WorldWideScience

Sample records for acoustics ultrasound device

  1. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    The work of this project is concerned with the simulation of surface acoustic waves (SAW) and topology optimization of SAW devices. SAWs are elastic vibrations that propagate along a material surface and are extensively used in electromechanical filters and resonators in telecommunication. A new...

  2. A dual-mode hemispherical sparse array for 3D passive acoustic mapping and skull localization within a clinical MRI guided focused ultrasound device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crake, Calum; Brinker, Spencer T.; Coviello, Christian M.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; McDannold, Nathan J.

    2018-03-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that passive acoustic imaging may be used alongside MRI for monitoring of focused ultrasound therapy. However, past implementations have generally made use of either linear arrays originally designed for diagnostic imaging or custom narrowband arrays specific to in-house therapeutic transducer designs, neither of which is fully compatible with clinical MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) devices. Here we have designed an array which is suitable for use within an FDA-approved MR-guided transcranial focused ultrasound device, within the bore of a 3 Tesla clinical MRI scanner. The array is constructed from 5  ×  0.4 mm piezoceramic disc elements arranged in pseudorandom fashion on a low-profile laser-cut acrylic frame designed to fit between the therapeutic elements of a 230 kHz InSightec ExAblate 4000 transducer. By exploiting thickness and radial resonance modes of the piezo discs the array is capable of both B-mode imaging at 5 MHz for skull localization, as well as passive reception at the second harmonic of the therapy array for detection of cavitation and 3D passive acoustic imaging. In active mode, the array was able to perform B-mode imaging of a human skull, showing the outer skull surface with good qualitative agreement with MR imaging. Extension to 3D showed the array was able to locate the skull within  ±2 mm/2° of reference points derived from MRI, which could potentially allow registration of a patient to the therapy system without the expense of real-time MRI. In passive mode, the array was able to resolve a point source in 3D within a  ±10 mm region about each axis from the focus, detect cavitation (SNR ~ 12 dB) at burst lengths from 10 cycles to continuous wave, and produce 3D acoustic maps in a flow phantom. Finally, the array was used to detect and map cavitation associated with microbubble activity in the brain in nonhuman primates.

  3. Ultrasound acoustic wave energy transfer and harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahab, Shima; Leadenham, Stephen; Guillot, François; Sabra, Karim; Erturk, Alper

    2014-04-01

    This paper investigates low-power electricity generation from ultrasound acoustic wave energy transfer combined with piezoelectric energy harvesting for wireless applications ranging from medical implants to naval sensor systems. The focus is placed on an underwater system that consists of a pulsating source for spherical wave generation and a harvester connected to an external resistive load for quantifying the electrical power output. An analytical electro-acoustic model is developed to relate the source strength to the electrical power output of the harvester located at a specific distance from the source. The model couples the energy harvester dynamics (piezoelectric device and electrical load) with the source strength through the acoustic-structure interaction at the harvester-fluid interface. Case studies are given for a detailed understanding of the coupled system dynamics under various conditions. Specifically the relationship between the electrical power output and system parameters, such as the distance of the harvester from the source, dimensions of the harvester, level of source strength, and electrical load resistance are explored. Sensitivity of the electrical power output to the excitation frequency in the neighborhood of the harvester's underwater resonance frequency is also reported.

  4. Acoustic bubble sorting for ultrasound contrast agent enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segers, Tim; Versluis, Michel

    2014-05-21

    An ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) suspension contains encapsulated microbubbles with a wide size distribution, with radii ranging from 1 to 10 μm. Medical transducers typically operate at a single frequency, therefore only a small selection of bubbles will resonate to the driving ultrasound pulse. Thus, the sensitivity can be improved by narrowing down the size distribution. Here, we present a simple lab-on-a-chip method to sort the population of microbubbles on-chip using a traveling ultrasound wave. First, we explore the physical parameter space of acoustic bubble sorting using well-defined bubble sizes formed in a flow-focusing device, then we demonstrate successful acoustic sorting of a commercial UCA. This novel sorting strategy may lead to an overall improvement of the sensitivity of contrast ultrasound by more than 10 dB.

  5. Controlling the acoustic streaming by pulsed ultrasounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyos, Mauricio; Castro, Angélica

    2013-01-01

    We propose a technique based on pulsed ultrasounds for controlling, reducing to a minimum observable value the acoustic streaming in closed ultrasonic standing wave fluidic resonators. By modifying the number of pulses and the repetition time it is possible to reduce the velocity of the acoustic streaming with respect to the velocity generated by the continuous ultrasound mode of operation. The acoustic streaming is observed at the nodal plane where a suspension of 800nm latex particles was focused by primary radiation force. A mixture of 800nm and 15μm latex particles has been also used for showing that the acoustic streaming is hardly reduced while primary and secondary forces continue to operate. The parameter we call "pulse mode factor" i.e. the time of applied ultrasound divided by the duty cycle, is found to be the adequate parameter that controls the acoustic streaming. We demonstrate that pulsed ultrasound is more efficient for controlling the acoustic streaming than the variation of the amplitude of the standing waves. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Acoustic inspection device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Burghard, Brion J.; Skorpik, James R.; Pappas, Richard A.; Mullen, O. Dennis; Samuel, Todd J.; Reid, Larry D.; Harris, Joe C.; Valencia, Juan D.; Smalley, Jonathan T.; Shepard, Chester L.; Taylor, Theodore T.

    2005-09-06

    An ultrasound inspection apparatus particularly adapted to examine containers (sealed or unsealed) containing a liquid or solid bulk material. The apparatus has an overall configuration of a hand held pistol with a front transducer contact surface that is positioned against a front wall of the container. An ultrasound pulse is transmitted from the apparatus to be reflected from a back wall of a container being investigated. The received echo pulse is converted to a digital waveform. The waveform is analyzed relative to temperature, travel distance of the pulse(s), and time of travel to ascertain characteristics of the liquid or other materials and to provide identification of the same.

  7. Satellite and acoustic tracking device

    KAUST Repository

    Berumen, Michael L.

    2014-02-20

    The present invention relates a method and device for tracking movements of marine animals or objects in large bodies of water and across significant distances. The method and device can track an acoustic transmitter attached to an animal or object beneath the ocean surface by employing an unmanned surface vessel equipped with a hydrophone array and GPS receiver.

  8. Satellite and acoustic tracking device

    KAUST Repository

    Berumen, Michael L.; De la Torre, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates a method and device for tracking movements of marine animals or objects in large bodies of water and across significant distances. The method and device can track an acoustic transmitter attached to an animal or object beneath the ocean surface by employing an unmanned surface vessel equipped with a hydrophone array and GPS receiver.

  9. Industrial installation surveillance acoustic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marini, Jean; Audenard, Bernard.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this invention is the detection of possible impacts of bodies migrating inside the installation, using acoustic sensors of the waves emitted at the time of impact of the migrating bodies. This device makes it possible to take into account only those acoustic signals relating to the impacts of bodies migrating in the area under surveillance, to the exclusion of any other acoustic or electric perturbing phenomenon. The invention has a preferential use in the case of a linear shape installation in which a fluid flows at high rate, such as a section of the primary system of a pressurized water nuclear reactor [fr

  10. Acoustic window planning for ultrasound acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbl, Rüdiger; Virga, Salvatore; Rackerseder, Julia; Frisch, Benjamin; Navab, Nassir; Hennersperger, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    Autonomous robotic ultrasound has recently gained considerable interest, especially for collaborative applications. Existing methods for acquisition trajectory planning are solely based on geometrical considerations, such as the pose of the transducer with respect to the patient surface. This work aims at establishing acoustic window planning to enable autonomous ultrasound acquisitions of anatomies with restricted acoustic windows, such as the liver or the heart. We propose a fully automatic approach for the planning of acquisition trajectories, which only requires information about the target region as well as existing tomographic imaging data, such as X-ray computed tomography. The framework integrates both geometrical and physics-based constraints to estimate the best ultrasound acquisition trajectories with respect to the available acoustic windows. We evaluate the developed method using virtual planning scenarios based on real patient data as well as for real robotic ultrasound acquisitions on a tissue-mimicking phantom. The proposed method yields superior image quality in comparison with a naive planning approach, while maintaining the necessary coverage of the target. We demonstrate that by taking image formation properties into account acquisition planning methods can outperform naive plannings. Furthermore, we show the need for such planning techniques, since naive approaches are not sufficient as they do not take the expected image quality into account.

  11. Laser-nucleated acoustic cavitation in focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerold, Bjoern; Kotopoulis, Spiros; McDougall, Craig; McGloin, David; Postema, Michiel; Prentice, Paul

    2011-04-01

    Acoustic cavitation can occur in therapeutic applications of high-amplitude focused ultrasound. Studying acoustic cavitation has been challenging, because the onset of nucleation is unpredictable. We hypothesized that acoustic cavitation can be forced to occur at a specific location using a laser to nucleate a microcavity in a pre-established ultrasound field. In this paper we describe a scientific instrument that is dedicated to this outcome, combining a focused ultrasound transducer with a pulsed laser. We present high-speed photographic observations of laser-induced cavitation and laser-nucleated acoustic cavitation, at frame rates of 0.5×10(6) frames per second, from laser pulses of energy above and below the optical breakdown threshold, respectively. Acoustic recordings demonstrated inertial cavitation can be controllably introduced to the ultrasound focus. This technique will contribute to the understanding of cavitation evolution in focused ultrasound including for potential therapeutic applications. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  12. Design of acoustic devices by topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this study is to design and optimize structures and devices that are subjected to acoustic waves. Examples are acoustic lenses, sound walls, waveguides and loud speakers. We formulate the design problem as a topology optimization problem, i.e. distribute material in a design domain...... such that the acoustic response is optimized....

  13. Acoustically active lipospheres containing paclitaxel: a new therapeutic ultrasound contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, E C; McCreery, T P; Sweitzer, R H; Caldwell, V E; Wu, Y

    1998-12-01

    Paclitaxel-carrying lipospheres (MRX-552) were developed and evaluated as a new ultrasound contrast agent for chemotherapeutic drug delivery. Paclitaxel was suspended in soybean oil and added to an aqueous suspension of phospholipids in vials. The headspace of the vials was replaced with perfluorobutane gas; the vials were sealed, and they were agitated at 4200 rpm on a shaking device. The resulting lipospheres containing paclitaxel were studied for concentration, size, acute toxicity in mice, and acoustic activity and drug release with ultrasound. Lipospheres containing sudan black dye were produced to demonstrate the acoustically active liposphere (AAL)-ultrasound release concept. Acoustically active lipospheres containing paclitaxel had a mean particle count of approximately 1 x 10(9) particles per mL and a mean size of 2.9 microns. Acute toxicity studies in mice showed a 10-fold reduction in toxicity for paclitaxel in AALs compared with free paclitaxel. The AALs reflected ultrasound as a contrast agent. Increasing amounts of ultrasound energy selectively ruptured the AALs and released the paclitaxel. Acoustically active lipospheres represent a new class of acoustically active drug delivery vehicles. Future studies will assess efficacy of AALs for ultrasound-mediated drug delivery.

  14. Acoustic Cavitation Enhances Focused Ultrasound Ablation with Phase-Shift Inorganic Perfluorohexane Nanoemulsions: An In Vitro Study Using a Clinical Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-Yan Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate whether acoustic cavitation could increase the evaporation of a phase-shift inorganic perfluorohexane (PFH nanoemulsion and enhance high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU ablation. Materials and Methods. PFH was encapsulated by mesoporous silica nanocapsule (MSNC to form a nanometer-sized droplet (MSNC-PFH. It was added to a tissue-mimicking phantom, whereas phosphate buffered saline (PBS was added as a control (PBS-control. HIFU (Pac=150 W, t=5/10 s exposures were performed in both phantoms with various duty cycles (DC. US images, temperature, and cavitation emissions were recorded during HIFU exposure. HIFU-induced lesions were measured and calculated. Results. Compared to PBS-control, MSNC-PFH nanoemulsion could significantly increase the volume of HIFU-induced lesion (P<0.01. Peak temperatures were 78.16 ± 5.64°C at a DC of 100%, 70.17 ± 6.43°C at 10%, 53.17 ± 4.54°C at 5%, and 42.00 ± 5.55°C at 2%, respectively. Inertial cavitation was much stronger in the pulsed-HIFU than that in the continuous-wave HIFU exposure. Compared to 100%-DC exposure, the mean volume of lesion induced by 5 s exposure at 10%-DC was significantly larger, but smaller at 2%-DC. Conclusions. MSNC-PFH nanoemulsion can significantly enhance HIFU ablation. Appropriate pulsed-HIFU exposure could significantly increase the volume of lesion and reduce total US energy required for HIFU ablation.

  15. Microfluidic device for acoustic cell lysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Darren W.; Cooley, Erika Jane; Smith, Gennifer Tanabe; James, Conrad D.; McClain, Jaime L.

    2015-08-04

    A microfluidic acoustic-based cell lysing device that can be integrated with on-chip nucleic acid extraction. Using a bulk acoustic wave (BAW) transducer array, acoustic waves can be coupled into microfluidic cartridges resulting in the lysis of cells contained therein by localized acoustic pressure. Cellular materials can then be extracted from the lysed cells. For example, nucleic acids can be extracted from the lysate using silica-based sol-gel filled microchannels, nucleic acid binding magnetic beads, or Nafion-coated electrodes. Integration of cell lysis and nucleic acid extraction on-chip enables a small, portable system that allows for rapid analysis in the field.

  16. Diamond: a material for acoustic devices

    OpenAIRE

    MORTET, Vincent; WILLIAMS, Oliver; HAENEN, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Diamond has been foreseen to replace silicon for high power, high frequency electronic applications or for devices that operates in harsh environments. However, diamond electronic devices are still in the laboratory stage due to the lack of large substrates and the complexity of diamond doping. On another hand, surface acoustic wave filters based on diamond are commercially available. Diamond is especially suited for acoustic applications because of its exceptional mechanical properties. The ...

  17. Challenges and regulatory considerations in the acoustic measurement of high-frequency (>20 MHz) ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, Samuel M; Sundar, Guru; Schafer, Mark E; Harris, Gerald R; Vaezy, Shahram; Gessert, James M; Howard, Samuel M; Moore, Mary K; Eaton, Richard M

    2013-11-01

    This article examines the challenges associated with making acoustic output measurements at high ultrasound frequencies (>20 MHz) in the context of regulatory considerations contained in the US Food and Drug Administration industry guidance document for diagnostic ultrasound devices. Error sources in the acoustic measurement, including hydrophone calibration and spatial averaging, nonlinear distortion, and mechanical alignment, are evaluated, and the limitations of currently available acoustic measurement instruments are discussed. An uncertainty analysis of acoustic intensity and power measurements is presented, and an example uncertainty calculation is done on a hypothetical 30-MHz high-frequency ultrasound system. This analysis concludes that the estimated measurement uncertainty of the acoustic intensity is +73%/-86%, and the uncertainty in the mechanical index is +37%/-43%. These values exceed the respective levels in the Food and Drug Administration guidance document of 30% and 15%, respectively, which are more representative of the measurement uncertainty associated with characterizing lower-frequency ultrasound systems. Recommendations made for minimizing the measurement uncertainty include implementing a mechanical positioning system that has sufficient repeatability and precision, reconstructing the time-pressure waveform via deconvolution using the hydrophone frequency response, and correcting for hydrophone spatial averaging.

  18. Ultrasound-guided removal of Implanon devices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Persaud, T

    2008-11-01

    Our study has shown that ultrasound-guided localisation and removal of Implanon rods is safe, practical and highly successful. Over a 4-year period, 119 patients had successful, uncomplicated removal of their subdermal devices.The technique is particularly useful for removal of the device when it is not palpable or when an attempt at removal of a palpable device has not been successful.

  19. Ultrasound appearances of Implanon implanted contraceptive devices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNeill, G

    2009-09-01

    Subdermal contraceptive devices represent a popular choice of contraception. Whilst often removed without the use of imaging, circumstances exist where imaging is required. Ultrasound is the modality of choice. The optimal technique and typical sonographic appearances are detailed in this article.

  20. Ultrasound imparted air-recoil resonance (UIAR) method for acoustic power estimation: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiplavil, Sreekumar; Rivens, Ian; ter Haar, Gail

    2013-07-01

    Ultrasound imparted air-recoil resonance (UIAR), a new method for acoustic power estimation, is introduced with emphasis on therapeutic high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) monitoring applications. Advantages of this approach over existing practices include fast response; electrical and magnetic inertness, and hence MRI compatibility; portability; high damage threshold and immunity to vibration and interference; low cost; etc. The angle of incidence should be fixed for accurate measurement. However, the transducer-detector pair can be aligned in any direction with respect to the force of gravity. In this sense, the operation of the device is orientation independent. The acoustic response of a pneumatically coupled pair of Helmholtz resonators, with one of them acting as the sensor head, is used for the estimation of acoustic power. The principle is valid in the case of pulsed/ burst as well as continuous ultrasound exposure, the former being more sensitive and accurate. An electro-acoustic theory has been developed for describing the dynamics of pressure flow and resonance in the system considering various thermo- viscous loss mechanisms. Experimental observations are found to be in agreement with theoretical results. Assuming the window damage threshold (~10 J·mm(-2)) and accuracy of RF power estimation are the upper and lower scale-limiting factors, the performance of the device was examined for an RF power range of 5 mW to 100 W with a HIFU transducer operating at 1.70 MHz, and an average nonlinearity of ~1.5% was observed. The device is also sensitive to sub-milliwatt powers. The frequency response was analyzed at 0.85, 1.70, 2.55, and 3.40 MHz and the results are presented with respective theoretical estimates. Typical response time is in the millisecond regime. Output drift is about 3% for resonant and 5% for nonresonant modes. The principle has been optimized to demonstrate a general-purpose acoustic power meter.

  1. Acoustic Pattern Recognition on Android Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Maiken Bjerg; Gaarsdal, Jesper; Steen, Kim Arild

    2013-01-01

    an Android application developed for acoustic pattern recognition of bird species. The acoustic data is recorded using a built-in microphone, and pattern recognition is performed on the device, requiring no network connection. The algorithm is implemented in C++ as a native Android module and the Open......CV library is used for signal processing. We conclude that the approach presented here is a viable solution to pattern recognition problems. Since it requires no network connection, it shows promise in fields such as wildlife research....

  2. P-shaped Coiled Stator Ultrasound Motor for Rotating Intravascular Surgery Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshinobu ABE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary focus of this paper is the development of an ultra-miniature ultrasound motor for use in the human blood vessel. Since the size of the drive source for rotating the atherectomy device and intravascular ultrasonography system are large currently in practical use, it is installed outside the body, and the rotational power for the atherectomy device and intravascular ultrasonography system are transmitted through the long tortuous blood vessel. Such systems suffer from the problem that the rotation becomes non-uniform, and the problem that the available time is limited. We have therefore developed a P-shaped coiled stator ultrasound motor as a miniature ultrasound motor for rotating the ultrasound sensor for use in blood vessels in order to solve these problems. In this paper, we describe measurement of the torque, revolution speed, output power, efficiency, and particle motion on acoustic waveguide of the P-shaped coiled stator ultrasound motor.

  3. Systematic design of acoustic devices by topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2005-01-01

    We present a method to design acoustic devices with topology optimization. The general algorithm is exemplified by the design of a reflection chamber that minimizes the transmission of acoustic waves in a specified frequency range.......We present a method to design acoustic devices with topology optimization. The general algorithm is exemplified by the design of a reflection chamber that minimizes the transmission of acoustic waves in a specified frequency range....

  4. A novel technology: microfluidic devices for microbubble ultrasound contrast agent generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hangyu; Chen, Junfang; Chen, Chuanpin

    2016-09-01

    Microbubbles are used as ultrasound contrast agents, which enhance ultrasound imaging techniques. In addition, microbubbles currently show promise in disease therapeutics. Microfluidic devices have increased the ability to produce microbubbles with precise size, and high monodispersity compared to microbubbles created using traditional methods. This paper will review several variations in microfluidic device structures used to produce microbubbles as ultrasound contrast agents. Microfluidic device structures include T-junction, and axisymmetric and asymmetric flow-focusing. These devices have made it possible to produce microbubbles that can enter the vascular space; these microbubbles must be less than 10 μm in diameter and have high monodispersity. For different demands of microbubbles production rate, asymmetric flow-focusing devices were divided into individual and integrated devices. In addition, asymmetric flow-focusing devices can produce double layer and multilayer microbubbles loaded with drug or biological components. Details on the mechanisms of both bubble formation and device structures are provided. Finally, microfluidically produced microbubble acoustic responses, microbubble stability, and microbubble use in ultrasound imaging are discussed.

  5. Integration of Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasound Transducers to Microfluidic Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Viržonis, Darius; Kodzius, Rimantas; Vanagas, Galius

    2013-01-01

    The design and manufacturing flexibility of capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducers (CMUT) makes them attractive option for integration with microfluidic devices both for sensing and fluid manipulation. CMUT concept is introduced here

  6. Integration of Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasound Transducers to Microfluidic Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Viržonis, Darius

    2013-10-22

    The design and manufacturing flexibility of capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducers (CMUT) makes them attractive option for integration with microfluidic devices both for sensing and fluid manipulation. CMUT concept is introduced here by presentin

  7. Numerical Calculation and Measurement of Nonlinear Acoustic Fields in Ultrasound Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagishi, Tetsuya; Saito, Shigemi; Mine, Yoshitaka

    2002-05-01

    In order to develop a tool for designing on the ultrasonic probe and its peripheral devices for tissue-harmonic-imaging systems, a study is carried out to compare the calculation and observation results of nonlinear acoustic fields for a diagnostic ultrasound system. The pulsed ultrasound with a center frequency of 2.5 MHz is emanated from a weakly focusing sector probe with a 6.5 mm aperture radius and a 50 mm focal length into an agar phantom with an attenuation coefficient of about 0.6 dB/cm/MHz or 1.2 dB/cm/MHz. The nonlinear acoustic field is measured using a needle-type hydrophone. The calculation is based on the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov(KZK) equation which is modified so that the frequency dependence of the attenuation coefficient is the same as that in biological tissue. This equation is numerically solved with the implicit backward method employing the iterative method. The measured and calculated amplitude spectra show good agreement with each other.

  8. Time-reversal acoustics and ultrasound-assisted convection-enhanced drug delivery to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbricht, William; Sistla, Manjari; Ghandi, Gaurav; Lewis, George; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2013-08-01

    Time-reversal acoustics is an effective way of focusing ultrasound deep inside heterogeneous media such as biological tissues. Convection-enhanced delivery is a method of delivering drugs into the brain by infusing them directly into the brain interstitium. These two technologies are combined in a focusing system that uses a "smart needle" to simultaneously infuse fluid into the brain and provide the necessary feedback for focusing ultrasound using time-reversal acoustics. The effects of time-reversal acoustics-focused ultrasound on the spatial distribution of infused low- and high-molecular weight tracer molecules are examined in live, anesthetized rats. Results show that exposing the rat brain to focused ultrasound significantly increases the penetration of infused compounds into the brain. The addition of stabilized microbubbles enhances the effect of ultrasound exposure.

  9. Acoustofluidics 14: Applications of acoustic streaming in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiklund, Martin; Green, Roy; Ohlin, Mathias

    2012-07-21

    In part 14 of the tutorial series "Acoustofluidics--exploiting ultrasonic standing wave forces and acoustic streaming in microfluidic systems for cell and particle manipulation", we provide a qualitative description of acoustic streaming and review its applications in lab-on-a-chip devices. The paper covers boundary layer driven streaming, including Schlichting and Rayleigh streaming, Eckart streaming in the bulk fluid, cavitation microstreaming and surface-acoustic-wave-driven streaming.

  10. Acoustofluidics: theory and simulation of radiation forces at ultrasound resonances in microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Bruus, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Theoretical analysis is combined with numerical simulations to optimize designs and functionalities of acoustofluidic devices, i.e. microfluidic devices in which ultrasound waves are used to anipulate biological particles. The resonance frequencies and corresponding modes of the acoustic fields...... are calculated for various specific geometries of glass/silicon chips containing water-filled microchannels. A special emphasis is put on taking the surrounding glass/silicon material into account, thus going beyond the traditional transverse half-wavelength picture. For the resonance frequencies, where...

  11. Acoustical characterisation of carbon nanotube-loaded polydimethylsiloxane used for optical ultrasound generation

    OpenAIRE

    Alles, E. J.; Heo, J.; Noimark, S.; Colchester, R.; Parkin, I.; Baac, H. W.; Desjardins, A.

    2017-01-01

    An optical ultrasound generator was used to perform broadband (2-35 MHz) acoustical characterisation measurements of a nanocomposite comprising carbon nanotubes (CNT) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a composite that is commonly used as optical ultrasound generator. Samples consisting of either pure PDMS or CNT-loaded PDMS were characterised to determine the influence of CNTs on the speed of sound and power-law acoustic attenuation parameters. A small weight fraction (

  12. Analyzing the Acoustic Beat with Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik; Hirth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this column, we have previously presented various examples of how physical relationships can be examined by analyzing acoustic signals using smartphones or tablet PCs. In this example, we will be exploring the acoustic phenomenon of small beats, which is produced by the overlapping of two tones with a low difference in frequency ?f. The…

  13. Gas loading of graphene-quartz surface acoustic wave devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, E. F.; Chick, E. M.; Bandhu, L.; Lawton, L. M.; Nash, G. R.

    2013-08-01

    Graphene was transferred to the propagation path of quartz surface acoustic wave devices and the attenuation due to gas loading of air and argon measured at 70 MHz and 210 MHz and compared to devices with no graphene. Under argon loading, there was no significant difference between the graphene and non-graphene device and the values of measured attenuation agree well with those calculated theoretically. Under air loading, at 210 MHz, there was a significant difference between the non-graphene and graphene devices, with the average value of attenuation obtained with the graphene devices being approximately twice that obtained from the bare quartz devices.

  14. Some limitations on processing materials in acoustic levitation devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oran, W. A.; Witherow, W. K.; Ross, B. B.; Rush, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    The spot heating of samples, suspended in an acoustic field, was investigated to determine if the technique could be used to process materials. A single axis resonance device operating in air at 25 C with an rms pressure maximum of 160 to 170 db was used in the experiments. The heat flow from a hot object suspended in a levitation node is dominated by the effects of the field, with the heat loss approximately 20 times larger than that due to natural convection. The acoustic forces which suspend the body at a node also serve to eject the heated air. The coupling between the locally heated region around the body and the acoustic field results in instabilities in both the pressure wave and force field. The investigations indicated the extreme difficulties in developing a materials processing device based on acoustic/spot heating for use in a terrestrial environment.

  15. Thin-film sparse boundary array design for passive acoustic mapping during ultrasound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coviello, Christian M; Kozick, Richard J; Hurrell, Andrew; Smith, Penny Probert; Coussios, Constantin-C

    2012-10-01

    A new 2-D hydrophone array for ultrasound therapy monitoring is presented, along with a novel algorithm for passive acoustic mapping using a sparse weighted aperture. The array is constructed using existing polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) ultrasound sensor technology, and is utilized for its broadband characteristics and its high receive sensitivity. For most 2-D arrays, high-resolution imagery is desired, which requires a large aperture at the cost of a large number of elements. The proposed array's geometry is sparse, with elements only on the boundary of the rectangular aperture. The missing information from the interior is filled in using linear imaging techniques. After receiving acoustic emissions during ultrasound therapy, this algorithm applies an apodization to the sparse aperture to limit side lobes and then reconstructs acoustic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution. Experiments show verification of the theoretical point spread function, and cavitation maps in agar phantoms correspond closely to predicted areas, showing the validity of the array and methodology.

  16. Device for acoustic detection in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanff, M.; Lions, N.; Peronnet, J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a device which comprises a first acoustic conductor placed vertically within the coolant liquid contained in a nuclear reactor vessel and a second coaxial acoustic conductor extending to the exterior of the reactor vessel. The device essentially comprises an accelerometer assembly for detecting signals delivered by the second conductor and an amplifier which applies the detected signals to measuring instruments located outside the reactor vessel. The accelerometer comprises an amplifying pressure needle carried by the upper end of the second conductor, a piezoelectric ceramic element, a block fitted with a spring for applying the ceramic element against the needle and a preamplifier connected in series with the amplifier

  17. A Numerical Analysis of Phononic-Assisted Control of Ultrasound Waves in Acoustofluidic Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    and streaming has received much attention, since it relies solely on mechanical properties such as particle size and contrast in density and compressibility. We present a theoretical study of phononic-assisted control of ultrasound waves in acoustofluidic devices. We propose the use of phononic crystal...... diffractors, which can be introduced in acoustofluidic structures. These diffractors can be applied in the design of efficient resonant cavities, directional sound waves for new types of particle sorting methods, or acoustically controlled deterministic lateral displacement. The PnC-diffractor-based devices...... can be made configurable, by embedding the diffractors, all working at the same excitation frequency but with different resulting diffraction patterns, in exchangeable membranes on top of the device....

  18. Acoustic bubble sorting for ultrasound contrast agent enrichment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, T.J.; Versluis, Michel

    2014-01-01

    An ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) suspension contains encapsulated microbubbles with a wide size distribution, with radii ranging from 1 to 10 μm. Medical transducers typically operate at a single frequency, therefore only a small selection of bubbles will resonate to the driving ultrasound pulse.

  19. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices for Harsh Environment Wireless Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Greve

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Langasite surface acoustic wave devices can be used to implement harsh-environment wireless sensing of gas concentration and temperature. This paper reviews prior work on the development of langasite surface acoustic wave devices, followed by a report of recent progress toward the implementation of oxygen gas sensors. Resistive metal oxide films can be used as the oxygen sensing film, although development of an adherent barrier layer will be necessary with the sensing layers studied here to prevent interaction with the langasite substrate. Experimental results are presented for the performance of a langasite surface acoustic wave oxygen sensor with tin oxide sensing layer, and these experimental results are correlated with direct measurements of the sensing layer resistivity.

  20. Acoustically and Electrokinetically Driven Transport in Microfluidic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, Ersin

    Electrokinetically driven flows are widely employed as a primary method for liquid pumping in micro-electromechanical systems. Mixing of analytes and reagents is limited in microfluidic devices due to the low Reynolds number of the flows. Acoustic excitations have recently been suggested to promote mixing in the microscale flow systems. Electrokinetic flows through straight microchannels were investigated using the Poisson-Boltzmann and Nernst-Planck models. The acoustic wave/fluid flow interactions in a microchannel were investigated via the development of two and three-dimensional dynamic predictive models for flows with field couplings of the electrical, mechanical and fluid flow quantities. The effectiveness and applicability of electrokinetic augmentation in flexural plate wave micropumps for enhanced capabilities were explored. The proposed concept can be exploited to integrate micropumps into complex microfluidic chips improving the portability of micro-total-analysis systems along with the capabilities of actively controlling acoustics and electrokinetics for micro-mixer applications. Acoustically excited flows in microchannels consisting of flexural plate wave devices and thin film resonators were considered. Compressible flow fields were considered to accommodate the acoustic excitations produced by a vibrating wall. The velocity and pressure profiles for different parameters including frequency, channel height, wave amplitude and length were investigated. Coupled electrokinetics and acoustics cases were investigated while the electric field intensity of the electrokinetic body forces and actuation frequency of acoustic excitations were varied. Multifield analysis of a piezoelectrically actuated valveless micropump was also presented. The effect of voltage and frequency on membrane deflection and flow rate were investigated. Detailed fluid/solid deformation coupled simulations of piezoelectric valveless micropump have been conducted to predict the

  1. Effects of microchannel confinement on acoustic vaporisation of ultrasound phase change contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shengtao; Zhang, Ge; Hau Leow, Chee; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2017-09-01

    The sub-micron phase change contrast agent (PCCA) composed of a perfluorocarbon liquid core can be activated into gaseous state and form stable echogenic microbubbles for contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging. It has shown great promise in imaging microvasculature, tumour microenvironment, and cancer cells. Although PCCAs have been extensively studied for different diagnostic and therapeutic applications, the effect of biologically geometrical confinement on the acoustic vaporisation of PCCAs is still not clear. We have investigated the difference in PCCA-produced ultrasound contrast enhancement after acoustic activation with and without a microvessel confinement on a microchannel phantom. The experimental results indicated more than one-order of magnitude less acoustic vaporisation in a microchannel than that in a free environment taking into account the attenuation effect of the vessel on the microbubble scattering. This may provide an improved understanding in the applications of PCCAs in vivo.

  2. An oxygen pressure sensor using surface acoustic wave devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighty, Bradley D.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Oglesby, Donald M.

    1993-01-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) piezoelectric devices are finding widespread applications in many arenas, particularly in the area of chemical sensing. We have developed an oxygen pressure sensor based on coating a SAW device with an oxygen binding agent which can be tailored to provide variable sensitivity. The coating is prepared by dissolving an oxygen binding agent in a toluene solution of a copolymer which is then sprayed onto the surface of the SAW device. Experimental data shows the feasibility of tailoring sensors to measure the partial pressure of oxygen from 2.6 to 67 KPa (20 to 500 torr). Potential applications of this technology are discussed.

  3. Surface acoustic wave coding for orthogonal frequency coded devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malocha, Donald (Inventor); Kozlovski, Nikolai (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Methods and systems for coding SAW OFC devices to mitigate code collisions in a wireless multi-tag system. Each device producing plural stepped frequencies as an OFC signal with a chip offset delay to increase code diversity. A method for assigning a different OCF to each device includes using a matrix based on the number of OFCs needed and the number chips per code, populating each matrix cell with OFC chip, and assigning the codes from the matrix to the devices. The asynchronous passive multi-tag system includes plural surface acoustic wave devices each producing a different OFC signal having the same number of chips and including a chip offset time delay, an algorithm for assigning OFCs to each device, and a transceiver to transmit an interrogation signal and receive OFC signals in response with minimal code collisions during transmission.

  4. Single-transducer dual-frequency ultrasound generation to enhance acoustic cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Hsieh, Chao-Ming

    2009-03-01

    Dual- or multiple-frequency ultrasound stimulation is capable of effectively enhancing the acoustic cavitation effect over single-frequency ultrasound. Potential application of this sonoreactor design has been widely proposed such as on sonoluminescence, sonochemistry enhancement, and transdermal drug release enhancement. All currently available sonoreactor designs employed multiple piezoelectric transducers for generating single-frequency ultrasonic waves separately and then these waves were mixed and interfered in solutions. The purpose of this research is to propose a novel design of generating dual-frequency ultrasonic waves with single piezoelectric elements, thereby enhancing acoustic cavitation. Macroscopic bubbles were detected optically, and they were quantified at either a single-frequency or for different frequency combinations for determining their efficiency for enhancing acoustic cavitation. Visible bubbles were optically detected and hydrogen peroxide was measured to quantify acoustic cavitation. Test water samples with different gas concentrations and different power levels were used to determine the efficacy of enhancing acoustic cavitation of this design. The spectrum obtained from the backscattered signals was also recorded and examined to confirm the occurrence of stable cavitation. The results confirmed that single-element dual-frequency ultrasound stimulation can enhance acoustic cavitation. Under certain testing conditions, the generation of bubbles can be enhanced up to a level of five times higher than the generation of bubbles in single-frequency stimulation, and can increase the hydrogen peroxide production up to an increase of one fold. This design may serve as a useful alternative for future sonoreactor design owing to its simplicity to produce dual- or multiple-frequency ultrasound.

  5. Understanding Acoustic Cavitation Initiation by Porous Nanoparticles: Toward Nanoscale Agents for Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Adem; Chattaraj, Rajarshi; Blum, Nicholas T; Goodwin, Andrew P

    2016-08-23

    Ultrasound is widely applied in medical diagnosis and therapy due to its safety, high penetration depth, and low cost. In order to improve the contrast of sonographs and efficiency of the ultrasound therapy, echogenic gas bodies or droplets (with diameters from 200 nm to 10 µm) are often used, which are not very stable in the bloodstream and unable to penetrate into target tissues. Recently, it was demonstrated that nanobubbles stabilized by nanoparticles can nucleate ultrasound responsive microbubbles under reduced acoustic pressures, which is very promising for the development of nanoscale (ultrasound agents. However, there is still very little understanding about the effects of nanoparticle properties on the stabilization of nanobubbles and nucleation of acoustic cavitation by these nanobubbles. Here, a series of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with sizes around 100 nm but with different morphologies were synthesized to understand the effects of nanoparticle porosity, surface roughness, hydrophobicity, and hydrophilic surface modification on acoustic cavitation inception by porous nanoparticles. The chemical analyses of the nanoparticles showed that, while the nanoparticles were prepared using the same silica precursor (TEOS) and surfactant (CTAB), they revealed varying amounts of carbon impurities, hydroxyl content, and degrees of silica crosslinking. Carbon impurities or hydrophobic modification with methyl groups is found to be essential for nanobubble stabilization by mesoporous silica nanoparticles. The acoustic cavitation experiments in the presence of ethanol and/or bovine serum albumin (BSA) demonstrated that acoustic cavitation is predominantly nucleated by the nanobubbles stabilized at the nanoparticle surface not inside the mesopores. Finally, acoustic cavitation experiments with rough and smooth nanoparticles were suggested that a rough nanoparticle surface is needed to largely preserve surface nanobubbles after coating the surface with hydrophilic

  6. Analytical and numerical calculations of optimum design frequency for focused ultrasound therapy and acoustic radiation force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergün, A Sanlı

    2011-10-01

    Focused ultrasound therapy relies on acoustic power absorption by tissue. The stronger the absorption the higher the temperature increase is. However, strong acoustic absorption also means faster attenuation and limited penetration depth. Hence, there is a trade-off between heat generation efficacy and penetration depth. In this paper, we formulated the acoustic power absorption as a function of frequency and attenuation coefficient, and defined two figures of merit to measure the power absorption: spatial peak of the acoustic power absorption density, and the acoustic power absorbed within the focal area. Then, we derived "rule of thumb" expressions for the optimum frequencies that maximized these figures of merit given the target depth and homogeneous tissue type. We also formulated a method to calculate the optimum frequency for inhomogeneous tissue given the tissue composition for situations where the tissue structure can be assumed to be made of parallel layers of homogeneous tissue. We checked the validity of the rules using linear acoustic field simulations. For a one-dimensional array of 4cm acoustic aperture, and for a two-dimensional array of 4×4cm(2) acoustic aperture, we found that the power absorbed within the focal area is maximized at 0.86MHz, and 0.79MHz, respectively, when the target depth is 4cm in muscle tissue. The rules on the other hand predicted the optimum frequencies for acoustic power absorption as 0.9MHz and 0.86MHz, respectively for the 1D and 2D array case, which are within 6% and 9% of the field simulation results. Because radiation force generated by an acoustic wave in a lossy propagation medium is approximately proportional to the acoustic power absorption, these rules can be used to maximize acoustic radiation force generated in tissue as well. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Bifurcation of ensemble oscillations and acoustic emissions from early stage cavitation clouds in focused ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerold, Bjoern; Prentice, Paul; Rachmilevitch, Itay

    2013-01-01

    The acoustic emissions from single cavitation clouds at an early stage of development in 0.521 MHz focused ultrasound of varying intensity, are detected and directly correlated to high-speed microscopic observations, recorded at 1 × 10 6 frames per second. At lower intensities, a stable regime of cloud response is identified whereby bubble-ensembles exhibit oscillations at half the driving frequency, which is also detected in the acoustic emission spectra. Higher intensities generate clouds that develop more rapidly, with increased nonlinearity evidenced by a bifurcation in the frequency of ensemble response, and in the acoustic emissions. A single bubble oscillation model is subject to equivalent ultrasound conditions and fitted to features in the hydrophone and high-speed spectral data, allowing an effective quiescent radius to be inferred for the clouds that evolve at each intensity. The approach indicates that the acoustic emissions originate from the ensemble dynamics and that the cloud acts as a single bubble of equivalent radius in terms of the scattered field. Jetting from component cavities on the periphery of clouds is regularly observed at higher intensities. The results may be of relevance for monitoring and controlling cavitation in therapeutic applications of focused ultrasound, where the phenomenon has the potential to mediate drug delivery from vasculature. (paper)

  8. Discrete microfluidics based on aluminum nitride surface acoustic wave devices

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, J.; Pang, H.F.; Garcia-Gancedo, L.; Iborra, E.; Clement, M.; De Miguel-Ramos, M.; Jin, H.; Luo, J.K.; Smith, S.; Dong, S.R.; Wang, D.M.; Fu, Y.Q.

    2015-01-01

    To date, most surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have been made from bulk piezoelectric materials, such as quartz, lithium niobate or lithium tantalite. These bulk materials are brittle, less easily integrated with electronics for control and signal processing, and difficult to realize multiple wave modes or apply complex electrode designs. Using thin film SAWs makes it convenient to integrate microelectronics and multiple sensing or microfluidics techniques into a lab-on-a-chip with low cos...

  9. Ultrasound assessment of the Essure contraceptive devices: is three-dimensional ultrasound really needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladini, Dario; Di Spiezio Sardo, Attilio; Coppola, Carmela; Zizolfi, Brunella; Pastore, Gaetano; Nappi, Carmine

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of 3-dimensional ultrasound (3DUS) for sonographic localization of Essure microinserts, comparing it with 2-dimensional ultrasound (2DUS) insofar as time to visualize the inserts and accuracy in determining their localization. Prospective study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). University clinic. Twenty-seven consecutive women undergoing hysteroscopic Essure device placement. Essure microinserts were inserted in the outpatient hysteroscopy clinic following the manufacturer's recommendations, leaving from 3 to 8 loops of the inserts in the uterine cavity. In all patients, 2DUS and 3DUS were performed 3 months after the procedure. 2DUS was performed first; the device(s) were located, and their position was recorded. Then 3DUS scans were acquired, trying when possible to have both devices at least at a 45-degree angle with the insonation beam for optimal rendering on 3DUS. The OmniView method with volume contrast imaging was used to show the relationships of the microinserts within the uterine cavity when possible. To define the position of the Essure device in relation to the uterus and the salpinges, we used the classification developed by Legendre and colleagues. After sonographic evaluation all women underwent hysterosalpingography to assess the success of sterilization. Hysteroscopic insertion was successful in all patients, with 2 Essure devices placed in 25 patients and 1 device in 2 patients (due to previous salpingectomy performed because of ectopic pregnancy), for a total of 52 devices. One spontaneous late (within 3 months) expulsion of the device occurred; the device had migrated almost completely into the uterine cavity. At 3-month follow-up, all 51 correctly placed devices were easily observed at 2DUS (mean [SD] duration of the procedure, 2.25 [0.8] minutes). At 3DUS in 51 cases, the device was in perfect position (1+2+3) in 21 (41.2%), in position 2+3 in 14 (27.4%), and in position +3 in 16 (31.4%). Both microinserts

  10. Streaming flow from ultrasound contrast agents by acoustic waves in a blood vessel model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunjin; Chung, Sang Kug; Rhee, Kyehan

    2015-09-01

    To elucidate the effects of streaming flow on ultrasound contrast agent (UCA)-assisted drug delivery, streaming velocity fields from sonicated UCA microbubbles were measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) in a blood vessel model. At the beginning of ultrasound sonication, the UCA bubbles formed clusters and translated in the direction of the ultrasound field. Bubble cluster formation and translation were faster with 2.25MHz sonication, a frequency close to the resonance frequency of the UCA. Translation of bubble clusters induced streaming jet flow that impinged on the vessel wall, forming symmetric vortices. The maximum streaming velocity was about 60mm/s at 2.25MHz and decreased to 15mm/s at 1.0MHz for the same acoustic pressure amplitude. The effect of the ultrasound frequency on wall shear stress was more noticeable. Maximum wall shear stress decreased from 0.84 to 0.1Pa as the ultrasound frequency decreased from 2.25 to 1.0MHz. The maximum spatial gradient of the wall shear stress also decreased from 1.0 to 0.1Pa/mm. This study showed that streaming flow was induced by bubble cluster formation and translation and was stronger upon sonication by an acoustic wave with a frequency near the UCA resonance frequency. Therefore, the secondary radiant force, which is much stronger at the resonance frequency, should play an important role in UCA-assisted drug delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Aptamer-conjugated and drug-loaded acoustic droplets for ultrasound theranosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chung-Hsin; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Lee, Ya-Hsuan; Luo, Yun-Ling; Huang, Yu-Fen; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2012-02-01

    Tumor therapy requires multi-functional treatment strategies with specific targeting of therapeutics to reduce general toxicity and increase efficacy. In this study we fabricated and functionally tested aptamer-conjugated and doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded acoustic droplets comprising cores of liquid perfluoropentane compound and lipid-based shell materials. Conjugation of sgc8c aptamers provided the ability to specifically target CCRF-CEM cells for both imaging and therapy. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) was introduced to trigger targeted acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) which resulted in both mechanical cancer cell destruction by inertial cavitation and chemical treatment through localized drug release. HIFU insonation showed a 56.8% decrease in cell viability with aptamer-conjugated droplets, representing a 4.5-fold increase in comparison to non-conjugated droplets. In addition, the fully-vaporized droplets resulted in the highest DOX uptake by cancer cells, compared to non-vaporized or partially vaporized droplets. Optical studies clearly illustrated the transient changes that occurred upon ADV of droplet-targeted CEM cells, and B-mode ultrasound imaging revealed contrast enhancement by ADV in ultrasound images. In conclusion, our fabricated droplets functioned as a hybrid chemical and mechanical strategy for the specific destruction of cancer cells upon ultrasound-mediated ADV, while simultaneously providing ultrasound imaging capability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A Label Free Disposable Device for Rapid Isolation of Rare Tumor Cells from Blood by Ultrasounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itziar González

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of blood samples as liquid biopsy is a label-free method for cancer diagnosis that offers benefits over traditional invasive biopsy techniques. Cell sorting by acoustic waves offers a means to separate rare cells from blood samples based on their physical properties in a label-free, contactless and biocompatible manner. Herein, we describe a flow-through separation approach that provides an efficient separation of tumor cells (TCs from white blood cells (WBCs in a microfluidic device, “THINUS-Chip” (Thin-Ultrasonic-Separator-Chip, actuated by ultrasounds. We introduce for the first time the concept of plate acoustic waves (PAW applied to acoustophoresis as a new strategy. It lies in the geometrical chip design: different to other microseparators based on either bulk acoustic waves (BAW or surface waves (SAW, SSAW and tSAW, it allows the use of polymeric materials without restrictions in the frequency of work. We demonstrate its ability to perform high-throughput isolation of TCs from WBCs, allowing a recovery rate of 84% ± 8% of TCs with a purity higher than 80% and combined viability of 85% at a flow rate of 80 μL/min (4.8 mL/h. The THINUS-Chip performs cell fractionation with low-cost manufacturing processes, opening the door to possible easy printing fabrication.

  13. Bladder wall thickness and ultrasound estimated bladder weight in healthy adults with portative ultrasound device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selcen Kanyilmaz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to investigate bladder wall thickness (BWT and ultrasound estimated bladder weight (UEBW values in healthy population with a portative ultrasound device and their relationship with demographic parameters. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out in Neurorehabilitation Clinic of Ege University Hospital. Ninety-five subjects (48 women and 47 men aged between 18 and 56 were included in the study. BWT and UEBW were determined non-invasively with a portative ultrasound device; Bladder Scan BVM 6500 (Verathon Inc., WA, USA at a frequency of 3.7 MHz at functional bladder capacity. These values were compared by gender, and their relation was assessed with age, body mass index (BMI and parity. Results: Mean BWT was 2.0 ± 0.4 mm and UEBW was 44.6 ± 8.3 g at a mean volume of 338.0 ± 82.1 ml. Although higher results were obtained in men at higher bladder volumes, the results did not differ significantly by gender. Correlation analyses revealed statistically significant correlation between UEBW and age (r = 0.32. BWT was negatively correlated with volume (r = -0.50 and bladder surface area (r = -0.57. Also, statistically significant correlations were observed between UEBW and volume (r = 0.36, bladder surface area (r = 0.48 and BWT (r = 0.25. Conclusion: Determined values of BWT and UEBW in healthy population are estimated with portative ultrasound devices, which are future promising, for their convenient, easy, non-invasive, time-efficient hand-held use for screening.

  14. Numerical study of thermoviscous effects in ultrasound-induced acoustic streaming in microchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Bruus, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    We present a numerical study of thermoviscous effects on the acoustic streaming flow generated by an ultrasound standing-wave resonance in a long straight microfluidic channel containing a Newtonian fluid. These effects enter primarily through the temperature and density dependence of the fluid...... viscosity. The resulting magnitude of the streaming flow is calculated and characterized numerically, and we find that even for thin acoustic boundary layers, the channel height affects the magnitude of the streaming flow. For the special case of a sufficiently large channel height, we have successfully...

  15. Mobile Communication Devices, Ambient Noise, and Acoustic Voice Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryn, Youri; Ysenbaert, Femke; Zarowski, Andrzej; Vanspauwen, Robby

    2017-03-01

    The ability to move with mobile communication devices (MCDs; ie, smartphones and tablet computers) may induce differences in microphone-to-mouth positioning and use in noise-packed environments, and thus influence reliability of acoustic voice measurements. This study investigated differences in various acoustic voice measures between six recording equipments in backgrounds with low and increasing noise levels. One chain of continuous speech and sustained vowel from 50 subjects with voice disorders (all separated by silence intervals) was radiated and re-recorded in an anechoic chamber with five MCDs and one high-quality recording system. These recordings were acquired in one condition without ambient noise and in four conditions with increased ambient noise. A total of 10 acoustic voice markers were obtained in the program Praat. Differences between MCDs and noise condition were assessed with Friedman repeated-measures test and posthoc Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, both for related samples, after Bonferroni correction. (1) Except median fundamental frequency and seven nonsignificant differences, MCD samples have significantly higher acoustic markers than clinical reference samples in minimal environmental noise. (2) Except median fundamental frequency, jitter local, and jitter rap, all acoustic measures on samples recorded with the reference system experienced significant influence from room noise levels. Fundamental frequency is resistant to recording system, environmental noise, and their combination. All other measures, however, were impacted by both recording system and noise condition, and especially by their combination, often already in the reference/baseline condition without added ambient noise. Caution is therefore warranted regarding implementation of MCDs as clinical recording tools, particularly when applied for treatment outcomes assessments. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Material and Phonon Engineering for Next Generation Acoustic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Nai-Kuei

    This thesis presents the theoretical and experimental work related to micromachining of low intrinsic loss sapphire and phononic crystals for engineering new classes of electroacoustic devices for frequency control applications. For the first time, a low loss sapphire suspended membrane was fabricated and utilized to form the main body of a piezoelectric lateral overtone bulk acoustic resonator (LOBAR). Since the metalized piezoelectric transducer area in a LOBAR is only a small fraction of the overall resonant cavity (made out of sapphire), high quality factor (Q) overtones are attained. The experiment confirms the low intrinsic mechanical loss of the transferred sapphire thin film, and the resonators exhibit the highest Q of 5,440 at 2.8 GHz ( f·Q of 1.53.1013 Hz). This is also the highest f·Q demonstrated for aluminum-nitride-(AIN)-based Lamb wave devices to date. Beyond demonstrating a low loss device, this experimental work has laid the foundation for the future development of new micromechanical devices based on a high Q, high hardness and chemically resilient material. The search for alternative ways to more efficiently perform frequency control functionalities lead to the exploration of Phononic Crystal (PnC) structures in AIN thin films. Four unit cell designs were theoretically and experimentally investigated to explore the behavior of phononic bandgaps (PBGs) in the ultra high frequency (UHF) range: (i) the conventional square lattice with circular air scatterer, (ii) the inverse acoustic bandgap (IABG) structure, (iii) the fractal PnC, and (iv) the X-shaped PnC. Each unit cell has its unique frequency characteristic that was exploited to synthesize either cavity resonators or improve the performance of acoustic delay lines. The PBGs operate in the range of 770 MHz to 1 GHz and exhibit a maximum acoustic rejection of 40 dB. AIN Lamb wave transducers (LWTs) were employed for the experimental demonstration of the PBGs and cavity resonances. Ultra

  17. A novel thermal acoustic device based on porous graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Lu-Qi; Liu, Ying; Ju, Zhen-Yi; Xie, Qian-Yi; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling, E-mail: RenTL@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Microelectronics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10084 (China); Tsinghua National Laboratory for Information Science and Technology (TNList), Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tian, He [Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    A thermal acoustic (TA) device was fabricated by laser scribing technology. Polyimide (PI) can be converted into patterned porous graphene (PG) by laser’s irradiation in one step. The sound pressure level (SPL) of such TA device is related to laser power. The theoretical model of TA effect was established to analyze the relationship between the SPL and laser power. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experiment results. It was found that PG has a flat frequency response in the range of 5-20 kHz. This novel TA device has the advantages of one-step procedure, high flexibility, no mechanical vibration, low cost and so on. It can open wide applications in speakers, multimedia, medical, earphones, consumer electronics and many other aspects.

  18. A novel thermal acoustic device based on porous graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Lu-Qi; Liu, Ying; Tian, He; Ju, Zhen-Yi; Xie, Qian-Yi; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2016-01-01

    A thermal acoustic (TA) device was fabricated by laser scribing technology. Polyimide (PI) can be converted into patterned porous graphene (PG) by laser's irradiation in one step. The sound pressure level (SPL) of such TA device is related to laser power. The theoretical model of TA effect was established to analyze the relationship between the SPL and laser power. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experiment results. It was found that PG has a flat frequency response in the range of 5-20 kHz. This novel TA device has the advantages of one-step procedure, high flexibility, no mechanical vibration, low cost and so on. It can open wide applications in speakers, multimedia, medical, earphones, consumer electronics and many other aspects.

  19. A novel thermal acoustic device based on porous graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Lu-Qi; Liu, Ying; Ju, Zhen-Yi; Xie, Qian-Yi; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling; Tian, He

    2016-01-01

    A thermal acoustic (TA) device was fabricated by laser scribing technology. Polyimide (PI) can be converted into patterned porous graphene (PG) by laser’s irradiation in one step. The sound pressure level (SPL) of such TA device is related to laser power. The theoretical model of TA effect was established to analyze the relationship between the SPL and laser power. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experiment results. It was found that PG has a flat frequency response in the range of 5-20 kHz. This novel TA device has the advantages of one-step procedure, high flexibility, no mechanical vibration, low cost and so on. It can open wide applications in speakers, multimedia, medical, earphones, consumer electronics and many other aspects

  20. Acoustically accessible window determination for ultrasound mediated treatment of glycogen storage disease type Ia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shutao; Raju, Balasundar I.; Leyvi, Evgeniy; Weinstein, David A.; Seip, Ralf

    2012-10-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa) is caused by an inherited single-gene defect resulting in an impaired glycogen to glucose conversion pathway. Targeted ultrasound mediated delivery (USMD) of plasmid DNA (pDNA) to liver in conjunction with microbubbles may provide a potential treatment for GSDIa patients. As the success of USMD treatments is largely dependent on the accessibility of the targeted tissue by the focused ultrasound beam, this study presents a quantitative approach to determine the acoustically accessible liver volume in GSDIa patients. Models of focused ultrasound beam profiles for transducers of varying aperture and focal lengths were applied to abdomen models reconstructed from suitable CT and MRI images. Transducer manipulations (simulating USMD treatment procedures) were implemented via transducer translations and rotations with the intent of targeting and exposing the entire liver to ultrasound. Results indicate that acoustically accessible liver volumes can be as large as 50% of the entire liver volume for GSDIa patients and on average 3 times larger compared to a healthy adult group due to GSDIa patients' increased liver size. Detailed descriptions of the evaluation algorithm, transducer-and abdomen models are presented, together with implications for USMD treatments of GSDIa patients and transducer designs for USMD applications.

  1. The Role of Acoustic Cavitation in Ultrasound-triggered Drug Release from Echogenic Liposomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopechek, Jonathan A.

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and globally. CVD-related mortality, including coronary heart disease, heart failure, or stroke, generally occurs due to atherosclerosis, a condition in which plaques build up within arterial walls, potentially causing blockage or rupture. Targeted therapies are needed to achieve more effective treatments. Echogenic liposomes (ELIP), which consist of a lipid membrane surrounding an aqueous core, have been developed to encapsulate a therapeutic agent and/or gas bubbles for targeted delivery and ultrasound image enhancement. Under certain conditions ultrasound can cause nonlinear bubble growth and collapse, known as "cavitation." Cavitation activity has been associated with enhanced drug delivery across cellular membranes. However, the mechanisms of ultrasound-mediated drug release from ELIP have not been previously investigated. Thus, the objective of this dissertation is to elucidate the role of acoustic cavitation in ultrasound-mediated drug release from ELIP. To determine the acoustic and physical properties of ELIP, the frequency-dependent attenuation and backscatter coefficients were measured between 3 and 30 MHz. The results were compared to a theoretical model by measuring the ELIP size distribution in order to determine properties of the lipid membrane. It was found that ELIP have a broad size distribution and can provide enhanced ultrasound image contrast across a broad range of clinically-relevant frequencies. Calcein, a hydrophilic fluorescent dye, and papaverine, a lipophilic vasodilator, were separately encapsulated in ELIP and exposed to color Doppler ultrasound pulses from a clinical diagnostic ultrasound scanner in a flow system. Spectrophotometric techniques (fluorescence and absorbance measurements) were used to detect calcein or papaverine release. As a positive control, Triton X-100 (a non-ionic detergent) was added to ELIP samples not exposed to ultrasound in order

  2. Acoustic emission and magnification of atomic lines resolution for laser breakdown of salt water in ultrasound field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulanov, Alexey V.; Nagorny, Ivan G.

    2015-01-01

    Researches of the acoustic effects accompanying optical breakdown in a water, generated by the focused laser radiation with power ultrasound have been carried out. Experiments were performed by using 532 nm pulses from Brilliant B Nd:YAG laser. Acoustic radiation was produced by acoustic focusing systems in the form hemisphere and ring by various resonance frequencies of 10.7 kHz and 60 kHz. The experimental results are obtained, that show the sharply strengthens effects of acoustic emission from a breakdown zone by the joint influence of a laser and ultrasonic irradiation. Essentially various thresholds of breakdown and character of acoustic emission in fresh and sea water are found out. The experimental result is established, testifying that acoustic emission of optical breakdown of sea water at presence and at absence of ultrasound essentially exceeds acoustic emission in fresh water. Atomic lines of some chemical elements like a Sodium, Magnesium and so on were investigated for laser breakdown of water with ultrasound field. The effect of magnification of this lines resolution for salt water in ultrasound field was obtained

  3. On a computational study for investigating acoustic streaming and heating during focused ultrasound ablation of liver tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solovchuk, Maxim A.; Sheu, Tony W.H.; Thiriet, Marc; Lin, Win-Li

    2013-01-01

    The influences of blood vessels and focused location on temperature distribution during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation of liver tumors are studied numerically. A three-dimensional acoustics-thermal-fluid coupling model is employed to compute the temperature field in the hepatic cancerous region. The model construction is based on the linear Westervelt and bioheat equations as well as the nonlinear Navier–Stokes equations for the liver parenchyma and blood vessels. The effect of acoustic streaming is also taken into account in the present HIFU simulation study. Different blood vessel diameters and focal point locations were investigated. We found from this three-dimensional numerical study that in large blood vessels both the convective cooling and acoustic streaming can considerably change the temperature field and the thermal lesion near blood vessels. If the blood vessel is located within the beam width, both acoustic streaming and blood flow cooling effects should be addressed. The temperature rise on the blood vessel wall generated by a 1.0 MHz focused ultrasound transducer with the focal intensity 327 W/cm 2 was 54% lower when acoustic streaming effect was taken into account. Subject to the applied acoustic power the streaming velocity in a 3 mm blood vessel is 12 cm/s. Thirty percent of the necrosed volume can be reduced, when taking into account the acoustic streaming effect. -- Highlights: • 3D three-field coupling physical model for focused ultrasound tumor ablation is presented. • Acoustic streaming and blood flow cooling effects on ultrasound heating are investigated. • Acoustic streaming can considerably affect the temperature distribution. • The lesion can be reduced by 30% due to the acoustic streaming effect. • Temperature on the blood vessel wall is reduced by 54% due to the acoustic streaming effect

  4. Acoustic holography as a metrological tool for characterizing medical ultrasound sources and fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Kreider, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic holography is a powerful technique for characterizing ultrasound sources and the fields they radiate, with the ability to quantify source vibrations and reduce the number of required measurements. These capabilities are increasingly appealing for meeting measurement standards in medical ultrasound; however, associated uncertainties have not been investigated systematically. Here errors associated with holographic representations of a linear, continuous-wave ultrasound field are studied. To facilitate the analysis, error metrics are defined explicitly, and a detailed description of a holography formulation based on the Rayleigh integral is provided. Errors are evaluated both for simulations of a typical therapeutic ultrasound source and for physical experiments with three different ultrasound sources. Simulated experiments explore sampling errors introduced by the use of a finite number of measurements, geometric uncertainties in the actual positions of acquired measurements, and uncertainties in the properties of the propagation medium. Results demonstrate the theoretical feasibility of keeping errors less than about 1%. Typical errors in physical experiments were somewhat larger, on the order of a few percent; comparison with simulations provides specific guidelines for improving the experimental implementation to reduce these errors. Overall, results suggest that holography can be implemented successfully as a metrological tool with small, quantifiable errors. PMID:26428789

  5. Acoustic holography as a metrological tool for characterizing medical ultrasound sources and fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Tsysar, Sergey A; Khokhlova, Vera A; Kreider, Wayne

    2015-09-01

    Acoustic holography is a powerful technique for characterizing ultrasound sources and the fields they radiate, with the ability to quantify source vibrations and reduce the number of required measurements. These capabilities are increasingly appealing for meeting measurement standards in medical ultrasound; however, associated uncertainties have not been investigated systematically. Here errors associated with holographic representations of a linear, continuous-wave ultrasound field are studied. To facilitate the analysis, error metrics are defined explicitly, and a detailed description of a holography formulation based on the Rayleigh integral is provided. Errors are evaluated both for simulations of a typical therapeutic ultrasound source and for physical experiments with three different ultrasound sources. Simulated experiments explore sampling errors introduced by the use of a finite number of measurements, geometric uncertainties in the actual positions of acquired measurements, and uncertainties in the properties of the propagation medium. Results demonstrate the theoretical feasibility of keeping errors less than about 1%. Typical errors in physical experiments were somewhat larger, on the order of a few percent; comparison with simulations provides specific guidelines for improving the experimental implementation to reduce these errors. Overall, results suggest that holography can be implemented successfully as a metrological tool with small, quantifiable errors.

  6. Acoustic streaming induced by two orthogonal ultrasound standing waves in a microfluidic channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doinikov, Alexander A; Thibault, Pierre; Marmottant, Philippe

    2018-07-01

    A mathematical model is derived for acoustic streaming in a microfluidic channel confined between a solid wall and a rigid reflector. Acoustic streaming is produced by two orthogonal ultrasound standing waves of the same frequency that are created by two pairs of counter-propagating leaky surface waves induced in the solid wall. The magnitudes and phases of the standing waves are assumed to be different. Full analytical solutions are found for the equations of acoustic streaming. The obtained solutions are used in numerical simulations to reveal the structure of the acoustic streaming. It is shown that the interaction of two standing waves leads to the appearance of a cross term in the equations of acoustic streaming. If the phase lag between the standing waves is nonzero, the cross term brings about circular vortices with rotation axes perpendicular to the solid wall of the channel. The vortices make fluid particles rotate and move alternately up and down between the solid wall and the reflector. The obtained results are of immediate interest for acoustomicrofluidic applications such as the ultrasonic micromixing of fluids and the manipulation of microparticles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis and experimental study on the effect of a resonant tube on the performance of acoustic levitation devices

    OpenAIRE

    Hai Jiang; Jianfang Liu; Qingqing Lv; Shoudong Gu; Xiaoyang Jiao; Minjiao Li; Shasha Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The influence of a resonant tube on the performance of acoustic standing wave-based levitation device (acoustic levitation device hereinafter) is studied by analyzing the acoustic pressure and levitation force of four types of acoustic levitation devices without a resonance tube and with resonance tubes of different radii R using ANSYS and MATLAB. Introducing a resonance tube either enhances or weakens the levitation strength of acoustic levitation device, depending on the resonance tube radi...

  8. Sensitivity of simulated transcranial ultrasound fields to acoustic medium property maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, James; Martin, Eleanor; Cox, Ben; Treeby, Bradley E.

    2017-04-01

    High intensity transcranial focused ultrasound is an FDA approved treatment for essential tremor, while low-intensity applications such as neurostimulation and opening the blood brain barrier are under active research. Simulations of transcranial ultrasound propagation are used both for focusing through the skull, and predicting intracranial fields. Maps of the skull acoustic properties are necessary for accurate simulations, and can be derived from medical images using a variety of methods. The skull maps range from segmented, homogeneous models, to fully heterogeneous models derived from medical image intensity. In the present work, the impact of uncertainties in the skull properties is examined using a model of transcranial propagation from a single element focused transducer. The impact of changes in bone layer geometry and the sound speed, density, and acoustic absorption values is quantified through a numerical sensitivity analysis. Sound speed is shown to be the most influential acoustic property, and must be defined with less than 4% error to obtain acceptable accuracy in simulated focus pressure, position, and volume. Changes in the skull thickness of as little as 0.1 mm can cause an error in peak intracranial pressure of greater than 5%, while smoothing with a 1 \\text{m}{{\\text{m}}3} kernel to imitate the effect of obtaining skull maps from low resolution images causes an increase of over 50% in peak pressure. The numerical results are confirmed experimentally through comparison with sonications made through 3D printed and resin cast skull bone phantoms.

  9. Controlled ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption using passive acoustic emissions monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas D Arvanitis

    Full Text Available The ability of ultrasonically-induced oscillations of circulating microbubbles to permeabilize vascular barriers such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB holds great promise for noninvasive targeted drug delivery. A major issue has been a lack of control over the procedure to ensure both safe and effective treatment. Here, we evaluated the use of passively-recorded acoustic emissions as a means to achieve this control. An acoustic emissions monitoring system was constructed and integrated into a clinical transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound system. Recordings were analyzed using a spectroscopic method that isolates the acoustic emissions caused by the microbubbles during sonication. This analysis characterized and quantified harmonic oscillations that occur when the BBB is disrupted, and broadband emissions that occur when tissue damage occurs. After validating the system's performance in pilot studies that explored a wide range of exposure levels, the measurements were used to control the ultrasound exposure level during transcranial sonications at 104 volumes over 22 weekly sessions in four macaques. We found that increasing the exposure level until a large harmonic emissions signal was observed was an effective means to ensure BBB disruption without broadband emissions. We had a success rate of 96% in inducing BBB disruption as measured by in contrast-enhanced MRI, and we detected broadband emissions in less than 0.2% of the applied bursts. The magnitude of the harmonic emissions signals was significantly (P<0.001 larger for sonications where BBB disruption was detected, and it correlated with BBB permeabilization as indicated by the magnitude of the MRI signal enhancement after MRI contrast administration (R(2 = 0.78. Overall, the results indicate that harmonic emissions can be a used to control focused ultrasound-induced BBB disruption. These results are promising for clinical translation of this technology.

  10. Tube leak detection device and acoustic sensor support device for moisture separating heater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyabe, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Takefumi.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention comprises an acoustic sensor which detects leak sounds when leak occurs in a heating tube of a moisture separating heater incorporated into a plant, a threshold value memory and switching mechanism containing each of threshold values on every power of a plant, and a leak judging mechanism for judging presence or absence of leaks by comparing a selected threshold value and signals given from the acoustic sensor. Background noises changing currently during operation of a steam turbine plant are compared with a threshold value greater than the background noises in the leak judging mechanism, and they are judged as 'no leak' so as not to recognize them as 'presence of tube leak'. Output values from the acoustic sensor are obtained on every frequency component, and standard frequency spectra are selected by turbine load corresponding signals using a standard spectra memory and switching mechanism. They are sent to a leak judging mechanism to analyze the acoustic signals using a frequency analyzer and compare them with the frequency spectral thereby judging leaks. (N.H.)

  11. Basics of biomedical ultrasound for engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Azhari, Haim

    2010-01-01

    "Basics of Biomedical Ultrasound for Engineers is a structured textbook for university engineering courses in biomedical ultrasound and for researchers in the field. This book offers a tool for building a solid understanding of biomedical ultrasound, and leads the novice through the field in a step-by-step manner. The book begins with the most basic definitions of waves, proceeds to ultrasounds in fluids, and then delves into solid ultrasounds, the most complicated kind of ultrasound. It encompasses a wide range of topics within biomedical ultrasound, from conceptual definitions of waves to the intricacies of focusing devices, transducers, and acoustic fields"--Provided by publisher.

  12. Direct and sustained intracellular delivery of exogenous molecules using acoustic-transfection with high frequency ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sangpil; Kim, Min Gon; Chiu, Chi Tat; Hwang, Jae Youn; Kim, Hyung Ham; Wang, Yingxiao; Shung, K. Kirk

    2016-02-01

    Controlling cell functions for research and therapeutic purposes may open new strategies for the treatment of many diseases. An efficient and safe introduction of membrane impermeable molecules into target cells will provide versatile means to modulate cell fate. We introduce a new transfection technique that utilizes high frequency ultrasound without any contrast agents such as microbubbles, bringing a single-cell level targeting and size-dependent intracellular delivery of macromolecules. The transfection apparatus consists of an ultrasonic transducer with the center frequency of over 150 MHz and an epi-fluorescence microscope, entitled acoustic-transfection system. Acoustic pulses, emitted from an ultrasonic transducer, perturb the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane of a targeted single-cell to induce intracellular delivery of exogenous molecules. Simultaneous live cell imaging using HeLa cells to investigate the intracellular concentration of Ca2+ and propidium iodide (PI) and the delivery of 3 kDa dextran labeled with Alexa 488 were demonstrated. Cytosolic delivery of 3 kDa dextran induced via acoustic-transfection was manifested by diffused fluorescence throughout whole cells. Short-term (6 hr) cell viability test and long-term (40 hr) cell tracking confirmed that the proposed approach has low cell cytotoxicity.

  13. Acoustic radiation- and streaming-induced microparticle velocities determined by microparticle image velocimetry in an ultrasound symmetry plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Augustsson, Per; Laurell, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present microparticle image velocimetry measurements of suspended microparticles of diameters from 0.6 to 10μm undergoing acoustophoresis in an ultrasound symmetry plane in a microchannel. The motion of the smallest particles is dominated by the Stokes drag from the induced acoustic streaming...

  14. Formulation and acoustic studies of a new phase-shift agent for diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeran, Paul S; Luois, Samantha; Dayton, Paul A; Matsunaga, Terry O

    2011-09-06

    Recent efforts in the area of acoustic droplet vaporization with the objective of designing extravascular ultrasound contrast agents has led to the development of stabilized, lipid-encapsulated nanodroplets of the highly volatile compound decafluorobutane (DFB). We developed two methods of generating DFB droplets, the first of which involves condensing DFB gas (boiling point from -1.1 to -2 °C) followed by extrusion with a lipid formulation in HEPES buffer. Acoustic droplet vaporization of micrometer-sized lipid-coated droplets at diagnostic ultrasound frequencies and mechanical indices were confirmed optically. In our second formulation methodology, we demonstrate the formulation of submicrometer-sized lipid-coated nanodroplets based upon condensation of preformed microbubbles containing DFB. The droplets are routinely in the 200-300 nm range and yield microbubbles on the order of 1-5 μm once vaporized, consistent with ideal gas law expansion predictions. The simple and effective nature of this methodology allows for the development of a variety of different formulations that can be used for imaging, drug and gene delivery, and therapy. This study is the first to our knowledge to demonstrate both a method of generating ADV agents by microbubble condensation and formulation of primarily submicrometer droplets of decafluorobutane that remain stable at physiological temperatures. Finally, activation of DFB nanodroplets is demonstrated using pressures within the FDA guidelines for diagnostic imaging, which may minimize the potential for bioeffects in humans. This methodology offers a new means of developing extravascular contrast agents for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. On the design of a (H)EV steerable warning device using acoustic beam forming and advanced numerical acoustic simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Genechten, B.; Vansant, K.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the simulation-based design methodology used in the eVADER project for the development of targeted acoustic warning devices for increased detectability of Hybrid and Electric Vehicles (HEVs) while, at the same time, reducing urban noise pollution. A key component of this system

  16. A Real-Time Audio Tele-Presence Device for Remote Acoustic Monitoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vaudrey, Michael

    2003-01-01

    .... At the end of the Phase I effort, ATI delivered to ARL a fully functional wired binaural hearing device capable of accurately monitoring remote acoustic environments as far as 50 feet from the listener/operator...

  17. Interaction of vortices with ultrasound and the acoustic Faraday effect in type-II superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, D.; Bulaevskii, L.; Ivlev, B.; Maley, M.; Bishop, A.R.

    1996-01-01

    We study the interaction of sound waves with vortices in type-II superconductors, taking into account pinning and electrodynamic forces between vortices and crystal displacements. We propose ultrasound techniques as a method for obtaining information about vortex dynamics. This is particularly appropiate at low temperatures where transport measurements are ineffective. The changes in sound velocity and attenuation due to vortices, can provide information on the elastic constants of the vortex system and on vortex dissipation, respectively. At low temperatures the Magnus force acting on vortices leads to the acoustic Faraday effect: there is a rotation of the polarization plane of tranverse sound waves propagating along the magnetic field. This effect is linear in the Magnus force and magnetic field in crystals with equivalent a and b axes for a field parallel to the c axis. We discuss how this effect can be measured by means of either pulse-echo techniques or standing sound waves. Also, we show that an ac electromagnetic field acting on the vortex system can generate ultrasound. We calculate the amplitude of the generated sound waves in the linear regime and compare with recent experiments. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  18. An Ultrasound and Acoustic Study of Turkish Rounded/Unrounded Vowel Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radisic, Milica

    This dissertation grew out of a phonology course paper on the adaption of Turkish words in Serbian. The focus of the paper was on the Turkish vowels /m y oe/. Noticeably, in contrast to vowels /y oe/, the back vowel /m/ showed variable patterns of adaptation. The conclusion drawn from the paper was that the vowel /m/ was different from other vowels. Interestingly, the Turkish vowel inventory is a crowded vowel system with three rounded/unrounded vowel pairs, two front vowel pairs (/i y/ and /e oe/), and one back vowel pair (/m u/). And, while phonetic research has largely focused on front vowel pairs in other languages, I emphasize on the importance of the back vowel pair. The dissertation examines the phonetics of Turkish vowels to determine acoustic and articulatory properties of vowels produced in different contexts. Four experiments were done, two describing vowels in isolation and two describing vowels in four different consonantal contexts, based on place of articulation. First, I discuss the theory behind acoustics and articulation, by outlining theories of coarticulation and describing how the vowel /m/ differs from other vowels. Then, I present methodology used in the dissertation. Chapters 4 and 5 present results of articulation and acoustic experiments on vowels in isolation, while Chapter 6 and 7 present results of the articulation and acoustic experiments on vowels in consonantal contexts. Chapter 8 discusses the main findings. The study discovered that the three rounded/unrounded vowel pairs are true pairs, as they do not articulatorily differ much in tongue height and frontness. Since they differ most consistently in F2, this confirms the non-linear relationship between articulation and acoustics. Both high back vowels /m u/ are more prone to coarticulation in F2 than other vowels. Context variability, short duration, and absence of visual cues can explain why /m/ behaves like no other vowel in loanword adaptations. The dissertation enriches phonetic

  19. Effects of acoustic radiation force and shear waves for absorption and stiffness sensing in ultrasound modulated optical tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Elson, Daniel S; Dunsby, Chris; Eckersley, Robert; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2011-04-11

    Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography (UOT) combines optical contrast with ultrasound spatial resolution and has great potential for soft tissue functional imaging. One current problem with this technique is the weak optical modulation signal, primarily due to strong optical scattering in diffuse media and minimal acoustically induced modulation. The acoustic radiation force (ARF) can create large particle displacements in tissue and has been shown to be able to improve optical modulation signals. However, shear wave propagation induced by the ARF can be a significant source of nonlocal optical modulation which may reduce UOT spatial resolution and contrast. In this paper, the time evolution of shear waves was examined on tissue mimicking-phantoms exposed to 5 MHz ultrasound and 532 nm optical radiation and measured with a CCD camera. It has been demonstrated that by generating an ARF with an acoustic burst and adjusting both the timing and the exposure time of the CCD measurement, optical contrast and spatial resolution can be improved by ~110% and ~40% respectively when using the ARF rather than 5 MHz ultrasound alone. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that this technique simultaneously detects both optical and mechanical contrast in the medium and the optical and mechanical contrast can be distinguished by adjusting the CCD exposure time. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  20. Acoustic Levitator Power Device: Study of Ethylene-Glycol Water Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccamo, M. T.; Cannuli, A.; Calabrò, E.; Magazù, S.

    2017-05-01

    Acoustic levitator power device is formed by two vertically and opposed high output acoustic transducers working at 22 kHz frequency and produces sound pressure levels of 160 dB. The acoustic waves are monitored from an oscilloscope using a signal amplifier. The ability to perform contactless measurements, avoidance of undesired contamination from the container, are some of advantages of this apparatus. Acoustic levitation can be also used for sample preparation of high concentrated mixtures starting from solutions. In the present paper, an acoustic levitator power device is employed to collect data on levitated water mixtures of Ethylene Glycol (EG) which are then analysed by Infra-Red spectroscopy. The study allows to follow the drying process versus time and to obtain a gel-like compound characterized by an extended chemical crosslinking.

  1. Non-invasive and real-time passive acoustic mapping of ultrasound-mediated drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, James J; Carlisle, Robert C; Coviello, Christian; Coussios, Constantin-C; Seymour, Len

    2014-01-01

    New classes of biologically active materials, such as viruses, siRNA, antibodies and a wide range of engineered nanoparticles have emerged as potent agents for diagnosing and treating diseases, yet many of these agents fail because there is no effective route of delivery to their intended targets. Focused ultrasound and its ability to drive microbubble-seeded cavitation have been shown to facilitate drug delivery. However, cavitation is difficult to control temporally and spatially, making prediction of therapeutic outcomes deep in the body difficult. Here, we utilized passive acoustic mapping in vivo to understand how ultrasound parameters influence cavitation dynamics and to correlate spatial maps of cavitation to drug delivery. Focused ultrasound (center frequency: 0.5 MHz, peak-rarefactional pressure: 1.2 MPa, pulse length: 25 cycles or 50,000 cycles, pulse repetition interval: 0.02, 0.2, 1 or 3 s, number of pulses: 80 pulses) was applied to murine xenograft-model tumors in vivo during systemic injection of microbubbles with and without cavitation-sensitive liposomes or type 5 adenoviruses. Analysis of in vivo cavitation dynamics through several pulses revealed that cavitation was more efficiently produced at a lower pulse repetition frequency of 1 Hz than at 50 Hz. Within a pulse, inertial cavitation activity was shown to persist but reduced to 50% and 25% of its initial magnitude in 4.3 and 29.3 ms, respectively. Both through several pulses and within a pulse, the spatial distribution of cavitation was shown to change in time due to variations in microbubble distribution present in tumors. Finally, we demonstrated that the centroid of the mapped cavitation activity was within 1.33  ±  0.6 mm and 0.36 mm from the centroid location of drug release from liposomes and expression of the reporter gene encoded by the adenovirus, respectively. Thus passive acoustic mapping not only unraveled key mechanisms whereby a successful outcome is

  2. Acoustic Characterization and Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging of Long-Circulating Lipid-Coated Microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongbo; Yang, Yanye; Zhang, Meimei; Yin, Liping; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Zhang, Dong

    2018-05-01

    A long-circulating lipid-coated ultrasound (US) contrast agent was fabricated to achieve a longer wash-out time and gain more resistance against higher-mechanical index sonication. Systemic physical, acoustic, and in vivo imaging experiments were performed to better understand the underlying mechanism enabling the improvement of contrast agent performance by adjusting the physical and acoustic properties of contrast agent microbubbles. By simply altering the gas core, a kind of US contrast agent microbubble was synthesized with a similar lipid-coating shell as SonoVue microbubbles (Bracco SpA, Milan, Italy) to achieve a longer wash-out time and higher inertial cavitation threshold. To bridge the structure-performance relationship of the synthesized microbubbles, the imaging performance of the microbubbles was assessed in vivo with SonoVue as a control group. The size distribution and inertial cavitation threshold of the synthesized microbubbles were characterized, and the shell parameters of the microbubbles were determined by acoustic attenuation measurements. All of the measurements were compared with SonoVue microbubbles. The synthesized microbubbles had a spherical shape, a smooth, consistent membrane, and a uniform distribution, with an average diameter of 1.484 μm. According to the measured attenuation curve, the synthesized microbubbles resonated at around 2.8 MHz. Although the bubble's shell elasticity (0.2 ± 0.09 N/m) was comparable with SonoVue, it had relatively greater viscosity and inertial cavitation because of the different gas core. Imaging studies showed that the synthesized microbubbles had a longer circulation time and a better chance of fighting against rapid collapse than SonoVue. Nano/micrometer long-circulating lipid-coated microbubbles could be fabricated by simply altering the core composition of SonoVue microbubbles with a higher-molecular weight gas. The smaller diameter and higher inertial cavitation threshold of the

  3. A thermal technique for local ultrasound intensity measurement: part 2. Application to exposimetry on a medical diagnostic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkens, V

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic output measurements on medical ultrasound equipment are usually performed using radiation force balances to determine the output power and using hydrophones to determine pressure and intensity parameters. The local temporal-average ultrasound intensity can be measured alternatively by thermal sensors. The technique was described and prototype sensors were characterized in a preceding paper. Here, the application of such a thermal intensity sensor to the output beam characterization of a typical medical diagnostic device is described. Two transducers, a 7.5 MHz linear array and a 3.5 MHz convex array were investigated in different operating modes. For comparison, hydrophone measurements were also performed. If the spatial averaging effect is taken into account, good agreement is found between both measurement methods. The maximum deviations of the spatial-peak temporal-average intensities I SPTA obtained with the thermal sensor from the corresponding hydrophone-based results were below 12%. The simple thermal technique offers advantages for intensity measurements especially in the case of scanning and combined modes of the diagnostic device, where the synchronization between hydrophone measurements and the complex pulse emission pattern can be difficult

  4. Temperature dependence of acoustic harmonics generated by nonlinear ultrasound beam propagation in ex vivo tissue and tissue-mimicking phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraghechi, Borna; Kolios, Michael C; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia is a cancer treatment technique that could be delivered as a stand-alone modality or in conjunction with chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Noninvasive and real-time temperature monitoring of the heated tissue improves the efficacy and safety of the treatment. A temperature-sensitive acoustic parameter is required for ultrasound-based thermometry. In this paper the amplitude and the energy of the acoustic harmonics of the ultrasound backscattered signal are proposed as suitable parameters for noninvasive ultrasound thermometry. A commercial high frequency ultrasound imaging system was used to generate and detect acoustic harmonics in tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and ex vivo bovine muscle tissues. The pressure amplitude and the energy content of the backscattered fundamental frequency (p1 and E1), the second (p2 and E2) and the third (p3 and E3) harmonics were detected in pulse-echo mode. Temperature was increased from 26° to 46 °C uniformly through both samples. The amplitude and the energy content of the harmonics and their ratio were measured and analysed as a function of temperature. The average p1, p2 and p3 increased by 69%, 100% and 283%, respectively as the temperature was elevated from 26° to 46 °C in tissue samples. In the same experiment the average E1, E2 and E3 increased by 163%, 281% and 2257%, respectively. A similar trend was observed in tissue-mimicking gel phantoms. The findings suggest that the harmonics generated due to nonlinear ultrasound beam propagation are highly sensitive to temperature and could potentially be used for noninvasive ultrasound tissue thermometry.

  5. The design and simulation of new downhole vibration device about acoustic oil recovery technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Hou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available More and more oilfields are using acoustic technology to enhance oil recovery. In order to know the mechanism of acoustic oil recovery technology, the sound radiator of a new downhole vibration device is modeled and analyzed. Based on the theoretical background, this paper firstly analyzes the acoustic mechanism for the oil reservoir and then makes a acoustic response analysis on the sound radiator model for frequency and time-domain investigation by using professional acoustic simulation software–LMS Virtual.lab Acoustics, finally calculates the acoustic transmission loss in the downhole oil reservoir. The research reveals that firstly, acoustic waves have influences on the oil & water fluidity in the oil reservoir, the oil pressure gradient and the interfacial tension of capillary; secondly, the acoustic radiation power and sound pressure of field point attain a peak on the natural frequency of the sound radiator; thirdly, with the acoustic impact, the sound pressure of oil reservoir would fluctuate so as to improve the oil recovery ratio; the last but not the least one is both the sound pressure of oil reservoir point and the transmission loss of rock have a positive correlation with the vibration frequency. Therefore, it is of great importance for the research of vibration frequency and structure optimization of sound radiator.

  6. 3D-printed adaptive acoustic lens as a disruptive technology for transcranial ultrasound therapy using single-element transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimbourg, Guillaume; Houdouin, Alexandre; Deffieux, Thomas; Tanter, Mickael; Aubry, Jean-François

    2018-01-01

    The development of multi-element arrays for better control of the shape of ultrasonic beams has opened the way for focusing through highly aberrating media, such as the human skull. As a result, the use of brain therapy with transcranial-focused ultrasound has rapidly grown. Although effective, such technology is expensive. We propose a disruptive, low-cost approach that consists of focusing a 1 MHz ultrasound beam through a human skull with a single-element transducer coupled with a tailored silicone acoustic lens cast in a 3D-printed mold and designed using computed tomography-based numerical acoustic simulation. We demonstrate on N  =  3 human skulls that adding lens-based aberration correction to a single-element transducer increases the deposited energy on the target 10 fold.

  7. The role of heating, cavitation and acoustic streaming in mediating ultrasound-induced changes of TGF-β gene expression in bone cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harle, J; Mayia, F

    2004-01-01

    This paper relates ultrasound-induced changes in bone cell function to quantitative data assessing the level of several interaction mechanisms within the exposure environment. Characterisation of ultrasound fields in terms of resultant levels of heating, cavitation and acoustic streaming may provide a novel means of accurately assessing the likelihood of biological effects in vitro

  8. Design of Passive Acoustic Wave Shaping Devices and Their Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rasmus Ellebæk; Sigmund, Ole; Fernandez Grande, Efren

    We discuss a topology optimization based approach for designing passive acoustic wave shaping devices and demonstrate its application to; directional sound emission [1], sound focusing and wave splitting. Optimized devices, numerical and experimental results are presented and benchmarked against...... other designs proposed in the literature. We focus on design problems where the size of the device is on the order of the wavelength, a problematic region for traditional design methods, such as ray tracing.The acoustic optimization problem is formulated in the frequency domain and modeled...

  9. Oscillating microbubbles for selective particle sorting in acoustic microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Priscilla; Xu, Lin; Neild, Adrian

    2012-05-01

    In this study, acoustic waves were used to excite a microbubble for selective particle trapping and sorting. Excitation of the bubble at its volume resonance, as necessary to drive strong fluid microstreaming, resulted in the particles being either selectively attracted to the bubble or continuing to follow the local microstreamlines. The operating principle exploited two acoustic phenomena acting on the particle suspension: the drag force arising from the acoustic microstreaming and the secondary Bjerknes force, i.e. the attractive radiation force produced between an oscillating bubble and a non-buoyant particle. It was also found that standing wave fields within the fluid chamber could be used to globally align bubbles and particles for local particle sorting by the bubble.

  10. Determination of acoustic fields in acidic suspensions of peanut shell during pretreatment with high-intensity ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Carregari Polachini

    Full Text Available Abstract The benefits of high-intensity ultrasound in diverse processes have stimulated many studies based on biomass pretreatment. In order to improve processes involving ultrasound, a calorimetric method has been widely used to measure the real power absorbed by the material as well as the cavitation effects. Peanut shells, a byproduct of peanut processing, were immersed in acidified aqueous solutions and submitted to an ultrasonic field. Acoustic power absorbed, acoustic intensity and power yield were obtained through specific heat determination and experimental data were modeled in different conditions. Specific heat values ranged from 3537.0 to 4190.6 J·kg-1·K-1, with lower values encountered for more concentrated biomass suspensions. The acoustic power transmitted and acoustic intensity varied linearly with the applied power and quadratically with solids concentration, reaching maximum values at higher applied nominal power and for less concentrated suspensions. A power yield of 82.7% was reached for dilute suspensions at 320 W, while 6.4% efficiency was observed for a concentrated suspension at low input energy (80 W.

  11. The Rijke Tube - A Thermo-acoustic Device

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The aim of the present article is threefold: First of all, we describe the construction of a cheap and ... finally, we present two problems of current industrial interest where the Rijke phenomenon is proving to be of ..... v'(t)= v sin OJt gives the instantaneous value of the acoustic velo- city. Here, (JJ t is to be measured with respect ...

  12. Determination of acoustic properties of thin polymer films utilizing the frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient of ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohmyoh, Hironori; Sakamoto, Yuhei

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports on a technique to measure the acoustic properties of a thin polymer film utilizing the frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient of ultrasound reflected back from a system comprising a reflection plate, the film, and a material that covers the film. The frequency components of the echo reflected from the back of the plate, where the film is attached, take their minimum values at the resonant frequency, and from these frequency characteristics, the acoustic impedance, sound velocity, and the density of the film can be determined. We applied this technique to characterize an ion exchange membrane, which has high water absorbability, and successfully determined the acoustic properties of the membrane without getting it wet.

  13. Applications of antireflection coatings in sonic crystal-based acoustic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yun; Deng Ke; Xu Shengjun; Qiu Chunyin; Yang Hai; Liu Zhengyou

    2011-01-01

    The unwanted reflection seriously baffles the practical applications of sonic crystals, such as for various acoustic lenses designed by utilizing the in-band properties of sonic crystals. Herein we introduce the concept of the antireflection coating into the sonic crystal-based devices. The efficiency of such accessorial structures is demonstrated well by an originally high reflection system. Promising perspectives can be anticipated in extending the antireflection coating layers into more general acoustic applications through a flexible design process.

  14. Design and simulation of a microfluidic device for acoustic cell separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, Amir; Boodaghi, Miad

    2018-03-01

    Experimental acoustic cell separation methods have been widely used to perform separation for different types of blood cells. However, numerical simulation of acoustic cell separation has not gained enough attention and needs further investigation since by using numerical methods, it is possible to optimize different parameters involved in the design of an acoustic device and calculate particle trajectories in a simple and low cost manner before spending time and effort for fabricating these devices. In this study, we present a comprehensive finite element-based simulation of acoustic separation of platelets, red blood cells and white blood cells, using standing surface acoustic waves (SSAWs). A microfluidic channel with three inlets, including the middle inlet for sheath flow and two symmetrical tilted angle inlets for the cells were used to drive the cells through the channel. Two interdigital transducers were also considered in this device and by implementing an alternating voltage to the transducers, an acoustic field was created which can exert the acoustic radiation force to the cells. Since this force is dependent to the size of the cells, the cells are pushed towards the midline of the channel with different path lines. Particle trajectories for different cells were obtained and compared with a theoretical equation. Two types of separations were observed as a result of varying the amplitude of the acoustic field. In the first mode of separation, white blood cells were sorted out through the middle outlet and in the second mode of separation, platelets were sorted out through the side outlets. Depending on the clinical needs and by using the studied microfluidic device, each of these modes can be applied to separate the desired cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. An improved method and data analysis for ultrasound acoustic emissions and xylem vulnerability in conifer wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkerstorfer, Silviya V; Rosner, Sabine; Hietz, Peter

    2012-10-01

    The vulnerability of the xylem to cavitation is an important trait in plant drought resistance and has been quantified by several methods. We present a modified method for the simultaneous measurement of cavitations, recorded as ultrasound acoustic emissions (UAEs), and the water potential, measured with a thermocouple psychrometer, in small samples of conifer wood. Analyzing the amplitude of the individual signals showed that a first phase, during which the mean amplitude increased, was followed by a second phase with distinctly lower signal amplitudes. We provide a method to separate the two groups of signals and show that for many samples plausible vulnerability curves require rejecting late low-energy UAEs. These very likely do not result from cavitations. This method was used to analyze the differences between juvenile wood, and early and late mature wood in Picea abies (L.) Karst. Juvenile earlywood was more resistant to cavitation than mature earlywood or latewood, which we relate to the tracheid anatomy of the samples. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  16. Sonic excitation by means of ultrasound; an experimental illustration of acoustic radiation forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozen, N.B.; Nuij, P.W.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic acoustic waves are known to induce a vibration of particles around an equilibrium position. However, for large acoustic amplitudes, due to non-linear acoustic effects, a rectified, net acoustic radiation force can occur. Experimental work is performed in which the non-linear behavior is

  17. AlScN thin film based surface acoustic wave devices with enhanced microfluidic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W B; Xuan, W P; Chen, J K; Wang, X Z; Luo, J K; Fu, Y Q; Chen, J J; Duan, P F; Mayrhofer, P; Bittner, A; Schmid, U

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the characterization of scandium aluminum nitride (Al 1−xS c xN , x   =  27%) films and discusses surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices based on them. Both AlScN and AlN films were deposited on silicon by sputtering and possessed columnar microstructures with (0 0 0 2) crystal orientation. The AlScN/Si SAW devices showed improved electromechanical coupling coefficients ( K 2 , ∼2%) compared with pure AlN films (<0.5%). The performance of the two types of devices was also investigated and compared, using acoustofluidics as an example. The AlScN/Si SAW devices achieved much lower threshold powers for the acoustic streaming and pumping of liquid droplets, and the acoustic streaming and pumping velocities were 2  ×  and 3  ×  those of the AlN/Si SAW devices, respectively. Mechanical characterization showed that the Young’s modulus and hardness of the AlN film decreased significantly when Sc was doped, and this was responsible for the decreased acoustic velocity and resonant frequency, and the increased temperature coefficient of frequency, of the AlScN SAW devices. (paper)

  18. Acoustic metamaterials for new two-dimensional sonic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrent, Daniel; Sanchez-Dehesa, Jose [Wave Phenomena Group, Department of Electronic Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, C/Camino de Vera sn, E-46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2007-09-15

    It has been shown that two-dimensional arrays of rigid or fluidlike cylinders in a fluid or a gas define, in the limit of large wavelengths, a class of acoustic metamaterials whose effective parameters (sound velocity and density) can be tailored up to a certain limit. This work goes a step further by considering arrays of solid cylinders in which the elastic properties of cylinders are taken into account. We have also treated mixtures of two different elastic cylinders. It is shown that both effects broaden the range of acoustic parameters available for designing metamaterials. For example, it is predicted that metamaterials with perfect matching of impedance with air are now possible by using aerogel and rigid cylinders equally distributed in a square lattice. As a potential application of the proposed metamaterial, we present a gradient index lens for airborne sound (i.e. a sonic Wood lens) whose functionality is demonstrated by multiple scattering simulations.

  19. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultrasound is a useful procedure for monitoring the baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two-dimensional image of the baby while inside the mother's ...

  20. Bone status in rheumatoid arthritis assessed at peripheral sites by three different quantitative ultrasound devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, O R; Suetta, C; Egsmose, C

    2004-01-01

    sites in 27 women with RA (mean disease duration 15 years) and in 36 healthy women matched for age, height and weight. Speed of sound (SOS, m/s), broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA, dB/MHz) and stiffness of the calcaneus were assessed by a Lunar Achilles device. Amplitude-dependent SOS (Ad-SOS, m...

  1. Influence of thermodynamic properties of a thermo-acoustic emitter on the efficiency of thermal airborne ultrasound generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daschewski, M; Kreutzbruck, M; Prager, J

    2015-12-01

    In this work we experimentally verify the theoretical prediction of the recently published Energy Density Fluctuation Model (EDF-model) of thermo-acoustic sound generation. Particularly, we investigate experimentally the influence of thermal inertia of an electrically conductive film on the efficiency of thermal airborne ultrasound generation predicted by the EDF-model. Unlike widely used theories, the EDF-model predicts that the thermal inertia of the electrically conductive film is a frequency-dependent parameter. Its influence grows non-linearly with the increase of excitation frequency and reduces the efficiency of the ultrasound generation. Thus, this parameter is the major limiting factor for the efficient thermal airborne ultrasound generation in the MHz-range. To verify this theoretical prediction experimentally, five thermo-acoustic emitter samples consisting of Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) coatings of different thicknesses (from 65 nm to 1.44 μm) on quartz glass substrates were tested for airborne ultrasound generation in a frequency range from 10 kHz to 800 kHz. For the measurement of thermally generated sound pressures a laser Doppler vibrometer combined with a 12 μm thin polyethylene foil was used as the sound pressure detector. All tested thermo-acoustic emitter samples showed a resonance-free frequency response in the entire tested frequency range. The thermal inertia of the heat producing film acts as a low-pass filter and reduces the generated sound pressure with the increasing excitation frequency and the ITO film thickness. The difference of generated sound pressure levels for samples with 65 nm and 1.44 μm thickness is in the order of about 6 dB at 50 kHz and of about 12 dB at 500 kHz. A comparison of sound pressure levels measured experimentally and those predicted by the EDF-model shows for all tested emitter samples a relative error of less than ±6%. Thus, experimental results confirm the prediction of the EDF-model and show that the model can

  2. Combined passive acoustic mapping and magnetic resonance thermometry for monitoring phase-shift nanoemulsion enhanced focused ultrasound therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crake, Calum; Meral, F. Can; Burgess, Mark T.; Papademetriou, Iason T.; McDannold, Nathan J.; Porter, Tyrone M.

    2017-08-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has the potential to enable precise, image-guided noninvasive surgery for the treatment of cancer in which tumors are identified and destroyed in a single integrated procedure. However, success of the method in highly vascular organs has been limited due to heat losses to perfusion, requiring development of techniques to locally enhance energy absorption and heating. In addition, FUS procedures are conventionally monitored using MRI, which provides excellent anatomical images and can map temperature, but is not capable of capturing the full gamut of available data such as the acoustic emissions generated during this inherently acoustically-driven procedure. Here, we employed phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNE) embedded in tissue phantoms to promote cavitation and hence temperature rise induced by FUS. In addition, we incorporated passive acoustic mapping (PAM) alongside simultaneous MR thermometry in order to visualize both acoustic emissions and temperature rise, within the bore of a full scale clinical MRI scanner. Focal cavitation of PSNE could be resolved using PAM and resulted in accelerated heating and increased the maximum elevated temperature measured via MR thermometry compared to experiments without nanoemulsions. Over time, the simultaneously acquired acoustic and temperature maps show translation of the focus of activity towards the FUS transducer, and the magnitude of the increase in cavitation and focal shift both increased with nanoemulsion concentration. PAM results were well correlated with MRI thermometry and demonstrated greater sensitivity, with the ability to detect cavitation before enhanced heating was observed. The results suggest that PSNE could be beneficial for enhancement of thermal focused ultrasound therapies and that PAM could be a critical tool for monitoring this process.

  3. The Use of Acoustic Radiation Force Decorrelation-Weighted Pulse Inversion for Enhanced Ultrasound Contrast Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Elizabeth B; Unnikrishnan, Sunil; Wang, Shiying; Klibanov, Alexander L; Hossack, John A; Mauldin, Frank William

    2017-02-01

    The use of ultrasound imaging for cancer diagnosis and screening can be enhanced with the use of molecularly targeted microbubbles. Nonlinear imaging strategies such as pulse inversion (PI) and "contrast pulse sequences" (CPS) can be used to differentiate microbubble signal, but often fail to suppress highly echogenic tissue interfaces. This failure results in false-positive detection and potential misdiagnosis. In this study, a novel acoustic radiation force (ARF)-based approach was developed for superior microbubble signal detection. The feasibility of this technique, termed ARF decorrelation-weighted PI (ADW-PI), was demonstrated in vivo using a subcutaneous mouse tumor model. Tumors were implanted in the hindlimb of C57BL/6 mice by subcutaneous injection of MC38 cells. Lipid-shelled microbubbles were conjugated to anti-VEGFR2 antibody and administered via bolus injection. An image sequence using ARF pulses to generate microbubble motion was combined with PI imaging on a Verasonics Vantage programmable scanner. ADW-PI images were generated by combining PI images with interframe signal decorrelation data. For comparison, CPS images of the same mouse tumor were acquired using a Siemens Sequoia clinical scanner. Microbubble-bound regions in the tumor interior exhibited significantly higher signal decorrelation than static tissue (n = 9, P < 0.001). The application of ARF significantly increased microbubble signal decorrelation (n = 9, P < 0.01). Using these decorrelation measurements, ADW-PI imaging demonstrated significantly improved microbubble contrast-to-tissue ratio when compared with corresponding CPS or PI images (n = 9, P < 0.001). Contrast-to-tissue ratio improved with ADW-PI by approximately 3 dB compared with PI images and 2 dB compared with CPS images. Acoustic radiation force can be used to generate adherent microbubble signal decorrelation without microbubble bursting. When combined with PI, measurements of the resulting microbubble signal

  4. Topology optimization applied to room acoustic problems and surface acoustic wave devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    can be minimized either by distribution of reflecting material in a design domain along the ceiling or by distribution of absorbing and reflecting material along all the walls for both 2D and 3D problems. It is also shown how the method can be used to design sound barriers. The main part...... in order to optimize more complicated SAW structures such as acoustic horns which focus the SAWs to a small area. [1] M. P. Bendsøe, O. Sigmund, “Topology optimization, theory, methods and applications”, Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg New York, 2nd edition, (2003). ISBN 3-540-42992-1. [2] J. S. Jensen......, Berlin, (2000). ISBN 3-540-67232-X. [5] M. M. de Lima Jr and P. V. Santos, “Modulation of photonic structures by surface acoustic waves”, Rep. Prog. Phys., 68 1639-1701 (2005)...

  5. Simultaneous acoustic stimulation of human primary and secondary somatosensory cortices using transcranial focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonhye; Chung, Yong An; Jung, Yujin; Song, In-Uk; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2016-10-26

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) is gaining momentum as a novel non-invasive brain stimulation method, with promising potential for superior spatial resolution and depth penetration compared to transcranial magnetic stimulation or transcranial direct current stimulation. We examined the presence of tactile sensations elicited by FUS stimulation of two separate brain regions in humans-the primary (SI) and secondary (SII) somatosensory areas of the hand, as guided by individual-specific functional magnetic resonance imaging data. Under image-guidance, acoustic stimulations were delivered to the SI and SII areas either separately or simultaneously. The SII areas were divided into sub-regions that are activated by four types of external tactile sensations to the palmar side of the right hand-vibrotactile, pressure, warmth, and coolness. Across the stimulation conditions (SI only, SII only, SI and SII simultaneously), participants reported various types of tactile sensations that arose from the hand contralateral to the stimulation, such as the palm/back of the hand or as single/neighboring fingers. The type of tactile sensations did not match the sensations that are associated with specific sub-regions in the SII. The neuro-stimulatory effects of FUS were transient and reversible, and the procedure did not cause any adverse changes or discomforts in the subject's mental/physical status. The use of multiple FUS transducers allowed for simultaneous stimulation of the SI/SII in the same hemisphere and elicited various tactile sensations in the absence of any external sensory stimuli. Stimulation of the SII area alone could also induce perception of tactile sensations. The ability to stimulate multiple brain areas in a spatially restricted fashion can be used to study causal relationships between regional brain activities and their cognitive/behavioral outcomes.

  6. Therapeutic ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, Lawrence A

    2004-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in medicine is now quite commonplace, especially with the recent introduction of small, portable and relatively inexpensive, hand-held diagnostic imaging devices. Moreover, ultrasound has expanded beyond the imaging realm, with methods and applications extending to novel therapeutic and surgical uses. These applications broadly include: tissue ablation, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, site-specific and ultrasound mediated drug activity, extracorporeal lithotripsy, and the enhancement of natural physiological functions such as wound healing and tissue regeneration. A particularly attractive aspect of this technology is that diagnostic and therapeutic systems can be combined to produce totally non-invasive, imageguided therapy. This general lecture will review a number of these exciting new applications of ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors as well as the introduction of acoustic hemostasis, especially in organs which are difficult to treat using conventional medical and surgical techniques. (amum lecture)

  7. Animal study assessing safety of an acoustic coupling fluid that holds the potential to avoid surgically induced artifacts in 3D ultrasound guided operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakola, Asgeir S; Jørgensen, Arve; Selbekk, Tormod; Michler, Ralf-Peter; Solheim, Ole; Torp, Sverre H; Sagberg, Lisa M; Aadahl, Petter; Unsgård, Geirmund

    2014-01-01

    Use of ultrasound in brain tumor surgery is common. The difference in attenuation between brain and isotonic saline may cause artifacts that degrade the ultrasound images, potentially affecting resection grades and safety. Our research group has developed an acoustic coupling fluid that attenuates ultrasound energy like the normal brain. We aimed to test in animals if the newly developed acoustic coupling fluid may have harmful effects. Eight rats were included for intraparenchymal injection into the brain, and if no adverse reactions were detected, 6 pigs were to be included with injection of the coupling fluid into the subarachnoid space. Animal behavior, EEG registrations, histopathology and immunohistochemistry were used in assessment. In total, 14 animals were included, 8 rats and 6 pigs. We did not detect any clinical adverse effects, seizure activity on EEG or histopathological signs of tissue damage. The novel acoustic coupling fluid intended for brain tumor surgery appears safe in rats and pigs under the tested circumstances

  8. Prehospital Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Tang Sun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound is a commonly used diagnostic tool in clinical conditions. With recent developments in technology, use of portable ultrasound devices has become feasible in prehospital settings. Many studies also proved the feasibility and accuracy of prehospital ultrasound. In this article, we focus on the use of prehospital ultrasound, with emphasis on trauma and chest ultrasound.

  9. Acoustic streaming in the transducer plane in ultrasonic particle manipulation devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Junjun; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Hill, Martyn

    2013-06-07

    In acoustofluidic manipulation and sorting devices, Rayleigh streaming flows are typically found in addition to the acoustic radiation forces. However, experimental work from various groups has described acoustic streaming that occurs in planar devices in a plane parallel to the transducer face. This is typically a four-quadrant streaming pattern with the circulation parallel to the transducer. Understanding its origins is essential for creating designs that limit or control this phenomenon. The cause of this kind of streaming pattern has not been previously explained as it is different from the well-known classical streaming patterns such as Rayleigh streaming and Eckart streaming, whose circulation planes are generally perpendicular to the face of the acoustic transducer. In order to gain insight into these patterns we present a numerical method based on Nyborg's limiting velocity boundary condition that includes terms ignored in the Rayleigh analysis, and verify its predictions against experimental PIV results in a simple device. The results show that the modelled particle trajectories match those found experimentally. Analysis of the dominant terms in the driving equations shows that the origin of this kind of streaming pattern is related to the circulation of the acoustic intensity.

  10. Acoustic Devices for Particle and Cell Manipulation and Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqiang Qiu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An emerging demand for the precise manipulation of cells and particles for applications in cell biology and analytical chemistry has driven rapid development of ultrasonic manipulation technology. Compared to the other manipulation technologies, such as magnetic tweezing, dielectrophoresis and optical tweezing, ultrasonic manipulation has shown potential in a variety of applications, with its advantages of versatile, inexpensive and easy integration into microfluidic systems, maintenance of cell viability, and generation of sufficient forces to handle particles, cells and their agglomerates. This article briefly reviews current practice and reports our development of various ultrasonic standing wave manipulation devices, including simple devices integrated with high frequency (>20 MHz ultrasonic transducers for the investigation of biological cells and complex ultrasonic transducer array systems to explore the feasibility of electronically controlled 2-D and 3-D manipulation. Piezoelectric and passive materials, fabrication techniques, characterization methods and possible applications are discussed. The behavior and performance of the devices have been investigated and predicted with computer simulations, and verified experimentally. Issues met during development are highlighted and discussed. To assist long term practical adoption, approaches to low-cost, wafer level batch-production and commercialization potential are also addressed.

  11. 2D array transducers for real-time 3D ultrasound guidance of interventional devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Edward D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2009-02-01

    We describe catheter ring arrays for real-time 3D ultrasound guidance of devices such as vascular grafts, heart valves and vena cava filters. We have constructed several prototypes operating at 5 MHz and consisting of 54 elements using the W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc. micro-miniature ribbon cables. We have recently constructed a new transducer using a braided wiring technology from Precision Interconnect. This transducer consists of 54 elements at 4.8 MHz with pitch of 0.20 mm and typical -6 dB bandwidth of 22%. In all cases, the transducer and wiring assembly were integrated with an 11 French catheter of a Cook Medical deployment device for vena cava filters. Preliminary in vivo and in vitro testing is ongoing including simultaneous 3D ultrasound and x-ray fluoroscopy.

  12. Dual-modality imaging with a ultrasound-gamma device for oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, C.; Pellegrini, R.; Cinti, M. N.; De Vincentis, G.; Lo Meo, S.; Fabbri, A.; Bennati, P.; Cencelli, V. Orsolini; Pani, R.

    2018-06-01

    Recently, dual-modality systems have been developed, aimed to correlate anatomical and functional information, improving disease localization and helping oncological or surgical treatments. Moreover, due to the growing interest in handheld detectors for preclinical trials or small animal imaging, in this work a new dual modality integrated device, based on a Ultrasounds probe and a small Field of View Single Photon Emission gamma camera, is proposed.

  13. The Analyzing of Ultrasound Propagation Wawes through a Piezoelectric Transducer in Function of Acoustic Charge

    OpenAIRE

    Grigore Liviu Odobescu

    2010-01-01

    The nature of acoustic charge, which works with an electronic generator to generate high intensity ultra-acoustic field is very various in function of application used [2]. The values of elements from equivalent scheme may be to vary in time in function of technologic process [3]. This fact determines the variation of accord frequencies and value of acoustic charge. In this manner the efficiency can be modified in time if it no take measures to minimize these influences of complex impedance t...

  14. Analysis and experimental study on the effect of a resonant tube on the performance of acoustic levitation devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai; Liu, Jianfang; Lv, Qingqing; Gu, Shoudong; Jiao, Xiaoyang; Li, Minjiao; Zhang, Shasha

    2016-09-01

    The influence of a resonant tube on the performance of acoustic standing wave-based levitation device (acoustic levitation device hereinafter) is studied by analyzing the acoustic pressure and levitation force of four types of acoustic levitation devices without a resonance tube and with resonance tubes of different radii R using ANSYS and MATLAB. Introducing a resonance tube either enhances or weakens the levitation strength of acoustic levitation device, depending on the resonance tube radii. Specifically, the levitation force is improved to a maximum degree when the resonance tube radius is slightly larger than the size of the reflector end face. Furthermore, the stability of acoustic levitation device is improved to a maximum degree by introducing a resonance tube of R=1.023λ. The experimental platform and levitation force measurement system of the acoustic levitation device with concave-end-face-type emitter and reflector are developed, and the test of suspended matters and liquid drops is conducted. Results show that the Φ6.5-mm steel ball is suspended easily when the resonance tube radius is 1.023λ, and the Φ5.5-mm steel ball cannot be suspended when the resonance tube radius is 1.251λ. The levitation capability of the original acoustic levitation device without a resonance tube is weakened when a resonance tube of R=1.251λ is applied. These results are consistent with the ANSYS simulation results. The levitation time of the liquid droplet with a resonance tube of R=1.023λ is longer than without a resonance tube. This result is also supported by the MATLAB simulation results. Therefore, the performance of acoustic levitation device can be improved by introducing a resonant tube with an appropriate radius.

  15. Analysis and experimental study on the effect of a resonant tube on the performance of acoustic levitation devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Jiang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of a resonant tube on the performance of acoustic standing wave-based levitation device (acoustic levitation device hereinafter is studied by analyzing the acoustic pressure and levitation force of four types of acoustic levitation devices without a resonance tube and with resonance tubes of different radii R using ANSYS and MATLAB. Introducing a resonance tube either enhances or weakens the levitation strength of acoustic levitation device, depending on the resonance tube radii. Specifically, the levitation force is improved to a maximum degree when the resonance tube radius is slightly larger than the size of the reflector end face. Furthermore, the stability of acoustic levitation device is improved to a maximum degree by introducing a resonance tube of R=1.023λ. The experimental platform and levitation force measurement system of the acoustic levitation device with concave-end-face-type emitter and reflector are developed, and the test of suspended matters and liquid drops is conducted. Results show that the Φ6.5-mm steel ball is suspended easily when the resonance tube radius is 1.023λ, and the Φ5.5-mm steel ball cannot be suspended when the resonance tube radius is 1.251λ. The levitation capability of the original acoustic levitation device without a resonance tube is weakened when a resonance tube of R=1.251λ is applied. These results are consistent with the ANSYS simulation results. The levitation time of the liquid droplet with a resonance tube of R=1.023λ is longer than without a resonance tube. This result is also supported by the MATLAB simulation results. Therefore, the performance of acoustic levitation device can be improved by introducing a resonant tube with an appropriate radius.

  16. Theoretical study of time-dependent, ultrasound-induced acoustic streaming in microchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Based on first- and second-order perturbation theory, we present a numerical study of the temporal buildup and decay of unsteady acoustic fields and acoustic streaming flows actuated by vibrating walls in the transverse cross-sectional plane of a long straight microchannel under adiabatic...

  17. Counterpropagating wave acoustic particle manipulation device for the effective manufacture of composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Marc-S; Drinkwater, Bruce W; Llewellyn-Jones, Thomas M; Trask, Richard S

    2015-10-01

    An ultrasonic assembly device exhibiting broadband behavior and a sacrificial plastic frame is described. This device is used to assemble a variety of microscopic particles differing in size, shape, and material into simple patterns within several host fluids. When the host fluid is epoxy, the assembled materials can be cured and the composite sample extracted from the sacrificial frame. The wideband performance means that within a single device, the wavelength can be varied, leading to control of the length scale of the acoustic radiation force field. We show that glass fibers of 50 μm length and 14 μm diameter can be assembled into a series of stripes separated by hundreds of microns in a time of 0.3 s. Finite element analysis is used to understand the attributes of the device which control its wideband characteristics. The bandwidth is shown to be governed by the damping produced by a combination of the plastic frame and the relatively large volume of the fluid particle mixture. The model also reveals that the acoustic radiation forces are a maximum near the substrate of the device, which is in agreement with experimental observations. The device is extended to 8-transducers and used to assemble more complex particle distributions.

  18. The Analyzing of Ultrasound Propagation Wawes through a Piezoelectric Transducer in Function of Acoustic Charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigore Liviu Odobescu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The nature of acoustic charge, which works with an electronic generator to generate high intensity ultra-acoustic field is very various in function of application used [2]. The values of elements from equivalent scheme may be to vary in time in function of technologic process [3]. This fact determines the variation of accord frequencies and value of acoustic charge. In this manner the efficiency can be modified in time if it no take measures to minimize these influences of complex impedance that works with electronic generator [4]. In this paper it is presented a method to analysis the influence of variation of acoustic charge and to minimize this influences for to assure an optimum operation of electronic generator, it is presented a program to calculate the power variation in function of acoustic charge and to chart the diagram of this variation. It is presented the experimental results obtained with the theory presented.

  19. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... completed. Young children may need additional preparation. When scheduling an ultrasound for yourself or your child, ask ... of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Manage Cookies Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  20. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reflect off body structures. A computer receives the waves and uses them to create a picture. Unlike with an x-ray or CT scan, this test does not use ionizing radiation. The test is done in the ultrasound ...

  1. AlScN thin film based surface acoustic wave devices with enhanced microfluidic performance

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wenbo; Fu, Yong Qing; Chen, Jinju; Xuan, Weipeng; Chen, Jinkai; Mayrhofer, Paul; Duan, Pengfei; Bittner, Elmar; Luo, Jikui

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the characterization of scandium aluminum nitride (Al1−x Sc x N, x  =  27%) films and discusses surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices based on them. Both AlScN and AlN films were deposited on silicon by sputtering and possessed columnar microstructures with (0 0 0 2) crystal orientation. The AlScN/Si SAW devices showed improved electromechanical coupling coefficients (K 2, ~2%) compared with pure AlN films (

  2. Photo-Acoustic Ultrasound Imaging to Distinguish Benign from Malignant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    tissue phantoms and animal models of disease . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Photoacoustic, Ultrasound imaging, transurethral probe 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...visible, ultrasound images are unable to discriminate between benign or malignant cancers. In photoacoustic imaging, laser energy is transmitted ...40 g/L concentration of sea plaque agarose into DI water heated to approximately 80°C. A 10 g/L concentration of silica powder was then added to

  3. Comparison of the time required for removal of intraradicular cast posts using two Brazilian ultrasound devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Brito-Júnior

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the time required for removal of intraradicular cast posts cemented with zinc phosphate (ZF or glass ionomer cement (GIC, using two Brazilian ultrasound devices (BUD. Seventy two human inferior premolars with single root canals were sectioned transversally at the cementoenamel junction. In each specimen, the root canal was endodontically treated, the post space was prepared to a depth of 9 mm and the canal was molded to obtain a post impression. After the casting procedures, the posts were randomly distributed into 2 groups (n = 36 according to the luting material used: G1 - ZF and G2 - GIC. The tooth and luted post set was then embedded in an acrylic resin block. The groups were then divided into 3 subgroups (n = 12 according to the ultrasound device used: A - Enac (Osada Electric, Japan, used as a control group; B - Profi II Ceramic (Dabi Atlante, Brazil and C - Jet Sonic Satelec (Gnatus, Brazil. The posts were submitted to the vibration process with maximum power set on all surrounding surfaces. Time of application was recorded with a chronometer until complete post dislodgment, and the data were analyzed by the ANOVA test (p < 0.05. The averages required for post removal in G1 and G2 were respectively 41.42 and 92.03 seconds, with significant statistical difference (p = 0.001. No statistical difference was observed among the three ultrasound devices (p = 0.088, and the BUD presented a performance similar to that of the international gold standard device (Enac. Moreover, the type of luting agent had a greater influence on the time required for post removal than the origin of the ultrasonic unit.

  4. Carotid Doppler ultrasound findings in patients with left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervini, Patrick; Park, Soon J; Shah, Dipesh K; Penev, Irina E; Lewis, Bradley D

    2010-12-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have been used to treat advanced heart failure refractory to medical management, as bridge therapy to myocardial recovery, as bridge therapy to cardiac transplantation, or as destination therapy for patients with unfavorable transplant candidacy. Neurologic complications are some of the most common and devastating complications in these patients. Preoperative carotid ultrasound is, therefore, a standard evaluation in patients at risk for cerebrovascular disease. Postoperative carotid artery Doppler sonography is performed in those patients with neurologic symptoms. It is likely, therefore, that sonographers, radiologists, and other physicians working in a center where LVADs are implanted will likely encounter a carotid artery Doppler study in this patient group. To our knowledge, the carotid Doppler findings in these patients have never been published. We review the Doppler ultrasound findings in 6 patients after LVAD insertion.

  5. 76 FR 43119 - Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery Devices; Classification of the Focused Ultrasound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... type of device must submit to FDA a premarket notification, prior to marketing the device, which... Orders 12866 and 13563 direct Agencies to assess all costs and benefits of available regulatory... (including potential economic, environmental, public health and safety, and other advantages; distributive...

  6. Detection of Breast Microcalcifications Under Ultrasound Using Power Doppler and Acoustic Resonance Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weinstein, Susan

    2003-01-01

    .... Our goal with our current project was to utilize breast sonography coupled with the technique of acoustic resonance to image and evaluate the breast micorcalcifications in patients prior to biopsy...

  7. Design evolution enhances patient compliance for low-intensity pulsed ultrasound device usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pounder NM

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Neill M Pounder, John T Jones, Kevin J Tanis Bioventus LLC, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Poor patient compliance or nonadherence with prescribed treatments can have a significant unfavorable impact on medical costs and clinical outcomes. In the current study, voice-of-the-customer research was conducted to aid in the development of a next-generation low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS bone healing product. An opportunity to improve patient compliance reporting was identified, resulting in the incorporation into the next-generation device of a visual calendar that provides direct feedback to the patient, indicating days for which they successfully completed treatment. Further ­investigation was done on whether inclusion of the visual calendar improved patient adherence to the prescribed therapy (20 minutes of daily treatment over a 6-month period. Thus, 12,984 data files were analyzed from patients prescribed either the earlier- or the next-generation LIPUS device. Over the 6-month period, overall patient compliance was 83.8% with the next-generation LIPUS device, compared with 74.2% for the previous version (p<0.0001. Incorporation of the calendar feature resulted in compliance never decreasing below 76% over the analysis period, whereas compliance with the earlier-generation product fell to 51%. A literature review on the LIPUS device shows a correlation between clinical effectiveness and compliance rates more than 70%. Incorporation of stakeholder feedback throughout the design and innovation process of a next-generation LIPUS device resulted in a measurable improvement in patient adherence, which may help to optimize clinical outcomes. Keywords: LIPUS, ultrasound, compliance, patient adherence, medical device design

  8. Numerical simulation of 3D boundary-driven acoustic streaming in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Junjun; Hill, Martyn; Glynne-Jones, Peter

    2014-02-07

    This article discusses three-dimensional (3D) boundary-driven streaming in acoustofluidic devices. Firstly, the 3D Rayleigh streaming pattern in a microchannel is simulated and its effect on the movement of microparticles of various sizes is demonstrated. The results obtained from this model show good comparisons with 3D experimental visualisations and demonstrate the fully 3D nature of the acoustic streaming field and the associated acoustophoretic motion of microparticles in acoustofluidic devices. This method is then applied to another acoustofluidic device in order to gain insights into an unusual in-plane streaming pattern. The origin of this streaming has not been fully described and its characteristics cannot be explained from the classical theory of Rayleigh streaming. The simulated in-plane streaming pattern was in good agreement with the experimental visualisation. The mechanism behind it is shown to be related to the active sound intensity field, which supports our previous findings on the mechanism of the in-plane acoustic streaming pattern visualised and modelled in a thin-layered capillary device.

  9. Development of a confocal ultrasound device using an inertial cavitation control for transfection in-vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestas, J. L.; Chettab, K.; Roux, S.; Prieur, F.; Lafond, M.; Dumontet, C.; Lafon, C.

    2015-12-01

    Sonoporation using low-frequency high-pressure ultrasound (US) is a non-viral approach for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. We developed a new sonoporation device designed for spatial and temporal control of ultrasound cavitation. This device was evaluated for the in vitro transfection efficiency of a plasmid coding for Green Fluorescent Protein (peGFP- C1) in adherent and non-adherent cell lines. The frequency spectrum of the signal receive by a hydrophone is used to compute a cavitation index (CI) representative of the inertial cavitation activity. The influence of the CI on transfection efficiency, as well as reproducibility were determined. A real-time feedback loop control on CI was integrated in the process to regulate the cavitation level during sonoporation. In both adherent and non-adherent cell lines, the sonoporation device produced a highly efficient transfection of peGFP-C1 (40-80%), as determined by flow cytometry analysis of GFP expression, along with a low rate of mortality assessed by propidium iodide staining. Moreover, the sonoporation of non-adherent cell lines Jurkat and K562 was found to be equivalent to nucleofection in terms of efficiency and toxicity while these two cell lines were resistant to transfection with lipofection.

  10. Circumferential lesion formation around the pulmonary veins in the left atrium with focused ultrasound using a 2D-array endoesophageal device: a numerical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichardo, Samuel; Hynynen, Kullervo [Imaging Research-Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Room C713, Toronto, ON M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2007-08-21

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequently sustained cardiac arrhythmia affecting humans. The electrical isolation by ablation of the pulmonary veins (PVs) in the left atrium (LA) of the heart has been proven as an effective cure of AF. The ablation consists mainly in the formation of a localized circumferential thermal coagulation of the cardiac tissue surrounding the PVs. In the present numerical study, the feasibility of producing the required circumferential lesion with an endoesophageal ultrasound probe is investigated. The probe operates at 1 MHz and consists of a 2D array with enough elements (114 x 20) to steer the acoustic field electronically in a volume comparable to the LA. Realistic anatomical conditions of the thorax were considered from the segmentation of histological images of the thorax. The cardiac muscle and the blood-filled cavities in the heart were identified and considered in the sound propagation and thermal models. The influence of different conditions of the thermal sinking in the LA chamber was also studied. The circumferential ablation of the PVs was achieved by the sum of individual lesions induced with the proposed device. Different scenarios of lesion formation were considered where ultrasound exposures (1, 2, 5 and 10 s) were combined with maximal peak temperatures (60, 70 and 80 {sup 0}C). The results of this numerical study allowed identifying the limits and best conditions for controlled lesion formation in the LA using the proposed device. A controlled situation for the lesion formation surrounding the PVs was obtained when the targets were located within a distance from the device in the range of 26 {+-} 7 mm. When combined with a maximal temperature of 70 {sup 0}C and an exposure time between 5 and 10 s, this distance ensured preservation of the esophageal structures, controlled lesion formation and delivery of an acoustic intensity at the transducer surface that is compatible with existing materials. With a peak

  11. Theoretical study of time-dependent, ultrasound-induced acoustic streaming in microchannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    Based on first- and second-order perturbation theory, we present a numerical study of the temporal buildup and decay of unsteady acoustic fields and acoustic streaming flows actuated by vibrating walls in the transverse cross-sectional plane of a long straight microchannel under adiabatic conditions and assuming temperature-independent material parameters. The unsteady streaming flow is obtained by averaging the time-dependent velocity field over one oscillation period, and as time increases, it is shown to converge towards the well-known steady time-averaged solution calculated in the frequency domain. Scaling analysis reveals that the acoustic resonance builds up much faster than the acoustic streaming, implying that the radiation force may dominate over the drag force from streaming even for small particles. However, our numerical time-dependent analysis indicates that pulsed actuation does not reduce streaming significantly due to its slow decay. Our analysis also shows that for an acoustic resonance with a quality factor Q, the amplitude of the oscillating second-order velocity component is Q times larger than the usual second-order steady time-averaged velocity component. Consequently, the well-known criterion v(1)≪c(s) for the validity of the perturbation expansion is replaced by the more restrictive criterion v(1)≪c(s)/Q. Our numerical model is available as supplemental material in the form of comsol model files and matlab scripts.

  12. Positioning device for MRI-guided high intensity focused ultrasound system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damianou, Christakis [Frederick Institute of Technology (FIT), Limassol (Cyprus); MEDSONIC, LTD, Limassol (Cyprus); Ioannides, Kleanthis [Polikliniki Igia, Limassol (Cyprus); Milonas, Nicos [Frederick Institute of Technology (FIT), Limassol (Cyprus)

    2008-04-15

    A prototype magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)- compatible positioning device was used to move an MRI-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer. The positioning device has three user-controlled degrees of freedom that allow access to various targeted lesions. The positioning device was designed and fabricated using construction materials selected for compatibility with high magnetic fields and fast switching magnetic field gradients encountered inside MRI scanners. The positioning device incorporates only MRI compatible materials such as piezoelectric motors, plastic sheets, brass screws, plastic pulleys and timing belts. The HIFU/MRI system includes the multiple subsystems (a) HIFU system, (b) MR imaging, (c) Positioning device (robot) and associate drivers, (d) temperature measurement, (e) cavitation detection, (f) MRI compatible camera, and (g) Soft ware. The MRI compatibility of the system was successfully demonstrated in a clinical high-field MRI scanner. The ability of the robot to accurately move the transducer thus creating discrete and overlapping lesions in biological tissue was tested successfully. A simple, cost effective, portable positioning device has been developed which can be used in virtually any clinical MRI scanner since it can be sited on the scanner's table. The propagation of HIFU can use either a lateral or superior-inferior approach. Discrete and large lesions were created successfully with reproducible results. (orig.)

  13. Acoustic anomalies in the resonant ultrasound spectra of La2-x SrxCuO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrao, J.L.; Lei, M.; Migliori, A.

    1992-01-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy is a novel technique for the simultaneous determination of a solid's elastic moduli. Measurements of the resonant ultrasound spectra of single crystals of La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 for several values of x are reported. Anomalies associated with the nonstoichiometric (x>0) doped superconductor have been observed. These anomalies indicate that the absence of short-wavelength translational invariance at the Brillouin-zone edge is being coupled into the zone center. Measurements of the stoichiometric (x=0) insulator will also be discussed. [This work was performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. ZnO film for application in surface acoustic wave device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, X Y; Fu, Y Q; Tan, S C; Luo, J K; Flewitt, A J; Maeng, S; Kim, S H; Choi, Y J; Lee, D S; Park, N M; Park, J; Milne, W I

    2007-01-01

    High quality, c-axis oriented zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films were grown on silicon substrate using RF magnetron sputtering. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices were fabricated with different thickness of ZnO ranging from 1.2 to 5.5 μmUm and the frequency responses were characterized using a network analyzer. Thick ZnO films produce the strongest transmission and reflection signals from the SAW devices. The SAW propagation velocity is also strongly dependent on ZnO film thickness. The performance of the ZnO SAW devices could be improved with addition of a SiO 2 layer, in name of reflection signal amplitude and phase velocity of Rayleigh wave

  15. Influence of ultrasound power on acoustic streaming and micro-bubbles formations in a low frequency sono-reactor: mathematical and 3D computational simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadi, Baharak; Raman, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Ibrahim, Shaliza

    2015-05-01

    This paper aims at investigating the influence of ultrasound power amplitude on liquid behaviour in a low-frequency (24 kHz) sono-reactor. Three types of analysis were employed: (i) mechanical analysis of micro-bubbles formation and their activities/characteristics using mathematical modelling. (ii) Numerical analysis of acoustic streaming, fluid flow pattern, volume fraction of micro-bubbles and turbulence using 3D CFD simulation. (iii) Practical analysis of fluid flow pattern and acoustic streaming under ultrasound irradiation using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). In mathematical modelling, a lone micro bubble generated under power ultrasound irradiation was mechanistically analysed. Its characteristics were illustrated as a function of bubble radius, internal temperature and pressure (hot spot conditions) and oscillation (pulsation) velocity. The results showed that ultrasound power significantly affected the conditions of hotspots and bubbles oscillation velocity. From the CFD results, it was observed that the total volume of the micro-bubbles increased by about 4.95% with each 100 W-increase in power amplitude. Furthermore, velocity of acoustic streaming increased from 29 to 119 cm/s as power increased, which was in good agreement with the PIV analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of acoustic parameters on the cavitation behavior of SonoVue microbubbles induced by pulsed ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yutong; Lin, Lizhou; Cheng, Mouwen; Jin, Lifang; Du, Lianfang; Han, Tao; Xu, Lin; Yu, Alfred C H; Qin, Peng

    2017-03-01

    SonoVue microbubbles could serve as artificial nuclei for ultrasound-triggered stable and inertial cavitation, resulting in beneficial biological effects for future therapeutic applications. To optimize and control the use of the cavitation of SonoVue bubbles in therapy while ensuring safety, it is important to comprehensively understand the relationship between the acoustic parameters and the cavitation behavior of the SonoVue bubbles. An agarose-gel tissue phantom was fabricated to hold the SonoVue bubble suspension. 1-MHz transmitting transducer calibrated by a hydrophone was used to trigger the cavitation of SonoVue bubbles under different ultrasonic parameters (i.e., peak rarefactional pressure (PRP), pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and pulse duration (PD)). Another 7.5-MHz focused transducer was employed to passively receive acoustic signals from the exposed bubbles. The ultraharmonics and broadband intensities in the acoustic emission spectra were measured to quantify the extent of stable and inertial cavitation of SonoVue bubbles, respectively. We found that the onset of both stable and inertial cavitation exhibited a strong dependence on the PRP and PD and a relatively weak dependence on the PRF. Approximate 0.25MPa PRP with more than 20μs PD was considered to be necessary for ultraharmonics emission of SonoVue bubbles, and obvious broadband signals started to appear when the PRP exceeded 0.40MPa. Moreover, the doses of stable and inertial cavitation varied with the PRP. The stable cavitation dose initially increased with increasing PRP, and then decreased rapidly after 0.5MPa. By contrast, the inertial cavitation dose continuously increased with increasing PRP. Finally, the doses of both stable and inertial cavitation were positively correlated with PRF and PD. These results could provide instructive information for optimizing future therapeutic applications of SonoVue bubbles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Targeted drug delivery with focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening using acoustically-activated nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cherry C; Sheeran, Paul S; Wu, Shih-Ying; Olumolade, Oluyemi O; Dayton, Paul A; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2013-12-28

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of systemically administered microbubbles has been shown to locally, transiently and reversibly increase the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), thus allowing targeted delivery of therapeutic agents in the brain for the treatment of central nervous system diseases. Currently, microbubbles are the only agents that have been used to facilitate the FUS-induced BBB opening. However, they are constrained within the intravascular space due to their micron-size diameters, limiting the delivery effect at or near the microvessels. In the present study, acoustically-activated nanodroplets were used as a new class of contrast agents to mediate FUS-induced BBB opening in order to study the feasibility of utilizing these nanoscale phase-shift particles for targeted drug delivery in the brain. Significant dextran delivery was achieved in the mouse hippocampus using nanodroplets at clinically relevant pressures. Passive cavitation detection was used in the attempt to establish a correlation between the amount of dextran delivered in the brain and the acoustic emission recorded during sonication. Conventional microbubbles with the same lipid shell composition and perfluorobutane core as the nanodroplets were also used to compare the efficiency of an FUS-induced dextran delivery. It was found that nanodroplets had a higher BBB opening pressure threshold but a lower stable cavitation threshold than microbubbles, suggesting that contrast agent-dependent acoustic emission monitoring was needed. A more homogeneous dextran delivery within the targeted hippocampus was achieved using nanodroplets without inducing inertial cavitation or compromising safety. Our results offered a new means of developing the FUS-induced BBB opening technology for potential extravascular targeted drug delivery in the brain, extending the potential drug delivery region beyond the cerebral vasculature. © 2013.

  18. High-speed automated NDT device for niobium plate using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oravecz, M.G.; Yu, B.Y.; Riney, K.; Kessler, L.W.; Padamsee, H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a nondestructive testing (NDT) device which rapidly and automatically identifies defects throughout the volume of a 23.4 cm x 23.4 cm x 0.3 cm, pure niobium plate using Scanning Laser Acoustic Microscope (SLAM), high-resolution, 60 MHz, ultrasonic images. A principle advantage of the SLAM technique is that it combines a video scan rate with a high scan density (130 lines/mm at 60 MHz). To automate the inspection system they integrated under computer control the following: the SLAM RS-170/330 video output, a computerized XY plate scanner, a real-time video digitizer/integrator, a computer algorithm for defect detection, a digital mass storage device, and a hardcopy output device. The key element was development of an efficient, reliable defect detection algorithm using a variance filter with a locally determined threshold. This algorithm is responsible for recognizing valid flaws in the midst of random texture. This texture was seen throughout the acoustic images and was caused by the niobium microstructure. The images, as analyzed, contained 128 x 120 pixels with 64 grey levels per pixel. This system allows economical inspection of the large quantities (eg. 100 tons) of material needed for future particle accelerators based on microwave superconductivity. Rapid nondestructive inspection of pure niobium sheet is required because current accelerator performance is largely limited by the quality of commercially available material. Previous work documented critical flaws that are detectable by SLAM techniques. 15 references, 9 figures

  19. Ultrasound rays in droplets: The role of viscosity and caustics in acoustic streaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    not depend on the viscosity in most simple geometries. However, viscosity has a profound influence on the acoustic streaming as demonstrated by Riaud et al. (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 821, 2017, pp. 384-420) in their study of sessile mm-sized water-glycerol droplets placed on a piezoelectric substrate with a 20...

  20. Imaging of human tooth using ultrasound based chirp-coded nonlinear time reversal acoustics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dos Santos, S.; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 6 (2011), s. 667-674 ISSN 0041-624X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : TR-NEWS * chirp-coded excitation * echodentography * ultrasonic imaging Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.838, year: 2011 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0041624X11000229

  1. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heartbeat can be seen as an ongoing ultrasound movie. Ultrasound devices also use Doppler, a special application ... the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  2. Validation of a Mobile Device for Acoustic Coordinated Reset Neuromodulation Tinnitus Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Christian; Wegener, Alexander; Poppe, Hendrik; Williams, Mark; Popelka, Gerald; Tass, Peter A

    2016-10-01

    Sound-based tinnitus intervention stimuli include broad-band noise signals with subjectively adjusted bandwidths used as maskers delivered by commercial devices or hearing aids, environmental sounds broadly described and delivered by both consumer devices and hearing aids, music recordings specifically modified and delivered in a variety of different ways, and other stimuli. Acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation therapy for tinnitus reduction has unique and more stringent requirements compared to all other sound-based tinnitus interventions. These include precise characterization of tinnitus pitch and loudness, and effective provision of patient-controlled daily therapy signals at defined frequencies, levels, and durations outside of the clinic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate an approach to accommodate these requirements including evaluation of a mobile device, validation of an automated tinnitus pitch-matching algorithm and assessment of a patient's ability to control stimuli and collect repeated outcome measures. The experimental design involved direct laboratory measurements of the sound delivery capabilities of a mobile device, comparison of an automated, adaptive pitch-matching method to a traditional manual method and measures of a patient's ability to understand and manipulate a mobile device graphic user interface to both deliver the therapy signals and collect the outcome measures. This study consisted of 5 samples of a common mobile device for the laboratory measures and a total of 30 adult participants: 15 randomly selected normal-hearing participants with simulated tinnitus for validation of a tinnitus pitch-matching algorithm and 15 sequentially selected patients already undergoing tinnitus therapy for evaluation of patient usability. No tinnitus intervention(s) were specifically studied as a component of this study. Data collection involved laboratory measures of mobile devices, comparison of manual and automated adaptive tinnitus

  3. Near-surface viscosity measurements with a love acoustic wave device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collings, A.F.; Cooper, B.J.; Lappas, S.; Sor, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: In the last decade, considerable research effort has been directed towards interfacing piezoelectric transducers with biological detection systems to produce efficient and highly selective biosensors. Several types of piezoelectric or, more specifically, acoustic wave transducers have been investigated. Our group has developed Love wave (guided surface skimming wave) devices which are made by attaching a thin overlayer with the appropriate acoustic properties to the surface of a conventional surface horizontal mode device. An optimised layer concentrates most of the propagating wave energy in the guiding layer and can improve the device sensitivity in detecting gas-phase mass loading on the surface some 20- to 40-fold. Love wave devices used in liquid phase sensing will also respond to viscous, as well as mass, loading on the device surface. We have studied the propagation of viscous waves into liquid sitting on a Love wave device both theoretically and experimentally. Modelling of the effect of a viscous liquid layer on a Love wave propagating in a layered medium predicts the velocity profile in the solid substrate and in the adjoining liquid. This is a function of the thickness of the guiding layer, the elastic properties of the guiding layer and the piezoelectric substrate, and of the viscosity and density of the liquid layer. We report here on measurements of the viscosity of aqueous glycerine solutions made with a quartz Love wave device with a 5.5 μm SiO 2 guiding layer. The linear relationship between the decrease in the device frequency and the square root of the viscosity density product is accurately observed at Newtonian viscosities. At higher viscosities, there is an increase in damping, the insertion loss of the device saturates, Δf is no longer proportional to (ηp) l/2 and reaches a maximum. We also show results for the determination of the gelation time in protein and inorganic aqueous gels and for the rate of change of viscosity with

  4. Efficiency of quantitative echogenicity for investigating supraspinatus tendinopathy by the gray-level histogram of two ultrasound devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jiun-Cheng; Chen, Po-Han; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Tsai, Yao-Hung; Hsu, Wei-Hsiu

    2017-10-01

    The gray-level histogram of ultrasound is a promising tool for scanning the hypoechogenic appearance of supraspinatus tendinopathy, and the aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the gray-level value of the supraspinatus tendon in the painful shoulder has a lower value on B-mode images even though in different ultrasound devices. Sixty-seven patients who had unilateral shoulder pain with rotator cuff tendinopathy underwent bilateral shoulder ultrasonography, and we compared the mean gray-level values of painful shoulders and contralateral shoulders without any pain in each patient using two ultrasound devices. The echogenicity ratio (symptomatic/asymptomatic side) of two ultrasound devices was compared. A significant difference existed between the symptomatic shoulder and contralateral asymptomatic shoulder (p level value measurements of each device. The symptomatic-to-asymptomatic tendon echogenicity ratio of device A was 0.919 ± 0.090 in the transverse plane and 0.937 ± 0.081 in the longitudinal plane, and the echogenicity ratio of device B was 0.899 ± 0.113 in the transverse plane and 0.940 ± 0.113 in the longitudinal plane. The decline of the mean gray-level value and the echogenicity ratio of the supraspinatus tendon in the painful shoulder may be utilized as a useful sonographic reference of unilateral rotator cuff lesions. Diagnostic level III.

  5. A computational study for investigating acoustic streaming and tissue heating during high intensity focused ultrasound through blood vessel with an obstacle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvin, Salma; Sultana, Aysha

    2017-06-01

    The influence of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) on the obstacle through blood vessel is studied numerically. A three-dimensional acoustics-thermal-fluid coupling model is employed to compute the temperature field around the obstacle through blood vessel. The model construction is based on the linear Westervelt and conjugate heat transfer equations for the obstacle through blood vessel. The system of equations is solved using Finite Element Method (FEM). We found from this three-dimensional numerical study that the rate of heat transfer is increasing from the obstacle and both the convective cooling and acoustic streaming can considerably change the temperature field.

  6. Are ultrasound-guided ophthalmic blocks injurious to the eye? A comparative rabbit model study of two ultrasound devices evaluating intraorbital thermal and structural changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palte, Howard D; Gayer, Steven; Arrieta, Esdras; Scot Shaw, Eric; Nose, Izuru; Lee, Elizabete; Arheart, Kristopher L; Dubovy, Sander; Birnbach, David J; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2012-07-01

    Since Atkinson's original description of retrobulbar block in 1936, needle-based anesthetic techniques have become integral to ophthalmic anesthesia. These techniques are unfortunately associated with rare, grave complications such as globe perforation. Ultrasound has gained widespread acceptance for peripheral nerve blockade, but its translation to ocular anesthesia has been hampered because sonic energy, in the guise of thermal or biomechanical insult, is potentially injurious to vulnerable eye tissue. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has defined guidelines for safe use of ultrasound for ophthalmic examination, but most ultrasound devices used by anesthesiologists are not FDA-approved for ocular application because they generate excessive energy. Regulating agencies state that ultrasound examinations can be safely undertaken as long as tissue temperatures do not increase >1.5°C above physiological levels. Using a rabbit model, we investigated the thermal and mechanical ocular effects after prolonged ultrasonic exposure to single orbital- and nonorbital-rated devices. In a dual-phase study, aimed at detecting ocular injury, the eyes of 8 rabbits were exposed to continuous 10-minute ultrasound examinations from 2 devices: (1) the Sonosite Micromaxx (nonorbital rated) and (2) the Sonomed VuMax (orbital rated) machines. In phase I, temperatures were continuously monitored via thermocouples implanted within specific eye structures (n = 4). In phase II the eyes were subjected to ultrasonic exposure without surgical intervention (n = 4). All eyes underwent light microscopy examinations, followed at different intervals by histology evaluations conducted by an ophthalmic pathologist. Temperature changes were monitored in the eyes of 4 rabbits. The nonorbital-rated transducer produced increases in ocular tissue temperature that surpassed the safe limit (increases >1.5°C) in the lens of 3 rabbits (at 5.0, 5.5, and 1.5 minutes) and cornea of 2 rabbits (both at 1

  7. Anisotropic Light Diffraction by Ultrasound in Crystals with Strong Acoustic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshin, Andrey S.; Balakshy, Vladimir I.

    In modern acousto-optics, crystalline materials are used predominantly for manufacturing acousto-optic instruments. Among these materials, such crystals as paratellurite, tellurium, calomel, TAS and some others occupy a prominent place, which are distinguished by exceptionally large anisotropy of acoustic properties. In this work, the influence of acoustic beam energy walk-off on characteristics of Bragg diffraction of light is studied by the example of tellurium crystal. It is shown that the walk-off can substantially change angular and frequency ranges, resulting in their narrowing or broadening subject to position of the operating point in the Bragg angle frequency characteristic. Coefficients of broadening are introduced for characterization of this effect.

  8. The Characterization of Surface Acoustic Wave Devices Based on AlN-Metal Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Shu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We report in this paper on the study of surface acoustic wave (SAW resonators based on an AlN/titanium alloy (TC4 structure. The AlN/TC4 structure with different thicknesses of AlN films was simulated, and the acoustic propagating modes were discussed. Based on the simulation results, interdigital transducers with a periodic length of 24 μm were patterned by lift-off photolithography techniques on the AlN films/TC4 structure, while the AlN film thickness was in the range 1.5–3.5 μm. The device performances in terms of quality factor (Q-factor and electromechanical coupling coefficient (k2 were determined from the measure S11 parameters. The Q-factor and k2 were strongly dependent not only on the normalized AlN film thickness but also on the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM of AlN (002 peak. The dispersion curve of the SAW phase velocity was analyzed, and the experimental results showed a good agreement with simulations. The temperature behaviors of the devices were also presented and discussed. The prepared SAW resonators based on AlN/TC4 structure have potential applications in integrated micromechanical sensing systems.

  9. A high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system for the ex vivo measurement of mechanical properties of crystalline lenses with laser-induced microbubbles interrogated by acoustic radiation force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sangpil; Emelianov, Stanislav; Aglyamov, Salavat; Karpiouk, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    A high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system for an ex vivo measurement of mechanical properties of an animal crystalline lens was developed and validated. We measured the bulk displacement of laser-induced microbubbles created at different positions within the lens using nanosecond laser pulses. An impulsive acoustic radiation force was applied to the microbubble, and spatio-temporal measurements of the microbubble displacement were assessed using a custom-made high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system consisting of two 25 MHz focused ultrasound transducers. One of these transducers was used to emit a train of ultrasound pulses and another transducer was used to receive the ultrasound echoes reflected from the microbubble. The developed system was operating at 1 MHz pulse repetition frequency. Based on the measured motion of the microbubble, Young’s moduli of surrounding tissue were reconstructed and the values were compared with those measured using the indentation test. Measured values of Young’s moduli of four bovine lenses ranged from 2.6 ± 0.1 to 26 ± 1.4 kPa, and there was good agreement between the two methods. Therefore, our studies, utilizing the high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system, suggest that the developed approach can be used to assess the mechanical properties of ex vivo crystalline lenses. Furthermore, the potential of the presented approach for in vivo measurements is discussed. (paper)

  10. A random phased array device for delivery of high intensity focused ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hand, J W; Shaw, A; Sadhoo, N; Rajagopal, S; Dickinson, R J; Gavrilov, L R

    2009-01-01

    Randomized phased arrays can offer electronic steering of a single focus and simultaneous multiple foci concomitant with low levels of secondary maxima and are potentially useful as sources of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). This work describes laboratory testing of a 1 MHz random phased array consisting of 254 elements on a spherical shell of radius of curvature 130 mm and diameter 170 mm. Acoustic output power and efficiency are measured for a range of input electrical powers, and field distributions for various single- and multiple-focus conditions are evaluated by a novel technique using an infrared camera to provide rapid imaging of temperature changes on the surface of an absorbing target. Experimental results show that the array can steer a single focus laterally to at least ±15 mm off axis and axially to more than ±15 mm from the centre of curvature of the array and patterns of four and five simultaneous foci ±10 mm laterally and axially whilst maintaining low intensity levels in secondary maxima away from the targeted area in good agreement with linear theoretical predictions. Experiments in which pork meat was thermally ablated indicate that contiguous lesions several cm 3 in volume can be produced using the patterns of multiple foci.

  11. A random phased array device for delivery of high intensity focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, J W; Shaw, A; Sadhoo, N; Rajagopal, S; Dickinson, R J; Gavrilov, L R

    2009-10-07

    Randomized phased arrays can offer electronic steering of a single focus and simultaneous multiple foci concomitant with low levels of secondary maxima and are potentially useful as sources of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). This work describes laboratory testing of a 1 MHz random phased array consisting of 254 elements on a spherical shell of radius of curvature 130 mm and diameter 170 mm. Acoustic output power and efficiency are measured for a range of input electrical powers, and field distributions for various single- and multiple-focus conditions are evaluated by a novel technique using an infrared camera to provide rapid imaging of temperature changes on the surface of an absorbing target. Experimental results show that the array can steer a single focus laterally to at least +/-15 mm off axis and axially to more than +/-15 mm from the centre of curvature of the array and patterns of four and five simultaneous foci +/-10 mm laterally and axially whilst maintaining low intensity levels in secondary maxima away from the targeted area in good agreement with linear theoretical predictions. Experiments in which pork meat was thermally ablated indicate that contiguous lesions several cm(3) in volume can be produced using the patterns of multiple foci.

  12. Interaction of vortex lattice with ultrasound and the acoustic Faraday effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, D.; Bulaevskii, L.; Ivlev, B.; Maley, M.; Bishop, A.R.

    1995-01-01

    The interaction of sound with the vortex lattice is considered for high-T c superconductors, taking into account pinning and electrodynamic forces between vortices and crystal displacements. At low temperatures the Magnus force results in the acoustic Faraday effect; the velocity of sound propagating along the magnetic field depends on the polarization. This effect is linear in the Magnus force and magnetic field in crystals with equivalent a and b axes for a field parallel to the c axis. In the thermally activated flux flow regime, the Faraday effect is caused by electric and magnetic fields induced by vortices and acting on ions

  13. Acoustic microstreaming due to an ultrasound contrast microbubble near a wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobadersany, Nima; Sarkar, Kausik

    2017-11-01

    In an ultrasound field, in addition to the sinusoidal motion of fluid particles, particles experience a steady streaming velocity due to nonlinear second order effects. Here, we have simulated the microstreaming flow near a plane rigid wall caused by the pulsations of contrast microbubbles. Although these microbubbles were initially developed as a contrast enhancing agents for ultrasound imaging, they generate additional therapeutic effects that can be harnessed for targeted drug delivery or blood brain barrier (BBB) opening. The microbubbles have a gas core coated with a stabilizing layer of lipids or proteins. We use analytical models as well as boundary element (BEM) simulation to simulate the flow around these bubbles implementing interfacial rheology models for the coating. The microstreaming flow is characterized by two wall bounded vortices. The size of the vortices decreases with the decrease of the separation from the wall. The vortex-induced shear stress is simulated and analyzed as a function of excitation parameters and geometry. These microstreaming shear stress plays a critical role in increasing the membrane permeability facilitating drug delivery or rupturing biological tissues.

  14. Guideline for Technical Quality Assurance (TQA) of Ultrasound devices (B-Mode) - Version 1.0 (July 2012)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kollmann, C.; Korte, C.L. de; Dudley, N.J.; Gritzmann, N.; Martin, K.; Evans, D.H.

    2012-01-01

    The Technical Quality Assurance group was initiated by the EFSUMB Board in 2007 and met firstly in 2008 to discuss and evaluate methods and procedures published for performing technical quality assurance for diagnostic ultrasound devices. It is the aim of this group of experts to advise the EFSUMB

  15. An experimental device for characterizing degassing processes and related elastic fingerprints: Analog volcano seismo-acoustic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Laura; Morgavi, Daniele; Cannata, Andrea; Campeggi, Carlo; Perugini, Diego

    2018-05-01

    A challenging objective of modern volcanology is to quantitatively characterize eruptive/degassing regimes from geophysical signals (in particular seismic and infrasonic), for both research and monitoring purposes. However, the outcomes of the attempts made so far are still considered very uncertain because volcanoes remain inaccessible when deriving quantitative information on crucial parameters such as plumbing system geometry and magma viscosity. In order to improve our knowledge of volcanic systems, a novel experimental device, which is capable of mimicking volcanic degassing processes with different regimes and gas flow rates, and allowing for the investigation of the related seismo-acoustic emissions, was designed and developed. The benefits of integrating observations on real volcanoes with seismo-acoustic signals generated in laboratory are many and include (i) the possibility to fix the controlling parameters such as the geometry of the structure where the gas flows, the gas flow rate, and the fluid viscosity; (ii) the possibility of performing acoustic measurements at different azimuthal and zenithal angles around the opening of the analog conduit, hence constraining the radiation pattern of different acoustic sources; (iii) the possibility to measure micro-seismic signals in distinct points of the analog conduit; (iv) finally, thanks to the transparent structure, it is possible to directly observe the degassing pattern through the optically clear analog magma and define the degassing regime producing the seismo-acoustic radiations. The above-described device represents a step forward in the analog volcano seismo-acoustic measurements.

  16. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Nonlinear acoustics, synthetic aperture imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingvall, Fredrik; Ping Wu; Stepinski, Tadeusz [Uppsala Univ., (Sweden). Dept. of Materials Science

    2003-03-01

    This report contains results concerning inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in year 2001/2002. The first chapter presents results of an investigation of a new method for synthetic aperture imaging. The new method presented here takes the form of a 2D filter based on minimum mean squared error (MMSE) criteria. The filter, which varies with the target position in two dimensions includes information about spatial impulse response (SIR) of the imaging system. Spatial resolution of the MMSE method is investigated and compared experimentally to that of the classical SAFT and phased array imaging. It is shown that the resolution of the MMSE algorithm, evaluated for imaging immersed copper specimen is superior to that observed for the two above-mentioned methods. Extended experimental and theoretical research concerning the potential of nonlinear waves and material harmonic imaging is presented in the second chapter. An experimental work is presented that was conducted using the RITEC RAM-5000 ultrasonic system capable of providing a high power tone-burst output. A new method for simulation of nonlinear acoustic waves that is a combination of the angular spectrum approach and the Burger's equation is also presented. This method was used for simulating nonlinear elastic waves radiated by the annular transducer that was used in the experiments.

  17. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Nonlinear acoustics, synthetic aperture imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingvall, Fredrik; Ping Wu; Stepinski, Tadeusz

    2003-03-01

    This report contains results concerning inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in year 2001/2002. The first chapter presents results of an investigation of a new method for synthetic aperture imaging. The new method presented here takes the form of a 2D filter based on minimum mean squared error (MMSE) criteria. The filter, which varies with the target position in two dimensions includes information about spatial impulse response (SIR) of the imaging system. Spatial resolution of the MMSE method is investigated and compared experimentally to that of the classical SAFT and phased array imaging. It is shown that the resolution of the MMSE algorithm, evaluated for imaging immersed copper specimen is superior to that observed for the two above-mentioned methods. Extended experimental and theoretical research concerning the potential of nonlinear waves and material harmonic imaging is presented in the second chapter. An experimental work is presented that was conducted using the RITEC RAM-5000 ultrasonic system capable of providing a high power tone-burst output. A new method for simulation of nonlinear acoustic waves that is a combination of the angular spectrum approach and the Burger's equation is also presented. This method was used for simulating nonlinear elastic waves radiated by the annular transducer that was used in the experiments

  18. Virtual touch tissue quantification of acoustic radiation force impulse: a new ultrasound elastic imaging in the diagnosis of thyroid nodules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Feng Zhang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Virtual touch tissue quantification (VTQ of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI is a new quantitative technique to measure tissue stiffness. The study was aimed to assess the usefulness of VTQ in the diagnosis of thyroid nodules. METHODS: 173 pathologically proven thyroid nodules in 142 patients were included and all were examined by conventional ultrasound (US, conventional elasticity imaging (EI and VTQ of ARFI. The tissue stiffness for VTQ was expressed as shear wave velocity (SWV (m/s. Receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC analyses were performed to assess the diagnostic performance. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility of VTQ measurement was assessed. RESULTS: The SWVs of benign and malignant thyroid nodules were 2.34±1.17 m/s (range: 0.61-9.00 m/s and 4.82±2.53 m/s (range: 2.32-9.00 m/s respectively (P20 mm and lowest for those ≤10 mm. The correlation coefficients were 0.904 for intraobserver measurement and 0.864 for interobserver measurement. CONCLUSIONS: VTQ of ARFI provides quantitative and reproducible information about the tissue stiffness, which is useful for the differentiation between benign and malignant thyroid nodules. The diagnostic performance of VTQ is higher than that of conventional EI.

  19. The Acoustic Lens Design and in Vivo Use of a Multifunctional Catheter Combining Intracardiac Ultrasound Imaging and Electrophysiology Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Cannata, Jonathan; Liu, Ruibin; Zhao, Jian Zhong; Shung, K. Kirk; Nguyen, Hien; Chia, Raymond; Dentinger, Aaron; Wildes, Douglas; Thomenius, Kai E.; Mahajan, Aman; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Kim, Kang; O’Donnell, Matthew; Sahn, David

    2009-01-01

    A multifunctional 9F intracardiac imaging and electrophysiology mapping catheter was developed and tested to help guide diagnostic and therapeutic intracardiac electrophysiology (EP) procedures. The catheter tip includes a 7.25-MHz, 64-element, side-looking phased array for high resolution sector scanning. Multiple electrophysiology mapping sensors were mounted as ring electrodes near the array for electrocardiographic synchronization of ultrasound images. The catheter array elevation beam performance in particular was investigated. An acoustic lens for the distal tip array designed with a round cross section can produce an acceptable elevation beam shape; however, the velocity of sound in the lens material should be approximately 155 m/s slower than in tissue for the best beam shape and wide bandwidth performance. To help establish the catheter’s unique ability for integration with electrophysiology interventional procedures, it was used in vivo in a porcine animal model, and demonstrated both useful intracardiac echocardiographic visualization and simultaneous 3-D positional information using integrated electroanatomical mapping techniques. The catheter also performed well in high frame rate imaging, color flow imaging, and strain rate imaging of atrial and ventricular structures. PMID:18407850

  20. Characterizing Focused-Ultrasound Mediated Drug Delivery to the Heterogeneous Primate Brain In Vivo with Acoustic Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shih-Ying; Sanchez, Carlos Sierra; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Buch, Amanda; Ferrera, Vincent P.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2016-11-01

    Focused ultrasound with microbubbles has been used to noninvasively and selectively deliver pharmacological agents across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for treating brain diseases. Acoustic cavitation monitoring could serve as an on-line tool to assess and control the treatment. While it demonstrated a strong correlation in small animals, its translation to primates remains in question due to the anatomically different and highly heterogeneous brain structures with gray and white matteras well as dense vasculature. In addition, the drug delivery efficiency and the BBB opening volume have never been shown to be predictable through cavitation monitoring in primates. This study aimed at determining how cavitation activity is correlated with the amount and concentration of gadolinium delivered through the BBB and its associated delivery efficiency as well as the BBB opening volume in non-human primates. Another important finding entails the effect of heterogeneous brain anatomy and vasculature of a primate brain, i.e., presence of large cerebral vessels, gray and white matter that will also affect the cavitation activity associated with variation of BBB opening in different tissue types, which is not typically observed in small animals. Both these new findings are critical in the primate brain and provide essential information for clinical applications.

  1. A portable blood plasma clot micro-elastometry device based on resonant acoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, C R; Li, Ling; Wolberg, Alisa S; Oldenburg, Amy L

    2015-07-01

    Abnormal blood clot stiffness is an important indicator of coagulation disorders arising from a variety of cardiovascular diseases and drug treatments. Here, we present a portable instrument for elastometry of microliter volume blood samples based upon the principle of resonant acoustic spectroscopy, where a sample of well-defined dimensions exhibits a fundamental longitudinal resonance mode proportional to the square root of the Young's modulus. In contrast to commercial thromboelastography, the resonant acoustic method offers improved repeatability and accuracy due to the high signal-to-noise ratio of the resonant vibration. We review the measurement principles and the design of a magnetically actuated microbead force transducer applying between 23 pN and 6.7 nN, providing a wide dynamic range of elastic moduli (3 Pa-27 kPa) appropriate for measurement of clot elastic modulus (CEM). An automated and portable device, the CEMport, is introduced and implemented using a 2 nm resolution displacement sensor with demonstrated accuracy and precision of 3% and 2%, respectively, of CEM in biogels. Importantly, the small strains (diagnostics and therapeutic monitoring.

  2. In vivo demonstration of ultrasound power delivery to charge implanted medical devices via acute and survival porcine studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radziemski, Leon; Makin, Inder Raj S

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies are an important step in proving the utility and safety of an ultrasound based implanted battery recharging system. To this end an Ultrasound Electrical Recharging System (USER™) was developed and tested. Experiments in vitro demonstrated power deliveries at the battery of up to 600 mW through 10-15 mm of tissue, 50 mW of power available at tissue depths of up to 50 mm, and the feasibility of using transducers bonded to titanium as used in medical implants. Acute in vivo studies in a porcine model were used to test reliability of power delivery, temperature excursions, and cooling techniques. The culminating five-week survival study involved repeated battery charging, a total of 10.5h of ultrasound exposure of the intervening living tissue, with an average RF input to electrical charging efficiency of 20%. This study was potentially the first long term cumulative living-tissue exposure using transcutaneous ultrasound power transmission to an implanted receiver in situ. Histology of the exposed tissue showed changes attributable primarily due to surgical implantation of the prototype device, and no damage due to the ultrasound exposure. The in vivo results are indicative of the potential safe delivery of ultrasound energy for a defined set of source conditions for charging batteries within implants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Density, ultrasound velocity, acoustic impedance, reflection and absorption coefficient determination of liquids via multiple reflection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoche, S; Hussein, M A; Becker, T

    2015-03-01

    The accuracy of density, reflection coefficient, and acoustic impedance determination via multiple reflection method was validated experimentally. The ternary system water-maltose-ethanol was used to execute a systematic, temperature dependent study over a wide range of densities and viscosities aiming an application as inline sensor in beverage industries. The validation results of the presented method and setup show root mean square errors of: 1.201E-3 g cm(-3) (±0.12%) density, 0.515E-3 (0.15%) reflection coefficient and 1.851E+3 kg s(-1) m(-2) (0.12%) specific acoustic impedance. The results of the diffraction corrected absorption showed an average standard deviation of only 0.12%. It was found that the absorption change shows a good correlation to concentration variations and may be useful for laboratory analysis of sufficiently pure liquids. The main part of the observed errors can be explained by the observed noise, temperature variation and the low signal resolution of 50 MHz. In particular, the poor signal-to-noise ratio of the second reflector echo was found to be a main accuracy limitation. Concerning the investigation of liquids the unstable properties of the reference material PMMA, due to hygroscopicity, were identified to be an additional, unpredictable source of uncertainty. While dimensional changes can be considered by adequate methodology, the impact of the time and temperature dependent water absorption on relevant reference properties like the buffer's sound velocity and density could not be considered and may explain part of the observed deviations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of Zinc Oxide (ZnO) piezoelectric properties for Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosydi Zakaria, Mohd; Johari, Shazlina; Hafiz Ismail, Mohd; Hashim, Uda

    2017-11-01

    In fabricating Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) biosensors device, the substrate is one of important factors that affected to performance device. there are many types of piezoelectric substrate in the markets and the cheapest is zinc Oxide substrate. Zinc Oxide (ZnO) with its unique properties can be used as piezoelectric substrate along with SAW devices for detection of DNA in this research. In this project, ZnO thin film is deposited onto silicon oxide substrate using electron beam evaporation (E-beam) and Sol-Gel technique. Different material structure is used to compare the roughness and best piezoelectric substrate of ZnO thin film. Two different structures of ZnO target which are pellet and granular are used for e-beam deposition and one sol-gel liquid were synthesize and compared. Parameter for thickness of ZnO e-beam deposition is fixed to a 0.1kÅ for both materials structure and sol-gel was coat using spin coat technique. After the process is done, samples are annealed at temperature of 500°C for 2 hours. The structural properties of effect of post annealing using different material structure of ZnO are studied using Atomic Force Microscopic (AFM) for surface morphology and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) for phase structure.

  5. Italian chapter of the International Society of cardiovascular ultrasound expert consensus document on training requirements for noncardiologists using hand-carried ultrasound devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Palmiero, Pasquale; Maiello, Maria; Losi, Maria-Angela

    2012-07-01

    Hand-carried ultrasound devices (HCDs), also named personal use echo, are pocket-size, compact, and battery-equipped echocardiographic systems. They have limited technical capabilities but offer some advantages compared with standard echocardiographic devices due to their simplicity of use, immediate availability at the patient's bedside, transportability, and relatively low cost. Current HCDs are considered as screening tools and are used to complement the physical examination by cardiologists. Many noncardiologic subspecialists, however, have adopted this technologic advancement rapidly raising the concern of an inappropriate use of HCD by health professionals who do not have any specific training. In keeping with the mission of the International Society of Cardiovascular Ultrasound to advance the science and art of cardiovascular ultrasound and encourage the knowledge of this subject, the purpose of this Expert Consensus document is to focus on the training for all health care professionals considering the use of HCD. Accordingly, this paper summarizes general aspects of HCD, such as technical characteristics and clinical indications, and then details the specific training requirements for noncardiologists (i.e., training program, minimum case load, duration, and certification of competence). © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Development of a combined surface plasmon resonance/surface acoustic wave device for the characterization of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, Florian; Tsortos, Achilleas; Papadakis, George; Gizeli, Electra; Roach, Paul; Newton, Michael I; McHale, Glen

    2009-01-01

    It is known that acoustic sensor devices, if operated in liquid phase, are sensitive not just to the mass of the analyte but also to various other parameters, such as size, shape, charge and elastic constants of the analyte as well as bound and viscously entrained water. This can be used to extract valuable information about a biomolecule, particularly if the acoustic device is combined with another sensor element which is sensitive to the mass or amount of analyte only. The latter is true in good approximation for various optical sensor techniques. This work reports on the development of a combined surface plasmon resonance/surface acoustic wave sensor system which is designed for the investigation of biomolecules such as proteins or DNA. Results for the deposition of neutravidin and DNA are reported

  7. A portable pulmonary delivery system for nano engineered DNA vaccines driven by surface acoustic wave devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajapaksa, A.E.; Qi, Aisha; Yeo, L.; Friend, J.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The increase in the need for effective delivery of potelll vaccines against infectious diseases, require robust yet straightforward pro duction of encapsulated DNA-laden aerosols. Aerosol delivery of drugs represents the next generation of vaccine delivery where the drug is deposited into the lung, which provides an ideal, non-invasive route. Moreover, several features of D A vaccines make them more attractive than conventional vaccines; thus, DNA vaccines have gained global interest for a variety of applications. However, several limitations such as ineffective cellular uptake and intracellular delivery, and degradation of DNA need to be overcome before clin ical applications. In this study, a novel and scalable engineered technique has been developed to create a biodegradable polymer system, which enables controlled delivery of a well designed DNA vaccine for immuno-therapeutics. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) atomisation has been found as useful mechanism for atomising fluid samples for medical and industrial devices. It is a straightforward method for synthesising un-agglomerated biodegradable nanoparti cles (<250 nm) in the absence of organic solvents which would represent a major breakthrough for biopharmaceutical encapsulation and delivery. Nano-scale polymer particles for DNA vaccines deliv ery were obtained through an evaporative process of the initial aerosol created by surface acoustic waves at 8-150 MHz, the final size of which could be controlled by modifying the initial polymer concen tration and solid contents. Thus, SAW atomiser represents a promising alternative for the development of a low power device for producing nano-engineered vaccines with a controlled and narrow size distribution as delivery system for genetic immuno-therapeutics.

  8. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) ultrasound imaging of pancreatic cystic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Onofrio, M., E-mail: mirko.donofrio@univr.it [Department of Radiology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy); Gallotti, A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy); Salvia, R. [Department of Surgery, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy); Capelli, P. [Department of Pathology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy); Mucelli, R. Pozzi [Department of Radiology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the ARFI ultrasound imaging with Virtual Touch tissue quantification in studying pancreatic cystic lesions, compared with phantom fluid models. Materials and methods: Different phantom fluids at different viscosity or density (water, iodinate contrast agent, and oil) were evaluated by two independent operators. From September to December 2008, 23 pancreatic cystic lesions were prospectively studied. All lesions were pathologically confirmed. Results: Non-numerical values on water and numerical values on other phantoms were obtained. Inter-observer evaluation revealed a perfect correlation (rs = 1.00; p < 0.0001) between all measurements achieved by both operators per each balloon and fluid. Among the pancreatic cystic lesions, 14 mucinous cystadenomas, 4 pseudocysts, 3 intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms and 2 serous cystadenomas were studied. The values obtained ranged from XXXX/0-4,85 m/s in mucinous cystadenomas, from XXXX/0-3,11 m/s in pseudocysts, from XXXX/0-4,57 m/s in intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms. In serous cystadenomas all values measured were XXXX/0 m/s. Diagnostic accuracy in benign and non-benign differentiation of pancreatic cystic lesions was 78%. Conclusions: Virtual Touch tissue quantification can be applied in the analysis of fluids and is potentially able to differentiate more complex (mucinous) from simple (serous) content in studying pancreatic cystic lesions.

  9. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) ultrasound imaging of pancreatic cystic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Onofrio, M.; Gallotti, A.; Salvia, R.; Capelli, P.; Mucelli, R. Pozzi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the ARFI ultrasound imaging with Virtual Touch tissue quantification in studying pancreatic cystic lesions, compared with phantom fluid models. Materials and methods: Different phantom fluids at different viscosity or density (water, iodinate contrast agent, and oil) were evaluated by two independent operators. From September to December 2008, 23 pancreatic cystic lesions were prospectively studied. All lesions were pathologically confirmed. Results: Non-numerical values on water and numerical values on other phantoms were obtained. Inter-observer evaluation revealed a perfect correlation (rs = 1.00; p < 0.0001) between all measurements achieved by both operators per each balloon and fluid. Among the pancreatic cystic lesions, 14 mucinous cystadenomas, 4 pseudocysts, 3 intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms and 2 serous cystadenomas were studied. The values obtained ranged from XXXX/0-4,85 m/s in mucinous cystadenomas, from XXXX/0-3,11 m/s in pseudocysts, from XXXX/0-4,57 m/s in intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms. In serous cystadenomas all values measured were XXXX/0 m/s. Diagnostic accuracy in benign and non-benign differentiation of pancreatic cystic lesions was 78%. Conclusions: Virtual Touch tissue quantification can be applied in the analysis of fluids and is potentially able to differentiate more complex (mucinous) from simple (serous) content in studying pancreatic cystic lesions.

  10. Surface acoustic wave devices on AlN/3C–SiC/Si multilayer structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Lien, Wei-Cheng; Riekkinen, Tommi; Senesky, Debbie G; Pisano, Albert P; Chen, Yung-Yu; Felmetsger, Valery V

    2013-01-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation characteristics in a multilayer structure including a piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) thin film and an epitaxial cubic silicon carbide (3C–SiC) layer on a silicon (Si) substrate are investigated by theoretical calculation in this work. Alternating current (ac) reactive magnetron sputtering was used to deposit highly c-axis-oriented AlN thin films, showing the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the rocking curve of 1.36° on epitaxial 3C–SiC layers on Si substrates. In addition, conventional two-port SAW devices were fabricated on the AlN/3C–SiC/Si multilayer structure and SAW propagation properties in the multilayer structure were experimentally investigated. The surface wave in the AlN/3C–SiC/Si multilayer structure exhibits a phase velocity of 5528 m s −1 and an electromechanical coupling coefficient of 0.42%. The results demonstrate the potential of AlN thin films grown on epitaxial 3C–SiC layers to create layered SAW devices with higher phase velocities and larger electromechanical coupling coefficients than SAW devices on an AlN/Si multilayer structure. Moreover, the FWHM values of rocking curves of the AlN thin film and 3C–SiC layer remained constant after annealing for 500 h at 540 °C in air atmosphere. Accordingly, the layered SAW devices based on AlN thin films and 3C–SiC layers are applicable to timing and sensing applications in harsh environments. (paper)

  11. Acoustofluidics: Theory and simulation of streaming and radiation forces at ultrasound resonances in microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    fields, which are directly related to the acoustic radiation force on single particles and to the acoustic streaming of the liquid. For the radiation pressure effects, there is good agreement between theory and simulation, while the numeric results for the acoustic streaming effects are more problematic...

  12. The use of Acoustic Radiation Force decorrelation-weighted pulse inversion (ADW-PI) for enhanced ultrasound contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Elizabeth; Unnikrishnan, Sunil; Wang, Shiying; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Hossack, John A.; Mauldin, F. William

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The use of ultrasound imaging for cancer diagnosis and screening can be enhanced with the use of molecularly targeted microbubbles. Nonlinear imaging strategies such as pulse inversion (PI) and “contrast pulse sequences” (CPS) can be used to differentiate microbubble signal, but often fail to suppress highly echogenic tissue interfaces. This failure results in false positive detection and potential misdiagnosis. In this study, a novel Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF) based approach was developed for superior microbubble signal detection. The feasibility of this technique, termed ARF-decorrelation-weighted PI (ADW-PI), was demonstrated in vivo using a subcutaneous mouse tumor model. Materials and Methods Tumors were implanted in the hindlimb of C57BL/6 mice by subcutaneous injection of MC38 cells. Lipid-shelled microbubbles were conjugated to anti-VEGFR2 antibody and administered via bolus injection. An image sequence using ARF pulses to generate microbubble motion was combined with PI imaging on a Verasonics Vantage programmable scanner. ADW-PI images were generated by combining PI images with inter-frame signal decorrelation data. For comparison, CPS images of the same mouse tumor were acquired using a Siemens Sequoia clinical scanner. Results Microbubble-bound regions in the tumor interior exhibited significantly higher signal decorrelation than static tissue (n = 9, p < 0.001). The application of ARF significantly increased microbubble signal decorrelation (n = 9, p < 0.01). Using these decorrelation measurements, ADW-PI imaging demonstrated significantly improved microbubble contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) when compared to corresponding CPS or PI images (n = 9, p < 0.001). CTR improved with ADW-PI by approximately 3 dB compared to PI images and 2 dB compared to CPS images. Conclusions Acoustic radiation force can be used to generate adherent microbubble signal decorrelation without microbubble bursting. When combined with pulse inversion

  13. Design and implementation of multichannel global active structural acoustic control for a device casing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Krzysztof; Wrona, Stanislaw; Pawelczyk, Marek

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents the idea and discussion on implementation of multichannel global active noise control systems. As a test plant an active casing is used. It has been developed by the authors to reduce device noise directly at the source by controlling vibration of its casing. To provide global acoustic effect in the whole environment, where the device operates, it requires a number of secondary sources and sensors for each casing wall, thus making the whole active control structure complicated, i.e. with a large number of interacting channels. The paper discloses all details concerning hardware setup and efficient implementation of control algorithms for the multichannel case. A new formulation is presented to introduce the distributed version of the Switched-error Filtered-reference Least Mean Squares (FXLMS) algorithm together with adaptation rate enhancement. The convergence rate of the proposed algorithm is compared with original Multiple-error FXLMS. A number of hints followed from many years of authors' experience on microprocessor control systems design and signal processing algorithms optimization are presented. They can be used for various active control and signal processing applications, both for academic research and commercialization.

  14. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Ultrasonic imaging, FSW monitoring with acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz; Olofsson, Tomas; Wennerstroem, Erik

    2006-12-01

    This report contains the research results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in years 2005/2006. In the first part of the report we propose a concept of monitoring of the friction stir welding (FSW) process by means of acoustic emission (AE) technique. First, we introduce the AE technique and then we present the principle of the system for monitoring the FSW process in cylindrical symmetry specific for the SKB canisters. We propose an omnidirectional circular array of ultrasonic transducers for receiving the AE signals generated by the FSW tool and the releases of the residual stress at canister's circumference. Finally, we review the theory of uniform circular arrays. The second part of the report is concerned with synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) characterized by enhanced spatial resolution. We evaluate three different approaches to perform imaging with less computational cost than that of the extended SAFT (ESAFT) method proposed in our previous reports. First, a sparse version of ESAFT is presented, which solves the reconstruction problem only for a small set of the most probable scatterers in the image. A frequency domain the ω-k SAFT algorithm, which relies on the far-field approximation is presented in the second part. Finally, a detailed analysis of the most computationally intense step in the ESAFT and the sparse 2D deconvolution is presented. In the final part of the report we introduce basics of the 3D ultrasonic imaging that has a great potential in the inspection of the FSW welds. We discuss in some detail the three interrelated steps involved in the 3D ultrasonic imaging: data acquisition, 3D reconstruction, and 3D visualization

  15. Real-time contrast ultrasound muscle perfusion imaging with intermediate-power imaging coupled with acoustically durable microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Sang-Hoon; Davidson, Brian P; Belcik, J Todd; Mott, Brian H; Goodman, Reid M; Ammi, Azzdine; Lindner, Jonathan R

    2015-06-01

    There is growing interest in limb contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) perfusion imaging for the evaluation of peripheral artery disease. Because of low resting microvascular blood flow in skeletal muscle, signal enhancement during limb CEU is prohibitively low for real-time imaging. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that this obstacle can be overcome by intermediate- rather than low-power CEU when performed with an acoustically resilient microbubble agent. Viscoelastic properties of Definity and Sonazoid were assessed by measuring bulk modulus during incremental increases in ambient pressure to 200 mm Hg. Comparison of in vivo microbubble destruction and signal enhancement at a mechanical index (MI) of 0.1 to 0.4 was performed by sequential reduction in pulsing interval from 10 to 0.05 sec during limb CEU at 7 MHz in mice and 1.8 MHz in dogs. Destruction was also assessed by broadband signal generation during passive cavitation detection. Real-time CEU perfusion imaging with destruction-replenishment was then performed at 1.8 MHz in dogs using an MI of 0.1, 0.2, or 0.3. Sonazoid had a higher bulk modulus than Definity (66 ± 12 vs 29 ± 2 kPa, P = .02) and exhibited less inertial cavitation (destruction) at MIs ≥ 0.2. On in vivo CEU, maximal signal intensity increased incrementally with MI for both agents and was equivalent between agents except at an MI of 0.1 (60% and 85% lower for Sonazoid at 7 and 1.8 MHz, respectively, P power imaging coupled with a durable microbubble contrast agent. Copyright © 2015 American Society of Echocardiography. All rights reserved.

  16. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Ultrasonic imaging, FSW monitoring with acoustic emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz (ed.); Olofsson, Tomas; Wennerstroem, Erik [Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Technical Sciences (Sweden). Signals and Systems

    2006-12-15

    This report contains the research results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in years 2005/2006. In the first part of the report we propose a concept of monitoring of the friction stir welding (FSW) process by means of acoustic emission (AE) technique. First, we introduce the AE technique and then we present the principle of the system for monitoring the FSW process in cylindrical symmetry specific for the SKB canisters. We propose an omnidirectional circular array of ultrasonic transducers for receiving the AE signals generated by the FSW tool and the releases of the residual stress at canister's circumference. Finally, we review the theory of uniform circular arrays. The second part of the report is concerned with synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) characterized by enhanced spatial resolution. We evaluate three different approaches to perform imaging with less computational cost than that of the extended SAFT (ESAFT) method proposed in our previous reports. First, a sparse version of ESAFT is presented, which solves the reconstruction problem only for a small set of the most probable scatterers in the image. A frequency domain the {omega}-k SAFT algorithm, which relies on the far-field approximation is presented in the second part. Finally, a detailed analysis of the most computationally intense step in the ESAFT and the sparse 2D deconvolution is presented. In the final part of the report we introduce basics of the 3D ultrasonic imaging that has a great potential in the inspection of the FSW welds. We discuss in some detail the three interrelated steps involved in the 3D ultrasonic imaging: data acquisition, 3D reconstruction, and 3D visualization.

  17. Diagnostic performance of multi-organ ultrasound with pocket-sized device in the management of acute dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforza, Alfonso; Mancusi, Costantino; Carlino, Maria Viviana; Buonauro, Agostino; Barozzi, Marco; Romano, Giuseppe; Serra, Sossio; de Simone, Giovanni

    2017-06-19

    The availability of ultra-miniaturized pocket ultrasound devices (PUD) adds diagnostic power to the clinical examination. Information on accuracy of ultrasound with handheld units in immediate differential diagnosis in emergency department (ED) is poor. The aim of this study is to test the usefulness and accuracy of lung ultrasound (LUS) alone or combined with ultrasound of the heart and inferior vena cava (IVC) using a PUD for the differential diagnosis of acute dyspnea (AD). We included 68 patients presenting to the ED of "Maurizio Bufalini" Hospital in Cesena (Italy) for AD. All patients underwent integrated ultrasound examination (IUE) of lung-heart-IVC, using PUD. The series was divided into patients with dyspnea of cardiac or non-cardiac origin. We used 2 × 2 contingency tables to analyze sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the three ultrasonic methods and their various combinations for the diagnosis of cardiogenic dyspnea (CD), comparing with the final diagnosis made by an independent emergency physician. LUS alone exhibited a good sensitivity (92.6%) and specificity (80.5%). The highest accuracy (90%) for the diagnosis of CD was obtained with the combination of LUS and one of the other two methods (heart or IVC). The IUE with PUD is a useful extension of the clinical examination, can be readily available at the bedside or in ambulance, requires few minutes and has a reliable diagnostic discriminant ability in the setting of AD.

  18. Heat Transfer Characteristics of a Focused Surface Acoustic Wave (F-SAW Device for Interfacial Droplet Jetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghwi Lee

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate the interfacial droplet jetting characteristics and thermal stability of a focused surface acoustic wave device (F-SAW. An F-SAW device capable of generating a 20 MHz surface acoustic wave by applying sufficient radio frequency power (2–19 W on a 128°-rotated YX-cut piezoelectric lithium niobate substrate for interfacial droplet jetting is proposed. The interfacial droplet jetting characteristics were visualized by a shadowgraph method using a high-speed camera, and a heat transfer experiment was conducted using K-type thermocouples. The interfacial droplet jetting characteristics (jet angle and height were analyzed for two different cases by applying a single interdigital transducer and two opposite interdigital transducers. Surface temperature variations were analyzed with radio frequency input power increases to evaluate the thermal stability of the F-SAW device in air and water environments. We demonstrate that the maximum temperature increase of the F-SAW device in the water was 1/20 of that in the air, owing to the very high convective heat transfer coefficient of the water, resulting in prevention of the performance degradation of the focused acoustic wave device.

  19. Ultrasound stethoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C. Vourvouri (Eleni)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis we repmi the many evaluation studies with the hand-held ultrasound device in the assessment of different cardiac pathologies and in different clinical settings. The reason for using the tetm "ultrasound stethoscopy" is that these devices are augmenting our

  20. [Contrastive study on conventional ultrasound, compression elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Zhou, Ping; Deng, Jin; Tian, Shuangming; Qian, Ying; Wu, Xiaomin; Ma, Shuhua; Li, Jiale

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of conventional ultrasound, compression elastography (CE) and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) in differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast tumors. A total of 98 patients with liver lesions were included in the study. The images of conventional ultrasound, CE and the values of virtual touch tissue quantification (VTQ) of breast lesions were obtained. The diagnostic performance of conventional ultrasound, CE and ARFI were assessed by using pathology as the gold standard, and then evaluate the diagnosis efficiency of these three approaches in differential diagnosing benign and malignant breast tumors. The specificity, sensitivity and accuracy in the diagnosis of malignant breast tumors for conventional ultrasound were 80.0%, 81.1% and 81.7%, respectively, whereas for CE elastic score were 85.7%, 86.7% and 86.3%, respectively. With a cutoff value of 3.71 for the SR, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy in diagnosis of malignant breast tumors were 97.1%, 83.3% and 88.4%, respectively. With a cutoff value of 3.78 m/s for VTQ, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy in diagnosis of malignant breast tumors were 94.3%, 91.7% and 92.6%, respectively. The difference in diagnosis efficiency among ARFI, CE and conventional ultrasound in differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast tumors was significant (Pbenign and malignant breast tumors. But the diagnosis efficiency of ARFI is superior to CE and conventional ultrasound. The three approaches can help each other in differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast tumors.

  1. Exploiting spatial degrees of freedom for high data rate ultrasound communication with implantable devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Max L.; Arbabian, Amin

    2017-09-01

    We propose and demonstrate an ultrasonic communication link using spatial degrees of freedom to increase data rates for deeply implantable medical devices. Low attenuation and millimeter wavelengths make ultrasound an ideal communication medium for miniaturized low-power implants. While a small spectral bandwidth has drastically limited achievable data rates in conventional ultrasonic implants, a large spatial bandwidth can be exploited by using multiple transducers in a multiple-input/multiple-output system to provide spatial multiplexing gain without additional power, larger bandwidth, or complicated packaging. We experimentally verify the communication link in mineral oil with a transmitter and a receiver 5 cm apart, each housing two custom-designed mm-sized piezoelectric transducers operating at the same frequency. Two streams of data modulated with quadrature phase-shift keying at 125 kbps are simultaneously transmitted and received on both channels, effectively doubling the data rate to 250 kbps with a measured bit error rate below 10-4. We also evaluate the performance and robustness of the channel separation network by testing the communication link after introducing position offsets. These results demonstrate the potential of spatial multiplexing to enable more complex implant applications requiring higher data rates.

  2. Training Program for Cardiology Residents to Perform Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Examination with Portable Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Vicente N; Mancuso, Frederico J N; Campos, Orlando; De Paola, Angelo A; Carvalho, Antonio C; Moises, Valdir A

    2015-10-01

    Training requirements for general cardiologists without echocardiographic expertise to perform focused cardiac ultrasound (FCU) with portable devices have not yet been defined. The objective of this study was to evaluate a training program to instruct cardiology residents to perform FCU with a hand-carried device (HCD) in different clinical settings. Twelve cardiology residents were subjected to a 50-question test, 4 lectures on basic echocardiography and imaging interpretation, the supervised interpretation of 50 echocardiograms and performance of 30 exams using HCD. After this period, they repeated the written test and were administered a practical test comprising 30 exams each (360 patients) in different clinical settings. They reported on 15 parameters and a final diagnosis; their findings were compared to the HCD exam of a specialist in echocardiography. The proportion of correct answers on the theoretical test was higher after training (86%) than before (51%; P = 0.001). The agreement was substantial among the 15 parameters analyzed (kappa ranging from 0.615 to 0.891; P < 0.001). The percentage of correct interpretation was lower for abnormal (75%) than normal (95%) items, for valve abnormalities (85%) compared to other items (92%) and for graded scale (87%) than for dichotomous (95%) items (P < 0.0001, for all). For the final diagnoses, the kappa value was higher than 0.941 (P < 0.001; 95% CI [0.914, 0.955]). The training proposed enabled residents to perform FCU with HCD, and their findings were in good agreement with those of a cardiologist specialized in echocardiography. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Applications of ultrasound in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, A D

    1988-01-01

    An ultrasonic descaler working at kHz frequencies is used in dentistry to remove attached deposits from the teeth. Such devices offer many advantages over conventional hand instruments by reducing both the work and time involved in the clinical descaling process. Although it is a recognised clinical instrument, there has been little attempt to standardise its acoustic power output. A parameter which may characterise adequately the acoustic emission from these instruments is the displacement amplitude of the probe tip. Modification of the ultrasonic descaler generator has led to the further use of the instrument in other dental areas. Diagnostic applications of MHz ultrasound is limited by the structure and arrangement of the dental tissues. Therapeutic ultrasound has been used to treat a variety of dentally related ailments, and ultrasonic cleaning baths are used to clean both dental instruments and materials.

  4. Educational value of pocket-sized ultrasound devices to improve understanding of ultrasound examination principles and sonographic anatomy for medical student.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Young Kim

    Full Text Available Medical students must understand the principles of ultrasonography (US, because US examinations are an important component of patient care in clinical practice. Pocket-sized ultrasound devices have the benefits of accessibility and ease of use. The primary objective of the present study was to evaluate the educational value of these devices in terms of improving medical student interest and understanding of US and sonographic anatomy.We added a US training program comprised of a self-study learning module and a hands-on training session to a two-week block curriculum of medical imaging for first year medical students (n = 40. Multiple pocket-sized US devices were used on a small-group basis during a single afternoon. Students were asked to complete a questionnaire before and after the US training session; these two questionnaires contained 6 and 10 questions, respectively, which were rated by students using a five-point Likert scale. In addition, understanding of sonographic anatomy was tested before and after the training program.Forty students completed the two questionnaires and the anatomy-related tests. Students found the program educationally valuable (4.37 ± 0.54 of 5 and reported that US practice was useful for improving their understanding of the principles of US examinations (4.23 ± 0.66 of 5 and sonographic anatomy (4.40 ± 0.55 of 5. Overall confidence at performing US examinations and understanding of sonographic anatomy were significantly increased after US training (increased overall confidence score, 1.87 ± 0.91 and improvement in sonographic anatomy score, 6.55 ± 1.55, p values < 0.001.US training using pocket-sized ultrasound devices was found to be educationally valuable for medical students in terms of improving understanding of US principles and familiarizing students with sonographic anatomy.

  5. The efficacy of a combination non-thermal focused ultrasound and radiofrequency device for noninvasive body contouring in Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Samantha Y N; Yeung, Chi K; Chan, Johnny C Y; Chan, Henry H L

    2016-02-01

    Several studies have been published on the first generation non-thermal focused ultrasound with an average improvement of 0-3.95 cm reported. We aim to investigate the efficacy of the second-generation non-thermal focused ultrasound device with a combined radiofrequency hand piece. With the addition of radiofrequency energy, the temperature of the adipose tissue is raised before focused ultrasound is applied. This facilitates the mechanical disruption of fat cells by focused ultrasound. Twenty subjects were recruited and underwent three treatments biweekly. Caliper reading, abdominal circumference, and standardized photographs were taken with the Vectra(®) system at all visits. We aim to have the subjects stand and hold the same position and the photograph taken after exhalation. Caliper and circumference measurements carry uncertainty. It is impossible to eliminate all uncertainties but can be improved by having the same trained physician assistant perform the measurement at the same site and taking an average of three readings. Pain score and satisfaction were recorded by means of the visual analogue scale. The efficacy is defined by a statistically significant improvement in circumferential improvement based on intention-to-treat analysis. Seventeen subjects completed the treatment schedule. Abdominal circumference showed statistically significant improvement at 2 weeks post-second treatment (P = 0.023) and almost all subsequent follow-ups. Caliper readings were statistically significant at 2 weeks post-second treatment (P = 0.013) and almost all follow-ups. The mean pain score reported was 2.3 on the visual analog scale and 6% were unsatisfied with the overall treatments. Six incidents of wheal formation appeared immediately after treatment all of which subsided spontaneously within several hours. The combination non-thermal focused ultrasound and radiofrequency device is effective for improving body contour in Asians. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Waveform-preserved unidirectional acoustic transmission based on impedance-matched acoustic metasurface and phononic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ai-Ling; Chen, Tian-Ning; Wang, Xiao-Peng; Wan, Le-Le

    2016-08-01

    The waveform distortion happens in most of the unidirectional acoustic transmission (UAT) devices proposed before. In this paper, a novel type of waveform-preserved UAT device composed of an impedance-matched acoustic metasurface (AMS) and a phononic crystal (PC) structure is proposed and numerically investigated. The acoustic pressure field distributions and transmittance are calculated by using the finite element method. The subwavelength AMS that can modulate the wavefront of the transmitted wave at will is designed and the band structure of the PC structure is calculated and analyzed. The sound pressure field distributions demonstrate that the unidirectional acoustic transmission can be realized by the proposed UAT device without changing the waveforms of the output waves, which is the distinctive feature compared with the previous UAT devices. The physical mechanism of the unidirectional acoustic transmission is discussed by analyzing the refraction angle changes and partial band gap map. The calculated transmission spectra show that the UAT device is valid within a relatively broad frequency range. The simulation results agree well with the theoretical predictions. The proposed UAT device provides a good reference for designing waveform-preserved UAT devices and has potential applications in many fields, such as medical ultrasound, acoustic rectifiers, and noise insulation.

  7. In-Line Acoustic Device Inspection of Leakage in Water Distribution Pipes Based on Wavelet and Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dileep Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally permanent acoustic sensors leak detection techniques have been proven to be very effective in water distribution pipes. However, these methods need long distance deployment and proper position of sensors and cannot be implemented on underground pipelines. An inline-inspection acoustic device is developed which consists of acoustic sensors. The device will travel by the flow of water through the pipes which record all noise events and detect small leaks. However, it records all the noise events regarding background noises, but the time domain noisy acoustic signal cannot manifest complete features such as the leak flow rate which does not distinguish the leak signal and environmental disturbance. This paper presents an algorithm structure with the modularity of wavelet and neural network, which combines the capability of wavelet transform analyzing leakage signals and classification capability of artificial neural networks. This study validates that the time domain is not evident to the complete features regarding noisy leak signals and significance of selection of mother wavelet to extract the noise event features in water distribution pipes. The simulation consequences have shown that an appropriate mother wavelet has been selected and localized to extract the features of the signal with leak noise and background noise, and by neural network implementation, the method improves the classification performance of extracted features.

  8. Passive Wireless Hydrogen Sensors Using Orthogonal Frequency Coded Acoustic Wave Devices, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) based hydrogen sensors for NASA application to distributed wireless hydrogen leak...

  9. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n  =  60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24 h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r 2   =  0.77); (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r 2   =  0.82); (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P  <  0.05, safe opening compared to cases of damage; P  <  0.0001, no opening compared to safe opening). The inertial cavitation dose was correlated with the resulting BBB permeability (r 2   =  0.72). Stable cavitation was found to be more reliable than inertial cavitation at assessing the BBB opening within the pressure range used in this study. This study demonstrates that the stable cavitation response during BBB opening holds promise for predicting and controlling the restoration and pharmacokinetics of FUS-opened BBB. The stable cavitation response

  10. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n  =  60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24 h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r2  =  0.77) (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r2  =  0.82) (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P  cases of damage; P  <  0.0001, no opening compared to safe opening). The inertial cavitation dose was correlated with the resulting BBB permeability (r2  =  0.72). Stable cavitation was found to be more reliable than inertial cavitation at assessing the BBB opening within the pressure range used in this study. This study demonstrates that the stable cavitation response during BBB opening holds promise for predicting and controlling the restoration and pharmacokinetics of FUS-opened BBB. The stable cavitation response therefore showed great promise in predicting the

  11. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-12-07

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n  =  60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24 h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r(2)  =  0.77); (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r(2)  =  0.82); (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P  cavitation dose was correlated with the resulting BBB permeability (r(2)  =  0.72). Stable cavitation was found to be more reliable than inertial cavitation at assessing the BBB opening within the pressure range used in this study. This study demonstrates that the stable cavitation response during BBB opening holds promise for predicting and controlling the restoration and pharmacokinetics of FUS-opened BBB. The stable cavitation response therefore showed great promise in predicting the BBB opening duration, enabling thus control of opening according to the drug

  12. Initial Experience with a Wireless Ultrasound-Guided Vacuum-Assisted Breast Biopsy Device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E-Ryung Choi

    Full Text Available To determine the imaging characteristic of frequent target lesions of wireless ultrasound (US-guided, vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (Wi-UVAB and to evaluate diagnostic yield, accuracy and complication of the device in indeterminate breast lesions.From March 2013 to October 2014, 114 women (age range, 29-76 years; mean age, 50.0 years underwent Wi-UVAB using a 13-gauge needle (Mammotome Elite®; Devicor Medical Products, Cincinnati, OH, USA. In 103 lesions of 96 women with surgical (n = 81 or follow-up (n = 22 data, complications, biopsy procedure, imaging findings of biopsy targets and histologic results were reviewed.Mean number of biopsy cores was 10 (range 4-25. Nine patients developed moderate bleeding. All lesions were suspicious on US, and included non-mass lesions (67.0% and mass lesions (33.0%. Visible calcifications on US were evident in 57.3% of the target lesions. Most of the lesions (93.2% were nonpalpable. Sixty-six (64.1% were malignant [ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS rate, 61%] and 12 were high-risk lesions (11.7%. Histologic underestimation was identified in 11 of 40 (27.5%. DCIS cases and in 3 of 9 (33.3% high-risk lesions necessitating surgery. There was no false-negative case.Wi-UVAB is very handy and advantageous for US-unapparent non-mass lesions to diagnose DCIS, especially for calcification cases. Histologic underestimation is unavoidable; still, Wi-UVAB is safe and accurate to diagnose a malignancy.

  13. Real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier opening via subharmonic acoustic emission detection: implementation of confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chih-Hung; Zhang, Jia-Wei; Liao, Yi-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-04-01

    Burst-tone focused ultrasound exposure in the presence of microbubbles has been demonstrated to be effective at inducing temporal and local opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which promises significant clinical potential to deliver therapeutic molecules into the central nervous system (CNS). Traditional contrast-enhanced imaging confirmation after focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure serves as a post-operative indicator of the effectiveness of FUS-BBB opening, however, an indicator that can concurrently report the BBB status and BBB-opening effectiveness is required to provide effective feedback to implement this treatment clinically. In this study, we demonstrate the use of subharmonic acoustic emission detection with implementation on a confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric ceramic structure to perform real-time monitoring of FUS-BBB opening. A confocal dual-frequency (0.55 MHz/1.1 MHz) focused ultrasound transducer was designed. The 1.1 MHz spherically-curved ceramic was employed to deliver FUS exposure to induce BBB-opening, whereas the outer-ring 0.55 MHz ceramic was employed to detect the subharmonic acoustic emissions originating from the target position. In stage-1 experiments, we employed spectral analysis and performed an energy spectrum density (ESD) calculation. An optimized 0.55 MHz ESD level change was shown to effectively discriminate the occurrence of BBB-opening. Wideband acoustic emissions received from 0.55 MHz ceramics were also analyzed to evaluate its correlations with erythrocyte extravasations. In stage-2 real-time monitoring experiments, we applied the predetermined ESD change as a detection threshold in PC-controlled algorithm to predict the FUS exposure intra-operatively. In stage-1 experiment, we showed that subharmonic ESD presents distinguishable dynamics between intact BBB and opened BBB, and therefore a threshold ESD change level (5.5 dB) can be identified for BBB-opening prediction. Using this ESD change threshold detection as a

  14. Real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier opening via subharmonic acoustic emission detection: implementation of confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Chih-Hung; Zhang, Jia-Wei; Liao, Yi-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-01-01

    Burst-tone focused ultrasound exposure in the presence of microbubbles has been demonstrated to be effective at inducing temporal and local opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which promises significant clinical potential to deliver therapeutic molecules into the central nervous system (CNS). Traditional contrast-enhanced imaging confirmation after focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure serves as a post-operative indicator of the effectiveness of FUS-BBB opening, however, an indicator that can concurrently report the BBB status and BBB-opening effectiveness is required to provide effective feedback to implement this treatment clinically. In this study, we demonstrate the use of subharmonic acoustic emission detection with implementation on a confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric ceramic structure to perform real-time monitoring of FUS-BBB opening. A confocal dual-frequency (0.55 MHz/1.1 MHz) focused ultrasound transducer was designed. The 1.1 MHz spherically-curved ceramic was employed to deliver FUS exposure to induce BBB-opening, whereas the outer-ring 0.55 MHz ceramic was employed to detect the subharmonic acoustic emissions originating from the target position. In stage-1 experiments, we employed spectral analysis and performed an energy spectrum density (ESD) calculation. An optimized 0.55 MHz ESD level change was shown to effectively discriminate the occurrence of BBB-opening. Wideband acoustic emissions received from 0.55 MHz ceramics were also analyzed to evaluate its correlations with erythrocyte extravasations. In stage-2 real-time monitoring experiments, we applied the predetermined ESD change as a detection threshold in PC-controlled algorithm to predict the FUS exposure intra-operatively. In stage-1 experiment, we showed that subharmonic ESD presents distinguishable dynamics between intact BBB and opened BBB, and therefore a threshold ESD change level (5.5 dB) can be identified for BBB-opening prediction. Using this ESD change threshold detection as a

  15. Testing the effects of an acoustic harassment device on the behaviour of harbour porpoises (Phocoena Phocoena)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diederichs, Ansgar; Brandt, Miriam J.; Hoeschle, Caroline; Betke, Klaus; Nehls, Georg

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The use of monopile foundations for offshore wind farm construction goes along with considerable underwater noise emissions during pile driving, which can potentially harm marine mammals in the vicinity of the sound source. In order to avoid hearing damage in porpoises and seals the use of deterring devices is mandatory during pile driving in German waters. However, so far there is too little information to judge if the deterring effect is sufficient to prevent physical damage in these marine mammals. Using a combination of visual observations and passive acoustic monitoring (C-PODs) we investigated the spatial effects of a Lofitech seal scarer on harbour porpoises. The seal scarer emits pulses at 14 kHz at a source level of about 189dB re 1 muPa, and sound measurements at various distances where carried out. Sighting rates of porpoises significantly declined within the whole 1 km observation radius. Recordings of porpoise echolocation signals by C-PODs were significantly reduced out to a distance of 7 km, with the strongest effect at the nearest PODs and a weak effect at further distances. Minimum observed approach distance during 28 hours of seal scarer activity was 700 m. A response study revealed clear avoidance reactions by porpoises out to the maximum studied distance of 2.6 km. However, in some cases no reaction was found, and occasionally porpoises were also recorded by PODs at close distances. This shows that there may be substantial variation between individuals, different motivational states or different environmental conditions. These results show that the application of seal scarers is useful for reducing the number of harbour porpoises that may suffer hearing damage caused by pile driving. However, since complete exclusion of all animals cannot be achieved, alternative mitigation measures should be considered. (Author)

  16. Ultrasound pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregnancy sonogram; Obstetric ultrasonography; Obstetric sonogram; Ultrasound - pregnancy; IUGR - ultrasound; Intrauterine growth - ultrasound; Polyhydramnios - ultrasound; Oligohydramnios - ultrasound; ...

  17. Frequency response improvement of a two-port surface acoustic wave device based on epitaxial AlN thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junning; Hao, Zhibiao; Luo, Yi; Li, Guoqiang

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an exploration on improving the frequency response of the symmetrical two-port AlN surface acoustic wave (SAW) device, using epitaxial AlN thin film on (0001) sapphire as the piezoelectric substrate. The devices were fabricated by lift-off processes with Ti/Al composite electrodes as interleaved digital transducers (IDT). The impact of DL and the number of the IDT finger pairs on the frequency response was carefully investigated. The overall properties of the device are found to be greatly improved with DL elongation, indicated by the reduced pass band ripple and increased stop band rejection ratio. The rejection increases by 8.3 dB when DL elongates from 15.5λ to 55.5λ and 4.4 dB further accompanying another 50λ elongation. This is because larger DL repels the stray acoustic energy out of the propagation path and provides a cleaner traveling channel for functional SAW, and at the same time restrains electromagnetic feedthrough. It is also found that proper addition of the IDT finger pairs is beneficial for the device response, indicated by the ripple reduction and the insertion loss drop.

  18. PASSIVE WIRELESS MULTI-SENSOR TEMPERATURE AND PRESSURE SENSING SYSTEM USING ACOUSTIC WAVE DEVICES, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors and multi-sensor systems for NASA application to remote wireless sensing of...

  19. Parametrics for Molecular Deuterium Concentrations in the Source Region of the UW-IEC Device Using an Ion Acoustic Wave Diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boris, D. R.; Emmert, G. A.

    2007-11-01

    The ion source region of the UW-Inertial Electrostatic Confinement device is comprised of a filament assisted DC discharge plasma that exists between the wall of the IEC vacuum chamber and the grounded spherical steel grid that makes up the anode of the IEC device. A 0-dimensional rate equation calculation of the molecular deuterium ion species concentration has been applied utilizing varying primary electron energy, and neutral gas pressure. By propagating ion acoustic waves in the source region of the IEC device the concentrations of molecular deuterium ion species have been determined for these varying plasma conditions, and high D3^+ concentrations have been verified. This was done by utilizing the multi-species ion acoustic wave dispersion relation, which relates the phase speed of the multi-species ion acoustic wave, vph, to the sum in quadrature of the concentration weighted ion acoustic sound speeds of the individual ion species.

  20. Assessment of the accuracy of an ultrasound elastography liver scanning system using a PVA-cryogel phantom with optimal acoustic and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournane, S; Cannon, L; Browne, J E; Fagan, A J

    2010-10-07

    The accuracy of a transient elastography liver-scanning ultrasound system was assessed using a novel application of PVA-cryogel as a tissue-mimicking material with acoustic and shear elasticity properties optimized to best represent those of liver tissue. Although the liver-scanning system has been shown to offer a safer alternative for diagnosing liver cirrhosis through stiffness measurement, as compared to the liver needle biopsy exam, the scanner's accuracy has not been fully established. Young's elastic modulus values of 5-6 wt% PVA-cryogel phantoms, also containing glycerol and 0.3 µm Al(2)O(3) and 3 µm Al(2)O(3), were measured using a 'gold standard' mechanical testing technique and transient elastography. The mechanically measured values and acoustic velocities of the phantoms ranged between 1.6 and 16.1 kPa and 1540 and 1570 m s(-1), respectively, mimicking those observed in liver tissue. The values reported by the transient elastography system overestimated Young's elastic modulus values representative of the progressive stages of liver fibrosis by up to 32%. These results were attributed to the relative rather than absolute nature of the measurement arising from the single-point acoustic velocity calibration of the system, rendering the measurements critically dependent on the speed of sound of the sample under investigation. Given the wide range of acoustic velocities which exist in the liver, spanning healthy tissue to cirrhotic pathology, coupled with the system's assumption that the liver is approximately elastic when it is rather highly viscoelastic, care should be exercised when interpreting the results from this system in patient groups.

  1. Assessment of the accuracy of an ultrasound elastography liver scanning system using a PVA-cryogel phantom with optimal acoustic and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cournane, S; Fagan, A J [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, St James' s Hospital, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Cannon, L; Browne, J E [Medical Ultrasound Physics and Technology Group, School of Physics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin' s Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2010-10-07

    The accuracy of a transient elastography liver-scanning ultrasound system was assessed using a novel application of PVA-cryogel as a tissue-mimicking material with acoustic and shear elasticity properties optimized to best represent those of liver tissue. Although the liver-scanning system has been shown to offer a safer alternative for diagnosing liver cirrhosis through stiffness measurement, as compared to the liver needle biopsy exam, the scanner's accuracy has not been fully established. Young's elastic modulus values of 5-6 wt% PVA-cryogel phantoms, also containing glycerol and 0.3 {mu}m Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 3 {mu}m Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, were measured using a 'gold standard' mechanical testing technique and transient elastography. The mechanically measured values and acoustic velocities of the phantoms ranged between 1.6 and 16.1 kPa and 1540 and 1570 m s{sup -1}, respectively, mimicking those observed in liver tissue. The values reported by the transient elastography system overestimated Young's elastic modulus values representative of the progressive stages of liver fibrosis by up to 32%. These results were attributed to the relative rather than absolute nature of the measurement arising from the single-point acoustic velocity calibration of the system, rendering the measurements critically dependent on the speed of sound of the sample under investigation. Given the wide range of acoustic velocities which exist in the liver, spanning healthy tissue to cirrhotic pathology, coupled with the system's assumption that the liver is approximately elastic when it is rather highly viscoelastic, care should be exercised when interpreting the results from this system in patient groups.

  2. Recent advances in particle and droplet manipulation for lab-on-a-chip devices based on surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuochen; Zhe, Jiang

    2011-04-07

    Manipulation of microscale particles and fluid liquid droplets is an important task for lab-on-a-chip devices for numerous biological researches and applications, such as cell detection and tissue engineering. Particle manipulation techniques based on surface acoustic waves (SAWs) appear effective for lab-on-a-chip devices because they are non-invasive, compatible with soft lithography micromachining, have high energy density, and work for nearly any type of microscale particles. Here we review the most recent research and development of the past two years in SAW based particle and liquid droplet manipulation for lab-on-a-chip devices including particle focusing and separation, particle alignment and patterning, particle directing, and liquid droplet delivery.

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ... the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ... the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on ... to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached ...

  6. Design and simulation study of high frequency response for surface acoustic wave device by using CST software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, M. R.; Hashim, U.; Amin, Mohd Hasrul I. M.; Ayub, R. Mat; Hashim, M. N.; Adam, T.

    2015-05-01

    This paper focuses on the enhancement and improvement of the Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) device performance. Due to increased demand in the international market for biosensor product, the product must be emphasized in terms of quality. However, within the technological advances, demand for device with low cost, high efficiency and friendly-user preferred. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) device with the combination of pair electrode know as Interdigital Transducer (IDT) was fabricated on a piezoelectric substrate. The design of Interdigital Transducer (IDT) parameter is changes in several sizes and values for which it is able to provide greater efficiency in sensing sensitivity by using process simulation with CST STUDIO Suite software. In addition, Interdigital Transducer (IDT) parameters also changed to be created the products with a smaller size and easy to handle where it also reduces the cost of this product. Parameter values of an Interdigital Transducer (IDT) will be changed in the design is the total number of fingers pair, finger length, finger width and spacing, aperture and also the thickness of the Interdigital Transducer (IDT). From the result, the performance of the sensor is improved significantly after modification is done.

  7. Opto-acoustic diagnostics of the thermal action of high-intensity focused ultrasound on biological tissues: the possibility of its applications and model experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khokhlova, Tanya D; Pelivanov, Ivan M; Solomatin, Vladimir S; Karabutov, Aleksander A; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A

    2006-01-01

    The possibility of using the opto-acoustic (OA) method for monitoring high-intensity ultrasonic therapy is studied. The optical properties of raw and boiled liver samples used as the undamaged model tissue and tissue destroyed by ultrasound, respectively, are measured. Experiments are performed with samples consisting of several alternating layers of raw and boiled liver of different thickness. The position and transverse size of the thermal lesion were determined from the temporal shape of the OA signals. The results of measurements are compared with the real size and position of the thermal lesion determined from the subsequent cuts of the sample. It is shown that the OA method permits the diagnostics of variations in biological tissues upon ultrasonic therapy. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  8. Transfer standard device to improve the traceable calibration of physiotherapy ultrasound machines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekkenberg, R.T.; Richards, A.; Beissner, K.; Zeqiri, B.; Bezemer, R.A.; Hodnett, M.; Prout, G.; Cantrall, C.

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) physiotherapy as a clinical treatment is extremely common in the Western world. Internationally, regulation to ensure safe application of US physiotherapy by regular calibration ranges from nil to mandatory. The need for a portable power standard (PPS) has been addressed within a

  9. Design and study of ultrasound-based automatic patient movement monitoring device for quantifying the intrafraction motion during teletherapy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, S; Vinothraj, R

    2012-11-08

    The aim of the present study is to fabricate indigenously ultrasonic-based automatic patient's movement monitoring device (UPMMD) that immediately halts teletherapy treatment if a patient moves, claiming accurate field treatment. The device consists of circuit board, magnetic attachment device, LED indicator, speaker, and ultrasonic emitter and receiver, which are placed on either side of the treatment table. The ultrasonic emitter produces the ultrasound waves and the receiver accepts the signal from the patient. When the patient moves, the receiver activates the circuit, an audible warning sound will be produced in the treatment console room alerting the technologist to stop treatment. Simultaneously, the electrical circuit to the teletherapy machine will be interrupted and radiation will be halted. The device and alarm system can detect patient movements with a sensitivity of about 1 mm. Our results indicate that, in spite of its low-cost, low-power, high-precision, nonintrusive, light weight, reusable and simplicity features, UPMMD is highly sensitive and offers accurate measurements. Furthermore, UPMMD is patient-friendly and requires minimal user training. This study revealed that the device can prevent the patient's normal tissues from unnecessary radiation exposure, and also it is helpful to deliver the radiation to the correct tumor location. Using this alarming system the patient can be repositioned after interrupting the treatment machine manually. It also enables the technologists to do their work more efficiently.

  10. Fabrication and Characterization of High-Sensitivity Underwater Acoustic Multimedia Communication Devices with Thick Composite PZT Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Cheng Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a high-sensitivity hydrophone fabricated with a Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS process using epitaxial thin films grown on silicon wafers. The evaluated resonant frequency was calculated through finite-element analysis (FEA. The hydrophone was designed, fabricated, and characterized by different measurements performed in a water tank, by using a pulsed sound technique with a sensitivity of −190 dB ± 2 dB for frequencies in the range 50–500 Hz. These results indicate the high-performance miniaturized acoustic devices, which can impact a variety of technological applications.

  11. Evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of ultra-miniaturized pocket ultrasound device on cardiac function in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li WANG

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To compare the diagnostic accuracy of a new ultra-miniaturized pocket ultrasound device (PUD (VscanTM, GE Healthcare, Wauwatosa, WI and conventional high-quality echocardiography system (Vivid qTM, GE Healthcare for a cardiac focused ultrasonography in critical patients. Methods  The patients admitted to our hospital and receiving transthoracic echocardiography (TTE using a PUD and a conventional echocardiography system were included in this study during the 10 months from December 2013 to October 2014. Each examination was performed independently by an intensive care unit (ICU physician and an experienced ultrasound doctor, unaware of the results found by the alternative device. The following parameters were assessed: global cardiac systolic function, identification of ventricular size, whether or not accompanying enlargement or hypertrophy, assessment for the morphology of cardiac valves and its function, pericardial effusion and estimation of the inferior vena cava (IVC diameter. The time-consuming of each device were recorded. Results  One hundred and twenty-eight patients were included in the study. Their left ventricular wall motion abnormalities, global left ventricular systolic dysfunction, pericardial effusion, IVC dilation were assessed by PUD and the assessment results were highly consistent with those by Vivid q (κ>0.84. The consistency was slightly lower in evaluating the left and right ventricular size. For evaluating the cardiac valves function, the agreement of two devices were relatively low (κ=0.69-0.84. Compared with Vivid q, PUD took less time (4.7±1.4min vs 6.3±2.6min; P<0.05. Conclusion  PUD can provide fast, reliable cardiac examination, thus being an effective method for ICU physicians to assess the cardiac f unction in critical patients. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.08.10

  12. Acoustic cloak/anti-cloak device with realizable passive/active metamaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Huijie; Wen Jihong; Yu Dianlong; Cai Li; Wen Xisen; Païdoussis, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing the coordinate transformation method, together with exchange of variables between Maxwell's equations and the acoustic equations with axial-invariance in cylindrical coordinates, the acoustic parameters (anisotropic density and scalar bulk modulus) for an ideal cloak and an ideal anti-cloak are obtained. An anti-cloak allows the inside object to ‘see’ outside, but to be invisible from outside; whereas a cloak is invisible from outside, but ‘blind’ from inside. Utilizing a scattering algorithm developed in this paper, the pressure field calculation of the cloak/anti-cloak is performed and the concepts and characteristics of the acoustic cloak/anti-cloak are revisited. To be more easily achievable experimentally, a multilayered cloak/anti-cloak model with homogeneous isotropic materials is introduced, and its corresponding pressure distributions are calculated. Also, the total scattering cross-section curves for the multilayered cloak and anti-cloak over a certain frequency range are presented and compared. Finally, an active acoustic metamaterial made up of piezo-diaphragm cavity arrays is designed for the cloak/anti-cloak. Taking into account the coupling between adjacent cavity cells, a multi-control strategy for piezo-diaphragm cavity arrays is exploited, rendering possible wide ranges of effective densities and effective bulk moduli (or acoustic speeds), or even double-negative transformation medium (i.e. both density and bulk modulus parameters are negative). With such sets of active acoustic metamaterials, the cloak and anti-cloak may become both theoretically and experimentally realizable. (paper)

  13. Task-oriented comparison of power spectral density estimation methods for quantifying acoustic attenuation in diagnostic ultrasound using a reference phantom method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado-Mendez, Ivan M; Nam, Kibo; Hall, Timothy J; Zagzebski, James A

    2013-07-01

    Reported here is a phantom-based comparison of methods for determining the power spectral density (PSD) of ultrasound backscattered signals. Those power spectral density values are then used to estimate parameters describing α(f), the frequency dependence of the acoustic attenuation coefficient. Phantoms were scanned with a clinical system equipped with a research interface to obtain radiofrequency echo data. Attenuation, modeled as a power law α(f)= α0 f (β), was estimated using a reference phantom method. The power spectral density was estimated using the short-time Fourier transform (STFT), Welch's periodogram, and Thomson's multitaper technique, and performance was analyzed when limiting the size of the parameter-estimation region. Errors were quantified by the bias and standard deviation of the α0 and β estimates, and by the overall power-law fit error (FE). For parameter estimation regions larger than ~34 pulse lengths (~1 cm for this experiment), an overall power-law FE of 4% was achieved with all spectral estimation methods. With smaller parameter estimation regions as in parametric image formation, the bias and standard deviation of the α0 and β estimates depended on the size of the parameter estimation region. Here, the multitaper method reduced the standard deviation of the α0 and β estimates compared with those using the other techniques. The results provide guidance for choosing methods for estimating the power spectral density in quantitative ultrasound methods.

  14. Acoustics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Kuttruff, Heinrich

    2006-01-01

    This definitive textbook provides students with a comprehensive introduction to acoustics. Beginning with the basic physical ideas, Acoustics balances the fundamentals with engineering aspects, applications and electroacoustics, also covering music, speech and the properties of human hearing. The concepts of acoustics are exposed and applied in:room acousticssound insulation in buildingsnoise controlunderwater sound and ultrasoundScientifically thorough, but with mathematics kept to a minimum, Acoustics is the perfect introduction to acoustics for students at any level of mechanical, electrical or civil engineering courses and an accessible resource for architects, musicians or sound engineers requiring a technical understanding of acoustics and their applications.

  15. An electro-optic spatial light modulator for thermoelastic generation of programmably focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    The concept proposed is an electro-optic technique that would make it possible to spatially modulate a high power pulsed laser beam to thermoelastically induce focused ultrasound in a test material. Being a purely electro-optic device, the modulator, and therefore the depth at which the acoustic focus occurs, can be programmed electronically at electronic speeds. If successful, it would become possible to scan ultrasound continuously in three dimensions within the component or structure under test.

  16. Development and experimental verification of a finite element method for accurate analysis of a surface acoustic wave device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohibul Kabir, K. M.; Matthews, Glenn I.; Sabri, Ylias M.; Russo, Salvy P.; Ippolito, Samuel J.; Bhargava, Suresh K.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate analysis of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices is highly important due to their use in ever-growing applications in electronics, telecommunication and chemical sensing. In this study, a novel approach for analyzing the SAW devices was developed based on a series of two-dimensional finite element method (FEM) simulations, which has been experimentally verified. It was found that the frequency response of the two SAW device structures, each having slightly different bandwidth and center lobe characteristics, can be successfully obtained utilizing the current density of the electrodes via FEM simulations. The two SAW structures were based on XY Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3) substrates and had two and four electrode finger pairs in both of their interdigital transducers, respectively. Later, SAW devices were fabricated in accordance with the simulated models and their measured frequency responses were found to correlate well with the obtained simulations results. The results indicated that better match between calculated and measured frequency response can be obtained when one of the input electrode finger pairs was set at zero volts and all the current density components were taken into account when calculating the frequency response of the simulated SAW device structures.

  17. Droplet trapping and fast acoustic release in a multi-height device with steady-state flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambach, Richard W; Linder, Kevin; Heymann, Michael; Franke, Thomas

    2017-10-11

    We demonstrate a novel multilayer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) device for selective storage and release of single emulsion droplets. Drops are captured in a microchannel cavity and can be released on-demand through a triggered surface acoustic wave pulse. The surface acoustic wave (SAW) is excited by a tapered interdigital transducer (TIDT) deposited on a piezoelectric lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ) substrate and inverts the pressure difference across the cavity trap to push a drop out of the trap and back into the main flow channel. Droplet capture and release does not require a flow rate change, flow interruption, flow inversion or valve action and can be achieved in as fast as 20 ms. This allows both on-demand droplet capture for analysis and monitoring over arbitrary time scales, and continuous device operation with a high droplet rate of 620 drops per s. We hence decouple long-term droplet interrogation from other operations on the chip. This will ease integration with other microfluidic droplet operations and functional components.

  18. Sonoporation of adherent cells under regulated ultrasound cavitation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muleki Seya, Pauline; Fouqueray, Manuela; Ngo, Jacqueline; Poizat, Adrien; Inserra, Claude; Béra, Jean-Christophe

    2015-04-01

    A sonoporation device dedicated to the adherent cell monolayer has been implemented with a regulation process allowing the real-time monitoring and control of inertial cavitation activity. Use of the cavitation-regulated device revealed first that adherent cell sonoporation efficiency is related to inertial cavitation activity, without inducing additional cell mortality. Reproducibility is enhanced for the highest sonoporation rates (up to 17%); sonoporation efficiency can reach 26% when advantage is taken of the standing wave acoustic configuration by applying a frequency sweep with ultrasound frequency tuned to the modal acoustic modes of the cavity. This device allows sonoporation of adherent and suspended cells, and the use of regulation allows some environmental parameters such as the temperature of the medium to be overcome, resulting in the possibility of cell sonoporation even at ambient temperature. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Acoustic cloaking and transformation acoustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huanyang; Chan, C T

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we give a brief introduction to the application of the new technique of transformation acoustics, which draws on a correspondence between coordinate transformation and material properties. The technique is formulated for both acoustic waves and linear liquid surface waves. Some interesting conceptual devices can be designed for manipulating acoustic waves. For example, we can design acoustic cloaks that make an object invisible to acoustic waves, and the cloak can either encompass or lie outside the object to be concealed. Transformation acoustics, as an analog of transformation optics, can go beyond invisibility cloaking. As an illustration for manipulating linear liquid surface waves, we show that a liquid wave rotator can be designed and fabricated to rotate the wave front. The acoustic transformation media require acoustic materials which are anisotropic and inhomogeneous. Such materials are difficult to find in nature. However, composite materials with embedded sub-wavelength resonators can in principle be made and such 'acoustic metamaterials' can exhibit nearly arbitrary values of effective density and modulus tensors to satisfy the demanding material requirements in transformation acoustics. We introduce resonant sonic materials and Helmholtz resonators as examples of acoustic metamaterials that exhibit resonant behaviour in effective density and effective modulus. (topical review)

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 3-D) ultrasound that formats the sound wave data into 3-D images. A Doppler ultrasound study ... to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached ...

  1. SU-D-210-07: The Dependence On Acoustic Velocity of Medium On the Needle Template and Electronic Grid Alignment in Ultrasound QA for Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, P; Kapoor, R; Curran, B [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); HH McGuire VA Hospital, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To analyze the impact on acoustic velocity (AV) of two different media (water and milk) using the needle template/electronic grid alignment test. Water, easily available, makes a good material to test the alignment of the template and grid although water’s AV (1498 m/s at 25°C) is significantly different from tissue (1540 m/s). Milk, with an AV much closer (1548 m/s) to prostate tissue, may be a good substitute for water in ultrasound quality assurance testing. Methods: Tests were performed using a Hitachi ultrasound unit with a mechanical arrangement designed to position needles parallel to the transducer. In this work, two materials – distilled water and homogenized whole milk (AVs of 1498 and 1548 m/s at 25°C) were used in a phantom to test ultrasound needle/grid alignment. The images were obtained with both materials and analyzed for their placement accuracy. Results: The needle template/electronic grid alignment tests showed displacement errors between measured and calculated values. The measurements showed displacements of 2.3mm (water) and 0.4mm (milk), and 1.6mm (water) and 0.3mm (milk) at depths of 7cm and 5cm respectively from true needle positions. The calculated results showed a displacement of 2.36 mm (water); 0.435mm (milk), and 1.66mm (water) and 0.31mm (milk) at a depth of 7cm and 5cm respectively. The displacements in the X and Y directions were also calculated. At depths of 7cm and 5cm, the (ΔX,ΔY) displacements in water were (0.829mm, 2.21mm) and (0.273mm, 1.634mm) and for milk were (0.15mm, 0.44mm) and (0.05mm, 0.302mm) respectively. Conclusion: The measured and calculated values were in good agreement for all tests. They show that milk provides superior results when performing needle template and electronic grid alignment tests for ultrasound units used in prostate brachytherapy.

  2. Topological Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  3. Low-frequency acoustic atomization with oscillatory flow around micropillars in a microfluidic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Yin Nee, E-mail: mailccheung@gmail.com, E-mail: mtnwong@ntu.edu.sg; Wong, Teck Neng, E-mail: mailccheung@gmail.com, E-mail: mtnwong@ntu.edu.sg [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Nguyen, Nam Trung, E-mail: nam-trung.nguyen@griffith.edu.au [Queensland Micro- and Nanotechnology Centre, Griffith University, Brisbane QLD 4111 (Australia)

    2014-10-06

    This letter reports a low frequency acoustic atomization technique with oscillatory extensional flow around micropillars. Large droplets passing through two micropillars are elongated. Small droplets are then produced through the pinch-off process at the spindle-shape ends. As the actuation frequency increases, the droplet size decreases with increasing monodispersity. This method is suitable for in-situ mass production of fine droplets in a multi-phase environment without external pumping. Small particles encapsulation was demonstrated with the current technique.

  4. High-intensity focused ultrasound sonothrombolysis: the use of perfluorocarbon droplets to achieve clot lysis at reduced acoustic power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajek, Daniel; Burgess, Alison; Huang, Yuexi; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate use of intravascular perfluorocarbon droplets to reduce the sonication power required to achieve clot lysis with high-intensity focused ultrasound. High-intensity focused ultrasound with droplets was initially applied to blood clots in an in vitro flow apparatus, and inertial cavitation thresholds were determined. An embolic model for ischemic stroke was used to illustrate the feasibility of this technique in vivo. Recanalization with intravascular droplets was achieved in vivo at 24 ± 5% of the sonication power without droplets. Recanalization occurred in 71% of rabbits that received 1-ms pulsed sonications during continuous intravascular droplet infusion (p = 0.041 vs controls). Preliminary experiments indicated that damage was confined to the ultrasonic focus, suggesting that tolerable treatments would be possible with a more tightly focused hemispheric array that allows the whole focus to be placed inside of the main arteries in the human brain. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Springer Handbook of Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Rossing, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and others. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents spanning: animal acoustics including infrasound and ultrasound, environmental noise control, music and human speech and singing, physiological and psychological acoustics, architectural acoustics, physical and engineering acoustics, signal processing, medical acoustics, and ocean acoustics. This handbook reviews the most important areas of acoustics, with emphasis on current research. The authors of the various chapters are all experts in their fields. Each chapter is richly illustrated with figures and tables. The latest rese...

  6. Micromachined silicon parallel acoustic delay lines as time-delayed ultrasound detector array for real-time photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y.; Chang, C.-C.; Wang, L. V.; Zou, J.

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the development of a new 16-channel parallel acoustic delay line (PADL) array for real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT). The PADLs were directly fabricated from single-crystalline silicon substrates using deep reactive ion etching. Compared with other acoustic delay lines (e.g., optical fibers), the micromachined silicon PADLs offer higher acoustic transmission efficiency, smaller form factor, easier assembly, and mass production capability. To demonstrate its real-time photoacoustic imaging capability, the silicon PADL array was interfaced with one single-element ultrasonic transducer followed by one channel of data acquisition electronics to receive 16 channels of photoacoustic signals simultaneously. A PAT image of an optically-absorbing target embedded in an optically-scattering phantom was reconstructed, which matched well with the actual size of the imaged target. Because the silicon PADL array allows a signal-to-channel reduction ratio of 16:1, it could significantly simplify the design and construction of ultrasonic receivers for real-time PAT.

  7. Micromachined silicon parallel acoustic delay lines as time-delayed ultrasound detector array for real-time photoacoustic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Y; Chang, C-C; Zou, J; Wang, L V

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the development of a new 16-channel parallel acoustic delay line (PADL) array for real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT). The PADLs were directly fabricated from single-crystalline silicon substrates using deep reactive ion etching. Compared with other acoustic delay lines (e.g., optical fibers), the micromachined silicon PADLs offer higher acoustic transmission efficiency, smaller form factor, easier assembly, and mass production capability. To demonstrate its real-time photoacoustic imaging capability, the silicon PADL array was interfaced with one single-element ultrasonic transducer followed by one channel of data acquisition electronics to receive 16 channels of photoacoustic signals simultaneously. A PAT image of an optically-absorbing target embedded in an optically-scattering phantom was reconstructed, which matched well with the actual size of the imaged target. Because the silicon PADL array allows a signal-to-channel reduction ratio of 16:1, it could significantly simplify the design and construction of ultrasonic receivers for real-time PAT. (paper)

  8. Acoustic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. Study of performance of acoustic fixture for using in noise reduction rate tests of hearing protection devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    zam Biabani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:One of the recommended methods for evaluation effectiveness of hearing protection is use the acoustic fixture accordance with standard ISO 4869-3. The aim of this study was evaluate the acoustic performance of fixture for using in noise reduction rate tests of hearing protection devices in the laboratory. Methods: In this cross-sectional study , noise reduction rates of five common ear muffs used in the Iran industries were investigated based on the ISO 11904 standard, microphone in real ear method, using noise dosimeter (SVANTEK , Model SV102 equipped with microphone SV25 model which can install inside the ear on 30 subjects under laboratory conditions. Also, noise reduction rate of earmuffs was determined using the fixture model AVASINA9402 accordance with standard procedures. Data were analyzed using the software SPSS21. Results: The results showed the real noise reduction rates of the earmuffs on the studied subjects are from 59% to 94% nominal reduction rates. That rates for the ear muffs on the studied fixture are from 64% to 92.The results showed that the noise reduction rates of the ear muffs on subjects compared with and noise reduction rates of the ear muffs on fixture were not statistically significant (p> 0.05. Conclusion: The results showed the accuracy of noise reduction rate of earmuffs using the fixture compared with real subjects is acceptable. Hence, the fixture is good choice for environments where there’s no possibility of acoustic evaluation on real subjects, also for quality control of productions in the earmuff manufacturers.

  10. Performance characterisation of a passive cavitation detector optimised for subharmonic periodic shock waves from acoustic cavitation in MHz and sub-MHz ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Kristoffer; Song, Jae Hee; Prentice, Paul

    2018-05-01

    We describe the design, construction and characterisation of a broadband passive cavitation detector, with the specific aim of detecting low frequency components of periodic shock waves, with high sensitivity. A finite element model is used to guide selection of matching and backing layers for the shock wave passive cavitation detector (swPCD), and the performance is evaluated against a commercially available device. Validation of the model, and characterisation of the swPCD is achieved through experimental detection of laser-plasma bubble collapse shock waves. The final swPCD design is 20 dB more sensitive to the subharmonic component, from acoustic cavitation driven at 220 kHz, than the comparable commercial device. This work may be significant for monitoring cavitation in medical applications, where sensitive detection is critical, and higher frequencies are more readily absorbed by tissue. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Research on two-port network of wavelet transform processor using surface acoustic wavelet devices and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shoubing; Lu, Wenke; Zhu, Changchun

    2017-11-01

    The goal of this research is to study two-port network of wavelet transform processor (WTP) using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices and its application. The motive was prompted by the inconvenience of the long research and design cycle and the huge research funding involved with traditional method in this field, which were caused by the lack of the simulation and emulation method of WTP using SAW devices. For this reason, we introduce the two-port network analysis tool, which has been widely used in the design and analysis of SAW devices with uniform interdigital transducers (IDTs). Because the admittance parameters calculation formula of the two-port network can only be used for the SAW devices with uniform IDTs, this analysis tool cannot be directly applied into the design and analysis of the processor using SAW devices, whose input interdigital transducer (IDT) is apodized weighting. Therefore, in this paper, we propose the channel segmentation method, which can convert the WTP using SAW devices into parallel channels, and also provide with the calculation formula of the number of channels, the number of finger pairs and the static capacitance of an interdigital period in each parallel channel firstly. From the parameters given above, we can calculate the admittance parameters of the two port network for each channel, so that we can obtain the admittance parameter of the two-port network of the WTP using SAW devices on the basis of the simplification rule of parallel two-port network. Through this analysis tool, not only can we get the impulse response function of the WTP using SAW devices but we can also get the matching circuit of it. Large numbers of studies show that the parameters of the two-port network obtained by this paper are consistent with those measured by network analyzer E5061A, and the impulse response function obtained by the two-port network analysis tool is also consistent with that measured by network analyzer E5061A, which can meet the

  12. CONTRIBUTIONS ON THE ULTRASOUND USE IN FASTFINDING AND CREATING THE ACCES TO THE CALCIFIED CANNALS AND ABLATION OF THE PULPOLITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Elena AMZA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment with ultrasounds, two categories of devices are used, which work on theprinciple of the magnetostriction phenomenon or the principle of pieso-electrictricity. The mostimportant part of an endodontic ultrasound device is the ultra-acoustic system which must becalculated, projected and made in such way so th exercise a certain type of ultrasound (asked bythat application which together with the endodontic instrument acoustically activated to worktogether in resonance regime. In order to find the hidden canals calcified and for an easiermaking of the acces to the root canals is suggested an endodontic instrument with an activespecific part and with a central canal which allows the penetration of a cooling fluid in the workarea and in order to create the phenomenon of ultrasound cavity

  13. A novel concept for continuous peripheral nerve blocks. Presentation of a new ultrasound-guided device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothe, C; Steen-Hansen, C; Madsen, M H

    2015-01-01

    positioning as well as during later in-plane readjustment of the catheter. We tested the system in the popliteal region of two fresh cadavers in a preliminary proof of concept study. RESULTS: Both initial placement and secondary readjustment were precise, judged by the catheter orifices placed close......BACKGROUND: Existing techniques for placing and maintaining the position of peripheral nerve catheters are associated with variable success rates and frequent secondary failures. These factors may affect the clinical efficacy and usefulness of peripheral nerve catheters. METHODS: We developed a new...... concept and prototype for ultrasound-guided in-plane positioning and readjustment of peripheral nerve catheters (patent pending). The integrated catheter-needle prototype comprises three parts: a curved needle, a catheter with clear echogenic markings attached to the needle tail and a detachable hub...

  14. Microstructure and mechanical properties of stress-tailored piezoelectric AlN thin films for electro-acoustic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reusch, Markus, E-mail: markus.reusch@iaf.fraunhofer.de [Laboratory for Compound Semiconductor Microsystems, IMTEK - Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics, Tullastrasse 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany); Cherneva, Sabina [Institute of Mechanics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 4, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Lu, Yuan; Žukauskaitė, Agnė; Kirste, Lutz; Holc, Katarzyna [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics, Tullastrasse 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany); Datcheva, Maria [Institute of Mechanics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 4, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Stoychev, Dimitar [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Lebedev, Vadim [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics, Tullastrasse 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany); Ambacher, Oliver [Laboratory for Compound Semiconductor Microsystems, IMTEK - Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics, Tullastrasse 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Sputtered AlN thin films with minimized intrinsic stress gradient. • Gradual increase of N{sub 2} concentration during film growth. • No degradation of AlN film properties by changing process conditions. • 2D Raman mapping of nanoindentation area. - Abstract: Nanoindentation measurements along with atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and residual stress analyses on the basis of Raman measurements have been performed to characterize stress-tailored AlN thin films grown using reactive RF magnetron sputtering. The intrinsic stress gradient caused by the growing in-plane grain size along film thickness was minimized by increasing the N{sub 2} concentration in the Ar/N{sub 2} gas mixture during the growth process. The increase of N{sub 2} concentration did not degrade the device-relevant material properties such as crystallographic orientation, surface morphology, piezoelectric response, or indentation modulus. Due to comparable crystallographic film properties for all investigated samples it was concluded that mainly the AlN crystallites contribute to the mechanical film properties such as indentation modulus and hardness, while the film stress or grain boundaries had only a minor influence. Therefore, by tailoring the stress gradient in the AlN films, device performance, fabrication yield, and the design flexibility of electro-acoustic devices can be greatly improved.

  15. Development of Acoustic Devices Functionalized with Cobalt Corroles or Metalloporphyrines for the Detection of Carbon Monoxide at Low Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meddy VANOTTI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Progresses in synthetic chemistry methodologies has pushed to develop a large variety of artificial receptors of particular interest for chemical sensor applications. We investigate here the behavior of gas sensors based on surface acoustic wave (SAW devices. The use of Love waves that are specially sensitive to surface perturbation enables to exploit the molecular recognition processes occurring in non conductive sensing layers of cobalt corroles [5,10,15-Tris(2,6-dichlorophenylcorrolato]cobalt(III] for CO detection. We have monitored phase variations of Love-wave-based delay lines under various operation conditions and studied the detection efficiency of a differential version of our sensors. A test bench also has especially been developed to allow for the regeneration of the sensor by freeing the CO trapping sites and therefore to provide an accurate control of the operation conditions. The detection threshold reached using the proposed SAW sensor is experimentally found below one ppm.

  16. On the acoustic wave sensor response to immortalized hypothalamic neurons at the device-liquid interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilin Cheung

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The response of a thickness shear mode biosensor to immortalized murine hypothalamic neurons (mHypoE-38 and -46 cells under a variety of conditions and stimuli is discussed. Cellular studies which lead to the production of detectable neuronal responses include neuronal deposition, adhesion and proliferation, alteration in the extent of specific cell-surface interactions, actin filament and microtubule cytoskeletal disruptions, effects of cell depolarization, inhibition of the Na+-K+ pump via ouabain, effects of neuronal synchronization and the effects ligand-receptor interaction (glucagon. In the presence of cells, fs shifts are largely influenced by the damping of the TSM resonator. The formation of cell-surface interactions and hence the increase in coupling and acoustic energy dissipation can be modeled as an additional resistor in the BVD model. Further sensor and cellular changes can be obtained by negating the effects of damping from fs via the use of Rm and θmax. Keywords: Acoustic wave sensor, Hypothalamic neurons, Neuron cell-surface interaction

  17. Separation of density and viscosity influence on liquid-loaded surface acoustic wave devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, F.; Hahn, D.; Büttgenbach, S.

    1999-05-01

    Love-mode sensors are reported for separate measurement of liquid density and viscosity. They combine the general merits of Love-mode devices, e.g., ease of sensitivity adjustment and robustness, with a highly effective procedure of separate determination of liquid density and viscosity. A model is proposed to describe the frequency response of the devices to liquid loading. Moreover, design rules are given for further optimization and sensitivity enhancement.

  18. Simulation-based design of a steerable acoustic warning device to increase (H)EV detectability while reducing urban noise pollution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Genechten, B.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the simulation-based design methodology used in the eVADER project for the development of targeted acoustic warning devices for increased detectability of Hybrid and Electric Vehicles (HEVs) while, at the same time, reducing urban noise pollution compared to conventional

  19. Acousto-optic measurements of ultrasound attenuation in tellurium dioxide crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voloshinov, V. B.; Lemyaskina, E. A.

    1996-01-01

    The paper is devoted to experimental investigation of ultrasound propagation in tellurium dioxide monocrystal. In particular, attenuation of slow shear acoustic modes in the crystal was measured. The measurements were performed by acousto-optic methods using probing of acoustic column by a laser beam. The paper describes measurements of acoustic attenuation coefficient for slow shear ultrasonic waves propagating at an angle =4.5 O with respect to the (110) direction in the (110) plane. The investigation was made at acoustic frequency f = 100 MHz with pulsed acoustic waves and with an optical beam of a He-Ne laser. It is found that the attenuation coefficient is α = 0.57 cm -1 ± 15 %. The attenuation at acoustic frequencies f ≥ 100 MHz influences performance characteristics of acousto-optical devices based on tellurium dioxide. As proved, spectral resolution of a quasicollinear acoustooptic filter decreases by a factor of 2 compared to a case of the attenuation absence. (authors)

  20. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. NDE of friction stir welds, nonlinear acoustics, ultrasonic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz (ed.); Lingvall, Fredrik; Wennerstroem, Erik; Ping Wu [Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Materials Science (Sweden). Signals and Systems

    2004-01-01

    This report contains results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in years 2002/2003. After a short introduction a review of the NDE techniques that have been applied to the assessment of friction stir welds (FSW) is presented. The review is based on the results reported by the specialists from the USA, mostly from the aerospace industry. A separate chapter is devoted to the extended experimental and theoretical research concerning potential of nonlinear waves in NDE applications. Further studies concerning nonlinear propagation of acoustic and elastic waves (classical nonlinearity) are reported. Also a preliminary investigation of the nonlinear ultrasonic detection of contacts and interfaces (non-classical nonlinearity) is included. Report on the continuation of previous work concerning computer simulation of nonlinear propagations of ultrasonic beams in water and in immersed solids is also presented. Finally, results of an investigation concerning a new method of synthetic aperture imaging (SAI) and its comparison to the traditional phased array (PA) imaging and to the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) are presented. A new spatial-temporal filtering method is presented that is a generalization of the previously proposed filter. Spatial resolution of the proposed method is investigated and compared experimentally to that of classical SAFT and PA imaging. Performance of the proposed method for flat targets is also investigated.

  1. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. NDE of friction stir welds, nonlinear acoustics, ultrasonic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz; Lingvall, Fredrik; Wennerstroem, Erik; Ping Wu

    2004-01-01

    This report contains results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in years 2002/2003. After a short introduction a review of the NDE techniques that have been applied to the assessment of friction stir welds (FSW) is presented. The review is based on the results reported by the specialists from the USA, mostly from the aerospace industry. A separate chapter is devoted to the extended experimental and theoretical research concerning potential of nonlinear waves in NDE applications. Further studies concerning nonlinear propagation of acoustic and elastic waves (classical nonlinearity) are reported. Also a preliminary investigation of the nonlinear ultrasonic detection of contacts and interfaces (non-classical nonlinearity) is included. Report on the continuation of previous work concerning computer simulation of nonlinear propagations of ultrasonic beams in water and in immersed solids is also presented. Finally, results of an investigation concerning a new method of synthetic aperture imaging (SAI) and its comparison to the traditional phased array (PA) imaging and to the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) are presented. A new spatial-temporal filtering method is presented that is a generalization of the previously proposed filter. Spatial resolution of the proposed method is investigated and compared experimentally to that of classical SAFT and PA imaging. Performance of the proposed method for flat targets is also investigated

  2. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography for Efficacy Evaluation after Hepatocellular Carcinoma Radiofrequency Ablation: A Comparative Study with Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To explore acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI elastography in assessing residual tumors of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC after radiofrequency ablation (RFA. Materials and Methods. There were 83 HCC lesions among 72 patients. All patients were examined with ARFI, contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS, and CT or MRI. Tumor brightness on virtual touch tissue imaging (VTI and shear wave velocity (SWV were assessed before and approximately one month after RFA. Results. There were 14 residual tumors after RFA. VTI showed that all the tumors were darker after RFA. VTI was not able to distinguish the ablated lesions and the residual tumors. 13 residual tumor lesions were detected by CEUS. All completely ablated nodules had SWV demonstration of x.xx., while with those residual nodules, 6 tumors had x.xx measurement and 8 tumors had measurable SWV. nine lesions with residual tumors occurred in cirrhosis subjects and 5 lesions with residual tumors occurred in fibrosis subjects; there was no residual tumor in the normal liver subjects. Conclusion. VTI technique cannot demonstrate residual tumor post RFA. While SWV measurement of less than x.xx is likely associated with residual tumors, measurement of less than x.xx cannot exclude residual tumors. Liver cirrhosis is associated with decreased chance of a complete ablation.

  3. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography for Efficacy Evaluation after Hepatocellular Carcinoma Radiofrequency Ablation: A Comparative Study with Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohong; Luo, Liangping; Chen, Jiexin; Wang, Jiexin; Zhou, Honglian; Li, Mingyi; Jin, Zhanqiang; Chen, Nianping; Miao, Huilai; Lin, Manzhou; Dai, Wei; Ahuja, Anil T.; Wang, Yi-Xiang J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To explore acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography in assessing residual tumors of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Materials and Methods. There were 83 HCC lesions among 72 patients. All patients were examined with ARFI, contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), and CT or MRI. Tumor brightness on virtual touch tissue imaging (VTI) and shear wave velocity (SWV) were assessed before and approximately one month after RFA. Results. There were 14 residual tumors after RFA. VTI showed that all the tumors were darker after RFA. VTI was not able to distinguish the ablated lesions and the residual tumors. 13 residual tumor lesions were detected by CEUS. All completely ablated nodules had SWV demonstration of x.xx., while with those residual nodules, 6 tumors had x.xx measurement and 8 tumors had measurable SWV. nine lesions with residual tumors occurred in cirrhosis subjects and 5 lesions with residual tumors occurred in fibrosis subjects; there was no residual tumor in the normal liver subjects. Conclusion. VTI technique cannot demonstrate residual tumor post RFA. While SWV measurement of less than x.xx is likely associated with residual tumors, measurement of less than x.xx cannot exclude residual tumors. Liver cirrhosis is associated with decreased chance of a complete ablation. PMID:24895624

  4. Fractional Ablative Laser Followed by Transdermal Acoustic Pressure Wave Device to Enhance the Drug Delivery of Aminolevulinic Acid: In Vivo Fluorescence Microscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waibel, Jill S; Rudnick, Ashley; Nousari, Carlos; Bhanusali, Dhaval G

    2016-01-01

    Topical drug delivery is the foundation of all dermatological therapy. Laser-assisted drug delivery (LAD) using fractional ablative laser is an evolving modality that may allow for a greater precise depth of penetration by existing topical medications, as well as more efficient transcutaneous delivery of large drug molecules. Additional studies need to be performed using energy-driven methods that may enhance drug delivery in a synergistic manner. Processes such as iontophoresis, electroporation, sonophoresis, and the use of photomechanical waves aid in penetration. This study evaluated in vivo if there is increased efficacy of fractional CO2 ablative laser with immediate acoustic pressure wave device. Five patients were treated and biopsied at 4 treatment sites: 1) topically applied aminolevulinic acid (ALA) alone; 2) fractional ablative CO2 laser and topical ALA alone; 3) fractional ablative CO2 laser and transdermal acoustic pressure wave device delivery system; and 4) topical ALA with transdermal delivery system. The comparison of the difference in the magnitude of diffusion with both lateral spread of ALA and depth diffusion of ALA was measured by fluorescence microscopy. For fractional ablative CO2 laser, ALA, and transdermal acoustic pressure wave device, the protoporphyrin IX lateral fluorescence was 0.024 mm on average vs 0.0084 mm for fractional ablative CO2 laser and ALA alone. The diffusion for the acoustic pressure wave device was an order of magnitude greater. We found that our combined approach of fractional ablative CO2 laser paired with the transdermal acoustic pressure wave device increased the depth of penetration of ALA.

  5. An experimental device for accurate ultrasounds measurements in liquid foods at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo-Baltasar, E; Taravillo, M; Baonza, V G; Sanz, P D; Guignon, B

    2012-01-01

    The use of high hydrostatic pressure to ensure safe and high-quality product has markedly increased in the food industry during the last decade. Ultrasonic sensors can be employed to control such processes in an equivalent way as they are currently used in processes carried out at room pressure. However, their installation, calibration and use are particularly challenging in the context of a high pressure environment. Besides, data about acoustic properties of food under pressure and even for water are quite scarce in the pressure range of interest for food treatment (namely, above 200 MPa). The objective of this work was to establish a methodology to determine the speed of sound in foods under pressure. An ultrasonic sensor using the multiple reflections method was adapted to a lab-scale HHP equipment to determine the speed of sound in water between 253.15 and 348.15 K, and at pressures up to 700 MPa. The experimental speed-of-sound data were compared to the data calculated from the equation of state of water (IAPWS-95 formulation). From this analysis, the way to calibrate cell path was validated. After this calibration procedure, the speed of sound could be determined in liquid foods by using this sensor with a relative uncertainty between (0.22 and 0.32) % at a confidence level of 95 % over the whole pressure domain.

  6. Chemical etching of Tungsten thin films for high-temperature surface acoustic wave-based sensor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spindler, M., E-mail: m.spindler@ifw-dresden.de [IFW Dresden, SAWLab Saxony, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Herold, S.; Acker, J. [BTU Cottbus – Senftenberg, Faculty of Sciences, P.O. Box 101548, 01968 Senftenberg (Germany); Brachmann, E.; Oswald, S.; Menzel, S.; Rane, G. [IFW Dresden, SAWLab Saxony, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-08-01

    Surface acoustic wave devices are widely used as wireless sensors in different application fields. Recent developments aimed to utilize those devices as temperature sensors even in the high temperature range (T > 300 °C) and in harsh environmental conditions. Therefore, conventional materials, which are used for the substrate and for the interdigital transducer finger electrodes such as multilayers or alloys based on Al or Cu have to be exchanged by materials, which fulfill some important criteria regarding temperature related effects. Electron beam evaporation as a standard fabrication method is not well applicable for depositing high temperature stable electrode materials because of their very high melting points. Magnetron sputtering is an alternative deposition process but is also not applicable for lift-off structuring without any further improvement of the structuring process. Due to a relatively high Ar gas pressure of about 10{sup −1} Pa, the sidewalls of the photoresist line structures are also covered by the metallization, which subsequently prevents a successful lift-off process. In this study, we investigate the chemical etching of thin tungsten films as an intermediate step between magnetron sputtering deposition of thin tungsten finger electrodes and the lift-off process to remove sidewall covering for a successful patterning process of interdigital transducers. - Highlights: • We fabricated Tungsten SAW Electrodes by magnetron sputtering technology. • An etching process removes sidewall covering of photoresist, which allows lift-off. • Tungsten etching rates based on a hydrogen peroxide solutions were determined.

  7. Integration of BST varactors with surface acoustic wave device by film transfer technology for tunable RF filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Hideki; Tanaka, Shuji; Kimura, Tetsuya; Koutsaroff, Ivoyl P; Kadota, Michio; Hashimoto, Ken-ya; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a film transfer process to integrate barium strontium titanate (BST) metal–insulator–metal (MIM) structures with surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices on a lithium niobate (LN) substrate. A high-quality BST film grown on a Si substrate above 650 °C was patterned into the MIM structures, and transferred to a LN substrate below 130 °C by Ar-plasma-activated Au–Au bonding and the Si lost wafer process. Simple test SAW devices with the transferred BST variable capacitors (VCs) were fabricated and characterized. The resonance frequency of a one-port SAW resonator with the VC connected in series changed from 999 to 1018 MHz, when a dc bias voltage of 3 V was applied to the VC. Although the observed frequency tuning range was smaller than expected due to the degradation of BST in the process, the experimental result demonstrated that a tunable SAW filter with the transferred BST VCs was feasible. (paper)

  8. Carbon nanotubes/ceria composite layers deposited on surface acoustic wave devices for gas detection at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, M., E-mail: marjorie.david@univ-tln.fr [Universite du Sud Toulon, Var, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 6242, BP 20132. F 83 957 LA GARDE (France); Arab, M.; Martino, C. [Universite du Sud Toulon, Var, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 6242, BP 20132. F 83 957 LA GARDE (France); Delmas, L. [SENSeOR, Sophia Antipolis, 06250 Mougins (France); Guinneton, F.; Gavarri, J.-R. [Universite du Sud Toulon, Var, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 6242, BP 20132. F 83 957 LA GARDE (France)

    2012-05-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor on ATquartz piezoelectric substrate has been designed and fabricated. Test devices were based on asynchronous single-port resonators operating near the 434-MHz-centered industrial, scientific, and medical band. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes/Ceria (MWNTs/CeO{sub 2}) nanocomposites were used as sensitive layers. The MWNTs were synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition method and coated with nanosized ceria oxide. The composites were deposited on SAW quartz resonator using air-brush technique. MWNTs/CeO{sub 2} nanocomposites were characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron and atomic force microscopy. The sensor responses were tested under acetone (C{sub 3}H{sub 5}OH) and ethanol (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH) gases. The output signal was done by S{sub 11} parameter of the SAW device and was monitored using a network analyzer. Frequency changes were observed under acetone and ethanol vapors. These changes depended on the surface conductivity of the nanocomposites deposited on the sensor. The single-port SAW gas sensor coated with the MWNTs/CeO{sub 2} presented the highest sensitivity in the case of acetone vapor interacting with these layers, with a frequency shift of 200 kHz at room temperature.

  9. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Phased arrays, ultrasonic imaging and nonlinear acoustics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz (ed.); Ping Wu; Wennerstroem, Erik [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Signals and Systems

    2004-09-01

    This report contains the research results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in years 2003/2004. After a short introduction a review of beam forming fundamentals required for proper understanding phased array operation is included. The factors that determine lateral resolution during ultrasonic imaging of flaws in solids are analyzed and results of simulations modelling contact inspection of copper are presented. In the second chapter an improved synthetic aperture imaging (SAI) technique is introduced. The proposed SAI technique is characterized by an enhanced lateral resolution compared with the previously proposed extended synthetic aperture focusing technique (ESAFT). The enhancement of imaging performance is achieved due to more realistic assumption concerning the probability density function of scatterers in the region of interest. The proposed technique takes the form of a two-step algorithm using the result obtained in the first step as a prior for the second step. Final chapter contains summary of our recent experimental and theoretical research on nonlinear ultrasonics of unbounded interfaces. A new theoretical model for rough interfaces is developed, and the experimental results from the copper specimens that mimic contact cracks of different types are presented. Derivation of the theory and selected measurement results are given in appendix.

  10. Green light emitting nanostructures of Tb3+ doped LaOF prepared via ultrasound route applicable in display devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, C.; Nagabhushana, H.; Basavaraj, R. B.; Prasad, B. Daruka

    2017-05-01

    For the first time Tb3+ (1-5 mol %) doped LaOF nanophosphors using Aloe vera (AV) leaves extract as bio-surfactant were synthesized by facile ultrasound supported sonochemical route at relatively high temperature (700°C) and short duration of 3h. The powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) profiles of LaOF nanophosphors showed tetragonal structure. The morphological features of LaOF with effect of Sonication time and concentration of bio-surfactant were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The particle size were estimated from transmission electron microscope (TEM) image was found to be in the range of 20-30 nm. The characteristic photoluminescence emission peaks at 487, 541, 586 and 620 nm in green region corresponding to 5D4→7Fj (j=6, 5, 4, 3) transitions of Tb3+ were observed. The LaOF: Tb3+ nanophosphors exhibit green luminescence with better chromaticity coordinates, colour purity and higher intensity under low-voltage electron beam excitation were observed by Commission International De I'Eclairage (CIE) along with colour correlated temperature (CCT). All results indicate that these obtained nanophosphors have potential applications in field emission display device.

  11. Effect of incisional friction and ophthalmic viscosurgical devices on the heat generation of ultrasound during cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Michael; Valentine, Jeremy; Coombs, Jamie; Olson, Randall J

    2006-07-01

    To determine the thermal features of the Legacy (Alcon) and Sovereign (Advanced Medical Optics) phacoemulsification machines in a cadaver eye and with 7 ophthalmic viscosurgical devices (OVDs). In situ and in vitro study. Temperature without occlusion was recorded at the sleeve placed in the wound of a cadaver eye, and temperature over baseline was determined after 60 seconds. The result was then compared with the results in a previous study that used balanced salt solution (BSS) in artificial chambers. In the second portion of the experiment, with irrigation and aspiration lines occluded, temperature was recorded at the sleeve placed in an artificial chamber filled with sodium hyaluronate 2.3% (Healon5), sodium hyaluronate 1.4% (Healon GV), sodium hyaluronate 1.0% (Healon), sodium hyaluronate 1.6% (Amvisc Plus), sodium hyaluronate 1.0% (Provisc), sodium hyaluronate 3.0%-chondroitin sulfate 4.0% (Viscoat), or hyaluronate 3.0% (Vitrax). Temperature over baseline was also determined after 60 seconds. These results were compared with each set of OVD data and with the results in the prior BSS study. In the eye-bank model, the Legacy machine had a 62% temperature increase from incisional friction and the Sovereign machine had a decrease of 8.6% over results in an artificial anterior chamber. The OVD temperature increases were greater for the Sovereign (Pgeneration in the Legacy, a stroke-length driven instrument, more than in the Sovereign, a power-driven instrument. Ophthalmic viscosurgical devices are not only a concern due to outflow occlusion but can also add up to 6 times the heat in comparison with BSS. The need to aspirate the OVD before using ultrasound is thus verified.

  12. Counterbalancing the use of ultrasound contrast agents by a cavitation-regulated system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjouy, C; Fouqueray, M; Lo, C W; Muleki Seya, P; Lee, J L; Bera, J C; Chen, W S; Inserra, C

    2015-09-01

    The stochastic behavior of cavitation can lead to major problems of initiation and maintenance of cavitation during sonication, responsible of poor reproducibility of US-induced bioeffects in the context of sonoporation for instance. To overcome these disadvantages, the injection of ultrasound contrast agents as cavitation nuclei ensures fast initiation and lower acoustic intensities required for cavitation activity. More recently, regulated-cavitation devices based on the real-time modulation of the applied acoustic intensity have shown their potential to maintain a stable cavitation state during an ultrasonic shot, in continuous or pulsed wave conditions. In this paper is investigated the interest, in terms of cavitation activity, of using such regulated-cavitation device or injecting ultrasound contrast agents in the sonicated medium. When using fixed applied acoustic intensity, results showed that introducing ultrasound contrast agents increases reproducibility of cavitation activity (coefficient of variation 62% and 22% without and with UCA, respectively). Moreover, the use of the regulated-cavitation device ensures a given cavitation activity (coefficient of variation less 0.4% in presence of UCAs or not). This highlights the interest of controlling cavitation over time to free cavitation-based application from the use of UCAs. Interestingly, during a one minute sonication, while ultrasound contrast agents progressively disappear, the regulated-cavitation device counterbalance their destruction to sustain a stable inertial cavitation activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and ...

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and ...

  15. Factors associated with successful magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound treatment: efficiency of acoustic energy delivery through the skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Won Seok; Jung, Hyun Ho; Zadicario, Eyal; Rachmilevitch, Itay; Tlusty, Tal; Vitek, Shuki; Chang, Jin Woo

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) was recently introduced as treatment for movement disorders such as essential tremor and advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Although deep brain target lesions are successfully generated in most patients, the target area temperature fails to increase in some cases. The skull is one of the greatest barriers to ultrasonic energy transmission. The authors analyzed the skull-related factors that may have prevented an increase in target area temperatures in patients who underwent MRgFUS. The authors retrospectively reviewed data from clinical trials that involved MRgFUS for essential tremor, idiopathic PD, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Data from 25 patients were included. The relationships between the maximal temperature during treatment and other factors, including sex, age, skull area of the sonication field, number of elements used, skull volume of the sonication field, and skull density ratio (SDR), were determined. Among the various factors, skull volume and SDR exhibited relationships with the maximum temperature. Skull volume was negatively correlated with maximal temperature (p = 0.023, r(2) = 0.206, y = 64.156 - 0.028x, whereas SDR was positively correlated with maximal temperature (p = 0.009, r(2) = 0.263, y = 49.643 + 11.832x). The other factors correlate with the maximal temperature, although some factors showed a tendency to correlate. Some skull-related factors correlated with the maximal target area temperature. Although the number of patients in the present study was relatively small, the results offer information that could guide the selection of MRgFUS candidates.

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... specific content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - Abdomen Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and ...

  19. Impact of the Test Device on the Behavior of the Acoustic Emission Signals: Contribution of the Numerical Modeling to Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issiaka Traore, Oumar; Cristini, Paul; Favretto-Cristini, Nathalie; Pantera, Laurent; Viguier-Pla, Sylvie

    2018-01-01

    In a context of nuclear safety experiment monitoring with the non destructive testing method of acoustic emission, we study the impact of the test device on the interpretation of the recorded physical signals by using spectral finite element modeling. The numerical results are validated by comparison with real acoustic emission data obtained from previous experiments. The results show that several parameters can have significant impacts on acoustic wave propagation and then on the interpretation of the physical signals. The potential position of the source mechanism, the positions of the receivers and the nature of the coolant fluid have to be taken into account in the definition a pre-processing strategy of the real acoustic emission signals. In order to show the relevance of such an approach, we use the results to propose an optimization of the positions of the acoustic emission sensors in order to reduce the estimation bias of the time-delay and then improve the localization of the source mechanisms.

  20. Real-Time Characterization of Electrospun PVP Nanofibers as Sensitive Layer of a Surface Acoustic Wave Device for Gas Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Matatagui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work has been to study the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP fibers deposited by means of the electrospinning technique for using as sensitive layer in surface acoustic wave (SAW sensors to detect volatile organic compounds (VOCs. The electrospinning process of the fibers has been monitored and RF characterized in real time, and it has been shown that the diameters of the fibers depend mainly on two variables: the applied voltage and the distance between the needle and the collector, since all the electrospun fibers have been characterized by a scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Real-time measurement during the fiber coating process has shown that the depth of penetration of mechanical perturbation in the fiber layer has a limit. It has been demonstrated that once this saturation has been reached, the increase of the thickness of the fibers coating does not improve the sensitivity of the sensor. Finally, the parameters used to deposit the electrospun fibers of smaller diameters have been used to deposit fibers on a SAW device to obtain a sensor to measure different concentrations of toluene at room temperature. The present sensor exhibited excellent sensitivity, good linearity and repeatability, and high and fast response to toluene at room temperature.

  1. Design and characterization of a high-power ultrasound driver with ultralow-output impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, George K.; Olbricht, William L.

    2009-11-01

    We describe a pocket-sized ultrasound driver with an ultralow-output impedance amplifier circuit (less than 0.05 Ω) that can transfer more than 99% of the voltage from a power supply to the ultrasound transducer with minimal reflections. The device produces high-power acoustical energy waves while operating at lower voltages than conventional ultrasound driving systems because energy losses owing to mismatched impedance are minimized. The peak performance of the driver is measured experimentally with a PZT-4, 1.54 MHz, piezoelectric ceramic, and modeled using an adjusted Mason model over a range of transducer resonant frequencies. The ultrasound driver can deliver a 100 Vpp (peak to peak) square-wave signal across 0-8 MHz ultrasound transducers in 5 ms bursts through continuous wave operation, producing acoustic powers exceeding 130 W. Effects of frequency, output impedance of the driver, and input impedance of the transducer on the maximum acoustic output power of piezoelectric transducers are examined. The small size, high power, and efficiency of the ultrasound driver make this technology useful for research, medical, and industrial ultrasonic applications.

  2. Improved cardiovascular diagnostic accuracy by pocket size imaging device in non-cardiologic outpatients: the NaUSiCa (Naples Ultrasound Stethoscope in Cardiology study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiattarella Pier

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Miniaturization has evolved in the creation of a pocket-size imaging device which can be utilized as an ultrasound stethoscope. This study assessed the additional diagnostic power of pocket size device by both experts operators and trainees in comparison with physical examination and its appropriateness of use in comparison with standard echo machine in a non-cardiologic population. Three hundred four consecutive non cardiologic outpatients underwent a sequential assessment including physical examination, pocket size imaging device and standard Doppler-echo exam. Pocket size device was used by both expert operators and trainees (who received specific training before the beginning of the study. All the operators were requested to give only visual, qualitative insights on specific issues. All standard Doppler-echo exams were performed by expert operators. One hundred two pocket size device exams were performed by experts and two hundred two by trainees. The time duration of the pocket size device exam was 304 ± 117 sec. Diagnosis of cardiac abnormalities was made in 38.2% of cases by physical examination and in 69.7% of cases by physical examination + pocket size device (additional diagnostic power = 31.5%, p In conclusion, pocket size device showed a relevant additional diagnostic value in comparison with physical examination. Sensitivity and specificity were good in experts and suboptimal in trainees. Specificity was particularly influenced by the level of experience. Training programs are needed for pocket size device users.

  3. Mathematical design of a novel input/instruction device using a moving acoustic emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianchao; Guo, Yukun; Li, Jingzhi; Liu, Hongyu

    2017-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the mathematical design of a novel input/instruction device using a moving emitter. The emitter acts as a point source and can be installed on a digital pen or worn on the finger of the human being who desires to interact/communicate with the computer. The input/instruction can be recognized by identifying the moving trajectory of the emitter performed by the human being from the collected wave field data. The identification process is modelled as an inverse source problem where one intends to identify the trajectory of a moving point source. There are several salient features of our study which distinguish our result from the existing ones in the literature. First, the point source is moving in an inhomogeneous background medium, which models the human body. Second, the dynamical wave field data are collected in a limited aperture. Third, the reconstruction method is independent of the background medium, and it is totally direct without any matrix inversion. Hence, it is efficient and robust with respect to the measurement noise. Both theoretical justifications and computational experiments are presented to verify our novel findings.

  4. The use of a pocket-sized ultrasound device improves physical examination: results of an in- and outpatient cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Colli

    Full Text Available The performance of pocket mobile ultrasound devices (PUDs is comparable with that of standard ultrasonography, whereas the accuracy of a physical examination is often poor requiring further tests to assess diagnostic hypotheses. Adding the use of PUD to physical examination could lead to an incremental benefit.We assessed whether the use of PUD in the context of physical examination can reduce the prescription of additional tests when used by physicians in different clinical settings.We conducted a cohort impact study in four hospital medical wards, one gastroenterological outpatient clinic, and 90 general practices in the same geographical area. The study involved 135 physicians who used PUD, after a short predefined training course, to examine 1962 consecutive patients with one of 10 diagnostic hypotheses: ascites, pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, urinary retention, urinary stones, gallstones, biliary-duct dilation, splenomegaly, abdominal mass, abdominal aortic aneurysm. According to the physicians' judgment, PUD examination could rule out or in the diagnostic hypothesis or require further testing; the concordance with the final diagnosis was assessed. The main outcome was the proportion of cases in which additional tests were required after PUD. The PUD diagnostic accuracy was assessed in patients submitted to further testing.The 1962 patients included 37% in-patients, 26% gastroenterology outpatients, 37% from general practices. Further testing after PUD examination was deemed unnecessary in 63%. Only 5% of patients with negative PUD not referred for further testing were classified false negatives with respect to the final diagnosis. In patients undergoing further tests, the sensitivity was 91%, and the specificity 83%.After a simple and short training course, a PUD examination can be used in addition to a physical examination to improve the answer to ten common clinical questions concerning in- and outpatients, and can reduce the

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to ... Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces pictures ...

  6. Combined ultrasound and MR imaging to guide focused ultrasound therapies in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitis, Costas D.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-07-01

    Several emerging therapies with potential for use in the brain, harness effects produced by acoustic cavitation—the interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles either generated during sonication or introduced into the vasculature. Systems developed for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal ablation can enable their clinical translation, but methods for real-time monitoring and control are currently lacking. Acoustic emissions produced during sonication can provide information about the location, strength and type of the microbubble oscillations within the ultrasound field, and they can be mapped in real-time using passive imaging approaches. Here, we tested whether such mapping can be achieved transcranially within a clinical brain MRgFUS system. We integrated an ultrasound imaging array into the hemisphere transducer of the MRgFUS device. Passive cavitation maps were obtained during sonications combined with a circulating microbubble agent at 20 targets in the cingulate cortex in three macaques. The maps were compared with MRI-evident tissue effects. The system successfully mapped microbubble activity during both stable and inertial cavitation, which was correlated with MRI-evident transient blood-brain barrier disruption and vascular damage, respectively. The location of this activity was coincident with the resulting tissue changes within the expected resolution limits of the system. While preliminary, these data clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to construct maps of stable and inertial cavitation transcranially, in a large animal model, and under clinically relevant conditions. Further, these results suggest that this hybrid ultrasound/MRI approach can provide comprehensive guidance for targeted drug delivery via blood-brain barrier disruption and other emerging ultrasound treatments, facilitating their clinical translation. We anticipate that it will also prove to be an important research tool that will

  7. Combined ultrasound and MR imaging to guide focused ultrasound therapies in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvanitis, Costas D; McDannold, Nathan; Livingstone, Margaret S

    2013-01-01

    Several emerging therapies with potential for use in the brain, harness effects produced by acoustic cavitation—the interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles either generated during sonication or introduced into the vasculature. Systems developed for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal ablation can enable their clinical translation, but methods for real-time monitoring and control are currently lacking. Acoustic emissions produced during sonication can provide information about the location, strength and type of the microbubble oscillations within the ultrasound field, and they can be mapped in real-time using passive imaging approaches. Here, we tested whether such mapping can be achieved transcranially within a clinical brain MRgFUS system. We integrated an ultrasound imaging array into the hemisphere transducer of the MRgFUS device. Passive cavitation maps were obtained during sonications combined with a circulating microbubble agent at 20 targets in the cingulate cortex in three macaques. The maps were compared with MRI-evident tissue effects. The system successfully mapped microbubble activity during both stable and inertial cavitation, which was correlated with MRI-evident transient blood–brain barrier disruption and vascular damage, respectively. The location of this activity was coincident with the resulting tissue changes within the expected resolution limits of the system. While preliminary, these data clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to construct maps of stable and inertial cavitation transcranially, in a large animal model, and under clinically relevant conditions. Further, these results suggest that this hybrid ultrasound/MRI approach can provide comprehensive guidance for targeted drug delivery via blood–brain barrier disruption and other emerging ultrasound treatments, facilitating their clinical translation. We anticipate that it will also prove to be an important research tool that

  8. Simultaneous ultrasound and photoacoustics based flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnyawali, Vaskar; Strohm, Eric M.; Tsai, Scott S. H.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2018-04-01

    We have developed a flow cytometer based on simultaneous detection of ultrasound and photoacoustic waves from individual particles/cells flowing in a microfluidic channel. Our polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based hydrodynamic 3-dimensional (3D) flow-focusing microfluidic device contains a cross-junction channel, a micro-needle (ID 100 μm and OD 200 μm) insert, and a 3D printed frame to hold and align a high frequency (center frequency 375 MHz) ultrasound transducer. The focused flow passes through a narrow focal zone with lateral and axial focal lengths of 6-8 μm and 15-20 μm, respectively. Both the lateral and axial alignments are achieved by screwing the transducer to the frame onto the PDMS device. Individual particles pass through an interrogation zone in the microfluidic channel with a collinearly aligned ultrasound transducer and a focused 532 nm wavelength laser beam. The particles are simultaneously insonified by high-frequency ultrasound and irradiated by a laser beam. The ultrasound backscatter and laser generated photoacoustic waves are detected for each passing particle. The backscattered ultrasound and photoacoustic signal are strongly dependent on the size, morphology, mechanical properties, and material properties of the flowing particles; these parameters can be extracted by analyzing unique features in the power spectrum of the signals. Frequencies less than 100 MHz do not have these unique spectral signatures. We show that we can reliably distinguish between different particles in a sample using the acoustic-based flow cytometer. This technique, when extended to biomedical applications, allows us to rapidly analyze the spectral signatures from individual single cells of a large cell population, with applications towards label-free detection and characterization of healthy and diseased cells.

  9. Multiple-frequency acoustic wave devices for chemical sensing and materials characterization in both gas and liquid phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S.J.; Ricco, A.J.

    1993-08-10

    A chemical or intrinsic physical property sensor is described comprising: (a) a substrate; (b) an interaction region of said substrate where the presence of a chemical or physical stimulus causes a detectable change in the velocity and/or an attenuation of an acoustic wave traversing said region; and (c) a plurality of paired input and output interdigitated electrodes patterned on the surface of said substrate where each of said paired electrodes has a distinct periodicity, where each of said paired electrodes is comprised of an input and an output electrode; (d) an input signal generation means for transmitting an input signal having a distinct frequency to a specified input interdigitated electrode of said plurality so that each input electrode receives a unique input signal, whereby said electrode responds to said input signal by generating an acoustic wave of a specified frequency, thus, said plurality responds by generating a plurality of acoustic waves of different frequencies; (e) an output signal receiving means for determining an acoustic wave velocity and an amplitude of said acoustic waves at several frequencies after said waves transverses said interaction region and comparing these values to an input acoustic wave velocity and an input acoustic wave amplitude to produce values for perturbations in acoustic wave velocities and for acoustic wave attenuation as a function of frequency, where said output receiving means is individually coupled to each of said output interdigitated electrode; (f) a computer means for analyzing a data stream comprising information from said output receiving means and from said input signal generation means to differentiate a specified response due to a perturbation from a subsequent specified response due to a subsequent perturbation to determine the chemical or intrinsic physical properties desired.

  10. Use of ultrasound in petroleum residue upgradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawarkar, A.N.; Pandit, A.B.; Samant, S.D.; Joshi, J.B. [Mumbai Univ., Mumbai (India). Inst. of Chemical Technology

    2009-06-15

    The importance of bottom-of-the barrel upgrading has increased in the current petroleum refining scenario because of the progressively heavier nature of crude oil. Heavy residues contain large concentrations of metals such as vanadium and nickel which foul catalysts and reduce the potential effect of residue fluidized catalytic cracking. This study showed that the cavitational energy induced by ultrasound be be successfully used to upgrade hydrocarbon mixtures. Conventional processes for the upgrading of residual feedstocks, such as thermal cracking and catalytic cracking, were carried out in the temperature range of 400-520 degrees C. Experiments were performed on 2 vacuum residues, Arabian mix vacuum residue (AMVR) and Bombay high vacuum residue (BHVR) and 1 Haldia asphalt (HA). These were subjected to acoustic cavitation for different reaction times from 15 to 120 minutes at ambient temperature and pressure. Two acoustic cavitation devices were compared, namely the ultrasonic bath and ultrasonic horn. In particular, this study compared the ability of these 2 devices to upgrade the petroleum residues to lighter, more value-added products. Different surfactants were used to examine the effect of ultrasound on upgrading the residue when emulsified in water. In order to better understand the reaction mechanism, a kinetic model was developed based on the constituents of the residue. The ultrasonic horn was found to be more effective in bringing about the upgrading than ultrasonic bath. The study also showed that the acoustic cavitation of the aqueous emulsified hydrocarbon mixture could reduce the asphaltenes content to a greater extent than the acoustic cavitation of non-emulsified hydrocarbon mixture. 20 refs., 11 tabs., 17 figs.

  11. Inducing Strong Non-Linearities in a Phonon Trapping Quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave Resonator Coupled to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Goryachev

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave resonator is designed to coherently trap phonons in such a way that they are well confined and immune to suspension losses so they exhibit extremely high acoustic Q-factors at low temperature, with Q × f products of order 10 18 Hz. In this work we couple such a resonator to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID amplifier and investigate effects in the strong signal regime. Both parallel and series connection topologies of the system are investigated. The study reveals significant non-Duffing response that is associated with the nonlinear characteristics of Josephson junctions. The nonlinearity provides quasi-periodic structure of the spectrum in both incident power and frequency. The result gives an insight into the open loop behaviour of a future Cryogenic Quartz Oscillator in the strong signal regime.

  12. Translational illusion of acoustic sources by transformation acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Li, Shichao; He, Sailing

    2017-09-01

    An acoustic illusion of creating a translated acoustic source is designed by utilizing transformation acoustics. An acoustic source shifter (ASS) composed of layered acoustic metamaterials is designed to achieve such an illusion. A practical example where the ASS is made with naturally available materials is also given. Numerical simulations verify the performance of the proposed device. The designed ASS may have some applications in, e.g., anti-sonar detection.

  13. Development of acoustic partial discharge detection device; Bubun hoden kenshutsusochi wo riyo shita onkyo niyoru hendensetsubi no zetsuen rekka shindan gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suenaga, Kiyoka [Kawasaki Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-06-15

    This paper introduces an acoustic partial discharge detection device, consisting of a microphone, amplifier circuit for analog signals, A/D (Digital Signal Processor). This device has the following unique characteristics: (1) Judging whether or not there is partial discharge by analyzing supersonic signals. (2) High sensitivity for detecting discharge ; 100 pC from a distance of 1.2 m. (3)Locating the position of discharge occurrence by using a sharpe directional parabola microphone and laser beam pointer. The detector was used in the steel works to detect partial discharge on high-voltage electrical apparatus, where faults due to partial discharge were found in the potential transformer and current transformer. The effectiveness of the device was thus verified. (author)

  14. Feasibility of Remote Real-Time Guidance of a Cardiac Examination Performed by Novices Using a Pocket-Sized Ultrasound Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan V. Mai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The potential of pocket-sized ultrasound devices (PUDs to improve global healthcare delivery is limited by the lack of a suitable imaging protocol and trained users. Therefore, we investigated the feasibility of performing a brief, evidence-based cardiac limited ultrasound exam (CLUE through wireless guidance of novice users. Methods. Three trainees applied PUDs on 27 subjects while directed by an off-site cardiologist to obtain a CLUE to screen for LV systolic dysfunction (LVSD, LA enlargement (LAE, ultrasound lung comets (ULC+, and elevated CVP (eCVP. Real-time remote audiovisual guidance and interpretation by the cardiologist were performed using the iPhone 4/iPod (FaceTime, Apple, Inc. attached to the PUD and transmitted data wirelessly. Accuracy and technical quality of transmitted images were compared to on-site, gold-standard echo thresholds. Results. Novice versus sonographer imaging yielded technically adequate views in 122/135 (90% versus 130/135 (96% (. CLUE’s combined SN, SP, and ACC were 0.67, 0.96, and 0.90. Technical adequacy (% and accuracy for each abnormality ( were LVSD (85%, 0.93, , LAE (89%, 0.74, , ULC+ (100%, 0.94, , and eCVP (78%, 0.91, . Conclusion. A novice can perform the CLUE using PUD when wirelessly guided by an expert. This method could facilitate PUD use for off-site bedside medical decision making and triaging of patients.

  15. A new approach for the screening of carotid lesions: a 'fast-track' method with the use of new generation hand-held ultrasound devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboyans, V; Lacroix, P; Jeannicot, A; Guilloux, J; Bertin, F; Laskar, M

    2004-09-01

    We assessed the usefulness of fast-track neck sonography with a new-generation hand-held ultrasound scanner in the detection of > or =60% carotid stenosis. Patients with a past history of atherosclerotic disease or presence of risk factors were enrolled. All had fast-track carotid screening with a hand-held ultrasound scanner. Initial assessment was performed with our quick imaging protocol. A second examiner performed a conventional complete carotid duplex as gold-standard. We enrolled 197 consecutive patients with a mean age of 67 years (range 35-94). A carotid stenosis >60% was detected in 13 cases (6%). The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of fast-track sonography was 100%, 64%, 17% and 100%, respectively. Concomitant power Doppler imaging during the fast-track method did not improve accuracy. The use of a fast-track method with a hand-held ultrasound device can reduce the number of unnecessary carotid Duplex and enhance the screening efficiency without missing significant carotid stenoses.

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Prostate ultrasound, also called transrectal ultrasound, provides ...

  17. Acoustic lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kittmer, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    Acoustic lenses focus ultrasound to produce pencil-like beams with reduced near fields. When fitted to conventional (flat-faced) transducers, such lenses greatly improve the ability to detect and size defects. This paper describes a program developed to design acoustic lenses for use in immersion or contact inspection, using normal or angle beam mode with flat or curved targets. Lens surfaces are circular in geometry to facilitate machining. For normal beam inspection of flat plate, spherical or cylindrical lenses are used. For angle beam or curved surface inspections, a compound lens is required to correct for the extra induced aberration. Such a lens is aspherical with one radius of curvature in the plane of incidence, and a different radius of curvature in the plane perpendicular to the incident plane. The resultant beam profile (i.e., location of the acoustic focus, beam diameter, 6 dB working range) depends on the degree of focusing and the transducer used. The operating frequency and bandwidth can be affected by the instrumentation used. Theoretical and measured beam profiles are in good agreement. Various applications, from zone focusing used for defect sizing in thick plate, to line focusing for pipe weld inspection, are discussed

  18. Quantitative Ultrasound Measurements at the Heel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugschies, M.; Brixen, K.; Hermann, P.

    2015-01-01

    Calcaneal quantitative ultrasound can be used to predict osteoporotic fracture risk, but its ability to monitor therapy is unclear possibly because of its limited precision. We developed a quantitative ultrasound device (foot ultrasound scanner) that measures the speed of sound at the heel...... with the foot ultrasound scanner reduced precision errors by half (p quantitative ultrasound measurements is feasible. (E-mail: m.daugschies@rad.uni-kiel.de) (C) 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology....

  19. A New Ultrasound-Guided Puncture Device with Augmented Degrees of Performance Freedom and Ability to Attach to Most Convex Probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Sung Il; Son, Kyu Ri; Kim, Young Jun; Jeon, Hae Jeong; Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of a newly-designed ultrasound (US)-guided puncture device. A newly-designed US-guided puncture device was composed of a guide segment and an attachable segment. The guide segment allowed the needle to be placed in the plane of US view with a maximal degree of freedom, and the attachable segment was designed to attach to most convex US probes. Six operators punctured 144 targets in phantoms using either the new device (n = 72) or free-hand technique (n = 72). The number of required needle passages and the necessary procedure times were compared between the two groups. The number of required needle passages and the necessary procedure time were significantly reduced in five operators when the newly-designed US-guided puncture device was used (p < 0.05). A newly-designed US-guided puncture device, which allows for a maximal degree of freedom in needle placement and can attach to most convex US probes, showed good performance in our study

  20. Catheter-based high-intensity ultrasound for epicardial ablation of the left ventricle: device design and in vivo feasiblity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Nazer, Babak; Jones, Peter D.; Tanaka, Yasuaki; Martin, Alastair; Ng, Bennett; Duggirala, Srikant; Diederich, Chris J.; Gerstenfeld, Edward P.

    2015-03-01

    The development and in vivo testing of a high-intensity ultrasound thermal ablation catheter for epicardial ablation of the left ventricle (LV) is presented. Scar tissue can occur in the mid-myocardial and epicardial space in patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy and lead to ventricular tachycardia. Current ablation technology uses radiofrequency energy, which is limited epicardially by the presence of coronary vessels, phrenic nerves, and fat. Ultrasound energy can be precisely directed to deliver targeted deep epicardial ablation while sparing intervening epicardial nerve and vessels. The proof-of-concept ultrasound applicators were designed for sub-xyphoid access to the pericardial space through a steerable 14-Fr sheath. The catheter consists of two rectangular planar transducers, for therapy (6.4 MHz) and imaging (5 MHz), mounted at the tip of a 3.5-mm flexible nylon catheter coupled and encapsulated within a custom-shaped balloon for cooling. Thermal lesions were created in the LV in a swine (n = 10) model in vivo. The ultrasound applicator was positioned fluoroscopically. Its orientation and contact with the LV were verified using A-mode imaging and a radio-opaque marker. Ablations employed 60-s exposures at 15 - 30 W (electrical power). Histology indicated thermal coagulation and ablative lesions penetrating 8 - 12 mm into the left ventricle on lateral and anterior walls and along the left anterior descending artery. The transducer design enabled successful sparing from the epicardial surface to 2 - 4 mm of intervening ventricle tissue and epicardial fat. The feasibility of targeted epicardial ablation with catheter-based ultrasound was demonstrated.

  1. Acoustic Surface Cavitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Merely the presence of compressible entities, known as bubbles, greatly enriches the physical phenomena encountered when introducing ultrasound in a liquid. Mediated by the response of these bubbles, the otherwise diffuse and relatively low energy density of the acoustic field can induce strong,

  2. Current perspectives on therapeutic ultrasound in the management of chronic wounds: a review of evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conner-Kerr T

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Teresa Conner-Kerr,1 Mary Ellen Oesterle2 1College of Health Sciences & Professions, 2Department of Physical Therapy, University of North Georgia, Dahlonega, GA, USA Abstract: Although therapeutic ultrasound has been in existence since the 1930s, questions remain as to its effectiveness in promoting tissue healing in various injured tissues. These tissues include soft tissues such as skin, tendons, ligaments, bursae, joint capsules and muscles. Limited evidence exists to support a role for therapeutic ultrasound in closed, soft tissue lesions. However, an evolving literature provides support for the role of therapeutic ultrasound in the treatment of chronic wounds, acute injuries such as fractures and split thickness graft donor sites as well as in the modulation of wound-related pain. Modern technology that uses low-frequency (kilohertz, long wave ultrasound appears promising compared to older, higher frequency ultrasound (megahertz devices. These newer devices appear to have positive effects on healing rates in various wound types, pain levels and the modulation of proinflammatory cytokines. Keywords: low-frequency ultrasound, non-contact ultrasound, KHz, acoustic, healing, cavitation

  3. Comparison of the biometric values obtained by two different A-mode ultrasound devices (Eye Cubed vs. PalmScan): a transversal, descriptive, and comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez-Montoya, Raul; Shusterman, Eugene Mark; López-Miranda, Miriam Jessica; Mayorquin-Ruiz, Mariana; Salcedo-Villanueva, Guillermo; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo; Morales-Cantón, Virgilio

    2010-03-24

    To assess the reliability of the measurements obtained with the PalmScan, when compared with another standardized A-mode ultrasound device, and assess the consistency and correlation between the two methods. Transversal, descriptive, and comparative study. We recorded the axial length (AL), anterior chamber depth (ACD) and lens thickness (LT) obtained with two A-mode ultrasounds (PalmScan A2000 and Eye Cubed) using an immersion technique. We compared the measurements with a two-sample t-test. Agreement between the two devices was assessed with Bland-Altman plots and 95% limits of agreement. 70 eyes of 70 patients were enrolled in this study. The measurements with the Eye Cubed of AL and ACD were shorter than the measurements taken by the PalmScan. The differences were not statistically significant regarding AL (p < 0.4) but significant regarding ACD (p < 0.001). The highest agreement between the two devices was obtained during LT measurement. The PalmScan measurements were shorter, but not statistically significantly (p < 0.2). The values of AL and LT, obtained with both devices are not identical, but within the limits of agreement. The agreement is not affected by the magnitude of the ocular dimensions (but only between range of 20 mm to 27 mm of AL and 3.5 mm to 5.7 mm of LT). A correction of about 0.5 D could be considered if an intraocular lens is being calculated. However due to the large variability of the results, the authors recommend discretion in using this conversion factor, and to adjust the power of the intraocular lenses based upon the personal experience of the surgeon.

  4. PVT Degradation Studies: Acoustic Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dib, Gerges [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tucker, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Philip J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Under certain environmental conditions, polyvinyl toluene (PVT) plastic scintillator has been observed to undergo internal fogging. This document reports on a study of acoustic techniques to determine whether they can provide a diagnostic for the fogging of PVT. Different ultrasound techniques were employed for detecting the level of internal fogging in PVT, including wave velocity measurements, attenuation, nonlinear acoustics, and acoustic microscopy. The results indicate that there are linear relations between the wave velocity and wave attenuation with the level of internal fogging. The effects of fogging on ultrasound wave attenuation is further verified by acoustic microscopy imaging, where regions with fog in the specimen demonstration higher levels of attenuation compared to clear regions. Results from the nonlinear ultrasound measurements were inconclusive due to high sensitivities to transducer coupling and fixture variabilities.

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound or with a rectal examination, an ultrasound-guided biopsy can be performed. This procedure involves advancing ... of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the pelvis uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures and ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or ... Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored ...

  9. Three-axis acoustic device for levitation of droplets in an open gas stream and its application to examine sulfur dioxide absorption by water droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Terrance L; Budwig, Ralph S

    2007-01-01

    Two acoustic devices to stabilize a droplet in an open gas stream (single-axis and three-axis levitators) have been designed and tested. The gas stream was provided by a jet apparatus with a 64 mm exit diameter and a uniform velocity profile. The acoustic source used was a Langevin vibrator with a concave reflector. The single-axis levitator relied primarily on the radial force from the acoustic field and was shown to be limited because of significant droplet wandering. The three-axis levitator relied on a combination of the axial and radial forces. The three-axis levitator was applied to examine droplet deformation and circulation and to investigate the uptake of SO(2) from the gas stream to the droplet. Droplets ranging in diameters from 2 to 5 mm were levitated in gas streams with velocities up to 9 ms. Droplet wandering was on the order of a half droplet diameter for a 3 mm diameter droplet. Droplet circulation ranged from the predicted Hadamard-Rybczynski pattern to a rotating droplet pattern. Droplet pH over a central volume of the droplet was measured by planar laser induced fluorescence. The results for the decay of droplet pH versus time are in general agreement with published theory and experiments.

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ... the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on ... to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached ...

  12. Ultrasound skin tightening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkis, Kira; Alam, Murad

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound skin tightening is a noninvasive, nonablative method that allows for energy deposition into the deep dermal and subcutaneous tissue while avoiding epidermal heating. Ultrasound coagulation is confined to arrays of 1-mm(3) zones that include the superficial musculoaponeurotic system and connective tissue. This technology gained approval from the Food and Drug Administration as the first energy-based skin "lifting" device, specifically for lifting lax tissue on the neck, submentum, and eyebrows. Ultrasound has the unique advantage of direct visualization of treated structures during treatment. Ultrasound is a safe and efficacious treatment for mild skin tightening and lifting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Temperature stable LiNbO3 surface acoustic wave device with diode sputtered amorphous TeO2 over-layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewan, Namrata; Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay; Sreenivas, K.

    2005-01-01

    Amorphous TeO 2 thin film, sputtered in the O 2 +Ar(25%+75%) gas environment using a metallic tellurium target, has been identified as an attractive negative temperature coefficient of delay (TCD) material that can yield a temperature stable device when combined with a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device based on positive TCD material such as LiNbO 3 . The influence of amorphous TeO 2 over-layer on the SAW propagation characteristics (velocity and temperature coefficient of delay) of the SAW filters (36 and 70 MHz) based on 128 deg. rotated Y-cut X-propagating lithium niobate (128 deg. Y-X LiNbO 3 ) single crystal has been studied. It is found that 0.042 λ thick TeO 2 over-layer on a prefabricated SAW device operating at 36 MHz centre frequency, reduces the TCD of the device from 76 ppm deg. C -1 to almost zero (∼1.4 ppm deg. C -1 ) without deteriorating its efficiency and could be considered as a suitable alternative for temperature stable devices in comparison to conventional SiO 2 over-layer

  14. A viscoelastic model for the prediction of transcranial ultrasound propagation: application for the estimation of shear acoustic properties in the human skull

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichardo, Samuel; Moreno-Hernández, Carlos; Drainville, Robert Andrew; Sin, Vivian; Curiel, Laura; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2017-09-01

    A better understanding of ultrasound transmission through the human skull is fundamental to develop optimal imaging and therapeutic applications. In this study, we present global attenuation values and functions that correlate apparent density calculated from computed tomography scans to shear speed of sound. For this purpose, we used a model for sound propagation based on the viscoelastic wave equation (VWE) assuming isotropic conditions. The model was validated using a series of measurements with plates of different plastic materials and angles of incidence of 0°, 15° and 50°. The optimal functions for transcranial ultrasound propagation were established using the VWE, scan measurements of transcranial propagation with an angle of incidence of 40° and a genetic optimization algorithm. Ten (10) locations over three (3) skulls were used for ultrasound frequencies of 270 kHz and 836 kHz. Results with plastic materials demonstrated that the viscoelastic modeling predicted both longitudinal and shear propagation with an average (±s.d.) error of 9(±7)% of the wavelength in the predicted delay and an error of 6.7(±5)% in the estimation of transmitted power. Using the new optimal functions of speed of sound and global attenuation for the human skull, the proposed model predicted the transcranial ultrasound transmission for a frequency of 270 kHz with an expected error in the predicted delay of 5(±2.7)% of the wavelength. The sound propagation model predicted accurately the sound propagation regardless of either shear or longitudinal sound transmission dominated. For 836 kHz, the model predicted accurately in average with an error in the predicted delay of 17(±16)% of the wavelength. Results indicated the importance of the specificity of the information at a voxel level to better understand ultrasound transmission through the skull. These results and new model will be very valuable tools for the future development of transcranial applications of

  15. The effect of post-annealing on surface acoustic wave devices based on ZnO thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phan, Duy-Thach; Chung, Gwiy-Sang

    2011-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films were deposited on unheated silicon substrates via radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering, and the post-deposition annealing of the ZnO thin films was performed at 400 deg. C, 600 deg. C, 800 deg. C, and 1000 deg. C. The characteristics of the thin films were investigated by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The films were then used to fabricate surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators. The effects of post-annealing on the SAW devices are discussed in this work. Resulting in the 600 deg. C is determined as optimal annealing temperature for SAW devices. At 400 deg. C, the microvoids exit between the grains yield large root mean square (RMS) surface roughness and higher insertion losses in SAW devices. The highest RMS surface roughness, crack and residual stress cause a reduction of surface velocity (about 40 m/s) and increase dramatically insertion loss at 1000 deg. C. The SAW devices response becomes very weak at this temperature, the electromechanical coupling coefficient (k 2 ) of ZnO film decrease from 3.8% at 600 deg. C to 1.49% at 1000 deg. C.

  16. Acoustic calibration apparatus for calibrating plethysmographic acoustic pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Davis, David C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus for calibrating an acoustic sensor is described. The apparatus includes a transmission material having an acoustic impedance approximately matching the acoustic impedance of the actual acoustic medium existing when the acoustic sensor is applied in actual in-service conditions. An elastic container holds the transmission material. A first sensor is coupled to the container at a first location on the container and a second sensor coupled to the container at a second location on the container, the second location being different from the first location. A sound producing device is coupled to the container and transmits acoustic signals inside the container.

  17. Holograms for acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-09-22

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound.

  18. Mobile Digital Recording: Adequacy of the iRig and iOS Device for Acoustic and Perceptual Analysis of Normal Voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Gisele; Fava, Gaetano; Baglione, Melody; Pimpinella, Michael

    2017-03-01

    To determine whether the iRig and iOS device recording system is comparable with a standard computer recording system for digital voice recording. Thirty-seven vocally healthy adults, between ages 20 and 62, with a mean age of 33.9 years, 13 males and 24 females, were recruited. Recordings were simultaneously digitalized in an iPad and iPhone using a unidirectional condenser microphone for smartphones/tablets (iRig Mic, IK Multimedia) and in a computer laptop (Dell-Inspiron) using a unidirectional condenser microphone (Samson-CL5) connected to a preamplifier with phantom power. Both microphones were lined up at an equal fixed distance from the subject's mouth. Speech tasks consisted of a sustained vowel "ah" at comfortable pitch/loudness, counting from 1 to 10, and a glissando "ah" from a low to a high note. The samples captured on the iOS devices were transferred via SoundCloud in WAV format, and analyzed using the Praat software. The acoustic parameters measured were mean, min, and max F0, SD F0, jitter local, jitter rap, jitter ppq5, jitter ddp, shimmer local, shimmer local-dB, shimmer apq3, shimmer apq5, shimmer apq11, shimmer dda, NHR, and HNR. There were no statistically significant differences for any parameter and speech task analyzed for both iOS devices as compared with the gold standard computer/preamp system (all P values > 0.050). In addition, there were no statistical differences in the perceptual identification of the recordings among devices (P device may provide reliable digital recording of normal voices. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a pelvic ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures that represent the flow of blood through ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are ... Ultrasound page for more information . Ultrasound examinations can help diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams are frequently ... pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) for women rectal ( transrectal ) for men A Doppler ultrasound exam ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ... Obstetrical Ultrasound page for more information . Ultrasound examinations can help diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: ...

  3. Acoustic Metamaterials in Aeronautics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Palma

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Metamaterials, man-made composites that are scaled smaller than the wavelength, have demonstrated a huge potential for application in acoustics, allowing the production of sub-wavelength acoustic absorbers, acoustic invisibility, perfect acoustic mirrors and acoustic lenses for hyper focusing, and acoustic illusions and enabling new degrees of freedom in the control of the acoustic field. The zero, or even negative, refractive sound index of metamaterials offers possibilities for the control of acoustic patterns and sound at sub-wavelength scales. Despite the tremendous growth in research on acoustic metamaterials during the last decade, the potential of metamaterial-based technologies in aeronautics has still not been fully explored, and its utilization is still in its infancy. Thus, the principal concepts mentioned above could very well provide a means to develop devices that allow the mitigation of the impact of civil aviation noise on the community. This paper gives a review of the most relevant works on acoustic metamaterials, analyzing them for their potential applicability in aeronautics, and, in this process, identifying possible implementation areas and interesting metabehaviors. It also identifies some technical challenges and possible future directions for research with the goal of unveiling the potential of metamaterials technology in aeronautics.

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: ...

  5. Principles and effects of acoustic cavitation - A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina GÂMBUŢEANU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, food industry has shown a real interest in ultrasound use because of its effect on physical, biochemical and microbial properties of food systems. In order to better understand how the acoustic cavity effects could be best applied in food industry, a review on acoustic cavitation and its effects was done. The present paper describes in detail the basic principles underlying the effects of ultrasounds on food processing applications. It also provides theoretical background on acoustic cavitation and ultrasound production method. Moreover, harnessing mechanic, optic, chemical and biological effects of acoustic cavitation in food industry were briefly highlighted.

  6. Design of a Thermoacoustic Sensor for Low Intensity Ultrasound Measurements Based on an Artificial Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jida; Chen, Jie

    2015-06-23

    In therapeutic ultrasound applications, accurate ultrasound output intensities are crucial because the physiological effects of therapeutic ultrasound are very sensitive to the intensity and duration of these applications. Although radiation force balance is a benchmark technique for measuring ultrasound intensity and power, it is costly, difficult to operate, and compromised by noise vibration. To overcome these limitations, the development of a low-cost, easy to operate, and vibration-resistant alternative device is necessary for rapid ultrasound intensity measurement. Therefore, we proposed and validated a novel two-layer thermoacoustic sensor using an artificial neural network technique to accurately measure low ultrasound intensities between 30 and 120 mW/cm2. The first layer of the sensor design is a cylindrical absorber made of plexiglass, followed by a second layer composed of polyurethane rubber with a high attenuation coefficient to absorb extra ultrasound energy. The sensor determined ultrasound intensities according to a temperature elevation induced by heat converted from incident acoustic energy. Compared with our previous one-layer sensor design, the new two-layer sensor enhanced the ultrasound absorption efficiency to provide more rapid and reliable measurements. Using a three-dimensional model in the K-wave toolbox, our simulation of the ultrasound propagation process demonstrated that the two-layer design is more efficient than the single layer design. We also integrated an artificial neural network algorithm to compensate for the large measurement offset. After obtaining multiple parameters of the sensor characteristics through calibration, the artificial neural network is built to correct temperature drifts and increase the reliability of our thermoacoustic measurements through iterative training about ten seconds. The performance of the artificial neural network method was validated through a series of experiments. Compared to our previous

  7. Effect of modulated ultrasound parameters on ultrasound-induced thrombolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltani, Azita; Volz, Kim R; Hansmann, Doulas R

    2008-01-01

    The potential of ultrasound to enhance enzyme-mediated thrombolysis by application of constant operating parameters (COP) has been widely demonstrated. In this study, the effect of ultrasound with modulated operating parameters (MOP) on enzyme-mediated thrombolysis was investigated. The MOP protocol was applied to an in vitro model of thrombolysis. The results were compared to a COP with the equivalent soft tissue thermal index (TIS) over the duration of ultrasound exposure of 30 min (p -2 ± 0.01 μm and 1.99 x 10 -2 ± 0.004 μm, respectively (p < 0.74). No signatures of inertial or stable cavitation were observed for either acoustic protocol. In conclusion, due to mechanisms other than cavitation, application of ultrasound with modulated operating parameters has the potential to significantly enhance the relative lysis enhancement compared to application of ultrasound with constant operating parameters.

  8. Treating multiple body parts for skin laxity and fat deposits using a novel focused radiofrequency device with an ultrasound component: Safety and efficacy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilukuri, Suneel; Denjean, Dominique; Fouque, Linda

    2017-12-01

    Growing demand for noninvasive skin tightening and reduction in fat results in an increasing pressure for devices with good clinical efficacy, consistency of results, and high patient comfort. The objective was to validate clinical efficacy and versatility of a novel device, which combines radiofrequency (RF) and ultrasound for treating skin laxity and fat deposits. We treated 34 subjects with facial skin laxity and/or abundant body or arm fat deposits. Subjects were divided based on their indications. Ten subjects received treatments to the face, 7 subjects to arms, 8 subjects to thighs, and 9 subjects on abdomen. All patients received 4 treatments on a weekly basis. Photographs of patients were assessed by blinded evaluators to recognize the baseline images from the 3-month follow-up images. Patient comfort and satisfaction were evaluated using a 5-point Likert scale questionnaire. Any adverse events were recorded. Patient images were correctly recognized in >90% of cases in all study groups. Patient questionnaires showed overall satisfaction with the therapy course and results. On a scale of 1 to 5, the patients agreed (4.1) that they are satisfied with the results that the treatment is comfortable (4.1) and that they are satisfied with the treatment time (4.1). No adverse events were reported. Consistent clinical efficacy was confirmed across all the treated areas, together with high patient comfort and satisfaction. We conclude the device is a highly versatile solution that can deliver results across body parts and different indications. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Ultrasound in chemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baig, S.; Farooq, R.; Malik, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    The use of ultrasound to promote chemical reactions or sono chemistry is a field of chemistry which involves the process of acoustic cavitations i.e. the collapse of microscopic bubbles in liquid. There are two essential components for the application of sono chemistry, a liquid medium and a source of high-energy vibrations. The liquid medium is necessary because sono chemistry is driven by acoustic cavitations that can only occur in liquids. The source of the vibrational energy is the transducer. The chemical effects of ultrasound include the enhancement of reaction rates at ambient temperatures and striking advancements in stoichiometric and catalytic reactions In some cases, ultrasonic irradiation can increase reactivities by nearly million fold. The ultrasound has large number of applications not only in emending old chemical processes but also in developing new synthetic strategies. Ultrasound enhances all chemical and physical processes e.g., crystallization, vitamin synthesis, preparation of catalysts, dissolution of chemicals, organometallic reactions, electrochemical processes, etc. High-power ultrasonics is a new powerful technology that is not only safe and environmentally friendly in its application but is also efficient and economical. It can be applied to existing processes to eliminate the need for chemicals and/or heat application in a variety of industrial processes. (author)

  10. Disruption of tumor neovasculature by microbubble enhanced ultrasound: a potential new physical therapy of anti-angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Gao, Shunji; Zhao, Yang; Li, Peijing; Liu, Jia; Li, Peng; Tan, Kaibin; Xie, Feng

    2012-02-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is of vital importance to the growth and metastasis of solid tumors. The angiogenesis is featured with a defective, leaky and fragile vascular construction. Microbubble enhanced ultrasound (MEUS) cavitation is capable of mechanical disruption of small blood vessels depending on effective acoustic pressure amplitude. We hypothesized that acoustic cavitation combining high-pressure amplitude pulsed ultrasound (US) and circulating microbubble could potentially disrupt tumor vasculature. A high-pressure amplitude, pulsed ultrasound device was developed to induce inertial cavitation of circulating microbubbles. The tumor vasculature of rat Walker 256 was insonated percutaneously with two acoustic pressures, 2.6 MPa and 4.8 MPa, both with intravenous injection of a lipid microbubble. The controls were treated by the ultrasound only or sham ultrasound exposure. Contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and histology were performed to assess tumor circulation and pathological changes. The CEUS results showed that the circulation of Walker 256 tumors could be completely blocked off for 24 hours in 4.8 MPa treated tumors. The CEUS gray scale value (GSV) indicated that there was significant GSV drop-off in both of the two experimental groups but none in the controls. Histology showed that the tumor microvasculature was disrupted into diffuse hematomas accompanied by thrombosis, intercellular edema and multiple cysts formation. The 24 hours of tumor circulation blockage resulted in massive necrosis of the tumor. MEUS provides a new, simple physical method for anti-angiogenic therapy and may have great potential for clinical applications. Copyright © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of layer and substrate properties on the surface acoustic wave velocity in scandium doped aluminum nitride based SAW devices on sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillinger, M., E-mail: manuel.gillinger@tuwien.ac.at; Knobloch, T.; Schneider, M.; Schmid, U. [Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Shaposhnikov, K.; Kaltenbacher, M. [Institute of Mechanics and Mechatronics, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-06

    This paper investigates the performance of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices consisting of reactively sputter deposited scandium doped aluminum nitride (Sc{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N) thin films as piezoelectric layers on sapphire substrates for wireless sensor or for RF-MEMS applications. To investigate the influence of piezoelectric film thickness on the device properties, samples with thickness ranging from 500 nm up to 3000 nm are fabricated. S{sub 21} measurements and simulations demonstrate that the phase velocity is predominantly influenced by the mass density of the electrode material rather than by the thickness of the piezoelectric film. Additionally, the wave propagation direction is varied by rotating the interdigital transducer structures with respect to the crystal orientation of the substrate. The phase velocity is about 2.5% higher for a-direction compared to m-direction of the sapphire substrate, which is in excellent agreement with the difference in the anisotropic Young's modulus of the substrate corresponding to these directions.

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ... Abdomen Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding ... Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or ... Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored ...

  14. Physics of Ultrasound. Chapter 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacefield, J. C. [University of Western Ontario, London (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    Ultrasound is the most commonly used diagnostic imaging modality, accounting for approximately 25% of all imaging examinations performed worldwide at the beginning of the 21st century. The success of ultrasound may be attributed to a number of attractive characteristics, including the relatively low cost and portability of an ultrasound scanner, the non-ionizing nature of ultrasound waves, the ability to produce real time images of blood flow and moving structures such as the beating heart, and the intrinsic contrast among soft tissue structures that is achieved without the need for an injected contrast agent. The latter characteristic enables ultrasound to be used for a wide range of medical applications, which historically have primarily included cardiac and vascular imaging, imaging of the abdominal organs and, most famously, in utero imaging of the developing fetus. Ongoing technological improvements continue to expand the use of ultrasound for many applications, including cancer imaging, musculoskeletal imaging, ophthalmology and others. The term ultrasound refers specifically to acoustic waves at frequencies greater than the maximum frequency audible to humans, which is nominally 20 kHz. Diagnostic imaging is generally performed using ultrasound in the frequency range of 2–15 MHz. The choice of frequency is dictated by a trade off between spatial resolution and penetration depth, since higher frequency waves can be focused more tightly but are attenuated more rapidly by tissue. The information contained in an ultrasonic image is influenced by the physical processes underlying propagation, reflection and attenuation of ultrasound waves in tissue.

  15. Evaluation of an Acoustic Charge Transport (ACT) device for adaptive interference suppression in spread spectrum communications systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Michael S.

    1993-12-01

    Analytical results have shown that adaptive filtering can be a powerful tool for the rejection of narrowband interference in a direct sequence spread spectrum receiver. However, the complexity of adaptive filtering hardware has hindered the experimental validation of these results. This thesis describes a unique adaptive filter architecture for implementing the Widrow-Hoff least mean square (LMS) algorithm using two state of the art acoustic charge transport (ACT) programmable transversal filters (PTF's). Signal to noise ratio improvement measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of the adaptive filter for suppressing single- and dual-tone jammers at jammer to signal ratios (JSR's) of up to 30 dB. It is shown that the ACT adaptive interference rejection system can consistently produce 55 dB notch depths with 3-dB bandwidths as low as 300 kHz with minimal degradation to the spread spectrum signal. It is also shown that the adaptive system can eliminate single tone jammers at any frequency within the spread spectrum bandwidth at any of 10, 20, or 30 dB JSRs within 10 to 15 iterations of the adaptive algorithm. The only drawback with the adaptive system as tested is the amount of time taken to perform an iteration because of the requirement to update the PTF tap weights sequentially. Suggestions are given as to how this particular parameter of the adaptive interference system could be optimized.

  16. Acoustic parametric pumping of spin waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshtgar, Hedyeh; Zareyan, Malek; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2014-11-01

    Recent experiments demonstrated generation of spin currents by ultrasound. We can understand this acoustically induced spin pumping in terms of the coupling between magnetization and lattice waves. Here we study the parametric excitation of magnetization by longitudinal acoustic waves and calculate the acoustic threshold power. The induced magnetization dynamics can be detected by the spin pumping into an adjacent normal metal that displays the inverse spin Hall effect.

  17. Acoustic parametric pumping of spin waves

    OpenAIRE

    Keshtgar, Hedyeh; Zareyan, Malek; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2013-01-01

    Recent experiments demonstrated generation of spin currents by ultrasound. We can understand this acoustically induced spin pumping in terms of the coupling between magnetization and lattice waves. Here we study the parametric excitation of magnetization by longitudinal acoustic waves and calculate the acoustic threshold power. The induced magnetization dynamics can be detected by the spin pumping into an adjacent normal metal that displays the inverse spin Hall effect.

  18. Architectural acoustics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Long, Marshall

    2014-01-01

    .... Beginning with a brief history, it reviews the fundamentals of acoustics, human perception and reaction to sound, acoustic noise measurements, noise metrics, and environmental noise characterization...

  19. Acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    The volume contains six papers which together provide an overall review of the inspection technique known as acoustic emission or stress wave emission. The titles are: a welder's introduction to acoustic emission technology; use of acoustic emission for detection of defects as they arise during fabrication; examples of laboratory application and assessment of acoustic emission in the United Kingdom; (Part I: acoustic emission behaviour of low alloy steels; Part II: fatigue crack assessment from proof testing and continuous monitoring); inspection of selected areas of engineering structures by acoustic emission; Japanese experience in laboratory and practical applications of acoustic emission to welded structures; and ASME acoustic emission code status. (U.K.)

  20. Non-Thermal High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Breast Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Comet assay reveals DNA strand breaks induced by ultrasonic cavitation in vitro, Ultrasound in medicine & biology 1995; 21: 841-8. 3. Dalecki D...doxorubicin, focused ultrasound , HIFU, prostate cancer I. INTRODUCTION Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pFUS) is able to create acoustic cavitation ... ultrasound for breast cancer therapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Chang Ming (Charlie) Ma, Ph.D

  1. Broadband manipulation of refracted wavefronts by gradient acoustic metasurface with V-shape structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Jun; Li, Yifeng; Liu, Xiaozhou

    2017-12-01

    We present a space folding acoustic metasurface with a V-shaped structure, which exhibits ultra-broadband and high efficiency transmission compared to previously investigated space folding metasurfaces. The proposal employs a gradient refractive index profile to redirect the refracted wave arbitrarily and an existence of air channels with direct sound propagation to improve impedance matching between the metasurface and the background medium. As expected from frequency-independent generalized Snell's law, the demonstrated acoustic metasurface can steer refracted wavefronts at will, including anomalous refraction, non-diffracting Bessel beam, sub-wavelength flat lens, and conversion of the propagating wave into the surface wave. The designed V-shape metasurface overcomes the limitation of narrowband, which may offer potential applications in medical ultrasound imaging and broadband acoustical devices.

  2. Review of Progress in Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Pérez, Nicolás; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2018-04-01

    Acoustic levitation uses acoustic radiation forces to counteract gravity and suspend objects in mid-air. Although acoustic levitation was first demonstrated almost a century ago, for a long time, it was limited to objects much smaller than the acoustic wavelength levitating at fixed positions in space. Recent advances in acoustic levitation now allow not only suspending but also rotating and translating objects in three dimensions. Acoustic levitation is also no longer restricted to small objects and can now be employed to levitate objects larger than the acoustic wavelength. This article reviews the progress of acoustic levitation, focusing on the working mechanism of different types of acoustic levitation devices developed to date. We start with a brief review of the theory. Then, we review the acoustic levitation methods to suspend objects at fixed positions, followed by the techniques that allow the manipulation of objects. Finally, we present a brief summary and offer some future perspectives for acoustic levitation.

  3. A novel composite material specifically developed for ultrasound bone phantoms: cortical, trabecular and skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wydra, A; Maev, R Gr

    2013-01-01

    In the various stages of developing diagnostic and therapeutic equipment, the use of phantoms can play a very important role in improving the process, help in implementation, testing and calibrations. Phantoms are especially useful in developing new applications and training new doctors in medical schools. However, devices that use different physical factors, such as MRI, Ultrasound, CT Scan, etc will require the phantom to be made of different physical properties. In this paper we introduce the properties of recently designed new materials for developing phantoms for ultrasonic human body investigation, which in today's market make up more than 30% in the world of phantoms. We developed a novel composite material which allows fabrication of various kinds of ultrasound bone phantoms to mimic most of the acoustical properties of human bones. In contrast to the ex vivo tissues, the proposed material can maintain the physical and acoustical properties unchanged for long periods of time; moreover, these properties can be custom designed and created to suit specific needs. As a result, we introduce three examples of ultrasound phantoms that we manufactured in our laboratory: cortical, trabecular and skull bone phantoms. The paper also presents the results of a comparison study between the acoustical and physical properties of actual human bones (reported in the referenced literatures) and the phantoms manufactured by us. (note)

  4. Compact acoustic levitation device for studies in fluid dynamics and material science in the laboratory and microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.

    1985-01-01

    An ultrasonic levitation device operable in both ordinary ground-based as well as in potential space-borne laboratories is described together with its various applications in the fields of fluid dynamics, material science, and light scattering. Some of the phenomena which can be studied by this instrument include surface waves on freely suspended liquids, the variations of the surface tension with temperature and contamination, the deep undercooling of materials with the temperature variations of their density and viscosity, and finally some of the optical diffraction properties of transparent substances.

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ... the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on ... to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached ...

  7. Love Acoustic Wave-Based Devices and Molecularly-Imprinted Polymers as Versatile Sensors for Electronic Nose or Tongue for Cancer Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Dejous

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and actual analytical techniques are restrictive in detecting it. Thus, there is still a challenge, as well as a need, for the development of quantitative non-invasive tools for the diagnosis of cancers and the follow-up care of patients. We introduce first the overall interest of electronic nose or tongue for such application of microsensors arrays with data processing in complex media, either gas (e.g., Volatile Organic Compounds or VOCs as biomarkers in breath or liquid (e.g., modified nucleosides as urinary biomarkers. Then this is illustrated with a versatile acoustic wave transducer, functionalized with molecularly-imprinted polymers (MIP synthesized for adenosine-5′-monophosphate (AMP as a model for nucleosides. The device including the thin film coating is described, then static measurements with scanning electron microscopy (SEM and electrical characterization after each step of the sensitive MIP process (deposit, removal of AMP template, capture of AMP target demonstrate the thin film functionality. Dynamic measurements with a microfluidic setup and four targets are presented afterwards. They show a sensitivity of 5 Hz·ppm−1 of the non-optimized microsensor for AMP detection, with a specificity of three times compared to PMPA, and almost nil sensitivity to 3′AMP and CMP, in accordance with previously published results on bulk MIP.

  8. Ultrasound therapy applicators for controlled thermal modification of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, E. Clif; Lichtenstiger, Carol; Rund, Laurie; Keralapura, Mallika; Gossett, Chad; Stahlhut, Randy; Neubauer, Paul; Komadina, Bruce; Williams, Emery; Alix, Chris; Jensen, Tor; Schook, Lawrence; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-03-01

    Heat therapy has long been used for treatments in dermatology and sports medicine. The use of laser, RF, microwave, and more recently, ultrasound treatment, for psoriasis, collagen reformation, and skin tightening has gained considerable interest over the past several years. Numerous studies and commercial devices have demonstrated the efficacy of these methods for treatment of skin disorders. Despite these promising results, current systems remain highly dependent on operator skill, and cannot effectively treat effectively because there is little or no control of the size, shape, and depth of the target zone. These limitations make it extremely difficult to obtain consistent treatment results. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility for using acoustic energy for controlled dose delivery sufficient to produce collagen modification for the treatment of skin tissue in the dermal and sub-dermal layers. We designed and evaluated a curvilinear focused ultrasound device for treating skin disorders such as psoriasis, stimulation of wound healing, tightening of skin through shrinkage of existing collagen and stimulation of new collagen formation, and skin cancer. Design parameters were examined using acoustic pattern simulations and thermal modeling. Acute studies were performed in 201 freshly-excised samples of young porcine underbelly skin tissue and 56 in-vivo treatment areas in 60- 80 kg pigs. These were treated with ultrasound (9-11MHz) focused in the deep dermis. Dose distribution was analyzed and gross pathology assessed. Tissue shrinkage was measured based on fiducial markers and video image registration and analyzed using NIH Image-J software. Comparisons were made between RF and focused ultrasound for five energy ranges. In each experimental series, therapeutic dose levels (60degC) were attained at 2-5mm depth. Localized collagen changes ranged from 1-3% for RF versus 8-15% for focused ultrasound. Therapeutic ultrasound applied at high

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal vaginal bleeding other menstrual problems Ultrasound exams ... pelvic ultrasound can help evaluate: pelvic masses pelvic pain ambiguous genitalia and anomalies of pelvic organs early ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... size, shape and consistency (whether the object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pictures of a man’s prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an ... Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Prostate ultrasound, ...

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal vaginal bleeding other menstrual problems Ultrasound exams also help identify: ... fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or ...

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams ... are three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) for women rectal ( transrectal ) for men ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the procedure? In women, a pelvic ultrasound is most often performed to evaluate the: uterus cervix ovaries ... page How is the procedure performed? Transabdominal: For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face- ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is used to evaluate the: bladder seminal vesicles prostate Transrectal ultrasound, a special study usually done to provide detailed evaluation of the prostate gland, involves inserting a specialized ultrasound transducer into ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding ... questions or for a referral to a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Ultrasound is widely available, easy-to-use ... procedures such as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids ovarian or uterine cancers A transvaginal ultrasound is usually performed to view the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) and the ovaries. Transvaginal ultrasound also evaluates the myometrium (muscular walls ...

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... those sound waves to create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in ... abnormal masses, such as tumors. In an ultrasound examination, a transducer both sends the sound waves into ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... needles are used to extract a sample of cells from organs for laboratory testing. Doppler ultrasound images ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no ... structure and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging uses no ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning ... radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn ... sexes without x-ray exposure. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... help to distract the child and make the time pass quickly. The ultrasound exam room may have ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ... bowel (rectum) removed during prior surgery are not good candidates for ultrasound of the prostate gland because ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Imaging? Ultrasound waves are disrupted by air or gas; therefore ultrasound is not an ideal imaging technique ... page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer ...

  10. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ... Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide procedures such as needle ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound exams in which the transducer ... in the sperm or urine following the procedure. After an ultrasound examination, you should be able to ...

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... investigation of the uterine cavity . Three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound permits evaluation of the uterus and ovaries ... abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or sonohysterography for patients with infertility. In ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and produces pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound ... from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and produces pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound ... from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... menstrual problems Ultrasound exams also help identify: palpable masses such as ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids ovarian ... In children, pelvic ultrasound can help evaluate: pelvic masses pelvic pain ambiguous genitalia and anomalies of pelvic ...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive, and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. ... create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. ... create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and development of an embryo or fetus during pregnancy. See the Obstetrical Ultrasound page for more information . ... object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face-up on an examination table that can be ... region of the prostate. A biopsy will add time to the procedure. If a Doppler ultrasound study ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams are frequently used to evaluate the ... vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) for women rectal ( transrectal ) for men A Doppler ultrasound exam may be part of ...

  3. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cummer, Steven A. ; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales....... The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create......-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview...

  4. Advancements in the Design and Fabrication of Ultrasound Transducers for Extreme Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosyj, Christopher

    An ultrasound transducer for operation from room temperature to 800 °C is developed. The device includes a lithium niobate piezoelectric crystal, a porous zirconia attenuative backing layer, and a quarter wavelength matching layer. The manufacturing procedure for porous zirconia is optimized by adjusting pore size and forming pressure to yield good acoustic performance and mechanical integrity. Several acoustic coupling methods are evaluated. A novel silver-copper braze and an aluminum-based braze are found to be suitable at elevated temperatures. Several materials are evaluated for their performance as a quarter wavelength matching layer in the transducer stack. The use of either a nickel-chromium or stainless steel matching layer is established in place of ceramic components. Equipment limitations prevent evaluation at 800 °C, though ultrasound transmission is theoretically achievable with the devices established by this study. Reliable high-amplitude, wide-bandwidth ultrasound transmission is achieved from room temperature to 600 °C with two transducer variants.

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound waves are ...

  6. The role of acoustic nonlinearity in tissue heating behind a rib cage using a high-intensity focused ultrasound phased array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuldashev, Petr V.; Shmeleva, Svetlana M.; Ilyin, Sergey A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Gavrilov, Leonid R.; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2013-04-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate theoretically the effects of nonlinear propagation in a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) field produced by a therapeutic phased array and the resultant heating of tissue behind a rib cage. Three configurations of focusing were simulated: in water, in water with ribs in the beam path and in water with ribs backed by a layer of soft tissue. The Westervelt equation was used to model the nonlinear HIFU field, and a 1 MHz phased array consisting of 254 circular elements was used as a boundary condition to the model. The temperature rise in tissue was modelled using the bioheat equation, and thermally necrosed volumes were calculated using the thermal dose formulation. The shapes of lesions predicted by the modelling were compared with those previously obtained in in vitro experiments at low-power sonications. Intensity levels at the face of the array elements that corresponded to the formation of high-amplitude shock fronts in the focal region were determined as 10 W cm-2 in the free field in water and 40 W cm-2 in the presence of ribs. It was shown that exposures with shocks provided a substantial increase in tissue heating, and its better spatial localization in the main focal region only. The relative effects of overheating ribs and splitting of the focus due to the periodic structure of the ribs were therefore reduced. These results suggest that utilizing nonlinear propagation and shock formation effects can be beneficial for inducing confined HIFU lesions when irradiating through obstructions such as ribs. Design of compact therapeutic arrays to provide maximum power outputs with lower intensity levels at the elements is necessary to achieve shock wave regimes for clinically relevant sonication depths in tissue.

  7. Inspection of copper canister for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Copper characterization, FSW monitoring with acoustic emission and ultrasonic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz

    2009-08-01

    This report contains the research results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in 2008. The first part of the report is concerned with aspects related to ultrasonic attenuation of copper material used for canisters. We present results of attenuation measurement performed for a number of samples taken from a real canister; two from the lid and four from different parts of canister wall. Ultrasonic attenuation of the material originating from canister lid is relatively low (less that 50 dB/m) and essentially frequency independent in the frequency range up to 5 MHz. However, for the material originating from the extruded canister part considerable variations of the attenuation are observed, which can reach even 200 dB/m at 3.5 MHz. In the second part of the report we present further development of the concept of the friction stir welding process monitoring by means of multiple sensors formed into a uniform circular array (UCA). After a brief introduction into modeling Lamb waves and UCA we focus on array processing techniques that enable estimating direction of arrival of multimodal Lamb waves. We consider two new techniques, the Capon beamformer and the broadband multiple signal classification technique (MUSIC). We present simulation results illustrating their performance. In the final part we present the phase shift migration algorithm for ultrasonic imaging of layered media using synthetic aperture concept. We start from explaining theory of the phase migration concept, which is followed by the results of experiments performed on copper blocks with drilled holes. We show that the proposed algorithm performs well for immersion inspection of metal objects and yields both improved spatial resolution and suppressed grain noise

  8. Inspection of copper canister for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Copper characterization, FSW monitoring with acoustic emission and ultrasonic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz (ed.); Engholm, Marcus; Olofsson, Tomas (Uppsala Univ., Signals and Systems, Dept. of Technical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2009-08-15

    This report contains the research results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in 2008. The first part of the report is concerned with aspects related to ultrasonic attenuation of copper material used for canisters. We present results of attenuation measurement performed for a number of samples taken from a real canister; two from the lid and four from different parts of canister wall. Ultrasonic attenuation of the material originating from canister lid is relatively low (less that 50 dB/m) and essentially frequency independent in the frequency range up to 5 MHz. However, for the material originating from the extruded canister part considerable variations of the attenuation are observed, which can reach even 200 dB/m at 3.5 MHz. In the second part of the report we present further development of the concept of the friction stir welding process monitoring by means of multiple sensors formed into a uniform circular array (UCA). After a brief introduction into modeling Lamb waves and UCA we focus on array processing techniques that enable estimating direction of arrival of multimodal Lamb waves. We consider two new techniques, the Capon beamformer and the broadband multiple signal classification technique (MUSIC). We present simulation results illustrating their performance. In the final part we present the phase shift migration algorithm for ultrasonic imaging of layered media using synthetic aperture concept. We start from explaining theory of the phase migration concept, which is followed by the results of experiments performed on copper blocks with drilled holes. We show that the proposed algorithm performs well for immersion inspection of metal objects and yields both improved spatial resolution and suppressed grain noise

  9. On the propagation of elastic waves in acoustically anisotropic austenitic materials and at their boundaries during non-destructive inspection with ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munikoti, V.K.

    2001-03-01

    In this work the propagation behaviour of ultrasound in austenitic weld metal has been analyzed by the time-harmonic plane wave approach. Bounded beam and pulse propagation as occurring in ultrasonic testing can be sufficiently dealt with by this approach. More sophisticated approaches principally do not offer any improvements in the results of plane wave modeling except for diffraction and aperture effects and, therefore, the subject matter of this work has been limited to plane wave propagation in the bulk of the medium and at different types of interfaces. Inspite of the fact, that the individual columnar grains of the weld metal have cubic symmetry, the austenitic weld metal as a whole exhibits cylinder-symmetrical texture, as substantiated by metallurgical examination, and therefore has been treated as an anisotropic poly-crystalline medium with transverse isotropic symmetry. (orig.) [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird die Ultraschallausbreitung in akustisch anisotropen, homogenen Werkstoffen mit stengelkristalliner Textur wie austenitischen Plattierungen und Schweissverbindungen, austenitischem Guss oder geschweissten Komponenten aus austenitischem Guss modelliert. Wie die in dieser Arbeit referierten metallurgischen Untersuchungen gezeigt haben, koennen austenitisches Schweissgut und stengelkristallin erstarrter austenitischer Guss makroskopisch als polykristallines Medium mit zylindersymmetrischer Textur behandelt werden, also als Medium mit transversal isotroper Symmetrie, obwohl mikroskopisch die einzelnen Stengelkristallite kubische Symmetrie aufweisen. Die Schallausbreitung wird mit Hilfe des Ansatzes ebener Wellen modelliert. Obwohl bei der Ultraschallpruefung gepulste und begrenzte Schallbuendel verwendet werden, liefert dieser Ansatz die bei der Ultraschallpruefung beobachteten Wellenarten mit Geschwindigkeiten und Polarisationen, Schallbuendelablenkung und Reflexion und Brechnung nach Richtung und Amplitude, so dass ueber das Modell der ebenen

  10. Acoustically assisted diffusion through membranes and biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floros, J.D.; Liang, H.

    1994-01-01

    Part of a special section on the symposium ''Ultrasonic Applications in the Food Industry.'' The use of high-intensity ultrasound in food processing is reviewed. Acoustic radiation, or sound, can be used to monitor various operations or products or to alter a process or product; however, the direct use of sound to improve food processes is not very popular. High-intensity acoustic radiation induces various changes as it passes through a medium, largely as a result of heating, cavitation, agitation and shear stresses, compression and rarefaction, and turbulence. The diffusion of sound through a medium is influenced by factors such as the temperature, acoustic intensity, acoustic frequency, direction of the acoustic wave, pulsation of the acoustic wave, and properties of the medium. Some potential applications of acoustic energy in food processes are increased drying efficiency, acceleration of diffusion through polymeric and biological membranes, and enhanced diffusion through porous materials

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and ...

  12. Elaboration of protocols as a guide in musculoskeletal ultrasound for radiology service of the Hospital Doctor Rafael A. Calderon Guardia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos Hernandez, Luis Diego

    2010-01-01

    A protocol to guide residents and attending physicians at the Hospital Dr. Rafael Angel Calderon Guardia has been provided for regulating the work in the field the ultrasound of muscles, tendons and sonography. The staff has handled the ultrasound devices must understand the basis of the interaction of acoustic energy to the tissues and to know the methods and instruments have been used to produce and improve the quality of the image obtained. The guide ultrasound normal locomotor allowed to have a model for service members and medical imaging radiology hospital; it has been prepared through a comprehensive literature review based on textbooks and current articles concerning the most important theoretical bases of the Doppler study, which covers the assessment of shoulder, elbow, wrist, knee and ankle. The data obtained in the study process, facilitated access to printed and digital information, which has led to diagnostic certainty and reliability of results. (author) [es

  13. A high-frequency transimpedance amplifier for CMOS integrated 2D CMUT array towards 3D ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiwei; Cheong, Jia Hao; Cha, Hyouk-Kyu; Yu, Hongbin; Je, Minkyu; Yu, Hao

    2013-01-01

    One transimpedance amplifier based CMOS analog front-end (AFE) receiver is integrated with capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducers (CMUTs) towards high frequency 3D ultrasound imaging. Considering device specifications from CMUTs, the TIA is designed to amplify received signals from 17.5MHz to 52.5MHz with center frequency at 35MHz; and is fabricated in Global Foundry 0.18-µm 30-V high-voltage (HV) Bipolar/CMOS/DMOS (BCD) process. The measurement results show that the TIA with power-supply 6V can reach transimpedance gain of 61dBΩ and operating frequency from 17.5MHz to 100MHz. The measured input referred noise is 27.5pA/√Hz. Acoustic pulse-echo testing is conducted to demonstrate the receiving functionality of the designed 3D ultrasound imaging system.

  14. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  15. Broadband unidirectional ultrasound propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2017-12-12

    A passive, linear arrangement of a sonic crystal-based apparatus and method including a 1D sonic crystal, a nonlinear medium, and an acoustic low-pass filter, for permitting unidirectional broadband ultrasound propagation as a collimated beam for underwater, air or other fluid communication, are described. The signal to be transmitted is first used to modulate a high-frequency ultrasonic carrier wave which is directed into the sonic crystal side of the apparatus. The apparatus processes the modulated signal, whereby the original low-frequency signal exits the apparatus as a collimated beam on the side of the apparatus opposite the sonic crystal. The sonic crystal provides a bandpass acoustic filter through which the modulated high-frequency ultrasonic signal passes, and the nonlinear medium demodulates the modulated signal and recovers the low-frequency sound beam. The low-pass filter removes remaining high-frequency components, and contributes to the unidirectional property of the apparatus.

  16. Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  17. A feasibility study of in vivo applications of single beam acoustic tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ying; Lee, Changyang; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2014-01-01

    Tools that are capable of manipulating micro-sized objects have been widely used in such fields as physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Several devices, including optical tweezers, atomic force microscope, micro-pipette aspirator, and standing surface wave type acoustic tweezers have been studied to satisfy this need. However, none of them has been demonstrated to be suitable for in vivo and clinical studies. Single beam acoustic tweezers (SBAT) is a technology that uses highly focused acoustic beam to trap particles toward the beam focus. Its feasibility was first theoretically and experimentally demonstrated by Lee and Shung several years ago. Since then, much effort has been devoted to improving this technology. At present, the tool is capable of trapping a microparticle as small as 1 μm, as well as a single red blood cell. Although in comparing to other microparticles manipulating technologies, SBAT has advantages of providing stronger trapping force and deeper penetration depth in tissues, and producing less tissue damage, its potential for in vivo applications has yet been explored. It is worth noting that ultrasound has been used as a diagnostic tool for over 50 years and no known major adverse effects have been observed at the diagnostic energy level. This paper reports the results of an initial attempt to assess the feasibility of single beam acoustic tweezers to trap microparticles in vivo inside of a blood vessel. The acoustic intensity of SBAT under the trapping conditions that were utilized was measured. The mechanical index and thermal index at the focus of acoustic beam were found to be 0.48 and 0.044, respectively, which meet the standard of commercial diagnostic ultrasound system.

  18. A feasibility study of in vivo applications of single beam acoustic tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying, E-mail: yli582@usc.edu; Lee, Changyang; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk [NIH Transducer Resource Center and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-1111 (United States)

    2014-10-27

    Tools that are capable of manipulating micro-sized objects have been widely used in such fields as physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Several devices, including optical tweezers, atomic force microscope, micro-pipette aspirator, and standing surface wave type acoustic tweezers have been studied to satisfy this need. However, none of them has been demonstrated to be suitable for in vivo and clinical studies. Single beam acoustic tweezers (SBAT) is a technology that uses highly focused acoustic beam to trap particles toward the beam focus. Its feasibility was first theoretically and experimentally demonstrated by Lee and Shung several years ago. Since then, much effort has been devoted to improving this technology. At present, the tool is capable of trapping a microparticle as small as 1 μm, as well as a single red blood cell. Although in comparing to other microparticles manipulating technologies, SBAT has advantages of providing stronger trapping force and deeper penetration depth in tissues, and producing less tissue damage, its potential for in vivo applications has yet been explored. It is worth noting that ultrasound has been used as a diagnostic tool for over 50 years and no known major adverse effects have been observed at the diagnostic energy level. This paper reports the results of an initial attempt to assess the feasibility of single beam acoustic tweezers to trap microparticles in vivo inside of a blood vessel. The acoustic intensity of SBAT under the trapping conditions that were utilized was measured. The mechanical index and thermal index at the focus of acoustic beam were found to be 0.48 and 0.044, respectively, which meet the standard of commercial diagnostic ultrasound system.

  19. Treatment of near-skull brain tissue with a focused device using shear-mode conversion: a numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichardo, Samuel; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2007-01-01

    Shear mode transmission through the skull has been previously proposed as a new trans-skull propagation technique for noninvasive therapeutic ultrasound (Clement 2004 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 115 1356-64). The main advantage of choosing shear over longitudinal mode resides on the fact that there is less wavefront distortion with the former. In the present study, the regions of the brain suitable for shear-mode transmission were established for a simple focused ultrasound device. The device consists of a spherically curved transducer that has a focal length of 10 cm, an aperture between 30 0 and 60 0 and operates at 0.74 MHz. The regions suitable for shear-mode transmission were determined by the shear wave acoustic windows that matched the shape of the device acoustic field. The acoustic windows were calculated using segmentation and triangulation of outer and inner faces of skull from 3D-MRI head datasets. Nine heads of healthy adults were analyzed. The surface considered for the calculations was the head region found above the supra-orbital margin. For every inspected point in the brain volume, the axis of the device was determined by the vector between this inspection point and a point located in the center of the brain. Numerical predictions of the acoustic field, where shear-mode conversion through the skull was considered, were obtained and compared to the case of water-only conditions. The brain tissue that is close to the skull showed suitable acoustic windows for shear waves. The central region of the brain seems to be unreachable using shear-mode. Analysis of the acoustic fields showed a proportional relation between the acoustic window for shear mode and the effective degree of focusing. However, this relation showed significant differences among specimens. In general, highly focused fields were obtained when the acoustic window for shear waves (A SW ) intersected more than 67% of the entering acoustic window (A TX ) of the device. The average depth from the

  20. Topological Acoustic Delay Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiwang; Tian, Ye; Cheng, Ying; Wei, Qi; Liu, Xiaojun; Christensen, Johan

    2018-03-01

    Topological protected wave engineering in artificially structured media is at the frontier of ongoing metamaterials research that is inspired by quantum mechanics. Acoustic analogues of electronic topological insulators have recently led to a wealth of new opportunities in manipulating sound propagation with strikingly unconventional acoustic edge modes immune to backscattering. Earlier fabrications of topological insulators are characterized by an unreconfigurable geometry and a very narrow frequency response, which severely hinders the exploration and design of useful devices. Here we establish topologically protected sound in reconfigurable phononic crystals that can be switched on and off simply by rotating its three-legged "atoms" without altering the lattice structure. In particular, we engineer robust phase delay defects that take advantage of the ultrabroadband reflection-free sound propagation. Such topological delay lines serve as a paradigm in compact acoustic devices, interconnects, and electroacoustic integrated circuits.

  1. Acoustic force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitters, G.; Kamsma, D.; Thalhammer, G.; Ritsch-Marte, M.; Peterman, E.J.G.; Wuite, G.J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Force spectroscopy has become an indispensable tool to unravel the structural and mechanochemical properties of biomolecules. Here we extend the force spectroscopy toolbox with an acoustic manipulation device that can exert forces from subpiconewtons to hundreds of piconewtons on thousands of

  2. Oscillating acoustic streaming jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moudjed, Brahim; Botton, Valery; Henry, Daniel; Millet, Severine; Ben Hadid, Hamda; Garandet, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    The present paper provides the first experimental investigation of an oscillating acoustic streaming jet. The observations are performed in the far field of a 2 MHz circular plane ultrasound transducer introduced in a rectangular cavity filled with water. Measurements are made by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in horizontal and vertical planes near the end of the cavity. Oscillations of the jet appear in this zone, for a sufficiently high Reynolds number, as an intermittent phenomenon on an otherwise straight jet fluctuating in intensity. The observed perturbation pattern is similar to that of former theoretical studies. This intermittently oscillatory behavior is the first step to the transition to turbulence. (authors)

  3. Registration of human skull computed tomography data to an ultrasound treatment space using a sparse high frequency ultrasound hemispherical array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Reilly, Meaghan A., E-mail: moreilly@sri.utoronto.ca; Jones, Ryan M. [Physical Sciences Platform, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); Birman, Gabriel [Physical Sciences Platform, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Hynynen, Kullervo [Physical Sciences Platform, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G9 (Canada)

    2016-09-15

    Purpose: Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) shows great promise for a range of therapeutic applications in the brain. Current clinical investigations rely on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to monitor treatments and for the registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT)-data to the MR images at the time of treatment to correct the sound aberrations caused by the skull. For some applications, MRI is not an appropriate choice for therapy monitoring and its cost may limit the accessibility of these treatments. An alternative approach, using high frequency ultrasound measurements to localize the skull surface and register CT data to the ultrasound treatment space, for the purposes of skull-related phase aberration correction and treatment targeting, has been developed. Methods: A prototype high frequency, hemispherical sparse array was fabricated. Pulse-echo measurements of the surface of five ex vivo human skulls were made, and the CT datasets of each skull were obtained. The acoustic data were used to rigidly register the CT-derived skull surface to the treatment space. The ultrasound-based registrations of the CT datasets were compared to the gold-standard landmark-based registrations. Results: The results show on an average sub-millimeter (0.9 ± 0.2 mm) displacement and subdegree (0.8° ± 0.4°) rotation registration errors. Numerical simulations predict that registration errors on this scale will result in a mean targeting error of 1.0 ± 0.2 mm and reduction in focal pressure of 1.0% ± 0.6% when targeting a midbrain structure (e.g., hippocampus) using a commercially available low-frequency brain prototype device (InSightec, 230 kHz brain system). Conclusions: If combined with ultrasound-based treatment monitoring techniques, this registration method could allow for the development of a low-cost transcranial FUS treatment platform to make this technology more widely available.

  4. Registration of human skull computed tomography data to an ultrasound treatment space using a sparse high frequency ultrasound hemispherical array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Meaghan A; Jones, Ryan M; Birman, Gabriel; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-09-01

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) shows great promise for a range of therapeutic applications in the brain. Current clinical investigations rely on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to monitor treatments and for the registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT)-data to the MR images at the time of treatment to correct the sound aberrations caused by the skull. For some applications, MRI is not an appropriate choice for therapy monitoring and its cost may limit the accessibility of these treatments. An alternative approach, using high frequency ultrasound measurements to localize the skull surface and register CT data to the ultrasound treatment space, for the purposes of skull-related phase aberration correction and treatment targeting, has been developed. A prototype high frequency, hemispherical sparse array was fabricated. Pulse-echo measurements of the surface of five ex vivo human skulls were made, and the CT datasets of each skull were obtained. The acoustic data were used to rigidly register the CT-derived skull surface to the treatment space. The ultrasound-based registrations of the CT datasets were compared to the gold-standard landmark-based registrations. The results show on an average sub-millimeter (0.9 ± 0.2 mm) displacement and subdegree (0.8° ± 0.4°) rotation registration errors. Numerical simulations predict that registration errors on this scale will result in a mean targeting error of 1.0 ± 0.2 mm and reduction in focal pressure of 1.0% ± 0.6% when targeting a midbrain structure (e.g., hippocampus) using a commercially available low-frequency brain prototype device (InSightec, 230 kHz brain system). If combined with ultrasound-based treatment monitoring techniques, this registration method could allow for the development of a low-cost transcranial FUS treatment platform to make this technology more widely available.

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  6. Integrated low power ultrasound sensor interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Imagine that the technical development can take the ultrasound measurement systems from the large piece of machinery today, to a coin size system tomorrow. The factor that has reduced the size of electronic systems over time is integration and integrated circuits. In this thesis circuit simulator models of complete ultrasound systems are used to design custom integrated circuits. These circuits are optimized for low power consumption and small size. The models that are used predict the acoust...

  7. Design Issues for Therapeutic Ultrasound Angioplasty Waveguides

    OpenAIRE

    Noone, Declan; Gavin, Graham; McGuinness, Garrett

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound angioplasty is a new minimally invasive cardiovascular procedure for disrupting atherosclerotic lesions. Mechanical energy is transmitted in the form of ultrasound waves via long, flexible wire waveguides navigated to the lesion site through the vascular system. The underpinning principle of this technology is that plaque may be disrupted through a combination of direct contact ablation, pressure waves, cavitation and acoustic streaming, which all depend on the amplitud...

  8. Investigation of acoustic waves generated in an elastic solid by a pulsed ion beam and their application in a FIB based scanning ion acoustic microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmadaliev, C.

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the acoustic wave generation by pulsed and periodically modulated ion beams in different solid materials depending on the beam parameters and to demonstrate the possibility to apply an intensity modulated focused ion beam (FIB) for acoustic emission and for nondestructive investigation of the internal structure of materials on a microscopic scale. The combination of a FIB and an ultrasound microscope in one device can provide the opportunity of nondestructive investigation, production and modification of micro- and nanostructures simultaneously. This work consists of the two main experimental parts. In the first part the process of elastic wave generation during the irradiation of metallic samples by a pulsed beam of energetic ions was investigated in an energy range from 1.5 to 10 MeV and pulse durations of 0.5-5 μs, applying ions with different masses, e.g. oxygen, silicon and gold, in charge states from 1 + to 4 + . The acoustic amplitude dependence on the ion beam parameters like the ion mass and energy, the ion charge state, the beam spot size and the pulse duration were of interest. This work deals with ultrasound transmitted in a solid, i.e. bulk waves, because of their importance for acoustic transmission microscopy and nondestructive inspection of internal structure of a sample. The second part of this work was carried out using the IMSA-100 FIB system operating in an energy range from 30 to 70 keV. The scanning ion acoustic microscope based on this FIB system was developed and tested. (orig.)

  9. Investigation of acoustic waves generated in an elastic solid by a pulsed ion beam and their application in a FIB based scanning ion acoustic microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmadaliev, C.

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the acoustic wave generation by pulsed and periodically modulated ion beams in different solid materials depending on the beam parameters and to demonstrate the possibility to apply an intensity modulated focused ion beam (FIB) for acoustic emission and for nondestructive investigation of the internal structure of materials on a microscopic scale. The combination of a FIB and an ultrasound microscope in one device can provide the opportunity of nondestructive investigation, production and modification of micro- and nanostructures simultaneously. This work consists of the two main experimental parts. In the first part the process of elastic wave generation during the irradiation of metallic samples by a pulsed beam of energetic ions was investigated in an energy range from 1.5 to 10 MeV and pulse durations of 0.5-5 {mu}s, applying ions with different masses, e.g. oxygen, silicon and gold, in charge states from 1{sup +} to 4{sup +}. The acoustic amplitude dependence on the ion beam parameters like the ion mass and energy, the ion charge state, the beam spot size and the pulse duration were of interest. This work deals with ultrasound transmitted in a solid, i.e. bulk waves, because of their importance for acoustic transmission microscopy and nondestructive inspection of internal structure of a sample. The second part of this work was carried out using the IMSA-100 FIB system operating in an energy range from 30 to 70 keV. The scanning ion acoustic microscope based on this FIB system was developed and tested. (orig.)

  10. Portable Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Ianni, Tommaso

    This PhD project investigates hardware strategies and imaging methods for hand-held ultrasound systems. The overall idea is to use a wireless ultrasound probe linked to general-purpose mobile devices for the processing and visualization. The approach has the potential to reduce the upfront costs...... beamforming strategies are simulated from a system-level perspective. The quality of the B-mode image is evaluated and the minimum specifications are derived for the design of a portable probe with integrated electronics in-handle. The system is based on a synthetic aperture sequential beamforming approach...... that allows to significantly reduce the data rate between the probe and processing unit. The second part investigates the feasibility of vector flow imaging in a hand-held ultrasound system. Vector flow imaging overcomes the limitations of conventional imaging methods in terms of flow angle compensation...

  11. Monitoring of transient cavitation induced by ultrasound and intense pulsed light in presence of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazgarnia, Ameneh; Shanei, Ahmad; Shanei, Mohammad Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important challenges in medical treatment is invention of a minimally invasive approach in order to induce lethal damages to cancer cells. Application of high intensity focused ultrasound can be beneficial to achieve this goal via the cavitation process. Existence of the particles and vapor in a liquid decreases the ultrasonic intensity threshold required for cavitation onset. In this study, synergism of intense pulsed light (IPL) and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) has been investigated as a means of providing nucleation sites for acoustic cavitation. Several approaches have been reported with the aim of cavitation monitoring. We conducted the experiments on the basis of sonochemiluminescence (SCL) and chemical dosimetric methods. The acoustic cavitation activity was investigated by determining the integrated SCL signal acquired over polyacrylamide gel phantoms containing luminol in the presence and absence of GNPs in the wavelength range of 400-500 nm using a spectrometer equipped with cooled charged coupled devices (CCD) during irradiation by different intensities of 1 MHz ultrasound and IPL pulses. In order to confirm these results, the terephthalic acid chemical dosimeter was utilized as well. The SCL signal recorded in the gel phantoms containing GNPs at different intensities of ultrasound in the presence of intense pulsed light was higher than the gel phantoms without GNPs. These results have been confirmed by the obtained data from the chemical dosimetry method. Acoustic cavitation in the presence of GNPs and intense pulsed light has been suggested as a new approach designed for decreasing threshold intensity of acoustic cavitation and improving targeted therapeutic effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... inserted into a man's rectum to view the prostate. Transvaginal ultrasound. The transducer is inserted into a ... Stenting Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Biopsies - Overview Images related to General Ultrasound Videos ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to produce ... the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? What is General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and ...

  14. High-frequency Doppler ultrasound transducer for the peripheral circulatory system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Youngmin; Yang, Jeongwon; Kang, Uk; Kim, Guanghoon [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    A Doppler ultrasound transducer was designed and implemented to measure the blood flow velocity in tiny vessels near the skin of hands or feet. The geometric parameters of the transducer for defining the observation volume were derived and implemented with an acoustic window made of polystyrene. The observation volume designed in this study was located 6.5 mm from the transducer, which was comparable to the value predicted geometrically. The two-way insertion loss of the transducer was -11.3 dB on ultrasound frequency of 20 MHz, and the 3-dB bandwidth was approximately 2 MHz. In addition, the Doppler shift in the frequency measured by using a Doppler device composed of the transducer and a Doppler signal processing unit was proportional to the flow velocity generated by a homemade flowing system. Finally, we concluded that the transducer could be applied to measure the blood flow velocity in hands or feet.

  15. High-frequency Doppler ultrasound transducer for the peripheral circulatory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Youngmin; Yang, Jeongwon; Kang, Uk; Kim, Guanghoon

    2011-01-01

    A Doppler ultrasound transducer was designed and implemented to measure the blood flow velocity in tiny vessels near the skin of hands or feet. The geometric parameters of the transducer for defining the observation volume were derived and implemented with an acoustic window made of polystyrene. The observation volume designed in this study was located 6.5 mm from the transducer, which was comparable to the value predicted geometrically. The two-way insertion loss of the transducer was -11.3 dB on ultrasound frequency of 20 MHz, and the 3-dB bandwidth was approximately 2 MHz. In addition, the Doppler shift in the frequency measured by using a Doppler device composed of the transducer and a Doppler signal processing unit was proportional to the flow velocity generated by a homemade flowing system. Finally, we concluded that the transducer could be applied to measure the blood flow velocity in hands or feet.

  16. Effect of ultrasound on dynamics characteristic of the cavitation bubble in grinding fluids during honing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ce; Zhu, Xijing

    2018-03-01

    The effect of ultrasound on generating and controlling the cavitation bubble of the grinding fluid during ultrasonic vibration honing was investigated. The grinding fluid on the surface of the honing stone was measured by utilizing the digital microscope VHX-600ESO. Based on analyzing the cavitation mechanism of the grinding fluid, the bubble dynamics model under conventional honing (CH) and ultrasonic vibration honing (UVH) was established respectively. Difference of dynamic behaviors of the bubble between the cases in UVH and CH was compared respectively, and the effects of acoustic amplitude and ultrasonic frequency on the bubble dynamics were simulated numerically using the Runge-Kutta fourth order method with variable step size adaptive control. Finally, the cavitation intensity of grinding fluids under ultrasound was measured quantitatively using acoustimeter. The results showed that the grinding fluid subjected to ultrasound can generate many bubbles and further forms numerous groups of araneose cavitation bubbles on the surface of the honing stone. The oscillation of the bubble under UVH is more intense than the case under CH, and the maximum velocity of the bubble wall under UVH is higher two magnitudes than the case under CH. For lower acoustic amplitude, the dynamic behaviors of the bubble under UVH are similar to that case under CH. As increasing acoustic amplitude, the cavitation intensity of the bubble is growing increased. Honing pressure has an inhabitation effect on cavitation effect of the grinding fluid. The perfect performance of cavitation of the grinding fluid can be obtained when the device of UVH is in the resonance. However, the cavitation intensity of the grinding fluid can be growing weakened with increasing ultrasonic frequency, when the device of UVH is in the off-resonance. The experimental results agree with the theoretical and numerical analysis, which provides a method for exploring applications of the cavitation effect in

  17. Acoustic Emission Stethoscope - Measurements with Acoustic Emission on Wind Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krystof Kryniski [AaF Infrastructure, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-02-15

    A remote ultrasonic stethoscope, designed on mobile devices to help a maintenance team in diagnosing drive train problems, has been demonstrated. By implementing an acoustic emission technology, the operating conditions of wind turbines have been assessed by trending techniques and ultrasonic acoustic emission converted into audible sound. The new approach has been developed and tested and compared to other monitoring techniques. Acoustic emission has generally been shown to provide a number of advantages over vibration and shock pulse methods because the system is operating in a substantially higher frequency range (100 kHz) and therefore it is more immune to operation of surrounding machines and components. Quick attenuation of ultrasonic propagation waves in the drive-train structure helps to pin-point the origin of any fault as the signals are sharper and more pronounced. Further, with the intensity measurements a direction of the source of ultrasonic energy can be identified. Using a high frequency thus makes the method suitable for measuring local effects and to determine local defects since the disturbing signals from other parts are damped. Recently developed programmable sensors capable of processing signals onboard, producing quality outputs with extremely low noise-to-signal ratio, have been used. It is discussed how the new approach can lower the cost of a wind-turbine monitoring system, while at the same time making it simple and more reliable, see Appendix A. The method has been tested on rotating parts of wind-turbines, including traditionally difficult areas such as low speed main bearings and planetary gearboxes. The method developed in the project was designed to see physical processes such as friction, impacts and metal removal, occurring when machinery degrades, can be detected and notified with the developed notification system. Apart from reporting the status and displaying the changes of the pre-defined parameters or symptoms, the system has

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be able to give a clearer picture of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may be repeated as often as is necessary if medically indicated. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding ...

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be able to give a clearer picture of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may be repeated as often as is necessary if medically indicated. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the pelvis uses sound waves to ...

  1. Interventional ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanSonnenberg, E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters and several case studies. Some of the chapter titles are: The Interplay of Ultrasound and Computed Tomography in the Planning and Execution of Interventional Procedures: Ulltrasound Guided Biopsy; Interventioal Genitourinary Sonography; Diagnosis and Treatment of Pericardial Effusion Using Ultrasonic Guidance; and New Ultrasound-Guided Interventional Procedures--Cholecystostomy, Pancreatography, Gastrostomy

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not use any ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning gives a clear picture of soft tissues that do not show up well on ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable or changed over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Ultrasound is widely available, easy-to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging uses ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide ...

  7. Three-Dimensional Phenomena in Microbubble Acoustic Streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Alvaro; Rossi, Massimiliano; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Wang, Cheng; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Kähler, Christian J.

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound-driven oscillating microbubbles are used as active actuators in microfluidic devices to perform manifold tasks such as mixing, sorting, and manipulation of microparticles. A common configuration consists of side bubbles created by trapping air pockets in blind channels perpendicular to the main channel direction. This configuration consists of acoustically excited bubbles with a semicylindrical shape that generate significant streaming flow. Because of the geometry of the channels, such flows are generally considered as quasi-two-dimensional. Similar assumptions are often made in many other microfluidic systems based on flat microchannels. However, in this Letter we show that microparticle trajectories actually present a much richer behavior, with particularly strong out-of-plane dynamics in regions close to the microbubble interface. Using astigmatism particle-tracking velocimetry, we reveal that the apparent planar streamlines are actually projections of a stream surface with a pseudotoroidal shape. We, therefore, show that acoustic streaming cannot generally be assumed as a two-dimensional phenomenon in confined systems. The results have crucial consequences for most of the applications involving acoustic streaming such as particle trapping, sorting, and mixing.

  8. Closed-Loop Noninvasive Ultrasound Glucose Sensing and Insulin Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    mechanism suggests that ultrasound interacts with the structured lipids within the intracellular channels of the stratum corneum to permeabilize the...R. Prausnitz, “Mechanism of intracellular delivery by acoustic cavitation ,” Ultrasound Med. Biol. 32, 915–924 2006. 14E. Maione, K. K. Shung, R. J...result of cavitation (11– 14). Low frequency ultrasound is capable of generating microbubbles in the water and tissue. These bubbles allow water

  9. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  10. Design of patient-specific focused ultrasound arrays for non-invasive brain therapy with increased trans-skull transmission and steering range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Alec; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2017-09-01

    The use of a phased array of ultrasound transducer elements to sonicate through the skull has opened the way for new treatments and the delivery of therapeutics beyond the blood-brain barrier. The limited steering range of current clinical devices, particularly at higher frequencies, limits the regions of the brain that are considered treatable by ultrasound. A new array design is introduced that allows for high levels of beam steering and increased transmission throughout the brain. These improvements are achieved using concave transducers normal to the outer-skull surface in a patient-specific configuration to target within the skull, so that the far-field of each beam is within the brain. It is shown that by using pulsed ultrasound waves timed to arrive in-phase at the desired target, sufficient levels of acoustic energy are delivered for blood-brain barrier opening throughout the brain.

  11. Development and Implementation of an Ultrasonic Method to Characterize Acoustic and Mechanical Fingernail Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacarescu, Rares Anthony

    The human fingernail is a vital organ used by humans on a daily basis and can provide an immense supply of information based on the biological feedback of the body. By studying the quantitative mechanical and acoustic properties of fingernails, a better understanding of the scarcely-investigated field of ungual research can be explored. Investigating fingernail properties with the use of pulse-echo ultrasound is the aim of this thesis. This thesis involves the application of a developed portable ultrasonic device in a hospital-based data collection and the advancement of ultrasonic methodology to include the calculation of acoustic impedance, density and elasticity. The results of the thesis show that the reflectance method can be utilized to determine fingernail properties with a maximum 17% deviation from literature. Repeatability of measurements fell within a 95% confidence interval. Thus, the ultrasonic reflectance method was validated and may have potential clinical and cosmetic applications.

  12. Acoustic textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Rajkishore

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the manufacturing and applications of acoustic textiles in various industries. It also includes examples from different industries in which acoustic textiles can be used to absorb noise and help reduce the impact of noise at the workplace. Given the importance of noise reduction in the working environment in several industries, the book offers a valuable guide for companies, educators and researchers involved with acoustic materials.

  13. Practical acoustic emission testing

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book is intended for non-destructive testing (NDT) technicians who want to learn practical acoustic emission testing based on level 1 of ISO 9712 (Non-destructive testing – Qualification and certification of personnel) criteria. The essential aspects of ISO/DIS 18436-6 (Condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines – Requirements for training and certification of personnel, Part 6: Acoustic Emission) are explained, and readers can deepen their understanding with the help of practice exercises. This work presents the guiding principles of acoustic emission measurement, signal processing, algorithms for source location, measurement devices, applicability of testing methods, and measurement cases to support not only researchers in this field but also and especially NDT technicians.

  14. Methods and apparatus for multi-parameter acoustic signature inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Aaron A [Richland, WA; Samuel, Todd J [Pasco, WA; Valencia, Juan D [Kennewick, WA; Gervais, Kevin L [Richland, WA; Tucker, Brian J [Pasco, WA; Kirihara, Leslie J [Richland, WA; Skorpik, James R [Kennewick, WA; Reid, Larry D [Benton City, WA; Munley, John T [Benton City, WA; Pappas, Richard A [Richland, WA; Wright, Bob W [West Richland, WA; Panetta, Paul D [Richland, WA; Thompson, Jason S [Richland, WA

    2007-07-24

    A multiparameter acoustic signature inspection device and method are described for non-invasive inspection of containers. Dual acoustic signatures discriminate between various fluids and materials for identification of the same.

  15. EFFECTS OF ACOUSTIC STIMULATION ON BIOPHYSICAL PROFILE TESTING TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pourissa

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Biophysical profile (BPP test is the most commonly used antenatal test of fetal well-being. Purpose of this study is determining the influence of acoustic stimulation (AS on BPP testing time. About 55 pregnant women at 35 to 42 weeks who referred to department of Obstetric & Gynecology at university of medical sciences, Tabriz, Iran, were selected randomly. We used abdominal ultrasound guidance to place buzzer like device with power of 110 dB at the skin surface of the maternal abdomen, close to the fetal head. BPP test performed and BPP mean testing time calculated before and after AS. Data compared and analyzed by paired t-test. The results showed that fetal AS reduces the overall mean testing time from 24 minutes to 5 minutes. This clinical application can be helpful in busy clinics when rapid assessment of fetal health is required.

  16. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  17. Ultrasound Imaging Methods for Breast Cancer Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozmen, N.

    2014-01-01

    The main focus of this thesis is on modeling acoustic wavefield propagation and implementing imaging algorithms for breast cancer detection using ultrasound. As a starting point, we use an integral equation formulation, which can be used to solve both the forward and inverse problems. This thesis

  18. Acoustic rainbow trapping by coiling up space

    KAUST Repository

    Ni, Xu

    2014-11-13

    We numerically realize the acoustic rainbow trapping effect by tapping an air waveguide with space-coiling metamaterials. Due to the high refractive-index of the space-coiling metamaterials, our device is more compact compared to the reported trapped-rainbow devices. A numerical model utilizing effective parameters is also calculated, whose results are consistent well with the direct numerical simulation of space-coiling structure. Moreover, such device with the capability of dropping different frequency components of a broadband incident temporal acoustic signal into different channels can function as an acoustic wavelength division de-multiplexer. These results may have potential applications in acoustic device design such as an acoustic filter and an artificial cochlea.

  19. Acoustic rainbow trapping by coiling up space

    KAUST Repository

    Ni, Xu; Wu, Ying; Chen, Ze-Guo; Zheng, Li-Yang; Xu, Ye-Long; Nayar, Priyanka; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2014-01-01

    We numerically realize the acoustic rainbow trapping effect by tapping an air waveguide with space-coiling metamaterials. Due to the high refractive-index of the space-coiling metamaterials, our device is more compact compared to the reported trapped-rainbow devices. A numerical model utilizing effective parameters is also calculated, whose results are consistent well with the direct numerical simulation of space-coiling structure. Moreover, such device with the capability of dropping different frequency components of a broadband incident temporal acoustic signal into different channels can function as an acoustic wavelength division de-multiplexer. These results may have potential applications in acoustic device design such as an acoustic filter and an artificial cochlea.

  20. Fetal Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... isn't recommended simply to determine a baby's sex. Similarly, fetal ultrasound isn't recommended solely for the purpose of producing keepsake videos or pictures. If your health care provider doesn' ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nodule felt by a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ... well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may be repeated as often as ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound exams are also used to monitor the health and development of an embryo or fetus during ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... no ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning may be able to give a clearer picture of soft tissues that do ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single exam. The transducer sends out high-frequency sound ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  10. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is located directly in front of the rectum, so the ultrasound exam is performed transrectally in order ... A follow-up examination may also be necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can ...

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the rectal wall is relatively insensitive to the pain in the region of the prostate. A biopsy ... needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnose symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an elevated blood test result. It’s also used to investigate ... physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image is immediately visible ... principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships and fishermen. When a sound wave strikes an ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... areas of the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. For ... make secure contact with the body and eliminate air pockets between the transducer and the skin that ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or ... of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or ... of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound is the preferred ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is smaller than the standard speculum used when performing a Pap test . A protective cover is placed ... of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound is the preferred ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on ... the child prior to the exam. Bringing books, small toys, music or games can help to distract ...

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... less than 20 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound ... in the region of the prostate. A biopsy will add time to the procedure. Rarely, a small ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are reviewed. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? For ... in the region of the prostate. A biopsy will add time to the procedure. If a Doppler ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... arteries and veins in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or ... diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal vaginal bleeding other menstrual problems Ultrasound exams ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... gel. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable or changed ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and development of an embryo or fetus during pregnancy. See the Obstetrical Ultrasound page for more information . ... move through vessels. The movement of blood cells causes a change in pitch of the reflected sound ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs such ... and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ... barium exams, CT scanning , and MRI are the methods of choice in such a setting. Large patients ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... move through vessels. The movement of blood cells causes a change in pitch of the reflected sound ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... gel. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  10. Ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, P.N.T.

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasound is a form of energy which consists of mechanical vibrations the frequencies of which are so high that they are above the range of human hearing. The lower frequency limit of the ultrasonic spectrum may generally be taken to be about 20 kHz. Most biomedical applications of ultrasound employ frequencies in the range 1-15 MHz. At these frequencies, the wavelength is in the range 1.5 - 0.1 mm in soft tissues, and narrow beams of ultrasound can be generated which propagate through such tissues without excessive attenuation. This chapter begins with brief reviews of the physics of diagnostic ultrasound pulse-echo imaging methods and Doppler imaging methods. The remainder of the chapter is a resume of the applications of ultrasonic imaging to physiological measurement

  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ...

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ...

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... frequently used to evaluate the reproductive and urinary systems. Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive and does not use ... and evaluate a variety of urinary and reproductive system disorders in both sexes without x-ray exposure. ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be asked to drink water prior to the examination to fill your bladder. Leave jewelry at home ... those sound waves to create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page ... to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment planning. detect an abnormal growth within the prostate. help ... end of their bowel (rectum) removed during prior surgery are not good candidates for ultrasound of the ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tip of the transducer is smaller than the standard speculum used when performing a Pap test . A ... both sexes without x-ray exposure. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects ...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an elevated blood test result. ... image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs ... or uterine cancers A transvaginal ultrasound is usually performed to view ...

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is enlarged, also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment ... caption Related Articles and Media Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the exam. Bringing books, small toys, music or games can help to distract the child and make ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... uterine cavity . Three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound permits evaluation of the uterus and ovaries in planes that ... a special study usually done to provide detailed evaluation of the prostate gland, involves inserting a specialized ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the examination process. To ensure a smooth experience, it often helps to explain the procedure to the ... on the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... difficulty urinating or an elevated blood test result. It’s also used to investigate a nodule found during ... difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide procedures such ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ... and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sexes without x-ray exposure. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ... and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rectum. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A transrectal ultrasound of the ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs such as the ... tumors other disorders of the urinary bladder In children, pelvic ultrasound can help evaluate: pelvic masses pelvic ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... uterus). Sonohysterography allows for a more in-depth investigation of the uterine cavity . Three-dimensional (3-D) ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? What are some common uses of the procedure? How should I prepare? What does the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I ...

  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... quickly. The ultrasound exam room may have a television. Feel free to ask for your child's favorite ... display screen that looks like a computer or television monitor. The image is created based on the ...

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal vaginal bleeding other menstrual problems Ultrasound exams also ... endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The ultrasound exam room may have a television. Feel free to ask for your child's favorite channel. ... performed over an area of tenderness, you may feel pressure or minor pain from the transducer. Once ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment planning. detect ... areas of the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. For ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids ovarian or uterine cancers A transvaginal ultrasound is usually performed to view ... detect: uterine anomalies uterine scars endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some ...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rectum. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A transrectal ultrasound of the ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? In women, a pelvic ultrasound ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ... standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... various body organs such as the liver or kidneys. top of page What are some common uses ... women, a pelvic ultrasound exam can help identify: kidney stones bladder tumors other disorders of the urinary ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the ovaries. Transvaginal ultrasound also evaluates the myometrium (muscular walls of the uterus). Sonohysterography allows for a ... and evaluate a variety of urinary and reproductive system disorders in both sexes without x-ray exposure. ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is at high risk for cancer. In this case, a biopsy is performed and an ultrasound probe ... will share the results with you. In some cases, the radiologist may discuss results with you at ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ovaries. Transvaginal ultrasound also evaluates the myometrium (muscular walls of the uterus). Sonohysterography allows for a more ... needle insertion) is usually minimal because the rectal wall is relatively insensitive to the pain in the ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such ... also called transrectal ultrasound, provides images of a man's prostate gland and surrounding tissue. The exam typically ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pain ambiguous genitalia and anomalies of pelvic organs early or delayed puberty in girls Pelvic ultrasound is ... sensitive to motion, and an active or crying child can prolong the examination process. To ensure a ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a transducer that ... the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound ...

  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ...

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... gel. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ...

  13. A programmable nonlinear acoustic metamaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianzhi Yang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic metamaterials with specifically designed lattices can manipulate acoustic/elastic waves in unprecedented ways. Whereas there are many studies that focus on passive linear lattice, with non-reconfigurable structures. In this letter, we present the design, theory and experimental demonstration of an active nonlinear acoustic metamaterial, the dynamic properties of which can be modified instantaneously with reversibility. By incorporating active and nonlinear elements in a single unit cell, a real-time tunability and switchability of the band gap is achieved. In addition, we demonstrate a dynamic “editing” capability for shaping transmission spectra, which can be used to create the desired band gap and resonance. This feature is impossible to achieve in passive metamaterials. These advantages demonstrate the versatility of the proposed device, paving the way toward smart acoustic devices, such as logic elements, diode and transistor.

  14. Factors associated with low-lying intrauterine devices: a cross-sectional ultrasound study in a cohort of African-American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshesh, Malana; Saldana, Tina; Deans, Elizabeth; Cooper, Tracy; Baird, Donna

    2018-03-14

    The object of this study is to examine factors and symptoms associated with low-lying IUDs as defined by ultrasound. This is a cross-sectional sub-study of participants in the Study of Environment, Life-style, and Fibroids (SELF). SELF participants had screening ultrasounds for fibroids at study enrollment; those with an IUD in place are included in this sub-study. Low-lying IUDs were identified and localized. Logistic regression was used to identify factors and symptoms associated with low-lying IUDs. Among 168 women with IUDs at ultrasound, 28 (17%) had a low-lying IUD. Having a low-lying IUD was associated with low education level (≤high school: aOR 3.1 95% CI 1.14-8.55) and with increased BMI (p=.002). Women with a low-lying IUD were more likely to report a "big problem" with dysmenorrhea (the highest option of the Likert scale) as compared to women with a normally-positioned IUD (OR 3.2 95% CI 1.07-9.54). Our study found that women with a low-lying IUD are more likely to be of lower education and higher BMI, and to report more dysmenorrhea. Women who are obese may benefit from additional counseling and closer follow-up after IUD placement. Future research is warranted to investigate IUD placement and possible IUD migration among women who are obese. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Design of a Thermoacoustic Sensor for Low Intensity Ultrasound Measurements Based on an Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jida Xing

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In therapeutic ultrasound applications, accurate ultrasound output intensities are crucial because the physiological effects of therapeutic ultrasound are very sensitive to the intensity and duration of these applications. Although radiation force balance is a benchmark technique for measuring ultrasound intensity and power, it is costly, difficult to operate, and compromised by noise vibration. To overcome these limitations, the development of a low-cost, easy to operate, and vibration-resistant alternative device is necessary for rapid ultrasound intensity measurement. Therefore, we proposed and validated a novel two-layer thermoacoustic sensor using an artificial neural network technique to accurately measure low ultrasound intensities between 30 and 120 mW/cm2. The first layer of the sensor design is a cylindrical absorber made of plexiglass, followed by a second layer composed of polyurethane rubber with a high attenuation coefficient to absorb extra ultrasound energy. The sensor determined ultrasound intensities according to a temperature elevation induced by heat converted from incident acoustic energy. Compared with our previous one-layer sensor design, the new two-layer sensor enhanced the ultrasound absorption efficiency to provide more rapid and reliable measurements. Using a three-dimensional model in the K-wave toolbox, our simulation of the ultrasound propagation process demonstrated that the two-layer design is more efficient than the single layer design. We also integrated an artificial neural network algorithm to compensate for the large measurement offset. After obtaining multiple parameters of the sensor characteristics through calibration, the artificial neural network is built to correct temperature drifts and increase the reliability of our thermoacoustic measurements through iterative training about ten seconds. The performance of the artificial neural network method was validated through a series of experiments. Compared

  16. Broadband acoustic properties of a murine skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Turner, Jake; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-07

    It has been well recognized that the presence of a skull imposes harsh restrictions on the use of ultrasound and optoacoustic techniques in the study, treatment and modulation of the brain function. We propose a rigorous modeling and experimental methodology for estimating the insertion loss and the elastic constants of the skull over a wide range of frequencies and incidence angles. A point-source-like excitation of ultrawideband acoustic radiation was induced via the absorption of nanosecond duration laser pulses by a 20 μm diameter microsphere. The acoustic waves transmitted through the skull are recorded by a broadband, spherically focused ultrasound transducer. A coregistered pulse-echo ultrasound scan is subsequently performed to provide accurate skull geometry to be fed into an acoustic transmission model represented in an angular spectrum domain. The modeling predictions were validated by measurements taken from a glass cover-slip and ex vivo adult mouse skulls. The flexible semi-analytical formulation of the model allows for seamless extension to other transducer geometries and diverse experimental scenarios involving broadband acoustic transmission through locally flat solid structures. It is anticipated that accurate quantification and modeling of the skull transmission effects would ultimately allow for skull aberration correction in a broad variety of applications employing transcranial detection or transmission of high frequency ultrasound.

  17. Modification of Food Systems by Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Carrillo-Lopez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describes the mechanism, operation, and recent potential applications of ultrasound in various food systems, as well as the physical and chemical effects of ultrasound treatments on the conservation and modification of different groups of food. Acoustic energy has been recognized as an emerging technology with great potential for applications in the food industry. The phenomenon of acoustic cavitation, which modifies the physical, chemical, and functional properties of food, can be used to improve existing processes and to develop new ones. The combination of ultrasonic energy with a sanitizing agent can improve the effect of microbial reduction in foods and, thereby, their quality. Finally, it is concluded that the use of ultrasound in food is a very promising area of research; however, more research is still needed before applying this technology in a wider range of industrial sectors.

  18. Ultrasound induced by CW laser cavitation bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korneev, N; Montero, P Rodriguez; Ramos-Garcia, R; Ramirez-San-Juan, J C; Padilla-Martinez, J P

    2011-01-01

    The generation of ultrasound by a collapsing single cavitation bubble in a strongly absorbing liquid illuminated with a moderate power CW laser is described. The ultrasound shock wave is detected with hydrophone and interferometric device. To obtain a stronger pulse it is necessary to adjust a liquid absorption and a beam diameter. Their influence can be qualitatively understood with a simple model.

  19. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... used to screen for brain conditions associated with prematurity, such as bleeding or brain tissue damage as ... or crying child will slow the examination process. Large patients are more difficult to image by ultrasound, ...

  20. Multilayer Integrated Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yafei

    2013-01-01

    Multilayer Integrated Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators mainly introduces the theory, design, fabrication technology and application of a recently developed new type of device, multilayer integrated film bulk acoustic resonators, at the micro and nano scale involving microelectronic devices, integrated circuits, optical devices, sensors and actuators, acoustic resonators, micro-nano manufacturing, multilayer integration, device theory and design principles, etc. These devices can work at very high frequencies by using the newly developed theory, design, and fabrication technology of nano and micro devices. Readers in fields of IC, electronic devices, sensors, materials, and films etc. will benefit from this book by learning the detailed fundamentals and potential applications of these advanced devices. Prof. Yafei Zhang is the director of the Ministry of Education’s Key Laboratory for Thin Films and Microfabrication Technology, PRC; Dr. Da Chen was a PhD student in Prof. Yafei Zhang’s research group.