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Sample records for acquired infections advantages

  1. Differences in microbiological profile between community-acquired, healthcare-associated and hospital-acquired infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Teresa; Ribeiro, Orquídea; Aragão, Irene; Costa-Pereira, Altamiro; Sarmento, António

    2013-01-01

    Microbiological profiles were analysed and compared for intra-abdominal, urinary, respiratory and bloodstream infections according to place of acquisition: community-acquired, with a separate analysis of healthcare-associated, and hospital-acquired. Prospective cohort study performed at a university tertiary care hospital over 1 year. Inclusion criteria were meeting the Centers for Disease Control definition of intra-abdominal, urinary, respiratory and bloodstream infections. A total of 1035 patients were included in the study. More than 25% of intra-abdominal infections were polymicrobial; multi-drug resistant gram-negatives were 38% in community-acquired, 50% in healthcare-associated and 57% in hospital-acquired. E. coli was the most prevalent among urinary infections: 69% in community-acquired, 56% in healthcare-associated and 26% in hospital-acquired; ESBL producers' pathogens were 10% in healthcare-associated and 3% in community-acquired and hospital-acquired. In respiratory infections Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most prevalent in community-acquired (54%) and MRSA in healthcare-associated (24%) and hospital-acquired (24%). A significant association was found between MRSA respiratory infection and hospitalization in the previous year (adjusted OR = 6.3), previous instrumentation (adjusted OR = 4.3) and previous antibiotic therapy (adjusted OR = 5.7); no cases were documented among patients without risk factors. Hospital mortality rate was 10% in community-acquired, 14% in healthcare-associated and 19% in hospital-acquired infection. This study shows that healthcare-associated has a different microbiologic profile than those from community or hospital acquired for the four main focus of infection. Knowledge of this fact is important because the existing guidelines for community-acquired are not entirely applicable for this group of patients.

  2. Acquired ventricular septal defect due to infective endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi E Durden

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired intracardiac left-to-right shunts are rare occurrences. Chest trauma and myocardial infection are well-known causes of acquired ventricular septal defect (VSD. There have been several case reports describing left ventricle to right atrium shunt after infective endocarditis (IE. We present here a patient found to have an acquired VSD secondary to IE of the aortic and tricuspid valves in the setting of a known bicuspid aortic valve. This is the first case reported of acquired VSD in a pediatric patient in the setting of IE along with literature review of acquired left-to-right shunts.

  3. Patients' Hand Washing and Reducing Hospital-Acquired Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverstick, Stacy; Goodrich, Cara; Freeman, Regi; James, Shandra; Kullar, Rajkiran; Ahrens, Melissa

    2017-06-01

    Hand hygiene is important to prevent hospital-acquired infections. Patients' hand hygiene is just as important as hospital workers' hand hygiene. Hospital-acquired infection rates remain a concern across health centers. To improve patients' hand hygiene through the promotion and use of hand washing with soap and water, hand sanitizer, or both and improve patients' education to reduce hospital-acquired infections. In August 2013, patients in a cardiothoracic postsurgical step-down unit were provided with individual bottles of hand sanitizer. Nurses and nursing technicians provided hand hygiene education to each patient. Patients completed a 6-question survey before the intervention, at hospital discharge and 1, 2, and 3 months after the intervention. Hospital-acquired infection data were tracked monthly by infection prevention staff. Significant correlations were found between hand hygiene and rates of infection with vancomycin-resistant enterococci ( P = .003) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ( P = .01) after the intervention. After the implementation of hand hygiene interventions, rates of both infections declined significantly and patients reported more staff offering opportunities for and encouraging hand hygiene. This quality improvement project demonstrates that increased hand hygiene compliance by patients can influence infection rates in an adult cardiothoracic step-down unit. The decreased infection rates and increased compliance with hand hygiene among the patients may be attributed to the implementation of patient education and the increased accessibility and use of hand sanitizer. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  4. Antibiotic resistance in community-acquired urinary tract infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of community-acquired UTI organisms to amoxycillin and co-trimoxazole was .... Treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infection in non-pregnant women. Postgrad ... Single-dose antibiotic treatment for symptomatic uri- nary tract infections in ...

  5. Clinical role of Cefixime in community-acquired infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreshaj, Sh; Doda-Ejupi, T; Tolaj, I Q; Mustafa, A; Kabashi, S; Shala, N; Geca, Nj; Aliu, A; Daka, A; Basha, N

    2011-01-01

    Cefixime is an oral third generation cephalosporin, frequently used in respiratory tract infections (RTI) in the pediatric population. However, in some publications cefixime has demonstrated poor efficacy against staphylococci and streptococci. of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cefixime in the treatment of community-acquired infections in a country where parenteral third generation cephalosporins have been used for a long time. The present study was designed to assess the clinical efficacy, bacteriological eradication rates and tolerability of cefixime in children with community-acquired upper RTI (URTI), lower RTI (LRTI) and uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI). The study was prospective, open, and included 89 patients, from 6 months to 28 years, of both sexes, with the diagnosis of community-acquired URTI, LRTI and UTI. The treatment with cefixime was successful in 30/30 (100%) patients suffering from acute otitis media (AOM), in 10/12 (83.3%) with acute sinusitis, in 12/12 patients (100%) with pneumonia, in 31/35 (88.57) with uncomplicated UTI. The antibiotic was well tolerated. In 10 days treatment we recorded one case (1.3%) with acute gastroenteritis and two cases (2.6%) of maculopapular rash. Side-effects were transient and disappeared after finishing therapy in all three of the cases. Community-acquired infections, such as AOM, LRTI and UTI, caused by susceptible pathogens, can be treated with cefixime, as a good choice for a successful clinical response.

  6. Brucella abortus infection acquired in microbiology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, P L; Mastrandrea, S; Rappelli, P; Cappuccinelli, P

    2000-05-01

    We report an outbreak of laboratory-acquired Brucella abortus infection originating in the accidental breakage of a centrifuge tube. A total of 12 laboratory workers were infected (attack rate of 31%), with an incubation time ranging from 6 weeks to 5 months. Antibody titers were evaluated weekly in all personnel exposed, allowing the diagnosis of the infection in most cases before the onset of clinical symptoms, so that specific therapy could be administrated.

  7. Surveillance for hospital-acquired infections on surgical wards in a Dutch university hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp-Hopmans, Titia E. M.; Blok, Hetty E. M.; Troelstra, Annet; Gigengack-Baars, Ada C. M.; Weersink, Annemarie J. L.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Verhoef, Jan; Mascini, Ellen M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine incidence rates of hospital-acquired infections and to develop preventive measures to reduce the risk of hospital-acquired infections. METHODS: Prospective surveillance for hospital-acquired infections was performed during a 5-year period in the wards housing general and

  8. Consumer attitudes about health care-acquired infections and hand hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuckin, Maryanne; Waterman, Richard; Shubin, Arlene

    2006-01-01

    Mandatory reporting and disclosure of health care-acquired infections have resulted in controversy over the perceived notion that consumers will not understand how to interpret data and that such information may negatively influence utilization of hospitals. The objective was to determine consumers' attitudes about health care-acquired infections, hand hygiene practices, and patient empowerment. A telephone survey based on a random digit dialing sample of all households in the United States was conducted. Consumers were asked about choosing a hospital, hand hygiene practices, and health care-acquired infections. Some 94% of respondents rated environmental cleanliness as very important. Hospital infection rates would influence decision making for 93% of consumers. Four in 5 consumers said they would ask their health care worker to wash and sanitize his or her hands. Our findings strongly suggest that (1) consumers will use infection data in selecting and/or leaving a hospital system and (2) consumers are ready to be empowered with information to ensure a positive outcome.

  9. Automated surveillance system for hospital-acquired urinary tract infections in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Condell, Orla; Gubbels, Sophie; Nielsen, J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Danish Hospital-Acquired Infections Database (HAIBA) is an automated surveillance system using hospital administrative, microbiological, and antibiotic medication data. AIM: To define and evaluate the case definition for hospital-acquired urinary tract infection (HA-UTI) and to de......BACKGROUND: The Danish Hospital-Acquired Infections Database (HAIBA) is an automated surveillance system using hospital administrative, microbiological, and antibiotic medication data. AIM: To define and evaluate the case definition for hospital-acquired urinary tract infection (HA-UTI......) and to describe surveillance data from 2010 to 2014. METHODS: The HA-UTI algorithm defined a laboratory-diagnosed UTI as a urine culture positive for no more than two micro-organisms with at least one at ≥10(4)cfu/mL, and a probable UTI as a negative urine culture and a relevant diagnosis code or antibiotic...... treatment. UTI was considered hospital-acquired if a urine sample was collected ≥48h after admission and UTI was calculated per 10,000 risk-days. For validation, prevalence was calculated for each day and compared to point prevalence survey (PPS) data. FINDINGS: HAIBA...

  10. Protection of dogs against canine heartworm infection 28?days after four monthly treatments with Advantage Multi? for Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Bowman, Dwight D.; Grazette, Alyssa R.; Basel, Chris; Wang, Yingying; Hostetler, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Monthly heartworm preventives are designed to protect dogs by killing heartworms acquired the month prior to their administration, and after treatment with most products, the drug levels rapidly dissipate to very low levels. Work with Advantage Multi? for Dogs (imidacloprid?+?moxidectin) topical solution showed protection against hookworm infection throughout the month after administration of several monthly doses suggesting that similar protection might occur with heartworms. This...

  11. Infection Control and Prevention: A Review of Hospital-Acquired Infections and the Economic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Deoine; Kemmerly, Sandra A.

    2009-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 2 million patients suffer from hospital-acquired infections every year and nearly 100,000 of them die. Most of these medical errors are preventable. Hospital-acquired infections result in up to $4.5 billion in additional healthcare expenses annually. The U.S. government has responded to this financial loss by focusing on healthcare quality report cards and by taking strong action to curb healthcare spending. The Medicare Program ha...

  12. The dynamics of naturally acquired immunity to Plasmodium falciparum infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola Pinkevych

    Full Text Available Severe malaria occurs predominantly in young children and immunity to clinical disease is associated with cumulative exposure in holoendemic settings. The relative contribution of immunity against various stages of the parasite life cycle that results in controlling infection and limiting disease is not well understood. Here we analyse the dynamics of Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection after treatment in a cohort of 197 healthy study participants of different ages in order to model naturally acquired immunity. We find that both delayed time-to-infection and reductions in asymptomatic parasitaemias in older age groups can be explained by immunity that reduces the growth of blood stage as opposed to liver stage parasites. We found that this mechanism would require at least two components - a rapidly acting strain-specific component, as well as a slowly acquired cross-reactive or general immunity to all strains. Analysis and modelling of malaria infection dynamics and naturally acquired immunity with age provides important insights into what mechanisms of immune control may be harnessed by malaria vaccine strategists.

  13. Hospital-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae infections in a paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is an important preventable cause of increased ... between July 2003 and December 2010, who developed a hospital-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae infection, was undertaken to describe the trend in ..... Bacterial nosocomial pneumonia in.

  14. Online continuing interprofessional education on hospital-acquired infections for Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio C. Medina-Presentado

    2017-03-01

    Discussion: Implementation of this educational program showed the feasibility of a continent-wide interprofessional massive course on hospital acquired-infections in Latin America, in the two main languages spoken in the region. Next steps included a new edition of this course and a “New Challenges” course on hospital-acquired infections, which were successfully implemented in the second semester of 2015 by the same institutions.

  15. The Host Response in Patients with Sepsis Developing Intensive Care Unit-acquired Secondary Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vught, Lonneke A; Wiewel, Maryse A; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Frencken, Jos F; Scicluna, Brendon P; Klein Klouwenberg, Peter M C; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Lutter, Rene; Horn, Janneke; Schultz, Marcus J; Bonten, Marc M J; Cremer, Olaf L; van der Poll, Tom

    2017-08-15

    Sepsis can be complicated by secondary infections. We explored the possibility that patients with sepsis developing a secondary infection while in the intensive care unit (ICU) display sustained inflammatory, vascular, and procoagulant responses. To compare systemic proinflammatory host responses in patients with sepsis who acquire a new infection with those who do not. Consecutive patients with sepsis with a length of ICU stay greater than 48 hours were prospectively analyzed for the development of ICU-acquired infections. Twenty host response biomarkers reflective of key pathways implicated in sepsis pathogenesis were measured during the first 4 days after ICU admission and at the day of an ICU-acquired infection or noninfectious complication. Of 1,237 admissions for sepsis (1,089 patients), 178 (14.4%) admissions were complicated by ICU-acquired infections (at Day 10 [6-13], median with interquartile range). Patients who developed a secondary infection showed higher disease severity scores and higher mortality up to 1 year than those who did not. Analyses of biomarkers in patients who later went on to develop secondary infections revealed a more dysregulated host response during the first 4 days after admission, as reflected by enhanced inflammation, stronger endothelial cell activation, a more disturbed vascular integrity, and evidence for enhanced coagulation activation. Host response reactions were similar at the time of ICU-acquired infectious or noninfectious complications. Patients with sepsis who developed an ICU-acquired infection showed a more dysregulated proinflammatory and vascular host response during the first 4 days of ICU admission than those who did not develop a secondary infection.

  16. Original Article Hospital Acquired Infection in Obafemi Awolowo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-08-07

    Aug 7, 2011 ... This study assesses the pattern of hospital acquired infections. (HAIs) and state of hygiene ... Unfortunately, due to inadequate resources and commitment to ... Turkey, India and Mexico (Rosenthal et al., 2005;. Salomao et al.

  17. Community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection in children: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borali, Elena; Ortisi, Giuseppe; Moretti, Chiara; Stacul, Elisabetta Francesca; Lipreri, Rita; Gesu, Giovanni Pietro; De Giacomo, Costantino

    2015-10-01

    Community acquired-Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has increased also in children in the last years. To determine the incidence of community-acquired CDI and to understand whether Clostridium difficile could be considered a symptom-triggering pathogen in infants. A five-year retrospective analysis (January 2007-December 2011) of faecal specimens from 124 children hospitalized in the Niguarda Ca' Granda Hospital for prolonged or muco-haemorrhagic diarrhoea was carried out. Stool samples were evaluated for common infective causes of diarrhoea and for Clostridium difficile toxins. Patients with and without CDI were compared for clinical characteristics and known risk factors for infection. Twenty-two children with CDI were identified in 5 years. An increased incidence of community-acquired CDI was observed, ranging from 0.75 per 1000 hospitalizations in 2007 to 9.8 per 1000 hospitalizations in 2011. Antimicrobial treatment was successful in all 19 children in whom it was administered; 8/22 CDI-positive children were younger than 2 years. No statistically significant differences in clinical presentation were observed between patients with and without CDI, nor in patients with and without risk factors for CDI. Our study shows that Clostridium difficile infection is increasing and suggests a possible pathogenic role in the first 2 years of life. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hospital-acquired infections in a Nigerian tertiary health facility: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hospital-acquired infections in a Nigerian tertiary health facility: An audit of surveillance reports. ... This study evaluated the occurrence of HAI in a foremost tertiary health facility over a 5-year period for the purpose of reinforcing control efforts. Materials and Methods: A retrospective survey of records from the infection control ...

  19. Prevalence of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pyogenic community and hospital acquired skin and soft tissues infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M. K.; Asrar, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the percentage and frequency of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in community and hospital-acquired pyogenic skin and soft tissue infections. Methods: The descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at the Dermatology Department of Combined Military Hospital, Abbottabad, from June 2009 to March 2010, and comprised 144 community-acquired and 54 hospital-acquired skin and soft tissue infections. Pus swabs from the infected lesions one from each individual were sent to laboratory for culture and sensitivity tests. Methicillin resistance was detected by 1 (mu) g oxacillin disk. Organisms were labelled methicillin-resistant once the inhibition zone for oxocillin was less than 10 mm. Data analysis was done by using SPSS 20. Results: Of the 198 patients in the study, 98(49.5%) were males and 100(50.5%) were females, with an overall mean age of 33.7+-14.8144 years. There were 144(72.72%) community-acquired infections and 54(27.27%) had hospital-acquired infections. Community-acquired Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus numbered 40(27.8%) and hospital-acquired ones numbered 26(48.1%). Conclusion: Prevalence of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in community and hospital-acquired pyogenic skin and soft tissue infections was high. (author)

  20. Use of a patient hand hygiene protocol to reduce hospital-acquired infections and improve nurses' hand washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Cherie; Wavra, Teresa; Drake, Diane Ash; Mulligan, Debbie; Bennett, Yvonne Pacheco; Nelson, Carla; Kirkwood, Peggy; Jones, Louise; Bader, Mary Kay

    2015-05-01

    Critically ill patients are at marked risk of hospital-acquired infections, which increase patients' morbidity and mortality. Registered nurses are the main health care providers of physical care, including hygiene to reduce and prevent hospital-acquired infections, for hospitalized critically ill patients. To investigate a new patient hand hygiene protocol designed to reduce hospital-acquired infection rates and improve nurses' hand-washing compliance in an intensive care unit. A preexperimental study design was used to compare 12-month rates of 2 common hospital-acquired infections, central catheter-associated bloodstream infection and catheter-associated urinary tract infection, and nurses' hand-washing compliance measured before and during use of the protocol. Reductions in 12-month infection rates were reported for both types of infections, but neither reduction was statistically significant. Mean 12-month nurse hand-washing compliance also improved, but not significantly. A hand hygiene protocol for patients in the intensive care unit was associated with reductions in hospital-acquired infections and improvements in nurses' hand-washing compliance. Prevention of such infections requires continuous quality improvement efforts to monitor lasting effectiveness as well as investigation of strategies to eliminate these infections. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  1. National Automated Surveillance of Hospital-Acquired Bacteremia in Denmark Using a Computer Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gubbels, Sophie; Nielsen, Jens; Voldstedlund, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND In 2015, Denmark launched an automated surveillance system for hospital-acquired infections, the Hospital-Acquired Infections Database (HAIBA). OBJECTIVE To describe the algorithm used in HAIBA, to determine its concordance with point prevalence surveys (PPSs), and to present trends...... advantages of automated surveillance, HAIBA allows monitoring of HA bacteremia across the healthcare system, supports prioritizing preventive measures, and holds promise for evaluating interventions. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;1-8....... for hospital-acquired bacteremia SETTING Private and public hospitals in Denmark METHODS A hospital-acquired bacteremia case was defined as at least 1 positive blood culture with at least 1 pathogen (bacterium or fungus) taken between 48 hours after admission and 48 hours after discharge, using the Danish...

  2. The burden and epidemiology of community-acquired central nervous system infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdem, H; Inan, A; Guven, E

    2017-01-01

    Risk assessment of central nervous system (CNS) infection patients is of key importance in predicting likely pathogens. However, data are lacking on the epidemiology globally. We performed a multicenter study to understand the burden of community-acquired CNS (CA-CNS) infections between 2012...

  3. Protection of dogs against canine heartworm infection 28 days after four monthly treatments with Advantage Multi® for Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Dwight D; Grazette, Alyssa R; Basel, Chris; Wang, Yingying; Hostetler, Joseph A

    2016-01-08

    Monthly heartworm preventives are designed to protect dogs by killing heartworms acquired the month prior to their administration, and after treatment with most products, the drug levels rapidly dissipate to very low levels. Work with Advantage Multi® for Dogs (imidacloprid + moxidectin) topical solution showed protection against hookworm infection throughout the month after administration of several monthly doses suggesting that similar protection might occur with heartworms. This study assessed the amount of protection afforded to dogs by the administration of four monthly doses of Advantage Multi for Dogs prior to infection with third-stage heartworm larvae (Dirofilaria immitis) 28 days after the last (fourth) treatment. There were 16 purpose-bred mongrel dogs in the study that were divided into two groups, 8 control and 8 treated dogs. Dogs were housed in a manner preventing contact between animals and groups, and personal protective gear worn by staff minimised the chance spread of the topically applied product between runs. The dogs in the treated group received monthly applications of Advantage Multi for Dogs as per label instructions on Study Days 0, 28, 56, and 84. On Study Day 112, all 16 dogs received 50 third-stage larvae of D. immitis ("Missouri" isolate) via subcutaneous inoculation in the inguinal region. The study was terminated on Day 264, and the number of heartworms per dog was determined at necropsy. Moxidectin levels after 4 treatments 28 days apart were near steady state on Study Day 112 when the dogs were inoculated with D. immitis third-stage larvae. At necropsy, 152 days after infection, all the control dogs had adult worms in their pulmonary arteries (geometric mean = 33.9; range 25-41), and none of the dogs treated four times prior to infection, with the last treatment 30 days prior to infection, harbored worms at necropsy. The efficacy of prevention was 100% when the dogs were infected 28 days after the last monthly treatment

  4. The incidence of nosocomial infection in the Intensive Care Unit, Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia: ICU-acquired nosocomial infection surveillance program 1998-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozaidi, S W; Sukro, J; Dan, A

    2001-06-01

    CU-acquired nosocomial infection (NI) remains one of the major causes of ICU mortality. This study presents the incidence of ICU-acquired nosocomial infection in ICU HUKM for the years 1998 and 1999, as part of the ongoing ICU-acquired nosocomial infection surveillance program. The overall incidence was 23%. The main types of NI was lower respiratory tract infection (15.3%), primary bacteraemia (8.1%), ventilator associated pneumonia (5.4%), urinary tract infection (2.0%), skin infection (1.6%) central venous catheter sepsis (1.2%) and surgical skin infection (0.8%). The overall culture positive nosocomial infection rate was only 12.1%, majority from the lungs (12.6%), blood (7.3%), skin swabs (2.0%), and urine (1.6%). The main gram-negative organism cultured was Acinetobacter sp. (19%) and Staph. aureus (8.5%) was the gram-positive organism. The overall ICU mortality rate was 27.5% of which 60.9% of patients who died were attributed directly to sepsis.

  5. Neonatal respiratory syncytial virus infection: role of transplacentally and breast milk-acquired antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, D T; Ogra, P L

    1986-01-01

    The effect of transplacentally and breast milk-acquired antibodies on respiratory syncytial virus infection was studied in neonatal and 2-month-old cotton rats. Adult female rats infected intranasally with live virus regularly produced virus-specific antibodies in the serum, colostrum, and breast milk. By using foster feeding techniques, we showed that both transplacentally and breast milk-acquired antibodies were effective in reducing the replication of respiratory syncytial virus in the lun...

  6. Surveillance for Travel and Domestically Acquired Multidrug-Resistant Human Shigella Infections-Pennsylvania, 2006-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu Lung; Tewari, Deepanker; Yealy, Courtney C; Fardig, David; M'ikanatha, Nkuchia M

    2016-01-01

    Shigellosis is a leading cause of enteric infections in the United States. We compared antimicrobial resistance in Shigella infections related to overseas travel (travel-associated) and in those acquired domestically by analyzing antimicrobial resistance patterns, geographic distributions, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns. We tested samples (n = 204) from a collection of isolates recovered from patients in Pennsylvania between 2006 and 2014. Isolates were grouped into travel- and non-travel-associated categories. Eighty-one (79.4%) of the Shigella isolates acquired during international travel were resistant to multiple antibiotics compared to 53 (52.1%) of the infections transmitted in domestic settings. A majority (79.4%) of isolates associated with international travel demonstrated resistance to aminoglycosides and tetracyclines, whereas 47 (46.1%) of the infections acquired domestically were resistant to tetracycline. Almost all isolates (92.2%) transmitted in domestic settings were resistant to aminoglycosides, and 5 isolates from adult male patients were resistant to azithromycin, a drug often used for empiric treatment of severe shigellosis. Twenty (19.6%) isolates associated with illnesses acquired during overseas travel in 4 countries were resistant to quinolones. One S. sonnei PFGE pattern was traced to a multidrug-resistant isolate acquired overseas that had caused a multistate outbreak of shigellosis, suggesting global dissemination of a drug-resistant species. Resistance to certain drugs-for example, tetracycline-increased in both overseas- and domestic-acquired infections during the study period. The prevalence of resistance to macrolides (azithromycin) and third-generation cephalosporins (ceftriaxone) was less than 1%; however, efforts to better monitor changes in drug resistance over time combined with increased antimicrobial stewardship are essential at the local, national, and global levels.

  7. Potential Cost-effectiveness of Early Identification of Hospital-acquired Infection in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsalik, Ephraim L; Li, Yanhong; Hudson, Lori L; Chu, Vivian H; Himmel, Tiffany; Limkakeng, Alex T; Katz, Jason N; Glickman, Seth W; McClain, Micah T; Welty-Wolf, Karen E; Fowler, Vance G; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Woods, Christopher W; Reed, Shelby D

    2016-03-01

    Limitations in methods for the rapid diagnosis of hospital-acquired infections often delay initiation of effective antimicrobial therapy. New diagnostic approaches offer potential clinical and cost-related improvements in the management of these infections. We developed a decision modeling framework to assess the potential cost-effectiveness of a rapid biomarker assay to identify hospital-acquired infection in high-risk patients earlier than standard diagnostic testing. The framework includes parameters representing rates of infection, rates of delayed appropriate therapy, and impact of delayed therapy on mortality, along with assumptions about diagnostic test characteristics and their impact on delayed therapy and length of stay. Parameter estimates were based on contemporary, published studies and supplemented with data from a four-site, observational, clinical study. Extensive sensitivity analyses were performed. The base-case analysis assumed 17.6% of ventilated patients and 11.2% of nonventilated patients develop hospital-acquired infection and that 28.7% of patients with hospital-acquired infection experience delays in appropriate antibiotic therapy with standard care. We assumed this percentage decreased by 50% (to 14.4%) among patients with true-positive results and increased by 50% (to 43.1%) among patients with false-negative results using a hypothetical biomarker assay. Cost of testing was set at $110/d. In the base-case analysis, among ventilated patients, daily diagnostic testing starting on admission reduced inpatient mortality from 12.3 to 11.9% and increased mean costs by $1,640 per patient, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $21,389 per life-year saved. Among nonventilated patients, inpatient mortality decreased from 7.3 to 7.1% and costs increased by $1,381 with diagnostic testing. The resulting incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $42,325 per life-year saved. Threshold analyses revealed the probabilities of developing

  8. Diabetes and Risk of Community-Acquired Respiratory Tract Infections, Urinary Tract Infections, and Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Reimar W.; Mor, Anil

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an update on the risk of several important community-acquired infections seen in patients with diabetes: respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and bacteremia. Respiratory tract infections: Recent epidemiological evidence shows a modest (1.25 to 1.75-fold) risk...... increase for hospitalization with pneumonia associated with diabetes. The increase of risk for tuberculosis is of similar magnitude in highly developed countries, and possibly higher in low-income countries. Poor glycemic control and long diabetes duration predict higher risk for both pneumonia...... and tuberculosis. Limited data is available for diabetes and influenza, yet both influenza and pneumococcal vaccination is recommended in patients with diabetes. Urinary tract infections: The risk of asymptomatic bacteriuria and cystitis is 1.5 to 2 times increased in diabetes patients, while their risk...

  9. Estimation of Extra Length of Stay Attributable to Hospital-Acquired Infections in Adult ICUs Using a Time-Dependent Multistate Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohannessian, Robin; Gustin, Marie-Paule; Bénet, Thomas; Gerbier-Colomban, Solweig; Girard, Raphaele; Argaud, Laurent; Rimmelé, Thomas; Guerin, Claude; Bohé, Julien; Piriou, Vincent; Vanhems, Philippe

    2018-04-10

    The objective of the study was to estimate the length of stay of patients with hospital-acquired infections hospitalized in ICUs using a multistate model. Active prospective surveillance of hospital-acquired infection from January 1, 1995, to December 31, 2012. Twelve ICUs at the University of Lyon hospital (France). Adult patients age greater than or equal to 18 years old and hospitalized greater than or equal to 2 days were included in the surveillance. All hospital-acquired infections (pneumonia, bacteremia, and urinary tract infection) occurring during ICU stay were collected. None. The competitive risks of in-hospital death, transfer, or discharge were considered in estimating the change in length of stay due to infection(s), using a multistate model, time of infection onset. Thirty-three thousand four-hundred forty-nine patients were involved, with an overall hospital-acquired infection attack rate of 15.5% (n = 5,176). Mean length of stay was 27.4 (± 18.3) days in patients with hospital-acquired infection and 7.3 (± 7.6) days in patients without hospital-acquired infection. A multistate model-estimated mean found an increase in length of stay by 5.0 days (95% CI, 4.6-5.4 d). The extra length of stay increased with the number of infected site and was higher for patients discharged alive from ICU. No increased length of stay was found for patients presenting late-onset hospital-acquired infection, more than the 25th day after admission. An increase length of stay of 5 days attributable to hospital-acquired infection in the ICU was estimated using a multistate model in a prospective surveillance study in France. The dose-response relationship between the number of hospitalacquired infection and length of stay and the impact of early-stage hospital-acquired infection may strengthen attention for clinicians to focus interventions on early preventions of hospital-acquired infection in ICU.

  10. Community-acquired respiratory infections are common in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Noa; Avivi, Irit; Kra-Oz, Zipora; Oren, Ilana; Hardak, Emilia

    2018-07-01

    Available data suggest that respiratory infections are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients hospitalized due to acute leukemia and allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). However, the precise incidence, risk factors, and severity of respiratory infection, mainly community-acquired, in patients with lymphoma and multiple myeloma (MM) are not fully determined. The current study aimed to investigate risk factors for respiratory infections and their clinical significance in patients with B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and multiple myeloma (MM) in the first year of diagnosis. Data of consecutive patients diagnosed with NHL or MM and treated at the Rambam Hematology Inpatient and Outpatient Units between 01/2011 and 03/2012 were evaluated. Information regarding anticancer treatment, incidence and course of respiratory infections, and infection-related outcomes was analyzed. One hundred and sixty episodes of respiratory infections were recorded in 103 (49%) of 211 (73-MM, 138-NHL) patients; 126 (79%) episodes were community-acquired, 47 (29%) of them required hospitalization. In univariate analysis, age respiratory infection risk (P = 0.058, 0.038, and 0.001, respectively). Ninety episodes (56% of all respiratory episodes) were examined for viral pathogens. Viral infections were documented in 25/90 (28%) episodes, 21 (84%) of them were community-acquired, requiring hospitalization in 5 (24%) cases. Anti-flu vaccination was performed in 119 (56%) patients. Two of the six patients diagnosed with influenza were vaccinated. Respiratory infections, including viral ones, are common in NHL and MM. Most infections are community-acquired and have a favorable outcome. Rapid identification of viral pathogens allows avoiding antibiotic overuse in this patient population.

  11. Prevalence and bacterial susceptibility of hospital acquired urinary tract infection

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    Dias Neto José Anastácio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Urinary tract infection is the most common nosocomially acquired infection. It is important to know the etiology and antibiotic susceptibility infectious agents to guide the initial empirical treatment. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of bacterial strains and their antibiotic susceptibility in nosocomially acquired urinary tract infection in a university hospital between January and June 2003. METHODS: We analyzed the data of 188 patients with positive urine culture (= 10(5 colony-forming units/mL following a period of 48 hours after admission. RESULTS: Half of patients were male. Mean age was 50.26 ± 22.7 (SD, range 3 months to 88 years. Gram-negative bacteria were the agent in approximately 80% of cases. The most common pathogens were E. coli (26%, Klebsiella sp. (15%, P. aeruginosa (15% and Enterococcus sp. (11%. The overall bacteria susceptibility showed that the pathogens were more sensible to imipenem (83%, second or third generation cephalosporin and aminoglycosides; and were highly resistant to ampicillin (27% and cefalothin (30%. It is important to note the low susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (42% and norfloxacin (43%. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that if one can not wait the results of urine culture, the best choices to begin empiric treatment are imipenem, second or third generation cephalosporin and aminoglycosides. Cefalothin and ampicillin are quite ineffective to treat these infections.

  12. A reliable user authentication and key agreement scheme for Web-based Hospital-acquired Infection Surveillance Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen-Yu; Tseng, Yi-Ju; Chung, Yufang; Chen, Yee-Chun; Lai, Feipei

    2012-08-01

    With the rapid development of the Internet, both digitization and electronic orientation are required on various applications in the daily life. For hospital-acquired infection control, a Web-based Hospital-acquired Infection Surveillance System was implemented. Clinical data from different hospitals and systems were collected and analyzed. The hospital-acquired infection screening rules in this system utilized this information to detect different patterns of defined hospital-acquired infection. Moreover, these data were integrated into the user interface of a signal entry point to assist physicians and healthcare providers in making decisions. Based on Service-Oriented Architecture, web-service techniques which were suitable for integrating heterogeneous platforms, protocols, and applications, were used. In summary, this system simplifies the workflow of hospital infection control and improves the healthcare quality. However, it is probable for attackers to intercept the process of data transmission or access to the user interface. To tackle the illegal access and to prevent the information from being stolen during transmission over the insecure Internet, a password-based user authentication scheme is proposed for information integrity.

  13. First reported outbreak of locally acquired hepatitis E virus infection in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapa, Chaturangi M; Furlong, Catriona; Rosewell, Alexander; Ward, Kate A; Adamson, Sheena; Shadbolt, Craig; Kok, Jen; Tracy, Samantha L; Bowden, Scott; Smedley, Elizabeth J; Ferson, Mark J; Sheppeard, Vicky; McAnulty, Jeremy M

    2016-04-18

    To determine the source and extent of a locally acquired hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection outbreak. A cluster of notified cases of HEV infection linked to a single restaurant (X) was identified in May 2014. People with laboratory-confirmed HEV infection in New South Wales between January 2013 and December 2014 were interviewed about potential risk factors for HEV infection. Co-diners at restaurant X and patients with suspected but unexplained viral hepatitis were retrospectively tested. Foods eaten by the infected persons were compared with those of seronegative co-diners. HEV RNA detected in sera from infected persons was sequenced and genotyped. Implicated foods were traced back to their sources. Potential sources of infection, including overseas travel and foods eaten, and origin of implicated food products. In 55 serologically confirmed cases of HEV infection, 24 people had not travelled overseas during their incubation periods. Of the 24, 17 reported having eaten at restaurant X, 15 of whom could be interviewed. All reported consuming pork liver pâté, compared with only four of seven uninfected co-diners (P restaurant X isolates. HEV RNA was isolated from pork sausages from a batch implicated in one of the locally acquired infections not linked with restaurant X. The pork livers used for pâté preparation by restaurant X were traced to a single Australian farm. This is the first reported HEV outbreak in Australia. HEV should be considered in patients presenting with a compatible illness, even without a history of overseas travel. Pork products should be thoroughly cooked before consumption.

  14. Epidemic of medical errors and hospital-acquired infections: systemic and social causes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Charney, William

    2012-01-01

    ...) and pharmaceutical errors combined are the second or third leading killer of Americans annually: approximately 300,000 die from a combination of medical errors, hospital acquired infections (HAIs...

  15. Patient referral patterns and the spread of hospital-acquired infections through national health care networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjibbe Donker

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Rates of hospital-acquired infections, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, are increasingly used as quality indicators for hospital hygiene. Alternatively, these rates may vary between hospitals, because hospitals differ in admission and referral of potentially colonized patients. We assessed if different referral patterns between hospitals in health care networks can influence rates of hospital-acquired infections like MRSA. We used the Dutch medical registration of 2004 to measure the connectedness between hospitals. This allowed us to reconstruct the network of hospitals in the Netherlands. We used mathematical models to assess the effect of different patient referral patterns on the potential spread of hospital-acquired infections between hospitals, and between categories of hospitals (University medical centers, top clinical hospitals and general hospitals. University hospitals have a higher number of shared patients than teaching or general hospitals, and are therefore more likely to be among the first to receive colonized patients. Moreover, as the network is directional towards university hospitals, they have a higher prevalence, even when infection control measures are equally effective in all hospitals. Patient referral patterns have a profound effect on the spread of health care-associated infections like hospital-acquired MRSA. The MRSA prevalence therefore differs between hospitals with the position of each hospital within the health care network. Any comparison of MRSA rates between hospitals, as a benchmark for hospital hygiene, should therefore take the position of a hospital within the network into account.

  16. Cerebral involvement in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krestin, G.P.; Juergens, R.; Steinbrich, W.; Diederich, N.; Koeln Univ.

    1986-01-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is usually due to opportunistic infections; these frequently offer a difficult differential diagnostic problem. Imaging methods play an important part in the elucidation of symptoms. CT and MR findings were analysed in 13 patients with AIDS and neurological symptoms. Some infections of the central nervous system (encephalitis of unknown aetiology, cytomegalic encephalitis, meningitis) may show cerebral atrophy or even no morphological changes. Toxoplasmosis and PML are the most common opportunistic infections typical changes on CT and MR may lead to diagnosis. MR offers advantages compared with CT in its higher sensitivity for the demonstration even of small lesions. (orig.) [de

  17. Colonic stenosis post-necrotizing enterocolitis in term newborn with acquired cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marseglia, L; Manti, S; D'Angelo, G; Lima, M; Impellizzeri, P; Romeo, C; Gitto, E

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis is a gastrointestinal emergency typical of premature infants. Intestinal strictures infrequently complicate medical or surgical treatment of necrotizing enterocolitis. Postnatal cytomegalovirus infection with gastrointestinal linvolvement has occasionally been described in subjects with necrotizing enterocolitis. We report the case of a full term infant presenting necrotizing enterocolitis, acquired cytomegalovirus infection and post necrotizing enterocolitis colonic stricture.List of abbreviations: necrotizing enterocolitis = NEC,cytomegalovirus = CMV. Celsius.

  18. Online continuing interprofessional education on hospital-acquired infections for Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Presentado, Julio C; Margolis, Alvaro; Teixeira, Lucia; Lorier, Leticia; Gales, Ana C; Pérez-Sartori, Graciela; Oliveira, Maura S; Seija, Verónica; Paciel, Daniela; Vignoli, Rafael; Guerra, Silvia; Albornoz, Henry; Arteta, Zaida; Lopez-Arredondo, Antonio; García, Sofía

    Latin America is a large and diverse region, comprising more than 600 million inhabitants and one million physicians in over 20 countries. Resistance to antibacterial drugs is particularly important in the region. This paper describes the design, implementation and results of an international bi-lingual (Spanish and Portuguese) online continuing interprofessional interactive educational program on hospital-acquired infections and antimicrobial resistance for Latin America, supported by the American Society for Microbiology. Participation, satisfaction and knowledge gain (through pre and post tests) were used. Moreover, commitment to change statements were requested from participants at the end of the course and three months later. There were 1169 participants from 19 Latin American countries who registered: 57% were physicians and 43% were other health care professionals. Of those, 1126 participated in the course, 46% received a certificate of completion and 54% a certificate of participation. There was a significant increase in knowledge between before and after the course. Of 535 participants who took both tests, the grade increased from 59 to 81%. Commitments to change were aligned with course objectives. Implementation of this educational program showed the feasibility of a continent-wide interprofessional massive course on hospital acquired-infections in Latin America, in the two main languages spoken in the region. Next steps included a new edition of this course and a "New Challenges" course on hospital-acquired infections, which were successfully implemented in the second semester of 2015 by the same institutions. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Community acquired urinary tract infection: etiology and bacterial susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias Neto José Anastácio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Urinary tract infections (UTI are one of the most common infectious diseases diagnosed. UTI account for a large proportion of antibacterial drug consumption and have large socio-economic impacts. Since the majority of the treatments begins or is done completely empirically, the knowledge of the organisms, their epidemiological characteristics and their antibacterial susceptibility that may vary with time is mandatory. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to report the prevalence of uropathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility of the community acquired UTI diagnosed in our institution and to provide a national data. METHODS: We analyzed retrospectively the results of urine cultures of 402 patients that had community acquired urinary tract infection in the year of 2003. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients in this study was 45.34 ± 23.56 (SD years. There were 242 (60.2% females and 160 (39.8% males. The most commonly isolated organism was Escherichia coli (58%. Klebsiella sp. (8.4% and Enterococcus sp.(7.9% were reported as the next most common organisms. Of all bacteria isolated from community acquired UTI, only 37% were sensitive to ampicillin, 51% to cefalothin and 52% to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The highest levels of susceptibility were to imipenem (96%, ceftriaxone (90%, amikacin (90%, gentamicin (88%, levofloxacin (86%, ciprofloxacin (73%, nitrofurantoin (77% and norfloxacin (75%. CONCLUSION: Gram-negative agents are the most common cause of UTI. Fluoroquinolones remains the choice among the orally administered antibiotics, followed by nitrofurantoin, second and third generation cephalosporins. For severe disease that require parenteral antibiotics the choice should be aminoglycosides, third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones or imipenem, which were the most effective.

  20. Utility of COX1 phylogenetics to differentiate between locally acquired and imported Plasmodium knowlesi infections in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Jin Phang; Gao, Qiu Han Christine; Lee, Vernon J; Tetteh, Kevin; Drakeley, Chris

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Although there have been several phylogenetic studies on Plasmodium knowlesi (P. knowlesi), only cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COX1) gene analysis has shown some geographical differentiation between the isolates of different countries. METHODS Phylogenetic analysis of locally acquired P. knowlesi infections, based on circumsporozoite, small subunit ribosomal ribonucleic acid (SSU rRNA), merozoite surface protein 1 and COX1 gene targets, was performed. The results were compared with the published sequences of regional isolates from Malaysia and Thailand. RESULTS Phylogenetic analysis of the circumsporozoite, SSU rRNA and merozoite surface protein 1 gene sequences for regional P. knowlesi isolates showed no obvious differentiation that could be attributed to their geographical origin. However, COX1 gene analysis showed that it was possible to differentiate between Singapore-acquired P. knowlesi infections and P. knowlesi infections from Peninsular Malaysia and Sarawak, Borneo, Malaysia. CONCLUSION The ability to differentiate between locally acquired P. knowlesi infections and imported P. knowlesi infections has important utility for the monitoring of P. knowlesi malaria control programmes in Singapore. PMID:26805667

  1. Utility of COX1 phylogenetics to differentiate between locally acquired and imported Plasmodium knowlesi infections in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Jin Phang; Gao, Qiu Han Christine; Lee, Vernon J; Tetteh, Kevin; Drakeley, Chris

    2016-12-01

    Although there have been several phylogenetic studies on Plasmodium knowlesi (P. knowlesi), only cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COX1) gene analysis has shown some geographical differentiation between the isolates of different countries. Phylogenetic analysis of locally acquired P. knowlesi infections, based on circumsporozoite, small subunit ribosomal ribonucleic acid (SSU rRNA), merozoite surface protein 1 and COX1 gene targets, was performed. The results were compared with the published sequences of regional isolates from Malaysia and Thailand. Phylogenetic analysis of the circumsporozoite, SSU rRNA and merozoite surface protein 1 gene sequences for regional P. knowlesi isolates showed no obvious differentiation that could be attributed to their geographical origin. However, COX1 gene analysis showed that it was possible to differentiate between Singapore-acquired P. knowlesi infections and P. knowlesi infections from Peninsular Malaysia and Sarawak, Borneo, Malaysia. The ability to differentiate between locally acquired P. knowlesi infections and imported P. knowlesi infections has important utility for the monitoring of P. knowlesi malaria control programmes in Singapore. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association

  2. A multicenter qualitative study on preventing hospital-acquired urinary tract infection in US hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint, Sanjay; Kowalski, Christine P; Forman, Jane; Damschroder, Laura; Hofer, Timothy P; Kaufman, Samuel R; Creswell, John W; Krein, Sarah L

    2008-04-01

    Although urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common hospital-acquired infection, there is little information about why hospitals use or do not use a range of available preventive practices. We thus conducted a multicenter study to understand better how US hospitals approach the prevention of hospital-acquired UTI. This research is part of a larger study employing both quantitative and qualitative methods. The qualitative phase consisted of 38 semistructured phone interviews with key personnel at 14 purposefully sampled US hospitals and 39 in-person interviews at 5 of those 14 hospitals, to identify recurrent and unifying themes that characterize how hospitals have addressed hospital-acquired UTI. Four recurrent themes emerged from our study data. First, although preventing hospital-acquired UTI was a low priority for most hospitals, there was substantial recognition of the value of early removal of a urinary catheter for patients. Second, those hospitals that made UTI prevention a high priority also focused on noninfectious complications and had committed advocates, or "champions," who facilitated prevention activities. Third, hospital-specific pilot studies were important in deciding whether or not to use devices such as antimicrobial-impregnated catheters. Finally, external forces, such as public reporting, influenced UTI surveillance and infection prevention activities. Clinicians and policy makers can use our findings to develop initiatives that, for example, use a champion to promote the removal of unnecessary urinary catheters or exploit external forces, such public reporting, to enhance patient safety.

  3. Hospital-acquired infections associated with poor air quality in air-conditioned environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Pinheiro da Silva

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: Individuals living in cities increasingly spend more time indoors in air-conditioned environments. Air conditioner contamination can be caused by the presence of aerosols from the external or internal environment, which may be associated with disease manifestations in patients present in this type of environment. Therefore, the aim of this review was to assess the air quality in air-conditioned hospital environments as a risk factor for hospital-acquired infections – HAI – as the air can be a potential source of infection, as well as assess the exposure of professionals and patients to different pollutants. Material and Methods: A literature review was performed in the LILACS, MEDLINE, SCIELO, SCIENCE DIRECT databases, CAPES thesis database and Ministry of Health – Brazil, including studies published between 1982 and 2008. The literature search was grouped according to the thematic focus, as follows: ventilation, maintenance and cleaning of systems that comprehend the environmental quality standard. Discussion and Conclusion: Outbreaks of hospital-acquired infections associated with Aspergillus, Acinetobacter, Legionella, and other genera such as Clostridium and Nocardia, which were found in air conditioners, were observed, thus indicating the need for air-conditioning quality control in these environments.

  4. Burden of Hospital Acquired Infections and Antimicrobial Use in Vietnamese Adult Intensive Care Units.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vu Dinh Phu

    Full Text Available Vietnam is a lower middle-income country with no national surveillance system for hospital-acquired infections (HAIs. We assessed the prevalence of hospital-acquired infections and antimicrobial use in adult intensive care units (ICUs across Vietnam.Monthly repeated point prevalence surveys were systematically conducted to assess HAI prevalence and antimicrobial use in 15 adult ICUs across Vietnam. Adults admitted to participating ICUs before 08:00 a.m. on the survey day were included.Among 3287 patients enrolled, the HAI prevalence was 29.5% (965/3266 patients, 21 missing. Pneumonia accounted for 79.4% (804/1012 of HAIs Most HAIs (84.5% [855/1012] were acquired in the survey hospital with 42.5% (363/855 acquired prior to ICU admission and 57.5% (492/855 developed during ICU admission. In multivariate analysis, the strongest risk factors for HAI acquired in ICU were: intubation (OR 2.76, urinary catheter (OR 2.12, no involvement of a family member in patient care (OR 1.94, and surgery after admission (OR 1.66. 726 bacterial isolates were cultured from 622/1012 HAIs, most frequently Acinetobacter baumannii (177/726 [24.4%], Pseudomonas aeruginosa (100/726 [13.8%], and Klebsiella pneumoniae (84/726 [11.6%], with carbapenem resistance rates of 89.2%, 55.7%, and 14.9% respectively. Antimicrobials were prescribed for 84.8% (2787/3287 patients, with 73.7% of patients receiving two or more. The most common antimicrobial groups were third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, and carbapenems (20.1%, 19.4%, and 14.1% of total antimicrobials, respectively.A high prevalence of HAIs was observed, mainly caused by Gram-negative bacteria with high carbapenem resistance rates. This in combination with a high rate of antimicrobial use illustrates the urgent need to improve rational antimicrobial use and infection control efforts.

  5. Physical Plant Design and Engineering Controls to Reduce Hospital-Acquired Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JM Conly

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the environment as a reservoir for microorganisms implicated in disease transmission in the hospital setting has been increasingly recognized, especially with respect to dialysis units, ventilation in specialized areas, and the proper use of disinfectants (1. Inherent within the environmental setting is the importance of physical plant design. Several studies have underscored the importance of optimizing design standards to maximize patient and health care worker (HCW safety, including the prevention of hospital-acquired infections in patients (2-6. Ulrich et al (7 recently completed an evidence-based review, entitled 'The role of the physical environment in the hospital of the 21st century: A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity', for the Center for Health Design in California (USA, which was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Ulrich and colleagues identified over 600 studies that examined the hospital environment and its effects on staff effectiveness, patient safety, patient and family stress, quality and costs. They suggested that one of the important elements in improving patient safety is the reduction of the risk of hospital-acquired infections through improved facility design.

  6. Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Concepción; Castillo-Álvarez, Federico; Azcona-Gutiérrez, José M; Herraiz, María J; Ibarra, Valvanera; Oteo, José A

    2015-05-01

    Neurological complications in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) are still common, even in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Opportunistic infections, immune reconstitution, the virus itself, antiretroviral drugs and neurocognitive disorders have to be considered when establishing the differential diagnosis. Toxoplasmic encephalitis remains the major cause of space-occupying lesions in the brain of patients with HIV/AIDS; however, spinal cord involvement has been reported infrequently. Here, we review spinal cord toxoplasmosis in HIV infection and illustrate the condition with a recent case from our hospital. We suggest that most patients with HIV/AIDS and myelitis with enhanced spine lesions, multiple brain lesions and positive serology for Toxoplasma gondii should receive immediate empirical treatment for toxoplasmosis, and a biopsy should be performed in those cases without clinical improvement or with deterioration.

  7. Perinatally acquired HIV infection in adolescents from sub-Saharan Africa: a review of emerging challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenthal, Elizabeth D; Bakeera-Kitaka, Sabrina; Marukutira, Tafireyi; Chapman, Jennifer; Goldrath, Kathryn; Ferrand, Rashida A

    2014-07-01

    Worldwide, more than three million children are infected with HIV, 90% of whom live in sub-Saharan Africa. As the HIV epidemic matures and antiretroviral treatment is scaled up, children with HIV are reaching adolescence in large numbers. The growing population of adolescents with perinatally acquired HIV infection living within this region presents not only unprecedented challenges but also opportunities to learn about the pathogenesis of HIV infection. In this Review, we discuss the changing epidemiology of paediatric HIV and the particular features of HIV infection in adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa. Longstanding HIV infection acquired when the immune system is not developed results in distinctive chronic clinical complications that cause severe morbidity. As well as dealing with chronic illness, HIV-infected adolescents have to confront psychosocial issues, maintain adherence to drugs, and learn to negotiate sexual relationships, while undergoing rapid physical and psychological development. Context-specific strategies for early identification of HIV infection in children and prompt linkage to care need to be developed. Clinical HIV care should integrate age-appropriate sexual and reproductive health and psychological, educational, and social services. Health-care workers will need to be trained to recognise and manage the needs of these young people so that the increasing numbers of children surviving to adolescence can access quality care beyond specialist services at low-level health-care facilities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of Chlorhexidine Bathing Every Other Day on Prevention of Hospital-Acquired Infections in the Surgical ICU: A Single-Center, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Joshua T; Ashton, Carol M; Bui, Lan N; Pham, Vy P; Shirkey, Beverly A; Blackshear, Jolene E; Bersamin, Jimmy B; Pomer, Rubie May L; Johnson, Michael L; Magtoto, Audrey D; Butler, Michelle O; Tran, Shirley K; Sanchez, Leah R; Patel, Jessica G; Ochoa, Robert A; Hai, Shaikh A; Denison, Karen I; Graviss, Edward A; Wray, Nelda P

    2016-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that compared with daily soap and water bathing, 2% chlorhexidine gluconate bathing every other day for up to 28 days decreases the risk of hospital-acquired catheter-associated urinary tract infection, ventilator-associated pneumonia, incisional surgical site infection, and primary bloodstream infection in surgical ICU patients. This was a single-center, pragmatic, randomized trial. Patients and clinicians were aware of treatment-group assignment; investigators who determined outcomes were blinded. Twenty-four-bed surgical ICU at a quaternary academic medical center. Adults admitted to the surgical ICU from July 2012 to May 2013 with an anticipated surgical ICU stay for 48 hours or more were included. Patients were randomized to bathing with 2% chlorhexidine every other day alternating with soap and water every other day (treatment arm) or to bathing with soap and water daily (control arm). The primary endpoint was a composite outcome of catheter-associated urinary tract infection, ventilator-associated pneumonia, incisional surgical site infection, and primary bloodstream infection. Of 350 patients randomized, 24 were excluded due to prior enrollment in this trial and one withdrew consent. Therefore, 325 were analyzed (164 soap and water versus 161 chlorhexidine). Patients acquired 53 infections. Compared with soap and water bathing, chlorhexidine bathing every other day decreased the risk of acquiring infections (hazard ratio = 0.555; 95% CI, 0.309-0.997; p = 0.049). For patients bathed with soap and water versus chlorhexidine, counts of incident hospital-acquired infections were 14 versus 7 for catheter-associated urinary tract infection, 13 versus 8 for ventilator-associated pneumonia, 6 versus 3 for incisional surgical site infections, and 2 versus 0 for primary bloodstream infection; the effect was consistent across all infections. The absolute risk reduction for acquiring a hospital-acquired infection was 9.0% (95% CI, 1.5-16.4%; p

  9. Associations Between Enteral Colonization With Gram-Negative Bacteria and Intensive Care Unit-Acquired Infections and Colonization of the Respiratory Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frencken, Jos F; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; Plantinga, Nienke L; Spitoni, Cristian; van de Groep, Kirsten; Cremer, Olaf L; Bonten, Marc J M

    2018-02-01

    Enteral and respiratory tract colonization with gram-negative bacteria may lead to subsequent infections in critically ill patients. We aimed to clarify the interdependence between gut and respiratory tract colonization and their associations with intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired infections in patients receiving selective digestive tract decontamination (SDD). Colonization status of the rectum and respiratory tract was determined using twice-weekly microbiological surveillance in mechanically ventilated subjects receiving SDD between May 2011 and June 2015 in a tertiary medical-surgical ICU in the Netherlands. Acquisition of infections was monitored daily by dedicated observers. Marginal structural models were used to determine the associations between gram-negative rectal colonization and respiratory tract colonization, ICU-acquired gram-negative infection, and ICU-acquired gram-negative bacteremia. Among 2066 ICU admissions, 1157 (56.0%) ever had documented gram-negative carriage in the rectum during ICU stay. Cumulative incidences of ICU-acquired gram-negative infection and bacteremia were 6.0% (n = 124) and 2.1% (n = 44), respectively. Rectal colonization was an independent risk factor for both respiratory tract colonization (cause-specific hazard ratio [CSHR], 2.93 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 2.02-4.23]) and new gram-negative infection in the ICU (CSHR, 3.04 [95% CI, 1.99-4.65]). Both rectal and respiratory tract colonization were associated with bacteremia (CSHR, 7.37 [95% CI, 3.25-16.68] and 2.56 [95% CI, 1.09-6.03], respectively). Similar associations were observed when Enterobacteriaceae and glucose nonfermenting gram-negative bacteria were analyzed separately. Gram-negative rectal colonization tends to be stronger associated with subsequent ICU-acquired gram-negative infections than gram-negative respiratory tract colonization. Gram-negative rectal colonization seems hardly associated with subsequent ICU-acquired gram-negative respiratory tract

  10. Detection of CTX-M-15 beta-lactamases in Enterobacteriaceae causing hospital- and community-acquired urinary tract infections as early as 2004, in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyahi, Joel; Moyo, Sabrina J; Tellevik, Marit Gjerde; Ndugulile, Faustine; Urassa, Willy; Blomberg, Bjørn; Langeland, Nina

    2017-04-17

    The spread of Extended Spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) among Enterobacteriaceae and other Gram-Negative pathogens in the community and hospitals represents a major challenge to combat infections. We conducted a study to assess the prevalence and genetic makeup of ESBL-type resistance in bacterial isolates causing community- and hospital-acquired urinary tract infections. A total of 172 isolates of Enterobacteriaceae were collected in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, from patients who met criteria of community and hospital-acquired urinary tract infections. We used E-test ESBL strips to test for ESBL-phenotype and PCR and sequencing for detection of ESBL genes. Overall 23.8% (41/172) of all isolates were ESBL-producers. ESBL-producers were more frequently isolated from hospital-acquired infections (32%, 27/84 than from community-acquired infections (16%, 14/88, p Enterobacteriaceae causing both hospital- and community-acquired infections in Tanzania.

  11. New Pneumococcal Carriage Acquired in Association with Acute Respiratory Infection Is Prone to Cause Otitis Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auranen, Kari; Syrjänen, Ritva; Leino, Tuija; Kilpi, Terhi

    2016-01-01

    For considering vaccine-prevention of pneumococcal acute otitis media (PncAOM), relationships between pneumococcal carriage, respiratory infection and PncAOM need to be understood. We analyzed nasopharyngeal samples collected from 329 unvaccinated Finnish children aged 2-24 months at scheduled visits and at visits during respiratory infection in 1994-97. We assessed temporal associations of respiratory infection with pneumococcal acquisition and whether PncAOM hazard depends on the relative timing of acquisition and the infection onset. The data comprised 607 person-years of risk-time for acquisition, 245 person-months of concurrent respiratory infection and carriage, and 119 episodes of PncAOM. The acquisition hazard was 3-fold in the month preceding respiratory sickness (hazard ratio, HR 3.5, 90% credible interval CI 2.9, 4.1) as compared to acquisition in healthy children. Moreover, the PncAOM hazard was markedly higher (HR 3.7, 90% CI 2.4, 5.3) during the first month of carriage acquired around the acute phase of respiratory infection (between 1 month before and 1 week after the sickness onset), as compared to carriage acquired later during sickness. The high proportion (76%) of PncAOM events occurring within 1 month of acquisition was due to frequent acquisition being associated with respiratory infection as well as the susceptibility of such acquisition to cause otitis media.

  12. Multi-centre point prevalence survey of hospital-acquired infections in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labi, Appiah-Korang; Obeng-Nkrumah, Noah; Owusu, Enid; Bjerrum, Stephanie; Bediako-Bowan, Antoinette; Sunkwa-Mills, Gifty; Akuffo, Christiana; Fenny, Ama Pokua; Opintan, Japheth Awuletey; Enweronu-Laryea, Christabel; Debrah, Samuel; Damale, Nelson; Bannerman, Cynthia; Newman, Mercy Jemima

    2018-05-03

    There is a paucity of data describing hospital acquired infections (HAIs) in Africa. To describe the prevalence and distribution of HAIs in acute care hospitals in Ghana. Between September and December 2016, point prevalence surveys were conducted in participating hospitals using protocols of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. We reviewed medical records of eligible inpatients at or before 8am on the day of survey to identify HAIs present at the time of survey. Ten hospitals were surveyed, representing 32.9% of all acute care beds in government hospitals. Of 2107 inpatients surveyed, 184 HAIs were identified among 172 patients, corresponding to an overall prevalence of 8.2%. The prevalence values in hospitals ranged from 3.5 to 14.4% with higher proportion of infections in secondary and tertiary care facilities. The most frequent HAIs were surgical site infections (32.6%), bloodstream infections (19.5%), urinary tract infections (18.5%), and respiratory tract infections (16.3%). Device-associated infections accounted for 7.1% of HAIs. For 12.5% of HAIs, a microorganism was reported; the most isolated microorganism was Escherichia coli. Approximately 61% of all patients surveyed were on antibiotics; 89.5% of patients with an HAI received at least one antimicrobial agent on the day of survey. The strongest independent predictors for HAI were the presence of invasive device before onset of infection and duration of hospital stay. We recorded a low HAI burden compared to findings from other low and middle income countries. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Community-acquired urinary tract infections in children: pathogens, antibiotic susceptibility and seasonal changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yolbaş, I; Tekin, R; Kelekci, S; Tekin, A; Okur, M H; Ece, A; Gunes, A; Sen, V

    2013-04-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common infections affecting children. The aim of our study is to determine microorganisms that cause community-acquired urinary tract infections and their antibiotic susceptibility in children. Our investigation includes 150 cases which has positive urine culture. The cases are detected at Pediatric Polyclinics of Dicle University between June 2010 and June 2011. The study included 118 (78.7%) female and 32 (21.3%) male children. Urinary tract infections were seen in autumn 10.7% (n = 16), summer 35.3% (n = 53), winter 30.7% (n = 46) and spring 23.3% (n = 35). The culture results indicated 75.3% (n = 113) Escherichia coli; 20.7% (n = 31) Klebsiella; 2.7% (n = 4) Proteus and % 1.3 (n = 2) Pseudomonas. The antibiotic resistance against Escherichia coli was found out is amikacin (3%), ertapenem (7%), imipenem (0%), meropenem (0%), nitrofurantoin (9%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (58%), piperacillin (83%), amoxicillin/clavulanate (50%), ampicillin/sulbactam (65%), cefazolin (54%), cefotaxime (51%), cefuroxime sodium (51% ) and tetracycline (68%). The resistance ratios of Klebsiella are amikacin (0%), imipenem (0%), levofloxacin (0%), meropenem (0%), amoxicillin/clavulanate (57%), ampicillin/sulbactam (79%), ceftriaxone (68%), cefuroxime sodium (74%) and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (61%). The results represent the increasing antibiotic resistance against microorganisms among the community-acquired UTI patients in a developing country such as Turkey. So, the physicians should consider resistance status of the infectious agent and choose effective antibiotics which are nitrofurantoin and cefoxitin for their empirical antibiotic treatment. Furthermore, they should be trained about selection of more effective antibiotics and check the regional studies regularly.

  14. Laboratory-acquired brucellosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, C.; Knudsen, J.D.; Lebech, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9......Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  15. Detection of IgM and IgG antibodies to Chlamydophila pneumoniae in pediatric community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surinder Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Chlamydophila pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae is an emerging infectious agent with a spectrum of clinical manifestations including lower and upper respiratory tract infections. Aims: To investigate the role of C. pneumoniae in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs in children using serological tests. Settings and Design: Two hundred children, age 2 months to 12 years, hospitalized for community-acquired LRTIs were investigated for C. pneumoniae etiology. Materials and Methods: We investigated 200 children hospitalized for community-acquired LRTIs, using ELISA for detecting anti-C. pneumoniae IgM and IgG antibodies. The demographic, clinical and radiological findings for C. pneumoniae antibody positive and C. pneumoniae antibody negative cases were compared. Statistical Analysis Used: Data analysis was performed by Chi-square test and Fisher′s exact tests using Epi Info (2002. Results: Clinical and radiological findings in both the groups were comparable. Serological evidence of C. pneumoniae infection was observed in 12 (6% patients; specific IgM antibodies were detected in 11 (91.67%; specific IgG antibodies in 1 (8.33% patients, while 4-fold rise in C. pneumoniae IgG antibody titers were noted in none of the patients. Conclusions: C. pneumoniae has a role in community-acquired LRTIs, even in children aged < 5 years. Serological detection using ELISA would enable pediatricians in better management of C. pneumoniae infections.

  16. INFECTION WITH HHV-6 OF MILITARY MEN AFFECTED BY COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

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    Brusnik SV

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus, 6 type (HHV-6 was isolated at the end of the 20th century from the blood leukocytes of patients with lymphoproliferative diseases. Serological studies conducted in different countries, indicate ubiquitylation of the HHV-6 and the existence of two antigenic variants - HHV-6A and HHV-6B. Their high tropism is determined in vitro to lymphocytic, nervous and dendritic cells of the CNS. Virus replicates in many cell, primary and passaged cultures of different origins. The reproduction cycle of HHV-6 continues on average 4-5 days forming syncytiums and intracytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions. Significant destruction and lysis almost 90 % of infected cells is reported after 5-10 day of monitoring. The utility of experimentation investigating the role of HHV-6 in the development of acute and chronic diseases in respiratory tract is caused by the fact that many patients, particularly those with chronic diseases, have complaints to chronic fatigue, decreased performance and low-grade temperature more than 3-6 months. Several studies demonstrate the presence of HHV-6 in saliva, salivary and bronchiolar glands, in swabs from pharyngonasal cavity and gorge. Tropism of HHV-6 to oropharyngeal epithelium with the possibility of finding the virus in the saliva and swabs from pharyngonasal cavity and gorge was found at the end of 20th century. This fact gave the basis for work determining the level of infection by this pathogen in patients with infectious and inflammatory pathology of the respiratory tract. Materials and methods. Serological studies were conducted with 38 soldiers affected by community-acquired pneumonia. Most of the surveyed patients were ranged in age from 20 to 45 years old, middle age (32,5±1,5 years. Patients were in stationary treatment in the Kharkov military hospital. The criteria for inclusion in the study on the infection of HHV-6 were soldiers affected by community-acquired pneumonia with atypical course of

  17. The human microbiota: novel targets for hospital-acquired infections and antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Melinda M; Johnson, J Kristie; Harris, Anthony D

    2016-05-01

    Hospital-acquired infections are increasing in frequency due to multidrug resistant organisms (MDROs), and the spread of MDROs has eroded our ability to treat infections. Health care professionals cannot rely solely on traditional infection control measures and antimicrobial stewardship to prevent MDRO transmission. We review research on the microbiota as a target for infection control interventions. We performed a literature review of key research findings related to the microbiota as a target for infection control interventions. These data are summarized and used to outline challenges, opportunities, and unanswered questions in the field. The healthy microbiota provides protective functions including colonization resistance, which refers to the microbiota's ability to prevent colonization and/or expansion of pathogens. Antibiotic use and other exposures in hospitalized patients are associated with disruptions of the microbiota that may reduce colonization resistance and select for antibiotic resistance. Novel methods to exploit protective mechanisms provided by an intact microbiota may provide the key to preventing the spread of MDROs in the health care setting. Research on the microbiota as a target for infection control has been limited. Epidemiologic studies will facilitate progress toward the goal of manipulating the microbiota for control of MDROs in the health care setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Acquired Long QT Syndrome and Torsade de Pointes Associated with HIV Infection

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    Alexander Shimabukuro-Vornhagen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report the case of an HIV infected patient that was treated for pneumonia with a macrolid antibiotic. The patient experienced a prolongation of the already pathologic QTc interval resulting in repeated torsades de pointes necessitating CPR and implantation of an AICD. This case exemplifies that torsades de pointes due to acquired long QT syndrome is a serious and potentially fatal complication in HIV-positive patients.

  19. The Economic Burden of Hospital-Acquired Clostridium difficile Infection: A Population-Based Matched Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanwa, Natasha; Kwong, Jeffrey C; Krahn, Murray; Daneman, Nick; Lu, Hong; Austin, Peter C; Govindarajan, Anand; Rosella, Laura C; Cadarette, Suzanne M; Sander, Beate

    2016-09-01

    BACKGROUND High-quality cost estimates for hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) are vital evidence for healthcare policy and decision-making. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the costs attributable to hospital-acquired CDI from the healthcare payer perspective. METHODS We conducted a population-based propensity-score matched cohort study of incident hospitalized subjects diagnosed with CDI (those with the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision, Canada code A04.7) from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2010, in Ontario, Canada. Infected subjects were matched to uninfected subjects (those without the code A04.7) on age, sex, comorbidities, geography, and other variables, and followed up through December 31, 2011. We stratified results by elective and nonelective admissions. The main study outcomes were up-to-3-year costs, which were evaluated in 2014 Canadian dollars. RESULTS We identified 28,308 infected subjects (mean annual incidence, 27.9 per 100,000 population, 3.3 per 1,000 admissions), with a mean age of 71.5 years (range, 0-107 years), 54.0% female, and 8.0% elective admissions. For elective admission subjects, cumulative mean attributable 1-, 2-, and 3-year costs adjusted for survival (undiscounted) were $32,151 (95% CI, $28,192-$36,005), $34,843 ($29,298-$40,027), and $37,171 ($30,364-$43,415), respectively. For nonelective admission subjects, the corresponding costs were $21,909 ($21,221-$22,609), $26,074 ($25,180-$27,014), and $29,944 ($28,873-$31,086), respectively. CONCLUSIONS Hospital-acquired CDI is associated with substantial healthcare costs. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first CDI costing study to present longitudinal costs. New strategies may be warranted to mitigate this costly infectious disease. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:1068-1078.

  20. Characteristics and specificity of acquired immunologic memory to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orme, I.M.

    1988-01-01

    The results herein show that mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and then exposed to a protracted course of isoniazid chemotherapy possess a heightened state of acquired resistance to subsequent challenge with the homologous organism. Our results provide the first evidence, moreover, that this resistance is mediated by a long-lived, cyclophosphamide- and irradiation-resistant L3T4+ Lyt-2- lymphocyte capable of giving rise to an accelerated re-emergence of resistance in the animal upon rechallenge. Evidence is also provided to show that triggering of this memory-immune T cell population in the re-challenged host was associated with the rapid emergence of non-specific resistance to secondary bacterial infection; however, the accelerated emergence of this population was only observed if the challenge inoculum consisted of the living organism. The relevance of this latter finding to strategies for vaccine development is discussed

  1. Bacteriology of hospital-acquired infection and antibiotic resistance in a hospital university of Bushehr Port Fatemeh Zahra (s in 2002-2003

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    Katayoon Vahdat

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infection is an increasing problem. The global problem of antimicrobial resistance is particularly pressing in developing countries, where the infectious disease burden is high and cost constraints prevent the widespread application of newer, more expensive agents. In a prospective study, 203 consecutive cases with hospital-acquired infection in a university hospital in Bushehr port were evaluated. The most common hospital-acquired infection was urinary (76 cases, conjunctivitis (16 cases, bacteremia (8 cases, meningitis (5 cases, wound (3 cases, empyema (2 cases and peritonitis (1 case. The patients with hospital-acquired infection were from surgical and internal medicine I.C.Us (53.2% & 15.6%, respectively. The most frequent isolated organisms were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (25.6%, Acinetobacter baumannii (19.7%, E. coli (13.3%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (11.3%, Staphylococcus aureus (8.4%, Staphylococcus epidermidis (7.9%, Enterobacter species (7%, Streptococcus species (6.4%, and Proteus mirabilis (0.5%. The most resistant organisms to antimicrobial agents were Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 97 & 93.3% of these bacteria were resistant to third generation cephalosporins. The isolated Staphylococcal species were resistant to amikacin (94%. In conclusion, gram negative bacteria were the most common etiologic agent of hospital-acquired infection and had a high level of resistance to amikacin and third generation cephalosporins. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies should be designed to combat these microorganisms.

  2. Community-acquired pneumonia due to Staphylococcus cohnii in an HIV-infected patient: case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroianni, A; Coronado, O; Nanetti, A; Manfredi, R; Chiodo, F

    1995-10-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci recently have been implicated as a cause of serious infections in immunocompromised individuals. An unusual case of community-acquired pneumonia due to Staphylococcus cohnii in an HIV-infected drug user is described. Results of a study conducted to examine the prevalence of infection due to Staphylococcus cohnii strains and their antibiotic-sensitivity patterns show a low frequency but a high morbidity. These results and a brief review of the literature emphasize the importance of these organisms and other staphylococcal species as emerging opportunistic pathogens in patients with AIDS.

  3. Fatal laboratory-acquired infection with an attenuated Yersinia pestis Strain--Chicago, Illinois, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-25

    On September 18, 2009, the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) was notified by a local hospital of a suspected case of fatal laboratory-acquired infection with Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. The patient, a researcher in a university laboratory, had been working along with other members of the laboratory group with a pigmentation-negative (pgm-) attenuated Y. pestis strain (KIM D27). The strain had not been known to have caused laboratory-acquired infections or human fatalities. Other researchers in a separate university laboratory facility in the same building had contact with a virulent Y. pestis strain (CO92) that is considered a select biologic agent; however, the pgm- attenuated KIM D27 is excluded from the National Select Agent Registry. The university, CDPH, the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH), and CDC conducted an investigation to ascertain the cause of death. This report summarizes the results of that investigation, which determined that the cause of death likely was an unrecognized occupational exposure (route unknown) to Y. pestis, leading to septic shock. Y. pestis was isolated from premortem blood cultures. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identified the clinical isolate as a pgm- strain of Y. pestis. Postmortem examination revealed no evidence of pneumonic plague. A postmortem diagnosis of hereditary hemochromatosis was made on the basis of histopathologic, laboratory, and genetic testing. One possible explanation for the unexpected fatal outcome in this patient is that hemochromatosis-induced iron overload might have provided the infecting KIM D27 strain, which is attenuated as a result of defects in its ability to acquire iron, with sufficient iron to overcome its iron-acquisition defects and become virulent. Researchers should adhere to recommended biosafety practices when handling any live bacterial cultures, even attenuated strains, and institutional biosafety committees should implement and maintain effective

  4. Cholestasis caused by panhypopituitarism and acquired cytomegalovirus infection in a 2-month-old male infant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, U; Chan, Wai-Tao; Ting, Wei-Hsin; Ho, Che-Sheng; Liu, Hsi-Che; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Septo-optic dysplasia (SOD) is a rare congenital disorder that may cause jaundice in infants. However, it is usually prone to neglect and misdiagnosis in infants with cholestasis because endocrine disorder such as panhypopituitarism is rare in the cause of infantile cholestasis. We report a case of SOD concurrent with acquired cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, who presented with prolonged jaundice as the first clinical sign. Patient concerns: The patient was a 2-month-old male infant who presented with cholestasis, combined with fever and panhypopituitarism. Diagnoses: He was diagnosed with SOD and acquired CMV infection. Interventions: He was treated with hormone replacement therapy and ganciclovir. Outcomes: After correction of the pituitary hormone deficiency and ganciclovir treatment, significant improvements of cholestasis, retinal lesions, and growth rate were seen in our patient. Lessons: Although an endocrine disorder such as panhypopituitarism is rare in the cause of neonatal or infantile cholestasis, we must keep this reason in mind. PMID:28445302

  5. How well do discharge diagnoses identify hospitalised patients with community-acquired infections? - a validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Laursen, Christian Borbjerg

    2014-01-01

    -10 diagnoses was 79.9% (95%CI: 78.1-81.3%), specificity 83.9% (95%CI: 82.6-85.1%), positive likelihood ratio 4.95 (95%CI: 4.58-5.36) and negative likelihood ratio 0.24 (95%CI: 0.22-0.26). The two most common sites of infection, the lower respiratory tract and urinary tract, had positive likelihood......BACKGROUND: Credible measures of disease incidence, trends and mortality can be obtained through surveillance using manual chart review, but this is both time-consuming and expensive. ICD-10 discharge diagnoses are used as surrogate markers of infection, but knowledge on the validity of infections...... in general is sparse. The aim of the study was to determine how well ICD-10 discharge diagnoses identify patients with community-acquired infections in a medical emergency department (ED), overall and related to sites of infection and patient characteristics. METHODS: We manually reviewed 5977 patients...

  6. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of Klebsiella spp. isolates causing community-acquired infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Garza-Ramos

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella spp. isolates from community-acquired infections were characterized. A total of 39 Klebsiella spp. isolates were obtained from outpatients at four rural hospitals in Mexico (2013–2014. The biochemical tests identified all as being K. pneumoniae. The molecular multiplex-PCR test identified 36 (92.4% K. pneumoniae isolates and one (2.5% K. variicola isolate, and phylogenetic analysis of the rpoB gene identified two isolates (5.1% belonging to K. quasipneumoniae subsp. quasipneumoniae and K. quasivariicola. The last one was confirmed by phylogenetic analysis of six-loci concatenated genes. Mostly the isolates were multidrug resistant; however, a minority were extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing (10.2%. The extended-spectrum β-lactamase CTX-M-15 gene was identified in these isolates. Analysis of biofilm production and the hypermucoviscosity phenotype showed a total of 35 (92.3% and seven (17.9% of the isolates were positive for these phenotypes respectively. The K2 (4/39, 10.2%, K5 (2/39, 5.1% and K54 (1/39, 2.5% serotypes were identified in seven (17.9% of the isolates, and only 28.5% (2/7 hypermucoviscous isolates were positive for the K2 and K5 serotypes. In general, the sequence type (ST analysis and phylogenetic analysis of seven multilocus sequence typing loci were heterogeneous; however, ST29 was the most prevalent ST in the analysed isolates, accounting for 19% (4/21 of the total isolates. Two of the four ST29 isolates had the hypermucoviscosity phenotype. The virulence factors for fimbriae were the most prevalent, followed by siderophores. Community-acquired infections are caused by various species from Klebsiella genus, with different profiles of antibiotic resistance and heterogeneous virulence factors. Keywords: Antimicrobial susceptibility, Bacterial resistance, Cephalosporin resistance, Community infection, ESBL, Hypermucoviscosity

  7. Strategy and technology to prevent hospital-acquired infections: Lessons from SARS, Ebola, and MERS in Asia and West Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Rajakaruna, Sanjeewa Jayachandra; Liu, Wen-Bin; Ding, Yi-Bo; Cao, Guang-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) are serious problems for healthcare systems, especially in developing countries where public health infrastructure and technology for infection preventions remain undeveloped. Here, we characterized how strategy and technology could be mobilized to improve the effectiveness of infection prevention and control in hospitals during the outbreaks of Ebola, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Asia and West Afr...

  8. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Antibiotic Treatment of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, U-Syn; Lee, Seung-Ju; Yeo, Jeong Kyun; Min, Seung Ki; Lee, Heeyoung

    2018-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are infectious diseases that commonly occur in communities. Although several international guidelines for the management of UTIs have been available, clinical characteristics, etiology and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns may differ from country to country. This work represents an update of the 2011 Korean guideline for UTIs. The current guideline was developed by the update and adaptation method. This clinical practice guideline provides recommendations for the diagnosis and management of UTIs, including asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute uncomplicated cystitis, acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis, complicated pyelonephritis related to urinary tract obstruction, and acute bacterial prostatitis. This guideline targets community-acquired UTIs occurring among adult patients. Healthcare-associated UTIs, catheter-associated UTIs, and infections in immunocompromised patients were not included in this guideline. PMID:29637759

  9. Impact of amoxicillin therapy on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Van Heirstraeten, Liesbet; Coenen, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of amoxicillin treatment on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. METHODS: Patients were prescribed amoxicillin 1 g, three times daily (n = 52) or placebo (n = 50) ...

  10. Epidemiological Profile and Risk Factors for Acquiring HBV and/or HCV in HIV-Infected Population Groups in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Manjula; Baniya, Jagat Bahadur; Aryal, Nirmal; Shrestha, Bimal; Rauniyar, Ramanuj; Adhikari, Anurag; Koirala, Pratik; Oli, Pardip Kumar; Pandit, Ram Deo; Stein, David A; Gupta, Birendra Prasad

    2018-01-01

    HBV and HCV infections are widespread among the HIV-infected individuals in Nepal. The goals of this study were to investigate the epidemiological profile and risk factors for acquiring HBV and/or HCV coinfection in disadvantaged HIV-positive population groups in Nepal. We conducted a retrospective study on blood samples from HIV-positive patients from the National Public Health Laboratory at Kathmandu to assay for HBsAg, HBeAg, and anti-HCV antibodies, HIV viral load, and CD4+ T cell count. Among 579 subjects, the prevalence of HIV-HBV, HIV-HCV, and HIV-HBV-HCV coinfections was 3.62%, 2.93%, and 0.34%, respectively. Multivariate regression analysis indicated that spouses of HIV-positive migrant labourers were at significant risk for coinfection with HBV infection, and an age of >40 years in HIV-infected individuals was identified as a significant risk factor for HCV coinfection. Overall our study indicates that disadvantaged population groups such as intravenous drug users, migrant workers and their spouses, female sex workers, and men who have sex with HIV-infected men are at a high and persistent risk of acquiring viral hepatitis. We conclude that Nepalese HIV patients should receive HBV and HCV diagnostic screening on a regular basis.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Acquires Limited Genetic Diversity in Prolonged Infections, Reactivations and Transmissions Involving Multiple Hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Herranz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB has limited ability to acquire variability. Analysis of its microevolution might help us to evaluate the pathways followed to acquire greater infective success. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS in the analysis of the transmission of MTB has elucidated the magnitude of variability in MTB. Analysis of transmission currently depends on the identification of clusters, according to the threshold of variability (<5 SNPs between isolates.Objective: We evaluated whether the acquisition of variability in MTB, was more frequent in situations which could favor it, namely intrapatient, prolonged infections or reactivations and interpatient transmissions involving multiple sequential hosts.Methods: We used WGS to analyze the accumulation of variability in sequential isolates from prolonged infections or translations from latency to reactivation. We then measured microevolution in transmission clusters with prolonged transmission time, high number of involved cases, simultaneous involvement of latency and active transmission.Results: Intrapatient and interpatient acquisition of variability was limited, within the ranges expected according to the thresholds of variability proposed, even though bursts of variability were observed.Conclusions: The thresholds of variability proposed for MTB seem to be valid in most circumstances, including those theoretically favoring acquisition of variability. Our data point to multifactorial modulation of microevolution, although further studies are necessary to elucidate the factors underlying this modulation.

  12. Antibiotic resistance patterns of pediatric community-acquired urinary infections

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    Eliana Biondi Medeiros Guidoni

    Full Text Available Knowledge about antimicrobial resistance patterns of the etiological agents of urinary tract infections (UTIs is essential for appropriate therapy. Urinary isolates from symptomatic UTI cases attended at Santa Casa University Hospital of São Paulo from August 1986 to December 1989 and August 2004 to December 2005 were identified by conventional methods. Antimicrobial resistance testing was performed by Kirby Bauer's disc diffusion method. Among the 257 children, E. coli was found in 77%. A high prevalence of resistance was observed against ampicillin and TMP/SMX (55% and 51%. The antibiotic resistance rates for E. coli were: nitrofurantoin (6%, nalidixic acid (14%, 1st generation cephalosporin (13%, 3rd generation cephalosporins (5%, aminoglycosides (2%, norfloxacin (9% and ciprofloxacin (4%. We found that E. coli was the predominant bacterial pathogen of community-acquired UTIs. We also detected increasing resistance to TMP/SMX among UTI pathogens in this population.

  13. Transcriptional Changes during Naturally Acquired Zika Virus Infection Render Dendritic Cells Highly Conducive to Viral Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoming; Hua, Stephane; Chen, Hsiao-Rong; Ouyang, Zhengyu; Einkauf, Kevin; Tse, Samantha; Ard, Kevin; Ciaranello, Andrea; Yawetz, Sigal; Sax, Paul; Rosenberg, Eric S; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Yu, Xu G

    2017-12-19

    Although dendritic cells are among the human cell population best equipped for cell-intrinsic antiviral immune defense, they seem highly susceptible to infection with the Zika virus (ZIKV). Using highly purified myeloid dendritic cells isolated from individuals with naturally acquired acute infection, we here show that ZIKV induces profound perturbations of transcriptional signatures relative to healthy donors. Interestingly, we noted a remarkable downregulation of antiviral interferon-stimulated genes and innate immune sensors, suggesting that ZIKV can actively suppress interferon-dependent immune responses. In contrast, several host factors known to support ZIKV infection were strongly upregulated during natural ZIKV infection; these transcripts included AXL, the main entry receptor for ZIKV; SOCS3, a negative regulator of ISG expression; and IDO-1, a recognized inducer of regulatory T cell responses. Thus, during in vivo infection, ZIKV can transform the transcriptome of dendritic cells in favor of the virus to render these cells highly conducive to ZIKV infection. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Prevalence and resistance pattern of Moraxella catarrhalis in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh SBU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Safia Bader Uddin Shaikh, Zafar Ahmed, Syed Ali Arsalan, Sana Shafiq Department of Pulmonology, Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan Introduction: Moraxella catarrhalis previously considered as commensal of upper respiratory tract has gained importance as a pathogen responsible for respiratory tract infections. Its beta-lactamase-producing ability draws even more attention toward its varying patterns of resistance. Methods: This was an observational study conducted to evaluate the prevalence and resistance pattern of M. catarrhalis. Patients aged 20–80 years admitted in the Department of Chest Medicine of Liaquat National Hospital from March 2012 to December 2012 were included in the study. Respiratory samples of sputum, tracheal secretions, and bronchoalveolar lavage were included, and their cultures were followed. Results: Out of 110 respiratory samples, 22 showed positive cultures for M. catarrhalis in which 14 were males and eight were females. Ten samples out of 22 showed resistance to clarithromycin, and 13 samples out of 22 displayed resistance to erythromycin, whereas 13 showed resistance to levofloxacin. Hence, 45% of the cultures showed resistance to macrolides so far and 59% showed resistance to quinolones. Conclusion: Our study shows that in our environment, M. catarrhalis may be resistant to macrolides and quinolones; hence, these should not be recommended as an alternative treatment in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections caused by M. catarrhalis. However, a study of larger sample size should be conducted to determine if the recommendations are required to be changed. Keywords: community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections or pneumonia, M. catarrhalis, antibiotic resistance, gram-negative diplococcic, Pakistan

  15. Hand sanitizer dispensers and associated hospital-acquired infections: friend or fomite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiref, Simon D; Leitman, I Michael; Riley, William

    2012-06-01

    Waterless alcohol-based hand sanitizers are an increasingly popular method of hand hygiene and help prevent hospital-acquired infection (HAI). Whether hand sanitizer dispensers (HSDs) may themselves harbor pathogens or act as fomites has not been reported. All HSDs in the surgical intensive care unit of an urban teaching hospital were cultured at three sites: The dispenser lever, the rear underside, and the area surrounding the dispensing nozzle. All HSDs yielded one or more bacterial species, including commensal skin flora and enteric gram-negative bacilli. Colonization was greatest on the lever, where there is direct hand contact. Hand sanitizer dispensers can become contaminated with pathogens that cause HAI and thus are potential fomites.

  16. Hospital-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections: Results of a Cohort Study Performed in an Internal Medicine Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobão, Maria João; Sousa, Paulo

    2017-09-29

    Urinary tract infections are the most frequent healthcare associated infections, being related to both high costs and morbidity. Our intention was to carry out an epidemiological characterization of hospital acquired urinary tract infections that occurred in an internal medicine department of a Portuguese hospital. Retrospective cohort study (historic cohort). Data were analysed from a systematic random sample of 388 patients, representative of the 3492 admissions occurred in 2014 in that department. One in four patients underwent the placement of a bladder catheter [24.7% (n = 96); 95% CI: 20% - 29%], 36.5% (95% CI: 33% - 48%) of which in the absence of clinical criteria for that procedure. The global cumulative incidence rate for nosocomial urinary tract infections was 4.6% (95% CI: 2.5% - 6.7%). Most hospital acquired urinary tract infections (61.1%) were related to bladder catheter use. We quantified 3.06 infections / 1000 patient-days and 14.5 infections / 1000 catheter-days. Catheter associated urinary tract infection occurred at an early stage of hospitalization. The vast majority of patients (66.7%) that developed a catheter associated urinary tract infection were subjected to bladder catheter placement at emergency department. Seventy one per cent of catheter associated urinary tract infection occurred in patients that were subjected to bladder catheter placement without criteria. These results point to an excessive and inadequate use of urinary catheters, highlighting the need for judicious use taking into account the formal clinical indications. The incidence of catheter associated urinary tract infection is similar to what we found in other studies. Nevertheless we found a very high incidence density per catheter-days that may foresee a problem probably related to the absence of early withdrawal of the device, and to both bladder catheter placement and maintenance practices. A significant part of catheter associated urinary tract infection

  17. Role of major histocompatibility complex class II in resistance of mice to naturally acquired infection with Syphacia obvelata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Patricia W.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2003-01-01

    Genetics plays a substantial role in host resistance in many host-parasite interactions. We examined the prevalence of naturally acquired infection with Syphacia obvelata in a number of mouse strains housed in a non-barrier facility. These mice, which included cross-bred and congenic, inbred strains on various genetic backgrounds, differ in the loci for the immune function genes--major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII), toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4), and solute carrier family 11, member 1 (Slc11a1)--which allowed comparisons of the impact of these genes on resistance to pinworm infection. Male and female mice of various ages were sampled over an 18-month period; infection was determined by use of the cellophane tape test. Results indicated that mice that were MHCII+/+ had a significantly lower prevalence of infection than did mice that were MHCII-/-. Differences were not seen between male and female mice. Although MHCII+/+ mice had an age-associated decrease in infection prevalence, such decrease was not seen in MHCII-/- mice. In contrast, infection prevalence in mice with the normal Tlr4 gene (Tlr4(LPS-n/LPS-n)) gene did not differ significantly compared with that in mice that were homozygous for either the point mutation (Tlr4(LPS-d/LPS-d)) or deletion (Tlr4(LPS-del/LPS-del)) of that gene. Likewise, the presence (Sle11a1r/r) or absence (Slc11a1s/s) of functional alleles for Slc11a1 had no effect on the prevalence of infection with S. obvelata. In conclusion, presence of MHCII, but not Tlr4 or Slc11a1 significantly influences prevalence of naturally acquired infection with S. obvelata. These data justify further comprehensive analyses of the immune components that are involved in pinworm resistance.

  18. Non-ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Severe Peripheral Artery Disease in a 20-Year-Old with Perinatally Acquired Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

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    Purva Sharma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection confers an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, including acute coronary syndrome (ACS. Patients with perinatally acquired HIV may be at increased risk due to the viral infection itself and exposure to HAART in utero or as part of treatment. A 20-year-old female with transplacentally acquired HIV infection presented with symptoms of transient aphasia, headache, palpitations, and blurry vision. She was admitted for hypertensive emergency with blood pressure 203/100 mmHg. Within a few hours, she complained of typical chest pain, and ECG showed marked ST depression. Troponin I levels escalated from 0.115 to 10.8. She underwent coronary angiogram showing 95% stenosis of the right coronary artery (RCA and severe peripheral arterial disease including total occlusion of both common iliacs and 95% infrarenal aortic stenosis with collateral circulation. She underwent successful percutaneous intervention with a drug-eluting stent to the mid-RCA. Patients with HIV are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Of these, coronary artery disease is one of the most critical complications of HIV. Perinatally acquired HIV infection can be a high-risk factor for cardiovascular disease. A high degree of suspicion is warranted in such patients, especially if they are noncompliant to their ART.

  19. SPHINGOMONAS PAUCIMOBILIS INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN: NOSOCOMIAL VERSUS COMMUNITY ACQUIRED INFECTIONS

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    Nuri Bayram

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Sphingomonas paucimobilis is a causative agent of infection in immunocompromised patients, and healthcare-associated infections. Although the infections associated with S.paucimobilis occurs rarely, it has been encountered with increasing frequency in clinical settings. In the current study we noted the risk factors and clinical features of the children with S.paucimobilis infections, and the antimicrobial susceptibilities of the isolated strains among the patients. This study was conducted in Dr. Behçet Uz Children’s Hospital, Turkey, during the period of January 2005 and December 2012. The medical records of pediatric patients with positive cultures for S.paucimobilis were reviewed. Sphingomonas paucimobilis isolates were recovered from 24 pediatric patients. The median age was 4 years (ranging from 3 days infant to 15 years and 58,3% were male. Eight (33,3% of the patients were under 1 months of age. Among the patients; 13 (54,2% infections were community related however 11(45.8% infections were nosocomial infection. The median duration of hospital stay was 7 days (ranging from 4 to 22 days. The most effective antibiotics were fluoroquinolones, carbapenems, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. This is the first largest study in children to evaluate the clinical features of S. paucimobilis infections. Sphingomonas paucimobilis may cause infections in both previously healthy and immunocompromised children. Although variable antimicrobial regimens were achieved to the patients, there was no attributable fatality due to S.paucimobilis infections due to the low virulence of the bacteria.

  20. Cholestasis caused by panhypopituitarism and acquired cytomegalovirus infection in a 2-month-old male infant: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, U; Chan, Wai-Tao; Ting, Wei-Hsin; Ho, Che-Sheng; Liu, Hsi-Che; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2017-04-01

    Septo-optic dysplasia (SOD) is a rare congenital disorder that may cause jaundice in infants. However, it is usually prone to neglect and misdiagnosis in infants with cholestasis because endocrine disorder such as panhypopituitarism is rare in the cause of infantile cholestasis. We report a case of SOD concurrent with acquired cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, who presented with prolonged jaundice as the first clinical sign. The patient was a 2-month-old male infant who presented with cholestasis, combined with fever and panhypopituitarism. He was diagnosed with SOD and acquired CMV infection. He was treated with hormone replacement therapy and ganciclovir. After correction of the pituitary hormone deficiency and ganciclovir treatment, significant improvements of cholestasis, retinal lesions, and growth rate were seen in our patient. Although an endocrine disorder such as panhypopituitarism is rare in the cause of neonatal or infantile cholestasis, we must keep this reason in mind.

  1. Comparison of viral infection in healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoung Un; Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Yeon Joo; Park, Jong Sun; Cho, Young-Jae; Yoon, Ho Il; Lee, Choon-Taek

    2018-01-01

    Background Although viruses are known to be the second most common etiological factor in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), the respiratory viral profile of the patients with healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) has not yet been elucidated. We investigated the prevalence and the clinical impact of respiratory virus infection in adult patients with HCAP. Methods Patients admitted with HCAP or CAP, between January and December 2016, to a tertiary referral hospital in Korea, were prospectively enrolled, and virus identification was performed using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results Among 452 enrolled patients (224 with HCAP, 228 with CAP), samples for respiratory viruses were collected from sputum or endotracheal aspirate in 430 (95.1%) patients and from nasopharyngeal specimens in 22 (4.9%) patients. Eighty-seven (19.2%) patients had a viral infection, and the proportion of those with viral infection was significantly lower in the HCAP than in the CAP group (13.8% vs 24.6%, p = 0.004). In both the HCAP and CAP groups, influenza A was the most common respiratory virus, followed by entero-rhinovirus. The seasonal distributions of respiratory viruses were also similar in both groups. In the HCAP group, the viral infection resulted in a similar length of hospital stay and in-hospital mortality as viral–bacterial coinfection and bacterial infection, and the CAP group showed similar results. Conclusions The prevalence of viral infection in patients with HCAP was lower than that in patients with CAP, and resulted in a similar prognosis as viral–bacterial coinfection or bacterial infection. PMID:29447204

  2. The burden and epidemiology of community-acquired central nervous system infections: a multinational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, H; Inan, A; Guven, E; Hargreaves, S; Larsen, L; Shehata, G; Pernicova, E; Khan, E; Bastakova, L; Namani, S; Harxhi, A; Roganovic, T; Lakatos, B; Uysal, S; Sipahi, O R; Crisan, A; Miftode, E; Stebel, R; Jegorovic, B; Fehér, Z; Jekkel, C; Pandak, N; Moravveji, A; Yilmaz, H; Khalifa, A; Musabak, U; Yilmaz, S; Jouhar, A; Oztoprak, N; Argemi, X; Baldeyrou, M; Bellaud, G; Moroti, R V; Hasbun, R; Salazar, L; Tekin, R; Canestri, A; Čalkić, L; Praticò, L; Yilmaz-Karadag, F; Santos, L; Pinto, A; Kaptan, F; Bossi, P; Aron, J; Duissenova, A; Shopayeva, G; Utaganov, B; Grgic, S; Ersoz, G; Wu, A K L; Lung, K C; Bruzsa, A; Radic, L B; Kahraman, H; Momen-Heravi, M; Kulzhanova, S; Rigo, F; Konkayeva, M; Smagulova, Z; Tang, T; Chan, P; Ahmetagic, S; Porobic-Jahic, H; Moradi, F; Kaya, S; Cag, Y; Bohr, A; Artuk, C; Celik, I; Amsilli, M; Gul, H C; Cascio, A; Lanzafame, M; Nassar, M

    2017-09-01

    Risk assessment of central nervous system (CNS) infection patients is of key importance in predicting likely pathogens. However, data are lacking on the epidemiology globally. We performed a multicenter study to understand the burden of community-acquired CNS (CA-CNS) infections between 2012 and 2014. A total of 2583 patients with CA-CNS infections were included from 37 referral centers in 20 countries. Of these, 477 (18.5%) patients survived with sequelae and 227 (8.8%) died, and 1879 (72.7%) patients were discharged with complete cure. The most frequent infecting pathogens in this study were Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 206, 8%) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (n = 152, 5.9%). Varicella zoster virus and Listeria were other common pathogens in the elderly. Although staphylococci and Listeria resulted in frequent infections in immunocompromised patients, cryptococci were leading pathogens in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals. Among the patients with any proven etiology, 96 (8.9%) patients presented with clinical features of a chronic CNS disease. Neurosyphilis, neurobrucellosis, neuroborreliosis, and CNS tuberculosis had a predilection to present chronic courses. Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, M. tuberculosis, and S. pneumoniae were the most fatal forms, while sequelae were significantly higher for herpes simplex virus type 1 (p < 0.05 for all). Tackling the high burden of CNS infections globally can only be achieved with effective pneumococcal immunization and strategies to eliminate tuberculosis, and more must be done to improve diagnostic capacity.

  3. Clinical and economic burden of Clostridium difficile infection in Europe: a systematic review of healthcare-facility-acquired infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, P N; Nathwani, D; Wilcox, M H; Stephens, J; Shelbaya, A; Haider, S

    2012-05-01

    PubMed, EMBASE and conference abstracts were reviewed systematically to determine the clinical and economic burden associated with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) acquired and treated in European healthcare facilities. Inclusion criteria were: published in the English language between 2000 and 2010, and study population of at least 20 patients with documented CDI acquired/treated in European healthcare facilities. Data collection was completed by three unblinded reviewers using the Cochrane Handbook and PRISMA statement. The primary outcomes were mortality, recurrence, length of hospital stay (LOS) and cost related to CDI. In total, 1138 primary articles and conference abstracts were identified, and this was narrowed to 39 and 30 studies, respectively. Data were available from 14 countries, with 47% of studies from UK institutions. CDI mortality at 30 days ranged from 2% (France) to 42% (UK). Mortality rates more than doubled from 1999 to 2004, and continued to rise until 2007 when reductions were noted in the UK. Recurrent CDI varied from 1% (France) to 36% (Ireland); however, recurrence definitions varied between studies. Median LOS ranged from eight days (Belgium) to 27 days (UK). The incremental cost of CDI was £4577 in Ireland and £8843 in Germany, after standardization to 2010 prices. Country-specific estimates, weighted by sample size, ranged from 2.8% to 29.8% for 30-day mortality and from 16 to 37 days for LOS. CDI burden in Europe was most commonly described using 30-day mortality, recurrence, LOS and cost data. The continued spread of CDI and resultant healthcare burden underscores the need for judicious use of antibiotics. Copyright © 2012 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Risk of newly detected infections and cervical abnormalities in women seropositive for naturally acquired human papillomavirus type 16/18 antibodies: analysis of the control arm of PATRICIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellsagué, Xavier; Naud, Paulo; Chow, Song-Nan; Wheeler, Cosette M; Germar, Maria Julieta V; Lehtinen, Matti; Paavonen, Jorma; Jaisamrarn, Unnop; Garland, Suzanne M; Salmerón, Jorge; Apter, Dan; Kitchener, Henry; Teixeira, Julio C; Skinner, S Rachel; Limson, Genara; Szarewski, Anne; Romanowski, Barbara; Aoki, Fred Y; Schwarz, Tino F; Poppe, Willy A J; Bosch, F Xavier; de Carvalho, Newton S; Peters, Klaus; Tjalma, Wiebren A A; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Raillard, Alice; Descamps, Dominique; Struyf, Frank; Dubin, Gary; Rosillon, Dominique; Baril, Laurence

    2014-08-15

    We examined risk of newly detected human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cervical abnormalities in relation to HPV type 16/18 antibody levels at enrollment in PATRICIA (Papilloma Trial Against Cancer in Young Adults; NCT00122681). Using Poisson regression, we compared risk of newly detected infection and cervical abnormalities associated with HPV-16/18 between seronegative vs seropositive women (15-25 years) in the control arm (DNA negative at baseline for the corresponding HPV type [HPV-16: n = 8193; HPV-18: n = 8463]). High titers of naturally acquired HPV-16 antibodies and/or linear trend for increasing antibody levels were significantly associated with lower risk of incident and persistent infection, atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or greater (ASCUS+), and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 1/2 or greater (CIN1+, CIN2+). For HPV-18, although seropositivity was associated with lower risk of ASCUS+ and CIN1+, no association between naturally acquired antibodies and infection was demonstrated. Naturally acquired HPV-16 antibody levels of 371 (95% confidence interval [CI], 242-794), 204 (95% CI, 129-480), and 480 (95% CI, 250-5756) EU/mL were associated with 90% reduction of incident infection, 6-month persistent infection, and ASCUS+, respectively. Naturally acquired antibodies to HPV-16, and to a lesser extent HPV-18, are associated with some reduced risk of subsequent infection and cervical abnormalities associated with the same HPV type. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  5. Healthcare acquired infection (HAIs): a deadly problem that is preventable: UV can help, what's holding it back?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Troy E.

    2018-02-01

    Healthcare Acquired Infections (HAIs) pose a significant health risk to our nation, especially to those most in need of healthcare. One in every 25 people admitted to a hospital will be infected by one or more HAIs. Significant reductions in HAI risks can be advanced through innovative technologies, such as UV antimicrobial disinfecting devices. Development of such technologies, along with the associated Behavioral, Chemical and Technological protocols to combat infectious HAIs is a worthwhile pursuit for the public good. A significant good will be accomplished by engaging optical scientists and engineers as well as healthcare professionals in opportunities to advance light-driven antimicrobial devices to halt infections. Fundamental change can be effected through a path of advancing standards and methods including optical measurements, and testing the efficacy of UV light antimicrobial devices and related technologies.

  6. Why sensitive bacteria are resistant to hospital infection control

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kleef, Esther; Luangasanatip, Nantasit; Bonten, Marc J; Cooper, Ben S

    2017-01-01

    Background: Large reductions in the incidence of antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile have been observed in response to multifaceted hospital-based interventions. Reductions in antibiotic-sensitive strains have been smaller or non-existent. It has been argued that since infection control measures, such as hand hygiene, should affect resistant and sensitive strains equally, observed changes must have largely resulted from other factors, including changes in antibiotic use. We used a mathematical model to test the validity of this reasoning. Methods: We developed a mechanistic model of resistant and sensitive strains in a hospital and its catchment area. We assumed the resistant strain had a competitive advantage in the hospital and the sensitive strain an advantage in the community. We simulated a hospital hand hygiene intervention that directly affected resistant and sensitive strains equally. The annual incidence rate ratio ( IRR) associated with the intervention was calculated for hospital- and community-acquired infections of both strains. Results: For the resistant strain, there were large reductions in hospital-acquired infections (0.1 ≤ IRR ≤ 0.6) and smaller reductions in community-acquired infections (0.2 ≤ IRR ≤  0.9). These reductions increased in line with increasing importance of nosocomial transmission of the strain. For the sensitive strain, reductions in hospital acquisitions were much smaller (0.6 ≤ IRR ≤ 0.9), while communityacquisitions could increase or decrease (0.9 ≤ IRR ≤ 1.2). The greater the importance of the community environment for the transmission of the sensitive strain, the smaller the reductions. Conclusions: Counter-intuitively, infection control interventions, including hand hygiene, can have strikingly discordant effects on resistant and sensitive strains even though they target them equally, following differences in their adaptation to hospital and community

  7. Why sensitive bacteria are resistant to hospital infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kleef, Esther; Luangasanatip, Nantasit; Bonten, Marc J; Cooper, Ben S

    2017-01-01

    Large reductions in the incidence of antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile have been observed in response to multifaceted hospital-based interventions. Reductions in antibiotic-sensitive strains have been smaller or non-existent. It has been argued that since infection control measures, such as hand hygiene, should affect resistant and sensitive strains equally, observed changes must have largely resulted from other factors, including changes in antibiotic use. We used a mathematical model to test the validity of this reasoning. We developed a mechanistic model of resistant and sensitive strains in a hospital and its catchment area. We assumed the resistant strain had a competitive advantage in the hospital and the sensitive strain an advantage in the community. We simulated a hospital hand hygiene intervention that directly affected resistant and sensitive strains equally. The annual incidence rate ratio (IRR) associated with the intervention was calculated for hospital- and community-acquired infections of both strains. For the resistant strain, there were large reductions in hospital-acquired infections (0.1 ≤ IRR ≤ 0.6) and smaller reductions in community-acquired infections (0.2 ≤ IRR ≤ 0.9). These reductions increased in line with increasing importance of nosocomial transmission of the strain. For the sensitive strain, reductions in hospital acquisitions were much smaller (0.6 ≤ IRR ≤ 0.9), while community acquisitions could increase or decrease (0.9 ≤ IRR ≤ 1.2). The greater the importance of the community environment for the transmission of the sensitive strain, the smaller the reductions. Counter-intuitively, infection control interventions, including hand hygiene, can have strikingly discordant effects on resistant and sensitive strains even though they target them equally. This follows from differences in their adaptation to hospital- and community-based transmission. Observed lack of

  8. Detection of immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies to Mycoplasma pneumoniae in children with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

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    Surinder Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae causes up to 40% of community-acquired pneumonia in children. It is impossible to identify M. pneumoniae infection on the basis of clinical signs, symptoms, and radiological features. Therefore, correct etiological diagnosis strongly depends on laboratory diagnosis. Aims: This study aims to investigate the role of M. pneumonia e in pediatric lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs employing enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA and particle agglutination (PA test. Settings and Design: Two hundred and eighty children, age 6 months to 12 years with community-acquired LRTIs were investigated for M. pneumoniae etiology. Materials and Methods: We investigated 280 children hospitalized for community-acquired LRTIs, using ELISA and PA test for detecting M. pneumoniae immunoglobulin M (IgM and immunoglobulin G antibodies. Statistical Analysis Used: The difference of proportion between the qualitative variables was tested using the Chi-square test and Fischer exact test. P ≤ 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Kappa value was used to assess agreement between ELISA and PA test. Results: M. pneumoniae was positive in 51 (23.2% 5 years of age.

  9. Molecular Characterization of Streptococcus agalactiae Causing Community- and Hospital-acquired Infections in Shanghai, China

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    Haoqin Jiang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus agalactiae, a colonizing agent in pregnant women and the main cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis, has been increasingly associated with invasive disease in nonpregnant adults. We collected a total of 87 non-repetitive S. agalactiae isolates causing community-acquired (CA and hospital-acquired (HA infections in nonpregnant adults from a teaching hospital in Shanghai between 2009 and 2013. We identified and characterized their antibiotic resistance, sequence type (ST, serotype, virulence, and biofilm formation. The most frequent STs were ST19 (29.9%, ST23 (16.1%, ST12 (13.8%, and ST1 (12.6%. ST19 had significantly different distributions between CA- and HA-group B Streptococci (GBS isolates. The most frequent serotypes were III (32.2%, Ia (26.4%, V (14.9%, Ib (13.8%, and II (5.7%. Serotype III/ST19 was significantly associated with levofloxacin resistance in all isoates. The HA-GBS multidrug resistant rate was much higher than that of CA-GBS. Virulence genes pavA, cfb were found in all isolates. Strong correlations exist between serotype Ib (CA and HA and surface protein genes spb1 and bac, serotype III (HA and surface protein gene cps and GBS pilus cluster. The serotype, epidemic clone, PFGE-based genotype, and virulence gene are closely related between CA-GBS and HA-GBS, and certain serotypes and clone types were significantly associated with antibiotic resistance. However, CA-GBS and HA-GBS still had significant differences in their distribution of clone types, antibiotic resistance, and specific virulence genes, which may provide a basis for infection control.

  10. Association of high mortality with extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) positive cultures in community acquired infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sumit; Anand, Dimple; Purwar, Sankalp; Samanta, Arijit; Upadhye, Kaustubh V; Gupta, Prasoon; Dhar, Debashis

    2018-04-01

    Infections due to multidrug resistant organisms have become a serious health concern worldwide. The present study was conducted to investigate the spectrum of microbial resistance pattern in the community and their effects on mortality. A retrospective review and analysis of prospectively collected data was done of all patients admitted with diagnosis of sepsis in two tertiary care ICU's for a period of two years. Demographics, culture positivity, microbial spectrum, resistance pattern and outcome data were collected. Out of 5309 patients enrolled; 3822 had suspected clinical infection on admission with 1452 patients growing positive microbial cultures. Among these, 201 bacterial strains were isolated from patients who had community acquired infections. 73% were Gram negative bacilli, commonest being E. coli (63%). 63.4% E. coli and 60.7% Klebsiella isolates were ESBL producers. The mortality in ESBL positive infections was significantly higher as compared to ESBL negative infections (Odds ratio 2.756). Moreover, ESBL positive patients empirically treated with Beta Lactams+Beta Lactamase inhibitors (BL+BLI) had significantly higher mortality as compared to patients treated with carbapenems. More data from multiple centres need to be gathered to formulate appropriate antibiotic policy for critically ill patients admitted from the community. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Utility of gallium imaging in the diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, M.C.; Bagwell, S.P.; Masur, H.

    1986-01-01

    Whole body Ga-67 scans revealed increased uptake in lymph nodes accessible for biopsy in three patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) infected by Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI). In diagnostically difficult cases where the usual methods for diagnosing MAI are not helpful, Ga-67 studies may be of value

  12. Point prevalence of hospital-acquired infections in two teaching hospitals of Amhara region in Ethiopia

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    Yallew WW

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Walelegn Worku Yallew,1 Abera Kumie,2 Feleke Moges Yehuala3 1Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, 2School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, 3Department of Medical Microbiology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Purpose: Hospital-acquired infection (HAI is a major safety issue affecting the quality of care of hundreds of millions of patients every year, in both developed and developing countries, including Ethiopia. In Ethiopia, there is no comprehensive research that presents the whole picture of HAIs in hospitals. The objective of this study was to examine the nature and extent of HAIs in Ethiopia. Methods: A repeated cross-sectional study was conducted in two teaching hospitals. All eligible inpatients admitted for at least 48 hours on the day of the survey were included. The survey was conducted in dry and wet seasons of Ethiopia, that is, in March to April and July 2015. Physicians and nurses collected the data according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition of HAIs. Coded and cleaned data were transferred to SPSS 21 and STATA 13 for analysis. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to examine the prevalence of HAIs and relationship between explanatory and outcome variables. Results: A total of 908 patients were included in this survey, the median age of the patients was 27 years (interquartile range: 16–40 years. A total of 650 (71.6% patients received antimicrobials during the survey. There were 135 patients with HAI, with a mean prevalence of 14.9% (95% confidence interval 12.7–17.1. Culture results showed that Klebsiella spp. (22.44% and Staphylococcus aureus (20.4% were the most commonly isolated HAI-causing pathogens in these hospitals. The association of patient age and hospital type with the occurrence of HAI was

  13. Acquired homotypic and heterotypic immunity against oculogenital Chlamydia trachomatis serovars following female genital tract infection in mice

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    Peña A Salvador

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted bacterial pathogen causing female genital tract infection throughout the world. Reinfection with the same serovar, as well as multiple infections with different serovars, occurs in humans. Using a murine model of female C. trachomatis genital tract infection, we determined if homotypic and/or heterotypic protection against reinfection was induced following infection with human oculogenital strains of C. trachomatis belonging to two serovars (D and H that have been shown to vary significantly in the course of infection in the murine model. Methods Groups of outbred CF-1 mice were reinfected intravaginally with a strain of either serovar D or H, two months after initial infection with these strains. Cellular immune and serologic status, both quantitative and qualitative, was assessed following initial infection, and the course of infection was monitored by culturing vaginal samples collected every 2–7 days following reinfection. Results Serovar D was both more virulent (longer duration of infection and immunogenic (higher level of circulating and vaginal IgG and higher incidence of IgA in vaginal secretions in the mouse genital tract. Although both serovars induced cross-reacting antibodies during the course of primary infection, prior infection with serovar H resulted in only a slight reduction in the median duration of infection against homotypic reinfection (p ~ 0.10, while prior infection with serovar D resulted in significant reduction in the median duration of infection against both homotypic (p Conclusion Serovar D infection resulted in significant homotypic and heterotypic protection against reinfection, while primary infection with serovar H resulted in only slight homotypic protection. In addition to being the first demonstration of acquired heterotypic immunity between human oculogenital serovars, the differences in the level and extent of this immunity

  14. Infection Control Link Nurse Program: An interdisciplinary approach n targeting health care-acquired infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopirala, Madhuri M.; Yahle-Dunbar, Lisa; Smyer, Justin; Wellington, Linda; Dickman, Jeanne; Zikri, Nancy; Martin, Jennifer; Kulich, Pat; Taylor, David; Mekhjian, Hagop; Nash, Mary; Mansfield, Jerry; Pancholi, Preeti; Howard, Mary; Chase, Linda; Brown, Susan; Kipp, Kristopher; Lefeld, Kristen; Myers, Amber; Pan, Xueliang; Mangino, Julie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background We describe a successful interdisciplinary liaison program that effectively reduced health care-acquired (HCA), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a university hospital setting. Methods Baseline was from January 2006 to March 2008, and intervention period was April 2008 to September 2009. Staff nurses were trained to be liaisons (link nurses) to infection prevention (IP) personnel with clearly defined goals assigned and with ongoing monthly education. HCA-MRSA incidence per 1,000 patient-days (PD) was compared between baseline and intervention period along with total and non-HCA-MRSA, HCA and non-HCA-MRSA bacteremia, and hand soap/sanitizer usage. Hand hygiene compliance was assessed. Results A reduction in MRSA rates was as follows in intervention period compared with baseline: HCA-MRSA decreased by 28% from 0.92 to 0.67 cases per 1,000 PD (incidence rate ratio, 0.72; 95% confidence interval: 0.62–0.83, P Hand soap/sanitizer usage and compliance with hand hygiene also increased significantly during IP. Conclusion Link nurse program effectively reduced HCA-MRSA. Goal-defined metrics with ongoing reeducation for the nurses by IP personnel helped drive these results. PMID:24548456

  15. Erythrovirus B19 infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: screening by histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Setúbal

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Erythrovirus B19 infects erythrocytic progenitors, transiently interrupting erythropoiesis. In AIDS patients it causes chronic anemia amenable to treatment. We looked for evidences of B19 infection in stored bone marrow material from patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Histological sections were made from stored paraffin blocks from 33 autopsies (39 blocks and 35 biopsies (45 blocks, 30 patients performed from 1988 to 2002. They were examined after hematoxylin-eosin (HE staining, immunohistochemical (IHC, and in situ hybridization. HE revealed intra-nuclear inclusion bodies ("lantern cells" suggesting B19 infection in 19 sections corresponding to 19 of 63 patients examined with this test. Seven of 78 sections subjected to immunohistochemistry were positive, corresponding to 7 of 58 patients examined with this test. Fourteen sections corresponding to 13 of the 20 HE and/or IHC positive patients were subjected to in situ hybridization, with six positives results. Among the 13 patients subjected to the three techniques, only one gave unequivocal positive results in all and was considered a true positive. The frequency of B19 infection (1/63 patients in the material examined can be deemed low.

  16. Assessing the magnitude and trends in hospital acquired infections in Canadian hospitals through sequential point prevalence surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Taylor

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare acquired infections (HAI are an important public health problem in developed countries, but comprehensive data on trends over time are lacking. Prevalence surveys have been used as a surrogate for incidence studies and can be readily repeated. Methods The Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program conducted prevalence surveys in 2002 and 2009 in a large network of major Canadian acute care hospitals. NHSN definitions of HAI were used. Use of isolation precautions on the survey day was documented. Results In 2009, 9,953 acute care inpatients were surveyed; 1,234 infections (124/1000 were found, compared to 111/1000 in 2002, (p < 0.0001. There was increased prevalence of urinary tract infection (UTI and Clostridium difficile, offset by decreases in pneumonia and bloodstream infection. Use of isolation precautions increased from 77 to 148 per 1000 patients (p < 0.0001, attributable to increased use of contact precautions in patients infected or colonized with antimicrobial resistant organisms. Conclusion Between 2002 and 2009 HAI prevalence increased by 11.7 % in a network of major Canadian hospitals due to increases in Clostridium difficile and urinary tract infection. The use of isolation precautions increased by 92.2 % attributable to increased contact isolation. National prevalence surveys are useful tools to assess evolving trends in HAI.

  17. Epidemiology of hospital acquired urinary tract infections in a medical college hospital in Goa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh S Kamat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospital Acquired Urinary Tract Infection (HAUTI is the commonest among the nosocomial infections, and hospital specific data concerning its magnitude and attributes is essential to its effective control. Materials and Methods: Prospective study was undertaken among 498 in-patients at the medical college hospital in Goa, employing the clinico-bacteriologic criteria of CDC, Atlanta, in the representative medicine and surgery wards. Antimicrobial sensitivity was tested using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Statistical Analysis: Statistical significance of association was tested using the chi-square test and the unpaired t-test at 5% level of significance, while the strength of association was expressed as the Odd′s ratio with 95% confidence interval calculated by Wolff′s method. Results: While the overall infection rate was 8.03/100 admissions, 33.6% of the catheterized patients developed HAUTI. Effect of gender was found to remain restricted to the development of HAUTI among females at an earlier age and earlier in time series compared to males, but no overall difference in incidence in the two sexes. The factors significantly associated with HAUTI included: duration of hospitalization, per urethral catheterization and the duration of catheterization. E. coli, Pseudomonas, Kebsiella, and Candida accounted for over 90% of the isolates, and 73.5% of these were resistant to all the antibiotics for which sensitivity was tested. The remaining isolates demonstrated sensitivity to amikacin and/or cefoperazone-sulbactam. Conclusion: High infection rate coupled with widespread isolation polyantimicrobial resistant nosocomial pathogens emphasizes the importance of meticulous surveillance of nosocomial infections in the hospital, with due attention to antibiotic prescription practices.

  18. Cutaneous community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in participants of athletic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip R

    2005-06-01

    Cutaneous community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CAMRSA) has been identified in otherwise healthy individuals either with or without methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA)-associated risk factors who participate in athletic activities. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical features of CAMRSA skin infection that occurred in university student athletes, evaluate the potential mechanisms for the transmission of MRSA infection of the skin in participants of athletic activities, and review the measures for preventing the spread of cutaneous CAMRSA infection in athletes. A retrospective chart review of the student athletes from the University of Houston whose skin lesions were evaluated at the Health Center and grew MRSA was performed. The clinical characteristics and the postulated mechanisms of cutaneous MRSA infection in the athletes were compared with those previously published in reports of CAMRSA skin infection outbreaks in other sports participants. Cutaneous CAMRSA infection occurred in seven student athletes (four women and three men) who were either weight lifters (three students) or members of a varsity sports team: volleyball (two women), basketball (one woman), and football (one man). The MRSA skin infection presented as solitary or multiple, tender, erythematous, fluctuant abscesses with surrounding cellulitis. The lesions were most frequently located in the axillary region (three weight lifters), on the buttocks (two women), or on the thighs (two women). The drainage from all of the skin lesions grew MRSA, which was susceptible to clindamycin, gentamicin, rifampin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and vancomycin; five of the isolates were also susceptible to ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. All of the bacterial strains were resistant to erythromycin, oxacillin, and penicillin. The cutaneous MRSA infections persisted or worsened in the six athletes who were empirically treated for methicillin-sensitive S. aureus at

  19. Multiple time scales in modeling the incidence of infections acquired in intensive care units

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    Martin Wolkewitz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When patients are admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU their risk of getting an infection will be highly depend on the length of stay at-risk in the ICU. In addition, risk of infection is likely to vary over calendar time as a result of fluctuations in the prevalence of the pathogen on the ward. Hence risk of infection is expected to depend on two time scales (time in ICU and calendar time as well as competing events (discharge or death and their spatial location. The purpose of this paper is to develop and apply appropriate statistical models for the risk of ICU-acquired infection accounting for multiple time scales, competing risks and the spatial clustering of the data. Methods A multi-center data base from a Spanish surveillance network was used to study the occurrence of an infection due to Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. The analysis included 84,843 patient admissions between January 2006 and December 2011 from 81 ICUs. Stratified Cox models were used to study multiple time scales while accounting for spatial clustering of the data (patients within ICUs and for death or discharge as competing events for MRSA infection. Results Both time scales, time in ICU and calendar time, are highly associated with the MRSA hazard rate and cumulative risk. When using only one basic time scale, the interpretation and magnitude of several patient-individual risk factors differed. Risk factors concerning the severity of illness were more pronounced when using only calendar time. These differences disappeared when using both time scales simultaneously. Conclusions The time-dependent dynamics of infections is complex and should be studied with models allowing for multiple time scales. For patient individual risk-factors we recommend stratified Cox regression models for competing events with ICU time as the basic time scale and calendar time as a covariate. The inclusion of calendar time and stratification by ICU

  20. Clinical and economic outcomes associated with community-acquired intra-abdominal infections caused by extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bijie; Ye, Huifeng; Xu, Yingchun; Ni, Yuxing; Hu, Yunjian; Yu, Yunsong; Huang, Zhenfei; Ma, Larry

    2010-06-01

    To compare clinical and economic outcomes in patients with community-acquired intra-abdominal infection (IAI) due to extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing (ESBL-positive) bacteria versus non-ESBL-producing (ESBL-negative) bacteria in China. This was a retrospective chart review study of patients hospitalized with community-acquired IAI due to ESBL-positive or ESBL-negative infections caused by Escherichia coli or Klebsiella spp. Data were collected from six hospitals in China that participated in the Study for Monitoring Antibiotic Resistance Trends (SMART) during 2006-2007. Outcomes included clinical response at discharge and following first-line antibiotic, number of antibiotic agents and classes, duration of hospitalization, and overall hospitalization and intravenous antibiotic costs. Of the 85 patients included in the study, 32 (37.6%) had ESBL-positive and 53 (62.4%) had ESBL-negative infections; E. coli was responsible for 77.6% of infections. Infection resolved at discharge in 30 (93.8%) ESBL-positive and 48 (90.6%) ESBL-negative patients (P = NS). Fewer ESBL-positive patients achieved complete response following first-line antibiotics (56.3% versus 83.0%; P = 0.01). ESBL-positive patients required longer antibiotic treatment, more antibiotics, longer hospitalization (24.3 versus 14.6 days; 1.67-fold ratio; P = 0.001), and incurred higher hospitalization costs ( yen24,604 vs. yen13,788; $3604 vs. $2020; 1.78-fold ratio; P < 0.001). Patients with ESBL-positive infection had similar resolution rates at discharge compared to those with ESBL-negative infection, despite poorer first-line antibiotic response. However, ESBL-positive infection led to significantly greater hospitalization cost and intravenous antibiotic cost, and longer hospital stay.

  1. Knowledge and Perceptions Regarding Community-Acquired Staphylococcal Infections Among Health Care Workers in Hawai‘i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Alan; Hurwitz, Eric; Tice, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Since the early 1990s, national rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections have increased dramatically. Initially identified in health care settings, community-acquired MRSA is now a major public health concern. With Hawai‘i's strikingly high incidence and prevalence of MRSA infections, a high level of knowledge and awareness among health care workers is essential to successfully controlling this evolving epidemic. Methods Health care and related workers were surveyed to assess their knowledge and perceptions about staphylococcal and MRSA infections. Knowledge was estimated by demonstrated ability to correctly identify risk factors including diabetes, obesity, pets, and seawater exposure as well as understanding the seriousness of antibiotic resistance. Perceptions were estimated by demonstrated awareness of the severity and elevated incidence and prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA infections. Results This study identified that occupation (advance clinical practitioner, nurse, public health professional, athletic trainers, and non-medical workers) as well as work location (community vs hospital) influence knowledge and perceptions regarding the epidemiology, severity, and risk factors of S. aureus and MRSA infections. Additionally, despite a well-documented global crisis with antibiotic resistance, Hawai‘i's community health care workers were less inclined to correctly identify the threat of antibiotic resistance as compared to their hospital-based colleagues. Conclusion Trends were observed in knowledge and perceptions with level of medical education. Differences were also noted according to work location. Overall, health care and related workers in the community were less likely to understand basic principles associated with S. aureus infections as well as misperceive this imminent threat. These findings provide compelling evidence for focused educational interventions targeting community health care and related workers

  2. A lean Six Sigma team increases hand hygiene compliance and reduces hospital-acquired MRSA infections by 51%.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carboneau, Clark; Benge, Eddie; Jaco, Mary T; Robinson, Mary

    2010-01-01

    A low hand hygiene compliance rate by healthcare workers increases hospital-acquired infections to patients. At Presbyterian Healthcare Services in Albuquerque, New Mexico a Lean Six Sigma team identified the reasons for noncompliance were multifaceted. The team followed the DMAIC process and completed the methodology in 12 months. They implemented multiple solutions in the three areas: Education, Culture, and Environment. Based on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) mortality research the team's results included an estimated 2.5 lives saved by reducing MRSA infections by 51%. Subsequently this 51% decrease in MRSA saved the hospital US$276,500. For those readers tasked with increasing hand hygiene compliance this article will provide the knowledge and insight needed to overcome multifaceted barriers to noncompliance.

  3. Incidence and prevalence of hospital-acquired infections in a cohort of patients admitted to medical departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Martin Haubro; Holm, Morten Olskjær; Pedersen, Svend Stenvang

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hospital-acquired infections (HAI) are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Only point prevalence analyses of HAI have been recorded in Denmark. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and prevalence of HAI in patients admitted to departments of internal.......7-10.6). Exposure to bladder catheter was associated with an increased risk of urinary tract infection, incidence rate ratio 4.9; (95% CI 1.8-11.5). For the initial 14 days of hospitalization, the incidence of HAI was independent, while the prevalence increased linearly with duration of admittance. CONCLUSION......: The incidence of HAI was relatively constant during the initial 14-day-period of hospitalization, suggesting that shortening the period will have no major impact on the incidence of HAI. The prevalence was 9.7%, which is in line with results from prior studies....

  4. Knowledge and Perceptions About Community-acquired Staphylococcal Infections Among Health Care Workers in Hawai‘i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Alan D; Hurwitz, Eric L; Katz, Alan R

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, national rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections have increased dramatically.1,2 Initially identified in health care settings, community-acquired MRSA is now a major public health concern. With Hawai‘i's expanding S. aureus and MRSA epidemic closely approximating the national trend in inpatient and outpatient settings,7,8 a high level of knowledge and awareness among health care workers is essential to successfully control this evolving epidemic. Health care and related workers were surveyed to assess their knowledge and perceptions about staphylococcal and MRSA infections. Knowledge was estimated by demonstrated ability to correctly identify risk factors including diabetes and obesity, as well as to demonstrate awareness of a growing staphylococcal and MRSA epidemic.9,10 Perceptions were estimated by level of concern of antibiotic resistance as well as of the severity of the staphylococcal and MRSA epidemic. Variations in knowledge and perception concerning basic principles associated with S. aureus infections as well as characteristics of the evolving S. aureus and MRSA epidemic were observed among various occupations (advance clinical practitioners, nurses, public health professionals, athletic trainers, and non-medical workers) as well as work locations (hospital, community, and non-clinical community). Overall, health care and related workers in community settings demonstrated disparities in knowledge regarding S. aureus and MRSA infections. They were also more likely to misperceive this growing threat. These findings provide support for focused educational interventions targeting community health care and related workers to improve awareness of staphylococcal infections in order to successfully address and combat this evolving epidemic. PMID:24069572

  5. Knowledge and perceptions about community-acquired staphylococcal infections among health care workers in Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Brandyn S; Tice, Alan D; Hurwitz, Eric L; Katz, Alan R

    2013-09-01

    Since the early 1990s, national rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections have increased dramatically.1,2 Initially identified in health care settings, community-acquired MRSA is now a major public health concern. With Hawai'i's expanding S. aureus and MRSA epidemic closely approximating the national trend in inpatient and outpatient settings,7,8 a high level of knowledge and awareness among health care workers is essential to successfully control this evolving epidemic. Health care and related workers were surveyed to assess their knowledge and perceptions about staphylococcal and MRSA infections. Knowledge was estimated by demonstrated ability to correctly identify risk factors including diabetes and obesity, as well as to demonstrate awareness of a growing staphylococcal and MRSA epidemic.9,10 Perceptions were estimated by level of concern of antibiotic resistance as well as of the severity of the staphylococcal and MRSA epidemic. Variations in knowledge and perception concerning basic principles associated with S. aureus infections as well as characteristics of the evolving S. aureus and MRSA epidemic were observed among various occupations (advance clinical practitioners, nurses, public health professionals, athletic trainers, and non-medical workers) as well as work locations (hospital, community, and non-clinical community). Overall, health care and related workers in community settings demonstrated disparities in knowledge regarding S. aureus and MRSA infections. They were also more likely to misperceive this growing threat. These findings provide support for focused educational interventions targeting community health care and related workers to improve awareness of staphylococcal infections in order to successfully address and combat this evolving epidemic.

  6. Community-acquired urinary tract infection: age and gender-dependent etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Denise Swei; Shieh, Huei Hsin; Ragazzi, Selma Lopes Betta; Koch, Vera Hermina Kalika; Martinez, Marina Baquerizo; Gilio, Alfredo Elias

    2013-01-01

    Choosing the antimicrobial agent for initial therapy of urinary tract infection (UTI) is usually empirical and should consider the prevalence of uropathogens in different age groups and gender. To establish prevalence rates of uropathogens in community-acquired UTI in relation to age and gender. Cross-sectional study conducted in the emergency department (ED) of a general hospital, from January to December, 2010, in patients younger than 15 years old who had clinical suspicion of UTI and collected quantitative urine culture. UTI was defined as urine culture with growth of a single agent > 100.000 colony forming units (cfu)/mL in a midstream collection or ≥ 50.000 cfu/mL in urethral catheterization. There were 63.464 visits to ED. 2577 urine cultures were obtained, of whom 291 were positive for UTI (prevalence = 11.3% of clinical suspicion and 0.46% of visits), 212 cases (72.8%) in females, median age = 2.6 years. The predominant uropathogen was E. coli (76.6%), followed by Proteus mirabilis (10.3%) and Staphylococcus saprophyticus (4.1%). Among infants 10 years (24.4% vs 0.4%; OR = 79.265; p 10 years and Proteus mirabilis in males.

  7. Community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy: predictors in a contemporary cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, Cristiane C; Coelho, Lara E; Grinsztejn, Beatriz J; Veloso, Valdilea G

    2017-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia represents the most frequent bacterial infection in patients with HIV/AIDS. We aimed to assess variables associated with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) among HIV-infected adults using ART. A cohort study of HIV-infected patients aged ≥18 years, enrolled from 2000 to 2015, on ART for at least 60 days, with primary outcome as the 1st episode of LRTI during follow-up. The independent variables included were sex at birth, age, race/skin color, educational level, tobacco smoking, alcohol use, cocaine use, diabetes mellitus, CD4 count, HIV viral load, influenza and pneumococcal vaccination. Extended Cox proportional hazards models accounting for time-updated variables were fitted to assess LRTI predictors. 2669 patients were included; median follow-up was 3.9 years per patient. LRTI was diagnosed in 384 patients; incidence rate was 30.7/1000 PY. In the unadjusted Cox extended models, non-white race [crude hazard ratio (cHR) 1.28, p = 0.020], cocaine use (cHR 2.01, p < 0.001), tobacco smoking (cHR 1.34, p value 0.007), and HIV viral load ≥400 copies/mL (cHR 3.40, p < 0.001) increased the risk of LRTI. Lower risk of LRTI was seen with higher educational level (cHR 0.61, p < 0.001), rise in CD4 counts (cHR 0.81, p < 0.001, per 100 cells/mm 3 increase), influenza (cHR 0.60, p = 0.002) and pneumococcal vaccination (cHR 0.57, p < 0.001). In the adjusted model, aHR for CD4 count was 0.86, for cocaine use 1.47 and for viral load ≥400 copies 2.20. LRTI has a high incidence in HIV-infected adults using ART. Higher CD4 counts and undetectable viral loads were protective, as were pneumococcal and influenza vaccines.

  8. The most frequent hospital-acquired infections related to medical interventions in hospitals in Vojvodina province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćosić Gorana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections associated with medical procedures, or hospital-acquired infections (HAIs, occur in all hospitals worldwide. An integrated infection-control program with HAI surveillance as its cornerstone can reduce the incidence of HAIs and contribute to economic benefits. The aim of this paper was to report the prevalence and epidemiological features of HAI in hospitals in Vojvodina, Serbia. The study population examined herein was compromised of all of the patients present in the ward at least 48 hours before the day of surveillance. It also included patients that were scheduled for discharge or transfer, and those temporarily absent from the ward for examinations or diagnostic procedures. Data were collected using uniform questionnaires, created by the scientific board of the study. Data from paper questionnaires were entered into a specially created electronic database and analyzed using standard statistical methods. A total of 2 435 patients were included in the study. The frequency of patients with HAI was 6.6% (95% CI: 5.6%-7.6%, and the prevalence of infection was 7.1% (95% CI: 6.1%-8.1%. HAI prevalence was significantly different depending on the ward, ranging from 1.7% in the gynecology department to 18.1% in intensive care departments. The most common type of HAI was pneumonia, representing 20.9% of all reported HAIs. The second most frequently reported type of HAI was surgical site infection (19.8%, followed by urinary tract infection (17.4%, gastro-intestinal infection (14.5% and bloodstream infection (11.0%. The most commonly found microorganisms were Enterococcus spp. (14.5%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.5%, Acinetobacter spp. (13.7%, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. (12.1%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10.5% and Clostridium difficile (7.3%. The most frequently used antibiotics in therapy were third generation cephalosporins to which most of the isolates showed resistance. Although the consumption of carbapenems in this sample was only

  9. Molecular investigations of a locally acquired case of melioidosis in Southern AZ, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Engelthaler

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Melioidosis is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, a Gram-negative bacillus, primarily found in soils in Southeast Asia and northern Australia. A recent case of melioidosis in non-endemic Arizona was determined to be the result of locally acquired infection, as the patient had no travel history to endemic regions and no previous history of disease. Diagnosis of the case was confirmed through multiple microbiologic and molecular techniques. To enhance the epidemiological analysis, we conducted several molecular genotyping procedures, including multi-locus sequence typing, SNP-profiling, and whole genome sequence typing. Each technique has different molecular epidemiologic advantages, all of which provided evidence that the infecting strain was most similar to those found in Southeast Asia, possibly originating in, or around, Malaysia. Advancements in new typing technologies provide genotyping resolution not previously available to public health investigators, allowing for more accurate source identification.

  10. Etiology and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of community-acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community-acquired urinary tract infections occur in individuals not admitted in hospital prior to development of the symptoms of the infection. It occurs mostly in women and caused by Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of urinary tract infection among individuals residing within Jos ...

  11. Predicting hospital-acquired infections by scoring system with simple parameters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Jui Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hospital-acquired infections (HAI are associated with increased attributable morbidity, mortality, prolonged hospitalization, and economic costs. A simple, reliable prediction model for HAI has great clinical relevance. The objective of this study is to develop a scoring system to predict HAI that was derived from Logistic Regression (LR and validated by Artificial Neural Networks (ANN simultaneously. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 476 patients from all the 806 HAI inpatients were included for the study between 2004 and 2005. A sample of 1,376 non-HAI inpatients was randomly drawn from all the admitted patients in the same period of time as the control group. External validation of 2,500 patients was abstracted from another academic teaching center. Sixteen variables were extracted from the Electronic Health Records (EHR and fed into ANN and LR models. With stepwise selection, the following seven variables were identified by LR models as statistically significant: Foley catheterization, central venous catheterization, arterial line, nasogastric tube, hemodialysis, stress ulcer prophylaxes and systemic glucocorticosteroids. Both ANN and LR models displayed excellent discrimination (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC]: 0.964 versus 0.969, p = 0.507 to identify infection in internal validation. During external validation, high AUC was obtained from both models (AUC: 0.850 versus 0.870, p = 0.447. The scoring system also performed extremely well in the internal (AUC: 0.965 and external (AUC: 0.871 validations. CONCLUSIONS: We developed a scoring system to predict HAI with simple parameters validated with ANN and LR models. Armed with this scoring system, infectious disease specialists can more efficiently identify patients at high risk for HAI during hospitalization. Further, using parameters either by observation of medical devices used or data obtained from EHR also provided good prediction

  12. Postnatally acquired cytomegalovirus infections in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, J.

    2013-01-01

    A postnatal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is common in very low birth weight infants with an estimated prevalence of 6–59%. Breast milk from CMV seropositive mothers is the main source of postnatal CMV infection. Ninety-six percent of these mothers shed CMV in their breast milk after delivery due

  13. Community-acquired carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii urinary tract infection just after marriage in a renal transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Y; Atalay, H; Turkmen, K; Biyik, Z; Genc, N; Yeksan, M

    2011-12-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is common in renal transplant recipients and may worsen allograft and patient survival. Many risk factors such as age, female gender, immunosuppression, comorbidity, deceased-donor kidney transplantation, and uretheral catheterization are involved in development of UTI. Acinetobacter baumannii has rarely been reported as a causative agent for development of UTI. Here, we present an unusual case of a renal transplant recipient who developed community-acquired carbapenem-resistent A. baumannii UTI. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Children who acquire HIV infection perinatally are at higher risk of early death than those acquiring infection through breastmilk: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renaud Becquet

    Full Text Available Assumptions about survival of HIV-infected children in Africa without antiretroviral therapy need to be updated to inform ongoing UNAIDS modelling of paediatric HIV epidemics among children. Improved estimates of infant survival by timing of HIV-infection (perinatally or postnatally are thus needed.A pooled analysis was conducted of individual data of all available intervention cohorts and randomized trials on prevention of HIV mother-to-child transmission in Africa. Studies were right-censored at the time of infant antiretroviral initiation. Overall mortality rate per 1000 child-years of follow-up was calculated by selected maternal and infant characteristics. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival curves by child's HIV infection status and timing of HIV infection. Individual data from 12 studies were pooled, with 12,112 children of HIV-infected women. Mortality rates per 1,000 child-years follow-up were 39.3 and 381.6 for HIV-uninfected and infected children respectively. One year after acquisition of HIV infection, an estimated 26% postnatally and 52% perinatally infected children would have died; and 4% uninfected children by age 1 year. Mortality was independently associated with maternal death (adjusted hazard ratio 2.2, 95%CI 1.6-3.0, maternal CD4<350 cells/ml (1.4, 1.1-1.7, postnatal (3.1, 2.1-4.1 or peri-partum HIV-infection (12.4, 10.1-15.3.These results update previous work and inform future UNAIDS modelling by providing survival estimates for HIV-infected untreated African children by timing of infection. We highlight the urgent need for the prevention of peri-partum and postnatal transmission and timely assessment of HIV infection in infants to initiate antiretroviral care and support for HIV-infected children.

  15. Common acquired kidney diseases in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    5. Common acquired kidney diseases in children. Examination of the urine is probably the most important investigation ... result from the same streptococcal infection. .... musculoskeletal system. ... Prediction of histopathology from clinical.

  16. Occurrence and analysis of irp2 virulence gene in isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp. from microbiota and hospital and community-acquired infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza Lopes, Ana Catarina; Rodrigues, Juliana Falcão; Cabral, Adriane Borges; da Silva, Maíra Espíndola; Leal, Nilma Cintra; da Silveira, Vera Magalhães; de Morais Júnior, Marcos Antônio

    2016-07-01

    Eighty-five isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp., originating from hospital- and community-acquired infections and from oropharyngeal and faecal microbiota from patients in Recife-PE, Brazil, were analyzed regarding the presence of irp2 gene. This is a Yersinia typical gene involved in the synthesis of siderophore yersiniabactin. DNA sequencing confirmed the identity of irp2 gene in five K. pneumoniae, five Enterobacter aerogenes and one Enterobacter amnigenus isolates. To our knowledge in the current literature, this is the first report of the irp2 gene in E. amnigenus, a species considered an unusual human pathogen, and in K. pneumoniae and E. aerogenes isolates from the normal microbiota and from community infections, respectively. Additionally, the analyses of nucleotide and amino acid sequences suggest the irp2 genes derived from isolates used in this study are more closely related to that of Yersinia pestis P.CE882 than to that of Yersinia enterocolitica 8081. These data demonstrated that K. pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp. from normal microbiota and from community- and hospital-acquired infections possess virulence factors important for the establishment of extra-intestinal infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Study on the Ferrokinetics and Acquired Immunity in Repeated Hookworm Infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Mun Ho; Lee, Pyl Ung

    1967-01-01

    In order to confirm whether acquired immunity or resistance can be developed by the repeated hookworm infections, the 150 mature actively moving filariform ancylostoma duodenale larvae obtained from the severe hookworm anemia patients were orally given to 8 healthy volunteers in three divided doses, 50 in each, at 5 day interval. Also the hematological changes as well as several ferrokinetics using 59 Fe were done and were compared with 10 controls. The clinical symptoms and signs were checked every day for the first 3 weeks and then twice weekly until the end of the experiment. The appearance of the ova in the stool was examined by the formalin ether method and the ova was counted by the Stoll's method. The following laboratory tests were done:1) Red blood cell count, venous blood hematocrit (micromethod), hemoglobin count (cyanomethemoglobin method) were checked every 5 to 7 day interval. 2) Plasma iron concentration (Barkan's modified method) was determined every 2 to 3 week interval. 3) Radioisotope studies:a) Ferrokinetics: Huff et al and Bothwell's method were applied. Erythropoietic Index (% of normal)= [ S ubject's turnover/100 ml whole bloodX100 ] over [ A verage normal turnover/100 ml whole blood ] b) Quantitative measurement of the gastrointestinal absorption of iron:Radioiron ( 59 Fe) balance method was applied. c) Determination of the plasma erythropoietin activity: Fried's method was applied. Following were the results: 1) The serum iron level was lower. The red cell volume was decreased, but with relative increase of plasma volume. 2) The plasma iron disappearance time was accelerated and the plasma iron turnover rate was decreased. The red cell iron turnover rate was markedly increased, while all of the red cell iron concentration, circulating red cell iron, plasma iron pool were decreased. The daily iron pool turnover and red cell renewal rate were increased. 3) The erythropoietic index, erythropoietin activity and intestinal absorption of iron

  18. The Study on the Ferrokinetics and Acquired Immunity in Repeated Hookworm Infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Mun Ho; Lee, Pyl Ung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1967-09-15

    In order to confirm whether acquired immunity or resistance can be developed by the repeated hookworm infections, the 150 mature actively moving filariform ancylostoma duodenale larvae obtained from the severe hookworm anemia patients were orally given to 8 healthy volunteers in three divided doses, 50 in each, at 5 day interval. Also the hematological changes as well as several ferrokinetics using {sup 59}Fe were done and were compared with 10 controls. The clinical symptoms and signs were checked every day for the first 3 weeks and then twice weekly until the end of the experiment. The appearance of the ova in the stool was examined by the formalin ether method and the ova was counted by the Stoll's method. The following laboratory tests were done:1) Red blood cell count, venous blood hematocrit (micromethod), hemoglobin count (cyanomethemoglobin method) were checked every 5 to 7 day interval. 2) Plasma iron concentration (Barkan's modified method) was determined every 2 to 3 week interval. 3) Radioisotope studies:a) Ferrokinetics: Huff et al and Bothwell's method were applied. Erythropoietic Index (% of normal)= ['Subject's turnover/100 ml whole bloodX100'] over ['Average normal turnover/100 ml whole blood'] b) Quantitative measurement of the gastrointestinal absorption of iron:Radioiron ({sup 59}Fe) balance method was applied. c) Determination of the plasma erythropoietin activity: Fried's method was applied. Following were the results: 1) The serum iron level was lower. The red cell volume was decreased, but with relative increase of plasma volume. 2) The plasma iron disappearance time was accelerated and the plasma iron turnover rate was decreased. The red cell iron turnover rate was markedly increased, while all of the red cell iron concentration, circulating red cell iron, plasma iron pool were decreased. The daily iron pool turnover and red cell renewal rate were increased. 3) The erythropoietic index, erythropoietin activity and intestinal absorption of

  19. Why sensitive bacteria are resistant to hospital infection control [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther van Kleef

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Large reductions in the incidence of antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile have been observed in response to multifaceted hospital-based interventions. Reductions in antibiotic-sensitive strains have been smaller or non-existent. It has been argued that since infection control measures, such as hand hygiene, should affect resistant and sensitive strains equally, observed changes must have largely resulted from other factors, including changes in antibiotic use. We used a mathematical model to test the validity of this reasoning. Methods: We developed a mechanistic model of resistant and sensitive strains in a hospital and its catchment area. We assumed the resistant strain had a competitive advantage in the hospital and the sensitive strain an advantage in the community. We simulated a hospital hand hygiene intervention that directly affected resistant and sensitive strains equally. The annual incidence rate ratio (IRR associated with the intervention was calculated for hospital- and community-acquired infections of both strains. Results: For the resistant strain, there were large reductions in hospital-acquired infections (0.1 ≤ IRR ≤ 0.6 and smaller reductions in community-acquired infections (0.2 ≤ IRR ≤  0.9. These reductions increased in line with increasing importance of nosocomial transmission of the strain. For the sensitive strain, reductions in hospital acquisitions were much smaller (0.6 ≤ IRR ≤ 0.9, while communityacquisitions could increase or decrease (0.9 ≤ IRR ≤ 1.2. The greater the importance of the community environment for the transmission of the sensitive strain, the smaller the reductions. Conclusions: Counter-intuitively, infection control interventions, including hand hygiene, can have strikingly discordant effects on resistant and sensitive strains even though they target them equally, following differences in their adaptation to hospital and

  20. Clinical and Laboratory Characteristics of Acute Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in Adult Hospitalised Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilista Piljić

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTI cause a great number of morbidity and mortality. These infections are serious complications in pregnancy, patients with diabetes, polycystic kidneys disease, sickle cell anaemia, kidney transplant and in patients with functional or structural anomalies of the urinary tract. The aim of this investigation was to determine a dominant causative agents of UTI and some of the clinical and laboratory characteristics of acute community-acquired UTI in adult hospitalised patients. We studied 200 adult patients with acute community-acquired UTI hospitalised in the Clinic for Infectious Diseases Tuzla from January 2006 to December 2007. The patients were divided into two groups: a group of patients with E. coli UTI (147 and a group of patients with non-E. coli UTI (53. In these two groups, the symptoms and signs of illness, blood test and urine analysis results were analysed. Our results have shown that the patients with E. coli UTI frequently had fever higher than 38,5 degrees C (p<0,0001, chills (p=0,0349, headache (p=0,0499, cloudy urine (p<0,0001, proteinuria (p=0,0011 and positive nitrite-test (p=0,0002. The patients with non-E. coli UTI frequently had fever lower than 38,5 degrees C (p<0,0001 and urine specific gravity <1015 (p=0,0012. There was no significant difference in blood test results between patients with E. coli and non-E. coli UTI. These clinical and laboratory findings can lead us to early etiological diagnosis of these UTI before urine culture detection of causative agents, which takes several days. Early etiological diagnosis of the E. coli and non-E. coli UTI is necessary for an urgent administration of appropriate empirical antibiotic treatment. This is very important in prevention of irreversible kidney damage, prolonged treatment, complications, as well as recidives and chronicity of the illness.

  1. Molecular epidemiology and spatiotemporal analysis of hospital-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii infection in a tertiary care hospital in southern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chusri, S; Chongsuvivatwong, V; Rivera, J I; Silpapojakul, K; Singkhamanan, K; McNeil, E; Doi, Y

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a major hospital-acquired pathogen in Thailand that has a negative effect on patient survival. The nature of its transmission is poorly understood. To investigate the genotypic and spatiotemporal pattern of A. baumannii infection at a hospital in Thailand. The medical records of patients infected with A. baumannii at an 800-bed tertiary care hospital in southern Thailand between January 2010 and December 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. A. baumannii was identified at the genomospecies level. Carbapenemase genes were identified among carbapenem-resistant isolates associated with A. baumannii infection. A spatiotemporal analysis was performed by admission ward, time of infection and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) groups of A. baumannii. Nine PFGE groups were identified among the 197 A. baumannii infections. All A. baumannii isolates were assigned to International Clonal Lineage II. bla OXA-23 was the most prevalent carbapenemase gene. Outbreaks were observed mainly in respiratory and intensive care units. The association between PFGE group and hospital unit was significant. Spatiotemporal analysis identified 20 clusters of single PFGE group infections. Approximately half of the clusters involved multiple hospital units simultaneously. A. baumannii transmitted both within and between hospital wards. Better understanding and control of the transmission of A. baumannii are needed. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Injection of new psychoactive substance snow blow associated with recently acquired HIV infections among homeless people who inject drugs in Dublin, Ireland, 2015.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Giese, Coralie

    2015-10-08

    In February 2015, an outbreak of recently acquired HIV infections among people who inject drugs (PWID) was identified in Dublin, following similar outbreaks in Greece and Romania in 2011. We compared drug and risk behaviours among 15 HIV cases and 39 controls. Injecting a synthetic cathinone, snow blow, was associated with recent HIV infection (AOR: 49; p = 0.003). Prevention and control efforts are underway among PWID in Dublin, but may also be needed elsewhere in Europe.

  3. High prevalence of hospital-acquired infections caused by gram-negative carbapenem resistant strains in Vietnamese pediatric ICUs: A multi-centre point prevalence survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le, N.K.; Wertheim, H.F.L.; Vu, P.D.; Khu, D.T.; Le, H.T.; Hoang, B.T.; Vo, V.T.; Lam, Y.M.; Vu, D.T.; Nguyen, Thanh Son; Thai, T.Q.; Nilsson, L.E.; Rydell, U.; Nguyen, K.V.; Nadjm, B.; Clarkson, L.; Hanberger, H.; Larsson, M.

    2016-01-01

    There is scarce information regarding hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) among children in resource-constrained settings. This study aims to measure prevalence of HAIs in Vietnamese pediatric hospitals.Monthly point prevalence surveys (PPSs) in 6 pediatric intensive care units (ICUs) in 3 referral

  4. The impact of nosocomially-acquired resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in a burn unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Alexis D; Shankowsky, Heather A; Swanson, Todd; Lee, Jonathan; Tredget, Edward E

    2007-07-01

    Nosocomially-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains a serious cause of infection and septic mortality in burn patients. This study was conducted to quantify the impact of nosocomially-transmitted resistant P. aeruginosa in a burn population. Using a TRACS burn database, 48 patients with P. aeruginosa resistant to gentamicin were identified (Pseudomonas group). Thirty-nine were case-matched to controls without resistant P. aeruginosa cultures (control group) for age, total body surface area, admission year, and presence of inhalation injury. Mortality and various morbidity endpoints were examined, as well as antibiotic costs. There was a significantly higher mortality rate in the Pseudomonas group (33% vs. 8%, p products used (packed cells 51.1 +/- 8.0 vs. 21.1 +/- 3.4, p < 0.01; platelets 11.9 +/- 3.0 vs. 1.4 +/- 0.7, p < 0.01) were all significantly higher in the Pseudomonas group. Cost of antibiotics was also significantly higher ($2,658.52 +/- $647.93 vs. $829.22 +/- $152.82, p < 0.01). Nosocomial colonization or infection, or both, of burn patients with aminoglycoside-resistant P. aeruginosa is associated with significantly higher morbidity, mortality, and cost of care. Increased resource consumption did not prevent significantly higher mortality rates when compared with that of control patients. Thus, prevention, identification, and eradication of nosocomial Pseudomonas contamination are critical for cost-effective, successful burn care.

  5. Enteric disease episodes and the risk of acquiring a future sexually transmitted infection: a prediction model in Montreal residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Melissa; Allard, Robert; Bédard, Lucie; Latreille, Jérôme; Buckeridge, David L

    2016-11-01

    The sexual transmission of enteric diseases poses an important public health challenge. We aimed to build a prediction model capable of identifying individuals with a reported enteric disease who could be at risk of acquiring future sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Passive surveillance data on Montreal residents with at least 1 enteric disease report was used to construct the prediction model. Cases were defined as all subjects with at least 1 STI report following their initial enteric disease episode. A final logistic regression prediction model was chosen using forward stepwise selection. The prediction model with the greatest validity included age, sex, residential location, number of STI episodes experienced prior to the first enteric disease episode, type of enteric disease acquired, and an interaction term between age and male sex. This model had an area under the curve of 0.77 and had acceptable calibration. A coordinated public health response to the sexual transmission of enteric diseases requires that a distinction be made between cases of enteric diseases transmitted through sexual activity from those transmitted through contaminated food or water. A prediction model can aid public health officials in identifying individuals who may have a higher risk of sexually acquiring a reportable disease. Once identified, these individuals could receive specialized intervention to prevent future infection. The information produced from a prediction model capable of identifying higher risk individuals can be used to guide efforts in investigating and controlling reported cases of enteric diseases and STIs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Role of duration of catheterization and length of hospital stay on the rate of catheter-related hospital-acquired urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Hazmi H

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hamdan Al-HazmiDivision of Urology, Department of Surgery, College of Medicine and King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaObjective: Our aim is to prove that duration of catheterization and length of hospital stay (LOS are associated with the rate of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections (UTI, while taking into account type of urinary catheter used, the most common organisms found, patient diagnosis on admission, associated comorbidities, age, sex, precautions that should be taken to avoid UTI, and comparison with other studies.Methods: The study was done in a university teaching hospital with a 920-bed capacity; this hospital is a tertiary care center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The study was done on 250 selected patients during the year 2010 as a retrospective descriptive study. Patients were selected as purposive sample, all of them having been exposed to urinary catheterization; hospital-acquired UTI were found in 100 patients. Data were abstracted from the archived patients' files in the medical record department using the annual infection control logbook prepared by the infection control department. The data collected were demographic information about the patients, clinical condition (diagnosis and the LOS, and possible risk factors for infection such as duration of catheterization, exposure to invasive devices or surgical procedures, and medical condition.Results: There was a statistically significant association between the rate of UTI and duration of catheterization: seven patients had UTI out of 46 catheterized patients (15% at 3 days of catheterization, while 30 patients had UTI out of 44 catheterized patients (68% at 8 days of catheterization (median 8 days in infected patients versus 3 days in noninfected patients; P-value <0.05, which means that the longer the duration of catheterization, the higher the UTI rate. There was a statistically significant association between the rate of UTI and LOS

  7. Aquatically acquired Aeromonas hydrophila wound infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-09-15

    Sep 15, 1990 ... in 2 cases of mixed infection associated with swimming acci- dents.l Recently focal ... with split-skin grafting was undertaken on the 8th day after the injury with a ... fermentative Gram-negative bacilli, excluded from the family.

  8. Gender and Age-Dependent Etiology of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Magliano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTIs are among the most frequent community-acquired infections worldwide. Escherichia coli is the most common UTI pathogen although underlying host factors such as patients’ age and gender may influence prevalence of causative agents. In this study, 61 273 consecutive urine samples received over a 22-month period from outpatients clinics of an urban area of north Italy underwent microbiological culture with subsequent bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of positive samples. A total of 13 820 uropathogens were isolated and their prevalence analyzed according to patient’s gender and age group. Overall Escherichia coli accounted for 67.6% of all isolates, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (8.8%, Enterococcus faecalis (6.3%, Proteus mirabilis (5.2%, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2.5%. Data stratification according to both age and gender showed E. coli isolation rates to be lower in both males aged ≥60 years (52.2%, E. faecalis and P. aeruginosa being more prevalent in this group (11.6% and 7.8%, resp., as well as in those aged ≤14 years (51.3% in whom P. mirabilis prevalence was found to be as high as 21.2%. Streptococcus agalactiae overall prevalence was found to be 2.3% although it was shown to occur most frequently in women aged between 15 and 59 years (4.1%. Susceptibility of E. coli to oral antimicrobial agents was demonstrated to be as follows: fosfomycin (72.9%, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (72.9%, ciprofloxacin (76.8%, ampicillin (48.0%, and amoxicillin/clavulanate (77.5%. In conclusion, both patients’ age and gender are significant factors in determining UTIs etiology; they can increase accuracy in defining the causative uropathogen as well as providing useful guidance to empiric treatment.

  9. An image-guided tool to prevent hospital acquired infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Melinda; Szilágyi, László; Lehotsky, Ákos; Haidegger, Tamás; Benyó, Balázs

    2011-03-01

    Hospital Acquired Infections (HAI) represent the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, and claims hundreds of thousands of lives annually in the rest of the world. This paper presents a novel low-cost mobile device|called Stery-Hand|that helps to avoid HAI by improving hand hygiene control through providing an objective evaluation of the quality of hand washing. The use of the system is intuitive: having performed hand washing with a soap mixed with UV re ective powder, the skin appears brighter in UV illumination on the disinfected surfaces. Washed hands are inserted into the Stery-Hand box, where a digital image is taken under UV lighting. Automated image processing algorithms are employed in three steps to evaluate the quality of hand washing. First, the contour of the hand is extracted in order to distinguish the hand from the background. Next, a semi-supervised clustering algorithm classies the pixels of the hand into three groups, corresponding to clean, partially clean and dirty areas. The clustering algorithm is derived from the histogram-based quick fuzzy c-means approach, using a priori information extracted from reference images, evaluated by experts. Finally, the identied areas are adjusted to suppress shading eects, and quantied in order to give a verdict on hand disinfection quality. The proposed methodology was validated through tests using hundreds of images recorded in our laboratory. The proposed system was found robust and accurate, producing correct estimation for over 98% of the test cases. Stery-Hand may be employed in general practice, and it may also serve educational purposes.

  10. Antibacterial resistance patterns of pediatric community-acquired urinary infection: Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konca, Capan; Tekin, Mehmet; Uckardes, Fatih; Akgun, Sadik; Almis, Habip; Bucak, Ibrahim Hakan; Genc, Yeliz; Turgut, Mehmet

    2017-03-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is common in children. The aim of this study was therefor to construct a guide for the empirical antibiotic treatment of community-acquired UTI by investigating the etiology and antimicrobial resistance patterns of uropathogens and analyzing the epidemiological and clinical patient characteristics. A total of 158 children with positive urine culture were included in the study. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed with Vitek 2 Compact for 28 commonly used antimicrobials. Mean age was 3.36 ± 3.38 years (range, 45 days-15 years). Escherichia coli (60.1%), and Klebsiella spp. (16.5%) were the most common uropathogens. For all Gram-negative isolates, a high level of resistance was found against ampicillin/sulbactam (60.1%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (44.2%), cefazolin (36.2%), cefuroxime sodium (33.5%), and amoxicillin/clavulanate (31.5%). A low level of resistance was noted against cefepime (8.7%), ertapenem (4.6%), norfloxacin (1.3%), and meropenem (0.7%). There was no resistance against amikacin. There is high antibiotic resistance in children with UTI. The patterns of uropathogen antimicrobial resistance vary in susceptibility to antimicrobials depending on region and time. Thus, the trends of antibiotic susceptibility patterns should be analyzed periodically to select the appropriate regimen for UTI treatment. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  11. Timing of positive blood samples does not differentiate pathogens causing healthcare-associated from community-acquired bloodstream infections in children in England: a linked retrospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    HENDERSON, K. L.; M?LLER-PEBODY, B.; WADE, A.; SHARLAND, M.; MINAJI, M.; JOHNSON, A. P.; GILBERT, R

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Paediatricians recognize that using the time-dependent community-acquired vs. hospital-acquired bloodstream infection (BSI) dichotomy to guide empirical treatment no longer distinguishes between causative pathogens due to the emergence of healthcare-associated BSIs. However, paediatric epidemiological evidence of the aetiology of BSIs in relation to hospital admission in England is lacking. For 12 common BSI-causing pathogens in England, timing of laboratory reports of positive paedia...

  12. HIV infection and hepatitis C virus genotype 1a are associated with phylogenetic clustering among people with recently acquired hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Sofia R; Jacka, Brendan; Bull, Rowena A; Luciani, Fabio; Matthews, Gail V; Lamoury, Francois M J; Hellard, Margaret E; Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Teutsch, Suzy; White, Bethany; Maher, Lisa; Dore, Gregory J; Lloyd, Andrew R; Grebely, Jason; Applegate, Tanya L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with phylogenetic clustering among people with recently acquired hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Participants with available sample at time of HCV detection were selected from three studies; the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C, the Hepatitis C Incidence and Transmission Study - Prison and Community. HCV RNA was extracted and Core to E2 region of HCV sequenced. Clusters were identified from maximum likelihood trees with 1000 bootstrap replicates using 90% bootstrap and 5% genetic distance threshold. Among 225 participants with available Core-E2 sequence (ATAHC, n=113; HITS-p, n=90; and HITS-c, n=22), HCV genotype prevalence was: G1a: 38% (n=86), G1b: 5% (n=12), G2a: 1% (n=2), G2b: 5% (n=11), G3a: 48% (n=109), G6a: 1% (n=2) and G6l 1% (n=3). Of participants included in phylogenetic trees, 22% of participants were in a pair/cluster (G1a-35%, 30/85, mean maximum genetic distance=0.031; G3a-11%, 12/106, mean maximum genetic distance=0.021; other genotypes-21%, 6/28, mean maximum genetic distance=0.023). Among HCV/HIV co-infected participants, 50% (18/36) were in a pair/cluster, compared to 16% (30/183) with HCV mono-infection (P=infection [vs. HCV mono-infection; adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 4.24; 95%CI 1.91, 9.39], and HCV G1a infection (vs. other HCV genotypes; AOR 3.33, 95%CI 0.14, 0.61).HCV treatment and prevention strategies, including enhanced antiviral therapy, should be optimised. The impact of targeting of HCV treatment as prevention to populations with higher phylogenetic clustering, such as those with HIV co-infection, could be explored through mathematical modelling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Cost-efficiency and Care Effectiveness of Probiotic Administration with Antibiotics to Prevent Hospital-Acquired Clostridium difficile Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starn, Emily S; Hampe, Holly; Cline, Thomas

    Health care facility-acquired Clostridium difficile infections (HCFA-CDI) have increased over the last several decades despite facilities developing protocols for prescribing probiotics with antibiotics to prevent HCFA-CDI. The literature does not consistently support this. A retrospective medical record review evaluated the care effectiveness of this practice. Care effectiveness was not found; patients receiving probiotics with antibiotics were twice as likely to develop HCFA-CDI (P = .004). Except with glycopeptides, patients were 1.88 times less likely to experience HCFA-CDI (P = .05).

  14. Community-acquired pneumonia due to pandemic A(H1N12009 influenzavirus and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus co-infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan J Murray

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial pneumonia is a well described complication of influenza. In recent years, community-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (cMRSA infection has emerged as a contributor to morbidity and mortality in patients with influenza. Since the emergence and rapid dissemination of pandemic A(H1N12009 influenzavirus in April 2009, initial descriptions of the clinical features of patients hospitalized with pneumonia have contained few details of patients with bacterial co-infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP caused by co-infection with pandemic A(H1N12009 influenzavirus and cMRSA were prospectively identified at two tertiary hospitals in one Australian city during July to September 2009, the period of intense influenza activity in our region. Detailed characterization of the cMRSA isolates was performed. 252 patients with pandemic A(H1N12009 influenzavirus infection were admitted at the two sites during the period of study. Three cases of CAP due to pandemic A(H1N12009/cMRSA co-infection were identified. The clinical features of these patients were typical of those with S. aureus co-infection or sequential infection following influenza. The 3 patients received appropriate empiric therapy for influenza, but inappropriate empiric therapy for cMRSA infection; all 3 survived. In addition, 2 fatal cases of CAP caused by pandemic A(H1N12009/cMRSA co-infection were identified on post-mortem examination. The cMRSA infections were caused by three different cMRSA clones, only one of which contained genes for Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Clinicians managing patients with pandemic A(H1N12009 influenzavirus infection should be alert to the possibility of co-infection or sequential infection with virulent, antimicrobial-resistant bacterial pathogens such as cMRSA. PVL toxin is not necessary for the development of cMRSA pneumonia in the setting of pandemic

  15. Spread of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft-tissue infection within a family: implications for antibiotic therapy and prevention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Amir, N H

    2010-04-01

    Outbreaks or clusters of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) within families have been reported. We describe a family cluster of CA-MRSA skin and soft-tissue infection where CA-MRSA was suspected because of recurrent infections which failed to respond to flucloxacillin. While the prevalence of CA-MRSA is low worldwide, CA-MRSA should be considered in certain circumstances depending on clinical presentation and risk assessment. Surveillance cultures of family contacts of patients with MRSA should be considered to help establish the prevalence of CA-MRSA and to inform the optimal choice of empiric antibiotic treatment.

  16. Acquired hypofibrinogenemia: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besser MW

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Martin W Besser,1 Stephen G MacDonald2 1Department of Haematology, 2Department of Specialist Haemostasis, The Pathology Partnership, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge, UK Abstract: Acquired hypofibrinogenemia is most frequently caused by hemodilution and consumption of clotting factors. The aggressive replacement of fibrinogen has become one of the core principles of modern management of massive hemorrhage. The best method for determining the patient’s fibrinogen level remains controversial, and particularly in acquired dysfibrinogenemia, could have major therapeutic implications depending on which quantification method is chosen. This review introduces the available laboratory and point-of-care methods and discusses the relative advantages and limitations. It also discusses current strategies for the correction of hypofibrinogenemia. Keywords: Clauss fibrinogen assay, fibrinogen antigen, viscoelastic testing, ­gravimetric fibrinogen assay, PT-derived fibrinogen, functional fibrinogen, direct oral anticoagulant, dysfibrinogenemia, afibrinogenemia

  17. Onychomycosis by Fusarium oxysporum probably acquired in utero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vania O. Carvalho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium oxysporum has been described as a pathogen causing onychomycosis, its incidence has been increasing in immunocompetent and disseminated infection can occur in immunosuppressed individuals. We describe the first case of congenital onychomycosis in a child caused by Fusarium oxysporum. The infection being acquired in utero was proven by molecular methods with the identification of the fungus both in the nail and placenta, most probably as an ascending contamination/infection in a HIV-positive, immunosuppressed mother.

  18. The selective advantage of host feminization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Tommy; Nielsen, Anders Isberg; Stig-Jørgensen, Anders Isak

    2012-01-01

    Male crabs infected by parasitic barnacles (Rhizocephala) are known to be morphologically feminized. Here, we investigate morphological chances in green crabs, Carcinus maenas, induced by the parasitic barnacle Sacculina carcini. Infected males acquire a broader, longer and segmented abdomen......, fringed with marginal setae. Copulatory appendages and pereopods are reduced in length, and the chelae become smaller. The feminization show great individual variation. Males with scars from lost externae, the parasites reproductive organ situated under the abdomen, are less modified than males carrying...... an externa, and the feminization is more pronounced in smaller than in larger males. No super-feminization is evident in female crabs that remain morphologically unaffected by infection. The protective value of a parasitically induced enlargement of the male abdomen may constitute an adaptation...

  19. Isolated acquired factor VII deficiency: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulliez, Sylvie M N; Devreese, Katrien M J

    2016-04-01

    Isolated acquired factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare haemorrhagic disorder. We report what is currently known about the pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of acquired FVII deficiency. We performed a literature search and included all articles published between 1980 and August 2015. Acquired FVII deficiency has been reported in 42 patients. There are well-established clinical diseases associated with acquired FVII deficiency, most notably infections, malignancy and haematological stem cell transplantation. The exact pathogenesis of the diseases is still unknown, but different pathophysiological hypotheses have been suggested. The clinical manifestation of acquired FVII deficiency varies greatly in severity; asymptomatic course as well as severe life-threatening bleeding diathesis and fatal bleedings have been described.

  20. Antibacterial Activity of Electrochemically Synthesized Colloidal Silver Nanoparticles Against Hospital-Acquired Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuc, Dao Tri; Huy, Tran Quang; Hoang, Luc Huy; Hoang, Tran Huy; Le, Anh-Tuan; Anh, Dang Duc

    2017-06-01

    This study evaluated the antibacterial activity of electrochemically synthesized colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) against hospital-acquired infections. Colloidal AgNPs were synthesized via a single process using bulk silver bars, bi-distilled water, trisodium citrate, and direct current voltage at room temperature. Colloidal AgNPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray analyses. The antibacterial activity of colloidal AgNPs against four bacterial strains isolated from clinical samples, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumonia, was evaluated by disc diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and ultrathin sectioning electron microscopy. The results showed that the prepared AgNPs were 19.7 ± 4.3 nm in size, quasi-spherical, and of high purity. Zones of inhibition approximately 6-10 mm in diameter were found, corresponding to AgNPs concentrations of 50 μg/mL to 100 μg/mL. The MIC results revealed that the antibacterial activity of the prepared AgNPs was strongly dependent on the concentration and strain of the tested bacteria.

  1. Drug resistance in community-acquired respiratory tract infections: role for an emerging antibacterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Aguilar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Lorenzo Aguilar1, María-José Giménez1, José Barberán21Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, University Complutense, Madrid; 2Infectious Diseases Department, Hospital Central de la Defensa Gomez Ulla, Madrid, SpainAbstract: The nasopharynx is the ecological niche where evolution towards resistance occurs in respiratory tract isolates. Dynamics of different bacterial populations in antibiotic-free multibacterial niches are the baseline that antibiotic treatments can alter by shifting the competitive balance in favor of resistant populations. For this reason, antibiotic resistance is increasingly being considered to be an ecological problem. Traditionally, resistance has implied the need for development of new antibiotics for which basic efficacy and safety data are required prior to licensing. Antibiotic development is mainly focused on demonstrating clinical efficacy and setting susceptibility breakpoints for efficacy prediction. However, additional information on pharmacodynamic data predicting absence of selection of resistance and of resistant subpopulations, and specific surveillance on resistance to core antibiotics (to detect emerging resistances and its link with antibiotic consumption in the community are valuable data in defining the role of a new antibiotic, not only from the perspective of its therapeutic potential but also from the ecologic perspective (countering resistances to core antibiotics in the community. The documented information on cefditoren gleaned from published studies in recent years is an example of the role for an emerging oral antibacterial facing current antibiotic resistance in community-acquired respiratory tract infections.Keywords: respiratory tract infection, antibiotic resistance, cefditoren, community

  2. Acquired factor VII deficiency associated with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoun, Soumaya; Lamchahab, Mouna; Oukkache, Bouchra; Qachouh, Maryam; Benchekroun, Said; Quessar, Asmaa

    2015-04-01

    Isolated acquired factor VII deficiency is a rare coagulopathy. It has been reported in 31 patients with malignancy, sepsis, postoperatively, aplastic anemia, and during bone marrow transplantation. We discuss, through a new case of acquired factor VII deficiency, the characteristics of this disease when it is associated with acute myeloid leukemia. Acquired factor VII deficiency in hematological diseases can be caused by intensive chemotherapy, infections, or hepatic dysfunction. The best treatment in developing countries remains corticosteroids associated with plasma exchange, frozen plasma, and antibiotics.

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility, risk factors and prevalence of bla cefotaximase, temoneira, and sulfhydryl variable genes among Escherichia coli in community-acquired pediatric urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kallyadan V Nisha

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: ESBL-producing E. coli from community-acquired pediatric UTI carries more than one type of beta-lactamase coding genes correlating their increased antibiotic resistance. Aggressive infection control policy, routine screening for detecting ESBL isolates in clinical samples, and antimicrobial stewardship are the keys to prevent their dissemination in community settings.

  4. Competitive advantage of a dengue 4 virus when co-infecting the mosquito Aedes aegypti with a dengue 1 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazeille, Marie; Gaborit, Pascal; Mousson, Laurence; Girod, Romain; Failloux, Anna-Bella

    2016-07-08

    Dengue viruses (DENV) are comprised in four related serotypes (DENV-1 to 4) and are critically important arboviral pathogens affecting human populations in the tropics. South American countries have seen the reemergence of DENV since the 1970's associated with the progressive re-infestation by the mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti. In French Guiana, DENV is now endemic with the co-circulation of different serotypes resulting in viral epidemics. Between 2009 and 2010, a predominant serotype change occurred from DENV-1 to DENV-4 suggesting a competitive displacement. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential role of the mosquito in the selection of the new epidemic serotype. To test this hypothesis of competitive displacement of one serotype by another in the mosquito vector, we performed mono- and co-infections of local Ae. aegypti collected during the inter-epidemic period with both viral autochthonous epidemic serotypes and compared infection, dissemination and transmission rates. We performed oral artificial infections of F1 populations in BSL-3 conditions and analyzed infection, dissemination and transmission rates. When two populations of Ae. aegypti from French Guiana were infected with either serotype, no significant differences in dissemination and transmission were observed between DENV-1 and DENV-4. However, in co-infection experiments, a strong competitive advantage for DENV-4 was seen at the midgut level leading to a much higher dissemination of this serotype. Furthermore only DENV-4 was present in Ae. aegypti saliva and therefore able to be transmitted. In an endemic context, mosquito vectors may be infected by several DENV serotypes. Our results suggest a possible competition between serotypes at the midgut level in co-infected mosquitoes leading to a drastically different transmission potential and, in this case, favoring the competitive displacement of DENV-1 by DENV-4. This phenomenon was observed despite a similar replicative fitness

  5. Direct Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) typing on peripheral blood mononuclear cells: no association between EBV type 2 infection or superinfection and the development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baarle, D.; Hovenkamp, E.; Kersten, M. J.; Klein, M. R.; Miedema, F.; van Oers, M. H.

    1999-01-01

    In the literature, a correlation has been suggested between the occurrence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) type 2 infection. To further investigate a possible role for EBV type 2 infection in the development of AIDS-NHL,

  6. Environmental scan of infection prevention and control practices for containment of hospital-acquired infectious disease outbreaks in acute care hospital settings across Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, Wrechelle; Geransar, Rose; Clayden, Nancy; Jones, Jessica; de Grood, Jill; Joffe, Mark; Taylor, Geoffrey; Missaghi, Bayan; Pearce, Craig; Ghali, William; Conly, John

    2017-10-01

    Ward closure is a method of controlling hospital-acquired infectious diseases outbreaks and is often coupled with other practices. However, the value and efficacy of ward closures remains uncertain. To understand the current practices and perceptions with respect to ward closure for hospital-acquired infectious disease outbreaks in acute care hospital settings across Canada. A Web-based environmental scan survey was developed by a team of infection prevention and control (IPC) experts and distributed to 235 IPC professionals at acute care sites across Canada. Data were analyzed using a mixed-methods approach of descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. A total of 110 completed responses showed that 70% of sites reported at least 1 outbreak during 2013, 44% of these sites reported the use of ward closure. Ward closure was considered an "appropriate," "sometimes appropriate," or "not appropriate" strategy to control outbreaks by 50%, 45%, and 5% of participants, respectively. System capacity issues and overall risk assessment were main factors influencing the decision to close hospital wards following an outbreak. Results suggest the use of ward closure for containment of hospital-acquired infectious disease outbreaks in Canadian acute care health settings is mixed, with outbreak control methods varying. The successful implementation of ward closure was dependent on overall support for the IPC team within hospital administration. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. X-ray and CT findings of soft tissue and bone infections secondary to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Songfeng; Liu Jinxin; Chen Bihua; Zhang Lieguang; Gan Qingxin; Huang Deyang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To summarize X-ray and CT findings of soft tissue and bone infections secondary to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Methods: The data of X-ray and CT findings of soft tissue and bone infections in 18 patients with AIDS were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Results: Of 18 patients with AIDS, the CT features of soft tissue demonstrated that subcutaneous patchy high density in 1 case which considered as cellulitis, round low density lesions with ring enhancement in 6 cases which considered as soft tissue abscesses, heterogeneous density lesions with peripheral enhancement in 1 case which considered as pyomyositis. Of 18 patients with AIDS, septic arthritis was found in 4 cases involving knee lesion in 3 cases and hip lesion. In the 4 case, the X-ray films showed bony destruction in 2 cases and the CT showed bone destruction in 3 cases and arthroedema in 4 cases. Of 18 patients with AIDS, osteomyelitis was found in 9 cases of which tuberculosis was considered in. 8 cases and vertebral involvement in 6 cases. In the 9 cases, the X-ray films and CT displayed bony destruction, hyperostosis, small sequestra, and intervertebral space narrowing. Of 18 patients with AIDS, costal lesions were found in 3 cases in which the CT showed expandable bony destruction. Of 18 patients with AIDS, ilium and sacroiliac joint lesions were found in 1 case in which the X-ray films and CT showed bony destruction, sequestra, and joint widening. Of 18 patients with AIDS, chronic pyogenic osteomyelitis of femur was found in 1 case in which the X-ray films showed bony destruction, hyperostosis osteosclerosis, and periosteal reaction. Conclusion: The X-ray and CT features of soft tissue and bone infections secondary to AIDS are characterized. The X-ray and CT are useful tools to early diagnose soft tissue and bone infections secondary to AIDS. (authors)

  8. A rare case of acquired lymphangioma circumscriptum of the penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adikari, S; Philippidou, M; Samuel, M

    2017-02-01

    Acquired lymphangioma circumscriptum is a rare occurrence on the penis. We report a case of a 47-year-old man who presented with a single lesion of acquired lymphangioma circumscriptum on the penis resembling genital warts. We report the case to increase awareness of this rare condition which may mimic sexually transmitted infections such as genital warts.

  9. Inherited and acquired immunodeficiencies underlying tuberculosis in childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Bustamante, Jacinta; El-Baghdadi, Jamila; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Parvaneh, Nima; Azbaoui, Safaa El; Agader, Aomar; Hassani, Amal; Hafidi, Naima El; Mrani, Nidal Alaoui; Jouhadi, Zineb; Ailal, Fatima; Najib, Jilali; Reisli, Ismail; Zamani, Adil; Yosunkaya, Sebnem; Gulle-Girit, Saniye; Yildiran, Alisan; Cipe, Funda Erol; Torun, Selda Hancerli; Metin, Ayse; Atikan, Basak Yildiz; Hatipoglu, Nevin; Aydogmus, Cigdem; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Dogu, Figen; Karaca, Neslihan; Aksu, Guzide; Kutukculer, Necil; Keser-Emiroglu, Melike; Somer, Ayper; Tanir, Gonul; Aytekin, Caner; Adimi, Parisa; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Mamishi, Setareh; Bousfiha, Aziz; Sanal, Ozden; Mansouri, Davood; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Abel, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) and a few related mycobacteria, is a devastating disease, killing more than a million individuals per year worldwide. However, its pathogenesis remains largely elusive, as only a small proportion of infected individuals develop clinical disease either during primary infection or during reactivation from latency or secondary infection. Subacute, hematogenous, and extrapulmonary disease tends to be more frequent in infants, children, and teenagers than in adults. Life-threatening primary TB of childhood can result from known acquired or inherited immunodeficiencies, although the vast majority of cases remain unexplained. We review here the conditions conferring a predisposition to childhood clinical diseases caused by mycobacteria, including not only M.tb but also weakly virulent mycobacteria, such as BCG vaccines and environmental mycobacteria. Infections with weakly virulent mycobacteria are much rarer than TB, but the inherited and acquired immunodeficiencies underlying these infections are much better known. Their study has also provided genetic and immunological insights into childhood TB, as illustrated by the discovery of single-gene inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity underlying severe cases of TB. Novel findings are expected from ongoing and future human genetic studies of childhood TB in countries that combine a high proportion of consanguineous marriages, a high incidence of TB, and an excellent clinical care, such as Iran, Morocco, and Turkey. PMID:25703555

  10. Enhanced surveillance of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia to identify targets for infection prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A K; Russell, C D

    2016-06-01

    Surveillance of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) in Scotland is limited to the number of infections per 100,000 acute occupied bed-days and susceptibility to meticillin. To demonstrate the value of enhanced SAB surveillance to identify targets for infection prevention. Prospective cohort study of all patients identified with SAB over a five-year period in a single health board in Scotland. All patients were reviewed at the bedside by a clinical microbiologist. In all, 556 SAB episodes were identified: 261 (46.6%) were hospital-acquired; 209 (37.9%) were healthcare-associated; 80 (14.4%) were community-acquired; and in six (1.1%) the origin of infection was not hospital-acquired, but could not be separated into healthcare-associated or community-acquired. These were classified as non-hospital-acquired. Meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) bacteraemia was associated with hospital-acquired and healthcare-associated infections. In addition, there was a significantly higher 30-day mortality associated with hospital-acquired (31.4%) and healthcare-associated (16.3%) infections compared to community-acquired SAB (8.7%). Vascular access devices were associated with hospital-acquired SAB and peripheral venous cannulas were the source for most of these (43.9%). Community-acquired infections were associated with intravenous drug misuse, respiratory tract infections and skeletal and joint infections. Skin and soft tissue infections were more widely seen in healthcare-associated infections. The data indicate that enhanced surveillance of SAB by origin of infection and source of bacteraemia has implications for infection prevention, empirical antibiotic therapy, and health improvement interventions. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Aquatically acquired Aeromonas hydrophila wound infection A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of Aeromonas hydrophila wound infections in healthy hosts after water-associated injury is being reported more frequently. This paper reports our experience with 3 such cases and outlines the importance of recognising the association between a water-related injury and, this organism.

  12. A novel 3D skin explant model to study anaerobic bacterial infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maboni, Grazieli; Davenport, Rebecca; Sessford, Kate

    2017-01-01

    of the tissue structure and the cell types present in the host environment. A 3D skin culture model can be set up using tissues acquired from surgical procedures or post slaughter, making it a cost effective and attractive alternative to animal experimentation. The majority of 3D culture models have been......Skin infection studies are often limited by financial and ethical constraints, and alternatives, such as monolayer cell culture, do not reflect many cellular processes limiting their application. For a more functional replacement, 3D skin culture models offer many advantages such as the maintenance...... bacterium and the causative agent of footrot. The mechanism of infection and host immune response to D. nodosus is poorly understood. Here we present a novel 3D skin ex vivo model to study anaerobic bacterial infections using ovine skin explants infected with D. nodosus. Our results demonstrate that D...

  13. Pasteurization of breastmilk decreases the rate of postnatally acquired cytomegalovirus infections, but shows a nonsignificant trend to an increased rate of necrotizing enterocolitis in very preterm infants--a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Katharina; Griesmaier, Elke; Brunner, Barbara; Neubauer, Vera; Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, Ursula; Trawöger, Rudolf

    2015-03-01

    This study assessed whether feeding preterm infants unpasteurized breastmilk (1) decreases the rate of late-onset sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis and (2) increases the rate of postnatally acquired cytomegalovirus infections. Between January 2008 and July 2013, preterm infants below 32 completed weeks of gestational age admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of Innsbruck Medical University (Innsbruck, Austria) (n=344) were eligible for the study. Of those, 323 fed breastmilk were retrospectively enrolled in the study. Two groups were formed, with 164 infants being fed unpasteurized and 159 infants being fed pasteurized breastmilk. There was no significant difference in the rate of late-onset sepsis or necrotizing enterocolitis between the unpasteurized and pasteurized breastmilk groups (late-onset sepsis, 15.9% versus 15.1% [p=0.486]; necrotizing enterocolitis, 2.4% versus 4.4% [p=0.254]). The number of infants diagnosed with postnatally acquired cytomegalovirus infection was significantly higher in the unpasteurized group (39.3%) compared with the pasteurized group (4.2%) (p=0.008). Feeding preterm infants unpasteurized breastmilk increases the rate of postnatally acquired cytomegalovirus infections. However, we also demonstrate a nonsignificant trend to a decreased rate of necrotizing enterocolitis in the unpasteurized group, which needs to be confirmed in larger studies.

  14. Zika virus infection acquired during brief travel to Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Jason C; Druce, Julian D; Leder, Karin

    2013-09-01

    Zika virus infection closely resembles dengue fever. It is possible that many cases are misdiagnosed or missed. We report a case of Zika virus infection in an Australian traveler who returned from Indonesia with fever and rash. Further case identification is required to determine the evolving epidemiology of this disease.

  15. [Community-acquired Acinetobacter pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, E; Wüst, J; Speich, R; Flury, G; Krause, M

    1993-08-21

    We report the history of a 38-year-old male native of Sri Lanka admitted to the emergency ward because of chest pain and shortness of breath. On physical and radiographic examination a bilateral predominantly right-sided pneumonia was found. The patient was admitted to the medical ICU and an antibiotic regimen with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and erythromycin was initiated. Shortly afterwards septic shock developed. The patient was intubated and received high doses of catecholamines. He died 30 hours after admission to the hospital. Cultures from sputum, tracheal aspirate and blood grew Acinetobacter baumanni. Acinetobacter is an ubiquitous gram-negative rod with coccobacillary appearance in clinical specimens, that may appear gram-positive due to poor discoloration on Gram-stain. It is a well known causative agent of nosocomial infections, particularly in intensive care units. Community-acquired pneumonias, however, are quite rare. Sporadic cases have been reported from the US, Papua-New Guinea and Australia. Interestingly, these pneumonias are fulminant and have a high mortality. Chronic obstructive lung disease, diabetes, and tobacco and alcohol consumption appear to be predisposing factors. Due to the rapid course and poor prognosis, prompt diagnosis and adequate antibiotic treatment are indicated. Antibiotics use for community-acquired pneumonias, such as amoxicillin/clavulanic acid or macrolides, are not sufficient. Appropriate antibiotics for the initial treatment of suspected Acinetobacter infections include imipenem and carboxy- and ureidopenicillins combined with an aminoglycoside.

  16. Community-acquired Pneumonia in Hospitalized Urban Young ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As part of a comprehensive hospital-based study of acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) in under-five urban Nigerian children, we sought to identify the possible clinical and investigative correlates of lobar versus bronchopneumonia, and the possible determinants of mortality in community-acquired pneumonia. Over a ...

  17. Cross-sectional study of CD4: CD8 ratio recovery in young adults with perinatally acquired HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Katrina M; Pintilie, Hannah; Foster, Caroline; Fidler, Sarah

    2018-02-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has improved survival into adulthood for young people with perinatally acquired HIV-1 (yp-PaHIV), but long-term prognosis remains unclear. We hypothesized that on-going immune activation, reflected in the failure of CD4:CD8 ratio normalization would be observed in yp-PaHIV, despite ART.A cross-sectional study of routinely collected clinical data from a cohort of yp-PaHIV (≥16 years).Data were collected from records of individuals attending a specialist clinic for yp-PaHIV transitioning to adult care. CD4:CD8 ratio and proportion with CD4:CD8 ratio ≥1, demographic data and viral parameters, including HIV-1 viral load (VL) and human cytomegalovirus (CMV) IgG, were analyzed with IBM SPSS Statistics v22.A total of 115 yp-PaHIV, median (IQR) age 22.0 (20.0-24.0) years, were studied, of whom 59 were females, and the majority were Black African 75/115 (65.2%). Where measured, CMV antibodies were frequently detected (71/74, 95.9%) and CMV IgG titre was inversely associated with CD4:CD8 ratio, (Rho -0.383, P = .012). Of those taking ART, 69 out of 90 (76.7%) yp-PaHIV had suppressed HIV viremia (HIV viremia. Persistence of low CD4:CD8 ratio was observed even in those with a CD4 count ≥500 cells/μL, where 28/52 (53.8%) had a CD4:CD8 ratio HIV infection and widespread CMV coinfection, CD4:CD8 ratio recovery rate was comparable to adults treated in acute infection. Where persistence of CD4:CD8 ratio abnormality was observed, on-going immune activation may have significance for non-AIDS outcomes. Taken together our findings indicate immune resilience to be a feature of these adult survivors of perinatally acquired HIV infection, which can be supported with early antiretroviral therapy.

  18. Community-acquired pneumonia in older patients: does age influence systemic cytokine levels in community-acquired pneumonia?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Emer

    2009-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of death in the elderly. The age-related increase in comorbid illnesses plays a part but the effect of aging on the immune response may be equally important. We aimed to evaluate patients with CAP for evidence of a muted response to infection in elderly patients admitted to hospital compared with a younger patient group.

  19. Opportunistic Neurologic Infections in Patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarillo, Fritzie; O'Keefe, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remain a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality despite the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) especially in the resource-limited regions of the world. Diagnosis of these infections may be challenging because findings on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and brain imaging are nonspecific. While brain biopsy provides a definitive diagnosis, it is an invasive procedure associated with a relatively low mortality rate, thus less invasive modalities have been studied in recent years. Diagnosis, therefore, can be established based on a combination of a compatible clinical syndrome, radiologic and CSF findings, and understanding of the role of HIV in these infections. The most common CNS opportunistic infections are AIDS-defining conditions; thus, treatment of these infections in combination with HAART has greatly improved survival.

  20. Efficacy of 10% imidacloprid + 2.5% moxidectin topical solution (Advantage Multi® for Dogs) for the prevention of heartworm disease and infection all month long.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Dwight D; Ohmes, Cameon M; Hostetler, Joseph A; Keil, Daniel J; Settje, Terry L; Charles, Samuel D

    2017-11-09

    Prior work has shown that the levels of moxidectin in dogs treated with Advantage Multi® for Dogs (Bayer Animal Health) remain at a high plasma concentration for the full month after application. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the efficacy of 10% imidacloprid + 2.5% moxidectin topical solution (Advantage Multi® for Dogs, also known as Advocate® for Dogs) for the prevention of heartworm infection and disease 30 days after just one application. Two groups of eight dogs each were included. Dogs in Group 1 received the product (Advantage Multi® for Dogs) while those in Group 2 remained as nontreated controls. All dogs entering the study completed a physical examination including examination for Dirofilaria immitis antigen and circulating microfilariae. Dogs in Group 1 were treated on Study Day (SD) -30 as per the label recommendation. Thirty days later (SD 0) dogs in Groups 1 and 2 were subcutaneously infected in the inguinal region with approximately 50 infective third-stage D. immitis larvae ("Missouri" isolate). Blood was collected on SDs 120 and 147 for examination for D. immitis antigen and circulating microfilariae. On SD 148, all animals were euthanized and necropsied for recovery of adult heartworms. All procedures were performed in accordance with the VICH GL9 guidelines. Examination and worm counts made at necropsy showed no heartworms in the treated dogs (Group 1) compared with six of eight nontreated dogs (Group 2) with heartworms (range of 2-33). The treated dogs (Group 1) had significantly fewer heartworms (p Dogs) is efficacious for the prevention of heartworm infection and disease all month long with no observation of treatment-related adverse events.

  1. Decrease in Staphylococcus aureus colonization and hospital-acquired infection in a medical intensive care unit after institution of an active surveillance and decolonization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Thomas G; Fatica, Cynthia; Scarpelli, Michele; Arroliga, Alejandro C; Guzman, Jorge; Shrestha, Nabin K; Hixson, Eric; Rosenblatt, Miriam; Gordon, Steven M; Procop, Gary W

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of an active surveillance program for Staphylococcus aureus linked to a decolonization protocol on the incidence of healthcare-associated infection and new nasal colonization due to S. aureus. Retrospective quasi-experimental study. An 18-bed medical intensive care unit at a tertiary care center in Cleveland, Ohio. From January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2007, all patients in the medical intensive care unit were screened for S. aureus nasal carriage at admission and weekly thereafter. During the preintervention period, January 1 through September 30, 2006, only surveillance occurred. During the intervention period, January 1 through December 31, 2007, S. aureus carriers received mupirocin intranasally. Beginning in February 2007, carriers also received chlorhexidine gluconate baths. During the preintervention period, 604 (73.7%) of 819 patients were screened for S. aureus nasal carriage, yielding 248 prevalent carriers (30.3%). During the intervention period, 752 (78.3%) of 960 patients were screened, yielding 276 carriers (28.8%). The incidence of S. aureus carriage decreased from 25 cases in 3,982 patient-days (6.28 cases per 1,000 patient-days) before intervention to 18 cases in 5,415 patient-days (3.32 cases per 1,000 patient-days) (P=.04; relative risk [RR], 0.53 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.28-0.97]) and from 9.57 to 4.77 cases per 1,000 at-risk patient-days (P=.02; RR, 0.50 [95% CI, 0.27-0.91]). The incidence of S. aureus hospital-acquired bloodstream infection during the 2 periods was 2.01 and 1.11 cases per 1,000 patient-days, respectively (P=.28). The incidence of S. aureus ventilator-associated pneumonia decreased from 1.51 to 0.18 cases per 1,000 patient-days (P=.03; RR, 0.12 [95% CI, 0.01-0.83]). The total incidence of S. aureus hospital-acquired infection decreased from 3.52 to 1.29 cases per 1,000 patient-days (P=.03; RR, 0.37 [95% CI, 0.14-0.90]). Active surveillance for S. aureus nasal carriage combined with

  2. Efficacy of nitroscanate against naturally acquired infection with Ancylostoma caninum, Dipylidium caninum, and Trichuris vulpis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, T M; Mercer, S H; Wade, C G; Lynn, R C

    1991-04-01

    Eighteen dogs with naturally acquired helminth infections were used to evaluate the efficacy of nitroscanate against Ancylostoma caninum, Dipylidium caninum, and Trichuris vulpis. Approximately 15 minutes before treatment, the dogs were given 100 to 200 g of canned dog food. Ten dogs were treated with nitroscanate (50 mg/kg of body weight, PO), and 8 dogs were given placebo tablets PO. The dogs were euthanatized and necropsied 10 days after treatment and helminths were recovered from the small intestine and cecum. On the basis of the number of worms recovered from treated dogs vs the number recovered from control dogs, we determined the efficacy of nitroscanate to be 99.6% against A caninum, 99.8% against D caninum, and 0% against T vulpis.

  3. Time-based distribution of Staphylococcus saprophyticus pulsed field gel-electrophoresis clusters in community-acquired urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Santos de Sousa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of urinary tract infections (UTI by Staphylococcus saprophyticus has not been fully characterised and strain typing methods have not been validated for this agent. To evaluate whether epidemiological relationships exist between clusters of pulsed field gel-electrophoresis (PFGE genotypes of S. saprophyticus from community-acquired UTI, a cross-sectional surveillance study was conducted in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In total, 32 (16% female patients attending two walk-in clinics were culture-positive for S. saprophyticus. Five PFGE clusters were defined and evaluated against epidemiological data. The PFGE clusters were grouped in time, suggesting the existence of community point sources of S. saprophyticus. From these point sources, S. saprophyticus strains may spread among individuals.

  4. Transgenic mosquitoes expressing a phospholipase A(2 gene have a fitness advantage when fed Plasmodium falciparum-infected blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C Smith

    Full Text Available Genetically modified mosquitoes have been proposed as an alternative strategy to reduce the heavy burden of malaria. In recent years, several proof-of-principle experiments have been performed that validate the idea that mosquitoes can be genetically modified to become refractory to malaria parasite development.We have created two transgenic lines of Anophelesstephensi, a natural vector of Plasmodium falciparum, which constitutively secrete a catalytically inactive phospholipase A2 (mPLA2 into the midgut lumen to interfere with Plasmodium ookinete invasion. Our experiments show that both transgenic lines expressing mPLA2 significantly impair the development of rodent malaria parasites, but only one line impairs the development of human malaria parasites. In addition, when fed on malaria-infected blood, mosquitoes from both transgenic lines are more fecund than non-transgenic mosquitoes. Consistent with these observations, cage experiments with mixed populations of transgenic and non-transgenic mosquitoes show that the percentage of transgenic mosquitoes increases when maintained on Plasmodium-infected blood.Our results suggest that the expression of an anti-Plasmodium effector gene gives transgenic mosquitoes a fitness advantage when fed malaria-infected blood. These findings have important implications for future applications of transgenic mosquito technology in malaria control.

  5. Competitive advantage of Borrelia burgdorferi with outer surface protein BBA03 during tick-mediated infection of the mammalian host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestor, Aaron; Rego, Ryan O M; Tilly, Kit; Rosa, Patricia A

    2012-10-01

    Linear plasmid lp54 is one of the most highly conserved and differentially expressed elements of the segmented genome of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. We previously reported that deletion of a 4.1-kb region of lp54 (bba01 to bba07 [bba01-bba07]) led to a slight attenuation of tick-transmitted infection in mice following challenge with a large number of infected ticks. In the current study, we reduced the number of ticks in the challenge to more closely mimic the natural dose and found a profound defect in tick-transmitted infection of the bba01-bba07 mutant relative to wild-type B. burgdorferi. We next focused on deletion of bba03 as the most likely cause of this mutant phenotype, as previous studies have shown that expression of bba03 is increased by culture conditions that simulate tick feeding. Consistent with this hypothesis, we demonstrated increased expression of bba03 by spirochetes in fed relative to unfed ticks. We also observed that a bba03 deletion mutant, although fully competent by itself, did not efficiently infect mice when transmitted by ticks that were simultaneously coinfected with wild-type B. burgdorferi. These results suggest that BBA03 provides a competitive advantage to spirochetes carrying this protein during tick transmission to a mammalian host in the natural infectious cycle.

  6. Infectious offspring: how birds acquire and transmit an avian polyomavirus in the wild.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Potti

    Full Text Available Detailed patterns of primary virus acquisition and subsequent dispersal in wild vertebrate populations are virtually absent. We show that nestlings of a songbird acquire polyomavirus infections from larval blowflies, common nest ectoparasites of cavity-nesting birds, while breeding adults acquire and renew the same viral infections via cloacal shedding from their offspring. Infections by these DNA viruses, known potential pathogens producing disease in some bird species, therefore follow an 'upwards vertical' route of an environmental nature mimicking horizontal transmission within families, as evidenced by patterns of viral infection in adults and young of experimental, cross-fostered offspring. This previously undescribed route of viral transmission from ectoparasites to offspring to parent hosts may be a common mechanism of virus dispersal in many taxa that display parental care.

  7. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Escherichia coli strains from samples collected before and after pivmecillinam or placebo treatment of uncomplicated community-acquired urinary tract infection in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnaes, Karen; Sandvang, Dorthe; Lundgren, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    The primary infecting Escherichia coli strains from 156 women with community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) randomized to pivmecillinam or placebo and the E. coli strains causing UTI at two follow-up visits were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE......). The finding that the majority of UTIs at follow-up are caused by the primary infecting E. coli strain supports the theory of a vaginal and rectal reservoir but could also support the recent discovery that E. coli strains are able to persist in the bladder epithelium despite appropriate antibiotic treatment......, constituting a reservoir for recurrent UTI....

  8. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Eschericia coli strains from samples collected before and after pivmecillinam or placebo treatment of uncomplicated community-acquired urinary tract infection in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnæs, K; Sandvang, D; Lundgren, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    The primary infecting Escherichia coli strains from 156 women with community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) randomized to pivmecillinam or placebo and the E. coli strains causing UTI at two follow-up visits were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE......). The finding that the majority of UTIs at follow-up are caused by the primary infecting E. coli strain supports the theory of a vaginal and rectal reservoir but could also support the recent discovery that E. coli strains are able to persist in the bladder epithelium despite appropriate antibiotic treatment......, constituting a reservoir for recurrent UTI....

  9. Multiple challenges of antibiotic use in a large hospital in Ethiopia - a ward-specific study showing high rates of hospital-acquired infections and ineffective prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutema, Girma; Håkonsen, Helle; Engidawork, Ephrem; Toverud, Else-Lydia

    2018-05-03

    This project aims to study the use of antibiotics in three clinical wards in the largest tertiary teaching hospital in Ethiopia for a period of 1 year. The specific aims were to assess the prevalence of patients on antibiotics, quantify the antibiotic consumption and identify the main indications of use. The material was all the medical charts (n = 2231) retrieved from three clinical wards (internal medicine, gynecology/obstetrics and surgery) in Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital (TASH) in Addis Ababa between September 2013 and September 2014. Data collection was performed manually by four pharmacists. Each medical chart represented one patient. About 60% of the patients were admitted to internal medicine, 20% to each of the other two wards. The number of bed days (BD) was on average 16.5. Antibiotics for systemic use were prescribed to 73.7% of the patients (on average: 2.1 antibiotics/patient) of whom 86.6% got a third or fourth generation cephalosporin (mainly ceftriaxone). The average consumption of antibiotics was 81.6 DDD/100BD, varying from 91.8 in internal medicine and 71.6 in surgery to 47.6 in gynecology/obstetrics. The five most frequently occurring infections were pneumonia (26.6%), surgical site infections (21.5%), neutropenic fever (6.9%), sepsis (6.4%) and urinary tract infections (4.7%). About one fourth of the prescriptions were for prophylactic purposes. Hospital acquired infections occurred in 23.5% of the patients (353 cases of surgical site infection). The prescribing was based on empirical treatment and sensitivity testing was reported in only 3.8% of the cases. In the present study from three wards in the largest tertiary teaching hospital in Ethiopia, three out of four patients were prescribed antibiotics, primarily empirically. The mean antibiotic consumption was 81.6 DDD/100BD. Surgical site infections constituted a large burden of the infections treated in the hospital, despite extensive prescribing of prophylaxis. The findings show

  10. Influence of HIV infection on the clinical presentation and outcome of adults with acute community-acquired pneumonia in Yaounde, Cameroon: a retrospective hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yone Eric Walter

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of HIV infection on the evolution of acute community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is still controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate possible differences in the clinical presentation and in-hospital outcomes of patients with CAP with and without HIV infection in a specialised service in Yaounde. Methods Medical files of 106 patients (51 men aged 15 years and above, admitted to the Pneumology service of the Yaounde Jamot Hospital between January 2008 and May 2012, were retrospectively studied. Results Sixty-two (58.5% patients were HIV infected. The median age of all patients was 40 years (interquartile range: 31.75-53 and there was no difference in the clinical and radiological profile of patients with and without HIV infection. The median leukocyte count (interquartile range was 14,600/mm3 (10,900-20,600 and 10,450/mm3 (6,400-16,850 respectively in HIV negative and HIV positive patients (p = 0.002. Median haemoglobin level (interquartile range was 10.8 g/dl (8.9-12 in HIV negative and 9.7 g/dl (8–11.6 in HIV positive patients (p = 0.025. In-hospital treatment failure on third day (39.5% vs. 25.5.1%, p = 0.137 and mortality rates (9% vs. 14.5%, p = 0.401 were similar between HIV negative and HIV positive patients. Conclusion Clinical and radiological features as well as response to treatment and in hospital fatal outcomes are similar in adult patients hospitalised with acute community-acquired pneumonia in Yaounde. In contrast, HIV infected patients tend to be more anaemic and have lower white cell counts than HIV negative patients. Larger prospective studies are needed to consolidate these findings.

  11. Effect of traditional Chinese medicine for treating human immunodeficiency virus infections and acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Boosting immune and alleviating symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wen; Wang, Jian; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    To respond to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic in China, the integration of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has important implications in health outcomes, especially in China where the use of TCM is widespread. The National Free TCM Pilot Program for HIV Infected People began in 5 provinces (Henan, Hebei, Anhui, Hubei, and Guangdong) in 2004, and quickly scaled up to 19 provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities in China including some places with high prevalence, 26,276 adults have been treated thus far. Usually, people with HIV infection seek TCM for four main reasons: to enhance immune function, to treat symptoms, to improve quality of life, and to reduce side effects related to medications. Evidences from randomized controlled clinical trials suggested some beneficial effects of use of traditional Chinese herbal medicine for HIV infections and AIDS. More proofs from large, well-designed, rigorous trials is needed to give firm support. Challenges include interaction between herbs and antiretroviral drugs, stigma and discrimination. The Free TCM Program has made considerable progress in providing the necessary alternative care and treatment for HIV-infected people in China, and has strong government support for continued improvement and expansion, establishing and improving a work mechanism integrating Chinese and Western medicines.

  12. Vertically transmitted cytomegalovirus infection in newborn preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcells, Carla; Botet, Francesc; Gayete, Sònia; Marcos, M Ángeles; Dorronsoro, Izaskun; de Alba, Concepción; Figueras-Aloy, Josep

    2016-07-01

    To determine the epidemiology of congenital and acquired cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections in preterm infants and to analyze the efficacy of breast milk freezing in decreasing the vertical transmission rate of CMV. During 2013 and 2014, preterm newborns who weighed ≤1500 g and were admitted to 22 Spanish neonatal units were included and screened for CMV infection according to the Spanish Neonatology Society recommendations. Each hospital treated the breast milk according to its own protocols. Among the 1236 preterm neonates included, 10 had a congenital infection (0.8%) and 49 had an acquired infection (4.0%) (82% demonstrated positive PCR-CMV in breast milk). The neonates who received only frozen milk presented less frequently with acquired infection (1.2%) than those fed fresh milk (5.5%) (RR=0.22; 95% CI 0.05-0.90; P=0.017). The newborns who received bank milk followed by frozen or fresh breast milk more frequently had an acquired infection (2.1% or 2.2%, respectively) than those fed only frozen breast milk. The incidence of congenital CMV infection in our sample is low, as described in the literature. To reduce acquired CMV infection, freezing breast milk might be an advisable procedure for preterm neonates born from seropositive mothers, either from the beginning of lactation or after a period of bank milk administration.

  13. Offshoring and access to location-specific advantages - the impact of governance mode and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mykhaylenko, Alona; Motika, Agnes; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum

    how access to particular offshoring advantages may provide this link. The results of a quantitative survey of more than 1000 Scandinavian firms show that certain offshoring factors (governance mode and type of offshored function) indeed impact the access a company acquires to certain offshoring...... advantages, which may explain the unpredictability of previous performance outcomes....

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility, risk factors and prevalence of bla cefotaximase, temoneira, and sulfhydryl variable genes among Escherichia coli in community-acquired pediatric urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisha, Kallyadan V; Veena, Shetty A; Rathika, Shenoy D; Vijaya, Shenoy M; Avinash, Shetty K

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli has become an important challenge among pediatric patients with community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI). The aim of this study was to assess the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, associated risk factors and to survey the frequency of bla cefotaximase (CTX-M), bla temoneira (TEM), and bla sulfhydryl variable (SHV) genotypes in ESBL-producing E. coli isolated from children with community-acquired UTI. This was a prospective study conducted from November 2012 to March 2016 in a tertiary care center. E. coli isolated in urine cultures from children aged ≤18 years was identified and confirmed for ESBL production. ESBL-positive strains were screened for ESBL encoding genes. Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test were used to compare the difference in antibiotic susceptibility with respect to ESBL positive and negative, and binary logistic regression was used to identify the risk factors associated with ESBL production. Among 523 E. coli isolates, 196 (37.5%) were ESBL positive, >90% were resistant to cephalosporins, and 56% were resistant to fluoroquinolones. Least resistance was observed for imipenem, netilmicin, and nitrofurantoin (2%, 8.6%, 15.3%). Association between ESBL production and drug resistance was significant for ceftazidime ( P antibiotics were the common risk factors. ESBL-producing E. coli from community-acquired pediatric UTI carries more than one type of beta-lactamase coding genes correlating their increased antibiotic resistance. Aggressive infection control policy, routine screening for detecting ESBL isolates in clinical samples, and antimicrobial stewardship are the keys to prevent their dissemination in community settings.

  15. Controlling Hospital-Acquired Infection: Focus on the Role of the Environment and New Technologies for Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY There is increasing interest in the role of cleaning for managing hospital-acquired infections (HAI). Pathogens such as vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), multiresistant Gram-negative bacilli, norovirus, and Clostridium difficile persist in the health care environment for days. Both detergent- and disinfectant-based cleaning can help control these pathogens, although difficulties with measuring cleanliness have compromised the quality of published evidence. Traditional cleaning methods are notoriously inefficient for decontamination, and new approaches have been proposed, including disinfectants, steam, automated dispersal systems, and antimicrobial surfaces. These methods are difficult to evaluate for cost-effectiveness because environmental data are not usually modeled against patient outcome. Recent studies have reported the value of physically removing soil using detergent, compared with more expensive (and toxic) disinfectants. Simple cleaning methods should be evaluated against nonmanual disinfection using standardized sampling and surveillance. Given worldwide concern over escalating antimicrobial resistance, it is clear that more studies on health care decontamination are required. Cleaning schedules should be adapted to reflect clinical risk, location, type of site, and hand touch frequency and should be evaluated for cost versus benefit for both routine and outbreak situations. Forthcoming evidence on the role of antimicrobial surfaces could supplement infection prevention strategies for health care environments, including those targeting multidrug-resistant pathogens. PMID:25278571

  16. Cannulae and infection control in theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Ann-Marie

    Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are those that are not present or incubating when an individual enters hospital, but are acquired while in hospital. At any one time, 8% of patients have an infection acquired in hospital (Department of Health (DH), 2008). On average, an infection adds 3-10 days to the length of a patient's stay in hospital. It can cost pound4000- pound10 000 more to treat a patient with an infection than one without an infection (DH, 2008). It is not surprising, then, that attention has been focused on tackling HAIs and, in particular, in-dwelling devices such as cannulae that have a potential for causing infections.

  17. The extent to which methyl salicylate is required for signaling systemic acquired resistance is dependent on exposure to light after infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Po-Pu; von Dahl, Caroline C; Klessig, Daniel F

    2011-12-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a state of heightened defense to a broad spectrum of pathogens that is activated throughout a plant following local infection. Development of SAR requires the translocation of one or more mobile signals from the site of infection through the vascular system to distal (systemic) tissues. The first such signal identified was methyl salicylate (MeSA) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Subsequent studies demonstrated that MeSA also serves as a SAR signal in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and potato (Solanum tuberosum). By contrast, another study suggested that MeSA is not required for SAR in Arabidopsis and raised questions regarding its signaling role in tobacco. Differences in experimental design, including the developmental age of the plants, the light intensity, and/or the strain of bacterial pathogen, were proposed to explain these conflicting results. Here, we demonstrate that the length of light exposure that plants receive after the primary infection determines the extent to which MeSA is required for SAR signaling. When the primary infection occurred late in the day and as a result infected plants received very little light exposure before entering the night/dark period, MeSA and its metabolizing enzymes were essential for SAR development. In contrast, when infection was done in the morning followed by 3.5 h or more of exposure to light, SAR developed in the absence of MeSA. However, MeSA was generally required for optimal SAR development. In addition to resolving the conflicting results concerning MeSA and SAR, this study underscores the importance of environmental factors on the plant's response to infection.

  18. Increased Toxoplasma gondii positivity relative to age in 125 Scottish sheep flocks; evidence of frequent acquired infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence was determined in 3333 sheep sera from 125 distinct sheep flocks in Scotland, with the majority of flocks being represented by 27 samples, which were collected between July 2006 and August 2008. The selected farms give a representative sample of 14 400 sheep holdings identified in the Scottish Government census data from 2004. Overall T. gondii seroprevalence, at individual sheep level, was determined to be 56.6%; each flock tested, had at least a single positive animal and in four flocks all ewes tested positive. The seroprevalence of sheep increased from 37.7% in one year old stock to 73.8% in ewes that were older than six years, showing that acquired infections during the life of the animals is frequent and that environmental contamination by T. gondii oocysts must be significant. The median within-flock seroprevalence varied significantly across Scotland, with the lowest seroprevalence of 42.3% in the South and the highest seroprevalence of 69.2% in the far North of Scotland and the Scottish Islands, while the central part of Scotland had a seroprevalence of 57.7%. This distribution disequilibrium may be due to the spread and survival of oocysts on pasture and lambing areas. A questionnaire accompanying sampling of flocks identified farms that used Toxovax®, a commercial vaccine that protects sheep from abortion due to T. gondii infection. Only 24.7% of farmers used the vaccine and the vaccine did not significantly affect the within flock seroprevalence for T. gondii. The implications for food safety and human infection are discussed. PMID:22189159

  19. Invasive Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Japanese Girl with Disseminating Multiple Organ Infection: A Case Report and Review of Japanese Pediatric Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuta Yonezawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric invasive community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA infection is very serious and occasionally fatal. This infectious disease is still a relatively rare and unfamiliar infectious disease in Japan. We report a positive outcome in a 23-month-old Japanese girl with meningitis, osteomyelitis, fasciitis, necrotizing pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and bacteremia due to CA-MRSA treated with linezolid. PCR testing of the CA-MRSA strain was positive for PVL and staphylococcal enterotoxin b and negative for ACME. SCC mec was type IVa. This case underscores the selection of effective combinations of antimicrobial agents for its treatment. We need to be aware of invasive CA-MRSA infection, which rapidly progresses with a serious clinical course, because the incidence of the disease may be increasing in Japan.

  20. Competitive Advantage and its Sources in an Evolving Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaridis, Apostolos D.

    2009-08-01

    In a continuously altered and evolving Market, as is the food manufacturing market, the main and long-lasting objective of firm that is the maximization of its wealth and consequently the continuous remaining in profit regions, appears that it is possible to be achieved via the obtainment and maintenance of diachronically long-term competitive advantage, which it will render the firm unique or leader force in a inexorable competition that is continuously extended in a globalized market. Various definitions and different regards are developed in regard to the competitive advantage and the way with which a firm it is possible, acquiring it, to star in the market in which it is activated. As result of sustainable competitive advantage in a firm comes the above the average performance. Abundance of resources and competences that are proposed as sources of competitive advantage in the resource-based view literature exists, while they are added continuously new based on empiric studies. In any case, it appears to suffer hierarchy of sources of competitive advantage, with regard to sustainability of these.

  1. Acute periostitis in early acquired syphilis simulating shin splints in a jogger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, J L; Mollet, E

    1986-01-01

    Acute periostitis affecting the long bones is a characteristic but uncommon manifestation of syphilis in the adult with an early acquired infection. This report describes the history of a jogger who developed acute localized periostitis of the shaft of both tibiae during the early stage of acquired syphilis. Symptomatology was initially attributed to the medial tibial stress syndrome.

  2. The effect of hand hygiene compliance on hospital-acquired infections in an ICU setting in a Kuwaiti teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Mona F; Jamal, Wafaa Y; Mousa, Haifa Al; Al-Abdulghani, Khaled A; Rotimi, Vincent O

    2013-02-01

    Hand washing is widely accepted as the cornerstone of infection control in the intensive care unit (ICU). Nosocomial infections are frequently viewed as indicating poor compliance with hand washing guidelines. To determine the hand hygiene (HH) compliance rate among healthcare workers (HCWs) and its effect on the nosocomial infection rates in the ICU of our hospital, we conducted an interventional study. The study spanned a period of 7 months (February 2011-August 2011) and consisted of education about HH indications and techniques, workplace reminder posters, focused group sessions, and feedback on the HH compliance and infection rates. The WHO HH observation protocol was used both before and after a hospital-wide HH campaign directed at all staff members, particularly those in the ICU. Compliance was measured by direct observation of the HCWs, using observation record forms in a patient-directed manner, with no more than two patients observed simultaneously. The overall HH compliance rate was calculated by dividing the number of HH actions by the total number of HH opportunities. The nosocomial infection rates for the pre- and post-interventional periods were also compared to establish the effect of the intervention on rate of infections acquired within the unit. The overall rate of HH compliance by all the HCWs increased from 42.9% pre-intervention to 61.4% post-intervention, P<0.001. Individually, the compliance was highest among the nurses, 49.9 vs. 82.5%, respectively (P<0.001) and lowest among the doctors, 38.6 vs. 43.2%, respectively (P=0.24). The effect of the increase in the HH compliance rate on the nosocomial infection rate was remarkable. There were significant reductions in the following: the rate of overall health care-associated infections/1000 patient-days, which fell from 37.2 pre-intervention to 15.1 post-intervention (P<0.001); the rate of bloodstream infections, which fell from 18.6 to 3.4/1000 central-line-days (P<0.001); and the rate of lower

  3. Predictors of Outcome following Acquired Brain Injury in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Abigail R.; DeMatt, Ellen; Salorio, Cynthia F.

    2009-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) in children and adolescents can result from multiple causes, including trauma, central nervous system infections, noninfectious disorders (epilepsy, hypoxia/ischemia, genetic/metabolic disorders), tumors, and vascular abnormalities. Prediction of outcomes is important, to target interventions, allocate resources,…

  4. Chest radiography patterns in 75 adolescents with vertically-acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, S.R., E-mail: sujal.desai@nhs.ne [King' s College London, King' s Health Partners, Department of Radiology, King' s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Copley, S.J. [Department of Radiology, Hammersmith Hospital (United Kingdom); Barker, R.D.; Elston, C.M. [King' s College London, King' s Health Partners, Department of Respiratory Medicine, King' s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Miller, R.F. [Research Department of Infection and Public Health, Division of Population Health, University College London (United Kingdom); Clinical Research Unit, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Wells, A.U. [The Interstitial Lung Disease Unit, Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Munyati, S. [Biomedical Research and Training Institute, Samora Machel Avenue (Zimbabwe); Nathoo, K. [Department of Paediatrics, University of Zimbabwe (Zimbabwe); Harare Central Hospital, Lobengula Road, Harare (Zimbabwe); Corbett, E.L.; Ferrand, R.A. [Clinical Research Unit, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Biomedical Research and Training Institute, Samora Machel Avenue (Zimbabwe)

    2011-03-15

    Aim: To evaluate lung disease on chest radiography (CR), the relative frequency of CR abnormalities, and their clinical correlates in adolescents with vertically-acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Materials and methods: CRs of 75 patients [59 inpatients (33 males; mean age 13.7 {+-} 2.3 years) and 16 outpatients (eight males; mean age 14.1 {+-} 2.1 years)] were retrospectively reviewed by three independent observers. The overall extent of disease (to the nearest 5%), its distribution, and the proportional extents (totalling 100%) of different radiographic patterns (including ring/tramline opacities and consolidation) were quantified. CR features and clinical data were compared. Results: CRs were abnormal in 51/75 (68%) with 'extensive' disease in 38/51 (74%). Ring/tramline opacities and consolidation predominated (i.e., proportional extent >50%) in 26 and 21 patients, respectively. Consolidation was significantly more common in patients hospitalized primarily for a respiratory illness than patients hospitalized for a non-respiratory illness or in outpatients (p < 0.005, {chi}{sup 2} for trend); by contrast, ring/tramline opacities did not differ in prevalence across the groups. On stepwise logistic regression, predominant consolidation was associated with progressive dyspnoea [odds ratio (OR) 5.60; 95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.60, 20.1; p < 0.01] and was associated with a primary respiratory cause for hospital admission (OR: 22.0; CI: 2.7, 181.1; p < 0.005). Ring/tramline opacities were equally prevalent in patients with and without chronic symptoms and in those admitted to hospital with respiratory and non-respiratory illness. Conclusion: In HIV-infected adolescents, evaluated in secondary practice, CR abnormalities are prevalent. The presence of ring/tramline opacities, believed to reflect chronic airway disease, is not linked chronic respiratory symptoms.

  5. Chest radiography patterns in 75 adolescents with vertically-acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, S.R.; Copley, S.J.; Barker, R.D.; Elston, C.M.; Miller, R.F.; Wells, A.U.; Munyati, S.; Nathoo, K.; Corbett, E.L.; Ferrand, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate lung disease on chest radiography (CR), the relative frequency of CR abnormalities, and their clinical correlates in adolescents with vertically-acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Materials and methods: CRs of 75 patients [59 inpatients (33 males; mean age 13.7 ± 2.3 years) and 16 outpatients (eight males; mean age 14.1 ± 2.1 years)] were retrospectively reviewed by three independent observers. The overall extent of disease (to the nearest 5%), its distribution, and the proportional extents (totalling 100%) of different radiographic patterns (including ring/tramline opacities and consolidation) were quantified. CR features and clinical data were compared. Results: CRs were abnormal in 51/75 (68%) with 'extensive' disease in 38/51 (74%). Ring/tramline opacities and consolidation predominated (i.e., proportional extent >50%) in 26 and 21 patients, respectively. Consolidation was significantly more common in patients hospitalized primarily for a respiratory illness than patients hospitalized for a non-respiratory illness or in outpatients (p 2 for trend); by contrast, ring/tramline opacities did not differ in prevalence across the groups. On stepwise logistic regression, predominant consolidation was associated with progressive dyspnoea [odds ratio (OR) 5.60; 95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.60, 20.1; p < 0.01] and was associated with a primary respiratory cause for hospital admission (OR: 22.0; CI: 2.7, 181.1; p < 0.005). Ring/tramline opacities were equally prevalent in patients with and without chronic symptoms and in those admitted to hospital with respiratory and non-respiratory illness. Conclusion: In HIV-infected adolescents, evaluated in secondary practice, CR abnormalities are prevalent. The presence of ring/tramline opacities, believed to reflect chronic airway disease, is not linked chronic respiratory symptoms.

  6. Human Dipylidiasis: A Case Report of Dipylidium caninum Infection from Karimnagar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KV Ramana

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Dipylidium caninum also refered to as the double-pored tapeworm is a cyclophyllidean cestode that commonly infects dogs and cats. Mammals act as definite hosts with intermediate hosts being dog and cat flea, the Ctenocephalides canis and Ctenocephalides catis respectively. The dog lice, Trichodectes canis and human flea (Pulex irritans also transmit Dipylidium caninum infection. Infants and young children are at high risk of acquiring infection. Majority of the infections are due to close association with pet dog and cats. Humans are accidental hosts who acquire infection by ingestion of infected dog and cat fleas. We report a rare case of Dipylidium caninum infection in a 9 year old girl who could have acquired infection by consuming food contaminated with infected fleas.

  7. Human Primary Epithelial Cells Acquire an Epithelial-Mesenchymal-Transition Phenotype during Long-Term Infection by the Oral Opportunistic Pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungnam Lee

    2017-12-01

    proliferation inhibitor, Mitomycin C. The cellular movement was determined by microscopy. Results displayed P. gingivalis infection promoted cell migration which was slightly enhanced by co-infection with Fusobacterium nucleatum, another oral opportunistic pathogen. Therefore, this study demonstrates human primary OECs acquire initial molecular/cellular changes that are consistent with EMT induction during long-term infection by P. gingivalis and provides a critically novel framework for future mechanistic studies.

  8. The changing face of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Kale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is an important cause of infection, both in hospitalised patients with significant healthcare exposure and in patients without healthcare risk factors. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA are known for their rapid community transmission and propensity to cause aggressive skin and soft tissue infections and community-acquired pneumonia. The distinction between the healthcare-associated (HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA is gradually fading owing to the acquisition of multiple virulence factors and genetic elements. The movement of CA-MRSA strains into the nosocomial setting limits the utility of using clinical risk factors alone to designate community or HA status. Identification of unique genetic characteristics and genotyping are valuable tools for MRSA epidemiological studies. Although the optimum pharmacotherapy for CA-MRSA infections has not been determined, many CA-MRSA strains remain broadly susceptible to several non-β-lactam antibacterial agents. This review aimed at illuminating the characteristic features of CA-MRSA, virulence factors, changing clinical settings and molecular epidemiology, insurgence into the hospital settings and therapy with drug resistance.

  9. A Case Of Bilateral Acquired Localized Lipoatrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Tanrıkulu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Lipoatrophy is characterized by inflammation and tissue loss in fatty tissue. This disease may be congenital or acquired, primary or secondary. Secondary lipoatrophy develops with infections, collagen tissue diseases, tumors and drug injections. In this report, we present the case of a 14-year-old female patient who developed lipoatrophy following intramuscular steroid injection to both buttocks.

  10. The Complete Genome and Phenome of a Community-Acquired Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Daniel N.; Elbourne, Liam D. H.; Hassan, Karl A.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Tetu, Sasha G.; Brown, Melissa H.; Shah, Bhumika S.; Peleg, Anton Y.; Mabbutt, Bridget C.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2013-01-01

    Many sequenced strains of Acinetobacter baumannii are established nosocomial pathogens capable of resistance to multiple antimicrobials. Community-acquired A. baumannii in contrast, comprise a minor proportion of all A. baumannii infections and are highly susceptible to antimicrobial treatment. However, these infections also present acute clinical manifestations associated with high reported rates of mortality. We report the complete 3.70 Mbp genome of A. baumannii D1279779, previously isolated from the bacteraemic infection of an Indigenous Australian; this strain represents the first community-acquired A. baumannii to be sequenced. Comparative analysis of currently published A. baumannii genomes identified twenty-four accessory gene clusters present in D1279779. These accessory elements were predicted to encode a range of functions including polysaccharide biosynthesis, type I DNA restriction-modification, and the metabolism of novel carbonaceous and nitrogenous compounds. Conversely, twenty genomic regions present in previously sequenced A. baumannii strains were absent in D1279779, including gene clusters involved in the catabolism of 4-hydroxybenzoate and glucarate, and the A. baumannii antibiotic resistance island, known to bestow resistance to multiple antimicrobials in nosocomial strains. Phenomic analysis utilising the Biolog Phenotype Microarray system indicated that A. baumannii D1279779 can utilise a broader range of carbon and nitrogen sources than international clone I and clone II nosocomial isolates. However, D1279779 was more sensitive to antimicrobial compounds, particularly beta-lactams, tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The combined genomic and phenomic analyses have provided insight into the features distinguishing A. baumannii isolated from community-acquired and nosocomial infections. PMID:23527001

  11. Factors associated with community-acquired urinary tract infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTI) are a common medical problem affecting the general population and thus commonly encountered in medical practice, with the global burden of UTIs at about 150 million people. Because uropathogens largely originate from colonic flora, they are easy to predict, and this is the ...

  12. Higher rates of triple-class virological failure in perinatally HIV-infected teenagers compared with heterosexually infected young adults in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Judd, A; Lodwick, R; Noguera-Julian, A

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to determine the time to, and risk factors for, triple-class virological failure (TCVF) across age groups for children and adolescents with perinatally acquired HIV infection and older adolescents and adults with heterosexually acquired HIV infection. METHODS...... compared with participants with heterosexually acquired HIV infection overall [17 (interquartile range (IQR) 4-111) vs. 8 (IQR 2-38) weeks, respectively], and highest in perinatally infected participants aged 10-14 years [49 (IQR 9-267) weeks]. The cumulative proportion with TCVF 5 years after starting ART......: We analysed individual patient data from cohorts in the Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research Europe (COHERE). A total of 5972 participants starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) from 1998, aged

  13. Changing prevalence and antibiotic drug resistance pattern of pathogens seen in community-acquired pediatric urinary tract infections at a tertiary care hospital of North India

    OpenAIRE

    Patwardhan, Vrushali; Kumar, Dinesh; Goel, Varun; Singh, Sarman

    2017-01-01

    b>Introduction: Timely treatment of urinary tract infection (UTI) with appropriate antibiotic administration is of immense importance in children to reduce the consequences. Aims and Objectives: The aim and objective of this study was to assess the temporal changes in the microbiological profiles and antimicrobial resistance patterns of uropathogens in pediatric community-acquired UTI. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of data collected over a Scattered period of 5...

  14. Antibiotic resistance in community-acquired urinary tract infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the treatment of other infections would inevitably lead to the development of resistance. S Afr Med J 1994; 84: 600-602. Antibiotic resistance is a major problem in developing countries.' There are many reasons for this, including antibiotic use in animal feeds, inappropriate prescribing and poor sanitation. Resistance rates in ...

  15. Knowledge concerning the nursing staff hospital-acquired infections in the prevention and transmission paths microorganisms living in the hospital environment .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Teresa Pierzak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The level of knowledge in the filed of infections associated with health care is a very important element affecting the health and lives of patients and medical staff working covering the entire interdisciplinary team. In the various stages of the nursing process, which consists of diagnosis, planning, implementation and evaluation, there is the problem of hospital infections. Objectives of work: The aim of the study is to assess the level of knowledge of nursing staff in the field of hospital infections, prevention and routes of transmission of microorganisms. Material and Method: The study was conducted in the period from 01.01.2017-01.06.2017 in the Regional Hospital in Kielce. The research was voluntary and those involved agreed to participate in them. The study included 92 (100% of the nursing staff. These were women 96.65% (n = 88 and men 4.35% (n = 4. The subjects were informed about the anonymity of the research. Method was used diagnostic survey, using the author, anonymous questionnaire consisting of 26 questions, which was developed on the basis of the latest reports from scientific articles on the subject of nosocomial infections. Results: Our study showed different levels of knowledge of hospital infection among nursing staff. The respondents do not know the importance of washing hands in the prevention of nosocomial infections. Alarming is the fact that only 64.13% (n = 59 of those participating in the survey asked about the most common source of hospital-acquired infections answered that it is "direct contact, usually by hand during the performed treatments and medicines." The nursing staff involved in the study I am aware of the need for training organization to raise knowledge of hospital infections. Respondents asked about the need to provide training for the prevention of infection in the workplace 84.78% (n = 78 responded that there is such a necessity. Conclusions: The level of knowledge of nursing staff is

  16. Tuberculosis and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome in South Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, M.V.; Genro, C.H.; Santos Silveira, R. de C. dos

    1989-01-01

    Tuberculosis and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome in South Brazil. The authors studied the incidence of tuberculosis in South Brazilian patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome from January 1985 to June 1988. During this period, tuberculosis occurred in 10.3% of acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients. The socioeconomic conditions and the incidence of disease in the population were not confirmed as a potential risk for tuberculosis infection. Chest radiographs revealed pulmonary infiltrates in six patients, hilar and/or mediastinal adenopathy in three, and pleural effusion in two. The two remaining patients had pulmonary consolidation associated with other features. None of these patients presented pulmonary cavitation or radiographic findings of typical reactivation of pulmonary tuberculosis. (author) [pt

  17. Infection control in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Mohamed F; Askari, Reza

    2014-12-01

    It is critical for health care personnel to recognize and appreciate the detrimental impact of intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired infections. The economic, clinical, and social expenses to patients and hospitals are overwhelming. To limit the incidence of ICU-acquired infections, aggressive infection control measures must be implemented and enforced. Researchers and national committees have developed and continue to develop evidence-based guidelines to control ICU infections. A multifaceted approach, including infection prevention committees, antimicrobial stewardship programs, daily reassessments-intervention bundles, identifying and minimizing risk factors, and continuing staff education programs, is essential. Infection control in the ICU is an evolving area of critical care research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Alarming incidence of hepatitis C virus re-infection after treatment of sexually acquired acute hepatitis C virus infection in HIV-infected MSM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers, Femke A. E.; Prins, Maria; Thomas, Xiomara; Molenkamp, Richard; Kwa, David; Brinkman, Kees; van der Meer, Jan T. M.; Schinkel, Janke; Countinho, R.; Reesink, H.; van Baarle, D.; Smit, C.; Gras, L.; van der Veldt, W.

    2011-01-01

    Recent data indicate that seroprevalence of sexually transmitted hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among MSM is stabilizing in Amsterdam. However, little is known about the incidence of HCV re-infection in MSM who have cleared their HCV infection. We, therefore, studied the incidence of re-infection

  19. Vertically acquired hepatitis C virus infection: Correlates of transmission and disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovo, Pier-Angelo; Calitri, Carmelina; Scolfaro, Carlo; Gabiano, Clara; Garazzino, Silvia

    2016-01-28

    The worldwide prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in children is 0.05%-0.4% in developed countries and 2%-5% in resource-limited settings, where inadequately tested blood products or un-sterile medical injections still remain important routes of infection. After the screening of blood donors, mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HCV has become the leading cause of pediatric infection, at a rate of 5%. Maternal HIV co-infection is a significant risk factor for MTCT and anti-HIV therapy during pregnancy seemingly can reduce the transmission rate of both viruses. Conversely, a high maternal viral load is an important, but not preventable risk factor, because at present no anti-HCV treatment can be administered to pregnant women to block viral replication. Caution is needed in adopting obstetric procedures, such as amniocentesis or internal fetal monitoring, that can favor fetal exposure to HCV contaminated maternal blood, though evidence is lacking on the real risk of single obstetric practices. Mode of delivery and type of feeding do not represent significant risk factors for MTCT. Therefore, there is no reason to offer elective caesarean section or discourage breast-feeding to HCV infected parturients. Information on the natural history of vertical HCV infection is limited. The primary infection is asymptomatic in infants. At least one quarter of infected children shows a spontaneous viral clearance (SVC) that usually occurs within 6 years of life. IL-28B polymorphims and genotype 3 infection have been associated with greater chances of SVC. In general, HCV progression is mild or moderate in children with chronic infection who grow regularly, though cases with marked liver fibrosis or hepatic failure have been described. Non-organ specific autoantibodies and cryoglobulins are frequently found in children with chronic infection, but autoimmune diseases or HCV associated extrahepatic manifestations are rare.

  20. Therapy-refractory Panton Valentine Leukocidin-positive community-acquired methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus sepsis with progressive metastatic soft tissue infection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schefold Joerg C

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a case of fulminant multiple organ failure including the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS, haemodynamic, and renal failure due to community-acquired methicillin-sensitive Panton Valentine Leukocidin (PVL positive spa-type 284 (ST121 Staphylococcus aureus septic shock. The patient's first clinical symptom was necrotizing pneumonia. Despite organism-sensitive triple antibiotic therapy with linezolid, imipenem and clindamycin from the first day of treatment, progressive abscess formation in multiple skeletal muscles was observed. As a result, repeated surgical interventions became necessary. Due to progressive soft tissue infection, the anti-microbial therapy was changed to a combination of clindamycin and daptomycin. Continued surgical and antimicrobial therapy finally led to a stabilisation of the patients' condition. The clinical course of our patient underlines the existence of a "PVL-syndrome" which is independent of in vitro Staphylococcus aureus susceptibility. The PVL-syndrome should not only be considered in patients with soft tissue or bone infection, but also in patients with pneumonia. Such a condition, which may easily be mistaken for uncomplicated pneumonia, should be treated early, aggressively and over a long period of time in order to avoid relapsing infection.

  1. The increasing importance of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostino, Jason W; Ferguson, John K; Eastwood, Keith; Kirk, Martyn D

    2017-11-06

    To identify groups at risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection, patterns of antimicrobial resistance, and the proportion of patients with MRSA infections but no history of recent hospitalisation. Case series of 39 231 patients with S. aureus isolates from specimens processed by the Hunter New England Local Health District (HNELHD) public pathology provider during 2008-2014. Proportion of MRSA infections among people with S. aureus isolates; antimicrobial susceptibility of MRSA isolates; origin of MRSA infections (community- or health care-associated); demographic factors associated with community-associated MRSA infections. There were 71 736 S. aureus-positive specimens during the study period and MRSA was isolated from 19.3% of first positive specimens. Most patients (56.9%) from whom MRSA was isolated had not been admitted to a public hospital in the past year. Multiple regression identified that patients with community-associated MRSA were more likely to be younger (under 40), Indigenous Australians (odds ratio [OR], 2.6; 95% CI, 2.3-2.8), or a resident of an aged care facility (OR, 4.7; 95% CI, 3.8-5.8). The proportion of MRSA isolates that included the dominant multi-resistant strain (AUS-2/3-like) declined from 29.6% to 3.4% during the study period (P resistant strain decreased, new strategies for controlling infections in the community are needed to reduce the prevalence of non-multi-resistant strains.

  2. Acquired premature ejaculation and male accessory gland infection: relevance of ultrasound examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro La Vignera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated a high frequency of premature ejaculation (PE among patients with male accessory gland infection (MAGI. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ultrasound (US features of patients with MAGI and acquired premature ejaculation (APE associated (MAGI-APEpos. US evaluation of 50 MAGI-APEpos patients compared to 50 patients with MAGI without PE (MAGI-PEneg which represent the control group. The diagnosis of APE was made through the evaluation of Intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT and confirmed with the questionnaire PEDT (Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool. The main outcome measure was represented by the frequency of US criteria suggestive of P (prostatitis, V (vesiculitis, and E (epididymitis in MAGI-APEpos and MAGI-PEneg patients. MAGI-APEpos patients showed a total number of US criteria significantly higher compared to MAGI-PEneg patients. MAGI-APEpos showed a higher frequency of US criteria of V and E (complicated forms of MAGI. Finally, in MAGI-APEpos group, it was found a positive relationship between the anteroposterior diameter (APD of the caudal tract of the epididymis and the APD of the seminal vesicles, as well as between both diameters and the PEDT score. MAGI-APEpos patients have a peculiar US characterization compared to MAGI-PEneg patients. According to these results, US evaluation of the epididymal and of the prostato vesicular tract should be considered in the practical clinical approach of patients with MAGI and APE. In particular, it could be a support for a possible pathophysiological interpretation of this clinical problem in these patients.

  3. Bacterial Aetiology and Antibiotic Resistance Pattern of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in Children in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazina Sharmin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs in children are among the most common bacterial infections. Community-acquired urinary tract infections (CAUTI are often treated empirically with broad-spectrum antibiotics. Pattern of aetiologic agents and their antibiotic sensitivity may vary according to geographical and regional location. So, knowledge of antibiotic resistance trends is important for improving evidence-based recommendations for empirical treatment of UTIs. Objectives: To determine the common bacterial aetiologies of CAUTIs and their antibiotic resistance patterns in a tertiary care hospital, Savar. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at Enam Medical College Hospital, Savar from May 2016 to April 2017. We collected clean-catch mid-stream urine samples from 257 patients having clinical diagnosis of UTI and submitted to the clinical microbiology laboratory for culture and sensitivity. Results: A total of 120 (46.7% samples were positive for bacterial growth. Escherichia coli (79% was the most common pathogen, followed by Klebsiella spp. (14%. Bacterial isolates showed high prevalence of resistance to multiple antibiotics. Resistance against amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, co-trimoxazole and ciprofloxacin was higher compared to newer quinolones and aminoglycosides. Conclusion: Esch. coli and Klebsiella spp. were the predominant bacterial pathogens. The resistance pattern to commonly prescribed antibiotics was quite high and alarming.

  4. Naturally acquired Lawsonia intracellularis infection in pigs studied from weaning to slaughter by indirect immunofluorescence antibody test and polymerase chain reaction on faeces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre; Vigre, Håkan; Sørensen, Vibeke

    2005-01-01

    by immunofluorescence antibody test compared to 24% by immunohistochemistry on ileal samples. Thus, applied at the time of slaughter the antibody test appeared to be a highly sensitive ante-mortem diagnostic tool for identifying L. intracelluaris exposed pigs with or without current proliferative enteropathy. (c) 2004......The course of naturally acquired Lawsonia intracellularis infection was studied in 41 pigs by testing blood and faeces samples collected four to seven times from before weaning to slaughter 5 months old. At slaughter, a sample of ileum was taken for histopathology. In the first sampling when...... later on shed and/or were seropositive for L. intracellularis. The lowest prevalence of L. intracellularis was observed in 6-13 weeks old pigs and it seemed as though L. intracellularis in early infected pigs only activates a minor antibody response. At slaughter 66% of the pigs were found positive...

  5. Prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia, mortality and all intensive care unit acquired infections by topically applied antimicrobial or antiseptic agents: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pileggi, Claudia; Bianco, Aida; Flotta, Domenico; Nobile, Carmelo G A; Pavia, Maria

    2011-06-24

    Given the high morbidity and mortality attributable to ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, prevention plays a key role in the management of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. One of the candidate preventive interventions is the selective decontamination of the digestive or respiratory tract (SDRD) by topical antiseptic or antimicrobial agents. We performed a meta-analysis to investigate the effect of topical digestive or respiratory tract decontamination with antiseptics or antibiotics in the prevention of VAP, of mortality and of all ICU-acquired infections in mechanically ventilated ICU patients. A meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials was performed. The U.S. National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE database, Embase, and Cochrane Library computerized bibliographic databases, and reference lists of selected studies were used. Selection criteria for inclusion were: randomised controlled trials (RCTs); primary studies; examining the reduction of VAP and/or mortality and/or all ICU-acquired infections in ICU patients by prophylactic use of one or more of following topical treatments: 1) oropharyngeal decontamination using antiseptics or antibiotics, 2) gastrointestinal tract decontamination using antibiotics, 3) oropharyngeal plus gastrointestinal tract decontamination using antibiotics and 4) respiratory tract decontamination using antibiotics; reported enough data to estimate the odds ratio (OR) or risk ratio (RR) and their variance; English language; published through June 2010. A total of 28 articles met all inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. The overall estimate of efficacy of topical SDRD in the prevention of VAP was 27% (95% CI of efficacy = 16% to 37%) for antiseptics and 36% (95% CI of efficacy = 18% to 50%) for antibiotics, whereas in none of the meta-analyses conducted on mortality was a significant effect found. The effect of topical SDRD in the prevention of all ICU-acquired

  6. Higher rates of triple-class virological failure in perinatally HIV-infected teenagers compared with heterosexually infected young adults in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, A; Lodwick, R; Noguera-Julian, A; Gibb, D M; Butler, K; Costagliola, D; Sabin, C; van Sighem, A; Ledergerber, B; Torti, C; Mocroft, A; Podzamczer, D; Dorrucci, M; De Wit, S; Obel, N; Dabis, F; Cozzi-Lepri, A; García, F; Brockmeyer, N H; Warszawski, J; Gonzalez-Tome, M I; Mussini, C; Touloumi, G; Zangerle, R; Ghosn, J; Castagna, A; Fätkenheuer, G; Stephan, C; Meyer, L; Campbell, M A; Chene, G; Phillips, A

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the time to, and risk factors for, triple-class virological failure (TCVF) across age groups for children and adolescents with perinatally acquired HIV infection and older adolescents and adults with heterosexually acquired HIV infection. We analysed individual patient data from cohorts in the Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research Europe (COHERE). A total of 5972 participants starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) from 1998, aged 500 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL despite ≥ 4 months of use. TCVF was defined as cumulative failure of two NRTIs, an NNRTI and a bPI. The median number of weeks between diagnosis and the start of ART was higher in participants with perinatal HIV infection compared with participants with heterosexually acquired HIV infection overall [17 (interquartile range (IQR) 4-111) vs. 8 (IQR 2-38) weeks, respectively], and highest in perinatally infected participants aged 10-14 years [49 (IQR 9-267) weeks]. The cumulative proportion with TCVF 5 years after starting ART was 9.6% [95% confidence interval (CI) 7.0-12.3%] in participants with perinatally acquired infection and 4.7% (95% CI 3.9-5.5%) in participants with heterosexually acquired infection, and highest in perinatally infected participants aged 10-14 years when starting ART (27.7%; 95% CI 13.2-42.1%). Across all participants, significant predictors of TCVF were those with perinatal HIV aged 10-14 years, African origin, pre-ART AIDS, NNRTI-based initial regimens, higher pre-ART viral load and lower pre-ART CD4. The results suggest a beneficial effect of starting ART before adolescence, and starting young people on boosted PIs, to maximize treatment response during this transitional stage of development. © 2016 The Authors. HIV Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British HIV Association.

  7. The Extent to Which Methyl Salicylate Is Required for Signaling Systemic Acquired Resistance Is Dependent on Exposure to Light after Infection1[OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Po-Pu; von Dahl, Caroline C.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a state of heightened defense to a broad spectrum of pathogens that is activated throughout a plant following local infection. Development of SAR requires the translocation of one or more mobile signals from the site of infection through the vascular system to distal (systemic) tissues. The first such signal identified was methyl salicylate (MeSA) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Subsequent studies demonstrated that MeSA also serves as a SAR signal in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and potato (Solanum tuberosum). By contrast, another study suggested that MeSA is not required for SAR in Arabidopsis and raised questions regarding its signaling role in tobacco. Differences in experimental design, including the developmental age of the plants, the light intensity, and/or the strain of bacterial pathogen, were proposed to explain these conflicting results. Here, we demonstrate that the length of light exposure that plants receive after the primary infection determines the extent to which MeSA is required for SAR signaling. When the primary infection occurred late in the day and as a result infected plants received very little light exposure before entering the night/dark period, MeSA and its metabolizing enzymes were essential for SAR development. In contrast, when infection was done in the morning followed by 3.5 h or more of exposure to light, SAR developed in the absence of MeSA. However, MeSA was generally required for optimal SAR development. In addition to resolving the conflicting results concerning MeSA and SAR, this study underscores the importance of environmental factors on the plant’s response to infection. PMID:22021417

  8. Acute seronegative polyarthritis associated with lymphogranuloma venereum infection in a patient with prevalent HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kober, C; Richardson, D; Bell, C; Walker-Bone, K

    2011-01-01

    A 44-year-old man who has sex with men presented with a three-month asymmetrical polyarthropathy. He had a positive HIV-1 antibody test consistent with infection acquired more than six months previously. Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV)-associated DNA was detected from a rectal swab. Following successful treatment for LGV his arthritis resolved completely. Infection with HIV-1 has been hypothesized to cause reactive arthritis but this has been disputed. The most likely diagnosis in this patient was sexually acquired reactive arthritis secondary to LGV infection. As LGV can be asymptomatic and treatment differs from that of the other serovars, screening should be considered in all men who have sex with men (MSM) presenting with acute arthritis, particularly if they are HIV infected.

  9. An unusual cause of community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaimie Mittal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of fatal community-acquired pneumonia (CAP due to Acinetobacter baumannii, which is rarely reported in the northeastern United States. Previously reported cases originate from tropical and subtropical climates, and infection tends to have an aggressive course with a poor outcome. Appropriate antimicrobial therapy is crucial; however, the associated systemic inflammatory response may overwhelm host defenses, especially in patients with certain co-morbidities.

  10. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Escherichia coli strains from samples collected before and after pivmecillinam or placebo treatment of uncomplicated community-acquired urinary tract infection in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnaes, Karen; Sandvang, Dorthe; Lundgren, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    ). The finding that the majority of UTIs at follow-up are caused by the primary infecting E. coli strain supports the theory of a vaginal and rectal reservoir but could also support the recent discovery that E. coli strains are able to persist in the bladder epithelium despite appropriate antibiotic treatment......The primary infecting Escherichia coli strains from 156 women with community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) randomized to pivmecillinam or placebo and the E. coli strains causing UTI at two follow-up visits were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE......). In the pivmecillinam treatment group PFGE showed that among patients having a negative urine culture at the first follow-up 77% (46/60) had a relapse with the primary infecting E. coli strain and 23% (14/60) had reinfection with a new E. coli strain at the second follow-up. Among patients having E. coli at the first...

  11. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Eschericia coli strains from samples collected before and after pivmecillinam or placebo treatment of uncomplicated community-acquired urinary tract infection in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnæs, K; Sandvang, D; Lundgren, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    ). The finding that the majority of UTIs at follow-up are caused by the primary infecting E. coli strain supports the theory of a vaginal and rectal reservoir but could also support the recent discovery that E. coli strains are able to persist in the bladder epithelium despite appropriate antibiotic treatment......The primary infecting Escherichia coli strains from 156 women with community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) randomized to pivmecillinam or placebo and the E. coli strains causing UTI at two follow-up visits were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE......). In the pivmecillinam treatment group PFGE showed that among patients having a negative urine culture at the first follow-up 77% (46/60) had a relapse with the primary infecting E. coli strain and 23% (14/60) had reinfection with a new E. coli strain at the second follow-up. Among patients having E. coli at the first...

  12. A Conceptual Mapping Resource Advantage Theory, Competitive Advantage Theory, and Transient Competitive Advantage

    OpenAIRE

    Jasanta PERANGINANGIN

    2015-01-01

    Competitive advantage is the main purposed of the business entity focusing on market base view. Resource advantage theorists put their concern to empowering resources development with resources based view, in the other side needs to redefining competitive advantage. All the competitive advantage are transient, concluded the end of competitive advantage. Redefining competitive advantage by selling migration and shrewdness outward. This research to emphasize innovation capability rarely appears...

  13. Cryptococcus sp abdominal infection in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency under secondary prophylaxis with fluconazole; Infeccao abdominal por Cryptococcus sp em paciente com imunodeficiencia adquirida em uso de profilaxia secundaria com fluconazol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutinho, Rosane Luiza; Zarehdinne, Monica [Infectologia do Hospital Eduardo de Menezes Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Peixoto, Arley; Tardieu Junior, Jose [Medicina da Faculdade de Saude e Ecologia Humana - FASEH, Vespasiano, MG (Brazil); Pedroso, Enio Roberto Pietra [Departamento de Clinica Medica da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais - UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-10-15

    This paper reports on a Cryptococcus sp infection relapse in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency three years after the first episode, when her T CD4+ lymphocyte count was high and she was making regular use of antiretroviral drugs. (author)

  14. A case of an immunocompetent young man obtaining community-acquired disseminated Nocardia brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinna; Cao, Jie; Wu, Yueqing; Wan, Nansheng; Pan, Li; Chen, Yuanbao

    2014-01-01

    Nocardiosis is a rare but severe pyogenic or granulomatous disease and caused by Nocardia that mainly infects immunocompromised patients. We report here a case of an immunocompetent 24-year-old male student with community-acquired pneumonia with asymptomatic disseminated cerebral abscess by Brasiliensis nocardiosis. The patient was fully recovered after receiving optimized antimicrobial therapy without relapse. This case suggests the health professionals such as the physicians of pulmonary, infection, neurology department and et al should always think about unusual cause of community acquired pneumonia, even in immunocompetent patients and when having pulmonary nocardiosis we should do a radiological neurological work up, even with the absence of neurological finding or symptom. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Taking advantage of public reporting: An infection composite score to assist evaluating hospital performance for infection prevention efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakih, Mohamad G; Skierczynski, Boguslow; Bufalino, Angelo; Groves, Clariecia; Roberts, Phillip; Heavens, Michelle; Hendrich, Ann; Haydar, Ziad

    2016-12-01

    The standardized infection ratio (SIR) evaluates individual publicly reported health care-associated infections, but it may not assess overall performance. We piloted an infection composite score (ICS) in 82 hospitals of a single health system. The ICS is a combined score for central line-associated bloodstream infections, catheter-associated urinary tract infections, colon and abdominal hysterectomy surgical site infections, and hospital-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and Clostridium difficile infections. Individual facility ICSs were calculated by normalizing each of the 6 SIR events to the system SIR for baseline and performance periods (ICS ib and ICS ip , respectively). A hospital ICS ib reflected its baseline performance compared with system baseline, whereas a ICS ip provided information of its outcome changes compared with system baseline. Both the ICS ib (baseline 2013) and ICS ip (performance 2014) were calculated for 63 hospitals (reporting at least 4 of the 6 event types). The ICS ip improved in 36 of 63 (57.1%) hospitals in 2014 when compared with the ICS ib in 2013. The ICS ib 2013 median was 0.96 (range, 0.13-2.94) versus the 2014 ICS ip median of 0.92 (range, 0-6.55). Variation was more evident in hospitals with ≤100 beds. The system performance score (ICS sp ) in 2014 was 0.95, a 5% improvement compared with 2013. The proposed ICS may help large health systems and state hospital associations better evaluate key infectious outcomes, comparing them with historic and concurrent performance of peers. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Urinary tract infections in women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common bacterial infections in women, with ... Acute cystitis refers to symptomatic infection of the bladder in the lower ... lungs in a patient with pneumonia.4. Risk factors ... use of antimicrobial agents for community-acquired UTIs has resulted in the emergence of antimicrobial resistance.

  17. Virtual Breakthrough Series, Part 1: Preventing Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection and Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcers in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkoff, Lisa; Neily, Julia; King, Beth J; Dellefield, Mary Ellen; Krein, Sarah; Young-Xu, Yinong; Boar, Shoshana; Mills, Peter D

    2016-11-01

    In 2014 the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) implemented a Virtual Breakthrough Series (VBTS) collaborative to help VHA facilities prevent hospital-acquired conditions: catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) and hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs). During the prework phase, participating facilities assembled a multidisciplinary team, assessed their current system for CAUTI or HAPU prevention, and examined baseline data to set improvement aims. The action phase consisted of educational conference calls, coaching, and monthly team reports. Learning was conducted via phone, web-based options, and e-mail. The CAUTI bundle focused on four key principles: (1) avoidance of indwelling urinary catheters, (2) proper insertion technique, (3) proper catheter maintenance, and (4) timely removal of the indwelling catheter. The HAPU bundle focused on assessment and inspection, pressure-relieving surfaces, turning and repositioning, incontinence management, and nutrition/hydration assessment and intervention. For the 18 participating units, the mean aggregated CAUTI rate decreased from 2.37 during the prework phase to 1.06 per 1,000 catheter-days during the action (implementation) phase (p model for implementing a virtual model for improvement. Copyright 2016 The Joint Commission.

  18. Severe Dermatophytosis and Acquired or Innate Immunodeficiency: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Rouzaud

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dermatophytes are keratinophilic fungi responsible for benign and common forms of infection worldwide. However, they can lead to rare and severe diseases in immunocompromised patients. Severe forms include extensive and/or invasive dermatophytosis, i.e., deep dermatophytosis and Majocchi’s granuloma. They are reported in immunocompromised hosts with primary (autosomal recessive CARD9 deficiency or acquired (solid organ transplantation, autoimmune diseases requiring immunosuppressive treatments, HIV infection immunodeficiencies. The clinical manifestations of the infection are not specific. Lymph node and organ involvement may also occur. Diagnosis requires both mycological and histological findings. There is no consensus on treatment. Systemic antifungal agents such as terbinafine and azoles (itraconazole or posaconazole are effective. However, long-term outcome and treatment management depend on the site and extent of the infection and the nature of the underlying immunodeficiency.

  19. Epidemiological Study of Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Conjunctivitis in a Level III Neonatal Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Dias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Conjunctivitis is one of the most frequently occurring hospital-acquired infections among neonates, although it is less studied than potentially life-threatening infections, such as sepsis and pneumonia. Objectives. The aims of our work were to identify epidemiologic characteristics, pathogens, and susceptibility patterns of bacterial hospital-acquired conjunctivitis (HAC in a level III neonatal unit. Materials and Methods. Data were collected retrospectively from patient charts and laboratory databases. Hospital-acquired conjunctivitis was defined in accordance with the Centers for Disease Control/National Healthcare Safety Network (CDC/NHSN diagnostic criteria. Results. One or more episodes of HAC were diagnosed in 4,0% ( of 1492 neonates admitted during the study period. Most of the episodes involved premature (75,4% and low birth weight (75,4% neonates. Infection rates were higher among patients undergoing noninvasive mechanical ventilation (46,7%, parenteral nutrition (13,6%, and phototherapy (6,8%. Predominant pathogens included Serratia marcescens (27,9%, Escherichia coli (23%, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (18%. Susceptibility patterns revealed bacterial resistances to several antibiotic classes. Gentamicin remains the adequate choice for empirical treatment of HAC in our NICU. Conclusion. It is important to know the local patterns of the disease in order to adjust prevention strategies. Our work contributes to the epidemiological characterization of a sometimes overlooked disease.

  20. Pet-Related Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Michael J

    2016-11-15

    Physicians and veterinarians have many opportunities to partner in promoting the well-being of people and their pets, especially by addressing zoonotic diseases that may be transmitted between a pet and a human family member. Common cutaneous pet-acquired zoonoses are dermatophytosis (ringworm) and sarcoptic mange (scabies), which are both readily treated. Toxoplasmosis can be acquired from exposure to cat feces, but appropriate hygienic measures can minimize the risk to pregnant women. Persons who work with animals are at increased risk of acquiring bartonellosis (e.g., cat-scratch disease); control of cat fleas is essential to minimize the risk of these infections. People and their pets share a range of tick-borne diseases, and exposure risk can be minimized with use of tick repellent, prompt tick removal, and appropriate tick control measures for pets. Pets such as reptiles, amphibians, and backyard poultry pose a risk of transmitting Salmonella species and are becoming more popular. Personal hygiene after interacting with these pets is crucial to prevent Salmonella infections. Leptospirosis is more often acquired from wildlife than infected dogs, but at-risk dogs can be protected with vaccination. The clinical history in the primary care office should routinely include questions about pets and occupational or other exposure to pet animals. Control and prevention of zoonoses are best achieved by enhancing communication between physicians and veterinarians to ensure patients know the risks of and how to prevent zoonoses in themselves, their pets, and other people.

  1. Implantation of cultured thymic fragments in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danner, S. A.; Schuurman, H. J.; Lange, J. M.; Gmelig Meyling, F. H.; Schellekens, P. T.; Huber, J.; Kater, L.

    1986-01-01

    Cultured thymic fragments were implanted in one patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related complex (ARC) and in eight AIDS patients with opportunistic infections (OIs, four patients), Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, two patients), or both (two patients). Thereafter, objective clinical

  2. Classification of Infections in Intensive Care Units: A Comparison of Current Definition of Hospital-Acquired Infections and Carrier State Criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Žurek

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The rate of nosocomial infection appears to depend on whether it is calculated using the Center for Disease Control (CDC or carrier state criteria. The objective of this study was to differentiate between primary endogenous (PE, secondary endogenous (SE and exogenous (EX infections, and to compare this classification with CDC criteria for nosocomial infections. Methods: Children hospitalized for more than 72 h at pediatric intensive care unit during 2004–2005 were enrolled. Children, who had the infection before the admission, and or did not develop an infection within the hospitalization were excluded. Surveillance samples were sampled on admission, and then twice a week. Diagnostic samples were obtained when infection was suspected based on the clinical condition and laboratory findings. Infections were evaluated as PE, SE and EX, and their incidences were compared with CDC criteria for nosocomial infections. Results: One hundred seventy eight patients were enrolled in the study. Forty-four patients (24.7% develop infection. Twenty-seven patients (61.3% had PE, 10 patients (22.7% had SE, and 7 patients (15.9% had EX infection. Secondary endogenous and EX infections are considered as nosocomial, thus 17 patients (38.6% had a nosocomial infection. Thirty-one patients (70.5% met CDC criteria for nosocomial infections. Seventeen patients (55% were classified as PE, and 14 patients (45% as SE or EX infections.Conclusion: Seventy percent of infections (31 out of 44 patients met the CDC criteria for nosocomial infections, but only 39% of infections (17 out of 44 patients were classified as nosocomial based on carrier state classification.

  3. Classification of infections in intensive care units: a comparison of current definition of hospital-acquired infections and carrier state criterion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Jiří; Fedora, Michal

    2012-06-01

    The rate of nosocomial infection appears to depend on whether it is calculated using the Center for Disease Control (CDC) or carrier state criteria. The objective of this study was to differentiate between primary endogenous (PE), secondary endogenous (SE) and exogenous (EX) infections, and to compare this classification with CDC criteria for nosocomial infections. Children hospitalized for more than 72 h at pediatric intensive care unit during 2004-2005 were enrolled. Children, who had the infection before the admission, and or did not develop an infection within the hospitalization were excluded. Surveillance samples were sampled on admission, and then twice a week. Diagnostic samples were obtained when infection was suspected based on the clinical condition and laboratory findings. Infections were evaluated as PE, SE and EX, and their incidences were compared with CDC criteria for nosocomial infections. One hundred seventy eight patients were enrolled in the study. Forty-four patients (24.7%) develop infection. Twenty-seven patients (61.3%) had PE, 10 patients (22.7%) had SE, and 7 patients (15.9%) had EX infection. Secondary endogenous and EX infections are considered as nosocomial, thus 17 patients (38.6%) had a nosocomial infection. Thirty-one patients (70.5%) met CDC criteria for nosocomial infections. Seventeen patients (55%) were classified as PE, and 14 patients (45%) as SE or EX infections. Seventy percent of infections (31 out of 44 patients) met the CDC criteria for nosocomial infections, but only 39% of infections (17 out of 44 patients) were classified as nosocomial based on carrier state classification.

  4. Transmission of Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Oderda

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. It is accepted as the major cause of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, carcinoma of the distal part of the stomach and gastric lymphoma. However, how and when the infection is acquired remain largely unknown. Identification of mode of transmission is vital for developing preventive measures to interrupt its spread, but studies focused on this issue are difficult to implement. From epidemiological studies, it is known that there are great differences in the prevalence of infection in different populations and in ethnic groups originating from high prevalence regions. This is likely related to inferior hygienic conditions and sanitation. In developing countries, infection occurs at a much earlier age. In developed countries, the prevalence of infection is related to poor socioeconomic conditions, particularly density of living. Humans seem to be the only reservoir of H pylori, which spread from person to person by oral-oral, fecal-oral or gastro-oral routes. Most infections are acquired in childhood, possibly from parents or other children living as close contacts. Infection from the environment or from animals cannot be entirely excluded.

  5. MRI of fetal acquired brain lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, Daniela; Brugger, Peter C.; Kasprian, Gregor; Witzani, Linde; Helmer, Hanns; Dietrich, Wolfgang; Eppel, Wolfgang; Langer, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Acquired fetal brain damage is suspected in cases of destruction of previously normally formed tissue, the primary cause of which is hypoxia. Fetal brain damage may occur as a consequence of acute or chronic maternal diseases, with acute diseases causing impairment of oxygen delivery to the fetal brain, and chronic diseases interfering with normal, placental development. Infections, metabolic diseases, feto-fetal transfusion syndrome, toxic agents, mechanical traumatic events, iatrogenic accidents, and space-occupying lesions may also qualify as pathologic conditions that initiate intrauterine brain damage. MR manifestations of acute fetal brain injury (such as hemorrhage or acute ischemic lesions) can easily be recognized, as they are hardly different from postnatal lesions. The availability of diffusion-weighted sequences enhances the sensitivity in recognizing acute ischemic lesions. Recent hemorrhages are usually readily depicted on T2 (*) sequences, where they display hypointense signals. Chronic fetal brain injury may be characterized by nonspecific changes that must be attributable to the presence of an acquired cerebral pathology. The workup in suspected acquired fetal brain injury also includes the assessment of extra-CNS organs that may be affected by an underlying pathology. Finally, the placenta, as the organ that mediates oxygen delivery from the maternal circulation to the fetus, must be examined on MR images

  6. MRI of fetal acquired brain lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: daniela.prayer@meduniwien.ac.at; Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Kasprian, Gregor [Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Witzani, Linde [Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Helmer, Hanns [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Dietrich, Wolfgang [Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Eppel, Wolfgang [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Langer, Martin [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    Acquired fetal brain damage is suspected in cases of destruction of previously normally formed tissue, the primary cause of which is hypoxia. Fetal brain damage may occur as a consequence of acute or chronic maternal diseases, with acute diseases causing impairment of oxygen delivery to the fetal brain, and chronic diseases interfering with normal, placental development. Infections, metabolic diseases, feto-fetal transfusion syndrome, toxic agents, mechanical traumatic events, iatrogenic accidents, and space-occupying lesions may also qualify as pathologic conditions that initiate intrauterine brain damage. MR manifestations of acute fetal brain injury (such as hemorrhage or acute ischemic lesions) can easily be recognized, as they are hardly different from postnatal lesions. The availability of diffusion-weighted sequences enhances the sensitivity in recognizing acute ischemic lesions. Recent hemorrhages are usually readily depicted on T2 (*) sequences, where they display hypointense signals. Chronic fetal brain injury may be characterized by nonspecific changes that must be attributable to the presence of an acquired cerebral pathology. The workup in suspected acquired fetal brain injury also includes the assessment of extra-CNS organs that may be affected by an underlying pathology. Finally, the placenta, as the organ that mediates oxygen delivery from the maternal circulation to the fetus, must be examined on MR images.

  7. The effectiveness of UV-C radiation for facility-wide environmental disinfection to reduce health care-acquired infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Nathanael A; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Tang, Weiming

    2015-12-01

    Health care-acquired infections (HAIs) constitute an increasing threat for patients worldwide. Potential contributors of HAIs include environmental surfaces in health care settings, where ultraviolet-C radiation (UV-C) is commonly used for disinfection. This UV-C intervention-based pilot study was conducted in a hospital setting to identify any change in the incidence of HAIs before and after UV-C intervention, and to determine the effectiveness of UV-C in reducing pathogens. In a hospital in Culver City, CA, during 2012-2013, bactericidal doses of UV-C radiation (254 nm) were delivered through a UV-C-based mobile environmental decontamination unit. The UV-C dosing technology and expertise of the specifically trained personnel were provided together as a dedicated service model by a contracted company. The incidence of HAIs before and after the intervention period were determined and compared. The dedicated service model dramatically reduced HAIs (incidence difference, 1.3/1000 patient-days, a 34.2% reduction). Reductions in the total number and incidence proportions (28.8%) of HAIs were observed after increasing and maintaining the coverage of UV-C treatments. The dedicated service model was found to be effective in decreasing the incidence of HAIs, which could reduce disease morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. This model provides a continuously monitored and frequently UV-C-treated patient environment. This approach to UV-C disinfection was associated with a decreased incidence of HAIs. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Incidence and risk of primary cytomegalovirus infection among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Primary cytomegalovirus infection in pregnancy remains a leading cause of congenital hearing loss and mental retardation worldwide. Most women acquired CMV infection horizontally from their infected children or younger children who were cross- infected at school or day care facilities. Over 90% of infected ...

  9. Transient Oral Human Cytomegalovirus Infections Indicate Inefficient Viral Spread from Very Few Initially Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Bryan T; Krantz, Elizabeth M; Swan, David; Ferrenberg, James; Simmons, Karen; Selke, Stacy; Huang, Meei-Li; Casper, Corey; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna; Schiffer, Joshua T; Gantt, Soren

    2017-06-15

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is acquired by the oral route in children, and primary infection is associated with abundant mucosal replication, as well as the establishment of latency in myeloid cells that results in lifelong infection. The efficiency of primary CMV infection in humans following oral exposure, however, is unknown. We consistently detected self-limited, low-level oral CMV shedding events, which we termed transient CMV infections, in a prospective birth cohort of 30 highly exposed CMV-uninfected infants. We estimated the likelihood of transient oral CMV infections by comparing their observed frequency to that of established primary infections, characterized by persistent high-level shedding, viremia, and seroconversion. We developed mathematical models of viral dynamics upon initial oral CMV infection and validated them using clinical shedding data. Transient infections comprised 76 to 88% of oral CMV shedding events. For this high percentage of transient infections to occur, we identified two mathematical prerequisites: a very small number of initially infected oral cells (1 to 4) and low viral infectivity (<1.5 new cells infected/cell). These observations indicate that oral CMV infection in infants typically begins with a single virus that spreads inefficiently to neighboring cells. Thus, although the incidence of CMV infection is high during infancy, our data provide a mechanistic framework to explain why multiple CMV exposures are typically required before infection is successfully established. These findings imply that a sufficiently primed immune response could prevent CMV from establishing latent infection in humans and support the achievability of a prophylactic CMV vaccine. IMPORTANCE CMV infects the majority of the world's population and is a major cause of birth defects. Developing a vaccine to prevent CMV infection would be extremely valuable but would be facilitated by a better understanding of how natural human CMV infection is acquired. We

  10. Epithelioid angiomatosis in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: morphology and differential diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walford, N.; van der Wouw, P. A.; Das, P. K.; ten Velden, J. J.; Hulsebosch, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    A rare vascular proliferation found as a skin lesion in patients suffering from the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and sometimes referred to as epithelioid angiomatosis is believed to be a manifestation of infection by the cat scratch bacillus or a related organism. We describe the histological

  11. Epidemiology, Management, and Risk-Adjusted Mortality of ICU-Acquired Enterococcal Bacteremia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, David S Y; Bonten, Marc J M; Safdari, Khatera; Spitoni, Cristian; Frencken, Jos F; Witteveen, Esther; Horn, Janneke; Klein Klouwenberg, Peter M C; Cremer, Olaf L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Enterococcal bacteremia has been associated with high case fatality, but it remains unknown to what extent death is caused by these infections. We therefore quantified attributable mortality of intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired bacteremia caused by enterococci. METHODS:  From 2011 to

  12. [Investigation of bacterial and viral etiology in community acquired central nervous system infections with molecular methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Hasip; Tünger, Alper; Şenol, Şebnem; Gazi, Hörü; Avcı, Meltem; Örmen, Bahar; Türker, Nesrin; Atalay, Sabri; Köse, Şükran; Ulusoy, Sercan; Işıkgöz Taşbakan, Meltem; Sipahi, Oğuz Reşat; Yamazhan, Tansu; Gülay, Zeynep; Alp Çavuş, Sema; Pullukçu, Hüsnü

    2017-07-01

    In this multicenter prospective cohort study, it was aimed to evaluate the bacterial and viral etiology in community-acquired central nervous system infections by standart bacteriological culture and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. Patients hospitalized with central nervous system infections between April 2012 and February 2014 were enrolled in the study. Demographic and clinical information of the patients were collected prospectively. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of the patients were examined by standart bacteriological culture methods, bacterial multiplex PCR (Seeplex meningitis-B ACE Detection (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, Listeria monocytogenes, Group B streptococci) and viral multiplex PCR (Seeplex meningitis-V1 ACE Detection kits herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV1), herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV2), varicella zoster virus (VZV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and human herpes virus 6 (HHV6)) (Seeplex meningitis-V2 ACE Detection kit (enteroviruses)). Patients were classified as purulent meningitis, aseptic meningitis and encephalitis according to their clinical, CSF (leukocyte level, predominant cell type, protein and glucose (blood/CSF) levels) and cranial imaging results. Patients who were infected with a pathogen other than the detection of the kit or diagnosed as chronic meningitis and other diseases during the follow up, were excluded from the study. A total of 79 patients (28 female, 51 male, aged 42.1 ± 18.5) fulfilled the study inclusion criteria. A total of 46 patients were classified in purulent meningitis group whereas 33 were in aseptic meningitis/encephalitis group. Pathogens were detected by multiplex PCR in 41 patients. CSF cultures were positive in 10 (21.7%) patients (nine S.pneumoniae, one H.influenzae) and PCR were positive for 27 (58.6%) patients in purulent meningitis group. In this group one type of bacteria were detected in 18 patients (14 S.pneumoniae, two N

  13. Portable Ultraviolet Light Surface-Disinfecting Devices for Prevention of Hospital-Acquired Infections: A Health Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitovic-Jokic, Milica; Kabali, Conrad; Li, Chunmei; Higgins, Caroline

    2018-01-01

    Background Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) are infections that patients contract while in the hospital that were neither present nor developing at the time of admission. In Canada an estimated 10% of adults with short-term hospitalization have HAIs. According to 2003 Canadian data, between 4% and 6% of these patients die from these infections. The most common HAIs in Ontario are caused by Clostridium difficile. The standard method of reducing and preventing these infections is decontamination of patient rooms through manual cleaning and disinfection. Several portable no-touch ultraviolet (UV) light systems have been proposed to supplement current hospital cleaning and disinfecting practices. Methods We searched for studies published from inception of UV disinfection technology to January 23, 2017. We compared portable UV surface-disinfecting devices used together with standard hospital room cleaning and disinfecting versus standard hospital cleaning and disinfecting alone. The primary outcome was HAI from C. difficile. Other outcomes were combined HAIs, colonization (i.e., carrying an infectious agent without exhibiting disease symptoms), and the HAI-associated mortality rate. We used Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) to rate the quality of evidence of included studies. We also performed a 5-year budget impact analysis from the hospital's perspective. This assessment was limited to portable devices and did not examine wall mounted devices, which are used in some hospitals. Results The database search for the clinical review yielded 10 peer-reviewed publications that met eligibility criteria. Three studies focused on mercury UV-C–based technology, seven on pulsed xenon UV technology. Findings were either inconsistent or produced very low-quality evidence using the GRADE rating system. The intervention was effective in reducing the rate of the composite outcome of HAIs (combined) and colonization (but quality of evidence

  14. Environmental contamination and hospital-acquired infection: factors that are easily overlooked.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggs, C; Knibbs, L D; Johnson, G R; Morawska, L

    2015-10-01

    There is an ongoing debate about the reasons for and factors contributing to healthcare-associated infection (HAI). Different solutions have been proposed over time to control the spread of HAI, with more focus on hand hygiene than on other aspects such as preventing the aerial dissemination of bacteria. Yet, it emerges that there is a need for a more pluralistic approach to infection control; one that reflects the complexity of the systems associated with HAI and involves multidisciplinary teams including hospital doctors, infection control nurses, microbiologists, architects, and engineers with expertise in building design and facilities management. This study reviews the knowledge base on the role that environmental contamination plays in the transmission of HAI, with the aim of raising awareness regarding infection control issues that are frequently overlooked. From the discussion presented in the study, it is clear that many unknowns persist regarding aerial dissemination of bacteria, and its control via cleaning and disinfection of the clinical environment. There is a paucity of good-quality epidemiological data, making it difficult for healthcare authorities to develop evidence-based policies. Consequently, there is a strong need for carefully designed studies to determine the impact of environmental contamination on the spread of HAI. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Risk factors for community-acquired urinary tract infections caused by ESBL-producing enterobacteriaceae--a case-control study in a low prevalence country.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Søraas

    Full Text Available Community-acquired urinary tract infection (CA-UTI is the most common infection caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, but the clinical epidemiology of these infections in low prevalence countries is largely unknown. A population based case-control study was conducted to assess risk factors for CA-UTI caused by ESBL-producing E. coli or K. pneumoniae. The study was carried out in a source population in Eastern Norway, a country with a low prevalence of infections caused by ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. The study population comprised 100 cases and 190 controls with CA-UTI caused by ESBL-producing and non-ESBL-producing E. coli or K. pneumoniae, respectively. The following independent risk factors of ESBL-positive UTIs were identified: Travel to Asia, The Middle East or Africa either during the past six weeks (Odds ratio (OR = 21; 95% confidence interval (CI: 4.5-97 or during the past 6 weeks to 24 months (OR = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.1-4.4, recent use of fluoroquinolones (OR = 16; 95% CI: 3.2-80 and β-lactams (except mecillinam (OR = 5.0; 95% CI: 2.1-12, diabetes mellitus (OR = 3.2; 95% CI: 1.0-11 and recreational freshwater swimming the past year (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.0-4.0. Factors associated with decreased risk were increasing number of fish meals per week (OR = 0.68 per fish meal; 95% CI: 0.51-0.90 and age (OR = 0.89 per 5 year increase; 95% CI: 0.82-0.97. In conclusion, we have identified risk factors that elucidate mechanisms and routes for dissemination of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in a low prevalence country, which can be used to guide appropriate treatment of CA-UTI and targeted infection control measures.

  16. Community-acquired pneumonia: 2012 history, mythology, and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donowitz, Gerald R

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonia remains one of the major disease entities practicing physicians must manage. It is a leading cause of infection-related morbidity and mortality in all age groups, and a leading cause of death in those older than 65 years of age. Despite its frequency and importance, clinical questions have remained in the therapy of community-acquired pneumonia including when to start antibiotics, when to stop them, who to treat, and what agents to use. Answers to these questions have involved historical practice, mythology, and science-sometimes good science, and sometimes better science. How clinical decisions are made for patients with community-acquired pneumonia serves as an illustrative model for other problem areas of medicine and allows for insight as to how clinical decisions have been made and clinical practice established.

  17. Clinical requirements in the treatment of today's respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höffken, G

    1993-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are among the most frequent infections in man and lower tract infections account substantially for the overall mortality in hospitals. Regarding the etiology of pneumonias, one has to consider different pathogenic mechanisms, age of the patients, underlying diseases, concomitant medications, symptomatologies, seasonal influences, and clinical conditions, e.g. intensive care environment and mechanical ventilation. To optimize the rational management of respiratory infections, identification of the etiologic agent would be desirable. The decision of how to treat is often based on epidemiologic, clinical, and radiological assessments. Epidemiologic studies have shown a pronounced difference in the etiologic spectrum between community- and hospital-acquired RTIs. In community-acquired pneumonias, pneumococci, Haemophilus influenzae, Legionella, Mycoplasma and viruses predominate, whereas in nosocomially acquired pneumonias, Enterobacteriaceae, e.g. Klebsiella, Proteus, Enterobacter as well as Pseudomonas and staphylococci comprise the most frequent isolates. Empirical therapy has to cover all possible etiologic pathogens which most likely cause the infection. In addition, an adequate kinetic profile, e.g. once or twice daily dosing, sufficient pulmonary tissue or fluid penetration, and acceptable tolerance and costs are prerequisites for optimal therapy. Drugs of choice for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia are aminobenzylpenicillins or macrolides. Oral cephalosporins exhibit excellent activity against many bacterial pathogens of typical community-acquired pneumonia, and are active against beta-lactamase-producing H. influenzae.

  18. Clinical evaluation and outcomes of naturally acquired West Nile virus infection in raptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Nicole M; Kratz, Gail E; Bates, Rebecca; Scherpelz, Judy A; Bowen, Richard A; Komar, Nicholas

    2009-03-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) infection and associated disease and mortality have been documented in numerous North American raptor species. Information regarding clinical presentations and long-term outcomes of WNV-infected raptors is important in the clinic for the diagnosis, treatment, and assessment of prognosis, as well as for understanding potential population level effects on raptor species. Raptors of 22 species admitted to a rehabilitation clinic were tested, from 2002 to 2005, for previous and acute WNV infection, while comparing clinical syndromes, trauma, and rehabilitation outcomes. Forty-two percent of admitted raptors (132/314) had been infected with WNV, and these presented with a WNV-attributed clinical disease rate of 67.4% (89/132). West Nile virus-infected raptors were less likely to be released (79/132 [59.8%]) than negative raptors (138/182 [75.8%]) and more likely to die or be euthanized (47/132 [35.6%] for WNV-infected vs. 32/182 [17.6%] for WNV-negative). However, WNV-infected raptors with neurologic disease were no less likely to be released (29/53 [54.7%]) than those without neurologic disease (50/79 [63.3%]). Clinical WNV-associated syndromes varied among species. Great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) were more likely to have neurologic signs, whereas American kestrels (Falco sparverius) and Swainson's hawks (Buteo swainsonii) were less likely to have neurologic signs. These results suggest that free-ranging raptors are frequently infected with WNV and that clinical syndromes differ among species. WNV has potentially devastating effects on raptors; however, rehabilitation of WNV-infected raptors can lead to positive outcomes, even for those having had severe neurologic disease.

  19. Abstract: Implementing Infection Control Measures in Neonatology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background Neonatal infection is a primary cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Objective The project's objective is to facilitate quality improvement by reduction of hospital-acquired infection (HAI) in hospitalized neonates. Methods Current infection control practices were surveyed and three main areas were ...

  20. The Ability to Assimilate Technology as a Source of Competitive Advantage of Financial Companies in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Glabiszewski Waldemar; Zastempowski Maciej

    2016-01-01

    This article is empirical in nature and attempts to assess the impact of ability to assimilate newly acquired technologies by financial companies operating in Poland gaining market competitive advantages. The outcome of the research conducted proved the existence of this relationship and found it be strong. This means that the development of these abilities within the absorptive potential of financial companies should trigger a significant increase in the market competitive advantages held by...

  1. Prevalence and characterisation of Staphylococcus aureus causing community-acquired skin and soft tissue infections on Java and Bali, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosaningsih, Dewi; Santoso, Sanarto; Setijowati, Nanik; Rasyid, Harun A; Budayanti, Nyoman S; Suata, Ketut; Widhyatmoko, Dicky B; Purwono, Priyo B; Kuntaman, Kuntaman; Damayanti, Damayanti; Prakoeswa, Cita R S; Laurens, Mitchell; van Nierop, Josephine W I; Nanninga, Geraldine L; Oudenes, Neline; de Regt, Michelle; Snijders, Susan V; Verbrugh, Henri A; Severin, Juliëtte A

    2018-01-01

    To define the role of Staphylococcus aureus in community settings among patients with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) in Indonesia. Staphylococcus aureus were cultured from anterior nares, throat and wounds of 567 ambulatory patients presenting with SSTI. The mecA gene and genes encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL; lukF-PV and lukS-PV) and exfoliative toxin (ET; eta and etb) were determined by PCR. Clonal relatedness among methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and PVL-positive S. aureus was analysed using multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) typing, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) for a subset of isolates. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) was determined for all MRSA isolates. Moreover, determinants for S. aureus SSTI, and PVL/ET-positive vs PVL/ET-negative S. aureus were assessed. Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from SSTI wounds of 257 (45.3%) patients, eight (3.1%) of these were MRSA. Genes encoding PVL and ETs were detected in 21.8% and 17.5% of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), respectively. PVL-positive MRSA was not detected. Nasopharyngeal S. aureus carriage was an independent determinant for S. aureus SSTI (odds ratio [OR] 1.8). Primary skin infection (OR 5.4) and previous antibiotic therapy (OR 3.5) were associated with PVL-positive MSSA. Primary skin infection (OR 2.2) was the only factor associated with ET-positive MSSA. MLVA typing revealed two more prevalent MSSA clusters. One ST1-MRSA-SCCmec type IV isolate and a cluster of ST239-MRSA-SCCmec type III were found. Community-acquired SSTI in Indonesia was frequently caused by PVL-positive MSSA, and the hospital-associated ST239-MRSA may have spread from the hospital into the community. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Organizational culture and its implications on infection prevention and control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Baral

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The hospital acquired infections are becoming common in our hospitals lately. These infections are difficult to treat and maybe life threatening. Hospital acquired infection  can be minimized or eradicated by good Infection Prevention and Control guidelines and good hand hygiene practices. The success of Infection Prevention and Control guidelines program in any hospital is largely impacted by the organizational culture.  In any health care setting the management is challenged by the organizational culture to change of any kind. Where implementation of Infection Prevention and Control guidelines program is easily implemented in some hospitals it is very difficult in others. Moreover, hand hygiene is not only biomedical practice but also has more behavioral factors. 

  3. C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, clinical pulmonary infection score, and pneumonia severity scores in nursing home acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porfyridis, Ilias; Georgiadis, Georgios; Vogazianos, Paris; Mitis, Georgios; Georgiou, Andreas

    2014-04-01

    Patients with nursing home acquired pneumonia (NHAP) present a distinct group of lower respiratory track infections with different risk factors, clinical presentation, and mortality rates. To evaluate the diagnostic value of clinical pulmonary infection score (CPIS), C-reactive protein, and procalcitonin and to compare the accuracy of pneumonia severity scores (confusion, urea nitrogen, breathing frequency, blood pressure, ≥ 65 y of age [CURB-65]; pneumonia severity index; NHAP index; systolic blood pressure, multilobar involvement, albumin, breathing frequency, tachycardia, confusion, oxygen, arterial pH [SMART-COP]; and systolic blood pressure, oxygen, age > 65 y, breathing frequency [SOAR]) in predicting in-patient mortality from NHAP. Nursing home residents admitted to the hospital with acute respiratory illness were enrolled in the study. Subjects were classified as having NHAP (Group A) or other pulmonary disorders (Group B). Clinical, imaging, and laboratory data were assessed to compute CPIS and severity scores. C-reactive protein and procalcitonin were measured by immunonephelometry and immunoassay, respectively. Fifty-eight subjects were diagnosed with NHAP (Group A) and 29 with other pulmonary disorders (Group B). The mean C-reactive protein ± SD was 16.38 ± 8.6 mg/dL in Group A and 5.2 ± 5.6 mg/dL in Group B (P 1.1 ng/mL was an independent predictor of in-patient mortality. Of the pneumonia severity scores, CURB-65 showed greater accuracy in predicting in-patient mortality (area under the curve of 0.68, 95% CI 0.53-0.84, P = .06). CPIS, procalcitonin, and C-reactive protein are reliable for the diagnosis of NHAP. Procalcitonin and CURB-65 are accurate in predicting in-patient mortality in NHAP.

  4. Epidemiology of HIV infection in Northern Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, W.U.Z.; Malik, I.A.; Hassan, Z.U.; Hannan, A.; Ahmad, M.

    1993-01-01

    At the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi, facilities for HIV screening are available since 1987. So far, 54, 170 individuals have been tested. These included 48235 blood donors, 3369 persons proceeding abroad, 561 patients of venereal diseases, 350 Lymphoma cases, 21 deportees from the UAE, 460 clinically suspected cases of AIDS, 735 persons who were worried about HIV infection and 439 family members of HIV positive cases. A total of 30 cases were positive for anti-HIV on a strict protocol, which included screening tests followed by confirmatory tests including Western blot for HIV antibodies. The mode of HIV transmission was ascertained after a detailed history of all seropostive cases. It was found that in 24 cases the virus was acquired through sexual contact with high risk persons, which was homosexual in 3, heterosexual in 17, and bisexual in 4 cases. In 4 cases, the infection was acquired through blood transfusion, one child was infected through breast feeding, whereas only in one case the exact mode of HIV transmission was unclear. Out of 30 HIV positive cases, only three cases acquired the disease within Pakistan, 20 had acquired HIV infection during their stay in the Gulf states, while few cases had it from other countries (Saudi Arabia 1, Greece 1, France 2, S E Asia 3). (author)

  5. The role of acquired immunity and periodontal disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Yen-Tung A

    2003-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis in human periodontal diseases is limited by the lack of specific and sensitive tools or models to study the complex microbial challenges and their interactions with the host's immune system. Recent advances in cellular and molecular biology research have demonstrated the importance of the acquired immune system not only in fighting the virulent periodontal pathogens but also in protecting the host from developing further devastating conditions in periodontal infections. The use of genetic knockout and immunodeficient mouse strains has shown that the acquired immune response-in particular, CD4+ T-cells-plays a pivotal role in controlling the ongoing infection, the immune/inflammatory responses, and the subsequent host's tissue destruction. In particular, studies of the pathogen-specific CD4+ T-cell-mediated immunity have clarified the roles of: (i) the relative diverse immune repertoire involved in periodontal pathogenesis, (ii) the contribution of pathogen-associated Th1-Th2 cytokine expressions in periodontal disease progression, and (iii) micro-organism-triggered periodontal CD4+ T-cell-mediated osteoclastogenic factor, 'RANK-L', which is linked to the induction of alveolar bone destruction in situ. The present review will focus on some recent advances in the acquired immune responses involving B-cells, CD8+ T-cells, and CD4+ T-cells in the context of periodontal disease progression. New approaches will further facilitate our understanding of their underlying molecular mechanisms that may lead to the development of new treatment modalities for periodontal diseases and their associated complications.

  6. Relationship between current level of immunodeficiency and non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-defining malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reekie, Joanne; Kosa, Csaba; Engsig, Frederik

    2010-01-01

    In the combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) era, non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining malignancies account for more morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients than AIDS-defining malignancies. However, conflicting data have been reported...

  7. Design of two molecular methodologies for the rapid identification of Colombian community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Escobar, Javier Antonio; Gómez, Ingrid Tatiana; Murillo, Martha Johanna; Castro, Betsy Esperanza; Chavarro, Bibiana; Márquez, Ricaurte Alejandro; Vanegas, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections are found with increasing the frequency, both in healthy individuals in the community and in hospitalized patients. In Colombia and the Andean region, CA-MRSA isolates have a genetic background that is related to the pandemic USA300 clone. Objective. Two molecular methods are designed and standardized for the rapid differentiation of Colombian community-acquired and hospital-acquired methicillin-...

  8. Health related quality of life in patients with community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia in France

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Luiz Flavio; Saba, Grèce; Ricard, Jean-Damien; Messika, Jonathan; Gaillat, Jacques; Bonnin, Pierre; Chidiac, Christian; Illes, Hajnal-Gabriela; Laurichesse, Henri; Detournay, Bruno; Petitpretz, Patrick; de Pouvourville, Gérard

    2018-01-01

    Background Community Acquired Pneumococcal Pneumonia is a lung infection that causes serious health problems and can lead to complications and death. The aim of this study was to observe and analyze health related quality of life after a hospital episode for patients with community acquired pneumococcal pneumonia in France. Methods A total of 524 individuals were enrolled prospectively in the study and were followed for 12 months after hospital discharge. Presence of streptococcus pneumoniae ...

  9. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: community transmission, pathogenesis, and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Nishiyama, Akihito; Takano, Tomomi; Yabe, Shizuka; Higuchi, Wataru; Razvina, Olga; Shi, Da

    2010-08-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is able to persist not only in hospitals (with a high level of antimicrobial agent use) but also in the community (with a low level of antimicrobial agent use). The former is called hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) and the latter community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA). It is believed MRSA clones are generated from S. aureus through insertion of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec), and outbreaks occur as they spread. Several worldwide and regional clones have been identified, and their epidemiological, clinical, and genetic characteristics have been described. CA-MRSA is likely able to survive in the community because of suitable SCCmec types (type IV or V), a clone-specific colonization/infection nature, toxin profiles (including Pantone-Valentine leucocidin, PVL), and narrow drug resistance patterns. CA-MRSA infections are generally seen in healthy children or young athletes, with unexpected cases of diseases, and also in elderly inpatients, occasionally surprising clinicians used to HA-MRSA infections. CA-MRSA spreads within families and close-contact groups or even through public transport, demonstrating transmission cores. Re-infection (including multifocal infection) frequently occurs, if the cores are not sought out and properly eradicated. Recently, attention has been given to CA-MRSA (USA300), which originated in the US, and is growing as HA-MRSA and also as a worldwide clone. CA-MRSA infection in influenza season has increasingly been noted as well. MRSA is also found in farm and companion animals, and has occasionally transferred to humans. As such, the epidemiological, clinical, and genetic behavior of CA-MRSA, a growing threat, is focused on in this study.

  10. The estimated lifetime probability of acquiring human papillomavirus in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesson, Harrell W; Dunne, Eileen F; Hariri, Susan; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2014-11-01

    Estimates of the lifetime probability of acquiring human papillomavirus (HPV) can help to quantify HPV incidence, illustrate how common HPV infection is, and highlight the importance of HPV vaccination. We developed a simple model, based primarily on the distribution of lifetime numbers of sex partners across the population and the per-partnership probability of acquiring HPV, to estimate the lifetime probability of acquiring HPV in the United States in the time frame before HPV vaccine availability. We estimated the average lifetime probability of acquiring HPV among those with at least 1 opposite sex partner to be 84.6% (range, 53.6%-95.0%) for women and 91.3% (range, 69.5%-97.7%) for men. Under base case assumptions, more than 80% of women and men acquire HPV by age 45 years. Our results are consistent with estimates in the existing literature suggesting a high lifetime probability of HPV acquisition and are supported by cohort studies showing high cumulative HPV incidence over a relatively short period, such as 3 to 5 years.

  11. Non-Escherichia coli versus Escherichia coli community-acquired urinary tract infections in children hospitalized in a tertiary center: relative frequency, risk factors, antimicrobial resistance and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Nir; Ashkenazi, Shai; Yaari, Arnon; Samra, Zmira; Livni, Gilat

    2005-07-01

    Currently hospitalization for children with urinary tract infections (UTIs) is reserved for severe or complicated cases. Changes may have taken place in the characteristics and causative uropathogens of hospital-treated community-acquired UTI. To study children hospitalized in a tertiary center with community-acquired UTI, compare Escherichia coli and non-E. coli UTI, define predictors for non-E. coli UTI and elucidate the appropriate therapeutic approach. A prospective clinical and laboratory study from 2001 through 2002 in a tertiary pediatric medical center. Patients were divided by results of the urine culture into E. coli and non-E. coli UTI groups, which were compared. Of 175 episodes of culture-proved UTI, 70 (40%) were caused by non-E. coli pathogens. Non-E. coli UTI was more commonly found in children who were male (P = 0.005), who had underlying renal abnormalities (P = 0.0085) and who had received antibiotic therapy in the prior month (P = 0.0009). Non-E. coli uropathogens were often resistant to antibiotics usually recommended for initial therapy for UTI, including cephalosporins and aminoglycosides; 19% were initially treated with inappropriate empiric intravenous antibiotics (compared with 2% for E. coli UTI, P = 0.0001), with a longer hospitalization. Current treatment routines are often inappropriate for hospitalized children with non-E. coli UTI, which is relatively common in this population. The defined risk factors associated with non-E. coli UTIs and its antimicrobial resistance patterns should be considered to improve empiric antibiotic therapy for these infections.

  12. Severity assessment scores to guide empirical use of antibiotics in community acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singanayagam, Aran; Chalmers, James D

    2013-10-01

    Severity assessment scores were first developed to predict the 30 day mortality in community acquired pneumonia; however, several guidelines have extended their use to guide empirical antibiotic prescription decisions. This approach has theoretical advantages because a decrease in broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment in low-risk patients might reduce antibiotic-related side-effects, and to give broad-spectrum therapy to patients at higher risk of death is intuitive. However, evidence in support of this approach is not clear. In particular, the British Thoracic Society guidelines suggest withholding a macrolide from patients with low CURB 65 scores, despite evidence that these patients have a higher frequency of atypical pathogens than do those with a higher severity of pneumonia. Severity scores do not perform well in some groups and might overestimate disease severity in elderly people, leading to inappropriate broad-spectrum treatment to those at high risk of complications such as Clostridium difficile infection. In this Review, we discuss the evidence for antibiotic prescribing guided by severity score and suggest that more evidence of effect and implementation is needed before this approach can be universally adopted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Potentially Preventable Hospitalizations and the Burden of Healthcare-Associated Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L. Lorden

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: An estimated 4% of hospital admissions acquired healthcare-associated infections (HAIs and accounted for $9.8 (USD billion in direct cost during 2011. In 2010, nearly 140 000 of the 3.5 million potentially preventable hospitalizations (PPHs may have acquired an HAI. There is a knowledge gap regarding the co-occurrence of these events. Aims: To estimate the period occurrences and likelihood of acquiring an HAI for the PPH population. Methods: Retrospective, cross-sectional study using logistic regression analysis of 2011 Texas Inpatient Discharge Public Use Data File including 2.6 million admissions from 576 acute care hospitals. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Prevention Quality Indicator software identified PPH, and existing administrative data identification methodologies were refined for Clostridium difficile infection, central line–associated bloodstream infection, catheter-associated urinary tract infection, and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Odds of acquiring HAIs when admitted with PPH were adjusted for demographic, health status, hospital, and community characteristics. Findings: We identified 272 923 PPH, 14 219 HAI, and 986 admissions with PPH and HAI. Odds of acquiring an HAI for diabetic patients admitted for lower extremity amputation demonstrated significantly increased odds ratio of 2.9 (95% confidence interval: 2.16-3.91 for Clostridium difficile infection. Other PPH patients had lower odds of acquiring HAI compared to non-PPH patients, and results were frequently significant. Conclusions: Clinical implications include increased risk of HAI among diabetic patients admitted for lower extremity amputation. Methodological implications include identification of rare events for inpatient subpopulations and the need for improved codification of HAIs to improve cost and policy analyses regarding allocation of resources toward clinical improvements.

  14. Bacterial Etiology and Antibiotic Resistance Profile of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in a Cameroonian City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nzalie, Rolf Nyah-Tuku; Gonsu, Hortense Kamga; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Community-acquired urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are usually treated empirically. Geographical variations in etiologic agents and their antibiotic sensitivity patterns are common. Knowledge of antibiotic resistance trends is important for improving evidence-based recommendations for empirical treatment of UTIs. Our aim was to determine the major bacterial etiologies of CAUTIs and their antibiotic resistance patterns in a cosmopolitan area of Cameroon for comparison with prescription practices of local physicians. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional descriptive study at two main hospitals in Yaoundé, collecting a clean-catch mid-stream urine sample from 92 patients having a clinical diagnosis of UTI. The empirical antibiotherapy was noted, and identification of bacterial species was done on CLED agar; antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Results. A total of 55 patients had samples positive for a UTI. Ciprofloxacin and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid were the most empirically prescribed antibiotics (30.9% and 23.6%, resp.); bacterial isolates showed high prevalence of resistance to both compounds. Escherichia coli (50.9%) was the most common pathogen, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (16.4%). Prevalence of resistance for ciprofloxacin was higher compared to newer quinolones. Conclusions. E. coli and K. pneumoniae were the predominant bacterial etiologies; the prevalence of resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics was high.

  15. Update on the prevention and control of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skov, Robert; Christiansen, Keryn; Dancer, Stephanie J; Daum, Robert S; Dryden, Matthew; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Lowy, Franklin D

    2012-03-01

    The rapid dissemination of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) since the early 2000s and the appearance of new successful lineages is a matter of concern. The burden of these infections varies widely between different groups of individuals and in different regions of the world. Estimating the total burden of disease is therefore problematic. Skin and soft-tissue infections, often in otherwise healthy young individuals, are the most common clinical manifestation of these infections. The antibiotic susceptibilities of these strains also vary, although they are often more susceptible to 'traditional' antibiotics than related hospital-acquired strains. Preventing the dissemination of these organisms throughout the general population requires a multifaceted approach, including screening and decolonisation, general hygiene and cleaning measures, antibiotic stewardship programmes and, in the future, vaccination. The current evidence on the prevention and control of CA-MRSA is appraised and summarised in this review. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  16. Hepatitis C virus infection in the human immunodeficiency virus infected patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Louise Nygaard; Lundbo, Lene Fogt; Benfield, Thomas

    2014-09-14

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) share the same transmission routes; therefore, coinfection is frequent. An estimated 5-10 million individuals alone in the western world are infected with both viruses. The majority of people acquire HCV by injection drug use and, to a lesser extent, through blood transfusion and blood products. Recently, there has been an increase in HCV infections among men who have sex with men. In the context of effective antiretroviral treatment, liver-related deaths are now more common than Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome-related deaths among HIV-HCV coinfected individuals. Morbidity and mortality rates from chronic HCV infection will increase because the infection incidence peaked in the mid-1980s and because liver disease progresses slowly and is clinically silent to cirrhosis and end-stage-liver disease over a 15-20 year time period for 15%-20% of chronically infected individuals. HCV treatment has rapidly changed with the development of new direct-acting antiviral agents; therefore, cure rates have greatly improved because the new treatment regimens target different parts of the HCV life cycle. In this review, we focus on the epidemiology, diagnosis and the natural course of HCV as well as current and future strategies for HCV therapy in the context of HIV-HCV coinfection in the western world.

  17. Microbe-Induced Inflammatory Signals Triggering Acquired Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, J Luis; Kotecha, Ritesh; Nakao, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    Acquired bone marrow failure syndromes encompass a unique set of disorders characterized by a reduction in the effective production of mature cells by the bone marrow (BM). In the majority of cases, these syndromes are the result of the immune-mediated destruction of hematopoietic stem cells or their progenitors at various stages of differentiation. Microbial infection has also been associated with hematopoietic stem cell injury and may lead to associated transient or persistent BM failure, and recent evidence has highlighted the potential impact of commensal microbes and their metabolites on hematopoiesis. We summarize the interactions between microorganisms and the host immune system and emphasize how they may impact the development of acquired BM failure.

  18. Treatment of infectious complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furio, M M; Wordell, C J

    1985-01-01

    The infectious complications of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are discussed, and the conventional and nonconventional therapies used for these infections are reviewed. The infections most commonly encountered in patients with AIDS are Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (58%), Candida esophagitis (31%), toxoplasmosis (21%), cytomegalovirus infections (15%), and herpes-simplex virus infections (12%). Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia is the most common life-threatening process in these patients. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ) is considered the drug of choice for its treatment. Oral candidiasis often indicates the progression to AIDS in the high-risk populations of homosexual or bisexual men, intravenous drug abusers, and individuals with hemophilia. Nystatin suspension is commonly used to treat oral candidiasis, while Candida esophagitis demands systemic therapy with ketoconazole. Toxoplasmosis most commonly manifests itself in patients with AIDS as a cerebral mass lesion. The recommended therapy includes sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine. AIDS patients frequently experience protozoal invasion of the intestinal tract with Giardia lamblia, Isospora belli, and Cryptosporidium muris. Various drugs have been tried for these infections, including quinacrine hydrochloride, metronidazole, TMP-SMZ, and spiramycin. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections commonly involve the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, eyes, brain, and nervous system. Attempts to treat these disseminated CMV infections with antiviral agents, including acyclovir, have not been successful. However, acyclovir has been found beneficial in the treatment of herpes-simplex virus infections. Multiple infectious complications may occur in patients with AIDS as a result of the cellular-immune deficiency associated with this disease. Until more research is done with AIDS patients, therapy must be based on the data available from the treatment of these infections in immunosuppressed patients without AIDS.

  19. Institutional advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Xavier

    Is there such a thing as institutional advantage—and what does it mean for the study of corporate competitive advantage? In this article, I develop the concept of institutional competitive advantage, as distinct from plain competitive advantage and from comparative institutional advantage. I first

  20. [Ceftaroline fosamil in community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calbo, Esther; Zaragoza, Rafael

    2014-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common infection in developed countries and causes a large number of hospital admissions and deaths. In recent years, the incidence of this disease has increased, caused by progressive population aging. Following the introduction of the conjugate vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae, there have been significant epidemiological changes that require close monitoring because of the possible emergence of new patterns of resistance. This article aims to review the role of ceftaroline fosamil, a new parenteral cephalosporin with antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens, in the treatment of pneumonia. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have shown the efficacy of ceftaroline fosamil against penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Additionally, ceftaroline has shown similar efficacy and safety to ceftriaxone in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia with severe prognosis (prognostic severity index III and IV) in two phase III clinical trials. Although a non-inferiority design was used for these clinical trials, some data suggest a superior efficacy of ceftaroline, with earlier clinical response and higher cure rate in infections caused by S. pneumoniae, making this drug particularly interesting for critically-ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit. Ceftaroline may also be considered for empirical and directed treatment of MRSA pneumonia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing bacteria causing community-acquired urinary tract infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megged, Orli

    2014-09-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria are infrequent pathogens of community-acquired (CA) urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of and identify risk factors for CA-UTIs due to ESBL-producing microorganisms (CA-ESBL-UTI). The medical records of all children diagnosed with CA-ESBL-UTI at our medical center between 2003 and 2013 were reviewed. Patients with non-ESBL-UTIs during the same period were included as controls. Eighty cases of CA-ESBL-UTI were identified. The incidence of ESBL-UTI increased from 2 to 3.8% during the study period. Compared to children with non-ESBL-UTI, those with ESBL were more likely to be of Arab descent, to have underlying medical conditions, to have received antibiotics in the month prior to the UTI and to have been previously hospitalized. The mean duration of hospitalization for patients with an ESBL-UTI was significantly longer than that for patients with a non-ESBL UTI (3.6 vs. 2 days; P = 0.01). In multivariate analysis, Arab ethnicity [odds ratio (OR) 6.1; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 2.7-13.6] and recent antibiotic treatment (OR 4.0; 95 % CI 1.6-10.4) were risk factors for CA-ESBL-UTI. The incidence of CA-ESBL-UTI is rising. The empiric treatment for suspected UTI in children who had been previously hospitalized and who had received antibiotics in the last month should cover ESBL-producing bacteria.

  2. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in community-acquired primary pyoderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Rahul

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although prevalence of MRSA strains is reported to be increasing, there are no studies of their prevalence in community-acquired primary pyodermas in western India. Aims: This study aimed at determining the prevalence of MRSA infection in community-acquired primary pyodermas. Methods: Open, prospective survey carried out in a tertiary care hospital in Mumbai. Materials and Methods: Eighty-six patients with primary pyoderma, visiting the dermatology outpatient, were studied clinically and microbiologically. Sensitivity testing was done for vancomycin, sisomycin, gentamicin, framycetin, erythromycin, methicillin, cefazolin, cefuroxime, penicillin G and ciprofloxacin. Phage typing was done for MRSA positive strains. Results : The culture positivity rate was 83.7%. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in all cases except two. Barring one, all strains of Staphylococcus were sensitive to methicillin. Conclusions: Methicillin resistance is uncommon in community-acquired primary pyodermas in Mumbai. Treatment with antibacterials active against MRSA is probably unwarranted for community-acquired primary pyodermas.

  3. KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP - THEIR IMPACT ON CREATING SUSTAINABLE COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Stošić Mihajlović

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern economy, less oriented to natural resources, and more on the intellectual aspects of asset, based on the fact that the competitive advantage of any company is the knowledge that she possesses. Terms of economic theory terms, it is necessary to build a strategy that will produce super profits, ie. strategy that will enable the efficient exploitation of knowledge companies to win competitive advantage. It is assumed that knowledge in its explicit or implicit manifestations can be managed. The question is how to develop a knowledge management strategy that would exploit this valuable resource and protect its value. Possibility of knowledge management is becoming increasingly important in today's so-called. knowledge economy (knowledge economy. The creation and dissemination of knowledge within modern organizations is becoming increasingly crucial factor in achieving and maintaining its competitive advantage. In fact, the only sustainable competitive advantage of modern organizations derives from what the company knows, how efficiently used what you know and how quickly acquire and use new knowledge. Modern organizations in the era of knowledge is one who learns, remembers and acts on the basis of the information and knowledge available in the best possible way.

  4. Antibiotic resistance patterns of pediatric community-acquired urinary infections

    OpenAIRE

    Guidoni, Eliana Biondi Medeiros; Berezin, Eitan N.; Nigro, Stanley; Santiago, Nataly A; Benini, Vanda; Toporovski, Julio

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge about antimicrobial resistance patterns of the etiological agents of urinary tract infections (UTIs) is essential for appropriate therapy. Urinary isolates from symptomatic UTI cases attended at Santa Casa University Hospital of São Paulo from August 1986 to December 1989 and August 2004 to December 2005 were identified by conventional methods. Antimicrobial resistance testing was performed by Kirby Bauer's disc diffusion method. Among the 257 children, E. coli was found in 77%. A h...

  5. Hand hygiene noncompliance and the cost of hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Keith L; Anderson, Deverick J; Kaye, Keith S

    2010-04-01

    Hand hygiene noncompliance is a major cause of nosocomial infection. Nosocomial infection cost data exist, but the effect of hand hygiene noncompliance is unknown. To estimate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-related cost of an incident of hand hygiene noncompliance by a healthcare worker during patient care. Two models were created to simulate sequential patient contacts by a hand hygiene-noncompliant healthcare worker. Model 1 involved encounters with patients of unknown MRSA status. Model 2 involved an encounter with an MRSA-colonized patient followed by an encounter with a patient of unknown MRSA status. The probability of new MRSA infection for the second patient was calculated using published data. A simulation of 1 million noncompliant events was performed. Total costs of resulting infections were aggregated and amortized over all events. Duke University Medical Center, a 750-bed tertiary medical center in Durham, North Carolina. Model 1 was associated with 42 MRSA infections (infection rate, 0.0042%). Mean infection cost was $47,092 (95% confidence interval [CI], $26,040-$68,146); mean cost per noncompliant event was $1.98 (95% CI, $0.91-$3.04). Model 2 was associated with 980 MRSA infections (0.098%). Mean infection cost was $53,598 (95% CI, $50,098-$57,097); mean cost per noncompliant event was $52.53 (95% CI, $47.73-$57.32). A 200-bed hospital incurs $1,779,283 in annual MRSA infection-related expenses attributable to hand hygiene noncompliance. A 1.0% increase in hand hygiene compliance resulted in annual savings of $39,650 to a 200-bed hospital. Hand hygiene noncompliance is associated with significant attributable hospital costs. Minimal improvements in compliance lead to substantial savings.

  6. Physicians' obligations to patients infected with Ebola: echoes of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkoff, Howard; Ecker, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Physicians across the United States are engaged in training in the identification, isolation, and initial care of patients with Ebola. Some will be asked to do more. The issue this viewpoint will address is the moral obligation of physicians to participate in these activities. In order to do so the implicit contract between society and its physicians will be considered, as will many of the arguments that are redolent of those that were litigated 30 years ago when acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) was raising public fears to similar levels, and some physicians were publically proclaiming their unwillingness to render care to those individuals. We will build the case that if steps are taken to reduce risks-optimal personal protective equipment and training-to what is essentially the lowest possible level then rendering care should be seen as obligatory. If not, as in the AIDS era there will be an unfair distribution of risk, with those who take their obligations seriously having to go beyond their fair measure of exposure. It would also potentially undermine patients' faith in the altruism of physicians and thereby degrade the esteem in which our profession is held and the trust that underpins the therapeutic relationship. Finally there is an implicit contract with society. Society gives tremendously to us; we encumber a debt from all society does and offers, a debt for which recompense is rarely sought. The mosaic of moral, historical, and professional imperatives to render care to the infected all echoes the words of medicine's moral leaders in the AIDS epidemic. Arnold Relman perhaps put it most succinctly, "the risk of contracting the patient's disease is one of the risks that is inherent in the profession of medicine. Physicians who are not willing to accept that risk…ought not be in the practice of medicine." Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of an ultraviolet room disinfection protocol to decrease nursing home microbial burden, infection and hospitalization rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Christine R; Taneli, Yavuz; Neiman, Tammy; Dyer, Elaine M; Arzaga, Alvin Jason A; Kelber, Sheryl T

    2017-03-03

    The focus of nursing home infection control procedures has been on decreasing transmission between healthcare workers and residents. Less evidence is available regarding whether decontamination of high-touch environmental surfaces impacts infection rates or resident outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine if ultraviolet disinfection is associated with changes in: 1) microbial counts and adenosine triphosphate counts on high-touch surfaces; and 2) facility wide nursing home acquired infection rates, and infection-related hospitalization. The study was conducted in one 160-bed long-term care facility. Following discharge of each resident, their room was cleaned and then disinfected using a newly acquired ultraviolet light disinfection device. Shared living spaces received weekly ultraviolet light disinfection. Thirty-six months of pretest infection and hospitalization data were compared with 12 months of posttest data. Pre and posttest cultures were taken from high-touch surfaces, and luminometer readings of adenosine triphosphate were done. Nursing home acquired infection rates were analyzed relative to hospital acquired infection rates using analysis of variance procedures. Wilcoxon signed rank tests, The Cochran's Q, and Chi Square were also used. There were statistically significant decreases in adenosine triphosphate readings on all high-touch surfaces after cleaning and disinfection. Culture results were positive for gram-positive cocci or rods on 33% (n = 30) of the 90 surfaces swabbed at baseline. After disinfectant cleaning, 6 of 90 samples (7.1%) tested positive for a gram-positive bacilli, and after ultraviolet disinfection 4 of the 90 samples (4.4%) were positive. There were significant decreases in nursing home acquired relative to hospital-acquired infection rates for the total infections (p = .004), urinary tract infection rates (p = .014), respiratory system infection rates (p = .017) and for rates of infection of the skin

  8. Oritavancin: a new opportunity for outpatient therapy of serious infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Alan

    2012-04-01

    Oritavancin is a new antibiotic for the treatment of serious infections with Gram-positive bacteria. It has been shown to be effective against methicillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus as well as enterococci. With a terminal half-life of 393 hours, oritavancin lends itself to a convenient and potentially cost-effective single-dose regimen. The single-dose regimen is currently being evaluated in pivotal phase 3 studies. This unique property provides an opportunity to assure consistent, effective, and safe treatment for serious infections while reducing the costs of care through the elimination of multiple infusions, reduced medical care staff, shorter hospital stays, and avoidance of hospital-acquired infections. These features seem ideal for the use of oritavancin in the outpatient management of serious infections. The impact that oritavancin will have on outpatient therapy is unclear. Current models will need to change with only a single infusion. Physician monitoring of the infection and underlying diseases may not be as frequent despite the need for close follow-up and frequent evaluations. There will be less need for a team of outpatient infusion specialists. Outpatient therapy will be compensated less without multiple infusions. With the possibility of fewer physician and other medical visits, there will be more responsibility for the patient and family and a reliance on patients to care for themselves. Although oritavancin offers tremendous theoretical advantages in the outpatient treatment of serious infections, care should be taken to assure the quality of care through changes in reimbursement, patient education, and development of systems to monitor care and outcomes.

  9. Hospital-acquired symptomatic urinary tract infection in patients admitted to an academic stroke center affects discharge disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifejika-Jones, Nneka L; Peng, Hui; Noser, Elizabeth A; Francisco, Gerard E; Grotta, James C

    2013-01-01

    To test the role of hospital-acquired symptomatic urinary tract infection (SUTI) as an independent predictor of discharge disposition in the acute stroke patient. A retrospective study of data collected from a stroke registry service. The registry is maintained by the Specialized Programs of Translational Research in Acute Stroke Data Core. The Specialized Programs of Translational Research in Acute Stroke is a national network of 8 centers that perform early phase clinical projects, share data, and promote new approaches to therapy for acute stroke. A single university-based hospital. We performed a data query of the fields of interest from our university-based stroke registry, a collection of 200 variables collected prospectively for each patient admitted to the stroke service between July 2004 and October 2009, with discharge disposition of home, inpatient rehabilitation, skilled nursing facility, or long-term acute care. Baseline demographics, including age, gender, ethnicity, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, were collected. Cerebrovascular disease risk factors were used for independent risk assessment. Interaction terms were created between SUTI and known covariates, such as age, NIHSS, serum creatinine level, history of stroke, and urinary incontinence. Because patients who share discharge disposition tend to have similar length of hospitalization, we analyzed the effect of SUTI on the median length of stay for a correlation. Days in the intensive care unit and death were used to evaluate morbidity and mortality. By using multivariate logistic regression, the data were analyzed for differences in poststroke disposition among patients with SUTI. Of 4971 patients admitted to the University of Texas at Houston Stroke Service, 2089 were discharged to home, 1029 to inpatient rehabilitation, 659 to a skilled nursing facility, and 226 to a long-term acute care facility. Patients with an SUTI were 57% less likely to be discharged home

  10. Hepatitis C seroconversions in HIV infection across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesecke, Christoph; Grint, Daniel; Soriano, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: In the last decade, several outbreaks of sexually acquired acute hepatitis C (HCV) infection have been described in HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). The aims of this study were to determine whether there has been an increase in the number of acute HCV infections...... HCV seroconversions were observed from 16,188 tests [1.38% (95%CI 1.20-1.56)] among 5736 patients between 2002 and 2013. Overall the odds of acquiring HCV infection increased by 4% per year (OR 1.04 [95%CI 0.99-1.09]; P = 0.10). Overall 63.2% (141/223) of all seroconversions were seen among MSM...

  11. Risk of Infections in Patients with Chronic Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mor, Anil; Thomsen, Reimar W.

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an update on the risk of several important community-acquired infections seen in patients with diabetes: respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and bacteremia. Respiratory tract infections: Recent epidemiological evidence shows a modest (1.25 to 1.75-fold) ri...... that individuals with diabetes have a substantially increased risk of a number of important infections. Clinicians should remain vigilant for infections in this increasing group of patients....

  12. Overview of zoonotic infections from fish and shellfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoonosis refers to diseases that can be transferred from animals, whether wild or domesticated, to humans. Zoonotic infections can be divided into: 1) topically acquired infection caused by contact with aquatic animals or their products and 2) food borne infection caused by eating raw or undercooked...

  13. Seroprevalence and risk factors of Toxoplasma gondii infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The infection is also associated with human immune deficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). In Rwanda, the burden and risk factors of T. gondii infection among pregnant women and among HIV infected pregnant women is largely unknown. This cross-sectional study aimed at determining the ...

  14. Country of infection among HIV-infected patients born abroad living in French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacher, Mathieu; Adriouch, Leila; Van Melle, Astrid; Parriault, Marie-Claire; Adenis, Antoine; Couppié, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    Over 75% of patients in the HIV cohort in French Guiana are of foreign origin. Our objective was to estimate what proportion of the migrant population of HIV-infected patients in Cayenne had been infected in French Guiana. We included patients of known foreign origin who were followed in Cayenne, for whom the year of arrival in French Guiana was known and the initial CD4 count at the time of diagnosis was available. The time between seroconversion and time at diagnosis was estimated using the formula [square root (CD4 at seroconversion)-square root(CD4 at HIV diagnosis)] / slope of CD4 decline.CD4 counts at the time of infection and the slope were computed in an age and ethnicity-dependent variable. The median estimated time between infection and diagnosis was 4.5 years (IQR = 0.2-9.2). Overall, using a median estimate of CD4 count at the time of infection, it was estimated that 53.2% (95% CI = 48.3-58%) of HIV infected foreign patients had acquired HIV after having arrived in French Guiana. Patients having arrived in French Guiana before and during the 1990s and those receiving their HIV diagnosis before 2010 were more likely to have been infected in French Guiana. Contrary to widespread belief suggesting that most migrants are already HIV-infected when they arrive in French Guiana, a large proportion of foreign HIV patients seem acquire the virus in French Guiana.There is still much to do in terms of primary prevention and testing among migrants.

  15. Nosocomial infections and their control strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahmed Khan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections are also known as hospital-acquired/associated infections. National Healthcare Safety Network along with Centers for Disease Control for surveillance has classified nosocomial infection sites into 13 types with 50 infection sites, which are specific on the basis of biological and clinical criteria. The agents that are usually involved in hospital-acquired infections include Streptococcus spp., Acinetobacter spp., enterococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Legionella and Enterobacteriaceae family members, namely, Proteus mirablis, Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens. Nosocomial pathogens can be transmitted through person to person, environment or contaminated water and food, infected individuals, contaminated healthcare personnel's skin or contact via shared items and surfaces. Mainly, multi-drug-resistant nosocomial organisms include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia, whereas Clostridium difficile shows natural resistance. Excessive and improper use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, especially in healthcare settings, is elevating nosocomial infections, which not only becomes a big health care problem but also causes great economic and production loss in the community. Nosocomial infections can be controlled by measuring and comparing the infection rates within healthcare settings and sticking to the best healthcare practices. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides the methodology for surveillance of nosocomial infections along with investigation of major outbreaks. By means of this surveillance, hospitals can devise a strategy comprising of infection control practices.

  16. Community-acquired pneumonia among smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, Jordi; Blanquer, José; Bello, Salvador

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have left absolutely no doubt that tobacco increases susceptibility to bacterial lung infection, even in passive smokers. This relationship also shows a dose-response effect, since the risk reduces spectacularly 10 years after giving up smoking, returning to the level of non-smokers. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the causative microorganism responsible for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) most frequently associated with smoking, particularly in invasive pneumococcal disease and septic shock. It is not clear how it acts on the progress of pneumonia, but there is evidence to suggest that the prognosis for pneumococcal pneumonia is worse. In CAP caused by Legionella pneumophila, it has also been observed that smoking is the most important risk factor, with the risk rising 121% for each pack of cigarettes smoked a day. Tobacco use may also favor diseases that are also known risk factors for CAP, such as periodontal disease and upper respiratory viral infections. By way of prevention, while giving up smoking should always be proposed, the use of the pneumococcal vaccine is also recommended, regardless of the presence of other comorbidities. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Radionuclide brain imaging in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, D.C.; Gacinovic, S.; Miller, R.F.

    1995-01-01

    Infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) may produce a variety of central nervous system (CNS) symptoms and signs. CNS involvement in patients with the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) includes AIDS dementia complex or HIV-1 associated cognitive/motor complex (widely known as HIV encephalopathy), progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML), opportunistic infections such as Toxoplasma gondii, TB, Cryptococcus and infiltration by non-Hodgkin's B cell lymphoma. High resolution structural imaging investigations, either X-ray Computed Tomography (CT scan) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have contributed to the understanding and definition of cerebral damage caused by HIV encephalopathy. Atrophy and mainly high signal scattered white matter abnormalities are commonly seen with MRI. PML produces focal white matter high signal abnormalities due to multiple foci of demyelination. However, using structural imaging techniques there are no reliable parameters to distinguish focal lesions due to opportunistic infection (Toxoplasma gondii abscess) from neoplasm (lymphoma infiltration). It is studied the use of radionuclide brain imaging techniques in the investigation of HIV infected patients. Brain perfusion Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPET), neuroreceptor and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) studies are reviewed. Greater emphasis is put on the potential of some radiopharmaceuticals, considered to be brain tumour markers, to distinguish intracerebral lymphoma infiltration from Toxoplasma infection. SPET with 201 Tl using quantification (tumour to non-tumour radioactivity ratios) appears a very promising technique to identify intracerebral lymphoma

  18. Metastatic Spreading of Community Acquired Staphylococcus aureus Bacteraemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 29-year-old woman presented to the Fondazione IRCCS “Cà Granda” Ospedale Maggiore, a tertiary care university hospital in Milan (Italy, with skin lesions, fever, myalgia, joint pain and swelling, and a one-week history of low back pain. The diagnosis was Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus bacteraemia spreading to skin, bones, and joints and a lumbosacral epidural abscess L5-S2. Neither initial focus nor predisposing conditions were apparent. The antibiotic therapy was prolonged for six-weeks with the resolution of fever, skin lesions, articular inflammation, and the epidural abscess. Community-acquired S. aureus infections can affect patients without traditional healthcare-associated risk factors, and community acquisition is a risk-factor for the development of complications. Raised awareness of S. aureus bacteraemia, also in patients without healthcare-associated risk factors, is important in the diagnosis, management, and control of this infection, because failure to recognise patients with serious infection and lack of understanding of empirical antimicrobial selection are associated with a high mortality rate in otherwise healthy people.

  19. The half-truth of first-mover advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Fernando; Lanzolla, Gianvito

    2005-04-01

    Many executives take for granted that the first company in a new product category gets an unbeatable head start and reaps long-lasting benefits. But that doesn't always happen. The authors of this article discovered that much depends on the pace at which the category's technology is changing and the speed at which the market is evolving. By analyzing these two factors, companies can improve their odds of succeeding as first movers with the resources they possess. Gradual evolution in both the technology and the market provides a first mover with the best conditions for creating a dominant position that is long lasting (Hoover in the vacuum cleaner industry is a good example). In such calm waters, a company can defend its advantages even without exceptional skills or extensive financial resources. When the market is changing rapidly and the product isn't, a first entrant with extensive resources can obtain a long-lasting advantage (as Sony did with its Walkman personal stereo); a company with only limited resources probably must settle for a short-term benefit. When the market is static but the product is changing constantly, first-mover advantages of either kind--durable or short-lived--are unlikely. Only companies with very deep pockets can survive (think of Sony and the digital cameras it pioneered). Rapid churn in both the technology and the market creates the worst conditions. But if companies have an acute sense of when to exit-as Netscape demonstrated when it agreed to be acquired by AOL-a worthwhile short-term gain is possible. Before venturing into a newly forming market, you need to analyze the environment, assess your resources, then determine which type offirst-mover advantage is most achievable. Once you've gone into the water, you have no choice but to swim.

  20. Naturally acquired immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars

    2005-01-01

    Infection by Plasmodium falciparum parasites can lead to substantial protective immunity to malaria, and available evidence suggest that acquisition of protection against some severe malaria syndromes can be fairly rapid. Although these facts have raised hopes that the development of effective...... protective immunity to P. falciparum malaria is acquired following natural exposure to the parasites is beginning to emerge, not least thanks to studies that have combined clinical and epidemiological data with basic immunological research. This framework involves IgG with specificity for clonally variant...... antigens on the surface of the infected erythrocytes, can explain some of the difficulties in relating particular immune responses with specificity for well-defined antigenic targets to clinical protection, and suggests a radically new approach to controlling malaria-related morbidity and mortality...

  1. [Primary Intracranial Malignant Lymphoma Associated with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome(AIDS):A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaka, Yasufumi; Otani, Naoki; Nishida, Sho; Fujii, Kazuya; Ueno, Hideaki; Tomura, Satoshi; Tomiyama, Arata; Osada, Hideo; Wada, Kojiro; Maeda, Takuya; Mori, Kentaro

    2017-11-01

    The spread of human immunodeficiency virus(HIV)infection may result in an increased likelihood of surgery in patients with HIV infection. We treated a patient with intracranial malignant lymphoma associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome(AIDS)caused by HIV infection. The recommendations of the countermeasure manual for AIDS were followed. Only surgical staff without finger injury or inflammation were permitted to be involved in the operation. All staff were dressed in a waterproof, full-body surgical gown, and wore double gloves, double foot covers, and an N95 mask. The surgery could be performed safely with such infection control measures. Histological examination revealed a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The patient was referred to the Division of Infectious Diseases and Respiratory Medicine for chemotherapy.

  2. Frequency of escherichia coli in patients with community acquired urinary tract infection and their resistance pattern against some commonly used anti bacterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, W.; Jamshed, F.; Ahmad, W.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a very common health problem and Escherichia coli (E coli) are the most common organisms associated with community acquired UTI. Unfortunately these bacteria have developed extensive resistance against most of the commonly used anti-bacterials. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency and resistance pattern of E coli in patients of community acquired UTI in an area in northern part of Pakistan. Methods: Urine specimens were collected from patients who were clinically diagnosed as community acquired UTI. Urine routine examination (Urine RE) was done and samples positive for UTI (Pus cells >10/High Power Field) were included in the study. These samples were inoculated on Eosin Methylene Blue (EMB) agar plates and incubated at 37 degree C for 36 hours. Suspected colonies were then inoculated further on EMB plates for pure cultures of E coli characterized by certain morphological characteristics. IMViC was applied for the confirmation of E coli. In vitro antibiotic susceptibility tests of E coli were performed with standardized commercial susceptibility discs (OXOID). Results: Out of 50 specimens, positive for UTI by urine RE, 20 showed pure growth of E coli on culture (40%). The majority of the isolates (28%; n=14) were from women while only 12% (n=6) were from men. Escherichia coli showed a high rate of resistance towards Ampicillin (90%), Tetracycline (70%), Erythromycin (70%) and Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole (55%). Sparfloxacin showed better results (45%) than ciprofloxacin (50%). Out of 20 E coli isolates, two (10%) were resistant to all the antibacterials except chloramphenicol, eight isolates (40%) showed resistance to six or more than six while 14 (70%) were resistant to four or more than four drugs. Conclusion: Rate of resistance of E coli against commonly used antibacterials was quite high and majority of the strains showed multidrug resistance. (author)

  3. Osteonecrosis in HIV-infected patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lama, E. de; Narvaez, J. A.; Roca, Y.; Pellicer, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    We present two cases of avascular osteonecrosis, one involving the knees and the other the hips, in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who met the criteria for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). We review the literature concerning this rare complication of HIV infection, focussing especially on the clinical and radiological features and its possible etiopathogenesis. (Author) 30 refs

  4. Strategies for the prevention of hospital-acquired infections in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghesi, A; Stronati, M

    2008-04-01

    Nosocomial infections are among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in neonatal intensive care units. Prevention of healthcare-associated infections is based on strategies that aim to limit susceptibility to infections by enhancing host defences, interrupting transmission of organisms by healthcare workers and by promoting the judicious use of antimicrobials. Several strategies are available and include: hand hygiene practices; prevention of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections; judicious use of antimicrobials for therapy and prophylaxis; enhancement of host defences; skin care; and early enteral feeding with human milk.

  5. Infected paratracheal air cyst; A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Jou, Sung Shick; Kim, Young Tong; Han, Jong Kyu

    2016-01-01

    An air-filled paratracheal cyst is a common radiological finding. It may be a congenital defect or an acquired lesion. 'Acquired paratracheal cyst' is the term given to the acquired abnormalities, which usually arise in adults. They result from a weakness of the tracheal wall, and they may be caused by trauma, infection, high pressure injuries, long lasting tracheostomy, and obstructive tracheal disease. Majority of the paratracheal air cysts are asymptomatic and are discovered incidentally on radiological images. Also, the management is primarily conservative treatment. Here, we report a case of an infected paratracheal air cyst on the right posterolateral wall of the trachea, which developed into an abscess and was visualized on follow-up multidetector computed tomography and was surgically removed due to persistent symptoms

  6. Infected paratracheal air cyst; A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Jou, Sung Shick; Kim, Young Tong; Han, Jong Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    An air-filled paratracheal cyst is a common radiological finding. It may be a congenital defect or an acquired lesion. 'Acquired paratracheal cyst' is the term given to the acquired abnormalities, which usually arise in adults. They result from a weakness of the tracheal wall, and they may be caused by trauma, infection, high pressure injuries, long lasting tracheostomy, and obstructive tracheal disease. Majority of the paratracheal air cysts are asymptomatic and are discovered incidentally on radiological images. Also, the management is primarily conservative treatment. Here, we report a case of an infected paratracheal air cyst on the right posterolateral wall of the trachea, which developed into an abscess and was visualized on follow-up multidetector computed tomography and was surgically removed due to persistent symptoms.

  7. Clostridium difficile infection : epidemiology, complications and recurrences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, Martijn Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming bacterium, the toxin-producing strains of which cause colitis. Risk factors are antibiotics, advanced age and severe comorbidity. C. difficile infection (CDI) has been regarded as mostly a hospital-acquired infection. Preventing relapses is considered the

  8. Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infections Observational European study (CIAO Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sartelli Massimo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Complicated intra-abdominal infections are frequently associated with poor prognoses and high morbidity and mortality rates. Despite advances in diagnosis, surgery, and antimicrobial therapy, mortality rates associated with complicated intra-abdominal infections remain exceedingly high. In order to describe the clinical, microbiological, and management-related profiles of both community-acquired and healthcare-acquired complicated intra-abdominal infections (IAIs, the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES, in collaboration with the Surgical Infections Society of Europe (SIS-E and other prominent European surgical societies, has designed the CIAO study. The CIAO study is a multicenter, observational study and will be carried out in various surgical departments throughout Europe. The study will include patients undergoing surgery or interventional drainage for complicated IAI.

  9. Bacterial Etiology and Antibiotic Resistance Profile of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in a Cameroonian City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Nyah-tuku Nzalie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Community-acquired urinary tract infections (CAUTIs are usually treated empirically. Geographical variations in etiologic agents and their antibiotic sensitivity patterns are common. Knowledge of antibiotic resistance trends is important for improving evidence-based recommendations for empirical treatment of UTIs. Our aim was to determine the major bacterial etiologies of CAUTIs and their antibiotic resistance patterns in a cosmopolitan area of Cameroon for comparison with prescription practices of local physicians. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional descriptive study at two main hospitals in Yaoundé, collecting a clean-catch mid-stream urine sample from 92 patients having a clinical diagnosis of UTI. The empirical antibiotherapy was noted, and identification of bacterial species was done on CLED agar; antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Results. A total of 55 patients had samples positive for a UTI. Ciprofloxacin and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid were the most empirically prescribed antibiotics (30.9% and 23.6%, resp.; bacterial isolates showed high prevalence of resistance to both compounds. Escherichia coli (50.9% was the most common pathogen, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (16.4%. Prevalence of resistance for ciprofloxacin was higher compared to newer quinolones. Conclusions. E. coli and K. pneumoniae were the predominant bacterial etiologies; the prevalence of resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics was high.

  10. Toward immunogenetic studies of amphibian chytridiomycosis: Linking innate and acquired immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, J.Q.; Savage, Anna E.; Zamudio, Kelly R.; Rosenblum, E.B.

    2009-01-01

    Recent declines in amphibian diversity and abundance have contributed significantly to the global loss of biodiversity. The fungal disease chytridiomycosis is widely considered to be a primary cause of these declines, yet the critical question of why amphibian species differ in susceptibility remains unanswered. Considerable evidence links environmental conditions and interspecific variability of the innate immune system to differential infection responses, but other sources of individual, population, or species-typical variation may also be important. In this article we review the preliminary evidence supporting a role for acquired immune defenses against chytridiomycosis, and advocate for targeted investigation of genes controlling acquired responses, as well as those that functionally bridge the innate and acquired immune systems. Immunogenetic data promise to answer key questions about chytridiomycosis susceptibility and host-pathogen coevolution, and will draw much needed attention to the importance of considering evolutionary processes in amphibian conservation management and practice. ?? 2009 by American Institute of Biological Sciences.

  11. [Role of parenteral cephalosporins for outpatients treatment of infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, S; Mazzei, T; Novelli, A

    2001-12-01

    OPAT (Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy) arose in the early 1980s in the USA and later in many other countries from the primary consideration that outpatient treatment is more cost-effective than hospitalisation. Currently, several thousand patients undergo OPAT programmes all over the world and several different bacterial infections are included in the list of treatable diseases, especially those requiring long-term parenteral treatment such as osteomyelitis and soft tissue infections. All injectable antibiotics are suitable for OPAT according to their microbiological spectrum, although clearly some pharmacological properties make one antibiotic more preferable than another. Beta-lactams represent more than half of the antibiotic world market and two-thirds of them are cephalosporins. Such a widespread use of cephalosporins is certainly due to their wide antibacterial spectrum and good tolerability. Among third-generation cephalosporins, covering the majority of micro-organisms responsible for community-acquired infections, ceftriaxone is the only one with an 8-hour half-life, thereby permitting a single daily dose, which represents a great advantage when undertaking an OPAT programme. Analysis of antibiotic consumption used for OPAT therapies, based on data collected from the International OPAT Registry project, with the participation of many countries (USA, Canada, Britain, Argentina, etc.) including Italy, shows that ceftriaxone is the most widely used antibiotic for home therapy, clearly due to the above-mentioned properties.

  12. Renaissance of antibiotics against difficult infections: Focus on oritavancin and new ketolides and quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2014-11-01

    Lipoglycopeptide, ketolide, and quinolone antibiotics are currently in clinical development, with specific advantages over available molecules within their respective classes. The lipoglycopeptide oritavancin is bactericidal against MRSA, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and multiresistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, and proved effective and safe for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI) upon administration of a single 1200 mg dose (two completed phase III trials). The ketolide solithromycin (two phase III studies recruiting for community-acquired pneumonia) shows a profile of activity similar to that of telithromycin, but in vitro data suggest a lower risk of hepatotoxicity, visual disturbance, and aggravation of myasthenia gravis due to reduced affinity for nicotinic receptors. Among quinolones, finafloxacin and delafloxacin share the unique property of an improved activity in acidic environments (found in many infection sites). Finafloxacin (phase II completed; activity profile similar to that of ciprofloxacin) is evaluated for complicated urinary tract and Helicobacter pylori infections. The other quinolones (directed towards Gram-positive pathogens) show improved activity on MRSA and multiresistant S. pneumoniae compared to current molecules. They are in clinical evaluation for ABSSSI (avarofloxacin (phase II completed), nemonoxacin and delafloxacin (ongoing phase III)), respiratory tract infections (zabofloxacin and nemonoxacin (ongoing phase III)), or gonorrhea (delafloxacin).

  13. Serodiagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Andersen, L P

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to the established role of Helicobacter pylori gastritis in gastritis and duodenal ulcer in general, conflicting results have been reported in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The seroprevalence during early HIV...

  14. Hepatitis C virus infection in the human immunodeficiency virus infected patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Louise Nygaard; Lundbo, Lene Fogt; Benfield, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) share the same transmission routes; therefore, coinfection is frequent. An estimated 5-10 million individuals alone in the western world are infected with both viruses. The majority of people acquire HCV by injection drug use and...

  15. A Clinical Study of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Associated Penicillium Marneffei Infection from a Non-Endemic Area in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jinding; Gui, Xien; Cao, Qian; Yang, Rongrong; Yan, Yajun; Deng, Liping; Lio, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the clinical characteristics, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of penicilliosis among the patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in non-endemic areas of China, and then to discuss its incubation period and the diagnostic performance of serum galactomannan test for penicilliosis. Medical records and travel histories of penicilliosis patients in Zhongnan hospital from January 2006 to December 2013, and the interval from when the patients left the endemic area to the onset of the disease was analyzed. Serum galactomannan levels of penicilliosis patients and AIDS patients with fever were measured by the Platelia Aspergillus Enzyme Immunoassay Kit. A total of 47 AIDS-associated penicilliosis were confirmed by fungal culture, which accounted for 4.8% of 981 AIDS-related admissions. The sensitivity and specificity of serum galactomannan test for penicilliosis were 95.8% (23/24) and 90.9% (30/33), respectively, (cutoff index = 1.0). Two independent predictors for early mortality (death within 12 weeks) of the patients (21.3%, 10/47) were a delayed diagnosis and no treatment with antifungal therapy. Among 14 patients who became ill after leaving endemic areas, ten patients presented with the onset symptoms within 12 months (from 11 days to 360 days). We found a patient living with asymptomatic P. marneffei fungemia who had not received any antifungal therapy until 18 months' follow up. The co-infection of P. marneffei and HIV was not uncommon in the non-endemic areas of penicilliosis in China. There exists a latent form of infection for P. marneffei. The incubation period of penicilliosis may be quite different from one patient to another. In AIDS patients, the serum galactomannan test has utility for the diagnosis of penicilliosis. When patients with penicilliosis/AIDS were diagnosed early and treated with standardized antifungal therapy and combined antiretroviral therapy, their prognosis improved.

  16. Risk of HPV-16/18 Infections and Associated Cervical Abnormalities in Women Seropositive for Naturally Acquired Antibodies: Pooled Analysis Based on Control Arms of Two Large Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Castellsagué, Xavier; Hildesheim, Allan; Wacholder, Sholom; Schiffman, Mark H; Bozonnat, Marie-Cécile; Baril, Laurence; Rosillon, Dominique

    2018-06-05

    Studies on the role of antibodies produced after infection with human papillomavirus 18 (HPV-18) and subsequent protection from HPV-18 infection have been conflicting, mainly due to inadequate sample size. We pooled data from the control arms of the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial and the PATRICIA trial. Using Poisson regression we compared the risk of newly detected 1-time HPV-18 infection, HPV-18 1-year persistent infection (12MPI), and HPV-18-associated atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or greater (ASC-US+) lesions between HPV-18 seropositive and seronegative women. High HPV-18 antibodies at enrollment was associated with reduced subsequent HPV-18 detection (P trend = 0.001; relative rate [RR] = 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47-1.01 for the third quartile; RR = 0.63; 95% CI, 0.43-0.94 for the fourth quartile, compared to seronegative). The risk of 12MPI showed a decreasing trend with increasing antibodies (P trend = 0.06; RR = 0.72; 95% CI, 0.29-1.77; RR = 0.42; 95% CI, 0.13-1.32 for the third and fourth quartiles, respectively). Lastly, we observed a significant decreased risk of HPV-18 ASC-US+ with increasing antibody (P trend = 0.01; RR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.21-0.97 for the fourth quartile). We also observed a significant decreased risk of HPV-16 infection, 12MPI, and ASC-US+ with increasing HPV-16 antibody level. High HPV-18 naturally acquired antibodies were associated with partial protection from future HPV-18 infections and associated lesions. NCT00128661 and NCT001226810.

  17. Biological Risks and Laboratory-Acquired Infections: A Reality That Cannot be Ignored in Health Biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Ana Cláudia; García Díez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Advances and research in biotechnology have applications over a wide range of areas, such as microbiology, medicine, the food industry, agriculture, genetically modified organisms, and nanotechnology, among others. However, research with pathogenic agents, such as virus, parasites, fungi, rickettsia, bacterial microorganisms, or genetic modified organisms, has generated concern because of their potential biological risk – not only for people, but also for the environment due to their unpredictable behavior. In addition, concern for biosafety is associated with the emergence of new diseases or re-emergence of diseases that were already under control. Biotechnology laboratories require biosafety measures designed to protect their staff, the population, and the environment, which may be exposed to hazardous organisms and materials. Laboratory staff training and education is essential, not only to acquire a good understanding about the direct handling of hazardous biological agents but also knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenicity, and human susceptibility to the biological materials used in research. Biological risk can be reduced and controlled by the correct application of internationally recognized procedures such as proper microbiological techniques, proper containment apparatus, adequate facilities, protective barriers, and special training and education of laboratory workers. To avoid occupational infections, knowledge about standardized microbiological procedures and techniques and the use of containment devices, facilities, and protective barriers is necessary. Training and education about the epidemiology, pathogenicity, and biohazards of the microorganisms involved may prevent or decrease the risk. In this way, the scientific community may benefit from the lessons learned in the past to anticipate future problems. PMID:25973418

  18. Biological risks and laboratory-acquired infections. A reality that cannot be ignored in health biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia Coelho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Advances and research in biotechnology have applications over a wide range of areas such as microbiology, medicine, the food industry, agriculture, genetically modified organisms and nanotechnology, among others. However, research with pathogenic agents such as virus, parasites, fungi, rickettsia, bacterial microorganisms or genetic modified organisms has generated concern because of their potential biological risk - not only for people, but also for the environment due to their unpredictable behavior. In addition, concern for biosafety is associated with the emergence of new diseases or re-emergence of diseases that were already under control. Biotechnology laboratories require biosafety measures designed to protect their staff, the population and the environment, which may be exposed to hazardous organisms and materials. Laboratory staff training and education is essential, not only to acquire a good understanding about the direct handling of hazardous biological agents but also knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenicity and human susceptibility to the biological materials used in research. Biological risk can be reduced and controlled by the correct application of internationally recognized procedures such as proper microbiological techniques, proper containment apparatus, adequate facilities, protective barriers and special training and education of laboratory workers. To avoid occupational infections, knowledge about standardized microbiological procedures and techniques and the use of containment devices, facilities and protective barriers is necessary. Training and education about the epidemiology, pathogenicity and biohazards of the microorganisms involved may prevent or decrease the risk. In this way, the scientific community may benefit from the lessons learned in the past to anticipate future problems.

  19. Grepafloxacin Clinical Program for Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne C Rodloff

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper evaluates the clinical trial program in lower respiratory tract infections treated with a new fluoroquinolone antibiotic, grepafloxacin. Unlike older quinolones, grepafloxacin has excellent activity against Gram-positive organisms, which include Streptococcus pneumoniae and “atypical” pathogens Legionella species. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Grepafloxacin has a long half-life of 12 to 15 h, which allows once daily dosing. Six studies have been conducted regarding community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections (LRTls, four about community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and two about acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (ABECB . In these studies, grepafloxacin demonstrated clinical equivalence with standard therapies. but, in patients with documented infections. grepafloxacin was statistically superior to amoxycillin in both CAP and ABECB. The new fluoroquinolone has a good safety profile, comparable with that of ciprofloxacin. The most common adverse effects of grepafloxacin were nausea and a metallic taste; however, these effects resulted in only a few discontinuations of therapy. With the increasing prevalence of resistance in pathogens isolated from community-acquired LRTIs, grepafloxacin offers a good alternative for monotherapy in these patients.

  20. Virulence factors and phylogenetic grouping of Escherichia coli isolates from patients with bacteraemia of urinary tract origin relate to sex and hospital- vs. community-acquired origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt-Rasmussen, Line; Ejrnæs, Karen; Lundgren, Bettina

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, Escherichia coli is a leading cause of bloodstream infections. Bacteraemia cases in both community- and hospital-acquired infections are often due to E. coli, and it is a major cause of mortality from these infections. These invasive infections are primarily due to extraintestinal path...

  1. Comparison of the effectiveness and antibiotic cost among ceftriaxone, ertapenem, and levofloxacin in treatment of community-acquired complicated urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-An; Yang, Ya-Sung; Wang, Jing-Xun; Lin, Hsin-Chung; Lin, De-Yu; Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Yeh, Kuo-Ming; Lin, Jung-Chung; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2016-04-01

    To study characteristics of patients with community-acquired complicated urinary tract infections (cUTIs) and to compare effectiveness and antibiotic cost of treatment with ceftriaxone (CRO), levofloxacin (LVX), and ertapenem (ETP). This retrospective study enrolled patients who had community-acquired cUTIs admitted to Division of Infectious Diseases in a single medical center from January 2011 to March 2013. Effectiveness, antibiotic cost, and clinical characteristics were compared among patients treated with CRO, LVX, and ETP. There were 358 eligible cases, including 139 who received CRO, 128 treated with ETP, and 91 with LVX. The most common pathogen was Escherichia coli. The susceptibilities of these three agents were higher and more superior than first-line antibiotics. Treatment with ETP was associated with a significantly shorter time to defervescence since admission (CRO: 39 hours, ETP: 30 hours, and LVX: 38 h; p = 0.031) and shorter hospitalization stay (CRO: 4 days, ETP: 3 days, and LVX: 4 days; p antibiotic costs in the CRO group were significantly lower than that in the other two groups [CRO: 62.4 United States dollars (USD), ETP: 185.33 USD, and LVX: 204.85 USD; p antibiotic is high. Using ETP, CRO, and LVX in the treatment of cUTIs for good clinical response should be suggested. Among the three agents, ETP had better susceptibility than CRO and LVX, reached defervescence sooner, and was associated with shorter hospital stays. However, using CRO in cUTIs was less expensive than the other two agents. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Genital herpes simplex virus infections in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, G; Corey, L

    1984-02-01

    With the decline in prevalence of childhood-acquired oral-labial herpes simplex type 1 infections in some populations and the increasing incidence of genital herpes infections in adults, clinicians are more likely to see patients with severe primary, first-episode genital herpes infections. Complications of these primary infections may include aseptic meningitis and urine retention secondary to sacral radiculopathy or autonomic dysfunction. Presented are the clinical course of first-episode and recurrent infections, complications, diagnostic laboratory methods, and results of controlled clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of topical, intravenous, and oral preparations of acyclovir.

  3. A Kap Study Of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Infection Among Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis B virus infection which is the world's most common blood borne viral infection is highly endemic in Nigeria. Health care workers including medical students are at risk of acquiring the infection while at work. Objective: To assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of HBV infection among medical ...

  4. Methyl salicylate is a critical mobile signal for plant systemic acquired resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Wook; Kaimoyo, Evans; Kumar, Dhirendra; Mosher, Stephen; Klessig, Daniel F

    2007-10-05

    In plants, the mobile signal for systemic acquired resistance (SAR), an organism-wide state of enhanced defense to subsequent infections, has been elusive. By stimulating immune responses in mosaic tobacco plants created by grafting different genetic backgrounds, we showed that the methyl salicylate (MeSA) esterase activity of salicylic acid-binding protein 2 (SABP2), which converts MeSA into salicylic acid (SA), is required for SAR signal perception in systemic tissue, the tissue that does not receive the primary (initial) infection. Moreover, in plants expressing mutant SABP2 with unregulated MeSA esterase activity in SAR signal-generating, primary infected leaves, SAR was compromised and the associated increase in MeSA levels was suppressed in primary infected leaves, their phloem exudates, and systemic leaves. SAR was also blocked when SA methyl transferase (which converts SA to MeSA) was silenced in primary infected leaves, and MeSA treatment of lower leaves induced SAR in upper untreated leaves. Therefore, we conclude that MeSA is a SAR signal in tobacco.

  5. Penicillin treatment for patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egelund, Gertrud Baunbæk; Jensen, Andreas Vestergaard; Andersen, Stine Bang

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a severe infection, with high mortality. Antibiotic strategies for CAP differ across Europe. The objective of the study was to describe the epidemiology of CAP in Denmark and evaluate the prognosis of patients empirically treated with penicillin......-G/V was commonly used and not associated with increased mortality in patients with mild to moderate pneumonia. Our results are in agreement with current conservative antibiotic strategy as outlined in the Danish guidelines....

  6. SENSITIVITY TO ANTIBACTERIAL DRUGS IN AGENTS OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osolodchenko T.,

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The widespread and uncontrolled use of antibiotics leads to selection of resistant strains and rise to atypical forms of most infectious agents. Constantly progressive resistance of microorganisms is currently the most important negative phenomenon of antibiotic therapy. The aim of the work was to optimize antibiotic therapy in community-acquired infections. The objective of study was to determine the range and degree of resistance in clinical isolates of microorganisms of different taxonomic groups, obtained from patients in outpatient care. Material and methods 213 clinical isolates of microorganisms obtained from patients in outpatient care were studied: 34,7 % strains were obtained from patients with inflammatory processes in upper respiratory tract, 11,7 % – with ear inflammation, 36,6 % – with inflammatory diseases of urinary and genital tracts, 11,3 % – with of skin and soft tissues inflammation, 4,2 % – eye inflammation and 1,4 % – with postoperative infectious complications. The collection of clinical material was performed accordingly before the start of antibacterial therapy. Microorganisms’ isolation and identification were carried out with the help of microbiological methods according to the regulatory documents. The study of resistance of bacterial strains to the antibacterial drugs was performed with the help of disc diffusion method on the Muller-Hinton nutritional medium and of fungal strains – on Saburo medium with the use of standard commercial discs. Results and discussion The array and level of resistance to antibacterial drugs in clinical isolates of microorganisms of different taxonomic groups obtained from patients in outpatient care was established. The research has established that 43,3 % Staphylococcus spp. isolates possessed polyantibiotic resistance and 3,8 % – extensive resistance, only sensitivity to aminoglycosides and glycopeptides was preserved. The majority of beta

  7. Advances in congenital and postnatal cytomegalovirus infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunkel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Congenital CMV infection (cCMV) is the most prevalent viral infection worldwide and the leading cause of non-genetic sensorineural hearing loss. Early diagnosis of cCMV infection is advantageous as it allows for regular follow-up and timely intervention in case of late-onset symptoms among

  8. [Epidemiologic study of Helicobacter pylori infection in Perú].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Ramos, Alberto; Gilman, Robert H; Watanabe-Yamamoto, José; Rosas-Aguirre, Angel

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of our investigations in the epidemiology of H. pylori infection in Peru during the last two decades. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Lima is decreasing in people of middle and high socioeconomic status and continues stationary in people of low socioeconomic status. This decrease is similar in Peruvian and Japanese population in this city, and is associated to the decrease of the gastrointestinal diseases related to this bacterium: peptic ulcer and stomach adenocarcinoma. The infection is slightly greater in males and is acquired in early ages of life. Via oro-fecal and water contamination are probably the most important transmission ways. In our country, so far, there is no evidence to assure that some races have higher pre-disposition to acquire the infection. There are no differences in the infection by H. pylori among coast, mountain or jungle populations; and people who live in high altitudes have more atrophic chronic gastritis secondary to H. pylori infection than people who live at sea level.

  9. Cerebral infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karampekios, Spyros [University of Crete, Department of Radiology, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Hesselink, John [UCSD, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Despite the development of many effective antibiotic therapies and the general improvement in hygiene and health care systems all over the world, the incidence of central nervous system (CNS) infection has increased significantly in the past 15 years. This can be attributed primarily to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic and its devastating effect on the immune system and secondarily to various immunosuppressive agents that are being used in aggressive cancer treatment and in organ transplantations. The brain particularly is protected from infection by the calvarium, meninges and blood brain barrier. However, different types of pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites, can reach the brain hematogenously or, less likely, by direct extension from an adjacent infected focus. The early detection and specific diagnosis of infection are of great importance, since brain infections are potentially treatable diseases. Imaging studies play a crucial role in the diagnostic process, along with the history (exposure to infectious agents), host factors (open head trauma, CSF leak, sinusitis, otitis, immune status), physical examination and laboratory analysis of CSF. (orig.)

  10. Cerebral infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karampekios, Spyros; Hesselink, John

    2005-01-01

    Despite the development of many effective antibiotic therapies and the general improvement in hygiene and health care systems all over the world, the incidence of central nervous system (CNS) infection has increased significantly in the past 15 years. This can be attributed primarily to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic and its devastating effect on the immune system and secondarily to various immunosuppressive agents that are being used in aggressive cancer treatment and in organ transplantations. The brain particularly is protected from infection by the calvarium, meninges and blood brain barrier. However, different types of pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites, can reach the brain hematogenously or, less likely, by direct extension from an adjacent infected focus. The early detection and specific diagnosis of infection are of great importance, since brain infections are potentially treatable diseases. Imaging studies play a crucial role in the diagnostic process, along with the history (exposure to infectious agents), host factors (open head trauma, CSF leak, sinusitis, otitis, immune status), physical examination and laboratory analysis of CSF. (orig.)

  11. Depression among people living with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Benin City, Nigeria: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikezie, U E; Otakpor, A N; Kuteyi, O B; James, B O

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a common co-morbidity among persons living with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) (PLWHAs). It is associated with poor treatment adherence and higher mortality rates. Few reports have, however, emanated from developing countries where socioeconomic factors may confound this association. We conducted a cross-sectional comparative study of PLWHAs and apparently healthy staff of three LGA's. The depression module of the Schedule for the Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was used to diagnose depression and depression symptom severity, respectively. Depression was commonly co-morbid among individuals with HIV/AIDS. It was five times more common in PLWHAs than in apparently healthy populations (29.3% vs. 7.3%, OR: 5.25, 95% CI: 2.50-11.76). A similar trend was observed for depression symptom severity. Among PLWHAs, depression was significantly more likely among females (OR: 7.91, 95% CI: 1.83-71.00, P 3 years (OR: 7.90, P risk. Depression was commonly co-morbid among PLWHAs studied. Clinicians should be aware of risk factors for depression among PLWHAs in order to improve treatment outcomes.

  12. Urinary tract infection caused by community-acquired extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing bacteria in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Hee; Yang, Eun Mi; Kim, Chan Jong

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by resistant strains of bacteria is increasingly prevalent in children. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics and risk factors for UTI caused by community-acquired extended-spectrum β-lactamase (CA-ESBL)-producing bacteria in infants. This was a retrospective study performed over 5 years in a single Korean center. Hospitalized infants with febrile UTI were enrolled and divided into two groups (CA-ESBL vs. CA non-ESBL UTI). The yearly prevalence was calculated. Baseline characteristics and clinical course such as fever duration, laboratory and radiological findings were compared between the two groups. Risk factors associated with the CA-ESBL UTI were investigated. Among the enrolled infants (n=185), 31 (17%) had CA-ESBL UTI. The yearly prevalence of ESBL of CA-ESBL UTI increased during the study (0% in 2010, 22.2% in 2015). Infants with CA-ESBL UTI had a longer duration of fever after initiating antibiotics (2.0±1.1 vs. 1.5±0.6 days, p=0.020). Cortical defects on renal scan and early treatment failure were more frequent in CA-ESBL (64.5 vs. 42.2%, p=0.023; 22.6 vs. 4.5%, p=0.001). A logistic regression analysis revealed that urinary tract abnormalities and previous UTI were independent risk factors for CA-EBSL UTI (odds ratio, 2.7; p=0.025; 10.3; p=0.022). The incidence of UTI caused by ESBL-producing bacteria has increased in Korean infants. Recognition of the clinical course and risk factors for ESLB-producing UTI may help to determine appropriate guidelines for its management. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  13. Diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of clinical and laboratory parameters in community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusbaumer Charly

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is the most frequent infection-related cause of death. The reference standard to diagnose CAP is a new infiltrate on chest radiograph in the presence of recently acquired respiratory signs and symptoms. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of clinical signs and symptoms and laboratory biomarkers for CAP. Methods 545 patients with suspected lower respiratory tract infection, admitted to the emergency department of a university hospital were included in a pre-planned post-hoc analysis of two controlled intervention trials. Baseline assessment included history, clinical examination, radiography and measurements of procalcitonin (PCT, highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP and leukocyte count. Results Of the 545 patients, 373 had CAP, 132 other respiratory tract infections, and 40 other final diagnoses. The AUC of a clinical model including standard clinical signs and symptoms (i.e. fever, cough, sputum production, abnormal chest auscultation and dyspnea to diagnose CAP was 0.79 [95% CI, 0.75–0.83]. This AUC was significantly improved by including PCT and hsCRP (0.92 [0.89–0.94]; p Conclusion PCT, and to a lesser degree hsCRP, improve the accuracy of currently recommended approaches for the diagnosis of CAP, thereby complementing clinical signs and symptoms. PCT is useful in the severity assessment of CAP.

  14. Prevalence, genotype distribution, and risk factors for hepatitis C infection among HIV-infected individuals in Slovenia: a 1986-2013 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škamperle, Mateja; Seme, Katja; Lunar, Maja M; Maver, Polona J; Tomažič, Janez; Vovko, Tomaž D; Pečavar, Blaž; Matičič, Mojca; Poljak, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, chronic hepatitis C has become one of the leading causes of non-AIDS-related morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. Two previous Slovenian nationwide studies published in 2002 and 2009 showed a very low prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among Slovenian HIV-infected individuals (14.5% and 10.7%, respectively). The presence of HCV infection was tested in 579/639 (90.6%) patients that were confirmed as HIV-positive in Slovenia by the end of 2013. Among them, 7.6% (44/579) of HIV-infected individuals were anti-HCV-positive, and 33/44 (75%) anti-HCV-positive patients were also HCV RNA-positive. HCV genotype 1 was most prevalent among HIV-infected patients (68%), followed by genotype 3 (20%), genotype 4 (8%), and genotype 2 (4%). Anti-HCV positivity was significantly higher in those that acquired HIV by the parenteral route (91.8%) than in those that acquired HIV by the sexual route (2.8%). Slovenia remains among the countries with the lowest prevalence of HCV infection in HIV-infected individuals. Because the burden of HIV among men who have sex with men in Slovenia is disproportionately high and increasing rapidly, the current favorable situation could change quickly and should be therefore monitored regularly.

  15. A dangerous hobby? Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae bacteremia most probably acquired from freshwater aquarium fish handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimaki, E; Nolte, O; Overesch, G; Strahm, C

    2017-08-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a facultative anaerobic Gram-positive rod that occurs widely in nature and is best known in veterinary medicine for causing swine erysipelas. In humans, infections are rare and mainly considered as occupationally acquired zoonosis. A case of E. rhusiopathiae bacteremia most likely associated with home freshwater aquarium handling is reported. The route of transmission was probably a cut with the dorsal fin of a dead pet fish. A short review of clinical presentations, therapeutic considerations and pitfalls of E. rhusiopathiae infections in humans is presented.

  16. Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia in Newborns with Birth Weight Less Than 1500 Grams: Risk Factors and Causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folic Nevena

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Low birth weight newborns (≤1500 grams are at a high risk of acquiring hospital infections due to the immaturity of the immune system, lack of efficient structural barriers, and an incomplete development of endogenous microbial flora.

  17. Identification of novel risk factors for community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection using spatial statistics and geographic information system analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deverick J Anderson

    Full Text Available The rate of community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection (CA-CDI is increasing. While receipt of antibiotics remains an important risk factor for CDI, studies related to acquisition of C. difficile outside of hospitals are lacking. As a result, risk factors for exposure to C. difficile in community settings have been inadequately studied.To identify novel environmental risk factors for CA-CDI.We performed a population-based retrospective cohort study of patients with CA-CDI from 1/1/2007 through 12/31/2014 in a 10-county area in central North Carolina. 360 Census Tracts in these 10 counties were used as the demographic Geographic Information System (GIS base-map. Longitude and latitude (X, Y coordinates were generated from patient home addresses and overlaid to Census Tracts polygons using ArcGIS; ArcView was used to assess "hot-spots" or clusters of CA-CDI. We then constructed a mixed hierarchical model to identify environmental variables independently associated with increased rates of CA-CDI.A total of 1,895 unique patients met our criteria for CA-CDI. The mean patient age was 54.5 years; 62% were female and 70% were Caucasian. 402 (21% patient addresses were located in "hot spots" or clusters of CA-CDI (p<0.001. "Hot spot" census tracts were scattered throughout the 10 counties. After adjusting for clustering and population density, age ≥ 60 years (p = 0.03, race (<0.001, proximity to a livestock farm (0.01, proximity to farming raw materials services (0.02, and proximity to a nursing home (0.04 were independently associated with increased rates of CA-CDI.Our study is the first to use spatial statistics and mixed models to identify important environmental risk factors for acquisition of C. difficile and adds to the growing evidence that farm practices may put patients at risk for important drug-resistant infections.

  18. Infections caused by Acinetobacter species and their susceptibility to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty-seven (63%) and 17 (30%) of the Acinetobacter isolates were from wound infections and UTI respectively. All the infections were nosocomially acquired and were associated with compromised host immunity, defective body defence, surgery or urinary catheterization; with Acinetobacter baumannii being the ...

  19. Community-acquired pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poetter-Lang, S.; Herold, C.J.

    2017-01-01

    The diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is often not possible based only on the clinical symptoms and biochemical parameters. For every patient with the suspicion of CAP, a chest radiograph in two planes should be carried out. Additionally, a risk stratification for the decision between outpatient therapy or hospitalization is recommended. Based on the evaluation of the different radiological patterns as well as their extent and distribution, a rough allocation to so-called pathogen groups as well as a differentiation between viral and bacterial infections are possible; however, because different pathogens cause different patterns an accurate correlation is not feasible by relying purely on imaging. The radiological findings serve as proof or exclusion of pneumonia and can also be used to evaluate the extent of the disease (e.g. monolobular, multilobular, unilateral or bilateral). In cases of prolonged disease, suspicion of complications (e.g. pleural effusion or empyema, necrotizing pneumonia or abscess) or comorbid conditions (e.g. underlying pulmonary or mediastinal diseases) computed tomography is an important diagnostic tool in addition to chest radiography. Ultrasound is often used to diagnose pleural processes (e.g. parapneumonic effusion or pleural empyema). (orig.) [de

  20. Evaluation of antimicrobial susceptibilities and virulence factors of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from community-acquired and health-care associated pediatric infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbuz, Adem; Karahan, Zeynep Ceren; Aldemir-Kocabaş, Bilge; Tekeli, Alper; Özdemir, Halil; Güriz, Haluk; Gökdemir, Refik; İnce, Erdal; Çiftçi, Ergin

    2017-01-01

    Karbuz A, Karahan ZC, Aldemir-Kocabaş B, Tekeli A, Özdemir H, Güriz H, Gökdemir R, İnce E, Çiftçi E. Evaluation of antimicrobial susceptibilities and virulence factors of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from community-acquired and health-care associated pediatric infections. Turk J Pediatr 2017; 59: 395-403. The aim of this study was to investigate the enterotoxins and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene as virulence factor, identification if antimicrobial sensitivity patterns, agr (accessory gene regulator) types and sequence types and in resistant cases to obtain SCCmec (staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec) gene types which will be helpful to decide empirical therapy and future health politics for S. aureus species. Total of 150 isolates of S. aureus were isolated from the cultures of the child patients in January 2011 and December 2012. In this study, the penicillin resistance was observed as 93.8%. PVL and mecA was detected positive in 8.7% and in 6% of all S. aureus strains, respectively. Two MRSA (methicillin resistant S.aureus) strains were detected as SCCmec type III and SCCmec type V and five MRSA strains were detected as SCCmec type IV. SET-I and SET-G were the most common detected enterotoxins. In both community-associated and healthcare-associated MRSA strains, agr type 1 was detected most commonly. The most common sequence types were ST737 in 13 patients than ST22 in eight patients and ST121 in six patients. This study highlights a necessity to review the cause of small changes in the structural genes in order to determine whether it is a cause or outcome; community-acquired and healthcare associated strains overlap.

  1. The biology of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Donald P

    2004-08-01

    The aim of this article is to review the basic biology of infection with HIV-1 and the development of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The discussion will include epidemiology, general description of the retroviruses, pathogenesis of the immune deficiency, clinical consequences, treatment, and treatment outcomes. Aspects of the infection that affect protein and energy balance will be identified.

  2. The double edge to parasite escape: invasive host is less infected but more infectable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Carolyn L; Miura, Osamu; Nishimura, Tomohiro; Byers, James E

    2017-09-01

    Nonnative species that escape their native-range parasites may benefit not only from reduced infection pathology, but also from relaxed selection on costly immune defenses, promoting reallocation of resources toward growth or reproduction. However, benefits accruing from a reduction in defense could come at the cost of increased infection susceptibility. We conducted common garden studies of the shore crab Hemigrapsus sanguineus from highly parasitized native (Japan) populations and largely parasite-free invasive (USA) populations to test for differences in susceptibility to infection by native-range rhizocephalan parasites, and to explore differences in host resource allocation. Nonnative individuals showed at least 1.8 times greater susceptibility to infection than their native counterparts, and had reduced standing metabolic rates, suggesting that less of their energy was spent on physiological self-maintenance. Our results support an indirect advantage to parasite escape via the relaxation of costly physiological defenses. However, this advantage comes at the cost of heightened susceptibility, a trade-off of parasite escape that is seldom considered. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  3. HIV Infection and Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... same age ( 1 ). The general term for these cancers is "HIV-associated cancers." Three of these cancers are known as " acquired ... also have an increased cumulative risk of developing HIV-associated cancers. What can people infected with HIV do to ...

  4. HIV Infection: The Clinical Picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfield, Robert R.; Burke, Donald S.

    1988-01-01

    Reports on the human immunodeficiency virus which causes disease that culminates in the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). States that the key to prolonging life and health is early detection of the infection which usually occurs years before symptoms emerge. (RT)

  5. Sensitivity, Specificity, and Positivity Predictors of the Pneumococcal Urinary Antigen Test in Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinos, Luis; Zalacain, Rafael; Menéndez, Rosario; Reyes, Soledad; Capelastegui, Alberto; Cillóniz, Catia; Rajas, Olga; Borderías, Luis; Martín-Villasclaras, Juan J; Bello, Salvador; Alfageme, Inmaculada; Rodríguez de Castro, Felipe; Rello, Jordi; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan; Gabarrús, Albert; Musher, Daniel M; Torres, Antoni

    2015-10-01

    Detection of the C-polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae in urine by an immune-chromatographic test is increasingly used to evaluate patients with community-acquired pneumonia. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of this test in the largest series of cases to date and used logistic regression models to determine predictors of positivity in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. We performed a multicenter, prospective, observational study of 4,374 patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. The urinary antigen test was done in 3,874 cases. Pneumococcal infection was diagnosed in 916 cases (21%); 653 (71%) of these cases were diagnosed exclusively by the urinary antigen test. Sensitivity and specificity were 60 and 99.7%, respectively. Predictors of urinary antigen positivity were female sex; heart rate≥125 bpm, systolic blood pressureantibiotic treatment; pleuritic chest pain; chills; pleural effusion; and blood urea nitrogen≥30 mg/dl. With at least six of all these predictors present, the probability of positivity was 52%. With only one factor present, the probability was only 12%. The urinary antigen test is a method with good sensitivity and excellent specificity in diagnosing pneumococcal pneumonia, and its use greatly increased the recognition of community-acquired pneumonia due to S. pneumoniae. With a specificity of 99.7%, this test could be used to direct simplified antibiotic therapy, thereby avoiding excess costs and risk for bacterial resistance that result from broad-spectrum antibiotics. We also identified predictors of positivity that could increase suspicion for pneumococcal infection or avoid the unnecessary use of this test.

  6. Symptomatic Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection in Children of Seropositive Women

    OpenAIRE

    Ines Mack; Marie-Anne Burckhardt; Marie-Anne Burckhardt; Ulrich Heininger; Friederike Prüfer; Sven Schulzke; Sven Wellmann

    2017-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most frequent congenital virus infection worldwide. The risk of congenital CMV (cCMV) transmission is highest in seronegative women who acquire primary CMV infection during pregnancy. A growing body of evidence indicates that secondary CMV infections in pregnant women with preconceptual immunity (either through reactivation of latent virus or re-infection with a new strain of CMV) contribute to a much greater proportion of symptomatic cCMV than was previously thou...

  7. Information systems supported organizational learning as a competitive advantage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Arias

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze the characteristics that make information systems useful in gathering and processing information with the aim of organizational learning and subsequent structural adaptation for better fitting to market requirements. Design/methodology/approach: Adaptation is a must when turning to foster the competitiveness and sustainability of the organization. Findings and Originality/value: It is clear that information systems can really create a difference in the way an organization acquires information from its environment and from itself in order to achieve a high-quality decision taking process. Research limitations/implications: Organizations have to look inside themselves in order to ensure the comprehension of their core competencies and the way they carry them out. Practical implications: Organizational learning is one of the means employed by organizations to get adapted to their surrounding environment. Social implications: Systems engineering techniques can be applied in order to leverage these core competencies and make organizations adaptable to the organizational environment requirements through the use of information systems. Originality/value: To obtain competitive advantages in the market. Keywords: competitive advantage, information systems, knowledge management, & the learning organization.

  8. Acquired Antibody Responses against Plasmodium vivax Infection Vary with Host Genotype for Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, Amanda; Muskus, Carlos; Duque, Victoria; Agudelo, Olga; Liu, Pu; Takagi, Akihide; Ntumngia, Francis B.; Adams, John H.; Sim, Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Corradin, Giampietro; Velez, Ivan D.; Wang, Ruobing

    2010-01-01

    Background Polymorphism of the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) is associated with susceptibility to and the severity of Plasmodium vivax malaria in humans. P. vivax uses DARC to invade erythrocytes. Individuals lacking DARC are ‘resistant’ to P. vivax erythrocytic infection. However, susceptibility to P. vivax in DARC+ individuals is reported to vary between specific DARC genotypes. We hypothesized that the natural acquisition of antibodies to P. vivax blood stages may vary with the host genotype and the level of DARC expression. Furthermore, high parasitemia has been reported to effect the acquisition of immunity against pre-erythrocytic parasites. We investigated the correlation between host DARC genotypes and the frequency and magnitude of antibodies against P. vivax erythrocytic stage antigens. Methodology/Findings We assessed the frequencies and magnitudes of antibody responses against P. vivax and P. falciparum sporozoite and erythrocytic antigens in Colombian donors from malaria-endemic regions. The frequency and level of naturally-acquired antibodies against the P. vivax erythrocytic antigens merozoite surface protein 1 (PvMSP1) and Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) varied with the host DARC genotypes. Donors with one negative allele (FY*B/FY*Bnull and FY*A/FY*Bnull) were more likely to have anti-PvMSP1 and anti-PvDBP antibodies than those with two positive alleles (FY*B/FY*B and FY*A/FY*B). The lower IgG3 and IgG1 components of the total IgG response may account for the decreased responses to P. vivax erythrocytic antigens with FY*A/FY*B and FY*B/FY*B genotypes. No such association was detected with P. falciparum erythrocytic antigens, which does not use DARC for erythrocyte invasion. Conclusion/Significance Individuals with higher DARC expression, which is associated with higher susceptibility to P. vivax infection, exhibited low frequencies and magnitudes of P. vivax blood-stage specific antibody responses. This may indicate that one of the

  9. Acquired antibody responses against Plasmodium vivax infection vary with host genotype for duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Maestre

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphism of the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC is associated with susceptibility to and the severity of Plasmodium vivax malaria in humans. P. vivax uses DARC to invade erythrocytes. Individuals lacking DARC are 'resistant' to P. vivax erythrocytic infection. However, susceptibility to P. vivax in DARC+ individuals is reported to vary between specific DARC genotypes. We hypothesized that the natural acquisition of antibodies to P. vivax blood stages may vary with the host genotype and the level of DARC expression. Furthermore, high parasitemia has been reported to effect the acquisition of immunity against pre-erythrocytic parasites. We investigated the correlation between host DARC genotypes and the frequency and magnitude of antibodies against P. vivax erythrocytic stage antigens.We assessed the frequencies and magnitudes of antibody responses against P. vivax and P. falciparum sporozoite and erythrocytic antigens in Colombian donors from malaria-endemic regions. The frequency and level of naturally-acquired antibodies against the P. vivax erythrocytic antigens merozoite surface protein 1 (PvMSP1 and Duffy binding protein (PvDBP varied with the host DARC genotypes. Donors with one negative allele (FY*B/FY*Bnull and FY*A/FY*Bnull were more likely to have anti-PvMSP1 and anti-PvDBP antibodies than those with two positive alleles (FY*B/FY*B and FY*A/FY*B. The lower IgG3 and IgG1 components of the total IgG response may account for the decreased responses to P. vivax erythrocytic antigens with FY*A/FY*B and FY*B/FY*B genotypes. No such association was detected with P. falciparum erythrocytic antigens, which does not use DARC for erythrocyte invasion.Individuals with higher DARC expression, which is associated with higher susceptibility to P. vivax infection, exhibited low frequencies and magnitudes of P. vivax blood-stage specific antibody responses. This may indicate that one of the primary mechanisms by which P. vivax evades

  10. Community acquired infections in older patients admitted to hospital from care homes versus the community: cohort study of microbiology and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwick, Charis; Santiago, Virginia Hernandez; McCowan, Colin; Broomhall, Janice; Davey, Peter

    2013-02-06

    Residents of care homes are at risk of colonisation and infection with antibiotic resistant bacteria, but there is little evidence that antibiotic resistance among such patients is associated with worse outcomes than among older people living in their own homes. Our aim was to compare the prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria and clinical outcomes in older patients admitted to hospital with acute infections from care homes versus their own homes. We enrolled patients admitted to Ninewells Hospital in 2005 who were older than 64 years with onset of acute community acquired respiratory tract, urinary tract or skin and soft tissue infections, and with at least one sample sent for culture. The primary outcome was 30 day mortality, adjusted for age, sex, Charlson Index of co-morbidity, sepsis severity, presence of resistant isolates and resistance to initial therapy. 161 patients were identified, 60 from care homes and 101 from the community. Care home patients were older, had more co-morbidities, and higher rates of resistant bacteria, including MRSA and Gram negative organisms resistant to co-amoxiclav, cefuroxime and/or ciprofloxacin, overall (70% versus 36%, p = 0.026). 30 day mortality was high in both groups (30% in care home patients and 24% in comparators). In multivariate logistic regression we found that place of residence did not predict 30 day mortality (adjusted odds ratio (OR) for own home versus care home 1.01, 95% CI 0.40-2.52, p = 0.984). Only having severe sepsis predicted 30 day mortality (OR 10.09, 95% CI 3.37-30.19, p care homes were more likely to have resistant organisms but high levels of antimicrobial resistance were found in both groups. Thus, we recommend that antibiotic therapies active against resistant organisms, guided by local resistance patterns, should be considered for all older patients admitted with severe sepsis regardless of their place of residence.

  11. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: The New Face of an Old Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, Edet E.

    2013-01-01

    The burden of infections caused by community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is increasing among different patient populations globally. As CA-MRSA has become established in healthcare facilities, the range of infections caused by them has also increased. Molecular characterization of CA-MRSA isolates obtained from different centers has revealed significant diversity in their genetic backgrounds. Although many CA-MRSA strains are still susceptible to non-β-lactam antibiotics, multiresistance to non-β-lactam agents has emerged in some clones, posing substantial problems for empirical and directed therapy of infections caused by these strains. Some CA-MRSA clones have acquired the capacity to spread locally and internationally. CA-MRSA belonging to ST80-MRSA-IV and ST30-MRSA-IV appear to be the dominant clones in the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). The emergence of pandemic CA-MRSA clones not only limits therapeutic options but also presents significant challenges for infection control. Continued monitoring of global epidemiology and emerging drug resistance data is critical for the effective management of these infections. PMID:24051949

  12. Campylobacter fetus Bacteremia Revealed by Cellulitis without Gastrointestinal Symptoms in the Context of Acquired Hypogammaglobulinemia: A Report of Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souleymane Brah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter fetus bacteremia is rare and occurs mainly in patients with immunosuppression. This infection, which often involves secondary localizations has already been reported in some primary humoral immune deficiencies. We describe three cases of severe infection due to C. fetus with cellulitis at presentation, but without any gastrointestinal symptoms, occurring in patients with acquired hypogammaglobulinemia.

  13. An Increased Risk of Osteoporosis during Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annapoorna, N; Rao, G Venkateswara; Reddy, N S; Rambabu, P; Rao, K R S Samabasiva

    2004-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by decreased bone mineral density and mechanistic imbalances of bone tissue that may result in reduced skeletal strength and an enhanced susceptibility to fractures. Osteoporosis in its most common form affects the elderly (both sexes) and all racial groups of human beings. Multiple environmental risk factors like acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) are believed to be one of the causes of osteoporosis. Recently a high incidence of osteoporosis has been observed in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals. The etiology of this occurrence in HIV infections is controversial. This problem seems to be more frequent in patients receiving potent antiretroviral therapy. In AIDS, the main suggested risk factors for the development of osteoporosis are use of protease inhibitors, longer duration of HIV infection, lower body weight before antiretroviral therapy, high viral load. Variations in serum parameters like osteocalcin, c-telopeptide, levels of elements like Calcium, Magnesium, Phosphorus, concentration of vitamin-D metabolites, lactate levels, bicarbonate concentrations, amount of alkaline phosphatase are demonstrated in the course of development of osteoporosis. OPG/RANKL/RANK system is final mediator of bone remodeling. Bone mineral density (BMD) test is of added value to assess the risk of osteoporosis in patients infected with AIDS. The biochemical markers also aid in this assessment. Clinical management mostly follows the lines of treatment of osteoporosis and osteopenia.

  14. A review of the role of Haemophilus influenzae in community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary PE Slack

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In an era when Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib conjugate vaccine is widely used, the incidence of Hib as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP has dramatically declined. Non-typeable H. influenzae (NTHi strains and, occasionally, other encapsulated serotypes of H. influenzae are now the cause of the majority of invasive H. influenzae infections, including bacteraemic CAP. NTHi have long been recognised as an important cause of lower respiratory tract infection, including pneumonia, in adults, especially those with underlying diseases. The role of NTHi as a cause of non-bacteraemic CAP in children is less clear. In this review the evidence for the role of NTHi and capsulated strains of H. influenzae will be examined.

  15. Clinical patterns, epidemiology and risk factors of community-acquired urinary tract infection caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producers: a prospective hospital case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almomani, Basima A; Hayajneh, Wail A; Ayoub, Abeer M; Ababneh, Mera A; Al Momani, Miral A

    2018-05-10

    To assess incidence rate, risk factors and susceptibility patterns associated with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae in community-acquired urinary tract infections (CA-UTIs). A prospective, case-control study was conducted at a tertiary teaching hospital from Jan 2015 to Dec 2016. The results of microbiology cultures were initially screened to include only patients with positive E. coli or K. pneumoniae urine cultures. Afterwards, clinical symptoms were assessed to confirm the UTI. To investigate the risk factors, patients with a positive urine culture for ESBL-producing isolates were assigned as cases, while patients with non-ESBL were assigned as controls. Out of 591 patients included in this study, 57.5% (n = 340) were included in the control group and 42.5% (n = 251) were in the case group. The incidence rate of ESBL-producing isolates was 3.465 cases per 1000-patient hospital admissions. Male gender (OR = 1.856, 95% CI = 1.192-2.889, p = 0.006), pediatrics (OR = 1.676, 95% CI = 1.117-2.517, p = 0.013), patients with comorbidity (OR = 1.542, 95% CI = 1.029-2.312, p = 0.036) and UTI in the previous 12 months (OR = 1.705, 95% CI = 1.106-2.628, p = 0.016) were independently associated with a higher risk of infection. The resistance rate for most commonly prescribed antibiotics was high. Our results suggest that the incidence of ESBL producers among CA-UTIs is high. Male gender, pediatrics, comorbidity and UTI in the previous 12 months were associated with a higher risk for infection. Continuous surveillance and prudent antibiotic use by healthcare professionals are important factors for effective control of ESBL associated infections.

  16. Severe community-acquired pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae in young female patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milačić Nena

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumonia is common agent causing community acquired pneumonia in younger population. However, the course of illness is usually benign and is rarely associated with pulmonary complications. We report a 27 years old female patient with unilateral pneumonia followed by pleural effusion and adhesions on the same side. This potential source of infection should be considered in young patients where resolution of symptoms from pneumonia is delayed.

  17. Aetiology of community-acquired neonatal sepsis in low- and middle-income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Waters

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available 99% of the approximate 1 million annual neonatal deaths from life-threatening invasive bacterial infections occur in developing countries, at least 50% of which are from home births or community settings. Data concerning aetiology of sepsis in these settings are necessary to inform targeted therapy and devise management guidelines. This review describes and analyses the bacterial aetiology of community-acquired neonatal sepsis in developing countries.

  18. Role of Monocyte/Macrophages during HIV/SIV Infection in Adult and Pediatric Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

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    Kristen M. Merino

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes/macrophages are a diverse group of cells that act as first responders in innate immunity and then as mediators for adaptive immunity to help clear infections. In performing these functions, however, the macrophage inflammatory responses can also contribute to pathogenesis. Various monocyte and tissue macrophage subsets have been associated with inflammatory disorders and tissue pathogeneses such as occur during HIV infection. Non-human primate research of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV has been invaluable in better understanding the pathogenesis of HIV infection. The question of HIV/SIV-infected macrophages serving as a viral reservoir has become significant for achieving a cure. In the rhesus macaque model, SIV-infected macrophages have been shown to promote pathogenesis in several tissues resulting in cardiovascular, metabolic, and neurological diseases. Results from human studies illustrated that alveolar macrophages could be an important HIV reservoir and humanized myeloid-only mice supported productive HIV infection and viral persistence in macrophages during ART treatment. Depletion of CD4+ T cells is considered the primary cause for terminal progression, but it was reported that increasing monocyte turnover was a significantly better predictor in SIV-infected adult macaques. Notably, pediatric cases of HIV/SIV exhibit faster and more severe disease progression than adults, yet neonates have fewer target T cells and generally lack the hallmark CD4+ T cell depletion typical of adult infections. Current data show that the baseline blood monocyte turnover rate was significantly higher in neonatal macaques compared to adults and this remained high with disease progression. In this review, we discuss recent data exploring the contribution of monocytes and macrophages to HIV/SIV infection and progression. Furthermore, we highlight the need to further investigate their role in pediatric cases of infection.

  19. THE ROLE OF A QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR A COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE OF ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Szwacka-Mokrzycka

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper was elaborated in order to determine the role and importance of quality management systems for an increase in the competitive advantage of an enterprise. The starting point is to present the contribution of different scientific staff to the development of the competitiveness theory and modern quality management systems. The presentation of contemporary sources of the competitive advantage and possibilities of the use of optimal competing strategies in particular conditions are a base for these considerations. The next part of the study includes a review of quality management systems as well as research results concerning sources of competitive advantages as well as economic and marketing effects of improvement of management efficiency. According to the research results, it could be concluded that quality perception, of both products and service quality proved by a suitable certificate as well as quality of the costumer’s service, is tightly connected with the level of costumer’s awareness. The research results confirm that implementation of the quality management system is perceived by enterprises as a significant source of the competitive advantage. As the respondents indicated, it contributes in increase in market access, acquiring new costumers, and as a consequence increase in market share of the investigated enterprises.

  20. CT of AIDS-related musculoskeletal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magid, D.; Fishman, E.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper characterizes musculoskeletal inflammatory diseases in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients and with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). CT, radiographic, and clinical data were reviewed in 10 patients, and patterns and features were compared with those in musculoskeletal infections occurring in non-AIDS patients. Infection was confirmed by means of biopsy or aspiration in eight cases and strongly suggested in the other two by blood cultures, cell counts, and other data

  1. Infecciones adquiridas en la comunidad por Staphylococcus aureus resistente a meticilina en un hospital de agudos Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in a hospital for acute diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Palombarani

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus resistente a meticilina (SAMR es uno de los principales agentes asociados a infecciones intrahospitalarias; sin embargo, en los últimos años ha surgido como un patógeno emergente de la comunidad, causando infecciones graves, principalmente en jóvenes. Se describen 33 casos de infecciones por SAMR de origen comunitario, diagnosticadas entre mayo de 2005 y junio de 2006 en el HIGA "Eva Perón". Se estudiaron retrospectivamente los aislamientos; se confirmó la resistencia a meticilina mediante la detección del gen mecA, se investigó la presencia de genes que codifican dos factores de virulencia (leucocidina de Panton-Valentine -LPV- y g-hemolisina y el tipo de casete mec mediante PCR. Todos los pacientes se encontraban sanos previamente. Cuatro pacientes menores de 12 años presentaron bacteriemia, uno con neumonía grave y los 3 restantes con infección osteoarticular; todos los pacientes mayores de 12 años presentaron infecciones de piel y partes blandas sin compromiso sistémico. Se constató la presencia de casete mec tipo IV en todos los aislamientos; la resistencia a meticilina no se acompañó de resistencia a otros antimicrobianos; los aislamientos fueron portadores de genes que codifican para LPV y para g-hemolisina. Es importante considerar la presencia de estas cepas de origen comunitario a fin de elaborar estrategias para su correcto tratamiento.Methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is one of the most prevalent pathogens associated with nosocomial infections. However, most recently, MRSA has arisen as an emerging community pathogen, causing serious infections, mainly among young patients. We herein describe 33 cases of infections caused by community-acquired MRSA (CMRSA, diagnosed between May 2005 and June 2006, at "Eva Perón" Hospital. The isolations were retrospectively studied. Methicillin resistance was confirmed by means of the detection of the mecA gene, and the genes for two virulence

  2. Hospital networks and the dispersal of hospital-acquired pathogens by patient transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjibbe Donker

    Full Text Available Hospital-acquired infections (HAI are often seen as preventable incidents that result from unsafe practices or poor hospital hygiene. This however ignores the fact that transmissibility is not only a property of the causative organisms but also of the hosts who can translocate bacteria when moving between hospitals. In an epidemiological sense, hospitals become connected through the patients they share. We here postulate that the degree of hospital connectedness crucially influences the rates of infections caused by hospital-acquired bacteria. To test this hypothesis, we mapped the movement of patients based on the UK-NHS Hospital Episode Statistics and observed that the proportion of patients admitted to a hospital after a recent episode in another hospital correlates with the hospital-specific incidence rate of MRSA bacteraemia as recorded by mandatory reporting. We observed a positive correlation between hospital connectedness and MRSA bacteraemia incidence rate that is significant for all financial years since 2001 except for 2008-09. All years combined, this correlation is positive and significantly different from zero (partial correlation coefficient r = 0.33 (0.28 to 0.38. When comparing the referral pattern for English hospitals with referral patterns observed in the Netherlands, we predict that English hospitals more likely see a swifter and more sustained spread of HAIs. Our results indicate that hospitals cannot be viewed as individual units but rather should be viewed as connected elements of larger modular networks. Our findings stress the importance of cooperative effects that will have a bearing on the planning of health care systems, patient management and hospital infection control.

  3. Spectrum and potency of ceftaroline against leading pathogens causing community-acquired respiratory tract and skin and soft tissue infections in Latin America, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Flamm

    Full Text Available Ceftaroline, the active metabolite of the prodrug ceftaroline fosamil, is a cephalosporin with in vitro bactericidal activity against Gram-positive organisms, including methicillinsusceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus, β-haemolytic and viridans group streptococci, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, as well as common Gram-negative organisms. In this study a total of 986 isolates collected in 2010 from patients in 15 medical centers in five Latin American countries from the Assessing Worldwide Antimicrobial Resistance Evaluation Program were identified as community-acquired respiratory tract or skin and soft tissue infection pathogens. Ceftaroline was the most potent agent tested against S. pneumoniae with a MIC90 value (0.12 µg/mL that was eight-fold lower than ceftriaxone, levofloxacin, and linezolid. Its spectrum of coverage (100.0% susceptible was similar to tigecycline, linezolid, levofloxacin and vancomycin. Against Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis, ceftaroline was the most active agent tested. The activity of ceftaroline against S. aureus (including MRSA was similar to that of vancomycin and tetracycline (MIC90,1 µg/mL and linezolid (MIC90,2 Jg/mL. The 1-haemolytic streptococci exhibited 100.0% susceptibility to ceftaroline. Ceftaroline activity against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., and Enterobacter spp. was similar to that of ceftriaxone and ceftazidime. These parenteral cephalosporin agents have potent activity against non-extended-spectrum These parenteral cephalosporin agents have potent activity against non-extended-spectrum-lactamase-phenotype strains, but are not active against extended-spectrum β-lactamase-phenotype strains. These results confirm the in vitro activity of ceftaroline against pathogens common in communityacquired respiratory tract and skin and soft tissue infection in Latin America, and suggest that ceftaroline fosamil could be an important therapeutic option for these infections.

  4. Learning-by-Being-Acquired

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Massimo Gaetano; Moreira, Solon; Rabbiosi, Larissa

    2016-01-01

    In horizontal acquisitions, the post-acquisition integration of the R&D function often damages the inventive labor force and results in lower innovative productivity of acquired inventors. In this paper we study post-acquisition integration in terms of R&D team reorganization-i.e., the creation...... of new teams with both inventors of the acquiring and acquired firms-and assess the impact of this integration action in the period that immediately follows the acquisition. Drawing on social identity and self-categorization theories, we argue that R&D team reorganization increases the acquired inventors...

  5. A review of mixed malaria species infections in anopheline mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Day Nicholas PJ

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with malaria mixed species infections are common and under reported. In PCR studies conducted in Asia mixed infection rates often exceed 20%. In South-East Asia, approximately one third of patients treated for falciparum malaria experience a subsequent Plasmodium vivax infection with a time interval suggesting relapse. It is uncertain whether the two infections are acquired simultaneously or separately. To determine whether mixed species infections in humans are derived from mainly from simultaneous or separate mosquito inoculations the literature on malaria species infection in wild captured anopheline mosquitoes was reviewed. Methods The biomedical literature was searched for studies of malaria infection and species identification in trapped wild mosquitoes and artificially infected mosquitoes. The study location and year, collection methods, mosquito species, number of specimens, parasite stage examined (oocysts or sporozoites, and the methods of parasite detection and speciation were tabulated. The entomological results in South East Asia were compared with mixed infection rates documented in patients in clinical studies. Results In total 63 studies were identified. Individual anopheline mosquitoes were examined for different malaria species in 28 of these. There were 14 studies from Africa; four with species evaluations in individual captured mosquitoes (SEICM. One study, from Ghana, identified a single mixed infection. No mixed infections were identified in Central and South America (seven studies, two SEICM. 42 studies were conducted in Asia and Oceania (11 from Thailand; 27 SEICM. The proportion of anophelines infected with Plasmodium falciparum parasites only was 0.51% (95% CI: 0.44 to 0.57%, for P. vivax only was 0.26% (95% CI: 0.21 to 0.30%, and for mixed P. falciparum and P. vivax infections was 0.036% (95% CI: 0.016 to 0.056%. The proportion of mixed infections in mosquitoes was significantly higher

  6. Computed tomography of the lungs in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartelius, H.; Gaub, J.; Jensen, L.I.; Jensen, J.; Faber, V.; Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomography of the chest was performed on 42 occasions as part of the diagnostic work-up in 26 homosexual men with, or suspected of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In 17 cases both the chest radiographs and the lung scans were abnormal, and bronchoscopy and/or lung biopsy established an etiologic diagnosis in the majority of these cases. In 9 cases CT of the lungs revealed unequivocal interstitial infiltration in the presence of a normal chest radiography, and subsequently and etiologic agent was demonstrated in all these cases. In 9 cases, patients with symptoms indicative of pulmonary infection had both a normal chest radiograph and a normal lung scan, and in none of these cases did the clinical course or additional diagnostic procedures indicate the presence of current opportunistic lung infection. CT of the lungs seems to identify accurately those patients with severe HIV-related diseases in whom invasive diagnostic procedures such as bronchoalveolar lavage and/or lung biopsy should be done. (orig.)

  7. Pulmonary infections in immunocompromised patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choneva, I.; Abadjieva, D.; Kirilov, R.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: The lung is one of the most commonly affected organs in immunocompromised patients. Primary complication is pulmonary infection which is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Although radiography and CT, as main diagnostic tools are reliable and credible methods, often there is difficulty with the correct diagnose. The reasons for this are that immunocompromised patients are potentially susceptible to infection by various microorganisms and that the radiographic findings are rarely specific for detecting a particular pathogen. What you will learn : Our objective is to present general nosological classification of pulmonary infections in immunocompromised patients, and to evaluate and analyze new imaging methods and discuss their correlation with the clinical setting, which aims to facilitate the diagnosis and to take a decision for the treatment. The experience indicates that a clinical environment conducive the immunocompromised patients to infection with certain pathogens, thereby changing the frequency of their occurrence. The most commonly cited fungal infections, cytomegalovirus infections, Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) of which convincing is the Imaging diagnosis primarily in fungal infections, and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and less accurate - in bacterial and viral infections. Discussion: The term 'immunocompromised' describes a subject with an increased risk for life-threatening infection as a result of congenital or acquired abnormalities of the immune system. Over the past few decades, the number of immunocompromised patients has grown considerably, reflecting the increased use of immunosuppressive drugs, and the syndrome of acquired immunodeficiency. Given the high incidence of pulmonary infections in immunocompromised patients (lung is one of the most commonly affected organs, such as lung infection is about 75% of pulmonary complications), rapid and accurate diagnosis is important

  8. The Cervicovaginal Microbiota in Women Notified for Chlamydia trachomatis Infection: A Case-Control Study at the Sexually Transmitted Infection Outpatient Clinic in Amsterdam, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veer, Charlotte; Bruisten, Sylvia M.; van der Helm, Jannie J.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; van Houdt, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Background. Increasing evidence suggests that the cervicovaginal microbiota (CVM) plays an important role in acquiring sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Here we study the CVM in a population of women notified by a sex partner for Chlamydia trachomatis infection. Methods. We included 98 women

  9. Community acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in a young athlete man: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahdar, Hossein Ali; Kazemian, Hossein; Bimanand, Lida; Zahedani, Shahram Shahraki; Feyisa, Seifu Gizaw; Taki, Elahe; Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Karami-Zarandi, Morteza

    2018-04-10

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is commonly known as nosocomial infection agent but rarely previously healthy peoples infected by P. aeruginosa. Here we report community acquired pneumonia in a 27 years old athleteman. 15 published P. aeruginosa CAP case reports are reviewed.1 53.3% of patients was female and 46.67% was male. The mean age was 44 years old (SD: ±13.54). In 8 report it is mentioned that the patient was smoker. Fatality rate was 46.6% and death rate was not significantly different between selected antibiotic regimen, sex and smoking in patient's outcome. Chest strike can be a risk factor for P. aeruginosa CAP in athlete people. Our reported patient treated by ciprofloxacin 400 mg per day and healed without any Secondary complication. Fast and timelymanner diagnosis and treatment is critical in Community acquired P. aeruginosapneumonia outcome. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Absolute advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G.M. van Marrewijk (Charles)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractA country is said to have an absolute advantage over another country in the production of a good or service if it can produce that good or service using fewer real resources. Equivalently, using the same inputs, the country can produce more output. The concept of absolute advantage can

  11. Norovirus Genotypes in Hospital Settings - Differences between Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franck, Kristina Træholt; Nielsen, Rikke Thoft; Holzknecht, Barbara Juliane

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Norovirus is a major cause of gastroenteritis and hospital outbreaks, leading to substantial morbidity and direct healthcare expenses as well as indirect societal costs. The aim of the study was to estimate the proportion of nosocomial norovirus infections among inpatients tested...

  12. Orbital manifestations in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Punita Kumari

    2014-01-01

    The orbital manifestations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome(AIDS) are uncommon. To provide a review of orbital manifestations of AIDS, the predisposing factors, investigations, treatment and outcome. Meticulous and systematic literature search of Pubmed to identify manuscripts describing orbital manifestations of AIDS was done and the articles were reviewed.The keywords used in the search were “orbit and AIDS”, “HIV positive and orbit”,“orbit manifestations in AIDS”, “orbital disease and AIDS” and “orbital infections and AIDS”. The orbital involvement in AIDS may present with opportunistic infections from organisms like fungi, viruses, bacteria and protozoa or with malignancies like Kaposi’s sarcoma, squamous cell carcinoma, smooth muscle cell tumors and lymphoma.The predisposing factors for orbital involvement in AIDS are low CD4+ cell count and the immunosuppressive states like diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis, intravenous drug abuse and neutropenia. A patient may present with fever, headache, nausea, vomiting,decreased vision, ocular pain, and, in cases of mass formation, there is periorbital swelling, axial proptosis, globe displacement and swollen optic disc. Radiologically,mass formation, orbital bony destruction, and spread of disease to contiguous structures including the central nervous system may be seen. The medical management includes therapy for infection and HIV-1 protease inhibitors (highly active antiretroviral therapy)to suppress HIV-1 replication. For tumors, radical surgery including debulking followed by postoperative radiotherapy is generally needed. Orbital involvements with AIDS in any form, infective or malignancy, causes significant morbidity and mortality and should be diagnosed and managed as early as possible.

  13. Introduction and immunopathogenesis of acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudharshan S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available India has a large number of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS, the third largest population of this group in the world. This disease was first described in patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia in 1981. Ocular lesions can occur at any stage of the disease but are more commonly seen at the late stages. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, the causative agent of AIDS is a retrovirus with RNA genome and a unique ′Reverse transcriptase enzyme′ and is of two types, HIV-1 and 2. Most human diseases are caused by HIV-1. The HIV-1 subtypes prevalent in India are A, B and C. They act predominantly by reducing the CD4+ cells and thus the patient becomes susceptible to opportunistic infections. High viral titers in the peripheral blood during primary infection lead to decrease in the number of CD4+ T lymphocytes. Onset of HIV-1-specific cellular immune response with synthesis of HIV-1 specific antibodies leads to the decline of plasma viral load and chronification of HIV-1 infection. However, the asymptomatic stage of infection may lead to persistent viral replication and a rapid turnover of plasma virions which is the clinical latency. During this period, there is further decrease in the CD4+ counts which makes the patient′s immune system incapable of controlling opportunistic pathogens and thus life-threatening AIDS-defining diseases emerge. Advent of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART has revolutionized the management of AIDS though there is associated increased development of immune recovery uveitis in a few of these patients.

  14. Avian Influenza: Potential Impact on Sub-Saharan Military Populations with High Rates of Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feldman, Robert L; Nickell, Kent

    2007-01-01

    ...)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. With the arrival of avian influenza in Africa, the potential exists that some of those soldiers might also become infected with H5N1, the virus responsible for the disease...

  15. The Ability to Assimilate Technology as a Source of Competitive Advantage of Financial Companies in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glabiszewski Waldemar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is empirical in nature and attempts to assess the impact of ability to assimilate newly acquired technologies by financial companies operating in Poland gaining market competitive advantages. The outcome of the research conducted proved the existence of this relationship and found it be strong. This means that the development of these abilities within the absorptive potential of financial companies should trigger a significant increase in the market competitive advantages held by them. The strong impact was identified both in the total of the analyzed personnel and general-organizational components of the assimilation abilities. As regards elementary components of the analyzed potential, the obtained results are definitely more diverse.

  16. Mania as complication of HIV infection: case reports | Sulyman ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These case reports highlight the fact that organic mood disorder, manic episode, in HIV infection AIDS might not be uncommon in this part of the world. Patients present with irritable mood rather than euphoria and they respond rapidly to psychotropic medications. Key words: Manic episode, HIV infection; Acquired immune ...

  17. Staphylococcus aureus Central Nervous System Infections in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Jesus G; Cain, Alexandra N; Mason, Edward O; Kaplan, Sheldon L; Hultén, Kristina G

    2017-10-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus are uncommon in pediatric patients. We review the epidemiology, clinical features and treatment in 68 patients with a S. aureus CNS infection evaluated at Texas Children's Hospital. Cases of CNS infection in children with positive cerebrospinal fluid cultures or spinal epidural abscess (SEA) for S. aureus at Texas Children's Hospital from 2001 to 2013 were reviewed. Seventy cases of S. aureus CNS infection occurred in 68 patients. Forty-nine cases (70%) were secondary to a CNS device, 5 (7.1%) were postoperative meningitis, 9 (12.8%) were hematogenous meningitis and 7 (10%) were SEAs. Forty-seven (67.2%) were caused by methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and 23 (32.8%) by methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Community-acquired infections were more often caused by MRSA that was clone USA300/pvl. Most patients were treated with nafcillin (MSSA) or vancomycin (MRSA) with or without rifampin. Among patients with MRSA infection, 50% had a serum vancomycin trough obtained with the median level being 10.6 μg/mL (range: 5.4-15.7 μg/mL). Only 1 death was associated with S. aureus infection. The epidemiology of invasive of S. aureus infections continues to evolve with MSSA accounting for most of the infections in this series. The majority of cases were associated with neurosurgical procedures; however, hematogenous S. aureus meningitis and SEA occurred as community-acquired infections in patients without predisposing factors. Patients with MRSA CNS infections had a favorable response to vancomycin, but the beneficial effect of combination therapy or targeting vancomycin trough concentrations of 15-20 μg/mL remains unclear.

  18. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis associated with acute Toxoplasma gondii infection: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiaotang; Zhou, Hui; Xie, Yongmei; Yu, Dan; Wang, Zhiling; Ren, Haitao

    2018-02-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis has been recognized as the most frequent autoimmune encephalitis in children. Several infectious agents have been implicated in anti-NMDA encephalitis. A previously healthy immunocompetent 9-year-old girl first presented with seizures, headaches and vomiting. Cerebrospinal fluid and brain magnetic resonance imaging were normal. After one week onset, the patient gradually developed unexplained personality and behavior changes, accompanied by fever and seizures again. Repeated CSF analysis revealed a slightly lymphocytic predominant pleocytosis and positive anti-NMDAR antibody. A variety of pathogenic examinations were negative, except for positive toxoplasma IgM and IgG. The patient was diagnoses for anti-NMDA encephalitis associated with acute acquired toxoplasma gondii infection. The patient received 10 days azithromycin for treatment of acquired toxoplasma infection. The parents refuse immunotherapy because substantial recovery from clinical symptoms. The patient was substantially recovered with residual mild agitation after therapy for acquired toxoplasma gondii infection. Two months later, the patient was completely devoid of symptoms, and the levels of serum IgM and IgG of toxoplasma gondii were decreased. Acquired toxoplasma gondii infection may trigger anti-NMDAR encephalitis in children, which has not been reported previously. Clinicians should assess the possibility of toxoplasma gondii infection when evaluating a patient with anti-NMDA encephalitis.

  19. Risk Factors for Acquired Rifamycin and Isoniazid Resistance: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neesha Rockwood

    Full Text Available Studies looking at acquired drug resistance (ADR are diverse with respect to geographical distribution, HIV co-infection rates, retreatment status and programmatic factors such as regimens administered and directly observed therapy. Our objective was to examine and consolidate evidence from clinical studies of the multifactorial aetiology of acquired rifamycin and/or isoniazid resistance within the scope of a single systematic review. This is important to inform policy and identify key areas for further studies.Case-control and cohort studies and randomised controlled trials that reported ADR as an outcome during antitubercular treatment regimens including a rifamycin and examined the association of at least 1 risk factor were included. Post hoc, we carried out random effects Mantel-Haenszel weighted meta-analyses of the impact of 2 key risk factors 1 HIV and 2 baseline drug resistance on the binary outcome of ADR. Heterogeneity was assessed used I2 statistic. As a secondary outcome, we calculated median cumulative incidence of ADR, weighted by the sample size of the studies.Meta-analysis of 15 studies showed increased risk of ADR with baseline mono- or polyresistance (RR 4.85 95% CI 3.26 to 7.23, heterogeneity I2 58%, 95% CI 26 to 76%. Meta-analysis of 8 studies showed that HIV co-infection was associated with increased risk of ADR (RR 3.02, 95% CI 1.28 to 7.11; there was considerable heterogeneity amongst these studies (I2 81%, 95% CI 64 to 90%. Non-adherence, extrapulmonary/disseminated disease and advanced immunosuppression in HIV co-infection were other risk factors noted. The weighted median cumulative incidence of acquired multi drug resistance calculated in 24 studies (assuming whole cohort as denominator, regardless of follow up DST was 0.1% (5th to 95th percentile 0.07 to 3.2%.Baseline drug resistance and HIV co-infection were significant risk factors for ADR. There was a trend of positive association with non-adherence which is likely

  20. [Nosocomial virus infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, H J

    1986-12-01

    Enveloped viruses, e.g. influenza- or varicella viruses may cause highly contagious airborne infections. Their spread is difficult to control, also in hospitals. In the case of influenza and varicella immune prophylaxis and chemotherapy/chemoprophylaxis are possible. This is of particular significance, since varicella and zoster are of increasing importance for immunocompromized patients. Diarrhea is caused to a large extent by viruses. Rotavirus infections play an important role in infancy, and are frequently acquired in the hospital. In a study on infectious gastroenteritis of infants in a hospital we were able to show that 30 percent of all rotavirus infections were of nosocomial origin. Admission of a rotavirus-excreting patient (or personnel) may start a long chain of rotavirus infections on pediatric wards. Even careful hygienic measures in the hospital can hardly prevent the spread of enterovirus infections. Such infections may be severe and lethal for newborns, as shown by us in a study on an outbreak of echovirus 11 disease on a maternity ward. We have recently obtained data on the "stickiness" of enteroviruses on human skin. This could explain essential features of the spread of enteroviruses in the population.

  1. Acquired neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozeron, Pierre; Trocello, Jean-Marc; Kubis, Nathalie

    2013-09-01

    Acquired neuropathies represent most of the neuropathies encountered in clinical practice. Hundreds of causes have been identified even though up to 41% of patients are still classified as idiopathic (Rajabally and Shah in J Neurol 258:1431-1436, 1). Routine evaluation relies on comprehensive medical history taking, clinical examination, nerve conduction studies and laboratory tests. Other investigations such as nerve biopsy or nerve or muscle imaging are performed in specific settings. This review focuses on recent advances in acquired neuropathies.

  2. [Anterior lumbar interbody fusion. Indications, technique, advantages and disadvantages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, M; Weidenfeld, M; Uckmann, F P

    2015-02-01

    Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) for lumbar interbody fusion from L2 to the sacrum has been an established technique for decades. The advantages and disadvantages of ALIF compared to posterior interbody fusion techniques are discussed. The operative technique is described in detail. Complications and avoidance strategies are discussed. This article is based on a selective literature search using PubMed and the experience of the authors in this medical field. The advantages of ALIF compared to posterior fusion techniques are the free approach to the anterior disc space without opening of the spinal canal or the neural foramina. This gives the possibility of an extensive anterior release and placement of the largest possible cages without the risk of neural structure damage. The disadvantages of ALIF are the additional anterior approach and the related complications. The most frequent complication is due to damage of vessels. The rate of complications is significantly increased in revision surgery. The ALIF technique meaningfully expands the repertoire of the spinal surgeon especially for the treatment of non-union after interbody fusion, in patients with epidural scar tissue at the index level and spinal infections. Advantages and disadvantages should be considered when evaluating the indications for ALIF.

  3. Competitive versus comparative advantage

    OpenAIRE

    Neary, J. Peter

    2002-01-01

    I explore the interactions between comparative, competitive and absolute advantage in a two-country model of oligopoly in general equilibrium. Comparative advantage always determines the direction of trade, but both competitive and absolute advantage affect resource allocation, trade patterns and trade volumes. Competitive advantage in the sense of more home firms drives foreign firms out of marginal sectors but also makes some marginal home sectors uncompetitive. Absolute advantage in the se...

  4. Relative Contribution of Dengue IgG Antibodies Acquired during Gestation or Breastfeeding in Mediating Dengue Disease Enhancement and Protection in Type I Interferon Receptor-Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Xuan Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV causes a spectrum of diseases ranging from self-limiting dengue fever to severe conditions such as haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE is thought to explain the occurrence of severe dengue whereby pre-existing binding but non-neutralising antibodies enhance DENV infection. The ADE phenomenon is supported by epidemiological findings that infants that born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk to develop severe dengue upon primary infection. The role of maternally acquired dengue-specific antibodies in disease enhancement was recently recapitulated in a mouse model where mice born to DENV1-immune mothers experienced enhanced disease severity upon DENV2 infection. Here, this study investigates the relative contribution of maternal dengue-specific antibodies acquired during gestation and breastfeeding in dengue disease. Using a surrogate breastfeeding mother experimental approach, we showed that majority of the maternal dengue-specific antibodies were acquired during breastfeeding and conferred an extended enhancement window. On the other hand, in the context of homologous infection, breastfeeding conferred protection. Furthermore, measurement of dengue-specific antibody titres over time in mice born to dengue immune mothers revealed a biphasic pattern of antibody decay as reported in humans. Our work provides evidence of the potential contribution of breast milk-acquired dengue-specific IgG antibodies in enhancement and protection against dengue. Should such contribution be established in humans as well, it may have important implications for the development of guidelines to dengue-immune breastfeeding mothers.

  5. Relative Contribution of Dengue IgG Antibodies Acquired during Gestation or Breastfeeding in Mediating Dengue Disease Enhancement and Protection in Type I Interferon Receptor-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei Xuan; Ong, Li Ching; Libau, Eshele Anak; Alonso, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes a spectrum of diseases ranging from self-limiting dengue fever to severe conditions such as haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is thought to explain the occurrence of severe dengue whereby pre-existing binding but non-neutralising antibodies enhance DENV infection. The ADE phenomenon is supported by epidemiological findings that infants that born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk to develop severe dengue upon primary infection. The role of maternally acquired dengue-specific antibodies in disease enhancement was recently recapitulated in a mouse model where mice born to DENV1-immune mothers experienced enhanced disease severity upon DENV2 infection. Here, this study investigates the relative contribution of maternal dengue-specific antibodies acquired during gestation and breastfeeding in dengue disease. Using a surrogate breastfeeding mother experimental approach, we showed that majority of the maternal dengue-specific antibodies were acquired during breastfeeding and conferred an extended enhancement window. On the other hand, in the context of homologous infection, breastfeeding conferred protection. Furthermore, measurement of dengue-specific antibody titres over time in mice born to dengue immune mothers revealed a biphasic pattern of antibody decay as reported in humans. Our work provides evidence of the potential contribution of breast milk-acquired dengue-specific IgG antibodies in enhancement and protection against dengue. Should such contribution be established in humans as well, it may have important implications for the development of guidelines to dengue-immune breastfeeding mothers.

  6. Relative Contribution of Dengue IgG Antibodies Acquired during Gestation or Breastfeeding in Mediating Dengue Disease Enhancement and Protection in Type I Interferon Receptor-Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei Xuan; Ong, Li Ching; Libau, Eshele Anak; Alonso, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes a spectrum of diseases ranging from self-limiting dengue fever to severe conditions such as haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is thought to explain the occurrence of severe dengue whereby pre-existing binding but non-neutralising antibodies enhance DENV infection. The ADE phenomenon is supported by epidemiological findings that infants that born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk to develop severe dengue upon primary infection. The role of maternally acquired dengue-specific antibodies in disease enhancement was recently recapitulated in a mouse model where mice born to DENV1-immune mothers experienced enhanced disease severity upon DENV2 infection. Here, this study investigates the relative contribution of maternal dengue-specific antibodies acquired during gestation and breastfeeding in dengue disease. Using a surrogate breastfeeding mother experimental approach, we showed that majority of the maternal dengue-specific antibodies were acquired during breastfeeding and conferred an extended enhancement window. On the other hand, in the context of homologous infection, breastfeeding conferred protection. Furthermore, measurement of dengue-specific antibody titres over time in mice born to dengue immune mothers revealed a biphasic pattern of antibody decay as reported in humans. Our work provides evidence of the potential contribution of breast milk-acquired dengue-specific IgG antibodies in enhancement and protection against dengue. Should such contribution be established in humans as well, it may have important implications for the development of guidelines to dengue-immune breastfeeding mothers. PMID:27341339

  7. Nursing home-acquired pneumonia, dysphagia and associated diseases in nursing home residents: A retrospective, cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollaar, V.R.Y.; Putten, G.J. van der; Maarel-Wierink, C.D. van der; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Swart, B.J.M. de; Baat, C. de; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) is a common infection among nursing home residents. There is also a high prevalence of dysphagia in nursing home residents and they suffer more often from comorbidity and multimorbidity. This puts nursing home residents at higher risk of (mortality

  8. Acquired Ichthyosis Triggered by an Osseous Hemangiopericytoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Patsatsi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ichthyoses are a heterogeneous group of cutaneous keratinization disorders that can be congenital or acquired. Apart from neoplastic disorders, the acquired form of ichthyosis (AI has been associated with a variety of diseases including infections, autoimmune/inflammatory and endocrine/metabolic diseases as well as nutritional conditions, medications and others. However, malignancy accounts for half of the reported cases, most commonly including lymphoproliferative disorders. We present a case of AI as a paraneoplastic skin manifestation of a primary, osseous hemangiopericytoma (HP accompanied by multiple liver metastases. We also review the literature and discuss the necessity of investigating underlying diseases, especially malignancy, when adult-onset ichthyosis arises.

  9. Community-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess: an emerging infection in Ireland and Europe.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, R

    2013-02-05

    INTRODUCTION: Klebsiella pneumoniae has emerged as a predominant cause of community-acquired mono-microbial pyogenic liver abscess. This was first described in Taiwan and has been widely reported in Asia. This infectious entity has been described in Europe, with single case reports predominating. METHODS: We present three cases in one year from our institution in Ireland and review the European literature to date. RESULTS\\/CONCLUSION: Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome is now emerging in Europe and notably is not restricted to individuals of Asian descent.

  10. Superior voice recognition in a patient with acquired prosopagnosia and object agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Adria E N; Démonet, Jean-François; Steeves, Jennifer K E

    2010-11-01

    Anecdotally, it has been reported that individuals with acquired prosopagnosia compensate for their inability to recognize faces by using other person identity cues such as hair, gait or the voice. Are they therefore superior at the use of non-face cues, specifically voices, to person identity? Here, we empirically measure person and object identity recognition in a patient with acquired prosopagnosia and object agnosia. We quantify person identity (face and voice) and object identity (car and horn) recognition for visual, auditory, and bimodal (visual and auditory) stimuli. The patient is unable to recognize faces or cars, consistent with his prosopagnosia and object agnosia, respectively. He is perfectly able to recognize people's voices and car horns and bimodal stimuli. These data show a reverse shift in the typical weighting of visual over auditory information for audiovisual stimuli in a compromised visual recognition system. Moreover, the patient shows selectively superior voice recognition compared to the controls revealing that two different stimulus domains, persons and objects, may not be equally affected by sensory adaptation effects. This also implies that person and object identity recognition are processed in separate pathways. These data demonstrate that an individual with acquired prosopagnosia and object agnosia can compensate for the visual impairment and become quite skilled at using spared aspects of sensory processing. In the case of acquired prosopagnosia it is advantageous to develop a superior use of voices for person identity recognition in everyday life. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Detecting Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections in nasopharyngeal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Muhi Kadhem Wannas Al-Janabi

    2017-08-19

    Aug 19, 2017 ... M. pneumonia in a respective bulk among pediatric patients with ... adults [3]. It is also a major cause of community acquired pneumo- nia affecting ..... various ways, where an infection with this organism may precede the onset ...

  12. Clostridium difficile infection in returning travellers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michal Stevens, A.; Esposito, Douglas H.; Stoney, Rhett J.; Hamer, Davidson H.; Flores-Figueroa, Jose; Bottieau, Emmanuel; Connor, Bradley A.; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Goorhuis, Abraham; Hynes, Noreen A.; Libman, Michael; Lopez-Velez, Rogelio; McCarthy, Anne E.; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Schwartz, Eli; van Genderen, Perry J. J.; Scott Benson, L.; Leung, Daniel T.

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the contribution of community-acquired cases to the global burden of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). The epidemiology of CDI among international travellers is poorly understood, and factors associated with international travel, such as antibiotic use and

  13. Study of the role of mobile phones in the transmission of Hospital acquired infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana M Angadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The inanimate objects like mobile phones in the immediate environment of the patients can act as a source of infection. Infectious agents from patients can be transferred on to the hands of the health care workers and in the absence of adequate hand hygiene practices can be transferred on to the mobile phones during their use and this can serve as a vehicle for the transmission of nosocomial pathogens from one patient to another. Aim: To evaluate the role of mobile phones in the transmission of pathogens by health care workers in health care centres. Materials and Methods: Mobile phones and hands were tested for micro-organisms before and after application of a disinfectant. A total of 60 mobile phones were tested for micro organisms, 30 from the health care workers (study group and 30 from relatives of patients attending Out Patient Department (control group. Swabs taken from their hands were also cultured. Results: Hands of all the health care workers and 27 mobile phones showed microorganisms on them. Only Staphylococcus aureus was isolated. The hands and mobile phones of 11 health care workers were contaminated with Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA was isolated from the hands of 24 (80% and mobile phones of 16 (53.3% health care workers. Ethyl alcohol was found to be 100% effective in disinfecting hands and mobile phones. Conclusions: To prevent the potential spread of infections through mobile phones, strict infection control practices, hand hygiene, and routine decontamination of mobile phones with alcohol should be advocated to prevent the spread of infection in the hospital settings.

  14. Application of Knowledge in Advergaming as a Possible Source of Competitive Advantage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mráček Pavel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the question of the utilization of knowledge in advergaming (an original tool of the marketing communication as a possible source of competitive advantage. Related terms are briefly described and the research was conducted within a group of young people in the Czech Republic. The research confirms that, just advergaming might have the potential for acquiring “consumers of the advertising message” and, consequently, the possible broadening of the knowledge of the company. The output then becomes the scheme for displaying the links and the utilization of the knowledge in the advergame itself.

  15. The dynamics of natural Plasmodium falciparum infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Felger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Natural immunity to Plasmodium falciparum has been widely studied, but its effects on parasite dynamics are poorly understood. Acquisition and clearance rates of untreated infections are key elements of the dynamics of malaria, but estimating these parameters is challenging because of frequent super-infection and imperfect detectability of parasites. Consequently, information on effects of host immune status or age on infection dynamics is fragmentary. METHODS: An age-stratified cohort of 347 individuals from Northern Ghana was sampled six times at 2 month intervals. High-throughput capillary electrophoresis was used to genotype the msp-2 locus of all P. falciparum infections detected by PCR. Force of infection (FOI and duration were estimated for each age group using an immigration-death model that allows for imperfect detection of circulating parasites. RESULTS: Allowing for imperfect detection substantially increased estimates of FOI and duration. Effects of naturally acquired immunity on the FOI and duration would be reflected in age dependence in these indices, but in our cohort data FOI tended to increase with age in children. Persistence of individual parasite clones was characteristic of all age-groups. Duration peaked in 5-9 year old children (average duration 319 days, 95% confidence interval 318;320. CONCLUSIONS: The main age-dependence is on parasite densities, with only small age-variations in the FOI and persistence of infections. This supports the hypothesis that acquired immunity controls transmission mainly by limiting blood-stage parasite densities rather than changing rates of acquisition or clearance of infections.

  16. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: an emerging pathogen in orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotte, Anthony L; Trzeciak, Marc A

    2008-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S aureus) remains one of the most common pathogens for skin and soft-tissue infections encountered by the orthopaedic surgeon. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S aureus (CA-MRSA) has become increasingly prevalent, particularly among athletes, children in day care, homeless persons, intravenous drug users, men who have sex with men, military recruits, certain minorities (ie, Alaskan Natives, Native Americans, Pacific Islanders), and prison inmates. Risk factors include antibiotic use within the preceding year, crowded living conditions, compromised skin integrity, contaminated surfaces, frequent skin-to-skin contact, shared items, and suboptimal cleanliness. When a patient presents with a skin or soft-tissue infection, the clinician should determine whether an abscess or other infection needs to be surgically incised and drained. Cultures should be performed. When the patient is a member of an at-risk group or has any of the risk factors for CA-MRSA, beta-lactam antibiotics (eg, methicillin) are no longer a reasonable choice for treatment. Empiric treatment should consist of non-beta-lactam antibiotics active against CA-MRSA.

  17. THE EFFECT OF ACQUISITION ON THE STOCK RETURNS OF ACQUIRING COMPANIES: EXAMINING THE EFFECT OF ACQUISITIONS OCCURED THROUGH THE PERMISSION OF CAPITAL MARKET BOARD ON THE STOCK RETURNS OF ACQUIRING COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEVENT ÇITAK

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A merger can be defined as the economical and legal integration of two or more firms. On the other hand, an acquisiton is the transfer of all asssets and liabilities of the target firm to the acquiring firm. In the literature, merger and acquisition concepts can be used interchangeably. Firms tend to merge for the sake of creating snergy, competitive advantage, diversification, increasing firm value etc. Mergers and acquisitions are sometimes in favour of acquiring firms’ stock holders and sometimes target firms’ stock holders. Merger gains change, depending on the type of the merger and form of payment. In this study, mergers that occured through the permission of Capital Market Board have been used for the analyses. Of the mergers which have the permission, acquiring firms that are listed on Istanbul Stock Exchange have been considered and postacquisition buy and hold abnormal returns and cumulative abnormal returns have been calculated. It is concluded that postacquisition abnormal returns aren’t statistically significant. On the other hand, 1 month, 3 month, 6 month, 1 year and 2 year buy and hold abnormal returns and cumulative abnormal returns of the acquiring firms that use different payment methods are not statistically different from each other, on the basis of same return horizon. Two different methods of abnormal return calculation don’t make any difference in postacquisition abnormal returns, either.

  18. Heterotopic ossification (myositis ossificans) in acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Detection by gallium scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drane, W.E.; Tipler, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    A case of heterotopic ossification (myositis ossificans) secondary to the central nervous system complications of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is reported. Because of the overwhelming suspicion of infection in this patient, this diagnosis was not considered until a gallium scan revealed the typical findings of heterotopic ossification. Because of the increasing utilization of gallium imaging in the AIDS population, every imaging specialist should be aware of this potential disorder

  19. Histopathological Diagnosis of Fungal Infections: Problems and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Histopathology is a major diagnostic tool in mycology and has the advantage of rapid diagnosis, cost effectiveness, ability to provide initial identification of the infecting fungus and demonstrates tissue reactions and currently the means of diagnosing the infections caused by the fungi: Lodoa loboi and Rhinosporidium ...

  20. Intracranial complications of Serratia marcescens infection in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madide, Ayanda; Smith, Johan

    2016-03-15

    Even though Serratia marcescens is not one of the most common causes of infection in neonates, it is associated with grave morbidity and mortality. We describe the evolution of brain parenchymal affectation observed in association with S. marcescens infection in neonates. This retrospective case series details brain ultrasound findings of five neonates with hospital-acquired S. marcescens infection. Neonatal S. marcescens infection with or without associated meningitis can be complicated by brain parenchymal affectation, leading to cerebral abscess formation. It is recommended that all neonates with this infection should undergo neuro-imaging more than once before discharge from hospital; this can be achieved using bedside ultrasonography.

  1. Evaluation of an algorithm for switching from IV to PO therapy in clinical practice in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Eerden, Menno M.; de Graaff, Casper S.; Vlaspolder, Fer; Bronsveld, Willem; Jansen, Henk M.; Boersma, Wim G.

    2004-01-01

    Background: in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), switching from IV to PO antibiotics offers advantages over IV therapy alone, including improved cost-effectiveness through reductions in the length of hospital stay and treatment costs. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine

  2. Prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection among Makerere ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Medical students in the course of their clinical work are at risk of acquiring hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection or transmitting it to their patients. HBV immunization for medical students in Uganda is recommended but not strictly enforced. It is important to assess the prevalence of HBV infection in medical students in ...

  3. [Etiology of urinary tract infections and antimicrobial susceptibility of urinary pathogens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Carlos; Costa, Elísio; Peres, António; Alves, Madalena; Pombo, Graça; Estevinho, Letícia

    2007-01-01

    With the objective of knowing the common etiological agents in urinary infection and comparing its antimicrobial susceptibility in nosocomial and community-acquired urinary infections, we analyse all the urine bacteriological exams from the Serviço de Patologia Clínica do Centro Hospitalar do Nordeste, EPE - Unidade Hospitalar de Bragança, during a two years period (April 2004 to March 2006). During this period, 4018 urine bacteriological exams were made. The cultural exam was positive in 572 samples (144 from nosocomial infections and 428 from community-acquired urinary infections). The Escherichia coli was the more isolated strain (68,4 %), followed by Klebsiella spp (7,9%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (6,1%) and Proteus mirabilis (5,2%). Concerning to antimicrobial susceptibility, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp showed a high resistance to the antimicrobials Amoxicillin, Piperacillin, Cephalothin, Ceftazidim and Quinolones. For Enterobacteriaceae Imipenem, Amikacin and Netilmicin were the antimicrobials with more level of susceptibility. Imipenem and Amikacin were the more efficient antimicrobials against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Concerning to the susceptibility for the same etiological agent, in nosocomial and community-acquired urinary infections, we founded statistical significant differences in the antimicrobials Ticarcillin-clavulanic acid and Collistin for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and in the group of antimicrobials from Quinolones for the Proteus mirabilis. In the other identified agents there were no statistical significant differences for antimicrobials. This study it allows making use of data necessary for the knowledge of etiologic urinary infection agents in Bragança and provides the information about the antimicrobials resistance, which were necessary to initiate an adequate empirical treatment and to elaborate treatment guides.

  4. Toxic shock syndrome due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection: Two case reports and a literature review in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada, Ryuichi; Fukuda, Saori; Ishimaru, Hiroyasu

    2017-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has been spreading worldwide, including in Japan. However, few cases of toxic shock syndrome caused by Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus have been reported in Japan. We report 2 cases, in middle-aged women, of toxic shock syndrome due to Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus via a vaginal portal of entry. The first patient had used a tampon and the second patient had vaginitis due to a cleft narrowing associated with vulvar lichen sclerosus. Both patients were admitted to our hospital with septic shock and severe acute kidney injury and subsequently recovered with appropriate antibiotic treatment. In our review of the literature, 8 cases of toxic shock syndrome caused by Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were reported in Japan. In these 8 cases, the main portals of entry were the skin and respiratory tract; however, the portal of entry of Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from a vaginal lesion has not been reported in Japan previously.

  5. Song sparrows Melospiza melodia have a home-field advantage in defending against sympatric malarial parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarquis-Adamson, Yanina

    2016-01-01

    Hosts and parasites interact on both evolutionary and ecological timescales. The outcome of these interactions, specifically whether hosts are more resistant to their local parasites (sympatric) than to parasites from another location (allopatric), is likely to affect the spread of infectious disease and the fitness consequences of host dispersal. We conducted a cross-infection experiment to determine whether song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) have an advantage in dealing with sympatric parasites. We captured birds from two breeding sites 437 km apart, and inoculated them with avian malaria (Plasmodium spp.) cultured either from their capture site or from the other site. Infection risk was lower for birds exposed to sympatric than to allopatric Plasmodium lineages, suggesting that song sparrows may have a home-field advantage in defending against local parasite strains. This pattern was more pronounced at one capture site than at the other, consistent with mosaic models of host–parasite interactions. Home-field advantage may arise from evolutionary processes, whereby host populations become adapted to their local parasites, and/or from ecological interactions, whereby host individuals develop resistance to the local parasites through previous immune exposure. Our findings suggest that greater susceptibility to novel parasites may represent a fitness consequence of natal dispersal. PMID:27853596

  6. Haemoglobin C and S role in acquired immunity against Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Verra

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A recently proposed mechanism of protection for haemoglobin C (HbC; beta6Glu-->Lys links an abnormal display of PfEMP1, an antigen involved in malaria pathogenesis, on the surface of HbC infected erythrocytes together with the observation of reduced cytoadhesion of parasitized erythrocytes and impaired rosetting in vitro. We investigated the impact of this hypothesis on the development of acquired immunity against Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens (VSA encoding PfEMP1 in HbC in comparison with HbA and HbS carriers of Burkina Faso. We measured: i total IgG against a single VSA, A4U, and against a panel of VSA from severe malaria cases in human sera from urban and rural areas of Burkina Faso of different haemoglobin genotypes (CC, AC, AS, SC, SS; ii total IgG against recombinant proteins of P. falciparum asexual sporozoite, blood stage antigens, and parasite schizont extract; iii total IgG against tetanus toxoid. Results showed that the reported abnormal cell-surface display of PfEMP1 on HbC infected erythrocytes observed in vitro is not associated to lower anti- PfEMP1 response in vivo. Higher immune response against the VSA panel and malaria antigens were observed in all adaptive genotypes containing at least one allelic variant HbC or HbS in the low transmission urban area whereas no differences were detected in the high transmission rural area. In both contexts the response against tetanus toxoid was not influenced by the beta-globin genotype. These findings suggest that both HbC and HbS affect the early development of naturally acquired immunity against malaria. The enhanced immune reactivity in both HbC and HbS carriers supports the hypothesis that the protection against malaria of these adaptive genotypes might be at least partially mediated by acquired immunity against malaria.

  7. Role of outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy in the treatment of community acquired skin and soft tissue infections in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Monica; Ooi, Chee Kheong; Wong, Joshua; Zhong, Lihua; Lye, David

    2017-07-06

    Treatment of community acquired skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) is a common indication for outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) in USA, UK and Australasia, however data from Asia are lacking. OPAT is well established within the Singapore healthcare since 2002, however, systematic use of OPAT for the treatment of SSTIs remains infrequent. In this report, we describe the treatment and outcome of patients with SSTIs referred directly from Emergency Department (ED) to OPAT for continuation of intravenous (IV) antibiotics in Singapore, thus avoiding potential hospital admission. This is a single center university hospital retrospective study of patients with SSTIs presenting to ED who were assessed to require IV antibiotics and accepted to the OPAT clinic for continuation of IV treatment. Exclusion criteria were: haemodynamic instability, uncontrolled or serious underlying co-morbidities, necessity for inpatient surgical drainage, facial cellulitis and cephalosporin allergy. Patients returned daily to the hospital’s OPAT clinic for administration of IV antibiotics and review, then switched to oral antibiotics on improvement. From 7 February 2012 to 31 July 2015, 120 patients with SSTIs were treated in OPAT. Median age was 56 years and 63% were male. Lower limbs were affected in 91%. Diabetes was present in 20%. Sixty-seven (56%) had been treated with oral antibiotics for a median duration of 3 days prior to OPAT treatment. Common symptoms were erythema (100%), swelling (96%), pain (88%) and fever (55%). Antibiotics administered were IV cefazolin with oral probenecid (71%) or IV ceftriaxone (29%) for median 3 days then oral cloxacillin (85%) for median 7 days. Clinical improvement occurred in 90%. Twelve patients (10%) were hospitalized for worsening cellulitis, with 4 patients requiring surgical drainage of abscess. Microbiological cultures from 2 patients with drained abscess grew methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and Klebsiella

  8. Bacterial viruses enable their host to acquire antibiotic resistance genes from neighbouring cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob Krause; Leisner, Jørgen; Cohn, Marianne Thorup

    2016-01-01

    Prophages are quiescent viruses located in the chromosomes of bacteria. In the human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, prophages are omnipresent and are believed to be responsible for the spread of some antibiotic resistance genes. Here we demonstrate that release of phages from a subpopulation of S....... aureus cells enables the intact, prophage-containing population to acquire beneficial genes from competing, phage-susceptible strains present in the same environment. Phage infection kills competitor cells and bits of their DNA are occasionally captured in viral transducing particles. Return...... of such particles to the prophage-containing population can drive the transfer of genes encoding potentially useful traits such as antibiotic resistance. This process, which can be viewed as ‘auto-transduction’, allows S. aureus to efficiently acquire antibiotic resistance both in vitro and in an in vivo virulence...

  9. Human Dipylidiasis: A Case Report of Dipylidium caninum Infection from Karimnagar

    OpenAIRE

    KV Ramana; Sanjeev D Rao; Ratna Rao; SK Mohanty; CG Wilson

    2011-01-01

    Dipylidium caninum also refered to as the double-pored tapeworm is a cyclophyllidean cestode that commonly infects dogs and cats. Mammals act as definite hosts with intermediate hosts being dog and cat flea, the Ctenocephalides canis and Ctenocephalides catis respectively. The dog lice, Trichodectes canis and human flea (Pulex irritans) also transmit Dipylidium caninum infection. Infants and young children are at high risk of acquiring infection. Majority of the infections are due to close as...

  10. Toxic shock syndrome due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection: Two case reports and a literature review in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Sada, Ryuichi; Fukuda, Saori; Ishimaru, Hiroyasu

    2017-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has been spreading worldwide, including in Japan. However, few cases of toxic shock syndrome caused by Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus have been reported in Japan. We report 2 cases, in middle-aged women, of toxic shock syndrome due to Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus via a vaginal portal of entry. The first patient had used a tampon and the second patient had vaginitis ...

  11. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis B virus infections in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, N.; Pedersen, C.; Lange, Marianne

    2004-01-01

    Denmark has a low incidence of acute hepatitis B (HBV) infections but the impact of an increasing number of immigrants with chronic HBV infection on HBV transmission is unknown. Objectives: To characterise individuals with chronic and acute HBV infection in a defined region and to examine...... with available sequence data. Among 83 ethnic Danes who acquired their HBV infection in Denmark, no new cases of transmission from immigrants were detected. Conclusion: Injecting drug use was the single most important factor for hepatitis B transmission in Denmark. The current Danish vaccination strategy...

  12. Evolutionary enhancement of Zika virus infectivity in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Jianying; Du, Senyan; Shan, Chao; Nie, Kaixiao; Zhang, Rudian; Li, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Renli; Wang, Tao; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Wang, Penghua; Shi, Pei-Yong; Cheng, Gong

    2017-05-25

    Zika virus (ZIKV) remained obscure until the recent explosive outbreaks in French Polynesia (2013-2014) and South America (2015-2016). Phylogenetic studies have shown that ZIKV has evolved into African and Asian lineages. The Asian lineage of ZIKV was responsible for the recent epidemics in the Americas. However, the underlying mechanisms through which ZIKV rapidly and explosively spread from Asia to the Americas are unclear. Non-structural protein 1 (NS1) facilitates flavivirus acquisition by mosquitoes from an infected mammalian host and subsequently enhances viral prevalence in mosquitoes. Here we show that NS1 antigenaemia determines ZIKV infectivity in its mosquito vector Aedes aegypti, which acquires ZIKV via a blood meal. Clinical isolates from the most recent outbreak in the Americas were much more infectious in mosquitoes than the FSS13025 strain, which was isolated in Cambodia in 2010. Further analyses showed that these epidemic strains have higher NS1 antigenaemia than the FSS13025 strain because of an alanine-to-valine amino acid substitution at residue 188 in NS1. ZIKV infectivity was enhanced by this amino acid substitution in the ZIKV FSS13025 strain in mosquitoes that acquired ZIKV from a viraemic C57BL/6 mouse deficient in type I and II interferon (IFN) receptors (AG6 mouse). Our results reveal that ZIKV evolved to acquire a spontaneous mutation in its NS1 protein, resulting in increased NS1 antigenaemia. Enhancement of NS1 antigenaemia in infected hosts promotes ZIKV infectivity and prevalence in mosquitoes, which could have facilitated transmission during recent ZIKV epidemics.

  13. Modelling the contact propagation of nosocomial infection in emergency departments

    OpenAIRE

    Jaramillo, Cecilia; Taboada, Manel; Epelde, Francisco; Rexachs, Dolores; Luque Amat, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The nosocomial infection is a special kind of infection that is caused by microorganisms acquired inside a hospital. In the daily care process of an emergency department, the interactions between patients and sanitary staff create the environment for the transmission of such microorganisms. Rates of morbility and mortality due to nosocomial infections areimportant indicators of the quality of hospital work. In this research, we use Agent Based Modeling and Simulation tech...

  14. Immunology and Pathology of Arena Virus Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-15

    the 15 guinea pigs infected with the attenuated strain (PIC3739) had measurable TNF at any time during the course. Mean serum TNF levels for adPIC...inherent replication advantage in adPIC or increased efficiency of natural immunity against the attenuated strain PIC3739. Significant changes in...Direct infection of T cells may cause frank cytolysis with induction of lymphopenia, as in parvovirus or HIV-l infections; alternatively, in non

  15. Chronic urinary tract infections in patients with spinal cord lesions – biofilm infection with need for long-term antibiotic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tofte, Nete; Nielsen, Alex C.Y.; Trøstrup, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    Patients suffering from spinal cord injuries resulting in complete or incomplete paraplegia or tetraplegia are highly disposed to frequent, recurrent or even chronic urinary tract infections (UTIs). The reason for the increased risk of acquiring UTIs is multifactorial, including reduced sensation...... of classical UTI symptoms, incomplete bladder emptying, frequent catheterizations or chronic urinary tract catheters. Biofilms in relation to UTIs have been shown both on catheters, on concrements or as intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs). Due to the increased risk of acquiring recurrent or chronic UTIs...... the UTI can also be challenging, especially distinguishing harmless colonization from pathogenic infection. Based on a previous study showing activation of humoral immune response toward UTI pathogens in patients with spinal cord lesions (SCL), the present mini review is an evaluation of using antibody...

  16. Increased colon cancer risk after severe Salmonella infection

    OpenAIRE

    Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Schaapveld, Michael; Kramers, Jolanda; Mooij, Sofie; Neefjes-Borst, E. Andra; van Pelt, Wilfrid; Neefjes, Jacques

    2018-01-01

    Background Colon cancer constitutes one of the most frequent malignancies. Previous studies showed that Salmonella manipulates host cell signaling pathways and that Salmonella Typhimurium infection facilitates colon cancer development in genetically predisposed mice. This epidemiological study examined whether severe Salmonella infection, usually acquired from contaminated food, is associated with increased colon cancer risk in humans. Methods and findings We performed a nationwide registry-b...

  17. Unusual presentation of herpes simplex virus infection in a boxer: 'Boxing glove herpes'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Begoña; Galache-Osuna, Cristina; Coto-Segura, Pablo; Suárez-Casado, Héctor; Mallo-García, Susana; Jiménez, Jorge Santos-Juanes

    2013-02-01

    Herein, we describe a patient with lesions of cutaneous herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection over the knuckles of both hands in the context of an outbreak among boxers. Interestingly, the infection had an unusually long duration (4 weeks), and was not acquired directly through skin-to-skin contact, as it usually does among athletes (herpes gladiatorum). In our case, transmission was acquired through the use of shared boxing gloves contaminated by HSV-1. To the best of our knowledge, herpes gladiatorum, or wrestler's herpes, has not been described previously in boxers and infection over the knuckles is not commonly reported. © 2011 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2011 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  18. Autoimmunity and dysmetabolism of human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Mei; Hong, Xue-Zhi; Xu, Jia-Hua; Luo, Jiang-Xi; Mo, Han-You; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-06-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) remains ill-defined by lists of symptoms, infections, tumors, and disorders in metabolism and immunity. Low CD4 cell count, severe loss of body weight, pneumocystis pneumonia, and Kaposi's sarcoma are the major disease indicators. Lines of evidence indicate that patients living with AIDS have both immunodeficiency and autoimmunity. Immunodeficiency is attributed to deficits in the skin- and mucosa-defined innate immunity, CD4 T cells and regulatory T cells, presumably relating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The autoimmunity in AIDS is evident by: (1) overproduction of autoantibodies, (2) impaired response of CD4 cells and CD8 cells, (3) failure of clinical trials of HIV vaccines, and (4) therapeutic benefits of immunosuppression following solid organ transplantation and bone marrow transplantation in patients at risk of AIDS. Autoantibodies are generated in response to antigens such as debris and molecules de novo released from dead cells, infectious agents, and catabolic events. Disturbances in metabolic homeostasis occur at the interface of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity in the development of AIDS. Optimal treatments favor therapeutics targeting on the regulation of metabolism to restore immune homeostasis.

  19. Estimation of CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes in human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients in Manipur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh H

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To estimate and stratify CD4 + and CD8 + T-lymphocyte levels in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infected (asymptomatic and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS patients (symptomatic and correlate the clinical features of the patients with CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte level. Methods : Between April 2002 and September 2003, a total of 415 HIV seropositive adult patients (297 males and 118 females attending Regional Institute of Medical Sciences (RIMS hospitals were tested for CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes by fluorescent activated cell sorter (FACS counter (Becton Dickinson. Symptomatic patients were diagnosed as per NACO clinical case definition. Results : Ranges of 0-50, 51-100, 101-200, 201-300, 301-400, 401-500 and above 500 CD4+ T-lymphocyte per microlitre were seen in 68, 52, 101, 73, 47, 31 and 43 patients respectively whereas CD8+ T-lymphocyte ranges of 0-300, 301-600, 601-900, 901-1500, 1501-2000, 2001-3500 per microlitre were seen in 29, 84, 92, 145, 40 and 25 patients respectively. One hundred and fifty patients were asymptomatic and 265 were symptomatic. CD4/CD8 ratio in asymptomatics and symptomatics were 0.13-1.69 and 0.01-0.93 respectively. Tuberculosis and candidiasis occurred in CD4+ T-lymphocyte categories between 0-400 cells per mL in symptomatics. However, cryptosporidiosis, toxoplasmosis, herpes zoster, cryptococcal meningitis, Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, penicilliosis and cytomegalovirus retinitis were seen in patients having CD4+ T-lymphocyte less than 200 per mL. Conclusions : CD4+ T-lymphocyte was decreased in both asymptomatic and symptomatic HIV patients, The decrease was greater in symptomatics while CD8+ T-lymphocyte was increased in both except advanced stage symptomatics. CD4:CD8 ratio was reversed in both groups. Opportunistic infections correlated with different CD4+ T-lymphocyte categories.

  20. IP-10-mediated T cell homing promotes cerebral inflammation over splenic immunity to malaria infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Q Nie

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum malaria causes 660 million clinical cases with over 2 million deaths each year. Acquired host immunity limits the clinical impact of malaria infection and provides protection against parasite replication. Experimental evidence indicates that cell-mediated immune responses also result in detrimental inflammation and contribute to severe disease induction. In both humans and mice, the spleen is a crucial organ involved in blood stage malaria clearance, while organ-specific disease appears to be associated with sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes in vascular beds and subsequent recruitment of inflammatory leukocytes. Using a rodent model of cerebral malaria, we have previously found that the majority of T lymphocytes in intravascular infiltrates of cerebral malaria-affected mice express the chemokine receptor CXCR3. Here we investigated the effect of IP-10 blockade in the development of experimental cerebral malaria and the induction of splenic anti-parasite immunity. We found that specific neutralization of IP-10 over the course of infection and genetic deletion of this chemokine in knockout mice reduces cerebral intravascular inflammation and is sufficient to protect P. berghei ANKA-infected mice from fatality. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that lack of IP-10 during infection significantly reduces peripheral parasitemia. The increased resistance to infection observed in the absence of IP-10-mediated cell trafficking was associated with retention and subsequent expansion of parasite-specific T cells in spleens of infected animals, which appears to be advantageous for the control of parasite burden. Thus, our results demonstrate that modulating homing of cellular immune responses to malaria is critical for reaching a balance between protective immunity and immunopathogenesis.

  1. Hospital-Acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia Related to Medicare Antibiotic Prescriptions: A State-Level Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Bryce T; Sumida, Wesley K; Taira, Deborah A; Davis, James W; Seto, Todd B

    2016-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) results in almost half of all deaths caused by antibiotic resistant organisms. Current evidence suggests that MRSA infections are associated with antibiotic use. This study examined state-level data to determine whether outpatient antibiotic use was associated with hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) infections. The 2013 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Healthcare-Associated Infections Progress Report was used to obtain HA-MRSA infection rates. Data on the number of antibiotic prescriptions with activity towards methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) at the state level were obtained from the 2013 Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data: Part D Prescriber Public Use File. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to analyze the relationship between the number of antibiotic prescriptions and HA-MRSA infection rates. The average number of HA-MRSA infections was 0.026 per 1000 persons with the highest rates concentrated in Southeastern and Northeastern states. The average number of outpatient prescriptions per capita was 0.74 with the highest rates in Southeastern states. A significant correlation (ρ = 0.64, P resistance.

  2. Validation of intensive care unit-acquired infection surveillance in the Italian SPIN-UTI network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masia, M D; Barchitta, M; Liperi, G; Cantù, A P; Alliata, E; Auxilia, F; Torregrossa, V; Mura, I; Agodi, A

    2010-10-01

    Validity is one of the most critical factors concerning surveillance of nosocomial infections (NIs). This article describes the first validation study of the Italian Nosocomial Infections Surveillance in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) project (SPIN-UTI) surveillance data. The objective was to validate infection data and thus to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of NI data reported on patients in the ICUs participating in the SPIN-UTI network. A validation study was performed at the end of the surveillance period. All medical records including all clinical and laboratory data were reviewed retrospectively by the trained physicians of the validation team and a positive predictive value (PPV), a negative predictive value (NPV), sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Eight ICUs (16.3%) were randomly chosen from all 49 SPIN-UTI ICUs for the validation study. In total, the validation team reviewed 832 patient charts (27.3% of the SPIN-UTI patients). The PPV was 83.5% and the NPV was 97.3%. The overall sensitivity was 82.3% and overall specificity was 97.2%. Over- and under-reporting of NIs were related to misinterpretation of the case definitions and deviations from the protocol despite previous training and instructions. The results of this study are useful to identify methodological problems within a surveillance system and have been used to plan retraining for surveillance personnel and to design and implement the second phase of the SPIN-UTI project. Copyright 2010 The Hospital Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A predictive model of days from infection to discharge in patients with healthcare-associated urinary tract infections: a structural equation modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, B G; Anderson, M; Ferguson, J K

    2017-11-01

    Length of stay (LOS) in hospital is an important component of describing how costs change in relation to healthcare-associated infection and this variable underpins models used to evaluate cost. It this therefore imperative that estimations of LOS associated with infections are performed accurately. To test the relationships between the size of hospital, age, and patient comorbidity on days from admission to infection and days from infection to discharge in patients with a healthcare-associated urinary tract infection (HAUTI), using structural equation modelling (SEM). A non-current cohort study in eight hospitals in New South Wales, Australia. All patients admitted to the hospital for >48 h and who acquired a HAUTI were included. From the 162,503 eligible patient admissions, 2821 (1.73%) acquired a HAUTI. SEM showed that the proposed model had acceptable fit indices for the combined sample (GFI = 1.00; AGFI = 1.00; NFI = 1.00; CFI = 1.00; RMSEA = 0.000). The main findings showed that age of patient had a direct association with days from admission to infection and with days from infection to discharge. Patient comorbidity had direct links to the variables days from admission to infection and days from infection to discharge. Multi-group analysis indicated that the age of male patients was more influential on the factor days from admission to infection when compared to female patients. Furthermore, the number of comorbidities was significantly more influential on days from admission to infection in male patients than in female patients. As the first published study to use SEM to explore a healthcare-associated infection and the predictors of days from infection to discharge in hospital, we can confirm that accounting for the timing of infection during hospitalization is important and that patient comorbidity influences the timing of infection. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of localized bacterial infection using radioisotope-labeled nucleosides imaging modality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Su Jin; Kang, Joo Hyun; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, Tae Sup; Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Kyo Chul; An, Gwang II; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lim, Sang Moo [KIRAMS, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sang Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Conventional diagnostic methods for infections are difficult to distinguish localized bacterial infections from sites of sterile inflammation. For this reason, the importance of developing methods to image bacterial infections is widely recognized. In this study to acquire bacterial infection imaging with radiolabeled nucleosides, in vitro bacterial thymidine kinase (tk) activities of Salmonella typhimurium with [{sup 18}F]FLT and [{sup 125}I]IVDU were measured and localized infections model in BALB/c mice was imaged with [{sup 18}F]FLT or [{sup 125}I]FIAU

  5. Should International Classification of Diseases codes be used to survey hospital-acquired pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfensberger, A; Meier, A H; Kuster, S P; Mehra, T; Meier, M-T; Sax, H

    2018-05-01

    As surveillance of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) is very resource intensive, alternatives for HAP surveillance are needed urgently. This study compared HAP rates according to routine discharge diagnostic codes of the International Classification of Diseases, 10 th Revision (ICD-10; ICD-HAP) with HAP rates according to the validated surveillance definitions of the Hospitals in Europe Link for Infection Control through Surveillance (HELICS/IPSE; HELICS-HAP) by manual retrospective re-evaluation of patient records. The positive predictive value of ICD-HAP for HELICS-HAP was 0.35, and sensitivity was 0.59. Therefore, the currently available ICD-10-based routine discharge data do not allow reliable identification of patients with HAP. Copyright © 2018 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Implementation and new insights in molecular diagnostics for HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Hin-Fung; Chan, Lawrence Wing-Chi; Tong, Jennifer Chiu-Hung; Wong, Heong-Ting; Lai, Christopher Koon-Chi; Au, Thomas Chi-Chuen; Chan, Amanda Kit-Ching; Ng, Lawrence Po-Wah; Cho, William Chi-Shing; Wong, Sze-Chuen Cesar

    2018-05-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a kind of acquired disease that breaks down the immune system. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the causative agent of AIDS. By the end of 2016, there were 36.7 million people living with HIV worldwide. Early diagnosis can alert infected individuals to risk behaviors in order to control HIV transmission. Infected individuals are also benefited from proper treatment and management upon early diagnosis. Thanks to the public awareness of the disease, the annual increase of new HIV infections has been slowly declining over the past decades. The advent of molecular diagnostics has allowed early detection and better management of HIV infected patients. Areas covered: In this review, the authors summarized and discussed the current and future technologies in molecular diagnosis as well as the biomarkers developed for HIV infection. Expert Commentary: A simple and rapid detection of viral load is important for patients and doctors to monitor HIV progression and antiretroviral treatment efficiency. In the near future, it is expected that new technologies such as digital PCR and CRISPR-based technology will play more important role in HIV detection and patient management.

  7. New Role of Quinolones in Respiratory Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald F Grossman

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of limited activity of the standard quinolones such as ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin against some clinically important organisms including Streptococcus pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, new quinolones have been developed. In addition to their improved activity against S pneumoniae, some also demonstrate excellent anaerobic activity. None of the quinolones have a role to play in the treatment of paediatric infections. Quinolones (both older and newer agents have demonstrated equivalent efficacy to standard antimicrobials in the treatment of acute sinusitis. Several groups have suggested that quinolones are excellent agents in the treatment of high risk patients with acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. These patients include the elderly, and those with frequent exacerbations, significant comorbid conditions. long duration of chronic bronchitis and major impairment of lung function. There is no evidence to suggest that the newer quinolones will differ from the currently available agents for th is disease. The major advantage of the newer quinolones appears to be in the treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia where pneumococcal infection is a real concern. A new parenteral quinolone with pneumococcal activity may replace the standard macrolide/cephalosporin combination that is commonly prescribed. For patients with nosocomial pneumonia, the newer agents are alternative choices, especially among patients with early onset pneumonia (less than five days of hospitalization, but are unlikely to replace ciprofloxacin in the intensive care unit setting because of poor Pseudomonas aeruginosa coverage.

  8. A framework for preventing healthcare-associated infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mented an HAI prevalence of 24%, with hospital-acquired pneumonia and ... Healthcare-associated infection (HAI) is a frequent and serious complication affecting 4 - 8% of ... The risk of pathogen transmission and hospital outbreaks after.

  9. Gatifloxacin phase IV surveillance trial (TeqCES study) utilizing 5000 primary care physician practices: report of pathogens isolated and susceptibility patterns in community-acquired respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A; Jones, Ronald N

    2002-09-01

    Recently FDA-approved fluoroquinolones like gatifloxacin possess enhanced activity against Gram-positive pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, experience with adverse events among previously used fluoroquinolones has led to expanded post-marketing investigations of clinical efficacy and safety. An open-label gatifloxacin trial was initiated in early 2000, using 2795 (>15000 enrolled cases) primary care providers for treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CARTI) such as community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (ABECB), acute sinusitis. Microbiology specimens and sputum slides were referred to a reference laboratory, pathogens identified and reference antimicrobial susceptibility tests performed. Results were classified by infection site, geographic census region and patient profile/demographics. The most frequent pathogens were: for CAP (n = 384)-S. pneumoniae (37%) > Hemophilus influenzae (31%) > Moraxella catarrhalis (13%); for ABECB (528)-H. influenzae (37%) > M. catarrhalis (26%) > S. pneumoniae (17%); and for sinusitis (2691)-M. catarrhalis (29%) > H. influenzae (24%) > S. pneumoniae (17%). H. parainfluenzae (ABECB) and S. aureus (sinusitis) were also commonly isolated. CAP S. pneumoniae isolates had significantly less high-level resistance (5% at > or =2 micro g/ml) than those isolates from ABECB or sinusitis (13-15%). United States census zone differences in S. pneumoniae resistance were identified (greatest in West or East South Central, South Atlantic). S. pneumoniae macrolide resistance was high (23-33%) and H. influenzae clarithromycin susceptibility was only 56-62%. beta-lactamase rates in H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis were 21-29% and 88-92%, respectively. Only one S. pneumoniae was not susceptible to gatifloxacin, and this new fluoroquinolone was fourfold more potent than levofloxacin (MIC(50,) 0.25 vs. 1 micro g/ml). This Phase IV surveillance trial (Teq

  10. The risk of HIV infection being transmitted by the oral route

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Microbiology and Immunology. Faculty of Medicine, . Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences,. P. O. Box 65001, Dar es Salaam. Tanzania. .... low occupational risk of acquiring. HIV infection despite frequent occupational exposre to persons at increased risk for HIV infection. (12). As a matter of fact, ...

  11. Recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the pneumonia acquired in the community in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The pneumonia acquired in the community in adults, is the acute infection of the pulmonary parenchyma that is developed away from the hospital environment, it is manifested in the first 48 hours from the entrance to the hospital or after seven days of having left. The supplement includes clinical square, epidemiology, etiology classification, diagnostic, treatment and prevention among others

  12. THE MANAGEMENT OF HIV INFECTION IN PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Marcaelia Valerian

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV is a RNA retrovirus which causes the clinical disease termed the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. Mother-to-child transmission is the main source of spreading HIV infection to the child with frequency is as high as 25-30%. This may occurred because of the intrapartum maternal blood exposure, infected genital tract secretions and during breastfeeding. The right combination of ARV treatment and elective section caesarean delivery has been proved to reduce the mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection prevalence and preventing obstetric complications significantly. Consultation and follow up with specialists is highly recommended.

  13. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in a patient with no known risk factors: a pathological study.

    OpenAIRE

    Burt, A D; Scott, G; Shiach, C R; Isles, C G

    1984-01-01

    We present the pathological findings in a case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in a patient with no known risk factor. Postmortem examination showed klebsiella lung abscess, generalised cytomegalovirus infection, cerebral toxoplasmosis, and a primary cerebral lymphoma. An additional feature was the presence of dilatation of the intrahepatic large bile ducts in association with an atypical distribution of cytomegalovirus. The relation between this case and previously reported case...

  14. Bovine paratuberculosis: a review of the advantages and disadvantages of different diagnostic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilardoni, Liliana R; Paolicchi, Fernando A; Mundo, Silvia L

    2012-01-01

    Paratuberculosis (PTB), or Johne's disease, is a chronic infectious granulomatous enteritis of ruminants, caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map). It is characterized by diarrhea and progressive cachexia, which may cause the death of the animal. Calves are the most susceptible to infection. Infected animals excrete Map mainly by the feces. PTB is endemic worldwide, with high prevalence levels, strong economic impact and public health relevance because of its possible association with Crohn's disease. Although the current reference diagnostic test is identification of Map in the bacterial culture, there are different diagnostic tests to identify infected individuals and/or herds. The sensitivity and specificity of these tests vary according to the stage of the disease in the animals to be evaluated. The correct choice and application of each of these diagnostic tests will ensure their success and may allow to establish a control program. The aim of this work is to review and discuss the different diagnostic tests used in the detection of Map-infected animals, focusing on their advantages and disadvantages.

  15. [Universal cytomegalovirus infection screening in premature newborns less than 1500 g].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botet, F; Figueras Aloy, J; Álvarez, E; de Alba, C; Dorronsolo, I; Echaniz Urcelay, I; Rite, S; Moreno, J; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Herranz Carrillo, G; Salguero, E; Sánchez Luna, M

    2014-10-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is endemic, and children who attend day care are the most important source of infection. To establish recommendations based on the medical evidence on the vertical transmission of cytomegalovirus in preterm infants weighing less than 1500g at birth. Infection in pregnant women may be primary or secondary. Although there is fetal infection, 85% of newborn infants are asymptomatic. Symptoms of infection include low birth weight, hepatosplenomegaly, thrombocytopenia, microcephaly and neurological disorders. The prognosis of symptomatic children is very poor, with high mortality and neurological disorders. The virus can be reactivated during breast feeding, and early infection is possible through breast milk, probably with little impact in term infants, although the long-term neurological outcome worsens in preterm infants. The diagnostic method of choice is the identification of CMV in urine; the determination in the first two weeks of life suggests congenital infection; later it can be acquired at birth or through breast milk or contaminated blood transfusion. Determine viral DNA at 4-6 weeks of life by protease chain reaction. If it is positive, monitoring of samples from the first days of life and breast milk are mandatory. This should allow the newborn to be classified into three states: "Without CMV infection", "Congenital CMV infection", "Acquired CMV infection". Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Scandinavian Cooperative Advantage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Robert; Freeman, R. Edward

    2015-01-01

    . We conclude by endorsing the expression “Scandinavian cooperative advantage” in an effort to draw attention to the Scandinavian context and encourage the field of strategic management to shift its focus from achieving a competitive advantage toward achieving a cooperative advantage....

  17. Accessing offshoring advantages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mykhaylenko, Alona; Motika, Agnes; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum

    2015-01-01

    . Assuming that different levels of synergy may exist between particular offshoring strategic decisions (choosing offshore outsourcing or captive offshoring and the type of function) and different offshoring advantages, this work advocates that the actual fact of realization of certain offshoring advantages...

  18. Reinfection And Bilateral Infection : Two Rare Manifestations Of Sporotrichosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiti P. K

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The localization of sporotrichosis is determined by the site of dermal injury by means of which the infective spores are introduced into subcutanceous tissue, but the reports of reinfection or bilateral infection are extremely rare. Although the probability of such occurrence is high in endemic areas, the rare incidence may be due to acquired host defense, a subject of much speculation. Two such rare cases are presented and some reports of cross infections of the disease are reviewed.

  19. Sexually transmitted infections in India: Current status (except human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thappa Devinder

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexually transmitted infections (STIs are more dynamic than other infections prevailing in the community. It is important that such dynamic epidemiological changes in STIs are acknowledged and kept track of in a vast and populous developing country like India, particularly in this HIV era. It is with this aim that the authors have reviewed the relevant literature in STI epidemiology in India during the past 25 years. Admittedly, there has been heterogeneity of data to account for the subcontinental dimension of this country. But a basic pattern in the changing epidemiology is discernible. Like the developed countries, in India too the bacterial STIs like chancroid and gonorrhea are declining, while viral STIs like HPV and herpes genitalis are on an upswing. The overall decline in the prevalence of STIs has to be interpreted with caution, however. This may partially reflect the improved facilities of treatment in the peripheral centres that obviates the need of many patients in attending the STD clinics in the tertiary centres. Also, the improved pharmacotherapy of many of the bacterial STIs may result in partial clearance and non-reporting of many of these infections.

  20. Management of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: WHO guidelines for low tuberculosis burden countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Getahun, Haileyesus; Matteelli, Alberto; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Aziz, Mohamed Abdel; Baddeley, Annabel; Barreira, Draurio; den Boon, Saskia; Borroto Gutierrez, Susana Marta; Bruchfeld, Judith; Burhan, Erlina; Cavalcante, Solange; Cedillos, Rolando; Chaisson, Richard; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Chesire, Lucy; Corbett, Elizabeth; Dara, Masoud; Denholm, Justin; de Vries, Gerard; Falzon, Dennis; Ford, Nathan; Gale-Rowe, Margaret; Gilpin, Chris; Girardi, Enrico; Go, Un-Yeong; Govindasamy, Darshini; D Grant, Alison; Grzemska, Malgorzata; Harris, Ross; Horsburgh, C. Robert; Ismayilov, Asker; Jaramillo, Ernesto; Kik, Sandra; Kranzer, Katharina; Lienhardt, Christian; LoBue, Philip; Lönnroth, Knut; Marks, Guy; Menzies, Dick; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Mosca, Davide; Mukadi, Ya Diul; Mwinga, Alwyn; Nelson, Lisa; Nishikiori, Nobuyuki; Oordt-Speets, Anouk; Rangaka, Molebogeng Xheedha; Reis, Andreas; Rotz, Lisa; Sandgren, Andreas; Sañé Schepisi, Monica; Schünemann, Holger J.; Sharma, Surender Kumar; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Stagg, Helen R.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Tayeb, Tamara; Uplekar, Mukund; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Vandevelde, Wim; van Kessel, Femke; van't Hoog, Anna; Varma, Jay K.; Vezhnina, Natalia; Voniatis, Constantia; Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten, Marije; Weil, Diana; Weyer, Karin; Wilkinson, Robert John; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Zellweger, Jean Pierre; Raviglione, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is characterised by the presence of immune responses to previously acquired Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection without clinical evidence of active tuberculosis (TB). Here we report evidence-based guidelines from the World Health Organization for a public health

  1. [Transplantation-associated infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würzner, R

    2004-01-01

    Transplantation-associated infections are caused by an infected transplanted organ or the endogenic or exogenic environment of the recipient in a state of induced immunodeficiency. The best therapy would be to reconstitute the immunodeficiency, but this is usually impossible as it endangers the transplanted organ. Thus, a specific, standardised anti-infectious therapy is needed even in the absence of clearly identified micro-organisms [bacteria (in two thirds gram-positive rods), parasites (in central Europe predominantly Toxoplasma), fungi (especially Candida spp. or Aspergillus spp.) or viruses (such as Parvovirus B19 and Cytomegalovirus)]. Origins of infection (e.g., hygiene), types of infection (e.g., reactivation), typical localisations, diagnostic tools (e.g., blood cultures, antigenic tests, PCR, CT, advantages and disadvantages of antibody assays) and possible therapies are briefly discussed. The take home messages are to avoid economy measures in microbial diagnostics and to use CMV-seronegative donors whenever possible.

  2. Pathology of Penicillium marneffei. An emerging acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C R; McGinnis, M R

    1997-08-01

    To summarize current knowledge regarding the opportunistic dimorphic fungal pathogen Penicillium marneffei. Clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, mycology, histopathology, diagnostic serology, in vitro antifungal agent susceptibility testing, and therapy are discussed for human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals primarily living in Southeast Asia. Critical evaluation of peer-reviewed publications located through an electronic literature database search, supplemented by unpublished observations, were used to prepare this report. Studies were selected based on either the fungal name Penicillium marneffei, penicilliosis, penicilliosis marneffei, or a combination of these. Articles were reviewed with appropriate data being abstracted and then synthesized into the review. Differential diagnostic criteria for tissue diagnosis and laboratory identification of the fungus are detailed. The usefulness of mycoserology and antifungal therapy are evaluated. Penicillium marneffei is an emerging pathogen, primarily among patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome residing in Southeast Asia. Although infection caused by P marneffei is endemic to this portion of the world, cases are being diagnosed and treated involving individuals who have traveled to this region. Penicilliosis marneffei can clinically resemble tuberculosis, molluscum contagiosum, cryptococcosis, and histoplasmosis. The successful treatment of P marneffei infection is dependent on its rapid and accurate diagnosis.

  3. A hospital-acquired outbreak of catheter-related nontuberculous mycobacterial infection in children on peritoneal dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Takuji; Ushijima, Katsumi; Uemura, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Catheter-related nontuberculous mycobacterial infection in children with chronic renal failure on peritoneal dialysis (PD) is rare. However, there have been five such infections in infants among PD patients at our center. Although the patients were treated with antibiotics to which the organisms showed in vitro sensitivity, they were clinically drug resistant. Hence, all PD catheters needed to be removed. Thereafter, following hemodialysis treatment for approximately 1 month, the PD catheters...

  4. A study on the fortuitons advantage of gamma irradiation in the prophylaxis of transmissible malaria by flood transfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braz, Lucia Maria Almeida; Amato Neto, Vicente; Carignani, Fabio Luis; Fernandes, Andreia Otaviano di Pietro; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Zuanella, Laura Santoro; Silva, Maria de Fatima dos Santos; Okumura, Massayuki

    1998-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the fortuitons advantages of using gamma irradiation on the prophylaxis of transmissible malaria by flood transfusion, with mice as the experimental model. In the first step, when the infected blood with Plasmodium berghei was submitted to 2,500 rad and 5,000 rad, with or without metronidazol, there was no success, because the animals presented parasitaemia and died after inoculation of irradiated blood. However there was partial success in the second step, when the infected blood received 10,000 and 15,000 rad, and was inoculated in mice, which showed infection and presented a survival rate of 20% and 40%, respectively, with later negativation of blood infected by P. berghei. (author)

  5. A case of newborn with community acquired pneumonia caused by Cupriavidus pauculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Banu; Dilli, Dilek; Zenciroğlu, Ayşegül; Okumuş, Nurullah; Ozkan, Sengül; Tanır, Gönül

    2012-01-01

    Cupriavidus pauculus is a gram-negative, aerobic, non-spore forming, non-fermentative motile bacillus. The bacillus can be isolated from water, bottled mineral water, and water from ultrafiltration systems in hospital setting. C. pauculus rarely causes human infections, however it may be an infectious agent especially in immunocompromised individuals. In this report, we present the first case of community acquired pneumonia caused by C. pauculus in a previously healthy newborn who was hospitalized in neonatal intensive care unit on postnatal day 16 because of respiratory distress.

  6. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission and infections in a neonatal intensive care unit despite active surveillance cultures and decolonization: challenges for infection prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoola, Victor O; Budd, Alicia; Wittig, Sara M; Ross, Tracy; Aucott, Susan W; Perl, Trish M; Carroll, Karen C; Milstone, Aaron M

    2014-04-01

    To characterize the epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmission and infections in a level IIIC neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and identify barriers to MRSA control. Retrospective cohort study in a university-affiliated NICU with an MRSA control program including weekly nares cultures of all neonates and admission nares cultures for neonates transferred from other hospitals or admitted from home. Medical records were reviewed to identify neonates with NICU-acquired MRSA colonization or infection between April 2007 and December 2011. Compliance with hand hygiene and an MRSA decolonization protocol were monitored. Relatedness of MRSA strains were assessed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Of 3,536 neonates, 74 (2.0%) had a culture grow MRSA, including 62 neonates with NICU-acquired MRSA. Nineteen of 74 neonates (26%) had an MRSA infection, including 8 who became infected before they were identified as MRSA colonized, and 11 of 66 colonized neonates (17%) developed a subsequent infection. Of the 37 neonates that underwent decolonization, 6 (16%) developed a subsequent infection, and 7 of 14 (50%) that remained in the NICU for 21 days or more became recolonized with MRSA. Using PFGE, there were 14 different strain types identified, with USA300 being the most common (31%). Current strategies to prevent infections-including active identification and decolonization of MRSA-colonized neonates-are inadequate because infants develop infections before being identified as colonized or after attempted decolonization. Future prevention efforts would benefit from improving detection of MRSA colonization, optimizing decolonization regimens, and identifying and interrupting reservoirs of transmission.

  7. Immunization with a recombinant subunit OspA vaccine markedly impacts the rate of newly acquired Borrelia burgdorferi infections in client-owned dogs living in a coastal community in Maine, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschner, Andrew K; Mugnai, Kristen

    2015-02-10

    In North America, Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative bacterial agent of canine Lyme borreliosis and is transmitted following prolonged attachment and feeding of vector ticks, Ixodes scapularis or Ixodes pacificus. Its prevention is predicated upon tick-avoidance, effective on-animal tick control and effective immunization strategies. The purpose of this study is to characterize dogs that are newly seropositive for Borrelia burgdorferi infection in relation to compliant use of a recombinant OspA canine Lyme borreliosis vaccine. Specifically, Preventive Fractions (PF) and Risk Ratios (RR) associated with the degree of vaccine compliancy (complete versus incomplete) are determined. 6,202 dogs were tested over a five year period in a single veterinary hospital utilizing a non-adjuvanted, recombinant OspA vaccine according to a 0, 1, 6 month (then yearly) protocol. Rates of newly acquired "Lyme-positive" antibody test results were compared between protocol compliant and poorly compliant (incompletely and/or non-vaccinated) dogs. Over the five-year span, one percent (range 0.39 - 1.3) of protocol compliant vaccinated, previously antibody negative dogs became seropositive for infection. Approximately twenty-one percent (range 16.8 - 33.3) of incompletely vaccinated dogs became positive for infection-specific antibodies. The Preventative Fraction for testing positive for antibodies specific for infection with Borrelia burgdorferi in any given year based on optimal vaccine compliance was, on average, 95.3% (range 93.29 - 98.08). The Risk Ratio for becoming infected with Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies in any given year if vaccine non-compliant was 21.41 (range 14.9 - 52.1). There was a high statistically significant relationship (p = <0.0001) in the observed data in terms of vaccination protocol compliance and the probability of Borrelia burgdorferi infection in each of the five years under study. The recombinant outer surface protein A (rOspA) vaccine for dogs is highly

  8. COMPETITIVE PRODUCT ADVANTAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian MICU

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cost advantages may be either internal or external. Internal economics of scope, scale, or experience, and external economies of focus or logistical integration, enable a company to produce some products at a lower cost than the competition. The coordination of pricing with suppliers, although not actually economizing resources, can improve the efficiency of pricing by avoiding the incrementalization of a supplier's nonincremental fixed costs and profit. Any of these strategies can generate cost advantages that are, at least in the short run, sustainable. Even cost advantages that are not sustainable, however, can generate temporary savings that are often the key to building more sustainable cost or product advantages later.. Even when a product's physical attributes are not readily differentiable, opportunities to develop product advantages remain. The augmented product that customers buy is more than the particular product or service exchanged. It includes all sorts of ancillary services and intangible relationships that make buying thesame product from one company less difficult, less risky, or more pleasant than buying from a competitor. Superior augmentation of the same basic product can add substantial value in the eyes of consumers, leading them to pay willingly what are often considerable price premiums.

  9. Neuropathogenesis of Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection: Disease Mechanisms and Prospects for Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Cheeran, Maxim C.-J.; Lokensgard, James R.; Schleiss, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the leading infectious cause of mental retardation and hearing loss in the developed world. In recent years, there has been an improved understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and long-term disabilities associated with CMV infection. In this review, current concepts regarding the pathogenesis of neurological injury caused by CMV infections acquired by the developing fetus are summarized. The pathogenesis of CMV-induced disabilities is con...

  10. Schistosomiasis coinfection in children influences acquired immune response against Plasmodium falciparum malaria antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamsir O Diallo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malaria and schistosomiasis coinfection frequently occurs in tropical countries. This study evaluates the influence of Schistosoma haematobium infection on specific antibody responses and cytokine production to recombinant merozoite surface protein-1-19 (MSP1-(19 and schizont extract of Plasmodium falciparum in malaria-infected children. METHODOLOGY: Specific IgG1 to MSP1-(19, as well as IgG1 and IgG3 to schizont extract were significantly increased in coinfected children compared to P. falciparum mono-infected children. Stimulation with MSP1-(19 lead to a specific production of both interleukin-10 (IL-10 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ, whereas the stimulation with schizont extract produced an IL-10 response only in the coinfected group. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that schistosomiasis coinfection favours anti-malarial protective antibody responses, which could be associated with the regulation of IL-10 and IFN-γ production and seems to be antigen-dependent. This study demonstrates the importance of infectious status of the population in the evaluation of acquired immunity against malaria and highlights the consequences of a multiple infection environment during clinical trials of anti-malaria vaccine candidates.

  11. The PICASSO Cohort: baseline characteristics of a cohort of men who have sex with men and male-to-female transgender women at high risk for syphilis infection in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Noah; Park, Hayoung; Konda, Kelika A; Joseph Davey, Dvora L; Bristow, Claire C; Brown, Brandon; Leon, Segundo R; Vargas, Silver K; Calvo, Gino M; Caceres, Carlos F; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2017-04-11

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) and male-to-female transgender women (transwomen) are disproportionately at risk of syphilis infection in Peru. From 2013 to 2014, MSM and transwomen seeking human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing and/or treatment were recruited into a 2-year observational cohort study to determine predictors of recently acquired syphilis infection (defined as a rapid plasma reagin [RPR] titer ≥1:16 and a reactive treponemal antibody test) in Lima, Peru. At baseline, interviewers collected sociodemographic, behavioral, and medical characteristics from participants. All cohort participants were tested for syphilis, HIV, Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) infection. Using cross-sectional analyses, bivariate and multivariate models were used to determine factors associated with recently acquired syphilis infection and calculate adjusted prevalence ratios. We recruited 401 participants, 312 MSM and 89 transwomen, with median ages of 29.0 and 32.5 years old (interquartile ranges: 23.3, 37.4 and 27.2, 39.5, respectively). The prevalence of recently acquired syphilis infection at baseline was 16.8% for MSM and 6.7% for transwomen. Among MSM and transwomen, 30.1 and 33.7% were infected with HIV, 18.6 and 24.7% were infected with CT, and 14.2 and 19.1% were infected with NG, respectively. Co-infection rates among MSM with recently acquired syphilis infection included: 44.2% with HIV, 40.4% with CT (32.7% with anal CT and 7.7% with pharyngeal CT), and 19.2% with NG (11.5% with anal NG and 7.7% with pharyngeal NG). Co-infection rates among transwomen with recently acquired syphilis infection included: 66.7% with HIV, 0% with CT, and 16.7% with anal NG. In multivariate analysis among the entire cohort, recently acquired syphilis infection was independently associated with younger age (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] = 0.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.93-0.99), receptive role

  12. Efficacy of a novel topical fipronil, (S)-methoprene, eprinomectin and praziquantel combination against naturally acquired intestinal nematode and cestode infections in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaus, Martin; Abu-Madi, Marawan A; Ibarra-Velarde, Froylán; Kok, Dawie J; Kusi, Ilir; Postoli, Rezart; Chester, S Theodore; Rosentel, Joseph; Alva, Roberto; Irwin, Jennifer; Visser, Martin; Winter, Renate; Rehbein, Steffen

    2014-04-28

    The efficacy of a novel topical combination formulation of fipronil, (S)-methoprene, eprinomectin and praziquantel against naturally acquired intestinal nematode and cestode infections in cats was evaluated in seven negative control, blinded studies. Cats were selected based on a pre-treatment faecal examination indicating a patent infection with at least hookworms (two studies), Toxocara ascarids (one study), taeniid cestodes (two studies) or Dipylidium cestodes (two studies). In each study, cats were assigned randomly to blocks of two animals each, based on decreasing pre-treatment body weight and were randomly allocated to one of two groups of six to 12 cats: untreated (control) or treated with topical fipronil (8.3%, w/v), (S)-methoprene (10%, w/v), eprinomectin (0.4%, w/v) and praziquantel (8.3%, w/v) (BROADLINE(®), Merial) at 0.12 mL/kg body weight (providing a minimum of 10mg fipronil+12 mg S-methoprene+0.5mg eprinomectin+10mg praziquantel per kg body weight). The topical treatment was administered directly on the skin in the midline of the neck in a single spot once on Day 0. For parasite recovery and count, cats were euthanized humanely and necropsied seven or ten days after treatment. A single treatment with the novel topical combination product provided 91% efficacy against Ancylostoma braziliense, ≥ 99% efficacy against Ancylostoma tubaeforme, and >97% efficacy against Toxocara cati. Similarly, excellent efficacy was established against Taenia taeniaeformis, Dipylidium caninum and Diplopylidium spp. as demonstrated by >97% and up to 100% reductions of cestode counts in the treated cats when compared to the untreated controls (P<0.01). All cats accepted the treatment well based on health observations post-treatment and daily health observations. No adverse experiences or other health problems were observed throughout the studies. The results of this series of controlled studies demonstrated high efficacy and excellent acceptability of the novel

  13. Annual Surveillance Summary: Klebsiella Species Infections in the Military Health System (MHS), 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Shortliffe LM, McCue JD. Urinary tract infection at the age extremes: pediatrics and geriatrics. Am J Med. 2002;113(1a)55S-66S. 7. U.S. Centers for...options are still present for Klebsiella species. However, for mild to moderate community- acquired infections (uncomplicated urinary tract infection ...Corps, which saw a percent decrease of 1.3%. Assessment of clinical and demographic characteristics found that urinary tract infections (UTIs

  14. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs; Hasbun, Rodrigo; Koedel, Uwe; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Wijdicks, Eelco

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and subarachnoid space that can also involve the brain cortex and parenchyma. It can be acquired spontaneously in the community - community-acquired bacterial meningitis - or in the hospital as a complication of invasive procedures or head trauma

  15. Bone health in HIV-infected children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckard, Allison R; Mora, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    Chronic HIV infection and exposure to antiretroviral therapy compromises bone health in children and adolescents, potentially impacting their long-term quality of life. Thus, the purpose of this article is to review the most recent literature on this topic in HIV-infected children and adolescents. Recent studies continue to demonstrate bone abnormalities in HIV-infected children and adolescents, whether HIV is acquired perinatally or during adolescence. Researchers have employed new modalities, both high tech and those that can be utilized in resource-limited settings, to better assess bone health. New data suggest that this population may also be experiencing an increase incidence of fractures, and they may not acquire the same peak bone mass as their HIV-uninfected counterparts. Reassuringly, however, in-utero tenofovir exposure does not appear to have a significant impact on bone health in HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. HIV-infected children and adolescents are exposed to HIV and antiretroviral therapy for many decades starting early in life and during the most critical time for skeletal growth and bone mass accrual. Recent findings underscore the need for further research on bone in this population. Longitudinal studies are especially needed to evaluate long-term risk of osteoporosis and fracture.

  16. Acquired Methemoglobinaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil Al-Lawati

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Acquired methemoglobinaemia is a relatively rare condition and, therefore infrequently encountered in acute medical practice. Suspicion of the condition may be triggered when the measured PaO2 is ‘out of keeping’ with the oxygen saturations that are discovered with pulse oximetry. We describe two separate cases of acquired methemoglobinaemia secondary to the recreational use of alkyl nitrites (’poppers’. The patients presented at separate times to two different teaching hospitals in London, UK. The similarity of these cases has led the authors to conclude that a raised awareness of this potentially fatal condition, and its association with a widely-available recreational drug, is necessary to ensure a correct and timely diagnosis.

  17. Care of HIV-exposed and HIV-infected neonates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, further reduction in MTCT may be possible if newborns at high risk of acquiring HIV ... infants of breastfeeding mothers with newly diagnosed HIV infection, dual NVP/ .... birth HIV DNA PCR testing for HIV-exposed low birth weight.

  18. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in a patient with no known risk factors: a pathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, A D; Scott, G; Shiach, C R; Isles, C G

    1984-04-01

    We present the pathological findings in a case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in a patient with no known risk factor. Postmortem examination showed klebsiella lung abscess, generalised cytomegalovirus infection, cerebral toxoplasmosis, and a primary cerebral lymphoma. An additional feature was the presence of dilatation of the intrahepatic large bile ducts in association with an atypical distribution of cytomegalovirus. The relation between this case and previously reported cases of AIDS is discussed.

  19. Interest of hybrid SPECT-CT imaging for diagnosis of infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riviere, A.; Farid, K.; Guyot, M.; Jeandot, R.; Allard, M.; Fernandez, P.; Clermont, H. de; Dauchy, F.; Dupon, M.; Fernandez, P.

    2008-01-01

    Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography-Computerized Tomography (SPECT-CT) is a new hybrid technique which offers new diagnostic capabilities in daily nuclear medicine practice. This technique not only allows to acquire merged anatomic and functional images in the same time, but also, it increases sensitivity and accuracy of SPECT thanks to attenuation and scattering corrections got from transmission data. Until now, SPECT-CT data have been mainly obtained in oncology and cardiology, but now, many authors use it in many scan studies and particularly for infectious diseases. In inflammatory bowel diseases, SPECT-CT seems to increase diagnostic performances and to modify management of many patients. In suspected vascular sepsis, SPECT-CT could increase sensitivity of white blood cell scintigraphy but also its specificity thanks to spatial resolution of CT. In osteo-articular sepsis, SPECT-CT has the advantage to distinguish osteomyelitis from soft tissue infection and to guide biopsies. Nevertheless, in the light of PET-CT works, SPECT-CT development will probably modify nuclear medicine practice and many studies have to be conducted to highlight consensual procedure guidelines. (authors)

  20. Cellulose digestion in Monochamus marmorator Kby. (coleoptera: Cerambycidae): role of acquired fungal enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukol, J.J.; Martin, M.M.

    1986-05-01

    Larvae of the balsam fir sawyer, Monochamus marmorator Kby. (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae), contain midgut digestive enzymes active against hemicellulose and cellulose. Cellulases from larvae fed on balsam fir wood infected with the fungus, Trichoderma harzianum Rifai (Deuteromycetes, Moniliales, Moniliaceae), were found to be identical to those of the cellulase complex produced by this fungus when compared using chromatography, electrophoresis, and isofocusing. When larvae are maintained on a fungusfree diet, their midgut fluids lack cellulolytic activity, and they are unable to digest cellulose. Cellulolytic capacity can be restored by feeding the larvae wood permeated by fungi. We conclude that the enzymes which enable M. marmorator larvae to digest cellulose are not produced by the larvae. Instead, the larvae acquire the capacity to digest cellulose by ingesting active fungal cellulases while feeding in fungus-infected wood.

  1. Cellulose digestion in Monochamus marmorator Kby. (coleoptera: Cerambycidae): role of acquired fungal enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukol, J.J.; Martin, M.M.

    1986-01-01

    Larvae of the balsam fir sawyer, Monochamus marmorator Kby. (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae), contain midgut digestive enzymes active against hemicellulose and cellulose. Cellulases from larvae fed on balsam fir wood infected with the fungus, Trichoderma harzianum Rifai (Deuteromycetes, Moniliales, Moniliaceae), were found to be identical to those of the cellulase complex produced by this fungus when compared using chromatography, electrophoresis, and isofocusing. When larvae are maintained on a fungusfree diet, their midgut fluids lack cellulolytic activity, and they are unable to digest cellulose. Cellulolytic capacity can be restored by feeding the larvae wood permeated by fungi. We conclude that the enzymes which enable M. marmorator larvae to digest cellulose are not produced by the larvae. Instead, the larvae acquire the capacity to digest cellulose by ingesting active fungal cellulases while feeding in fungus-infected wood

  2. Cervical Lymph Nodes as a Selective Niche for Brucella during Oral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bargen, Kristine; Gagnaire, Aurélie; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; de Bovis, Béatrice; Baudimont, Fannie; Chasson, Lionel; Bosilkovski, Mile; Papadopoulos, Alexia; Martirosyan, Anna; Henri, Sandrine; Mège, Jean-Louis; Malissen, Bernard; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Cervical lymph nodes (CLN) are the first lymph nodes encountered by material taking the oral route. To study their role in orally acquired infections, we analyzed 307 patients of up to 14 years treated in the university clinic of Skopje, Macedonia, for brucellosis, a zoonotic bacterial disease frequently acquired by ingestion of contaminated dairy products. From these children, 36% had lymphadenopathy. Among orally infected children, lymphadenopathy with CLN being the only lymph nodes affected was significantly more frequent as compared to those infected by contact with animals (83% vs. 63%), suggesting a possible involvement of CLN during orally acquired human brucellosis. Using a murine model where bacteria are delivered into the oral cavity, we show that Brucella quickly and selectively colonize the CLN where they proliferate and persist over long periods of time for up to 50 days post-infection. A similar efficient though less specific drainage to CLN was found for Brucella, Salmonella typhimurium and fluorescent microspheres delivered by gavage, a pathway likely representing a mixed infection mode of intragastric and oral infection, suggesting a central pathway of drained material. Microspheres as well as bacteria drained to CLN predominately reside in cells expressing CD68 and no or low levels of CD11c. Even though no systemic response could be detected, Brucella induced a locally restricted inflammatory reaction with increased expression levels of interferon γ, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-12, granzyme B and a delayed induction of Nos2. Inflammation led to pronounced lymphadenopathy, infiltration of macrophages/monocytes expressing high levels of major histocompatibility complex II and to formation of epitheloid granulomas. Together, these results highlight the role of CLN in oral infections as both, an initial and efficient trap for bacterial invaders and as possible reservoir for chronic pathogens. They likewise cast a new light on the significance of oral

  3. [Influence of serious infections due to Gram-negative bacteria on the hospital economy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, B; Gómez, J; Gómez Vargas, J; Guerra, B; Ruiz Gómez, J; Simarro, E; Baños, V; Canteras, M; Valdes, M

    2000-12-01

    Nosocomial infections due to Gram-negative bacteria are very important since they are associated with high morbidity and high hospital costs. A prospective study of 250 inpatients was carried out, 200 of whom had Gram-negative bacterial infections. Patients were divided into groups of 50 according to the localization of the infection (urinary, surgical wound, respiratory tract and bacteremia), with a control group of 50 patients with similar characteristics but no infection. We calculated the cost for the different groups by multiplying the average length of hospital stay in days by the daily cost of the stay. Significant differences were observed in the average length of stay per patient according to the type of infection and how it was acquired. In terms of cost, nosocomial infection due to Gram-negative bacteria was 1,049,139 pesetas more expensive than community-acquired infection. The cost of the stay for patients with postsurgical infection due to Gram-negative bacteria was 1,108, 252 pesetas more expensive than for the group of control patients. Nosocomial infection due to Gram-negative bacteria is associated with a prolongation in hospital stay of 9 to 28 days, which is the factor that most reflects the cost that can be attributed to nosocomial infection. Consensual and protocolized measures which allow for better clinical management need to be developed.

  4. How active resisters and organizational constipators affect health care-acquired infection prevention efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint, Sanjay; Kowalski, Christine P; Banaszak-Holl, Jane; Forman, Jane; Damschroder, Laura; Krein, Sarah L

    2009-05-01

    As of October 2008, hospitals in the United States no longer receive Medicare reimbursement for certain types of health care-associated infection (HAI), thereby heightening the need for effective prevention efforts. The mere existence of evidence-based practices, however, does not always result in the use of such practices because of the complexities inherent in translating evidence into practice. A qualitative study was conducted to determine the barriers to implementing evidence-based practices to prevent HAI, with a specific focus on the role played by hospital personnel. In-depth phone and in-person interviews were conducted between October 2006 and September 2007 with 86 participants (31 physicians) including chief executive officers, chiefs of staff, hospital epidemiologists, infection control professionals, intensive care unit directors, nurse managers, and frontline physicians and nurses, in 14 hospitals. Active resistance to evidence-based practice change was pervasive. Successful efforts to overcome active resisters included benchmarking infection rates, identifying effective champions, and participating in collaborative efforts. Organizational constipators-mid- to high-level executives who act as insidious barriers to change-also increased the difficulty in implementing change. Recognizing the presence of constipators is often the first step in addressing the problem but can be followed with including the organizational constipator early in group discussions to improve communication and obtain buy-in, working around the individual, and terminating the constipator's employment. Two types of personnel-active resistors and organizational constipators-impeded HAI prevention activities, and several approaches were used to overcome those barriers. Hospital administrators and patient safety leaders can use the findings to more successfully structure activities that prevent HAI in their hospitals.

  5. Syringe access for the prevention of blood borne infections among injection drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rich Josiah D

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately one-third of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome cases in the United States are associated with the practice of sharing of injection equipment and are preventable through the once-only use of syringes, needles and other injection equipment. Discussion Sterile syringes may be obtained legally by 4 methods depending on the state. They may be purchased over the counter, prescribed, obtained at syringe exchange programs or furnished by authorized agencies. Each of these avenues has advantages and disadvantages; therefore, legal access through all means is the most likely way to promote the use of sterile syringes. Summary By assisting illicit drug injectors to obtain sterile syringes the primary care provider is able to reduce the incidence of blood borne infections, and educate patients about safe syringe disposal. The provider is also able to initiate discussion about drug use in a nonjudgmental manner and to offer care to patients who are not yet ready to consider drug treatment.

  6. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor suppression of HIV infectivity and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Tami; Lynch, Kevin; Dubé, Benoit; Gettes, David R; Tustin, Nancy B; Ping Lai, Jian; Metzger, David S; Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D; Evans, Dwight L

    2010-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram would down-regulate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity and that the greatest effects would be seen in people with depression. Depression is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality in HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathobiology of depression, and pharmacologic therapies for depression target this system. The 5-HT transporter and 5-HT receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous and immune systems. Depression has been associated with suppression of natural killer cells and CD8(+) lymphocytes, key regulators of HIV infection. Ex vivo models for acute and chronic HIV infection were used to study the effects of citalopram on HIV viral infection and replication in 48 depressed and nondepressed women. For both the acute and chronic infection models, HIV reverse transcriptase activity was measured in the citalopram treatment condition and the control condition. The SSRI significantly down-regulated the reverse transcriptase response in both the acute and chronic infection models. Specifically, citalopram significantly decreased the acute HIV infectivity of macrophages. Citalopram also significantly decreased HIV viral replication in the latently infected T-cell line and in the latently infected macrophage cell line. There was no difference in down-regulation by depression status. These studies suggest that an SSRI enhances natural killer/CD8 noncytolytic HIV suppression in HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome and decreases HIV viral infectivity of macrophages, ex vivo, suggesting the need for in vivo studies to determine a potential role for agents targeting serotonin in the host defense against HIV.

  7. A Novel 3D Skin Explant Model to Study Anaerobic Bacterial Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazieli Maboni

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Skin infection studies are often limited by financial and ethical constraints, and alternatives, such as monolayer cell culture, do not reflect many cellular processes limiting their application. For a more functional replacement, 3D skin culture models offer many advantages such as the maintenance of the tissue structure and the cell types present in the host environment. A 3D skin culture model can be set up using tissues acquired from surgical procedures or post slaughter, making it a cost effective and attractive alternative to animal experimentation. The majority of 3D culture models have been established for aerobic pathogens, but currently there are no models for anaerobic skin infections. Footrot is an anaerobic bacterial infection which affects the ovine interdigital skin causing a substantial animal welfare and financial impact worldwide. Dichelobacter nodosus is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium and the causative agent of footrot. The mechanism of infection and host immune response to D. nodosus is poorly understood. Here we present a novel 3D skin ex vivo model to study anaerobic bacterial infections using ovine skin explants infected with D. nodosus. Our results demonstrate that D. nodosus can invade the skin explant, and that altered expression of key inflammatory markers could be quantified in the culture media. The viability of explants was assessed by tissue integrity (histopathological features and cell death (DNA fragmentation over 76 h showing the model was stable for 28 h. D. nodosus was quantified in all infected skin explants by qPCR and the bacterium was visualized invading the epidermis by Fluorescent in situ Hybridization. Measurement of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in the culture media revealed that the explants released IL1β in response to bacteria. In contrast, levels of CXCL8 production were no different to mock-infected explants. The 3D skin model realistically simulates the interdigital skin and has

  8. Treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with Chinese medicine in China: opportunity, advancement and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Bin; Wang, Xin; Liu, Hui-Juan; Jin, Yan-Tao; Guo, Hui-Jun; Jiang, Zi-Qiang; Li, Zhen; Xu, Li-Ran

    2013-08-01

    Chinese medicine (CM) has been used in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) for 30 years and the demonstrated therapeutic effects of CM, such as reducing plasma HIV viral load, increasing CD4(+)T cell counts, promoting immunity reconstitution, ameliorating symptoms and signs, improving the health related quality of life (HRQOL) and counteracting against the effects of anti-retroviral drugs, were summarized and reviewed in this article. The authors point out that it had been a good opportunity to use CM for the treatment of HIV infection and AIDS in the past and also there are huge challenges ahead for CM research and clinicians to discover more effective CM and its underlying mechanisms for treatment of AIDS.

  9. Efficacy of a hospital-wide environmental cleaning protocol on hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Paul Andrew; Watson, Luke Robert; Torress-Cook, Alfonso

    2016-07-01

    Environmental contamination has been associated with over half of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreaks in hospitals. We explored if a hospital-wide environmental and patient cleaning protocol would lower hospital acquired MRSA rates and associated costs. This study evaluates the impact of implementing a hospital-wide environmental and patient cleaning protocol on the rate of MRSA infection and the potential cost benefit of the intervention. A retrospective, pre-post interventional study design was used. The intervention comprised a combination of enhanced environmental cleaning of high touch surfaces, daily washing of patients with benzalkonium chloride, and targeted isolation of patients with active infection. The rate of MRSA infection per 1000 patient days (PD) was compared with the rate after the intervention (Steiros Algorithm ® ) was implemented. A cost-benefit analysis based on the number of MRSA infections avoided was conducted. The MRSA rates decreased by 96% from 3.04 per 1000 PD to 0.11 per 1000 PD ( P reduction in MRSA infections, avoided an estimated $1,655,143 in healthcare costs. Implementation of this hospital-wide protocol appears to be associated with a reduction in the rate of MRSA infection and therefore a reduction in associated healthcare costs.

  10. Posttransplant De Novo Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Renal Transplant Recipients: Its Impact on Morbidity and Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Farina M; Laeeq, S Muddasir; Luck, Nasir Hassan; Aziz, Tahir; Abbas, Zaigham; Mubarak, Muhammed

    2017-02-01

    The clinical effects of hepatitis C virus infection acquired after transplant have not been thoroughly studied. We aimed to study hepatitis C virus-related morbidity and mortality with de novo hepatitis C virus infection after renal transplant. Data from mortality files were retrospectively collected from January 2011 to January 2015. Patients were divided into 2 groups: hepatitis C virus positive (group A) and hepatitis C virus negative (group B). Eighty-one patients were included, with median duration of survival of 39 months after transplant. In group A (32 patients), 78.1% of patients were males, with mean age of 36.83 ± 9.15 years. The mean survival duration was better in group A than in group B (67.59 ± 67.1 vs 58.10 ± 59.6 mo; P = .58). Acute cellular rejection was 25% in group A versus 20.4% in group B, whereas chronic allograft nephropathy was 20.4% for group A versus 18.4% for group B. Hepatitis C virus-related death was observed in 7 patients (21.9%). Infection was the main cause of death, with 40.6% of patients in group A versus 53% of patients in group B. On multivariate analyses, better patient survival was associated with greater interval of acquiring HCV after transplant (P = .038). HCV infection acquired after renal transplant is not associated with increased HCV-related mortality, and prognosis is related to the time interval of acquiring infection after transplant.

  11. [Trend analysis of acquired syphilis in Mexico from 2003 to 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Ortiz, Antonia; Uribe-Salas, Felipe J; Olamendi-Portugal, Ma Leonidez; García-Cisneros, Santa; Conde-Glez, Carlos Jesús; Sánchez-Alemán, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    To identify the population group in which syphilis increase was concentrated. The information was collected from the Mexico health statistical yearbooks. The information disaggregated by sex, age group and state during the period 2003 to 2013 was used to form different databases. Linear regression analysis with confidence interval at 95% was used to evaluate changes over time in different population groups. An increase of 0.67 cases per 100,000 population (95%CI 0.30-1.04) in men was detected from 2010. The increase was concentrated in each group of 20-24 and 25-44. The highest incidence of acquired syphilis was reported in the last two years: 2012 and 2013. The last year reported a 1.85 times higher incidence than reported in 2003. Aguascalientes, Distrito Federal, Durango, Mexico, Oaxaca, Puebla, Quintana Roo, Yucatan and Zacatecas reported that syphilis increased during the study period. Acquired syphilis may be reemerging in our country among young men; this increase is not uniform across the country, it is necessary to focus intervention measures for this sexually transmitted infection.

  12. Acquired radioresistance of cancer and the AKT/GSK3β/cyclin D1 overexpression cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimura, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    Fractionated radiotherapy (RT) is widely used in cancer therapy for its advantages in the preservation of normal tissues. However, repopulation of surviving tumor cells during fractionated RT limits the efficacy of RT. In fact, repopulating tumors often acquire radioresistance and this is the major cause of failure of RT. We have recently demonstrated that human tumor cells acquire radioresistance when exposed to fractionated radiation (FR) of X-rays every 12 hours for 1 month. The acquired radioresistance was associated with overexpression of cyclin D1, a result of a series of molecular changes; constitutive activation of DNA-PK and AKT with concomitant down-regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) which results in suppression of cyclin D1 proteolysis. Aberrant cyclin D1 overexpression in S-phase induced DNA double strand breaks which activated DNA-PK and established the vicious cycle of cycling D1 overexpression. This overexpression of cyclin D1 is responsible for the radioresistance phenotype of long-term FR cells, since this phenotype was completely abrogated by treatment of FR cells by the AKT/PKB signaling inhibitor (API-2), an AKT inhibitor or by a Cdk4 inhibitor. Thus, targeting the AKT/GSK3β/cyclin D1/Cdk4 pathway can be an efficient modality to suppress acquired radioresistance of tumor cells. In this article, I overview the newly discovered molecular mechanisms underlying acquired radioresistance of tumor cells induced by FR, and propose a strategy for eradication of tumors using fractionated RT by overcoming tumor radioresistance. (author)

  13. Radiation-resistant acquired immunity of vaccinated mice to Schistosoma mansoni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, R.; Coulson, P.S.; Dixon, B.; Wilson, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Vaccination of mice with attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni induces specific acquired resistance to challenge infection. This resistance is immunologically-mediated, possibly via a delayed-type hypersensitivity. Studies of parasite migration have shown that the protective mechanism operates most effectively in the lungs of vaccinated mice. We have probed the mechanism by exposing mice to 500 rads of gamma radiation before challenge infection. Our results show that the effector mechanism operative against challenge larvae is resistant to radiation. In contrast, classical immune responses are markedly suppressed by the same treatment. While leukocyte populations in the blood fall dramatically after irradiation, numbers of cells recoverable by bronchoalveolar lavage are unaffected. We suggest that vaccination with attenuated cercariae establishes populations of sensitized cells in the lungs which trigger the mechanism of resistance when challenge schistosomula migrate through pulmonary capillary beds. Although the cells may be partially disabled by irradiation, they remain responsive to worm antigens and thereby capable of initiating the elimination mechanism. This hypothesis would explain the radiation resistance of vaccine-induced immunity to S. mansoni

  14. The Healthy Skin Project: changing nursing practice to prevent and treat hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour-Burton, Teri; Fields, Willa; Outlaw, Lanie; Deleon, Elvira

    2013-06-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcers are serious clinical complications that can lead to increased length of stay, pain, infection, and, potentially, death. The surgical progressive care unit at Sharp Grossmont Hospital, San Diego, California, developed the multidisciplinary Healthy Skin Project to decrease the prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. The previous treatment plan was reviewed and modified according to current evidence-based practice. The project consisted of 3 components: creation of a position for a unit-based wound liaison nurse, staff education, and involvement of the nursing assistants. The wound liaison nurse developed and conducted bimonthly skin audits, which revealed inconsistencies in clinical practice and documentation. Education for the staff was accomplished via a self-learning module, case presentations, and 1-on-1 training. In addition, a pressure ulcer algorithm tool was developed to demonstrate step-by-step wound management and documentation. From Spring 2003 through Summer 2006, the prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers ranged from 0.0% to 18.92%, with a mean of 4.85%. After implementation of the project, the prevalence decreased to 0.0% for 17 of 20 quarters, through 2011. Prevention and a multidisciplinary approach are effective in reducing the occurrence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

  15. Factores contribuyentes al desarrollo de infecciones adquiridas en la comunidad en diabéticos tipo 2 admitidos en salas de medicina del Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia Factors contributing to the development of community-acquired infections in type-2 diabetics admitted to the Cayetano Heredia National Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gino Guillermo Tapia-Zegarra

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available El propósito del estudio es identificar factores contribuyentes al desarrollo de infecciones adquiridas en la comunidad en diabéticos tipo 2 hospitalizados. De tal forma, se siguió el diseño de un estudio de casos y controles no apareado. Consecuentemente, se eligieron en forma aleatoria 105 diabéticos con infección adquirida en la comunidad y 105 diabéticos con patología no infecciosa, obtenidos de los Servicios de Medicina de un hospital universitario, entre 1991 y 1998. Mediante el análisis bivariado y multivariado, se obtuvo la estimación ajustada del valor de odds ratio. Los resultados permitieron, según análisis estratificado por edad y sexo, obtener a neuropatía autonómica como factor contribuyente de infecciones urinarias (OR = 4,07. En el modelo multivariado se aisló a vasculopatía periférica (R²: 0,24 como contribuyente de infección de piel y partes blandas (OR = 6,79. Los intervalos de confianza fueron significativos y de 95% de confiabilidad. En conclusión, vasculopatía periférica y vejiga neurogénica contribuyen al desarrollo de infecciones adquiridas en la comunidad en diabéticos tipo 2 hospitalizados.This study aims to identify factors contributing to the development of community-acquired infections in hospitalized type-2 diabetics, using an unmatched case-control design. A total of 105 pairs of diabetic patients with community-acquired infections as compared to non-infectious diseases, respectively, were chosen randomly from the discharge registry of the clinical wards of a teaching hospital from 1991 to 1998. Bivariate and multivariate analysis was conducted with estimation of the adjusted odds ratio. According to stratified analysis controlling for age and sex, autonomic neuropathy proved to be a contributing factor to development of urinary tract infections (OR = 4.07. In the multivariate model, peripheral vasculopathy was isolated (R²: 0.24 as a contributing factor in the development of soft

  16. Recovering With Acquired Apraxia of Speech: The First 2 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Katarina L; Shafer, Jennifer N; Harmon, Tyson G; Jacks, Adam

    2016-12-01

    This study was intended to document speech recovery for 1 person with acquired apraxia of speech quantitatively and on the basis of her lived experience. The second author sustained a traumatic brain injury that resulted in acquired apraxia of speech. Over a 2-year period, she documented her recovery through 22 video-recorded monologues. We analyzed these monologues using a combination of auditory perceptual, acoustic, and qualitative methods. Recovery was evident for all quantitative variables examined. For speech sound production, the recovery was most prominent during the first 3 months, but slower improvement was evident for many months. Measures of speaking rate, fluency, and prosody changed more gradually throughout the entire period. A qualitative analysis of topics addressed in the monologues was consistent with the quantitative speech recovery and indicated a subjective dynamic relationship between accuracy and rate, an observation that several factors made speech sound production variable, and a persisting need for cognitive effort while speaking. Speech features improved over an extended time, but the recovery trajectories differed, indicating dynamic reorganization of the underlying speech production system. The relationship among speech dimensions should be examined in other cases and in population samples. The combination of quantitative and qualitative analysis methods offers advantages for understanding clinically relevant aspects of recovery.

  17. The Influence of Marketing Intelligence on Business Competitive Advantage (A Study of Diamond Bank Plc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladipo Patric Kunle Ade

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the influence of Marketing Intelligence on Business Competitive Advantage: A study of Diamond Bank Plc, Nigeria. Five objectives were identified and translated into five research questions which aptly answered by subjecting them to a test of hypotheses. A Descriptive research was used to survey 292 members of the staff of Diamond Bank in Lagos, Central Regional branches and head office. Out of which 285 responses were obtained, while 6 responses were destroyed because they were not properly filled. Also, data was collected through a self-administered questionnaire, as Pearson correlation, T-test and Regression were used to test the hypotheses statements. However, the result of the findings revealed that marketing intelligence sub-constructs such as internal records, competitor’s sales data, marketplace opportunity, competitors’ threats and competitors’ risks have significant and positive influence on business competitive advantage. Thus, it can be concluded that marketing intelligence as sensitive information has enabled the bank to successfully acquire more profit, expand the branch network all over the country, perform better than its rivals in the market and increase its business competitive advantage.

  18. Epidemiology of Multiresistant Acinetobacter Infections in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savov, E.; Borisova, M.; Michailova, G.

    2007-01-01

    Evolution of bacteria towards resistance to antimicrobial drugs, including these with multidrug resistance, is very important issue for hospital epidemiology in all over the world. There are many papers about an increasing number of Acinetobacter baumannii blood stream and other type of infections in patients at military medical facilities in the Iraq / Kuwait region and in Afghanistan during Operation Enduring Freedom /OEF /. It has now become also a one of the major cause of hospital acquired infections in Bulgaria which due to its remarkable propensity to rapidly acquire resistance determinants to a wide range of antimicrobial drugs. According to the data obtained in Bulgaria, it can be concluded that the majority of the A.baumannii isolates was strikingly resistant, including the 3rd generation of cephalosporins, quinolones and also carbapenems, in the last years. Different methods / phenotypical and molecular methods, including PCR/ for a multidrug A.baumannii investigation and its clonality determination are needed, especially when the strains are not epidemiological related.(author)

  19. The Histological Appearances Of The Adult Kidney In Hiv Infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SITWALA COMPUTERS

    Luchengam@gmail.com. ABSTRACT. Background: Kidney disease in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is very common. The cause of the various histological appearances include HIV infection of the kidney, immunologic responses to the.

  20. Dentigenous infectious foci ? a risk factor of infective endocarditis

    OpenAIRE

    Wisniewska-Spychala, Beata; Sokalski, Jerzy; Grajek, Stefan; Jemielity, Marek; Trojnarska, Olga; Choroszy-Kr?l, Irena; S?jka, Anna; Maksymiuk, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Dentigenous, infectious foci are frequently associated with the development of various diseases. The role of such foci in the evolution of endocarditis still remains unclear. This article presents the concluding results of an interdisciplinary study verifying the influence of dentigenous, infectious foci on the development of infective endocarditis. Material/Methods The study subjects were 60 adult patients with history of infective endocarditis and coexistent acquired hear...

  1. Prevention of hospital-acquired pneumonia in non-ventilated adult patients: a narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Pássaro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumonia is one of the leading hospital-acquired infections worldwide and has an important impact. Although preventive measures for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP are well known, less is known about appropriate measures for prevention of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP. Aim The purpose of this narrative review is to provide an overview of the current standards for preventing HAP in non-ventilated adult patients. Methods A search of the literature up to May 2015 was conducted using Medline for guidelines published by national professional societies or professional medical associations. In addition, a comprehensive search for the following preventive measures was performed: hand hygiene, oral care, bed position, mobilization, diagnosis and treatment of dysphagia, aspiration prevention, viral infections and stress bleeding prophylaxis. Findings Regarding international guidelines, several measures were recommended for VAP, whilst no specific recommendations for HAP prevention in non-ventilated patients are available. There is reasonable evidence available that oral care is associated with a reduction in HAP. Early mobilization interventions, swift diagnosis and treatment of dysphagia, and multimodal programmes for the prevention of nosocomial influenza cross-infection, have a positive impact on HAP reduction. The impact of bed position and stress bleeding prophylaxis remains uncertain. Systematic antibiotic prophylaxis for HAP prevention should be avoided. Conclusion Scant literature and little guidance is available for the prevention of HAP among non-ventilated adult patients. In addition, the criteria used for the diagnosis of HAP and the populations targeted in the studies selected are heterogeneous. Oral care was the most studied measure and was commonly associated with a decrease in HAP rate, although a broad range of interventions are proposed. No robust evidence is available for other measures. Further high

  2. Prevention of hospital-acquired pneumonia in non-ventilated adult patients: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pássaro, Leonor; Harbarth, Stephan; Landelle, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is one of the leading hospital-acquired infections worldwide and has an important impact. Although preventive measures for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) are well known, less is known about appropriate measures for prevention of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). The purpose of this narrative review is to provide an overview of the current standards for preventing HAP in non-ventilated adult patients. A search of the literature up to May 2015 was conducted using Medline for guidelines published by national professional societies or professional medical associations. In addition, a comprehensive search for the following preventive measures was performed: hand hygiene, oral care, bed position, mobilization, diagnosis and treatment of dysphagia, aspiration prevention, viral infections and stress bleeding prophylaxis. Regarding international guidelines, several measures were recommended for VAP, whilst no specific recommendations for HAP prevention in non-ventilated patients are available. There is reasonable evidence available that oral care is associated with a reduction in HAP. Early mobilization interventions, swift diagnosis and treatment of dysphagia, and multimodal programmes for the prevention of nosocomial influenza cross-infection, have a positive impact on HAP reduction. The impact of bed position and stress bleeding prophylaxis remains uncertain. Systematic antibiotic prophylaxis for HAP prevention should be avoided. Scant literature and little guidance is available for the prevention of HAP among non-ventilated adult patients. In addition, the criteria used for the diagnosis of HAP and the populations targeted in the studies selected are heterogeneous. Oral care was the most studied measure and was commonly associated with a decrease in HAP rate, although a broad range of interventions are proposed. No robust evidence is available for other measures. Further high-quality studies are required to evaluate the impact of specific measures on

  3. Computed tomography in the evaluation of acquired stenosis in the neonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faw, K.; Muntz, H.; Siegel, M.; Spector, G.

    1982-01-01

    We studied the feasibility of computed tomographic evaluation of the neonatal airway. Three neonatal larynges, removed at necroscopy, were examined by computed tomography. Good resolution of soft tissue, cartilage and airway lumen was obtained in these small specimens. On the basis of these findings two neonates with acquired subglottic stenosis were examined by endoscopy, soft tissue airway radiographs, and computed tomography. Measurements of radiation dose revealed that a computed tomographic study delivered 36% of the mean tissue dose of standard image intensifier fluoroscopy. Computed tomography and fluoroscopy both demonstrated the degree and length of this stenosis accurately. An advantage of CT over conventional imaging procedures was better definition of the cross sectional area of the airway

  4. Prevalence and risk factors of infections caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Hazuki; Hagihara, Mao; Kato, Hideo; Hirai, Jun; Nishiyama, Naoya; Koizumi, Yusuke; Sakanashi, Daisuke; Suematsu, Hiroyuki; Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-05-01

    To study the clinical characteristics and associated risk factors of infections caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae. A case-control study at a large university hospital in Japan, comparing patients who were infected or colonized with ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae (n = 212) and non-ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae (n = 2089) in 2010-2013. Data were collected from medical charts, retrospectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to explore risk factors of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Proteus mirabilis) infection or colonization for each pathogen, respectively. ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae [E. coli (n = 113), K. oxytoca (n = 46), K. pneumoniae (n = 41), P. mirabilis (n = 12)] were taken from patients were identified in 1409 outpatient and 892 inpatients. Infection or colonization caused by ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae was considered to be hospital-acquired, healthcare-associated and community-acquired in 60.4%, 17.9% and 21.7% patients, respectively. Independent risk factors for ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae infection or colonization were male sex, cerebrovascular disease, intubation/tracheostomy, major surgery within 60 days (p  0.05). The problem of ESBL production is no longer limited to hospital-acquired infections. The presence of chronic illness, such as cerebrovascular disease, and recent antimicrobial use were independent risk factors for ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae infection or colonization. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Challenges in Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Thomas J; Baddour, Larry M; Habib, Gilbert; Hoen, Bruno; Salaun, Erwan; Pettersson, Gosta B; Schäfers, Hans Joachim; Prendergast, Bernard D

    2017-01-24

    Infective endocarditis is defined by a focus of infection within the heart and is a feared disease across the field of cardiology. It is frequently acquired in the health care setting, and more than one-half of cases now occur in patients without known heart disease. Despite optimal care, mortality approaches 30% at 1 year. The challenges posed by infective endocarditis are significant. It is heterogeneous in etiology, clinical manifestations, and course. Staphylococcus aureus, which has become the predominant causative organism in the developed world, leads to an aggressive form of the disease, often in vulnerable or elderly patient populations. There is a lack of research infrastructure and funding, with few randomized controlled trials to guide practice. Longstanding controversies such as the timing of surgery or the role of antibiotic prophylaxis have not been resolved. The present article reviews the challenges posed by infective endocarditis and outlines current and future strategies to limit its impact. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. T lymphocytes among HIV-infected and -uninfected infants: CD4/CD8 ratio as a potential tool in diagnosis of infection in infants under the age of 2 years

    OpenAIRE

    Bikoue Arsene; Gwanzura Christine; Tobaiwa Ocean; Rusakaniko Simbarashe; Nathoo Kusum J; Katzenstein David A; Zijenah Lynn S; Nhembe Margaret; Matibe Petronella; Janossy George

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Serologic tests for HIV infection in infants less than 18 months do not differentiate exposure and infection since maternally acquired IgG antibodies may be detected in infants. Thus, the gold standard for diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in infants under the age of 2 years is DNA or reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. There is an urgent need to evaluate alternative and cost effective laboratory methods for early diagnosis of infant HIV-1 infection as well as iden...

  7. Geographic distribution of Staphylococcus aureus causing invasive infections in Europe : A molecular-epidemiological analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grundmann, Hajo; Aanensen, David M; van den Wijngaard, Cees C; Spratt, Brian G; Harmsen, Dag; Friedrich, Alexander W; Tami, Adriana

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important human pathogens and methicillin-resistant variants (MRSAs) are a major cause of hospital and community-acquired infection. We aimed to map the geographic distribution of the dominant clones that cause invasive infections in Europe.

  8. Aspects of infection in intensive care unit--prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, K A; Hasan, M K; Chowdhury, M G; Akhter, H

    2010-07-01

    Nosocomial infections are the main source of infection in a hospitalized patient. Source of contaminant may be multiple. In a cardiac ICU the vulnerable open heart surgery patients are with multiple invasive lines and monitors. Pediatrics and neonates are more vulnerable because of their poor immunity and nutritional debility. Frequent indwelling line access makes a patient more prone to systemic infection with variable organisms. Our aim is to minimize the chances of hospital acquired infection as far as possible by the use of systemic approach to the patients as guided by the international standard hospital protocol.

  9. Antibiotic resistance patterns of community-acquired urinary tract infections in children with vesicoureteral reflux receiving prophylactic antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chi-Hui; Tsai, Ming-Horng; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Su, Lin-Hui; Tsau, Yong-Kwei; Lin, Chi-Jen; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Lin, Tzou-Yien

    2008-12-01

    The goal was to examine bacterial antimicrobial resistance of recurrent urinary tract infections in children receiving antibiotic prophylaxis because of primary vesicoureteral reflux. We reviewed data retrospectively for children with documented vesicoureteral reflux in 2 hospitals during a 5-year follow-up period. The patients were receiving co-trimoxazole, cephalexin, or cefaclor prophylaxis or prophylaxis with a sequence of different antibiotics (alternative monotherapy). Demographic data, degree of vesicoureteral reflux, prophylactic antibiotics prescribed, and antibiotic sensitivity results of first urinary tract infections and breakthrough urinary tract infections were recorded. Three hundred twenty-four patients underwent antibiotic prophylaxis (109 with co-trimoxazole, 100 with cephalexin, 44 with cefaclor, and 71 with alternative monotherapy) in one hospital and 96 children underwent co-trimoxazole prophylaxis in the other hospital. Breakthrough urinary tract infections occurred in patients from both hospitals (20.4% and 25%, respectively). Escherichia coli infection was significantly less common in children receiving antibiotic prophylaxis, compared with their initial episodes of urinary tract infection, at both hospitals. Children receiving cephalosporin prophylaxis were more likely to have an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing organism for breakthrough urinary tract infections, compared with children with co-trimoxazole prophylaxis. Antimicrobial susceptibilities to almost all antibiotics decreased with cephalosporin prophylaxis when recurrent urinary tract infections developed. The extent of decreased susceptibilities was also severe for prophylaxis with a sequence of different antibiotics. However, antimicrobial susceptibilities decreased minimally in co-trimoxazole prophylaxis groups. Children receiving cephalosporin prophylaxis are more likely to have extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing bacteria or multidrug-resistant uropathogens

  10. Naturally acquired antibody responses to recombinant Pfs230 and Pfs48/45 transmission blocking vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sophie; Grignard, Lynn; Nebie, Issa; Chilongola, Jaffu; Dodoo, Daniel; Sauerwein, Robert; Theisen, Michael; Roeffen, Will; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Singh, Sanjay; Kyei-Baafour, Eric; Tetteh, Kevin; Drakeley, Chris; Bousema, Teun

    2015-07-01

    Pfs48/45 and Pfs230 are Plasmodium falciparum sexual stage proteins and promising malaria transmission-blocking vaccine candidates. Antibody responses against these proteins may be naturally acquired and target antigens may be under selective pressure. This has consequences for the future evaluation of vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy in populations naturally exposed to malaria. We determined naturally acquired antibody responses to the recombinant proteins Pfs48/45-10C and Pfs230-230CMB in children from three malaria endemic settings in Ghana, Tanzania and Burkina Faso. We also examined genetic polymorphisms in the P. falciparum gene pfs48/45. Antibody prevalence was 1.1-18.2% for 10C and 6.7-18.9% for 230CMB. In Burkina Faso we observed evidence of an age-dependent acquisition pattern for both 10C (p < 0.001) and 230CMB (p = 0.031). Membrane feeding assays on a separate dataset demonstrated an association between functional transmission reducing activity and antibody prevalence for both 10C (p = 0.017) and 230CMB (p = 0.049). 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms were found in pfs48/45 (from 126 samples), with 5 non-synonymous SNPs in the Pfs48/45 10C region. We conclude there are naturally acquired antibody responses to both vaccine candidates which have functional relevance by reducing the transmissibility of infected individuals. We identified genetic polymorphisms, in pfs48/45 which exhibited geographical specificity. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dengue infections in non-immune travellers to Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massad, E; Rocklov, J; Wilder-Smith, A

    2013-02-01

    Dengue is the most frequent arboviral disease and is expanding geographically. Dengue is also increasingly being reported in travellers, in particular in travellers to Thailand. However, data to quantify the risk of travellers acquiring dengue when travelling to Thailand are lacking. Using mathematical modelling, we set out to estimate the risk of non-immune persons acquiring dengue when travelling to Thailand. The model is deterministic with stochastic parameters and assumes a Poisson distribution for the mosquitoes' biting rate and a Gamma distribution for the probability of acquiring dengue from an infected mosquito. From the force of infection we calculated the risk of dengue acquisition for travellers to Thailand arriving in a typical year (averaged over a 17-year period) in the high season of transmission. A traveller arriving in the high season of transmission and remaining for 7 days has a risk of acquiring dengue of 0·2% (95% CI 0·16-0·23), whereas the risk for travel of 15 and 30 days' duration is 0·46% (95% CI 0·41-0·50) and 0·81% (95% CI 0·76-0·87), respectively. Our data highlight that the risk of non-immune travellers acquiring dengue in Thailand is substantial. The incidence of 0·81% after a 1-month stay is similar to that reported in prospective seroconversion studies in Israeli travellers to Thailand, highlighting that our models are consistent with actual data. Risk estimates based on mathematical modelling offer more detailed information depending on various travel scenarios, and will help the travel medicine provider give better evidence-based advice for travellers to dengue-endemic countries.

  12. Evidence for possible biological advantages of the newly emerging HIV-1 circulating recombinant form from Malaysia - CRF33_01B in comparison to its progenitors - CRF01_AE and subtype B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Katherine A; Wang, Bin; Miranda-Saksena, Monica; Boadle, Ross; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Ng, Kee-Peng; Saksena, Nitin K

    2010-04-01

    In Malaysia, co-circulation of CRF01_AE and subtype B has resulted in the emergence of the second generation derivative; CRF33_01B in approximately 20% of its HIV-1 infected individuals. Our objective was to identify possible biological advantages that CRF33_01B possesses over its progenitors. Biological and molecular comparisons of CRF33_01B against its parental subtypes clearly show that CRF33_01B replicated better in activated whole peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and CD4+ T-lymphocytes, but not monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). Also, its acquired fitness was greater than CRF01_AE but not subtype B. Moreover, CRF33_01B has higher rate of apoptotic cell death and syncytia induction compared to subtype B. These adaptive and survival abilities could have been acquired by CRF33_01B due to the incorporation of subtype B fragments into the gag-RT region of its full-length genome. Our studies confirm the previously held belief that HIV-1 strains may harbor enhanced biological fitness upon recombination. We therefore estimate a possible gradual replacement of the current predominance of CRF01_AE, as well as wider dissemination of CRF33_01B, together with the identification of other new CRF01_AE/B inter-subtype recombinants in Malaysia.

  13. Intrinsic, adaptive and acquired antimicrobial resistance in Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzanlou, Mohsen; Chai, Wern Chern; Venter, Henrietta

    2017-02-28

    Gram-negative bacteria are responsible for a large proportion of antimicrobial-resistant infections in humans and animals. Among this class of bacteria are also some of the most successful environmental organisms. Part of this success is their adaptability to a variety of different niches, their intrinsic resistance to antimicrobial drugs and their ability to rapidly acquire resistance mechanisms. These mechanisms of resistance are not exclusive and the interplay of several mechanisms causes high levels of resistance. In this review, we explore the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance in Gram-negative organisms and how these different mechanisms enable them to survive many different stress conditions. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  14. Infection Control in Child Day Care Centres : Development and evaluation of a hand hygiene intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.P. Zomer (Tizza)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Children attending child day care centres are at increased risk of acquiring gastrointestinal and respiratory infections compared to children cared for at home. Hand hygiene is known to be an effective measure to prevent infections. However, compliance with hand

  15. Roultella ornithinolytica infection in infancy: a case of febrile urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Petris, Laura; Ruffini, Ermanno

    2018-05-02

    Raoultella ornithinolytica is a Gram-negative, non-motile, encapsulated, aerobic bacillus belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae family. R. ornithinolytica is a not very common, but emergent causal agent of human infection, and its expression of beta-lactamase provides resistance to commonly used antibiotics. The pathogenetic potential of R. ornithinolytica isolates in human disease has become increasingly important. Several cases of hospital-acquired infection, mostly associated with invasive procedures, or in patients with co-morbidity caused by R. ornithinolytica, have been previously reported in the adult population. In pediatric population, two cases in immunocompromised children, one case in an infant with visceral heterotaxy and one case of catheter-related bacteraemia are described. Here, we present the first case of febrile urinary tract infection due to R. ornithinolytica in an 8-month-old infant, recovered from a previous febrile UTI caused by E. coli and without co-morbidity. The empiric therapy with ceftriaxone, followed by cefpodoxime proxetil, resolved symptoms: the clinical condition of the infant improved rapidly and the treatment eradicated urine from the R. ornithinolytica infection. Since other pathogens rather than R. ornithinolytica are usually identified in children with urinary tract infections, including Escherichia coli, Proteus, Klebsiella and Pseudomonas, the identification of this microorganism in our patient's urine was also unexpected.

  16. Successful treatment of Rhodococcus equi pulmonary infection in a renal transplant recipient.

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, H. P.; Bowler, I. C.; Watson, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    The rhodococcus is a mycobacterium-like organism which is normally a pathogen in foals. It usually spreads by direct contact or by aerosol from horse faeces and causes pyogranulomatous pulmonary infections. Occasionally, it acts opportunistically to infect immuno-compromised human hosts, most commonly those with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Here we report a pulmonary infection by Rhodococcus equi in a renal transplant recipient who was successfully treated. The literature o...

  17. Factors Associated With Healthcare-Acquired Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections: Analysis Using Multiple Data Sources and Data Mining Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung In; Bliss, Donna Z; Chi, Chih-Lin; Delaney, Connie W; Westra, Bonnie L

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with healthcare-acquired catheter-associated urinary tract infections (HA-CAUTIs) using multiple data sources and data mining techniques. Three data sets were integrated for analysis: electronic health record data from a university hospital in the Midwestern United States was combined with staffing and environmental data from the hospital's National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators and a list of patients with HA-CAUTIs. Three data mining techniques were used for identification of factors associated with HA-CAUTI: decision trees, logistic regression, and support vector machines. Fewer total nursing hours per patient-day, lower percentage of direct care RNs with specialty nursing certification, higher percentage of direct care RNs with associate's degree in nursing, and higher percentage of direct care RNs with BSN, MSN, or doctoral degree are associated with HA-CAUTI occurrence. The results also support the association of the following factors with HA-CAUTI identified by previous studies: female gender; older age (>50 years); longer length of stay; severe underlying disease; glucose lab results (>200 mg/dL); longer use of the catheter; and RN staffing. Additional findings from this study demonstrated that the presence of more nurses with specialty nursing certifications can reduce HA-CAUTI occurrence. While there may be valid reasons for leaving in a urinary catheter, findings show that having a catheter in for more than 48 hours contributes to HA-CAUTI occurrence. Finally, the findings suggest that more nursing hours per patient-day are related to better patient outcomes.

  18. CHLAMYDIA PNEUMONIAE – THE PREVALENCE OF ANTIBODIES IN HEALTHY POPULATION AND IN PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darja Keše

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. To determinate the prevalence rates of Chlamydia pneumoniae infections in Slovenia and to evaluate the importance of C. pneumoniae infections at patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP.Materials and methods. With the microimmunofluorescence test (micro-IF we evaluated the presence of C. pneumoniae specific antibodies in 1036 healthy subjects, in two periods of time, in 1991–93 and 1997–1998. We also tested the pair sera collected from 2118 patients with CAP between 1993–1999.Results. We demonstrated that C. pneumoniae infections are common in our population, as we detected IgG antibodies in 43.1% of healthy population. The prevalence rate of C. pneumoniae infections statistically significant increased in two periods of time. Acute C. pneumoniae infections were proved in 15.9% of all patients with CAP.Conclusions. C. pneumoniae is important respiratory pathogen also in our community. The infections are more common in older patients. Because C. pneumoniae like other Chlamydia species has tendency to cause chronic disease, it is reasonable to diagnose this bacterium in respiratory patients. It is also recommended to test convalescent sera at serologic laboratory diagnosis.

  19. Brokers and Competitive Advantage

    OpenAIRE

    Michael D. Ryall; Olav Sorenson

    2007-01-01

    The broker profits by intermediating between two (or more) parties. Using a biform game, we examine whether such a position can confer a competitive advantage, as well as whether any such advantage could persist if actors formed relations strategically. Our analysis reveals that, if one considers exogenous the relations between actors, brokers can enjoy an advantage but only if (1) they do not face substitutes either for the connections they offer or the value they can create, (2) they interm...

  20. Acquired A amyloidosis from injection drug use presenting with atraumatic splenic rupture in a hospitalized patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanks Douglas K

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Little is known about splenic rupture in patients who develop systemic acquired A amyloidosis. This is the first report of a case of atraumatic splenic rupture in a patient with acquired A amyloidosis from chronic injection drug use. Case presentation A 58-year-old Caucasian man with a long history of injection drug use, hospitalized for infective endocarditis, experienced atraumatic splenic rupture and underwent splenectomy. Histopathological and microbiological analyses of the splenic tissue were consistent with systemic acquired A amyloidosis, most likely from injection drug use, that led to splenic rupture without any recognized trauma or evidence of bacterial embolization to the spleen. Conclusion In patients with chronic inflammatory conditions, including the use of injection drugs, who experience acute onset of left upper quadrant pain, the diagnosis of atraumatic splenic rupture must be considered.

  1. Generic Advantages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Generic Advantages. Scalability an incremental coverage. Standardization. Business Plan Flexibility. Lifecycle Flexibility. Reliability. Service Interoperability. Changed Industry dynamics.

  2. How do they make it look so easy? The expert orienteer's cognitive advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, David W; Arsal, Guler

    2015-01-01

    Expertise in sport can appear so extraordinary that it is difficult to imagine how "normal" individuals may achieve it. However, in this review, we show that experts in the sport of orienteering, which requires on-foot navigation using map and compass through wild terrain, can make the difficult look easy because they have developed a cognitive advantage. Specifically, they have acquired knowledge of cognitive and behavioural strategies that allow them to circumvent natural limitations on attention. Cognitive strategies include avoiding peaks of demand on attention by distributing the processing of map information over time and reducing the need to attend to the map by simplifying the navigation required to complete a race. Behavioural strategies include reducing the visual search required of the map by physically arranging and rearranging the map display during races. It is concluded that expertise in orienteering can be partly attributed to the circumvention of natural limitations on attention achieved via the employment of acquired cognitive and behavioural strategies. Thus, superior performance in sport may not be the possession of only a privileged few; it may be available to all aspiring athletes.

  3. Hepatitis C virus quasispecies and pseudotype analysis from acute infection to chronicity in HIV-1 co-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferns, R Bridget; Tarr, Alexander W; Hue, Stephane; Urbanowicz, Richard A; McClure, C Patrick; Gilson, Richard; Ball, Jonathan K; Nastouli, Eleni; Garson, Jeremy A; Pillay, Deenan

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infected patients who acquire HCV infection have higher rates of chronicity and liver disease progression than patients with HCV mono-infection. Understanding early events in this pathogenic process is important. We applied single genome sequencing of the E1 to NS3 regions and viral pseudotype neutralization assays to explore the consequences of viral quasispecies evolution from pre-seroconversion to chronicity in four co-infected individuals (mean follow up 566 days). We observed that one to three founder viruses were transmitted. Relatively low viral sequence diversity, possibly related to an impaired immune response, due to HIV infection was observed in three patients. However, the fourth patient, after an early purifying selection displayed increasing E2 sequence evolution, possibly related to being on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Viral pseudotypes generated from HCV variants showed relative resistance to neutralization by autologous plasma but not to plasma collected from later time points, confirming ongoing virus escape from antibody neutralization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Review of Laboratory-Acquired Infections in the Asia-Pacific: Understanding Risk and the Need for Improved Biosafety for Veterinary and Zoonotic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarunee Siengsanan-Lamont

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A rapid review was performed to determine (1 the number and causes of reported laboratory-acquired infections (LAI in the Asia-Pacific region; (2 their significance and threat to the community; (3 the primary risk factors associated with LAIs; (4 the consequences in the event of a LAI or pathogen escape; and (5 to make general recommendations regarding biosafety practices for diagnosis and research in the Asia-Pacific region. A search for LAI and zoonoses in the Asia-Pacific region using online search engines revealed a relatively low number of reports. Only 27 LAI reports were published between 1982 and 2016. The most common pathogens associated with LAIs were dengue virus, Arthroderma spp., Brucella spp., Mycobacterium spp., Rickettsia spp., and Shigella spp. Seventy-eight percent (21 out of 27 LAI reports occurred in high-income countries (i.e., Australia, Japan, South Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan where laboratories were likely to comply with international biosafety standards. Two upper-middle income countries (China (2, and Malaysia (2 and one lower-middle income country (India (2 reported LAI incidents. The majority of the reports (fifty-two percent (14/27 of LAIs occurred in research laboratories. Five LAI reports were from clinical or diagnostic laboratories that are considered at the frontier for zoonotic disease detection. Governments and laboratories in the Asia-Pacific region should be encouraged to report LAI cases as it provides a useful tool to monitor unintended release of zoonotic pathogens and to further improve laboratory biosafety. Non-reporting of LAI events could pose a risk of disease transmission from infected laboratory staff to communities and the environment. The international community has an important and continuing role to play in supporting laboratories in the Asia-Pacific region to ensure that they maintain the safe working environment for the staff and their families, and the wider community.

  5. Osteonecrosis in HIV-infected patients; Osteonecrosis en pacientes con infeccion por VIH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lama, E. de; Narvaez, J. A.; Roca, Y.; Pellicer, J. M. [Servicio de Radiodiagnostico y RM Ciutat Sanitaria i Universitaria de bellvitge. L' Hospitalet de Llobregar. Barcelona (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    We present two cases of avascular osteonecrosis, one involving the knees and the other the hips, in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who met the criteria for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). We review the literature concerning this rare complication of HIV infection, focussing especially on the clinical and radiological features and its possible etiopathogenesis. (Author) 30 refs.

  6. Ten years after acquiring an HIV-1 infection: a study in a cohort of eleven neonates infected by aliquots from a single plasma donation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, H.; Gerritsen, E. J.; van Tol, M. J.; Dooren, L. J.; Vossen, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    We present data from a 10-year follow-up study of 11 children who had been infected in the neonatal period by small aliquots of plasma from a single donation. Three of the children died within the first 2.5 years of life, 5 other children died between 6.2 and 11 years after infection and 3 are alive

  7. Evolving issues in the prevention of surgical site infections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, A

    2009-06-01

    Surgical site infection is one of the more common causes of post-operative morbidity. Such infections contribute to prolonged recovery, delayed discharge and increasing costs to both patients and the health service. In the current climate increased emphasis is being placed on minimising the risks of acquiring or transmitting these nosocomial infections. This article reviews the current literature obtained from a Pubmed database search in relation to three specific aspects of surgical site infection: compliance with prophylactic antibiotics, post-discharge surveillance and novel methods for preventing surgical site infections. These topics represent areas where many institutions will find room for improvement in the prevention of surgical site infections. Tight adherence to prophylactic antibiotic guidelines, close followup of surgical wounds during and after hospital discharge, and attention to oxygenation status and the body temperature of patients may all prove to be useful adjuncts in significantly decreasing surgical site infections.

  8. Neuropathological and biochemical criteria to identify acquired Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease among presumed sporadic cases.