Guided Isolation of Neuroprotective Compounds from Uncaria rhynchophylla against Beta-Amyloid-Induced Neurotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Xian, Yan-Fang; Lin, Zhi-Xiu; Mao, Qing-Qiu; Hu, Zhen; Zhao, Ming; Che, Chun-Tao; Ip, Siu-Po

    2012-01-01

    Uncaria rhynchophylla is a component herb of many Chinese herbal formulae for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Previous study in our laboratory has demonstrated that an ethanol extract of Uncaria rhynchophylla ameliorated cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease induced by D-galactose. However, the active ingredients of Uncaria rhynchophylla responsible for the anti-Alzheimer's disease activity have not been identified. This study aims to identify the active ingr...

  13. Neuroprotective role of vitamin D3 in colchicine-induced Alzheimer's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Group II: rats with induced AD by icv colchicine injection of 15 lg/rat bilaterally and receiving no treatment. Group III: rats pre-treated with active form of vitamin D3 42 IU/kg/day subcutaneously (s.c.) for one week followed by induction of AD then post-treated with vitamin D3 in the same dose for 3 weeks. Group IV: rats with ...

  14. Neuroprotective effects of overexpressed cyclophilin B against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yoojung; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Yeonghwan; Jin, Jizi; Jin, Byung Kwan; Jahng, Geon-Ho; Jung, Min Hyung; Park, Chan; Kang, Insug; Ha, Joohun; Choe, Wonchae

    2011-08-15

    Accumulated amyloid-β (Aβ) is a well-known cause of neuronal apoptosis in Alzheimer disease and functions in part by generating oxidative stress. Our previous work suggested that cyclophilin B (CypB) protects against endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Therefore, in this study we examined the ability of CypB to protect against Aβ toxicity. CypB is present in the neurons of rat and mouse brains, and treating neural cells with Aβ(25-35) mediates apoptotic cell death. Aβ(25-35)-induced neuronal toxicity was inhibited by the overexpression of CypB as measured by cell viability, apoptotic morphology, sub-G1 cell population, intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation, activated caspase-3, PARP cleavage, Bcl-2 proteins, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI-3-K) activation. CypB/R95A PPIase mutants did not reduce Aβ(25-35) toxicity. We showed that Aβ(25-35)-induced apoptosis is more severe in a CypB knockdown model, confirming that CypB protects against Aβ(25-35)-induced toxicity. Consequently, these findings suggest that CypB may protect against Aβ toxicity by its antioxidant properties, by regulating MAPK and PI-3-K signaling, and through the ER stress pathway. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Antiapoptotic and neuroprotective role of Curcumin in Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced kindling model in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Lekha; Chakrabarti, Amitava; Kumari, Sweta; Bhatia, Alka; Banerjee, Dibyojyoti

    2016-02-01

    Kindling, a sub threshold chemical or electrical stimulation, increases seizure duration and enhances accompanied behavior until it reaches a sort of equilibrium state. The present study aimed to explore the effect of curcumin on the development of kindling in PTZ kindled rats and its role in apoptosis and neuronal damage. In a PTZ kindled Wistar rat model, different doses of curcumin (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg) were administrated orally one hour before the PTZ injections on alternate day during the whole kindling days. The following parameters were compared between control and experimental groups: the course of kindling, stages of seizures, Histopathological scoring of hippocampus, antioxidant parameters in the hippocampus, DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 expression in hippocampus, and neuron-specific enolase in the blood. One way ANOVA followed by Bonferroni post hoc analysis and Fischer's Exact test were used for statistical analyses. PTZ, 30 mg/kg, induced kindling in rats after 32.0 ± 1.4 days. Curcumin showed dose-dependent anti-seizure effect. Curcumin (300 mg/kg) significantly increased the latency to myoclonic jerks, clonic seizures as well as generalized tonic-clonic seizures, improved the seizure score and decreased the number of myoclonic jerks. PTZ kindling induced a significant neuronal injury, oxidative stress and apoptosis which were reversed by pretreatment with curcumin in a dose-dependent manner. Our study suggests that curcumin has a potential antiepileptogenic effect on kindling-induced epileptogenesis.

  16. Neuroprotective and antioxidant effects of curcumin in a ketamine-induced model of mania in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazal, Marta; Valente, Matheus R; Acosta, Bruna A; Kaufmann, Fernanda N; Braganhol, Elizandra; Lencina, Claiton L; Stefanello, Francieli M; Ghisleni, Gabriele; Kaster, Manuella P

    2014-02-05

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic and debilitating illness characterized by recurrent manic and depressive episodes. Our research investigates the protective effects of curcumin, the main curcuminoid of the Indian spice turmeric, in a model of mania induced by ketamine administration in rats. Our results indicated that ketamine treatment (25 mg/kg, for 8 days) induced hyperlocomotion in the open-field test and oxidative damage in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HP), evaluated by increased lipid peroxidation and decreased total thiol content. Moreover, ketamine treatment reduced the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase in the HP. Pretreatment of rats with curcumin (20 and 50 mg/kg, for 14 days) or with lithium chloride (45 mg/kg, positive control) prevented behavioral and pro-oxidant effects induced by ketamine. These findings suggest that curcumin might be a good compound for preventive intervention in BD, reducing the episode relapse and the oxidative damage associated with the manic phase of this disorder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Neuroprotection and mechanisms of atractylenolide III in preventing learning and memory impairment induced by chronic high-dose homocysteine administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H; Ji, Z-H; Liu, C; Yu, X-Y

    2015-04-02

    Studies demonstrated that chronic high-dose homocysteine administration induced learning and memory impairment in animals. Atractylenolide III (Aen-III), a neuroprotective constituent of Atractylodis macrocephalae Koidz, was isolated in our previous study. In this study, we investigated potential benefits of Aen-III in preventing learning and memory impairment following chronic high-dose homocysteine administration in rats. Results showed that administration of Aen-III significantly ameliorated learning and memory impairment induced by chronic high-dose homocysteine administration in rats, decreased homocysteine-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and restored homocysteine-induced decrease of phosphorylated protein kinase C expression level. Moreover, Aen-III protected primary cultured neurons from apoptotic death induced by homocysteine treatment. This study provides the first evidence for the neuroprotective effect of Aen-III in preventing learning and impairment induced by chronic administration of homocysteine. Aen-III may have therapeutic potential in treating homocysteine-mediated cognitive impairment and neuronal injury. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Neuroprotective effects of nootkatone from Alpiniae oxyphyllae Fructus against amyloid-β-induced cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bosai; Xu, Fanxing; Xiao, Feng; Yan, Tingxu; Wu, Bo; Bi, Kaishun; Jia, Ying

    2018-02-01

    The sesquiterpene nootkatone (NKT), isolated from Alpiniae oxyphyllae Fructus, was shown to possess protective effects on neurons. In our study, by using an Alzheimer's disease (AD) model of mice induced by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of Aβ 1-42 oligomers, we investigated the effects of NKT on memory impairment and further evaluated the pathological changes of mice. AD mice were treated by i.c.v. injection of NKT (at a dose of 0.02 mg/kg and 0.20 mg/kg) or vehicle (PBS) into the lateral ventricle once daily for 5 consecutive days. The behavioral tasks were performed, and levels of some biochemical indicators and histopathological changes of the brain were evaluated to elucidate the mechanism of NKT in the treatment of AD. The results revealed that NKT significantly improved the neurobehavioral performance of the AD mice in the Y-maze and Morris water maze tests. More importantly, NKT treatment decreased the malondialdehyde (MDA), Aβ as well as the acetylcholin esterase (AChE) levels in the mice brain, while increased the glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) levels with improved histopathological changes in the hippocampus. These findings provided evidences for the beneficial role of NKT in Aβ 1-42 -induced mice AD model linking to anti-oxidative and anti-AChE activities with inhibitory effect against Aβ accumulation.

  19. Molecular programs induced by heat acclimation confer neuroprotection against TBI and hypoxic insults via cross-tolerance mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal eHorowitz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuroprotection following prolonged exposure to high ambient temperatures (heat acclimation HA develops via altered molecular programs such as cross-tolerance (Heat Acclimation -Neuroprotection Cross-Tolerance -HANCT. The mechanisms underlying cross-tolerance depend on enhanced on-demand protective pathways evolving during acclimation. The protection achieved is long lasting and limits the need for de novo recruitment of cytoprotective pathways upon exposure to novel stressors. Using mouse and rat acclimated phenotypes, we will focus on the impact of heat acclimation on Angiotensin II-AT2 receptors in neurogenesis and on HIF-1 as key mediators in spontaneous recovery and HANCT after traumatic brain injury (TBI. The neuroprotective consequences of heat acclimation on NMDA and AMPA receptors will be discussed using the global hypoxia model. A behavioral-molecular link will be crystallized. The differences between HANCT and consensus preconditioning will be reviewed.

  20. Hemin offers neuroprotection through inducing exogenous neuroglobin in focal cerebral hypoxic-ischemia in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xue; Xu, Rui; Xie, Fei; Zhu, Haiyuan; Zhu, Ji; Wang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the inducible effect of hemin on exogenous neuroglobin (Ngb) in focal cerebral hypoxic-ischemia in rats. Methods: 125 healthy SD rats were randomly divided into five groups: sham-operation control group, operation group, hemin treatment group, exogenous Ngb treatment group, and hemin and exogenous Ngb joint treatment group. Twenty-four hours after focal cerebral hypoxic-ischemia, Ngb expression was evaluated by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, and western blot analyses, while the brain water content and infarct volume were examined. Results: Immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, and western blot analyses showed more pronounced Ngb expression in the hemin and exogenous Ngb joint operation group than in the hemin or exogenous Ngb individual treatment groups, thus producing significant differences in brain water content and infarct volume (p exogenous Ngb. PMID:24966924

  1. Neuroprotective effect of peroxiredoxin 6 against hypoxia-induced retinal ganglion cell damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Anil

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to respond to changes in the extra-intracellular environment is prerequisite for cell survival. Cellular responses to the environment include elevating defense systems, such as the antioxidant defense system. Hypoxia-evoked reactive oxygen species (ROS-driven oxidative stress is an underlying mechanism of retinal ganglion cell (RGC death that leads to blinding disorders. The protein peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6 plays a pleiotropic role in negatively regulating death signaling in response to stressors, and thereby stabilizes cellular homeostasis. Results We have shown that RGCs exposed to hypoxia (1% or hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride display reduced expression of PRDX6 with higher ROS expression and activation of NF-κB. These cells undergo apoptosis, while cells with over-expression of PRDX6 demonstrate resistance against hypoxia-driven RGC death. The RGCs exposed to hypoxia either with 1% oxygen or cobalt chloride (0-400 μM, revealed ~30%-70% apoptotic cell death after 48 and 72 h of exposure. Western analysis and real-time PCR showed elevated expression of PRDX6 during hypoxia at 24 h, while PRDX6 protein and mRNA expression declined from 48 h onwards following hypoxia exposure. Concomitant with this, RGCs showed increased ROS expression and activation of NF-κB with IkB phosphorylation/degradation, as examined with H2DCF-DA and transactivation assays. These hypoxia-induced adverse reactions could be reversed by over-expression of PRDX6. Conclusion Because an abundance of PRDX6 in cells was able to attenuate hypoxia-induced RGC death, the protein could possibly be developed as a novel therapeutic agent acting to postpone RGC injury and delay the progression of glaucoma and other disorders caused by the increased-ROS-generated death signaling related to hypoxia.

  2. Chitosan nanoparticle-based neuronal membrane sealing and neuroprotection following acrolein-induced cell injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Riyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highly reactive aldehyde acrolein is a very potent endogenous toxin with a long half-life. Acrolein is produced within cells after insult, and is a central player in slow and progressive "secondary injury" cascades. Indeed, acrolein-biomolecule complexes formed by cross-linking with proteins and DNA are associated with a number of pathologies, especially central nervous system (CNS trauma and neurodegenerative diseases. Hydralazine is capable of inhibiting or reducing acrolein-induced damage. However, since hydralazine's principle activity is to reduce blood pressure as a common anti-hypertension drug, the possible problems encountered when applied to hypotensive trauma victims have led us to explore alternative approaches. This study aims to evaluate such an alternative - a chitosan nanoparticle-based therapeutic system. Results Hydralazine-loaded chitosan nanoparticles were prepared using different types of polyanions and characterized for particle size, morphology, zeta potential value, and the efficiency of hydralazine entrapment and release. Hydralazine-loaded chitosan nanoparticles ranged in size from 300 nm to 350 nm in diameter, and with a tunable, or adjustable, surface charge. Conclusions We evaluated the utility of chitosan nanoparticles with an in-vitro model of acrolein-mediated cell injury using PC -12 cells. The particles effectively, and statistically, reduced damage to membrane integrity, secondary oxidative stress, and lipid peroxidation. This study suggests that a chitosan nanoparticle-based therapy to interfere with "secondary" injury may be possible.

  3. Evaluation of anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of camel milk in strychnine-induced seizure model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humera Khatoon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To discover the use of camel milk as an alternate medicine for the treatment and prevention of convulsions using strychnine-induced seizure model. Methods: Thirty animals were divided into three equal groups. Group I was on distilled water, Group II was on camel milk for 15 days prior to experiment and Group III was on reference drug diazepam. On the day of experiment, strychnine was administered in all treatment groups after distilled water, camel milk and diazepam treatments respectively. Animals were observed for 30 min for latency of seizure onset, frequency of convulsions and duration of jerks. The mortality rate was also evaluated for each group. Results: Camel milk treatment showed significant seizure protection as observed by delayed seizure onset (P ≤ 0.001, decreased total duration of convulsions (P ≤ 0.001 and mortality rate (P ≤ 0.001 when compared with Group I. Conclusions: Anticonvulsant activity of camel milk could be due to potentiation of glycinergic and GABAergic activities both. Antioxidant activity can also amplify its antiepileptic activity. Further studies are required to confirm the exact mechanism of action.

  4. The neuroprotective action of pyrroloquinoline quinone against glutamate-induced apoptosis in hippocampal neurons is mediated through the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qi; Shen Mi; Ding Mei; Shen Dingding; Ding Fei

    2011-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a cofactor in several enzyme-catalyzed redox reactions, possesses a potential capability of scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibiting cell apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the effects of PQQ on glutamate-induced cell death in primary cultured hippocampal neurons and the possible underlying mechanisms. We found that glutamate-induced apoptosis in cultured hippocampal neurons was significantly attenuated by the ensuing PQQ treatment, which also inhibited the glutamate-induced increase in Ca2+ influx, caspase-3 activity, and ROS production, and reversed the glutamate-induced decrease in Bcl-2/Bax ratio. The examination of signaling pathways revealed that PQQ treatment activated the phosphorylation of Akt and suppressed the glutamate-induced phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK). And inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt cascade by LY294002 and wortmannin significantly blocked the protective effects of PQQ, and alleviated the increase in Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Taken together, our results indicated that PQQ could protect primary cultured hippocampal neurons against glutamate-induced cell damage by scavenging ROS, reducing Ca2+ influx, and caspase-3 activity, and suggested that PQQ-activated PI3K/Akt signaling might be responsible for its neuroprotective action through modulation of glutamate-induced imbalance between Bcl-2 and Bax. - Research Highlights: →PQQ attenuated glutamate-induced cell apoptosis of cultured hippocampal neurons. →PQQ inhibited glutamate-induced Ca 2+ influx and caspase-3 activity. →PQQ reduced glutamate-induced increase in ROS production. →PQQ affected phosphorylation of Akt and JNK signalings after glutamate injury. →PI3K/Akt was required for neuroprotection of PQQ by modulating Bcl-2/Bax ratio.

  5. Running wheel exercise enhances recovery from nigrostriatal dopamine injury without inducing neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, S J; Gross, N B; Fricks, A N; Casiano, B D; Nguyen, T B; Marshall, J F

    2007-02-09

    Forced use of the forelimb contralateral to a unilateral injection of the dopaminergic neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine can promote recovery of motor function in that limb and can significantly decrease damage to dopamine terminals. The present study was conducted to determine (1) whether a form of voluntary exercise, wheel running, would improve motor performance in rats with such lesions, and (2) whether any beneficial effects of wheel running are attributable to ameliorating the dopaminergic damage. In experiment 1, rats were allowed to run in exercise wheels or kept in home cages for 2 1/2 weeks, then given stereotaxic infusions of 6-hydroxydopamine into the left striatum. The rats were replaced into their original environments (wheels or home cages) for four additional weeks, and asymmetries in forelimb use were quantified at 3, 10, 17, and 24 days postoperatively. After killing, dopaminergic damage was assessed by both quantifying 3 beta-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2 beta-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([(125)I]RTI-55) binding to striatal dopamine transporters and counting tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells in the substantia nigra. Exercised 6-hydroxydopamine-infused rats showed improved motor outcomes relative to sedentary lesioned controls, effects that were most apparent at postoperative days 17 and 24. Despite this behavioral improvement, 6-hydroxydopamine-induced loss of striatal dopamine transporters and tyrosine hydroxylase-positive nigral cells in exercised and sedentary groups did not differ. Since prior studies suggested that forced limb use improves motor performance by sparing nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons from 6-hydroxydopamine damage, experiment 2 used a combined regimen of forced plus voluntary wheel running. Again, we found that the motor performance of exercised rats improved more rapidly than that of sedentary controls, but that there were no differences between these groups in the damage produced by 6-hydroxydopamine. It appears that voluntary

  6. Electroacupuncture-Induced Neuroprotection against Cerebral Ischemia in Rats: Role of the Dopamine D2 Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Shu Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cerebral ischemia is known to produce brain damage and related behavioural deficits, including memory deficits and motor disorders. Evidence shows that EA significantly promotes recovery of neurological function and thus improves quality of life. Objective. Evidence exists for the involvement of catecholamines in human neuroplasticity. A better understanding of dopaminergic (DAergic modulation in this process will be important. Methods. A total of 72 adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were divided into 6 groups: normal, model, EA, spiperone group, EA + spiperone group, and pergolide. The middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO model was used in all 6 groups except the normal group. A behavioural assessment was conducted at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after MCAO. The percent of brain infarct area was also determined 7 days after MCAO. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43 fluorescence double labeling was performed in the striatum. Results. In this study, we found that EA at Fengchi (GB20 acupoints resulted in marked improvements based on a behavioural assessment. Both TTC staining and GAP-43 immunofluorescence labeling results showed that EA treatment reduced ischemia injury and promoted neuroplasticity compared with the model group. The D2R-selective agonist, pergolide, showed similar results, but these results were reversed by the D2R-selective antagonist, spiperone. We also found that there were more colocalization and expression of GAP-43 and TH in the EA and pergolide groups than those in the other groups. Conclusion. These results suggest that the neuroplasticity induced by EA was mediated by D2 autoreceptors in DAergic neurons.

  7. [Neuroprotective effect of erigeron breviscapus (vant) hand-mazz on NMDA-induced retinal neuron injury in the rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jingming; Jiag, Youqin; Liu, Xuyang

    2004-07-01

    To investigate if Erigeron Breviscapus (vant) Hand-Mazz (EBHM) has a neuroprotective effect against NMDA-induced neuron death in retinal ganglion cell layer (RGCL). Sixty healthy SD rats were randomly divided into four groups. 6 animals were in normal control group (group A). The others were divided as group B (EBHM group), group C (normal saline+NMDA group), group D (EBHM+NMDA group). Each group has 18 rats. 10 nmol NMDA was chosen for intravitreal injection to cause partial damage of the neurons in RGCL in the right eyes of Groups C and D. Same volume PBS was intravitreal injected in the left eyes as self-control. Groups B and D were pre-treated intraperitoneally with 6% EBHM solution at a dose of 15 mg x 100 g(-1) x d(-1) seven days before and after NMDA treatment. Group C were administrated intraperitoneally with 0.9% normal saline at the same time of EBHM injection. Rats were sacrificed in 4, 7, 14 days after NMDA treatment. Flat preparation of whole retinas were stained with 0.5% cresyl violet and neuron counting in RGCL from both eyes. Each subgroup has 6 rats. There was no significant difference between the right eye and the left eye of neuron counting from RGCL in normal control group (group A) (P=0.200). There was no significant difference between normal control group and EBHM group either in the right eyes or in the left eye in 4 days, 7 days and 14 days respectively after intravitreal injection of 10 nmol NMDA in group C and group D. (P=0.636, P=0.193). Neuron counting from RGCL of group C and group D were significant decreased in the NMDA-treated eyes in 4 days, 7 days and 14 days after intravitreal injection (P 0.05). Neuron counting was significantly higher in the EBHM+NMDA group than normal saline+NMDA group at 14 days after intraviteal injection (P=0.044). However,it is obvious that the difference was still significant between normal control group and EBHM+NMDA group (P < 0.05). EBHM has no effect on neuron counting of RGCL when administered alone

  8. Cognitive deficits and decreased locomotor activity induced by single-walled carbon nanotubes and neuroprotective effects of ascorbic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu X

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Xudong Liu,1,* Yuchao Zhang,1,* Jinquan Li,1 Dong Wang,1 Yang Wu,1 Yan Li,2 Zhisong Lu,3 Samuel CT Yu,4 Rui Li,1 Xu Yang1 1Laboratory of Environmental Biomedicine, Hubei Key Laboratory of Genetic Regulation and Integrative Biology, College of Life Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan, People's Republic of China; 2Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region; 3Institute for Clean Energy and Advanced Materials, Southwest University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China; 4Division of Environment, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs have shown increasing promise in the field of biomedicine, especially in applications related to the nervous system. However, there are limited studies available on the neurotoxicity of SWCNTs used in vivo. In this study, neurobehavioral changes caused by SWCNTs in mice and oxidative stress were investigated. The results of ethological analysis (Morris water maze and open-field test, brain histopathological examination, and assessments of oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species [ROS], malondialdehyde [MDA], and glutathione [GSH], inflammation (nuclear factor κB, tumor necrosis factor a, interleukin-1β, and apoptosis (cysteine-aspartic acid protease 3 in brains showed that 6.25 and 12.50 mg/kg/day SWCNTs in mice could induce cognitive deficits and decreased locomotor activity, brain histopathological alterations, and increased levels of oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis in mouse brains; however, 3.125 mg/kg/day SWCNTs had zero or minor adverse effects in mice, and these effects were blocked by concurrent administration of ascorbic acid. Down-regulation of oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis were proposed to explain the neuroprotective effects of

  9. Neuroprotective effects of corn silk maysin via inhibition of H2O2-induced apoptotic cell death in SK-N-MC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Doo Jin; Kim, Sun-Lim; Choi, Ji Won; Park, Yong Il

    2014-07-25

    Neuroprotective effects of maysin, which is a flavone glycoside that was isolated from the corn silk (CS, Zea mays L.) of a Korean hybrid corn Kwangpyeongok, against oxidative stress (H2O2)-induced apoptotic cell death of human neuroblastoma SK-N-MC cells were investigated. Maysin cytotoxicity was determined by measuring cell viability using MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured using a 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCF-DA) assay. Apoptotic cell death was monitored by annexin V-FITC/PI double staining and by a TUNEL assay. Antioxidant enzyme mRNA levels were determined by real-time PCR. The cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) was measured by western blotting. Maysin pretreatment reduced the cytotoxic effect of H2O2 on SK-N-MC cells, as shown by the increase in cell viability and by reduced LDH release. Maysin pretreatment also dose-dependently reduced the intracellular ROS level and inhibited PARP cleavage. In addition, DNA damage and H2O2-induced apoptotic cell death were significantly attenuated by maysin pretreatment. Moreover, maysin pretreatment (5-50 μg/ml) for 2h significantly and dose-dependently increased the mRNA levels of antioxidant enzymes (CAT, GPx-1, SOD-1, SOD-2 and HO-1) in H2O2 (200 μM)-insulted cells. These results suggest that CS maysin has neuroprotective effects against oxidative stress (H2O2)-induced apoptotic death of human brain SK-N-MC cells through its antioxidative action. This report is the first regarding neuroprotective health benefits of corn silk maysin by its anti-apoptotic action and by triggering the expression of intracellular antioxidant enzyme systems in SK-N-MC cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Serotonergic hyperactivity as a potential factor in developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogaard, Berit

    2013-01-01

    Though synesthesia research has seen a huge growth in recent decades, and tremendous progress has been made in terms of understanding the mechanism and cause of synesthesia, we are still left mostly in the dark when it comes to the mechanistic commonalities (if any) among developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia. We know that many forms of synesthesia involve aberrant structural or functional brain connectivity. Proposed mechanisms include direct projection and disinhibited feedback mechanisms, in which information from two otherwise structurally or functionally separate brain regions mix. We also know that synesthesia sometimes runs in families. However, it is unclear what causes its onset. Studies of psychedelic drugs, such as psilocybin, LSD and mescaline, reveal that exposure to these drugs can induce synesthesia. One neurotransmitter suspected to be central to the perceptual changes is serotonin. Excessive serotonin in the brain may cause many of the characteristics of psychedelic intoxication. Excessive serotonin levels may also play a role in synesthesia acquired after brain injury. In brain injury sudden cell death floods local brain regions with serotonin and glutamate. This neurotransmitter flooding could perhaps result in unusual feature binding. Finally, developmental synesthesia that occurs in individuals with autism may be a result of alterations in the serotonergic system, leading to a blockage of regular gating mechanisms. I conclude on these grounds that one commonality among at least some cases of acquired, developmental and drug-induced synesthesia may be the presence of excessive levels of serotonin, which increases the excitability and connectedness of sensory brain regions.

  11. ERKs and mitochondria-related pathways are essential for glycyrrhizic acid-mediated neuroprotection against glutamate-induced toxicity in differentiated PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.; Guo, T.Q.; Wang, Z.Y.; Lu, J.H.; Liu, D.P.; Meng, Q.F.; Xie, J.; Zhang, X.L.; Liu, Y.; Teng, L.S.

    2014-01-01

    The present study focuses on the neuroprotective effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA, a major compound separated from Glycyrrhiza Radix, which is a crude Chinese traditional drug) against glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in differentiated PC12 (DPC12) cells. The results showed that GA treatment improved cell viability and ameliorated abnormal glutamate-induced alterations in mitochondria in DPC12 cells. GA reversed glutamate-suppressed B-cell lymphoma 2 levels, inhibited glutamate-enhanced expressions of Bax and cleaved caspase 3, and reduced cytochrome C (Cyto C) release. Exposure to glutamate strongly inhibited phosphorylation of AKT (protein kinase B) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs); however, GA pretreatment enhanced activation of ERKs but not AKT. The presence of PD98059 (a mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase [MEK] inhibitor) but not LY294002 (a phosphoinositide 3-kinase [PI3K] inhibitor) diminished the potency of GA for improving viability of glutamate-exposed DPC12 cells. These results indicated that ERKs and mitochondria-related pathways are essential for the neuroprotective effect of GA against glutamate-induced toxicity in DPC12 cells. The present study provides experimental evidence supporting GA as a potential therapeutic agent for use in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

  12. ERKs and mitochondria-related pathways are essential for glycyrrhizic acid-mediated neuroprotection against glutamate-induced toxicity in differentiated PC12 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, D. [School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun (China); The State Engineering Laboratory of AIDS Vaccine, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Guo, T.Q. [School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Wang, Z.Y. [State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Lu, J.H.; Liu, D.P.; Meng, Q.F.; Xie, J. [School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Zhang, X.L. [Faculty of ScienceNational University of Singapore (Singapore); Liu, Y. [School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Teng, L.S. [School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun (China); The State Engineering Laboratory of AIDS Vaccine, Jilin University, Changchun (China)

    2014-07-25

    The present study focuses on the neuroprotective effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA, a major compound separated from Glycyrrhiza Radix, which is a crude Chinese traditional drug) against glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in differentiated PC12 (DPC12) cells. The results showed that GA treatment improved cell viability and ameliorated abnormal glutamate-induced alterations in mitochondria in DPC12 cells. GA reversed glutamate-suppressed B-cell lymphoma 2 levels, inhibited glutamate-enhanced expressions of Bax and cleaved caspase 3, and reduced cytochrome C (Cyto C) release. Exposure to glutamate strongly inhibited phosphorylation of AKT (protein kinase B) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs); however, GA pretreatment enhanced activation of ERKs but not AKT. The presence of PD98059 (a mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase [MEK] inhibitor) but not LY294002 (a phosphoinositide 3-kinase [PI3K] inhibitor) diminished the potency of GA for improving viability of glutamate-exposed DPC12 cells. These results indicated that ERKs and mitochondria-related pathways are essential for the neuroprotective effect of GA against glutamate-induced toxicity in DPC12 cells. The present study provides experimental evidence supporting GA as a potential therapeutic agent for use in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Neuroprotective effects of glyceryl nonivamide against microglia-like cells and 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y human dopaminergic neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chin; Uang, Hao-Wei; Lin, Rong-Jyh; Chen, Ing-Jun; Lo, Yi-Ching

    2007-12-01

    Glyceryl nonivamide (GLNVA), a vanilloid receptor (VR) agonist, has been reported to have calcitonin gene-related peptide-associated vasodilatation and to prevent subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced cerebral vasospasm. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of GLNVA on activated microglia-like cell mediated- and proparkinsonian neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. In coculture conditions, we used lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV-2 cells as a model of activated microglia. LPS-induced neuronal death was significantly inhibited by diphenylene iodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. However, capsazepine, the selective VR1 antagonist, did not block the neuroprotective effects of GLNVA. GLNVA reduced LPS-activated microglia-mediated neuronal death, but it lacked protection in DPI-pretreated cultures. GLNVA also decreased LPS activated microglia induced overexpression of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS) and glycoprotein 91 phagocyte oxidase (gp91(phox)) on SH-SY5Y cells. Pretreatment of BV-2 cells with GLNVA diminished LPS-induced nitric oxide production, overexpression of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS), and gp91(phox) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (iROS). GLNVA also reduced cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression, inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB (IkappaB)alpha/IkappaBbeta degradation, NF-kappaB activation, and the overproduction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, and prostaglandin E2 in BV-2 cells. However, GLNVA augmented anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 production on LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. Furthermore, in 6-OHDA-treated SH-SY5Y cells, GLNVA rescued the changes in condensed nuclear and apoptotic bodies, prevented the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, and reduced cells death. GLNVA also suppressed accumulation of iROS and up-regulated heme oxygenase-1 expression. 6-OHDA-induced overexpression of nNOS, i

  14. Neuroprotective effects of Salvia aristata Aucher ex Benth. on hydrogen peroxide induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Esmaeili

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Oxidative stress is implicated in the neuronal damage associated with Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotropic lateral sclerosis and cerebral ischemic stroke. The present work was designed to establish the neuroprotective effects of Salvia aristata extract on H2O2-induced apoptosis in human dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells. Methods: The total phenol and flavonoids contents of the plant extracts were quantified by colorimetric methods. The antioxidant activity was assessed using DPPH free radicals scavenging activity assay, and the neuroprotective effect on H2O2-induced oxidative stress was also investigated using human dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells by MTT assay and western blotting techniques. Results: The highest scavenging activity was found for methanol extract of S. aristata roots (85.28 ± 2.61 μg/mL, with the highest total phenolic and flavonoids content (90.28 mg total phenols as gallic acid and 250.12 mg total flavonoids as rutin, respectively. Our results also, showed that H2O2-induced cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells was suppressed by treatment with S. aristata. Moreover, S. aristata root extract was effective in attenuating the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptotic cell death has induced by H2O2.  S. aristata suppressed the down-regulation of Bcl-2, upregulation of Bax, and the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c to cytosol. In addition, S. aristata attenuated caspase-3, and -9 activation, and eventually protected the cells against H2O2-induced apoptosis. Conclusion: Theresults of the present study suggest that treatment of SH-SY5Y cells with S. aristata could block H2O2-induced apoptosis by regulating Bcl-2 family members and by suppressing caspase cascade activation.

  15. Neuroprotective Effects of Hesperidin, a Plant Flavanone, on Rotenone-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in a Cellular Model for Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppusamy Tamilselvam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotenone a widely used pesticide that inhibits mitochondrial complex I has been used to investigate the pathobiology of PD both in vitro and in vivo. Studies have shown that the neurotoxicity of rotenone may be related to its ability to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to neuronal apoptosis. The current study was carried out to investigate the neuroprotective effects of hesperidin, a citrus fruit flavanol, against rotenone-induced apoptosis in human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. We assessed cell death, mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS generation, ATP levels, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, reduced glutathione (GSH levels, and the activity of catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx using well established assays. Apoptosis was determined in normal, rotenone, and hesperidin treated cells, by measuring the protein expression of cytochrome c (cyt c, caspases 3 and 9, Bax, and Bcl-2 using the standard western blotting technique. The apoptosis in rotenone-induced SK-N-SH cells was accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, increased ROS generation, the depletion of GSH, enhanced activities of enzymatic antioxidants, upregulation of Bax, cyt c, and caspases 3 and 9, and downregulation of Bcl-2, which were attenuated in the presence of hesperidin. Our data suggests that hesperidin exerts its neuroprotective effect against rotenone due to its antioxidant, maintenance of mitochondrial function, and antiapoptotic properties in a neuroblastoma cell line.

  16. Neuroprotective Effect of Total and Sequential Extract of Scrophularia striata Boiss. in Rat Cerebellar Granule Neurons Following Glutamate- Induced Neurotoxicity: An In-vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavati, Parvin; Ramezani, Mina; Monsef-Esfahani, Hamid R; Hajiagha, Reza; Parsa, Maliheh; Tavajohi, Shoreh; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2013-01-01

    Neuroprotective effect of the extract from aerial parts of Scrophularia striata Boiss (Scrophulariaceae) was investigated against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity on cultured rat pups Cerebellar Granule Neurons (CGNs). CGNs from 8 days old Sprague-Dawley rat were prepared and cultured. The experiments were performed after 8 days in culture. The plant was collected from the northeastern part (Ruin region) of Iran and air-dried at room temperature. The total extract was prepared with maceration of prepared powder in ethanol 80% for three times. Sequential extracts were obtained using dried and powdered aerial parts with increasingly polar solvents: petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol 80% solution. Cultured cells were exposed to 125 μM of glutamate for 12 h following a 24 h of incubation with test fractions at concentration of 10 mcg/mL. Morphological assay was performed using invert light microscope after fixation and staining with haematoxylin. Neuronal viability was measured using MTT assay. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS software. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed by Tukey post-hoc test. Values were considered statistically significant when p-value ≤ 0.05. Results of this study showed a significant neuroprotective activity of high polarity methanolic fraction of aerial parts of Scrophularia striata against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in a dosedependent manner. Treatment with 10 mcg/mL of the fractions showed the best result. PMID:24250613

  17. Neuroprotective effect of curcumin as evinced by abrogation of rotenone-induced motor deficits, oxidative and mitochondrial dysfunctions in mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Dharmendra K; Juvekar, Archana R

    Curcumin, a natural polyphenolic compound extracted from rhizomes of Curcuma longa (turmeric), a plant in the ginger family (Zingiberaceae) has been used worldwide and extensively in Southeast Asia. Curcumin exhibited numerous biological and pharmacological activities including potent antioxidant, cardiovascular disease, anticancer, anti-inflammatory effects and neurodegenerative disorders in cell cultures and animal models. Hence, the present study was designed in order to explore the possible neuroprotective role of curcumin against rotenone induced cognitive impairment, oxidative and mitochondrial dysfunction in mice. Chronic administration of rotenone (1mg/kg i.p.) for a period of three weeks significantly impaired cognitive function (actophotometer, rotarod and open field test), oxidative defense (increased lipid peroxidation, nitrite concentration and decreased activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione level) and mitochondrial complex (II and III) enzymes activities as compared to normal control group. Three weeks of curcumin (50, 100 and 200mg/kg, p.o.) treatment significantly improved behavioral alterations, oxidative damage and mitochondrial enzyme complex activities as compared to negative control (rotenone treated) group. Curcumin treated mice also mitigated enhanced acetylcholine esterase enzyme level as compared to negative control group. We found that curcumin restored motor deficits and enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes suggesting its antioxidant potential in vivo. The findings of the present study conclude neuroprotective role of curcumin against rotenone induced Parkinson's in mice and offer strong justification for the therapeutic prospective of this compound in the management of PD. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Neuroprotective effect of Demethoxycurcumin, a natural derivative of Curcumin on rotenone induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY 5Y Neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, Muthu; Rajasankar, Srinivasagam; Gobi, Veerappan Venkatesh; Dhanalakshmi, Chinnasamy; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Justin Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Kalandar, Ameer; Chidambaram, Ranganathan

    2017-04-18

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are the main toxic events leading to dopaminergic neuronal death in Parkinson's disease (PD) and identified as vital objective for therapeutic intercession. This study investigated the neuro-protective effects of the demethoxycurcumin (DMC), a derivative of curcumin against rotenone induced neurotoxicity. SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells are divided into four experimental groups: untreated cells, cells incubated with rotenone (100 nM), cells treated with DMC (50 nM) + rotenone (100 nM) and DMC alone treated. 24 h after treatment with rotenone and 28 h after treatment with DMC, cell viability was assessed using the MTT assay, and levels of ROS and MMP, plus expression of apoptotic protein were analysed. Rotenone induced cell death in SH-SY5Y cells was significantly reduced by DMC pretreatment in a dose-dependent manner, indicating the potent neuroprotective effects of DMC. Rotenone treatment significantly increases the levels of ROS, loss of MMP, release of Cyt-c and expression of pro-apoptotic markers and decreases the expression of anti-apoptotic markers. Even though the results of the present study indicated that the DMC may serve as a potent therapeutic agent particularly for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases like PD, further pre-clinical and clinical studies are required.

  19. LC-MS/MS profiling and neuroprotective effects of Mentat® against transient global ischemia and reperfusion-induced brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanatha, Gollapalle Lakshminarayanashastry; Kumar, Lakkavalli Mohan Sharath; Rafiq, Mohamed; Kavya, Kethaganahalli Jayaramaiah; Thippeswamy, Agadi Hiremath; Yuvaraj, Huvvinamadu Chandrashekarappa; Azeemuddin, Mohammed; Anturlikar, Suryakanth Dattatreya; Patki, Pralhad Sadashiv; Babu, Uddagiri Venkanna; Ramakrishnan, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible beneficial effects of Mentat against transient global ischemia and reperfusion-induced brain injury in rats. The neuroprotective effects of Mentat were evaluated against transient global ischemia and reperfusion (I/R)-induced brain injury in rats. Various neurobehavioral and biochemical parameters were assessed, followed by morphologic and histopathologic evaluation of brain tissue to conclude the protective effect of Mentat. Additionally, in vitro antioxidant assays were performed to explore the antioxidant capacity of Mentat and detailed liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) profiling was carried out to identify the active phytoconstituents responsible for the protective effects of Mentat. Sixty minutes of transient global ischemia followed by 24 h reperfusion (I/R) caused significant alterations in the cognitive and neurologic functions in the ischemia control group (P cerebral infarct area (P protective effects. These findings suggest that Mentat is a neuroprotective agent that may be a useful adjunct in the management of ischemic stroke and its rehabilitation especially with respect to associated memory impairment and other related neurologic conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Serotonergic Hyperactivity as a Potential Factor in Developmental, Acquired and Drug-Induced Synesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berit eBrogaard

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Though synesthesia research has seen a huge growth in recent decades, and tremendous progress has been made in terms of understanding the mechanism and cause of synesthesia, we are still left mostly in the dark when it comes to the mechanistic commonalities (if any among developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia. We know that many forms of synesthesia involve aberrant structural or functional brain connectivity. Proposed mechanisms include direct projection and disinhibited feedback mechanisms, in which information from two otherwise structurally or functionally separate brain regions mix. We also know that synesthesia sometimes runs in families. However, it is unclear what causes its onset. Studies of psychedelic drugs, such as psilocybin, LSD and mescaline, reveal that exposure to these drugs can induce synesthesia. One neurotransmitter suspected to be central to the perceptual changes is serotonin. Excessive serotonin in the brain may cause many of the characteristics of psychedelic intoxication. Excessive serotonin levels may also play a role in synesthesia acquired after brain injury. In brain injury sudden cell death floods local brain regions with serotonin and glutamate. This neurotransmitter flooding could perhaps result in unusual feature binding. Finally, developmental synesthesia that occurs in individuals with autism may be a result of alterations in the serotonergic system, leading to a blockage of regular gating mechanisms. I conclude on these grounds that one commonality among at least some cases of acquired, developmental and drug-induced synesthesia may be the presence of excessive levels of serotonin, which increases the excitability and connectedness of sensory brain regions.

  1. Constraint-induced movement therapy for children with acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kristina Schmidt; Pallesen, Hanne; Kristensen, Hanne Kaae

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 125–137 Danish children with acquired brain injury (ABI) require rehabilitation annually, 30–40 of these at a highly specialized level. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) has shown significant effects in increasing function in children with cerebral palsy. More knowledge of how...... CIMT can be adapted for the rehabilitation of children with ABI is needed. The primary purpose of the study was to generate new knowledge about the pedagogical initiatives and frameworks involved in children’s participation in and activities during CIMT. Four children with ABI participated in the 60 h...

  2. Validation of ethnopharmacology of ayurvedic sarasvata ghrita and comparative evaluation of its neuroprotective effect with modern alcoholic and lipid based extracts in β-amyloid induced memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelar, Madhuri; Nanaware, Sadhana; Arulmozhi, S; Lohidasan, Sathiyanarayanan; Mahadik, Kakasaheb

    2018-06-12

    Sarasvata ghrita (SG), a polyherbal formulation from ayurveda, an ancient medicinal system of India, has been used to improve intelligence and memory, treat speech delay, speaking difficulties and low digestion power in children. Study aimed to validate the ethno use of SG in memory enhancement through systematic scientific protocol. The effect of SG and modern extracts of ingredients of SG was compared on cognitive function and neuroprotection in amyloid-β peptide 25-35(Aβ25-35) induced memory impairment in wistar rats. Further the underlying mechanism for neuroprotective activity was investigated. SG was prepared as per traditional method, ethanolic extract (EE) was prepared by conventional method and lipid based extract was prepared by modern extraction method. All extracts were standardised by newly developed HPLC method with respect to marker compounds. SG, EE and LE were administered orally to male Wistar rats at doses of 100,200 and 400 mg/kg Body Weight by feeding needle for a period of 21 days after the intracerebroventricular administration of Aβ25-35 bilaterally. Spatial memory of rats was tested using Morris water maze (MWM) and Radial arm maze (RAM) test. The possible underlying mechanisms for the cognitive improvement exhibited by SG, EE and LE was investigated through ex-vivo brain antioxidant effect, monoamine level estimation, acetylcholine esterase (AchE) inhibitory effect and Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) levels estimation. SG, EE and LE were analyzed by HPLC method, results showed that EE extract has high percent of selected phytoconstituents as compared with SG and LE. SG and LE decrease escape latency and searching distance in a dose dependant manner during MWM test. In case of RAM significant decrease in number of errors and increase in number of correct choices indicate an elevation in retention and recall aspects of learning and memory after administration of SG an LE. SG and LE extract can efficiently prevent accumulation of

  3. Neuroprotective effect of asiatic acid on rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis in differentiated SH-SYS5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, Jagatheesan; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Justin Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed

    2017-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease, manifested due to the loss of dopaminergic neurons, which ultimately leads to impaired movement in elderly populations. The pathogenesis of PD is associated with numerous factors including oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. There is no effective therapy available to cure or halt the progression of this disease still now. Asiatic acid (AA) is a triterpene extracted from Centella asiatica has been reported as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent, that offers neuroprotection against glutamate toxicity. Therefore, in this study, we have investigated the effect of AA in a rotenone (an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I) induced in vitro model of PD. Following the exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to rotenone, there was a marked overproduction of ROS, mitochondrial dysfunction (as indexed by the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential) and apoptosis (Hoechst and dual staining, comet assay; expressions of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic indices). Pre-treatment with AA reversed these changes might be due to its antioxidant, mitoprotective and anti-apoptotic properties. However further extensive studies on in vivo models of PD are warranted to prove AA neuroprotective effect before entering into the clinical trial.

  4. Neuroprotection comparison of chlorogenic acid and its metabolites against mechanistically distinct cell death-inducing agents in cultured cerebellar granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taram, Faten; Winter, Aimee N; Linseman, Daniel A

    2016-10-01

    While the number of patients diagnosed with neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease is increasing, there are currently no effective treatments that significantly limit the neuronal cell death underlying these diseases. Chlorogenic acid (CGA), a polyphenolic compound found in high concentration in coffee, is known to possess antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of CGA and its major metabolites in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule neurons. We show that CGA and caffeic acid displayed a dramatic protective effect against the nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside. In marked contrast, ferulic acid and quinic acid had no protective effect against this nitrosative stress. While CGA and quinic acid had no protective effect against glutamate-induced cell death, caffeic acid and ferulic acid significantly protected neurons from excitotoxicity. Finally, caffeic acid was the only compound to display significant protective activity against hydrogen peroxide, proteasome inhibition, caspase-dependent intrinsic apoptosis, and endoplasmic reticulum stress. These results indicate that caffeic acid displays a much broader profile of neuroprotection against a diverse range of stressors than its parent polyphenol, CGA, or the other major metabolites, ferulic acid and quinic acid. We conclude that caffeic acid is a promising candidate for testing in pre-clinical models of neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetics but not MAP kinase inhibitors are neuroprotective against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced neuronal death in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Miou; Dominguez, Reymundo; Baudry, Michel

    2007-12-01

    Although oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) has been widely used as a model of ischemic brain damage, the mechanisms underlying acute neuronal death in this model are not yet well understood. We used OGD in acute hippocampal slices to investigate the roles of reactive oxygen species and of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in neuronal death. In particular, we tested the neuroprotective effects of two synthetic superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetics, EUK-189 and EUK-207. Acute hippocampal slices prepared from 2-month-old or postnatal day 10 rats were exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation for 2 h followed by 2.5 h reoxygenation. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release in the medium and propidium iodide (PI) uptake were used to evaluate cell viability. EUK-189 or EUK-207 applied during the OGD and reoxygenation periods decreased LDH release and PI uptake in slices from 2-month-old rats. EUK-189 or EUK-207 also partly blocked OGD-induced ATP depletion and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) dephosphorylation, and completely eliminated reactive oxygen species generation. The MEK inhibitor U0126 applied together with EUK-189 or EUK-207 completely blocked ERK1/2 activation, but had no effect on their protective effects against OGD-induced LDH release. U0126 alone had no effect on OGD-induced LDH release. EUK-207 had no effect on OGD-induced p38 or c-Jun N-terminal kinase dephosphorylation, and when the p38 inhibitor SB203580 was applied together with EUK-207, it had no effect on the protective effects of EUK-207. SB203580 alone had no effect on OGD-induced LDH release either. In slices from p10 rats, OGD also induced high-LDH release that was partly reversed by EUK-207; however, neither OGD nor EUK-207 produced significant changes in ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation. OGD-induced spectrin degradation was not modified by EUK-189 or EUK-207 in slices from p10 or 2-month-old rats, suggesting that their protective effects was not mediated through

  6. Neuroprotective Effects of a Standardized Flavonoid Extract from Safflower against a Rotenone-Induced Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuramatjan Ablat

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a major age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra par compacta (SNpc. Rotenone is a neurotoxin that is routinely used to model PD to aid in understanding the mechanisms of neuronal death. Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius. L. has long been used to treat cerebrovascular diseases in China. This plant contains flavonoids, which have been reported to be effective in models of neurodegenerative disease. We previously reported that kaempferol derivatives from safflower could bind DJ-1, a protein associated with PD, and that a flavonoid extract from safflower exhibited neuroprotective effects in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced mouse model of PD. In this study, a standardized safflower flavonoid extract (SAFE was isolated from safflower and found to primarily contain flavonoids. The aim of the current study was to confirm the neuroprotective effects of SAFE in rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. The results showed that SAFE treatment increased body weight and improved rearing behavior and grip strength. SAFE (35 or 70 mg/kg/day treatment reversed the decreased protein expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine transporter and DJ-1 and increased the levels of dopamine and its metabolite. In contrast, acetylcholine levels were decreased. SAFE treatment also led to partial inhibition of PD-associated changes in extracellular space diffusion parameters. These changes were detected using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI tracer-based method, which provides novel information regarding neuronal loss and astrocyte activation. Thus, our results indicate that SAFE represents a potential therapeutic herbal treatment for PD.

  7. The role of trophic factors and inflammatory processes in physical activity-induced neuroprotection in Parkinson’s disease

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    Ewelina Pałasz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Glial cells and neurotrophins play an important role in maintaining homeostasis of the CNS. Disturbances of their function can lead to a number of nervous system diseases, including Parkinson’s disease (PD. Current clinical studies provide evidence that moderate physical activity adapted to the health status of PD patients can support pharmacological treatment, slow down the onset of motor impairments, and extend the patients period of independence. Physical activity, by stimulating the production and release of endogenous trophic factors, prevents the neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons via inhibition of inflammatory processes and the reduction of oxidative stress. The aim of this study is to present the current state of knowledge for the anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties of physical activity as a supportive therapy in Parkinson’s disease.

  8. Histological studies of neuroprotective effects of Curcuma longa Linn. on neuronal loss induced by dexamethasone treatment in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issuriya, Acharaporn; Kumarnsit, Ekkasit; Wattanapiromsakul, Chatchai; Vongvatcharanon, Uraporn

    2014-10-01

    Long term exposure to dexamethasone (Dx) is associated with brain damage especially in the hippocampus via the oxidative stress pathway. Previously, an ethanolic extract from Curcuma longa Linn. (CL) containing the curcumin constituent has been reported to produce antioxidant effects. However, its neuroprotective property on brain histology has remained unexplored. This study has examined the effects of a CL extract on the densities of cresyl violet positive neurons and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactive (GFAP-ir) astrocytes in the hippocampus of Dx treated male rats. It showed that 21 days of Dx treatment (0.5mg/kg, i.p. once daily) significantly reduced the densities of cresyl violet positive neurons in the sub-areas CA1, CA3 and the dentate gyrus, but not in the CA2 area. However, CL pretreatment (100mg/kg, p.o.) was found to significantly restore neuronal densities in the CA1 and dentate gyrus. In addition, Dx treatment also significantly decreased the densities of the GFAP-ir astrocytes in the sub-areas CA1, CA3 and the dentate gyrus. However, CL pretreatment (100mg/kg, p.o.) failed to protect the loss of astrocytes in these sub-areas. These findings confirm the neuroprotective effects of the CL extract and indicate that the cause of astrocyte loss might be partially reduced by a non-oxidative mechanism. Moreover, the detection of neuronal and glial densities was suitable method to study brain damage and the effects of treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Prolactin-induced neuroprotection against glutamate excitotoxicity is mediated by the reduction of [Ca2+]i overload and NF-κB activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-Segura, Nadia A.; Flores-Soto, Edgar; García de la Cadena, Selene; Coronado-Mares, Isabel; Gomez-Verjan, Juan C.; Ferreira, Diana G.; Cabrera-Reyes, Erika Alejandra; Lopes, Luísa V.; Massieu, Lourdes

    2017-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a peptidic hormone that displays pleiotropic functions in the organism including different actions in the brain. PRL exerts a neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity produced by glutamate (Glu) or kainic acid in both in vitro and in vivo models. It is well known that Glu excitotoxicity causes cell death through apoptotic or necrotic pathways due to intracellular calcium ([Ca2+] i) overload. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess the molecular mechanisms by which PRL maintains cellular viability of primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons exposed to Glu excitotoxicity. We determined cell viability by monitoring mitochondrial activity and using fluorescent markers for viable and dead cells. The intracellular calcium level was determined by a fluorometric assay and proteins involved in the apoptotic pathway were determined by immunoblot. Our results demonstrated that PRL afforded neuroprotection against Glu excitotoxicity, as evidenced by a decrease in propidium iodide staining and by the decrease of the LDH activity. In addition, the MTT assay shows that PRL maintains normal mitochondrial activity even in neurons exposed to Glu. Furthermore, the Glu-induced intracellular [Ca2+]i overload was attenuated by PRL. These data correlate with the reduction found in the level of active caspase-3 and the pro-apoptotic ratio (Bax/Bcl-2). Concomitantly, PRL elicited the nuclear translocation of the transcriptional factor NF-κB, which was detected by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that PRL prevents Glu excitotoxicity by a mechanism involving the restoration of the intracellular calcium homeostasis and mitochondrial activity, as well as an anti-apoptotic action possibly mediated by the activity of NF-κB. Overall, the current results suggest that PRL could be of potential therapeutic advantage in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28475602

  10. The neuroprotection of cannabidiol against MPP⁺-induced toxicity in PC12 cells involves trkA receptors, upregulation of axonal and synaptic proteins, neuritogenesis, and might be relevant to Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Neife Aparecida Guinaim; Martins, Nádia Maria; Sisti, Flávia Malvestio; Fernandes, Laís Silva; Ferreira, Rafaela Scalco; Queiroz, Regina Helena Costa; Santos, Antônio Cardozo

    2015-12-25

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa with potential to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Its neuroprotection has been mainly associated with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant events; however, other mechanisms might be involved. We investigated the involvement of neuritogenesis, NGF receptors (trkA), NGF, and neuronal proteins in the mechanism of neuroprotection of CBD against MPP(+) toxicity in PC12 cells. CBD increased cell viability, differentiation, and the expression of axonal (GAP-43) and synaptic (synaptophysin and synapsin I) proteins. Its neuritogenic effect was not dependent or additive to NGF, but it was inhibited by K252a (trkA inhibitor). CBD did not increase the expression of NGF, but protected against its decrease induced by MPP(+), probably by an indirect mechanism. We also evaluated the neuritogenesis in SH-SY5Y cells, which do not express trkA receptors. CBD did not induce neuritogenesis in this cellular model, which supports the involvement of trkA receptors. This is the first study to report the involvement of neuronal proteins and trkA in the neuroprotection of CBD. Our findings suggest that CBD has a neurorestorative potential independent of NGF that might contribute to its neuroprotection against MPP(+), a neurotoxin relevant to Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Neuroprotective effects of anticonvulsants in rat hippocampal slice cultures exposed to oxygen/glucose deprivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, Jens C

    2003-01-01

    cell death induced by OGD. The newer anticonvulsants carbamazepine, felbamate, lamotrigine, tiagabine, and oxcarbazepine also had significant neuroprotective effects, but gabapentin, valproic acid (10 mM), levetiracetam and retigabine were not neuroprotective at a concentration up to 300 micro...

  12. Neuroprotective potential of quercetin in combination with piperine against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsher Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available 1-Methy-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP is a neurotoxin that selectively damages dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and induces Parkinson's like symptoms in rodents. Quercetin (QC is a natural polyphenolic bioflavonoid with potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties but lacks of clinical attraction due to low oral bioavailability. Piperine is a well established bioavailability enhancer used pre-clinically to improve the bioavailability of antioxidants (e.g., Quercetin. Therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective potential of QC together with piperine against MPTP-induced neurotoxicity in rats. MPTP (100 μg/μL/rat, bilaterally was injected intranigrally on days 1, 4 and 7 using a digital stereotaxic apparatus. QC (25 and 50 mg/kg, intragastrically and QC (25 mg/kg, intragastrically in combination with piperine (2.5 mg/kg, intragastrically were administered daily for 14 days starting from day 8 after the 3rd injection of MPTP. On day 22, animals were sacrificed and the striatum was isolated for oxidative stress parameter (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, nitrite and glutathione, neuroinflammatory cytokine (interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α and neurotransmitter (dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, homovanillic acid, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid evaluations. Bilateral infusion of MPTP into substantia nigra pars compacta led to significant motor deficits as evidenced by impairments in locomotor activity and rotarod performance in open field test and grip strength and narrow beam walk performance. Both QC (25 and 50 mg/kg and QC (25 mg/kg in combination with piperine (2.5 mg/kg, in particular the combination therapy, significantly improved MPTP-induced behavioral abnormalities in rats, reversed the abnormal alterations of neurotransmitters in the striatum, and alleviated

  13. Cudarflavone B Provides Neuroprotection against Glutamate-Induced Mouse Hippocampal HT22 Cell Damage through the Nrf2 and PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathways

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    Dong-Sung Lee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative cell damage contributes to neuronal degeneration in many central nervous system (CNS diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and ischemia. Nrf2 signaling-mediated heme oxygenase (HO-1 expression acts against oxidants that are thought to play a key role in the pathogenesis of neuronal diseases. Cudraflavone B is a prenylated flavone isolated from C. tricuspidata which has shown anti-proliferative activity, mouse brain monoamine oxidase (MAO inhibitory effects, apoptotic actions in human gastric carcinoma cells and mouse melanoma cells, and hepatoprotective activity. In this study, cudraflavone B showed neuroprotective effects and reactive oxygen species (ROS inhibition against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity by inducing the expression of HO-1 in mouse hippocampal HT22 cells. Furthermore, cudraflavone B caused the nuclear accumulation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 and increased the promoter activity of antioxidant response elements (ARE in mouse hippocampal HT22 cells. In addition, we found that the Nrf2-midiated HO-1 expression by cudraflavone B is involved in the cell protective response and ROS reductions, and cudraflavone B-induced expression of HO-1 was mediated through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathway in HT22 cells. Our results demonstrated the potential application of naturally occurring cudraflavone B as a therapeutic agent from neurodegenerative disease.

  14. PI3K/Akt/GSK3β induced CREB activation ameliorates arsenic mediated alterations in NMDA receptors and associated signaling in rat hippocampus: Neuroprotective role of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Pranay; Dhuriya, Yogesh K; Kumar, Vivek; Srivastava, Akriti; Gupta, Richa; Shukla, Rajendra K; Yadav, Rajesh S; Dwivedi, Hari N; Pant, Aditya B; Khanna, Vinay K

    2018-04-30

    Protective efficacy of curcumin in arsenic induced NMDA receptor dysfunctions and PI3K/Akt/ GSK3β signalling in hippocampus has been investigated in vivo and in vitro. Exposure to sodium arsenite (in vivo - 20 mg/kg, body weight p.o. for 28 days; in vitro - 10 μM for 24 h) and curcumin (in vivo - 100 mg/kg body weight p.o. for 28 days; in vitro - 20 μM for 24 h) was carried out alone or simultaneously. Treatment with curcumin ameliorated sodium arsenite induced alterations in the levels of NMDA receptors, its receptor subunits and synaptic proteins - pCaMKIIα, PSD-95 and SynGAP both in vivo and in vitro. Decreased levels of BDNF, pAkt, pERK1/2, pGSK3β and pCREB on sodium arsenite exposure were also protected by curcumin. Curcumin was found to decrease sodium arsenite induced changes in hippocampus by modulating PI3K/Akt/GSK3β neuronal survival pathway, known to regulate various cellular events. Treatment of hippocampal cultures with pharmacological inhibitors for ERK1/2, GSK3β and Akt individually inhibited levels of CREB and proteins associated with PI3K/Akt/GSK3β pathway. Simultaneous treatment with curcumin was found to improve sodium arsenite induced learning and memory deficits in rats assessed by water maze and Y-maze. The results provide evidence that curcumin exercises its neuroprotective effect involving PI3K/Akt pathway which may affect NMDA receptors and downstream signalling through TrKβ and BDNF in arsenic induced cognitive deficits in hippocampus. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Inhibition of the prostaglandin EP2 receptor is neuroprotective and accelerates functional recovery in a rat model of organophosphorus induced status epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Asheebo; Ganesh, Thota; Lelutiu, Nadia; Gueorguieva, Paoula; Dingledine, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high levels of organophosphorus compounds (OP) can induce status epilepticus (SE) in humans and rodents via acute cholinergic toxicity, leading to neurodegeneration and brain inflammation. Currently there is no treatment to combat the neuropathologies associated with OP exposure. We recently demonstrated that inhibition of the EP2 receptor for PGE2 reduces neuronal injury in mice following pilocarpine-induced SE. Here, we investigated the therapeutic effects of an EP2 inhibitor (TG6-10-1) in a rat model of SE using diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP). We tested the hypothesis that EP2 receptor inhibition initiated well after the onset of DFP-induced SE reduces the associated neuropathologies. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with pyridostigmine bromide (0.1 mg/kg, sc) and atropine methylbromide (20 mg/kg, sc) followed by DFP (9.5 mg/kg, ip) to induce SE. DFP administration resulted in prolonged upregulation of COX-2. The rats were administered TG6-10-1 or vehicle (ip) at various time points relative to DFP exposure. Treatment with TG6-10-1 or vehicle did not alter the observed behavioral seizures, however six doses of TG6-10-1 starting 80-150 min after the onset of DFP-induced SE significantly reduced neurodegeneration in the hippocampus, blunted the inflammatory cytokine burst, reduced microglial activation and decreased weight loss in the days after status epilepticus. By contrast, astrogliosis was unaffected by EP2 inhibition 4 d after DFP. Transient treatments with the EP2 antagonist 1 h before DFP, or beginning 4 h after DFP, were ineffective. Delayed mortality, which was low (10%) after DFP, was unaffected by TG6-10-1. Thus, selective inhibition of the EP2 receptor within a time window that coincides with the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 by DFP is neuroprotective and accelerates functional recovery of rats. PMID:25656476

  16. Anticonvulsant, neuroprotective and behavioral effects of organic and conventional yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis St. Hil.) on pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Cátia Dos Santos; Scola, Gustavo; Rodrigues, Adriana Dalpicolli; Cesio, Verónica; Laprovitera, Mariajosé; Heinzen, Horacio; Dos Santos, Maitê Telles; Fank, Bruna; de Freitas, Suzana Cesa Vieira; Coitinho, Adriana Simon; Salvador, Mirian

    2013-03-01

    Epilepsy, which is one of the most common neurological disorders, involves the occurrence of spontaneous and recurrent seizures that alter the performance of the brain and affect several sensory and behavioral functions. Oxidative damage has been associated with post-seizure neuronal injury, thereby increasing an individual's susceptibility to the occurrence of neurodegenerative disorders. The present study investigated the possible anticonvulsive and neuroprotective effects of organic and conventional yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis), a plant rich in polyphenols, on pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures in Wistar rats. The behavioral and polyphenolic profiles of the yerba mate samples were also evaluated. Infusions of yerba mate (50mg/kg) or distilled water were given to rats for fifteen days by oral gavage. On the 15th day the animals were subjected to open field test, and exploratory behavior was assessed. Subsequently, 60mg/kg PTZ (i.p.) was administered, and animals were observed for the appearance of convulsions for 30min. Latency for the first seizure, tonic-clonic and generalized seizures time, frequency of seizures and mortality induced by PTZ were recorded. The animals were then sacrificed, and the cerebellum, cerebral cortex and hippocampus were quickly removed and frozen to study the neuroprotective effects of yerba mate. The oxidative damage in lipids and proteins, nitric oxide levels, the activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (Sod) and catalase (Cat) and non-enzymatic cellular defense (sulfhydryl protein) were quantified in all the tissues. The results showed that organic and conventional yerba mate infusions were able to reduce the frequency of seizures when compared to the PTZ group. Besides, organic yerba mate infusion decreases the tonic-clonic seizures time in relation to the PTZ group. It was also shown that organic and conventional yerba mate infusions reduced the oxidative damage in lipids and proteins and nitric oxide

  17. An investigation of the neuroprotective effects of Curcumin in a model of Homocysteine - induced oxidative stress in the rat’s brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ataie

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available "n  "nBackground and the purpose of the study: Aging is the major risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases and oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of them. Oxidative stress can induce neuronal damages and modulate intracellular signaling, ultimately leading to neuronal death by apoptosis or necrosis. In this study, the possible antioxidant and neuroprotective properties of the natural polyphenolic antioxidant compound, curcumin against homocysteine (Hcy neurotoxicity was investigated. "nMethods: Curcumin (5, 15, 45 mg/kg was injected intraperitonealy (i.p. once daily for a period of 10 days beginning 5 days prior to Hcy (0.2 μmol/μl intracerebroventricular (i.c.v injection in rats. Biochemical and behavioral studies, including passive avoidance learning and locomotor activity tests were studied 24 hrs after the last curcumin or its vehicle injection. The cell density of hippocampus layers and apoptosis in rats' hippocampi by immunohistochical methods were also studied. Results and major conclusion:Results indicated that Hcy could induce lipid peroxidation and increase Malondialdehyde (MDA and Super Oxide Anion (SOA levels in rat's brain.Additionally, Hcy impaired memory retention in passive avoidance learning test. However, curcumin decreased MDA and SOA levels significantly and improved learning and memory in rats. On the other hand Hcy could induce cell death and apoptosis in rats' hippocampi which was inhibited by curcumin. These results suggest that Hcy may induce lipid peroxidation in rat's brain. and polyphenol treatment (curcumin improves learning and memory deficits by protecting the nervous system against Oxidative stress.

  18. Pioglitazone Confers Neuroprotection Against Ischemia-Induced Pyroptosis due to its Inhibitory Effects on HMGB-1/RAGE and Rac1/ROS Pathway by Activating PPAR-ɤ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingping Xia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Recent researches highlighted the protective potential of pioglitazone, a PPAR-γ agonist, in the progression of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, there has been no study on the application of pioglitazone in treating ischemic stroke through mechanisms involving pyroptosis. Methods: The cerebral injury was established by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO. in vitro ischemia in primary cultured astrocytes was induced by the oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD. ELISA and Western Blot analysis were employed to the levels of PPAR-γ, pyroptosis-related biomarkers and cytoplasmic translocation of HMGB-1 and RAGE expression as well as Rac1 activity, respectively. Results: We demonstrated that repeated intraperitoneal administration of pioglitazone remarkably reduced the infarct volume, improved neurological deficits and suppressed the Rac1 activity with significant reduction of excessive ROS in rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO. Moreover, pioglitazone alleviated the up-regulation of pyroptosis-related biomarkers and the increased cytoplasmic translocation of HMGB-1 and RAGE expression in cerebral penumbra cortex. Similarly, the protective effects of pioglitazone on cultured astrocytes were characterized by reduced Rac1 activity, pyroptosis related protein expressions and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release. However, these protective effects of pioglitazone were neutralized with the use of GW9662, a PPAR-γ inhibitor. Interestingly, Rac1 knockdown in lentivirus with the Rac1 small hair RNA (shRNA could inhibit the OGD-induced pyroptosis of primary cultured astrocytes. Furthermore, the combination of Rac1-shRNA and pioglitazone can further strengthen the inhibitory effects on pyroptosis induced by OGD. Conclusion: The neuroprotection of pioglitazone was attributable to the alleviated ischemia/hypoxia-induced pyroptosis and was also associated with the PPARγ-mediated suppression of HGMB-1/RAGE signaling

  19. Pioglitazone Confers Neuroprotection Against Ischemia-Induced Pyroptosis due to its Inhibitory Effects on HMGB-1/RAGE and Rac1/ROS Pathway by Activating PPAR-ɤ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Pingping; Pan, Yundan; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Na; Wang, E; Guo, Qulian; Ye, Zhi

    2018-01-01

    Recent researches highlighted the protective potential of pioglitazone, a PPAR-γ agonist, in the progression of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, there has been no study on the application of pioglitazone in treating ischemic stroke through mechanisms involving pyroptosis. The cerebral injury was established by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). in vitro ischemia in primary cultured astrocytes was induced by the oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). ELISA and Western Blot analysis were employed to the levels of PPAR-γ, pyroptosis-related biomarkers and cytoplasmic translocation of HMGB-1 and RAGE expression as well as Rac1 activity, respectively. We demonstrated that repeated intraperitoneal administration of pioglitazone remarkably reduced the infarct volume, improved neurological deficits and suppressed the Rac1 activity with significant reduction of excessive ROS in rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Moreover, pioglitazone alleviated the up-regulation of pyroptosis-related biomarkers and the increased cytoplasmic translocation of HMGB-1 and RAGE expression in cerebral penumbra cortex. Similarly, the protective effects of pioglitazone on cultured astrocytes were characterized by reduced Rac1 activity, pyroptosis related protein expressions and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. However, these protective effects of pioglitazone were neutralized with the use of GW9662, a PPAR-γ inhibitor. Interestingly, Rac1 knockdown in lentivirus with the Rac1 small hair RNA (shRNA) could inhibit the OGD-induced pyroptosis of primary cultured astrocytes. Furthermore, the combination of Rac1-shRNA and pioglitazone can further strengthen the inhibitory effects on pyroptosis induced by OGD. The neuroprotection of pioglitazone was attributable to the alleviated ischemia/hypoxia-induced pyroptosis and was also associated with the PPARγ-mediated suppression of HGMB-1/RAGE signaling pathway. Moreover, the inhibition of Rac1 promoted this function

  20. Occupationally-acquired noise-induced hearing loss: a senseless workplace hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurmis, Andrew P; Apps, Stacey A

    2007-01-01

    Occupational noise-induced hearing loss (ONIHL) describes an acquired hearing deficiency directly attributable to excessive workplace noise exposure. Data suggest that excessive noise attributes to approximately 37% of all adult causes of hearing loss and remains a significant contributor to employment-related morbidity internationally. Typically insidiously-acquired, often without frank progressive symptomatology, regional medical agencies continue to struggle with this potentially debilitating condition. The aim of the study was to provide a synopsis of the current understanding of ONIHL, its impact on individual workers and the wider international community, and to identify barriers to more uniform adoption of personal hearing protection. A review of the contemporary literature was performed using defined keyword searches and OVID, PubMed, and Google Scholar as primary electronic search engines. A number of published works were identified, describing aspects of the relationship between workplace-related noise exposure and subsequent development of employee hearing impairment, which demonstrate an overwhelming gender imbalance, with up to 97% of affected individuals being male. Industry-specific associations (e.g., mining, manufacturing and heavy construction) were well documented, as were links to toxin-specific exposures, in the recognized development of hearing loss. However, evidence of integration of appraisal of the topically-current area of genetic susceptibility was often lacking. Much discordance still exists among international agencies in the prescriptive regulation and enforcement of "safe" exposure limits. Despite a high level of public awareness regarding the importance of hearing preservation and increasingly stringent international occupational health, safety and welfare requirements mandating provision of safer work environments, ONIHL continues to be a significant occupational hazard. ONIHL is permanent and may cause significant disability, for

  1. Neuroprotection by flavonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dajas F.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The high morbidity, high socioeconomic costs and lack of specific treatments are key factors that define the relevance of brain pathology for human health and the importance of research on neuronal protective agents. Epidemiological studies have shown beneficial effects of flavonoids on arteriosclerosis-related pathology in general and neurodegeneration in particular. Flavonoids can protect the brain by their ability to modulate intracellular signals promoting cellular survival. Quercetin and structurally related flavonoids (myricetin, fisetin, luteolin showed a marked cytoprotective capacity in in vitro experimental conditions in models of predominantly apoptotic death such as that induced by medium concentrations (200 µM of H2O2 added to PC12 cells in culture. Nevertheless, quercetin did not protect substantia nigra neurons in vivo from an oxidative insult (6-hydroxydopamine, probably due to difficulties in crossing the blood-brain barrier. On the other hand, treatment of permanent focal ischemia with a lecithin/quercetin preparation decreased lesion volume, showing that preparations that help to cross the blood-brain barrier may be critical for the expression of the effects of flavonoids on the brain. The hypothesis is advanced that a group of quercetin-related flavonoids could become lead molecules for the development of neuroprotective compounds with multitarget anti-ischemic effects.

  2. [Neuroprotective effects of curcumin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Wang, Pengwen

    2009-12-01

    Traditionally, turmeric has been put to use as a food additive and herbal medicine in Asia. Curcumin is an active principle of the perennial herb curcuma longa (commonly known as turmeric). Recent evidence suggests that curcumin has activities with potential for neuroprotective efficacy, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiprotein-aggregate activities. In the current review, we provide the newly evidence for the potential role of curcumin in the neuroprotective effects of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD).

  3. In vitro neuroprotective potential of four medicinal plants against rotenone-induced toxicity in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoposengwe, Keabetswe; van Tonder, Jacob John; Steenkamp, Vanessa

    2013-12-12

    Lannea schweinfurthii, Zanthoxylum capense, Scadoxus puniceus and Crinum bulbispermum are used traditionally to treat neurological disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytoprotective potential of the four plants, after induction of toxicity using rotenone, in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Cytotoxicity of the plant extracts and rotenone was assessed using the sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. Fluorometry was used to measure intracellular redox state (reactive oxygen species (ROS) and intracellular glutathione content), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and caspase-3 activity, as a marker of apoptotic cell death. Of the tested plants, the methanol extract of Z. capense was the least cytotoxic; LC50 121.3 ± 6.97 μg/ml, while S. puniceus methanol extract was the most cytotoxic; LC50 20.75 ± 1.47 μg/ml. Rotenone reduced intracellular ROS levels after 24 h exposure. Pre-treating cells with S. puniceus and C. bulbispermum extracts reversed the effects of rotenone on intracellular ROS levels. Rotenone exposure also decreased intracellular glutathione levels, which was counteracted by pre-treatment with any one of the extracts. MMP was reduced by rotenone, which was neutralized by pre-treatment with C. bulbispermum ethyl acetate extract. All extracts inhibited rotenone-induced activation of caspase-3. The studied plants demonstrated anti-apoptotic activity and restored intracellular glutathione content following rotenone treatment, suggesting that they may possess neuroprotective properties.

  4. Neuroprotective effects of orientin on oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion-induced cell injury in primary culture of rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Zeng, Junan; Zhao, Guangyu; Zhao, Wenjing; Gao, Songyi; Liu, Li

    2018-01-01

    together, these results demonstrated that orientin has significant neuroprotective effects against OGD/RP-induced cell injury via JNK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in primary culture of rat cortical neurons. Impact statement Orientin has been used in traditional eastern medicine and reported to possess antioxidant properties. However, the effects of orientin on neonatal ischemic brain injury and the underlying mechanisms involved have not been studied. Our results showed that orientin exerts significant neuroprotective effects on cell injury caused by oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion via the JNK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in primary culture of rat cortical neurons, implying the potential therapeutic application of orientin via the suppression of oxidative stress and cell apoptosis. This research suggested that orientin may be used as a therapeutic and preventive option for newborn cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  5. Neuroprotective effects of curcumin and highly bioavailable curcumin on oxidative stress induced by sodium nitroprusside in rat striatal cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Qand Agha; Kume, Toshiaki; Izuo, Naotaka; Takada-Takatori, Yuki; Imaizumi, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Tadashi; Izumi, Yasuhiko; Akaike, Akinori

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin, a polyphenolic compound extracted from Curcuma longa, has several pharmacological activities such as anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of curcumin and THERACURMIN, a highly bioavailable curcumin, against sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced oxidative damage in primary striatal cell culture. THERACURMIN as well as curcumin significantly prevented SNP-induced cytotoxicity. To elucidate the cytoprotective effects of curcumin and THERACURMIN, we measured the intracellular glutathione level in striatal cells. Curcumin and THERACURMIN significantly elevated the glutathione level, which was decreased by treatment with SNP. Moreover, curcumin showed potent 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging ability. Finally, a ferrozine assay showed that curcumin (10-100 µg/mL) has potent Fe(2+)-chelating ability. These results suggest that curcumin and THERACURMIN exert potent protective effects against SNP-induced cytotoxicity by free radical-scavenging and iron-chelating activities.

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor exerts neuroprotective actions against amyloid β-induced apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    KIM, JIN HEE

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brains demonstrate decreased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and increased levels of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ), which is neurotoxic. The present study assessed the impact of BDNF on the toxic effects of Aβ25–35-induced apoptosis and the effects on BDNF-mediated signaling using the MTT assay, western blotting and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Aβ25–35 was found to induce an apoptosis, dose-dependent effect on SH-SY5Y neuro...

  7. Neuroprotective effect of paeonol against isofluraneinduced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate whether paeonol affords neuroprotection against isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity. Methods: Separate groups of neonatal rat pups were administered paeonol (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg) from post-natal day 3 (P3) to post-natal day 15. On post-natal day 7, the pups were exposed to 6 h of isoflurane (0.75 ...

  8. Neuroprotection in glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Doozandeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a degenerative optic neuropathy characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC loss and visual field defects. It is known that in some glaucoma patients, death of RGCs continues despite intraocular pressure (IOP reduction. Neuroprotection in the field of glaucoma is defined as any treatment, independent of IOP reduction, which prevents RGC death. Glutamate antagonists, ginkgo biloba extract, neurotrophic factors, antioxidants, calcium channel blockers, brimonidine, glaucoma medications with blood regulatory effect and nitric oxide synthase inhibitors are among compounds with possible neuroprotective activity in preclinical studies. A few agents (such as brimonidine or memantine with neuroprotective effects in experimental studies have advanced to clinical trials; however the results of clinical trials for these agents have not been conclusive. Nevertheless, lack of compelling clinical evidence has not prevented the off-label use of some of these compounds in glaucoma practice. Stem cell transplantation has been reported to halt experimental neurodegenerative disease processes in the absence of cell replacement. It has been hypothesized that transplantation of some types of stem cells activates multiple neuroprotective pathways via secretion of various factors. The advantage of this approach is a prolonged and targeted effect. Important concerns in this field include the secretion of unwanted harmful mediators, graft survival issues and tumorigenesis. Neuroprotection in glaucoma, pharmacologically or by stem cell transplantation, is an interesting subject waiting for broad and multidisciplinary collaborative studies to better clarify its role in clinical practice.

  9. Topiramate via NMDA, AMPA/kainate, GABAA and Alpha2 receptors and by modulation of CREB/BDNF and Akt/GSK3 signaling pathway exerts neuroprotective effects against methylphenidate-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Motevalian, Manijeh; Fatima, Sulail; Beiranvand, Tabassom; Mozaffari, Shiva

    2017-11-01

    Chronic abuse of methylphenidate (MPH) often causes neuronal cell death. Topiramate (TPM) carries neuroprotective effects, but its exact mechanism of action remains unclear. In the present study, the role of various doses of TPM and its possible mechanisms, receptors and signaling pathways involved against MPH-induced hippocampal neurodegeneration were evaluated in vivo. Thus, domoic acid (DOM) was used as AMPA/kainate receptor agonist, bicuculline (BIC) as GABA A receptor antagonist, ketamine (KET) as NMDA receptor antagonist, yohimbine (YOH) as α 2 adrenergic receptor antagonist and haloperidol (HAL) was used as dopamine D 2 receptor antagonist. Open field test (OFT) was used to investigate the disturbances in motor activity. Hippocampal neurodegenerative parameters were evaluated. Protein expressions of CREB/BDNF and Akt/GSK3 signaling pathways were also evaluated. Cresyl violet staining was performed to show and confirm the changes in the shape of the cells. TPM (70 and 100 mg/kg) reduced MPH-induced rise in lipid peroxidation, oxidized form of glutathione (GSSG), IL-1β and TNF-α levels, Bax expression and motor activity disturbances. In addition, TPM treatment increased Bcl-2 expression, the level of reduced form of glutathione (GSH) and the levels and activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase enzymes. TPM also inhibited MPH-induced hippocampal degeneration. Pretreatment of animals with DOM, BIC, KET and YOH inhibited TPM-induced neuroprotection and increased oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, neuroapoptosis and neurodegeneration while reducing CREB, BDNF and Akt protein expressions. Also pretreatment with DOM, BIC, KET and YOH inhibited TPM-induced decreases in GSK3. It can be concluded that the mentioned receptors by modulation of CREB/BDNF and Akt/GSK3 pathways, are involved in neuroprotection of TPM against MPH-induced neurodegeneration.

  10. Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effect of (S)-3,4-dicarboxyphenylglycine against seizures induced in immature rats by homocysteic acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Druga, Rastislav; Haugvicová, Renata; Mareš, Pavel; Otáhal, Jakub

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 4 (2008), s. 665-675 ISSN 0028-3908 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/02/1238; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/05/2015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : DL-homocysteic acid induced seizures * mGluR8 agonist (S)-3,4-DCPG * protection Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.383, year: 2008

  11. Enhanced neuroprotective efficacy of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells co-overexpressing BDNF and VEGF in a rat model of cardiac arrest-induced global cerebral ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lili; Lin, Qingming; Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Leong, Kahong; Tan, Zhiqun; Huang, Zitong

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac arrest-induced global cerebral ischemia injury (CA-GCII) usually leads to a poor neurological outcome without an effective treatment. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) may provide a potential cell-based therapy against neurologic disorders through induction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). To optimize the neuroprotective efficacy of BMMSCs further, in this study we have derived BMMSCs, which co-overexpress both BDNF and VEGF, and tested them for the treatment of CA-GCII in a rat model. Lentiviruses that express rat BDNF exon IV or VEGF-A were created using the bicistronic shuttle vectors of pLVX-IRES-ZsGreen1 and pLVX-IRES-tdTomato, respectively. BMMSCs that were co-transduced with the engineered lentiviruses with co-overexpression of both BDNF and VEGF along with corresponding fluorescent protein reporters were injected via jugular vein of rats that just recovered from a cardiac arrest. Animals were then scored for neurofunctional deficits and examined for brain pathology and gene expression relevant to the engraftment seven days after the treatments. We demonstrate that anchorage of lentiviral vector-transduced BMMSCs, which co-overexpressed both BDNF and VEGF in the hippocampus and temporal cortex along with significantly ameliorated brain pathology and improved neurofunctional performance in CA-GCII rats after transplantation. These findings provide a proof of concept for the further validation of engineered BMMSCs for the treatment of CA-GCII patients in clinical practice in the future. PMID:28492549

  12. Neuroprotective effects of edaravone on cognitive deficit, oxidative stress and tau hyperphosphorylation induced by intracerebroventricular streptozotocin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shanshan; Yu, Guichun; Chi, Lijun; Zhu, Jiwei; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Liming

    2013-09-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated as an important factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we have investigated the effects of edaravone (9mg/kg, 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one), a free radical scavenger, in a streptozotocin (STZ-3mg/kg) induced rat model of sporadic AD (sAD). Treatment with edaravone significantly improved STZ-induced cognitive damage as evaluated in Morris water maze and step-down tests and markedly restored changes in malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) adducts, hydroxyl radical (OH), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and protein carbonyl (PC) levels. In addition, histomorphological observations confirmed the protective effect of edaravone on neuronal degeneration. Moreover, hyperphosphorylation of tau resulting from intracerebroventricular streptozotocin (ICV-STZ) injection was decreased by the administration of edaravone. These results provide experimental evidence demonstrating preventive effects of edaravone on cognitive dysfunction, oxidative stress and hyperphosphorylation of tau in ICV-STZ rats. Since edaravone has been used for treatment of patients with stroke, it represents a safe and established therapeutic intervention that has the potential for a novel application in the treatment of age-related neurodegenerative disorders associated with cognitive decline, such as AD. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Neuroprotective Effect of Matricaria chamomilla Extract on Motor Dysfunction Induced by Transient Global Cerebral Ischemia and Reperfusion in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Moshfegh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Stroke can cause paralysis, muscle weakness, and loss of balance that may affect walking and routine activities. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ethyl alcohol extract of Matricaria chamomilla on cerebral ischemia-induced motor dysfunctions in rats. Methods In this experimental study, forty two male Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups consisting of control group, sham group, ischemia/reperfusion group and three treatment groups [treated with 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg doses of M. chamomilla extract and undergoing ischemia/reperfusion(I/R]. Motor coordination and balance were evaluated using Rotarod test. Total antioxidant capacity, malondialdehyde (MDA, and nitric oxide (NO levels of serum and brain were also determined. Results The extract of M. chamomilla significantly improved I/R-induced motor dysfunction. Induction of I/R led to increase serum MDA, while the extract of M, chamomlla significantly reduced it. Administration all doses of M. chamomilla extract to the ischemic rats did not reduce the hippocampus MDA levels (P > 0.05. The extract of M. chamomilla at dose of 200 mg/kg slightly decreased cortex MDA (P > 0.01. It had no significant effects on the total antioxidant capacity of the brain (hippocampus and cortex and serum. Injection of Matricaria chamomilla extract also did not change serum NO level. Conclusions Our findings suggested that the Matricaria chamomilla extract could improve motor dysfunction.

  14. Orally active multi-functional antioxidants are neuroprotective in a rat model of light-induced retinal damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Randazzo

    Full Text Available Progression of age-related macular degeneration has been linked to iron dysregulation and oxidative stress that induce apoptosis of neural retinal cells. Since both antioxidants and chelating agents have been reported to reduce the progression of retinal lesions associated with AMD in experimental animals, the present study evaluates the ability of multi-functional antioxidants containing functional groups that can independently chelate redox metals and quench free radicals to protect the retina against light-induced retinal degeneration, a rat model of dry atrophic AMD.Proof of concept studies were conducted to evaluate the ability of 4-(5-hydroxypyrimidin-2-yl-N,N-dimethyl-3,5-dioxopiperazine-1-sulfonamide (compound 4 and 4-(5-hydroxy-4,6-dimethoxypyrimidin-2-yl-N,N-dimethyl-3,5-dioxopiperazine-1-sulfonamide (compound 8 to reduce retinal damage in 2-week dark adapted Wistar rats exposed to 1000 lx of light for 3 hours. Assessment of the oxidative stress markers 4- hydroxynonenal and nitrotyrosine modified proteins and Thioredoxin by ELISA and Western blots indicated that these compounds reduced the oxidative insult caused by light exposure. The beneficial antioxidant effects of these compounds in providing significant functional and structural protection were confirmed by electroretinography and quantitative histology of the retina.The present study suggests that multi-functional compounds may be effective candidates for preventive therapy of AMD.

  15. Neuroprotection of Sex Steroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingyue; Kelley, Melissa H.; Herson, Paco S.; Hurn, Patricia D.

    2011-01-01

    Sex steroids are essential for reproduction and development in animals and humans, and sex steroids also play an important role in neuroprotection following brain injury. New data indicate that sex-specific responses to brain injury occur at the cellular and molecular levels. This review summarizes the current understanding of neuroprotection by sex steroids, particularly estrogen, androgen, and progesterone, based on both in vitro and in vivo studies. Better understanding of the role of sex steroids under physiological and pathological conditions will help us to develop novel effective therapeutic strategies for brain injury. PMID:20595940

  16. Neuroprotective and antioxidant activities of bamboo salt soy sauce against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jong Hee; Noh, Min-Young; Choi, Jae-Hyeok; Lee, Haiwon; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2016-04-01

    Bamboo salt (BS) and soy sauce (SS) are traditional foods in Asia, which contain antioxidants that have cytoprotective effects on the body. The majority of SS products contain high levels of common salt, consumption of which has been associated with numerous detrimental effects on the body. However, BS may be considered a healthier substitute to common salt. The present study hypothesized that SS made from BS, known as bamboo salt soy sauce (BSSS), may possess enhanced cytoprotective properties; this was evaluated using a hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 )-induced neuronal cell death rat model. Rat neuronal cells were pretreated with various concentrations (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10%) of BSSS, traditional soy sauce (TRSS) and brewed soy sauce (BRSS), and were subsequently exposed to H 2 O 2 (100 µM). The viability of neuronal cells, and the occurrence of DNA fragmentation, was subsequently examined. Pretreatment of neuronal cells with TRSS and BRSS reduced cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas neuronal cells pretreated with BSSS exhibited increased cell viability, as compared with non-treated neuronal cells. Furthermore, neuronal cells pretreated with 0.01% BSSS exhibited the greatest increase in viability. Exposure of neuronal cells to H 2 O 2 significantly increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), B-cell lymphoma 2-associated X protein, poly (ADP-ribose), cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, cytochrome c , apoptosis-inducing factor, cleaved caspase-9 and cleaved caspase-3, in all cases. Pretreatment of neuronal cells with BSSS significantly reduced the levels of ROS generated by H 2 O 2 , and increased the levels of phosphorylated AKT and phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3β. Furthermore, the observed effects of BSSS could be blocked by administration of 10 µM LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor. The results of the present study suggested that BSSS may exert positive neuroprotective effects against H 2 O 2

  17. Neuroprotective role of nanoencapsulated quercetin in combating ischemia-reperfusion induced neuronal damage in young and aged rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparajita Ghosh

    Full Text Available Cerebral stroke is the leading cause of death and permanent disability among elderly people. In both humans and animals, cerebral ischemia damages the nerve cells in vulnerable regions of the brain, viz., hippocampus, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and hypothalamus. The present study was conducted to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of nanoencapsulated quercetin (QC in combating ischemia-reperfusion-induced neuronal damage in young and aged Swiss Albino rats. Cerebral ischemia was induced by occlusion of the common carotid arteries of both young and aged rats followed by reperfusion. Nanoencapsulated quercetin (2.7 mg/kg b wt was administered to both groups of animals via oral gavage two hours prior to ischemic insults as well as post-operation till day 3. Cerebral ischemia and 30 min consecutive reperfusion caused a substantial increase in lipid peroxidation, decreased antioxidant enzyme activities and tissue osmolality in different brain regions of both groups of animals. It also decreased mitochondrial membrane microviscosity and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in different brain regions of young and aged rats. Among the brain regions studied, the hippocampus appeared to be the worst affected region showing increased upregulation of iNOS and caspase-3 activity with decreased neuronal count in the CA1 and CA3 subfields of both young and aged rats. Furthermore, three days of continuous reperfusion after ischemia caused massive damage to neuronal cells. However, it was observed that oral treatment of nanoencapsulated quercetin (2.7 mg/kg b wt resulted in downregulation of iNOS and caspase-3 activities and improved neuronal count in the hippocampal subfields even 3 days after reperfusion. Moreover, the nanoformulation imparted a significant level of protection in the antioxidant status in different brain regions, thus contributing to a better understanding of the given pathophysiological processes causing ischemic neuronal damage.

  18. Neuroprotective role of antioxidant and pyranocarboxylic acid derivative against AlCl3 induced Alzheimer’s disease in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarabjeet Singh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess potential of quercetin and etodolac to treat oxidative stress in neuronal death and inflammation in Alzheimer’s disease of AlCl3 induced rat models. All results of this AlCl3 model are compared with those obtained in controls. Methods: Wistar rats, housed in a controlled environment were treated with aluminum chloride (4.2 mg/kg of body weight, i.p. for 28 d rather than oral to ensure neurotoxic concentration in hippocampus and hypothalamic region, part highly active in memory control and cognition, while control group was injected with saline. Estimation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance, superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione and acetylcholine levels gave estimation of neuronal damage. Low (20 mg/kg and 25 mg/kg and high (40 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg doses of quercetin and etodolac were administered to the test groups respectively. Histopathology study was conducted to perform relative study. Results: Co-administration of quercetin and etodolac either alone or in combination prevented the changes in biochemical markers of Alzheimer’s disease, but significant results (P<0.05 were seen when a combination of two was administered at low dose levels. Good correlation was developed between chemical estimations and histopathology study. Conclusions: Our findings suggest a combined role of anti-oxidant and cyclooxygenase inhibitor in protection of neural degeneration and inflammation due to oxidative stress.

  19. Microbe-Induced Inflammatory Signals Triggering Acquired Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, J Luis; Kotecha, Ritesh; Nakao, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    Acquired bone marrow failure syndromes encompass a unique set of disorders characterized by a reduction in the effective production of mature cells by the bone marrow (BM). In the majority of cases, these syndromes are the result of the immune-mediated destruction of hematopoietic stem cells or their progenitors at various stages of differentiation. Microbial infection has also been associated with hematopoietic stem cell injury and may lead to associated transient or persistent BM failure, and recent evidence has highlighted the potential impact of commensal microbes and their metabolites on hematopoiesis. We summarize the interactions between microorganisms and the host immune system and emphasize how they may impact the development of acquired BM failure.

  20. Breathing, feeding, and neuroprotection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Homma, Ikuo; Shioda, S

    2006-01-01

    ... of knowledge of brain functions and morphology. Akiyoshi Hosoyamada, M.D., Ph.D. President Showa University, Tokyo 142-8555, Japan December 2005Preface Brain research is on the march, with several advanced technical developments and new findings uncovered almost daily. Within the brain-research fields, we focus on breathing, neuroprotection, an...

  1. Discovery of non-peptidic small molecule inhibitors of cyclophilin D as neuroprotective agents in Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Insun; Londhe, Ashwini M.; Lim, Ji Woong; Park, Beoung-Geon; Jung, Seo Yun; Lee, Jae Yeol; Lim, Sang Min; No, Kyoung Tai; Lee, Jiyoun; Pae, Ae Nim

    2017-10-01

    Cyclophilin D (CypD) is a mitochondria-specific cyclophilin that is known to play a pivotal role in the formation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP).The formation and opening of the mPTP disrupt mitochondrial homeostasis, cause mitochondrial dysfunction and eventually lead to cell death. Several recent studies have found that CypD promotes the formation of the mPTP upon binding to β amyloid (Aβ) peptides inside brain mitochondria, suggesting that neuronal CypD has a potential to be a promising therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we generated an energy-based pharmacophore model by using the crystal structure of CypD—cyclosporine A (CsA) complex and performed virtual screening of ChemDiv database, which yielded forty-five potential hit compounds with novel scaffolds. We further tested those compounds using mitochondrial functional assays in neuronal cells and identified fifteen compounds with excellent protective effects against Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. To validate whether these effects derived from binding to CypD, we performed surface plasmon resonance (SPR)—based direct binding assays with selected compounds and discovered compound 29 was found to have the equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) value of 88.2 nM. This binding affinity value and biological activity correspond well with our predicted binding mode. We believe that this study offers new insights into the rational design of small molecule CypD inhibitors, and provides a promising lead for future therapeutic development.

  2. Neuroprotective effect of electroacupuncture and upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α during acute ischaemic stroke in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ce; Zhang, Tingting; Yu, Kewei; Xie, Hongyu; Bai, Yulong; Zhang, Li; Wu, Yi; Wang, Nianhong

    2017-10-01

    Acupuncture is a traditional method that has been widely used in various fields of medicine with therapeutic effect. However, evidence of effectiveness to support the application of electroacupuncture (EA) during the process of ischaemia is scarce. To investigate dynamic changes in hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α expression as well as its association with neurological status in rats subjected to acute ischaemic stroke and EA intervention. Forty adult male rats were randomly divided into three groups that received sham surgery (Control group, n=10) or underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion and EA (MCAO+EA group, n=15) or minimal acupuncture as a control treatment (MCAO+MA group, n=15). The rats in the MCAO+EA and MCAO+MA groups received EA or acupuncture without any electrical current, respectively, during 90 min of ischaemia. Rats in the Control group received the same surgical procedure but without MCAO. EA involved electrical stimulation of needles inserted into the quadriceps at 50 Hz frequency and 3 mA current intensity. Neurological status was evaluated on postoperative day 1, and cerebral infarction volume (IV) and HIF-1α expression 24 hours later. Neurological scores were improved and cerebral IV was decreased in the MCAO+EA group compared to the MCAO+MA group (both p<0.05). Moreover, HIF-1α expression was higher in the MCAO+EA group versus the MCAO+MA group (p<0.05). EA enhanced recovery of neurological function, decreased cerebral IV and increased HIF-1α expression in ischaemic rats. Further research is needed to determine whether EA is effective for stroke treatment through the stimulation of muscle contraction. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. New Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection of Inducible and Acquired Clarithromycin Resistance in the Mycobacterium abscessus Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shallom, Shamira J; Moura, Natalia S; Olivier, Kenneth N; Sampaio, Elizabeth P; Holland, Steven M; Zelazny, Adrian M

    2015-11-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium abscessus group (MAG) cause lung, soft tissue, and disseminated infections. The oral macrolides clarithromycin and azithromycin are commonly used for treatment. MAG can display clarithromycin resistance through the inducible erm(41) gene or via acquired mutations in the rrl (23S rRNA) gene. Strains harboring a truncation or a T28C substitution in erm(41) lose the inducible resistance trait. Phenotypic detection of clarithromycin resistance requires extended incubation (14 days), highlighting the need for faster methods to detect resistance. Two real-time PCR-based assays were developed to assess inducible and acquired clarithromycin resistance and tested on a total of 90 clinical and reference strains. A SYBR green assay was designed to distinguish between a full-length and truncated erm(41) gene by temperature shift in melting curve analysis. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele discrimination assays were developed to distinguish T or C at position 28 of erm(41) and 23S rRNA rrl gene mutations at position 2058 and/or 2059. Truncated and full-size erm(41) genes were detected in 21/90 and 69/90 strains, respectively, with 64/69 displaying T at nucleotide position 28 and 5/69 containing C at that position. Fifteen isolates showed rrl mutations conferring clarithromycin resistance, including A2058G (11 isolates), A2058C (3 isolates), and A2059G (1 isolate). Targeted sequencing and phenotypic assessment of resistance concurred with molecular assay results. Interestingly, we also noted cooccurring strains harboring an active erm(41), inactive erm(41), and/or acquired mutational resistance, as well as slowly growing MAG strains and also strains displaying an inducible resistance phenotype within 5 days, long before the recommended 14-day extended incubation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Acquiring the optimal time for hyperbaric therapy in the rat model of CFA induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Sung Tae; Lee, Chang-Hyung; Shin, Yong Il; Ko, Hyun Yoon; Lee, Da Gyo; Jeong, Han-Sol

    2014-01-01

    We previously published an article about the pressure effect using a rheumatoid animal model. Hyperbaric therapy appears to be beneficial in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by reducing the inflammatory process in an animal model. In this sense, acquiring the optimal pressure-treatment time parameter for RA is important and no optimal hyperbaric therapy time has been suggested up to now. The purpose of our study was to acquire the optimal time for hyperbaric therapy in the RA rat model. Controlled animal study. Following injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into one side of the knee joint, 32 rats were randomly assigned to 3 different time groups (1, 3, 5 hours a day) under 1.5 atmospheres absolute (ATA) hyperbaric chamber for 12 days. The pain levels were assessed daily for 2 weeks by weight bearing force (WBF) of the affected limb. In addition, the levels of gelatinase, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expression in the synovial fluids of the knees were analyzed. The reduction of WBF was high at 2 days after injection and then it was spontaneously increased up to 14 days in all 3 groups. There were significant differences of WBF between 5 hours and control during the third through twelfth days, between 3 hours and control during the third through fifth and tenth through twelfth days, and between 3 hours and 5 hours during the third through seventh days (P CFA injection in all groups compared to the initial findings, however, the 3 hour group showed a smaller MMP-9/MMP-2 ratio than the control group. Although enough samples were used for the study to support our hypothesis, more samples will be needed to raise the validity and reliability. The effect of hyperbaric treatment appears to be dependent upon the elevated therapy time under 1.5 ATA pressure for a short period of time; however, the long-term effects were similar in all pressure groups. Further study will be needed to acquire the optimal pressure-treatment parameter relationship in various conditions for

  5. Comparison of the neuroprotective potential of Mucuna pruriens seed extract with estrogen in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced PD mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Satyndra Kumar; Prakash, Jay; Chouhan, Shikha; Westfall, Susan; Verma, Mradul; Singh, Tryambak Deo; Singh, Surya Pratap

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disease found in the aging population. Currently, many studies are being conducted to find a suitable and effective cure for PD, with an emphasis on the use of herbal plants. In Ayurveda, Mucuna pruriens (Mp), a leguminous plant, is used as an anti-inflammatory drug. In this study, the neuroprotective effect of an ethanolic extract of Mp seed is evaluated in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of PD and compared to estrogen, a well reported neuroprotective agent used for treating PD. Twenty-four Swiss albino mice were randomly divided into four groups: Control, MPTP, MPTP+Mp and MPTP+estrogen. The behavioural recovery in both Mp and estrogen treated mice was investigated using the rotarod, foot printing and hanging tests. The recovery of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) region was estimated by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), immunostaining. Additionally inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity was evaluated to assess the level of oxidative damage and glial activation respectively. The levels of dopamine and its metabolite in the nigrostriatal region were measured by HPLC. Mp treatment restored all the deficits induced by MPTP more effectively than estrogen. Mp treatment recovered the number of TH-positive cells in both the SN region and the striatum while reducing the expression of iNOS and GFAP in the SN. Treatment with Mp significantly increased the levels of dopamine, DOPAC and homovanillic acid compared to MPTP intoxicated mice. Notably, the effect of Mp was greater than that elicited by estrogen. Mp down regulates NO production, neuroinflammation and microglial activation and all of these actions contribute to Mp's neuroprotective activity. These results suggest that Mp can be an effective treatment for neurodegenerative diseases, especially PD by decreasing oxidative stress and possibly by

  6. An Involvement of PI3-K/Akt Activation and Inhibition of AIF Translocation in Neuroprotective Effects of Undecylenic Acid (UDA) Against Pro-Apoptotic Factors-Induced Cell Death in Human Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cells.

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    Jantas, Danuta; Piotrowski, Marek; Lason, Wladyslaw

    2015-12-01

    Undecylenic acid (UDA), a naturally occurring 11-carbon unsaturated fatty acid, has been used for several years as an economical antifungal agent and a nutritional supplement. Recently, the potential usefulness of UDA as a neuroprotective drug has been suggested based on the ability of this agent to inhibit μ-calpain activity. In order to verify neuroprotective potential of UDA, we tested protective efficacy of this compound against cell damage evoked by pro-apoptotic factors (staurosporine and doxorubicin) and oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide) in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. We showed that UDA partially protected SH-SY5Y cells against the staurosporine- and doxorubicin-evoked cell death; however, this effect was not connected with its influence on caspase-3 activity. UDA decreased the St-induced changes in mitochondrial and cytosolic AIF level, whereas in Dox-model it affected only the cytosolic AIF content. Moreover, UDA (1-40 μM) decreased the hydrogen peroxide-induced cell damage which was connected with attenuation of hydrogen peroxide-mediated necrotic (PI staining, ADP/ATP ratio) and apoptotic (mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-3 activation, AIF translocation) changes. Finally, we demonstrated that an inhibitor of PI3-K/Akt (LY294002) but not MAPK/ERK1/2 (U0126) pathway blocked the protection mediated by UDA in all tested models of SH-SY5Y cell injury. These in vitro data point to UDA as potentially effective neuroprotectant the utility of which should be further validated in animal studies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Neuroprotection in glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Sushil K; Gupta, Viney; Crowston, Jonathan G

    2011-01-01

    Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of retinal ganglion cells and their axons. Recent evidence suggests that intraocular pressure (IOP) is only one of the many risk factors for this disease. Current treatment options for this disease have been limited to the reduction of IOP; however, it is clear now that the disease progression continues in many patients despite effective lowering of IOP. In the search for newer modalities in treating this disease, much data have emerged from experimental research the world over, suggesting various pathological processes involved in this disease and newer possible strategies to treat it. This review article looks into the current understanding of the pathophysiology of glaucoma, the importance of neuroprotection, the various possible pharmacological approaches for neuroprotection and evidence of current available medications. PMID:21150020

  8. Vorinostat-induced autophagy switches from a death-promoting to a cytoprotective signal to drive acquired resistance.

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    Dupéré-Richer, D; Kinal, M; Ménasché, V; Nielsen, T H; Del Rincon, S; Pettersson, F; Miller, W H

    2013-02-07

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have shown promising activity against hematological malignancies in clinical trials and have led to the approval of vorinostat for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. However, de novo or acquired resistance to HDACi therapy is inevitable, and their molecular mechanisms are still unclear. To gain insight into HDACi resistance, we developed vorinostat-resistant clones from the hematological cell lines U937 and SUDHL6. Although cross-resistant to some but not all HDACi, the resistant cell lines exhibit dramatically increased sensitivity toward chloroquine, an inhibitor of autophagy. Consistent with this, resistant cells growing in vorinostat show increased autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy in vorinostat-resistant U937 cells by knockdown of Beclin-1 or Lamp-2 (lysosome-associated membrane protein 2) restores sensitivity to vorinostat. Interestingly, autophagy is also activated in parental U937 cells by de novo treatment with vorinostat. However, in contrast to the resistant cells, inhibition of autophagy decreases sensitivity to vorinostat. These results indicate that autophagy can switch from a proapoptotic signal to a prosurvival function driving acquired resistance. Moreover, inducers of autophagy (such as mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors) synergize with vorinostat to induce cell death in parental cells, whereas the resistant cells remain insensitive. These data highlight the complexity of the design of combination strategies using modulators of autophagy and HDACi for the treatment of hematological malignancies.

  9. Paraquat induces oxidative stress, neuronal loss in substantia nigra region and Parkinsonism in adult rats: Neuroprotection and amelioration of symptoms by water-soluble formulation of Coenzyme Q10

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    Sridhar TS

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson's disease, for which currently there is no cure, develops as a result of progressive loss of dopamine neurons in the brain; thus, identification of any potential therapeutic intervention for disease management is of a great importance. Results Here we report that prophylactic application of water-soluble formulation of coenzyme Q10 could effectively offset the effects of environmental neurotoxin paraquat, believed to be a contributing factor in the development of familial PD. In this study we utilized a model of paraquat-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in adult rats that received three weekly intra-peritoneal injections of the herbicide paraquat. Histological and biochemical analyses of rat brains revealed increased levels of oxidative stress markers and a loss of approximately 65% of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra region. The paraquat-exposed rats also displayed impaired balancing skills on a slowly rotating drum (rotorod evidenced by their reduced spontaneity in gait performance. In contrast, paraquat exposed rats receiving a water-soluble formulation of coenzyme Q10 in their drinking water prior to and during the paraquat treatment neither developed neurodegeneration nor reduced rotorod performance and were indistinguishable from the control paraquat-untreated rats. Conclusion Our data confirmed that paraquat-induced neurotoxicity represents a convenient rat model of Parkinsonian neurodegeneration suitable for mechanistic and neuroprotective studies. This is the first preclinical evaluation of a water-soluble coenzyme Q10 formulation showing the evidence of prophylactic neuroprotection at clinically relevant doses.

  10. Lithium-induced neuroprotection in stroke involves increased miR-124 expression, reduced RE1-silencing transcription factor abundance and decreased protein deubiquitination by GSK3β inhibition-independent pathways.

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    Doeppner, Thorsten R; Kaltwasser, Britta; Sanchez-Mendoza, Eduardo H; Caglayan, Ahmet B; Bähr, Mathias; Hermann, Dirk M

    2017-03-01

    Lithium promotes acute poststroke neuronal survival, which includes mechanisms that are not limited to GSK3β inhibition. However, whether lithium induces long-term neuroprotection and enhanced brain remodeling is unclear. Therefore, mice were exposed to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion and lithium (1 mg/kg bolus followed by 2 mg/kg/day over up to 7 days) was intraperitoneally administered starting 0-9 h after reperfusion onset. Delivery of lithium no later than 6 h reduced infarct volume on day 2 and decreased brain edema, leukocyte infiltration, and microglial activation, as shown by histochemistry and flow cytometry. Lithium-induced neuroprotection persisted throughout the observation period of 56 days and was associated with enhanced neurological recovery. Poststroke angioneurogenesis and axonal plasticity were also enhanced by lithium. On the molecular level, lithium increased miR-124 expression, reduced RE1-silencing transcription factor abundance, and decreased protein deubiquitination in cultivated cortical neurons exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation and in brains of mice exposed to cerebral ischemia. Notably, this effect was not mimicked by pharmacological GSK3β inhibition. This study for the first time provides efficacy data for lithium in the postacute ischemic phase, reporting a novel mechanism of action, i.e. increased miR-124 expression facilitating REST degradation by which lithium promotes postischemic neuroplasticity and angiogenesis.

  11. Changes in gait patterns induced by rhythmic auditory stimulation for adolescents with acquired brain injury.

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    Kim, Soo Ji; Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Yoo, Ga Eul; Chong, Hyun Ju; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2016-12-01

    The effects of rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) on gait in adolescents with acquired brain injury (ABI) were investigated. A total of 14 adolescents with ABI were initially recruited, and 12 were included in the final analysis (n = 6 each). They were randomly assigned to the experimental (RAS) or the control (conventional gait training) groups. The experimental group received gait training with RAS three times a week for 4 weeks. For both groups, spatiotemporal parameters and kinematic data, such as dynamic motions of joints on three-dimensional planes during a gait cycle and the range of motion in each joint, were collected. Significant group differences in pre-post changes were observed in cadence, walking velocity, and step time, indicating that there were greater improvements in those parameters in the RAS group compared with the control group. Significant increases in hip and knee motions in the sagittal plane were also observed in the RAS group. The changes in kinematic data significantly differed between groups, particularly from terminal stance to mid-swing phase. An increase of both spatiotemporal parameters and corresponding kinematic changes of hip and knee joints after RAS protocol indicates that the use of rhythmic cueing may change gait patterns in adolescents with ABI. © 2016 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of New York Academy of Sciences.

  12. Inhibition of Cathepsins B Induces Neuroprotection Against Secondary Degeneration in Ipsilateral Substantia Nigra After Focal Cortical Infarction in Adult Male Rats

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    Xialin Zuo

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability in the world. In general, recovery from stroke is incomplete. Accumulating evidences have shown that focal cerebral infarction leads to dynamic trans-neuronal degeneration in non-ischemic remote brain regions, with the disruption of connections to synapsed neurons sustaining ischemic insults. Previously, we had reported that the ipsilateral striatum, thalamus degenerated in succession after permanent distal branch of middle cerebral artery occlusion (dMCAO in Sprague-Dawley (SD rats and cathepsin (Cath B was activated before these relay degeneration. Here, we investigate the role of CathB in the secondary degeneration of ipsilateral substantia nigra (SN after focal cortical infarction. We further examined whether the inhibition of CathB with L-3-trans-(Propyl-carbamoyloxirane-2-carbonyl-L-isoleucyl-L-proline methyl ester (CA-074Me would attenuate secondary degeneration through enhancing the cortico-striatum-nigral connections and contribute to the neuroprotective effects. Our results demonstrated that secondary degeneration in the ipsilateral SN occurred and CathB was upregulated in the ipsilateral SN after focal cortical infarction. The inhibition of CathB with CA-074Me reduced the neuronal loss and gliosis in the ipsilateral SN. Using biotinylated dextran amine (BDA or pseudorabies virus (PRV 152 as anterograde or retrograde tracer to trace striatum-nigral and cortico-nigral projections pathway, CA-074Me can effectively enhance the cortico-striatum-nigral connections and exert neuroprotection against secondary degeneration in the ipsilateral SN after cortical ischemia. Our study suggests that the lysosomal protease CathB mediates the secondary damage in the ipsilateral SN after dMCAO, thus it can be a promising neuroprotective target for the rehabilitation of stroke patients.

  13. Ghrelin-AMPK Signaling Mediates the Neuroprotective Effects of Calorie Restriction in Parkinson's Disease

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    Bayliss, Jacqueline A.; Lemus, Moyra B.; Stark, Romana; Santos, Vanessa V.; Thompson, Aiysha; Rees, Daniel J.; Galic, Sandra; Elsworth, John D.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Davies, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) is neuroprotective in Parkinson's disease (PD) although the mechanisms are unknown. In this study we hypothesized that elevated ghrelin, a gut hormone with neuroprotective properties, during CR prevents neurodegeneration in an 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of PD. CR attenuated the MPTP-induced loss of substantia nigra (SN) dopamine neurons and striatal dopamine turnover in ghrelin WT but not KO mice, demonstrating that ghrelin mediates CR's neuroprotective effect. CR elevated phosphorylated AMPK and ACC levels in the striatum of WT but not KO mice suggesting that AMPK is a target for ghrelin-induced neuroprotection. Indeed, exogenous ghrelin significantly increased pAMPK in the SN. Genetic deletion of AMPKβ1 and 2 subunits only in dopamine neurons prevented ghrelin-induced AMPK phosphorylation and neuroprotection. Hence, ghrelin signaling through AMPK in SN dopamine neurons mediates CR's neuroprotective effects. We consider targeting AMPK in dopamine neurons may recapitulate neuroprotective effects of CR without requiring dietary intervention. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The neuroprotective mechanisms of calorie restriction (CR) in Parkinson's disease are unknown. Indeed, the difficulty to adhere to CR necessitates an alternative method to recapitulate the neuroprotective benefits of CR while bypassing dietary constraints. Here we show that CR increases plasma ghrelin, which targets substantia nigra dopamine to maintain neuronal survival. Selective deletion on AMPK beta1 and beta2 subunits only in DAT cre-expressing neurons shows that the ghrelin-induced neuroprotection requires activation of AMPK in substantia nigra dopamine neurons. We have discovered ghrelin as a key metabolic signal, and AMPK in dopamine neurons as its target, which links calorie restriction with neuroprotection in Parkinson's disease. Thus, targeting AMPK in dopamine neurons may provide novel neuroprotective benefits in Parkinson's disease. PMID

  14. Novel Neuroprotective Strategies in Ischemic Retinal Lesions

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    Robert Gabriel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Retinal ischemia can be effectively modeled by permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusion, which leads to chronic hypoperfusion-induced degeneration in the entire rat retina. The complex pathways leading to retinal cell death offer a complex approach of neuroprotective strategies. In the present review we summarize recent findings with different neuroprotective candidate molecules. We describe the protective effects of intravitreal treatment with: (i urocortin 2; (ii a mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K+ channel opener, diazoxide; (iii a neurotrophic factor, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide; and (iv a novel poly(ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitor (HO3089. The retinoprotective effects are demonstrated with morphological description and effects on apoptotic pathways using molecular biological techniques.

  15. Neuroprotection in Preterm Infants

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    R. Berger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Preterm infants born before the 30th week of pregnancy are especially at risk of perinatal brain damage which is usually a result of cerebral ischemia or an ascending intrauterine infection. Prevention of preterm birth and early intervention given signs of imminent intrauterine infection can reduce the incidence of perinatal cerebral injury. It has been shown that administering magnesium intravenously to women at imminent risk of a preterm birth leads to a significant reduction in the likelihood of the infant developing cerebral palsy and motor skill dysfunction. It has also been demonstrated that delayed clamping of the umbilical cord after birth reduces the rate of brain hemorrhage among preterm infants by up to 50%. In addition, mesenchymal stem cells seem to have significant neuroprotective potential in animal experiments, as they increase the rate of regeneration of the damaged cerebral area. Clinical tests of these types of therapeutic intervention measures appear to be imminent. In the last trimester of pregnancy, the serum concentrations of estradiol and progesterone increase significantly. Preterm infants are removed abruptly from this estradiol and progesterone rich environment. It has been demonstrated in animal experiments that estradiol and progesterone protect the immature brain from hypoxic-ischemic lesions. However, this neuroprotective strategy has unfortunately not yet been subject to sufficient clinical investigation.

  16. Phenobarbital Augments Hypothermic Neuroprotection

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    Barks, John D.; Liu, Yi-Qing; Shangguan, Yu; Silverstein, Faye S.

    2010-01-01

    Seizures are associated with adverse outcome in infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. We hypothesized that early administration of the anticonvulsant phenobarbital after cerebral hypoxia-ischemia could enhance the neuroprotective efficacy of delayed-onset hypothermia. We tested this hypothesis in a neonatal rodent model. Seven-day-old rats (n=104) underwent right carotid ligation, followed by 90 min 8%O2 exposure; 15 min later, they received injections of phenobarbital (40 mg/kg) or saline. One or 3h later, all were treated with hypothermia (30°C, 3h). Function and neuropathology were evaluated after 7 days (“early outcomes”) or 1 month (“late outcomes”). Early outcome assessment demonstrated better sensorimotor performance and less cortical damage in phenobarbital-treated groups; there were no differences between groups in which the hypothermia delay was shortened from 3h to 1h. Late outcome assessment confirmed sustained benefits of phenobarbital+hypothermia treatment; sensorimotor performance was better (persistent attenuation of contralateral forepaw placing deficits and absence of contralateral forepaw neglect); neuropathology scores were lower (medians, phenobarbital 2, saline 8.5, pphenobarbital may augment the neuroprotective efficacy of therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:20098339

  17. Metabolic Syndrome and Neuroprotection

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    Melisa Etchegoyen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Over the years the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS has drastically increased in developing countries as a major byproduct of industrialization. Many factors, such as the consumption of high-calorie diets and a sedentary lifestyle, bolster the spread of this disorder. Undoubtedly, the massive and still increasing incidence of MetS places this epidemic as an important public health issue. Hereon we revisit another outlook of MetS beyond its classical association with cardiovascular disease (CVD and Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 (DM2, for MetS also poses a risk factor for the nervous tissue and threatens neuronal function. First, we revise a few essential concepts of MetS pathophysiology. Second, we explore some neuroprotective approaches in MetS pertaining brain hypoxia. The articles chosen for this review range from the years 1989 until 2017; the selection criteria was based on those providing data and exploratory information on MetS as well as those that studied innovative therapeutic approaches.Pathophysiology: The characteristically impaired metabolic pathways of MetS lead to hyperglycemia, insulin resistance (IR, inflammation, and hypoxia, all closely associated with an overall pro-oxidative status. Oxidative stress is well-known to cause the wreckage of cellular structures and tissue architecture. Alteration of the redox homeostasis and oxidative stress alter the macromolecular array of DNA, lipids, and proteins, in turn disrupting the biochemical pathways necessary for normal cell function.Neuroprotection: Different neuroprotective strategies are discussed involving lifestyle changes, medication aimed to mitigate MetS cardinal symptoms, and treatments targeted toward reducing oxidative stress. It is well-known that the routine practice of physical exercise, aerobic activity in particular, and a complete and well-balanced nutrition are key factors to prevent MetS. Nevertheless, pharmacological control of MetS as a whole and

  18. Neuroprotective therapies for glaucoma

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    Song W

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Wei Song, Ping Huang, Chun Zhang Department of Ophthalmology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Glaucoma is the second leading cause for blindness worldwide. It is mainly caused by glaucomatous optic neuropathy (GON characterized by retinal ganglion cell loss, which leads to visual field defect and blindness. Up to now, the main purpose of antiglaucomatous therapies has been to lower intraocular pressure (IOP through surgeries and medications. However, it has been found that progressive GON is still present in some patients with effective IOP decrease. Therefore, risk factors other than IOP elevation, like neurotrophin deprivation and excitotoxicity, contribute to progressive GON. Novel approaches of neuroprotection may be more effective for preserving the function of the optic nerve. Keywords: glaucoma, glaucomatous optic neuropathy, retinal ganglion cells, neuro­protection

  19. ASTROCYTES IN THE NEUROPROTECTION AFTER BRAIN STROKE

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    Gloria Patricia Cardona Gomez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are specialized glial cells of the nervous system, which have multiple homeostatic functions for the survival and maintenance of the neurovascular unit. It has been shown that astrocytes have critical role in the dynamics pro survival conferring neuroprotective, angiogenic, immunomodulatory, neurogenic, antioxidants and regulatory synapse functions (Shen et al 2012; Gimsa et al 2013; Proschel et al 2014; making them excellent candidates as the source of neuroprotection and neurorestauration of tissue affected by events ischemia and / or reperfusion. However, these cells also may be involved in negative responses such as reactive astrocytes and glial scar under chronic excitotoxic responses generated by these events. To know what are the key points in the pro and anti-survival responses of astrocytes, would allow use them as targets in cellular therapies. This review has aim to study the mechanisms for neuroprotection in these cells (Posada-Duque et al submitted, which would make them targets of cell therapy, through of inducing regeneration, such as vehicle for corrective molecular systems and trigger endogenous cellular events that can recover the tissue homeostasis, which is lost after progressive damage.

  20. β-Adrenoceptor activation depresses brain inflammation and is neuroprotective in lipopolysaccharide-induced sensitization to oxygen-glucose deprivation in organotypic hippocampal slices

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    Cilio Corrado

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation acting in synergy with brain ischemia aggravates perinatal ischemic brain damage. The sensitizing effect of pro-inflammatory exposure prior to hypoxia is dependent on signaling by TNF-α through TNF receptor (TNFR 1. Adrenoceptor (AR activation is known to modulate the immune response and synaptic transmission. The possible protective effect of α˜ and β˜AR activation against neuronal damage caused by tissue ischemia and inflammation, acting in concert, was evaluated in murine hippocampal organotypic slices treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS and subsequently subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD. Method Hippocampal slices from mice were obtained at P6, and were grown in vitro for 9 days on nitrocellulose membranes. Slices were treated with β1(dobutamine-, β2(terbutaline-, α1(phenylephrine- and α2(clonidine-AR agonists (5 and 50 μM, respectively during LPS (1 μg/mL, 24 h -exposure followed by exposure to OGD (15 min in a hypoxic chamber. Cell death in the slice CA1 region was assessed by propidium iodide staining of dead cells. Results Exposure to LPS + OGD caused extensive cell death from 4 up to 48 h after reoxygenation. Co-incubation with β1-agonist (50 μM during LPS exposure before OGD conferred complete protection from cell death (P -/- and TNFR2-/- slices exposed to LPS followed by OGD. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that activation of both β1- and β2-receptors is neuroprotective and may offer mechanistic insights valuable for development of neuro-protective strategies in neonates.

  1. α-Linolenic Acid, A Nutraceutical with Pleiotropic Properties That Targets Endogenous Neuroprotective Pathways to Protect against Organophosphate Nerve Agent-Induced Neuropathology

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    Tetsade Piermartiri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available α-Linolenic acid (ALA is a nutraceutical found in vegetable products such as flax and walnuts. The pleiotropic properties of ALA target endogenous neuroprotective and neurorestorative pathways in brain and involve the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a major neuroprotective protein in brain, and downstream signaling pathways likely mediated via activation of TrkB, the cognate receptor of BDNF. In this review, we discuss possible mechanisms of ALA efficacy against the highly toxic OP nerve agent soman. Organophosphate (OP nerve agents are highly toxic chemical warfare agents and a threat to military and civilian populations. Once considered only for battlefield use, these agents are now used by terrorists to inflict mass casualties. OP nerve agents inhibit the critical enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE that rapidly leads to a cholinergic crisis involving multiple organs. Status epilepticus results from the excessive accumulation of synaptic acetylcholine which in turn leads to the overactivation of muscarinic receptors; prolonged seizures cause the neuropathology and long-term consequences in survivors. Current countermeasures mitigate symptoms and signs as well as reduce brain damage, but must be given within minutes after exposure to OP nerve agents supporting interest in newer and more effective therapies. The pleiotropic properties of ALA result in a coordinated molecular and cellular program to restore neuronal networks and improve cognitive function in soman-exposed animals. Collectively, ALA should be brought to the clinic to treat the long-term consequences of nerve agents in survivors. ALA may be an effective therapy for other acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders.

  2. Schistosoma mansoni: is acquired immunity induced by highly x-irradiated cercariae dependent on the size of the challenging dose

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    Hsue, S.Y.; Hsue, H.F.; Osborne, J.W.; Johnson, S.C.

    1982-01-01

    A high degree of immunity, as shown by a 91% reduction of the number of worms recovered was found in five groups of mice that were immunized five times with highly X-irradiated cercariae and then challenged with 10, 20, 50, 100, or 500 normal Schistosoma mansoni cercariae. The results indicated that there were no significant differences in worm reduction in immunized mice challenged with different numbers of cercariae; consequently the immunity induced by this immunization method did not appear to be challenge-dose-dependent. However, the results also showed that when immunized mice were challenged with 500, 100, 50, 20, and 10 cercariae, 0, 13, 26, 56, and 68%, respectively, of the experimental animals were free of worms. Thus, the percentage of worm-negative cases increased as the number of challenge cercariae decreased. When viewed in this manner, the acquired immunity may be considered challenge-dose-dependent as well. If this method of vaccination is used for schistosomiasis control, we may anticipate that in both hypo- and hyperendemic areas, the intensity of infection and the severity of the disease will be reduced owing to a reduction in worms burdens, and in hypoendemic areas, there will be a number of worm-free cases

  3. Skeletal Muscle and Lymphocyte Mitochondrial Dysfunctions in Septic Shock Trigger ICU-Acquired Weakness and Sepsis-Induced Immunoparalysis

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    Quentin Maestraggi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental events driving the pathological processes of septic shock-induced multiorgan failure (MOF at the cellular and subcellular levels remain debated. Emerging data implicate mitochondrial dysfunction as a critical factor in the pathogenesis of sepsis-associated MOF. If macrocirculatory and microcirculatory dysfunctions undoubtedly participate in organ dysfunction at the early stage of septic shock, an intrinsic bioenergetic failure, sometimes called “cytopathic hypoxia,” perpetuates cellular dysfunction. Short-term failure of vital organs immediately threatens patient survival but long-term recovery is also severely hindered by persistent dysfunction of organs traditionally described as nonvital, such as skeletal muscle and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. In this review, we will stress how and why a persistent mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscles and PBMC could impair survival in patients who overcome the first acute phase of their septic episode. First, muscle wasting protracts weaning from mechanical ventilation, increases the risk of mechanical ventilator-associated pneumonia, and creates a state of ICU-acquired muscle weakness, compelling the patient to bed. Second, failure of the immune system (“immunoparalysis” translates into its inability to clear infectious foci and predisposes the patient to recurrent nosocomial infections. We will finally emphasize how mitochondrial-targeted therapies could represent a realistic strategy to promote long-term recovery after sepsis.

  4. Exercise-Induced Neuroprotection of Hippocampus in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice via Upregulation of Mitochondrial 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase

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    Hai Bo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving mitochondrial function has been proposed as a reasonable therapeutic strategy to reduce amyloid-β (Aβ load and to modify the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, the relationship between mitochondrial adaptation and brain neuroprotection caused by physical exercise in AD is poorly understood. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of long-term treadmill exercise on mitochondrial 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1 level, mtDNA oxidative damage, and mitochondrial function in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of AD. In the present study, twenty weeks of treadmill training significantly improved the cognitive function and reduced the expression of Aβ-42 in APP/PS1 transgenic (Tg mice. Training also ameliorated mitochondrial respiratory function by increasing the complexes I, and IV and ATP synthase activities, whereas it attenuated ROS generation and mtDNA oxidative damage in Tg mice. Furthermore, the impaired mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes and mitochondrial OGG1 activities seen in Tg mice were restored with training. Acetylation level of mitochondrial OGG1 and MnSOD was markedly suppressed in Tg mice after exercise training, in parallel with increased level of SIRT3. These findings suggest that exercise training could increase mtDNA repair capacity in the mouse hippocampus, which in turn would result in protection against AD-related mitochondrial dysfunction and phenotypic deterioration.

  5. Virgin coconut oil (VCO) by normalizing NLRP3 inflammasome showed potential neuroprotective effects in Amyloid-β induced toxicity and high-fat diet fed rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Fatemeh; Khazaei, Mozafar; Komaki, Alireza; Amiri, Iraj; Jalili, Cyrus

    2018-05-02

    Both dyslipidemia and Alzheimer disease (AD) are associated with aging. In this study, the effects of virgin coconut oil (VCO) on inflammasome and oxidative stress in Alzheimer's model (receiving Amyloid-β (Aβ)) and high-fat diet (HFD) model were determined. A total of 120 male Wistar rats, were divided into 12 groups (n = 10), including; healthy control, sham surgery, sham surgery receiving normal saline, HFD, HFD + 8% VCO, HFD + 10% VCO, Aβ received rats, Aβ + 8%VCO, Aβ + 10%VCO, HFD + Aβ, HFD + Aβ+8%VCO, and HFD + Aβ + 10%VCO. Following memory and learning tests, blood sample prepared from the heart and hippocampus of rats in each group was kept at -70 °C for genes expression, oxidative stress, and biochemical tests. Aβ and HFD significantly impaired memory and learning by activating of both NOD-like receptor family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome and oxidative stress (p<0.05), while treatment with both 8 and 10% VCO normalized inflammasome genes expression and oxidative stress (p<0.05). The Congo Red, Cresyl Violet staining and immunohistochemistry (IHC) test revealed that VCO improved hippocampus histological changes, reduced Aβ plaques and phosphorylated Tau. High-fat diet has exacerbated the effects of Aβ, while VCO showed potential neuroprotective effect. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Alterations in white matter microstructure as vulnerability factors and acquired signs of traffic accident-induced PTSD.

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    Yawen Sun

    Full Text Available It remains unclear whether white matter (WM changes found in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD patients are stress-induced or precursors for vulnerability. The current study aimed to identify susceptibility factors relating to the development of PTSD and to examine the ability of these factors to predict the course of longitudinal PTSD. Sixty two victims who had experienced traffic accidents underwent diffusion tensor imaging using a 3.0T MRI system within 2 days after their accidents. Of these, 21 were diagnosed with PTSD at 1 or 6 months using the Clinician-Administered Ptsd Scale (CAPS. Then, 11 trauma-exposed victims with PTSD underwent the second MRI scan. Compared with the victims without PTSD, the victims with PTSD showed decreased fractional anisotropy (FA in WM of the anterior cingulate cortex, ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC, temporal lobes and midbrain, and increased mean diffusivity (MD in the vmPFC within 2 days after the traumatic event. Importantly, decreased FA of the vmPFC in the acute phase predicted greater future CAPS scores. In addition, we found decreased FA in the insula in the follow-up scan in the victims with PTSD, which correlated with the decreased FA of the vmPFC in their baseline scan. These results suggested that the WM might have changed within 2 days after the traumatic event in the individuals who would later develop PTSD. Furthermore, decreased FA of the vmPFC could be a possible vulnerability marker predicting future development of PTSD and may provide an outcome prediction of the acquired signs.

  7. Acquired neuropathies.

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    Lozeron, Pierre; Trocello, Jean-Marc; Kubis, Nathalie

    2013-09-01

    Acquired neuropathies represent most of the neuropathies encountered in clinical practice. Hundreds of causes have been identified even though up to 41% of patients are still classified as idiopathic (Rajabally and Shah in J Neurol 258:1431-1436, 1). Routine evaluation relies on comprehensive medical history taking, clinical examination, nerve conduction studies and laboratory tests. Other investigations such as nerve biopsy or nerve or muscle imaging are performed in specific settings. This review focuses on recent advances in acquired neuropathies.

  8. Neuroprotective effect of Terminalia chebula extracts and ellagic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the common neurodegenerative disorders among elderly. The purpose of this study was to determine the neuroprotective effect and mechanisms of action underlying the Terminalia chebula extracts and ellagic acid by using beta-amyloid25-35 (Aβ25-35)-induced cell toxicity ...

  9. The Neuroprotective Functions of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Proteins

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    Gábor Lovas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β proteins are multifunctional cytokines whose neural functions are increasingly recognized. The machinery of TGF-β signaling, including the serine kinase type transmembrane receptors, is present in the central nervous system. However, the 3 mammalian TGF-β subtypes have distinct distributions in the brain suggesting different neural functions. Evidence of their involvement in the development and plasticity of the nervous system as well as their functions in peripheral organs suggested that they also exhibit neuroprotective functions. Indeed, TGF-β expression is induced following a variety of types of brain tissue injury. The neuroprotective function of TGF-βs is most established following brain ischemia. Damage in experimental animal models of global and focal ischemia was shown to be attenuated by TGF-βs. In addition, support for their neuroprotective actions following trauma, sclerosis multiplex, neurodegenerative diseases, infections, and brain tumors is also accumulating. The review will also describe the potential mechanisms of neuroprotection exerted by TGF-βs including anti-inflammatory, -apoptotic, -excitotoxic actions as well as the promotion of scar formation, angiogenesis, and neuroregeneration. The participation of these mechanisms in the neuroprotective effects of TGF-βs during different brain lesions will also be discussed.

  10. Neuroprotective effects of Arctium lappa L. roots against glutamate-induced oxidative stress by inhibiting phosphorylation of p38, JNK and ERK 1/2 MAPKs in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xing; Sui, Shuang; Huang, Jin; Bai, Jun-Peng; Ren, Tian-Shu; Zhao, Qing-Chun

    2014-07-01

    Many studies have shown that glutamate-induced oxidative stress can lead to neuronal cell death involved in the development of neurodegenerative diseases. In this work, protective effects of ethyl acetate extract (EAE) of Arctium lappa L. roots against glutamate-induced oxidative stress in PC12 cells were evaluated. Also, the effects of EAE on antioxidant system, mitochondrial pathway, and signal transduction pathway were explored. Pretreatment with EAE significantly increased cell viability, activities of GSH-Px and SOD, mitochondrial membrane potential and reduced LDH leakage, ROS formation, and nuclear condensation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, western blot results revealed that EAE increased the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, and inhibited the up-regulation of caspase-3, release of cytochrome c, phosphorylation of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2). Therefore, our results indicate that EAE may be a promising neuroprotective agent for the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases implicated with oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Insulin-like Growth Factor-I Mediates Neuroprotection in Proteasome Inhibition-Induced Cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Benxu; Maffi, Shivani Kaushal; Martinez, Alex Anthony; Acosta, Yolanda P Villarreal; Morales, Liza D; Roberts, James L

    2011-01-01

    The proteasome is an enzyme complex responsible for targeted intracellular proteolysis. Alterations in proteasome-mediated protein clearance have been implicated in the pathogenesis of aging, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). In such diseases, proteasome inhibition may contribute to formation of abnormal protein aggregates, which in turn activate intracellular unfolded protein responses that cause oxidative stress and apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of Insulin-like Growth Factor-I (IGF-1) for neural SH-SY5Y cells treated with the proteasomal inhibitor, Epoxomicin, In SH-SY5Y cells, Epoxomicin treatment results in accumulation of intracellular ubiquitinated proteins and cytochrome c release from damaged mitochondria, leading to cell death, in Epoxomicin time- and dose-dependent manner. In cells treated with small amounts of IGF-1, the same dosages of Epoxomicin reduced both mitochondrial damage (cytochrome c release) and reduced caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage, both of which are markers of apoptosis. Notably, however, IGF-1-treated SH-SY5Y cells still contained ubiquitinated protein aggregates. This result indicates that IGF-1 blocks the downstream apoptotic consequences of Epoxomicin treatment leading to decreased proteasome function. Clues as to the mechanism for this protective effect come from (a) increased AKT phosphorylation observed in IGF-1-protected cells, vs. cells exposed to Epoxomicin without IGF-1, and (b) reduction of IGF-1 protection by pretreatment of the cells with LY294002 (an inhibitor of PI3-kinase). Together these findings suggest that activation of PI3/AKT pathways by IGF-1 is involved in IGF-1 neuroprotection against apoptosis following proteasome inhibition. PMID:21545837

  12. SABP2, a methyl salicylate esterase is required for the systemic acquired resistance induced by acibenzolar-S-methyl in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Diwaker; Jiang, Yu-Lin; Kumar, Dhirendra

    2010-08-04

    Tobacco SABP2, a 29kDa protein catalyzes the conversion of methyl salicylic acid (MeSA) into salicylic acid (SA) to induce SAR. Pretreatment of plants with acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM), a functional analog of salicylic acid induces systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Data presented in this paper suggest that SABP2 catalyzes the conversion of ASM into acibenzolar to induce SAR. Transgenic SABP2-silenced tobacco plants when treated with ASM, fail to express PR-1 proteins and do not induce robust SAR expression. When treated with acibenzolar, full SAR is induced in SABP2-silenced plants. These results show that functional SABP2 is required for ASM-mediated induction of resistance. Copyright (c) 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Neuroprotective effect of CNB-001, a novel pyrazole derivative of curcumin on biochemical and apoptotic markers against rotenone-induced SK-N-SH cellular model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraj, Richard L; Tamilselvam, Kuppusamy; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Elangovan, Namasivayam

    2013-11-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are underpinned for initiating a cascade of toxic events leading to dopaminergic neuronal death in Parkinson's disease (PD) and identified as vital target for therapeutic intervention. Curcumin, a potent antioxidant has been reported to display diverse neuroprotective properties against various neurodegenerative diseases including PD. In this present study, we investigated the protective effect of CNB-001, a pyrazole derivative of curcumin on rotenone-induced toxicity and its possible mechanisms in neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. Rotenone insult significantly reduced cell viability (MTT assay) and resulted in 78 % apoptosis (dual staining) by altering Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3, and cytochrome C expression. Moreover, rotenone enhanced ROS production and disrupts mitochondrial membrane potential. These resultant phenotypes were distinctly alleviated by CNB-001. Pretreatment with CNB-001(2 μM) 2 h before rotenone exposure (100 nM) increased cell viability, decreased ROS formation, maintained normal physiological mitochondrial membrane potential, and reduced apoptosis. Furthermore, CNB-001 inhibited downstream apoptotic cascade by increasing the expression of vital antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and decreased the expression of Bax, caspase-3, and cytochrome C. Collectively, the results suggest that CNB-001 protects neuronal cell against toxicity through antioxidant and antiapoptotic properties through its action on mitochondria. Therefore, it may be concluded that CNB-001 can be further developed as a promising drug for treatment of PD.

  14. Clinical trials for neuroprotection in ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, G; Carlesi, C; Pasquali, L; Piazza, S; Pietracupa, S; Fornai, F; Ruggieri, S; Murri, L

    2010-07-01

    Owing to uncertainty on the pathogenic mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) riluzole remains the only available therapy, with only marginal effects on disease survival. Here we review some of the recent advances in the search for disease-modifying drugs for ALS based on their putative neuroprotective effetcs. A number of more or less established agents have recently been investigated also in ALS for their potential role in neuroprotection and relying on antiglutamatergic, antioxidant or antiapoptotic strategies. Among them Talampanel, beta-lactam antibiotics, Coenzyme Q10, and minocycline have been investigated. Progress has also been made in exploiting growth factors for the treatment of ALS, partly due to advances in developing effective delivery systems to the central nervous system. A number of new therapies have also been identified, including a novel class of compounds, such as heat-shock protein co-inducers, which upregulate cell stress responses, and agents promoting autophagy and mitochondriogenesis, such as lithium and rapamycin. More recently, alterations of mRNA processing were described as a pathogenic mechanism in genetically defined forms of ALS, as those related to TDP-43 and FUS-TLS gene mutations. This knowledge is expected to improve our understanding of the pathogenetic mechanism in ALS and developing more effective therapies.

  15. General anesthetics in children: neurotoxic or neuroprotective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Farias Rebouças

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: general anesthetics are involved in neuroprotection in adults after ischemic events and cognitive impairment, thus, they also may be associated with learning disorders in children exposed to them before three years of age. Objective: Describe about the neurotoxic effects of general anesthetics in experimental animals and children. Method: This is a systematic review, performed from search in databases and on PubMed using the keywords "neurotoxicity" and "general anesthetics," and "general anesthetics," "neurotoxicity", "children", "young child "and" pediatric ". Results: The search resulted in 185 articles. Out of these, 78 met our inclusion criteria. We found that there was a significant evidence of neurotoxicity induced by general anesthetics in experimental animals that were just born, resulting in late and permanent cognitive deficits. This effect was associated with multiple exposures, exposure length of time and combination of drugs. However, some studies found cognitive impairment after a single exposure to anesthetic. Conclusion: There is insufficient evidence to state that general anesthetics are neurotoxic and have the potential to trigger learning and behavior disabilities in children. However, we suggest caution in indicating surgery in children under three years old, analyzing risk-benefit and inserting the family in the decision process.   Keywords: Neurotoxicity; Neuroprotection; Cognitive Impairment; Children; General Anesthesics

  16. Acquired Methemoglobinaemia

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    Adil Al-Lawati

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Acquired methemoglobinaemia is a relatively rare condition and, therefore infrequently encountered in acute medical practice. Suspicion of the condition may be triggered when the measured PaO2 is ‘out of keeping’ with the oxygen saturations that are discovered with pulse oximetry. We describe two separate cases of acquired methemoglobinaemia secondary to the recreational use of alkyl nitrites (’poppers’. The patients presented at separate times to two different teaching hospitals in London, UK. The similarity of these cases has led the authors to conclude that a raised awareness of this potentially fatal condition, and its association with a widely-available recreational drug, is necessary to ensure a correct and timely diagnosis.

  17. Neuroprotective Compound from an Endophytic Fungus, Colletotrichum sp. JS-0367.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji Hoon; Lee, Changyeol; Lee, Dahae; Kim, Soonok; Bang, Sunghee; Shin, Myoung-Sook; Lee, Jun; Kang, Ki Sung; Shim, Sang Hee

    2018-05-23

    Colletotrichum sp. JS-0367 was isolated from Morus alba (mulberry), identified, and cultured on a large scale for chemical investigation. One new anthraquinone (1) and three known anthraquinones (2-4) were isolated and identified using spectroscopic methods including 1D/2D-NMR and HRESIMS. Although the neuroprotective effects of some anthraquinones have been reported, the biological activities of the four anthraquinones isolated in this study have not been reported. Therefore, the neuroprotective effects of these compounds were determined against murine hippocampal HT22 cell death induced by glutamate. Compound 4, evariquinone, showed strong protective effects against HT22 cell death induced by glutamate by the inhibition of intracellular ROS accumulation and Ca 2+ influx triggered by glutamate. Immunoblot analysis revealed that compound 4 reduced the phosphorylation of MAPKs (JNK, ERK1/2, and p38) induced by glutamate. Furthermore, compound 4 strongly attenuated glutamate-mediated apoptotic cell death.

  18. Neuroprotective Effects of a Variety of Pomegranate Juice Extracts against MPTP-Induced Cytotoxicity and Oxidative Stress in Human Primary Neurons

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    Nady Braidy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP is an environmental toxin which selectively induces oxidative damage and mitochondrial and proteasomal dysfunctions to dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra leading to Parkinsonian syndrome in animal models and humans. MPTP is one of the most widely used in vitro models to investigate the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD and, screen for novel therapeutic compounds that can slow down or ameliorate this progressive degenerative disease. We investigated the therapeutic effect of pomegranate juice extracts (PJE, Helow, Malasi, Qusum, and Hamadh against MPTP-induced neurotoxicity in primary human neurons by examining extracellular LDH activity, intracellular NAD+ and ATP levels, and endogenous antioxidant levels including lipid peroxidation products, catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx activities, and reduced glutathione (GSH levels. MPTP induced a reduction in SOD and GPx activities and intracellular NAD+, ATP, and GSH levels parallel to an increase in extracellular LDH and CAT activities, although lipid peroxidation was not altered. We report that helow and malasi can ameliorate MPTP-induced neurotoxicity by attenuating the observed changes in redox function to a greater extent than qusum and hamedh. Selected PJE varieties may exhibit properties which may be of therapeutic value to slow down age-related degeneration and neurodegeneration in particular.

  19. Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid is a potent PPARγ agonist with neuroprotective activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Xavier; Del Río, Carmen; Casano, Salvatore; Palomares, Belén; Ferreiro-Vera, Carlos; Navarrete, Carmen; Sánchez-Carnerero, Carolina; Cantarero, Irene; Bellido, Maria Luz; Meyer, Stefan; Morello, Gaetano; Appendino, Giovanni; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2017-12-01

    Phytocannabinoids are produced in Cannabis sativa L. in acidic form and are decarboxylated upon heating, processing and storage. While the biological effects of decarboxylated cannabinoids such as Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol have been extensively investigated, the bioactivity of Δ 9 -tetahydrocannabinol acid (Δ 9 -THCA) is largely unknown, despite its occurrence in different Cannabis preparations. Here we have assessed possible neuroprotective actions of Δ 9 -THCA through modulation of PPARγ pathways. The effects of six phytocannabinoids on PPARγ binding and transcriptional activity were investigated. The effect of Δ 9 -THCA on mitochondrial biogenesis and PPARγ coactivator 1-α expression was investigated in Neuro-2a (N2a) cells. The neuroprotective effect was analysed in STHdh Q111/Q111 cells expressing a mutated form of the huntingtin protein and in N2a cells infected with an adenovirus carrying human huntingtin containing 94 polyQ repeats (mHtt-q94). The in vivo neuroprotective activity of Δ 9 -THCA was investigated in mice intoxicated with the mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA). Cannabinoid acids bind and activate PPARγ with higher potency than their decarboxylated products. Δ 9 -THCA increased mitochondrial mass in neuroblastoma N2a cells and prevented cytotoxicity induced by serum deprivation in STHdh Q111/Q111 cells and by mutHtt-q94 in N2a cells. Δ 9 -THCA, through a PPARγ-dependent pathway, was neuroprotective in mice treated with 3-NPA, improving motor deficits and preventing striatal degeneration. In addition, Δ 9 -THCA attenuated microgliosis, astrogliosis and up-regulation of proinflammatory markers induced by 3-NPA. Δ 9 -THCA shows potent neuroprotective activity, which is worth considering for the treatment of Huntington's disease and possibly other neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  20. Neuroprotective Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures by Modulating Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Sprouting, Neuron Survival, Astrocyte Proliferation, and S100B Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chung-Hsiang; Lin, Yi-Wen; Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Hsu-Jan; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2012-01-01

    Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR), which is a traditional Chinese medicine, has anticonvulsive effect in our previous studies, and the cellular mechanisms behind this are still little known. Because of this, we wanted to determine the importance of the role of UR on kainic acid- (KA-) induced epilepsy. Oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate the onset of epileptic seizure in animal tests. Hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting dramatically decreased, while neuronal survival increased with UR treatment in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas. Furthermore, oral UR for 6 weeks significantly attenuated the overexpression of astrocyte proliferation and S100B proteins but not γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A)) receptors. These results indicate that oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate mossy fiber sprouting, astrocyte proliferation, and S100B protein overexpression and increase neuronal survival in KA-induced epileptic rat hippocampus.

  1. Neuroprotective Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures by Modulating Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Sprouting, Neuron Survival, Astrocyte Proliferation, and S100B Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsiang Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR, which is a traditional Chinese medicine, has anticonvulsive effect in our previous studies, and the cellular mechanisms behind this are still little known. Because of this, we wanted to determine the importance of the role of UR on kainic acid- (KA- induced epilepsy. Oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate the onset of epileptic seizure in animal tests. Hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting dramatically decreased, while neuronal survival increased with UR treatment in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas. Furthermore, oral UR for 6 weeks significantly attenuated the overexpression of astrocyte proliferation and S100B proteins but not γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA receptors. These results indicate that oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate mossy fiber sprouting, astrocyte proliferation, and S100B protein overexpression and increase neuronal survival in KA-induced epileptic rat hippocampus

  2. Studying neuroprotective effect of Atorvastatin as a small molecule drug on high glucose-induced neurotoxicity in undifferentiated PC12 cells: role of NADPH oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayegan, Samira; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Sharifi, Ali Mohammad

    2017-02-01

    Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidase (NOX) activation has been considered the essential mechanism induced by hyperglycemia in various tissues. However, there is no comprehensive study on the role of NOXs in high glucose (HG)-induced toxic effect in neural tissues. Recently, a therapeutic strategy in oxidative related pathologies has been introduced by blocking the undesirable actions of NOX enzymes by small molecules. The protective roles of Statins in ameliorating oxidative stress by NOX inhibition have been shown in some tissues except neural. We hypothesized then, that different NOXs may have role in HG-induced neural cell injury. Furthermore, we postulate that Atorvastatin as a small molecule may modulate this NOXs activity to protect neural cells. Undifferentiated PC12 cells were treated with HG (140 mM/24 h) in the presence and absence of Atorvastatin (1 μM/96 h). The cell viability was measured by MTT assay and the gene and protein expressions profile of NOX (1-4) were determined by RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. Levels of ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA) were also evaluated. Gene and protein expression levels of NOX (1-4) and consequently ROS and MDA levels were elevated in HG-treated PC12 cells. Atorvastatin could significantly decrease HG-induced NOXs, ROS and MDA elevation and improve impaired cell viability. It can be concluded that HG could elevate NOXs activity, ROS and MDA levels in neural tissues and Atorvastatin as a small molecule NOX inhibitor drug may prevent and delay diabetic complications, particularly neuropathy.

  3. Neuroprotective Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures by Modulating Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Sprouting, Neuron Survival, Astrocyte Proliferation, and S100B Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Chung-Hsiang Liu; Yi-Wen Lin; Nou-Ying Tang; Hsu-Jan Liu; Ching-Liang Hsieh

    2012-01-01

    Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR), which is a traditional Chinese medicine, has anticonvulsive effect in our previous studies, and the cellular mechanisms behind this are still little known. Because of this, we wanted to determine the importance of the role of UR on kainic acid- (KA-) induced epilepsy. Oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate the onset of epileptic seizure in animal tests. Hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting dramatically decreased, while neuronal survival increased with UR treat...

  4. Resveratrol Neuroprotection in a Chronic Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe eFonseca-Kelly

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a naturally-occurring polyphenol that activates SIRT1, an NAD-dependent deacetylase. SRT501, a pharmaceutical formulation of resveratrol with enhanced systemic absorption, prevents neuronal loss without suppressing inflammation in mice with relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a model of multiple sclerosis. In contrast, resveratrol has been reported to suppress inflammation in chronic EAE, although neuroprotective effects were not evaluated. The current studies examine potential neuroprotective and immunomodulatory effects of resveratrol in chronic EAE induced by immunization with myelin oligodendroglial glycoprotein peptide in C57/Bl6 mice. Effects of two distinct formulations of resveratrol administered daily orally were compared. Resveratrol delayed the onset of EAE compared to vehicle-treated EAE mice, but did not prevent or alter the phenotype of inflammation in spinal cords or optic nerves. Significant neuroprotective effects were observed, with higher numbers of retinal ganglion cells found in eyes of resveratrol-treated EAE mice with optic nerve inflammation. Results demonstrate that resveratrol prevents neuronal loss in this chronic demyelinating disease model, similar to its effects in relapsing EAE. Differences in immunosuppression compared with prior studies suggest that immunomodulatory effects may be limited and may depend on specific immunization parameters or timing of treatment. Importantly, neuroprotective effects can occur without immunosuppression, suggesting a potential additive benefit of resveratrol in combination with anti-inflammatory therapies for multiple sclerosis.

  5. Neuroprotective Effect of Portulaca oleraceae Ethanolic Extract Ameliorates Methylmercury Induced Cognitive Dysfunction and Oxidative Stress in Cerebellum and Cortex of Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumathi, Thangarajan; Christinal, Johnson

    2016-07-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is highly toxic, and its principal target tissue in human is the nervous system, which has made MeHg intoxication a public health concern for many decades. Portulaca oleraceae (purslane), a member of the Portulacaceae family, is widespread as a weed and has been ranked the eighth most common plant in the world. In this study, we sought for potential beneficial effects of Portulaca oleracea ethanolic extract (POEE) against the neurotoxicity induced by MeHg in cerebellum and cortex of rats. Male Wistar rats were administered with MeHg orally at a dose of 5 mg/kg b.w. for 21 days. Experimental rats were given MeHg and also administered with POEE (4 mg/kg, orally) 1 h prior to the administration of MeHg for 21 days. After MeHg exposure, we determine the mercury concentration by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS); mercury content was observed high in MeHg-induced group. POEE reduced the mercury content. We also observed that the activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and the level of glutathione were reduced. The levels of glutathione reductase and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance were found to be increased. The above biochemical changes were found to be reversed with POEE. Behavioral changes like decrease tail flick response, longer immobility time, and decreased motor activity were noted down during MeHg exposure. POEE pretreatment offered protection from these behavioral changes. MeHg intoxication also caused histopathological changes in cerebellum and cortex, which was found to be normalized by treatment with POEE. The present results indicate that POEE has protective effect against MeHg-induced neurotoxicity.

  6. Neuroprotection by aripiprazole against β-amyloid-induced toxicity by P-CK2α activation via inhibition of GSK-3β

    OpenAIRE

    Park, So Youn; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Lee, Won Suk; Bae, Sun Sik; Kim, Koanhoi; Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae

    2017-01-01

    Psychosis is reported over 30% of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in clinics. Aripiprazole is an atypical antipsychotic drug with partial agonist activity at the D2 dopamine and 5-HT1A receptors with low side-effect profile. We identified aripiprazole is able to overcome the amyloid-β (Aβ)-evoked neurotoxicity and then increase the cell viability. This study elucidated the mechanism(s) by which aripiprazole ameliorates Aβ1-42-induced decreased neurite outgrowth and viability in neurona...

  7. Diet-Induced Growth Is Regulated via Acquired Leptin Resistance and Engages a Pomc-Somatostatin-Growth Hormone Circuit

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    Heiko Löhr

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Anorexigenic pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc/alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (αMSH neurons of the hypothalamic melanocortin system function as key regulators of energy homeostasis, also controlling somatic growth across different species. However, the mechanisms of melanocortin-dependent growth control still remain ill-defined. Here, we reveal a thus-far-unrecognized structural and functional connection between Pomc neurons and the somatotropic hypothalamo-pituitary axis. Excessive feeding of larval zebrafish causes leptin resistance and reduced levels of the hypothalamic satiety mediator pomca. In turn, this leads to reduced activation of hypophysiotropic somatostatin (Sst-neurons that express the melanocortin receptor Mc4r, elevated growth hormone (GH expression in the pituitary, and enhanced somatic growth. Mc4r expression and αMSH responsiveness are conserved in Sst-expressing hypothalamic neurons of mice. Thus, acquired leptin resistance and attenuation of pomca transcription in response to excessive caloric intake may represent an ancient mechanism to promote somatic growth when food resources are plentiful. : The melanocortin system controls energy homeostasis and somatic growth, but the underlying mechanisms are elusive. Löhr et al. identify a functional neural circuit in which Pomc neurons stimulate hypothalamic somatostatin neurons, thereby inhibiting hypophyseal growth hormone production. Excessive feeding and acquired leptin resistance attenuate this pathway, allowing faster somatic growth when food resources are rich. Keywords: Pomc neuron, somatostatin neuron, somatic growth, growth hormone, melanocortin system, high-fat diet, obesity, leptin resistance, zebrafish, mouse

  8. Resveratrol Neuroprotection in Stroke and Traumatic CNS injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mary; Dempsey, Robert J; Vemuganti, Raghu

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol, a stilbene formed in many plants in response to various stressors, elicits multiple beneficial effects in vertebrates. Particularly, resveratrol was shown to have therapeutic properties in cancer, atherosclerosis and neurodegeneration. Resveratrol-induced benefits are modulated by multiple synergistic pathways that control oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death. Despite the lack of a definitive mechanism, both in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that resveratrol can induce a neuroprotective state when administered acutely or prior to experimental injury to the CNS. In this review, we discuss the neuroprotective potential of resveratrol in stroke, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, with a focus on the molecular pathways responsible for this protection. PMID:26277384

  9. Prophylactic Neuroprotection of Total Glucosides of Paeoniae Radix Alba against Semen Strychni-Induced Neurotoxicity in Rats: Suppressing Oxidative Stress and Reducing the Absorption of Toxic Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shujuan; Chu, Yanjie; Zhang, Ruowen; Sun, Linjia; Chen, Xiaohui

    2018-04-20

    Strychnos alkaloids (SAs) are the main toxic constituents in Semen Strychni, a traditional Chinese medicine, which is known for its fatal neurotoxicity. Hence, the present study was carried out to evaluate the neurotoxicity induced by SAs and the pre-protective effects of the total glucosides of Paeoniae Radix Alba (TGP). An SA brain damage model was firstly established. The neurotoxicity induced by SAs and the pre-protective effects of TGP were confirmed by physical and behavioral testing, biochemical assay, and histological examination. Then, a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated to investigate the time-course change and distribution of strychnine and brucine (two main SAs) in the brain after oral SA administration with or without TGP pretreatment. Biochemical analysis results indicated that TGP could ameliorate the oxidative stress status caused by SAs. Time-course change and distribution studies demonstrated that strychnine and brucine were rapidly absorbed into the brain, peaked early at 0.5 h, and were mainly located in the hippocampus and cerebellum. TGP showed a pre-protective effect against neurotoxicity by reducing the absorption of toxic alkaloids into the brain. These findings could provide beneficial information in facilitating future studies of Semen Strychni neurotoxicity and developing herbal medicines to alleviate neurotoxicity in the clinic.

  10. Prophylactic Neuroprotection of Total Glucosides of Paeoniae Radix Alba against Semen Strychni-Induced Neurotoxicity in Rats: Suppressing Oxidative Stress and Reducing the Absorption of Toxic Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujuan Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Strychnos alkaloids (SAs are the main toxic constituents in Semen Strychni, a traditional Chinese medicine, which is known for its fatal neurotoxicity. Hence, the present study was carried out to evaluate the neurotoxicity induced by SAs and the pre-protective effects of the total glucosides of Paeoniae Radix Alba (TGP. An SA brain damage model was firstly established. The neurotoxicity induced by SAs and the pre-protective effects of TGP were confirmed by physical and behavioral testing, biochemical assay, and histological examination. Then, a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated to investigate the time-course change and distribution of strychnine and brucine (two main SAs in the brain after oral SA administration with or without TGP pretreatment. Biochemical analysis results indicated that TGP could ameliorate the oxidative stress status caused by SAs. Time-course change and distribution studies demonstrated that strychnine and brucine were rapidly absorbed into the brain, peaked early at 0.5 h, and were mainly located in the hippocampus and cerebellum. TGP showed a pre-protective effect against neurotoxicity by reducing the absorption of toxic alkaloids into the brain. These findings could provide beneficial information in facilitating future studies of Semen Strychni neurotoxicity and developing herbal medicines to alleviate neurotoxicity in the clinic.

  11. Attenuating effect of seeds of Adenanthera pavonina aqueous extract in neuropathic pain in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats: an evidence of neuroprotective effects

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    Ramdas B Pandhare

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to investigate the attenuating effects of Adenanthera pavonina L., Leguminosae-Mimosaceae seeds aqueous extract (APSAE, in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic neuropathy in rats. APSAE (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg per day was given to diabetic rats for twelve weeks. Cold and hot water tail immersion tests, photoactometer and Rota-rod tests were performed to assess degree of colder, thermal, spontaneous motor activity and motor co-ordination changes respectively at different time intervals i.e., week 0, 4, 8 and 12. Tissue superoxide anion and total calcium levels were determined after twelve weeks to assess biochemical alterations. Histopathological evaluations of sciatic nerve were also performed to assess nerve damage. APSAE treatment increased tail flick latency significantly in diabetic rats. APSAE also reduced superoxide anion and total calcium levels. These results suggested that APSAE has attenuated development of diabetic neuropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats when compared with pregabalin (10 mg/kg, p.o. and could be beneficial in preventing the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  12. Neuroprotective 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones of Imperata cylindrica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong Seon; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Sung, Sang Hyun; Kim, Young Choong

    2006-02-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the methanolic extract of the rhizomes of Imperata cylindrica afforded a new compound, 5-hydroxy-2-(2-phenylethyl)chromone (1), together with three known compounds, 5-hydroxy-2-[2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl]chromone (2), flidersiachromone (3), and 5-hydroxy-2-styrylchromone (4). Among these four compounds, 1 and 2 showed significant neuroprotective activity against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultures of rat cortical cells.

  13. Evidence for different mechanisms of ‘unhooking’ for melphalan and cisplatin-induced DNA interstrand cross-links in vitro and in clinical acquired resistant tumour samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spanswick Victoria J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs are critical lesions produced by several cancer chemotherapy agents including platinum drugs and nitrogen mustards. We have previously shown in haematological (multiple myeloma and solid tumours (ovarian cancer that clinical sensitivity to such agents can result from a defect in DNA ICL processing leading to their persistence. Conversely, enhanced repair can result in clinical acquired resistance following chemotherapy. The repair of ICLs is complex but it is assumed that the ‘unhooking’ step is common to all ICLs. Methods Using a modification of the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay we measured the formation and unhooking of melphalan and cisplatin-induced ICLs in cell lines and clinical samples. DNA damage response in the form of γ-H2AX foci formation and the formation of RAD51 foci as a marker of homologous recombination were also determined. Real-time PCR of 84 genes involved in DNA damage signalling pathways was also examined pre- and post-treatment. Results Plasma cells from multiple myeloma patients known to be clinically resistant to melphalan showed significant unhooking of melphalan-induced ICLs at 48 hours, but did not unhook cisplatin-induced ICLs. In ovarian cancer cells obtained from patients following platinum-based chemotherapy, unhooking of cisplatin-induced ICLs was observed at 48 hours, but no unhooking of melphalan-induced ICLs. In vitro, A549 cells were proficient at unhooking both melphalan and cisplatin-induced ICLs. γ-H2AX foci formation closely followed the formation of ICLs for both drugs, and rapidly declined following the peak of formation. RPMI8226 cells unhooked melphalan, but not cisplatin-induced ICLs. In these cells, although cross-links form with cisplatin, the γ-H2AX response is weak. In A549 cells, addition of 3nM gemcitabine resulted in complete inhibition of cisplatin-induced ICL unhooking but no effect on repair of melphalan ICLs. The

  14. Evidence for different mechanisms of ‘unhooking’ for melphalan and cisplatin-induced DNA interstrand cross-links in vitro and in clinical acquired resistant tumour samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spanswick, Victoria J; Hartley, John A; Lowe, Helen L; Newton, Claire; Bingham, John P; Bagnobianchi, Alessia; Kiakos, Konstantinos; Craddock, Charles; Ledermann, Jonathan A; Hochhauser, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) are critical lesions produced by several cancer chemotherapy agents including platinum drugs and nitrogen mustards. We have previously shown in haematological (multiple myeloma) and solid tumours (ovarian cancer) that clinical sensitivity to such agents can result from a defect in DNA ICL processing leading to their persistence. Conversely, enhanced repair can result in clinical acquired resistance following chemotherapy. The repair of ICLs is complex but it is assumed that the ‘unhooking’ step is common to all ICLs. Using a modification of the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay we measured the formation and unhooking of melphalan and cisplatin-induced ICLs in cell lines and clinical samples. DNA damage response in the form of γ-H2AX foci formation and the formation of RAD51 foci as a marker of homologous recombination were also determined. Real-time PCR of 84 genes involved in DNA damage signalling pathways was also examined pre- and post-treatment. Plasma cells from multiple myeloma patients known to be clinically resistant to melphalan showed significant unhooking of melphalan-induced ICLs at 48 hours, but did not unhook cisplatin-induced ICLs. In ovarian cancer cells obtained from patients following platinum-based chemotherapy, unhooking of cisplatin-induced ICLs was observed at 48 hours, but no unhooking of melphalan-induced ICLs. In vitro, A549 cells were proficient at unhooking both melphalan and cisplatin-induced ICLs. γ-H2AX foci formation closely followed the formation of ICLs for both drugs, and rapidly declined following the peak of formation. RPMI8226 cells unhooked melphalan, but not cisplatin-induced ICLs. In these cells, although cross-links form with cisplatin, the γ-H2AX response is weak. In A549 cells, addition of 3nM gemcitabine resulted in complete inhibition of cisplatin-induced ICL unhooking but no effect on repair of melphalan ICLs. The RAD51 foci response was both drug and cell line

  15. Neuroprotective effect of prenylated arylbenzofuran and flavonoids from morus alba fruits on glutamate-induced oxidative injury in HT22 hippocampal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kyeong-Hwa; Lee, Dae-Young; Jeong, Rak-Hun; Lee, Dong-Sung; Kim, Young-Eon; Hong, Eock-Kee; Kim, Youn-Chul; Baek, Nam-In

    2015-04-01

    A prenylated arylbenzofuran and six flavonoids were isolated from the fruits of Morus alba L. through silica gel, octadecyl silica gel, and Diaion HP-20 column chromatography. Based on the nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, and infrared spectroscopic data, the chemical structures of the compounds were determined to be artoindonesianin O (1), isobavachalcone (2), morachalcone A (3), quercetin (4), astragalin (5), isoquercetin (6), and rutin (7). The isolated compounds were evaluated for protection of HT22-immortalized hippocampal cells against glutamate-induced oxidative stress. Compounds 1 and 3 exhibited protective effects with EC(50) values of 19.7±1.2 and 35.5±2.1 μM, respectively. The major compounds 1-3 and 7 were quantified using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis and were determined to be 1.88±2.1, 1.90±1.8, 0.78±1.5, and 37.29±2.2 mg/kg, respectively, in the ethanol extract of M. alba L. fruits.

  16. Involvement of Bax and Bcl2 in Neuroprotective Effect of Curcumin in Kainic Acid-Induced Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Male Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    zahra Kiasalari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with neuronal apoptosis. Curcumin has antioxidant and anticonvulsant activities, therefore this study was conducted to assess involvement of Bax and Bcl2 in protective effect of curcumin in epileptic rats. Methods: 28 rats were divided into sham, curcumin-pretreated sham, epileptic (kainate, and curcumin-pretreated epileptic groups. Experimental model of epilepsy was induced by intrahippocampal administration of kainic acid. Rats received curcumin at a dose of 100 mg/kg. Finally, Nissl staining and Bax and Bcl2 immunohistochemistry were conducted on hippocampal sections and data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and unpaired t-test. The p-value less than 0.05was considered statistically significant. Results: Induction of epilepsy was followed by a significant seizure and curcumin pretreatment significantly reduced seizure intensity (p<0.01. In addition, there were no significant differences between the groups in Nissl staining of CA3 area neurons. In addition, Bax positive neurons were observed in CA3 area in kainate group and significantly decreased in curcumin pretreated rats (p<0.05. Meanwhile, Bcl2 positive neurons were also moderately observed in kainate group and curcumin pretreatment significantly increased it (p<0.05. Conclusion: Curcumin pretreatment exhibits anticonvulsant activity in epileptic rats. It also decreases the expression of pro-apoptotic protein Bax and significantly enhances the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 and hence could reduce neuronal apoptosis.

  17. Mitigation of arsenic-induced acquired cancer phenotype in prostate cancer stem cells by miR-143 restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngalame, Ntube N.O., E-mail: ngalamenn@niehs.nih.gov; Makia, Ngome L., E-mail: makianl@niehs.nih.gov; Waalkes, Michael P., E-mail: waalkes@niehs.nih.gov; Tokar, Erik J., E-mail: tokare@mail.nih.gov

    2016-12-01

    Inorganic arsenic, an environmental contaminant and a human carcinogen is associated with prostate cancer. Emerging evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are the driving force of carcinogenesis. Chronic arsenic exposure malignantly transforms the human normal prostate stem/progenitor cell (SC) line, WPE-stem to arsenic-cancer SCs (As-CSCs), through unknown mechanisms. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. In prior work, miR-143 was markedly downregulated in As-CSCs, suggesting a role in arsenic-induced malignant transformation. In the present study, we investigated whether loss of miR-143 expression is important in arsenic-induced transformation of prostate SCs. Restoration of miR-143 in As-CSCs was achieved by lentivirus-mediated miR-143 overexpression. Cells were assessed bi-weekly for up to 30 weeks to examine mitigation of cancer phenotype. Secreted matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity was increased by arsenic-induced malignant transformation, but miR-143 restoration decreased secreted MMP-2 and MMP-9 enzyme activities compared with scramble controls. Increased cell proliferation and apoptotic resistance, two hallmarks of cancer, were decreased upon miR-143 restoration. Increased apoptosis was associated with decreased BCL2 and BCL-XL expression. miR-143 restoration dysregulated the expression of SC/CSC self-renewal genes including NOTCH-1, BMI-1, OCT4 and ABCG2. The anticancer effects of miR-143 overexpression appeared to be mediated by targeting and inhibiting LIMK1 protein, and the phosphorylation of cofilin, a LIMK1 substrate. These findings clearly show that miR-143 restoration mitigated multiple cancer characteristics in the As-CSCs, suggesting a potential role in arsenic-induced transformation of prostate SCs. Thus, miR-143 is a potential biomarker and therapeutic target for arsenic-induced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure

  18. Mitigation of arsenic-induced acquired cancer phenotype in prostate cancer stem cells by miR-143 restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngalame, Ntube N.O.; Makia, Ngome L.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Tokar, Erik J.

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic, an environmental contaminant and a human carcinogen is associated with prostate cancer. Emerging evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are the driving force of carcinogenesis. Chronic arsenic exposure malignantly transforms the human normal prostate stem/progenitor cell (SC) line, WPE-stem to arsenic-cancer SCs (As-CSCs), through unknown mechanisms. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. In prior work, miR-143 was markedly downregulated in As-CSCs, suggesting a role in arsenic-induced malignant transformation. In the present study, we investigated whether loss of miR-143 expression is important in arsenic-induced transformation of prostate SCs. Restoration of miR-143 in As-CSCs was achieved by lentivirus-mediated miR-143 overexpression. Cells were assessed bi-weekly for up to 30 weeks to examine mitigation of cancer phenotype. Secreted matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity was increased by arsenic-induced malignant transformation, but miR-143 restoration decreased secreted MMP-2 and MMP-9 enzyme activities compared with scramble controls. Increased cell proliferation and apoptotic resistance, two hallmarks of cancer, were decreased upon miR-143 restoration. Increased apoptosis was associated with decreased BCL2 and BCL-XL expression. miR-143 restoration dysregulated the expression of SC/CSC self-renewal genes including NOTCH-1, BMI-1, OCT4 and ABCG2. The anticancer effects of miR-143 overexpression appeared to be mediated by targeting and inhibiting LIMK1 protein, and the phosphorylation of cofilin, a LIMK1 substrate. These findings clearly show that miR-143 restoration mitigated multiple cancer characteristics in the As-CSCs, suggesting a potential role in arsenic-induced transformation of prostate SCs. Thus, miR-143 is a potential biomarker and therapeutic target for arsenic-induced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure

  19. Anesthetic Preconditioning as Endogenous Neuroprotection in Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Han Chou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Blindness in glaucoma is the result of death of Retinal Ganglion Cells (RGCs and their axons. RGC death is generally preceded by a stage of reversible dysfunction and structural remodeling. Current treatments aimed at reducing intraocular pressure (IOP are ineffective or incompletely effective in management of the disease. IOP-independent neuroprotection or neuroprotection as adjuvant to IOP lowering in glaucoma remains a challenge as effective agents without side effects have not been identified yet. We show in DBA/2J mice with spontaneous IOP elevation and glaucoma that the lifespan of functional RGCs can be extended by preconditioning RGCs with retrobulbar lidocaine in one eye at four months of age that temporary blocks RGC axonal transport. The contralateral, PBS-injected eye served as control. Lidocaine-induced impairment of axonal transport to superior colliculi was assessed by intravitreal injection of cholera toxin B. Long-term (nine months effect of lidocaine were assessed on RGC electrical responsiveness (PERG, IOP, expression of relevant protein (BDNF, TrkB, PSD95, GFAP, Synaptophysin, and GAPDH and RGC density. While lidocaine treatment did not alter the age-related increase of IOP, TrkB expression was elevated, GFAP expression was decreased, RGC survival was improved by 35%, and PERG function was preserved. Results suggest that the lifespan of functional RGCs in mouse glaucoma can be extended by preconditioning RGCs in early stages of the disease using a minimally invasive treatment with retrobulbar lidocaine, a common ophthalmologic procedure. Lidocaine is inexpensive, safe and is approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA to be administered intravenously.

  20. The antiepileptic and neuroprotective effect of the Buxus hyrcana Pojark hydroethanolic extract against the pentylentetrazol induced model of the seizures in the male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Vahid; Allahyari, Farzin; Hosseini, Abdolkarim

    2018-03-06

    The genus Buxus grows up widespread in Europe and Western Asia. It is an important traditional plant that has been used in the treatment of many illnesses. In the present study, the effect of hydroethanolic extract of Buxus hyrcana Pojark (BHP) on the animal model of seizure was studied. In this experimental study, 42 male Wistar rats weighing 220-250 g were randomly selected and were divided into experimental and control groups (six rats per group). The experimental groups were treated by the intraperitoneal (i.p.) single injection of 150, 300, 450, 600 and 750 mg kg -1 of hydroalcoholic extracts of BHP. The control negative group received normal saline (0.9%) and the control positive group received phenobarbital (30 mg kg -1 , i.p.) pre-treatment. Thirty minutes after the treatments, the seizure behaviors were evaluated by the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) (70 mg kg -1 , i.p.) challenge. In addition, after the experiment, the rats were put to death and their brains were removed for the histological study. The ANOVA demonstrated that compared to the control group, all the BHP doses delayed the initiation and duration of the tonic, colonic and tonic-colonic seizures and significantly reduced the tonic and colonic seizures (p < 0.001). Furthermore, the administration of all five doses of the extract significantly prevented the production of the dark neurons (p < 0.001) in different areas of the hippocampus compared to PTZ group. We can conclude that the BHP extract has beneficial effects for the prevention of the PTZ induced seizure.

  1. Lack of neuroprotection in the absence of P2X7 receptors in toxin-induced animal models of Parkinson's disease

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    Kittel Ágnes

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies indicate a role of P2X7 receptors in processes that lead to neuronal death. The main objective of our study was to examine whether genetic deletion or pharmacological blockade of P2X7 receptors influenced dopaminergic cell death in various models of Parkinson's disease (PD. Results mRNA encoding P2X7 and P2X4 receptors was up-regulated after treatment of PC12 cells with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6- tetrahydropyridine (MPTP. P2X7 antagonists protected against MPTP and rotenone induced toxicity in the LDH assay, but failed to protect after rotenone treatment in the MTT assay in PC12 cells and in primary midbrain culture. In vivo MPTP and in vitro rotenone pretreatments increased the mRNA expression of P2X7 receptors in the striatum and substantia nigra of wild-type mice. Basal mRNA expression of P2X4 receptors was higher in P2X7 knockout mice and was further up-regulated by MPTP treatment. Genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of P2X7 receptors did not change survival rate or depletion of striatal endogenous dopamine (DA content after in vivo MPTP or in vitro rotenone treatment. However, depletion of norepinephrine was significant after MPTP treatment only in P2X7 knockout mice. The basal ATP content was higher in the substantia nigra of wild-type mice, but the ADP level was lower. Rotenone treatment elicited a similar reduction in ATP content in the substantia nigra of both genotypes, whereas reduction of ATP was more pronounced after rotenone treatment in striatal slices of P2X7 deficient mice. Although the endogenous amino acid content remained unchanged, the level of the endocannabinoid, 2-AG, was elevated by rotenone in the striatum of wild-type mice, an effect that was absent in mice deficient in P2X7 receptors. Conclusions We conclude that P2X7 receptor deficiency or inhibition does not support the survival of dopaminergic neurons in an in vivo or in vitro models of PD.

  2. Neuroprotective properties of GLP-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul; Burcelin, Remy; Nathanson, Esther

    2011-01-01

    emptying. Furthermore, data are beginning to emerge that indicate a potential role for GLP-1 in neuroprotection. The increased risk of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and stroke in people with type 2 diabetes suggests that shared mechanisms/pathways of cell death, possibly related to insulin...... path towards cellular dysfunction and death. This article summarizes the evidence for neuronal activity of GLP-1 and examines the limited data that currently exist on the therapeutic potential of GLP-1 in specific neurological and neurodegenerative conditions, namely Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson...

  3. Neurotropic and neuroprotective activities of the earthworm peptide Lumbricusin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Ik Hwan; Nam, Seung Taek; Hong, Ji; Zhang, Peng; Hwang, Jae Sam; Seok, Heon; Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Dong Gun; Kim, Jae Il; Kim, Ho

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 11-mer peptide Lumbricusin, a defensin like peptide, is isolated from earthworm. • We here demonstrated that Lumbricusin has neurotropic and neuroprotective effects. • p27 degradation by Lumbricusin mediates effects of Lumbricusin on neuronal cells. - Abstract: We recently isolated a polypeptide from the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris that is structurally similar to defensin, a well-known antibacterial peptide. An 11-mer antibacterial peptide (NH 2 -RNRRWCIDQQA), designated Lumbricusin, was synthesized based on the amino acid sequence of the isolated polypeptide. Since we previously reported that CopA3, a dung beetle peptide, enhanced neuronal cell proliferation, we here examined whether Lumbricusin exerted neurotropic and/or neuroprotective effects. Lumbricusin treatment induced a time-dependent increase (∼51%) in the proliferation of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Lumbricusin also significantly inhibited the apoptosis and decreased viability induced by treatment with 6-hydroxy dopamine, a Parkinson’s disease-mimicking agent. Immunoblot analyses revealed that Lumbricusin treatment increased ubiquitination of p27 Kip1 protein, a negative regulator of cell-cycle progression, in SH-SY5Y cells, and markedly promoted its degradation. Notably, adenoviral-mediated over-expression of p27 Kip1 significantly blocked the antiapoptotic effect of Lumbricusin in 6-hydroxy dopamine-treated SH-SY5Y cells. These results suggest that promotion of p27 Kip1 degradation may be the main mechanism underlying the neuroprotective and neurotropic effects of Lumbricusin

  4. Neurotropic and neuroprotective activities of the earthworm peptide Lumbricusin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Ik Hwan; Nam, Seung Taek; Hong, Ji; Zhang, Peng [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Daejin University, Pocheon, Gyeonggido 487-711 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jae Sam [Department of Agricultural Biology, National Academy of Agricultural Science, RDA, Suwon 441-707 (Korea, Republic of); Seok, Heon [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Jungwon University, Goesan, Chungcheongbukdo 367-700 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Dong Gun [School of Life Sciences, KNU Creative Bioresearch Group (BK21 Plus Program), College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daehak-ro 80, Buk-gu, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Il [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ho, E-mail: hokim@daejin.ac.kr [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Daejin University, Pocheon, Gyeonggido 487-711 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-06

    Highlights: • 11-mer peptide Lumbricusin, a defensin like peptide, is isolated from earthworm. • We here demonstrated that Lumbricusin has neurotropic and neuroprotective effects. • p27 degradation by Lumbricusin mediates effects of Lumbricusin on neuronal cells. - Abstract: We recently isolated a polypeptide from the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris that is structurally similar to defensin, a well-known antibacterial peptide. An 11-mer antibacterial peptide (NH{sub 2}-RNRRWCIDQQA), designated Lumbricusin, was synthesized based on the amino acid sequence of the isolated polypeptide. Since we previously reported that CopA3, a dung beetle peptide, enhanced neuronal cell proliferation, we here examined whether Lumbricusin exerted neurotropic and/or neuroprotective effects. Lumbricusin treatment induced a time-dependent increase (∼51%) in the proliferation of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Lumbricusin also significantly inhibited the apoptosis and decreased viability induced by treatment with 6-hydroxy dopamine, a Parkinson’s disease-mimicking agent. Immunoblot analyses revealed that Lumbricusin treatment increased ubiquitination of p27{sup Kip1} protein, a negative regulator of cell-cycle progression, in SH-SY5Y cells, and markedly promoted its degradation. Notably, adenoviral-mediated over-expression of p27{sup Kip1} significantly blocked the antiapoptotic effect of Lumbricusin in 6-hydroxy dopamine-treated SH-SY5Y cells. These results suggest that promotion of p27{sup Kip1} degradation may be the main mechanism underlying the neuroprotective and neurotropic effects of Lumbricusin.

  5. A study of the possibility of acquiring noise-induced hearing loss by the use of personal cassette players (walkman).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen-Rise, I; Flottorp, G; Tvete, O

    1991-01-01

    Playing various types of music on five selected personal cassette players (PCPs), A-weighted sound pressure levels (SPLs), together with octave band spectrum, were measured on KEMAR (Knowles Electronics Manikin for Acoustic Research). Maximum and equivalent SPLs were measured for various types of music, PCPs and for different gain (volume) settings. The measured SPL-values on KEMAR ear were transformed to field values outside the ear canal by means of corrections based on KEMAR's ear canal resonance curve--in order to compare measured values with the Norwegian national noise risk criteria. Temporary threshold shift (TTS) was measured after listening to PCP music for one hour in order to obtain additional information about possible risk of hearing damage. TTS values are presented for six subjects when playing two different pop music cassettes on one type PCP. Our analysis indicates that the risk for permanent noise-induced hearing loss from listening to PCP is very small for normal listening conditions.

  6. An Acquired HER2T798I Gatekeeper Mutation Induces Resistance to Neratinib in a Patient with HER2 Mutant-Driven Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanker, Ariella B; Brewer, Monica Red; Sheehan, Jonathan H; Koch, James P; Sliwoski, Gregory R; Nagy, Rebecca; Lanman, Richard; Berger, Michael F; Hyman, David M; Solit, David B; He, Jie; Miller, Vincent; Cutler, Richard E; Lalani, Alshad S; Cross, Darren; Lovly, Christine M; Meiler, Jens; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2017-06-01

    We report a HER2 T798I gatekeeper mutation in a patient with HER2 L869R -mutant breast cancer with acquired resistance to neratinib. Laboratory studies suggested that HER2 L869R is a neratinib-sensitive, gain-of-function mutation that upon dimerization with mutant HER3 E928G , also present in the breast cancer, amplifies HER2 signaling. The patient was treated with neratinib and exhibited a sustained partial response. Upon clinical progression, HER2 T798I was detected in plasma tumor cell-free DNA. Structural modeling of this acquired mutation suggested that the increased bulk of isoleucine in HER2 T798I reduces neratinib binding. Neratinib blocked HER2-mediated signaling and growth in cells expressing HER2 L869R but not HER2 L869R/T798I In contrast, afatinib and the osimertinib metabolite AZ5104 strongly suppressed HER2 L869R/T798I -induced signaling and cell growth. Acquisition of HER2 T798I upon development of resistance to neratinib in a breast cancer with an initial activating HER2 mutation suggests HER2 L869R is a driver mutation. HER2 T798I -mediated neratinib resistance may be overcome by other irreversible HER2 inhibitors like afatinib. Significance: We found an acquired HER2 gatekeeper mutation in a patient with HER2 -mutant breast cancer upon clinical progression on neratinib. We speculate that HER2 T798I may arise as a secondary mutation following response to effective HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) in other cancers with HER2 -activating mutations. This resistance may be overcome by other irreversible HER2 TKIs, such as afatinib. Cancer Discov; 7(6); 575-85. ©2017 AACR. This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 539 . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. A New Triterpene from Buddleja lindleyana with Neuroprotective Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Shuo Ren

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the phytochemical investigation of Buddleja lindleyana , a new 3-acetyl substituted triterpene, 13, 28-epoxy-23-hydroxy-3β-acetoxy-olean-11-ene (1, together with four same skeleton type known compounds (2-5 were isolated. The structure of 1 was elucidated by means of extensive spectroscopic analysis. Their neuroprotective effect against 1-methyl-4 -phenylpyridinium ion-induced (MPP +-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells were evaluated. The structure activity relationship of compounds 1-5 has been discussed preliminarily.

  8. Analysis of neutron diffraction spectra acquired in situ during stress-induced transformations in superelastic NiTi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidyanathan, R.; Bourke, M.A.; Dunand, D.C.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron diffraction spectra were obtained during various stages of a reversible stress-induced austenite to martensite phase transformation in superelastic NiTi. This was accomplished by neutron diffraction measurements on bulk polycrystalline NiTi samples simultaneously subjected to mechanical loading. Analysis of the data was carried out using individual lattice plane (hkl) reflections as well as by Rietveld refinement. In the Rietveld procedure, strains in austenite were described in terms of an isotropic (hkl independent) and an anisotropic (hkl dependent) component. At higher stresses, austenite lattice plane reflections exhibited nonlinear and dissimilar elastic responses which may be attributed to the transformation. The texture evolution is significant in both austenite and martensite phases during the transformation and two approaches were used to describe this evolving texture, i.e., an ellipsoidal model due to March - Dollase and a generalized spherical-harmonic approach. The respective predictions of the phase fraction evolution as a function of applied stress were compared. A methodology is thus established to quantify the discrete phase strains, phase volume fractions, and texture during such transformations. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  9. Unconventional neurotransmitters, neurodegeneration and neuroprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Leonelli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurotransmitters are also involved in functions other than conventional signal transfer between nerve cells, such as development, plasticity, neurodegeneration, and neuroprotection. For example, there is a considerable amount of data indicating developmental roles for the glutamatergic, cholinergic, dopaminergic, GABA-ergic, and ATP/adenosine systems. In this review, we discuss the existing literature on these "new" functions of neurotransmitters in relation to some unconventional neurotransmitters, such as the endocannabinoids and nitric oxide. Data indicating both transcriptional and post-transcriptional modulation of endocannabinoid and nitrinergic systems after neural lesions are discussed in relation to the non-conventional roles of these neurotransmitters. Knowledge of the roles of neurotransmitters in brain functions other than information transfer is critical for a more complete understanding of the functional organization of the brain and to provide more opportunities for the development of therapeutical tools aimed at minimizing neuronal death.

  10. Stem Cell-Based Neuroprotective and Neurorestorative Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Wei Hung

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells, a special subset of cells derived from embryo or adult tissues, are known to present the characteristics of self-renewal, multiple lineages of differentiation, high plastic capability, and long-term maintenance. Recent reports have further suggested that neural stem cells (NSCs derived from the adult hippocampal and subventricular regions possess the utilizing potential to develop the transplantation strategies and to screen the candidate agents for neurogenesis, neuroprotection, and neuroplasticity in neurodegenerative diseases. In this article, we review the roles of NSCs and other stem cells in neuroprotective and neurorestorative therapies for neurological and psychiatric diseases. We show the evidences that NSCs play the key roles involved in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders, including depression, stroke and Parkinson’s disease. Moreover, the potential and possible utilities of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS, reprogramming from adult fibroblasts with ectopic expression of four embryonic genes, are also reviewed and further discussed. An understanding of the biophysiology of stem cells could help us elucidate the pathogenicity and develop new treatments for neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to cell transplantation therapies, the application of stem cells can further provide a platform for drug discovery and small molecular testing, including Chinese herbal medicines. In addition, the high-throughput stem cell-based systems can be used to elucidate the mechanisms of neuroprotective candidates in translation medical research for neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Docosahexaenoic acid confers enduring neuroprotection in experimental stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Ha; Belayev, Ludmila; Khoutorova, Larissa; Obenaus, Andre; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2014-03-15

    Recently we demonstrated that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is highly neuroprotective when animals were allowed to survive during one week. This study was conducted to establish whether the neuroprotection induced by DHA persists with chronic survival. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 2h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) and treated with DHA or saline at 3h after MCAo. Animals received neurobehavioral examination (composite neuroscore, rota-rod, beam walking and Y maze tests) followed by ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology at 3 weeks. DHA improved composite neurologic score beginning on day 1 by 20%, which persisted throughout weeks 1-3 by 24-41% compared to the saline-treated group. DHA prolonged the latency in rota-rod on weeks 2-3 by 162-178%, enhanced balance performance in the beam walking test on weeks 1 and 2 by 42-51%, and decreased the number of entries in the Y maze test by 51% and spontaneous alteration by 53% on week 2 compared to the saline-treated group. DHA treatment reduced tissue loss (computed from T2-weighted images) by 24% and total and cortical infarct volumes by 46% and 54% compared to the saline-treated group. These results show that DHA confers enduring ischemic neuroprotection. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Neuroprotection and its molecular mechanism following spinal cord injury☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nai-Kui; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Acute spinal cord injury initiates a complex cascade of molecular events termed ‘secondary injury’, which leads to progressive degeneration ranging from early neuronal apoptosis at the lesion site to delayed degeneration of intact white matter tracts, and, ultimately, expansion of the initial injury. These secondary injury processes include, but are not limited to, inflammation, free radical-induced cell death, glutamate excitotoxicity, phospholipase A2 activation, and induction of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, which are important targets in developing neuroprotective strategies for treatment of spinal cord injury. Recently, a number of studies have shown promising results on neuroprotection and recovery of function in rodent models of spinal cord injury using treatments that target secondary injury processes including inflammation, phospholipase A2 activation, and manipulation of the PTEN-Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. The present review outlines our ongoing research on the molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection in experimental spinal cord injury and briefly summarizes our earlier findings on the therapeutic potential of pharmacological treatments in spinal cord injury. PMID:25624837

  13. Molecular Basis for Certain Neuroprotective Effects of Thyroid Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eDavis

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiology of brain damage that is common to ischemia-reperfusion inury and brain trauma includes disordered neuronal and glial cell energetics, intracellular acidosis, calcium toxicity, extracellular excitotoxic glutamate accumulation and dysfunction of the cytoskeleton and endoplasmic reticulum. Thyroid hormone isoforms, 3, 5, 3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3 and L-thyroxine (T4, have nongenomic and genomic actions that are relevant to repair of certain features of the pathophysiology of brain damage. Thyroid hormone can nongenomically repair intracullar H+ accumulation by stimulation of the Na+/H+ exchanger and can support desirably low [Ca2+]i.c. by activation of plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase. Thyroid hormone nongenomically stimulates astrocyte glutamate uptake, an action that protects both glial cells and neurons. The hormone supports the integrity of the cytoskeleton by its effect on actin. Several proteins linked to thyroid hormone action are also neuroprotective. For example, the hormone stimulates expression of the seladin-1 gene whose gene product is anti-apoptotic and is potentially protection in the setting of neurodegeneration. Transthyretin (TTR is a serum transport protein for T4 that is important to blood-brain barrier transfer of the hormone and TTR has also been found to be neuroprotective in the setting of ischemia. Finally, the interesting thyronamine derivatives of T4 have been shown to protect against ischemic brain damage through their ability to induce hypothermia in the intact organism. Thus, thyroid hromone or hormone derivatives have experimental promise as neuroprotective agents.

  14. Neuroprotective effects of metabotropic glutamate receptor group II and III activators against MPP(+)-induced cell death in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells: the impact of cell differentiation state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantas, D; Greda, A; Golda, S; Korostynski, M; Grygier, B; Roman, A; Pilc, A; Lason, W

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies have documented that metabotropic glutamate receptors from group II and III (mGluR II/III) are a potential target in the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), however, the neuroprotective effects of particular mGluR II/III subtypes in relation to PD pathology are recognized only partially. In the present study, we investigated the effect of various mGluR II/III activators in the in vitro model of PD using human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line and mitochondrial neurotoxin MPP(+). We demonstrated that all tested mGluR ligands: mGluR II agonist - LY354740, mGluR III agonist - ACPT-I, mGluR4 PAM - VU0361737, mGluR8 agonist - (S)-3,4-DCPG, mGluR8 PAM - AZ12216052 and mGluR7 allosteric agonist - AMN082 were protective against MPP(+)-evoked cell damage in undifferentiated (UN-) SH-SY5Y cells with the highest neuroprotection mediated by mGluR8-specific agents. However, in retinoic acid- differentiated (RA-) SH-SY5Y cells we found protection mediated only by mGluR8 activators. We also demonstrated the cell proliferation stimulating effect for mGluR4 and mGluR8 PAMs. Next, we showed that the protection mediated by mGluR II/III activators in UN-SH-SY5Y was not accompanied by the modulation of caspase-3 activity, however, a decrease in the number of apoptotic nuclei was found. Finally, we showed that the inhibitor of necroptosis, necrostatin-1 blocked the mGluR III-mediated protection. Altogether our comparative in vitro data add a further proof to neuroprotective effects of mGluR agonists or PAMs and point to mGluR8 as a promising target for neuroprotective interventions in PD. The results also suggest the participation of necroptosis-related molecular pathways in neuroprotective effects of mGluR III activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Study on the chemical composition of triterpenoid from the fruit of Buddleja lindleyana and their neuroprotective activitiy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, De-Ling; Wang, Yang-Kui; Wang, Xun-Cui; Liu, Jin-Song; Jin, Chuan-Shan; Zhang, Wei

    2011-12-01

    To study the chemical composition of triterpenoid from the fruit of Buddleja lindleyana. The chemical components were isolated by chromatography. The structures were identified by spectral data. The neuroprotective activity of these compounds were evaluated by using MPP+ induced injury in PC12 cells. 3 compounds were separated and identified as oleanane, alpha-L-msnnopyranoside derive (1), 13, 28-epoxy-3beta,23-dihydroxy-11-oleanene (2), 3, 23, 28-trihydroxyolean-11,13 (18)-diene (3). Compounds 1-3 showed obviously neuroprotective activity. The data of compound (1) is reported for the first time. The neuroprotective activities of compounds 1, 2, 3 are reported for the first time.

  16. Electrical stimulation and tinnitus: neuroplasticity, neuromodulation, neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Shulman; Barbara, Goldstein; Arnold, Strashun

    2013-01-01

    Neuroplasticity (NPL), neuromodulation (NM), and neuroprotection (NPT) are ongoing biophysiological processes that are linked together in sensory systems, the goal being the maintenance of a homeostasis of normal sensory function in the central nervous system. It is hypothesized that when the balance between excitatory - inhibitory action is broken in sensory systems, predominantly due to neuromodulatory activity with reduced induced inhibition and excitation predominates, sensory circuits become plastic with adaptation at synaptic levels to environmental inputs(1). Tinnitus an aberrant auditory sensation, for all clinical types, is clinically considered to reflect a failure of NPL, NM, and NPT to maintain normal auditory function at synaptic levels in sensory cortex and projected to downstream levels in the central auditory system in brain and sensorineural elements in ear. Clinically, the tinnitus sensation becomes behaviorally manifest with varying degrees of annoyance, reflecting a principle of sensory physiology that each sensation has components, i.e. sensory, affect/behavior, psychomotor and memory. Modalities of tinnitus therapies, eg instrumentation, pharmacology, surgery, target a particular component of tinnitus, with resultant activation of neuromodulators at multiple neuromodulatory centers in brain and ear. Effective neuromodulation at sensory neuronal synaptic levels results in NPL in sensory cortex, NPT and tinnitus relief. Functional brain imaging, metabolic (PET brain) and electrophysiology quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) data in a cochlear implant soft failure patient demonstrates what is clinically considered to reflect NPL, NM, NPT. The reader is provided with a rationale for tinnitus diagnosis and treatment, with a focus on ES, reflecting the biology underlying NPL, NM, NPT.

  17. The acquired radioresistance in HeLa cells under conditions mimicking hypoxia was attenuated by a decreased expression of HIF subunit genes induced by RNA interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Nobutaka; Ogawa, Ryohei; Cui, Zheng-Guo; Morii, Akihiro; Watanabe, Akihiko; Kanayama, Shinji; Yoneda, Yuko; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The cancer cells residing in the hypoxic layer are resistant to radiation and these are ones responsible for cancer recurrence after radiation therapy. One of the reasons why hypoxic cancer cells acquire radioresistance may be attributable to changes in the gene expression profile by the activation of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). However, the details underlying this process remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of knockdown of HIF subunit genes to elucidate how HIF subunit genes may be involved in the radioresistance acquired by HeLa cells following exposure to a hypoxia mimic. Interestingly, HIF-1α and HIF-2α seemed mutually complementary for each other when either of them was suppressed. We thus suppressed the expression of both genes simultaneously. To do this, we developed a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting a high homology region between HIF-1α and HIF-2α. It was shown that the expression of the shRNA effectively suppressed the acquisition of radioresistance following the hypoxia mimic. Moreover, it was confirmed that suppression of both subunits resulted in the downregulation of stem cell markers and the suppression of spheroid formation during the hypoxia mimicking-conditions. This shRNA-mediated knockdown method targeting a common region shared by a family of genes may offer a new candidate cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Incubation with CoCl 2 confers radioresistance to HeLa cells. • Both HIF-1α and HIF-2α are involved in the acquisition of radioresistance. • An shRNA to a homology region of HIF-1α and HIF-2α suppressed the radioresistance. • The shRNA decreased cells with stem cell markers and a stem cell phenotype

  18. The acquired radioresistance in HeLa cells under conditions mimicking hypoxia was attenuated by a decreased expression of HIF subunit genes induced by RNA interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, Nobutaka [Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); New Products Research & Development, Gene Engineering Division, NIPPON GENE Co., Ltd. (Japan); Ogawa, Ryohei, E-mail: ogawa@med.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Cui, Zheng-Guo [Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama (Japan); Morii, Akihiro; Watanabe, Akihiko [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama (Japan); Kanayama, Shinji; Yoneda, Yuko [New Products Research & Development, Gene Engineering Division, NIPPON GENE Co., Ltd. (Japan); Kondo, Takashi [Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    The cancer cells residing in the hypoxic layer are resistant to radiation and these are ones responsible for cancer recurrence after radiation therapy. One of the reasons why hypoxic cancer cells acquire radioresistance may be attributable to changes in the gene expression profile by the activation of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). However, the details underlying this process remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of knockdown of HIF subunit genes to elucidate how HIF subunit genes may be involved in the radioresistance acquired by HeLa cells following exposure to a hypoxia mimic. Interestingly, HIF-1α and HIF-2α seemed mutually complementary for each other when either of them was suppressed. We thus suppressed the expression of both genes simultaneously. To do this, we developed a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting a high homology region between HIF-1α and HIF-2α. It was shown that the expression of the shRNA effectively suppressed the acquisition of radioresistance following the hypoxia mimic. Moreover, it was confirmed that suppression of both subunits resulted in the downregulation of stem cell markers and the suppression of spheroid formation during the hypoxia mimicking-conditions. This shRNA-mediated knockdown method targeting a common region shared by a family of genes may offer a new candidate cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Incubation with CoCl{sub 2} confers radioresistance to HeLa cells. • Both HIF-1α and HIF-2α are involved in the acquisition of radioresistance. • An shRNA to a homology region of HIF-1α and HIF-2α suppressed the radioresistance. • The shRNA decreased cells with stem cell markers and a stem cell phenotype.

  19. Intermittent fasting is neuroprotective in focal cerebral ischemia by minimizing autophagic flux disturbance and inhibiting apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ji Heun; Yu, Kwang Sik; Bak, Dong Ho; Lee, Je Hun; Lee, Nam Seob; Jeong, Young Gil; Kim, Dong Kwan; Kim, Jwa-Jin; Han, Seung-Yun

    2016-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that autophagy induced by caloric restriction (CR) is neuroprotective against cerebral ischemia. However, it has not been determined whether intermittent fasting (IF), a variation of CR, can exert autophagy-related neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia. Therefore, the neuroprotective effect of IF was evaluated over the course of two weeks in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia, which was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion (MCAO/R). Specifically, the role of autophagy modulation as a potential underlying mechanism for this phenomenon was investigated. It was demonstrated that IF reduced infarct volume and brain edema, improved neurobehavioral deficits, and rescued neuronal loss after MCAO/R. Furthermore, neuronal apoptosis was decreased by IF in the rat cortex. An increase in the number of autophagosomes (APs) was demonstrated in the cortices of IF-treated rats, using immunofluorescence staining and transmission electron microscopy. Using immunoblots, an IF-induced increase was detected in microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-II, Rab7, and cathepsin D protein levels, which corroborated previous morphological studies. Notably, IF reduced the accumulation of APs and p62, demonstrating that IF attenuated the MCAO/R-induced disturbance of autophagic flux in neurons. The findings of the present study suggest that IF-induced neuroprotection in focal cerebral ischemia is due, at least in part, to the minimization of autophagic flux disturbance and inhibition of apoptosis.

  20. Encapsulation of curcumin in polyelectrolyte nanocapsules and their neuroprotective activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepanowicz, Krzysztof; Jantas, Danuta; Piotrowski, Marek; Staroń, Jakub; Leśkiewicz, Monika; Regulska, Magdalena; Lasoń, Władysław; Warszyński, Piotr

    2016-09-01

    Poor water solubility and low bioavailability of lipophilic drugs can be potentially improved with the use of delivery systems. In this study, encapsulation of nanoemulsion droplets was utilized to prepare curcumin nanocarriers. Nanosize droplets containing the drug were encapsulated in polyelectrolyte shells formed by the layer-by-layer (LbL) adsorption of biocompatible polyelectrolytes: poly-L-lysine (PLL) and poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA). The size of synthesized nanocapsules was around 100 nm. Their biocompatibility and neuroprotective effects were evaluated on the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line using cell viability/toxicity assays (MTT reduction, LDH release). Statistically significant toxic effect was clearly observed for PLL coated nanocapsules (reduction in cell viability about 20%-60%), while nanocapsules with PLL/PGA coating did not evoke any detrimental effects on SH-SY5Y cells. Curcumin encapsulated in PLL/PGA showed similar neuroprotective activity against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cell damage, as did 5 μM curcumin pre-dissolved in DMSO (about 16% of protection). Determination of concentration of curcumin in cell lysate confirmed that curcumin in nanocapsules has cell protective effect in lower concentrations (at least 20 times) than when given alone. Intracellular mechanisms of encapsulated curcumin-mediated protection engaged the prevention of the H2O2-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) but did not attenuate Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) formation. The obtained results indicate the utility of PLL/PGA shell nanocapsules as a promising, alternative way of curcumin delivery for neuroprotective purposes with improved efficiency and reduced toxicity.

  1. Neuroprotective Effect of Insulin-like Growth Factor-II on 1- Methyl-4 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the receptor-mediated neuroprotective effect of insulin-like growth factor-II (IGFII) on 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium (MPP) induced oxidative damage in adult cortical neuronal cultures. Methods: Adult rats were randomly divided into 5 groups. Cortical neurons were prepared from rats. The cells were ...

  2. Neuroprotective properties of a novel, non-haematopoietic agonist of the erythropoietin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pankratova, Stanislava; Kiryushko, Dar'Ya; Sonn, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    they are involved in tissue protection. However, the use of erythropoietin as a neuroprotective agent may be hampered by its erythropoietic activity. Therefore, developing non-haematopoietic erythropoietin mimetics is important. Based on the crystal structure of the complex of erythropoietin and its receptor, we...... attenuated seizures, decreased mortality and reduced neurodegeneration in an in vivo model of kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity. In contrast to erythropoietin, Epotris did not stimulate erythropoiesis upon chronic administration. Thus, Epotris is a novel neuroprotective non-haematopoietic erythropoietin...

  3. Natural host genetic resistance to lentiviral CNS disease: a neuroprotective MHC class I allele in SIV-infected macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L Mankowski

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection frequently causes neurologic disease even with anti-retroviral treatment. Although associations between MHC class I alleles and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS have been reported, the role MHC class I alleles play in restricting development of HIV-induced organ-specific diseases, including neurologic disease, has not been characterized. This study examined the relationship between expression of the MHC class I allele Mane-A*10 and development of lentiviral-induced central nervous system (CNS disease using a well-characterized simian immunodeficiency (SIV/pigtailed macaque model. The risk of developing CNS disease (SIV encephalitis was 2.5 times higher for animals that did not express the MHC class I allele Mane-A*10 (P = 0.002; RR = 2.5. Animals expressing the Mane-A*10 allele had significantly lower amounts of activated macrophages, SIV RNA, and neuronal dysfunction in the CNS than Mane-A*10 negative animals (P<0.001. Mane-A*10 positive animals with the highest CNS viral burdens contained SIV gag escape mutants at the Mane-A*10-restricted KP9 epitope in the CNS whereas wild type KP9 sequences dominated in the brain of Mane-A*10 negative animals with comparable CNS viral burdens. These concordant findings demonstrate that particular MHC class I alleles play major neuroprotective roles in lentiviral-induced CNS disease.

  4. Gene expression in cerebral ischemia: a new approach for neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, Mónica; Arenillas, Juan

    2006-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia is one of the strongest stimuli for gene induction in the brain. Hundreds of genes have been found to be induced by brain ischemia. Many genes are involved in neurodestructive functions such as excitotoxicity, inflammatory response and neuronal apoptosis. However, cerebral ischemia is also a powerful reformatting and reprogramming stimulus for the brain through neuroprotective gene expression. Several genes may participate in both cellular responses. Thus, isolation of candidate genes for neuroprotection strategies and interpretation of expression changes have been proven difficult. Nevertheless, many studies are being carried out to improve the knowledge of the gene activation and protein expression following ischemic stroke, as well as in the development of new therapies that modify biochemical, molecular and genetic changes underlying cerebral ischemia. Owing to the complexity of the process involving numerous critical genes expressed differentially in time, space and concentration, ongoing therapeutic efforts should be based on multiple interventions at different levels. By modification of the acute gene expression induced by ischemia or the apoptotic gene program, gene therapy is a promising treatment but is still in a very experimental phase. Some hurdles will have to be overcome before these therapies can be introduced into human clinical stroke trials. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Microglia and neuroprotection: implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Wolfgang J

    2005-04-01

    The first part of this paper summarizes some of the key observations from experimental work in animals that support a role of microglia as neuroprotective cells after acute neuronal injury. These studies point towards an important role of neuronal-microglial crosstalk in the facilitation of neuroprotection. Conceptually, injured neurons are thought to generate rescue signals that trigger microglial activation and, in turn, activated microglia produce trophic or other factors that help damaged neurons recover from injury. Against this background, the second part of this paper summarizes recent work from postmortem studies conducted in humans that have revealed the occurrence of senescent, or dystrophic, microglial cells in the aged and Alzheimer's disease brain. These findings suggest that microglial cells become increasingly dysfunctional with advancing age and that a loss of microglial cell function may involve a loss of neuroprotective properties that could contribute to the development of aging-related neurodegeneration.

  6. The Neuroprotection Effect of Oxygen Therapy: A Systematic Review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-04

    Apr 4, 2018 ... investigating the neuroprotective effect of oxygen, but the outcomes as well as ...... Neuroprotective gases – Fantasy or reality for clinical use? Prog .... of oxygen on brain tissue oxygen tension in children with severe traumatic ...

  7. Wine polyphenols: potential agents in neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basli, Abdelkader; Soulet, Stéphanie; Chaher, Nassima; Mérillon, Jean-Michel; Chibane, Mohamed; Monti, Jean-Pierre; Richard, Tristan

    2012-01-01

    There are numerous studies indicating that a moderate consumption of red wine provides certain health benefits, such as the protection against neurodegenerative diseases. This protective effect is most likely due to the presence of phenolic compounds in wine. Wine polyphenolic compounds are well known for the antioxidant properties. Oxidative stress is involved in many forms of cellular and molecular deterioration. This damage can lead to cell death and various neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's diseases. Extensive investigations have been undertaken to determine the neuroprotective effects of wine-related polyphenols. In this review we present the neuroprotective abilities of the major classes of wine-related polyphenols.

  8. Epigenetics and Therapeutic Targets Mediating Neuroprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Irfan A.; Mehler, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly evolving science of epigenetics is transforming our understanding of the nervous system in health and disease and holds great promise for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches targeting neurological diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic factors and mechanisms serve as important mediators of the pathogenic processes that lead to irrevocable neural injury and of countervailing homeostatic and regenerative responses. Epigenetics is, therefore, of considerable translational significance to the field of neuroprotection. In this brief review, we provide an overview of epigenetic mechanisms and highlight the emerging roles played by epigenetic processes in neural cell dysfunction and death and in resultant neuroprotective responses. PMID:26236020

  9. Wine Polyphenols: Potential Agents in Neuroprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basli, Abdelkader; Soulet, Stéphanie; Chaher, Nassima; Mérillon, Jean-Michel; Chibane, Mohamed; Monti, Jean-Pierre; Richard, Tristan

    2012-01-01

    There are numerous studies indicating that a moderate consumption of red wine provides certain health benefits, such as the protection against neurodegenerative diseases. This protective effect is most likely due to the presence of phenolic compounds in wine. Wine polyphenolic compounds are well known for the antioxidant properties. Oxidative stress is involved in many forms of cellular and molecular deterioration. This damage can lead to cell death and various neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's diseases. Extensive investigations have been undertaken to determine the neuroprotective effects of wine-related polyphenols. In this review we present the neuroprotective abilities of the major classes of wine-related polyphenols. PMID:22829964

  10. Proliferative Activity and Neuroprotective Effect of Ligustrazene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proliferative Activity and Neuroprotective Effect of. Ligustrazene Derivative by Irritation of Vascular. Endothelial Growth Factor Expression in Middle Cerebral. Artery Occlusion Rats. Zhang Huazheng1, Wang Penglong2, Ren Liwei1, Wang Xiaobo2, Li Guoliang2,. Wang Mina1, Chu Fuhao2, Gong Yan2, Xu Bing2, Bi Siling1, ...

  11. Paracrine effect of carbon monoxide - astrocytes promote neuroprotection through purinergic signaling in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroga, Cláudia S F; Alves, Raquel M A; Conde, Sílvia V; Alves, Paula M; Vieira, Helena L A

    2016-08-15

    The neuroprotective role of carbon monoxide (CO) has been studied in a cell-autonomous mode. Herein, a new concept is disclosed - CO affects astrocyte-neuron communication in a paracrine manner to promote neuroprotection. Neuronal survival was assessed when co-cultured with astrocytes that had been pre-treated or not with CO. The CO-pre-treated astrocytes reduced neuronal cell death, and the cellular mechanisms were investigated, focusing on purinergic signaling. CO modulates astrocytic metabolism and extracellular ATP content in the co-culture medium. Moreover, several antagonists of P1 adenosine and P2 ATP receptors partially reverted CO-induced neuroprotection through astrocytes. Likewise, knocking down expression of the neuronal P1 adenosine receptor A2A-R (encoded by Adora2a) reverted the neuroprotective effects of CO-exposed astrocytes. The neuroprotection of CO-treated astrocytes also decreased following prevention of ATP or adenosine release from astrocytic cells and inhibition of extracellular ATP metabolism into adenosine. Finally, the neuronal downstream event involves TrkB (also known as NTRK2) receptors and BDNF. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of TrkB receptors reverts neuroprotection triggered by CO-treated astrocytes. Furthermore, the neuronal ratio of BDNF to pro-BDNF increased in the presence of CO-treated astrocytes and decreased whenever A2A-R expression was silenced. In summary, CO prevents neuronal cell death in a paracrine manner by targeting astrocytic metabolism through purinergic signaling. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Intranasal Delivery of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Its Neuroprotective Effects Against Ischemic Brain Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bao-Liang; He, Mei-Qing; Han, Xiang-Yu; Sun, Jing-Yi; Yang, Ming-Feng; Yuan, Hui; Fan, Cun-Dong; Zhang, Shuai; Mao, Lei-Lei; Li, Da-Wei; Zhang, Zong-Yong; Zheng, Cheng-Bi; Yang, Xiao-Yi; Li, Yang V; Stetler, R Anne; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor with strong neuroprotective properties. However, it has limited capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier and thus potentially limiting its protective capacity. Recent studies demonstrated that intranasal drug administration is a promising way in delivering neuroprotective agents to the central nervous system. The current study therefore aimed at determining whether intranasal administration of G-CSF increases its delivery to the brain and its neuroprotective effect against ischemic brain injury. Transient focal cerebral ischemia in rat was induced with middle cerebral artery occlusion. Our resulted showed that intranasal administration is 8-12 times more effective than subcutaneous injection in delivering G-CSF to cerebrospinal fluid and brain parenchyma. Intranasal delivery enhanced the protective effects of G-CSF against ischemic injury in rats, indicated by decreased infarct volume and increased recovery of neurological function. The neuroprotective mechanisms of G-CSF involved enhanced upregulation of HO-1 and reduced calcium overload following ischemia. Intranasal G-CSF application also promoted angiogenesis and neurogenesis following brain ischemia. Taken together, G-CSF is a legitimate neuroprotective agent and intranasal administration of G-CSF is more effective in delivery and neuroprotection and could be a practical approach in clinic.

  13. Klotho upregulation contributes to the neuroprotection of ligustilide against cerebral ischemic injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Fang-Yi; Shi, Meng-Qi; Zhou, Hong-Jing; Liu, Dong-Ling; Sang, Na; Du, Jun-Rong

    2018-02-05

    Klotho, an aging-suppressor gene, encodes a protein that potentially acts as a neuroprotective factor. Our previous studies showed that ligustilide minimizes the cognitive dysfunction and brain damage induced by cerebral ischemia; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study aims to investigate whether klotho is involved in the protective effects of ligustilide against cerebral ischemic injury in mice. Cerebral ischemia was induced by bilateral common carotid arterial occlusion. Neurobehavioral tests as well as Nissl and Fluoro-Jade B staining were used to evaluate the protective effects of ligustilide in cerebral ischemia, and Western blotting and ELISA approaches were used to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Administration of ligustilide prevented the development of neurological deficits and reduced neuronal loss in the hippocampal CA1 region and the caudate putamen after cerebral ischemia. The protective effects were associated with inhibition of the RIG-I/NF-κB p65 and Akt/FoxO1 pathways and with prevention of inflammation and oxidative stress in the brain. Further, downregulation of klotho could attenuate the neuroprotection of ligustilide against cerebral ischemic injury. Ligustilide exerted neuroprotective effects in mice after cerebral ischemia by regulating anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant signaling pathways. Furthermore, klotho upregulation contributes to the neuroprotection of LIG against cerebral ischemic injury. These results indicated that ligustilide may be a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of cerebral ischemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Neuregulins, Neuroprotection and Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yurek, David M; Seroogy, Kim B

    2006-01-01

    ... s disease, in primary neuronal cultures of midbrain dopamine cells, and in a dopaminergic cell line. Overall, results from these studies may form the basis for the therapeutic application of neuregulins to the treatment of neurotoxin-induced neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease.

  15. Pharmacological preconditioning with GYKI 52466: a prophylactic approach to neuroprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea S Goulton

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Some toxins and drugs can trigger lasting neuroprotective mechanisms that enable neurons to resist a subsequent severe insult. This ‘pharmacological preconditioning’ has far-reaching implications for conditions in which blood flow to the brain is interrupted. We have previously shown that in vitro preconditioning with the AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI 52466 induces tolerance to kainic acid (KA toxicity in hippocampus. This effect persists well after washout of the drug and may be mediated via inverse agonism of G protein linked receptors. Given the amplifying nature of metabotropic modulation, we hypothesised that GYKI 52466 may be effective in reducing seizure severity at doses well below those normally associated with adverse side effects. Here we report that pharmacological preconditioning with low-dose GYKI imparts a significant protection against KA-induced seizures in vivo. GYKI (3 mg/kg, s.c., 90 to 180 min. prior to high-dose KA, markedly reduced seizure scores, virtually abolished all level 3 and level 4 seizures, and completely suppressed KA-induced hippocampal cFOS expression. In addition, preconditioned animals exhibited significant reductions in high frequency/high amplitude spiking and ECoG power in the delta, theta, alpha and beta bands during KA. Adverse behaviours often associated with higher doses of GYKI were not evident during preconditioning. The fact that GYKI is effective at doses well-below, and at pre-administration intervals well-beyond previous studies, suggests that a classical blockade of ionotropic AMPA receptors does not underlie anticonvulsant effects. Low-dose GYKI preconditioning may represent a novel, prophylactic strategy for neuroprotection in a field almost completely devoid of effective pharmaceuticals.

  16. Neuroprotective effect of the endogenous neural peptide apelin in cultured mouse cortical neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Xiang Jun; Yu, Shan Ping; Zhang, Like; Wei, Ling

    2010-01-01

    The adipocytokine apelin and its G protein-coupled APJ receptor were initially isolated from a bovine stomach and have been detected in the brain and cardiovascular system. Recent studies suggest that apelin can protect cardiomyocytes from ischemic injury. Here, we investigated the effect of apelin on apoptosis in mouse primary cultures of cortical neurons. Exposure of the cortical cultures to a serum-free medium for 24 h induced nuclear fragmentation and apoptotic death; apelin-13 (1.0-5.0 nM) markedly prevented the neuronal apoptosis. Apelin neuroprotective effects were mediated by multiple mechanisms. Apelin-13 reduced serum deprivation (SD)-induced ROS generation, mitochondria depolarization, cytochrome c release and activation of caspase-3. Apelin-13 prevented SD-induced changes in phosphorylation status of Akt and ERK1/2. In addition, apelin-13 attenuated NMDA-induced intracellular Ca 2+ accumulation. These results indicate that apelin is an endogenous neuroprotective adipocytokine that may block apoptosis and excitotoxic death via cellular and molecular mechanisms. It is suggested that apelins may be further explored as a potential neuroprotective reagent for ischemia-induced brain damage.

  17. Neuroprotective Properties of Endocannabinoids N-Arachidonoyl Dopamine and N-Docosahexaenoyl Dopamine Examined in Neuronal Precursors Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosadova, E V; Arsenyeva, E L; Manuilova, E S; Khaspekov, L G; Bobrov, M Yu; Bezuglov, V V; Illarioshkin, S N; Grivennikov, I A

    2017-11-01

    Neuroprotective properties of endocannabinoids N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA) and N-docosahexaenoyl dopamine (DHDA) were examined in neuronal precursor cells differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells and subjected to oxidative stress. Both compounds exerted neuroprotective activity, which was enhanced by elevating the concentration of the endocannabinoids within the 0.1-10 µM range. However, both agents at 10 µM concentration showed a marked toxic effect resulting in death of ~30% of the cells. Finally, antagonists of cannabinoid receptors as well as the receptor of the TRPV1 endovanilloid system did not hamper the neuroprotective effects of these endocannabinoids.

  18. Post-stroke angiotensin II type 2 receptor activation provides long-term neuroprotection in aged rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennion, Douglas M; Isenberg, Jacob D; Harmel, Allison T

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) by administration of Compound 21 (C21), a selective AT2R agonist, induces neuroprotection in models of ischemic stroke in young adult animals. The mechanisms of this neuroprotective action are varied, and may include direct and indirect....... These findings demonstrate that the neuroprotection previously characterized only during earlier time points using stroke models in young animals is sustained long-term in aged rats, implying even greater clinical relevance for the study of AT2R agonists for the acute treatment of ischemic stroke in human....... Intraperitoneal injections of C21 (0.03mg/kg) after ischemic stroke induced by transient monofilament middle cerebral artery occlusion resulted in protective effects that were sustained for up to at least 3-weeks post-stroke. These included improved neurological function across multiple assessments...

  19. Putative neuroprotective agents in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Seetal; Maes, Michael; Anderson, George; Dean, Olivia M; Moylan, Steven; Berk, Michael

    2013-04-05

    In many individuals with major neuropsychiatric disorders including depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, their disease characteristics are consistent with a neuroprogressive illness. This includes progressive structural brain changes, cognitive and functional decline, poorer treatment response and an increasing vulnerability to relapse with chronicity. The underlying molecular mechanisms of neuroprogression are thought to include neurotrophins and regulation of neurogenesis and apoptosis, neurotransmitters, inflammatory, oxidative and nitrosative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, cortisol and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and epigenetic influences. Knowledge of the involvement of each of these pathways implies that specific agents that act on some or multiple of these pathways may thus block this cascade and have neuroprotective properties. This paper reviews the potential of the most promising of these agents, including lithium and other known psychotropics, aspirin, minocycline, statins, N-acetylcysteine, leptin and melatonin. These agents are putative neuroprotective agents for schizophrenia and mood disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Wine Polyphenols: Potential Agents in Neuroprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelkader Basli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are numerous studies indicating that a moderate consumption of red wine provides certain health benefits, such as the protection against neurodegenerative diseases. This protective effect is most likely due to the presence of phenolic compounds in wine. Wine polyphenolic compounds are well known for the antioxidant properties. Oxidative stress is involved in many forms of cellular and molecular deterioration. This damage can lead to cell death and various neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s diseases. Extensive investigations have been undertaken to determine the neuroprotective effects of wine-related polyphenols. In this review we present the neuroprotective abilities of the major classes of wine-related polyphenols.

  1. Functional mechanism of neuroprotection by inhibitors of type B monoamine oxidase in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoi, Makoto; Maruyama, Wakako

    2009-08-01

    Neuroprotective therapy has been proposed for age-related neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease. Inhibitors of type B monoamine oxidase (MAOB-Is), rasagiline and (-)deprenyl, are the most promising candidate neuroprotective drugs. Clinical trials of rasagiline in patients with Parkinson's disease suggest that rasagiline may have some disease-modifying effects. Results using animal and cellular models have proved that the MAOB-Is protect neurons by the intervention of 'intrinsic' mitochondrial apoptotic cascade and the induction of prosurvival antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and neurotrophic factors. Rasagiline-related MAOB-Is prevent mitochondrial permeability transition induced by various insults and activation of subsequent apoptotic cascades: cytochrome c release, casapase activation, and condensation and fragmentation of nuclear DNA. MAOB-Is increase transcription of prosurvival genes through activating the nuclear transcription factor-(NF) system. Rasagiline increases the protein and mRNA levels of GDNF in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells, whereas (-)deprenyl increases those of BDNF. Systemic administration of (-)deprenyl and rasagiline increases these neurotrophic factors in the cerebrospinal fluid from patients with Parkinson's disease and nonhuman primates. This review presents recent advances in our understanding of the neuroprotection offered by MAOB-Is and possible evaluation of neuroprotective efficacy in clinical samples is discussed.

  2. The GABAA receptor agonist THIP is neuroprotective in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Noraberg, Jens; Zimmer, Jens

    2003-01-01

    The potential neuroprotective effects of the GABA(A) receptor agonists THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) and muscimol, and the selective GluR5 kainate receptor agonist ATPA ((RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid), which activates GABAergic interneu......The potential neuroprotective effects of the GABA(A) receptor agonists THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) and muscimol, and the selective GluR5 kainate receptor agonist ATPA ((RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid), which activates GABAergic...... interneurons, were examined in hippocampal slice cultures exposed to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). The NMDA-induced excitotoxicity was quantified by densitometric measurements of propidium iodide (PI) uptake. THIP (100-1000 microM) was neuroprotective in slice cultures co-exposed to NMDA (10 microM) for 48 h......, while muscimol (100-1000 microM) and ATPA (1-3 microM) were without effect. The results demonstrate that direct GABA(A) agonism can mediate neuroprotection in the hippocampus in vitro as previously suggested in vivo....

  3. Male/female differences in neuroprotection and neuromodulation of brain dopamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie eBourque

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The existence of a sex difference in Parkinson’s disease is observed in several variables, including susceptibility of the disease, age at onset and symptoms. These differences between men and women represent a significant characteristic of Parkinson’s disease which suggests that estrogens may exert beneficial effects against the development and the progression of the disease. This paper reviews the neuroprotective and neuromodulator effect of 17β-estradiol and progesterone as compared to androgens in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system of both female and male rodents. The 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP mice model of Parkinson’s disease and methamphetamine toxicity faithfully reproduce the sex differences of Parkinson’s disease in that endogenous estrogen levels appear to influence the vulnerability to toxins targeting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system. Exogenous 17β-estradiol and/or progesterone treatments show neuroprotective properties against nigrostriatal dopaminergic toxins while androgens fail to induce beneficial effect. Sex steroids treatments show males and females difference in their neuroprotective action against methamphetamine toxicity. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic structure and function, as well as the distribution of estrogen receptors, show sex difference and may influence the susceptibility to the toxins and the response to sex steroids. Genomic and non-genomic actions of 17β-estradiol converge to promote survival factors and the presence of both estrogen receptors α and β are critical to 17β-estradiol neuroprotective action against MPTP toxicity.

  4. Neuroprotective Effects of Citicoline in in Vitro Models of Retinal Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Matteucci

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, citicoline has been the object of remarkable interest as a possible neuroprotectant. The aim of this study was to investigate if citicoline affected cell survival in primary retinal cultures and if it exerted neuroprotective activity in conditions modeling retinal neurodegeneration. Primary retinal cultures, obtained from rat embryos, were first treated with increasing concentrations of citicoline (up to 1000 µM and analyzed in terms of apoptosis and caspase activation and characterized by immunocytochemistry to identify neuronal and glial cells. Subsequently, excitotoxic concentration of glutamate or High Glucose-containing cell culture medium (HG was administered as well-known conditions modeling neurodegeneration. Glutamate or HG treatments were performed in the presence or not of citicoline. Neuronal degeneration was evaluated in terms of apoptosis and loss of synapses. The results showed that citicoline did not cause any damage to the retinal neuroglial population up to 1000 µM. At the concentration of 100 µM, it was able to counteract neuronal cell damage both in glutamate- and HG-treated retinal cultures by decreasing proapoptotic effects and contrasting synapse loss. These data confirm that citicoline can efficiently exert a neuroprotective activity. In addition, the results suggest that primary retinal cultures, under conditions inducing neurodegeneration, may represent a useful system to investigate citicoline neuroprotective mechanisms.

  5. Neuroprotective actions of the synthetic estrogen 17alpha-ethynylestradiol in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picazo, Ofir; Becerril-Montes, Adriana; Huidobro-Perez, Delia; Garcia-Segura, Luis M

    2010-07-01

    17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2), a major constituent of many oral contraceptives, is similar in structure to 17beta-estradiol, which has neuroprotective properties in several animal models. This study explored the potential neuroprotective actions of EE2 against kainic and quinolinic acid toxicity in the hippocampus of adult ovariectomized Wistar rats. A decrease in the number of Nissl-stained neurons and the induction of vimentin immunoreactivity in astrocytes was observed in the hilus of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus after the administration of either kainic acid or quinolinic acid. EE2 prevented the neuronal loss and the induction of vimentin immunoreactivity induced by kainic acid at low (1 microg/rat) and high (10-100 microg/rat) doses and exerted a protection against quinolinic acid toxicity at a low dose (1 microg/rat) only. These observations demonstrate that EE2 exerts neuroprotective actions against excitotoxic insults. This finding is relevant for the design of new neuroprotective estrogenic compounds.

  6. Tadalafil enhances the neuroprotective effects of ischemic postconditioning in mice, probably in a nitric oxide associated manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Puja; Singh, Nirmal

    2014-05-01

    This study investigates the modulatory effect of tadalafil, a selective phosphodiesterase (PDE-5) inhibitor, on the neuroprotective effects of ischemic postconditioning (iPoCo) in mice. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCAO) for 12 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h was employed to produce ischemia and reperfusion induced cerebral injury. Cerebral infarct size was measured using TTC staining. Memory was assessed using the Morris water maze test. Degree of motor incoordination was evaluated using inclined beam-walking, rota-rod, and lateral push tests. Brain nitrite/nitrate, acetylcholinesterase activity, TBARS, and glutathione levels were also estimated. BCAO followed by reperfusion produced a significant increase in cerebral infarct size, brain nitrite/nitrate and TBARS levels, and acetylcholinesterase activity along with a reduction in glutathione. Marked impairment of memory and motor coordination was also noted. iPoCo consisting of 3 episodes of 10 s carotid artery occlusion and reperfusion instituted immediately after BCAO significantly decreased infarct size, memory impairment, motor incoordination, and altered biochemistry. Pretreatment with tadalafil mimicked the neuroprotective effects of iPoCo. The tadalafil-induced neuroprotective effects were significantly attenuated by l-NAME, a nonselective NOS inhibitor. We concluded that tadalafil mimics the neuroprotective effects of iPoCo, probably through a nitric oxide dependent pathway, and PDE-5 could be a target of interest with respect to the neuroprotective mechanism of iPoCo.

  7. A Case of Acquired Rifampin Resistance in Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-Induced Cystitis: Necessity for Treatment Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce N Wolfe

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of presumed bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG cystitis in an elderly female patient following direct intravesical BCG instillation treatment for papillary transitional cell carcinoma is reported. The organism cultured from urine samples was eventually identified as a rifampin-resistant Mycobacterium bovis BCG isolate. Because the patient had received rifampin monotherapy during the course of treatment for presumed BCG disease, the clinical picture favoured acquired rifampin resistance. Sequencing of the target gene for rifampin (rpoB confirmed a known mutation responsible for conferring high levels of resistance to both rifampin and rifabutin (Ser531Tyr. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of M bovis BCG disease in a non-HIV patient where the organism had acquired drug resistance to rifampin, and the second reported case of M bovis BCG that had acquired drug resistance. The present case demonstrates the necessity to re-evaluate appropriate guidelines for the effective treatment of BCG disease.

  8. The neuroprotective effect of nicotine in Parkinson’s disease models is associated with inhibiting PARP-1 and caspase-3 cleavage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Y.D. Lu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Clinical evidence points to neuroprotective effects of smoking in Parkinson’s disease (PD, but the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We investigated the pharmacological pathways involved in these neuroprotective effects, which could provide novel ideas for developing targeted neuroprotective treatments for PD. We used the ETC complex I inhibitor methylpyridinium ion (MPP+ to induce cell death in SH-SY5Y cells as a cellular model for PD and found that nicotine inhibits cell death. Using choline as a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR agonist, we found that nAChR stimulation was sufficient to protect SH-SY5Y cells against cell death from MPP+. Blocking α7 nAChR with methyllycaconitine (MLA prevented the protective effects of nicotine, demonstrating that these receptors are necessary for the neuroprotective effects of nicotine. The neuroprotective effect of nicotine involves other pathways relevant to PD. Cleaved Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 and cleaved caspase-3 were decreased by nicotine in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA lesioned mice and in MPP+-treated SH-SY5Y cells. In conclusion, our data indicate that nicotine likely exerts neuroprotective effects in PD through the α7 nAChR and downstream pathways including PARP-1 and caspase-3. This knowledge could be pursued in future research to develop neuroprotective treatments for PD.

  9. Neuroprotective function for ramified microglia in hippocampal excitotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinet Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most of the known functions of microglia, including neurotoxic and neuroprotective properties, are attributed to morphologically-activated microglia. Resting, ramified microglia are suggested to primarily monitor their environment including synapses. Here, we show an active protective role of ramified microglia in excitotoxicity-induced neurodegeneration. Methods Mouse organotypic hippocampal slice cultures were treated with N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA to induce excitotoxic neuronal cell death. This procedure was performed in slices containing resting microglia or slices that were chemically or genetically depleted of their endogenous microglia. Results Treatment of mouse organotypic hippocampal slice cultures with 10-50 μM N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA induced region-specific excitotoxic neuronal cell death with CA1 neurons being most vulnerable, whereas CA3 and DG neurons were affected less. Ablation of ramified microglia severely enhanced NMDA-induced neuronal cell death in the CA3 and DG region rendering them almost as sensitive as CA1 neurons. Replenishment of microglia-free slices with microglia restored the original resistance of CA3 and DG neurons towards NMDA. Conclusions Our data strongly suggest that ramified microglia not only screen their microenvironment but additionally protect hippocampal neurons under pathological conditions. Morphological activation of ramified microglia is thus not required to influence neuronal survival.

  10. Two new compounds from the fruits of Buddleja lindleyana with neuroprotective effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, De-Ling; Wang, Yang-Kui; Liu, Jing-Song; Wang, Xun-Cui; Zhang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Two new triterpenoid glycosides, mimengosides H (1) and I (2), were isolated from the fruits of Buddleja lindleyana Fort. Their structures were determined by extensive spectroscopic methods. Neuroprotective effects of these isolates against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells were evaluated. Pretreatment with compound 1 had potential protective effect in a concentration range from 0.1 to 1 μmol l⁻¹.

  11. Are purines mediators of the anticonvulsant/neuroprotective effects of ketogenic diets?

    OpenAIRE

    Masino, Susan A.; Geiger, Jonathan D.

    2008-01-01

    Abnormal neuronal signaling caused by metabolic changes characterizes several neurological disorders, and in some instances metabolic interventions provide therapeutic benefits. Indeed, altering metabolism either by fasting or by maintaining a low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) diet might reduce epileptic seizures and offer neuroprotection in part because the diet increases mitochondrial biogenesis and brain energy levels. Here we focus on a novel hypothesis that a ketogenic diet-induced change in ...

  12. TRPV1 may increase the effectiveness of estrogen therapy on neuroprotection and neuroregeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ramírez-Barrantes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging induces physical deterioration, loss of the blood brain barrier, neuronal loss-induced mental and neurodegenerative diseases. Hypotalamus-hypophysis-gonad axis aging precedes symptoms of menopause or andropause and is a major determinant of sensory and cognitive integrated function. Sexual steroids support important functions, exert pleiotropic effects in different sensory cells, promote regeneration, plasticity and health of the nervous system. Their diminution is associated with impaired cognitive and mental health and increased risk of neurodegenerative diseases. Then, restoring neuroendocrine axes during aging can be key to enhance brain health through neuroprotection and neuroregeneration, depending on the modulation of plasticity mechanisms. Estrogen-dependent transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1 expression induces neuroprotection, neurogenesis and regeneration on damaged tissues. Agonists of TRPV1 can modulate neuroprotection and repair of sensitive neurons, while modulators as other cognitive enhancers may improve the survival rate, differentiation and integration of neural stem cell progenitors in functional neural network. Menopause constitutes a relevant clinical model of steroidal production decline associated with progressive cognitive and mental impairment, which allows exploring the effects of hormone therapy in health outcomes such as dysfunction of CNS. Simulating the administration of hormone therapy to virtual menopausal individuals allows assessing its hypothetical impact and sensitivity to conditions that modify the effectiveness and efficiency.

  13. Preclinical anticonvulsant and neuroprotective profile of 8319, a non-competitive NMDA antagonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fielding, S.; Wilker, J.C.; Chernack, J.; Ramirez, V.; Wilmot, C.A.; Martin, L.L.; Payack, J.F.; Cornfeldt, M.L.; Rudolphi, K.A.; Rush, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    8319, ((+-)-2-Amino-N-ethyl-alpha-(3-methyl-2-thienyl)benzeneethanamine 2HCl), is a novel compound with the profile of a non-competitive NMDA antagonist. The compound displaced [3H] TCP with high affinity (IC50 = 43 nM), but was inactive at the NMDA, benzodiazepine and GABA sites; in vivo, 8319 showed good efficacy as an anticonvulsant and potential neuroprotective agent. It blocked seizures induced by NMDLA, supramaximal electroshock, pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), picrotoxin, and thiosemicarbazide with ED50's of 1-20 mg/kg ip. As a neuroprotective agent, 8319 (30-100 mg/kg sc) prevented the death of dorsal hippocampal pyramidal cells induced by direct injection of 20 nmol NMDA. At 15 mg/kg ip, the compound was also effective against hippocampal neuronal necrosis induced via bilateral occlusion of the carotid arteries in gerbils. In summary, 8319 is a noncompetitive NMDA antagonist with good anticonvulsant activity and may possess neuroprotective properties useful in the treatment of brain ischemia

  14. Neuropharmacological and neuroprotective activities of some metabolites produced by cell suspension culture of Waltheria americana Linn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundo, Jorge; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Herrera-Ruiz, Maribel; Gutiérrez, María Del Carmen; Arellano-García, Jesús; León-Rivera, Ismael; Perea-Arango, Irene

    2017-10-01

    Waltheria americana is a plant used in Mexican traditional medicine to treat some nervous system disorders. The aims of the present study were to isolate and determine the neuropharmacological and neurprotective activities of metabolites produced by a cell suspension culture of Waltheria americana. Submerged cultivation of W. americana cells provided biomass. A methanol-soluble extract (WAsc) was obtained from biomass. WAsc was fractionated yielding the chromatographic fractions 4WAsc-H 2 O and WAsc-CH 2 Cl 2 . For the determination of anticonvulsant activity in vivo, seizures were induced in mice by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ). Neuropharmacological activities (release of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) and neuroprotection) of chromatographic fractions were determined by in vitro histological analysis of brain sections of mice post mortem. Fraction 4WAsc-H 2 O (containing saccharides) did not produce neuronal damage, neurodegeneration, interstitial tissue edema, astrocytic activation, nor cell death. Pretreatment of animals with 4WAsc-H 2 O and WAsc-CH 2 Cl 2 from W. americana cell suspensions induced an increase in: GABA release, seizure latency, survival time, neuroprotection, and a decrease in the degree of severity of tonic/tonic-clonic convulsions, preventing PTZ-induced death of up to 100% of animals of study. Bioactive compounds produced in suspension cell culture of W. americana produce neuroprotective and neuropharmacological activities associated with the GABAergic neurotransmission system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Acquired bleeding disorders

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B one marrow aplasia ... Laboratory approach to a suspected acquired bleeding disorder. (LER = leuko- .... lymphocytic leukaemia, and lymphoma). ... cells), a bone marrow aspirate and trephine biopsy (BMAT) is not ..... transplantation.

  16. Pneumonia - children - community acquired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronchopneumonia - children; Community-acquired pneumonia - children; CAP - children ... Viruses are the most common cause of pneumonia in infants and children. Ways your child can get CAP include: Bacteria and viruses living in the nose, sinuses, or mouth may spread ...

  17. Cerium and yttrium oxide nanoparticles are neuroprotective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, David; Dargusch, Richard; Raitano, Joan; Chan, S.-W.

    2006-01-01

    The responses of cells exposed to nanoparticles have been studied with regard to toxicity, but very little attention has been paid to the possibility that some types of particles can protect cells from various forms of lethal stress. It is shown here that nanoparticles composed of cerium oxide or yttrium oxide protect nerve cells from oxidative stress and that the neuroprotection is independent of particle size. The ceria and yttria nanoparticles act as direct antioxidants to limit the amount of reactive oxygen species required to kill the cells. It follows that this group of nanoparticles could be used to modulate oxidative stress in biological systems

  18. Laboratory-acquired brucellosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, C.; Knudsen, J.D.; Lebech, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9......Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  19. Coptis chinensis Franch. exhibits neuroprotective properties against oxidative stress in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedemann, Thomas; Otto, Benjamin; Klätschke, Kristin; Schumacher, Udo; Tao, Yi; Leung, Alexander Kai-Man; Efferth, Thomas; Schröder, Sven

    2014-08-08

    The dried rhizome of Coptis chinensis Franch. (family Ranunculaceae) is traditionally used in Chinese medicine for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and diabetes. Recent studies showed a variety of activities of Coptis chinensis Franch. alkaloids, including neuroprotective, neuroregenerative, anti-diabetic, anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. However, there is no report on the neuroprotective effect of Coptis chinensis Franch. watery extract against tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH) induced oxidative damage. The aim of the study is to investigate neuroprotective properties of Coptis chinensis Franch. rhizome watery extract (CRE) and to evaluate its potential mechanism of action. Neuroprotective properties on t-BOOH induced oxidative stress were investigated in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Cells were pretreated with CRE for 2 h or 24 h followed by 2 h of treatment with t-BOOH. To evaluate the neuroprotective effect of CRE, cell viability, cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and the apoptotic rate were determined and microarray analyses, as well as qRT-PCR analyses were conducted. Two hours of exposure to 100 µM t-BOOH resulted in a significant reduction of cell viability, increased apoptotic rate, declined mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and increased ROS production. Reduction of cell viability, increased apoptotic rate and declined mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) could be significantly reduced in cells pretreated with CRE (100 µg/ml) for 2h or 24h ahead of t-BOOH exposure with the greatest effect after 24h of pretreatment; however ROS production was not changed significantly. Furthermore, microarray analyses revealed that the expressions of 2 genes; thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) and mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1, were significantly regulated. Down regulation of TXNIP was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Due to its neuroprotective properties CRE might be a potential

  20. Nrf2 signaling contributes to the neuroprotective effects of urate against 6-OHDA toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mounting evidence shows that urate may become a biomarker of Parkinson's disease (PD diagnosis and prognosis and a neuroprotectant candidate for PD therapy. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying its neuroprotective actions remain poorly understood. RESULTS: In this study, we showed that urate pretreatment protected dopaminergic cell line (SH-SY5Y and MES23.5 against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA- and hydrogen peroxide- induced cell damage. Urate was found to be accumulated into SH-SY5Y cells after 30 min treatment. Moreover, urate induced NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 accumulation by inhibiting its ubiquitinationa and degradation, and also promoted its nuclear translocation; however, it did not modulate Nrf2 mRNA level or Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1 expression. In addition, urate markedly up-regulated the transcription and protein expression of γ-glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (γ-GCLC and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, both of which are controlled by Nrf2 activity. Furthermore, Nrf2 knockdown by siRNA abolished the intracellular glutathione augmentation and the protection exerted by urate pretreatment. CONCLUSION: Our findings demonstrated that urate treatment may result in Nrf2-targeted anti-oxidant genes transcription and expression by reducing Nrf2 ubiquitination and degradation and promoting its nuclear translocation, and thus offer neuroprotection on dopaminergic cells against oxidative stresses.

  1. Pharmacological preconditioning by milrinone: memory preserving and neuroprotective effect in ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saklani, Reetu; Jaggi, Amteshwar; Singh, Nirmal

    2010-07-01

    We tested the neuroprotective effect of milrinone, a phosphodiesterase III inhibitor, in pharmacological preconditioning. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion for 12 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h produced ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) cerebral injury in male Swiss albino mice. Cerebral infarct size was measured using triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Memory was assessed using the Morris water maze test, and motor coordination was evaluated using the inclined beam walking test, rota-rod test, and lateral push test. Milrinone (50 microg/kg & 100 microg/kg i.v.) was administered 24 h before surgery in a separate group of animals to induce pharmacological preconditioning. I/R increased cerebral infarct size and impaired memory and motor coordination. Milrinone treatment significantly decreased cerebral infarct size and reversed I/R-induced impairments in memory and motor coordination. This neuroprotective effect was blocked by ruthenium red (3 mg/kg, s.c.), an intracellular ryanodine receptor blocker. These findings indicate that milrinone preconditioning exerts a marked neuroprotective effect on the ischemic brain, putatively due to increased intracellular calcium levels activating calcium-sensitive signal transduction cascades.

  2. ATG5 overexpression is neuroprotective and attenuates cytoskeletal and vesicle-trafficking alterations in axotomized motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva-Rodríguez, Tatiana; Romeo-Guitart, David; Marmolejo-Martínez-Artesero, Sara; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Bosch, Assumpció; Forés, Joaquim; Casas, Caty

    2018-05-24

    Injured neurons should engage endogenous mechanisms of self-protection to limit neurodegeneration. Enhancing efficacy of these mechanisms or correcting dysfunctional pathways may be a successful strategy for inducing neuroprotection. Spinal motoneurons retrogradely degenerate after proximal axotomy due to mechanical detachment (avulsion) of the nerve roots, and this limits recovery of nervous system function in patients after this type of trauma. In a previously reported proteomic analysis, we demonstrated that autophagy is a key endogenous mechanism that may allow motoneuron survival and regeneration after distal axotomy and suture of the nerve. Herein, we show that autophagy flux is dysfunctional or blocked in degenerated motoneurons after root avulsion. We also found that there were abnormalities in anterograde/retrograde motor proteins, key secretory pathway factors, and lysosome function. Further, LAMP1 protein was missorted and underglycosylated as well as the proton pump v-ATPase. In vitro modeling revealed how sequential disruptions in these systems likely lead to neurodegeneration. In vivo, we observed that cytoskeletal alterations, induced by a single injection of nocodazole, were sufficient to promote neurodegeneration of avulsed motoneurons. Besides, only pre-treatment with rapamycin, but not post-treatment, neuroprotected after nerve root avulsion. In agreement, overexpressing ATG5 in injured motoneurons led to neuroprotection and attenuation of cytoskeletal and trafficking-related abnormalities. These discoveries serve as proof of concept for autophagy-target therapy to halting the progression of neurodegenerative processes.

  3. Differential effects of synthetic progestagens on neuron survival and estrogen neuroprotection in cultured neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Anusha; Pike, Christian J

    2014-03-25

    Progesterone and other progestagens are used in combination with estrogens for clinical purposes, including contraception and postmenopausal hormone therapy. Progesterone and estrogens have interactive effects in brain, however interactions between synthetic progestagens and 17β-estradiol (E2) in neurons are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of seven clinically relevant progestagens on estrogen receptor (ER) mRNA expression, E2-induced neuroprotection, and E2-induced BDNF mRNA expression. We found that medroxyprogesterone acetate decreased both ERα and ERβ expression and blocked E2-mediated neuroprotection and BDNF expression. Conversely, levonorgestrel and nesterone increased ERα and or ERβ expression, were neuroprotective, and failed to attenuate E2-mediated increases in neuron survival and BDNF expression. Other progestagens tested, including norethindrone, norethindrone acetate, norethynodrel, and norgestimate, had variable effects on the measured endpoints. Our results demonstrate a range of qualitatively different actions of progestagens in cultured neurons, suggesting significant variability in the neural effects of clinically utilized progestagens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Oxytocin modulates GABAAR subunits to confer neuroprotection in stroke in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Yuji; Pappas, Colleen; Tajiri, Naoki; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2016-10-21

    Oxytocin protects against ischemia-induced inflammation and oxidative stress, and is associated with GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid, an inhibitory neurotransmitter) signaling transduction in neurons. However, the molecular mechanism by which oxytocin affords neuroprotection, especially the interaction between oxytocin receptor and GABA A receptor (GABA A R), remains to be elucidated. Primary rat neural cells were exposed to oxytocin before induction of experimental acute stroke model via oxygen-glucose deprivation-reperfusion (OGD/R) injury. Pretreatment with oxytocin increased cell viability, decreased the cell damage against oxidative stress, and prevented the release of high mobility group box1 during OGD/R. However, introduction of oxytocin during OGD/R did not induce neuroprotection. Although oxytocin did not affect the glutathione-related cellular metabolism before OGD, oxytocin modulated the expression levels of GABA A R subunits, which function to remove excessive neuronal excitability via chloride ion influx. Oxytocin-pretreated cells significantly increased the chloride ion influx in response to GABA and THIP (δ-GABA A R specific agonist). This study provides evidence that oxytocin regulated GABA A R subunits in affording neuroprotection against OGD/R injury.

  5. Neuroprotective effects of NAP against excitotoxic brain damage in the newborn mice: implications for cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowska, P; Passemard, S; Mok, A; Schwendimann, L; Gozes, I; Gressens, P

    2011-01-26

    Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) was shown to be essential for embryogenesis and brain development while NAP, an active motif of ADNP, is neuroprotective in a broad range of neurodegenerative disorders. In the present study, we examined the protective potential of ADNP/NAP in a mouse model of excitotoxic brain lesion mimicking brain damage associated with cerebral palsy. We demonstrated that NAP had a potent neuroprotective effect against ibotenate-induced excitotoxic damage in the cortical plate and the white matter of P5 mice, and moderate against brain lesions of P0 mice. In contrast, endogenous ADNP appears not to be involved in the response to excitotoxic challenge in the studied model. Our findings further show that NAP reduced the number of apoptotic neurons through activation of PI-3K/Akt pathway in the cortical plate or both PI-3K/Akt and MAPK/MEK1 kinases in the white matter. In addition, NAP prevented ibotenate-induced loss of pre-oligodendrocytes without affecting the number of astrocytes or activated microglia around the site of injection. These findings indicate that protective actions of NAP are mediated by triggering transduction pathways that are crucial for neuronal and oligodendroglial survival, thus, NAP might be a promising therapeutic agent for treating developing brain damage. © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Memantine mediates neuroprotection via regulating neurovascular unit in a mouse model of focal cerebral ischemia.

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    Chen, Zheng-Zhen; Yang, Dan-Dan; Zhao, Zhan; Yan, Hui; Ji, Juan; Sun, Xiu-Lan

    2016-04-01

    Memantine is a low-moderate affinity and uncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, which is also a potential neuroprotectant in acute ischemic stroke for its particular action profiles. The present study was to reveal the mechanisms involved in the neuroprotection of memantine. We used a mouse model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia via middle cerebral artery occlusion to verify our hypothesis. 2,3,5-Triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining was used to compare infarct size. The amount of astrocytes and the somal volume of the microglia cell body were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and stereological estimates. Western blotting was used to determine the protein expressions. Memantine prevented cerebral ischemia-induced brain infarct and neuronal injury, and reduced oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced cortical neuronal apoptosis. Moreover, memantine reduced the amount of the damaged astrocytes and over activated microglia after 24h of ischemia. In the early phase of ischemia, higher production of MMP-9 was observed, and thereby collagen IV was dramatically disrupted. Meanwhile, the post-synaptic density protein 95(PSD-95) was also severely cleavaged. Memantine decreased MMP-9 secretion, prevented the degradation of collagen IV in mouse brain. PSD-95 cleavage was also inhibited by memantine. These results suggested that memantine exerted neuroprotection effects in acute ischemic brain damage, partially via improving the functions of neurovascular unit. Taking all these findings together, we consider that memantine might be a promising protective agent against ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neuroprotective Drug for Nerve Trauma Revealed Using Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo-Guitart, David; Forés, Joaquim; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Valls, Raquel; Leiva-Rodríguez, Tatiana; Galea, Elena; González-Pérez, Francisco; Navarro, Xavier; Petegnief, Valerie; Bosch, Assumpció; Coma, Mireia; Mas, José Manuel; Casas, Caty

    2018-01-30

    Here we used a systems biology approach and artificial intelligence to identify a neuroprotective agent for the treatment of peripheral nerve root avulsion. Based on accumulated knowledge of the neurodegenerative and neuroprotective processes that occur in motoneurons after root avulsion, we built up protein networks and converted them into mathematical models. Unbiased proteomic data from our preclinical models were used for machine learning algorithms and for restrictions to be imposed on mathematical solutions. Solutions allowed us to identify combinations of repurposed drugs as potential neuroprotective agents and we validated them in our preclinical models. The best one, NeuroHeal, neuroprotected motoneurons, exerted anti-inflammatory properties and promoted functional locomotor recovery. NeuroHeal endorsed the activation of Sirtuin 1, which was essential for its neuroprotective effect. These results support the value of network-centric approaches for drug discovery and demonstrate the efficacy of NeuroHeal as adjuvant treatment with surgical repair for nervous system trauma.

  8. Comparison of Nootropic and Neuroprotective Features of Aryl-Substituted Analogs of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyurenkov, I N; Borodkina, L E; Bagmetova, V V; Berestovitskaya, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2016-02-01

    GABA analogs containing phenyl (phenibut) or para-chlorophenyl (baclofen) substituents demonstrated nootropic activity in a dose of 20 mg/kg: they improved passive avoidance conditioning, decelerated its natural extinction, and exerted antiamnestic effect on the models of amnesia provoked by scopolamine or electroshock. Tolyl-containing GABA analog (tolibut, 20 mg/kg) exhibited antiamnestic activity only on the model of electroshock-induced amnesia. Baclofen and, to a lesser extent, tolibut alleviated seizures provoked by electroshock, i.e. both agents exerted anticonvulsant effect. All examined GABA aryl derivatives demonstrated neuroprotective properties on the maximum electroshock model: they shortened the duration of coma and shortened the period of spontaneous motor activity recovery. In addition, these agents decreased the severity of passive avoidance amnesia and behavioral deficit in the open field test in rats exposed to electroshock. The greatest neuroprotective properties were exhibited by phenyl-containing GABA analog phenibut.

  9. Topiramate as a neuroprotective agent in a rat model of spinal cord injury

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    Firat Narin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Topiramate (TPM is a widely used antiepileptic and antimigraine agent which has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects in various experimental traumatic brain injury and stroke models. However, its utility in spinal cord injury has not been studied extensively. Thus, we evaluated effects of TPM on secondary cellular injury mechanisms in an experimental rat model of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI. After rat models of thoracic contusive SCI were established by free weight-drop method, TPM (40 mg/kg was given at 12-hour intervals for four times orally. Post TPM treatment, malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels were significantly reduced and reduced glutathione levels were increased, while immunoreactivity for endothelial nitric oxide synthase, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and apoptotic peptidase activating factor 1 was diminished in SCI rats. In addition, TPM treatment improved the functional recovery of SCI rats. This study suggests that administration of TPM exerts neuroprotective effects on SCI.

  10. Nutraceutical Antioxidants as Novel Neuroprotective Agents

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    Daniel A. Linseman

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A variety of antioxidant compounds derived from natural products (nutraceuticals have demonstrated neuroprotective activity in either in vitro or in vivo models of neuronal cell death or neurodegeneration, respectively. These natural antioxidants fall into several distinct groups based on their chemical structures: (1 flavonoid polyphenols like epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG from green tea and quercetin from apples; (2 non-flavonoid polyphenols such as curcumin from tumeric and resveratrol from grapes; (3 phenolic acids or phenolic diterpenes such as rosmarinic acid or carnosic acid, respectively, both from rosemary; and (4 organosulfur compounds including the isothiocyanate, L-sulforaphane, from broccoli and the thiosulfonate allicin, from garlic. All of these compounds are generally considered to be antioxidants. They may be classified this way either because they directly scavenge free radicals or they indirectly increase endogenous cellular antioxidant defenses, for example, via activation of the nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 transcription factor pathway. Alternative mechanisms of action have also been suggested for the neuroprotective effects of these compounds such as modulation of signal transduction cascades or effects on gene expression. Here, we review the literature pertaining to these various classes of nutraceutical antioxidants and discuss their potential therapeutic value in neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Aging Enables Ca2+ Overload and Apoptosis Induced by Amyloid-β Oligomers in Rat Hippocampal Neurons: Neuroprotection by Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and R-Flurbiprofen in Aging Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Rodríguez, María; García-Durillo, Mónica; Villalobos, Carlos; Núñez, Lucía

    2016-07-22

    The most important risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is aging. Neurotoxicity in AD has been linked to dyshomeostasis of intracellular Ca2+ induced by small aggregates of the amyloid-β peptide 1-42 (Aβ42 oligomers). However, how aging influences susceptibility to neurotoxicity induced by Aβ42 oligomers is unknown. In this study, we used long-term cultures of rat hippocampal neurons, a model of neuronal in vitro aging, to investigate the contribution of aging to Ca2+ dishomeostasis and neuron cell death induced by Aβ42 oligomers. In addition, we tested whether non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and R-flurbiprofen prevent apoptosis acting on subcellular Ca2+ in aged neurons. We found that Aβ42 oligomers have no effect on young hippocampal neurons cultured for 2 days in vitro (2 DIV). However, they promoted apoptosis modestly in mature neurons (8 DIV) and these effects increased dramatically after 13 DIV, when neurons display many hallmarks of in vivo aging. Consistently, cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ responses induced by Aβ42 oligomers increased dramatically with culture age. At low concentrations, NSAIDs and the enantiomer R-flurbiprofen lacking anti-inflammatory activity prevent Ca2+ overload and neuron cell death induced by Aβ42 oligomers in aged neurons. However, at high concentrations R-flurbiprofen induces apoptosis. Thus, Aβ42 oligomers promote Ca2+ overload and neuron cell death only in aged rat hippocampal neurons. These effects are prevented by low concentrations of NSAIDs and R-flurbiprofen acting on mitochondrial Ca2+ overload.

  12. Cell type-specific neuroprotective activity of untranslocated prion protein.

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    Elena Restelli

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A key pathogenic role in prion diseases was proposed for a cytosolic form of the prion protein (PrP. However, it is not clear how cytosolic PrP localization influences neuronal viability, with either cytotoxic or anti-apoptotic effects reported in different studies. The cellular mechanism by which PrP is delivered to the cytosol of neurons is also debated, and either retrograde transport from the endoplasmic reticulum or inefficient translocation during biosynthesis has been proposed. We investigated cytosolic PrP biogenesis and effect on cell viability in primary neuronal cultures from different mouse brain regions.Mild proteasome inhibition induced accumulation of an untranslocated form of cytosolic PrP in cortical and hippocampal cells, but not in cerebellar granules. A cyclopeptolide that interferes with the correct insertion of the PrP signal sequence into the translocon increased the amount of untranslocated PrP in cortical and hippocampal cells, and induced its synthesis in cerebellar neurons. Untranslocated PrP boosted the resistance of cortical and hippocampal neurons to apoptotic insults but had no effect on cerebellar cells.These results indicate cell type-dependent differences in the efficiency of PrP translocation, and argue that cytosolic PrP targeting might serve a physiological neuroprotective function.

  13. Neuroprotection of taurine against reactive oxygen species is associated with inhibiting NADPH oxidases.

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    Han, Zhou; Gao, Li-Yan; Lin, Yu-Hui; Chang, Lei; Wu, Hai-Yin; Luo, Chun-Xia; Zhu, Dong-Ya

    2016-04-15

    It is well established that taurine shows potent protection against glutamate-induced injury to neurons in stroke. The neuroprotection may result from multiple mechanisms. Increasing evidences suggest that NADPH oxidases (Nox), the primary source of superoxide induced by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation, are involved in the process of oxidative stress. We found that 100μM NMDA induced oxidative stress by increasing the reactive oxygen species level, which contributed to the cell death, in vitro. Neuron cultures pretreated with 25mM taurine showed lower percentage of death cells and declined reactive oxygen species level. Moreover, taurine attenuated Nox2/Nox4 protein expression and enzyme activity and declined intracellular calcium intensity during NMDA-induced neuron injury. Additionally, taurine also showed neuroprotection against H2O2-induced injury, accompanying with Nox inhibition. So, we suppose that protection of taurine against reactive oxygen species during NMDA-induced neuron injury is associated with Nox inhibition, probably in a calcium-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterisation of neuroprotective efficacy of modified poly-arginine-9 (R9) peptides using a neuronal glutamic acid excitotoxicity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Adam B; Anderton, Ryan S; Knuckey, Neville W; Meloni, Bruno P

    2017-02-01

    In a recent study, we highlighted the importance of cationic charge and arginine residues for the neuroprotective properties of poly-arginine and arginine-rich peptides. In this study, using cortical neuronal cultures and an in vitro glutamic acid excitotoxicity model, we examined the neuroprotective efficacy of different modifications to the poly-arginine-9 peptide (R9). We compared an unmodified R9 peptide with R9 peptides containing the following modifications: (i) C-terminal amidation (R9-NH2); (ii) N-terminal acetylation (Ac-R9); (iii) C-terminal amidation with N-terminal acetylation (Ac-R9-NH2); and (iv) C-terminal amidation with D-amino acids (R9D-NH2). The three C-terminal amidated peptides (R9-NH2, Ac-R9-NH2, and R9D-NH2) displayed neuroprotective effects greater than the unmodified R9 peptide, while the N-terminal acetylated peptide (Ac-R9) had reduced efficacy. Using the R9-NH2 peptide, neuroprotection could be induced with a 10 min peptide pre-treatment, 1-6 h before glutamic acid insult, or when added to neuronal cultures up to 45 min post-insult. In addition, all peptides were capable of reducing glutamic acid-mediated neuronal intracellular calcium influx, in a manner that reflected their neuroprotective efficacy. This study further highlights the neuroprotective properties of poly-arginine peptides and provides insight into peptide modifications that affect efficacy.

  15. Phenothiazine-mediated rescue of cognition in tau transgenic mice requires neuroprotection and reduced soluble tau burden

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    Abisambra Jose F

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has traditionally been thought that the pathological accumulation of tau in Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies facilitates neurodegeneration, which in turn leads to cognitive impairment. However, recent evidence suggests that tau tangles are not the entity responsible for memory loss, rather it is an intermediate tau species that disrupts neuronal function. Thus, efforts to discover therapeutics for tauopathies emphasize soluble tau reductions as well as neuroprotection. Results Here, we found that neuroprotection alone caused by methylene blue (MB, the parent compound of the anti-tau phenothiaziazine drug, Rember™, was insufficient to rescue cognition in a mouse model of the human tauopathy, progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP and fronto-temporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP17: Only when levels of soluble tau protein were concomitantly reduced by a very high concentration of MB, was cognitive improvement observed. Thus, neurodegeneration can be decoupled from tau accumulation, but phenotypic improvement is only possible when soluble tau levels are also reduced. Conclusions Neuroprotection alone is not sufficient to rescue tau-induced memory loss in a transgenic mouse model. Development of neuroprotective agents is an area of intense investigation in the tauopathy drug discovery field. This may ultimately be an unsuccessful approach if soluble toxic tau intermediates are not also reduced. Thus, MB and related compounds, despite their pleiotropic nature, may be the proverbial "magic bullet" because they not only are neuroprotective, but are also able to facilitate soluble tau clearance. Moreover, this shows that neuroprotection is possible without reducing tau levels. This indicates that there is a definitive molecular link between tau and cell death cascades that can be disrupted.

  16. Refocusing Neuroprotection in Cerebral Reperfusion Era: New Challenges and Strategies

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    Xiao-Yi Xiong

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pathophysiological processes of stroke have revealed that the damaged brain should be considered as an integral structure to be protected. However, promising neuroprotective drugs have failed when translated to clinical trials. In this review, we evaluated previous studies of neuroprotection and found that unsound patient selection and evaluation methods, single-target treatments, etc., without cerebral revascularization may be major reasons of failed neuroprotective strategies. Fortunately, this may be reversed by recent advances that provide increased revascularization with increased availability of endovascular procedures. However, the current improved effects of endovascular therapy are not able to match to the higher rate of revascularization, which may be ascribed to cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and lacking of neuroprotection. Accordingly, we suggest various research strategies to improve the lower therapeutic efficacy for ischemic stroke treatment: (1 multitarget neuroprotectant combinative therapy (cocktail therapy should be investigated and performed based on revascularization; (2 and more efforts should be dedicated to shifting research emphasis to establish recirculation, increasing functional collateral circulation and elucidating brain–blood barrier damage mechanisms to reduce hemorrhagic transformation. Therefore, we propose that a comprehensive neuroprotective strategy before and after the endovascular treatment may speed progress toward improving neuroprotection after stroke to protect against brain injury.

  17. Pharmacologic investigations on the role of Sirt-1 in neuroprotective mechanism of postconditioning in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harpreet; Kumar, Amit; Jaggi, Amteshwar S; Singh, Nirmal

    2015-07-01

    Cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury is one of the primary causes of ischemic stroke. Ischemic postconditioning (iPoCo) is evolving as an important adaptive technique to contain I-R injury. Some recent studies have shown neuroprotective effects of iPoCo. However, the neuroprotective mechanism of iPoCo is not clear. So, the present study has been undertaken to investigate the possible role of Sirtinol, a selective class III histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor in the neuroprotective mechanism of iPoCo in mice. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCAO) for 12 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h was used to produce I-R-induced cerebral injury in Swiss albino mice. iPoCo involving three episodes of 10-s carotid artery occlusion and reperfusion instituted immediately after BCAO just before prolonged reperfusion of 24 h. Cerebral infarct size was measured using triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Memory was evaluated using a Morris water maze test. Rotarod test, inclined beam-walking test, and neurologic severity score (NSS) were used to assess motor incoordination. Acetylcholine esterase levels, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS), and glutathione level were also estimated. BCAO for 12 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h produced a significant rise in cerebral infarct size and NSS along with impairment of memory and motor coordination and biochemical alteration (↑acetylcholine esterase, ↓glutathione, and ↑TBARS). iPoCo, involving three episodes of 10-s carotid artery occlusion with intermittent reperfusion of 10 s applied just after ischemic insult of 12 min produced a significant decrease in cerebral infarct size and NSS along with the reversal of I-R-induced impairment of memory and motor coordination. iPoCo-induced neuroprotective effects were significantly abolished by pretreatment with selective SIRT 1 (class III HDAC) blocker Sirtinol (10 mg/kg intraperitoneal). It may be concluded that the neuroprotective effect of iPoCo probably

  18. Neuroprotective effects of edaravone-administration on 6-OHDA-treated dopaminergic neurons

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    Wang Feifei

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson's disease (PD is a neurological disorder characterized by the degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic systems. Free radicals induced by oxidative stress are involved in the mechanisms of cell death in PD. This study clarifies the neuroprotective effects of edaravone (MCI-186, 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one, which has already been used for the treatment of cerebral ischemia in Japan, on TH-positive dopaminergic neurons using PD model both in vitro and in vivo. 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, a neurotoxin for dopaminergic neurons, was added to cultured dopaminergic neurons derived from murine embryonal ventral mesencephalon with subsequet administration of edaravone or saline. The number of surviving TH-positive neurons and the degree of cell damage induced by free radicals were analyzed. In parallel, edaravone or saline was intravenously administered for PD model of rats receiving intrastriatal 6-OHDA lesion with subsequent behavioral and histological analyses. Results In vitro study showed that edaravone significantly ameliorated the survival of TH-positive neurons in a dose-responsive manner. The number of apoptotic cells and HEt-positive cells significantly decreased, thus indicating that the neuroprotective effects of edaravone might be mediated by anti-apoptotic effects through the suppression of free radicals by edaravone. In vivo study demonstrated that edaravone-administration at 30 minutes after 6-OHDA lesion reduced the number of amphetamine-induced rotations significantly than edaravone-administration at 24 hours. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH staining of the striatum and substantia nigra pars compacta revealed that edaravone might exert neuroprotective effects on nigrostriatal dopaminergic systems. The neuroprotective effects were prominent when edaravone was administered early and in high concentration. TUNEL, HEt and Iba-1 staining in vivo might demonstrate the involvement of anti-apoptotic, anti

  19. Brain aromatase: roles in reproduction and neuroprotection.

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    Roselli, Charles F

    2007-01-01

    It is well established that aromatization constitutes an essential part of testosterone's signaling pathway in brain and that estrogen metabolites, often together with testosterone, organize and activate masculine neural circuits. This paper summarizes the current understanding regarding the distribution, regulation and function of brain aromatase in mammals. Data from our laboratory are presented that highlight the important function of aromatase in the regulation of androgen feedback sensitivity in non-human primates and the possible role that aromatase plays in determining the brain structure and sexual partner preferences of rams. In addition, new data is presented indicating that the capacity for aromatization in cortical astrocytes is associated with cell survival and may be important for neuroprotection. It is anticipated that a better appreciation of the physiological and pathophysiological functions of aromatase will lead to important clinical insights.

  20. Therapeutic neuroprotective agents for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

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    Pandya, Rachna S.; Zhu, Haining; Li, Wei; Bowser, Robert; Friedlander, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal chronic neurodegenerative disease whose hallmark is proteinaceous, ubiquitinated, cytoplasmic inclusions in motor neurons and surrounding cells. Multiple mechanisms proposed as responsible for ALS pathogenesis include dysfunction of protein degradation, glutamate excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. It is therefore essential to gain a better understanding of the underlying disease etiology and search for neuroprotective agents that might delay disease onset, slow progression, prolong survival, and ultimately reduce the burden of disease. Because riluzole, the only Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved treatment, prolongs the ALS patient’s life by only 3 months, new therapeutic agents are urgently needed. In this review, we focus on studies of various small pharmacological compounds targeting the proposed pathogenic mechanisms of ALS and discuss their impact on disease progression. PMID:23864030

  1. The emerging role of retromer in neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Kirsty J; Korswagen, Hendrick C; Cullen, Peter J

    2017-08-01

    Efficient sorting and transportation of integral membrane proteins, such as ion channels, nutrient transporters, signalling receptors, cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion molecules is essential for the function of cellular organelles and hence organism development and physiology. Retromer is a master controller of integral membrane protein sorting and transport through one of the major sorting station within eukaryotic cells, the endosomal network. Subtle de-regulation of retromer is an emerging theme in the pathoetiology of Parkinson's disease. Here we summarise recent advances in defining the neuroprotective role of retromer and how its de-regulation may contribute to Parkinson's disease by interfering with: lysosomal health and protein degradation, association with accessory proteins including the WASH complex and mitochondrial health. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Neuroprotection for treatment of glaucoma in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Dayse F; Lindsley, Kristina

    2017-01-25

    Glaucoma is a heterogeneous group of conditions involving progressive damage to the optic nerve, deterioration of retinal ganglion cells, and ultimately visual field loss. It is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. Open angle glaucoma (OAG), the most common form of glaucoma, is a chronic condition that may or may not present with increased intraocular pressure (IOP). Neuroprotection for glaucoma refers to any intervention intended to prevent optic nerve damage or cell death. The objective of this review was to systematically examine the evidence regarding the effectiveness of neuroprotective agents for slowing the progression of OAG in adults compared with no neuroprotective agent, placebo, or other glaucoma treatment. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2016, Issue 7), Ovid MEDLINE, Epub Ahead of Print, In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily (January 1946 to August 2016), Embase (January 1980 to August 2016), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to August 2016), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 16 August 2016. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in which topical or oral treatments were used for neuroprotection in adults with OAG. Minimum follow-up time was four years. Two review authors independently reviewed titles and abstracts from the literature searches. We obtained full-text copies of potentially relevant studies and re-evaluated for inclusion. Two review authors independently extracted data related to study characteristics, risk of bias, and outcomes. We identified one trial for this review, thus we

  3. Neuroprotective Effects of Exogenous Activin A on Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation in PC12 Cells

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    Zhong-Xin Xu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic cerebrovascular disease is one of the most common causes of death in the World. Exogenous activin A (ActA protects neurons against toxicity and plays a central role in regulating the brain’s response to injury. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms involved in the neuroprotective effects of ActA in a model of hypoxic-ischemic brain disease. We found that ActA could effectively increase the survival rate of PC12 cells and relieve oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD damage. To clarify the neuroprotective mechanisms of ActA, the effects of ActA on the ActA/Smad pathway and on the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS and superoxide dismutase (SOD were investigated using OGD in PC12 cells. The results showed that ActA could increase the expression of activin receptor IIA (ActRIIA, Smad3 and Smad4 and that 50 ng/mL and 100 ng/mL of ActA could reduce NO levels and increase SOD activity by 78.9% and 79.9%, respectively. These results suggested that the neuroprotective effects of ActA in ischemia could be related to the activation of the ActA/Smad signaling pathway and to its anti-oxidant activities.

  4. Uric acid demonstrates neuroprotective effect on Parkinson's disease mice through Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway.

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    Huang, Ting-Ting; Hao, Dong-Lin; Wu, Bo-Na; Mao, Lun-Lin; Zhang, Jin

    2017-12-02

    Uric acid has neuroprotective effect on Parkinson's disease (PD) by inhibiting oxidative damage and neuronal cell death. Our previous study has shown that uric acid protected dopaminergic cell line damage through inhibiting accumulation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). This study aimed to investigate its in vivo neuroprotective effect. PD was induced by MPTP intraperitoneally injection for 7 d in male C57BL/6 mice. Mice were treated with either uric acid (intraperitoneally injection 250 mg/kg) or saline for a total of 13 d. We showed that uric acid improved behavioral performances and cognition of PD mice, increased TH-positive dopaminergic neurons and decreased GFAP-positive astrocytes in substantia nigra (SN). Uric acid increased mRNA and protein expressions of Nrf2 and three Nrf2-responsive genes, including γ-glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (γ-GCLC), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NQO1. Uric acid significantly increased superoxide dismutase (SOD), CAT, glutathione (GSH) levels and decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) level in SN regions of MPTP-treated mice. Uric acid inhibited the hippocampal expression of IL-1β and decreased serum and hippocampus levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). In conclusion, uric acid demonstrates neuroprotective properties for dopaminergic neurons in PD mice through modulation of neuroinflammation and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Neuroprotective Effects of Cannabidiol in Hypoxic Ischemic Insult. The Therapeutic Window in Newborn Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Nagat; Ceprian, Maria; Jimenez, Laura; Pazos, M Ruth; Martínez-Orgado, Jose

    2017-01-01

    A relevant therapeutic time window (TTW) is an important criterion for considering the clinical relevance of a substance preventing newborn hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain damage. To test the TTW of the neuroprotective effects of cannabidol (CBD), a non-psychoactive cannabinoid in a model of newborn HI brain damage. 9-10 day-old C57BL6 mice underwent a HI insult (10% oxygen for 90 min after left carotid artery electrocoagulation). Then, CBD 1 mg/kg or vehicle were administered s.c. 15 min, or 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 or 24 h after the end of the HI insult. Seven days later brain damage was assessed using T2W Magnetic Resonance Imaging scan (ipsilateral hemisphere volume loss, IVHL) and histological studies: Nissl staining (neuropathological score), TUNEL staining (apoptotic damage) and immunohistochemistry with glial fibrillary acidic protein (astrocyte viability) or ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule (microglial activation). CBD administered up to 18 h after HI reduced IHVL and neuropathological score by 60%, TUNEL+ count by 90% and astrocyte damage by 50%. In addition, CBD blunted the HI-induced increase in microglial population. When CBD administration was delayed 24 h, however, the neuroprotective effect was lost in terms of IHVL, apoptosis or astrogliosis reduction. CBD shows a TTW of 18 h when administered to HI newborn mice, which represents a broader TTW than reported for other neuroprotective treatments including hypothermia. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Nanoencapsulation of the sasanquasaponin from Camellia oleifera, its photo responsiveness and neuroprotective effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yong; Xing, Haiting; Li, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Sasanquasaponin, a bioactive compound isolated from seeds of Camellia oleifera, shows central effects in our previous research. In order to investigate its neuroprotective effects, a new kind of nanocapsule with photo responsiveness was designed to deliver sasanquasaponin into the brain and adjusted by red light. The nanocapsule was prepared using sasanquasaponin emulsified with soybean lecithin and cholesterol solution. The natural phaeophorbide from silkworm excrement as a photosensitizer was added in the lipid phase to make the nanocapsules photo responsive. The physicochemical properties of encapsulation efficiency, size distribution, morphology and stability were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography, particle size analyzer, transmission electron microscope, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry. Photo responsiveness was determined by the sasanquasaponin release in pH 7.5 phosphate buffer under the laser at 670 nm. The neuroprotective effects were evaluated by the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), decrease of inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β in the brain, and amelioration of kainic acid-induced behavioral disorder in mice. The nanocapsules had higher encapsulation efficiency and stability when the phaeophorbide content was 2% of lecithin weight. The average size was 172.2 nm, distributed in the range of 142-220 nm. The phaeophorbide was scattered sufficiently in the outer lecithin layer of the nanocapsules and increased the drug release after irradiation. TH expression in brain tissues and locomotive activities in mice were reduced by kainic acid, but could be improved by the sasanquasaponin nanocapsules after tail vein injection with 15 minutes of irradiation at the nasal cavity. The sasanquasaponin took effect through inflammatory alleviation in central tissues. The sasanquasaponin nanocapsules with phaeophorbide have photo responsiveness and neuroprotective effects under the irradiation of red light. This

  7. Curcumin plays neuroprotective roles against traumatic brain injury partly via Nrf2 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenwen; Yang, Bei; Wang, Linlin; Li, Bingxuan; Guo, Xiangshen; Zhang, Miao; Jiang, Zhenfei; Fu, Jingqi; Pi, Jingbo; Guan, Dawei; Zhao, Rui

    2018-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), which leads to high mortality and morbidity, is a prominent public health problem worldwide with no effective treatment. Curcumin has been shown to be beneficial for neuroprotection in vivo and in vitro, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study determined whether the neuroprotective role of curcumin in mouse TBI is dependent on the NF-E2-related factor (Nrf2) pathway. The Feeney weight-drop contusion model was used to mimic TBI. Curcumin was administered intraperitoneally 15 min after TBI induction, and brains were collected at 24 h after TBI. The levels of Nrf2 and its downstream genes (Hmox-1, Nqo1, Gclm, and Gclc) were detected by Western blot and qRT-PCR at 24 h after TBI. In addition, edema, oxidative damage, cell apoptosis and inflammatory reactions were evaluated in wild type (WT) and Nrf2-knockout (Nrf2-KO) mice to explore the role of Nrf2 signaling after curcumin treatment. In wild type mice, curcumin treatment resulted in reduced ipsilateral cortex injury, neutrophil infiltration, and microglia activation, improving neuron survival against TBI-induced apoptosis and degeneration. These effects were accompanied by increased expression and nuclear translocation of Nrf2, and enhanced expression of antioxidant enzymes. However, Nrf2 deletion attenuated the neuroprotective effects of curcumin in Nrf2-KO mice after TBI. These findings demonstrated that curcumin effects on TBI are associated with the activation the Nrf2 pathway, providing novel insights into the neuroprotective role of Nrf2 and the potential therapeutic use of curcumin for TBI. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  9. Acquired hypofibrinogenemia: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besser MW

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Martin W Besser,1 Stephen G MacDonald2 1Department of Haematology, 2Department of Specialist Haemostasis, The Pathology Partnership, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge, UK Abstract: Acquired hypofibrinogenemia is most frequently caused by hemodilution and consumption of clotting factors. The aggressive replacement of fibrinogen has become one of the core principles of modern management of massive hemorrhage. The best method for determining the patient’s fibrinogen level remains controversial, and particularly in acquired dysfibrinogenemia, could have major therapeutic implications depending on which quantification method is chosen. This review introduces the available laboratory and point-of-care methods and discusses the relative advantages and limitations. It also discusses current strategies for the correction of hypofibrinogenemia. Keywords: Clauss fibrinogen assay, fibrinogen antigen, viscoelastic testing, ­gravimetric fibrinogen assay, PT-derived fibrinogen, functional fibrinogen, direct oral anticoagulant, dysfibrinogenemia, afibrinogenemia

  10. Neuronal Rho GTPase Rac1 elimination confers neuroprotection in a mouse model of permanent ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabiyik, Cansu; Fernandes, Rui; Figueiredo, Francisco Rosário; Socodato, Renato; Brakebusch, Cord; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke; Relvas, João Bettencourt; Santos, Sofia Duque

    2017-09-28

    The Rho GTPase Rac1 is a multifunctional protein involved in distinct pathways ranging from development to pathology. The aim of the present study was to unravel the contribution of neuronal Rac1 in regulating the response to brain injury induced by permanent focal cerebral ischemia (pMCAO). Our results show that pMCAO significantly increased total Rac1 levels in wild type mice, mainly through rising nuclear Rac1, while a reduction in Rac1 activation was observed. Such changes preceded cell death induced by excitotoxic stress. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 in primary neuronal cortical cells prevented the increase in oxidative stress induced after overactivation of glutamate receptors. However, this was not sufficient to prevent the associated neuronal cell death. In contrast, RNAi-mediated knock down of Rac1 in primary cortical neurons prevented cell death elicited by glutamate excitotoxicity and decreased the activity of NADPH oxidase. To test whether in vivo down regulation of neuronal Rac1 was neuroprotective after pMCAO, we used tamoxifen-inducible neuron-specific conditional Rac1-knockout mice. We observed a significant 50% decrease in brain infarct volume of knockout mice and a concomitant increase in HIF-1α expression compared to littermate control mice, demonstrating that ablation of Rac1 in neurons is neuroprotective. Transmission electron microscopy performed in the ischemic brain showed that lysosomes in the infarct of Rac1- knockout mice were preserved at similar levels to those of non-infarcted tissue, while littermate mice displayed a decrease in the number of lysosomes, further corroborating the notion that Rac1 ablation in neurons is neuroprotective. Our results demonstrate that Rac1 plays important roles in the ischemic pathological cascade and that modulation of its levels is of therapeutic interest. © 2017 International Society of Neuropathology.

  11. Acquired hypertrichosis lanuginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired hypertirichosis lanuginose developed rapidly in a patient with no detectable malignancy. Soft, fine, downy hair growth was noticed on the face, ears, limbs and trunk. Bilaterally symmetrical vitiliginous macules were present on the ear and preauricular region. This case is reported because of its rarity, absence of any detectable malignancy and development of vitiligo, which to our knowledge has not been reported earlier.

  12. The neuroprotective effects of α-iso-cubebene on dopaminergic cell death: involvement of CREB/Nrf2 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Young; Son, Beung Gu; Park, Young Hoon; Kim, Cheol-Min; Park, Geuntae; Choi, Young-Whan

    2014-09-01

    As a part of ongoing studies to elucidate pharmacologically active components of Schisandra chinensis, we isolated and studied α-iso-cubebene. The neuroprotective mechanisms of α-iso-cubebene in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were investigated. α-Iso-cubebene significantly inhibited cytotoxicity and apoptosis due to 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells. Pretreatment of cells with α-iso-cubebene reduced intracellular accumulation of ROS and calcium in response to 6-OHDA. The neuroprotective effects of α-iso-cubebene were found to result from protecting the mitochondrial membrane potential. Notably, α-iso-cubebene inhibited the release of apoptosis-inducing factor from the mitochondria into the cytosol and nucleus after 6-OHDA treatment. α-Iso-cubebene also induced the activation of PKA/PKB/CREB/Nrf2 and suppressed 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. α-Iso-cubebene was found to induce phosphorylation of PKA and PKB and activate Nrf2 and CREB signaling pathways in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, α-iso-cubebene stimulated the expression of the antioxidant response genes NQO1 and HO-1. Finally, α-iso-cubebene-mediated neuroprotective effects were found to be reversible after transfection with CREB and Nrf2 small interfering RNAs.

  13. Cytochrome C is tyrosine 97 phosphorylated by neuroprotective insulin treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H Sanderson

    Full Text Available Recent advancements in isolation techniques for cytochrome c (Cytc have allowed us to discover post-translational modifications of this protein. We previously identified two distinct tyrosine phosphorylated residues on Cytc in mammalian liver and heart that alter its electron transfer kinetics and the ability to induce apoptosis. Here we investigated the phosphorylation status of Cytc in ischemic brain and sought to determine if insulin-induced neuroprotection and inhibition of Cytc release was associated with phosphorylation of Cytc. Using an animal model of global brain ischemia, we found a ∼50% decrease in neuronal death in the CA1 hippocampal region with post-ischemic insulin administration. This insulin-mediated increase in neuronal survival was associated with inhibition of Cytc release at 24 hours of reperfusion. To investigate possible changes in the phosphorylation state of Cytc we first isolated the protein from ischemic pig brain and brain that was treated with insulin. Ischemic brains demonstrated no detectable tyrosine phosphorylation. In contrast Cytc isolated from brains treated with insulin showed robust phosphorylation of Cytc, and the phosphorylation site was unambiguously identified as Tyr97 by immobilized metal affinity chromatography/nano-liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We next confirmed these results in rats by in vivo application of insulin in the absence or presence of global brain ischemia and determined that Cytc Tyr97-phosphorylation is strongly induced under both conditions but cannot be detected in untreated controls. These data suggest a mechanism whereby Cytc is targeted for phosphorylation by insulin signaling, which may prevent its release from the mitochondria and the induction of apoptosis.

  14. Mechanism of neuroprotective mitochondrial remodeling by PKA/AKAP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald A Merrill

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial shape is determined by fission and fusion reactions catalyzed by large GTPases of the dynamin family, mutation of which can cause neurological dysfunction. While fission-inducing protein phosphatases have been identified, the identity of opposing kinase signaling complexes has remained elusive. We report here that in both neurons and non-neuronal cells, cAMP elevation and expression of an outer-mitochondrial membrane (OMM targeted form of the protein kinase A (PKA catalytic subunit reshapes mitochondria into an interconnected network. Conversely, OMM-targeting of the PKA inhibitor PKI promotes mitochondrial fragmentation upstream of neuronal death. RNAi and overexpression approaches identify mitochondria-localized A kinase anchoring protein 1 (AKAP1 as a neuroprotective and mitochondria-stabilizing factor in vitro and in vivo. According to epistasis studies with phosphorylation site-mutant dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1, inhibition of the mitochondrial fission enzyme through a conserved PKA site is the principal mechanism by which cAMP and PKA/AKAP1 promote both mitochondrial elongation and neuronal survival. Phenocopied by a mutation that slows GTP hydrolysis, Drp1 phosphorylation inhibits the disassembly step of its catalytic cycle, accumulating large, slowly recycling Drp1 oligomers at the OMM. Unopposed fusion then promotes formation of a mitochondrial reticulum, which protects neurons from diverse insults.

  15. Quercetin, not caffeine, is a major neuroprotective component in coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moonhee; McGeer, Edith G; McGeer, Patrick L

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that coffee consumption reduces the risk of Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. To determine the factors involved, we examined the protective effects of coffee components. The test involved prevention of neurotoxicity to SH-SY5Y cells that was induced by lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-γ or interferon-γ released from activated microglia and astrocytes. We found that quercetin, flavones, chlorogenic acid, and caffeine protected SH-SY5Y cells from these toxins. They also reduced the release of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 from the activated microglia and astrocytes and attenuated the activation of proteins from P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor kappa light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB). After exposure to toxin containing glial-stimulated conditioned medium, we also found that quercetin reduced oxidative/nitrative damage to DNA, as well as to the lipids and proteins of SH-SY5Y cells. There was a resultant increase in [GSH]i in SH-SY5Y cells. The data indicate that quercetin is the major neuroprotective component in coffee against Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Transthyretin neuroprotection in Alzheimer's disease is dependent on proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Catarina S; Eira, Jessica; Ribeiro, Carlos A; Oliveira, Ângela; Sousa, Mónica M; Cardoso, Isabel; Liz, Márcia A

    2017-11-01

    The deposition of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) in the hippocampus is one of the major hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease, a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by memory loss and cognitive impairment. The modulation of Aβ levels in the brain results from an equilibrium between its production from the amyloid precursor protein and removal by amyloid clearance proteins, which might occur via enzymatic (Aβ-degrading enzymes) or nonenzymatic (binding/transport proteins) reactions. Transthyretin (TTR) is one of the major Aβ-binding proteins acting as a neuroprotector in AD. In addition, TTR cleaves Aβ peptide in vitro. In this work, we show that proteolytically active TTR, and not the inactive form of the protein, impacts on Aβ fibrillogenesis, degrades neuronal-secreted Aβ, and reduces Aβ-induced toxicity in hippocampal neurons. Our data demonstrate that TTR proteolytic activity is required for the neuroprotective effect of the protein constituting a putative novel therapeutic target for AD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Promise of Neuroprotective Agents in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith ePotashkin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s Disease is characterized by loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra of the brain. Since there are limited treatment options for PD, neuroprotective agents are currently being tested as a means to slow disease progression. Agents targeting oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation are prime candidates for neuroprotection. This review identifies Rasagiline, Minocycline and creatine, as the most promising neuroprotective agents for PD, and they are all currently in phase III trials. Other agents possessing protective characteristics in delaying PD include stimulants, vitamins, supplements, and other drugs. Additionally, combination therapies also show benefits in slowing PD progression. The identification of neuroprotective agents for PD provides us with therapeutic opportunities for modifying the course of disease progression and, perhaps, reducing the risk of onset when preclinical biomarkers become available.

  18. Neuroprotection against oxidative stress by serum from heat acclimated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beit-Yannai, E; Trembovler, V; Horowitz, M; Lazarovici, P; Kohen, R; Shohami, E

    1998-09-25

    Exposure of PC12 cells, to 1% serum derived from normothermic (CON) rats resulted in 79% cell death. Sister cultures treated with 1% serum derived from heat acclimated (ACC) rats, were neuroprotected and expressed a significant reduction in cell death. In PC12 cells exposed to a free radical generator causing an oxidative stress, 90% cell death was measured in CON serum treated cultures, while ACC serum treated cultures were neuroprotected. Xanthine oxidase activity and uric acid (UA) levels were lower in ACC serum compared to CON. Addition of UA to both sera abolished the difference in cell viability, and toxicity of ACC serum reached that of CON. These findings suggest a causal relationship between the lower levels of UA in ACC and the neuroprotective effect observed. The present study proposes heat acclimation as an experimental and/or clinical tool for the achievement of neuroprotection.

  19. Neuroprotective Drug for Nerve Trauma Revealed Using Artificial Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Romeo-Guitart, David; Forés, Joaquim; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Valls, Raquel; Leiva-Rodríguez, Tatiana; Galea, Elena; González-Pérez, Francisco; Navarro, Xavier; Petegnief, Valerie; Bosch, Assumpció; Coma, Mireia; Mas, José Manuel; Casas, Caty

    2018-01-01

    Here we used a systems biology approach and artificial intelligence to identify a neuroprotective agent for the treatment of peripheral nerve root avulsion. Based on accumulated knowledge of the neurodegenerative and neuroprotective processes that occur in motoneurons after root avulsion, we built up protein networks and converted them into mathematical models. Unbiased proteomic data from our preclinical models were used for machine learning algorithms and for restrictions to be imposed on m...

  20. Neuroprotection trek--the next generation: the measurement is the message.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Russell J

    2005-08-01

    Animal trials of many pharmacological neuroprotective agents have been quite successful, whereas trials in humans have been uniformly disappointing. A major difference between laboratory research in animals and clinical research in humans is the amount and/or quality of data obtained. The goal of this presentation is to argue that when clinical studies consist of more valid, objective data--that is, as our measurement capabilities in clinical research become as robust as they are in laboratory research--we are likely to gain new insights into both (1) injury to the nervous system and (2) neuroprotective treatment strategies. Technological advances (in data acquisition and analysis)--often novel even in the laboratory--will be the "scale" that will enable progress in measurement. As examples of such technological advances, two projects initiated at NASA Ames Research Center are cited. The NASA Smart Probe Project, with the goal of combining multiple microsensors and neural networks for real-time tissue identification (e.g., for tumor detection), has recently moved into the clinical realm, with a prototype being used to diagnose breast cancer in women "on the spot". The NASA Nanoelectrode Array Project has fabricated nanoscale devices that can simultaneously monitor electrical activity and neurotransmitter concentrations, while providing electrical stimulation focally and precisely (and potentially in a closed-loop fashion based on the input from the nanosensors). The large amounts of data that such techniques can acquire and analyze--separated spatially and temporally throughout the nervous system, if necessary--will provide insights not only into neuroprotective strategies, but also into the workings of the nervous system itself.

  1. Small Molecule Anticonvulsant Agents with Potent In Vitro Neuroprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Garry R.; Zhang, Yan; Du, Yanming; Kondaveeti, Sandeep K.; Zdilla, Michael J.; Reitz, Allen B.

    2012-01-01

    Severe seizure activity is associated with recurring cycles of excitotoxicity and oxidative stress that result in progressive neuronal damage and death. Intervention to halt these pathological processes is a compelling disease-modifying strategy for the treatment of seizure disorders. In the present study, a core small molecule with anticonvulsant activity has been structurally optimized for neuroprotection. Phenotypic screening of rat hippocampal cultures with nutrient medium depleted of antioxidants was utilized as a disease model. Increased cell death and decreased neuronal viability produced by acute treatment with glutamate or hydrogen peroxide were prevented by our novel molecules. The neuroprotection associated with this chemical series has marked structure activity relationships that focus on modification of the benzylic position of a 2-phenyl-2-hydroxyethyl sulfamide core structure. Complete separation between anticonvulsant activity and neuroprotective action was dependent on substitution at the benzylic carbon. Chiral selectivity was evident in that the S-enantiomer of the benzylic hydroxy group had neither neuroprotective nor anticonvulsant activity, while the R-enantiomer of the lead compound had full neuroprotective action at ≤40 nM and antiseizure activity in three animal models. These studies indicate that potent, multifunctional neuroprotective anticonvulsants are feasible within a single molecular entity. PMID:22535312

  2. CpG preconditioning regulates miRNA expression that modulates genomic reprogramming associated with neuroprotection against ischemic injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartanian, Keri B; Mitchell, Hugh D; Stevens, Susan L; Conrad, Valerie K; McDermott, Jason E; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P

    2015-01-01

    Cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) preconditioning reprograms the genomic response to stroke to protect the brain against ischemic injury. The mechanisms underlying genomic reprogramming are incompletely understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression; however, their role in modulating gene responses produced by CpG preconditioning is unknown. We evaluated brain miRNA expression in response to CpG preconditioning before and after stroke using microarray. Importantly, we have data from previous gene microarrays under the same conditions, which allowed integration of miRNA and gene expression data to specifically identify regulated miRNA gene targets. CpG preconditioning did not significantly alter miRNA expression before stroke, indicating that miRNA regulation is not critical for the initiation of preconditioning-induced neuroprotection. However, after stroke, differentially regulated miRNAs between CpG- and saline-treated animals associated with the upregulation of several neuroprotective genes, implicating these miRNAs in genomic reprogramming that increases neuroprotection. Statistical analysis revealed that the miRNA targets were enriched in the gene population regulated in the setting of stroke, implying that miRNAs likely orchestrate this gene expression. These data suggest that miRNAs regulate endogenous responses to stroke and that manipulation of these miRNAs may have the potential to acutely activate novel neuroprotective processes that reduce damage. PMID:25388675

  3. Neuroprotective potential of high-dose biotin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark F; DiNicolantonio, James J

    2017-11-01

    A recent controlled trial has established that high-dose biotin supplementation - 100 mg, three times daily - has a stabilizing effect on progression of multiple sclerosis (MS). Although this effect has been attributed to an optimization of biotin's essential cofactor role in the brain, a case can be made that direct stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) by pharmacological concentrations of biotin plays a key role in this regard. The utility of high-dose biotin in MS might reflect an anti-inflammatory effect of cGMP on the cerebral microvasculature, as well on oligodendrocyte differentiation and on Schwann cell production of neurotrophic factors thought to have potential for managing MS. But biotin's ability to boost cGMP synthesis in the brain may have broader neuroprotective potential. In many types of neurons and neural cells, cGMP exerts neurotrophic-mimetic effects - entailing activation of the PI3K-Akt and Ras-ERK pathways - that promote neuron survival and plasticity. Hippocampal long term potentiation requires nitric oxide synthesis, which in turn promotes an activating phosphorylation of CREB via a pathway involving cGMP and protein kinase G (PKG). In Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyloid beta suppresses this mechanism by inhibiting sGC activity; agents which exert a countervailing effect by boosting cGMP levels tend to restore effective long-term potentiation in rodent models of AD. Moreover, NO/cGMP suppresses amyloid beta production within the brain by inhibiting expression of amyloid precursor protein and BACE1. In conjunction with cGMP's ability to oppose neuron apoptosis, these effects suggest that high-dose biotin might have potential for the prevention and management of AD. cGMP also promotes neurogenesis, and may lessen stroke risk by impeding atherogenesis and hypertrophic remodeling in the cerebral vasculature. The neuroprotective potential of high-dose biotin likely could be boosted by concurrent administration of brain

  4. Exercise training attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by peripheral immunomodulation rather than direct neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Ofira; Fainstein, Nina; Touloumi, Olga; Lagoudaki, Roza; Hanya, Ester; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos; Katz, Abram; Ben-Hur, Tamir

    2018-01-01

    Conflicting results exist on the effects of exercise training (ET) on Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE), nor is it known how exercise impacts on disease progression. We examined whether ET ameliorates the development of EAE by modulating the systemic immune system or exerting direct neuroprotective effects on the CNS. Healthy mice were subjected to 6weeks of motorized treadmill running. The Proteolipid protein (PLP)-induced transfer EAE model in mice was utilized. To assess effects of ET on systemic autoimmunity, lymph-node (LN)-T cells from trained- vs. sedentary donor mice were transferred to naïve recipients. To assess direct neuroprotective effects of ET, PLP-reactive LN-T cells were transferred into recipient mice that were trained prior to EAE transfer or to sedentary mice. EAE severity was assessed in vivo and the characteristics of encephalitogenic LN-T cells derived from PLP-immunized mice were evaluated in vitro. LN-T cells obtained from trained mice induced an attenuated clinical and pathological EAE in recipient mice vs. cells derived from sedentary animals. Training inhibited the activation, proliferation and cytokine gene expression of PLP-reactive T cells in response to CNS-derived autoantigen, but strongly enhanced their proliferation in response to Concanavalin A, a non-specific stimulus. However, there was no difference in EAE severity when autoreactive encephalitogenic T cells were transferred to trained vs. sedentary recipient mice. ET inhibits immune system responses to an auto-antigen to attenuate EAE, rather than generally suppressing the immune system, but does not induce a direct neuro-protective effect against EAE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Isoflurane provides neuroprotection in neonatal hypoxic ischemic brain injury by suppressing apoptosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, De-An; Bi, Ling-Yun; Huang, Qian; Zhang, Fang-Min; Han, Zi-Ming

    Isoflurane is halogenated volatile ether used for inhalational anesthesia. It is widely used in clinics as an inhalational anesthetic. Neonatal hypoxic ischemia injury ensues in the immature brain that results in delayed cell death via excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. Isoflurane has shown neuroprotective properties that make a beneficial basis of using isoflurane in both cell culture and animal models, including various models of brain injury. We aimed to determine the neuroprotective effect of isoflurane on hypoxic brain injury and elucidated the underlying mechanism. A hippocampal slice, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid with glucose and oxygen deprivation, was used as an in vitro model for brain hypoxia. The orthodromic population spike and hypoxic injury potential were recorded in the CA1 and CA3 regions. Amino acid neurotransmitters concentration in perfusion solution of hippocampal slices was measured. Isoflurane treatment caused delayed elimination of population spike and improved the recovery of population spike; decreased frequency of hypoxic injury potential, postponed the onset of hypoxic injury potential and increased the duration of hypoxic injury potential. Isoflurane treatment also decreased the hypoxia-induced release of amino acid neurotransmitters such as aspartate, glutamate and glycine induced by hypoxia, but the levels of γ-aminobutyric acid were elevated. Morphological studies showed that isoflurane treatment attenuated edema of pyramid neurons in the CA1 region. It also reduced apoptosis as evident by lowered expression of caspase-3 and PARP genes. Isoflurane showed a neuro-protective effect on hippocampal neuron injury induced by hypoxia through suppression of apoptosis. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Isoflurane provides neuroprotection in neonatal hypoxic ischemic brain injury by suppressing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, De-An; Bi, Ling-Yun; Huang, Qian; Zhang, Fang-Min; Han, Zi-Ming

    Isoflurane is halogenated volatile ether used for inhalational anesthesia. It is widely used in clinics as an inhalational anesthetic. Neonatal hypoxic ischemia injury ensues in the immature brain that results in delayed cell death via excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. Isoflurane has shown neuroprotective properties that make a beneficial basis of using isoflurane in both cell culture and animal models, including various models of brain injury. We aimed to determine the neuroprotective effect of isoflurane on hypoxic brain injury and elucidated the underlying mechanism. A hippocampal slice, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid with glucose and oxygen deprivation, was used as an in vitro model for brain hypoxia. The orthodromic population spike and hypoxic injury potential were recorded in the CA1 and CA3 regions. Amino acid neurotransmitters concentration in perfusion solution of hippocampal slices was measured. Isoflurane treatment caused delayed elimination of population spike and improved the recovery of population spike; decreased frequency of hypoxic injury potential, postponed the onset of hypoxic injury potential and increased the duration of hypoxic injury potential. Isoflurane treatment also decreased the hypoxia-induced release of amino acid neurotransmitters such as aspartate, glutamate and glycine induced by hypoxia, but the levels of γ-aminobutyric acid were elevated. Morphological studies showed that isoflurane treatment attenuated edema of pyramid neurons in the CA1 region. It also reduced apoptosis as evident by lowered expression of caspase-3 and PARP genes. Isoflurane showed a neuro-protective effect on hippocampal neuron injury induced by hypoxia through suppression of apoptosis. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Isoflurane provides neuroprotection in neonatal hypoxic ischemic brain injury by suppressing apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-An Zhao

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: Isoflurane is halogenated volatile ether used for inhalational anesthesia. It is widely used in clinics as an inhalational anesthetic. Neonatal hypoxic ischemia injury ensues in the immature brain that results in delayed cell death via excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. Isoflurane has shown neuroprotective properties that make a beneficial basis of using isoflurane in both cell culture and animal models, including various models of brain injury. We aimed to determine the neuroprotective effect of isoflurane on hypoxic brain injury and elucidated the underlying mechanism. Methods: A hippocampal slice, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid with glucose and oxygen deprivation, was used as an in vitro model for brain hypoxia. The orthodromic population spike and hypoxic injury potential were recorded in the CA1 and CA3 regions. Amino acid neurotransmitters concentration in perfusion solution of hippocampal slices was measured. Results: Isoflurane treatment caused delayed elimination of population spike and improved the recovery of population spike; decreased frequency of hypoxic injury potential, postponed the onset of hypoxic injury potential and increased the duration of hypoxic injury potential. Isoflurane treatment also decreased the hypoxia-induced release of amino acid neurotransmitters such as aspartate, glutamate and glycine induced by hypoxia, but the levels of γ-aminobutyric acid were elevated. Morphological studies showed that isoflurane treatment attenuated edema of pyramid neurons in the CA1 region. It also reduced apoptosis as evident by lowered expression of caspase-3 and PARP genes. Conclusions: Isoflurane showed a neuro-protective effect on hippocampal neuron injury induced by hypoxia through suppression of apoptosis.

  8. α-Iso-cubebene exerts neuroprotective effects in amyloid beta stimulated microglia activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Young; Park, Se Jin; Park, Nan Jeong; Joo, Woo Hong; Lee, Sang-Joon; Choi, Young-Whan

    2013-10-25

    Schisandra chinensis is commonly used for food and as a traditional remedy for the treatment of neuronal disorders. However, it is unclear which component of S. chinensis is responsible for its neuropharmacological effects. To answer this question, we isolated α-iso-cubebene, a dibenzocyclooctadiene lignin, from S. chinensis and determined if it has any anti-neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective properties against amyloid β-induced neuroinflammation in microglia. Microglia that are stimulated by amyloid β increased their production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). We found this was all inhibited by α-iso-cubebene. Consistent with these results, α-iso-cubebene inhibited the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and MMP-9 in amyloid β-stimulated microglia. Subsequent mechanistic studies revealed that α-iso-cubebene inhibited the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB-α, the phosphorylation and transactivity of NF-κB, and the phosphorylation of MAPK in amyloid β-stimulated microglia. These results suggest that α-iso-cubebene impairs the amyloid β-induced neuroinflammatory response of microglia by inhibiting the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. Importantly, α-iso-cubebene can provide critical neuroprotection for primary cortical neurons against amyloid β-stimulated microglia-mediated neurotoxicity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing that α-iso-cubebene can provide neuroprotection against, and influence neuroinflammation triggered by, amyloid β activation of microglia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The acquired hyperostosis syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dihlmann, W.; Hering, L.; Bargon, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    Sterno-costo-clavicular hyperostosis (SCCH) is the most common manifestation of a syndrome, consisting of increased bone metabolism, mostly new bone formation and heterotopic ossification of fibrous tissue, which we have characterised as the acquired hyperostosis syndrome. In part I we discuss the terminology, radiological appearances, scintigraphy, clinical and laboratory findings, bacteriology, histology, nosology, complications, treatment and differential diagnosis of SCCH. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is regarded as a phaenotype of SCCH, depending on the age. CRMO occurs in children, adolescents and young adults, SCCH predominantly in middleaged and elderly adults. (orig.) [de

  10. Acquired epidermolysis bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricel Sucar Batista

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis bullosa is a group of diseases or skin disorders genetically transmitted and it is characterized by the appearance of bullae, ulcers and skin wounds. It usually appears at birth or in the first months of life. This is a case of a 72-year-old female patient who comes to the dermatology department with skin lesions of 6 months of evolution. A skin biopsy was performed, taking a sample for direct and indirect immunofluorescence. Acquired epidermolysis bullosa of unknown etiology was diagnosed. Treatment was started with low-dose colchicine to increase it later, according to the patient’s tolerance and disease progression.

  11. Blood Glutamate Scavenging: Insight into Neuroprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zlotnik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain insults are characterized by a multitude of complex processes, of which glutamate release plays a major role. Deleterious excess of glutamate in the brain’s extracellular fluids stimulates glutamate receptors, which in turn lead to cell swelling, apoptosis, and neuronal death. These exacerbate neurological outcome. Approaches aimed at antagonizing the astrocytic and glial glutamate receptors have failed to demonstrate clinical benefit. Alternatively, eliminating excess glutamate from brain interstitial fluids by making use of the naturally occurring brain-to-blood glutamate efflux has been shown to be effective in various animal studies. This is facilitated by gradient driven transport across brain capillary endothelial glutamate transporters. Blood glutamate scavengers enhance this naturally occurring mechanism by reducing the blood glutamate concentration, thus increasing the rate at which excess glutamate is cleared. Blood glutamate scavenging is achieved by several mechanisms including: catalyzation of the enzymatic process involved in glutamate metabolism, redistribution of glutamate into tissue, and acute stress response. Regardless of the mechanism involved, decreased blood glutamate concentration is associated with improved neurological outcome. This review focuses on the physiological, mechanistic and clinical roles of blood glutamate scavenging, particularly in the context of acute and chronic CNS injury. We discuss the details of brain-to-blood glutamate efflux, auto-regulation mechanisms of blood glutamate, natural and exogenous blood glutamate scavenging systems, and redistribution of glutamate. We then propose different applied methodologies to reduce blood and brain glutamate concentrations and discuss the neuroprotective role of blood glutamate scavenging.

  12. Nanoencapsulation of the sasanquasaponin from Camellia oleifera, its photo responsiveness and neuroprotective effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Y

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Yong Ye, Haiting Xing, Yue Li Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Sasanquasaponin, a bioactive compound isolated from seeds of Camellia oleifera, shows central effects in our previous research. In order to investigate its neuroprotective effects, a new kind of nanocapsule with photo responsiveness was designed to deliver sasanquasaponin into the brain and adjusted by red light. The nanocapsule was prepared using sasanquasaponin emulsified with soybean lecithin and cholesterol solution. The natural phaeophorbide from silkworm excrement as a photosensitizer was added in the lipid phase to make the nanocapsules photo responsive. The physicochemical properties of encapsulation efficiency, size distribution, morphology and stability were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography, particle size analyzer, transmission electron microscope, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry. Photo responsiveness was determined by the sasanquasaponin release in pH 7.5 phosphate buffer under the laser at 670 nm. The neuroprotective effects were evaluated by the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, decrease of inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1ß in the brain, and amelioration of kainic acid-induced behavioral disorder in mice. The nanocapsules had higher encapsulation efficiency and stability when the phaeophorbide content was 2% of lecithin weight. The average size was 172.2 nm, distributed in the range of 142–220 nm. The phaeophorbide was scattered sufficiently in the outer lecithin layer of the nanocapsules and increased the drug release after irradiation. TH expression in brain tissues and locomotive activities in mice were reduced by kainic acid, but could be improved by the sasanquasaponin nanocapsules after tail vein injection with 15 minutes of irradiation at the nasal cavity. The

  13. Astrocyte truncated-TrkB mediates BDNF antiapoptotic effect leading to neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Julieta; Turati, Juan; Ramírez, Delia; Carniglia, Lila; Durand, Daniela; Lasaga, Mercedes; Caruso, Carla

    2018-05-31

    Astrocytes are glial cells that help maintain brain homeostasis and become reactive in neurodegenerative processes releasing both harmful and beneficial factors. We have demonstrated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression is induced by melanocortins in astrocytes but BDNF actions in astrocytes are largely unknown. We hypothesize that BDNF may prevent astrocyte death resulting in neuroprotection. We found that BDNF increased astrocyte viability, preventing apoptosis induced by serum deprivation by decreasing active caspase-3 and p53 expression. The antiapoptotic action of BDNF was abolished by ANA-12 (a specific TrkB antagonist) and by K252a (a general Trk antagonist). Astrocytes only express the BDNF receptor TrkB truncated isoform 1, TrkB-T1. BDNF induced ERK, Akt and Src (a non-receptor tyrosine kinase) activation in astrocytes. Blocking ERK and Akt pathways abolished BDNF protection in serum deprivation-induced cell death. Moreover, BDNF protected astrocytes from death by 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), an effect also blocked by ANA-12, K252a, and inhibitors of ERK, calcium and Src. BDNF reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels induced in astrocytes by 3-NP and increased xCT expression and glutathione levels. Astrocyte conditioned media (ACM) from untreated astrocytes partially protected PC12 neurons whereas ACM from BDNF-treated astrocytes completely protected PC12 neurons from 3-NP-induced apoptosis. Both ACM from control and BDNF-treated astrocytes markedly reduced ROS levels induced by 3-NP in PC12 cells. Our results demonstrate that BDNF protects astrocytes from cell death through TrkB-T1 signaling, exerts an antioxidant action, and induces release of neuroprotective factors from astrocytes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Neuroprotective effect of cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation in a rat stroke model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notturno, Francesca; Pace, Marta; Zappasodi, Filippo; Cam, Etrugul; Bassetti, Claudio L; Uncini, Antonino

    2014-07-15

    Experimental focal brain ischemia generates in the penumbra recurrent depolarizations which spread across the injured cortex inducing infarct growth. Transcranial direct current stimulation can induce a lasting, polarity-specific, modulation of cortical excitability. To verify whether cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation could reduce the infarct size and the number of depolarizations, focal ischemia was induced in the rat by the 3 vessels occlusion technique. In the first experiment 12 ischemic rats received cathodal stimulation (alternating 15 min on and 15 min off) starting 45 min after middle cerebral artery occlusion and lasting 4 h. In the second experiment 12 ischemic rats received cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation with the same protocol but starting soon after middle cerebral artery occlusion and lasting 6 h. In both experiments controls were 12 ischemic rats not receiving stimulation. Cathodal stimulation reduced the infarct volume in the first experiment by 20% (p=0.002) and in the second by 30% (p=0.003). The area of cerebral infarction was smaller in animals receiving cathodal stimulation in both experiments (p=0.005). Cathodal stimulation reduced the number of depolarizations (p=0.023) and infarct volume correlated with the number of depolarizations (p=0.048). Our findings indicate that cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation exert a neuroprotective effect in the acute phase of stroke possibly decreasing the number of spreading depolarizations. These findings may have translational relevance and open a new avenue in neuroprotection of stroke in humans. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Survival, differentiation, and neuroprotective mechanisms of human stem cells complexed with neurotrophin-3-releasing pharmacologically active microcarriers in an ex vivo model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daviaud, Nicolas; Garbayo, Elisa; Sindji, Laurence; Martínez-Serrano, Alberto; Schiller, Paul C; Montero-Menei, Claudia N

    2015-06-01

    Stem cell-based regenerative therapies hold great potential for the treatment of degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). We recently reported the repair and functional recovery after treatment with human marrow-isolated adult multilineage inducible (MIAMI) cells adhered to neurotrophin-3 (NT3) releasing pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs) in hemiparkinsonian rats. In order to comprehend this effect, the goal of the present work was to elucidate the survival, differentiation, and neuroprotective mechanisms of MIAMI cells and human neural stem cells (NSCs), both adhering to NT3-releasing PAMs in an ex vivo organotypic model of nigrostriatal degeneration made from brain sagittal slices. It was shown that PAMs led to a marked increase in MIAMI cell survival and neuronal differentiation when releasing NT3. A significant neuroprotective effect of MIAMI cells adhering to PAMs was also demonstrated. NSCs barely had a neuroprotective effect and differentiated mostly into dopaminergic neuronal cells when adhering to PAM-NT3. Moreover, those cells were able to release dopamine in a sufficient amount to induce a return to baseline levels. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analyses identified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stanniocalcin-1 as potential mediators of the neuroprotective effect of MIAMI cells and NSCs, respectively. It was also shown that VEGF locally stimulated tissue vascularization, which might improve graft survival, without excluding a direct neuroprotective effect of VEGF on dopaminergic neurons. These results indicate a prospective interest of human NSC/PAM and MIAMI cell/PAM complexes in tissue engineering for PD. Stem cell-based regenerative therapies hold great potential for the treatment of degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). The present work elucidates and compares the survival, differentiation, and neuroprotective mechanisms

  16. Da-Bu-Yin-Wan and Qian-Zheng-San to Neuroprotect the Mouse Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Gang Gong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Da-Bu-Yin-Wan (DBYW and Qian-Zheng-San (QZS, two classic traditional Chinese medicinal formulas, were clinically employed to treat Parkinson’s disease (PD. Our previous studies demonstrated neuroprotective effects of them on mitochondrial function in PD mice induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP. The purpose of this research was to investigate their possible mechanisms in the light of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium (mitoKATP channels. The neuroprotective effect of DBYW and QZS on dopamine (DA neurons in substantia nigra (SN in the MPTP-induced PD mice was investigated by behavioral test (pole test and immunohistochemistry. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP level in the midbrain tissue was detected by firefly luciferase method. MitoKATP channel subunits SUR1 and Kir6.2 mRNA and protein expressions were tested by real-time PCR (RT-PCR and Western blot. It was observed that DBYW and/or QZS served to ameliorate MPTP-induced behavioral impairment and prevent the loss of substantia nigra dopamine neurons, as well as increase ATP level in the midbrain tissue and downregulate SUR1 expression at mRNA and protein levels with no marked influence on Kir6.2. We concluded that DBYW and QZS exhibit neuroprotective effects probably through the regulation of ATP level and mitoKATP channel subunit expressions.

  17. A comparison of the neuroprotective efficacy of individual oxime (HI-6) and combinations of oximes (HI-6+trimedoxime, HI-6+K203) in soman-poisoned rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassa, Jiri; Karasova, Jana Zdarova; Tesarova, Sandra

    2011-07-01

    The ability of two combinations of oximes (HI-6+trimedoxime, HI-6+K203) to reduce soman-induced acute neurotoxic signs and symptoms was compared with the neuroprotective efficacy of the oxime HI-6 alone, using a functional observational battery. Soman-induced neurotoxicity and the neuroprotective effects of HI-6 alone and HI-6 combined with trimedoxime or K203 in rats poisoned with soman at a sublethal dose (90 μg/kg intramuscularly, i.m.; 80% of LD₅₀ value) were monitored by the functional observational battery at 24 hours following soman administration. The results indicate that both tested oxime mixtures combined with atropine were able to allow soman-poisoned rats to survive 24 hours following soman challenge, while 4 nontreated soman-poisoned rats and 1 soman-poisoned rat treated with oxime HI-6 alone combined with atropine died within 24 hours following soman poisoning. While the oxime HI-6 alone combined with atropine treatment was able to eliminate a few soman-induced neurotoxic signs and symptoms, both oxime mixtures showed higher neuroprotective efficacy in soman-poisoned rats. Especially, the combination of HI-6 with trimedoxime was able to eliminate most soman-induced neurotoxic signs and symptoms and markedly reduce acute neurotoxicity of soman in rats. Thus, both tested mixtures of oximes combined with atropine were able to increase the neuroprotective effectiveness of antidotal treatment of acute soman poisonings, compared to the individual oxime.

  18. Neurodegeneration and Neuroprotection in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah S. Alhomida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is widely considered to be a neurovascular disease. This is in contrast to its previous identity as solely a vascular disease. Early in the disease progression of diabetes, the major cells in the neuronal component of the retina consist of retinal ganglion cells and glial cells, both of which have been found to be compromised. A number of retinal function tests also indicated a functional deficit in diabetic retina, which further supports dysfunction of neuronal cells. As an endocrinological disorder, diabetes alters metabolism both systemically and locally in several body organs, including the retina. A growing body of evidences indicates increased levels of excitotoxic metabolites, including glutamate, branched chain amino acids and homocysteine in cases of diabetic retinopathy. Also present, early in the disease, are decreased levels of folic acid and vitamin-B12, which are potential metabolites capable of damaging neurons. These altered levels of metabolites are found to activate several metabolic pathways, leading to increases in oxidative stress and decreases in the level of neurotrophic factors. As a consequence, they may damage retinal neurons in diabetic patients. In this review, we have discussed those potential excitotoxic metabolites and their implications in neuronal damage. Possible therapeutic targets to protect neurons are also discussed. However, further research is needed to understand the exact molecular mechanism of neurodegeneration so that effective neuroprotection strategies can be developed. By protecting retinal neurons early in diabetic retinopathy cases, damage of retinal vessels can be protected, thereby helping to ameliorate the progression of diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of blindness worldwide.

  19. Neuroprotection for Nerve Agent-Induced Brain Damage

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newmark, Jonathan; Ballough, Gerald P; Filbert, Margaret G

    2002-01-01

    ... secondary to exposure to nerve agents. Preliminary work in this laboratory has demonstrated proof of concept using a compound not yet approved for clinical use by the US Food and Drug Administration...

  20. Medical management of Parkinson's disease: focus on neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, Marie-Catherine; Alcaraz-Zubeldia, Mireya; Rios, Camilo

    2011-06-01

    Neuroprotection refers to the protection of neurons from excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis as principal mechanisms of cell loss in a variety of diseases of the central nervous system. Our interest in Parkinson's disease (PD) treatment is focused on drugs with neuroprotective properties in preclinical experiments and evidence-based efficacy in human subjects. To this date, neuroprotection has never been solidly proven in clinical trials but recent adequate markers and/or strategies to study and promote this important goal are described. A myriad of compounds with protective properties in cell cultures and animal models yield to few treatments in clinical practice. At present, markers of neuronal vitality, disease modifying effects and long term clinical stability are the elements searched for in clinical trials. This review highlights new strategies to monitor patients with PD. Currently, neuroprotection in subjects has not been solidly achieved for selegiline and pramipexole; however, a recent rasagiline trial design is showing new indications of disease course modifying effects. In neurological practice, it is of utmost importance to take into account the potential neuroprotection exerted by a treatment in conjunction with its symptomatic efficacy.

  1. Inhalation gases or gaseous mediators as neuroprotectants for cerebral ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Brad A; Harrison, Joanne C; Nair, Shiva M; Sammut, Ivan A

    2013-01-01

    Ischaemic stroke is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While recombinant tissue plasminogen activator can be administered to produce thrombolysis and restore blood flow to the ischaemic brain, therapeutic benefit is only achieved in a fraction of the subset of patients eligible for fibrinolytic intervention. Neuroprotective therapies attempting to restrict the extent of brain injury following cerebral ischaemia have not been successfully translated into the clinic despite overwhelming pre-clinical evidence of neuroprotection. Therefore, an adequate treatment for the majority of acute ischaemic stroke patients remains elusive. In the stroke literature, the use of therapeutic gases has received relatively little attention. Gases such as hyperbaric and normobaric oxygen, xenon, hydrogen, helium and argon all possess biological effects that have shown to be neuroprotective in pre-clinical models of ischaemic stroke. There are significant advantages to using gases including their relative abundance, low cost and feasibility for administration, all of which make them ideal candidates for a translational therapy for stroke. In addition, modulating cellular gaseous mediators including nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulphide may be an attractive option for ischaemic stroke therapy. Inhalation of these gaseous mediators can also produce neuroprotection, but this strategy remains to be confirmed as a viable therapy for ischaemic stroke. This review highlights the neuroprotective potential of therapeutic gas therapy and modulation of gaseous mediators for ischaemic stroke. The therapeutic advantages of gaseous therapy offer new promising directions in breaking the translational barrier for ischaemic stroke.

  2. Neuroprotective and Cognitive Enhancement Potentials of Baicalin: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandhasamy Sowndhararajan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders that are characterized by the gradual loss of neurons. The development of effective neuroprotective agents to prevent and control neurodegenerative diseases is specifically important. Recently, there has been an increasing interest in selecting flavonoid compounds as potential neuroprotective agents, owing to their high effectiveness with low side effects. Baicalin is one of the important flavonoid compounds, which is mainly isolated from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi (an important Chinese medicinal herb. In recent years, a number of studies have shown that baicalin has a potent neuroprotective effect in various in vitro and in vivo models of neuronal injury. In particular, baicalin effectively prevents neurodegenerative diseases through various pharmacological mechanisms, including antioxidative stress, anti-excitotoxicity, anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, stimulating neurogenesis, promoting the expression of neuronal protective factors, etc. This review mainly focuses on the neuroprotective and cognitive enhancement effects of baicalin. The aim of the present review is to compile all information in relation to the neuroprotective and cognitive enhancement effects of baicalin and its molecular mechanisms of action in various in vitro and in vivo experimental models.

  3. Neuroprotection for Stroke: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Kleinschnitz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuroprotection aims to prevent salvageable neurons from dying. Despite showing efficacy in experimental stroke studies, the concept of neuroprotection has failed in clinical trials. Reasons for the translational difficulties include a lack of methodological agreement between preclinical and clinical studies and the heterogeneity of stroke in humans compared to homogeneous strokes in animal models. Even when the international recommendations for preclinical stroke research, the Stroke Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR criteria, were followed, we have still seen limited success in the clinic, examples being NXY-059 and haematopoietic growth factors which fulfilled nearly all the STAIR criteria. However, there are a number of neuroprotective treatments under investigation in clinical trials such as hypothermia and ebselen. Moreover, promising neuroprotective treatments based on a deeper understanding of the complex pathophysiology of ischemic stroke such as inhibitors of NADPH oxidases and PSD-95 are currently evaluated in preclinical studies. Further concepts to improve translation include the investigation of neuroprotectants in multicenter preclinical Phase III-type studies, improved animal models, and close alignment between clinical trial and preclinical methodologies. Future successful translation will require both new concepts for preclinical testing and innovative approaches based on mechanistic insights into the ischemic cascade.

  4. Neuroprotection of a sesamin derivative, 1, 2-bis [(3-methoxy- phenyl methyl] ethane-1, 2-dicaroxylic acid (MMEDA against ischemic and hypoxic neuronal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Tsen Hung

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Stroke may cause severe neuronal damage. The sesamin have been demonstrated to possess neuroprotection by its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. One sesamin derivative was artificially composited, 1, 2-bis [(3-methoxyphenyl methyl] ethane-1, 2-dicaroxylic acid (MMEDA had been developed to study its antioxidative activity and neuroprotection. Materials and Methods: The infaction of Sprague Dawley (SD rats and hypoxia models of BV-2 microglia or PC12 cells were investigated for in vivo and in vitro test respectively. Lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species (ROS, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and related signaling pathways from hypoxic cells were analyzed by ELISA or Western blot assay, respectively. Results: MMEDA showed a protective effect when given 90 min after the focal cerebral ischemia. The neuroprotection of MMEDA was further confirmed by attenuating ROS and PGE2 release from hypoxic BV-2 or PC12 cells. MMEDA significantly reduced hypoxia-induced JNK and caspase-3 (survival and apoptotic pathways in PC12 cells. Conclusion: The neuroprotective effect of MMEDA on ischemia/hypoxia models was involved with its antioxidative activity and anti-inflammatory effects. These results suggest that MMEDA exert effective neuroprotection against ischemia/hypoxia injury.

  5. Dual activities of the anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204 provide neuroprotection in brain slice models for neurodegenerative diseases and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kanegan, Michael J; Dunn, Denise E; Kaltenbach, Linda S; Shah, Bijal; He, Dong Ning; McCoy, Daniel D; Yang, Peiying; Peng, Jiangnan; Shen, Li; Du, Lin; Cichewicz, Robert H; Newman, Robert A; Lo, Donald C

    2016-05-12

    We previously reported neuroprotective activity of the botanical anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204, a supercritical CO2 extract of Nerium oleander, in brain slice and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. We showed that one component of this neuroprotective activity is mediated through its principal cardiac glycoside constituent, oleandrin, via induction of the potent neurotrophic factor brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, we also noted that the concentration-relation for PBI-05204 in the brain slice oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model is considerably broader than that for oleandrin as a single agent. We thus surmised that PBI-05204 contains an additional neuroprotective component(s), distinct from oleandrin. We report here that neuroprotective activity is also provided by the triterpenoid constituents of PBI-05204, notably oleanolic acid. We demonstrate that a sub-fraction of PBI-05204 (Fraction 0-4) containing oleanolic and other triterpenoids, but without cardiac glycosides, induces the expression of cellular antioxidant gene transcription programs regulated through antioxidant transcriptional response elements (AREs). Finally, we show that Fraction 0-4 provides broad neuroprotection in organotypic brain slice models for neurodegeneration driven by amyloid precursor protein (APP) and tau implicated in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementias, respectively, in addition to ischemic injury modeled by OGD.

  6. Post-stroke angiotensin II type 2 receptor activation provides long-term neuroprotection in aged rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M Bennion

    Full Text Available Activation of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R by administration of Compound 21 (C21, a selective AT2R agonist, induces neuroprotection in models of ischemic stroke in young adult animals. The mechanisms of this neuroprotective action are varied, and may include direct and indirect effects of AT2R activation. Our objectives were to assess the long-term protective effects of post-stroke C21 treatments in a clinically-relevant model of stroke in aged rats and to characterize the cellular localization of AT2Rs in the mouse brain of transgenic reporter mice following stroke. Intraperitoneal injections of C21 (0.03mg/kg after ischemic stroke induced by transient monofilament middle cerebral artery occlusion resulted in protective effects that were sustained for up to at least 3-weeks post-stroke. These included improved neurological function across multiple assessments and a significant reduction in infarct volume as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. We also found AT2R expression to be on neurons, not astrocytes or microglia, in normal female and male mouse brains. Stroke did not induce altered cellular localization of AT2R when assessed at 7 and 14 days post-stroke. These findings demonstrate that the neuroprotection previously characterized only during earlier time points using stroke models in young animals is sustained long-term in aged rats, implying even greater clinical relevance for the study of AT2R agonists for the acute treatment of ischemic stroke in human disease. Further, it appears that this sustained neuroprotection is likely due to a mix of both direct and indirect effects stemming from selective activation of AT2Rs on neurons or other cells besides astrocytes and microglia.

  7. Post-stroke angiotensin II type 2 receptor activation provides long-term neuroprotection in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennion, Douglas M; Isenberg, Jacob D; Harmel, Allison T; DeMars, Kelly; Dang, Alex N; Jones, Chad H; Pignataro, Megan E; Graham, Justin T; Steckelings, U Muscha; Alexander, Jon C; Febo, Marcelo; Krause, Eric G; de Kloet, Annette D; Candelario-Jalil, Eduardo; Sumners, Colin

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) by administration of Compound 21 (C21), a selective AT2R agonist, induces neuroprotection in models of ischemic stroke in young adult animals. The mechanisms of this neuroprotective action are varied, and may include direct and indirect effects of AT2R activation. Our objectives were to assess the long-term protective effects of post-stroke C21 treatments in a clinically-relevant model of stroke in aged rats and to characterize the cellular localization of AT2Rs in the mouse brain of transgenic reporter mice following stroke. Intraperitoneal injections of C21 (0.03mg/kg) after ischemic stroke induced by transient monofilament middle cerebral artery occlusion resulted in protective effects that were sustained for up to at least 3-weeks post-stroke. These included improved neurological function across multiple assessments and a significant reduction in infarct volume as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. We also found AT2R expression to be on neurons, not astrocytes or microglia, in normal female and male mouse brains. Stroke did not induce altered cellular localization of AT2R when assessed at 7 and 14 days post-stroke. These findings demonstrate that the neuroprotection previously characterized only during earlier time points using stroke models in young animals is sustained long-term in aged rats, implying even greater clinical relevance for the study of AT2R agonists for the acute treatment of ischemic stroke in human disease. Further, it appears that this sustained neuroprotection is likely due to a mix of both direct and indirect effects stemming from selective activation of AT2Rs on neurons or other cells besides astrocytes and microglia.

  8. Taurine Provides Neuroprotection against Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froger, Nicolas; Cadetti, Lucia; Lorach, Henri; Martins, Joao; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Dubus, Elisabeth; Degardin, Julie; Pain, Dorothée; Forster, Valérie; Chicaud, Laurent; Ivkovic, Ivana; Simonutti, Manuel; Fouquet, Stéphane; Jammoul, Firas; Léveillard, Thierry; Benosman, Ryad; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration occurs in numerous retinal diseases leading to blindness, either as a primary process like in glaucoma, or secondary to photoreceptor loss. However, no commercial drug is yet directly targeting RGCs for their neuroprotection. In the 70s, taurine, a small sulfonic acid provided by nutrition, was found to be essential for the survival of photoreceptors, but this dependence was not related to any retinal disease. More recently, taurine deprivation was incriminated in the retinal toxicity of an antiepileptic drug. We demonstrate here that taurine can improve RGC survival in culture or in different animal models of RGC degeneration. Taurine effect on RGC survival was assessed in vitro on primary pure RCG cultures under serum-deprivation conditions, and on NMDA-treated retinal explants from adult rats. In vivo, taurine was administered through the drinking water in two glaucomatous animal models (DBA/2J mice and rats with vein occlusion) and in a model of Retinitis pigmentosa with secondary RGC degeneration (P23H rats). After a 6-day incubation, 1 mM taurine significantly enhanced RGCs survival (+68%), whereas control RGCs were cultured in a taurine-free medium, containing all natural amino-acids. This effect was found to rely on taurine-uptake by RGCs. Furthermore taurine (1 mM) partly prevented NMDA-induced RGC excitotoxicity. Finally, taurine supplementation increased RGC densities both in DBA/2J mice, in rats with vein occlusion and in P23H rats by contrast to controls drinking taurine-free water. This study indicates that enriched taurine nutrition can directly promote RGC survival through RGC intracellular pathways. It provides evidence that taurine can positively interfere with retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:23115615

  9. Intercontrole acquiring by Framatome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Framatome group, as the worldwide leader in nuclear power plant construction, has reinforced his competences in nuclear services thanks to the acquiring of the Intercontrole company, specialized in non-destructive testing in nuclear and industrial environments. After a presentation of the functioning principle and of the safety aspects of a PWR reactor, this press dossier presents in a first part the role of nuclear services and in particular of non-destructive testing in nuclear power plants (in-service inspection, regulatory aspects, testing processes). This part is illustrated with some examples of inspection performed on some components of the primary coolant loop (steam generators, reactor vessel, pressurizer, pipes, primary pumps). A second part presents the technical centres and units of Framatome in charge of performing non-destructive inspections, while a third part describes the industrial policy and strategy of the group in this domain (market of nuclear park maintenance in France, in the USA and worldwide, creation of the 'inspection and control' centre of Framatome). A last part presents the activities of the Intercontrole company and of its daughter companies with some examples of actions realized in the nuclear and natural gas domains. (J.S.)

  10. Pediatric acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodack, Marie I

    2010-10-01

    Although pediatric patients are sometimes included in studies about visual problems in patients with acquired brain injury (ABI), few studies deal solely with children. Unlike studies dealing with adult patients, in which mechanisms of brain injury are divided into cerebral vascular accident (CVA) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), studies on pediatric patients deal almost exclusively with traumatic brain injury, specifically caused by accidents. Here we report on the vision problems of 4 pediatric patients, ages 3 to 18 years, who were examined in the ophthalmology/optometry clinic at a children's hospital. All patients had an internally caused brain injury and after the initial insult manifested problems in at least one of the following areas: acuity, binocularity, motility (tracking or saccades), accommodation, visual fields, and visual perceptual skills. Pediatric patients can suffer from a variety of oculo-visual problems after the onset of head injury. These patients may or may not be symptomatic and can benefit from optometric intervention. Copyright © 2010 American Optometric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Community-acquired pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poetter-Lang, S.; Herold, C.J.

    2017-01-01

    The diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is often not possible based only on the clinical symptoms and biochemical parameters. For every patient with the suspicion of CAP, a chest radiograph in two planes should be carried out. Additionally, a risk stratification for the decision between outpatient therapy or hospitalization is recommended. Based on the evaluation of the different radiological patterns as well as their extent and distribution, a rough allocation to so-called pathogen groups as well as a differentiation between viral and bacterial infections are possible; however, because different pathogens cause different patterns an accurate correlation is not feasible by relying purely on imaging. The radiological findings serve as proof or exclusion of pneumonia and can also be used to evaluate the extent of the disease (e.g. monolobular, multilobular, unilateral or bilateral). In cases of prolonged disease, suspicion of complications (e.g. pleural effusion or empyema, necrotizing pneumonia or abscess) or comorbid conditions (e.g. underlying pulmonary or mediastinal diseases) computed tomography is an important diagnostic tool in addition to chest radiography. Ultrasound is often used to diagnose pleural processes (e.g. parapneumonic effusion or pleural empyema). (orig.) [de

  12. Neuroprotective Activity of Lavender Oil on Transient Focal Cerebral Ischemia in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiusheng Zheng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The air-dried aerial parts of Lavandula angustifolia Mill, a traditional Uygur herbal drug, is used as resuscitation-inducing therapy to treat neurodisfunctions, such as stroke. This study was designed to assess the neuroprotective effects of lavender oil against ischemia/reperfusion (IR injury in mice. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by the intraluminal occlusion method with a nylon string. The neurodysfuntion was evaluated by neurological deficit and the infarct area was showed by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC staining. The histopathological changes were observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The levels of mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS, malondialdehyde (MDA and carbonyl, the ratio of reduced glutathione (GSH/glutathione disulfide (GSSG, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and glutathion peroxidase (GSH-Px in brain tissue were measured to estimate the oxidative stress state. Neurological deficit, infarct size, histopathology changes and oxidative stress markers were evaluated after 22 h of reperfusion. In comparison with the model group, treatment with lavender oil significantly decreased neurological deficit scores, infarct size, the levels of MDA, carbonyl and ROS, and attenuated neuronal damage, upregulated SOD, CAT, GSH-Px activities and GSH/GSSG ratio. These results suggested that the neuroprotective effects of lavender oil against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury may be attributed to its antioxidant effects.

  13. Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of Rosa damascena hydro-alcoholic extract on rat hippocampus

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    Mansour Homayoun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Previously, analgesic, hypnotic, and anticonvulsant effects have been suggested for Rosa damascena (R. damascena. In the present study, possible anti-seizure and neuro-protective effects of hydro-alcoholic extract of R. damascena has been investigated after inducing seizures in rats by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ. Materials and Methods: The rats were divided to five groups: (1 Control: received saline, (2 PTZ: 100 mg/kg, i.p., (3 PTZ-Extract 50 mg/kg(PTZ-Ext 50, (4 PTZ- Extract 100 mg/kg(PTZ-Ext 100, and (5 PTZ- Extract 200 mg/kg(PTZ-Ext 200 groups which were treated with 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg respectively of hydro-alcoholic extract of R. damascena for one week before PTZ injection. The animals were examined for electrocorticography (ECoG recording and finally, the brains were removed for histological study. Results: The hydro-alcoholic extract of R. damascena significantly prolonged the latency of seizure attacks and reduced the frequency and amplitude of epileptiform burst discharges induced by PTZ injection. Moreover, all three doses of the extract significantly inhibited production of dark neurons in different regions of the hippocampus in the mentioned animal model. Conclusion: The present study showed that the hydro-alcoholic extract of R. damascena has anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects. More investigations are needed to be done in order to better understand the responsible compound(s as well as the possible mechanism(s.

  14. Pifithrin-α provides neuroprotective effects at the level of mitochondria independently of p53 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitemeier, Sandra; Ganjam, Goutham K; Diemert, Sebastian; Culmsee, Carsten

    2014-12-01

    Impaired mitochondrial integrity and function are key features of intrinsic death pathways in neuronal cells. Therefore, key regulators of intrinsic death pathways acting upstream of mitochondria are potential targets for therapeutic approaches of neuroprotection. The tumor suppressor p53 is a well-established regulator of cellular responses towards different kinds of lethal stress, including oxidative stress. Recent reports suggested that p53 may affect mitochondrial integrity and function through both, transcriptional activation of mitochondria-targeted pro-death proteins and direct effects at the mitochondrial membrane. In the present study, we compared the effects of pharmacological inhibition of p53 by pifithrin-α with those of selective p53 gene silencing by RNA interference. Using MTT assay and real-time cell impedance measurements we confirmed the protective effect of both strategies against glutamate-induced oxidative stress in immortalized mouse hippocampal HT-22 neurons. Further, we observed full restoration of mitochondrial membrane potential and inhibition of glutamate-induced mitochondrial fragmentation by pifithrin-α which was, in contrast, not achieved by p53 gene silencing. Downregulation of p53 by siRNA decreased p53 transcriptional activity and reduced expression levels of p21 mRNA, while pifithrin-α did not affect these endpoints. These results suggest a neuroprotective effect of pifithrin-α which occurred at the level of mitochondria and independently of p53 inhibition.

  15. Kynurenic Acid and Neuroprotective Activity of the Ketogenic Diet in the Eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnowski, Tomasz; Tulidowicz-Bielak, Maria; Zarnowska, Iwona; Mitosek-Szewczyk, Krystyna; Wnorowski, Artur; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Gasior, Maciej; Turski, Waldemar A

    2017-01-01

    There is growing evidence of the involvement of the kynurenine metabolic pathway and the enhancement of kynurenic acid production in the neuroprotective effects of the ketogenic diet. Here, we review evidence implicating kynurenic acid in the efficacy of ketogenic diet in eye diseases associated with neurodegeneration. Ketogenic diet and ketone bodies that are elevated during exposure to the ketogenic diet each have a neuroprotective effect on retinal ganglion cells in a rat model of Nmethyl- D-aspartate induced neuronal damage. Chronic exposure to ketogenic diet also increases kynurenic acid concentrations in discrete rat brain structures. A non-selective glutamate receptor agonist, glutamate, also decreases the production of kynurenic acid in bovine retinal slices; this effect is attenuated by acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate, two of three ketone bodies overproduced during ketogenic diet. Whether ketogenic diet induced enhancement of kynurenic acid production would translate into a clinically significant improvement in certain eye diseases like glaucoma and retinal neurodegenerations awaits further experimental and clinical verification. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Neuroprotection by curcumin in ischemic brain injury involves the Akt/Nrf2 pathway.

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    Jingxian Wu

    Full Text Available Oxidative damage plays a critical role in many diseases of the central nervous system. This study was conducted to determine the molecular mechanisms involved in the putative anti-oxidative effects of curcumin against experimental stroke. Oxygen and glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R was used to mimic ischemic insult in primary cultured cortical neurons. A rapid increase in the intracellular expression of NAD(PH: quinone oxidoreductase1 (NQO1 induced by OGD was counteracted by curcumin post-treatment, which paralleled attenuated cell injury. The reduction of phosphorylation Akt induced by OGD was restored by curcumin. Consequently, NQO1 expression and the binding activity of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 to antioxidant response element (ARE were increased. LY294002 blocked the increase in phospho-Akt evoked by curcumin and abolished the associated protective effect. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion for 60 minutes. Curcumin administration significantly reduced infarct size. Curcumin also markedly reduced oxidative stress levels in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO rats; hence, these effects were all suppressed by LY294002. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that curcumin protects neurons against ischemic injury, and this neuroprotective effect involves the Akt/Nrf2 pathway. In addition, Nrf2 is involved in the neuroprotective effects of curcumin against oxidative damage.

  17. In vitro evaluation of antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of curcumin loaded in Pluronic micelles

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    Cvetelina Gorinova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a polyphenolic substance with attractive pharmacological activities (e.g. antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer. Incorporation of curcumin in polymeric micelles could overcome the problems associated with its instability and low aqueous solubility. The aim of this study was to load curcumin in polymeric micelles based on Pluronic® P 123 or Pluronic® F 127 triblock copolymers and evaluate the antioxidant and neuroprotective effects after micellization. The micelles were prepared and loaded with curcumin by applying the dissolution method. Higher encapsulation efficiency was observed in the micelles formulated with Pluronic® P 123. These micelles were characterized with small size and narrow size distribution. The effects of micellar curcumin were investigated in two in vitro models. First, the capacity of micellar curcumin to inhibit iron/ascorbic acid-induced lipid peroxidation in rat liver microsomes was evaluated. Micellar curcumin and free drug showed similar inhibition of lipid peroxidation. Second, micellar curcumin and free curcumin showed protective potential in a model of 6-hydroxydopamine induced neurotoxicity in rat brain synaptosomes. The results from both methods indicated preservation of antioxidant and neuroprotective activity of curcumin in micelles. The small micellar size, high loading capacity and preservation of antioxidant activity of curcumin into Pluronic micelles, suggested their further evaluation as a curcumin delivery system.

  18. Neuroprotection by Curcumin in Ischemic Brain Injury Involves the Akt/Nrf2 Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingxian; Li, Qiong; Wang, Xiaoyan; Yu, Shanshan; Li, Lan; Wu, Xuemei; Chen, Yanlin; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative damage plays a critical role in many diseases of the central nervous system. This study was conducted to determine the molecular mechanisms involved in the putative anti-oxidative effects of curcumin against experimental stroke. Oxygen and glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R) was used to mimic ischemic insult in primary cultured cortical neurons. A rapid increase in the intracellular expression of NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase1 (NQO1) induced by OGD was counteracted by curcumin post-treatment, which paralleled attenuated cell injury. The reduction of phosphorylation Akt induced by OGD was restored by curcumin. Consequently, NQO1 expression and the binding activity of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) to antioxidant response element (ARE) were increased. LY294002 blocked the increase in phospho-Akt evoked by curcumin and abolished the associated protective effect. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion for 60 minutes. Curcumin administration significantly reduced infarct size. Curcumin also markedly reduced oxidative stress levels in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rats; hence, these effects were all suppressed by LY294002. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that curcumin protects neurons against ischemic injury, and this neuroprotective effect involves the Akt/Nrf2 pathway. In addition, Nrf2 is involved in the neuroprotective effects of curcumin against oxidative damage. PMID:23555802

  19. Phytochemical Characteristics, Free Radical Scavenging Activities, and Neuroprotection of Five Medicinal Plant Extracts

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    Chia Lin Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine phytochemical characteristics, chemiluminescence antioxidant capacities, and neuroprotective effects on PC12 cells for methanol extracts of Spatholobus suberectus, Uncaria rhynchophylla, Alpinia officinarum, Drynaria fortunei, and Crataegus pinnatifida. The C. pinnatifida extract (CPE afforded the greatest yield and total phenolic content. The S. suberectus extract (SSE yielded the greatest total flavonoid content. The U. rhynchophylla extract (URE produced the greatest total tannin content, and the A. officinarum extract (AOE produced the greatest total triterpenoid content. The D. fortunei extract, assayed using horseradish peroxidase-luminol-hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, and AOE using pyrogallol-luminol assay each exhibited better antioxidant activity than the L-ascorbic acid and 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid did. The CPE, SSE, and URE presented neurogrowth effects and neuroprotective activities on H2O2-induced PC12 cell death at 0.5–5.0 μg/mL. The CPE represents a promising medicinal plant source for the treatment of H2O2-induced neurodegenerative disease, because of its useful phytochemical characteristics.

  20. Phytochemical Characteristics, Free Radical Scavenging Activities, and Neuroprotection of Five Medicinal Plant Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia Lin; Lin, Che San; Lai, Guia Hung

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine phytochemical characteristics, chemiluminescence antioxidant capacities, and neuroprotective effects on PC12 cells for methanol extracts of Spatholobus suberectus, Uncaria rhynchophylla, Alpinia officinarum, Drynaria fortunei, and Crataegus pinnatifida. The C. pinnatifida extract (CPE) afforded the greatest yield and total phenolic content. The S. suberectus extract (SSE) yielded the greatest total flavonoid content. The U. rhynchophylla extract (URE) produced the greatest total tannin content, and the A. officinarum extract (AOE) produced the greatest total triterpenoid content. The D. fortunei extract, assayed using horseradish peroxidase-luminol-hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and AOE using pyrogallol-luminol assay each exhibited better antioxidant activity than the L-ascorbic acid and 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid did. The CPE, SSE, and URE presented neurogrowth effects and neuroprotective activities on H2O2-induced PC12 cell death at 0.5–5.0 μg/mL. The CPE represents a promising medicinal plant source for the treatment of H2O2-induced neurodegenerative disease, because of its useful phytochemical characteristics. PMID:21845204

  1. Neuroprotective effects of sildenafil against oxidative stress and memory dysfunction in mice exposed to noise stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikandaner, Hu Erxidan; Park, So Young; Kim, Min Jung; Park, Shi Nae; Yang, Dong Won

    2017-02-15

    Noise exposure has been well characterized as an environmental stressor, and is known to have auditory and non-auditory effects. Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors affect memory and hippocampus plasticity through various signaling cascades which are regulated by cGMP. In this study, we investigated the effects of sildenafil on memory deficiency, neuroprotection and oxidative stress in mice caused by chronic noise exposure. Mice were exposed to noise for 4h every day up to 14days at 110dB SPL of noise level. Sildenafil (15mg/kg) was orally administered 30min before noise exposure for 14days. Behavioral assessments were performed using novel object recognition (NOR) test and radial arm maze (RAM) test. Higher levels of memory dysfunction and oxidative stress were observed in noise alone-induced mice compared to control group. Interestingly, sildenafil administration increased memory performance, decreased oxidative stress, and increased neuroprotection in the hippocampus region of noise alone-induced mice likely through affecting memory related pathways such as cGMP/PKG/CREB and p25/CDK5, and induction of free radical scavengers such as SOD1, SOD2, SOD3, Prdx5, and catalase in the brain of stressed mice. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Neuroprotective effects of ebselen following forebrain ischemia: involvement of glutamate and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Fujisawa, Hirosuke; Suehiro, Eiichi; Shirao, Satoshi; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2011-01-01

    Ebselen is a mimic of glutathione peroxidase that reacts with peroxynitrite and inhibits nitric oxide (NO) synthase. Ebselen has beneficial effects on the neurological outcome of patients with stroke. In this study, the mechanisms by which ebselen can elicit neuroprotective effects against ischemic brain injury were investigated in male Wistar rats. Experimental forebrain ischemia was induced by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion with hemorrhagic hypotension. Ebselen was administered to animals in the treatment group 2 hours prior to the induction of forebrain ischemia, and placebo was administered in the control group. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by the hydrogen clearance method. Cortical extracellular levels of excitatory amino acids (EAAs) and NO were evaluated using in vivo microdialysis. Neuronal damage in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus was assessed in brains harvested after a 24-hour period of survival. CBF did not recover to normal physiological levels after ischemic insults in either the control or treatment groups. The differences in the sequential changes in extracellular EAA and NO levels between groups were not statistically significant. There was a significantly larger mean density of intact, undamaged neurons in the CA1 subfield in the treatment group than in the control group. The neuroprotective effects of ebselen were reflected in the histological findings, without significant inhibition of glutamate release or NO synthesis during the acute phase of experimentally induced cerebral ischemia.

  3. Using lithium as a neuroprotective agent in patients with cancer

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    Khasraw Mustafa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neurocognitive impairment is being increasingly recognized as an important issue in patients with cancer who develop cognitive difficulties either as part of direct or indirect involvement of the nervous system or as a consequence of either chemotherapy-related or radiotherapy-related complications. Brain radiotherapy in particular can lead to significant cognitive defects. Neurocognitive decline adversely affects quality of life, meaningful employment, and even simple daily activities. Neuroprotection may be a viable and realistic goal in preventing neurocognitive sequelae in these patients, especially in the setting of cranial irradiation. Lithium is an agent that has been in use for psychiatric disorders for decades, but recently there has been emerging evidence that it can have a neuroprotective effect. This review discusses neurocognitive impairment in patients with cancer and the potential for investigating the use of lithium as a neuroprotectant in such patients.

  4. The neuroprotective effects of milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 against oligomeric amyloid β toxicity

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    Li Endong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphatidylserine receptor is a key molecule that mediates the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. Milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8 is a phosphatidylserine receptor that is expressed on various macrophage lineage cells, including microglia in the central nervous system (CNS. Targeted clearance of degenerated neurons by microglia is essential to maintain healthy neural networks. We previously showed that the CX3C chemokine fractalkine is secreted from degenerated neurons and accelerates microglial clearance of neuronal debris via inducing the release of MFG-E8. However, the mechanisms by which microglia produce MFG-E8 and the precise functions of MFG-E8 are unknown. Methods The release of MFG-E8 from microglia treated with conditioned medium from neurons exposed to neurotoxic substances, glutamate or oligomeric amyloid β (oAβ was measured by ELISA. The neuroprotective effects of MFG-E8 and MFG-E8 − induced microglial phagocytosis of oAβ were assessed by immunocytochemistry. The effects of MFG-E8 on the production of the anti-oxidative enzyme hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1 were determined by ELISA and immunocytochemisty. Results MFG-E8 was induced in microglia treated with conditioned medium from neurons that had been exposed to neurotoxicants, glutamate or oAβ. MFG-E8 significantly attenuated oAβ-induced neuronal cell death in a primary neuron − microglia coculture system. Microglial phagocytosis of oAβ was accelerated by MFG-E8 treatment due to increased CD47 expression in the absence of neurotoxic molecule production, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, nitric oxide, and glutamate. MFG-E8 − treated microglia induced nuclear factor E(2 − related factor 2 (Nrf2 − mediated HO-1 production, which also contributed to neuroprotection. Conclusions These results suggest that microglia release MFG-E8 in response to signals from degenerated neurons and that MFG-E8 protects oAβ-induced neuronal cell death

  5. Neuroprotective Effect of Arctigenin via Upregulation of P-CREB in Mouse Primary Neurons and Human SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells

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    Zhang, Nan; Wen, Qingping; Ren, Lu; Liang, Wenbo; Xia, Yang; Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Dan; Sun, Dong; Hu, Yv; Hao, Haiguang; Yan, Yaping; Zhang, Guangxian; Yang, Jingxian; Kang, Tingguo

    2013-01-01

    Arctigenin (Arc) has been shown to act on scopolamine-induced memory deficit mice and to provide a neuroprotective effect on cultured cortical neurons from glutamate-induced neurodegeneration through mechanisms not completely defined. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of Arc on H89-induced cell damage and its potential mechanisms in mouse cortical neurons and human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. We found that Arc prevented cell viability loss induced by H89 in human SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, Arc reduced intracellular beta amyloid (Aβ) production induced by H89 in neurons and human SH-SY5Y cells, and Arc also inhibited the presenilin 1(PS1) protein level in neurons. In addition, neural apoptosis in both types of cells, inhibition of neurite outgrowth in human SH-SY5Y cells and reduction of synaptic marker synaptophysin (SYN) expression in neurons were also observed after H89 exposure. All these effects induced by H89 were markedly reversed by Arc treatment. Arc also significantly attenuated downregulation of the phosphorylation of CREB (p-CREB) induced by H89, which may contribute to the neuroprotective effects of Arc. These results demonstrated that Arc exerted the ability to protect neurons and SH-SY5Y cells against H89-induced cell injury via upregulation of p-CREB. PMID:24025424

  6. Neuroprotective Effect of Arctigenin via Upregulation of P-CREB in Mouse Primary Neurons and Human SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells

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    Tingguo Kang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Arctigenin (Arc has been shown to act on scopolamine-induced memory deficit mice and to provide a neuroprotective effect on cultured cortical neurons from glutamate-induced neurodegeneration through mechanisms not completely defined. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of Arc on H89-induced cell damage and its potential mechanisms in mouse cortical neurons and human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. We found that Arc prevented cell viability loss induced by H89 in human SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, Arc reduced intracellular beta amyloid (Aβ production induced by H89 in neurons and human SH-SY5Y cells, and Arc also inhibited the presenilin 1(PS1 protein level in neurons. In addition, neural apoptosis in both types of cells, inhibition of neurite outgrowth in human SH-SY5Y cells and reduction of synaptic marker synaptophysin (SYN expression in neurons were also observed after H89 exposure. All these effects induced by H89 were markedly reversed by Arc treatment. Arc also significantly attenuated downregulation of the phosphorylation of CREB (p-CREB induced by H89, which may contribute to the neuroprotective effects of Arc. These results demonstrated that Arc exerted the ability to protect neurons and SH-SY5Y cells against H89-induced cell injury via upregulation of p-CREB.

  7. Neuroprotection of rat retinal ganglion cells mediated through alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, K; Mata, D; Linn, D M; Linn, C L

    2013-05-01

    Glutamate-induced excitotoxicity is thought to play an important role in several neurodegenerative diseases in the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, neuroprotection against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity was analyzed using acetylcholine (ACh), nicotine and the α7 specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) agonist, N-[(3R)-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl]-4-chlorobenzamide hydrochloride (PNU-282987), in cultured adult rat retinal neurons. Adult Long Evans rat retinas were dissociated and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) were isolated from all other retinal tissue using a two-step panning technique. Once isolated, RGCs were cultured under various pharmacological conditions to demonstrate excitotoxicity and neuroprotection against excitotoxicity. After 3 days, RGCs were immunostained with antibodies against the glycoprotein, Thy 1.1, counted and cell survival was assessed relative to control untreated conditions. 500 μM glutamate induced excitotoxicity in large and small RGCs in an adult rat dissociated culture. After 3 days in culture with glutamate, the cell survival of large RGCs decreased by an average of 48.16% while the cell survival of small RGCs decreased by an average of 42.03%. Using specific glutamate receptor agonists and antagonists, we provide evidence that the excitotoxic response was mediated through α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainic acid (KA) and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors through an apoptotic mechanism. However, the excitotoxic effect of glutamate on all RGCs was eliminated if cells were cultured for an hour with 10 μM ACh, 100 μM nicotine or 100 nM of the α7 nAChR agonist, PNU-282987, before the glutamate insult. Inhibition studies using 10nM methyllycaconitine (MLA) or α-bungarotoxin (α-Bgt) supported the hypothesis that neuroprotection against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity on rat RGCs was mediated through α7 nAChRs. In immunocytochemical studies, double

  8. Melatonin-Based Therapeutics for Neuroprotection in Stroke

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    Cesar V. Borlongan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present review paper supports the approach to deliver melatonin and to target melatonin receptors for neuroprotection in stroke. We discuss laboratory evidence demonstrating neuroprotective effects of exogenous melatonin treatment and transplantation of melatonin-secreting cells in stroke. In addition, we describe a novel mechanism of action underlying the therapeutic benefits of stem cell therapy in stroke, implicating the role of melatonin receptors. As we envision the clinical entry of melatonin-based therapeutics, we discuss translational experiments that warrant consideration to reveal an optimal melatonin treatment strategy that is safe and effective for human application.

  9. Both Creatine and Its Product Phosphocreatine Reduce Oxidative Stress and Afford Neuroprotection in an In Vitro Parkinson’s Model

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    Mauricio Peña Cunha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Creatine is the substrate for creatine kinase in the synthesis of phosphocreatine (PCr. This energetic system is endowed of antioxidant and neuroprotective properties and plays a pivotal role in brain energy homeostasis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of creatine and PCr against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in rat striatal slices, used as an in vitro Parkinson’s model. The possible involvement of the signaling pathway mediated by phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K, protein kinase B (Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β was also evaluated. Exposure of striatal slices to 6-OHDA caused a significant disruption of the cellular homeostasis measured as 3-(4,5 dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide reduction, lactate dehydrogenase release, and tyrosine hydroxylase levels. 6-OHDA exposure increased the levels of reactive oxygen species and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances production and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential in rat striatal slices. Furthermore, 6-OHDA decreased the phosphorylation of Akt (Serine473 and GSK3β (Serine9. Coincubation with 6-OHDA and creatine or PCr reduced the effects of 6-OHDA toxicity. The protective effect afforded by creatine or PCr against 6-OHDA-induced toxicity was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. In conclusion, creatine and PCr minimize oxidative stress in striatum to afford neuroprotection of dopaminergic neurons.

  10. Both Creatine and Its Product Phosphocreatine Reduce Oxidative Stress and Afford Neuroprotection in an In Vitro Parkinson’s Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-de-Saavedra, Maria D.; Romero, Alejandro; Egea, Javier; Ludka, Fabiana K.; Tasca, Carla I.; Farina, Marcelo; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S.; López, Manuela G.

    2014-01-01

    Creatine is the substrate for creatine kinase in the synthesis of phosphocreatine (PCr). This energetic system is endowed of antioxidant and neuroprotective properties and plays a pivotal role in brain energy homeostasis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of creatine and PCr against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in rat striatal slices, used as an in vitro Parkinson’s model. The possible involvement of the signaling pathway mediated by phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), protein kinase B (Akt), and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) was also evaluated. Exposure of striatal slices to 6-OHDA caused a significant disruption of the cellular homeostasis measured as 3-(4,5 dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide reduction, lactate dehydrogenase release, and tyrosine hydroxylase levels. 6-OHDA exposure increased the levels of reactive oxygen species and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances production and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential in rat striatal slices. Furthermore, 6-OHDA decreased the phosphorylation of Akt (Serine473) and GSK3β (Serine9). Coincubation with 6-OHDA and creatine or PCr reduced the effects of 6-OHDA toxicity. The protective effect afforded by creatine or PCr against 6-OHDA-induced toxicity was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. In conclusion, creatine and PCr minimize oxidative stress in striatum to afford neuroprotection of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25424428

  11. Evidence for the role of histaminergic pathways in neuroprotective mechanism of ischemic postconditioning in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Indresh; Kumar, Amit; Jaggi, Amteshwar S; Singh, Nirmal

    2017-08-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the possible role of histaminergic pathway in neuroprotective mechanism of ischemic postconditioning (iPoCo). Bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCAO) for 12 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h was employed to produce I/R-induced cerebral injury in National Institutes of Health mice mice. iPoCo involving three episodes of carotid artery occlusion and reperfusion of 10 sec each was instituted immediately after BCAO just before prolonged reperfusion. Cerebral infarct size was measured using triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Memory was evaluated using Morris water maze test. Rotarod test, inclined beam-walking test, and neurological severity score (NSS) were performed to assess motor incoordination and sensorimotor abilities. Brain acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity, brain myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, brain thiobarbituric acid-reactive species (TBARS), and glutathione level (GSH) were also estimated. BCAO produced a significant rise in cerebral infarct size and NSS along with impairment of memory and motor coordination and biochemical alteration (↑AChE, ↑MPO ↓GSH, and ↑TBARS). iPoCo attenuated the deleterious effect of BCAO on infarct size, memory, NSS, motor coordination, and biochemical markers. Pretreatment of carnosine (a histamine [HA] precursor) potentiated the neuroprotective effects of iPoCo, whereas pretreatment of ketotifen (HA H1 receptor blocker and mast cell stabilizer) abolished the protective effects of iPoCo as well as that of carnosine on iPoCo. It may be concluded that neuroprotective effect of iPoCo probably involves activation of histaminergic pathways. © 2017 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  12. Preclinical quantitative MicroPET imaging in evaluation of neuroprotective drug candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Ji Yeon; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Ji Sun; Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Kyeong Min; Choi, Tae Hyun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun

    2007-01-01

    Using in vivo molecular imaging with microPET/SPECT has been expected to facilitate drug discovery and development. In this study, we applied quantitative microPET to the preclinical evaluation of the effects of two neuroprotective drug candidates to the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuronal damage. Fifteen SD rats were divided into three groups. The rats of each group were orally administrated one of neuroprotective candidate; NeuProtec (100mg/kg bid) and SureCero (10mg/kg, qd) or normal saline (0.1ml, qd) for 3 weeks. 6-OHDA was sterotactically placed to the right striatum on eighth day after starting while continuing the medication for additional 14 days. [ 124 I]FP-ClT PET scans were obtained using microPET R4 scanner. The behavioral test by amphetamine-induced rotation and the histological examination after thyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemical staining were performed. Different uptake in the lesioned striatum among the groups were demonstrated on [ 124 I]FP-CIT PET images. The rats with NeuProtec showed higher binding in the lesion than controls. No differences were observed in SureCere groups. The FP-CIT uptake in the lesioned striatum was well correlated with the % reduction of TH(+) cells (rho =0.73, p=0.025), and also correlated with rotation test (rho =0.79, p=0.001) [ 124 I]FP-CIT animal PET depicted the neuroprotective effects of NeuProtec to the 6-OHDA neurotoxicity in the rat striatum. No demonstrable effect of SureCero might indicate that inadequate dosage was used in this study. MicroPET imaging with small animal could be a great tool in preclinical evaluation of drug efficacy

  13. Fetal Neuroprotection by Magnesium Sulfate: From Translational Research to Clinical Application

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    Clément Chollat

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite improvements in perinatal care, preterm birth still occurs regularly and the associated brain injury and adverse neurological outcomes remain a persistent challenge. Antenatal magnesium sulfate administration is an intervention with demonstrated neuroprotective effects for preterm births before 32 weeks of gestation (WG. Owing to its biological properties, including its action as an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor blocker and its anti-inflammatory effects, magnesium is a good candidate for neuroprotection. In hypoxia models, including hypoxia-ischemia, inflammation, and excitotoxicity in various species (mice, rats, pigs, magnesium sulfate preconditioning decreased the induced lesions’ sizes and inflammatory cytokine levels, prevented cell death, and improved long-term behavior. In humans, some observational studies have demonstrated reduced risks of cerebral palsy after antenatal magnesium sulfate therapy. Meta-analyses of five randomized controlled trials using magnesium sulfate as a neuroprotectant showed amelioration of cerebral palsy at 2 years. A meta-analysis of individual participant data from these trials showed an equally strong decrease in cerebral palsy and the combined risk of fetal/infant death and cerebral palsy at 2 years. The benefit remained similar regardless of gestational age, cause of prematurity, and total dose received. These data support the use of a minimal dose (e.g., 4 g loading dose ± 1 g/h maintenance dose over 12 h to avoid potential deleterious effects. Antenatal magnesium sulfate is now recommended by the World Health Organization and many pediatric and obstetrical societies, and it is requisite to maximize its administration among women at risk of preterm delivery before 32 WG.

  14. Polyelectrolyte-coated nanocapsules containing undecylenic acid: Synthesis, biocompatibility and neuroprotective properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Marek; Jantas, Danuta; Szczepanowicz, Krzysztof; Łukasiewicz, Sylwia; Lasoń, Władysław; Warszyński, Piotr

    2015-11-01

    The main objectives of the present study were to investigate the biocompatibility of polyelectrolyte-coated nanocapsules and to evaluate the neuroprotective action of the nanoencapsulated water-insoluble neuroprotective drug-undecylenic acid (UDA), in vitro. Core-shell nanocapsules were synthesized using nanoemulsification and the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique (by saturation method). The average size of synthesized nanocapsules was around 80 nm and the concentration was 2.5 × 10(10) particles/ml. Their zeta potential values ranged from less than -30 mV for the ones with external polyanion layers through -4 mV for the PEG-ylated layers to more than 30 mV for the polycation layers. Biocompatibility of synthesized nanocarriers was evaluated in the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line using cell viability/toxicity assays (MTT reduction, LDH release). The results obtained showed that synthesized nanocapsules coated with PLL and PGA (also PEG-ylated) were non-toxic to SH-SY5Y cells, therefore, they were used as nanocarriers for UDA. Moreover, studies with ROD/FITC-labeled polyelectrolytes demonstrated approximately 20% cellular uptake of synthetized nanocapsules. Further studies showed that nanoencapsulated form of UDA was biocompatible and protected SH-SY5Y cells against the staurosporine-induced damage in lower concentrations than those of the same drug added directly to the culture medium. These data suggest that designed nanocapsules might serve as novel, promising delivery systems for neuroprotective agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Emulsion-core and polyelectrolyte-shell nanocapsules: biocompatibility and neuroprotection against SH-SY5Y cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrowski, Marek; Szczepanowicz, Krzysztof; Jantas, Danuta; Leśkiewicz, Monika; Lasoń, Władysław; Warszyński, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    The emulsion-core and polyelectrolyte-coated nanocapsules, designed as water-insoluble neuroprotective drug delivery system, were synthesized using layer-by-layer saturation method. The isopropyl myristate was used as oil phase and docusate sodium salt as emulsifier. For the polyelectrolyte shell preparation, synthetic polyelectrolytes, cationic (PDADMAC, PAH, and PLL) and anionic (PGA) were used. The particle size and zeta potential of nanocapsules were characterized by the dynamic light scattering. The average size of synthesized nanocapsules ranged from ∼80 to ∼100 nm. Zeta potential values ranged from less than approximately −30 mV for the polyanion layers to greater than approximately +30 mV for the polycation layers. Biocompatibilities of the synthesized nanocarriers were evaluated against SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells using various biochemical assays. The results obtained show that synthesized nanocapsules coated with PLL and PGA were nontoxic to SH-SY5Y cells, and they were used as nanocarriers for model neuroprotective drug (a calpain inhibitor MDL 28170). The neuroprotective action of the encapsulated MDL 28170 against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress cytotoxicity was evaluated in the same cell line. The results showed that nanoencapsulated form of MDL 28170 were biocompatible and protected SH-SY5Y cells against the H 2 O 2 (0.5 mM/24 h)-induced damage in 20–40 times lower concentrations than those of the same drug added directly to the culture medium. These data suggest that the nanoscale carriers of neuroprotective drugs might serve as novel promising therapeutic agents for oxidative stress-related neurodegenerative processes

  16. Autologous transplants of Adipose-Derived Adult Stromal (ADAS) cells afford dopaminergic neuroprotection in a model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Melissa K; Martinez, Terina N; Ruhn, Kelly A; Wrage, Philip C; Keefer, Edward W; Botterman, Barry R; Tansey, Keith E; Tansey, Malú G

    2008-03-01

    Adult adipose contains stromal progenitor cells with neurogenic potential. However, the stability of neuronal phenotypes adopted by Adipose-Derived Adult Stromal (ADAS) cells and whether terminal neuronal differentiation is required for their consideration as alternatives in cell replacement strategies to treat neurological disorders is largely unknown. We investigated whether in vitro neural induction of ADAS cells determined their ability to neuroprotect or restore function in a lesioned dopaminergic pathway. In vitro-expanded naïve or differentiated ADAS cells were autologously transplanted into substantia nigra 1 week after an intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine injection. Neurochemical and behavioral measures demonstrated neuroprotective effects of both ADAS grafts against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced dopaminergic neuron death, suggesting that pre-transplantation differentiation of the cells does not determine their ability to survive or neuroprotect in vivo. Therefore, we investigated whether equivalent protection by naïve and neurally-induced ADAS grafts resulted from robust in situ differentiation of both graft types into dopaminergic fates. Immunohistological analyses revealed that ADAS cells did not adopt dopaminergic cell fates in situ, consistent with the limited ability of these cells to undergo terminal differentiation into electrically active neurons in vitro. Moreover, re-exposure of neurally-differentiated ADAS cells to serum-containing medium in vitro confirmed ADAS cell phenotypic instability (plasticity). Lastly, given that gene expression analyses of in vitro-expanded ADAS cells revealed that both naïve and differentiated ADAS cells express potent dopaminergic survival factors, ADAS transplants may have exerted neuroprotective effects by production of trophic factors at the lesion site. ADAS cells may be ideal for ex vivo gene transfer therapies in Parkinson's disease treatment.

  17. Emulsion-core and polyelectrolyte-shell nanocapsules: biocompatibility and neuroprotection against SH-SY5Y cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piotrowski, Marek, E-mail: ncpiotro@cyf-kr.edu.pl; Szczepanowicz, Krzysztof [Polish Academy of Sciences, Jerzy Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry (Poland); Jantas, Danuta; Leśkiewicz, Monika; Lasoń, Władysław [Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Pharmacology (Poland); Warszyński, Piotr [Polish Academy of Sciences, Jerzy Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry (Poland)

    2013-11-15

    The emulsion-core and polyelectrolyte-coated nanocapsules, designed as water-insoluble neuroprotective drug delivery system, were synthesized using layer-by-layer saturation method. The isopropyl myristate was used as oil phase and docusate sodium salt as emulsifier. For the polyelectrolyte shell preparation, synthetic polyelectrolytes, cationic (PDADMAC, PAH, and PLL) and anionic (PGA) were used. The particle size and zeta potential of nanocapsules were characterized by the dynamic light scattering. The average size of synthesized nanocapsules ranged from ∼80 to ∼100 nm. Zeta potential values ranged from less than approximately −30 mV for the polyanion layers to greater than approximately +30 mV for the polycation layers. Biocompatibilities of the synthesized nanocarriers were evaluated against SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells using various biochemical assays. The results obtained show that synthesized nanocapsules coated with PLL and PGA were nontoxic to SH-SY5Y cells, and they were used as nanocarriers for model neuroprotective drug (a calpain inhibitor MDL 28170). The neuroprotective action of the encapsulated MDL 28170 against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress cytotoxicity was evaluated in the same cell line. The results showed that nanoencapsulated form of MDL 28170 were biocompatible and protected SH-SY5Y cells against the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (0.5 mM/24 h)-induced damage in 20–40 times lower concentrations than those of the same drug added directly to the culture medium. These data suggest that the nanoscale carriers of neuroprotective drugs might serve as novel promising therapeutic agents for oxidative stress-related neurodegenerative processes.

  18. Learning-by-Being-Acquired

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Massimo Gaetano; Moreira, Solon; Rabbiosi, Larissa

    2016-01-01

    In horizontal acquisitions, the post-acquisition integration of the R&D function often damages the inventive labor force and results in lower innovative productivity of acquired inventors. In this paper we study post-acquisition integration in terms of R&D team reorganization-i.e., the creation...... of new teams with both inventors of the acquiring and acquired firms-and assess the impact of this integration action in the period that immediately follows the acquisition. Drawing on social identity and self-categorization theories, we argue that R&D team reorganization increases the acquired inventors...

  19. ent-Kaurane Diterpenoids with Neuroprotective Properties from Corn Silk ( Zea mays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Zhao, Peng; Zhou, Le; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Huang, Xiao-Xiao; Lin, Bin; Song, Shao-Jiang

    2018-05-25

    Thirteen new ent-kaurane diterpenoids, stigmaydenes A-M (1-13), together with two known compounds (14, 15), were isolated from the crude extract of corn silk ( Zea mays). The structures of the compounds were confirmed by comprehensive spectroscopic analyses. The absolute configuration of compound 1 was defined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The absolute configurations of the compounds were also confirmed by comparison of experimental and calculated specific rotations. The compounds were evaluated for their neuroprotective effects against H 2 O 2 -induced SH-SY5Y cell injury, and compound 8 was active at 100 μM, as determined by flow cytometry (annexin V-FITC/PI staining) and Hoechst 33258 staining. The results suggested that compound 8 could protect neuronal cells from H 2 O 2 -induced injury by inhibiting apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells.

  20. Neuroprotective potential of Citrullus lanatus seed extract and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mercury chloride toxicity continues to be relevant in the advent of increased interest in mining activity in Nigeria. The neuroprotective potential of Citrullus lanatus seed extract (CLSE) (Watermelon seed) and vitamin E (VIT E) on mercury chloride intoxication on the frontal cerebral cortex of male rats was investigated.

  1. Neuroprotective therapies in glaucoma: II. Genetic nanotechnology tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafissi, Nafiseh; Foldvari, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophic factor genome engineering could have many potential applications not only in the deeper understanding of neurodegenerative disorders but also in improved therapeutics. The fields of nanomedicine, regenerative medicine, and gene/cell-based therapy have been revolutionized by the development of safer and efficient non-viral technologies for gene delivery and genome editing with modern techniques for insertion of the neurotrophic factors into clinically relevant cells for a more sustained pharmaceutical effect. It has been suggested that the long-term expression of neurotrophic factors is the ultimate approach to prevent and/or treat neurodegenerative disorders such as glaucoma in patients who do not respond to available treatments or are at the progressive stage of the disease. Recent preclinical research suggests that novel neuroprotective gene and cell therapeutics could be promising approaches for both non-invasive neuroprotection and regenerative functions in the eye. Several progenitor and retinal cell types have been investigated as potential candidates for glaucoma neurotrophin therapy either as targets for gene therapy, options for cell replacement therapy, or as vehicles for gene delivery. Therefore, in parallel with deeper understanding of the specific protective effects of different neurotrophic factors and the potential therapeutic cell candidates for glaucoma neuroprotection, the development of non-invasive and highly specific gene delivery methods with safe and effective technologies to modify cell candidates for life-long neuroprotection in the eye is essential before investing in this field.

  2. Multiple sclerosis: Neuroprotective alliance of estrogen-progesterone and gender

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kipp, M.; Amor, S.; Kraut, R.; Beyer, C.

    2012-01-01

    The potential of 17β-estradiol and progesterone as neuroprotective factors is well-recognized. Persuasive data comes from in vitro and animal models reflecting a wide range of CNS disorders. These studies have endeavored to translate findings into human therapies. Nonetheless, few human studies show

  3. Neuroprotective effect of creatine against propionic acid toxicity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With sufficient research and clinical trials in future, this could prove to be successful in treatment or management of autism as a neurodevelopmental disorder recently related to PA neurotoxicity. Keywords: Propionic acid, creatine, SH-SY5Y, comet assay, DNA fragmentation assay, apoptosis, neuroprotection. African Journal ...

  4. Neuroprotective effects of α-lipoic acid against hypoxic– ischemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To explore the neuroprotective efficacy of α-lipoic acid (ALA) against hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in neonatal rats. Methods: Forty-eight rats (P7-pups) were randomly assigned to one of four groups: group I received saline; group II (HI) underwent unilateral carotid artery ligation and hypoxia (92 % N2 ...

  5. Putative neuroprotective actions of N-acyl-ethanolamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Harald S.; Moesgaard, B.; Petersen, G.

    2002-01-01

    when other phospholipids are subjected to rapid degradation. This is an important biosynthetic aspect of NAPE and NAE, as NAEs may be neuroprotective by a number of different mechanisms involving both receptor activation and non-receptor-mediated effects, e.g. by binding to cannabinoid receptors...

  6. Neuroprotective effects of Ellagic acid on Neonatal Hypoxic Brain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate if ellagic acid exerts neuroprotective effects in hypoxic ischemic (HI) brain injury by inhibiting apoptosis and inflammatory responses. Methods: Separate groups of rat pups from post-natal day 4 (D4) were administered with ellagic acid (10, 20 or 40 mg/kg body weight) orally till post- natal day 10 ...

  7. Neuroprotective effect of creatine against propionic acid toxicity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    edoja

    2013-07-31

    Jul 31, 2013 ... Full Length Research Paper. Neuroprotective effect of creatine against propionic acid toxicity in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells in culture. Afaf El-Ansary*, Ghada Abu-Shmais and Abeer Al-Dbass. Biochemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 22452, Zip code 11495, Riyadh, ...

  8. Neuroprotection as a Therapeutic Target for Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Cristina; Simó, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a multifactorial progressive disease of the retina and a leading cause of vision loss. DR has long been regarded as a vascular disorder, although neuronal death and visual impairment appear before vascular lesions, suggesting an important role played by neurodegeneration in DR and the appropriateness of neuroprotective strategies. Upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), the main target of current therapies, is likely to be one of the first responses to retinal hyperglycemic stress and VEGF may represent an important survival factor in early phases of DR. Of central importance for clinical trials is the detection of retinal neurodegeneration in the clinical setting, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography seems the most indicated technique. Many substances have been tested in animal studies for their neuroprotective properties and for possible use in humans. Perhaps, the most intriguing perspective is the use of endogenous neuroprotective substances or nutraceuticals. Together, the data point to the central role of neurodegeneration in the pathogenesis of DR and indicate neuroprotection as an effective strategy for treating this disease. However, clinical trials to determine not only the effectiveness and safety but also the compliance of a noninvasive route of drug administration are needed. PMID:27123463

  9. Neuroprotection as a Therapeutic Target for Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Hernández

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR is a multifactorial progressive disease of the retina and a leading cause of vision loss. DR has long been regarded as a vascular disorder, although neuronal death and visual impairment appear before vascular lesions, suggesting an important role played by neurodegeneration in DR and the appropriateness of neuroprotective strategies. Upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, the main target of current therapies, is likely to be one of the first responses to retinal hyperglycemic stress and VEGF may represent an important survival factor in early phases of DR. Of central importance for clinical trials is the detection of retinal neurodegeneration in the clinical setting, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography seems the most indicated technique. Many substances have been tested in animal studies for their neuroprotective properties and for possible use in humans. Perhaps, the most intriguing perspective is the use of endogenous neuroprotective substances or nutraceuticals. Together, the data point to the central role of neurodegeneration in the pathogenesis of DR and indicate neuroprotection as an effective strategy for treating this disease. However, clinical trials to determine not only the effectiveness and safety but also the compliance of a noninvasive route of drug administration are needed.

  10. NEUROPROTECTIVE THERAPIES IN GLAUCOMA: II. GENETIC NANOTECHNOLOGY TOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafiseh eNafissi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophic factor genome engineering could have many potential applications not only in the deeper understanding of neurodegenerative disorders but also in improved therapeutics. The field of nanomedicine, regenerative medicine, and gene/cell-based therapy have been revolutionized by the development of safer and efficient non-viral technologies for gene delivery and genome editing with modern techniques for insertion of the neurotrophic factors into clinically relevant cells for a more sustained pharmaceutical effect. It has been suggested that the long-term expression of neurotrophic factors is the ultimate approach to prevent and/or treat neurodegenerative disorders such as glaucoma in patients who do not respond to available treatments or are at the progressive stage of the disease. Recent preclinical research suggests that novel neuroprotective gene and cell therapeutics could be promising approaches for both non-invasive neuroprotection and regenerative functions in the eye. Several progenitor and retinal cell types have been investigated as potential candidates for glaucoma neurotrophin therapy either as targets for gene therapy, options for cell replacement therapy, or as vehicles for gene delivery. Therefore, in parallel with deeper understanding of the specific protective effects of different neurotrophic factors and the potential therapeutic cell candidates for glaucoma neuroprotection, the development of non-invasive and highly specific gene delivery methods with safe and effective technologies to modify cell candidates for life-long neuroprotection in the eye is essential before investing in this field.

  11. The Neuroprotective Effect Of Electro-Acupuncture Against Ischemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Neuroprotective Effect Of Electro-Acupuncture Against Ischemic Stroke In Animal Model: A Review. ... Conclusion: An awareness of the benefits of acupuncture might lead more patients into accepting acupuncture therapy for the management of patients with ischemic stroke and patients with high risk of ischemic stroke.

  12. Neuroprotective effect corilagin in spinal cord injury rat model by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Neurological functions get altered in a patient suffering from spinal cord injury (SCI). Present study evaluates the neuroprotective effect of corilagin in spinal cord injury rats by inhibiting nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), inflammatory mediators and apoptosis. Materials and method: Spinal cord injury was ...

  13. Maternally acquired runt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, A E; Billingham, R E

    1973-01-19

    Without altering the structural integrity of the placenta by irradiation or drugs, we have shown that it is possible to immunize females both adoptively and actively against the paternally inherited transplantation antigens of their fetuses. Such immunization causes a high incidence of runt disease among the litters. Although the putative chimeric status of the affected offspring has yet to be confirmed, the results of our experiments support the thesis that runt disease is caused by the activities of "unwanted" immigrant lymphocytes from the maternal circulation. Our results suggest that immunologically activated cells are more likely to cross the placenta than normal cells and that this greater mobility may not be related to the immunologic specificity of the activated cells. Two factors may have contributed to the apparent failure of numerous previous attempts to demonstrate the capacity of transplantation immunity to affect the well-being of a fetus or, more correctly, its placenta, in the way that might be expected of a homograft. (i) Investigators were preoccupied with obtaining a classic type of rejection, in utero, analogous to the rejection of an orthotopic skin homograft. The birth of consistently healthy-looking litters, interpreted as a failure of the experiment, convinced the investigators of the efficacy of nature's solution of the homograft problem and there was no reason for them to suspect its possible limitations. Observation of the litters for several weeks might have uncovered the phenomenon of maternally induced runt disease. (ii) Most investigators resorted to hyperimmunization of the mothers. This would have facilitated the synthesis of protective isoantibodies capable of interfering with the expression of the potentially harmful cellular immune response (6). Ever since the abnormalities of runt disease were first described they have repeatedly been compared to those observed in patients with certain lymphomas (17). Various theories have been

  14. Melatonin for women in pregnancy for neuroprotection of the fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Dominic; Shepherd, Emily; Wallace, Euan M

    2016-03-29

    Melatonin is an antioxidant with anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects. Animal studies have supported a fetal neuroprotective role for melatonin when administered maternally. It is important to assess whether melatonin, given to the mother, can reduce the risk of neurosensory disabilities (including cerebral palsy) and death, associated with fetal brain injury, for the preterm or term compromised fetus. To assess the effects of melatonin when used for neuroprotection of the fetus. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 January 2016). We planned to include randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing melatonin given to women in pregnancy (regardless of the route, timing, dose and duration of administration) for fetal neuroprotection with placebo, no treatment, or with an alternative agent aimed at providing fetal neuroprotection. We also planned to include comparisons of different regimens for administration of melatonin. Two review authors planned to independently assess trial eligibility, trial quality and extract the data. We found no randomised trials for inclusion in this review. One study is ongoing. As we did not identify any randomised trials for inclusion in this review, we are unable to comment on implications for practice at this stage.Although evidence from animals studies has supported a fetal neuroprotective role for melatonin when administered to the mother during pregnancy, no trials assessing melatonin for fetal neuroprotection in pregnant women have been completed to date. However, there is currently one ongoing randomised controlled trial (with an estimated enrolment target of 60 pregnant women) which examines the dose of melatonin, administered to women at risk of imminent very preterm birth (less than 28 weeks' gestation) required to reduce brain damage in the white matter of the babies that were born very preterm.Further high-quality research is needed and research

  15. Identification of Sleep-Modulated Pathways Involved in Neuroprotection from Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Marta; Baracchi, Francesca; Gao, Bo; Bassetti, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    Sleep deprivation (SDp) performed before stroke induces an ischemic tolerance state as observed in other forms of preconditioning. As the mechanisms underlying this effect are not well understood, we used DNA oligonucleotide microarray analysis to identify the genes and the gene-pathways underlying SDp preconditioning effects. Gene expression was analyzed 3 days after stroke in 4 experimental groups: (i) SDp performed before focal cerebral ischemia (IS) induction; (ii) SDp performed before sham surgery; (iii) IS without SDp; and (iv) sham surgery without SDp. SDp was performed by gentle handling during the last 6 h of the light period, and ischemia was induced immediately after. Basic sleep research laboratory. Stroke induced a massive alteration in gene expression both in sleep deprived and non-sleep deprived animals. However, compared to animals that underwent ischemia alone, SDp induced a general reduction in transcriptional changes with a reduction in the upregulation of genes involved in cell cycle regulation and immune response. Moreover, an upregulation of a new neuroendocrine pathway which included melanin concentrating hormone, glycoprotein hormones-α-polypeptide and hypocretin was observed exclusively in rats sleep deprived before stroke. Our data indicate that sleep deprivation before stroke reprogrammed the signaling response to injury. The inhibition of cell cycle regulation and inflammation are neuroprotective mechanisms reported also for other forms of preconditioning treatment, whereas the implication of the neuroendocrine function is novel and has never been described before. These results therefore provide new insights into neuroprotective mechanisms involved in ischemic tolerance mechanisms. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  16. Neuroprotective effects of testosterone metabolites and dependency on receptor action on the morphology of somatic motoneurons following the death of neighboring motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yi; Chew, Cory; Muñoz, Fernando; Sengelaub, Dale R

    2017-06-01

    Partial depletion of spinal motoneuron populations induces dendritic atrophy in neighboring motoneurons, and treatment with testosterone is neuroprotective, attenuating induced dendritic atrophy. In this study we examined whether the protective effects of testosterone could be mediated via its androgenic or estrogenic metabolites. Furthermore, to assess whether these neuroprotective effects were mediated through steroid hormone receptors, we used receptor antagonists to attempt to prevent the neuroprotective effects of hormones after partial motoneuron depletion. Motoneurons innervating the vastus medialis muscles of adult male rats were selectively killed by intramuscular injection of cholera toxin-conjugated saporin. Simultaneously, some saporin-injected rats were treated with either dihydrotestosterone or estradiol, alone or in combination with their respective receptor antagonists, or left untreated. Four weeks later, motoneurons innervating the ipsilateral vastus lateralis muscle were labeled with cholera toxin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase, and dendritic arbors were reconstructed in three dimensions. Compared with intact normal animals, partial motoneuron depletion resulted in decreased dendritic length in remaining quadriceps motoneurons. Dendritic atrophy was attenuated with both dihydrotestosterone and estradiol treatment to a degree similar to that seen with testosterone, and attenuation of atrophy was prevented by receptor blockade. Together, these findings suggest that neuroprotective effects on motoneurons can be mediated by either androgenic or estrogenic hormones and require action via steroid hormone receptors, further supporting a role for hormones as neurotherapeutic agents in the injured nervous system. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 691-707, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Neuroprotective Effect of Hydroxytyrosol in Experimental Diabetic Retinopathy: Relationship with Cardiovascular Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Correa, José Antonio; Rodríguez-Pérez, María Dolores; Márquez-Estrada, Lucía; López-Villodres, Juan Antonio; Reyes, José Julio; Rodriguez-Gutierrez, Guillermo; Fernández-Bolaños, Juan; De La Cruz, José Pedro

    2018-01-24

    The aim of the study was to test the neuroprotective effect of hydroxytyrosol (HT) on experimental diabetic retinopathy. Animals were divided in four groups: (1) control nondiabetic rats, (2) streptozotocin-diabetic rats (DR), (3) DR treated with 1 mg/kg/day p.o. HT, and (4) DR treated with 5 mg/kg/day p.o. HT. Treatment with HT was started 7 days before inducing diabetes and was maintained for 2 months. In the DR group, total area occupied by extracellular matrix was increased, area occupied by retinal cells was decreased; both returned to near-control values in DR rats treated with HT. The number of retinal ganglion cells in DR was significantly lower (44%) than in the control group, and this decrease was smaller after HT treatment (34% and 9.1%). Linear regression analysis showed that prostacyclin, platelet aggregation, peroxynitrites, and the dose of 5 mg/kg/day HT significantly influenced retinal ganglion cell count. In conclusion, HT exerted a neuroprotective effect on diabetic retinopathy, and this effect correlated significantly with changes in some cardiovascular biomarkers.

  18. α7 Nicotinic Receptor Promotes the Neuroprotective Functions of Astrocytes against Oxaliplatin Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Di Cesare Mannelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathies are characterized by a complex response of the central nervous system to injuries. Glial cells are recruited to maintain neuronal homeostasis but dysregulated activation leads to pain signaling amplification and reduces the glial neuroprotective power. Recently, we highlighted the property of α7 nicotinic-acetylcholine-receptor (nAChR agonists to relieve pain and induce neuroprotection simultaneously with a strong increase in astrocyte density. Aimed to study the role of α7 nAChR in the neuron-glia cross-talk, we treated primary rat neurons and astrocytes with the neurotoxic anticancer drug oxaliplatin evaluating the effect of the α7 nAChR agonist PNU-282987 (PNU. Oxaliplatin (1 μM, 48 h reduced cell viability and increased caspase-3 activity of neuron monocultures without damaging astrocytes. In cocultures, astrocytes were not able to protect neurons by oxaliplatin even if glial cell metabolism was stimulated (pyruvate increase. On the contrary, the coculture incubation with 10 μM PNU improved neuron viability and inhibited apoptosis. In the absence of astrocytes, the protection disappeared. Furthermore, PNU promoted the release of the anti-inflammatory cytokine TGF-β1 and the expression of the glutamate-detoxifying enzyme glutamine synthetase. The α7 nAChR stimulation protects neurons from oxaliplatin toxicity through an astrocyte-mediated mechanism. α7 nAChR is suggested for recovering the homeostatic role of astrocytes.

  19. Plants-Derived Neuroprotective Agents: Cutting the Cycle of Cell Death through Multiple Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiwo Olayemi Elufioye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroprotection is the preservation of the structure and function of neurons from insults arising from cellular injuries induced by a variety of agents or neurodegenerative diseases (NDs. The various NDs including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s diseases as well as amyotropic lateral sclerosis affect millions of people around the world with the main risk factor being advancing age. Each of these diseases affects specific neurons and/or regions in the brain and involves characteristic pathological and molecular features. Hence, several in vitro and in vivo study models specific to each disease have been employed to study NDs with the aim of understanding their underlying mechanisms and identifying new therapeutic strategies. Of the most prevalent drug development efforts employed in the past few decades, mechanisms implicated in the accumulation of protein-based deposits, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and certain neurotransmitter deficits such as acetylcholine and dopamine have been scrutinized in great detail. In this review, we presented classical examples of plant-derived neuroprotective agents by highlighting their structural class and specific mechanisms of action. Many of these natural products that have shown therapeutic efficacies appear to be working through the above-mentioned key multiple mechanisms of action.

  20. Free-Radical Scavenger Edaravone Treatment Confers Neuroprotection Against Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Hua; Li, Yong-Cai; Li, Xia; Shi, Hong; Gao, Yan-Qin; Vosler, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of neurological disability in young adults. Edaravone, a novel synthetic small-molecule free-radical scavenger, has been shown to have a neuroprotective effect in both animal models of cerebral ischemia and stroke patients; however, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this report, we investigated the potential mechanisms of edaravone treatment in a rat model of TBI. TBI was induced in the right cerebral cortex of male adult rats using Feeney's weight-drop method. Edaravone (0.75, 1.5, or 3 mg/kg) or vehicle (normal saline) was intravenously administered at 2 and 12 h after TBI. Edaravone treatment significantly decreased hippocampal CA3 neuron loss, reduced oxidative stress, and decreased neuronal programmed cell death compared to vehicle treatment. The protective effects of edaravone treatment were also related to the pathology of TBI on non-neuronal cells, as edaravone decreased astrocyte and glial activation. Lastly, edaravone treatment significantly reduced the presence of inflammatory cytokines, cerebral edema, blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability, and, importantly, neurological deficits following TBI. Our results suggest that edaravone exerts a neuroprotective effect in the rat model of TBI. The likely mechanism is via inhibiting oxidative stress, leading to a decreased inflammatory response and glial activation, and thereby reducing neuronal death and improving neurological function. PMID:21732763

  1. Neuroprotective effect of Buddleja officinalis extract on transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Ha, Nina; Bu, Yung-Min; Choi, Hyoung Il; Park, Yoo Guen; Kim, Yoon Bum; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Kim, Hocheol

    2006-08-01

    The flower buds of Buddleja officinalis MAXIM (Loganiaceae) are used to treat headache and inflammatory diseases in traditional Korean medicine. In the present study, the neuroprotective effects of the methanolic extract of B. officinalis (BOME) and of its hexane fraction (BOHF) were investigated in a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo, 120 min occlusion, 24 h reperfusion) Sprague-Dawley rat model. BOME or BOHF (100 mg/kg, p.o.) was twice administered 30 min before the onset of MCAo and 2 h after reperfusion. BOME and BOHF treated groups showed infarct volumes reduced by 33.9% and 68.2%, respectively, at 2 h occlusion. In BOHF treated animals, cyclooxygenase-2 and iNOS inductions were inhibited in ischemic hemispheres at both the mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, in vitro studies showed that BOME and BOHF both inhibited LPS-induced nitric oxide production in BV-2 mouse microglial cells. These results suggest that the anti-inflammatory and the microglial activation inhibitory effects of B. officinalis extract may contribute to its neuroprotective effects in brain ischemia.

  2. AP-1 proteins in the adult brain: facts and fiction about effectors of neuroprotection and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdegen, T; Waetzig, V

    2001-04-30

    Jun and Fos proteins are induced and activated following most physiological and pathophysiological stimuli in the brain. Only few data allow conclusions about distinct functions of AP-1 proteins in neurodegeneration and neuroregeneration, and these functions mainly refer to c-Jun and its activation by JNKs. Apoptotic functions of activated c-Jun affect hippocampal, nigral and primary cultured neurons following excitotoxic stimulation and destruction of the neuron-target-axis including withdrawal of trophic molecules. The inhibition of JNKs might exert neuroprotection by subsequent omission of c-Jun activation. Besides endogenous neuronal functions, the c-Jun/AP-1 proteins can damage the nervous system by upregulation of harmful programs in non-neuronal cells (e.g. microglia) with release of neurodegenerative molecules. In contrast, the differentiation with neurite extension and maturation of neural cells in vitro indicate physiological and potentially neuroprotective functions of c-Jun and JNKs including sensoring for alterations in the cytoskeleton. This review summarizes the multiple molecular interfunctions which are involved in the shift from the physiological role to degenerative effects of the Jun/JNK-axis such as cell type-specific expression and intracellular localization of scaffold proteins and upstream activators, antagonistic phosphatases, interaction with other kinase systems, or the activation of transcription factors competing for binding to JNK proteins and AP-1 DNA elements.

  3. Neuroprotective effects of 17β-estradiol rely on estrogen receptor membrane initiated signals

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    Marco eFiocchetti

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 17β-estradiol (E2 exerts protective effects in the central nervous system besides its crucial role in many physiological and pathological events. E2 effects are not restricted to the brain areas related with the control of the reproductive function, but rather are widespread throughout the developing and the adult brain. E2 actions are mediated by estrogen receptors (i.e., ERα and ERβ belonging to the nuclear receptor super family. As members of the ligand-regulated transcription factor family, the actions of ERs in the brain were thought to mediate only the E2 long-term transcriptional effects. However, a growing body of evidence has emerged indicating the presence of rapid, membrane initiated E2 effects in the brain which result independent from ER transcriptional activities and involved in E2-induced neuroprotection. Aim of this review is to focus on the rapid effects of E2 in the brain taking into account the specific contribution of the signaling pathway of ERβ subtype in neuroprotective actions of E2.

  4. Neuroprotective effect of curcumin on transient focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Yong; Zheng, Weiping; Lu, Yuyu; Feng, Gang; Yu, Shanshan

    2008-09-10

    Curcumin, a member of the curcuminoid family of compounds, is a yellow colored phenolic pigment obtained from the powdered rhizome of C. longa Linn. Recent studies have demonstrated that curcumin has protective effects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, little is known about its mechanism. Hence, in the present study the neuroprotective potential of curcumin was investigated in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) induced focal cerebral IR injury. Administration of curcumin 100 and 300 mg/kg i.p. 60 min after MCAO significantly diminished infarct volume, and improved neurological deficit in a dose-dependent manner. Nissl staining showed that the neuronal injury was significantly improved after being treated with curcumin. Curcumin significantly decreased the expression of caspase-3 protein. A higher number of TUNEL-positive cells were found in the vehicle group, but they were significantly decreased in the treated group. Taken together, these results suggest that the neuroprotective potentials of curcumin against focal cerebral ischemic injury are, at least in part, ascribed to its anti-apoptotic effects.

  5. Melanocortin-1 receptor activation is neuroprotective in mouse models of neuroinflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mykicki, Nadine; Herrmann, Alexander M; Schwab, Nicholas; Deenen, René; Sparwasser, Tim; Limmer, Andreas; Wachsmuth, Lydia; Klotz, Luisa; Köhrer, Karl; Faber, Cornelius; Wiendl, Heinz; Luger, Thomas A; Meuth, Sven G; Loser, Karin

    2016-10-26

    In inflammation-associated progressive neuroinflammatory disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), inflammatory infiltrates containing T helper 1 (T H 1) and T H 17 cells cause demyelination and neuronal degeneration. Regulatory T cells (T reg ) control the activation and infiltration of autoreactive T cells into the central nervous system (CNS). In MS and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice, T reg function is impaired. We show that a recently approved drug, Nle 4 -d-Phe 7 -α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (NDP-MSH), induced functional T reg , resulting in amelioration of EAE progression in mice. NDP-MSH also prevented immune cell infiltration into the CNS by restoring the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. NDP-MSH exerted long-lasting neuroprotective effects in mice with EAE and prevented excitotoxic death and reestablished action potential firing in mouse and human neurons in vitro. Neuroprotection by NDP-MSH was mediated via signaling through the melanocortin-1 and orphan nuclear 4 receptors in mouse and human neurons. NDP-MSH may be of benefit in treating neuroinflammatory diseases such as relapsing-remitting MS and related disorders. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. The structural features of the sulfated heteropolysaccharide (ST-1) from Sargassum thunbergii and its neuroprotective activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Weihua; Liu, Bing; Li, Shuai; Chen, Jing; Tang, Hong; Jiang, Di; Zhang, Quanbin; Zhong, Weihong

    2018-03-01

    Polysaccharide (ST) was prepared from Sargassum thunbergii using hot water. Two fractions (ST-1 and ST-2) were prepared using anion exchange chromatography. One desulfated polysaccharide (ST-1-DS) was also prepared. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) performed on ST-1-DS showed that the desulfated polysaccharides contained methyl glycosides of mono-sulfated and di-sulfated galacto-fucooligosaccharides. This result suggested that ST-1 might contain sulfated galactofucan, which consists of a backbone of alternating (Gal) n and (Fuc) n and sulfated randomly on Gal and mainly on C-2 in Fuc. In addition, ST-1 was degraded in 1M sulfuric acid. The solution was centrifuged, and the supernatant was concentrated and precipitated in ethanol to obtain the precipitate (ST-1-P). ST-1-P was then separated using gel chromatography and anion exchange chromatography to obtain the oligomers. ESI-MS spectra of oligomers indicated that ST-1 mostly contained sulfated glucuronomannan and fucoglucuronan. ESI-MS with collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-CID-MS/MS) suggested that glucuronomannan contained alternating 2-linked Man and 4-linked GlcA, while fucoglucuronan contained 4-linked glucuronan with branched Fuc at C-3. Finally, the neuroprotective activities of ST, ST-1, ST-2 and MIX (a mixture of ST-1 and ST-2) were determined. ST showed the most neuroprotective activity, which indicated that ST might be a good candidate for curing neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Anticonvulsant and Neuroprotective Activities of Phragmanthera austroarabica Extract in Pentylenetetrazole-Kindled Mice

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    Hibah M. Aldawsari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective activity of Phragmanthera austroarabica extract were tested in pentylenetetrazole-kindled mice. All the chemical constituents of the plant extract were identified. Additionally, the extract was standardized and proved to contain total phenolic contents equal to 379.92±1.32 mg gallic acid equivalents/g dry plant extract. Induction of kindling was achieved by repeated intraperitoneal administration of pentylenetetrazole (35 mg/kg twice weekly. Male albino mice were given P. austroarabica extract (200, 400, or 800 mg/kg. The two higher doses (400 or 800 mg/kg of the extract significantly caused notable reduction in seizure activity and hippocampal malondialdehyde level compared to pentylenetetrazole control group. The highest dose enhanced cortical GSH level and showed intact DNA in the laddering assay. Upon studying the neuroprotective effect, mice treated with the higher dose of the extract demonstrated an improvement in the percent of surviving neurons in the cortex and hippocampus. We concluded that P. austroarabica extract ameliorated seizure activity and protected cortical and hippocampal neurons against pentylenetetrazole-induced kindling in mice.

  8. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs; Hasbun, Rodrigo; Koedel, Uwe; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Wijdicks, Eelco

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and subarachnoid space that can also involve the brain cortex and parenchyma. It can be acquired spontaneously in the community - community-acquired bacterial meningitis - or in the hospital as a complication of invasive procedures or head trauma

  9. Anesthetic neuroprotection: antecedents and an appraisal of preclinical and clinical data quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Kazuyoshi; Berger, Miles; Nadler, Jacob; Warner, David S

    2014-01-01

    Anesthetics have been studied for nearly fifty years as potential neuroprotective compounds in both perioperative and resuscitation medicine. Although anesthetics present pharmacologic properties consistent with preservation of brain viability in the context of an ischemic insult, no anesthetic has been proven efficacious for neuroprotection in humans. After such effort, it could be concluded that anesthetics are simply not neuroprotective in humans. Moreover, pharmacologic neuroprotection with non-anesthetic drugs has also repeatedly failed to be demonstrated in human acute brain injury. Recent focus has been on rectification of promising preclinical neuroprotection data and subsequent failed clinical trials. This has led to consensus guidelines for the process of transferring purported therapeutics from bench to bedside. In this review we first examined the history of anesthetic neuroprotection research. Then, a systematic review was performed to identify major clinical trials of anesthetic neuroprotection. Both the preclinical neuroprotection portfolio cited to justify a clinical trial and the design and conduct of that clinical trial were evaluated using modern standards that include the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR) and Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) guidelines. In publications intended to define anesthetic neuroprotection, we found overall poor quality of both preclinical efficacy analysis portfolios and clinical trial designs and conduct. Hence, using current translational research standards, it was not possible to conclude from existing data whether anesthetics ameliorate perioperative ischemic brain injury. Incorporation of advances in translational neuroprotection research conduct may provide a basis for more definitive and potentially successful clinical trials of anesthetics as neuroprotectants.

  10. The Small Heat Shock Protein α-Crystallin B Shows Neuroprotective Properties in a Glaucoma Animal Model

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    Fabian Anders

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease that leads to irreversible retinal ganglion cell (RGC loss and is one of the main causes of blindness worldwide. The pathogenesis of glaucoma remains unclear, and novel approaches for neuroprotective treatments are urgently needed. Previous studies have revealed significant down-regulation of α-crystallin B as an initial reaction to elevated intraocular pressure (IOP, followed by a clear but delayed up-regulation, suggesting that this small heat-shock protein plays a pathophysiological role in the disease. This study analyzed the neuroprotective effect of α-crystallin B in an experimental animal model of glaucoma. Significant IOP elevation induced by episcleral vein cauterization resulted in a considerable impairment of the RGCs and the retinal nerve fiber layer. An intravitreal injection of α-crystallin B at the time of the IOP increase was able to rescue the RGCs, as measured in a functional photopic electroretinogram, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, and RGC counts. Mass-spectrometry-based proteomics and antibody-microarray measurements indicated that a α-crystallin injection distinctly up-regulated all of the subclasses (α, β, and γ of the crystallin protein family. The creation of an interactive protein network revealed clear correlations between individual proteins, which showed a regulatory shift resulting from the crystallin injection. The neuroprotective properties of α-crystallin B further demonstrate the potential importance of crystallin proteins in developing therapeutic options for glaucoma.

  11. Neuroprotective properties of curcumin in toxin-base animal models of Parkinson's disease: a systematic experiment literatures review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Shi; Zhang, Zeng-Rui; Zhang, Man-Man; Sun, Miao-Xuan; Wang, Wen-Wen; Xie, Cheng-Long

    2017-08-17

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a polyphenol extracted from the plant Curcuma longa, is widely used in Southeast Asia, China and India in food preparation and for medicinal purposes. Meanwhile, the neuroprotective actions of curcumin have been documented for experimental therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we used a systematic review to comprehensively assess the efficacy of curcumin in experimental PD. Using electronic and manual search for the literatures, we identified studies describing the efficacy of curcumin in animal models of PD. We identified 13 studies with a total of 298 animals describing the efficacy of curcumin in animal models of PD. The methodological quality of all preclinical trials is ranged from 2 to 5. The majority of the experiment studies demonstrated that curcumin was more significantly neuroprotection effective than control groups for treating PD. Among them, five studies indicated that curcumin had an anti-inflammatory effect in the PD animal models (p curcumin, by which it protected substantia nigra neurons and improved striatal dopamine levels. Furthermore, two studies in this review displayed that curcumin treatment was also effective in reducing neuronal apoptosis and improving functional outcome in animal models of PD. Most of the preclinical studies demonstrated the positive findings while one study reported that curcumin had no beneficial effects against Mn-induced disruption of hippocampal metal and neurotransmitter homeostasis. The results demonstrated a marked efficacy of curcumin in experimental model of PD, suggesting curcumin probably a candidate neuroprotective drug for human PD patients.

  12. Melatoninergic System in Parkinson’s Disease: From Neuroprotection to the Management of Motor and Nonmotor Symptoms

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    Josiel Mileno Mack

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is synthesized by several tissues besides the pineal gland, and beyond its regulatory effects in light-dark cycle, melatonin is a hormone with neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties. Melatonin acts as a free-radical scavenger, reducing reactive species and improving mitochondrial homeostasis. Melatonin also regulates the expression of neurotrophins that are involved in the survival of dopaminergic neurons and reduces α-synuclein aggregation, thus protecting the dopaminergic system against damage. The unbalance of pineal melatonin synthesis can predispose the organism to inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease (PD. The aim of this review is to summarize the knowledge about the potential role of the melatoninergic system in the pathogenesis and treatment of PD. The literature reviewed here indicates that PD is associated with impaired brain expression of melatonin and its receptors MT1 and MT2. Exogenous melatonin treatment presented an outstanding neuroprotective effect in animal models of PD induced by different toxins, such as 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP, rotenone, paraquat, and maneb. Despite the neuroprotective effects and the improvement of motor impairments, melatonin also presents the potential to improve nonmotor symptoms commonly experienced by PD patients such as sleep and anxiety disorders, depression, and memory dysfunction.

  13. Neuroprotective effect of Amorphophallus campanulatus in STZ ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3 mg/kg, ICV) day one and 3rd day after surgery. Surgery was performed on anesthetized rats by the help of stereotaxic apparatus. STZ induced AD rats were treated with petroleum ether extract of AC (100, 200 and 500 mg/kg, p.o.) for 14 days.

  14. Dantrolene is neuroprotective in Huntington's disease transgenic mouse model

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    Chen Xi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Avai