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Sample records for acoustics

  1. Communication Acoustics

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  2. Acoustic telemetry

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To determine movements of green turtles in the nearshore foraging areas, we deployed acoustic tags and determined their movements through active and passive acoustic...

  3. Acoustical Imaging

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  4. Acoustic textiles

    Nayak, Rajkishore

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the manufacturing and applications of acoustic textiles in various industries. It also includes examples from different industries in which acoustic textiles can be used to absorb noise and help reduce the impact of noise at the workplace. Given the importance of noise reduction in the working environment in several industries, the book offers a valuable guide for companies, educators and researchers involved with acoustic materials.

  5. Acoustic biosensors

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of ...

  6. Radiation acoustics

    Lyamshev, Leonid M

    2004-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a developing field lying at the intersection of acoustics, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and condensed matter physics. Radiation Acoustics is among the first books to address this promising field of study, and the first to collect all of the most significant results achieved since research in this area began in earnest in the 1970s.The book begins by reviewing the data on elementary particles, absorption of penetrating radiation in a substance, and the mechanisms of acoustic radiation excitation. The next seven chapters present a theoretical treatment of thermoradiation sound generation in condensed media under the action of modulated penetrating radiation and radiation pulses. The author explores particular features of the acoustic fields of moving thermoradiation sound sources, sound excitation by single high-energy particles, and the efficiency and optimal conditions of thermoradiation sound generation. Experimental results follow the theoretical discussions, and these clearl...

  7. Acoustical Imaging

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  8. Battlefield acoustics

    Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2015-01-01

    This book presents all aspects of situational awareness in a battlefield using acoustic signals. It starts by presenting the science behind understanding and interpretation of sound signals. The book then goes on to provide various signal processing techniques used in acoustics to find the direction of sound source, localize gunfire, track vehicles, and detect people. The necessary mathematical background and various classification and fusion techniques are presented. The book contains majority of the things one would need to process acoustic signals for all aspects of situational awareness in one location. The book also presents array theory, which is pivotal in finding the direction of arrival of acoustic signals. In addition, the book presents techniques to fuse the information from multiple homogeneous/heterogeneous sensors for better detection. MATLAB code is provided for majority of the real application, which is a valuable resource in not only understanding the theory but readers, can also use the code...

  9. Acoustics Research

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fisheries acoustics data are collected from more than 200 sea-days each year aboard the FRV DELAWARE II and FRV ALBATROSS IV (decommissioned) and the FSV Henry B....

  10. Room Acoustics

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  11. Acoustic biosensors

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  12. Droplets Acoustics

    Dahan, Raphael; Carmon, Tal

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to their capillary resonances (Rayleigh, 1879) and their optical resonances (Ashkin, 1977), droplets acoustical resonances were rarely considered. Here we experimentally excite, for the first time, the acoustical resonances of a droplet that relies on sound instead of capillary waves. Droplets vibrations at 37 MHz rates and 100 quality factor are optically excited and interrogated at an optical threshold of 68 microWatt. Our vibrations span a spectral band that is 1000 times higher when compared with drops previously-studied capillary vibration.

  13. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  14. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions......, counterbalancing their weight, and ii) acoustic vortices, spinning sound fields that can impinge angular momentum and cause rotation of objects. In this contribution, both force-creating sound fields are studied by means of numerical simulations. The Boundary Element Method is employed to this end. The simulation...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without...

  15. Acoustic cryocooler

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  16. Acoustic telemetry.

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  17. Responsive acoustic surfaces

    Peters, Brady; Tamke, Martin; Nielsen, Stig Anton;

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic performance is defined by the parameter of reverberation time; however, this does not capture the acoustic experience in some types of open plan spaces. As many working and learning activities now take place in open plan spaces, it is important to be able to understand and design...... for the acoustic conditions of these spaces. This paper describes an experimental research project that studied the design processes necessary to design for sound. A responsive acoustic surface was designed, fabricated and tested. This acoustic surface was designed to create specific sonic effects. The design...... was simulated using custom integrated acoustic software and also using Odeon acoustic analysis software. The research demonstrates a method for designing space- and sound-defining surfaces, defines the concept of acoustic subspace, and suggests some new parameters for defining acoustic subspaces....

  18. Springer Handbook of Acoustics

    Rossing, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and others. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents spanning: animal acoustics including infrasound and ultrasound, environmental noise control, music and human speech and singing, physiological and psychological acoustics, architectural acoustics, physical and engineering acoustics, signal processing, medical acoustics, and ocean acoustics. This handbook reviews the most important areas of acoustics, with emphasis on current research. The authors of the various chapters are all experts in their fields. Each chapter is richly illustrated with figures and tables. The latest rese...

  19. Acoustic Spatiality

    Brandon LaBelle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Experiences of listening can be appreciated as intensely relational, bringing us into contact with surrounding events, bodies and things. Given that sound propagates and expands outwardly, as a set of oscillations from a particular source, listening carries with it a sensual intensity, whereby auditory phenomena deliver intrusive and disruptive as well as soothing and assuring experiences. The physicality characteristic of sound suggests a deeply impressionistic, locational "knowledge structure" – that is, the ways in which listening affords processes of exchange, of being in the world, and from which we extend ourselves. Sound, as physical energy reflecting and absorbing into the materiality around us, and even one's self, provides a rich platform for understanding place and emplacement. Sound is always already a trace of location.Such features of auditory experience give suggestion for what I may call an acoustical paradigm – how sound sets in motion not only the material world but also the flows of the imagination, lending to forces of signification and social structure, and figuring us in relation to each other. The relationality of sound brings us into a steady web of interferences, each of which announces the promise or problematic of being somewhere.

  20. Acoustic Neurinomas

    Mohammad Faraji Rad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic neuromas (AN are schwann cell-derived tumors that commonly arise from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve also known as vestibular schwannoma(VS causes unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo and unsteadiness. In many cases, the tumor size may remain unchanged for many years following diagnosis, which is typically made by MRI. In the majority of cases the tumor is small, leaving the clinician and patient with the options of either serial scanning or active treatment by gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR or microneurosurgery. Despite the vast number of published treatment reports, comparative studies are few. The predominant clinical endpoints of AN treatment include tumor control, facial nerve function and hearing preservation. Less focus has been put on symptom relief and health-related quality of life (QOL. It is uncertain if treating a small tumor leaves the patient with a better chance of obtaining relief from future hearing loss, vertigo or tinnitus than by observing it without treatment.   In this paper we review the literature for the natural course, the treatment alternatives and the results of AN. Finally, we present our experience with a management strategy applied for more than 30 years.

  1. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  2. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  3. Atlantic Herring Acoustic Surveys

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC Advanced Sampling Technologies Research Group conducts annual fisheries acoustic surveys using state-of-the-art acoustic, midwater trawling, and underwater...

  4. Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD

    2016-06-14

    develop and demonstrate emerging undersea acoustic communication technologies at operationally useful ranges and data rates. The secondary objective...Technology Demonstration program (ACOMMS ATD) was to demonstrate long range and moderate data rate underwater acoustic communications between a submarine...moderate data rate acoustic communications capability for tactical use between submarines, surface combatants, unmanned undersea vehicles (UUVs), and other

  5. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  6. Acoustic elliptical cylindrical cloaks

    Ma Hua; Qu Shao-Bo; Xu Zhuo; Wang Jia-Fu

    2009-01-01

    By making a comparison between the acoustic equations and the 2-dimensional (2D) Maxwell equations, we obtain the material parameter equations (MPE) for acoustic elliptical cylindrical cloaks. Both the theoretical results and the numerical results indicate that an elliptical cylindrical cloak can realize perfect acoustic invisibility when the spatial distributions of mass density and bulk modulus are exactly configured according to the proposed equations. The present work is the meaningful exploration of designing acoustic cloaks that are neither sphere nor circular cylinder in shape, and opens up possibilities for making complex and multiplex acoustic cloaks with simple models such as spheres, circular or elliptic cylinders.

  7. Indoor acoustic gain design

    Concha-Abarca, Justo Andres

    2002-11-01

    The design of sound reinforcement systems includes many variables and usually some of these variables are discussed. There are criteria to optimize the performance of the sound reinforcement systems under indoor conditions. The equivalent acoustic distance, the necessary acoustic gain, and the potential acoustic gain are parameters which must be adjusted with respect to the loudspeaker array, electric power and directionality of loudspeakers, the room acoustics conditions, the distance and distribution of the audience, and the type of the original sources. The design and installation of front of the house and monitoring systems have individual criteria. This article is about this criteria and it proposes general considerations for the indoor acoustic gain design.

  8. Vibro-acoustics

    Nilsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume book gives a thorough and comprehensive presentation of vibration and acoustic theories. Different from traditional textbooks which typically deal with some aspects of either acoustic or vibration problems, it is unique of this book to combine those two correlated subjects together. Moreover, it provides fundamental analysis and mathematical descriptions for several crucial phenomena of Vibro-Acoustics which are quite useful in noise reduction, including how structures are excited, energy flows from an excitation point to a sound radiating surface, and finally how a structure radiates noise to a surrounding fluid. Many measurement results included in the text make the reading interesting and informative. Problems/questions are listed at the end of each chapter and the solutions are provided. This will help the readers to understand the topics of Vibro-Acoustics more deeply. The book should be of interest to anyone interested in sound and vibration, vehicle acoustics, ship acoustics and inter...

  9. Springer handbook of acoustics

    2014-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and electronics. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is also in his 2nd edition an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents. This new edition of the Handbook features over 11 revised and expanded chapters, new illustrations, and 2 new chapters covering microphone arrays  and acoustic emission.  Updated chapters contain the latest research and applications in, e.g. sound propagation in the atmosphere, nonlinear acoustics in fluids, building and concert hall acoustics, signal processing, psychoacoustics, computer music, animal bioacousics, sound intensity, modal acoustics as well as new chapters on microphone arrays an...

  10. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    2016-04-30

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-043016 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to...improve our understanding. During the past few years, the physics effects studied have been three-dimensional propagation on global scales, deep water

  11. Nearfield Acoustical Holography

    Hayek, Sabih I.

    Nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is a method by which a set of acoustic pressure measurements at points located on a specific surface (called a hologram) can be used to image sources on vibrating surfaces on the acoustic field in three-dimensional space. NAH data are processed to take advantage of the evanescent wavefield to image sources that are separated less that one-eighth of a wavelength.

  12. Laboratory for Structural Acoustics

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where acoustic radiation, scattering, and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures are...

  13. Handbook of Engineering Acoustics

    Möser, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book examines the physical background of engineering acoustics, focusing on empirically obtained engineering experience as well as on measurement techniques and engineering methods for prognostics. Its goal is not only to describe the state of art of engineering acoustics but also to give practical help to engineers in order to solve acoustic problems. It deals with the origin, the transmission and the methods of the abating different kinds of air-borne and structure-borne sounds caused by various mechanisms – from traffic to machinery and flow-induced sound. In addition the modern aspects of room and building acoustics, as well as psychoacoustics and active noise control, are covered.

  14. Acoustic Technology Laboratory

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains an electro-magnetic worldwide data collection and field measurement capability in the area of acoustic technology. Outfitted by NASA Langley...

  15. Localized acoustic surface modes

    Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen; Bağcı, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes. We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  16. Shallow Water Acoustic Laboratory

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where high-frequency acoustic scattering and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures...

  17. Localized Acoustic Surface Modes

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-08-04

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes (ASMs). We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  18. Acoustic Signals and Systems

    2008-01-01

    The Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics will compile the techniques and applications of signal processing as they are used in the many varied areas of Acoustics. The Handbook will emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of signal processing in acoustics. Each Section of the Handbook...... will present topics on signal processing which are important in a specific area of acoustics. These will be of interest to specialists in these areas because they will be presented from their technical perspective, rather than a generic engineering approach to signal processing. Non-specialists, or specialists...

  19. Acoustic fluidization for earthquakes?

    Sornette, D.; Sornette, A.

    2000-01-01

    Melosh [1996] has suggested that acoustic fluidization could provide an alternative to theories that are invoked as explanations for why some crustal faults appear to be weak. We show that there is a subtle but profound inconsistency in the theory that unfortunately invalidates the results. We propose possible remedies but must acknowledge that the relevance of acoustic fluidization remains an open question.

  20. Acoustic ground impedance meter

    Zuckerwar, A. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus are presented for measuring the acoustic impedance of a surface in which the surface is used to enclose one end of the chamber of a Helmholz resonator. Acoustic waves are generated in the neck of the resonator by a piston driven by a variable speed motor through a cam assembly. The acoustic waves are measured in the chamber and the frequency of the generated acoustic waves is measured by an optical device. These measurements are used to compute the compliance and conductance of the chamber and surface combined. The same procedure is followed with a calibration plate having infinite acoustic impedance enclosing the chamber of the resonator to compute the compliance and conductance of the chamber alone. Then by subtracting, the compliance and conductance for the surface is obtained.

  1. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  2. Computational Ocean Acoustics

    Jensen, Finn B; Porter, Michael B; Schmidt, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the computer has played an increasingly pivotal role in the field of ocean acoustics. Faster and less expensive than actual ocean experiments, and capable of accommodating the full complexity of the acoustic problem, numerical models are now standard research tools in ocean laboratories. The progress made in computational ocean acoustics over the last thirty years is summed up in this authoritative and innovatively illustrated new text. Written by some of the field's pioneers, all Fellows of the Acoustical Society of America, Computational Ocean Acoustics presents the latest numerical techniques for solving the wave equation in heterogeneous fluid–solid media. The authors discuss various computational schemes in detail, emphasizing the importance of theoretical foundations that lead directly to numerical implementations for real ocean environments. To further clarify the presentation, the fundamental propagation features of the techniques are illustrated in color. Computational Ocean A...

  3. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  4. Flat acoustic lens by acoustic grating with curled slits

    Peng, Pai; Xiao, Bingmu; Wu, Ying, E-mail: ying.wu@kaust.edu.sa

    2014-10-03

    We design a flat sub-wavelength lens that can focus acoustic wave. We analytically study the transmission through an acoustic grating with curled slits, which can serve as a material with tunable impedance and refractive index for acoustic waves. The effective parameters rely on the geometry of the slits and are independent of frequency. A flat acoustic focusing lens by such acoustic grating with gradient effective refractive index is designed. The focusing effect is clearly observed in simulations and well predicted by the theory. We demonstrate that despite the large impedance mismatch between the acoustic lens and the matrix, the intensity at the focal point is still high due to Fabry–Perot resonance. - Highlights: • Expression of transmission coefficient of an acoustic grating with curled slits. • Non-dispersive and tunable effective medium parameters for the acoustic grating. • A flat acoustic focusing lens with gradient index by using the acoustic grating.

  5. Predicting Acoustics in Class Rooms

    Christensen, Claus Lynge; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2005-01-01

    Typical class rooms have fairly simple geometries, even so room acoustics in this type of room is difficult to predict using today's room acoustic computer modeling software. The reasons why acoustics of class rooms are harder to predict than acoustics of complicated concert halls might...

  6. Underwater Applications of Acoustical Holography

    P. C. Mehta

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the basic technique of acoustical holography. Requirements for recording the acoustical hologram are discussed with its ability for underwater imaging in view. Some practical systems for short-range and medium-range imaging are described. The advantages of acoustical holography over optical imaging, acoustical imaging and sonars are outlined.

  7. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  8. Acoustic Igniter Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An acoustic igniter eliminates the need to use electrical energy to drive spark systems to initiate combustion in liquid-propellant rockets. It does not involve the...

  9. Acoustic imaging system

    Kendall, J. M., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Tool detects noise sources by scanning sound "scene" and displaying relative location of noise-producing elements in area. System consists of ellipsoidal acoustic mirror and microphone and a display device.

  10. Acoustic imaging system

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  11. An acoustic invisible gateway

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Liang, Bin; Kan, Wei-Wei; Yang, Jun; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The recently-emerged concept of "invisible gateway" with the extraordinary capability to block the waves but allow the passage of other entities has attracted great attentions due to the general interests in illusion devices. However, the possibility to realize such a fascinating phenomenon for acoustic waves has not yet been explored, which should be of paramount significance for acoustical applications but would necessarily involve experimental difficulty. Here we design and experimentally demonstrate an acoustic invisible gateway (AIG) capable of concealing a channel under the detection of sound. Instead of "restoring" a whole block of background medium by using transformation acoustics that inevitably requires complementary or restoring media with extreme parameters, we propose an inherently distinct methodology that only aims at engineering the surface impedance at the "gate" to mimic a rigid "wall" and can be conveniently implemented by decorating meta-structures behind the channel. Such a simple yet ef...

  12. Acoustics Noise Test Cell

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Acoustic Noise Test Cell at the NASA/Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is located adjacent to the large vibration system; both are located in a class 10K...

  13. Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA) is a progressive wave tube test facility that is used to test structures for dynamic response and sonic fatigue due to...

  14. Autonomous Acoustic Receiver System

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Collects underwater acoustic data and oceanographic data. Data are recorded onboard an ocean buoy and can be telemetered to a remote ship or shore station...

  15. Principles of musical acoustics

    Hartmann, William M

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Musical Acoustics focuses on the basic principles in the science and technology of music. Musical examples and specific musical instruments demonstrate the principles. The book begins with a study of vibrations and waves, in that order. These topics constitute the basic physical properties of sound, one of two pillars supporting the science of musical acoustics. The second pillar is the human element, the physiological and psychological aspects of acoustical science. The perceptual topics include loudness, pitch, tone color, and localization of sound. With these two pillars in place, it is possible to go in a variety of directions. The book treats in turn, the topics of room acoustics, audio both analog and digital, broadcasting, and speech. It ends with chapters on the traditional musical instruments, organized by family. The mathematical level of this book assumes that the reader is familiar with elementary algebra. Trigonometric functions, logarithms and powers also appear in the book, but co...

  16. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    ... Programs & Services Search ANAUSA.org Connect with us! Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma Each heading slides to reveal more information. Early Symptoms Early Symptoms Early symptoms are easily overlooked, thus making diagnosis ...

  17. Anal acoustic reflectometry

    Mitchell, Peter J; Klarskov, Niels; Telford, Karen J;

    2011-01-01

    Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis.......Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis....

  18. Acoustic vector sensor signal processing

    SUN Guiqing; LI Qihu; ZHANG Bin

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic vector sensor simultaneously, colocately and directly measures orthogonal components of particle velocity as well as pressure at single point in acoustic field so that is possible to improve performance of traditional underwater acoustic measurement devices or detection systems and extends new ideas for solving practical underwater acoustic engineering problems. Although acoustic vector sensor history of appearing in underwater acoustic area is no long, but with huge and potential military demands, acoustic vector sensor has strong development trend in last decade, it is evolving into a one of important underwater acoustic technology. Under this background, we try to review recent progress in study on acoustic vector sensor signal processing, such as signal detection, DOA estimation, beamforming, and so on.

  19. Acoustic comfort in eating establishments

    Svensson, David; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    The subjective concept of acoustic comfort in eating establishments has been investigated in this study. The goal was to develop a predictive model for the acoustic comfort, by means of simple objective parameters, while also examining which other subjective acoustic parameters could help explain...... the feeling of acoustic comfort. Through several layers of anal ysis, acoustic comfort was found to be rather complex, and could not be explained entirely by common subjective parameters such as annoyance, intelligibility or privacy. A predictive model for the mean acoustic comfort for an eating establishment...

  20. Interactions in an acoustic world

    Simaciu, Ion; Borsos, Zoltan; Bradac, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    The present paper aims to complete an earlier paper where the acoustic world was introduced. This is accomplished by analyzing the interactions which occur between the inhomogeneities of the acoustic medium, which are induced by the acoustic vibrations traveling in the medium. When a wave packet travels in a medium, the medium becomes inhomogeneous. The spherical wave packet behaves like an acoustic spherical lens for the acoustic plane waves. According to the principle of causality, there is an interaction between the wave and plane wave packet. In specific conditions the wave packet behaves as an acoustic black hole.

  1. A Century of Acoustic Metrology

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1998-01-01

    The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect.......The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect....

  2. Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL) is a state-of-the-art Undersea Warfare (USW) acoustic data analysis facility capable of both active and passive underwater...

  3. Acoustic detection of pneumothorax

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Royston, Thomas J.; Balk, Robert A.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2003-04-01

    This study aims at investigating the feasibility of using low-frequency (pneumothorax detection were tested in dogs. In the first approach, broadband acoustic signals were introduced into the trachea during end-expiration and transmitted waves were measured at the chest surface. Pneumothorax was found to consistently decrease pulmonary acoustic transmission in the 200-1200-Hz frequency band, while less change was observed at lower frequencies (ppneumothorax states (pPneumothorax was found to be associated with a preferential reduction of sound amplitude in the 200- to 700-Hz range, and a decrease of sound amplitude variation (in the 300 to 600-Hz band) during the respiration cycle (pPneumothorax changed the frequency and decay rate of percussive sounds. These results imply that certain medical conditions may be reliably detected using appropriate acoustic measurements and analysis. [Work supported by NIH/NHLBI #R44HL61108.

  4. Practical acoustic emission testing

    2016-01-01

    This book is intended for non-destructive testing (NDT) technicians who want to learn practical acoustic emission testing based on level 1 of ISO 9712 (Non-destructive testing – Qualification and certification of personnel) criteria. The essential aspects of ISO/DIS 18436-6 (Condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines – Requirements for training and certification of personnel, Part 6: Acoustic Emission) are explained, and readers can deepen their understanding with the help of practice exercises. This work presents the guiding principles of acoustic emission measurement, signal processing, algorithms for source location, measurement devices, applicability of testing methods, and measurement cases to support not only researchers in this field but also and especially NDT technicians.

  5. Passive broadband acoustic thermometry

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Klin'shov, V. V.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    The 1D internal (core) temperature profiles for the model object (plasticine) and the human hand are reconstructed using the passive acoustothermometric broadband probing data. Thermal acoustic radiation is detected by a broadband (0.8-3.5 MHz) acoustic radiometer. The temperature distribution is reconstructed using a priori information corresponding to the experimental conditions. The temperature distribution for the heated model object is assumed to be monotonic. For the hand, we assume that the temperature distribution satisfies the heat-conduction equation taking into account the blood flow. The average error of reconstruction determined for plasticine from the results of independent temperature measurements is 0.6 K for a measuring time of 25 s. The reconstructed value of the core temperature of the hand (36°C) generally corresponds to physiological data. The obtained results make it possible to use passive broadband acoustic probing for measuring the core temperatures in medical procedures associated with heating of human organism tissues.

  6. Acoustics of courtyard theatres

    WANG Jiqing

    2008-01-01

    The traditional Chinese theatre was often built with a courtyard. In such open-top space, the absence of a roof would mean little reverberation and non-diffused sound field.Acoustically the situation is quite different from that of any enclosed space. The refore, theclassic room acoustics, such as Sabine reverberation formula, would no longer be applicable due to the lack of sound reflections from the ceiling. As the parameter of reverberation time T30 shows the decay rate only, it would not properly characterize the prominent change in the fine structure of the echogram, particularly in case of a large reduction of reflections during the decay process. The sense of reverbrance in a courtyard space would differ noticeably from that of the equivalent 3D-T30 in an enclosed space. Based upon the characteristic analysis of the sound field in an open-top space, this paper presents a preliminary study on the acoustics of the courtyard theatres.

  7. Acoustics waves and oscillations

    Sen, S.N.

    2013-01-01

    Parameters of acoustics presented in a logical and lucid style Physical principles discussed with mathematical formulations Importance of ultrasonic waves highlighted Dispersion of ultrasonic waves in viscous liquids explained This book presents the theory of waves and oscillations and various applications of acoustics in a logical and simple form. The physical principles have been explained with necessary mathematical formulation and supported by experimental layout wherever possible. Incorporating the classical view point all aspects of acoustic waves and oscillations have been discussed together with detailed elaboration of modern technological applications of sound. A separate chapter on ultrasonics emphasizes the importance of this branch of science in fundamental and applied research. In this edition a new chapter ''Hypersonic Velocity in Viscous Liquids as revealed from Brillouin Spectra'' has been added. The book is expected to present to its readers a comprehensive presentation of the subject matter...

  8. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  9. Room Acoustical Fields

    Mechel, Fridolin

    2013-01-01

    This book presents the theory of room acoustical fields and revises the Mirror Source Methods for practical computational use, emphasizing the wave character of acoustical fields.  The presented higher methods include the concepts of “Mirror Point Sources” and “Corner sources which allow for an excellent approximation of complex room geometries and even equipped rooms. In contrast to classical description, this book extends the theory of sound fields describing them by their complex sound pressure and the particle velocity. This approach enables accurate descriptions of interference and absorption phenomena.

  10. Acoustic black holes

    Visser, M

    1999-01-01

    Acoustic propagation in a moving fluid provides a conceptually clean and powerful analogy for understanding black hole physics. As a teaching tool, the analogy is useful for introducing students to both General Relativity and fluid mechanics. As a research tool, the analogy helps clarify what aspects of the physics are kinematics and what aspects are dynamics. In particular, Hawking radiation is a purely kinematical effect, whereas black hole entropy is intrinsically dynamical. Finally, I discuss the fact that with present technology acoustic Hawking radiation is almost experimentally testable.

  11. From Architectural Acoustics to Acoustical Architecture Using Computer Simulation

    Schmidt, Anne Marie Due; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2005-01-01

    Architectural acoustics design has in the past been based on simple design rules. However, with a growing complexity in architectural acoustics and the emergence of room acoustic simulation programmes with considerable potential, it is now possible to subjectively analyse and evaluate acoustic...... properties prior to the actual construction of a building. With the right tools applied, acoustic design can become an integral part of the architectural design process. The aim of this paper is to investigate the field of application that an acoustic simulation programme can have during an architectural...... acoustic design process and to set up a strategy to develop future programmes. The emphasis is put on the first three out of four phases in the working process of the architect and a case study is carried out in which each phase is represented by typical results ? as exemplified with reference...

  12. Evoked acoustic emission

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J;

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has onl...

  13. Evoked acoustic emission

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J;

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...

  14. Indigenous Acoustic Detection.

    1982-01-26

    considerable distances, and they act as good sensors of human presence. Though singing insects are ubiquitous in warm areas, even in the desert ( Nevo and...methodology. DTIC. CD-58-PL. Lloyd, J. E. 1981. Personnel communication. Nevo , E. and S. A. Blondheim. 1972. Acoustic isolation in the speciation of

  15. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    2015-04-15

    sound speed profile is range-independent; since there is little expectation there will be significant mesoscale phenomenon given the lack of solar ...34 Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 93 (4), 1736-1742 (1993). 2 Chris H. Harrison and Martin Siderius, "Effective Parameters for Matched

  16. Holograms for acoustics

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G.; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-09-01

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound.

  17. Acoustic field modulation in regenerators

    Hu, J. Y.; Wang, W.; Luo, E. C.; Chen, Y. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The regenerator is a key component that transfers energy between heat and work. The conversion efficiency is significantly influenced by the acoustic field in the regenerator. Much effort has been spent to quantitatively determine this influence, but few comprehensive experimental verifications have been performed because of difficulties in modulating and measuring the acoustic field. In this paper, a method requiring two compressors is introduced and theoretically investigated that achieves acoustic field modulation in the regenerator. One compressor outputs the acoustic power for the regenerator; the other acts as a phase shifter. A RC load dissipates the acoustic power out of both the regenerator and the latter compressor. The acoustic field can be modulated by adjusting the current in the two compressors and opening the RC load. The acoustic field is measured with pressure sensors instead of flow-field imaging equipment, thereby greatly simplifying the experiment.

  18. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    Cummer, Steven A. ; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales....... The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create......-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview...

  19. Flat acoustic lens by acoustic grating with curled slits

    Peng, Pai

    2014-10-01

    We design a flat sub-wavelength lens that can focus acoustic wave. We analytically study the transmission through an acoustic grating with curled slits, which can serve as a material with tunable impedance and refractive index for acoustic waves. The effective parameters rely on the geometry of the slits and are independent of frequency. A flat acoustic focusing lens by such acoustic grating with gradient effective refractive index is designed. The focusing effect is clearly observed in simulations and well predicted by the theory. We demonstrate that despite the large impedance mismatch between the acoustic lens and the matrix, the intensity at the focal point is still high due to Fabry-Perot resonance.

  20. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces

    Wu, Ying; Mei, Jun; Aljahdali, Rasha

    We design a type of acoustic metasurface, which is composed of carefully designed slits in a rigid thin plate. The effective refractive indices of different slits are different but the impedances are kept the same as that of the host medium. Numerical simulations show that such a metasurface can redirect or reflect a normally incident wave at different frequencies, even though it is impedance matched to the host medium. We show that the underlying mechanisms can be understood by using the generalized Snell's law, and a unified analytic model based on mode-coupling theory. We demonstrate some simple realization of such acoustic metasurface with real materials. The principle is also extended to the design of planar acoustic lens which can focus acoustic waves. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces.

  1. A Martian acoustic anemometer.

    Banfield, Don; Schindel, David W; Tarr, Steve; Dissly, Richard W

    2016-08-01

    An acoustic anemometer for use on Mars has been developed. To understand the processes that control the interaction between surface and atmosphere on Mars, not only the mean winds, but also the turbulent boundary layer, the fluxes of momentum, heat and molecular constituents between surface and atmosphere must be measured. Terrestrially this is done with acoustic anemometers, but the low density atmosphere on Mars makes it challenging to adapt such an instrument for use on Mars. This has been achieved using capacitive transducers and pulse compression, and was successfully demonstrated on a stratospheric balloon (simulating the Martian environment) and in a dedicated Mars Wind Tunnel facility. This instrument achieves a measurement accuracy of ∼5 cm/s with an update rate of >20 Hz under Martian conditions.

  2. Acoustic absorption by sunspots

    Braun, D. C.; Labonte, B. J.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the initial results of a series of observations designed to probe the nature of sunspots by detecting their influence on high-degree p-mode oscillations in the surrounding photosphere. The analysis decomposes the observed oscillations into radially propagating waves described by Hankel functions in a cylindrical coordinate system centered on the sunspot. From measurements of the differences in power between waves traveling outward and inward, it is demonstrated that sunspots appear to absorb as much as 50 percent of the incoming acoustic waves. It is found that for all three sunspots observed, the amount of absorption increases linearly with horizontal wavenumber. The effect is present in p-mode oscillations with wavelengths both significantly larger and smaller than the diameter of the sunspot umbrae. Actual absorption of acoustic energy of the magnitude observed may produce measurable decreases in the power and lifetimes of high-degree p-mode oscillations during periods of high solar activity.

  3. ACOUSTIC EMISSION ANALYZER

    J. J. Almeida-Pérez

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper appears a solution for acoustic emission analysis commonly known as noise. For the accomplishmentof this work a personal computer is used, besides sensors (microphones and boards designed and built for signalconditioning. These components are part of a virtual instrument used for monitoring the acoustical emission. Themain goal of this work is to develop a virtual instrument that supplies many important data as the result of ananalysis allowing to have information in an easy and friendly way. Moreover this information is very useful forstudying and resolving several situations in planning, production and testing areas.The main characteristics of the virtual instrument are: signal analysis in time, effective power measurement inDecibels (dB, average intensity taken from the principle of paired microphones, as well as the data analysis infrequency. These characteristics are included to handle two information channels.

  4. Electromagnetic acoustic imaging.

    Emerson, Jane F; Chang, David B; McNaughton, Stuart; Jeong, Jong Seob; Shung, K K; Cerwin, Stephen A

    2013-02-01

    Electromagnetic acoustic imaging (EMAI) is a new imaging technique that uses long-wavelength RF electromagnetic (EM) waves to induce ultrasound emission. Signal intensity and image contrast have been found to depend on spatially varying electrical conductivity of the medium in addition to conventional acoustic properties. The resultant conductivity- weighted ultrasound data may enhance the diagnostic performance of medical ultrasound in cancer and cardiovascular applications because of the known changes in conductivity of malignancy and blood-filled spaces. EMAI has a potential advantage over other related imaging techniques because it combines the high resolution associated with ultrasound detection with the generation of the ultrasound signals directly related to physiologically important electrical properties of the tissues. Here, we report the theoretical development of EMAI, implementation of a dual-mode EMAI/ultrasound apparatus, and successful demonstrations of EMAI in various phantoms designed to establish feasibility of the approach for eventual medical applications.

  5. Acoustic emission source modeling

    Hora P.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the acoustic emission (AE source modeling by means of FEM system COMSOL Multiphysics. The following types of sources are used: the spatially concentrated force and the double forces (dipole. The pulse excitation is studied in both cases. As a material is used steel. The computed displacements are compared with the exact analytical solution of point sources under consideration.

  6. Acoustic Characterization of Soil

    2007-11-02

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Dept. of Electrical & Computer Enginnering Dept Natural Resources...same transduction device is used for transmit and receive, and the broad-band mechanical matching between the transduction device and the acoustic...has a direct influence over the imaging depth for a given dynamic range. Figure 10 demonstrated the influence of the roundtrip propagation loss as a

  7. Acoustic Communications for UUVs

    2016-06-07

    through use of high-gain, error-control coding coupled with a modified decision feedback equalizer (DFE) which allows the gain to be exploited prior to...finished it wait for feedback from the receiver. At the host each packet is decoded and displayed if it is correct, or added to a list of bad packets if it...Systems Laboratory, Florida Alantic University, July 1998. L. Freitag el al: ‘A Bidriectional Coherent Acoustic Communications Systems for Underwater

  8. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    Ang, Kar M.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K., E-mail: tan.ming.kwang@monash.edu [School of Engineering, Monash University Malaysia, 47500 Bandar Sunway, Selangor (Malaysia); Yeo, Leslie Y. [Micro/Nanophysics Research Laboratory, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia); Friend, James R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  9. Acoustics, computers and measurements

    Truchard, James J.

    2003-10-01

    The human ear has created a high standard for the requirements of acoustical measurements. The transient nature of most acoustical signals has limited the success of traditional volt meters. Professor Hixson's pioneering work in electroacoustical measurements at ARL and The University of Texas helped set the stage for modern computer-based measurements. The tremendous performance of modern PCs and extensive libraries of signal processing functions in virtual instrumentation application software has revolutionized the way acoustical measurements are made. Today's analog to digital converters have up to 24 bits of resolution with a dynamic range of over 120 dB and a single PC processor can process 112 channels of FFTs at 4 kHz in real time. Wavelet technology further extends the capabilities for analyzing transients. The tools available for measurements in speech, electroacoustics, noise, and vibration represent some of the most advanced measurement tools available. During the last 50 years, Professor Hixson has helped drive this revolution from simple oscilloscope measurements to the modern high performance computer-based measurements.

  10. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    Ang, Kar M.; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ˜ 106 Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ˜ 10-9 m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ˜ 10-8 m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10-8 m with 106 Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  11. High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics

    Jackson, Darrell R

    2007-01-01

    High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics is the first book in a new series sponsored by the Office of Naval Research on the latest research in underwater acoustics. This exciting new title provides ready access to experimental data, theory, and models relevant to high-frequency seafloor acoustics and will be of interest to sonar engineers and researchers working in underwater acoustics. The physical characteristics of the seafloor affecting acoustic propagation and scattering are covered, including physical and geoacoustic properties and surface roughness. Current theories for acoustic propagation in sediments are presented along with corresponding models for reflection, scattering, and seafloor penetration. The main text is backed up by an extensive bibliography and technical appendices.

  12. Latest Trends in Acoustic Sensing

    Cinzia Caliendo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Acoustics-based methods offer a powerful tool for sensing applications. Acoustic sensors can be applied in many fields ranging from materials characterization, structural health monitoring, acoustic imaging, defect characterization, etc., to name just a few. A proper selection of the acoustic wave frequency over a wide spectrum that extends from infrasound (<20 Hz up to ultrasound (in the GHz–band, together with a number of different propagating modes, including bulk longitudinal and shear waves, surface waves, plate modes, etc., allow acoustic tools to be successfully applied to the characterization of gaseous, solid and liquid environments. The purpose of this special issue is to provide an overview of the research trends in acoustic wave sensing through some cases that are representative of specific applications in different sensing fields.

  13. Fundamentals of Shallow Water Acoustics

    Katsnelson, Boris; Lynch, James

    2012-01-01

    Shallow water acoustics (SWA), the study of how low and medium frequency sound propagates and scatters on the continental shelves of the world's oceans, has both technical interest and a large number of practical applications. Technically, shallow water poses an interesting medium for the study of acoustic scattering, inverse theory, and propagation physics in a complicated oceanic waveguide. Practically, shallow water acoustics has interest for geophysical exploration, marine mammal studies, and naval applications. Additionally, one notes the very interdisciplinary nature of shallow water acoustics, including acoustical physics, physical oceanography, marine geology, and marine biology. In this specialized volume, the authors, all of whom have extensive at-sea experience in U.S. and Russian research efforts, have tried to summarize the main experimental, theoretical, and computational results in shallow water acoustics, with an emphasis on providing physical insight into the topics presented.

  14. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    Chu, S. Reynold; Allen, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the project is to develop an acoustic modeling capability, based on commercial off-the-shelf software, to be used as a tool for oversight of the future manned Constellation vehicles. The use of such a model will help ensure compliance with acoustic requirements. Also, this project includes modeling validation and development feedback via building physical mockups and conducting acoustic measurements to compare with the predictions.

  15. Acoustic Imaging of Combustion Noise

    Ramohalli, K. N.; Seshan, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Elliposidal acoustic mirror used to measure sound emitted at discrete points in burning turbulent jets. Mirror deemphasizes sources close to target source and excludes sources far from target. At acoustic frequency of 20 kHz, mirror resolves sound from region 1.25 cm wide. Currently used by NASA for research on jet flames. Produces clearly identifiable and measurable variation of acoustic spectral intensities along length of flame. Utilized in variety of monitoring or control systems involving flames or other reacting flows.

  16. Acoustic streaming with heat exchange

    Gubaidullin, A. A.; Pyatkova, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Acoustic streaming in a cylindrical cavity with heat exchange is numerically investigated. The cavity is filled with air. The boundaries of the cavity are maintained at constant temperature. The features of acoustic streaming manifesting with the decrease in the frequency of vibration in comparison with the resonant frequency are determined. The influence of the nonlinearity of process on acoustic streaming is shown. The nonlinearity is caused by the increase of the vibration amplitude.

  17. Combined Environment Acoustic Chamber (CEAC)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The CEAC imposes combined acoustic, thermal and mechanical loads on aerospace structures. The CEAC is employed to measure structural response and determine...

  18. Acoustic Communications Measurement Systems (ACOMMS)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Design and develop adaptive signal processing techniques to improve underwater acoustic communications and networking. Phase coherent and incoherent signal...

  19. Acoustic transparency and slow sound using detuned acoustic resonators

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that the phenomenon of acoustic transparency and slowsound propagation can be realized with detuned acoustic resonators (DAR), mimicking thereby the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in atomic physics. Sound propagation in a pipe with a series of side...

  20. Frequency steerable acoustic transducers

    Senesi, Matteo

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an active research area devoted to the assessment of the structural integrity of critical components of aerospace, civil and mechanical systems. Guided wave methods have been proposed for SHM of plate-like structures using permanently attached piezoelectric transducers, which generate and sense waves to evaluate the presence of damage. Effective interrogation of structural health is often facilitated by sensors and actuators with the ability to perform electronic, i.e. phased array, scanning. The objective of this research is to design an innovative directional piezoelectric transducer to be employed for the localization of broadband acoustic events, or for the generation of Lamb waves for active interrogation of structural health. The proposed Frequency Steerable Acoustic Transducers (FSATs) are characterized by a spatial arrangement of active material which leads to directional characteristics varying with frequency. Thus FSATs can be employed both for directional sensing and generation of guided waves without relying on phasing and control of a large number of channels. The analytical expression of the shape of the FSATs is obtained through a theoretical formulation for continuously distributed active material as part of a shaped piezoelectric device. The FSAT configurations analyzed in this work are a quadrilateral array and a geometry which corresponds to a spiral in the wavenumber domain. The quadrilateral array is experimentally validated, confirming the concept of frequency-dependent directionality. Its limited directivity is improved by the Wavenumber Spiral FSAT (WS-FSAT), which, instead, is characterized by a continuous frequency dependent directionality. Preliminary validations of the WS-FSAT, using a laser doppler vibrometer, are followed by the implementation of the WS-FSAT as a properly shaped piezo transducer. The prototype is first used for localization of acoustic broadband sources. Signal processing

  1. Acoustic Mechanical Feedthroughs

    Sherrit, Stewart; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic motors can have problems when operating in extreme environments. In addition, if one needs to do mechanical work outside a structure, electrical feedthroughs are required to transport the electric power to drive the motor. In this paper, we present designs for driving rotary and linear motors by pumping stress waves across a structure or barrier. We accomplish this by designing a piezoelectric actuator on one side of the structure and a resonance structure that is matched to the piezoelectric resonance of the actuator on the other side. Typically, piezoelectric motors can be designed with high torques and lower speeds without the need for gears. One can also use other actuation materials such as electrostrictive, or magnetostrictive materials in a benign environment and transmit the power in acoustic form as a stress wave and actuate mechanisms that are external to the benign environment. This technology removes the need to perforate a structure and allows work to be done directly on the other side of a structure without the use of electrical feedthroughs, which can weaken the structure, pipe, or vessel. Acoustic energy is pumped as a stress wave at a set frequency or range of frequencies to produce rotary or linear motion in a structure. This method of transferring useful mechanical work across solid barriers by pumping acoustic energy through a resonant structure features the ability to transfer work (rotary or linear motion) across pressure or thermal barriers, or in a sterile environment, without generating contaminants. Reflectors in the wall of barriers can be designed to enhance the efficiency of the energy/power transmission. The method features the ability to produce a bi-directional driving mechanism using higher-mode resonances. There are a variety of applications where the presence of a motor is complicated by thermal or chemical environments that would be hostile to the motor components and reduce life and, in some instances, not be

  2. Taming Acoustic Cavitation

    Rivas, David Fernandez; Enriquez, Oscar R; Versluis, Michel; Prosperetti, Andrea; Gardeniers, Han; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video we show acoustic cavitation occurring from pits etched on a silicon surface. By immersing the surface in a liquid, gas pockets are entrapped in the pits which upon ultrasonic insonation, are observed to shed cavitation bubbles. Modulating the driving pressure it is possible to induce different behaviours based on the force balance that determines the interaction among bubbles and the silicon surface. This system can be used for several applications like sonochemical water treatment, cleaning of surfaces with deposited materials such as biofilms.

  3. Wind turbine acoustics

    Hubbard, Harvey H.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    1990-12-01

    Available information on the physical characteristics of the noise generated by wind turbines is summarized, with example sound pressure time histories, narrow- and broadband frequency spectra, and noise radiation patterns. Reviewed are noise measurement standards, analysis technology, and a method of characterizing wind turbine noise. Prediction methods are given for both low-frequency rotational harmonics and broadband noise components. Also included are atmospheric propagation data showing the effects of distance and refraction by wind shear. Human perception thresholds, based on laboratory and field tests, are given. Building vibration analysis methods are summarized. The bibliography of this report lists technical publications on all aspects of wind turbine acoustics.

  4. Acoustic Ground-Impedance Meter

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Helmoltz resonator used in compact, portable meter measures acoustic impedance of ground or other surfaces. Earth's surface is subject of increasing acoustical investigations because of its importance in aircraft noise prediction and measurment. Meter offers several advantages. Is compact and portable and set up at any test site, irrespective of landscape features, weather or other environmental condition.

  5. Propagation of Ion Acoustic Perturbations

    Pécseli, Hans

    1975-01-01

    Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered.......Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered....

  6. Acoustic Center or Time Origin?

    Staffeldt, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The paper discusses the acoustic center in relation to measurements of loudspeaker polar data. Also, it presents the related concept time origin and discusses the deviation that appears between positions of the acoustic center found by wavefront based and time based measuring methods....

  7. Acoustic Absorption in Porous Materials

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Johnston, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of both the areas of materials science and acoustics is necessary to successfully develop materials for acoustic absorption applications. This paper presents the basic knowledge and approaches for determining the acoustic performance of porous materials in a manner that will help materials researchers new to this area gain the understanding and skills necessary to make meaningful contributions to this field of study. Beginning with the basics and making as few assumptions as possible, this paper reviews relevant topics in the acoustic performance of porous materials, which are often used to make acoustic bulk absorbers, moving from the physics of sound wave interactions with porous materials to measurement techniques for flow resistivity, characteristic impedance, and wavenumber.

  8. Acoustics and Hearing

    Damaske, Peter

    2008-01-01

    When one listens to music at home, one would like to have an acoustic impression close to that of being in the concert hall. Until recently this meant elaborate multi-channelled sound systems with 5 or more speakers. But head-related stereophony achieves the surround-sound effect in living rooms with only two loudspeakers. By virtue of their slight directivity as well as an electronic filter the limitations previously common to two-speaker systems can be overcome and this holds for any arbitrary two-channel recording. The book also investigates the question of how a wide and diffuse sound image can arise in concert halls and shows that the quality of concert halls decisively depends on diffuse sound images arising in the onset of reverberation. For this purpose a strong onset of reverberation is modified in an anechoic chamber by electroacoustic means. Acoustics and Hearing proposes ideas concerning signal processing in the auditory system that explain the measured results and the resultant sound effects plea...

  9. MEMS Based Acoustic Array

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); Nishida, Toshikaza (Inventor); Humphreys, William M. (Inventor); Arnold, David P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Embodiments of the present invention described and shown in the specification aid drawings include a combination responsive to an acoustic wave that can be utilized as a dynamic pressure sensor. In one embodiment of the present invention, the combination has a substrate having a first surface and an opposite second surface, a microphone positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having an input and a first output and a second output, wherein the input receives a biased voltage, and the microphone generates an output signal responsive to the acoustic wave between the first output and the second output. The combination further has an amplifier positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having a first input and a second input and an output, wherein the first input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the first output of the microphone and the second input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the second output of the microphone for receiving the output sinual from the microphone. The amplifier is spaced from the microphone with a separation smaller than 0.5 mm.

  10. Acoustic data transmission method

    Duckworth, A.

    1991-09-17

    This patent describes a method for transmitting time line data through a drillstring having drill pipe sections connected end-to-end by joints from a first location below the surface of the earth to a second location at or near the surface of the earth, the length and cross-sectional area of the drill pipe sections being different from the length and cross-sectional area of the joints. It comprises generating acoustic data signals having a single frequency content in at least one passband of the drillstring; transmitting the data signals through the drillstring from either the first location to the second location or from the second location to the first location during a time period prior to the onset of reflective interference caused by the data signals reflecting from along the length of the drillstring, the time period being equal to or less than the time for the data signals to travel three lengths of the drillstring; stopping the transmission of data signals at the onset of the reflective interference and allowing the acoustic signals to substantially attenuate; and detecting the data signals at the respective first or second location.

  11. Acoustic Signal Feature Extraction of Vehicle Targets

    蓝金辉; 马宝华; 李科杰

    2002-01-01

    Acoustic signal feature extraction is an important part of target recognition. The mechanisms for producing acoustic signals and their propagation are analyzed to extract the features of the radiated noise from different targets. Analysis of the acoustic spectra of typical vehicle targets acquired outdoors shows that the vehicles can be classified based on the acoustic spectra and amplitudes.

  12. Acoustic classification of dwellings

    Berardi, Umberto; Rasmussen, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Schemes for the classification of dwellings according to different building performances have been proposed in the last years worldwide. The general idea behind these schemes relates to the positive impact a higher label, and thus a better performance, should have. In particular, focusing on soun...... exchanging experiences about constructions fulfilling different classes, reducing trade barriers, and finally increasing the sound insulation of dwellings.......Schemes for the classification of dwellings according to different building performances have been proposed in the last years worldwide. The general idea behind these schemes relates to the positive impact a higher label, and thus a better performance, should have. In particular, focusing on sound...... insulation performance, national schemes for sound classification of dwellings have been developed in several European countries. These schemes define acoustic classes according to different levels of sound insulation. Due to the lack of coordination among countries, a significant diversity in terms...

  13. Acoustic cavitation movies

    Crum, Lawrence A.

    2003-04-01

    Acoustic cavitation is a phenomenon that occurs on microsecond time scales and micron length scales, yet, it has many macroscopic manifestations. Accordingly, it is often difficult, at least for the author, to form realistic physical descriptions of the specific mechanisms through which it expresses itself in our macroscopic world. For example, there are still many who believe that cavitation erosion is due to the shock wave that is emitted by bubble implosion, rather than the liquid jet created on asymmetric collapse...and they may be right. Over the years, the author has accumulated a number of movies and high-speed photographs of cavitation activity, which he uses to form his own visual references. In the time allotted, he will show a number of these movies and photographs and discuss their relevance to existing technological problems. A limited number of CDs containing the presented materials will be available to interested individuals. [Work supported in part by the NIH, USAMRMC, and the ONR.

  14. Acoustic/Magnetic Stress Sensor

    Heyman, J. S.; Namkung, M.

    1986-01-01

    High-resolution sensor fast, portable, does not require permanent bonding to structure. Sensor measures nondestructively type (compressive or tensile) and magnitude of stresses and stress gradients present in class of materials. Includes precise high-resolution acoustic interferometer, sending acoustic transducer, receiving acoustic transducer, electromagnet coil and core, power supply, and magnetic-field-measuring device such as Hall probe. This measurement especially important for construction and applications where steel is widely used. Sensor useful especially for nondestructive evaluation of stress in steel members because of portability, rapid testing, and nonpermanent installation.

  15. Acoustics of friction.

    Akay, Adnan

    2002-04-01

    This article presents an overview of the acoustics of friction by covering friction sounds, friction-induced vibrations and waves in solids, and descriptions of other frictional phenomena related to acoustics. Friction, resulting from the sliding contact of solids, often gives rise to diverse forms of waves and oscillations within solids which frequently lead to radiation of sound to the surrounding media. Among the many everyday examples of friction sounds, violin music and brake noise in automobiles represent the two extremes in terms of the sounds they produce and the mechanisms by which they are generated. Of the multiple examples of friction sounds in nature, insect sounds are prominent. Friction also provides a means by which energy dissipation takes place at the interface of solids. Friction damping that develops between surfaces, such as joints and connections, in some cases requires only microscopic motion to dissipate energy. Modeling of friction-induced vibrations and friction damping in mechanical systems requires an accurate description of friction for which only approximations exist. While many of the components that contribute to friction can be modeled, computational requirements become prohibitive for their contemporaneous calculation. Furthermore, quantification of friction at the atomic scale still remains elusive. At the atomic scale, friction becomes a mechanism that converts the kinetic energy associated with the relative motion of surfaces to thermal energy. However, the description of the conversion to thermal energy represented by a disordered state of oscillations of atoms in a solid is still not well understood. At the macroscopic level, friction interacts with the vibrations and waves that it causes. Such interaction sets up a feedback between the friction force and waves at the surfaces, thereby making friction and surface motion interdependent. Such interdependence forms the basis for friction-induced motion as in the case of

  16. NEAR-FIELD ACOUSTIC HOLOGRAPHY FOR SEMI-FREE ACOUSTIC FIELD BASED ON WAVE SUPERPOSITION APPROACH

    LI Weibing; CHEN Jian; YU Fei; CHEN Xinzhao

    2006-01-01

    In the semi-free acoustic field, the actual acoustic pressure at any point is composed of two parts: The direct acoustic pressure and the reflected acoustic pressure. The general acoustic holographic theories and algorithms request that there is only the direct acoustic pressure contained in the pressure at any point on the hologram surface, consequently, they cannot be used to reconstruct acoustic source and predict acoustic field directly. To take the reflected pressure into consideration, near-field acoustic holography for semi-free acoustic field based on wave superposition approach is proposed to realize the holographic reconstruction and prediction of the semi-free acoustic field, and the wave superposition approach is adopted as a holographic transform algorithm. The proposed theory and algorithm are realized and verified with a numerical example,and the drawbacks of the general theories and algorithms in the holographic reconstruction and prediction of the semi-free acoustic field are also demonstrated by this numerical example.

  17. Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The very large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Plum Brook Station, is currently under construction and is due to...

  18. Frequency Steered Acoustic Transducer Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project is to develop, fabricate, and characterize a novel frequency steered acoustic transducer (FSAT) for the...

  19. Cryogenic Acoustic Suppression Testing Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will explore and test the feasibility and effectiveness of using a cryogenic fluid (liquid nitrogen) to facilitate acoustic suppression in a...

  20. ADAPTIVE ELLIPSOIDAL ACOUSTIC INFINITE ELEMENT

    Yang Ruiliang; Wang Hongzhen

    2004-01-01

    It is shown that the basis of the ellipsoidal acoustic infinite element Burnett method,the multipole expansion,cannot represent real ellipsoidal acoustic field exactly.To solve the problem,a weight of angular direction is added to the multipole expansion.The comparison of the modified method and the prime method shows that the modified method can describe and solve the ellipsoidal acoustic field more accurately than ever.A dilating sphere is used to test the new method further.Unlike other infinite element methods,varied ratio of the ellipsoidal artificial boundary instead of sphere is used.The pressure value of the artificial boundary is utilized as the initial value of the new method.Then the radiating phenomena of the ellipsoidal acoustic field can be researched using the new method.These examples show the feasibility of the adaptive method.

  1. Frequency Steered Acoustic Transducer Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase II project is to fabricate, characterize, and verify performance of a new type of frequency steered acoustic transducer...

  2. Acoustically-driven microfluidic systems

    Wang, A W; Benett, W J; Tarte, L R

    2000-06-23

    We have demonstrated a non-contact method of concentrating and mixing particles in a plastic microfluidic chamber employing acoustic radiation pressure. A flaw cell package has also been designed that integrates liquid sample interconnects, electrical contacts and a removable sample chamber. Experiments were performed on 1, 3, 6, and 10 {micro}m polystyrene beads. Increased antibody binding to a solid-phase substrate was observed in the presence of acoustic mixing due to improve mass transport.

  3. Biological Effects of Acoustic Cavitation

    2007-11-02

    rectified diffusion. 56 III. STABLE CAVITATION A. Introduction There are manv areas associated with the biological effects of ultrasound in which the...used said as cavitation indicators. Further, if clinical ultrasound systems are found to be inducing cavitation , either stable or transient, it will...O BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF ACOUSTIC CAVITATION by Lawrence A. Crum -- Physical Acoustics Research Laboratory Department of Physics and Astronomy ’ CTE

  4. Autonomous Adaptive Acoustic Relay Positioning

    2013-09-01

    equipment construction and repair tasks [51]. Commercial ROVs range from large, versatile work-class vehicles like Soil Machine Dynamics (SMD) QUANTUM and...range-only formation control using teams of heterogeneous vehicles with wifi and acoustic communications. Shankar and Chitre formulated the multi-armed...acoustic communication and sensing by marine robots. IEEE Journal of Oceanographic Engineering, 38:522–533, 2013. [43] S. Shankar and Chitre. Tuning

  5. Acoustic Multipurpose Cargo Transfer Bag

    Baccus, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    The Logistics Reduction (LR) project within the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is tasked with reducing logistical mass and repurposing logistical items. Multipurpose Cargo Transfer Bags (MCTB) are designed to be the same external volume as a regular cargo transfer bag, the common logistics carrier for the International Space Station. After use as a cargo bag, the MCTB can be unzipped and unfolded to be reused. This Acoustic MCTBs transform into acoustic blankets after the initial logistics carrying objective is complete.

  6. Acoustic Rectification in Dispersive Media

    Cantrell, John H.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  7. Study Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    Walker, James; Workman,Gary

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work will be to develop techniques for monitoring the acoustic emissions from carbon epoxy composite structures at cryogenic temperatures. Performance of transducers at temperatures ranging from ambient to cryogenic and the characteristics of acoustic emission from composite structures will be studied and documented. This entire effort is directed towards characterization of structures used in NASA propulsion programs such as the X-33.

  8. Opto-acoustic cell permeation

    Visuri, S R; Heredia, N

    2000-03-09

    Optically generated acoustic waves have been used to temporarily permeate biological cells. This technique may be useful for enhancing transfection of DNA into cells or enhancing the absorption of locally delivered drugs. A diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at kHz repetition rates was used to produce a series of acoustic pulses. An acoustic wave was formed via thermoelastic expansion by depositing laser radiation into an absorbing dye. Generated pressures were measured with a PVDF hydrophone. The acoustic waves were transmitted to cultured and plated cells. The cell media contained a selection of normally- impermeable fluorescent-labeled dextran dyes. Following treatment with the opto-acoustic technique, cellular incorporation of dyes, up to 40,000 Molecular Weight, was noted. Control cells that did not receive opto-acoustic treatment had unremarkable dye incorporation. Uptake of dye was quantified via fluorescent microscopic analysis. Trypan Blue membrane exclusion assays and fluorescent labeling assays confirmed the vitality of cells following treatment. This method of enhanced drug delivery has the potential to dramatically reduce required drug dosages and associated side effects and enable revolutionary therapies.

  9. Covert underwater acoustic communications.

    Ling, Jun; He, Hao; Li, Jian; Roberts, William; Stoica, Petre

    2010-11-01

    Low probability of detection (LPD) communications are conducted at a low received signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to deter eavesdroppers to sense the presence of the transmitted signal. Successful detection at intended receiver heavily relies on the processing gain achieved by employing the direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) technique. For scenarios that lack a sufficiently low SNR to maintain LPD, another metric, referred to as low probability of interception (LPI), is of interest to protect the privacy of the transmitted information. If covert communications take place in underwater acoustic (UWA) environments, then additional challenges are present. The time-varying nature of the UWA channel prevents the employment of a long spreading waveform. Furthermore, UWA environments are frequency-selective channels with long memory, which imposes challenges to the design of the spreading waveform. In this paper, a covert UWA communication system that adopts the DSSS technique and a coherent RAKE receiver is investigated. Emphasis is placed on the design of a spreading waveform that not only accounts for the transceiver structure and frequency-selective nature of the UWA channel, but also possesses a superior LPI. The proposed techniques are evaluated using both simulated and SPACE'08 in-water experimental data.

  10. Passive Acoustic Vessel Localization

    Suwal, Pasang Sherpa

    This thesis investigates the development of a low-cost passive acoustic system for localizing moving vessels to monitor areas where human activities such as fishing, snorkeling and poaching are restricted. The system uses several off-the-shelf sensors with unsynchronized clocks where the Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA) or time delay is extracted by cross-correlation of the signal between paired sensors. The cross-correlation function uses phase correlation or Phase Transform (PHAT) which whitens the cross-spectrum in order to de-emphasize dominant frequency components. Using the locations of pairs of sensors as foci, hyperbolic equations can be defined using the time delay between them. With three or more sensors, multiple hyperbolic functions can be calculated which intersect at a unique point: the boat's location. It is also found that increasing separation distances between sensors decreased the correlation between the signals. However larger separation distances have better localization capability than with small distances. Experimental results from the Columbia and Willamette Rivers are presented to demonstrate performance.

  11. Acoustic Signal Processing

    Hartmann, William M.; Candy, James V.

    Signal processing refers to the acquisition, storage, display, and generation of signals - also to the extraction of information from signals and the re-encoding of information. As such, signal processing in some form is an essential element in the practice of all aspects of acoustics. Signal processing algorithms enable acousticians to separate signals from noise, to perform automatic speech recognition, or to compress information for more efficient storage or transmission. Signal processing concepts are the building blocks used to construct models of speech and hearing. Now, in the 21st century, all signal processing is effectively digital signal processing. Widespread access to high-speed processing, massive memory, and inexpensive software make signal processing procedures of enormous sophistication and power available to anyone who wants to use them. Because advanced signal processing is now accessible to everybody, there is a need for primers that introduce basic mathematical concepts that underlie the digital algorithms. The present handbook chapter is intended to serve such a purpose.

  12. Focusing of Acoustic Waves through Acoustic Materials with Subwavelength Structures

    Xiao, Bingmu

    2013-05-01

    In this thesis, wave propagation through acoustic materials with subwavelength slits structures is studied. Guided by the findings, acoustic wave focusing is achieved with a specific material design. By using a parameter retrieving method, an effective medium theory for a slab with periodic subwavelength cut-through slits is successfully derived. The theory is based on eigenfunction solutions to the acoustic wave equation. Numerical simulations are implemented by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for the two-dimensional acoustic wave equation. The theory provides the effective impedance and refractive index functions for the equivalent medium, which can reproduce the transmission and reflection spectral responses of the original structure. I analytically and numerically investigate both the validity and limitations of the theory, and the influences of material and geometry on the effective spectral responses are studied. Results show that large contrasts in impedance and density are conditions that validate the effective medium theory, and this approximation displays a better accuracy for a thick slab with narrow slits in it. Based on the effective medium theory developed, a design of a at slab with a snake shaped" subwavelength structure is proposed as a means of achieving acoustic focusing. The property of focusing is demonstrated by FDTD simulations. Good agreement is observed between the proposed structure and the equivalent lens pre- dicted by the theory, which leads to robust broadband focusing by a thin at slab.

  13. Acoustic loading effects on oscillating rod bundles

    Lin, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical study of the interaction between an infinite acoustic medium and a cluster of circular rods is described. The acoustic field due to oscillating rods and the acoustic loading on the rods are first solved in a closed form. The acoustic loading is then used as a forcing function for rod responses, and the acousto-elastic couplings are solved simultaneously. Numerical examples are presented for several cases to illustrate the effects of various system parameters on the acoustic reaction force coefficients. The effect of the acoustic loading on the coupled eigenfrequencies are discussed.

  14. Reflective echo tomographic imaging using acoustic beams

    Kisner, Roger; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2014-11-25

    An inspection system includes a plurality of acoustic beamformers, where each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers including a plurality of acoustic transmitter elements. The system also includes at least one controller configured for causing each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers to generate an acoustic beam directed to a point in a volume of interest during a first time. Based on a reflected wave intensity detected at a plurality of acoustic receiver elements, an image of the volume of interest can be generated.

  15. Modelling of acoustic transmission through perforated layer

    Lukeš V.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with modeling the acoustic transmission through a perforated interface plane separating two halfspaces occupied by the acoustic medium. We considered the two-scale homogenization limit of the standard acoustic problem imposed in the layer with the perforated periodic structure embedded inside. The homogenized transmission conditions govern the interface discontinuity of the acoustic pressure associated with the two halfspaces and the magnitude of the fictitious transversal acoustic velocity. By numerical examples we illustrate this novel approach of modeling the acoustic impedance of perforated interfaces.

  16. Sonification of acoustic emission data

    Raith, Manuel; Große, Christian

    2014-05-01

    While loading different specimens, acoustic emissions appear due to micro crack formation or friction of already existing crack edges. These acoustic emissions can be recorded using suitable ultrasonic transducers and transient recorders. The analysis of acoustic emissions can be used to investigate the mechanical behavior of different specimens under load. Our working group has undertaken several experiments, monitored with acoustic emission techniques. Different materials such as natural stone, concrete, wood, steel, carbon composites and bone were investigated. Also the experimental setup has been varied. Fire-spalling experiments on ultrahigh performance concrete and pullout experiments on bonded anchors have been carried out. Furthermore uniaxial compression tests on natural stone and animal bone had been conducted. The analysis tools include not only the counting of events but the analysis of full waveforms. Powerful localization algorithms and automatic onset picking techniques (based on Akaikes Information Criterion) were established to handle the huge amount of data. Up to several thousand events were recorded during experiments of a few minutes. More sophisticated techniques like moment tensor inversion have been established on this relatively small scale as well. Problems are related to the amount of data but also to signal-to-noise quality, boundary conditions (reflections) sensor characteristics and unknown and changing Greens functions of the media. Some of the acoustic emissions recorded during these experiments had been transferred into audio range. The transformation into the audio range was done using Matlab. It is the aim of the sonification to establish a tool that is on one hand able to help controlling the experiment in-situ and probably adjust the load parameters according to the number and intensity of the acoustic emissions. On the other hand sonification can help to improve the understanding of acoustic emission techniques for training

  17. Acoustic constituents of prosodic typology

    Komatsu, Masahiko

    Different languages sound different, and considerable part of it derives from the typological difference of prosody. Although such difference is often referred to as lexical accent types (stress accent, pitch accent, and tone; e.g. English, Japanese, and Chinese respectively) and rhythm types (stress-, syllable-, and mora-timed rhythms; e.g. English, Spanish, and Japanese respectively), it is unclear whether these types are determined in terms of acoustic properties, The thesis intends to provide a potential basis for the description of prosody in terms of acoustics. It argues for the hypothesis that the source component of the source-filter model (acoustic features) approximately corresponds to prosody (linguistic features) through several experimental-phonetic studies. The study consists of four parts. (1) Preliminary experiment: Perceptual language identification tests were performed using English and Japanese speech samples whose frequency spectral information (i.e. non-source component) is heavily reduced. The results indicated that humans can discriminate languages with such signals. (2) Discussion on the linguistic information that the source component contains: This part constitutes the foundation of the argument of the thesis. Perception tests of consonants with the source signal indicated that the source component carries the information on broad categories of phonemes that contributes to the creation of rhythm. (3) Acoustic analysis: The speech samples of Chinese, English, Japanese, and Spanish, differing in prosodic types, were analyzed. These languages showed difference in acoustic characteristics of the source component. (4) Perceptual experiment: A language identification test for the above four languages was performed using the source signal with its acoustic features parameterized. It revealed that humans can discriminate prosodic types solely with the source features and that the discrimination is easier as acoustic information increases. The

  18. CALCULATION OF ACOUSTIC EFFICIENCY OF PORTABLE ACOUSTIC SCREEN

    Aleksandr Skvortsov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The research of influence of life environment adverse factors on physical development and health of population is an actual problem of ecology. The aspects of the most actual problems of the modern world, namely environmental industrial noise pollution are considered in the article. Industrial facilities everywhere have noisy equipment. Noise is a significant factors of negative influenceon people and environment. Combined effects of noise and of other physical pollutions on people may cause amplification of their negative impact. If the noise pollution level from the object in a residential area exceeds the permissible levels (MPL, noise protection measures can be initiated. Today, the most common design decisions for noise protection are sound absorbing construction, noise screens and barriers, acousting housings, soundproff cabins. Many of them are popular, others are less known. The article deals with one of the most wide spread means of noise protection – a portable acoustic screen. The aim of the research is to determine the efficiency of portable acoustic screens. It is shown that the installation of such structures can reduce the average value of the sound level. The authors analyzed acoustic screens as device to reduce noise pollution. The authors offer a potable acoustic screen differing from the used easyness, mobility, minimum price and good sound protective properties. Effectiveness, a sound absorption coefficient and sound conductivity coefficient of a portable acoustic screen are evaluated. The descriptions of the algorithm calculations and the combination of technical solutions have practical originality. The results of the research demonstrate the advantages of the proposed solutions for reducing noise levels in the agro-industrial complex.

  19. Virtual acoustic displays

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    1991-01-01

    A 3D auditory display can potentially enhance information transfer by combining directional and iconic information in a quite naturalistic representation of dynamic objects in the interface. Another aspect of auditory spatial clues is that, in conjunction with other modalities, it can act as a potentiator of information in the display. For example, visual and auditory cues together can reinforce the information content of the display and provide a greater sense of presence or realism in a manner not readily achievable by either modality alone. This phenomenon will be particularly useful in telepresence applications, such as advanced teleconferencing environments, shared electronic workspaces, and monitoring telerobotic activities in remote or hazardous situations. Thus, the combination of direct spatial cues with good principles of iconic design could provide an extremely powerful and information-rich display which is also quite easy to use. An alternative approach, recently developed at ARC, generates externalized, 3D sound cues over headphones in realtime using digital signal processing. Here, the synthesis technique involves the digital generation of stimuli using Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTF's) measured in the two ear-canals of individual subjects. Other similar approaches include an analog system developed by Loomis, et. al., (1990) and digital systems which make use of transforms derived from normative mannikins and simulations of room acoustics. Such an interface also requires the careful psychophysical evaluation of listener's ability to accurately localize the virtual or synthetic sound sources. From an applied standpoint, measurement of each potential listener's HRTF's may not be possible in practice. For experienced listeners, localization performance was only slightly degraded compared to a subject's inherent ability. Alternatively, even inexperienced listeners may be able to adapt to a particular set of HRTF's as long as they provide adequate

  20. On Architectural Acoustics Design using Computer Simulation

    Schmidt, Anne Marie Due; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2004-01-01

    is to investigate the field of application an acoustic simulation program can have during an architectural acoustics design process. A case study is carried out in order to represent the iterative working process of an architect. The working process is divided into five phases and represented by typical results......The acoustical quality of a given building, or space within the building, is highly dependent on the architectural design. Architectural acoustics design has in the past been based on simple design rules. However, with a growing complexity in the architectural acoustic and the emergence of potent...... room acoustic simulation programs it is now possible to subjectively analyze and evaluate acoustic properties prior to the actual construction of a facility. With the right tools applied, the acoustic design can become an integrated part of the architectural design process. The aim of the present paper...

  1. Acoustic remote sensing of ocean flows

    Joseph, A.; Desa, E.

    Acoustic techniques have become powerful tools for measurement of ocean circulation mainly because of the ability of acoustic signals to travel long distances in water, and the inherently non-invasive nature of measurement. The satellite remote...

  2. Golden Gate and Pt. Reyes Acoustic Detections

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains detections of acoustic tagged fish from two general locations: Golden Gate (east and west line) and Pt. Reyes. Several Vemco 69khz acoustic...

  3. Acoustic network event classification using swarm optimization

    Burman, Jerry

    2013-05-01

    Classifying acoustic signals detected by distributed sensor networks is a difficult problem due to the wide variations that can occur in the transmission of terrestrial, subterranean, seismic and aerial events. An acoustic event classifier was developed that uses particle swarm optimization to perform a flexible time correlation of a sensed acoustic signature to reference data. In order to mitigate the effects from interference such as multipath, the classifier fuses signatures from multiple sensors to form a composite sensed acoustic signature and then automatically matches the composite signature with reference data. The approach can classify all types of acoustic events but is particularly well suited to explosive events such as gun shots, mortar blasts and improvised explosive devices that produce an acoustic signature having a shock wave component that is aperiodic and non-linear. The classifier was applied to field data and yielded excellent results in terms of reconstructing degraded acoustic signatures from multiple sensors and in classifying disparate acoustic events.

  4. Acoustic Localization with Infrasonic Signals

    Threatt, Arnesha; Elbing, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Numerous geophysical and anthropogenic events emit infrasonic frequencies (wind turbines and tornadoes. These sounds, which cannot be heard by the human ear, can be detected from large distances (in excess of 100 miles) due to low frequency acoustic signals having a very low decay rate in the atmosphere. Thus infrasound could be used for long-range, passive monitoring and detection of these events. An array of microphones separated by known distances can be used to locate a given source, which is known as acoustic localization. However, acoustic localization with infrasound is particularly challenging due to contamination from other signals, sensitivity to wind noise and producing a trusted source for system development. The objective of the current work is to create an infrasonic source using a propane torch wand or a subwoofer and locate the source using multiple infrasonic microphones. This presentation will present preliminary results from various microphone configurations used to locate the source.

  5. Classroom acoustics: Three pilot studies

    Smaldino, Joseph J.

    2005-04-01

    This paper summarizes three related pilot projects designed to focus on the possible effects of classroom acoustics on fine auditory discrimination as it relates to language acquisition, especially English as a second language. The first study investigated the influence of improving the signal-to-noise ratio on the differentiation of English phonemes. The results showed better differentiation with better signal-to-noise ratio. The second studied speech perception in noise by young adults for whom English was a second language. The outcome indicated that the second language learners required a better signal-to-noise ratio to perform equally to the native language participants. The last study surveyed the acoustic conditions of preschool and day care classrooms, wherein first and second language learning occurs. The survey suggested an unfavorable acoustic environment for language learning.

  6. Acoustic Communication for Medical Nanorobots

    Hogg, Tad

    2012-01-01

    Communication among microscopic robots (nanorobots) can coordinate their activities for biomedical tasks. The feasibility of in vivo ultrasonic communication is evaluated for micron-size robots broadcasting into various types of tissues. Frequencies between 10MHz and 300MHz give the best tradeoff between efficient acoustic generation and attenuation for communication over distances of about 100 microns. Based on these results, we find power available from ambient oxygen and glucose in the bloodstream can readily support communication rates up to 10,000 bits/second between micron-sized robots. We discuss techniques, such as directional acoustic beams, that can increase this rate. The acoustic pressure fields enabling this communication are unlikely to damage nearby tissue, and short bursts at considerably higher power could be of therapeutic use.

  7. Acoustic multivariate condition monitoring - AMCM

    Rosenhave, P.E. [Vestfold College, Maritime Dept., Toensberg (Norway)

    1997-12-31

    In Norway, Vestfold College, Maritime Department presents new opportunities for non-invasive, on- or off-line acoustic monitoring of rotating machinery such as off-shore pumps and diesel engines. New developments within acoustic sensor technology coupled with chemometric data analysis of complex signals now allow condition monitoring of hitherto unavailable flexibility and diagnostic specificity. Chemometrics paired with existing knowledge yields a new and powerful tool for condition monitoring. By the use of multivariate techniques and acoustics it is possible to quantify wear and tear as well as predict the performance of working components in complex machinery. This presentation describes the AMCM method and one result of a feasibility study conducted onboard the LPG/C `Norgas Mariner` owned by Norwegian Gas Carriers as (NGC), Oslo. (orig.) 6 refs.

  8. Particle analysis in an acoustic cytometer

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D

    2012-09-18

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for acoustically manipulating one or more particles. Acoustically manipulated particles may be separated by size. The particles may be flowed in a flow stream and acoustic radiation pressure, which may be radial, may be applied to the flow stream. This application of acoustic radiation pressure may separate the particles. In one embodiment, the particles may be separated by size, and as a further example, the larger particles may be transported to a central axis.

  9. Absorption boundary conditions for geomertical acoustics

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Defining accurate acoustical boundary conditions is of crucial importance for room acoustic simulations. In predicting sound fields using phased geometrical acoustics methods, the absorption coefficients or surface impedances of the boundary surfaces can be used, but no guideline has been developed...... solutions. Two rectangular rooms with uniform and non-uniform absorption distributions are tested. It is concluded that the impedance and random incidence absorption boundary conditions produce reasonable results with some exceptions at low frequencies for acoustically soft materials....

  10. Acoustic behaviors of unsaturated soils

    Lu, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Soils are unconsolidated granular materials, consisting of solid particles, water and air. Their mechanical and dynamic behaviors are determined by the discrete nature of the media as well as external and inter-particle forces. For unsaturated soils, two factors significantly affect soils acoustic/seismic responses: external pressure and internal water potential/matric suction. In triaxial cell tests, unsaturated soils were subjected to predefined stress paths to undergo stages of normal consolidation, unload-reload cycles, and failure. The stress deformation curve and stress-P-wave velocity were measured and compared. The study revealed that soil's dynamic response to external pressure are similar to those of the load-deformation behaviors and demonstrated that acoustic velocity can be used to monitor the state of stress of soils. In a long term field soil survey, the P-wave velocities were found to be correlated with water potential as expressed as a power-law relationship. The above phenomena can be understood by using the Terzaghi' s the principle of effective stress. The measured results were in good agreement with Brutsaert theory. The effective stress concept can also be applied to explain the observations in a soil pipe flow study in which soil internal erosion processes were monitored and interpreted by the temporal evolution of the P-wave velocity. In addition to above linear acoustic behaviors, soils, like other earth materials, exhibit astonishing non-classical nonlinear behaviors such as end-point memory, hysteresis, strain -dependent shear modulus, resonant frequency shift, and phase shift, harmonics generation, etc. A nonlinear acoustic study of a soil as a function of water content showed that the nonlinear acoustic parameter are much sensitive to the variations of soil water content than that of the acoustic velocity.

  11. CT findings of acoustic neuroma

    Sim, Do Choul; Lee, Jae Mun; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Bahk, Yong Whee [Catholic Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-10-15

    Computed Tomography (CT) is very accurate in evaluating the location, size, shape and extension of acoustic neuroma. We analysed CT findings of 23 acoustic neuromas seen at Department of Radiology, Kangnam St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic University Medical College during the period of from January 1981 to June 1987. 1. Five (22%) were men and 18 (78%) were women with the high incidence occurring in the 4th and 5th decades. 2. Twenty two cases were diagnosed satisfactorily by CT examinations which included axial, coronal and reconstruction images. One with the smallest dimension of 8 mm in diameter could not be detected by the conventional CT scan. But is could be seen after metrizamide cisternography. mean size of the tumor masses was estimated 3.6 cm in diameter. 3. The shape of the tumor was oval in 50%, round in 27% and lobulated in 23%. The masses were presented as hypodense in 50%, isodense in 32% and hyperdense in 18%. All tumors were extended from the internal acoustic and toward the cerebellopontine angle. The internal acoustic canal was widened in 77%. Hydrocephalus was associated in 45%. Widening of cerebellopontine angle cistern was noted in 50%. 4. After contrast infusion the tumors were enhanced markedly in 45%, moderately in 32% and mildly in 23%. The enhanced pattern was homogeneous in 41%, mixed in 41% and rim in 18%. The margin of the tumors was sharply defined in 82%. The tumors were attached to the petrous bone with acute angle in 73%. Cystic change within the tumor was found in 27%. The peritumoral edema was noted in 45%. In conclusion, CT is of most effective modalities to evaluate size, shape, extent and internal architecture of acoustic neuroma as well as relationship with adjacent anatomic structures including the internal acoustic canal.

  12. Acoustically-Induced Electrical Signals

    Brown, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    We have observed electrical signals excited by and moving along with an acoustic pulse propagating in a sandstone sample. Using resonance we are now studying the characteristics of this acousto-electric signal and determining its origin and the controlling physical parameters. Four rock samples with a range of porosities, permeabilities, and mineralogies were chosen: Berea, Boise, and Colton sandstones and Austin Chalk. Pore water salinity was varied from deionized water to sea water. Ag-AgCl electrodes were attached to the sample and were interfaced to a 4-wire electrical resistivity system. Under computer control, the acoustic signals were excited and the electrical response was recorded. We see strong acoustically-induced electrical signals in all samples, with the magnitude of the effect for each rock getting stronger as we move from the 1st to the 3rd harmonics in resonance. Given a particular fluid salinity, each rock has its own distinct sensitivity in the induced electrical effect. For example at the 2nd harmonic, Berea Sandstone produces the largest electrical signal per acoustic power input even though Austin Chalk and Boise Sandstone tend to resonate with much larger amplitudes at the same harmonic. Two effects are potentially responsible for this acoustically-induced electrical response: one the co-seismic seismo-electric effect and the other a strain-induced resistivity change known as the acousto-electric effect. We have designed experimental tests to separate these mechanisms. The tests show that the seismo-electric effect is dominant in our studies. We note that these experiments are in a fluid viscosity dominated seismo-electric regime, leading to a simple interpretation of the signals where the electric potential developed is proportional to the local acceleration of the rock. Toward a test of this theory we have measured the local time-varying acoustic strain in our samples using a laser vibrometer.

  13. Acoustic Test Characterization of Melamine Foam for Usage in NASA's Payload Fairing Acoustic Attenuation Systems

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The external acoustic liftoff levels predicted for NASA's future heavy lift launch vehicles are expected to be significantly higher than the environment created by today's commercial launch vehicles. This creates a need to develop an improved acoustic attenuation system for future NASA payload fairings. NASA Glenn Research Center initiated an acoustic test series to characterize the acoustic performance of melamine foam, with and without various acoustic enhancements. This testing was denoted as NEMFAT, which stands for NESC Enhanced Melamine Foam Acoustic Test, and is the subject of this paper. Both absorption and transmission loss testing of numerous foam configurations were performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratory in July 2013. The NEMFAT test data provides an initial acoustic characterization and database of melamine foam for NASA. Because of its acoustic performance and lighter mass relative to fiberglass blankets, melamine foam is being strongly considered for use in the acoustic attenuation systems of NASA's future launch vehicles.

  14. Physical foundations of technical acoustics

    Malecki, I

    1969-01-01

    Physical Foundations of Technical Acoustics discusses theoretical foundations of acoustical engineering. It is not so much a technical compendium as a systematic statement of physical laws so conceived that technologists might find in it all the information they need to become acquainted with the physical meaning and mathematical expression of phenomena they encounter in their work. To facilitate the acquirement of notions, which lie beyond a layman's grasp, the plan of narration adopted consists in beginning with the simplest idealized cases and then gradually moving on to the truest possibl

  15. Oscillating nonlinear acoustic shock waves

    Gaididei, Yuri; Rasmussen, Anders Rønne; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2016-01-01

    We investigate oscillating shock waves in a tube using a higher order weakly nonlinear acoustic model. The model includes thermoviscous effects and is non isentropic. The oscillating shock waves are generated at one end of the tube by a sinusoidal driver. Numerical simulations show that at resona......We investigate oscillating shock waves in a tube using a higher order weakly nonlinear acoustic model. The model includes thermoviscous effects and is non isentropic. The oscillating shock waves are generated at one end of the tube by a sinusoidal driver. Numerical simulations show...

  16. Location of an acoustic window in dolphins.

    Popov, V V; Supin, A Y

    1990-01-15

    Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) to sound clicks from sources in different positions were recorded in dolphins Inia geoffrensis. The position of the acoustic window was determined by measurement of acoustic delays. The acoustic window was found to lie close to the auditory meatus and the bulla rather than on the lower jaw.

  17. Predicting and auralizing acoustics in classrooms

    Christensen, Claus Lynge

    2005-01-01

    Although classrooms have fairly simple geometries, this type of room is known to cause problems when trying to predict their acoustics using room acoustics computer modeling. Some typical features from a room acoustics point of view are: Parallel walls, low ceilings (the rooms are flat), uneven...

  18. Outdoor Acoustics as a General Discipline

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1999-01-01

    A tutorial paper exploring the characteristics of sound outdoors. Outdoor acoustics is contrasted to room acoustics. A number of important aspects of outdoor acoustics are exemplified and theoretical approaches are outlined. These are influence of ground impedance, influence of weather, screening...

  19. Aero-acoustic Computations of Wind Turbines

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Michelsen, Jess; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2002-01-01

    A numerical algorithm for acoustic noise generation is extended to 3D flows. The approach involves two parts comprising a viscous incompressible flow part and an inviscid acoustic part. In order to simulate noise generated from a wind turbine, the incompressible and acoustic equations are written...

  20. 4th Pacific Rim Underwater Acoustics Conference

    Xu, Wen; Cheng, Qianliu; Zhao, Hangfang

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings are a collection of 16 selected scientific papers and reviews by distinguished international experts that were presented at the 4th Pacific Rim Underwater Acoustics Conference (PRUAC), held in Hangzhou, China in October 2013. The topics discussed at the conference include internal wave observation and prediction; environmental uncertainty and coupling to sound propagation; environmental noise and ocean dynamics; dynamic modeling in acoustic fields; acoustic tomography and ocean parameter estimation; time reversal and matched field processing; underwater acoustic localization and communication as well as measurement instrumentations and platforms. These proceedings provide insights into the latest developments in underwater acoustics, promoting the exchange of ideas for the benefit of future research.

  1. Longitudinal bulk acoustic mass sensor

    Hales, Jan Harry; Teva, Jordi; Boisen, Anja

    2009-01-01

    A polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever is fabricated and operated in air at 51 MHz. A mass sensitivity of 100 Hz/fg (1 fg=10(-15) g) is obtained from the preliminary experiments where a minute mass is deposited on the device by means of focused ion beam. The total noise i...

  2. Acoustics SIMOPS: managing the unnecessary

    Hanton, Samuel John [Nautronix Marine Technology Solutions, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Time is money, and offshore operations are expensive. The desire therefore, is to increase efficiency through the condensing of schedules. This inevitably leads to SIMOPS of some degree, and this paper discusses SIMOPS along with, more specifically, the challenges they provide to acoustic positioning. (author)

  3. Topology optimization for acoustic problems

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a method to control acoustic properties in a room with topology optimization is presented. It is shown how the squared sound pressure amplitude in a certain part of a room can be minimized by distribution of material in a design domain along the ceiling in 2D and 3D. Nice 0-1 design...

  4. Acoustic Microscopy at Cryogenic Temperatures.

    1982-01-01

    intensities are used, and quantitatitvely acount for the onset of nonlinear excess attenuation. Aooeuuaiol For DTIC TAB Unaranounc ed Just if icat to By...to acoustic power is a reasonable value and can be acounted for by assuming a one-way transducer conversion loss of 5 dB, a lens illumination loss of

  5. APL - North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory

    2011-09-01

    the roles of internal waves, ocean spice, internal tides, fronts and eddies in causing fluctuations in acoustic receptions. 5. To improve basin-scale...Farmer, R. Gentry, T. Gross, A. Hawkins, F.~Li, K. Metcalf , J.H. Miller, D. Moretti, C. Rodrigo, and T. Shinke, (2011). “An International Quiet

  6. Acoustic Climb to Cruise Test

    1991-01-01

    Flight test film footage of three different aircraft testing the acoustical noise levels during take-off, climb, maneuvers, and touch and go landings are described. These sound tests were conducted on two fighter aircraft and one cargo aircraft. Results from mobile test vehicle are shown.

  7. Acoustic Absorption Characteristics of People.

    Kingsbury, H. F.; Wallace, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    The acoustic absorption characteristics of informally dressed college students in typical classroom seating are shown to differ substantially from data for formally dressed audiences in upholstered seating. Absorption data, expressed as sabins per person or absorption coefficient per square foot, shows that there is considerable variation between…

  8. Fundamentals of Acoustic Backscatter Imagery

    2011-09-20

    41 6.12 Geocoding ...47 7.6 Errors in Geocoding .............................................................................................................. 47...h = z - R cos6 (39a) and x = rt sin6. (39b) 6.12 Geocoding Acoustic backscatter imagery data are collected by recording the across-track signals

  9. Numerical investigation of acoustic solitons

    Lombard, Bruno; Richoux, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic solitons can be obtained by considering the propagation of large amplitude sound waves across a set of Helmholtz resonators. The model proposed by Sugimoto and his coauthors has been validated experimentally in previous works. Here we examine some of its theoretical properties: low-frequency regime, balance of energy, stability. We propose also numerical experiments illustrating typical features of solitary waves.

  10. Acoustic Liner for Turbomachinery Applications

    Huff, Dennis L.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Jones, Michael G.; Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this innovation is to reduce aircraft noise in the communities surrounding airports by significantly attenuating the noise generated by the turbomachinery, and enhancing safety by providing a containment barrier for a blade failure. Acoustic liners are used in today's turbofan engines to reduce noise. The amount of noise reduction from an acoustic liner is a function of the treatment area, the liner design, and the material properties, and limited by the constraints of the nacelle or casement design. It is desirable to increase the effective area of the acoustic treatment to increase noise suppression. Modern turbofan engines use wide-chord rotor blades, which means there is considerable treatment area available over the rotor tip. Turbofan engines require containment over the rotors for protection from blade failure. Traditional methods use a material wrap such as Kevlar integrated with rub strips and sometimes metal layers (sandwiches). It is possible to substitute the soft rub-strip material with an open-cell metallic foam that provides noise-reduction benefits and a sacrificial material in the first layer of the containment system. An open-cell foam was evaluated that behaves like a bulk acoustic liner, serves as a tip rub strip, and can be integrated with a rotor containment system. Foams can be integrated with the fan-containment system to provide sufficient safety margins and increased noise attenuation. The major innovation is the integration of the foam with the containment.

  11. MTCI acoustic agglomeration particulate control

    Chandran, R.R.; Mansour, M.N. [Manufacturing and Technology Conversion International, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Scaroni, A.W.; Koopmann, G.H. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Loth, J.L. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1994-10-01

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate pulse combination induced acoustic enhancement of coal ash agglomeration and sulfur capture at conditions typical of direct coal-fired turbines and PFBC hot gas cleanup. MTCI has developed an advanced compact pulse combustor island for direct coal-firing in combustion gas turbines. This combustor island comprises a coal-fired pulse combustor, a combined ash agglomeration and sulfur capture chamber (CAASCC), and a hot cyclone. In the MTCI proprietary approach, the pulse combustion-induced high intensity sound waves improve sulfur capture efficiency and ash agglomeration. The resulting agglomerates allow the use of commercial cyclones and achieve very high particulate collection efficiency. In the MTCI proprietary approach, sorbent particles are injected into a gas stream subjected to an intense acoustic field. The acoustic field serves to improve sulfur capture efficiency by enhancing both gas film and intra-particle mass transfer rates. In addition, the sorbent particles act as dynamic filter foci, providing a high density of stagnant agglomerating centers for trapping the finer entrained (in the oscillating flow field) fly ash fractions. A team has been formed with MTCI as the prime contractor and Penn State University and West Virginia University as subcontractors to MTCI. MTCI is focusing on hardware development and system demonstration, PSU is investigating and modeling acoustic agglomeration and sulfur capture, and WVU is studying aerovalve fluid dynamics. Results are presented from all three studies.

  12. Satellite and acoustic tracking device

    Berumen, Michael L.

    2014-02-20

    The present invention relates a method and device for tracking movements of marine animals or objects in large bodies of water and across significant distances. The method and device can track an acoustic transmitter attached to an animal or object beneath the ocean surface by employing an unmanned surface vessel equipped with a hydrophone array and GPS receiver.

  13. Acoustic design by topology optimization

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2008-01-01

    To bring down noise levels in human surroundings is an important issue and a method to reduce noise by means of topology optimization is presented here. The acoustic field is modeled by Helmholtz equation and the topology optimization method is based on continuous material interpolation functions...

  14. On architectural acoustic design using computer simulation

    Schmidt, Anne Marie Due; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2004-01-01

    acoustic design process. The emphasis is put on the first three out of five phases in the working process of the architect and a case study is carried out in which each phase is represented by typical results ? as exemplified with reference to the design of Bagsværd Church by Jørn Utzon. The paper......Architectural acoustics design has in the past been based on simple design rules. However, with a growing complexity in architectural acoustics and the emergence of room acoustic simulation programmes with considerable potential, it is now possible to subjectively analyse and evaluate acoustic...... properties prior to the actual construction of a building. With the right tools applied, acoustic design can become an integral part of the architectural design process. The aim of this paper is to investigate the field of application that an acoustic simulation programme can have during an architectural...

  15. Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics

    Havelock, David; Vorländer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics presents signal processing as it is practiced in the field of acoustics. The Handbook is organized by areas of acoustics, with recognized leaders coordinating the self-contained chapters of each section. It brings together a wide range of perspectives from over 100 authors to reveal the interdisciplinary nature of signal processing in acoustics. Success in acoustic applications often requires juggling both the acoustic and the signal processing parameters of the problem. This handbook brings the key issues from both into perspective and is complementary to other reference material on the two subjects. It is a unique resource for experts and practitioners alike to find new ideas and techniques within the diversity of signal processing in acoustics.

  16. High-overtone Bulk-Acoustic Resonator gravimetric sensitivity: towards wideband acoustic spectroscopy

    Rabus, D; Ballandras, S; Baron, T; Lebrasseur, E; Carry, E

    2015-01-01

    In the context of direct detection sensors with compact dimensions, we investigate the gravimetric sensitivity of High-overtone Bulk Acoustic Resonators, through modeling of their acoustic characteristics and experiment. The high frequency characterizing such devices is expected to induce a significant effect when the acoustic field boundary conditions are modified by a thin adlayer. Furthermore, the multimode spectral characteristics is considered for wideband acoustic spectroscopy of the adlayer, once the gravimetric sensitivity dependence of the various overtones is established. Finally, means of improving the gravimetric sensitivity by confining the acoustic field in a low acoustic-impedance layer is theoretically established.

  17. Acoustic spin pumping in magnetoelectric bulk acoustic wave resonator

    N. I. Polzikova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the generation and detection of spin currents by using magnetoelastic resonance excitation in a magnetoelectric composite high overtone bulk acoustic wave (BAW resonator (HBAR formed by a Al-ZnO-Al-GGG-YIG-Pt structure. Transversal BAW drives magnetization oscillations in YIG film at a given resonant magnetic field, and the resonant magneto-elastic coupling establishes the spin-current generation at the Pt/YIG interface. Due to the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE this BAW-driven spin current is converted to a dc voltage in the Pt layer. The dependence of the measured voltage both on magnetic field and frequency has a resonant character. The voltage is determined by the acoustic power in HBAR and changes its sign upon magnetic field reversal. We compare the experimentally observed amplitudes of the ISHE electrical field achieved by our method and other approaches to spin current generation that use surface acoustic waves and microwave resonators for ferromagnetic resonance excitation, with the theoretically expected values.

  18. APPLICATION OF DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION IN ACOUSTIC AND STRUCTURAL ACOUSTIC ANALYSIS

    2007-01-01

    Conventional element based methods for modeling acoustic problems are limited to low-frequency applications due to the huge computational efforts. For high-frequency applications, probabilistic techniques, such as statistical energy analysis (SEA), are used. For mid-frequency range, currently no adequate and mature simulation methods exist. Recently, wave based method has been developed which is based on the indirect TREFFTZ approach and has shown to be able to tackle problems in the mid-frequency range. In contrast with the element based methods, no discretization is required. A sufficient, but not necessary, condition for convergence of this method is that the acoustic problem domain is convex. Non-convex domains have to be partitioned into a number of (convex) subdomains. At the interfaces between subdomains, specific coupling conditions have to be imposed. The considered two-dimensional coupled vibro-acoustic problem illustrates the beneficial convergence rate of the proposed wave based prediction technique with high accuracy. The results show the new technique can be applied up to much higher frequencies.

  19. Acoustic modes in fluid networks

    Michalopoulos, C. D.; Clark, Robert W., Jr.; Doiron, Harold H.

    Pressure and flow rate eigenvalue problems for one-dimensional flow of a fluid in a network of pipes are derived from the familiar transmission line equations. These equations are linearized by assuming small velocity and pressure oscillations about mean flow conditions. It is shown that the flow rate eigenvalues are the same as the pressure eigenvalues and the relationship between line pressure modes and flow rate modes is established. A volume at the end of each branch is employed which allows any combination of boundary conditions, from open to closed, to be used. The Jacobi iterative method is used to compute undamped natural frequencies and associated pressure/flow modes. Several numerical examples are presented which include acoustic modes for the Helium Supply System of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Main Propulsion System. It should be noted that the method presented herein can be applied to any one-dimensional acoustic system involving an arbitrary number of branches.

  20. Acoustic reflex and general anaesthesia.

    Farkas, Z

    1983-01-01

    Infant and small children are not always able to cooperate in impedance measurements. For this reason it was decided, -in special cases, -to perform acoustic reflex examination under general anaesthesia. The first report on stapedius reflex and general anaesthesia was published by Mink et al. in 1981. Under the effect of Tiobutabarbital, Propanidid and Diazepam there is no reflex response. Acoustic reflex can be elicited with Ketamin-hydrochlorid and Alphaxalone-alphadolone acetate narcosis. The reflex threshold remains unchanged and the amplitude of muscle contraction is somewhat increased. The method was used: 1. to assess the type and degree of hearing loss in children with cleft palate and/or lip prior to surgery. 2. to exclude neuromuscular disorders with indication of pharyngoplasties. 3. to quantify hearing level in children--mostly multiply handicapped--with retarded speech development. The results of Behavioral Observation and Impedance Audiometry are discussed and evaluated.

  1. Cooperative OFDM underwater acoustic communications

    Cheng, Xilin; Cheng, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Following underwater acoustic channel modeling, this book investigates the relationship between coherence time and transmission distances. It considers the power allocation issues of two typical transmission scenarios, namely short-range transmission and medium-long range transmission. For the former scenario, an adaptive system is developed based on instantaneous channel state information. The primary focus is on cooperative dual-hop orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM). This book includes the decomposed fountain codes designed to enable reliable communications with higher energy efficiency. It covers the Doppler Effect, which improves packet transmission reliability for effective low-complexity mirror-mapping-based intercarrier interference cancellation schemes capable of suppressing the intercarrier interference power level. Designed for professionals and researchers in the field of underwater acoustic communications, this book is also suitable for advanced-level students in electrical enginee...

  2. Acoustic Propagation Modeling Using MATLAB

    1993-09-01

    Acoustic propagation, transient waves, transfer function, linear systems theory 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 13. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 1...method of diffraction prediction. This report describes an ap- proach based on linear systems theory and the Fourier transform. The goal was to achieve a...differed by the use of linear systems theory . Linear systems theory revealed the importance of the total impulse response and its equivalence to the

  3. Uncertainty analysis in acoustic investigations

    2013-01-01

    The problem of uncertainty assessment in acoustic investigations is presented in the hereby paper. The aspect of the uncertainty asymmetry in processing of data obtained in the measuring test of sound levels, determined in decibels, was sketched. On the basis of the analysis of data obtained in the continuous monitoring of road traffic noise in Krakow typical probability distributions for a day, evening and night were determined. The method of the uncertainty assessment based on the propagati...

  4. Acoustical characterization of portuguese libraries

    António Pedro Oliveira de Carvalho; António Eduardo Batista da Costa

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the acoustical characterization of the main reading room of 28 public li-braries in Portugal. In situ measurements were held regarding the interior sound pressure lev-els (background noise, with and without the HVAC equipment working), the Noise Criteria and Noise Rating values (NC/NR), the objective speech intelligibility using the Rapid Speech Transmission Index (RASTI) and Reverberation Time (125 to 4k Hz). Two groups of librar-ies were formed (Classic and Modern librar...

  5. Annual Report for Ocean Acoustics

    2013-09-30

    feeding , diving) and social boundings (mum- calf , mum- calf and associated adult, adult-adult). Moreover, by cross- correlating the transmitted and received...such approach. In order to do so, we make use of existing numerical acoustic propagation methods, e.g. Vertex, feed these methods with different...transmission occurs. We also consider the cost of feeding this channel state information back and develop a controller that minimizes the number of both

  6. APL - North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory

    2015-03-04

    Flatté’s statistical acoustic code to Mike Porter at HLS Research for inclusion in the OALIB website. PUBLICATIONS Andrew, Rex K., James A...show the MCPE confidence intervals and curves with diamonds show confidence intervals on the measured values. Diamonds indicate the depths at which...left, except that only depths from 800 to 1400 m are shown. The diamond -shaped symbols show the arrival depth and corresponding intensity of rays with

  7. Acoustic telemetry and fisheries management

    Crossin, Glenn T.; Heupel, Michelle R.; Holbrook, Christopher; Hussey, Nigel E.; Lowerre-Barbieri, Susan K; Nguyen, Vivian M.; Raby, Graham D.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of acoustic telemetry as a tool for addressing issues in fisheries management, and serves as the lead to the special Feature Issue of Ecological Applications titled “Acoustic Telemetry and Fisheries Management”. Specifically, we provide an overview of the ways in which acoustic telemetry can be used to inform issues central to the ecology, conservation, and management of exploited and/or imperiled fish species. Despite great strides in this area in recent years, there are comparatively few examples where data have been applied directly to influence fisheries management and policy. We review the literature on this issue, identify the strengths and weaknesses of work done to date, and highlight knowledge gaps and difficulties in applying empirical fish telemetry studies to fisheries policy and practice. We then highlight the key areas of management and policy addressed, as well as the challenges that needed to be overcome to do this. We conclude with a set of recommendations about how researchers can, in consultation with stock assessment scientists and managers, formulate testable scientific questions to address and design future studies to generate data that can be used in a meaningful way by fisheries management and conservation practitioners. We also urge the involvement of relevant stakeholders (managers, fishers, conservation societies, etc.) early on in the process (i.e. in the co-creation of research projects), so that all priority questions and issues can be addressed effectively.

  8. Vibro-acoustic analysis of the acoustic-structure interaction of flexible structure due to acoustic excitation

    Djojodihardjo, Harijono

    2015-03-01

    The application of BE-FE acoustic-structure interaction on a structure subject to acoustic load is elaborated using the boundary element-finite element acoustic structural coupling and the utilization of the computational scheme developed earlier. The plausibility of the numerical treatment is investigated and validated through application to generic cases. The analysis carried out in the work is intended to serve as a baseline in the analysis of acoustic structure interaction for lightweight structures. Results obtained thus far exhibit the robustness of the method developed.

  9. Measuring Acoustic Wave Transit Time in Furnace Based on Active Acoustic Source Signal

    Zhen Luo; Feng Tian; Xiao-Ping Sun

    2007-01-01

    Accurate measurement of transit time for acoustic wave between two sensors installed on two sides of a furnace is a key to implementing the temperature field measurement technique based on acoustical method. A new method for measuring transit time of acoustic wave based on active acoustic source signal is proposed in this paper, which includes the followings: the time when the acoustic source signal arrives at the two sensors is measured first; then, the difference of two arriving time arguments is computed, thereby we get the transit time of the acoustic wave between two sensors installed on the two sides of the furnace. Avoiding the restriction on acoustic source signal and background noise, the new method can get the transit time of acoustic wave with higher precision and stronger ability of resisting noise interference.

  10. Integration of Acoustic Detection Equipment into ANTARES

    Lahmann, R; Graf, K; Hoessl, J; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Katz, U; Naumann, C; Salomon, K

    2005-01-01

    The ANTARES group at the University of Erlangen is working towards the integration of a set of acoustic sensors into the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope. With this setup, tests of acoustic particle detection methods and background studies shall be performed. The ANTARES Neutrino Telescope, which is currently being constructed in the Mediterranean Sea, will be equipped with the infrastructure to accommodate a 3-dimensional array of photomultipliers for the detection of Cherenkov light. Within this infrastructure, the required resources for acoustic sensors are available: Bandwidth for the transmission of the acoustic data to the shore, electrical power for the off-shore electronics and physical space to install the acoustic sensors and to route the connecting cables (transmitting signals and power) into the electronics containers. It will be explained how the integration will be performed with minimal modifications of the existing ANTARES design and which setup is foreseen for the acquisition of the acoustic data.

  11. High-sensitivity fiber optic acoustic sensors

    Lu, Ping; Liu, Deming; Liao, Hao

    2016-11-01

    Due to the overwhelming advantages compared with traditional electronicsensors, fiber-optic acoustic sensors have arisen enormous interest in multiple disciplines. In this paper we present the recent research achievements of our group on fiber-optic acoustic sensors. The main point of our research is high sensitivity interferometric acoustic sensors, including Michelson, Sagnac, and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In addition, some advanced technologies have been proposed for acoustic or acoustic pressure sensing such as single-mode/multimode fiber coupler, dual FBGs and multi-longitudinal mode fiber laser based acoustic sensors. Moreover, our attention we have also been paid on signal demodulation schemes. The intensity-based quadrature point (Q-point) demodulation, two-wavelength quadrature demodulation and symmetric 3×3 coupler methodare discussed and compared in this paper.

  12. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1993-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  13. Acoustic levitation of a large solid sphere

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Bernassau, Anne L.; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic levitation can levitate spherical objects much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The acoustic levitation of an expanded polystyrene sphere of 50 mm in diameter, corresponding to 3.6 times the wavelength, is achieved by using three 25 kHz ultrasonic transducers arranged in a tripod fashion. In this configuration, a standing wave is created between the transducers and the sphere. The axial acoustic radiation force generated by each transducer on the sphere was modeled numerically as a function of the distance between the sphere and the transducer. The theoretical acoustic radiation force was verified experimentally in a setup consisting of an electronic scale and an ultrasonic transducer mounted on a motorized linear stage. The comparison between the numerical and experimental acoustic radiation forces presents a good agreement.

  14. North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory: Deep Water Acoustic Propagation in the Philippine Sea

    2016-06-21

    and Yuen, M. Y. (2015). "Multipurpose acoustic networks in the Integrated Arctic Ocean Observing System," Arctic 68, 11-27. 2. Publications...the "Special Issue on Deep-water Ocean Acoustics" in the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America (Vol. 134, No . 4, Pt. 2 of 2 , October20 13...15. SUBJECT TERMS ocean acoustics, deep water acousti c propagati on 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c

  15. Acoustic Characterization of Grass-cover Ground

    2014-11-20

    absorption in the higher frequency limits of the acoustic impedance measurements system compared to dried soil . THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA ...Catholic University of America In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements For the Degree Master of Science By Chelsea Good Washington, D.C 2014...and Hadj Benkreira. Acoustic properties of low grow- ing plants. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America , 133(5):2554–2565, 2013. [4] Jq

  16. Acoustic Casimir Pressure for Arbitrary Media

    Barcenas, J; Esquivel-Sirvent, R

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we derive a general expression for the acoustic Casimir pressure between two parallel slabs made of arbitrary materials and whose acoustic reflection coefficients are not equal. The formalism is based on the calculation of the local density of modes using a Green's function approach. The results for the Casimir acoustic pressure are generalized to a sphere/plate configuration using the proximity theorem

  17. Detecting the Nonlinearity of Fish Acoustic Signals

    REN Xinmin; YIN Li

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the nonlinearity of fish acoustic signals by using the surrogate data method.We compare the difference of three test statistics - time-irreversibility Trey, correlation dimension D2 and auto mutual information function Ⅰbetween the original data and the surrogate data.We come to the conclusion that there exists nonlinearity in the fish acoustic signals and there exist deterministic nonlinear components; therefore nonlinear dynamic theory can be used to analyze fish acoustic signals.

  18. Memory-Effect on Acoustic Cavitation

    Yavaṣ, Oğuz; Leiderer, Paul; Park, Hee K.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Poon, Chie C.; Tam, Andrew C.

    1994-01-01

    The formation of bubbles at a liquid-solid interface due to acoustic cavitation depends particularly on the preconditions of the interface. Here, it wiIl be shown that following laser-induced bubble formation at the interface the acoustic cavitation efficiency is strongly enhanced. Optical reflectance measurements reveal that this observed enhancement of acoustic cavitation due to preceding laser-induced bubble formation, which could be termed as memory effect, decays in a few hundred microse...

  19. Outdoor Synthetic Aperture Acoustic Ground Target Measurements

    2010-04-19

    1341 (2003). [11] C. A. Dimarzio, T. Shi, F. J. Blonigen et al., “ Laser -Induced Acoustic Landmine Detection,” The Journal Of The Acoustical Society...High Frequency A/S Coupling For Ap Buried Landmine Detection Using Laser Doppler Vibrometers,” Proc. SPIE 5415(1), 35-41 (2004). [16] Bishop, S... Dolphin Echolocation Clicks For Target Discrimination,” The Journal Of The Acoustical Society Of America 124(1), 657-666 (2008). [20] Y. Nakamura

  20. Acoustic 3D imaging of dental structures

    Lewis, D.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hume, W.R. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Douglass, G.D. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Our goals for the first year of this three dimensional electodynamic imaging project was to determine how to combine flexible, individual addressable; preprocessing of array source signals; spectral extrapolation or received signals; acoustic tomography codes; and acoustic propagation modeling code. We investigated flexible, individually addressable acoustic array material to find the best match in power, sensitivity and cost and settled on PVDF sheet arrays and 3-1 composite material.

  1. Experimental Acoustic Evaluation of an Auditorium

    Marina Dana Ţopa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a case history: the acoustical analysis of a rectangular auditorium. The following acoustical parameters were evaluated: early decay time, reverberation time, clarity, definition, and center time. The excitation signal was linear sweep sine and additional analysis was carried out: peak-to-noise ratio, reverberation time for empty and occupied room, standard deviation of acoustical parameters, diffusion, and just noticeable differences analysis. Conclusions about room’s destination and modeling were drawn in the end.

  2. Acoustic resonance phase locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-08-19

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell to generate a photoacoustic signal, the acoustic source having a source frequency; continuously measuring detection phase of the photoacoustic signal with respect to source frequency or a harmonic thereof; and employing the measured detection phase to provide magnitude and direction for correcting the source frequency to the resonance frequency.

  3. Acoustic resonance frequency locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-09-09

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell, the acoustic source having a source frequency; repeatedly and continuously sweeping the source frequency across the resonance frequency at a sweep rate; and employing an odd-harmonic of the source frequency sweep rate to maintain the source frequency sweep centered on the resonance frequency.

  4. Acoustic resonance for nonmetallic mine detection

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-04-01

    The feasibility of acoustic resonance for detection of plastic mines was investigated by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Instrumentation and Controls Division under an internally funded program. The data reported in this paper suggest that acoustic resonance is not a practical method for mine detection. Representative small plastic anti-personnel mines were tested, and were found to not exhibit detectable acoustic resonances. Also, non-metal objects known to have strong acoustic resonances were tested with a variety of excitation techniques, and no practical non-contact method of exciting a consistently detectable resonance in a buried object was discovered. Some of the experimental data developed in this work may be useful to other researchers seeking a method to detect buried plastic mines. A number of excitation methods and their pitfalls are discussed. Excitation methods that were investigated include swept acoustic, chopped acoustic, wavelet acoustic, and mechanical shaking. Under very contrived conditions, a weak response that could be attributed to acoustic resonance was observed, but it does not appear to be practical as a mine detection feature. Transfer properties of soil were investigated. Impulse responses of several representative plastic mines were investigated. Acoustic leakage coupling, and its implications as a disruptive mechanism were investigated.

  5. Sonic effervescence: A tutorial on acoustic cavitation

    Apfel, R.E. [Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8286 (United States)

    1997-03-01

    This article on acoustic cavitation is a revision of a tutorial lecture presented at the Acoustical Society of America meeting in Austin, Texas, on 28 November 1994. The general approach adopted here differs from a review article in stressing the overarching themes that come under the category of acoustic cavitation, rather than being an encyclopedic reference on the topic. When possible, specific order-of-magnitude estimates have been given so that the reader can better understand the particular phenomena being described. The basic physics is discussed, and applications are reviewed with the goal of putting them in a useful context. {copyright} {ital 1997 Acoustical Society of America.}

  6. Propagation behavior of acoustic wave in wood

    Huadong Xu; Guoqi Xu; Lihai Wang; Lei Yu

    2014-01-01

    We used acoustic tests on a quarter-sawn poplar timbers to study the effects of wood anisotropy and cavity defects on acoustic wave velocity and travel path, and we investigated acoustic wave propagation behavior in wood. The timber specimens were first tested in unmodified condition and then tested after introduction of cavity defects of varying sizes to quantify the transmitting time of acoustic waves in laboratory conditions. Two-dimensional acoustic wave contour maps on the radial section of specimens were then simulated and analyzed based on the experimental data. We tested the relationship between wood grain and acoustic wave velocity as waves passed in various directions through wood. Wood anisotropy has significant effects on both velocity and travel path of acoustic waves, and the velocity of waves passing longitudinally through timbers exceeded the radial velocity. Moreover, cavity defects altered acoustic wave time contours on radial sections of timbers. Acous-tic wave transits from an excitation point to the region behind a cavity in defective wood more slowly than in intact wood.

  7. Acoustic concerns related to multi cultural societies

    Gade, Anders Christian

    2001-01-01

    Immigration has increased cultural diversity in western societies. The process of integrating immigrants into their host countries can be smoothed if acousticians learn to recognize (1) the acoustic traditions of immigrant cultures and (2) the specific acoustic needs of the new society members. Two...... related projects are discussed. The ``Cahrisma'' project (Conservation of Acoustical Heritage by the Revival and Identification of the Sinan's Mosque Acoustics) is sponsored by the European Commission and carried out in cooperation among researchers in Turkey, Malta, Italy, France, Switzerland...

  8. Acoustics of finite-aperture vortex beams

    Mitri, F G

    2014-01-01

    A method based on the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld surface integral is provided, which makes it feasible to rigorously model, evaluate and compute the acoustic scattering and other mechanical effects of finite-aperture vortex beams such as the acoustic radiation force and torque on a viscoelastic sphere in various applications in acoustic tweezers and microfluidics, particle entrapment, manipulation and rotation. Partial-wave series expansions are derived for the incident field of acoustic spiraling (vortex) beams, comprising high-order Bessel and Bessel-Gauss beams.

  9. Theory of Acoustic Raman Modes in Proteins

    DeWolf, Timothy; Gordon, Reuven

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis that associates the resonances of extraordinary acoustic Raman (EAR) spectroscopy [Wheaton et al., Nat. Photonics 9, 68 (2015)] with the collective modes of proteins. The theory uses the anisotropic elastic network model to find the protein acoustic modes, and calculates Raman intensity by treating the protein as a polarizable ellipsoid. Reasonable agreement is found between EAR spectra and our theory. Protein acoustic modes have been extensively studied theoretically to assess the role they play in protein function; this result suggests EAR spectroscopy as a new experimental tool for studies of protein acoustic modes.

  10. Acoustic characteristics of the water of the Bay of Bengal

    Murty, T.V.R.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Chodankar, P.V.; Murty, C.S.

    Acoustic eigen rays (rays connecting the source and receiver) have been indentified and their turning depth, path length, travel time etc. evaluated. Acoustic intensity loss due to mean environmental conditions, vergence along acoustic rays...

  11. Identification of Acoustic-Vibratory System by Acoustic Measurement

    Takuzo Iwatsubo

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method for reducing ill-conditioning in a class of identification problems is proposed. The key point of the method is that the identified vibration of the sound source is expressed as a superposition of vibration modes. The mathematical property of the coefficient matrix, the practical error expanding ratio, and the stochastic error expanding ratio are investigated in a numerical example. The mode-superposition method is shown to be an effective tool for acoustic-vibratory inverse analysis.

  12. Airy acoustical-sheet spinner tweezers

    Mitri, F. G.

    2016-09-01

    The Airy acoustical beam exhibits parabolic propagation and spatial acceleration, meaning that the propagation bending angle continuously increases before the beam trajectory reaches a critical angle where it decays after a propagation distance, without applying any external bending force. As such, it is of particular importance to investigate its properties from the standpoint of acoustical radiation force, spin torque, and particle dynamics theories, in the development of novel particle sorting techniques and acoustically mediated clearing systems. This work investigates these effects on a two-dimensional (2D) circular absorptive structure placed in the field of a nonparaxial Airy "acoustical-sheet" (i.e., finite beam in 2D), for potential applications in surface acoustic waves and acousto-fluidics. Based on the characteristics of the acoustic field, the beam is capable of manipulating the circular cylindrical fluid cross-section and guides it along a transverse or parabolic trajectory. This feature of Airy acoustical beams could lead to a unique characteristic in single-beam acoustical tweezers related to acoustical sieving, filtering, and removal of particles and cells from a section of a small channel. The analysis developed here is based on the description of the nonparaxial Airy beam using the angular spectrum decomposition of plane waves in close association with the partial-wave series expansion method in cylindrical coordinates. The numerical results demonstrate the ability of the nonparaxial Airy acoustical-sheet beam to pull, propel, or accelerate a particle along a parabolic trajectory, in addition to particle confinement in the transverse direction of wave propagation. Negative or positive radiation force and spin torque causing rotation in the clockwise or the anticlockwise direction can occur depending on the nondimensional parameter ka (where k is the wavenumber and a is the radius) and the location of the cylinder in the beam. Applications in

  13. Liquid rocket combustion chamber acoustic characterization

    Cândido Magno de Souza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 40 years, many solid and liquid rocket motors have experienced combustion instabilities. Among other causes, there is the interaction of acoustic modes with the combustion and/or fluid dynamic processes inside the combustion chamber. Studies have been showing that, even if less than 1% of the available energy is diverted to an acoustic mode, combustion instability can be generated. On one hand, this instability can lead to ballistic pressure changes, couple with other propulsion systems such as guidance or thrust vector control, and in the worst case, cause motor structural failure. In this case, measures, applying acoustic techniques, must be taken to correct/minimize these influences on the combustion. The combustion chamber acoustic behavior in operating conditions can be estimated by considering its behavior in room conditions. In this way, acoustic tests can be easily performed, thus identifying the cavity modes. This paper describes the procedures to characterize the acoustic behavior in the inner cavity of four different configurations of a combustion chamber. Simple analytical models are used to calculate the acoustic resonance frequencies and these results are compared with acoustic natural frequencies measured at room conditions. Some comments about the measurement procedures are done, as well as the next steps for the continuity of this research. The analytical and experimental procedures results showed good agreement. However, limitations on high frequency band as well as in the identification of specific kinds of modes indicate that numerical methods able to model the real cavity geometry and an acoustic experimental modal analysis may be necessary for a more complete analysis. Future works shall also consider the presence of passive acoustic devices such as baffles and resonators capable of introducing damping and avoiding or limiting acoustic instabilities.

  14. Identification of Turbomachinery Noise Sources Using Acoustical Holography Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Evaluation and enhancement of the acoustical performance of turbomachinery requires knowledge of the acoustic sources. However, the noise generation mechanisms...

  15. An overview of acoustic telemetry

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    Acoustic telemetry has been a dream of the drilling industry for the past 50 years. It offers the promise of data rates which are one-hundred times greater than existing technology. Such a system would open the door to true logging-while-drilling technology and bring enormous profits to its developers. The basic idea is to produce an encoded sound wave at the bottom of the well, let it propagate up the steel drillpipe, and extract the data from the signal at the surface. Unfortunately, substantial difficulties arise. The first difficult problem is to produce the sound wave. Since the most promising transmission wavelengths are about 20 feet, normal transducer efficiencies are quire low. Compounding this problem is the structural complexity of the bottomhole assembly and drillstring. For example, the acoustic impedance of the drillstring changes every 30 feet and produces an unusual scattering pattern in the acoustic transmission. This scattering pattern causes distortion of the signal and is often confused with signal attenuation. These problems are not intractable. Recent work has demonstrated that broad frequency bands exist which are capable of transmitting data at rates up to 100 bits per second. Our work has also identified the mechanism which is responsible for the observed anomalies in the patterns of signal attenuation. Furthermore in the past few years a body of experience has been developed in designing more efficient transducers for application to metal waveguides. The direction of future work is clear. New transducer designs which are more efficient and compatible with existing downhole power supplies need to be built and tested; existing field test data need to be analyzed for transmission bandwidth and attenuation; and the new and less expensive methods of collecting data on transmission path quality need to be incorporated into this effort. 11 refs.

  16. Superhigh Temperatures and Acoustic Cavitation

    Belyaev, V B; Miller, M B; Sermyagin, A V; Topolnikov, A S

    2003-01-01

    The experimental results on thermonuclear synthesis under acoustic cavitation have been analyzed with the account of the latest data and their discussion. The analysis testifies that this avenue of research is a very promising one. The numerical calculations of the D(d, n)^{3}He reaction rate in the deuterated acetone (C_{3}D_{6}O) under the influence of ultrasound depending on T environment temperature within the range T=249-295 K have been carried out within the framework of hydrodynamic model. The results show that it is possible to improve substantially the effect/background relationship in experiments by decreasing the fluid temperature twenty-thirty degrees below zero.

  17. Surface Acoustic Wave Frequency Comb

    Savchenkov, A A; Ilchenko, V S; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2011-01-01

    We report on realization of an efficient triply-resonant coupling between two long lived optical modes and a high frequency surface acoustic wave (SAW) mode of the same monolithic crystalline whispering gallery mode resonator. The coupling results in an opto-mechanical oscillation and generation of a monochromatic SAW. A strong nonlinear interaction of this mechanical mode with other equidistant SAW modes leads to mechanical hyper-parametric oscillation and generation of a SAW pulse train and associated frequency comb in the resonator. We visualized the comb observing the modulation of the modulated light escaping the resonator.

  18. Acoustic emission methodology and application

    Nazarchuk, Zinoviy; Serhiyenko, Oleh

    2017-01-01

    This monograph analyses in detail the physical aspects of the elastic waves radiation during deformation or fracture of materials. I presents the  methodological bases for the practical use of acoustic emission device, and describes the results of theoretical and experimental researches of evaluation of the crack growth resistance of materials, selection of the useful AE signals. The efficiency of this methodology is shown through the diagnostics of various-purpose industrial objects. The authors obtain results of experimental researches with the help of the new methods and facilities.

  19. Physical acoustics principles and methods

    Mason, Warren P

    1964-01-01

    Physical Acoustics: Principles and Methods, Volume l-Part A focuses on high frequency sound waves in gases, liquids, and solids that have been proven as powerful tools in analyzing the molecular, defect, domain wall, and other types of motions. The selection first tackles wave propagation in fluids and normal solids and guided wave propagation in elongated cylinders and plates. Discussions focus on fundamentals of continuum mechanics; small-amplitude waves in a linear viscoelastic medium; representation of oscillations and waves; and special effects associated with guided elastic waves in plat

  20. OFDM for underwater acoustic communications

    Zhou, Shengli

    2014-01-01

    A blend of introductory material and advanced signal processing and communication techniques, of critical importance to underwater system and network development This book, which is the first to describe the processing techniques central to underwater OFDM, is arranged into four distinct sections: First, it describes the characteristics of underwater acoustic channels, and stresses the difference from wireless radio channels. Then it goes over the basics of OFDM and channel coding. The second part starts with an overview of the OFDM receiver, and develops various modules for the receiver des

  1. Sonochemistry and the acoustic bubble

    Grieser, Franz; Enomoto, Naoya; Harada, Hisashi; Okitsu, Kenji; Yasui, Kyuichi

    2015-01-01

    Sonochemistry and the Acoustic Bubble provides an introduction to the way ultrasound acts on bubbles in a liquid to cause bubbles to collapse violently, leading to localized 'hot spots' in the liquid with temperatures of 5000° celcius and under pressures of several hundred atmospheres. These extreme conditions produce events such as the emission of light, sonoluminescence, with a lifetime of less than a nanosecond, and free radicals that can initiate a host of varied chemical reactions (sonochemistry) in the liquid, all at room temperature. The physics and chemistry behind the p

  2. Introducing passive acoustic filter in acoustic based condition monitoring: Motor bike piston-bore fault identification

    Jena, D. P.; Panigrahi, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    Requirement of designing a sophisticated digital band-pass filter in acoustic based condition monitoring has been eliminated by introducing a passive acoustic filter in the present work. So far, no one has attempted to explore the possibility of implementing passive acoustic filters in acoustic based condition monitoring as a pre-conditioner. In order to enhance the acoustic based condition monitoring, a passive acoustic band-pass filter has been designed and deployed. Towards achieving an efficient band-pass acoustic filter, a generalized design methodology has been proposed to design and optimize the desired acoustic filter using multiple filter components in series. An appropriate objective function has been identified for genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization technique with multiple design constraints. In addition, the sturdiness of the proposed method has been demonstrated in designing a band-pass filter by using an n-branch Quincke tube, a high pass filter and multiple Helmholtz resonators. The performance of the designed acoustic band-pass filter has been shown by investigating the piston-bore defect of a motor-bike using engine noise signature. On the introducing a passive acoustic filter in acoustic based condition monitoring reveals the enhancement in machine learning based fault identification practice significantly. This is also a first attempt of its own kind.

  3. Enhanced Acoustic Emission in Relation to the Acoustic Halo Surrounding Active Region 11429

    Hanson, Chris S; Leka, K D

    2015-01-01

    The use of acoustic holography in the high-frequency $p$-mode spectrum can resolve the source distributions of enhanced acoustic emissions within halo structures surrounding active regions. In doing so, statistical methods can then be applied to ascertain relationships with the magnetic field. This is the focus of this study. The mechanism responsible for the detected enhancement of acoustic sources around solar active regions has not yet been explained. Furthermore the relationship between the magnetic field and enhanced acoustic emission has not yet been comprehensively examined. We have used vector magnetograms from the \\Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to image the magnetic-field properties in the halo. We have studied the acoustic morphology of an active region, with a complex halo and "glories," and we have linked some acoustic properties to the magnetic-field configuration. In particular, we find that acoustic sources are significantly enhanced in reg...

  4. On Collisionless Damping of Ion Acoustic Waves

    Jensen, Vagn Orla; Petersen, P.I.

    1973-01-01

    Exact theoretical treatments show that the damping of ion acoustic waves in collisionless plasmas does not vanish when the derivative of the undisturbed distribution function at the phase velocity equals zero.......Exact theoretical treatments show that the damping of ion acoustic waves in collisionless plasmas does not vanish when the derivative of the undisturbed distribution function at the phase velocity equals zero....

  5. Room acoustic properties of concert halls

    Gade, Anders Christian

    1996-01-01

    A large database of values of various room acoustic parameters has provided the basis for statistical analyses of how and how much the acoustic properties of concert halls are influenced by their size, shape, and absorption area (as deduced from measured reverberation time). The data have been...

  6. An Optimisation Approach for Room Acoustics Design

    Holm-Jørgensen, Kristian; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Andersen, Lars

    2005-01-01

    This paper discuss on a conceptual level the value of optimisation techniques in architectural acoustics room design from a practical point of view. It is chosen to optimise one objective room acoustics design criterium estimated from the sound field inside the room. The sound field is modeled...

  7. Acoustics in rock and pop music halls

    Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert; Gade, Anders Christian

    2007-01-01

    The existing body of literature regarding the acoustic design of concert halls has focused almost exclusively on classical music, although there are many more performances of rhythmic music, including rock and pop. Objective measurements were made of the acoustics of twenty rock music venues...

  8. Design basis of industrial acoustic separators

    Cappon, H.J.; Keesman, K.J.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the process of obtaining a basic design for an industrial scale acoustic separator based on flow characteristics inside the separation chamber, on acoustic analysis within the chamber and calculated particle trajectories combining these two analyses. Adequate criteria for subsequ

  9. An acoustical model based monitoring network

    Wessels, P.W.; Basten, T.G.H.; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the approach for an acoustical model based monitoring network is demonstrated. This network is capable of reconstructing a noise map, based on the combination of measured sound levels and an acoustic model of the area. By pre-calculating the sound attenuation within the network the noi

  10. Environmental Fluctuations and Acoustic Data Communications

    2015-09-30

    GOALS Couple together analytical and numerical modeling of oceanographic and surface wave processes, acoustic propagation modeling, statistical...acoustic digital data communication systems in shallow water. OBJECTIVES Develop analytical /numerical models, validated with experimental data...simplified geometry simulated. An asymmetric source- receiver geometry results in a striation pattern that is dominated by upward or downward

  11. Nonadhesive acoustic membranes based on polyimide

    Vorob'ev A.V.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a comparison of technical characteristics of acoustic membranes with an adhesive layer and nonadhesive membranes. The authors present the manufacturing technology for acoustic membranes based on aluminum-polyimide film dielectrics and analyze the advantages of such membranes in comparison to other sound emitters.

  12. Acoustic characteristics of Danish infant directed speech

    Bohn, Ocke-Schwen

    2013-01-01

    Danish presents several challenges for language learners, such as a very densely packed upper portion of the acoustic vowel space, and a sibilant contrast that is acoustically less distinct than in e.g. English. The present study examined whether Danish caregivers enhance Danish contrasts when......'s receptive vocabulary knowledge....

  13. Acoustic power measurements of oscillating flames

    Valk, M.

    1981-01-01

    The acoustic power of an oscillating flame is measured. A turbulent premixed propane/air flame is situated near a pressure antinode of a standing wave in a laboratory combustion chamber. This standing wave is generated by a piston. The fluctuating heat release of the flame will supply acoustic power

  14. Spectral statistics of the acoustic stadium

    Méndez-Sánchez, R. A.; Báez, G.; Leyvraz, F.; Seligman, T. H.

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the normal-mode frequencies and wave amplitudes of the two-dimensional acoustical stadium. We also obtain the statistical properties of the acoustical spectrum and show that they agree with the results given by random matrix theory. Some normal-mode wave amplitudes showing scarring are presented.

  15. Experimental Verification of Acoustic Impedance Inversion

    郭永刚; 王宁; 林俊轩

    2003-01-01

    Well controlled model experiments were carried out to verify acoustic impedance inversion scheme, and different methods of extracting impulse responses were investigated by practical data. The acoustic impedance profiles reconstructed from impulse responses are in good agreement with the measured value and theoretical value.

  16. Performance of several viscothermal acoustic finite elements

    Kampinga, W.R.; Wijnant, Y.H.; Boer, de A.

    2010-01-01

    Viscothermal acoustics can be described by the linearized Navier Stokes equations. Besides inertia and compressibility, these equations take the heat conductivity and the viscosity of the medium (air) into account. These 'viscothermal' effects are significant in, for example, miniature acoustic tran

  17. Acoustic Pattern Recognition on Android Devices

    Møller, Maiken Bjerg; Gaarsdal, Jesper; Steen, Kim Arild

    2013-01-01

    an Android application developed for acoustic pattern recognition of bird species. The acoustic data is recorded using a built-in microphone, and pattern recognition is performed on the device, requiring no network connection. The algorithm is implemented in C++ as a native Android module and the Open...

  18. Three-dimensional nonlinear acoustical holography

    Niu, Yaying

    Nearfield Acoustical Holography (NAH) is an acoustic field visualization technique that can be used to reconstruct three-dimensional (3-D) acoustic fields by projecting two-dimensional (2-D) data measured on a hologram surface. However, linear NAH algorithms developed and improved by many researchers can result in significant reconstruction errors when they are applied to reconstruct 3-D acoustic fields that are radiated from a high-level noise source and include significant nonlinear components. Here, planar, nonlinear acoustical holography procedures are developed that can be used to reconstruct 3-D, nonlinear acoustic fields radiated from a high-level noise source based on 2-D acoustic pressure data measured on a hologram surface. The first nonlinear acoustic holography procedure is derived for reconstructing steady-state acoustic pressure fields by applying perturbation and renormalization methods to nonlinear, dissipative, pressure-based Westervelt Wave Equation (WWE). The nonlinear acoustic pressure fields radiated from a high-level pulsating sphere and an infinite-size, vibrating panel are used to validate this procedure. Although the WWE-based algorithm is successfully validated by those two numerical simulations, it still has several limitations: (1) Only the fundamental frequency and its second harmonic nonlinear components can be reconstructed; (2) the application of this algorithm is limited to mono-frequency source cases; (3) the effects of bent wave rays caused by transverse particle velocities are not included; (4) only acoustic pressure fields can be reconstructed. In order to address the limitations of the steady-state, WWE-based procedure, a transient, planar, nonlinear acoustic holography algorithm is developed that can be used to reconstruct 3-D nonlinear acoustic pressure and particle velocity fields. This procedure is based on Kuznetsov Wave Equation (KWE) that is directly solved by using temporal and spatial Fourier Transforms. When compared

  19. Worship space acoustics 3 decades of design

    Ryherd, Erica; Ronsse, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    This book takes the reader on a wide-ranging tour through churches, synagogues, mosques, and other worship spaces designed during the past 30 years. The book begins with a series of essays on topics ranging from the soundscape of worship spaces to ecclesiastical design at the turn of the 21st Century. Perspective pieces from an architect, audio designer, music director, and worship space owner are also included. The core of the book presents the acoustical and architectural design of a wide variety of individual worship space venues. Acoustical consulting firms, architects, and worship space designers from across the world contributed their recent innovative works in the area of worship space acoustics. The contributions include detailed renderings and architectural drawings, as well as informative acoustic data graphs and evocative descriptions of the spaces. Filled with beautiful photography and fascinating modern design, this book is a must-read for anyone interested in religious architecture, acoustical d...

  20. Pulsed-Source Interferometry in Acoustic Imaging

    Shcheglov, Kirill; Gutierrez, Roman; Tang, Tony K.

    2003-01-01

    A combination of pulsed-source interferometry and acoustic diffraction has been proposed for use in imaging subsurface microscopic defects and other features in such diverse objects as integrated-circuit chips, specimens of materials, and mechanical parts. A specimen to be inspected by this technique would be mounted with its bottom side in contact with an acoustic transducer driven by a continuous-wave acoustic signal at a suitable frequency, which could be as low as a megahertz or as high as a few hundred gigahertz. The top side of the specimen would be coupled to an object that would have a flat (when not vibrating) top surface and that would serve as the acoustical analog of an optical medium (in effect, an acoustical "optic").

  1. Product Sound: Acoustically pleasant motor drives

    Mathe, Laszlo

    The work in this thesis is focused on the acoustic noise generated by electrical motors driven by a pulse width modulated (PWM) power electronic inverter. In a usual inverter based electrical drive, the modulation uses fixed switching frequency; that introduces a set of harmonics in the acoustic...... spectra transforming the acoustic noise generated by the motor in a strong whistling noise. To maintain high efficiency for the entire drive, the switching frequency is typically kept around 4 kHz. However, this is the range where the human ear is the most sensitive. The main goal of this thesis...... is to ameliorate this whistling acoustic noise, while maintaining the efficiency of the drive. The first chapter of the report is an introductory chapter where the motivation, objectives, limitations and an overview on electrical motor acoustics are presented. A list of main contributions of this PhD project...

  2. International Conference on Acoustics and Vibration

    Chaari, Fakher; Walha, Lasaad; Abdennadher, Moez; Abbes, Mohamed; Haddar, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    The book provides readers with a snapshot of recent research and industrial trends in field of industrial acoustics and vibration. Each chapter, accepted after a rigorous peer-review process, reports on a selected, original piece of work presented and discussed at International Conference on Acoustics and Vibration (ICAV2016), which was organized by the Tunisian Association of Industrial Acoustics and Vibration (ATAVI) and held March 21-23, in Hammamet, Tunisia. The contributions, mainly written by north African authors, covers advances in both theory and practice in a variety of subfields, such as: smart materials and structures; fluid-structure interaction; structural acoustics as well as computational vibro-acoustics and numerical methods. Further topics include: engines control, noise identification, robust design, flow-induced vibration and many others.This book provides a valuable resource for both academics and professionals dealing with diverse issues in applied mechanics. By combining advanced theori...

  3. Acoustic rainbow trapping by coiling up space

    Ni, Xu

    2014-11-13

    We numerically realize the acoustic rainbow trapping effect by tapping an air waveguide with space-coiling metamaterials. Due to the high refractive-index of the space-coiling metamaterials, our device is more compact compared to the reported trapped-rainbow devices. A numerical model utilizing effective parameters is also calculated, whose results are consistent well with the direct numerical simulation of space-coiling structure. Moreover, such device with the capability of dropping different frequency components of a broadband incident temporal acoustic signal into different channels can function as an acoustic wavelength division de-multiplexer. These results may have potential applications in acoustic device design such as an acoustic filter and an artificial cochlea.

  4. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, Carol

    2010-06-08

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  5. Unexpectedly Large Surface Gravities for Acoustic Horizons?

    Liberati, S; Visser, M; Liberati, Stefano; Sonego, Sebastiano; Visser, Matt

    2000-01-01

    Acoustic black holes are fluid dynamic analogs of general relativistic black holes, wherein the behaviour of sound waves in a moving fluid acts as an analog for scalar fields propagating in a gravitational background. Acoustic horizons possess many of the properties more normally associated with the event horizons of general relativity, up to and including Hawking radiation. They have received much attention because it would seem to be much easier to experimentally create an acoustic horizon than to create an event horizon. We wish to point out some potential difficulties (and opportunities) in actually setting up an experiment that possesses an acoustic horizon. We show that in zero-viscosity, stationary fluid flow with generic boundary conditions, the creation of an acoustic horizon is accompanied by a formally infinite ``surface gravity'', and a formally infinite Hawking flux. Only by applying a suitable non-constant external body force, and for very specific boundary conditions on the flow, can these quan...

  6. Acoustic propagation in a rigid torus

    El-Raheb, M.; Wagner, P.

    1982-01-01

    The acoustic propagation in a rigid torus is analyzed using a Green's function method. Three types of surface elements are developed; a flat quadrilateral element used in modeling polygonal cavities, a curved conical element appropriate for surfaces with one curvature, and a toroidal element developed for such doubly curved surfaces as the torus. Curved elements are necessary since the acoustic pressure is sensitive to slope discontinuities between consecutive surface elements especially near cavity resonances. The acoustic characteristics of the torus are compared to those of a bend of square cross section for a frequency range that includes the transverse acoustic resonance. Two equivalences between the different sections are tested; the first conserves curvature and cross-sectional dimension while the second matches transverse resonance and duct volume. The second equivalence accurately matches the acoustic characteristics of the torus up to the cutoff frequency corresponding to a mode with two circumferential waves.

  7. 30th International Acoustical Imaging Symposium

    Jones, Joie; Lee, Hua

    2011-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2009 the 30th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Monterey, CA, USA, March 1-4. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 30 in the Series contains an excellent collection of forty three papers presented in five major categories: Biomedical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation Systems Analysis Signal Analysis and Image Processing Audience Researchers in medical imaging and biomedical instrumentation experts.

  8. An introduction to acoustic emission

    Scruby, C. B.

    1987-08-01

    The technique of acoustic emission (AE) uses one or more sensors to 'listen' to a wide range of events that may take place inside a solid material. Depending on the source of this high frequency sound, there are broadly three application areas: structural testing and surveillance, process monitoring and control, and materials characterization. In the first case the source is probably a defect which radiates elastic waves as it grows. Provided these waves are detectable, AE can be used in conjunction with other NDT techniques to assess structural integrity. Advances in deterministic and statistical analysis methods now enable data to be interpreted in greater detail and with more confidence than before. In the second area the acoustic signature of processes is monitored, ranging from for instance the machining of metallic components to the mixing of foodstuffs, and changes correlated with variations in the process, with the potential for feedback and process control. In the third area, AE is used as an additional diagnostic technique for the study of, for instance, fracture, because it gives unique dynamic information on defect growth.

  9. Acoustic image-processing software

    Several algorithims that display, enhance and analyze side-scan sonar images of the seafloor, have been developed by the University of Washington, Seattle, as part of an Office of Naval Research funded program in acoustic image analysis. One of these programs, PORTAL, is a small (less than 100K) image display and enhancement program that can run on MS-DOS computers with VGA boards. This program is now available in the public domain for general use in acoustic image processing.PORTAL is designed to display side-scan sonar data that is stored in most standard formats, including SeaMARC I, II, 150 and GLORIA data. (See image.) In addition to the “standard” formats, PORTAL has a module “front end” that allows the user to modify the program to accept other image formats. In addition to side-scan sonar data, the program can also display digital optical images from scanners and “framegrabbers,” gridded bathymetry data from Sea Beam and other sources, and potential field (magnetics/gravity) data. While limited in image analysis capability, the program allows image enhancement by histogram manipulation, and basic filtering operations, including multistage filtering. PORTAL can print reasonably high-quality images on Postscript laser printers and lower-quality images on non-Postscript printers with HP Laserjet emulation. Images suitable only for index sheets are also possible on dot matrix printers.

  10. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses: Reverberant Acoustic Testing (RAT) vs. Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecraft, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structural responses, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The speaker testing was performed using multi-input-single-output (MISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) control schemes with and without the test articles. In this paper the spatial variation of the acoustic field due to acoustic standing waves and their impacts on the structural responses in RAT and DFAT (both using MISO and MIMO controls for DFAT) are discussed in some detail.

  11. A membrane-type acoustic metamaterial with adjustable acoustic properties

    Langfeldt, F.; Riecken, J.; Gleine, W.; von Estorff, O.

    2016-07-01

    A new realization of a membrane-type acoustic metamaterial (MAM) with adjustable sound transmission properties is presented. The proposed design distinguishes itself from other realizations by a stacked arrangement of two MAMs which is inflated using pressurized air. The static pressurization leads to large nonlinear deformations and, consequently, geometrical stiffening of the MAMs which is exploited to adjust the eigenmodes and sound transmission loss of the structure. A theoretical analysis of the proposed inflatable MAM design using numerical and analytical models is performed in order to identify two important mechanisms, namely the shifting of the eigenfrequencies and modal residuals due to the pressurization, responsible for the transmission loss adjustment. Analytical formulas are provided for predicting the eigenmode shifting and normal incidence sound transmission loss of inflated single and double MAMs using the concept of effective mass. The investigations are concluded with results from a test sample measurement inside an impedance tube, which confirm the theoretical predictions.

  12. An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1992-03-24

    Acoustic telemetry has been a dream of the drilling industry for the past 50 years. It offers the promise of data rates which are one-hundred times greater than existing technology. Such a system would open the door to true logging-while-drilling technology and bring enormous profits to its developers. The oil and gas industry has led in most of the attempts to develop this type of telemetry system; however, very substantial efforts have also been made through government sponsored work in the geothermal industry. None of these previous attempts have lead to a commercial telemetry system. Conceptually, the problem looks easy. The basic idea is to produce an encoded sound wave at the bottom of the well, let it propagate up the steel drillpipe, and extract the data from the signal at the surface. Unfortunately, substantial difficulties arise. The first difficult problem is to produce the sound wave. Since the most promising transmission wavelengths are about 20 feet, normal transducer efficiencies are quite low. Compounding this problem is the structural complexity of the bottomhole assembly and drillstring. For example, the acoustic impedance of the drillstring changes every 30 feet and produces an unusual scattering pattern in the acoustic transmission. This scattering pattern causes distortion of the signal and is often confused with signal attenuation. These problems are not intractable. Recent work has demonstrated that broad frequency bands exist which are capable of transmitting data at rates up to 100 bits per second. Our work has also identified the mechanism which is responsible for the observed anomalies in the patterns of signal attenuation. Furthermore in the past few years a body of experience has been developed in designing more efficient transducers for application to metal Waveguides. The direction of future work is clear. New transducer designs which are more efficient and compatible with existing downhole power supplies need to be built and tested

  13. Acoustical studies on corrugated tubes

    Balaguru, Rajavel

    Corrugated tubes and pipes offer greater global flexibility combined with local rigidity. They are used in numerous engineering applications such as vacuum cleaner hosing, air conditioning systems of aircraft and automobiles, HVAC control systems of heating ducts in buildings, compact heat exchangers, medical equipment and offshore gas and oil transportation flexible riser pipelines. Recently there has been a renewed research interest in analyzing the flow through a corrugated tube to understand the underlying mechanism of so called whistling, although the whistling in such a tube was identified in early twentieth century. The phenomenon of whistling in a corrugated tube is interesting because an airflow through a smooth walled tube of similar dimensions will not generate any whistling tones. Study of whistling in corrugated tubes is important because, it not only causes an undesirable noise problem but also results in flow-acoustic coupling. Such a coupling can cause significant structural vibrations due to flow-acoustic-structure interaction. This interaction would cause flow-induced vibrations that could result in severe damage to mechanical systems having corrugated tubes. In this research work, sound generation (whistling) in corrugated tubes due to airflow is analyzed using experimental as well as Computational Fluid Dynamics-Large Eddy Simulation (CFD-LES) techniques. Sound generation mechanisms resulting in whistling have been investigated. The whistling in terms of frequencies and sound pressure levels for different flow velocities are studied. The analytical and experimental studies are carried out to understand the influence of various parameters of corrugated tubes such as cavity length, cavity width, cavity depth, pitch, Reynolds numbers and number of corrugations. The results indicate that there is a good agreement between theoretically calculated, computationally predicted and experimentally measured whistling frequencies and sound pressure levels

  14. The Acoustical Properties of Indonesian Hardwood Species

    Tarcisius Rio Mardikanto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The acoustical properties of four Indonesian tropical hardwood species were evaluated in this study. The objectives of this study were to determine acoustical parameters e.g. logarithmic decrement, sound absorption, sound velocity as well as density and wood stiffness; and to evaluate the potential of those species for acoustical purposes. Sonokeling (Dalbergia latifolia, Mahoni (Swietenia mahagony, Acacia (Acacia mangium and Manii wood (Maesopsis eminii were selected in this research. Three different cutting plane patterns of sawn timber (quarter-sawn, flat-sawn, and plain-sawn were converted into small specimens. The methods for determining acoustical properties were longitudinal vibration testing and time of flight of ultrasonic wave method. The result showed no significant difference (α=0.05 of acoustical properties in logarithmic decrement, sound absorption, and ultrasonic velocity means on quarter-sawn, flat-sawn, and plain-sawn for all wood species tested. We found that Mahoni and Sonokeling had good acoustical properties of logarithmic decrement, ultrasonic wave velocity, and ratio of wood stiffness to wood density; and is preferred for crafting musical instruments. Acacia and Manii woods are recommended for developing acoustic panels in building construction because those species possess higher sound absorption values.

  15. Material fabrication using acoustic radiation forces

    Sinha, Naveen N.; Sinha, Dipen N.; Goddard, Gregory Russ

    2015-12-01

    Apparatus and methods for using acoustic radiation forces to order particles suspended in a host liquid are described. The particles may range in size from nanometers to millimeters, and may have any shape. The suspension is placed in an acoustic resonator cavity, and acoustical energy is supplied thereto using acoustic transducers. The resulting pattern may be fixed by using a solidifiable host liquid, forming thereby a solid material. Patterns may be quickly generated; typical times ranging from a few seconds to a few minutes. In a one-dimensional arrangement, parallel layers of particles are formed. With two and three dimensional transducer arrangements, more complex particle configurations are possible since different standing-wave patterns may be generated in the resonator. Fabrication of periodic structures, such as metamaterials, having periods tunable by varying the frequency of the acoustic waves, on surfaces or in bulk volume using acoustic radiation forces, provides great flexibility in the creation of new materials. Periodicities may range from millimeters to sub-micron distances, covering a large portion of the range for optical and acoustical metamaterials.

  16. Digital electrostatic acoustic transducer array

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo

    2016-12-19

    In this paper we present the fabrication and characterization of an array of electrostatic acoustic transducers. The array is micromachined on a silicon wafer using standard micro-machining techniques. Each array contains 2n electrostatic transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a hexagonal membrane shape structure, which is separated from the substrate by 3µm air gap. The membrane is made out 5µm thick polyimide layer that has a bottom gold electrode on the substrate and a gold top electrode on top of the membrane (250nm). The wafer layout design was diced in nine chips with different array configurations, with variation of the membrane dimensions. The device was tested with 90 V giving and sound output level as high as 35dB, while actuating all the elements at the same time.

  17. Acoustical coupling of lizard eardrums

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Manley, Geoffrey A

    2008-01-01

    Lizard ears are clear examples of two-input pressure-difference receivers, with up to 40-dB differences in eardrum vibration amplitude in response to ipsi- and contralateral stimulus directions. The directionality is created by acoustical coupling of the eardrums and interaction of the direct...... and indirect sound components on the eardrum. The ensuing pressure-difference characteristics generate the highest directionality of any similar-sized terrestrial vertebrate ear. The aim of the present study was to measure the gain of the direct and indirect sound components in three lizard species: Anolis...... sagrei and Basiliscus vittatus (iguanids) and Hemidactylus frenatus (gekkonid) by laser vibrometry, using either free-field sound or a headphone and coupler for stimulation. The directivity of the ear of these lizards is pronounced in the frequency range from 2 to 5 kHz. The directivity is ovoidal...

  18. Tinnitus pitch and acoustic trauma

    Cahani, M.; Paul, G.; Shahar, A.

    1983-01-01

    Fifty-six subjects complaining of tinnitus underwent an audiometric test and a test for identifying the analogous pitch of their tinnitus. All of the subjects reported that they had been exposed to noise in the past. The subjects were divided into two groups on the basis of their audiometric test results. Group P was composed of subjects who showed a sensorineural hearing loss typical of acoustic trauma. Group N was composed of subjects whose hearing was within normal limits. The pitch of the tinnitus in group P was concentrated in the high-frequency range, whereas in group N tinnitus pitch values were distributed over the low and mid-audiometric frequency spectrum. It was deduced that different processes are involved in the generation of tinnitus in the two groups.

  19. Nonlinear acoustic propagation in rectangular ducts

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Tsai, M.-S.

    1974-01-01

    The method of multiple scales is used to obtain a second-order uniformly valid expansion for nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in a rectangular duct whose walls are treated with a nonlinear acoustic material. The wave propagation in the duct is characterized by the unsteady nonlinear Euler equations. The results show that nonlinear materials attenuate sound more than linear materials except at high acoustic frequencies. The nonlinear materials produce higher and combination tones which have higher attenuation rates than the fundamentals. Moreover, the attenuation rates of the fundamentals increase with increasing amplitude.

  20. Application of holography in jet acoustic studies

    G Pundarika; R Lakshminarayana; T S Sheshadri

    2004-08-01

    Source strength distribution on a jet boundary was obtained from measurements using the principle of acoustic holography. Measurements were conducted in an open field. Measurement of acoustic pressure on a cylindrical twodimensional contour located close to the vibrating jet boundary was used to obtain the acoustic source strength distribution at the jet boundary. Particular attention was focussed on back projection of the sound field on to a cylindrical surface. A jet emanating from 5 mm convergent nozzle was used for the holography experiments, assuming axisymmetry. Experimental results were compared with results obtained from holography

  1. An acoustic double fishnet using Helmholtz resonators.

    Murray, A R J; Summers, I R; Sambles, J R; Hibbins, A P

    2014-09-01

    The acoustic transmission of a closely spaced pair of patterned and perforated rigid plates is explored in air. The structure resembles an acoustic double fishnet design, with each plate modified such that the gap between them acts as an array of Helmholtz resonators. This allows the center frequency of the stop band to be reduced by a factor greater than 2 from the value obtained for the conventional acoustic double fishnet design. Experimental results accord well with the predictions of a finite element model.

  2. Inverse potential scattering in duct acoustics.

    Forbes, Barbara J; Pike, E Roy; Sharp, David B; Aktosun, Tuncay

    2006-01-01

    The inverse problem of the noninvasive measurement of the shape of an acoustical duct in which one-dimensional wave propagation can be assumed is examined within the theoretical framework of the governing Klein-Gordon equation. Previous deterministic methods developed over the last 40 years have all required direct measurement of the reflectance or input impedance but now, by application of the methods of inverse quantum scattering to the acoustical system, it is shown that the reflectance can be algorithmically derived from the radiated wave. The potential and area functions of the duct can subsequently be reconstructed. The results are discussed with particular reference to acoustic pulse reflectometry.

  3. A novel broadband waterborne acoustic absorber

    Wang, Changxian; Wen, Weibin; Huang, Yixing; Chen, Mingji; Lei, Hongshuai; Fang, Daining

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we extended the ray tracing theory in polar coordinate system, and originally proposed the Snell-Descartes law in polar coordinates. Based on these theories, a novel broadband waterborne acoustic absorber device was proposed. This device is designed with gradient-distributing materials along radius, which makes the incidence acoustic wave ray warps. The echo reduction effects of this device were investigated by finite element analysis, and the numerical results show that the reflectivity of acoustic wave for the new device is lower than that of homogenous and Alberich layers in almost all frequency 0-30 kHz at the same loss factor.

  4. Acoustic focusing by metal circular ring structure

    Xia, Jian-Ping; Sun, Hong-Xiang

    2015-02-01

    We report an exotic acoustic focusing effect through a simple brass circular ring structure immersed in water. The acoustic waves can be focused on a prefect point at the centre of the ring structure. This exotic acoustic focusing phenomenon arises from the intrinsic modes in the ring structure at some special eigenfrequencies, which is essentially distinct from the previous studies originating from the negative refraction. The focusing effect is closely related to the size and shape of the ring structure. Interesting applications of the focusing mechanism in black box detectors in the sea and medical ultrasound treatment are further discussed.

  5. Energy based prediction models for building acoustics

    Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    In order to reach robust and simplified yet accurate prediction models, energy based principle are commonly used in many fields of acoustics, especially in building acoustics. This includes simple energy flow models, the framework of statistical energy analysis (SEA) as well as more elaborated...... principles as, e.g., wave intensity analysis (WIA). The European standards for building acoustic predictions, the EN 12354 series, are based on energy flow and SEA principles. In the present paper, different energy based prediction models are discussed and critically reviewed. Special attention is placed...

  6. Optical and opto-acoustic interventional imaging.

    Sarantopoulos, Athanasios; Beziere, Nicolas; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2012-02-01

    Many clinical interventional procedures, such as surgery or endoscopy, are today still guided by human vision and perception. Human vision however is not sensitive or accurate in detecting a large range of disease biomarkers, for example cellular or molecular processes characteristic of disease. For this reason advanced optical and opto-acoustic (photo-acoustic) methods are considered for enabling a more versatile, sensitive and accurate detection of disease biomarkers and complement human vision in clinical decision making during interventions. Herein, we outline developments in emerging fluorescence and opto-acoustic sensing and imaging techniques that can lead to practical implementations toward improving interventional vision.

  7. Software for neutrino acoustic detection and localization

    Bouhadef, B. [INFN Sezione Pisa, Polo Fibonacci, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, ' E. Fermi' University of Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: bouhadef@df.unipi.it

    2009-06-01

    The evidence of the existing of UHE (E>10{sup 19}eV) cosmic rays and its possible connection to UHE neutrino suggests the building of an acoustic telescope for neutrino, exploiting thermo-acoustic effect. We present software for neutrino acoustic signal detection and localization. The main points discussed here are the sea noise model, the determination of time differences of arrival (TDOA) between hydrophones signals, the source localization algorithm, and the telescope geometry effect. The effect of TDOAs errors and telescope geometry on the localization accuracy is also discussed.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of acoustic neuroma

    Kashihara, Kengo; Murata, Hideaki; Ito, Haruhide; Onishi, Hiroaki; Kadoya, Masumi; Suzuki, Masayuki.

    1989-03-01

    Thirteen patients with acoustic neuroma were studied on a 1.5T superconductive magnetic resonance (MR) imager. Acoustic neuromas appeared as lower signal intensity than the surrounding brain stem on T1 weighted image (W.I.), and as higher signal intensity on T2 W.I.. Axial and coronal sections of T1 W.I. were very useful in observing the tumor in the auditory canal and in investigating the anatomical relations of the tumor and the surrounding structures. MR imaging is very excellent examination to make early diagnosis of the acoustic neuroma and preoperative anatomical evaluation.

  9. High transmission acoustic focusing by impedance-matched acoustic meta-surfaces

    Al Jahdali, Rasha

    2016-01-19

    Impedance is an important issue in the design of acoustic lenses because mismatched impedance is detrimental to real focusing applications. Here, we report two designs of acoustic lenses that focus acoustic waves in water and air, respectively. They are tailored by acoustic meta-surfaces, which are rigid thin plates decorated with periodically distributed sub-wavelength slits. Their respective building blocks are constructed from the coiling-up spaces in water and the layered structures in air. Analytic analysis based on coupled-mode theory and transfer matrix reveals that the impedances of the lenses are matched to those of the background media. With these impedance-matched acoustic lenses, we demonstrate the acoustic focusing effect by finite-element simulations.

  10. Droplet actuation by surface acoustic waves: an interplay between acoustic streaming and radiation pressure

    Brunet, Philippe; Baudoin, Michael; Matar, Olivier Bou; Zoueshtiagh, Farzam

    2010-11-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAW) are known to be a versatile technique for the actuation of sessile drops. Droplet displacement, internal mixing or drop splitting, are amongst the elementary operations that SAW can achieve, which are useful on lab-on-chip microfluidics benches. On the purpose to understand the underlying physical mechanisms involved during these operations, we study experimentally the droplet dynamics varying different physical parameters. Here in particular, the influence of liquid viscosity and acoustic frequency is investigated: it is indeed predicted that both quantities should play a role in the acoustic-hydrodynamic coupling involved in the dynamics. The key point is to compare the relative magnitude of the attenuation length, i.e. the scale within which the acoustic wave decays in the fluid, and the size of the drop. This relative magnitude governs the relative importance of acoustic streaming and acoustic radiation pressure, which are both involved in the droplet dynamics.

  11. Density-near-zero using the acoustically induced transparency of a Fano acoustic resonator

    Elayouch, A.

    2017-01-05

    We report experimental results of near-zero mass density involving an acoustic metamaterial supporting Fano resonance. For this, we designed and fabricated an acoustic resonator with two closely coupled modes and measured its transmission properties. Our study reveals that the phenomenon of acoustically induced transparency is accompanied by an effect of near-zero density. Indeed, the dynamic effective parameters obtained from experimental data show the presence of a frequency band where the effective mass density is close to zero, with high transmission levels reaching 0.7. Furthermore, we demonstrate that such effective parameters lead to wave guiding in a 90-degrees-bent channel. This kind of acoustic metamaterial can, therefore, give rise to acoustic functions like controlling the wavefront, which may lead to very promising applications in acoustic cloacking or imaging.

  12. North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory: Deep Water Acoustic Propagation in the Philippine Sea

    2014-09-30

    acoustic predictions and for understanding the local ocean dynamics, (iii) improving our understanding of the physics of scattering by internal waves ...the scattering of the acoustic signals by ocean internal waves and/or spice (Dzieciuch, 2014). The procedure consisted of pulse compression of the...ambient noise field, and (v) understanding the relationship between the acoustic field in the water column and the seismic field in the seafloor for both

  13. Acoustic Test Results of Melamine Foam with Application to Payload Fairing Acoustic Attenuation Systems

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    A spacecraft at launch is subjected to a harsh acoustic and vibration environment resulting from the passage of acoustic energy, created during the liftoff of a launch vehicle, through the vehicle's payload fairing. In order to ensure the mission success of the spacecraft it is often necessary to reduce the resulting internal acoustic sound pressure levels through the usage of acoustic attenuation systems. Melamine foam, lining the interior walls of the payload fairing, is often utilized as the main component of such a system. In order to better understand the acoustic properties of melamine foam, with the goal of developing improved acoustic attenuation systems, NASA has recently performed panel level testing on numerous configurations of melamine foam acoustic treatments at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratory. Parameters assessed included the foam's thickness and density, as well as the effects of a top outer cover sheet material and mass barriers embedded within the foam. This testing followed the ASTM C423 standard for absorption and the ASTM E90 standard for transmission loss. The acoustic test data obtained and subsequent conclusions are the subjects of this paper.

  14. Supersonic acoustic intensity with statistically optimized near-field acoustic holography

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn

    2011-01-01

    The concept of supersonic acoustic intensity was introduced some years ago for estimating the fraction of the flow of energy radiated by a source that propagates to the far field. It differs from the usual (active) intensity by excluding the near-field energy resulting from evanescent waves...... to the information provided by the near-field acoustic holography technique. This study proposes a version of the supersonic acoustic intensity applied to statistically optimized near-field acoustic holography (SONAH). The theory, numerical results and an experimental study are presented. The possibility of using...

  15. The acoustic force density acting on inhomogeneous fluids in acoustic fields

    Karlsen, Jonas T; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    We present a theory for the acoustic force density acting on inhomogeneous fluids in acoustic fields on time scales that are slow compared to the acoustic oscillation period. The acoustic force density depends on gradients in the density and compressibility of the fluid. For microfluidic systems, the theory predicts a relocation of the inhomogeneities into stable field-dependent configurations, which are qualitatively different from the horizontally layered configurations due to gravity. Experimental validation is obtained by confocal imaging of aqueous solutions in a glass-silicon microchip.

  16. New acoustics, based on lefthanded media

    Gan, Woon S.

    2012-05-01

    Metamaterials are materials with artificial properties defined by their sub-wavelength structure rather than their chemical composition. With the arrival of photonic crystals and phononic crystals, the fabrication of metamaterials which do not exist in nature become a reality. We discovered parity invariance in acoustical field equation. We also show that negative refraction is a special case of coordinates transformation (used in acoustical cloaking) when the determinant of the direction cosines matrix equals -1 and we develop a unifed theory for negative refraction and cloaking. Gauge invariance approach also removes the ambiguity problem of positive sign and negative sign when using the dispersion relation for the negative refractive index. Lefthanded materials produce Poynting vector in opposite direction to wave propagation. This gives rise to new phenomena in refraction, diffraction, and scattering of acoustic waves in the material‥ These three are the basic mechanisms of sound propagation in medium. Hence we call this new acoustics.

  17. Acoustic Monitoring for Spaceflight Vehicle Applications Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR will develop and demonstrate acoustic sensor technology enabling real-time, remotely performed measuring and monitoring of sound pressure levels and noise...

  18. Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Lab (AAPL)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility is an acoustically treated geodesic dome. The 130-ft-diameter dome is 65-ft high and acts as a noise barrier, protecting adjacent Glenn buildings and...

  19. Generation of Nanometer Wavelength Acoustic Waves

    O.Yu. Komina

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of acoustic wave generation of nanometer range in plates is shown. The experimental results that show the possible reconfiguring of the generator frequency in YFeO3 with a constant magnetic field are given.

  20. Reconfigurable origami-inspired acoustic waveguides.

    Babaee, Sahab; Overvelde, Johannes T B; Chen, Elizabeth R; Tournat, Vincent; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-11-01

    We combine numerical simulations and experiments to design a new class of reconfigurable waveguides based on three-dimensional origami-inspired metamaterials. Our strategy builds on the fact that the rigid plates and hinges forming these structures define networks of tubes that can be easily reconfigured. As such, they provide an ideal platform to actively control and redirect the propagation of sound. We design reconfigurable systems that, depending on the externally applied deformation, can act as networks of waveguides oriented along one, two, or three preferential directions. Moreover, we demonstrate that the capability of the structure to guide and radiate acoustic energy along predefined directions can be easily switched on and off, as the networks of tubes are reversibly formed and disrupted. The proposed designs expand the ability of existing acoustic metamaterials and exploit complex waveguiding to enhance control over propagation and radiation of acoustic energy, opening avenues for the design of a new class of tunable acoustic functional systems.

  1. A modular guitar for teaching musical acoustics

    Marozeau, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    In order to keep students activated in a course on musical acoustics, they were asked to build a modular guitar, designed to be updated throughout the course. In the first stage, dedicated to the physics of strings, a guitar was made out of three strings attached to a long piece of wood. The stud......In order to keep students activated in a course on musical acoustics, they were asked to build a modular guitar, designed to be updated throughout the course. In the first stage, dedicated to the physics of strings, a guitar was made out of three strings attached to a long piece of wood....... The students measured the effect of the place of plucking on the mode of the vibrations of the strings. The second stage was dedicated to the acoustic resonances. Using a laser cutter, the students built a wooden box that was coupled to their guitar using straps. New acoustical measurements were made to study...

  2. Design Report for Low Power Acoustic Detector

    2013-08-01

    the hardware design, target detection algorithm design in both MATLAB and VHDL , and typical performance results. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Acoustic low...diagram. .......................................................................................................3 Figure 4. HED VHDL block diagram...6 Figure 5. DCD VHDL block diagram

  3. Acoustics of two-phase pipe flows

    Dijk, van, Nico M.

    2005-01-01

    Acoustic signals that are recorded in oil pipelines contain information about the flow. In order to extract this information from the pressure recordings, detailed knowledge about the transmission properties of sound waves in the pipes is required.

  4. [The acoustic indicator of saliva under stress].

    Shalenkova, M A; Mikhaĭlova, Z D; Klemin, V A; Korkotashvili, L V; Abanin, A M; Klemina, A V; Dolgov, V V

    2014-03-01

    The situation of stress affects various organs and systems that results in development of functional disorders and/or somatic diseases. As a result, different noninvasive, including salivary, techniques of diagnostic of stress conditions are in the process of development. The dynamics of acoustic indicator of saliva is studied during the period of passing the exams. The relationship of indicator with levels of potassium, sodium, glucose and protein of saliva was analyzed. The sampling consisted of 102 students of 5 and 6 academic years of medical university. To detect the acoustic indicator of saliva acoustic analyzer AKBa-01- "BIOM" was applied. The level of potassium and sodium in saliva was detected using method of flame photometry. The level of glucose in saliva was detected by glucose oxydase technique using analyzer "EXAN-G". The protein in saliva was detected by biuretic technique. The correlation between acoustic indicator of saliva and analyzed indicators of saliva was established.

  5. High Temperature Acoustic Noise Reduction Materials Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is to use combustion synthesis techniques to manufacture ceramic-based acoustic liners capable of withstanding temperatures up to 2500?C....

  6. Broadband acoustic cloak for ultrasound waves.

    Zhang, Shu; Xia, Chunguang; Fang, Nicholas

    2011-01-14

    Invisibility devices based on coordinate transformation have opened up a new field of considerable interest. We present here the first practical realization of a low-loss and broadband acoustic cloak for underwater ultrasound. This metamaterial cloak is constructed with a network of acoustic circuit elements, namely, serial inductors and shunt capacitors. Our experiment clearly shows that the acoustic cloak can effectively bend the ultrasound waves around the hidden object, with reduced scattering and shadow. Because of the nonresonant nature of the building elements, this low-loss (∼6  dB/m) cylindrical cloak exhibits invisibility over a broad frequency range from 52 to 64 kHz. Furthermore, our experimental study indicates that this design approach should be scalable to different acoustic frequencies and offers the possibility for a variety of devices based on coordinate transformation.

  7. Vibro-acoustics of lightweight sandwich structures

    Lu, Tianjian

    2014-01-01

    Vibro-Acoustics of Lightweight Sandwich Structures introduces the study of the coupled vibration and acoustic behavior of lightweight sandwich structures in response to harmonic force and sound pressure. This book focuses on the theoretical modeling and experimental investigation of lightweight sandwich structures in order to provide a predictive framework for vibro-acoustic characteristics of typical engineering structures. Furthermore, by developing solution tools, it concentrates on the influence of key systematic parameters leading to effective guidance for optimal structure design toward lightweight, high-stiffness and superior sound insulation capability. This book is intended for researchers, scientists, engineers and graduate students in mechanical engineering especially in structural mechanics, mechanics and acoustics. Fengxian Xin and Tianjian Lu both work at the School of Aerospace, Xi’an Jiaotong University.

  8. Designing single-beam multitrapping acoustical tweezers

    Silva, Glauber T

    2014-01-01

    The concept of a single-beam acoustical tweezer device which can simultaneously trap microparticles at different points is proposed and demonstrated through computational simulations. The device employs an ultrasound beam produced by a circular focused transducer operating at 1 MHz in water medium. The ultrasound beam exerts a radiation force that may tweeze suspended microparticles in the medium. Simulations show that the acoustical tweezer can simultaneously trap microparticles in the pre-focal zone along the beam axis, i.e. between the transducer surface and its geometric focus. As acoustical tweezers are fast becoming a key instrument in microparticle handling, the development of acoustic multitrapping concept may turn into a useful tool in engineering these devices.

  9. Characterizing Acoustic Sources in Pressure Vessels

    李路明; 郑鹏; 刘时风; 施克仁

    2002-01-01

    The "dream" of acoustic emission (AE) testing is to get the acoustic source characteristics from AE signals, especially when evaluating aging pressure vessels. In this paper, the wavelet transform was used to analyze different AE signals from cracks (surface and inner), pencil-lead-breakage and leakage. These acoustic sources were applied on an actual pressure vessel. While the vessel experienced hydraulic pressure, their AE signals were acquired by a digital AE testing system with a wide frequency band transducer and a high speed A/D converter. Then, the digital signals were analyzed using the wavelet transform method. Correlation coefficients of the transformed data show that the different acoustic sources can be easily identified.

  10. Acoustic energy in ducts - Further observations

    Eversman, W.

    1979-01-01

    The transmission of acoustic energy in uniform ducts carrying uniform flow is investigated with the purpose of clarifying two points of interest. The two commonly used definitions of acoustic 'energy' flux are shown to be related by a Legendre transformation of the Lagrangian density exactly as in deriving the Hamiltonian density in mechanics. In the acoustic case the total energy density and the Hamiltonian density are not the same which accounts for two different 'energy' fluxes. When the duct has acoustically absorptive walls neither of the two flux expressions gives correct results. A reevaluation of the basis of derivation of the energy density and energy flux provides forms which yield consistent results for soft walled ducts.

  11. Underwater Acoustic Sensing with Optical Fibres

    V. V. Rampal

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of optical fibres for the detection of acoustic pressure underwater has been discussed with particular reference to the recent literature on the development of fibre optic hydrophones.

  12. Modern methods in analytical acoustics lecture notes

    Crighton, D G; Williams, J E Ffowcs; Heckl, M; Leppington, F G

    1992-01-01

    Modern Methods in Analytical Acoustics considers topics fundamental to the understanding of noise, vibration and fluid mechanisms. The series of lectures on which this material is based began by some twenty five years ago and has been developed and expanded ever since. Acknowledged experts in the field have given this course many times in Europe and the USA. Although the scope of the course has widened considerably, the primary aim of teaching analytical techniques of acoustics alongside specific areas of wave motion and unsteady fluid mechanisms remains. The distinguished authors of this volume are drawn from Departments of Acoustics, Engineering of Applied Mathematics in Berlin, Cambridge and London. Their intention is to reach a wider audience of all those concerned with acoustic analysis than has been able to attend the course.

  13. Acoustic Resonance Reaction Control Thruster (ARCTIC) Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop and demonstrate the innovative Acoustic Resonance Reaction Control Thruster (ARCTIC) to provide rapid and reliable in-space impulse...

  14. Finite difference solutions to shocked acoustic waves

    Walkington, N. J.; Eversman, W.

    1983-01-01

    The MacCormack, Lambda and split flux finite differencing schemes are used to solve a one dimensional acoustics problem. Two duct configurations were considered, a uniform duct and a converging-diverging nozzle. Asymptotic solutions for these two ducts are compared with the numerical solutions. When the acoustic amplitude and frequency are sufficiently high the acoustic signal shocks. This condition leads to a deterioration of the numerical solutions since viscous terms may be required if the shock is to be resolved. A continuous uniform duct solution is considered to demonstrate how the viscous terms modify the solution. These results are then compared with a shocked solution with and without viscous terms. Generally it is found that the most accurate solutions are those obtained using the minimum possible viscosity coefficients. All of the schemes considered give results accurate enough for acoustic power calculations with no one scheme performing significantly better than the others.

  15. Acoustic Power Transmission Through a Ducted Fan

    Envia, Ed

    2016-01-01

    For high-speed ducted fans, when the rotor flowfield is shock-free, the main contribution to the inlet radiated acoustic power comes from the portion of the rotor stator interaction sound field that is transmitted upstream through the rotor. As such, inclusion of the acoustic transmission is an essential ingredient in the prediction of the fan inlet noise when the fan tip relative speed is subsonic. This paper describes a linearized Euler based approach to computing the acoustic transmission of fan tones through the rotor. The approach is embodied in a code called LINFLUX was applied to a candidate subsonic fan called the Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP). The results from this study suggest that it is possible to make such prediction with sufficient fidelity to provide an indication of the acoustic transmission trends with the fan tip speed.

  16. Reconfigurable origami-inspired acoustic waveguides

    Babaee, Sahab; Overvelde, Johannes T. B.; Chen, Elizabeth R.; Tournat, Vincent; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    We combine numerical simulations and experiments to design a new class of reconfigurable waveguides based on three-dimensional origami-inspired metamaterials. Our strategy builds on the fact that the rigid plates and hinges forming these structures define networks of tubes that can be easily reconfigured. As such, they provide an ideal platform to actively control and redirect the propagation of sound. We design reconfigurable systems that, depending on the externally applied deformation, can act as networks of waveguides oriented along one, two, or three preferential directions. Moreover, we demonstrate that the capability of the structure to guide and radiate acoustic energy along predefined directions can be easily switched on and off, as the networks of tubes are reversibly formed and disrupted. The proposed designs expand the ability of existing acoustic metamaterials and exploit complex waveguiding to enhance control over propagation and radiation of acoustic energy, opening avenues for the design of a new class of tunable acoustic functional systems. PMID:28138527

  17. Acoustic metric of the compressible draining bathtub

    Cherubini, C.; Filippi, S.

    2011-10-01

    The draining bathtub flow, a cornerstone in the theory of acoustic black holes, is here extended to the case of exact solutions for compressible nonviscous flows characterized by a polytropic equation of state. Investigating the analytical configurations obtained for selected values of the polytropic index, it is found that each of them becomes nonphysical at the so called limiting circle. By studying the null geodesics structure of the corresponding acoustic line elements, it is shown that such a geometrical locus coincides with the acoustic event horizon. This region is characterized also by an infinite value of space-time curvature, so the acoustic analogy breaks down there. Possible applications for artificial and natural vortices are finally discussed.

  18. Opto-Acoustic Biosensing with Optomechanofluidic Resonators

    Zhu, Kaiyuan; Carmon, Tal; Fan, Xudong; Bahl, Gaurav

    2014-01-01

    Opto-mechano-fluidic resonators (OMFRs) are a unique optofluidics platform that can measure the acoustic properties of fluids and bioanalytes in a fully-contained microfluidic system. By confining light in ultra-high-Q whispering gallery modes of OMFRs, optical forces such as radiation pressure and electrostriction can be used to actuate and sense structural mechanical vibrations spanning MHz to GHz frequencies. These vibrations are hybrid fluid-shell modes that entrain any bioanalyte present inside. As a result, bioanalytes can now reflect their acoustic properties on the optomechanical vibrational spectrum of the device, in addition to optical property measurements with existing optofluidics techniques. In this work, we investigate acoustic sensing capabilities of OMFRs using computational eigenfrequency analysis. We analyze the OMFR eigenfrequency sensitivity to bulk fluid-phase materials as well as nanoparticles, and propose methods to extract multiple acoustic parameters from multiple vibrational modes. ...

  19. Image processing techniques for acoustic images

    Murphy, Brian P.

    1991-06-01

    The primary goal of this research is to test the effectiveness of various image processing techniques applied to acoustic images generated in MATLAB. The simulated acoustic images have the same characteristics as those generated by a computer model of a high resolution imaging sonar. Edge detection and segmentation are the two image processing techniques discussed in this study. The two methods tested are a modified version of the Kalman filtering and median filtering.

  20. Materials for Bulk Acoustic Resonators and Filters

    Loebl, Hans-Peter

    2003-03-01

    Highly selective solidly mounted bulk acoustic wave (BAW) band pass filters are suited for mobile and wireless systems in the GHz frequency range between 0.8 and 10 GHz. Electro-acoustic thin film BAW resonators are the building blocks these BAW filters. Piezoelectric materials used in these resonators include mainly AlN or ZnO which can be deposited by dedicated thin film sputter deposition techniques. Using these piezo-electric materials and using suited materials for the acoustic Bragg reflector, BAW resonators with high quality factors can be fabricated. The achievable filter bandwidth is approximately 4Alternatively, also ferroelectric thin films might be used to achieve higher coupling coefficient and thus filter bandwidth. BAW resonators and filters have been designed and fabricated on 6" Silicon and glass wafers. Results are presented for resonators and filters operating between 1.95 and 8 GHz. The talk will give an overview of the material aspects which are important for BAW devices. It will be shown that modeling of the resonator and filter response using 1D electro-acoustic simulation (1,2) which includes losses is essential to extract acoustic and electrical material parameters. (1) Solidly Mounted Bulk Acoustic Wave Filters for the Ghz Frequency Range, H.P. Loebl, C. Metzmacher , D.N.Peligrad , R. Mauczok , M. Klee , W. Brand , R.F. Milsom , P.Lok , F.van Straten , A. Tuinhout , J.W.Lobeek, IEEE 2002 Ultrasonics Symposium Munich, October 2002. (2) Combined Acoustic-Electromagnetic Simulation Of Thin-Film Bulk Acoustic Wave Filters, R.F. Milsom, H-P. Löbl, D.N. Peligrad, J-W. Lobeek, A. Tuinhout, R. H. ten Dolle IEEE 2002 Ultrasonics Symposium Munich, October 2002.

  1. GOATS 2008: Autonomous, Adaptive Multistatic Acoustic Sensing

    2010-09-30

    the concept of a network of AUVs as an array of Virtual Sensors, based on fully integrated sensing, modeling and control , reducing the inter- platform...acoustic modeling , platform dynamics and network communication and control . In regard to the environmental acoustic modeling , MIT continues to...adaptive, bi- and multi-static, passive and active sonar configurations for concurrent detection, classification and localization of subsea and bottom

  2. Canada Basin Acoustic Propagation Experiment (CANAPE)

    2015-09-30

    pworcester@ucsd.edu Award Number: N00014-15-1-2068 LONG-TERM GOALS The Arctic Ocean is undergoing dramatic changes in both the ice cover and...fundamental limits to the use of acoustic methods and signal processing imposed by ice and ocean processes in the new Arctic . The hope is that these...the ocean from wind and solar forcing and preserving the stable Arctic acoustic channel. Ice conditions are not the only environmental changes in

  3. Advanced Concepts for Underwater Acoustic Channel Modeling

    Etter, P. C.; Haas, C. H.; Ramani, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines nearshore underwater-acoustic channel modeling concepts and compares channel-state information requirements against existing modeling capabilities. This process defines a subset of candidate acoustic models suitable for simulating signal propagation in underwater communications. Underwater-acoustic communications find many practical applications in coastal oceanography, and networking is the enabling technology for these applications. Such networks can be formed by establishing two-way acoustic links between autonomous underwater vehicles and moored oceanographic sensors. These networks can be connected to a surface unit for further data transfer to ships, satellites, or shore stations via a radio-frequency link. This configuration establishes an interactive environment in which researchers can extract real-time data from multiple, but distant, underwater instruments. After evaluating the obtained data, control messages can be sent back to individual instruments to adapt the networks to changing situations. Underwater networks can also be used to increase the operating ranges of autonomous underwater vehicles by hopping the control and data messages through networks that cover large areas. A model of the ocean medium between acoustic sources and receivers is called a channel model. In an oceanic channel, characteristics of the acoustic signals change as they travel from transmitters to receivers. These characteristics depend upon the acoustic frequency, the distances between sources and receivers, the paths followed by the signals, and the prevailing ocean environment in the vicinity of the paths. Properties of the received signals can be derived from those of the transmitted signals using these channel models. This study concludes that ray-theory models are best suited to the simulation of acoustic signal propagation in oceanic channels and identifies 33 such models that are eligible candidates.

  4. Acoustic comfort in large dining spaces

    Chen, X.; Kang, J

    2017-01-01

    © 2016 Elsevier Ltd This study carried out a questionnaire field investigation in two typical large dining spaces. The results suggest that the acoustic comfort of diners has an influence on the comfort evaluation of the overall dining environment, and background noise is an important factor affecting the acoustic comfort evaluation of diners. The role of various individual sound sources in background noise has been investigated, considering general background music, speech sound, activity so...

  5. Design of an impedance matching acoustic bend

    Yang, Yuzhen; Jia, Han; Lu, Wenjia; Sun, Zhaoyong; Yang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    We propose the design of an impedance matching acoustic bend in this article. The bending structure is composed of sub-wavelength unit cells with perforated plates and side pipes, whose mass density and bulk modulus can be tuned simultaneously. So the refraction index and the impedance of the acoustic bend can be modulated simultaneously to guarantee both the bending effect and the high transmission. The simulation results of sound pressure field distribution show that the bending effect of t...

  6. Development of the seafloor acoustic ranging system

    Osada, Y.; Kido, M.; Fujimoto, H.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed a seafloor acoustic ranging system, which simulates an operation with the DONET (Development of Dense Ocean-floor Network System for Earthquake and Tsunami) cable, to monitor seafloor crustal movement. The seafloor acoustic ranging system was based on the precise acoustic transponder (PXP). We have a few problems for the improvement of the resolution. One thing is the variation of sound speed. Another is the bending of ray path. A PXP measures horizontal distances on the seafloor from the round trip travel times of acoustic pulses between pairs of PXP. The PXP was equipped with the pressure, temperature gauge and tilt-meter. The variation of sound speed in seawater has a direct effect on the measurement. Therefore we collect the data of temperature and pressure. But we don't collect the data of salinity because of less influence than temperature and pressure. Accordingly a ray path of acoustic wave tends to be bent upward in the deep sea due to the Snell's law. As the acoustic transducer of each PXPs held about 3.0m above the seafloor, the baseline is too long for altitude from the seafloor. In this year we carried out the experiment for the seafloor acoustic ranging system. We deployed two PXPs at about 750m spacing on Kumano-nada. The water depth is about 2050m. We collected the 660 data in this experiment during one day. The round trip travel time show the variation with peak-to-peak amplitude of about 0.03msec. It was confirmed to explain the majority in this change by the change in sound speed according to the temperature and pressure. This results shows the resolution of acoustic measurements is +/-2mm. Acknowledgement This study is supported by 'DONET' of Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology.

  7. Acoustic Rotation Modes in Complex Plasmas

    白冬雪; 王正汹; 王晓钢

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic rotation modes in complex plasmas are investigated in a cylindrical system with an axial symmetry.The linear mode solution is derived. The mode in an infinite area is reduced to a classical dust acoustic wave in the region away from the centre. When the dusty plasma is confined in a finite region, the breathing and rotating-void behaviour are observed. Vivid structures of different mode number solutions are illustrated.

  8. Acoustic simulation in architecture with parallel algorithm

    Li, Xiaohong; Zhang, Xinrong; Li, Dan

    2004-03-01

    In allusion to complexity of architecture environment and Real-time simulation of architecture acoustics, a parallel radiosity algorithm was developed. The distribution of sound energy in scene is solved with this method. And then the impulse response between sources and receivers at frequency segment, which are calculated with multi-process, are combined into whole frequency response. The numerical experiment shows that parallel arithmetic can improve the acoustic simulating efficiency of complex scene.

  9. World Conference on Acoustic Emission 2013

    Wu, Zhanwen; Zhang, Junjiao

    2015-01-01

    This volume collects the papers from the 2013 World Conference on Acoustic Emission in Shanghai. The latest research and applications of Acoustic Emission (AE) are explored, with particular emphasis on detecting and processing of AE signals, development of AE instrument and testing standards, AE of materials, engineering structures and systems, including the processing of collected data and analytical techniques as well as experimental case studies.

  10. Unidirectional propagation of designer surface acoustic waves

    Lu, Jiuyang; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2014-01-01

    We propose an efficient design route to generate unidirectional propagation of the designer surface acoustic waves. The whole system consists of a periodically corrugated rigid plate combining with a pair of asymmetric narrow slits. The directionality of the structure-induced surface waves stems from the destructive interference between the evanescent waves emitted from the double slits. The theoretical prediction is validated well by simulations and experiments. Promising applications can be anticipated, such as in designing compact acoustic circuits.

  11. Ottoman royal women's spaces: The acoustic dimension

    Ergin, Nina

    2014-01-01

    In their discussion of space in relation to gender, historians of women in the Middle East so far have focused primarily on physical and visual access. This paper argues that women's acoustic space merits closer consideration, especially since acoustic methods of communication very often could and did exceed the limits of vision and visually bounded space. This argument is based on three different case studies concerning Ottoman royal women of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries: (1) hare...

  12. Photoacoustic cell using elliptical acoustic focusing

    Heritier, J.-M.; Fouquet, J. E.; Siegman, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    A photoacoustic cell has been developed in the form of an elliptical cylinder in which essentially all the acoustic energy generated by a laser beam passing down one axis is focused onto a cylindrical acoustic tranducer located along the other axis. Preliminary measurements on a liquid-filled cell of this design show high sensitivity and a notably clean impulse response. A similar design may be useful for photoacoustic measurements in vapors as well.

  13. Three-Dimensional Shallow Water Acoustics

    2014-09-30

    To achieve this goal, individual environmental factor will be first studied and then considered jointly with a unified ocean, seabed and acoustic...parabolic- equation (PE) wave propagation models with improved split-step marching algorithms [4-6] are used to study sound propagation in realistic...environments. When the acoustic mode coupling can be neglected, a vertical-mode horizontal-PE model is used. The parabolic- equation (PE) approximation

  14. ACOUSTIC EFFECTS ON BINARY AEROELASTICITY MODEL

    Kok Hwa Yu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Acoustics is the science concerned with the study of sound. The effects of sound on structures attract overwhelm interests and numerous studies were carried out in this particular area. Many of the preliminary investigations show that acoustic pressure produces significant influences on structures such as thin plate, membrane and also high-impedance medium like water (and other similar fluids. Thus, it is useful to investigate the structure response with the presence of acoustics on aircraft, especially on aircraft wings, tails and control surfaces which are vulnerable to flutter phenomena. The present paper describes the modeling of structural-acoustic interactions to simulate the external acoustic effect on binary flutter model. Here, the binary flutter model which illustrated as a rectangular wing is constructed using strip theory with simplified unsteady aerodynamics involving flap and pitch degree of freedom terms. The external acoustic excitation, on the other hand, is modeled using four-node quadrilateral isoparametric element via finite element approach. Both equations then carefully coupled and solved using eigenvalue solution. The mentioned approach is implemented in MATLAB and the outcome of the simulated result are later described, analyzed and illustrated in this paper.

  15. Sustainable Acoustic Metasurfaces for Sound Control

    Paola Gori

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sound attenuation with conventional acoustic materials is subject to the mass law and requires massive and bulky structures at low frequencies. A possible alternative solution is provided by the use of metamaterials, which are artificial materials properly engineered to obtain properties and characteristics that it is not possible to find in natural materials. Theory and applications of metamaterials, already consolidated in electromagnetism, can be extended to acoustics; in particular, they can be applied to improve the properties of acoustical panels. The design of acoustic metasurfaces that could effectively control transmitted sound in unconventional ways appears a significant subject to be investigated, given its wide-ranging possible applications. In this contribution, we investigate the application of a metasurface-inspired technique to achieve the acoustical insulation of an environment. The designed surface has subwavelength thickness and structuring and could be realized with cheap, lightweight and sustainable materials. We present a few examples of such structures and analyze their acoustical behavior by means of full-wave simulations.

  16. Acoustic Emission of Deformation Twinning in Magnesium

    Chengyang Mo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Acoustic Emission of deformation twinning in Magnesium is investigated in this article. Single crystal testing with combined full field deformation measurements, as well as polycrystalline testing inside the scanning electron microscope with simultaneous monitoring of texture evolution and twin nucleation were compared to testing at the laboratory scale with respect to recordings of Acoustic Emission activity. Single crystal testing revealed the formation of layered twin boundaries in areas of strain localization which was accompanied by distinct changes in the acoustic data. Testing inside the microscope directly showed twin nucleation, proliferation and growth as well as associated crystallographic reorientations. A post processing approach of the Acoustic Emission activity revealed the existence of a class of signals that appears in a strain range in which twinning is profuse, as validated by the in situ and ex situ microscopy observations. Features extracted from such activity were cross-correlated both with the available mechanical and microscopy data, as well as with the Acoustic Emission activity recorded at the laboratory scale for similarly prepared specimens. The overall approach demonstrates that the method of Acoustic Emission could provide real time volumetric information related to the activation of deformation twinning in Magnesium alloys, in spite of the complexity of the propagation phenomena, the possible activation of several deformation modes and the challenges posed by the sensing approach itself when applied in this type of materials evaluation approach.

  17. A NOVEL ELLIPSOIDAL ACOUSTIC INFINITE ELEMENT

    YANG Rui-liang; WANG Hong-zhen

    2005-01-01

    A novel ellipsoidal acoustic infinite element is proposed. It is based a new pressure representation, which can describe and solve the ellipsoidal acoustic field more exactly. The shape functions of this novel acoustic infinite element are similar .to the Burnett's method, while the weight functions are defined as the product of the complex conjugates of the shaped functions and an additional weighting factor. The code of this method is cheap to generate as for 1-D element because only 1-D integral needs to be numerical. Coupling with the standard finite element, this method provides a capability for very efficiently modeling acoustic fields surrounding structures of virtually any practical shape. This novel method was deduced in brief and the conclusion was kept in detail. To test the feasibility of this novel method efficiently, in the examples the infinite elements were considered, excluding the finite elements relative. This novel ellipsoidal acoustic infinite element can deduce the analytic solution of an oscillating sphere. The example of a prolate spheroid shows that the novel infinite element is superior to the boundary element and other acoustic infinite elements. Analytical and numerical results of these examples show that this novel method is feasible.

  18. Pattern-formation under acoustic driving forces

    Valverde, Jose Manuel

    2015-07-01

    Chemical and metallurgical processes enhanced by high intensity acoustic waves, thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, fuel rods in nuclear reactors, heat exchanger tubes, offshore and vibrating structures, solar thermal collectors, acoustic levitators, microfluidic devices, cycling, musical acoustics, blood flow through veins/arteries, hearing in the mammalian ear, carbon nanotube loudspeakers, etc. The evolution of a myriad of processes involving the oscillation of viscous fluids in the presence of solid boundaries is up to a certain extent influenced by acoustic streaming. In addition to the sound field, viscous energy dissipation at the fluid-solid boundary causes a time-independent fluid circulation, which can lead to a significant enhancement of heat, mass and momentum transfer at large oscillation amplitudes. A particularly relevant phenomenon that can be notably affected by acoustic streaming is the promotion of sound waves by temperature gradients or viceversa (thermoacoustics), which is at the basis of potentially efficient and environmental friendly engines and refrigerators that have attracted a renewed interest in the last years. In the present manuscript, historical developments and the underlying basic physics behind acoustic streaming and thermoacoustics are reviewed from an unifying perspective.

  19. Acoustic fluidization - A new geologic process

    Melosh, H. J.

    1979-01-01

    A number of geologic processes, particularly seismic faulting, impact crater slumping, and long runout landslides, require the failure of geologic materials under differential stresses much smaller than expected on the basis of conventional rock mechanics. This paper proposes that the low strengths apparent in these phenomena are due to a state of 'acoustic fluidization' induced by a transient strong acoustic wave field. The strain rates possible in such a field are evaluated, and it is shown that acoustically fluidized debris behaves as a newtonian fluid with a viscosity in the range 100,000 to 10,000,000 P for plausible conditions. Energy gains and losses in the acoustic field are discussed, and the mechanism is shown to be effective if internal dissipation in the field gives a Q approximately greater than 100. Whether such values for Q are realized is not known at present. However, acoustic fluidization provides a qualitatively correct description of the failure of rock debris under low differential stresses in the processes of faulting, crater slumping, and long runout landslides. Acoustic fluidization thus deserves serious consideration as a possible explanation of these phenomena.

  20. Acoustic estimation of suspended sediment concentration

    ZHU; Weiqing(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Morse, P. H. , Theoretical Acoustics, New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co. , 1968.[2]Skudrjuk, E., Die Grundlagen der Akustik, Wien: Springer-Verlag, 1954.[3]Olshevskii, V. V., Statistical Characteristics of Sea Reverberation, Moscow: Nauka Publisher, 1966.[4]Thorne, P. D., Hardcastl, P. J., Soulsby, R. L., Analysis of acoustic measurements of suspended sediments, J. Geop.Res. , 1993, 98: 899.[5]Guo Jijie, Ren Laifa, Li Yunwu, ln-situ calibration of acoustic measurement of suspended sedienmt, Acta Oceanologica Sini-ca, 1998, (20): 120-125.[6]Zhang Shuying, Li Yunwu, Development and application of an acoustic suspended sediemnt monitoring system, Acta Oceanologica Sinica, 1998, (20): 114-119.[7]Zhang Shuying, Li Yunwu, A theoretical analysis of acoustic suspended sediment obsvervation, Acta Acoustica, 1999, (24):267-274.[8]Zhu Weiqing, Pan Feng, Zhu Min et al. , IOA-1 Multi-function Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (MADCP), OCEAN'2000,Rhode Island, USA.

  1. Bioeffects due to acoustic droplet vaporization

    Bull, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Encapsulated micro- and nano-droplets can be vaporized via ultrasound, a process termed acoustic droplet vaporization. Our interest is primarily motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment. In this methodology, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that arise from the acoustic vaporization of vascular microdroplets. Additionally, the microdroplets may be used as vehicles for localized drug delivery, with or without flow occlusion. In this talk, we examine the dynamics of acoustic droplet vaporization through experiments and theoretical/computational fluid mechanics models, and investigate the bioeffects of acoustic droplet vaporization on endothelial cells and in vivo. Early timescale vaporization events, including phase change, are directly visualized using ultra-high speed imaging, and the influence of acoustic parameters on droplet/bubble dynamics is discussed. Acoustic and fluid mechanics parameters affecting the severity of endothelial cell bioeffects are explored. These findings suggest parameter spaces for which bioeffects may be reduced or enhanced, depending on the objective of the therapy. This work was supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  2. Controlling the acoustic streaming by pulsed ultrasounds.

    Hoyos, Mauricio; Castro, Angélica

    2013-01-01

    We propose a technique based on pulsed ultrasounds for controlling, reducing to a minimum observable value the acoustic streaming in closed ultrasonic standing wave fluidic resonators. By modifying the number of pulses and the repetition time it is possible to reduce the velocity of the acoustic streaming with respect to the velocity generated by the continuous ultrasound mode of operation. The acoustic streaming is observed at the nodal plane where a suspension of 800nm latex particles was focused by primary radiation force. A mixture of 800nm and 15μm latex particles has been also used for showing that the acoustic streaming is hardly reduced while primary and secondary forces continue to operate. The parameter we call "pulse mode factor" i.e. the time of applied ultrasound divided by the duty cycle, is found to be the adequate parameter that controls the acoustic streaming. We demonstrate that pulsed ultrasound is more efficient for controlling the acoustic streaming than the variation of the amplitude of the standing waves.

  3. The Development of the Acoustic Design of NASA Glenn Research Center's New Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  4. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    Chu, SShao-sheng R.; Allen, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic modeling can be used to identify key noise sources, determine/analyze sub-allocated requirements, keep track of the accumulation of minor noise sources, and to predict vehicle noise levels at various stages in vehicle development, first with estimates of noise sources, later with experimental data. In FY09, the physical mockup developed in FY08, with interior geometric shape similar to Orion CM (Crew Module) IML (Interior Mode Line), was used to validate SEA (Statistical Energy Analysis) acoustic model development with realistic ventilation fan sources. The sound power levels of these sources were unknown a priori, as opposed to previous studies that RSS (Reference Sound Source) with known sound power level was used. The modeling results were evaluated based on comparisons to measurements of sound pressure levels over a wide frequency range, including the frequency range where SEA gives good results. Sound intensity measurement was performed over a rectangular-shaped grid system enclosing the ventilation fan source. Sound intensities were measured at the top, front, back, right, and left surfaces of the and system. Sound intensity at the bottom surface was not measured, but sound blocking material was placed tinder the bottom surface to reflect most of the incident sound energy back to the remaining measured surfaces. Integrating measured sound intensities over measured surfaces renders estimated sound power of the source. The reverberation time T6o of the mockup interior had been modified to match reverberation levels of ISS US Lab interior for speech frequency bands, i.e., 0.5k, 1k, 2k, 4 kHz, by attaching appropriately sized Thinsulate sound absorption material to the interior wall of the mockup. Sound absorption of Thinsulate was modeled in three methods: Sabine equation with measured mockup interior reverberation time T60, layup model based on past impedance tube testing, and layup model plus air absorption correction. The evaluation/validation was

  5. Apparatus for separating particles utilizing engineered acoustic contrast capture particles

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D

    2016-05-17

    An apparatus for separating particles from a medium includes a capillary defining a flow path therein that is in fluid communication with a medium source. The medium source includes engineered acoustic contrast capture particle having a predetermined acoustic contrast. The apparatus includes a vibration generator that is operable to produce at least one acoustic field within the flow path. The acoustic field produces a force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles and a force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles in the flow path and drives the engineered acoustic contrast capture particles to either the force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles or the force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles.

  6. Nonlinear Acoustics Used To Reduce Leakage Flow

    Daniels, Christopher C.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2004-01-01

    Leakage and wear are two fundamental problems in all traditional turbine seals that contribute to an engine's inefficiency. The solutions to seal leakage and wear conflict in the conventional design space. Reducing the clearance between the seal and rotating shaft reduces leakage but increases wear because of increased contact incidents. Increasing the clearance to reduce the contact between parts reduces wear but increases parasitic leakage. The goal of this effort is to develop a seal that restricts leakage flow using acoustic pressure while operating in a noncontacting manner, thereby increasing life. In 1996, Dr. Timothy Lucas announced his discovery of a method to produce shock-free high-amplitude pressure waves. For the first time, the formation of large acoustic pressures was possible using dissonant resonators. A pre-prototype acoustic seal developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center exploits this fundamental acoustic discovery: a specially shaped cavity oscillated at the contained fluid's resonant frequency produces high-amplitude acoustic pressure waves of a magnitude approaching those required of today's seals. While the original researchers are continuing their development of acoustic pumps, refrigeration compressors, and electronic thermal management systems using this technology, the goal of researchers at Glenn is to apply these acoustic principles to a revolutionary sealing device. When the acoustic resonator shape is optimized for the sealing device, the flow from a high-pressure cavity to a low-pressure cavity will be restricted by a series of high-amplitude standing pressure waves of higher pressure than the pressure to be sealed. Since the sealing resonator cavity will not touch the adjacent sealing structures, seal wear will be eliminated, improving system life. Under a cooperative agreement between Glenn and the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI), an acoustic-based pre-prototype seal was demonstrated for the first time. A pressurized cavity was

  7. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius.

  8. Cetacean Density Estimation from Novel Acoustic Datasets by Acoustic Propagation Modeling

    2012-09-30

    by Acoustic Propagation Modeling Martin Siderius and Elizabeth Thorp Küsel Portland State University Electrical and Computer Engineering...example with Blainville’s beaked whales,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125, 1982-1994. McMurtry G. M., Herrero-Bervera, E., Cremer , M. D., Smith, J. R., Resig, J

  9. Research on modal analysis of structural acoustic radiation using structural vibration modes and acoustic radiation modes

    LI Sheng; ZHAO Deyou

    2004-01-01

    Modal analysis of structural acoustic radiation from a vibrating structure is discussed using structural vibration modes and acoustic radiation modes based on the quadratic form of acoustic power. The finite element method is employed for discretisizing the structure.The boundary element method and Rayleigh integral are used for modeling the acoustic fluid.It is shown that the power radiated by a single vibration mode is to increase the radiated power and the effect of modal interaction can lead to an increase or a decrease or no change in the radiated power, moreover, control of vibration modes is a good way to reduce both vibration and radiated sound as long as the influence of interaction of vibration modes on sound radiation is insignificant. Stiffeners may change mode shapes of a plate and thus change radiation efficiency of the plate's modes. The CHIEF method is adopted to obtain an acoustic radiation mode formulation without the nonuniqueness difficulty at critical frequencies for three-dimensional structures by using Moore-Penrose inverse. A pulsating cube is involved to verify the formulation. Good agreement is obtained between the numerical and analytical solutions. The shapes and radiation efficiencies of acoustic radiation modes of the cube are discussed. The structural acoustic control using structural vibration modes and acoustic radiation modes are compared and studied.

  10. Prediction and Measurement of the Vibration and Acoustic Radiation of Panels Subjected to Acoustic Loading

    Turner, Travis L.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    1995-01-01

    Interior noise and sonic fatigue are important issues in the development and design of advanced subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Conventional aircraft typically employ passive treatments, such as constrained layer damping and acoustic absorption materials, to reduce the structural response and resulting acoustic levels in the aircraft interior. These techniques require significant addition of mass and only attenuate relatively high frequency noise transmitted through the fuselage. Although structural acoustic coupling is in general very important in the study of aircraft fuselage interior noise, analysis of noise transmission through a panel supported in an infinite rigid baffle (separating two semi-infinite acoustic domains) can be useful in evaluating the effects of active/adaptive materials, complex loading, etc. Recent work has been aimed at developing adaptive and/or active methods of controlling the structural acoustic response of panels to reduce the transmitted noise1. A finite element formulation was recently developed to study the dynamic response of shape memory alloy (SMA) hybrid composite panels (conventional composite panel with embedded SMA fibers) subject to combined acoustic and thermal loads2. Further analysis has been performed to predict the far-field acoustic radiation using the finite element dynamic panel response prediction3. The purpose of the present work is to validate the panel vibration and acoustic radiation prediction methods with baseline experimental results obtained from an isotropic panel, without the effect of SMA.

  11. Acoustic and streaming velocity components in a resonant waveguide at high acoustic levels.

    Daru, Virginie; Reyt, Ida; Bailliet, Hélène; Weisman, Catherine; Baltean-Carlès, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Rayleigh streaming is a steady flow generated by the interaction between an acoustic wave and a solid wall, generally assumed to be second order in a Mach number expansion. Acoustic streaming is well known in the case of a stationary plane wave at low amplitude: it has a half-wavelength spatial periodicity and the maximum axial streaming velocity is a quadratic function of the acoustic velocity amplitude at antinode. For higher acoustic levels, additional streaming cells have been observed. Results of laser Doppler velocimetry measurements are here compared to direct numerical simulations. The evolution of axial and radial velocity components for both acoustic and streaming velocities is studied from low to high acoustic amplitudes. Two streaming flow regimes are pointed out, the axial streaming dependency on acoustics going from quadratic to linear. The evolution of streaming flow is different for outer cells and for inner cells. Also, the hypothesis of radial streaming velocity being of second order in a Mach number expansion, is not valid at high amplitudes. The change of regime occurs when the radial streaming velocity amplitude becomes larger than the radial acoustic velocity amplitude, high levels being therefore characterized by nonlinear interaction of the different velocity components.

  12. Homogenization scheme for acoustic metamaterials

    Yang, Min

    2014-02-26

    We present a homogenization scheme for acoustic metamaterials that is based on reproducing the lowest orders of scattering amplitudes from a finite volume of metamaterials. This approach is noted to differ significantly from that of coherent potential approximation, which is based on adjusting the effective-medium parameters to minimize scatterings in the long-wavelength limit. With the aid of metamaterials’ eigenstates, the effective parameters, such as mass density and elastic modulus can be obtained by matching the surface responses of a metamaterial\\'s structural unit cell with a piece of homogenized material. From the Green\\'s theorem applied to the exterior domain problem, matching the surface responses is noted to be the same as reproducing the scattering amplitudes. We verify our scheme by applying it to three different examples: a layered lattice, a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice, and a decorated-membrane system. It is shown that the predicted characteristics and wave fields agree almost exactly with numerical simulations and experiments and the scheme\\'s validity is constrained by the number of dominant surface multipoles instead of the usual long-wavelength assumption. In particular, the validity extends to the full band in one dimension and to regimes near the boundaries of the Brillouin zone in two dimensions.

  13. Acoustic properties of biodegradable nonwovens

    Yilmaz, Nazire Deniz

    The purpose of this study is to provide a better understanding of acoustical properties of nonwovens, and to model the noise control behavior in terms of material and treatment parameters. A review of existing models on sound absorption of fibrous materials, coupled with experimental data will help in modeling sound absorption in multi-layer needle-punched nonwoven fabrics of different fibers: hemp, polylactide, polypropylene, and glassfiber. The effects of several treatments, which the materials may undergo during sound absorber manufacturing, namely alkalization, compression and heat treatments are investigated. The collected data is evaluated by experts. Expert evaluation further provides information about market demands for sound absorbers, and the perception of the designed nonwovens through the eyes of professionals. This research provides a contribution to the body of knowledge on the sound absorption properties of nonwovens, and provides a better understanding of the effects of some manufacturing processes on nonwovens' noise control performance and contributes to the wider adoption of nonwovens as sound absorbers.

  14. Acoustic pollution in hospital environments

    Olivera, J. M.; Rocha, L. A.; Rotger, V. I.; Herrera, M. C.

    2011-12-01

    There are many different services within a hospital. This means different types of noise which can be considered as acoustic pollution. Knowing that preterm infants exposed to high amounts of noise in the NICU are at a much higher risk because of their neurologic immaturity and physiologic instability, that excessive levels of noise also affect the persons and it can also impede some studies on patients, it was proposed to evaluate the Sound Pressure Level in some services of the Instituto de Maternidad, Tucumán, Argentina. There were evaluated the Level III NICU, the laundry service, a physical space destined for a service of evoked potential and a neonatal incubator under working conditions. The measurements were performed with a type II sonometer (CENTER 322) and it was also used an incubator analyzer (FLUKE INCU) for the incubator. The average values obtained were of 63.6 dBA for the NICU, 82.5dBA for the laundry room, 52.7 dBA for the evoked potential room and 62.8 dBA in the inside of the incubator under 64 dBA in the outside. The reports were documented in compliance with the appropriate standards.

  15. Joint Acoustic and Modulation Frequency

    Les Atlas

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a considerable evidence that our perception of sound uses important features which is related to underlying signal modulations. This topic has been studied extensively via perceptual experiments, yet there are few, if any, well-developed signal processing methods which capitalize on or model these effects. We begin by summarizing evidence of the importance of modulation representations from psychophysical, physiological, and other sources. The concept of a two-dimensional joint acoustic and modulation frequency representation is proposed. A simple single sinusoidal amplitude modulator of a sinusoidal carrier is then used to illustrate properties of an unconstrained and ideal joint representation. Added constraints are required to remove or reduce undesired interference terms and to provide invertibility. It is then noted that the constraints would also apply to more general and complex cases of broader modulation and carriers. Applications in single-channel speaker separation and in audio coding are used to illustrate the applicability of this joint representation. Other applications in signal analysis and filtering are suggested.

  16. Vestibular Schwannoma or acoustic neuroma

    Hekmatara M

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular schwannoma is the most common tumor of the posterior fossa of the skull. Patients referred with the primary otologic symptoms such as hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo, imbalance, and the cranial nerve palsy. Thirty-three patients were operated and treated by a team of otolaryngologist and neurosurgeon, anudiometrist, and internist. Patients'chiefcomplaint was due to 94% hearing loss and 27% tinnitus. They scarcely complain of vertigo. If a patient refers with the palsy or paralysis of facial nerve preoperation, we must think of the facial nerve schwannoma or hemangioma or congential cholestoma or malignant metastases rather than acoustic neuroma. The best way for preoperative diagnosis is audiometry, ABR (Auditory Brain Response, and SDS (speech discrimination score with 90% success, but computer Tomography (CT scan and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Image are the valuable anatomic diagnostic radiographic devices. The best method of operation is translabirynthine approach (TLA, since it has the advantages such as an easy access to nerve paths and being the nearest path to CPA (Cerebellopontine Angle. Physicians ought to talk to patients about the importance of the microscopic surgery, surgical methods, and their probable diverse effects such as hearing loss, facial nerve palsy, and intracranial problems.

  17. Synthesis of anisotropic swirling surface acoustic waves by inverse filter, towards integrated generators of acoustical vortices

    Riaud, Antoine; Charron, Eric; Bussonnière, Adrien; Matar, Olivier Bou

    2015-01-01

    From radio-electronics signal analysis to biological samples actuation, surface acoustic waves (SAW) are involved in a multitude of modern devices. Despite this versatility, SAW transducers developed up to date only authorize the synthesis of the most simple standing or progressive waves such as plane and focused waves. In particular, acoustical integrated sources able to generate acoustical vortices (the analogue of optical vortices) are missing. In this work, we propose a flexible tool based on inverse filter technique and arrays of SAW transducers enabling the synthesis of prescribed complex wave patterns at the surface of anisotropic media. The potential of this setup is illustrated by the synthesis of a 2D analog of 3D acoustical vortices, namely "swirling surface acoustic waves". Similarly to their 3D counterpart, they appear as concentric structures of bright rings with a phase singularity in their center resulting in a central dark spot. Swirling SAW can be useful in fragile sensors whose neighborhood...

  18. Modern acoustics in China related to Dah-You MAA

    ZHANG Jialu

    2006-01-01

    The history of Acoustics is very long, but for modern Acoustics it was only started from the end of 19th century after Bell's and Sabine's works. Modern Acoustics in China was developed even later. The main contributions to the development of modern Acoustics in China of Dah-You MAA and his academic achievements were presented in this paper. It is shown that Dah-You MAA who is one of the founders of the normal mode theory and the modern Acoustics in China has played an important role in developing modern Acoustics. Some preliminary studies of MAA's scientific philosophy and his social activities were discussed in this paper also.

  19. Imaging of Acoustic Waves in Sand

    Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

    2003-08-01

    There is considerable interest in detecting objects such as landmines shallowly buried in loose earth or sand. Various techniques involving microwave, acoustic, thermal and magnetic sensors have been used to detect such objects. Acoustic and microwave sensors have shown promise, especially if used together. In most cases, the sensor package is scanned over an area to eventually build up an image or map of anomalies. We are proposing an alternate, acoustic method that directly provides an image of acoustic waves in sand or soil, and their interaction with buried objects. The INEEL Laser Ultrasonic Camera utilizes dynamic holography within photorefractive recording materials. This permits one to image and demodulate acoustic waves on surfaces in real time, without scanning. A video image is produced where intensity is directly and linearly proportional to surface motion. Both specular and diffusely reflecting surfaces can be accomodated and surface motion as small as 0.1 nm can be quantitatively detected. This system was used to directly image acoustic surface waves in sand as well as in solid objects. Waves as frequencies of 16 kHz were generated using modified acoustic speakers. These waves were directed through sand toward partially buried objects. The sand container was not on a vibration isolation table, but sat on the lab floor. Interaction of wavefronts with buried objects showed reflection, diffraction and interference effects that could provide clues to location and characteristics of buried objects. Although results are preliminary, success in this effort suggests that this method could be applied to detection of buried landmines or other near-surface items such as pipes and tanks.

  20. Virtual reflections in electronic acoustic architecture

    van Munster, Bjorn

    2005-09-01

    In the era of the ancient Greeks and Byzantines, the first attempts for increasing reverberation time are noted. In the 1950s, the Ambiophonic system accomplished this by means of an electronic device, for the first time. The early systems only increased the reverberation time by delaying the picked-up reverberation. With the introduction of multichannel feedback-based systems, the reverberation level also could be increased. Later, it was understood that it was important to also fill in the missing reflections, address reflection density, frequency dependence, etc. This resulted in the development of the SIAP concept. Current DSP technology led to the development of a processor whereby density, length, level, and the frequency content can be controlled for different areas in the same room or different rooms, leading to the concept of the acoustic server. electronic acoustic architecture has become the current state-of-the-art approach for solving acoustic deficiencies in, among others, rehearsal rooms, theaters, churches, and multipurpose venues. Incorporation of complementary passive acoustic solutions provides an optimum solution for all room problems. This paper discusses the utilization of virtual reflections in the new approach of electronic acoustic architecture for different environments. Measurements performed in the Sejong Performing Arts Centre, Seoul, South Korea, show the power of this approach.

  1. Acoustical measurements in ancient Roman theatres

    Farnetani, Andrea; Fausti, Patrizio; Pompoli, Roberto; Prodi, Nicola

    2001-05-01

    The Greek and Roman theatres are among the most precious and spectacular items of cultural heritage in the Mediterranean countries. The theatres are famous not only for their impressive architecture, but also for the acoustic qualities. For this reason it is important to consider these theatres as an acoustical heritage and to study their sound field. Within the activities of the ERATO (identification Evaluation and Revival of the Acoustical heritage of ancient Theatres and Odea) project, acoustical measurements were taken in well-preserved ancient Roman theatres at Aspendos (Turkey) and Jerash (Jordan). Roman theatres have an impressive stage building that forms a back wall in the orchestra area, and it was found that, from the analysis of the acoustical parameters, the reverberation time (e.g., 1.7 s at middle frequencies in the theatre of Aspendos) is quite long compared not only with other open-space theatres but also with closed spaces. Contrary to modern halls the clarity is high and this fact, together with a low sound level in most of the seats, gives the sound field a unique character.

  2. Acoustic Absorption of Natural Fiber Composites

    Hasina Mamtaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study is a bibliographic observation on prevailing tendencies in the development of acoustic absorption by natural fiber composites. Despite having less detrimental environmental effects and thorough availability, natural fibers are still unsuitable for wide implementation in industrial purposes. Some shortcomings such as the presence of moisture contents, thicker diameter, and lower antifungus quality hold up the progress of natural fiber composites in staying competitive with synthetic composites. The review indicates the importance of the pretreatment of fresh natural fiber to overcome these shortcomings. However, the pretreatment of natural fiber causes the removal of moisture contents which results in the decrease of its acoustic absorption performance. Incorporation of granular materials in treated fiber composite is expected to play a significant role as a replacement for moisture contents. This review aims to investigate the acoustic absorption behavior of natural fiber composites due to the incorporation of granular materials. It is intended that this review will provide an overview of the analytical approaches for the modeling of acoustic wave propagation through the natural fiber composites. The possible influential factors of fibers and grains were described in this study for the enhancement of low frequency acoustic absorption of the composites.

  3. Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging.

    McDannold, Nathan; Maier, Stephan E

    2008-08-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is an elastography method developed for ultrasound imaging that maps displacements produced by focused ultrasound pulses systematically applied to different locations. The resulting images are "stiffness weighted" and yield information about local mechanical tissue properties. Here, the feasibility of magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was tested. Quasistatic MR elastography was used to measure focal displacements using a one-dimensional MRI pulse sequence. A 1.63 or 1.5 MHz transducer supplied ultrasound pulses which were triggered by the magnetic resonance imaging hardware to occur before a displacement-encoding gradient. Displacements in and around the focus were mapped in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in an ex vivo bovine kidney. They were readily observed and increased linearly with acoustic power in the phantom (R2=0.99). At higher acoustic power levels, the displacement substantially increased and was associated with irreversible changes in the phantom. At these levels, transverse displacement components could also be detected. Displacements in the kidney were also observed and increased after thermal ablation. While the measurements need validation, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting small displacements induced by low-power ultrasound pulses using an efficient magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence that is compatible with tracking of a dynamically steered ultrasound focal spot, and that the displacement increases with acoustic power. MR-ARFI has potential for elastography or to guide ultrasound therapies that use low-power pulsed ultrasound exposures, such as drug delivery.

  4. Liquid lens using acoustic radiation force.

    Koyama, Daisuke; Isago, Ryoichi; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2011-03-01

    A liquid lens is proposed that uses acoustic radiation force with no mechanical moving parts. It consists of a cylindrical acrylic cell filled with two immiscible liquids (degassed water and silicone oil) and a concave ultrasound transducer. The focal point of the transducer is located on the oil-water interface, which functions as a lens. The acoustic radiation force is generated when there is a difference in the acoustic energy densities of different media. An acoustic standing wave was generated in the axial direction of the lens and the variation of the shape of the oil-water interface was observed by optical coherence tomography (OCT). The lens profile can be rapidly changed by varying the acoustic radiation force from the transducer. The kinematic viscosity of silicone oil was optimized to minimize the response times of the lens. Response times of 40 and 80 ms when switching ultrasonic radiation on and off were obtained with a kinematic viscosity of 200 cSt. The path of a laser beam transmitted through the lens was calculated by ray-tracing simulations based on the experimental results obtained by OCT. The transmitted laser beam could be focused by applying an input voltage. The liquid lens could be operated as a variable-focus lens by varying the input voltage.

  5. Mobile platform for acoustic mine detection applications

    Libbey, Brad; Fenneman, Douglas; Burns, Brian

    2005-06-01

    Researchers in academia have successfully demonstrated acoustic landmine detection techniques. These typically employ acoustic or seismic sources to induce vibration in the mine/soil system, and use vibration sensors such as laser vibrometers or geophones to measure the resultant surface motion. These techniques exploit the unique mechanical properties of landmines to discriminate the vibration response of a buried mine from an off-target measurement. The Army requires the ability to rapidly and reliably scan an area for landmines and is developing a mobile platform at NVESD to meet this requirement. The platform represents an initial step toward the implementation of acoustic mine detection technology on a representative field vehicle. The effort relies heavily on the acoustic mine detection cart system developed by researchers at the University of Mississippi and Planning Systems, Inc. The NVESD platform consists of a John Deere E-gator configured with a robotic control system to accurately position the vehicle. In its present design, the E-gator has been outfitted with an array of laser vibrometers and a bank of loudspeakers. Care has been taken to ensure that the vehicle"s mounting hardware and data acquisition algorithms are sufficiently robust to accommodate the implementation of other sensor modalities. A thorough discussion of the mobile platform from its inception to its present configuration will be provided. Specific topics to be addressed include the vehicle"s control and data acquisition systems. Preliminary results from acoustic mine detection experiments will also be presented.

  6. Speaker independent acoustic-to-articulatory inversion

    Ji, An

    Acoustic-to-articulatory inversion, the determination of articulatory parameters from acoustic signals, is a difficult but important problem for many speech processing applications, such as automatic speech recognition (ASR) and computer aided pronunciation training (CAPT). In recent years, several approaches have been successfully implemented for speaker dependent models with parallel acoustic and kinematic training data. However, in many practical applications inversion is needed for new speakers for whom no articulatory data is available. In order to address this problem, this dissertation introduces a novel speaker adaptation approach called Parallel Reference Speaker Weighting (PRSW), based on parallel acoustic and articulatory Hidden Markov Models (HMM). This approach uses a robust normalized articulatory space and palate referenced articulatory features combined with speaker-weighted adaptation to form an inversion mapping for new speakers that can accurately estimate articulatory trajectories. The proposed PRSW method is evaluated on the newly collected Marquette electromagnetic articulography -- Mandarin Accented English (EMA-MAE) corpus using 20 native English speakers. Cross-speaker inversion results show that given a good selection of reference speakers with consistent acoustic and articulatory patterns, the PRSW approach gives good speaker independent inversion performance even without kinematic training data.

  7. Acoustic Gaits: Gait Analysis With Footstep Sounds.

    Altaf, M Umair Bin; Butko, Taras; Juang, Biing-Hwang Fred

    2015-08-01

    We describe the acoustic gaits-the natural human gait quantitative characteristics derived from the sound of footsteps as the person walks normally. We introduce the acoustic gait profile, which is obtained from temporal signal analysis of sound of footsteps collected by microphones and illustrate some of the spatio-temporal gait parameters that can be extracted from the acoustic gait profile by using three temporal signal analysis methods-the squared energy estimate, Hilbert transform and Teager-Kaiser energy operator. Based on the statistical analysis of the parameter estimates, we show that the spatio-temporal parameters and gait characteristics obtained using the acoustic gait profile can consistently and reliably estimate a subset of clinical and biometric gait parameters currently in use for standardized gait assessments. We conclude that the Teager-Kaiser energy operator provides the most consistent gait parameter estimates showing the least variation across different sessions and zones. Acoustic gaits use an inexpensive set of microphones with a computing device as an accurate and unintrusive gait analysis system. This is in contrast to the expensive and intrusive systems currently used in laboratory gait analysis such as the force plates, pressure mats and wearable sensors, some of which may change the gait parameters that are being measured.

  8. Acoustic communication in insect disease vectors

    Felipe de Mello Vigoder

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic signalling has been extensively studied in insect species, which has led to a better understanding of sexual communication, sexual selection and modes of speciation. The significance of acoustic signals for a blood-sucking insect was first reported in the XIX century by Christopher Johnston, studying the hearing organs of mosquitoes, but has received relatively little attention in other disease vectors until recently. Acoustic signals are often associated with mating behaviour and sexual selection and changes in signalling can lead to rapid evolutionary divergence and may ultimately contribute to the process of speciation. Songs can also have implications for the success of novel methods of disease control such as determining the mating competitiveness of modified insects used for mass-release control programs. Species-specific sound “signatures” may help identify incipient species within species complexes that may be of epidemiological significance, e.g. of higher vectorial capacity, thereby enabling the application of more focussed control measures to optimise the reduction of pathogen transmission. Although the study of acoustic communication in insect vectors has been relatively limited, this review of research demonstrates their value as models for understanding both the functional and evolutionary significance of acoustic communication in insects.

  9. Acoustic streaming of a sharp edge.

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Zhou, Jianbo; Yalamanchili, Satish

    2014-07-01

    Anomalous acoustic streaming is observed emanating from sharp edges of solid bodies that are vibrating in fluids. The streaming velocities can be orders of magnitude higher than expected from the Rayleigh streaming at similar amplitudes of vibration. Acoustic velocity of fluid relative to a solid body diverges at a sharp edge, giving rise to a localized time-independent body force acting on the fluid. This force results in a formation of a localized jet. Two-dimensional numerical simulations are performed to predict acoustic streaming for low amplitude vibration using two methods: (1) Steady-state solution utilizing perturbation theory and (2) direct transient solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. Both analyses agree with each other and correctly predict the streaming of a sharp-edged vibrating blade measured experimentally. The origin of the streaming can be attributed to the centrifugal force of the acoustic fluid flow around a sharp edge. The dependence of this acoustic streaming on frequency and velocity is examined using dimensional analysis. The dependence law is devised and confirmed by numerical simulations.

  10. Tuned Chamber Core Panel Acoustic Test Results

    Schiller, Noah H.; Allen, Albert R.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents acoustic testing of tuned chamber core panels, which can be used to supplement the low-frequency performance of conventional acoustic treatment. The tuned chamber core concept incorporates low-frequency noise control directly within the primary structure and is applicable to sandwich constructions with a directional core, including corrugated-, truss-, and fluted-core designs. These types of sandwich structures have long, hollow channels (or chambers) in the core. By adding small holes through one of the facesheets, the hollow chambers can be utilized as an array of low-frequency acoustic resonators. These resonators can then be used to attenuate low-frequency noise (below 400 Hz) inside a vehicle compartment without increasing the weight or size of the structure. The results of this test program demonstrate that the tuned chamber core concept is effective when used in isolation or combined with acoustic foam treatments. Specifically, an array of acoustic resonators integrated within the core of the panels was shown to improve both the low-frequency absorption and transmission loss of the structure in targeted one-third octave bands.

  11. Acoustic Issues in Human Spaceflight

    Clark, Jonathan B.

    2001-01-01

    NASA is concerned about acute effect of sound on crew performance on International Space Station (ISS), and is developing strategies to assess and reduce acute, chronic, and delayed effects of sound. High noise levels can cause headaches, irritation, fatigue, impaired sleep, headache, and tinnitus and have resulted in an inability to hear alarms. Speech intelligibility may be more impaired for crew understanding non-native language in a noisy environment. No hearing loss occurred, but significant effects on crew performance and communication occurred. Permanent Threshold Shifts (PTS) have not been observed in the US shuttle program. Russian specification for noise in spacecraft is 60 dBA (awake) and 50 dBA (asleep) while the U.S. noise specification on ISS is NC 50 (awake) and NC 40 (asleep) with a 85 dBA hazard limit. Background noise levels of ISS modules have measured 56-69 dBA. Treadmill exercise operations measure 77 dBA. Alarms are required to be 20 dBA above ambient. Hearing protection is recommended when noise exceeds 60 dB 24 hour Leq. Countermeasures include hearing protection and design/ engineering controls. Advanced composite materials with excellent low frequency attenuation properties could be applied as a barrier protection around noisy equipment, or used on personal protective equipment worn by the crew. Hearing protection countermeasures include foam ear inserts, passive muff headsets, and active noise reduction headsets. Oto-acoustic emissions (OAE) could be used to monitor effectiveness of hearing protection countermeasures and tailor hearing protection countermeasures to individual crewmembers. Micro-gravity, vibration, toxic fumes, air quality/composition, stress, temperature, physical exertion or some combination of the above factors may have interacted with moderate long-term noise exposure to cause significant hearing loss. Longitudinal studies will need to address what co-morbidity factors, such as radiation, toxicology, microgravity

  12. Nonlinear acoustics and honeycomb materials

    Thompson, D. O.

    2012-05-01

    The scope of research activity that Bruce Thompson embraced was very large. In this talk three different research topics that the author shared with Bruce are reviewed. They represent Bruce's introduction to NDE and include nonlinear acoustics, nondestructive measurements of adhesive bond strengths in honeycomb panels, and studies of flexural wave dispersion in honeycomb materials. In the first of these, four harmonics of a 30 Mhz finite amplitude wave were measured for both fused silica and aluminum single crystals with varying lengths and amounts of cold work using a capacity microphone with heterodyne receiver with a flat frequency response from 30 to 250 Mhz. The results for fused silica with no dislocation structure could be described by a model due to Fubini, originally developed for gases, that depends upon only the second and third order elastic constants and not the fourth and higher order constants. The same was not true for the aluminum with dislocation structures. These results raised some questions about models for harmonic generation in materials with dislocations. In the second topic, experiments were made to determine the adhesive bond strengths of honeycomb panels using the vibrational response of the panels (Chladni figures). The results showed that both the damping characteristics of panel vibrations as a whole and velocity of propagation of elastic waves that travel along the surface and sample the bondline can be correlated with destructively determined bond strengths. Finally, the phase velocity of flexural waves traveling along a 1-inch honeycomb sandwich panel was determined from 170 Hz to 50 Khz, ranging from 2.2×104 cm/sec at the low end to 1.18×105 cm/sec at 40 Khz. The dispersion arises from the finite thickness of the panel and agreed with the results of continuum models for the honeycomb. Above 40 Khz, this was not the case. The paper concludes with a tribute to Bruce for his many wonderful contributions and lessons beyond his

  13. Stereotactic radiosurgery in acoustic neurinomas

    Yamamoto, Masaaki; Noren, G. (Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1990-12-01

    The records of 57 patients with 61 acoustic neurinomas treated with stereotatic radiosurgery at the Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, from 1982 through 1984, were reviewed. Adequate radiological and clinical follow-up evaluations were available in these cases. An additional 8 patients were treated during this same period but were not included because of insufficient data. The tumors were evaluated with CT or MRI. Their post-operative follow-up period was 6-66 months (mean 28 months). Decrease of tumor size or no change was considered as a response to radiosurgery. This was found in 54 (88%) of the tumors. Small tumors with a diameter of less than 15 mm responded better (93%) than large ones (85%). Ninety-five percent of unilateral tumors and 74% of tumors associated with neurofibromatosis responded well. Seven tumors had definite radiographic signs of subsequent growth. Four were removed using standard microsurgical tequniques and three have so far not required further treatment. Facial and trigeminal nerve function was evaluated in 58 facial surfaces where tumors had been irradiated. Transient facial weakness developed in 9% and facial hypesthesia in 9% of the irradiated cases. The onset of these nerve dysfunction appeared with a latency period of 4 to 15 months after radiosurgery. Excluding the ears which had been totally deaf before the treatment, forty-one ears were evaluated fully by audiometry prior to and one year after irradiation. 30% of them had no change in hearing, 68% had a more or less pronouced deterioration and 2% had improvement. We regard efficiency in arresting tumor growth without endangering life, preservation of facial nerve function, and only a day of hospitalization as major benefits of radiosurgery. (author).

  14. Nonlinear acoustics in biomedical ultrasound

    Cleveland, Robin O.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasound is widely used to image inside the body; it is also used therapeutically to treat certain medical conditions. In both imaging and therapy applications the amplitudes employed in biomedical ultrasound are often high enough that nonlinear acoustic effects are present in the propagation: the effects have the potential to be advantageous in some scenarios but a hindrance in others. In the case of ultrasound imaging the nonlinearity produces higher harmonics that result in images of greater quality. However, nonlinear effects interfere with the imaging of ultrasound contrast agents (typically micron sized bubbles with a strong nonlinear response of their own) and nonlinear effects also result in complications when derating of pressure measurements in water to in situ values in tissue. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as a non-invasive therapeutic modality which can result in thermal ablation of tissue. For thermal ablation, the extra effective attenuation resulting from nonlinear effects can result in enhanced heating of tissue if shock formation occurs in the target region for ablation - a highly desirable effect. However, if nonlinearity is too strong it can also result in undesired near-field heating and reduced ablation in the target region. The disruption of tissue (histotripsy) and fragmentation of kidney stones (lithotripsy) exploits shock waves to produce mechanically based effects, with minimal heating present. In these scenarios it is necessary for the waves to be of sufficient amplitude that a shock exists when the waveform reaches the target region. This talk will discuss how underlying nonlinear phenomenon act in all the diagnostic and therapeutic applications described above.

  15. Acoustical Environment of Three Stations at Rileys Hump

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Passive acoustic recorders were deployed to record acoustic signals over the time span of two years, and the data analyzed for the existence of known spawning sounds...

  16. On the Acoustic Properties of Vaporized Submicron Perfluorocarbon Droplets

    Reznik, Nikita; Lajoinie, Guillaume; Shpak, Oleksandr; Gelderblom, Erik C.; Williams, Ross; Jong, de Nico; Versluis, Michel; Burns, Peter N.

    2014-01-01

    The acoustic characteristics of microbubbles created from vaporized submicron perfluorocarbon droplets with fluorosurfactant coating are examined. Utilizing ultra-high-speed optical imaging, the acoustic response of individual microbubbles to low-intensity diagnostic ultrasound was observed on clini

  17. Early-Onset Alcohol Dependence Increases the Acoustic Startle Reflex

    Schellekens, A.F.A.; Mulders, P.C.R.; Ellenbroek, B.A.; Jong, C.A.J. de; Buitelaar, J.K.; Cools, A.R.; Verkes, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hyperreactivity and impaired sensory gating of the acoustic startle response in alcohol dependence has been suggested to reflect a residual effect of previous detoxifications, increasing the severity of subsequent withdrawal episodes. Previous studies on the acoustic startle only include

  18. Acoustic clouds: standing sound waves around a black hole analogue

    Benone, Carolina L; Herdeiro, Carlos; Radu, Eugen

    2014-01-01

    Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic black holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

  19. Methods and apparatus for multi-parameter acoustic signature inspection

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Samuel, Todd J.; Valencia, Juan D.; Gervais, Kevin L.; Tucker, Brian J.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Skorpik, James R.; Reid, Larry D.; Munley, John T.; Pappas, Richard A.; Wright, Bob W.; Panetta, Paul D.; Thompson, Jason S.

    2007-07-24

    A multiparameter acoustic signature inspection device and method are described for non-invasive inspection of containers. Dual acoustic signatures discriminate between various fluids and materials for identification of the same.

  20. Dry acoustic microscope for visualizing the defects in eletronic devices

    Tohmyoh, Hironori; Saka, Masumi [Dept. of Nanomechanics, Tohoku University, Tohoku (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    Acoustic microscopy/imaging has been widely used in electronics industry for the non-destructive detection and evaluation of defects in electronic devices. However, the conventional acoustic microscope requires the immersion of the samples in water, which puts a limitation on the samples that can be analyzed. To realize the high-resolution acoustic inspection of electronic devices without immersing them in water, the dry acoustic microscope, where a polymer film is inserted between water and the devices, has been developed, In this paper, we demonstrate the high-resolution acoustic imaging of two types of electronic devices under the dry environment by the present dry acoustic microscope. One is the silicon chip package with high acoustic impedance, and the other is the plastic package with low acoustic impedance.

  1. Acoustic manipulation of oscillating spherical bodies: Emergence of axial negative acoustic radiation force

    Rajabi, Majid; Mojahed, Alireza

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, emergence of negative axial acoustic radiation force on a rigid oscillating spherical body is investigated for acoustic manipulation purposes. The problem of plane acoustic wave scattering from an oscillating spherical body submerged in an ideal acoustic fluid medium is solved. For the case of oscillating direction collinear with the wave propagation wave number vector (desired path), it has been shown that the acoustic radiation force, as a result of nonlinear acoustic wave interaction with bodies can be expressed as a linear function of incident wave field and the oscillation properties of the oscillator (i.e., amplitude and phase of oscillation). The negative (i.e., pulling effects) and positive (i.e., pushing effects) radiation force situations are divided in oscillation complex plane with a specific frequency-dependant straight line. This characteristic line defines the radiation force cancellation state. In order to investigate the stability of the mentioned manipulation strategy, the case of misaligned oscillation of sphere with the wave propagation direction is studied. The proposed methodology may suggest a novel concept of single-beam acoustic handling techniques based on smart carriers.

  2. Subwavelength diffractive acoustics and wavefront manipulation with a reflective acoustic metasurface

    Wang, Wenqi; Xie, Yangbo; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2016-11-01

    Acoustic metasurfaces provide useful wavefront shaping capabilities, such as beam steering, acoustic focusing, and asymmetric transmission, in a compact structure. Most acoustic metasurfaces described in the literature are transmissive devices and focus their performance on steering sound beam of the fundamental diffractive order. In addition, the range of incident angles studied is usually below the critical incidence predicted by generalized Snell's law of reflection. In this work, we comprehensively analyze the wave interaction with a generic periodic phase-modulating structure in order to predict the behavior of all diffractive orders, especially for cases beyond critical incidence. Under the guidance of the presented analysis, a broadband reflective metasurface is designed based on an expanded library of labyrinthine acoustic metamaterials. Various local and nonlocal wavefront shaping properties are experimentally demonstrated, and enhanced absorption of higher order diffractive waves is experimentally shown for the first time. The proposed methodology provides an accurate approach for predicting practical diffracted wave behaviors and opens a new perspective for the study of acoustic periodic structures. The designed metasurface extends the functionalities of acoustic metasurfaces and paves the way for the design of thin planar reflective structures for broadband acoustic wave manipulation and extraordinary absorption.

  3. Origami acoustics: using principles of folding structural acoustics for simple and large focusing of sound energy

    Harne, Ryan L.; Lynd, Danielle T.

    2016-08-01

    Fixed in spatial distribution, arrays of planar, electromechanical acoustic transducers cannot adapt their wave energy focusing abilities unless each transducer is externally controlled, creating challenges for the implementation and portability of such beamforming systems. Recently, planar, origami-based structural tessellations are found to facilitate great versatility in system function and properties through kinematic folding. In this research we bridge the physics of acoustics and origami-based design to discover that the simple topological reconfigurations of a Miura-ori-based acoustic array yield many orders of magnitude worth of reversible change in wave energy focusing: a potential for acoustic field morphing easily obtained through deployable, tessellated architectures. Our experimental and theoretical studies directly translate the roles of folding the tessellated array to the adaptations in spectral and spatial wave propagation sensitivities for far field energy transmission. It is shown that kinematic folding rules and flat-foldable tessellated arrays collectively provide novel solutions to the long-standing challenges of conventional, electronically-steered acoustic beamformers. While our examples consider sound radiation from the foldable array in air, linear acoustic reciprocity dictates that the findings may inspire new innovations for acoustic receivers, e.g. adaptive sound absorbers and microphone arrays, as well as concepts that include water-borne waves.

  4. MEMS Gyroscopes Based on Acoustic Sagnac Effect

    Yuanyuan Yu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the design, fabrication and preliminary test results of a novel microelectromechanical systems (MEMS device—the acoustic gyroscope. The unique operating mechanism is based on the “acoustic version” of the Sagnac effect in fiber-optic gyros. The device measures the phase difference between two sound waves traveling in opposite directions, and correlates the signal to the angular velocity of the hosting frame. As sound travels significantly slower than light and develops a larger phase change within the same path length, the acoustic gyro can potentially outperform fiber-optic gyros in sensitivity and form factor. It also promises superior stability compared to vibratory MEMS gyros as the design contains no moving parts and is largely insensitive to mechanical stress or temperature. We have carried out systematic simulations and experiments, and developed a series of processes and design rules to implement the device.

  5. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials

    Zhai, S. L.; Zhao, X. P.; Liu, S.; Shen, F. L.; Li, L. L.; Luo, C. R.

    2016-08-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with ‘flute-like’ acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  6. Student design projects in applied acoustics.

    Bös, Joachim; Moritz, Karsten; Skowronek, Adam; Thyes, Christian; Tschesche, Johannes; Hanselka, Holger

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes a series of student projects which are intended to complement theoretical education in acoustics and engineering noise control with practical experience. The projects are also intended to enhance the students' ability to work in a team, to manage a project, and to present their results. The projects are carried out in close cooperation with industrial partners so that the students can get a taste of the professional life of noise control engineers. The organization of such a project, its execution, and some of the results from the most recent student project are presented as a demonstrative example. This latest project involved the creation of noise maps of a production hall, the acoustic analysis of a packaging machine, and the acoustic analysis of a spiral vibratory conveyor. Upon completion of the analysis, students then designed, applied, and verified some simple preliminary noise reduction measures to demonstrate the potential of these techniques.

  7. Aero-Acoustic Computations of Wind Turbines

    Zhu, Wei Jun

    2008-01-01

    are solved using the in-house flow solver EllipSys2D/3D which is a second-order finite volume code. The acoustic equations are solved using high-order finite difference schemes. The incompressible flow equations and the acoustic equations are solved at the same time levels where the pressure....... The acoustic solver consists of numerical schemes from fourth-order up to tenth-order accuracy, the use of different schemes are case dependent. In practice, at high Reynolds numbers when flow becomes turbulent, schemes with the highest order of accuracy are always used to resolve the small waves. For time...... integration, the classical 4-stage Runge-Kutta scheme is applied. Non-centered high-order schemes at numerical boundaries and high-order filter schemes are also discussed due to their importance. The method was validated against a few test cases and further applied for flows around a cylinder and an airfoil...

  8. Flow acoustics in solid-fluid structures

    Willatzen, Morten; Mads, Mikhail Vladimirovich Deryabin

    2008-01-01

    The governing two-dimensional equations of a heterogeneous material composed of a fluid (allowed to flow in the absence of acoustic excitations) and a crystalline piezoelectric cubic solid stacked one-dimensionally (along the z direction) are derived and special emphasis is given to the discussion...... of acoustic group velocity for the structure as a function of the wavenumber component perpendicular to the stacking direction (being the x axis). Variations in physical parameters with y are neglected assuming infinite material homogeneity along the y direction and the flow velocity is assumed to be directed...... in the general solution but examples are provided for the case where these are subject to rigid-wall conditions (Neumann boundary conditions in the acoustic pressure). In the second part of the paper, emphasis is given to the general case of larger frequencies and wavenumber-frequency bandstructure formation...

  9. Broad-band acoustic hyperbolic metamaterial

    Shen, Chen; Sui, Ni; Wang, Wenqi; Cummer, Steven A; Jing, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic metamaterials (AMMs) are engineered materials, made from subwavelength structures, that exhibit useful or unusual constitutive properties. There has been intense research interest in AMMs since its first realization in 2000 by Liu et al. A number of functionalities and applications have been proposed and achieved using AMMs. Hyperbolic metamaterials are one of the most important types of metamaterials due to their extreme anisotropy and numerous possible applications, including negative refraction, backward waves, spatial filtering, and subwavelength imaging. Although the importance of acoustic hyperbolic metamaterials (AHMMs) as a tool for achieving full control of acoustic waves is substantial, the realization of a broad-band and truly hyperbolic AMM has not been reported so far. Here, we demonstrate the design and experimental characterization of a broadband AHMM that operates between 1.0 kHz and 2.5 kHz.

  10. Multilayer Integrated Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators

    Zhang, Yafei

    2013-01-01

    Multilayer Integrated Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators mainly introduces the theory, design, fabrication technology and application of a recently developed new type of device, multilayer integrated film bulk acoustic resonators, at the micro and nano scale involving microelectronic devices, integrated circuits, optical devices, sensors and actuators, acoustic resonators, micro-nano manufacturing, multilayer integration, device theory and design principles, etc. These devices can work at very high frequencies by using the newly developed theory, design, and fabrication technology of nano and micro devices. Readers in fields of IC, electronic devices, sensors, materials, and films etc. will benefit from this book by learning the detailed fundamentals and potential applications of these advanced devices. Prof. Yafei Zhang is the director of the Ministry of Education’s Key Laboratory for Thin Films and Microfabrication Technology, PRC; Dr. Da Chen was a PhD student in Prof. Yafei Zhang’s research group.

  11. Utilizing computer models for optimizing classroom acoustics

    Hinckley, Jennifer M.; Rosenberg, Carl J.

    2002-05-01

    The acoustical conditions in a classroom play an integral role in establishing an ideal learning environment. Speech intelligibility is dependent on many factors, including speech loudness, room finishes, and background noise levels. The goal of this investigation was to use computer modeling techniques to study the effect of acoustical conditions on speech intelligibility in a classroom. This study focused on a simulated classroom which was generated using the CATT-acoustic computer modeling program. The computer was utilized as an analytical tool in an effort to optimize speech intelligibility in a typical classroom environment. The factors that were focused on were reverberation time, location of absorptive materials, and background noise levels. Speech intelligibility was measured with the Rapid Speech Transmission Index (RASTI) method.

  12. Gas sensing with surface acoustic wave devices

    Martin, S. J.; Schweizer, K. S.; Ricco, A. J.; Zipperian, T. E.

    1985-03-01

    The use of a ZnO-on-Si surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator as a gas sensor is discussed. In particular, the sensitivity of the device to organic vapors is examined. The planar nature of the SAW device, in which the acoustic energy is confined to within roughly one acoustic wavelength of the surface, makes the device extremely sensitive to surface perturbations. This characteristic has been exploited in the construction of SAW gas sensors in which the surface wave propagation characteristics are altered by species adsorbed from the ambient gas. The porous nature of the sputtered ZnO film, in conjunction with the microbalance capability of the SAW device, gives the sensor the ability to distinguish molecules on the basis of both size and mass.

  13. Distributed acoustic sensing with Michelson interferometer demodulation

    Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Chen; Shang, Ying; Wang, Chang; Zhao, Wenan; Peng, Gangding; Wang, Hongzhong

    2016-12-01

    The distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) has been extensively studied and widely used. A distributed acoustic sensing system based on the unbalanced Michelson interferometer with phase generated carrier (PGC) demodulation was designed and tested. The system could directly obtain the phase, amplitude, frequency response, and location information of sound wave at the same time and measurement at all points along the sensing fiber simultaneously. Experiments showed that the system successfully measured the acoustic signals with a phase-pressure sensitivity about-148 dB (re rad/μPa) and frequency response ripple less than 1.5 dB. The further field experiment showed that the system could measure signals at all points along the sensing fiber simultaneously.

  14. 2nd International Symposium on Shipboard Acoustics

    1986-01-01

    The first International Symposium on Shipboard Acoustics, held in Noordwijkerhout (The Netherlands) in 1976, was a meeting of invited experts, each having considerable expertise in ship acoustics. Many of the participants were dealing with research on various ship acoustical subjects, and it proved to be a good idea to discuss future investigations and new techniques. At that time acousticians learned to use real-time signal-processing techniques and attempts were made to establish sound level prediction methods based on semi-fundamental considerations instead of the methods using empirically obtained data. Time was pressing as it was assumed that, in view of the adoption of Recommendation 141 of the International Labour Conference in 1970, authorities would soon make appropriate provisions to "protect seafarers from the ill effects of noise". This resulted in several national recommendations followed by the IMO "Code on noise levels aboard ships" which was adopted by the IMO Assembly in 1981. After that, pre...

  15. Constructing acoustic timefronts using random matrix theory

    Hegewisch, Katherine C

    2012-01-01

    In a recent letter [Europhys. Lett. {\\bf 97}, 34002 (2012)], random matrix theory is introduced for long-range acoustic propagation in the ocean. The theory is expressed in terms of unitary propagation matrices that represent the scattering between acoustic modes due to sound speed fluctuations induced by the ocean's internal waves. The scattering exhibits a power-law decay as a function of the differences in mode numbers thereby generating a power-law, banded, random unitary matrix ensemble. This work gives a more complete account of that approach and extends the methods to the construction of an ensemble of acoustic timefronts. The result is a very efficient method for studying the statistical properties of timefronts at various propagation ranges that agrees well with propagation based on the parabolic equation. It helps identify which information about the ocean environment survives in the timefronts and how to connect features of the data to the surviving environmental information. It also makes direct c...

  16. Acoustical Quality Assessment of the Classroom Environment

    George, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Teaching is one of the most important factors affecting any education system. Many research efforts have been conducted to facilitate the presentation modes used by instructors in classrooms as well as provide means for students to review lectures through web browsers. Other studies have been made to provide acoustical design recommendations for classrooms like room size and reverberation times. However, using acoustical features of classrooms as a way to provide education systems with feedback about the learning process was not thoroughly investigated in any of these studies. We propose a system that extracts different sound features of students and instructors, and then uses machine learning techniques to evaluate the acoustical quality of any learning environment. We infer conclusions about the students' satisfaction with the quality of lectures. Using classifiers instead of surveys and other subjective ways of measures can facilitate and speed such experiments which enables us to perform them continuously...

  17. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials.

    Zhai, S L; Zhao, X P; Liu, S; Shen, F L; Li, L L; Luo, C R

    2016-08-31

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with 'flute-like' acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  18. Acoustic and optical phonons in metallic diamond

    M. Hoesch, T. Fukuda, T. Takenouchi, J.P. Sutter, S. Tsutsui, A.Q.R. Baron, M. Nagao, Y. Takano, H. Kawarada and J. Mizuki

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The dispersion of acoustic and optical phonons in highly boron-doped diamond has been measured by inelastic X-ray scattering at an energy resolution of 6.4 meV. The sample is doped in the metallic regime and shows superconductivity below 4.2 K (midpoint. The data are compared to pure and nitrogen-doped diamond that represent the non-metallic state. No difference is found for the acoustic phonons in the three samples, while the optical phonons show a shift of the dispersion (softening in qualitative agreement with earlier results from Raman spectroscopy. The presence of boron and nitrogen incorporated into the diamond lattice leads to structural disorder. Evidence for this is found both in the observation of otherwise symmetry-forbidded Bragg intensity at (0 0 2 and intensity from acoustic phonon modes in the vicinity of (0 0 2.

  19. Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming

    Branch; Darren W. , Meyer; Grant D. , Craighead; Harold G.

    2011-05-17

    An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

  20. Systematic design of acoustic devices by topology optimization

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2005-01-01

    We present a method to design acoustic devices with topology optimization. The general algorithm is exemplified by the design of a reflection chamber that minimizes the transmission of acoustic waves in a specified frequency range.......We present a method to design acoustic devices with topology optimization. The general algorithm is exemplified by the design of a reflection chamber that minimizes the transmission of acoustic waves in a specified frequency range....

  1. On Modeling Eavesdropping Attacks in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks †

    Qiu Wang; Hong-Ning Dai; Xuran Li; Hao Wang; Hong Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The security and privacy of underwater acoustic sensor networks has received extensive attention recently due to the proliferation of underwater activities. This paper proposes an analytical model to investigate the eavesdropping attacks in underwater acoustic sensor networks. Our analytical framework considers the impacts of various underwater acoustic channel conditions (such as the acoustic signal frequency, spreading factor and wind speed) and different hydrophones (isotropic hydrophones ...

  2. Humanitarian mine detection by acoustic resonance

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-03-01

    The JASON Committee at MITRE Corp. was tasked by DARPA to inquire into suitable technologies for humanitarian mine detection. Acoustic resonance was one of the very few technologies that the JASONs determined might be promising for the task, but was as yet unexplored at the time that they conducted their inquiry. The objective of this Seed Money investigation into acoustic resonance was to determine if it would be feasible to use acoustic resonance to provide an improvement to present methods for humanitarian mine detection. As detailed in this report, acoustic resonance methods do not appear to be feasible for this task. Although acoustic resonant responses are relatively easy to detect when they exist, they are very difficult to excite by the non-contact means that must be used for buried objects. Despite many different attempts, this research did not discover any practical means of using sound to excite resonant responses in objects known to have strong resonances. The shaker table experiments did see an effect that might be attributable to the resonance of the object under test, but the effect was weak, and exploited the a priori knowledge of the resonant frequency of the object under test to distinguish it from the background. If experiments that used objects known to have strong acoustic resonances produced such marginal results, this does not seem to be a practical method to detect objects with weak resonances or non-existent resonances. The results of this work contribute to the ORNL countermine initiative. ORNL is exploring several unconventional mine detection technologies, and is proposed to explore others. Since this research has discovered some major pitfalls in non-metallic mine detection, this experience will add realism to other strategies proposed for mine detection technologies. The experiment provided hands-on experience with inert plastic mines under field conditions, and gives ORNL additional insight into the problems of developing practical

  3. Acoustics in rock and pop music halls

    Adelman-Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert; Gade, Anders Christian

    2007-01-01

    The existing body of literature regarding the acoustic design of concert halls has focused almost exclusively on classical music, although there are many more performances of rhythmic music, including rock and pop. Objective measurements were made of the acoustics of twenty rock music venues...... in Denmark and a questionnaire was used in a subjective assessment of those venues with professional rock musicians and sound engineers. Correlations between the objective and subjective results lead, among others, to a recommendation for reverberation time as a function of hall volume. Since the bass...

  4. A Treatise on Acoustic Radiation. Volume 1.

    1981-01-01

    8217po ,,.a .- - - _~ ~ .~ ~ a* W W;, V~ ~v ~ ,d-vw ~ .- .. * . - " ,.• ,% A Treatise on Acoustic Radiation REFERENCES I. P. M. Morse, K. U. Ingard ...34Methods of Theoretical Physics", McGraw-Hill, 1953, p. 837. 5. L. L. Foldy, H. Primakoff, JASA. 17, 109-120 (1945). 6. P. M. Morse, K. V. Ingard ...Ref. (24), p. 17. 26. P. M. Morse, K. U. Ingard , "Theoretical Acoustics", McGraw-Hill (1969) p. 315. 27. L. D. Landau, E. M. Lifshitz, "Fluid

  5. A Klein-Gordon acoustic theory

    Anno, P.D.

    1992-12-01

    Geophysicists do not associate traveltime variation with density variation in acoustic or elastic wavefield interpretation. Rather, given a constant index of refraction, density variation within the medium of propagation is associated only with amplitudes. This point of view prevails because density does not occur as a variable in classical results such as Snell`s Law or the eikonal equation. Nevertheless, in this paper I predict, analytically, a continuum of density effects on acoustic wavefields-including a dispersive traveltime delay when density variation is rapid. I also examine the ability of a common imaging algorithm to cope with this time delay.

  6. A Klein-Gordon acoustic theory

    Anno, P.D.

    1992-12-01

    Geophysicists do not associate traveltime variation with density variation in acoustic or elastic wavefield interpretation. Rather, given a constant index of refraction, density variation within the medium of propagation is associated only with amplitudes. This point of view prevails because density does not occur as a variable in classical results such as Snell's Law or the eikonal equation. Nevertheless, in this paper I predict, analytically, a continuum of density effects on acoustic wavefields-including a dispersive traveltime delay when density variation is rapid. I also examine the ability of a common imaging algorithm to cope with this time delay.

  7. Acoustic Nonlinear Behaviour of Microbubble Contrast Agent

    俞金飞; 陆荣荣; 龚秀芬; 石涛

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the nonlinear characteristics of a microbubble contrast agent Sonazoid R (Nycomed,Norway), including the second, third, 1/2-order, 3/2-order and 5/2-order harmonics. We have measured the 1/2-order subharmonic response to different transmission sound pressures. We have found that subharmonic signals cannot be generated until the acoustic pressure reaches a certain value, which is the most different subharmonic from high harmonics. This result is favourable for the further study of the subharmonic in the bubbly liquid.The 3/2-order ultraharmonic response to acoustic pressure was also measured.

  8. Aeroelastic-Acoustics Simulation of Flight Systems

    Gupta, kajal K.; Choi, S.; Ibrahim, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the details of a numerical finite element (FE) based analysis procedure and a resulting code for the simulation of the acoustics phenomenon arising from aeroelastic interactions. Both CFD and structural simulations are based on FE discretization employing unstructured grids. The sound pressure level (SPL) on structural surfaces is calculated from the root mean square (RMS) of the unsteady pressure and the acoustic wave frequencies are computed from a fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the unsteady pressure distribution as a function of time. The resulting tool proves to be unique as it is designed to analyze complex practical problems, involving large scale computations, in a routine fashion.

  9. eshless Method for Acoustic and Elastic Modeling

    JiaXiaofeng; HuTianyue; WangRunqiu

    2005-01-01

    Wave equation method is one of the fundamental techniques for seismic modeling and imaging. In this paper the element-free-method (EFM) was used to solve acoustic and elastic equations.The key point of this method is no need of elements, which makes nodes free from the elemental restraint. Besides, the moving-least-squares (MLS) criterion in EFM leads to a high accuracy and smooth derivatives. The theories of EFM for both acoustic and elastic wave equations as well as absorbing boundary conditions were discussed respectively. Furthermore, some pre-stack models were used to show the good performance of EFM in seismic modeling.

  10. Properties of Materials Using Acoustic Waves.

    1984-10-01

    CLASSiFICATIOO OF THIS PAGIR elM. DMe Eatae" to nonlinear acoustics which should permit us to cast problems with geometric and other complexities into a...on the kinetics of chemical reactions . 5. New theoretical approaches in nonlinear acoustics (R.M. McGowan and Professor B.-T. Chu) We are working to...of water and methanol was compared with the theoretical predictions given by Marston’s theory and the simplified model (Hsu 1983). This set of data

  11. Acoustic superfocusing by solid phononic crystals

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Assouar, M. Badreddine; Oudich, Mourad

    2014-12-01

    We propose a solid phononic crystal lens capable of acoustic superfocusing beyond the diffraction limit. The unit cell of the crystal is formed by four rigid cylinders in a hosting material with a cavity arranged in the center. Theoretical studies reveal that the solid lens produces both negative refraction to focus propagating waves and surface states to amplify evanescent waves. Numerical analyses of the superfocusing effect of the considered solid phononic lens are presented with a separated source excitation to the lens. In this case, acoustic superfocusing beyond the diffraction limit is evidenced. Compared to the fluid phononic lenses, the solid lens is more suitable for ultrasonic imaging applications.

  12. Absorption of surface acoustic waves by graphene

    S. H. Zhang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a theoretical study on interactions of electrons in graphene with surface acoustic waves (SAWs. We find that owing to momentum and energy conservation laws, the electronic transition accompanied by the SAW absorption cannot be achieved via inter-band transition channels in graphene. For graphene, strong absorption of SAWs can be observed in a wide frequency range up to terahertz at room temperature. The intensity of SAW absorption by graphene depends strongly on temperature and can be adjusted by changing the carrier density. This study is relevant to the exploration of the acoustic properties of graphene and to the application of graphene as frequency-tunable SAW devices.

  13. Acoustic Logging Modeling by Refined Biot's Equations

    Plyushchenkov, Boris D.; Turchaninov, Victor I.

    An explicit uniform completely conservative finite difference scheme for the refined Biot's equations is proposed. This system is modified according to the modern theory of dynamic permeability and tortuosity in a fluid-saturated elastic porous media. The approximate local boundary transparency conditions are constructed. The acoustic logging device is simulated by the choice of appropriate boundary conditions on its external surface. This scheme and these conditions are satisfactory for exploring borehole acoustic problems in permeable formations in a real axial-symmetrical situation. The developed approach can be adapted for a nonsymmetric case also.

  14. Asymmetric acoustic transmission in multiple frequency bands

    Sun, Hong-xiang, E-mail: jsdxshx@ujs.edu.cn [Research Center of Fluid Machinery Engineering and Technology, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); State Key Laboratory of Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Yuan, Shou-qi, E-mail: Shouqiy@ujs.edu.cn [Research Center of Fluid Machinery Engineering and Technology, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Zhang, Shu-yi [Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-11-23

    We report both experimentally and numerically that the multi-band device of the asymmetric acoustic transmission is realized by placing two periodic gratings with different periods on both sides of two brass plates immersed in water. The asymmetric acoustic transmission can exist in four frequency bands below 1500 kHz, which arises from the interaction between various diffractions from the two gratings and Lamb modes in the brass plates immersed in water. The results indicate that the device has the advantages of multiple band, broader bandwidth, and simpler structure. Our finding should have great potential applications in ultrasonic devices.

  15. Physical acoustics v.8 principles and methods

    Mason, Warren P

    1971-01-01

    Physical Acoustics: Principles and Methods, Volume VIII discusses a number of themes on physical acoustics that are divided into seven chapters. Chapter 1 describes the principles and applications of a tool for investigating phonons in dielectric crystals, the spin phonon spectrometer. The next chapter discusses the use of ultrasound in investigating Landau quantum oscillations in the presence of a magnetic field and their relation to the strain dependence of the Fermi surface of metals. The third chapter focuses on the ultrasonic measurements that are made by pulsing methods with velo

  16. Fourth-order acoustic torque in intense sound fields

    Wang, T. G.; Kanber, H.; Olli, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    The observation of a fourth-order acoustic torque in intense sound fields is reported. The torque was determined by measuring the acoustically induced angular deflection of a polished cylinder suspended by a torsion fiber. This torque was measured in a sound field of amplitude greater than that in which first-order acoustic torque has been observed.

  17. Measurement of acoustic attenuation in South Pole ice

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J.A.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S.W.; Bay, R.; Alba, J.L.B.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J.J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J.K.; Becker, K.H.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D.Z.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D.J.; Bohm, C.; Boser, S.; Botner, O.; Bradley, L.; Braun, J.; Buitink, S.; Carson, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D.F.; D'Agostino, M.V.; Danninger, M.; Clercq, C. De; Demirors, L.; Depaepe, O.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; Vries-Uiterweerd, G. de; DeYoung, T.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J.P.; Duvoort, M.R.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R.W.; Engdegard, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P.A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A.R.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Foerster, M.M.; Fox, B.D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T.K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganugapati, R.; Geisler, M.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glusenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J.A.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Gross, A.; Grullon, S.; Gunasingha, R.M.; Gurtner, M.; Gustafsson, L.; Ha, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Helbing, K.; Herquet, P.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G.C.; Hoffman, K.D.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Huelsnitz, W.; Lafebre, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) and a retrievable transmitter deployed in holes drilled for the IceCube experiment, we have measured the attenuation of acoustic signals by South Pole ice at depths between 190 m and 500 m. Three data sets, using different acoustic sources, have been

  18. ACOUSTIC EMISSION MODEL WITH THERMOACTIVATIVE DESTRUCTION OF COMPOSITE MATERIAL SURFACE

    Sergii Filonenko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of acoustic emission energy during the composite material machining for termoactivativemodel of acoustic radiation is simulated. The regularities of resultant signals energy parameters change dependingon composite materials machining speed are determined. Obtained regularities with their statistical characteristicsare described. Sensitivity of acoustic emission energy parameters to the change of composite material machiningspeed is shown.

  19. An efficient planar inverse acoustic method based on Toeplitz matrices

    Wind, J.W.; Boer, de A.; Ellenbroek, M.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes a new, fast method to solve inverse acoustic problems for planar sources. This problem is often encountered in practice and methods such as planar nearfield acoustic holography (PNAH) and statistically optimised nearfield acoustic holography (SONAH) are widely used to solve it.

  20. Third International Conference on Acoustic Communication by Animals

    2011-09-30

    predominant aim of this conference is to consider acoustic communication, its mechanisms, and the detection of acoustic signals, particularly in noisy ...frogs (6). Topics covered included cognition/language; song and call classification; rule learning; acoustic ecology; communication in noisy ...at the Statler Hotel and Conference Center on the Cornell University campus. Evening programs included a networking dinner (“Bioacoustics and Pizza

  1. Estimation of acoustic resonances for room transfer function equalization

    Gil-Cacho, Pepe; van Waterschoot, Toon; Moonen, Marc;

    2010-01-01

    Strong acoustic resonances create long room impulse responses (RIRs) which may harm the speech transmission in an acoustic space and hence reduce speech intelligibility. Equalization is performed by cancelling the main acoustic resonances common to multiple room transfer functions (RTFs), i.e., c...

  2. Aero-acoustic modeling using large eddy simulation

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2007-01-01

    The splitting technique for aero-acoustic computations is extended to simulate three-dimensional flow and acoustic waves from airfoils. The aero-acoustic model is coupled to a sub-grid-scale turbulence model for Large-Eddy Simulations. In the first test case, the model is applied to compute laminar...

  3. Topology optimization for acoustic-structure interaction problems

    Yoon, Gil Ho; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2006-01-01

    We propose a gradient based topology optimization algorithm for acoustic-structure (vibro-acoustic) interaction problems without an explicit interfacing boundary representation. In acoustic-structure interaction problems, the pressure field and the displacement field are governed by the Helmholtz...

  4. Computational study for investigating acoustic streaming and heating during acoustic hemostasis

    Solovchuk, Maxim A; Sheu, Tony W H

    2014-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has many applications ranging from thermal ablation of cancer to hemostasis. Although focused ultrasound can seal a bleeding site, physical mechanisms of acoustic hemostasis are not fully understood yet. To understand better the interaction between different physical mechanisms involved in hemostasis a mathematical model of acoustic hemostasis is developed. This model comprises the nonlinear Westervelt equation and the bioheat equations in tissue and blood vessel. In the three dimensional domain, the nonlinear hemodynamic equations are coupled with the acoustic and thermal equations. Convected cooling and acoustic streaming effects are incorporated in the modeling study. Several sonication angles and two wound shapes have been studied. The optimal focal point location is at the rear of the wound and the optimal angle is 45$^0$.

  5. Understanding acoustics an experimentalist’s view of acoustics and vibration

    Garrett, Steven L

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides a unified approach to acoustics and vibration suitable for use in advanced undergraduate and first-year graduate courses on vibration and fluids. The book includes thorough treatment of vibration of harmonic oscillators, coupled oscillators, isotropic elasticity, and waves in solids including the use of resonance techniques for determination of elastic moduli. Drawing on 35 years of experience teaching introductory graduate acoustics at the Naval Postgraduate School and Penn State, the author presents a hydrodynamic approach to the acoustics of sound in fluids that provides a uniform methodology for analysis of lumped-element systems and wave propagation that can incorporate attenuation mechanisms and complex media. This view provides a consistent and reliable approach that can be extended with confidence to more complex fluids and future applications. Understanding Acoustics opens with a mathematical introduction that includes graphing and statistical uncertainty, followed by five chap...

  6. Photospheric high-frequency acoustic power excess in sunspot umbra: signature of magneto-acoustic modes

    S. Zharkov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We present observational evidence for the presence of MHD (magnetohydrodynamic waves in the solar photosphere deduced from SOHO/MDI (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager Dopplergram velocity observations. The magneto-acoustic perturbations are observed as acoustic power enhancement in the sunspot umbra at high-frequency bands in the velocity component perpendicular to the magnetic field. We use numerical modelling of wave propagation through localised non-uniform magnetic field concentration along with the same filtering procedure as applied to the observations to identify the observed waves. Guided by the results of the numerical simulations we classify the observed oscillations as magneto-acoustic waves excited by the trapped sub-photospheric acoustic waves. We consider the potential application of the presented method as a diagnostic tool for magnetohelioseismology.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of acoustic streaming: absorption coefficient and acoustic field shape estimation.

    Madelin, Guillaume; Grucker, Daniel; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Thiaudiere, Eric

    2006-07-01

    In this study, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to visualize acoustic streaming in liquids. A single-shot spin echo sequence (HASTE) with a saturation band perpendicular to the acoustic beam permits the acquisition of an instantaneous image of the flow due to the application of ultrasound. An average acoustic streaming velocity can be estimated from the MR images, from which the ultrasonic absorption coefficient and the bulk viscosity of different glycerol-water mixtures can be deduced. In the same way, this MRI method could be used to assess the acoustic field and time-average power of ultrasonic transducers in water (or other liquids with known physical properties), after calibration of a geometrical parameter that is dependent on the experimental setup.

  8. Acoustic logic gates and Boolean operation based on self-collimating acoustic beams

    Zhang, Ting; Cheng, Ying; Guo, Jian-zhong; Xu, Jian-yi; Liu, Xiao-jun

    2015-03-01

    The reveal of self-collimation effect in two-dimensional (2D) photonic or acoustic crystals has opened up possibilities for signal manipulation. In this paper, we have proposed acoustic logic gates based on the linear interference of self-collimated beams in 2D sonic crystals (SCs) with line-defects. The line defects on the diagonal of the 2D square SCs are actually functioning as a 3 dB splitter. By adjusting the phase difference between two input signals, the basic Boolean logic functions such as XOR, OR, AND, and NOT are achieved both theoretically and experimentally. Due to the non-diffracting property of self-collimation beams, more complex Boolean logic and algorithms such as NAND, NOR, and XNOR can be realized by cascading the basic logic gates. The achievement of acoustic logic gates and Boolean operation provides a promising approach for acoustic signal computing and manipulations.

  9. Acoustic logic gates and Boolean operation based on self-collimating acoustic beams

    Zhang, Ting; Xu, Jian-yi [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Department of Physics and Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Cheng, Ying, E-mail: chengying@nju.edu.cn; Liu, Xiao-jun, E-mail: liuxiaojun@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Department of Physics and Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); State Key Laboratory of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Guo, Jian-zhong [School of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xian 710119 (China)

    2015-03-16

    The reveal of self-collimation effect in two-dimensional (2D) photonic or acoustic crystals has opened up possibilities for signal manipulation. In this paper, we have proposed acoustic logic gates based on the linear interference of self-collimated beams in 2D sonic crystals (SCs) with line-defects. The line defects on the diagonal of the 2D square SCs are actually functioning as a 3 dB splitter. By adjusting the phase difference between two input signals, the basic Boolean logic functions such as XOR, OR, AND, and NOT are achieved both theoretically and experimentally. Due to the non-diffracting property of self-collimation beams, more complex Boolean logic and algorithms such as NAND, NOR, and XNOR can be realized by cascading the basic logic gates. The achievement of acoustic logic gates and Boolean operation provides a promising approach for acoustic signal computing and manipulations.

  10. Application of Gauge Theory to Acoustic Fields -- Revolutionizing and Rewriting the Whole Field of Acoustics

    Gan, W. S.

    2008-12-01

    This paper is to be dedicated to Prof C N Yang's 85th birthday celebration because the idea here was inspired by Prof Yang's public lecture in Singapore in 2006. There are many similarities between electromagnetic waves and acoustic waves. Maxwell's equations for em waves is the oldest gauge theory. We discover symmetries in the pair of wave equations in the acoustic stress field and the velocity field. We also derive a new equation in terms of the stress field for sound propagation in solids. This is different from the Christoffel's equation which is in term of the velocity field. We feel that stress field can better characterize the elastic properties of the sound waves. We also derive the acoustic gauge field condition and gauge invariance and symmetries for the acoustic fields. We also apply symmetries to study negative refraction. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  11. Cetacean Density Estimation from Novel Acoustic Datasets by Acoustic Propagation Modeling

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Cetacean Density Estimation from Novel Acoustic Datasets...OBJECTIVES The objectives of this research are to apply existing methods for cetacean density estimation from passive acoustic recordings made by single...sensors, to novel data sets and cetacean species, as well as refine the existing techniques in order to develop a more generalized model that can be

  12. SYS 2: Acoustic ENSBox A System of Self Calibrating Distributed Acoustic Arrays

    Lewis Girod; Martin Lukac; Vlad Trifa; Deborah Estrin

    2006-01-01

    The Acoustic Embedded Networked Sensing Box, is a platform for prototyping rapid-deployable distributed acoustic sensing systems, particularly distributed source localization. Each ENSBox integrates an ARM processor running Linux and supports key facilities required for source localization: a sensor array, wireless network services, time synchronization, and precise self-calibration of array position and orientation. The ENSBoxs integrated high precision self-calibration facility sets it ap...

  13. Acoustic communication for Maya Autonomous Underwater Vehicle - performance evaluation of acoustic modem

    Afzulpurkar, S.; Maurya, P.; Navelkar, G.S.; Desa, E.S.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Dabholkar, N.A.; Madhan, R.; Prabhudesai, S.P.

    /plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Acoustic communication for Maya Autonomous Underwater Vehicle - performance evaluation of acoustic modem. S. Afzulpurkar, P. Maurya, G. Navelkar, E. Desa, A. Mascarenhas, N. Dabholkar, R. Madhan 1 , S. Prabhudesai... factors that can be tweaked to get better performance at maximum range. Multiple in-situ tests were planned and carried out to test the above modems for their reliability and efficacy. II. EXPERIMENT SCENARIOS AND SETUP The field evaluation...

  14. Environmental Acoustics and Intensity Vector Acoustics with Emphasis on Shallow Water Effects and the Sea Surface

    2014-09-30

    Vector Acoustics with Emphasis on Shallow Water Effects and the Sea Surface Peter H. Dahl Applied Physics Laboratory University of Washington...To understand and predict key properties of the signal intensity vector field as it propagates away from an active sound source, with emphasis is on...exploit acoustic vector field properties (velocity, acceleration, intensity) much more than today’s. Furthermore, advancement of current Navy

  15. Objective and subjective evaluation of the acoustic comfort in classrooms.

    Zannin, Paulo Henrique Trombetta; Marcon, Carolina Reich

    2007-09-01

    The acoustic comfort of classrooms in a Brazilian public school has been evaluated through interviews with 62 teachers and 464 pupils, measurements of background noise, reverberation time, and sound insulation. Acoustic measurements have revealed the poor acoustic quality of the classrooms. Results have shown that teachers and pupils consider the noise generated and the voice of the teacher in neighboring classrooms as the main sources of annoyance inside the classroom. Acoustic simulations resulted in the suggestion of placement of perforated plywood on the ceiling, for reduction in reverberation time and increase in the acoustic comfort of the classrooms.

  16. Acoustic streaming jets: A scaling and dimensional analysis

    Botton, V.; Moudjed, B.; Henry, D.; Millet, S.; Ben-Hadid, H.; Garandet, J. P.

    2015-10-01

    We present our work on acoustic streaming free jets driven by ultrasonic beams in liquids. These jets are steady flows generated far from walls by progressive acoustic waves. As can be seen on figure 1, our set-up, denominated AStrID for Acoustic Streaming Investigation Device, is made of a water tank in which a 29 mm plane source emits continuous ultrasonic waves at typically 2 MHz. Our approach combines an experimental characterization of both the acoustic pressure field (hydrophone) and the obtained acoustic streaming velocity field (PIV visualization) on one hand, with CFD using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on the other hand.

  17. ISAT: The mega-fauna acoustic tracking system

    De la Torre, Pedro

    2013-06-01

    The acoustic tracking module of the Integrated Satellite and Acoustic Telemetry (iSAT) system is discussed in detail. iSAT is capable of detecting the relative direction of an acoustic source by measuring the order of arrival (OOA) of the acoustic signal to each hydrophone in a triangular array. The characteristics of the hydrophones, the projector, and the target acoustic signal used for iSAT are described. Initially it is designed to study the movements of whale sharks (Rhincodon typus), but it could potentially be used to describe high resolution movements of other marine species. © 2013 IEEE.

  18. Subjective evaluation of restaurant acoustics in a virtual sound environment

    Nielsen, Nicolaj Østergaard; Marschall, Marton; Santurette, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    surveys report that noise complaints are on par with poor service. This study investigated the relation between objective acoustic parameters and subjective evaluation of acoustic comfort at five restaurants in terms of three parameters: noise annoyance, speech intelligibility, and privacy. At each...... location, customers filled out questionnaire surveys, acoustic parameters were measured, and recordings of restaurant acoustic scenes were obtained with a 64-channel spherical array. The acoustic scenes were reproduced in a virtual sound environment (VSE) with 64 loudspeakers placed in an anechoic room...

  19. Acoustic streaming jets: A scaling and dimensional analysis

    Botton, V., E-mail: valery.botton@insa-lyon.fr; Henry, D.; Millet, S.; Ben-Hadid, H. [LMFA, UMR CNRS 5509, Université de Lyon, ECL/INSA Lyon/Univ. Lyon 1, 36 avenue Guy deCollongue, 69134 Ecully Cedex (France); Moudjed, B. [LMFA, UMR CNRS 5509, Université de Lyon, ECL/INSA Lyon/Univ. Lyon 1, 36 avenue Guy deCollongue, 69134 Ecully Cedex (France); LIEFT, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Garandet, J. P. [LIEFT, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2015-10-28

    We present our work on acoustic streaming free jets driven by ultrasonic beams in liquids. These jets are steady flows generated far from walls by progressive acoustic waves. As can be seen on figure 1, our set-up, denominated AStrID for Acoustic Streaming Investigation Device, is made of a water tank in which a 29 mm plane source emits continuous ultrasonic waves at typically 2 MHz. Our approach combines an experimental characterization of both the acoustic pressure field (hydrophone) and the obtained acoustic streaming velocity field (PIV visualization) on one hand, with CFD using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on the other hand.

  20. Fiber optic hydrophones for acoustic neutrino detection

    Buis, E.J.; Doppenberg, E.J.J.; Lahmann, R.; Toet, P.M.; Vreugd, J. de

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic neutrinos with ultra high energies can be detected acoustically using hydrophones. The detection of these neutrinos may provide crucial information about then GZK mechanism. The flux of these neutrinos, however, is expected to be low, so that a detection volume is required more than a order o

  1. Hawking Temperature of Acoustic Black Hole

    Zhi Kun Xie

    2014-09-01

    Using a new tortoise coordinate transformation, the Hawking radiation of the acoustic black hole was discussed by studying the Klein–Gordon equation of scalar particles in the curve space-time. It was found that the Hawking temperature is connected with time and position on the event horizon.

  2. Acoustical Analysis of a Test Horn.

    1988-01-20

    Laboratories, Inc. if /pliable) Flight Dynamics Laboratory (AFWAL/ FIBRA ) n/a Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories 6c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIPCode) 7b...AFWAL/ FIBRA DO Form 1473, JUN 86 Previous editions are obsolete. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE UNCLASSIFIED "S.,, PREFACE This acoustical

  3. A synthetic aperture acoustic prototype system

    Luke, Robert H.; Bishop, Steven S.; Chan, Aaron M.; Gugino, Peter M.; Donzelli, Thomas P.; Soumekh, Mehrdad

    2015-05-01

    A novel quasi-monostatic system operating in a side-scan synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) imaging mode is presented. This research project's objectives are to explore the military utility of outdoor continuous sound imaging of roadside foliage and target detection. The acoustic imaging method has several military relevant advantages such as being immune to RF jamming, superior spatial resolution as compared to 0.8-2.4 GHz ground penetrating radar (GPR), capable of standoff side and forward-looking scanning, and relatively low cost, weight and size when compared to GPR technologies. The prototype system's broadband 2-17 kHz LFM chirp transceiver is mounted on a manned all-terrain vehicle. Targets are positioned within the acoustic main beam at slant ranges of two to seven meters and on surfaces such as dirt, grass, gravel and weathered asphalt and with an intervening metallic chain link fence. Acoustic image reconstructions and signature plots result in means for literal interpretation and quantifiable analyses.

  4. Some Applications of Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes the evaluation of thin amorphous magnetic film by using of surface acoustic waves on piezo electric substrate. The obtained experimental data show strong dependence of material parameters on the annealing temperature. The mixed ferromagnetic/SAW devices for electronic applications will be also discussed.

  5. Acoustic simulations of Mudejar-Gothic churches.

    Galindo, Miguel; Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, an iterative process is used in order to estimate the values of absorption coefficients of those materials of which little is known in the literature, so that an acoustic simulation can be carried out in Mudejar-Gothic churches. The estimation of the scattering coefficients, which is even less developed, is based on the size of the irregularities. This methodology implemented is applied to six Mudejar-Gothic churches of Seville (southern Spain). The simulated monophonic acoustic parameters, both in the frequency domain and as a function of source-receiver distance (spatial distribution), are analyzed and compared with the in situ measures. Good agreement has been found between these sets of values, whereby each parameter is discussed in terms of the just noticeable difference. This procedure for existing buildings, especially for those which are rich in heritage, enables a reliable evaluation of the effect on the maintenance, restoration, and conditioning for new uses, as well as the recreation of the acoustic environment of ancient times. Along these lines, the acoustic influence of the timber roof and the presence of the public in these churches have also been studied.

  6. Acoustical-Levitation Chamber for Metallurgy

    Barmatz, M. B.; Trinh, E.; Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Jacobi, N.

    1983-01-01

    Sample moved to different positions for heating and quenching. Acoustical levitation chamber selectively excited in fundamental and second-harmonic longitudinal modes to hold sample at one of three stable postions: A, B, or C. Levitated object quickly moved from one of these positions to another by changing modes. Object rapidly quenched at A or C after heating in furnace region at B.

  7. Broadband acoustic properties of a murine skull.

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Turner, Jake; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-07

    It has been well recognized that the presence of a skull imposes harsh restrictions on the use of ultrasound and optoacoustic techniques in the study, treatment and modulation of the brain function. We propose a rigorous modeling and experimental methodology for estimating the insertion loss and the elastic constants of the skull over a wide range of frequencies and incidence angles. A point-source-like excitation of ultrawideband acoustic radiation was induced via the absorption of nanosecond duration laser pulses by a 20 μm diameter microsphere. The acoustic waves transmitted through the skull are recorded by a broadband, spherically focused ultrasound transducer. A coregistered pulse-echo ultrasound scan is subsequently performed to provide accurate skull geometry to be fed into an acoustic transmission model represented in an angular spectrum domain. The modeling predictions were validated by measurements taken from a glass cover-slip and ex vivo adult mouse skulls. The flexible semi-analytical formulation of the model allows for seamless extension to other transducer geometries and diverse experimental scenarios involving broadband acoustic transmission through locally flat solid structures. It is anticipated that accurate quantification and modeling of the skull transmission effects would ultimately allow for skull aberration correction in a broad variety of applications employing transcranial detection or transmission of high frequency ultrasound.

  8. Airflow Test of Acoustic Board Samples

    Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Jensen, Lise Mellergaard

    In the laboratory of Indoor Environmental Engineering, Department of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University an airflow test on 2x10 samples of acoustic board were carried out the 2nd of June 2012. The tests were carried out for Rambøll and STO AG. The test includes connected values of volume flow...

  9. Diffraction and diffusion in room acoustics

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Rasmussen, Birgit

    1996-01-01

    that are not plane but curved or irregular. The importance of diffusion has been demonstrated in concert halls. Methods for the design of diffusing surfaces and the development of new types of diffusers are reviewed. Finally, the importance of diffraction and diffusion in room acoustic computer models is discussed....

  10. Extraordinary transmission of gigahertz surface acoustic waves.

    Mezil, Sylvain; Chonan, Kazuki; Otsuka, Paul H; Tomoda, Motonobu; Matsuda, Osamu; Lee, Sam H; Wright, Oliver B

    2016-09-19

    Extraordinary transmission of waves, i.e. a transmission superior to the amount predicted by geometrical considerations of the aperture alone, has to date only been studied in the bulk. Here we present a new class of extraordinary transmission for waves confined in two dimensions to a flat surface. By means of acoustic numerical simulations in the gigahertz range, corresponding to acoustic wavelengths λ ~ 3-50 μm, we track the transmission of plane surface acoustic wave fronts between two silicon blocks joined by a deeply subwavelength bridge of variable length with or without an attached cavity. Several resonant modes of the structure, both one- and two-dimensional in nature, lead to extraordinary acoustic transmission, in this case with transmission efficiencies, i.e. intensity enhancements, up to ~23 and ~8 in the two respective cases. We show how the cavity shape and bridge size influence the extraordinary transmission efficiency. Applications include new metamaterials and subwavelength imaging.

  11. Simplified scheduling for underwater acoustic networks

    Kleunen, van Wouter; Meratnia, Nirvana; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2013-01-01

    The acoustic propagation speed under water poses significant challenges to the design of underwater sensor networks and their medium access control protocols. Similar to the air, scheduling transmissions under water has significant impact on throughput, energy consumption, and reliability. In this p

  12. Acoustic-optical imaging without immersion

    Liu, H.

    1979-01-01

    System using membraneous end wall of Bragg cell to separate test specimen from acoustic transmission medium, operates in real time and uses readily available optical components. System can be easily set up and maintained by people with little or no training in holography.

  13. Acoustic Resonance between Ground and Thermosphere

    M Matsumura

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-low frequency acoustic waves called "acoustic gravity waves" or "infrasounds" are theoretically expected to resonate between the ground and the thermosphere. This resonance is a very important phenomenon causing the coupling of the solid Earth, neutral atmosphere, and ionospheric plasma. This acoustic resonance, however, has not been confirmed by direct observations. In this study, atmospheric perturbations on the ground and ionospheric disturbances were observed and compared with each other to confirm the existence of resonance. Atmospheric perturbations were observed with a barometer, and ionospheric disturbances were observed using the HF Doppler method. An end point of resonance is in the ionosphere, where conductivity is high and the dynamo effect occurs. Thus, geomagnetic observation is also useful, so the geomagnetic data were compared with other data. Power spectral density was calculated and averaged for each month. Peaks appeared at the theoretically expected resonance frequencies in the pressure and HF Doppler data. The frequencies of the peaks varied with the seasons. This is probably because the vertical temperature profile of the atmosphere varies with the seasons, as does the reflection height of infrasounds. These results indicate that acoustic resonance occurs frequently.

  14. Multicarrier Spread Spectrum for Covert Acoustic Communications

    Walree, P.A. van; Sangfelt, E.; Leus, G.

    2008-01-01

    A multicarrier modulation scheme is presented to achieve the objective of clandestine acoustic communications. The modulation consists of a single bit sequence simultaneously modulated onto multiple carriers. As all bands carry the same symbol stream, they can be adaptively combined with a multichan

  15. Mesoscale Phenomenon Revealed by an Acoustic Sounder

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Jensen, Niels Otto

    1976-01-01

    A particular phenomenon observed on an acoustic sounder record is analyzed, and is interpreted as being associated with the passing of a land breeze front. A simple physical explanation of the frontal movements is suggested. The actual existence of the land breeze is demonstrated by examination...

  16. Validation of high frequency acoustic target modeling

    Quesson, B.A.J.; Schippers, P.; Groen, J.; Sabel, J.C.; Driessen, F.P.G.

    2005-01-01

    The underwater acoustics group at TNO Defense, Security and Safety has developed two simulation software programs named ALMOST and SIMONA. The first is already commercially used and aims at sonar performance prediction, whereas the second one is used as a tool to generate simulated data for mine hun

  17. Acoustic simulation of a patient's obstructed airway.

    van der Velden, W C P; van Zuijlen, A H; de Jong, A T; Lynch, C T; Hoeve, L J; Bijl, H

    2016-01-01

    This research focuses on the numerical simulation of stridor; a high pitched, abnormal noise, resulting from turbulent airflow and vibrating tissue through a partially obstructed airway. Characteristics of stridor noise are used by medical doctors as indication for location and size of the obstruction. The relation between type of stridor and the various diseases associated with airway obstruction is unclear; therefore, simply listening to stridor is an unreliable diagnostic tool. The overall aim of the study is to better understand the relationship between characteristics of stridor noise and localization and size of the obstruction. Acoustic analysis of stridor may then in future simplify the diagnostic process, and reduce the need for more invasive procedures such as laryngoscopy under general anesthesia. In this paper, the feasibility of a coupled flow, acoustic and structural model is investigated to predict the noise generated by the obstruction as well as the propagation of the noise through the airways, taking into account a one-way coupled fluid, structure, and acoustic interaction components. The flow and acoustic solver are validated on a diaphragm and a simplified airway model. A realistic airway model of a patient suffering from a subglottic stenosis, derived from a real computed tomography scan, is further analyzed. Near the mouth, the broadband noise levels at higher frequencies increased with approximately 15-20 dB comparing the stridorous model with the healthy model, indicating stridorous sound.

  18. Protection of window glass from acoustic leakage

    Lych, Sergij; Rakobovchuk, Volodymyr

    2013-01-01

    In a survey was presented an analysis of the most common glass samples on the Ukrainian market on their protection level against leakage of acoustic information. The glass samples were studied by means of roentgen analysis, and the impact of elemental composition of glass according to a laser beam reflection factor was defined.

  19. Ultrafast magnetoelastic probing of surface acoustic transients

    Janusonis, J.; Chang, C. L.; Jansma, T.; Gatilova, A.; Vlasov, V. S.; Lomonosov, A. M.; Temnov, V. V.; Tobey, R. I.

    2016-01-01

    We generate in-plane magnetoelastic waves in nickel films using the all-optical transient grating technique. When performed on amorphous glass substrates, two dominant magnetoelastic excitations can be resonantly driven by the underlying elastic distortions, the Rayleigh surface acoustic wave and th

  20. Analog Acoustic Expression in Speech Communication

    Shintel, Hadas; Nusbaum, Howard C.; Okrent, Arika

    2006-01-01

    We present the first experimental evidence of a phenomenon in speech communication we call "analog acoustic expression." Speech is generally thought of as conveying information in two distinct ways: discrete linguistic-symbolic units such as words and sentences represent linguistic meaning, and continuous prosodic forms convey information about…

  1. Dimensional analysis of acoustically propagated signals

    Hansen, Scott D.; Thomson, Dennis W.

    1993-01-01

    Traditionally, long term measurements of atmospherically propagated sound signals have consisted of time series of multiminute averages. Only recently have continuous measurements with temporal resolution corresponding to turbulent time scales been available. With modern digital data acquisition systems we now have the capability to simultaneously record both acoustical and meteorological parameters with sufficient temporal resolution to allow us to examine in detail relationships between fluctuating sound and the meteorological variables, particularly wind and temperature, which locally determine the acoustic refractive index. The atmospheric acoustic propagation medium can be treated as a nonlinear dynamical system, a kind of signal processor whose innards depend on thermodynamic and turbulent processes in the atmosphere. The atmosphere is an inherently nonlinear dynamical system. In fact one simple model of atmospheric convection, the Lorenz system, may well be the most widely studied of all dynamical systems. In this paper we report some results of our having applied methods used to characterize nonlinear dynamical systems to study the characteristics of acoustical signals propagated through the atmosphere. For example, we investigate whether or not it is possible to parameterize signal fluctuations in terms of fractal dimensions. For time series one such parameter is the limit capacity dimension. Nicolis and Nicolis were among the first to use the kind of methods we have to study the properties of low dimension global attractors.

  2. Acoustic vs Interferometric Measurements of Lightning

    Arechiga, R. O.; Erives, H.; Sonnenfeld, R. G.; Stanley, M. A.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.; Edens, H. E.; Lapierre, J. L.; Stock, M.; Jensen, D.; Morris, K.

    2015-12-01

    During the summer of 2015 we acquired acoustic and RF data on severalflashes from thunderstorms over Fort Morgan CO. and Langmuir Laboratoryin the Magdalena mountains of central New Mexico. The acoustic arrayswere located at a distance of roughly 150 m from the interferometers.Lightning mapping array and slow antenna data were also obtained. Theacoustic arrays consist of arrays of five audio-range and six infrasoundmicrophones operating at 50 KHz and 1 KHz respectively. The lightninginterferometer at Fort Morgan CO. consists of three flat-plate, 13" diameterantennas at the vertices of an equilateral 50 m per side triangle. Theinterferometer at Langmuir Laboratory consists of three 13" dishes separatedby about 15 m. Both interferometers, operating at 180 Megasamples persecond, use the analysis software and digitizer hardware pioneered byStanley, Stock et al. The high data rate allows for excellent spatialresolution of high speed (and typically high current) processes such asK-changes, return strokes and dart-leaders. In previous studies, we haveshown the usefulness of acoustic recordings to locate thunder sources aswell as infrasound pulses from lightning. This work will present acomparison of Acoustic and Interferometric measurements from lightning,using some interesting flashes, including a positive cloud to ground,that occurred in these campaigns.

  3. Scattering of Acoustic Waves from Ocean Boundaries

    2015-09-30

    from the interface roughness and volume heterogeneities and propagation within the sediment. The model will aid in the detection and classification ...of buried mines and improve SONAR performance in shallow water. OBJECTIVES 1) Determination of the correct physical model of acoustic propagation... algorithms for AUV sonars based on the measurements and models previously developed by this program. Additionally, the models developed in this research

  4. Extraordinary transmission of gigahertz surface acoustic waves

    Mezil, Sylvain; Chonan, Kazuki; Otsuka, Paul H.; Tomoda, Motonobu; Matsuda, Osamu; Lee, Sam H.; Wright, Oliver B.

    2016-01-01

    Extraordinary transmission of waves, i.e. a transmission superior to the amount predicted by geometrical considerations of the aperture alone, has to date only been studied in the bulk. Here we present a new class of extraordinary transmission for waves confined in two dimensions to a flat surface. By means of acoustic numerical simulations in the gigahertz range, corresponding to acoustic wavelengths λ ~ 3–50 μm, we track the transmission of plane surface acoustic wave fronts between two silicon blocks joined by a deeply subwavelength bridge of variable length with or without an attached cavity. Several resonant modes of the structure, both one- and two-dimensional in nature, lead to extraordinary acoustic transmission, in this case with transmission efficiencies, i.e. intensity enhancements, up to ~23 and ~8 in the two respective cases. We show how the cavity shape and bridge size influence the extraordinary transmission efficiency. Applications include new metamaterials and subwavelength imaging. PMID:27640998

  5. The acoustic center of laboratory standard microphones

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Rasmussen, Knud; Jacobsen, Finn

    2006-01-01

    center from the inverse distance law is analyzed. Experimental values of the acoustic center of laboratory standard microphones are presented, and numerical results obtained using the boundary element method supplement the experimental data. Estimated uncertainties are also presented. The results...... reported confirm values previously defined in an international standard and extend the frequency range....

  6. Inverse acoustic problem of N homogeneous scatterers

    Berntsen, Svend

    2002-01-01

    The three-dimensional inverse acoustic medium problem of N homogeneous objects with known geometry and location is considered. It is proven that one scattering experiment is sufficient for the unique determination of the complex wavenumbers of the objects. The mapping from the scattered fields...

  7. Measuring Norwegian dialect distances using acoustic features

    Heeringa, Wilbert; Johnson, Keith; Gooskens, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Levenshtein distance has become a popular tool for measuring linguistic dialect distances, and has been applied to Irish Gaelic, Dutch, German and other dialect groups. The method, in the current state of the art, depends upon phonetic transcriptions, even when acoustic differences are used the numb

  8. Multilevel multi-integration algorithm for acoustics

    Hernández Ramírez, Isaías

    2005-01-01

    In acoustics the study of the prediction of noise and its possible consequences has tremendously gained in importance in the past decades. A low noise level has become an essential quality as well as a marketing advantage for products and installations. For guidance in the design of silent products

  9. The structural acoustic properties of stiffened shells

    Luan, Yu

    2008-01-01

    . This is important when a number of stiffened plates are combined in a complicated structure composed of many plates. However, whereas the equivalent plate theory is well established there is no similar established theory for stiffened shells. This paper investigates the mechanical and structural acoustic properties...... of curved shells with stiffening ribs. Finite element simulations and experimental data will be compared and discussed....

  10. Acoustic signal analysis of underwater elastic cylinder

    LI Xiukun; YANG Shi'e

    2001-01-01

    The echoes of underwater elastic cylinder comprise two types of acoustic components: Geometrical scattering waves and elastic scattering waves. The transfer function is appropriate to characterize the echo of targets. And the discrete wavelet transform of amplitude spectrum is presented and used to identify the resonant components of underwater targets.PACS numbers: 43.30, 43.60

  11. Acoustic Evidence for Phonologically Mismatched Speech Errors

    Gormley, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Speech errors are generally said to accommodate to their new phonological context. This accommodation has been validated by several transcription studies. The transcription methodology is not the best choice for detecting errors at this level, however, as this type of error can be difficult to perceive. This paper presents an acoustic analysis of…

  12. An acoustic finite element including viscothermal effects

    Nijhof, M.J.J.; Wijnant, Y.H.; Boer, de A.

    2007-01-01

    In acoustics it is generally assumed that viscous- en thermal boundary layer effects play a minor role in the propagation of sound waves. Hence, these effects are neglected in the basic set of equations describing the sound field. However, for geometries that include small confinements of air or thi

  13. Extraordinary transmission of gigahertz surface acoustic waves

    Mezil, Sylvain; Chonan, Kazuki; Otsuka, Paul H.; Tomoda, Motonobu; Matsuda, Osamu; Lee, Sam H.; Wright, Oliver B.

    2016-09-01

    Extraordinary transmission of waves, i.e. a transmission superior to the amount predicted by geometrical considerations of the aperture alone, has to date only been studied in the bulk. Here we present a new class of extraordinary transmission for waves confined in two dimensions to a flat surface. By means of acoustic numerical simulations in the gigahertz range, corresponding to acoustic wavelengths λ ~ 3–50 μm, we track the transmission of plane surface acoustic wave fronts between two silicon blocks joined by a deeply subwavelength bridge of variable length with or without an attached cavity. Several resonant modes of the structure, both one- and two-dimensional in nature, lead to extraordinary acoustic transmission, in this case with transmission efficiencies, i.e. intensity enhancements, up to ~23 and ~8 in the two respective cases. We show how the cavity shape and bridge size influence the extraordinary transmission efficiency. Applications include new metamaterials and subwavelength imaging.

  14. Modeling the Acoustic Channel for Simulation Studies

    2012-09-30

    assess the performance of networking schemes or to derive general methods able to improve the reliability of underwater acoustic communications. Finally...approach, are reported in [TWC2012]. DISSEMINATION ACTIVITIES The results obtained in the conducted reseach have been disseminated to the research

  15. Force Measurements in Vibration and Acoustic Tests

    Scharton, T. D.

    1996-01-01

    The advent of triaxial, piezoelectric force gages and the associated signal processing is a precursor to several dynamics testing innovations. This new technology is applicable to spacecraft programs that JPL manages. An application of force measurement is force limiting (when testing spacecraft in random vibration tests). Base-drive and acoustic modal testing is a potential application.

  16. Abstract wave equations with acoustic boundary conditions

    Mugnolo, Delio

    2010-01-01

    We define an abstract setting to treat wave equations equipped with time-dependent acoustic boundary conditions on bounded domains of ${\\bf R}^n$. We prove a well-posedness result and develop a spectral theory which also allows to prove a conjecture proposed in (Gal-Goldstein-Goldstein, J. Evol. Equations 3 (2004), 623-636). Concrete problems are also discussed.

  17. The Sounds of Nanoscience: Acoustic STM Analogues

    Euler, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    A hands-on model of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) is presented. It uses near-field imaging with sound and computer assisted visualization to create acoustic mappings of resonator arrangements. Due to the (partial) analogy of matter and sound waves the images closely resemble STM scans of atoms. Moreover, the method can be extended to build…

  18. Acoustic tomography in the atmospheric surface layer

    A. Ziemann

    Full Text Available Acoustic tomography is presented as a technique for remote monitoring of meteorological quantities. This method and a special algorithm of analysis can directly produce area-averaged values of meteorological parameters. As a result consistent data will be obtained for validation of numerical atmospheric micro-scale models. Such a measuring system can complement conventional point measurements over different surfaces. The procedure of acoustic tomography uses the horizontal propagation of sound waves in the atmospheric surface layer. Therefore, to provide a general overview of sound propagation under various atmospheric conditions a two-dimensional ray-tracing model according to a modified version of Snell's law is used. The state of the crossed atmosphere can be estimated from measurements of acoustic travel time between sources and receivers at different points. Derivation of area-averaged values of the sound speed and furthermore of air temperature results from the inversion of travel time values for all acoustic paths. Thereby, the applied straight ray two-dimensional tomographic model using SIRT (simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique is characterised as a method with small computational requirements, satisfactory convergence and stability properties as well as simple handling, especially, during online evaluation.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (turbulence; instruments and techniques.

  19. Computational acoustic modeling of cetacean vocalizations

    Gurevich, Michael Dixon

    A framework for computational acoustic modeling of hypothetical vocal production mechanisms in cetaceans is presented. As a specific example, a model of a proposed source in the larynx of odontocetes is developed. Whales and dolphins generate a broad range of vocal sounds, but the exact mechanisms they use are not conclusively understood. In the fifty years since it has become widely accepted that whales can and do make sound, how they do so has remained particularly confounding. Cetaceans' highly divergent respiratory anatomy, along with the difficulty of internal observation during vocalization have contributed to this uncertainty. A variety of acoustical, morphological, ethological and physiological evidence has led to conflicting and often disputed theories of the locations and mechanisms of cetaceans' sound sources. Computational acoustic modeling has been used to create real-time parametric models of musical instruments and the human voice. These techniques can be applied to cetacean vocalizations to help better understand the nature and function of these sounds. Extensive studies of odontocete laryngeal morphology have revealed vocal folds that are consistently similar to a known but poorly understood acoustic source, the ribbon reed. A parametric computational model of the ribbon reed is developed, based on simplified geometrical, mechanical and fluid models drawn from the human voice literature. The physical parameters of the ribbon reed model are then adapted to those of the odontocete larynx. With reasonable estimates of real physical parameters, both the ribbon reed and odontocete larynx models produce sounds that are perceptually similar to their real-world counterparts, and both respond realistically under varying control conditions. Comparisons of acoustic features of the real-world and synthetic systems show a number of consistencies. While this does not on its own prove that either model is conclusively an accurate description of the source, it

  20. Acoustic properties of aluminium foams

    García, L. E.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses normal incidence sound absorption by aluminium foam manufactured with powder metallurgy technology. Aluminium foams with different surface morphologies were obtained by varying the type of precursor and adding filler materials during the foaming process. The sound absorption coefficients found for these aluminium foams were compared to the coefficient for commercial foams marketed under the name ALPORAS. The effect of foam thickness on the absorption coefficient was studied for each sample prepared. The combination of good acoustic and mechanical properties makes aluminium foams particularly attractive products. The study included an analysis of the effect of 2-, 5- and 10-cm air gaps on the sound absorption coefficient. The results showed that such gaps, which are routinely used in construction to reduce the reverberation period in indoor premises, raised the low frequency absorption coefficient significantly. This increase was found to depend on aluminium foam density and thickness and the depth of the air gap. In this same line, we have investigated the absorption coefficient of the aluminium foams combined with a mineral fiber panel.Se presenta un estudio del coeficiente de absorción acústica a incidencia normal de espumas de aluminio fabricadas mediante la técnica pulvimetalúrgica. Se fabricaron espumas de aluminio de distinta morfología superficial variando el tipo de precursor y usando materiales de relleno durante el proceso de espumación. Se muestra un estudio comparativo del coeficiente de absorción acústica de las espumas de aluminio fabricadas y las espumas comerciales conocidas como ALPORAS. Para cada muestra fabricada se estudió la influencia del espesor sobre el valor del coeficiente de absorción.El atractivo de las espumas de aluminio radica en que en ellas se combinan interesantes propiedades acústicas y mecánicas. Se analizó el efecto de una cámara de aire de 2, 5 y 10 cm de anchura sobre el

  1. Applications of adaptive focused acoustics to compound management.

    Nixon, Elizabeth; Holland-Crimmin, Sue; Lupotsky, Brian; Chan, James; Curtis, Jon; Dobbs, Karen; Blaxill, Zoe

    2009-06-01

    Since the introduction of lithotripsy kidney stone therapy, Focused Acoustics and its properties have been thoroughly utilized in medicine and exploration. More recently, Compound Management is exploring its applications and benefits to sample integrity. There are 2 forms of Focused Acoustics: Acoustic Droplet Ejection and Adaptive Focused Acoustics, which work by emitting high-powered acoustic waves through water toward a focused point. This focused power results in noncontact plate-to-plate sample transfer or sample dissolution, respectively. For the purposes of this article, only Adaptive Focused Acoustics will be addressed. Adaptive Focused Acoustics uses high-powered acoustic waves to mix, homogenize, dissolve, and thaw samples. It facilitates transferable samples through noncontact, closed-container, isothermal mixing. Experimental results show significantly reduced mixing times, limited degradation, and ideal use for heat-sensitive compounds. Upon implementation, acoustic dissolution has reduced the number of samples requiring longer mixing times as well as reducing the number impacted by incomplete compound dissolution. It has also helped in increasing the overall sample concentration from 6 to 8 mM to 8 to 10 mM by ensuring complete compound solubilization. The application of Adaptive Focused Acoustics, however, cannot be applied to all Compound Management processes, such as sample thawing and low-volume sample reconstitution. This article will go on to describe the areas where Adaptive Focused Acoustics adds value as well as areas in which it has shown no clear benefit.

  2. Measurement of acoustical characteristics of mosques in Saudi Arabia

    Abdou, Adel A.

    2003-03-01

    The study of mosque acoustics, with regard to acoustical characteristics, sound quality for speech intelligibility, and other applicable acoustic criteria, has been largely neglected. In this study a background as to why mosques are designed as they are and how mosque design is influenced by worship considerations is given. In the study the acoustical characteristics of typically constructed contemporary mosques in Saudi Arabia have been investigated, employing a well-known impulse response. Extensive field measurements were taken in 21 representative mosques of different sizes and architectural features in order to characterize their acoustical quality and to identify the impact of air conditioning, ceiling fans, and sound reinforcement systems on their acoustics. Objective room-acoustic indicators such as reverberation time (RT) and clarity (C50) were measured. Background noise (BN) was assessed with and without the operation of air conditioning and fans. The speech transmission index (STI) was also evaluated with and without the operation of existing sound reinforcement systems. The existence of acoustical deficiencies was confirmed and quantified. The study, in addition to describing mosque acoustics, compares design goals to results obtained in practice and suggests acoustical target values for mosque design. The results show that acoustical quality in the investigated mosques deviates from optimum conditions when unoccupied, but is much better in the occupied condition.

  3. Theory and modeling of cylindrical thermo-acoustic transduction

    Tong, Lihong, E-mail: lhtong@ecjtu.edu.cn [School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang, Jiangxi (China); Lim, C.W. [Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR (China); Zhao, Xiushao; Geng, Daxing [School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang, Jiangxi (China)

    2016-06-03

    Models both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are proposed and the corresponding acoustic pressure solutions are obtained. The acoustic pressure for an individual carbon nanotube (CNT) as a function of input power is investigated analytically and it is verified by comparing with the published experimental data. Further numerical analysis on the acoustic pressure response and characteristics for varying input frequency and distance are also examined both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions. Through detailed theoretical and numerical studies on the acoustic pressure solution for thinfilm-solid cylindrical transduction, it is concluded that a solid with smaller thermal conductivity favors to improve the acoustic performance. In general, the proposed models are applicable to a variety of cylindrical thermo-acoustic devices performing in different gaseous media. - Highlights: • Theory and modeling both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are proposed. • The modeling is verified by comparing with the published experimental data. • Acoustic response characteristics of cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are predicted by the proposed model.

  4. Acoustical experiment of yogurt fermentation process.

    Ogasawara, H; Mizutani, K; Ohbuchi, T; Nakamura, T

    2006-12-22

    One of the important factors through food manufacturing is hygienic management. Thus, food manufactures prove their hygienic activities by taking certifications like a Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP). This concept also applies to food monitoring. Acoustical measurements have advantage for other measurement in food monitoring because they make it possible to measure with noncontact and nondestructive. We tried to monitor lactic fermentation of yogurt by a probing sensor using a pair of acoustic transducers. Temperature of the solution changes by the reaction heat of fermentation. Consequently the sound velocity propagated through the solution also changes depending on the temperature. At the same time, the solution change its phase from liquid to gel. The transducers usage in the solution indicates the change of the temperature as the change of the phase difference between two transducers. The acoustic method has advantages of nondestructive measurement that reduces contamination of food product by measuring instrument. The sensor was inserted into milk with lactic acid bacterial stain of 19 degrees C and monitored phase retardation of propagated acoustic wave and its temperature with thermocouples in the mild. The monitoring result of fermentation from milk to Caspian Sea yogurt by the acoustic transducers with the frequency of 3.7 MHz started to show gradient change in temperature caused by reaction heat of fermentation but stop the gradient change at the end although the temperature still change. The gradient change stopped its change because of phase change from liquid to gel. The present method will be able to measure indirectly by setting transducers outside of the measuring object. This noncontact sensing method will have great advantage of reduces risk of food contamination from measuring instrument because the measurement probes are set out of fermentation reactor or food containers. Our proposed method will contribute to the

  5. Acoustic interaction forces between small particles in an ideal fluid

    Silva, Glauber T

    2014-01-01

    We present a theoretical expression for the acoustic interaction force between small spherical particles suspended in an ideal fluid exposed to an external acoustic wave. The acoustic interaction force is the part of the acoustic radiation force on one given particle involving the scattered waves from the other particles. The particles, either compressible liquid droplets or elastic microspheres, are considered to be much smaller than the acoustic wavelength. In this so-called Rayleigh limit, the acoustic interaction forces between the particles are well approximated by gradients of pair-interaction potentials with no restriction on the inter-particle distance. The theory is applied to studies of the acoustic interaction force on a particle suspension in either standing or traveling plane waves. The results show aggregation regions along the wave propagation direction, while particles may attract or repel each other in the transverse direction. In addition, a mean-field approximation is developed to describe ...

  6. Holographic acoustic elements for manipulation of levitated objects

    Marzo, Asier; Seah, Sue Ann; Drinkwater, Bruce W.; Sahoo, Deepak Ranjan; Long, Benjamin; Subramanian, Sriram

    2015-10-01

    Sound can levitate objects of different sizes and materials through air, water and tissue. This allows us to manipulate cells, liquids, compounds or living things without touching or contaminating them. However, acoustic levitation has required the targets to be enclosed with acoustic elements or had limited manoeuvrability. Here we optimize the phases used to drive an ultrasonic phased array and show that acoustic levitation can be employed to translate, rotate and manipulate particles using even a single-sided emitter. Furthermore, we introduce the holographic acoustic elements framework that permits the rapid generation of traps and provides a bridge between optical and acoustical trapping. Acoustic structures shaped as tweezers, twisters or bottles emerge as the optimum mechanisms for tractor beams or containerless transportation. Single-beam levitation could manipulate particles inside our body for applications in targeted drug delivery or acoustically controlled micro-machines that do not interfere with magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. Applied acoustics concepts, absorbers, and silencers for acoustical comfort and noise control alternative solutions, innovative tools, practical examples

    Fuchs, Helmut V

    2013-01-01

    The author gives a comprehensive overview of materials and components for noise control and acoustical comfort. Sound absorbers must meet acoustical and architectural requirements, which fibrous or porous material alone can meet. Basics and applications are demonstrated, with representative examples for spatial acoustics, free-field test facilities and canal linings. Acoustic engineers and construction professionals will find some new basic concepts and tools for developments in order to improve acoustical comfort. Interference absorbers, active resonators and micro-perforated absorbers of different materials and designs complete the list of applications.

  8. Highly Localized Acoustic Streaming and Size-Selective Submicrometer Particle Concentration Using High Frequency Microscale Focused Acoustic Fields.

    Collins, David J; Ma, Zhichao; Ai, Ye

    2016-05-17

    Concentration and separation of particles and biological specimens are fundamental functions of micro/nanofluidic systems. Acoustic streaming is an effective and biocompatible way to create rapid microscale fluid motion and induce particle capture, though the >100 MHz frequencies required to directly generate acoustic body forces on the microscale have traditionally been difficult to generate and localize in a way that is amenable to efficient generation of streaming. Moreover, acoustic, hydrodynamic, and electrical forces as typically applied have difficulty manipulating specimens in the submicrometer regime. In this work, we introduce highly focused traveling surface acoustic waves (SAW) at high frequencies between 193 and 636 MHz for efficient and highly localized production of acoustic streaming vortices on microfluidic length scales. Concentration occurs via a novel mechanism, whereby the combined acoustic radiation and streaming field results in size-selective aggregation in fluid streamlines in the vicinity of a high-amplitude acoustic beam, as opposed to previous acoustic radiation induced particle concentration where objects typically migrate toward minimum pressure locations. Though the acoustic streaming is induced by a traveling wave, we are able to manipulate particles an order of magnitude smaller than possible using the traveling wave force alone. We experimentally and theoretically examine the range of particle sizes that can be captured in fluid streamlines using this technique, with rapid particle concentration demonstrated down to 300 nm diameters. We also demonstrate that locations of trapping and concentration are size-dependent, which is attributed to the combined effects of the acoustic streaming and acoustic forces.

  9. The Acoustic Performance of Plane Laggings and Similar Multi-Layer Acoustic Structures.

    Au, Chak Kuen

    Acoustic laggings are used to inhibit the transmission of the sound radiated from the vibrating surfaces of machines, ducts, pipes, etc. They are formed of layers of porous materials such as fibreglass or mineral wool, layers of impervious materials such as metal cladding sheets and sometimes airspaces. A novel procedure for estimating the diffuse field 1/3 octave band insertion loss which a plane acoustic lagging produces when applied to a plane structure is developed. This novel procedure, which constitutes the major contribution of the work described in the thesis to new knowledge, is based on sets of formulae which describe how obliquely incident plane sound waves interact with the different basic layers, such as the porous layers and the impervious layers which form the lagging. The validity of the procedure is demonstrated by comparing the results it produces with measured results. The procedure is then used to undertake a parametric study to assess the effect of the properties of the various types of layers. Often the cladding sheet of a lagging is fastened to the base structure which is being lagged and an approximate analysis to consider the effect of such fastening is presented. The influence of corrugated cladding sheets is also considered. The principles used to predict the performance of plane acoustic laggings can be adapted to predict other acoustic properties such as the acoustic absorption of plane acoustic structures and this is done in the final part of the thesis. A comparison is made between the predicted and the measured performances of various types of acoustic structures.

  10. Numerical analysis of acoustic impedance microscope utilizing acoustic lens transducer to examine cultured cells.

    Gunawan, Agus Indra; Hozumi, Naohiro; Takahashi, Kenta; Yoshida, Sachiko; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2015-12-01

    A new technique is proposed for non-contact quantitative cell observation using focused ultrasonic waves. This technique interprets acoustic reflection intensity into the characteristic acoustic impedance of the biological cell. The cells are cultured on a plastic film substrate. A focused acoustic beam is transmitted through the substrate to its interface with the cell. A two-dimensional (2-D) reflection intensity profile is obtained by scanning the focal point along the interface. A reference substance is observed under the same conditions. These two reflections are compared and interpreted into the characteristic acoustic impedance of the cell based on a calibration curve that was created prior to the observation. To create the calibration curve, a numerical analysis of the sound field is performed using Fourier Transforms and is verified using several saline solutions. Because the cells are suspended by two plastic films, no contamination is introduced during the observation. In a practical observation, a sapphire lens transducer with a center frequency of 300 MHz was employed using ZnO thin film. The objects studied were co-cultured rat-derived glial (astrocyte) cells and glioma cells. The result was the clear observation of the internal structure of the cells. The acoustic impedance of the cells was spreading between 1.62 and 1.72 MNs/m(3). Cytoskeleton was indicated by high acoustic impedance. The introduction of cytochalasin-B led to a significant reduction in the acoustic impedance of the glioma cells; its effect on the glial cells was less significant. It is believed that this non-contact observation method will be useful for continuous cell inspections.

  11. Acoustics in mechanical engineering undergraduate core courses: Challenges and opportunities

    Prasad, M. G.

    2005-04-01

    Generally in an undergraduate curriculum of mechanical engineering, acoustics is not included as a core course. The major core courses deal with mechanics, design, dynamics of machinery, etc. However, engineering aspects of acoustics or noise can be included through elective courses. Given the limited slots for elective courses in a curriculum, it is difficult to run elective courses in acoustics regularly with a required number of students. The challenge is to find innovative ways to include acoustics into core courses so that all students are exposed to the field and its applications. The design and analysis of machine elements such as cams, gears, etc. are always part of core courses. It is in these contexts that the acoustics through noise aspects including multimedia can be introduced. Acoustics as an effect due to vibration as cause can be included in vibration analysis. A core course on system modeling can include acoustics. The integration of acoustical topics not only strengthens the core courses but also prepares the graduating engineer to deal with real problems better. Thus, it is important for academic acousticians to bring acoustics into the core courses. This paper presents some efforts to include the acoustics material in some core courses.

  12. Acoustic solitons: A robust tool to investigate the generation and detection of ultrafast acoustic waves

    Péronne, Emmanuel; Chuecos, Nicolas; Thevenard, Laura; Perrin, Bernard

    2017-02-01

    Solitons are self-preserving traveling waves of great interest in nonlinear physics but hard to observe experimentally. In this report an experimental setup is designed to observe and characterize acoustic solitons in a GaAs(001) substrate. It is based on careful temperature control of the sample and an interferometric detection scheme. Ultrashort acoustic solitons, such as the one predicted by the Korteweg-de Vries equation, are observed and fully characterized. Their particlelike nature is clearly evidenced and their unique properties are thoroughly checked. The spatial averaging of the soliton wave front is shown to account for the differences between the theoretical and experimental soliton profile. It appears that ultrafast acoustic experiments provide a precise measurement of the soliton velocity. It allows for absolute calibration of the setup as well as the response function analysis of the detection layer. Moreover, the temporal distribution of the solitons is also analyzed with the help of the inverse scattering method. It shows how the initial acoustic pulse profile which gives birth to solitons after nonlinear propagation can be retrieved. Such investigations provide a new tool to probe transient properties of highly excited matter through the study of the emitted acoustic pulse after laser excitation.

  13. Acoustic and categorical dissimilarity of musical timbre: Evidence from asymmetriesbetween acoustic and chimeric sounds

    Kai eSiedenburg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the role of acoustic and categorical information in timbre dissimilarity ratings. Using a Gammatone-filterbank-based sound transformation, we created tones that were rated as less familiar than recorded tones from orchestral instruments and that were harder to associate with an unambiguous sound source (Exp. 1. A subset of transformed tones, a set of orchestral recordings, and a mixed set were then rated on pairwise dissimilarity (Exp. 2A. We observed that recorded instrument timbres clustered into subsets that distinguished timbres according to acoustic and categorical properties. For the subset of cross-category comparisons in the mixed set, we observed asymmetries in the distribution of ratings, as well as a stark decay of inter-rater agreement. These effects were replicated in a more robust within-subjects design (Exp. 2B and cannot be explained by acoustic factors alone. We finally introduced a novel model of timbre dissimilarity based on partial least-squares regression that compared the contributions of both acoustic and categorical timbre descriptors. The best model fit (R^2 = .88 was achieved when both types of descriptors were taken into account. These findings are interpreted as evidence for an interplay of acoustic and categorical information in timbre dissimilarity perception.

  14. Acoustic and Categorical Dissimilarity of Musical Timbre: Evidence from Asymmetries Between Acoustic and Chimeric Sounds.

    Siedenburg, Kai; Jones-Mollerup, Kiray; McAdams, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of acoustic and categorical information in timbre dissimilarity ratings. Using a Gammatone-filterbank-based sound transformation, we created tones that were rated as less familiar than recorded tones from orchestral instruments and that were harder to associate with an unambiguous sound source (Experiment 1). A subset of transformed tones, a set of orchestral recordings, and a mixed set were then rated on pairwise dissimilarity (Experiment 2A). We observed that recorded instrument timbres clustered into subsets that distinguished timbres according to acoustic and categorical properties. For the subset of cross-category comparisons in the mixed set, we observed asymmetries in the distribution of ratings, as well as a stark decay of inter-rater agreement. These effects were replicated in a more robust within-subjects design (Experiment 2B) and cannot be explained by acoustic factors alone. We finally introduced a novel model of timbre dissimilarity based on partial least-squares regression that compared the contributions of both acoustic and categorical timbre descriptors. The best model fit (R (2) = 0.88) was achieved when both types of descriptors were taken into account. These findings are interpreted as evidence for an interplay of acoustic and categorical information in timbre dissimilarity perception.

  15. Contactless Acoustic Manipulation and Sorting of Particles by Dynamic Acoustic Fields.

    Andrade, Marco Aurelio; Skotis, George D; Ritchie, Scott; Cumming, David R S; Riehle, Mathis O; Bernassau, Anne L

    2016-09-12

    This paper presents a contactless, acoustic technique to manipulate and sort particles of varying size in both liquid and air media. An acoustic standing wave is generated by the superposition of counter-propagating waves emitted by two opposing emitters. The acoustic radiation force traps the smallest particles at the pressure nodes of the acoustic standing wave. The position of the particles can be manipulated by dynamically changing the phase difference between the two emitters. By applying a dynamic acoustic field (DAF), it is demonstrated that particles can be manipulated spatially and sorted according to size. The discrimination (sorting dynamic range) capability is initially demonstrated in liquid media by separating three different sets of polystyrene particles, ranging in size from 5 to 45 μm in diameter. The separation between particles was performed up to a ratio of 5/6 in diameter (20 % diameter difference). Finally, the scalability of the DAF method is demonstrated by sorting expanded polystyrene particles of 2 and 5 mm diameter in air.

  16. Study of acoustic resonance of cascades

    Honjo, M.; Tominaga, T.

    Discrete sounds and vibrations from guide vanes due to acoustic resonance in the vane flow path, are experimentally investigated. Other causes of pure sounds in stationary vanes are considered, such as direct radiation from wake shedding vortices, bubble vortices or leading edges, and radial or axial modes of air columns. Two-dimensional cascade tests are performed under various conditions, and the data are compared with theoretical results of flat plate cascades. Three-dimensional ducted guide vane model tests are carried out to apply prototype guide vanes, and to confirm the resonance of the two-dimensional tests. Results show that frequency is more sensitive to chord length than pitch length, and the ratio of the fluctuation frequency to fluid sound velocity/pitch length is independent of the scale. Bubble vortices on concave surfaces or leading edges are not exciting sources; and under the limit of solidity, no exciting energy can generate acoustic resonance in correspondence to the mode.

  17. Visualizing acoustical beats with a smartphones

    Giménez, Marcos H; Castro-Palacio, Juan C; Gómez-Tejedor, José A; Monsoriu, Juan A

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a new Physics laboratory experiment on Acoustics beats is presented. We have designed a simple experimental setup to study superposition of sound waves of slightly different frequencies (acoustic beat). The microphone of a smartphone is used to capture the sound waves emitted by two equidistant speakers from the mobile which are at the same time connected to two AC generators. The smartphone is used as a measuring instrument. By means of a simple and free AndroidTM application, the sound level (in dB) as a function of time is measured and exported to a .csv format file. Applying common graphing analysis and a fitting procedure, the frequency of the beat is obtained. The beat frequencies as obtained from the smartphone data are compared with the difference of the frequencies set at the AC generator. A very good agreement is obtained being the percentage discrepancies within 1 %.

  18. On the Coriolis effect in acoustic waveguides.

    Wegert, Henry; Reindl, Leonard M; Ruile, Werner; Mayer, Andreas P

    2012-05-01

    Rotation of an elastic medium gives rise to a shift of frequency of its acoustic modes, i.e., the time-period vibrations that exist in it. This frequency shift is investigated by applying perturbation theory in the regime of small ratios of the rotation velocity and the frequency of the acoustic mode. In an expansion of the relative frequency shift in powers of this ratio, upper bounds are derived for the first-order and the second-order terms. The derivation of the theoretical upper bounds of the first-order term is presented for linear vibration modes as well as for stable nonlinear vibrations with periodic time dependence that can be represented by a Fourier series.

  19. Advanced Applications for Underwater Acoustic Modeling

    Paul C. Etter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the ocean soundscape have been driven by anthropogenic activity (e.g., naval-sonar systems, seismic-exploration activity, maritime shipping and windfarm development and by natural factors (e.g., climate change and ocean acidification. New regulatory initiatives have placed additional restrictions on uses of sound in the ocean: mitigation of marine-mammal endangerment is now an integral consideration in acoustic-system design and operation. Modeling tools traditionally used in underwater acoustics have undergone a necessary transformation to respond to the rapidly changing requirements imposed by this new soundscape. Advanced modeling techniques now include forward and inverse applications, integrated-modeling approaches, nonintrusive measurements, and novel processing methods. A 32-year baseline inventory of modeling techniques has been updated to reflect these new developments including the basic mathematics and references to the key literature. Charts have been provided to guide soundscape practitioners to the most efficient modeling techniques for any given application.

  20. Signal Classification for Acoustic Neutrino Detection

    Neff, M; Enzenhöfer, A; Graf, K; Hößl, J; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; Richardt, C

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on signal classification for deep-sea acoustic neutrino detection. In the deep sea, the background of transient signals is very diverse. Approaches like matched filtering are not sufficient to distinguish between neutrino-like signals and other transient signals with similar signature, which are forming the acoustic background for neutrino detection in the deep-sea environment. A classification system based on machine learning algorithms is analysed with the goal to find a robust and effective way to perform this task. For a well-trained model, a testing error on the level of one percent is achieved for strong classifiers like Random Forest and Boosting Trees using the extracted features of the signal as input and utilising dense clusters of sensors instead of single sensors.

  1. Compact acoustic antenna design using labyrinthine metamaterials

    Ren, Chunyu

    2015-05-01

    We present an effective design and architecture for a class of acoustic antennas in air. The work begins with a conformal transformation method that yields the preliminary design, which is constructed using an isotropic but inhomogeneous material. However, the desired material parameters have been unavailable until now. Here we show that by scaling up the refractive index and optimizing the geometry in the preliminary design, a series of square antennas can be achieved to exhibit an excellent beam-collimating effect. An important part of our strategy is that the device's thickness and material properties can be tailored easily to greatly facilitate its realization. It is also demonstrated that the proposed antenna can be made very thin and readily implemented using labyrinthine acoustic metamaterials.

  2. NW-MILO Acoustic Data Collection

    Matzner, Shari; Myers, Joshua R.; Maxwell, Adam R.; Jones, Mark E.

    2010-02-17

    There is an enduring requirement to improve our ability to detect potential threats and discriminate these from the legitimate commercial and recreational activity ongoing in the nearshore/littoral portion of the maritime domain. The Northwest Maritime Information and Littoral Operations (NW-MILO) Program at PNNL’s Coastal Security Institute in Sequim, Washington is establishing a methodology to detect and classify these threats - in part through developing a better understanding of acoustic signatures in a near-shore environment. The purpose of the acoustic data collection described here is to investigate the acoustic signatures of small vessels. The data is being recorded continuously, 24 hours a day, along with radar track data and imagery. The recording began in August 2008, and to date the data contains tens of thousands of signals from small vessels recorded in a variety of environmental conditions. The quantity and variety of this data collection, with the supporting imagery and radar track data, makes it particularly useful for the development of robust acoustic signature models and advanced algorithms for signal classification and information extraction. The underwater acoustic sensing system is part of a multi-modal sensing system that is operating near the mouth of Sequim Bay. Sequim Bay opens onto the Straight of Juan de Fuca, which contains part of the border between the U.S. and Canada. Table 1 lists the specific components used for the NW-MILO system. The acoustic sensor is a hydrophone permanently deployed at a mean depth of about 3 meters. In addition to a hydrophone, the other sensors in the system are a marine radar, an electro-optical (EO) camera and an infra-red (IR) camera. The radar is integrated with a vessel tracking system (VTS) that provides position, speed and heading information. The data from all the sensors is recorded and saved to a central server. The data has been validated in terms of its usability for characterizing the

  3. Broadband solid cloak for underwater acoustics

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Xiaoning; Bi, Yafeng; Sun, Zhaoyong; Xiang, Ping; Yang, Jun; Hu, Gengkai

    2016-01-01

    Shielding an object to be undetectable is an important issue for engineering applications. Cloaking is the ultimate shielding example, routing waves around an object without mutual interaction, demonstrated as possible in principle by transformation and metamaterial techniques. Example applications have been successfully designed and validated for electromagnetic wave, thin plate flexural wave, thermal flux, and airborne sound. However, for underwater acoustics, the commonly used scheme based on meta-fluids with anisotropic density for airborne sound is unworkable since an acoustic rigid material is required with mass density three orders of magnitude higher than water. Material with such high density is impossible using even the heaviest metal, and may suffer from a narrow working frequency band even if realized with locally resonant techniques. An alternative solution was recently suggested based on solid pentamode material, which can be impedance matched with water and has anisotropic modulus. Here, we rep...

  4. Homotopy Based Reconstruction from Acoustic Images

    Sharma, Ojaswa

    of the inherent arrangement. The problem of reconstruction from arbitrary cross sections is a generic problem and is also shown to be solved here using the mathematical tool of continuous deformations. As part of a complete processing, segmentation using level set methods is explored for acoustic images and fast...... GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) based methods are suggested for a streaming computation on large volumes of data. Validation of results for acoustic images is not straightforward due to unavailability of ground truth. Accuracy figures for the suggested methods are provided using phantom object......This thesis presents work in the direction of generating smooth surfaces from linear cross sections embedded in R2 and R3 using homotopy continuation. The methods developed in this research are generic and can be applied to higher dimensions as well. Two types of problems addressed in this research...

  5. Signal classification for acoustic neutrino detection

    Neff, M., E-mail: max.neff@physik.uni-erlangen.de [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Anton, G.; Enzenhoefer, A.; Graf, K.; Hoessl, J.; Katz, U.; Lahmann, R.; Richardt, C. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-01-11

    This article focuses on signal classification for deep-sea acoustic neutrino detection. In the deep sea, the background of transient signals is very diverse. Approaches like matched filtering are not sufficient to distinguish between neutrino-like signals and other transient signals with similar signature, which are forming the acoustic background for neutrino detection in the deep-sea environment. A classification system based on machine learning algorithms is analysed with the goal to find a robust and effective way to perform this task. For a well-trained model, a testing error on the level of 1% is achieved for strong classifiers like Random Forest and Boosting Trees using the extracted features of the signal as input and utilising dense clusters of sensors instead of single sensors.

  6. Acoustic Impedance Inversion VIa Wavelet Transform COnstraints

    HuiyanZHANG; BainianLU; 等

    1998-01-01

    As is well known,the acoustic impedance inversion problem is,in general.an underdetermined inverse problem and some constraints about the model have to be incorporated in the inversion scheme,In this article,we assume that a prioir scale information about the model is available to constrain the inversion.We then explore another approach by means of the wavelet transform.WT,where we are specifically concerned with the selection and application of a priori scale information in the wavelet domain to reconstruct the acoustic impedance model.A simple example is explored,which show that the WT approach improves results in comparison with the conventional approach.

  7. Acoustic signal processing toolbox for array processing

    Pham, Tien; Whipps, Gene T.

    2003-08-01

    The US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has developed an acoustic signal processing toolbox (ASPT) for acoustic sensor array processing. The intent of this document is to describe the toolbox and its uses. The ASPT is a GUI-based software that is developed and runs under MATLAB. The current version, ASPT 3.0, requires MATLAB 6.0 and above. ASPT contains a variety of narrowband (NB) and incoherent and coherent wideband (WB) direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation and beamforming algorithms that have been researched and developed at ARL. Currently, ASPT contains 16 DOA and beamforming algorithms. It contains several different NB and WB versions of the MVDR, MUSIC and ESPRIT algorithms. In addition, there are a variety of pre-processing, simulation and analysis tools available in the toolbox. The user can perform simulation or real data analysis for all algorithms with user-defined signal model parameters and array geometries.

  8. Acoustic data transmission through a drillstring

    Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for acoustically transmitting data along a drillstring is presented. In accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, acoustic data signals are conditioned to counteract distortions caused by the drillstring. Preferably, this conditioning step comprises multiplying each frequency component of the data signal by exp (-ikL) where L is the transmission length of the drillstring, k is the wave number in the drillstring at the frequency of each component and i is (-1).sup.1/2. In another embodiment of this invention, data signals having a frequency content in at least one passband of the drillstring are generated preferably traveling in only one direction (e.g., up the drillstring) while echoes in the drillstring resulting from the data transmission are suppressed.

  9. Acoustic data transmission through a drillstring

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1992-07-07

    A method and apparatus for acoustically transmitting data along a drillstring are presented. In accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, acoustic data signals are conditioned to counteract distortions caused by the drillstring. Preferably, this conditioning step comprises multiplying each frequency component of the data signal by exp ([minus]ikL) where L is the transmission length of the drillstring, k is the wave number in the drillstring at the frequency of each component and i is ([minus]1)[sup 1/2]. In another embodiment of this invention, data signals having a frequency content in at least one passband of the drillstring are generated preferably traveling in only one direction (e.g., up the drillstring) while echoes in the drillstring resulting from the data transmission are suppressed. 20 figs.

  10. Simulating acoustic waves in spotted stars

    Papini, Emanuele; Gizon, Laurent; Hanasoge, Shravan M

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic modes of oscillation are affected by stellar activity, however it is unclear how starspots contribute to these changes. Here we investigate the non-magnetic effects of starspots on global modes with angular degree $\\ell \\leq 2$ in highly active stars, and characterize the spot seismic signature on synthetic light curves. We perform 3D time-domain simulations of linear acoustic waves to study their interaction with a model starspot. We model the spot as a 3D change in the sound speed stratification with respect to a convectively stable stellar background, built from solar Model S. We perform a parametric study by considering different depths and perturbation amplitudes. Exact numerical simulations allow investigation of the wavefield-spot interaction beyond first order perturbation theory. The interaction of the axisymmetric modes with the starspot is strongly nonlinear. As mode frequency increases, the frequency shifts for radial modes exceed the value predicted by linear theory, while the shifts for...

  11. 28th International Acoustical Imaging Symposium

    André, Michael P; Andre, Michael; Arnold, Walter; Bamber, Jeff; Burov, Valentin; Chubachi, Noriyoshi; Erikson, Kenneth; Ermert, Helmut; Fink, Mathias; Gan, Woon S; Granz, Bernd; Greenleaf, James; Hu, Jiankai; Jones, Joie P; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre; Laugier, Pascal; Lee, Hua; Lees, Sidney; Levin, Vadim M; Maev, Roman; Masotti, Leonardo; Nowicki, Andrzej; O’Brien, William; Prasad, Manika; Rafter, Patrick; Rouseff, Daniel; Thijssen, Johan; Tittmann, Bernard; Tortoli, Piero; Steen, Anton; Waag, Robert; Wells, Peter; Acoustical Imaging

    2007-01-01

    The International Acoustical Imaging Symposium has been held continuously since 1968 as a unique forum for advanced research, promoting the sharing of technology, developments, methods and theory among all areas of acoustics. The interdisciplinary nature of the Symposium and the wide international participation are two of its main strengths. Scientists from around the world present their papers in an informal environment conducive to lively discussion and cross-fertilization. The fact that a loyal community of scientists has supported this Series since 1968 is evidence of its impact on the field. The Symposium Series continues to thrive in a busy calendar of scientific meetings without the infrastructure of a professional society. It does so because those who attend and those who rely on the Proceedings as a well-known reference work acknowledge its value. This Volume 28 of the Proceedings likewise contains an excellent collection of papers presented in six major categories, offering both a broad perspective ...

  12. The acoustics of uvulars in Tlingit

    Denzer-King, Ryan E.

    This paper looks at the acoustics of uvulars in Tlingit, an Athabaskan language spoken in Alaska and Canada. Data from five native speakers was used for acoustic analysis for tokens from five phoneme groups (alveolars, plain velars, labialized velars, plain uvulars, and labialized uvulars). The tokens were analyzed by computing spectral moments of plosive bursts and fricatives, and F2 and F3 values for post-consonantal vowels, which were used to calculate locus equations, a descriptive measure of the relationship between F2 at vowel onset and midpoint. Several trends were observed, including a greater difference between F2 and F 3 after uvulars than after velars, as well as a higher center of gravity (COG) and lower skew and kurtosis for uvulars than for velars. The comparison of plain versus labialized consonants supports the finding of Suh (2008) that labialization lowers mean burst energy, or COG, and additionally found labialization to raise skew and kurtosis.

  13. Nanoscale Characterization with Laser Picosecond Acoustics

    Wright, Oliver B.

    2007-11-01

    Nanophotonics—the manipulation of light with nanomaterials—is a booming subject, its success owing to the host of nanoscale fabrication techniques now at our disposal. However, for the characterization of such nanomaterials it is expedient to turn to other types of waves with a wavelength commensurate with the nanostructure in question. One such choice is acoustic waves of nanometre wavelength. The aim of this article is to provide an introduction to laser picosecond acoustics, a means by which gigahertz-terahertz ultrasonic waves can be generated and detected by ultrashort light pulses. This method can therefore be used to characterize materials with nanometre spatial resolution. In this article we review the theoretical background for opaque single-layer thin film isotropic samples with reference to key experiments. Solids including metals and semiconductors are discussed, although liquids and, conceivably, gases, are not excluded.

  14. Acoustics dictionary quadrilingual English, German, French, Dutch

    Reichardt, Walter

    1983-01-01

    Interest in acoustics continues to increase. Although this branch of science was concerned primarily with the promotion of qualitative and quantitative sound transmission until a few decades ago, emphasis is currently placed also on the limitation of sound nuisance and, by extension, the setting of boundaries for permissible sound levels in places \\vhere people are found. This last aspect in particular is exercising more and more influence on the design of buildings and machines, and in town and country planning. In addition, sound vibrations, because of their physical characteristics, are being used increasingly in disparate disciplines such as navigation, medical investigation and non­ destructive materials research. The flood of publications resulting from this increased interest in acoustics has led to a growing number of people being confronted with terminology which had until quite re­ cently only been used by a relatively small group of specialists and had remained largely unknown as a result. This f...

  15. Thermally induced acoustic waves in porous silicon

    Gavrilchenko, Iryna V.; Shulimov, Yuriy G.; Skryshevsky, Valeriy A. [Radiophysics Department, Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University, Kyiv (Ukraine); Benilov, Arthur I. [Radiophysics Department, Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University, Kyiv (Ukraine); Laboratoire d' Electronique, Optoelectronique et Microsystemes, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Ecully (France)

    2009-07-15

    Thermally induced acoustic waves in structures with porous silicon have been studied. Two different schemas of acoustic phenomena recording are compared: in the first one a signal from microphone was measured as function of output frequency, in second one the resistance of porous silicon was measured using Wheatstone bridge. For both methods, the resonance peak is situated in same frequencies depending on difference in thermal properties between porous silicon and c-Si as well as geometry of studied structures. 1.0 kHz shifting of resonance peak in saturated alcohol vapors comparing to ambient air is observed. It can be applied as new transducer for chemical sensors based on porous silicon. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Studies in musical acoustics and psychoacoustics

    2017-01-01

    This book comprises twelve articles which cover a range of topics from musical instrument acoustics to issues in psychoacoustics and sound perception as well as neuromusicology. In addition to experimental methods and data acquisition, modeling (such as FEM or wave field synthesis) and numerical simulation plays a central role in studies addressing sound production in musical instruments as well as interaction of radiated sound with the environment. Some of the studies have a focus on psychoacoustic aspects in regard to virtual pitch and timbre as well as apparent source width (for techniques such as stereo or ambisonics) in music production. Since musical acoustics imply subjects playing instruments or singing in order to produce sound according to musical structures, this area is also covered including a study that presents an artifical intelligent agent capable to interact with a real ('analog') player in musical genres such as traditional and free jazz. .

  17. Distributed acoustic sensing for pipeline monitoring

    Hill, David; McEwen-King, Magnus [OptaSense, QinetiQ Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    Optical fibre is deployed widely across the oil and gas industry. As well as being deployed regularly to provide high bandwidth telecommunications and infrastructure for SCADA it is increasingly being used to sense pressure, temperature and strain along buried pipelines, on subsea pipelines and downhole. In this paper we present results from the latest sensing capability using standard optical fibre to detect acoustic signals along the entire length of a pipeline. In Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) an optical fibre is used for both sensing and telemetry. In this paper we present results from the OptaSense{sup TM} system which has been used to detect third party intervention (TPI) along buried pipelines. In a typical deployment the system is connected to an existing standard single-mode fibre, up to 50km in length, and was used to independently listen to the acoustic / seismic activity at every 10 meter interval. We will show that through the use of advanced array processing of the independent, simultaneously sampled channels it is possible to detect and locate activity within the vicinity of the pipeline and through sophisticated acoustic signal processing to obtain the acoustic signature to classify the type of activity. By combining spare fibre capacity in existing buried fibre optic cables; processing and display techniques commonly found in sonar; and state-of-the-art in fibre-optic distributed acoustic sensing, we will describe the new monitoring capabilities that are available to the pipeline operator. Without the expense of retrofitting sensors to the pipeline, this technology can provide a high performance, rapidly deployable and cost effective method of providing gapless and persistent monitoring of a pipeline. We will show how this approach can be used to detect, classify and locate activity such as; third party interference (including activity indicative of illegal hot tapping); real time tracking of pigs; and leak detection. We will also show how an

  18. Study of Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of future propulsion systems utilizing advanced composite structures for the storage of cryogenic fuels, such as liquid hydrogen or oxygen, presents many challenges. Economic justification for these structures requires light weight, reusable components with an infrastructure allowing periodic evaluation of structural integrity after enduring demanding stresses during operation. A major focus has been placed on the use of acoustic emission NDE to detect propagating defects, in service, necessitating an extensive study into characterizing the nature of acoustic signal propagation at very low temperatures and developing the methodology of applying AE sensors to monitor cryogenic components. This work addresses the question of sensor performance in the cryogenic environment. Problems involving sensor mounting, spectral response and durability are addressed. The results of this work provides a common point of measure from which sensor selection can be made when testing composite components at cryogenic temperatures.

  19. Acoustical Imaging Cameras for the Inspection and Condition Assessment of Hydraulic Structures

    2010-08-01

    feasibility of using acoustical imaging for underwater inspection of structures. INTRODUCTION: Visibility in clear water for the human eye and optical ...but higher resolution than sidescan or multibeam acoustical images • Nonhomogeneity of returned signal caused by variation in angles of signals...acoustical imaging. To obtain higher resolutions than other acoustical imaging technologies such as multibeam and sidescan systems, acoustical camera

  20. Ocean Acoustic Tomography Mooring Design Study.

    1982-04-01

    Figure 5 A- 13 APPENDIX B Power Systems for the Long-Range Acoustic Transmitter STRAWMAN #1 Lithium Primary Battery Lithium Thionyl Chloride ...buoyancy provided by a syntactic foam sphere. - LRT and the top buoyancy at the same depth. - Lithium primary battery placed with LRT. - Tension member...much less pressure). 4. Same as 1. except: - Lithium primary battery placed upon the anchor. - Electromechanical cable (also the tension member